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Sample records for pneumonia induced severe

  1. A severe Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia inducing an acute antibody-mediated pulmonary graft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Démir, Sarah; Saison, Julien; Sénéchal, Agathe; Mornex, Jean-Francois

    2017-01-01

    A 40-year-old cystic fibrosis woman with a history of double-lung transplantation 2 years previously was admitted for a progressive respiratory distress. Physical examination revealed fever (39°C) and diffuse bilateral lung crackles. Laboratory findings included severe hypoxemia and inflammatory syndrome. Bronchoalveolar lavage and serological test were positive for mycoplasma pneumonia. As the patient did not improve after 3 days of antibiotics and donor-specific HLA antibodies had been detected, an acute antibody-mediated graft rejection was treated with high-dose corticosteroids, plasma exchange, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab. The patient rapidly improved. Unfortunately, 6 months after this episode, she developed a bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome with a dependence to noninvasive ventilator leading to the indication of retransplantation. This case illustrates the possible relationship between infection and humoral rejection. These two diagnoses should be promptly investigated and systematically treated in lung transplant recipients. PMID:28144069

  2. Toll-like receptor 4 agonistic antibody promotes innate immunity against severe pneumonia induced by coinfection with influenza virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akitaka; Nakamura, Shigeki; Seki, Masafumi; Fukudome, Kenji; Iwanaga, Naoki; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-07-01

    Coinfection with bacteria is a major cause of mortality during influenza epidemics. Recently, Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists were shown to have immunomodulatory functions. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness and mechanisms of the new TLR4 agonistic monoclonal antibody UT12 against secondary pneumococcal pneumonia induced by coinfection with influenza virus in a mouse model. Mice were intranasally inoculated with Streptococcus pneumoniae 2 days after influenza virus inoculation. UT12 was intraperitoneally administered 2 h before each inoculation. Survival rates were significantly increased and body weight loss was significantly decreased by UT12 administration. Additionally, the production of inflammatory mediators was significantly suppressed by the administration of UT12. In a histopathological study, pneumonia in UT12-treated mice was very mild compared to that in control mice. UT12 increased antimicrobial defense through the acceleration of macrophage recruitment into the lower respiratory tract induced by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) pathway-dependent monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) production. Collectively, these findings indicate that UT12 promoted pulmonary innate immunity and may reduce the severity of severe pneumonia induced by coinfection with influenza virus and S. pneumoniae. This immunomodulatory effect of UT12 improves the prognosis of secondary pneumococcal pneumonia and makes UT12 an attractive candidate for treating severe infectious diseases.

  3. Prevotella intermedia induces severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in mice with upregulated platelet-activating factor receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Nakamura, Shigeki; Harada, Tatsuhiko; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of respiratory infection worldwide. Although oral hygiene has been considered a risk factor for developing pneumonia, the relationship between oral bacteria and pneumococcal infection is unknown. In this study, we examined the synergic effects of Prevotella intermedia, a major periodontopathic bacterium, on pneumococcal pneumonia. The synergic effects of the supernatant of P. intermedia (PiSup) on pneumococcal pneumonia were investigated in mice, and the stimulation of pneumococcal adhesion to human alveolar (A549) cells by PiSup was assessed. The effects of PiSup on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) transcript levels in vitro and in vivo were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, and the differences between the effects of pneumococcal infection induced by various periodontopathic bacterial species were verified in mice. Mice inoculated with S. pneumoniae plus PiSup exhibited a significantly lower survival rate, higher bacterial loads in the lungs, spleen, and blood, and higher inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) than those infected without PiSup. In A549 cells, PiSup increased pneumococcal adhesion and PAFR transcript levels. PiSup also increased lung PAFR transcript levels in mice. Similar effects were not observed in the supernatants of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Fusobacterium nucleatum. Thus, P. intermedia has the potential to induce severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia with enhanced pneumococcal adhesion to lower airway cells.

  4. Clinical Features of Severe or Fatal Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Izumikawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children and young adults. The incidence of fulminant M. pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP) is relatively rare despite the high prevalence of M. pneumoniae infection. This literature review highlights the clinical features of fulminant MPP by examining the most recent data in epidemiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, and treatment. Fulminant MPP accounts for 0.5–2% of all MPP cases and primarily affects young adults with no underlying disease. Key clinical findings include a cough, fever, and dyspnea along with diffuse abnormal findings in radiological examinations. Levels of inflammatory markers such as white blood cells and C-reactive protein are elevated, as well as levels of lactate dehydrogenase, IL-18, aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase. The exact pathogenesis of fulminant MPP remains unclear, but theories include a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to M. pneumoniae and the contribution of delayed antibiotic administration to disease progression. Treatment options involve pairing the appropriate anti-mycoplasma agent with a corticosteroid that will downregulate the hypersensitivity response, and mortality rates are quite low in this treatment group. Further research is necessary to determine the exact pathogenesis of severe and fulminant types of MPP. PMID:27313568

  5. Etiology of severe pneumonia in Ecuadorian children

    PubMed Central

    Jonnalagadda, Sivani; Rodríguez, Oswaldo; Estrella, Bertha; Sabin, Lora L.; Sempértegui, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Background In Latin America, community-acquired pneumonia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children. Few studies have examined the etiology of pneumonia in Ecuador. Methods This observational study was part of a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted among children aged 2–59 months with severe pneumonia in Quito, Ecuador. Nasopharyngeal and blood samples were tested for bacterial and viral etiology by polymerase chain reaction. Risk factors for specific respiratory pathogens were also evaluated. Results Among 406 children tested, 159 (39.2%) had respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), 71 (17.5%) had human metapneumovirus (hMPV), and 62 (15.3%) had adenovirus. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified in 37 (9.2%) samples and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in three (0.74%) samples. The yearly circulation pattern of RSV (P = 0.0003) overlapped with S. pneumoniae, (P = 0.03) with most cases occurring in the rainy season. In multivariable analysis, risk factors for RSV included younger age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.9, P = 0.01) and being underweight (aOR = 1.8, P = 0.04). Maternal education (aOR = 0.82, P = 0.003), pulse oximetry (aOR = 0.93, P = 0.005), and rales (aOR = 0.25, P = 0.007) were associated with influenza A. Younger age (aOR = 3.5, P = 0.007) and elevated baseline respiratory rate were associated with HPIV-3 infection (aOR = 0.94, P = 0.03). Conclusion These results indicate the importance of RSV and influenza, and potentially modifiable risk factors including undernutrition and future use of a RSV vaccine, when an effective vaccine becomes available. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00513929 PMID:28182741

  6. Osteopontin promotes host defense during Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van der Windt, G J W; Hoogerwerf, J J; de Vos, A F; Florquin, S; van der Poll, T

    2010-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of nosocomial pneumonia. Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein involved in inflammatory processes, some of which is mediated by CD44. The aim of this study was to determine the role of OPN during K. pneumoniae-induced pneumonia. Wild-type (WT) and OPN knockout (KO) mice were intranasally infected with 10⁴ colony forming units of K. pneumoniae, or administered Klebsiella lipopolysaccharides (LPS). In addition, recombinant OPN (rOPN) was intranasally administered to WT and CD44 KO mice. During Klebsiella pneumonia, WT mice displayed elevated pulmonary and plasma OPN levels. OPN KO and WT mice showed similar pulmonary bacterial loads 6 h after infection; thereafter, Klebsiella loads were higher in lungs of OPN KO mice and the mortality rate in this group was higher than in WT mice. Early neutrophil recruitment into the bronchoalveolar space was impaired in the absence of OPN after intrapulmonary delivery of either Klebsiella bacteria or Klebsiella LPS. Moreover, rOPN induced neutrophil migration into the bronchoalveolar space, independent from CD44. In vitro, OPN did not affect K. pneumoniae growth or neutrophil function. In conclusion, OPN levels were rapidly increased in the bronchoalveolar space during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, where OPN serves a chemotactic function towards neutrophils, thereby facilitating an effective innate immune response.

  7. Severe hypoxaemia due to methaemoglobinaemia and aspiration pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Tomonori; Hojo, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a previously healthy 40-year-old man who was admitted to the emergency department due to severe hypoxaemia after emesis. He vomited after a cup of coffee with the milk at his office. On admission, he showed cyanosis and oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry was extremely low (86%) in spite of the administration of 10 litres of oxygen. The authors suspected pneumonia, but oxygen saturation was disproportionately low to pneumonia severity. Oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry was significantly different from oxygen saturation calculated from arterial blood gas analysis, suggesting the existence of haemoglobin abnormality. The level of methaemoglobin was 9.3% (reference range, 1–2%). The patient was treated by antibiotics for pneumonia, and his methaemoglobinaemia was spontaneously ameliorated. The authors later found that the patient drank bleach containing hypochlorous acid instead of milk by mistake. To conclude, the patient’s hypoxaemia was due to pneumonia and drug-induced acquired methaemoglobinaemia. PMID:22679183

  8. Barium sulfate aspiration: Severe chemical pneumonia induced by a massive reflux of contrast medium during small bowel barium enema.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Ji; Zhou, Xiaowei; Dong, Hongmei; Zhou, Yiwu

    2015-08-01

    Barium contrast radiography is a conventional procedure aimed at revealing lesions of the alimentary tract using barium sulfate on X-ray irradiation. Although it is widely used in clinics, adverse effects and complications are observed, such as anaphylaxis, granuloma, fecalithes, abdomen-leaking, embolism, bacterial contamination, and aspiration. We report a case of death due to a massive barium sulfate aspiration resulted from an air-barium double contrast enema radiography. A 25-year-old female patient was hospitalized with symptoms of abdominal distention, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea for three days. A progressive respiratory distress presented only 1h after a small bowel air-barium double contrast enema. The patient died 11h later. The result of autopsy revealed the cause of death to be severe chemical pneumonitis induced by gastric fluid which was aspirated into her lungs. Barium sulfate is generally recognized to be chemically inert for the respiratory system, but a mixture of barium sulfate with gastric contents is fatal. Here we intend to suggest that, when determining the potential cause of death, medical examiners should consider a patient's status quo as well as the possible adverse effects and complications caused by the barium sulfate preparation during gastrointestinal radiography.

  9. Levetiracetam-induced eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Aisling; Fuld, Jonathan; Soon, Elaine

    2017-03-08

    Levetiracetam is widely regarded as a benign antiepileptic drug, compared to older antiepileptic medication. We report a case of eosinophilic pneumonia due to levetiracetam use in a non-smoking woman aged 59 years with no previous respiratory history. Our patient presented with exertional breathlessness and marked desaturation on exertion. She displayed 'reverse bat-wing' infiltrates on her chest radiograph and peripheral eosinophilia on a complete blood count. Her symptoms, radiology and peripheral eosinophilia resolved completely with cessation of levetiracetam and a course of prednisolone. This is the first report of isolated eosinophilic pneumonia due to levetiracetam. Other reports of levetiracetam-induced eosinophilia describe drug rash, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS syndrome). Detection of pulmonary drug reactions requires a careful drug history and high index of suspicion. Identifying and reporting a causative agent is crucially important, as cessation of the drug is essential for resolution of the syndrome.

  10. A Non-Human Primate Model of Severe Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Luis F.; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Hinojosa, Cecilia A.; Soni, Nilam J.; Shenoy, Anukul T.; Gilley, Ryan P.; Gonzalez-Juarbe, Norberto; Noda, Julio R.; Winter, Vicki T.; de la Garza, Melissa A.; Shade, Robert E.; Coalson, Jacqueline J.; Giavedoni, Luis D.; Anzueto, Antonio; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and infectious death in adults worldwide. A non-human primate model is needed to study the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of severe pneumonia, identify diagnostic tools, explore potential therapeutic targets, and test clinical interventions during pneumococcal pneumonia. Objective To develop a non-human primate model of pneumococcal pneumonia. Methods Seven adult baboons (Papio cynocephalus) were surgically tethered to a continuous monitoring system that recorded heart rate, temperature, and electrocardiography. Animals were inoculated with 109 colony-forming units of S. pneumoniae using bronchoscopy. Three baboons were rescued with intravenous ampicillin therapy. Pneumonia was diagnosed using lung ultrasonography and ex vivo confirmation by histopathology and immunodetection of pneumococcal capsule. Organ failure, using serum biomarkers and quantification of bacteremia, was assessed daily. Results Challenged animals developed signs and symptoms of pneumonia 4 days after infection. Infection was characterized by the presence of cough, tachypnea, dyspnea, tachycardia and fever. All animals developed leukocytosis and bacteremia 24 hours after infection. A severe inflammatory reaction was detected by elevation of serum cytokines, including Interleukin (IL)1Ra, IL-6, and IL-8, after infection. Lung ultrasonography precisely detected the lobes with pneumonia that were later confirmed by pathological analysis. Lung pathology positively correlated with disease severity. Antimicrobial therapy rapidly reversed symptomology and reduced serum cytokines. Conclusions We have developed a novel animal model for severe pneumococcal pneumonia that mimics the clinical presentation, inflammatory response, and infection kinetics seen in humans. This is a novel model to test vaccines and treatments, measure biomarkers to diagnose pneumonia, and predict outcomes. PMID:27855182

  11. Nebulized C1-Esterase Inhibitor does not Reduce Pulmonary Complement Activation in Rats with Severe Streptococcus Pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Friso; Lagrand, Wim; Glas, Gerie J; Beurskens, Charlotte J P; van Mierlo, Gerard; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Juffermans, Nicole P; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J

    2016-12-01

    Complement activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. We hypothesized that inhibition of the complement system in the lungs by repeated treatment with nebulized plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor reduces pulmonary complement activation and subsequently attenuates lung injury and lung inflammation. This was investigated in a rat model of severe Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. Rats were intra-tracheally challenged with S. pneumoniae to induce pneumonia. Nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor or saline (control animals) was repeatedly administered to rats, 30 min before induction of pneumonia and every 6 h thereafter. Rats were sacrificed 20 or 40 h after inoculation with bacteria. Brochoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were obtained for measuring levels of complement activation (C4b/c), lung injury and inflammation. Induction of pneumonia was associated with pulmonary complement activation (C4b/c at 20 h 1.24 % [0.56-2.59] and at 40 h 2.08 % [0.98-5.12], compared to 0.50 % [0.07-0.59] and 0.03 % [0.03-0.03] in the healthy control animals). The functional fraction of C1-INH was detectable in BALF, but no effect was found on pulmonary complement activation (C4b/c at 20 h 0.73 % [0.16-1.93] and at 40 h 2.38 % [0.54-4.19]). Twenty hours after inoculation, nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor treatment reduced total histology score, but this effect was no longer seen at 40 h. Nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor did not affect other markers of lung injury or lung inflammation. In this negative experimental animal study, severe S. pneumoniae pneumonia in rats is associated with pulmonary complement activation. Repeated treatment with nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor, although successfully delivered to the lungs, does not affect pulmonary complement activation, lung inflammation or lung injury.

  12. Pulmonary tuberculosis in severely-malnourished or HIV-infected children with pneumonia: a review.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Pietroni, Mark A C; Faruque, Abu S G; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip K; Hossain, Iqbal; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2013-09-01

    Presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) as acute pneumonia in severely-malnourished and HIV-positive children has received very little attention, although this is very important in the management of pneumonia in children living in communities where TB is highly endemic. Our aim was to identify confirmed TB in children with acute pneumonia and HIV infection and/or severe acute malnutrition (SAM) (weight-for-length/height or weight-for-age z score <-3 of the WHO median, or presence of nutritional oedema). We conducted a literature search, using PubMed and Web of Science in April 2013 for the period from January 1974 through April 2013. We included only those studies that reported confirmed TB identified by acid fast bacilli (AFB) through smear microscopy, or by culture-positive specimens from children with acute pneumonia and SAM and/or HIV infection. The specimens were collected either from induced sputum (IS), or gastric lavage (GL), or broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), or percutaneous lung aspirates (LA). Pneumonia was defined as the radiological evidence of lobar or patchy consolidation and/or clinical evidence of severe/ very severe pneumonia according to the WHO criteria of acute respiratory infection. A total of 17 studies met our search criteria but 6 were relevant for our review. Eleven studies were excluded as those did not assess the HIV status of the children or specify the nutritional status of the children with acute pneumonia and TB. We identified only 747 under-five children from the six relevant studies that determined a tubercular aetiology of acute pneumonia in children with SAM and/or positive HIV status. Three studies were reported from South Africa and one each from the Gambia, Ethiopia, and Thailand where 610, 90, 35, and 12 children were enrolled and 64 (10%), 23 (26%), 5 (14%), and 1 (8%) children were identified with active TB respectively, with a total of 93 (12%) children with active TB. Among 610 HIV-infected children in three studies

  13. Klebsiella pneumoniae secretes outer membrane vesicles that induce the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Je Chul; Lee, Eun Jeoung; Lee, Jung Hwa; Jun, So Hyun; Choi, Chi Won; Kim, Seung Il; Kang, Sang Sun; Hyun, Sunghee

    2012-06-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria are an important vehicle for delivery of effector molecules to host cells, but the production of OMVs from Klebsiella pneumoniae, an opportunistic pathogen of both nosocomial and community-acquired infections, and their role in bacterial pathogenesis have not yet been determined. In the present study, we examined the production of OMVs from K. pneumoniae and determined the induction of the innate immune response against K. pneumoniae OMVs. Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 produced and secreted OMVs during in vitro culture. Proteomic analysis revealed that 159 different proteins were associated with K. pneumoniae OMVs. Klebsiella pneumoniae OMVs did not inhibit cell growth or induce cell death. However, these vesicles induced expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 in epithelial cells. An intratracheal challenge of K. pneumoniae OMVs in neutropenic mice resulted in severe lung pathology similar to K. pneumoniae infection. In conclusion, K. pneumoniae produces OMVs like other pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria and K. pneumoniae OMVs are a molecular complex that induces the innate immune response.

  14. Protease activated receptor 4 limits bacterial growth and lung pathology during late stage Streptococcus pneumoniae induced pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, S F; Van't Veer, C; van den Boogaard, F E; Nieuwland, R; Hoogendijk, A J; de Boer, O J; Roelofs, J J T H; van der Poll, T

    2013-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common causative pathogen of pneumonia and sepsis. Pneumonia and sepsis are associated with enhanced activation of coagulation, resulting in the production of several host-derived proteases at the primary site of infection and in the circulation. Serine proteases cleave protease activated receptors (PARs), which form a molecular link between coagulation and inflammation. PAR4 is one of four subtypes of PARs and is widely expressed by multiple cell types in the respiratory tract implicated in pulmonary inflammation, by immune cells and by platelets. In mice, mouse (m)PAR4 is the only thrombin receptor expressed by platelets. We here sought to determine the contribution of mPAR4 to the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal inoculation with S. pneumoniae in mPAR4-deficient (par4-/-) and wild-type mice. Mice were sacrificed after 6, 24 or 48 hours (h). Blood, lungs, liver and spleen were collected for analyses. Ex vivo stimulation assays were performed with S. pneumoniae and mPAR4 activating peptides. At 48 h after infection, higher bacterial loads were found in the lungs and blood of par4-/- mice (p < 0.05), accompanied by higher histopathology scores and increased cytokine levels (p < 0.05) in the lungs. Ex vivo, co-stimulation with mPAR4 activating peptide enhanced the whole blood cytokine response to S. pneumoniae. Thrombin inhibition resulted in decreased cytokine release after S. pneumoniae stimulation in human whole blood. Our findings suggest that mPAR4 contributes to antibacterial defence during murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

  15. Impact of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections in Severely Burned Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    versus nosocomial Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia: clinical features, treatment outcomes, and clinical implication of antimicrobial resistance. J...Impact of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections in Severely Burned Patients Jason W Bennett, MD, MSPH, Janelle...Significantly higher mortality has been demonstrated in patients who suffer severe burns com- plicated by Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia. The specific

  16. A case of vildagliptin-induced interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kuse, Naoyuki; Abe, Shinji; Kuribayashi, Hidehiko; Inomata, Minoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Fukuda, Yuh; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old Japanese male with type 2 diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital with a productive cough and worsening dyspnea. He had started receiving vildagliptin, which is one of the dipeptideylpeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, several days before the appearance of his symptoms. Laboratory findings revealed markedly elevated levels of immunoglobulin E and Krebs von den Lungen-6. Chest computed tomography revealed ground-glass opacity with irregular reticulation throughout both lungs. Biopsy specimens by transbronchial lung biopsy showed subacute interstitial pneumonia and an organizing pneumonia pattern with acute alveolar injury. The drug lymphocyte stimulation test showed a positive result for vildagliptin. Withdrawal of vildagliptin and administration of glucocorticoid treatment improved his respiratory condition and radiological findings. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient with vildagliptin-induced interstitial pneumonia based on both his clinical course and pathological findings. Interstitial pneumonia as a side effect of vildagliptin is rare. It may be necessary to monitor the respiratory condition of patients upon administration of DPP-4 inhibitors until further evidence is obtained.

  17. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Kids > Pneumonia A A A What's ... it from playing in the rain? What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (say: noo-MOW-nyuh) is an infection ...

  18. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Teens > Pneumonia A A A What's ... having to go to the hospital. What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (pronounced: noo-MOW-nyuh) is an infection ...

  19. Klebsiella pneumoniae Siderophores Induce Inflammation, Bacterial Dissemination, and HIF-1α Stabilization during Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Victoria I.; Breen, Paul; Houle, Sébastien; Dozois, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections, including pneumonia and bacteremia, and is rapidly acquiring antibiotic resistance. K. pneumoniae requires secretion of siderophores, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity iron chelators, for bacterial replication and full virulence. The specific combination of siderophores secreted by K. pneumoniae during infection can impact tissue localization, systemic dissemination, and host survival. However, the effect of these potent iron chelators on the host during infection is unknown. In vitro, siderophores deplete epithelial cell iron, induce cytokine secretion, and activate the master transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein that controls vascular permeability and inflammatory gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae directly contributes to inflammation and bacterial dissemination during pneumonia. To examine the effects of siderophore secretion independently of bacterial growth, we performed infections with tonB mutants that persist in vivo but are deficient in siderophore import. Using a murine model of pneumonia, we found that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae induces the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), CXCL1, and CXCL2, as well as bacterial dissemination to the spleen, compared to siderophore-negative mutants at an equivalent bacterial number. Furthermore, we determined that siderophore-secreting K. pneumoniae stabilized HIF-1α in vivo and that bacterial dissemination to the spleen required alveolar epithelial HIF-1α. Our results indicate that siderophores act directly on the host to induce inflammatory cytokines and bacterial dissemination and that HIF-1α is a susceptibility factor for bacterial invasion during pneumonia. PMID:27624128

  20. [Emergence of new pneumonia: besides severe acute respiratory syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, P; Pozzi, E

    2006-10-01

    Important epidemiological modifications have been registered in respiratory infections, both in immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. Pathogens with modified antibiotic susceptibility patterns have emerged, which display an increased antibiotic resistance, such as S. pneumoniae, S. aureus, H. influenzae. This trait has a strong impact on the therapeutic choices, particularly when an empiric antibiotic treatment is selected. The prevalence of bacterial species showing non-susceptibility to the most common prescribed antibiotics (betalactams, macrolides etc.) follows a different geographic distribution. Some pathogens have acquired a new epidemiological role in patients affected with immune deficiencies: among them P. carinii and other bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. The emergence of new, previously unknown, species, has been registered, both bacteria (C. pneumoniae) and viruses (Metapneumovirus, Hantavirus etc.). Such aspects must be considered in the diagnosis of respiratory infections, which should include diagnostic tests for the identification of such pathogens. Among the new respiratory infections severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has quickly become a health care emergency, so that efforts have been made to identify the aetiological agent as well as the main epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the disease. Avian influenza has raised great interest immediately after the first cases of human infection caused by the avian virus, especially after the outbreaks in Asian countries and in the Netherlands. A crucial step in containing infection is the prevention of the disease; efforts are directed toward this endpoint.

  1. A severe case of acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia treated with systemic corticosteroid

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Hideki; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia is a rare disorder in adults. A treatment of choice for lipoid pneumonia has not been established, and systemic corticosteroid use remains controversial. We report the case of a 32-year-old man with schizophrenia who presented with kerosene-induced acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia that was treated with a systemic corticosteroid. In this case, supportive therapy did not improve the patient's condition, so systemic corticosteroid therapy was commenced four days after he ingested the kerosene. After corticosteroid commencement, the patient's symptoms and hypoxia improved within a few days. Although some radiological characteristics of this disorder have been reported previously, the process of radiological improvement of exogenous lipoid pneumonia is not well known. In this case, computed tomography findings changed dramatically after corticosteroid therapy was initiated. Extensive bilateral consolidations that were observed on admission improved. Although pneumatoceles developed two weeks after corticosteroid commencement, they were nearly gone after two months of the treatment. While corticosteroid therapy is not suitable for all cases, it should be considered for severe or refractory cases. PMID:27222789

  2. Severe Sepsis in Severely Malnourished Young Bangladeshi Children with Pneumonia: A Retrospective Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background In developing countries, there is no published report on predicting factors of severe sepsis in severely acute malnourished (SAM) children having pneumonia and impact of fluid resuscitation in such children. Thus, we aimed to identify predicting factors for severe sepsis and assess the outcome of fluid resuscitation of such children. Methods In this retrospective case-control study SAM children aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh from April 2011 through July 2012 with history of cough or difficult breathing and radiologic pneumonia, who were assessed for severe sepsis at admission constituted the study population. We compared the pneumonic SAM children with severe sepsis (cases = 50) with those without severe sepsis (controls = 354). Severe sepsis was defined with objective clinical criteria and managed with fluid resuscitation, in addition to antibiotic and other supportive therapy, following the standard hospital guideline, which is very similar to the WHO guideline. Results The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (40% vs. 4%; p<0.001). In logistic regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders, lack of BCG vaccination, drowsiness, abdominal distension, acute kidney injury, and metabolic acidosis at admission remained as independent predicting factors for severe sepsis in pneumonic SAM children (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion and Significance We noted a much higher case fatality among under-five SAM children with pneumonia and severe sepsis who required fluid resuscitation in addition to standard antibiotic and other supportive therapy compared to those without severe sepsis. Independent risk factors and outcome of the management of severe sepsis in our study children highlight the importance for defining optimal fluid resuscitation therapy aiming at reducing the case

  3. Preliminary investigation of a mice model of Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Renois, Fanny; Jacques, Jérôme; Guillard, Thomas; Moret, Hélène; Pluot, Michel; Andreoletti, Laurent; de Champs, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    In the present study, we comparatively assessed the pathophysiological mechanisms developed during lung infection of BALB/C female mice infected by an original wild type Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae strain (CH137) or by a referent subspecies K. pneumoniae. subsp. pneumoniae strain (ATCC10031). The mice infected with 2.10⁶ CFU K. p. subsp. pneumoniae (n = 10) showed transient signs of infection and all of them recovered. All of those infected with 1.10⁶ CFU K. p. subsp. ozaenae (n = 10) developed pneumonia within 24 h and died between 48 and 72 h. Few macrophages, numerous polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes were observed in their lungs in opposite to K. p. subsp. pneumoniae. In bronchoalveolar lavage, a significant increase in MIP-2, IL-6, KC and MCP-1 levels was only observed in K. p. subsp. ozaenae infected mice whereas high levels of TNF-α were evidenced with the two subspecies. Our findings indicated a lethal effect of a wild type K. p. subsp. ozaenae strain by acute pneumonia reflecting an insufficient alveolar macrophage response. This model might be of a major interest to comparatively explore the pathogenicity of K. p. subsp ozaenae strains and to further explore the physiopathological mechanisms of gram-negative bacteria induced human pneumonia.

  4. Mortality, morbidity, and disease severity of patients with aspiration pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lanspa, Michael J.; Jones, Barbara E.; Brown, Samuel M.; Dean, Nathan C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Aspiration pneumonia is a common syndrome, although less well characterized than other pneumonia syndromes. We describe a large population of patients with aspiration pneumonia. Methods In this retrospective population study, we queried the electronic medical record at a tertiary-care, university-affiliated hospital from 1996–2006. Patients were initially identified by ICD-9 code 507.x; subsequent physician chart review excluded patients with aspiration pneumonitis and those without a confirmatory radiograph. Patients with community-acquired aspiration pneumonia were compared to a contemporaneous population of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. We compared CURB-65 predicted mortality with actual 30-day mortality. Results We identified 628 patients with aspiration pneumonia, of which 510 were community-acquired. Median age was 77, with 30-day mortality of 21%. Compared to CAP patients, patients with community-acquired aspiration pneumonia had more frequent inpatient admission (99% vs. 58%) and ICU admission (38% vs. 14%), higher Charlson comorbidity index (3 vs. 1), and higher prevalence of “do not resuscitate/intubate” orders (24% vs. 11%). CURB-65 predicted mortality poorly in aspiration pneumonia patients (AUC 0.66). Conclusions Patients with community-acquired aspiration pneumonia are older, have more comorbidities, and demonstrate higher mortality than CAP patients, even after adjustment for age and comorbidities. CURB-65 poorly predicts mortality in this population. PMID:23184866

  5. Streptococcus pneumoniae capsule determines disease severity in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Grandgirard, Denis; Valente, Luca G.; Täuber, Martin G.; Leib, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria can be characterized into over 90 serotypes according to the composition of their polysaccharide capsules. Some serotypes are common in nasopharyngeal carriage whereas others are associated with invasive disease, but when carriage serotypes do invade disease is often particularly severe. It is unknown whether disease severity is due directly to the capsule type or to other virulence factors. Here, we used a clinical pneumococcal isolate and its capsule-switch mutants to determine the effect of capsule, in isolation from the genetic background, on severity of meningitis in an infant rat model. We found that possession of a capsule was essential for causing meningitis. Serotype 6B caused significantly more mortality than 7F and this correlated with increased capsule thickness in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a stronger inflammatory cytokine response in the CSF and ultimately more cortical brain damage. We conclude that capsule type has a direct effect on meningitis severity. This is an important consideration in the current era of vaccination targeting a subset of capsule types that causes serotype replacement. PMID:27009189

  6. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Severely-malnourished or HIV-infected Children with Pneumonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Pietroni, Mark A.C.; Faruque, Abu S.G.; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip K.; Hossain, Md. Iqbal; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2013-01-01

    Presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) as acute pneumonia in severely-malnourished and HIV-positive children has received very little attention, although this is very important in the management of pneumonia in children living in communities where TB is highly endemic. Our aim was to identify confirmed TB in children with acute pneumonia and HIV infection and/or severe acute malnutrition (SAM) (weight-for-length/height or weight-for-age z score <-3 of the WHO median, or presence of nutritional oedema). We conducted a literature search, using PubMed and Web of Science in April 2013 for the period from January 1974 through April 2013. We included only those studies that reported confirmed TB identified by acid fast bacilli (AFB) through smear microscopy, or by culture-positive specimens from children with acute pneumonia and SAM and/or HIV infection. The specimens were collected either from induced sputum (IS), or gastric lavage (GL), or broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), or percutaneous lung aspirates (LA). Pneumonia was defined as the radiological evidence of lobar or patchy consolidation and/or clinical evidence of severe/very severe pneumonia according to the WHO criteria of acute respiratory infection. A total of 17 studies met our search criteria but 6 were relevant for our review. Eleven studies were excluded as those did not assess the HIV status of the children or specify the nutritional status of the children with acute pneumonia and TB. We identified only 747 under-five children from the six relevant studies that determined a tubercular aetiology of acute pneumonia in children with SAM and/or positive HIV status. Three studies were reported from South Africa and one each from the Gambia, Ethiopia, and Thailand where 610, 90, 35, and 12 children were enrolled and 64 (10%), 23 (26%), 5 (14%), and 1 (8%) children were identified with active TB respectively, with a total of 93 (12%) children with active TB. Among 610 HIV-infected children in three studies

  7. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and is often caused by a tiny microorganism, Mycoplasma pneumoniae (pronounced: my-co-PLAZ-ma noo-MO- ... help the doctor identify the type of pneumonia. Mycoplasma pneumoniae , for example, often causes headaches, sore throats, ...

  8. Cytomegalovirus pneumonia as the first manifestation of severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jończyk-Potoczna, Katarzyna; Ossowska, Lidia; Bręborowicz, Anna; Bartkowska-Śniatkowska, Alicja; Wachowiak, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by the absence of functional T lymphocytes and impairment of adaptive immunity. While heterogeneity of the genetic background in SCID leads to the variability of immune phenotypes, most of affected newborns appear healthy but within the first few months they develop life-threatening opportunistic respiratory or gastrointestinal tract infections. The objective of the study was to define the presenting features and etiology of infections in children with SCID. We retrospectively reviewed five children in whom the diagnosis of SCID had been established in our pediatric immunology clinic over the last 10-year period. A viral respiratory tract infection was the first manifestation of SCID in all the children studied. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia was recognized in as many as 4 cases and coronavirus pulmonary infection was diagnosed in one case, whereas Pneumocystis jiroveci was identified as a co-pathogen in one CMV-infected patient. Severe combined immunodeficiency is a pediatric emergency condition and given the significant impact of pulmonary CMV infection in SCID children, establishing an accurate etiological diagnosis is of essential importance in instituting the specific treatment and improving the outcome. PMID:26155153

  9. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Pneumonia is an infection that inflames the air sacs in one or both lungs. The air sacs may fill with fluid or pus ( ... organisms, including bacteria, viruses and fungi, can cause pneumonia. Pneumonia can range in seriousness from mild to ...

  10. Swift recovery of severe hypoxemic pneumonia upon morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Galland, C; Ferrand, F X; Cividjian, A; Sergent, B; Pichot, C; Ghignone, M; Quintin, L

    2014-01-01

    A morbidly obese (body mass index = 55.5) female patient presented with severe hypoxemic community acquired pneumonia [PaO2/FiO2 (P/F) = 57] with primarily right basal atelectasis, but without bilateral opacities in the upper lobes on the chest X-ray. Major O2 desaturations led the nurses to object to moving the patient to the prone position: muscle relaxation combined to prone position was impossible. Therefore, stringent 60 degrees reverse Trendelenburg legs down position was constantly maintained during mechanical ventilation through the endotracheal tube, using low pressure support (pressure support = 5-10 cmH2O) and high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). PEEP was progressively increased to 20 cmH2O, and little or no sedation was used. A P/F improvement from 57 to 200 over three days allowed removing the tracheal tube. The patient was discharged 13 days after admission. In this paper, the use of high PEEP in the context of morbid obesity, and low pressure support are discussed.

  11. Aspiration pneumonia caused by fentanyl-induced cough -a case report-

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kyung Jee; Lee, Hyo Min; Park, Eun Young; Kim, Man Ho; Kim, Yi Seul; Kang, Mae Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Although fentanyl-induced cough is generally transient and benign, it can give rise to serious problems in patients to whom increasing intracranial, intraocular or intraabdominal pressures may create dangerous situations. This case demonstrates aspiration pneumonia as a complication, exhibiting severe cough induced by intravenous injection of fentanyl. PMID:24101960

  12. Severity prediction rules in community acquired pneumonia: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, W; Lewis, S; Macfarlane, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The British Thoracic Society (BTS) developed a rule (BTSr) based on severity criteria to predict short term mortality in adults admitted to hospital with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, neither the BTSr nor a recent modification of it (mBTSr) have been validated in the UK. A case-control study was conducted in a typical UK population to determine the clinical factors predictive of mortality and to assess the performance of these rules.
METHODS—Cases were drawn from all patients with CAP who died in 1997 in five large hospitals in the Mid Trent area. Controls were randomly selected from survivors. Factors associated with mortality were identified following review of medical case notes and performance of the severity prediction rules assessed.
RESULTS—Age >65 years, temperature <37°C, respiratory rate >24 breaths/min, mental confusion, urea concentration of >7 mmol/l, sodium concentration of <135 mmol/l, and the presence of a pleural effusion, all determined on admission, were independently associated with in-hospital mortality on multivariate analysis. The BTSr was 52% sensitive and 79% specific in predicting death while the mBTSr displayed 66% sensitivity and 73% specificity.
CONCLUSIONS—The value of three of the four factors (presence of mental confusion, raised respiratory rate, raised urea) used in the mBTSr as predictors of mortality is confirmed. However, the BTSr and mBTSr did not perform as well in this validation study which included a high proportion (48%) of elderly patients (⩾75 years) compared with the derivation studies.

 PMID:10679541

  13. Dietary supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids ameliorates acute pneumonia induced by Klebsiella pneumoniae in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sonica; Chhibber, Sanjay; Mohan, Harsh; Sharma, Saroj

    2013-07-01

    The immune benefits associated with the optimal intake of dietary fatty acids are widely known. The objective of the present investigation was to elucidate the role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) food source on acute pneumonia induced by Klebsiella pneumoniae. Three different n-3 PUFA preparations (cod liver oil, Maxigard, and flaxseed oil) were orally supplemented and infection was induced in different groups of experimental mice. Mice fed olive oil and normal saline served as oil and saline controls, respectively. After 2 weeks of fatty acid feeding, no effect on the establishment of infection was observed when acute pneumonia was induced in animals. On the other hand, 6 weeks of n-3 PUFA administration was found to improve resistance in mice, as reduced lung bacterial load coupled with significant improvement in pathology was seen in infected mice. Alveolar macrophages collected from all 3 groups of mice fed n-3 PUFA exhibited a significant decrease in the level of apoptosis following infection with K. pneumoniae and an enhanced in vitro phagocytic potential for the pathogen. Lower lung levels of nitric oxide, malondialdehyde, and lactate dehydrogenase were associated with a decrease in the severity of tissue damage. There was a significant increase in the lung levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)). No significant change was observed in the levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10). This study highlights that dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation exerts an overall beneficial effect against acute experimental pneumonia. This mechanism is operative through upregulation of nonspecific and specific immune defenses of the host.

  14. Virus infection facilitates the development of severe pneumonia in transplant patients with hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Duorong; Wu, Jim; Pan, Yujia; Yan, JinSong; Liu, Min; Liu, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an effective therapy for patients with hematologic malignancies. Severe pneumonia is associated with high mortality rate in HSCT recipients. Viral co-infection indicates a poor prognosis of HSCT recipients. In this study, a total of 68 allogeneic HSCT recipients were included. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection was assessed by testing peripheral blood and oropharynx swabs, respectively, collected in the first 180 days after transplantation. We analysed the correlation of CMV and RSV co-infection with severe pneumonia and mortality. The incidence of CMV and RSV co-infection was 26.5% (18/68). Severe pneumonia was diagnosed in 61% (11/18) cases with co-infection compared to only 10% (5/50) cases with mono-infection or no infection. The analysis of potential risk factors for severe pneumonia showed that CMV and RSV co-infection was significantly associated with severe pneumonia (p < 0.001). The 5 patients who died of severe pneumonia were all co-infected with CMV and RSV. In conclusion, CMV and RSV co-infection appears to be an important factor and facilitates the development of severe pneumonia in allogeneic HSCT patients with hematologic malignancies. PMID:27340772

  15. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or another health care facility such as a nursing home or rehab facility. Pneumonia that affects people in ... You can help prevent pneumonia by following the measures below. Wash your hands often, especially: Before preparing ...

  16. Early non-invasive ventilation treatment for severe influenza pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez, M; Almirall, J; Lorente, L; Marqués, A; Socias, L; Vidaur, L; Rello, J

    2013-03-01

    The role of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory failure caused by viral pneumonia remains controversial. Our objective was to evaluate the use of NIV in a cohort of (H1N1)v pneumonia. Usefulness and success of NIV were assessed in a prospective, observational registry of patients with influenza A (H1N1) virus pneumonia in 148 Spanish intensive care units (ICUs) in 2009-10. Significant variables for NIV success were included in a multivariate analysis. In all, 685 patients with confirmed influenza A (H1N1)v viral pneumonia were admitted to participating ICUs; 489 were ventilated, 177 with NIV. The NIV was successful in 72 patients (40.7%), the rest required intubation. Low Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, low Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and absence of renal failure were associated with NIV success. Success of NIV was independently associated with fewer than two chest X-ray quadrant opacities (OR 3.5) and no vasopressor requirement (OR 8.1). However, among patients with two or more quadrant opacities, a SOFA score ≤7 presented a higher success rate than those with SOFA score >7 (OR 10.7). Patients in whom NIV was successful required shorter ventilation time, shorter ICU stay and hospital stay than NIV failure. In patients in whom NIV failed, the delay in intubation did not increase mortality (26.5% versus 24.2%). Clinicians used NIV in 25.8% of influenza A (H1N1)v viral pneumonia admitted to ICU, and treatment was effective in 40.6% of them. NIV success was associated with shorter hospital stay and mortality similar to non-ventilated patients. NIV failure was associated with a mortality similar to those who were intubated from the start.

  17. Galectin-3 Reduces the Severity of Pneumococcal Pneumonia by Augmenting Neutrophil Function

    PubMed Central

    Farnworth, Sarah L.; Henderson, Neil C.; MacKinnon, Alison C.; Atkinson, Kirsten M.; Wilkinson, Tom; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Hayashi, Katsutoshi; Simpson, A. John; Rossi, Adriano G.; Haslett, Christopher; Sethi, Tariq

    2008-01-01

    The Gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide, resulting in high mortality. Our in vivo studies show that galectin-3−/− mice develop more severe pneumonia after infection with S. pneumoniae, as demonstrated by increased bacteremia and lung damage compared to wild-type mice and that galectin-3 reduces the severity of pneumococcal pneumonia in part by augmenting neutrophil function. Specifically, we show that 1) galectin-3 directly acts as a neutrophil-activating agent and potentiates the effect of fMLP, 2) exogenous galectin-3 augments neutrophil phagocytosis of bacteria and delays neutrophil apoptosis, 3) phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils by galectin-3−/− macrophages is less efficient compared to wild type, and 4) galectin-3 demonstrates bacteriostatic properties against S. pneumoniae in vitro. Furthermore, ad-back of recombinant galectin-3 in vivo protects galectin-3-deficient mice from developing severe pneumonia. Together, these results demonstrate that galectin-3 is a key molecule in the host defense against pneumococcal infection. Therapeutic strategies designed to augment galectin-3 activity may both enhance inflammatory cell function (by directly affecting neutrophil responsiveness and prolonging neutrophil longevity) and have direct bacteriostatic activity, improving clinical outcomes after severe pneumococcal infection. PMID:18202191

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia and Citrobacter rodentium-induced gut infection differentially alter vitamin A concentrations in the lung and liver of mice.

    PubMed

    Restori, Katherine H; McDaniel, Kaitlin L; Wray, Amanda E; Cantorna, Margherita T; Ross, A Catharine

    2014-03-01

    In the developing world, vitamin A (VA) deficiency is endemic in populations that are also at great risk of morbidity and mortality because of pneumococcal pneumonia and enteric infections. To better understand how lung and gastrointestinal pathogens affect VA status, we assessed VA concentrations in serum, lung, and liver during an invasive pneumonia infection induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3, and a noninvasive gut infection induced by Citrobacter rodentium, in vitamin A-adequate (VAA) and vitamin A-deficient (VAD) mice. For pneumonia infection, mice were immunized with pneumococcal polysaccharide serotype 3 (PPS3), or not (infected-control), 5 d prior to intranasal inoculation with S. pneumoniae. Two days post-inoculation, immunization was protective against systemic infection regardless of VA status as PPS3 immunization decreased bacteremia compared with infected-control mice (P < 0.05). Retinol concentrations in the lung were higher in infected-control VAA mice (15.7 nmol/g: P < 0.05) compared with PPS3-immunized mice (8.23 nmol/g), but this was not associated with increased lung bacterial burden. VAA mice had reduced severity of C. rodentium-induced gut infection as measured by fecal bacterial shedding compared with VAD mice (P < 0.05). Liver retinol and retinyl ester concentrations in VAA mice decreased at the peak of infection (retinol, 8.1 nmol/g; retinyl esters, 985 nmol/g; P < 0.05, compared with uninfected mice; retinol, 29.5 nmol/g; retinyl esters, 1730 nmol/g), whereas tissue VA concentrations were low in VAD mice during both infections. Colonic mucin gene expression was also depressed at peak infection compared with uninfected mice (P < 0.05). Overall, pneumonia had less effect on VA status than gastrointestinal infection, predominantly owing to reduced hepatic VA storage at the peak of gut infection.

  19. Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae induced ventilator-associated pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients in China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Q; Zhou, M; Zou, M; Liu, W-e

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics of hypervirulent K. pneumoniae (hvKP) induced ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and the microbiological characteristics and epidemiology of the hvKP strains. A retrospective study of 49 mechanically ventilated patients with K. pneumoniae induced VAP was conducted at a university hospital in China from January 2014 to December 2014. Clinical characteristics and K. pneumoniae antimicrobial susceptibility and biofilm formation were analyzed. Genes of capsular serotypes K1, K2, K5, K20, K54 and K57 and virulence factors plasmid rmpA(p-rmpA), iroB, iucA, mrkD, entB, iutA, ybtS, kfu and allS were also evaluated. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses were used to study the clonal relationship of the K. pneumoniae strains. Strains possessed p-rmpA and iroB and iucA were defined as hvKP. Of 49 patients, 14 patients (28.6 %) were infected by hvKP. Antimicrobial resistant rate was significantly higher in cKP than that in hvKP. One ST29 K54 extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing hvKP strain was detected. The prevalence of K1 and K2 in hvKP was 42.9 % and 21.4 %, respectively. The incidences of K1, K2, K20, p-rmpA, iroB, iucA, iutA, Kfu and alls were significantly higher in hvKP than those in cKP. ST23 was dominant among hvKP strains, and all the ST23 strains had identical RAPD pattern. hvKP has become a common pathogen of VAP in mechanically ventilated patients in China. Clinicians should increase awareness of hvKP induced VAP and enhance epidemiologic surveillance.

  20. Efficacy of a three day course of azithromycin in moderately severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Rizzato, G; Montemurro, L; Fraioli, P; Montanari, G; Fanti, D; Pozzoli, R; Magliano, E

    1995-03-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of a 3 day course of azithromycin in low to moderately severe community-acquired pneumonia. Forty patients with low to moderately severe community-acquired pneumonia (29 males, 11 females, mean age 46 +/- 17 yrs; 20 pretreated with betalactams for 2-10 days with no results before admission to hospital; 18 with evidence of co-morbidity) were enrolled in an open, randomized study with azithromycin, 500 mg q.d. oral therapy for 3 days, versus clarithromycin, 250 mg b.i.d. oral therapy for 10 +/- 2 days. The aetiology of pneumonia was identified in 18 patients by serology (nine Mycoplasma pneumoniae, four Chlamydia pneumoniae, five Legionella pneumophila; one patient with chlamydial infection also had Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteraemia). A presumptive aetiological diagnosis was obtained with sputum culture in three other patients (one Haemophilus influenzae, two Haemophilus parainfluenzae), all strains were sole isolates with 10(8) Colony forming units (CFU), and with Gram stain in one patient with Streptococcus pneumoniae. All patients in the azithromycin group (one after a second 3 day course), and all but two (of those available for evaluation) of the clarithromycin group were cured. Defervescence occurred after 2.6 +/- 1.6 days, and chest roentgenogram cleared after 8.9 +/- 3.3 days, with no difference between the two groups. Tolerance was good, and there were no withdrawals from therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Cost of management of severe pneumonia in young children: systematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shanshan; Sammon, Peter M.; King, Isobel; Andrade, Ana Lucia; Toscano, Cristiana M.; Araujo, Sheila N; Sinha, Anushua; Madhi, Shabir A.; Khandaker, Gulam; Yin, Jiehui Kevin; Booy, Robert; Huda, Tanvir M; Rahman, Qazi S; El Arifeen, Shams; Gentile, Angela; Giglio, Norberto; Bhuiyan, Mejbah U.; Sturm–Ramirez, Katharine; Gessner, Bradford D.; Nadjib, Mardiati; Carosone–Link, Phyllis J.; Simões, Eric AF; Child, Jason A; Ahmed, Imran; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Soofi, Sajid B; Khan, Rumana J; Campbell, Harry; Nair, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Background Childhood pneumonia is a major cause of childhood illness and the second leading cause of child death globally. Understanding the costs associated with the management of childhood pneumonia is essential for resource allocation and priority setting for child health. Methods We conducted a systematic review to identify studies reporting data on the cost of management of pneumonia in children younger than 5 years old. We collected unpublished cost data on non–severe, severe and very severe pneumonia through collaboration with an international working group. We extracted data on cost per episode, duration of hospital stay and unit cost of interventions for the management of pneumonia. The mean (95% confidence interval, CI) and median (interquartile range, IQR) treatment costs were estimated and reported where appropriate. Results We identified 24 published studies eligible for inclusion and supplemented these with data from 10 unpublished studies. The 34 studies included in the cost analysis contained data on more than 95 000 children with pneumonia from both low– and–middle income countries (LMIC) and high–income countries (HIC) covering all 6 WHO regions. The total cost (per episode) for management of severe pneumonia was US$ 4.3 (95% CI 1.5–8.7), US$ 51.7 (95% CI 17.4–91.0) and US$ 242.7 (95% CI 153.6–341.4)–559.4 (95% CI 268.9–886.3) in community, out–patient facilities and different levels of hospital in–patient settings in LMIC. Direct medical cost for severe pneumonia in hospital inpatient settings was estimated to be 26.6%–115.8% of patients’ monthly household income in LMIC. The mean direct non–medical cost and indirect cost for severe pneumonia management accounted for 0.5–31% of weekly household income. The mean length of stay (LOS) in hospital for children with severe pneumonia was 5.8 (IQR 5.3–6.4) and 7.7 (IQR 5.5–9.9) days in LMIC and HIC respectively for these children. Conclusion This is the most

  2. Severe community-acquired pneumonia and positive urinary antigen test for S. pneumoniae: amoxicillin is associated with a favourable outcome.

    PubMed

    Blanc, V; Mothes, A; Smetz, A; Timontin, I; Guardia, M D; Billiemaz, A; Dellamonica, J; Vassallo, M; Néri, D; Chadapaud, S; Toyer, A-L; Del Guidice, P; Fribourg, A; Léotard, S; Nicolle, I; Roger, P-M

    2015-12-01

    Positive urinary antigen tests (UAT) for pneumococcal infection in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) may lead to targeted antibiotic therapy. We report an audit aimed at defining the link between mortality and targeted therapy. We conducted a retrospective multicentre audit of patients with severe CAP for whom a UAT was positive for S. pneumoniae. Patients admitted from January 2010 to December 2013 to 8 medical centres (from A to H) were included. Co-morbidities were defined by the specific treatment administered before hospital care, or if the diagnosis was newly established during the hospital stay. We used the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) to assess disease severity. Only patients with PSI > 90 were included. Antibiotic treatments and the PSI were extracted from patients' charts. Amoxicillin had to be prescribed as a targeted antibiotic treatment or at the time of antibiotic reassessment. A total of 389 patients were included. The mean (±STD) PSI score was 128 ± 29; 38.9% of the patients had a class 5 PSI score. Intensive care was required for 36.6% of the patients. Amoxicillin was initially prescribed in 47 cases (12.1%) and in 34 cases after reassessment (8.7%). In logistic regression analysis, we found three parameters associated with mortality: being hospitalised in institution D, class 5 PSI score, and metastatic cancer. In contrast, three antibiotic regimens were protective factors, including targeted therapy: OR = 0.09, p < 0.001. In the context of severe CAP with positive UAT for S. pneumoniae, targeted therapy was associated with a reduction in mortality.

  3. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... en español Pulmonía You're out in the rain, jumping around in puddles, and somebody yells, "Get ... you really catch it from playing in the rain? What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (say: noo-MOW-nyuh) ...

  4. Severe pneumonia in the elderly: a multivariate analysis of risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Ding, Cheng; Yin, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the second leading reason for hospitalization of medicare beneficiaries. The mortality rate is high, especially in the elderly. In this study, we aimed to determine the risk factors associated with severe pneumonia in the elderly. Retrospective study was conducted and data of old patients with severe pneumonia were collected. They were divided into two groups: the experiment group (death group) and the control (living group). The general situation, underlying diseases, laboratory tests, types of etiology, imaging analysis and treatment situation of patients were analyzed and compared. Univariate analysis and logistic multivariate regression analysis were used to screen the related and independent risk factors for the diagnosis of severe pneumonia in the elderly. In univariate analysis, there were many factors had statistical significance including chronic kidney disease, electrolyte disturbance, low phosphorus and so on. Result of logistic multivariate regression analysis showed pro-BNP level and serum prealbumin were independent risk factors. In sputum culture, the relevance ratio of acinetobacter baumannii was the highest in gram negative bacteria followed by klebsiella pneumoniae. In gram positive bacteria, the relevance ratio of staphylococcus aureus was the highest. In conclusion, the analysis on risk factors for severe pneumonia has great clinical significance on improving the prognosis. PMID:26550157

  5. Severe pneumonia in the elderly: a multivariate analysis of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Ding, Cheng; Yin, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the second leading reason for hospitalization of medicare beneficiaries. The mortality rate is high, especially in the elderly. In this study, we aimed to determine the risk factors associated with severe pneumonia in the elderly. Retrospective study was conducted and data of old patients with severe pneumonia were collected. They were divided into two groups: the experiment group (death group) and the control (living group). The general situation, underlying diseases, laboratory tests, types of etiology, imaging analysis and treatment situation of patients were analyzed and compared. Univariate analysis and logistic multivariate regression analysis were used to screen the related and independent risk factors for the diagnosis of severe pneumonia in the elderly. In univariate analysis, there were many factors had statistical significance including chronic kidney disease, electrolyte disturbance, low phosphorus and so on. Result of logistic multivariate regression analysis showed pro-BNP level and serum prealbumin were independent risk factors. In sputum culture, the relevance ratio of acinetobacter baumannii was the highest in gram negative bacteria followed by klebsiella pneumoniae. In gram positive bacteria, the relevance ratio of staphylococcus aureus was the highest. In conclusion, the analysis on risk factors for severe pneumonia has great clinical significance on improving the prognosis.

  6. Validity of Antibodies in Lymphocyte Supernatant in Diagnosing Tuberculosis in Severely Malnourished Children Presenting with Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Raqib, Rubhana; Banu, Sayera; Shahid, Abu ASMSB; Shahunja, KM; Sharmin, Lazina; Ashraf, Hasan; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in young children can be challenging, especially in severely malnourished children. There is a critical need for improved diagnostics for children. Thus, we sought to evaluate the performance of a technique that measures antibodies in lymphocyte supernatant (ALS) for the diagnosis of TB in severely malnourished children presenting with suspected pneumonia. Methods Children less than 5 years with severe acute malnutrition and radiological features of pneumonia admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, were enrolled consecutively following informed written consent. In addition to clinical and radiological assessment, samples taken for TB diagnosis included gastric lavage fluid and induced sputum for microbiological confirmation. ALS was measured from venous blood, and results were evaluated in children classified as “confirmed”, “non-confirmed TB” or “not TB”. Results Among 224 children who had ALS analysis, 12 (5.4%) children had microbiologically “confirmed TB”, a further 41 (18%) had clinically diagnosed “non-confirmed TB” and the remaining 168 (75%) were considered not to have TB. ALS was positive in 89 (40%) and negative in 85 (39%) of children, with a large number (47 or 21%) reported as “borderline”. These proportions were similar between the three diagnostic groups. The sensitivity and specificity of ALS when comparing “Confirmed TB” to “Not TB” was only 67% (95% CI: 31–91%) and 51% (95% CI: 42–60%), respectively. Conclusions and Significance Our data suggest that ALS is not sufficiently accurate to improve the diagnosis of TB in children with severe malnutrition. PMID:26020966

  7. Influence of porcine circovirus type 2 vaccination on the probability and severity of pneumonia detected postmortem

    PubMed Central

    Raith, J.; Kuchling, S.; Schleicher, C.; Schobesberger, H.; Köfer, J.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of porcine circovirus type 2 vaccination (PCV-2) on the probability and severity of pneumonia, postmortem findings of 247,505 pigs slaughtered between 2008 and 2011 were analysed by applying a cumulative link mixed model. Three major effects could be observed: (1) PCV-2 vaccination significantly (P<0.01) reduced the odds (coefficient: −0.05) of postmortem findings of mild, moderate and severe pneumonia for vaccinated pigs. (2) Pigs from fattening farms were less likely (coefficient: −0.44; P<0.05) to exhibit signs of pneumonia at slaughter than pigs from farrow-to-finish farms. (3) When vaccinated, the odds of detecting postmortem signs showed an even more pronounced reduction (coefficient: −0.19; P<0.001) for pigs from fattening farms. Combining PCV-2 vaccination, farm type and interaction effects between these two factors, a pig vaccinated against PCV-2 from a fattening farm had only half the chance (OR 0.51) of pneumonia being detected at postmortem than a non-vaccinated pig from a farrow-to-finish farm. The study demonstrates the benefit of a vaccination programme against PCV-2 as an important tool to reduce the risk of postmortem pneumonia findings and the severity of pneumonia in pigs at slaughter. PMID:25413158

  8. High prevalence of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia among Mozambican children <5 years of age admitted to hospital with clinical severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lanaspa, M; O'Callaghan-Gordo, C; Machevo, S; Madrid, L; Nhampossa, T; Acácio, S; de la Horra, C; Friaza, V; Campano, E; Alonso, P L; Calderón, E J; Roca, A; Bassat, Q

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to describe Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) prevalence and features in children from sub-Saharan Africa and to investigate PCP-associated risk factors. During 2006-2007 we used molecular methods to test children younger than 5 years old admitted with severe pneumonia to a hospital in southern Mozambique for Pneumocystis infection. We recruited 834 children. PCP prevalence was 6.8% and HIV prevalence was 25.7%. The in-hospital and delayed mortality were significantly higher among children with PCP (20.8% vs. 10.2%, p 0.021, and 11.5% vs. 3.6%, p 0.044, respectively). Clinical features were mostly overlapping between the two groups. Independent risk factors for PCP were age less than a year (odds ratio (OR) 6.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.86-21.65), HIV infection (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.16-7.70), grunting (OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.04-6.73) and digital clubbing (OR 10.75, 95% CI 1.21-95.56). PCP is a common and life-threatening cause of severe pneumonia in Mozambican children. Mother-to-child HIV transmission prevention should be strengthened. Better diagnostic tools are needed.

  9. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the flu Your doctor will use your medical history, a physical exam, and lab tests to diagnose pneumonia. Treatment depends on what kind you have. If bacteria are the cause, antibiotics should help. If you ...

  10. Acute lung inflammation in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia and sepsis in BALB/c mice: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2011-10-01

    Lungs play an important role in the body's defense against a variety of pathogens, but this network of immune system-mediated defense can be deregulated during acute pulmonary infections. The present study compares acute lung inflammation occurring during Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia and sepsis in BALB/c mice. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal instillation of bacteria (10(4) cfu), while sepsis was developed by placing the fibrin-thrombin clot containing known amount of bacteria (10(2) cfu) into the peritoneal cavity of animals. Mice with sepsis showed 100% mortality within five post-infection days, whereas all the animals with pneumonia survived. In animals suffering from K. pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia, all the inflammatory parameters (TNF-α, IL-1α, MPO, MDA, and NO) were found to be maximum till third post-infection day, after that, a decline was observed, whereas in septic animals, all the above-mentioned markers of inflammation kept on increasing. Histopathological study showed presence of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages (or foam cells) in lungs of mice with pneumonia after third post-infection day, which might have contributed to the induction of resolution of inflammation, but no such observation was made in lungs of septic mice. Hence, during pneumonia, controlled activation of macrophages may lead to resolution of inflammation.

  11. Radiation-Induced Organizing Pneumonia: A Characteristic Disease that Requires Symptom-Oriented Management

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Keisuke; Seo, Yuji; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia (RIOP) is an inflammatory lung disease that is occasionally observed after irradiation to the breast. It is a type of secondary organizing pneumonia that is characterized by infiltrates outside the irradiated volume that are sometimes migratory. Corticosteroids work acutely, but relapse of pneumonia is often experienced. Management of RIOP should simply be symptom-oriented, and the use of corticosteroids should be limited to severe symptoms from the perspective not only of cost-effectiveness but also of cancer treatment. Once steroid therapy is started, it takes a long time to stop it due to frequent relapses. We review RIOP from the perspective of its diagnosis, epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis, and patient management. PMID:28134830

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Mild and Severe Pneumonia: Insights from RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sai; Feng, Cong; Chen, Li; Huang, Zhi; Zhou, Xuan; Li, Bei; Wang, Li-Li; Chen, Wei; Lv, Fa-Qin; Li, Tan-Shi

    2017-04-06

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying mild and severe pneumonia by use of mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq). MATERIAL AND METHODS RNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of patients with mild pneumonia, severe pneumonia, and healthy controls. Sequencing was performed on the HiSeq4000 platform. After filtering, clean reads were mapped to the human reference genome hg19. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between the control group and the mild or severe group. A transcription factor-gene network was constructed for each group. Biological process (BP) terms enriched by DEGs in the network were analyzed and these genes were also mapped to the Connectivity map to search for small-molecule drugs. RESULTS A total of 199 and 560 DEGs were identified from the mild group and severe group, respectively. A transcription factor-gene network consisting of 215 nodes and another network consisting of 451 nodes were constructed in the mild group and severe group, respectively, and 54 DEGs (e.g., S100A9 and S100A12) were found to be common, with consistent differential expression changes in the 2 groups. Genes in the transcription factor-gene network for the mild group were mainly enriched in 13 BP terms, especially defense and inflammatory response (e.g., S100A8) and spermatogenesis, while the top BP terms enriched by genes in the severe group include response to oxidative stress (CCL5), wound healing, and regulation of cell differentiation (CCL5), and of the cellular protein metabolic process. CONCLUSIONS S100A9 and S100A12 may have a role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia: S100A9 and CXCL1 may contribute solely in mild pneumonia, and CCL5 and CXCL11 may contribute in severe pneumonia.

  13. Severe pneumonia due to Nocardia otitidiscaviarum identified by mass spectroscopy in a cotton farmer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen; Feng, Mei; Zhu, Jing; Tao, Ye; Kang, Mei; Chen, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Nocardia species are aerobic saprophytic bacilli. Among Nocardia species, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum (N otitidiscaviarum) is rarely reported in pulmonary infection. Patient concerns: We reported a case of N otitidiscaviarum pneumonia in a cotton farmer. Diagnoses: N otitidiscaviarum pneumonia was identified by mass spectroscopy. Interventions: Combined treatments (amikacin, imipenem and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) were administered after identification of N otitidiscaviarum. Outcomes: The patient eventually died from severe respiratory insufficiency in the hospital. Lessons: Early precise diagnosis and prompt combined therapy are of vital importance in severe Nocardia pulmonary infection. PMID:28353613

  14. Mortality of community-acquired pneumonia in Korea: assessed with the pneumonia severity index and the CURB-65 score.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye In; Kim, Shin Woo; Chang, Hyun Ha; Cha, Seung Ick; Lee, Jae Hee; Ki, Hyun Kyun; Cheong, Hae Suk; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Ryu, Seong Yeol; Kwon, Ki Tae; Lee, Byung Kee; Choo, Eun Ju; Kim, Do Jin; Kang, Cheol-In; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae Hoon; Suh, Gee Young; Shim, Tae Sun; Kim, Young Keun; Kim, Hyo Youl; Moon, Chi Sook; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Park, Seong Yeon; Oh, Jin Young; Jung, Sook In; Park, Kyung Hwa; Yun, Na Ra; Yoon, Sung Ho; Sohn, Kyung Mok; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Jung, Ki Suck

    2013-09-01

    The pneumonia severity index (PSI) and CURB-65 are widely used tools for the prediction of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). This study was conducted to evaluate validation of severity scoring system including the PSI and CURB-65 scores of Korean CAP patients. In the prospective CAP cohort (participated in by 14 hospitals in Korea from January 2009 to September 2011), 883 patients aged over 18 yr were studied. The 30-day mortalities of all patients were calculated with their PSI index classes and CURB scores. The overall mortality rate was 4.5% (40/883). The mortality rates per CURB-65 score were as follows: score 0, 2.3% (6/260); score 1, 4.0% (12/300); score 2, 6.0% (13/216); score 3, 5.7% (5/88); score 4, 23.5% (4/17); and score 5, 0% (0/2). Mortality rate with PSI risk class were as follows: I, 2.3% (4/174); II, 2.7% (5/182); III, 2.3% (5/213); IV, 4.5% (11/245); and V, 21.7% (15/69). The subgroup mortality rate of Korean CAP patients varies based on the severity scores and CURB-65 is more valid for the lower scores, and PSI, for the higher scores. Thus, these variations must be considered when using PSI and CURB-65 for CAP in Korean patients.

  15. Causes of non-adherence to therapeutic guidelines in severe community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Gattarello, Simone; Ramírez, Sergio; Almarales, José Rafael; Borgatta, Bárbara; Lagunes, Leonel; Encina, Belén; Rello, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the adherence to Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines and the causes of lack of adherence during empirical antibiotic prescription in severe pneumonia in Latin America. Methods A clinical questionnaire was submitted to 36 physicians from Latin America; they were asked to indicate the empirical treatment in two fictitious cases of severe respiratory infection: community-acquired pneumonia and nosocomial pneumonia. Results In the case of communityacquired pneumonia, 11 prescriptions of 36 (30.6%) were compliant with international guidelines. The causes for non-compliant treatment were monotherapy (16.0%), the unnecessary prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics (40.0%) and the use of non-recommended antibiotics (44.0%). In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the rate of adherence to the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines was 2.8% (1 patient of 36). The reasons for lack of compliance were monotherapy (14.3%) and a lack of dual antibiotic coverage against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85.7%). If monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered adequate, the antibiotic treatment would be adequate in 100% of the total prescriptions. Conclusion The compliance rate with the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines in the community-acquired pneumonia scenario was 30.6%; the most frequent cause of lack of compliance was the indication of monotherapy. In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the compliance rate with the guidelines was 2.8%, and the most important cause of non-adherence was lack of combined antipseudomonal therapy. If the use of monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered the correct option, the treatment would be adequate in 100% of the prescriptions. PMID:25909312

  16. Pneumococcal colonisation density: a new marker for disease severity in HIV-infected adults with pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Albrich, Werner C; Madhi, Shabir A; Adrian, Peter V; van Niekerk, Nadia; Telles, Jean-Noel; Ebrahim, N; Messaoudi, Melina; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Giersdorf, Sven; Vernet, Guy; Mueller, Beat; Klugman, Keith P

    2014-01-01

    Objective A high genomic load of Pneumococcus from blood or cerebrospinal fluid has been associated with increased mortality. We aimed to analyse whether nasopharyngeal colonisation density in HIV-infected patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with markers of disease severity or poor outcome. Methods Quantitative lytA real-time PCR was performed on nasopharyngeal swabs in HIV-infected South African adults hospitalised for acute CAP at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto, South Africa. Pneumonia aetiology was considered pneumococcal if any sputum culture or Gram stain, urinary pneumococcal C-polysaccharide-based antigen, blood culture or whole blood lytA real-time PCR revealed pneumococci. Results There was a moderate correlation between the mean nasopharyngeal colonisation densities and increasing CURB65 scores among all-cause patients with pneumonia (Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.15, p=0.06) or with the Pitt bacteraemia score among patients with pneumococcal bacteraemia (p=0.63). In patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonisation density was higher among non-survivors than survivors (7.7 vs 6.1 log10 copies/mL, respectively, p=0.02) and among those who had pneumococci identified from blood cultures and/or by whole blood lytA real-time PCR than those with non-bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia (6.6 vs 5.6 log10 copies/mL, p=0.03). Nasopharyngeal colonisation density correlated positively with the biomarkers procalcitonin (Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.37, p<0.0001), proadrenomedullin (r=0.39, p=0.008) and copeptin (r=0.30, p=0.01). Conclusions In addition to its previously reported role as a diagnostic tool for pneumococcal pneumonia, quantitative nasopharyngeal colonisation density also correlates with mortality and prognostic biomarkers. It may also be useful as a severity marker for pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected adults. PMID:25113557

  17. Treatment of severe pneumonia in hospitalized patients: results of a multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial comparing intravenous ciprofloxacin with imipenem-cilastatin. The Severe Pneumonia Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Fink, M P; Snydman, D R; Niederman, M S; Leeper, K V; Johnson, R H; Heard, S O; Wunderink, R G; Caldwell, J W; Schentag, J J; Siami, G A

    1994-01-01

    Intravenously administered ciprofloxacin was compared with imipenem for the treatment of severe pneumonia. In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial, which included an intent-to-treat analysis, a total of 405 patients with severe pneumonia were enrolled. The mean APACHE II score was 17.6, 79% of the patients required mechanical ventilation, and 78% had nosocomial pneumonia. A subgroup of 205 patients (98 ciprofloxacin-treated patients and 107 imipenem-treated patients) were evaluable for the major efficacy endpoints. Patients were randomized to receive intravenous treatment with either ciprofloxacin (400 mg every 8 h) or imipenem (1,000 mg every 8 h), and doses were adjusted for renal function. The primary and secondary efficacy endpoints were bacteriological and clinical responses at 3 to 7 days after completion of therapy. Ciprofloxacin-treated patients had a higher bacteriological eradication rate than did imipenem-treated patients (69 versus 59%; 95% confidence interval of -0.6%, 26.2%; P = 0.069) and also a significantly higher clinical response rate (69 versus 56%; 95% confidence interval of 3.5%, 28.5%; P = 0.021). The greatest difference between ciprofloxacin and imipenem was in eradication of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (93 versus 65%; P = 0.009). Stepwise logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following factors to be associated with bacteriological eradication: absence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P < 0.01), higher weight (P < 0.01), a low APACHE II score (P = 0.03), and treatment with ciprofloxacin (P = 0.04). When P. aeruginosa was recovered from initial respiratory tract cultures, failure to achieve bacteriological eradication and development of resistance during therapy were common in both treatment groups (67 and 33% for ciprofloxacin and 59 and 53% for imipenem, respectively). Seizures were observed more frequently with imipenem than with ciprofloxacin (6 versus 1%; P = 0.028). These results demonstrate that

  18. Mint3/Apba3 depletion ameliorates severe murine influenza pneumonia and macrophage cytokine production in response to the influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Takayuki; Fujita, Tomoko; Nakaoka, Hiroki J.; Hara, Toshiro; Kobayashi, Noritada; Murakami, Yoshinori; Seiki, Motoharu; Sakamoto, Takeharu

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection is a common cause of severe pneumonia. Studies have suggested that excessive activation of the host immune system including macrophages is responsible for the severe pathologies mediated by IFV infection. Here, we focused on the X11 protein family member Mint3/Apba3, known to promote ATP production via glycolysis by activating hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) in macrophages, and examined its roles in lung pathogenesis and anti-viral defence upon IFV infection. Mint3-deficient mice exhibited improved influenza pneumonia with reduced inflammatory cytokines/chemokine levels and neutrophil infiltration in the IFV-infected lungs without alteration in viral burden, type-I interferon production, or acquired immunity. In macrophages, Mint3 depletion attenuated NF-κB signalling and the resultant cytokine/chemokine production in response to IFV infection by increasing IκBα and activating the cellular energy sensor AMPK, respectively. Thus, Mint3 might represent one of the likely therapeutic targets for the treatment of severe influenza pneumonia without affecting host anti-viral defence through suppressing macrophage cytokine/chemokine production. PMID:27883071

  19. Management of severe community-acquired pneumonia in Brazil: a secondary analysis of an international survey

    PubMed Central

    Rabello, Lígia; Conceição, Catarina; Ebecken, Katia; Lisboa, Thiago; Bozza, Fernando Augusto; Soares, Márcio; Póvoa, Pedro; Salluh, Jorge Ibrain Figueira

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate Brazilian physicians’ perceptions regarding the diagnosis, severity assessment, treatment and risk stratification of severe community-acquired pneumonia patients and to compare those perceptions to current guidelines. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional international anonymous survey among a convenience sample of critical care, pulmonary, emergency and internal medicine physicians from Brazil between October and December 2008. The electronic survey evaluated physicians’ attitudes towards the diagnosis, risk assessment and therapeutic interventions for patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia. Results A total of 253 physicians responded to the survey, with 66% from Southeast Brazil. The majority (60%) of the responding physicians had > 10 years of medical experience. The risk assessment of severe community-acquired pneumonia was very heterogeneous, with clinical evaluation as the most frequent approach. Although blood cultures were recognized as exhibiting a poor diagnostic performance, these cultures were performed by 75% of respondents. In contrast, the presence of urinary pneumococcal and Legionella antigens was evaluated by less than 1/3 of physicians. The vast majority of physicians (95%) prescribe antibiotics according to a guideline, with the combination of a 3rd/4th generation cephalosporin plus a macrolide as the most frequent choice. Conclusion This Brazilian survey identified an important gap between guidelines and clinical practice and recommends the institution of educational programs that implement evidence-based strategies for the management of severe community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:25909314

  20. Loss of CARD9-mediated innate activation attenuates severe influenza pneumonia without compromising host viral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Takayuki; Iizasa, Ei’ichi; Kobayashi, Noritada; Yoshida, Hiroki; Hara, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection is a common cause of severe viral pneumonia associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is difficult to control with general immunosuppressive therapy including corticosteroids due to the unfavorable effect on viral replication. Studies have suggested that the excessive activation of the innate immunity by IFV is responsible for severe pathologies. In this study, we focused on CARD9, a signaling adaptor known to regulate innate immune activation through multiple innate sensor proteins, and investigated its role in anti-IFV defense and lung pathogenesis in a mouse model recapitulating severe influenza pneumonia with ARDS. We found that influenza pneumonia was dramatically attenuated in Card9-deficient mice, which showed improved mortality with reduced inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the infected lungs. However, viral clearance, type-I interferon production, and the development of anti-viral B and T cell immunity were not compromised by CARD9 deficiency. Syk or CARD9-deficient DCs but not macrophages showed impaired cytokine but not type-I interferon production in response to IFV in vitro, indicating a possible role for the Syk-CARD9 pathway in DCs in excessive inflammation of IFV-infected lungs. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is an ideal therapeutic target for severe influenza pneumonia without affecting viral clearance. PMID:26627732

  1. Outcomes and duration of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia therapy in infants with severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Ingrid S; Englund, Janet A; Burroughs, Lauri M; Torgerson, Troy R; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    This retrospective review of patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) evaluated the relationship between duration of therapy to treat PCP and overall survival. We found that 80% of patients receiving only 21 days of antibiotics survived to 12 months beyond hematopoietic cell transplant, whereas only 25% of patients who required longer treatment for PCP survived to stem cell engraftment.

  2. Lethal exacerbation of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in severe combined immunodeficiency mice after infection by pneumonia virus of mice.

    PubMed

    Roths, J B; Smith, A L; Sidman, C L

    1993-04-01

    Mice homozygous for the mutant allele scid (severe combined immunodeficiency) have been described as excellent models for Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) pneumonia (PCP), a major health problem in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and other immunodeficiency states. Other microorganisms have been shown to infect AIDS patients simultaneously with Pc, but whether one opportunist is able to directly influence the pathogenicity of another has not been determined previously. We have deliberately coinfected scid mice (with extent Pc infection) with a variety of primarily pneumotropic viruses and bacteria and have identified pneumonia virus of mice as causing a dramatic increase in the density of Pc organisms and the morbidity due to PCP in immunodeficient scid mice. This finding has clinical significance in the management of PCP, in that the identification and treatment of coinfecting pneumotropic pathogens may be as important as treatment targeted at Pc. A search for other synergistic (or antagonistic) microorganisms and determination of their mechanism(s) of action in altering the progression of PCP is indicated.

  3. Severe community-acquired Enterobacter pneumonia: a plea for greater awareness of the concept of health-care-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with Enterobacter community-acquired pneumonia (EnCAP) were admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU). Our primary aim was to describe them as few data are available on EnCAP. A comparison with CAP due to common and typical bacteria was performed. Methods Baseline clinical, biological and radiographic characteristics, criteria for health-care-associated pneumonia (HCAP) were compared between each case of EnCAP and thirty age-matched typical CAP cases. A univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors independently associated with ENCAP. Their outcome was also compared. Results In comparison with CAP due to common bacteria, a lower leukocytosis and constant HCAP criteria were associated with EnCAP. Empiric antibiotic therapy was less effective in EnCAP (20%) than in typical CAP (97%) (p < 0.01). A delay in the initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy (3.3 ± 1.6 vs. 1.2 ± 0.6 days; p < 0.01) and an increase in duration of mechanical ventilation (8.4 ± 5.2 vs. 4.0 ± 4.3 days; p = 0.01) and ICU stay were observed in EnCAP patients. Conclusions EnCAP is a severe infection which is more consistent with HCAP than with typical CAP. This retrospectively suggests that the application of HCAP guidelines should have improved EnCAP management. PMID:21569334

  4. A clinical tool to predict failed response to therapy in children with severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Mamtani, Manju; Patel, Archana; Hibberd, Patricia L; Tuan, Tran Anh; Jeena, Prakash; Chisaka, Noel; Hassan, Mumtaz; Radovan, Irene Maulen; Thea, Donald M; Qazi, Shamim; Kulkarni, Hemant

    2009-04-01

    Severe pneumonia in children under 5 years of age continues to be an important clinical entity with treatment failure rates as high as 20%. Where severe pneumonias are common, predictive tools for treatment failure like chest radiography and pulse oximetry are not available or affordable. Thus, there is a need for development of simple, accurate and inexpensive clinical tools for prediction of treatment failure. Using clinical, chest radiographic and pulse oximetry data from 1702 children recruited in the Amoxicillin Penicillin Pneumonia International Study (APPIS) trial we developed and validated a simple clinical tool. For development, a randomly derived development sample (n = 889) was used. The tool which was based on the results of multivariate logistic regression models was validated on a separate sample of 813 children. The derived clinical tool in its final form contained three clinical predictors: age of child, excess age-specific respiratory rate at baseline and at 24 hr of hospitalization. This tool had a 70% and 66% predictive accuracy in the development and validation samples, respectively. The tool is presented as an easy-to-use nomogram. It is possible to predict the likelihood of treatment failure in children with severe pneumonia based on clinical features that are simple and inexpensive to measure.

  5. [A case of nonclostridial gas gangrene of the leg complicated by severe pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Seiko; Baba, Kenji; Suzuki, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Etsuro

    2005-10-01

    A 73-year-old man admitted for febrile left leg pain with dyspnea, who had poorly controlled diabetes was found on admission to have severe hypoxia and chest X-ray showed infiltrates in the middle to lower left lung. X-rays of the left leg showed gas around the knee joint. These findings suggested severe pneumonia with gas gangrene, necessitating immediate debridement of the gas gangrene lesion and hyperbaric oxygenation. Antibiotics were also administered intravenously (panipenem/betamipron 0.5 g x 3/day, clindamycin 600 mg x 2/day, and erythromycin 500 mg x 3/day). We conducted fiberoptic bronchoscope daily because consolidation of the whole left lung developed with purulent sputum expectoration. Both pneumonia and gas gangrene gradually ameliorated avoiding amputation of theleg. Gas gangrene was cured without leaving sequelae such as motor dysfunction. Staphylococcus aureus was detected in both pus from the leg and sputum collected by bronchoscopy. Microorganisms showed the same pattern of sensitivity to antibiotics, suggesting a causal relationship between pneumonia and gas gangrene through the blood stream. Gas gangrene was considered the primary infection followed by pneumonia, since pain and swelling of the left leg preceded the airway symptoms. The present case illustrates in compromised hosts including diabetics, gas gangrene may develop taking an opportunity of airway infection, and that in some cases, early debridement of the lesion and optimal use of antibiotics may help cure this disease without aggressive surgery. Hyperbaric oxygenation may also be useful, although its validity must be investigated further.

  6. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W; Nawroth, Peter P; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A D

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated-if any-cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS.

  7. Predictors of Severe Sepsis among Patients Hospitalized for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Antoni; Reyes, Soledad; Méndez, Raúl; Zalacaín, Rafael; Capelastegui, Alberto; Rajas, Olga; Borderías, Luis; Martin-Villasclaras, Juan; Bello, Salvador; Alfageme, Inmaculada; Rodríguez de Castro, Felipe; Rello, Jordi; Molinos, Luis; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe sepsis, may be present on hospital arrival in approximately one-third of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Objective To determine the host characteristics and micro-organisms associated with severe sepsis in patients hospitalized with CAP. Results We performed a prospective multicenter cohort study in 13 Spanish hospital, on 4070 hospitalized CAP patients, 1529 of whom (37.6%) presented with severe sepsis. Severe sepsis CAP was independently associated with older age (>65 years), alcohol abuse (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.07–1.61), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.50–2.04) and renal disease (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.21–2.03), whereas prior antibiotic treatment was a protective factor (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.52–0.73). Bacteremia (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.05–1.79), S pneumoniae (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.31–1.95) and mixed microbial etiology (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.10–2.49) were associated with severe sepsis CAP. Conclusions CAP patients with COPD, renal disease and alcohol abuse, as well as those with CAP due to S pneumonia or mixed micro-organisms are more likely to present to the hospital with severe sepsis. PMID:26727202

  8. Post-Discharge Mortality in Children with Severe Malnutrition and Pneumonia in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Graham, Stephen M.; Duke, Trevor; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2014-01-01

    Background Post-discharge mortality among children with severe illness in resource-limited settings is under-recognized and there are limited data. We evaluated post-discharge mortality in a recently reported cohort of children with severe malnutrition and pneumonia, and identified characteristics associated with an increased risk of death. Methods Young children (<5 years of age) with severe malnutrition (WHO criteria) and radiographic pneumonia on admission to Dhaka Hospital of icddr,b over a 15-month period were managed according to standard protocols. Those discharged were followed-up and survival status at 12 weeks post-discharge was determined. Verbal autopsy was requested from families of those that died. Results Of 405 children hospitalized with severe malnutrition and pneumonia, 369 (median age, 10 months) were discharged alive with a follow-up plan. Of these, 32 (8.7%) died in the community within 3 months of discharge: median 22 (IQR 9–35) days from discharge to death. Most deaths were reportedly associated with acute onset of new respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms. Those that died following discharge were significantly younger (median 6 [IQR 3,12] months) and more severely malnourished, on admission and on discharge, than those that survived. Bivariate analysis found that severe wasting on admission (OR 3.64, 95% CI 1.66–7.97) and age <12 months (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.1–8.8) were significantly associated with post-discharge death. Of those that died in the community, none had attended a scheduled follow-up and care-seeking from a traditional healer was more common (p<0.001) compared to those who survived. Conclusion and Significance Post-discharge mortality was common in Bangladeshi children following inpatient care for severe malnutrition and pneumonia. The underlying contributing factors require a better understanding to inform the potential of interventions that could improve survival. PMID:25225798

  9. Severe parainfluenza pneumonia in a case of transient hypogammalobulinemia of infancy.

    PubMed

    Cotugno, Nicola; Manno, Emma Concetta; Stoppa, Francesca; Sinibaldi, Serena; Saffirio, Claudia; D'Argenio, Parizia; Marano, Marco; Di Nardo, Matteo; Palma, Paolo

    2013-06-26

    Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) infection, largely known to cause self-limiting bronchiolitis and pneumonia in immune competent patients, can lead to severe to fatal pulmonary disease in immune disorders, such as primary or acquired-immune deficiencies. We report the case of a 1-year-old child who developed an acute respiratory distress syndrome. Because of a progressive respiratory failure unresponsive to conventional treatment extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was rapidly started. HPIV-3 infection was diagnosed on the rhinopharyngeal fluid and immunological examinations revealed a hypogammaglobulinemia. A combination therapy with ribavirin, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and steroid under ECMO support was started with considerable improvement. Subsequent analysis and more specific immunological assessment resulted normal confirming the diagnosis of transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy (THI). This case highlights the importance of prompt therapy with early ECMO support in combination with ribavirin, IVIG and steroids in patients affected by severe HPIV-3 pneumonia and THI.

  10. Outcomes and Duration of Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia Therapy in Infants with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Ingrid S.; Englund, Janet A.; Burroughs, Lauri M.; Torgerson, Troy R.; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    This retrospective review of patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) evaluated the relationship between duration of therapy to treat PCP and overall survival. We found that 80% of patients receiving only 21 days of antibiotics survived to 12 months beyond hematopoetic cell transplant, whereas only 25% of patients who required longer treatment for PCP survived to stem cell engraftment. PMID:21817949

  11. Severity assessment tools in ICU patients with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Pereira, J M; Moreno, R P; Matos, R; Rhodes, A; Martin-Loeches, I; Cecconi, M; Lisboa, T; Rello, J

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if severity assessment tools (general severity of illness and community-acquired pneumonia specific scores) can be used to guide decisions for patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to pandemic influenza A pneumonia. A prospective, observational, multicentre study included 265 patients with a mean age of 42 (±16.1) years and an ICU mortality of 31.7%. On admission to the ICU, the mean pneumonia severity index (PSI) score was 103.2 ± 43.2 points, the CURB-65 score was 1.7 ± 1.1 points and the PIRO-CAP score was 3.2 ± 1.5 points. None of the scores had a good predictive ability: area under the ROC for PSI, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.65-0.78); CURB-65, 0.67 (95% CI, 0.59-0.74); and PIRO-CAP, 0.64 (95% CI, 0.56-0.71). The PSI score (OR, 1.022 (1.009-1.034), p 0.001) was independently associated with ICU mortality; however, none of the three scores, when used at ICU admission, were able to reliably detect a low-risk group of patients. Low risk for mortality was identified in 27.5% of patients using PIRO-CAP, but above 40% when using PSI (I-III) or CURB65 (<2). Observed mortality was 13.7%, 13.5% and 19.4%, respectively. Pneumonia-specific scores undervalued severity and should not be used as instruments to guide decisions in the ICU.

  12. Treatment Failure and Mortality amongst Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition Presenting with Cough or Respiratory Difficulty and Radiological Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background Appropriate intervention is critical in reducing deaths among under-five, severe acutely malnourished (SAM) children with danger signs of severe pneumonia; however, there is paucity of data on outcome of World Health Organisation (WHO) recommended interventions of SAM children with severe pneumonia. We sought to evaluate outcome of the interventions in such children. Methods We prospectively enrolled SAM children aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) ward of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), between April 2011 and June 2012 with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia. All the enrolled children were treated with ampicillin and gentamicin, and micronutrients as recommended by the WHO. Comparison was made among pneumonic children with (n = 111) and without WHO defined danger signs of severe pneumonia (n = 296). The outcomes of interest were treatment failure (if a child required changing of antibiotics) and deaths during hospitalization. Further comparison was also made among those who developed treatment failure and who did not and among the survivors and deaths. Results SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia more often experienced treatment failure (58% vs. 20%; p<0.001) and fatal outcome (21% vs. 4%; p<0.001) compared to those without danger signs. Only 6/111 (5.4%) SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia and 12/296 (4.0%) without danger signs had bacterial isolates from blood. In log-linear binomial regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, danger signs of severe pneumonia, dehydration, hypocalcaemia, and bacteraemia were independently associated both with treatment failure and deaths in SAM children presenting with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia (p<0.01). Conclusion and Significance The result suggests that SAM children with cough or

  13. Effect of nitric oxide inhalation on gas exchange in acute severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Federico P; Amado, Veronica M; Roca, Josep; Torres, Antoni; Nicolas, Josep M; Rodriguez-Roisin, Robert; Barberà, Joan A

    2013-06-15

    Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) causes selective pulmonary vasodilatation and may improve gas exchange. The study was aimed to evaluate the acute effects of inhaled NO on pulmonary gas exchange in severe unilateral pneumonia, where hypoxemia results from increased intrapulmonary shunt. We studied 8 patients without preexisting lung disease (59±18 yr; 4M/4F) with early unilateral severe pneumonia and respiratory failure. Pulmonary and systemic hemodynamics and gas exchange, including ventilation-perfusion (V;A/Q;) distributions, were measured at baseline and while breathing 5 and 40 parts per million (ppm) of NO. Inhaled NO caused a dose-dependent fall in pulmonary vascular resistance (by 12% and 21%, with 5 and 40ppm, respectively; p<0.01, each) and improvement of PaO2 (by 25% and 23%; p<0.05, each), owing to the reduction of intrapulmonary shunt (by 23% and 27%; p<0.05, each), without changes in the amount of perfusion to low V;A/Q; ratio alveolar units. Patients with greater baseline intrapulmonary shunt exhibited greater improvement in arterial oxygenation (r(2)=0.55, p<0.05). We conclude that low doses of inhaled NO improve pulmonary gas exchange in acute severe pneumonia.

  14. Pore-Forming Toxins Induce Macrophage Necroptosis during Acute Bacterial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    González-Juarbe, Norberto; Gilley, Ryan Paul; Hinojosa, Cecilia Anahí; Bradley, Kelley Margaret; Kamei, Akinobu; Gao, Geli; Dube, Peter Herman; Bergman, Molly Ann; Orihuela, Carlos Javier

    2015-12-01

    Necroptosis is a highly pro-inflammatory mode of cell death regulated by RIP (or RIPK)1 and RIP3 kinases and mediated by the effector MLKL. We report that diverse bacterial pathogens that produce a pore-forming toxin (PFT) induce necroptosis of macrophages and this can be blocked for protection against Serratia marcescens hemorrhagic pneumonia. Following challenge with S. marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), and purified recombinant pneumolysin, macrophages pretreated with inhibitors of RIP1, RIP3, and MLKL were protected against death. Alveolar macrophages in MLKL KO mice were also protected during S. marcescens pneumonia. Inhibition of caspases had no impact on macrophage death and caspase-1 and -3/7 were determined to be inactive following challenge despite the detection of IL-1β in supernatants. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from RIP3 KO, but not caspase-1/11 KO or caspase-3 KO mice, were resistant to PFT-induced death. We explored the mechanisms for PFT-induced necroptosis and determined that loss of ion homeostasis at the plasma membrane, mitochondrial damage, ATP depletion, and the generation of reactive oxygen species were together responsible. Treatment of mice with necrostatin-5, an inhibitor of RIP1; GW806742X, an inhibitor of MLKL; and necrostatin-5 along with co-enzyme Q10 (N5/C10), which enhances ATP production; reduced the severity of S. marcescens pneumonia in a mouse intratracheal challenge model. N5/C10 protected alveolar macrophages, reduced bacterial burden, and lessened hemorrhage in the lungs. We conclude that necroptosis is the major cell death pathway evoked by PFTs in macrophages and the necroptosis pathway can be targeted for disease intervention.

  15. Pore-Forming Toxins Induce Macrophage Necroptosis during Acute Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    González-Juarbe, Norberto; Gilley, Ryan Paul; Hinojosa, Cecilia Anahí; Bradley, Kelley Margaret; Kamei, Akinobu; Gao, Geli; Dube, Peter Herman; Bergman, Molly Ann; Orihuela, Carlos Javier

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is a highly pro-inflammatory mode of cell death regulated by RIP (or RIPK)1 and RIP3 kinases and mediated by the effector MLKL. We report that diverse bacterial pathogens that produce a pore-forming toxin (PFT) induce necroptosis of macrophages and this can be blocked for protection against Serratia marcescens hemorrhagic pneumonia. Following challenge with S. marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), and purified recombinant pneumolysin, macrophages pretreated with inhibitors of RIP1, RIP3, and MLKL were protected against death. Alveolar macrophages in MLKL KO mice were also protected during S. marcescens pneumonia. Inhibition of caspases had no impact on macrophage death and caspase-1 and -3/7 were determined to be inactive following challenge despite the detection of IL-1β in supernatants. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from RIP3 KO, but not caspase-1/11 KO or caspase-3 KO mice, were resistant to PFT-induced death. We explored the mechanisms for PFT-induced necroptosis and determined that loss of ion homeostasis at the plasma membrane, mitochondrial damage, ATP depletion, and the generation of reactive oxygen species were together responsible. Treatment of mice with necrostatin-5, an inhibitor of RIP1; GW806742X, an inhibitor of MLKL; and necrostatin-5 along with co-enzyme Q10 (N5/C10), which enhances ATP production; reduced the severity of S. marcescens pneumonia in a mouse intratracheal challenge model. N5/C10 protected alveolar macrophages, reduced bacterial burden, and lessened hemorrhage in the lungs. We conclude that necroptosis is the major cell death pathway evoked by PFTs in macrophages and the necroptosis pathway can be targeted for disease intervention. PMID:26659062

  16. Influenza Pneumonia Surveillance among Hospitalized Adults May Underestimate the Burden of Severe Influenza Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Justin R.; Neuzil, Kathleen M.; Cooke, Colin R.; Neradilek, Moni B.; Goss, Christopher H.; Shay, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies seeking to estimate the burden of influenza among hospitalized adults often use case definitions that require presence of pneumonia. The goal of this study was to assess the extent to which restricting influenza testing to adults hospitalized with pneumonia could underestimate the total burden of hospitalized influenza disease. Methods We conducted a modelling study using the complete State Inpatient Databases from Arizona, California, and Washington and regional influenza surveillance data acquired from CDC from January 2003 through March 2009. The exposures of interest were positive laboratory tests for influenza A (H1N1), influenza A (H3N2), and influenza B from two contiguous US Federal Regions encompassing the study area. We identified the two outcomes of interest by ICD-9-CM code: respiratory and circulatory hospitalizations, as well as critical illness hospitalizations (acute respiratory failure, severe sepsis, and in-hospital death). We linked the hospitalization datasets with the virus surveillance datasets by geographic region and month of hospitalization. We used negative binomial regression models to estimate the number of influenza-associated events for the outcomes of interest. We sub-categorized these events to include all outcomes with or without pneumonia diagnosis codes. Results We estimated that there were 80,834 (95% CI 29,214–174,033) influenza-associated respiratory and circulatory hospitalizations and 26,760 (95% CI 14,541–47,464) influenza-associated critical illness hospitalizations. When a pneumonia diagnosis was excluded, the estimated number of influenza-associated respiratory and circulatory hospitalizations was 24,816 (95% CI 6,342–92,624). The estimated number of influenza-associated critical illness hospitalizations was 8,213 (95% CI 3,764–20,799). Around 30% of both influenza-associated respiratory and circulatory hospitalizations, as well as influenza-associated critical illness hospitalizations did not

  17. Mutational alteration of a nitrogen-fixing bacterium to sensitivity to infection by bacteriophage Mu: isolation of nif mutations of Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al induced by Mu.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, R N

    1976-01-01

    The nitrogen-fixing bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al is not sensitive to infection by bacteriophage Mu. A mutant of K. pneumoniae that is sensitive to Mu infection was isolated. Several Mu-induced auxotrophic mutations of K. pneumoniae including nif, trp, and rtl were isolated and genetically characterized. Evidence is presented that the Mu-induced mutations of nif arise as the result of insertion of Mu within (or near) the nif operon(s). The rtl locus, which determines the ability to utilize ribitol as a carbon source, was found to be linked to nif loci. PMID:789339

  18. Community-acquired pneumonia: economics of inpatient medical care vis-à-vis clinical severity*,**

    PubMed Central

    Cupurdija, Vojislav; Lazic, Zorica; Petrovic, Marina; Mojsilovic, Slavica; Cekerevac, Ivan; Rancic, Nemanja; Jakovljevic, Mihajlo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the direct and indirect costs of diagnosing and treating community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), correlating those costs with CAP severity at diagnosis and identifying the major cost drivers. Methods: This was a prospective cost analysis study using bottom-up costing. Clinical severity and mortality risk were assessed with the pneumonia severity index (PSI) and the mental Confusion-Urea-Respiratory rate-Blood pressure-age ≥ 65 years (CURB-65) scale, respectively. The sample comprised 95 inpatients hospitalized for newly diagnosed CAP. The analysis was run from a societal perspective with a time horizon of one year. Results: Expressed as mean ± standard deviation, in Euros, the direct and indirect medical costs per CAP patient were 696 ± 531 and 410 ± 283, respectively, the total per-patient cost therefore being 1,106 ± 657. The combined budget impact of our patient cohort, in Euros, was 105,087 (66,109 and 38,979 in direct and indirect costs, respectively). The major cost drivers, in descending order, were the opportunity cost (lost productivity); diagnosis and treatment of comorbidities; and administration of medications, oxygen, and blood derivatives. The CURB-65 and PSI scores both correlated with the indirect costs of CAP treatment. The PSI score correlated positively with the overall frequency of use of health care services. Neither score showed any clear relationship with the direct costs of CAP treatment. Conclusions: Clinical severity at admission appears to be unrelated to the costs of CAP treatment. This is mostly attributable to unwarranted hospital admission (or unnecessarily long hospital stays) in cases of mild pneumonia, as well as to over-prescription of antibiotics. Authorities should strive to improve adherence to guidelines and promote cost-effective prescribing practices among physicians in southeastern Europe. PMID:25750674

  19. Dynamic regulation of cardiolipin by the lipid pump Atp8b1 determines the severity of lung injury in experimental pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ray, Nancy B; Durairaj, Lakshmi; Chen, Bill B; McVerry, Bryan J; Ryan, Alan J; Donahoe, Michael; Waltenbaugh, Alisa K; O'Donnell, Christopher P; Henderson, Florita C; Etscheidt, Christopher A; McCoy, Diann M; Agassandian, Marianna; Hayes-Rowan, Emily C; Coon, Tiffany A; Butler, Phillip L; Gakhar, Lokesh; Mathur, Satya N; Sieren, Jessica C; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Kagan, Valerian E; McLennan, Geoffrey; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2010-10-01

    Pneumonia remains the leading cause of death from infection in the US, yet fundamentally new conceptual models underlying its pathogenesis have not emerged. We show that humans and mice with bacterial pneumonia have markedly elevated amounts of cardiolipin, a rare, mitochondrial-specific phospholipid, in lung fluid and find that it potently disrupts surfactant function. Intratracheal cardiolipin administration in mice recapitulates the clinical phenotype of pneumonia, including impaired lung mechanics, modulation of cell survival and cytokine networks and lung consolidation. We have identified and characterized the activity of a unique cardiolipin transporter, the P-type ATPase transmembrane lipid pump Atp8b1, a mutant version of which is associated with severe pneumonia in humans and mice. Atp8b1 bound and internalized cardiolipin from extracellular fluid via a basic residue-enriched motif. Administration of a peptide encompassing the cardiolipin binding motif or Atp8b1 gene transfer in mice lessened bacteria-induced lung injury and improved survival. The results unveil a new paradigm whereby Atp8b1 is a cardiolipin importer whose capacity to remove cardiolipin from lung fluid is exceeded during inflammation or when Atp8b1 is defective. This discovery opens the door for new therapeutic strategies directed at modulating the abundance or molecular interactions of cardiolipin in pneumonia.

  20. A definite case of (L)-carbocisteine-induced pneumonia with CATCH22 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Kenichiro; Ichihara, Eiki; Hisamoto, Akiko; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Tanimoto, Yasushi; Akagi, Sadaharu; Kato, Katsuya; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A 32-year-old male with CATCH22 syndrome presented with a high fever and productive cough after taking drugs for acute bronchitis, including (L)-carbocisteine. Chest radiography revealed ground-glass opacities in the bilateral lung fields. He had a history of similar pneumonia. Under the assumption of drug-induced pneumonia, or bacterial or viral pneumonia, all drugs including (L)-carbocisteine were discontinued, and antibiotics were started. A drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test was positive only for (L)-carbocisteine. The only drug in common between this and the previous episode of pneumonia was (L)-carbocisteine. We thus concluded that this was a definite case of (L)-carbocisteine-induced pneumonia in a patient with CATCH22 syndrome.

  1. Value of bacterial antigen detection in the diagnostic yield of transthoracic needle aspiration in severe community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Bella, F.; Tort, J.; Morera, M. A.; Espaulella, J.; Armengol, J.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Transthoracic needle aspiration (TNA) with an ultrathin needle is a safe and highly specific procedure for obtaining a diagnosis in bacterial pneumonias, but its sensitivity is at best 70%. A study was performed to assess whether Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b antigen detection by latex agglutination from the TNA sample enhanced the diagnostic yield. METHODS--Blood cultures, TNA with an ultrathin needle (culture, Gram stain, and latex agglutination), serological tests, and pneumococcal antigen detection in the urine by counterimmunoelectrophoresis were performed in samples from 18 of 23 consecutive patients with severe community acquired pneumonia. RESULTS--The causative organism was identified in 16 cases (88%): S pneumoniae (10 cases), S pneumoniae plus H influenzae (two cases), Legionella pneumophila (three cases), and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (one case). The investigation of antigens by latex agglutination in the pulmonary aspirate increased the diagnostic yield of TNA from 50% to 78% and provided a rapid diagnosis (in less than two hours) with therapeutic implications in seven cases. Its effectiveness was not modified by prior antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSIONS--A latex agglutination test on the pulmonary aspirate enhances the diagnostic yield of TNA in severe community acquired pneumonia. PMID:8303628

  2. Influenza A/H1N1 Severe Pneumonia: Novel Morphocytological Findings in Bronchoalveolar Lavage

    PubMed Central

    Faverio, Paola; Messinesi, Grazia; Brenna, Ambrogio; Pesci, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed in three patients with severe influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Light microscopy analysis of BAL cytocentrifugates showed the presence of characteristic large, mononuclear, plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like cells never described before. Via transmission electron microscopy, these cells were classified as atypical type II pneumocytes and some of them showed cytoplasmic vesicles and inclusions. We concluded that plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like type II pneumocytes might represent a morphologic marker of A/H1N1 influenza virus infection as well as reparative cellular activation after diffuse alveolar damage. PMID:25383078

  3. Outpatient treatment of children with severe pneumonia with oral amoxicillin in 4 countries: The MASS study

    PubMed Central

    Addo-Yobo, Emmanuel; Anh, Dang Duc; El-Sayed, Hesham Fathey; Fox, LeAnne; Fox, Matthew P.; MacLeod, William; Saha, Samir; Tuan, Tran Anh; Thea, Donald M.; Qazi, Shamim

    2011-01-01

    Summary Objective A recent RCT demonstrated home-based treatment of WHO-defined severe pneumonia with oral amoxicillin was equivalent to hospital-based therapy and parenteral antibiotics. We aimed to determine whether this finding is generalizable across four countries. Methods Multi-centre observational study in Bangladesh, Egypt, Ghana and Vietnam between November 2005 and May 2008. Children aged 3 to 59 months with WHO-defined severe pneumonia were enrolled at participating health centers and managed at home with oral amoxicillin (80–90 mg/kg/day) for 5 days. Children were followed-up at home on days 1, 2, 3 and 6 and at a facility on day 14 to look for cumulative treatment failure through day 6 and relapse between days 6–14. Results Of 6,582 children screened, 873 were included, of whom 823 had an outcome ascertained. There was substantial variation in presenting characteristics by site. Bangladesh and Ghana had fever (97%) as a more common symptom than Egypt (74%) and Vietnam (66%), while in Vietnam audible wheeze was more common (49%) than at other sites (range 2%–16%). Treatment failure by day 6 was 9.2% (95% CI: 7.3%–11.2%) across all sites, varying from 6.4% (95% CI: 3.1%–9.8%) in Ghana to 13.2% (95% CI: 8.4%–18.0%) in Vietnam. 2.7% (95% CI: 1.5%–3.9%) of the 733 children well on day 6 relapsed by day 14. The most common causes of treatment failure were persistence of LCI at day 6 (3.8%; 95% CI: 2.6%–5.2%), abnormal sleepy or difficult to wake (1.3%; 95% CI: 0.7%–2.3%), and central cyanosis (1.3%; 95% CI: 0.7%–2.3%). All children survived and only one adverse drug reaction occurred. Treatment was more frequent in young infants and those presenting with rapid respiratory rates. Conclusions Clinical treatment failure and adverse event rates among children with severe pneumonia treated at home with oral amoxicillin did not substantially differ across geographic areas. Thus home-based therapy of severe pneumonia can be applied to a wide

  4. Influenza A/H1N1 Severe Pneumonia: Novel Morphocytological Findings in Bronchoalveolar Lavage.

    PubMed

    Faverio, Paola; Aliberti, Stefano; Ezekiel, Clinton; Messinesi, Grazia; Brenna, Ambrogio; Pesci, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed in three patients with severe influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Light microscopy analysis of BAL cytocentrifugates showed the presence of characteristic large, mononuclear, plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like cells never described before. Via transmission electron microscopy, these cells were classified as atypical type II pneumocytes and some of them showed cytoplasmic vesicles and inclusions. We concluded that plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like type II pneumocytes might represent a morphologic marker of A/H1N1 influenza virus infection as well as reparative cellular activation after diffuse alveolar damage.

  5. Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection in Mice Induces Chronic Lung Inflammation, iBALT Formation, and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jupelli, Madhulika; Shimada, Kenichi; Chiba, Norika; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Jones, Heather D.; Peterson, Ellena; Chen, Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) lung infection can induce chronic lung inflammation and is associated with not only acute asthma but also COPD exacerbations. However, in mouse models of CP infection, most studies have investigated specifically the acute phase of the infection and not the longer-term chronic changes in the lungs. We infected C57BL/6 mice with 5×105 CP intratracheally and monitored inflammation, cellular infiltrates and cytokine levels over time to investigate the chronic inflammatory lung changes. While bacteria numbers declined by day 28, macrophage numbers remained high through day 35. Immune cell clusters were detected as early as day 14 and persisted through day 35, and stained positive for B, T, and follicular dendritic cells, indicating these clusters were inducible bronchus associated lymphoid tissues (iBALTs). Classically activated inflammatory M1 macrophages were the predominant subtype early on while alternatively activated M2 macrophages increased later during infection. Adoptive transfer of M1 but not M2 macrophages intratracheally 1 week after infection resulted in greater lung inflammation, severe fibrosis, and increased numbers of iBALTS 35 days after infection. In summary, we show that CP lung infection in mice induces chronic inflammatory changes including iBALT formations as well as fibrosis. These observations suggest that the M1 macrophages, which are part of the normal response to clear acute C. pneumoniae lung infection, result in an enhanced acute response when present in excess numbers, with greater inflammation, tissue injury, and severe fibrosis. PMID:24204830

  6. Viral and bacterial co-infection in severe pneumonia triggers innate immune responses and specifically enhances IP-10: a translational study.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jonathan; Machado, Daniela; Terrier, Olivier; Pouzol, Stephane; Messaoudi, Mélina; Basualdo, Wilma; Espínola, Emilio E; Guillen, Rosa M; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Picot, Valentina; Bénet, Thomas; Endtz, Hubert; Russomando, Graciela; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia

    2016-12-06

    Mixed viral and bacterial infections are widely described in community-acquired pneumonia; however, the clinical implications of co-infection on the associated immunopathology remain poorly studied. In this study, microRNA, mRNA and cytokine/chemokine secretion profiling were investigated for human monocyte-derived macrophages infected in-vitro with Influenza virus A/H1N1 and/or Streptococcus pneumoniae. We observed that the in-vitro co-infection synergistically increased interferon-γ-induced protein-10 (CXCL10, IP-10) expression compared to the singly-infected cells conditions. We demonstrated that endogenous miRNA-200a-3p, whose expression was synergistically induced following co-infection, indirectly regulates CXCL10 expression by targeting suppressor of cytokine signaling-6 (SOCS-6), a well-known regulator of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. Additionally, in a subsequent clinical pilot study, immunomodulators levels were evaluated in samples from 74 children (≤5 years-old) hospitalized with viral and/or bacterial community-acquired pneumonia. Clinically, among the 74 cases of pneumonia, patients with identified mixed-detection had significantly higher (3.6-fold) serum IP-10 levels than those with a single detection (P = 0.03), and were significantly associated with severe pneumonia (P < 0.01). This study demonstrates that viral and bacterial co-infection modulates the JAK-STAT signaling pathway and leads to exacerbated IP-10 expression, which could play a major role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia.

  7. Viral and bacterial co-infection in severe pneumonia triggers innate immune responses and specifically enhances IP-10: a translational study

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Jonathan; Machado, Daniela; Terrier, Olivier; Pouzol, Stephane; Messaoudi, Mélina; Basualdo, Wilma; Espínola, Emilio E; Guillen, Rosa M.; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Picot, Valentina; Bénet, Thomas; Endtz, Hubert; Russomando, Graciela; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia

    2016-01-01

    Mixed viral and bacterial infections are widely described in community-acquired pneumonia; however, the clinical implications of co-infection on the associated immunopathology remain poorly studied. In this study, microRNA, mRNA and cytokine/chemokine secretion profiling were investigated for human monocyte-derived macrophages infected in-vitro with Influenza virus A/H1N1 and/or Streptococcus pneumoniae. We observed that the in-vitro co-infection synergistically increased interferon-γ-induced protein-10 (CXCL10, IP-10) expression compared to the singly-infected cells conditions. We demonstrated that endogenous miRNA-200a-3p, whose expression was synergistically induced following co-infection, indirectly regulates CXCL10 expression by targeting suppressor of cytokine signaling-6 (SOCS-6), a well-known regulator of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. Additionally, in a subsequent clinical pilot study, immunomodulators levels were evaluated in samples from 74 children (≤5 years-old) hospitalized with viral and/or bacterial community-acquired pneumonia. Clinically, among the 74 cases of pneumonia, patients with identified mixed-detection had significantly higher (3.6-fold) serum IP-10 levels than those with a single detection (P = 0.03), and were significantly associated with severe pneumonia (P < 0.01). This study demonstrates that viral and bacterial co-infection modulates the JAK-STAT signaling pathway and leads to exacerbated IP-10 expression, which could play a major role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. PMID:27922126

  8. Performance evaluation of MR-proadrenomedullin and other scoring systems in severe sepsis with pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Rollas, Kazım; Alagöz, Ali; Seğmen, Fatih; Sipit, Tuğrul

    2014-01-01

    Background In sepsis, risk assessment is as crucial as early and accurate diagnosis. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of mid-regional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) with other scoring systems in severe sepsis and septic shock patients due to community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods Patients were divided into 2 groups as severe sepsis and septic shock due to CAP (group 1, n=31) and only CAP group (group 2, n=26). Serum MR-proADM, procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), and d-dimer level were analyzed. Acute Physiological and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, and Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) were performed for all patients. Results There was no difference between groups in terms of serum MR-proADM levels (P=0.780). Serum MR-proADM was not found a significant value for the prediction of death within the 4 and 8 weeks in all patients. SOFA score was the most significant to predict mortality in 4 and 8 weeks (P<0.001). The combination of SOFA score and serum MR-proADM was a strong factor to predict death in 4 weeks (specifity 86.8% and sensitivity 66.7%). The combination of MR-proADM, SOFA score, and APACHE II score was found 75.0% sensitive and 71.4% specific to predict mortality within 4 weeks in group 1. Conclusions The MR-proADM does not correlate with mortality or disease severity to predict mortality. The combination of SOFA, APACHE II scores, and MR-proADM was efficient to predict prognosis and mortality rate in severe sepsis or septic shock patients. PMID:25093088

  9. Severe Pneumonia Associated with Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Outbreak, San Luis Potosí, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Magaña-Aquino, Martin; García-Sepúlveda, Christian A.; Ochoa-Pérez, Uciel R.; Falcón-Escobedo, Reynaldo; Comas-García, Andreu; Aranda-Romo, Saray; Contreras-Treviño, Hugo I.; Jiménez-Rico, Paulina V.; Banda-Barbosa, Mario A.; Dominguez-Paulin, Félix; Bernal-Blanco, J. Mario; Pérez-González, Luis F.; Noyola, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of adults hospitalized with pneumonia during the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak. Patients admitted to a general hospital in San Luis Potosí, Mexico, from April 10 through May 11, 2009, suspected to have influenza virus–associated pneumonia were evaluated. We identified 50 patients with suspected influenza pneumonia; the presence of influenza virus was confirmed in 18: 11 with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, 5 with unsubtypeable influenza A virus, 1 with seasonal influenza A virus (H3N2), and 1 in whom assay results for seasonal and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 viruses were positive. Eighteen patients were treated in the intensive care unit, and 10 died. During the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, severe pneumonia developed in young adults who had no identifiable risk factors; early diagnosis and treatment of influenza virus infections may have a determinant role in outcome. PMID:20031039

  10. Precision medicine for the treatment of severe pneumonia in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Rello, Jordi; Perez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in its management, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains the most important cause of sepsis-related mortality and the reason for many ICU admissions. Severity assessment is the cornerstone of CAP patient management and the attempts to ensure the best site of care and therapy. Survival depends on a combination of host factors (genetic, age, comorbidities, defenses), pathogens (virulence, serotypes) and drugs. To reduce CAP mortality, early adequate antibiotic therapy is fundamental. The use of combination therapy with a macrolide seems to improve the clinical outcome in the subset of patients with high inflammation due to immunomodulation. Guidelines on antibiotic therapy have been associated with beneficial effects, and studies of newer adjunctive drugs have produced promising results. This paper discusses the current state of knowledge regarding of precision medicine and the treatment of severe CAP patients.

  11. Defining community acquired pneumonia severity on presentation to hospital: an international derivation and validation study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, W; van der Eerden, M M; Laing, R; Boersma, W; Karalus, N; Town, G; Lewis, S; Macfarlane, J

    2003-01-01

    Background: In the assessment of severity in community acquired pneumonia (CAP), the modified British Thoracic Society (mBTS) rule identifies patients with severe pneumonia but not patients who might be suitable for home management. A multicentre study was conducted to derive and validate a practical severity assessment model for stratifying adults hospitalised with CAP into different management groups. Methods: Data from three prospective studies of CAP conducted in the UK, New Zealand, and the Netherlands were combined. A derivation cohort comprising 80% of the data was used to develop the model. Prognostic variables were identified using multiple logistic regression with 30 day mortality as the outcome measure. The final model was tested against the validation cohort. Results: 1068 patients were studied (mean age 64 years, 51.5% male, 30 day mortality 9%). Age ⩾65 years (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.6 to 8.0) and albumin <30 g/dl (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.5 to 8.7) were independently associated with mortality over and above the mBTS rule (OR 5.2, 95% CI 2.7 to 10). A six point score, one point for each of Confusion, Urea >7 mmol/l, Respiratory rate ⩾30/min, low systolic(<90 mm Hg) or diastolic (⩽60 mm Hg) Blood pressure), age ⩾65 years (CURB-65 score) based on information available at initial hospital assessment, enabled patients to be stratified according to increasing risk of mortality: score 0, 0.7%; score 1, 3.2%; score 2, 3%; score 3, 17%; score 4, 41.5% and score 5, 57%. The validation cohort confirmed a similar pattern. Conclusions: A simple six point score based on confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and age can be used to stratify patients with CAP into different management groups. PMID:12728155

  12. Inflammatory profiles in severe pneumonia associated with the pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus isolated in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga, Joaquín; Torres, Martha; Romo, Javier; Torres, Diana; Jiménez, Luis; Ramírez, Gustavo; Cruz, Alfredo; Espinosa, Enrique; Herrera, Teresa; Buendía, Ivette; Ramírez-Venegas, Alejandra; González, Yolanda; Bobadilla, Karen; Hernández, Fernando; García, Jorge; Quiñones-Falconi, Francisco; Sada, Eduardo; Manjarrez, María E; Cabello, Carlos; Kawa, Simón; Zlotnik, Albert; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moisés

    2011-11-01

    The immune mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of severe pneumonia associated with the A/H1N1 virus are not well known. The objective of this study was to determine whether severe A/H1N1-associated pneumonia can be explained by the emergence of particular T-cell subsets and the cytokines/chemokines they produced, as well as distinct responses to infection. T-cell subset distribution and cytokine/chemokine levels in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were determined in patients with severe A/H1N1 infection, asymptomatic household contacts, and healthy controls. Cytokine and chemokine production was also evaluated after in vitro infection with seasonal H1N1 and pandemic A/H1N1 strains. We found an increase in the frequency of peripheral Th2 and Tc2 cells in A/H1N1 patients. A trend toward increased Tc1 cells was observed in household contacts. Elevated serum levels of IL-6, CXCL8, and CCL2 were found in patients and a similar cytokine/chemokine profile was observed in BAL, in which CCL5 was also increased. Infection assays revealed that both strains induce the production of several cytokines/chemokines at 24 and 72 h, however, IL-6, CCL3, and CXCL8 were strongly up-regulated in 72-h cultures in presence of the A/H1N1 virus. Several inflammatory mediators are up-regulated in peripheral and lung samples from A/H1N1-infected patients who developed severe pneumonia. In addition, the A/H1N1 strain induces higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines than the seasonal H1N1 strain. These findings suggest that it is possible to identify biomarkers of severe pneumonia and also suggest the therapeutic use of immunomodulatory drugs in patients with severe pneumonia associated with A/H1N1 infection.

  13. Eosinophilic infiltrate in a patient with severe Legionella pneumonia as a levofloxacin-related complication: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Legionella pneumonia can appear with different levels of severity and it can often present with complications such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. Case presentation We report the case of a 44-year-old Caucasian man with Legionella pneumonia with successive development of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. During his stay in intensive care the clinical and radiological situation of the previously observed acute respiratory distress syndrome unexpectedly worsened due to acute pulmonary eosinophilic infiltrate of iatrogenic origin. Conclusion Levofloxacin treatment caused the occurrence of acute eosinophilic infiltrate. Diagnosis was possible following bronchoscopic examination using bronchoaspirate and transbronchial biopsy. PMID:21070648

  14. Semi-automated method to measure pneumonia severity in mice through computed tomography (CT) scan analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johri, Ansh; Schimel, Daniel; Noguchi, Audrey; Hsu, Lewis L.

    2010-03-01

    Imaging is a crucial clinical tool for diagnosis and assessment of pneumonia, but quantitative methods are lacking. Micro-computed tomography (micro CT), designed for lab animals, provides opportunities for non-invasive radiographic endpoints for pneumonia studies. HYPOTHESIS: In vivo micro CT scans of mice with early bacterial pneumonia can be scored quantitatively by semiautomated imaging methods, with good reproducibility and correlation with bacterial dose inoculated, pneumonia survival outcome, and radiologists' scores. METHODS: Healthy mice had intratracheal inoculation of E. coli bacteria (n=24) or saline control (n=11). In vivo micro CT scans were performed 24 hours later with microCAT II (Siemens). Two independent radiologists scored the extent of airspace abnormality, on a scale of 0 (normal) to 24 (completely abnormal). Using the Amira 5.2 software (Mercury Computer Systems), a histogram distribution of voxel counts between the Hounsfield range of -510 to 0 was created and analyzed, and a segmentation procedure was devised. RESULTS: A t-test was performed to determine whether there was a significant difference in the mean voxel value of each mouse in the three experimental groups: Saline Survivors, Pneumonia Survivors, and Pneumonia Non-survivors. It was found that the voxel count method was able to statistically tell apart the Saline Survivors from the Pneumonia Survivors, the Saline Survivors from the Pneumonia Non-survivors, but not the Pneumonia Survivors vs. Pneumonia Non-survivors. The segmentation method, however, was successfully able to distinguish the two Pneumonia groups. CONCLUSION: We have pilot-tested an evaluation of early pneumonia in mice using micro CT and a semi-automated method for lung segmentation and scoring system. Statistical analysis indicates that the system is reliable and merits further evaluation.

  15. Low Rates of Treatment Failure in Children Aged 2–59 Months Treated for Severe Pneumonia: A Multisite Pooled Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Matthew P.; Thea, Donald M.; Sadruddin, Salim; Bari, Abdul; Bonawitz, Rachael; Hazir, Tabish; Bin Nisar, Yasir; Qazi, Shamim A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Despite advances in childhood pneumonia management, it remains a major killer of children worldwide. We sought to estimate global treatment failure rates in children aged 2–59 months with World Health Organization–defined severe pneumonia. Methods. We pooled data from 4 severe pneumonia studies conducted during 1999–2009 using similar methodologies. We defined treatment failure by day 6 as death, danger signs (inability to drink, convulsions, abnormally sleepy), fever (≥38°C) and lower chest indrawing (LCI; days 2–3), LCI (day 6), or antibiotic change. Results. Among 6398 cases of severe pneumonia from 10 countries, 564 (cluster adjusted: 8.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.9%–11.5%) failed treatment by day 6. The most common reasons for clinical failure were persistence of fever and LCI or LCI or fever alone (75% of failures). Seventeen (0.3%) children died. Danger signs were uncommon (<1%). Infants 6–11 months and 2–5 months were 2- and 3.5-fold more likely, respectively, to fail treatment (adjusted OR [AOR], 1.8 [95% CI, 1.4–2.3] and AOR, 3.5 [95% CI, 2.8–4.3]) as children aged 12–59 months. Failure was increased 7-fold (AOR, 7.2 [95% CI, 5.0–10.5]) when comparing infants 2–5 months with very fast breathing to children 12–59 months with normal breathing. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate that severe pneumonia case management with antibiotics at health facilities or in the community is associated with few serious morbidities or deaths across diverse geographic settings and support moves to shift management of severe pneumonia with oral antibiotics to outpatients in the community. PMID:23264361

  16. Pneumonia Virus of Mice Severe Respiratory Virus Infection in a Natural Host

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Helene F.; Domachowske, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    Pneumonia virus of mice (PVM; family Paramyxoviridae, genus Pneumovirus) is a natural mouse pathogen that is closely related to the human and bovine respiratory syncytial viruses. Among the prominent features of this infection, robust replication of PVM takes place in bronchial epithelial cells in response to a minimal virus inoculum. Virus replication in situ results in local production of proinflammatory cytokines (MIP-1α, MIP-2, MCP-1 and IFNγ) and granulocyte recruitment to the lung. If left unchecked, PVM infection and the ensuing inflammatory response ultimately lead to pulmonary edema, respiratory compromise and death. In this review, we consider the recent studies using the PVM model that have provided important insights into the role of the inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of severe respiratory virus infection. We also highlight several works that have elucidated acquired immune responses to this pathogen, including T cell responses and the development of humoral immunity. Finally, we consider several immunomodulatory strategies that have been used successfully to reduce morbidity and mortality when administered to PVM infected, symptomatic mice, and thus hold promise as realistic therapeutic strategies for severe respiratory virus infections in human subjects. PMID:18471897

  17. Aspiration pneumonia-induced sepsis increases cardiac dysfunction after burn trauma.

    PubMed

    Sheeran, P W; Maass, D L; White, D J; Turbeville, T D; Giroir, B P; Horton, J W

    1998-05-01

    with aspiration pneumonia-induced sepsis than in animals with either burn alone or aspiration pneumonia-induced sepsis alone. While our data suggest that elevated circulating TNF-alpha levels may contribute, in part, to depressed cardiac function, further studies are needed to fully define the mechanisms underlying cardiac contractile deficits in this model. We speculate that depressed cardiopulmonary function due to burn complicated by pneumonia and sepsis contributes to the high mortality of this patient population.

  18. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae - A Primary Cause of Severe Pneumonia Epizootics in the Norwegian Muskox (Ovibos moschatus) Population

    PubMed Central

    Handeland, Kjell; Tengs, Torstein; Kokotovic, Branko; Vikøren, Turid; Ayling, Roger D.; Bergsjø, Bjarne; Sigurðardóttir, Ólöf G.; Bretten, Tord

    2014-01-01

    The Norwegian muskox (Ovibos moschatus) population lives on the high mountain plateau of Dovre and originates from animals introduced from Greenland. In the late summers of 2006 and 2012, severe outbreaks of pneumonia with mortality rates of 25-30% occurred. During the 2012 epidemic high quality samples from culled sick animals were obtained for microbiological and pathological examinations. High throughput sequencing (pyrosequencing) of pneumonic lung tissue revealed high concentrations of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in all six animals examined by this method and Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida in four animals, whereas no virus sequences could be identified. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and P. multocida multocida were also isolated by culture. Using real time PCR on lung swabs, M. ovipneumoniae was detected in all of the 19 pneumonic lungs examined. Gross pathological examination revealed heavy consolidations primarily in the cranial parts of the lungs and it also identified one case of otitis media. Histologically, lung lesions were characterized as acute to subacute mixed exudative and moderately proliferative bronchoalveolar pneumonia. Immunohistochemical (IHC) examination revealed high load of M. ovipneumoniae antigens within lung lesions, with particularly intensive staining in the neutrophils. Similar IHC finding were observed in archived lung tissue blocks from animals examined during the 2006 epidemic. An M. ovipneumoniae specific ELISA was applied on bio-banked muskox sera from stray muskoxen killed in the period 2004–2013 and sick muskoxen culled, as well as sera from wild reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) on Dovre and muskoxen from Greenland. Serology and mycoplasma culturing was also carried out on sheep that had been on pasture in the muskox area during the outbreak in 2012. Our findings indicated separate introductions of M. ovipneumoniae infection in 2006 and 2012 from infected co-grazing sheep. Salt licks shared by the two species were a

  19. R-roscovitine reduces lung inflammation induced by lipoteichoic acid and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hoogendijk, Arie J; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Duitman, Janwillem; van Lieshout, Miriam H P; Blok, Dana C; van der Poll, Tom; Wieland, Catharina W

    2012-09-25

    Bacterial pneumonia remains associated with high morbidity and mortality. The gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important proinflammatory component of the gram-positive bacterial cell wall. R-roscovitine, a purine analog, is a potent cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-1, -2, -5 and -7 inhibitor that has the ability to inhibit the cell cycle and to induce polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) apoptosis. We sought to investigate the effect of R-roscovitine on LTA-induced activation of cell lines with relevance for lung inflammation in vitro and on lung inflammation elicited by either LTA or viable S. pneumoniae in vivo. In vitro R-roscovitine enhanced apoptosis in PMNs and reduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) production in MH-S (alveolar macrophage) and MLE-12/MLE-15 (respiratory epithelial) cell lines. In vivo R-roscovitine treatment reduced PMN numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid during LTA-induced lung inflammation; this effect was reversed by inhibiting apoptosis. Postponed treatment with R-roscovitine (24 and 72 h) diminished PMN numbers in lung tissue during gram-positive pneumonia; this step was associated with a transient increase in pulmonary bacterial loads. R-roscovitine inhibits proinflammatory responses induced by the gram-positive stimuli LTA and S. pneumoniae. R-roscovitine reduces PMN numbers in lungs upon LTA administration by enhancing apoptosis. The reduction in PMN numbers caused by R-roscovitine during S. pneumoniae pneumonia may hamper antibacterial defense.

  20. Differences in antibiotic-induced oxidative stress responses between laboratory and clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Bédis; Lupien, Andréanne; Bergeron, Michel G; Leprohon, Philippe; Ouellette, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Oxidants were shown to contribute to the lethality of bactericidal antibiotics in different bacterial species, including the laboratory strain Streptococcus pneumoniae R6. Resistance to penicillin among S. pneumoniae R6 mutants was further shown to protect against the induction of oxidants upon exposure to unrelated bactericidal compounds. In the work described here, we expanded on these results by studying the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in the context of antibiotic sensitivity and resistance by including S. pneumoniae clinical isolates. In S. pneumoniae R6, penicillin, ciprofloxacin, and kanamycin but not the bacteriostatic linezolid, erythromycin, or tetracycline induced the accumulation of reactive oxygen species. For the three bactericidal compounds, resistance to a single molecule prevented the accumulation of oxidants upon exposure to unrelated bactericidal antibiotics, and this was accompanied by a reduced lethality. This phenomenon does not involve target site mutations but most likely implicates additional mutations occurring early during the selection of resistance to increase survival while more efficient resistance mechanisms are being selected or acquired. Bactericidal antibiotics also induced oxidants in sensitive S. pneumoniae clinical isolates. The importance of oxidants in the lethality of bactericidal antibiotics was less clear than for S. pneumoniae R6, however, since ciprofloxacin induced oxidants even in ciprofloxacin-resistant S. pneumoniae clinical isolates. Our results provide a clear example of the complex nature of the mode of action of antibiotics. The adaptive approach to oxidative stress of S. pneumoniae is peculiar, and a better understanding of the mechanism implicated in response to oxidative injury should also help clarify the role of oxidants induced by antibiotics.

  1. Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kist, M.; Koester, H.; Bredt, W.

    1985-06-01

    Precultured guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AM) and freshly harvested alveolar cells (FHAC) activated by interaction with Mycoplasma pneumoniae were cytotoxic for xenogeneic /sup 75/selenomethionine-labeled tumor target cells. Phagocytosis of whole opsonized or nonopsonized M. pneumoniae cells was more effective in eliciting cytotoxicity than uptake of sonicated microorganisms. The addition of living mycoplasma cells to the assay system enhanced the cytotoxic effect considerably. Target cells were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxic action of phagocytes if they were coated with mycoplasma antigen or cocultured together with M. pneumoniae. The activation of the phagocytes could be inhibited by 2-deoxy-D-glucose but not by antimicrobial substances suppressing mycoplasma protein synthesis. It was accompanied by /sup 51/Cr release without detectable signs of cell damage. The supernatants of activated cells were cytotoxic for approximately 24 h. Inhibition, release, and cytotoxic activity indicate the necessity of an intact metabolism of the effector cells and suggest a secretion of cytotoxic substances.

  2. Plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor does not prevent mechanical ventilation-induced pulmonary complement activation in a rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de Beer, F M; Aslami, H; Hoeksma, J; van Mierlo, G; Wouters, D; Zeerleder, S; Roelofs, J J T H; Juffermans, N P; Schultz, M J; Lagrand, W K

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical ventilation has the potential to cause lung injury, and the role of complement activation herein is uncertain. We hypothesized that inhibition of the complement cascade by administration of plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) prevents ventilation-induced pulmonary complement activation, and as such attenuates lung inflammation and lung injury in a rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. Forty hours after intratracheal challenge with S. pneumoniae causing pneumonia rats were subjected to ventilation with lower tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or high tidal volumes without PEEP, after an intravenous bolus of C1-INH (200 U/kg) or placebo (saline). After 4 h of ventilation blood, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were collected. Non-ventilated rats with S. pneumoniae pneumonia served as controls. While ventilation with lower tidal volumes and PEEP slightly amplified pneumonia-induced complement activation in the lungs, ventilation with higher tidal volumes without PEEP augmented local complement activation more strongly. Systemic pre-treatment with C1-INH, however, failed to alter ventilation-induced complement activation with both ventilation strategies. In accordance, lung inflammation and lung injury were not affected by pre-treatment with C1-INH, neither in rats ventilated with lower tidal volumes and PEEP, nor rats ventilated with high tidal volumes without PEEP. Ventilation augments pulmonary complement activation in a rat model of S. pneumoniae pneumonia. Systemic administration of C1-INH, however, does not attenuate ventilation-induced complement activation, lung inflammation, and lung injury.

  3. Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia with Bacteremia Caused by Herbaspirillum aquaticum or Herbaspirillum huttiense in an Immune-Competent Adult

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, Joanna; Smith, L. Patrick; Salzer, William

    2015-01-01

    Herbaspirillum spp. are Gram-negative bacteria that inhabit soil and water. Infections caused by these organisms have been reported in immunocompromised hosts. We describe severe community-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by Herbaspirillum aquaticum or H. huttiense in an immunocompetent adult male. PMID:26179298

  4. Characterisation of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) isolates from an outbreak with haemorrhagic enteritis and severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yeşilbağ, Kadir; Förster, Christine; Ozyiğit, M Ozgür; Alpay, Gizem; Tuncer, Pelin; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen; König, Matthias

    2014-02-21

    During 2007 a disease outbreak occurred in cattle in the Marmara region of western Turkey characterised by severe pneumonia and haemorrhagic enteritis in calves. Cases from three farms at different locations were examined and bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) isolated in all cases. Phylogenetic characterisation of the virus isolates allocated them in a new cluster tentatively named as BVDV-1r.

  5. Soluble RAGE as a severity marker in community acquired pneumonia associated sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is considered the most important cause of death from infectious disease in developed countries. Severity assessment scores partially address the difficulties in identifying high-risk patients. A lack of specific and valid pathophysiologic severity markers affect early and effective sepsis therapy. HMGB-1, sRAGE and RAGE have been involved in sepsis and their potential as severity markers has been proposed. The aim of this study was to evaluate HMGB-1, RAGE and sRAGE levels in patients with CAP-associated sepsis and determine their possible association with clinical outcome. Method We evaluated 33 patients with CAP-associated sepsis admitted to the emergency room and followed in the medical wards. Severity assessment scores (CURB-65, PSI, APACHE II, SOFA) and serologic markers (HMGB-1, RAGE, sRAGE) were evaluated on admission. Results Thirty patients with a diagnosis of CAP-associated sepsis were enrolled in the study within 24 hours after admission. Fourteen (46.6%) had pandemic (H1N1) influenza A virus, 2 (6.6%) had seasonal influenza A and 14 other diagnoses. Of the patients in the study group, 16 (53.3%) had a fatal outcome. ARDS was observed in 17 (56.6%) and a total of 22 patients had severe sepsis on admission (73%). The SOFA score showed the greatest difference between surviving and non-surviving groups (P = .003) with similar results in ARDS patients (P = .005). sRAGE levels tended to be higher in non-surviving (P = .058) and ARDS patients (P = .058). Logistic regression modeling demonstrated that SOFA (P = .013) and sRAGE (P = .05) were the only variables that modified the probability of a fatal outcome. Conclusion The association of elevated sRAGE with a fatal outcome suggests that it may have an independent causal effect in CAP. SOFA scores were the only clinical factor with the ability to identify surviving and ARDS patients. PMID:22264245

  6. Serum levels of immunoglobulins and severity of community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Mari C; Torán, Pere; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Palomera, Elisabet; Güell, Estel; Vendrell, Ester; Yébenes, Joan Carles; Torres, Antoni; Almirall, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Instruction There is evidence of a relationship between severity of infection and inflammatory response of the immune system. The objective is to assess serum levels of immunoglobulins and to establish its relationship with severity of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and clinical outcome. Methods This was an observational and cross-sectional study in which 3 groups of patients diagnosed with CAP were compared: patients treated in the outpatient setting (n=54), patients requiring in-patient care (hospital ward) (n=173), and patients requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) (n=191). Results Serum total IgG (and IgG subclasses IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4), IgA and IgM were measured at the first clinical visit. Normal cutpoints were defined as the lowest value obtained in controls (≤680, ≤323, ≤154, ≤10, ≤5, ≤30 and ≤50 mg/dL for total IgG, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, IgM and IgA, respectively). Serum immunoglobulin levels decreased in relation to severity of CAP. Low serum levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 showed a relationship with ICU admission. Low serum level of total IgG was independently associated with ICU admission (OR=2.45, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.2, p=0.002), adjusted by the CURB-65 severity score and comorbidities (chronic respiratory and heart diseases). Low levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 were significantly associated with 30-day mortality. Conclusions Patients with severe CAP admitted to the ICU showed lower levels of immunoglobulins than non-ICU patients and this increased mortality. PMID:27933180

  7. Mesalazine-induced eosinophilic pneumonia with bone marrow infiltration: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunjian; Luo, Ling; Wang, Xiaofang; Liu, Xiaoyang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Ding, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Mesalazine-induced eosinophilic pneumonia has been rarely reported. We reported a case of mesalazine-induced eosinophilic pneumonia in a 56-year-old female who took mesalazine without a prescription for suspected ulcerative colitis. She had an elevated eosinophil count in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Eosinophil infiltration was also noted in bone marrow aspirates. Chest radiograph and computed tomography demonstrated bilateral upper lung predominant infiltrates and spirometry showed a restrictive ventilatory defect with a reduced diffusion capacity. The patient recovered after cessation of mesalazine therapy. Mesalazine-induced lung damage should be considered in patients who develop unexplained respiratory symptoms while taking this agent. PMID:27366075

  8. Smoking-Induced Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia in a 15-year-old Girl: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Ji-Seok; Kwon, Ji-Won; Kim, Byoung-Ju

    2010-01-01

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia is a very rare disease that is characterized by acute febrile respiratory failure, diffuse bilateral infiltrates on chest X-ray, and eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in the absence of infection. We present the case of a 15-year-old girl diagnosed with smoking-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia. A previously healthy young girl with a 1-day history of fever presented with cough, dyspnea, and diffuse bilateral infiltrates on chest X-ray. She had started smoking only 3 weeks before presentation. She was diagnosed by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid tests and lung biopsy and dramatically improved after steroid treatment. We emphasize that acute eosinophilic pneumonia must be considered when acute pneumonia does not respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics. Effective treatment and prompt institution of therapy can obviate unnecessary morbidity and mortality. PMID:20358030

  9. Emergency treatment and nursing of children with severe pneumonia complicated by heart failure and respiratory failure: 10 case reports

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanli; An, Xinjiang; Fu, Mingyu; Li, Chunli

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia refers to lung inflammation caused by different pathogens or other factors, and is a common pediatric disease occurring in infants and young children. It is closely related to the anatomical and physiological characteristics of infants and young children and is more frequent during winter and spring, or sudden changes in temperature. Pneumonia is a serious disease that poses a threat to children's health and its morbidity and mortality rank first, accounting for 24.5–65.2% of pediatric inpatients. Due to juvenile age, severe illness and rapid changes, children often suffer acute heart failure, respiratory failure and even toxic encephalopathy at the same time. The concurrence in different stages of the process of emergency treatment tends to relapse, which directly places the lives of these children at risk. Severe pneumonia constitutes one of the main causes of infant mortality. In the process of nursing children with severe pneumonia, intensive care was provided, including condition assessment and diagnosis, close observation of disease, keeping the airway unblocked, rational oxygen therapy, prevention and treatment of respiratory and circulatory failure, support of vital organs, complications, and health education. The inflammatory response was proactively controlled, to prevent suffocation and reduce mortality. In summary, positive and effective nursing can promote the rehabilitation of children patients, which can be reinforced with adequate communication with the parents and/or caretakers. PMID:27698703

  10. Emergency treatment and nursing of children with severe pneumonia complicated by heart failure and respiratory failure: 10 case reports.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanli; An, Xinjiang; Fu, Mingyu; Li, Chunli

    2016-10-01

    Pneumonia refers to lung inflammation caused by different pathogens or other factors, and is a common pediatric disease occurring in infants and young children. It is closely related to the anatomical and physiological characteristics of infants and young children and is more frequent during winter and spring, or sudden changes in temperature. Pneumonia is a serious disease that poses a threat to children's health and its morbidity and mortality rank first, accounting for 24.5-65.2% of pediatric inpatients. Due to juvenile age, severe illness and rapid changes, children often suffer acute heart failure, respiratory failure and even toxic encephalopathy at the same time. The concurrence in different stages of the process of emergency treatment tends to relapse, which directly places the lives of these children at risk. Severe pneumonia constitutes one of the main causes of infant mortality. In the process of nursing children with severe pneumonia, intensive care was provided, including condition assessment and diagnosis, close observation of disease, keeping the airway unblocked, rational oxygen therapy, prevention and treatment of respiratory and circulatory failure, support of vital organs, complications, and health education. The inflammatory response was proactively controlled, to prevent suffocation and reduce mortality. In summary, positive and effective nursing can promote the rehabilitation of children patients, which can be reinforced with adequate communication with the parents and/or caretakers.

  11. Probiotics: Prevention of Severe Pneumonia and Endotracheal Colonization Trial (PROSPECT): A Feasibility Clinical Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP); Other Infections; Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea; C-Difficile; Duration of Mechanical Ventilation; Length of ICU Stay; Length of Hospital Stay; ICU and Hospital Mortality

  12. Using Data-Driven Rules to Predict Mortality in Severe Community Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuang; Rosenfeld, Roni; Clermont, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of patient-centered outcomes in hospitals is useful for performance benchmarking, resource allocation, and guidance regarding active treatment and withdrawal of care. Yet, their use by clinicians is limited by the complexity of available tools and amount of data required. We propose to use Disjunctive Normal Forms as a novel approach to predict hospital and 90-day mortality from instance-based patient data, comprising demographic, genetic, and physiologic information in a large cohort of patients admitted with severe community acquired pneumonia. We develop two algorithms to efficiently learn Disjunctive Normal Forms, which yield easy-to-interpret rules that explicitly map data to the outcome of interest. Disjunctive Normal Forms achieve higher prediction performance quality compared to a set of state-of-the-art machine learning models, and unveils insights unavailable with standard methods. Disjunctive Normal Forms constitute an intuitive set of prediction rules that could be easily implemented to predict outcomes and guide criteria-based clinical decision making and clinical trial execution, and thus of greater practical usefulness than currently available prediction tools. The Java implementation of the tool JavaDNF will be publicly available. PMID:24699007

  13. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells prevent cigarette smoke and Chlamydophila pneumoniae-induced Th2 inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Gray, Pearl; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2010-10-01

    Smoking promotes the development of allergic asthma and pneumonia. Chlamydophila pneumoniae lung infection is associated with an increased risk for asthma, inducing an immune response regulated by dendritic cells (DCs). This study sought to determine whether exposure to cigarette smoke modulates the functional activity of CD11c-positive DCs in the lung, with and without concomitant C. pneumoniae infection. Bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) were exposed in vitro to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and/or live C. pneumoniae (Cpn), and then adoptively transferred intratracheally into wild-type mice. Although CSE plus Cpn appeared to exert an additive effect on the production of Th2 cytokines in vitro, we did not see this effect in vivo. However, the adoptive transfer of DCs pulsed with both CSE and C. pneumoniae into the lungs of naive mice led to an influx of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) that suppressed the Th2 skewing ability of the transferred BMDCs. The depletion of pDCs by antibody restored the Th2 skewing ability of the BMDCs. The expression of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase in the lung was reduced after the depletion of pDCs, and blocking IFN-α in vitro prevented the ability of pDCs to inhibit the Th2 responses induced by myeloid DCs (mDCs), suggesting their potential involvement in the mechanism of altered polarization. In conclusion, exposure to cigarette smoke skews C. pneumoniae-induced mDCs responses toward a Th2 bias in the lung, which is prevented by pDCs. We propose that pDCs may play a major role in the immunosuppressive lung environment in smokers with C. pneumoniae infection.

  14. Viral Infection Is Not Uncommon in Adult Patients with Severe Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hyo-Lim; Hong, Sang-Bum; Ko, Gwang-Beom; Huh, Jin Won; Sung, Heungsup; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Han; Lee, Sang-Oh; Kim, Mi-Na; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Lim, Chae-Man; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Koh, Younsuck; Choi, Sang-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background Viral pathogens have not generally been regarded as important causes of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), except in patients with hematologic malignancy or transplant recipients. We investigated the role and distribution of viruses in adult with severe HAP who required intensive care. Methods From March 2010 to February 2012, adult patients with severe HAP required admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), 28-bed medical ICU in a tertiary care hospital, were prospectively enrolled. Respiratory viruses were detected using multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and/or shell vial culture. Results A total of 262 patients were enrolled and 107 patients (40.8%) underwent bronchoscopic BAL for etiologic diagnosis. One hundred and fifty-six patients (59.5%) had bacterial infections and 59 patients (22.5%) had viral infections. Viruses were detected in BAL fluid specimens of 37 patients (62.7%, 37/59). The most commonly identified viruses were respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus (both 27.1%, 16/59), followed by rhinovirus (25.4%, 15/59), and influenza virus (16.9%, 10/59). Twenty-one patients (8.0%, 21/262) had bacterial-viral coinfections and Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly coexisting bacteria (n = 10). Viral infection in non-immunocompromised patients was not uncommon (11.1%, 16/143), although it was not as frequent as that in immunocompromised patients (36.4%, 43/119). Non-immunocompromised patients were significantly older than immunocompromised patients and had significantly higher rates of underlying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, tuberculous destroyed lung and chronic kidney disease. The 28 day mortalities of patients with bacterial infections, viral infections and bacterial-viral coinfections were not significantly different (29.5%, 35.6% and 19.0%, respectively; p = 0.321). Conclusions Viral pathogens are not uncommon in adult patients with severe HAP who required ICU admission

  15. Diagnosis of Tuberculosis Following World Health Organization–Recommended Criteria in Severely Malnourished Children Presenting With Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2017-01-01

    Evidences on diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) following the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) are lacking. We sought to evaluate the WHO criteria for the diagnosis of TB in such children. In this prospective study, we enrolled SAM children aged <5 with radiological pneumonia. We collected induced sputum and gastric lavage for smear microscopy, mycobacterial culture, and Xpert MTB/RIF. Using the last 2 methods as the gold standard, we determined sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of WHO criteria (n = 388). However, Xpert MTB/RIF was performed on the last 214 children. Compared to mycobacterial culture–confirmed TB, sensitivity and specificity (95% confidence interval) of WHO criteria were 40 (14% to 73%) and 84 (80% to 87%), respectively. Compared to culture- and/or Xpert MTB/RIF-confirmed TB, the values were 22% (9% to 43%) and 83 (79% to 87%), respectively. Thus, the good specificity of the WHO criteria may help minimize overtreatment with anti-TB therapy in SAM children, especially in resource-limited settings. PMID:28229100

  16. Klebsiella pneumoniae alleviates influenza-induced acute lung injury via limiting NK cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Li, Fengqi; Sun, Rui; Gao, Xiang; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2014-08-01

    A protective effect induced by bacterial preinfection upon a subsequent lethal influenza virus infection has been observed, but the underlying immune mechanisms have not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we used a mouse model of Klebsiella pneumoniae preinfection to gain insight into how bacterial preinfection influences the subsequent lethal influenza virus infection. We found that K. pneumoniae preinfection significantly attenuated lung immune injury and decreased mortality during influenza virus infection, but K. pneumoniae-specific immunity was not involved in this cross-protection against influenza virus. K. pneumoniae preinfection limited NK cell expansion, which was involved in influenza-induced immune injury and death. Furthermore, K. pneumoniae preinfection could not control NK cell expansion and death during influenza virus infection in Rag1(-/-) mice, but adoptive transfer of T cells from wild-type mice was able to restore this protective effect. Our data suggest that the adaptive immune response activated by bacterial infection limits the excessive innate immune response induced by a subsequent influenza infection, ultimately protecting mice from death.

  17. Phenotyping community-acquired pneumonia according to the presence of acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory failure (ARF) and severe sepsis (SS) are possible complications in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The aim of the study was to evaluate prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and impact on mortality of hospitalized patients with CAP according to the presence of ARF and SS on admission. Methods This was a multicenter, observational, prospective study of consecutive CAP patients admitted to three hospitals in Italy, Spain, and Scotland between 2008 and 2010. Three groups of patients were identified: those with neither ARF nor SS (Group A), those with only ARF (Group B) and those with both ARF and SS (Group C) on admission. Results Among the 2,145 patients enrolled, 45% belonged to Group A, 36% to Group B and 20% to Group C. Patients in Group C were more severe than patients in Group B. Isolated ARF was correlated with age (p < 0.001), COPD (p < 0.001) and multilobar infiltrates (p < 0.001). The contemporary occurrence of ARF and SS was associated with age (p = 0.002), residency in nursing home (p = 0.007), COPD (p < 0.001), multilobar involvement (p < 0.001) and renal disease (p < 0.001). 4.2% of patients in Group A died, 9.3% in Group B and 26% in Group C, p < 0.001. After adjustment, the presence of only ARF had an OR for in-hospital mortality of 1.85 (p = 0.011) and the presence of both ARF and SS had an OR of 6.32 (p < 0.001). Conclusions The identification of ARF and SS on hospital admission can help physicians in classifying CAP patients into three different clinical phenotypes. PMID:24593040

  18. Potentially Modifiable Factors Associated with Death of Infants and Children with Severe Pneumonia Routinely Managed in District Hospitals in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Enarson, Penelope M.; Gie, Robert P.; Mwansambo, Charles C.; Chalira, Alfred E.; Lufesi, Norman N.; Maganga, Ellubey R.; Enarson, Donald A.; Cameron, Neil A.; Graham, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate recognised co-morbidities and clinical management associated with inpatient pneumonia mortality in Malawian district hospitals. Methods Prospective cohort study, of patient records, carried out in Malawi between 1st October 2000 and 30th June 2003. The study included all children aged 0-59 months admitted to the paediatric wards in sixteen district hospitals throughout Malawi with severe and very severe pneumonia. We compared individual factors between those that survived (n = 14 076) and those that died (n = 1 633). Results From logistic regression analysis, predictors of death in hospital, adjusted for age, sex and severity grade included comorbid conditions of meningitis (OR =2.49, 95% CI 1.50-4.15), malnutrition (OR =2.37, 95% CI 1.94-2.88) and severe anaemia (OR =1.41, 95% CI 1.03-1.92). Requiring supplementary oxygen (OR =2.16, 95% CI 1.85-2.51) and intravenous fluids (OR =3.02, 95% CI 2.13-4.28) were associated with death while blood transfusion was no longer significant (OR =1.10, 95% CI 0.77-1.57) when the model included severe anaemia. Conclusions This study identified a number of challenges to improve outcome for Malawian infants and children hospitalised with pneumonia. These included improved assessment of co-morbidities and more rigorous application of standard case management. PMID:26237222

  19. Characteristic of the Oxidative Stress in Blood of Patients in Dependence of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Severity

    PubMed Central

    Muravlyova, Larissa; Molotov–Luchankiy, Vilen; Bakirova, Ryszhan; Klyuyev, Dmitriy; Demidchik, Ludmila; Lee, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At the present time the alternation of the oxidative metabolism is considered as one of the leading pathogenic mechanisms in the development and progression of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However the nature and direction of the oxidative protein changes in CAP patient’s blood had been almost unexplored. AIM: To define oxidative and modified proteins in erythrocytes and blood plasma of CAP patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Blood plasma and erythrocytes obtained from: 42 patients with moderate severity pneumonia, 12 patients with grave severity pneumonia and 32 healthy volunteers. Content of advanced oxidation protein products, malondialdehyde and reactive carbonyl derivatives were estimated as indicators of the oxidative stress and oxidative damage of proteins. RESULTS: In patients with grave severity the level of oxidative proteins and MDA in erythrocytes exceeded both: control values and similar meanings in CAP patients with moderate severity. The further growth of MDA in this group patients’ blood plasma was observed, but the level of oxidative proteins decreased in comparison with those in CAP patients with moderate severity. CONCLUSION: To sum up, our derived data show, that injury of erythrocytes’ redox-status and blood plasma components plays an essential role in development and progression CAP. PMID:27275344

  20. Pneumolysin expression by streptococcus pneumoniae protects colonized mice from influenza virus-induced disease.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Amaya I; Strauman, Maura C; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Williams, Katie L; Osborne, Lisa C; Shen, Hao; Liu, Qin; Garlick, David; Artis, David; Hensley, Scott E; Caton, Andrew J; Weiser, Jeffrey N; Erikson, Jan

    2014-08-01

    The response to influenza virus (IAV) infection and severity of disease is highly variable in humans. We hypothesized that one factor contributing to this variability is the presence of specific respiratory tract (RT) microbes. One such microbe is Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) that is carried asymptomatically in the RT of many humans. In a mouse co-infection model we found that in contrast to secondary bacterial infection that exacerbates disease, Sp colonization 10 days prior to IAV protects from virus-induced morbidity and lung pathology. Using mutant Sp strains, we identified a critical role for the bacterial virulence factor pneumolysin (PLY) in mediating this protection. Colonization with the PLY-sufficient Sp strain induces expression of the immune-suppressive enzyme arginase 1 in alveolar macrophages (aMø) and correlates with attenuated recruitment and function of pulmonary inflammatory cells. Our study demonstrates a novel role for PLY in Sp-mediated protection by maintaining aMø as "gatekeepers" against virus-induced immunopathology.

  1. Expanded CURB-65: a new score system predicts severity of community-acquired pneumonia with superior efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-liang; Xu, Feng; Hui Zhou; Wu, Xue-jie; Shi, Ling-xian; Lu, Rui-qing; Farcomeni, Alessio; Venditti, Mario; Zhao, Ying-li; Luo, Shu-ya; Dong, Xiao-jun; Falcone, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to develop a new simpler and more effective severity score for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. A total of 1640 consecutive hospitalized CAP patients in Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University were included. The effectiveness of different pneumonia severity scores to predict mortality was compared, and the performance of the new score was validated on an external cohort of 1164 patients with pneumonia admitted to a teaching hospital in Italy. Using age ≥ 65 years, LDH > 230 u/L, albumin < 3.5 g/dL, platelet count < 100 × 109/L, confusion, urea > 7 mmol/L, respiratory rate ≥ 30/min, low blood pressure, we assembled a new severity score named as expanded-CURB-65. The 30-day mortality and length of stay were increased along with increased risk score. The AUCs in the prediction of 30-day mortality in the main cohort were 0.826 (95% CI, 0.807–0.844), 0.801 (95% CI, 0.781–0.820), 0.756 (95% CI, 0.735–0.777), 0.793 (95% CI, 0.773–0.813) and 0.759 (95% CI, 0.737–0.779) for the expanded-CURB-65, PSI, CURB-65, SMART-COP and A-DROP, respectively. The performance of this bedside score was confirmed in CAP patients of the validation cohort although calibration was not successful in patients with health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP). The expanded CURB-65 is objective, simpler and more accurate scoring system for evaluation of CAP severity, and the predictive efficiency was better than other score systems. PMID:26987602

  2. Semi-recumbent body position fails to prevent healthcare-associated pneumonia in Vietnamese patients with severe tetanus.

    PubMed

    Loan, Huynh Thi; Parry, Janet; Nga, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Yen, Lam Minh; Binh, Nguyen Thien; Thuy, Tran Thi Diem; Duong, Nguyen Minh; Campbell, James I; Thwaites, Louise; Farrar, Jeremy J; Parry, Christopher M

    2012-02-01

    Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) is a common complication in patients with severe tetanus. Nursing tetanus patients in a semi-recumbent body position could reduce the incidence of HCAP. In a randomised controlled trial we compared the occurrence of HCAP in patients with severe tetanus nursed in a semi-recumbent (30°) or supine position. A total of 229 adults and children (aged ≥1 year) with severe tetanus admitted to hospital in Vietnam, were randomly assigned to a supine (n=112) or semi-recumbent (n=117) position. For patients maintaining their assigned positions and in hospital for>48h there was no significant difference between the two groups in the frequency of clinically suspected pneumonia [22/106 (20.8%) vs 26/104 (25.0%); p=0.464], pneumonia rate/1000 intensive care unit days (13.9 vs 14.6; p=0.48) and pneumonia rate/1000 ventilated days (39.2 vs 38.1; p=0.72). Mortality in the supine patients was 11/112 (9.8%) compared with 17/117 (14.5%) in the semi-recumbent patients (p=0.277). The overall complication rate [57/112 (50.9%) vs 76/117 (65.0%); p=0.03] and need for tracheostomy [51/112 (45.5%) vs 69/117 (58.9%); p=0.04) was greater in semi-recumbent patients. Semi-recumbent body positioning did not prevent the occurrence of HCAP in severe tetanus patients.

  3. Pneumococcal Surface Protein A Plays a Major Role in Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Saumyaa; Pujanauski, Lindsey; Colino, Jesus; Flora, Michael; Torres, Raul M; Tuomanen, Elaine; Snapper, Clifford M

    2016-05-01

    Intact, inactivated Streptococcus pneumoniae [including the unencapsulated S. pneumoniae, serotype 2 strain (R36A)] markedly inhibits the humoral immune response to coimmunized heterologous proteins, a property not observed with several other intact Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we determined the nature of this immunosuppressive property. Because phosphorylcholine (PC), a major haptenic component of teichoic acid in the S. pneumoniae cell wall, and lipoteichoic acid in the S. pneumoniae membrane were previously reported to be immunosuppressive when derived from filarial parasites, we determined whether R36A lacking PC (R36A(pc-)) was inhibitory. Indeed, although R36A(pc-) exhibited a markedly reduced level of inhibition of the IgG response to coimmunized chicken OVA (cOVA), no inhibition was observed when using several other distinct PC-expressing bacteria or a soluble, protein-PC conjugate. Further, treatment of R36A with periodate, which selectively destroys PC residues, had no effect on R36A-mediated inhibition. Because R36A(pc-) also lacks choline-binding proteins (CBPs) that require PC for cell wall attachment, and because treatment of R36A with trypsin eliminated its inhibitory activity, we incubated R36A in choline chloride, which selectively strips CBPs from its surface. R36A lacking CBPs lost most of its inhibitory property, whereas the supernatant of choline chloride-treated R36A, containing CBPs, was markedly inhibitory. Coimmunization studies using cOVA and various S. pneumoniae mutants, each genetically deficient in one of the CBPs, demonstrated that only S. pneumoniae lacking the CBP pneumococcal surface protein A lost its ability to inhibit the IgG anti-cOVA response. These results strongly suggest that PspA plays a major role in mediating the immunosuppressive property of S. pneumoniae.

  4. [A case of sho-seiryu-to-induced pneumonia with a marked increase in peripheral eosinophils].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Taku; Higa, Mariko; Takahashi, Miki; Saito, Sayoko; Kikuchi, Naoshi; Yamamuro, Wataru

    2006-08-01

    A 25-year-old woman presented with a high temperature, cough and dyspnea three days after taking sho-seiryu-to, a Chinese herbal preparation, for a cough and throat pain. A chest X-ray film and computed tomography (CT) scan revealed diffuse infiltrative shadows in both the middle and lower lung fields. Arterial blood gas analysis showed hypoxemia (PaO2 43Torr under room air). The white cell count was 40,800/mm3, with eosinophilic cells accounting for 56.5% of the cells. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone under a diagnosis of drug-induced pneumonia and the administration of sho-seiryu-to was discontinued. Immediately after the prednisolone administration, her chest X-ray film findings, clinical symptoms and laboratory data markedly improved. A lymphocyte stimulation test for sho-seiryu-to using peripheral lymphocytes was positive. In 29 cases of herbal medicine-induced pneumonia reported in Japanese medical literature over a 10-year period, sho-saiko-to has been the predominant cause of drug-induced pneumonia. This is the second case of sho-seiryu-to-induced pneumonia.

  5. Recurrent sclerema in a young infant presenting with severe sepsis and severe pneumonia: an uncommon but extremely life-threatening condition.

    PubMed

    Afroze, Farzana; Pietroni, Mark A C; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer

    2013-12-01

    A one month and twenty-five days old baby girl with problems of acute watery diarrhoea, severe dehydration, severe malnutrition, and reduced activity was admitted to the gastrointestinal unit of Dhaka Hospital of icddr,b. The differentials included dehydration, dyselectrolytaemia and severe sepsis. She was treated following the protocolized management guidelines of the hospital. However, within the next 24 hours, the patient deteriorated with additional problems of severe sepsis, severe pneumonia, hypoxaemia, ileus, and sclerema. She was transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). In the ICU, she was managed with oxygen supplementation, intravenous antibiotics, intravenous fluid, including a number of blood transfusions, vitamins, minerals, and diet. One month prior to this admission, she had been admitted to the ICU also with sclerema, septic shock, and urinary tract infection due to Escherichia coli and was discharged after full recovery. On both the occasions, she required repeated blood transfusions and aggressive antibiotic therapy in addition to appropriate fluid therapy and oxygen supplementation. She fully recovered from severe sepsis, severe malnutrition, ileus, sclerema, and pneumonia, both clinically and radiologically and was discharged two weeks after admission. Consecutive episodes of sclerema, resulting in two successive hospitalizations in a severely-malnourished young septic infant, have never been reported. However, this was managed successfully with blood transfusion, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and correction of electrolyte imbalance.

  6. Prokinetic Therapy Reduces Aspiration Pneumonia in Tube-Fed Patients With Severe Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pareek, Namita; Williams, John; Hanna, Deborah; Johnson, William D.; Minocha, Anil; Abell, Thomas L.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical benefit of prokinetic therapy in aspiration pneumonia in patients with developmental disabilities, we conducted a retrospective study; records of 22 tube-fed patients were reviewed from December 1990 to October 1998 for a mean of 22.7 months before and 38.9 months during Cisapride therapy. Numbers of hospital admissions…

  7. A Prospective Study of the Prevalence of Tuberculosis and Bacteraemia in Bangladeshi Children with Severe Malnutrition and Pneumonia Including an Evaluation of Xpert MTB/RIF Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Graham, Stephen M.; Duke, Trevor; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Ashraf, Hasan; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; La Vincente, Sophie; Banu, Sayera; Raqib, Rubhana; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe malnutrition is a risk factor for pneumonia due to a wide range of pathogens but aetiological data are limited and the role of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is uncertain. Methods We prospectively investigated severely malnourished young children (<5 years) with radiological pneumonia admitted over a 15-month period. Investigations included blood culture, sputa for microscopy and mycobacterial culture. Xpert MTB/RIF assay was introduced during the study. Study children were followed for 12 weeks following their discharge from the hospital. Results 405 eligible children were enrolled, with a median age of 10 months. Bacterial pathogens were isolated from blood culture in 18 (4.4%) children, of which 72% were Gram negatives. Tuberculosis was confirmed microbiologically in 7% (27/396) of children that provided sputum - 10 by culture, 21 by Xpert MTB/RIF assay, and 4 by both tests. The diagnostic yield from induced sputum was 6% compared to 3.5% from gastric aspirate. Sixty (16%) additional children had tuberculosis diagnosed clinically that was not microbiologically confirmed. Most confirmed tuberculosis cases did not have a positive contact history or positive tuberculin test. The sensitivity and specificity of Xpert MTB/RIF assay compared to culture was 67% (95% CI: 24–94) and 92% (95% CI: 87–95) respectively. Overall case-fatality rate was 17% and half of the deaths occurred in home following discharge from the hospital. Conclusion and Significance TB was common in severely malnourished Bangladeshi children with pneumonia. X-pert MTB/RIF assay provided higher case detection rate compared to sputum microscopy and culture. The high mortality among the study children underscores the need for further research aimed at improved case detection and management for better outcomes. PMID:24695758

  8. Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia with Respiratory Failure Induced by Synthetic Cannabinoid Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Öcal, Nesrin; Doğan, Deniz; Çiçek, Ali Fuat; Yücel, Orhan; Tozkoparan, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent days, synthetic cannabinoid derivatives have become life threatening for young people. Here, we want to share a case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia triggered by inhalation of synthetic cannabinoid, new side effects of which are being detected day by day. Case Report A 21-year-old male, who had no history of pulmonary diseases, was admitted to the clinic with shortness of breath. His oxygen saturation was measured as 85–86% in room air. Common irregular ground-glass opacities were observed in thorax radiology. His peripheral blood eosinophil count was 1100 cell/mm3 with a leukocyte differential of 12%. Sputum eosinophilia was also observed. The patient was diagnosed with acute eosinophilic pneumonia in terms of current clinical, radiological and laboratory findings. Rapid remission was achieved with corticosteroid therapy. Conclusion This is the first reported case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia induced by synthetic cannabinoid inhalation. PMID:27994925

  9. Biomarkers of Delirium in a Low-Risk Community-Acquired Pneumonia-Induced Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, Cristiane Damiani; Vuolo, Francieli; Generoso, Jaqueline; Soares, Márcio; Barichello, Tatiana; Quevedo, João; Ritter, Cristiane; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    There are different theories about the pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE), and the majority of our knowledge was derived from critically ill patients. 7In less severe sepsis, it is probable that neuroinflammation can be a major aspect of SAE development. We hypothesized that in non-severe septic patients, blood biomarkers of inflammation, endothelial activation, coagulation, and brain function would be different when compared to patients with and without brain dysfunction. A total of 30 patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)-induced sepsis were included of which 10 (33 %) developed SAE. Eight medical patients admitted to the general ward, except due to sepsis or infection, which developed delirium were included as delirium, non-sepsis group. From all measured biomarkers, only brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed, and presumably secreted (RANTES), and interleukin (IL)-10 where significantly different when compared to SAE and sepsis groups. In addition, SAE patients presented higher levels of BDNF, vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB/BB and RANTES when compared to delirium patients. In conclusion, the profile of biomarkers differs between SAE, sepsis, and delirium patients, suggesting that pathways related to SAE are different from delirium and from sepsis itself.

  10. A comparison of human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus WHO-defined severe pneumonia in Moroccan children.

    PubMed

    Jroundi, I; Mahraoui, C; Benmessaoud, R; Moraleda, C; Tligui, H; Seffar, M; El Kettani, S E C; Benjelloun, B S; Chaacho, S; Muñoz-Almagro, C; Ruiz, J; Alonso, P L; Bassat, Q

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory infections remain the principal cause of morbidity and mortality in Moroccan children. Besides bacterial infections, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are prominent among other viruses due to their high prevalence and association with severe clinical episodes. We aimed to describe and compare RSV- and hMPV-associated cases of WHO-defined severe pneumonia in a paediatric population admitted to Morocco's reference hospital. Children aged 2-59 months admitted to the Hôpital d'Enfants de Rabat, Morocco meeting WHO-defined severe pneumonia criteria were recruited during 14 months and thoroughly investigated to ascertain a definitive diagnosis. Viral prevalence of RSV, hMPV and other viruses causing respiratory symptoms was investigated in nasopharyngeal aspirate samples through the use of molecular methods. Of the 683 children recruited and included in the final analysis, 61/683 (8·9%) and 124/683 (18·2%) were infected with hMPV and RSV, respectively. Besides a borderline significant tendency for higher age in hMPV cases, patients infected with either of the viruses behaved similarly in terms of demographics, patient history, past morbidity and comorbidity, vaccination history, socioeconomic background and family environment. Clinical presentation on arrival was also similar for both viruses, but hMPV cases were associated with more severity than RSV cases, had a higher risk of intensive care need, and received antibiotic treatment more frequently. RSV and hMPV are common and potentially life-threatening causes of WHO-defined pneumonia in Moroccan children. Both viruses show indistinctive clinical symptomatology, but in Moroccan children, hMPV was associated with a more severe evolution.

  11. Sociodemographic, Epidemiological, and Clinical Risk Factors for Childhood Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Severely Malnourished Children Presenting With Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu Syeed Golam; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate sociodemographic, epidemiological, and clinical risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in children presenting with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and pneumonia. Children aged 0 to 59 months with SAM and radiologic pneumonia from April 2011 to July 2012 were studied in Bangladesh. Children with confirmed PTB (by culture and/or X-pert MTB/RIF) (cases = 27) and without PTB (controls = 81; randomly selected from 378 children) were compared. The cases more often had the history of contact with active PTB patient (P < .01) and exposure to cigarette smoke (P = .04) compared with the controls. In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, the cases were independently associated with working mother (P = .05) and positive tuberculin skin test (TST; P = .02). Thus, pneumonia in SAM children is a common presentation of PTB and further highlights the importance of the use of simple TST and/or history of contact with active TB patients in diagnosing PTB in such children, especially in resource-limited settings. PMID:27335971

  12. Deciphering tissue-induced Klebsiella pneumoniae lipid A structure.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Enrique; Martínez-Moliner, Verónica; Moranta, David; Dahlström, Käthe M; Regueiro, Verónica; Tomás, Anna; Cano, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Frank, Christian G; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Insua, José Luis; Salminen, Tiina A; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-17

    The outcome of an infection depends on host recognition of the pathogen, hence leading to the activation of signaling pathways controlling defense responses. A long-held belief is that the modification of the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide could help Gram-negative pathogens to evade innate immunity. However, direct evidence that this happens in vivo is lacking. Here we report the lipid A expressed in the tissues of infected mice by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings demonstrate that Klebsiella remodels its lipid A in a tissue-dependent manner. Lipid A species found in the lungs are consistent with a 2-hydroxyacyl-modified lipid A dependent on the PhoPQ-regulated oxygenase LpxO. The in vivo lipid A pattern is lost in minimally passaged bacteria isolated from the tissues. LpxO-dependent modification reduces the activation of inflammatory responses and mediates resistance to antimicrobial peptides. An lpxO mutant is attenuated in vivo thereby highlighting the importance of this lipid A modification in Klebsiella infection biology. Colistin, one of the last options to treat multidrug-resistant Klebsiella infections, triggers the in vivo lipid A pattern. Moreover, colistin-resistant isolates already express the in vivo lipid A pattern. In these isolates, LpxO-dependent lipid A modification mediates resistance to colistin. Deciphering the lipid A expressed in vivo opens the possibility of designing novel therapeutics targeting the enzymes responsible for the in vivo lipid A pattern.

  13. Deciphering tissue-induced Klebsiella pneumoniae lipid A structure

    PubMed Central

    Llobet, Enrique; Martínez-Moliner, Verónica; Moranta, David; Dahlström, Käthe M.; Regueiro, Verónica; Tomás, Anna; Cano, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Frank, Christian G.; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Insua, José Luis; Salminen, Tiina A.; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A.

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of an infection depends on host recognition of the pathogen, hence leading to the activation of signaling pathways controlling defense responses. A long-held belief is that the modification of the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide could help Gram-negative pathogens to evade innate immunity. However, direct evidence that this happens in vivo is lacking. Here we report the lipid A expressed in the tissues of infected mice by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings demonstrate that Klebsiella remodels its lipid A in a tissue-dependent manner. Lipid A species found in the lungs are consistent with a 2-hydroxyacyl-modified lipid A dependent on the PhoPQ-regulated oxygenase LpxO. The in vivo lipid A pattern is lost in minimally passaged bacteria isolated from the tissues. LpxO-dependent modification reduces the activation of inflammatory responses and mediates resistance to antimicrobial peptides. An lpxO mutant is attenuated in vivo thereby highlighting the importance of this lipid A modification in Klebsiella infection biology. Colistin, one of the last options to treat multidrug-resistant Klebsiella infections, triggers the in vivo lipid A pattern. Moreover, colistin-resistant isolates already express the in vivo lipid A pattern. In these isolates, LpxO-dependent lipid A modification mediates resistance to colistin. Deciphering the lipid A expressed in vivo opens the possibility of designing novel therapeutics targeting the enzymes responsible for the in vivo lipid A pattern. PMID:26578797

  14. Comparison of Immunoglobulin G Subclass Concentrations in Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Severe Pandemic 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Claire L.; Holmes, Natasha E.; Grayson, M. Lindsay; Torresi, Joseph; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Cheng, Allen C.

    2012-01-01

    We compared immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclasses in patients with severe noninfluenza community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) to those in patients with severe pandemic 2009 influenza (H1N1) virus infection. Low IgG1 and IgG2 levels occurred often in the CAP group; however, H1N1 patients had lower IgG1 and IgG2 levels (5.4 versus 3.3 g/liter [P = 0.008] and 2.5 versus 1.2 g/liter [P < 0.001], respectively). Low IgG2 levels may be specifically linked to severe H1N1; however, it is not clear whether this association is related to H1N1 or to other features of severity. PMID:22237894

  15. Lung epithelial cells are essential effectors of inducible resistance to pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Cleaver, Jeffrey O.; You, Dahui; Michaud, Danielle R.; Guzmán Pruneda, Francisco A.; Leiva Juarez, Miguel M.; Zhang, Jiexin; Weill, Patrick M.; Adachi, Roberto; Gong, Lei; Moghaddam, Seyed; Poynter, Matthew E.; Tuvim, Michael J.; Evans, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious pneumonias are a leading cause of death worldwide, particularly among immunocompromised patients. Therapeutic stimulation of the lungs’ intrinsic defenses with a unique combination of inhaled Toll-like receptor agonists broadly protects mice against otherwise lethal pneumonias. As the survival benefit persists despite cytotoxic chemotherapy-related neutropenia, the cells required for protection were investigated. The inducibility of resistance was tested in mice with deficiencies of leukocyte lineages due to genetic deletions and in wild type mice with leukocyte populations significantly reduced by antibodies or toxins. Surprisingly, these serial reductions in leukocyte lineages did not appreciably impair inducible resistance, but targeted disruption of Toll-like receptor signaling in the lung epithelium resulted in complete abrogation of the protective effect. Isolated lung epithelial cells were also induced to kill pathogens in the absence of leukocytes. Proteomic and gene expression analyses of isolated epithelial cells and whole lungs revealed highly congruent antimicrobial responses. Taken together, these data indicate that lung epithelial cells are necessary and sufficient effectors of inducible resistance. These findings challenge conventional paradigms about the role of epithelia in antimicrobial defense and offer a novel potential intervention to protect patients with impaired leukocyte-mediated immunity from fatal pneumonias. PMID:23632328

  16. Immunization with LytB protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae activates complement-mediated phagocytosis and induces protection against pneumonia and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Bruno; Aguinagalde, Leire; Ruiz, Susana; Domenech, Mirian; Antequera, María Luisa; Fenoll, Asunción; García, Pedro; García, Ernesto; Yuste, Jose

    2016-12-07

    The cell wall glucosaminidase LytB of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a surface exposed protein involved in daughter cell separation, biofilm formation and contributes to different aspects of the pathogenesis process. In this study we have characterized the antibody responses after immunization of mice with LytB in the presence of alhydrogel as an adjuvant. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays measuring different subclasses of immunoglobulin G, demonstrated that the antibody responses to LytB were predominantly IgG1 and IgG2b, followed by IgG3 and IgG2a subclasses. Complement-mediated immunity against two different pneumococcal serotypes was investigated using sera from immunized mice. Immunization with LytB increased the recognition of S. pneumoniae by complement components C1q and C3b demonstrating that anti-LytB antibodies trigger activation of the classical pathway. Phagocytosis assays showed that serum containing antibodies to LytB stimulates neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis against S. pneumoniae. Animal models of infection including invasive pneumonia and sepsis were performed with two different clinical isolates. Vaccination with LytB increased bacterial clearance and induced protection demonstrating that LytB might be a good candidate to be considered in a future protein-based vaccine against S. pneumoniae.

  17. Severe Hyponatremia due to Levofloxacin Treatment for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Community-Acquired Pneumonia in a Patient with Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blaga, Sorin Nicu

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia (serum Na levels of <135 mEq/L) is the most common electrolyte imbalance encountered in clinical practice, affecting up to 15–28% of hospitalized patients. This case report refers to a middle-aged man with severe hyponatremia due to Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion related to four possible etiological factors: glossopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, cisplatin treatment, right basal pneumonia with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the treatment with Levofloxacin. This case report discusses a rare complication of common conditions and of a common treatment. To our knowledge this is the first case of hyponatremia related to Levofloxacin and the second related to fluoroquinolones. PMID:27847519

  18. Interstitial lung disease and profound hypoxaemia in a severely-malnourished child with very severe pneumonia and potential lymph-node tuberculosis: an uncommon but serious co-morbidity.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Mohammod J; Parvin, Irin; Ashraf, Hasan; Saha, Haimanti; Matin, Fariha B; Pietroni, Mark A C

    2013-03-01

    A nine-month old boy was initially admitted at the Acute Respiratory Infection Unit of Dhaka Hospital of icddr,b and soon after transferred to the Intensive Care Unit of the same hospital. The boy had problems of very severe pneumonia (confirmed by radiology), severe hypoxaemia, severe malnutrition, and Down's syndrome. The patient was treated according to the hospital protocol for the management of pneumonia and malnutrition. During the hospital stay, hypoxaemia was persistent with very little improvement of pneumonia; a number of differentials, such as pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, lymph-node tuberculosis, were added to the problems. Subsequently, the patient's hypoxaemia improved with the empirical use of antitubercular drugs. However, the patient again developed persistent hypoxaemia and, after unsuccessful treatment for a hospital-acquired pneumonia, the problems further expanded to include interstitial lung disease (ILD). This was confirmed by high-resolution computed tomography, and the patient was treated with prednisolone for 6 months, along with antitubercular drugs. He fully recovered from ILD, hypoxaemia, and pneumonia both clinically and radiologically. Therefore, severely-malnourished children having wet cough and pneumonia with persistent hypoxaemia should be assessed for the possible existence of interstitial lung disease. This may help provide a prompt and appropriate management to reduce morbidity and deaths in such patients.

  19. Role of Human Metapneumovirus, Influenza A Virus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Causing WHO-Defined Severe Pneumonia in Children in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asad; Khowaja, Asif Raza; Bashir, Maaman Zahoor; Aziz, Fatima; Mustafa, Sultan; Zaidi, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Objective The role of respiratory viruses in causing severe, life threatening pneumonia in children in developing countries is not well established. Our study aims to determine the role of human metapneumovirus (HMPV), influenza A virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in children, aged 6 weeks to 2 years, hospitalized with WHO defined severe pneumonia (tachypnea plus any general danger sign or chest in-drawing) at a public sector hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods This study was conducted from November 2010 to September 2011 at Abbassi Shaheed Hospital, a large public tertiary care hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Children admitted with WHO-defined severe pneumonia were enrolled and throat swabs were obtained to detect respiratory viruses using real time RT-PCR. Chest x-rays of all subjects were obtained and independently interpreted by two radiologists to diagnose radiologic pneumonia. Results 169 children were enrolled. HMPV was detected in 24 (14.2%), influenza A virus in 9 (5.3%) and RSV in 30 (17.8%) children admitted with severe pneumonia. Of 9 patients with influenza A, 8 tested positive for H1N1. Viral etiology was found in 18% of radiologically confirmed pneumonia. HMPV infections peaked in February and April, influenza A was prevalent in January, June and November and RSV infections were most prevalent from June to September. Conclusion HMPV, influenza A and RSV are common causes of WHO-defined severe pneumonia in hospitalized children in Karachi. Knowledge regarding the viral etiology of pediatric pneumonia and individual viral seasonality can help in the recommendation and implementation of appropriate management strategies. PMID:24058625

  20. Bortezomib-induced Severe Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jerkins, James H.; Suciu, Anca; Mazimba, Sula; Calvo, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of anti-cancer drug associated cardiac side effects are diverse and can range from acutely induced cardiac arrhythmias to severe contractile dysfunction, and potentially fatal heart failure. Anthracyclines and trastuzumab cardiac toxicity have been well described and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) evaluation is commonly performed before their use. Bortezomib (Velcade), a potent, specific and reversible proteasome inhibitor is approved for treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). The incidence of cardiac failure associated with bortezomib therapy in clinical trials remains incidental. Acute exacerbation of pre-existing congestive cardiac failure has been associated with this therapy but de novo cardiomyopathy has been reported in only one patient receiving bortezomib for small cell lung cancer. As a result, cardiac evaluation is not normally ordered before its use. We describe a 50-year-old female with newly diagnosed MM and no risk factors for cardiac disease that unexpectedly developed florid heart failure after 2 cycles of bortezomib and low-dose dexamethasone. 2-D echocardiogram showed dilated cardiomyopathy with severely decreased LVEF; no changes consistent with amyloid deposits or myocardial scarring were described. Coronary angiogram ruled out coronary artery disease. The mechanism of bortezomib-induced cardiomyopathy has been postulated to be through fluid retention. Based on literature review we hypothesize that the disruption of the ubiquitin-proteasome system by bortezomib may cause cardiomyopathy and severe cardiac failure. As Bortezomib is a new and promising therapy for MM patients, we recommend routinely monitoring cardiac parameters in patients undergoing this treatment.

  1. [A possible case of drug-induced pneumonia due to L-carbocisteine].

    PubMed

    Koreeda, Yoshimizu; Tanoue, Asako; Kumamoto, Tomohiro; Kubota, Kouji; Hagihara, Yoko; Taira, Tetsuhiko; Noma, Satoshi; Kawabata, Toshifumi; Suetsugu, Takayuki; Matsuyama, Wataru; Mizuno, Keiko; Kawabata, Masaharu; Higashimoto, Ikkou; Osame, Mitsuhiro; Arimura, Kimiyoshi

    2007-08-01

    A 70-year-old man presented with a deteriorating fever and productive cough after the administration of drugs including L-carbocisteine against the common cold. Since chest radiograph revealed pulmonary infiltrates in the right lower lung field, he was admitted to our hospital, then L-carbocisteine was continued and antibiotics started. However, his symptoms, laboratory findings, and hypoxia worsened. Pulmonary infiltrates on his chest radiograph increased and chest CT demonstrated pulmonary consolidation with traction bronchiectasis and ground glass opacity with thickened of interlobular septae in the right lung field. Analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed elevated numbers of total cells, neutrophils and eosinophils, and the CD4/CD8 ratio was 5.65. Under a suspected diagnosis of drug-induced pneumonia, we halted L-carbocisteine administration stopped and began corticosteroid therapy. Subsequently his symptoms and findings markedly improved. The drug lymphocyte stimulation test for L-carbocisteine using peripheral blood lymphocytes showed positive results. On the basis of the clinical course, laboratory and radiographic findings, we considered this case to possibly be drug-induced pneumonia due to L-carbocisteine. To our knowledge, this is possibly the first case of L-carbocisteine-induced pneumonia to be reported.

  2. Expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae Bacteriocins Is Induced by Antibiotics via Regulatory Interplay with the Competence System.

    PubMed

    Kjos, Morten; Miller, Eric; Slager, Jelle; Lake, Frank B; Gericke, Oliver; Roberts, Ian S; Rozen, Daniel E; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2016-02-01

    Pneumococcal bacteriocins (pneumocins) are antibacterial toxins that mediate intra-species competition within the human host. However, the triggers of pneumocin expression are poorly understood. Using RNA-sequencing, we mapped the regulon of the pneumocin cluster (blp) of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39. Furthermore, by analogy with pneumococcal competence, we show that several antibiotics activate the blp-genes. Using real-time gene expression measurements we show that while the promoter driving expression of the two-component regulatory system blpR/H is constitutive, the remaining blp-promoters that control pneumocin expression, immunity and the inducer peptide BlpC, are pH-dependent and induced in the late exponential phase. Intriguingly, competence for genetic transformation, mediated by the paralogous ComD/E two-component quorum system, is induced by the same environmental cues. To test for interplay between these regulatory systems, we quantified the regulatory response to the addition of synthetic BlpC and competence-stimulating peptide (CSP). Supporting the idea of such interplay, we found that immediately upon addition of CSP, the blp-promoters were activated in a comD/E-dependent manner. After a delay, blp-expression was highly induced and was strictly dependent on blpRH and blpC. This raised the question of the mechanism of BlpC export, since bioinformatic analysis showed that the genes encoding the putative exporter for BlpC, blpAB, are not intact in strain D39 and most other strains. By contrast, all sequenced pneumococcal strains contain intact comAB genes, encoding the transport system for CSP. Consistent with the idea that comAB mediate BlpC export, we finally show that high-level expression of the blp-genes requires comAB. Together, our results demonstrate that regulation of pneumocin expression is intertwined with competence, explaining why certain antibiotics induce blp-expression. Antibiotic-induced pneumocin expression might therefore have

  3. Bacteriophage-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier: improved pharmacokinetics mediates effective resolution of Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced lobar pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Singla, Saloni; Harjai, Kusum; Katare, Om Prakash; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2015-07-15

    This study examined the therapeutic and prophylactic potential of bacteriophages in a mouse model of Klebsiella pneumoniae lobar pneumonia. Phages were administered intraperitoneally. Liposome-entrapped phages (LP) were effective in treating infection, even when therapy was delayed by 3 days after the induction of pneumonia. In contrast, nonliposomal phages provided protection when administered 24 hours after infection. Administration of nonliposomal phages 6 hours prior to intranasal bacterial challenge resulted in complete protection, compared with LP, which was effective even when administered 48 hours prior to infection. Increased reduction and a greater increment in the levels of proinflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokines, respectively, in homogenates of lung from LP-treated mice were suggestive of increased efficacy of LP in the treatment of pneumonia. This is the first study to assess liposomes as a delivery vehicle for phage, and the results confirm the superiority of LP for both therapeutic and prophylactic applications.

  4. Cytokine and chemokine responses in pediatric patients with severe pneumonia associated with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yuji; Kawamura, Yoshiki; Nakai, Hidetaka; Sugata, Ken; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Ihira, Masaru; Ohashi, Masahiro; Kato, Tomochika; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2012-09-01

    Severe pneumonia and leukocytosis are characteristic, frequently observed, clinical findings in pediatric patients with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus infection. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of cytokines and chemokines in complicating pneumonia and leukocytosis in patients with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus infection. Forty-seven patients with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus infection were enrolled in this study. Expression of interleukin (IL)-10 (P = 0.027) and IL-5 (P = 0.014) was significantly greater in patients with pneumonia than in those without pneumonia. Additionally, serum concentrations of interferon-γ (P = 0.009), tumor necrosis factor-α (P = 0.01), IL-4 (P = 0.024), and IL-2 (P = 0.012) were significantly lower in pneumonia patients with neutrophilic leukocytosis than in those without neutrophilic leukocytosis. Of the five serum chemokine concentrations assessed, only IL-8 was significantly lower in pneumonia patients with neutrophilic leukocytosis than in those without leukocytosis (P = 0.001). These cytokines and chemokines may play important roles in the pathogenesis of childhood pneumonia associated with A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus infection.

  5. Zinc as an adjunct to antibiotics for the treatment of severe pneumonia in children <5 years: a meta-analysis of randomised-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Tie, Hong-Tao; Tan, Qi; Luo, Ming-Zhu; Li, Qiang; Yu, Jia-Lin; Wu, Qing-Chen

    2016-03-14

    The effect of Zn, as an adjunct to antibiotics, on the treatment of severe pneumonia in young children is still under debate; therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the therapeutic role of Zn for severe pneumonia in children younger than 5 years. PubMed, Cochrane library and Embase databases were systematically searched from inception until October 2015 for randomised-controlled trials (RCT) that assessed the effect of Zn as an adjunct to antibiotics for severe pneumonia. Random-effects model was used for calculating the pooled estimates, and intention-to-treat principle was also applied. Nine RCT involving 2926 children were included. Overall, the pooled results showed that adjunct treatment with Zn failed to reduce the time to recovery from severe pneumonia (hazard ratios (HR)=1·04; 95% CI 0·90, 1·19; I(2)=39%; P=0·58), hospital length of stay (HR=1·04; 95% CI 0·83, 1·33; I(2)=57%; P=0·74), treatment failure (relative risk (RR)=0·95; 95% CI 0·79, 1·14; I(2)=20%; P=0·58) or change of antibiotics (RR=1·07; 95% CI 0·79, 1·45; I(2)=44%; P=0·67). In addition, continuous outcomes were consistent while meta-analysed with standard mean difference, and all outcomes remained stable in intention-to-treat analysis. No significant differences were observed in the two groups between death rate, adverse events or recovery times of severe pneumonia indicators. Our results suggested that adjunct treatment with Zn failed to benefit young children in the treatment of severe pneumonia. Considering the clinical heterogeneity, baseline characteristics of children, definition of severe pneumonia and Zn supplement way should be taken into consideration in future research. This study was registered at PRESPERO as CRD42015019798.

  6. Antibiotic Usage Prior and During Hospitalization for Clinical Severe Pneumonia in Children under Five Years of Age in Rabat, Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Jroundi, Imane; Benmessaoud, Rachid; Mahraoui, Chafiq; Moraleda, Cinta; Tligui, Houssain; Seffar, Myriam; Benjelloun, Badr Sououd; Vila, Jordi; Ruiz, Joaquim; Alonso, Pedro L.; Bassat, Quique

    2013-01-01

    Scarce and limited epidemiological, clinical and microbiological data are available regarding pediatric respiratory tract infections in the Kingdom of Morocco, a middle-income country in Northwestern Africa. Data on antibiotic usage for such infections are also scarce. A good understanding of pre-admission and intra-hospital usage of antibiotics in children with respiratory infections linked with an adequate surveillance of the antibiotic susceptibility from circulating pathogens could help policy makers improve their recommendations on management of respiratory infections. We hereby present data on antibiotic usage prior and during admission and antibiotic susceptibility of major circulating respiratory pathogens in children under five years of age admitted to the Hôpital d’Enfants de Rabat, Morocco, with a diagnosis of clinical severe pneumonia (using World Health Organization (WHO) standardized case definitions) during a period of 14 months (November 2010–December 2011), as part of a larger hospital-based surveillance study designed to understand the etiology and epidemiology of severe pneumonia cases among children. PMID:27029313

  7. Antibiotic Usage Prior and During Hospitalization for Clinical Severe Pneumonia in Children under Five Years of Age in Rabat, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Jroundi, Imane; Benmessaoud, Rachid; Mahraoui, Chafiq; Moraleda, Cinta; Tligui, Houssain; Seffar, Myriam; Benjelloun, Badr Sououd; Vila, Jordi; Ruiz, Joaquim; Alonso, Pedro L; Bassat, Quique

    2013-09-26

    Scarce and limited epidemiological, clinical and microbiological data are available regarding pediatric respiratory tract infections in the Kingdom of Morocco, a middle-income country in Northwestern Africa. Data on antibiotic usage for such infections are also scarce. A good understanding of pre-admission and intra-hospital usage of antibiotics in children with respiratory infections linked with an adequate surveillance of the antibiotic susceptibility from circulating pathogens could help policy makers improve their recommendations on management of respiratory infections. We hereby present data on antibiotic usage prior and during admission and antibiotic susceptibility of major circulating respiratory pathogens in children under five years of age admitted to the Hôpital d'Enfants de Rabat, Morocco, with a diagnosis of clinical severe pneumonia (using World Health Organization (WHO) standardized case definitions) during a period of 14 months (November 2010-December 2011), as part of a larger hospital-based surveillance study designed to understand the etiology and epidemiology of severe pneumonia cases among children.

  8. Evaluation of the efficacy of a bacteriophage in the treatment of pneumonia induced by multidrug resistance Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fang; Wang, Xitao; Wang, Linhui; Li, Zhen; Che, Jian; Wang, Lili; Li, Xiaoyu; Cao, Zhenhui; Zhang, Jiancheng; Jin, Liji; Xu, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (MRKP) has steadily grown beyond antibiotic control. However, a bacteriophage is considered to be a potential antibiotic alternative for treating bacterial infections. In this study, a lytic bacteriophage, phage 1513, was isolated using a clinical MRKP isolate KP 1513 as the host and was characterized. It produced a clear plaque with a halo and was classified as Siphoviridae. It had a short latent period of 30 min, a burst size of 264 and could inhibit KP 1513 growth in vitro with a dose-dependent pattern. Intranasal administration of a single dose of 2×10(9) PFU/mouse 2 h after KP 1513 inoculation was able to protect mice against lethal pneumonia. In a sublethal pneumonia model, phage-treated mice exhibited a lower level of K. pneumoniae burden in the lungs as compared to the untreated control. These mice lost less body weight and exhibited lower levels of inflammatory cytokines in their lungs. Lung lesion conditions were obviously improved by phage therapy. Therefore, phage 1513 has a great effect in vitro and in vivo, which has potential to be used as an alternative to an antibiotic treatment of pneumonia that is caused by the multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae.

  9. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: incidence and severity.

    PubMed Central

    Lankisch, P G; Dröge, M; Gottesleben, F

    1995-01-01

    To determine the incidence and severity of drug induced acute pancreatitis, data from 45 German centres of gastroenterology were evaluated. Among 1613 patients treated for acute pancreatitis in 1993, drug induced acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 22 patients (incidence 1.4%). Drugs held responsible were azathioprine, mesalazine/sulfasalazine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI), oestrogens, frusemide, hydrochlorothiazide, and rifampicin. Pancreatic necrosis not exceeding 33% of the organ was found on ultrasonography or computed tomography, or both, in three patients (14%). Pancreatic pseudocysts did not occur. A decrease of arterial PO2 reflecting respiratory insufficiency, and an increase of serum creatinine, reflecting renal insufficiency as complications of acute pancreatitis were seen in two (9%) and four (18%) patients, respectively. Artificial ventilation was not needed, and dialysis was necessary in only one (5%) case. Two patients (9%) died of AIDS and tuberculosis, respectively; pancreatitis did not seem to have contributed materially to their death. In conclusion, drugs rarely cause acute pancreatitis, and drug induced acute pancreatitis usually runs a benign course. PMID:7489946

  10. [Severe primary liver abscess and septic pulmonary embolism due to Klebsiella pneumoniae with hypermucoviscosity phenotype].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Keitaro; Koide, Takashi; Nagatomo, Tomoko; Tamura, Masaki; Higaki, Manabu; Takata, Saori; Wada, Hiroo; Ishii, Haruyuki; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Shinichi; Goto, Hajime

    2011-07-01

    A 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus seen for fever, right chest pain, and right-lung field consolidation on chest X-ray was found in thoracoabdominal computed tomography (CT) to have variable-sized nodules in both lung fields and multiple low-density hepatic areas. On physical examination, his pulse was 145 beats per minute and blood pressure 92/68mmHg, indicating a preshock state. Laboratory tests showed elevated WBC of 15,200/microL, serum-C-reactive protein (CRP) of 34.4 mg/dL, and a decreased platelet count of 16,000/microL. Suspecting liver abscesses complicated by a septic pulmonary embolism, we immediately conducted percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage (PTAD). Liver abscess blood culture and drainage fluid grew the Klebsiella pneumoniae hypermucoviscosity phenotype, carrying the rmpA gene. Although the man had been in critical condition on admission, broad-spectrum antibiotics and PTAD treatment improved his clinical condition to where he could be discharged without problem.

  11. Simultaneous virus identification and characterization of severe unexplained pneumonia cases using a metagenomics sequencing technique.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaohui; Tang, Guangpeng; Zhao, Xiang; Huang, Yan; Chen, Tao; Lei, Mingyu; Chen, Wenbing; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Wenfei; Zhuang, Li; Yang, Jing; Feng, Zhaomin; Wang, Dayan; Wang, Dingming; Shu, Yuelong

    2017-03-01

    Many viruses can cause respiratory diseases in humans. Although great advances have been achieved in methods of diagnosis, it remains challenging to identify pathogens in unexplained pneumonia (UP) cases. In this study, we applied next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and a metagenomic approach to detect and characterize respiratory viruses in UP cases from Guizhou Province, China. A total of 33 oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from hospitalized UP patients and subjected to NGS. An unbiased metagenomic analysis pipeline identified 13 virus species in 16 samples. Human rhinovirus C was the virus most frequently detected and was identified in seven samples. Human measles virus, adenovirus B 55 and coxsackievirus A10 were also identified. Metagenomic sequencing also provided virus genomic sequences, which enabled genotype characterization and phylogenetic analysis. For cases of multiple infection, metagenomic sequencing afforded information regarding the quantity of each virus in the sample, which could be used to evaluate each viruses' role in the disease. Our study highlights the potential of metagenomic sequencing for pathogen identification in UP cases.

  12. Challenges in the design of antibiotic equivalency studies: the multicenter equivalency study of oral amoxicillin versus injectable penicillin in children aged 3-59 months with severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Patricia L; Patel, Archana

    2004-08-15

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that children with severe pneumonia (characterized by cough or difficult breathing, as well as lower chest wall indrawing) be hospitalized and treated with parenteral penicillin. Oral amoxicillin, if equally effective for treating severe pneumonia, would address challenges associated with providing parenteral therapy, including risk of transmission of bloodborne pathogens from contaminated needles, exposure to nosocomial pathogens during hospitalization, inadequate access to health care facilities, and cost. The recently completed multicenter international trial of oral amoxicillin versus parenteral penicillin for treatment of severe pneumonia demonstrated the equivalency of these agents in children with severe pneumonia. This article focuses on the challenges of designing an equivalence study and the threats to the validity of the trial results, particularly the implications of the bias toward finding equivalence when subjects are unlikely to respond to either study therapy. These considerations have implications for use of the Amoxicillin Penicillin Pneumonia International Study (APPIS) results in clinical practice and for potential modification of WHO treatment guidelines.

  13. Analysis of Phase 3 telavancin nosocomial pneumonia data excluding patients with severe renal impairment and acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Torres, A.; Rubinstein, E.; Corey, G. R.; Stryjewski, M. E.; Barriere, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Telavancin is approved in Europe for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus when other alternatives are not suitable. The approved European prescribing information contraindicates the use of telavancin in patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance <30 mL/min, including patients on haemodialysis) and pre-existing acute renal failure owing to the higher observed mortality in these patients. Data from the ATTAIN studies were reanalysed, excluding patients with these contraindicating conditions at baseline. (At the time of submission of this article, the European marketing authorization of telavancin for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia was suspended pending evidence of a new European Medicines Agency-approved supplier. Clinigen Healthcare Ltd, Theravance's commercialization partner for telavancin in Europe, is in the process of seeking approval of a new manufacturing source.) Methods A post hoc analysis of data from two Phase 3 ATTAIN trials of telavancin for the treatment of Gram-positive nosocomial pneumonia assessing clinical outcomes and safety. Results The all-treated population for this analysis represented 84.2% (1266/1503) of the ATTAIN all-treated population. The cure rates in the clinically evaluable population were similar in the telavancin (82.5%, 231/280) and vancomycin (81.3%, 243/299) groups [treatment difference (95% CI): 1.3% (−5.0% to 7.6%)], and were consistent with the overall ATTAIN study results. The cure rate was higher in the telavancin than the vancomycin treatment group in microbiologically evaluable patients with only Gram-positive pathogens isolated at baseline [85.0% (130/153) versus 75.2% (109/145), respectively; treatment difference (95% CI): 9.7% (0.6%–18.8%)]. The incidences of adverse events were similar between treatment groups and consistent with the overall findings of the ATTAIN study. Conclusions This analysis demonstrated that in the subset

  14. Adjunctive steroid in HIV-negative patients with severe Pneumocystis pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-dose steroid therapy has been proven effective in AIDS-related Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) but not in non-AIDS-related cases. We evaluated the effects on survival of steroids in HIV-negative patients with PCP. Methods Retrospective study patients admitted to the ICU with hypoxemic PCP. We compared patients receiving HDS (≥1 mg/Kg/day prednisone equivalent), low-dose steroids (LDS group, <1 mg/Kg/day prednisone equivalent), and no steroids (NS group). Variables independently associated with ICU mortality were identified. Results 139 HIV-negative patients with PCP were included. Median age was 48 [40–60] years. The main underlying conditions were hematological malignancies (n=55, 39.6%), cancer (n=11, 7.9%), and solid organ transplantation (n=73, 52.2%). ICU mortality was 26% (36 deaths). The HDS group had 72 (51.8%) patients, the LDS group 35 (25%) patients, and the NS group 32 (23%) patients. Independent predictors of ICU mortality were SAPS II at ICU admission (odds ratio [OR], 1.04/point; [95%CI], 1.01-1.08, P=0.01), non-hematological disease (OR, 4.06; [95%CI], 1.19-13.09, P=0.03), vasopressor use (OR, 20.31; 95%CI, 6.45-63.9, P<0.001), and HDS (OR, 9.33; 95%CI, 1.97-44.3, P=0.02). HDS was not associated with the rate of ICU-acquired infections. Conclusions HDS were associated with increased mortality in HIV-negative patients with PCP via a mechanism independent from an increased risk of infection. PMID:23981859

  15. Clinical Usefulness of Urinary Fatty Acid Binding Proteins in Assessing the Severity and Predicting Treatment Response of Pneumonia in Critically Ill Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Tsung-Cheng; Tsai, Han-Chen; Chang, Shi-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    pneumonia severity and in predicting treatment response, respectively. Further studies with larger populations are needed to verify these issues.

  16. Ventilator-associated pneumonia and ICU mortality in severe ARDS patients ventilated according to a lung-protective strategy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) may contribute to the mortality associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to determine the incidence, outcome, and risk factors of bacterial VAP complicating severe ARDS in patients ventilated by using a strictly standardized lung-protective strategy. Methods This prospective epidemiologic study was done in all the 339 patients with severe ARDS included in a multicenter randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind trial of cisatracurium besylate in severe ARDS patients. Patients with suspected VAP underwent bronchoalveolar lavage to confirm the diagnosis. Results Ninety-eight (28.9%) patients had at least one episode of microbiologically documented bacterial VAP, including 41 (41.8%) who died in the ICU, compared with 74 (30.7%) of the 241 patients without VAP (P = 0.05). After adjustment, age and severity at baseline, but not VAP, were associated with ICU death. Cisatracurium besylate therapy within 2 days of ARDS onset decreased the risk of ICU death. Factors independently associated with an increased risk to develop a VAP were male sex and worse admission Glasgow Coma Scale score. Tracheostomy, enteral nutrition, and the use of a subglottic secretion-drainage device were protective. Conclusions In patients with severe ARDS receiving lung-protective ventilation, VAP was associated with an increased crude ICU mortality which did not remain significant after adjustment. PMID:22524447

  17. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection induced allergic airway sensitization is controlled by regulatory T-cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Crother, Timothy R; Schröder, Nicolas W J; Karlin, Justin; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Peterson, Ellena; Arditi, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) is associated with induction and exacerbation of asthma. CP infection can induce allergic airway sensitization in mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Allergen exposure 5 days after a low dose (mild-moderate), but not a high dose (severe) CP infection induces antigen sensitization in mice. Innate immune signals play a critical role in controlling CP infection induced allergic airway sensitization, however these mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Wild-type, TLR2-/-, and TLR4-/- mice were infected intranasally (i.n.) with a low dose of CP, followed by i.n. exposure to human serum albumin (HSA) and challenged with HSA 2 weeks later. Airway inflammation, immunoglobulins, eosinophils, and goblet cells were measured. Low dose CP infection induced allergic sensitization in TLR2-/- mice, but not in TLR4-/- mice, due to differential Treg responses in these genotypes. TLR2-/- mice had reduced numbers of Tregs in the lung during CP infection while TLR4-/- mice had increased numbers. High dose CP infection resulted in an increase in Tregs and pDCs in lungs, which prevented antigen sensitization in WT mice. Depletion of Tregs or pDCs resulted in allergic airway sensitization. We conclude that Tregs and pDCs are critical determinants regulating CP infection-induced allergic sensitization. Furthermore, TLR2 and TLR4 signaling during CP infection may play a regulatory role through the modulation of Tregs.

  18. Valuable hematological indicators for the diagnosis and severity assessment of Chinese children with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Jingjing; Shao, Xiaonan; Ma, Yibo; Lv, Darong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chest X-ray is a “golden standard” for the diagnosis and severity assessment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, it cannot be used as routine examination of CAP in children. The present study aims to investigate the roles of prealbumin (PA) in CAP in children and further determine the usefulness of PA in diagnosis and severity assessment of CAP in children. This was a retrospective analysis of 174 cases of hospitalized children with CAP. The following indicators were recorded: vital sign, inflammatory indexes, PA, and respiratory pathogens immunoglobulin M antibody test results. A total of 33 healthy children were selected as the control group. The results of laboratory tests between CAP and control groups were compared. CAP group was further divided into mild CAP and severe CAP groups, and vital signs and laboratory examination results of 2 groups were compared. The total positive rate of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in this study was 27.4%, and there was no significant difference in different seasons (P = 0.356). Compared with controls, there was no significant difference between procalcitonin and C-reactive protein in CAP group (P = 0.355, 0.061). The white blood cell count, percentage of neutrophils, neutrophil count, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in the CAP group were significantly higher than those in control group, and PA was significantly lower than that in the control group (all P < 0.05). In the traditional cutoff value (<170 mg/L), the sensitivity of PA for the diagnosis of CAP was 0.847, which was significant higher than traditional inflammatory indicators. Moreover, it was found that PA was an independent protective factor for CAP in children based on multivariate analysis (odds ratio: 0.974; 95% confidence interval: 0.956–0.993; P = 0.008). PA level in severe CAP group was significantly lower than in mild CAP group (P = 0.001). With a cutoff value of 125 mg/L, the sensitivity and specificity of PA for

  19. Atypical pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Bacteria that cause atypical pneumonia include: Mycoplasma pneumonia is caused by the bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae . It often affects people younger than age 40. Pneumonia due to Chlamydophila pneumoniae bacteria ...

  20. Amoxicillin plus temocillin as an alternative empiric therapy for the treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia: results from a retrospective audit.

    PubMed

    Habayeb, H; Sajin, B; Patel, K; Grundy, C; Al-Dujaili, A; Van de Velde, S

    2015-08-01

    A formulary decision was made at a large provider of acute hospital services in Surrey to replace piperacillin/tazobactam with amoxicillin+temocillin for the empiric treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia. This decision was made because the use of broad-spectrum-β-lactam antibiotics is a known risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and for the selection of resistance. After the antibiotic formulary was changed, a retrospective audit was conducted to assess the effect of this change. Data from patients hospitalised between January 2011 and July 2012 for severe hospital-acquired pneumonia and treated empirically with piperacillin/tazobactam or amoxicillin+temocillin were reviewed retrospectively. Clinical characteristics of patients, data related to the episode of pneumonia, clinical success and incidence of significant diarrhoea and CDI were analysed. One hundred ninety-two episodes of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia in 188 patients were identified from hospital records. Ninety-eight patients received piperacillin/tazobactam and 94 amoxicillin+temocillin. At baseline, the two treatment groups were comparable, except that more patients with renal insufficiency were treated with piperacillin/tazobactam. Clinical success was comparable (80 versus 82 %; P = 0.86), but differences were observed between piperacillin/tazobactam and amoxicillin+temocillin for the rates of significant diarrhoea (34 versus 4 %, respectively; P < 0.0001) and for CDI (7 versus 0 %, respectively; P < 0.0028). This preliminary study suggests that the combination amoxicillin+temocillin is a viable alternative to piperacillin/tazobactam for the treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia. This combination appears to be associated with fewer gastrointestinal adverse events. Further studies are needed to evaluate the place of amoxicillin+temocillin as empiric treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia.

  1. Thalidomide treatment modulates macrophage pro-inflammatory function and cytokine levels in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055 induced pneumonia in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2010-07-01

    Lung innate immune response plays an important role in the clearance of pathogens from lungs, however, profound activation of innate immune cells (alveolar macrophages or neutrophils) can lead to development of acute lung inflammation or injury by producing various pro-inflammatory molecules (IL-1, TNF-alpha and H2O2 etc.). Present study is designed to investigate the immunomodulatory action of thalidomide in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055 induced acute lung infection in BALB/c mice. Acute lung inflammation was induced by intranasal instillation of K. pneumoniae B5055 into mice without any anaesthesia and treated with thalidomide (30 mg/kg/day/po) or normal saline orally using a treatment schedule shown to modulate pro-inflammatory innate immune response. Thalidomide treatment modulated pro-inflammatory function of alveolar macrophages by significantly (p<0.05) decreasing their phagocytic potential in terms of phagocytic uptake and intracellular killing, spreading and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) release. Besides that thalidomide treatment also significantly (p<0.05) decreased neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli. Remarkably, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1alpha and TNF-alpha) were found to be decreased significantly (p<0.05) in thalidomide treated group but the levels of IL-10 were found to be significantly (p<0.05) elevated. Thus thalidomide proved a promising immunomodulatory agent in acute lung inflammation associated with pneumonia caused by gram negative bacterial infection.

  2. Epidemiology and etiology of childhood pneumonia in 2010: estimates of incidence, severe morbidity, mortality, underlying risk factors and causative pathogens for 192 countries

    PubMed Central

    Rudan, Igor; O’Brien, Katherine L.; Nair, Harish; Liu, Li; Theodoratou, Evropi; Qazi, Shamim; Lukšić, Ivana; Fischer Walker, Christa L.; Black, Robert E.; Campbell, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Background The recent series of reviews conducted within the Global Action Plan for Pneumonia and Diarrhoea (GAPPD) addressed epidemiology of the two deadly diseases at the global and regional level; it also estimated the effectiveness of interventions, barriers to achieving high coverage and the main implications for health policy. The aim of this paper is to provide the estimates of childhood pneumonia at the country level. This should allow national policy–makers and stakeholders to implement proposed policies in the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF member countries. Methods We conducted a series of systematic reviews to update previous estimates of the global, regional and national burden of childhood pneumonia incidence, severe morbidity, mortality, risk factors and specific contributions of the most common pathogens: Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza virus (flu). We distributed the global and regional–level estimates of the number of cases, severe cases and deaths from childhood pneumonia in 2010–2011 by specific countries using an epidemiological model. The model was based on the prevalence of the five main risk factors for childhood pneumonia within countries (malnutrition, low birth weight, non–exclusive breastfeeding in the first four months, solid fuel use and crowding) and risk effect sizes estimated using meta–analysis. Findings The incidence of community–acquired childhood pneumonia in low– and middle–income countries (LMIC) in the year 2010, using World Health Organization's definition, was about 0.22 (interquartile range (IQR) 0.11–0.51) episodes per child–year (e/cy), with 11.5% (IQR 8.0–33.0%) of cases progressing to severe episodes. This is a reduction of nearly 25% over the past decade, which is consistent with observed reductions in the prevalence of risk factors for pneumonia throughout LMIC. At the level of pneumonia incidence

  3. Clinical Risk Factors of Death From Pneumonia in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition in an Urban Critical Care Ward of Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Ashraf, Hasan; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Imran, Gazi; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2013-01-01

    Background Risks of death are high when children with pneumonia also have severe acute malnutrition (SAM) as a co-morbidity. However, there is limited published information on risk factors of death from pneumonia in SAM children. We evaluated clinically identifiable factors associated with death in under-five children who were hospitalized for the management of pneumonia and SAM. Methods For this unmatched case-control design, SAM children of either sex, aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) during April 2011 to July 2012 with radiological pneumonia were studied. The SAM children with pneumonia who had fatal outcome constituted the cases (n = 35), and randomly selected SAM children with pneumonia who survived constituted controls (n = 105). Results The median (inter-quartile range) age (months) was comparable among the cases and the controls [8.0 (4.9, 11.0) vs. 9.7 (5.0, 18.0); p = 0.210)]. In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, such as vomiting, abnormal mental status, and systolic hypotension (<70 mm of Hg) in absence of dehydration, fatal cases of severely malnourished under-five children with pneumonia were more often hypoxemic (OR = 23.15, 95% CI = 4.38–122.42), had clinical dehydration (some/severe) (OR = 9.48, 95% CI = 2.42–37.19), abdominal distension at admission (OR = 4.41, 95% CI = 1.12–16.52), and received blood transfusion (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.21–24.99) for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension. Conclusion and Significance We identified hypoxemia, clinical dehydration, and abdominal distension as the independent predictors of death in SAM children with pneumonia. SAM children with pneumonia who required blood transfusion for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension were also at risk for death. Thus, early identification and

  4. Childhood very severe pneumonia and meningitis-related hospitalization and death in Yemen, before and after introduction of H. influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Banajeh, S M; Ashoor, O; Al-Magramy, A S

    2014-07-08

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine was included in the Yemen immunization programme in 2005. This study compared the rates of very severe pneumonia and all-cause meningitis hospitalization and death, before and after introduction of conjugate Hib vaccine, and reports the results of the 2010 bacterial meningitis surveillance. A retrospective analysis was made of data collected for 2000-2010 for all children aged 2-60 months in the main children's hospital in Sana'a. Compared with the pre-Hib vaccination period, the post-Hib period showed significant and impressive reductions in the rates of hospitalization and death for all-cause meningitis. However, hospitalization and death for very severe pneumonia improved only modestly, and there was evidence of a decreasing but non-significant trend indicting that very severe pneumonia was a non-specific endpoint with multi-etiologies (both viral and bacterial). Very severe pneumonia remains the leading cause of severe morbidity and death for young children, particularly those aged < 12 months.

  5. Vaccination with Klebsiella pneumoniae-derived extracellular vesicles protects against bacteria-induced lethality via both humoral and cellular immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Hee; Choi, Hyun-Il; Hong, Sung-Wook; Kim, Kwang-sun; Gho, Yong Song; Jeon, Seong Gyu

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae highlights the need to develop preventive measures to ameliorate Klebsiella infections. Bacteria-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical nanometer-sized proteolipids enriched with outer membrane proteins. Gram-negative bacteria-derived EVs have gained interest for use as nonliving complex vaccines. In the present study, we evaluated whether K. pneumoniae-derived EVs confer protection against bacteria-induced lethality. K. pneumoniae-derived EVs isolated from in vitro bacterial culture supernatants induced innate immunity, including the upregulation of co-stimulatory molecule expression and proinflammatory mediator production. EV vaccination via the intraperitoneal route elicited EV-reactive antibodies and interferon-gamma-producing T-cell responses. Three vaccinations with the EVs prevented bacteria-induced lethality. As verified by sera and splenocytes adoptive transfer, the protective effect of EV vaccination was dependent on both humoral and cellular immunity. Taken together, these findings suggest that K. pneumoniae-derived EVs are a novel vaccine candidate against K. pneumoniae infections. PMID:26358222

  6. Compliance with severe sepsis bundles and its effect on patient outcomes of severe community-acquired pneumonia in a limited resources country

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Yan; Li, Yi-Min; Nong, Ling-Bo; Xu, Yuan-Da; He, Guo-Qing; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Jiang, Mei; Xiao, Zheng-Iun; Zhong, Nan-Shan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Validation of compliance with severe sepsis bundles is still needed. The purpose of this study was to determine compliance and its outcomes in severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients in a limited resources country. Material and methods A prospective cohort study of 212 severe CAP patients was carried out. The implementation programme was organized into two continuous phases. The primary outcomes were compliance and hospital mortality. Results Compliance with administration of antibiotics and vasopressors as well as plateau pressure on average < 30 cm H2O was high in both groups. In the bundles group, patients received more serum lactate monitoring (62.3% vs. 11.3%), more blood cultures (47.1% vs. 24.5%), more fluid resuscitation (63.2% vs. 26.4%) and volumes infused (1319.8 ±1107.4 ml vs. 461.9 ±799.3 ml), more inotropic dobutamine and/or packed red blood cells (21.7% vs. 10.0%), more low-dose steroids (56.5% vs. 15.0%), and more glucose control (51.9% vs. 6.6%) compared with such patients in the control group. The rates of total compliance with 6-hour, 24-hour, and 6/24-hour bundles in the prospective period were 47.1%, 51.9%, and 42.5%, respectively. Hospital mortality was reduced from 44.3% to 29.2% (p = 0.023) in the bundles group, and the compliant subgroup had a more than twofold decrease in mortality (17.8% vs. 37.7%, p = 0.003). Serum lactate measured, blood cultures, and fluid resuscitation showed independent relationships with decreased mortality. Conclusions Total compliance was relatively low, but the implementation of severe sepsis bundles could clearly reduce mortality from severe CAP. PMID:25395949

  7. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein is a potential biomarker of acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shan; Chen, Xia; Jiang, Li; Zhu, Bo; Jiang, Qi; Xi, Xiuming

    2016-09-23

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis and risk stratification in patients with ARDS should improve prognosis. Unfortunately, no clinical biomarkers are available for use in early diagnosis. Quantitative proteomics is a powerful tool for biomarker discovery in cancer, autoimmune diseases, and ARDS. Here, we employed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology to identify potential biomarkers for early ARDS diagnosis and predict the risk for increased disease severity induced by pneumonia. We collected the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma from ARDS patients with differing degrees of ARDS severity. We identified 338 proteins dysregulated in ARDS through iTRAQ, 18 of which showed significant differences with at least 1.5-fold differential expression in patients with mild or severe ARDS. Differential plasma expression of pulmonary surfactant associated protein A, apolipoprotein A1, and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1) was verified in plasma samples. Our results indicate that DMBT1 can potentially serve as a biomarker for early ARDS diagnosis and disease severity assessment.

  8. Aspiration pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic pneumonia; Aspiration of vomitus; Necrotizing pneumonia; Aspiration pneumonitis ... The type of bacteria that caused the pneumonia depends on: Your ... facility, for example) Whether you were recently hospitalized ...

  9. The management of severe community acquired pneumonia in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Liapikou, Adamantia; Rosales-Mayor, Edmundo; Torres, Antoni

    2014-06-01

    Severe CAP (SCAP), accounting for 6% of admissions to intensive care units (ICUs) needs early diagnosis and aggressive interventions at the most proximal point of disease presentation. The prognostic scores as the ATS/IDSA rule, the systolic blood pressure, multilobar infiltrates, albumin, respiratory rate, tachycardia, confusion, oxygen and pH or SCAP system are appropriate in early identification of eligible patients requiring admission to ICU. Then the recommended initial resuscitation in SCAP in the ICU consists of fluid volume intake titrated to specific goals after a fluid challenge and hemodynamic optimization. The first selection of antimicrobial therapy should be started in the first hour and would be broad enough to cover all likely pathogens. Combination therapy may be useful in patients with non refractory septic shock and severe sepsis pneumococcal bacteremia as well. After 6 hours the patient would be reevaluated in terms of hemodynamic stability and antibiotic and therapy. Future developments will focus on sepsis biomarkers, molecular diagnostic techniques and the development of novel therapeutic immunomodulaty agents.

  10. 25-Hydroxy-Vitamin D Concentration Is Not Affected by Severe or Non-Severe Pneumonia, or Inflammation, in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Haugen, Johanne; Chandyo, Ram K.; Ulak, Manjeswori; Mathisen, Maria; Basnet, Sudha; Brokstad, Karl A.; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Shrestha, Prakash S.; Strand, Tor A.

    2017-01-01

    Poor vitamin D status has been associated with increased risk and severity of respiratory tract infections. Whether or not inflammation and infection affects 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration is controversial and is important in the interpretation of observational studies using plasma-25(OH)D as a biomarker for status. Our objectives were to measure whether 25(OH)D concentration was altered by an episode of acute lower respiratory tract infection and whether markers of inflammation predicted the 25(OH)D concentration. Children aged 2–35 months with severe (n = 43) and non-severe (n = 387) community-acquired, WHO-defined pneumonia were included. 25(OH)D concentration and inflammatory markers (cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors) were measured in plasma during the acute phase and 14, 45, and 90 days later. Predictors for 25(OH)D concentrations were identified in multiple linear regression models. Mean 25(OH)D concentration during the acute phase and after recovery (14, 45, and 90 days) was 84.4 nmol/L ± 33.6, and 80.6 ± 35.4, respectively. None of the inflammatory markers predicted 25(OH)D concentration in the multiple regression models. Age was the most important predictor for 25(OH)D concentration, and there were no differences in 25(OH)D concentrations during illness and after 14, 45, and 90 days when adjusting for age. Infection and inflammation did not alter the 25(OH)D concentration in young children with acute lower respiratory tract infections. PMID:28106720

  11. Pleural and pericardial effusions combined with ascites in a patient with severe sunitinib-induced hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kust, Davor; Kruljac, Ivan; Peternac, Ana Šverko; Ostojić, Jelena; Prpić, Marin; Čaržavec, Dubravka; Gaćina, Petar

    2016-06-01

    To best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of pericardial and pleural effusions combined with ascites, precipitated with severe sunitinib-induced hypothyroidism. A 58-year-old man presented in our emergency department due to dyspnoea and dry cough. Sixteen months earlier, the patient underwent left nephrectomy due to metastatic renal cell adenocarcinoma (RCC), and therapy with sunitinib was initiated postoperatively. Thyroid function was not assessed during the therapy. On admission, all laboratory findings were within normal range. Computed tomography of the chest detected voluminous bilateral pleural effusions and mild pericardial effusion, and echocardiography revealed pericardial effusion. Thoracocentesis was carried out three times, and cytological examination showed no signs of malignant cells. After assessment of the thyroid function, neglected hypothyroidism was registered. Substitution therapy with levothyroxine was initiated, and thyroid function normalised 2 weeks later. Few days after the last thoracocentesis, his condition suddenly got worse. Thoracocentesis was repeated, and microbiological analysis of the exudate came positive for Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Despite the implemented therapeutic measures, his clinical condition progressively deteriorated. The patient died 27 days after the admission, hospital-acquired pneumonia was identified as the cause of death. Our case emphasises the necessity of careful monitoring and management of side-effects in patients who receive sunitinib. Hypothyroidism is a known cause of pleural, pericardial and abdominal effusions, as reported in several case reports. Timely initiation of substitution levothyroxine therapy can decrease unnecessary pauses in the therapy with sunitinib, as well as prevent development of severe symptoms.

  12. Berberine inhibits Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration through downregulating MMP3 and MMP9 via PI3K.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lu; Zhang, Lijun; Wang, Beibei; Wei, Junyan; Liu, Jingya; Zhang, Lijun

    2015-05-15

    The mechanisms by which Chlamydia pneumoniae infection promote vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration required in the development of atherosclerosis have not yet been fully clarified. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have important roles in VSMC migration. However, it is still unknown whether MMPs are involved in C. pneumoniae infection-induced VSMC migration. In addition, whether berberine can exert its inhibitory effects on the infection-induced VSMC migration also remains unclear. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of berberine on C. pneumoniae infection-induced VSMC migration and explored the possible mechanisms involved in this process. Herein, we found that C. pneumoniae infection could induce VSMC migration through Matrigel-coated membrane (P<0.05), which can be significantly inhibited by the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor GM6001 (P<0.05). Our results also showed that C. pneumoniae infection upregulated both mRNA and protein expressions of MMP3 and MMP9 (P<0.05). The specific phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 significantly suppressed the increases in MMP3 and MMP9 protein expressions induced by C. pneumoniae infection (P<0.05). Further experiments showed that berberine significantly attenuated C. pneumoniae infection-induced VSMC migration (P<0.05). Moreover, berberine suppressed the protein expressions of MMP3 and MMP9 caused by C. pneumoniae infection in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). C. pneumoniae infection-induced increase in the phosphorylation level of Akt at Ser473 was inhibited by the treatment with berberine (P<0.05). Taken together, our data suggest that berberine inhibits C. pneumoniae infection-induced VSMC migration by downregulating the expressions of MMP3 and MMP9 via PI3K.

  13. Mycoplasma pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Walking pneumonia; Community-acquired pneumonia - mycoplasma; Community-acquired pneumonia - atypical ... Mycoplasma pneumonia usually affects people younger than 40. People who live or work in crowded areas such ...

  14. Necrotizing Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Elitsa V; Bartlett, Allison H

    2017-02-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia refers to the development of necrosis, liquefication, and cavitation of the lung parenchyma from an infectious pathogen. Nearly 4% of all community-acquired pneumonias are necrotizing, although studies retrospectively evaluating the incidence have found it to be increasing during the past 20 years. Common presenting symptoms include fever, tachypnea, and cough, and most of those afflicted also develop complications such as parapneumonic effusions, empyemas, or bronchopleural fistulae. When compared to age-matched controls with parapneumonic effusions or severe pneumonias without a necrotizing component, those with necrotizing pneumonia have been shown to have more elevated white blood cell counts and inflammatory markers that take longer to normalize, a longer duration of symptoms despite initiation of therapy, and a longer hospital stay. Despite the high incidence of complications during the acute phase of illness, the overall prognosis of necrotizing pneumonia has been shown to be promising, with nearly all children surviving the illness. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(2):e65-e68.].

  15. Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection Induced Allergic Airway Sensitization Is Controlled by Regulatory T-Cells and Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Crother, Timothy R.; Schröder, Nicolas W. J.; Karlin, Justin; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Peterson, Ellena; Arditi, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) is associated with induction and exacerbation of asthma. CP infection can induce allergic airway sensitization in mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Allergen exposure 5 days after a low dose (mild-moderate), but not a high dose (severe) CP infection induces antigen sensitization in mice. Innate immune signals play a critical role in controlling CP infection induced allergic airway sensitization, however these mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Wild-type, TLR2−/−, and TLR4−/− mice were infected intranasally (i.n.) with a low dose of CP, followed by i.n. exposure to human serum albumin (HSA) and challenged with HSA 2 weeks later. Airway inflammation, immunoglobulins, eosinophils, and goblet cells were measured. Low dose CP infection induced allergic sensitization in TLR2−/− mice, but not in TLR4−/− mice, due to differential Treg responses in these genotypes. TLR2−/− mice had reduced numbers of Tregs in the lung during CP infection while TLR4−/− mice had increased numbers. High dose CP infection resulted in an increase in Tregs and pDCs in lungs, which prevented antigen sensitization in WT mice. Depletion of Tregs or pDCs resulted in allergic airway sensitization. We conclude that Tregs and pDCs are critical determinants regulating CP infection-induced allergic sensitization. Furthermore, TLR2 and TLR4 signaling during CP infection may play a regulatory role through the modulation of Tregs. PMID:21695198

  16. TIR-Domain-Containing Adaptor-Inducing Interferon-β (TRIF) Mediates Antibacterial Defense during Gram-Negative Pneumonia by Inducing Interferon-x03B3.

    PubMed

    van Lieshout, Miriam H P; Florquin, Sandrine; Vanʼt Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of Gram-negative pneumonia and sepsis. Mice deficient for TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) demonstrate enhanced bacterial growth and dissemination during Klebsiella pneumonia. We show here that the impaired antibacterial defense of TRIF mutant mice is associated with absent interferon (IFN)-x03B3; production in the lungs. IFN-x03B3; production by splenocytes in response to K. pneumoniae in vitro was critically dependent on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), the common TLR adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response gene (MyD88) and TRIF. Reconstitution of TRIF mutant mice with recombinant IFN-x03B3; via the airways reduced bacterial loads in lungs and distant body sites to levels measured in wild-type mice, and partially restored pulmonary cytokine levels. The IFN-x03B3;-induced, improved, enhanced antibacterial response in TRIF mutant mice occurred at the expense of increased hepatocellular injury. These data indicate that TRIF mediates antibacterial defense during Gram-negative pneumonia, at least in part, by inducing IFN-x03B3; at the primary site of infection.

  17. Oral Amoxicillin Versus Benzyl Penicillin for Severe Pneumonia Among Kenyan Children: A Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Noninferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Agweyu, Ambrose; Gathara, David; Oliwa, Jacquie; Muinga, Naomi; Edwards, Tansy; Allen, Elizabeth; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth; English, Mike; Aweyo, Florence; Awuonda, Bernard; Chabi, Martin; Isika, Newton; Kariuki, Mary; Kuria, Magdalene; Mandi, Polycarp; Masibo, Leah; Massawa, Thaddeus; Mogoa, Wycliffe; Mutai, Beatrice; Muriithi, Gatwiri; Ng'arng'ar, Samuel; Nyamai, Rachel; Okello, Dorothy; Oywer, Wilson; Wanjala, Lordin

    2015-01-01

    Background. There are concerns that the evidence from studies showing noninferiority of oral amoxicillin to benzyl penicillin for severe pneumonia may not be generalizable to high-mortality settings. Methods. An open-label, multicenter, randomized controlled noninferiority trial was conducted at 6 Kenyan hospitals. Eligible children aged 2–59 months were randomized to receive amoxicillin or benzyl penicillin and followed up for the primary outcome of treatment failure at 48 hours. A noninferiority margin of risk difference between amoxicillin and benzyl penicillin groups was prespecified at 7%. Results. We recruited 527 children, including 302 (57.3%) with comorbidity. Treatment failure was observed in 20 of 260 (7.7%) and 21 of 261 (8.0%) of patients in the amoxicillin and benzyl penicillin arms, respectively (risk difference, −0.3% [95% confidence interval, −5.0% to 4.3%]) in per-protocol analyses. These findings were supported by the results of intention-to-treat analyses. Treatment failure by day 5 postenrollment was 11.4% and 11.0% and rising to 13.5% and 16.8% by day 14 in the amoxicillin vs benzyl penicillin groups, respectively. The most frequent cause of cumulative treatment failure at day 14 was clinical deterioration within 48 hours of enrollment (33/59 [55.9%]). Four patients died (overall mortality 0.8%) during the study, 3 of whom were allocated to the benzyl penicillin group. The presence of wheeze was independently associated with less frequent treatment failure. Conclusions. Our findings confirm noninferiority of amoxicillin to benzyl penicillin, provide estimates of risk of treatment failure in Kenya, and offer important additional evidence for policy making in sub-Saharan Africa. Clinical Trial Registration. NCT01399723. PMID:25550349

  18. Disease-specific dynamic biomarkers selected by integrating inflammatory mediators with clinical informatics in ARDS patients with severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chengshui; Shi, Lin; Li, Yuping; Wang, Xiangdong; Yang, Shuanying

    2016-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a heterogeneous syndrome that occurs as a result of various risk factors, including either direct or indirect lung injury, and systemic inflammation triggered also by severe pneumonia (SP). SP-ARDS-associated morbidity and mortality remains high also due to the lack of disease-specific biomarkers. The present study aimed at identifying disease-specific biomarkers in SP or SP-ARDS by integrating proteomic profiles of inflammatory mediators with clinical informatics. Plasma was sampled from the healthy as controls or patients with SP infected with bacteria or infection-associated SP-ARDS on the day of admission, day 3, and day 7. About 15 or 52 cytokines showed significant difference between SP and SP-ARDS patients with controls or 13 between SP-ARDS with SP alone and controls, including bone morphogenetic protein-15 (BMP-15), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 16 (CXCL16), chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 3 (CXCR3), interleukin-6 (IL-6), protein NOV homolog (NOV/CCN3), glypican 3, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4), IL-5, IL-5 R alpha, IL-22 BP, leptin, MIP-1d, and orexin B with a significant correlation with Digital Evaluation Score System (DESS) scores. ARDS patients with overexpressed IL-6, CXCL16, or IGFBP-4 had significantly longer hospital stay and higher incidence of secondary infection. We also found higher levels of those mediators were associated with poor survival rates in patients with lung cancer and involved in the process of the epithelial mesenchymal transition of alveolar epithelial cells. Our preliminary study suggested that integration of proteomic profiles with clinical informatics as part of clinical bioinformatics is important to validate and optimize disease-specific and disease-staged biomarkers.

  19. Severe Legionnaires' disease with pneumonia and biopsy-confirmed myocarditis most likely caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Naoto; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Takano, Tomoko

    2012-01-01

    We herein describe the successful treatment of a patient with possible Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6 infection complicated by pneumonia and myocarditis. A 32-year-old man presented with a five-day history of cough, dyspnea and chest pain. Chest radiography revealed patchy opacities in both lungs suggestive of bilateral pneumonia, and a urinary antigen test for Legionella pneumophila was positive. After admission, the patient developed congestive heart failure due to pathologically confirmed myocarditis. He was successfully treated with minocycline, macrolide, steroids and noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV). He eventually recovered with a normalized cardiac function. L. pneumophila serogroup 6 was isolated from the bathwater in the patient's home.

  20. Cluster Randomized Trial of Community Case Management of Severe Pneumonia with Oral Amoxicillin in Children 2-59 Months of Age in Haripur District, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Bari, Abdul; Sadruddin, Salim; Khan, Attaullah; Khan, Ibad ul Haque; Ullah, Aman; Lehri, Iqbal A.; Macleod, William B.; Fox, Matthew P.; Thea, Donald M; Qazi, Shamim A.

    2013-01-01

    Background First dose oral cotrimoxazole and referral is the recommended treatment for WHO-defined severe pneumonia. Difficulties with referral compliance are reported from many low resource settings resulting in low access to appropriate treatment. Methods In a cluster-randomized equivalence trial in Haripur District, Pakistan 28 clusters were randomized equally to intervention and control clusters. In 14 intervention clusters children 2-59 months of age with severe pneumonia were treated with oral amoxicillin by community-based Lady Health Workers (LHW). In 14 control clusters LHWs gave first dose of oral cotrimoxazole and referred to a health facility for appropriate treatment, which was standard of care. The objective was to determine whether community case-management (CCM) of severe pneumonia by LHW using oral amoxicillin was equivalent to current standard of care. Primary outcome was treatment failure on day 6 of treatment. Participants, care givers, and assessors were not blinded to study therapy. Per-protocol analysis was conducted adjusting for clustering within arms using generalized estimating equations. Findings 1995 children were randomized to intervention and 1477 to control clusters. We analysed 1857 children randomized to intervention and 1354 randomized to control clusters. They were similar in sex, age, and clinical characteristics. Treatment failure was 8·9% (165/1857) in intervention and 17·8% (241/1354) in control clusters. Cluster adjusted failure rates, the primary outcome, were significantly reduced in intervention clusters (risk difference (RD) -8·9%; 95% CI:-12.4% to -5.4%) by day 6. Further adjusting for baseline covariates made little difference (RD: -7·3%, CI: -10·1% to -4·5%). Three deaths occurred, only one in the intervention arm. Two deaths were before day 6, while one occurred between day 6 and 14. Most reduction in risk was in fever and lower chest indrawing on day 3 (RD -6·38%; 95% CI: -8·3% to -4·5%). Age, gender and

  1. Application of DNA amplification to pneumocystosis: presence of serum Pneumocystis carinii DNA during human and experimentally induced Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Much remains unknown about the basic biology of P. carinii and studies of this infection have been hampered by the lack of cultivation methods. We developed a sensitive and specific assay for P. carinii by utilizing DNA amplification of the P. carinii dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene. By this method, P. carinii DNA was detected in the lungs of rats with experimentally induced P. carinii pneumonia 2 wk before the onset of histopathological changes. DNA amplification analysis of serum demonstrated that by 10 wk of corticosteroid treatment, 12 of 12 (100%) infected rats had circulating DHFR DNA. P. carinii DHFR DNA also was detected in the serum of patients with AIDS and active P. carinii pneumonia (12 of 14 sera collected prospectively). Patients with advanced AIDS but without a history of P. carinii pneumonia were negative by this assay (0 of 6 sera examined). Serum polymerase chain reaction may facilitate investigations into the natural history and epidemiology of P. carinii infection, provide insight into the pathogenesis of parasite dissemination, and offer a useful, noninvasive diagnostic test for the detection of human pneumocystosis. PMID:1402679

  2. Evaluation of disk approximation and single-well broth tests for detection of inducible clindamycin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, James H; McElmeel, M Leticia; Fulcher, Letitia C; McGee, Lesley; Glennen, Anita

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluated an agar disk diffusion D-zone test and an erythromycin-clindamycin (ERY + CLI) single-well broth test for inducible CLI resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae. The standard CLSI disk approximation test and a single-well combination test incorporating 1 plus 0.5 μg/ml ERY + CLI detected >96% of isolates containing the ermB determinant.

  3. 2-Chloroadenosine (2-CADO) treatment modulates the pro-inflammatory immune response to prevent acute lung inflammation in BALB/c mice suffering from Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2010-06-01

    Acute lung inflammation (ALI) is a life-threatening pathology and can develop during the course of several clinical conditions such as pneumonia, acid aspiration or sepsis. Adenosine plays a significant role in controlling acute inflammation via binding to A(2A) receptors on inflammatory cells, i.e. neutrophils or macrophages. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of 2-chloroadenosine (2-CADO), alone or in combination with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced acute lung infection in mice. Acute lung infection in mice was induced by directly instilling the selected dose (10(4) colony-forming units/mL) of bacteria intranasally. Histopathological examination of the lungs was performed to reveal neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli. In addition to the major pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin (IL)-1alpha, levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were also determined. Intranasal instillation of bacteria caused profound neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli as well as a significant increase in the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (i.e. TNFalpha and IL-1alpha). However, intravenous administration of 2-CADO 10 microg/kg/day, alone or in combination with an antibiotic (i.e. AMC), significantly decreased neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli. A significant decrease in TNFalpha and IL-1alpha along with elevation of IL-10 levels in the lung homogenate of mice with acute lung infection was observed upon treatment with 2-CADO alone, with no significant decrease in bacterial counts. Moreover, in combination with AMC, 2-CADO exhibited its immunomodulatory action in acute lung infection and prevented ALI, whilst an antibacterial action was exhibited by AMC.

  4. Chloramphenicol versus ampicillin plus gentamicin for community acquired very severe pneumonia among children aged 2-59 months in low resource settings: multicentre randomised controlled trial (SPEAR study)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether five days’ treatment with injectable ampicillin plus gentamicin compared with chloramphenicol reduces treatment failure in children aged 2-59 months with community acquired very severe pneumonia in low resource settings. Design Open label randomised controlled trial. Setting Inpatient wards within tertiary care hospitals in Bangladesh, Ecuador, India, Mexico, Pakistan, Yemen, and Zambia. Participants Children aged 2-59 months with WHO defined very severe pneumonia. Intervention Chloramphenicol versus a combination of ampicillin plus gentamicin. Main outcome measures Primary outcome measure was treatment failure at five days. Secondary outcomes were treatment failure defined similarly among all participants evaluated at 48 hours and at 10 and 21 days. Results More children failed treatment with chloramphenicol at day 5 (16% v 11%; relative risk 1.43, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.97) and also by days 10 and 21. Overall, 112 bacterial isolates were obtained from blood and lung aspirates in 110 children (11.5%), with the most common organisms being Staphylococcus aureus (n=47) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=22). In subgroup analysis, bacteraemia with any organism increased the risk of treatment failure at 21 days in the chloramphenicol group (2.09, 1.41 to 3.10) but not in the ampicillin plus gentamicin group (1.12, 0.59 to 2.13). Similarly, isolation of S pneumoniae increased the risk of treatment failure at day 21 (4.06, 2.73 to 6.03) and death (5.80, 2.62 to 12.85) in the chloramphenicol group but not in the ampicillin plus gentamicin group. No difference was found in treatment failure for children with S aureus bacteraemia in the two groups, but the power to detect a difference in this subgroup analysis was low. Independent predictors of treatment failure by multivariate analysis were hypoxaemia (oxygen saturation <90%), receiving chloramphenicol, being female, and poor immunisation status. Conclusion Injectable ampicillin plus

  5. Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gilroy, Shelley A; Bennett, Nicholas J

    2011-12-01

    Pneumocystis (carinii) jiroveci pneumonia can occur in immunocompromised individuals, especially hematopoietic stem and solid organ transplant recipients and those receiving immunosuppressive agents, and is the most common opportunistic infection in persons with advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The Pneumocystis genus was initially mistaken as a trypanosome and later as a protozoan. Genetic analysis identified the organism as a unicellular fungus. Pneumocystis jiroveci is the species responsible for human infections. A slow indolent time course with symptoms of pneumonia progressing over weeks to months is characteristic in HIV-infected patients. Fulminant respiratory failure associated with fever and dry cough is typical in non-HIV-infected patients. Definitive diagnosis relies on histopathological testing of sputum, induced or sampled by fiberoptic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. The first-line drug for treatment and prevention is trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

  6. The protective effects of Ambroxol in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced pneumonia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiwen; Huang, Yi; Han, Yipin; Bai, Chun-xue; Wang, Guifang

    2011-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the effect of Ambroxol on the pulmonary surfactant (PS) in rat pneumonia induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). Material and methods The pneumonic rats were obtained by injecting ATCC27853 intratracheally. One hundred and twenty SD rats were randomized into four groups: normal saline and Ambroxol was injected intraperitoneally following PA challenge in the PA/NS and PA/AM group; the other two groups were NS/AM and NS/NS. The wet/dry weight ratio (W/D), and pathological changes were assayed. Total proteins (TP), total phospholipid (TPL), and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analysed. Some BALF was cultured for colony counts. Ultrastructural change of the lung was observed by electron microscopy. Results The W/D ratio in the PA/AM group was lower than that in the PA/NS group; both were higher than that in the NS/NS group (p < 0.05). There were more neutrophils in the PA/NS group than in the PA/AM group (p < 0.05), and more in the PA/AM group than in the NS/NS group (p < 0.05). The ratio of DSPC/TPL and DSPC/TP in the BALF in PA/NS group was lower than that in the PA/AM group; DSPC/TPL and DSPC/TP ratios also increased in the NS/AM group. The PA colony numbers in the PA/AM group were lower than in the PA/NS group (p > 0.05). In the PA/NS group, vacuolation occurred in the lamellar body of alveolar type 2 cells (AT2) and the PS layer was rough and broken in some areas. In the PA/AM group, the degree of vacuolation of the lamellar body was less than in the PA/NS group. Conclusions Ambroxol could protect rats from pneumonia by improving the level of endogenous PS, especially DPPC. PMID:22312374

  7. Changes in epidemiology, clinical features and severity of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pneumonia in the first post-pandemic influenza season.

    PubMed

    Viasus, D; Cordero, E; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Oteo, J A; Fernández-Navarro, A; Ortega, L; Gracia-Ahufinger, I; Fariñas, M C; García-Almodovar, E; Payeras, A; Paño-Pardo, J R; Muñez-Rubio, E; Carratalà, J

    2012-03-01

    Although the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus is expected to circulate as a seasonal virus for some years after the pandemic period, its behaviour cannot be predicted. We analysed a prospective cohort study of hospitalized adults with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pneumonia at 14 teaching hospitals in Spain to compare the epidemiology, clinical features and outcomes of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pneumonia between the pandemic period and the first post-pandemic influenza season. A total of 348 patients were included: 234 during the pandemic period and 114 during the first post-pandemic influenza season. Patients during the post-pandemic period were older and more likely to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease and cancer than the others. Septic shock, altered mental status and respiratory failure on arrival at hospital were significantly more common during the post-pandemic period. Time from illness onset to receipt of antiviral therapy was also longer during this period. Early antiviral therapy was less frequently administered to patients during the post-pandemic period (22.9% versus 10.9%; p 0.009). In addition, length of stay was longer, and need for mechanical ventilation and intensive-care unit admission were significantly higher during the post-pandemic period. In-hospital mortality (5.1% versus 21.2%; p <0.001) was also greater during this period. In conclusion, significant epidemiological changes and an increased severity of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pneumonia were found in the first post-pandemic influenza season. Physicians should consider influenza A (H1N1) 2009 when selecting microbiological testing and treatment in patients with pneumonia in the upcoming influenza season.

  8. Ethanol-induced alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) potentiates pneumolysin in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Luong, Truc Thanh; Kim, Eun-Hye; Bak, Jong Phil; Nguyen, Cuong Thach; Choi, Sangdun; Briles, David E; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol impairs the host immune system, rendering the host more vulnerable to infection. Therefore, alcoholics are at increased risk of acquiring serious bacterial infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, including pneumonia. Nevertheless, how alcohol affects pneumococcal virulence remains unclear. Here, we showed that the S. pneumoniae type 2 D39 strain is ethanol tolerant and that alcohol upregulates alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) and potentiates pneumolysin (Ply). Hemolytic activity, colonization, and virulence of S. pneumoniae, as well as host cell myeloperoxidase activity, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and inflammation, were significantly attenuated in adhE mutant bacteria (ΔadhE strain) compared to D39 wild-type bacteria. Therefore, AdhE might act as a pneumococcal virulence factor. Moreover, in the presence of ethanol, S. pneumoniae AdhE produced acetaldehyde and NADH, which subsequently led Rex (redox-sensing transcriptional repressor) to dissociate from the adhE promoter. An increase in AdhE level under the ethanol condition conferred an increase in Ply and H2O2 levels. Consistently, S. pneumoniae D39 caused higher cytotoxicity to RAW 264.7 cells than the ΔadhE strain under the ethanol stress condition, and ethanol-fed mice (alcoholic mice) were more susceptible to infection with the D39 wild-type bacteria than with the ΔadhE strain. Taken together, these data indicate that AdhE increases Ply under the ethanol stress condition, thus potentiating pneumococcal virulence.

  9. Fatal Community-acquired Pneumonia in Children Caused by Re-emergent Human Adenovirus 7d Associated with Higher Severity of Illness and Fatality Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiwu; Zeng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jing; Pan, Yuxian; Chen, Manjun; Guo, Yonghui; Yu, Nan; Chodosh, James; Fu, Ning; Che, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Qiwei

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are highly contagious pathogens causing acute respiratory disease (ARD), such as community-acquired pneumonia. HAdV-7d, a re-emergent genomic variant, has been recently reported in Asia and the United States after a several-decade absence. However, whether HAdV-7d is associated with higher severity than other types is currently unclear. In this study, the clinical and epidemiological investigation showed that fever, cough, and sore throat were the three most common respiratory symptoms of HAdV infections. HAdV-7 caused longer duration of fever, higher morbidity of tachypnea/dyspnea, pleural effusion, diarrhea, hepatosplenomegaly, consciousness alteration, as well as higher rates of pneumonia, mechanical ventilation and higher fatality rate (28.6%) than other types, particularly HAdV-3 and HAdV-2. The genomes of seven HAdV-7d isolates from mild, severe, and fatal cases were sequenced and highly similar with each other. Surprisingly, two isolates (2011, 2012) had 100% identical genomes with an earlier strain from a fatal ARD outbreak in China (2009), which elucidates the virus origin and confirms the unexpected HAdV genomic conservation and stability. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that L1 52/55-kDa DNA packaging protein may be associated with the higher severity of illness and fatality rate of HAdV-7. Clinicians need to be aware of HAdVs in children with ARD. PMID:27848998

  10. Aspiration-related organizing pneumonia complicating laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding: A lung cancer mimicker

    PubMed Central

    Aljohaney, Ahmed A.; Ajlan, Amr M.; Alghamdi, Fahad A.

    2016-01-01

    There are several described pulmonary complications due to laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. We report a rare case of a 32-year-old male who presented with pulmonary symptoms and a solitary lung mass 12 years after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. A bronchoscopic lung biopsy showed organizing pneumonia that was induced by aspiration pneumonia. The atypical radiological appearance of the aspiration pneumonia may pose a diagnostic challenge, and clinicians' awareness regarding such an entity is needed to avoid unnecessary intervention. PMID:27803757

  11. Aspiration-related organizing pneumonia complicating laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding: A lung cancer mimicker.

    PubMed

    Aljohaney, Ahmed A; Ajlan, Amr M; Alghamdi, Fahad A

    2016-01-01

    There are several described pulmonary complications due to laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. We report a rare case of a 32-year-old male who presented with pulmonary symptoms and a solitary lung mass 12 years after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. A bronchoscopic lung biopsy showed organizing pneumonia that was induced by aspiration pneumonia. The atypical radiological appearance of the aspiration pneumonia may pose a diagnostic challenge, and clinicians' awareness regarding such an entity is needed to avoid unnecessary intervention.

  12. Failure of standard antimicrobial therapy in children aged 3-59 months with mild or asymptomatic HIV infection and severe pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Jeena, Prakash; Thea, Donald M.; MacLeod, William B.; Chisaka, Noel; Fox, Matthew P.; Coovadia, H. M.; Qazi, Shamim

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether children aged 3-59 months with mild or non-symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and WHO-defined severe pneumonia have a higher failure rate than do HIV-uninfected children when treated with the standard WHO treatment of parenteral penicillin or oral amoxicillin. METHODS: This study was a planned sub-analysis of a randomized trial of 3-59-month-old children presenting with WHO-defined severe pneumonia (the APPIS study). We included two sites with high HIV prevalence in Durban, South Africa and Ndola, Zambia. Primary outcome measures were clinical treatment failure at day 2 and day 14. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV IDENTIFIER: CT00227331http://www.clinicaltrialsgov/show/NCT00227331). FINDINGS: Of the 523 children enrolled, HIV status was known for 464 participants; 106 (23%) of these were infected with HIV. By day 2, 57 (12.3%) children had failed treatment and 110 (23.7%) failed by day 14. Twenty (18.9%) HIV-infected children failed by day 2 compared with 37 (10.3%) uninfected children (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.07; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-4.00). Thirty-four (32.1%) HIV-infected children failed treatment by day 14 compared with 76 (21.2%) uninfected children (adjusted OR 1.88; 95% CI: 1.11-3.17). Analysis stratified by age showed that the greatest differential in treatment failure at day 2 and day 14 occurred in the children aged 3-5 months. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-infected children with severe pneumonia fail WHO-standard treatment with parenteral penicillin or amoxicillin at day 2 and day 14 more often than do HIV-uninfected children, especially young infants. Standard case management of acute respiratory infection (ARI) using WHO treatment guidelines is inadequate in areas of high HIV prevalence and reappraisal of empiric antimicrobial therapy is urgently needed for severe pneumonia associated with HIV-1. PMID:16628299

  13. A Histologically Distinctive Interstitial Pneumonia Induced by Overexpression of the Interleukin 6, Transforming Growth Factor β1, or Platelet-Derived Growth Factor B Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Sakuma, Junko; Hayashi, Seiji; Abe, Kin'ya; Saito, Izumu; Harada, Shizuko; Sakatani, Mitsunoir; Yamamoto, Satoru; Matsumoto, Norinao; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Kishmoto, Tadamitsu

    1995-10-01

    Interstitial pneumonia is characterized by alveolitis with resulting fibrosis of the interstitium. To determine the relevance of humoral factors in the pathogenesis of interstitial pneumonia, we introduced expression vectors into Wistar rats via the trachea to locally overexpress humoral factors in the lungs. Human interleukin (IL) 6 and IL-6 receptor genes induced lymphocytic alveolitis without marked fibroblast proliferation. In contrast, overexpression of human transforming growth factor β1 or human platelet-derived growth factor B gene induced only mild or apparent cellular infiltration in the alveoli, respectively. However, both factors induced significant proliferation of fibroblasts and deposition of collagen fibrils. These histopathologic changes induced by the transforming growth factor β1 and platelet-derived growth factor B gene are partly akin to those changes seen in lung tissues from patients with pulmonary fibrosis and markedly contrast with the changes induced by overexpression of the IL-6 and IL-6 receptor genes that mimics lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia.

  14. Efficacy of High-Dose Meropenem (Six Grams per Day) in Treatment of Experimental Murine Pneumonia Induced by Meropenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Iwanaga, Naoki; Takemoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Taiga; Yanagihara, Kastunori; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Mukae, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru; Izumikawa, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    High-dose meropenem (MEPM; 6 g/day) has been approved as a treatment for purulent meningitis; however, little is known regarding its in vivo efficacy in refractory lower respiratory tract infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of MEPM at 6 g/day in a murine model of severe pneumonia caused by MEPM-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Experimental pneumonia induced by MEPM-resistant P. aeruginosa was treated with normal-dose MEPM (150 mg/kg of body weight, simulating a 3-g/day regimen in humans) or high-dose MEPM (500 mg/kg, simulating a 6-g/day regimen in humans). Mice treated with high-dose MEPM showed significantly restored survival relative to that of untreated mice and tended to show a survival rate higher than that of mice treated with normal-dose MEPM. The viable bacterial counts (of two clinical isolates) in the lungs decreased significantly in mice treated with high-dose MEPM from those for untreated mice (P < 0.001) or mice treated with normal-dose MEPM (P, <0.01 and <0.05). The number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was also significantly lower in mice treated with high-dose MEPM than in untreated mice. The free MEPM concentration in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) exceeded 16 μg/ml for 85 min in mice treated with high-dose MEPM, but not for mice treated with normal-dose MEPM. Our results demonstrate that high-dose MEPM (6 g/day) might provide better protection against pneumonia caused by MEPM-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa than the dose normally administered (less than 3 g/day).

  15. Ovine pulmonary surfactant induces killing of Pasteurella haemolytica, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae by normal serum.

    PubMed Central

    Brogden, K A

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant has been shown to play an increasingly important role in bacterial clearance at the alveolar surface in the lung. This study describes a bactericidal mechanism in which ovine pulmonary surfactant induces killing of Pasteurella haemolytica by normal serum. To demonstrate killing, six bacterial species were incubated first with pulmonary surfactant for 60 min at 37 degrees C and then with serum for an additional 60 min at 37 degrees C. P. haemolytica type A1 strains 82-25 and L101, a P. haemolytica type 2 strain, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae were susceptible and Pasteurella multocida, Serratia marcescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were not susceptible to killing by ovine pulmonary surfactant and normal serum. No bacteria incubated with bovine pulmonary surfactant were killed by normal serum. Although the species origin of pulmonary surfactant was selective, the species origin of serum was not. P. haemolytica incubated with ovine pulmonary surfactant was killed by fetal calf serum, gnotobiotic calf serum, pooled normal sheep serum, pooled normal rabbit serum, and pooled guinea pig serum. Ultrastructurally, killed P. haemolytica suspensions contained dead cells and cells distorted with vacuoles between the cytoplasmic membrane and the cytoplasm. The mechanism of killing did not correlate with concentrations of complement or lysozyme or titers of residual antibody in either the pulmonary surfactant or the serum, and killing was reduced by preincubation of surfactant with P. haemolytica lipopolysaccharide. Preliminary characterization of both surfactant and serum implicate a low-molecular-weight proteinaceous component in the surfactant and serum albumin in the serum. This mechanism may help clear certain gram-negative bacteria from the lungs of sheep as a part of the pulmonary innate defense system. Images PMID:1452351

  16. NKT Cells in the Induced Sputum of Severe Asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Hamzaoui, Agnes; Cheik Rouhou, Sana; Graïri, Hedia; Abid, Hanadi; Ammar, Jamel; Chelbi, Hanene; Hamzaoui, Kamel

    2006-01-01

    To determine whether there was a specific inflammatory process in severe asthmatics, the phenotypic characteristics of induced sputum immune cells were analysed among patients with severe asthma. Twenty-two induced sputa (10 severe asthmatics) were studied. Flow cytometric analysis was performed using immune cells of the sputum and monoclonal antibodies to CD3, CD4, CD8, CD56, CD25, and TCRγδ. The number of NKT (CD3+CD56+) cells was significantly higher in the sputum of severe asthmatics compared with mild asthmatic and healthy control groups (P < .05). CD8+CD56+ cells were the predominant subtype of the increased NKT cells in severe asthmatics. CD3+CD56+Vα24+, TCRγδ+ CD56+, and CD4+CD25+ T cells were significantly increased in severe asthmatic patients. These results suggest that the immunopathogenesis of severe asthmatics vary between severe and mild asthmatics, and that CD8+CD56+ NKT cells may play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of severe asthma. PMID:16883065

  17. Chlamydia pneumoniae-induced foam cell formation requires MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling and is reciprocally modulated by liver X receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Shimada, Kenichi; Bulut, Yonca; Doherty, Terence M; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2008-11-15

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is detected by macrophages and other APCs via TLRs and can exacerbate developing atherosclerotic lesions, but how that occurs is not known. Liver X receptors (LXRs) centrally control reverse cholesterol transport, but also negatively modulate TLR-mediated inflammatory pathways. We isolated peritoneal macrophages from wild-type, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR2/4, MyD88, TRIF, MyD88/TRIF, and IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) KO mice, treated them with live or UV-killed C. pneumoniae in the presence or absence of oxidized LDL, then measured foam cell formation. In some experiments, the synthetic LXR agonist GW3965 was added to macrophages infected with C. pneumoniae in the presence of oxidized LDL. Both live and UV-killed C. pneumoniae induced IRF3 activation and promoted foam cell formation in wild-type macrophages, whereas the genetic absence of TLR2, TLR4, MyD88, TRIF, or IRF3, but not TLR3, significantly reduced foam cell formation. C. pneumoniae-induced foam cell formation was significantly reduced by the LXR agonist GW3965, which in turn inhibited C. pneumoniae-induced IRF3 activation, suggesting a bidirectional cross-talk. We conclude that C. pneumoniae facilitates foam cell formation via activation of both MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent (i.e., TRIF-dependent and IRF3-dependent) pathways downstream of TLR2 and TLR4 signaling and that TLR3 is not involved in this process. This mechanism could at least partly explain why infection with C. pneumoniae accelerates the development of atherosclerotic plaque and lends support to the proposal that LXR agonists might prove clinically useful in suppressing atherogenesis.

  18. A preliminary study on the potential of Mycoplasma pneumoniae to induce dyskaryotic change in respiratory epithelium in adult community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    An, Shu-Chang; Yang, Dong-Hong; Luo, Chao-Feng; Chen, Xin; Liu, Guo-Tian; Weng, Yan; Liu, Jing-Zhe; Shang, Ying; Wang, Rui-Qin; Gao, Zhan-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to explore the cellular morphology of respiratory epithelium in Mycoplasma pneumonia (MpP) patients. Materials and Methods: The cast-off cell morphological findings from bronchoscopic brushings in MpP and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by typical pathogens were reviewed. Results: Compared with the CAP group, cellular dysplasia in respiratory tract epithelial brushings was significantly greater in MpP patients (P = 0.033). Conclusion: Unique biological characteristics and mechanisms of pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) may result in dyskaryotic changes in respiratory epithelium in adult MpP. PMID:28163727

  19. Effectiveness of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination in preventing community-acquired pneumonia hospitalization and severe outcomes in the elderly in Spain.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Àngela; Soldevila, Núria; Toledo, Diana; Torner, Núria; Force, Luis; Pérez, María José; Martín, Vicente; Rodríguez-Rojas, Lourdes; Astray, Jenaro; Egurrola, Mikel; Sanz, Francisco; Castilla, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia is a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly, but investigation of the etiological agent of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is not possible in most hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination (PPSV23) in preventing CAP hospitalization and reducing the risk of intensive care unit admission (ICU) and fatal outcomes in hospitalized people aged ≥65 years. We made a multicenter case-control study in 20 Spanish hospitals during 2013-2014 and 2014-2015. We selected patients aged ≥65 years hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia and controls matched by sex, age and date of hospitalization. Multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression to estimate vaccine effectiveness and unconditional logistic regression to evaluate the reduction in the risk of severe and fatal outcomes. 1895 cases and 1895 controls were included; 13.7% of cases and 14.4% of controls had received PPSV23 in the last five years. The effectiveness of PPSV23 in preventing CAP hospitalization was 15.2% (95% CI -3.1-30.3). The benefit of PPSV23 in avoiding ICU admission or death was 28.1% (95% CI -14.3-56.9) in all patients, 30.9% (95% CI -32.2-67.4) in immunocompetent patients and 26.9% (95% CI -38.6-64.8) in immunocompromised patients. In conclusion, PPSV23 showed a modest trend to avoidance of hospitalizations due to CAP and to the prevention of death or ICU admission in elderly patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of CAP.

  20. Effectiveness of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination in preventing community-acquired pneumonia hospitalization and severe outcomes in the elderly in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Soldevila, Núria; Toledo, Diana; Torner, Núria; Force, Luis; Pérez, María José; Martín, Vicente; Rodríguez-Rojas, Lourdes; Astray, Jenaro; Egurrola, Mikel; Sanz, Francisco; Castilla, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia is a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly, but investigation of the etiological agent of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is not possible in most hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination (PPSV23) in preventing CAP hospitalization and reducing the risk of intensive care unit admission (ICU) and fatal outcomes in hospitalized people aged ≥65 years. We made a multicenter case-control study in 20 Spanish hospitals during 2013–2014 and 2014–2015. We selected patients aged ≥65 years hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia and controls matched by sex, age and date of hospitalization. Multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression to estimate vaccine effectiveness and unconditional logistic regression to evaluate the reduction in the risk of severe and fatal outcomes. 1895 cases and 1895 controls were included; 13.7% of cases and 14.4% of controls had received PPSV23 in the last five years. The effectiveness of PPSV23 in preventing CAP hospitalization was 15.2% (95% CI -3.1–30.3). The benefit of PPSV23 in avoiding ICU admission or death was 28.1% (95% CI -14.3–56.9) in all patients, 30.9% (95% CI -32.2–67.4) in immunocompetent patients and 26.9% (95% CI -38.6–64.8) in immunocompromised patients. In conclusion, PPSV23 showed a modest trend to avoidance of hospitalizations due to CAP and to the prevention of death or ICU admission in elderly patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of CAP. PMID:28187206

  1. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia.

  2. Phenytoin-induced severe gingival overgrowth in a child.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Verma, Nidhi; Verma, Umesh Pratap

    2014-07-21

    Gingival enlargement or overgrowth (GO) is a common complication of the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin (PHT). GO is evident in almost half of the patients receiving PHT therapy. PHT-induced gingival overgrowth (PGO) is more common in children than in adults and affects both males and females equally. PGO may vary from mild to severe and does not seem to be dose dependant. It is supposed that PHT and its metabolites cause a direct effect on the periodontal tissues; however, poor oral hygiene may contribute to the severity of gingival inflammation in patients with PGO. Management of PGO includes meticulous oral hygiene practice to reduce inflammation and surgical excision of the overgrown tissue, known as gingivectomy. We present a case of PHT-induced severe GO in a 10-year-old boy and discuss the clinical features, aetiology, pathogenesis and management of PGO.

  3. Phenytoin-induced severe gingival overgrowth in a child

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Verma, Nidhi; Verma, Umesh Pratap

    2014-01-01

    Gingival enlargement or overgrowth (GO) is a common complication of the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin (PHT). GO is evident in almost half of the patients receiving PHT therapy. PHT-induced gingival overgrowth (PGO) is more common in children than in adults and affects both males and females equally. PGO may vary from mild to severe and does not seem to be dose dependant. It is supposed that PHT and its metabolites cause a direct effect on the periodontal tissues; however, poor oral hygiene may contribute to the severity of gingival inflammation in patients with PGO. Management of PGO includes meticulous oral hygiene practice to reduce inflammation and surgical excision of the overgrown tissue, known as gingivectomy. We present a case of PHT-induced severe GO in a 10-year-old boy and discuss the clinical features, aetiology, pathogenesis and management of PGO. PMID:25053668

  4. Analysis of Risk Factors for Severe Acute Respiratory Infection and Pneumonia and among Adult Patients with Acute Respiratory Illness during 2011-2014 Influenza Seasons in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Wie, Seong-Heon; Jeong, Hye Won; Kim, Young Keun; Park, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Shin Woo; Lee, Sun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization recommends the surveillance of influenza-like illness (ILI) and severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) to respond effectively to both seasonal influenza epidemics and pandemics. In Korea, the “Hospital-based Influenza Morbidity and Mortality (HIMM)” surveillance system has been operated to monitor ILI and SARI occurrences. Materials and Methods A multi-center prospective observational study was conducted. Adult patients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) were enrolled during the 2011-12, 2012-2013, and 2013-2014 influenza seasons at the 10 university hospitals using the HIMM surveillance system. With respect to SARI and pneumonia development, risk profiles were analyzed in patients with ARI in Korea. Results A total of 5,459 cases were eligible for this analysis. Among 5,459 cases with ARI, 2,887 cases (52.9%) were identified that they had influenza infection. Among enrolled cases, 750 cases belonged to the SARI group, while 4,709 cases belonged to the non-SARI group. With respect to pneumonia development, 317 cases were accompanied by pneumonia, and 5,142 cases were not. Multivariate analyses revealed that the following factors were associated with an increased risk of SARI: Old age (≥65 years) (odds ratio [OR] 2.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.2-3.32), chronic heart disease (CHD) (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.68-2.98), cerebrovascular disease (CVD) (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.05-2.10), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.48-3.69), asthma (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.62-3.36), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.73-3.99), chronic liver disease (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.04-2.81), and autoimmune diseases (OR 2.53, 1.57-4.08). Multivariate analyses revealed that the following factors were independent risk factors for pneumonia development: Old age (≥65 years) (OR 5.71, 95% CI 4.10-7.94), CHD (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.07-2.22), COPD (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.48-3.69), asthma (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.62-3.36), CKD (OR 2.62, 95

  5. TLR/MyD88 and liver X receptor alpha signaling pathways reciprocally control Chlamydia pneumoniae-induced acceleration of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Naiki, Yoshikazu; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Wong, Michelle H; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Shimada, Kenichi; Chen, Shuang; Yilmaz, Atilla; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Schröder, Nicolas W J; Crother, Timothy R; Bulut, Yonca; Doherty, Terence M; Bradley, Michelle; Shaposhnik, Zory; Peterson, Ellena M; Tontonoz, Peter; Shah, Prediman K; Arditi, Moshe

    2008-11-15

    Experimental and clinical studies link Chlamydia pneumoniae infection to atherogenesis and atherothrombotic events, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that C. pneumoniae-induced acceleration of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E (ApoE)(-/-) mice is reciprocally modulated by activation of TLR-mediated innate immune and liver X receptor alpha (LXRalpha) signaling pathways. We infected ApoE(-/-) mice and ApoE(-/-) mice that also lacked TLR2, TLR4, MyD88, or LXRalpha intranasally with C. pneumoniae followed by feeding of a high fat diet for 4 mo. Mock-infected littermates served as controls. Atherosclerosis was assessed in aortic sinuses and in en face preparation of whole aorta. The numbers of activated dendritic cells (DCs) within plaques and the serum levels of cholesterol and proinflammatory cytokines were also measured. C. pneumoniae infection markedly accelerated atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice that was associated with increased numbers of activated DCs in aortic sinus plaques and higher circulating levels of MCP-1, IL-12p40, IL-6, and TNF-alpha. In contrast, C. pneumoniae infection had only a minimal effect on atherosclerosis, accumulation of activated DCs in the sinus plaques, or circulating cytokine increases in ApoE(-/-) mice that were also deficient in TLR2, TLR4, or MyD88. However, C. pneumoniae-induced acceleration of atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice was further enhanced in ApoE(-/-)LXRalpha(-/-) double knockout mice and was accompanied by higher serum levels of IL-6 and TNF-alpha. We conclude that C. pneumoniae infection accelerates atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice predominantly through a TLR/MyD88-dependent mechanism and that LXRalpha appears to reciprocally modulate and reduce the proatherogenic effects of C. pneumoniae infection.

  6. IFN-τ inhibits S. aureus-induced inflammation by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs in RAW 264.7 cells and mice with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gan; Wu, Haichong; Jiang, Kangfeng; Rui, Guangze; Zhu, Zhe; Qiu, Changwei; Guo, Mengyao; Deng, Ganzhen

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), a significant cause of pneumonia, leads to severe inflammation. Few effective treatments or drugs have been reported for S. aureus infection. Interferon tau (IFN-τ) is a type I interferon with low cellular toxicity even at high doses. Previous studies have reported that IFN-τ could significantly mitigate tissue inflammation; however, IFN-τ treatment in S. aureus-induced pneumonia has not been well reported. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the anti-inflammatory mechanism of IFN-τ in S. aureus-induced pneumonia in mice. A S. aureus-induced pneumonia model and RAW 264.7 cells were used in this research. The histopathological as well as lung wet to dry ratio (W/D) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity results showed that IFN-τ could protect the lung from S. aureus damage. In addition, ELISA and qPCR revealed that IFN-τ treatment led to a decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) in both the cells and mouse model, but IL-10 was increased. TLR2, which is involved in the response during S. aureus infection, was also down-regulated by IFN-τ treatment and directly affected NF-κB and MAPK pathway activation. Then, we examined the phosphorylation of IκBα, NF-κB p65 and MAPKs by western blotting, and the results displayed that the phosphorylation of IκBα, NF-κB p65 and MAPKs was inhibited upon IFN-τ treatment in both the cells and mouse model. These findings indicate that IFN-τ has anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo through the inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK activation, suggesting that IFN-τ may have potential as a therapeutic agent against S. aureus-induced inflammatory diseases.

  7. Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: validation of severity criteria. The Grupo Andaluz para el Estudio de las Enfermedades Infecciosas.

    PubMed

    Cordero, E; Pachón, J; Rivero, A; Girón, J A; Gómez-Mateos, J; Merino, M D; Torres-Tortosa, M; González-Serrano, M; Aliaga, L; Collado, A; Hernández-Quero, J; Barrera, A; Nuño, E

    2000-12-01

    Severity criteria for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have always excluded patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. A 1-yr, multicenter, prospective observational study of HIV-infected patients with bacterial CAP was done to validate the criteria used in the American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines for CAP, and to determine the prognosis-associated factors in the HIV-infected population with bacterial CAP. Overall, 355 cases were included, with an attributable mortality of 9.3%. Patients who met the ATS criteria had a longer hospital stay (p = 0.01), longer duration of fever (p < 0.001), and higher attributable mortality (13.1% versus 3.5%, p = 0.02) than those who did not. Three factors were independently related to mortality: CD4(+) cell count < 100/microl, radiologic progression of disease, and shock. Pleural effusion, cavities, and/or multilobar infiltrates at admission were independently associated with radiologic progression. A prognostic rule based on the five criteria of shock, CD4(+) cell count < 100/microl, pleural effusion, cavities, and multilobar infiltrates had a high negative predictive value for mortality (97.1%). The attributable mortality for severe pneumonia was 11.3%, as compared with 1.3% for nonsevere disease (p = 0.008). The ATS severity criteria are valid in HIV-infected patients with bacterial CAP. Our study provides the basis for identification of patients who may require hospitalization determined by clinical judgment and the five clinical criteria of shock, a CD4(+) cell count < 100/microl, pleural effusion, cavities, and multilobar involvement. These prognostic factors should be validated in independent cohort studies.

  8. Pneumonia (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs caused by an infection. Many different organisms can cause it, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of ...

  9. Bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to aspiration pneumonia induced by a wristwatch lodged at the pharyngoesophageal junction.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Chihiro; Miyao, Masashi; Kotani, Hirokazu; Tamaki, Keiji

    2015-06-01

    Bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to disease is rare and seldom encountered in forensic autopsies; however, traumatic bilateral pneumothorax occurs often. Herein, we present a forensic case involving a 50-year-old woman who died 4 days after ingesting a wristwatch. Postmortem computed tomography and autopsy findings demonstrated that the wristwatch was lodged at the pharyngoesophageal junction, that she had a bilateral pneumothorax unaccompanied by any thoracic wound, and that macular hemorrhagic lesions on the lung surfaces were responsible for the pneumothorax. A histological examination of the macular lesions revealed that they were aspiration pneumonia foci with many birefringent foreign materials. Furthermore, a necrotic process secondary to aspiration pneumonia with a one way check-valve hyperinflation caused by foreign materials in the bronchioles was the most probable pathogenesis of her pneumothorax. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a bilateral secondary spontaneous pneumothorax caused by a large foreign body at the pharyngoesophageal junction leading to death.

  10. Elevated Plasma Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 and Its Correlations with Severity of Disease in Patients with Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yia-Ting; Wang, Yao-Chen; Lee, Hsiang-Lin; Lu, Min-Chi; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) increases patient mortality and medical expenditure, and a real-time and reliable method for the rapid diagnosis of VAP may help reduce fatal complications. Matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) is considered significant in the pathogenesis of lung inflammation and infection. Therefore, we examined its relationship with the clinical course of VAP. This retrospective observational study recruited 30 healthy volunteers, 12 patients who used mechanical ventilation without the development of VAP (hereafter, patients without VAP), and 30 patients with a clinical diagnosis of VAP (hereafter, patients with VAP). The activity and level of plasma MMP-9 were determined through a gelatin zymography assay and ELISA. Our results report that both plasma MMP-9 activity and concentration were significantly elevated in the acute stage of patients with VAP when compared with control group and patients without VAP (p < 0.001). Subsequently, the plasma MMP-9 of patients with VAP decreased significantly after antibiotic treatment. Furthermore, plasma MMP-9 concentration was positively correlated with the clinical pulmonary infection score (r = 0.409, p = 0.007), WBCs (r = 0.620, p < 0.001), and neutrophils counts (r = 0.335, p = 0.035). In addition, plasma MMP-9 is an excellent tool for recognizing VAP when the cutoff level is set to 92.62 ng/mL (AUC = 0.863, 95% CI = 0.761 to 0.932). In conclusions, we concluded that MMP-9 levels play a role in the development of VAP and might have the potential to be applied in the development of VAP therapies. PMID:27499696

  11. Sulfadoxine specific lymphocyte transformation in a patient with eosinophilic pneumonia induced by sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (Fansidar).

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, P T; Holzschuh, J; Berg, P A

    1989-01-01

    A patient developed eosinophilic peripheral pulmonary infiltrates while receiving malaria prophylaxis with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (Fansidar). Withdrawal of Fansidar and treatment with corticosteroids led to rapid recovery. No exacerbation occurred after cessation of corticosteroids. Lymphocyte transformation testing gave a positive result in the presence of sulfadoxine but not pyrimethamine. It is concluded that drug hypersensitivity to sulfadoxine was the cause of the eosinophilic pneumonia in this patient. Images PMID:2763233

  12. Microbiological and pathological examination of fatal calf pneumonia cases induced by bacterial and viral respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Szeredi, Levente; Jánosi, Szilárd; Pálfi, Vilmos

    2010-09-01

    The infectious origin of fatal cases of calf pneumonia was studied in 48 calves from 27 different herds on postmortem examination. Lung tissue samples were examined by pathological, histological, bacterial culture, virus isolation and immunohistochemical methods for the detection of viral and bacterial infections. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 47/48 cases and infectious agents were found in 40/47 (85%) of those cases. The presence of multiple respiratory pathogens in 23/40 (57.5%) cases indicated the complex origin of fatal calf pneumonia. The most important respiratory pathogens were Mannheimia-Pasteurella in 36/40 (90%) cases, followed by Arcanobacterium pyogenes in 16/40 (40%) cases, Mycoplasma bovis in 12/40 (30%) cases, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus in 4/40 (10%) cases. Histophilus somni was detected in 2/40 (5%) cases, while bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhoea virus and parainfluenza virus-3 were each found in 1/40 (2.5%) case. Mastadenovirus, bovine coronavirus, influenza A virus or Chlamydiaceae were not detected.

  13. Bone scintigraphy of severe hypercalcemia following simvastatin induced rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Zubair B.; Hu, Sophia; Amorosa, Louis F.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Simvastatin induced rhabdomyolysis with renal failure is a well reported clinical entity with hyperkalemia recognized as a life threatening risk. The risk of delayed hypercalcemia during the recovery of renal function is not well appreciated as this varies in severity and can be caused by multiple mechanisms. We present a patient with high dose simvastatin induced rhabdomyolysis leading to late onset of severe hypercalcemia due to calcium phosphate deposition in muscles diagnosed by distinctive bone scintigraphy. A 60-year-old Asian male was admitted to the hospital for profound weakness one week following the initiation of simvastatin 80 mg daily post myocardial infarction. His clinical course was complicated by contrast nephropathy. One week later, he developed progressive weakness in all his extremities and inability to raise his head and eat. Simvastatin was discontinued at this point. CPK elevation to greater than 425,000 U was found, consistent with rhabdomyolysis. He became oliguric requiring hemodialysis. Muscle biopsy showed severe muscle necrosis and type 2 fiber atrophy. One month later, he developed hypercalcemia with suppressed intact PTH and 1, 25(OH) D levels. Whole body bone scintigraphy showed calcium phosphate deposition throughout his musculature. His calcium levels normalized in 1 week on hemodialysis. This patient’s experience illustrates the marked risk of delayed severe hypercalcemia from rhabdomyolysis due to dissolution of myocellular calcium phosphate deposits. It also provides an opportunity to review the different mechanisms of hypercalcemia especially in statin induced rhabdomyolysis. Recognition of this phenomenon is critical for appropriate follow up and treatment of such patients. PMID:28228795

  14. Antibody responses of Chlamydophila pneumoniae pneumonia: Why is the diagnosis of C. pneumoniae pneumonia difficult?

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Takaaki; Akaike, Hiroto; Teranishi, Hideto; Wakabayashi, Tokio; Nakano, Takashi; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Okimoto, Niro

    2015-07-01

    The ELNAS Plate Chlamydophila pneumoniae commercial test kit for the detection of anti-C. pneumoniae-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgA and IgG antibodies has become available in Japan recently. To determine the optimum serum collection point for the ELNAS plate in the diagnosis of C. pneumoniae pneumonia, we analyzed the kinetics of the antibody response in patients with laboratory-confirmed C. pneumoniae pneumonia. We enrolled five C. pneumoniae pneumonia cases and collected sera from patients for several months. The kinetics of the IgM and IgG antibody responses were similar among the five patients. Significant increases in IgM and IgG antibody titer between paired sera were observed in all patients. IgM antibodies appeared approximately 2-3 weeks after the onset of illness, reached a peak after 4-5 weeks, and were generally undetectable after 3-5 months. IgG antibodies developed slowly for the first 30 days and reached a plateau approximately 3-4 months after the onset of illness. The kinetics of IgA antibody responses were different among the five patients, and significant increases in IgA antibody titer between paired sera were observed in only two patients. Although the sample size was small, the best serum collection time seemed to be approximately 3-6 weeks after onset of illness when using a single serum sample for the detection of IgM antibodies. Paired sera samples should be obtained at least 4 weeks apart. IgA antibody analysis using ELNAS may not be a useful marker for acute C. pneumoniae pneumonia.

  15. Vancomycin-induced thrombocytopaenia in a patient with severe pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Simon P; Rankin, Iain; Sheth, Hemant

    2013-10-16

    Vancomycin-induced thrombocytopenia is a rare side effect of a commonly used drug that may cause life-threatening disease. A 51-year-old man was treated for an episode of acute severe alcohol-induced pancreatitis complicated by development of a peripancreatic fluid collection. He developed fever of unknown origin and was treated with intravenous vancomycin and piperacillin with tazobactam. On day 6 of vancomycin therapy his platelet count dropped to 46×10(9)/L (237×10(9)/L on day 1 of treatment) and by day 8 of therapy platelets had fallen to a nadir of 9×10(9)/L. The patient at this stage displayed a florid purpuric rash and haematoma formation on attempted intravenous cannulation. A clinical diagnosis of vancomycin-induced thrombocytopaenia was made and the drug withdrawn. After 3 days a significant improvement in the platelet count was noted, rising to 56 × 10(9)/L. Immunofluorescence testing (PIFT) ruled out teicoplanin and heparin as causes of drug-induced thrombocytopenia.

  16. Severe cefepime-induced status epilepticus treated with haemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Suarez-de-la-Rica, A; Hernández-Gancedo, C; López-Tofiño, A; Maseda, E; Gilsanz, F

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity caused by cefepime may occur predominantly in patients with impaired renal function. A case of a cefepime-induced non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is presented. A 65-year-old woman suffered a severe NCSE due to cefepime in the presence of acute renal failure, requiring coma induction with sodium thiopental. A serious interaction between valproic acid (VPA) and meropenem was also produced after changing cefepime to meropenem. Continuous veno-venous haemofiltration was employed to improve cefepime clearance, and the patient progressively regained her previous mental condition. In conclusion, the cefepime dose must be adjusted according to renal function in order to avoid toxicity in patients with renal failure. Electroencephalogram should be considered in cases of acute confusional state in patients receiving cefepime, to achieve early detection of NCSE. Continuous renal replacement therapy may be successfully employed in severe cases in order to accelerate cefepime removal. Likewise, meropenem should not be used concomitantly with VPA.

  17. Macrolide Efflux in Streptococcus pneumoniae Is Mediated by a Dual Efflux Pump (mel and mef) and Is Erythromycin Inducible

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Karita D.; Nisbet, Rebecca; Stephens, David S.

    2005-01-01

    Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae due to efflux has emerged as an important worldwide clinical problem over the past decade. Efflux is mediated by the genes of the genetic element mega (macrolide efflux genetic assembly) and related elements, such as Tn1207.1. These elements contain two adjacent genes, mef (mefE or mefA) and the closely related mel gene (msrA homolog), encoding a proton motive force pump and a putative ATP-binding cassette transporter homolog, and are transcribed as an operon (M. Del Grosso et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 40:774-778, 2004; K. Gay and D. S. Stephens, J. Infect. Dis. 184:56-65, 2001; and M. Santagati et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 44:2585-2587, 2000). Previous studies have shown that Mef is required for macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae; however, the contribution of Mel has not been fully determined. Independent deletions were constructed in mefE and mel in the serotype 14 macrolide-resistant strains GA16638 (erythromycin [Em] MIC, 8 to 16 μg/ml) and GA17719 (Em MIC, 2 to 4 μg/ml), which contain allelic variations in the mega element. The MICs to erythromycin were significantly reduced for the independent deletion mutants of both mefE and mel compared to those of the parent strains and further reduced threefold to fourfold to Em MICs of <0.15 μg/ml with mefE mel double mutants. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, the expression of mefE in the mel deletion mutants was increased more than 10-fold. However, in the mefE deletion mutants, the expression of mel did not differ significantly from the parent strains. The expression of both mefE and mel was inducible by erythromycin. These data indicate a requirement for both Mef and Mel in the novel efflux-mediated macrolide resistance system in S. pneumoniae and other gram-positive bacteria and that the system is inducible by macrolides. PMID:16189099

  18. Mycoplasma pneumoniae-Induced Mucocutaneous Rash: A New Syndrome Distinct from Erythema Multiforme? Report of a New Case and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, M; Imbernón-Moya, A; Lobato-Berezo, A; Churruca-Grijelmo, M

    2016-09-01

    Respiratory tract infection due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae can provoke cutaneous and mucosal rashes, which have been classified within the spectrum of erythema multiforme or Stevens-Johnson syndrome. This classification is of therapeutic and prognostic importance and has generated intense debate in the literature. A recent systematic review of 202 cases of mucocutaneous rashes associated with M. pneumoniae infection concluded that these rashes might constitute a distinct entity, for which the term Mycoplasma-induced rash and mucositis was proposed. We describe a patient with acute M pneumoniae respiratory tract infection who presented mucosal and cutaneous lesions that were difficult to classify as erythema multiforme or Stevens-Johnson syndrome; the lesions were compatible with the proposed new disease.

  19. Apoptosis in immunocytes induced by several types of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Tomoki; Tajima, Yukari; Ueda, Hideo; Hayashi, Koichi; Shutoh, Yasufumi; Harada, Takanori; Kosaka, Tadashi

    2010-03-01

    Several types of pesticides, such as organophosphates and organochlorines, can induce thymocyte apoptosis, resulting in thymic atrophy and predisposing the highly sensitive fetal immune system to loss of tolerance to self-antigens and subsequent increased risk for autoimmune disease and allergies. In the studies here, mouse primary thymocytes and a human acute T-cell leukemia cell line (J45.01) were employed to examine potential thymocyte apoptosis induced by several types of chemicals, including several commonly-used pesticides. Thymocytes and J45.01 cells were treated for 4 or 8 hr with varying doses of metamidophos, parathion, PNMC, or methoxychlor; dexamethasone was used as a positive control. Apoptosis, cell viability, the proportion of Annexin-V+ cells, the activities of caspases 3/7, 8, and 9, and the levels of DNA fragmentation in both the J45.01 cells and thymocytes were then examined. The results here show that with both cell types, there was an increase in the proportion of annexin-V+ cells and levels of DNA fragmentation following exposure to parathion, PNMC, methoxychlor, or dexamethasone (positive control); however, the levels of sensitivity appeared to differ between the cell types. Furthermore, caspase-7 and -8 activities also differed between the J45.01 cells and thymocytes when treated with PNMC, methoxychlor, or dexamethasone. A more precise characterization of these inter-cellular differences is the logical next step in our studies of the effects of these (and other) pesticides on immune cell integrity. These specific types of follow-on mechanistic experiments are currently underway in our laboratories.

  20. Plasma IL-6/IL-10 Ratio and IL-8, LDH, and HBDH Level Predict the Severity and the Risk of Death in AIDS Patients with Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jia; Su, Junwei; Xie, Yirui; Yin, Michael T.; Huang, Ying; Xu, Lijun; Zhou, Qihui

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To identify blood biomarkers to predict severity and mortality in AIDS PCP patients. Methods. Biomarkers including clinical parameters and plasma inflammatory cytokines were assessed in 32 HIV-infected patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) at time of admission. Predictive value of the biomarkers for clinical severity and in-hospital mortality was evaluated by corresponding ROC curve. Results. Levels of CRP, WBC, LDH, HBDH, and Ferritin were significantly higher in the severe and nonsurvivor AIDS PCP patients. These important biochemical indicators have inverse correlation with oxygenation index, especially levels of LDH (P = 0.008, R2 = 0.258), HBDH (P = 0.001, R2 = 0.335), and Ferritin (P = 0.005, R2 = 0.237). Plasma IL-8 and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in patients with PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 200 mmHg and nonsurvivors than in those with PaO2/FiO2 > 200 mmHg and survivors. Severe and nonsurvival groups showed higher ratio of mean IL-6/IL-10 level (1.78 ± 1.56, P < 0.001; 1.11 ± 0.72, P = 0.043), larger AUC (95% CI 0.781–1.000, P < 0.001; 95% CI 0.592–0.917, P = 0.043), and more significantly inverse correlation with the oxygenation index. Conclusion. Plasma IL-8, LDH, and HBDH levels and IL-6/IL-10 ratio could be helpful for early evaluation of the severity and predicting fatal outcomes in AIDS PCP patients. PMID:27579328

  1. Plasma IL-6/IL-10 Ratio and IL-8, LDH, and HBDH Level Predict the Severity and the Risk of Death in AIDS Patients with Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia; Su, Junwei; Xie, Yirui; Yin, Michael T; Huang, Ying; Xu, Lijun; Zhou, Qihui; Zhu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To identify blood biomarkers to predict severity and mortality in AIDS PCP patients. Methods. Biomarkers including clinical parameters and plasma inflammatory cytokines were assessed in 32 HIV-infected patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) at time of admission. Predictive value of the biomarkers for clinical severity and in-hospital mortality was evaluated by corresponding ROC curve. Results. Levels of CRP, WBC, LDH, HBDH, and Ferritin were significantly higher in the severe and nonsurvivor AIDS PCP patients. These important biochemical indicators have inverse correlation with oxygenation index, especially levels of LDH (P = 0.008, R (2) = 0.258), HBDH (P = 0.001, R (2) = 0.335), and Ferritin (P = 0.005, R (2) = 0.237). Plasma IL-8 and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in patients with PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 200 mmHg and nonsurvivors than in those with PaO2/FiO2 > 200 mmHg and survivors. Severe and nonsurvival groups showed higher ratio of mean IL-6/IL-10 level (1.78 ± 1.56, P < 0.001; 1.11 ± 0.72, P = 0.043), larger AUC (95% CI 0.781-1.000, P < 0.001; 95% CI 0.592-0.917, P = 0.043), and more significantly inverse correlation with the oxygenation index. Conclusion. Plasma IL-8, LDH, and HBDH levels and IL-6/IL-10 ratio could be helpful for early evaluation of the severity and predicting fatal outcomes in AIDS PCP patients.

  2. IL-17A is proatherogenic in high-fat diet-induced and Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-accelerated atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Zhang, Wenxuan; Huang, Ganghua; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2010-11-01

    The role of IL-17 in atherogenesis remains controversial. We previously reported that the TLR/MyD88 signaling pathway plays an important role in high-fat diet as well as Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection-mediated acceleration of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. In this study, we investigated the role of the IL-17A in high-fat diet (HFD)- and C. pneumoniae-induced acceleration of atherosclerosis. The aortic sinus plaque and aortic lesion size and lipid composition as well as macrophage accumulation in the lesions were significantly diminished in IL-17A(-/-) mice fed an HFD compared with wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 control mice. As expected, C. pneumoniae infection led to a significant increase in size and lipid content of the atherosclerotic lesions in WT mice. However, IL-17A(-/-) mice developed significantly less acceleration of lesion size following C. pneumoniae infection compared with WT control despite similar levels of blood cholesterol levels. Furthermore, C. pneumoniae infection in WT but not in IL-17A(-/-) mice was associated with significant increases in serum concentrations of IL-12p40, CCL2, IFN-γ, and numbers of macrophages in their plaques. Additionally, in vitro studies suggest that IL-17A activates vascular endothelial cells, which secrete cytokines that in turn enhance foam cell formation in macrophages. Taken together, our data suggest that IL-17A is proatherogenic and that it plays an important role in both diet-induced atherosclerotic lesion development, and C. pneumoniae infection-mediated acceleration of atherosclerotic lesions in the presence of HFD.

  3. [A case of drug-induced interstitial pneumonia caused by S-1 and CPT-11 combination therapy for advanced colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Kuga, Yoshio; Tanaka, Tomotaka; Okanobu, Hideharu; Arita, Michinori; Yoshimi, Satoshi; Miwata, Tomohiro; Fujino, Hatsue; Moriya, Takashi; Ohya, Toshihide

    2011-03-01

    The patient was a 77-year-old woman admitted for nausea and abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) revealed advanced ascending colon cancer with liver metastasis. After operation, we started combination chemotherapy of S-1 and irinotecan (CPT-11); S-1(80 mg/m²) administered orally for consecutive days followed by 14 days rest.CPT -11 (100 mg/m²) was given as a 2-hour infusion on day 1 and 15. The patient complained of high fever and subsequent dyspnea with severe hypoxemia after the first course of combination chemotherapy of S-1 and CPT-11.CT scan showed diffuse interstitial lesions with ground glass opacity on both lungs. Steroid pulse therapy with oxygen therapy remarkably improved her symptoms, and abnormal findings on CT scan also resolved. Drug lymphocyte stimulation test was positive against S-1 and negative against CPT-11. These findings were consistent with S-1-induced lung injury. Drug -induced pneumonia needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis when patients treated with S-1 and CPT-11 combination therapy present high fever and dyspnea.

  4. Chronic mould exposure as a risk factor for severe community acquired pneumonia in a patient requiring extra corporeal membrane oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Stephanie; Hassan, Ibrahim; Barker, Julian; Ashworth, Alan; Barnes, Anita; Fedor, Igor; Feddy, Lee; Hayes, Tim; Malagon, Ignacio; Stirling, Sarah; Szentgyorgyi, Lajos; Mutton, Ken; Richardson, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    A previously fit and well man developed acute respiratory failure due to environmental mould exposure from living in damp rental accommodation. Despite aggressive intensive care management he rapidly deteriorated and required respiratory and cardiac Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation. We hypothesize that poor domiciliary conditions may make an underestimated contribution to community respiratory disease. These conditions may present as acute and severe illness with non-typical pathogens identified. PMID:26236598

  5. Large Eddy Simulations of Severe Convection Induced Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nash'at; Proctor, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Convective storms can pose a serious risk to aviation operations since they are often accompanied by turbulence, heavy rain, hail, icing, lightning, strong winds, and poor visibility. They can cause major delays in air traffic due to the re-routing of flights, and by disrupting operations at the airports in the vicinity of the storm system. In this study, the Terminal Area Simulation System is used to simulate five different convective events ranging from a mesoscale convective complex to isolated storms. The occurrence of convection induced turbulence is analyzed from these simulations. The validation of model results with the radar data and other observations is reported and an aircraft-centric turbulence hazard metric calculated for each case is discussed. The turbulence analysis showed that large pockets of significant turbulence hazard can be found in regions of low radar reflectivity. Moderate and severe turbulence was often found in building cumulus turrets and overshooting tops.

  6. A case of severe psychosis induced by novel recreational drugs

    PubMed Central

    Dragogna, Filippo; Oldani, Lucio; Buoli, Massimiliano; Altamura, A. Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:  The use of novel recreational drugs is becoming of public interest, especially after recent international alerts about their cardiovascular and neurological toxicity. Additionally, little is known about the psychiatric consequences of the long-term use of these compounds. Case presentation: We describe a case of severe psychotic episode likely induced by chronic use of a combination of new recreational drugs (methylenedioxypyrovalerone, mephedrone, butylone and alpha-pyrrolidinopentiophenone). The patient had no psychiatric history and showed poor response to conventional antipsychotic treatment (haloperidol). Conclusions: This case illustrates the potential negative effects of recreational drugs that cannot be limited to an acute psychotic episode but might determine a condition of prolonged paranoid psychosis. Although the use of these compounds is currently increasing, such molecules might often pass undetected in patients accessing the emergency room, leading to misdiagnosis (e.g. schizophrenic episode) and lack of appropriate treatment. PMID:25352977

  7. Treating leukemia at the risk of inducing severe anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wendy S.; Zhu, Helen He; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Anemia is a frequently observed adverse effect in cancer patients who receive chemotherapy or drugs designed to block specific oncogenic signaling pathways, although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. An article first published online (Zhu HH, Luo X, Zhang K, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2015;112:13342–13347) presented data indicating that cell type-specific pathway cross-talk is likely an important mechanism to consider. Shp2 and Pten, two master regulators of central cytoplasmic signaling pathways, oppose each other in myeloproliferation and leukemogenesis, but cooperate in promoting erythropoiesis. Thus, genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of Shp2 suppresses the leukemogenic effect of Pten loss, yet simultaneously induces severe anemia in mice with Pten deficiency in blood cells. PMID:26826310

  8. A Survey of Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ogo, Etsuyo Komaki, Ritsuko; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Uchida, Masafumi; Abe, Toshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Mitsumori, Michihide; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: We observed a rare and unique occurrence of radiation-induced pulmonary injury outside the tangential field for early breast cancer treatment. The findings appeared to be idiopathic and were called radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome. We surveyed major hospitals in Japan to review their findings of radiation-induced BOOP, in particular the clinical and pictorial characteristics of the entity. Methods and Materials: We reviewed surveys completed and returned by 20 institutions. The survey responses were based on a total of 37 cases of BOOP syndrome. We also reviewed X-ray and computed tomography scans provided by these institutions. We discussed the information derived from the questionnaire and analyzed patients' characteristics, methods used in the treatment of BOOP syndrome, and prognosis. Results: The incidence of the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was about 1.8% (37 of 2,056). We did not find a relationship between the characteristics of patients and the occurrence of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. The pulmonary findings were classified into four patterns on chest computed tomography scans. Progression of the pulmonary lesions observed on chest X-ray was classified into three patterns. Pneumonitis appeared within 6 months after radiotherapy was completed and disappeared within 6-12 months after its onset. At 5-year follow-up, 2 patients had died, 1 of breast cancer and the other of interstitial pneumonitis, which seemed to be idiopathic and unrelated to the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Although the incidence of BOOP syndrome and its associated prognosis are not significant, the patients' clinical condition must be carefully followed.

  9. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Pneumonia - viral; Walking pneumonia - viral Images Lungs Respiratory system References Lee FE, Treanor JJ. Viral infections. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  10. CMV - pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bone marrow transplant Breathing difficulty Chemotherapy CMV retinitis HIV/AIDS Immune response Mononucleosis Pneumonia - adults (community acquired) WBC count Patient Instructions Pneumonia in adults - discharge Review Date 12/10/2015 Updated by: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant ...

  11. Sepsis Caused by Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL)-Positive K. pneumoniae and E. coli: Comparison of Severity of Sepsis, Delay of Anti-Infective Therapy and ESBL Genotype.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, Christian; Gürntke, Stephan; Steinmetz, Ivo; Kohler, Christian; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Gastmeier, Petra; Schwab, Frank; Kola, Axel; Deja, Maria; Leistner, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Infections with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) are associated with increased mortality. Outcome differences due to various species of ESBL-E or ESBL genotypes are not well investigated. We conducted a cohort study to assess risk factors for mortality in cases of ESBL-E bacteremia (K. pneumoniae or E. coli) and the risk factors for sepsis with organ failure. All consecutive patients of our institution from 2008 to 2011 with bacteremia due to ESBL-E were included. Basic epidemiological data, underlying comorbidities, origin of bacteremia, severity of sepsis and delay of appropriate anti-infective treatment were collected. Isolates were PCR-screened for the presence of ESBL genes and plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases. Cox proportional hazard regression on mortality and multivariable logistic regression on risk factors for sepsis with organ failure was conducted. 219 cases were included in the analysis: 73.1% due to E. coli, 26.9% due to K. pneumoniae. There was no significant difference in hospital mortality (ESBL-E. coli, 23.8% vs. ESBL-K. pneumoniae 27.1%, p = 0.724). However, the risk of sepsis with organ failure was associated in cases of K. pneumoniae bacteremia (OR 4.5, p<0.001) and patients with liver disease (OR 3.4, p = 0.004) or renal disease (OR 6.8, p<0.001). We found significant differences in clinical presentation of ESBL-E bacteremia due to K. pneumoniae compared to E. coli. As K. pneumoniae cases showed a more serious clinical presentation as E. coli cases and were associated with different risk factors, treatment and prevention strategies should be adjusted accordingly.

  12. Coagulopathy induced by acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia in severe bleeding.

    PubMed

    De Robertis, E; Kozek-Langenecker, S A; Tufano, R; Romano, G M; Piazza, O; Zito Marinosci, G

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis, hypothermia and hypocalcaemia are determinants for morbidity and mortality during massive hemorrhages. However, precise pathological mechanisms of these environmental factors and their potential additive or synergistic anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet effects are not fully elucidated and are at least in part controversial. Best available evidences from experimental trials indicate that acidosis and hypothermia progressively impair platelet aggregability and clot formation. Considering the cell-based model of coagulation physiology, hypothermia predominantly prolongs the initiation phase, while acidosis prolongs the propagation phase of thrombin generation. Acidosis increases fibrinogen breakdown while hypothermia impairs its synthesis. Acidosis and hypothermia have additive effects. The effect of hypocalcaemia on coagulopathy is less investigated but it appears that below the cut-off of 0.9 mmol/L, several enzymatic steps in the plasmatic coagulation system are blocked while above that cut-off effects remain without clinical sequalae. The impact of environmental factor on hemostasis is underestimated in clinical practice due to our current practice of using routine coagulation laboratory tests such as partial thromboplastin time or prothrombin time, which are performed at standardized test temperature, after pH correction, and upon recalcification. Temperature-adjustments are feasible in viscoelastic point-of-care tests such as thrombelastography and thromboelastometry which may permit quantification of hypothermia-induced coagulopathy. Rewarming hypothermic bleeding patients is highly recommended because it improves patient outcome. Despite the absence of high-quality evidence, calcium supplementation is clinical routine in bleeding management. Buffer administration may not reverse acidosis-induced coagulopathy but may be essential for the efficacy of coagulation factor concentrates such as recombinant activated factor VII.

  13. Extracorporeal Treatment in Severe Hypertriglyceridemia-Induced Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zeitler, Heike; Balta, Zeynep; Klein, Burkhard; Strassburg, Christian P

    2015-08-01

    Plasmapheresis is a well-accepted treatment option in severe hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis (HTGP). The rationale behind this approach is the depletion of triglycerides and the reduction of inflammatory cytokines. The time span between onset of clinical symptoms and start of plasmapheresis might have an important impact on mortality. Hyperviscosity of patients' plasma represents another special challenge for the applied separation technology. The procedures can be performed either by centrifugal device (CFD) or membrane based (MBS) units. The present study reports the outcome of 10 patients suffering from HTG. The expected mortality of the collective was 25%. Plasmapheresis was started after an average 16.3 h (SD ± 6.7 h) after onset of symptoms. No mortality occurred. Apheresis was statistically equally effective with both devices. A median of 3 sessions reduced the TG level to normal and correlated with patients' improvement. During follow up, three patients developed a pancreatic pseudocyst requiring surgical intervention without further complication.

  14. [A Case of Pneumocystis Pneumonia after Cetuximab-based Bioradiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Asano; Kogo, Ryunosuke; Uryu, Hideoki; Yasumatsu, Ryuji; Nakashima, Torahiko; Komune, Shizuo

    2016-03-01

    Reports of drug-induced interstitial pneumonia caused by Cetuximab have been increasing. Pneumocystis pneumonia is important as a differential diagnosis of drug-induced interstitial pneumonia. We report herein on a 64-year-old man with pneumocystis pneumonia after cetuximab-based bioradiotherapy for laryngeal cancer. After radiotherapy, the patient developed multi-drug resistant pneumonia. Chest CT imaging revealed diffuse ground-glass opacities in the lung field. He was diagnosed as having pneumocystis pneumonia based on the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) findings, and then his symptoms improved after treatment with Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole. It is important to assess the risk factor for pneumocystis pneumonia for early its detection and treatment.

  15. Analysis of Factors Associated With Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Norihisa Sato, Shuhei; Katsui, Kuniaki; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Tsuda, Toshihide; Yoshida, Atsushi; Morito, Tsuneharu; Nakagawa, Tomio; Mizuta, Akifumi; Waki, Takahiro; Niiya, Harutaka; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate factors associated with radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 702 women with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery at seven institutions between July 1995 and December 2006 were analyzed. In all patients, the whole breast was irradiated with two tangential photon beams. The criteria used for the diagnosis of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome were as follows: (1) radiotherapy to the breast within 12 months, (2) general and/or respiratory symptoms lasting for {>=}2 weeks, (3) radiographs showing lung infiltration outside the radiation port, and (4) no evidence of a specific cause. Results: Radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was seen in 16 patients (2.3%). Eleven patients (68.8%) were administered steroids. The duration of steroid administration ranged from 1 week to 3.7 years (median, 1.1 years). Multivariate analysis revealed that age ({>=}50 years; odds ratio [OR] 8.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-67.76; p = 0.04) and concurrent endocrine therapy (OR 3.05; 95% CI 1.09-8.54; p = 0.03) were significantly associated with BOOP syndrome. Of the 161 patients whose age was {>=}50 years and who received concurrent endocrine therapy, 10 (6.2%) developed BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Age ({>=}50 years) and concurrent endocrine therapy can promote the development of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Physicians should carefully follow patients who received breast-conserving therapy, especially those who are older than 50 years and received concurrent endocrine therapy during radiotherapy.

  16. Pneumonia caused by Pittsburgh pneumonia agent: radiologic manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Muder, R.R.; Reddy, S.C.; Yu, V.L.; Kroboth, F.J.

    1984-03-01

    Using an objective scoring system, chest radiographs were reviewed in 23 cases of pneumonia due to the Pittsburgh pneumonia agent (PPA, Tatlockia micdadei, Legionella micdadei), including six cases of pneumonia with simultaneous isolation of PPA and L pneumophila (Legionnaires' disease). Infiltrates were typically segmental to lobar; nodular infiltrates were noted in three cases. Spread to additional lobes after presentation occurred in four of 17 PPA infections. Pneumonia caused by both PPA and L pneumophila was unusually severe, with involvement of all lobes occurring in four of six cases, compared with one of 17 cases of PPA infection (p>0.02). Radiographic severity did not correlate with underlying disease, immune status, or outcome. The majority of patients receiving erythromycin demonstrated objective radiologic improvement. In a patients, population that included nonimmunosuppressed patient, nodule formation and rapid radiologic progression were not found to be characteristic of PPA pneumonia.

  17. Expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase enhances the clearance of pneumococcal pneumonia: evidence of a subpopulation of protective anti-pneumococcal B1a cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Natsuo; Kerfoot, Steven M; Hutchinson, Andrew T; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Nakazawa, Naomi; Szczepanik, Marian; Majewska-Szczepanik, Monika; Nazimek, Katarzyna; Ohana, Noboru; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Mori, Tsutomu; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Kanemitsu, Keiji; Askenase, Philip W

    2016-01-01

    We describe a protective early acquired immune response to pneumococcal pneumonia that is mediated by a subset of B1a cells. Mice deficient in B1 cells (xid), or activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID(-/-) ), or invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells (Jα18(-/-) ), or interleukin-13 (IL-13(-/-) ) had impaired early clearance of pneumococci in the lung, compared with wild-type mice. In contrast, AID(-/-) mice adoptively transferred with AID(+/+) B1a cells, significantly cleared bacteria from the lungs as early as 3 days post infection. We show that this early bacterial clearance corresponds to an allergic contact sensitivity-like cutaneous response, probably due to a subpopulation of initiating B1a cells. In the pneumonia model, these B1a cells were found to secrete higher affinity antigen-specific IgM. In addition, as in contact sensitivity, iNKT cells were required for the anti-pneumococcal B1a cell initiating response, probably through early production of IL-13, given that IL-13(-/-) mice also failed to clear infection. Our study is the first to demonstrate the importance of AID in generating an appropriate B1a cell response to pathogenic bacteria. Given the antibody affinity and pneumonia resistance data, natural IgM produced by conventional B1a cells are not responsible for pneumonia clearance compared with the AID-dependent subset.

  18. Prevalence and correlates of treatment failure among Kenyan children hospitalised with severe community-acquired pneumonia: a prospective study of the clinical effectiveness of WHO pneumonia case management guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Agweyu, Ambrose; Kibore, Minnie; Digolo, Lina; Kosgei, Caroline; Maina, Virginia; Mugane, Samson; Muma, Sarah; Wachira, John; Waiyego, Mary; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent and pattern of treatment failure (TF) among children hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia at a large tertiary hospital in Kenya. Methods We followed up children aged 2–59 months with WHO-defined severe pneumonia (SP) and very severe pneumonia (VSP) for up to 5 days for TF using two definitions: (i) documentation of pre-defined clinical signs resulting in change of treatment (ii) primary clinician's decision to change treatment with or without documentation of the same pre-defined clinical signs. Results We enrolled 385 children. The risk of TF varied between 1.8% (95% CI 0.4–5.1) and 12.4% (95% CI 7.9–18.4) for SP and 21.4% (95% CI 15.9–27) and 39.3% (95% CI 32.5–46.4) for VSP depending on the definition applied. Higher rates were associated with early changes in therapy by clinician in the absence of an obvious clinical rationale. Non-adherence to treatment guidelines was observed for 70/169 (41.4%) and 67/201 (33.3%) of children with SP and VSP, respectively. Among children with SP, adherence to treatment guidelines was associated with the presence of wheeze on initial assessment (P = 0.02), while clinician non-adherence to guideline-recommended treatments for VSP tended to occur in children with altered consciousness (P < 0.001). Using propensity score matching to account for imbalance in the distribution of baseline clinical characteristics among children with VSP revealed no difference in TF between those treated with the guideline-recommended regimen vs. more costly broad-spectrum alternatives [risk difference 0.37 (95% CI −0.84 to 0.51)]. Conclusion Before revising current pneumonia case management guidelines, standardised definitions of TF and appropriate studies of treatment effectiveness of alternative regimens are required. Objectif Déterminer l'ampleur et les caractéristiques de l’échec du traitement (ET) chez les enfants hospitalisés avec une pneumonie acquise dans la communauté dans

  19. Toll-like receptor 4-positive macrophages protect mice from Pasteurella pneumotropica-induced pneumonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Marcia L.; Mosier, Derek A.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-positive macrophages in early recognition and clearance of pulmonary bacteria. TLR4 is a trans-membrane receptor that is the primary recognition molecule for lipopolysaccharide of gram-negative bacteria. The TLR4(Lps-del) mouse strains C57BL10/ScN (B10) and STOCK Abb(tm1) TLR4(Lps-del) Slc11a1(s)(B10 x C2D) are susceptible to pulmonary infections and develop pneumonia when naturally or experimentally infected by the opportunistic bacterium Pasteurella pneumotropica. Since these mice have the TLR4(Lps-del) genotype, we hypothesized that reconstitution of mice with TLR4-positive macrophages would provide resistance to this bacterium. A cultured macrophage cell line (C2D macrophages) and bone marrow cells from C2D mice were adoptively transferred to B10 and B10 x C2D mice by intraperitoneal injection. C2D macrophages increased B10 and B10 x C2D mouse resistance to P. pneumotropica. In C2D-recipient mice there was earlier transcription of tumor necrosis factor alpha and chemokines JE and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) in the lungs of B10 and B10 x C2D mice, and there was earlier transcription of KC and MIP-1alpha in B10 x C2D mice. In addition, the course of inflammation following experimental Pasteurella challenge was altered in C2D recipients. C2D macrophages also protected B10 x C2D mice, which lack CD4(+) T cells. These data indicate that macrophages are critical for pulmonary immunity and can provide host resistance to P. pneumotropica. This study indicates that TLR4-positive macrophages are important for early recognition and clearance of pulmonary bacterial infections.

  20. Animal models of polymicrobial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hraiech, Sami; Papazian, Laurent; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Bregeon, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the leading causes of severe and occasionally life-threatening infections. The physiopathology of pneumonia has been extensively studied, providing information for the development of new treatments for this condition. In addition to in vitro research, animal models have been largely used in the field of pneumonia. Several models have been described and have provided a better understanding of pneumonia under different settings and with various pathogens. However, the concept of one pathogen leading to one infection has been challenged, and recent flu epidemics suggest that some pathogens exhibit highly virulent potential. Although “two hits” animal models have been used to study infectious diseases, few of these models have been described in pneumonia. Therefore the aims of this review were to provide an overview of the available literature in this field, to describe well-studied and uncommon pathogen associations, and to summarize the major insights obtained from this information. PMID:26170617

  1. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  2. Comparison of passively transferred antibodies in bighorn and domestic lambs reveals one factor in differential susceptibility of these species to Mannheimia haemolytica-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Caroline N; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Knowles, Donald P; Call, Douglas R; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2011-07-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica consistently causes fatal bronchopneumonia in bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) under natural and experimental conditions. Leukotoxin is the primary virulence factor of this organism. BHS are more susceptible to developing fatal pneumonia than the related species Ovis aries (domestic sheep [DS]). In BHS herds affected by pneumonia, lamb recruitment is severely impaired for years subsequent to an outbreak. We hypothesized that a lack of maternally derived antibodies (Abs) against M. haemolytica provides an immunologic basis for enhanced susceptibility of BH lambs to population-limiting pneumonia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the titers of Abs directed against M. haemolytica in the sera of BH and domestic lambs at birth through 12 weeks of age. Results revealed that BH lambs had approximately 18-fold lower titers of Ab against surface antigens of M. haemolytica and approximately 20-fold lower titers of leukotoxin-neutralizing Abs than domestic lambs. The titers of leukotoxin-neutralizing Abs in the serum and colostrum samples of BH ewes were approximately 157- and 50-fold lower than those for domestic ewes, respectively. Comparatively, the higher titers of parainfluenza 3 virus-neutralizing Abs in the BH lambs ruled out the possibility that these BHS had an impaired ability to passively transfer Abs to their lambs. These results suggest that lower levels of leukotoxin-neutralizing Abs in the sera of BH ewes, and resultant low Ab titers in their lambs, may be a critical factor in the poor lamb recruitment in herds affected by pneumonia.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Induces Lung Injury through TNF-α/c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ching-Mei

    2017-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common nosocomial infection among intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is the most common multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogen and VAP caused by PA carries a high rate of morbidity and mortality. This study examined the molecular mechanism of PA VAP-induced lung injury. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice and JNK1 knockout (JNK1-/-) mice received mechanical ventilation (MV) for 3 h at 2 days after receiving nasal instillation of PA. The WT and JNK1-/- mice also received MV after the induction of lung injury by instillation of supernatants from PA-stimulated alveolar macrophages (AMs). AMs isolated from WT, IκB-kinase (IKK)βΔMye (IKKβ was selectively deleted in macrophages), and JNK1-/- mice were ex vivo stimulated with live PA and supernatants were collected for cytokine assay. Intranasal instillation of 106 PA enhanced MV-induced NF-κB DNA binding activity in the lungs and nitrite levels in BALF. MV after PA instillation significantly increased the expression of ICAM and VCAM in the lungs and TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of WT mice, but not in JNK1-/- mice. MV after supernatant instillation induced more total protein concentration in BALF and neutrophil sequestration in the lungs in WT mice than JNK1-/- mice and cytokine assay of supernatants indicated that TNF-α is a critical regulator of PA VAP-induced lung injury. Ex vivo PA stimulation induced TNF-α production by AMs from WT as well as JNK1-/- mice but not IKKβΔMye mice. In summary, PA colonization plays an important role in PA VAP-induced lung injury through the induction of JNK1-mediated inflammation. These results suggest that the pathogenesis mechanism of PA VAP involves production of TNF-α through activation of IKK/NF-κB pathways in AMs and JNK signaling pathway in the lungs. PMID:28060857

  4. Clerocidin interacts with the cleavage complex of Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV to induce selective irreversible DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Richter, Sara N; Leo, Elisabetta; Giaretta, Giulia; Gatto, Barbara; Fisher, L Mark; Palumbo, Manlio

    2006-01-01

    Clerocidin (CL), a diterpenoid natural product, alkylates DNA through its epoxide moiety and exhibits both anticancer and antibacterial activities. We have examined CL action in the presence of topoisomerase IV from Streptococcus pneumoniae. CL promoted irreversible enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage leading to single- and double-stranded DNA breaks at specific sites. Reaction required the diterpenoid function: no cleavage was seen using a naphthalene-substituted analogue. Moreover, drug-induced DNA breakage was not observed using a mutant topoisomerase IV (ParC Y118F) unable to form a cleavage complex with DNA. Sequence analysis of 102 single-stranded DNA breaks and 79 double-stranded breaks revealed an overwhelming preference for G at the -1 position, i.e. immediately 5' of the enzyme DNA scission site. This specificity contrasts with that of topoisomerase IV cleavage with antibacterial quinolones. Indeed, CL stimulated DNA breakage by a quinolone-resistant topoisomerase IV (ParC S79F). Overall, the results indicate that topoisomerase IV facilitates selective irreversible CL attack at guanine and that its cleavage complex differs markedly from that of mammalian topoisomerase II which promotes both irreversible and reversible CL attack at guanine and cytosine, respectively. The unique ability to form exclusively irreversible DNA breaks suggests topoisomerase IV may be a key intracellular target of CL in bacteria.

  5. Efficacy of high doses of oral penicillin versus amoxicillin in the treatment of adults with non-severe pneumonia attended in the community: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    other antimicrobial treatment will be necessary. Any clinical result other than the anterior will be considered as treatment failure. A total of 210 patients will be recruited to detect a non-inferiority margin of 15% between the two treatments with a minimum power of 80% considering an alpha error of 2.5% for a unilateral hypothesis and maximum possible losses of 15%. Discussion This pragmatic trial addresses the long-standing hypothesis that the administration of high doses of a narrow-spectrum antibiotic (penicillin V) in patients with non-severe pneumonia attended in the community is not less effective than high doses of amoxicillin (treatment currently recommended) in patients under the age of 65 years. Trial registration EudraCT number 2012-003511-63. PMID:23594463

  6. Thrombocytopenia associated with Mycoplasma pneumonia during pregnancy: case presentation and approach for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Aiko; Mimura, Kazuya; Kanagawa, Takeshi; Maeda, Tetsuo; Tomimatsu, Takuji; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-08-01

    Thrombocytopenia during pregnancy has many different causes, but Mycoplasma pneumoniae is not usually considered one of the several pathogens that induce thrombocytopenia. Herein, we present a case of severe thrombocytopenia that was associated with M. pneumoniae during pregnancy. The patient experienced fever, cough, and cytopenia with M. pneumoniae-specific IgM antibody increasing from 40-fold to 160-fold during the 2 weeks of illness. A diagnosis was made after excluding other diseases that cause thrombocytopenia. The patient was successfully treated with azithromycin hydrate, and she delivered a healthy newborn without any complications. Pregnant women who are infected with M. pneumoniae during pregnancy may develop severe and fatal thrombocytopenia. Prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatment lead to early recovery.

  7. MyD88 is pivotal for the early inflammatory response and subsequent bacterial clearance and survival in a mouse model of Chlamydia pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Naiki, Yoshikazu; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Schröder, Nicolas W J; Alsabeh, Randa; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Zhang, Wenxuan; Chen, Shuang; Wei, Bo; Bulut, Yonca; Wong, Michelle H; Peterson, Ellena M; Arditi, Moshe

    2005-08-12

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is the causative agent of respiratory tract infections and a number of chronic diseases. Here we investigated the involvement of the common TLR adaptor molecule MyD88 in host responses to C. pneumoniae-induced pneumonia in mice. MyD88-deficient mice were severely impaired in their ability to mount an acute early inflammatory response toward C. pneumoniae. Although the bacterial burden in the lungs was comparable 5 days after infection, MyD88-deficient mice exhibited only minor signs of pneumonia and reduced expression of inflammatory mediators. MyD88-deficient mice were unable to up-regulate proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, demonstrated delayed recruitment of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells to the lungs, and were unable to clear the pathogen from their lungs at day 14. At day 14 the MyD88-deficent mice developed a severe, chronic lung inflammation with elevated IL-1beta and IFN-gamma leading to increased mortality, whereas wild-type mice as well as TLR2- or TLR4-deficient mice recovered from acute pneumonia and did not show delayed bacterial clearance. Thus, MyD88 is essential to recognize C. pneumoniae infection and initiate a prompt and effective immune host response against this organism leading to clearance of bacteria from infected lungs.

  8. Vinpocetine inhibits Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced upregulation of mucin MUC5AC expression via induction of MKP-1 phosphatase in the pathogenesis of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Yun; Komatsu, Kensei; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Miyata, Masanori; O'Neill Bohn, Ashley; Xu, Haidong; Yan, Chen; Li, Jian-Dong

    2015-06-15

    Mucin overproduction is a hallmark of otitis media (OM). Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common bacterial pathogens causing OM. Mucin MUC5AC plays an important role in mucociliary clearance of bacterial pathogens. However, if uncontrolled, excessive mucus contributes significantly to conductive hearing loss. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapeutic agents that suppress mucus overproduction. In this study, we show that a currently existing antistroke drug, vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, inhibited S. pneumoniae-induced mucin MUC5AC upregulation in cultured middle ear epithelial cells and in the middle ear of mice. Moreover, vinpocetine inhibited MUC5AC upregulation by inhibiting the MAPK ERK pathway in an MKP-1-dependent manner. Importantly, ototopical administration of vinpocetine postinfection inhibited MUC5AC expression and middle ear inflammation induced by S. pneumoniae and reduced hearing loss and pneumococcal loads in a well-established mouse model of OM. Thus, these studies identified vinpocetine as a potential therapeutic agent for inhibiting mucus production in the pathogenesis of OM.

  9. Passive protection of mice against Streptococcus pneumoniae challenge by naturally occurring and vaccine-induced human anti-PhtD antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Roger H; Ming, Marin; Williams, Kimberley; Hopfer, Robert; Gurunathan, Sanjay; Gallichan, Scott; Tang, Mei; Ochs, Martina M

    2015-01-01

    Currently marketed Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccines are based on polysaccharide capsular antigens from the most common strains. Pneumococcal histidine triad protein D (PhtD) is a conserved surface protein that is being evaluated as a candidate for a vaccine with improved serotype coverage. Here, we measured the functional activity of human anti-PhtD antibodies in a passive protection model wherein mice were challenged with a lethal dose of S. pneumoniae by intravenous injection. This functional activity was compared with anti-PhtD antibody concentrations measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to estimate the 50% protective dose (ED50). Anti-PhtD antibodies affinity purified from pooled normal human sera passively protected mice with an ED50 of 1679 ELISA units/ml (95% confidence interval, 1420–1946). Sera from subjects injected with aluminum-adjuvanted PhtD in a phase I trial had similar activity per unit of antibody (ED50 = 1331 ELISA units/ml [95% confidence interval, 762–2038]). Vaccine-induced activity in the passive protection model was blocked by pre-incubation with recombinant PhtD but not by a control S. pneumoniae antigen (LytB). These results show that human anti-PhtD antibodies, whether naturally acquired or induced by the PhtD candidate vaccine, are functional. This supports the development of the PhtD candidate as part of a broadly protective pneumococcal vaccine. PMID:25912273

  10. Passive protection of mice against Streptococcus pneumoniae challenge by naturally occurring and vaccine-induced human anti-PhtD antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Roger H; Ming, Marin; Williams, Kimberley; Hopfer, Robert; Gurunathan, Sanjay; Gallichan, Scott; Tang, Mei; Ochs, Martina M

    2015-01-01

    Currently marketed Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccines are based on polysaccharide capsular antigens from the most common strains. Pneumococcal histidine triad protein D (PhtD) is a conserved surface protein that is being evaluated as a candidate for a vaccine with improved serotype coverage. Here, we measured the functional activity of human anti-PhtD antibodies in a passive protection model wherein mice were challenged with a lethal dose of S. pneumoniae by intravenous injection. This functional activity was compared with anti-PhtD antibody concentrations measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to estimate the 50% protective dose (ED50). Anti-PhtD antibodies affinity purified from pooled normal human sera passively protected mice with an ED50 of 1679 ELISA units/ml (95% confidence interval, 1420-1946). Sera from subjects injected with aluminum-adjuvanted PhtD in a phase I trial had similar activity per unit of antibody (ED50 = 1331 ELISA units/ml [95% confidence interval, 762-2038]). Vaccine-induced activity in the passive protection model was blocked by pre-incubation with recombinant PhtD but not by a control S. pneumoniae antigen (LytB). These results show that human anti-PhtD antibodies, whether naturally acquired or induced by the PhtD candidate vaccine, are functional. This supports the development of the PhtD candidate as part of a broadly protective pneumococcal vaccine.

  11. Polytrauma Increases Susceptibility to Pseudomonas Pneumonia in Mature Mice.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Isaiah R; Ghosh, Sarbani; Fuchs, Anja; Hilliard, Julia; Davis, Christopher G; Bochicchio, Grant V; Southard, Robert E

    2016-05-01

    Pneumonia is the most common complication observed in patients with severe injuries. Although the average age of injured patients is 47 years, existing studies of the effect of injury on the susceptibility to infectious complications have focused on young animals, equivalent to a late adolescent human. We hypothesized that mature adult animals are more susceptible to infection after injury than younger counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we challenged 6 to 8-month-old mature mice to a polytrauma injury followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia and compared them to young (8-10-week-old) animals. We demonstrate that polytrauma injury increases mortality from pneumonia in mature animals (sham-pneumonia 21% vs. polytrauma-pneumonia 62%) but not younger counterparts. After polytrauma, pneumonia in mature mice is associated with higher bacterial burden in lung, increased incidence of bacteremia, and elevated levels of bacteria in the blood, demonstrating that injury decreases the ability to control the infectious challenge. We further find that polytrauma did not induce elevations in circulating cytokine levels (TNF-alpha, IL-6, KC, and IL-10) 24  h after injury. However, mature mice subjected to polytrauma demonstrated an exaggerated circulating inflammatory cytokine response to subsequent Pseudomonas pneumonia. Additionally, whereas prior injury increases LPS-stimulated IL-6 production by peripheral blood leukocytes from young (8-10-week-old) mice, injury does not prime IL-6 production by cell from mature adult mice. We conclude that in mature mice polytrauma results in increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas pneumonia while priming an exaggerated but ineffective inflammatory response.

  12. Antibiotic Activity against Naive and Induced Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilms in an In Vitro Pharmacodynamic Model

    PubMed Central

    Vandevelde, Nathalie M.; Tulkens, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms play a role in the pathogenicity of pneumococcal infections. A pharmacodynamic in vitro model of biofilm was developed that allows characterization of the activity of antibiotics against viability and biomass by using in parallel capsulated (ATCC 49619) and noncapsulated (R6) reference strains. Naive biofilms were obtained by incubating fresh planktonic cultures for 2 to 11 days in 96-well polystyrene plates. Induced biofilms were obtained using planktonic bacteria collected from the supernatant of 6-day-old naive biofilms. Biomass production was more rapid and intense in the induced model, but the levels were similar for both strains. Full concentration responses fitting sigmoidal regressions allowed calculation of maximal efficacies and relative potencies of drugs. All antibiotics tested (amoxicillin, clarithromycin, solithromycin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin) were more effective against young naive biofilms than against old or induced biofilms, except macrolides/ketolides, which were as effective at reducing viability in 2-day-old naive biofilms and in 11-day-old induced biofilms of R6. Macrolides/ketolides, however, were less potent than fluoroquinolones against R6 (approximately 5- to 20-fold-higher concentrations needed to reduction viability of 20%). However, at concentrations obtainable in epithelial lining fluid, the viabilities of mature or induced biofilms were reduced 15 to 45% (amoxicillin), 17 to 44% (macrolides/ketolides), and 12 to 64% (fluoroquinolones), and biomasses were reduced 5 to 45% (amoxicillin), 5 to 60% (macrolides/ketolides), and 10 to 76% (fluoroquinolones), with solithromycin and moxifloxacin being the most effective and the most potent agents (due to lower MICs) in their respective classes. This study allowed the ranking of antibiotics with respect to their potential effectiveness in biofilm-related infections, underlining the need to search for still more effective options. PMID:24342635

  13. Natural Antioxidant Betanin Protects Rats from Paraquat-Induced Acute Lung Injury Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further. PMID:25861636

  14. Natural antioxidant betanin protects rats from paraquat-induced acute lung injury interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Han, Junyan; Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further.

  15. Severe thrombocytopenia in hantavirus-induced nephropathia epidemica.

    PubMed

    Latus, J; Kitterer, D; Segerer, S; Artunc, F; Alscher, M D; Braun, N

    2015-02-01

    Nephropathia epidemica is a milder form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, caused by Puumala virus. The clinical picture is characterized by a rapid loss of renal function (acute kidney injury) and thrombocytopenia. The purpose of the current analysis was to compare the clinical course of patients presenting with or without severe thrombocytopenia. In 47 out of 456 patients with acute nephropathia epidemica, the nadir count of thrombocytes was available for the acute course of the disease. The clinical course of these patients was further analyzed. No major bleeding (e.g., intracranial bleeding or gastrointestinal bleeding) occurred in either group. Creatinine peak levels were higher and proteinuria was more frequently present in the severely thrombocytopenic group. In conclusion, severe thrombocytopenia is common in nephropathia epidemica and is associated with a more severe course of the disease; however, bleeding complications are rare.

  16. [DRUG INDUCED EXANTHEMA AND SEVERE CUTANEOUS DRUG REACTIONS].

    PubMed

    Bensaïd, Benoît; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Lebrun-Vignes, Bénédicte; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2015-09-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) are delayed hypersensivities. Their clinical presentation and severity are very diverse ranging from the frequent and benign exanthemas to the rare but severe CADR involving deep organs in the case of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or leading to skin bulla and epidermal detachment in toxic epidermal necrolysis. The main differential diagnoses are infections, especially viral ones, which could give clinical symptoms identical to those occurring in CADR.

  17. Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection of Host Epithelial Cells via Polymeric Immunoglobulin Receptor Transiently Induces Calcium Release from Intracellular Stores*

    PubMed Central

    Asmat, Tauseef M.; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Räth, Susann; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2011-01-01

    The pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) is a major adhesin of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) that interacts in a human-specific manner with the ectodomain of the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) produced by respiratory epithelial cells. This interaction promotes bacterial colonization and bacterial internalization by initiating host signal transduction cascades. Here, we examined alterations of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) levels in epithelial cells during host cell infections with pneumococci via the PspC-hpIgR mechanism. The release of [Ca2+]i from intracellular stores in host cells was significantly increased by wild-type pneumococci but not by PspC-deficient pneumococci. The increase in [Ca2+]i was dependent on phospholipase C as pretreatment of cells with a phospholipase C-specific inhibitor U73122 abolished the increase in [Ca2+]i. In addition, we demonstrated the effect of [Ca2+]i on pneumococcal internalization by epithelial cells. Uptake of pneumococci was significantly increased after pretreatment of epithelial cells with the cell-permeable calcium chelator 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid-tetraacetoxymethyl ester or use of EGTA as an extracellular Ca2+-chelating agent. In contrast, thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ATPase, which increases [Ca2+]i in a sustained fashion, significantly reduced pIgR-mediated pneumococcal invasion. Importantly, pneumococcal adherence to pIgR-expressing cells was not altered in the presence of inhibitors as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that pneumococcal infections induce mobilization of [Ca2+]i from intracellular stores. This may constitute a defense response of host cells as the experimental reduction of intracellular calcium levels facilitates pneumococcal internalization by pIgR-expressing cells, whereas elevated calcium levels diminished bacterial internalization by host epithelial

  18. Severe pneumonia due to infection with Candida krusei in a case of suspected Middle East respiratory syndrome: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Mingming; Wang, Junwei; Hu, Peiyang; Wang, Bin; Xu, Wanghua; Chen, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Candida krusei (C. krusei) pneumonia is a rare infection that is frequently associated with a poor outcome. The present study reports an unusual case of C. krusei pneumonia that was initially suspected to be a Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) case. A 64-year-old Saudi Arabian male patient was admitted to our hospital with complaints of cough and dyspnea that persisted for 6 days. The patient presented fever (oral temperature, 38.5°C) and slight tachypnea (25 respirations/min). A chest computerized tomography demonstrated unclear lung fields, diffuse pathological changes in the two lungs and multiple lymphadenectasis in the retrocaval and para-aortic arch area. The patient received 95–98% oxygen (6 l/min) for 24 h, as well as sulbactam sodium/cefoperazone sodium (1:1) injection (3.0 g) every 12 h, oral oseltamivir capsules (75 mg/time) twice a day, medaron injection (80 mg/time) and 750 ml fluid infusion; however, he succumbed to the disease on day 2 after admission. The infection was diagnosed by sputum smear and culture subsequent to patient mortality. A sputum smear showed a large fungal infection and sputum culture revealed the presence of C. krusei infection. Serum procalcitonin concentrations were 4.73 µg/l and 7.23 µg/l on days 2 and 3 after admission, respectively. In conclusion, the diagnosis of Candida pneumonia should be strongly considered in the presence of growth of Candida from a sputum culture and based on a suggestive computed tomography image. Tumescent diaphragmatic lymph nodes may also be an important symptom of Candida pneumonia. Treatment should be initiated immediately to improve tissue oxygenation, restore cardiovascular function and improve other organ functions. PMID:28101187

  19. Granzyme A impairs host defense during Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M; Vernooy, Juanita H; Medema, Jan P; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van Zoelen, Marieke A D; Endeman, Henrik; Biesma, Douwe H; Boon, Louis; Van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Granzyme A (GzmA) is a serine protease produced by a variety of cell types involved in the immune response. We sought to determine the role of GzmA on the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. GzmA was measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) harvested from CAP patients from the infected and contralateral uninfected side and in lung tissue slides from CAP patients and controls. In CAP patients, GzmA levels were increased in BALF obtained from the infected lung. Human lungs showed constitutive GzmA expression by both parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells. In an experimental setting, pneumonia was induced in wild-type (WT) and GzmA-deficient (GzmA(-/-)) mice by intranasal inoculation of S. pneumoniae In separate experiments, WT and GzmA(-/-) mice were treated with natural killer (NK) cell depleting antibodies. Upon infection with S. pneumoniae, GzmA(-/-) mice showed a better survival and lower bacterial counts in BALF and distant body sites compared with WT mice. Although NK cells showed strong GzmA expression, NK cell depletion did not influence bacterial loads in either WT or GzmA(-/-) mice. These results implicate that GzmA plays an unfavorable role in host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia by a mechanism that does not depend on NK cells.

  20. Streptococcus pneumoniae disrupts pulmonary immune defence via elastase release following pneumolysin-dependent neutrophil lysis

    PubMed Central

    Domon, Hisanori; Oda, Masataka; Maekawa, Tomoki; Nagai, Kosuke; Takeda, Wataru; Terao, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia and is the principal cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Previous studies suggested that excessive activation of neutrophils results in the release of neutrophil elastase, which contributes to lung injury in severe pneumonia. Although both pneumococcal virulence factors and neutrophil elastase contribute to the development and progression of pneumonia, there are no studies analysing relationships between these factors. Here, we showed that pneumolysin, a pneumococcal pore-forming toxin, induced cell lysis in primary isolated human neutrophils, leading to the release of neutrophil elastase. Pneumolysin exerted minimal cytotoxicity against alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages, whereas neutrophil elastase induced detachment of alveolar epithelial cells and impaired phagocytic activity in macrophages. Additionally, activation of neutrophil elastase did not exert bactericidal activity against S. pneumoniae in vitro. P2X7 receptor, which belongs to a family of purinergic receptors, was involved in pneumolysin-induced cell lysis. These findings suggested that infiltrated neutrophils are the primary target cells of pneumolysin, and that S. pneumoniae exploits neutrophil-elastase leakage to induce the disruption of pulmonary immune defences, thereby causing lung injury. PMID:27892542

  1. The role of the PM2.5-associated metals in pathogenesis of child Mycoplasma Pneumoniae infections: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wei; Xu, Xijin; Lei, Yongge; Cao, Junjun; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Liang; Huo, Xia

    2016-06-01

    The peak occurrence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) infections in childhood and haze episodes is concurrent. Together, the prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae varies among countries might also be related to the concentration of ambient fine particulate mass (aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm, PM2.5). Numerous cohort studies have identified consistent associations between ambient PM2.5 and cardiorespiratory morbidity and mortality. PM2.5 is a carrier of the heavy metals. The relationship between PM2.5-associated metals and M. pneumoniae infections in childhood has been increasingly drawing public attention. First, we reviewed original articles and review papers in Pubmed and Web of Science regarding M. pneumoniae and PM2.5-associated metal and analyzed the structural basis of PM2.5-associated metal interaction with M. pneumoniae. Then, the possible mechanisms of action between them were conjectured. Mechanisms of oxidative stress induction and modulation of the host immune system and inflammatory responses via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and/or the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway are postulated to be the result of PM2.5-associated metal complex interaction with M. pneumoniae. In addition, a heavy metal effect on M. pneumoniae-expressed community-acquired respiratory distress syndrome (CARDS) toxin, and activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and TLRs to induce the differentiation of T helper (Th) cells are also regarded as important reasons for the influence of the heavy metals on the severity of M. pneumoniae pneumonia and the initial onset and exacerbation of M. pneumoniae associated asthma. PM2.5-associated metals via complex mechanisms can exert a great impact on the host through interaction with M. pneumoniae.

  2. Effectiveness of Combined Therapy with Pirfenidone and Erythromycin for Unclassifiable Interstitial Pneumonia Induced by HTLV-1-associated Bronchioloalveolar Disorder (HABA)

    PubMed Central

    Yokohori, Naoko; Sato, Akitoshi; Hasegawa, Mizue; Katsura, Hideki; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Takemura, Tamiko

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus involved in the pathogenesis of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTVL-1-associated bronchioloalveolar disorder (HABA). The clinical and pathological findings of HABA have been characterized as either a diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) pattern or idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) pattern. Treatments for HABA include corticosteroids for the IIP pattern and erythromycin for the DPB pattern. We herein report a case of HABA-associated unclassifiable interstitial pneumonia that improved with combined therapy with pirfenidone and erythromycin. This is the first report on the effectiveness of combined therapy with pirfenidone and erythromycin for HABA. PMID:28050003

  3. Baking soda induced severe metabolic alkalosis in a haemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Solak, Yalcin; Turkmen, Kultigin; Atalay, Huseyin; Turk, Suleyman

    2009-08-01

    Metabolic alkalosis is a rare occurence in hemodialysis population compared to metabolic acidosis unless some precipitating factors such as nasogastric suction, vomiting and alkali ingestion or infusion are present. When metabolic alkalosis develops, it may cause serious clinical consequences among them are sleep apnea, resistent hypertension, dysrhythmia and seizures. Here, we present a 54-year-old female hemodialysis patient who developed a severe metabolic alkalosis due to baking soda ingestion to relieve dyspepsia. She had sleep apnea, volume overload and uncontrolled hypertension due to metabolic alkalosis. Metabolic alkalosis was corrected and the patient's clinical condition was relieved with negative-bicarbonate hemodialysis.

  4. [Nosocomial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Díaz, Emili; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio; Vallés, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    The hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) is one of the most common infections acquired among hospitalised patients. Within the HAP, the ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection complication among patients with acute respiratory failure. The VAP and HAP are associated with increased mortality and increased hospital costs. The rise in HAP due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria also causes an increase in the incidence of inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy, with an associated increased risk of hospital mortality. It is very important to know the most common organisms responsible for these infections in each hospital and each Intensive Care Unit, as well as their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, in order to reduce the incidence of inappropriate antibiotic therapy and improve the prognosis of patients. Additionally, clinical strategies aimed at the prevention of HAP and VAP should be employed in hospital settings caring for patients at risk for these infections.

  5. Global burden of childhood pneumonia and diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christa L Fischer; Rudan, Igor; Liu, Li; Nair, Harish; Theodoratou, Evropi; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; O'Brien, Katherine L; Campbell, Harry; Black, Robert E

    2013-04-20

    Diarrhoea and pneumonia are the leading infectious causes of childhood morbidity and mortality. We comprehensively reviewed the epidemiology of childhood diarrhoea and pneumonia in 2010-11 to inform the planning of integrated control programmes for both illnesses. We estimated that, in 2010, there were 1·731 billion episodes of diarrhoea (36 million of which progressed to severe episodes) and 120 million episodes of pneumonia (14 million of which progressed to severe episodes) in children younger than 5 years. We estimated that, in 2011, 700,000 episodes of diarrhoea and 1·3 million of pneumonia led to death. A high proportion of deaths occurs in the first 2 years of life in both diseases--72% for diarrhoea and 81% for pneumonia. The epidemiology of childhood diarrhoea and that of pneumonia overlap, which might be partly because of shared risk factors, such as undernutrition, suboptimum breastfeeding, and zinc deficiency. Rotavirus is the most common cause of vaccine-preventable severe diarrhoea (associated with 28% of cases), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (18·3%) of vaccine-preventable severe pneumonia. Morbidity and mortality from childhood pneumonia and diarrhoea are falling, but action is needed globally and at country level to accelerate the reduction.

  6. Acinetobacter Pneumonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hartzell, Joshua D.; Kim, Andrew S.; Kortepeter, Mark G.; Moran, Kimberly A.

    2007-01-01

    Acinetobacter species are becoming a major cause of nosocomial infections, including hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Acinetobacter species have become increasingly resistant to antibiotics over the past several years and currently present a significant challenge in treating these infections. Physicians now rely on older agents, such as polymyxins (colistin), for treatment. This paper reviews the epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of this emerging pathogen. PMID:18092011

  7. Pneumocystis Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Pneumocystis Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Parents > Pneumocystis Pneumonia A A A What's in this article? About PCP Diagnosing PCP Treating PCP Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is an infection caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci , ...

  8. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... kids under 6 years old. Take your child's temperature at least once each morning and each evening, ... Respiratory System Croup Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Influenza (Flu) Walking Pneumonia Word! Pneumonia Pneumonia Hib ...

  9. How Is Pneumonia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to cure the infection and prevent complications. Bacterial pneumonia Bacterial pneumonia is treated with medicines called antibiotics. ... fewer symptoms such as cough and fever. Viral pneumonia Antibiotics don't work when the cause of ...

  10. What Is Pneumonia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Pneumonia Pneumonia is a bacterial, viral, or fungal infection of ... and trouble breathing. Many factors affect how serious pneumonia is, such as the type of germ causing ...

  11. Inhibition of host cell catalase by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: a possible mechanism for cell injury.

    PubMed Central

    Almagor, M; Yatziv, S; Kahane, I

    1983-01-01

    This study demonstrates that viable Mycoplasma pneumoniae cells inhibit catalase activity in several types of intact human cells as well as in solution. Human erythrocyte catalase was inhibited up to 72%, and the inhibition of catalase in human cultured skin fibroblasts, lung carcinoma epithelial cells, and ciliated epithelial cells from human nasal polyps ranged between 75 and 80%. UV light-killed mycoplasmas failed to inhibit catalase activity both in intact cells and in vitro. After M. pneumoniae infection of human cultured skin fibroblasts, the level of malonyldialdehyde, an indicator for membrane lipid peroxidation, was 3.5 times higher than in control fibroblasts. Virulent M. pneumoniae completely inhibited catalase activity in solution, whereas the nonvirulent strains had a lesser ability to inhibit catalase activity. These findings suggest that as a result of host cell catalase inhibition by M. pneumoniae, the toxicity of the hydrogen peroxide generated by the microorganism and the affected cell is enhanced, thereby inducing host cell damage. PMID:6407999

  12. Pathology of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Hashisako, Mikiko; Fukuoka, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The updated classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) in 2013 by American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society included several important revisions to the categories described in the 2002 classification. In the updated classification, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP) was moved from major to rare IIPs, pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) was newly included in the rare IIPs, acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) and interstitial pneumonias with a bronchiolocentric distribution are recognized as rare histologic patterns, and unclassifiable IIP (UCIP) was classified as an IIP. However, recent reports indicate the areas of concern that may require further evaluation. Here, we describe the histopathologic features of the updated IIPs and their rare histologic patterns and also point out some of the issues to be considered in this context. PMID:26949346

  13. [Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias in 2016].

    PubMed

    Debray, M-P; Borie, R; Danel, C; Khalil, A; Majlath, M; Crestani, B

    2017-02-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias comprise 8 clinicopathological entities, most of them with a chronic course and various prognosis. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is the most frequent and most severe of these. Computed tomography has an important role for its diagnosis. It can identify the corresponding pathological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia in about 50 percent of cases. It can suggest differential diagnosis in other cases, most frequently fibrosing nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Imaging features should be integrated to clinical and available pathologic data during multidisciplinary team meetings involving physicians with a good knowledge of interstitial diseases. Some cases may be unclassifiable, but these could later be reclassified as new data may occur or imaging features may change. Surgical lung biopsy is being less frequently performed and an emerging less invasive technique, lung cryobiopsy, is under evaluation. Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis is a distinct entity only recently described, with uncertain prevalence and prognosis that seems being quite often associated to another pattern of interstitial pneumonia.

  14. Interferon-α induced severe thrombocytopenia: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Han, Da-Kang; Lu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of severe thrombocytopenia following pegylated interferon-α 2a (Peg-IFN-α 2a) treatment of hepatitis C virus infection and summarize the clinical characteristics of 16 cases of IFN-α induced severe thrombocytopenia and its immune-mediated mechanism. Discontinuation of IFN-α and early administration of immunosuppressants are the effective therapy for IFN-α induced severe thrombocytopenia. PMID:20238410

  15. A Case Report on the Successful Treatment of Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Infectious Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Initially Presenting with Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kawatani, Yohei; Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Hayashi, Yujiro; Taneichi, Tetsuyoshi; Ito, Yujiro; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Suda, Yuji; Hori, Takaki

    2015-01-01

    Infectious abdominal aortic aneurysms often present with abdominal and lower back pain, but prolonged fever may be the only symptom. Infectious abdominal aortic aneurysms initially presenting with meningitis are extremely rare; there are no reports of their successful treatment. Cases with Streptococcus pneumoniae as the causative bacteria are even rarer with a higher mortality rate than those caused by other bacteria. We present the case of a 65-year-old man with lower limb weakness and back pain. Examination revealed fever and neck stiffness. Cerebrospinal fluid showed leukocytosis and low glucose levels. The patient was diagnosed with meningitis and bacteremia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and treated with antibiotics. Fever, inflammatory response, and neurologic findings showed improvement. However, abdominal computed tomography revealed an aneurysm not present on admission. Antibiotics were continued, and a rifampicin soaked artificial vascular graft was implanted. Tissue cultures showed no bacteria, and histological findings indicated inflammation with high leukocyte levels. There were no postoperative complications or neurologic abnormalities. Physical examination, blood tests, and computed tomography confirmed there was no relapse over the following 13 months. This is the first reported case of survival of a patient with an infectious abdominal aortic aneurysm initially presenting with meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:26779361

  16. Healthcare-associated Pneumonia and Aspiration Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Kosaku; Ishii, Hiroshi; Kadota, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) is a new concept of pneumonia proposed by the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America in 2005. This category is located between community-acquired pneumonia and hospital-acquired pneumonia with respect to the characteristics of the causative pathogens and mortality, and primarily targets elderly patients in healthcare facilities. Aspiration among such patients is recognized to be a primary mechanism for the development of pneumonia, particularly since the HCAP guidelines were published. However, it is difficult to manage patients with aspiration pneumonia because the definition of the condition is unclear, and the treatment is associated with ethical aspects. This review focused on the definition, prevalence and role of aspiration pneumonia as a prognostic factor in published studies of HCAP and attempted to identify problems associated with the concept of aspiration pneumonia. PMID:25657850

  17. Severe hypoglycemia-induced lethal cardiac arrhythmias are mediated by sympathoadrenal activation.

    PubMed

    Reno, Candace M; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Chen, Y Stefanie; VanderWeele, Jennifer; Jethi, Krishan; Fisher, Simon J

    2013-10-01

    For people with insulin-treated diabetes, severe hypoglycemia can be lethal, though potential mechanisms involved are poorly understood. To investigate how severe hypoglycemia can be fatal, hyperinsulinemic, severe hypoglycemic (10-15 mg/dL) clamps were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats with simultaneous electrocardiogram monitoring. With goals of reducing hypoglycemia-induced mortality, the hypotheses tested were that: 1) antecedent glycemic control impacts mortality associated with severe hypoglycemia; 2) with limitation of hypokalemia, potassium supplementation could limit hypoglycemia-associated deaths; 3) with prevention of central neuroglycopenia, brain glucose infusion could prevent hypoglycemia-associated arrhythmias and deaths; and 4) with limitation of sympathoadrenal activation, adrenergic blockers could prevent hypoglycemia-induced arrhythmic deaths. Severe hypoglycemia-induced mortality was noted to be worsened by diabetes, but recurrent antecedent hypoglycemia markedly improved the ability to survive an episode of severe hypoglycemia. Potassium supplementation tended to reduce mortality. Severe hypoglycemia caused numerous cardiac arrhythmias including premature ventricular contractions, tachycardia, and high-degree heart block. Intracerebroventricular glucose infusion reduced severe hypoglycemia-induced arrhythmias and overall mortality. β-Adrenergic blockade markedly reduced cardiac arrhythmias and completely abrogated deaths due to severe hypoglycemia. Under conditions studied, sudden deaths caused by insulin-induced severe hypoglycemia were mediated by lethal cardiac arrhythmias triggered by brain neuroglycopenia and the marked sympathoadrenal response.

  18. Bilateral optic papillitis following mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Milla, E; Zografos, L; Piguet, B

    1998-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an atypical bacterium that can cause a great variety of respiratory infections and be responsible for ocular involvement such as conjunctivitis, anterior uveitis and very rarely optic neuropathy. We report herein an additional case of bilateral optic disc swelling with profound visual loss following Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia and review the world literature on the ocular manifestations associated with this pathogen.

  19. Differential susceptibility of transgenic mice expressing human surfactant protein B genetic variants to Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lin; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Rimei; Xu, Yongan; Zuo, Yi Y.; Cooney, Robert N; Wang, Guirong

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant protein B (SP-B) is essential for lung function. Previous studies have indicated that a SP-B 1580C/T polymorphism (SNP rs1130866) was associated with lung diseases including pneumonia. The SNP causes an altered N-linked glycosylation modification at Asn129 of proSP-B, e.g. the C allele with this glycosylation site but not in the T allele. This study aimed to generate humanized SP-B transgenic mice carrying either SP-B C or T allele without a mouse SP-B background and then examine functional susceptibility to bacterial pneumonia in vivo. A total of 18 transgenic mouse founders were generated by the DNA microinjection method. These founders were back-crossed with SP-B KO mice to eliminate mouse SP-B background. Four founder lines expressing similar SP-B levels to human lung were chosen for further investigation. After intratracheal infection with 50μl of P. aeruginosa solution (1×107 CFU/mouse) or saline in SP-B-C, SP-B-T mice the mice were sacrificed 24 hours post-infection and tissues were harvested. Analysis of surfactant activity revealed differential susceptibility between SP-B-C and SP-B-T mice to bacterial infection, e.g. higher minimum surface tension in infected SP-B-C versus infected SP-B-T mice. These results demonstrate for the first time that human SP-B C allele is more susceptible to bacterial pneumonia than SP-B T allele in vivo. PMID:26620227

  20. Nosocomial pneumonia: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Niederman, Michael S

    2013-07-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia remains a significant cause of hospital-acquired infection, imposing substantial economic burden on the health care system worldwide. Various preventive strategies have been increasingly used to prevent the development of pneumonia. It is now recognized that patients with health care-associated pneumonia are a heterogeneous population and that not all are at risk for infection with nosocomial pneumonia pathogens, with some being infected with the same organisms as in community-acquired pneumonia. This review discusses the risk factors for nosocomial pneumonia, controversies in its diagnosis, and approaches to the treatment and prevention of nosocomial and health care-associated pneumonia.

  1. Impaired acquired resistance of mice to Klebsiella pneumoniae infection induced by acute NO/sub 2/ exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bouley, G.; Azoulay-Dupuis, E.; Gaudebout, C.

    1985-12-01

    The natural resistance of nonimmunized C57B1/6 mice to an intraperitoneal Klebsiella pneumoniae challenge was not significantly affected by prior continuous exposure to 20 ppm NO/sub 2/ for 4 days. In contrast, the acquired resistance of mice immunized just before and infected just after NO/sub 2/ exposure was seriously impaired. This could not be explained by the loss of appetite (about 30%) observed in NO/sub 2/ treated mice, for neither the natural nor acquired resistance of control air exposure mice given approximately 70% ad libitum food and water were significantly modified.

  2. [An Elderly Patient with Metastatic Breast Cancer Who Developed Severe Adverse Events such as Stomatitis and Interstitial Pneumonia after Everolimus plus Exemestane Treatment].

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Kana; Yoshida, Takashi; Goto, Yoshinari; Kimura, Morihiko

    2016-06-01

    An 80-year-old woman was diagnosed with right breast cancer with clinical Stage IIIA 6 years previously. She underwent mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection. The pathological diagnosis was invasive micropapillary carcinoma with lymph node involvement. Immunohistochemically, the tumor was positive for estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, and negative for HER2. Postoperatively, the patient was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel, followed by endocrine therapy with letrozole. Four years after surgery, she experienced a recurrence of breast cancer in the thoracic wall, and was treated with exemestane, toremifene, and fulvestrant for 1 year and 5 months. However, she developed carcinomatous pleurisy and was treated with eribulin. This last treatment was ineffective. Subsequently, she received combination therapy with everolimus and exemestane. Although the pleural effusion reduced markedly after 5 weeks, stomatitis, diarrhea, melena, and interstitial pneumonia occurred as adverse events. The symptoms improved after drug discontinuation and steroid therapy. The combination therapy with everolimus and exemestane is a prospective therapy for hormone-resistant recurrent breast cancer, but the management of adverse events is very important.

  3. Severe starvation hypoglycemia and congestive heart failure induced by thyroid crisis, with accidentally induced severe liver dysfunction and disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Chiaki; Sasaki, Hideo; Kosuge, Keiichiro; Miyakita, Yasushi; Hayakawa, Masahumi; Suzuki, Akiko; Abe, Eri; Suzuki, Katsunori; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2005-03-01

    A 69-year-old woman caught a cold resulting in nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and severe anorexia. Then she suffered progressively from dyspnea and leg edema, and finally became delirious. On admission severe hypoglycemia, hypothermia, marked tachycardia, generalized edema, mild jaundice and cachexy were noted. EKG showed atrial fibrillation. A chest X-ray, chest CT and echocardiography showed congestive heart failure. Therapeutic use of diuretics induced shock leading to serious liver dysfunction and disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, combined therapy by intravenous glucose, digitalis, diuretics, anti-fibrinolytic drug and hydrocortisone were effective. Addition of antithyroid therapy brought a further favorable outcome.

  4. Permanent pacemaker lead induced severe tricuspid regurgitation in patient undergoing multiple valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hee; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Wook Sung

    2015-04-01

    Severe and permanent tricuspid regurgitation induced by pacemaker leads is rarely reported in the literature. The mechanism of pacemaker-induced tricuspid regurgitation has been identified, but its management has not been well established. Furthermore, debate still exists regarding the proper surgical approach. We present the case of a patient with severe tricuspid regurgitation induced by a pacemaker lead, accompanied by triple valve disease. The patient underwent double valve replacement and tricuspid valve repair without removal of the pre-existing pacemaker lead. The operation was successful and the surgical procedure is discussed in detail.

  5. Sex differences in severity of inflammation-induced anorexia and weight loss.

    PubMed

    Lennie, Terry A

    2004-04-01

    Food intake and body weight changes in response to induction of acute inflammation were examined in intact cycling females, ovariectomized females, and sham-operated male rats. In intact females, body weight and feeding responses were compared between rats in which inflammation was induced on day of estrus with rats in which inflammation was induced on day of diestrus. Anorexia and weight loss were more severe in the female rats with inflammation induced on estrus day, which coincides with peak serum estrogen levels. In ovariectomized females, inflammation was induced the day after rats received injections of estrogen, progesterone, or sesame oil (vehicle). Males received vehicle injections. Among female rats, the group that received estradiol injections the previous day displayed the most severe anorexia. The least severe anorexia was observed in female rats that received progesterone the previous day. Food intake of female rats that received vehicle injections prior to induction of inflammation was greater than the rats receiving estrogen but less than the rats receiving progesterone. Male rats displayed the most severe anorexia and greatest weight loss. These data suggest that, although females exposed to estradiol prior to induction of acute inflammation display more severe anorexia than those exposed to progesterone, it may be that progesterone attenuates severity of anorexia rather than estrogen solely potentiating severity. Male rats, however, appear to experience the most severe anorexia in response to this form of inflammation.

  6. Colibactin Contributes to the Hypervirulence of pks+ K1 CC23 Klebsiella pneumoniae in Mouse Meningitis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min-Chi; Chen, Ying-Tsong; Chiang, Ming-Ko; Wang, Yao-Chen; Hsiao, Pei-Yi; Huang, Yi-Jhen; Lin, Ching-Ting; Cheng, Ching-Chang; Liang, Chih-Lung; Lai, Yi-Chyi

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the most common pathogen of community-acquired meningitis in Taiwan. However, the lack of a physiologically relevant meningitis model for K. pneumoniae has impeded research into its pathogenesis mechanism. Based on the core genome MLST analyses, the hypervirulent K1 K. pneumoniae strains, which are etiologically implicated in adult meningitis, mostly belong to a single clonal complex, CC23. Some K1 CC23 K. pneumoniae strains carry a gene cluster responsible for colibactin production. Colibactin is a small genotoxic molecule biosynthesized by an NRPS-PKS complex, which is encoded by genes located on the pks island. Compared to other hypervirulent K. pneumoniae which primarily infect the liver, the colibactin-producing (pks+) K1 CC23 strains had significant tropism toward the brain of BALB/c mice. We aimed in this study to develop a physiologically relevant meningitis model with the use of pks+ K1 CC23 K. pneumoniae. Acute meningitis was successfully induced in adult BALB/c male mice through orogastric, intranasal, and intravenous inoculation of pks+ K1 CC23 K. pneumoniae. Besides the typical symptoms of bacterial meningitis, severe DNA damages, and caspase 3-independent cell death were elicited by the colibactin-producing K1 CC23 K. pneumoniae strain. The deletion of clbA, which abolished the production of colibactin, substantially hindered K. pneumoniae hypervirulence in the key pathogenic steps toward the development of meningitis. Our findings collectively demonstrated that colibactin was necessary but not sufficient for the meningeal tropism of pks+ K1 CC23 K. pneumoniae, and the mouse model established in this study can be applied to identify other virulence factors participating in the development of this life-threatening disease.

  7. Antecedent glycemic control reduces severe hypoglycemia-induced neuronal damage in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Reno, Candace M; Tanoli, Tariq; Bree, Adam; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Cui, Chen; Maloney, Susan E; Wozniak, David F; Fisher, Simon J

    2013-06-15

    Brain damage due to severe hypoglycemia occurs in insulin-treated people with diabetes. This study tests the hypothesis that chronic insulin therapy that normalizes elevated blood glucose in diabetic rats would be neuroprotective against brain damage induced by an acute episode of severe hypoglycemia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were split into three groups: 1) control, non-diabetic; 2) STZ-diabetic; and 3) insulin-treated STZ-diabetic. After 3 wk of chronic treatment, unrestrained awake rats underwent acute hyperinsulinemic severe hypoglycemic (10-15 mg/dl) clamps for 1 h. Rats were subsequently analyzed for brain damage and cognitive function. Severe hypoglycemia induced 15-fold more neuronal damage in STZ-diabetic rats compared with nondiabetic rats. Chronic insulin treatment of diabetic rats, which nearly normalized glucose levels, markedly reduced neuronal damage induced by severe hypoglycemia. Fortunately, no cognitive defects associated with the hypoglycemia-induced brain damage were observed in any group. In conclusion, antecedent blood glucose control represents a major modifiable therapeutic intervention that can afford diabetic subjects neuroprotection against severe hypoglycemia-induced brain damage.

  8. Granzymes A and B Regulate the Local Inflammatory Response during Klebsiella pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    García-Laorden, M Isabel; Stroo, Ingrid; Blok, Dana C; Florquin, Sandrine; Medema, Jan Paul; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia. Granzymes (gzms), mainly found in cytotoxic lymphocytes, have been implicated as mediators of infection and inflammation. We here sought to investigate the role of gzmA and gzmB in the host response to K. pneumoniae-induced airway infection and sepsis. For this purpose, pneumonia was induced in wild-type (WT) and gzmA-deficient (gzmA-/-), gzmB-/- and gzmAxB-/- mice by intranasal infection with K. pneumoniae. In WT mice, gzmA and gzmB were mainly expressed by natural killer cells. Pneumonia was associated with reduced intracellular gzmA and increased intracellular gzmB levels. Gzm deficiency had little impact on antibacterial defence: gzmA-/- and gzmAxB-/- mice transiently showed modestly higher bacterial loads in the lungs but not in distant organs. GzmB-/- and, to a larger extent, gzmAxB-/- mice displayed transiently increased lung inflammation, reflected in the semi-quantitative histology scores and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Most differences between gzm-deficient and WT mice had disappeared during late-stage pneumonia. Gzm deficiency did not impact on distant organ injury or survival. These results suggest that gzmA and gzmB partly regulate local inflammation during early pneumonia but eventually play an insignificant role during pneumosepsis by the common human pathogen K. pneumoniae.

  9. Differences in Inflammatory Response Induced by Two Representatives of Clades of the Pandemic ST258 Klebsiella pneumoniae Clonal Lineage Producing KPC-Type Carbapenemases.

    PubMed

    Castronovo, Giuseppe; Clemente, Ann Maria; Antonelli, Alberto; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Tanturli, Michele; Perissi, Eloisa; Paccosi, Sara; Parenti, Astrid; Cozzolino, Federico; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Torcia, Maria Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    ST258-K. pneumoniae (ST258-KP) strains, the most widespread multidrug-resistant hospital-acquired pathogens, belong to at least two clades differing in a 215 Kb genomic region that includes the cluster of capsule genes. To investigate the effects of the different capsular phenotype on host-pathogen interactions, we studied representatives of ST258-KP clades, KKBO-1 and KK207-1, for their ability to activate monocytes and myeloid dendritic cells from human immune competent hosts. The two ST258-KP strains strongly induced the production of inflammatory cytokines. Significant differences between the strains were found in their ability to induce the production of IL-1β: KK207-1/clade I was much less effective than KKBO-1/clade II in inducing IL-1β production by monocytes and dendritic cells. The activation of NLRP3 inflammasome pathway by live cells and/or purified capsular polysaccharides was studied in monocytes and dendritic cells. We found that glibenclamide, a NLRP3 inhibitor, inhibits more than 90% of the production of mature IL-1β induced by KKBO1 and KK207-1. KK207-1 was always less efficient compared to KKBO-1 in: a) inducing NLRP3 and pro-IL-1β gene and protein expression; b) in inducing caspase-1 activation and pro-IL-1β cleavage. Capsular composition may play a role in the differential inflammatory response induced by the ST258-KP strains since capsular polysaccharides purified from bacterial cells affect NLRP3 and pro-IL-1β gene expression through p38MAPK- and NF-κB-mediated pathways. In each of these functions, capsular polysaccharides from KK207-1 were significantly less efficient compared to those purified from KKBO-1. On the whole, our data suggest that the change in capsular phenotype may help bacterial cells of clade I to partially escape innate immune recognition and IL-1β-mediated inflammation.

  10. Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase-4 during Pneumococcal Pneumonia Reduces Inflammation and Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Luciana P; Garcia, Cristiana C; Vago, Juliana P; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Galvão, Izabela; David, Bruna A; Rachid, Milene A; Silva, Patrícia M R; Russo, Remo C; Teixeira, Mauro M; Sousa, Lirlândia P

    2016-07-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. The inflammatory response to bacteria is necessary to control infection, but it may also contribute to tissue damage. Phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, such as rolipram (ROL), effectively reduce inflammation. Here, we examined the impact of ROL in a pneumococcal pneumonia murine model. Mice were infected intranasally with 10(5)-10(6) CFU of Streptococcus pneumoniae, treated with ROL in a prophylactic or therapeutic schedule in combination, or not, with the antibiotic ceftriaxone. Inflammation and bacteria counts were assessed, and ex vivo phagocytosis assays were performed. ROL treatment during S. pneumoniae infection decreased neutrophil recruitment into lungs and airways and reduced lung injury. Prophylactic ROL treatment also decreased cytokine levels in the airways. Although modulation of inflammation by ROL ameliorated pneumonia, bacteria burden was not reduced. On the other hand, antibiotic therapy reduced bacteria without reducing neutrophil infiltration, cytokine level, or lung injury. Combined ROL and ceftriaxone treatment decreased lethality rates and was more efficient in reducing inflammation, by increasing proresolving protein annexin A1 (AnxA1) expression, and bacterial burden by enhancing phagocytosis. Lack of AnxA1 increased inflammation and lethality induced by pneumococcal infection. These data show that immunomodulatory effects of phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors are useful during severe pneumococcal pneumonia and suggest their potential benefit as adjunctive therapy during infectious diseases.

  11. Streptococcus pneumoniae, le transformiste.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Calum; Campo, Nathalie; Bergé, Matthieu J; Polard, Patrice; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2014-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is an important human pathogen. Natural genetic transformation, which was discovered in this species, involves internalization of exogenous single-stranded DNA and its incorporation into the chromosome. It allows acquisition of pathogenicity islands and antibiotic resistance and promotes vaccine escape via capsule switching. This opinion article discusses how recent advances regarding several facets of pneumococcal transformation support the view that the process has evolved to maximize plasticity potential in this species, making the pneumococcus le transformiste of the bacterial kingdom and providing an advantage in the constant struggle between this pathogen and its host.

  12. Crystal amphetamine smoking-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia and diffuse alveolar damage: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Sen; Chen, Yu-Ching; Chang, Yih-Leong; Yeh, Diana Yu-Wung; Lin, Chen-Chun

    2014-10-31

    Eosinophilic pneumonia (EP) is a disease characterized by prominent infiltration of lung structures by eosinophils. The lung interstitium is infiltrated by eosinophils, and essentially the alveolar spaces are filled with eosinophils and a fibrinous exudate, with conservation of the global architecture of the lung. Diagnosis of EP relies on pathological demonstration of alveolar eosinophilia along with characteristic clinical manifestations of nonproductive cough, dyspnea, chest pain and/or unique imaging features. EP may be categorized according to the origin: EP of undetermined origin may overlap with well-individualized syndromes, while EP with a definite cause are mainly due to infections or drug abuse. Here, we report a case of an amphetamine abuser who developed acute EP and acute respiratory distress syndrome after amphetamine inhalation. Related studies on the pathogenesis of stimulant-related lung injury and treatment strategies are also discussed.

  13. Risk stratification of early admission to the intensive care unit of patients with no major criteria of severe community-acquired pneumonia: development of an international prediction rule

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Bertrand; Labarère, José; Coma, Eva; Santin, Aline; Hayon, Jan; Gurgui, Mercé; Camus, Nicolas; Roupie, Eric; Hémery, François; Hervé, Jérôme; Salloum, Mirna; Fine, Michael J; Brun-Buisson, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Introduction To identify risk factors for early (< three days) intensive care unit (ICU) admission of patients hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and not requiring immediate ICU admission, and to stratify the risk of ICU admission on days 1 to 3. Methods Using the original data from four North American and European prospective multicentre cohort studies of patients with CAP, we derived and validated a prediction rule for ICU admission on days 1 to 3 of emergency department (ED) presentation, for patients presenting with no obvious reason for immediate ICU admission (not requiring immediate respiratory or circulatory support). Results A total of 6560 patients were included (4593 and 1967 in the derivation and validation cohort, respectively), 303 (4.6%) of whom were admitted to an ICU on days 1 to 3. The Risk of Early Admission to ICU index (REA-ICU index) comprised 11 criteria independently associated with ICU admission: male gender, age younger than 80 years, comorbid conditions, respiratory rate of 30 breaths/minute or higher, heart rate of 125 beats/minute or higher, multilobar infiltrate or pleural effusion, white blood cell count less than 3 or 20 G/L or above, hypoxaemia (oxygen saturation < 90% or arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) < 60 mmHg), blood urea nitrogen of 11 mmol/L or higher, pH less than 7.35 and sodium less than 130 mEq/L. The REA-ICU index stratified patients into four risk classes with a risk of ICU admission on days 1 to 3 ranging from 0.7 to 31%. The area under the curve was 0.81 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.78 to 0.83) in the overall population. Conclusions The REA-ICU index accurately stratifies the risk of ICU admission on days 1 to 3 for patients presenting to the ED with CAP and no obvious indication for immediate ICU admission and therefore may assist orientation decisions. PMID:19358736

  14. Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli-induced pneumonia in three kittens and fecal prevalence in a clinically healthy cohort population.

    PubMed

    Highland, Margaret A; Byrne, Barbara A; Debroy, Chitrita; Samitz, Eileen M; Peterson, Tracy S; Oslund, Karen L

    2009-09-01

    Three kittens, ages 5, 9, and 17 weeks, were found dead by separate caregivers and were submitted for necropsy. At gross necropsy, each kitten had hemorrhagic or bloody fibrinoserous thoracic fluid and differing distributions of pulmonary consolidation. On histologic examination, the pulmonary lesion in each kitten was similar and was characterized by acute necrotizing and hemorrhagic pneumonia and pleuritis, with numerous intralesional small Gram-negative rods. A pure culture of a distinct serotype of Escherichia coli was identified in lung tissue from each kitten (O4H5, O6H7, O6H5). Lung isolates, genotyped by polymerase chain reaction, carried genes that are characteristic of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), including cnf-1, papG allele I, papA, papC, sfa, fim, hlyD, malX, iroN, fyuA, kpsMII, and ompT. Escherichia coli isolates from the intestines of 2 of the kittens were 100% related to the respective lung isolate, as determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Cultures of fecal samples collected from a clinically healthy cohort population of kittens revealed 16 of 19 tested kittens (84%) to be shedding hemolytic E. coli. Ten different serotypes were identified from 43 hemolytic E. coli fecal isolates from the cohort population, each of which had a genetic profile consistent with that typical of ExPEC. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report to describe a cluster of isolated cases of pneumonia in kittens caused by distinct serotypes of ExPEC and to evaluate the prevalence of hemolytic E. coli carrying ExPEC-associated genes in the feces of a cohort population of kittens.

  15. Transcriptional attenuation controls macrolide inducible efflux and resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and in other Gram-positive bacteria containing mef/mel(msr(D)) elements.

    PubMed

    Chancey, Scott T; Bai, Xianhe; Kumar, Nikhil; Drabek, Elliott F; Daugherty, Sean C; Colon, Thomas; Ott, Sandra; Sengamalay, Naomi; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Tallon, Luke J; Fraser, Claire M; Tettelin, Hervé; Stephens, David S

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide resistance, emerging in Streptococcus pneumoniae and other Gram-positive bacteria, is increasingly due to efflux pumps encoded by mef/mel(msr) operons found on discrete mobile genetic elements. The regulation of mef/mel(msr) in these elements is not well understood. We identified the mef(E)/mel transcriptional start, localized the mef(E)/mel promoter, and demonstrated attenuation of transcription as a mechanism of regulation of macrolide-inducible mef-mediated macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae. The mef(E)/mel transcriptional start site was a guanine 327 bp upstream of mef(E). Consensus pneumococcal promoter -10 (5'-TATACT-3') and -35 (5'-TTGAAC-3') boxes separated by 17 bp were identified 7 bp upstream of the start site. Analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 327 5' region identified four pairs of inverted repeats R1-R8 predicted to fold into stem-loops, a small leader peptide [MTASMRLR, (Mef(E)L)] required for macrolide induction and a Rho-independent transcription terminator. RNA-seq analyses provided confirmation of transcriptional attenuation. In addition, expression of mef(E)L was also influenced by mef(E)L-dependent mRNA stability. The regulatory region 5' of mef(E) was highly conserved in other mef/mel(msr)-containing elements including Tn1207.1 and the 5612IQ complex in pneumococci and Tn1207.3 in Group A streptococci, indicating a regulatory mechanism common to a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria containing mef/mel(msr) elements.

  16. Transcriptional Attenuation Controls Macrolide Inducible Efflux and Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and in Other Gram-Positive Bacteria Containing mef/mel(msr(D)) Elements

    PubMed Central

    Chancey, Scott T.; Bai, Xianhe; Kumar, Nikhil; Drabek, Elliott F.; Daugherty, Sean C.; Colon, Thomas; Ott, Sandra; Sengamalay, Naomi; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Tallon, Luke J.; Fraser, Claire M.; Tettelin, Hervé; Stephens, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide resistance, emerging in Streptococcus pneumoniae and other Gram-positive bacteria, is increasingly due to efflux pumps encoded by mef/mel(msr) operons found on discrete mobile genetic elements. The regulation of mef/mel(msr) in these elements is not well understood. We identified the mef(E)/mel transcriptional start, localized the mef(E)/mel promoter, and demonstrated attenuation of transcription as a mechanism of regulation of macrolide-inducible mef-mediated macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae. The mef(E)/mel transcriptional start site was a guanine 327 bp upstream of mef(E). Consensus pneumococcal promoter -10 (5′-TATACT-3′) and -35 (5′-TTGAAC-3′) boxes separated by 17 bp were identified 7 bp upstream of the start site. Analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 327 5’ region identified four pairs of inverted repeats R1-R8 predicted to fold into stem-loops, a small leader peptide [MTASMRLR, (Mef(E)L)] required for macrolide induction and a Rho-independent transcription terminator. RNA-seq analyses provided confirmation of transcriptional attenuation. In addition, expression of mef(E)L was also influenced by mef(E)L-dependent mRNA stability. The regulatory region 5’ of mef(E) was highly conserved in other mef/mel(msr)-containing elements including Tn1207.1 and the 5612IQ complex in pneumococci and Tn1207.3 in Group A streptococci, indicating a regulatory mechanism common to a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria containing mef/mel(msr) elements. PMID:25695510

  17. [A case of a flapping infected thrombus in the internal jugular vein, septic pneumonias and heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia].

    PubMed

    Majdák, P; Kubík, J; Harmátová, L

    2011-01-01

    We present a case of a 54 years old female patient after anterior wall left ventricular myocardial infarction in 2005 who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery requiring cannulation of the right internal jugular vein (IJV). She was admitted to a Department of Pulmonary Diseases with left bronchopneumonia (BPN) following 7 day treatment, with hemoptysis, dyspnoea and fevers. Duplex ultrasound (DUS) was used to diagnose flapping thrombus in the right IJV, severe thrombocytopenia and, in addition, progressing multiple infiltrates on X-ray a few days later. We empirically adjusted the treatment initiated in primary care and observed deterioration of the severe thrombocytopenia during treatment with low molecular weight heparine. We diagnosed heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) and, even though this indication was not included in our drug formulary, we initiated treatment with Arixtra (fondaparinux) 2.5 mg s.c. daily. Intensive conservative treatment was associated with significant clinical and laboratory improvement of the condition, significant regression of the IJV thrombus as well as the finding on X-ray. The final effective antibiotic treatment lasted 20 (amoxicillin + clavulanate) and 10 (clindamycin) days, respectively. Treatment with Arixtra (fondaparinux) continued in primary care and lasted a total of 65 days until normal thrombocyte levels were achieved, with gradual transition to oral anticoagulation treatment. The patient was discharged to primary care on the 23rd day of hospitalization when she was stabilized, a febrile and her cardiopulmonary functions were compensated. We did not identify any case of treatment of jugular thrombosis and concurrent HIT with fondaparin anywhere in the international literature.

  18. [A case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia due to Sho-saiko-to].

    PubMed

    Kobashi, Y; Nakajima, M; Niki, Y; Matsushima, T

    1997-12-01

    A 16-year-boy who had taken a common over-the-counter cold remedy containing Sho-saiko-to, presented with fever, severe cough, sputum and dyspena. Two days later, he was admitted because a negative density, pulmonary edema-like shadow was noted on chest X-ray. A diagnosis of drug-induced pneumonia was strongly suspected, because an arterial blood gas analysis showed severe hypoxemia and leukocytosis with eosinophilia, and the chest X-ray showed a diffuse negative density pulmonary edema like shadow bilaterally. The findings on microscopic examination of transbronchial lung biopsy specimens were compatible with eosinophilic pneumonia. The eosinophil percentage in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was high. The result of a lymphocyte-stimulation test was positive for Sho-saiko-to, and Sho-saiko-to-induced pneumonia was strongly suspected. The patient ceased taking the cold remedy, and prednisolone was given. The clinical symptoms, severe hypoxemia, and chest X-ray findings markedly improved. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of acute eosinophilic pneumonia induced by Sho-saiko-to.

  19. A novel method for rapid detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae antigens in blood.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kiyoyasu; Kubo, Toru; Ehara, Naomi; Nakano, Reiji; Matsutake, Toyoshi; Ishimatu, Yuji; Tanaka, Yumi; Akamatsu, Suguru; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we used "RAPIRUN(®)Streptococcus pneumoniae HS (otitis media/sinusitis) (RAPIRUN-HS)," a rapid S. pneumoniae antigen detection kit, to investigate methods for detecting S. pneumoniae antigens in blood of 32 bacterial pneumonia patients. We simultaneously performed PCR to detect S. pneumoniae in blood samples. The results of these tests were compared based on pneumonia severity, determined using the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) score classification. Four S. pneumoniae PCR-positive patients of the six severe pneumococcal pneumonia patients (PSI risk class IV/V) also tested positive using RAPIRUN-HS. Twenty-four mild to moderate pneumonia patients (PSI risk class I-III) were S. pneumoniae PCR-negative; of these, 21 tested negative using RAPIRUN-HS. The pneumococcal pneumonia patients testing positive using RAPIRUN-HS had low leukocyte counts and elevated C-reactive protein and procalcitonin levels, indicating that RAPIRUN-HS results were correlated with pneumonia severity. The time course evaluations of the laboratory tests for severe pneumococcal pneumonia patients showed that RAPIRUN-HS and S. pneumoniae PCR yielded positive results earlier than the changes in procalcitonin and IL-6. Thus, concomitant pneumococcal bacteremia was strongly suspected in patients testing positive using RAPIRUN-HS. In conclusion, RAPIRUN-HS may be useful for determining whether to admit patients into hospitals and selecting the appropriate antimicrobial agents.

  20. Severe acute cholangitis after endoscopic sphincterotomy induced by barium examination: A case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Wu, Ya-Guang; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Su, Zhong-Xue; Xu, Jian; Xian, Guo-Zhe; Wu, Shuo-Dong

    2012-10-21

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) is considered as a possible etiological factor for severe cholangitis. We herein report a case of severe cholangitis after endoscopic sphincterotomy induced by barium examination. An adult male patient presented with epigastric pain was diagnosed as having choledocholithiasis by ultrasonography. EST was performed and the stone was completely cleaned. Barium examination was done 3 d after EST and severe cholangitis appeared 4 h later. The patient was recovered after treated with tienam for 4 d. Barium examination may induce severe cholangitis in patients after EST, although rare, barium examination should be chosen cautiously. Cautions should be also used when EST is performed in patients younger than 50 years to avoid the damage to the sphincter of Oddi.

  1. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000671.htm Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia is a fungal infection of the lungs. The ...

  2. Pneumonia - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000011.htm Pneumonia in children - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has pneumonia, which is an infection in the lungs. In ...

  3. Health care-associated pneumonia: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Attridge, Russell T; Frei, Christopher R

    2011-08-01

    Health care-associated pneumonia is a relatively new classification of pneumonia that includes community-dwelling pneumonia patients having contact with the health care system. Current data indicate that health care-associated pneumonia patients present with more severe disease, are more likely to be infected with drug-resistant pathogens, and suffer increased mortality compared with community-acquired pneumonia patients. Guidelines recommend that these patients receive empiric antibiotics similar to those recommended for nosocomial pneumonia; however, it is not currently known if outcomes are improved when health care-associated pneumonia patients are treated with these therapies. In addition, the individual health care-associated pneumonia risk factors are based on limited data and are a poor predictor of patients likely to be infected with drug-resistant pathogens. Many questions remain on how to most appropriately care for this growing group of pneumonia patients. This review is an evidence-based discussion of current health care-associated pneumonia data, the individual health care-associated pneumonia risk factors, and limitations and additional considerations for the health care-associated pneumonia classification system.

  4. Incidence of Pneumonia After Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study and Associated Factors.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hannae; Park, Jung-Gyoo; Min, David; Park, Hee-Won; Kang, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Kun-Jai; Baek, Sora

    2016-02-01

    Pneumonia after videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) is sometimes considered to be caused by aspiration during VFSS; however, to our knowledge, a relationship between these events has not been clearly investigated. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of VFSS-related pneumonia and related factors. Overall, 696 VFSS cases were retrospectively reviewed. Cases in which blood culture was performed within 3 days after VFSS due to newly developed infectious signs were considered as post-VFSS infection cases. Pneumonia was suspected when there was some evidence of respiratory infectious signs in clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. The underlying disease, clinical signs, and VFSS findings of the pneumonia group were assessed. Among 696 cases, pneumonia was diagnosed in 15 patients. The patients in the pneumonia group tended to be older and had higher aspiration rate on VFSS than those in the non-pneumonia group. In the pneumonia group, 2 patients showed no aspiration during VFSS. In 6 patients, pneumonia developed after massive aspiration of gastric content in 5 patients and inappropriate oral feeding with risk of aspiration before VFSS in 1 patient. Only 7 patients (1.0 %) were finally determined as having VFSS-related pneumonia. In conclusion, the 72-h incidence of VFSS-related pneumonia was 1.0 %. Old age and severity of swallowing difficulty are associated with occurrence of pneumonia.

  5. Nanogel-based pneumococcal surface protein A nasal vaccine induces microRNA-associated Th17 cell responses with neutralizing antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Y; Yuki, Y; Katakai, Y; Harada, N; Takahashi, H; Takeda, S; Mejima, M; Joo, S; Kurokawa, S; Sawada, S; Shibata, H; Park, E J; Fujihashi, K; Briles, D E; Yasutomi, Y; Tsukada, H; Akiyoshi, K; Kiyono, H

    2015-01-01

    We previously established a nanosized nasal vaccine delivery system by using a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan nanogel (cCHP nanogel), which is a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free nasal vaccination. In the present study, we examined the central nervous system safety and efficacy of nasal vaccination with our developed cCHP nanogel containing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA-nanogel) against pneumococcal infection in nonhuman primates. When [18F]-labeled PspA-nanogel was nasally administered to a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), longer-term retention of PspA was noted in the nasal cavity when compared with administration of PspA alone. Of importance, no deposition of [18F]-PspA was seen in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination effectively induced PspA-specific serum IgG with protective activity and mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) Ab responses in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nasal PspA-nanogel-induced immune responses were mediated through T-helper (Th) 2 and Th17 cytokine responses concomitantly with marked increases in the levels of miR-181a and miR-326 in the serum and respiratory tract tissues, respectively, of the macaques. These results demonstrate that nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination is a safe and effective strategy for the development of a nasal vaccine for the prevention of pneumonia in humans. PMID:25669148

  6. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... pneumonia. Pulse oximetry. For this test, a small sensor is attached to your finger or ear. The sensor uses light to estimate how much oxygen is ... to help find the cause of your pneumonia. Types of pneumonia Your doctor may also diagnosis you ...

  7. Severe pegfilgrastim-induced bone pain completely alleviated with loratadine: A case report.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Cristina; Li, Quan; Copeland, Larry

    2015-08-01

    Febrile neutropenia is an oncologic emergency that can result in serious consequences. Granulocyte colony stimulating factors (G-CSFs) are often used as prophylaxis for febrile neutropenia. Bone pain is the most notorious adverse effect caused by G-CSFs. Specifically, with pegfilgrastim (Neulasta(®)), the incidence of bone pain is higher in practice than was observed during clinical trials. Traditional analgesics, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and opioids, can be ineffective in severe pegfilgrastim-induced bone pain. With the high frequency of this adverse effect, it is clear that health practitioners need additional treatment options for patients who experience severe pegfilgrastim-induced bone pain. The mechanisms of bone pain secondary to G-CSFs are not fully known, but research has shown that histamine release is involved in the inflammatory process. There is scant previous clinical data on antihistamine use in the management of G-CSF-induced pain. We present the first case report in which loratadine prophylaxis completely alleviated NSAID-resistant severe pain secondary to pegfilgrastim. The result showed that loratadine may be a promising option for severe, resistant pegfilgrastim-induced bone pain. Further clinical studies are warranted and ongoing.

  8. Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Report of Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Laria, A.; Lurati, A.; Scarpellini, M.

    2015-01-01

    According to the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society consensus classification, idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) include several clinic-radiologic-pathologic entities: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. Ultrasound Lung Comets (ULCs) are an echographic chest-sonography hallmark of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. We describe the ultrasound (US) findings in the follow-up of a NSIP's case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:26240772

  9. Pheochromocytoma Multisystem Crisis Behaving Like Interstitial Pneumonia: An Autopsy Case

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, Yohta; Kawano, Kiyoshi; Fujisawa, Naoki; Yoshida, Keiko; Yamashita, Tomoko; Makita, Naoki; Takeshita, Hiroaki; Kamimori, Kimio; Yanagi, Shiro; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2017-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma multisystem crisis is a rare and life-threatening disease that is associated with numerous symptoms and which is also difficult to diagnose. We herein report an autopsy case of a 61-year-old man who died due to pheochromocytoma multisystem crisis. The patient complained of vomiting and breathlessness. Computed tomography showed a shadow-like region with a similar appearance to interstitial pneumonia. The patient was diagnosed with takotsubo cardiomyopathy induced by severe lung disease based on the results of echocardiography and coronary angiography. The patient was treated for interstitial pneumonia. However, his condition rapidly deteriorated and he died 6 hours after arrival. We were later informed of his extremely high catecholamine serum levels. We found pheochromocytoma with hemorrhage at autopsy. The patient's lungs showed acute passive congestion with edema and extravasation. PMID:28090043

  10. Microparticle-Induced Coagulation Relates to Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Patrick; Erkilet, Gülsüm; Veulemans, Verena; Kröpil, Patric; Schurgers, Leon; Zeus, Tobias; Heiss, Christian; Kelm, Malte; Westenfeld, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating microparticles (MPs) derived from endothelial cells and blood cells bear procoagulant activity and promote thrombin generation. Thrombin exerts proinflammatory effects mediating the progression of atherosclerosis. Aortic valve stenosis may represent an atherosclerosis-like process involving both the aortic valve and the vascular system. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MP-induced thrombin generation is related to coronary atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 55 patients with severe aortic valve stenosis, we assessed the coronary calcification score (CAC) as indicator of total coronary atherosclerosis burden, and aortic valve calcification (AVC) by computed tomography. Thrombin-antithrombin complex (TATc) levels were measured as a marker for thrombin formation. Circulating MPs were characterized by flow cytometry according to the expression of established surface antigens and by measuring MP-induced thrombin generation. Results Patients with CAC score below the median were classified as patients with low CAC, patients with CAC Score above the median as high CAC. In patients with high CAC compared to patients with low CAC we detected higher levels of TATc, platelet-derived MPs (PMPs), endothelial-derived MPs (EMPs) and MP-induced thrombin generation. Increased level of PMPs and MP-induced thrombin generation were independent predictors for the severity of CAC. In contrast, AVC Score did not differ between patients with high and low CAC and did neither correlate with MPs levels nor with MP-induced thrombin generation. Conclusion In patients with severe aortic valve stenosis MP-induced thrombin generation was independently associated with the severity of CAC but not AVC indicating different pathomechanisms involved in coronary artery and aortic valve calcification. PMID:27010400

  11. Low Levels of NDRG1 in Nerve Tissue Are Predictive of Severe Paclitaxel-Induced Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Raghav; Jeyasekharan, Anand D.; Pang, Brendan; Soong, Richie Chuan Teck; Kumarakulasinghe, Nesaretnam Barr; Ow, Samuel Guan Wei; Ho, Jingshan; Lim, Joline Si Jing; Tan, David Shao Peng; Wilder-Smith, Einar P. V.; Bandla, Aishwarya; Tan, Stacey Sze Hui; Asuncion, Bernadette Reyna; Fazreen, Zul; Hoppe, Michal Marek; Putti, Thomas Choudary; Poh, Lay Mui; Goh, Boon Cher; Lee, Soo-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sensory peripheral neuropathy caused by paclitaxel is a common and dose limiting toxicity, for which there are currently no validated predictive biomarkers. We investigated the relationship between the Charcot-Marie-Tooth protein NDRG1 and paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Methods/Materials Archived mammary tissue specimen blocks of breast cancer patients who received weekly paclitaxel in a single centre were retrieved and NDRG1 immunohistochemistry was performed on normal nerve tissue found within the sample. The mean nerve NDRG1 score was defined by an algorithm based on intensity of staining and percentage of stained nerve bundles. NDRG1 scores were correlated with paclitaxel induced neuropathy Results 111 patients were studied. 17 of 111 (15%) developed severe paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. The mean nerve NDRG1 expression score was 5.4 in patients with severe neuropathy versus 7.7 in those without severe neuropathy (p = 0.0019). A Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of the mean nerve NDRG1 score revealed an area under the curve of 0.74 (p = 0.0013) for the identification of severe neuropathy, with a score of 7 being most discriminative. 13/54 (24%) subjects with an NDRG1 score < = 7 developed severe neuropathy, compared to only 4/57 (7%) in those with a score >7 (p = 0.017). Conclusion Low NDRG1 expression in nerve tissue present within samples of surgical resection may identify subjects at risk for severe paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Since nerve biopsies are not routinely feasible for patients undergoing chemotherapy for early breast cancer, this promising biomarker strategy is compatible with current clinical workflow. PMID:27716814

  12. Clozapine-induced hypersalivation: an estimate of prevalence, severity and impact on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Senan; Cunningham, Aoife; O’Callaghan, Niamh; Byrne, Fintan; Mc Donald, Colm; McInerney, Shane; Hallahan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and severity of clozapine-induced hypersalivation, and assess the impact hypersalivation has on global functioning. Methods: Participants attending a dedicated clozapine clinic were invited to undertake a structured interview regarding their experiences of clozapine-induced hypersalivation. Two psychometric instruments to measure hypersalivation, the Nocturnal Hypersalivation Rating Scale and the Drooling Severity and Frequency Scale were used. Results: Clozapine-induced hypersalivation was experienced by 92% of participants, with nocturnal hypersalivation more prevalent compared to daytime hypersalivation (85% versus 48%). Daytime drooling was severe in 18% of cases and was present on a frequent or constant basis for 20% of individuals. Hypersalivation had at least a moderate impact on the quality of life of 15% of study participants. Conclusions: Clozapine-induced hypersalivation is the most prevalent adverse effect experienced by patients treated with clozapine and negatively impacts on quality of life, particularly if daytime drooling is present. The development of further strategies to ameliorate this adverse effect is required given the demonstrated lack of success to date in managing this condition. PMID:27354906

  13. Differences in Inflammatory Response Induced by Two Representatives of Clades of the Pandemic ST258 Klebsiella pneumoniae Clonal Lineage Producing KPC-Type Carbapenemases

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Alberto; D’Andrea, Marco Maria; Tanturli, Michele; Perissi, Eloisa; Paccosi, Sara; Parenti, Astrid; Cozzolino, Federico; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2017-01-01

    ST258-K. pneumoniae (ST258-KP) strains, the most widespread multidrug-resistant hospital-acquired pathogens, belong to at least two clades differing in a 215 Kb genomic region that includes the cluster of capsule genes. To investigate the effects of the different capsular phenotype on host-pathogen interactions, we studied representatives of ST258-KP clades, KKBO-1 and KK207-1, for their ability to activate monocytes and myeloid dendritic cells from human immune competent hosts. The two ST258-KP strains strongly induced the production of inflammatory cytokines. Significant differences between the strains were found in their ability to induce the production of IL-1β: KK207-1/clade I was much less effective than KKBO-1/clade II in inducing IL-1β production by monocytes and dendritic cells. The activation of NLRP3 inflammasome pathway by live cells and/or purified capsular polysaccharides was studied in monocytes and dendritic cells. We found that glibenclamide, a NLRP3 inhibitor, inhibits more than 90% of the production of mature IL-1β induced by KKBO1 and KK207-1. KK207-1 was always less efficient compared to KKBO-1 in: a) inducing NLRP3 and pro-IL-1β gene and protein expression; b) in inducing caspase-1 activation and pro-IL-1β cleavage. Capsular composition may play a role in the differential inflammatory response induced by the ST258-KP strains since capsular polysaccharides purified from bacterial cells affect NLRP3 and pro-IL-1β gene expression through p38MAPK- and NF-κB-mediated pathways. In each of these functions, capsular polysaccharides from KK207-1 were significantly less efficient compared to those purified from KKBO-1. On the whole, our data suggest that the change in capsular phenotype may help bacterial cells of clade I to partially escape innate immune recognition and IL-1β-mediated inflammation. PMID:28081233

  14. Total synthesis of a Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 12F CPS repeating unit hexasaccharide.

    PubMed

    Seeberger, Peter H; Pereira, Claney L; Govindan, Subramanian

    2017-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae causes severe disease globally. Vaccines that prevent S. pneumoniae infections induce antibodies against epitopes within the bacterial capsular polysaccharide (CPS). A better immunological understanding of the epitopes that protect from bacterial infection requires defined oligosaccharides obtained by total synthesis. The key to the synthesis of the S. pneumoniae serotype 12F CPS hexasaccharide repeating unit that is not contained in currently used glycoconjugate vaccines is the assembly of the trisaccharide β-D-GalpNAc-(1→4)-[α-D-Glcp-(1→3)]-β-D-ManpNAcA, in which the branching points are equipped with orthogonal protecting groups. A linear approach relying on the sequential assembly of monosaccharide building blocks proved superior to a convergent [3 + 3] strategy that was not successful due to steric constraints. The synthetic hexasaccharide is the starting point for further immunological investigations.

  15. Total synthesis of a Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 12F CPS repeating unit hexasaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Claney L; Govindan, Subramanian

    2017-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae causes severe disease globally. Vaccines that prevent S. pneumoniae infections induce antibodies against epitopes within the bacterial capsular polysaccharide (CPS). A better immunological understanding of the epitopes that protect from bacterial infection requires defined oligosaccharides obtained by total synthesis. The key to the synthesis of the S. pneumoniae serotype 12F CPS hexasaccharide repeating unit that is not contained in currently used glycoconjugate vaccines is the assembly of the trisaccharide β-D-GalpNAc-(1→4)-[α-D-Glcp-(1→3)]-β-D-ManpNAcA, in which the branching points are equipped with orthogonal protecting groups. A linear approach relying on the sequential assembly of monosaccharide building blocks proved superior to a convergent [3 + 3] strategy that was not successful due to steric constraints. The synthetic hexasaccharide is the starting point for further immunological investigations. PMID:28228857

  16. Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta (TRIF)-mediated signaling contributes to innate immune responses in the lung during Escherichia coli pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jeyaseelan, Samithamby; Young, Scott K; Fessler, Michael B; Liu, Yuhong; Malcolm, Kenneth C; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Akira, Shizuo; Worthen, G Scott

    2007-03-01

    Bacterial pneumonia remains a serious disease and is associated with neutrophil recruitment. Innate immunity is pivotal for the elimination of bacteria, and TLRs are essential in this process. Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta (TRIF) is an adaptor for TLR3 and TLR4, and is associated with the MyD88-independent cascade. However, the importance of TRIF in immune responses against pulmonary bacterial pathogens is not well understood. We investigated the involvement of TRIF in a murine model of Escherichia coli pneumonia. TRIF(-/-) mice infected with E. coli display attenuated neutrophil migration; NF-kappaB activation; and TNF-alpha, IL-6, and LPS-induced C-X-C chemokine production in the lungs. In addition, E. coli-induced phosphorylation of JNK, ERK, and p38 MAPK was detected in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) of TRIF(+/+) mice, but attenuated in BMMs of TRIF(-/-) mice. Furthermore, E. coli-induced TNF-alpha and IL-6 production was attenuated in BMMs of TRIF(-/-) mice. E. coli LPS-induced late MAPK activation, and TNF-alpha and IL-6 production were abolished in BMMs of TRIF(-/-) mice. Moreover, TRIF is not required for LPS-induced neutrophil influx, and keratinocyte cell-derived chemokine, MIP-2, and LPS-induced C-X-C chemokine production in the lungs. Using TLR3(-/-) mice, we ruled out the role of TLR3-mediated TRIF-dependent neutrophil influx during E. coli pneumonia. A TLR4-blocking Ab inhibited E. coli-induced TNF-alpha and IL-6 in BMMs of both TRIF(-/-) and TRIF(+/+) mice, suggesting that TRIF-mediated signaling involves TLR4. We also found that TRIF is critical to control E. coli burden in the lungs and E. coli dissemination. Thus, rapid activation of TRIF-dependent TLR4-mediated signaling cascade serves to augment pulmonary host defense against a Gram-negative pathogen.

  17. The circadian rhythm of melatonin modulates the severity of caerulein-induced pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jaworek, Jolanta; Konturek, Stanisław J; Tomaszewska, Romana; Leja-Szpak, Anna; Bonior, Joanna; Nawrot, Katarzyna; Palonek, Magdalena; Stachura, Jerzy; Pawlik, Wiesław W

    2004-10-01

    Melatonin, an antioxidant, protects the pancreas against acute inflammation but, although this indole is released mainly at night, no study has been undertaken to determine circadian changes of plasma melatonin levels and the severity of acute pancreatitis. The aims of this study were: (a) to compare the severity of caerulein-induced pancreatitis (CIP) produced in the rat during the day and at the night, and (b) to assess the changes of plasma melatonin level and the activity of an antioxidative enzyme; superoxide dismutase (SOD), in the pancreas subjected to CIP during the day time and at night without or with administration of exogenous melatonin or its precursor; l-tryptophan. Rats were kept in 12 hr light/dark cycle. CIP was induced by subcutaneous infusion of caerulein (5 microg/kg/hr for 5 hr). Melatonin (5 or 25 mg/kg) or l-tryptophan (50 or 250 mg/kg) was given intraperitoneally 30 min prior to the start of CIP. CIP induced during the day time was confirmed by histological examination and manifested by pancreatic edema, and rises of amylase and lipase plasma activities (by 400 and 500%, respectively), whereas pancreatic SOD, pancreatic blood flow (PBF) and oxygen consumption by pancreatic tissue (VO(2)) were decreased by 70, 40 and 45%, respectively, as compared with the appropriate controls. All morphological and biochemical parameters of CIP induced at night were significantly less severe, compared with those recorded during the light phase. Plasma melatonin immunoreactivity was significantly higher during the night, than during the day, especially following administration of melatonin or its precursor, which reversed all manifestations of CIP. In conclusion, a circadian rhythm modulates the severity of CIP with a decrease of pancreatitis severity during the night compared with that at the day time and this may be due to the increased plasma level of melatonin and higher activity of SOD in the pancreas.

  18. Experimental rabbit models of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed Central

    Moazed, T. C.; Kuo, C.; Patton, D. L.; Grayston, J. T.; Campbell, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR), a common cause of acute respiratory disease in humans, has recently been associated with coronary and aortic atherosclerosis. In this study, we evaluated rabbit models of chlamydial infection to investigate the pathogenesis of C. pneumoniae infection. New Zealand White rabbits were inoculated intranasally and intratracheally with C. pneumoniae, strain AR-39, and primary and repeated infection were assessed. After a single inoculation, lung pathology was characterized by a moderate self-resolving interstitial pneumonia with bronchiolitis of 21 days in duration. Chlamydial DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) intermittently in the upper respiratory tract and lung tissue through day 21 postinoculation, spleen tissue at day 14, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells at days 3 and 21. After repeated inoculations, chlamydial DNA was detected by PCR in the upper respiratory tract and lung tissue through day 42. Lung lesions consisted of multifocal interstitial mononuclear cell aggregates that persisted up to day 42. Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits were less susceptible to C. pneumoniae infection. After multiple inoculations of Watanabe rabbits, C. pneumoniae was detected by PCR and/or immunocytochemistry until day 21. In conclusion, C. pneumoniae induced a moderate respiratory infection in these rabbit models. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8579129

  19. Role of Serum Mycoplasma pneumoniae IgA, IgM, and IgG in the Diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae-Related Pneumonia in School-Age Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Ju; Huang, Eng-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Min; Kuo, Kuang-Che; Huang, Yi-Chuan; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Niu, Chen-Kuang; Yu, Hong-Ren

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important causative pathogen of community-acquired pneumonia in children. Rapid and reliable laboratory diagnosis of M. pneumoniae infection is important so that appropriate antibiotic treatment can be initiated to reduce the misuse of drugs and resistance rates. Anti-M. pneumoniae immunoglobulin M (IgM) is an indicator of recent primary infection but can persist for several months after initial infection. It has been suggested that anti-M. pneumoniae immunoglobulin A (IgA) can be a reliable indicator for recent M. pneumoniae infection in adults. We investigated the clinical diagnostic value of M. pneumoniae IgA in school-age children and adolescents with M. pneumoniae-related pneumonia. Eighty children with pneumonia and seropositive for M. pneumoniae IgM or with a 4-fold increase of anti-M. pneumoniae immunoglobulin G (IgG) were enrolled from May 2015 to March 2016. The titers of M. pneumoniae IgA, IgM, and IgG, the clinical features, and laboratory examinations of blood, C-reactive protein, and liver enzymes were analyzed. The initial positivity rates for M. pneumoniae IgM and IgA upon admission to the hospital were 63.6 and 33.8%, respectively. One week after admission, the cumulative positivity rates for M. pneumoniae IgM and IgA increased to 97.5 and 56.3%, respectively. Detection of M. pneumoniae IgM was more sensitive than detection of M. pneumoniae IgA for the diagnosis of M. pneumoniae-related pneumonia in school-age children and adolescents; however, paired sera are necessary for a more accurate diagnosis.

  20. Biomarkers in Pediatric Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an infectious disease caused by bacteria, viruses, or a combination of these infectious agents. The severity of the clinical manifestations of CAP varies significantly. Consequently, both the differentiation of viral from bacterial CAP cases and the accurate assessment and prediction of disease severity are critical for effectively managing individuals with CAP. To solve questionable cases, several biomarkers indicating the etiology and severity of CAP have been studied. Unfortunately, only a few studies have examined the roles of these biomarkers in pediatric practice. The main aim of this paper is to detail current knowledge regarding the use of biomarkers to diagnose and treat CAP in children, analyzing the most recently published relevant studies. Despite several attempts, the etiologic diagnosis of pediatric CAP and the estimation of the potential outcome remain unsolved problems in most cases. Among traditional biomarkers, procalcitonin (PCT) appears to be the most effective for both selecting bacterial cases and evaluating the severity. However, a precise cut-off separating bacterial from viral and mild from severe cases has not been defined. The three-host protein assay based on C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), plasma interferon-γ protein-10 (IP-10), and micro-array-based whole genome expression arrays might offer more advantages in comparison with former biomarkers. However, further studies are needed before the routine use of those presently in development can be recommended. PMID:28218726

  1. Age-Related Effect of Viral-Induced Wheezing in Severe Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Geovanny F.; Jain, Amisha; Kurdi, Bassem; Megalaa, Rosemary; Pancham, Krishna; Huseni, Shehlanoor; Isaza, Natalia; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E.; Rose, Mary C.; Pillai, Dinesh; Nino, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Premature children are prone to severe viral respiratory infections in early life, but the age at which susceptibility peaks and disappears for each pathogen is unclear. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed of the age distribution and clinical features of acute viral respiratory infections in full-term and premature children, aged zero to seven years. Results: The study comprised of a total of 630 hospitalizations (n = 580 children). Sixty-seven percent of these hospitalizations occurred in children born full-term (>37 weeks), 12% in preterm (32–37 weeks) and 21% in severely premature children (<32 weeks). The most common viruses identified were rhinovirus (RV; 60%) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV; 17%). Age-distribution analysis of each virus identified that severely premature children had a higher relative frequency of RV and RSV in their first three years, relative to preterm or full-term children. Additionally, the probability of RV- or RSV-induced wheezing was higher overall in severely premature children less than three years old. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the vulnerability to viral infections in children born severely premature is more specific for RV and RSV and persists during the first three years of age. Further studies are needed to elucidate the age-dependent molecular mechanisms that underlie why premature infants develop RV- and RSV-induced wheezing in early life. PMID:27775602

  2. Age-Related Effect of Viral-Induced Wheezing in Severe Prematurity.

    PubMed

    Perez, Geovanny F; Jain, Amisha; Kurdi, Bassem; Megalaa, Rosemary; Pancham, Krishna; Huseni, Shehlanoor; Isaza, Natalia; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Rose, Mary C; Pillai, Dinesh; Nino, Gustavo

    2016-10-20

    Premature children are prone to severe viral respiratory infections in early life, but the age at which susceptibility peaks and disappears for each pathogen is unclear. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed of the age distribution and clinical features of acute viral respiratory infections in full-term and premature children, aged zero to seven years. Results: The study comprised of a total of 630 hospitalizations (n = 580 children). Sixty-seven percent of these hospitalizations occurred in children born full-term (>37 weeks), 12% in preterm (32-37 weeks) and 21% in severely premature children (<32 weeks). The most common viruses identified were rhinovirus (RV; 60%) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV; 17%). Age-distribution analysis of each virus identified that severely premature children had a higher relative frequency of RV and RSV in their first three years, relative to preterm or full-term children. Additionally, the probability of RV- or RSV-induced wheezing was higher overall in severely premature children less than three years old. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the vulnerability to viral infections in children born severely premature is more specific for RV and RSV and persists during the first three years of age. Further studies are needed to elucidate the age-dependent molecular mechanisms that underlie why premature infants develop RV- and RSV-induced wheezing in early life.

  3. Hyperactivity induced by prenatal BrdU exposure across several experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuwagata, Makiko; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Muneoka, Katsumasa; Shioda, Seiji

    2011-12-01

    Behavioral results are sometimes not reproducible even in the positive controls of developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) tests. Effects of several factors on the results should be considered. In the present paper, we examined the effects of strain-, gender-, and test-condition differences on BrdU-induced hyperactivity. The results showed that BrdU-induced hyperactivity was reproducible in two rat strains (SD and F344 rats), rodent species (rat and mouse), and both sexes. When the level of background sound in a test room was increased, the hyperactivity was persistent, resulting in no effect of background sound on BrdU-induced hyperactivity. Thus, we have demonstrated that the BrdU-animal model is a useful positive control via prenatal exposure to validate the entire DNT test process.

  4. Single immunoglobulin interleukin-1 receptor-related molecule impairs host defense during pneumonia and sepsis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Blok, Dana C; van Lieshout, Miriam H P; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Florquin, Sandrine; de Boer, Onno J; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto; van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of pneumonia and sepsis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a pivotal role in the host defense against infection. In this study, we sought to determine the role of single immunoglobulin interleukin-1 receptor-related molecule (SIGIRR a.k.a. TIR8), a negative regulator of TLR signaling, in pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. Wild-type and SIGIRR-deficient (sigirr-/-) mice were infected intranasally (to induce pneumonia) or intravenously (to induce primary sepsis) with S. pneumoniae and euthanized after 6, 24, or 48 h for analyses. Additionally, survival studies were performed. sigirr-/- mice showed delayed mortality during lethal pneumococcal pneumonia. Accordingly, sigirr-/- mice displayed lower bacterial loads in lungs and less dissemination of the infection 24 h after the induction of pneumonia. SIGIRR deficiency was associated with increased interstitial and perivascular inflammation in lung tissue early after infection, with no impact on neutrophil recruitment or cytokine production. sigirr-/- mice also demonstrated reduced bacterial burdens at multiple body sites during S. pneumoniae sepsis. sigirr-/- alveolar macrophages and neutrophils exhibited an increased capacity to phagocytose viable pneumococci. These results suggest that SIGIRR impairs the antibacterial host defense during pneumonia and sepsis caused by S. pneumoniae.

  5. Risk Factors and Clinical Impact of Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase–Producing K. pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Gasink, Leanne B.; Edelstein, Paul H.; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Synnestvedt, Marie; Fishman, Neil O.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)–producing K. pneumoniae is an emerging pathogen with serious clinical and infection control implications. To our knowledge, no study has specifically examined risk factors for KPC-producing K. pneumoniae or its impact on mortality. METHODS To identify risk factors for infection or colonization with KPC-producing K. pneumoniae, a case-control study was performed. Case patients with KPC-producing K. pneumoniae were compared with control subjects with carbapenem-susceptible K. pneumoniae. A cohort study evaluated the association between KPC-producing K. pneumoniae and in-hospital mortality. RESULTS Fifty-six case patients and 863 control subjects were identified. In multivariable analysis, independent risk factors for KPC-producing K. pneumoniae were (1) severe illness (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 4.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.25–8.25), (2) prior fluoroquinolone use (AOR, 3.39; 95% CI, 1.50, 7.66), and (3) prior extended-spectrum cephalosporin use (AOR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.18, 5.52). Compared with samples from other anatomic locations, K. pneumoniae isolates from blood samples were less likely to harbor KPC (AOR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12, 0.86). KPC-producing K. pneumoniae was independently associated with in-hospital mortality (AOR, 3.60; 95% CI, 1.87–6.91). CONCLUSIONS KPC-producing K. pneumoniae is an emerging pathogen associated with significant mortality. Our findings highlight the urgent need to develop strategies for prevention and infection control. Limiting use of certain antimicrobials, specifically fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins, use may be effective strategies. PMID:19860564

  6. Arthritic disease is more severe in older rats in a kaolin/carrageenan-induced arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Yeom, Mijung; Choi, Hyun Mi; Yang, Hyung-In; Yoo, Myung Chul; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2012-12-01

    This study examined in an arthritis animal model whether elderly onset rheumatoid arthritis (EORA) is a more severe disease than younger onset rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis was induced by injecting 5% kaolin/carrageenan into the left tibiotarsal ankles of 18-month-old and 4-week-old rats. Various parameters were measured to evaluate the arthritic progression of kaolin/carrageenan-induced arthritis in the rats. Immunohistochemical staining of arthritic joints was performed to determine the degree of inflammation in old and young rats. Measurements of ankle volume and thickness, arthritic index, number of squeaks, and the paw pressure test showed the 18-month-old rats had more severe disease than the young rats in a kaolin/carrageenan-induced arthritis model. The degree of inflammation and MMP-1 expression of arthritic joints in old rats was significantly higher than that of young rats based on histological evaluation with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and immunochemistry. More severe disease symptoms were found in old rats with EORA, but the molecular mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. Understanding the molecular mechanisms will be helpful to develop clinical protocols to efficiently treat patients with EORA, which is difficult to control with current protocols.

  7. The NOD/RIP2 pathway is essential for host defenses against Chlamydophila pneumoniae lung infection.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kenichi; Chen, Shuang; Dempsey, Paul W; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Alsabeh, Randa; Slepenkin, Anatoly V; Peterson, Ellena; Doherty, Terence M; Underhill, David; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2009-04-01

    Here we investigated the role of the Nod/Rip2 pathway in host responses to Chlamydophila pneumoniae-induced pneumonia in mice. Rip2(-/-) mice infected with C. pneumoniae exhibited impaired iNOS expression and NO production, and delayed neutrophil recruitment to the lungs. Levels of IL-6 and IFN-gamma levels as well as KC and MIP-2 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were significantly decreased in Rip2(-/-) mice compared to wild-type (WT) mice at day 3. Rip2(-/-) mice showed significant delay in bacterial clearance from the lungs and developed more severe and chronic lung inflammation that continued even on day 35 and led to increased mortality, whereas WT mice cleared the bacterial load, recovered from acute pneumonia, and survived. Both Nod1(-/-) and Nod2(-/-) mice also showed delayed bacterial clearance, suggesting that C. pneumoniae is recognized by both of these intracellular receptors. Bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that Rip2 in BM-derived cells rather than non-hematopoietic stromal cells played a key role in host responses in the lungs and clearance of C. pneumoniae. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of WT macrophages intratracheally was able to rescue the bacterial clearance defect in Rip2(-/-) mice. These results demonstrate that in addition to the TLR/MyD88 pathway, the Nod/Rip2 signaling pathway also plays a significant role in intracellular recognition, innate immune host responses, and ultimately has a decisive impact on clearance of C. pneumoniae from the lungs and survival of the infectious challenge.

  8. Immunoinformatics Approach in Designing Epitope-based Vaccine Against Meningitis-inducing Bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae Type b)

    PubMed Central

    Zahroh, Hilyatuz; Ma’rup, Ahmad; Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Parikesit, Arli Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis infection is one of the major threats during Hajj season in Mecca. Meningitis vaccines are available, but their uses are limited in some countries due to religious reasons. Furthermore, they only give protection to certain serogroups, not to all types of meningitis-inducing bacteria. Recently, research on epitope-based vaccines has been developed intensively. Such vaccines have potential advantages over conventional vaccines in that they are safer to use and well responded to the antibody. In this study, we developed epitope-based vaccine candidates against various meningitis-inducing bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae type b. The epitopes were selected from their protein of polysaccharide capsule. B-cell epitopes were predicted by using BCPred, while T-cell epitope for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I was predicted using PAProC, TAPPred, and Immune Epitope Database. Immune Epitope Database was also used to predict T-cell epitope for MHC class II. Population coverage and molecular docking simulation were predicted against previously generated epitope vaccine candidates. The best candidates for MHC class I- and class II-restricted T-cell epitopes were MQYGDKTTF, MKEQNTLEI, ECTEGEPDY, DLSIVVPIY, YPMAMMWRNASNRAI, TLQMTLLGIVPNLNK, ETSLHHIPGISNYFI, and SLLYILEKNAEMEFD, which showed 80% population coverage. The complexes of class I T-cell epitopes–HLA-C*03:03 and class II T-cell epitopes–HLA-DRB1*11:01 showed better affinity than standards as evaluated from their ΔGbinding value and the binding interaction between epitopes and HLA molecules. These peptide constructs may further be undergone in vitro and in vivo testings for the development of targeted vaccine against meningitis infection. PMID:27812281

  9. A novel initiation mechanism of death in Streptococcus pneumoniae induced by the human milk protein-lipid complex HAMLET and activated during physiological death.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Emily A; Marks, Laura R; Duffey, Michael E; Hakansson, Anders P

    2012-08-03

    To cause colonization or infection, most bacteria grow in biofilms where differentiation and death of subpopulations is critical for optimal survival of the whole population. However, little is known about initiation of bacterial death under physiological conditions. Membrane depolarization has been suggested, but never shown to be involved, due to the difficulty of performing such studies in bacteria and the paucity of information that exists regarding ion transport mechanisms in prokaryotes. In this study, we performed the first extensive investigation of ion transport and membrane depolarization in a bacterial system. We found that HAMLET, a human milk protein-lipid complex, kills Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) in a manner that shares features with activation of physiological death from starvation. Addition of HAMLET to pneumococci dissipated membrane polarity, but depolarization per se was not enough to trigger death. Rather, both HAMLET- and starvation-induced death of pneumococci specifically required a sodium-dependent calcium influx, as shown using calcium and sodium transport inhibitors. This mechanism was verified under low sodium conditions, and in the presence of ionomycin or monensin, which enhanced pneumococcal sensitivity to HAMLET- and starvation-induced death. Pneumococcal death was also inhibited by kinase inhibitors, and indicated the involvement of Ser/Thr kinases in these processes. The importance of this activation mechanism was made evident, as dysregulation and manipulation of physiological death was detrimental to biofilm formation, a hallmark of bacterial colonization. Overall, our findings provide novel information on the role of ion transport during bacterial death, with the potential to uncover future antimicrobial targets.

  10. Is β-Lactam Plus Macrolide More Effective than β-Lactam Plus Fluoroquinolone among Patients with Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia?: a Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Adding either macrolide or fluoroquinolone (FQ) to β-lactam has been recommended for patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, due to the limited evidence available, there is a question as to the superiority of the two combination therapies. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register, Scopus, and Web of Science databases were searched for systematic review and meta-analysis. A total of eight trials were analyzed. The total number of patients in the β-lactam plus macrolide (BL-M) and β-lactam plus fluoroquinolone (BL-F) groups was 2,273 and 1,600, respectively. Overall mortality of the BL-M group was lower than that of the BL-F group (19.4% vs. 26.8%), which showed statistical significance (odds ratio [OR], 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.49 to 0.94; P = 0.02). Length of hospital stay was reduced in the BL-M group compared to the BL-F group (mean difference, −3.05 days; 95% CI, −6.01 to −0.09; P = 0.04). However, there was no significant difference in length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay between the two groups. Among patients with severe CAP, BL-M therapy may better reduce overall mortality and length of hospital stay than BL-F therapy. However, we could not elicit strong conclusions from the available trials due to high risk of bias and methodological limitations. PMID:27914135

  11. Branhamella catarrhalis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Milton H.; Gabay, Elizabeth L.; Mathisen, Glenn E.; Finegold, Sydney M.

    1983-01-01

    The diagnosis of Branhamella catarrhalis pneumonia in five cases was established by culture of pulmonary secretions obtained by transtracheal aspiration. B catarrhalis caused an acute lobar pneumonia which usually responded promptly to appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Recognition that this organism may cause pneumonia in a nonimmunocompromised person should alert clinicians to consider it as a possible pathogen when Gramnegative diplococci are seen on smears of specimens from the lower respiratory tract. Images PMID:6837019

  12. Severe malformations of eelpout (Zoarces viviparus) fry are induced by maternal estrogenic exposure during early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Morthorst, Jane E; Korsgaard, Bodil; Bjerregaard, Poul

    2016-02-01

    Pregnant eelpout were exposed via the water to known endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) to clarify if EDCs could be causing the increased eelpout fry malformation frequencies observed in coastal areas receiving high anthropogenic input. The presence of a teratogenic window for estrogen-induced malformations was also investigated by starting the exposure at different times during eelpout pregnancy. Both 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) (17.8 ng/L) and pyrene (0.5 μg/L) significantly increased fry malformation frequency whereas 4-t-octylphenol (4-t-OP) up to 14.3 μg/L did not. Vitellogenin was significantly induced by EE2 (5.7 and 17.8 ng/L) but not by 4-t-OP and pyrene. A critical period for estrogen-induced fry malformations was identified and closed between 14 and 22 days post fertilization (dpf). Exposure to 17β-estradiol (E2) between 0 and 14 dpf caused severe malformations and severity increased the closer exposure start was to fertilization, whereas malformations were absent by exposure starting later than 14 dpf. Data on ovarian fluid volume and larval length supported the suggested teratogenic window. Larval mortality also increased when exposure started right after fertilization.

  13. Dysphagia, dystussia, and aspiration pneumonia in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Hideki; Miyagi, Midori; Ebihara, Takae; Okazaki, Tatsuma

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development and wide distribution of guidelines for pneumonia, death from pneumonia is increasing due to population aging. Conventionally, aspiration pneumonia was mainly thought to be one of the infectious diseases. However, we have proven that chronic repeated aspiration of a small amount of sterile material can cause the usual type of aspiration pneumonia in mouse lung. Moreover, chronic repeated aspiration of small amounts induced chronic inflammation in both frail elderly people and mouse lung. These observations suggest the need for a paradigm shift of the treatment for pneumonia in the elderly. Since aspiration pneumonia is fundamentally based on dysphagia, we should shift the therapy for aspiration pneumonia from pathogen-oriented therapy to function-oriented therapy. Function-oriented therapy in aspiration pneumonia means therapy focusing on slowing or reversing the functional decline that occurs as part of the aging process, such as “dementia → dysphagia → dystussia → atussia → silent aspiration”. Atussia is ultimate dysfunction of cough physiology, and aspiration with atussia is called silent aspiration, which leads to the development of life-threatening aspiration pneumonia. Research pursuing effective strategies to restore function in the elderly is warranted in order to decrease pneumonia deaths in elderly people. PMID:27076964

  14. Dysphagia, dystussia, and aspiration pneumonia in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Satoru; Sekiya, Hideki; Miyagi, Midori; Ebihara, Takae; Okazaki, Tatsuma

    2016-03-01

    Despite the development and wide distribution of guidelines for pneumonia, death from pneumonia is increasing due to population aging. Conventionally, aspiration pneumonia was mainly thought to be one of the infectious diseases. However, we have proven that chronic repeated aspiration of a small amount of sterile material can cause the usual type of aspiration pneumonia in mouse lung. Moreover, chronic repeated aspiration of small amounts induced chronic inflammation in both frail elderly people and mouse lung. These observations suggest the need for a paradigm shift of the treatment for pneumonia in the elderly. Since aspiration pneumonia is fundamentally based on dysphagia, we should shift the therapy for aspiration pneumonia from pathogen-oriented therapy to function-oriented therapy. Function-oriented therapy in aspiration pneumonia means therapy focusing on slowing or reversing the functional decline that occurs as part of the aging process, such as "dementia → dysphagia → dystussia → atussia → silent aspiration". Atussia is ultimate dysfunction of cough physiology, and aspiration with atussia is called silent aspiration, which leads to the development of life-threatening aspiration pneumonia. Research pursuing effective strategies to restore function in the elderly is warranted in order to decrease pneumonia deaths in elderly people.

  15. [Thousand faces of Streptococcus pneumonia (pneumococcus) infections].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Bálint Gergely; Lénárt, Katalin Szidónia; Kádár, Béla; Gombos, Andrea; Dezsényi, Balázs; Szanka, Judit; Bobek, Ilona; Prinz, Gyula

    2015-11-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are high worldwide and in Hungary among paediatric as well as adult populations. Pneumococci account for 35-40% of community acquired adult pneumonias requiring hospitalization, while 25-30% of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonias are accompanied by bacteraemia. 5-7% of all infections are fatal but this rate is exponentially higher in high risk patients and elderly people. Mortality could reach 20% among patients with severe invasive pneumococcal infections. Complications may develop despite administration of adequate antibiotics. The authors summarize the epidemiology of pneumococcal infections, pathogenesis of non-invasive and invasive disease and present basic clinical aspects through demonstration of four cases. Early risk stratification, sampling of hemocultures, administration of antibiotics and wider application of active immunization could reduce the mortality of invasive disease. Anti-pneumococcal vaccination is advisable for adults of ≥50 years and high risk patients of ≥18 years who are susceptible to pneumococcal disease.

  16. Helminth-induced arginase-1 exacerbates lung inflammation and disease severity in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Monin, Leticia; Griffiths, Kristin L; Lam, Wing Y; Gopal, Radha; Kang, Dongwan D; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Rajamanickam, Anuradha; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Babu, Subash; Kolls, Jay K; Mitreva, Makedonka; Rosa, Bruce A; Ramos-Payan, Rosalio; Morrison, Thomas E; Murray, Peter J; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Pearce, Edward J; Khader, Shabaana A

    2015-12-01

    Parasitic helminth worms, such as Schistosoma mansoni, are endemic in regions with a high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) among the population. Human studies suggest that helminth coinfections contribute to increased TB susceptibility and increased rates of TB reactivation. Prevailing models suggest that T helper type 2 (Th2) responses induced by helminth infection impair Th1 immune responses and thereby limit Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) control. Using a pulmonary mouse model of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that S. mansoni coinfection or immunization with S. mansoni egg antigens can reversibly impair Mtb-specific T cell responses without affecting macrophage-mediated Mtb control. Instead, S. mansoni infection resulted in accumulation of high arginase-1-expressing macrophages in the lung, which formed type 2 granulomas and exacerbated inflammation in Mtb-infected mice. Treatment of coinfected animals with an antihelminthic improved Mtb-specific Th1 responses and reduced disease severity. In a genetically diverse mouse population infected with Mtb, enhanced arginase-1 activity was associated with increased lung inflammation. Moreover, in patients with pulmonary TB, lung damage correlated with increased serum activity of arginase-1, which was elevated in TB patients coinfected with helminths. Together, our data indicate that helminth coinfection induces arginase-1-expressing type 2 granulomas, thereby increasing inflammation and TB disease severity. These results also provide insight into the mechanisms by which helminth coinfections drive increased susceptibility, disease progression, and severity in TB.

  17. Recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist attenuates the severity of chronic pancreatitis induced by TNBS in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunfang; Shen, Jiaqing; Zhang, Jing; Jia, Zhenyu; He, Zhilong; Zhuang, Xiaohui; Xu, Ting; Shi, Yuqi; Zhu, Shunying; Wu, Mingyuan; Han, Wei

    2015-02-15

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common disease in the department of gastroenterology, with the main symptoms of exocrine and/or endocrine insufficiency and abdominal pain. The pathogenic mechanism of CP is still not fully clarified and the aims of treatment now are to relieve symptoms. In this study, we attempted to find a connection between interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced chronic pancreatitis, and then the therapeutic effect of recombinant IL-1Ra was also detected in the CP model. Chronic pancreatitis was induced by intraductal infusion of TNBS in SD rats followed by a consecutive administration of rIL-1Ra, and the histological changes and collagen content in the pancreas were measured, as well as the abdominal hypersensitivity. We found that rhIL-1Ra could attenuate the severity of chronic pancreatic injury, modulate the extracellular matrix secretion, focal proliferation and apoptosis, and cellular immunity in TNBS-induced CP. Interestingly, rIL-1Ra could also block the pancreatitis-induced referred abdominal hypersensitivity. In conclusion, IL-1Ra may play a protective role in CP and rIL-1Ra would be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of CP, while its possible mechanisms and clinical usage still need further investigation.

  18. Sensitivity and Specificity of Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1, Midregional Proatrial Natriuretic Peptide and Midregional Proadrenomedullin for Distinguishing Etiology and to Assess Severity in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Susanna; Di Gangi, Maria; Cardinale, Fabio; Baraldi, Eugenio; Corsini, Ilaria; Da Dalt, Liviana; Tovo, Pier Angelo; Correra, Antonio; Villani, Alberto; Sacco, Oliviero; Tenero, Laura; Dones, Piera; Gambino, Monia; Zampiero, Alberto; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Study Design This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1), midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP) and midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) to distinguish bacterial from viral community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and to identify severe cases in children hospitalized for radiologically confirmed CAP. Index test results were compared with those derived from routine diagnostic tests, i.e., white blood cell (WBC) counts, neutrophil percentages, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) levels. Methods This prospective, multicenter study was carried out in the most important children’s hospitals (n = 11) in Italy and 433 otherwise healthy children hospitalized for radiologically confirmed CAP were enrolled. Among cases for whom etiology could be determined, CAP was ascribed to bacteria in 235 (54.3%) children and to one or more viruses in 111 (25.6%) children. A total of 312 (72.2%) children had severe disease. Results CRP and PCT had the best performances for both bacterial and viral CAP identification. The cut-off values with the highest combined sensitivity and specificity for the identification of bacterial and viral infections using CRP were ≥7.98 mg/L and ≤7.5 mg/L, respectively. When PCT was considered, the cut-off values with the highest combined sensitivity and specificity were ≥0.188 ng/mL for bacterial CAP and ≤0.07 ng/mL for viral CAP. For the identification of severe cases, the best results were obtained with evaluations of PCT and MR-proANP. However, in both cases, the biomarker cut-off with the highest combined sensitivity and specificity (≥0.093 ng/mL for PCT and ≥33.8 pmol/L for proANP) had a relatively good sensitivity (higher than 70%) but a limited specificity (of approximately 55%). Conclusions This study indicates that in children with CAP, sTREM-1, MR-proANP, and MR-proADM blood levels have poor abilities to differentiate

  19. [Severe hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis: a case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Herrera Del Águila, Dwight Denis; Garavito Rentería, Jorge; Linarez Medina, Karen; Lizarzaburu Rodríguez, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis occurs in about 1-4% of the cases. It is the third leading cause of pancreatitis after biliary and alcoholic etiology. Hypertriglyceridemia can be caused by primary causes, lipid metabolism disorders and secondary causes. A 32 year old man, born in Huancayo, with a history of diabetes mellitus type 2, severe mixed dyslipidemia with primary hypertriglyceridemia, was admitted to emergency with 10 days of abdominal pain with moderate intensity in epigastrium and left hypochondrium spreading to dorsal region after intake of high-fat meal. 24 hours before admission, pain exacerbates increasing intensity and causing nausea and bilious vomits. Therefore, all laboratory examinations are carried out resulting in hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis. For that reason, an adequate clinical history physical examination associated with laboratory and image examinations are important to consider hypertriglyceridemia as part of the etiology of acute pancreatitis.

  20. Severe Corticosteroid-Induced Ocular Hypertension Requiring Bilateral Trabeculectomies in a Patient with Takayasu's Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pranev; Ameen, Sally; Ahmed, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of severe corticosteroid-induced ocular hypertension (OHT) after prolonged systemic corticosteroid use in a young woman with Takayasu's arteritis. As she did not sufficiently respond to ocular antihypertensive therapies, bilateral enhanced trabeculectomies were required to normalize her intraocular pressures. The systemic side effects of corticosteroids are well known, yet steroid-induced OHT and glaucoma remain silent causes of ocular morbidity. This case highlights the importance of IOP-monitoring in visually asymptomatic patients on systemic corticosteroids. It further emphasizes the need to raise awareness of the potential ocular side effects of steroids amongst physicians, in particular those looking after patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27957366

  1. Clinical implications and treatment of multiresistant Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    File, T M

    2006-05-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading bacterial cause of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Prior to the 1970s this pathogen was uniformly susceptible to penicillin and most other antimicrobials. However, since the 1990s there has been a significant increase in drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (DRSP) due, in large part, to increased use of antimicrobials. The clinical significance of this resistance is not definitely established, but appears to be most relevant to specific MICs for specific antimicrobials. Certain beta-lactams (amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone), the respiratory fluoroquinolones, and telithromycin are among several agents that remain effective against DRSP. Continued surveillance studies, appropriate antimicrobial usage campaigns, stratification of patients based on known risk factors for resistance, and vaccination programmes are needed to appropriately manage DRSP and limit its spread.

  2. Nivolumab-Induced Severe Akathisia in an Advanced Lung Cancer Patient

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Jiro; Sato, Taku; Tanaka, Ryota; Okazaki, Toshimasa; Takahashi, Satomi

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 58 Final Diagnosis: Nivolumab induced severe akathisia Symptoms: Distress fidgety • restlessness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Methylprednisolone pulse therapy and other drugs Specialty: Oncology Objective: Adverse events of drug therapy Background: Nivolumab is an anti-PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor that was recently developed for cancer immunotherapy. In the clinical trials of nivolumab, its adverse effects were reported to be less likely than those of conventional anti-cancer agents; however, after practical clinical distribution, it has come to be known that nivolumab induces various immune-related adverse events. Case Report: A 58-year-old male with a recurrence of lung adenocarcinoma was treated with nivolumab. Only four days after the initial administration of nivolumab, the patient presented with unbearable restlessness and distress that was resistant to all therapeutic agents used, and it gradually became worse. He finally came to need deep sedation despite his cancer status being stable during the course. Clinical tests including magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid cytology, and antibodies of paraneoplastic syndrome exhibited no signs of encephalitis or another possible cause of the neuropathy. The diagnosis of akathisia could be made only by his somatoform presentation. It was uncertain whether or not this complication was correlated with the activation of his immune system. Conclusions: Anti-immune check point inhibitors may induce many unknown adverse events. Severe akathisia induced by nivolumab, as in our case, has not been reported yet. Collecting every adverse event of nivolumab may be important to make a better algorithm to manage its huge variety of complications. PMID:27893699

  3. Vitamin D Deficiency Is Associated With the Severity of Radiation-Induced Proctitis in Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbanzadeh-Moghaddam, Amir; Gholamrezaei, Ali; Hemati, Simin

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced injury to normal tissues is a common complication of radiation therapy in cancer patients. Considering the role of vitamin D in mucosal barrier hemostasis and inflammatory responses, we investigated whether vitamin D deficiency is associated with the severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis in cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This prospective observational study was conducted in cancer patients referred for pelvic radiation therapy. Serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured before radiation therapy. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations of <35 nmol/L and <40 nmol/L in male and female patients, respectively, based on available normative data. Acute proctitis was assessed after 5 weeks of radiation therapy (total received radiation dose of 50 Gy) and graded from 0 to 4 using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. Results: Ninety-eight patients (57.1% male) with a mean age of 62.8 ± 9.1 years were studied. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 57 patients (58.1%). Symptoms of acute proctitis occurred in 72 patients (73.4%) after radiation therapy. RTOG grade was significantly higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency than in normal cases (median [interquartile range] of 2 [0.5-3] vs 1 [0-2], P=.037). Vitamin D deficiency was associated with RTOG grade of ≥2, independent of possible confounding factors; odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 3.07 (1.27-7.50), P=.013. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis. Investigating the underlying mechanisms of this association and evaluating the effectiveness of vitamin D therapy in preventing radiation-induced acute proctitis is warranted.

  4. Extent of pre-operative L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia predicts the severity of graft-induced dyskinesia after fetal dopamine cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    García, Joanna; Carlsson, Thomas; Döbrössy, Máté; Nikkhah, Guido; Winkler, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Graft-induced dyskinesia has emerged as a problematic side effect after transplantation of fetal dopamine cells into the striatum of patients with Parkinson's disease. These adverse effects of dystonic and choreatiform hyperkinesias that persisted even after withdrawal of L-DOPA medication are not yet fully understood, which poses a main obstacle for the re-initiation of neural transplantation in Parkinson's disease. The severity of pre-operative L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia has been proposed as one of several parameters influencing the development of graft-induced dyskinesia. We have therefore characterized graft-induced dyskinesia in the rat model of Parkinson's disease in animals with either mild or severe pre-operative L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. We show that animals with intrastriatal grafts of fetal dopamine cells and severe pre-operative L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia will reduce their L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia scores by more than 75% but at the same time develop graft-induced dyskinesia of intermediate to strong severity. In contrast, animals with dopamine grafts of similar size but only mild pre-operative L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia also developed graft-induced dyskinesia but this was very mild and of intermediate severity only in a single animal. Severity of pre-operative L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia was correlated with the severity of graft-induced dyskinesia. Our data suggest that patients with no or only mild L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia may carry a lower risk for the development of graft-induced dyskinesia and therefore are better candidates to receive intracerebral grafts of fetal dopamine cells as compared to patients with more pronounced L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

  5. SEW2871 Alleviates the Severity of Caerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lei; Ke, Lu; Wu, Congye; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Weiqin; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate type-1 receptor (S1P1) agonists have the potential to inhibit the egress of lymphocytes, and have been demonstrated to provide protective effects on some acute inflammatory diseases. However, the value of S1P1 agonists on acute pancreatitis (AP) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of SEW2871, a S1P1-selective agonist, on caerulein-induced AP in mice. AP was induced by giving eight intraperitoneal injections of caerulein (50 µg/kg/h) at hourly intervals. SEW2871 was administered by gavage, at a dose of 20 mg/kg, at 0 h and 12 h after the first intraperitoneal injection of caerulein. The mice were sacrificed at 24 h. Severity of AP, serum amylase and lipase activity, levels of serum cytokines, pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, CD45+CD4+ T lymphocytes in blood, CD4+ T cell infiltration in the pancreas, and proinflammatory cytokine production were assessed. Furthermore, the expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 and phospho-STAT3 (p-STAT3) in the pancreas was also evaluated. The results revealed that the administration of SEW2871 ameliorated the severity of AP, by a reduction of serum pancreatic enzyme activity and levels of cytokines, decreased pancreatic MPO activity, depletion of CD4+CD45+ T lymphocytes in the blood and a reduction of CD4+ T cell infiltration in the pancreas. Furthermore, the expression of proinflammatory cytokines mRNA and p-STAT3 were also suppressed by SEW2871 treatment. These results suggest that SEW2871 treatment attenuates the severity of caerulein-induced AP in mice, which may provide a new therapeutic approach for AP therapy.

  6. Severe duodenal hemorrhage induced by Lugol's solution administered for thyroid crisis treatment.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Mutsuko; Furumoto, Youhei; Watanabe, Naoko; Horiuchi, Takao; Murayama, Minekazu; Kitamura, Mari; Kaneko, Shingo; Inoshita, Seiji; Maruyama, Yasuki; Suenaga, Matsuhiko; Fujita, Hiroshi; Fujiki, Kazuhiko; Yakushiji, Fumiatsu

    2010-01-01

    Lugol's solution is an iodinated agent used for treating thyroid crisis. It is primarily used in diagnostic tests for esophageal diseases. However, Lugol's solution can cause local mucosal injury and hemorrhage. We report, for the first time, a case of 34-year-old man who exhibited severe duodenal hemorrhage induced by Lugol's solution that was used to treat thyroid crisis. The quantity of Lugol's solution used for treating thyroid crisis is much higher than that used for mucosal disease investigation. Clinical practitioners should be aware of gastrointestinal hemorrhage when using Lugol's solution for the treatment of thyroid crisis.

  7. Williopsis saturnus yeast killer toxin does not kill Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Ochigava, Irma; Collier, Phillip J; Walker, Graeme M; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2011-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important human bacterial pathogen, and the increase in antibiotic resistance demands the development of new antimicrobial compounds. Several reports have suggested that yeast killer toxins show activity against bacteria and we therefore investigated the activity of K9 killer toxin from the yeast Williopsis saturnus var. mrakii NCYC 500 against S. pneumoniae. However, no inhibition of bacterial growth was observed with concentrated K9 preparations in agar diffusion assays and in liquid culture. Although cell morphology was slightly affected by K9 treatment, no effect on cellular viability was detectable, and K9 had no stimulatory effect on cell lysis induced by β-lactams or Triton X-100. This indicated that K9 did not contribute to cell wall damage. Moreover, flow cytometry was used as a sensitive assessment of integrity of cells exposed to killer toxin. No significant damage of S. pneumoniae cells was evident, although minor changes in fluorescence suggested that K9 killer toxin may interact with bacterial surface components.

  8. Investigating Non-Invasive Hemodynamic Monitoring Devices Using Severe Dengue as a Surrogate for Trauma-Induced Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Devices Using Severe Dengue as a Surrogate for Trauma-Induced Shock” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Stephen Thomas CONTRACTING...Hemodynamic Monitoring Devices Using Severe Dengue as a Surrogate for Trauma-Induced Shock” 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-2-0079 5c. PROGRAM

  9. Vector promoters used in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao; Zhu, Chengqian; Lin, Jie; Li, Jingkang; Fu, Shuilin; Gong, Heng

    2016-09-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the metabolic engineering of Klebsiella pneumoniae; however, our knowledge of the actual expression level of promoters used in K. pneumoniae is limited. In this study, the expression levels of three promoters were compared systematically by using the lacZ reporter gene with different carbon sources in K. pneumoniae. The results showed that, although promoters PT5 and Ptac designed for Escherichia coli were functional, PT5 appeared more efficient and the induction/repression ratio of Ptac was decreased extremely in K. pneumoniae. The basal level of Ptac for lacZ expression reached 396.5 U/mg, which was 9.5-fold higher compared with PT5 in LB medium, indicating Ptac can be used as an efficient "constitutive" promoter as well as an efficient induced promoter in K. pneumoniae. In different carbon sources medium, a newly constructed endogenous constitutive Pbud proved to be a stable and weak promoter. On the basis of our data, a set of Pbud and Ptac promoters could meet the broad range (about 1,000 orders of magnitude) of gene expression needed for engineered K. pneumoniae in glycerol-based medium.

  10. EFFECT OF AGE ON KAINATE-INDUCED SEIZURE SEVERITY AND CELL DEATH

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Meghan C.; Lorenzana, Ariana; Bloom, Christopher S.; Chancer, Zackary O.; Schauwecker, P. Elyse

    2008-01-01

    While the onset and extent of epilepsy increases in the aged population, the reasons for this increased incidence remain unexplored. The present study used two inbred strains of mice (C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ) to address the genetic control of age-dependent neurodegeneration by building upon previous experiments that have identified phenotypic differences in susceptibility to hippocampal seizure-induced cell death. We determined if seizure induction and seizure-induced cell death are affected differentially in young adult, mature, and aged male C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ mice administered the excitotoxin, kainic acid. Dose response testing was performed in three-four groups of male mice from each strain. Following kainate injections, mice were scored for seizure activity and brains from mice in each age group were processed for light microscopic histopathologic evaluation seven days following kainate administration to evaluate the severity of seizure-induced brain damage. Irrespective of the dose of kainate administered or the age group examined, resistant strains of mice (C57BL/6J) continued to be resistant to seizure-induced cell death. In contrast, aged animals of the FVB/NJ strain were more vulnerable to the induction of behavioral seizures and associated neuropathology after systemic injection of kainic acid than young or middle-aged mice. Results from these studies suggest that the age-related increased susceptibility to the neurotoxic effects of seizure induction and seizure-induced injury is regulated in a strain-dependent manner, similar to previous observations in young adult mice. PMID:18479826

  11. Risk assessment of severe accident-induced steam generator tube rupture

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the basis, results, and related risk implications of an analysis performed by an ad hoc working group of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the containment bypass potential attributable to steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) induced by severe accident conditions. The SGTR Severe Accident Working Group, comprised of staff members from the NRC`s Offices of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) and Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), undertook the analysis beginning in December 1995 to support a proposed steam generator integrity rule. The work drew upon previous risk and thermal-hydraulic analyses of core damage sequences, with a focus on the Surry plant as a representative example. This analysis yielded new results, however, derived by predicting thermal-hydraulic conditions of selected severe accident scenarios using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, flawed tube failure modeling, and tube failure probability estimates. These results, in terms of containment bypass probability, form the basis for the findings presented in this report. The representative calculation using Surry plant data indicates that some existing plants could be vulnerable to containment bypass resulting from tube failure during severe accidents. To specifically identify the population of plants that may pose a significant bypass risk would require more definitive analysis considering uncertainties in some assumptions and plant- and design-specific variables. 46 refs., 62 figs., 37 tabs.

  12. Severe hyponatremia caused by nab-paclitaxel-induced syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Neuzillet, Cindy; Babai, Samy; Kempf, Emmanuelle; Pujol, Géraldine; Rousseau, Benoît; Le-Louët, Hervé; Christophe Tournigand

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is increasing. Most patients have advanced disease at diagnosis and therapeutic options in this setting are limited. Gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel regimen was demonstrated to increase survival compared with gemcitabine monotherapy and is therefore indicated as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic PDAC and performance status Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) 0-2. The safety profile of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel combination includes neutropenia, fatigue, and neuropathy as most common adverse events of grade 3 or higher. No case of severe hyponatremia associated with the use of nab-paclitaxel for the treatment of PDAC has been reported to date. We report the case of a 72-year-old Caucasian man with a metastatic PDAC treated with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel regimen, who presented with a severe hyponatremia (grade 4) caused by a documented syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). This SIADH was attributed to nab-paclitaxel after a rigorous imputability analysis, including a rechallenge procedure with dose reduction. After dose and schedule adjustment, nab-paclitaxel was pursued without recurrence of severe hyponatremia and with maintained efficacy. Hyponatremia is a rare but potentially severe complication of nab-paclitaxel therapy that medical oncologists and gastroenterologists should be aware of. Nab-paclitaxel-induced hyponatremia is manageable upon dose and schedule adaptation, and should not contraindicate careful nab-paclitaxel reintroduction. This is of particular interest for a disease in which the therapeutic options are limited. PMID:27368013

  13. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia severity is associated with cowhage-induced itch

    PubMed Central

    Saif, G.A. Bin; McMichael, A.; Kwatra, S.G.; Chan, Y.-H.; Yosipovitch, G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Patients with central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) often suffer from varying degrees of itch, pain and burning sensations. However, the neural component of these skin sensations has not been assessed. Objective To conduct a comprehensive analysis of C nerve fibre function relating to itch and pain perception in patients with CCCA using thermosensory testing and experimental itch models. Methods Fifteen healthy African-American women and 16 African-American female patients with CCCA participated in the study and underwent quantitative computerized thermosensory testing to assess warmth and heat pain thresholds. Itch was induced using histamine iontophoresis and application of cowhage spicules, and the intensity of each itch was assessed. The association between itch intensity and CCCA severity score was examined. Results A positive correlation between CCCA severity score and peak itch ratings of cowhage on the lesional scalp (crown) was observed (P = 0·023, r = 0·562). Notably, the histamine peak itch rating was not found to have a significant correlation with CCCA severity score (P = 0·913). The crown also had significantly higher warmth and pain thresholds than the occiput in both healthy subjects and patients with CCCA. Conclusions Our results suggest a putative role for the protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2, which is activated by cowhage, in the pathogenesis of CCCA. Future studies should examine PAR-2-directed therapeutics for patients with CCCA. Examining for itch and other dysaesthesias in patients with CCCA is of vital importance to dermatologists in assessing disease severity. PMID:22985403

  14. Persistent Pneumonia in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Kristen; Logan, Latania; Codispoti, Christopher; Jones, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    A 4-month-old boy with past medical history of eczema presented with fever and cough; a chest radiograph showed lung consolidation, and he was initially treated with amoxicillin for presumed community-acquired pneumonia. After several days, his fever persisted. He was also profoundly anemic. Antibiotic coverage was broadened because of the concern for resistant organisms; he began to improve and was discharged from the hospital. However, at 5 months of age, his fever returned, and he continued to demonstrate lung consolidation on chest radiograph. Additionally, he had lost weight and continued to be anemic. Splenic cysts were noted on abdominal ultrasound. He was diagnosed with an unusual etiology for his pneumonia and improved with the appropriate therapy. An underlying immunodeficiency was suspected, but initial testing was nondiagnostic. At 12 months of age, he presented with another infection, and the final diagnosis was made. PMID:26122810

  15. Persistent Pneumonia in an Infant.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Kristen; Logan, Latania; Codispoti, Christopher; Jones, Carolyn; Van Opstal, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    A 4-month-old boy with past medical history of eczema presented with fever and cough; a chest radiograph showed lung consolidation, and he was initially treated with amoxicillin for presumed community-acquired pneumonia. After several days, his fever persisted. He was also profoundly anemic. Antibiotic coverage was broadened because of the concern for resistant organisms; he began to improve and was discharged from the hospital. However, at 5 months of age, his fever returned, and he continued to demonstrate lung consolidation on chest radiograph. Additionally, he had lost weight and continued to be anemic. Splenic cysts were noted on abdominal ultrasound. He was diagnosed with an unusual etiology for his pneumonia and improved with the appropriate therapy. An underlying immunodeficiency was suspected, but initial testing was nondiagnostic. At 12 months of age, he presented with another infection, and the final diagnosis was made.

  16. [Pneumonia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Catherinot, Emilie

    2012-01-01

    Pneumonia is a serious medical pathology frequent in elderly people. The physiological changes of the respiratory system linked with age reduce postural drainage capacities and increase the risk of acute respiratory failure. Associated with other comorbidities, chronic inhalation is a major risk factor of pneumonia in elderly people. Prevention is based on vaccination, nutrition, dental care and an adapted diet.

  17. Bronchitis and Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a health care provider. How serious are bronchitis and pneumonia? Both conditions are more serious if a child has a chronic health condition or if the condition is caused by a bacteria, in which case antibiotics are the treatment of choice. When pneumonia is caused by bacteria, ...

  18. Complicated secondary pneumonia after swine-origin influenza A virus infection in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Igusa, Ryotaro; Sakakibara, Tomohiro; Shibahara, Taizo; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Ota, Kozo

    2012-01-01

    The pandemic of the swine-origin influenza A virus (S-OIV) in 2009 demonstrated severe viral pneumonia followed by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although ARDS would be caused by the influenza virus pneumonia itself, it has remained unclear whether other respiratory viral or bacterial infections coexist with S-OIV pneumonia. We report an immunocompetent patient with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Herpes simplex virus (HSV) pneumonia secondary to S-OIV infection. A 57-year-old man previously without major medical illness was admitted to our hospital with severe pneumonia accompanied by ARDS due to S-OIV. In his clinical course, anti-influenza treatment was not effective. Sputum culture revealed the presence of MRSA, and HSV was isolated in broncho-alveoler lavage (BAL) fluid. Administration of an antiviral agent (acyclovir), an antibacterial agent (linezolid), and a corticosteroid (methylprednisolone) successfully improved the pneumonia and ARDS. HSV pneumonia can scarcely be seen in healthy people. However recently it has been recognized as a ventilator-associated pneumonia. Although coexistence of Streptococcus pneumoniae and MRSA was reported in S-OIV pneumonia, secondary viral infection has not been reported. The present report is the first patient with HSV pneumonia secondary to S-OIV infection. We propose that a possibility of hidden HSV pneumonia should be taken into consideration in patients with prolonged severe pneumonia due to influenza infection.

  19. Stress-induced intestinal necrosis resulting from severe trauma of an earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jia-Qing; Zhang, Guo-Hu; Tian, Fu-Zhou; Wang, Yong-Hua; Zhang, Lin; Cao, Yong-Kuan; Wang, Pei-Hong

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the possible reasons and suggest therapeutic plan of stress-induced intestinal necrosis resulting from the severe trauma. METHODS: Three patients in our study were trapped inside collapsed structures for 22, 21 and 37 h, respectively. The patients underwent 3-4 operations after sustaining their injuries. Mechanical ventilation, intermittent hemodialysis and other treatments were also provided. The patients showed signs of peritoneal irritation on postoperative days 10-38. Small intestinal necrosis was confirmed by emergency laparotomy, and for each patient, part of the small bowel was removed. RESULTS: Two patients who all performed 3 operations died of respiratory complications on the first and second postoperative days respectively. The third patient who performed 4 operations was discharged and made a full recovery. Three patients had the following common characteristics: (1) Multiple severe trauma events with no direct penetrating gastrointestinal injury; (2) Multiple surgeries with impaired renal function and intermittent hemodialysis treatment; (3) Progressive abdominal pain and tenderness, and peritoneal irritation was present on post-traumatic days 10-38; (4) Abdominal operations confirmed segment ulcer, necrosis of the small intestine, hyperplasia and stiffness of the intestinal wall; and (5) Pathological examinations suggested submucosal hemorrhage, necrosis, fibrosis and hyalinization of the vascular wall. Pathological examinations of all 3 patients suggested intestinal necrosis with fistulas. CONCLUSION: Intestinal necrosis is strongly asso-ciated with stress from trauma and post-traumatic complications; timely exploratory laparotomy maybe an effective method for preventing and treating stress-induced intestinal necrosis. PMID:22563202

  20. Nivolumab-Induced Severe Akathisia in an Advanced Lung Cancer Patient.

    PubMed

    Abe, Jiro; Sato, Taku; Tanaka, Ryota; Okazaki, Toshimasa; Takahashi, Satomi

    2016-11-23

    BACKGROUND Nivolumab is an anti-PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor that was recently developed for cancer immunotherapy. In the clinical trials of nivolumab, its adverse effects were reported to be less likely than those of conventional anti-cancer agents; however, after practical clinical distribution, it has come to be known that nivolumab induces various immune-related adverse events. CASE REPORT A 58-year-old male with a recurrence of lung adenocarcinoma was treated with nivolumab. Only four days after the initial administration of nivolumab, the patient presented with unbearable restlessness and distress that was resistant to all therapeutic agents used, and it gradually became worse. He finally came to need deep sedation despite his cancer status being stable during the course. Clinical tests including magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid cytology, and antibodies of paraneoplastic syndrome exhibited no signs of encephalitis or another possible cause of the neuropathy. The diagnosis of akathisia could be made only by his somatoform presentation. It was uncertain whether or not this complication was correlated with the activation of his immune system. CONCLUSIONS Anti-immune check point inhibitors may induce many unknown adverse events. Severe akathisia induced by nivolumab, as in our case, has not been reported yet. Collecting every adverse event of nivolumab may be important to make a better algorithm to manage its huge variety of complications.

  1. Severe hypoxia induces chemo-resistance in clinical cervical tumors through MVP over-expression

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Pedro C; Lloret, Marta; Clavo, Bernardino; Apolinario, Rosa M; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Bordón, Elisa; Fontes, Fausto; Rey, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen molecule modulates tumour response to radiotherapy. Higher radiation doses are required under hypoxic conditions to induce cell death. Hypoxia may inhibit the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair through down regulating Ku70/80 expression. Hypoxia induces drug resistance in clinical tumours, although the mechanism is not clearly elucidated. Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a hollow barrel-like structure composed of three proteins: major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and telomerase associated protein-1 and small untranslated RNA. Over-expression of MVP has been associated with chemotherapy resistance. Also, it has been related to poor outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relation of Major Vault Protein expression and tumor hypoxia in clinical cervical tumors. MVP, p53 and angiogenesis, together with tumor oxygenation, were determined in forty-three consecutive patients suffering from localized cervix carcinoma. High MVP expression was related to severe hypoxia compared to low MVP expressing tumors (p = 0.022). Tumors over-expressing MVP also showed increased angiogenesis (p = 0.003). Besides it, in this study we show for the first time that severe tumor hypoxia is associated with high MVP expression in clinical cervical tumors. Up-regulation of MVP by hypoxia is of critical relevance as chemotherapy is currently a standard treatment for those patients. From our results it could be suggested that hypoxia not only induces increased genetic instability, oncogenic properties and metastatization, but through the correlation observed with MVP expression, another pathway of chemo and radiation resistance could be developed. PMID:19660100

  2. Severe hypoxia induces chemo-resistance in clinical cervical tumors through MVP over-expression.

    PubMed

    Lara, Pedro C; Lloret, Marta; Clavo, Bernardino; Apolinario, Rosa M; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Bordón, Elisa; Fontes, Fausto; Rey, Agustín

    2009-08-06

    Oxygen molecule modulates tumour response to radiotherapy. Higher radiation doses are required under hypoxic conditions to induce cell death. Hypoxia may inhibit the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair through down regulating Ku70/80 expression. Hypoxia induces drug resistance in clinical tumours, although the mechanism is not clearly elucidated. Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a hollow barrel-like structure composed of three proteins: major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and telomerase associated protein-1 and small untranslated RNA. Over-expression of MVP has been associated with chemotherapy resistance. Also, it has been related to poor outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relation of Major Vault Protein expression and tumor hypoxia in clinical cervical tumors. MVP, p53 and angiogenesis, together with tumor oxygenation, were determined in forty-three consecutive patients suffering from localized cervix carcinoma. High MVP expression was related to severe hypoxia compared to low MVP expressing tumors (p = 0.022). Tumors over-expressing MVP also showed increased angiogenesis (p = 0.003). Besides it, in this study we show for the first time that severe tumor hypoxia is associated with high MVP expression in clinical cervical tumors. Up-regulation of MVP by hypoxia is of critical relevance as chemotherapy is currently a standard treatment for those patients. From our results it could be suggested that hypoxia not only induces increased genetic instability, oncogenic properties and metastatization, but through the correlation observed with MVP expression, another pathway of chemo and radiation resistance could be developed.

  3. Hydrogen-rich saline ameliorates the severity of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Han; Sun, Yan Ping; Li, Yang; Liu, Wen Wu; Xiang, Hong Gang; Fan, Lie Ying; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Xin Yun; Cai, Jian Mei; Ruan, Can Ping; Su, Ning; Yan, Rong Lin; Sun, Xue Jun; Wang, Qiang

    2010-03-05

    Molecular hydrogen, which reacts with the hydroxyl radical, has been considered as a novel antioxidant. Here, we evaluated the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on the L-arginine (L-Arg)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by giving two intraperitoneal injections of L-Arg, each at concentrations of 250 mg/100 g body weight, with an interval of 1 h. Hydrogen-rich saline (>0.6 mM, 6 ml/kg) or saline (6 ml/kg) was administered, respectively, via tail vein 15 min after each L-Arg administration. Severity of AP was assessed by analysis of serum amylase activity, pancreatic water content and histology. Samples of pancreas were taken for measuring malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase. Apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cell was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) were detected with immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated the severity of L-Arg-induced AP by ameliorating the increased serum amylase activity, inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, lipid oxidation and pancreatic tissue edema. Moreover, hydrogen-rich saline treatment could promote acinar cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and NF-{kappa}B activation. These results indicate that hydrogen treatment has a protective effect against AP, and the effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit oxidative stress, apoptosis, NF-{kappa}B activation and to promote acinar cell proliferation.

  4. Acute pneumonia and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Medina, Vicente F; Musher, Daniel M; Shachkina, Svetlana; Chirinos, Julio A

    2013-02-09

    Although traditionally regarded as a disease confined to the lungs, acute pneumonia has important effects on the cardiovascular system at all severities of infection. Pneumonia tends to affect individuals who are also at high cardiovascular risk. Results of recent studies show that about a quarter of adults admitted to hospital with pneumonia develop a major acute cardiac complication during their hospital stay, which is associated with a 60% increase in short-term mortality. These findings suggest that outcomes of patients with pneumonia can be improved by prevention of the development and progression of associated cardiac complications. Before this hypothesis can be tested, however, an adequate mechanistic understanding of the cardiovascular changes that occur during pneumonia, and their role in the trigger of various cardiac complications, is needed. In this Review, we summarise knowledge about the burden of cardiac complications in adults with acute pneumonia, the cardiovascular response to this infection, the potential effects of commonly used cardiovascular and anti-infective drugs on these associations, and possible directions for future research.

  5. L-Dopa induced dyskinesias in Parkinsonian mice: disease severity or L-Dopa history

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Lufei; Diaz, Oscar; Zhang, Yajun; Ladenheim, Bruce; Cadet, Jean-Lud; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Olson, Lars; Hoffer, Barry J.; Bäckman, Cristina M.

    2016-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, the efficacy of L-Dopa treatment changes over time, as dyskinesias emerge with previously beneficial doses. Using MitoPark mice, that models mitochondrial failure in dopamine (DA) neurons and mimics the progressive loss of dopamine observed in Parkinson’s disease, we found that the severity of DA denervation and associated adaptations in striatal neurotransmission at the time of initiation of L-Dopa treatment determines development of L-Dopa induced dyskinesias. We treated 20-week, and 28-week old MitoPark mice with L-Dopa (10 mg/kg i.p. twice a day) and found locomotor responses to be significantly different. While all MitoPark mice developed sensitization to L-Dopa treatment over time, 28-week old MitoPark mice with extensive striatal DA denervation developed abnormal involuntary movements rapidly and severely after starting L-Dopa treatment, as compared to a more gradual escalation of movements in 20-week old animals that started treatment at earlier stages of degeneration. Our data support that it is the extent of loss of DA innervation that determines how soon motor complications develop with L-Dopa treatment. Gene array studies of striatal neurotransmitter receptors revealed changes in mRNA expression levels for DA, serotonin, glutamate and GABA receptors in striatum of 28-week old MitoPark mice. Our results support that delaying L-Dopa treatment until Parkinson’s disease symptoms become more severe does not delay the development of L-Dopa-induced dyskinesias. MitoPark mice model genetic alterations known to impair mitochondrial function in a subgroup of Parkinson patients and provide a platform in which to study treatments to minimize the development of dyskinesia. PMID:26086365

  6. Expression of the 1918 Influenza A Virus PB1-F2 Enhances the Pathogenesis of Viral and Secondary Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, Julie L.; Hornung, Felicita; Boyd, Kelli L.; Smith, Amber M.; McKeon, Raelene; Bennink, Jack; Yewdell, Jonathan W.; McCullers, Jonathan A.

    2007-01-01

    Secondary bacterial pneumonia frequently claimed the lives of victims during the devastating 1918 influenza A virus pandemic. Little is known about the viral factors contributing to the lethality of the 1918 pandemic. Here we show that expression of the viral accessory protein PB1-F2 enhances inflammation during primary viral infection of mice and increases both the frequency and severity of secondary bacterial pneumonia. The priming effect of PB1-F2 on bacterial pneumonia could be recapitulated in mice by intranasal delivery of a synthetic peptide derived from the C-terminal portion of the PB1-F2. Relative to its isogenic parent, an influenza virus engineered to express a PB1-F2 with coding changes matching the 1918 pandemic strain was more virulent in mice, induced more pulmonary immunopathology, and led to more severe secondary bacterial pneumonia. These findings help explain both the unparalleled virulence of the 1918 strain and the high incidence of fatal pneumonia during the pandemic. PMID:18005742

  7. Protective effects of daphnetin on sodium taurocholate‑induced severe acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Jiao; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Wang, Li-Kun; Shi, Qiao; Zuo, Teng; Liu, Tian-Yi; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Wei-Xing

    2014-05-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is the sudden onset of pancreatic inflammation, which is characterized by edema, acinar cell necrosis, hemorrhage and severe inflammation of the pancreas and is associated with a high mortality rate. Daphnetin has been shown to alleviate organ injury in a variety of preclinical animal models of coagulation disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of daphnetin on severe acute pancreatitis in a rat model. Severe acute pancreatitis in the rat model was induced by retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg) into the bile-pancreatic duct. Daphnetin (4 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally at 30 min prior to the infusion of sodium taurocholate. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by various analyses of serum amylase and lipase, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, as well as by histological grading. The levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in the serum were measured by ELISA. The results revealed that the daphnetin-treated SAP rat group (SAP-D) exhibited a lower pathological score of the pancreas compared with the SAP group (SAP). Further analyses demonstrated that the SAP-D group had lower levels of serum amylase, lipase and pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α and IL-1β, and a decreased MPO activity and MDA content 3, 6 and 12 h subsequent to the infusion of sodium taurocholate compared with the SAP group (SAP). These findings indicated that daphnetin exerted a protective function in the SAP rat model. Therefore, daphnetin may be considered as a potential compound for the therapy and prevention of acute pancreatitis.

  8. Ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by colistin-resistant KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Viaggi, Bruno; Sbrana, Francesco; Malacarne, Paolo; Tascini, Carlo

    2015-05-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae producing KPC-type carbapenemase causes severe nosocomial infection at a high mortality rate. Nosocomial pneumonia in particular is associated with high mortality, likely due to the unfavorable pulmonary pharmacokinetics of the antibiotics used against this agent. Therefore, early and accurate microbiological identification and susceptibility evaluation are crucial in order to optimize antibiotic therapy. We report a case of ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae producing KPC-type carbapenemase treated using a carbapenem-sparing therapy and tailored according to the serum procalcitonin concentration in order to limit the duration of antibiotic therapy.

  9. Severe Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome to Cow's Milk in Infants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Geng, Lanlan; Xu, Zhaohui; Chen, Peiyu; Friesen, Craig A; Gong, Sitang; Li, Ding-You

    2015-12-22

    Cow's milk is the most common cause of food-protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES). The aim of this study was to examine the clinical features and treatment outcomes of infants with severe FPIES to cow's milk. We reviewed all infants ≤ 12 months of age who were hospitalized and diagnosed with severe FPIES to cow's milk between 1 January 2011 and 31 August 2014 in a tertiary Children's Medical Center in China. Patients' clinical features, feeding patterns, laboratory tests, and treatment outcomes were reviewed. A total of 12 infants met the inclusion criteria. All infants presented with diarrhea, edema, and hypoalbuminemia. Other main clinical manifestations included regurgitation/vomiting, skin rashes, low-grade fever, bloody and/or mucous stools, abdominal distention, and failure to thrive. They had clinical remission with resolution of diarrhea and significant increase of serum albumin after elimination of cow's milk protein (CMP) from the diet. The majority of infants developed tolerance to the CMP challenge test after 12 months of avoidance. In conclusion, we reported the clinical experience of 12 infants with severe FPIES to cow's milk, which resulted in malnutrition, hypoproteinemia, and failure to thrive. Prompt treatment with CMP-free formula is effective and leads to clinical remission of FPIES in infants.

  10. Prevalence and severity of plaque-induced gingivitis in a Saudi adult population

    PubMed Central

    Idrees, Majdy M.; Azzeghaiby, Saleh N.; Hammad, Mohammad M.; Kujan, Omar B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence and severity of plaque-induced gingivitis among a Saudi adult population in Riyadh region. Methods: Three hundred and eighty-five eligible participants in this cross-sectional study were recruited from routine dental patients attending the oral diagnosis clinic at Al-Farabi College in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from June 2013 to December 2013. A clinical examination was performed by 2 dentists to measure the gingival and plaque indices of Löe and Silness for each participant. Results: The prevalence of gingivitis was 100% among adult subjects aged between 18-40 years old. Moreover, the mean gingival index was 1.68±0.31, which indicates a moderate gingival inflammation. In fact, males showed more severe signs of gingival inflammation compared with females (p=0.001). In addition, the mean plaque index was 0.875±0.49, which indicates a good plaque status of the participants. Interestingly, the age was not related either to the gingival inflammation (p=0.13), or to the amount of plaque accumulation (p=0.17). However, males were more affected than females (p=0.005). Conclusion: The results of this study show that plaque accumulation is strongly associated with high prevalence of moderate to severe gingivitis among Saudi subjects. PMID:25399215

  11. [Infection and coronary atherosclerosis: the role Chlamydia pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Paz, M; de Otero, J; Codinach, P; Ferrer-Ruscalleda, F; Gayà, M; Ibernón, M

    1998-11-01

    The role of inflammatory reactions in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is widely accepted. Recently, an increasing body of evidence has linked infections to atherosclerosis. It is hypothesized that infections could interact with other risk factors of vascular disease, enhancing the endothelial damage and the production of atherosclerotic plaques. Several different infectious agents have been related to the atherosclerosis genesis: mainly herpesvirus, Helicobacter pylori and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Several lines of evidence strongly link C. pneumoniae to atherosclerosis. Consequently, several studies evaluating the effectiveness of antibiotic treatment in the reduction of cardiac ischemic events in patients with C. pneumoniae seropositivity have been performed. These studies support a causative role for C. pneumoniae. This article reviews the recent evidence linking infections to atherosclerosis, with emphasis on the role of C. pneumoniae on the atherosclerotic plaque.

  12. C-type Lectin Mincle Recognizes Glucosyl-diacylglycerol of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Plays a Protective Role in Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Behler-Janbeck, Friederike; Takano, Tomotsugu; Maus, Regina; Stolper, Jennifer; Jonigk, Danny; Tort Tarrés, Meritxell; Fuehner, Thomas; Prasse, Antje; Welte, Tobias; Timmer, Mattie S M; Stocker, Bridget L; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Yamasaki, Sho; Maus, Ulrich A

    2016-12-01

    Among various innate immune receptor families, the role of C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in lung protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) is not fully defined. We here show that Mincle gene expression was induced in alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of mice and patients with pneumococcal pneumonia. Moreover, S. pneumoniae directly triggered Mincle reporter cell activation in vitro via its glycolipid glucosyl-diacylglycerol (Glc-DAG), which was identified as the ligand recognized by Mincle. Purified Glc-DAG triggered Mincle reporter cell activation and stimulated inflammatory cytokine release by human alveolar macrophages and alveolar macrophages from WT but not Mincle KO mice. Mincle deficiency led to increased bacterial loads and decreased survival together with strongly dysregulated cytokine responses in mice challenged with focal pneumonia inducing S. pneumoniae, all of which was normalized in Mincle KO mice reconstituted with a WT hematopoietic system. In conclusion, the Mincle-Glc-DAG axis is a hitherto unrecognized element of lung protective immunity against focal pneumonia induced by S. pneumoniae.

  13. C-type Lectin Mincle Recognizes Glucosyl-diacylglycerol of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Plays a Protective Role in Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Behler-Janbeck, Friederike; Maus, Regina; Stolper, Jennifer; Jonigk, Danny; Fuehner, Thomas; Prasse, Antje; Welte, Tobias; Stocker, Bridget L.; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Yamasaki, Sho; Maus, Ulrich A.

    2016-01-01

    Among various innate immune receptor families, the role of C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in lung protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) is not fully defined. We here show that Mincle gene expression was induced in alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of mice and patients with pneumococcal pneumonia. Moreover, S. pneumoniae directly triggered Mincle reporter cell activation in vitro via its glycolipid glucosyl-diacylglycerol (Glc-DAG), which was identified as the ligand recognized by Mincle. Purified Glc-DAG triggered Mincle reporter cell activation and stimulated inflammatory cytokine release by human alveolar macrophages and alveolar macrophages from WT but not Mincle KO mice. Mincle deficiency led to increased bacterial loads and decreased survival together with strongly dysregulated cytokine responses in mice challenged with focal pneumonia inducing S. pneumoniae, all of which was normalized in Mincle KO mice reconstituted with a WT hematopoietic system. In conclusion, the Mincle-Glc-DAG axis is a hitherto unrecognized element of lung protective immunity against focal pneumonia induced by S. pneumoniae. PMID:27923071

  14. Acute pneumonia in Zimbabwe: bacterial isolates by lung aspiration.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeogu, M O

    1988-01-01

    Forty children, aged 2 months to 11 years, with severe acute pneumonia were investigated by needle aspiration of the lung. Fourteen organisms were isolated in only 13 patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated in six patients, Staphylococcus aureus in three, and Haemophilus influenzae in two. Two patients had mixed organisms. PMID:3196056

  15. Accidental hypothermia in severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Vardon, Fanny; Mrozek, Ségolène; Geeraerts, Thomas; Fourcade, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Hypothermia, along with acidosis and coagulopathy, is part of the lethal triad that worsen the prognosis of severe trauma patients. While accidental hypothermia is easy to identify by a simple measurement, it is no less pernicious if it is not detected or treated in the initial phase of patient care. It is a multifactorial process and is a factor of mortality in severe trauma cases. The consequences of hypothermia are many: it modifies myocardial contractions and may induce arrhythmias; it contributes to trauma-induced coagulopathy; from an immunological point of view, it diminishes inflammatory response and increases the chance of pneumonia in the patient; it inhibits the elimination of anaesthetic drugs and can complicate the calculation of dosing requirements; and it leads to an over-estimation of coagulation factor activities. This review will detail the pathophysiological consequences of hypothermia, as well as the most recent principle recommendations in dealing with it.

  16. Draft Genome Sequences of Streptococcus pneumoniae with High-Level Resistance to Respiratory Fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Keness, Yoram; Bisharat, Naiel

    2016-03-31

    Streptococcus pneumoniaeis the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia. Levofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone used for treatment of severe community-acquired pneumonia. Here, we describe the draft genome sequences ofS. pneumoniaewith emerging resistance to levofloxacin, resulting in failure of treatment of pneumococcal pneumonia.

  17. Severe noise-induced deafness--a 10-year review of cases.

    PubMed

    Tay, P

    1996-08-01

    Noise Induced Deafness (NID) is the leading occupational disease in Singapore. Every year, over 500 new cases of NID are detected by the Department of Industrial Health (DIH). Severe NID is a disabling disease which is compensable under the law. A retrospective study was conducted to elicit the profile of workers with severe, disabling NID. From 1 January 1985 to 31 December 1994, the DIH confirmed 127 of such cases. Of these, 57 (44.9%) were involved in the building and repair of ships and boats, 30 (23.6%) with the basic steel industries, manufacture and fabrication of metal products and storage batteries, 9 (7.2%) with the transport and allied support industries, 7 (5.5%) in granite quarrying, 7 (5.5%) in the manufacture of food and drinks, 5 (3.9%) in the manufacture of wooden furniture and 7 (5.5%) in other industries such as manufacture of glass, electricity generation, construction, textiles, printing and so on. The mean age of these workers upon diagnosis of severe NID was 48 years (SD 8.07). The mean duration of exposure to noise was 24 years (SD 9.11). The mean of the average hearing thresholds at 1, 2 and 3 kHz for these workers was found to be 61.5 dBA (SD 4.26). The main jobs at risk were grit blasters, steel workers, fitters, boiler fabricators, panel beaters and carpenters. Noise dosimetry was performed on 46 of the cases and the mean time-weighted exposure level was 90 dBA (SD 10.00). Finally, 82.7% of cases already had audiometric evidence of severe deafness at the time of notification.

  18. Severe Endobronchial Inflammation Induced by Aspiration of a Ferrous Sulfate Tablet.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sang Youn; Sohn, Sung Birm; Lee, Jung Min; Lee, Ji Ae; Chung, Sangmi; Kim, Junga; Choi, Juwhan; Kim, Sehwa; Yoo, Ah Young; Roh, Jong Ah; Park, Haein; Kim, Won Shik; Sim, Jae Kyeom; Shim, Jae Jeong; Min, Kyung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Iron supplements such as ferrous sulfate tablets are usually used to treat iron-deficiency anemia in some elderly patients with primary neurologic disorders or decreased gag reflexes due to stroke, senile dementia, or parkinsonism. While the aspiration of ferrous sulfate is rarely reported, it is a potentially life-threatening condition that can lead to airway necrosis and bronchial stenosis. A detailed history and high suspicion of aspiration are required to avoid delays in diagnosis and treatment. The diagnosis can be confirmed by bronchoscopic examination and a tissue biopsy. Early removal of the aspirated tablet prevents acute complications, such as bronchial necrosis, hemoptysis, and lobar consolidation. Tablet removal is also necessary to prevent late bronchial stenosis. We presented the first case in Korea of a ferrous sulfate tablet aspiration that induced severe endobronchial inflammation.

  19. Suckdown, fountain lift, and pressures induced on several tandem jet V/STOL configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellavia, David C.; Wardwell, Douglas A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Kuhn, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a program to improve the methods for predicting the suckdown and hot gas ingestion for jet V/STOL aircraft in ground effect, a data base is being created that provides a systematic variation of parameters so that a new empirical prediction procedure can be developed. The first series of tests in this program was completed. Suckdown, fountain lift, and pressures induced on several two-jet V/STOL configurations are described. It is one of three reports that present the data obtained from tests conducted at Lockheed Aeronautical Systems-Rye Canyon Facility and in the High Bay area of the 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel complex at NASA Ames Research Center.

  20. Mechanisms of interferon-γ production by neutrophils and its function during Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gomez, John C; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Martin, Jessica R; Dang, Hong; Brickey, W June; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Dinauer, Mary C; Doerschuk, Claire M

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a common public health problem associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and cost. Neutrophils are usually the earliest leukocytes to respond to bacteria in the lungs. Neutrophils rapidly sequester in the pulmonary microvasculature and migrate into the lung parenchyma and alveolar spaces, where they perform numerous effector functions for host defense. Previous studies showed that migrated neutrophils produce IFN-γ early during pneumonia induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae and that early production of IFN-γ regulates bacterial clearance. IFN-γ production by neutrophils requires Rac2, Hck/Lyn/Fgr Src family tyrosine kinases, and NADPH oxidase. Our current studies examined the mechanisms that regulate IFN-γ production by lung neutrophils during acute S. pneumoniae pneumonia in mice and its function. We demonstrate that IFN-γ production by neutrophils is a tightly regulated process that does not require IL-12. The adaptor molecule MyD88 is critical for IFN-γ production by neutrophils. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor CalDAG-GEFI modulates IFN-γ production. The CD11/CD18 complex, CD44, Toll-like receptors 2 and 4, TRIF, and Nrf2 are not required for IFN-γ production by neutrophils. The recently described neutrophil-dendritic cell hybrid cell, identified by its expression of Ly6G and CD11c, is present at low numbers in pneumonic lungs and is not a source of IFN-γ. IFN-γ produced by neutrophils early during acute S. pneumoniae pneumonia induces transcription of target genes in the lungs, which are critical for host defense. These studies underline the complexity of the neutrophil responses during pneumonia in the acute inflammatory response and in subsequent resolution or initiation of immune responses.

  1. Mechanisms of Interferon-γ Production by Neutrophils and Its Function during Streptococcus pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, John C.; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Martin, Jessica R.; Dang, Hong; Brickey, W. June; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Dinauer, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a common public health problem associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and cost. Neutrophils are usually the earliest leukocytes to respond to bacteria in the lungs. Neutrophils rapidly sequester in the pulmonary microvasculature and migrate into the lung parenchyma and alveolar spaces, where they perform numerous effector functions for host defense. Previous studies showed that migrated neutrophils produce IFN-γ early during pneumonia induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae and that early production of IFN-γ regulates bacterial clearance. IFN-γ production by neutrophils requires Rac2, Hck/Lyn/Fgr Src family tyrosine kinases, and NADPH oxidase. Our current studies examined the mechanisms that regulate IFN-γ production by lung neutrophils during acute S. pneumoniae pneumonia in mice and its function. We demonstrate that IFN-γ production by neutrophils is a tightly regulated process that does not require IL-12. The adaptor molecule MyD88 is critical for IFN-γ production by neutrophils. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor CalDAG-GEFI modulates IFN-γ production. The CD11/CD18 complex, CD44, Toll-like receptors 2 and 4, TRIF, and Nrf2 are not required for IFN-γ production by neutrophils. The recently described neutrophil–dendritic cell hybrid cell, identified by its expression of Ly6G and CD11c, is present at low numbers in pneumonic lungs and is not a source of IFN-γ. IFN-γ produced by neutrophils early during acute S. pneumoniae pneumonia induces transcription of target genes in the lungs, which are critical for host defense. These studies underline the complexity of the neutrophil responses during pneumonia in the acute inflammatory response and in subsequent resolution or initiation of immune responses. PMID:25100610

  2. Diet-Induced Obesity Significantly Increases the Severity of Post-Traumatic Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Louer, Craig R.; Furman, Bridgette D.; Huebner, Janet L.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Olson, Steven A.; Guilak, Farshid

    2012-01-01

    Objective Obesity and joint injury are both primary risk factors for osteoarthritis (OA) that involve potential alterations in the biomechanical and inflammatory environments of the joint. Post-traumatic arthritis (PTA) is a frequent long-term complication of intra-articular fractures. Obesity has been linked to primary OA and may potentially contribute to the development of PTA by a variety of mechanisms. The objectives of this study were to determine if diet-induced obesity influences the severity of PTA in mice and to examine interrelationships between joint degeneration and serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and adipokines in this response. Methods C57BL/6 mice were fed either normal chow (13% fat) or a high-fat diet (60% fat) starting at 4 weeks of age. At 16 weeks, half of each group received closed intra-articular fracture of the left knee. At 8 weeks post-fracture, knee osteoarthritis was assessed by cartilage and synovium histology in addition to bone morphology. Serum cytokine concentrations were determined with multiplex assay. Results Fractured knee joints of mice on a high-fat diet showed significantly increased osteoarthritic degeneration compared to non-fractured contralateral controls, while fractured knee joints of low-fat mice did not demonstrate significant differences from non-fractured contralateral controls. High-fat diet increased serum concentrations of interleukin-12p70, interleukin-6, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine, while decreasing adiponectin concentrations. Systemic levels of adiponectin were inversely correlated with synovial inflammation in control limbs. Conclusion Diet-induced obesity significantly increased the severity of osteoarthritis following intra-articular fracture. Obesity and joint injury together can alter systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-12p70. PMID:22576842

  3. Isoflurane and Sevoflurane Induce Severe Hepatic Insulin Resistance in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Stella P.; Broussard, Josiane L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anesthesia induces insulin resistance, which may contribute to elevated blood glucose and adverse post-operative outcomes in critically ill patients, and impair glycemic control in surgical patients with diabetes. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which anesthesia impairs insulin sensitivity. Here we investigate the effects of anesthesia on insulin sensitivity in metabolic tissues. Methods Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were performed in 32 lean (control diet; n = 16 conscious versus n = 16 anesthetized) and 24 fat-fed (6 weeks fat-feeding; n = 16 conscious versus n = 8 anesthetized) adult male mongrel dogs in conjunction with tracer methodology to differentiate hepatic versus peripheral insulin sensitivity. Propofol was administered as an intravenous bolus (3mg/kg) to initiate anesthesia, which was then maintained with inhaled sevoflurane or isoflurane (2–3%) for the duration of the procedure. Results Anesthesia reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity by approximately 50% in both lean and fat-fed animals as compared to conscious animals, and insulin action at the liver was almost completely suppressed during anesthesia such that hepatic insulin sensitivity was decreased by 75.5% and; 116.2% in lean and fat-fed groups, respectively. Conclusion Inhaled anesthesia induces severe hepatic insulin resistance in a canine model. Countermeasures that preserve hepatic insulin sensitivity may represent a therapeutic target that could improve surgical outcomes in both diabetic and healthy patients. PMID:27802272

  4. Ursodeoxycholic Acid ameliorates pain severity and cartilage degeneration in monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Moon, Su-Jin; Jeong, Jeong-Hee; Jhun, Joo Yeon; Yang, Eun Ji; Min, Jun-Ki; Choi, Jong Young; Cho, Mi-La

    2014-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterized by a progressive loss of cartilage. And, increased oxidative stress plays a relevant role in the pathogenesis of OA. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is a used drug for liver diseases known for its free radical-scavenging property. The objectives of this study were to investigate the in vivo effects of UDCA on pain severity and cartilage degeneration using an experimental OA model and to explore its mode of actions. OA was induced in rats by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) to the knee. Oral administration UDCA was initiated on the day of MIA injection. Limb nociception was assessed by measuring the paw withdrawal latency and threshold. Samples were analyzed macroscopically and histologically. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, nitrotyrosine and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in knee joints. UDCA showed an antinociceptive property and attenuated cartilage degeneration. OA rats given oral UDCA significantly exhibited a decreased number of osteoclasts in subchondral bone legion compared with the vehicle-treated OA group. UDCA reduced the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, nitrotyrosine and iNOS in articular cartilage. UDCA treatment significantly attenuated the mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), -13, and ADAMTS5 in IL-1β-stimulated human OA chondrocytes. These results show the inhibitory effects of UDCA on pain production and cartilage degeneration in experimentally induced OA. The chondroprotective properties of UDCA were achieved by suppressing oxidative damage and inhibiting catabolic factors that are implicated in the pathogenesis of cartilage damage in OA.

  5. Pneumonia treated in the internal medicine department: focus on healthcare-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Giannella, M; Pinilla, B; Capdevila, J A; Martínez Alarcón, J; Muñoz, P; López Álvarez, J; Bouza, E

    2012-08-01

    Patients with pneumonia treated in the internal medicine department (IMD) are often at risk of healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). The importance of HCAP is controversial. We invited physicians from 72 IMDs to report on all patients with pneumonia hospitalized in their department during 2 weeks (one each in January and June 2010) to compare HCAP with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). We analysed 1002 episodes of pneumonia: 58.9% were CAP, 30.6% were HCAP and 10.4% were HAP. A comparison between CAP, HCAP and HAP showed that HCAP patients were older (77, 83 and 80.5 years; p < 0.001), had poorer functional status (Barthel 100, 30 and 65; p < 0.001) and had more risk factors for aspiration pneumonia (18, 50 and 34%; p < 0.001). The frequency of testing to establish an aetiological diagnosis was lower among HCAP patients (87, 72 and 79; p < 0.001), as was adherence to the therapeutic recommendations of guidelines (70, 23 and 56%; p < 0.001). In-hospital mortality increased progressively between CAP, HCAP and HAP (8, 19 and 27%; p < 0.001). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the main pathogen in CAP and HCAP. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) caused 17 and 12.3% of HCAP. In patients with a confirmed aetiological diagnosis, the independent risk factors for pneumonia due do difficult-to-treat microorganisms (Enterobacteriaceae, P. aeruginosa or MRSA) were HCAP, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases and higher Port Severity Index. Our data confirm the importance of maintaining high awareness of HCAP among patients treated in IMDs, because of the different aetiologies, therapy requirements and prognosis of this population.

  6. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach.

  7. Prevention strategies for healthcare-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Lee E

    2009-02-01

    Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) represents one of the largest subsets of patients with pneumonia. Based on epidemiological projections for the aging U.S. population, the number of hospitalizations for HCAP is expected to increase exponentially for the next several decades. The unique risk factors for colonization with resistant pathogens in these patients provide multiple opportunities for HCAP prevention. However, our current understanding of the most effective prevention measures is woefully inadequate and constitutes an extrapolation from studies done in community-acquired and hospital-acquired pneumonia patients. This review explores common prevention strategies that may be applicable to HCAP, highlights areas of controversy that require further study, and describes several areas of ongoing novel investigation.

  8. Sodium Thiosulfate Versus Hydroxocobalamin in the Treatment of Acute, Severe Cyanide Induced Cardiotoxicity in a Swine (Sus Scrofa) Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-22

    intoxicated by cyanide develop cardiac-ar.rest or severely low blood pressure. Currently several antidotes exist, but many have severe adverse effects...machine. They were intoxicated with cyanide (infused through the vein) until the blood pressure was low. The animals were assigned to-one of three...IUIVIJ:lt:M Sodium thiosulfate versus hydroxocoba~amin in the treatment of acute, severe cyanide induced cardiotoxicity in a swine (Sus Scrofa)model on

  9. Dopamine disposition in the presynaptic process regulates the severity of methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Donald M; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Thomas, David M

    2008-10-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is well known for its ability to cause damage to dopamine (DA) nerve endings of the striatum. The mechanisms by which METH causes neurotoxicity are not fully understood, but likely candidates are increased oxidative and nitrosative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Microglial activation is also emerging as an important element of the METH neurotoxic cascade, and it appears that extensive cross-talk between these cells and DA nerve endings is an early event in this process. It may seem paradoxical, but DA itself is also thought to be an essential factor in the neuronal damaging effects of METH, but issues relating to its precise role in this regard remain unanswered. We present in this overview a summary of studies that tested how alterations in the disposition of presynaptic DA (injections of reserpine, L-DOPA, or clorgyline) modulate METH neurotoxicity. In all cases, these drugs significantly increased the magnitude of microglial activation as well as the severity of damage to striatal DA nerve endings caused by METH. The enhancement of METH effects in striatum by reserpine, L-DOPA, and clorgyline persisted for 14 days and showed no evidence of recovery. These data establish that subtle shifts in the newly synthesized pool of DA can cause substantial changes in the severity of METH-induced neurotoxicity. DA released into the synapse by METH is very likely the source of downstream reactants that provoke microglial activation and the ensuing damage to DA nerve endings.

  10. Influence of injection timing on severity of cadmium-induced testicular toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Katsumi; Yanagiba, Yukie; Ashimori, Atsushige; Takeuchi, Asuka; Takada, Naoko; Togawa, Masako; Hasegawa, Tatsuya; Ikeda, Masayuki; Miura, Nobuhiko

    2013-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the endocrine disrupter and is a well-known testicular toxicant. Recently, we reported that Cd-induced mortality was markedly different by injection timing. In this report, we investigated whether severity of testicular toxicity was affected by injection timing of Cd. C57BL/6J mice (male, 7 w) were received single intraperitoneal injection of CdCl(2) (4.5 mg/kg) at zeitgeber time 6 (ZT6) or ZT18; these injection timings showed highest (ZT6) or lowest (ZT18) mortality in our previous study (Miura, 2012). After one week of the injection, several parameters for testicular toxicity such as epididymal sperm motility and numbers of sperm head both in cauda epididymidis and testis were measured. At ZT6 injection group, all parameters examined were significantly reduced compared to the control group. However, very interestingly, no significant changes were observed at ZT18 injection group. We obtained similar results by another experiment in which mice were received single subcutaneous injection of CdCl(2) (4 or 6 mg/kg) followed by measuring the parameters ten days after the injection. This diurnal variation was not contradictory to the result of the lethal toxicity which we showed earlier. Therefore, our results indicate that the testicular toxicity of Cd is also influenced by the injection timing.

  11. Patterns and severity of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lavoie Smith, Ellen M; Li, Lang; Chiang, ChienWei; Thomas, Karin; Hutchinson, Raymond J; Wells, Elizabeth M; Ho, Richard H; Skiles, Jodi; Chakraborty, Arindom; Bridges, Celia M; Renbarger, Jamie

    2015-03-01

    Vincristine, a critical component of combination chemotherapy treatment for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), can lead to vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy (VIPN). Longitudinal VIPN assessments were obtained over 12 months from newly diagnosed children with ALL (N = 128) aged 1-18 years who received vincristine at one of four academic children's hospitals. VIPN assessments were obtained using the Total Neuropathy Score-Pediatric Vincristine (TNS©-PV), National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE©), Balis© grading scale, and Pediatric Neuropathic Pain Scale©-Five (PNPS©-5). Of children who provided a full TNS©-PV score, 85/109 (78%) developed VIPN (TNS©-PV ≥4). Mean TNS©-PV, grading scale, and pain scores were low. CTCAE©-derived grades 3 and 4 sensory and motor VIPN occurred in 1.6%/0%, and 1.9%/0% of subjects, respectively. VIPN did not resolve in months 8-12 despite decreasing dose density. VIPN was worse in older children. Partition cluster analysis revealed 2-3 patient clusters; one cluster (n = 14) experienced severe VIPN. In this population, VIPN occurs more commonly than previous research suggests, persists throughout the first year of treatment, and can be severe.

  12. Porphyromonas gingivalis oral infection exacerbates the development and severity of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Clinical studies suggest a direct influence of periodontal disease (PD) on serum inflammatory markers and disease assessment of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the influence of PD on arthritis development remains unclear. This investigation was undertaken to determine the contribution of chronic PD to immune activation and development of joint inflammation using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Methods DBA1/J mice orally infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis were administered with collagen II (CII) emulsified in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) or incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) to induce arthritis. Arthritis development was assessed by visual scoring of paw swelling, caliper measurement of the paws, mRNA expression, paw micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis, histology, and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase for osteoclast detection (TRAP)-positive immunohistochemistry. Serum and reactivated splenocytes were evaluated for cytokine expression. Results Mice induced for PD and/or arthritis developed periodontal disease, shown by decreased alveolar bone and alteration of mRNA expression in gingival tissues and submandibular lymph nodes compared to vehicle. P. gingivalis oral infection increased paw swelling and osteoclast numbers in mice immunized with CFA/CII. Arthritis incidence and severity were increased by P. gingivalis in mice that received IFA/CII immunizations. Increased synovitis, bone erosions, and osteoclast numbers in the paws were observed following IFA/CII immunizations in mice infected with P gingivalis. Furthermore, cytokine analysis showed a trend toward increased serum Th17/Th1 ratios when P. gingivalis infection was present in mice receiving either CFA/CII or IFA/CII immunizations. Significant cytokine increases induced by P. gingivalis oral infection were mostly associated to Th17-related cytokines of reactivated splenic cells, including IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-22 in the CFA

  13. [Three cases of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Fujino, Satoru; Hisatomi, Keiko; Iida, Tetsuya; Ohe, Nobuharu; Hirakata, Yoichi; Hara, Kohei

    2003-07-01

    We encountered 3 cases of pneumonia caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia between January and June 2001. S. maltophilia is resistant to broad-spectrum antibiotics including carbapenem. Reported studies indicate that excessive use of broad-spectrum antibiotics may induce resistance in this organism. However, our data showed that there was no clear correlation between the amounts of carbapenems used in our hospital and the isolation of the organism. If broad-spectrum antibiotics are ineffective or even actually worsen a case of pneumonia, S. maltophilia may be the sole causative organism, and a potent double- (or triple-) combination therapy consisting of minocyclin and one or two other potent antimicrobial agents should be considered.

  14. Carcinoma of the lung complicating lipoid pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Felson, B.; Ralaisomay, G.

    1983-11-01

    The authors have encountered four cases of oil aspiration pneumonia complicated by carcinoma. Each had a clear-cut history of chronic intake of an oily substance, radiographic changes, and histologically documented oil aspiration pneumonia. Lung cancer later appeared in the involved area. A small number of similar cases also have been reported. The implication is that oil aspiration pneumonitis may induce bronchogenic carcinoma, particularly either the alveolar cell or the squamous cell variety. The radiographic diagnosis of the malignant transformation is difficult, and consequently the prognosis is poor.

  15. Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis: the role of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, M; Schiavoni, G; Del Piano, M; Shaik, Y; Boscolo, P; Caraffa, A; Grano, M; Teté, S; Conti, F; Sessa, R

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae), a respiratory pathogen, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, an inflammatory progressive disease, characterized by the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Among several types of inflammatory cells involved in the atherogenesis process, recently particular attention has been directed toward the mast cells. Experimental studies have provided several mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae and mast cells could play a role in all stages of atherosclerosis, from initial inflammatory lesions to plaque rupture. C. pneumoniae, as well as mast cells, may actively participate both through the production of cytokines and matrix-degrading metalloproteinases and by provoking apoptosis of atheroma-associated vascular cells, key events in plaque rupture. This mini-review provides a brief overview on adventitial inflammatory effects of C. pneumoniae and mast cells and their potential role in plaque instability. In addition, in this paper we review the role of mast cells in innate immunity.

  16. Pneumocystis pneumonia: an update.

    PubMed

    Sritangratanakul, Sureeporn; Nuchprayoon, Surang; Nuchprayoon, Issarang

    2004-09-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of illness and death in immunocompromised hosts. The numbers of pneumocystis pneumonia cases in Thailand have increased each year from 1992 to 2000 and peaked in 2000 at 6,255 cases. The microbe that causes pneumocystis pneumonia in humans is called Pneumocystis jirovecii. Pneumocystis sp. was discovered nearly a century ago, but the knowledge of Pneumocystis sp. remained poorly understood, until the molecular biology techniques help scientists verify it fungus nature. In the past, Pneumocystis sp. was misclassified as protozoan due to its morphologic features. Later, it was reclassified as fungus due to DNA analysis. Cotrimaxazole, the combination of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, is the drug of choice for treatment and prophylaxis of pneumocystis pneumonia. However, increasing evidence of mutations in the enzyme dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS), the target of sulfa drugs represent emergence of sulfa resistance.

  17. What Is Walking Pneumonia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... M.D. References Goldman L, et al., eds. Mycoplasma infections. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, ... for Medical Education and Research; 2014. Baum SG. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/ ...

  18. Pneumonia in adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 69. Mandell LA. Streptococcus pneumoniae infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 289.

  19. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dysplasia (BPD) Respiratory Syncytial Virus Coughing Lungs and Respiratory System Croup Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Influenza ( ... Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) Bronchitis Pneumonia Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  20. [Interstitial Pneumonia and Emphysema].

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Kato, Yuko; Ishii, Sachiyo

    2015-09-01

    Interstitial pneumonia (IP) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are representative diseases of restrictive pulmonary dysfunction and obstructive pulmonary dysfunction, respectively. In the preoperative anesthesia clinic, anesthesiologists are frequently asked to assess the anesthesia management of patients with these diseases. In respiratory function tests, IP is detected as a decrease in % vital capacity (< 80%), and COPD as a decrease in % FEV1.0 (< 70%). Other key factors which affect the assessment are; 1) severity assessment that affects the safety of anesthesia management, 2) prognostic evaluation including the acute exacerbation in the postoperative period, and 3) patient-related factors (age, life degree of autonomy, other comorbidities, surgery-related factors, and anesthesia method). In the patients in the disease stage I or II, anesthesia management is relatively safe. On the other hand, the patients in the disease stage IV have no surgical indication except life-saving emergent situation. In another words, anesthesiologists are required to make the judgment for the anesthesia management of the patient in the disease stage III, based on the assessment of patient-related factors, surgery-related factors, and prognosis.

  1. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) deficiency protects mice against severe forms of experimentally induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bendjelloul, F; Malý, P; Mandys, V; Jirkovská, M; Prokešová, L; Tučková, L; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, H

    2000-01-01

    ICAM-1 (CD54), the ligand for LFA-1 and Mac-1, is up-regulated during inflammatory reaction on the activated vascular endothelium. To determine its role in intestinal inflammation, we induced acute experimental colitis in mice with a deleted ICAM-1 gene, by feeding them with 3% dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) in drinking water for 7 days. Chronic colitis was elicited by DSS similarly, followed by 2 weeks with water. In the acute phase of inflammation, ICAM-1-deficient mice exhibited a significantly lower mortality rate (5%) than control C57Bl/6J mice (35%). Control animals, but not the ICAM-1-deficient mice, exhibited diarrhoea and rectal bleeding. Histological examination of large-bowel samples evaluated the intensity of inflammatory changes, and type and extent of mucosal lesions. In the acute phase, 33.3% of samples from ICAM-1-deficient mice exhibited mucosal defects (flat and fissural ulcers), predominantly mild to moderate inflammatory infiltrate within the lamina propria mucosae and lower grades of mucosal lesions. Much stronger inflammatory changes were present in control animals, flat ulcers (sometimes multiple) and fissural ulcers being observed in 62.5% of samples. Mucosal inflammatory infiltrate was moderate to severe, typically with higher grades of mucosal lesions. In chronic colitis, smaller inflammatory changes were found in the large bowel. The two mouse strains differed, the chronic colitis being accompanied by an increased serum level of anti-epithelial IgA autoantibodies in C57Bl/6 control mice but not in ICAM-1-deficient mice. These findings provide direct evidence of the participation of ICAM-1 molecule in the development of experimentally induced intestinal inflammation. PMID:10606964

  2. Diet-induced obesity severely impairs myelinated aortic baroreceptor reflex responses.

    PubMed

    McCully, Belinda H; Brooks, Virginia L; Andresen, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) attenuates the arterial cardiac baroreceptor reflex, but the mechanisms and sites of action are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that DIO impairs central aortic baroreceptor pathways. Normal chow control (CON) and high-fat-chow obesity-resistant (OR) and obesity-prone (OP) rats were anesthetized (inactin, 120 mg/kg) and underwent sinoaortic denervation. The central end of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) was electrically stimulated to generate frequency-dependent baroreflex curves (5-100 Hz) during selective activation of myelinated (A-fiber) or combined (A- and C-fiber) ADN baroreceptors. A mild stimulus (1 V) that activates only A-fiber ADN baroreceptors induced robust, frequency-dependent depressor and bradycardic responses in CON and OR rats, but these responses were completely abolished in OP rats. Maximal activation of A fibers (3 V) elicited frequency-dependent reflexes in all groups, but a dramatic deficit was still present in OP rats. Activation of all ADN baroreceptors (20 V) evoked even larger reflex responses. Depressor responses were nearly identical among groups, but OP rats still exhibited attenuated bradycardia. In separate groups of rats, the reduced heart rate (HR) response to maximal activation of ADN A fibers (3 V) persisted in OP rats following pharmacological blockade of β(1)-adrenergic or muscarinic receptors, suggesting deficits in both parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) reflex pathways. However, the bradycardic responses to direct efferent vagal stimulation were similar among groups. Taken together, our data suggest that DIO severely impairs the central processing of myelinated aortic baroreceptor control of HR, including both PNS and SNS components.

  3. Loss of Bace1 in Mice Does Not Alter the Severity of Caerulein Induced Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Heindl, Mario; Tuennemann, Jan; Sommerer, Ines; Mössner, Joachim; Hoffmeister, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    Context Beta-site alpha-amyloid protein cleaving enzyme1 (BACE1) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Additional to its moderate expression in the brain, high levels of BACE1 mRNA were found in the pancreas. Murine Bace1 has been immunohistochemicaly detected at the apical pole of acinar cells within the exocrine pancreas of mice and Bace1 activity was observed in pancreatic juice. In vitro experiments revealed enteropeptidase as a putative substrate for Bace1 suggesting a role in acute pancreatitis. Objective The aim of this study was to address a protective mechanism of Bace1 in acute experimental pancreatitis in mice. Methods Acute experimental pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of caerulein in homozygote Bace1-/- mice and wild type mice. Serum and tissue analyses were carried out after 4 h, 8 h and 24 h. Measurement of plasma amylase and lipase was performed to confirm pancreatitis induction. In order to assess the severity of pancreatitis H&E stained pancreatic sections were examined regarding edema, inflammation and apoptosis. Immunohistochemical detection of myeloperoxidase (MPO) positive cells was carried out to further quantify the extent of inflammation. Expression of Bace2 within the pancreas was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR. Results We demonstrate that total loss of Bace1 in mice leads to no alterations in the course of acute experimental caerulein-pancreatitis. Bace1-/- mice develop a moderate pancreatitis that is comparable in histomorphological and serological features with those seen in wild type mice. Discussion We discuss the results in the context of the applied caerulein induced edematous pancreatitis model and possible compensatory mechanisms via Bace2 that might be responsible for the observed results. PMID:25961820

  4. Changes in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity during and following severe insulin-induced hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Cardell, M; Siesjö, B K; Wieloch, T

    1991-01-01

    The effect of severe insulin-induced hypoglycemia on the activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC) was investigated in homogenates of frozen rat cerebral cortex during burst suppression EEG, after 10, 30, and 60 min of isoelectric EEG, and after 30 and 180 min and 24 h of recovery following 30 min of hypoglycemic coma. Changes in PDHC activity were correlated to levels of labile organic phosphates and glycolytic metabolites. In cortex from control animals, the rate of [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation was 7.1 +/- 1.3 U/mg of protein, or 35% of the total PDHC activity. The activity was unchanged during burst suppression EEG whereas the active fraction increased to 81-87% during hypoglycemic coma. Thirty minutes after glucose-induced recovery, the PDHC activity had decreased by 33% compared to control levels, and remained significantly depressed after 3 h of recovery. This decrease in activity was not due to a decrease in the total PDHC activity. At 24 h of recovery, PDHC activity had returned to control levels. We conclude that the activation of PDHC during hypoglycemic coma is probably the result of an increased PDH phosphatase activity following depolarization and calcium influx, and allosteric inhibition of PDH kinase due to increased ADP/ATP ratio. The depression of PDHC activity following hypoglycemic coma is probably due to an increased phosphorylation of the enzyme, as a consequence of an imbalance between PDH phosphatase and kinase activities. Since some reduction of the ATP/ADP ratio persisted and since the lactate/pyruvate ratio had normalized by 3 h of recovery, the depression of PDHC most likely reflects a decrease in PDH phosphatase activity, probably due to a decrease in intramitochondrial Ca2+.

  5. MAG-EPA reduces severity of DSS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Morin, Caroline; Blier, Pierre U; Fortin, Samuel

    2016-05-15

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic disease characterized by diffuse inflammation of the intestinal mucosa of the large bowel. Omega-3 (ω3) fatty acid supplementation has been associated with a decreased production of inflammatory cytokines involved in UC pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the preventive and therapeutic potential of eicosapentaenoic acid monoglyceride (MAG-EPA) in an in vivo rats model of UC induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). DSS rats were untreated or treated per os with MAG-EPA. Morphological, histological, and biochemical analyses were performed following MAG-EPA administrations. Morphological and histological analyses revealed that MAG-EPA pretreatment (12 days pre-DSS) and treatment (6 days post-DSS) exhibited strong activity in reducing severity of disease in DSS rats. Following MAG-EPA administrations, tissue levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were markedly lower compared with rats treated only with DSS. MAG-EPA per os administration decrease neutrophil infiltration in colon tissues, as depicted by myelohyperoxidase activity. Results also revealed a reduced activation of NF-κB pathways correlated with a decreased expression of COX-2 in colon homogenates derived from MAG-EPA-pretreated and treated rats. Tension measurements performed on colon tissues revealed that contractile responses to methacholine and relaxing effect induced by sodium nitroprusside were largely increased following MAG-EPA treatment. The combined treatment of MAG-EPA and vitamin E displayed an antagonistic effect on anti-inflammatory properties of MAG-EPA in DSS rats.

  6. A prebiotic galactooligosaccharide mixture reduces severity of hyperpnoea-induced bronchoconstriction and markers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Neil C; Johnson, Michael A; Shaw, Dominick E; Spendlove, Ian; Vulevic, Jelena; Sharpe, Graham R; Hunter, Kirsty A

    2016-09-01

    Gut microbes have a substantial influence on systemic immune function and allergic sensitisation. Manipulation of the gut microbiome through prebiotics may provide a potential strategy to influence the immunopathology of asthma. This study investigated the effects of prebiotic Bimuno-galactooligosaccharide (B-GOS) supplementation on hyperpnoea-induced bronchoconstriction (HIB), a surrogate for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and airway inflammation. A total of ten adults with asthma and HIB and eight controls without asthma were randomised to receive 5·5 g/d of either B-GOS or placebo for 3 weeks separated by a 2-week washout period. The peak fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) following eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea (EVH) defined HIB severity. Markers of airway inflammation were measured at baseline and after EVH. Pulmonary function remained unchanged in the control group. In the HIB group, the peak post-EVH fall in FEV1 at day 0 (-880 (sd 480) ml) was unchanged after placebo, but was attenuated by 40 % (-940 (sd 460) v. -570 (sd 310) ml, P=0·004) after B-GOS. In the HIB group, B-GOS reduced baseline chemokine CC ligand 17 (399 (sd 140) v. 323 (sd 144) pg/ml, P=0·005) and TNF-α (2·68 (sd 0·98) v. 2·18 (sd 0·59) pg/ml, P=0·040) and abolished the EVH-induced 29 % increase in TNF-α. Baseline C-reactive protein was reduced following B-GOS in HIB (2·46 (sd 1·14) v. 1·44 (sd 0·41) mg/l, P=0·015) and control (2·16 (sd 1·02) v. 1·47 (sd 0·33) mg/l, P=0·050) groups. Chemokine CC ligand 11 and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide remained unchanged. B-GOS supplementation attenuated airway hyper-responsiveness with concomitant reductions in markers of airway inflammation associated with HIB.

  7. Oral ruxolitinib induces hair regrowth in patients with moderate-to-severe alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Mackay-Wiggan, Julian; Nguyen, Nhan; Cerise, Jane E.; Clark, Charlotte; Ulerio, Grace; Furniss, Megan; Vaughan, Roger; Clynes, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Alopecia areata (AA) is a common autoimmune disease with a lifetime risk of 1.7%; there are no FDA-approved treatments for AA. We previously identified a dominant IFN-γ transcriptional signature in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in human and mouse AA skin and showed that treatment with JAK inhibitors induced durable hair regrowth in mice by targeting this pathway. Here, we investigated the use of the oral JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib in the treatment of patients with moderate-to-severe AA. METHODS. We initiated an open-label clinical trial of 12 patients with moderate-to-severe AA, using oral ruxolitinib, 20 mg twice per day, for 3–6 months of treatment followed by 3 months follow-up off drug. The primary endpoint was the proportion of subjects with 50% or greater hair regrowth from baseline to end of treatment. RESULTS. Nine of twelve patients (75%) demonstrated a remarkable response to treatment, with average hair regrowth of 92% at the end of treatment. Safety parameters remained largely within normal limits, and no serious adverse effects were reported. Gene expression profiling revealed treatment-related downregulation of inflammatory markers, including signatures for CTLs and IFN response genes and upregulation of hair-specific markers. CONCLUSION. In this pilot study, 9 of 12 patients (75%) treated with ruxolitinib showed significant scalp hair regrowth and improvement of AA. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to further assess the safety and efficacy of ruxolitinib in the treatment of AA. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01950780. FUNDING. Locks of Love Foundation, the Alopecia Areata Initiative, NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), and the Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research/Columbia University Medical Center Clinical and Translational Science Award (CUMC CTSA). PMID:27699253

  8. Violet diode laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence: a tool for assessing mosaic disease severity in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin; Eghan, Moses J; Asare-Bediako, Elvis; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K

    2012-01-01

    Violet diode laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence was used in agronomical assessment (disease severity and average yield per plant). Because cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is of economic importance, improved cultivars with various levels of affinity for cassava mosaic disease were investigated. Fluorescence data correlated with cassava mosaic disease severity levels and with the average yield per plant.

  9. Chronic nitrate enrichment decreases severity and induces protection against an infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Smallbone, Willow; Cable, Jo; Maceda-Veiga, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Excessive fertilisation is one of the most pernicious forms of global change resulting in eutrophication. It has major implications for disease control and the conservation of biodiversity. Yet, the direct link between nutrient enrichment and disease remains largely unexplored. Here, we present the first experimental evidence that chronic nitrate enrichment decreases severity and induces protection against an infectious disease. Specifically, this study shows that nitrate concentrations ranging between 50 and 250mgNO3(-)/l reduce Gyrodactylus turnbulli infection intensity in two populations of Trinidadian guppies Poecilia reticulata, and that the highest nitrate concentration can even clean the parasites from the fish. This added to the fact that host nitrate pre-exposure altered the fish epidermal structure and reduced parasite intensity, suggests that nitrate protected the host against the disease. Nitrate treatments also caused fish mortality. As we used ecologically-relevant nitrate concentrations, and guppies are top-consumers widely used for mosquito bio-control in tropical and often nutrient-enriched waters, our results can have major ecological and social implications. In conclusion, this study advocates reducing nitrate level including the legislative threshold to protect the aquatic biota, even though this may control an ectoparasitic disease.

  10. Dengue NS1 antigen contributes to disease severity by inducing interleukin (IL)-10 by monocytes.

    PubMed

    Adikari, T N; Gomes, L; Wickramasinghe, N; Salimi, M; Wijesiriwardana, N; Kamaladasa, A; Shyamali, N L A; Ogg, G S; Malavige, G N

    2016-04-01

    Both dengue NS1 antigen and serum interleukin (IL)-10 levels have been shown to associate with severe clinical disease in acute dengue infection, and IL-10 has also been shown to suppress dengue-specific T cell responses. Therefore, we proceeded to investigate the mechanisms by which dengue NS1 contributes to disease pathogenesis and if it is associated with altered IL-10 production. Serum IL-10 and dengue NS1 antigen levels were assessed serially in 36 adult Sri Lankan individuals with acute dengue infection. We found that the serum IL-10 levels correlated positively with dengue NS1 antigen levels (Spearman's r = 0·47, P < 0·0001), and NS1 also correlated with annexin V expression by T cells in acute dengue (Spearman's r = 0·63, P = 0·001). However, NS1 levels did not associate with the functionality of T cell responses or with expression of co-stimulatory molecules. Therefore, we further assessed the effect of dengue NS1 on monocytes and T cells by co-culturing primary monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), with varying concentrations of NS1 for up to 96 h. Monocytes co-cultured with NS1 produced high levels of IL-10, with the highest levels seen at 24 h, and then declined gradually. Therefore, our data show that dengue NS1 appears to contribute to pathogenesis of dengue infection by inducing IL-10 production by monocytes.

  11. Severe ductopenia and cholestasis from levofloxacin drug-induced liver injury: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Levine, Calley; Trivedi, Anshu; Thung, Swan N; Perumalswami, Ponni V

    2014-05-01

    A 67-year-old woman with hypertension, hypothyroidism, and glaucoma was referred for jaundice and elevated liver function tests. She was treated for streptococcal endophthalmitis with 2 weeks of intravenous (IV) levofloxacin followed by 2 months of oral levofloxacin. The patient had no prior history of liver disease and denied alcohol intake. Her physical exam was remarkable for jaundice and scleral icterus without any stigmata of liver disease. Viral hepatitis serologies and antibodies, including myeloperoxidase, proteinase 3, and antinuclear, antimitochondrial, antiliver kidney microsome, antismooth muscle antibodies, were all within normal limits. The liver biopsy revealed severe cholestasis, extensive bile duct loss, and fibrosis. The patient had no known exposure to any other systemic medications or inciting factors other than levofloxacin. Although there are a few reported cases of drug-induced liver disease (DILI) related to levofloxacin, this case is believed to be the first reported case of ductopenia or vanishing bile duct syndrome (VBDS) associated with levofloxacin. Although fluoroquinolones, such as levofloxacin, are generally considered safe antibiotics, health practitioners must be aware of their association with DILI, as the diagnosis of DILI is one of exclusion and requires a high index of suspicion.

  12. Transmutation-induced embrittlement of vanadium and several vanadium alloys in HFIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Garner, F. A.; Pawel, J. E.; Shiba, K.; Hishinuma, A.

    1996-10-01

    Vanadium, V1Ni, V10Ti and V10Ti1Ni (at%) were irradiated in HFIR to doses ranging from 18 to 30 dpa and temperatures between 300 and 600°C. Since the irradiation was conducted in a highly thermalized neutron spectrum without shielding against thermal neutrons, significant levels of chromium (15-22%) were formed by transmutation. The addition of such large chromium levels caused strong embrittlement. At higher irradiation temperatures radiation-induced segregation of transmutant Cr and solute Ti at specimen surfaces caused strong increases in the density of the alloy. The resultant shrinkage, possibly compounded by thermal cycling, led to cracks developing at all intersections of grain boundaries with the specimen surface. This caused specimens irradiated at 500°C or below to often fail during retrieval from the reactor, as well as during electropolishing and other handling operations. At 600°C, the cracking and embrittlement processes are so severe that only a fine dust, composed mostly of individual grains or chunks of grains, was found in the irradiation capsule.

  13. An unusual autopsy case of lethal hypothermia exacerbated by body lice-induced severe anemia.

    PubMed

    Nara, Akina; Nagai, Hisashi; Yamaguchi, Rutsuko; Makino, Yohsuke; Chiba, Fumiko; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Yajima, Daisuke; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-05-01

    Pediculus humanus humanus (known as body lice) are commonly found in the folds of clothes, and can cause skin disorders when they feed on human blood, resulting in an itching sensation. Body lice are known as vectors of infectious diseases, including typhus, recurrent fever, and trench fever. An infestation with blood-sucking body lice induces severe cutaneous pruritus, and this skin disorder is known as "vagabond's disease." A body lice infestation is sometimes complicated with iron deficiency anemia. In the present case, a man in his late 70s died of lethal hypothermia in the outdoors during the winter season. The case history and autopsy findings revealed that the cause of the lethal hypothermia was iron deficiency anemia, which was associated with a prolonged infestation of blood-sucking body lice. Also, he had vagabond's disease because the skin on his body was abnormal and highly pigmented. This is an unusual autopsy case since the body lice contributed to the cause of the death.

  14. Overexpression of gamma-sarcoglycan induces severe muscular dystrophy. Implications for the regulation of Sarcoglycan assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Hadhazy, M; Groh, M E; Wheeler, M T; Wollmann, R; McNally, E M

    2001-06-15

    The sarcoglycan complex is found normally at the plasma membrane of muscle. Disruption of the sarcoglycan complex, through primary gene mutations in dystrophin or sarcoglycan subunits, produces membrane instability and muscular dystrophy. Restoration of the sarcoglycan complex at the plasma membrane requires reintroduction of the mutant sarcoglycan subunit in a manner that will permit normal assembly of the entire sarcoglycan complex. To study sarcoglycan gene replacement, we introduced transgenes expressing murine gamma-sarcoglycan into muscle of normal mice. Mice expressing high levels of gamma-sarcoglycan, under the control of the muscle-specific creatine kinase promoter, developed a severe muscular dystrophy with greatly reduced muscle mass and early lethality. Marked gamma-sarcoglycan overexpression produced cytoplasmic aggregates that interfered with normal membrane targeting of gamma-sarcoglycan. Overexpression of gamma-sarcoglycan lead to the up-regulation of alpha- and beta-sarcoglycan. These data suggest that increased gamma-sarcoglycan and/or mislocalization of gamma-sarcoglycan to the cytoplasm is sufficient to induce muscle damage and provides a new model of muscular dystrophy that highlights the importance of this protein in the assembly, function, and downstream signaling of the sarcoglycan complex. Most importantly, gene dosage and promoter strength should be given serious consideration in replacement gene therapy to ensure safety in human clinical trials.

  15. Ocular manifestations of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Salzman, M B; Sood, S K; Slavin, M L; Rubin, L G

    1992-05-01

    Ocular manifestations of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection, other than conjunctivitis, are uncommon. Optic disk swelling, optic nerve atrophy, retinal exudates and hemorrhages, and cranial nerve palsies have been infrequently reported. We describe a 15-year-old patient who developed bilateral optic disk edema and iritis during an acute infection with M. pneumoniae and review the world literature on findings associated with ocular manifestations of infection with this pathogen. Although our patient experienced complete resolution of iritis and optic disk edema after 6 weeks, several patients described in the literature have experienced permanent sequelae as a result of optic neuropathy.

  16. Current concepts and dilemmas in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jay H.; Moua, Teng; Azadeh, Natalya; Baqir, Misbah; Yi, Eunhee S.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias comprise approximately one-third of interstitial lung diseases (also called diffuse parenchymal infiltrative lung diseases). The classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias has undergone several revisions since the initial description of 40 years ago, and the most recent version was published in 2013. Although some aspects have been clarified, this group of heterogeneous disorders continues to be a source of confusion and misunderstanding in clinical applications. In this article, we explore several topical themes in the evaluation and management of patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. PMID:27853529

  17. Fatal pneumonia due to Serratia proteamaculans subsp. quinovora.

    PubMed Central

    Bollet, C; Grimont, P; Gainnier, M; Geissler, A; Sainty, J M; De Micco, P

    1993-01-01

    Serratia proteamaculans subsp. quinovora was isolated from several samples (blood cultures, tracheal aspirates, pleural effusion) from a patient with pneumonia. This is the first clinical isolate and the first documented human infection caused by this organism. PMID:8432835

  18. Cortical Blindness in a Child Secondary to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia Tirado, A; Jimenez-Rolando, B; Noval, S; Martinez Bermejo, A

    2017-01-01

    Our objective is to present a case of an uncommon complication associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in a child where cortical blindness was the main clinical feature. Stroke due to an infection by M. pneumoniae is very uncommon. No consensus has been reached on the pathogenesis, although several pathogenic mechanisms have been proposed. Occlusion of posterior cerebral circulation is the most uncommon central nervous system complication of M. pneumoniae infection being reported. Symptoms are usually hemiplegia and dysarthria. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who suffered cortical blindness due to a stroke 2 days after M. pneumoniae infection. This is the first case of documented cortical blindness due to posterior cerebral arteries occlusion in children after M. pneumoniae infection.

  19. Protective efficacy of the chimeric Staphylococcus aureus vaccine candidate IC in sepsis and pneumonia models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liuyang; Cai, Changzhi; Feng, Qiang; Shi, Yun; Zuo, Qianfei; Yang, Huijie; Jing, Haiming; Wei, Chao; Zhuang, Yuan; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2016-02-11

    Staphylococcus aureus causes serious sepsis and necrotic pneumonia worldwide. Due to the spread of multidrug-resistant strains, developing an effective vaccine is the most promising method for combating S. aureus infection. In this study, based on the immune-dominant areas of the iron surface determinant B (IsdB) and clumping factor A (ClfA), we designed the novel chimeric vaccine IsdB151-277ClfA33-213 (IC). IC formulated with the AlPO4 adjuvant induced higher protection in an S. aureus sepsis model compared with the single components alone and showed broad immune protection against several clinical S. aureus isolates. Immunisation with IC induced strong antibody responses. The protective effect of antibodies was demonstrated through the opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) and passive immunisation experiment. Moreover, this new chimeric vaccine induced Th1/Th17-skewed cellular immune responses based on cytokine profiles and CD4(+) T cell stimulation tests. Neutralisation of IL-17A alone (but not IFN-γ) resulted in a significant decrease in vaccine immune protection. Finally, we found that IC showed protective efficacy in a pneumonia model. Taken together, these data provide evidence that IC is a potentially promising vaccine candidate for combating S. aureus sepsis and pneumonia.

  20. Protective efficacy of the chimeric Staphylococcus aureus vaccine candidate IC in sepsis and pneumonia models

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liuyang; Cai, Changzhi; Feng, Qiang; Shi, Yun; Zuo, Qianfei; Yang, Huijie; Jing, Haiming; Wei, Chao; Zhuang, Yuan; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes serious sepsis and necrotic pneumonia worldwide. Due to the spread of multidrug-resistant strains, developing an effective vaccine is the most promising method for combating S. aureus infection. In this study, based on the immune-dominant areas of the iron surface determinant B (IsdB) and clumping factor A (ClfA), we designed the novel chimeric vaccine IsdB151-277ClfA33-213 (IC). IC formulated with the AlPO4 adjuvant induced higher protection in an S. aureus sepsis model compared with the single components alone and showed broad immune protection against several clinical S. aureus isolates. Immunisation with IC induced strong antibody responses. The protective effect of antibodies was demonstrated through the opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) and passive immunisation experiment. Moreover, this new chimeric vaccine induced Th1/Th17-skewed cellular immune responses based on cytokine profiles and CD4+ T cell stimulation tests. Neutralisation of IL-17A alone (but not IFN-γ) resulted in a significant decrease in vaccine immune protection. Finally, we found that IC showed protective efficacy in a pneumonia model. Taken together, these data provide evidence that IC is a potentially promising vaccine candidate for combating S. aureus sepsis and pneumonia. PMID:26865417

  1. Pediatric round pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen-Lin; Wu, Ping-Sheng; Tsai, Li-Ping; Tsai, Wen-Hsin

    2014-12-01

    "Round pneumonia" or "spherical pneumonia" is a well-characterized clinical entity that seems to be less addressed by pediatricians in Taiwan. We herein report the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with prolonged fever, cough, and chest X-rays showing a well-demarcated round mass measuring 5.9 × 5.6 × 4.3 cm in the left lower lung field, findings which were typical for round pneumonia. The urinary pneumococcal antigen test was positive, and serum anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibody titer measurement using a microparticle agglutination method was 1:160 (+). After oral administration of antibiotics including azithromycin and amoxicillin/clavulanate, which was subsequently replaced by ceftibuten due to moderate diarrhea, the fever subsided 2 days later and the round patch had completely resolved on the 18th day after the diagnosis. Recent evidence suggests treating classical round pneumonia with antibiotics first and waiving unwarranted advanced imaging studies, while alternative etiologies such as abscesses, tuberculosis, nonbacterial infections, congenital malformations, or neoplasms should still be considered in patients with atypical features or poor treatment response.

  2. How Can Pneumonia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... t last as long Fewer serious complications Pneumococcal pneumonia vaccines Two vaccines are available to prevent pneumococcal ... Vaccination Web page. Other ways to help prevent pneumonia You also can take the following steps to ...

  3. Impact of Stress-Induced Diabetes on Outcomes in Severely Burned Children

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Celeste C.; Ali, Arham; McClean, Josef; Benjamin, Nicole; Clayton, Robert P.; Andersen, Clark R.; Mlcak, Ronald P.; Suman, Oscar E.; Meyer, Walter; Herndon, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Post-burn hyperglycemia leads to graft failure, multiple organ failure, and death. A hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp is used to keep serum glucose between 60-110mg/dL. Because of frequent hypoglycemic episodes, a less stringent sliding scale insulin protocol is used to maintain serum glucose levels between 80-160mg/dL following elevations above 180mg/dL. Study Design We randomized pediatric patients with massive burns into two groups – patients receiving sliding scale insulin to lower blood glucose levels (n=145) and those receiving no insulin (n = 98) to determine the differences in morbidity and mortality. Patients 0-18 years old with burns covering ≥30% of the total body surface area and not randomized to receive anabolic agents were included in this study. Endpoints included glucose levels, infections, resting energy expenditure (REE), lean body mass, bone mineral content (BMC), fat mass, muscle strength, and serum inflammatory cytokines, hormones, and liver enzymes. Results Maximal glucose levels occurred within 6 days of burn injury. Blood glucose levels were age dependent with older children requiring more insulin, p<0.05. Daily maximum and daily minimum, but not 6am,glucose levels were significantly different based on treatment group, p<0.05. Insulin significantly increased REE and improved BMC, p<0.05. Each additional wound infection increased incidence of hyperglycemia, p=0.004. There was no mortality in patients not receiving insulin, only in patients who received insulin (p<0.004). Muscle strength was increased in patients receiving insulin (p<0.05). Conclusions A subset of severely burned children develops burn-induced hyperglycemia. Length of stay was reduced in the no insulin group, and there were no deaths in this group. Administration of insulin positively impacted BMC and muscle strength, but increased REE, hypoglycemic episodes, and mortality. New glucose-lowering strategies may be needed. PMID:24655871

  4. [Ceftaroline fosamil in community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Calbo, Esther; Zaragoza, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common infection in developed countries and causes a large number of hospital admissions and deaths. In recent years, the incidence of this disease has increased, caused by progressive population aging. Following the introduction of the conjugate vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae, there have been significant epidemiological changes that require close monitoring because of the possible emergence of new patterns of resistance. This article aims to review the role of ceftaroline fosamil, a new parenteral cephalosporin with antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens, in the treatment of pneumonia. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have shown the efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil against penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Additionally, ceftaroline has shown similar efficacy and safety to ceftriaxone in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia with severe prognosis (prognostic severity index III and IV) in two phase III clinical trials. Although a non-inferiority design was used for these clinical trials, some data suggest a superior efficacy of ceftaroline, with earlier clinical response and higher cure rate in infections caused by S. pneumoniae, making this drug particularly interesting for critically-ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Ceftaroline may also be considered for empirical and directed treatment of MRSA pneumonia.

  5. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-related hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and acute encephalitis and poliomyelitis-like flaccid paralysis.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kanae; Kano, Gen; Shibata, Mayumi; Sakamoto, Izumi; Matsui, Hirofumi; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2011-05-01

    A 3-year-old male presented with Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-related hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). The patient developed an episode of HLH with severe skin eruption following C. pneumoniae pneumonia. Symptoms responded to steroid/cyclosporine A therapy, but the patient slowly lost consciousness and developed systemic flaccid paralysis. He was diagnosed with encephalitis/myelitis by brain and spinal MRI. Neurological symptoms and signs gradually resolved. We thought that the immune response to C. pneumoniae infection triggered the development of HLH, associated with unusual neurological complications. This report describes a novel case of C. pneumoniae-associated HLH and with poliomyelitis like flaccid paralysis.

  6. A Compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Gretchen L.; Kinjo, Takeshi; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, “walking” pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review. PMID:27148202

  7. Development of Cryptosporidium parvum-Induced Gastrointestinal Neoplasia in Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) Mice: Severity of Lesions Is Correlated with Infection Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Certad, Gabriela; Creusy, Colette; Ngouanesavanh, Tramy; Guyot, Karine; Gantois, Nausicaa; Mouray, Anthony; Chassat, Thierry; Flament, Nicolas; Fleurisse, Laurence; Pinon, Anthony; Delhaes, Laurence; Dei-Cas, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    We reported previously that Cryptosporidium parvum was able to induce intestinal tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice treated with corticoids. To further characterize this Cryptosporidium-induced cell transformation, SCID mice treated with dexamethasone were challenged with C. parvum oocysts, and euthanatized sequentially after infection for histologic examination. Ki-67 was used as a marker of cellular proliferation. Our previous results were confirmed, and it was also found that mice receiving higher inocula (106–107) experienced more severe neoplastic development. Additionally, neoplastic changes were observed not only in the caecum but also in the stomach and duodenum of some animals. Interestingly, SCID mice (6/6) inoculated with 105–107 oocysts showed high grade intraepithelial neoplasia or adenomas with high grade dysplasia in the caecum after Day 46 post-infection (PI). Immunohistochemistry for Ki-67 staining indicated the neoplastic process associated to cryptosporidiosis, and evidenced the first immunohistochemical alterations at early stages of the process, even at 3 weeks PI. PMID:20134002

  8. Ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    2009-11-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a pneumonia that develops initially more than 48 h from the start of tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. The route of infection is almost always through the respiratory tract. Intake of contaminants from outside the tracheal tube (silent aspiration) is considered a key route, and suctioning of secretions that have accumulated above the cuff of the endotracheal tubes is effective in preventing infection. The circuit is managed and heated-wire humidifiers and suction are manipulated based on appropriate infection control measures. To diagnose pathogens, efforts should be made to collect specimens from the pneumonia focus. Realistically, however, diagnosis can also be achieved based on the clinical course and from the results of culture of samples from tracheal aspirate. Use of prophylactic antimicrobials is not recommended, but once a diagnosis is made, antimicrobials are administered that combat the causative microorganism.

  9. Prioritized Expression of BTN2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Pronounced Translation Repression Induced by Severe Ethanol Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yukina; Izawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Severe ethanol stress (>9% ethanol, v/v) as well as glucose deprivation rapidly induces a pronounced repression of overall protein synthesis in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, transcriptional activation in yeast cells under severe ethanol stress does not always indicate the production of expected protein levels. Messenger RNAs of genes containing heat shock elements can be intensively translated under glucose deprivation, suggesting that some mRNAs are preferentially translated even under severe ethanol stress. In the present study, we tried to identify the mRNA that can be preferentially translated under severe ethanol stress. BTN2 encodes a v-SNARE binding protein, and its null mutant shows hypersensitivity to ethanol. We found that BTN2 mRNA was efficiently translated under severe ethanol stress but not under mild ethanol stress. Moreover, the increased Btn2 protein levels caused by severe ethanol stress were smoothly decreased with the elimination of ethanol stress. These findings suggested that severe ethanol stress extensively induced BTN2 expression. Further, the BTN2 promoter induced protein synthesis of non-native genes such as CUR1, GIC2, and YUR1 in the presence of high ethanol concentrations, indicating that this promoter overcame severe ethanol stress-induced translation repression. Thus, our findings provide an important clue about yeast response to severe ethanol stress and suggest that the BTN2 promoter can be used to improve the efficiency of ethanol production and stress tolerance of yeast cells by modifying gene expression in the presence of high ethanol concentration. PMID:27602028

  10. Lung dendritic cells facilitate extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination during pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl, Alva; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Goldmann, Oliver; Medina, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia worldwide. Given the critical role of dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating and modulating the immune response to pathogens, we investigated here the role of DCs in S. pneumoniae lung infections. Using a well-established transgenic mouse line which allows the conditional transient depletion of DCs, we showed that ablation of DCs resulted in enhanced resistance to intranasal challenge with S. pneumoniae. DCs-depleted mice exhibited delayed bacterial systemic dissemination, significantly reduced bacterial loads in the infected organs and lower levels of serum inflammatory mediators than non-depleted animals. The increased resistance of DCs-depleted mice to S. pneumoniae was associated with a better capacity to restrict pneumococci extrapulmonary dissemination. Furthermore, we demonstrated that S. pneumoniae disseminated from the lungs into the regional lymph nodes in a cell-independent manner and that this direct way of dissemination was much more efficient in the presence of DCs. We also provide evidence that S. pneumoniae induces expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in cultured bone marrow-derived DCs. MMP-9 is a protease involved in the breakdown of extracellular matrix proteins and is critical for DC trafficking across extracellular matrix and basement membranes during the migration from the periphery to the lymph nodes. MMP-9 was also significantly up-regulated in the lungs of mice after intranasal infection with S. pneumoniae. Notably, the expression levels of MMP-9 in the infected lungs were significantly decreased after depletion of DCs suggesting the involvement of DCs in MMP-9 production during pneumococcal pneumonia. Thus, we propose that S. pneumoniae can exploit the DC-derived proteolysis to open tissue barriers thereby facilitating its own dissemination from the local site of infection. PMID:23802100

  11. Characteristics associated with clinician diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia; a descriptive study of afflicted patients and their outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lanspa, Michael J.; Peyrani, Paula; Wiemken, Timothy; Wilson, Emily; Ramirez, Julio A.; Dean, Nathan C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspiration pneumonia is a common disease, although less well characterized than other pneumonia syndromes. Objective We analyzed patient-level covariates associated with clinician-defined aspiration pneumonia. Methods We used the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Organization (CAPO) database, a multicenter, international population of patients with community-acquired pneumonia, using data from 2001 to 2012. Aspiration pneumonia was determined by the treating clinician. We analyzed covariates associated with clinician-defined diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia using logistic regression. We compared aspiration pneumonia patients to propensity-matched cases with non-aspiration pneumonia. Results We studied 5185 patients. 451 of these patients had aspiration pneumonia. Patients with aspiration pneumonia were older, had greater disease severity, and more comorbidities than patients with non-aspiration pneumonia. They were more likely cared for in the intensive care unit (19% vs. 13%, p=0.002), had longer unadjusted hospital length of stay (9 vs. 7 days, p<0.001), and took longer to achieve clinical stability (unadjusted 8 vs. 4 days, p<0.001). Confusion, nursing home residence, and cerebrovascular disease were most associated with clinician diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia (OR 4.4, 2.9, 2.3 respectively). Unadjusted inpatient mortality was higher (23% vs. 9%, p < 0.001). Aspiration pneumonia conferred a 2.3 odds ratio for inpatient mortality, after adjusting for age, disease severity, and comorbidities. Conclusions Among pneumonia patients, confusion, nursing home residence, and cerebrovascular disease are associated with a clinician diagnosis of aspiration, Aspiration pneumonia is associated with greater mortality among patients with community-acquired pneumonia, which is not explained by older age, measured indices of severity, or comorbidities. PMID:25363892

  12. Community-Acquired Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Viasus, Diego; Di Yacovo, Silvana; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Verdaguer, Ricard; Manresa, Frederic; Dorca, Jordi; Gudiol, Francesc; Carratalà, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Legionella pneumophila has been increasingly recognized as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and an important public health problem worldwide. We conducted the present study to assess trends in epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical features, treatment, and outcomes of sporadic community-acquired L. pneumophila pneumonia requiring hospitalization at a university hospital over a 15-year period (1995–2010). Among 3934 nonimmunosuppressed hospitalized patients with CAP, 214 (5.4%) had L. pneumophila pneumonia (16 cases were categorized as travel-associated pneumonia, and 21 were part of small clusters). Since the introduction of the urinary antigen test, the diagnosis of L. pneumophila using this method remained stable over the years (p = 0.42); however, diagnosis by means of seroconversion and culture decreased (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively). The median age of patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia was 58.2 years (SD 13.8), and 76.4% were male. At least 1 comorbid condition was present in 119 (55.6%) patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia, mainly chronic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, and chronic pulmonary disease. The frequency of older patients (aged >65 yr) and comorbidities among patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia increased over the years (p = 0.06 and p = 0.02, respectively). In addition, 100 (46.9%) patients were classified into high-risk classes according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (groups IV–V). Twenty-four (11.2%) patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia received inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy at hospital admission. Compared with patients who received appropriate empirical antibiotic, patients who received inappropriate therapy more frequently had acute onset of illness (p = 0.004), pleuritic chest pain (p = 0.03), and pleural effusion (p = 0.05). The number of patients who received macrolides decreased over the study period (p < 0.001), whereas the number of patients who received levofloxacin increased (p

  13. Successful recovery of MERS CoV pneumonia in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shalhoub, Sarah; AlZahrani, Abdulwahab; Simhairi, Raed; Mushtaq, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS CoV) may cause severe pneumonia with significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients with multiple comorbid condition. MERS CoV pneumonia has not been previously reported in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Herein, we report a case of MERS CoV pneumonia with a successful outcome in a patient recently diagnosed with HIV.

  14. Protective contributions against invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia of antibody and Th17-cell responses to nasopharyngeal colonisation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathan M; Khandavilli, Suneeta; Camberlein, Emilie; Hyams, Catherine; Baxendale, Helen E; Brown, Jeremy S

    2011-01-01

    The nasopharyngeal commensal bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae is also a frequent cause of serious infections. Nasopharyngeal colonisation with S. pneumoniae inhibits subsequent re-colonisation by inducing Th17-cell adaptive responses, whereas vaccination prevents invasive infections by inducing antibodies to S. pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides. In contrast, protection against invasive infection after nasopharyngeal colonisation with mutant S. pneumoniae strains was associated with antibody responses to protein antigens. The role of colonisation-induced Th17-cell responses during subsequent invasive infections is unknown. Using mouse models, we show that previous colonisation with S. pneumoniae protects against subsequent lethal pneumonia mainly by preventing bacteraemia with a more modest effect on local control of infection within the lung. Previous colonisation resulted in CD4-dependent increased levels of Th17-cell cytokines during subsequent infectious challenge. However, mice depleted of CD4 cells prior to challenge remained protected against bacteraemia, whereas no protection was seen in antibody deficient mice and similar protection could be achieved through passive transfer of serum. Serum from colonised mice but not antibody deficient mice promoted phagocytosis of S. pneumoniae, and previously colonised mice were able to rapidly clear S. pneumoniae from the blood after intravenous inoculation. Thus, despite priming for a Th17-cell response during subsequent infection, the protective effects of prior colonisation in this model was not dependent on CD4 cells but on rapid clearance of bacteria from the blood by antibody-mediated phagocytosis. These data suggest that whilst nasopharyngeal colonisation induces a range of immune responses, the effective protective responses depend upon the site of subsequent infection.

  15. PAI-1-Dependent Endothelial Cell Death Determines Severity of Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Abderrahmani, Rym; François, Agnes; Buard, Valerie; Tarlet, Georges; Blirando, Karl; Hneino, Mohammad; Vaurijoux, Aurelie; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien

    2012-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity still remains a dose-limiting factor in clinical radiation therapy. Recently, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (SERPINE1/PAI-1) was reported as an essential mediator of late radiation-induced intestinal injury. However, it is not clear whether PAI-1 plays a role in acute radiation-induced intestinal damage and we hypothesized that PAI-1 may play a role in the endothelium radiosensitivity. In vivo, in a model of radiation enteropathy in PAI-1 −/− mice, apoptosis of radiosensitive compartments, epithelial and microvascular endothelium was quantified. In vitro, the role of PAI-1 in the radiation-induced endothelial cells (ECs) death was investigated. The level of apoptotic ECs is lower in PAI-1 −/− compared with Wt mice after irradiation. This is associated with a conserved microvascular density and consequently with a better mucosal integrity in PAI-1 −/− mice. In vitro, irradiation rapidly stimulates PAI-1 expression in ECs and radiation sensitivity is increased in ECs that stably overexpress PAI-1, whereas PAI-1 knockdown increases EC survival after irradiation. Moreover, ECs prepared from PAI-1 −/− mice are more resistant to radiation-induced cell death than Wt ECs and this is associated with activation of the Akt pathway. This study demonstrates that PAI-1 plays a key role in radiation-induced EC death in the intestine and suggests that this contributes strongly to the progression of radiation-induced intestinal injury. PMID:22563394

  16. Pneumocystis Jiroveci Pneumonia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly P. carinii) Pneumonia (PJP). A 60 year old HIV+ male with a CD4+ count of 144 cells/mm3 complaining of cough ...case the lucency is too wide and irregular for a Mach band. Clinically, patients with PJP demonstrate nonspecific complaints. Fever, cough

  17. Fungal diagnostics in pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lease, Erika D; Alexander, Barbara D

    2011-12-01

    Fungal pneumonia is increasingly common, particularly in highly immunosuppressed patients, such as solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, and the diagnosis is evolving. Although standard techniques such as microscopy and culture remain the mainstays of diagnosis, relatively recent advances in serological and molecular testing are important additions to the field. This article reviews the laboratory tools used to diagnose fungal respiratory disease.

  18. Vaccinating welders against pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T; Cosgrove, Martin P

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2011 the Department of Health in England recommended that welders should each receive a single dose of the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PPV23). This review assesses the evidence behind the advice and its practical implications. Method The review was informed by a systematic search in Medline, which related pneumonia to welding and/or exposure to metal fume, and was supplemented using the personal libraries of the authors. Findings There is consistent evidence that welders die more often of pneumonia, especially lobar pneumonia, are hospitalised more often with lobar and pneumococcal pneumonia, and more often develop invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). It is estimated that one case of IPD may be prevented over a 10-year period by vaccinating 588 welders against pneumococcal infection. Conclusions A good case exists that employers should offer PPV23 vaccination to welders and other employees exposed to metal fume. Additionally, reasonable measures must be taken to minimise exposure to welding fume and welders should be encouraged not to smoke. PMID:22764269

  19. A case study of pediatric pneumonia with empyema.

    PubMed

    Waldrep, Vanessa B; Sloand, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    This case study provides a discussion of the diagnosis, management and comprehensive plan of care for empyema in children for the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) working in primary care. The incidence of complicated pneumonias including those progressing to empyema is on the rise among pediatric patients. The ambiguous signs and symptoms of complicated pneumonias create a challenge for the provider when developing an accurate diagnosis and plan of care. Pediatric nurse practitioners must be cognizant of the increased incidence of complicated pneumonias and manage their patients accordingly. If left untreated, empyema may result in severe pulmonary complications.

  20. DO ACUTE PHASE PROTEINS REFLECT SEVERITY OF INFLAMMATION IN RAT MODELS OF POLLUTANT-INDUCED LUNG INJURY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Title: DO ACUTE PHASE PROTEINS REFLECT THE SEVERITY OF INFLAMMATION IN RAT MODELS OF POLLUTANT-INDUCED LUNG INJURY?

    M. C. Schladweiler, BS 1, P. S. Gilmour, PhD 2, D. L. Andrews, BS 1, D. L. Costa, ScD 1, A. D. Ledbetter, BS 1, K. E. Pinkerton, PhD 3 and U. P. Kodavanti, ...

  1. Mothers' perception and healthcare seeking behavior of pneumonia children in rural bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ferdous, Farzana; Dil Farzana, Fahmida; Ahmed, Shahnawaz; Das, Sumon Kumar; Malek, Mohammad Abdul; Das, Jui; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer

    2014-01-01

    We describe mothers' perception about signs and symptoms, causes of the illness, and healthcare seeking behaviors related to pneumonia and express the major modifiable barriers to seeking timely treatment when their under-5 children had pneumonia in rural Bangladesh. Using focus group discussion, we understood mothers' perception and healthcare seeking behavior of childhood pneumonia. Although mothers described pneumonia as a serious life threatening disease in young children but most of the mothers (n = 24) could not diagnose whether their child had pneumonia or not. Environmental factors such as dust particles, spread from coughing mother, and drinking cold water or playing with water were perceived as the causes for pneumonia. Three common barriers noted were as follows: illness was not perceived as serious enough or distance from healthcare facility or lack of money at household for seeking treatment outside. Most of the rural mothers did not have knowledge about severity of childhood pneumonia.

  2. [The ambitious but achievable goal: to end preventable childhood deaths due to pneumonia by 2025].

    PubMed

    Yao, Kai-Hu; Yang, Yong-Hong

    2014-10-01

    Globally, pneumonia is the leading cause of childhood mortality. Pneumonia is the second killer of children less than 5 years of age in China. The World Heath Organization and United Nations Children′s Fund launched the integrated Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Pneumonia and Diarrhea (GAPPD) in 2013. The ambitious goal is to end preventable childhood deaths due to pneumonia by 2025. Countries or regions should achieve the following goals: (1) reduce mortality from pneumonia in children less than 5 years of age to fewer than 3 per 1 000 live births; (2) reduce the incidence of severe pneumonia by 75% in children less than 5 years of age compared to 2010 levels. If the implementation of key interventions is accelerated, the mortality rate of childhood pneumonia will drop substantially every year, which makes the goal achievable.

  3. Uncomplicated pneumonia in healthy Canadian children and youth: Practice points for management

    PubMed Central

    Le Saux, Nicole; Robinson, Joan L

    2015-01-01

    Although immunization has decreased the incidence of bacterial pneumonia in vaccinated children, pneumonia remains common in healthy children. Symptoms of bacterial pneumonia frequently overlap those present with viral infections or reactive airway disease. Optimally, the diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia should be supported by a chest radiograph before starting antimicrobials. Factors such as age, vital signs and other measures of illness severity are critical when deciding whether to admit a patient to hospital. Because Streptococcus pneumoniae continues to be the most common cause of bacterial pneumonia in children, prescribing amoxicillin or ampicillin for seven to 10 days remains the mainstay of empirical therapy for nonsevere pneumonia. If improvement does not occur, consideration should be given to searching for complications (empyema or lung abscess). Routine chest radiographs at the end of therapy are not recommended unless clinically indicated. PMID:26744558

  4. Neuroprotective effects of bloodletting at Jing points combined with mild induced hypothermia in acute severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yue; Miao, Xiao-mei; Yi, Tai-long; Chen, Xu-yi; Sun, Hong-tao; Cheng, Shi-xiang; Zhang, Sai

    2016-01-01

    Bloodletting at Jing points has been used to treat coma in traditional Chinese medicine. Mild induced hypothermia has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects. However, the therapeutic effects of bloodletting at Jing points and mild induced hypothermia alone are limited. Therefore, we investigated whether combined treatment might have clinical effectiveness for the treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. Using a rat model of traumatic brain injury, combined treatment substantially alleviated cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, neurological function was ameliorated, and cellular necrosis and the inflammatory response were lessened. These findings suggest that the combined effects of bloodletting at Jing points (20 μL, twice a day, for 2 days) and mild induced hypothermia (6 hours) are better than their individual effects alone. Their combined application may have marked neuroprotective effects in the clinical treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. PMID:27482221

  5. Coronavirus 229E-related pneumonia in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Pene, Frédéric; Merlat, Annabelle; Vabret, Astrid; Rozenberg, Flore; Buzyn, Agnès; Dreyfus, François; Cariou, Alain; Freymuth, François; Lebon, Pierre

    2003-10-01

    Coronaviruses strains 229E and OC43 have been associated with various respiratory illnesses ranging from the self-resolving common cold to severe pneumonia. Although chronic underlying conditions are major determinants of severe respiratory virus infections, few data about coronavirus-related pneumonia in immunocompromised patients are available. Here we report 2 well-documented cases of pneumonia related to coronavirus 229E, each with a different clinical presentation. Diagnosis was made on the basis of viral culture and electron microscopy findings that exhibited typical crown-like particles and through amplification of the viral genome by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. On the basis of this report, coronaviruses should be considered as potential causative microorganisms of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients.

  6. A review of factors influencing the incidence and severity of plaque-induced gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Trombelli, L; Farina, R

    2013-06-01

    An individual variation in the gingival inflammatory response to the dental biofilm has been demonstrated. This variability can be observed between individuals with neither quantitative nor qualitative differences in plaque accumulation. The reported significant differences in gingival inflammatory response under quantitatively and/or qualitatively almost identical bacterial challenge suggest that the gingival response to plaque accumulation may be an individual trait, possibly genetic in origin. The most recent classification of periodontal diseases acknowledges that the clinical expression of plaque-induced gingival inflammation can be substantially modified by systemic factors, either inherent to the host or related to environmental influences. The aim of the present literature review is to describe (i) the factors influencing the development of plaque-induced gingivitis as well as (ii) those metabolic, environmental and systemic factors which have a direct impact on the etiopathogenetic pathway of plaque-induced gingivitis, thus altering the nature or course of the gingival inflammatory response to dental biofilm.

  7. Severe Self-induced Beam Distortion in Laboratory Simulated Laser Propagation at 10.6 micro.

    PubMed

    Buser, R G; Rohde, R S

    1973-02-01

    Precision irradiance profiles have been determined for horizontally slewing high power laser beams through stationary absorbing gaseous media for the case of strong beam-medium interaction coupled with strong heating. Results are compared with the predictions of existing theoretical models concerning thermally induced lens effects in the presence of cross winds. Bending of the beam into the wind by beam slewing and intensification is found in reasonable agreement with the theory; for the observed overall beam spread, induced flow, turbulent tail, and concomitant beam breakup, no satisfactory theoretical treatment is available.

  8. Fatal pneumonia associated with temozolomide therapy in patients with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroki; Saito, Yoshinobu; Kokuho, Nariaki; Morimoto, Taisuke; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Tanaka, Toru; Abe, Shinji; Fujita, Kazue; Azuma, Arata; Gemma, Akihiko

    2012-07-01

    This report presents the cases of three patients with fatal pneumonia that was highly suspected to be Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) based on serological diagnosis. Their chest radiographs showed bilateral pneumonia and each had presented with severe respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation when they arrived at the hospital. Although bronchoscopical sampling could not be performed, their chest computed tomography imaging and a marked elevation of serum KL-6 and β-D-glucan levels were characteristic of Pneumocystis pneumonia. All three were found to have been treated with temozolomide after surgery for malignant glioma. Temozolomide can cause Pneumocystis pneumonia. The three patients did not receive prophylactic medication against Pneumocystis pneumonia during treatment with temozolomide, and their histories suggested that all had delayed seeking treatment. It may be difficult to diagnose Pneumocystis pneumonia because the symptoms are not specific for Pneumocystis pneumonia and they tend to be similar to those of common respiratory infectious diseases. Therefore, patients who receive temozolomide therapy have the potential to develop fatal pneumonia and should be carefully observed. The patients should also be adequately informed about Pneumocystis pneumonia, and prophylaxis against Pneumocystis pneumonia should be considered proactively before treatment with temozolomide is initiated.

  9. Cocaine-induced myocardial infarction associated with severe reversible systolic dysfunction and pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Arzola-Castañer, Daniel; Johnson, Charles

    2004-12-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) associated to cocaine use was originally reported in 1982 and cases are being encountered more frequently in our milieu. The literature regarding this diagnosis has included mostly cases of cocaine associated chest pain and MI without serious sequelae. A lesser number of reports however focus on the clinical presentation of severe myocardial dysfunction and severe pulmonary edema, with the mechanism for pulmonary edema still being debated. Although previously described individually, these manifestations are thought to be an uncommon complication of cocaine ingestion. In this article the subject is reviewed and we report our experience with two patients that presented to our care with severe pulmonary edema and concomitant severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction that resolved spontaneously with supportive therapy. It is felt that this clinical picture after cocaine use may be more common than expected. In this article we discuss the possible mechanisms associated to this presentation as well as review the literature regarding this subject.

  10. Export Requirements of Pneumolysin in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Price, Katherine E.; Greene, Neil G.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major causative agent of otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. Pneumolysin (Ply), a member of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), is produced by virtually all clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae, and ply mutant strains are severely attenuated in mouse models of colonization and infection. In contrast to all other known members of the CDC family, Ply lacks a signal peptide for export outside the cell. Instead, Ply has been hypothesized to be released upon autolysis or, alternatively, via a nonautolytic mechanism that remains undefined. We show that an exogenously added signal sequence is not sufficient for Sec-dependent Ply secretion in S. pneumoniae but is sufficient in the surrogate host Bacillus subtilis. Previously, we showed that Ply is localized primarily to the cell wall compartment in the absence of detectable cell lysis. Here we show that Ply released by autolysis cannot reassociate with intact cells, suggesting that there is a Ply export mechanism that is coupled to cell wall localization of the protein. This putative export mechanism is capable of secreting a related CDC without its signal sequence. We show that B. subtilis can export Ply, suggesting that the export pathway is conserved. Finally, through truncation and domain swapping analyses, we show that export is dependent on domain 2 of Ply. PMID:22563048

  11. The newly synthesized pool of dopamine determines the severity of methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, David M.; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) has long been implicated as a participant in the neurotoxicity caused by methamphetamine (METH), yet, its mechanism of action in this regard is not fully understood. Treatment of mice with the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) inhibitor α-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT) lowers striatal cytoplasmic DA content by 55% and completely protects against METH-induced damage to DA nerve terminals. Reserpine, by disrupting vesicle amine storage, depletes striatal DA by more than 95% and accentuates METH-induced neurotoxicity. L-DOPA reverses the protective effect of AMPT against METH and enhances neurotoxicity in animals with intact TH. Inhibition of MAO-A by clorgyline increases pre-synaptic DA content and enhances METH striatal neurotoxicity. In all conditions of altered pre-synaptic DA homeostasis, increases or decreases in METH neurotoxicity paralleled changes in striatal microglial activation. Mice treated with AMPT, L-DOPA, or clorgyline + METH developed hyperthermia to the same extent as animals treated with METH alone, whereas mice treated with reserpine + METH were hypothermic, suggesting that the effects of alterations in cytoplasmic DA on METH neurotoxicity were not strictly mediated by changes in core body temperature. Taken together, the present data reinforce the notion that METH-induced release of DA from the newly synthesized pool of transmitter into the extracellular space plays an essential role in drug-induced striatal neurotoxicity and microglial activation. Subtle alterations in intracellular DA content can lead to significant enhancement of METH neurotoxicity. Our results also suggest that reactants derived from METH-induced oxidation of released DA may serve as neuronal signals that lead to microglial activation early in the neurotoxic process associated with METH. PMID:18088364

  12. The newly synthesized pool of dopamine determines the severity of methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2008-05-01

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) has long been implicated as a participant in the neurotoxicity caused by methamphetamine (METH), yet, its mechanism of action in this regard is not fully understood. Treatment of mice with the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) inhibitor alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT) lowers striatal cytoplasmic DA content by 55% and completely protects against METH-induced damage to DA nerve terminals. Reserpine, by disrupting vesicle amine storage, depletes striatal DA by more than 95% and accentuates METH-induced neurotoxicity. l-DOPA reverses the protective effect of AMPT against METH and enhances neurotoxicity in animals with intact TH. Inhibition of MAO-A by clorgyline increases pre-synaptic DA content and enhances METH striatal neurotoxicity. In all conditions of altered pre-synaptic DA homeostasis, increases or decreases in METH neurotoxicity paralleled changes in striatal microglial activation. Mice treated with AMPT, l-DOPA, or clorgyline + METH developed hyperthermia to the same extent as animals treated with METH alone, whereas mice treated with reserpine + METH were hypothermic, suggesting that the effects of alterations in cytoplasmic DA on METH neurotoxicity were not strictly mediated by changes in core body temperature. Taken together, the present data reinforce the notion that METH-induced release of DA from the newly synthesized pool of transmitter into the extracellular space plays an essential role in drug-induced striatal neurotoxicity and microglial activation. Subtle alterations in intracellular DA content can lead to significant enhancement of METH neurotoxicity. Our results also suggest that reactants derived from METH-induced oxidation of released DA may serve as neuronal signals that lead to microglial activation early in the neurotoxic process associated with METH.

  13. New insights in the outbreak pattern of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Enno; Ehrhardt, Ingrid; Dumke, Roger

    2015-10-01

    Since a well-documented incidence peak in 2011/12 in European countries, infections due to the cell wall-less bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae have gained the increased attention of clinicians, microbiologists and health authorities. Despite the mild or asymptomatic clinical course of most M. pneumoniae infections, the microorganism is responsible for severe interstitial pneumonia and extra-pulmonary complications. Here, we report the time-dependence of 5545 notified cases of laboratory-confirmed M. pneumoniae disease in Saxony from 2001 until June 2014 as measured by serodiagnosis. In parallel, from 2003 until 2012 467 M. pneumoniae-positive respiratory samples or isolated strains were analysed by molecular typing based on sequence differences in the main P1 adhesin of M. pneumoniae. The epidemiological data showed a prolonged outbreak especially in the period 2011-2013. The typing of circulating strains during the outbreak did not support predominance of one of the two major P1 subtypes (mean proportion of subtype 1: 57%) or a change of one to the other subtype during the endemic situation before and during the outbreak period. From the last major outbreak in Europe, we conclude that the notification of M. pneumoniae-positive cases, which is legally required only in Saxony, should be expanded to the whole country, to optimise awareness of this human pathogen and to reflect upon antibiotic therapy.

  14. A review of genetic methods and models for analysis of coronavirus-induced severe pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    McGruder, Brenna

    2015-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) have been studied for over 60 years, but have only recently gained notoriety as deadly human pathogens with the emergence of severe respiratory syndrome CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome virus. The rapid emergence of these viruses has demonstrated the need for good models to study severe CoV respiratory infection and pathogenesis. There are, currently, different methods and models for the study of CoV disease. The available genetic methods for the study and evaluation of CoV genetics are reviewed here. There are several animal models, both mouse and alternative animals, for the study of severe CoV respiratory disease that have been examined, each with different pros and cons relative to the actual pathogenesis of the disease in humans. A current limitation of these models is that no animal model perfectly recapitulates the disease seen in humans. Through the review and analysis of the available disease models, investigators can employ the most appropriate available model to study various aspects of CoV pathogenesis and evaluate possible antiviral treatments that may potentially be successful in future treatment and prevention of severe CoV respiratory infections. PMID:25252685

  15. Increased Nasopharyngeal Density and Concurrent Carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis Are Associated with Pneumonia in Febrile Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background We assessed nasopharyngeal (NP) carriage of five pathogens in febrile children with and without acute respiratory infection (ARI) of the upper (URTI) or lower tract, attending health facilities in Tanzania. Methods NP swabs collected from children (N = 960) aged 2 months to 10 years, and with a temperature ≥38°C, were utilized to quantify bacterial density of S. pneumoniae (Sp), H. influenzae (Hi), M. catarrhalis (Mc), S. aureus (Sa), and N. meningitidis (Nm). We determined associations between presence of individual species, densities, or concurrent carriage of all species combination with respiratory diseases including clinical pneumonia, pneumonia with normal chest radiography (CXR) and endpoint pneumonia. Results Individual carriage, and NP density, of Sp, Hi, or Mc, but not Sa, or Nm, was significantly associated with febrile ARI and clinical pneumonia when compared to febrile non-ARI episodes. Density was also significantly increased in severe pneumonia when compared to mild URTI (Sp, p<0.002; Hi p<0.001; Mc, p = 0.014). Accordingly, concurrent carriage of Sp+, Hi+, and Mc+, in the absence of Sa- and Nm-, was significantly more prevalent in children with ARI (p = 0.03), or clinical pneumonia (p<0.001) than non-ARI, and in children with clinical pneumonia (p = 0.0007) than URTI. Furthermore, Sp+, Hi+, and Mc+ differentiated children with pneumonia with normal CXR, or endpoint pneumonia, from those with URTI, and non-ARI cases. Conclusions Concurrent NP carriage of Sp, Hi, and Mc was a predictor of clinical pneumonia and identified children with pneumonia with normal CXR and endpoint pneumonia from those with febrile URTI, or non-ARI episodes. PMID:27907156

  16. mPneumonia: Development of an Innovative mHealth Application for Diagnosing and Treating Childhood Pneumonia and Other Childhood Illnesses in Low-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Delarosa, Jaclyn; Brunette, Waylon; Levari, Shahar; Sundt, Mitch; Larson, Clarice; Tawiah Agyemang, Charlotte; Newton, Sam; Borriello, Gaetano; Anderson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of death in children worldwide. Each year, pneumonia kills an estimated 935,000 children under five years of age, with most of these deaths occurring in developing countries. The current approach for pneumonia diagnosis in low-resource settings—using the World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) paper-based protocols and relying on a health care provider’s ability to manually count respiratory rate—has proven inadequate. Furthermore, hypoxemia—a diagnostic indicator of the presence and severity of pneumonia often associated with an increased risk of death—is not assessed because pulse oximetry is frequently not available in low-resource settings. In an effort to address childhood pneumonia mortality and improve frontline health care providers’ ability to diagnose, classify, and manage pneumonia and other childhood illnesses, PATH collaborated with the University of Washington to develop “mPneumonia,” an innovative mobile health application using an Android tablet. mPneumonia integrates a digital version of the IMCI algorithm with a software-based breath counter and a pediatric pulse oximeter. We conducted a design-stage usability field test of mPneumonia in Ghana, with the goal of creating a user-friendly diagnostic and management tool for childhood pneumonia and other childhood illnesses that would improve diagnostic accuracy and facilitate adherence by health care providers to established guidelines in low-resource settings. The results of the field test provided valuable information for understanding the usability and acceptability of mPneumonia among health care providers, and identifying approaches to iterate and improve. This critical feedback helped ascertain the common failure modes related to the user interface design, navigation, and accessibility of mPneumonia and the modifications required to improve user experience and create a tool aimed at decreasing mortality

  17. Disease severity in K/BxN serum transfer-induced arthritis is not affected by IL-33 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Interleukin (IL)-33 is a cytokine of the IL-1 family, which signals through the ST2 receptor. Previous work suggested implication of the IL-33/ST2 axis in the pathogenesis of human and mouse arthritis. Here, we directly investigated the role of endogenous IL-33 in K/BxN serum transfer-induced arthritis by using IL-33 knockout (KO) mice. Methods Arthritis was induced by injection of complete K/BxN serum or purified IgG. Disease severity was monitored by clinical and histological scoring. Results K/BxN serum transfer induced pronounced arthritis with similar incidence and severity in IL-33 KO and wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, disease development was significantly reduced in ST2 KO mice. IL-33 expression in synovial tissue was comparable in arthritic WT and ST2 KO mice, and absent in IL-33 KO mice. Transfer of purified arthritogenic IgG instead of complete K/BxN serum also resulted in similar arthritis severity in IL-33 KO and WT mice, excluding a contribution of IL-33 contained in the serum of donor mice to explain this result. We investigated additional potential confounding factors, including purity of genetic background, but the mechanisms underlying reduced arthritis in ST2 KO mice remained unclear. Conclusions The data obtained with IL-33 KO mice indicate that endogenous IL-33 is not required for the development of joint inflammation in K/BxN serum transfer-induced arthritis. On the contrary, arthritis severity was reduced in ST2 KO mice. This observation might relate to IL-33 independent effects of ST2, and/or reveal the existence of confounding variables affecting the severity of joint inflammation in these KO strains. PMID:23324173

  18. Thrombocytopenia induces multiple intracranial hemorrhages in patients with severe burns: A review of 16 cases

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, JIANDA; LIU, JINYAN; LUO, CHENGQUN; HU, FENG; LIU, RUI; CHEN, ZIZI; CHEN, YAO; XIONG, WU; XIE, JIANFEI; HE, QUANYONG; YIN, CHAOQI; WANG, SHAOHUA; ZHANG, YANWEN; ZENG, SAINAN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the etiology and diagnosis of multiple intracranial hemorrhages (ICHs) following severe burns, with a retrospective review of 16 cases of severe burns further complicated by multiple ICHs. Using cranial CT scans of the brains, we identified that all patients presented with low platelet counts and coagulation abnormalities prior to intracranial hemorrhaging. Following conventional treatment and various supporting treatments, five cases succumbed following a progressive reduction in blood platelet levels and the ICHs were cured in 11 cases following the restoration of normal platelet levels. We conclude that low platelet counts and coagulation abnormalities may cause multiple ICHs following severe burns and early diagnosis and treatment is the key to successful treatment. PMID:23935750

  19. A Case of Survival: Myocardial Infarction and Ventricular Arrhythmia Induced by Severe Hydrogen Sulfide Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Chen, Shenjie; Mao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Most cases of acute hydrogen sulfide (H2S) poisoning in China are caused by sewage processing. With the rapid development of urbanization in China, H2S poisoning is showing an increasing trend. Here, we report a case of survival from severe H2S poisoning. A 40-year-old worker was found in the underground sewer lines. He was unresponsive with bilaterally dilated pupils and had poor oxygen saturation. After intubation, he was transferred to the intensive care unit. He developed respiratory failure, acute myocardial infarction, ventricular arrhythmia and left ventricular function impairment, requiring artificial ventilation with highly concentrated oxygen, hyperbaric oxygen treatment and drug therapy. Consequently, he completely recovered from the respiratory and cardiac failure. Cases of survival after severe H2S intoxication have been rarely reported. Such exposures may bring about severe myocardial impairment, which is most likely to benefit from angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition and β-blocker.

  20. Vaccines to prevent severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-induced disease

    PubMed Central

    Enjuanes, Luis; DeDiego, Marta L.; Álvarez, Enrique; Deming, Damon; Sheahan, Tim; Baric, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    An important effort has been performed after the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2003 to diagnose and prevent virus spreading. Several types of vaccines have been developed including inactivated viruses, subunit vaccines, virus-like particles (VLPs), DNA vaccines, heterologous expression systems, and vaccines derived from SARS-CoV genome by reverse genetics. This review describes several aspects essential to develop SARS-CoV vaccines, such as the correlates of protection, virus serotypes, vaccination side effects, and bio-safeguards that can be engineered into recombinant vaccine approaches based on the SARS-CoV genome. The production of effective and safe vaccines to prevent SARS has led to the development of promising vaccine candidates, in contrast to the design of vaccines for other coronaviruses, that in general has been less successful. After preclinical trials in animal models, efficacy and safety evaluation of the most promising vaccine candidates described has to be performed in humans. PMID:17416434

  1. The Impacts of Cellular Senescence in Elderly Pneumonia and in Age-Related Lung Diseases That Increase the Risk of Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Shigehisa; Tsubouchi, Hironobu; Miura, Ayako; Matsuo, Ayako; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2017-02-25

    Pneumonia generates considerable negative impacts on the elderly. Despite the widespread uses of vaccines and appropriate antibiotics, the morbidity and mortality of elderly pneumonia are significantly higher compared to the counte