Science.gov

Sample records for pneumonia induced severe

  1. Severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J

    1982-03-01

    The successful management of severe pneumonia involves a logical approach to antibiotic therapy, based on selecting drugs active against the most likely pathogen in each individual case while awaiting possible identification of an organism. In patients who deteriorate, more invasive diagnostic procedures should be considered in combination with broader-spectrum antibiotic treatment. Controlled oxygen therapy monitored by arterial blood-gas tension measurements is essential and mechanical ventilation may be indicated in some cases. Other measures including physiotherapy, fluid replacement, and the relief of pleuritic pain should not be forgotten.

  2. Safety of Induced Sputum Collection in Children Hospitalized With Severe or Very Severe Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    DeLuca, Andrea N; Hammitt, Laura L; Kim, Julia; Higdon, Melissa M; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Howie, Stephen R C; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; Murdoch, David R; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Amornintapichet, Tussanee; Awori, Juliet O; Chuananon, Somchai; Driscoll, Amanda J; Ebruke, Bernard E; Hossain, Lokman; Jahan, Yasmin; Kagucia, E Wangeci; Kazungu, Sidi; Moore, David P; Mudau, Azwifarwi; Mwananyanda, Lawrence; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Seidenberg, Phil; Sylla, Mamadou; Tapia, Milagritos D; Zaman, Syed M A; O'Brien, Katherine L

    2017-06-15

    Induced sputum (IS) may provide diagnostic information about the etiology of pneumonia. The safety of this procedure across a heterogeneous population with severe pneumonia in low- and middle-income countries has not been described. IS specimens were obtained as part a 7-country study of the etiology of severe and very severe pneumonia in hospitalized children <5 years of age. Rigorous clinical monitoring was done before, during, and after the procedure to record oxygen requirement, oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, consciousness level, and other evidence of clinical deterioration. Criteria for IS contraindications were predefined and serious adverse events (SAEs) were reported to ethics committees and a central safety monitor. A total of 4653 IS procedures were done among 3802 children. Thirteen SAEs were reported in relation to collection of IS, or 0.34% of children with at least 1 IS specimen collected (95% confidence interval, 0.15%-0.53%). A drop in oxygen saturation that required supplemental oxygen was the most common SAE. One child died after feeding was reinitiated 2 hours after undergoing sputum induction; this death was categorized as "possibly related" to the procedure. The overall frequency of SAEs was very low, and the nature of most SAEs was manageable, demonstrating a low-risk safety profile for IS collection even among severely ill children in low-income-country settings. Healthcare providers should monitor oxygen saturation and requirements during and after IS collection, and assess patients prior to reinitiating feeding after the IS procedure, to ensure patient safety.

  3. Safety of Induced Sputum Collection in Children Hospitalized With Severe or Very Severe Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    DeLuca, Andrea N.; Hammitt, Laura L.; Kim, Julia; Higdon, Melissa M.; Baggett, Henry C.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Kotloff, Karen L.; Levine, Orin S.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Murdoch, David R.; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Thea, Donald M.; Amornintapichet, Tussanee; Awori, Juliet O.; Chuananon, Somchai; Driscoll, Amanda J.; Ebruke, Bernard E.; Hossain, Lokman; Jahan, Yasmin; Kagucia, E. Wangeci; Kazungu, Sidi; Moore, David P.; Mudau, Azwifarwi; Mwananyanda, Lawrence; Park, Daniel E.; Prosperi, Christine; Seidenberg, Phil; Sylla, Mamadou; Tapia, Milagritos D.; Zaman, Syed M. A.; O’Brien, Katherine L.; Levine, Orin S.; Knoll, Maria Deloria; Feikin, Daniel R.; DeLuca, Andrea N.; Driscoll, Amanda J.; Fancourt, Nicholas; Fu, Wei; Hammitt, Laura L.; Higdon, Melissa M.; Kagucia, E. Wangeci; Karron, Ruth A.; Li, Mengying; Park, Daniel E.; Prosperi, Christine; Wu, Zhenke; Zeger, Scott L.; Watson, Nora L.; Crawley, Jane; Murdoch, David R.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Endtz, Hubert P.; Zaman, Khalequ; Goswami, Doli; Hossain, Lokman; Jahan, Yasmin; Ashraf, Hasan; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Ebruke, Bernard E.; Antonio, Martin; McLellan, Jessica; Machuka, Eunice; Shamsul, Arifin; Zaman, Syed M.A.; Mackenzie, Grant; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Awori, Juliet O.; Morpeth, Susan C.; Kamau, Alice; Kazungu, Sidi; Silaba, Micah; Kotloff, Karen L.; Tapia, Milagritos D.; Sow, Samba O.; Sylla, Mamadou; Tamboura, Boubou; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Kourouma, Nana; Toure, Aliou; Madhi, Shabir A.; Moore, David P.; Adrian, Peter V.; Baillie, Vicky L.; Kuwanda, Locadiah; Mudau, Azwifarwi; Groome, Michelle J.; Mahomed, Nasreen; Baggett, Henry C.; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Maloney, Susan A.; Bunthi, Charatdao; Rhodes, Julia; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Akarasewi, Pasakorn; Thea, Donald M.; Mwananyanda, Lawrence; Chipeta, James; Seidenberg, Phil; Mwansa, James; wa Somwe, Somwe; Kwenda, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Induced sputum (IS) may provide diagnostic information about the etiology of pneumonia. The safety of this procedure across a heterogeneous population with severe pneumonia in low- and middle-income countries has not been described. Methods. IS specimens were obtained as part a 7-country study of the etiology of severe and very severe pneumonia in hospitalized children <5 years of age. Rigorous clinical monitoring was done before, during, and after the procedure to record oxygen requirement, oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, consciousness level, and other evidence of clinical deterioration. Criteria for IS contraindications were predefined and serious adverse events (SAEs) were reported to ethics committees and a central safety monitor. Results. A total of 4653 IS procedures were done among 3802 children. Thirteen SAEs were reported in relation to collection of IS, or 0.34% of children with at least 1 IS specimen collected (95% confidence interval, 0.15%–0.53%). A drop in oxygen saturation that required supplemental oxygen was the most common SAE. One child died after feeding was reinitiated 2 hours after undergoing sputum induction; this death was categorized as “possibly related” to the procedure. Conclusions. The overall frequency of SAEs was very low, and the nature of most SAEs was manageable, demonstrating a low-risk safety profile for IS collection even among severely ill children in low-income-country settings. Healthcare providers should monitor oxygen saturation and requirements during and after IS collection, and assess patients prior to reinitiating feeding after the IS procedure, to ensure patient safety. PMID:28575356

  4. A severe Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia inducing an acute antibody-mediated pulmonary graft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Démir, Sarah; Saison, Julien; Sénéchal, Agathe; Mornex, Jean-Francois

    2017-01-01

    A 40-year-old cystic fibrosis woman with a history of double-lung transplantation 2 years previously was admitted for a progressive respiratory distress. Physical examination revealed fever (39°C) and diffuse bilateral lung crackles. Laboratory findings included severe hypoxemia and inflammatory syndrome. Bronchoalveolar lavage and serological test were positive for mycoplasma pneumonia. As the patient did not improve after 3 days of antibiotics and donor-specific HLA antibodies had been detected, an acute antibody-mediated graft rejection was treated with high-dose corticosteroids, plasma exchange, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab. The patient rapidly improved. Unfortunately, 6 months after this episode, she developed a bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome with a dependence to noninvasive ventilator leading to the indication of retransplantation. This case illustrates the possible relationship between infection and humoral rejection. These two diagnoses should be promptly investigated and systematically treated in lung transplant recipients. PMID:28144069

  5. Toll-like receptor 4 agonistic antibody promotes innate immunity against severe pneumonia induced by coinfection with influenza virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akitaka; Nakamura, Shigeki; Seki, Masafumi; Fukudome, Kenji; Iwanaga, Naoki; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-07-01

    Coinfection with bacteria is a major cause of mortality during influenza epidemics. Recently, Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists were shown to have immunomodulatory functions. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness and mechanisms of the new TLR4 agonistic monoclonal antibody UT12 against secondary pneumococcal pneumonia induced by coinfection with influenza virus in a mouse model. Mice were intranasally inoculated with Streptococcus pneumoniae 2 days after influenza virus inoculation. UT12 was intraperitoneally administered 2 h before each inoculation. Survival rates were significantly increased and body weight loss was significantly decreased by UT12 administration. Additionally, the production of inflammatory mediators was significantly suppressed by the administration of UT12. In a histopathological study, pneumonia in UT12-treated mice was very mild compared to that in control mice. UT12 increased antimicrobial defense through the acceleration of macrophage recruitment into the lower respiratory tract induced by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) pathway-dependent monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) production. Collectively, these findings indicate that UT12 promoted pulmonary innate immunity and may reduce the severity of severe pneumonia induced by coinfection with influenza virus and S. pneumoniae. This immunomodulatory effect of UT12 improves the prognosis of secondary pneumococcal pneumonia and makes UT12 an attractive candidate for treating severe infectious diseases.

  6. Prevotella intermedia induces severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in mice with upregulated platelet-activating factor receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Nakamura, Shigeki; Harada, Tatsuhiko; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of respiratory infection worldwide. Although oral hygiene has been considered a risk factor for developing pneumonia, the relationship between oral bacteria and pneumococcal infection is unknown. In this study, we examined the synergic effects of Prevotella intermedia, a major periodontopathic bacterium, on pneumococcal pneumonia. The synergic effects of the supernatant of P. intermedia (PiSup) on pneumococcal pneumonia were investigated in mice, and the stimulation of pneumococcal adhesion to human alveolar (A549) cells by PiSup was assessed. The effects of PiSup on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) transcript levels in vitro and in vivo were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, and the differences between the effects of pneumococcal infection induced by various periodontopathic bacterial species were verified in mice. Mice inoculated with S. pneumoniae plus PiSup exhibited a significantly lower survival rate, higher bacterial loads in the lungs, spleen, and blood, and higher inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) than those infected without PiSup. In A549 cells, PiSup increased pneumococcal adhesion and PAFR transcript levels. PiSup also increased lung PAFR transcript levels in mice. Similar effects were not observed in the supernatants of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Fusobacterium nucleatum. Thus, P. intermedia has the potential to induce severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia with enhanced pneumococcal adhesion to lower airway cells.

  7. Prevotella intermedia Induces Severe Bacteremic Pneumococcal Pneumonia in Mice with Upregulated Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Nakamura, Shigeki; Harada, Tatsuhiko; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of respiratory infection worldwide. Although oral hygiene has been considered a risk factor for developing pneumonia, the relationship between oral bacteria and pneumococcal infection is unknown. In this study, we examined the synergic effects of Prevotella intermedia, a major periodontopathic bacterium, on pneumococcal pneumonia. The synergic effects of the supernatant of P. intermedia (PiSup) on pneumococcal pneumonia were investigated in mice, and the stimulation of pneumococcal adhesion to human alveolar (A549) cells by PiSup was assessed. The effects of PiSup on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) transcript levels in vitro and in vivo were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, and the differences between the effects of pneumococcal infection induced by various periodontopathic bacterial species were verified in mice. Mice inoculated with S. pneumoniae plus PiSup exhibited a significantly lower survival rate, higher bacterial loads in the lungs, spleen, and blood, and higher inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) than those infected without PiSup. In A549 cells, PiSup increased pneumococcal adhesion and PAFR transcript levels. PiSup also increased lung PAFR transcript levels in mice. Similar effects were not observed in the supernatants of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Fusobacterium nucleatum. Thus, P. intermedia has the potential to induce severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia with enhanced pneumococcal adhesion to lower airway cells. PMID:24478074

  8. Clinical Features of Severe or Fatal Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Izumikawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children and young adults. The incidence of fulminant M. pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP) is relatively rare despite the high prevalence of M. pneumoniae infection. This literature review highlights the clinical features of fulminant MPP by examining the most recent data in epidemiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, and treatment. Fulminant MPP accounts for 0.5–2% of all MPP cases and primarily affects young adults with no underlying disease. Key clinical findings include a cough, fever, and dyspnea along with diffuse abnormal findings in radiological examinations. Levels of inflammatory markers such as white blood cells and C-reactive protein are elevated, as well as levels of lactate dehydrogenase, IL-18, aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase. The exact pathogenesis of fulminant MPP remains unclear, but theories include a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to M. pneumoniae and the contribution of delayed antibiotic administration to disease progression. Treatment options involve pairing the appropriate anti-mycoplasma agent with a corticosteroid that will downregulate the hypersensitivity response, and mortality rates are quite low in this treatment group. Further research is necessary to determine the exact pathogenesis of severe and fulminant types of MPP. PMID:27313568

  9. Burden of Severe Pneumonia, Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pneumonia Deaths in Indian States: Modelling Based Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Habib; Jit, Mark; Heymann, David L.; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The burden of severe pneumonia in terms of morbidity and mortality is unknown in India especially at sub-national level. In this context, we aimed to estimate the number of severe pneumonia episodes, pneumococcal pneumonia episodes and pneumonia deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2010. We adapted and parameterized a mathematical model based on the epidemiological concept of potential impact fraction developed CHERG for this analysis. The key parameters that determine the distribution of severe pneumonia episode across Indian states were state-specific under-5 population, state-specific prevalence of selected definite pneumonia risk factors and meta-estimates of relative risks for each of these risk factors. We applied the incidence estimates and attributable fraction of risk factors to population estimates for 2010 of each Indian state. We then estimated the number of pneumococcal pneumonia cases by applying the vaccine probe methodology to an existing trial. We estimated mortality due to severe pneumonia and pneumococcal pneumonia by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from multi-centric hospital-based studies. Our results suggest that in 2010, 3.6 million (3.3–3.9 million) episodes of severe pneumonia and 0.35 million (0.31–0.40 million) all cause pneumonia deaths occurred in children younger than 5 years in India. The states that merit special mention include Uttar Pradesh where 18.1% children reside but contribute 24% of pneumonia cases and 26% pneumonia deaths, Bihar (11.3% children, 16% cases, 22% deaths) Madhya Pradesh (6.6% children, 9% cases, 12% deaths), and Rajasthan (6.6% children, 8% cases, 11% deaths). Further, we estimated that 0.56 million (0.49–0.64 million) severe episodes of pneumococcal pneumonia and 105 thousand (92–119 thousand) pneumococcal deaths occurred in India. The top contributors to India’s pneumococcal pneumonia burden were Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan in that order. Our

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia induce distinct host responses.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Kevin W; McDunn, Jonathan E; Clark, Andrew T; Dunne, W Michael; Dixon, David J; Turnbull, Isaiah R; Dipasco, Peter J; Osberghaus, William F; Sherman, Benjamin; Martin, James R; Walter, Michael J; Cobb, J Perren; Buchman, Timothy G; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2010-01-01

    Pathogens that cause pneumonia may be treated in a targeted fashion by antibiotics, but if this therapy fails, then treatment involves only nonspecific supportive measures, independent of the inciting infection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether host response is similar after disparate infections with similar mortalities. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Animal laboratory in a university medical center. Pneumonia was induced in FVB/N mice by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or two different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from septic animals was assayed by a microarray immunoassay measuring 18 inflammatory mediators at multiple time points. The host response was dependent on the causative organism as well as kinetics of mortality, but the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses were independent of inoculum concentration or degree of bacteremia. Pneumonia caused by different concentrations of the same bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also yielded distinct inflammatory responses; however, inflammatory mediator expression did not directly track the severity of infection. For all infections, the host response was compartmentalized, with markedly different concentrations of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation and the lungs. Hierarchical clustering analysis resulted in the identification of five distinct clusters of the host response to bacterial infection. Principal components analysis correlated pulmonary macrophage inflammatory peptide-2 and interleukin-10 with progression of infection, whereas elevated plasma tumor necrosis factor sr2 and macrophage chemotactic peptide-1 were indicative of fulminant disease with >90% mortality within 48 hrs. Septic mice have distinct local and systemic responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Targeting specific host inflammatory responses induced by distinct bacterial infections could represent a

  11. Epidemiology of severe pneumonia caused by Legionella longbeachae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Chlamydia pneumoniae: 1-year, population-based surveillance for severe pneumonia in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Phares, Christina R; Wangroongsarb, Piyada; Chantra, Somrak; Paveenkitiporn, Wantana; Tondella, Maria-Lucia; Benson, Robert F; Thacker, W Lanier; Fields, Barry S; Moore, Matthew R; Fischer, Julie; Dowell, Scott F; Olsen, Sonja J

    2007-12-15

    Legionella species, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Chlamydia pneumoniae are recognized as important causes of pneumonia in high-income countries, but their significance in middle-income countries, such as Thailand, is unknown. Population-based surveillance identified inpatient 3489 cases of clinically-defined pneumonia in a rural Thai province for 1 year. Patients who had a chest radiograph performed (for 2059 cases of pneumonia) were enrolled in an etiology study (which included 755 cases of pneumonia among 738 patients). Paired serum, nasopharyngeal swab, and urine specimens were obtained for diagnostic immunologic and molecular tests. Patients aged <18 years were not systematically tested for Legionella species. We report a lower limit of incidence (observed incidence) and an upper limit extrapolated to persons not tested or not enrolled in the study. The incidence of pneumonia due to Legionella longbeachae requiring hospitalization was 5-29 cases per 100,000 population. No case of Legionella pneumophila pneumonia was observed. The definite C. pneumoniae pneumonia incidence was 3-23 cases per 100,000 population; rates were highest among patients aged <1 year (18-166 cases per 100,000 population) and those aged >or=70 years (23-201 cases per 100,000 population). M. pneumoniae pneumonia had a similar age distribution, with an overall incidence of 6-44 cases per 100,000 population. These pathogens were associated with 15% of all cases of pneumonia. A nonsignificantly higher proportion of patients with pneumonia associated with L. longbeachae, compared with patients with pneumonia associated with M. pneumoniae or C. pneumoniae, required supplemental oxygen or mechanical ventilation (45% vs. 18%; P<.1). Among patients with atypical pneumonia, only 15% received antibiotics with activity against the associated pathogen. M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, and L. longbeachae, but not L. pneumophila, are frequently associated with severe pneumonia in rural Thailand. Few patients

  12. Etiology of severe pneumonia in Ecuadorian children

    PubMed Central

    Jonnalagadda, Sivani; Rodríguez, Oswaldo; Estrella, Bertha; Sabin, Lora L.; Sempértegui, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Background In Latin America, community-acquired pneumonia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children. Few studies have examined the etiology of pneumonia in Ecuador. Methods This observational study was part of a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted among children aged 2–59 months with severe pneumonia in Quito, Ecuador. Nasopharyngeal and blood samples were tested for bacterial and viral etiology by polymerase chain reaction. Risk factors for specific respiratory pathogens were also evaluated. Results Among 406 children tested, 159 (39.2%) had respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), 71 (17.5%) had human metapneumovirus (hMPV), and 62 (15.3%) had adenovirus. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified in 37 (9.2%) samples and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in three (0.74%) samples. The yearly circulation pattern of RSV (P = 0.0003) overlapped with S. pneumoniae, (P = 0.03) with most cases occurring in the rainy season. In multivariable analysis, risk factors for RSV included younger age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.9, P = 0.01) and being underweight (aOR = 1.8, P = 0.04). Maternal education (aOR = 0.82, P = 0.003), pulse oximetry (aOR = 0.93, P = 0.005), and rales (aOR = 0.25, P = 0.007) were associated with influenza A. Younger age (aOR = 3.5, P = 0.007) and elevated baseline respiratory rate were associated with HPIV-3 infection (aOR = 0.94, P = 0.03). Conclusion These results indicate the importance of RSV and influenza, and potentially modifiable risk factors including undernutrition and future use of a RSV vaccine, when an effective vaccine becomes available. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00513929 PMID:28182741

  13. Etiology of severe pneumonia in Ecuadorian children.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, Sivani; Rodríguez, Oswaldo; Estrella, Bertha; Sabin, Lora L; Sempértegui, Fernando; Hamer, Davidson H

    2017-01-01

    In Latin America, community-acquired pneumonia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children. Few studies have examined the etiology of pneumonia in Ecuador. This observational study was part of a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted among children aged 2-59 months with severe pneumonia in Quito, Ecuador. Nasopharyngeal and blood samples were tested for bacterial and viral etiology by polymerase chain reaction. Risk factors for specific respiratory pathogens were also evaluated. Among 406 children tested, 159 (39.2%) had respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), 71 (17.5%) had human metapneumovirus (hMPV), and 62 (15.3%) had adenovirus. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified in 37 (9.2%) samples and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in three (0.74%) samples. The yearly circulation pattern of RSV (P = 0.0003) overlapped with S. pneumoniae, (P = 0.03) with most cases occurring in the rainy season. In multivariable analysis, risk factors for RSV included younger age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.9, P = 0.01) and being underweight (aOR = 1.8, P = 0.04). Maternal education (aOR = 0.82, P = 0.003), pulse oximetry (aOR = 0.93, P = 0.005), and rales (aOR = 0.25, P = 0.007) were associated with influenza A. Younger age (aOR = 3.5, P = 0.007) and elevated baseline respiratory rate were associated with HPIV-3 infection (aOR = 0.94, P = 0.03). These results indicate the importance of RSV and influenza, and potentially modifiable risk factors including undernutrition and future use of a RSV vaccine, when an effective vaccine becomes available. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00513929.

  14. 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene is associated with multiple organ dysfunction and septic shock in pneumonia induced severe sepsis: prospective, observational, genetic study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Activation of inflammation and coagulation are closely related and mutually interdependent in sepsis. The acute-phase protein, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a key element in the inhibition of fibrinolysis. Elevated levels of PAI-1 have been related to worse outcome in pneumonia. We aimed to evaluate the effect of functionally relevant 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene in pneumonia induced sepsis. Methods We enrolled 208 Caucasian patients with severe sepsis due to pneumonia admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Patients were followed up until ICU discharge or death. Clinical data were collected prospectively and the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Patients were stratified according to the occurrence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, septic shock or death. Results We found that carriers of the PAI-1 4G/4G and 4G/5G genotypes have a 2.74-fold higher risk for multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (odds ratio [OR] 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.335 - 5.604; p = 0.006) and a 2.57-fold higher risk for septic shock (OR 95%CI = 1.180 - 5.615; p = 0.018) than 5G/5G carriers. The multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for independent predictors, such as age, nosocomial pneumonia and positive microbiological culture also supported that carriers of the 4G allele have a higher prevalence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.957; 95%CI = 1.306 -6.698; p = 0.009) and septic shock (aOR = 2.603; 95%CI = 1.137 - 5.959; p = 0.024). However, genotype and allele analyses have not shown any significant difference regarding mortality in models non-adjusted or adjusted for acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II. Patients bearing the 4G allele had higher disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) score at admission (p = 0.007) than 5G/5G carriers. Moreover, in 4G allele carriers the length of ICU stay

  15. 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene is associated with multiple organ dysfunction and septic shock in pneumonia induced severe sepsis: prospective, observational, genetic study.

    PubMed

    Madách, Krisztina; Aladzsity, István; Szilágyi, Agnes; Fust, George; Gál, János; Pénzes, István; Prohászka, Zoltán

    2010-01-01

    Activation of inflammation and coagulation are closely related and mutually interdependent in sepsis. The acute-phase protein, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a key element in the inhibition of fibrinolysis. Elevated levels of PAI-1 have been related to worse outcome in pneumonia. We aimed to evaluate the effect of functionally relevant 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene in pneumonia induced sepsis. We enrolled 208 Caucasian patients with severe sepsis due to pneumonia admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Patients were followed up until ICU discharge or death. Clinical data were collected prospectively and the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Patients were stratified according to the occurrence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, septic shock or death. We found that carriers of the PAI-1 4G/4G and 4G/5G genotypes have a 2.74-fold higher risk for multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (odds ratio [OR] 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.335 - 5.604; p = 0.006) and a 2.57-fold higher risk for septic shock (OR 95%CI = 1.180 - 5.615; p = 0.018) than 5G/5G carriers. The multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for independent predictors, such as age, nosocomial pneumonia and positive microbiological culture also supported that carriers of the 4G allele have a higher prevalence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.957; 95%CI = 1.306 -6.698; p = 0.009) and septic shock (aOR = 2.603; 95%CI = 1.137 - 5.959; p = 0.024). However, genotype and allele analyses have not shown any significant difference regarding mortality in models non-adjusted or adjusted for acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II. Patients bearing the 4G allele had higher disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) score at admission (p = 0.007) than 5G/5G carriers. Moreover, in 4G allele carriers the length of ICU stay of non-survivors was longer

  16. Osteopontin promotes host defense during Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van der Windt, G J W; Hoogerwerf, J J; de Vos, A F; Florquin, S; van der Poll, T

    2010-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of nosocomial pneumonia. Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein involved in inflammatory processes, some of which is mediated by CD44. The aim of this study was to determine the role of OPN during K. pneumoniae-induced pneumonia. Wild-type (WT) and OPN knockout (KO) mice were intranasally infected with 10⁴ colony forming units of K. pneumoniae, or administered Klebsiella lipopolysaccharides (LPS). In addition, recombinant OPN (rOPN) was intranasally administered to WT and CD44 KO mice. During Klebsiella pneumonia, WT mice displayed elevated pulmonary and plasma OPN levels. OPN KO and WT mice showed similar pulmonary bacterial loads 6 h after infection; thereafter, Klebsiella loads were higher in lungs of OPN KO mice and the mortality rate in this group was higher than in WT mice. Early neutrophil recruitment into the bronchoalveolar space was impaired in the absence of OPN after intrapulmonary delivery of either Klebsiella bacteria or Klebsiella LPS. Moreover, rOPN induced neutrophil migration into the bronchoalveolar space, independent from CD44. In vitro, OPN did not affect K. pneumoniae growth or neutrophil function. In conclusion, OPN levels were rapidly increased in the bronchoalveolar space during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, where OPN serves a chemotactic function towards neutrophils, thereby facilitating an effective innate immune response.

  17. Levetiracetam-induced eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Aisling; Fuld, Jonathan; Soon, Elaine

    2017-03-08

    Levetiracetam is widely regarded as a benign antiepileptic drug, compared to older antiepileptic medication. We report a case of eosinophilic pneumonia due to levetiracetam use in a non-smoking woman aged 59 years with no previous respiratory history. Our patient presented with exertional breathlessness and marked desaturation on exertion. She displayed 'reverse bat-wing' infiltrates on her chest radiograph and peripheral eosinophilia on a complete blood count. Her symptoms, radiology and peripheral eosinophilia resolved completely with cessation of levetiracetam and a course of prednisolone. This is the first report of isolated eosinophilic pneumonia due to levetiracetam. Other reports of levetiracetam-induced eosinophilia describe drug rash, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS syndrome). Detection of pulmonary drug reactions requires a careful drug history and high index of suspicion. Identifying and reporting a causative agent is crucially important, as cessation of the drug is essential for resolution of the syndrome.

  18. Chlamydia pneumoniae and severity of asthma.

    PubMed

    Von, Hertzen Leena; Vasankari, Tuula; Liippo, Kari; Wahlström, Eva; Puolakkainen, Mirja

    2002-01-01

    A substantial increase in the prevalence of asthma in the Western world during the last few decades has led to a continuous search for novel factors that might be involved in the development of the disease. We carried out a study to clarify whether there is a relationship between severity of asthma and Chlamydia pneumoniae-specific titres at the group level and whether antibodies to the 60 kDa chlamydial heat shock protein (chsp60) are associated with asthma. A total of 116 (31 men, 85 women) consecutive asthma patients from a chest clinic were recruited and divided into 3 groups according to the severity of the disease: there were 13 asthmatics with severe, 54 with moderate and 49 with mild asthma. In addition, 50 (31 men, 19 women) consecutive blood donors were enrolled to serve as a control group. Sera for the measurements of specific IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies using a microimmunofluorescence test and of chsp60 using an enzyme immunoassay were obtained upon enrolment and also 3-4 months later from the asthma patients. Severe and moderate asthma were found to be strongly associated with elevated IgA antibody levels to C. pneumoniae [odds ratio (OR) 5.58, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.31-23.72 for severe and OR 5.65, 95% CI 2.05-15.53 for moderate asthma] in a logistic regression model. Furthermore, in women, the occurrence of elevated IgA antibody levels and the age-adjusted geometric mean titres of IgA antibodies were significantly higher among the asthmatics than the controls (p = 0.003 and 0.04, respectively). Antibodies to chsp60 occurred more frequently and in higher concentrations among the asthmatics than the controls, although the differences did not reach significance. In conclusion, severe and moderate asthma were significantly associated with elevated IgA antibody levels to C. pneumoniae suggestive of chronic infection. Antibodies to chsp60 did not prove to be a useful marker of such an infection among the asthmatics studied here.

  19. Severe hypoxaemia due to methaemoglobinaemia and aspiration pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Tomonori; Hojo, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a previously healthy 40-year-old man who was admitted to the emergency department due to severe hypoxaemia after emesis. He vomited after a cup of coffee with the milk at his office. On admission, he showed cyanosis and oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry was extremely low (86%) in spite of the administration of 10 litres of oxygen. The authors suspected pneumonia, but oxygen saturation was disproportionately low to pneumonia severity. Oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry was significantly different from oxygen saturation calculated from arterial blood gas analysis, suggesting the existence of haemoglobin abnormality. The level of methaemoglobin was 9.3% (reference range, 1–2%). The patient was treated by antibiotics for pneumonia, and his methaemoglobinaemia was spontaneously ameliorated. The authors later found that the patient drank bleach containing hypochlorous acid instead of milk by mistake. To conclude, the patient’s hypoxaemia was due to pneumonia and drug-induced acquired methaemoglobinaemia. PMID:22679183

  20. Barium sulfate aspiration: Severe chemical pneumonia induced by a massive reflux of contrast medium during small bowel barium enema.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Ji; Zhou, Xiaowei; Dong, Hongmei; Zhou, Yiwu

    2015-08-01

    Barium contrast radiography is a conventional procedure aimed at revealing lesions of the alimentary tract using barium sulfate on X-ray irradiation. Although it is widely used in clinics, adverse effects and complications are observed, such as anaphylaxis, granuloma, fecalithes, abdomen-leaking, embolism, bacterial contamination, and aspiration. We report a case of death due to a massive barium sulfate aspiration resulted from an air-barium double contrast enema radiography. A 25-year-old female patient was hospitalized with symptoms of abdominal distention, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea for three days. A progressive respiratory distress presented only 1h after a small bowel air-barium double contrast enema. The patient died 11h later. The result of autopsy revealed the cause of death to be severe chemical pneumonitis induced by gastric fluid which was aspirated into her lungs. Barium sulfate is generally recognized to be chemically inert for the respiratory system, but a mixture of barium sulfate with gastric contents is fatal. Here we intend to suggest that, when determining the potential cause of death, medical examiners should consider a patient's status quo as well as the possible adverse effects and complications caused by the barium sulfate preparation during gastrointestinal radiography.

  1. Severe Pneumococcal Pneumonia Causes Acute Cardiac Toxicity and Subsequent Cardiac Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Luis F; Restrepo, Marcos I; Hinojosa, Cecilia A; Soni, Nilam J; Anzueto, Antonio; Babu, Bettina L; Gonzalez-Juarbe, Norberto; Rodriguez, Alejandro H; Jimenez, Alejandro; Chalmers, James D; Aliberti, Stefano; Sibila, Oriol; Winter, Vicki T; Coalson, Jacqueline J; Giavedoni, Luis D; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Waterer, Grant W; Witzenrath, Martin; Suttorp, Norbert; Dube, Peter H; Orihuela, Carlos J

    2017-09-01

    Up to one-third of patients hospitalized with pneumococcal pneumonia experience major adverse cardiac events (MACE) during or after pneumonia. In mice, Streptococcus pneumoniae can invade the myocardium, induce cardiomyocyte death, and disrupt cardiac function following bacteremia, but it is unknown whether the same occurs in humans with severe pneumonia. We sought to determine whether S. pneumoniae can (1) translocate the heart, (2) induce cardiomyocyte death, (3) cause MACE, and (4) induce cardiac scar formation after antibiotic treatment during severe pneumonia using a nonhuman primate (NHP) model. We examined cardiac tissue from six adult NHPs with severe pneumococcal pneumonia and three uninfected control animals. Three animals were rescued with antibiotics (convalescent animals). Electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, and serum biomarkers of cardiac damage were measured (troponin T, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, and heart-type fatty acid binding protein). Histological examination included hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry, picrosirius red staining, and transmission electron microscopy. Immunoblots were used to assess the underlying mechanisms. Nonspecific ischemic alterations were detected by electrocardiography and echocardiography. Serum levels of troponin T and heart-type fatty acid binding protein were increased (P < 0.05) after pneumococcal infection in both acutely ill and convalescent NHPs. S. pneumoniae was detected in the myocardium of all NHPs with acute severe pneumonia. Necroptosis and apoptosis were detected in the myocardium of both acutely ill and convalescent NHPs. Evidence of cardiac scar formation was observed only in convalescent animals by transmission electron microscopy and picrosirius red staining. S. pneumoniae invades the myocardium and induces cardiac injury with necroptosis and apoptosis, followed by cardiac scarring after antibiotic therapy, in an NHP model of severe

  2. Sporadic, severe bronchointerstitial pneumonia of foals

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, John F.; Wilcock, Brian P.; Carman, P. Suzanne; Hoffman, Andrew M.

    1991-01-01

    Bronchointerstitial pneumonia was diagnosed postmortem in 19 foals in a 10 year retrospective study of submissions to a diagnostic center in Ontario. Mean age at death was 2.0 ± 0.05 (SEM) mo (range five days to four months). Fourteen of 19 were aged from 1.5 to 2.5 mo. Clinically, the disease was generally characterized by sudden onset of fever and increasingly severe dyspnea which developed into respiratory distress before death. Mean length of illness was 7.0 ± 0.33 days (range 1-21 days). The disease appeared to affect only individual foals on 19 different farms. At postmortem, lungs were typically diffusely red, wet, firm, and failed to collapse. The major lesion recognized histologically was epithelial necrosis of alveoli and terminal bronchioles. Alveolar lumens contained large epithelioid cells, which were probably macrophages, and multinucleated syncytial cells were present in 16 of the 19 lungs. Inflammatory cells were sparse. Intraalveolar fibrin was prominent in all lungs. Bacteriological examination revealed no significant pathogen in 12 animals, but Rhodococcus equi was isolated from seven foals, associated in two animals with extensive abscesses. Viruses were not recovered from eight foals examined. On the basis of the similarity and severity of lesions, the sporadic nature of the disease, and the similar age at onset which appears to coincide with declining maternally-derived immunoglobulins, we speculate that this disease may be the result of a viral infection. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:17423819

  3. [Mycoplasma Pneumoniae-Induced Meningoencephalitis].

    PubMed

    Özel, C; Dafotakis, M; Nikoubashman, O; Litmathe, J; Matz, O; Schöne, U

    2015-07-01

    In clinical practice, secondary infections of the central nervous system (CNS) represent rare yet severe complications of their respective primary infections. In this case report, we describe a 22-year-old patient with a medical history of Asthma bronchiale, who developed significant neurological deficits after a respiratory infection. The neurological symptoms progressed despite antibiotic therapy with vancomycin, ampicillin and ceftriaxone. The patient's cerebrospinal fluid and a cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) furnished evidence of acute meningoencephalitis. Microbiological assessment confirmed an acute mycoplasma pneumonia infection. Changing the patient's antibiotic regimen to minocycline and prednisolone led to significant clinical improvement. Pathomechanisms and therapeutic options to treat meningoencephalitis will be discussed in the following. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. A Non-Human Primate Model of Severe Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Luis F.; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Hinojosa, Cecilia A.; Soni, Nilam J.; Shenoy, Anukul T.; Gilley, Ryan P.; Gonzalez-Juarbe, Norberto; Noda, Julio R.; Winter, Vicki T.; de la Garza, Melissa A.; Shade, Robert E.; Coalson, Jacqueline J.; Giavedoni, Luis D.; Anzueto, Antonio; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia and infectious death in adults worldwide. A non-human primate model is needed to study the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of severe pneumonia, identify diagnostic tools, explore potential therapeutic targets, and test clinical interventions during pneumococcal pneumonia. Objective To develop a non-human primate model of pneumococcal pneumonia. Methods Seven adult baboons (Papio cynocephalus) were surgically tethered to a continuous monitoring system that recorded heart rate, temperature, and electrocardiography. Animals were inoculated with 109 colony-forming units of S. pneumoniae using bronchoscopy. Three baboons were rescued with intravenous ampicillin therapy. Pneumonia was diagnosed using lung ultrasonography and ex vivo confirmation by histopathology and immunodetection of pneumococcal capsule. Organ failure, using serum biomarkers and quantification of bacteremia, was assessed daily. Results Challenged animals developed signs and symptoms of pneumonia 4 days after infection. Infection was characterized by the presence of cough, tachypnea, dyspnea, tachycardia and fever. All animals developed leukocytosis and bacteremia 24 hours after infection. A severe inflammatory reaction was detected by elevation of serum cytokines, including Interleukin (IL)1Ra, IL-6, and IL-8, after infection. Lung ultrasonography precisely detected the lobes with pneumonia that were later confirmed by pathological analysis. Lung pathology positively correlated with disease severity. Antimicrobial therapy rapidly reversed symptomology and reduced serum cytokines. Conclusions We have developed a novel animal model for severe pneumococcal pneumonia that mimics the clinical presentation, inflammatory response, and infection kinetics seen in humans. This is a novel model to test vaccines and treatments, measure biomarkers to diagnose pneumonia, and predict outcomes. PMID:27855182

  5. Lactobacillus pentosus strain b240 suppresses pneumonia induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae in mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, A; Seki, M; Yamahira, S; Noguchi, H; Kosai, K; Toba, M; Morinaga, Y; Miyazaki, T; Izumikawa, K; Kakeya, H; Yamamoto, Y; Yanagihara, K; Tashiro, T; Kohda, N; Kohno, S

    2011-07-01

    Oral administration of probiotics has been known to improve inflammatory responses against infectious diseases. Here, we describe the inhibitory effect of oral intake of heat-killed Lactobacillus pentosus strain b240 (b240) on pneumococcal pneumonia in a murine experimental model.  The mice treated with oral b240 for 21 days before Streptococcus pneumoniae infection exhibited prolonged survival time and less body weight loss, compared with saline-treated control mice. Mild pneumonia with significantly reduced secretion of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines according to related mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling molecules (phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase) was found in b240-treated mice, whereas severe pneumonia with hypercytokinemia was evident in control mice. Prominent reduction in the number of pneumococci and elevated expression of Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 in the lung tissues was concomitantly noted in b240-treated mice. These findings indicate that b240 has inhibitory effects on pneumococcal pneumonia induced by Strep. pneumoniae infection and improves inflammatory tissue responses, resulting in reduced damages to the respiratory tissues. These results demonstrate that oral administration of b240 might protect host animals from Strep. pneumoniae infection by augmentation of innate immune response. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Effect of zinc supplementation on infants with severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao; Qian, Su-Yun; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Zhe-Zhe

    2016-05-01

    Pneumonia is a common respiratory infectious disease in infancy. Previous work shows controversial results on the benefit of zinc supplementation in patients with pneumonia. We conducted this study to investigate serum zinc status amongst infants with severe pneumonia and the clinical impact that zinc supplementation has on those patients with low serum zinc levels. This study design was a non-blinded prospective randomized controlled trial. The study is approved by the Ethics Committees of Beijing Children's Hospital. A total of 96 infants diagnosed with severe pneumonia and hospitalized in the pediatric intensive care unit between November 2011 and January 2012 were enrolled. Enrolled patients were divided into low serum zinc and normal serum zinc group. The low serum zinc group was randomized into treatment and control groups. Only the treatment group received zinc supplementation within 48-72 hours after hospitalization. The prevalence of zinc deficiency on admission was 76.0%. The low zinc level was most apparent in infants between 1 and 3 months of age. The serum zinc level increased in the zinc treatment group and returned to a normal level (median, 53.20 μmol/L) on day 12±2. There was no statistical difference in the pediatric critic illness score, lung injury score, length of hospital stay, and duration of mechanical ventilation between the zinc treatment group and control group. Zinc deficiency is common in infants with severe pneumonia. Normalization of zinc levels with zinc supplementation did not improve clinical outcomes of infants with pneumonia.

  7. Nebulized C1-Esterase Inhibitor does not Reduce Pulmonary Complement Activation in Rats with Severe Streptococcus Pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Friso; Lagrand, Wim; Glas, Gerie J; Beurskens, Charlotte J P; van Mierlo, Gerard; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Juffermans, Nicole P; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J

    2016-12-01

    Complement activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. We hypothesized that inhibition of the complement system in the lungs by repeated treatment with nebulized plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor reduces pulmonary complement activation and subsequently attenuates lung injury and lung inflammation. This was investigated in a rat model of severe Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. Rats were intra-tracheally challenged with S. pneumoniae to induce pneumonia. Nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor or saline (control animals) was repeatedly administered to rats, 30 min before induction of pneumonia and every 6 h thereafter. Rats were sacrificed 20 or 40 h after inoculation with bacteria. Brochoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were obtained for measuring levels of complement activation (C4b/c), lung injury and inflammation. Induction of pneumonia was associated with pulmonary complement activation (C4b/c at 20 h 1.24 % [0.56-2.59] and at 40 h 2.08 % [0.98-5.12], compared to 0.50 % [0.07-0.59] and 0.03 % [0.03-0.03] in the healthy control animals). The functional fraction of C1-INH was detectable in BALF, but no effect was found on pulmonary complement activation (C4b/c at 20 h 0.73 % [0.16-1.93] and at 40 h 2.38 % [0.54-4.19]). Twenty hours after inoculation, nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor treatment reduced total histology score, but this effect was no longer seen at 40 h. Nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor did not affect other markers of lung injury or lung inflammation. In this negative experimental animal study, severe S. pneumoniae pneumonia in rats is associated with pulmonary complement activation. Repeated treatment with nebulized C1-esterase inhibitor, although successfully delivered to the lungs, does not affect pulmonary complement activation, lung inflammation or lung injury.

  8. Inducible epithelial resistance protects mice against leukemia-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Leiva-Juárez, Miguel M; Ware, Hayden H; Kulkarni, Vikram V; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick A; Tuvim, Michael J; Evans, Scott E

    2016-08-18

    Despite widespread infection prevention efforts, pneumonia remains the leading cause of death among patients with acute leukemia, due to complex disease- and treatment-dependent immune defects. We have reported that a single inhaled treatment with a synergistic combination of Toll-like receptor 2/6 (TLR 2/6) and TLR9 agonists (Pam2-ODN) induces protective mucosal defenses in mice against a broad range of pathogens. As Pam2-ODN-induced protection persists despite depletion of several leukocyte populations, we tested whether it could prevent pneumonia in a mouse model of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remission induction therapy. Pam2-ODN prevented death due to pneumonia caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Aspergillus fumigatus when mice were heavily engrafted with leukemia cells, had severe chemotherapy-induced neutropenia or both. Pam2-ODN also extended survival of pneumonia in NSG mice engrafted with primary human AML cells. Protection was associated with rapid pathogen killing in the lungs at the time of infection and with reduced pathogen burdens at distant sites at the end of observation. Pathogen killing was inducible directly from isolated lung epithelial cells and was not abrogated by the presence of leukemia cells or cytotoxic agents. Pam2-ODN had no discernible effect on replication rate, total tumor population, or killing by chemotherapy of mouse or human leukemia cells, either in vitro or in vivo. Taken together, we report that therapeutic stimulation of lung epithelial defenses robustly protects against otherwise lethal pneumonias despite the profound immune dysfunction associated with acute leukemia and its treatment. These findings may suggest an opportunity to protect this population during periods of peak vulnerability. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. Lenalidomide-induced eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Toma, Andrew; Rapoport, Aaron P; Burke, Allen; Sachdeva, Ashutosh

    2017-07-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell dyscrasia accounting for 10% of haematologic malignancies. Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug analogous to thalidomide that is approved for use in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, and in combination with dexamethasone for refractory or relapsed multiple myeloma. Lenalidomide is preferred to thalidomide because of reduced toxicity, and pulmonary side effects are considered rare. We present, to our knowledge, an unusual and first reported case of a patient with relapsed multiple myeloma who received lenalidomide after autologous stem cell transplant, then developed eosinophilic pneumonia presenting as dyspnoea, peripheral eosinophilia, and bilateral pulmonary opacities. Bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage was negative for infection, and transbronchial lung biopsies showed eosinophilic pneumonia. After discontinuation of lenalidomide and initiation of prednisone therapy, his dyspnoea improved and eosinophilia resolved; however, symptoms recurred when the drug was restarted at a lower dose, confirming its causative role. In the absence of infection, clinicians should always bear in mind drug toxicity in the differential diagnosis of patients receiving lenalidomide and related agents.

  10. Preceding human metapneumovirus infection increases adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae and severity of murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shen-Hao; Liao, Sui-Ling; Wong, Kin-Sun; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2016-04-01

    Coinfection with respiratory virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae has been frequently reported in several epidemiologic studies. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of preceding human metapneumovirus (hMPV) inoculation on subsequent pneumococcal infection. Hep-2 and A549 cells were infected with hMPV then inoculated with S. pneumoniae. Bacterial adhesion was measured using colony forming unit and cytometric-fluorescence assays. In vivo bacterial adhesion was examined in hMPV-infected mice after inoculation of fluorescence-conjugated S. pneumoniae. Pulmonary inflammation (bacterial titers, cytokine levels, and histopathology) of hMPV-infected mice was investigated after inoculation with S. pneumoniae. In vitro results of bacterial infection with S. pneumoniae on A549 and Hep-2 monolayer cells showed that even though cellular adherence was variable among different serotypes, there was significantly enhanced bacterial adherence in A549 cells with preceding hMPV infection. In addition, in vivo study of hMPV-infected mice showed increased adhesion of S. pneumoniae on the bronchial epithelium with delayed bacterial clearance and exacerbated histopathology. Furthermore, mice with preceding hMPV infection showed repressed recruitment of airway neutrophils with decreased expression of neutrophil chemoattractants during pneumococcal infection. These results suggest that hMPV-infected airway cells, especially the lower airway epithelium, express increased adherence with S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, hMPV-infected mice showed impaired recruitment of airway neutrophils, possibly leading to delayed bacterial clearance and exacerbated pulmonary inflammation, after secondary infection with pneumococcal isolates. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Increased insulin requirements are associated with pneumonia after severe injury.

    PubMed

    Martin, R Shayn; Smith, Judy S; Hoth, J Jason; Miller, Preston R; Meredith, J Wayne; Chang, Michael C

    2007-08-01

    Hyperglycemia after severe injury has been associated with an increased risk of infection and death. Strict glycemic control has been found to be valuable in select surgical populations. Varying amounts of insulin by infusion are required to maintain blood glucose levels within normal limits. Little is known about how insulin requirements are affected by the presence of infection, and therefore, the purpose of this study was to characterize this relationship. Medical records of all intubated, injured patients admitted to the intensive care unit during a 16-month period were reviewed. Patients were included if they were managed with an insulin infusion, and they had a single bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) culture performed for presumed pneumonia between 48 hours and 8 days. Mean hourly and 24-hour insulin requirements were analyzed before BAL was performed and then compared with values after cultures were obtained. This difference was then compared between patients with and without pneumonia. Eighty-two patients met inclusion criteria during the 16-month study period. The hourly and 24-hour insulin requirements significantly increased from before to after BAL was performed in patients with pneumonia (n = 54) and not in those without (n = 28) (p = 0.008). The 24-hour insulin requirement increased by 26.2 units from before to after BAL in the pneumonia group versus 7.6 units in the nonpneumonia group (p = 0.029). A mean hourly insulin requirement increase of 1.2 units more than the pre-BAL level demonstrated an 86% positive predictive value and 89% specificity for pneumonia. An increase in insulin requirements at the time of obtaining pulmonary cultures is associated with the presence of pneumonia and may represent a valuable tool for earlier recognition.

  12. [Radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Ducray, J; Vignot, S; Lacout, A; Pougnet, I; Marcy, P-Y; Chapellier, C; Foray, N; Creisson, A; Thariat, J

    2017-04-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia is an inflammatory reaction that can occur as a consequence of various pulmonary affections. Radiotherapy is not the sole and systematic cause of bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia. Radiation-induced should not be confused with post-radiation, dose-dependent, inflammatory pulmonary fibrosis, which is non-immunological and located within the irradiation field. The role of immunity, local inflammation and individual radiosensitivity in bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia is not well defined. Bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia represents 1% of irradiated patients with breast cancer. It results in fever (flu-like symptoms), a rather dry cough and dyspnea. In the post-radiation context, bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia may be diagnosed several months and up to a year after breast irradiation. The treatment consists of prolonged steroids or immunosuppressants, which do not prevent chronicity in 15% of patients and death in up to 5% of cases, the remaining 80% of patients healing without sequelae. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Hypoxemia adds to the CURB-65 pneumonia severity score in hospitalized patients with mild pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Francisco; Restrepo, Marcos I; Fernández, Estrella; Mortensen, Eric M; Aguar, María Carmen; Cervera, Angela; Chiner, Eusebi; Blanquer, Jose

    2011-05-01

    Hypoxemia may influence the prognosis of patients with mild pneumonia, regardless of the initial CURB-65 score (confusion, blood urea nitrogen > 20 mg/dL, respiratory rate > 30 breaths/min, blood pressure < 90/60 mm Hg, and age ≥ 65 y). To determine the risk factors associated with hypoxemia and the influence of hypoxemia on clinical outcomes in hospitalized patients with mild pneumonia. We performed a multicenter prospective cohort study of 585 consecutive hospitalized patients with mild pneumonia (CURB-65 groups 0 and 1). We stratified the patients according to the presence of hypoxemia, defined as a P(aO(2))/F(IO(2)) < 300 mm Hg on admission. We assessed the risk factors associated with hypoxemia, hypoxemia's influence on the course of pneumonia, and clinical outcomes (mortality, hospital stay, and need for intensive care unit admission), with multivariable regression. Fifty percent of the patients (294 cases) had hypoxemia on admission. The risk factors independently associated with hypoxemia were: bilateral radiological involvement (odds ratio 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.5), history of COPD (odds ratio 2.5, 95% CI 1.4-4.3), and hypoalbuminemia (odds ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.5). The hypoxemic patients had longer hospital stay, higher intensive care unit admission rate, higher rate of severe sepsis, and higher mortality than the non-hypoxemic patients. Hypoxemia in patients with mild pneumonia is independently associated with several adverse clinical and radiological variables, and the hypoxemic patients had worse clinical outcomes than the non-hypoxemic patients. Therefore, additional attention should be paid to the presence of hypoxemia, regardless of a low CURB-65 score.

  14. Pulmonary tuberculosis in severely-malnourished or HIV-infected children with pneumonia: a review.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Pietroni, Mark A C; Faruque, Abu S G; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip K; Hossain, Iqbal; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2013-09-01

    Presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) as acute pneumonia in severely-malnourished and HIV-positive children has received very little attention, although this is very important in the management of pneumonia in children living in communities where TB is highly endemic. Our aim was to identify confirmed TB in children with acute pneumonia and HIV infection and/or severe acute malnutrition (SAM) (weight-for-length/height or weight-for-age z score <-3 of the WHO median, or presence of nutritional oedema). We conducted a literature search, using PubMed and Web of Science in April 2013 for the period from January 1974 through April 2013. We included only those studies that reported confirmed TB identified by acid fast bacilli (AFB) through smear microscopy, or by culture-positive specimens from children with acute pneumonia and SAM and/or HIV infection. The specimens were collected either from induced sputum (IS), or gastric lavage (GL), or broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), or percutaneous lung aspirates (LA). Pneumonia was defined as the radiological evidence of lobar or patchy consolidation and/or clinical evidence of severe/ very severe pneumonia according to the WHO criteria of acute respiratory infection. A total of 17 studies met our search criteria but 6 were relevant for our review. Eleven studies were excluded as those did not assess the HIV status of the children or specify the nutritional status of the children with acute pneumonia and TB. We identified only 747 under-five children from the six relevant studies that determined a tubercular aetiology of acute pneumonia in children with SAM and/or positive HIV status. Three studies were reported from South Africa and one each from the Gambia, Ethiopia, and Thailand where 610, 90, 35, and 12 children were enrolled and 64 (10%), 23 (26%), 5 (14%), and 1 (8%) children were identified with active TB respectively, with a total of 93 (12%) children with active TB. Among 610 HIV-infected children in three studies

  15. Detection of Pneumonia Associated Pathogens Using a Prototype Multiplexed Pneumonia Test in Hospitalized Patients with Severe Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Berit; Eickmeyer, Holm; Heininger, Alexandra; Juretzek, Stephanie; Karrasch, Matthias; Denis, Olivier; Roisin, Sandrine; Pletz, Mathias W.; Klein, Matthias; Barth, Sandra; Lüdke, Gerd H.; Thews, Anne; Torres, Antoni; Cillóniz, Catia; Straube, Eberhard; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Keller, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Severe pneumonia remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been shown to be more sensitive than current standard microbiological methods – particularly in patients with prior antibiotic treatment – and therefore, may improve the accuracy of microbiological diagnosis for hospitalized patients with pneumonia. Conventional detection techniques and multiplex PCR for 14 typical bacterial pneumonia-associated pathogens were performed on respiratory samples collected from adult hospitalized patients enrolled in a prospective multi-center study. Patients were enrolled from March until September 2012. A total of 739 fresh, native samples were eligible for analysis, of which 75 were sputa, 421 aspirates, and 234 bronchial lavages. 276 pathogens were detected by microbiology for which a valid PCR result was generated (positive or negative detection result by Curetis prototype system). Among these, 120 were identified by the prototype assay, 50 pathogens were not detected. Overall performance of the prototype for pathogen identification was 70.6% sensitivity (95% confidence interval (CI) lower bound: 63.3%, upper bound: 76.9%) and 95.2% specificity (95% CI lower bound: 94.6%, upper bound: 95.7%). Based on the study results, device cut-off settings were adjusted for future series production. The overall performance with the settings of the CE series production devices was 78.7% sensitivity (95% CI lower bound: 72.1%) and 96.6% specificity (95% CI lower bound: 96.1%). Time to result was 5.2 hours (median) for the prototype test and 43.5 h for standard-of-care. The Pneumonia Application provides a rapid and moderately sensitive assay for the detection of pneumonia-causing pathogens with minimal hands-on time. Trial Registration Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien (DRKS) DRKS00005684 PMID:25397673

  16. Klebsiella pneumoniae secretes outer membrane vesicles that induce the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Je Chul; Lee, Eun Jeoung; Lee, Jung Hwa; Jun, So Hyun; Choi, Chi Won; Kim, Seung Il; Kang, Sang Sun; Hyun, Sunghee

    2012-06-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria are an important vehicle for delivery of effector molecules to host cells, but the production of OMVs from Klebsiella pneumoniae, an opportunistic pathogen of both nosocomial and community-acquired infections, and their role in bacterial pathogenesis have not yet been determined. In the present study, we examined the production of OMVs from K. pneumoniae and determined the induction of the innate immune response against K. pneumoniae OMVs. Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 produced and secreted OMVs during in vitro culture. Proteomic analysis revealed that 159 different proteins were associated with K. pneumoniae OMVs. Klebsiella pneumoniae OMVs did not inhibit cell growth or induce cell death. However, these vesicles induced expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 in epithelial cells. An intratracheal challenge of K. pneumoniae OMVs in neutropenic mice resulted in severe lung pathology similar to K. pneumoniae infection. In conclusion, K. pneumoniae produces OMVs like other pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria and K. pneumoniae OMVs are a molecular complex that induces the innate immune response.

  17. Protease activated receptor 4 limits bacterial growth and lung pathology during late stage Streptococcus pneumoniae induced pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, S F; Van't Veer, C; van den Boogaard, F E; Nieuwland, R; Hoogendijk, A J; de Boer, O J; Roelofs, J J T H; van der Poll, T

    2013-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common causative pathogen of pneumonia and sepsis. Pneumonia and sepsis are associated with enhanced activation of coagulation, resulting in the production of several host-derived proteases at the primary site of infection and in the circulation. Serine proteases cleave protease activated receptors (PARs), which form a molecular link between coagulation and inflammation. PAR4 is one of four subtypes of PARs and is widely expressed by multiple cell types in the respiratory tract implicated in pulmonary inflammation, by immune cells and by platelets. In mice, mouse (m)PAR4 is the only thrombin receptor expressed by platelets. We here sought to determine the contribution of mPAR4 to the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal inoculation with S. pneumoniae in mPAR4-deficient (par4-/-) and wild-type mice. Mice were sacrificed after 6, 24 or 48 hours (h). Blood, lungs, liver and spleen were collected for analyses. Ex vivo stimulation assays were performed with S. pneumoniae and mPAR4 activating peptides. At 48 h after infection, higher bacterial loads were found in the lungs and blood of par4-/- mice (p < 0.05), accompanied by higher histopathology scores and increased cytokine levels (p < 0.05) in the lungs. Ex vivo, co-stimulation with mPAR4 activating peptide enhanced the whole blood cytokine response to S. pneumoniae. Thrombin inhibition resulted in decreased cytokine release after S. pneumoniae stimulation in human whole blood. Our findings suggest that mPAR4 contributes to antibacterial defence during murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

  18. Increase in fitness of Streptococcus pneumoniae is associated with the severity of necrotizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Chia; Chi, Hsin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Lai, Shen-Hao; Mu, Jung-Jung; Wong, Kin-Sun; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Huang, Yi-Chuan; Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Chang, Luan-Yin; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Huang, Li-Min

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of necrotizing pneumococcal pneumonia has increased during the past 2 decades. We hypothesized that increased pneumococcal load or augmented inflammatory cytokine production might lead to destructive pneumococcal lung disease. This study enrolled prospectively 0- to 18-year-old children with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia with pleural effusion admitted to 6 medical centers from March 2010 to April 2012. Children were diagnosed with pneumococcal empyema if the pleural fluid tested positive for quantitative pneumococcal (lytA) detection by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Pneumococcal empyema cases were further divided into 4 groups according to necrosis severity: (0) nonnecrosis, (1) mild necrosis, (2) cavitation and (3) bronchopleural fistula. Nasopharyngeal and pleural pneumococcal load, as well as levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8), Th1-(IL-2, IFN-γ), Th2-(IL-4, IL-10) and Th17-cytokines (IL-17), in the pleural fluid was measured. Serotypes 19A and 3 accounted for 69.4% and 12.5%, respectively, of 72 cases of pneumococcal empyema. Pleural pneumococcal load was significantly higher in serotypes 19A and 3 infection than in the other strains causing infection (P = 0.006). There was a correlation between nasopharyngeal and pleural pneumococcal load (ρ = 0.35; P = 0.05). In multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis, pleural pneumococcal load (adjusted odds ratio: 1.79; 95% confidence interval: 1.03-3.06) and IL-8 (adjusted odds ratio: 2.64; 95% confidence interval: 1.21-5.75) were independent factors associated with the severity of lung necrosis. Evolution of Streptococcus pneumoniae toward increased fitness in their interaction with host and exaggerated IL-8 expression may be responsible for the increase of necrotizing pneumococcal pneumonia.

  19. A case of vildagliptin-induced interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kuse, Naoyuki; Abe, Shinji; Kuribayashi, Hidehiko; Inomata, Minoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Fukuda, Yuh; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old Japanese male with type 2 diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital with a productive cough and worsening dyspnea. He had started receiving vildagliptin, which is one of the dipeptideylpeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, several days before the appearance of his symptoms. Laboratory findings revealed markedly elevated levels of immunoglobulin E and Krebs von den Lungen-6. Chest computed tomography revealed ground-glass opacity with irregular reticulation throughout both lungs. Biopsy specimens by transbronchial lung biopsy showed subacute interstitial pneumonia and an organizing pneumonia pattern with acute alveolar injury. The drug lymphocyte stimulation test showed a positive result for vildagliptin. Withdrawal of vildagliptin and administration of glucocorticoid treatment improved his respiratory condition and radiological findings. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient with vildagliptin-induced interstitial pneumonia based on both his clinical course and pathological findings. Interstitial pneumonia as a side effect of vildagliptin is rare. It may be necessary to monitor the respiratory condition of patients upon administration of DPP-4 inhibitors until further evidence is obtained.

  20. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Kids > Pneumonia A A A What's ... it from playing in the rain? What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (say: noo-MOW-nyuh) is an infection ...

  1. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Teens > Pneumonia A A A What's ... having to go to the hospital. What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (pronounced: noo-MOW-nyuh) is an infection ...

  2. Correlation of inflammatory and cardiovascular biomarkers with pneumonia severity scores.

    PubMed

    Lacoma, Alicia; Bas, Albert; Tudela, Pere; Giménez, Montse; Mòdol, Josep Maria; Pérez, Miguel; Ausina, Vicente; Dominguez, Jose; Prat-Aymerich, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    To assess the correlation of procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), neopterin, mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), and mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) with severity risk scores: severe CAP (SCAP) and SMART-COP in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), as well as short term prognosis and to determine the correlation with mortality risk scores. Eighty-five patients with a final diagnosis of pneumonia were consecutively included during a two month period. Epidemiological, clinical, microbiological, and radiological data were recorded. Patients were stratified according to the PSI, CURB-65, SCAP and SMART-COP. Complications were defined as respiratory failure/shock, need of ICU, and death. Plasma samples were collected at admission. MR-proANP and MR-proADM showed significantly higher levels in high risk SCAP group in comparison to low risk. When considering SMART-COP none of the biomarkers showed statistical differences. MR-proADM levels were high in patients with high risk of needing intensive respiratory or vasopressor support according to SMRT-CO. Neopterin and MR-proADM were significantly higher in patients that developed complications. PCT and MR-proADM showed significantly higher levels in cases of a definite bacterial diagnosis in comparison to probable bacterial, and unknown origin. MR-proANP and MR-proADM levels increased statistically according to PSI and CURB-65. Biomarker levels are higher in pneumonia patients with a poorer prognosis according to SCAP and SMART-COP indexes, and to the development of complications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  3. Klebsiella pneumoniae Siderophores Induce Inflammation, Bacterial Dissemination, and HIF-1α Stabilization during Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Victoria I.; Breen, Paul; Houle, Sébastien; Dozois, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections, including pneumonia and bacteremia, and is rapidly acquiring antibiotic resistance. K. pneumoniae requires secretion of siderophores, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity iron chelators, for bacterial replication and full virulence. The specific combination of siderophores secreted by K. pneumoniae during infection can impact tissue localization, systemic dissemination, and host survival. However, the effect of these potent iron chelators on the host during infection is unknown. In vitro, siderophores deplete epithelial cell iron, induce cytokine secretion, and activate the master transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein that controls vascular permeability and inflammatory gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae directly contributes to inflammation and bacterial dissemination during pneumonia. To examine the effects of siderophore secretion independently of bacterial growth, we performed infections with tonB mutants that persist in vivo but are deficient in siderophore import. Using a murine model of pneumonia, we found that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae induces the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), CXCL1, and CXCL2, as well as bacterial dissemination to the spleen, compared to siderophore-negative mutants at an equivalent bacterial number. Furthermore, we determined that siderophore-secreting K. pneumoniae stabilized HIF-1α in vivo and that bacterial dissemination to the spleen required alveolar epithelial HIF-1α. Our results indicate that siderophores act directly on the host to induce inflammatory cytokines and bacterial dissemination and that HIF-1α is a susceptibility factor for bacterial invasion during pneumonia. PMID:27624128

  4. Therapeutic Effects of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell–derived Microvesicles in Severe Pneumonia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Monsel, Antoine; Zhu, Ying-gang; Gennai, Stephane; Hao, Qi; Hu, Shuling; Rouby, Jean-Jacques; Rosenzwajg, Michelle; Matthay, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Microvesicles (MVs) are anuclear fragments of cells released from the endosomal compartment or shed from surface membranes. We and other investigators demonstrated that MVs released by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were as effective as the cells themselves in inflammatory injuries, such as after endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. However, the therapeutic effects of MVs in an infectious model of acute lung injury remain unknown. Objectives: We investigated the effects of human MSC MVs on lung inflammation, protein permeability, bacterial clearance, and survival after severe bacterial pneumonia. Methods: We tested the effects of MVs derived from human MSCs on Escherichia coli pneumonia in mice. We also studied the interactions between MVs and human monocytes and human alveolar epithelial type 2 cells. Measurements and Main Results: Administration of MVs derived from human MSCs improved survival in part through keratinocyte growth factor secretion and decreased the influx of inflammatory cells, cytokines, protein, and bacteria in mice injured with bacterial pneumonia. In primary cultures of human monocytes or alveolar type 2 cells, the uptake of MVs was mediated by CD44 receptors, which were essential for the therapeutic effects. MVs enhanced monocyte phagocytosis of bacteria while decreasing inflammatory cytokine secretion and increased intracellular ATP levels in injured alveolar epithelial type 2 cells. Prestimulation of MSCs with a toll-like receptor 3 agonist further enhanced the therapeutic effects of the released MVs. Conclusions: MVs derived from human MSCs were as effective as the parent stem cells in severe bacterial pneumonia. PMID:26067592

  5. [Emergence of new pneumonia: besides severe acute respiratory syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, P; Pozzi, E

    2006-10-01

    Important epidemiological modifications have been registered in respiratory infections, both in immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. Pathogens with modified antibiotic susceptibility patterns have emerged, which display an increased antibiotic resistance, such as S. pneumoniae, S. aureus, H. influenzae. This trait has a strong impact on the therapeutic choices, particularly when an empiric antibiotic treatment is selected. The prevalence of bacterial species showing non-susceptibility to the most common prescribed antibiotics (betalactams, macrolides etc.) follows a different geographic distribution. Some pathogens have acquired a new epidemiological role in patients affected with immune deficiencies: among them P. carinii and other bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. The emergence of new, previously unknown, species, has been registered, both bacteria (C. pneumoniae) and viruses (Metapneumovirus, Hantavirus etc.). Such aspects must be considered in the diagnosis of respiratory infections, which should include diagnostic tests for the identification of such pathogens. Among the new respiratory infections severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has quickly become a health care emergency, so that efforts have been made to identify the aetiological agent as well as the main epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the disease. Avian influenza has raised great interest immediately after the first cases of human infection caused by the avian virus, especially after the outbreaks in Asian countries and in the Netherlands. A crucial step in containing infection is the prevention of the disease; efforts are directed toward this endpoint.

  6. Preliminary investigation of a mice model of Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Renois, Fanny; Jacques, Jérôme; Guillard, Thomas; Moret, Hélène; Pluot, Michel; Andreoletti, Laurent; de Champs, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    In the present study, we comparatively assessed the pathophysiological mechanisms developed during lung infection of BALB/C female mice infected by an original wild type Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae strain (CH137) or by a referent subspecies K. pneumoniae. subsp. pneumoniae strain (ATCC10031). The mice infected with 2.10⁶ CFU K. p. subsp. pneumoniae (n = 10) showed transient signs of infection and all of them recovered. All of those infected with 1.10⁶ CFU K. p. subsp. ozaenae (n = 10) developed pneumonia within 24 h and died between 48 and 72 h. Few macrophages, numerous polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes were observed in their lungs in opposite to K. p. subsp. pneumoniae. In bronchoalveolar lavage, a significant increase in MIP-2, IL-6, KC and MCP-1 levels was only observed in K. p. subsp. ozaenae infected mice whereas high levels of TNF-α were evidenced with the two subspecies. Our findings indicated a lethal effect of a wild type K. p. subsp. ozaenae strain by acute pneumonia reflecting an insufficient alveolar macrophage response. This model might be of a major interest to comparatively explore the pathogenicity of K. p. subsp ozaenae strains and to further explore the physiopathological mechanisms of gram-negative bacteria induced human pneumonia. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of Risk Factors for Severe Pneumonia in Children: The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Deloria-Knoll, Maria; Feikin, Daniel R.; DeLuca, Andrea N.; Driscoll, Amanda J.; Moïsi, Jennifer C.; Johnson, Hope L.; Murdoch, David R.; O’Brien, Katherine L.; Levine, Orin S.; Scott, J. Anthony G.

    2012-01-01

    As a case-control study of etiology, the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) project also provides an opportunity to assess the risk factors for severe pneumonia in hospitalized children at 7 sites. We identified relevant risk factors by literature review and iterative expert consultation. Decisions for inclusion in PERCH were based on comparability to published data, analytic plans, data collection costs and logistic feasibility, including interviewer time and subject fatigue. We aimed to standardize questions at all sites, but significant variation in the economic, cultural, and geographic characteristics of sites made it difficult to obtain this objective. Despite these challenges, the depth of the evaluation of multiple risk factors across the breadth of the PERCH sites should furnish new and valuable information about the major risk factors for childhood severe and very severe pneumonia, including risk factors for pneumonia caused by specific etiologies, in developing countries. PMID:22403226

  8. Klebsiella pneumoniae Siderophores Induce Inflammation, Bacterial Dissemination, and HIF-1α Stabilization during Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Holden, Victoria I; Breen, Paul; Houle, Sébastien; Dozois, Charles M; Bachman, Michael A

    2016-09-13

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections, including pneumonia and bacteremia, and is rapidly acquiring antibiotic resistance. K. pneumoniae requires secretion of siderophores, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity iron chelators, for bacterial replication and full virulence. The specific combination of siderophores secreted by K. pneumoniae during infection can impact tissue localization, systemic dissemination, and host survival. However, the effect of these potent iron chelators on the host during infection is unknown. In vitro, siderophores deplete epithelial cell iron, induce cytokine secretion, and activate the master transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein that controls vascular permeability and inflammatory gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae directly contributes to inflammation and bacterial dissemination during pneumonia. To examine the effects of siderophore secretion independently of bacterial growth, we performed infections with tonB mutants that persist in vivo but are deficient in siderophore import. Using a murine model of pneumonia, we found that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae induces the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), CXCL1, and CXCL2, as well as bacterial dissemination to the spleen, compared to siderophore-negative mutants at an equivalent bacterial number. Furthermore, we determined that siderophore-secreting K. pneumoniae stabilized HIF-1α in vivo and that bacterial dissemination to the spleen required alveolar epithelial HIF-1α. Our results indicate that siderophores act directly on the host to induce inflammatory cytokines and bacterial dissemination and that HIF-1α is a susceptibility factor for bacterial invasion during pneumonia. Klebsiella pneumoniae causes a wide range of bacterial diseases, including pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and sepsis. To cause infection, K. pneumoniae steals

  9. The Definition of Pneumonia, the Assessment of Severity, and Clinical Standardization in the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Wonodi, Chizoba; Moïsi, Jennifer C.; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; DeLuca, Andrea N.; Karron, Ruth A.; Bhat, Niranjan; Murdoch, David R.; Crawley, Jane; Levine, Orin S.; O’Brien, Katherine L.; Feikin, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    To develop a case definition for the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) project, we sought a widely acceptable classification that was linked to existing pneumonia research and focused on very severe cases. We began with the World Health Organization’s classification of severe/very severe pneumonia and refined it through literature reviews and a 2-stage process of expert consultation. PERCH will study hospitalized children, aged 1–59 months, with pneumonia who present with cough or difficulty breathing and have either severe pneumonia (lower chest wall indrawing) or very severe pneumonia (central cyanosis, difficulty breastfeeding/drinking, vomiting everything, convulsions, lethargy, unconsciousness, or head nodding). It will exclude patients with recent hospitalization and children with wheeze whose indrawing resolves after bronchodilator therapy. The PERCH investigators agreed upon standard interpretations of the symptoms and signs. These will be maintained by a clinical standardization monitor who conducts repeated instruction at each site and by recurrent local training and testing. PMID:22403224

  10. Mortality, morbidity, and disease severity of patients with aspiration pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lanspa, Michael J.; Jones, Barbara E.; Brown, Samuel M.; Dean, Nathan C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Aspiration pneumonia is a common syndrome, although less well characterized than other pneumonia syndromes. We describe a large population of patients with aspiration pneumonia. Methods In this retrospective population study, we queried the electronic medical record at a tertiary-care, university-affiliated hospital from 1996–2006. Patients were initially identified by ICD-9 code 507.x; subsequent physician chart review excluded patients with aspiration pneumonitis and those without a confirmatory radiograph. Patients with community-acquired aspiration pneumonia were compared to a contemporaneous population of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. We compared CURB-65 predicted mortality with actual 30-day mortality. Results We identified 628 patients with aspiration pneumonia, of which 510 were community-acquired. Median age was 77, with 30-day mortality of 21%. Compared to CAP patients, patients with community-acquired aspiration pneumonia had more frequent inpatient admission (99% vs. 58%) and ICU admission (38% vs. 14%), higher Charlson comorbidity index (3 vs. 1), and higher prevalence of “do not resuscitate/intubate” orders (24% vs. 11%). CURB-65 predicted mortality poorly in aspiration pneumonia patients (AUC 0.66). Conclusions Patients with community-acquired aspiration pneumonia are older, have more comorbidities, and demonstrate higher mortality than CAP patients, even after adjustment for age and comorbidities. CURB-65 poorly predicts mortality in this population. PMID:23184866

  11. Severe Sepsis in Severely Malnourished Young Bangladeshi Children with Pneumonia: A Retrospective Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S G; Shahid, Abu S M S B; Shahunja, K M; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    In developing countries, there is no published report on predicting factors of severe sepsis in severely acute malnourished (SAM) children having pneumonia and impact of fluid resuscitation in such children. Thus, we aimed to identify predicting factors for severe sepsis and assess the outcome of fluid resuscitation of such children. In this retrospective case-control study SAM children aged 0-59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh from April 2011 through July 2012 with history of cough or difficult breathing and radiologic pneumonia, who were assessed for severe sepsis at admission constituted the study population. We compared the pneumonic SAM children with severe sepsis (cases = 50) with those without severe sepsis (controls = 354). Severe sepsis was defined with objective clinical criteria and managed with fluid resuscitation, in addition to antibiotic and other supportive therapy, following the standard hospital guideline, which is very similar to the WHO guideline. The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (40% vs. 4%; p<0.001). In logistic regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders, lack of BCG vaccination, drowsiness, abdominal distension, acute kidney injury, and metabolic acidosis at admission remained as independent predicting factors for severe sepsis in pneumonic SAM children (p<0.05 for all comparisons). We noted a much higher case fatality among under-five SAM children with pneumonia and severe sepsis who required fluid resuscitation in addition to standard antibiotic and other supportive therapy compared to those without severe sepsis. Independent risk factors and outcome of the management of severe sepsis in our study children highlight the importance for defining optimal fluid resuscitation therapy aiming at reducing the case fatality in such children.

  12. Severe Sepsis in Severely Malnourished Young Bangladeshi Children with Pneumonia: A Retrospective Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background In developing countries, there is no published report on predicting factors of severe sepsis in severely acute malnourished (SAM) children having pneumonia and impact of fluid resuscitation in such children. Thus, we aimed to identify predicting factors for severe sepsis and assess the outcome of fluid resuscitation of such children. Methods In this retrospective case-control study SAM children aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh from April 2011 through July 2012 with history of cough or difficult breathing and radiologic pneumonia, who were assessed for severe sepsis at admission constituted the study population. We compared the pneumonic SAM children with severe sepsis (cases = 50) with those without severe sepsis (controls = 354). Severe sepsis was defined with objective clinical criteria and managed with fluid resuscitation, in addition to antibiotic and other supportive therapy, following the standard hospital guideline, which is very similar to the WHO guideline. Results The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (40% vs. 4%; p<0.001). In logistic regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders, lack of BCG vaccination, drowsiness, abdominal distension, acute kidney injury, and metabolic acidosis at admission remained as independent predicting factors for severe sepsis in pneumonic SAM children (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion and Significance We noted a much higher case fatality among under-five SAM children with pneumonia and severe sepsis who required fluid resuscitation in addition to standard antibiotic and other supportive therapy compared to those without severe sepsis. Independent risk factors and outcome of the management of severe sepsis in our study children highlight the importance for defining optimal fluid resuscitation therapy aiming at reducing the case

  13. Pneumonia severity index class v patients with community-acquired pneumonia: characteristics, outcomes, and value of severity scores.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Mauricio; Badia, Joan R; Cavalcanti, Manuela; Ferrer, Miquel; Agustí, Carles; Angrill, Joaquin; García, Elisa; Mensa, Josep; Niederman, Michael S; Torres, Antoni

    2007-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with a pneumonia severity index (PSI) score in risk class V (PSI-V) is a potentially life-threatening condition, yet the majority of patients are not admitted to the ICU. The aim of this study was to characterize CAP patients in PSI-V to determine the risk factors for ICU admission and mortality, and to assess the performance of CAP severity scores in this population. Prospective observational study including hospitalized adults with CAP in PSI-V from 1996 to 2003. Clinical and laboratory data, microbiological findings, and outcomes were recorded. The PSI score; modified American Thoracic Society (ATS) score; the confusion, urea, respiratory rate, low BP (CURB) score, and CURB plus age of >/= 65 years score were calculated. A reduced score based on the acute illness variables contained in the PSI was also obtained. A total of 457 patients were included in the study (mean [+/- SD] age, 79 +/- 11 years), of whom 92 (20%) were admitted to the ICU. Patients in the ward were older (mean age, 82 +/- 10 vs 70 +/- 10 years, respectively) and had more comorbidities. ICU patients experienced significantly more acute organ failures. The mortality rate was higher in ICU patients, but also was high for non-ICU patients (37% vs 20%, respectively; p = 0,003). A low level of consciousness (odds ratio [OR], 3.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2 to 5) and shock (OR, 24.7; 95% CI, 14 to 44) were associated with a higher risk of death. The modified ATS severity rule had the best accuracy in predicting ICU admission and mortality. Most CAP patients PSI-V were treated on a hospital ward. Those admitted to the ICU were younger and had findings of more acute illness. The PSI performed well as a mortality prediction tool but was less appropriate for guiding site-of-care decisions.

  14. Streptococcus pneumoniae capsule determines disease severity in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Grandgirard, Denis; Valente, Luca G.; Täuber, Martin G.; Leib, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria can be characterized into over 90 serotypes according to the composition of their polysaccharide capsules. Some serotypes are common in nasopharyngeal carriage whereas others are associated with invasive disease, but when carriage serotypes do invade disease is often particularly severe. It is unknown whether disease severity is due directly to the capsule type or to other virulence factors. Here, we used a clinical pneumococcal isolate and its capsule-switch mutants to determine the effect of capsule, in isolation from the genetic background, on severity of meningitis in an infant rat model. We found that possession of a capsule was essential for causing meningitis. Serotype 6B caused significantly more mortality than 7F and this correlated with increased capsule thickness in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a stronger inflammatory cytokine response in the CSF and ultimately more cortical brain damage. We conclude that capsule type has a direct effect on meningitis severity. This is an important consideration in the current era of vaccination targeting a subset of capsule types that causes serotype replacement. PMID:27009189

  15. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Severely-malnourished or HIV-infected Children with Pneumonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Pietroni, Mark A.C.; Faruque, Abu S.G.; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip K.; Hossain, Md. Iqbal; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2013-01-01

    Presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) as acute pneumonia in severely-malnourished and HIV-positive children has received very little attention, although this is very important in the management of pneumonia in children living in communities where TB is highly endemic. Our aim was to identify confirmed TB in children with acute pneumonia and HIV infection and/or severe acute malnutrition (SAM) (weight-for-length/height or weight-for-age z score <-3 of the WHO median, or presence of nutritional oedema). We conducted a literature search, using PubMed and Web of Science in April 2013 for the period from January 1974 through April 2013. We included only those studies that reported confirmed TB identified by acid fast bacilli (AFB) through smear microscopy, or by culture-positive specimens from children with acute pneumonia and SAM and/or HIV infection. The specimens were collected either from induced sputum (IS), or gastric lavage (GL), or broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), or percutaneous lung aspirates (LA). Pneumonia was defined as the radiological evidence of lobar or patchy consolidation and/or clinical evidence of severe/very severe pneumonia according to the WHO criteria of acute respiratory infection. A total of 17 studies met our search criteria but 6 were relevant for our review. Eleven studies were excluded as those did not assess the HIV status of the children or specify the nutritional status of the children with acute pneumonia and TB. We identified only 747 under-five children from the six relevant studies that determined a tubercular aetiology of acute pneumonia in children with SAM and/or positive HIV status. Three studies were reported from South Africa and one each from the Gambia, Ethiopia, and Thailand where 610, 90, 35, and 12 children were enrolled and 64 (10%), 23 (26%), 5 (14%), and 1 (8%) children were identified with active TB respectively, with a total of 93 (12%) children with active TB. Among 610 HIV-infected children in three studies

  16. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Pneumonia is an infection that inflames the air sacs in one or both lungs. The air sacs may fill with fluid or pus ( ... organisms, including bacteria, viruses and fungi, can cause pneumonia. Pneumonia can range in seriousness from mild to ...

  17. Cytomegalovirus pneumonia as the first manifestation of severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jończyk-Potoczna, Katarzyna; Ossowska, Lidia; Bręborowicz, Anna; Bartkowska-Śniatkowska, Alicja; Wachowiak, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by the absence of functional T lymphocytes and impairment of adaptive immunity. While heterogeneity of the genetic background in SCID leads to the variability of immune phenotypes, most of affected newborns appear healthy but within the first few months they develop life-threatening opportunistic respiratory or gastrointestinal tract infections. The objective of the study was to define the presenting features and etiology of infections in children with SCID. We retrospectively reviewed five children in whom the diagnosis of SCID had been established in our pediatric immunology clinic over the last 10-year period. A viral respiratory tract infection was the first manifestation of SCID in all the children studied. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia was recognized in as many as 4 cases and coronavirus pulmonary infection was diagnosed in one case, whereas Pneumocystis jiroveci was identified as a co-pathogen in one CMV-infected patient. Severe combined immunodeficiency is a pediatric emergency condition and given the significant impact of pulmonary CMV infection in SCID children, establishing an accurate etiological diagnosis is of essential importance in instituting the specific treatment and improving the outcome. PMID:26155153

  18. Aspiration pneumonia caused by fentanyl-induced cough -a case report-

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kyung Jee; Lee, Hyo Min; Park, Eun Young; Kim, Man Ho; Kim, Yi Seul; Kang, Mae Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Although fentanyl-induced cough is generally transient and benign, it can give rise to serious problems in patients to whom increasing intracranial, intraocular or intraabdominal pressures may create dangerous situations. This case demonstrates aspiration pneumonia as a complication, exhibiting severe cough induced by intravenous injection of fentanyl. PMID:24101960

  19. Swift recovery of severe hypoxemic pneumonia upon morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Galland, C; Ferrand, F X; Cividjian, A; Sergent, B; Pichot, C; Ghignone, M; Quintin, L

    2014-01-01

    A morbidly obese (body mass index = 55.5) female patient presented with severe hypoxemic community acquired pneumonia [PaO2/FiO2 (P/F) = 57] with primarily right basal atelectasis, but without bilateral opacities in the upper lobes on the chest X-ray. Major O2 desaturations led the nurses to object to moving the patient to the prone position: muscle relaxation combined to prone position was impossible. Therefore, stringent 60 degrees reverse Trendelenburg legs down position was constantly maintained during mechanical ventilation through the endotracheal tube, using low pressure support (pressure support = 5-10 cmH2O) and high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). PEEP was progressively increased to 20 cmH2O, and little or no sedation was used. A P/F improvement from 57 to 200 over three days allowed removing the tracheal tube. The patient was discharged 13 days after admission. In this paper, the use of high PEEP in the context of morbid obesity, and low pressure support are discussed.

  20. [Life threatening asthma associated to severe pneumonia and acute myopathy].

    PubMed

    Girardis, M; Raffaelli, M; Flore, I; Pressacco, C; Pasetto, A

    2001-05-01

    A young male was transferred to our intensive care unit (ICU) from the intensive care unit of a local hospital where he was admitted for life-threatening asthma ten days before. As severe hypoxemia, we immediately started inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) that improved significantly pulmonary gas exchange. The first day after admission in our ICU, a chest computed tomography showed a three-lobar pneumonia and, therefore, a broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy was decided. iNO therapy was withdrawn 96 hours after the beginning because of a stable improvement of pulmonary gas exchange and a relative loss of efficacy. Five days after arrival in our ICU, sedative and neuromuscular blocking drugs initiated 15 days before were stopped and, after the awakening, the patient presented tetra-paresis. Muscle biopsy and electromyography indicated an acute myopathy that was probably caused by the association between large doses of steroids and neuromuscular blocking agents. In spite of an intensive physiotherapy program, the patient was extubated only 15 days after admission and he underwent non-invasive mechanical ventilation for further 7 days. The patient was discharged from our ICU 10 days after extubation with a good restore of muscle functioning which was complete two months later.

  1. Severe varicella-zoster virus pneumonia: a multicenter cohort study.

    PubMed

    Mirouse, Adrien; Vignon, Philippe; Piron, Prescillia; Robert, René; Papazian, Laurent; Géri, Guillaume; Blanc, Pascal; Guitton, Christophe; Guérin, Claude; Bigé, Naïke; Rabbat, Antoine; Lefebvre, Aurélie; Razazi, Keyvan; Fartoukh, Muriel; Mariotte, Eric; Bouadma, Lila; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Seguin, Amélie; Souweine, Bertrand; Moreau, Anne-Sophie; Faguer, Stanislas; Mari, Arnaud; Mayaux, Julien; Schneider, Francis; Stoclin, Annabelle; Perez, Pierre; Maizel, Julien; Lafon, Charles; Ganster, Frédérique; Argaud, Laurent; Girault, Christophe; Barbier, François; Lecuyer, Lucien; Lambert, Jérôme; Canet, Emmanuel

    2017-06-07

    Pneumonia is a dreaded complication of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection in adults; however, the data are limited. Our objective was to investigate the clinical features, management, and outcomes of critically ill patients with VZV-related community-acquired pneumonia (VZV-CAP). This was an observational study of patients with VZV-CAP admitted to 29 intensive care units (ICUs) from January 1996 to January 2015. One hundred and two patients with VZV-CAP were included. Patients were young (age 39 years (interquartile range 32-51)) and 53 (52%) were immunocompromised. Time since respiratory symptom onset was 2 (1-3) days. There was a seasonal distribution of the disease, with more cases during spring and winter time. All but four patients presented with typical skin rash on ICU admission. Half the patients received mechanical ventilation within 1 (1-2) day following ICU admission (the ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to fractional inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) = 150 (80-284), 80% with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)). Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score on day 1 (odds ratio (OR) 1.90 (1.33-2.70); p < 0.001), oxygen flow at ICU admission (OR 1.25 (1.08-1.45); p = 0.004), and early bacterial co-infection (OR 14.94 (2.00-111.8); p = 0.009) were independently associated with the need for mechanical ventilation. Duration of mechanical ventilation was 14 (7-21) days. ICU and hospital mortality rates were 17% and 24%, respectively. All patients were treated with aciclovir and 10 received adjunctive therapy with steroids. Compared to 60 matched steroid-free controls, patients treated with steroids had a longer mechanical ventilation duration, ICU length of stay, and a similar hospital mortality, but experienced more ICU-acquired infections. Severe VZV-CAP is responsible for an acute pulmonary involvement associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. Steroid therapy did not influence mortality, but increased the

  2. Dietary supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids ameliorates acute pneumonia induced by Klebsiella pneumoniae in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sonica; Chhibber, Sanjay; Mohan, Harsh; Sharma, Saroj

    2013-07-01

    The immune benefits associated with the optimal intake of dietary fatty acids are widely known. The objective of the present investigation was to elucidate the role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) food source on acute pneumonia induced by Klebsiella pneumoniae. Three different n-3 PUFA preparations (cod liver oil, Maxigard, and flaxseed oil) were orally supplemented and infection was induced in different groups of experimental mice. Mice fed olive oil and normal saline served as oil and saline controls, respectively. After 2 weeks of fatty acid feeding, no effect on the establishment of infection was observed when acute pneumonia was induced in animals. On the other hand, 6 weeks of n-3 PUFA administration was found to improve resistance in mice, as reduced lung bacterial load coupled with significant improvement in pathology was seen in infected mice. Alveolar macrophages collected from all 3 groups of mice fed n-3 PUFA exhibited a significant decrease in the level of apoptosis following infection with K. pneumoniae and an enhanced in vitro phagocytic potential for the pathogen. Lower lung levels of nitric oxide, malondialdehyde, and lactate dehydrogenase were associated with a decrease in the severity of tissue damage. There was a significant increase in the lung levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)). No significant change was observed in the levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10). This study highlights that dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation exerts an overall beneficial effect against acute experimental pneumonia. This mechanism is operative through upregulation of nonspecific and specific immune defenses of the host.

  3. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or another health care facility such as a nursing home or rehab facility. Pneumonia that affects people in ... You can help prevent pneumonia by following the measures below. Wash your hands often, especially: Before preparing ...

  4. Severity prediction rules in community acquired pneumonia: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, W; Lewis, S; Macfarlane, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The British Thoracic Society (BTS) developed a rule (BTSr) based on severity criteria to predict short term mortality in adults admitted to hospital with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, neither the BTSr nor a recent modification of it (mBTSr) have been validated in the UK. A case-control study was conducted in a typical UK population to determine the clinical factors predictive of mortality and to assess the performance of these rules.
METHODS—Cases were drawn from all patients with CAP who died in 1997 in five large hospitals in the Mid Trent area. Controls were randomly selected from survivors. Factors associated with mortality were identified following review of medical case notes and performance of the severity prediction rules assessed.
RESULTS—Age >65 years, temperature <37°C, respiratory rate >24 breaths/min, mental confusion, urea concentration of >7 mmol/l, sodium concentration of <135 mmol/l, and the presence of a pleural effusion, all determined on admission, were independently associated with in-hospital mortality on multivariate analysis. The BTSr was 52% sensitive and 79% specific in predicting death while the mBTSr displayed 66% sensitivity and 73% specificity.
CONCLUSIONS—The value of three of the four factors (presence of mental confusion, raised respiratory rate, raised urea) used in the mBTSr as predictors of mortality is confirmed. However, the BTSr and mBTSr did not perform as well in this validation study which included a high proportion (48%) of elderly patients (⩾75 years) compared with the derivation studies.

 PMID:10679541

  5. Virus infection facilitates the development of severe pneumonia in transplant patients with hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Duorong; Wu, Jim; Pan, Yujia; Yan, JinSong; Liu, Min; Liu, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an effective therapy for patients with hematologic malignancies. Severe pneumonia is associated with high mortality rate in HSCT recipients. Viral co-infection indicates a poor prognosis of HSCT recipients. In this study, a total of 68 allogeneic HSCT recipients were included. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection was assessed by testing peripheral blood and oropharynx swabs, respectively, collected in the first 180 days after transplantation. We analysed the correlation of CMV and RSV co-infection with severe pneumonia and mortality. The incidence of CMV and RSV co-infection was 26.5% (18/68). Severe pneumonia was diagnosed in 61% (11/18) cases with co-infection compared to only 10% (5/50) cases with mono-infection or no infection. The analysis of potential risk factors for severe pneumonia showed that CMV and RSV co-infection was significantly associated with severe pneumonia (p < 0.001). The 5 patients who died of severe pneumonia were all co-infected with CMV and RSV. In conclusion, CMV and RSV co-infection appears to be an important factor and facilitates the development of severe pneumonia in allogeneic HSCT patients with hematologic malignancies. PMID:27340772

  6. I-ROAD could be efficient in predicting severity of community-acquired pneumonia or healthcare-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Matsunuma, Ryo; Asai, Nobuhiro; Ohkuni, Yoshihiro; Nakashima, Kei; Iwasaki, Takuya; Misawa, Masafumi; Kaneko, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The ability to predict the prognosis of patients with pneumonia is critical, especially when making decisions regarding treatment regimens and sites of care. However, prognostic guidelines for healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) have yet to be established. I-ROAD is the prognostic guideline of the Japanese Respiratory Society for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). This study compared available prognostic guidelines to determine the usefulness of I-ROAD as a prognostic tool for patients with HCAP. METHODS We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with pneumonia admitted to Kameda Medical Center, Japan, from January 2006 to September 2009. Patients were categorised into two groups, namely those with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and those with HCAP. We compared the baseline characteristics, laboratory findings, identified pathogens, antibiotic regimens, clinical outcomes, pneumonic severity and prognostic accuracy of each guideline between the two patient groups. The severity of each disease was assessed on admission using the A-DROP, CURB-65, PSI and I-ROAD guidelines. RESULTS Of the 302 patients evaluated, 228 (75.5%) were diagnosed with CAP and 74 (24.5%) with HCAP. Patients with HCAP were older and had a higher performance status than patients with CAP. The mortality rate in the CAP group tended to rise with increasing severity scores of prognostic guidelines. Although the severity scores of all prognostic guidelines could predict 30-day mortality in patients with CAP, I-ROAD exhibited a higher discriminatory power for patients with HCAP based on analysis of receiver-operating characteristic curves. CONCLUSION I-ROAD could be more accurate than other prognostic guidelines for evaluating the severity of HCAP. PMID:25017407

  7. Early non-invasive ventilation treatment for severe influenza pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez, M; Almirall, J; Lorente, L; Marqués, A; Socias, L; Vidaur, L; Rello, J

    2013-03-01

    The role of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory failure caused by viral pneumonia remains controversial. Our objective was to evaluate the use of NIV in a cohort of (H1N1)v pneumonia. Usefulness and success of NIV were assessed in a prospective, observational registry of patients with influenza A (H1N1) virus pneumonia in 148 Spanish intensive care units (ICUs) in 2009-10. Significant variables for NIV success were included in a multivariate analysis. In all, 685 patients with confirmed influenza A (H1N1)v viral pneumonia were admitted to participating ICUs; 489 were ventilated, 177 with NIV. The NIV was successful in 72 patients (40.7%), the rest required intubation. Low Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, low Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and absence of renal failure were associated with NIV success. Success of NIV was independently associated with fewer than two chest X-ray quadrant opacities (OR 3.5) and no vasopressor requirement (OR 8.1). However, among patients with two or more quadrant opacities, a SOFA score ≤7 presented a higher success rate than those with SOFA score >7 (OR 10.7). Patients in whom NIV was successful required shorter ventilation time, shorter ICU stay and hospital stay than NIV failure. In patients in whom NIV failed, the delay in intubation did not increase mortality (26.5% versus 24.2%). Clinicians used NIV in 25.8% of influenza A (H1N1)v viral pneumonia admitted to ICU, and treatment was effective in 40.6% of them. NIV success was associated with shorter hospital stay and mortality similar to non-ventilated patients. NIV failure was associated with a mortality similar to those who were intubated from the start. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  8. Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia and Citrobacter rodentium-induced gut infection differentially alter vitamin A concentrations in the lung and liver of mice.

    PubMed

    Restori, Katherine H; McDaniel, Kaitlin L; Wray, Amanda E; Cantorna, Margherita T; Ross, A Catharine

    2014-03-01

    In the developing world, vitamin A (VA) deficiency is endemic in populations that are also at great risk of morbidity and mortality because of pneumococcal pneumonia and enteric infections. To better understand how lung and gastrointestinal pathogens affect VA status, we assessed VA concentrations in serum, lung, and liver during an invasive pneumonia infection induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3, and a noninvasive gut infection induced by Citrobacter rodentium, in vitamin A-adequate (VAA) and vitamin A-deficient (VAD) mice. For pneumonia infection, mice were immunized with pneumococcal polysaccharide serotype 3 (PPS3), or not (infected-control), 5 d prior to intranasal inoculation with S. pneumoniae. Two days post-inoculation, immunization was protective against systemic infection regardless of VA status as PPS3 immunization decreased bacteremia compared with infected-control mice (P < 0.05). Retinol concentrations in the lung were higher in infected-control VAA mice (15.7 nmol/g: P < 0.05) compared with PPS3-immunized mice (8.23 nmol/g), but this was not associated with increased lung bacterial burden. VAA mice had reduced severity of C. rodentium-induced gut infection as measured by fecal bacterial shedding compared with VAD mice (P < 0.05). Liver retinol and retinyl ester concentrations in VAA mice decreased at the peak of infection (retinol, 8.1 nmol/g; retinyl esters, 985 nmol/g; P < 0.05, compared with uninfected mice; retinol, 29.5 nmol/g; retinyl esters, 1730 nmol/g), whereas tissue VA concentrations were low in VAD mice during both infections. Colonic mucin gene expression was also depressed at peak infection compared with uninfected mice (P < 0.05). Overall, pneumonia had less effect on VA status than gastrointestinal infection, predominantly owing to reduced hepatic VA storage at the peak of gut infection.

  9. A Mouse Model of Post-Stroke Pneumonia Induced by Intra-Tracheal Inoculation with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Mracsko, Eva; Stegemann-Koniszewski, Sabine; Na, Shin-Young; Dalpke, Alexander; Bruder, Dunja; Lasitschka, Felix; Veltkamp, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Stroke-induced immunodeficiency increases the risk of infectious complications, which adversely affects neurological outcome. Among those, pneumonia affects as many as one third of stroke patients and is the main contributor to mortality in the post-acute phase of stroke. Experimental findings on post-stroke susceptibility to spontaneous pneumonia in mice are contradictory. Here, we established a mouse model inducing standardized bacterial pneumonia and characterized the impaired pulmonary cellular and humoral immune responses after experimental stroke. Bacterial pneumonia was induced by intra-tracheal inoculation with Streptococcus pneumoniae at different time points after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Bacterial counts in lungs and blood, histological changes, and cytokine production in the lungs were assessed. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of pneumonia on stroke outcome. Intra-tracheal inoculation resulted in reproducible pneumonia and bacteraemia, and demonstrated post-stroke susceptibility to streptococcal pneumonia developing with a delay of at least 24 h after MCAO. Higher bacterial counts in mice infected 3 days after stroke induction correlated with reduced neutrophil and macrophage infiltration in the lungs and lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the broncho-alveolar lavage compared to sham-operated animals. Pneumonia increased mortality without affecting brain-infiltrating leukocytes. In this standardized mouse model of post-stroke pneumonia, we describe attenuated leukocyte infiltration and cytokine production in response to bacterial infection in the lungs that has a profound effect on outcome. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae induced ventilator-associated pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients in China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Q; Zhou, M; Zou, M; Liu, W-e

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics of hypervirulent K. pneumoniae (hvKP) induced ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and the microbiological characteristics and epidemiology of the hvKP strains. A retrospective study of 49 mechanically ventilated patients with K. pneumoniae induced VAP was conducted at a university hospital in China from January 2014 to December 2014. Clinical characteristics and K. pneumoniae antimicrobial susceptibility and biofilm formation were analyzed. Genes of capsular serotypes K1, K2, K5, K20, K54 and K57 and virulence factors plasmid rmpA(p-rmpA), iroB, iucA, mrkD, entB, iutA, ybtS, kfu and allS were also evaluated. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses were used to study the clonal relationship of the K. pneumoniae strains. Strains possessed p-rmpA and iroB and iucA were defined as hvKP. Of 49 patients, 14 patients (28.6 %) were infected by hvKP. Antimicrobial resistant rate was significantly higher in cKP than that in hvKP. One ST29 K54 extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing hvKP strain was detected. The prevalence of K1 and K2 in hvKP was 42.9 % and 21.4 %, respectively. The incidences of K1, K2, K20, p-rmpA, iroB, iucA, iutA, Kfu and alls were significantly higher in hvKP than those in cKP. ST23 was dominant among hvKP strains, and all the ST23 strains had identical RAPD pattern. hvKP has become a common pathogen of VAP in mechanically ventilated patients in China. Clinicians should increase awareness of hvKP induced VAP and enhance epidemiologic surveillance.

  11. Galectin-3 Reduces the Severity of Pneumococcal Pneumonia by Augmenting Neutrophil Function

    PubMed Central

    Farnworth, Sarah L.; Henderson, Neil C.; MacKinnon, Alison C.; Atkinson, Kirsten M.; Wilkinson, Tom; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Hayashi, Katsutoshi; Simpson, A. John; Rossi, Adriano G.; Haslett, Christopher; Sethi, Tariq

    2008-01-01

    The Gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide, resulting in high mortality. Our in vivo studies show that galectin-3−/− mice develop more severe pneumonia after infection with S. pneumoniae, as demonstrated by increased bacteremia and lung damage compared to wild-type mice and that galectin-3 reduces the severity of pneumococcal pneumonia in part by augmenting neutrophil function. Specifically, we show that 1) galectin-3 directly acts as a neutrophil-activating agent and potentiates the effect of fMLP, 2) exogenous galectin-3 augments neutrophil phagocytosis of bacteria and delays neutrophil apoptosis, 3) phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils by galectin-3−/− macrophages is less efficient compared to wild type, and 4) galectin-3 demonstrates bacteriostatic properties against S. pneumoniae in vitro. Furthermore, ad-back of recombinant galectin-3 in vivo protects galectin-3-deficient mice from developing severe pneumonia. Together, these results demonstrate that galectin-3 is a key molecule in the host defense against pneumococcal infection. Therapeutic strategies designed to augment galectin-3 activity may both enhance inflammatory cell function (by directly affecting neutrophil responsiveness and prolonging neutrophil longevity) and have direct bacteriostatic activity, improving clinical outcomes after severe pneumococcal infection. PMID:18202191

  12. Persistent cyanosis in a 4 month old infant with severe pneumonia and haemoglobin M.

    PubMed

    Hütten, M; Kohne, E; Yagmur, E; Schaible, T; Wenzl, T; Wagner, N; Heimann, K

    2009-09-01

    M haemoglobinaemia is a rare cause of persistant cyanosis. We report a four months old infant who suffered from severe pneumonia and respiratory distress syndrome. After return of normal respiration, cyanosis persisted. Oxygen saturation on pulse oximetry never exceeded 85%. Finally, we succeeded in isolating a haemoglobin M Saskatoon. HbM Saskatoon is normally a harmless variant. However, in conjunction with severe pneumonia, we assume that it did not only affect clinical evaluation, but also exacerbated pneumonia by reducing the oxygen binding capacity.

  13. Severe Pneumonia Caused by Legionella pneumophila: Differential Diagnosis and Therapeutic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Chahin, Abdullah; Opal, Steven M

    2017-03-01

    Severe legionella pneumonia poses a diagnostic challenge and requires early intervention. Legionnaire's disease can have several presenting signs, symptoms, and laboratory abnormalities that suggest that Legionella pneumophila is the pathogen, but none of these are sufficient to distinguish L pneumophila pneumonia from other respiratory pathogens. L pneumophila is primarily an intracellular pathogen and needs treatment with antibiotics that efficiently enter the intracellular space. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... en español Pulmonía You're out in the rain, jumping around in puddles, and somebody yells, "Get ... you really catch it from playing in the rain? What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (say: noo-MOW-nyuh) ...

  15. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... is often caused by viruses, such as the influenza virus (flu) and adenovirus . Other viruses, such as respiratory ... especially which bug is causing the illness. With influenza pneumonia, for ... exposure to the flu virus. But with walking pneumonia, a person may not ...

  16. Efficacy of a three day course of azithromycin in moderately severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Rizzato, G; Montemurro, L; Fraioli, P; Montanari, G; Fanti, D; Pozzoli, R; Magliano, E

    1995-03-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of a 3 day course of azithromycin in low to moderately severe community-acquired pneumonia. Forty patients with low to moderately severe community-acquired pneumonia (29 males, 11 females, mean age 46 +/- 17 yrs; 20 pretreated with betalactams for 2-10 days with no results before admission to hospital; 18 with evidence of co-morbidity) were enrolled in an open, randomized study with azithromycin, 500 mg q.d. oral therapy for 3 days, versus clarithromycin, 250 mg b.i.d. oral therapy for 10 +/- 2 days. The aetiology of pneumonia was identified in 18 patients by serology (nine Mycoplasma pneumoniae, four Chlamydia pneumoniae, five Legionella pneumophila; one patient with chlamydial infection also had Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteraemia). A presumptive aetiological diagnosis was obtained with sputum culture in three other patients (one Haemophilus influenzae, two Haemophilus parainfluenzae), all strains were sole isolates with 10(8) Colony forming units (CFU), and with Gram stain in one patient with Streptococcus pneumoniae. All patients in the azithromycin group (one after a second 3 day course), and all but two (of those available for evaluation) of the clarithromycin group were cured. Defervescence occurred after 2.6 +/- 1.6 days, and chest roentgenogram cleared after 8.9 +/- 3.3 days, with no difference between the two groups. Tolerance was good, and there were no withdrawals from therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Massive pulmonary gangrene: a severe complication of Klebsiella pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, L.; Fraser, R. G.; Robson, H. G.

    1975-01-01

    Summary: Massive pulmonary gangrene developed in two patients. Review of the literature reveals 10 other case reports of pulmonary gangrene complicating lobar pneumonia. Among the total of 12 patients whose cases have now been reported, all 4 patients who were treated nonsurgically died and the 8 who underwent surgical resection of the gangrenous lung survived. The present report emphasizes the necessity of early recognition and appropriate surgical treatment for a successful outcome. Images FIG. 1A FIG. 1B FIG. 2 FIG. 3A FIG. 3B FIG. 4 PMID:1089466

  18. Severe community-acquired pneumonia and positive urinary antigen test for S. pneumoniae: amoxicillin is associated with a favourable outcome.

    PubMed

    Blanc, V; Mothes, A; Smetz, A; Timontin, I; Guardia, M D; Billiemaz, A; Dellamonica, J; Vassallo, M; Néri, D; Chadapaud, S; Toyer, A-L; Del Guidice, P; Fribourg, A; Léotard, S; Nicolle, I; Roger, P-M

    2015-12-01

    Positive urinary antigen tests (UAT) for pneumococcal infection in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) may lead to targeted antibiotic therapy. We report an audit aimed at defining the link between mortality and targeted therapy. We conducted a retrospective multicentre audit of patients with severe CAP for whom a UAT was positive for S. pneumoniae. Patients admitted from January 2010 to December 2013 to 8 medical centres (from A to H) were included. Co-morbidities were defined by the specific treatment administered before hospital care, or if the diagnosis was newly established during the hospital stay. We used the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) to assess disease severity. Only patients with PSI > 90 were included. Antibiotic treatments and the PSI were extracted from patients' charts. Amoxicillin had to be prescribed as a targeted antibiotic treatment or at the time of antibiotic reassessment. A total of 389 patients were included. The mean (±STD) PSI score was 128 ± 29; 38.9% of the patients had a class 5 PSI score. Intensive care was required for 36.6% of the patients. Amoxicillin was initially prescribed in 47 cases (12.1%) and in 34 cases after reassessment (8.7%). In logistic regression analysis, we found three parameters associated with mortality: being hospitalised in institution D, class 5 PSI score, and metastatic cancer. In contrast, three antibiotic regimens were protective factors, including targeted therapy: OR = 0.09, p < 0.001. In the context of severe CAP with positive UAT for S. pneumoniae, targeted therapy was associated with a reduction in mortality.

  19. Cost of management of severe pneumonia in young children: systematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shanshan; Sammon, Peter M.; King, Isobel; Andrade, Ana Lucia; Toscano, Cristiana M.; Araujo, Sheila N; Sinha, Anushua; Madhi, Shabir A.; Khandaker, Gulam; Yin, Jiehui Kevin; Booy, Robert; Huda, Tanvir M; Rahman, Qazi S; El Arifeen, Shams; Gentile, Angela; Giglio, Norberto; Bhuiyan, Mejbah U.; Sturm–Ramirez, Katharine; Gessner, Bradford D.; Nadjib, Mardiati; Carosone–Link, Phyllis J.; Simões, Eric AF; Child, Jason A; Ahmed, Imran; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Soofi, Sajid B; Khan, Rumana J; Campbell, Harry; Nair, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Background Childhood pneumonia is a major cause of childhood illness and the second leading cause of child death globally. Understanding the costs associated with the management of childhood pneumonia is essential for resource allocation and priority setting for child health. Methods We conducted a systematic review to identify studies reporting data on the cost of management of pneumonia in children younger than 5 years old. We collected unpublished cost data on non–severe, severe and very severe pneumonia through collaboration with an international working group. We extracted data on cost per episode, duration of hospital stay and unit cost of interventions for the management of pneumonia. The mean (95% confidence interval, CI) and median (interquartile range, IQR) treatment costs were estimated and reported where appropriate. Results We identified 24 published studies eligible for inclusion and supplemented these with data from 10 unpublished studies. The 34 studies included in the cost analysis contained data on more than 95 000 children with pneumonia from both low– and–middle income countries (LMIC) and high–income countries (HIC) covering all 6 WHO regions. The total cost (per episode) for management of severe pneumonia was US$ 4.3 (95% CI 1.5–8.7), US$ 51.7 (95% CI 17.4–91.0) and US$ 242.7 (95% CI 153.6–341.4)–559.4 (95% CI 268.9–886.3) in community, out–patient facilities and different levels of hospital in–patient settings in LMIC. Direct medical cost for severe pneumonia in hospital inpatient settings was estimated to be 26.6%–115.8% of patients’ monthly household income in LMIC. The mean direct non–medical cost and indirect cost for severe pneumonia management accounted for 0.5–31% of weekly household income. The mean length of stay (LOS) in hospital for children with severe pneumonia was 5.8 (IQR 5.3–6.4) and 7.7 (IQR 5.5–9.9) days in LMIC and HIC respectively for these children. Conclusion This is the most

  20. Care at first-level facilities for children with severe pneumonia in Bangladesh: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Enayet K; El Arifeen, Shams; Rahman, Muntasirur; Hoque, Dm Emdadul; Hossain, M Altaf; Begum, Khadija; Siddik, Ashraf; Begum, Nazma; Sadeq-ur Rahman, Qazi; Akter, Tasnima; Haque, Twaha M; Al-Helal, Za Motin; Baqui, Abdullah H; Bryce, Jennifer; Black, Robert E

    2008-09-06

    Guidelines on integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) for severe pneumonia recommend referral to hospitals. However, in many settings, children who are referred do not actually attend hospital, which severely limits appropriate care. We aimed to assess the safety and effectiveness of modified guidelines that allowed most children with severe pneumonia to be treated locally in first-level facilities, with referral only for those with danger signs or other severe classifications. We did an observational cohort study in ten first-level health facilities in Matlab, rural Bangladesh that had implemented IMCI guidelines. We assessed children with severe pneumonia who were aged between 2 and 59 months, and for whom we could obtain complete information, in two cohorts: 261 children who presented to these facilities between May, 2003, and April, 2004 (before implementation of the modified guidelines) and 1271 children between September, 2004, and August, 2005 (after full implementation). We obtained information about the characteristics and management of their illness, including referrals and admissions to hospital, from facility records. Staff visited households to obtain details of treatment, socioeconomic information, and final outcome, including mortality data. 245 (94%) of 261 children who had severe pneumonia were referred to hospital before the guidelines were modified, compared with 107 (8%) of 1271 after implementation (p<0.0001). 94 (36%) children with severe pneumonia received correct management before the guidelines were modified, compared with 1145 (90%) children after implementation (p<0.0001). Before modification of the guidelines, three children with severe pneumonia who presented at first-level facilities died, with a case-fatality rate of 1.1%; after modification, seven children died, with a case-fatality rate of 0.6% (p=0.39). Local adaptation of the IMCI guidelines, with appropriate training and supervision, could allow safe and effective

  1. Pneumonia-induced sepsis in mice: temporal study of inflammatory and cardiovascular parameters.

    PubMed

    Sordi, Regina; Menezes-de-Lima, Octávio; Della-Justina, Ana M; Rezende, Edir; Assreuy, Jamil

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present work is to provide a better comprehension of the pneumonia-induced sepsis model through temporal evaluation of several parameters, and thus identify the main factors that determine mortality in this model. Klebsiella pneumoniae was inoculated intratracheally in anesthetized Swiss male mice. Inflammatory and cardiovascular parameters were evaluated 6, 24 and 48 h after the insult. The results show that severity of infection and the mortality correlated with the amount of bacteria. Six, 24 and 48 h after inoculation, animals presented pathological changes in lungs, increase in cell number in the bronchoalveolar lavage, leukopenia, increase in TNF-α and IL-1β levels, hypotension and hyporesponsiveness to vasoconstrictors, the two latter characteristics of severe sepsis and septic shock. Significant numbers of bacteria in spleen and heart homogenates indicated infection spreading. Interestingly, NOS-2 expression appeared late after bacteria inoculation, whereas levels of NOS-1 and NOS-3 were unchanged. The high NOS-2 expression coincided with an exacerbated NO production in the infection focus and in plasma, as judging by nitrate + nitrite levels. This study shows that K. pneumoniae inoculation induces a systemic inflammatory response and cardiovascular alterations, which endures at least until 48 h. K. pneumoniae-induced lung infection is a clinically relevant animal model of sepsis and a better understanding of this model may help to increase the knowledge about sepsis pathophysiology. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2013 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  2. Severe pneumonia in the elderly: a multivariate analysis of risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Ding, Cheng; Yin, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the second leading reason for hospitalization of medicare beneficiaries. The mortality rate is high, especially in the elderly. In this study, we aimed to determine the risk factors associated with severe pneumonia in the elderly. Retrospective study was conducted and data of old patients with severe pneumonia were collected. They were divided into two groups: the experiment group (death group) and the control (living group). The general situation, underlying diseases, laboratory tests, types of etiology, imaging analysis and treatment situation of patients were analyzed and compared. Univariate analysis and logistic multivariate regression analysis were used to screen the related and independent risk factors for the diagnosis of severe pneumonia in the elderly. In univariate analysis, there were many factors had statistical significance including chronic kidney disease, electrolyte disturbance, low phosphorus and so on. Result of logistic multivariate regression analysis showed pro-BNP level and serum prealbumin were independent risk factors. In sputum culture, the relevance ratio of acinetobacter baumannii was the highest in gram negative bacteria followed by klebsiella pneumoniae. In gram positive bacteria, the relevance ratio of staphylococcus aureus was the highest. In conclusion, the analysis on risk factors for severe pneumonia has great clinical significance on improving the prognosis. PMID:26550157

  3. Severe pneumonia in the elderly: a multivariate analysis of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Ding, Cheng; Yin, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the second leading reason for hospitalization of medicare beneficiaries. The mortality rate is high, especially in the elderly. In this study, we aimed to determine the risk factors associated with severe pneumonia in the elderly. Retrospective study was conducted and data of old patients with severe pneumonia were collected. They were divided into two groups: the experiment group (death group) and the control (living group). The general situation, underlying diseases, laboratory tests, types of etiology, imaging analysis and treatment situation of patients were analyzed and compared. Univariate analysis and logistic multivariate regression analysis were used to screen the related and independent risk factors for the diagnosis of severe pneumonia in the elderly. In univariate analysis, there were many factors had statistical significance including chronic kidney disease, electrolyte disturbance, low phosphorus and so on. Result of logistic multivariate regression analysis showed pro-BNP level and serum prealbumin were independent risk factors. In sputum culture, the relevance ratio of acinetobacter baumannii was the highest in gram negative bacteria followed by klebsiella pneumoniae. In gram positive bacteria, the relevance ratio of staphylococcus aureus was the highest. In conclusion, the analysis on risk factors for severe pneumonia has great clinical significance on improving the prognosis.

  4. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... vomiting and you are not strong enough to cough the particles out of your lungs.Opportunistic pneumonia ... lungs because you are not strong enough to cough the particles out. Alcohol abuse also interferes with ...

  5. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the flu Your doctor will use your medical history, a physical exam, and lab tests to diagnose pneumonia. Treatment depends on what kind you have. If bacteria are the cause, antibiotics should help. If you ...

  6. Validity of Antibodies in Lymphocyte Supernatant in Diagnosing Tuberculosis in Severely Malnourished Children Presenting with Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Raqib, Rubhana; Banu, Sayera; Shahid, Abu ASMSB; Shahunja, KM; Sharmin, Lazina; Ashraf, Hasan; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in young children can be challenging, especially in severely malnourished children. There is a critical need for improved diagnostics for children. Thus, we sought to evaluate the performance of a technique that measures antibodies in lymphocyte supernatant (ALS) for the diagnosis of TB in severely malnourished children presenting with suspected pneumonia. Methods Children less than 5 years with severe acute malnutrition and radiological features of pneumonia admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, were enrolled consecutively following informed written consent. In addition to clinical and radiological assessment, samples taken for TB diagnosis included gastric lavage fluid and induced sputum for microbiological confirmation. ALS was measured from venous blood, and results were evaluated in children classified as “confirmed”, “non-confirmed TB” or “not TB”. Results Among 224 children who had ALS analysis, 12 (5.4%) children had microbiologically “confirmed TB”, a further 41 (18%) had clinically diagnosed “non-confirmed TB” and the remaining 168 (75%) were considered not to have TB. ALS was positive in 89 (40%) and negative in 85 (39%) of children, with a large number (47 or 21%) reported as “borderline”. These proportions were similar between the three diagnostic groups. The sensitivity and specificity of ALS when comparing “Confirmed TB” to “Not TB” was only 67% (95% CI: 31–91%) and 51% (95% CI: 42–60%), respectively. Conclusions and Significance Our data suggest that ALS is not sufficiently accurate to improve the diagnosis of TB in children with severe malnutrition. PMID:26020966

  7. High prevalence of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia among Mozambican children <5 years of age admitted to hospital with clinical severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lanaspa, M; O'Callaghan-Gordo, C; Machevo, S; Madrid, L; Nhampossa, T; Acácio, S; de la Horra, C; Friaza, V; Campano, E; Alonso, P L; Calderón, E J; Roca, A; Bassat, Q

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to describe Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) prevalence and features in children from sub-Saharan Africa and to investigate PCP-associated risk factors. During 2006-2007 we used molecular methods to test children younger than 5 years old admitted with severe pneumonia to a hospital in southern Mozambique for Pneumocystis infection. We recruited 834 children. PCP prevalence was 6.8% and HIV prevalence was 25.7%. The in-hospital and delayed mortality were significantly higher among children with PCP (20.8% vs. 10.2%, p 0.021, and 11.5% vs. 3.6%, p 0.044, respectively). Clinical features were mostly overlapping between the two groups. Independent risk factors for PCP were age less than a year (odds ratio (OR) 6.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.86-21.65), HIV infection (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.16-7.70), grunting (OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.04-6.73) and digital clubbing (OR 10.75, 95% CI 1.21-95.56). PCP is a common and life-threatening cause of severe pneumonia in Mozambican children. Mother-to-child HIV transmission prevention should be strengthened. Better diagnostic tools are needed.

  8. Pneumonia in patients with severe head injury: incidence, risk factors, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuo-Wei; Chen, Han-Jung; Lu, Kang; Liliang, Po-Chou; Huang, Chun-Kai; Tang, Pi-Lien; Tsai, Yu-Duan; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Liang, Cheng-Loong

    2013-02-01

    The reported incidence of hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia in critically ill trauma patients varies from as low as 4% to as high as 87%, with fatality rates varying from 6% to 59%. Clinical studies have identified the risk factors for pneumonia. The authors undertook this retrospective study to evaluate the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia in a group of patients with severe head injuries. This was a retrospective review of consecutive adult patients admitted to the neurosurgical ICU in the authors' hospital because of severe head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale scores ≤ 8) between January 2008 and December 2010. During the study period, 290 patients were admitted to the neurosurgical ICU. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that age (HR 1.01, 95% CI 1.001-1.02), nasogastric tube insertion (HR 4.56, 95% CI 1.11-18.64), and hemiplegia or hemiparesis (HR 3.79, 95% CI 2.01-7.17) were significantly associated with the development of pneumonia. The authors identified 3 risk factors (age, nasogastric tube insertion, and hemiplegia or hemiparesis) associated with the development of pneumonia in patients with severe head injury. This finding constituted the basis for developing a simple screening tool that can be used to assess the risk of occurrence of pneumonia in such patients.

  9. Influence of porcine circovirus type 2 vaccination on the probability and severity of pneumonia detected postmortem

    PubMed Central

    Raith, J.; Kuchling, S.; Schleicher, C.; Schobesberger, H.; Köfer, J.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of porcine circovirus type 2 vaccination (PCV-2) on the probability and severity of pneumonia, postmortem findings of 247,505 pigs slaughtered between 2008 and 2011 were analysed by applying a cumulative link mixed model. Three major effects could be observed: (1) PCV-2 vaccination significantly (P<0.01) reduced the odds (coefficient: −0.05) of postmortem findings of mild, moderate and severe pneumonia for vaccinated pigs. (2) Pigs from fattening farms were less likely (coefficient: −0.44; P<0.05) to exhibit signs of pneumonia at slaughter than pigs from farrow-to-finish farms. (3) When vaccinated, the odds of detecting postmortem signs showed an even more pronounced reduction (coefficient: −0.19; P<0.001) for pigs from fattening farms. Combining PCV-2 vaccination, farm type and interaction effects between these two factors, a pig vaccinated against PCV-2 from a fattening farm had only half the chance (OR 0.51) of pneumonia being detected at postmortem than a non-vaccinated pig from a farrow-to-finish farm. The study demonstrates the benefit of a vaccination programme against PCV-2 as an important tool to reduce the risk of postmortem pneumonia findings and the severity of pneumonia in pigs at slaughter. PMID:25413158

  10. Acute lung inflammation in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia and sepsis in BALB/c mice: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2011-10-01

    Lungs play an important role in the body's defense against a variety of pathogens, but this network of immune system-mediated defense can be deregulated during acute pulmonary infections. The present study compares acute lung inflammation occurring during Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia and sepsis in BALB/c mice. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal instillation of bacteria (10(4) cfu), while sepsis was developed by placing the fibrin-thrombin clot containing known amount of bacteria (10(2) cfu) into the peritoneal cavity of animals. Mice with sepsis showed 100% mortality within five post-infection days, whereas all the animals with pneumonia survived. In animals suffering from K. pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia, all the inflammatory parameters (TNF-α, IL-1α, MPO, MDA, and NO) were found to be maximum till third post-infection day, after that, a decline was observed, whereas in septic animals, all the above-mentioned markers of inflammation kept on increasing. Histopathological study showed presence of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages (or foam cells) in lungs of mice with pneumonia after third post-infection day, which might have contributed to the induction of resolution of inflammation, but no such observation was made in lungs of septic mice. Hence, during pneumonia, controlled activation of macrophages may lead to resolution of inflammation.

  11. Terlipressin Induced Severe Hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Šíma, Martin; Pokorný, Miroslav; Paďour, František; Slanař, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Terlipressin is a vasopressin analogue used for its vasoconstrictor effect in the treatment of variceal bleeding. Despite its good safety profile compared to vasopressin, some adverse reactions may occur during its use - e.g. hyponatremia. We describe a case of a cirrhotic patient with active variceal bleeding treated during two separate hospitalizations with terlipressin. In both drug treatment periods, severe laboratory hyponatremia developed. After terlipressin discontinuation, mineral disbalance corrected rapidly. Positive dechallenge and rechallenge corresponding to the drug administration schedule confirms the causality between terlipressin administration and hyponatremia. Hyponatremia was preceded with substantial fluid retention in both episodes. In this case report we want to highlight the need for fluid balance monitoring immediately after first terlipressin dose, which may individually predict the patient risk for the development of hyponatremia as other risk factors have rather limited predictive value in real clinical settings.

  12. Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS Toxin Induces Pulmonary Eosinophilic and Lymphocytic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Jorge L.; Coalson, Jacqueline J.; Brooks, Edward G.; Winter, Vicki T.; Chaparro, Adriana; Principe, Molly F. R.; Kannan, Thirumalai R.; Baseman, Joel B.

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes acute and chronic lung infections in humans, leading to a variety of pulmonary and extrapulmonary sequelae. Of the airway complications of M. pneumoniae infection, M. pneumoniae–associated exacerbation of asthma and pediatric wheezing are emerging as significant sources of human morbidity. However, M. pneumoniae products capable of promoting allergic inflammation are unknown. Recently, we reported that M. pneumoniae produces an ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating toxin termed the community-acquired respiratory distress syndrome (CARDS) toxin. Here we report that naive mice exposed to a single dose of recombinant CARDS (rCARDS) toxin respond with a robust inflammatory response consistent with allergic disease. rCARDS toxin induced 30-fold increased expression of the Th-2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 and 70- to 80-fold increased expression of the Th-2 chemokines CCL17 and CCL22, corresponding to a mixed cellular inflammatory response comprised of a robust eosinophilia, accumulation of T cells and B cells, and mucus metaplasia. The inflammatory responses correlate temporally with toxin-dependent increases in airway hyperreactivity characterized by increases in airway restriction and decreases in lung compliance. Furthermore, CARDS toxin–mediated changes in lung function and histopathology are dependent on CD4+ T cells. Altogether, the data suggest that rCARDS toxin is capable of inducing allergic-type inflammation in naive animals and may represent a causal factor in M. pneumoniae–associated asthma. PMID:22281984

  13. Radiation-Induced Organizing Pneumonia: A Characteristic Disease that Requires Symptom-Oriented Management

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Keisuke; Seo, Yuji; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia (RIOP) is an inflammatory lung disease that is occasionally observed after irradiation to the breast. It is a type of secondary organizing pneumonia that is characterized by infiltrates outside the irradiated volume that are sometimes migratory. Corticosteroids work acutely, but relapse of pneumonia is often experienced. Management of RIOP should simply be symptom-oriented, and the use of corticosteroids should be limited to severe symptoms from the perspective not only of cost-effectiveness but also of cancer treatment. Once steroid therapy is started, it takes a long time to stop it due to frequent relapses. We review RIOP from the perspective of its diagnosis, epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis, and patient management. PMID:28134830

  14. Radiation-Induced Organizing Pneumonia: A Characteristic Disease that Requires Symptom-Oriented Management.

    PubMed

    Otani, Keisuke; Seo, Yuji; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-27

    Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia (RIOP) is an inflammatory lung disease that is occasionally observed after irradiation to the breast. It is a type of secondary organizing pneumonia that is characterized by infiltrates outside the irradiated volume that are sometimes migratory. Corticosteroids work acutely, but relapse of pneumonia is often experienced. Management of RIOP should simply be symptom-oriented, and the use of corticosteroids should be limited to severe symptoms from the perspective not only of cost-effectiveness but also of cancer treatment. Once steroid therapy is started, it takes a long time to stop it due to frequent relapses. We review RIOP from the perspective of its diagnosis, epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis, and patient management.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Mild and Severe Pneumonia: Insights from RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sai; Feng, Cong; Chen, Li; Huang, Zhi; Zhou, Xuan; Li, Bei; Wang, Li-Li; Chen, Wei; Lv, Fa-Qin; Li, Tan-Shi

    2017-04-06

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying mild and severe pneumonia by use of mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq). MATERIAL AND METHODS RNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of patients with mild pneumonia, severe pneumonia, and healthy controls. Sequencing was performed on the HiSeq4000 platform. After filtering, clean reads were mapped to the human reference genome hg19. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between the control group and the mild or severe group. A transcription factor-gene network was constructed for each group. Biological process (BP) terms enriched by DEGs in the network were analyzed and these genes were also mapped to the Connectivity map to search for small-molecule drugs. RESULTS A total of 199 and 560 DEGs were identified from the mild group and severe group, respectively. A transcription factor-gene network consisting of 215 nodes and another network consisting of 451 nodes were constructed in the mild group and severe group, respectively, and 54 DEGs (e.g., S100A9 and S100A12) were found to be common, with consistent differential expression changes in the 2 groups. Genes in the transcription factor-gene network for the mild group were mainly enriched in 13 BP terms, especially defense and inflammatory response (e.g., S100A8) and spermatogenesis, while the top BP terms enriched by genes in the severe group include response to oxidative stress (CCL5), wound healing, and regulation of cell differentiation (CCL5), and of the cellular protein metabolic process. CONCLUSIONS S100A9 and S100A12 may have a role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia: S100A9 and CXCL1 may contribute solely in mild pneumonia, and CCL5 and CXCL11 may contribute in severe pneumonia.

  16. Therapeutic activities of cefazolin, cefotaxime, and ceftazidime against experimentally induced Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Bakker-Woudenberg, I A; van den Berg, J C; Michel, M F

    1982-01-01

    The efficacies of several dosage schedules of cefazolin, cefotaxime, and ceftazidime, started 12 or 36 h after infection, were examined in experimental pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in rats. The therapeutic activities of the cephalosporins were compared with the antibacterial activities in vitro and the serum concentration curves. The course of experimental pneumonia was rapid and characterized by tissue necrosis. Response to antimicrobial treatment was evaluated with respect to mortality and numbers of bacteria in lung (left lobe), blood, and pleural fluid. When antibiotic treatment was started early, i.e., 12 h after bacterial inoculation, cefotaxime and ceftazidime were equally effective and superior to cefazolin. Eleven doses of 10 mg of cefotaxime or ceftazidime per kg or 11 doses of 60 mg of cefazolin per kg were required to improve the survival rate. With a delay in administration to 36 h after inoculation, the efficacy of the cephalosporins decreased markedly. In the three dosages tested, cefazolin was ineffective. Survival improved with the administration of nine doses of 60 mg of cefotaxime per kg or nine doses of 10 mg of ceftazidime per kg. These results are not in accordance with the ratio of in vitro activities of cefotaxime and ceftazidime or the serum concentration curves. Images PMID:6297384

  17. Severe pneumonia due to Nocardia otitidiscaviarum identified by mass spectroscopy in a cotton farmer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen; Feng, Mei; Zhu, Jing; Tao, Ye; Kang, Mei; Chen, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Nocardia species are aerobic saprophytic bacilli. Among Nocardia species, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum (N otitidiscaviarum) is rarely reported in pulmonary infection. Patient concerns: We reported a case of N otitidiscaviarum pneumonia in a cotton farmer. Diagnoses: N otitidiscaviarum pneumonia was identified by mass spectroscopy. Interventions: Combined treatments (amikacin, imipenem and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) were administered after identification of N otitidiscaviarum. Outcomes: The patient eventually died from severe respiratory insufficiency in the hospital. Lessons: Early precise diagnosis and prompt combined therapy are of vital importance in severe Nocardia pulmonary infection. PMID:28353613

  18. Mortality of community-acquired pneumonia in Korea: assessed with the pneumonia severity index and the CURB-65 score.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye In; Kim, Shin Woo; Chang, Hyun Ha; Cha, Seung Ick; Lee, Jae Hee; Ki, Hyun Kyun; Cheong, Hae Suk; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Ryu, Seong Yeol; Kwon, Ki Tae; Lee, Byung Kee; Choo, Eun Ju; Kim, Do Jin; Kang, Cheol-In; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae Hoon; Suh, Gee Young; Shim, Tae Sun; Kim, Young Keun; Kim, Hyo Youl; Moon, Chi Sook; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Park, Seong Yeon; Oh, Jin Young; Jung, Sook In; Park, Kyung Hwa; Yun, Na Ra; Yoon, Sung Ho; Sohn, Kyung Mok; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Jung, Ki Suck

    2013-09-01

    The pneumonia severity index (PSI) and CURB-65 are widely used tools for the prediction of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). This study was conducted to evaluate validation of severity scoring system including the PSI and CURB-65 scores of Korean CAP patients. In the prospective CAP cohort (participated in by 14 hospitals in Korea from January 2009 to September 2011), 883 patients aged over 18 yr were studied. The 30-day mortalities of all patients were calculated with their PSI index classes and CURB scores. The overall mortality rate was 4.5% (40/883). The mortality rates per CURB-65 score were as follows: score 0, 2.3% (6/260); score 1, 4.0% (12/300); score 2, 6.0% (13/216); score 3, 5.7% (5/88); score 4, 23.5% (4/17); and score 5, 0% (0/2). Mortality rate with PSI risk class were as follows: I, 2.3% (4/174); II, 2.7% (5/182); III, 2.3% (5/213); IV, 4.5% (11/245); and V, 21.7% (15/69). The subgroup mortality rate of Korean CAP patients varies based on the severity scores and CURB-65 is more valid for the lower scores, and PSI, for the higher scores. Thus, these variations must be considered when using PSI and CURB-65 for CAP in Korean patients.

  19. Causes of non-adherence to therapeutic guidelines in severe community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Gattarello, Simone; Ramírez, Sergio; Almarales, José Rafael; Borgatta, Bárbara; Lagunes, Leonel; Encina, Belén; Rello, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the adherence to Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines and the causes of lack of adherence during empirical antibiotic prescription in severe pneumonia in Latin America. Methods A clinical questionnaire was submitted to 36 physicians from Latin America; they were asked to indicate the empirical treatment in two fictitious cases of severe respiratory infection: community-acquired pneumonia and nosocomial pneumonia. Results In the case of communityacquired pneumonia, 11 prescriptions of 36 (30.6%) were compliant with international guidelines. The causes for non-compliant treatment were monotherapy (16.0%), the unnecessary prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics (40.0%) and the use of non-recommended antibiotics (44.0%). In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the rate of adherence to the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines was 2.8% (1 patient of 36). The reasons for lack of compliance were monotherapy (14.3%) and a lack of dual antibiotic coverage against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85.7%). If monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered adequate, the antibiotic treatment would be adequate in 100% of the total prescriptions. Conclusion The compliance rate with the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines in the community-acquired pneumonia scenario was 30.6%; the most frequent cause of lack of compliance was the indication of monotherapy. In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the compliance rate with the guidelines was 2.8%, and the most important cause of non-adherence was lack of combined antipseudomonal therapy. If the use of monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered the correct option, the treatment would be adequate in 100% of the prescriptions. PMID:25909312

  20. Causes of non-adherence to therapeutic guidelines in severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gattarello, Simone; Ramírez, Sergio; Almarales, José Rafael; Borgatta, Bárbara; Lagunes, Leonel; Encina, Belén; Rello, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    To assess the adherence to Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines and the causes of lack of adherence during empirical antibiotic prescription in severe pneumonia in Latin America. A clinical questionnaire was submitted to 36 physicians from Latin America; they were asked to indicate the empirical treatment in two fictitious cases of severe respiratory infection: community-acquired pneumonia and nosocomial pneumonia. In the case of community acquired pneumonia, 11 prescriptions of 36 (30.6%) were compliant with international guidelines. The causes for non-compliant treatment were monotherapy (16.0%), the unnecessary prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics (40.0%) and the use of non-recommended antibiotics (44.0%). In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the rate of adherence to the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines was 2.8% (1 patient of 36). The reasons for lack of compliance were monotherapy (14.3%) and a lack of dual antibiotic coverage against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85.7%). If monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered adequate, the antibiotic treatment would be adequate in 100% of the total prescriptions. The compliance rate with the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines in the community-acquired pneumonia scenario was 30.6%; the most frequent cause of lack of compliance was the indication of monotherapy. In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the compliance rate with the guidelines was 2.8%, and the most important cause of non-adherence was lack of combined antipseudomonal therapy. If the use of monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered the correct option, the treatment would be adequate in 100% of the prescriptions.

  1. Pneumococcal colonisation density: a new marker for disease severity in HIV-infected adults with pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Albrich, Werner C; Madhi, Shabir A; Adrian, Peter V; van Niekerk, Nadia; Telles, Jean-Noel; Ebrahim, N; Messaoudi, Melina; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Giersdorf, Sven; Vernet, Guy; Mueller, Beat; Klugman, Keith P

    2014-01-01

    Objective A high genomic load of Pneumococcus from blood or cerebrospinal fluid has been associated with increased mortality. We aimed to analyse whether nasopharyngeal colonisation density in HIV-infected patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with markers of disease severity or poor outcome. Methods Quantitative lytA real-time PCR was performed on nasopharyngeal swabs in HIV-infected South African adults hospitalised for acute CAP at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto, South Africa. Pneumonia aetiology was considered pneumococcal if any sputum culture or Gram stain, urinary pneumococcal C-polysaccharide-based antigen, blood culture or whole blood lytA real-time PCR revealed pneumococci. Results There was a moderate correlation between the mean nasopharyngeal colonisation densities and increasing CURB65 scores among all-cause patients with pneumonia (Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.15, p=0.06) or with the Pitt bacteraemia score among patients with pneumococcal bacteraemia (p=0.63). In patients with pneumococcal pneumonia, nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonisation density was higher among non-survivors than survivors (7.7 vs 6.1 log10 copies/mL, respectively, p=0.02) and among those who had pneumococci identified from blood cultures and/or by whole blood lytA real-time PCR than those with non-bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia (6.6 vs 5.6 log10 copies/mL, p=0.03). Nasopharyngeal colonisation density correlated positively with the biomarkers procalcitonin (Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.37, p<0.0001), proadrenomedullin (r=0.39, p=0.008) and copeptin (r=0.30, p=0.01). Conclusions In addition to its previously reported role as a diagnostic tool for pneumococcal pneumonia, quantitative nasopharyngeal colonisation density also correlates with mortality and prognostic biomarkers. It may also be useful as a severity marker for pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected adults. PMID:25113557

  2. Preventative effect of massage on gastric volvulus in infants with gastroesophageal reflux-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yan, Suqi; Xiong, Xiaoli; Wan, Qi; Liu, Fan; Tang, Jianqiao; Jiang, Zhixia; Zhou, Lishan; Yuan, Kai; Xie, Dong

    2015-10-01

    To study the preventative effects of massage on gastric volvulus (GV) in infants with gastroesophageal reflux (GER)-induced pneumonia. One-hundred and eighty GV with GER-induced pneumonia inpatients were divided randomly into four groups: basic treatment 1 (n = 60), basic treatment 2 (n = 30), massage treatment 1 (n = 60) and massage treatment 2 (n = 30). Clinical examinations selected between groups 1 and 2 were different. Radiography of the upper gastrointestinal tract using iodine-containing contrast was assessed in group 1 before and after treatment, whereas 24-h pH monitoring of the distal esophagus was assessed in group 2 before and after treatment. Symptom scores and chest radiography were assessed in all groups upon hospital admission and after procedures. Clinical effects were estimated after procedures in all groups. The prevalence of severe pneumonia among the four groups was compared. Massage treatment groups showed a significantly higher percentage of cure and total effect (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) and a lower prevalence of recurrence (but with no statistic difference, P > 0.05) than basic treatment groups. Furthermore, massage treatment groups had remarkably lower scores for symptoms and signs (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), especially for choking on milk, than basic treatment groups. There was significant attenuation of chest inflammation (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), GV (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) and GER (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) in massage treatment groups compared with those in basic treatment groups. Finally, massage treatment groups demonstrated a lower prevalence of severe pneumonia than basic treatment groups (P < 0.05). Massage treatment can prevent GV with GER-induced pneumonia in infants by timely correction of stomach rotation and subsequent attenuation of GER.

  3. Treatment of severe pneumonia in hospitalized patients: results of a multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial comparing intravenous ciprofloxacin with imipenem-cilastatin. The Severe Pneumonia Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Fink, M P; Snydman, D R; Niederman, M S; Leeper, K V; Johnson, R H; Heard, S O; Wunderink, R G; Caldwell, J W; Schentag, J J; Siami, G A

    1994-01-01

    Intravenously administered ciprofloxacin was compared with imipenem for the treatment of severe pneumonia. In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial, which included an intent-to-treat analysis, a total of 405 patients with severe pneumonia were enrolled. The mean APACHE II score was 17.6, 79% of the patients required mechanical ventilation, and 78% had nosocomial pneumonia. A subgroup of 205 patients (98 ciprofloxacin-treated patients and 107 imipenem-treated patients) were evaluable for the major efficacy endpoints. Patients were randomized to receive intravenous treatment with either ciprofloxacin (400 mg every 8 h) or imipenem (1,000 mg every 8 h), and doses were adjusted for renal function. The primary and secondary efficacy endpoints were bacteriological and clinical responses at 3 to 7 days after completion of therapy. Ciprofloxacin-treated patients had a higher bacteriological eradication rate than did imipenem-treated patients (69 versus 59%; 95% confidence interval of -0.6%, 26.2%; P = 0.069) and also a significantly higher clinical response rate (69 versus 56%; 95% confidence interval of 3.5%, 28.5%; P = 0.021). The greatest difference between ciprofloxacin and imipenem was in eradication of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (93 versus 65%; P = 0.009). Stepwise logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following factors to be associated with bacteriological eradication: absence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P < 0.01), higher weight (P < 0.01), a low APACHE II score (P = 0.03), and treatment with ciprofloxacin (P = 0.04). When P. aeruginosa was recovered from initial respiratory tract cultures, failure to achieve bacteriological eradication and development of resistance during therapy were common in both treatment groups (67 and 33% for ciprofloxacin and 59 and 53% for imipenem, respectively). Seizures were observed more frequently with imipenem than with ciprofloxacin (6 versus 1%; P = 0.028). These results demonstrate that

  4. Study on JNK/AP-1 signaling pathway of airway mucus hypersecretion of severe pneumonia under RSV infection.

    PubMed

    Li, X-M; Sun, S-Z; Wu, F-L; Shi, T; Fan, H-J; Li, D-Z

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the JNK/AP-1 signaling pathway of airway mucus hypersecretion of severe pneumonia under respiratory virus (RSV) infection. Total of 56 severe pneumonia children under RSV infection were selected. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to measure the expression quantity of MUC5B mRNA and MUC5AC mRNA, and ELISA was used to measure the expression quantity of MUC5AC and MUC5B proteins. Following that, the children were divided into airway mucus hypersecretion group (n = 37) and non-hypersecretion group (n = 19). Western blotting was performed to detect the expression levels of JNK1/2, p-JNK1/2 and AP-1 proteins. Expression of MUC5AC and MUC5B proteins, and MUC5AC mRNA and MUC5B mRNA in the airway mucus hypersecretion group were significantly higher than those in the non-hypersecretion group (p < 0.05). The expression levels of JNK1/2, p-JNK1/2 and AP-1 proteins in airway mucus hypersecretion group were higher than those in the non-hypersecretion group (p < 0.05). MUC5AC and MUC5B can be used as marker molecules of airway mucus hypersecretion. Airway mucus hypersecretion of severe pneumonia induced by RSV might be related to the activation of JNK/AP-1 signaling pathway.

  5. Mint3/Apba3 depletion ameliorates severe murine influenza pneumonia and macrophage cytokine production in response to the influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Takayuki; Fujita, Tomoko; Nakaoka, Hiroki J.; Hara, Toshiro; Kobayashi, Noritada; Murakami, Yoshinori; Seiki, Motoharu; Sakamoto, Takeharu

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection is a common cause of severe pneumonia. Studies have suggested that excessive activation of the host immune system including macrophages is responsible for the severe pathologies mediated by IFV infection. Here, we focused on the X11 protein family member Mint3/Apba3, known to promote ATP production via glycolysis by activating hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) in macrophages, and examined its roles in lung pathogenesis and anti-viral defence upon IFV infection. Mint3-deficient mice exhibited improved influenza pneumonia with reduced inflammatory cytokines/chemokine levels and neutrophil infiltration in the IFV-infected lungs without alteration in viral burden, type-I interferon production, or acquired immunity. In macrophages, Mint3 depletion attenuated NF-κB signalling and the resultant cytokine/chemokine production in response to IFV infection by increasing IκBα and activating the cellular energy sensor AMPK, respectively. Thus, Mint3 might represent one of the likely therapeutic targets for the treatment of severe influenza pneumonia without affecting host anti-viral defence through suppressing macrophage cytokine/chemokine production. PMID:27883071

  6. Effect of hyperimmune plasma on the severity of pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi in experimentally infected foals.

    PubMed

    Caston, Stephanie S; McClure, Scott R; Martens, Ronald J; Chaffin, M Keith; Miles, Kristina G; Griffith, Ronald W; Cohen, Noah D

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the prophylactic effectiveness of hyperimmune plasma (HIP) as an aid in the prevention of pneumonia caused by experimental infection with Rhodococcus equi. Thirty neonatal foals were administered R. equi HIP or saline at 2 days of age and were infected with virulent R. equi at 7 days. All foals developed signs or symptoms of respiratory disease. Radiographic scores on day 28 and neutrophil concentrations on day 49 were significantly greater in control foals, and time to respiratory effort score of 2 or higher was significantly shorter for control foals. Three foals, all in the principal group, died or were euthanized before the end of the study, but there was no significant difference in mortality between groups. VapA titers were significantly greater in principal foals. Administration of R. equi HIP decreased the severity of radiographic lesions and prolonged time to increased respiratory effort due to R. equi-induced pneumonia.

  7. Management of severe community-acquired pneumonia in Brazil: a secondary analysis of an international survey

    PubMed Central

    Rabello, Lígia; Conceição, Catarina; Ebecken, Katia; Lisboa, Thiago; Bozza, Fernando Augusto; Soares, Márcio; Póvoa, Pedro; Salluh, Jorge Ibrain Figueira

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate Brazilian physicians’ perceptions regarding the diagnosis, severity assessment, treatment and risk stratification of severe community-acquired pneumonia patients and to compare those perceptions to current guidelines. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional international anonymous survey among a convenience sample of critical care, pulmonary, emergency and internal medicine physicians from Brazil between October and December 2008. The electronic survey evaluated physicians’ attitudes towards the diagnosis, risk assessment and therapeutic interventions for patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia. Results A total of 253 physicians responded to the survey, with 66% from Southeast Brazil. The majority (60%) of the responding physicians had > 10 years of medical experience. The risk assessment of severe community-acquired pneumonia was very heterogeneous, with clinical evaluation as the most frequent approach. Although blood cultures were recognized as exhibiting a poor diagnostic performance, these cultures were performed by 75% of respondents. In contrast, the presence of urinary pneumococcal and Legionella antigens was evaluated by less than 1/3 of physicians. The vast majority of physicians (95%) prescribe antibiotics according to a guideline, with the combination of a 3rd/4th generation cephalosporin plus a macrolide as the most frequent choice. Conclusion This Brazilian survey identified an important gap between guidelines and clinical practice and recommends the institution of educational programs that implement evidence-based strategies for the management of severe community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:25909314

  8. Respiratory viruses from hospitalized children with severe pneumonia in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pneumonia remains a leading cause of child death in developing countries. The viruses in severe pneumonia remain poorly defined. Methods The study was conducted at the Eastern Visayas Regional Medical Center in Tacloban City, Philippines from May 2008 to May 2009. Patients aged 8 days to 13 years old who were admitted to the Department of Pediatrics with severe pneumonia were enrolled for the study. Upon admission, polymerase chain reaction was performed using nasopharyngeal swabs and blood cultures to detect respiratory viruses and bacteria, respectively. Result Among the 819 patients enrolled, at least one virus was detected in 501 cases (61.2%). In addition, 423 cases were positive for a single virus while bacteria were detected in the blood culture sample of 31 cases. The most commonly detected viruses were human rhinoviruses (n = 189), including types A (n = 103), B (n = 17), and C (n = 69), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 165). Novel viruses such as human metapneumovirus, human coronavirus NL63, human bocavirus, and human polyomaviruses WU and KI were also detected. There were 70 deaths, and one or more viruses were detected in 35 (50%) of these cases. Positivity only for influenza A virus (OR = 4.3, 95% CI = 1.3-14.6) was significantly associated with fatal outcome. From the blood culture, Burkholderia cepacia group (n = 9), Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 4), Staphylococcus aureus (n = 4), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 1), and Salmonella C1 (n = 1) were also isolated. Conclusion Viruses were commonly detected in children with severe pneumonia in the Philippines. Hence, viral etiologies should be considered while developing better effective strategies to reduce child pneumonia-related deaths in developing countries. PMID:23092190

  9. Respiratory viruses from hospitalized children with severe pneumonia in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akira; Lupisan, Socorro; Furuse, Yuki; Fuji, Naoko; Saito, Mariko; Tamaki, Raita; Galang, Hazel; Sombrero, Lydia; Mondoy, Melisa; Aniceto, Rapunzel; Olveda, Remigio; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2012-10-23

    Pneumonia remains a leading cause of child death in developing countries. The viruses in severe pneumonia remain poorly defined. The study was conducted at the Eastern Visayas Regional Medical Center in Tacloban City, Philippines from May 2008 to May 2009. Patients aged 8 days to 13 years old who were admitted to the Department of Pediatrics with severe pneumonia were enrolled for the study. Upon admission, polymerase chain reaction was performed using nasopharyngeal swabs and blood cultures to detect respiratory viruses and bacteria, respectively. Among the 819 patients enrolled, at least one virus was detected in 501 cases (61.2%). In addition, 423 cases were positive for a single virus while bacteria were detected in the blood culture sample of 31 cases. The most commonly detected viruses were human rhinoviruses (n = 189), including types A (n = 103), B (n = 17), and C (n = 69), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 165). Novel viruses such as human metapneumovirus, human coronavirus NL63, human bocavirus, and human polyomaviruses WU and KI were also detected. There were 70 deaths, and one or more viruses were detected in 35 (50%) of these cases. Positivity only for influenza A virus (OR = 4.3, 95% CI = 1.3-14.6) was significantly associated with fatal outcome. From the blood culture, Burkholderia cepacia group (n = 9), Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 4), Staphylococcus aureus (n = 4), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 1), and Salmonella C1 (n = 1) were also isolated. Viruses were commonly detected in children with severe pneumonia in the Philippines. Hence, viral etiologies should be considered while developing better effective strategies to reduce child pneumonia-related deaths in developing countries.

  10. Loss of CARD9-mediated innate activation attenuates severe influenza pneumonia without compromising host viral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Takayuki; Iizasa, Ei’ichi; Kobayashi, Noritada; Yoshida, Hiroki; Hara, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection is a common cause of severe viral pneumonia associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is difficult to control with general immunosuppressive therapy including corticosteroids due to the unfavorable effect on viral replication. Studies have suggested that the excessive activation of the innate immunity by IFV is responsible for severe pathologies. In this study, we focused on CARD9, a signaling adaptor known to regulate innate immune activation through multiple innate sensor proteins, and investigated its role in anti-IFV defense and lung pathogenesis in a mouse model recapitulating severe influenza pneumonia with ARDS. We found that influenza pneumonia was dramatically attenuated in Card9-deficient mice, which showed improved mortality with reduced inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the infected lungs. However, viral clearance, type-I interferon production, and the development of anti-viral B and T cell immunity were not compromised by CARD9 deficiency. Syk or CARD9-deficient DCs but not macrophages showed impaired cytokine but not type-I interferon production in response to IFV in vitro, indicating a possible role for the Syk-CARD9 pathway in DCs in excessive inflammation of IFV-infected lungs. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is an ideal therapeutic target for severe influenza pneumonia without affecting viral clearance. PMID:26627732

  11. Severe interstitial pneumonia due to murine typhus in a patient returning from Bali.

    PubMed

    Malheiro, Luís; Ceia, Filipa; Alves, João; Carvalho, Ana Cláudia; Sobrinho-Simões, Joana; Sousa, Rita; Sarmento, António; Santos, Lurdes

    2017-01-01

    Murine typhus has been increasingly reported as a cause of fever in returning travelers from Southeast Asia. We report a case of a previously healthy traveler returning from Bali with an non-specific febrile illness which quickly progressed to a severe form of interstitial pneumonia. After a careful epidemiological evaluation and laboratory analysis, murine typhus was diagnosed.

  12. Outcomes and duration of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia therapy in infants with severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Ingrid S; Englund, Janet A; Burroughs, Lauri M; Torgerson, Troy R; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    This retrospective review of patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) evaluated the relationship between duration of therapy to treat PCP and overall survival. We found that 80% of patients receiving only 21 days of antibiotics survived to 12 months beyond hematopoietic cell transplant, whereas only 25% of patients who required longer treatment for PCP survived to stem cell engraftment.

  13. Risk Factors for Severe Influenza A–Related Pneumonia in Adult Cohort, Mexico, 2013–14

    PubMed Central

    Magaña-Aquino, Martin; Bernal-Silva, Sofía; Araujo-Meléndez, Javier; Comas-García, Andreu; Alonso-Zúñiga, Emma; Torres-Torres, Eliana; Noyola, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    During the 2013–14 influenza season, we assessed characteristics of 102 adults with suspected influenza pneumonia in a hospital in Mexico; most were unvaccinated. More comorbidities and severity of illness were found than for patients admitted during the 2009–10 influenza pandemic. Vaccination policies should focus on risk factors. PMID:25148014

  14. Legionella pneumonia associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and diffuse alveolar hemorrhage - A rare association.

    PubMed

    Kashif, Muhammad; Patel, Ravi; Bajantri, Bharat; Diaz-Fuentes, Gilda

    2017-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a common, usually underreported and undiagnosed cause of community acquired pneumonia which can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage rarely have been associated with legionella infection. We present a 61-year-old man with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and obesity admitted with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. He was found to have Legionella pneumonia with associated diffuse alveolar hemorrhage diagnosed with bronchoscopic sequential bronchoalveolar lavage. He was successfully managed with antibiotics, lung protective strategies and intravenous pulse dose steroids. This patient highlights the unusual association of Legionella infection and diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Additionally, the case re-enforces the need for early and aggressive evaluation and management of patients presenting with pneumonia and progressive hypoxia despite adequate treatment.

  15. Lethal exacerbation of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in severe combined immunodeficiency mice after infection by pneumonia virus of mice.

    PubMed

    Roths, J B; Smith, A L; Sidman, C L

    1993-04-01

    Mice homozygous for the mutant allele scid (severe combined immunodeficiency) have been described as excellent models for Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) pneumonia (PCP), a major health problem in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and other immunodeficiency states. Other microorganisms have been shown to infect AIDS patients simultaneously with Pc, but whether one opportunist is able to directly influence the pathogenicity of another has not been determined previously. We have deliberately coinfected scid mice (with extent Pc infection) with a variety of primarily pneumotropic viruses and bacteria and have identified pneumonia virus of mice as causing a dramatic increase in the density of Pc organisms and the morbidity due to PCP in immunodeficient scid mice. This finding has clinical significance in the management of PCP, in that the identification and treatment of coinfecting pneumotropic pathogens may be as important as treatment targeted at Pc. A search for other synergistic (or antagonistic) microorganisms and determination of their mechanism(s) of action in altering the progression of PCP is indicated.

  16. Severe community-acquired Enterobacter pneumonia: a plea for greater awareness of the concept of health-care-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with Enterobacter community-acquired pneumonia (EnCAP) were admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU). Our primary aim was to describe them as few data are available on EnCAP. A comparison with CAP due to common and typical bacteria was performed. Methods Baseline clinical, biological and radiographic characteristics, criteria for health-care-associated pneumonia (HCAP) were compared between each case of EnCAP and thirty age-matched typical CAP cases. A univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors independently associated with ENCAP. Their outcome was also compared. Results In comparison with CAP due to common bacteria, a lower leukocytosis and constant HCAP criteria were associated with EnCAP. Empiric antibiotic therapy was less effective in EnCAP (20%) than in typical CAP (97%) (p < 0.01). A delay in the initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy (3.3 ± 1.6 vs. 1.2 ± 0.6 days; p < 0.01) and an increase in duration of mechanical ventilation (8.4 ± 5.2 vs. 4.0 ± 4.3 days; p = 0.01) and ICU stay were observed in EnCAP patients. Conclusions EnCAP is a severe infection which is more consistent with HCAP than with typical CAP. This retrospectively suggests that the application of HCAP guidelines should have improved EnCAP management. PMID:21569334

  17. Exposure of bighorn sheep to domestic goats colonized with Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae induces sub-lethal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Cassirer, E. Frances; Potter, Kathleen A.; Foreyt, William J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bronchopneumonia is a population limiting disease of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) that has been associated with contact with domestic Caprinae. The disease is polymicrobial but is initiated by Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, which is commonly carried by both domestic sheep (O. aries) and goats (Capra aegagrus hircus). However, while previous bighorn sheep comingling studies with domestic sheep have resulted in nearly 100% pneumonia mortality, only sporadic occurrence of fatal pneumonia was reported from previous comingling studies with domestic goats. Here, we evaluated the ability of domestic goats of defined M. ovipneumoniae carriage status to induce pneumonia in comingled bighorn sheep. Methodology/Principal findings In experiment 1, three bighorn sheep naïve to M. ovipneumoniae developed non-fatal respiratory disease (coughing, nasal discharge) following comingling with three naturally M. ovipneumoniae-colonized domestic goats. Gross and histological lesions of pneumonia, limited to small areas on the ventral and lateral edges of the anterior and middle lung lobes, were observed at necropsies conducted at the end of the experiment. A control group of three bighorn sheep from the same source housed in isolation during experiment 1 remained free of observed respiratory disease. In experiment 2, three bighorn sheep remained free of observed respiratory disease while comingled with three M. ovipneumoniae-free domestic goats. In experiment 3, introduction of a domestic goat-origin strain of M. ovipneumoniae to the same comingled goats and bighorn sheep used in experiment 2 resulted in clinical signs of respiratory disease (coughing, nasal discharge) in both host species. At the end of experiment 3, gross and histological evidence of pneumonia similar to that observed in experiment 1 bighorn sheep was observed in both affected bighorn sheep and domestic goats. Conclusions/Significance M. ovipneumoniae strains carried by domestic goats were transmitted to

  18. Exposure of bighorn sheep to domestic goats colonized with Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae induces sub-lethal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Besser, Thomas E; Cassirer, E Frances; Potter, Kathleen A; Foreyt, William J

    2017-01-01

    Bronchopneumonia is a population limiting disease of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) that has been associated with contact with domestic Caprinae. The disease is polymicrobial but is initiated by Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, which is commonly carried by both domestic sheep (O. aries) and goats (Capra aegagrus hircus). However, while previous bighorn sheep comingling studies with domestic sheep have resulted in nearly 100% pneumonia mortality, only sporadic occurrence of fatal pneumonia was reported from previous comingling studies with domestic goats. Here, we evaluated the ability of domestic goats of defined M. ovipneumoniae carriage status to induce pneumonia in comingled bighorn sheep. In experiment 1, three bighorn sheep naïve to M. ovipneumoniae developed non-fatal respiratory disease (coughing, nasal discharge) following comingling with three naturally M. ovipneumoniae-colonized domestic goats. Gross and histological lesions of pneumonia, limited to small areas on the ventral and lateral edges of the anterior and middle lung lobes, were observed at necropsies conducted at the end of the experiment. A control group of three bighorn sheep from the same source housed in isolation during experiment 1 remained free of observed respiratory disease. In experiment 2, three bighorn sheep remained free of observed respiratory disease while comingled with three M. ovipneumoniae-free domestic goats. In experiment 3, introduction of a domestic goat-origin strain of M. ovipneumoniae to the same comingled goats and bighorn sheep used in experiment 2 resulted in clinical signs of respiratory disease (coughing, nasal discharge) in both host species. At the end of experiment 3, gross and histological evidence of pneumonia similar to that observed in experiment 1 bighorn sheep was observed in both affected bighorn sheep and domestic goats. M. ovipneumoniae strains carried by domestic goats were transmitted to comingled bighorn sheep, triggering development of pneumonia. However

  19. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W; Nawroth, Peter P; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A D

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated-if any-cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS.

  20. A clinical tool to predict failed response to therapy in children with severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Mamtani, Manju; Patel, Archana; Hibberd, Patricia L; Tuan, Tran Anh; Jeena, Prakash; Chisaka, Noel; Hassan, Mumtaz; Radovan, Irene Maulen; Thea, Donald M; Qazi, Shamim; Kulkarni, Hemant

    2009-04-01

    Severe pneumonia in children under 5 years of age continues to be an important clinical entity with treatment failure rates as high as 20%. Where severe pneumonias are common, predictive tools for treatment failure like chest radiography and pulse oximetry are not available or affordable. Thus, there is a need for development of simple, accurate and inexpensive clinical tools for prediction of treatment failure. Using clinical, chest radiographic and pulse oximetry data from 1702 children recruited in the Amoxicillin Penicillin Pneumonia International Study (APPIS) trial we developed and validated a simple clinical tool. For development, a randomly derived development sample (n = 889) was used. The tool which was based on the results of multivariate logistic regression models was validated on a separate sample of 813 children. The derived clinical tool in its final form contained three clinical predictors: age of child, excess age-specific respiratory rate at baseline and at 24 hr of hospitalization. This tool had a 70% and 66% predictive accuracy in the development and validation samples, respectively. The tool is presented as an easy-to-use nomogram. It is possible to predict the likelihood of treatment failure in children with severe pneumonia based on clinical features that are simple and inexpensive to measure.

  1. Importance of Legionella pneumophila in the etiology of severe community-acquired pneumonia in Santiago, Chile.

    PubMed

    Arancibia, Francisco; Cortes, Claudia P; Valdés, Marcelo; Cerda, Javier; Hernández, Antonio; Soto, Luis; Torres, Antoni

    2014-02-01

    In US and European literature, Legionella pneumophila is reported as an important etiologic agent of severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), but in Chile this information is lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and identify predictors of severe CAP caused by L pneumophila in Santiago, Chile. A multicenter, prospective clinical study lasting 18 months was conducted; it included all adult patients with severe CAP admitted to the ICUs of four hospitals in Santiago. We excluded patients who were immunocompromised, had been hospitalized in the previous 4 weeks, or presented with another disease during their hospitalization. All data for the diagnosis of severe CAP were registered, and urinary antigens for L pneumophila serogroup 1 were determined. A total of 104 patients with severe CAP were included (mean ± SD age, 58.3 ± 19.3 years; men, 64.4%; APACHE (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation) II score, 16.7 ± 6.3; Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score, 6.1 ± 3.2; Pitt Bacteremia Score, 3.4 ± 2.5; Pao2/Fio2, 170.8 ± 87.1). An etiologic agent was identified in 62 patients (59.6%), with the most frequent being Streptococcus pneumoniae (27 patients [26%]) and L pneumophila (nine patients [8.6%]). Logistic regression analysis showed that a plasma sodium level of ≤ 130 mEq/L was an independent predictor for L pneumophila severe CAP (OR, 11.3; 95% CI, 2.5-50.5; P = .002). Global mortality was 26% and 33% for L pneumophila. The Pitt bacteremia score and pneumonia score index were the best predictors of mortality. We found that in Santiago, L pneumophila was second to S pneumoniae as the etiologic agent of severe CAP. Severe hyponatremia at admission appears to be an indicator for L pneumophila etiology in severe CAP.

  2. A Serendipitous Mutation Reveals the Severe Virulence Defect of a Klebsiella pneumoniae fepB Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Michelle; Broberg, Christopher A.; Walker, Kimberly A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is considered a significant public health threat because of the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains and the challenge associated with treating life-threatening infections. Capsule, siderophores, and adhesins have been implicated as virulence determinants of K. pneumoniae, yet we lack a clear understanding of how this pathogen causes disease. In a previous screen for virulence genes, we identified a potential new virulence locus and constructed a mutant (smr) with this locus deleted. In this study, we characterize the smr mutant and show that this mutation renders K. pneumoniae avirulent in a pneumonia model of infection. The smr mutant was expected to have a deletion of three genes, but subsequent genome sequencing indicated that a much larger deletion had occurred. Further analysis of the deleted region indicated that the virulence defect of the smr mutant could be attributed to the loss of FepB, a periplasmic protein required for import of the siderophore enterobactin. Interestingly, a ΔfepB mutant was more attenuated than a mutant unable to synthesize enterobactin, suggesting that additional processes are affected. As FepB is highly conserved among the members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, therapeutic targeting of FepB may be useful for the treatment of Klebsiella and other bacterial infections. IMPORTANCE In addition to having a reputation as the causative agent of several types of hospital-acquired infections, Klebsiella pneumoniae has gained widespread attention as a pathogen with a propensity for acquiring antibiotic resistance. It is capable of causing a range of infections, including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis. Because of the rapid emergence of carbapenem resistance among Klebsiella strains, there is a dire need for a better understanding of virulence mechanisms and identification of new drug targets. Here, we identify the periplasmic transporter FepB as one such potential target. PMID

  3. [A case of nonclostridial gas gangrene of the leg complicated by severe pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Seiko; Baba, Kenji; Suzuki, Kiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Etsuro

    2005-10-01

    A 73-year-old man admitted for febrile left leg pain with dyspnea, who had poorly controlled diabetes was found on admission to have severe hypoxia and chest X-ray showed infiltrates in the middle to lower left lung. X-rays of the left leg showed gas around the knee joint. These findings suggested severe pneumonia with gas gangrene, necessitating immediate debridement of the gas gangrene lesion and hyperbaric oxygenation. Antibiotics were also administered intravenously (panipenem/betamipron 0.5 g x 3/day, clindamycin 600 mg x 2/day, and erythromycin 500 mg x 3/day). We conducted fiberoptic bronchoscope daily because consolidation of the whole left lung developed with purulent sputum expectoration. Both pneumonia and gas gangrene gradually ameliorated avoiding amputation of theleg. Gas gangrene was cured without leaving sequelae such as motor dysfunction. Staphylococcus aureus was detected in both pus from the leg and sputum collected by bronchoscopy. Microorganisms showed the same pattern of sensitivity to antibiotics, suggesting a causal relationship between pneumonia and gas gangrene through the blood stream. Gas gangrene was considered the primary infection followed by pneumonia, since pain and swelling of the left leg preceded the airway symptoms. The present case illustrates in compromised hosts including diabetics, gas gangrene may develop taking an opportunity of airway infection, and that in some cases, early debridement of the lesion and optimal use of antibiotics may help cure this disease without aggressive surgery. Hyperbaric oxygenation may also be useful, although its validity must be investigated further.

  4. Predictors of Severe Sepsis among Patients Hospitalized for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Antoni; Reyes, Soledad; Méndez, Raúl; Zalacaín, Rafael; Capelastegui, Alberto; Rajas, Olga; Borderías, Luis; Martin-Villasclaras, Juan; Bello, Salvador; Alfageme, Inmaculada; Rodríguez de Castro, Felipe; Rello, Jordi; Molinos, Luis; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe sepsis, may be present on hospital arrival in approximately one-third of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Objective To determine the host characteristics and micro-organisms associated with severe sepsis in patients hospitalized with CAP. Results We performed a prospective multicenter cohort study in 13 Spanish hospital, on 4070 hospitalized CAP patients, 1529 of whom (37.6%) presented with severe sepsis. Severe sepsis CAP was independently associated with older age (>65 years), alcohol abuse (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.07–1.61), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.50–2.04) and renal disease (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.21–2.03), whereas prior antibiotic treatment was a protective factor (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.52–0.73). Bacteremia (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.05–1.79), S pneumoniae (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.31–1.95) and mixed microbial etiology (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.10–2.49) were associated with severe sepsis CAP. Conclusions CAP patients with COPD, renal disease and alcohol abuse, as well as those with CAP due to S pneumonia or mixed micro-organisms are more likely to present to the hospital with severe sepsis. PMID:26727202

  5. Post-discharge mortality in children with severe malnutrition and pneumonia in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Graham, Stephen M; Duke, Trevor; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Shahid, Abu S M S B; Shahunja, K M; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2014-01-01

    Post-discharge mortality among children with severe illness in resource-limited settings is under-recognized and there are limited data. We evaluated post-discharge mortality in a recently reported cohort of children with severe malnutrition and pneumonia, and identified characteristics associated with an increased risk of death. Young children (<5 years of age) with severe malnutrition (WHO criteria) and radiographic pneumonia on admission to Dhaka Hospital of icddr,b over a 15-month period were managed according to standard protocols. Those discharged were followed-up and survival status at 12 weeks post-discharge was determined. Verbal autopsy was requested from families of those that died. Of 405 children hospitalized with severe malnutrition and pneumonia, 369 (median age, 10 months) were discharged alive with a follow-up plan. Of these, 32 (8.7%) died in the community within 3 months of discharge: median 22 (IQR 9-35) days from discharge to death. Most deaths were reportedly associated with acute onset of new respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms. Those that died following discharge were significantly younger (median 6 [IQR 3,12] months) and more severely malnourished, on admission and on discharge, than those that survived. Bivariate analysis found that severe wasting on admission (OR 3.64, 95% CI 1.66-7.97) and age <12 months (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.1-8.8) were significantly associated with post-discharge death. Of those that died in the community, none had attended a scheduled follow-up and care-seeking from a traditional healer was more common (p<0.001) compared to those who survived. Post-discharge mortality was common in Bangladeshi children following inpatient care for severe malnutrition and pneumonia. The underlying contributing factors require a better understanding to inform the potential of interventions that could improve survival.

  6. Post-Discharge Mortality in Children with Severe Malnutrition and Pneumonia in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Graham, Stephen M.; Duke, Trevor; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2014-01-01

    Background Post-discharge mortality among children with severe illness in resource-limited settings is under-recognized and there are limited data. We evaluated post-discharge mortality in a recently reported cohort of children with severe malnutrition and pneumonia, and identified characteristics associated with an increased risk of death. Methods Young children (<5 years of age) with severe malnutrition (WHO criteria) and radiographic pneumonia on admission to Dhaka Hospital of icddr,b over a 15-month period were managed according to standard protocols. Those discharged were followed-up and survival status at 12 weeks post-discharge was determined. Verbal autopsy was requested from families of those that died. Results Of 405 children hospitalized with severe malnutrition and pneumonia, 369 (median age, 10 months) were discharged alive with a follow-up plan. Of these, 32 (8.7%) died in the community within 3 months of discharge: median 22 (IQR 9–35) days from discharge to death. Most deaths were reportedly associated with acute onset of new respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms. Those that died following discharge were significantly younger (median 6 [IQR 3,12] months) and more severely malnourished, on admission and on discharge, than those that survived. Bivariate analysis found that severe wasting on admission (OR 3.64, 95% CI 1.66–7.97) and age <12 months (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.1–8.8) were significantly associated with post-discharge death. Of those that died in the community, none had attended a scheduled follow-up and care-seeking from a traditional healer was more common (p<0.001) compared to those who survived. Conclusion and Significance Post-discharge mortality was common in Bangladeshi children following inpatient care for severe malnutrition and pneumonia. The underlying contributing factors require a better understanding to inform the potential of interventions that could improve survival. PMID:25225798

  7. The Diagnostic Utility of Induced Sputum Microscopy and Culture in Childhood Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, David R; Morpeth, Susan C; Hammitt, Laura L; Driscoll, Amanda J; Watson, Nora L; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Feikin, Daniel R; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; O'Brien, Katherine L; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Adrian, Peter V; Ahmed, Dilruba; Alam, Muntasir; Awori, Juliet O; DeLuca, Andrea N; Higdon, Melissa M; Karron, Ruth A; Kwenda, Geoffrey; Machuka, Eunice M; Makprasert, Sirirat; McLellan, Jessica; Moore, David P; Mwaba, John; Mwarumba, Salim; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Sangwichian, Ornuma; Sissoko, Seydou; Tapia, Milagritos D; Zeger, Scott L; Howie, Stephen R C

    2017-06-15

    Sputum microscopy and culture are commonly used for diagnosing the cause of pneumonia in adults but are rarely performed in children due to difficulties in obtaining specimens. Induced sputum is occasionally used to investigate lower respiratory infections in children but has not been widely used in pneumonia etiology studies. We evaluated the diagnostic utility of induced sputum microscopy and culture in patients enrolled in the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study, a large study of community-acquired pneumonia in children aged 1-59 months. Comparisons were made between induced sputum samples from hospitalized children with radiographically confirmed pneumonia and children categorized as nonpneumonia (due to the absence of prespecified clinical and laboratory signs and absence of infiltrate on chest radiograph). One induced sputum sample was available for analysis from 3772 (89.1%) of 4232 suspected pneumonia cases enrolled in PERCH. Of these, sputum from 2608 (69.1%) met the quality criterion of <10 squamous epithelial cells per low-power field, and 1162 (44.6%) had radiographic pneumonia. Induced sputum microscopy and culture results were not associated with radiographic pneumonia, regardless of prior antibiotic use, stratification by specific bacteria, or interpretative criteria used. The findings of this study do not support the culture of induced sputum specimens as a diagnostic tool for pneumonia in young children as part of routine clinical practice.

  8. Streptococcus pneumoniae Coinfection Is Correlated with the Severity of H1N1 Pandemic Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Cisterna, Daniel; Savji, Nazir; Bussetti, Ana Valeria; Kapoor, Vishal; Hui, Jeffrey; Tokarz, Rafal; Briese, Thomas; Baumeister, Elsa; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2009-01-01

    Background Initial reports in May 2009 of the novel influenza strain H1N1pdm estimated a case fatality rate (CFR) of 0.6%, similar to that of seasonal influenza. In July 2009, however, Argentina reported 3056 cases with 137 deaths, representing a CFR of 4.5%. Potential explanations for increased CFR included virus reassortment or genetic drift, or infection of a more vulnerable population. Virus genomic sequencing of 26 Argentinian samples representing both severe and mild disease indicated no evidence of reassortment, mutations associated with resistance to antiviral drugs, or genetic drift that might contribute to virulence. Furthermore, no evidence was found for increased frequency of risk factors for H1N1pdm disease. Methods/Principal Findings We examined nasopharyngeal swab samples (NPS) from 199 cases of H1N1pdm infection from Argentina with MassTag PCR, testing for 33 additional microbial agents. The study population consisted of 199 H1N1pdm-infected subjects sampled between 23 June and 4 July 2009. Thirty-nine had severe disease defined as death (n = 20) or hospitalization (n = 19); 160 had mild disease. At least one additional agent of potential pathogenic importance was identified in 152 samples (76%), including Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 62); Haemophilus influenzae (n = 104); human respiratory syncytial virus A (n = 11) and B (n = 1); human rhinovirus A (n = 1) and B (n = 4); human coronaviruses 229E (n = 1) and OC43 (n = 2); Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 2); Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 2); Serratia marcescens (n = 1); and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 35) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, n = 6). The presence of S. pneumoniae was strongly correlated with severe disease. S. pneumoniae was present in 56.4% of severe cases versus 25% of mild cases; more than one-third of H1N1pdm NPS with S. pneumoniae were from subjects with severe disease (22 of 62 S. pneumoniae-positive NPS, p = 0

  9. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Serves a Protective Role during Klebsiella pneumoniae - Induced Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F.; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Florquin, Sandrine; Tanck, Michael W.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom; van Zoelen, Marieke A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella species is the second most commonly isolated gram-negative organism in sepsis and a frequent causative pathogen in pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed on different cell types and plays a key role in diverse inflammatory responses. We here aimed to investigate the role of RAGE in the host response to Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae pneumonia and intransally inoculated rage gene deficient (RAGE-/-) and normal wild-type (Wt) mice with K. pneumoniae. Klebsiella pneumonia resulted in an increased pulmonary expression of RAGE. Furthermore, the high-affinity RAGE ligand high mobility group box-1 was upregulated during K. pneumoniae pneumonia. RAGE deficiency impaired host defense as reflected by a worsened survival, increased bacterial outgrowth and dissemination in RAGE-/- mice. RAGE-/- neutrophils showed a diminished phagocytosing capacity of live K. pneumoniae in vitro. Relative to Wt mice, RAGE-/- mice demonstrated similar lung inflammation, and slightly elevated—if any—cytokine and chemokine levels and unchanged hepatocellular injury. In addition, RAGE-/- mice displayed an unaltered response to intranasally instilled Klebsiella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with respect to pulmonary cell recruitment and local release of cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that (endogenous) RAGE protects against K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Also, they demonstrate that RAGE contributes to an effective antibacterial defense during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, at least partly via its participation in the phagocytic properties of professional granulocytes. Additionally, our results indicate that RAGE is not essential for the induction of a local and systemic inflammatory response to either intact Klebsiella or Klebsiella LPS. PMID:26824892

  10. Severe parainfluenza pneumonia in a case of transient hypogammalobulinemia of infancy.

    PubMed

    Cotugno, Nicola; Manno, Emma Concetta; Stoppa, Francesca; Sinibaldi, Serena; Saffirio, Claudia; D'Argenio, Parizia; Marano, Marco; Di Nardo, Matteo; Palma, Paolo

    2013-06-26

    Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) infection, largely known to cause self-limiting bronchiolitis and pneumonia in immune competent patients, can lead to severe to fatal pulmonary disease in immune disorders, such as primary or acquired-immune deficiencies. We report the case of a 1-year-old child who developed an acute respiratory distress syndrome. Because of a progressive respiratory failure unresponsive to conventional treatment extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was rapidly started. HPIV-3 infection was diagnosed on the rhinopharyngeal fluid and immunological examinations revealed a hypogammaglobulinemia. A combination therapy with ribavirin, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and steroid under ECMO support was started with considerable improvement. Subsequent analysis and more specific immunological assessment resulted normal confirming the diagnosis of transient hypogammaglobulinemia of infancy (THI). This case highlights the importance of prompt therapy with early ECMO support in combination with ribavirin, IVIG and steroids in patients affected by severe HPIV-3 pneumonia and THI.

  11. Is Higher Viral Load in the Upper Respiratory Tract Associated With Severe Pneumonia? Findings From the PERCH Study.

    PubMed

    Feikin, Daniel R; Fu, Wei; Park, Daniel E; Shi, Qiyuan; Higdon, Melissa M; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Hammitt, Laura L; Howie, Stephen R C; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Adrian, Peter V; Antonio, Martin; Awori, Juliet O; Baillie, Vicky L; DeLuca, Andrea N; Driscoll, Amanda J; Ebruke, Bernard E; Goswami, Doli; Karron, Ruth A; Li, Mengying; Morpeth, Susan C; Mwaba, John; Mwansa, James; Prosperi, Christine; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Sow, Samba O; Tapia, Milagritos D; Whistler, Toni; Zaman, Khalequ; Zeger, Scott L; O' Brien, Katherine L; Murdoch, David R

    2017-06-15

    The etiologic inference of identifying a pathogen in the upper respiratory tract (URT) of children with pneumonia is unclear. To determine if viral load could provide evidence of causality of pneumonia, we compared viral load in the URT of children with World Health Organization-defined severe and very severe pneumonia and age-matched community controls. In the 9 developing country sites, nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs from children with and without pneumonia were tested using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for 17 viruses. The association of viral load with case status was evaluated using logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to determine optimal discriminatory viral load cutoffs. Viral load density distributions were plotted. The mean viral load was higher in cases than controls for 7 viruses. However, there was substantial overlap in viral load distribution of cases and controls for all viruses. ROC curves to determine the optimal viral load cutoff produced an area under the curve of <0.80 for all viruses, suggesting poor to fair discrimination between cases and controls. Fatal and very severe pneumonia cases did not have higher viral load than less severe cases for most viruses. Although we found higher viral loads among pneumonia cases than controls for some viruses, the utility in using viral load of URT specimens to define viral pneumonia was equivocal. Our analysis was limited by lack of a gold standard for viral pneumonia.

  12. Severe disseminated lung disease and bronchiectasis probably due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Halal, F.; Brochu, P.; Delage, G.; Lamarre, A.; Rivard, G.

    1977-01-01

    Severe disseminated lung disease causing acute respiratory failure developed in a previously healthy 6 1/2-year-old boy. Mycoplasma pneumoniae was implicated and a complement-fixing antibody titre of 1:1024 against this organism was detected. At autopsy bronchiectasis was found, affecting chiefly the right middle and lower lobes. The unusual radiologic and pathologic findings are discussed. Images FIG. 1 PMID:578782

  13. Usefulness of C-reactive protein in monitoring the severe community-acquired pneumonia clinical course.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Luís; Póvoa, Pedro; Almeida, Eduardo; Fernandes, Antero; Mealha, Rui; Moreira, Pedro; Sabino, Henrique

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the C-reactive protein level, the body temperature and the white cell count in patients after prescription of antibiotics in order to describe the clinical resolution of severe community-acquired pneumonia. A cohort of 53 consecutive patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia was studied. The C-reactive protein levels, body temperature and white cell count were monitored daily. By day 3 a C-reactive protein level 0.5 times the initial level was a marker of poor outcome (sensitivity, 0.91; specificity, 0.59). Patients were divided according to their C-reactive protein patterns of response to antibiotics, into fast response, slow response, nonresponse, and biphasic response. About 96% of patients with a C-reactive protein pattern of fast response and 74% of patients with a slow response pattern survived, whereas those patients with the patterns of nonresponse and of biphasic response had a mortality rate of 100% and 33%, respectively (P < 0.001). On day 3 of antibiotic therapy, a decrease in C-reactive protein levels by 0.31 or more from the previous day's level was a marker of good prognosis (sensitivity, 0.75; specificity, 0.85). Daily C-reactive protein measurement after antibiotic prescription is useful in identification, as early as day 3, of severe community-acquired pneumonia patients with poor outcome. The identification of the C-reactive protein pattern of response to antibiotic therapy was useful in the recognition of the individual clinical course, either improving or worsening, as well as the rate of improvement, in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia.

  14. Severity assessment tools in ICU patients with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Pereira, J M; Moreno, R P; Matos, R; Rhodes, A; Martin-Loeches, I; Cecconi, M; Lisboa, T; Rello, J

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if severity assessment tools (general severity of illness and community-acquired pneumonia specific scores) can be used to guide decisions for patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to pandemic influenza A pneumonia. A prospective, observational, multicentre study included 265 patients with a mean age of 42 (±16.1) years and an ICU mortality of 31.7%. On admission to the ICU, the mean pneumonia severity index (PSI) score was 103.2 ± 43.2 points, the CURB-65 score was 1.7 ± 1.1 points and the PIRO-CAP score was 3.2 ± 1.5 points. None of the scores had a good predictive ability: area under the ROC for PSI, 0.72 (95% CI, 0.65-0.78); CURB-65, 0.67 (95% CI, 0.59-0.74); and PIRO-CAP, 0.64 (95% CI, 0.56-0.71). The PSI score (OR, 1.022 (1.009-1.034), p 0.001) was independently associated with ICU mortality; however, none of the three scores, when used at ICU admission, were able to reliably detect a low-risk group of patients. Low risk for mortality was identified in 27.5% of patients using PIRO-CAP, but above 40% when using PSI (I-III) or CURB65 (<2). Observed mortality was 13.7%, 13.5% and 19.4%, respectively. Pneumonia-specific scores undervalued severity and should not be used as instruments to guide decisions in the ICU. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  15. Outcomes and Duration of Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia Therapy in Infants with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Ingrid S.; Englund, Janet A.; Burroughs, Lauri M.; Torgerson, Troy R.; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    This retrospective review of patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) evaluated the relationship between duration of therapy to treat PCP and overall survival. We found that 80% of patients receiving only 21 days of antibiotics survived to 12 months beyond hematopoetic cell transplant, whereas only 25% of patients who required longer treatment for PCP survived to stem cell engraftment. PMID:21817949

  16. Treatment Failure and Mortality amongst Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition Presenting with Cough or Respiratory Difficulty and Radiological Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background Appropriate intervention is critical in reducing deaths among under-five, severe acutely malnourished (SAM) children with danger signs of severe pneumonia; however, there is paucity of data on outcome of World Health Organisation (WHO) recommended interventions of SAM children with severe pneumonia. We sought to evaluate outcome of the interventions in such children. Methods We prospectively enrolled SAM children aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) ward of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), between April 2011 and June 2012 with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia. All the enrolled children were treated with ampicillin and gentamicin, and micronutrients as recommended by the WHO. Comparison was made among pneumonic children with (n = 111) and without WHO defined danger signs of severe pneumonia (n = 296). The outcomes of interest were treatment failure (if a child required changing of antibiotics) and deaths during hospitalization. Further comparison was also made among those who developed treatment failure and who did not and among the survivors and deaths. Results SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia more often experienced treatment failure (58% vs. 20%; p<0.001) and fatal outcome (21% vs. 4%; p<0.001) compared to those without danger signs. Only 6/111 (5.4%) SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia and 12/296 (4.0%) without danger signs had bacterial isolates from blood. In log-linear binomial regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, danger signs of severe pneumonia, dehydration, hypocalcaemia, and bacteraemia were independently associated both with treatment failure and deaths in SAM children presenting with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia (p<0.01). Conclusion and Significance The result suggests that SAM children with cough or

  17. Pore-Forming Toxins Induce Macrophage Necroptosis during Acute Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    González-Juarbe, Norberto; Gilley, Ryan Paul; Hinojosa, Cecilia Anahí; Bradley, Kelley Margaret; Kamei, Akinobu; Gao, Geli; Dube, Peter Herman; Bergman, Molly Ann; Orihuela, Carlos Javier

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is a highly pro-inflammatory mode of cell death regulated by RIP (or RIPK)1 and RIP3 kinases and mediated by the effector MLKL. We report that diverse bacterial pathogens that produce a pore-forming toxin (PFT) induce necroptosis of macrophages and this can be blocked for protection against Serratia marcescens hemorrhagic pneumonia. Following challenge with S. marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), and purified recombinant pneumolysin, macrophages pretreated with inhibitors of RIP1, RIP3, and MLKL were protected against death. Alveolar macrophages in MLKL KO mice were also protected during S. marcescens pneumonia. Inhibition of caspases had no impact on macrophage death and caspase-1 and -3/7 were determined to be inactive following challenge despite the detection of IL-1β in supernatants. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from RIP3 KO, but not caspase-1/11 KO or caspase-3 KO mice, were resistant to PFT-induced death. We explored the mechanisms for PFT-induced necroptosis and determined that loss of ion homeostasis at the plasma membrane, mitochondrial damage, ATP depletion, and the generation of reactive oxygen species were together responsible. Treatment of mice with necrostatin-5, an inhibitor of RIP1; GW806742X, an inhibitor of MLKL; and necrostatin-5 along with co-enzyme Q10 (N5/C10), which enhances ATP production; reduced the severity of S. marcescens pneumonia in a mouse intratracheal challenge model. N5/C10 protected alveolar macrophages, reduced bacterial burden, and lessened hemorrhage in the lungs. We conclude that necroptosis is the major cell death pathway evoked by PFTs in macrophages and the necroptosis pathway can be targeted for disease intervention. PMID:26659062

  18. Effect of nitric oxide inhalation on gas exchange in acute severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Federico P; Amado, Veronica M; Roca, Josep; Torres, Antoni; Nicolas, Josep M; Rodriguez-Roisin, Robert; Barberà, Joan A

    2013-06-15

    Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) causes selective pulmonary vasodilatation and may improve gas exchange. The study was aimed to evaluate the acute effects of inhaled NO on pulmonary gas exchange in severe unilateral pneumonia, where hypoxemia results from increased intrapulmonary shunt. We studied 8 patients without preexisting lung disease (59±18 yr; 4M/4F) with early unilateral severe pneumonia and respiratory failure. Pulmonary and systemic hemodynamics and gas exchange, including ventilation-perfusion (V;A/Q;) distributions, were measured at baseline and while breathing 5 and 40 parts per million (ppm) of NO. Inhaled NO caused a dose-dependent fall in pulmonary vascular resistance (by 12% and 21%, with 5 and 40ppm, respectively; p<0.01, each) and improvement of PaO2 (by 25% and 23%; p<0.05, each), owing to the reduction of intrapulmonary shunt (by 23% and 27%; p<0.05, each), without changes in the amount of perfusion to low V;A/Q; ratio alveolar units. Patients with greater baseline intrapulmonary shunt exhibited greater improvement in arterial oxygenation (r(2)=0.55, p<0.05). We conclude that low doses of inhaled NO improve pulmonary gas exchange in acute severe pneumonia.

  19. Treatment of severe human metapneumovirus (hMPV) pneumonia in an immunocompromised child with oral ribavirin and IVIG.

    PubMed

    Kitanovski, Lidija; Kopriva, Silvester; Pokorn, Marko; Dolničar, Majda B; Rajić, Vladan; Stefanović, Milica; Jazbec, Janez

    2013-10-01

    The clinical manifestations of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infection resemble those of respiratory syncytial virus with the most severe disease occurring in infants, the elderly, chronically ill, and immunocompromised hosts. We present a case of a 2-year-old girl undergoing intensive chemotherapy for Burkitt lymphoma who developed severe hMPV pneumonia. Rapid and complete recovery was observed after treatment with oral ribavirin and intravenous immunoglobulin. As hMPV can cause severe pneumonia in immunocompromised patients and due to the reports of effective treatment with ribavirin, clinical studies to elucidate the role of ribavirin in treatment of hMPV pneumonia may be needed.

  20. Mutational alteration of a nitrogen-fixing bacterium to sensitivity to infection by bacteriophage Mu: isolation of nif mutations of Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al induced by Mu.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, R N

    1976-01-01

    The nitrogen-fixing bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al is not sensitive to infection by bacteriophage Mu. A mutant of K. pneumoniae that is sensitive to Mu infection was isolated. Several Mu-induced auxotrophic mutations of K. pneumoniae including nif, trp, and rtl were isolated and genetically characterized. Evidence is presented that the Mu-induced mutations of nif arise as the result of insertion of Mu within (or near) the nif operon(s). The rtl locus, which determines the ability to utilize ribitol as a carbon source, was found to be linked to nif loci. PMID:789339

  1. Influenza Pneumonia Surveillance among Hospitalized Adults May Underestimate the Burden of Severe Influenza Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Justin R.; Neuzil, Kathleen M.; Cooke, Colin R.; Neradilek, Moni B.; Goss, Christopher H.; Shay, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies seeking to estimate the burden of influenza among hospitalized adults often use case definitions that require presence of pneumonia. The goal of this study was to assess the extent to which restricting influenza testing to adults hospitalized with pneumonia could underestimate the total burden of hospitalized influenza disease. Methods We conducted a modelling study using the complete State Inpatient Databases from Arizona, California, and Washington and regional influenza surveillance data acquired from CDC from January 2003 through March 2009. The exposures of interest were positive laboratory tests for influenza A (H1N1), influenza A (H3N2), and influenza B from two contiguous US Federal Regions encompassing the study area. We identified the two outcomes of interest by ICD-9-CM code: respiratory and circulatory hospitalizations, as well as critical illness hospitalizations (acute respiratory failure, severe sepsis, and in-hospital death). We linked the hospitalization datasets with the virus surveillance datasets by geographic region and month of hospitalization. We used negative binomial regression models to estimate the number of influenza-associated events for the outcomes of interest. We sub-categorized these events to include all outcomes with or without pneumonia diagnosis codes. Results We estimated that there were 80,834 (95% CI 29,214–174,033) influenza-associated respiratory and circulatory hospitalizations and 26,760 (95% CI 14,541–47,464) influenza-associated critical illness hospitalizations. When a pneumonia diagnosis was excluded, the estimated number of influenza-associated respiratory and circulatory hospitalizations was 24,816 (95% CI 6,342–92,624). The estimated number of influenza-associated critical illness hospitalizations was 8,213 (95% CI 3,764–20,799). Around 30% of both influenza-associated respiratory and circulatory hospitalizations, as well as influenza-associated critical illness hospitalizations did not

  2. A definite case of (L)-carbocisteine-induced pneumonia with CATCH22 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Kenichiro; Ichihara, Eiki; Hisamoto, Akiko; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Tanimoto, Yasushi; Akagi, Sadaharu; Kato, Katsuya; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A 32-year-old male with CATCH22 syndrome presented with a high fever and productive cough after taking drugs for acute bronchitis, including (L)-carbocisteine. Chest radiography revealed ground-glass opacities in the bilateral lung fields. He had a history of similar pneumonia. Under the assumption of drug-induced pneumonia, or bacterial or viral pneumonia, all drugs including (L)-carbocisteine were discontinued, and antibiotics were started. A drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test was positive only for (L)-carbocisteine. The only drug in common between this and the previous episode of pneumonia was (L)-carbocisteine. We thus concluded that this was a definite case of (L)-carbocisteine-induced pneumonia in a patient with CATCH22 syndrome.

  3. Cigarette Smoking-Induced Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia: A Case Report Including a Provocation Test

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Gene Hyun; Kim, Yang-Ki; Lee, Young Mok; Kim, Ki-Up; Hwang, Jung Hwa; Kim, Dong Won

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism and cause of acute eosinophilic pneumonia are largely unknown. Many factors including the smoking of cigarettes have been suggested, but none have been proven to directly cause acute eosinophilic pneumonia. The authors report a case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia in a young Asian male who recently started smoking. The diagnosis was made based on his clinical course and results of chest radiography, lung spirometry, bronchoalveolar lavage, and transbronchial lung biopsies. After administration of methylprednisolone, his clinical course rapidly improved. A provocation test was designed to establish a connection between cigarette smoking and the development of acute eosinophilic pneumonia. After the provocation test, the patient showed identical symptoms, increase in sputum eosinophils, and worsening of pulmonary function. The results of the provocation test suggest that smoking may directly cause acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and support previous reports of cigarette smoking-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia. PMID:18303214

  4. Pneumococcal pneumonia - Are the new severity scores more accurate in predicting adverse outcomes?

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, C; Ladeira, I; Gaio, A R; Brito, M C

    2013-01-01

    The site-of-care decision is one of the most important factors in the management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia. The severity scores are validated prognostic tools for community-acquired pneumonia mortality and treatment site decision. The aim of this paper was to compare the discriminatory power of four scores - the classic PSI and CURB65 ant the most recent SCAP and SMART-COP - in predicting major adverse events: death, ICU admission, need for invasive mechanical ventilation or vasopressor support in patients admitted with pneumococcal pneumonia. A five year retrospective study of patients admitted for pneumococcal pneumonia. Patients were stratified based on admission data and assigned to low-, intermediate-, and high-risk classes for each score. Results were obtained comparing low versus non-low risk classes. We studied 142 episodes of hospitalization with 2 deaths and 10 patients needing mechanical ventilation and vasopressor support. The majority of patients were classified as low risk by all scores - we found high negative predictive values for all adverse events studied, the most negative value corresponding to the SCAP score. The more recent scores showed better accuracy for predicting ICU admission and need for ventilation or vasopressor support (mostly for the SCAP score with higher AUC values for all adverse events). The rate of all adverse outcomes increased directly with increasing risk class in all scores. The new gravity scores appear to have a higher discriminatory power in all adverse events in our study, particularly, the SCAP score. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection in Mice Induces Chronic Lung Inflammation, iBALT Formation, and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jupelli, Madhulika; Shimada, Kenichi; Chiba, Norika; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Jones, Heather D.; Peterson, Ellena; Chen, Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) lung infection can induce chronic lung inflammation and is associated with not only acute asthma but also COPD exacerbations. However, in mouse models of CP infection, most studies have investigated specifically the acute phase of the infection and not the longer-term chronic changes in the lungs. We infected C57BL/6 mice with 5×105 CP intratracheally and monitored inflammation, cellular infiltrates and cytokine levels over time to investigate the chronic inflammatory lung changes. While bacteria numbers declined by day 28, macrophage numbers remained high through day 35. Immune cell clusters were detected as early as day 14 and persisted through day 35, and stained positive for B, T, and follicular dendritic cells, indicating these clusters were inducible bronchus associated lymphoid tissues (iBALTs). Classically activated inflammatory M1 macrophages were the predominant subtype early on while alternatively activated M2 macrophages increased later during infection. Adoptive transfer of M1 but not M2 macrophages intratracheally 1 week after infection resulted in greater lung inflammation, severe fibrosis, and increased numbers of iBALTS 35 days after infection. In summary, we show that CP lung infection in mice induces chronic inflammatory changes including iBALT formations as well as fibrosis. These observations suggest that the M1 macrophages, which are part of the normal response to clear acute C. pneumoniae lung infection, result in an enhanced acute response when present in excess numbers, with greater inflammation, tissue injury, and severe fibrosis. PMID:24204830

  6. Genetic variants associated with severe pneumonia in A/H1N1 influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Zúñiga, J.; Buendía-Roldán, I.; Zhao, Y.; Jiménez, L.; Torres, D.; Romo, J.; Ramírez, G.; Cruz, A.; Vargas-Alarcon, G.; Sheu, C-C.; Chen, F.; Su, L.; Tager, A.M.; Pardo, A.; Selman, M.; Christiani, D.C.

    2013-01-01

    The A/H1N1 influenza strain isolated in Mexico in 2009 caused severe pulmonary illness in a small number of exposed individuals. Our objective was to determine the influence of genetic factors on their susceptibility. We carried out a case–control association study genotyping 91 patients with confirmed severe pneumonia from A/H1N1 infection and 98 exposed but asymptomatic household contacts, using the HumanCVD BeadChip (Illumina, San Diego, CA, USA). Four risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly (p<0.0001) associated with severe pneumonia: rs1801274 (Fc fragment of immunoglobulin G, low-affinity IIA, receptor (FCGR2A) gene, chromosome 1; OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.69–4.25); rs9856661 (gene unknown, chromosome 3; OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.64–4.18); rs8070740 (RPA interacting protein (RPAIN) gene, chromosome 17; OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.63–4.39); and rs3786054 (complement component 1, q subcomponent binding protein (C1QBP) gene, chromosome 17; OR 3.13, 95% CI 1.89–5.17). All SNP associations remained significant after adjustment for sex and comorbidities. The SNPs on chromosome 17 were in linkage disequilibrium. These findings revealed that gene polymorphisms located in chromosomes 1 and 17 might influence susceptibility to development of severe pneumonia in A/H1N1 infection. Two of these SNPs are mapped within genes (FCGR2A, C1QBP) involved in the handling of immune complexes and complement activation, respectively, suggesting that these genes may confer risk due to increased activation of host immunity. PMID:21737555

  7. Community-acquired pneumonia: economics of inpatient medical care vis-à-vis clinical severity*,**

    PubMed Central

    Cupurdija, Vojislav; Lazic, Zorica; Petrovic, Marina; Mojsilovic, Slavica; Cekerevac, Ivan; Rancic, Nemanja; Jakovljevic, Mihajlo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the direct and indirect costs of diagnosing and treating community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), correlating those costs with CAP severity at diagnosis and identifying the major cost drivers. Methods: This was a prospective cost analysis study using bottom-up costing. Clinical severity and mortality risk were assessed with the pneumonia severity index (PSI) and the mental Confusion-Urea-Respiratory rate-Blood pressure-age ≥ 65 years (CURB-65) scale, respectively. The sample comprised 95 inpatients hospitalized for newly diagnosed CAP. The analysis was run from a societal perspective with a time horizon of one year. Results: Expressed as mean ± standard deviation, in Euros, the direct and indirect medical costs per CAP patient were 696 ± 531 and 410 ± 283, respectively, the total per-patient cost therefore being 1,106 ± 657. The combined budget impact of our patient cohort, in Euros, was 105,087 (66,109 and 38,979 in direct and indirect costs, respectively). The major cost drivers, in descending order, were the opportunity cost (lost productivity); diagnosis and treatment of comorbidities; and administration of medications, oxygen, and blood derivatives. The CURB-65 and PSI scores both correlated with the indirect costs of CAP treatment. The PSI score correlated positively with the overall frequency of use of health care services. Neither score showed any clear relationship with the direct costs of CAP treatment. Conclusions: Clinical severity at admission appears to be unrelated to the costs of CAP treatment. This is mostly attributable to unwarranted hospital admission (or unnecessarily long hospital stays) in cases of mild pneumonia, as well as to over-prescription of antibiotics. Authorities should strive to improve adherence to guidelines and promote cost-effective prescribing practices among physicians in southeastern Europe. PMID:25750674

  8. Dynamic regulation of cardiolipin by the lipid pump Atp8b1 determines the severity of lung injury in experimental pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ray, Nancy B; Durairaj, Lakshmi; Chen, Bill B; McVerry, Bryan J; Ryan, Alan J; Donahoe, Michael; Waltenbaugh, Alisa K; O'Donnell, Christopher P; Henderson, Florita C; Etscheidt, Christopher A; McCoy, Diann M; Agassandian, Marianna; Hayes-Rowan, Emily C; Coon, Tiffany A; Butler, Phillip L; Gakhar, Lokesh; Mathur, Satya N; Sieren, Jessica C; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Kagan, Valerian E; McLennan, Geoffrey; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2010-10-01

    Pneumonia remains the leading cause of death from infection in the US, yet fundamentally new conceptual models underlying its pathogenesis have not emerged. We show that humans and mice with bacterial pneumonia have markedly elevated amounts of cardiolipin, a rare, mitochondrial-specific phospholipid, in lung fluid and find that it potently disrupts surfactant function. Intratracheal cardiolipin administration in mice recapitulates the clinical phenotype of pneumonia, including impaired lung mechanics, modulation of cell survival and cytokine networks and lung consolidation. We have identified and characterized the activity of a unique cardiolipin transporter, the P-type ATPase transmembrane lipid pump Atp8b1, a mutant version of which is associated with severe pneumonia in humans and mice. Atp8b1 bound and internalized cardiolipin from extracellular fluid via a basic residue-enriched motif. Administration of a peptide encompassing the cardiolipin binding motif or Atp8b1 gene transfer in mice lessened bacteria-induced lung injury and improved survival. The results unveil a new paradigm whereby Atp8b1 is a cardiolipin importer whose capacity to remove cardiolipin from lung fluid is exceeded during inflammation or when Atp8b1 is defective. This discovery opens the door for new therapeutic strategies directed at modulating the abundance or molecular interactions of cardiolipin in pneumonia.

  9. Hospitalization costs of severe bacterial pneumonia in children: comparative analysis considering different costing methods.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Sheila Elke Araujo; Minamisava, Ruth; Vieira, Maria Aparecida da Silva; Itria, Alexander; Pessoa, Vicente Porfirio; Andrade, Ana Lúcia Sampaio Sgambatti de; Toscano, Cristiana Maria

    2017-01-01

    To determine and compare hospitalization costs of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia cases via different costing methods under the Brazilian Public Unified Health System perspective. Cost-of-illness study based on primary data collected from a sample of 59 children aged between 28 days and 35 months and hospitalized due to bacterial pneumonia. Direct medical and non-medical costs were considered and three costing methods employed: micro-costing based on medical record review, micro-costing based on therapeutic guidelines and gross-costing based on the Brazilian Public Unified Health System reimbursement rates. Costs estimates obtained via different methods were compared using the Friedman test. Cost estimates of inpatient cases of severe pneumonia amounted to R$ 780,70/$Int. 858.7 (medical record review), R$ 641,90/$Int. 706.90 (therapeutic guidelines) and R$ 594,80/$Int. 654.28 (Brazilian Public Unified Health System reimbursement rates). Costs estimated via micro-costing (medical record review or therapeutic guidelines) did not differ significantly (p=0.405), while estimates based on reimbursement rates were significantly lower compared to estimates based on therapeutic guidelines (p<0.001) or record review (p=0.006). Brazilian Public Unified Health System costs estimated via different costing methods differ significantly, with gross-costing yielding lower cost estimates. Given costs estimated by different micro-costing methods are similar and costing methods based on therapeutic guidelines are easier to apply and less expensive, this method may be a valuable alternative for estimation of hospitalization costs of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia in children. Determinar e comparar custos hospitalares no tratamento da pneumonia bacteriana adquirida na comunidade por diferentes metodologias de custeio, na perspectiva do Sistema Único de Saúde. Estudo de custo, com coleta de dados primários de uma amostra de 59 crianças com 28 dias a 35 meses de idade

  10. Multidisciplinary Comprehensive Care for Early Recommencement of Oral Intake in Older Adults With Severe Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Tamami; Shamoto, Hiroshi; Anzai, Hideaki; Koganei, Yutaka; Maeda, Keisuke; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka

    2016-10-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.3 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Multidisciplinary Comprehensive Care for Early Recommencement of Oral Intake in Older Adults With Severe Pneumonia" found on pages 21-29, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until September 30, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Describe the effect of multidisciplinary comprehensive care

  11. Randomized controlled trial of day care versus hospital care of severe pneumonia in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Hasan; Mahmud, Rokhsana; Alam, Nur H; Jahan, Selina A; Kamal, Syed M; Haque, Fazlul; Salam, Mohammed A; Gyr, Niklaus

    2010-10-01

    A randomized controlled trial compared day care versus hospital care management of pneumonia. Children 2 to 59 months of age with severe pneumonia received either day care, with antibiotic treatment, feeding, and supportive care from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, or hospital care, with similar 24-hour treatment. In 2006-2008, 360 children were assigned randomly to receive either day care or hospital care; 189 (53%) had hypoxemia, with a mean±SD oxygen saturation of 93±4%, which increased to 99±1% after oxygen therapy. The mean±SD durations of day care and hospital care were 7.1±2.3 and 6.5±2.8 days, respectively. Successful management was possible for 156 (87.7% [95% confidence interval [CI]: 80.9%-90.9%]) of 180 children in the day care group and 173 (96.1% [95% CI: 92.2%-98.1%]) of 180 children in the hospital care group (P=.001). Twenty-three children in the day care group (12.8% [95% CI: 8.7%-18.4%] and 4 children in the hospital care group (2.2% [95% CI: 0.9%-5.6%] required referral to hospitals (P<.001). During the follow-up period, 22 children in the day care group (14.1% [95% CI: 9.5%-20.4%]) and 11 children in the hospital care group (6.4% [95% CI: 3.6%-11%]) required readmission to hospitals (P=.01). The estimated costs per child treated successfully at the clinic and the hospital were US$114 and US$178, respectively. Severe childhood pneumonia without severe malnutrition can be successfully managed at day care clinics, except for children with hypoxemia who require prolonged oxygen therapy.

  12. Value of bacterial antigen detection in the diagnostic yield of transthoracic needle aspiration in severe community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Bella, F.; Tort, J.; Morera, M. A.; Espaulella, J.; Armengol, J.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Transthoracic needle aspiration (TNA) with an ultrathin needle is a safe and highly specific procedure for obtaining a diagnosis in bacterial pneumonias, but its sensitivity is at best 70%. A study was performed to assess whether Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b antigen detection by latex agglutination from the TNA sample enhanced the diagnostic yield. METHODS--Blood cultures, TNA with an ultrathin needle (culture, Gram stain, and latex agglutination), serological tests, and pneumococcal antigen detection in the urine by counterimmunoelectrophoresis were performed in samples from 18 of 23 consecutive patients with severe community acquired pneumonia. RESULTS--The causative organism was identified in 16 cases (88%): S pneumoniae (10 cases), S pneumoniae plus H influenzae (two cases), Legionella pneumophila (three cases), and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (one case). The investigation of antigens by latex agglutination in the pulmonary aspirate increased the diagnostic yield of TNA from 50% to 78% and provided a rapid diagnosis (in less than two hours) with therapeutic implications in seven cases. Its effectiveness was not modified by prior antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSIONS--A latex agglutination test on the pulmonary aspirate enhances the diagnostic yield of TNA in severe community acquired pneumonia. PMID:8303628

  13. Influenza A/H1N1 Severe Pneumonia: Novel Morphocytological Findings in Bronchoalveolar Lavage

    PubMed Central

    Faverio, Paola; Messinesi, Grazia; Brenna, Ambrogio; Pesci, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed in three patients with severe influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Light microscopy analysis of BAL cytocentrifugates showed the presence of characteristic large, mononuclear, plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like cells never described before. Via transmission electron microscopy, these cells were classified as atypical type II pneumocytes and some of them showed cytoplasmic vesicles and inclusions. We concluded that plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like type II pneumocytes might represent a morphologic marker of A/H1N1 influenza virus infection as well as reparative cellular activation after diffuse alveolar damage. PMID:25383078

  14. Effect of context on respiratory rate measurement in identifying non-severe pneumonia in African children.

    PubMed

    Muro, Florida; Mtove, George; Mosha, Neema; Wangai, Hannah; Harrison, Nicole; Hildenwall, Helena; Schellenberg, David; Todd, Jim; Olomi, Raimos; Reyburn, Hugh

    2015-06-01

    Cough or difficult breathing and an increased respiratory rate for their age are the commonest indications for outpatient antibiotic treatment in African children. We aimed to determine whether respiratory rate was likely to be transiently raised by a number of contextual factors in a busy clinic leading to inaccurate diagnosis. Respiratory rates were recorded in children aged 2-59 months presenting with cough or difficulty breathing to one of the two busy outpatient clinics and then repeated at 10-min intervals over 1 h in a quiet setting. One hundred and sixty-seven children were enrolled with a mean age of 7.1 (SD ± 2.9) months in infants and 27.6 (SD ± 12.8) months in children aged 12-59 months. The mean respiratory rate declined from 42.3 and 33.6 breaths per minute (bpm) in the clinic to 39.1 and 32.6 bpm after 10 min in a quiet room and to 39.2 and 30.7 bpm (P < 0.001) after 60 min in younger and older children, respectively. This resulted in 11/13 (85%) infants and 2/15 (13%) older children being misclassified with non-severe pneumonia. In a random effects linear regression model, the variability in respiratory rate within children (42%) was almost as much as the variability between children (58%). Changing the respiratory rates cut-offs to higher thresholds resulted in a small reduction in the proportion of non-severe pneumonia mis-classifications in infants. Noise and other contextual factors may cause a transient increase in respiratory rate and consequently misclassification of non-severe pneumonia. However, this effect is less pronounced in older children than infants. Respiratory rate is a difficult sign to measure as the variation is large between and within children. More studies of the accuracy and utility of respiratory rate as a proxy for non-severe pneumonia diagnosis in a busy clinic are needed. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Outpatient treatment of children with severe pneumonia with oral amoxicillin in 4 countries: The MASS study

    PubMed Central

    Addo-Yobo, Emmanuel; Anh, Dang Duc; El-Sayed, Hesham Fathey; Fox, LeAnne; Fox, Matthew P.; MacLeod, William; Saha, Samir; Tuan, Tran Anh; Thea, Donald M.; Qazi, Shamim

    2011-01-01

    Summary Objective A recent RCT demonstrated home-based treatment of WHO-defined severe pneumonia with oral amoxicillin was equivalent to hospital-based therapy and parenteral antibiotics. We aimed to determine whether this finding is generalizable across four countries. Methods Multi-centre observational study in Bangladesh, Egypt, Ghana and Vietnam between November 2005 and May 2008. Children aged 3 to 59 months with WHO-defined severe pneumonia were enrolled at participating health centers and managed at home with oral amoxicillin (80–90 mg/kg/day) for 5 days. Children were followed-up at home on days 1, 2, 3 and 6 and at a facility on day 14 to look for cumulative treatment failure through day 6 and relapse between days 6–14. Results Of 6,582 children screened, 873 were included, of whom 823 had an outcome ascertained. There was substantial variation in presenting characteristics by site. Bangladesh and Ghana had fever (97%) as a more common symptom than Egypt (74%) and Vietnam (66%), while in Vietnam audible wheeze was more common (49%) than at other sites (range 2%–16%). Treatment failure by day 6 was 9.2% (95% CI: 7.3%–11.2%) across all sites, varying from 6.4% (95% CI: 3.1%–9.8%) in Ghana to 13.2% (95% CI: 8.4%–18.0%) in Vietnam. 2.7% (95% CI: 1.5%–3.9%) of the 733 children well on day 6 relapsed by day 14. The most common causes of treatment failure were persistence of LCI at day 6 (3.8%; 95% CI: 2.6%–5.2%), abnormal sleepy or difficult to wake (1.3%; 95% CI: 0.7%–2.3%), and central cyanosis (1.3%; 95% CI: 0.7%–2.3%). All children survived and only one adverse drug reaction occurred. Treatment was more frequent in young infants and those presenting with rapid respiratory rates. Conclusions Clinical treatment failure and adverse event rates among children with severe pneumonia treated at home with oral amoxicillin did not substantially differ across geographic areas. Thus home-based therapy of severe pneumonia can be applied to a wide

  16. Influenza A/H1N1 Severe Pneumonia: Novel Morphocytological Findings in Bronchoalveolar Lavage.

    PubMed

    Faverio, Paola; Aliberti, Stefano; Ezekiel, Clinton; Messinesi, Grazia; Brenna, Ambrogio; Pesci, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed in three patients with severe influenza A/H1N1 pneumonia complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Light microscopy analysis of BAL cytocentrifugates showed the presence of characteristic large, mononuclear, plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like cells never described before. Via transmission electron microscopy, these cells were classified as atypical type II pneumocytes and some of them showed cytoplasmic vesicles and inclusions. We concluded that plasmoblastic/plasmocytoid-like type II pneumocytes might represent a morphologic marker of A/H1N1 influenza virus infection as well as reparative cellular activation after diffuse alveolar damage.

  17. Viral and bacterial co-infection in severe pneumonia triggers innate immune responses and specifically enhances IP-10: a translational study.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jonathan; Machado, Daniela; Terrier, Olivier; Pouzol, Stephane; Messaoudi, Mélina; Basualdo, Wilma; Espínola, Emilio E; Guillen, Rosa M; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Picot, Valentina; Bénet, Thomas; Endtz, Hubert; Russomando, Graciela; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia

    2016-12-06

    Mixed viral and bacterial infections are widely described in community-acquired pneumonia; however, the clinical implications of co-infection on the associated immunopathology remain poorly studied. In this study, microRNA, mRNA and cytokine/chemokine secretion profiling were investigated for human monocyte-derived macrophages infected in-vitro with Influenza virus A/H1N1 and/or Streptococcus pneumoniae. We observed that the in-vitro co-infection synergistically increased interferon-γ-induced protein-10 (CXCL10, IP-10) expression compared to the singly-infected cells conditions. We demonstrated that endogenous miRNA-200a-3p, whose expression was synergistically induced following co-infection, indirectly regulates CXCL10 expression by targeting suppressor of cytokine signaling-6 (SOCS-6), a well-known regulator of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. Additionally, in a subsequent clinical pilot study, immunomodulators levels were evaluated in samples from 74 children (≤5 years-old) hospitalized with viral and/or bacterial community-acquired pneumonia. Clinically, among the 74 cases of pneumonia, patients with identified mixed-detection had significantly higher (3.6-fold) serum IP-10 levels than those with a single detection (P = 0.03), and were significantly associated with severe pneumonia (P < 0.01). This study demonstrates that viral and bacterial co-infection modulates the JAK-STAT signaling pathway and leads to exacerbated IP-10 expression, which could play a major role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia.

  18. Viral and bacterial co-infection in severe pneumonia triggers innate immune responses and specifically enhances IP-10: a translational study

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Jonathan; Machado, Daniela; Terrier, Olivier; Pouzol, Stephane; Messaoudi, Mélina; Basualdo, Wilma; Espínola, Emilio E; Guillen, Rosa M.; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Picot, Valentina; Bénet, Thomas; Endtz, Hubert; Russomando, Graciela; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia

    2016-01-01

    Mixed viral and bacterial infections are widely described in community-acquired pneumonia; however, the clinical implications of co-infection on the associated immunopathology remain poorly studied. In this study, microRNA, mRNA and cytokine/chemokine secretion profiling were investigated for human monocyte-derived macrophages infected in-vitro with Influenza virus A/H1N1 and/or Streptococcus pneumoniae. We observed that the in-vitro co-infection synergistically increased interferon-γ-induced protein-10 (CXCL10, IP-10) expression compared to the singly-infected cells conditions. We demonstrated that endogenous miRNA-200a-3p, whose expression was synergistically induced following co-infection, indirectly regulates CXCL10 expression by targeting suppressor of cytokine signaling-6 (SOCS-6), a well-known regulator of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. Additionally, in a subsequent clinical pilot study, immunomodulators levels were evaluated in samples from 74 children (≤5 years-old) hospitalized with viral and/or bacterial community-acquired pneumonia. Clinically, among the 74 cases of pneumonia, patients with identified mixed-detection had significantly higher (3.6-fold) serum IP-10 levels than those with a single detection (P = 0.03), and were significantly associated with severe pneumonia (P < 0.01). This study demonstrates that viral and bacterial co-infection modulates the JAK-STAT signaling pathway and leads to exacerbated IP-10 expression, which could play a major role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. PMID:27922126

  19. Can Procalcitonin Add to the Prognostic Power of the Severity Scoring System in Adults with Pneumonia?

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, HamidReza; Sarvghad, MohammadReza; Nooghabi, Mehdi Jabbari

    2015-01-01

    Background: The first decision confronting clinicians in the management of patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is whether the patient is to be hospitalized or not. We sought to validate the pneumonia scoring system and assess the power of procalcitonin (PCT) level to predict in-hospital mortality (IHM) and intensive vasopressor and respiratory support (IVRS) requirements in patients with CAP. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 patients with CAP were evaluated for severity of illness based on the defined scoring systems including pneumonia severity index (PSI), confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure, age>65 (CURB-65), confusion, respiratory rate, blood pressure, age>65 (CRB-65), infectious diseases society of America/American thoracic society 2007 criteria (IDSA/ATS 2007) and systolic blood pressure, multilobar infiltrate, albumin, respiratory rate, tachycardia, confusion, low oxygen, low pH (SMART-COP). Demographic, clinical, laboratory and radiographic data were collected prospectively. The accuracy of each scoring system in predicting IVRS requirement and IHM was assessed from the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Level of PCT was determined by semi-quantitative PCT-Q method (BRAHMS). The accuracy of the defined scoring systems, PCT levels and each scoring system plus PCT levels in prediction of IHM and IVRS requirement was analyzed. Results: The accuracy of PCT levels in predicting IHM and IVRS requirement based on AUC was 0.542 and 0.658, respectively and the best threshold was ≥ 2ng/mL for both of them. Adding the level of procalcitonin to different scoring systems (based on the defined scoring systems) improved the accuracy of all systems. Conclusion: We do not suggest using the PCT level alone as a predictor for mortality and IVRS requirement. Instead, we suggest PSI plus PCT and IDSA/ATS 2007 plus PCT as accurate predictors for IHM and SMART-COP plus PCT for IVRS requirement in patients who

  20. Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Illness Severity among Children Hospitalized with Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Anna; Edwards, Kathryn M; Grijalva, Carlos G; Self, Wesley H; Zhu, Yuwei; Chappell, James D; Arnold, Sandra R; McCullers, Jonathan A; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Bramley, Anna M; Jain, Seema; Williams, Derek J

    2015-10-01

    To assess the relationship between secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure and disease severity among children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Children hospitalized with clinical and radiographic CAP were enrolled between January 1, 2010, and June 30, 2012 at 3 hospitals in Tennessee and Utah as part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community study. Household SHS exposure was defined based on the number of smokers in the child's home. Outcomes included hospital length of stay, intensive care unit admission, and mechanical ventilation. Proportional hazards and logistic regression models were used to assess associations between SHS exposure and outcomes. All models were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, household education level, government insurance, comorbidities, enrollment site, year, and season. Of the 2219 children included in the study, SHS exposure was reported in 785 (35.4%), including 325 (14.8%) with ≥2 smokers in the home. Compared with nonexposed children, the children exposed to ≥2 smokers had longer length of stay (median, 70.4 hours vs 64.4 hours; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.75-0.97) and were more likely to receive intensive care (25.2% vs 20.9%; aOR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.05-1.96), but not mechanical ventilation. Outcomes in children exposed to only 1 household smoker were similar to those in nonexposed children. Children hospitalized with CAP from households with ≥2 smokers had a longer length of stay and were more likely to require intensive care compared with children from households with no smokers, suggesting that they experienced greater pneumonia severity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia: a rare histopathological variant of chemotherapy-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arjun; Sen, Shiraj; Naina, Harris

    2016-04-06

    Bleomycin-induced lung injury is the most common chemotherapy-associated lung disease, and is linked with several histopathological patterns. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia (AFOP) is a relatively new and rare histological pattern of diffuse lung injury. We report the first known case of bleomycin-induced AFOP. A 36-year-old man with metastatic testicular cancer received three cycles of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin, before being transitioned to paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin. He subsequently presented with exertional dyspnoea, cough and pleuritic chest pain. CT of the chest demonstrated bilateral ground glass opacities with peribronchovascular distribution and pulmonary function tests demonstrated a restrictive pattern of lung disease with impaired diffusion. Transbronchial biopsy revealed intra-alveolar fibrin deposits with organising pneumonia, consisting of intraluminal loose connective tissue consistent with AFOP. The patient received high-dose corticosteroids with symptomatic and radiographic improvement. AFOP should be recognised as a histopathological variant of bleomycin-induced lung injury. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Low C-reactive protein values at admission predict mortality in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae that require intensive care management.

    PubMed

    Que, Yok-Ai; Virgini, Virginie; Lozeron, Elise Dupuis; Paratte, Géraldine; Prod'hom, Guy; Revelly, Jean-Pierre; Pagani, Jean-Luc; Charbonney, Emmanuel; Eggimann, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    To identify risk factors associated with mortality in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by S. pneumoniae who require intensive care unit (ICU) management, and to assess the prognostic values of these risk factors at the time of admission. Retrospective analysis of all consecutive patients with CAP caused by S. pneumoniae who were admitted to the 32-bed medico-surgical ICU of a community and referral university hospital between 2002 and 2011. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on variables available at admission. Among the 77 adult patients with severe CAP caused by S. pneumoniae who required ICU management, 12 patients died (observed mortality rate 15.6%). Univariate analysis indicated that septic shock and low C-reactive protein (CRP) values at admission were associated with an increased risk of death. In a multivariate model, after adjustment for age and gender, septic shock [odds ratio (OR), confidence interval 95%; 4.96, 1.11-22.25; p = 0.036], and CRP (OR 0.99, 0.98-0.99 p = 0.034) remained significantly associated with death. Finally, we assessed the discriminative ability of CRP to predict mortality by computing its receiver operating characteristic curve. The CRP value cut-off for the best sensitivity and specificity was 169.5 mg/L to predict hospital mortality with an area under the curve of 0.72 (0.55-0.89). The mortality of patients with S. pneumoniae CAP requiring ICU management was much lower than predicted by severity scores. The presence of septic shock and a CRP value at admission <169.5 mg/L predicted a fatal outcome.

  3. Prospectively defined murine mesenchymal stem cells inhibit Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced acute lung injury and improve pneumonia survival.

    PubMed

    Hackstein, Holger; Lippitsch, Anne; Krug, Philipp; Schevtschenko, Inna; Kranz, Sabine; Hecker, Matthias; Dietert, Kristina; Gruber, Achim D; Bein, Gregor; Brendel, Cornelia; Baal, Nelli

    2015-10-06

    Numerous studies have described the immunosuppressive capacity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) but these studies use mixtures of heterogeneous progenitor cells for in vitro expansion. Recently, multipotent MSC have been prospectively identified in murine bone marrow (BM) on the basis of PDFGRa(+) SCA1(+) CD45(-) TER119(-) (PαS) expression but the immunomodulatory capacity of these MSC is unknown. We isolated PαS MSC by high-purity FACS sorting of murine BM and after in vitro expansion we analyzed the in vivo immunomodulatory activity during acute pneumonia. PαS MSC (1 × 10(6)) were applied intratracheally 4 h after acute respiratory Klebsiella pneumoniae induced infection. PαS MSC treatment resulted in significantly reduced alveolitis and protein leakage in comparison to mock-treated controls. PαS MSC-treated mice exhibited significantly reduced alveolar TNF-α and IL-12p70 expression, while IL-10 expression was unaffected. Dissection of respiratory dendritic cell (DC) subsets by multiparameter flow cytometry revealed significantly reduced lung DC infiltration and significantly reduced CD86 costimulatory expression on lung CD103(+) DC in PαS MSC-treated mice. In the post-acute phase of pneumonia, PαS MSC-treated animals exhibited significantly reduced respiratory IL-17(+) CD4(+) T cells and IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) T cells. Moreover, PαS MSC treatment significantly improved overall pneumonia survival and did not increase bacterial load. In this study we demonstrated for the first time the feasibility and in vivo immunomodulatory capacity of prospectively defined MSC in pneumonia.

  4. Plasma-derived human antithrombin attenuates ventilator-induced coagulopathy but not inflammation in a Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia model in rats.

    PubMed

    Aslami, H; Haitsma, J J; Hofstra, J J; Florquin, S; Dos Santos, C; Streutker, C; Zhang, H; Levi, M; Slutsky, A S; Schultz, M J

    2012-03-01

    Mechanical ventilation exaggerates pneumonia-associated pulmonary coagulopathy and inflammation. We hypothesized that the administration of plasma-derived human antithrombin (AT), one of the natural inhibitors of coagulation, prevents ventilator-induced pulmonary coagulopathy, inflammation and bacterial outgrowth in a Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia model in rats. Forty-eight hours after induction of S. pneumoniae pneumonia rats were subjected to mechanical ventilation (tidal volume 12 mL kg(-1), positive end-expiratory pressure 0 cmH(2)O and inspired oxygen fraction 40%). Rats were randomized to systemic treatment with AT (250 IU administered intravenously (i.v.) before the start of mechanical ventilation) or placebo (saline). Non-ventilated, non-infected rats and non-ventilated rats with pneumonia served as controls. The primary endpoints were pulmonary coagulation and inflammation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Pneumonia was characterized by local activation of coagulation and inhibition of fibrinolysis, resulting in increased levels of fibrin degradation products and fibrin deposition in the lung. Mechanical ventilation exaggerated pulmonary coagulopathy and inflammation. Systemic administration of AT led to supra-normal BALF levels of AT and decreased ventilator-associated activation of coagulation. AT neither affected pulmonary inflammation nor bacterial outgrowth from the lungs or blood. Plasma-derived human AT attenuates ventilator-induced coagulopathy, but not inflammation and bacterial outgrowth in a S. pneumoniae pneumonia model in rats. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  5. Performance evaluation of MR-proadrenomedullin and other scoring systems in severe sepsis with pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Rollas, Kazım; Alagöz, Ali; Seğmen, Fatih; Sipit, Tuğrul

    2014-01-01

    Background In sepsis, risk assessment is as crucial as early and accurate diagnosis. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of mid-regional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) with other scoring systems in severe sepsis and septic shock patients due to community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods Patients were divided into 2 groups as severe sepsis and septic shock due to CAP (group 1, n=31) and only CAP group (group 2, n=26). Serum MR-proADM, procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), and d-dimer level were analyzed. Acute Physiological and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, and Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) were performed for all patients. Results There was no difference between groups in terms of serum MR-proADM levels (P=0.780). Serum MR-proADM was not found a significant value for the prediction of death within the 4 and 8 weeks in all patients. SOFA score was the most significant to predict mortality in 4 and 8 weeks (P<0.001). The combination of SOFA score and serum MR-proADM was a strong factor to predict death in 4 weeks (specifity 86.8% and sensitivity 66.7%). The combination of MR-proADM, SOFA score, and APACHE II score was found 75.0% sensitive and 71.4% specific to predict mortality within 4 weeks in group 1. Conclusions The MR-proADM does not correlate with mortality or disease severity to predict mortality. The combination of SOFA, APACHE II scores, and MR-proADM was efficient to predict prognosis and mortality rate in severe sepsis or septic shock patients. PMID:25093088

  6. Severe Pneumonia Associated with Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Outbreak, San Luis Potosí, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Magaña-Aquino, Martin; García-Sepúlveda, Christian A.; Ochoa-Pérez, Uciel R.; Falcón-Escobedo, Reynaldo; Comas-García, Andreu; Aranda-Romo, Saray; Contreras-Treviño, Hugo I.; Jiménez-Rico, Paulina V.; Banda-Barbosa, Mario A.; Dominguez-Paulin, Félix; Bernal-Blanco, J. Mario; Pérez-González, Luis F.; Noyola, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of adults hospitalized with pneumonia during the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak. Patients admitted to a general hospital in San Luis Potosí, Mexico, from April 10 through May 11, 2009, suspected to have influenza virus–associated pneumonia were evaluated. We identified 50 patients with suspected influenza pneumonia; the presence of influenza virus was confirmed in 18: 11 with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, 5 with unsubtypeable influenza A virus, 1 with seasonal influenza A virus (H3N2), and 1 in whom assay results for seasonal and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 viruses were positive. Eighteen patients were treated in the intensive care unit, and 10 died. During the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, severe pneumonia developed in young adults who had no identifiable risk factors; early diagnosis and treatment of influenza virus infections may have a determinant role in outcome. PMID:20031039

  7. Precision medicine for the treatment of severe pneumonia in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Rello, Jordi; Perez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in its management, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains the most important cause of sepsis-related mortality and the reason for many ICU admissions. Severity assessment is the cornerstone of CAP patient management and the attempts to ensure the best site of care and therapy. Survival depends on a combination of host factors (genetic, age, comorbidities, defenses), pathogens (virulence, serotypes) and drugs. To reduce CAP mortality, early adequate antibiotic therapy is fundamental. The use of combination therapy with a macrolide seems to improve the clinical outcome in the subset of patients with high inflammation due to immunomodulation. Guidelines on antibiotic therapy have been associated with beneficial effects, and studies of newer adjunctive drugs have produced promising results. This paper discusses the current state of knowledge regarding of precision medicine and the treatment of severe CAP patients.

  8. Early non-invasive ventilation treatment for respiratory failure due to severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Antonello; Ferraioli, Gianluca; Ferrari-Bravo, Maura; Barlascini, Cornelius; Santo, Mario; Ferrera, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Severe community-acquired pneumonia (sCAP) have been as defined pneumonia requiring admission to the intensive care unit or carrying a high risk of death. Currently, the treatment of sCAP consists of antibiotic therapy and ventilator support. The use of invasive ventilation causes several complications as does admission to ICU. For this reason, non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been used for acute respiratory failure to avoid endotracheal intubation. However, few studies have currently assessed the usefulness of NIV in sCAP. We prospectively assessed 127 patients with sCAP and severe acute respiratory failure [oxygen arterial pressure/oxygen inspiratory fraction ratio (PaO2/FiO2) <250]. We defined successful NIV as avoidance of intubation and the achievement of PaO2/FiO2 >250 with spontaneous breathing. We assessed predictors of NIV failure and hospital mortality using univariate and multivariate analyses. NIV failed in 32 patients (25.1%). Higher chest X-ray score at admission, chest X-ray worsening, and a lower PaO2/FiO2 and higher alveolar-arteriolar gradient (A-aDO2) after 1 h of NIV all independently predicted NIV failure. Higher lactate dehydrogenase and confusion, elevated blood urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure plus age ≥65 years at admission, higher A-aDO2, respiratory rate and lower PaO2/FiO2 after 1 h of NIV and intubation rate were directly related to hospital mortality. Successful treatment is strongly related to less severe illness as well as to a good initial and sustained response to medical therapy and NIV treatment. Constant monitoring of these patients is mandatory. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Defining community acquired pneumonia severity on presentation to hospital: an international derivation and validation study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, W; van der Eerden, M M; Laing, R; Boersma, W; Karalus, N; Town, G; Lewis, S; Macfarlane, J

    2003-01-01

    Background: In the assessment of severity in community acquired pneumonia (CAP), the modified British Thoracic Society (mBTS) rule identifies patients with severe pneumonia but not patients who might be suitable for home management. A multicentre study was conducted to derive and validate a practical severity assessment model for stratifying adults hospitalised with CAP into different management groups. Methods: Data from three prospective studies of CAP conducted in the UK, New Zealand, and the Netherlands were combined. A derivation cohort comprising 80% of the data was used to develop the model. Prognostic variables were identified using multiple logistic regression with 30 day mortality as the outcome measure. The final model was tested against the validation cohort. Results: 1068 patients were studied (mean age 64 years, 51.5% male, 30 day mortality 9%). Age ⩾65 years (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.6 to 8.0) and albumin <30 g/dl (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.5 to 8.7) were independently associated with mortality over and above the mBTS rule (OR 5.2, 95% CI 2.7 to 10). A six point score, one point for each of Confusion, Urea >7 mmol/l, Respiratory rate ⩾30/min, low systolic(<90 mm Hg) or diastolic (⩽60 mm Hg) Blood pressure), age ⩾65 years (CURB-65 score) based on information available at initial hospital assessment, enabled patients to be stratified according to increasing risk of mortality: score 0, 0.7%; score 1, 3.2%; score 2, 3%; score 3, 17%; score 4, 41.5% and score 5, 57%. The validation cohort confirmed a similar pattern. Conclusions: A simple six point score based on confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and age can be used to stratify patients with CAP into different management groups. PMID:12728155

  10. Increased Lymphatic Vessel Length Is Associated With the Fibroblast Reticulum and Disease Severity in Usual Interstitial Pneumonia and Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Gregory P.; Janssen, William J.; Huie, Tristan J.; Burnham, Ellen L.; Heinz, David E.; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Sahin, Hakan; Schwarz, Marvin I.; Cool, Carlyne D.; Groshong, Steve D.; Geraci, Mark W.; Tuder, Rubin M.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Henson, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Lymphangiogenesis responds to tissue injury as a key component of normal wound healing. The development of fibrosis in the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias may result from abnormal wound healing in response to injury. We hypothesize that increased lymphatic vessel (LV) length, a marker of lymphangiogenesis, is associated with parenchymal components of the fibroblast reticulum (organizing collagen, fibrotic collagen, and fibroblast foci), and its extent correlates with disease severity. Methods: We assessed stereologically the parenchymal structure of fibrotic lungs and its associated lymphatic network, which was highlighted immunohistochemically in age-matched samples of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) with FVC < 80%, COPD with a Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease stage 0, and normal control lungs. Results: LV length density, as opposed to vessel volume density, was found to be associated with organizing and fibrotic collagen density (P < .0001). Length density of LVs and the volume density of organizing and fibrotic collagen were significantly associated with severity of both % FVC (P < .001) and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (P < .001). Conclusions: Severity of disease in UIP and NSIP is associated with increased LV length and is strongly associated with components of the fibroblast reticulum, namely organizing and fibrotic collagen, which supports a pathogenic role of LVs in these two diseases. Furthermore, the absence of definable differences between UIP and NSIP suggests that LVs are a unifying mechanism for the development of fibrosis in these fibrotic lung diseases. PMID:22797508

  11. Streptococcus pneumoniae–Induced Pneumonia and Citrobacter rodentium–Induced Gut Infection Differentially Alter Vitamin A Concentrations in the Lung and Liver of Mice12

    PubMed Central

    Restori, Katherine H.; McDaniel, Kaitlin L.; Wray, Amanda E.; Cantorna, Margherita T.; Ross, A. Catharine

    2014-01-01

    In the developing world, vitamin A (VA) deficiency is endemic in populations that are also at great risk of morbidity and mortality because of pneumococcal pneumonia and enteric infections. To better understand how lung and gastrointestinal pathogens affect VA status, we assessed VA concentrations in serum, lung, and liver during an invasive pneumonia infection induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3, and a noninvasive gut infection induced by Citrobacter rodentium, in vitamin A–adequate (VAA) and vitamin A–deficient (VAD) mice. For pneumonia infection, mice were immunized with pneumococcal polysaccharide serotype 3 (PPS3), or not (infected-control), 5 d prior to intranasal inoculation with S. pneumoniae. Two days post-inoculation, immunization was protective against systemic infection regardless of VA status as PPS3 immunization decreased bacteremia compared with infected-control mice (P < 0.05). Retinol concentrations in the lung were higher in infected-control VAA mice (15.7 nmol/g: P < 0.05) compared with PPS3-immunized mice (8.23 nmol/g), but this was not associated with increased lung bacterial burden. VAA mice had reduced severity of C. rodentium–induced gut infection as measured by fecal bacterial shedding compared with VAD mice (P < 0.05). Liver retinol and retinyl ester concentrations in VAA mice decreased at the peak of infection (retinol, 8.1 nmol/g; retinyl esters, 985 nmol/g; P < 0.05, compared with uninfected mice; retinol, 29.5 nmol/g; retinyl esters, 1730 nmol/g), whereas tissue VA concentrations were low in VAD mice during both infections. Colonic mucin gene expression was also depressed at peak infection compared with uninfected mice (P < 0.05). Overall, pneumonia had less effect on VA status than gastrointestinal infection, predominantly owing to reduced hepatic VA storage at the peak of gut infection. PMID:24431327

  12. Gremlin localization and expression levels partially differentiate idiopathic interstitial pneumonia severity and subtype.

    PubMed

    Myllärniemi, M; Vuorinen, K; Pulkkinen, V; Kankaanranta, H; Aine, T; Salmenkivi, K; Keski-Oja, J; Koli, K; Kinnula, Vl

    2008-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (histopathology of usual interstitial pneumonia, UIP) and non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) are diseases characterized by loss of normal lung architecture and function. The differential diagnosis between IPF/UIP and NSIP may be difficult. The levels of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4 antagonist gremlin are up-regulated in IPF/UIP. The present study was performed to clarify whether the localization or the mRNA expression of gremlin or BMP-4 could be used in the differential diagnosis or assessment of severity of IPF/UIP and NSIP. Gremlin and BMP-4 immunoreactivities were quantitated from 24 UIP and 12 NSIP lung specimens. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses were performed to compare gremlin and BMP-4 expression between UIP (n = 8) and NSIP (n = 5) biopsies. Immunohistochemical positivity and mRNA levels were correlated to lung function parameters. In IPF/UIP biopsies, gremlin was detected mainly in the thickened lung parenchyma, whereas in NSIP it was observed in the alveolar epithelium. BMP-4-positive (BMP-4+) cells were detected solely in the alveolar wall. The percentage of gremlin-positive area was higher in IPF/UIP (5.1 +/- 0.6) than in NSIP (1.8 +/- 0.7) (n = 36, p < 0.0001). Gremlin mRNA levels were higher in advanced UIP (p = 0.008) and NSIP (p = 0.007) biopsies than in the normal control lung. A negative correlation was found between the specific diffusion capacity corrected for alveolar volume (DLCO/VA) and gremlin mRNA levels (r = - 0.69, p = 0.007). The highest numbers of BMP-4+ cells were found in NSIP biopsies. BMP-4 mRNA levels correlated positively with forced vital capacity (r = 0.801, p < 0.0001) and diffusion capacity. Parenchymal gremlin immunoreactivity is thus suggestive of a UIP-type interstitial pneumonia. Gremlin expression levels correlating negatively and BMP-4 levels positively with disease severity support recent observations of a fibroprotective role for the BMPs.

  13. Aspiration pneumonia-induced sepsis increases cardiac dysfunction after burn trauma.

    PubMed

    Sheeran, P W; Maass, D L; White, D J; Turbeville, T D; Giroir, B P; Horton, J W

    1998-05-01

    with aspiration pneumonia-induced sepsis than in animals with either burn alone or aspiration pneumonia-induced sepsis alone. While our data suggest that elevated circulating TNF-alpha levels may contribute, in part, to depressed cardiac function, further studies are needed to fully define the mechanisms underlying cardiac contractile deficits in this model. We speculate that depressed cardiopulmonary function due to burn complicated by pneumonia and sepsis contributes to the high mortality of this patient population.

  14. Aerosolized clindamycin is superior to aerosolized dexamethasone or clindamycin-dexamethasone combination in the treatment of severe Porphyromonas gingivalis aspiration pneumonia in an experimental murine model.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Ana; Pavlica, Zlatko; Nemec-Svete, Alenka; Eržen, Damijan; Milutinović, Aleksandra; Petelin, Milan

    2012-02-01

    Adjunctive corticosteroid treatment to reduce excessive local inflammatory response in pneumonia is controversial. To study the effects of an early local adjunct dexamethasone treatment on the course of pneumonia and inflammatory/cytokine response, mice were intratracheally inoculated with live Porphyromonas gingivalis and treated with either clindamycin (C), dexamethasone (D), C+D combination, or were not treated (Pg). Six mice from each group were euthanized at 6, 24, 72, and 168 hours after inoculation. Levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, soluble TNF-α receptors (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 in the serum and lung-homogenate supernatant were determined. Lung samples were histopathologically assessed and all findings compared to those found in 24 sham-inoculated mice (phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]). Severe P. gingivalis-induced bronchopneumonia progressed from 24 hours, peaked at 72 hours, and resolved after 168 hours with changes in local and systemic cytokine levels. Clindamycin-treated mice developed only mild bronchopneumonia that resolved fast (72 hours) with an early (6-24 hours) normalization of local and systemic cytokine levels. Similar course of pneumonia and cytokine level changes were observed in mice treated with C+D, but later. Early (6-24 hours) local elevation of sTNFRs was observed in C and C+D groups of mice, whereas nontreated (Pg) mice had increased systemic sTNFRs. Severe bronchopneumonia with delayed resolution was observed in D-group mice, with an early local and systemic decrease in sTNFR1 and persistent elevation of local TNF-α. Clindamycin or a clindamycin-dexamethasone combination treatment significantly improves the course of P. gingivalis-aspiration pneumonia, but more so if clindamycin alone is used. A favorable course of pneumonia seems to be associated with an early elevation of sTNFRs and normalization of TNF-α.

  15. Severe Sepsis Facilitates Intestinal Colonization by Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Transfer of the SHV-18 Resistance Gene to Escherichia coli during Antimicrobial Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jun; Liu, Shaoze; Lin, Zhaofen; Li, Wenfang; Liu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens are frequent and life threatening in critically ill patients. To investigate whether severe sepsis affects gut colonization by resistant pathogens and genetic exchange between opportunistic pathogens, we tested the intestinal-colonization ability of an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae strain carrying the SHV-18 resistance gene and the transfer ability of the resistance gene to endogenous Escherichia coli under ceftriaxone treatment in rats with burn injury only or severe sepsis induced by burns plus endotoxin exposure. Without ceftriaxone treatment, the K. pneumoniae strain colonized the intestine in both septic and burned rats for a short time, with clearance occurring earlier in burn-only rats but never in sham burn rats. In both burned and septic rats, the colonization level of the challenge strain dropped at the beginning and then later increased during ceftriaxone treatment, after which it declined gradually. This pattern coincided with the change in resistance of K. pneumoniae to ceftriaxone during and after ceftriaxone treatment. Compared with burn-only injury, severe sepsis had a more significant effect on the change in antimicrobial resistance to ceftriaxone. Only in septic rats was the resistance gene successfully transferred from the challenge strain to endogenous E. coli during ceftriaxone treatment; the gene persisted for at least 4 weeks after ceftriaxone treatment. We concluded that severe sepsis can facilitate intestinal colonization by an exogenous resistant pathogen and the transfer of the resistance gene to a potential endogenous pathogen during antimicrobial treatment. PMID:24277046

  16. Estimated incidence of influenza-virus-associated severe pneumonia in children in El Salvador, 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Armero, Julio; Rodriguez, David; de Lozano, Celina; Bonilla, Luis; Minaya, Percy; Chacón, Rafael; Jara, Jorge; Blanco, Natalia; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Bresee, Joseph; Xu, Xiyan; Klimov, Alexander; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Linares-Perez, Nivaldo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the incidence of influenza-virus-associated severe pneumonia among Salvadorian children aged < 5 years. Methods Data on children aged < 5 years admitted with severe pneumonia to a sentinel hospital in the western region were collected weekly. Nasal and oropharyngeal swab specimens were collected from a convenience sample of case patients for respiratory virus testing. A health-care utilization survey was conducted in the hospital catchment area to determine the proportion of residents who sought care at the hospital. The incidence of influenza-virus-associated severe pneumonia among all Salvadorian children aged < 5 years was estimated from surveillance and census data, with adjustment for health-care utilization. Influenza virus strains were characterized by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to determine their correspondence with northern and southern hemisphere influenza vaccine formulations. Findings Physicians identified 2554 cases of severe pneumonia. Samples from 608 cases were tested for respiratory viruses and 37 (6%) were positive for influenza virus. The estimated incidence of influenza-virus-associated severe pneumonia was 3.2 cases per 1000 person–years (95% confidence interval, CI: 2.8–3.7) overall, 1.5 cases per 1000 person–years (95% CI: 1.0–2.0) during 2008, 7.6 cases per 1000 person–years (95% CI: 6.5–8.9) during 2009 and 0.6 cases per 1000 person–years (95% CI: 0.3–1.0) during 2010. Northern and southern hemisphere vaccine formulations matched influenza virus strains isolated during 2008 and 2010. Conclusion Influenza-virus-associated severe pneumonia occurred frequently among young Salvadorian children during 2008–2010. Antigens in northern and southern hemisphere influenza vaccine formulations corresponded to circulating strains. PMID:23109743

  17. Estimated incidence of influenza-virus-associated severe pneumonia in children in El Salvador, 2008-2010.

    PubMed

    Clara, Wilfrido; Armero, Julio; Rodriguez, David; de Lozano, Celina; Bonilla, Luis; Minaya, Percy; Chacón, Rafael; Jara, Jorge; Blanco, Natalia; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Bresee, Joseph; Xu, Xiyan; Klimov, Alexander; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Linares-Perez, Nivaldo

    2012-10-01

    To estimate the incidence of influenza-virus-associated severe pneumonia among Salvadorian children aged < 5 years. Data on children aged < 5 years admitted with severe pneumonia to a sentinel hospital in the western region were collected weekly. Nasal and oropharyngeal swab specimens were collected from a convenience sample of case patients for respiratory virus testing. A health-care utilization survey was conducted in the hospital catchment area to determine the proportion of residents who sought care at the hospital. The incidence of influenza-virus-associated severe pneumonia among all Salvadorian children aged < 5 years was estimated from surveillance and census data, with adjustment for health-care utilization. Influenza virus strains were characterized by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to determine their correspondence with northern and southern hemisphere influenza vaccine formulations. Physicians identified 2554 cases of severe pneumonia. Samples from 608 cases were tested for respiratory viruses and 37 (6%) were positive for influenza virus. The estimated incidence of influenza-virus-associated severe pneumonia was 3.2 cases per 1000 person-years (95% confidence interval, CI: 2.8-3.7) overall, 1.5 cases per 1000 person-years (95% CI: 1.0-2.0) during 2008, 7.6 cases per 1000 person-years (95% CI: 6.5-8.9) during 2009 and 0.6 cases per 1000 person-years (95% CI: 0.3-1.0) during 2010. Northern and southern hemisphere vaccine formulations matched influenza virus strains isolated during 2008 and 2010. Influenza-virus-associated severe pneumonia occurred frequently among young Salvadorian children during 2008-2010. Antigens in northern and southern hemisphere influenza vaccine formulations corresponded to circulating strains.

  18. Role of persistent infection in the control and severity of asthma: focus on Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    von, Hertzen L C

    2002-03-01

    Conventional risk factors have been unable to explain most of the substantial increase in the prevalence of asthma observed in many countries during the last few decades. Much attention has been directed at the "hygiene hypothesis", the apparent inverse relationship between intense systemic childhood infections and the subsequent development of asthma and atopy. However, it is not only the absence or scarcity of infections, but the prolonged presence of certain microorganisms in the lungs that may be involved in the development of asthma. Accumulating evidence suggests that Chlamydia pneumoniae, an intracellular ubiquitous pathogen with an innate propensity to persist and cause chronic infections, may be associated with asthma. This microorganism can achieve a state of "latency" in which it is viable but dormant and does not multiply. During this state, however, chlamydia continues to synthesize the "stress" protein, a 60-kDa heat shock protein (hsp60). This protein is able to elicit a strong host inflammatory response at sites of its production and appears to be involved in tissue injury and scarring processes. As inflammation has been found to be present in almost all asthmatics, whatever the severity and aetiology of the disease, inhaled glucocorticoids now have an established position in the treatment of early stages. However, corticosteroids negatively affect many aspects of cell-mediated immunity and favour the shift from a T-helper-1-type response towards a T-helper-2-type response. Corticosteroids may thus severely deteriorate the host's ability to eradicate an intracellular pathogen, such as Chlamydia pneumoniae, which requires a properly functioning cell-mediated (T-helper-1-type) immune response to be cleared. These drugs are also able to reactivate persistent Chlamydia to an active growth phase, which, by increasing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines at the site of infection, can further amplify inflammation in the airways of patients with

  19. Oral versus intravenous clarithromycin in moderate to severe community-acquired pneumonia: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Rae, Nikolas; Singanayagam, Aran; Schembri, Stuart; Chalmers, James D

    2017-01-01

    British Thoracic Society guidelines recommend clarithromycin in addition to beta-lactam antibiotics for patients with community-acquired pneumonia and CURB-65 score 2-5. Intravenous therapy is commonly used but there are few data on whether oral therapy is equally effective. This observational study used propensity matching to compare two groups of patients with moderate to severe community-acquired pneumonia (CURB-65 score 2-5) treated with oral (n = 226) or intravenous (n = 226) clarithromycin on admission. Outcomes were 30-day mortality, intensive care unit admission, time to clinical stability, and length of hospital stay. There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality (16.8% for intravenous [IV] group vs. 14.6% for oral group, hazard ratio for IV group 1.11 95% CI 0.70-1.78), ICU admission (10.6% in both groups) or complications (10.6% for IV group and 9.3% for oral group) between the groups. The time to clinical stability in both cohorts was a median of 5 days (interquartile range 3-7 days, p = 0.3). The median length of hospital stay was 8 days in the IV group (interquartile range 4-14 days) and 7 days in the oral group (interquartile range 4-13 days), p = 0.5. No other differences were observed between oral and IV groups. Where the oral route is not compromised, oral macrolides appear to be equivalent to IV in treating moderate to severe CAP.

  20. Inflammatory profiles in severe pneumonia associated with the pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus isolated in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga, Joaquín; Torres, Martha; Romo, Javier; Torres, Diana; Jiménez, Luis; Ramírez, Gustavo; Cruz, Alfredo; Espinosa, Enrique; Herrera, Teresa; Buendía, Ivette; Ramírez-Venegas, Alejandra; González, Yolanda; Bobadilla, Karen; Hernández, Fernando; García, Jorge; Quiñones-Falconi, Francisco; Sada, Eduardo; Manjarrez, María E; Cabello, Carlos; Kawa, Simón; Zlotnik, Albert; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moisés

    2011-11-01

    The immune mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of severe pneumonia associated with the A/H1N1 virus are not well known. The objective of this study was to determine whether severe A/H1N1-associated pneumonia can be explained by the emergence of particular T-cell subsets and the cytokines/chemokines they produced, as well as distinct responses to infection. T-cell subset distribution and cytokine/chemokine levels in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were determined in patients with severe A/H1N1 infection, asymptomatic household contacts, and healthy controls. Cytokine and chemokine production was also evaluated after in vitro infection with seasonal H1N1 and pandemic A/H1N1 strains. We found an increase in the frequency of peripheral Th2 and Tc2 cells in A/H1N1 patients. A trend toward increased Tc1 cells was observed in household contacts. Elevated serum levels of IL-6, CXCL8, and CCL2 were found in patients and a similar cytokine/chemokine profile was observed in BAL, in which CCL5 was also increased. Infection assays revealed that both strains induce the production of several cytokines/chemokines at 24 and 72 h, however, IL-6, CCL3, and CXCL8 were strongly up-regulated in 72-h cultures in presence of the A/H1N1 virus. Several inflammatory mediators are up-regulated in peripheral and lung samples from A/H1N1-infected patients who developed severe pneumonia. In addition, the A/H1N1 strain induces higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines than the seasonal H1N1 strain. These findings suggest that it is possible to identify biomarkers of severe pneumonia and also suggest the therapeutic use of immunomodulatory drugs in patients with severe pneumonia associated with A/H1N1 infection.

  1. R-roscovitine reduces lung inflammation induced by lipoteichoic acid and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hoogendijk, Arie J; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Duitman, Janwillem; van Lieshout, Miriam H P; Blok, Dana C; van der Poll, Tom; Wieland, Catharina W

    2012-09-25

    Bacterial pneumonia remains associated with high morbidity and mortality. The gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important proinflammatory component of the gram-positive bacterial cell wall. R-roscovitine, a purine analog, is a potent cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-1, -2, -5 and -7 inhibitor that has the ability to inhibit the cell cycle and to induce polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) apoptosis. We sought to investigate the effect of R-roscovitine on LTA-induced activation of cell lines with relevance for lung inflammation in vitro and on lung inflammation elicited by either LTA or viable S. pneumoniae in vivo. In vitro R-roscovitine enhanced apoptosis in PMNs and reduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) production in MH-S (alveolar macrophage) and MLE-12/MLE-15 (respiratory epithelial) cell lines. In vivo R-roscovitine treatment reduced PMN numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid during LTA-induced lung inflammation; this effect was reversed by inhibiting apoptosis. Postponed treatment with R-roscovitine (24 and 72 h) diminished PMN numbers in lung tissue during gram-positive pneumonia; this step was associated with a transient increase in pulmonary bacterial loads. R-roscovitine inhibits proinflammatory responses induced by the gram-positive stimuli LTA and S. pneumoniae. R-roscovitine reduces PMN numbers in lungs upon LTA administration by enhancing apoptosis. The reduction in PMN numbers caused by R-roscovitine during S. pneumoniae pneumonia may hamper antibacterial defense.

  2. Differences in antibiotic-induced oxidative stress responses between laboratory and clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Bédis; Lupien, Andréanne; Bergeron, Michel G; Leprohon, Philippe; Ouellette, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Oxidants were shown to contribute to the lethality of bactericidal antibiotics in different bacterial species, including the laboratory strain Streptococcus pneumoniae R6. Resistance to penicillin among S. pneumoniae R6 mutants was further shown to protect against the induction of oxidants upon exposure to unrelated bactericidal compounds. In the work described here, we expanded on these results by studying the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in the context of antibiotic sensitivity and resistance by including S. pneumoniae clinical isolates. In S. pneumoniae R6, penicillin, ciprofloxacin, and kanamycin but not the bacteriostatic linezolid, erythromycin, or tetracycline induced the accumulation of reactive oxygen species. For the three bactericidal compounds, resistance to a single molecule prevented the accumulation of oxidants upon exposure to unrelated bactericidal antibiotics, and this was accompanied by a reduced lethality. This phenomenon does not involve target site mutations but most likely implicates additional mutations occurring early during the selection of resistance to increase survival while more efficient resistance mechanisms are being selected or acquired. Bactericidal antibiotics also induced oxidants in sensitive S. pneumoniae clinical isolates. The importance of oxidants in the lethality of bactericidal antibiotics was less clear than for S. pneumoniae R6, however, since ciprofloxacin induced oxidants even in ciprofloxacin-resistant S. pneumoniae clinical isolates. Our results provide a clear example of the complex nature of the mode of action of antibiotics. The adaptive approach to oxidative stress of S. pneumoniae is peculiar, and a better understanding of the mechanism implicated in response to oxidative injury should also help clarify the role of oxidants induced by antibiotics.

  3. R-roscovitine Reduces Lung Inflammation Induced by Lipoteichoic Acid and Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hoogendijk, Arie J; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Duitman, JanWillem; van Lieshout, Miriam H P; Blok, Dana C; van der Poll, Tom; Wieland, Catharina W

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia remains associated with high morbidity and mortality. The gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important proinflammatory component of the gram-positive bacterial cell wall. R-roscovitine, a purine analog, is a potent cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-1, −2, −5 and −7 inhibitor that has the ability to inhibit the cell cycle and to induce polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) apoptosis. We sought to investigate the effect of R-roscovitine on LTA-induced activation of cell lines with relevance for lung inflammation in vitro and on lung inflammation elicited by either LTA or viable S. pneumoniae in vivo. In vitro R-roscovitine enhanced apoptosis in PMNs and reduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) production in MH-S (alveolar macrophage) and MLE-12/MLE-15 (respiratory epithelial) cell lines. In vivo R-roscovitine treatment reduced PMN numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid during LTA-induced lung inflammation; this effect was reversed by inhibiting apoptosis. Postponed treatment with R-roscovitine (24 and 72 h) diminished PMN numbers in lung tissue during gram-positive pneumonia; this step was associated with a transient increase in pulmonary bacterial loads. R-roscovitine inhibits proinflammatory responses induced by the gram-positive stimuli LTA and S. pneumoniae. R-roscovitine reduces PMN numbers in lungs upon LTA administration by enhancing apoptosis. The reduction in PMN numbers caused by R-roscovitine during S. pneumoniae pneumonia may hamper antibacterial defense. PMID:22692577

  4. Eosinophilic infiltrate in a patient with severe Legionella pneumonia as a levofloxacin-related complication: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Legionella pneumonia can appear with different levels of severity and it can often present with complications such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. Case presentation We report the case of a 44-year-old Caucasian man with Legionella pneumonia with successive development of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. During his stay in intensive care the clinical and radiological situation of the previously observed acute respiratory distress syndrome unexpectedly worsened due to acute pulmonary eosinophilic infiltrate of iatrogenic origin. Conclusion Levofloxacin treatment caused the occurrence of acute eosinophilic infiltrate. Diagnosis was possible following bronchoscopic examination using bronchoaspirate and transbronchial biopsy. PMID:21070648

  5. Semi-automated method to measure pneumonia severity in mice through computed tomography (CT) scan analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johri, Ansh; Schimel, Daniel; Noguchi, Audrey; Hsu, Lewis L.

    2010-03-01

    Imaging is a crucial clinical tool for diagnosis and assessment of pneumonia, but quantitative methods are lacking. Micro-computed tomography (micro CT), designed for lab animals, provides opportunities for non-invasive radiographic endpoints for pneumonia studies. HYPOTHESIS: In vivo micro CT scans of mice with early bacterial pneumonia can be scored quantitatively by semiautomated imaging methods, with good reproducibility and correlation with bacterial dose inoculated, pneumonia survival outcome, and radiologists' scores. METHODS: Healthy mice had intratracheal inoculation of E. coli bacteria (n=24) or saline control (n=11). In vivo micro CT scans were performed 24 hours later with microCAT II (Siemens). Two independent radiologists scored the extent of airspace abnormality, on a scale of 0 (normal) to 24 (completely abnormal). Using the Amira 5.2 software (Mercury Computer Systems), a histogram distribution of voxel counts between the Hounsfield range of -510 to 0 was created and analyzed, and a segmentation procedure was devised. RESULTS: A t-test was performed to determine whether there was a significant difference in the mean voxel value of each mouse in the three experimental groups: Saline Survivors, Pneumonia Survivors, and Pneumonia Non-survivors. It was found that the voxel count method was able to statistically tell apart the Saline Survivors from the Pneumonia Survivors, the Saline Survivors from the Pneumonia Non-survivors, but not the Pneumonia Survivors vs. Pneumonia Non-survivors. The segmentation method, however, was successfully able to distinguish the two Pneumonia groups. CONCLUSION: We have pilot-tested an evaluation of early pneumonia in mice using micro CT and a semi-automated method for lung segmentation and scoring system. Statistical analysis indicates that the system is reliable and merits further evaluation.

  6. Low Rates of Treatment Failure in Children Aged 2–59 Months Treated for Severe Pneumonia: A Multisite Pooled Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Matthew P.; Thea, Donald M.; Sadruddin, Salim; Bari, Abdul; Bonawitz, Rachael; Hazir, Tabish; Bin Nisar, Yasir; Qazi, Shamim A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Despite advances in childhood pneumonia management, it remains a major killer of children worldwide. We sought to estimate global treatment failure rates in children aged 2–59 months with World Health Organization–defined severe pneumonia. Methods. We pooled data from 4 severe pneumonia studies conducted during 1999–2009 using similar methodologies. We defined treatment failure by day 6 as death, danger signs (inability to drink, convulsions, abnormally sleepy), fever (≥38°C) and lower chest indrawing (LCI; days 2–3), LCI (day 6), or antibiotic change. Results. Among 6398 cases of severe pneumonia from 10 countries, 564 (cluster adjusted: 8.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.9%–11.5%) failed treatment by day 6. The most common reasons for clinical failure were persistence of fever and LCI or LCI or fever alone (75% of failures). Seventeen (0.3%) children died. Danger signs were uncommon (<1%). Infants 6–11 months and 2–5 months were 2- and 3.5-fold more likely, respectively, to fail treatment (adjusted OR [AOR], 1.8 [95% CI, 1.4–2.3] and AOR, 3.5 [95% CI, 2.8–4.3]) as children aged 12–59 months. Failure was increased 7-fold (AOR, 7.2 [95% CI, 5.0–10.5]) when comparing infants 2–5 months with very fast breathing to children 12–59 months with normal breathing. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate that severe pneumonia case management with antibiotics at health facilities or in the community is associated with few serious morbidities or deaths across diverse geographic settings and support moves to shift management of severe pneumonia with oral antibiotics to outpatients in the community. PMID:23264361

  7. Pneumonia Virus of Mice Severe Respiratory Virus Infection in a Natural Host

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Helene F.; Domachowske, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    Pneumonia virus of mice (PVM; family Paramyxoviridae, genus Pneumovirus) is a natural mouse pathogen that is closely related to the human and bovine respiratory syncytial viruses. Among the prominent features of this infection, robust replication of PVM takes place in bronchial epithelial cells in response to a minimal virus inoculum. Virus replication in situ results in local production of proinflammatory cytokines (MIP-1α, MIP-2, MCP-1 and IFNγ) and granulocyte recruitment to the lung. If left unchecked, PVM infection and the ensuing inflammatory response ultimately lead to pulmonary edema, respiratory compromise and death. In this review, we consider the recent studies using the PVM model that have provided important insights into the role of the inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of severe respiratory virus infection. We also highlight several works that have elucidated acquired immune responses to this pathogen, including T cell responses and the development of humoral immunity. Finally, we consider several immunomodulatory strategies that have been used successfully to reduce morbidity and mortality when administered to PVM infected, symptomatic mice, and thus hold promise as realistic therapeutic strategies for severe respiratory virus infections in human subjects. PMID:18471897

  8. [Extracorporeal CO2 removal as life support system for a severe organizing pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Rival, G; Millet, O; Capellier, G

    2016-12-01

    Acute lung injuries are usually found in intensive care unit. The diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) is the associated histological pattern and the most severe end-stage of the disease. Organizing pneumonia (OP), for which corticosteroids are the reference therapy, can mimic DAD. While postponing the response to treatment, to limit mechanical ventilation side effects, extracorporeal membrane oxygene can be proposed. We present a case of a severe OP for which extracorporeal CO2 removal (ECCO2R) is used as a bridge to recovery under corticosteroid therapy. In the context of a flu-like syndrome, the non-recovery of a lung impairment is reported to a severe OP. ECCO2R is applied when using an ultraprotective ventilation and while waiting for lung healing under corticosteroid. This strategy allowed successful recovery, early physical therapy and active mobilization. This observation presents the diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties of the lung parenchymental disease in intensive care. OP must be recognized. ECCO2R can be used in severe OP as a bridge to recovery while waiting for the corticosteroid efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kist, M.; Koester, H.; Bredt, W.

    1985-06-01

    Precultured guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AM) and freshly harvested alveolar cells (FHAC) activated by interaction with Mycoplasma pneumoniae were cytotoxic for xenogeneic /sup 75/selenomethionine-labeled tumor target cells. Phagocytosis of whole opsonized or nonopsonized M. pneumoniae cells was more effective in eliciting cytotoxicity than uptake of sonicated microorganisms. The addition of living mycoplasma cells to the assay system enhanced the cytotoxic effect considerably. Target cells were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxic action of phagocytes if they were coated with mycoplasma antigen or cocultured together with M. pneumoniae. The activation of the phagocytes could be inhibited by 2-deoxy-D-glucose but not by antimicrobial substances suppressing mycoplasma protein synthesis. It was accompanied by /sup 51/Cr release without detectable signs of cell damage. The supernatants of activated cells were cytotoxic for approximately 24 h. Inhibition, release, and cytotoxic activity indicate the necessity of an intact metabolism of the effector cells and suggest a secretion of cytotoxic substances.

  10. Plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor does not prevent mechanical ventilation-induced pulmonary complement activation in a rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de Beer, F M; Aslami, H; Hoeksma, J; van Mierlo, G; Wouters, D; Zeerleder, S; Roelofs, J J T H; Juffermans, N P; Schultz, M J; Lagrand, W K

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical ventilation has the potential to cause lung injury, and the role of complement activation herein is uncertain. We hypothesized that inhibition of the complement cascade by administration of plasma-derived human C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) prevents ventilation-induced pulmonary complement activation, and as such attenuates lung inflammation and lung injury in a rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. Forty hours after intratracheal challenge with S. pneumoniae causing pneumonia rats were subjected to ventilation with lower tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or high tidal volumes without PEEP, after an intravenous bolus of C1-INH (200 U/kg) or placebo (saline). After 4 h of ventilation blood, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were collected. Non-ventilated rats with S. pneumoniae pneumonia served as controls. While ventilation with lower tidal volumes and PEEP slightly amplified pneumonia-induced complement activation in the lungs, ventilation with higher tidal volumes without PEEP augmented local complement activation more strongly. Systemic pre-treatment with C1-INH, however, failed to alter ventilation-induced complement activation with both ventilation strategies. In accordance, lung inflammation and lung injury were not affected by pre-treatment with C1-INH, neither in rats ventilated with lower tidal volumes and PEEP, nor rats ventilated with high tidal volumes without PEEP. Ventilation augments pulmonary complement activation in a rat model of S. pneumoniae pneumonia. Systemic administration of C1-INH, however, does not attenuate ventilation-induced complement activation, lung inflammation, and lung injury.

  11. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae - A Primary Cause of Severe Pneumonia Epizootics in the Norwegian Muskox (Ovibos moschatus) Population

    PubMed Central

    Handeland, Kjell; Tengs, Torstein; Kokotovic, Branko; Vikøren, Turid; Ayling, Roger D.; Bergsjø, Bjarne; Sigurðardóttir, Ólöf G.; Bretten, Tord

    2014-01-01

    The Norwegian muskox (Ovibos moschatus) population lives on the high mountain plateau of Dovre and originates from animals introduced from Greenland. In the late summers of 2006 and 2012, severe outbreaks of pneumonia with mortality rates of 25-30% occurred. During the 2012 epidemic high quality samples from culled sick animals were obtained for microbiological and pathological examinations. High throughput sequencing (pyrosequencing) of pneumonic lung tissue revealed high concentrations of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in all six animals examined by this method and Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida in four animals, whereas no virus sequences could be identified. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and P. multocida multocida were also isolated by culture. Using real time PCR on lung swabs, M. ovipneumoniae was detected in all of the 19 pneumonic lungs examined. Gross pathological examination revealed heavy consolidations primarily in the cranial parts of the lungs and it also identified one case of otitis media. Histologically, lung lesions were characterized as acute to subacute mixed exudative and moderately proliferative bronchoalveolar pneumonia. Immunohistochemical (IHC) examination revealed high load of M. ovipneumoniae antigens within lung lesions, with particularly intensive staining in the neutrophils. Similar IHC finding were observed in archived lung tissue blocks from animals examined during the 2006 epidemic. An M. ovipneumoniae specific ELISA was applied on bio-banked muskox sera from stray muskoxen killed in the period 2004–2013 and sick muskoxen culled, as well as sera from wild reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) on Dovre and muskoxen from Greenland. Serology and mycoplasma culturing was also carried out on sheep that had been on pasture in the muskox area during the outbreak in 2012. Our findings indicated separate introductions of M. ovipneumoniae infection in 2006 and 2012 from infected co-grazing sheep. Salt licks shared by the two species were a

  12. Mesalazine-induced eosinophilic pneumonia with bone marrow infiltration: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunjian; Luo, Ling; Wang, Xiaofang; Liu, Xiaoyang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Ding, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Mesalazine-induced eosinophilic pneumonia has been rarely reported. We reported a case of mesalazine-induced eosinophilic pneumonia in a 56-year-old female who took mesalazine without a prescription for suspected ulcerative colitis. She had an elevated eosinophil count in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Eosinophil infiltration was also noted in bone marrow aspirates. Chest radiograph and computed tomography demonstrated bilateral upper lung predominant infiltrates and spirometry showed a restrictive ventilatory defect with a reduced diffusion capacity. The patient recovered after cessation of mesalazine therapy. Mesalazine-induced lung damage should be considered in patients who develop unexplained respiratory symptoms while taking this agent. PMID:27366075

  13. Predictors of non-invasive ventilation failure in severe respiratory failure due to community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Antonello; Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Barlascini, Cornelius; Senarega, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been used for acute respiratory failure to avoid endotracheal intubation and intensive care admission. Few studies have assessed the usefulness of NIV in patients with severe community acquired pneumonia (CAP). The use of NIV in severe CAP is controversial because there is a greater variability in success compared to other pulmonary conditions. We retrospectively followed 130 patients with CAP and severe acute respiratory failure (PaO2/FiO2 < 250) admitted to a Respiratory Monitoring Unit (RMU) and underwent NIV. We assessed predictors of NIV failure and hospital mortality using univariate and multivariate analyses. NIV failed in 26 patients (20.0%). Higher chest X-ray score at admission, higher heart rate after 1 hour of NIV, and a higher alveolar-arteriolar gradient (A-aDO2) after 24 hours of NIV each independently predicted NIV failure. Higher chest X ray score, higher LDH at admission, higher heart rate after 24 hours of NIV and higher A-aDO2 after 24 hours of NIV were directly related to hospital mortality. NIV treatment had high rate of success. Successful treatment is related to less lung involvement and to early good response to NIV and continuous improvement in clinical response.

  14. Smoking-Induced Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia in a 15-year-old Girl: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Ji-Seok; Kwon, Ji-Won; Kim, Byoung-Ju

    2010-01-01

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia is a very rare disease that is characterized by acute febrile respiratory failure, diffuse bilateral infiltrates on chest X-ray, and eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in the absence of infection. We present the case of a 15-year-old girl diagnosed with smoking-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia. A previously healthy young girl with a 1-day history of fever presented with cough, dyspnea, and diffuse bilateral infiltrates on chest X-ray. She had started smoking only 3 weeks before presentation. She was diagnosed by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid tests and lung biopsy and dramatically improved after steroid treatment. We emphasize that acute eosinophilic pneumonia must be considered when acute pneumonia does not respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics. Effective treatment and prompt institution of therapy can obviate unnecessary morbidity and mortality. PMID:20358030

  15. Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia with Bacteremia Caused by Herbaspirillum aquaticum or Herbaspirillum huttiense in an Immune-Competent Adult

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, Joanna; Smith, L. Patrick; Salzer, William

    2015-01-01

    Herbaspirillum spp. are Gram-negative bacteria that inhabit soil and water. Infections caused by these organisms have been reported in immunocompromised hosts. We describe severe community-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by Herbaspirillum aquaticum or H. huttiense in an immunocompetent adult male. PMID:26179298

  16. Characterisation of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) isolates from an outbreak with haemorrhagic enteritis and severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yeşilbağ, Kadir; Förster, Christine; Ozyiğit, M Ozgür; Alpay, Gizem; Tuncer, Pelin; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen; König, Matthias

    2014-02-21

    During 2007 a disease outbreak occurred in cattle in the Marmara region of western Turkey characterised by severe pneumonia and haemorrhagic enteritis in calves. Cases from three farms at different locations were examined and bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) isolated in all cases. Phylogenetic characterisation of the virus isolates allocated them in a new cluster tentatively named as BVDV-1r.

  17. Soluble RAGE as a severity marker in community acquired pneumonia associated sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is considered the most important cause of death from infectious disease in developed countries. Severity assessment scores partially address the difficulties in identifying high-risk patients. A lack of specific and valid pathophysiologic severity markers affect early and effective sepsis therapy. HMGB-1, sRAGE and RAGE have been involved in sepsis and their potential as severity markers has been proposed. The aim of this study was to evaluate HMGB-1, RAGE and sRAGE levels in patients with CAP-associated sepsis and determine their possible association with clinical outcome. Method We evaluated 33 patients with CAP-associated sepsis admitted to the emergency room and followed in the medical wards. Severity assessment scores (CURB-65, PSI, APACHE II, SOFA) and serologic markers (HMGB-1, RAGE, sRAGE) were evaluated on admission. Results Thirty patients with a diagnosis of CAP-associated sepsis were enrolled in the study within 24 hours after admission. Fourteen (46.6%) had pandemic (H1N1) influenza A virus, 2 (6.6%) had seasonal influenza A and 14 other diagnoses. Of the patients in the study group, 16 (53.3%) had a fatal outcome. ARDS was observed in 17 (56.6%) and a total of 22 patients had severe sepsis on admission (73%). The SOFA score showed the greatest difference between surviving and non-surviving groups (P = .003) with similar results in ARDS patients (P = .005). sRAGE levels tended to be higher in non-surviving (P = .058) and ARDS patients (P = .058). Logistic regression modeling demonstrated that SOFA (P = .013) and sRAGE (P = .05) were the only variables that modified the probability of a fatal outcome. Conclusion The association of elevated sRAGE with a fatal outcome suggests that it may have an independent causal effect in CAP. SOFA scores were the only clinical factor with the ability to identify surviving and ARDS patients. PMID:22264245

  18. Serum levels of immunoglobulins and severity of community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Mari C; Torán, Pere; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Palomera, Elisabet; Güell, Estel; Vendrell, Ester; Yébenes, Joan Carles; Torres, Antoni; Almirall, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Instruction There is evidence of a relationship between severity of infection and inflammatory response of the immune system. The objective is to assess serum levels of immunoglobulins and to establish its relationship with severity of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and clinical outcome. Methods This was an observational and cross-sectional study in which 3 groups of patients diagnosed with CAP were compared: patients treated in the outpatient setting (n=54), patients requiring in-patient care (hospital ward) (n=173), and patients requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) (n=191). Results Serum total IgG (and IgG subclasses IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4), IgA and IgM were measured at the first clinical visit. Normal cutpoints were defined as the lowest value obtained in controls (≤680, ≤323, ≤154, ≤10, ≤5, ≤30 and ≤50 mg/dL for total IgG, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, IgM and IgA, respectively). Serum immunoglobulin levels decreased in relation to severity of CAP. Low serum levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 showed a relationship with ICU admission. Low serum level of total IgG was independently associated with ICU admission (OR=2.45, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.2, p=0.002), adjusted by the CURB-65 severity score and comorbidities (chronic respiratory and heart diseases). Low levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 were significantly associated with 30-day mortality. Conclusions Patients with severe CAP admitted to the ICU showed lower levels of immunoglobulins than non-ICU patients and this increased mortality. PMID:27933180

  19. A Case of Mexiletine-induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome Presenting as Eosinophilic Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Pyo; Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Tae Hyung; Sohn, Jang Won; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Soo

    2010-01-01

    An 82-yr-old man was presented with fever and cough accompanied by generalized erythematous rash. He had taken mexiletine for 5 months, as he had been diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy and ventricular arrhythmia. Laboratory studies showed peripheral blood eosinophilia and elevated liver transaminase levels. Chest radiographs showed multiple nodular consolidations in both lungs. Biopsies of the lung and skin lesions revealed eosinophilic infiltration. After a thorough review of his medication history, mexiletine was suspected as the etiologic agent. After discontinuing the mexiletine and starting oral prednisolone, the patient improved, and the skin and lung lesions disappeared. Subsequently, mexiletine was confirmed as the causative agent based on a positive patch test. Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome is a severe adverse reaction to drugs and results from treatment with anticonvulsants, allopurinol, sulfonamides, and many other drugs. Several cases of mexiletine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome have been reported in older Japanese males with manifestation of fever, rash, peripheral blood eosinophilia, liver dysfunction without other organ involvement. Here, we report a case of mexiletine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome which presented as eosinophilic pneumonia in a Korean male. PMID:20052362

  20. Early Trauma-Induced Coagulopathy is Associated with Increased Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Spinal Cord Injury Patients.

    PubMed

    Younan, Duraid; Lin, Erica; Griffin, Russell; Vanlandingham, Sean; Waters, Alicia; Harrigan, Mark; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Kerby, Jeffrey D

    2016-05-01

    Early trauma-induced coagulopathy may increase susceptibility to nosocomial infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia. However, the relationship between trauma- induced coagulopathy and the development of ventilator-associated pneumonia in spinal cord injury patients has not been evaluated. We conducted a 5-year retrospective study of 300 spinal cord injury patients admitted to Level 1 trauma center. Standard coagulation studies were evaluated upon arrival, prior to fluid resuscitative efforts, and at 24  h after admission. Based on these studies, three groups of patients were identified: no coagulopathy, latent coagulopathy, and admission coagulopathy. Ventilator- associated pneumonia was identified utilizing Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. Since we used the data in the trauma registry and did not have the information on FiO2 and PEEP, we elected to use the VAP terminology and not the VAE sequence. Demographic, injury, and clinical characteristics were compared among no coagulopathy, latent coagulopathy, and admission coagulopathy groups using chi-square test and ANOVA for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. A logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between coagulopathy and both ventilator-associated pneumonia and mortality. The incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia was 54.5% (OR 4.01, 95% CI 1.76-9.15) in spinal cord injury patients with admission coagulopathy, compared with the 17.5% in spinal cord injury patients with no coagulopathy. Mortality was significantly higher in spinal cord injury patients with admission coagulopathy than in spinal cord injury patients with no coagulopathy (OR 6.14, 95% CI 1.73-21.73).After adjusting for age, race, injury mechanism, Injury Severity Score, base deficit at admission, the number of pRBC units transfused in the first 24  h, and hospital stay, only the association of ventilator

  1. Emergency treatment and nursing of children with severe pneumonia complicated by heart failure and respiratory failure: 10 case reports.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanli; An, Xinjiang; Fu, Mingyu; Li, Chunli

    2016-10-01

    Pneumonia refers to lung inflammation caused by different pathogens or other factors, and is a common pediatric disease occurring in infants and young children. It is closely related to the anatomical and physiological characteristics of infants and young children and is more frequent during winter and spring, or sudden changes in temperature. Pneumonia is a serious disease that poses a threat to children's health and its morbidity and mortality rank first, accounting for 24.5-65.2% of pediatric inpatients. Due to juvenile age, severe illness and rapid changes, children often suffer acute heart failure, respiratory failure and even toxic encephalopathy at the same time. The concurrence in different stages of the process of emergency treatment tends to relapse, which directly places the lives of these children at risk. Severe pneumonia constitutes one of the main causes of infant mortality. In the process of nursing children with severe pneumonia, intensive care was provided, including condition assessment and diagnosis, close observation of disease, keeping the airway unblocked, rational oxygen therapy, prevention and treatment of respiratory and circulatory failure, support of vital organs, complications, and health education. The inflammatory response was proactively controlled, to prevent suffocation and reduce mortality. In summary, positive and effective nursing can promote the rehabilitation of children patients, which can be reinforced with adequate communication with the parents and/or caretakers.

  2. Emergency treatment and nursing of children with severe pneumonia complicated by heart failure and respiratory failure: 10 case reports

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanli; An, Xinjiang; Fu, Mingyu; Li, Chunli

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia refers to lung inflammation caused by different pathogens or other factors, and is a common pediatric disease occurring in infants and young children. It is closely related to the anatomical and physiological characteristics of infants and young children and is more frequent during winter and spring, or sudden changes in temperature. Pneumonia is a serious disease that poses a threat to children's health and its morbidity and mortality rank first, accounting for 24.5–65.2% of pediatric inpatients. Due to juvenile age, severe illness and rapid changes, children often suffer acute heart failure, respiratory failure and even toxic encephalopathy at the same time. The concurrence in different stages of the process of emergency treatment tends to relapse, which directly places the lives of these children at risk. Severe pneumonia constitutes one of the main causes of infant mortality. In the process of nursing children with severe pneumonia, intensive care was provided, including condition assessment and diagnosis, close observation of disease, keeping the airway unblocked, rational oxygen therapy, prevention and treatment of respiratory and circulatory failure, support of vital organs, complications, and health education. The inflammatory response was proactively controlled, to prevent suffocation and reduce mortality. In summary, positive and effective nursing can promote the rehabilitation of children patients, which can be reinforced with adequate communication with the parents and/or caretakers. PMID:27698703

  3. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells prevent cigarette smoke and Chlamydophila pneumoniae-induced Th2 inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Gray, Pearl; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2010-10-01

    Smoking promotes the development of allergic asthma and pneumonia. Chlamydophila pneumoniae lung infection is associated with an increased risk for asthma, inducing an immune response regulated by dendritic cells (DCs). This study sought to determine whether exposure to cigarette smoke modulates the functional activity of CD11c-positive DCs in the lung, with and without concomitant C. pneumoniae infection. Bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) were exposed in vitro to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and/or live C. pneumoniae (Cpn), and then adoptively transferred intratracheally into wild-type mice. Although CSE plus Cpn appeared to exert an additive effect on the production of Th2 cytokines in vitro, we did not see this effect in vivo. However, the adoptive transfer of DCs pulsed with both CSE and C. pneumoniae into the lungs of naive mice led to an influx of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) that suppressed the Th2 skewing ability of the transferred BMDCs. The depletion of pDCs by antibody restored the Th2 skewing ability of the BMDCs. The expression of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase in the lung was reduced after the depletion of pDCs, and blocking IFN-α in vitro prevented the ability of pDCs to inhibit the Th2 responses induced by myeloid DCs (mDCs), suggesting their potential involvement in the mechanism of altered polarization. In conclusion, exposure to cigarette smoke skews C. pneumoniae-induced mDCs responses toward a Th2 bias in the lung, which is prevented by pDCs. We propose that pDCs may play a major role in the immunosuppressive lung environment in smokers with C. pneumoniae infection.

  4. Klebsiella pneumoniae alleviates influenza-induced acute lung injury via limiting NK cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Li, Fengqi; Sun, Rui; Gao, Xiang; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2014-08-01

    A protective effect induced by bacterial preinfection upon a subsequent lethal influenza virus infection has been observed, but the underlying immune mechanisms have not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we used a mouse model of Klebsiella pneumoniae preinfection to gain insight into how bacterial preinfection influences the subsequent lethal influenza virus infection. We found that K. pneumoniae preinfection significantly attenuated lung immune injury and decreased mortality during influenza virus infection, but K. pneumoniae-specific immunity was not involved in this cross-protection against influenza virus. K. pneumoniae preinfection limited NK cell expansion, which was involved in influenza-induced immune injury and death. Furthermore, K. pneumoniae preinfection could not control NK cell expansion and death during influenza virus infection in Rag1(-/-) mice, but adoptive transfer of T cells from wild-type mice was able to restore this protective effect. Our data suggest that the adaptive immune response activated by bacterial infection limits the excessive innate immune response induced by a subsequent influenza infection, ultimately protecting mice from death. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Probiotics: Prevention of Severe Pneumonia and Endotracheal Colonization Trial (PROSPECT): A Feasibility Clinical Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP); Other Infections; Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea; C-Difficile; Duration of Mechanical Ventilation; Length of ICU Stay; Length of Hospital Stay; ICU and Hospital Mortality

  6. Predictors of failure of noninvasive ventilation in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Carron, Michele; Freo, Ulderico; Zorzi, Manuel; Ori, Carlo

    2010-09-01

    The study aimed to investigate cardiorespiratory parameters potentially predictive of failure of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Sixty-four consecutive patients with severe CAP entered the study and underwent NIV with a helmet. Arterial blood gases, Pao(2)/FIo(2), and oxygenation index (OI; mean airway pressure × FIo(2) × 100/Pao(2)) were determined before and after a 1-hour trial of NIV. Noninvasive ventilation succeeded in 28 patients (43%) and failed in 36 patients (56%). Patients who avoided intubation had significantly (P < .05) shorter stays in ICU and lower rates of mortality in ICU and in hospital. Patients who failed NIV had higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score II at ICU admission (33 ± 11 versus 29 ± 9) and lower pH before NIV trial (7.37 versus 7.44). Furthermore, patients who required intubation failed to improve or worsened arterial blood gases during NIV trial and, by the end of the trial, had lower (P < .05) pH (7.34 versus 7.44) and Pao(2)/FiO(2) (177 versus 228) and higher OI (8.6 versus 5.0) and respiratory rate (28 versus 23 breaths/min). In a multivariate analysis, post-NIV to pre-NIV deltas of Pao(2)/FiO(2) and of OI were independent predictors of NIV failure, with OI delta being significantly more accurate. Noninvasive ventilation failed in approximately half patients with severe CAP. Posttrial to pretrial deltas of Pao(2)/FiO(2) and OI may help to guide decision about endotracheal intubation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Empirical use of fluoroquinolones improves the survival of critically ill patients with tuberculosis mimicking severe pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Empirical use of fluoroquinolones may delay the initiation of appropriate therapy for tuberculosis (TB). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of empirical fluoroquinolone use on the survival of patients with pulmonary TB that mimicked severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) requiring intensive care. Methods Patients aged >18 years with culture-confirmed pulmonary TB who presented as severe CAP and were admitted to the ICU were divided into fluoroquinolone (FQ) and nonfluoroquinolone (non-FQ) groups based on the type of empirical antibiotics used. Those patients with previous anti-TB treatment or those who died within 3 days of hospitalization were excluded. The primary end point was 100-day survival. Results Of the 77 patients identified, 43 (56%) were in the FQ group and 34 (44%) were in the non-FQ group. The two groups had no statistically significant difference in co-morbidities (95% vs. 97%, P > 0.99) and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores (21.2 ± 7.1 vs. 22.5 ± 7.5, P = 0.46) on ICU admission. Overall, 91% and 82% of patients in the FQ and non-FQ groups, respectively, had sputum examinations for TB within 1 week of admission (P = 0.46), and results were positive in 7% and 15% (P = 0.47), respectively. For both groups, 29% received appropriate anti-TB therapy within 2 weeks after ICU admission. The 100-day mortality rate was 40% and 68% for the FQ and non-FQ groups, respectively (P = 0.02). By Cox regression analysis, APACHE score <20, no bacteremia during the ICU stay, and empirical fluoroquinolone use were independently associated with survival. Conclusion Empirical use of fluoroquinolones may improve the survival of ICU patients admitted for pulmonary TB mimicking severe CAP. PMID:23098258

  8. Using Data-Driven Rules to Predict Mortality in Severe Community Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuang; Rosenfeld, Roni; Clermont, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of patient-centered outcomes in hospitals is useful for performance benchmarking, resource allocation, and guidance regarding active treatment and withdrawal of care. Yet, their use by clinicians is limited by the complexity of available tools and amount of data required. We propose to use Disjunctive Normal Forms as a novel approach to predict hospital and 90-day mortality from instance-based patient data, comprising demographic, genetic, and physiologic information in a large cohort of patients admitted with severe community acquired pneumonia. We develop two algorithms to efficiently learn Disjunctive Normal Forms, which yield easy-to-interpret rules that explicitly map data to the outcome of interest. Disjunctive Normal Forms achieve higher prediction performance quality compared to a set of state-of-the-art machine learning models, and unveils insights unavailable with standard methods. Disjunctive Normal Forms constitute an intuitive set of prediction rules that could be easily implemented to predict outcomes and guide criteria-based clinical decision making and clinical trial execution, and thus of greater practical usefulness than currently available prediction tools. The Java implementation of the tool JavaDNF will be publicly available. PMID:24699007

  9. X-ray CT and pneumonia inhibition properties of gold-silver nanoparticles for targeting MRSA induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Huo, Da; Ding, Jing; Cui, Yi X; Xia, Lu Y; Li, Hui; He, Jian; Zhou, Zheng Y; Wang, Hong W; Hu, Yong

    2014-08-01

    Non-invasive assay for the early stage diagnosis of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) related pneumonia is of great clinical importance and still a great challenge. In this paper, we reported a novel kind of Au@Ag core-shell theranostic nanoparticles (NPs) conjugated with MRSA specific antibody on their surface. Compared with the raw Au@Ag NPs, these antibody modified NPs (AAMA NPs) showed 10.66 fold enhancement targeting to the MRSA in vitro. In vivo target efficacy was measured with rats bearing pneumonia induced by different pathogens. Computed tomography (CT) results revealed that these AAMA NPs had higher CT contrast enhancement (498 HU), than those of raw Au@Ag and Omnipaque (oth <100 HU). In addition, lesions labeled by AAMA NPs could be distinguished from lung parenchyma by taking advantage of spectra CT. Bio-distribution analysis confirmed that these AAMA NPs accumulated in the MRSA rich site. Both BAL and Elisa assays indicated that these AAMA NPs greatly alleviated the inflammation reaction by reducing bacterial proliferation and cytokine production. Pathological study showed that these NPs exerted negligible long term cytotoxicity in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Plasma levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 as a biomarker for disease severity of patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pin-Yu; Tsao, Shih-Ming; Chang, Jer-Hwa; Chien, Ming-Hsien; Hung, Wen-Yueh; Huang, Yi-Wen; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is characterized as an acute inflammation of the lung associated with the activation of macrophages and neutrophils. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is an essential adhesion molecule involved in immune cell recruitment in lung inflammation. We investigated whether ICAM-1 is a useful biomarker for assessing the disease severity of hospitalized adult patients with CAP. Plasma soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) levels were measured in 78 patients with CAP and 69 healthy controls by using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The pneumonia severity index scores were used to determine CAP severity in patients upon initial hospitalization. The sICAM-1 and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels decreased significantly in patients with CAP after antibiotic treatment. The plasma concentration of sICAM-1 alone, but not CRP, was correlated with CAP severity according to the pneumonia severity index scores (r=0.431, p<0.001). The sICAM-1 levels in patients with CAP with high mortality risk were significantly higher than those in patients with CAP with medium or low mortality risk. Moreover, the sICAM-1 level showed a significant correlation with the length of hospital stay (r=0.488, p<0.001). Mechanistic investigations found that bacterial lipopolysaccharide induced upregulation of ICAM-1 expression through the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway in RAW264.7 macrophages. Plasma sICAM-1 levels may play a role in the diagnosis and clinical assessment of CAP severity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Contributions of Polyclonal Malaria, Gametocytemia, and Pneumonia to Infant Severe Anemia Incidence in Malaria Hyperendemic Pemba, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Jaenisch, Thomas; Sazawal, Sunil; Dutta, Arup; Deb, Saikat; Ramsan, Mahdi; Sullivan, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The causative factors for severe anemia incidence in sub-Saharan Africa are multifactorial. In an observational, longitudinal study of two cohorts of about 300 infants followed-up for six months in a malaria hyperendemic area, the risk factors for severe anemia incidence were clinical malaria and pneumonia, which outweighed nutritional and sociodemographic factors. Severe anemia incidence was 1–2/year at age 2 months, peaked around 6–7/year at age 7–12 months, and decreased back to 1–2/year at age 16–22 months. The age-dependent increase of severe anemia incidence was shown to be parallel to the age-dependent increase of clinical malaria. Previous clinical malaria episodes increased the severe anemia risk by 80%, and gametocyte carriage and pneumonia at prior visit was associated with a six-fold increase and a > 10-fold increase, respectively. The role of pneumonia and malaria as risk factors, and areas for interventions for severe anemia, should not be underestimated. PMID:22665595

  12. Diagnosis of Tuberculosis Following World Health Organization–Recommended Criteria in Severely Malnourished Children Presenting With Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2017-01-01

    Evidences on diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) following the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) are lacking. We sought to evaluate the WHO criteria for the diagnosis of TB in such children. In this prospective study, we enrolled SAM children aged <5 with radiological pneumonia. We collected induced sputum and gastric lavage for smear microscopy, mycobacterial culture, and Xpert MTB/RIF. Using the last 2 methods as the gold standard, we determined sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of WHO criteria (n = 388). However, Xpert MTB/RIF was performed on the last 214 children. Compared to mycobacterial culture–confirmed TB, sensitivity and specificity (95% confidence interval) of WHO criteria were 40 (14% to 73%) and 84 (80% to 87%), respectively. Compared to culture- and/or Xpert MTB/RIF-confirmed TB, the values were 22% (9% to 43%) and 83 (79% to 87%), respectively. Thus, the good specificity of the WHO criteria may help minimize overtreatment with anti-TB therapy in SAM children, especially in resource-limited settings. PMID:28229100

  13. Viral Infection Is Not Uncommon in Adult Patients with Severe Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hyo-Lim; Hong, Sang-Bum; Ko, Gwang-Beom; Huh, Jin Won; Sung, Heungsup; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Han; Lee, Sang-Oh; Kim, Mi-Na; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Lim, Chae-Man; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Koh, Younsuck; Choi, Sang-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background Viral pathogens have not generally been regarded as important causes of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), except in patients with hematologic malignancy or transplant recipients. We investigated the role and distribution of viruses in adult with severe HAP who required intensive care. Methods From March 2010 to February 2012, adult patients with severe HAP required admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), 28-bed medical ICU in a tertiary care hospital, were prospectively enrolled. Respiratory viruses were detected using multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and/or shell vial culture. Results A total of 262 patients were enrolled and 107 patients (40.8%) underwent bronchoscopic BAL for etiologic diagnosis. One hundred and fifty-six patients (59.5%) had bacterial infections and 59 patients (22.5%) had viral infections. Viruses were detected in BAL fluid specimens of 37 patients (62.7%, 37/59). The most commonly identified viruses were respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus (both 27.1%, 16/59), followed by rhinovirus (25.4%, 15/59), and influenza virus (16.9%, 10/59). Twenty-one patients (8.0%, 21/262) had bacterial-viral coinfections and Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly coexisting bacteria (n = 10). Viral infection in non-immunocompromised patients was not uncommon (11.1%, 16/143), although it was not as frequent as that in immunocompromised patients (36.4%, 43/119). Non-immunocompromised patients were significantly older than immunocompromised patients and had significantly higher rates of underlying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, tuberculous destroyed lung and chronic kidney disease. The 28 day mortalities of patients with bacterial infections, viral infections and bacterial-viral coinfections were not significantly different (29.5%, 35.6% and 19.0%, respectively; p = 0.321). Conclusions Viral pathogens are not uncommon in adult patients with severe HAP who required ICU admission

  14. Oxidative stress in immunocompetent patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Trefler, S; Rodríguez, A; Martín-Loeches, I; Sanchez, V; Marín, J; Llauradó, M; Romeu, M; Díaz, E; Nogués, R; Giralt, M

    2014-03-01

    A comparison was made of the oxidative stress (OS) levels of patients with either viral or bacterial severe community-acquired pneumonia (sCAP) and of patients without infection (healthy volunteers (HV) and patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI)). A prospective observational study was made. Critically ill patients with sCAP. The TBARS level was measured as an index of oxidative injury. SOD, CAT and redox glutathione system (GSH, GSSG, GR, GPx) activities were measured as reflecting antioxidant capacity. Severity of illness was assessed by the APACHE II, SOFA and SIRS scores. Thirty-seven subjects were included: 15 patients with CAP (12 of bacterial origin [BCAP] and 3 due to 2009 A/H1N1 virus [VCAP]), 10 HV and 12 AMI patients. Intensive care CAP mortality was 26.7% (n=4). Plasmatic TBARS levels were higher in CAP patients than in HV, but similar to those recorded in AMI patients. In contrast, VCAP was associated with lower TBARS levels, and some components of the glutathione redox system were higher in BCAP patients and HV. The OS levels did not differ between survivors and non-survivors. Our results suggest the occurrence of higher OS in sCAP patients compared with HV. In contrast, lower TBARS levels were observed in VCAP patients, suggesting an increase of antioxidant activity related to the redox glutathione system. However, further research involving a larger cohort is needed in order to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. Phenotyping community-acquired pneumonia according to the presence of acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory failure (ARF) and severe sepsis (SS) are possible complications in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The aim of the study was to evaluate prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and impact on mortality of hospitalized patients with CAP according to the presence of ARF and SS on admission. Methods This was a multicenter, observational, prospective study of consecutive CAP patients admitted to three hospitals in Italy, Spain, and Scotland between 2008 and 2010. Three groups of patients were identified: those with neither ARF nor SS (Group A), those with only ARF (Group B) and those with both ARF and SS (Group C) on admission. Results Among the 2,145 patients enrolled, 45% belonged to Group A, 36% to Group B and 20% to Group C. Patients in Group C were more severe than patients in Group B. Isolated ARF was correlated with age (p < 0.001), COPD (p < 0.001) and multilobar infiltrates (p < 0.001). The contemporary occurrence of ARF and SS was associated with age (p = 0.002), residency in nursing home (p = 0.007), COPD (p < 0.001), multilobar involvement (p < 0.001) and renal disease (p < 0.001). 4.2% of patients in Group A died, 9.3% in Group B and 26% in Group C, p < 0.001. After adjustment, the presence of only ARF had an OR for in-hospital mortality of 1.85 (p = 0.011) and the presence of both ARF and SS had an OR of 6.32 (p < 0.001). Conclusions The identification of ARF and SS on hospital admission can help physicians in classifying CAP patients into three different clinical phenotypes. PMID:24593040

  16. High pneumococcal DNA load, procalcitonin and suPAR levels correlate to severe disease development in patients with pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Loonen, A J M; Kesarsing, C; Kusters, R; Hilbink, M; Wever, P C; van den Brule, A J C

    2017-03-29

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is mostly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. Identification of the pathogen causing CAP can be achieved by conventional culture techniques of sputum and/or blood, antigen detection from urine or molecular analysis. However, it remains difficult to determine patients who are at risk of severe disease development (intensive care unit [ICU] admittance and/or death). In this retrospective study, 121 patients admitted to the emergency department with pneumonia symptoms were included. Several markers of infection (pneumococcal DNA load in blood (real-time LytA PCR), white blood cell (WBC) count, C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) levels) were assessed for their ability to predict severe disease development. Of 121 patients, 6 were excluded from the study because of an alternative diagnosis, whereas 8 were excluded from biomarker analysis because of the presence of co-morbidities. Of the 115 patients analysed by the LytA PCR, 23 were positive. PCR detected S. pneumoniae DNA in 82% of patients with positive blood culture for S. pneumoniae. PCR missed three samples from patients in which S. pneumoniae was recovered by blood cultures. However, eight additional LytA PCR-positive samples were detected from patients whose blood cultures remained negative. Pneumococcal DNA load was also monitored in time for 31 patients, of whom 11 had positive PCR results. For 10 out of 11 (91%) positive PCR patients, a clear increase in Ct-values was observed, indicating a lower pneumococcal DNA load in the blood as a result of antibiotic therapy. Biomarker analysis was performed in 107 patients, of whom 29 showed severe disease development. Pneumococcal DNA load (p = 0.026), PCT (p = 0.046) and suPAR (p = 0.001) levels most reliably predicted severe disease development. In conclusion, in patients with CAP, higher pneumococcal DNA load, PCT and suPAR values are associated with

  17. Characteristic of the Oxidative Stress in Blood of Patients in Dependence of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Severity

    PubMed Central

    Muravlyova, Larissa; Molotov–Luchankiy, Vilen; Bakirova, Ryszhan; Klyuyev, Dmitriy; Demidchik, Ludmila; Lee, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At the present time the alternation of the oxidative metabolism is considered as one of the leading pathogenic mechanisms in the development and progression of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However the nature and direction of the oxidative protein changes in CAP patient’s blood had been almost unexplored. AIM: To define oxidative and modified proteins in erythrocytes and blood plasma of CAP patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Blood plasma and erythrocytes obtained from: 42 patients with moderate severity pneumonia, 12 patients with grave severity pneumonia and 32 healthy volunteers. Content of advanced oxidation protein products, malondialdehyde and reactive carbonyl derivatives were estimated as indicators of the oxidative stress and oxidative damage of proteins. RESULTS: In patients with grave severity the level of oxidative proteins and MDA in erythrocytes exceeded both: control values and similar meanings in CAP patients with moderate severity. The further growth of MDA in this group patients’ blood plasma was observed, but the level of oxidative proteins decreased in comparison with those in CAP patients with moderate severity. CONCLUSION: To sum up, our derived data show, that injury of erythrocytes’ redox-status and blood plasma components plays an essential role in development and progression CAP. PMID:27275344

  18. Potentially Modifiable Factors Associated with Death of Infants and Children with Severe Pneumonia Routinely Managed in District Hospitals in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Enarson, Penelope M.; Gie, Robert P.; Mwansambo, Charles C.; Chalira, Alfred E.; Lufesi, Norman N.; Maganga, Ellubey R.; Enarson, Donald A.; Cameron, Neil A.; Graham, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate recognised co-morbidities and clinical management associated with inpatient pneumonia mortality in Malawian district hospitals. Methods Prospective cohort study, of patient records, carried out in Malawi between 1st October 2000 and 30th June 2003. The study included all children aged 0-59 months admitted to the paediatric wards in sixteen district hospitals throughout Malawi with severe and very severe pneumonia. We compared individual factors between those that survived (n = 14 076) and those that died (n = 1 633). Results From logistic regression analysis, predictors of death in hospital, adjusted for age, sex and severity grade included comorbid conditions of meningitis (OR =2.49, 95% CI 1.50-4.15), malnutrition (OR =2.37, 95% CI 1.94-2.88) and severe anaemia (OR =1.41, 95% CI 1.03-1.92). Requiring supplementary oxygen (OR =2.16, 95% CI 1.85-2.51) and intravenous fluids (OR =3.02, 95% CI 2.13-4.28) were associated with death while blood transfusion was no longer significant (OR =1.10, 95% CI 0.77-1.57) when the model included severe anaemia. Conclusions This study identified a number of challenges to improve outcome for Malawian infants and children hospitalised with pneumonia. These included improved assessment of co-morbidities and more rigorous application of standard case management. PMID:26237222

  19. Potentially Modifiable Factors Associated with Death of Infants and Children with Severe Pneumonia Routinely Managed in District Hospitals in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Enarson, Penelope M; Gie, Robert P; Mwansambo, Charles C; Chalira, Alfred E; Lufesi, Norman N; Maganga, Ellubey R; Enarson, Donald A; Cameron, Neil A; Graham, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    To investigate recognised co-morbidities and clinical management associated with inpatient pneumonia mortality in Malawian district hospitals. Prospective cohort study, of patient records, carried out in Malawi between 1st October 2000 and 30th June 2003. The study included all children aged 0-59 months admitted to the paediatric wards in sixteen district hospitals throughout Malawi with severe and very severe pneumonia. We compared individual factors between those that survived (n = 14 076) and those that died (n = 1 633). From logistic regression analysis, predictors of death in hospital, adjusted for age, sex and severity grade included comorbid conditions of meningitis (OR =2.49, 95% CI 1.50-4.15), malnutrition (OR =2.37, 95% CI 1.94-2.88) and severe anaemia (OR =1.41, 95% CI 1.03-1.92). Requiring supplementary oxygen (OR =2.16, 95% CI 1.85-2.51) and intravenous fluids (OR =3.02, 95% CI 2.13-4.28) were associated with death while blood transfusion was no longer significant (OR =1.10, 95% CI 0.77-1.57) when the model included severe anaemia. This study identified a number of challenges to improve outcome for Malawian infants and children hospitalised with pneumonia. These included improved assessment of co-morbidities and more rigorous application of standard case management.

  20. Pneumococcal Surface Protein A Plays a Major Role in Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Saumyaa; Pujanauski, Lindsey; Colino, Jesus; Flora, Michael; Torres, Raul M; Tuomanen, Elaine; Snapper, Clifford M

    2016-05-01

    Intact, inactivated Streptococcus pneumoniae [including the unencapsulated S. pneumoniae, serotype 2 strain (R36A)] markedly inhibits the humoral immune response to coimmunized heterologous proteins, a property not observed with several other intact Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we determined the nature of this immunosuppressive property. Because phosphorylcholine (PC), a major haptenic component of teichoic acid in the S. pneumoniae cell wall, and lipoteichoic acid in the S. pneumoniae membrane were previously reported to be immunosuppressive when derived from filarial parasites, we determined whether R36A lacking PC (R36A(pc-)) was inhibitory. Indeed, although R36A(pc-) exhibited a markedly reduced level of inhibition of the IgG response to coimmunized chicken OVA (cOVA), no inhibition was observed when using several other distinct PC-expressing bacteria or a soluble, protein-PC conjugate. Further, treatment of R36A with periodate, which selectively destroys PC residues, had no effect on R36A-mediated inhibition. Because R36A(pc-) also lacks choline-binding proteins (CBPs) that require PC for cell wall attachment, and because treatment of R36A with trypsin eliminated its inhibitory activity, we incubated R36A in choline chloride, which selectively strips CBPs from its surface. R36A lacking CBPs lost most of its inhibitory property, whereas the supernatant of choline chloride-treated R36A, containing CBPs, was markedly inhibitory. Coimmunization studies using cOVA and various S. pneumoniae mutants, each genetically deficient in one of the CBPs, demonstrated that only S. pneumoniae lacking the CBP pneumococcal surface protein A lost its ability to inhibit the IgG anti-cOVA response. These results strongly suggest that PspA plays a major role in mediating the immunosuppressive property of S. pneumoniae.

  1. Discordance of physician clinical judgment vs. pneumonia severity index (PSI) score to admit patients with low risk community-acquired pneumonia: a prospective multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Marcos I.; González-Barcala, Francisco J.; Soni, Nilam J.; Vidal, Iria; Sanjuàn, Pilar; Llinares, Diego; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Lucía; Rábade, Carlos; Otero-González, Isabel; Verea-Hernando, Héctor

    2017-01-01

    Background The relationship between clinical judgment and the pneumonia severity index (PSI) score in deciding the site of care for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has not been well investigated. The objective of the study was to determine the clinical factors that influence decision-making to hospitalize low-risk patients (PSI ≤2) with CAP. Methods An observational, prospective, multicenter study of consecutive CAP patients was performed at five hospitals in Spain. Patients admitted with CAP and a PSI ≤2 were identified. Admitting physicians completed a patient-specific survey to identify the clinical factors influencing the decision to admit a patient. The reason for admission was categorized into 1 of 6 categories. We also assessed whether the reason for admission was associated with poorer clinical outcomes [intensive care unit (ICU) admission, 30-day mortality or readmission]. Results One hundred and fifty-five hospitalized patients were enrolled. Two or more reasons for admission were seen in 94 patients (60.6%), including abnormal clinical test results (60%), signs of clinical deterioration (43.2%), comorbid conditions (28.4%), psychosocial factors (28.4%), suspected H1N1 pneumonia (20.6%), and recent visit to the emergency department (ED) in the past 2 weeks (7.7%). Signs of clinical deterioration and abnormal clinical test results were associated with poorer clinical outcomes (P<0.005). Conclusions Low-risk patients with CAP and a PSI ≤2 are admitted to the hospital for multiple reasons. Abnormal clinical test results and signs of clinical deterioration are two specific reasons for admission that are associated with poorer clinical outcomes in low risk CAP patients. PMID:28740667

  2. Predictive accuracy of the pneumonia severity index vs CRB-65 for time to clinical stability: results from the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Organization (CAPO) International Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Forest W; Brock, Guy N; Peyrani, Paula; Rodríguez, Eduardo L; Díaz, Alejandro A; Rossi, Paolo; Ramirez, Julio A

    2010-11-01

    The Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) and CRB-65 are scores used to predict mortality in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). It is unknown how well either score predicts time to clinical stability in hospitalized patients with CAP. Thus, it is also not known which score predicts time to clinical stability better. A secondary analysis of 3087 patients from the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Organization (CAPO) database was performed. Time-dependent receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curves for time to clinical stability were calculated for the PSI and CRB-65 scores at day seven of hospitalization. Secondary outcomes were to assess the relationship of the PSI and CRB-65 to in-hospital mortality and length of stay (LOS). ROC curves for LOS and mortality were calculated. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for time to clinical stability by day seven was 0.638 (95% CI 0.613, 0.660) when using the PSI, and 0.647 (95% CI 0.619, 0.670) while using the CRB-65. The difference in AUC values was not statistically significant (95% CI for difference of -0.03 to 0.01). However, the difference in the AUC values for discharge within 14 days (0.651 for PSI vs 0.63 for CRB-65, 95% CI for difference 0.001-0.049), and 28-day in-hospital mortality (0.738 for PSI vs 0.69 for CRB-65, 95% CI for difference 0.02-0.082) were both statistically significant. This study demonstrates a moderate ability of both the PSI and CRB-65 scores to predict time to clinical stability, and found that the predictive accuracy of the PSI was equivalent to that of the CRB-65 for this outcome. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [A case of sho-seiryu-to-induced pneumonia with a marked increase in peripheral eosinophils].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Taku; Higa, Mariko; Takahashi, Miki; Saito, Sayoko; Kikuchi, Naoshi; Yamamuro, Wataru

    2006-08-01

    A 25-year-old woman presented with a high temperature, cough and dyspnea three days after taking sho-seiryu-to, a Chinese herbal preparation, for a cough and throat pain. A chest X-ray film and computed tomography (CT) scan revealed diffuse infiltrative shadows in both the middle and lower lung fields. Arterial blood gas analysis showed hypoxemia (PaO2 43Torr under room air). The white cell count was 40,800/mm3, with eosinophilic cells accounting for 56.5% of the cells. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone under a diagnosis of drug-induced pneumonia and the administration of sho-seiryu-to was discontinued. Immediately after the prednisolone administration, her chest X-ray film findings, clinical symptoms and laboratory data markedly improved. A lymphocyte stimulation test for sho-seiryu-to using peripheral lymphocytes was positive. In 29 cases of herbal medicine-induced pneumonia reported in Japanese medical literature over a 10-year period, sho-saiko-to has been the predominant cause of drug-induced pneumonia. This is the second case of sho-seiryu-to-induced pneumonia.

  4. Impact of weekend admission on in-hospital mortality in severe community-acquired pneumonia patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Hironori; Kunisawa, Susumu; Yamashita, Kazuto; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the consequences of weekend admission on the quality of care in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia. We compared the outcomes of weekend versus weekdays' admission for these patients on risk-adjusted mortality. Using a large nationwide administrative database, we analysed patients with severe pneumonia who had been hospitalized in 1044 acute care hospitals between 2012 and 2013. We compared risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality of guideline-concordant care between patients admitted weekdays and patients admitted on weekends. The study sample comprised 17 342 patients admitted on weekdays and 6190 patients admitted on weekends. The mortality rate of the weekend admission group was significantly higher than that of the weekday admission group (23.7% vs 20.5%; P < 0.001). Even after adjusting for baseline patient severity and need for urgent care, weekend admissions were associated with higher mortality (odds ratio: 1.10; 95% confidence interval: 1.02-1.19). The implementation rates of guideline-concordant microbiological tests (including sputum cultures and urine antigen tests) were significantly lower in the weekend admission group. These tests were found to be associated with lower in-hospital mortality. Our findings showed that weekend admission was associated with increased mortality in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia in Japan. This may have been influenced by lower implementation of microbiological testing. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  5. [Domestic imipenem cilastatin sodium for the treatment of severe aspiration pneumonia, a curative effect observation].

    PubMed

    Yin, Hai-yan; Ye, Xiao-ling; Zhang, Rui; Zhu, You-feng

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of domestic imipenem cilastatin sodium for the treatments of severe aspiration pneumonia. A randomize, open, parallel-controlled trial was conducted. Sixty-eight patients with severe aspiration pneumonia were divided into trial group (n=36) and control group (n=32) by random distribution method. The application of trial group domestic imipenem cilastatin sodium was 1.0 g intravenous drip, every 6-8 hours for 7-14 days. The control group application with imported injection imipenem cilastatin sodium was 1.0 g intravenous drip, every 6-8 hours for 7-14 days. The highest daily temperature (T), heart rate (HR), breathing rate (RR), pulse blood oxygen saturation (SpO(2)), blood oxygen partial pressure (PaO(2)), inhaled oxygen concentration (FiO(2)), oxygenation index (PaO(2)/FiO(2)), airway peak pressure (Paw), minute ventilation (MV) and white blood count (WBC), pro calcitonin (PCT), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) index before and 1, 3, 7 days after treatment, and liver and kidney function, chest X-rays, and sputum cultures of drug sensitive test were conducted. And the effectiveness and safety were determined according to the standards. After treatment indexes of the two groups were obviously improved, i. e. T, HR, RR, Paw, MV, the WBC, PCT, CRP were gradually declined, PaO(2)/FiO(2) was gradually raised. There were statistical significance before and 3 days after treatment in the trial and the control group [T: 37.35±0.91 centigrade vs. 38.43±1.06 centigrade, 37.28±0.88 centigrade vs. 38.35±1.11 centigrade; HR: 90.25±10.60 bpm vs. 118.94±15.46 bpm, 89.31±11.17 bpm vs. 124.34±17.87 bpm; RR: 25.14±3.17 bpm vs. 32.28±4.49 bpm, 24.81±2.43 bpm vs. 33.13±4.17 bpm; Paw: 23.03±3.04 cm H(2)O vs. 33.22±4.59 cm H(2)O, 22.75±3.22 cm H(2)O vs. 33.63±4.79 cm H(2)O; MV: 8.67±1.26 L/min vs. 11.80±2.01 L/min, 8.88±1.45 L/min vs. 13.21±2.90 L/min; WBC: 11.26±1.96 ×10(9)/L vs. 14.57±3.10 ×10(9)/L, 12.28±3.38

  6. Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia with Respiratory Failure Induced by Synthetic Cannabinoid Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Öcal, Nesrin; Doğan, Deniz; Çiçek, Ali Fuat; Yücel, Orhan; Tozkoparan, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent days, synthetic cannabinoid derivatives have become life threatening for young people. Here, we want to share a case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia triggered by inhalation of synthetic cannabinoid, new side effects of which are being detected day by day. Case Report A 21-year-old male, who had no history of pulmonary diseases, was admitted to the clinic with shortness of breath. His oxygen saturation was measured as 85–86% in room air. Common irregular ground-glass opacities were observed in thorax radiology. His peripheral blood eosinophil count was 1100 cell/mm3 with a leukocyte differential of 12%. Sputum eosinophilia was also observed. The patient was diagnosed with acute eosinophilic pneumonia in terms of current clinical, radiological and laboratory findings. Rapid remission was achieved with corticosteroid therapy. Conclusion This is the first reported case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia induced by synthetic cannabinoid inhalation. PMID:27994925

  7. Semi-recumbent body position fails to prevent healthcare-associated pneumonia in Vietnamese patients with severe tetanus.

    PubMed

    Loan, Huynh Thi; Parry, Janet; Nga, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Yen, Lam Minh; Binh, Nguyen Thien; Thuy, Tran Thi Diem; Duong, Nguyen Minh; Campbell, James I; Thwaites, Louise; Farrar, Jeremy J; Parry, Christopher M

    2012-02-01

    Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) is a common complication in patients with severe tetanus. Nursing tetanus patients in a semi-recumbent body position could reduce the incidence of HCAP. In a randomised controlled trial we compared the occurrence of HCAP in patients with severe tetanus nursed in a semi-recumbent (30°) or supine position. A total of 229 adults and children (aged ≥1 year) with severe tetanus admitted to hospital in Vietnam, were randomly assigned to a supine (n=112) or semi-recumbent (n=117) position. For patients maintaining their assigned positions and in hospital for>48h there was no significant difference between the two groups in the frequency of clinically suspected pneumonia [22/106 (20.8%) vs 26/104 (25.0%); p=0.464], pneumonia rate/1000 intensive care unit days (13.9 vs 14.6; p=0.48) and pneumonia rate/1000 ventilated days (39.2 vs 38.1; p=0.72). Mortality in the supine patients was 11/112 (9.8%) compared with 17/117 (14.5%) in the semi-recumbent patients (p=0.277). The overall complication rate [57/112 (50.9%) vs 76/117 (65.0%); p=0.03] and need for tracheostomy [51/112 (45.5%) vs 69/117 (58.9%); p=0.04) was greater in semi-recumbent patients. Semi-recumbent body positioning did not prevent the occurrence of HCAP in severe tetanus patients.

  8. Expanded CURB-65: a new score system predicts severity of community-acquired pneumonia with superior efficiency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-liang; Xu, Feng; Zhou, Hui; Wu, Xue-jie; Shi, Ling-xian; Lu, Rui-qing; Farcomeni, Alessio; Venditti, Mario; Zhao, Ying-li; Luo, Shu-ya; Dong, Xiao-jun; Falcone, Marco

    2016-03-18

    Aim of this study was to develop a new simpler and more effective severity score for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. A total of 1640 consecutive hospitalized CAP patients in Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University were included. The effectiveness of different pneumonia severity scores to predict mortality was compared, and the performance of the new score was validated on an external cohort of 1164 patients with pneumonia admitted to a teaching hospital in Italy. Using age ≥ 65 years, LDH > 230 u/L, albumin < 3.5 g/dL, platelet count < 100 × 10(9)/L, confusion, urea > 7 mmol/L, respiratory rate ≥ 30/min, low blood pressure, we assembled a new severity score named as expanded-CURB-65. The 30-day mortality and length of stay were increased along with increased risk score. The AUCs in the prediction of 30-day mortality in the main cohort were 0.826 (95% CI, 0.807-0.844), 0.801 (95% CI, 0.781-0.820), 0.756 (95% CI, 0.735-0.777), 0.793 (95% CI, 0.773-0.813) and 0.759 (95% CI, 0.737-0.779) for the expanded-CURB-65, PSI, CURB-65, SMART-COP and A-DROP, respectively. The performance of this bedside score was confirmed in CAP patients of the validation cohort although calibration was not successful in patients with health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP). The expanded CURB-65 is objective, simpler and more accurate scoring system for evaluation of CAP severity, and the predictive efficiency was better than other score systems.

  9. Expanded CURB-65: a new score system predicts severity of community-acquired pneumonia with superior efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-liang; Xu, Feng; Hui Zhou; Wu, Xue-jie; Shi, Ling-xian; Lu, Rui-qing; Farcomeni, Alessio; Venditti, Mario; Zhao, Ying-li; Luo, Shu-ya; Dong, Xiao-jun; Falcone, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to develop a new simpler and more effective severity score for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. A total of 1640 consecutive hospitalized CAP patients in Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University were included. The effectiveness of different pneumonia severity scores to predict mortality was compared, and the performance of the new score was validated on an external cohort of 1164 patients with pneumonia admitted to a teaching hospital in Italy. Using age ≥ 65 years, LDH > 230 u/L, albumin < 3.5 g/dL, platelet count < 100 × 109/L, confusion, urea > 7 mmol/L, respiratory rate ≥ 30/min, low blood pressure, we assembled a new severity score named as expanded-CURB-65. The 30-day mortality and length of stay were increased along with increased risk score. The AUCs in the prediction of 30-day mortality in the main cohort were 0.826 (95% CI, 0.807–0.844), 0.801 (95% CI, 0.781–0.820), 0.756 (95% CI, 0.735–0.777), 0.793 (95% CI, 0.773–0.813) and 0.759 (95% CI, 0.737–0.779) for the expanded-CURB-65, PSI, CURB-65, SMART-COP and A-DROP, respectively. The performance of this bedside score was confirmed in CAP patients of the validation cohort although calibration was not successful in patients with health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP). The expanded CURB-65 is objective, simpler and more accurate scoring system for evaluation of CAP severity, and the predictive efficiency was better than other score systems. PMID:26987602

  10. Thrombocytopenia impairs host defense during murine Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; Schouten, Marcel; de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Brands, Xanthe; Schultz, Marcus J; van't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. In patients, thrombocytopenia is correlated with an adverse outcome of pneumonia. Platelets can modulate the host response to infection in several ways, that is, by facilitating clot formation, production of antimicrobial proteins, and interaction with neutrophils. We studied the effect of thrombocytopenia during murine pneumococcal pneumonia. Animal study. University research laboratory. Mice. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal inoculation of S. pneumoniae. Platelets were depleted by anti-mouse thrombocyte serum; controls received nonimmunogenic serum. In separate studies, mice were treated with the platelet P2Y12 receptor inhibitor clopidogrel or placebo. Thrombocytopenic mice (platelet counts < 1% of uninfected controls) showed a reduced survival during pneumococcal pneumonia (27% vs 75% among controls; p = 0.003), which was associated with higher bacterial loads in lungs, spleen, and blood. Thrombocytopenic mice showed enhanced coagulation activation (thrombin-antithrombin complexes) in plasma. Proinflammatory cytokine levels were higher in plasma but not in lungs of thrombocytopenic mice. Although clopidogrel treatment strongly prolonged the bleeding time, it did not impact on bacterial loads during pneumococcal pneumonia. Platelets play a protective role during pneumococcal pneumonia independent of their aggregation.

  11. Oxygen-driving and atomized mucosolvan inhalation combined with holistic nursing in the treatment of children severe bronchial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang

    2015-07-01

    This paper aimed to discuss the method, effect and safety of oxygen-driving and atomized Mucosolvan inhalation combined with holistic nursing in the treatment of children severe bronchial pneumonia. Totally 90 children with severe bronchial pneumonia who were treated in our hospital from March 2013 to November 2013 were selected as the research objects. Based on randomized controlled principle, those children were divided into control group, test group I and test group II according to the time to enter the hospital, 30 in each group. Patients in control group was given conventional therapy; test group I was given holistic nursing combined with conventional therapy; test group II was given oxygen-driving and atomized Mucosolvan inhalation combined with holistic nursing on the basis of conventional therapy. After test, the difference of main symptoms in control group, test group I and II was of no statistical significance (P>0.05). Test group II was found with the best curative effect, secondary was test group I and control group was the last. It can be concluded that, oxygen-driving and atomized Mucosolvan inhalation combined with holistic nursing has certain effect in the treatment of children severe bronchial pneumonia and is better than holistic nursing only.

  12. Incidence and severity of childhood pneumonia in the first year of life in a South African birth cohort: the Drakenstein Child Health Study.

    PubMed

    le Roux, David M; Myer, Landon; Nicol, Mark P; Zar, Heather J

    2015-02-01

    Childhood pneumonia causes substantial mortality and morbidity. Accurate measurements of pneumonia incidence are scarce in low-income and middle-income countries, particularly after implementation of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. We aimed to assess the incidence, severity, and risk factors for pneumonia in the first year of life in children enrolled in a South African birth cohort. This birth cohort study is being done at two sites in Paarl, a periurban area of South Africa. We enrolled pregnant women (>18 years) and followed up mother-infant pairs to 1 year of age. We obtained data for risk factors and respiratory symptoms. Children received 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine according to national immunisation schedules. We established pneumonia surveillance systems and documented episodes of ambulatory pneumonia and pneumonia warranting hospital admission. We calculated incidence rate ratios for pneumonia with mixed-effects Poisson regression. Between May 29, 2012 and May 31, 2014, we enrolled 697 infants who accrued 513 child-years of follow-up. We recorded 141 pneumonia episodes, with an incidence of 0·27 episodes per child-year (95% CI 0·23-0·32). 32 (23%) pneumonia cases were severe pneumonia, with an incidence of 0·06 episodes per child-year (95% CI 0·04-0·08). Two (1%) of 141 pneumonia episodes led to death from pneumonia. Maternal HIV, maternal smoking, male sex, and malnutrition were associated with an increased incidence of pneumonia. Pneumonia incidence was high in the first year of life, despite a strong immunisation programme including 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Incidence was associated with pneumonia risk factors that are amenable to interventions. Prevention of childhood pneumonia through public health interventions to address these risk factors should be strengthened. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, South African Thoracic Society, Federation of Infectious Diseases Societies of South Africa, and University of Cape Town

  13. Microscopic Analysis and Quality Assessment of Induced Sputum From Children With Pneumonia in the PERCH Study.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, David R; Morpeth, Susan C; Hammitt, Laura L; Driscoll, Amanda J; Watson, Nora L; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Feikin, Daniel R; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; O'Brien, Katherine L; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Ahmed, Dilruba; Awori, Juliet O; DeLuca, Andrea N; Ebruke, Bernard E; Higdon, Melissa M; Jorakate, Possawat; Karron, Ruth A; Kazungu, Sidi; Kwenda, Geoffrey; Hossain, Lokman; Makprasert, Sirirat; Moore, David P; Mudau, Azwifarwi; Mwaba, John; Panchalingam, Sandra; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Salaudeen, Rasheed; Toure, Aliou; Zeger, Scott L; Howie, Stephen R C

    2017-06-15

    It is standard practice for laboratories to assess the cellular quality of expectorated sputum specimens to check that they originated from the lower respiratory tract. The presence of low numbers of squamous epithelial cells (SECs) and high numbers of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells are regarded as indicative of a lower respiratory tract specimen. However, these quality ratings have never been evaluated for induced sputum specimens from children with suspected pneumonia. We evaluated induced sputum Gram stain smears and cultures from hospitalized children aged 1-59 months enrolled in a large study of community-acquired pneumonia. We hypothesized that a specimen representative of the lower respiratory tract will contain smaller quantities of oropharyngeal flora and be more likely to have a predominance of potential pathogens compared to a specimen containing mainly saliva. The prevalence of potential pathogens cultured from induced sputum specimens and quantity of oropharyngeal flora were compared for different quantities of SECs and PMNs. Of 3772 induced sputum specimens, 2608 (69%) had <10 SECs per low-power field (LPF) and 2350 (62%) had >25 PMNs per LPF, measures traditionally associated with specimens from the lower respiratory tract in adults. Using isolation of low quantities of oropharyngeal flora and higher prevalence of potential pathogens as markers of higher quality, <10 SECs per LPF (but not >25 PMNs per LPF) was the microscopic variable most associated with high quality of induced sputum. Quantity of SECs may be a useful quality measure of induced sputum from young children with pneumonia.

  14. Impact of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections in Severely Burned Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    there is no copyright to be transferred. Received February 6, 2010; Revised March 31, 2010; Accepted March 31, 2010. From Walter Reed Army Institute... Fung CP, et al. Variety of TEM-, SHV-, and CTX-M-type beta-lactamases present in recent clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae

  15. Rhodococcus equi hyperimmune plasma decreases pneumonia severity after a randomised experimental challenge of neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M G; Loynachan, A; Horohov, D W

    2016-03-12

    Since a vaccine is not available against Rhodococcus equi, R equi-specific hyperimmune plasma (HIP) is commonly used, although its efficacy remains controversial. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a commercially available HIP to prevent clinical rhodococcal pneumonia in neonatal foals after experimental challenge. British Veterinary Association.

  16. Prokinetic Therapy Reduces Aspiration Pneumonia in Tube-Fed Patients With Severe Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pareek, Namita; Williams, John; Hanna, Deborah; Johnson, William D.; Minocha, Anil; Abell, Thomas L.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical benefit of prokinetic therapy in aspiration pneumonia in patients with developmental disabilities, we conducted a retrospective study; records of 22 tube-fed patients were reviewed from December 1990 to October 1998 for a mean of 22.7 months before and 38.9 months during Cisapride therapy. Numbers of hospital admissions…

  17. Prokinetic Therapy Reduces Aspiration Pneumonia in Tube-Fed Patients With Severe Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pareek, Namita; Williams, John; Hanna, Deborah; Johnson, William D.; Minocha, Anil; Abell, Thomas L.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical benefit of prokinetic therapy in aspiration pneumonia in patients with developmental disabilities, we conducted a retrospective study; records of 22 tube-fed patients were reviewed from December 1990 to October 1998 for a mean of 22.7 months before and 38.9 months during Cisapride therapy. Numbers of hospital admissions…

  18. Recurrent sclerema in a young infant presenting with severe sepsis and severe pneumonia: an uncommon but extremely life-threatening condition.

    PubMed

    Afroze, Farzana; Pietroni, Mark A C; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer

    2013-12-01

    A one month and twenty-five days old baby girl with problems of acute watery diarrhoea, severe dehydration, severe malnutrition, and reduced activity was admitted to the gastrointestinal unit of Dhaka Hospital of icddr,b. The differentials included dehydration, dyselectrolytaemia and severe sepsis. She was treated following the protocolized management guidelines of the hospital. However, within the next 24 hours, the patient deteriorated with additional problems of severe sepsis, severe pneumonia, hypoxaemia, ileus, and sclerema. She was transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). In the ICU, she was managed with oxygen supplementation, intravenous antibiotics, intravenous fluid, including a number of blood transfusions, vitamins, minerals, and diet. One month prior to this admission, she had been admitted to the ICU also with sclerema, septic shock, and urinary tract infection due to Escherichia coli and was discharged after full recovery. On both the occasions, she required repeated blood transfusions and aggressive antibiotic therapy in addition to appropriate fluid therapy and oxygen supplementation. She fully recovered from severe sepsis, severe malnutrition, ileus, sclerema, and pneumonia, both clinically and radiologically and was discharged two weeks after admission. Consecutive episodes of sclerema, resulting in two successive hospitalizations in a severely-malnourished young septic infant, have never been reported. However, this was managed successfully with blood transfusion, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and correction of electrolyte imbalance.

  19. Biomarkers of Delirium in a Low-Risk Community-Acquired Pneumonia-Induced Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, Cristiane Damiani; Vuolo, Francieli; Generoso, Jaqueline; Soares, Márcio; Barichello, Tatiana; Quevedo, João; Ritter, Cristiane; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    There are different theories about the pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE), and the majority of our knowledge was derived from critically ill patients. 7In less severe sepsis, it is probable that neuroinflammation can be a major aspect of SAE development. We hypothesized that in non-severe septic patients, blood biomarkers of inflammation, endothelial activation, coagulation, and brain function would be different when compared to patients with and without brain dysfunction. A total of 30 patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)-induced sepsis were included of which 10 (33 %) developed SAE. Eight medical patients admitted to the general ward, except due to sepsis or infection, which developed delirium were included as delirium, non-sepsis group. From all measured biomarkers, only brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed, and presumably secreted (RANTES), and interleukin (IL)-10 where significantly different when compared to SAE and sepsis groups. In addition, SAE patients presented higher levels of BDNF, vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB/BB and RANTES when compared to delirium patients. In conclusion, the profile of biomarkers differs between SAE, sepsis, and delirium patients, suggesting that pathways related to SAE are different from delirium and from sepsis itself.

  20. A Prospective Study of the Prevalence of Tuberculosis and Bacteraemia in Bangladeshi Children with Severe Malnutrition and Pneumonia Including an Evaluation of Xpert MTB/RIF Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Graham, Stephen M.; Duke, Trevor; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Ashraf, Hasan; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; La Vincente, Sophie; Banu, Sayera; Raqib, Rubhana; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe malnutrition is a risk factor for pneumonia due to a wide range of pathogens but aetiological data are limited and the role of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is uncertain. Methods We prospectively investigated severely malnourished young children (<5 years) with radiological pneumonia admitted over a 15-month period. Investigations included blood culture, sputa for microscopy and mycobacterial culture. Xpert MTB/RIF assay was introduced during the study. Study children were followed for 12 weeks following their discharge from the hospital. Results 405 eligible children were enrolled, with a median age of 10 months. Bacterial pathogens were isolated from blood culture in 18 (4.4%) children, of which 72% were Gram negatives. Tuberculosis was confirmed microbiologically in 7% (27/396) of children that provided sputum - 10 by culture, 21 by Xpert MTB/RIF assay, and 4 by both tests. The diagnostic yield from induced sputum was 6% compared to 3.5% from gastric aspirate. Sixty (16%) additional children had tuberculosis diagnosed clinically that was not microbiologically confirmed. Most confirmed tuberculosis cases did not have a positive contact history or positive tuberculin test. The sensitivity and specificity of Xpert MTB/RIF assay compared to culture was 67% (95% CI: 24–94) and 92% (95% CI: 87–95) respectively. Overall case-fatality rate was 17% and half of the deaths occurred in home following discharge from the hospital. Conclusion and Significance TB was common in severely malnourished Bangladeshi children with pneumonia. X-pert MTB/RIF assay provided higher case detection rate compared to sputum microscopy and culture. The high mortality among the study children underscores the need for further research aimed at improved case detection and management for better outcomes. PMID:24695758

  1. Time to blood culture positivity as a predictor of clinical outcomes and severity in adults with bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Cillóniz, Catia; Ceccato, Adrian; de la Calle, Cristina; Gabarrús, Albert; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Almela, Manel; Soriano, Alex; Martinez, José Antonio; Marco, Francesc; Vila, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to investigate the association between the time to positivity of blood culture (TTP) with clinical outcome and severity of pneumococcal bacteremic pneumonia. Methods Prospective observational study carried out in 278 hospitalized adult CAP patients with positive blood culture for Streptococcus pneumonia (2003–2015). Results A total of 278 cases of bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia were analyzed, median age 62 (46; 79) years. Fifty-one percent of the cases had PSI IV-V. Twenty-one (8%) died within 30-days after admission. The analysis of the TTP showed that the first quartile of the TTP (9.2h) was the best cut-off for differentiating 2 groups of patients at risk, early (TTP <9.2 h) and late (TTP ≥9.2 h) detection groups (AUC 0.66 [95% CI 0.53 to 0.79]). Early TTP was associated with a statistically significant risk of invasive mechanical ventilation (18% vs. 6%, p = 0.007), longer length of hospital stay (12 days vs. 8 days, p<0.001), higher in-hospital mortality (15% vs. 4%, p = 0.010), and 30-day mortality (15% vs. 5%, p = 0.018). After adjustment for potential confounders, regression analyses revealed early TTP as independently associated with high risk of invasive mechanical ventilation (OR 4.60, 95% CI 1.63 to 13.03), longer length of hospital stay (β 5.20, 95% CI 1.81 to 8.52), higher in-hospital mortality (OR 5.35, 95% CI 1.55 to 18.53), and a trend to higher 30-day mortality (OR 2.47, 95% CI 0.85 to 7.21) to be a contributing factor. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that TTP is an easy to obtain surrogate marker of the severity of pneumococcal pneumonia and a good predictor of its outcome. PMID:28787020

  2. Deciphering tissue-induced Klebsiella pneumoniae lipid A structure.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Enrique; Martínez-Moliner, Verónica; Moranta, David; Dahlström, Käthe M; Regueiro, Verónica; Tomás, Anna; Cano, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Frank, Christian G; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Insua, José Luis; Salminen, Tiina A; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-17

    The outcome of an infection depends on host recognition of the pathogen, hence leading to the activation of signaling pathways controlling defense responses. A long-held belief is that the modification of the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide could help Gram-negative pathogens to evade innate immunity. However, direct evidence that this happens in vivo is lacking. Here we report the lipid A expressed in the tissues of infected mice by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings demonstrate that Klebsiella remodels its lipid A in a tissue-dependent manner. Lipid A species found in the lungs are consistent with a 2-hydroxyacyl-modified lipid A dependent on the PhoPQ-regulated oxygenase LpxO. The in vivo lipid A pattern is lost in minimally passaged bacteria isolated from the tissues. LpxO-dependent modification reduces the activation of inflammatory responses and mediates resistance to antimicrobial peptides. An lpxO mutant is attenuated in vivo thereby highlighting the importance of this lipid A modification in Klebsiella infection biology. Colistin, one of the last options to treat multidrug-resistant Klebsiella infections, triggers the in vivo lipid A pattern. Moreover, colistin-resistant isolates already express the in vivo lipid A pattern. In these isolates, LpxO-dependent lipid A modification mediates resistance to colistin. Deciphering the lipid A expressed in vivo opens the possibility of designing novel therapeutics targeting the enzymes responsible for the in vivo lipid A pattern.

  3. Deciphering tissue-induced Klebsiella pneumoniae lipid A structure

    PubMed Central

    Llobet, Enrique; Martínez-Moliner, Verónica; Moranta, David; Dahlström, Käthe M.; Regueiro, Verónica; Tomás, Anna; Cano, Victoria; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Camino; Frank, Christian G.; Fernández-Carrasco, Helena; Insua, José Luis; Salminen, Tiina A.; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A.

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of an infection depends on host recognition of the pathogen, hence leading to the activation of signaling pathways controlling defense responses. A long-held belief is that the modification of the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide could help Gram-negative pathogens to evade innate immunity. However, direct evidence that this happens in vivo is lacking. Here we report the lipid A expressed in the tissues of infected mice by the human pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our findings demonstrate that Klebsiella remodels its lipid A in a tissue-dependent manner. Lipid A species found in the lungs are consistent with a 2-hydroxyacyl-modified lipid A dependent on the PhoPQ-regulated oxygenase LpxO. The in vivo lipid A pattern is lost in minimally passaged bacteria isolated from the tissues. LpxO-dependent modification reduces the activation of inflammatory responses and mediates resistance to antimicrobial peptides. An lpxO mutant is attenuated in vivo thereby highlighting the importance of this lipid A modification in Klebsiella infection biology. Colistin, one of the last options to treat multidrug-resistant Klebsiella infections, triggers the in vivo lipid A pattern. Moreover, colistin-resistant isolates already express the in vivo lipid A pattern. In these isolates, LpxO-dependent lipid A modification mediates resistance to colistin. Deciphering the lipid A expressed in vivo opens the possibility of designing novel therapeutics targeting the enzymes responsible for the in vivo lipid A pattern. PMID:26578797

  4. Stimulus induced bursts in severe postanoxic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tjepkema-Cloostermans, Marleen C; Wijers, Elisabeth T; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2016-11-01

    To report on a distinct effect of auditory and sensory stimuli on the EEG in comatose patients with severe postanoxic encephalopathy. In two comatose patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with severe postanoxic encephalopathy and burst-suppression EEG, we studied the effect of external stimuli (sound and touch) on the occurrence of bursts. In patient A bursts could be induced by either auditory or sensory stimuli. In patient B bursts could only be induced by touching different facial regions (forehead, nose and chin). When stimuli were presented with relatively long intervals, bursts persistently followed the stimuli, while stimuli with short intervals (<1s) did not induce bursts. In both patients bursts were not accompanied by myoclonia. Both patients deceased. Bursts in patients with a severe postanoxic encephalopathy can be induced by external stimuli, resulting in stimulus-dependent burst-suppression. Stimulus induced bursts should not be interpreted as prognostic favourable EEG reactivity. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Insights into the pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun; Liu, Mihua; Ye, Zhufeng; Tan, Tianping; Liu, Xinghui; You, Xiaoxing; Zeng, Yanhua; Wu, Yimou

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma are the smallest prokaryotic microbes present in nature. These wall-less, malleable organisms can pass through cell filters, and grow and propagate under cell-free conditions in vitro. Of the pathogenic Mycoplasma Mycoplasma pneumoniae has been examined the most. In addition to primary atypical pneumonia and community-acquired pneumonia with predominantly respiratory symptoms, M. pneumoniae can also induce autoimmune hemolytic anemia and other diseases in the blood, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal tract and skin, and can induce pericarditis, myocarditis, nephritis and meningitis. The pathogenesis of M. pneumoniae infection is complex and remains to be fully elucidated. The present review aimed to summarize several direct damage mechanisms, including adhesion damage, destruction of membrane fusion, nutrition depletion, invasive damage, toxic damage, inflammatory damage and immune damage. Further investigations are required for determining the detailed pathogenesis of M. pneumoniae. PMID:27667580

  6. Zinc adjunct therapy reduces case fatality in severe childhood pneumonia: a randomized double blind placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Pneumonia is a leading cause of children's deaths in developing countries and hinders achievement of the fourth Millennium Development Goal. This goal aims to reduce the under-five mortality rate, by two thirds, between 1990 and 2015. Few studies have examined the impact of zinc adjunct therapy on the outcome of childhood pneumonia. We determined the effect of zinc as adjunct therapy on time to normalization of respiratory rate, temperature and oxygen saturation. We also studied the effect of zinc adjunct therapy on case fatality of severe childhood pneumonia (as a secondary outcome) in Mulago Hospital, Uganda. Methods In this double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 352 children aged 6 to 59 months, with severe pneumonia were randomized to zinc (20 mg for children ≥12 months, and 10 mg for those < 12 months) or a placebo once daily for seven days, in addition to standard antibiotics for severe pneumonia. Children were assessed every six hours. Oxygen saturation was normal if it was above 92% (breathing room air) for more than 15 minutes. The respiratory rate was normal if it was consistently (more than 24 hours) below 50 breaths per minute in infants and 40 breaths per minute in children above 12 months of age. Temperature was normal if consistently below 37.5°C. The difference in case fatality was expressed by the risk ratio between the two groups. Results Time to normalization of the respiratory rate, temperature and oxygen saturation was not significantly different between the two arms. Case fatality was 7/176 (4.0%) in the zinc group and 21/176 (11.9%) in the placebo group: Relative Risk 0.33 (95% CI 0.15 to 0.76). Relative Risk Reduction was 0.67 (95% CI 0.24 to 0.85), while the number needed to treat was 13. Among HIV infected children, case fatality was higher in the placebo (7/27) than in the zinc (0/28) group; RR 0.1 (95% CI 0.0, 1.0). Among 127 HIV uninfected children receiving the placebo, case fatality was 7

  7. A comparison of human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus WHO-defined severe pneumonia in Moroccan children.

    PubMed

    Jroundi, I; Mahraoui, C; Benmessaoud, R; Moraleda, C; Tligui, H; Seffar, M; El Kettani, S E C; Benjelloun, B S; Chaacho, S; Muñoz-Almagro, C; Ruiz, J; Alonso, P L; Bassat, Q

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory infections remain the principal cause of morbidity and mortality in Moroccan children. Besides bacterial infections, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are prominent among other viruses due to their high prevalence and association with severe clinical episodes. We aimed to describe and compare RSV- and hMPV-associated cases of WHO-defined severe pneumonia in a paediatric population admitted to Morocco's reference hospital. Children aged 2-59 months admitted to the Hôpital d'Enfants de Rabat, Morocco meeting WHO-defined severe pneumonia criteria were recruited during 14 months and thoroughly investigated to ascertain a definitive diagnosis. Viral prevalence of RSV, hMPV and other viruses causing respiratory symptoms was investigated in nasopharyngeal aspirate samples through the use of molecular methods. Of the 683 children recruited and included in the final analysis, 61/683 (8·9%) and 124/683 (18·2%) were infected with hMPV and RSV, respectively. Besides a borderline significant tendency for higher age in hMPV cases, patients infected with either of the viruses behaved similarly in terms of demographics, patient history, past morbidity and comorbidity, vaccination history, socioeconomic background and family environment. Clinical presentation on arrival was also similar for both viruses, but hMPV cases were associated with more severity than RSV cases, had a higher risk of intensive care need, and received antibiotic treatment more frequently. RSV and hMPV are common and potentially life-threatening causes of WHO-defined pneumonia in Moroccan children. Both viruses show indistinctive clinical symptomatology, but in Moroccan children, hMPV was associated with a more severe evolution.

  8. Lung epithelial cells are essential effectors of inducible resistance to pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Cleaver, Jeffrey O.; You, Dahui; Michaud, Danielle R.; Guzmán Pruneda, Francisco A.; Leiva Juarez, Miguel M.; Zhang, Jiexin; Weill, Patrick M.; Adachi, Roberto; Gong, Lei; Moghaddam, Seyed; Poynter, Matthew E.; Tuvim, Michael J.; Evans, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious pneumonias are a leading cause of death worldwide, particularly among immunocompromised patients. Therapeutic stimulation of the lungs’ intrinsic defenses with a unique combination of inhaled Toll-like receptor agonists broadly protects mice against otherwise lethal pneumonias. As the survival benefit persists despite cytotoxic chemotherapy-related neutropenia, the cells required for protection were investigated. The inducibility of resistance was tested in mice with deficiencies of leukocyte lineages due to genetic deletions and in wild type mice with leukocyte populations significantly reduced by antibodies or toxins. Surprisingly, these serial reductions in leukocyte lineages did not appreciably impair inducible resistance, but targeted disruption of Toll-like receptor signaling in the lung epithelium resulted in complete abrogation of the protective effect. Isolated lung epithelial cells were also induced to kill pathogens in the absence of leukocytes. Proteomic and gene expression analyses of isolated epithelial cells and whole lungs revealed highly congruent antimicrobial responses. Taken together, these data indicate that lung epithelial cells are necessary and sufficient effectors of inducible resistance. These findings challenge conventional paradigms about the role of epithelia in antimicrobial defense and offer a novel potential intervention to protect patients with impaired leukocyte-mediated immunity from fatal pneumonias. PMID:23632328

  9. Use of Liposomal Gentamicin for Treatment of 5 Foals with Experimentally Induced Rhodococcus equi Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cohen, N D; Giguère, S; Burton, A J; Rocha, J N; Berghaus, L J; Brake, C N; Bordin, A I; Coleman, M C

    2016-01-01

    Adverse effects of, and bacterial resistance to, macrolides used to treat Rhodococcus equi infections have prompted search for clinically effective alternative antimicrobials. Liposomal gentamicin (LG) is effective against R. equi in vitro and decreases tissue concentrations of R. equi in experimentally infected mice. Effectiveness of LG treatment of foals with R. equi pneumonia, however, has not been described. Liposomal gentamicin is safe and effective for treating foals with R. equi pneumonia. Ten foals with experimentally induced R. equi pneumonia. Pilot treatment trial. Foals with pneumonia induced by intrabronchial instillation of R. equi were randomly allocated to receive either clarithromycin combined with rifampin (CLR + RIF) PO or LG IV, and followed by daily physical examinations and weekly thoracic ultrasonography and serum creatinine concentration determinations until the resolution of clinical signs. Treatment success was defined as the resolution of clinical signs and ultrasonographically identified pulmonary abscesses. All 10 foals were successfully treated. Two of 5 foals treated with LG developed azotemia within 1 week; LG was discontinued and treatment switched to CLR + RIF for these foals. None of the CLR + RIF treated foals developed azotemia. Liposomal gentamicin IV can be effective for treatment of R. equi pneumonia, but nephrotoxicity indicates that an alternative dosing interval or route (such as nebulization) will be needed before LG is adequately safe for clinical use. Larger comparative trials will be needed to evaluate the relative efficacy of a safer LG dosage regimen. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  10. Sociodemographic, Epidemiological, and Clinical Risk Factors for Childhood Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Severely Malnourished Children Presenting With Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu Syeed Golam; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate sociodemographic, epidemiological, and clinical risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in children presenting with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and pneumonia. Children aged 0 to 59 months with SAM and radiologic pneumonia from April 2011 to July 2012 were studied in Bangladesh. Children with confirmed PTB (by culture and/or X-pert MTB/RIF) (cases = 27) and without PTB (controls = 81; randomly selected from 378 children) were compared. The cases more often had the history of contact with active PTB patient (P < .01) and exposure to cigarette smoke (P = .04) compared with the controls. In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, the cases were independently associated with working mother (P = .05) and positive tuberculin skin test (TST; P = .02). Thus, pneumonia in SAM children is a common presentation of PTB and further highlights the importance of the use of simple TST and/or history of contact with active TB patients in diagnosing PTB in such children, especially in resource-limited settings. PMID:27335971

  11. The History of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Saraya, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    In the United States in the 1930s, although the pathogen was not known, atypical pneumonia was clinically distinguished from pneumococcal pneumonia by its resistance to sulfonamides. Reimann (1938) reported seven patients with an unusual form of tracheo bronchopneumonia and severe constitutional symptoms. He believed the clinical picture of this disease differed from that of the disease caused by influenza viruses or known bacteria and instead suspected “primary atypical pneumonia.” For many years, the responsible infectious agent was tentatively classified as a filterable virus that could pass through a Seitz filter to remove bacteria and was reported to be a psittacosis-like or new virus. After that, Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) identified an agent that was the principal cause of primary atypical pneumonia using cotton rats, hamsters, and chick embryos. Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) did not perform an inoculation study in human volunteers. During the 1940s, there were three groups engaged in discovering the etiology of the primary atypical pneumonia. (1) Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases Diseases directed by John Dingle, (2) Dr. Monroe Eaton’s group, the Virus Research Laboratory of the California State Public Health Department, (3) The Hospital of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research directed by Horsfall. During 1940s, the members of the Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases concluded that the bacteria-free filtrates obtained from the patients, presumably containing a virus, could induce primary atypical pneumonia in human volunteers via Pinehurst trials. During 1950s, serological approaches for identification of the Eaton agent developed such as Fluorescent-Stainable Antibody, and at the beginning of the1960s, the Eaton agent successfully grew in media, and finally accepted as a cause of primary atypical pneumonia. Thus, technical difficulties with visualizing the agent and failure to recognize the full significance of the

  12. Immunization with LytB protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae activates complement-mediated phagocytosis and induces protection against pneumonia and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Bruno; Aguinagalde, Leire; Ruiz, Susana; Domenech, Mirian; Antequera, María Luisa; Fenoll, Asunción; García, Pedro; García, Ernesto; Yuste, Jose

    2016-12-07

    The cell wall glucosaminidase LytB of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a surface exposed protein involved in daughter cell separation, biofilm formation and contributes to different aspects of the pathogenesis process. In this study we have characterized the antibody responses after immunization of mice with LytB in the presence of alhydrogel as an adjuvant. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays measuring different subclasses of immunoglobulin G, demonstrated that the antibody responses to LytB were predominantly IgG1 and IgG2b, followed by IgG3 and IgG2a subclasses. Complement-mediated immunity against two different pneumococcal serotypes was investigated using sera from immunized mice. Immunization with LytB increased the recognition of S. pneumoniae by complement components C1q and C3b demonstrating that anti-LytB antibodies trigger activation of the classical pathway. Phagocytosis assays showed that serum containing antibodies to LytB stimulates neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis against S. pneumoniae. Animal models of infection including invasive pneumonia and sepsis were performed with two different clinical isolates. Vaccination with LytB increased bacterial clearance and induced protection demonstrating that LytB might be a good candidate to be considered in a future protein-based vaccine against S. pneumoniae.

  13. Indoor Air Pollution and Delayed Measles Vaccination Increase the Risk of Severe Pneumonia in Children: Results from a Case-Control Study in Mwanza, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    PrayGod, George; Mukerebe, Crispin; Magawa, Ruth; Jeremiah, Kidola; Török, M Estée

    2016-01-01

    Mortality due to severe pneumonia during childhood in resource-constrained settings is high, but data to provide basis for interventions to improve survival are limited. The objective of this study was to determine the risk factors for severe pneumonia in children aged under five years old in Mwanza, Tanzania. We conducted a case-control study of children aged 2 to 59 months at Sekou-Toure regional hospital in Mwanza City, north-western, Tanzania from May 2013 to March 2014. Cases were children with severe pneumonia and controls were children with other illnesses. Data on demography, social-economical status, nutritional status, environmental factors, vaccination status, vitamin A supplementation and deworming, and nasopharyngeal carriage were collected and analysed using logistic regression. 117 patients were included in the study. Of these, 45 were cases and 72 controls. Cases were younger than controls, but there were no differences in social-economic or nutritional status between the two groups. In multiple regression, we found that an increased risk of severe pneumonia was associated with cooking indoors (OR 5.5, 95% CI: 1.4, 22.1), and delayed measles vaccination (OR 3.9, 95% CI: 1.1, 14.8). The lack of vitamin A supplementation in the preceding six month and Enterobacter spp nasopharyngeal carriage were not associated with higher risk of severe pneumonia. Age ≥24 months (OR 0.2, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.8) and not receiving antibiotics before referral (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1, 0.9) were associated with lower risk for severe pneumonia. Indoor air pollution and delayed measles vaccination increase the risk for severe pneumonia among children aged below five years. Interventions to reduce indoor air pollution and to promote timely administration of measles vaccination are urgently needed to reduce the burden of severe pneumonia in children in Tanzania.

  14. [A possible case of drug-induced pneumonia due to L-carbocisteine].

    PubMed

    Koreeda, Yoshimizu; Tanoue, Asako; Kumamoto, Tomohiro; Kubota, Kouji; Hagihara, Yoko; Taira, Tetsuhiko; Noma, Satoshi; Kawabata, Toshifumi; Suetsugu, Takayuki; Matsuyama, Wataru; Mizuno, Keiko; Kawabata, Masaharu; Higashimoto, Ikkou; Osame, Mitsuhiro; Arimura, Kimiyoshi

    2007-08-01

    A 70-year-old man presented with a deteriorating fever and productive cough after the administration of drugs including L-carbocisteine against the common cold. Since chest radiograph revealed pulmonary infiltrates in the right lower lung field, he was admitted to our hospital, then L-carbocisteine was continued and antibiotics started. However, his symptoms, laboratory findings, and hypoxia worsened. Pulmonary infiltrates on his chest radiograph increased and chest CT demonstrated pulmonary consolidation with traction bronchiectasis and ground glass opacity with thickened of interlobular septae in the right lung field. Analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed elevated numbers of total cells, neutrophils and eosinophils, and the CD4/CD8 ratio was 5.65. Under a suspected diagnosis of drug-induced pneumonia, we halted L-carbocisteine administration stopped and began corticosteroid therapy. Subsequently his symptoms and findings markedly improved. The drug lymphocyte stimulation test for L-carbocisteine using peripheral blood lymphocytes showed positive results. On the basis of the clinical course, laboratory and radiographic findings, we considered this case to possibly be drug-induced pneumonia due to L-carbocisteine. To our knowledge, this is possibly the first case of L-carbocisteine-induced pneumonia to be reported.

  15. Expression of B and T Lymphocyte Attenuator in Patients with Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia and the Effect of Steroid Therapy in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoqi; Wang, Daoxin; Liu, Daishun; Qi, Di; Liu, Zhenfeng

    2016-12-01

    Severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a clinical problem, and the identification of new therapeutic targets may increase the rate of successfully treating patients with severe CAP. B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) is an immunoglobulin-related membrane protein that may play a vital role in the pathogenesis of infection. However, the effects of BTLA in related to severe CAP involved are unknown. In this study, we investigated potential changes in BTLA expression on lymphocytes in patients with severe CAP and determined how BTLA expression affects a model of LPS-induced acute lung inflammation. The percentages of circulating BTLA+CD4+ lymphocytes were determined in patients with severe CAP and in an LPS-induced acute lung inflammation model. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected from mice and analyzed for leukocyte counts and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Lung tissue samples were collected and assessed via Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and HE staining. The percentages of circulating BTLA+CD4+ lymphocytes were significantly higher in patients with severe CAP and in mice with LPS-induced acute lung inflammation than in the control groups. After treatment with either dexamethasone or the agonistic anti-BTLA antibody 6A6, BTLA expression was significantly higher than that in the control mice with LPS-induced acute lung inflammation. Moreover, both dexamethasone and the agonistic anti-BTLA antibody 6A6 attenuated inflammatory responses and nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway activation. These results demonstrated that BTLA may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of severe CAP and that BTLA expression may reflect the body's immune status and guide decisions regarding steroid therapy for treating severe CAP.

  16. Expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae Bacteriocins Is Induced by Antibiotics via Regulatory Interplay with the Competence System

    PubMed Central

    Slager, Jelle; Lake, Frank B.; Gericke, Oliver; Roberts, Ian S.; Rozen, Daniel E.; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal bacteriocins (pneumocins) are antibacterial toxins that mediate intra-species competition within the human host. However, the triggers of pneumocin expression are poorly understood. Using RNA-sequencing, we mapped the regulon of the pneumocin cluster (blp) of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39. Furthermore, by analogy with pneumococcal competence, we show that several antibiotics activate the blp-genes. Using real-time gene expression measurements we show that while the promoter driving expression of the two-component regulatory system blpR/H is constitutive, the remaining blp-promoters that control pneumocin expression, immunity and the inducer peptide BlpC, are pH-dependent and induced in the late exponential phase. Intriguingly, competence for genetic transformation, mediated by the paralogous ComD/E two-component quorum system, is induced by the same environmental cues. To test for interplay between these regulatory systems, we quantified the regulatory response to the addition of synthetic BlpC and competence-stimulating peptide (CSP). Supporting the idea of such interplay, we found that immediately upon addition of CSP, the blp-promoters were activated in a comD/E-dependent manner. After a delay, blp-expression was highly induced and was strictly dependent on blpRH and blpC. This raised the question of the mechanism of BlpC export, since bioinformatic analysis showed that the genes encoding the putative exporter for BlpC, blpAB, are not intact in strain D39 and most other strains. By contrast, all sequenced pneumococcal strains contain intact comAB genes, encoding the transport system for CSP. Consistent with the idea that comAB mediate BlpC export, we finally show that high-level expression of the blp-genes requires comAB. Together, our results demonstrate that regulation of pneumocin expression is intertwined with competence, explaining why certain antibiotics induce blp-expression. Antibiotic-induced pneumocin expression might therefore have

  17. Expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae Bacteriocins Is Induced by Antibiotics via Regulatory Interplay with the Competence System.

    PubMed

    Kjos, Morten; Miller, Eric; Slager, Jelle; Lake, Frank B; Gericke, Oliver; Roberts, Ian S; Rozen, Daniel E; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2016-02-01

    Pneumococcal bacteriocins (pneumocins) are antibacterial toxins that mediate intra-species competition within the human host. However, the triggers of pneumocin expression are poorly understood. Using RNA-sequencing, we mapped the regulon of the pneumocin cluster (blp) of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39. Furthermore, by analogy with pneumococcal competence, we show that several antibiotics activate the blp-genes. Using real-time gene expression measurements we show that while the promoter driving expression of the two-component regulatory system blpR/H is constitutive, the remaining blp-promoters that control pneumocin expression, immunity and the inducer peptide BlpC, are pH-dependent and induced in the late exponential phase. Intriguingly, competence for genetic transformation, mediated by the paralogous ComD/E two-component quorum system, is induced by the same environmental cues. To test for interplay between these regulatory systems, we quantified the regulatory response to the addition of synthetic BlpC and competence-stimulating peptide (CSP). Supporting the idea of such interplay, we found that immediately upon addition of CSP, the blp-promoters were activated in a comD/E-dependent manner. After a delay, blp-expression was highly induced and was strictly dependent on blpRH and blpC. This raised the question of the mechanism of BlpC export, since bioinformatic analysis showed that the genes encoding the putative exporter for BlpC, blpAB, are not intact in strain D39 and most other strains. By contrast, all sequenced pneumococcal strains contain intact comAB genes, encoding the transport system for CSP. Consistent with the idea that comAB mediate BlpC export, we finally show that high-level expression of the blp-genes requires comAB. Together, our results demonstrate that regulation of pneumocin expression is intertwined with competence, explaining why certain antibiotics induce blp-expression. Antibiotic-induced pneumocin expression might therefore have

  18. Comparison of Immunoglobulin G Subclass Concentrations in Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Severe Pandemic 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Claire L.; Holmes, Natasha E.; Grayson, M. Lindsay; Torresi, Joseph; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Cheng, Allen C.

    2012-01-01

    We compared immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclasses in patients with severe noninfluenza community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) to those in patients with severe pandemic 2009 influenza (H1N1) virus infection. Low IgG1 and IgG2 levels occurred often in the CAP group; however, H1N1 patients had lower IgG1 and IgG2 levels (5.4 versus 3.3 g/liter [P = 0.008] and 2.5 versus 1.2 g/liter [P < 0.001], respectively). Low IgG2 levels may be specifically linked to severe H1N1; however, it is not clear whether this association is related to H1N1 or to other features of severity. PMID:22237894

  19. Severe pneumonia after heart transplantation as a result of human parvovirus B19.

    PubMed

    Janner, D; Bork, J; Baum, M; Chinnock, R

    1994-01-01

    The diverse manifestations of human parvovirus B19 infection have been well established. Erythema infectiosum, fetal hydrops, adult arthropathy, and aplastic anemia in patients with hemoglobinopathies or underlying immunocompromise have been described. Recently we successfully treated a patient who, after heart transplantation, had fever, rash, and pneumonia with respiratory failure caused by human parovirus B19. Human parovirus B19 has not been reported previously as a pathogen causing pulmonary disease after pediatric heart transplantation, and we wish to report it at this time.

  20. Severe Hyponatremia due to Levofloxacin Treatment for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Community-Acquired Pneumonia in a Patient with Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blaga, Sorin Nicu

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia (serum Na levels of <135 mEq/L) is the most common electrolyte imbalance encountered in clinical practice, affecting up to 15–28% of hospitalized patients. This case report refers to a middle-aged man with severe hyponatremia due to Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion related to four possible etiological factors: glossopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, cisplatin treatment, right basal pneumonia with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the treatment with Levofloxacin. This case report discusses a rare complication of common conditions and of a common treatment. To our knowledge this is the first case of hyponatremia related to Levofloxacin and the second related to fluoroquinolones. PMID:27847519

  1. Evaluation of the efficacy of a bacteriophage in the treatment of pneumonia induced by multidrug resistance Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fang; Wang, Xitao; Wang, Linhui; Li, Zhen; Che, Jian; Wang, Lili; Li, Xiaoyu; Cao, Zhenhui; Zhang, Jiancheng; Jin, Liji; Xu, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (MRKP) has steadily grown beyond antibiotic control. However, a bacteriophage is considered to be a potential antibiotic alternative for treating bacterial infections. In this study, a lytic bacteriophage, phage 1513, was isolated using a clinical MRKP isolate KP 1513 as the host and was characterized. It produced a clear plaque with a halo and was classified as Siphoviridae. It had a short latent period of 30 min, a burst size of 264 and could inhibit KP 1513 growth in vitro with a dose-dependent pattern. Intranasal administration of a single dose of 2×10(9) PFU/mouse 2 h after KP 1513 inoculation was able to protect mice against lethal pneumonia. In a sublethal pneumonia model, phage-treated mice exhibited a lower level of K. pneumoniae burden in the lungs as compared to the untreated control. These mice lost less body weight and exhibited lower levels of inflammatory cytokines in their lungs. Lung lesion conditions were obviously improved by phage therapy. Therefore, phage 1513 has a great effect in vitro and in vivo, which has potential to be used as an alternative to an antibiotic treatment of pneumonia that is caused by the multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae.

  2. Interstitial lung disease and profound hypoxaemia in a severely-malnourished child with very severe pneumonia and potential lymph-node tuberculosis: an uncommon but serious co-morbidity.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Mohammod J; Parvin, Irin; Ashraf, Hasan; Saha, Haimanti; Matin, Fariha B; Pietroni, Mark A C

    2013-03-01

    A nine-month old boy was initially admitted at the Acute Respiratory Infection Unit of Dhaka Hospital of icddr,b and soon after transferred to the Intensive Care Unit of the same hospital. The boy had problems of very severe pneumonia (confirmed by radiology), severe hypoxaemia, severe malnutrition, and Down's syndrome. The patient was treated according to the hospital protocol for the management of pneumonia and malnutrition. During the hospital stay, hypoxaemia was persistent with very little improvement of pneumonia; a number of differentials, such as pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, lymph-node tuberculosis, were added to the problems. Subsequently, the patient's hypoxaemia improved with the empirical use of antitubercular drugs. However, the patient again developed persistent hypoxaemia and, after unsuccessful treatment for a hospital-acquired pneumonia, the problems further expanded to include interstitial lung disease (ILD). This was confirmed by high-resolution computed tomography, and the patient was treated with prednisolone for 6 months, along with antitubercular drugs. He fully recovered from ILD, hypoxaemia, and pneumonia both clinically and radiologically. Therefore, severely-malnourished children having wet cough and pneumonia with persistent hypoxaemia should be assessed for the possible existence of interstitial lung disease. This may help provide a prompt and appropriate management to reduce morbidity and deaths in such patients.

  3. Role of Human Metapneumovirus, Influenza A Virus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Causing WHO-Defined Severe Pneumonia in Children in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asad; Khowaja, Asif Raza; Bashir, Maaman Zahoor; Aziz, Fatima; Mustafa, Sultan; Zaidi, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Objective The role of respiratory viruses in causing severe, life threatening pneumonia in children in developing countries is not well established. Our study aims to determine the role of human metapneumovirus (HMPV), influenza A virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in children, aged 6 weeks to 2 years, hospitalized with WHO defined severe pneumonia (tachypnea plus any general danger sign or chest in-drawing) at a public sector hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods This study was conducted from November 2010 to September 2011 at Abbassi Shaheed Hospital, a large public tertiary care hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Children admitted with WHO-defined severe pneumonia were enrolled and throat swabs were obtained to detect respiratory viruses using real time RT-PCR. Chest x-rays of all subjects were obtained and independently interpreted by two radiologists to diagnose radiologic pneumonia. Results 169 children were enrolled. HMPV was detected in 24 (14.2%), influenza A virus in 9 (5.3%) and RSV in 30 (17.8%) children admitted with severe pneumonia. Of 9 patients with influenza A, 8 tested positive for H1N1. Viral etiology was found in 18% of radiologically confirmed pneumonia. HMPV infections peaked in February and April, influenza A was prevalent in January, June and November and RSV infections were most prevalent from June to September. Conclusion HMPV, influenza A and RSV are common causes of WHO-defined severe pneumonia in hospitalized children in Karachi. Knowledge regarding the viral etiology of pediatric pneumonia and individual viral seasonality can help in the recommendation and implementation of appropriate management strategies. PMID:24058625

  4. Severe rhinovirus pneumonia in a young woman taking performance-enhancing drugs.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Kristina Nadine; Wyder, Daniel; Spasic, Danijela; Herren, Thomas

    2016-01-06

    A 22-year-old woman presented to the emergency room of a local hospital with pleuritic chest pain. She regularly worked out and admitted to taking performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs). Clinical findings and further diagnostic work up revealed a diagnosis of perimyocarditis, and adequate therapy was initiated. During the course of the first day, the patient had to be intubated and mechanically ventilated. A diagnosis of bilateral pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to an infection by rhinovirus spp was made. A smoking habit, the intense physical training and the use of PED's may have exacerbated the course of the viral pneumonia. After 12 days the patient could be extubated. The length of stay in the intensive care unit was 16 days. After hospital discharge, the patient went to a pulmonary rehabilitation facility for 2 weeks. The outcome was favourable and the patient resumed her strength and endurance training. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  5. Respiratory viruses associated with severe pneumonia in children under 2 years old in a rural community in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Asad; Akhund, Tauseef; Warraich, Gohar Javed; Aziz, Fatima; Rahman, Najeeb; Umrani, Fayyaz Ahmed; Qureshi, Shahida; Petri, William A; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Zaidi, Anita K M; Hughes, Molly A

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of respiratory viruses associated with severe pneumonia among children less than 2 years of age in the rural district of Matiari in Sindh, Pakistan. This study was a community-based prospective cohort active surveillance of infants enrolled at birth and followed for 2 years. Cases were identified using the World Health Organization's Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses' definition of severe pneumonia. Nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained for assessment by multiplex RT-PCR for eight viruses and their subtypes, including RSV, influenza virus, human metapneumovirus, enterovirus/rhinovirus, coronavirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, and human bocavirus. Blood cultures were collected from febrile participants. A total of 817 newborns were enrolled and followed with fortnightly surveillance for 2 years, accounting for a total of 1,501 child-years of follow-up. Of the nasopharyngeal swabs collected, 77.8% (179/230) were positive for one or more of the above mentioned respiratory viruses. The incidence of laboratory confirmed viral-associated pneumonia was 11.9 per 100 child-years of follow-up. Enterovirus/rhinovirus was detected in 51.7% patients, followed by parainfluenza virus type III (8.3%), and RSV (5.7%). Of the uncontaminated blood cultures, 1.4% (5/356) were positive. Respiratory viruses are frequently detected during acute respiratory infection episodes in children under 2 years old in a rural community in Pakistan. However, causal association is yet to be established and the concomitant role of bacteria as a co-infection or super-infection needs further investigation. J. Med. Virol. 88:1882-1890, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Topical treatment of Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055 induced burn wound infection in mice using natural products.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Seema; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2010-06-30

    Burn wound infection remains the principal cause of death in burn patients. Efficacy of honey and aloe vera gel was evaluated in the treatment of burn wound infection induced with Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055 and their efficacy was compared with an isolated and well-characterized Klebsiella specific phage Kpn5. A full thickness burn wound was induced in mice and infected with K. pneumoniae B5055 via topical route. The efficacy of natural antimicrobial agents (honey and aloe vera gel) topically applied daily was compared with the efficacy of phage Kpn5 suspended in hydrogel applied topically a single time on the burn wound. Efficacy of these antimicrobial agents was assessed on the basis of the percentage of infected mice that survived following treatment. In comparison to untreated control mice, those treated with a single dose of phage Kpn5 at MOI of 200 showed significant reduction in mortality (P < 0.001). Daily application of honey and aloe vera gel provided significant protection (P < 0.001), but in combination with phage, no additional advantage was observed (P > 0.05) compared to the use of honey and aloe vera gel alone. The results of this study strongly suggest that phage Kpn5 has therapeutic value in treating burn wound infection in mice as a single topical application of this phage was able to rescue mice from infection caused by K. pneumoniae B5055 in comparison to multiple applications of honey and aloe vera gel.

  7. Cytokine and chemokine responses in pediatric patients with severe pneumonia associated with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yuji; Kawamura, Yoshiki; Nakai, Hidetaka; Sugata, Ken; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Ihira, Masaru; Ohashi, Masahiro; Kato, Tomochika; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2012-09-01

    Severe pneumonia and leukocytosis are characteristic, frequently observed, clinical findings in pediatric patients with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus infection. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of cytokines and chemokines in complicating pneumonia and leukocytosis in patients with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus infection. Forty-seven patients with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus infection were enrolled in this study. Expression of interleukin (IL)-10 (P = 0.027) and IL-5 (P = 0.014) was significantly greater in patients with pneumonia than in those without pneumonia. Additionally, serum concentrations of interferon-γ (P = 0.009), tumor necrosis factor-α (P = 0.01), IL-4 (P = 0.024), and IL-2 (P = 0.012) were significantly lower in pneumonia patients with neutrophilic leukocytosis than in those without neutrophilic leukocytosis. Of the five serum chemokine concentrations assessed, only IL-8 was significantly lower in pneumonia patients with neutrophilic leukocytosis than in those without leukocytosis (P = 0.001). These cytokines and chemokines may play important roles in the pathogenesis of childhood pneumonia associated with A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus infection.

  8. PEG-asparaginase induced severe hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Rodolfo J; Yoon, Justin; Devoe, Craig; Myers, Alyson K

    2016-04-01

    Asparaginase (ASP) is an effective chemotherapy agent extensively used in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). There has been a recent interest in using ASP in adults with ALL, particularly the less toxic pegylated (PEG) formulation. Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a rare complication of PEG-ASP therapy. We report two cases of obese patients who developed severe HTG after receiving PEG for ALL. Both patients were incidentally found to have severe HTG (TG of 4,330 and 4,420 mg/dL). In both patients, there was no personal or family history of dyslipidemia or hypothyroidism. There was no evidence of pancreatitis or skin manifestations of HTG. Both patients were treated with PEG cessation, low-fat diet and pharmacotherapy. Both patients were re-challenged with PEG, with subsequent increase in TG but no associated complications. TG returned to baseline after discontinuing PEG and while on therapy for HTG. A literature review of PEG-induced HTG in adults demonstrated similar results: asymptomatic presentation despite very severe HTG. HTG is a rare but clinically important adverse effect of PEG. Underlying obesity and/or diabetes may represent risk factors. Clinicians should monitor TG levels during PEG therapy to avoid TG-induced pancreatitis.

  9. Bortezomib-induced Severe Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jerkins, James H.; Suciu, Anca; Mazimba, Sula; Calvo, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of anti-cancer drug associated cardiac side effects are diverse and can range from acutely induced cardiac arrhythmias to severe contractile dysfunction, and potentially fatal heart failure. Anthracyclines and trastuzumab cardiac toxicity have been well described and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) evaluation is commonly performed before their use. Bortezomib (Velcade), a potent, specific and reversible proteasome inhibitor is approved for treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). The incidence of cardiac failure associated with bortezomib therapy in clinical trials remains incidental. Acute exacerbation of pre-existing congestive cardiac failure has been associated with this therapy but de novo cardiomyopathy has been reported in only one patient receiving bortezomib for small cell lung cancer. As a result, cardiac evaluation is not normally ordered before its use. We describe a 50-year-old female with newly diagnosed MM and no risk factors for cardiac disease that unexpectedly developed florid heart failure after 2 cycles of bortezomib and low-dose dexamethasone. 2-D echocardiogram showed dilated cardiomyopathy with severely decreased LVEF; no changes consistent with amyloid deposits or myocardial scarring were described. Coronary angiogram ruled out coronary artery disease. The mechanism of bortezomib-induced cardiomyopathy has been postulated to be through fluid retention. Based on literature review we hypothesize that the disruption of the ubiquitin-proteasome system by bortezomib may cause cardiomyopathy and severe cardiac failure. As Bortezomib is a new and promising therapy for MM patients, we recommend routinely monitoring cardiac parameters in patients undergoing this treatment.

  10. Zinc as an adjunct to antibiotics for the treatment of severe pneumonia in children <5 years: a meta-analysis of randomised-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Tie, Hong-Tao; Tan, Qi; Luo, Ming-Zhu; Li, Qiang; Yu, Jia-Lin; Wu, Qing-Chen

    2016-03-14

    The effect of Zn, as an adjunct to antibiotics, on the treatment of severe pneumonia in young children is still under debate; therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the therapeutic role of Zn for severe pneumonia in children younger than 5 years. PubMed, Cochrane library and Embase databases were systematically searched from inception until October 2015 for randomised-controlled trials (RCT) that assessed the effect of Zn as an adjunct to antibiotics for severe pneumonia. Random-effects model was used for calculating the pooled estimates, and intention-to-treat principle was also applied. Nine RCT involving 2926 children were included. Overall, the pooled results showed that adjunct treatment with Zn failed to reduce the time to recovery from severe pneumonia (hazard ratios (HR)=1·04; 95% CI 0·90, 1·19; I(2)=39%; P=0·58), hospital length of stay (HR=1·04; 95% CI 0·83, 1·33; I(2)=57%; P=0·74), treatment failure (relative risk (RR)=0·95; 95% CI 0·79, 1·14; I(2)=20%; P=0·58) or change of antibiotics (RR=1·07; 95% CI 0·79, 1·45; I(2)=44%; P=0·67). In addition, continuous outcomes were consistent while meta-analysed with standard mean difference, and all outcomes remained stable in intention-to-treat analysis. No significant differences were observed in the two groups between death rate, adverse events or recovery times of severe pneumonia indicators. Our results suggested that adjunct treatment with Zn failed to benefit young children in the treatment of severe pneumonia. Considering the clinical heterogeneity, baseline characteristics of children, definition of severe pneumonia and Zn supplement way should be taken into consideration in future research. This study was registered at PRESPERO as CRD42015019798.

  11. Antibiotic Usage Prior and During Hospitalization for Clinical Severe Pneumonia in Children under Five Years of Age in Rabat, Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Jroundi, Imane; Benmessaoud, Rachid; Mahraoui, Chafiq; Moraleda, Cinta; Tligui, Houssain; Seffar, Myriam; Benjelloun, Badr Sououd; Vila, Jordi; Ruiz, Joaquim; Alonso, Pedro L.; Bassat, Quique

    2013-01-01

    Scarce and limited epidemiological, clinical and microbiological data are available regarding pediatric respiratory tract infections in the Kingdom of Morocco, a middle-income country in Northwestern Africa. Data on antibiotic usage for such infections are also scarce. A good understanding of pre-admission and intra-hospital usage of antibiotics in children with respiratory infections linked with an adequate surveillance of the antibiotic susceptibility from circulating pathogens could help policy makers improve their recommendations on management of respiratory infections. We hereby present data on antibiotic usage prior and during admission and antibiotic susceptibility of major circulating respiratory pathogens in children under five years of age admitted to the Hôpital d’Enfants de Rabat, Morocco, with a diagnosis of clinical severe pneumonia (using World Health Organization (WHO) standardized case definitions) during a period of 14 months (November 2010–December 2011), as part of a larger hospital-based surveillance study designed to understand the etiology and epidemiology of severe pneumonia cases among children. PMID:27029313

  12. Antibiotic Usage Prior and During Hospitalization for Clinical Severe Pneumonia in Children under Five Years of Age in Rabat, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Jroundi, Imane; Benmessaoud, Rachid; Mahraoui, Chafiq; Moraleda, Cinta; Tligui, Houssain; Seffar, Myriam; Benjelloun, Badr Sououd; Vila, Jordi; Ruiz, Joaquim; Alonso, Pedro L; Bassat, Quique

    2013-09-26

    Scarce and limited epidemiological, clinical and microbiological data are available regarding pediatric respiratory tract infections in the Kingdom of Morocco, a middle-income country in Northwestern Africa. Data on antibiotic usage for such infections are also scarce. A good understanding of pre-admission and intra-hospital usage of antibiotics in children with respiratory infections linked with an adequate surveillance of the antibiotic susceptibility from circulating pathogens could help policy makers improve their recommendations on management of respiratory infections. We hereby present data on antibiotic usage prior and during admission and antibiotic susceptibility of major circulating respiratory pathogens in children under five years of age admitted to the Hôpital d'Enfants de Rabat, Morocco, with a diagnosis of clinical severe pneumonia (using World Health Organization (WHO) standardized case definitions) during a period of 14 months (November 2010-December 2011), as part of a larger hospital-based surveillance study designed to understand the etiology and epidemiology of severe pneumonia cases among children.

  13. The FER rs4957796 TT genotype is associated with unfavorable 90-day survival in Caucasian patients with severe ARDS due to pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hinz, José; Büttner, Benedikt; Kriesel, Fabian; Steinau, Maximilian; Frederik Popov, Aron; Ghadimi, Michael; Beissbarth, Tim; Tzvetkov, Mladen; Bergmann, Ingo; Mansur, Ashham

    2017-08-29

    A recent genome-wide association study showed that a genetic variant within the FER gene is associated with survival in patients with sepsis due to pneumonia. Because severe pneumonia is the main cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), we aimed to investigate the effect of the FER polymorphism rs4957796 on the 90-day survival in patients with ARDS due to pneumonia. An assessment of a prospectively collected cohort of 441 patients with ARDS admitted to three intensive care units at the University Medical Centre identified 274 patients with ARDS due to pneumonia. The 90-day mortality risk was recorded as the primary outcome parameter. Sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores and organ support-free days were used as the secondary variables. FER rs4957796 TT-homozygous patients were compared with C-allele carriers. The survival analysis revealed a higher 90-day mortality risk among T homozygotes than among C-allele carriers (p = 0.0144) exclusively in patients with severe ARDS due to pneumonia. The FER rs4957796 TT genotype remained a significant covariate for the 90-day mortality risk in the multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 4.62; 95% CI, 1.58-13.50; p = 0.0050). In conclusion, FER rs4957796 might act as a prognostic variable for survival in patients with severe ARDS due to pneumonia.

  14. Cytomegalovirus Colitis in a Critically Ill Patient Following Severe Legionella Pneumonia with Multiple Organ Failure.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kei; Aoshima, Masahiro; Suzuki, Fumi; Watanabe, Junko; Otsuka, Yoshihito

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old man visited an emergency department complaining of dyspnea. He was diagnosed to have Legionella pneumonia with multiple organ failure. Although his multiple organ failure improved, he suffered from persistent abdominal pain and diarrhea with continuous minor bleeding. Colonoscopy revealed a longitudinal ulcer of the rectum, below the peritoneal reflection. He was diagnosed with cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis. Antiviral therapy with ganciclovir was initiated. He finally underwent a colostomy after a bowel stricture caused an intestinal outlet obstruction, which made oral intake impossible. Based on the present case, we believe that CMV colitis must be considered as one of the differential diagnoses when critically ill patients develop continuous diarrhea and abdominal pain.

  15. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: incidence and severity.

    PubMed Central

    Lankisch, P G; Dröge, M; Gottesleben, F

    1995-01-01

    To determine the incidence and severity of drug induced acute pancreatitis, data from 45 German centres of gastroenterology were evaluated. Among 1613 patients treated for acute pancreatitis in 1993, drug induced acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 22 patients (incidence 1.4%). Drugs held responsible were azathioprine, mesalazine/sulfasalazine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI), oestrogens, frusemide, hydrochlorothiazide, and rifampicin. Pancreatic necrosis not exceeding 33% of the organ was found on ultrasonography or computed tomography, or both, in three patients (14%). Pancreatic pseudocysts did not occur. A decrease of arterial PO2 reflecting respiratory insufficiency, and an increase of serum creatinine, reflecting renal insufficiency as complications of acute pancreatitis were seen in two (9%) and four (18%) patients, respectively. Artificial ventilation was not needed, and dialysis was necessary in only one (5%) case. Two patients (9%) died of AIDS and tuberculosis, respectively; pancreatitis did not seem to have contributed materially to their death. In conclusion, drugs rarely cause acute pancreatitis, and drug induced acute pancreatitis usually runs a benign course. PMID:7489946

  16. Curcumin ameliorates severe influenza pneumonia via attenuating lung injury and regulating macrophage cytokines production.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuguang; Xu, Jing; Guo, Xiangjun; Huang, Mao

    2017-08-29

    Curcumin, an active phenolic agent extract from the Curcuma longa, exhibits excellent anti-cancer, anti-inflammation, and neuroprotective effects. We aimed to investigate the anti-influenza role of Curcumin in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Curcumin on replication of influenza A virus (IAV) was examined in human lung cancer cell line A549, as well as in a mouse model. Curcumin could inhibit IAV in vitro and alleviate the severity of the disease in the mouse after infection with IAV. The results also indicated that Curcumin could trigger expression of Heme oxygenase-1 in vivo and attenuate IAV-induced injury to the lung tissue. Furthermore, Curcumin could regulate immune response following IAV infection through inhibiting production of local inflammatory cytokines. In addition, Curcumin was found to inhibit NF-κB signaling in macrophages, as well as the subsequent production of cytokines/chemokines responding to IAV infection, by enhancing IκBα and AMPK. Our current study supports the potential of Curcumin as a promising treatment against IAV infection, whose effect may be mediated by regulating immune response to prevent injury to the lung tissue. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. The Use of Polymerase Chain Reaction Amplification for the Detection of Viruses and Bacteria in Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Siow, Wen Ting; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan; Lee, Chun Kiat; Lee, Hong Kai; Ong, Venetia; Ngerng, Wang Jee; Lim, Hui Fang; Tan, Adeline; Tang, Julian Wei-Tze; Phua, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens are often not identified in severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), and the few studies using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques for virus detection are from temperate countries. This study assesses if PCR amplification improves virus and bacteria detection, and if viral infection contributes to mortality in severe CAP in a tropical setting, where respiratory pathogens have less well-defined seasonality. In this cohort study of patients with severe CAP in an intensive care unit, endotracheal aspirates for intubated patients and nasopharyngeal swabs for non-intubated patients were sent for PCR amplification for respiratory viruses. Blood, endotracheal aspirates for intubated patients, and sputum for non-intubated patients were analysed using a multiplex PCR system for bacteria. Out of 100 patients, using predominantly cultures, bacteria were identified in 42 patients; PCR amplification increased this number to 55 patients. PCR amplification identified viruses in 32 patients. In total, only bacteria, only viruses, and both bacteria and viruses were found in 37, 14, and 18 patients, respectively. The commonest viruses were influenza A H1N1/2009 and rhinovirus; the commonest bacterium was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Hospital mortality rates for patients with no pathogens, bacterial infection, viral infection, and bacterial-viral co-infection were 16.1, 24.3, 0, and 5.6%, respectively (p = 0.10). On multivariable analysis, virus detection was associated with lower mortality (adjusted odds ratio 0.12, 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.99; p = 0.049). Viruses and bacteria were detected in 7 of 10 patients with severe CAP with the aid of PCR amplification. Viral infection appears to be independently associated with lower mortality. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Kinase Activity Profiling of Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hoogendijk, Arie J.; Diks, Sander H.; van der Poll, Tom; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Wieland, Catharina W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pneumonia represents a major health burden. Previous work demonstrated that although the induction of inflammation is important for adequate host defense against pneumonia, an inability to regulate the host's inflammatory response within the lung later during infection can be detrimental. Intracellular signaling pathways commonly rely on activation of kinases, and kinases play an essential role in the regulation of the inflammatory response of immune cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Pneumonia was induced in mice via intranasal instillation of Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae. Kinomics peptide arrays, exhibiting 1024 specific consensus sequences for protein kinases, were used to produce a systems biology analysis of cellular kinase activity during the course of pneumonia. Several differences in kinase activity revealed by the arrays were validated in lung homogenates of individual mice using western blot. We identified cascades of activated kinases showing that chemotoxic stress and a T helper 1 response were induced during the course of pneumococcal pneumonia. In addition, our data point to a reduction in WNT activity in lungs of S. pneumoniae infected mice. Moreover, this study demonstrated a reduction in overall CDK activity implying alterations in cell cycle biology. Conclusions/Significance This study utilizes systems biology to provide insight into the signaling events occurring during lung infection with the common cause of community acquired pneumonia, and may assist in identifying novel therapeutic targets in the treatment of bacterial pneumonia. PMID:21483672

  19. Bacteriophage-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier: improved pharmacokinetics mediates effective resolution of Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced lobar pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Singla, Saloni; Harjai, Kusum; Katare, Om Prakash; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2015-07-15

    This study examined the therapeutic and prophylactic potential of bacteriophages in a mouse model of Klebsiella pneumoniae lobar pneumonia. Phages were administered intraperitoneally. Liposome-entrapped phages (LP) were effective in treating infection, even when therapy was delayed by 3 days after the induction of pneumonia. In contrast, nonliposomal phages provided protection when administered 24 hours after infection. Administration of nonliposomal phages 6 hours prior to intranasal bacterial challenge resulted in complete protection, compared with LP, which was effective even when administered 48 hours prior to infection. Increased reduction and a greater increment in the levels of proinflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokines, respectively, in homogenates of lung from LP-treated mice were suggestive of increased efficacy of LP in the treatment of pneumonia. This is the first study to assess liposomes as a delivery vehicle for phage, and the results confirm the superiority of LP for both therapeutic and prophylactic applications. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. [Severe primary liver abscess and septic pulmonary embolism due to Klebsiella pneumoniae with hypermucoviscosity phenotype].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Keitaro; Koide, Takashi; Nagatomo, Tomoko; Tamura, Masaki; Higaki, Manabu; Takata, Saori; Wada, Hiroo; Ishii, Haruyuki; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Shinichi; Goto, Hajime

    2011-07-01

    A 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus seen for fever, right chest pain, and right-lung field consolidation on chest X-ray was found in thoracoabdominal computed tomography (CT) to have variable-sized nodules in both lung fields and multiple low-density hepatic areas. On physical examination, his pulse was 145 beats per minute and blood pressure 92/68mmHg, indicating a preshock state. Laboratory tests showed elevated WBC of 15,200/microL, serum-C-reactive protein (CRP) of 34.4 mg/dL, and a decreased platelet count of 16,000/microL. Suspecting liver abscesses complicated by a septic pulmonary embolism, we immediately conducted percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage (PTAD). Liver abscess blood culture and drainage fluid grew the Klebsiella pneumoniae hypermucoviscosity phenotype, carrying the rmpA gene. Although the man had been in critical condition on admission, broad-spectrum antibiotics and PTAD treatment improved his clinical condition to where he could be discharged without problem.

  1. Simultaneous virus identification and characterization of severe unexplained pneumonia cases using a metagenomics sequencing technique.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaohui; Tang, Guangpeng; Zhao, Xiang; Huang, Yan; Chen, Tao; Lei, Mingyu; Chen, Wenbing; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Wenfei; Zhuang, Li; Yang, Jing; Feng, Zhaomin; Wang, Dayan; Wang, Dingming; Shu, Yuelong

    2017-03-01

    Many viruses can cause respiratory diseases in humans. Although great advances have been achieved in methods of diagnosis, it remains challenging to identify pathogens in unexplained pneumonia (UP) cases. In this study, we applied next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and a metagenomic approach to detect and characterize respiratory viruses in UP cases from Guizhou Province, China. A total of 33 oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from hospitalized UP patients and subjected to NGS. An unbiased metagenomic analysis pipeline identified 13 virus species in 16 samples. Human rhinovirus C was the virus most frequently detected and was identified in seven samples. Human measles virus, adenovirus B 55 and coxsackievirus A10 were also identified. Metagenomic sequencing also provided virus genomic sequences, which enabled genotype characterization and phylogenetic analysis. For cases of multiple infection, metagenomic sequencing afforded information regarding the quantity of each virus in the sample, which could be used to evaluate each viruses' role in the disease. Our study highlights the potential of metagenomic sequencing for pathogen identification in UP cases.

  2. CURB-65 and other markers of illness severity in community-acquired pneumonia among HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Almeida, André; Almeida, Ana Rita; Castelo Branco, Sara; Vesza, Zsófia; Pereira, Rui

    2016-10-01

    As the relative burden of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia among HIV-positive patients increases, adequate prediction of case severity on presentation is crucial. We sought to determine what characteristics measurable on presentation are predictive of worse outcomes. We studied all admissions for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia over one year at a tertiary centre. Patient demographics, comorbidities, HIV-specific markers and CURB-65 scores on Emergency Department presentation were reviewed. Outcomes of interest included mortality, bacteraemia, intensive care unit admission and orotracheal intubation. A total of 396 patients were included: 49 HIV-positive and 347 HIV-negative. Mean CURB-65 score was 1.3 for HIV-positive and 2.2 for HIV-negative patients (p < 0.0001), its predictive value for mortality being maintained in both groups (p = 0.03 and p < 0.001, respectively). Adjusting for CURB-65 scores, HIV infection by itself was only associated with bacteraemia (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 7.1, 95% CI [2.6-19.5]). Patients with < 200 CD4 cells/µL presented similar CURB-65 adjusted mortality (aOR 1.7, 95% CI [0.2-15.2]), but higher risk of intensive care unit admission (aOR 5.7, 95% CI [1.5-22.0]) and orotracheal intubation (aOR 9.1, 95% CI [2.2-37.1]), compared to HIV-negative patients. These two associations were not observed in the > 200 CD4 cells/µL subgroup (aOR 2.2, 95% CI [0.7-7.6] and aOR 0.8, 95% CI [0.1-6.5], respectively). Antiretroviral therapy and viral load suppression were not associated with different outcomes (p > 0.05). High CURB-65 scores and CD4 counts < 200 cells/µL were both associated with worse outcomes. Severity assessment scales and CD4 counts may both be helpful in predicting severity in HIV-positive patients presenting with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Challenges in the design of antibiotic equivalency studies: the multicenter equivalency study of oral amoxicillin versus injectable penicillin in children aged 3-59 months with severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Patricia L; Patel, Archana

    2004-08-15

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that children with severe pneumonia (characterized by cough or difficult breathing, as well as lower chest wall indrawing) be hospitalized and treated with parenteral penicillin. Oral amoxicillin, if equally effective for treating severe pneumonia, would address challenges associated with providing parenteral therapy, including risk of transmission of bloodborne pathogens from contaminated needles, exposure to nosocomial pathogens during hospitalization, inadequate access to health care facilities, and cost. The recently completed multicenter international trial of oral amoxicillin versus parenteral penicillin for treatment of severe pneumonia demonstrated the equivalency of these agents in children with severe pneumonia. This article focuses on the challenges of designing an equivalence study and the threats to the validity of the trial results, particularly the implications of the bias toward finding equivalence when subjects are unlikely to respond to either study therapy. These considerations have implications for use of the Amoxicillin Penicillin Pneumonia International Study (APPIS) results in clinical practice and for potential modification of WHO treatment guidelines.

  4. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection induced allergic airway sensitization is controlled by regulatory T-cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Crother, Timothy R; Schröder, Nicolas W J; Karlin, Justin; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Peterson, Ellena; Arditi, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) is associated with induction and exacerbation of asthma. CP infection can induce allergic airway sensitization in mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Allergen exposure 5 days after a low dose (mild-moderate), but not a high dose (severe) CP infection induces antigen sensitization in mice. Innate immune signals play a critical role in controlling CP infection induced allergic airway sensitization, however these mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Wild-type, TLR2-/-, and TLR4-/- mice were infected intranasally (i.n.) with a low dose of CP, followed by i.n. exposure to human serum albumin (HSA) and challenged with HSA 2 weeks later. Airway inflammation, immunoglobulins, eosinophils, and goblet cells were measured. Low dose CP infection induced allergic sensitization in TLR2-/- mice, but not in TLR4-/- mice, due to differential Treg responses in these genotypes. TLR2-/- mice had reduced numbers of Tregs in the lung during CP infection while TLR4-/- mice had increased numbers. High dose CP infection resulted in an increase in Tregs and pDCs in lungs, which prevented antigen sensitization in WT mice. Depletion of Tregs or pDCs resulted in allergic airway sensitization. We conclude that Tregs and pDCs are critical determinants regulating CP infection-induced allergic sensitization. Furthermore, TLR2 and TLR4 signaling during CP infection may play a regulatory role through the modulation of Tregs.

  5. Thalidomide treatment modulates macrophage pro-inflammatory function and cytokine levels in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055 induced pneumonia in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2010-07-01

    Lung innate immune response plays an important role in the clearance of pathogens from lungs, however, profound activation of innate immune cells (alveolar macrophages or neutrophils) can lead to development of acute lung inflammation or injury by producing various pro-inflammatory molecules (IL-1, TNF-alpha and H2O2 etc.). Present study is designed to investigate the immunomodulatory action of thalidomide in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055 induced acute lung infection in BALB/c mice. Acute lung inflammation was induced by intranasal instillation of K. pneumoniae B5055 into mice without any anaesthesia and treated with thalidomide (30 mg/kg/day/po) or normal saline orally using a treatment schedule shown to modulate pro-inflammatory innate immune response. Thalidomide treatment modulated pro-inflammatory function of alveolar macrophages by significantly (p<0.05) decreasing their phagocytic potential in terms of phagocytic uptake and intracellular killing, spreading and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) release. Besides that thalidomide treatment also significantly (p<0.05) decreased neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli. Remarkably, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1alpha and TNF-alpha) were found to be decreased significantly (p<0.05) in thalidomide treated group but the levels of IL-10 were found to be significantly (p<0.05) elevated. Thus thalidomide proved a promising immunomodulatory agent in acute lung inflammation associated with pneumonia caused by gram negative bacterial infection. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of Phase 3 telavancin nosocomial pneumonia data excluding patients with severe renal impairment and acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Torres, A.; Rubinstein, E.; Corey, G. R.; Stryjewski, M. E.; Barriere, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Telavancin is approved in Europe for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus when other alternatives are not suitable. The approved European prescribing information contraindicates the use of telavancin in patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance <30 mL/min, including patients on haemodialysis) and pre-existing acute renal failure owing to the higher observed mortality in these patients. Data from the ATTAIN studies were reanalysed, excluding patients with these contraindicating conditions at baseline. (At the time of submission of this article, the European marketing authorization of telavancin for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia was suspended pending evidence of a new European Medicines Agency-approved supplier. Clinigen Healthcare Ltd, Theravance's commercialization partner for telavancin in Europe, is in the process of seeking approval of a new manufacturing source.) Methods A post hoc analysis of data from two Phase 3 ATTAIN trials of telavancin for the treatment of Gram-positive nosocomial pneumonia assessing clinical outcomes and safety. Results The all-treated population for this analysis represented 84.2% (1266/1503) of the ATTAIN all-treated population. The cure rates in the clinically evaluable population were similar in the telavancin (82.5%, 231/280) and vancomycin (81.3%, 243/299) groups [treatment difference (95% CI): 1.3% (−5.0% to 7.6%)], and were consistent with the overall ATTAIN study results. The cure rate was higher in the telavancin than the vancomycin treatment group in microbiologically evaluable patients with only Gram-positive pathogens isolated at baseline [85.0% (130/153) versus 75.2% (109/145), respectively; treatment difference (95% CI): 9.7% (0.6%–18.8%)]. The incidences of adverse events were similar between treatment groups and consistent with the overall findings of the ATTAIN study. Conclusions This analysis demonstrated that in the subset

  7. Adjunctive steroid in HIV-negative patients with severe Pneumocystis pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-dose steroid therapy has been proven effective in AIDS-related Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) but not in non-AIDS-related cases. We evaluated the effects on survival of steroids in HIV-negative patients with PCP. Methods Retrospective study patients admitted to the ICU with hypoxemic PCP. We compared patients receiving HDS (≥1 mg/Kg/day prednisone equivalent), low-dose steroids (LDS group, <1 mg/Kg/day prednisone equivalent), and no steroids (NS group). Variables independently associated with ICU mortality were identified. Results 139 HIV-negative patients with PCP were included. Median age was 48 [40–60] years. The main underlying conditions were hematological malignancies (n=55, 39.6%), cancer (n=11, 7.9%), and solid organ transplantation (n=73, 52.2%). ICU mortality was 26% (36 deaths). The HDS group had 72 (51.8%) patients, the LDS group 35 (25%) patients, and the NS group 32 (23%) patients. Independent predictors of ICU mortality were SAPS II at ICU admission (odds ratio [OR], 1.04/point; [95%CI], 1.01-1.08, P=0.01), non-hematological disease (OR, 4.06; [95%CI], 1.19-13.09, P=0.03), vasopressor use (OR, 20.31; 95%CI, 6.45-63.9, P<0.001), and HDS (OR, 9.33; 95%CI, 1.97-44.3, P=0.02). HDS was not associated with the rate of ICU-acquired infections. Conclusions HDS were associated with increased mortality in HIV-negative patients with PCP via a mechanism independent from an increased risk of infection. PMID:23981859

  8. Bubble continuous positive airway pressure for children with severe pneumonia and hypoxaemia in Bangladesh: an open, randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Mohammod J; Salam, Mohammed A; Smith, Jonathan H; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Pietroni, Mark A C; Shahunja, K M; Shahid, Abu S M S B; Faruque, Abu S G; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip K; Sharifuzzaman; Graham, Stephen M; Duke, Trevor

    2015-09-12

    In developing countries, mortality in children with very severe pneumonia is high, even with the provision of appropriate antibiotics, standard oxygen therapy, and other supportive care. We assessed whether oxygen therapy delivered by bubble continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improved outcomes compared with standard low-flow and high-flow oxygen therapies. This open, randomised, controlled trial took place in Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. We randomly assigned children younger than 5 years with severe pneumonia and hypoxaemia to receive oxygen therapy by either bubble CPAP (5 L/min starting at a CPAP level of 5 cm H2O), standard low-flow nasal cannula (2 L/min), or high-flow nasal cannula (2 L/kg per min up to the maximum of 12 L/min). Randomisation was done with use of the permuted block methods (block size of 15 patients) and Fisher and Yates tables of random permutations. The primary outcome was treatment failure (ie, clinical failure, intubation and mechanical ventilation, death, or termination of hospital stay against medical advice) after more than 1 h of treatment. Primary and safety analyses were by intention to treat. We did two interim analyses and stopped the trial after the second interim analysis on Aug 3, 2013, as directed by the data safety and monitoring board. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01396759. Between Aug 4, 2011, and July 17, 2013, 225 eligible children were recruited. We randomly allocated 79 (35%) children to receive oxygen therapy by bubble CPAP, 67 (30%) to low-flow oxygen therapy, and 79 (35%) to high-flow oxygen therapy. Treatment failed for 31 (14%) children, of whom five (6%) had received bubble CPAP, 16 (24%) had received low-flow oxygen therapy, and ten (13%) had received high-flow oxygen therapy. Significantly fewer children in the bubble CPAP group had treatment failure than in the low-flow oxygen therapy group (relative risk [RR] 0·27

  9. Clinical Usefulness of Urinary Fatty Acid Binding Proteins in Assessing the Severity and Predicting Treatment Response of Pneumonia in Critically Ill Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Tsung-Cheng; Tsai, Han-Chen; Chang, Shi-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    pneumonia severity and in predicting treatment response, respectively. Further studies with larger populations are needed to verify these issues.

  10. Ventilator-associated pneumonia and ICU mortality in severe ARDS patients ventilated according to a lung-protective strategy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) may contribute to the mortality associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to determine the incidence, outcome, and risk factors of bacterial VAP complicating severe ARDS in patients ventilated by using a strictly standardized lung-protective strategy. Methods This prospective epidemiologic study was done in all the 339 patients with severe ARDS included in a multicenter randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind trial of cisatracurium besylate in severe ARDS patients. Patients with suspected VAP underwent bronchoalveolar lavage to confirm the diagnosis. Results Ninety-eight (28.9%) patients had at least one episode of microbiologically documented bacterial VAP, including 41 (41.8%) who died in the ICU, compared with 74 (30.7%) of the 241 patients without VAP (P = 0.05). After adjustment, age and severity at baseline, but not VAP, were associated with ICU death. Cisatracurium besylate therapy within 2 days of ARDS onset decreased the risk of ICU death. Factors independently associated with an increased risk to develop a VAP were male sex and worse admission Glasgow Coma Scale score. Tracheostomy, enteral nutrition, and the use of a subglottic secretion-drainage device were protective. Conclusions In patients with severe ARDS receiving lung-protective ventilation, VAP was associated with an increased crude ICU mortality which did not remain significant after adjustment. PMID:22524447

  11. Peripheral ovine progressive pneumonia provirus levels correlate with and predict histological tissue lesion severity in naturally infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Herrmann-Hoesing, Lynn M; Noh, Susan M; White, Stephen N; Snekvik, Kevin R; Truscott, Thomas; Knowles, Donald P

    2009-04-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine whether anti-ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) antibody responses in serum or OPP provirus levels in peripheral blood associate with the degree of histologically measured tissue lesions in naturally OPPV-infected sheep. Sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, and hematoxylin- and eosin-stained lung, mammary gland, carpal synovial membrane, and brain tissues from 11 OPPV-infected ewes (mean age of 8.6 years) and 5 OPPV-uninfected ewes (mean age of 6 years) were evaluated for lesion severity. Ovine progressive pneumonia (OPP) provirus levels and anti-OPPV antibody titers in peripheral blood and serum samples, respectively, were measured upon euthanasia and 3 years prior to euthanasia. Both mean peripheral OPP provirus levels and mean serum anti-surface envelope glycoprotein (anti-SU) antibody titers at the time of euthanasia were significantly higher in ewes with moderate to severe histological lesions than in ewes with no to mild histological lesions. However, although mean peripheral blood OPP provirus levels at euthanasia and 3 years prior to euthanasia significantly correlated with the highest histological lesion score for any affected tissue (two-tailed P values, 0.03 and 0.02), mean serum anti-SU antibody titers, anti-capsid antibody titers, and anti-transmembrane 90 antibody titers at euthanasia did not show a significant correlation with the highest histological lesion score for any tissue (two-tailed P values, 0.32, 0.97, and 0.18, respectively). These data are the first to show that OPP provirus levels predict and correlate with the extent of OPPV-related histological lesions in various OPPV-affected tissues. These findings suggest that peripheral OPP provirus levels quantitatively contribute more to the development of histological lesions than the systemic anti-SU antibody host immune response.

  12. Valuable hematological indicators for the diagnosis and severity assessment of Chinese children with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Jingjing; Shao, Xiaonan; Ma, Yibo; Lv, Darong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chest X-ray is a “golden standard” for the diagnosis and severity assessment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, it cannot be used as routine examination of CAP in children. The present study aims to investigate the roles of prealbumin (PA) in CAP in children and further determine the usefulness of PA in diagnosis and severity assessment of CAP in children. This was a retrospective analysis of 174 cases of hospitalized children with CAP. The following indicators were recorded: vital sign, inflammatory indexes, PA, and respiratory pathogens immunoglobulin M antibody test results. A total of 33 healthy children were selected as the control group. The results of laboratory tests between CAP and control groups were compared. CAP group was further divided into mild CAP and severe CAP groups, and vital signs and laboratory examination results of 2 groups were compared. The total positive rate of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in this study was 27.4%, and there was no significant difference in different seasons (P = 0.356). Compared with controls, there was no significant difference between procalcitonin and C-reactive protein in CAP group (P = 0.355, 0.061). The white blood cell count, percentage of neutrophils, neutrophil count, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in the CAP group were significantly higher than those in control group, and PA was significantly lower than that in the control group (all P < 0.05). In the traditional cutoff value (<170 mg/L), the sensitivity of PA for the diagnosis of CAP was 0.847, which was significant higher than traditional inflammatory indicators. Moreover, it was found that PA was an independent protective factor for CAP in children based on multivariate analysis (odds ratio: 0.974; 95% confidence interval: 0.956–0.993; P = 0.008). PA level in severe CAP group was significantly lower than in mild CAP group (P = 0.001). With a cutoff value of 125 mg/L, the sensitivity and specificity of PA for

  13. Amoxicillin plus temocillin as an alternative empiric therapy for the treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia: results from a retrospective audit.

    PubMed

    Habayeb, H; Sajin, B; Patel, K; Grundy, C; Al-Dujaili, A; Van de Velde, S

    2015-08-01

    A formulary decision was made at a large provider of acute hospital services in Surrey to replace piperacillin/tazobactam with amoxicillin+temocillin for the empiric treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia. This decision was made because the use of broad-spectrum-β-lactam antibiotics is a known risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and for the selection of resistance. After the antibiotic formulary was changed, a retrospective audit was conducted to assess the effect of this change. Data from patients hospitalised between January 2011 and July 2012 for severe hospital-acquired pneumonia and treated empirically with piperacillin/tazobactam or amoxicillin+temocillin were reviewed retrospectively. Clinical characteristics of patients, data related to the episode of pneumonia, clinical success and incidence of significant diarrhoea and CDI were analysed. One hundred ninety-two episodes of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia in 188 patients were identified from hospital records. Ninety-eight patients received piperacillin/tazobactam and 94 amoxicillin+temocillin. At baseline, the two treatment groups were comparable, except that more patients with renal insufficiency were treated with piperacillin/tazobactam. Clinical success was comparable (80 versus 82 %; P = 0.86), but differences were observed between piperacillin/tazobactam and amoxicillin+temocillin for the rates of significant diarrhoea (34 versus 4 %, respectively; P < 0.0001) and for CDI (7 versus 0 %, respectively; P < 0.0028). This preliminary study suggests that the combination amoxicillin+temocillin is a viable alternative to piperacillin/tazobactam for the treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia. This combination appears to be associated with fewer gastrointestinal adverse events. Further studies are needed to evaluate the place of amoxicillin+temocillin as empiric treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia.

  14. Epidemiology and etiology of childhood pneumonia in 2010: estimates of incidence, severe morbidity, mortality, underlying risk factors and causative pathogens for 192 countries

    PubMed Central

    Rudan, Igor; O’Brien, Katherine L.; Nair, Harish; Liu, Li; Theodoratou, Evropi; Qazi, Shamim; Lukšić, Ivana; Fischer Walker, Christa L.; Black, Robert E.; Campbell, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Background The recent series of reviews conducted within the Global Action Plan for Pneumonia and Diarrhoea (GAPPD) addressed epidemiology of the two deadly diseases at the global and regional level; it also estimated the effectiveness of interventions, barriers to achieving high coverage and the main implications for health policy. The aim of this paper is to provide the estimates of childhood pneumonia at the country level. This should allow national policy–makers and stakeholders to implement proposed policies in the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF member countries. Methods We conducted a series of systematic reviews to update previous estimates of the global, regional and national burden of childhood pneumonia incidence, severe morbidity, mortality, risk factors and specific contributions of the most common pathogens: Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza virus (flu). We distributed the global and regional–level estimates of the number of cases, severe cases and deaths from childhood pneumonia in 2010–2011 by specific countries using an epidemiological model. The model was based on the prevalence of the five main risk factors for childhood pneumonia within countries (malnutrition, low birth weight, non–exclusive breastfeeding in the first four months, solid fuel use and crowding) and risk effect sizes estimated using meta–analysis. Findings The incidence of community–acquired childhood pneumonia in low– and middle–income countries (LMIC) in the year 2010, using World Health Organization's definition, was about 0.22 (interquartile range (IQR) 0.11–0.51) episodes per child–year (e/cy), with 11.5% (IQR 8.0–33.0%) of cases progressing to severe episodes. This is a reduction of nearly 25% over the past decade, which is consistent with observed reductions in the prevalence of risk factors for pneumonia throughout LMIC. At the level of pneumonia incidence

  15. Vaccination with Klebsiella pneumoniae-derived extracellular vesicles protects against bacteria-induced lethality via both humoral and cellular immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Hee; Choi, Hyun-Il; Hong, Sung-Wook; Kim, Kwang-sun; Gho, Yong Song; Jeon, Seong Gyu

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae highlights the need to develop preventive measures to ameliorate Klebsiella infections. Bacteria-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical nanometer-sized proteolipids enriched with outer membrane proteins. Gram-negative bacteria-derived EVs have gained interest for use as nonliving complex vaccines. In the present study, we evaluated whether K. pneumoniae-derived EVs confer protection against bacteria-induced lethality. K. pneumoniae-derived EVs isolated from in vitro bacterial culture supernatants induced innate immunity, including the upregulation of co-stimulatory molecule expression and proinflammatory mediator production. EV vaccination via the intraperitoneal route elicited EV-reactive antibodies and interferon-gamma-producing T-cell responses. Three vaccinations with the EVs prevented bacteria-induced lethality. As verified by sera and splenocytes adoptive transfer, the protective effect of EV vaccination was dependent on both humoral and cellular immunity. Taken together, these findings suggest that K. pneumoniae-derived EVs are a novel vaccine candidate against K. pneumoniae infections. PMID:26358222

  16. Combination of ECMO and cytokine adsorption therapy for severe sepsis with cardiogenic shock and ARDS due to Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia and H1N1.

    PubMed

    Lees, N J; Rosenberg, Ajp; Hurtado-Doce, A I; Jones, J; Marczin, N; Zeriouh, M; Weymann, A; Sabashnikov, A; Simon, A R; Popov, A F

    2016-12-01

    Sepsis-induced cardiogenic shock in combination with severe acute respiratory failure represents a life-threatening combination that is often refractory to the conventional methods of treatment. We describe the case of a 33-year-old patient who developed acute cardiovascular collapse and ARDS secondary to superinfection of Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive Staphylococcus aureus and H1N1 pneumonia who underwent successful combination therapy for severe sepsis-related cardiomyopathy and respiratory failure using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and cytokine adsorption therapy.

  17. 4G/5G polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene is associated with mortality in intensive care unit patients with severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sapru, Anil; Hansen, Helen; Ajayi, Temitayo; Brown, Ron; Garcia, Oscar; Zhuo, HanJing; Wiemels, Joseph; Matthay, Michael A; Wiener-Kronish, Jeanine

    2009-05-01

    Higher plasma and pulmonary edema fluid levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) are associated with increased mortality in patients with pneumonia and acute lung injury. The 4G allele of the 4G/5G polymorphism of the PAI-1 gene is associated with higher PAI-1 levels and an increased incidence of hospitalizations for pneumonia. The authors hypothesized that the 4G allele would be associated with worse clinical outcomes (mortality and ventilator-free days) in patients with severe pneumonia. The authors enrolled patients admitted with severe pneumonia in a prospective cohort. Patients were followed until hospital discharge. DNA was isolated from blood samples, and genotyping detection for the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was carried out using Taqman-based allelic discrimination. A total of 111 patients were available for analysis. Distribution of genotypes was 4G/4G 26 of 111 (23%), 4G/5G 59 of 111 (53%), and 5G/5G 26 of 111 (23%). Of 111 patients, 32 (29%) died before hospital discharge and 105 patients (94%) received mechanical ventilation. Patients with the 4G/4G and the 4G/5G genotypes had higher mortality (35% vs. 8%, P = 0.007) and fewer ventilator-free days (median 4 vs. 13, P = 0.04) compared to patients with the 5G/5G genotype. The 4G allele of the 4G/5G polymorphism in the PAI-1 gene is associated with fewer ventilator-free days and increased mortality in hospitalized patients with severe pneumonia. These findings suggest that PAI-1 may have a role in pathogenesis and that the 4G/5G polymorphism may be an important biomarker of risk in patients with severe pneumonia.

  18. 4G/5G Polymorphism of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor -1 Gene Is Associated with Mortality in Intensive Care Unit Patients with Severe Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Sapru, Anil; Hansen, Helen; Ajayi, Temitayo; Brown, Ron; Garcia, Oscar; Zhuo, HanJing; Wiemels, Joseph; Matthay, Michael A.; Wiener-Kronish, Jeanine

    2011-01-01

    Background Higher plasma and pulmonary edema fluid levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) are associated with increased mortality in patients with pneumonia and acute lung injury. The 4G allele of the 4G/5G polymorphism of the PAI-1 gene is associated with higher PAI-1 levels and an increased incidence of hospitalizations for pneumonia. The authors hypothesized that the 4G allele would be associated with worse clinical outcomes (mortality and ventilator-free days) in patients with severe pneumonia. Methods The authors enrolled patients admitted with severe pneumonia in a prospective cohort. Patients were followed until hospital discharge. DNA was isolated from blood samples, and genotyping detection for the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was carried out using Taqman-based allelic discrimination. Results A total of 111 patients were available for analysis. Distribution of genotypes was 4G/4G 26 of 111 (23%), 4G/5G 59 of 111 (53%), and 5G/5G 26 of 111 (23%). Of 111 patients, 32 (29%) died before hospital discharge and 105 patients (94%) received mechanical ventilation. Patients with the 4G/4G and the 4G/5G genotypes had higher mortality (35% vs. 8%, P = 0.007) and fewer ventilator-free days (median 4 vs. 13, P = 0.04) compared to patients with the 5G/5G genotype. Conclusions The 4G allele of the 4G/5G polymorphism in the PAI-1 gene is associated with fewer ventilator-free days and increased mortality in hospitalized patients with severe pneumonia. These findings suggest that PAI-1 may have a role in pathogenesis and that the 4G/5G polymorphism may be an important biomarker of risk in patients with severe pneumonia. PMID:19387177

  19. The epidemiology and aetiology of infections in children admitted with clinical severe pneumonia to a university hospital in Rabat, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Jroundi, Imane; Mahraoui, Chafiq; Benmessaoud, Rachid; Moraleda, Cinta; Tligui, Houssain; Seffar, Myriam; Kettani, Selma Cherif; Benjelloun, Badr Sououd; Chaacho, Saad; Maaroufi, Abderrahman; Hayes, Edward B; Álvarez-Martínez, Míriam J; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen; Ruiz, Joaquim; Alonso, Pedro L; Bassat, Quique

    2014-08-01

    Scarce and limited epidemiological, clinical and microbiological data are available regarding paediatric respiratory tract infections in the Kingdom of Morocco, a middle-income country in northwestern Africa. The results of hospital-based surveillance aiming at describing the aetiology and epidemiology of respiratory distress among children <5 years of age are presented. Children admitted to the Hôpital d'Enfants de Rabat, Morocco, and meeting the World Health Organization clinical criteria for severe pneumonia were recruited over a period of 14 months and were thoroughly investigated to ascertain a definitive diagnosis. In total, 700 children were recruited for the study. Most frequent clinical diagnoses included wheezing-related conditions (bronchitis/asthma, 46%; bronchiolitis, 15%), while typical bacterial pneumonia was infrequent (only 19% of the cases). Invasive bacterial disease detected by classical microbiology or molecular methods was also uncommon, affecting only 3.5% of the patients, and with an overall low detection of pneumococcal or Haemophilus influenzae type b disease. Conversely, coverage of respiratory viral detection in the nasopharynx was almost universal among cases (92%), with the three most frequent viruses detected being rhinovirus (53%), respiratory syncytial virus (18%) and adenovirus (17%). The overall case fatality rate (CFR) among recruited patients with a known outcome was 4.1% (28/690). In Morocco, the epidemiological profile of paediatric acute respiratory infections is markedly shifted towards wheezing-related diseases and thus resembles that of high-income countries. However, the high associated CFRs found in this study call for an improvement in preventive and clinical management strategies. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Decrease in mortality in severe community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia: impact of improving antibiotic strategies (2000-2013).

    PubMed

    Gattarello, Simone; Borgatta, Bárbara; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Vallés, Jordi; Vidaur, Loreto; Zaragoza, Rafael; Torres, Antoni; Rello, Jordi

    2014-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare antibiotic prescribing practices and survival in the ICU for patients with pneumococcal severe community-acquired pneumonia (SCAP) between 2000 and 2013. This was a matched case-control study of two prospectively recorded cohorts in Europe. Eighty patients from the Community-Acquired Pneumonia en la Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos (CAPUCI) II study (case group) were matched with 80 patients from CAPUCI I (control group) based on the following: shock at admission, need of mechanical ventilation, COPD, immunosuppression, and age. Demographic data were comparable in the two groups. Combined antibiotic therapy increased from 66.2% to 87.5% (P < .01), and the percentage of patients receiving the first dose of antibiotic within 3 h increased from 27.5% to 70.0% (P < .01). ICU mortality was significantly lower (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68-0.98) in cases, both in the whole population and in the subgroups of patients with shock (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.50-0.89) or receiving mechanical ventilation (OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.55-0.96). In the multivariate analysis, ICU mortality increased in patients requiring mechanical ventilation (OR, 5.23; 95% CI, 1.60-17.17) and decreased in patients receiving early antibiotic treatment (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.15-0.87) and combined therapy (OR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.07-0.51). In pneumococcal SCAP, early antibiotic prescription and use of combination therapy increased. Both were associated with improved survival.

  1. Clinical Risk Factors of Death From Pneumonia in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition in an Urban Critical Care Ward of Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Ashraf, Hasan; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Imran, Gazi; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2013-01-01

    Background Risks of death are high when children with pneumonia also have severe acute malnutrition (SAM) as a co-morbidity. However, there is limited published information on risk factors of death from pneumonia in SAM children. We evaluated clinically identifiable factors associated with death in under-five children who were hospitalized for the management of pneumonia and SAM. Methods For this unmatched case-control design, SAM children of either sex, aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) during April 2011 to July 2012 with radiological pneumonia were studied. The SAM children with pneumonia who had fatal outcome constituted the cases (n = 35), and randomly selected SAM children with pneumonia who survived constituted controls (n = 105). Results The median (inter-quartile range) age (months) was comparable among the cases and the controls [8.0 (4.9, 11.0) vs. 9.7 (5.0, 18.0); p = 0.210)]. In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, such as vomiting, abnormal mental status, and systolic hypotension (<70 mm of Hg) in absence of dehydration, fatal cases of severely malnourished under-five children with pneumonia were more often hypoxemic (OR = 23.15, 95% CI = 4.38–122.42), had clinical dehydration (some/severe) (OR = 9.48, 95% CI = 2.42–37.19), abdominal distension at admission (OR = 4.41, 95% CI = 1.12–16.52), and received blood transfusion (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.21–24.99) for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension. Conclusion and Significance We identified hypoxemia, clinical dehydration, and abdominal distension as the independent predictors of death in SAM children with pneumonia. SAM children with pneumonia who required blood transfusion for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension were also at risk for death. Thus, early identification and

  2. Childhood very severe pneumonia and meningitis-related hospitalization and death in Yemen, before and after introduction of H. influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Banajeh, S M; Ashoor, O; Al-Magramy, A S

    2014-07-08

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine was included in the Yemen immunization programme in 2005. This study compared the rates of very severe pneumonia and all-cause meningitis hospitalization and death, before and after introduction of conjugate Hib vaccine, and reports the results of the 2010 bacterial meningitis surveillance. A retrospective analysis was made of data collected for 2000-2010 for all children aged 2-60 months in the main children's hospital in Sana'a. Compared with the pre-Hib vaccination period, the post-Hib period showed significant and impressive reductions in the rates of hospitalization and death for all-cause meningitis. However, hospitalization and death for very severe pneumonia improved only modestly, and there was evidence of a decreasing but non-significant trend indicting that very severe pneumonia was a non-specific endpoint with multi-etiologies (both viral and bacterial). Very severe pneumonia remains the leading cause of severe morbidity and death for young children, particularly those aged < 12 months.

  3. Azacitidine-induced cryptogenic organizing pneumonia: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Alnimer, Yanal; Salah, Samer; Abuqayas, Bashar; Alrabi, Kamal

    2016-01-20

    Myelodysplasia syndrome is a heterogeneous group of hematological disorders that are characterized by abnormal morphology and cytopenias of bone marrow elements. Azacitidine is a hypomethylating agent that is commonly used in treatment of myelodysplasia syndrome. We present an extremely rare case of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia following therapy with azacitidine and a review of the relevant literature. This is the fifth case of azacitidine-induced interstitial lung disease and the sixth one due to hypomethylating drugs; of interest, this is the first reported case that has occurred after the second cycle. Our case report highlights an important, potentially treatable and rare side effect of azacitidine and hypomethylating agents in general that might be overlooked by oncologists. Furthermore, our review of the literature showed heterogeneity in the clinical outcome which might, in part, be due to delay in initiating corticosteroids treatment. A 67-year-old white man presented with worsening shortness of breath and mild productive cough that started 1 week prior to his presentation. An initial chest X-ray showed infiltration of both lung fields. Radiographic findings of computed axial tomography, results of bronchoscopy and a lung biopsy were consistent with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia. The patient showed variable clinical response to steroids and he remained dependent on home oxygen. We concluded that there is a recognizable potentially life-threatening toxicity due to organizing pneumonia secondary to azacitidine in the setting of myelodysplasia syndrome treatment. This toxicity is not limited to the first cycle as in previous cases; furthermore, pleural effusion can be associated with this toxicity. Health care professionals should be aware of this recognizable side effect. Early recognition and timely management are critical to prevent permanent lung fibrosis.

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Oxidative Stress in Lung Epithelial Cells Depends on Pneumococcal Autolysis and Is Reversible by Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Zahlten, Janine; Kim, Ye-Ji; Doehn, Jan-Moritz; Pribyl, Thomas; Hocke, Andreas C; García, Pedro; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Suttorp, Norbert; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Hübner, Ralf-Harto

    2015-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide. During pneumococcal pneumonia, the human airway epithelium is exposed to large amounts of H2O2 as a product of host and pathogen oxidative metabolism. Airway cells are known to be highly vulnerable to oxidant damage, but the pathophysiology of oxidative stress induced by S. pneumoniae and the role of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant systems of the host are not well characterized. For gluthation/gluthathion disulfide analysis BEAS-2B cells, primary broncho-epithelial cells (pBEC), explanted human lung tissue and mouse lungs were infected with different S. pneumoniae strains (D39, A66, R6x, H2O2/pneumolysin/LytA- deficient mutants of R6x). Cell death was proven by LDH assay and cell viability by IL-8 ELISA. The translocation of Nrf2 and the expression of catalase were shown via Western blot. The binding of Nrf2 at the catalase promoter was analyzed by ChIP. We observed a significant induction of oxidative stress induced by S. pneumoniae in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. Upon stimulation, the oxidant-responsive transcription factor Nrf2 was activated, and catalase was upregulated via Nrf2. The pneumococci-induced oxidative stress was independent of S. pneumoniae-derived H2O2 and pneumolysin but depended on the pneumococcal autolysin LytA. The Nrf2 inducer resveratrol, as opposed to catalase, reversed oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. These observations indicate a H2O2-independent induction of oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells via the release of bacterial factors of S. pneumoniae. Resveratrol might be an option for prevention of acute lung injury and inflammatory responses observed in pneumococcal pneumonia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Cellular Vacuoles Induced by Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS Toxin Originate from Rab9-Associated Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Coreen; Kannan, T. R.; Baseman, Joel B.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we identified an ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating cytotoxin in Mycoplasma pneumoniae designated Community Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome (CARDS) toxin. In this study we show that vacuoles induced by recombinant CARDS (rCARDS) toxin are acidic and derive from the endocytic pathway as determined by the uptake of neutral red and the fluid-phase marker, Lucifer yellow, respectively. Also, we demonstrate that the formation of rCARDS toxin-associated cytoplasmic vacuoles is inhibited by the vacuolar ATPase inhibitor, bafilomycin A1, and the ionophore, monensin. To examine the ontogeny of these vacuoles, we analyzed the distribution of endosomal and lysosomal membrane markers during vacuole formation and observed the enrichment of the late endosomal GTPase, Rab9, around rCARDS toxin-induced vacuoles. Immunogold-labeled Rab9 and overexpression of green fluorescent-tagged Rab9 further confirmed vacuolar association. The late endosomal- and lysosomal-associated membrane proteins, LAMP1 and LAMP2, also localized to the vacuolar membranes, while the late endosomal protein, Rab7, and early endosomal markers, Rab5 and EEA1, were excluded. HeLa cells expressing dominant-negative (DN) Rab9 exhibited markedly reduced vacuole formation in the presence of rCARDS toxin, in contrast to cells expressing DN-Rab7, highlighting the importance of Rab9 function in rCARDS toxin-induced vacuolation. Our findings reveal the unique Rab9-association with rCARDS toxin-induced vacuoles and its possible relationship to the characteristic histopathology that accompanies M. pneumoniae infection. PMID:21829543

  6. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein is a potential biomarker of acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shan; Chen, Xia; Jiang, Li; Zhu, Bo; Jiang, Qi; Xi, Xiuming

    2016-09-23

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis and risk stratification in patients with ARDS should improve prognosis. Unfortunately, no clinical biomarkers are available for use in early diagnosis. Quantitative proteomics is a powerful tool for biomarker discovery in cancer, autoimmune diseases, and ARDS. Here, we employed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology to identify potential biomarkers for early ARDS diagnosis and predict the risk for increased disease severity induced by pneumonia. We collected the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma from ARDS patients with differing degrees of ARDS severity. We identified 338 proteins dysregulated in ARDS through iTRAQ, 18 of which showed significant differences with at least 1.5-fold differential expression in patients with mild or severe ARDS. Differential plasma expression of pulmonary surfactant associated protein A, apolipoprotein A1, and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1) was verified in plasma samples. Our results indicate that DMBT1 can potentially serve as a biomarker for early ARDS diagnosis and disease severity assessment.

  7. Aspiration pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic pneumonia; Aspiration of vomitus; Necrotizing pneumonia; Aspiration pneumonitis ... The type of bacteria that caused the pneumonia depends on: Your ... facility, for example) Whether you were recently hospitalized ...

  8. Clinical severity of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) infection is associated with bacterial load in oropharyngeal secretions but not with MP genotype

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Disease severity in Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) infection could potentially be related to bacterial factors such as MP genotype (MP1 or MP2; distinguished by different adhesions proteins) or bacterial load in airway secretions. We have compared these parameters in patients who were hospitalized for MP pneumonia, with outpatients with mild MP disease. Methods MP bacterial load was measured by real-time PCR in 45 in- and outpatients ("clinical study group") in whom MP DNA had been detected in oropharyngeal secretions by PCR. In addition, genotype and phylogenetic relationships were determined. The phylogenetical assessment was done by partial DNA sequencing of the P1 gene on isolates from 33 patients in the clinical study-group where sufficient DNA was available. The assessment was further extended to isolates from 13 MP-positive family members and 37 unselected MP positive patients from the two subsequent years and two different geographical locations. In total 83 strains were molecular characterized. Results Mean MP loads were significantly higher in 24 hospitalized patients than in 21 outpatients (1600 vs. 170 genomic equivalents/μL, p = 0.009). This difference remained significant after adjustment for age and days between disease onset and sampling. Hospitalized patients also had higher C-reactive protein levels. Mean levels were 188 vs 20 mg/L (p = 0,001). The genotype assessment showed MP genotype 1 in 17 of the 33 sequenced strains from the clinical study-group, and type 2 in 16 of these patients. Within each genotype, sequence differences were minimal. No association between disease severity and MP genotype was observed. In the extended genotype assessment, MP1 was found in similar proportions. In family contacts it was found in 53% and among patients from the two subsequent years 53% and 40%. Conclusions A higher MP bacterial load in throat secretions at diagnosis was associated with more advanced respiratory disease in patients, but MP genotype

  9. Compliance with severe sepsis bundles and its effect on patient outcomes of severe community-acquired pneumonia in a limited resources country

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Yan; Li, Yi-Min; Nong, Ling-Bo; Xu, Yuan-Da; He, Guo-Qing; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Jiang, Mei; Xiao, Zheng-Iun; Zhong, Nan-Shan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Validation of compliance with severe sepsis bundles is still needed. The purpose of this study was to determine compliance and its outcomes in severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients in a limited resources country. Material and methods A prospective cohort study of 212 severe CAP patients was carried out. The implementation programme was organized into two continuous phases. The primary outcomes were compliance and hospital mortality. Results Compliance with administration of antibiotics and vasopressors as well as plateau pressure on average < 30 cm H2O was high in both groups. In the bundles group, patients received more serum lactate monitoring (62.3% vs. 11.3%), more blood cultures (47.1% vs. 24.5%), more fluid resuscitation (63.2% vs. 26.4%) and volumes infused (1319.8 ±1107.4 ml vs. 461.9 ±799.3 ml), more inotropic dobutamine and/or packed red blood cells (21.7% vs. 10.0%), more low-dose steroids (56.5% vs. 15.0%), and more glucose control (51.9% vs. 6.6%) compared with such patients in the control group. The rates of total compliance with 6-hour, 24-hour, and 6/24-hour bundles in the prospective period were 47.1%, 51.9%, and 42.5%, respectively. Hospital mortality was reduced from 44.3% to 29.2% (p = 0.023) in the bundles group, and the compliant subgroup had a more than twofold decrease in mortality (17.8% vs. 37.7%, p = 0.003). Serum lactate measured, blood cultures, and fluid resuscitation showed independent relationships with decreased mortality. Conclusions Total compliance was relatively low, but the implementation of severe sepsis bundles could clearly reduce mortality from severe CAP. PMID:25395949

  10. Pneumolysin Is the Main Inducer of Cytotoxicity to Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Zysk, Gregor; Schneider-Wald, Barbara Katharina; Hwang, Jae Hyuk; Bejo, Levente; Kim, Kwang Sik; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Hakenbeck, Regine; Heinz, Hans-Peter

    2001-01-01

    In pneumococcal meningitis it is assumed that bacteria cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which consists mainly of cerebral endothelial cells. The effect of Streptococcus pneumoniae on the BBB was investigated with an in vitro BBB model using a human brain microvascular endothelial cell line (HBMEC) and primary cultures of bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells (BBMEC). Within a few hours of incubation with pneumococci, rounding and detachment of the HBMEC were observed, and the transendothelial electrical resistance of the BBMEC monolayer decreased markedly. An S. pneumoniae mutant deficient in pneumolysin did not affect the integrity of the endothelial cell monolayer. Neither cell wall fragments nor isolated pneumococcal cell walls induced changes of endothelial cell morphology. However, purified pneumolysin caused endothelial cell damage comparable to that caused by the viable pneumococci. The cell detachment was dependent on de novo protein synthesis and required the activities of caspase and tyrosine kinases. The results show that pneumolysin is an important component for damaging the BBB and may contribute to the entry of pneumococci into the cerebral compartment and to the development of brain edema in pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:11159977

  11. Berberine inhibits Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration through downregulating MMP3 and MMP9 via PI3K.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lu; Zhang, Lijun; Wang, Beibei; Wei, Junyan; Liu, Jingya; Zhang, Lijun

    2015-05-15

    The mechanisms by which Chlamydia pneumoniae infection promote vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration required in the development of atherosclerosis have not yet been fully clarified. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have important roles in VSMC migration. However, it is still unknown whether MMPs are involved in C. pneumoniae infection-induced VSMC migration. In addition, whether berberine can exert its inhibitory effects on the infection-induced VSMC migration also remains unclear. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of berberine on C. pneumoniae infection-induced VSMC migration and explored the possible mechanisms involved in this process. Herein, we found that C. pneumoniae infection could induce VSMC migration through Matrigel-coated membrane (P<0.05), which can be significantly inhibited by the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor GM6001 (P<0.05). Our results also showed that C. pneumoniae infection upregulated both mRNA and protein expressions of MMP3 and MMP9 (P<0.05). The specific phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 significantly suppressed the increases in MMP3 and MMP9 protein expressions induced by C. pneumoniae infection (P<0.05). Further experiments showed that berberine significantly attenuated C. pneumoniae infection-induced VSMC migration (P<0.05). Moreover, berberine suppressed the protein expressions of MMP3 and MMP9 caused by C. pneumoniae infection in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). C. pneumoniae infection-induced increase in the phosphorylation level of Akt at Ser473 was inhibited by the treatment with berberine (P<0.05). Taken together, our data suggest that berberine inhibits C. pneumoniae infection-induced VSMC migration by downregulating the expressions of MMP3 and MMP9 via PI3K.

  12. The management of severe community acquired pneumonia in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Liapikou, Adamantia; Rosales-Mayor, Edmundo; Torres, Antoni

    2014-06-01

    Severe CAP (SCAP), accounting for 6% of admissions to intensive care units (ICUs) needs early diagnosis and aggressive interventions at the most proximal point of disease presentation. The prognostic scores as the ATS/IDSA rule, the systolic blood pressure, multilobar infiltrates, albumin, respiratory rate, tachycardia, confusion, oxygen and pH or SCAP system are appropriate in early identification of eligible patients requiring admission to ICU. Then the recommended initial resuscitation in SCAP in the ICU consists of fluid volume intake titrated to specific goals after a fluid challenge and hemodynamic optimization. The first selection of antimicrobial therapy should be started in the first hour and would be broad enough to cover all likely pathogens. Combination therapy may be useful in patients with non refractory septic shock and severe sepsis pneumococcal bacteremia as well. After 6 hours the patient would be reevaluated in terms of hemodynamic stability and antibiotic and therapy. Future developments will focus on sepsis biomarkers, molecular diagnostic techniques and the development of novel therapeutic immunomodulaty agents.

  13. Necrotizing Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Elitsa V; Bartlett, Allison H

    2017-02-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia refers to the development of necrosis, liquefication, and cavitation of the lung parenchyma from an infectious pathogen. Nearly 4% of all community-acquired pneumonias are necrotizing, although studies retrospectively evaluating the incidence have found it to be increasing during the past 20 years. Common presenting symptoms include fever, tachypnea, and cough, and most of those afflicted also develop complications such as parapneumonic effusions, empyemas, or bronchopleural fistulae. When compared to age-matched controls with parapneumonic effusions or severe pneumonias without a necrotizing component, those with necrotizing pneumonia have been shown to have more elevated white blood cell counts and inflammatory markers that take longer to normalize, a longer duration of symptoms despite initiation of therapy, and a longer hospital stay. Despite the high incidence of complications during the acute phase of illness, the overall prognosis of necrotizing pneumonia has been shown to be promising, with nearly all children surviving the illness. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(2):e65-e68.].

  14. 25-Hydroxy-Vitamin D Concentration Is Not Affected by Severe or Non-Severe Pneumonia, or Inflammation, in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Haugen, Johanne; Chandyo, Ram K.; Ulak, Manjeswori; Mathisen, Maria; Basnet, Sudha; Brokstad, Karl A.; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Shrestha, Prakash S.; Strand, Tor A.

    2017-01-01

    Poor vitamin D status has been associated with increased risk and severity of respiratory tract infections. Whether or not inflammation and infection affects 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration is controversial and is important in the interpretation of observational studies using plasma-25(OH)D as a biomarker for status. Our objectives were to measure whether 25(OH)D concentration was altered by an episode of acute lower respiratory tract infection and whether markers of inflammation predicted the 25(OH)D concentration. Children aged 2–35 months with severe (n = 43) and non-severe (n = 387) community-acquired, WHO-defined pneumonia were included. 25(OH)D concentration and inflammatory markers (cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors) were measured in plasma during the acute phase and 14, 45, and 90 days later. Predictors for 25(OH)D concentrations were identified in multiple linear regression models. Mean 25(OH)D concentration during the acute phase and after recovery (14, 45, and 90 days) was 84.4 nmol/L ± 33.6, and 80.6 ± 35.4, respectively. None of the inflammatory markers predicted 25(OH)D concentration in the multiple regression models. Age was the most important predictor for 25(OH)D concentration, and there were no differences in 25(OH)D concentrations during illness and after 14, 45, and 90 days when adjusting for age. Infection and inflammation did not alter the 25(OH)D concentration in young children with acute lower respiratory tract infections. PMID:28106720

  15. Value of bronchoalveolar lavage in the management of severe acute pneumonia and interstitial pneumonitis in the immunocompromised child.

    PubMed Central

    de Blic, J; McKelvie, P; Le Bourgeois, M; Blanche, S; Benoist, M R; Scheinmann, P

    1987-01-01

    The diagnostic value of 73 bronchoalveolar lavages was assessed in 67 immunocompromised children (aged 3 months to 16 years) with pulmonary infiltrates. Thirty one children had primary and 19 secondary immune deficiency, 14 acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and three AIDS related complex. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed during fibreoptic bronchoscopy, under local anaesthesia in all but two. One or more infective agents was found in eight of 11 patients with severe acute pneumonia and in 26 of 62 patients with interstitial pneumonitis. In interstitial pneumonitis, the most frequently encountered agents were Pneumocystis carinii (12), cytomegalovirus (8), and Aspergillus fumigatus (3). The yield was related to the severity of interstitial pneumonitis. The mean cellular count and cytological profile in lavage returns from patients with varying infective agents or underlying pathological conditions showed no significant difference, except in those children with AIDS and AIDS related complex who had appreciable lymphocytosis (mean percentage of lymphocytes 28 (SD 17]. In children with AIDS and chronic interstitial pneumonitis lymphocytosis without pneumocystis infection was observed in eight of nine bronchoalveolar lavage returns and was suggestive of pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia. Finally, bronchoalveolar lavage produced a specific diagnosis from the microbiological or cytological findings in 44 instances (60%). Transient exacerbation of tachypnoea was observed in the most severely ill children but there was no case of respiratory decompensation attributable to the bronchoscopy. Bronchoalveolar lavage is a safe and rapid examination for the investigation of pulmonary infiltrates in immunocompromised children. It should be performed as a first line investigation and should reduce the use of open lung biopsy techniques. PMID:2827334

  16. Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection Induced Allergic Airway Sensitization Is Controlled by Regulatory T-Cells and Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Crother, Timothy R.; Schröder, Nicolas W. J.; Karlin, Justin; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Peterson, Ellena; Arditi, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) is associated with induction and exacerbation of asthma. CP infection can induce allergic airway sensitization in mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Allergen exposure 5 days after a low dose (mild-moderate), but not a high dose (severe) CP infection induces antigen sensitization in mice. Innate immune signals play a critical role in controlling CP infection induced allergic airway sensitization, however these mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Wild-type, TLR2−/−, and TLR4−/− mice were infected intranasally (i.n.) with a low dose of CP, followed by i.n. exposure to human serum albumin (HSA) and challenged with HSA 2 weeks later. Airway inflammation, immunoglobulins, eosinophils, and goblet cells were measured. Low dose CP infection induced allergic sensitization in TLR2−/− mice, but not in TLR4−/− mice, due to differential Treg responses in these genotypes. TLR2−/− mice had reduced numbers of Tregs in the lung during CP infection while TLR4−/− mice had increased numbers. High dose CP infection resulted in an increase in Tregs and pDCs in lungs, which prevented antigen sensitization in WT mice. Depletion of Tregs or pDCs resulted in allergic airway sensitization. We conclude that Tregs and pDCs are critical determinants regulating CP infection-induced allergic sensitization. Furthermore, TLR2 and TLR4 signaling during CP infection may play a regulatory role through the modulation of Tregs. PMID:21695198

  17. Pleural and pericardial effusions combined with ascites in a patient with severe sunitinib-induced hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kust, Davor; Kruljac, Ivan; Peternac, Ana Šverko; Ostojić, Jelena; Prpić, Marin; Čaržavec, Dubravka; Gaćina, Petar

    2016-06-01

    To best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of pericardial and pleural effusions combined with ascites, precipitated with severe sunitinib-induced hypothyroidism. A 58-year-old man presented in our emergency department due to dyspnoea and dry cough. Sixteen months earlier, the patient underwent left nephrectomy due to metastatic renal cell adenocarcinoma (RCC), and therapy with sunitinib was initiated postoperatively. Thyroid function was not assessed during the therapy. On admission, all laboratory findings were within normal range. Computed tomography of the chest detected voluminous bilateral pleural effusions and mild pericardial effusion, and echocardiography revealed pericardial effusion. Thoracocentesis was carried out three times, and cytological examination showed no signs of malignant cells. After assessment of the thyroid function, neglected hypothyroidism was registered. Substitution therapy with levothyroxine was initiated, and thyroid function normalised 2 weeks later. Few days after the last thoracocentesis, his condition suddenly got worse. Thoracocentesis was repeated, and microbiological analysis of the exudate came positive for Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Despite the implemented therapeutic measures, his clinical condition progressively deteriorated. The patient died 27 days after the admission, hospital-acquired pneumonia was identified as the cause of death. Our case emphasises the necessity of careful monitoring and management of side-effects in patients who receive sunitinib. Hypothyroidism is a known cause of pleural, pericardial and abdominal effusions, as reported in several case reports. Timely initiation of substitution levothyroxine therapy can decrease unnecessary pauses in the therapy with sunitinib, as well as prevent development of severe symptoms.

  18. TIR-Domain-Containing Adaptor-Inducing Interferon-β (TRIF) Mediates Antibacterial Defense during Gram-Negative Pneumonia by Inducing Interferon-x03B3.

    PubMed

    van Lieshout, Miriam H P; Florquin, Sandrine; Vanʼt Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of Gram-negative pneumonia and sepsis. Mice deficient for TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) demonstrate enhanced bacterial growth and dissemination during Klebsiella pneumonia. We show here that the impaired antibacterial defense of TRIF mutant mice is associated with absent interferon (IFN)-x03B3; production in the lungs. IFN-x03B3; production by splenocytes in response to K. pneumoniae in vitro was critically dependent on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), the common TLR adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response gene (MyD88) and TRIF. Reconstitution of TRIF mutant mice with recombinant IFN-x03B3; via the airways reduced bacterial loads in lungs and distant body sites to levels measured in wild-type mice, and partially restored pulmonary cytokine levels. The IFN-x03B3;-induced, improved, enhanced antibacterial response in TRIF mutant mice occurred at the expense of increased hepatocellular injury. These data indicate that TRIF mediates antibacterial defense during Gram-negative pneumonia, at least in part, by inducing IFN-x03B3; at the primary site of infection.

  19. Prevalence and correlates of treatment failure among Kenyan children hospitalised with severe community-acquired pneumonia: a prospective study of the clinical effectiveness of WHO pneumonia case management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Agweyu, Ambrose; Kibore, Minnie; Digolo, Lina; Kosgei, Caroline; Maina, Virginia; Mugane, Samson; Muma, Sarah; Wachira, John; Waiyego, Mary; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    To determine the extent and pattern of treatment failure (TF) among children hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia at a large tertiary hospital in Kenya. We followed up children aged 2-59 months with WHO-defined severe pneumonia (SP) and very severe pneumonia (VSP) for up to 5 days for TF using two definitions: (i) documentation of pre-defined clinical signs resulting in change of treatment (ii) primary clinician's decision to change treatment with or without documentation of the same pre-defined clinical signs. We enrolled 385 children. The risk of TF varied between 1.8% (95% CI 0.4-5.1) and 12.4% (95% CI 7.9-18.4) for SP and 21.4% (95% CI 15.9-27) and 39.3% (95% CI 32.5-46.4) for VSP depending on the definition applied. Higher rates were associated with early changes in therapy by clinician in the absence of an obvious clinical rationale. Non-adherence to treatment guidelines was observed for 70/169 (41.4%) and 67/201 (33.3%) of children with SP and VSP, respectively. Among children with SP, adherence to treatment guidelines was associated with the presence of wheeze on initial assessment (P = 0.02), while clinician non-adherence to guideline-recommended treatments for VSP tended to occur in children with altered consciousness (P < 0.001). Using propensity score matching to account for imbalance in the distribution of baseline clinical characteristics among children with VSP revealed no difference in TF between those treated with the guideline-recommended regimen vs. more costly broad-spectrum alternatives [risk difference 0.37 (95% CI -0.84 to 0.51)]. Before revising current pneumonia case management guidelines, standardised definitions of TF and appropriate studies of treatment effectiveness of alternative regimens are required. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Severity of Pneumonia in Under 5-Year-Old Children from Developing Countries: A Multicenter, Prospective, Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Bénet, Thomas; Picot, Valentina Sanchez; Awasthi, Shally; Pandey, Nitin; Bavdekar, Ashish; Kawade, Anand; Robinson, Annick; Rakoto-Andrianarivelo, Mala; Sylla, Maryam; Diallo, Souleymane; Russomando, Graciela; Basualdo, Wilma; Komurian-Pradel, Florence; Endtz, Hubert; Vanhems, Philippe; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; For The Gabriel Network

    2017-07-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death in children. The objectives were to evaluate the microbiological agents linked with hypoxemia in hospitalized children with pneumonia from developing countries, to identify predictors of hypoxemia, and to characterize factors associated with in-hospital mortality. A multicenter, observational study was conducted in five hospitals, from India (Lucknow, Vadu), Madagascar (Antananarivo), Mali (Bamako), and Paraguay (San Lorenzo). Children aged 2-60 months with radiologically confirmed pneumonia were enrolled prospectively. Respiratory and whole blood specimens were collected, identifying viruses and bacteria by real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Microbiological agents linked with hypoxemia at admission (oxygen saturation < 90%) were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression, and factors associated with 14-day in-hospital mortality were assessed by bivariate Cox regression. Overall, 405 pneumonia cases (3,338 hospitalization days) were analyzed; 13 patients died within 14 days of hospitalization. Hypoxemia prevalence was 17.3%. Detection of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in respiratory samples was independently associated with increased risk of hypoxemia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.4, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.0-5.8 and aOR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.1-5.3, respectively). Lower chest indrawing and cyanosis were predictive of hypoxemia (positive likelihood ratios = 2.3 and 2.4, respectively). Predictors of death were Streptococcus pneumoniae detection by blood PCR (crude hazard ratio [cHR] = 4.6, 95% CI = 1.5-14.0), procalcitonin ≥ 50 ng/mL (cHR = 22.4, 95% CI = 7.3-68.5) and hypoxemia (cHR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.6-14.4). These findings were consistent on bivariate analysis. hMPV and RSV in respiratory samples were linked with hypoxemia, and S. pneumoniae in blood was associated with increased risk of death among hospitalized children with pneumonia in developing countries.

  1. Joint Intratracheal Surfactant-Antibacterial Therapy in Experimental Pseudomonas-Induced Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Birkun, Alexei A; Kubyshkin, Anatoly V; Novikov, Nikolai Y; Krivorutchenko, Yuri L; Fedosov, Michael I; Postnikova, Olga N; Snitser, Anatoly A

    2015-08-01

    The application of an exogenous pulmonary surfactant as a carrier for intratracheally administered antimicrobials represents a promising therapeutic modality that is still on its way to clinical practice. Owing to its ability to decrease surface tension, exogenous surfactant may enhance delivery of antibiotics into foci of pulmonary infection, thus increasing efficiency and safety of topical antimicrobial therapy in bacterial lung diseases. To assess potential interactions between exogenous surfactant and amikacin in vitro, and to study the effects of their joint intratracheal instillation in rats with acute pneumonia caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antibacterial and surface-active properties of amikacin (Amicil, Kievmedpreparat, Ukraine), porcine pulmonary surfactant (Suzacrin, Docpharm, Ukraine), and their combination were studied in vitro using standard microbiologic procedures and modified Pattle method (estimation of bubble diameter). Similar methods were utilized to study bacterial contamination of lungs and blood, and to assess the surface activity of bronchoalveolar wash (BAW) in 119 Wistar rats, including infected (intratracheal introduction of P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853) and noninfected animals. Histopathologic findings, differential leukocyte counts, and oxygenation parameters were recorded. Antibacterial and surface-active properties of the surfactant and amikacin remained unimpaired in vitro. In rats anti-pseudomonal and anti-inflammatory effects of the surfactant-amikacin mixture were more pronounced (p<0.05) than effects of pure amikacin as evidenced by recorded rates of bacterial growth and granulocytic response. The combined therapy considerably restricted tissue damage and mitigated reduction of BAW surface activity. The advantages of the joint surfactant-amikacin therapy of Pseudomonas-induced pneumonia may suggest further clinical trials.

  2. Risk factors for severe outcomes among members of the United States military hospitalized with pneumonia and influenza, 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    Van Kerkhove, Maria D; Cooper, Michael J; Cost, Angelia A; Sanchez, Jose L; Riley, Steven

    2015-12-08

    The progression from hospitalization for a respiratory infection to requiring substantial supportive therapy is a key stage of the influenza severity pyramid. Respiratory infections are responsible for 300,000-400,000 medical encounters each year among US military personnel, some of which progress to severe acute respiratory infections. We obtained data on 11,086 hospitalizations for pneumonia and influenza (P&I) among non-recruit US military service members during the period of 1 January 2000 through 31 December 2012. From these, we identified 512 P&I hospitalizations that progressed to severe episodes using standard case definitions. We evaluated the effect of demographic and occupational characteristics, co-morbid conditions, and history of influenza vaccination on the risk of a hospitalized P&I case becoming a severe case. We also evaluated the risk of a severe outcome and the length of time since influenza vaccination (within 180, 60, and 30 days). The median age of subjects at the time of the P&I episode was 32 years (range, 28-40) and subjects were predominantly male (89.5%). In a univariate analysis, demographic risk factors for a severe episode included service in the US Air Force (RR=1.6 relative to US Army, 95%CI 1.3-2.1), US Coast Guard (RR=2.1, 1.2-3.7) or US Navy (RR=1.4, 1.1-1.8). Being born in the US and recent influenza vaccination (within 180 days of episode) were protective against developing severe disease. Among co-morbid conditions, univariate risk factors for severe disease included chronic renal or liver disease (RR=4.98, 95%CI 4.1-6.1), diseases of the circulatory system (RR=3.1, 95%CI 2.6-3.7), diabetes mellitus (RR=2.3, 95%CI 1.5-3.6), obesity (RR=1.6, 95%CI 1.2-2.1), cancer (RR=1.6, 95%CI 1.3-2.0), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (RR=1.4, 95%CI 1.1-1.7). Although many of the risk factors found to be significant in univariate analysis were no longer significant under a multivariate analysis, receipt of any influenza vaccine

  3. Risk factors for severe outcomes among members of the United States military hospitalized with pneumonia and influenza, 2000–2012

    PubMed Central

    Van Kerkhove, Maria D; Cooper, Michael J.; Eick-Cost, Angelia A.; Sanchez, Jose L.; Riley, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Background The progression from hospitalization for a respiratory infection to requiring substantial supportive therapy is a key stage of the influenza severity pyramid. Respiratory infections are responsible for 300,000 to 400,000 medical encounters each year among US military personnel, some of which progress to severe acute respiratory infections. Methods We obtained data on 11,086 hospitalizations for pneumonia and influenza (P&I) among non-recruit US military service members during the period of 1 January 2000 through 31 December 2012. From these, we identified 512 P&I hospitalizations that progressed to severe episodes using standard case definitions. We evaluated the effect of demographic and occupational characteristics, comorbid conditions, and history of influenza vaccination on the risk of a hospitalized P&I case becoming a severe case. We also evaluated the risk of a severe outcome and the length of time since influenza vaccination (within 180, 60 and 30 days). Results The median age of subjects at the time of the P&I episode was 32 years (range, 28–40) and subjects were predominantly male (89.5%). In a univariate analysis, demographic risk factors for a severe episode included service in the US Air Force (RR=1.6 relative to US Army, 95%CI 1.3-2.1), US Coast Guard (RR=2.1, 1.2-3.7) or US Navy (RR=1.4, 1.1-1.8). Being born in the US and recent influenza vaccination (within 180 days of episode) were protective against developing severe disease. Among comorbid conditions, univariate risk factors for severe disease included chronic renal or liver disease (RR=4.98, 95%CI 4.1-6.1), diseases of the circulatory system (RR=3.1, 95%CI 2.6-3.7), diabetes mellitus (RR=2.3, 95%CI 1.5-3.6), obesity (RR=1.6, 95%CI 1.2-2.1), cancer (RR=1.6, 95%CI 1.3-2.0) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (RR=1.4, 95%CI 1.1-1.7). Although many of the risk factors found to be significant in univariate analysis were no longer significant under a multivariate analysis, receipt

  4. Case fatality proportions and predictive factors for mortality among children hospitalized with severe pneumonia in a rural developing country setting.

    PubMed

    Djelantik, I G G; Gessner, Bradford D; Sutanto, Augustinus; Steinhoff, Mark; Linehan, Mary; Moulton, Lawrence H; Arjoso, Soemarjati

    2003-12-01

    Few large studies have evaluated risk factors for mortality among children hospitalized for pneumonia and this may contribute to suboptimal case management efficiency. To identify useful screening criteria for mortality among children hospitalized for pneumonia in a developing country setting, we conducted a population-based hospital cohort study among children less than 2 years of age admitted for pneumonia during 1999-2001 at one of three major hospitals on Lombok Island, Indonesia. Of 4351 children admitted for pneumonia, 12 per cent died before discharge. Case fatality proportions were seasonal, with peaks occurring immediately after peaks in the proportion of cases positive for respiratory syncytial virus. Children with an oxygen saturation < or = 85 per cent or age younger than 4 months were 5.6 times more likely to die than children with none of these predictive factors (95 per cent CI, 4.5-7.1); 83 per cent of children who died had one of these two risk factors. For children < 4 months old, mortality increased at an oxygen saturation < 88 per cent compared with < 80 per cent for older children. Laboratory, physical examination, and radiological findings were not associated with or did not contribute substantially to mortality prediction. Among children hospitalized for pneumonia, age less than 4 months and hypoxia were identified with those at high risk of death. Age influences cut-off levels for hypoxia.

  5. Disease-specific dynamic biomarkers selected by integrating inflammatory mediators with clinical informatics in ARDS patients with severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chengshui; Shi, Lin; Li, Yuping; Wang, Xiangdong; Yang, Shuanying

    2016-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a heterogeneous syndrome that occurs as a result of various risk factors, including either direct or indirect lung injury, and systemic inflammation triggered also by severe pneumonia (SP). SP-ARDS-associated morbidity and mortality remains high also due to the lack of disease-specific biomarkers. The present study aimed at identifying disease-specific biomarkers in SP or SP-ARDS by integrating proteomic profiles of inflammatory mediators with clinical informatics. Plasma was sampled from the healthy as controls or patients with SP infected with bacteria or infection-associated SP-ARDS on the day of admission, day 3, and day 7. About 15 or 52 cytokines showed significant difference between SP and SP-ARDS patients with controls or 13 between SP-ARDS with SP alone and controls, including bone morphogenetic protein-15 (BMP-15), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 16 (CXCL16), chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 3 (CXCR3), interleukin-6 (IL-6), protein NOV homolog (NOV/CCN3), glypican 3, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4), IL-5, IL-5 R alpha, IL-22 BP, leptin, MIP-1d, and orexin B with a significant correlation with Digital Evaluation Score System (DESS) scores. ARDS patients with overexpressed IL-6, CXCL16, or IGFBP-4 had significantly longer hospital stay and higher incidence of secondary infection. We also found higher levels of those mediators were associated with poor survival rates in patients with lung cancer and involved in the process of the epithelial mesenchymal transition of alveolar epithelial cells. Our preliminary study suggested that integration of proteomic profiles with clinical informatics as part of clinical bioinformatics is important to validate and optimize disease-specific and disease-staged biomarkers.

  6. Oral Amoxicillin Versus Benzyl Penicillin for Severe Pneumonia Among Kenyan Children: A Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Noninferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Agweyu, Ambrose; Gathara, David; Oliwa, Jacquie; Muinga, Naomi; Edwards, Tansy; Allen, Elizabeth; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth; English, Mike; Aweyo, Florence; Awuonda, Bernard; Chabi, Martin; Isika, Newton; Kariuki, Mary; Kuria, Magdalene; Mandi, Polycarp; Masibo, Leah; Massawa, Thaddeus; Mogoa, Wycliffe; Mutai, Beatrice; Muriithi, Gatwiri; Ng'arng'ar, Samuel; Nyamai, Rachel; Okello, Dorothy; Oywer, Wilson; Wanjala, Lordin

    2015-01-01

    Background. There are concerns that the evidence from studies showing noninferiority of oral amoxicillin to benzyl penicillin for severe pneumonia may not be generalizable to high-mortality settings. Methods. An open-label, multicenter, randomized controlled noninferiority trial was conducted at 6 Kenyan hospitals. Eligible children aged 2–59 months were randomized to receive amoxicillin or benzyl penicillin and followed up for the primary outcome of treatment failure at 48 hours. A noninferiority margin of risk difference between amoxicillin and benzyl penicillin groups was prespecified at 7%. Results. We recruited 527 children, including 302 (57.3%) with comorbidity. Treatment failure was observed in 20 of 260 (7.7%) and 21 of 261 (8.0%) of patients in the amoxicillin and benzyl penicillin arms, respectively (risk difference, −0.3% [95% confidence interval, −5.0% to 4.3%]) in per-protocol analyses. These findings were supported by the results of intention-to-treat analyses. Treatment failure by day 5 postenrollment was 11.4% and 11.0% and rising to 13.5% and 16.8% by day 14 in the amoxicillin vs benzyl penicillin groups, respectively. The most frequent cause of cumulative treatment failure at day 14 was clinical deterioration within 48 hours of enrollment (33/59 [55.9%]). Four patients died (overall mortality 0.8%) during the study, 3 of whom were allocated to the benzyl penicillin group. The presence of wheeze was independently associated with less frequent treatment failure. Conclusions. Our findings confirm noninferiority of amoxicillin to benzyl penicillin, provide estimates of risk of treatment failure in Kenya, and offer important additional evidence for policy making in sub-Saharan Africa. Clinical Trial Registration. NCT01399723. PMID:25550349

  7. [Two cases of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) induced radiotherapy after surgery of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hojo, Shigeyuki; Yoshioka, Setsuko; Toyoda, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Kaori; Yoshioka, Akiko; Fujie, Yujiro; Fukunaga, Hiroki; Ota, Hirofumi; Endo, Wakio; Maeura, Yoshiichi

    2010-11-01

    We report two cases of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) induced radiotherapy after surgery of breast cancer. One of the patients was a 58-year-old woman. She underwent a conserving surgery for bilateral breast cancers, and received radiation therapy to the remaining part of bilateral breasts. Two months after the termination of irradiation, cough, fever and general fatigue developed. We clinically diagnosed this case as BOOP after radiation therapy. After initiation of oral steroid therapy, the clinical symptoms and radiographic findings disappeared. Another patient was a 57-year-old woman. She underwent radical mastectomy for right breast cancer. A month after the operation, she suffered from local recurrence, so radiation therapy to the thoracic wall was performed. After irradiation, resection of the thoracic wall lesion was performed because of malignancy from local skin biopsy specimen. Two months after the termination of irradiation, cough, dyspnea and fever developed. We clinically diagnosed this case as radiation-induced BOOP by BAL and TBLB findings. After an initiation of steroid therapy, the clinical symptoms and radiographic findings disappeared. It is important to be aware of BOOP as a complication in the patient who was given radiation after surgery of breast cancer.

  8. Severe Legionnaires' disease with pneumonia and biopsy-confirmed myocarditis most likely caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Naoto; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Takano, Tomoko

    2012-01-01

    We herein describe the successful treatment of a patient with possible Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6 infection complicated by pneumonia and myocarditis. A 32-year-old man presented with a five-day history of cough, dyspnea and chest pain. Chest radiography revealed patchy opacities in both lungs suggestive of bilateral pneumonia, and a urinary antigen test for Legionella pneumophila was positive. After admission, the patient developed congestive heart failure due to pathologically confirmed myocarditis. He was successfully treated with minocycline, macrolide, steroids and noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV). He eventually recovered with a normalized cardiac function. L. pneumophila serogroup 6 was isolated from the bathwater in the patient's home.

  9. The Transcriptome of Streptococcus pneumoniae Induced by Local and Global Changes in Supercoiling

    PubMed Central

    de la Campa, Adela G.; Ferrándiz, María J.; Martín-Galiano, Antonio J.; García, María T.; Tirado-Vélez, Jose M.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial chromosome is compacted in a manner optimal for DNA transactions to occur. The degree of compaction results from the level of DNA-supercoiling and the presence of nucleoid-binding proteins. DNA-supercoiling is homeostatically maintained by the opposing activities of relaxing DNA topoisomerases and negative supercoil-inducing DNA gyrase. DNA-supercoiling acts as a general cis regulator of transcription, which can be superimposed upon other types of more specific trans regulatory mechanism. Transcriptomic studies on the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae, which has a relatively small genome (∼2 Mb) and few nucleoid-binding proteins, have been performed under conditions of local and global changes in supercoiling. The response to local changes induced by fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which target DNA gyrase subunit A and/or topoisomerase IV, involves an increase in oxygen radicals which reduces cell viability, while the induction of global supercoiling changes by novobiocin (a DNA gyrase subunit B inhibitor), or by seconeolitsine (a topoisomerase I inhibitor), has revealed the existence of topological domains that specifically respond to such changes. The control of DNA-supercoiling in S. pneumoniae occurs mainly via the regulation of topoisomerase gene transcription: relaxation triggers the up-regulation of gyrase and the down-regulation of topoisomerases I and IV, while hypernegative supercoiling down-regulates the expression of topoisomerase I. Relaxation affects 13% of the genome, with the majority of the genes affected located in 15 domains. Hypernegative supercoiling affects 10% of the genome, with one quarter of the genes affected located in 12 domains. However, all the above domains overlap, suggesting that the chromosome is organized into topological domains with fixed locations. Based on its response to relaxation, the pneumococcal chromosome can be said to be organized into five types of domain: up-regulated, down-regulated, position

  10. Application of DNA amplification to pneumocystosis: presence of serum Pneumocystis carinii DNA during human and experimentally induced Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Much remains unknown about the basic biology of P. carinii and studies of this infection have been hampered by the lack of cultivation methods. We developed a sensitive and specific assay for P. carinii by utilizing DNA amplification of the P. carinii dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene. By this method, P. carinii DNA was detected in the lungs of rats with experimentally induced P. carinii pneumonia 2 wk before the onset of histopathological changes. DNA amplification analysis of serum demonstrated that by 10 wk of corticosteroid treatment, 12 of 12 (100%) infected rats had circulating DHFR DNA. P. carinii DHFR DNA also was detected in the serum of patients with AIDS and active P. carinii pneumonia (12 of 14 sera collected prospectively). Patients with advanced AIDS but without a history of P. carinii pneumonia were negative by this assay (0 of 6 sera examined). Serum polymerase chain reaction may facilitate investigations into the natural history and epidemiology of P. carinii infection, provide insight into the pathogenesis of parasite dissemination, and offer a useful, noninvasive diagnostic test for the detection of human pneumocystosis. PMID:1402679

  11. Evaluation of disk approximation and single-well broth tests for detection of inducible clindamycin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, James H; McElmeel, M Leticia; Fulcher, Letitia C; McGee, Lesley; Glennen, Anita

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluated an agar disk diffusion D-zone test and an erythromycin-clindamycin (ERY + CLI) single-well broth test for inducible CLI resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae. The standard CLSI disk approximation test and a single-well combination test incorporating 1 plus 0.5 μg/ml ERY + CLI detected >96% of isolates containing the ermB determinant.

  12. Cluster Randomized Trial of Community Case Management of Severe Pneumonia with Oral Amoxicillin in Children 2-59 Months of Age in Haripur District, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Bari, Abdul; Sadruddin, Salim; Khan, Attaullah; Khan, Ibad ul Haque; Ullah, Aman; Lehri, Iqbal A.; Macleod, William B.; Fox, Matthew P.; Thea, Donald M; Qazi, Shamim A.

    2013-01-01

    Background First dose oral cotrimoxazole and referral is the recommended treatment for WHO-defined severe pneumonia. Difficulties with referral compliance are reported from many low resource settings resulting in low access to appropriate treatment. Methods In a cluster-randomized equivalence trial in Haripur District, Pakistan 28 clusters were randomized equally to intervention and control clusters. In 14 intervention clusters children 2-59 months of age with severe pneumonia were treated with oral amoxicillin by community-based Lady Health Workers (LHW). In 14 control clusters LHWs gave first dose of oral cotrimoxazole and referred to a health facility for appropriate treatment, which was standard of care. The objective was to determine whether community case-management (CCM) of severe pneumonia by LHW using oral amoxicillin was equivalent to current standard of care. Primary outcome was treatment failure on day 6 of treatment. Participants, care givers, and assessors were not blinded to study therapy. Per-protocol analysis was conducted adjusting for clustering within arms using generalized estimating equations. Findings 1995 children were randomized to intervention and 1477 to control clusters. We analysed 1857 children randomized to intervention and 1354 randomized to control clusters. They were similar in sex, age, and clinical characteristics. Treatment failure was 8·9% (165/1857) in intervention and 17·8% (241/1354) in control clusters. Cluster adjusted failure rates, the primary outcome, were significantly reduced in intervention clusters (risk difference (RD) -8·9%; 95% CI:-12.4% to -5.4%) by day 6. Further adjusting for baseline covariates made little difference (RD: -7·3%, CI: -10·1% to -4·5%). Three deaths occurred, only one in the intervention arm. Two deaths were before day 6, while one occurred between day 6 and 14. Most reduction in risk was in fever and lower chest indrawing on day 3 (RD -6·38%; 95% CI: -8·3% to -4·5%). Age, gender and

  13. [Experience in the management of the severe form of human influenza A H1N1 pneumonia in an intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Sosa-García, Jesús Ojino; Arch-Tirado, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    At the beginning of the second trimester of 2009 there was an influenza A (H1N1) outbreak. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical presentation and mortality of the severe form of pneumonia in patients with human influenza A H1N1. We conducted a retrospective review of all files of confirmed and suspected patients with severe human influenza A (H1N1) pneumonia. We studied 26 patients admitted to the ICU from April 1 to December 31, 2009, among which 16 were males (61.54%) and 10 females (38.46%) with an average age of 52.26 ± 15.48 years. The time of onset of symptoms to admission to the ICU was 6.3 ± 3.19 days. The most frequent symptoms and signs were salmonated sputum (47%), chills (45%), dry cough (44%) and myalgia (42%). The mortality rate was 19.23%. The treatment was based on antiviral therapy, modulating inflammation and ventilatory techniques to optimize oxygenation. There was an association between combined therapy based on methylprednisolone, activated protein C and statins with a better survival (p = 0.05). Pneumonia virus of human influenza A (H1N1) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. According to our results, it is recommended to make an early diagnosis and to initiate a treatment regimen based on treatment bundles designed to optimize oxygenation, reduce viral load and modulate inflammation.

  14. 2-Chloroadenosine (2-CADO) treatment modulates the pro-inflammatory immune response to prevent acute lung inflammation in BALB/c mice suffering from Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2010-06-01

    Acute lung inflammation (ALI) is a life-threatening pathology and can develop during the course of several clinical conditions such as pneumonia, acid aspiration or sepsis. Adenosine plays a significant role in controlling acute inflammation via binding to A(2A) receptors on inflammatory cells, i.e. neutrophils or macrophages. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of 2-chloroadenosine (2-CADO), alone or in combination with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced acute lung infection in mice. Acute lung infection in mice was induced by directly instilling the selected dose (10(4) colony-forming units/mL) of bacteria intranasally. Histopathological examination of the lungs was performed to reveal neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli. In addition to the major pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin (IL)-1alpha, levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were also determined. Intranasal instillation of bacteria caused profound neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli as well as a significant increase in the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (i.e. TNFalpha and IL-1alpha). However, intravenous administration of 2-CADO 10 microg/kg/day, alone or in combination with an antibiotic (i.e. AMC), significantly decreased neutrophil infiltration into the lung alveoli. A significant decrease in TNFalpha and IL-1alpha along with elevation of IL-10 levels in the lung homogenate of mice with acute lung infection was observed upon treatment with 2-CADO alone, with no significant decrease in bacterial counts. Moreover, in combination with AMC, 2-CADO exhibited its immunomodulatory action in acute lung infection and prevented ALI, whilst an antibacterial action was exhibited by AMC. 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  15. Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gilroy, Shelley A; Bennett, Nicholas J

    2011-12-01

    Pneumocystis (carinii) jiroveci pneumonia can occur in immunocompromised individuals, especially hematopoietic stem and solid organ transplant recipients and those receiving immunosuppressive agents, and is the most common opportunistic infection in persons with advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The Pneumocystis genus was initially mistaken as a trypanosome and later as a protozoan. Genetic analysis identified the organism as a unicellular fungus. Pneumocystis jiroveci is the species responsible for human infections. A slow indolent time course with symptoms of pneumonia progressing over weeks to months is characteristic in HIV-infected patients. Fulminant respiratory failure associated with fever and dry cough is typical in non-HIV-infected patients. Definitive diagnosis relies on histopathological testing of sputum, induced or sampled by fiberoptic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. The first-line drug for treatment and prevention is trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

  16. The protective effects of Ambroxol in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced pneumonia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiwen; Huang, Yi; Han, Yipin; Bai, Chun-xue; Wang, Guifang

    2011-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the effect of Ambroxol on the pulmonary surfactant (PS) in rat pneumonia induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). Material and methods The pneumonic rats were obtained by injecting ATCC27853 intratracheally. One hundred and twenty SD rats were randomized into four groups: normal saline and Ambroxol was injected intraperitoneally following PA challenge in the PA/NS and PA/AM group; the other two groups were NS/AM and NS/NS. The wet/dry weight ratio (W/D), and pathological changes were assayed. Total proteins (TP), total phospholipid (TPL), and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analysed. Some BALF was cultured for colony counts. Ultrastructural change of the lung was observed by electron microscopy. Results The W/D ratio in the PA/AM group was lower than that in the PA/NS group; both were higher than that in the NS/NS group (p < 0.05). There were more neutrophils in the PA/NS group than in the PA/AM group (p < 0.05), and more in the PA/AM group than in the NS/NS group (p < 0.05). The ratio of DSPC/TPL and DSPC/TP in the BALF in PA/NS group was lower than that in the PA/AM group; DSPC/TPL and DSPC/TP ratios also increased in the NS/AM group. The PA colony numbers in the PA/AM group were lower than in the PA/NS group (p > 0.05). In the PA/NS group, vacuolation occurred in the lamellar body of alveolar type 2 cells (AT2) and the PS layer was rough and broken in some areas. In the PA/AM group, the degree of vacuolation of the lamellar body was less than in the PA/NS group. Conclusions Ambroxol could protect rats from pneumonia by improving the level of endogenous PS, especially DPPC. PMID:22312374

  17. Chlamydia pneumoniae Augments the Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein-Induced Death of Mouse Macrophages by a Caspase-Independent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yaraei, Kambiz; Campbell, Lee Ann; Zhu, Xiaodong; Liles, W. Conrad; Kuo, Cho-chou; Rosenfeld, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common respiratory pathogen that is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae contributes to cardiovascular disease have not been determined yet. C. pneumoniae infection may accelerate the death of cells within atherosclerotic lesions and contribute to the formation of unstable lesions. To test this hypothesis, the impact of C. pneumoniae infection on the death of lipid-loaded mouse macrophages was investigated. It was observed that RAW 264.7 cells are highly susceptible to the toxic effects of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and exhibit markers of cell death within 24 h of treatment with as little as 5 μg/ml oxidized LDL. Subsequent infection with either live C. pneumoniae or heat-killed or UV-inactivated C. pneumoniae at a low multiplicity of infection for 24 to 72 h stimulated both additional binding of annexin V and the uptake of propidium iodide. Thus, C. pneumoniae augments the effects of oxidized LDL on cell death independent of a sustained infection. However, unlike oxidized LDL, C. pneumoniae infection does not activate caspase 3 or induce formation of the mitochondrial transition pore or the fragmentation of DNA, all of which are classical markers of apoptosis. Furthermore, primary bone marrow macrophages isolated from mice deficient in Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) but not TLR-4 are resistant to C. pneumoniae-induced death. These data suggest that C. pneumoniae kills cells by a caspase-independent pathway and that the process is potentially mediated by activation of TLR-2. PMID:15972525

  18. Severe acute respiratory failure secondary to acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia requiring mechanical ventilation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    López-Cuenca, Sonia; Morales-García, Silvia; Martín-Hita, Ana; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Fernández-Segoviano, Pilar; Esteban, Andrés

    2012-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman was admitted to our ICU with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and criteria for ARDS. Despite an F(IO(2)) of 1.0 and a lung protective strategy, the patient died on day 15 without any improvement. The relatives gave consent for post-mortem analysis. The histopathologic study of the lung showed findings typical of an acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia. Apropos of this case we performed a PubMed search. We found 13 articles, including a total of 29 patients. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia is an unusual cause of acute lung injury. The diagnostic criterion is histopathologic. There is little information regarding the pathophysiology of this illness. Important questions remain regarding this disease, including predisposing factors and management. Patients who require mechanical ventilation have poor outcomes.

  19. Chloramphenicol versus ampicillin plus gentamicin for community acquired very severe pneumonia among children aged 2-59 months in low resource settings: multicentre randomised controlled trial (SPEAR study)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether five days’ treatment with injectable ampicillin plus gentamicin compared with chloramphenicol reduces treatment failure in children aged 2-59 months with community acquired very severe pneumonia in low resource settings. Design Open label randomised controlled trial. Setting Inpatient wards within tertiary care hospitals in Bangladesh, Ecuador, India, Mexico, Pakistan, Yemen, and Zambia. Participants Children aged 2-59 months with WHO defined very severe pneumonia. Intervention Chloramphenicol versus a combination of ampicillin plus gentamicin. Main outcome measures Primary outcome measure was treatment failure at five days. Secondary outcomes were treatment failure defined similarly among all participants evaluated at 48 hours and at 10 and 21 days. Results More children failed treatment with chloramphenicol at day 5 (16% v 11%; relative risk 1.43, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.97) and also by days 10 and 21. Overall, 112 bacterial isolates were obtained from blood and lung aspirates in 110 children (11.5%), with the most common organisms being Staphylococcus aureus (n=47) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=22). In subgroup analysis, bacteraemia with any organism increased the risk of treatment failure at 21 days in the chloramphenicol group (2.09, 1.41 to 3.10) but not in the ampicillin plus gentamicin group (1.12, 0.59 to 2.13). Similarly, isolation of S pneumoniae increased the risk of treatment failure at day 21 (4.06, 2.73 to 6.03) and death (5.80, 2.62 to 12.85) in the chloramphenicol group but not in the ampicillin plus gentamicin group. No difference was found in treatment failure for children with S aureus bacteraemia in the two groups, but the power to detect a difference in this subgroup analysis was low. Independent predictors of treatment failure by multivariate analysis were hypoxaemia (oxygen saturation <90%), receiving chloramphenicol, being female, and poor immunisation status. Conclusion Injectable ampicillin plus

  20. Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS toxin exacerbates ovalbumin-induced asthma-like inflammation in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Medina, Jorge L; Coalson, Jacqueline J; Brooks, Edward G; Le Saux, Claude Jourdan; Winter, Vicki T; Chaparro, Adriana; Principe, Molly F R; Solis, Laura; Kannan, T R; Baseman, Joel B; Dube, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes a range of airway and extrapulmonary pathologies in humans. Clinically, M. pneumoniae is associated with acute exacerbations of human asthma and a worsening of experimentally induced asthma in mice. Recently, we demonstrated that Community Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome (CARDS) toxin, an ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating toxin synthesized by M. pneumoniae, is sufficient to induce an asthma-like disease in BALB/cJ mice. To test the potential of CARDS toxin to exacerbate preexisting asthma, we examined inflammatory responses to recombinant CARDS toxin in an ovalbumin (OVA) murine model of asthma. Differences in pulmonary inflammatory responses between treatment groups were analyzed by histology, cell differentials and changes in cytokine and chemokine concentrations. Additionally, assessments of airway hyperreactivity were evaluated through direct pulmonary function measurements. Analysis of histology revealed exaggerated cellular inflammation with a strong eosinophilic component in the CARDS toxin-treated group. Heightened T-helper type-2 inflammatory responses were evidenced by increased expression of IL-4, IL-13, CCL17 and CCL22 corresponding with increased airway hyperreactivity in the CARDS toxin-treated mice. These data demonstrate that CARDS toxin can be a causal factor in the worsening of experimental allergic asthma, highlighting the potential importance of CARDS toxin in the etiology and exacerbation of human asthma.

  1. Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS Toxin Exacerbates Ovalbumin-Induced Asthma-Like Inflammation in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Jorge L.; Coalson, Jacqueline J.; Brooks, Edward G.; Le Saux, Claude Jourdan; Winter, Vicki T.; Chaparro, Adriana; Principe, Molly F. R.; Solis, Laura; Kannan, T. R.; Baseman, Joel B.; Dube, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes a range of airway and extrapulmonary pathologies in humans. Clinically, M. pneumoniae is associated with acute exacerbations of human asthma and a worsening of experimentally induced asthma in mice. Recently, we demonstrated that Community Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome (CARDS) toxin, an ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating toxin synthesized by M. pneumoniae, is sufficient to induce an asthma-like disease in BALB/cJ mice. To test the potential of CARDS toxin to exacerbate preexisting asthma, we examined inflammatory responses to recombinant CARDS toxin in an ovalbumin (OVA) murine model of asthma. Differences in pulmonary inflammatory responses between treatment groups were analyzed by histology, cell differentials and changes in cytokine and chemokine concentrations. Additionally, assessments of airway hyperreactivity were evaluated through direct pulmonary function measurements. Analysis of histology revealed exaggerated cellular inflammation with a strong eosinophilic component in the CARDS toxin-treated group. Heightened T-helper type-2 inflammatory responses were evidenced by increased expression of IL-4, IL-13, CCL17 and CCL22 corresponding with increased airway hyperreactivity in the CARDS toxin-treated mice. These data demonstrate that CARDS toxin can be a causal factor in the worsening of experimental allergic asthma, highlighting the potential importance of CARDS toxin in the etiology and exacerbation of human asthma. PMID:25058417

  2. Ethanol-induced alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) potentiates pneumolysin in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Luong, Truc Thanh; Kim, Eun-Hye; Bak, Jong Phil; Nguyen, Cuong Thach; Choi, Sangdun; Briles, David E; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol impairs the host immune system, rendering the host more vulnerable to infection. Therefore, alcoholics are at increased risk of acquiring serious bacterial infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, including pneumonia. Nevertheless, how alcohol affects pneumococcal virulence remains unclear. Here, we showed that the S. pneumoniae type 2 D39 strain is ethanol tolerant and that alcohol upregulates alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) and potentiates pneumolysin (Ply). Hemolytic activity, colonization, and virulence of S. pneumoniae, as well as host cell myeloperoxidase activity, proinflammatory cytokine secretion, and inflammation, were significantly attenuated in adhE mutant bacteria (ΔadhE strain) compared to D39 wild-type bacteria. Therefore, AdhE might act as a pneumococcal virulence factor. Moreover, in the presence of ethanol, S. pneumoniae AdhE produced acetaldehyde and NADH, which subsequently led Rex (redox-sensing transcriptional repressor) to dissociate from the adhE promoter. An increase in AdhE level under the ethanol condition conferred an increase in Ply and H2O2 levels. Consistently, S. pneumoniae D39 caused higher cytotoxicity to RAW 264.7 cells than the ΔadhE strain under the ethanol stress condition, and ethanol-fed mice (alcoholic mice) were more susceptible to infection with the D39 wild-type bacteria than with the ΔadhE strain. Taken together, these data indicate that AdhE increases Ply under the ethanol stress condition, thus potentiating pneumococcal virulence.

  3. Changes in epidemiology, clinical features and severity of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pneumonia in the first post-pandemic influenza season.

    PubMed

    Viasus, D; Cordero, E; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Oteo, J A; Fernández-Navarro, A; Ortega, L; Gracia-Ahufinger, I; Fariñas, M C; García-Almodovar, E; Payeras, A; Paño-Pardo, J R; Muñez-Rubio, E; Carratalà, J

    2012-03-01

    Although the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus is expected to circulate as a seasonal virus for some years after the pandemic period, its behaviour cannot be predicted. We analysed a prospective cohort study of hospitalized adults with influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pneumonia at 14 teaching hospitals in Spain to compare the epidemiology, clinical features and outcomes of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pneumonia between the pandemic period and the first post-pandemic influenza season. A total of 348 patients were included: 234 during the pandemic period and 114 during the first post-pandemic influenza season. Patients during the post-pandemic period were older and more likely to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease and cancer than the others. Septic shock, altered mental status and respiratory failure on arrival at hospital were significantly more common during the post-pandemic period. Time from illness onset to receipt of antiviral therapy was also longer during this period. Early antiviral therapy was less frequently administered to patients during the post-pandemic period (22.9% versus 10.9%; p 0.009). In addition, length of stay was longer, and need for mechanical ventilation and intensive-care unit admission were significantly higher during the post-pandemic period. In-hospital mortality (5.1% versus 21.2%; p <0.001) was also greater during this period. In conclusion, significant epidemiological changes and an increased severity of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pneumonia were found in the first post-pandemic influenza season. Physicians should consider influenza A (H1N1) 2009 when selecting microbiological testing and treatment in patients with pneumonia in the upcoming influenza season.

  4. Chlamydophila pneumoniae induces production of the defensin-like MIG/CXCL9, which has in vitro antichlamydial activity.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Emese P; Faludi, Ildikó; Virók, Dezso P; Endrész, Valéria; Burián, Katalin

    2011-03-01

    CXC chemokines that lack the ELR motif, including the monokine induced by IFN-γ (MIG/CXCL9), the IFN-induced protein of 10 kDa (IP-10/CXCL10), and the IFN-inducible T-cell α-chemoattractant (I-TAC/CXCL11), have been shown to mediate the generation of type 1 immune responses and to possess defensin-like bactericidal effects. This study revealed that the infection of mice with Chlamydophila pneumoniae via the intranasal route resulted in the local expression of MIG/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, and I-TAC/CXCL11. The expression of IP-10/CXCL10 and I-TAC/CXCL11 mRNA peaked on day 4. On day 7, the expression of MIG/CXCL9 mRNA in the infected lungs was increased 156-fold relative to that in the uninfected mouse lungs. MIG/CXCL9 was also detected at a protein level from day 1, with the highest concentration in the supernatants of the infected lungs on day 7. The expression of IFN-γ displayed similar kinetics. C. pneumoniae and its inactivated form also induced the production of MIG/CXCL9 in mouse fibroblasts and in the murine macrophage cell line J774A in vitro. Cotreatment of the tissue cultures with C. pneumoniae and different quantities of IFN-γ resulted in strong increases in MIG/CXCL9 production. Recombinant MIG/CXCL9 exerted dose-dependent antibacterial activity against C. pneumoniae. Significant antichlamydial activity of MIG/CXCL9 was observed after a 15-min incubation period. Chlamydial proteins at a molecular weight of 60 kDa were identified by Far-Western blot assay and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry as binding molecules of MIG/CXCL9. The results of these experiments suggest that MIG/CXCL9 might play an important role in the innate and acquired defense mechanisms against C. pneumoniae. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Update on interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Pamela A; Lascola, Kara M

    2015-04-01

    Interstitial pneumonias encompass a wide variety of acute and chronic respiratory diseases and include the specific diseases equine multinodular pulmonary fibrosis and acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress. These diseases have been diagnosed in all age groups of horses, and numerous agents have been identified as potential causes of interstitial pneumonia. Despite the varied causes, interstitial pneumonia is uniformly recognized by the severity of respiratory disease and often poor clinical outcome. This article reviews the causal agents that have been associated with the development of interstitial pneumonia in horses. Pathophysiology, clinical diagnosis, and treatment options are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pneumococcal surface protein A plays a major role in Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Saumyaa; Pujanauski, Lindsey; Colino, Jesus; Flora, Michael; Torres, Raul M; Tuomanen, Elaine; Snapper, Clifford M

    2016-01-01

    Intact, inactivated Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pn) [including the unencapsulated strain, R36A], markedly inhibits the humoral immune response to co-immunized heterologous proteins, a property not observed with several other intact Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we determined the nature of this immunosuppressive property. Since phosphorylcholine (PC), a major haptenic component of teichoic acid in the Pn cell wall, and lipoteichoic acid in the Pn membrane, was previously reported to be immunosuppresive when derived from filarial parasites, we determined whether R36A lacking PC (R36Apc-) was inhibitory. Indeed, although R36Apc- exhibited a markedly reduced level of inhibition of the IgG response to co-immunized cOVA, no inhibition was observed when using several other distinct PC-expressing bacteria or a soluble, protein-PC conjugate. Further, treatment of R36A with periodate, which selectively destroys PC residues, had no effect on R36A-mediated inhibition. Since R36Apc- also lacks choline-binding proteins (CBPs), that require PC for cell wall attachment, and since treatment of R36A with trypsin eliminated its inhibitory activity, we incubated R36A in choline chloride, which selectively strips CBPs from its surface. R36A lacking CBPs lost most of its inhibitory property, whereas the supernatant of choline chloride-treated R36A, containing CBPs, was markedly inhibitory. Co-immunization studies using cOVA and various Pn mutants, each genetically deficient in one of the CBPs, demonstrated that only Pn lacking the CBP, pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA), lost its ability to inhibit the IgG anti-cOVA response. These results strongly suggest that PspA plays a major role in mediating the immunosuppressive property of Pn. PMID:27029587

  7. Aspiration-related organizing pneumonia complicating laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding: A lung cancer mimicker

    PubMed Central

    Aljohaney, Ahmed A.; Ajlan, Amr M.; Alghamdi, Fahad A.

    2016-01-01

    There are several described pulmonary complications due to laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. We report a rare case of a 32-year-old male who presented with pulmonary symptoms and a solitary lung mass 12 years after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. A bronchoscopic lung biopsy showed organizing pneumonia that was induced by aspiration pneumonia. The atypical radiological appearance of the aspiration pneumonia may pose a diagnostic challenge, and clinicians' awareness regarding such an entity is needed to avoid unnecessary intervention. PMID:27803757

  8. Aspiration-related organizing pneumonia complicating laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding: A lung cancer mimicker.

    PubMed

    Aljohaney, Ahmed A; Ajlan, Amr M; Alghamdi, Fahad A

    2016-01-01

    There are several described pulmonary complications due to laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. We report a rare case of a 32-year-old male who presented with pulmonary symptoms and a solitary lung mass 12 years after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. A bronchoscopic lung biopsy showed organizing pneumonia that was induced by aspiration pneumonia. The atypical radiological appearance of the aspiration pneumonia may pose a diagnostic challenge, and clinicians' awareness regarding such an entity is needed to avoid unnecessary intervention.

  9. A Histologically Distinctive Interstitial Pneumonia Induced by Overexpression of the Interleukin 6, Transforming Growth Factor β1, or Platelet-Derived Growth Factor B Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Sakuma, Junko; Hayashi, Seiji; Abe, Kin'ya; Saito, Izumu; Harada, Shizuko; Sakatani, Mitsunoir; Yamamoto, Satoru; Matsumoto, Norinao; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Kishmoto, Tadamitsu

    1995-10-01

    Interstitial pneumonia is characterized by alveolitis with resulting fibrosis of the interstitium. To determine the relevance of humoral factors in the pathogenesis of interstitial pneumonia, we introduced expression vectors into Wistar rats via the trachea to locally overexpress humoral factors in the lungs. Human interleukin (IL) 6 and IL-6 receptor genes induced lymphocytic alveolitis without marked fibroblast proliferation. In contrast, overexpression of human transforming growth factor β1 or human platelet-derived growth factor B gene induced only mild or apparent cellular infiltration in the alveoli, respectively. However, both factors induced significant proliferation of fibroblasts and deposition of collagen fibrils. These histopathologic changes induced by the transforming growth factor β1 and platelet-derived growth factor B gene are partly akin to those changes seen in lung tissues from patients with pulmonary fibrosis and markedly contrast with the changes induced by overexpression of the IL-6 and IL-6 receptor genes that mimics lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia.

  10. Treatment with macrolides and glucocorticosteroids in severe community-acquired pneumonia: A post-hoc exploratory analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ceccato, Adrian; Cilloniz, Catia; Ranzani, Otavio T; Menendez, Rosario; Agusti, Carles; Gabarrus, Albert; Ferrer, Miquel; Sibila, Oriol; Niederman, Michael S; Torres, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    Systemic corticosteroids have anti-inflammatory effects, whereas macrolides also have immunomodulatory activity in addition to their primary antimicrobial actions. We aimed to evaluate the potential interaction effect between corticosteroids and macrolides on the systemic inflammatory response in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia to determine if combining these two immunomodulating agents was harmful, or possibly beneficial. We performed a post-hoc exploratory analysis of a randomized clinical trial conducted in three tertiary hospitals in Spain. This trial included patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia with high inflammatory response (C-reactive protein [CRP] >15 mg/dL) who were randomized to receive methylprednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/tpd or placebo. The choice of antibiotic treatment was at the physician's discretion. One hundred and six patients were classified into four groups according to antimicrobial therapy combination (β-lactam plus macrolide or β-lactam plus fluoroquinolone) and corticosteroid arm (placebo or corticosteroids). The primary outcome was treatment failure (composite outcome of early treatment failure, or of late treatment failure, or of both early and late treatment failure). The methylprednisolone with β-lactam plus macrolide group had more elderly patients, with comorbidities, and higher pneumonia severity index (PSI) risk class V, but a lower proportion of intensive care unit admission, compared to the other groups. We found non differences in treatment failure between groups (overall p = 0.374); however, a significant difference in late treatment failure was observed (4 patients in the placebo with β-lactam plus macrolide group (31%) vs. 9 patients in the placebo with β-lactam plus fluoroquinolone group (24%) vs. 0 patients in the methylprednisolone with β-lactam plus macrolide group (0%) vs. 2 patients [5%] in the methylprednisolone with β-lactam plus fluoroquinolone group overall p = 0.009). We found a

  11. Steroid treatment increases the recurrence of radiation-induced organizing pneumonia after breast-conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    Otani, Keisuke; Nishiyama, Kinji; Ito, Yuri; Kawaguchi, Yoshifumi; Inaji, Hideo

    2014-08-01

    Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia (RIOP) is an important complication of postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. Unfortunately, conventional corticosteroid therapy is frequently associated with relapses. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the outcomes of steroid treatment in patients with RIOP. In total, 26 patients diagnosed with RIOP from among 2404 women who received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer were included and classified into steroid (n = 7) and nonsteroid (n = 19) groups. Serum, sputum, and bronchoalveolar lavage composition; subjective symptoms (cough, fever, and dyspnea); migratory progression; and RIOP relapse were compared between the groups. Treatment type did not affect the duration of the subjective symptoms, which was 1.6 and 1.7 months for the steroid and nonsteroid groups, respectively. In contrast, RIOP relapse and new pulmonary lesions developed in five patients in the steroid group and only three patients in the nonsteroid group (P = 0.014). By assessing RIOP duration as the time to resolution of symptoms and discontinuation of therapy, the median duration of RIOP was significantly longer in the steroid (17.1 months) than that in the nonsteroid group (2.3 months, P = 0.005), primarily because of frequent relapses. After remission, persistent pulmonary dysfunction did not occur in the nonsteroid group. This single-center retrospective study demonstrates that steroid therapy results in frequent relapses and significantly prolongs RIOP duration. Corticosteroid treatment is considered a critical factor in RIOP recurrence. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Ovine pulmonary surfactant induces killing of Pasteurella haemolytica, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae by normal serum.

    PubMed Central

    Brogden, K A

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant has been shown to play an increasingly important role in bacterial clearance at the alveolar surface in the lung. This study describes a bactericidal mechanism in which ovine pulmonary surfactant induces killing of Pasteurella haemolytica by normal serum. To demonstrate killing, six bacterial species were incubated first with pulmonary surfactant for 60 min at 37 degrees C and then with serum for an additional 60 min at 37 degrees C. P. haemolytica type A1 strains 82-25 and L101, a P. haemolytica type 2 strain, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumoniae were susceptible and Pasteurella multocida, Serratia marcescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were not susceptible to killing by ovine pulmonary surfactant and normal serum. No bacteria incubated with bovine pulmonary surfactant were killed by normal serum. Although the species origin of pulmonary surfactant was selective, the species origin of serum was not. P. haemolytica incubated with ovine pulmonary surfactant was killed by fetal calf serum, gnotobiotic calf serum, pooled normal sheep serum, pooled normal rabbit serum, and pooled guinea pig serum. Ultrastructurally, killed P. haemolytica suspensions contained dead cells and cells distorted with vacuoles between the cytoplasmic membrane and the cytoplasm. The mechanism of killing did not correlate with concentrations of complement or lysozyme or titers of residual antibody in either the pulmonary surfactant or the serum, and killing was reduced by preincubation of surfactant with P. haemolytica lipopolysaccharide. Preliminary characterization of both surfactant and serum implicate a low-molecular-weight proteinaceous component in the surfactant and serum albumin in the serum. This mechanism may help clear certain gram-negative bacteria from the lungs of sheep as a part of the pulmonary innate defense system. Images PMID:1452351

  13. Fatal Community-acquired Pneumonia in Children Caused by Re-emergent Human Adenovirus 7d Associated with Higher Severity of Illness and Fatality Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiwu; Zeng, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jing; Pan, Yuxian; Chen, Manjun; Guo, Yonghui; Yu, Nan; Chodosh, James; Fu, Ning; Che, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Qiwei

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are highly contagious pathogens causing acute respiratory disease (ARD), such as community-acquired pneumonia. HAdV-7d, a re-emergent genomic variant, has been recently reported in Asia and the United States after a several-decade absence. However, whether HAdV-7d is associated with higher severity than other types is currently unclear. In this study, the clinical and epidemiological investigation showed that fever, cough, and sore throat were the three most common respiratory symptoms of HAdV infections. HAdV-7 caused longer duration of fever, higher morbidity of tachypnea/dyspnea, pleural effusion, diarrhea, hepatosplenomegaly, consciousness alteration, as well as higher rates of pneumonia, mechanical ventilation and higher fatality rate (28.6%) than other types, particularly HAdV-3 and HAdV-2. The genomes of seven HAdV-7d isolates from mild, severe, and fatal cases were sequenced and highly similar with each other. Surprisingly, two isolates (2011, 2012) had 100% identical genomes with an earlier strain from a fatal ARD outbreak in China (2009), which elucidates the virus origin and confirms the unexpected HAdV genomic conservation and stability. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that L1 52/55-kDa DNA packaging protein may be associated with the higher severity of illness and fatality rate of HAdV-7. Clinicians need to be aware of HAdVs in children with ARD. PMID:27848998

  14. Observational Follow-up Study on a Cohort of Children with Severe Pneumonia after Discharge from a Day-care Clinic in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Nur H.; Chisti, Mohammod J.; Salam, Mohammed A.; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gyr, Niklaus

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Compliance, morbidity, mortality, and hospitalization during fortnightly follow-up were evaluated by an observational study on a cohort of children with severe and very severe pneumonia after day-care treatment at an urban clinic. The primary outcome measures were proportions of success (compliance) and failure (non-compliance) of follow-up visits at the day-care clinic. In total, 251 children were followed up, with median (IQR) age of 5.0 (3.0-9.0) months, and their compliance dropped from 92% at the first to 85% at the sixth visit. Cough (28%), fever (20%), and rapid breathing (13%) were common morbidities. Successful follow-up visits were possible in 180 (95.2%) and 56 (90.3%) of the children with severe and very severe pneumonia respectively. Eleven (4.4%) needed hospitalization, and four (1.6%) died. Majority (≈90%) of the children could be successfully followed up; some failed to attend their scheduled follow-up visits due to hospitalization and death. The common morbidities indicate the importance of follow-up for detecting medical problems and early treatment, thus reducing risk of death. PMID:25076656

  15. Efficacy of High-Dose Meropenem (Six Grams per Day) in Treatment of Experimental Murine Pneumonia Induced by Meropenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Iwanaga, Naoki; Takemoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Taiga; Yanagihara, Kastunori; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Mukae, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru; Izumikawa, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    High-dose meropenem (MEPM; 6 g/day) has been approved as a treatment for purulent meningitis; however, little is known regarding its in vivo efficacy in refractory lower respiratory tract infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of MEPM at 6 g/day in a murine model of severe pneumonia caused by MEPM-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Experimental pneumonia induced by MEPM-resistant P. aeruginosa was treated with normal-dose MEPM (150 mg/kg of body weight, simulating a 3-g/day regimen in humans) or high-dose MEPM (500 mg/kg, simulating a 6-g/day regimen in humans). Mice treated with high-dose MEPM showed significantly restored survival relative to that of untreated mice and tended to show a survival rate higher than that of mice treated with normal-dose MEPM. The viable bacterial counts (of two clinical isolates) in the lungs decreased significantly in mice treated with high-dose MEPM from those for untreated mice (P < 0.001) or mice treated with normal-dose MEPM (P, <0.01 and <0.05). The number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was also significantly lower in mice treated with high-dose MEPM than in untreated mice. The free MEPM concentration in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) exceeded 16 μg/ml for 85 min in mice treated with high-dose MEPM, but not for mice treated with normal-dose MEPM. Our results demonstrate that high-dose MEPM (6 g/day) might provide better protection against pneumonia caused by MEPM-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa than the dose normally administered (less than 3 g/day).

  16. Observational follow-up study following two cohorts of children with severe pneumonia after discharge from day care clinic/hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Nur H; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gyr, Niklaus

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To compare the features of relapse, morbidity, mortality and re-hospitalisation following successful discharge after severe pneumonia in children between a day care group and a hospital group and to explore the predictors of failures during 3 months of follow-up. Design An observational study following two cohorts of children with severe pneumonia for 3 months after discharge from hospital/clinic. Setting Day care was provided at the Radda Clinic and hospital care at a hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Participants Children aged 2–59 months with severe pneumonia attending the clinic/hospital who survived to discharge. Intervention No intervention was done except providing some medications for minor illnesses, if indicated. Primary outcome measures The primary outcome measures were the proportion of successes and failures of day care at follow-up visits as determined by estimating the OR with 95% CI in comparison to hospital care. Results The authors enrolled 360 children with a mean (SD) age of 8 (7) months, 81% were infants and 61% were men. The follow-up compliance dropped from 95% at first to 85% at sixth visit. The common morbidities during the follow-up period included cough (28%), fever (17%), diarrhoea (9%) and rapid breathing (7%). During the follow-up period, significantly more day care children (n=22 (OR 12.2 (95% CI 8.2–17.8))) required re-hospitalisation after completion of initial day care compared with initial hospital care group (n=11 (OR 6.1 (95% CI 3.4–10.6))). The predictors for failure were associated with tachycardia, tachypnoea and hypoxaemia on admission and prolonged duration of stay. Conclusions There are considerable morbidities in children discharged following treatment of severe pneumonia like cough, fever, rapid breathing and diarrhoea during 3-month period. The findings indicate the importance of follow-up for early detection of medical problems and their management to reduce the risk of death. Establishment of an

  17. Failure of standard antimicrobial therapy in children aged 3-59 months with mild or asymptomatic HIV infection and severe pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Jeena, Prakash; Thea, Donald M.; MacLeod, William B.; Chisaka, Noel; Fox, Matthew P.; Coovadia, H. M.; Qazi, Shamim

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether children aged 3-59 months with mild or non-symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and WHO-defined severe pneumonia have a higher failure rate than do HIV-uninfected children when treated with the standard WHO treatment of parenteral penicillin or oral amoxicillin. METHODS: This study was a planned sub-analysis of a randomized trial of 3-59-month-old children presenting with WHO-defined severe pneumonia (the APPIS study). We included two sites with high HIV prevalence in Durban, South Africa and Ndola, Zambia. Primary outcome measures were clinical treatment failure at day 2 and day 14. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV IDENTIFIER: CT00227331http://www.clinicaltrialsgov/show/NCT00227331). FINDINGS: Of the 523 children enrolled, HIV status was known for 464 participants; 106 (23%) of these were infected with HIV. By day 2, 57 (12.3%) children had failed treatment and 110 (23.7%) failed by day 14. Twenty (18.9%) HIV-infected children failed by day 2 compared with 37 (10.3%) uninfected children (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.07; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-4.00). Thirty-four (32.1%) HIV-infected children failed treatment by day 14 compared with 76 (21.2%) uninfected children (adjusted OR 1.88; 95% CI: 1.11-3.17). Analysis stratified by age showed that the greatest differential in treatment failure at day 2 and day 14 occurred in the children aged 3-5 months. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-infected children with severe pneumonia fail WHO-standard treatment with parenteral penicillin or amoxicillin at day 2 and day 14 more often than do HIV-uninfected children, especially young infants. Standard case management of acute respiratory infection (ARI) using WHO treatment guidelines is inadequate in areas of high HIV prevalence and reappraisal of empiric antimicrobial therapy is urgently needed for severe pneumonia associated with HIV-1. PMID:16628299

  18. Platelet and endothelial cell P-selectin are required for host defense against Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced pneumosepsis.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, S F; Van't Veer, C; Roelofs, J J T H; Claushuis, T A M; de Boer, O J; Tanck, M W T; Hoogendijk, A J; van der Poll, T

    2015-06-01

    Sepsis is associated with activation of platelets and endothelial cells accompanied by enhanced P-selectin surface expression. Both platelet- and endothelial P-selectin have been associated with leukocyte recruitment and induction of inflammatory alterations. Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae is a common human sepsis pathogen, particularly in the context of pneumonia. Wild-type (WT) and P-selectin-deficient (Selp(-/-) ) mice or bone marrow chimeric mice were infected with K. pneumoniae via the airways to induce pneumosepsis. Mice were sacrificed during early (12 h after infection) or late-stage (44 h) sepsis for analyses, or followed in a survival study. Selp(-/-) mice displayed 10-1000-fold higher bacterial burdens in the lungs, blood and distant organs during late-stage sepsis. P-selectin deficiency did not influence leukocyte recruitment to the lungs, but was associated with decreased platelet-monocyte complexes and increased cytokine release. Bone marrow transfer studies revealed a role for both platelet and endothelial cell P-selectin as mice deficient in platelet or endothelial cell P-selectin displayed an intermediate phenotype in bacterial loads and survival compared with full wild-type or full knockout control mice. Both platelet and endothelial cell P-selectin contribute to host defense during Klebsiella pneumosepsis. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  19. A preliminary study on the potential of Mycoplasma pneumoniae to induce dyskaryotic change in respiratory epithelium in adult community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    An, Shu-Chang; Yang, Dong-Hong; Luo, Chao-Feng; Chen, Xin; Liu, Guo-Tian; Weng, Yan; Liu, Jing-Zhe; Shang, Ying; Wang, Rui-Qin; Gao, Zhan-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to explore the cellular morphology of respiratory epithelium in Mycoplasma pneumonia (MpP) patients. Materials and Methods: The cast-off cell morphological findings from bronchoscopic brushings in MpP and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by typical pathogens were reviewed. Results: Compared with the CAP group, cellular dysplasia in respiratory tract epithelial brushings was significantly greater in MpP patients (P = 0.033). Conclusion: Unique biological characteristics and mechanisms of pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) may result in dyskaryotic changes in respiratory epithelium in adult MpP. PMID:28163727

  20. Chlamydia pneumoniae-induced foam cell formation requires MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling and is reciprocally modulated by liver X receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Shimada, Kenichi; Bulut, Yonca; Doherty, Terence M; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2008-11-15

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is detected by macrophages and other APCs via TLRs and can exacerbate developing atherosclerotic lesions, but how that occurs is not known. Liver X receptors (LXRs) centrally control reverse cholesterol transport, but also negatively modulate TLR-mediated inflammatory pathways. We isolated peritoneal macrophages from wild-type, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR2/4, MyD88, TRIF, MyD88/TRIF, and IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) KO mice, treated them with live or UV-killed C. pneumoniae in the presence or absence of oxidized LDL, then measured foam cell formation. In some experiments, the synthetic LXR agonist GW3965 was added to macrophages infected with C. pneumoniae in the presence of oxidized LDL. Both live and UV-killed C. pneumoniae induced IRF3 activation and promoted foam cell formation in wild-type macrophages, whereas the genetic absence of TLR2, TLR4, MyD88, TRIF, or IRF3, but not TLR3, significantly reduced foam cell formation. C. pneumoniae-induced foam cell formation was significantly reduced by the LXR agonist GW3965, which in turn inhibited C. pneumoniae-induced IRF3 activation, suggesting a bidirectional cross-talk. We conclude that C. pneumoniae facilitates foam cell formation via activation of both MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent (i.e., TRIF-dependent and IRF3-dependent) pathways downstream of TLR2 and TLR4 signaling and that TLR3 is not involved in this process. This mechanism could at least partly explain why infection with C. pneumoniae accelerates the development of atherosclerotic plaque and lends support to the proposal that LXR agonists might prove clinically useful in suppressing atherogenesis.

  1. Data Management and Data Quality in PERCH, a Large International Case-Control Study of Severe Childhood Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Watson, Nora L; Prosperi, Christine; Driscoll, Amanda J; Higdon, Melissa M; Park, Daniel E; Sanza, Megan; DeLuca, Andrea N; Awori, Juliet O; Goswami, Doli; Hammond, Emily; Hossain, Lokman; Johnson, Catherine; Kamau, Alice; Kuwanda, Locadiah; Moore, David P; Neyzari, Omid; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Parker, David; Sapchookul, Patranuch; Seidenberg, Phil; Shamsul, Arifin; Siazeele, Kazungu; Srisaengchai, Prasong; Sylla, Mamadou; Levine, Orin S; Murdoch, David R; O'Brien, Katherine L; Wolff, Mark; Deloria Knoll, Maria

    2017-06-15

    The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study is the largest multicountry etiology study of pediatric pneumonia undertaken in the past 3 decades. The study enrolled 4232 hospitalized cases and 5325 controls over 2 years across 9 research sites in 7 countries in Africa and Asia. The volume and complexity of data collection in PERCH presented considerable logistical and technical challenges. The project chose an internet-based data entry system to allow real-time access to the data, enabling the project to monitor and clean incoming data and perform preliminary analyses throughout the study. To ensure high-quality data, the project developed comprehensive quality indicator, data query, and monitoring reports. Among the approximately 9000 cases and controls, analyzable laboratory results were available for ≥96% of core specimens collected. Selected approaches to data management in PERCH may be extended to the planning and organization of international studies of similar scope and complexity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  2. CPAP IMPACT: a protocol for a randomised trial of bubble continuous positive airway pressure versus standard care for high-risk children with severe pneumonia using adaptive design methods

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew G; Eckerle, Michelle; Mvalo, Tisungane; Weir, Brian; Martinson, Francis; Chalira, Alfred; Lufesi, Norman; Mofolo, Innocent; Hosseinipour, Mina

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Pneumonia is a leading cause of mortality among children in low-resource settings. Mortality is greatest among children with high-risk conditions including HIV infection or exposure, severe malnutrition and/or severe hypoxaemia. WHO treatment recommendations include low-flow oxygen for children with severe pneumonia. Bubble continuous positive airway pressure (bCPAP) is a non-invasive support modality that provides positive end-expiratory pressure and oxygen. bCPAP is effective in the treatment of neonates in low-resource settings; its efficacy is unknown for high-risk children with severe pneumonia in low-resource settings. Methods and analysis CPAP IMPACT is a randomised clinical trial comparing bCPAP to low-flow oxygen in the treatment of severe pneumonia among high-risk children 1–59 months of age. High-risk children are stratified into two subgroups: (1) HIV infection or exposure and/or severe malnutrition; (2) severe hypoxaemia. The trial is being conducted in a Malawi district hospital and will enrol 900 participants. The primary outcome is in-hospital mortality rate of children treated with standard care as compared with bCPAP. Ethics and dissemination CPAP IMPACT has approval from the Institutional Review Boards of all investigators. An urgent need exists to determine whether bCPAP decreases mortality among high-risk children with severe pneumonia to inform resource utilisation in low-resource settings. Trial registration number NCT02484183; Pre-results. PMID:28883928

  3. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia.

  4. Association of IL-10 (-819T/C, -592A/C and -1082A/G) and IL-6 -174G/C gene polymorphism and the risk of pneumonia-induced sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zheng-Rong; Zhang, Shao-Lei; Feng, Bo

    2017-03-01

    Association between inherited variants and the risks of sepsis is controversial. To evaluate the risk of pneumonia-induced sepsis by examining its linkage with polymorphisms of IL-6 and IL-10. Samples were obtained from 188 pneumonia-induced sepsis patients, 162 pneumonia patients and 200 healthy controls. Subjects with IL-10 -1082 AA genotypes and IL-6 -174 CC genotype had a higher risk of sepsis and increased mRNA levels. The variants of IL-10 -1082 A allele and IL-6 -174 C allele contributed to an increased risk of pneumonia-induced sepsis.

  5. TLR/MyD88 and liver X receptor alpha signaling pathways reciprocally control Chlamydia pneumoniae-induced acceleration of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Naiki, Yoshikazu; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Wong, Michelle H; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Shimada, Kenichi; Chen, Shuang; Yilmaz, Atilla; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Schröder, Nicolas W J; Crother, Timothy R; Bulut, Yonca; Doherty, Terence M; Bradley, Michelle; Shaposhnik, Zory; Peterson, Ellena M; Tontonoz, Peter; Shah, Prediman K; Arditi, Moshe

    2008-11-15

    Experimental and clinical studies link Chlamydia pneumoniae infection to atherogenesis and atherothrombotic events, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that C. pneumoniae-induced acceleration of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E (ApoE)(-/-) mice is reciprocally modulated by activation of TLR-mediated innate immune and liver X receptor alpha (LXRalpha) signaling pathways. We infected ApoE(-/-) mice and ApoE(-/-) mice that also lacked TLR2, TLR4, MyD88, or LXRalpha intranasally with C. pneumoniae followed by feeding of a high fat diet for 4 mo. Mock-infected littermates served as controls. Atherosclerosis was assessed in aortic sinuses and in en face preparation of whole aorta. The numbers of activated dendritic cells (DCs) within plaques and the serum levels of cholesterol and proinflammatory cytokines were also measured. C. pneumoniae infection markedly accelerated atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice that was associated with increased numbers of activated DCs in aortic sinus plaques and higher circulating levels of MCP-1, IL-12p40, IL-6, and TNF-alpha. In contrast, C. pneumoniae infection had only a minimal effect on atherosclerosis, accumulation of activated DCs in the sinus plaques, or circulating cytokine increases in ApoE(-/-) mice that were also deficient in TLR2, TLR4, or MyD88. However, C. pneumoniae-induced acceleration of atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice was further enhanced in ApoE(-/-)LXRalpha(-/-) double knockout mice and was accompanied by higher serum levels of IL-6 and TNF-alpha. We conclude that C. pneumoniae infection accelerates atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice predominantly through a TLR/MyD88-dependent mechanism and that LXRalpha appears to reciprocally modulate and reduce the proatherogenic effects of C. pneumoniae infection.

  6. NKT Cells in the Induced Sputum of Severe Asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Hamzaoui, Agnes; Cheik Rouhou, Sana; Graïri, Hedia; Abid, Hanadi; Ammar, Jamel; Chelbi, Hanene; Hamzaoui, Kamel

    2006-01-01

    To determine whether there was a specific inflammatory process in severe asthmatics, the phenotypic characteristics of induced sputum immune cells were analysed among patients with severe asthma. Twenty-two induced sputa (10 severe asthmatics) were studied. Flow cytometric analysis was performed using immune cells of the sputum and monoclonal antibodies to CD3, CD4, CD8, CD56, CD25, and TCRγδ. The number of NKT (CD3+CD56+) cells was significantly higher in the sputum of severe asthmatics compared with mild asthmatic and healthy control groups (P < .05). CD8+CD56+ cells were the predominant subtype of the increased NKT cells in severe asthmatics. CD3+CD56+Vα24+, TCRγδ+ CD56+, and CD4+CD25+ T cells were significantly increased in severe asthmatic patients. These results suggest that the immunopathogenesis of severe asthmatics vary between severe and mild asthmatics, and that CD8+CD56+ NKT cells may play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of severe asthma. PMID:16883065

  7. Effectiveness of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination in preventing community-acquired pneumonia hospitalization and severe outcomes in the elderly in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Soldevila, Núria; Toledo, Diana; Torner, Núria; Force, Luis; Pérez, María José; Martín, Vicente; Rodríguez-Rojas, Lourdes; Astray, Jenaro; Egurrola, Mikel; Sanz, Francisco; Castilla, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia is a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly, but investigation of the etiological agent of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is not possible in most hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination (PPSV23) in preventing CAP hospitalization and reducing the risk of intensive care unit admission (ICU) and fatal outcomes in hospitalized people aged ≥65 years. We made a multicenter case-control study in 20 Spanish hospitals during 2013–2014 and 2014–2015. We selected patients aged ≥65 years hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia and controls matched by sex, age and date of hospitalization. Multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression to estimate vaccine effectiveness and unconditional logistic regression to evaluate the reduction in the risk of severe and fatal outcomes. 1895 cases and 1895 controls were included; 13.7% of cases and 14.4% of controls had received PPSV23 in the last five years. The effectiveness of PPSV23 in preventing CAP hospitalization was 15.2% (95% CI -3.1–30.3). The benefit of PPSV23 in avoiding ICU admission or death was 28.1% (95% CI -14.3–56.9) in all patients, 30.9% (95% CI -32.2–67.4) in immunocompetent patients and 26.9% (95% CI -38.6–64.8) in immunocompromised patients. In conclusion, PPSV23 showed a modest trend to avoidance of hospitalizations due to CAP and to the prevention of death or ICU admission in elderly patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of CAP. PMID:28187206

  8. Effectiveness of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination in preventing community-acquired pneumonia hospitalization and severe outcomes in the elderly in Spain.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Àngela; Soldevila, Núria; Toledo, Diana; Torner, Núria; Force, Luis; Pérez, María José; Martín, Vicente; Rodríguez-Rojas, Lourdes; Astray, Jenaro; Egurrola, Mikel; Sanz, Francisco; Castilla, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia is a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly, but investigation of the etiological agent of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is not possible in most hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination (PPSV23) in preventing CAP hospitalization and reducing the risk of intensive care unit admission (ICU) and fatal outcomes in hospitalized people aged ≥65 years. We made a multicenter case-control study in 20 Spanish hospitals during 2013-2014 and 2014-2015. We selected patients aged ≥65 years hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia and controls matched by sex, age and date of hospitalization. Multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression to estimate vaccine effectiveness and unconditional logistic regression to evaluate the reduction in the risk of severe and fatal outcomes. 1895 cases and 1895 controls were included; 13.7% of cases and 14.4% of controls had received PPSV23 in the last five years. The effectiveness of PPSV23 in preventing CAP hospitalization was 15.2% (95% CI -3.1-30.3). The benefit of PPSV23 in avoiding ICU admission or death was 28.1% (95% CI -14.3-56.9) in all patients, 30.9% (95% CI -32.2-67.4) in immunocompetent patients and 26.9% (95% CI -38.6-64.8) in immunocompromised patients. In conclusion, PPSV23 showed a modest trend to avoidance of hospitalizations due to CAP and to the prevention of death or ICU admission in elderly patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of CAP.

  9. IFN-τ inhibits S. aureus-induced inflammation by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs in RAW 264.7 cells and mice with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gan; Wu, Haichong; Jiang, Kangfeng; Rui, Guangze; Zhu, Zhe; Qiu, Changwei; Guo, Mengyao; Deng, Ganzhen

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), a significant cause of pneumonia, leads to severe inflammation. Few effective treatments or drugs have been reported for S. aureus infection. Interferon tau (IFN-τ) is a type I interferon with low cellular toxicity even at high doses. Previous studies have reported that IFN-τ could significantly mitigate tissue inflammation; however, IFN-τ treatment in S. aureus-induced pneumonia has not been well reported. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the anti-inflammatory mechanism of IFN-τ in S. aureus-induced pneumonia in mice. A S. aureus-induced pneumonia model and RAW 264.7 cells were used in this research. The histopathological as well as lung wet to dry ratio (W/D) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity results showed that IFN-τ could protect the lung from S. aureus damage. In addition, ELISA and qPCR revealed that IFN-τ treatment led to a decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) in both the cells and mouse model, but IL-10 was increased. TLR2, which is involved in the response during S. aureus infection, was also down-regulated by IFN-τ treatment and directly affected NF-κB and MAPK pathway activation. Then, we examined the phosphorylation of IκBα, NF-κB p65 and MAPKs by western blotting, and the results displayed that the phosphorylation of IκBα, NF-κB p65 and MAPKs was inhibited upon IFN-τ treatment in both the cells and mouse model. These findings indicate that IFN-τ has anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo through the inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK activation, suggesting that IFN-τ may have potential as a therapeutic agent against S. aureus-induced inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Candidate HLA genes for prediction of co-trimoxazole-induced severe cutaneous reactions.

    PubMed

    Kongpan, Thachanan; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Konyoung, Parinya; Kanjanawart, Sirimas; Chumworathayi, Pansu; Wichukchinda, Nuanjun; Kidkeukarun, Runglak; Preechakul, Suphanlinee; Khunarkornsiri, Usanee; Bamrungram, Warawut; Supharatwattanakun, Butsaban; Mootsikapun, Piroon; Kwangsukstid, Supanida; Denjanta, Sukanda; Vannaprasaht, Suda; Rungapiromnan, Watcharee; Suwankesawong, Wimon; Tassaneeyakul, Wongwiwat; Tassaneeyakul, Wichittra

    2015-08-01

    Co-trimoxazole is a sulfonamide-containing antibiotic that is effective in the treatment of several infections and for prophylaxis of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. This drug has been reported as a common culprit drug for the Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and for toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) play a key role in the immunopathogenesis of severe cutaneous reactions induced by several drugs. This study investigated the association between the HLA class I and HLA-DRB1 polymorphisms and co-trimoxazole-induced SJS/TEN in a Thai population. Forty-three patients with co-trimoxazole-induced SJS/TEN and 91 co-trimoxazole-tolerant patients were enrolled in the study. HLA class I and HLA-DRB1 were genotyped using the reverse sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe method. The frequencies of three alleles of HLA, namely HLA-B*15:02, HLA-C*06:02, and HLA-C*08:01, were significantly higher in the co-trimoxazole-induced SJS/TEN group compared with controls. The risks for co-trimoxazole-induced SJS/TEN in patients with the HLA-B*15:02, HLA-C*06:02, or HLA-C*08:01 allele were about 3-11-fold higher when compared with those who did not carry one of these alleles. Individuals who carried the HLA-B*15:02-C*08:01 haplotype had a 14-fold higher risk for co-trimoxazole-induced SJS/TEN. Evidence of associations between co-trimoxazole-induced SJS/TEN and HLA alleles including HLA-B*15:02, HLA-C*06:02, and HLA-C*08:01 were found in the study population. These findings may suggest that apart from the HLA molecules, other molecules involved in the molecular pathogenesis of these severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions may play an important role in the susceptibility of individuals to SJS/TEN caused by co-trimoxazole.

  11. Analysis of Risk Factors for Severe Acute Respiratory Infection and Pneumonia and among Adult Patients with Acute Respiratory Illness during 2011-2014 Influenza Seasons in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Wie, Seong-Heon; Jeong, Hye Won; Kim, Young Keun; Park, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Shin Woo; Lee, Sun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization recommends the surveillance of influenza-like illness (ILI) and severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) to respond effectively to both seasonal influenza epidemics and pandemics. In Korea, the “Hospital-based Influenza Morbidity and Mortality (HIMM)” surveillance system has been operated to monitor ILI and SARI occurrences. Materials and Methods A multi-center prospective observational study was conducted. Adult patients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) were enrolled during the 2011-12, 2012-2013, and 2013-2014 influenza seasons at the 10 university hospitals using the HIMM surveillance system. With respect to SARI and pneumonia development, risk profiles were analyzed in patients with ARI in Korea. Results A total of 5,459 cases were eligible for this analysis. Among 5,459 cases with ARI, 2,887 cases (52.9%) were identified that they had influenza infection. Among enrolled cases, 750 cases belonged to the SARI group, while 4,709 cases belonged to the non-SARI group. With respect to pneumonia development, 317 cases were accompanied by pneumonia, and 5,142 cases were not. Multivariate analyses revealed that the following factors were associated with an increased risk of SARI: Old age (≥65 years) (odds ratio [OR] 2.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.2-3.32), chronic heart disease (CHD) (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.68-2.98), cerebrovascular disease (CVD) (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.05-2.10), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.48-3.69), asthma (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.62-3.36), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.73-3.99), chronic liver disease (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.04-2.81), and autoimmune diseases (OR 2.53, 1.57-4.08). Multivariate analyses revealed that the following factors were independent risk factors for pneumonia development: Old age (≥65 years) (OR 5.71, 95% CI 4.10-7.94), CHD (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.07-2.22), COPD (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.48-3.69), asthma (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.62-3.36), CKD (OR 2.62, 95

  12. CMV - pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan of chest Urine culture (clean catch) Sputum gram stain and culture Treatment The goal of treatment is ... Mononucleosis Pneumonia - adults (community acquired) WBC count Patient Instructions Pneumonia in adults - discharge Review Date 12/10/ ...

  13. Pneumonia (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs caused by an infection. Many different organisms can cause it, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of ...

  14. Bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to aspiration pneumonia induced by a wristwatch lodged at the pharyngoesophageal junction.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Chihiro; Miyao, Masashi; Kotani, Hirokazu; Tamaki, Keiji

    2015-06-01

    Bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to disease is rare and seldom encountered in forensic autopsies; however, traumatic bilateral pneumothorax occurs often. Herein, we present a forensic case involving a 50-year-old woman who died 4 days after ingesting a wristwatch. Postmortem computed tomography and autopsy findings demonstrated that the wristwatch was lodged at the pharyngoesophageal junction, that she had a bilateral pneumothorax unaccompanied by any thoracic wound, and that macular hemorrhagic lesions on the lung surfaces were responsible for the pneumothorax. A histological examination of the macular lesions revealed that they were aspiration pneumonia foci with many birefringent foreign materials. Furthermore, a necrotic process secondary to aspiration pneumonia with a one way check-valve hyperinflation caused by foreign materials in the bronchioles was the most probable pathogenesis of her pneumothorax. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a bilateral secondary spontaneous pneumothorax caused by a large foreign body at the pharyngoesophageal junction leading to death.

  15. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia associated with anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome induced by lamotrigine.

    PubMed

    Ghandourah, Hasan; Bhandal, Samarjeet; Brundler, Marie-Anne; Noseworthy, Mary

    2016-01-29

    A 14-year-old girl who was known to have a seizure disorder and on lamotrigine treatment was admitted to the hospital, with a history of rash, fever and cough. Her condition deteriorated with clinical features suggestive of anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome (ACHS) complicated with bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia (BOOP). Her chest CT showed multifocal parenchymal opacities and lung biopsy was typical for BOOP. Initially, the lamotrigine was discontinued since the onset of the rash, then she was treated for pneumonia with antibiotics, which may have delayed the diagnosis. Eventually, BOOP was considered and she was treated with a high dose of corticosteroid. She improved clinically and her repeated chest CT showed a marked resolution of the lesions. This case illustrates the possible occurrence of BOOP as a complication of ACHS secondary to lamotrigine treatment. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Sulfadoxine specific lymphocyte transformation in a patient with eosinophilic pneumonia induced by sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (Fansidar).

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, P T; Holzschuh, J; Berg, P A

    1989-01-01

    A patient developed eosinophilic peripheral pulmonary infiltrates while receiving malaria prophylaxis with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (Fansidar). Withdrawal of Fansidar and treatment with corticosteroids led to rapid recovery. No exacerbation occurred after cessation of corticosteroids. Lymphocyte transformation testing gave a positive result in the presence of sulfadoxine but not pyrimethamine. It is concluded that drug hypersensitivity to sulfadoxine was the cause of the eosinophilic pneumonia in this patient. Images PMID:2763233

  17. Phenytoin-induced severe gingival overgrowth in a child.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Verma, Nidhi; Verma, Umesh Pratap

    2014-07-21

    Gingival enlargement or overgrowth (GO) is a common complication of the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin (PHT). GO is evident in almost half of the patients receiving PHT therapy. PHT-induced gingival overgrowth (PGO) is more common in children than in adults and affects both males and females equally. PGO may vary from mild to severe and does not seem to be dose dependant. It is supposed that PHT and its metabolites cause a direct effect on the periodontal tissues; however, poor oral hygiene may contribute to the severity of gingival inflammation in patients with PGO. Management of PGO includes meticulous oral hygiene practice to reduce inflammation and surgical excision of the overgrown tissue, known as gingivectomy. We present a case of PHT-induced severe GO in a 10-year-old boy and discuss the clinical features, aetiology, pathogenesis and management of PGO.

  18. Phenytoin-induced severe gingival overgrowth in a child

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Verma, Nidhi; Verma, Umesh Pratap

    2014-01-01

    Gingival enlargement or overgrowth (GO) is a common complication of the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin (PHT). GO is evident in almost half of the patients receiving PHT therapy. PHT-induced gingival overgrowth (PGO) is more common in children than in adults and affects both males and females equally. PGO may vary from mild to severe and does not seem to be dose dependant. It is supposed that PHT and its metabolites cause a direct effect on the periodontal tissues; however, poor oral hygiene may contribute to the severity of gingival inflammation in patients with PGO. Management of PGO includes meticulous oral hygiene practice to reduce inflammation and surgical excision of the overgrown tissue, known as gingivectomy. We present a case of PHT-induced severe GO in a 10-year-old boy and discuss the clinical features, aetiology, pathogenesis and management of PGO. PMID:25053668

  19. Microbiological and pathological examination of fatal calf pneumonia cases induced by bacterial and viral respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Szeredi, Levente; Jánosi, Szilárd; Pálfi, Vilmos

    2010-09-01

    The infectious origin of fatal cases of calf pneumonia was studied in 48 calves from 27 different herds on postmortem examination. Lung tissue samples were examined by pathological, histological, bacterial culture, virus isolation and immunohistochemical methods for the detection of viral and bacterial infections. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 47/48 cases and infectious agents were found in 40/47 (85%) of those cases. The presence of multiple respiratory pathogens in 23/40 (57.5%) cases indicated the complex origin of fatal calf pneumonia. The most important respiratory pathogens were Mannheimia-Pasteurella in 36/40 (90%) cases, followed by Arcanobacterium pyogenes in 16/40 (40%) cases, Mycoplasma bovis in 12/40 (30%) cases, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus in 4/40 (10%) cases. Histophilus somni was detected in 2/40 (5%) cases, while bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhoea virus and parainfluenza virus-3 were each found in 1/40 (2.5%) case. Mastadenovirus, bovine coronavirus, influenza A virus or Chlamydiaceae were not detected.

  20. Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: validation of severity criteria. The Grupo Andaluz para el Estudio de las Enfermedades Infecciosas.

    PubMed

    Cordero, E; Pachón, J; Rivero, A; Girón, J A; Gómez-Mateos, J; Merino, M D; Torres-Tortosa, M; González-Serrano, M; Aliaga, L; Collado, A; Hernández-Quero, J; Barrera, A; Nuño, E

    2000-12-01

    Severity criteria for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have always excluded patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. A 1-yr, multicenter, prospective observational study of HIV-infected patients with bacterial CAP was done to validate the criteria used in the American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines for CAP, and to determine the prognosis-associated factors in the HIV-infected population with bacterial CAP. Overall, 355 cases were included, with an attributable mortality of 9.3%. Patients who met the ATS criteria had a longer hospital stay (p = 0.01), longer duration of fever (p < 0.001), and higher attributable mortality (13.1% versus 3.5%, p = 0.02) than those who did not. Three factors were independently related to mortality: CD4(+) cell count < 100/microl, radiologic progression of disease, and shock. Pleural effusion, cavities, and/or multilobar infiltrates at admission were independently associated with radiologic progression. A prognostic rule based on the five criteria of shock, CD4(+) cell count < 100/microl, pleural effusion, cavities, and multilobar infiltrates had a high negative predictive value for mortality (97.1%). The attributable mortality for severe pneumonia was 11.3%, as compared with 1.3% for nonsevere disease (p = 0.008). The ATS severity criteria are valid in HIV-infected patients with bacterial CAP. Our study provides the basis for identification of patients who may require hospitalization determined by clinical judgment and the five clinical criteria of shock, a CD4(+) cell count < 100/microl, pleural effusion, cavities, and multilobar involvement. These prognostic factors should be validated in independent cohort studies.

  1. Human mesenchymal stem cells reduce the severity of acute lung injury in a sheep model of bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Asmussen, Sven; Ito, Hiroshi; Traber, Daniel L; Lee, Jae W; Cox, Robert A; Hawkins, Hal K; McAuley, Daniel F; McKenna, David H; Traber, Lillian D; Zhuo, Hanjing; Wilson, Jennifer; Herndon, David N; Prough, Donald S; Liu, Kathleen D; Matthay, Michael A; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2014-09-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells (hMSCs) improve survival in mouse models of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and reduce pulmonary oedema in a perfused human lung preparation injured with Escherichia coli bacteria. We hypothesised that clinical grade hMSCs would reduce the severity of acute lung injury (ALI) and would be safe in a sheep model of ARDS. Adult sheep (30-40 kg) were surgically prepared. After 5 days of recovery, ALI was induced with cotton smoke insufflation, followed by instillation of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2.5×10(11) CFU) into both lungs under isoflurane anaesthesia. Following the injury, sheep were ventilated, resuscitated with lactated Ringer's solution and studied for 24 h. The sheep were randomly allocated to receive one of the following treatments intravenously over 1 h in one of the following groups: (1) control, PlasmaLyte A, n=8; (2) lower dose hMSCs, 5×10(6) hMSCs/kg, n=7; and (3) higher-dose hMSCs, 10×10(6) hMSCs/kg, n=4. By 24 h, the PaO2/FiO2 ratio was significantly improved in both hMSC treatment groups compared with the control group (control group: PaO2/FiO2 of 97±15 mm Hg; lower dose: 288±55 mm Hg (p=0.003); higher dose: 327±2 mm Hg (p=0.003)). The median lung water content was lower in the higher-dose hMSC-treated group compared with the control group (higher dose: 5.0 g wet/g dry [IQR 4.9-5.8] vs control: 6.7 g wet/g dry [IQR 6.4-7.5] (p=0.01)). The hMSCs had no adverse effects. Human MSCs were well tolerated and improved oxygenation and decreased pulmonary oedema in a sheep model of severe ARDS. NCT01775774 for Phase 1. NCT02097641 for Phase 2. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Antibody responses of Chlamydophila pneumoniae pneumonia: Why is the diagnosis of C. pneumoniae pneumonia difficult?

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Takaaki; Akaike, Hiroto; Teranishi, Hideto; Wakabayashi, Tokio; Nakano, Takashi; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Okimoto, Niro

    2015-07-01

    The ELNAS Plate Chlamydophila pneumoniae commercial test kit for the detection of anti-C. pneumoniae-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgA and IgG antibodies has become available in Japan recently. To determine the optimum serum collection point for the ELNAS plate in the diagnosis of C. pneumoniae pneumonia, we analyzed the kinetics of the antibody response in patients with laboratory-confirmed C. pneumoniae pneumonia. We enrolled five C. pneumoniae pneumonia cases and collected sera from patients for several months. The kinetics of the IgM and IgG antibody responses were similar among the five patients. Significant increases in IgM and IgG antibody titer between paired sera were observed in all patients. IgM antibodies appeared approximately 2-3 weeks after the onset of illness, reached a peak after 4-5 weeks, and were generally undetectable after 3-5 months. IgG antibodies developed slowly for the first 30 days and reached a plateau approximately 3-4 months after the onset of illness. The kinetics of IgA antibody responses were different among the five patients, and significant increases in IgA antibody titer between paired sera were observed in only two patients. Although the sample size was small, the best serum collection time seemed to be approximately 3-6 weeks after onset of illness when using a single serum sample for the detection of IgM antibodies. Paired sera samples should be obtained at least 4 weeks apart. IgA antibody analysis using ELNAS may not be a useful marker for acute C. pneumoniae pneumonia.

  3. Elevated Plasma Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 and Its Correlations with Severity of Disease in Patients with Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yia-Ting; Wang, Yao-Chen; Lee, Hsiang-Lin; Lu, Min-Chi; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) increases patient mortality and medical expenditure, and a real-time and reliable method for the rapid diagnosis of VAP may help reduce fatal complications. Matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) is considered significant in the pathogenesis of lung inflammation and infection. Therefore, we examined its relationship with the clinical course of VAP. This retrospective observational study recruited 30 healthy volunteers, 12 patients who used mechanical ventilation without the development of VAP (hereafter, patients without VAP), and 30 patients with a clinical diagnosis of VAP (hereafter, patients with VAP). The activity and level of plasma MMP-9 were determined through a gelatin zymography assay and ELISA. Our results report that both plasma MMP-9 activity and concentration were significantly elevated in the acute stage of patients with VAP when compared with control group and patients without VAP (p < 0.001). Subsequently, the plasma MMP-9 of patients with VAP decreased significantly after antibiotic treatment. Furthermore, plasma MMP-9 concentration was positively correlated with the clinical pulmonary infection score (r = 0.409, p = 0.007), WBCs (r = 0.620, p < 0.001), and neutrophils counts (r = 0.335, p = 0.035). In addition, plasma MMP-9 is an excellent tool for recognizing VAP when the cutoff level is set to 92.62 ng/mL (AUC = 0.863, 95% CI = 0.761 to 0.932). In conclusions, we concluded that MMP-9 levels play a role in the development of VAP and might have the potential to be applied in the development of VAP therapies. PMID:27499696

  4. Protective effect of a polyphenolic rich extract from Magnolia officinalis bark on influenza virus-induced pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Ning; Yu, Chen-Huan; Cai, Wei; Hua, Jian; Li, Shi-Qing; Wang, Wei

    2011-03-08

    Magnolia officinalis bark is used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of cough, colds, fever, chronic bronchitis and stomach ailments. To investigate therapeutic effects of polyphenol rich extract from M. officinalis bark (MPE) in influenza virus A-infected mice, and to provide evidence for the inflammation response and immunomodulatory potential during infection. Mice were infected with influenza virus A (IVA) and MPE at doses of 10 and 20mg/kg were orally administrated daily for 5 days after challenge. The levels of serum L-6 and TNF-α were determined by ELISA while protein expressions of NF-κB and TLR3 were detected by western blotting analysis. MPE exhibited significant therapeutical effects on reducing levels of serum NO, IL-6 and TNF-α, inhibiting pneumonia, decreasing lung viral titers and sensitizing IVA-induced apoptosis through down-regulation of NF-κB and TLR3 protein expression in the lung tissue of IVA-infected mice. MPE could exhibit preventive and therapeutical effects on IVA-infected mice as a suppressor of the production of inflammatory mediators, NO and pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6. These effects appeared to be mediated, at least in part, by an inhibition of TLR3 and NF-κB activation. Therefore, MPE could provide a safe and effective therapeutic approach for influenza and its subsequent viral pneumonia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Severe phenytoin-induced gingival enlargement associated with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Lucchesi, Juliana Antico; Cortelli, Shelia Cavalka; Rodrigues, Jose Augusto; Duarte, Poliana Mendes

    2008-01-01

    The potential of phenytoin to induce gingival hyperplasia has been well-established. High levels of dental plaque and calculus have been reported as a critical co-factor for the development and severity of phenytoin-induced gingival hyperplasia. This article documents a severe gingival enlargement associated with periodontitis (in a patient under combined anti-epileptic therapy) and provides a rational model for its clinical management. Initially, full-mouth scaling and root planing, oral hygiene instructions, and phenytoin withdrawal were performed; however, clinical results demonstrated partial resolution of maxillary gingival hyperplasia. Subsequently, surgical therapy was indicated for the maxillary teeth. Complete reduction of gingival enlargement and improvement of clinical periodontal parameters were observed after the surgical therapy. This case report clearly describes the challenges that oral and medical health practitioners face when developing appropriate prevention and treatment programs for epileptic patients, particularly those with periodontal disease.

  6. Severity of influenza A 2009 (H1N1) pneumonia is underestimated by routine prediction rules. Results from a prospective, population-based study.

    PubMed

    Bjarnason, Agnar; Thorleifsdottir, Gudlaug; Löve, Arthur; Gudnason, Janus F; Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Hallgrimsson, Kristinn L; Kristjansdottir, Berglind S; Haraldsson, Gunnsteinn; Baldursson, Olafur; Kristinsson, Karl G; Gottfredsson, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to pandemic influenza A 2009 (H1N1) have been inadequately compared to CAP caused by other respiratory pathogens. The performance of prediction rules for CAP during an epidemic with a new infectious agent are unknown. Prospective, population-based study from November 2008-November 2009, in centers representing 70% of hospital beds in Iceland. Patients admitted with CAP underwent evaluation and etiologic testing, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for influenza. Data on influenza-like illness in the community and overall hospital admissions were collected. Clinical and laboratory data, including pneumonia severity index (PSI) and CURB-65 of patients with CAP due to H1N1 were compared to those caused by other agents. Of 338 consecutive and eligible patients 313 (93%) were enrolled. During the pandemic peak, influenza A 2009 (H1N1) patients constituted 38% of admissions due to CAP. These patients were younger, more dyspnoeic and more frequently reported hemoptysis. They had significantly lower severity scores than other patients with CAP (1.23 vs. 1.61, P= .02 for CURB-65, 2.05 vs. 2.87 for PSI, P<.001) and were more likely to require intensive care admission (41% vs. 5%, P<.001) and receive mechanical ventilation (14% vs. 2%, P= .01). Bacterial co-infection was detected in 23% of influenza A 2009 (H1N1) patients with CAP. Clinical characteristics of CAP caused by influenza A 2009 (H1N1) differ markedly from CAP caused by other etiologic agents. Commonly used CAP prediction rules often failed to predict admissions to intensive care or need for assisted ventilation in CAP caused by the influenza A 2009 (H1N1) virus, underscoring the importance of clinical acumen under these circumstances.

  7. Severity of Influenza A 2009 (H1N1) Pneumonia Is Underestimated by Routine Prediction Rules. Results from a Prospective, Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnason, Agnar; Thorleifsdottir, Gudlaug; Löve, Arthur; Gudnason, Janus F.; Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Hallgrimsson, Kristinn L.; Kristjansdottir, Berglind S.; Haraldsson, Gunnsteinn; Baldursson, Olafur; Kristinsson, Karl G.; Gottfredsson, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Background Characteristics of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to pandemic influenza A 2009 (H1N1) have been inadequately compared to CAP caused by other respiratory pathogens. The performance of prediction rules for CAP during an epidemic with a new infectious agent are unknown. Methods Prospective, population-based study from November 2008–November 2009, in centers representing 70% of hospital beds in Iceland. Patients admitted with CAP underwent evaluation and etiologic testing, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for influenza. Data on influenza-like illness in the community and overall hospital admissions were collected. Clinical and laboratory data, including pneumonia severity index (PSI) and CURB-65 of patients with CAP due to H1N1 were compared to those caused by other agents. Results Of 338 consecutive and eligible patients 313 (93%) were enrolled. During the pandemic peak, influenza A 2009 (H1N1) patients constituted 38% of admissions due to CAP. These patients were younger, more dyspnoeic and more frequently reported hemoptysis. They had significantly lower severity scores than other patients with CAP (1.23 vs. 1.61, P = .02 for CURB-65, 2.05 vs. 2.87 for PSI, P<.001) and were more likely to require intensive care admission (41% vs. 5%, P<.001) and receive mechanical ventilation (14% vs. 2%, P = .01). Bacterial co-infection was detected in 23% of influenza A 2009 (H1N1) patients with CAP. Conclusions Clinical characteristics of CAP caused by influenza A 2009 (H1N1) differ markedly from CAP caused by other etiologic agents. Commonly used CAP prediction rules often failed to predict admissions to intensive care or need for assisted ventilation in CAP caused by the influenza A 2009 (H1N1) virus, underscoring the importance of clinical acumen under these circumstances. PMID:23071646

  8. Evolution over a 15-year period of the clinical characteristics and outcomes of critically ill patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Vallés, J; Diaz, E; Martín-Loeches, I; Bacelar, N; Saludes, P; Lema, J; Gallego, M; Fontanals, D; Artigas, A

    2016-05-01

    To study the characteristics and outcomes of patients in the ICU with severe community-acquired pneumonia (SCAP) over a 15-year surveillance period. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of episodes of SCAP, and assessed the epidemiology, etiology, treatment and outcomes of patients admitted to the ICU, comparing three periods (1999-2003, 2004-2008 and 2009-2013). A total of 458 patients were diagnosed with SCAP. The overall cumulative incidence was 37.4 episodes/1000 admissions, with a progressive increase over the three periods (P<0.001). Patients fulfilling the two major IDSA/ATS criteria at admission increased from 64.2% in the first period to 82.5% in the last period (P=0.005). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the prevalent pathogen. The incidence of bacteremia was 23.1%, and a progressive significant reduction in overall incidence was observed over the three periods (P=0.02). Globally, 91% of the patients received appropriate empiric antibiotic treatment, increasing from 78.3% in the first period to 97.7% in the last period (P<0.001). Combination antibiotic therapy (betalactam+macrolide or fluoroquinolone) increased significantly from the first period (61%) to the last period (81.3%) (P<0.001). Global ICU mortality was 25.1%, and decreased over the three periods (P=0.001). Despite a progressively higher incidence and severity of SCAP in our ICU, crude ICU mortality decreased by 18%. The increased use of combined antibiotic therapy and the decreasing rates of bacteremia were associated to improved patient prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  9. Bone scintigraphy of severe hypercalcemia following simvastatin induced rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Zubair B.; Hu, Sophia; Amorosa, Louis F.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Simvastatin induced rhabdomyolysis with renal failure is a well reported clinical entity with hyperkalemia recognized as a life threatening risk. The risk of delayed hypercalcemia during the recovery of renal function is not well appreciated as this varies in severity and can be caused by multiple mechanisms. We present a patient with high dose simvastatin induced rhabdomyolysis leading to late onset of severe hypercalcemia due to calcium phosphate deposition in muscles diagnosed by distinctive bone scintigraphy. A 60-year-old Asian male was admitted to the hospital for profound weakness one week following the initiation of simvastatin 80 mg daily post myocardial infarction. His clinical course was complicated by contrast nephropathy. One week later, he developed progressive weakness in all his extremities and inability to raise his head and eat. Simvastatin was discontinued at this point. CPK elevation to greater than 425,000 U was found, consistent with rhabdomyolysis. He became oliguric requiring hemodialysis. Muscle biopsy showed severe muscle necrosis and type 2 fiber atrophy. One month later, he developed hypercalcemia with suppressed intact PTH and 1, 25(OH) D levels. Whole body bone scintigraphy showed calcium phosphate deposition throughout his musculature. His calcium levels normalized in 1 week on hemodialysis. This patient’s experience illustrates the marked risk of delayed severe hypercalcemia from rhabdomyolysis due to dissolution of myocellular calcium phosphate deposits. It also provides an opportunity to review the different mechanisms of hypercalcemia especially in statin induced rhabdomyolysis. Recognition of this phenomenon is critical for appropriate follow up and treatment of such patients. PMID:28228795

  10. Macrolide Efflux in Streptococcus pneumoniae Is Mediated by a Dual Efflux Pump (mel and mef) and Is Erythromycin Inducible

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Karita D.; Nisbet, Rebecca; Stephens, David S.

    2005-01-01

    Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae due to efflux has emerged as an important worldwide clinical problem over the past decade. Efflux is mediated by the genes of the genetic element mega (macrolide efflux genetic assembly) and related elements, such as Tn1207.1. These elements contain two adjacent genes, mef (mefE or mefA) and the closely related mel gene (msrA homolog), encoding a proton motive force pump and a putative ATP-binding cassette transporter homolog, and are transcribed as an operon (M. Del Grosso et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 40:774-778, 2004; K. Gay and D. S. Stephens, J. Infect. Dis. 184:56-65, 2001; and M. Santagati et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 44:2585-2587, 2000). Previous studies have shown that Mef is required for macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae; however, the contribution of Mel has not been fully determined. Independent deletions were constructed in mefE and mel in the serotype 14 macrolide-resistant strains GA16638 (erythromycin [Em] MIC, 8 to 16 μg/ml) and GA17719 (Em MIC, 2 to 4 μg/ml), which contain allelic variations in the mega element. The MICs to erythromycin were significantly reduced for the independent deletion mutants of both mefE and mel compared to those of the parent strains and further reduced threefold to fourfold to Em MICs of <0.15 μg/ml with mefE mel double mutants. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, the expression of mefE in the mel deletion mutants was increased more than 10-fold. However, in the mefE deletion mutants, the expression of mel did not differ significantly from the parent strains. The expression of both mefE and mel was inducible by erythromycin. These data indicate a requirement for both Mef and Mel in the novel efflux-mediated macrolide resistance system in S. pneumoniae and other gram-positive bacteria and that the system is inducible by macrolides. PMID:16189099

  11. Starvation of cancer via induced ketogenesis and severe hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Kapelner, Adam; Vorsanger, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Neoplasms are highly dependent on glucose as their substrate for energy production and are generally not able to catabolize other fuel sources such as ketones and fatty acids. Thus, removing access to glucose has the potential to starve cancer cells and induce apoptosis. Unfortunately, other body tissues are also dependent on glucose for energy under normal conditions. However, in human starvation (or in the setting of diet-induced ketogenesis), the body "keto-adapts" and glucose requirements of most tissues drop to almost nil. Exceptions include the central nervous system (CNS) and various other tissues which have a small but obligatory requirement of glucose. Our hypothesized treatment takes keto-adaptation as a prerequisite. We then propose the induction of severe hypoglycemia by depressing gluconeogenesis while administering glucose to the brain. Although severe hypoglycemia normally produces adverse effects such as seizure and coma, it is relatively safe following keto-adaptation. We hypothesize that our therapeutic hypoglycemia treatment has potential to rapidly induce tumor cell necrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mycoplasma pneumoniae-Induced Mucocutaneous Rash: A New Syndrome Distinct from Erythema Multiforme? Report of a New Case and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, M; Imbernón-Moya, A; Lobato-Berezo, A; Churruca-Grijelmo, M

    2016-09-01

    Respiratory tract infection due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae can provoke cutaneous and mucosal rashes, which have been classified within the spectrum of erythema multiforme or Stevens-Johnson syndrome. This classification is of therapeutic and prognostic importance and has generated intense debate in the literature. A recent systematic review of 202 cases of mucocutaneous rashes associated with M. pneumoniae infection concluded that these rashes might constitute a distinct entity, for which the term Mycoplasma-induced rash and mucositis was proposed. We describe a patient with acute M pneumoniae respiratory tract infection who presented mucosal and cutaneous lesions that were difficult to classify as erythema multiforme or Stevens-Johnson syndrome; the lesions were compatible with the proposed new disease.

  13. Serum-induced iron-acquisition systems and TonB contribute to virulence in Klebsiella pneumoniae causing primary pyogenic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Lee, Cha-Ze; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Wang, Jin-Town

    2008-06-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae has become the predominant pathogen causing primary pyogenic liver abscess (PLA). K. pneumoniae was stimulated by human serum, and gene expression was analyzed by microarray. Three putative iron acquisition systems, Yersinia high-pathogenicity island (HPI), iucABCDiutA, and iroA(iroNDCB), that increased in expression and predominated in PLA-associated K. pneumoniae strains were identified. By use of siderophore uptake assays, these 3 systems were confirmed to be siderophore-dependent iron acquisition systems. Only the irp2-iuc-iroA triple mutant showed decreased virulence in mice. Full-genome analysis of K. pneumoniae strain NTUH-K2044 identified 10 putative iron uptake systems. Seven of these 10 systems were TonB dependent, including Yersinia HPI, iucABCDiutA, and iroA. A tonB deletion mutant was demonstrated to have profound attenuation of virulence. Immunization with the tonB mutant resulted in seroconversion of extracellular polysaccharide antibodies and protective efficacy against subsequent exposure to the parental strain. Iron uptake systems were the genes in K. pneumoniae that were highly up-regulated in response to sera. Although there are multiple iron transporter systems in NTUH-K2044, a mutation in all 3 loci (irp2, iuc, and iroA) is necessary to decrease virulence. The tonB mutant is a potential vaccine candidate because it can induce a significant protective immune response against challenge with a wild-type strain.

  14. Vancomycin-induced thrombocytopaenia in a patient with severe pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Simon P; Rankin, Iain; Sheth, Hemant

    2013-10-16

    Vancomycin-induced thrombocytopenia is a rare side effect of a commonly used drug that may cause life-threatening disease. A 51-year-old man was treated for an episode of acute severe alcohol-induced pancreatitis complicated by development of a peripancreatic fluid collection. He developed fever of unknown origin and was treated with intravenous vancomycin and piperacillin with tazobactam. On day 6 of vancomycin therapy his platelet count dropped to 46×10(9)/L (237×10(9)/L on day 1 of treatment) and by day 8 of therapy platelets had fallen to a nadir of 9×10(9)/L. The patient at this stage displayed a florid purpuric rash and haematoma formation on attempted intravenous cannulation. A clinical diagnosis of vancomycin-induced thrombocytopaenia was made and the drug withdrawn. After 3 days a significant improvement in the platelet count was noted, rising to 56 × 10(9)/L. Immunofluorescence testing (PIFT) ruled out teicoplanin and heparin as causes of drug-induced thrombocytopenia.

  15. IL-17A is proatherogenic in high-fat diet-induced and Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-accelerated atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Zhang, Wenxuan; Huang, Ganghua; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2010-11-01

    The role of IL-17 in atherogenesis remains controversial. We previously reported that the TLR/MyD88 signaling pathway plays an important role in high-fat diet as well as Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection-mediated acceleration of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. In this study, we investigated the role of the IL-17A in high-fat diet (HFD)- and C. pneumoniae-induced acceleration of atherosclerosis. The aortic sinus plaque and aortic lesion size and lipid composition as well as macrophage accumulation in the lesions were significantly diminished in IL-17A(-/-) mice fed an HFD compared with wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 control mice. As expected, C. pneumoniae infection led to a significant increase in size and lipid content of the atherosclerotic lesions in WT mice. However, IL-17A(-/-) mice developed significantly less acceleration of lesion size following C. pneumoniae infection compared with WT control despite similar levels of blood cholesterol levels. Furthermore, C. pneumoniae infection in WT but not in IL-17A(-/-) mice was associated with significant increases in serum concentrations of IL-12p40, CCL2, IFN-γ, and numbers of macrophages in their plaques. Additionally, in vitro studies suggest that IL-17A activates vascular endothelial cells, which secrete cytokines that in turn enhance foam cell formation in macrophages. Taken together, our data suggest that IL-17A is proatherogenic and that it plays an important role in both diet-induced atherosclerotic lesion development, and C. pneumoniae infection-mediated acceleration of atherosclerotic lesions in the presence of HFD.

  16. Severe valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy successfully managed with peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amandeep; Suri, Ashish; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2014-07-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a commonly used drug for epilepsy, psychiatric disorders and migraine and is frequently used in neurosurgical intensive care units. Though most of its side-effects are mild and transient, certain idiosyncratic side-effects have been attributed to VPA. Valproate induced hyperammonemia (VIH) is one such side-effect. VIH can produce symptoms of encephalopathy known as valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy (VHE). VIH and VHE usually respond to withdrawal of VPA. However, in some cases VHE can be unresponsive to supportive measures and severe enough to be life-threatening. In such cases, dialysis can be used to rapidly reverse hyperammonemia and VHE and can prove to be a lifesaving measure. We report such a case of VIH and life-threatening VHE in a postoperative neurosurgical patient that was managed successfully with peritoneal dialysis.

  17. First two cases of severe multifocal infections caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in Switzerland: characterization of an atypical non-K1/K2-serotype strain causing liver abscess and endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Babouee Flury, Baharak; Donà, Valentina; Buetti, Niccolò; Furrer, Hansjakob; Endimiani, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    We describe the first two multifocal invasive infections due to Klebsiella pneumoniae recently observed in Switzerland. Phenotypic (MIC assays and string test) and molecular analyses (PCR/Sequencing for bla, virulence factor genes and whole genome sequencing for one strain) were performed to characterize the causative K. pneumoniae isolates. Both K. pneumoniae isolates (Kp1 and Kp2) were pan-susceptible to antibiotics and produced narrow-spectrum SHV β-lactamases. However, only Kp1 was string test positive. Kp1 was of ST380 and caused liver abscess as well as pneumonia and orbital phlegmon in an Eritrean patient. It belonged to the hypervirulent capsular serotype K2 and harboured the classic virulence-associated rmpA and aerobactin genes, fulfilling both the clinical and microbiological definitions for an invasive K. pneumoniae syndrome. Kp2 was of ST1043 and caused both liver abscess and endocarditis in a Swiss patient. Moreover, it did not possess the classic virulence-associated genes. Whole genome sequencing identified less well-known virulence factors in Kp2 that might have contributed to its virulence. Among these there were genes important for intestinal colonization and/or invasion, such as genes involved in adhesion (e.g., fimABCD and mrkABCD), regulation of capsule polysaccharide biosynthesis (e.g., evgS-evgA), as well as iron uptake (iroN), energy conversion, and metabolism. This report confirms the continuous dissemination of hypervirulent K. pneumoniae strains among patients of non-Asian descent in Europe. Moreover, it highlights the genetic background of an atypical hypervirulent K. pneumoniae causing a severe invasive infection despite not possessing the classical virulence characteristics of hypermucoviscous strains. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Inhibition of nitric oxide production reverses diabetes-induced Kupffer cell activation and Klebsiella pneumonia liver translocation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Han; Chung, Pei-Hsuan; Wu, Ying-Ying; Fung, Chang-Phone; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Chen, Lee-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) is the most common pathogen of pyogenic liver abscess in East and Southeast Asia and diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major risk factor. The effect and mechanism of diabetes on KP liver abscess was examined in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and Akita mice (C57BL/6J-Ins2Akita). KP translocation to liver and plasma alaine transaminase levels were increased and liver clearance of KP was decreased in DM mice. Diabetic mice exhibited overgrowth of Enterococcus as well as E.coli and decreased lactobacilli/bifidas growth in intestine, increased intestinal iNOS protein and nitrite levels in portal vein, and increased IL-1β and TNF-α expression of Kupffer cells. Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) or dead L. salivarius (dLac) supplementation reversed diabetes-induced enteric dysbiosis, NO levels in portal vein, and KP translocation to liver. L-NAME treatment decreased intestinal iNOS protein expression as well as Kupffer cell activation and increased liver clearance of KP in DM mice. Dead E.coli (2×108 CFU/ml) feeding for one week induced iNOS and TLR4 expression of intestine in germ-free (GF) mice. Dead bacteria feeding induced IL-1β and TNF-α expression of Kupffer cells in GF mice but not in GF TLR4-/- mice. In conclusion, balance of intestinal microflora is important for preventing intestinal iNOS expression, Kupffer cell activation, and KP liver translocation in diabetes. Reversal of diabetes-induced enteric dysbiosis with FOS or dead L. salivarius decreases diabetes-induced intestinal iNOS expression and KP liver translocation. Diabetes induces Kupffer cell activation and KP liver translocation through enteric dysbiosis and nitric oxide production.

  19. Inhibition of nitric oxide production reverses diabetes-induced Kupffer cell activation and Klebsiella pneumonia liver translocation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying-Ying; Fung, Chang-Phone; Hsu, Ching-Mei

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) is the most common pathogen of pyogenic liver abscess in East and Southeast Asia and diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major risk factor. The effect and mechanism of diabetes on KP liver abscess was examined in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and Akita mice (C57BL/6J-Ins2Akita). KP translocation to liver and plasma alaine transaminase levels were increased and liver clearance of KP was decreased in DM mice. Diabetic mice exhibited overgrowth of Enterococcus as well as E.coli and decreased lactobacilli/bifidas growth in intestine, increased intestinal iNOS protein and nitrite levels in portal vein, and increased IL-1β and TNF-α expression of Kupffer cells. Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) or dead L. salivarius (dLac) supplementation reversed diabetes-induced enteric dysbiosis, NO levels in portal vein, and KP translocation to liver. L-NAME treatment decreased intestinal iNOS protein expression as well as Kupffer cell activation and increased liver clearance of KP in DM mice. Dead E.coli (2×108 CFU/ml) feeding for one week induced iNOS and TLR4 expression of intestine in germ-free (GF) mice. Dead bacteria feeding induced IL-1β and TNF-α expression of Kupffer cells in GF mice but not in GF TLR4-/- mice. In conclusion, balance of intestinal microflora is important for preventing intestinal iNOS expression, Kupffer cell activation, and KP liver translocation in diabetes. Reversal of diabetes-induced enteric dysbiosis with FOS or dead L. salivarius decreases diabetes-induced intestinal iNOS expression and KP liver translocation. Diabetes induces Kupffer cell activation and KP liver translocation through enteric dysbiosis and nitric oxide production. PMID:28493939

  20. [A case of drug-induced interstitial pneumonia caused by S-1 and CPT-11 combination therapy for advanced colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Kuga, Yoshio; Tanaka, Tomotaka; Okanobu, Hideharu; Arita, Michinori; Yoshimi, Satoshi; Miwata, Tomohiro; Fujino, Hatsue; Moriya, Takashi; Ohya, Toshihide

    2011-03-01

    The patient was a 77-year-old woman admitted for nausea and abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) revealed advanced ascending colon cancer with liver metastasis. After operation, we started combination chemotherapy of S-1 and irinotecan (CPT-11); S-1(80 mg/m²) administered orally for consecutive days followed by 14 days rest.CPT -11 (100 mg/m²) was given as a 2-hour infusion on day 1 and 15. The patient complained of high fever and subsequent dyspnea with severe hypoxemia after the first course of combination chemotherapy of S-1 and CPT-11.CT scan showed diffuse interstitial lesions with ground glass opacity on both lungs. Steroid pulse therapy with oxygen therapy remarkably improved her symptoms, and abnormal findings on CT scan also resolved. Drug lymphocyte stimulation test was positive against S-1 and negative against CPT-11. These findings were consistent with S-1-induced lung injury. Drug -induced pneumonia needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis when patients treated with S-1 and CPT-11 combination therapy present high fever and dyspnea.

  1. Activities of pefloxacin and ciprofloxacin in experimentally induced Pseudomonas pneumonia in neutropenic guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Gordin, F M; Hackbarth, C J; Scott, K G; Sande, M A

    1985-01-01

    Pefloxacin and ciprofloxacin are two new quinoline carboxylic acid derivatives that have activity in vitro against a wide range of gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Using a well-standardized model of Pseudomonas pneumonia in neutropenic guinea pigs, we tested the efficacy in vivo of these new agents. Both were highly effective in increasing survival and decreasing bacterial counts in the lungs of surviving animals. Pefloxacin and ciprofloxacin were significantly better (P less than 0.05) than aminoglycosides or beta-lactams tested in prior studies with this model, and they were as effective as combination therapy with aminoglycosides and beta-lactams. Resistance to either ciprofloxacin or pefloxacin did not emerge during the study period. Further studies with these drugs in the therapy of Pseudomonas sp. infections are warranted. PMID:3159336

  2. Association of C-Reactive Protein With Bacterial and Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Associated Pneumonia Among Children Aged <5 Years in the PERCH Study.

    PubMed

    Higdon, Melissa M; Le, Tham; O'Brien, Katherine L; Murdoch, David R; Prosperi, Christine; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Feikin, Daniel R; Hammitt, Laura L; Howie, Stephen R C; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Awori, Juliet O; Baillie, Vicky L; Cascio, Stephanie; Chuananon, Somchai; DeLuca, Andrea N; Driscoll, Amanda J; Ebruke, Bernard E; Endtz, Hubert P; Kaewpan, Anek; Kahn, Geoff; Karani, Angela; Karron, Ruth A; Moore, David P; Park, Daniel E; Rahman, Mohammed Ziaur; Salaudeen, Rasheed; Seidenberg, Phil; Somwe, Somwe Wa; Sylla, Mamadou; Tapia, Milagritos D; Zeger, Scott L; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Madhi, Shabir A

    2017-06-15

    Lack of a gold standard for identifying bacterial and viral etiologies of pneumonia has limited evaluation of C-reactive protein (CRP) for identifying bacterial pneumonia. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of CRP for identifying bacterial vs respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) pneumonia in the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) multicenter case-control study. We measured serum CRP levels in cases with World Health Organization-defined severe or very severe pneumonia and a subset of community controls. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of elevated CRP for "confirmed" bacterial pneumonia (positive blood culture or positive lung aspirate or pleural fluid culture or polymerase chain reaction [PCR]) compared to "RSV pneumonia" (nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal or induced sputum PCR-positive without confirmed/suspected bacterial pneumonia). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to assess the performance of elevated CRP in distinguishing these cases. Among 601 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative tested controls, 3% had CRP ≥40 mg/L. Among 119 HIV-negative cases with confirmed bacterial pneumonia, 77% had CRP ≥40 mg/L compared with 17% of 556 RSV pneumonia cases. The ROC analysis produced an area under the curve of 0.87, indicating very good discrimination; a cut-point of 37.1 mg/L best discriminated confirmed bacterial pneumonia (sensitivity 77%) from RSV pneumonia (specificity 82%). CRP ≥100 mg/L substantially improved specificity over CRP ≥40 mg/L, though at a loss to sensitivity. Elevated CRP was positively associated with confirmed bacterial pneumonia and negatively associated with RSV pneumonia in PERCH. CRP may be useful for distinguishing bacterial from RSV-associated pneumonia, although its role in discriminating against other respiratory viral-associated pneumonia needs further study.

  3. A Survey of Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ogo, Etsuyo Komaki, Ritsuko; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Uchida, Masafumi; Abe, Toshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Mitsumori, Michihide; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: We observed a rare and unique occurrence of radiation-induced pulmonary injury outside the tangential field for early breast cancer treatment. The findings appeared to be idiopathic and were called radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome. We surveyed major hospitals in Japan to review their findings of radiation-induced BOOP, in particular the clinical and pictorial characteristics of the entity. Methods and Materials: We reviewed surveys completed and returned by 20 institutions. The survey responses were based on a total of 37 cases of BOOP syndrome. We also reviewed X-ray and computed tomography scans provided by these institutions. We discussed the information derived from the questionnaire and analyzed patients' characteristics, methods used in the treatment of BOOP syndrome, and prognosis. Results: The incidence of the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was about 1.8% (37 of 2,056). We did not find a relationship between the characteristics of patients and the occurrence of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. The pulmonary findings were classified into four patterns on chest computed tomography scans. Progression of the pulmonary lesions observed on chest X-ray was classified into three patterns. Pneumonitis appeared within 6 months after radiotherapy was completed and disappeared within 6-12 months after its onset. At 5-year follow-up, 2 patients had died, 1 of breast cancer and the other of interstitial pneumonitis, which seemed to be idiopathic and unrelated to the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Although the incidence of BOOP syndrome and its associated prognosis are not significant, the patients' clinical condition must be carefully followed.

  4. Plasma IL-6/IL-10 Ratio and IL-8, LDH, and HBDH Level Predict the Severity and the Risk of Death in AIDS Patients with Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia; Su, Junwei; Xie, Yirui; Yin, Michael T; Huang, Ying; Xu, Lijun; Zhou, Qihui; Zhu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To identify blood biomarkers to predict severity and mortality in AIDS PCP patients. Methods. Biomarkers including clinical parameters and plasma inflammatory cytokines were assessed in 32 HIV-infected patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) at time of admission. Predictive value of the biomarkers for clinical severity and in-hospital mortality was evaluated by corresponding ROC curve. Results. Levels of CRP, WBC, LDH, HBDH, and Ferritin were significantly higher in the severe and nonsurvivor AIDS PCP patients. These important biochemical indicators have inverse correlation with oxygenation index, especially levels of LDH (P = 0.008, R (2) = 0.258), HBDH (P = 0.001, R (2) = 0.335), and Ferritin (P = 0.005, R (2) = 0.237). Plasma IL-8 and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in patients with PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 200 mmHg and nonsurvivors than in those with PaO2/FiO2 > 200 mmHg and survivors. Severe and nonsurvival groups showed higher ratio of mean IL-6/IL-10 level (1.78 ± 1.56, P < 0.001; 1.11 ± 0.72, P = 0.043), larger AUC (95% CI 0.781-1.000, P < 0.001; 95% CI 0.592-0.917, P = 0.043), and more significantly inverse correlation with the oxygenation index. Conclusion. Plasma IL-8, LDH, and HBDH levels and IL-6/IL-10 ratio could be helpful for early evaluation of the severity and predicting fatal outcomes in AIDS PCP patients.

  5. Plasma IL-6/IL-10 Ratio and IL-8, LDH, and HBDH Level Predict the Severity and the Risk of Death in AIDS Patients with Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jia; Su, Junwei; Xie, Yirui; Yin, Michael T.; Huang, Ying; Xu, Lijun; Zhou, Qihui

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To identify blood biomarkers to predict severity and mortality in AIDS PCP patients. Methods. Biomarkers including clinical parameters and plasma inflammatory cytokines were assessed in 32 HIV-infected patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) at time of admission. Predictive value of the biomarkers for clinical severity and in-hospital mortality was evaluated by corresponding ROC curve. Results. Levels of CRP, WBC, LDH, HBDH, and Ferritin were significantly higher in the severe and nonsurvivor AIDS PCP patients. These important biochemical indicators have inverse correlation with oxygenation index, especially levels of LDH (P = 0.008, R2 = 0.258), HBDH (P = 0.001, R2 = 0.335), and Ferritin (P = 0.005, R2 = 0.237). Plasma IL-8 and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in patients with PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 200 mmHg and nonsurvivors than in those with PaO2/FiO2 > 200 mmHg and survivors. Severe and nonsurvival groups showed higher ratio of mean IL-6/IL-10 level (1.78 ± 1.56, P < 0.001; 1.11 ± 0.72, P = 0.043), larger AUC (95% CI 0.781–1.000, P < 0.001; 95% CI 0.592–0.917, P = 0.043), and more significantly inverse correlation with the oxygenation index. Conclusion. Plasma IL-8, LDH, and HBDH levels and IL-6/IL-10 ratio could be helpful for early evaluation of the severity and predicting fatal outcomes in AIDS PCP patients. PMID:27579328

  6. CREBH Determines the Severity of Sulpyrine-Induced Fatal Shock

    PubMed Central

    Saiga, Hiroyuki; Ma, Ji Su; Ohshima, Jun; Machimura, Sakaaki; Sasai, Miwa; Kimura, Taishi; Ueda, Yoshiyasu; Kayama, Hisako; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Although the pyrazolone derivative sulpyrine is widely used as an antipyretic analgesic drug, side effects, including fatal shock, have been reported. However, the molecular mechanism underlying such a severe side effect is largely unclear. Here, we report that the transcription factor CREBH that is highly expressed in the liver plays an important role in fatal shock induced by sulpyrine in mice. CREBH-deficient mice were resistant to experimental fatal sulpyrine shock. We found that sulpyrine-induced expression of cytochrome P450 2B (CYP2B) family genes, which are involved in sulpyrine metabolism, in the liver was severely impaired in CREBH-deficient mice. Moreover, introduction of CYP2B in CREBH-deficient liver restored susceptibility to sulpyrine. Furthermore, ectopic expression of CREBH up-regulated CYP2B10 promoter activity, and in vivo knockdown of CREBH in wild-type mice conferred a significant resistance to fatal sulpyrine shock. These data demonstrate that CREBH is a positive regulator of CYP2B in response to sulpyrine administration, which possibly results in fatal shock. PMID:23409047

  7. Mitochondrial ROS Induces Cardiac Inflammation via a Pathway through mtDNA Damage in a Pneumonia-Related Sepsis Model

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiao; Carlson, Deborah; Sun, Yuxiao; Ma, Lisha; Wolf, Steven E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Zang, Qun S.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that mitochondria-targeted vitamin E (Mito-Vit-E), a mtROS specific antioxidant, improves cardiac performance and attenuates inflammation in a pneumonia-related sepsis model. In this study, we applied the same approaches to decipher the signaling pathway(s) of mtROS-dependent cardiac inflammation after sepsis. Sepsis was induced in Sprague Dawley rats by intratracheal injection of S. pneumoniae. Mito-Vit-E, vitamin E or vehicle was administered 30 minutes later. In myocardium 24 hours post-inoculation, Mito-Vit-E, but not vitamin E, significantly protected mtDNA integrity and decreased mtDNA damage. Mito-Vit-E alleviated sepsis-induced reduction in mitochondria-localized DNA repair enzymes including DNA polymerase γ, AP endonuclease, 8-oxoguanine glycosylase, and uracil-DNA glycosylase. Mito-Vit-E dramatically improved metabolism and membrane integrity in mitochondria, suppressed leakage of mtDNA into the cytoplasm, inhibited up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) pathway factors MYD88 and RAGE, and limited RAGE interaction with its ligand TFAM in septic hearts. Mito-Vit-E also deactivated NF-κB and caspase 1, reduced expression of the essential inflammasome component ASC, and decreased inflammatory cytokine IL–1β. In vitro, both Mito-Vit-E and TLR9 inhibitor OND-I suppressed LPS-induced up-regulation in MYD88, RAGE, ASC, active caspase 1, and IL–1β in cardiomyocytes. Since free mtDNA escaped from damaged mitochondria function as a type of DAMPs to stimulate inflammation through TLR9, these data together suggest that sepsis-induced cardiac inflammation is mediated, at least partially, through mtDNA-TLR9-RAGE. At last, Mito-Vit-E reduced the circulation of myocardial injury marker troponin-I, diminished apoptosis and amended morphology in septic hearts, suggesting that mitochondria-targeted antioxidants are a potential cardioprotective approach for sepsis. PMID:26448624

  8. Are parents of children hospitalized with severe community-acquired pneumonia more satisfied with care when physicians allow them to share decisions on the antibiotic route?

    PubMed

    Rosati, Paola; Di Salvo, Viviana; Crudo, Stefania; D'Amico, Roberto; Carlino, Cecilia; Marchili, Maria Rosaria; Gonfiantini, Michaela; Di Ciommo, Vincenzo

    2015-12-01

    Despite convincing evidence that oral and injected amoxicillin have equal efficacy in children with severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), hospitalized children often receive injected antibiotics. To investigate whether shared decision-making (choosing the antibiotic route) influences parental satisfaction. In a one-year questionnaire-based study, we enrolled consecutive children hospitalized for CAP. At admission, all children's parents received a leaflet on CAP. Parents arriving during the daytime were assigned to a shared group and could choose the antibiotic route, those admitted at other times were assigned to an unshared group for whom physicians chose the antibiotic route. Shared group parents answered anonymous questionnaire investigating why they chose a specific route. Parents in both groups answered another anonymous questionnaire at discharge assessing perceived satisfaction with care. Parents' satisfaction with perceived medical information as assessed by data from a questionnaire. Of the 95 children enrolled, more children's parents were assigned to the unshared than the shared group (77 vs. 18). Of the 18 children's parents in the shared group, 14 chose the oral antibiotic route mainly to avoid painful injections. Doctors explanations were considered better in the shared than in the unshared group (P = 0.02). The larger number of children's parents assigned to the unshared group reflects paediatricians' reluctance to offer shared-decision making. Well-informed parents prefer oral antibiotic therapy for children with severe CAP. Allowing parents choose the antibiotic route respects parents' wishes, reduces children's pain and improves satisfaction. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Chronic mould exposure as a risk factor for severe community acquired pneumonia in a patient requiring extra corporeal membrane oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Stephanie; Hassan, Ibrahim; Barker, Julian; Ashworth, Alan; Barnes, Anita; Fedor, Igor; Feddy, Lee; Hayes, Tim; Malagon, Ignacio; Stirling, Sarah; Szentgyorgyi, Lajos; Mutton, Ken; Richardson, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    A previously fit and well man developed acute respiratory failure due to environmental mould exposure from living in damp rental accommodation. Despite aggressive intensive care management he rapidly deteriorated and required respiratory and cardiac Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation. We hypothesize that poor domiciliary conditions may make an underestimated contribution to community respiratory disease. These conditions may present as acute and severe illness with non-typical pathogens identified. PMID:26236598

  10. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Pneumonia - viral; Walking pneumonia - viral Images Lungs Respiratory system References Lee FE, Treanor JJ. Viral infections. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  11. Apoptosis in immunocytes induced by several types of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Tomoki; Tajima, Yukari; Ueda, Hideo; Hayashi, Koichi; Shutoh, Yasufumi; Harada, Takanori; Kosaka, Tadashi

    2010-03-01

    Several types of pesticides, such as organophosphates and organochlorines, can induce thymocyte apoptosis, resulting in thymic atrophy and predisposing the highly sensitive fetal immune system to loss of tolerance to self-antigens and subsequent increased risk for autoimmune disease and allergies. In the studies here, mouse primary thymocytes and a human acute T-cell leukemia cell line (J45.01) were employed to examine potential thymocyte apoptosis induced by several types of chemicals, including several commonly-used pesticides. Thymocytes and J45.01 cells were treated for 4 or 8 hr with varying doses of metamidophos, parathion, PNMC, or methoxychlor; dexamethasone was used as a positive control. Apoptosis, cell viability, the proportion of Annexin-V+ cells, the activities of caspases 3/7, 8, and 9, and the levels of DNA fragmentation in both the J45.01 cells and thymocytes were then examined. The results here show that with both cell types, there was an increase in the proportion of annexin-V+ cells and levels of DNA fragmentation following exposure to parathion, PNMC, methoxychlor, or dexamethasone (positive control); however, the levels of sensitivity appeared to differ between the cell types. Furthermore, caspase-7 and -8 activities also differed between the J45.01 cells and thymocytes when treated with PNMC, methoxychlor, or dexamethasone. A more precise characterization of these inter-cellular differences is the logical next step in our studies of the effects of these (and other) pesticides on immune cell integrity. These specific types of follow-on mechanistic experiments are currently underway in our laboratories.

  12. Programmed Death Ligand 1 Promotes Early-Life Chlamydia Respiratory Infection-Induced Severe Allergic Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Starkey, Malcolm R; Nguyen, Duc H; Brown, Alexandra C; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; Kim, Richard Y; Yagita, Hideo; Horvat, Jay C; Hansbro, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    Chlamydia infections are frequent causes of respiratory illness, particularly pneumonia in infants, and are linked to permanent reductions in lung function and the induction of asthma. However, the immune responses that protect against early-life infection and the mechanisms that lead to chronic lung disease are incompletely understood. In the current study, we investigated the role of programmed death (PD)-1 and its ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2 in promoting early-life Chlamydia respiratory infection, and infection-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and severe allergic airway disease in later life. Infection increased PD-1 and PD-L1, but not PD-L2, mRNA expression in the lung. Flow cytometric analysis of whole lung homogenates identified monocytes, dendritic cells, CD4(+), and CD8(+) T cells as major sources of PD-1 and PD-L1. Inhibition of PD-1 and PD-L1, but not PD-L2, during infection ablated infection-induced AHR in later life. Given that PD-L1 was the most highly up-regulated and its targeting prevented infection-induced AHR, subsequent analyses focused on this ligand. Inhibition of PD-L1 had no effect on Chlamydia load but suppressed infection-induced pulmonary inflammation. Infection decreased the levels of the IL-13 decoy receptor in the lung, which were restored to baseline levels by inhibition of PD-L1. Finally, inhibition of PD-L1 during infection prevented subsequent infection-induced severe allergic airways disease in later life by decreasing IL-13 levels, Gob-5 expression, mucus production, and AHR. Thus, early-life Chlamydia respiratory infection-induced PD-L1 promotes severe inflammation during infection, permanent reductions in lung function, and the development of more severe allergic airway disease in later life.

  13. [Subtotal thyroid resection in severe, iodine-induced hyperthyroidism].

    PubMed

    Hintze, G; Lepsien, G; Becker, H D; Köbberling, J

    1985-09-01

    Iodine-induced thyrotoxicosis due to iodine application in high amounts in patients with circumscript or disseminated thyroid autonomy, is complicated by a prolonged course, mainly due to a resistance to conservative therapy with thiourea derivates. We therefore decided to perform an early subtotal thyroidectomy in 24 thyrotoxic patients. This measure is in contrast to the common opinion that surgery should only be performed after normalization of thyroid hormones. In all 24 patients with severe hyperthyroidism, including three patients with thyroid storm, hormone levels decreased within a few days after surgery to normal or subnormal values and the clinical picture of thyrotoxicosis disappeared. In the case of thyroid storm the signs of disorientation normalized within 1-3 days. One patient died five weeks after surgery due to severe concomitant diseases. One patient exhibited transitory respiration distress and another had postoperative hypocalcemia. In 13 patients L-thyroxine replacement became necessary due to subclinical or clinical hypothyroidism. Surgery as a early treatment for thyrotoxicosis should be reserved for patients with severe illness where conservative treatment has been shown to be ineffective. In rare selected cases, when a rapid normalization is required, surgery without preoperative treatment seems to be justified. The effect of surgery was impressive in all our cases and there were only minor perioperative complications.

  14. Efficacies of cefotaxime and ceftriaxone in a mouse model of pneumonia induced by two penicillin- and cephalosporin-resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Sauve, C; Azoulay-Dupuis, E; Moine, P; Darras-Joly, C; Rieux, V; Carbon, C; Bédos, J P

    1996-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of ceftriaxone (CRO), at 50 mg/kg of body weight every 12 h, against a highly penicillin-resistant (MIC, 4 micrograms/ml) Streptococcus pneumoniae strain with low-level resistance to CRO (MIC, 0.5 microgram/ml) in a leukopenic-mouse pneumonia model (P. Moine, E. Vallée, E. Azoulay-Dupuis, P. Bourget, J.-P. Bédos, J. Bauchet, and J.-J. Pocidalo, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 38:1953-1958, 1994). In the present study, we assessed the activity of CRO versus those of cefotaxime (CTX) and amoxicillin (AMO) against two highly penicillin- and cephalosporin-resistant S. pneumoniae strains (P40422 and P40984) (MICs of 2 and 8 for penicillin, 2 and 4 for AMO, and 4 and 8 for CRO or CTX, respectively). Against both strains, a greater than an 80% cumulative survival rate was observed with CRO at a dose of 100 or 200 mg/kg every 12 h (dose/MIC ratio, 25). With CTX, a high dosage of 400 mg/kg (dose/MIC ratio, 100 or 50) administered every 8 h (TID) was needed to protect 66 and 75% of the animals, respectively, with no statistically significant differences versus CRO. Against the P40422 strain, CRO (100 mg/kg) produced the greatest bactericidal effect, from the 8th to the 24th hour after a single injection (1.8-log-unit reduction over 24 h), and the fastest bacterial pulmonary clearance during treatment; with CTX, only multiple injections at a high dosage, i.e., 400 mg/kg TID, demonstrated a significant bactericidal effect. AMO in a high dosage, 400 mg/kg (dose/MIC ratio, 200) TID, showed good activity only against the P40422 strain. Despite the identical MICs of CTX and CRO, the longer time (3.6 to 4.6 h) that serum CRO concentrations remained above the MICs for the pathogens at a dose of 100 mg/kg resulted in greater efficacy versus CTX against highly penicillin- and cephalosporin-resistant S. pneumoniae strains. PMID:9124850

  15. Alcohol induced diabetic ketoacidosis exacerbated by an acute respiratory infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Distel, Caleb; Jacobson, Stephanie; Tille, Patricia M

    2013-01-01

    Ketoacidosis is a metabolic condition that occurs as a result of an insufficient amount of insulin. The lack of insulin results in an increased release of glucose from the liver and an excess of ketone bodies as a result of the breakdown of adipose tissue. This occurs when carbohydrates are unable to be properly processed for needed energy requirements during cellular metabolism. Ketoacidosis is commonly linked to diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus is a condition where the body is unable to produce the proper amount of insulin or is unable to effectively respond to insulin stimulation. Excessive alcohol use can damage the pancreas, reducing insulin secretion. Other conditions such as pneumonia or urinary tract infections can trigger the release of counter-regulatory hormones that may contribute to the decrease in insulin's activity and secretion. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis often include nausea and vomiting, increased thirst and urine production, hyperglycemia, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, confusion, headache, general weakness, fatigue and increased heart rate. If left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis can lead to more serious complications including circulatory collapse, decreased blood potassium levels, infection and cerebral edema. The following case study presents a complex condition of ketoacidosis associated with a bacterial infection compounded by the patient's history of alcohol abuse.

  16. Large Eddy Simulations of Severe Convection Induced Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nash'at; Proctor, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Convective storms can pose a serious risk to aviation operations since they are often accompanied by turbulence, heavy rain, hail, icing, lightning, strong winds, and poor visibility. They can cause major delays in air traffic due to the re-routing of flights, and by disrupting operations at the airports in the vicinity of the storm system. In this study, the Terminal Area Simulation System is used to simulate five different convective events ranging from a mesoscale convective complex to isolated storms. The occurrence of convection induced turbulence is analyzed from these simulations. The validation of model results with the radar data and other observations is reported and an aircraft-centric turbulence hazard metric calculated for each case is discussed. The turbulence analysis showed that large pockets of significant turbulence hazard can be found in regions of low radar reflectivity. Moderate and severe turbulence was often found in building cumulus turrets and overshooting tops.

  17. A case of severe psychosis induced by novel recreational drugs

    PubMed Central

    Dragogna, Filippo; Oldani, Lucio; Buoli, Massimiliano; Altamura, A. Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:  The use of novel recreational drugs is becoming of public interest, especially after recent international alerts about their cardiovascular and neurological toxicity. Additionally, little is known about the psychiatric consequences of the long-term use of these compounds. Case presentation: We describe a case of severe psychotic episode likely induced by chronic use of a combination of new recreational drugs (methylenedioxypyrovalerone, mephedrone, butylone and alpha-pyrrolidinopentiophenone). The patient had no psychiatric history and showed poor response to conventional antipsychotic treatment (haloperidol). Conclusions: This case illustrates the potential negative effects of recreational drugs that cannot be limited to an acute psychotic episode but might determine a condition of prolonged paranoid psychosis. Although the use of these compounds is currently increasing, such molecules might often pass undetected in patients accessing the emergency room, leading to misdiagnosis (e.g. schizophrenic episode) and lack of appropriate treatment. PMID:25352977

  18. Treating leukemia at the risk of inducing severe anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wendy S.; Zhu, Helen He; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Anemia is a frequently observed adverse effect in cancer patients who receive chemotherapy or drugs designed to block specific oncogenic signaling pathways, although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. An article first published online (Zhu HH, Luo X, Zhang K, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2015;112:13342–13347) presented data indicating that cell type-specific pathway cross-talk is likely an important mechanism to consider. Shp2 and Pten, two master regulators of central cytoplasmic signaling pathways, oppose each other in myeloproliferation and leukemogenesis, but cooperate in promoting erythropoiesis. Thus, genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of Shp2 suppresses the leukemogenic effect of Pten loss, yet simultaneously induces severe anemia in mice with Pten deficiency in blood cells. PMID:26826310

  19. Hypoxaemia in Mozambican children <5 years of age admitted to hospital with clinical severe pneumonia: clinical features and performance of predictor models.

    PubMed

    Bassat, Quique; Lanaspa, Miguel; Machevo, Sónia; O'Callaghan-Gordo, Cristina; Madrid, Lola; Nhampossa, Tacilta; Acácio, Sozinho; Roca, Anna; Alonso, Pedro L

    2016-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of hypoxaemia among under-five children admitted to hospital with clinical severe pneumonia and to assess the performance to diagnose hypoxaemia of models based on clinical signs. We conducted a hospital-based survey in a district hospital from Southern Mozambique. A total of 825 children were recruited after obtaining an informed consent. The prevalence of hypoxaemia on admission was 27.9%, and 19.8% of these children died (OR compared with non-hypoxaemic children 3.22, 95% CI 1.98-5.21, P < 0.001). The model with larger area under the ROC curve (AUC-ROC) to predict hypoxaemia included cyanosis or thoracoabdominal breathing or respiratory rate ≥70 breaths per minute. None of the models performed well when tested in different case scenarios of oxygen availability through mathematical modelling, with over 50% of hypoxaemic children not receiving oxygen even in favourable case scenarios. Clinical signs alone or in combination are not suitable to diagnose hypoxaemia. The use of pulse oximeters should be strongly encouraged. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Pneumonia and Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyu-Lee; Seon, Seung-Han; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2017-07-22

    Pneumonia is an inflammatory disease of the lung, responsible for high morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or other microorganisms. Streptococcus pneumoniae, a gram-positive bacterium with over 90 serotypes, is the most common causative agent. Moreover, comorbid factors including heart failure, renal disease, and pulmonary disease could increase the risk of pneumococcal pneumonia. Since the advent of the pneumococcal vaccine in the 1980s, the incidence of pneumonia has decreased significantly. However, current vaccines confer only limited protection against serotypes included in the vaccine. Thus, to overcome this limitation, new types of pneumococcal vaccines have been sought and under clinical trials. In this review, we discuss pneumonia and summarize the various types of pneumococcal vaccines in progress.

  1. Sepsis Caused by Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL)-Positive K. pneumoniae and E. coli: Comparison of Severity of Sepsis, Delay of Anti-Infective Therapy and ESBL Genotype.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, Christian; Gürntke, Stephan; Steinmetz, Ivo; Kohler, Christian; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Gastmeier, Petra; Schwab, Frank; Kola, Axel; Deja, Maria; Leistner, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Infections with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) are associated with increased mortality. Outcome differences due to various species of ESBL-E or ESBL genotypes are not well investigated. We conducted a cohort study to assess risk factors for mortality in cases of ESBL-E bacteremia (K. pneumoniae or E. coli) and the risk fa