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Sample records for pneumophila evidence suggesting

  1. Virulence factor rtx in Legionella pneumophila, evidence suggesting it is a modular multifunctional protein

    PubMed Central

    D'Auria, Giuseppe; Jiménez, Núria; Peris-Bondia, Francesc; Pelaz, Carmen; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés

    2008-01-01

    Background The repeats in toxin (Rtx) are an important pathogenicity factor involved in host cells invasion of Legionella pneumophila and other pathogenic bacteria. Its role in escaping the host immune system and cytotoxic activity is well known. Its repeated motives and modularity make Rtx a multifunctional factor in pathogenicity. Results The comparative analysis of rtx gene among 6 strains of L. pneumophila showed modularity in their structures. Among compared genomes, the N-terminal region of the protein presents highly dissimilar repeats with functionally similar domains. On the contrary, the C-terminal region is maintained with a fashionable modular configuration, which gives support to its proposed role in adhesion and pore formation. Despite the variability of rtx among the considered strains, the flanking genes are maintained in synteny and similarity. Conclusion In contrast to the extracellular bacteria Vibrio cholerae, in which the rtx gene is highly conserved and flanking genes have lost synteny and similarity, the gene region coding for the Rtx toxin in the intracellular pathogen L. pneumophila shows a rapid evolution. Changes in the rtx could play a role in pathogenicity. The interplay of the Rtx toxin with host membranes might lead to the evolution of new variants that are able to escape host cell defences. PMID:18194518

  2. Legionella pneumophila strain associated with the first evidence of person-to-person transmission of Legionnaires’ disease: a unique mosaic genetic backbone

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Vítor; Nunes, Alexandra; Sampaio, Daniel A.; Vieira, Luís; Machado, Jorge; Simões, Maria J.; Gonçalves, Paulo; Gomes, João P.

    2016-01-01

    A first strong evidence of person-to-person transmission of Legionnaires’ Disease (LD) was recently reported. Here, we characterize the genetic backbone of this case-related Legionella pneumophila strain (“PtVFX/2014”), which also caused a large outbreak of LD. PtVFX/2014 is phylogenetically divergent from the most worldwide studied outbreak-associated L. pneumophila subspecies pneumophila serogroup 1 strains. In fact, this strain is also from serogroup 1, but belongs to the L. pneumophila subspecies fraseri. Its genomic mosaic backbone reveals eight horizontally transferred regions encompassing genes, for instance, involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis or encoding virulence-associated Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system (T4BSS) substrates. PtVFX/2014 also inherited a rare ~65 kb pathogenicity island carrying virulence factors and detoxifying enzymes believed to contribute to the emergence of best-fitted strains in water reservoirs and in human macrophages, as well as a inter-species transferred (from L. oakridgensis) ~37.5 kb genomic island (harboring a lvh/lvr T4ASS cluster) that had never been found intact within L. pneumophila species. PtVFX/2014 encodes another lvh/lvr cluster near to CRISPR-associated genes, which may boost L. pneumophila transition from an environmental bacterium to a human pathogen. Overall, this unique genomic make-up may impact PtVFX/2014 ability to adapt to diverse environments, and, ultimately, to be transmitted and cause human disease. PMID:27196677

  3. Legionella pneumophila strain associated with the first evidence of person-to-person transmission of Legionnaires' disease: a unique mosaic genetic backbone.

    PubMed

    Borges, Vítor; Nunes, Alexandra; Sampaio, Daniel A; Vieira, Luís; Machado, Jorge; Simões, Maria J; Gonçalves, Paulo; Gomes, João P

    2016-05-19

    A first strong evidence of person-to-person transmission of Legionnaires' Disease (LD) was recently reported. Here, we characterize the genetic backbone of this case-related Legionella pneumophila strain ("PtVFX/2014"), which also caused a large outbreak of LD. PtVFX/2014 is phylogenetically divergent from the most worldwide studied outbreak-associated L. pneumophila subspecies pneumophila serogroup 1 strains. In fact, this strain is also from serogroup 1, but belongs to the L. pneumophila subspecies fraseri. Its genomic mosaic backbone reveals eight horizontally transferred regions encompassing genes, for instance, involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis or encoding virulence-associated Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system (T4BSS) substrates. PtVFX/2014 also inherited a rare ~65 kb pathogenicity island carrying virulence factors and detoxifying enzymes believed to contribute to the emergence of best-fitted strains in water reservoirs and in human macrophages, as well as a inter-species transferred (from L. oakridgensis) ~37.5 kb genomic island (harboring a lvh/lvr T4ASS cluster) that had never been found intact within L. pneumophila species. PtVFX/2014 encodes another lvh/lvr cluster near to CRISPR-associated genes, which may boost L. pneumophila transition from an environmental bacterium to a human pathogen. Overall, this unique genomic make-up may impact PtVFX/2014 ability to adapt to diverse environments, and, ultimately, to be transmitted and cause human disease.

  4. [Evidence that suggest the reality of reincarnation].

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Ernesto

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide, children can be found who reported that they have memories of a previous life. More than 2,500 cases have been studied and their specifications have been published and preserved in the archives of the Division of Perceptual Studies at the University of Virginia (United States). Many of those children come from countries where the majority of the inhabitants believe in reincarnation, but others come from countries with different cultures and religions that reject it. In many cases, the revelations of the children have been verified and have corresponded to a particular individual, already dead. A good number of these children have marks and birth defects corresponding to wounds on the body of his previous personality. Many have behaviors related to their claims to their former life: phobias, philias, and attachments. Others seem to recognize people and places of his supposed previous life, and some of their assertions have been made under controlled conditions. The hypothesis of reincarnation is controversial. We can never say that it does not occur, or will obtain conclusive evidence that it happens. The cases that have been described so far, isolated or combined, do not provide irrefutable proof of reincarnation, but they supply evidence that suggest its reality.

  5. Biofilms: The Stronghold of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Nour, Mena; Duncan, Carla; Low, Donald E.; Guyard, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila and is defined as a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5% to 80%. L. pneumophila is ubiquitous in natural and anthropogenic water systems. L. pneumophila is transmitted by inhalation of contaminated aerosols produced by a variety of devices. While L. pneumophila replicates within environmental protozoa, colonization and persistence in its natural environment are also mediated by biofilm formation and colonization within multispecies microbial communities. There is now evidence that some legionellosis outbreaks are correlated with the presence of biofilms. Thus, preventing biofilm formation appears as one of the strategies to reduce water system contamination. However, we lack information about the chemical and biophysical conditions, as well as the molecular mechanisms that allow the production of biofilms by L. pneumophila. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of biofilm formation by L. pneumophila and the roles of other microbial species in L. pneumophila biofilm colonization. In addition, we discuss the protective roles of biofilms against current L. pneumophila sanitation strategies along with the initial data available on the regulation of L. pneumophila biofilm formation. PMID:24185913

  6. New evidence suggesting segmentation of Cocos Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, L.R.; Sauermann, R.P.; De Boer, J.

    1985-02-01

    Compilation and analysis of geophysical and geological data indicate that the Cocos plate consists of three segments that have individual poles of rotation and independent motion vectors. Contoured heat-flow and gravity maps of the region delineate the boundaries of the segments within the Cocos plate. These segments have different focal-plane solutions along the Middle America Trench and different sedimentary-basin configurations within the Central America-Mexico island arc. Recent studies of seismic data from the region also have suggested that the subducted Cocos plate consists of three segments. The proposed northern and central segments are separated by the northeast-trending Siqueros-Tehuantepec Ridge fracture zone. The proposed central and southern segments are separated by the northeast-trending Costa Rica fracture zone that is located just northwest of the Cocos Ridge and extends from the Galapagos rift to the central valley of Costa Rica. Poles of rotation and relative motion vectors have been calculated with respect to the Caribbean plate for each segment. The northern segment is moving N75/sup 0/E, oblique to the trench; the central segment is moving N50/sup 0/E, perpendicular to the trench; the southern segment is moving north, perpendicular to the trench. The Siqueros-Tehuantepec and Costa Rice fracture zones appear to join with tectonized zones that dissect the Central America-Mexico island arc and extend across the Caribbean plate, suggesting that it too is segmented. Structural and stratigraphic data from the sedimentary basins on the island arc suggest that these fracture zones have existed throughout the Tertiary history of the region.

  7. [Infection with Legionella pneumophila among workers of Polish sea drilling platforms].

    PubMed

    Lapiński, T W; Kruminis-Lozowski, J

    1997-01-01

    The epidemiology, clinic, diagnostic dates and treatment of Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) were discussion. The our study were removal in 246 workers seas drill platforms. The antibody opposed of L. pneumophila were mean in 54 with 246 workers. Investigation were execution into conjunction of specifically job and life workers and frequently appearance of bronchitis. The antibody L. pneumophila were detection in 25% persons. These dates may suggest possibilities of L. pneumophila infections among workers of these professions.

  8. Characterization and resuscitation of ‘non-culturable’ cells of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Legionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen responsible for Legionnaires’ disease, an infection which can lead to potentially fatal pneumonia. After disinfection, L. pneumophila has been detected, like many other bacteria, in a “viable but non culturable” state (VBNC). The physiological significance of the VBNC state is unclear and controversial: it could be an adaptive response favoring long-term survival; or the consequence of cellular deterioration which, despite maintenance of certain features of viable cells, leads to death; or an injured state leading to an artificial loss of culturability during the plating procedure. VBNC cells have been found to be resuscitated by contact with amoebae. Results We used quantitative microscopic analysis, to investigate this “resuscitation” phenomenon in L. pneumophila in a model involving amending solid plating media with ROS scavengers (pyruvate or glutamate), and co-culture with amoebae. Our results suggest that the restoration observed in the presence of pyruvate and glutamate may be mostly due to the capacity of these molecules to help the injured cells to recover after a stress. We report evidence that this extracellular signal leads to a transition from a not-culturable form to a culturable form of L. pneumophila, providing a technique for recovering virulent and previously uncultivated forms of L. pneumophila. Conclusion These new media could be used to reduce the risk of underestimation of counts of virulent of L. pneumophila cells in environmental samples. PMID:24383402

  9. Genetic Evidence that Legionella pneumophila RpoS Modulates Expression of the Transmission Phenotype in Both the Exponential Phase and the Stationary Phase

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Michael A.; Swanson, Michele S.

    2004-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Legionella pneumophila alternates between two states: replication within phagocytes and transmission between host amoebae or macrophages. In broth cultures that model this life cycle, during the replication period, CsrA inhibits expression of transmission traits. When nutrients become limiting, the alarmone (p)ppGpp accumulates and the sigma factors RpoS and FliA and the positive activators LetA/S and LetE promote differentiation to the transmissible form. Here we show that when cells enter the postexponential growth phase, RpoS increases expression of the transmission genes fliA, flaA, and mip, factors L. pneumophila needs to establish a new replication niche. In contrast, in exponential (E)-phase cells whose (p)ppGpp levels are low, rpoS inhibits expression of transmission traits, on the basis of three separate observations. First, rpoS RNA levels peak in the E phase, suggestive of a role for RpoS during replication. Second, in multiple copies, rpoS decreases the amounts of csrA, letE, fliA, and flaA transcripts and inhibits the transmission traits of motility, infectivity, and cytotoxicity. Third, rpoS blocks expression of cytotoxicity and motility by E-phase bacteria that have been induced to express the LetA activator ectopically. The data are discussed in the context of a model in which the alarmone (p)ppGpp enables RpoS to outcompete other sigma factors for binding to RNA polymerase to promote transcription of transmission genes, while LetA/S acts in parallel to relieve CsrA posttranscriptional repression of the transmission regulon. By coupling transcriptional and posttranscriptional control pathways, intracellular L. pneumophila could respond to stress by rapidly differentiating to a transmissible form. PMID:15102753

  10. Effect of Prior Influenza Virus Infection on Susceptibility of AKR/J Mice and Squirrel Monkeys to Respiratory Challenge with Legionella pneumophila.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-30

    influenza virus and Legionella pneumophila than to either agent alone. b 3 F As knowledge of Legionnaires ’ disease has accumulated, the evidence...suggests that many infections occur in individuals with underlying disease . Since Legionella pneumophila appears to spread by the airborne route (5, 6, 8, 9...The sequence of influenza followed by Legionnaires ’ disease may be relatively unco mon in nature because of the differing seasonal patterns of the

  11. Ecological distribution of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Fliermans, C B; Cherry, W B; Orrison, L H; Smith, S J; Tison, D L; Pope, D H

    1981-01-01

    Bacteria were concentrated 500-fold from 20-liter water samples collected from 67 different lakes and rivers in the United States. The data suggest that Legionella pneumophila is part of the natural aquatic environment and that the bacterium is capable of surviving extreme ranges of environmental conditions. The data further demonstrate the effectiveness of the direct fluorescent-antibody technique for detecting L. pneumophila in natural aquatic systems. Smears of the concentrated samples were screened microscopically for serogroups of L. pneumophila by the direct fluorescent-antibody technique. Virtually all of the 793 samples were found to be positive by this method. The 318 samples containing the largest numbers of positive bacteria which were morphologically consistent with L. pneumophila were injected into guinea pigs for attempted isolations. Isolates were obtained from habitats with a wide range of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. Samples collected monthly from a thermally altered lake and injected into guinea pigs demonstrated a seasonality of infection, with the highest frequency of infection occurring during the summer months. PMID:7013702

  12. Nutrient salvaging and metabolism by the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Maris V; Swanson, Michele S

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila is ubiquitous in freshwater environments as a free-swimming organism, resident of biofilms, or parasite of protozoa. If the bacterium is aerosolized and inhaled by a susceptible human host, it can infect alveolar macrophages and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. A sophisticated cell differentiation program equips L. pneumophila to persist in both extracellular and intracellular niches. During its life cycle, L. pneumophila alternates between at least two distinct forms: a transmissive form equipped to infect host cells and evade lysosomal degradation, and a replicative form that multiplies within a phagosomal compartment that it has retooled to its advantage. The efficient changeover between transmissive and replicative states is fundamental to L. pneumophila's fitness as an intracellular pathogen. The transmission and replication programs of L. pneumophila are governed by a number of metabolic cues that signal whether conditions are favorable for replication or instead trigger escape from a spent host. Several lines of experimental evidence gathered over the past decade establish strong links between metabolism, cellular differentiation, and virulence of L. pneumophila. Herein, we focus on current knowledge of the metabolic components employed by intracellular L. pneumophila for cell differentiation, nutrient salvaging and utilization of host factors. Specifically, we highlight the metabolic cues that are coupled to bacterial differentiation, nutrient acquisition systems, and the strategies utilized by L. pneumophila to exploit host metabolites for intracellular replication.

  13. Intragenic Recombination Has a Critical Role on the Evolution of Legionella pneumophila Virulence-Related Effector sidJ

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Joana; Teixeira, Paulo Gonçalves; d'Avó, Ana Filipa; Júnior, Célio Santos; Veríssimo, António

    2014-01-01

    SidJ is a Dot/Icm effector involved in the trafficking or retention of ER-derived vesicles to Legionella pneumophila vacuoles whose mutation causes an observable growth defect, both in macrophage and amoeba hosts. Given the crucial role of this effector in L. pneumophila virulence we investigated the mechanisms shaping its molecular evolution. The alignment of SidJ sequences revealed several alleles with amino acid variations that may influence the protein properties. The identification of HGT events and the detection of balancing selection operating on sidJ evolution emerge as a clear result. Evidence suggests that intragenic recombination is an important strategy in the evolutionary adaptive process playing an active role on sidJ genetic plasticity. This pattern of evolution is in accordance with the life style of L. pneumophila as a broad host-range pathogen by preventing host-specialization and contributing to the resilience of the species. PMID:25299187

  14. Growth of Legionella pneumophila in Acanthamoeba castellanii enhances invasion.

    PubMed Central

    Cirillo, J D; Falkow, S; Tompkins, L S

    1994-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is considered to be a facultative intracellular parasite. Therefore, the ability of these bacteria to enter, i.e., invade, eukaryotic cells is expected to be a key pathogenic determinant. We compared the invasive ability of bacteria grown under standard laboratory conditions with that of bacteria grown in Acanthamoeba castellanii, one of the protozoan species that serves as a natural host for L. pneumophila in the environment. Amoeba-grown L. pneumophila cells were found to be at least 100-fold more invasive for epithelial cells and 10-fold more invasive for macrophages and A. castellanii than were L. pneumophila cells grown on agar. Comparison of agar- and amoeba-grown L. pneumophila cells by light and electron microscopy demonstrated dramatic differences in the morphology and structure of the bacteria. Analyses of protein expression in the two strains of bacteria suggest that these phenotypic differences may be due to the expression of new proteins in amoeba-grown L. pneumophila cells. In addition, the amoeba-grown bacteria were found to enter macrophages via coiling phagocytosis at a higher frequency than agar-grown bacteria did. Replication of L. pneumophila in protozoans present in domestic water supplies may be necessary to produce bacteria that are competent to enter mammalian cells and produce human disease. Images PMID:8039895

  15. Ciliate Paramecium is a natural reservoir of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenta; Nakao, Ryo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Tachibana, Masato; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2016-04-15

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, replicates within alveolar macrophages and free-living amoebae. However, the lifestyle of L. pneumophila in the environment remains largely unknown. Here we established a novel natural host model of L. pneumophila endosymbiosis using the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. We also identified Legionella endosymbiosis-modulating factor A (LefA), which contributes to the change in life stage from endosymbiosis to host lysis, enabling escape to the environment. We isolated L. pneumophila strains from the environment, and they exhibited cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and induced host lysis. Acidification of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) was inhibited, and enlarged LCVs including numerous bacteria were observed in P. caudatum infected with L. pneumophila. An isogenic L. pneumophila lefA mutant exhibited decreased cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and impaired the modification of LCVs, resulting in the establishment of endosymbiosis between them. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila may have a mechanism to switch their endosymbiosis in protistan hosts in the environment.

  16. Ciliate Paramecium is a natural reservoir of Legionella pneumophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kenta; Nakao, Ryo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Tachibana, Masato; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2016-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, replicates within alveolar macrophages and free-living amoebae. However, the lifestyle of L. pneumophila in the environment remains largely unknown. Here we established a novel natural host model of L. pneumophila endosymbiosis using the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. We also identified Legionella endosymbiosis-modulating factor A (LefA), which contributes to the change in life stage from endosymbiosis to host lysis, enabling escape to the environment. We isolated L. pneumophila strains from the environment, and they exhibited cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and induced host lysis. Acidification of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) was inhibited, and enlarged LCVs including numerous bacteria were observed in P. caudatum infected with L. pneumophila. An isogenic L. pneumophila lefA mutant exhibited decreased cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and impaired the modification of LCVs, resulting in the establishment of endosymbiosis between them. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila may have a mechanism to switch their endosymbiosis in protistan hosts in the environment.

  17. Ciliate Paramecium is a natural reservoir of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kenta; Nakao, Ryo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Tachibana, Masato; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, replicates within alveolar macrophages and free-living amoebae. However, the lifestyle of L. pneumophila in the environment remains largely unknown. Here we established a novel natural host model of L. pneumophila endosymbiosis using the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. We also identified Legionella endosymbiosis-modulating factor A (LefA), which contributes to the change in life stage from endosymbiosis to host lysis, enabling escape to the environment. We isolated L. pneumophila strains from the environment, and they exhibited cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and induced host lysis. Acidification of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) was inhibited, and enlarged LCVs including numerous bacteria were observed in P. caudatum infected with L. pneumophila. An isogenic L. pneumophila lefA mutant exhibited decreased cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and impaired the modification of LCVs, resulting in the establishment of endosymbiosis between them. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila may have a mechanism to switch their endosymbiosis in protistan hosts in the environment. PMID:27079173

  18. Analysis of cell surface alterations in Legionella pneumophila cells treated with human apolipoprotein E.

    PubMed

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Cytryńska, Małgorzata; Wdowiak-Wróbel, Sylwia; Chmiel, Elżbieta; Gruszecki, Wiesław I

    2015-03-01

    Binding of human apolipoprotein E (apoE) to Legionella pneumophila lipopolysaccharide was analysed at the molecular level by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, thereby providing biophysical evidence for apoE-L. pneumophila lipopolysaccharide interaction. Atomic force microscopy imaging of apoE-exposed L. pneumophila cells revealed alterations in the bacterial cell surface topography and nanomechanical properties in comparison with control bacteria. The changes induced by apoE binding to lipopolysaccharide on the surface of L. pneumophila cells may participate in: (1) impeding the penetration of host cells by the bacteria; (2) suppression of pathogen intracellular growth and eventually; and (3) inhibition of the development of infection.

  19. Severe Pneumonia Caused by Legionella pneumophila: Differential Diagnosis and Therapeutic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Chahin, Abdullah; Opal, Steven M

    2017-03-01

    Severe legionella pneumonia poses a diagnostic challenge and requires early intervention. Legionnaire's disease can have several presenting signs, symptoms, and laboratory abnormalities that suggest that Legionella pneumophila is the pathogen, but none of these are sufficient to distinguish L pneumophila pneumonia from other respiratory pathogens. L pneumophila is primarily an intracellular pathogen and needs treatment with antibiotics that efficiently enter the intracellular space. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Is total-etch dead? Evidence suggests otherwise.

    PubMed

    Alex, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Both the total-etch and self-etching systems of today have the potential to provide durable adhesive interface, and despite the proclamations of some, total-etch is alive and well. Indeed, evidence indicates that a viable and growing market remains for total-etch adhesive systems. This paper will discuss the origins, evolution, and idiosyncrasies of the total-etch technique as well as its place in dentistry today. New innovations, the use of antimicrobials to inhibit matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and sensitivity issues will also be discussed.

  1. Evidence suggesting possible SCA1 gene involvement in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, S.R.; Wange, S.; Sun, C.

    1994-09-01

    Several findings suggest a possible role for the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p in some cases of schizophrenia. First, linkage analyses in Irish pedigrees provided LOD scores up to 3.0 for one model tested using microsatellites closely linked to SCA1. Reanalysis of these data using affected sibpair methods yielded a significant result (p = 0.01) for one marker. An attempt to replicate this linkage finding was made using 44 NIMH families (206 individuals, 80 affected) and 12 Utah families (120 individuals, 49 affected). LOD scores were negative in these new families, even allowing for heterogeneity, as were results using affected sibpair methods. However, one Utah family provided a LOD score of 1.3. We also screened the SCA1 trinucleotide repeat to search for expansions characteristic of this disorder in these families and in 38 additional unrelated schizophrenics. We found 1 schizophrenic with 41 repeats, which is substantially larger than the maximum size of 36 repeats observed in previous studies of several hundred controls. We are now assessing whether the distribution of SCA1 repeats differs significantly in schizophrenia versus controls. Recent reports suggest possible anticipation in schizophrenia (also characteristic of SCA1) and a few cases of psychiatric symptoms suggesting schizophrenia have been observed in the highly related disorder DRPLA (SCA2), which is also based on trinucleotide repeat expansion. These findings suggest that further investigations of this gene and chromosome region may be a priority.

  2. ERP evidence suggests executive dysfunction in ecstasy polydrug users.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C A; Fairclough, S H; Fisk, J E; Tames, F; Montgomery, C

    2013-08-01

    Deficits in executive functions such as access to semantic/long-term memory have been shown in ecstasy users in previous research. Equally, there have been many reports of equivocal findings in this area. The current study sought to further investigate behavioural and electro-physiological measures of this executive function in ecstasy users. Twenty ecstasy-polydrug users, 20 non-ecstasy-polydrug users and 20 drug-naïve controls were recruited. Participants completed background questionnaires about their drug use, sleep quality, fluid intelligence and mood state. Each individual also completed a semantic retrieval task whilst 64 channel Electroencephalography (EEG) measures were recorded. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) revealed no between-group differences in behavioural performance on the task. Mixed ANOVA on event-related potential (ERP) components P2, N2 and P3 revealed significant between-group differences in the N2 component. Subsequent exploratory univariate ANOVAs on the N2 component revealed marginally significant between-group differences, generally showing greater negativity at occipito-parietal electrodes in ecstasy users compared to drug-naïve controls. Despite absence of behavioural differences, differences in N2 magnitude are evidence of abnormal executive functioning in ecstasy-polydrug users.

  3. Evidences Suggesting Involvement of Viruses in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kanupriya; Metgud, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers and it constitutes a major health problem particularly in developing countries. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents the most frequent of all oral neoplasms. Several risk factors have been well characterized to be associated with OSCC with substantial evidences. The etiology of OSCC is complex and involves many factors. The most clearly defined potential factors are smoking and alcohol, which substantially increase the risk of OSCC. However, despite this clear association, a substantial proportion of patients develop OSCC without exposure to them, emphasizing the role of other risk factors such as genetic susceptibility and oncogenic viruses. Some viruses are strongly associated with OSCC while the association of others is less frequent and may depend on cofactors for their carcinogenic effects. Therefore, the exact role of viruses must be evaluated with care in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of OSCC. Although a viral association within a subset of OSCC has been shown, the molecular and histopathological characteristics of these tumors have yet to be clearly defined. PMID:24455418

  4. Palinacousis--evidence to suggest a post-ictal phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Wazim; Ahuja, Niharika; Shah, Aashit

    2012-06-15

    Palinacousis is a paroxysmal auditory illusion in which perseveration of an external auditory stimulus occurs after cessation of the stimulus. The subjects recognize the illusory nature of this experience, which is often a fragment of the last sentence they heard. Palinacousis has been reported in only a few documented cases. It has been described as an aura, a component of complex partial seizures, and a post-ictal event. We put forward evidence demonstrating palinacousis as a post-ictal event. A 68-year-old woman presented with an acute sensory aphasia, and an EEG showed frequent epileptiform discharges from the left temporo-parietal region. MRI showed an enhancing mass in the left inferior parietal lobule that was consistent with a metastasis. A CT scan of the thorax later showed an enhancing mass in the left lung that was determined to be an invasive non-small cell carcinoma. Treatment with levetiracetam resulted in loss of epileptiform activity on EEG and resolution of aphasia, but soon afterward, she started complaining of recurrent auditory illusions in her right ear. These consisted of phrases from the ends of sentences she heard. Continuous EEG monitoring during her auditory symptoms showed intermittent left temporal slowing but no epileptiform discharges or electrographic seizures. An FDG-PET scan with the glucose uptake phase during episodes of auditory illusions revealed hypometabolism of bilateral medial temporal cortices and increased uptake in the metastatic tumor. A systematic review identified 14 cases with palinacousis since 1981. Cases prior to that were excluded due to the lack of sufficient data. We propose that palinacousis is a "negative" phenomenon, at least in some individuals. It occurs with a loss of function of a region of the brain that normally suppresses auditory perseveration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Legionella pneumophila kai operon is implicated in stress response and confers fitness in competitive environments

    PubMed Central

    Loza-Correa, Maria; Sahr, Tobias; Rolando, Monica; Daniels, Craig; Petit, Pierre; Skarina, Tania; Valero, Laura Gomez; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Honoré, Nadine; Savchenko, Aleksey; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Legionella pneumophila uses aquatic protozoa as replication niche and protection from harsh environments. Although L. pneumophila is not known to have a circadian clock, it encodes homologues of the KaiBC proteins of Cyanobacteria that regulate circadian gene expression. We show that L. pneumophila kaiB, kaiC and the downstream gene lpp1114, are transcribed as a unit under the control of the stress sigma factor RpoS. KaiC and KaiB of L. pneumophila do not interact as evidenced by yeast and bacterial two-hybrid analyses. Fusion of the C-terminal residues of cyanobacterial KaiB to Legionella KaiB restores their interaction. In contrast, KaiC of L. pneumophila conserved autophosphorylation activity, but KaiB does not trigger the dephosphorylation of KaiC like in Cyanobacteria. The crystal structure of L. pneumophila KaiB suggests that it is an oxidoreductase-like protein with a typical thioredoxin fold. Indeed, mutant analyses revealed that the kai operon-encoded proteins increase fitness of L. pneumophila in competitive environments, and confer higher resistance to oxidative and sodium stress. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that L. pneumophila KaiBC resemble Synechosystis KaiC2B2 and not circadian KaiB1C1. Thus, the L. pneumophila Kai proteins do not encode a circadian clock, but enhance stress resistance and adaption to changes in the environments. PMID:23957615

  6. Identification of vacuoles containing extraintestinal differentiated forms of Legionella pneumophila in colonized Caenorhabditis elegans soil nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Hellinga, Jacqueline R; Garduño, Rafael A; Kormish, Jay D; Tanner, Jennifer R; Khan, Deirdre; Buchko, Kristyn; Jimenez, Celine; Pinette, Mathieu M; Brassinga, Ann Karen C

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, is a facultative intracellular parasite of freshwater protozoa. Legionella pneumophila features a unique developmental network that involves several developmental forms including the infectious cyst forms. Reservoirs of L. pneumophila include natural and man-made freshwater systems; however, recent studies have shown that isolates of L. pneumophila can also be obtained directly from garden potting soil suggesting the presence of an additional reservoir. A previous study employing the metazoan Caenorhabditis elegans, a member of the Rhabditidae family of free-living soil nematodes, demonstrated that the intestinal lumen can be colonized with L. pneumophila. While both replicative forms and differentiated forms were observed in C. elegans, these morphologically distinct forms were initially observed to be restricted to the intestinal lumen. Using live DIC imaging coupled with focused transmission electron microscopy analyses, we report here that L. pneumophila is able to invade and establish Legionella-containing vacuoles (LCVs) in the intestinal cells. In addition, LCVs containing replicative and differentiated cyst forms were observed in the pseudocoelomic cavity and gonadal tissue of nematodes colonized with L. pneumophila. Furthermore, establishment of LCVs in the gonadal tissue was Dot/Icm dependent and required the presence of the endocytic factor RME-1 to gain access to maturing oocytes. Our findings are novel as this is the first report, to our knowledge, of extraintestinal LCVs containing L. pneumophila cyst forms in C. elegans tissues, highlighting the potential of soil-dwelling nematodes as an alternate environmental reservoir for L. pneumophila. PMID:26131925

  7. Identification of vacuoles containing extraintestinal differentiated forms of Legionella pneumophila in colonized Caenorhabditis elegans soil nematodes.

    PubMed

    Hellinga, Jacqueline R; Garduño, Rafael A; Kormish, Jay D; Tanner, Jennifer R; Khan, Deirdre; Buchko, Kristyn; Jimenez, Celine; Pinette, Mathieu M; Brassinga, Ann Karen C

    2015-08-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, is a facultative intracellular parasite of freshwater protozoa. Legionella pneumophila features a unique developmental network that involves several developmental forms including the infectious cyst forms. Reservoirs of L. pneumophila include natural and man-made freshwater systems; however, recent studies have shown that isolates of L. pneumophila can also be obtained directly from garden potting soil suggesting the presence of an additional reservoir. A previous study employing the metazoan Caenorhabditis elegans, a member of the Rhabditidae family of free-living soil nematodes, demonstrated that the intestinal lumen can be colonized with L. pneumophila. While both replicative forms and differentiated forms were observed in C. elegans, these morphologically distinct forms were initially observed to be restricted to the intestinal lumen. Using live DIC imaging coupled with focused transmission electron microscopy analyses, we report here that L. pneumophila is able to invade and establish Legionella-containing vacuoles (LCVs) in the intestinal cells. In addition, LCVs containing replicative and differentiated cyst forms were observed in the pseudocoelomic cavity and gonadal tissue of nematodes colonized with L. pneumophila. Furthermore, establishment of LCVs in the gonadal tissue was Dot/Icm dependent and required the presence of the endocytic factor RME-1 to gain access to maturing oocytes. Our findings are novel as this is the first report, to our knowledge, of extraintestinal LCVs containing L. pneumophila cyst forms in C. elegans tissues, highlighting the potential of soil-dwelling nematodes as an alternate environmental reservoir for L. pneumophila.

  8. Lactoferrin inhibits or promotes Legionella pneumophila intracellular multiplication in nonactivated and interferon gamma-activated human monocytes depending upon its degree of iron saturation. Iron-lactoferrin and nonphysiologic iron chelates reverse monocyte activation against Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, T F; Horwitz, M A

    1991-01-01

    We have been exploring the role of iron in the pathogenesis of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication in human monocytes is iron dependent and that IFN gamma-activated monocytes inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication by limiting the availability of iron. In this study, we have investigated the effect on L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication of lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein which is internalized via specific receptors on monocytes, and of nonphysiologic iron chelates which enter monocytes by a receptor-independent route. Apolactoferrin completely inhibited L. pneumophila multiplication in nonactivated monocytes, and enhanced the capacity of IFN gamma-activated monocytes to inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication. In contrast, iron-saturated lactoferrin had no effect on the already rapid rate of L. pneumophila multiplication in nonactivated monocytes. Moreover, it reversed the capacity of activated monocytes to inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication, demonstrating that L. pneumophila can utilize iron from the lactoferrin-lactoferrin receptor pathway. The capacity of iron-lactoferrin to reverse monocyte activation was dependent upon its percent iron saturation and not just its total iron content. Similarly, the nonphysiologic iron chelates ferric nitrilotriacetate and ferric ammonium citrate completely reverse and ferric pyrophosphate partially reversed the capacity of IFN gamma-activated monocytes to inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication, demonstrating that L. pneumophila can utilize iron derived from nonphysiologic iron chelates internalized by monocytes independently of the transferrin and lactoferrin endocytic pathways. This study suggests that at sites of inflammation, lactoferrin may inhibit or promote L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication in mononuclear phagocytes depending upon

  9. First Case of Legionnaire's Disease Caused by Legionella anisa in Spain and the Limitations on the Diagnosis of Legionella non-pneumophila Infections.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Lucianna; Izquierdo, Fernando; Magnet, Angela; Hurtado, Carolina; Salinas, Mireya A; Gomes, Thiago Santos; Angulo, Santiago; Salso, Santiago; Pelaez, Jesús; Tejeda, Maria Isabel; Alhambra, Almudena; Gómez, Carmen; Enríquez, Ana; Estirado, Eva; Fenoy, Soledad; Del Aguila, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a severe form of pneumonia, with worldwide relevance, caused by Legionella spp. Approximately 90% of all cases of legionellosis are caused by Legionella pneumophila, but other species can also be responsible for this infection. These bacteria are transmitted by inhalation of aerosols or aspiration of contaminated water. In Spain, environmental studies have demonstrated the presence of Legionella non-pneumophila species in drinking water treatment plants and water distribution networks. Aware that this evidence indicates a risk factor and the lack of routine assays designed to detect simultaneously diverse Legionella species, we analyzed 210 urine samples from patients presenting clinical manifestations of pneumonia using a semi-nested PCR for partial amplification of the 16S rDNA gene of Legionella and a diagnostic method used in hospitals for Legionella antigen detection. In this study, we detected a total of 15 cases of legionellosis (7.1%) and the first case of Legionnaires' disease caused by L. anisa in Spain. While the conventional method used in hospitals could only detect four cases (1.9%) produced by L. pneumophila serogroup 1, using PCR, the following species were identified: Legionella spp. (10/15), L. pneumophila (4/15) and L. anisa (1/15). These results suggest the need to change hospital diagnostic strategies regarding the identification of Legionella species associated with this disease. Therefore, the detection of Legionella DNA by PCR in urine samples seems to be a suitable alternative method for a sensitive, accurate and rapid diagnosis of Legionella pneumonia, caused by L. pneumophila and also for L. non-pneumophila species.

  10. First Case of Legionnaire's Disease Caused by Legionella anisa in Spain and the Limitations on the Diagnosis of Legionella non-pneumophila Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vaccaro, Lucianna; Izquierdo, Fernando; Magnet, Angela; Hurtado, Carolina; Salinas, Mireya A.; Gomes, Thiago Santos; Angulo, Santiago; Salso, Santiago; Pelaez, Jesús; Tejeda, Maria Isabel; Alhambra, Almudena; Gómez, Carmen; Enríquez, Ana; Estirado, Eva; Fenoy, Soledad; del Aguila, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires’ disease is a severe form of pneumonia, with worldwide relevance, caused by Legionella spp. Approximately 90% of all cases of legionellosis are caused by Legionella pneumophila, but other species can also be responsible for this infection. These bacteria are transmitted by inhalation of aerosols or aspiration of contaminated water. In Spain, environmental studies have demonstrated the presence of Legionella non-pneumophila species in drinking water treatment plants and water distribution networks. Aware that this evidence indicates a risk factor and the lack of routine assays designed to detect simultaneously diverse Legionella species, we analyzed 210 urine samples from patients presenting clinical manifestations of pneumonia using a semi-nested PCR for partial amplification of the 16S rDNA gene of Legionella and a diagnostic method used in hospitals for Legionella antigen detection. In this study, we detected a total of 15 cases of legionellosis (7.1%) and the first case of Legionnaires’ disease caused by L. anisa in Spain. While the conventional method used in hospitals could only detect four cases (1.9%) produced by L. pneumophila serogroup 1, using PCR, the following species were identified: Legionella spp. (10/15), L. pneumophila (4/15) and L. anisa (1/15). These results suggest the need to change hospital diagnostic strategies regarding the identification of Legionella species associated with this disease. Therefore, the detection of Legionella DNA by PCR in urine samples seems to be a suitable alternative method for a sensitive, accurate and rapid diagnosis of Legionella pneumonia, caused by L. pneumophila and also for L. non-pneumophila species. PMID:27442238

  11. From amoeba to macrophages: exploring the molecular mechanisms of Legionella pneumophila infection in both hosts.

    PubMed

    Escoll, Pedro; Rolando, Monica; Gomez-Valero, Laura; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. It replicates within amoeba and infects accidentally human macrophages. Several similarities are seen in the L. pneumophila-infection cycle in both hosts, suggesting that the tools necessary for macrophage infection may have evolved during co-evolution of L. pneumophila and amoeba. The establishment of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) within the host cytoplasm requires the remodeling of the LCV surface and the hijacking of vesicles and organelles. Then L. pneumophila replicates in a safe intracellular niche in amoeba and macrophages. In this review we will summarize the existing knowledge of the L. pneumophila infection cycle in both hosts at the molecular level and compare the factors involved within amoeba and macrophages. This knowledge will be discussed in the light of recent findings from the Acanthamoeba castellanii genome analyses suggesting the existence of a primitive immune-like system in amoeba.

  12. Association of Legionella pneumophila with the macrophage endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, M S; Isberg, R R

    1995-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila replicates within a membrane-bounded compartment that is studded with ribosomes. In this study we investigated whether these ribosomes originate from the cytoplasmic pool or are associated with host endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopic localization studies of ER proteins in macrophages infected with L. pneumophila indicated that the bacteria reside in a compartment surrounded by ER. An L. pneumophila mutant that grows slowly in macrophages was slow to associate with host ER, providing genetic evidence in support of the hypothesis that this specialized vacuole is required for intracellular bacterial growth. Ultrastructural studies, in which the ER luminal protein BiP was labeled by immunoperoxidase cytochemistry, revealed that L. pneumophila replication vacuoles resemble nascent autophagosomes. Furthermore, short-term amino acid starvation of macrophages, which stimulated host autophagosomes. Furthermore, short-term amino acid starvation of macrophages, which stimulated host autophagy, increased association of the bacteria with the ER and enhanced bacterial growth. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that L. pneumophila exploits the autophagy machinery of macrophages to establish an intracellular niche favorable for replication. PMID:7642298

  13. Caspase Exploitation by Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Kathrin; Amer, Amal O.

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila remains a major health concern, especially for hospitalized patients. L. pneumophila in the environment can survive extracellular or as protozoan parasite within amoeba. After human infection it efficiently replicates in alveolar macrophages without activating inflammasome assembly and cleavage of caspase-1. In contrast murine macrophages actively recognize intracellular L. pneumophila via inflammasome components which initiate pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, phagosomal maturation and pyroptotic cell death thereby leading to bacterial restriction. During this process flagellin-dependent and -independent signaling pathways trigger the canonical as well as the non-canonical inflammasome. This review describes the current knowledge about L. pneumophila-induced inflammasome pathways in permissive and restrictive host cells. PMID:27148204

  14. Legionella pneumophila lipopolysaccharide activates the classical complement pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, C S; Schultz, D R; Arnold, P I; Johnson, W

    1992-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterium capable of entering and growing in alveolar macrophages and monocytes. Complement and complement receptors are important in the uptake of L. pneumophila by human mononuclear phagocytes. The surface molecules of L. pneumophila that activate the complement system are unknown. To identify these factors, we investigated the effects of L. pneumophila lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the classical and alternative complement pathways of normal human serum by functional hemolytic assays. Although incubation of LPS in normal human serum at 37 degrees C resulted in the activation of both pathways, complement activation proceeded primarily through the classical pathway. Activation of the classical pathway by LPS was dependent on natural antibodies of the immunoglobulin M class that were present in various quantities in sera from different normal individuals but were absent in an immunoglobulin-deficient serum obtained from an agammaglobulinemic patient. Additional studies using sheep erythrocytes coated with LPS suggested that the antibodies recognized antigenic sites in the carbohydrate portion of LPS. The ability of LPS to interact with the complement system suggests a role for LPS in the uptake of L. pneumophila by mononuclear phagocytes. PMID:1612744

  15. Legionella pneumophila prevents proliferation of its natural host Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Mengue, Luce; Régnacq, Matthieu; Aucher, Willy; Portier, Emilie; Héchard, Yann; Samba-Louaka, Ascel

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous, pathogenic, Gram-negative bacterium responsible for legionellosis. Like many other amoeba-resistant microorganisms, L. pneumophila resists host clearance and multiplies inside the cell. Through its Dot/Icm type IV secretion system, the bacterium injects more than three hundred effectors that modulate host cell physiology in order to promote its own intracellular replication. Here we report that L. pneumophila prevents proliferation of its natural host Acanthamoeba castellanii. Infected amoebae could not undergo DNA replication and no cell division was observed. The Dot/Icm secretion system was necessary for L. pneumophila to prevent the eukaryotic proliferation. The absence of proliferation was associated with altered amoebal morphology and with a decrease of mRNA transcript levels of CDC2b, a putative regulator of the A. castellanii cell cycle. Complementation of CDC28-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the CDC2b cDNA was sufficient to restore proliferation of CDC28-deficient S. cerevisiae and suggests for the first time that CDC2b from A. castellanii could be functional and a bona fide cyclin-dependent kinase. Hence, our results reveal that L. pneumophila impairs proliferation of A. castellanii and this effect could involve the cell cycle protein CDC2b. PMID:27805070

  16. Mechanisms of Legionella pneumophila-induced interleukin-8 expression in human lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Teruya, Hiromitsu; Higa, Futoshi; Akamine, Morikazu; Ishikawa, Chie; Okudaira, Taeko; Tomimori, Koh; Mukaida, Naofumi; Tateyama, Masao; Heuner, Klaus; Fujita, Jiro; Mori, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    Background Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium, capable of replicating within the phagosomes of macrophages and monocytes, but little is known about its interaction with human lung epithelial cells. We investigated the effect of L. pneumophila on the expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in human A549 alveolar and NCI-H292 tracheal epithelial cell lines. Results Infection of L. pneumophila strain, but not heat-killed strain, resulted in upregulation of IL-8. IL-8 mRNA expression was induced immediately after the infection and its signal became gradually stronger until 24 h after infection. On the other hand, IL-8 expression in A549 cells infected with L. pneumophila lacking a functional type IV secretion system was transient. The IL-8 expression was slightly induced at 16 h and increased at 24 h after infection with flagellin-deficient Legionella. Activation of the IL-8 promoter by L. pneumophila infection occurred through the action of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Transfection of dominant negative mutants of NF-κB-inducing kinase, IκB kinase and IκB inhibited L. pneumophila-mediated activation of IL-8 promoter. Treatment with hsp90 inhibitor suppressed L. pneumophila-induced IL-8 mRNA due to deactivation of NF-κB. Conclusion Collectively, these results suggest that L. pneumophila induces activation of NF-κB through an intracellular signaling pathway that involves NF-κB-inducing kinase and IκB kinase, leading to IL-8 gene transcription, and that hsp90 acts as a crucial regulator in L. pneumophila-induced IL-8 expression, presumably contributing to immune response in L. pneumophila. The presence of flagellin and a type IV secretion system are critical for Legionella to induce IL-8 expression in lung epithelial cells. PMID:18034886

  17. Virulence conversion of Legionella pneumophila: a one-way phenomenon.

    PubMed Central

    Catrenich, C E; Johnson, W

    1988-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that Legionella pneumophila converts from virulence to avirulence after passage on supplemented Mueller-Hinton (SMH) agar and may convert back to virulence after passage in guinea pigs. However, there is no additional information concerning the apparent interconversion of virulent and avirulent derivatives of L. pneumophila cultures. We investigated the stability of a parental virulent culture and its avirulent derivatives and the growth and viability of these cultures on charcoal-yeast extract (CYE) and SMH agars. Avirulent derivatives of a highly virulent L. pneumophila culture were obtained by passage of the virulent parent culture on SMH agar. The only time a virulent L. pneumophila culture was recoverable from an avirulent culture was when the avirulent culture was derived from a saline suspension of a virulent culture which had been passaged only five times on SMH agar. When an avirulent culture was derived from a virulent culture passaged 25 times on SMH agar or from an isolated colony which grew on a SMH agar plate, we were unable to recover a virulent culture after successive passage through guinea pigs. These results suggest that the conversion process which occurs between virulent and avirulent forms of L. pneumophila is a one-way phenomenon from virulence to avirulence and that stable avirulent derivatives can be isolated. Furthermore, our findings suggest that SMH agar acts as a selective medium for the growth of avirulent L. pneumophila, and growth on SMH agar may be a phenotypic marker for avirulence. Virulent cells, although unable to grow on SMH agar, may remain viable for several passages on SMH agar and propagate when inoculated into guinea pigs. Images PMID:3182073

  18. Alveolar Macrophages and Neutrophils Are the Primary Reservoirs for Legionella pneumophila and Mediate Cytosolic Surveillance of Type IV Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Copenhaver, Alan M.; Casson, Cierra N.; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Fung, Thomas C.; Duda, Matthew M.; Roy, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen responsible for the severe pneumonia Legionnaires' disease, uses its dot/icm-encoded type IV secretion system (T4SS) to translocate effector proteins that promote its survival and replication into the host cell cytosol. However, by introducing bacterial products into the host cytosol, L. pneumophila also activates cytosolic immunosurveillance pathways, thereby triggering robust proinflammatory responses that mediate the control of infection. Thus, the pulmonary cell types that L. pneumophila infects not only may act as an intracellular niche that facilitates its pathogenesis but also may contribute to the immune response against L. pneumophila. The identity of these host cells remains poorly understood. Here, we developed a strain of L. pneumophila producing a fusion protein consisting of β-lactamase fused to the T4SS-translocated effector RalF, which allowed us to track cells injected by the T4SS. Our data reveal that alveolar macrophages and neutrophils both are the primary recipients of T4SS-translocated effectors and harbor viable L. pneumophila during pulmonary infection of mice. Moreover, both alveolar macrophages and neutrophils from infected mice produced tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1α in response to T4SS-sufficient, but not T4SS-deficient, L. pneumophila. Collectively, our data suggest that alveolar macrophages and neutrophils are both an intracellular reservoir for L. pneumophila and a source of proinflammatory cytokines that contribute to the host immune response against L. pneumophila during pulmonary infection. PMID:25092908

  19. Survival of Legionella pneumophila in the cold-water ciliate Tetrahymena vorax

    SciTech Connect

    Smith-Somerville, H.E.; Huryn, V.B.; Walker, C.; Winters, A.L. )

    1991-09-01

    The processing of phagosomes containing Legionella pneumophila and Escerichia coli were compared in Tetrahymena vorax, a hymenostome ciliated protozoan that prefers lower temperatures. L. pneumophila did not multiply in the ciliate when incubated at 20 to 22C, but vacuoles containing L. pneumophila were retained in the cells for a substantially longer time than vacuoles with E. coli. Electron micrographs showed no evidence of degradation of L. pneumophila cells through 12 h, while E. coli cells in the process of being digested were observed in vacuoles 75 min after the addition of the bacterium T. vorax ingested L. pneumophila normally, but by 10 to 15 min, the vacuolar membrane appeared denser than that surrounding nascent or newly formed phagosomes. In older vacuoles, electron-dense particles lined portions of the membrane. Acidification of the phagosomes indicated by the accumulation of neutral red was similar in T. vorax containing L. pneumophila or E. coli. This ciliate could provide a model for the analysis of virulence-associated intracellular events independent of the replication of L. pneumophila.

  20. Role of stagnation and obstruction of water flow in isolation of Legionella pneumophila from hospital plumbing.

    PubMed Central

    Ciesielski, C A; Blaser, M J; Wang, W L

    1984-01-01

    The stagnation of water in two of four hospital hot-water storage tanks found to contain Legionella pneumophila was reduced by keeping the two tanks continually on-line for 1 year. L. pneumophila colony counts in these two tanks fell quickly to low levels, whereas the organisms persisted in the two tanks that were not in use. L. pneumophila continued to be isolated from 50 to 100% of the hospital showerheads which were sampled during this period. We also examined aerators and other hospital faucet fixtures which obstruct water flow. L. pneumophila was isolated from 22 of 30 faucet aerators and 2 of 16 vacuum breakers but not from 26 nonobstructed faucets or 6 backflow preventers. Over a 7-month period, after nine faucet aerators were sterilized, 10 of 60 surveillance cultures revealed L. pneumophila, despite the inability to isolate the organism from the potable-water tanks in use. These data suggest that prevention of stagnation in hot-water tanks may be effective in reducing L. pneumophila concentrations in potable-water systems serving high-risk populations. We have also shown that faucet aerators, by providing a surface for L. pneumophila to colonize, can become secondary reservoirs for the organism in hospital plumbing. PMID:6508313

  1. Effects of metals on Legionella pneumophila growth in drinking water plumbing systems.

    PubMed Central

    States, S J; Conley, L F; Ceraso, M; Stephenson, T E; Wolford, R S; Wadowsky, R M; McNamara, A M; Yee, R B

    1985-01-01

    An investigation of the chemical environment and growth of Legionella pneumophila in plumbing systems was conducted to gain a better understanding of its ecology in this habitat. Water samples were collected from hospital and institutional hot-water tanks known to have supported L. pneumophila and were analyzed for 23 chemical parameters. The chemical environment of these tanks was found to vary extensively, with the concentrations of certain metals reaching relatively high levels due to corrosion. The effect of various chemical conditions on L. pneumophila growth was then examined by observing its multiplication in the chemically analyzed hot-water tank samples after sterilization and reinoculation with L. pneumophila. L. pneumophila and associated microbiota used in these experiments were obtained from a hot-water tank. These stains were maintained in tap water and had never been passaged on agar. The results of the growth studies indicate that although elevated concentrations of a number of metals are toxic, lower levels of certain metals such as iron, zinc, and potassium enhance growth of naturally occurring L. pneumophila. Parallel observations on accompanying non-Legionellaceae bacteria failed to show the same relationship. These findings suggest that metal plumbing components and associated corrosion products are important factors in the survival and growth of L. pneumophila in plumbing systems and may also be important in related habitats such as cooling towers and air-conditioning systems. PMID:4091551

  2. Apoptosis in Macrophages and Alveolar Epithelial Cells during Early Stages of Infection by Legionella pneumophila and Its Role in Cytopathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lian-Yong; Abu Kwaik, Yousef

    1999-01-01

    The hallmark of Legionnaires’ disease is intracellular replication of Legionella pneumophila within cells in the alveolar spaces. Cytopathogenicity of this bacterium to the host cell has been well demonstrated, but the mechanisms of host cell death due to infection by L. pneumophila are not well understood. In this study, induction of apoptosis in macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells by L. pneumophila during early stages of infection was confirmed by using multiple criteria, including DNA fragmentation by agarose gel electrophoresis, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling, surface exposure of phosphatidylserine, and cellular morphology by transmission electron microscopy. Induction of nuclear apoptosis in L. pneumophila-infected macrophages is mediated by activation of the caspase cascade death machinery. We provide genetic and biochemical evidence that L. pneumophila-induced apoptosis in macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells does not require intracellular bacterial replication or new protein synthesis. In addition, extracellular L. pneumophila is capable of inducing apoptosis. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis by L. pneumophila correlates with cytopathogenicity. We conclude that L. pneumophila-induced apoptosis in macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells plays an important role in cytopathogenicity to the host cell during early stages of infection. PMID:9916101

  3. Legionella pneumophila utilizes a single-player disulfide-bond oxidoreductase system to manage disulfide bond formation and isomerization.

    PubMed

    Kpadeh, Zegbeh Z; Day, Shandra R; Mills, Brandy W; Hoffman, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila uses a single homodimeric disulfide bond (DSB) oxidoreductase DsbA2 to catalyze extracytoplasmic protein folding and to correct DSB errors through protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) activity. In Escherichia coli, these functions are separated to avoid futile cycling. In L. pneumophila, DsbA2 is maintained as a mixture of disulfides (S-S) and free thiols (SH), but when expressed in E. coli, only the SH form is observed. We provide evidence to suggest that structural differences in DsbB oxidases (LpDsbB1 and LpDsbB2) and DsbD reductases (LpDsbD1 and LpDsbD2) (compared with E. coli) permit bifunctional activities without creating a futile cycle. LpdsbB1 and LpdsbB2 partially complemented an EcdsbB mutant while neither LpdsbD1 nor LpdsbD2 complemented an EcdsbD mutant unless DsbA2 was also expressed. When the dsb genes of E. coli were replaced with those of L. pneumophila, motility was restored and DsbA2 was present as a mixture of redox forms. A dominant-negative approach to interfere with DsbA2 function in L. pneumophila determined that DSB oxidase activity was necessary for intracellular multiplication and assembly/function of the Dot/Icm Type IVb secretion system. Our studies show that a single-player system may escape the futile cycle trap by limiting transfer of reducing equivalents from LpDsbDs to DsbA2.

  4. Suggestions for the promotion of evidence-based public health in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jong-Myon

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based public health (EBPH) is defined as public health decision-making based on current best evidence. Debates about the latent tuberculosis infection control program suggested by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2017 highlight the need to promote EBPH. Three strategies have been proposed, including providing necessary evidence by evaluating policy-evidence gaps; delivering high-quality, relevant, and timely evidence by conducting systematic reviews and adapting public health guidelines; and making value-driven decisions by training and educating public health policymakers.

  5. Cocultivation of Legionella pneumophila and free-living amoebae.

    PubMed Central

    Tyndall, R L; Domingue, E L

    1982-01-01

    Studies of the interaction of Legionella pneumophila with free-living amoebae showed that Naegleria lovaniensis and Acanthamoeba royreba could use L. pneumophila as a sole food source. However, growth of the amoebae on nonnutrient agar plates seeded with L. pneumophila was slower than growth on nonnutrient agar plates seeded with Escherichia coli. On inoculation of L. pneumophila into axenic cultures of N. lovaniensis and A. royreba, 99.9% of the L. pneumophila was destroyed within 24 h. After several weeks, however, some amoeba cultures became chronically infected and supported the growth of L. pneumophila. Amoebae exposed to L. pneumophila and containing adhered L. pneumophila, L. pneumophila antigens, or both, showed no increased pathogenic potential on intranasal inoculation of weanling mice. Similarly, L. pneumophila propagated in chronically infected amoeba cultures showed no increase in virulence on intraperitoneal inoculation of guinea pigs relative to L. pneumophila grown in yeast extract broth. Images PMID:7149720

  6. Dynamics and impact of homologous recombination on the evolution of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    David, Sophia; Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Harris, Simon R; Marttinen, Pekka; Rusniok, Christophe; Buchrieser, Carmen; Harrison, Timothy G; Parkhill, Julian

    2017-06-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium and the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. Previous genomic studies have shown that recombination accounts for a high proportion (>96%) of diversity within several major disease-associated sequence types (STs) of L. pneumophila. This suggests that recombination represents a potentially important force shaping adaptation and virulence. Despite this, little is known about the biological effects of recombination in L. pneumophila, particularly with regards to homologous recombination (whereby genes are replaced with alternative allelic variants). Using newly available population genomic data, we have disentangled events arising from homologous and non-homologous recombination in six major disease-associated STs of L. pneumophila (subsp. pneumophila), and subsequently performed a detailed characterisation of the dynamics and impact of homologous recombination. We identified genomic "hotspots" of homologous recombination that include regions containing outer membrane proteins, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) region and Dot/Icm effectors, which provide interesting clues to the selection pressures faced by L. pneumophila. Inference of the origin of the recombined regions showed that isolates have most frequently imported DNA from isolates belonging to their own clade, but also occasionally from other major clades of the same subspecies. This supports the hypothesis that the possibility for horizontal exchange of new adaptations between major clades of the subspecies may have been a critical factor in the recent emergence of several clinically important STs from diverse genomic backgrounds. However, acquisition of recombined regions from another subspecies, L. pneumophila subsp. fraseri, was rarely observed, suggesting the existence of a recombination barrier and/or the possibility of ongoing speciation between the two subspecies. Finally, we suggest that multi-fragment recombination may occur in L. pneumophila

  7. Dynamics and impact of homologous recombination on the evolution of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Marttinen, Pekka; Rusniok, Christophe; Harrison, Timothy G.

    2017-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium and the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease. Previous genomic studies have shown that recombination accounts for a high proportion (>96%) of diversity within several major disease-associated sequence types (STs) of L. pneumophila. This suggests that recombination represents a potentially important force shaping adaptation and virulence. Despite this, little is known about the biological effects of recombination in L. pneumophila, particularly with regards to homologous recombination (whereby genes are replaced with alternative allelic variants). Using newly available population genomic data, we have disentangled events arising from homologous and non-homologous recombination in six major disease-associated STs of L. pneumophila (subsp. pneumophila), and subsequently performed a detailed characterisation of the dynamics and impact of homologous recombination. We identified genomic “hotspots” of homologous recombination that include regions containing outer membrane proteins, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) region and Dot/Icm effectors, which provide interesting clues to the selection pressures faced by L. pneumophila. Inference of the origin of the recombined regions showed that isolates have most frequently imported DNA from isolates belonging to their own clade, but also occasionally from other major clades of the same subspecies. This supports the hypothesis that the possibility for horizontal exchange of new adaptations between major clades of the subspecies may have been a critical factor in the recent emergence of several clinically important STs from diverse genomic backgrounds. However, acquisition of recombined regions from another subspecies, L. pneumophila subsp. fraseri, was rarely observed, suggesting the existence of a recombination barrier and/or the possibility of ongoing speciation between the two subspecies. Finally, we suggest that multi-fragment recombination may occur in L. pneumophila

  8. Growth of Legionella pneumophila in association with blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria)

    SciTech Connect

    Tison, D.L.; Pope, D.H.; Cherry, W.B.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1980-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila (Legionnaires disease bacterium) of serogroup 1 was isolated from an algal-bacterial mat community growing at 45/sup 0/C in a man-made thermal effluent. This isolate was grown in mineral salts medium at 45/sup 0/C in association with the blue-green alga (cyanobacterium) Fischerella sp. over a pH range of 6.9 to 7.6. L. pneumophila was apparently using algal extracellular products as its carbon and energy sources. These observations indicate that the temperature, pH, and nutritional requirements of L. pneumophila are not as stringent as those previously observed when cultured on complex media. This association between L. pneumophila and certain blue-green algae suggests an explanation for the apparent widespread distribution of the bacterium in nature.

  9. Bafilomycin A1 and intracellular multiplication of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Cattani, L; Goldoni, P; Pastoris, M C; Sinibaldi, L; Orsi, N

    1997-01-01

    Multiplication of Legionella pneumophila in HeLa cells was found to be inhibited by noncytotoxic concentrations of bafilomycin A1, with blockage of bacterial growth at a concentration 15.6 nM. The inhibiting action was evident only when the antibiotic was present during the initial phase of intracellular multiplication, i.e., during the formation of the phagosome, whereas the addition of the drug did not affect microorganisms already actively multiplying within the phagosome. PMID:8980784

  10. Potential Virulence Role of the Legionella pneumophila ptsP Ortholog

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Futoshi; Edelstein, Paul H.

    2001-01-01

    We previously identified the Legionella pneumophila ptsP (phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase) ortholog gene as a putative virulence factor in a study of signature-tagged mutagenesis using a guinea pig pneumonia model. In this study, we further defined the phenotypic properties of L. pneumophila ptsP and its complete sequence. The L. pneumophila ptsP was 2,295 bases in length. Its deduced amino acid sequence had high similarity with ptsP orthologs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Azotobacter vinelandii, and Escherichia coli, with nearly identical lengths. Here we show that while the mutant grew well in laboratory media, it was defective in both lung and spleen multiplication in guinea pigs. It grew slowly in guinea pig alveolar macrophages despite good uptake into the cells. Furthermore, there was minimal growth in a human alveolar epithelial cell line (A549). Transcomplementation of the L. pneumophila ptsP mutant almost completely rescued its growth in alveolar macrophages, in A549 cells, and in guinea pig lung and spleen. The L. pneumophila ptsP mutant was capable of evasion of phagosome-lysosome fusion and resided in ribosome-studded phagosomes. Pore formation activity of the mutant was normal. The L. pneumophila ptsP mutant expressed DotA and IcmX in apparently normal amounts, suggesting that the ptsP mutation did not affect dotA and icmX regulation. In addition, the mutant was resistant to serum and neutrophil killing. Taken together, these findings show that L. pneumophila ptsP is required for full in vivo virulence of L. pneumophila, most probably by affecting intracellular growth. PMID:11447151

  11. DNA probe specific for Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Grimont, P A; Grimont, F; Desplaces, N; Tchen, P

    1985-01-01

    A procedure for preparing a DNA probe to be used in the specific detection of Legionella pneumophila by dot or colony hybridization has been devised. When total DNA from L. pneumophila was used as a radioactive probe, cross-hybridization occurred with DNA from many other species belonging to various families (including Legionellaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Vibrionaceae). Cross-hybridizing restriction fragments in L. pneumophila ATCC 33152 DNA were identified on Southern blots. When unlabeled DNA from strain ATCC 33152 was cleaved by endonuclease BamHI, the DNA fragments cross-hybridizing with the labeled DNA from all of the other species and genera tested (or with Escherichia coli 16 + 23 S RNA) had a size of 21.4 and 16.2 kilobase pairs (major bands) and 28.0, 12.8, and 10.1 kilobase pairs (minor bands). BamHI restriction fragments of L. pneumophila DNA deprived of the cross-hybridizing fragments were pooled and used as a probe for the detection of L. pneumophila. This probe proved to be specific for L. pneumophila in colony and dot hybridization. It can potentially be used for the detection of L. pneumophila in clinical and water samples. The procedure described can be readily applied to the preparation of probes specific for phylogenetically isolated bacterial species other than L. pneumophila. Images PMID:3980693

  12. Permissiveness of freshly isolated environmental strains of amoebae for growth of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Mathieu; Binet, Marie; Bouteleux, Celine; Herbelin, Pascaline; Soreau, Sylvie; Héchard, Yann

    2016-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacterium commonly found in water and responsible for severe pneumonia. Free-living amoebae are protozoa also found in water, which feed on bacteria by phagocytosis. Under favorable conditions, some L. pneumophila are able to resist phagocytic digestion and even multiply within amoebae. However, it is not clear whether L. pneumophila could infect at a same rate a large range of amoebae or if there is some selectivity towards specific amoebal genera or strains. Also, most studies have been performed using collection strains and not with freshly isolated strains. In our study, we assess the permissiveness of freshly isolated environmental strains of amoebae, belonging to three common genera (i.e. Acanthamoeba, Naegleria and Vermamoeba), for growth of L. pneumophila at three different temperatures. Our results indicated that all the tested strains of amoebae were permissive to L. pneumophila Lens and that there was no significant difference between the strains. Intracellular proliferation was more efficient at a temperature of 40°C. In conclusion, our work suggests that, under favorable conditions, virulent strains of L. pneumophila could equally infect a large number of isolates of common freshwater amoeba genera.

  13. The Legionella pneumophila GIG operon responds to gold and copper in planktonic and biofilm cultures

    PubMed Central

    Jwanoswki, Kathleen; Wells, Christina; Bruce, Terri; Rutt, Jennifer; Banks, Tabitha; McNealy, Tamara L.

    2017-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila contaminates man-made water systems and creates numerous exposure risks for Legionnaires’ Disease. Because copper/silver ionization is commonly used to control L. pneumophila, its mechanisms of metal response and detoxification are of significant interest. Here we describe an L. pneumophila operon with significant similarity to the GIG operon of Cupriavidus metallidurans. The Legionella GIG operon is present in a subset of strains and has been acquired as part of the ICE-βox 65-kB integrative conjugative element. We assessed GIG promoter activity following exposure of L. pneumophila to multiple concentrations of HAuCl4, CuSO4 and AgNO3. At 37°C, control stationary phase cultures exhibited GIG promoter activity. This activity increased significantly in response to 20 and 50uM HAuCl4 and CuSO4 but not in response to AgNO3. Conversely, at 26°C, cultures exhibited decreased promoter response to copper. GIG promoter activity was also induced by HAuCl4 or CuSO4 during early biofilm establishment at both temperatures. When an L. pneumophila GIG promoter construct was transformed into E. coli DH5α, cultures showed baseline expression levels that did not increase following metal addition. Analysis of L. pneumophila transcriptional regulatory mutants suggested that GIG up-regulation in the presence of metal ions may be influenced by the stationary phase sigma factor, RpoS. PMID:28463986

  14. Birc1e/Naip5 rapidly antagonizes modulation of phagosome maturation by Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Anne; de Chastellier, Chantal; Balor, Stéphanie; Gros, Philippe

    2007-04-01

    Legionella survives intracellularly by preventing fusion with lysosomes, due to phagosome escape from the endocytic pathway at an early stage of phagosome maturation, and by creating a replicative organelle that acquires endoplasmic reticulum (ER) characteristics through sustained interactions and fusion with the ER. Intracellular replication of Legionella pneumophila in mouse macrophages is controlled by the Lgn1 locus. Functional complementation in vivo has identified the Birc1e/Naip5 gene as being responsible for the Lgn1 effect. To understand the function and temporal site of action of Birc1e/Naip5 in susceptibility to L. pneumophila, we examined the biogenesis of Legionella-containing vacuoles (LCVs) formed in permissive A/J macrophages and in their Birc1e/Naip5 transgenic non-permissive counterpart. Birc1e/Naip5 effects on acquisition of lysosomal and ER markers were evident within 1-2 h following infection. A significantly higher proportion of LCVs formed in Birc1e/Naip5 transgenic macrophages had acquired the lysosomal markers cathepsin D and Lamp1 by 2 h post infection, whereas a significantly higher proportion of LCVs formed in permissive macrophages were positively stained for the ER markers BAP31 and calnexin, 6 h post infection. Likewise, studies by electron microscopy showed acquisition of lysosomal contents (horseradish peroxidase), within the first hour following phagocytic uptake, by LCVs formed in Birc1e/Naip5 transgenic macrophages and delivery of the ER marker glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase) only to the lumen of LCVs formed in A/J macrophages. Finally, a larger proportion of LCVs formed in A/J macrophages were studded with ribosomes 24 h post infection, compared with LCVs formed in Birc1e/Naip5 transgenic macrophages. These results suggest that sensing of L. pneumophila products by Birc1e/Naip5 in macrophages occurs rapidly following phagocytosis, a process that antagonizes the ability of L. pneumophila to remodel its phagosome into a specialized

  15. Cocultivation of Legionella pneumophila and free-living amoebae

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, R.L.; Domingue, E.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of the interaction of Legionella pneumophila with free-living amoebae showed that Naegleria lovaniensis and Acanthamoeba royreba could use L. pneumophia as a sole food source. However, growth of the amoebae on nonnutrient agar plates seeded with L. pneumophila was slower than growth on nonnutrient agar plates seeded with Escherichia coli. On inoculation of L. pneumophila into axenic cultures of N. lovaniensis and A. roryba, 99.9% of the L. pneumophila was destroyed within 24 h. After several weeks, however, some amoeba cultures became chronically infected and supported the growth of L. pneumophila. Amoebae exposed to L. pneumophila and containing adhered L. pneumophila, L. pneumophila antigens, or both, showed no increased pathogenic potential on intranasal inoculation of weanling mice. Similarly, L. pneumophila propagated in chronically infected amoeba cultures showed no increase in virulence on intraperitoneal inoculation of guinea pigs relative to L. pneumophila grown in yeast extract broth. 20 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  16. Deletion of potD, encoding a putative spermidine-binding protein, results in a complex phenotype in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Abdelhady, Hany; Tompkins, Nicholas P; Carson, Kaitlyn R; Garduño, Rafael A

    2014-07-01

    L. pneumophila is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in a membrane-bound compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). We previously observed that the polyamine spermidine, produced by host cells or added exogenously, enhances the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. To study this enhancing effect and determine whether polyamines are used as nutrients, we deleted potD from L. pneumophila strain JR32. The gene potD encodes a spermidine-binding protein that in other bacteria is essential for the function of the PotABCD polyamine transporter. Deletion of potD did not affect L. pneumophila growth in vitro in the presence or absence of spermidine and putrescine, suggesting that PotD plays a redundant or no role in polyamine uptake. However, deletion of potD resulted in a puzzlingly complex phenotype that included defects in L. pneumophila's ability to form filaments, tolerate Na(+), associate with macrophages and amoeba, recruit host vesicles to the LCV, and initiate intracellular growth. Moreover, the ΔpotD mutant was completely unable to grow in L929 cells treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of spermidine synthesis. These complex and disparate effects suggest that the L. pneumophila potD encodes either: (i) a multifunctional protein, (ii) a protein that interacts with, or regulates a, multifunctional protein, or (iii) a protein that contributes (directly or indirectly) to a regulatory network. Protein function studies with the L. pneumophila PotD protein are thus warranted.

  17. Heterogeneity in the attachment and uptake mechanisms of the Legionnaires' disease bacterium, Legionella pneumophila, by protozoan hosts.

    PubMed

    Harb, O S; Venkataraman, C; Haack, B J; Gao, L Y; Kwaik, Y A

    1998-01-01

    Invasion and intracellular replication of Legionella pneumophila within protozoa in the environment plays a major role in the transmission of Legionnaires' disease. Intracellular replication of L. pneumophila within protozoa occurs in a rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER)-surrounded phagosome (Y. Abu Kwaik, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 62:2022-2028, 1996). Since the subsequent fate of many intracellular pathogens is determined by the route of entry, we compared the mechanisms of attachment and subsequent uptake of L. pneumophila by the two protozoa Hartmannella vermiformis and Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Our data provide biochemical and genetic evidence that the mechanisms of attachment and subsequent uptake of L. pneumophila by the two protozoan hosts are, in part, different. First, uptake of L. pneumophila by H. vermiformis is completely blocked by the monovalent sugars galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, but these sugars partially blocked A. polyphaga. Second, attachment of L. pneumophila to H. vermiformis is associated with a time-dependent and reversible tyrosine dephosphorylation of multiple host proteins. In contrast, only a slight dephosphorylation of a 170-kDa protein of A. polyphaga is detected upon infection. Third, synthesis of H. vermiformis proteins but not of A. polyphaga proteins is required for uptake of L. pneumophila. Fourth, we have identified L. pneumophila mutants that are severely defective in attachment to A. polyphaga but which exhibit minor reductions in attachment to H. vermiformis and, thus, provide a genetic basis for the difference in mechanisms of attachment to both protozoa. The data indicate a remarkable adaptation of L. pneumophila to attach and invade different protozoan hosts by different mechanisms, yet invasion is followed by a remarkably similar intracellular replication within a RER-surrounded phagosome and subsequent killing of the host cell.

  18. Severe Legionnaires' disease with pneumonia and biopsy-confirmed myocarditis most likely caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Naoto; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Takano, Tomoko

    2012-01-01

    We herein describe the successful treatment of a patient with possible Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6 infection complicated by pneumonia and myocarditis. A 32-year-old man presented with a five-day history of cough, dyspnea and chest pain. Chest radiography revealed patchy opacities in both lungs suggestive of bilateral pneumonia, and a urinary antigen test for Legionella pneumophila was positive. After admission, the patient developed congestive heart failure due to pathologically confirmed myocarditis. He was successfully treated with minocycline, macrolide, steroids and noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV). He eventually recovered with a normalized cardiac function. L. pneumophila serogroup 6 was isolated from the bathwater in the patient's home.

  19. A Plasmid in Legionella pneumophila

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    13). which they were isolated and the number of the isolate The Legionnaires disease bacterium, L. pneu. from that city. The following 16... Legionnaires disease bacterium. .1. (un. Micro. biol. 8:320-:t25. appears reasonable that this organism could sup- 1:l. Fraser, D5. W., and J. F. McI~ade. 1979...INFECTION AND IMMUNITY, Sept. 1980, p. 1(92-1095 Vol. 29, No. :1 0I 9-9567/A)/- 1092/14$02.00/0. A Plasmid in Legionella pneumophila_ ( (/’ )GREGORY

  20. Influence of temperature, chlorine residual and heavy metals on the presence of Legionella pneumophila in hot water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Rakić, Anita; Perić, Jelena; Foglar, Lucija

    2012-01-01

    The microbiological colonisation of buildings and man-made structures often occurs on the walls of plumbing systems; therefore, monitoring of opportunistic pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), both in water distribution mains and in consumers' plumbing systems, is an important issue according to the international and national guidelines that regulate the quality of drinking water. This paper investigates the presence of L. pneumophila in the Dalmatian County of Croatia and the relationship between L. pneumophila presence and heavy metals concentrations, free residual chlorine and water temperature in hot water distribution systems (WDS). Investigations were performed on a large number of hot water samples taken from taps in kitchens and bathrooms in hotels and homes for the elderly and disabled in the Split region. Of the 127 hot water samples examined, 12 (9.4%) were positive for Legionella spp. with median values concentration of 450 cfu × L(-1). Among positive isolates, 10 (83.3%) were L. pneumophila sg 1, and two of them (16.6%) belonged to the genera L. pneumophila sg 2-14. The positive correlation between the water temperature, iron and manganese concentrations, and L. pneumophila contamination was proved by statistical analysis of the experimental data. On the contrary, zinc and free residual chlorine had no observed influence on the presence of L. pneumophila. The presence of heavy metals in water samples confirms the corrosion of distribution system pipes and fittings, and suggests that metal plumbing components and associated corrosion products are important factors in the survival and growth of L. pneumophila in WDS.

  1. Alveolar macrophages and neutrophils are the primary reservoirs for Legionella pneumophila and mediate cytosolic surveillance of type IV secretion.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Alan M; Casson, Cierra N; Nguyen, Hieu T; Fung, Thomas C; Duda, Matthew M; Roy, Craig R; Shin, Sunny

    2014-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen responsible for the severe pneumonia Legionnaires' disease, uses its dot/icm-encoded type IV secretion system (T4SS) to translocate effector proteins that promote its survival and replication into the host cell cytosol. However, by introducing bacterial products into the host cytosol, L. pneumophila also activates cytosolic immunosurveillance pathways, thereby triggering robust proinflammatory responses that mediate the control of infection. Thus, the pulmonary cell types that L. pneumophila infects not only may act as an intracellular niche that facilitates its pathogenesis but also may contribute to the immune response against L. pneumophila. The identity of these host cells remains poorly understood. Here, we developed a strain of L. pneumophila producing a fusion protein consisting of β-lactamase fused to the T4SS-translocated effector RalF, which allowed us to track cells injected by the T4SS. Our data reveal that alveolar macrophages and neutrophils both are the primary recipients of T4SS-translocated effectors and harbor viable L. pneumophila during pulmonary infection of mice. Moreover, both alveolar macrophages and neutrophils from infected mice produced tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1α in response to T4SS-sufficient, but not T4SS-deficient, L. pneumophila. Collectively, our data suggest that alveolar macrophages and neutrophils are both an intracellular reservoir for L. pneumophila and a source of proinflammatory cytokines that contribute to the host immune response against L. pneumophila during pulmonary infection. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Genome-wide Chromatin Profiling of Legionella pneumophila-Infected Human Macrophages Reveals Activation of the Probacterial Host Factor TNFAIP2.

    PubMed

    Du Bois, Ilona; Marsico, Annalisa; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Schweiger, Michal R; Caffrey, Brian E; Sittka-Stark, Alexandra; Eberhardt, Martin; Vera, Julio; Vingron, Martin; Schmeck, Bernd T

    2016-08-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Infection leads to a broad host cell response, as evident, for example, on the transcriptional level. Chromatin modifications, which control gene expression, play a central role in the transcriptional response to L. pneumophila  We infected human-blood-derived macrophages (BDMs) with L. pneumophila and used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing to screen for gene promoters with the activating histone 4 acetylation mark. We found the promoter of tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein 2 (TNFAIP2) to be acetylated at histone H4. This factor has not been characterized in the pathology of L. pneumophila TNFAIP2 messenger RNA and protein were upregulated in response to L. pneumophila infection of human-BDMs and human alveolar epithelial (A549) cells. We showed that L. pneumophila-induced TNFAIP2 expression is dependent on the NF-κB transcription factor. Importantly, knock down of TNFAIP2 led to reduced intracellular replication of L. pneumophila Corby in A549 cells. Taken together, genome-wide chromatin analysis of L. pneumophila-infected macrophages demonstrated induction of TNFAIP2, a NF-κB-dependent factor relevant for bacterial replication. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Serospecific antigens of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Otten, S; Iyer, S; Johnson, W; Montgomery, R

    1986-01-01

    Serospecific antigens isolated by EDTA extraction from four serogroups of Legionella pneumophila were analyzed for their chemical composition, molecular heterogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunological properties. The antigens were shown to be lipopolysaccharides and to differ from the lipopolysaccharides of other gram-negative bacteria. The serospecific antigens contained rhamnose, mannose, glucosamine, and two unidentified sugars together with 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, phosphate, and fatty acids. The fatty acid composition was predominantly branched-chain acids with smaller amounts of 3-hydroxymyristic acid. The antigens contain periodate-sensitive groups; mannosyl residues were completely cleaved by periodate oxidation. Hydrolysis of the total lipopolysaccharide by acetic acid resulted in the separation of a lipid A-like material that cross-reacted with the antiserum to lipid A from Salmonella minnesota but did not comigrate with it on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. None of the four antigens contained heptose. All of the antigen preparations showed endotoxicity when tested by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. The results of this study indicate that the serogroup-specific antigens of L. pneumophila are lipopolysaccharides containing an unusual lipid A and core structure and different from those of other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:3017918

  4. Cytotoxic glucosyltransferases of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Belyi, Yury; Jank, Thomas; Aktories, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Legionella is a gram-negative bacterium and the causative pathogen of legionellosis-a severe pneumonia in humans. A large number of Legionella effectors interfere with numerous host cell functions, including intracellular vacuole trafficking and maturation, phospholipid metabolism, protein ubiquitination, pro-/anti-apoptotic balances or inflammatory responses. Moreover, eukaryotic protein synthesis is affected by L. pneumophila glucosyltransferases Lgt1, Lgt2, and Lgt3. Structurally, these enzymes are similar to large clostridial cytotoxins, use UDP-glucose as a co-substrate and modify a conserved serine residue (Ser-53) in elongation factor 1A (eEF1A). The ternary complex consisting of eEF1A, GTP, and aminoacylated-tRNA seems to be the substrate for Lgts. Studies with Saccharomyces cerevisiae corroborated that eEF1A is the major target responsible for Lgt-induced cytotoxic activity. In addition to Lgt proteins, Legionella produces other effector glycosyltransferase, including the modularly composed protein SetA, which displays tropism for early endosomal compartments, subverts host cell vesicle trafficking and demonstrates toxic activities toward yeast and mammalian cells. Here, our current knowledge about both groups of L. pneumophila glycosylating effectors is reviewed.

  5. Hartmannella vermiformis inhibition of Legionella pneumophila cultivability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hartmannella vermiformis is frequently isolated from drinking water (DW) and is permissive to Legionella pneumophila intracellular replication. Thus, H. vermiformis may play an important role in the growth and survival potential of such environmental pathogens. In this study, Pag...

  6. Hartmannella vermiformis inhibition of Legionella pneumophila cultivability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hartmannella vermiformis is frequently isolated from drinking water (DW) and is permissive to Legionella pneumophila intracellular replication. Thus, H. vermiformis may play an important role in the growth and survival potential of such environmental pathogens. In this study, Pag...

  7. Fibers under fire: suggestions for improving their use to provide forensic evidence.

    PubMed

    Grieve, M C; Wiggins, K G

    2001-07-01

    The current emphasis on DNA technology in forensic science has led many to believe that trace evidence examinations, including fibers, may be of little value. Reasons are given here to show that this is an erroneous assumption. In the face of this situation, fibers examiners have been challenged to consider ways in which they can improve the services they offer to the Criminal Justice System not only by increasing the efficiency of the examinations, but also by expressing the evidential value of the findings in a clearer way. The separate stages within fibers casework from evidence collection to report writing are critically examined. Suggestions are made on how improvements may be achieved. Areas where particular progress can be made include improving communication and exchange of information between the investigator and the scientist and streamlining analysis by using the latest equipment in conjunction with effective case management. In addition, ways of making better use of existing data pertaining to fiber frequencies, accumulating new data by using the resources of working groups, and improving training procedures with respect to evidence interpretation are discussed.

  8. Legionella pneumophila decreases velocity of Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Mengue, Luce; Richard, Freddie-Jeanne; Caubet, Yves; Rolland, Steven; Héchard, Yann; Samba-Louaka, Ascel

    2017-08-02

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoeba commonly found in aquatic environment. It feeds on bacteria even if some bacteria resist amoebal digestion. Thus, A. castellanii is described as a Trojan horse able to harbor pathogenic bacteria. L. pneumophila is one of the amoeba-resisting bacteria able to avoid host degradation by phagocytosis and to multiply inside the amoeba. When infecting its host, L. pneumophila injects hundreds of effectors via a type IV secretion system that change physiology of the amoeba to its profit. In this study, we assess mobility of A. castellanii upon infection with L. pneumophila. Electron-microscopy analysis of amoebae revealed a reduction of acanthopodia on cells infected with L. pneumophila. Analysis of velocity showed that migration of A. castellanii infected with L. pneumophila was significantly impaired compare to uninfected cells. Taken together, infection with L. pneumophila could prevent formation of cytoplasmic extensions such as acanthopodia with consequences on the shape, adherence and mobility of A. castellanii. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic structure of populations of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Selander, R K; McKinney, R M; Whittam, T S; Bibb, W F; Brenner, D J; Nolte, F S; Pattison, P E

    1985-01-01

    The genetic structure of populations of Legionella pneumophila was defined by an analysis of electrophoretically demonstrable allelic variation at structural genes encoding 22 enzymes in 292 isolates from clinical and environmental sources. Nineteen of the loci were polymorphic, and 62 distinctive electrophoretic types (ETs), representing multilocus genotypes, were identified. Principal coordinates and clustering analyses demonstrated that isolates received as L. pneumophila were a heterogeneous array of genotypes that included two previously undescribed species. For 50 ETs of L. pneumophila (strict sense), mean genetic diversity per locus was 0.312, and diversity was equivalent in ETs represented by isolates recovered from clinical sources and those collected from environmental sources. Cluster analysis revealed four major groups or lineages of ETs in L. pneumophila. Genetic diversity among ETs of the same serotype was, on average, 93% of that in the total sample of ETs. Isolates marked by particular patterns of reactivity to a panel of nine monoclonal antibodies were also genetically heterogeneous, mean diversity within patterns being about 75% of the total. Both Pontiac fever and the pneumonic form of legionellosis may be caused by isolates of the same ET. The genetic structure of L. pneumophila is clonal, and many clones apparently are worldwide in distribution. The fact that L. pneumophila is only 60% as variable as Escherichia coli raises the possibility that isolates recovered from clinical cases and man-made environments are a restricted subset of all clones in the species as a whole. PMID:4030689

  10. Overexpresssion of a Legionella pneumophila homologue of the E. coli regulator csrA affects cell size, flagellation, and pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Fettes, P S; Forsbach-Birk, V; Lynch, D; Marre, R

    2001-11-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an inhabitant of the aquatic environment and the causative agent of a bacterial pneumonia. We identified the presence of an L. pneumophila homologue of csrA of E. coli and rsmA of Erwinia carotovora, genes which regulate gene expression by destabilising mRNA and which have been shown to relate to environmental fitness and pathogenicity. The Legionella csrA was able to complement a csrA-negative mutant of E. coli. Overproduction of csrA in L. pneumophila lead to a reduction of flagellation and pigmentation and an increase in bacterial cell size. csrA overproduction was associated with a reduction of fliA and flaA transcripts. This suggests that similar to E. coli and Erwinia, L. pneumophila csrA is a regulator of gene expression and may contribute to the capability of the pathogen to rapidly adapt to changing environments.

  11. Assessment of Legionella pneumophila in recreational spring water with quantitative PCR (Taqman) assay

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shu-Min; Chou, Ming-Yuan; Ji, Wen-Tsai; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Tsai, Hsiu-Feng; Huang, Yu-Li; Chiu, Yi-Chou; Kao, Erl-Shyh; Kao, Po-Min; Fan, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Legionella spp. are common in various natural and man-made aquatic environments. Recreational hot spring is frequently reported as an infection hotspot because of various factors such as temperature and humidity. Although polymerase chain reaction (PCR) had been used for detecting Legionella, several inhibitors such as humic substances, calcium, and melanin in the recreational spring water may interfere with the reaction thus resulting in risk underestimation. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficiencies of conventional and Taqman quantitative PCR (qPCR) on detecting Legionella pneumophila in spring facilities and in receiving water. In the results, Taqman PCR had much better efficiency on specifying the pathogen in both river and spring samples. L. pneumophila was detected in all of the 27 river water samples and 45 of the 48 hot spring water samples. The estimated L. pneumophela concentrations ranged between 1.0 × 102 and 3.3 × 105 cells/l in river water and 72.1–5.7 × 106 cells/l in hot spring water. Total coliforms and turbidity were significantly correlated with concentrations of L. pneumophila in positive water samples. Significant difference was also found in water temperature between the presence/absence of L. pneumophila. Our results suggest that conventional PCR may be not enough for detecting L. pneumophila particularly in the aquatic environments full of reaction inhibitors. PMID:26184706

  12. Assessment of Legionella pneumophila in recreational spring water with quantitative PCR (Taqman) assay.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shu-Min; Chou, Ming-Yuan; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Ji, Wen-Tsai; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Tsai, Hsiu-Feng; Huang, Yu-Li; Chiu, Yi-Chou; Kao, Erl-Shyh; Kao, Po-Min; Fan, Cheng-Wei

    2015-07-01

    Legionella spp. are common in various natural and man-made aquatic environments. Recreational hot spring is frequently reported as an infection hotspot because of various factors such as temperature and humidity. Although polymerase chain reaction (PCR) had been used for detecting Legionella, several inhibitors such as humic substances, calcium, and melanin in the recreational spring water may interfere with the reaction thus resulting in risk underestimation. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficiencies of conventional and Taqman quantitative PCR (qPCR) on detecting Legionella pneumophila in spring facilities and in receiving water. In the results, Taqman PCR had much better efficiency on specifying the pathogen in both river and spring samples. L. pneumophila was detected in all of the 27 river water samples and 45 of the 48 hot spring water samples. The estimated L. pneumophela concentrations ranged between 1.0 × 10(2) and 3.3 × 10(5) cells/l in river water and 72.1-5.7 × 10(6) cells/l in hot spring water. Total coliforms and turbidity were significantly correlated with concentrations of L. pneumophila in positive water samples. Significant difference was also found in water temperature between the presence/absence of L. pneumophila. Our results suggest that conventional PCR may be not enough for detecting L. pneumophila particularly in the aquatic environments full of reaction inhibitors.

  13. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from pluvial floods by amoebal coculture.

    PubMed

    Schalk, J A C; Docters van Leeuwen, A E; Lodder, W J; de Man, H; Euser, S; den Boer, J W; de Roda Husman, A M

    2012-06-01

    Viable Legionella pneumophila bacteria were isolated by amoebal coculture from pluvial floods after intense rainfall and from water collected at sewage treatment plants. Several isolated L. pneumophila strains belonged to sequence types that have been previously identified in patients.

  14. Direct Evidence of Egestion and Salivation of Xylella fastidiosa Suggests Sharpshooters Can Be "Flying Syringes".

    PubMed

    Backus, Elaine A; Shugart, Holly J; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Morgan, J Kent; Shatters, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is unique among insect-transmitted plant pathogens because it is propagative but noncirculative, adhering to and multiplying on the cuticular lining of the anterior foregut. Any inoculation mechanism for X. fastidiosa must explain how bacterial cells exit the vector's stylets via the food canal and directly enter the plant. A combined egestion-salivation mechanism has been proposed to explain these unique features. Egestion is the putative outward flow of fluid from the foregut via hypothesized bidirectional pumping of the cibarium. The present study traced green fluorescent protein-expressing X. fastidiosa or fluorescent nanoparticles acquired from artificial diets by glassy-winged sharpshooters, Homalodisca vitripennis, as they were egested into simultaneously secreted saliva. X. fastidiosa or nanoparticles were shown to mix with gelling saliva to form fluorescent deposits and salivary sheaths on artificial diets, providing the first direct, conclusive evidence of egestion by any hemipteran insect. Therefore, the present results strongly support an egestion-salivation mechanism of X. fastidiosa inoculation. Results also support that a column of fluid is transiently held in the foregut without being swallowed. Evidence also supports (but does not definitively prove) that bacteria were suspended in the column of fluid during the vector's transit from diet to diet, and were egested with the held fluid. Thus, we hypothesize that sharpshooters could be true "flying syringes," especially when inoculation occurs very soon after uptake of bacteria, suggesting the new paradigm of a nonpersistent X. fastidiosa transmission mechanism.

  15. Molecular evidence to suggest the origin of a colonization: Drosophila subobscura in America.

    PubMed

    Araúz, Pedro A; Peris-Bondia, Francesc; Latorre, Amparo; Serra, Luís; Mestres, Francesc

    2011-12-01

    The recent colonization of America by Drosophila subobscura represents a great opportunity for evolutionary biology studies. Knowledge of the populations from which the colonization started would provide an understanding of how genetic composition changed during adaptation to the new environment. Thus, a 793 nucleotide fragment of the Odh (Octanol dehydrogenase) gene was sequenced in 66 chromosomal lines from Barcelona (western Mediterranean) and in 66 from Mt. Parnes (Greece, eastern Mediterranean). No sequence of Odh fragment in Barcelona or Mt. Parnes was identical to any of those previously detected in America. However, an Odh sequence from Barcelona differed in only one nucleotide from another found in American populations. In both cases, the chromosomal lines presented the same inversion: O(7), and the Odh gene was located within this inversion. This evidence suggests a possible western Mediterranean origin for the colonization. Finally, the molecular and inversion data indicate that the colonization was not characterized by multiple reintroductions.

  16. Gaps in the evidence about companion animals and human health: some suggestions for progress.

    PubMed

    Chur-Hansen, Anna; Stern, Cindy; Winefield, Helen

    2010-09-01

    A number of researchers have explored the relationship between companion animal ownership and human physical and psychological health. Results have been inconclusive, with positive, neutral and negative effects variously reported in the literature. Furthermore, the possible mechanisms of any influence are frustratingly unclear. A number of conceptual and methodological weaknesses have hampered progress in our understanding of how companion animals may impact upon human health. The two evidence gaps discussed in this paper, with suggestions for needed next steps, are: (i) a preponderance of anecdotal reports and cross-sectional research designs; and (ii) failure to control for a host of other known influences on human health including health habits, level of attachment to the companion animal and human social supports. Finally, an example of these gaps is provided in relation to the literature on the effects of animals on elderly nursing home residents.

  17. Evidence suggesting digenic inheritance of Waardenburg syndrome type II with ocular albinism.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Pei-Wen; Spector, Elaine; McGregor, Tracy L

    2009-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a series of auditory-pigmentary disorders inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. In most patients, WS2 results from mutations in the MITF gene. MITF encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that activates transcription of tyrosinase and other melanocyte proteins. The clinical presentation of WS is highly variable, and we believe that Tietz syndrome and WS2 with ocular albinism (OA) are likely two variations of WS2 due to the presence of modifiers. One family with a molecular diagnosis of WS2 co-segregating with OA has previously been reported. A digenic mutation mechanism including both a MITF mutation and the TYR(R402Q) hypomorphic allele was proposed to be the cause of OA in this family. Here, we present a second WS2 family with OA and provide evidence suggesting the TYR(R402Q) allele does not cause OA in this family. We hypothesize the presence of a novel OCA3 mutation together with the MITF del p.R217 mutation account for the OA phenotype in this family. Since MITF is a transcription factor for pigmentation genes, a mutation in MITF plus a heterozygous mutation in OCA3 together provide an adverse effect crossing a quantitative threshold; therefore, WS2 with OA occurs. We have hypothesized previously that the clinical spectrum and mutation mechanism of OCA depend on the pigmentation threshold of an affected individual. This unique family has provided further evidence supporting this hypothesis. We suggest that by studying OCA patients alongside WS patients with various pigmentation profiles we can facilitate further understanding of the pigmentation pathway.

  18. Y-chromosome evidence suggests a common paternal heritage of Austro-Asiatic populations

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vikrant; Reddy, Arimanda NS; Babu, Jagedeesh P; Rao, Tipirisetti N; Langstieh, Banrida T; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Reddy, Alla G; Singh, Lalji; Reddy, Battini M

    2007-01-01

    Background The Austro-Asiatic linguistic family, which is considered to be the oldest of all the families in India, has a substantial presence in Southeast Asia. However, the possibility of any genetic link among the linguistic sub-families of the Indian Austro-Asiatics on the one hand and between the Indian and the Southeast Asian Austro-Asiatics on the other has not been explored till now. Therefore, to trace the origin and historic expansion of Austro-Asiatic groups of India, we analysed Y-chromosome SNP and STR data of the 1222 individuals from 25 Indian populations, covering all the three branches of Austro-Asiatic tribes, viz. Mundari, Khasi-Khmuic and Mon-Khmer, along with the previously published data on 214 relevant populations from Asia and Oceania. Results Our results suggest a strong paternal genetic link, not only among the subgroups of Indian Austro-Asiatic populations but also with those of Southeast Asia. However, maternal link based on mtDNA is not evident. The results also indicate that the haplogroup O-M95 had originated in the Indian Austro-Asiatic populations ~65,000 yrs BP (95% C.I. 25,442 – 132,230) and their ancestors carried it further to Southeast Asia via the Northeast Indian corridor. Subsequently, in the process of expansion, the Mon-Khmer populations from Southeast Asia seem to have migrated and colonized Andaman and Nicobar Islands at a much later point of time. Conclusion Our findings are consistent with the linguistic evidence, which suggests that the linguistic ancestors of the Austro-Asiatic populations have originated in India and then migrated to Southeast Asia. PMID:17389048

  19. Fatal coinfection with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 8 and Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Guillouzouic, Aurélie; Bemer, Pascale; Gay-Andrieu, Françoise; Bretonnière, Cédric; Lepelletier, Didier; Mahé, Pierre-Joachim; Villers, Daniel; Jarraud, Sophie; Reynaud, Alain; Corvec, Stéphane

    2008-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. We report on a patient who simultaneously developed L. pneumophila serogroup 8 pneumonia and Aspergillus fumigatus lung abscesses. Despite appropriate treatments, Aspergillus disease progressed with metastasis. Coinfections caused by L. pneumophila and A. fumigatus remain exceptional. In apparently immunocompetent patients, corticosteroid therapy is a key risk factor for aspergillosis.

  20. Evidence for preserved novel word learning in Down syndrome suggests multiple routes to vocabulary acquisition.

    PubMed

    Mosse, Emma K; Jarrold, Christopher

    2011-08-01

    Three studies investigated novel word learning, some requiring phonological production, each involving between 11 and 17 individuals with Down syndrome, and between 15 and 24 typically developing individuals matched for receptive vocabulary. The effect of stimuli wordlikeness and incidental procedure-based memory demands were examined to see whether these may account for an apparent impairment in word learning in Down syndrome demonstrated in earlier research. Paired associate word and nonword learning tasks were presented, requiring participants to learn the names of novel characters. The nonword stimuli varied in the degree of wordlikeness in 2 studies. A third study investigated extraneous task demand. Across 3 studies, there was no suggestion of a word learning deficit associated with Down syndrome (η(2)(p) for the main effect of group of .03, .11, and .03, respectively), despite the level of phonological representation required. There was evidence that novel word learning by participants with Down syndrome exceeded that which their verbal short-term memory capacity would predict. Vocabulary acquisition in Down syndrome may not rely on verbal short-term memory to the same extent as in typically developing children, lending support to the suggestion that new word learning may be underpinned by an additional memory process.

  1. Stationary phase and mature infectious forms of Legionella pneumophila produce distinct viable but non-culturable cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Bana, Badii H; Haddad, Moreen T; Garduño, Rafael A

    2014-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterial parasite of freshwater protozoa and an accidental waterborne human pathogen. L. pneumophila is highly pleomorphic showing several forms that differentiate within its developmental cycle. In water, L. pneumophila produces viable but non-culturable cells (VBNCCs), which remain largely uncharacterized. We produced VBNCCs from two developmental forms of L. pneumophila [stationary phase forms (SPFs) and mature infectious forms (MIFs)] in two water microcosms [double-deionized (dd) and tap water] at 45°C. In contrast with SPFs, MIFs upheld a robust ultrastructure and high viability in the two water microcosms. In dd-water, MIFs and SPFs lost their culturability faster than in tap water and did not consume their poly-β-hydroxybutyrate inclusions. Resuscitation in Acanthamoeba castellani was only possible for VBNCCs produced from SPFs in tap water. Addition of salts to dd-water prolonged L. pneumophila culturability to tap water levels, suggesting that L. pneumophila requires ions to maintain its readiness to resume growth. VBNCCs resisted detergent lysis and digestion in the ciliate Tetrahymena, except for VBNCCs produced from SPFs in dd-water. L. pneumophila VBNCCs thus show distinct traits according to its originating developmental form and the surrounding water microcosm.

  2. IroT/mavN, a new iron-regulated gene involved in Legionella pneumophila virulence against amoebae and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Portier, Emilie; Zheng, Huaixin; Sahr, Tobias; Burnside, Denise M; Mallama, Celeste; Buchrieser, Carmen; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Héchard, Yann

    2015-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacterium commonly found in water. Eventually, it could be transmitted to humans via inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Iron is known as a key requirement for the growth of L. pneumophila in the environment and within its hosts. Many studies were performed to understand iron utilization by L. pneumophila but no global approaches were conducted. In this study, transcriptomic analyses were performed, comparing gene expression in L. pneumophila in standard versus iron restricted conditions. Among the regulated genes, a newly described one, lpp_2867, was highly induced in iron-restricted conditions. Mutants lacking this gene in L. pneumophila were not affected in siderophore synthesis or utilization. On the contrary, they were defective for growth on iron-depleted solid media and for ferrous iron uptake. A sequence analysis predicts that Lpp_2867 is a membrane protein, suggesting that it is involved in ferrous iron transport. We thus named it IroT, for iron transporter. Infection assays showed that the mutants are highly impaired in intracellular growth within their environmental host Acanthamoeba castellanii and human macrophages. Taken together, our results show that IroT is involved, directly or indirectly, in ferrous iron transport and is a key virulence factor for L. pneumophila.

  3. IroT/mavN, a new iron-regulated gene involved in Legionella pneumophila virulence against amoebae and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    PORTIER, Emilie; ZHENG, Huaixin; SAHR, Tobias; BURNSIDE, Denise M.; MALLAMA, Celeste; BUCHRIESER, Carmen; CIANCIOTTO, Nicholas P.; HÉCHARD, Yann

    2015-01-01

    Summary Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacterium commonly found in water. Eventually, it could be transmitted to humans via inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Iron is known as a key requirement for the growth of L. pneumophila in the environment and within its hosts. Many studies were performed to understand iron utilization by L. pneumophila but no global approaches were conducted. In this study, transcriptomic analyses were performed, comparing gene expression in L. pneumophila in standard vs. iron restricted conditions. Among the regulated genes, a newly described one, lpp_2867, was highly induced in iron restricted conditions. Mutants lacking this gene in L. pneumophila were not affected in siderophore synthesis or utilization. On the contrary, they were defective for growth on iron depleted solid media and for ferrous iron uptake. A sequence analysis predicts that Lpp_2867 is a membrane protein, suggesting that it is involved in ferrous iron transport. We thus named it IroT, for iron transporter. Infection assays showed that the mutants are highly impaired in intracellular growth within their environmental host Acanthamoeba castellanii and human macrophages. Taken together, our results show that IroT is involved, directly or indirectly, in ferrous iron transport and is a key virulence factor for L. pneumophila. PMID:25141909

  4. Evidence to suggest that cathepsin K degrades articular cartilage in naturally occurring equine osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vinardell, T; Dejica, V; Poole, A R; Mort, J S; Richard, H; Laverty, S

    2009-03-01

    The mechanisms leading to degeneration of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA) are complex and not yet fully understood. Cathepsin K (CK) is a cysteine protease which can also cleave the triple helix of type II collagen. This exposes a neoepitope that can now be identified by specific antibodies. The aim of this study was to obtain evidence suggesting a role for CK in naturally occurring equine OA in both lesional and peri-lesional regions. Articular cartilages (n=12 horses; 5 healthy, 7 OA) were harvested from animals postmortem. A gross macroscopic examination, histologic (Safranin O-Fast Green and Picrosirius red staining) and immunohistochemical evaluation were performed. Samples were divided into normal appearing cartilage, peri-lesional and lesional cartilage. Cartilage degradation in the samples was graded histologically and immunohistochemically. CK and possible CK cleavage were detected immunohistochemically with specific anti-protein and anti-neoepitope antibodies, respectively. A comparison of CK neoepitope (C2K) production with the collagenase-generated neoepitope produced by matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-1, 8 and 13 (C2C) was also assessed immunohistochemically. CK and CK cleavage were significantly more abundant in OA cartilage (both peri-lesional and lesional) when compared to remote cartilage within the sample joint or cartilage from healthy joints. The immunohistochemical pattern observed for CK degradation (C2K) was similar to that of collagenase degradation (C2C). Macroscopic cartilage changes and histologic findings were significantly correlated with immunohistochemistry results. The data generated suggests that CK may be involved in cartilage collagen degradation in naturally occurring osteoarthritis.

  5. Statistical Evidence Suggests that Inattention Drives Hyperactivity/Impulsivity in Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Elena; Groot, Perry; Claassen, Tom; van Hulzen, Kimm J.; Glennon, Jeffrey C.; Franke, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous factor analytic studies consistently support a distinction between two symptom domains of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity. Both dimensions show high internal consistency and moderate to strong correlations with each other. However, it is not clear what drives this strong correlation. The aim of this paper is to address this issue. Method We applied a sophisticated approach for causal discovery on three independent data sets of scores of the two ADHD dimensions in NeuroIMAGE (total N = 675), ADHD-200 (N = 245), and IMpACT (N = 164), assessed by different raters and instruments, and further used information on gender or a genetic risk haplotype. Results In all data sets we found strong statistical evidence for the same pattern: the clear dependence between hyperactivity/impulsivity symptom level and an established genetic factor (either gender or risk haplotype) vanishes when one conditions upon inattention symptom level. Under reasonable assumptions, e.g., that phenotypes do not cause genotypes, a causal model that is consistent with this pattern contains a causal path from inattention to hyperactivity/impulsivity. Conclusions The robust dependency cancellation observed in three different data sets suggests that inattention is a driving factor for hyperactivity/impulsivity. This causal hypothesis can be further validated in intervention studies. Our model suggests that interventions that affect inattention will also have an effect on the level of hyperactivity/impulsivity. On the other hand, interventions that affect hyperactivity/impulsivity would not change the level of inattention. This causal model may explain earlier findings on heritable factors causing ADHD reported in the study of twins with learning difficulties. PMID:27768717

  6. Further genetic evidence suggesting a role for the RhoGTPase-RhoGEF pathway in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Ben H; Prince, Richard L; Mamotte, Cyril; Spector, Tim D; Hart, Deborah J; Dudbridge, Frank; Wilson, Scott G

    2009-08-01

    Osteoporosis is a highly heritable trait that appears to be influenced by multiple genes. Genome-wide linkage studies have highlighted the chromosomal region 3p14-p21 as a quantitative trait locus for BMD. We have previously published evidence suggesting that the ARHGEF3 gene from this region is associated with BMD in women. The product of this gene activates the RHOA GTPase, the gene for which is also located within this region. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of genetic polymorphism in RHOA on bone density in women. Sequence variation within the RHOA gene region was determined using 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a discovery cohort of 769 female sibs. Of the 9 SNPs, one was found to be monomorphic with the others representing 3 distinct linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks. Using FBAT software, significant associations were found between two of these LD blocks and BMD Z-score of the spine and hip (P=0.001-0.036). The LD block tagged by the SNP rs17595772 showed maximal association, with the more common G allele at rs17595772 associated with decreased BMD Z-score. Genotyping for rs17595772 in a replication cohort of 780 postmenopausal women confirmed an association with BMD Z-score (P=0.002-0.036). Again, the G allele was found to be associated with a reduced hip and spine BMD Z-score. These results support the implication of the RhoGTPase-RhoGEF pathway in osteoporosis, and suggest that one or more genes in this pathway may be responsible for the linkage observed between 3p14-p21 and BMD.

  7. Immunohistochemical evidence suggests intrinsic regulatory activity of human eccrine sweat glands

    PubMed Central

    ZANCANARO, CARLO; MERIGO, FLAVIA; CRESCIMANNO, CATERINA; ORLANDINI, SIMONETTA; OSCULATI, ANTONIO

    1999-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry of normal eccrine sweat glands was performed on paraffin sections of human skin. Immunoreactivity (ir) for neuron specific enolase, S100 protein (S100), regulatory peptides, nitric oxide synthase type I (NOS-I) and choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) was found in small nerve bundles close to sweat glands. In the glands, secretory cells were labelled with anticytokeratin antibody. Using antibodies to S100, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) a specific distribution pattern was found in secretory cells. Granulated (dark) and parietal (clear) cells were immunopositive for CGRP, and S100 and SP, respectively. Immunoreactivity was diffuse in the cytoplasm for CGRP and S100, and peripheral for SP. Myoepithelial cells were not labelled. Electron microscopy revealed electron dense granules, probably containing peptide, in granulated cells. Using antibodies to NOS-I and ChAT, ir was exclusively found in myoepithelial cells. Immunoreactivity for the atrial natriuretic peptide was absent in sweat glands. These results provide evidence for the presence of both regulatory peptides involved in vasodilation and key enzymes for the synthesis of nitric oxide and acetylcholine in the secretory coil of human sweat glands. It is suggested that human sweat glands are capable of some intrinsic regulation in addition to that carried out by their nerve supply. PMID:10386780

  8. The Legionella pneumophila rpoS Gene Is Required for Growth within Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Laura M.; Shuman, Howard A.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate regulatory networks in Legionella pneumophila, the gene encoding the homolog of the Escherichia coli stress and stationary-phase sigma factor RpoS was identified by complementation of an E. coli rpoS mutation. An open reading frame that is approximately 60% identical to the E. coli rpoS gene was identified. Western blot analysis showed that the level of L. pneumophila RpoS increased in stationary phase. An insertion mutation was constructed in the rpoS gene on the chromosome of L. pneumophila, and the ability of this mutant strain to survive various stress conditions was assayed and compared with results for the wild-type strain. Both the mutant and wild-type strains were more resistant to stress when in stationary phase than when in the logarithmic phase of growth. This finding indicates that L. pneumophila RpoS is not required for a stationary-phase-dependent resistance to stress. Although the mutant strain was able to kill HL-60- and THP-1-derived macrophages, it could not replicate within a protozoan host, Acanthamoeba castellanii. These data suggest that L. pneumophila possesses a growth phase-dependent resistance to stress that is independent of RpoS control and that RpoS likely regulates genes that enable it to survive in the environment within protozoa. Our data indicate that the role of rpoS in L. pneumophila is very different from what has previously been reported for E. coli rpoS. PMID:10438758

  9. Incidence of Legionella pneumophila infections among Oklahoma pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed Central

    Flournoy, D. J.; Guthrie, P. J.; Lawrence, C. H.; Silberg, S. L.; Beaver, S.

    1990-01-01

    Prior studies by the authors suggested high levels of Legionella pneumophila in the recreational and water supply reservoirs in central Oklahoma. This high exposure potential was supported by a relatively high prevalence of seropositive, asymptomatic infections among healthy blood donors in the area. In contrast, the present 9-month laboratory-based study confirmed only one clinical Legionella infection among 117 unidentified pulmonary disease patients admitted to the Oklahoma City Veterans Administration Medical Center. Comparison with the reports of others and with reported legionellosis in Oklahoma indicates that differences in cohort definition and variations in utilization and interpretation of clinical analyses leads to wide variations in the reported incidence of legionellosis. PMID:2304095

  10. Plaque assay for virulent Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, R C; Lee, S H; Haldane, D; Sumarah, R; Rozee, K R

    1989-01-01

    Methods of assessing virulence of Legionella pneumophila, the etiologic agent of Legionnaires disease, include the infection of guinea pigs, fertile chicken eggs, and mammalian and protozoan cell cultures. Guinea pig assays, in particular, are expensive, laborious, or unsuitable for routine screening of Legionella isolates. We have developed a virulence assay that requires the enumeration of viruslike plaques which are the result of virulent L. pneumophila infecting mouse L929 cells. Each plaque is the consequence of the initial infection of an L cell with a single bacterium. A nonvirulent mutant derived from the serial passage of virulent L. pneumophila on Mueller-Hinton agar fails to survive within L cells and consequently fails to produce plaques. Images PMID:2674192

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1.

    PubMed Central

    van Ketel, R J; ter Schegget, J; Zanen, H C

    1984-01-01

    The DNA of patient and environmental isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was analyzed by restriction endonuclease cleavage. The electrophoretic patterns of the DNA digests of isolates from a group of patients with Legionnaires disease acquired in a hospital were indistinguishable from one another and were identical to the DNA pattern of a strain isolated from the hot water supply of the hospital. On the other hand, they were easily differentiated from strains isolated from patients and hot water supplies in other hospitals in the same city. The homogeneity of populations of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 colonizing plumbing systems was also investigated by DNA restriction endonuclease analysis in three hospitals. We distinguished two subtypes in one hospital; the two other hospitals had homogeneous populations. Restriction endonuclease digest analysis of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 DNA enables subtyping and appears to be a useful method for examining the epidemiology of outbreaks of Legionnaires disease. Images PMID:6092423

  12. Evidence for Ig Light Chain Isotype Exclusion in Shark B Lymphocytes Suggests Ordered Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Anita; Ohta, Yuko; Flajnik, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Unlike most vertebrates, the shark IgL gene organization precludes secondary rearrangements that delete self-reactive VJ rearranged genes. Nurse sharks express four L chain isotypes, κ, λ, σ, and σ-2, encoded by 35 functional minigenes or clusters. The sequence of gene activation/expression and receptor editing of these isotypes have not been studied. We therefore investigated the extent of isotypic exclusion in separated B cell subpopulations. Surface Ig (sIg)κ–expressing cells, isolated with mAb LK14 that recognizes Cκ, carry predominantly nonproductive rearrangements of other L chain isotypes. Conversely, after depletion with LK14, sIgM+ cells contained largely nonproductive κ and enrichment for in-frame VJ of the others. Because some isotypic inclusion was observed at the mRNA level, expression in the BCR was examined. Functional λ mRNA was obtained, as expected, from the LK14-depleted population, but was also in sIgκ+ splenocytes. Whereas λ somatic mutants from the depleted sample displayed evidence of positive selection, the λ genes in sIgκ+ cells accumulated bystander mutations indicating a failure to express their products at the cell surface in association with the BCR H chain. In conclusion, a shark B cell expresses one L chain isotype at the surface and other isotypes as nonproductive VJ, sterile transcripts, or in-frame VJ whose products may not associate with the H chain. Based on the mRNA content found in the B cell subpopulations, an order of L chain gene activation is suggested as: σ-2 followed by κ, then σ and λ. PMID:28760881

  13. Electroencephalographic neurofeedback: Level of evidence in mental and brain disorders and suggestions for good clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; McGonigal, A; Lopez, R; Daudet, C; Kotwas, I; Bartolomei, F

    2015-12-01

    The technique of electroencephalographic neurofeedback (EEG NF) emerged in the 1970s and is a technique that measures a subject's EEG signal, processes it in real time, extracts a parameter of interest and presents this information in visual or auditory form. The goal is to effectuate a behavioural modification by modulating brain activity. The EEG NF opens new therapeutic possibilities in the fields of psychiatry and neurology. However, the development of EEG NF in clinical practice requires (i) a good level of evidence of therapeutic efficacy of this technique, (ii) a good practice guide for this technique. Firstly, this article investigates selected trials with the following criteria: study design with controlled, randomized, and open or blind protocol, primary endpoint related to the mental and brain disorders treated and assessed with standardized measurement tools, identifiable EEG neurophysiological targets, underpinned by pathophysiological relevance. Trials were found for: epilepsies, migraine, stroke, chronic insomnia, attentional-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, addictive disorders, psychotic disorders. Secondly, this article investigates the principles of neurofeedback therapy in line with learning theory. Different underlying therapeutic models are presented didactically between two continua: a continuum between implicit and explicit learning and a continuum between the biomedical model (centred on "the disease") and integrative biopsychosocial model of health (centred on "the illness"). The main relevant learning model is to link neurofeedback therapy with the field of cognitive remediation techniques. The methodological specificity of neurofeedback is to be guided by biologically relevant neurophysiological parameters. Guidelines for good clinical practice of EEG NF concerning technical issues of electrophysiology and of learning are suggested. These require validation by

  14. Mixed signals? Morphological and molecular evidence suggest a color polymorphism in some neotropical polythore damselflies.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Herrera, Melissa; Kuhn, William R; Lorenzo-Carballa, Maria Olalla; Harding, Kathleen M; Ankrom, Nikole; Sherratt, Thomas N; Hoffmann, Joachim; Van Gossum, Hans; Ware, Jessica L; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo; Beatty, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    The study of color polymorphisms (CP) has provided profound insights into the maintenance of genetic variation in natural populations. We here offer the first evidence for an elaborate wing polymorphism in the Neotropical damselfly genus Polythore, which consists of 21 described species, distributed along the eastern slopes of the Andes in South America. These damselflies display highly complex wing colors and patterning, incorporating black, white, yellow, and orange in multiple wing bands. Wing colors, along with some components of the male genitalia, have been the primary characters used in species description; few other morphological traits vary within the group, and so there are few useful diagnostic characters. Previous research has indicated the possibility of a cryptic species existing in P. procera in Colombia, despite there being no significant differences in wing color and pattern between the populations of the two putative species. Here we analyze the complexity and diversity of wing color patterns of individuals from five described Polythore species in the Central Amazon Basin of Peru using a novel suite of morphological analyses to quantify wing color and pattern: geometric morphometrics, chromaticity analysis, and Gabor wavelet transformation. We then test whether these color patterns are good predictors of species by recovering the phylogenetic relationships among the 5 species using the barcode gene (COI). Our results suggest that, while highly distinct and discrete wing patterns exist in Polythore, these "wingforms" do not represent monophyletic clades in the recovered topology. The wingforms identified as P. victoria and P. ornata are both involved in a polymorphism with P. neopicta; also, cryptic speciation may have taking place among individuals with the P. victoria wingform. Only P. aurora and P. spateri represent monophyletic species with a single wingform in our molecular phylogeny. We discuss the implications of this polymorphism, and the

  15. Mixed Signals? Morphological and Molecular Evidence Suggest a Color Polymorphism in Some Neotropical Polythore Damselflies

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Kathleen M.; Ankrom, Nikole; Sherratt, Thomas N.; Hoffmann, Joachim; Van Gossum, Hans; Ware, Jessica L.; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    The study of color polymorphisms (CP) has provided profound insights into the maintenance of genetic variation in natural populations. We here offer the first evidence for an elaborate wing polymorphism in the Neotropical damselfly genus Polythore, which consists of 21 described species, distributed along the eastern slopes of the Andes in South America. These damselflies display highly complex wing colors and patterning, incorporating black, white, yellow, and orange in multiple wing bands. Wing colors, along with some components of the male genitalia, have been the primary characters used in species description; few other morphological traits vary within the group, and so there are few useful diagnostic characters. Previous research has indicated the possibility of a cryptic species existing in P. procera in Colombia, despite there being no significant differences in wing color and pattern between the populations of the two putative species. Here we analyze the complexity and diversity of wing color patterns of individuals from five described Polythore species in the Central Amazon Basin of Peru using a novel suite of morphological analyses to quantify wing color and pattern: geometric morphometrics, chromaticity analysis, and Gabor wavelet transformation. We then test whether these color patterns are good predictors of species by recovering the phylogenetic relationships among the 5 species using the barcode gene (COI). Our results suggest that, while highly distinct and discrete wing patterns exist in Polythore, these “wingforms” do not represent monophyletic clades in the recovered topology. The wingforms identified as P. victoria and P. ornata are both involved in a polymorphism with P. neopicta; also, cryptic speciation may have taking place among individuals with the P. victoria wingform. Only P. aurora and P. spateri represent monophyletic species with a single wingform in our molecular phylogeny. We discuss the implications of this polymorphism, and

  16. Influence of intra-amoebic and other growth conditions on the surface properties of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, J; Lambert, P A; Brown, M R

    1993-01-01

    The surface properties of Legionella pneumophila were examined by analyzing outer membrane (OM) proteins, lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and cellular fatty acids after growth within Acanthamoeba polyphaga and in vitro under various nutrient-depleted conditions. Intra-amoeba-grown legionellae were found to differ in several respects from cells grown in vitro; most notably, they contained a 15-kDa OM protein and a monounsaturated straight-chain fatty acid (18:1(9)). These compounds were also found in abundant quantities in the host amoeba. Immunoblot analysis of intra-amoeba-grown legionellae with antiacanthamoebic serum revealed that both the bacterial whole cells and Sarkosyl-extracted OMs contained amoebic antigens. The findings suggest that the 15-kDa OM protein is likely to be of amoebic origin and associates with the OM of the bacterium. It is proposed that disruption of amoebic membranes, as a result of intra-amoebic infection, may liberate macromolecules, including a 15-kDa polypeptide, a major constituent of the amoebic membrane, which adhere to the surface of the legionellae. Growth under specific nutrient depletions also had a significant effect on the surface composition of L. pneumophila. Cells grown under phosphate depletion were markedly sensitive to protease K digestion and contained lower levels of LPS, as observed by silver staining of the digests on polyacrylamide gels. Intra-amoeba-grown cells contained more bands than the in vitro-grown organisms, reflecting further differences in the nature of the LPS. The whole-cell fatty acids of the phosphate-depleted cells were appreciably different from those of cells grown under other nutritional conditions. We found no evidence for expression of iron-regulated OM proteins under iron depletion. Images PMID:8335382

  17. Community-Acquired Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Viasus, Diego; Di Yacovo, Silvana; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Verdaguer, Ricard; Manresa, Frederic; Dorca, Jordi; Gudiol, Francesc; Carratalà, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Legionella pneumophila has been increasingly recognized as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and an important public health problem worldwide. We conducted the present study to assess trends in epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical features, treatment, and outcomes of sporadic community-acquired L. pneumophila pneumonia requiring hospitalization at a university hospital over a 15-year period (1995–2010). Among 3934 nonimmunosuppressed hospitalized patients with CAP, 214 (5.4%) had L. pneumophila pneumonia (16 cases were categorized as travel-associated pneumonia, and 21 were part of small clusters). Since the introduction of the urinary antigen test, the diagnosis of L. pneumophila using this method remained stable over the years (p = 0.42); however, diagnosis by means of seroconversion and culture decreased (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively). The median age of patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia was 58.2 years (SD 13.8), and 76.4% were male. At least 1 comorbid condition was present in 119 (55.6%) patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia, mainly chronic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, and chronic pulmonary disease. The frequency of older patients (aged >65 yr) and comorbidities among patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia increased over the years (p = 0.06 and p = 0.02, respectively). In addition, 100 (46.9%) patients were classified into high-risk classes according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (groups IV–V). Twenty-four (11.2%) patients with L. pneumophila pneumonia received inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy at hospital admission. Compared with patients who received appropriate empirical antibiotic, patients who received inappropriate therapy more frequently had acute onset of illness (p = 0.004), pleuritic chest pain (p = 0.03), and pleural effusion (p = 0.05). The number of patients who received macrolides decreased over the study period (p < 0.001), whereas the number of patients who received levofloxacin increased (p

  18. The question of knowledge in evidence-based design for healthcare facilities: limitations and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mahbub

    2013-01-01

    To help designers and researchers and other proponents of evidence-based design (EBD) overcome limitations concerning knowledge categorization and acquisition of evidence-based design (EBD). The evidence-based design (EBD) approach for healthcare facilities has been widely embraced by both designers and researchers in recent years; however, there are some limitations concerning knowledge categorization and acquisition of EBD. These limitations include an overemphasis on empirical knowledge gained by experimental research, a narrow focus that excludes design knowledge generated outside healthcare and allied fields, and a lack of interest in empirical knowledge gained by qualitative studies. In order to overcome these limitations, the proponents of EBD must acknowledge that design knowledge relevant to healthcare design can be found in disciplines unrelated to healthcare; that design knowledge does not always need empirical validation; and that design knowledge of the semantic kind can be more easily accessed and understood through qualitative studies. To reassess the foundations of knowledge of EBD with moderated skepticism is necessary because there are philosophical and analytical problems yet to be overcome in delivering on the promises of EBD. To question and reassess the foundations of knowledge base of EBD is not necessarily to deny its value, but rather to stimulate a judicious and balanced appraisal of its limitations so that, in future, we are able to take necessary steps to overcome these limitations. Design process, evidence-based design, methodology, theory, interdisciplinary.

  19. Contamination of Hospital Water Supplies in Gilan, Iran, with Legionella pneumophila, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi Jalali Moghadam, Masoumeh; Asfaram Meshginshahr, Sajad

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to determine the contamination degree of hospital water supplies with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, and E. coli in Gilan, Iran. Samples were collected directly into sterile containers and concentrated by centrifuge. Half part of any sample transferred to yeast extract broth and the second part transferred to Trypticase Soy Broth and incubated for 3 days. DNA was extracted by using commercial kit. Four rounds of PCR were performed as follows: multiplex PCR for detecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Integron 1, and Metallo-β-lactamases gene; PCR for detecting Legionella pneumophila and mip gene separately; PCR for detecting E. coli; and another PCR for detecting whole bacterial presence. Contamination rates of cold, warm, and incubator water samples with P. aeruginosa, were 16.6%, 37.5%, and 6.8% consequently. Degrees of contamination with L. pneumophila were 3.3%, 9.3%, and 10.9% and with E. coli were zero, 6.2%, and zero. Total bacterial contamination of cold, warm, and incubator water samples was 93.3%, 84.4%, and 89.0% consequently. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found in 20.0% of all samples. Contamination degree with P. aeruginosa was considerable and with L. pneumophila was moderate. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found frequently indicating widespread multiple drug resistance bacteria. We suggest using new decontamination method based on nanotechnology. PMID:26448745

  20. Treatment of alveolar macrophages with cytochalasin D inhibits uptake and subsequent growth of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, J A; Winn, W C

    1986-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila multiplied rapidly in guinea pig and rat alveolar macrophages but failed to grow when phagocytic activity was inhibited by pretreatment with 0.5 or 1.0 microgram of cytochalasin D per ml. Attachment was not inhibited by cytochalasin D. No extracellular multiplication occurred when L. pneumophila were in close proximity to viable functional macrophages or even when the bacteria were attached to plasma membranes of the macrophages. Nonopsonized L. pneumophila were avidly phagocytized by alveolar macrophages. When bacteria were centrifuged onto a cell pellet, more than 85% of the phagocytes contained one or more bacteria within 15 min. In contrast, under the same conditions only approximately 15% of the macrophages contained nonopsonized Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus. Phagocytosis of L. pneumophila by untreated guinea pig macrophages occurred by extension of pseudopodia around the bacteria in a classical manner. The failure of the bacteria to actively penetrate the phagocyte suggests that their intracellular survival must not depend on avoidance of a phagosome but rather on an inhibition of or resistance to subsequent microbicidal functions of the macrophage. Images PMID:3941000

  1. Passage through Tetrahymena tropicalis enhances the resistance to stress and the infectivity of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Koubar, Mohamad; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Garduño, Rafael A; Frère, Jacques

    2011-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterium prevalent in fresh water which accidentally infects humans and is responsible for the disease called legionellosis. Intracellular growth of L. pneumophila in Tetrahymena is inconsistent; in the species Tetrahymena tropicalis stationary-phase forms (SPFs) of L. pneumophila differentiate into mature intracellular forms (MIFs) without apparent bacterial replication and are expelled from the ciliate as pellets containing numerous MIFS. In the present work, we tested the impact of L. pneumophila passage through T. tropicalis. We observed that MIFs released from T. tropicalis are more resistant to various stresses than SPFs. Under our conditions, MIFs harboured a higher gentamicin resistance, maintained even after 3 months as pellets. Long-term survival essays revealed that MIFs survived better in a nutrient-poor environment than SFPs, as a reduction of only about 3 logs was observed after 4 months in the MIF population, whereas no cultivable SPFs were detected after 3 months in the same medium, corresponding to a loss of about 7 logs. We have also observed that MIFs are significantly more infectious in human pneumocyte cells compared with SPFs. These results strongly suggest a potential role of ciliates in increasing the risk of legionellosis.

  2. Contamination of Hospital Water Supplies in Gilan, Iran, with Legionella pneumophila, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi Jalali Moghadam, Masoumeh; Honarmand, Hamidreza; Asfaram Meshginshahr, Sajad

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to determine the contamination degree of hospital water supplies with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, and E. coli in Gilan, Iran. Samples were collected directly into sterile containers and concentrated by centrifuge. Half part of any sample transferred to yeast extract broth and the second part transferred to Trypticase Soy Broth and incubated for 3 days. DNA was extracted by using commercial kit. Four rounds of PCR were performed as follows: multiplex PCR for detecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Integron 1, and Metallo-β-lactamases gene; PCR for detecting Legionella pneumophila and mip gene separately; PCR for detecting E. coli; and another PCR for detecting whole bacterial presence. Contamination rates of cold, warm, and incubator water samples with P. aeruginosa, were 16.6%, 37.5%, and 6.8% consequently. Degrees of contamination with L. pneumophila were 3.3%, 9.3%, and 10.9% and with E. coli were zero, 6.2%, and zero. Total bacterial contamination of cold, warm, and incubator water samples was 93.3%, 84.4%, and 89.0% consequently. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found in 20.0% of all samples. Contamination degree with P. aeruginosa was considerable and with L. pneumophila was moderate. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found frequently indicating widespread multiple drug resistance bacteria. We suggest using new decontamination method based on nanotechnology.

  3. Chemical composition of a lipopolysaccharide from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Sonesson, A; Jantzen, E; Bryn, K; Larsson, L; Eng, J

    1989-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide isolated from Legionella pneumophila (Phil. 1) was examined for chemical composition. The polysaccharide split off by mild acid hydrolysis contained rhamnose, mannose, glucose, quinovosamine, glucosamine and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, in molar proportions 1.6:1.8:1.0:1.5:4.1:2.7. Heptoses were absent and glucose was probably mainly phosphorylated. The carbohydrate backbone of the lipid A part consisted of glucosamine, quinovosamine and glycerol, in the molar ratios 3.9:1.0:3.4, with glycerol as a phosphorylated moiety. A complex fatty acid substitution pattern comprising eight O-ester-linked, exclusively nonhydroxylated acids, and nineteen amide-linked, exclusively 3-hydroxylated acids was revealed. Both straight- and branched (iso and anteiso) carbon chains occurred. The major hydroxy fatty acid was 3-hydroxy-12-methyltridecanoic acid and six others were of a chain-length above 20 carbon atoms, with 3-hydroxy-20-methyldocosanoic acid as the longest. Two dihydroxy fatty acids, 2,3-dihydroxy-12-methyltridecanoic and 2,3-dihydroxytetradecanoic acids, were also detected. These results suggest that L. pneumophila contains a rather complex and unusual lipopolysaccharide structure of considerable biological and chemotaxonomic interest.

  4. Water heater temperature set point and water use patterns influence Legionella pneumophila and associated microorganisms at the tap.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, William J; Ji, Pan; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc A

    2015-12-01

    Lowering water heater temperature set points and using less drinking water are common approaches to conserving water and energy; yet, there are discrepancies in past literature regarding the effects of water heater temperature and water use patterns on the occurrence of opportunistic pathogens, in particular Legionella pneumophila. Our objective was to conduct a controlled, replicated pilot-scale investigation to address this knowledge gap using continuously recirculating water heaters to examine five water heater set points (39-58 °C) under three water use conditions. We hypothesized that L. pneumophila levels at the tap depend on the collective influence of water heater temperature, flow frequency, and the resident plumbing ecology. We confirmed temperature setting to be a critical factor in suppressing L. pneumophila growth both in continuously recirculating hot water lines and at distal taps. For example, at 51 °C, planktonic L. pneumophila in recirculating lines was reduced by a factor of 28.7 compared to 39 °C and was prevented from re-colonizing biofilm. However, L. pneumophila still persisted up to 58 °C, with evidence that it was growing under the conditions of this study. Further, exposure to 51 °C water in a low-use tap appeared to optimally select for L. pneumophila (e.g., 125 times greater numbers than in high-use taps). We subsequently explored relationships among L. pneumophila and other ecologically relevant microbes, noting that elevated temperature did not have a general disinfecting effect in terms of total bacterial numbers. We documented the relationship between L. pneumophila and Legionella spp., and noted several instances of correlations with Vermamoeba vermiformis, and generally found that there is a dynamic relationship with this amoeba host over the range of temperatures and water use frequencies examined. Our study provides a new window of understanding into the microbial ecology of potable hot water systems and helps to resolve

  5. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from hotels of Greece.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, S D; Antoniadis, A; Papapaganagiotou, J; Stefanou, T

    1989-03-01

    Twenty water samples collected from 6 hotels situated in various areas of Greece were examined for the presence of Legionella pneumophila and Legionella-like organisms. Five of the six hotels included in this investigation were associated with cases of legionellosis. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 and 8 were isolated from four of six hotels, mainly from the hot water supply system. This is the first isolation and identification of L. pneumophila in Greece.

  6. Disseminating evidence-based practices in substance abuse treatment: a review with suggestions.

    PubMed

    Miller, William R; Sorensen, James L; Selzer, Jeffrey A; Brigham, Gregory S

    2006-07-01

    Although substance abuse professionals are generally open to new and better therapeutic methods, most evidence-based treatments do not easily find their way into practice. Natural diffusion processes for innovations in substance abuse treatments are relatively informal and have yielded a widely acknowledged gap between science and community practice. This review focuses on methods for effectively disseminating new treatment methods into practice. Therapist manuals and one-time workshops are in themselves relatively ineffective in helping practitioners gain proficiency in new clinical approaches. Individual performance feedback and coaching improve the acquisition of clinical skills. Specific incentives for implementation may also be needed to encourage treatment providers, programs, and systems to adopt new approaches.

  7. Identification of Nonfatal Strangulation by 911 Dispatchers: Suggestions for Advances Toward Evidence-Based Prosecution.

    PubMed

    Reckdenwald, Amy; Nordham, Chelsea; Pritchard, Adam; Francis, Brielle

    2017-06-01

    Research highlights the need for systematic law enforcement training on nonfatal strangulation in domestic violence situations to improve evidence-based prosecution of these violent felonies. However, most of this research focuses on the role of police officers in the safety response. Although often overlooked, this research examines the role of 911 dispatchers, who are many times the first person the victim calls for assistance. This study examines official domestic violence records, gathered through a partnership with a County Sheriff's agency, to determine whether domestic violence strangulation is being adequately identified and documented by first responders. This research highlights the need for considering 911 dispatchers as having a potentially critical role in a comprehensive response to domestic violence strangulation from initial screening to eventual prosecution.

  8. Event-related potential evidence suggesting voters remember political events that never happened.

    PubMed

    Coronel, Jason C; Federmeier, Kara D; Gonsalves, Brian D

    2014-03-01

    Voters tend to misattribute issue positions to political candidates that are consistent with their partisan affiliation, even though these candidates have never explicitly stated or endorsed such stances. The prevailing explanation in political science is that voters misattribute candidates' issue positions because they use their political knowledge to make educated but incorrect guesses. We suggest that voter errors can also stem from a different source: false memories. The current study examined event-related potential (ERP) responses to misattributed and accurately remembered candidate issue information. We report here that ERP responses to misattributed information can elicit memory signals similar to that of correctly remembered old information--a pattern consistent with a false memory rather than educated guessing interpretation of these misattributions. These results suggest that some types of voter misinformation about candidates may be harder to correct than previously thought.

  9. Event-related potential evidence suggesting voters remember political events that never happened

    PubMed Central

    Federmeier, Kara D.; Gonsalves, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Voters tend to misattribute issue positions to political candidates that are consistent with their partisan affiliation, even though these candidates have never explicitly stated or endorsed such stances. The prevailing explanation in political science is that voters misattribute candidates’ issue positions because they use their political knowledge to make educated but incorrect guesses. We suggest that voter errors can also stem from a different source: false memories. The current study examined event-related potential (ERP) responses to misattributed and accurately remembered candidate issue information. We report here that ERP responses to misattributed information can elicit memory signals similar to that of correctly remembered old information—a pattern consistent with a false memory rather than educated guessing interpretation of these misattributions. These results suggest that some types of voter misinformation about candidates may be harder to correct than previously thought. PMID:23202775

  10. Poor quality evidence suggests that failure rates for atraumatic restorative treatment and conventional amalgam are similar.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Dominic

    2012-06-01

    The Medline, Cochrane CENTRAL, Biomed Central, Database of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), OpenJ-Gate, Bibliografia Brasileira de Odontologia (BBO), LILACS, IndMed, Sabinet, Scielo, Scirus (Medicine), OpenSIGLE and Google Scholar databases were searched. Hand searching was performed for journals not indexed in the databases. References of included trials were checked. Prospective clinical trials with test and control groups with a follow up of at least one year were included. Data abstraction was conducted independently and clinical and methodologically homogeneous data were pooled using a fixed-effects model. Eighteen trials were included. From these 32 individual dichotomous datasets were extracted and analysed. The majority of the results show no differences between both types of intervention. A high risk of selection-, performance-, detection- and attrition bias was identified. Existing research gaps are mainly due to lack of trials and small sample size. The current evidence indicates that the failure rate of high-viscosity GIC/ART restorations is not higher than, but similar to that of conventional amalgam fillings after periods longer than one year. These results are in line with the conclusions drawn during the original systematic review. There is a high risk that these results are affected by bias, and thus confirmation by further trials with suitably high numbers of participants is needed.

  11. Dietary options and behavior suggested by plant biomarker evidence in an early human habitat.

    PubMed

    Magill, Clayton R; Ashley, Gail M; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Freeman, Katherine H

    2016-03-15

    The availability of plants and freshwater shapes the diets and social behavior of chimpanzees, our closest living relative. However, limited evidence about the spatial relationships shared between ancestral human (hominin) remains, edible resources, refuge, and freshwater leaves the influence of local resources on our species' evolution open to debate. Exceptionally well-preserved organic geochemical fossils--biomarkers--preserved in a soil horizon resolve different plant communities at meter scales across a contiguous 25,000 m(2) archaeological land surface at Olduvai Gorge from about 2 Ma. Biomarkers reveal hominins had access to aquatic plants and protective woods in a patchwork landscape, which included a spring-fed wetland near a woodland that both were surrounded by open grassland. Numerous cut-marked animal bones are located within the wooded area, and within meters of wetland vegetation delineated by biomarkers for ferns and sedges. Taken together, plant biomarkers, clustered bone debris, and hominin remains define a clear spatial pattern that places animal butchery amid the refuge of an isolated forest patch and near freshwater with diverse edible resources.

  12. Dietary options and behavior suggested by plant biomarker evidence in an early human habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magill, Clayton R.; Ashley, Gail M.; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2016-03-01

    The availability of plants and freshwater shapes the diets and social behavior of chimpanzees, our closest living relative. However, limited evidence about the spatial relationships shared between ancestral human (hominin) remains, edible resources, refuge, and freshwater leaves the influence of local resources on our species' evolution open to debate. Exceptionally well-preserved organic geochemical fossils-biomarkers-preserved in a soil horizon resolve different plant communities at meter scales across a contiguous 25,000 m2 archaeological land surface at Olduvai Gorge from about 2 Ma. Biomarkers reveal hominins had access to aquatic plants and protective woods in a patchwork landscape, which included a spring-fed wetland near a woodland that both were surrounded by open grassland. Numerous cut-marked animal bones are located within the wooded area, and within meters of wetland vegetation delineated by biomarkers for ferns and sedges. Taken together, plant biomarkers, clustered bone debris, and hominin remains define a clear spatial pattern that places animal butchery amid the refuge of an isolated forest patch and near freshwater with diverse edible resources.

  13. Dietary options and behavior suggested by plant biomarker evidence in an early human habitat

    PubMed Central

    Magill, Clayton R.; Ashley, Gail M.; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2016-01-01

    The availability of plants and freshwater shapes the diets and social behavior of chimpanzees, our closest living relative. However, limited evidence about the spatial relationships shared between ancestral human (hominin) remains, edible resources, refuge, and freshwater leaves the influence of local resources on our species’ evolution open to debate. Exceptionally well-preserved organic geochemical fossils—biomarkers—preserved in a soil horizon resolve different plant communities at meter scales across a contiguous 25,000 m2 archaeological land surface at Olduvai Gorge from about 2 Ma. Biomarkers reveal hominins had access to aquatic plants and protective woods in a patchwork landscape, which included a spring-fed wetland near a woodland that both were surrounded by open grassland. Numerous cut-marked animal bones are located within the wooded area, and within meters of wetland vegetation delineated by biomarkers for ferns and sedges. Taken together, plant biomarkers, clustered bone debris, and hominin remains define a clear spatial pattern that places animal butchery amid the refuge of an isolated forest patch and near freshwater with diverse edible resources. PMID:26903646

  14. Genomic and Experimental Evidence Suggests that Verrucomicrobium spinosum Interacts with Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Sait, Michelle; Kamneva, Olga K.; Fay, David S.; Kirienko, Natalia V.; Polek, James; Shirasu-Hiza, Mimi M.; Ward, Naomi L.

    2011-01-01

    Our knowledge of pathogens and symbionts is heavily biased toward phyla containing species that are straightforward to isolate in pure culture. Novel bacterial phyla are often represented by a handful of strains, and the number of species interacting with eukaryotes is likely underestimated. Identification of predicted pathogenesis and symbiosis determinants such as the Type III Secretion System (T3SS) in the genomes of “free-living” bacteria suggests that these microbes participate in uncharacterized interactions with eukaryotes. Our study aimed to test this hypothesis on Verrucomicrobium spinosum (phylum Verrucomicrobia) and to begin characterization of its predicted T3SS. We showed the putative T3SS structural genes to be transcriptionally active, and that expression of predicted effector proteins was toxic to yeast in an established functional screen. Our results suggest that the predicted T3SS genes of V. spinosum could encode a functional T3SS, although further work is needed to determine whether V. spinosum produces a T3SS injectisome that delivers the predicted effectors. In the absence of a known eukaryotic host, we made use of invertebrate infection models. The injection or feeding of V. spinosum to Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, respectively, was shown to result in increased mortality rates relative to controls, a phenomenon exaggerated in C. elegans mutants hypersensitive to pathogen infection. This finding, although not conclusively demonstrating pathogenesis, suggests that V. spinosum is capable of pathogenic activity toward an invertebrate host. Symbiotic interactions with a natural host provide an alternative explanation for the results seen in the invertebrate models. Further work is needed to determine whether V. spinosum can establish and maintain interactions with eukaryotic species found in its natural habitat, and whether the predicted T3SS is directly involved in pathogenic or symbiotic activity. PMID:22022322

  15. New Evidence Suggests Thorium Enrichment in Lunar Mare Basalts of the Western Procellarum Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Gillis, J. J.; Lawrence, D. J.; Maurice, S.

    2001-05-01

    Recent orbital remote-sensing missions have provided new compositional information about the global distribution of basalt types on the Moon. Previous work suggested a wide distribution of basalts of intermediate Ti content, which are rare in the lunar sample collections, and the occurrence of other basalts that are compositionally or mineralogically dissimilar to the returned samples and lunar basaltic meteorites. Measurement of thorium concentrations by Lunar Prospector's gamma-ray spectrometer reveal some basalt flows in the Procellarum region to have elevated thorium concentrations relative to most of the sampled basalts. Clementine UVVIS derived FeO estimates suggest that these basalts, with ~20 wt% FeO, do not derive their thorium enrichment from contamination by KREEP-rich Imbrium ejecta, re-excavated from beneath basalts by young craters such as Kepler and Aristarchus. Enrichment in thorium may result from assimilation of crustal rocks prior to eruption or from KREEP enrichment in mantle source regions. Distinguishing between these possibilities is needed to determine whether any cause-effect relationships exist between the enrichment of heat-producing Th, U, and K in the Procellarum KREEP Terrane and features such as the lack of anorthositic crust in the region, relaxation of topography across the Procellarum basin, and extended volcanism that occurred there. To investigate these basalts, we integrate Lunar Prospector gamma-ray data (resampled to 0.5 degree resolution), Clementine spectral reflectance (using modified algorithms to derive FeO and TiO2 concentrations), Lunar Orbiter images, and photogeologic maps. Results to date suggest significant enrichment of thorium in Eratosthenian basalts of Western Procellarum at levels of ~3-5 ppm, similar to concentrations measured in some Apollo 11 high-K basalts from Mare Tranquillitatis and in rare incompatible-element-rich basaltic glasses from Apollo 14 and Apollo 15 samples. It is unclear at present whether

  16. Diagnostic Utility of Splenial Lesions in a Case of Legionnaires' Disease due to Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 2.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Yuji; Hoshino, Yasunobu; Sasaki, Fuyuko; Kurita, Naohide; Kawajiri, Sumihiro; Noda, Kazuyuki; Hattori, Nobutaka; Amemura-Maekawa, Junko; Kura, Fumiaki; Okuma, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 49-year-old man with clinically mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) associated with Legionnaires' disease due to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 2. Past reports suggest that Legionella infection is frequent in cases of MERS-associated pneumonia. Obtaining an early diagnosis of legionella infection is a challenge, especially if a Legionella pneumophila serogroup other than serogroup 1 contains the causative agent. In this case, the splenial lesion played an important role in recognizing the legionella infection. We suggest that legionella infection should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of splenial lesions associated with pneumonia.

  17. The impact of monochloramine on the diversity and dynamics of Legionella pneumophila subpopulations in a nuclear power plant cooling circuit.

    PubMed

    Jakubek, Delphine; Le Brun, Matthieu; Leblon, Gerard; DuBow, Michael; Binet, Marie

    2013-08-01

    Members of the pathogenic Legionella genus encounter suitable growth conditions in nuclear power plant cooling circuits. To limit its proliferation and ensure that levels remain below regulatory thresholds, chemical treatment with monochloramine can be used in continuous or sequential conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of monochloramine on L. pneumophila subpopulations in the cooling circuits of a nuclear power plant. The chosen procedure involved monitoring the diversity and dynamics of L. pneumophila subpopulations every month over the course of a year in a nuclear power plant cooling circuit, which was treated for 2 months during the period under study. This study confirmed the effectiveness of monochloramine to limit L. pneumophila concentrations in cooling circuits. The culturable L. pneumophila community was strongly affected by the injection of monochloramine. Several subpopulations persisted during treatment at low concentrations (below the detection limit of standard methods), suggesting that the susceptibility of L. pneumophila is strain dependent. Although the composition of the subpopulations was not similar, the resilience of the community structure was observed. Indeed, the community eventually returned to its initial structure and presented a similar pattern of richness, diversity and uniformity to that seen before treatment.

  18. Genomic and archaeological evidence suggest a dual origin of domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Frantz, Laurent A F; Mullin, Victoria E; Pionnier-Capitan, Maud; Lebrasseur, Ophélie; Ollivier, Morgane; Perri, Angela; Linderholm, Anna; Mattiangeli, Valeria; Teasdale, Matthew D; Dimopoulos, Evangelos A; Tresset, Anne; Duffraisse, Marilyne; McCormick, Finbar; Bartosiewicz, László; Gál, Erika; Nyerges, Éva A; Sablin, Mikhail V; Bréhard, Stéphanie; Mashkour, Marjan; Bălăşescu, Adrian; Gillet, Benjamin; Hughes, Sandrine; Chassaing, Olivier; Hitte, Christophe; Vigne, Jean-Denis; Dobney, Keith; Hänni, Catherine; Bradley, Daniel G; Larson, Greger

    2016-06-03

    The geographic and temporal origins of dogs remain controversial. We generated genetic sequences from 59 ancient dogs and a complete (28x) genome of a late Neolithic dog (dated to ~4800 calendar years before the present) from Ireland. Our analyses revealed a deep split separating modern East Asian and Western Eurasian dogs. Surprisingly, the date of this divergence (~14,000 to 6400 years ago) occurs commensurate with, or several millennia after, the first appearance of dogs in Europe and East Asia. Additional analyses of ancient and modern mitochondrial DNA revealed a sharp discontinuity in haplotype frequencies in Europe. Combined, these results suggest that dogs may have been domesticated independently in Eastern and Western Eurasia from distinct wolf populations. East Eurasian dogs were then possibly transported to Europe with people, where they partially replaced European Paleolithic dogs.

  19. Looking for evidence of magnetosheath current as suggested by LFM global MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockrell, Sophia; Whittlesey, Phyllis; Mitchell, Elizabeth; Lopez, Ramon

    2009-04-01

    The ability to predict the effects of the solar wind on the near-Earth space environment is receiving attention due to the increased use of satellites for business, consumers, and the military. Determining if there is a current in the magnetosheath is part of a larger project to predict these effects. Solar magnetic field lines drape themselves along the magnetosheath, a subsonic region outside the boundary of the Earth's magnetic field. Using data from two satellites, Geotail and Interball, in the magnetosheath during geomagnetic storm times, we look for unexpected reverses in the magnetic field direction, known as reverse draping, which indicate a current flowing in the magnetosheath. Simulations done by our group suggest that during periods of strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field we might expect reverse draping. We will be presenting case studies indicating when reverse draping is occurring in the magnetosheath.

  20. Genetic evidence suggests that homosporous ferns with high chromosome numbers are diploid.

    PubMed

    Haufler, C H; Soltis, D E

    1986-06-01

    Homosporous ferns have usually been considered highly polyploid because they have high chromosome numbers (average n = 57.05). In angiosperms, species with chromosome numbers higher than n = 14 generally have more isozymes than those with lower numbers, consistent with their polyploidy. By extrapolation, homosporous ferns would be expected to have many isozymes. However, ongoing surveys indicate that within fern genera, species having the lowest chromosome numbers have the number of isozymes considered typical of diploid seed plants. Only species above these lowest numbers have additional isozymes. Therefore, homosporous ferns either have gone through repeated cycles of polyploidy and gene silencing or were initiated with relatively high chromosome numbers. The latter possibility represents a radical departure from currently advocated hypotheses of fern evolution and suggests that there may be fundamental differences between the genomes of homosporous ferns and those of higher plants. These hypotheses can be tested by genetic, karyological, and molecular techniques.

  1. Extensive recombination events and horizontal gene transfer shaped the Legionella pneumophila genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular pathogen of environmental protozoa. When humans inhale contaminated aerosols this bacterium may cause a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' disease. Despite the abundance of dozens of Legionella species in aquatic reservoirs, the vast majority of human disease is caused by a single serogroup (Sg) of a single species, namely L. pneumophila Sg1. To get further insights into genome dynamics and evolution of Sg1 strains, we sequenced strains Lorraine and HL 0604 1035 (Sg1) and compared them to the available sequences of Sg1 strains Paris, Lens, Corby and Philadelphia, resulting in a comprehensive multigenome analysis. Results We show that L. pneumophila Sg1 has a highly conserved and syntenic core genome that comprises the many eukaryotic like proteins and a conserved repertoire of over 200 Dot/Icm type IV secreted substrates. However, recombination events and horizontal gene transfer are frequent. In particular the analyses of the distribution of nucleotide polymorphisms suggests that large chromosomal fragments of over 200 kbs are exchanged between L. pneumophila strains and contribute to the genome dynamics in the natural population. The many secretion systems present might be implicated in exchange of these fragments by conjugal transfer. Plasmids also play a role in genome diversification and are exchanged among strains and circulate between different Legionella species. Conclusion Horizontal gene transfer among bacteria and from eukaryotes to L. pneumophila as well as recombination between strains allows different clones to evolve into predominant disease clones and others to replace them subsequently within relatively short periods of time. PMID:22044686

  2. Nuclease activity of Legionella pneumophila Cas2 promotes intracellular infection of amoebal host cells.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Felizza F; Mallama, Celeste A; Fairbairn, Stephanie G; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the primary agent of Legionnaires' disease, flourishes in both natural and man-made environments by growing in a wide variety of aquatic amoebae. Recently, we determined that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila promotes intracellular infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, the two amoebae most commonly linked to cases of disease. The Cas2 family of proteins is best known for its role in the bacterial and archeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system that constitutes a form of adaptive immunity against phage and plasmid. However, the infection event mediated by L. pneumophila Cas2 appeared to be distinct from this function, because cas2 mutants exhibited infectivity defects in the absence of added phage or plasmid and since mutants lacking the CRISPR array or any one of the other cas genes were not impaired in infection ability. We now report that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila has both RNase and DNase activities, with the RNase activity being more pronounced. By characterizing a catalytically deficient version of Cas2, we determined that nuclease activity is critical for promoting infection of amoebae. Also, introduction of Cas2, but not its catalytic mutant form, into a strain of L. pneumophila that naturally lacks a CRISPR-Cas locus caused that strain to be 40- to 80-fold more infective for amoebae, unequivocally demonstrating that Cas2 facilitates the infection process independently of any other component encoded within the CRISPR-Cas locus. Finally, a cas2 mutant was impaired for infection of Willaertia magna but not Naegleria lovaniensis, suggesting that Cas2 promotes infection of most but not all amoebal hosts.

  3. Interaction of legionella pneumophila and helicobacter pylori with bacterial species isolated from drinking water biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is well established that Legionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen; by contrast, the mode of Helicobacter pylori transmission remains unknown but water seems to play an important role. This work aims to study the influence of five microorganisms isolated from drinking water biofilms on the survival and integration of both of these pathogens into biofilms. Results Firstly, both pathogens were studied for auto- and co-aggregation with the species isolated from drinking water; subsequently the formation of mono and dual-species biofilms by L. pneumophila or H. pylori with the same microorganisms was investigated. Neither auto- nor co-aggregation was observed between the microorganisms tested. For biofilm studies, sessile cells were quantified in terms of total cells by SYTO 9 staining, viable L. pneumophila or H. pylori cells were quantified using 16 S rRNA-specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes and cultivable cells by standard culture techniques. Acidovorax sp. and Sphingomonas sp. appeared to have an antagonistic effect on L. pneumophila cultivability but not on the viability (as assessed by rRNA content using the PNA probe), possibly leading to the formation of viable but noncultivable (VBNC) cells, whereas Mycobacterium chelonae increased the cultivability of this pathogen. The results obtained for H. pylori showed that M. chelonae and Sphingomonas sp. help this pathogen to maintain cultivability for at least 24 hours. Conclusions It appears that M. chelonae may have an important role in the survival of both pathogens in drinking water. This work also suggests that the presence of some microorganisms can decrease the cultivability of L. pneumophila but not the viability which indicates that the presence of autochthonous microorganisms can lead to misleading results when the safety of water is assessed by cultivable methods alone. PMID:21418578

  4. Nuclease Activity of Legionella pneumophila Cas2 Promotes Intracellular Infection of Amoebal Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Felizza F.; Mallama, Celeste A.; Fairbairn, Stephanie G.

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the primary agent of Legionnaires' disease, flourishes in both natural and man-made environments by growing in a wide variety of aquatic amoebae. Recently, we determined that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila promotes intracellular infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, the two amoebae most commonly linked to cases of disease. The Cas2 family of proteins is best known for its role in the bacterial and archeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)–CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system that constitutes a form of adaptive immunity against phage and plasmid. However, the infection event mediated by L. pneumophila Cas2 appeared to be distinct from this function, because cas2 mutants exhibited infectivity defects in the absence of added phage or plasmid and since mutants lacking the CRISPR array or any one of the other cas genes were not impaired in infection ability. We now report that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila has both RNase and DNase activities, with the RNase activity being more pronounced. By characterizing a catalytically deficient version of Cas2, we determined that nuclease activity is critical for promoting infection of amoebae. Also, introduction of Cas2, but not its catalytic mutant form, into a strain of L. pneumophila that naturally lacks a CRISPR-Cas locus caused that strain to be 40- to 80-fold more infective for amoebae, unequivocally demonstrating that Cas2 facilitates the infection process independently of any other component encoded within the CRISPR-Cas locus. Finally, a cas2 mutant was impaired for infection of Willaertia magna but not Naegleria lovaniensis, suggesting that Cas2 promotes infection of most but not all amoebal hosts. PMID:25547789

  5. Interaction of Legionella pneumophila and Helicobacter pylori with bacterial species isolated from drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gião, Maria S; Azevedo, Nuno F; Wilks, Sandra A; Vieira, Maria J; Keevil, Charles W

    2011-03-18

    It is well established that Legionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen; by contrast, the mode of Helicobacter pylori transmission remains unknown but water seems to play an important role. This work aims to study the influence of five microorganisms isolated from drinking water biofilms on the survival and integration of both of these pathogens into biofilms. Firstly, both pathogens were studied for auto- and co-aggregation with the species isolated from drinking water; subsequently the formation of mono and dual-species biofilms by L. pneumophila or H. pylori with the same microorganisms was investigated. Neither auto- nor co-aggregation was observed between the microorganisms tested. For biofilm studies, sessile cells were quantified in terms of total cells by SYTO 9 staining, viable L. pneumophila or H. pylori cells were quantified using 16 S rRNA-specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes and cultivable cells by standard culture techniques. Acidovorax sp. and Sphingomonas sp. appeared to have an antagonistic effect on L. pneumophila cultivability but not on the viability (as assessed by rRNA content using the PNA probe), possibly leading to the formation of viable but noncultivable (VBNC) cells, whereas Mycobacterium chelonae increased the cultivability of this pathogen. The results obtained for H. pylori showed that M. chelonae and Sphingomonas sp. help this pathogen to maintain cultivability for at least 24 hours. It appears that M. chelonae may have an important role in the survival of both pathogens in drinking water. This work also suggests that the presence of some microorganisms can decrease the cultivability of L. pneumophila but not the viability which indicates that the presence of autochthonous microorganisms can lead to misleading results when the safety of water is assessed by cultivable methods alone.

  6. Travel-associated infections caused by unusual serogroups of Legionella pneumophila identified using Legionella BIOCHIP slides in Turkey and Iraq.

    PubMed

    Kocazeybek, Bekir S; Yuksel, Pelin; Keskin, Dilek; Sheikh, Suhail; Habip, Zafer; Yavuzer, Serap Sahin; Caliskan, Reyhan; Altun, Yagız Meric; Kuskucu, Mert; Cengiz, Mahir; Dinc, Harika Oyku; Karakullukcu, Asiye; Ergin, Sevgi; Saribas, Suat; Yilmaz, Nail; Tokman, Hrisi Bahar

    2016-01-01

    Although Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 is the common disease causing serogroup, rare serogroups can also may cause legionellosis. A 54-year-old male patient (index case) reported that he had been on a religious trip (for visiting, tomb of Ali, which is important for Shias) to Iraq with a large group (50 shia pilgrims from Kars city of Turkey) two weeks prior to admission. Due to civil war, the hotel where the patient stayed in Iraq lacked proper hygiene. A large number of people in the travel group were experiencing the same symptoms. Other five cases were 2 males (ages; 50, 45) and 3 females including the wife of the index case (ages; 50, 28, 27). The detection of L. pneumophila IgG and IgM was performed by anti-L. pneumophila Indirect Immunofluorescent IgM, IgG kit. Legionella 1 biochip/verification BIOCHIP slides were used for serogrouping in Euroimmun AG, Leubeck, Germany. In index case, L. pneumophila IgM was positive with a titer of 1/32 titer. IgG was negative with a 1/100 titer. Another case (28 year old female), had clinical symptoms identical to the index case. L. pneumophila IgM and IgG were positive with titers of 1/64 and 1/100, respectively. These two cases were diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease caused by L. pneumophila serogroup 12 (index case) and female (28-year-old) by serogroup 11. The other 4 cases were diagnosed with possible Pontiac fever caused by L. pneumophila serogroups 14 (wife of the index case), 4, and 6 whereas the serogroup of L. pneumophila detected in 27 years old female case could not be identified. A major limitation of this work is the absence of genotyping and the serogroup difference between index case and his wife who shared the same hotel. We suggest that this serogroup difference may be caused by (for men and women) sitting separately in Islamic rules. On the other hand, the movement of people in the context of mutual visits between countries or neighboring countries for tourism-related (i.e., for religious events

  7. Maternal psychiatric disease and epigenetic evidence suggest a common biology for poor fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Timothy H; Marsit, Carmen J; Williams, Scott M

    2015-08-25

    further characterize the association between maternal psychiatric disease and poor fetal growth. Because the association appears to depend on active psychiatric disease, this suggests a transient and potentially modifiable pathophysiology. The molecular findings in this study suggest that altered leptin signaling may be involved in the biological mechanisms that link prenatal maternal psychiatric symptoms and poor fetal growth.

  8. Meaningful use of health information technology: evidence suggests benefits and challenges lie ahead.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Michael F; Poon, Eric

    2011-12-01

    Less than 3 years into the passage of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, measurable results are emerging. For example, in the first 11 months during which healthcare providers ("eligible professionals") and acute care hospitals ("eligible hospitals") had the opportunity to demonstrate stage 1 "Meaningful Use" of Healthcare Information Technology (HIT), more than 20,000 "eligible professionals" and 750 "eligible hospitals" have done so. In the current issue of The American Journal of Managed Care, we showcase examples of HITECH's potential impact, as well as illustrate the opportunities and challenges ahead. Two studies in this issue illustrate how HIT can improve the capacity of our healthcare system to manage chronic illnesses. The study by Vollmer et al describes how an interactive voice recognition system can improve adherence to inhaled corticosteroids among individuals with asthma in a large health maintenance organization. Shelley's study shows that the combination of electronic medical records, clinical decision support, and performance feedback can improve the rate of blood pressure control in patients with hypertension who receive care in community health centers. Together, these studies provide hope that the nation's investment in HIT could one day yield clinical dividends. Three other studies in this issue suggest that success for HIT will require attention to both technological and sociological factors. The study by Millery et al attributes the success of an HIT-based intervention to a multi-faceted approach that involves a combination of decision support tools, systematic provider feedback, implementation support, and leadership. Results from Abramson's study suggest that the full error-reduction potential of e-prescribing may only be reached with the combination of on-line clinical decision support and support for clinicians. The study by

  9. Evidence to Suggest That Teeth Act as Human Ornament Displays Signalling Mate Quality

    PubMed Central

    Hendrie, Colin A.; Brewer, Gayle

    2012-01-01

    Ornament displays seen in animals convey information about genetic quality, developmental history and current disease state to both prospective sexual partners and potential rivals. In this context, showing of teeth through smiles etc is a characteristic feature of human social interaction. Tooth development is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Adult teeth record environmental and traumatic events, as well as the effects of disease and ageing. Teeth are therefore a rich source of information about individuals and their histories. This study examined the effects of digital manipulations of tooth colour and spacing. Results showed that deviation away from normal spacing and/or the presence of yellowed colouration had negative effects on ratings of attractiveness and that these effects were markedly stronger in female models. Whitening had no effect beyond that produced by natural colouration. This indicates that these colour induced alterations in ratings of attractiveness are mediated by increased/decreased yellowing rather than whitening per se. Teeth become yellower and darker with age. Therefore it is suggested that whilst the teeth of both sexes act as human ornament displays, the female display is more complex because it additionally signals residual reproductive value. PMID:22860076

  10. Genomic evidence for rod monochromacy in sloths and armadillos suggests early subterranean history for Xenarthra.

    PubMed

    Emerling, Christopher A; Springer, Mark S

    2015-02-07

    Rod monochromacy is a rare condition in vertebrates characterized by the absence of cone photoreceptor cells. The resulting phenotype is colourblindness and low acuity vision in dim-light and blindness in bright-light conditions. Early reports of xenarthrans (armadillos, sloths and anteaters) suggest that they are rod monochromats, but this has not been tested with genomic data. We searched the genomes of Dasypus novemcinctus (nine-banded armadillo), Choloepus hoffmanni (Hoffmann's two-toed sloth) and Mylodon darwinii (extinct ground sloth) for retinal photoreceptor genes and examined them for inactivating mutations. We performed PCR and Sanger sequencing on cone phototransduction genes of 10 additional xenarthrans to test for shared inactivating mutations and estimated the timing of inactivation for photoreceptor pseudogenes. We concluded that a stem xenarthran became an long-wavelength sensitive-cone monochromat following a missense mutation at a critical residue in SWS1, and a stem cingulate (armadillos, glyptodonts and pampatheres) and stem pilosan (sloths and anteaters) independently acquired rod monochromacy early in their evolutionary history following the inactivation of LWS and PDE6C, respectively. We hypothesize that rod monochromacy in armadillos and pilosans evolved as an adaptation to a subterranean habitat in the early history of Xenarthra. The presence of rod monochromacy has major implications for understanding xenarthran behavioural ecology and evolution. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Genomic evidence for rod monochromacy in sloths and armadillos suggests early subterranean history for Xenarthra

    PubMed Central

    Emerling, Christopher A.; Springer, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Rod monochromacy is a rare condition in vertebrates characterized by the absence of cone photoreceptor cells. The resulting phenotype is colourblindness and low acuity vision in dim-light and blindness in bright-light conditions. Early reports of xenarthrans (armadillos, sloths and anteaters) suggest that they are rod monochromats, but this has not been tested with genomic data. We searched the genomes of Dasypus novemcinctus (nine-banded armadillo), Choloepus hoffmanni (Hoffmann's two-toed sloth) and Mylodon darwinii (extinct ground sloth) for retinal photoreceptor genes and examined them for inactivating mutations. We performed PCR and Sanger sequencing on cone phototransduction genes of 10 additional xenarthrans to test for shared inactivating mutations and estimated the timing of inactivation for photoreceptor pseudogenes. We concluded that a stem xenarthran became an long-wavelength sensitive-cone monochromat following a missense mutation at a critical residue in SWS1, and a stem cingulate (armadillos, glyptodonts and pampatheres) and stem pilosan (sloths and anteaters) independently acquired rod monochromacy early in their evolutionary history following the inactivation of LWS and PDE6C, respectively. We hypothesize that rod monochromacy in armadillos and pilosans evolved as an adaptation to a subterranean habitat in the early history of Xenarthra. The presence of rod monochromacy has major implications for understanding xenarthran behavioural ecology and evolution. PMID:25540280

  12. Complex phylogeography in Rhinoclemmys melanosterna: conflicting mitochondrial and nuclear evidence suggests past hybridization (Testudines: Geoemydidae).

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ramírez, Mario; Carr, John L; Fritz, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    We examined differentiation within the Colombian wood turtle Rhinoclemmys melanosterna, and among R. melanosterna and the closely allied species R. diademata, R.funerea and R. punctularia, based on 1060 base pairs of the mitochondrial cyt b gene. We also assessed the phylogenetic relationships among these species using 2050 bp of mtDNA (partial cyt b, 12S and 16S genes) and 3620 bp of nuclear DNA (partial Rag 1, Rag 2, C-mos, R35 and ODC genes). There is considerable phylogeographic structuring within R. melanosterna, with seven distinct clades distributed across the species' range. These clades correlate to some extent with previously described differences in the dorsal pattern of head coloration. Individual and combined analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA indicated contradictory relationships among R. melanosterna, R. diademata, R. funerea and R. punctularia. Mitochondrial DNA sequences revealed R. melanosterna to be non-monophyletic with respect to R. diademata, R. funerea and R. punctularia. In contrast, R. melanosterna constituted a well-supported monophyletic clade using nuclear DNA. This conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear data suggests past gene flow among the allopatrically and parapatrically distributed species R. melanosterna, R. diademata, R. funerea and R. punctularia. Compared to the other Rhinoclemmys species, the taxa under study are weakly differentiated. To assess their taxonomic status, further research is warranted using additional nuclear markers and additional samples of R. diademata, R. funerea and R. punctularia. For the time being, a continued classification of R. melanosterna, R. diademata, R. funerea and R. punctularia as distinct species is justified owing to their allopatric and parapatric distributions, and to conserve the established usage of names that is based on morphological and karyotypic differentiation.

  13. Evidence suggests rigid aortic grafts increase systolic blood pressure: results of a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, T; Morris, L; McGloughlin, T

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a serious complication of the aorta and is treated using vascular bypass grafts. Two main classes of graft are available to treat AAA; grafts implanted by open surgery and stent-grafts implanted using minimally invasive endovascular techniques. Both classes of graft consist of an aortic section which bifurcates into two iliac sections. It has been hypothesized that implantation of aortic grafts and stent-grafts serve to significantly increase abdominal aortic pressures. In this study, an open-loop computer-controlled pumping system was built to produce physiologically realistic pressure and flow-rates. Models of a compliant abdominal aortic aneurysm, a compliant walled graft and a tapered graft were manufactured using an injection moulding technique and fused deposition modelling was used to create a rigid walled graft. A specific transient flow-rate waveform was then applied at the inlet of each model and the resulting pressure waveforms 30 mm upstream from the bifurcation was recorded. Peak pressure measurements were recorded over the course of the pulse for each model. The compliant aneurysm model was found to have a systolic pressure of 107 mmHg while the complaint graft model was 153 mmHg. The rigid graft model had a peak systolic pressure of 199 mmHg. In the tapered graft, the peak pressure dropped to 142 mmHg. The data suggests that implanting a graft model in place of an aneurysm model in an in vitro flow circuit can increase the pressures recorded upstream from the iliac bifurcation and that tapered grafts may alleviate this problem.

  14. Empirical evidence suggests adverse climate events have not affected Australian women's health and well-being.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jennifer R; Loxton, Deborah; Baker, Jeanine; Rich, Jane L; Dobson, Annette J

    2012-10-01

    To compare the health and well-being of women by exposure to adverse climate events. An Exceptional Circumstance declaration (EC) was used as a proxy for adverse climate events. The Australian government may provide financial support to people living in EC areas, i.e. areas experiencing a one in 20-25 year event (drought, flood or fire) that results in a severe, extended downturn in farm or farm-related income. Data from 6,584 53-58 year old non-metropolitan women participating in the 2004 survey of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH) were linked to EC data. Generalised linear models were used to analyse differences in SF-36 General Health (GH) and Mental Health (MH) and perceived stress by EC for all women. Models were adjusted for demographic, health-related and psychosocial factors potentially on the pathway between EC and health. Given that the effects on health were expected to be greater in vulnerable people, analyses were repeated for women with worse socioeconomic circumstances. GH, MH and stress did not differ for the 3,366 women in EC areas and 3,218 women in non-EC areas. GH, MH and stress were worse among vulnerable women (who had difficulty managing on available income) regardless of EC. This research adds to the existing literature on climate change, associated adverse climate events and health, by suggesting that multiple resources available in high income countries, including government support and individual psychosocial resources may mitigate some of the health impacts of adverse climate events, even among vulnerable people. © 2012 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2012 Public Health Association of Australia.

  15. Evidence suggesting a transcortical pathway from cutaneous foot afferents to tibialis anterior motoneurones in man.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, J; Petersen, N; Fedirchuk, B

    1997-01-01

    1. Stimulation of the superficial peroneal or the sural nerve (3 shocks, 3 ms interval, 1 ms duration, 2.5 x perception threshold) evoked a reflex activation of the tibialis anterior muscle at a latency of approximately 70-95 ms in all of nine healthy human subjects. Stimulation of the medial plantar nerve only rarely produced similar effects. The possibility that a transcortical pathway contributes to these late reflex responses was investigated by combining the cutaneous stimulations and a transcranial magnetic stimulation of the contralateral motor cortex. 2. A significant facilitation of short-latency peaks in the post-stimulus time histogram of single tibialis anterior motor units evoked by the transcortical magnetic stimulation was observed in eight out of nine subjects following stimulation of the superficial peroneal or sural nerves at the latency of the long-latency reflex. In contrast such a facilitation was only rarely seen when the medial plantar nerve was stimulated. 3. With the same timing for the stimuli, the superficial peroneal and sural nerve stimulations also produced a significant increase in the short-latency, presumed monosynaptic, facilitation of the tibialis anterior H reflex produced by the brain stimulation. 4. Similar facilitatory effects of the cutaneous stimuli could not be demonstrated when the magnetic stimulation of the cortex was replaced with electrical stimulation, implying that cortical excitability is affected by a conditioning cutaneous stimulation. 5. It is suggested that the long-latency reflexes in the tibialis anterior muscle evoked by activation of cutaneous afferents from the human foot are, at least partly, mediated by a transcortical pathway. PMID:9192318

  16. Cytogenetic and molecular evidence suggest multiple origins and geographical parthenogenesis in Nothoscordum gracile (Alliaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Luiz Gustavo Rodrigues; Crosa, Orfeo; Speranza, Pablo; Guerra, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Nothoscordum gracile is an apomitic tetraploid widely distributed throughout the Americas and naturalized in many temperate regions of other continents. It has been suggested to form a species complex with sexual and apomictic N. nudicaule and N. macrostemon. Tetraploids of these species also share a structurally heterozygous chromosome complement 2n = 19 (13M + 6A). In this work, the origin of N. gracile and its relationships with its related species was investigated based on cytological and molecular data. Methods Cytogenetic analyses were based on meiotic behaviour, CMA bands, localization of 5S and 45S rDNA sites, and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). Nuclear ITS and plastidial trnL-trnF sequences were also obtained for most individuals. Key Results Proximal CMA bands were observed in the long arms of all acrocentrics of 2x and 4x N. macrostemon but not in diploid and some tetraploid cytotypes of N. nudicaule. Samples of N. gracile showed a variable number of CMA bands in the long arms of acrocentrics. Analysis of ITS sequences, dot-blot, GISH, and 5S and 45S rDNA sites, revealed no differentiation among the three species. The trnL-trnF cpDNA fragment showed variation with a trend to geographical structuring irrespective of morphospecies and fully congruent with karyotype variation. Conclusions The 2n = 19 karyotype was probably formed by a centric fusion event occurring in N. nudicaule and later transmitted to tetraploid cytotypes of N. macrostemon. Diploids of N. nudicaule and N. macrostemon appeared as consistent recently diverged species, whereas tetraploid apomicts seem to constitute an assemblage of polyploid hybrids originating from multiple independent hybridization events between them, part of which are morphologically recognizable as N. gracile. PMID:22362660

  17. Legionella pneumophila Toxin, Isolation and Purification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    Fort Detrick, Frederick, Maryland, U.S.A. INTRODUCTION We are all aware of the dramatic outbreak of what is now termed Legionnaires ’ Disease that...bacteria now termed Legionella pneumophila was isolated and identified as the etiologic agent by Drs. Fraser (1) and McDade (2). Although Legionnaires ...recognize two distinct clinical syndromes associated with this Ot organism. The first termed Legionnaires ’ Disease , involves patients ranging in age from 3

  18. The phagosome containing Legionella pneumophila within the protozoan Hartmannella vermiformis is surrounded by the rough endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Abu Kwaik, Y

    1996-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular parasite of protozoa and human phagocytes. To examine adaptation of this bacterium to parasitize protozoa, the sequence of events of the intracellular infection of the amoeba Hartmannella vermiformis was examined. The previously described uptake phenomenon of coiling phagocytosis by human monocytes was not detected. A 1 h postinfection with wild-type strain AA100, mitochondria were observed within the vicinity of the phagosome. At 2.5 h postinfection, numerous vesicles surrounded the phagosomes and mitochondria were in close proximity to the phagosome. At 5 h postinfection, the bacterium was surrounded by a ribosome-studded multilayer membrane. Bacterial multiplication was evident by 8 h postinfection, and the phagosome was surrounded by a ribosome-studded multilayer membrane until 15 h postinfection. The recruitment of organelles and formation of the ribosome-studded phagosome was defective in an isogenic attenuated mutant of L. pneumophila (strain AA101A) that failed to replicate within amoebae. At 20 h postinfection with wild-type strain AA100, numerous bacteria were present in the phagosome and ribosome were not detected around the phagosome. These data showed that, at the ultrastructural level, the intracellular infection of protozoa by L. pneumophila is highly similar to that of infection of macrophages. Immunocytochemical studies provided evidence that at 5 h postinfection the phagosome containing L. pneumophila acquired an abundant amount of the endoplasmic reticulum-specific protein (BiP). Similar to phagosomes containing heat-killed wild-type L. pneumophila, the BiP protein was not detectable in phagosomes containing the mutant strain AA101A. In addition to the absence of ribosomes and mitochondria, the BiP protein was not detected in the phagosomes at 20 h postinfection with wild-type L. pneumophila. The data indicated that the ability of L. pneumophila to establish the intracellular infection of amoebae is

  19. Replicative Legionella pneumophila lung infection in intratracheally inoculated A/J mice. A murine model of human Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Brieland, J.; Freeman, P.; Kunkel, R.; Chrisp, C.; Hurley, M.; Fantone, J.; Engleberg, C.

    1994-01-01

    The role of host immune responses in the pathogenesis of Legionnaires' disease is incompletely understood, due in part to the current lack of an animal model that is both susceptible to replicative Legionella pneumophila-induced lung infection and for which species-specific immunological reagents are available. We have developed a model of replicative L. pneumophila lung infection in intratracheally inoculated A/J mice. L. pneumophila was obtained in the exponential growth phase and inoculated into the trachea of 6- to 8-week-old female A/J mice. Microbiological and histopathological evidence of infection was demonstrated in mice inoculated with 10(6) colony-forming units. Development of an acute pneumonia that resembled human Legionnaires' disease coincided with exponential growth of the bacteria in the lung 24 to 48 hours after intratracheal inoculation of L. pneumophila. This was associated with increased plasma levels of interferon-gamma at 24 hours after inoculation. After 48 hours, the bacteria were gradually eliminated from the lung over the next 5 days, corresponding with resolution of the inflammatory response in the lung, thereby mimicking the outcome frequently seen in the immunocompetent human host. Treatment of animals with anti-interferon-gamma antibody enhanced bacterial replication and disease progression, indicating an important role of host immune response in resolution of the infection. Because of the availability of murine-specific reagents, this model of replicative L. pneumophila lung infection in A/J mice after intrapulmonary inoculation of L. pneumophila potentially provides an important tool for future studies investigating the role of host immune responses in the pathogenesis of Legionnaires' disease in the immunocompetent host. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7992856

  20. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from Pluvial Floods by Amoebal Coculture

    PubMed Central

    Docters van Leeuwen, A. E.; Lodder, W. J.; de Man, H.; Euser, S.; den Boer, J. W.; de Roda Husman, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Viable Legionella pneumophila bacteria were isolated by amoebal coculture from pluvial floods after intense rainfall and from water collected at sewage treatment plants. Several isolated L. pneumophila strains belonged to sequence types that have been previously identified in patients. PMID:22467504

  1. Effect of copper and silver ionization on Legionella pneumophila eradication

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.E.; Vidic, R.D.; Stout, J.E.; Yu, V.L.

    1995-11-01

    The presence of Legionella pneumophila in water distribution systems has been epidemiologically linked to hospital-acquired Legionnaires` disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of copper and silver ions for inactivation of Legionella pneumophila. Experimental results showed that L. pneumophila was completely inactivated at copper concentration of 0.1 mg/L within the period of 2.5 hours while 6-log reduction requires a Ct value of 0.8 mg/L*hour. On the other hand, more than 24 hours was required to completely eradicate L. pneumophila at the highest silver ion concentration (0.08 mg/L) tested and only 4-log reduction is observed for Ct value of 0.8 mg/L*hour. The effective synergism of these ions in eradicating L. pneumophila was observed for copper concentrations of 0.05 and silver concentration of 0.04 mg/L. One approach for the control of L. pneumophila in water distribution systems is to initiate copper/silver ion concentrations at 0.4/0.04 mg/L to achieve complete eradication of L. pneumophila already present in the water distribution system (as established in previous studies) followed by a lower residual (0.05/0.04 mg/L) protection against L. pneumophila in the incoming water.

  2. Legionella pneumophila Secretes an Endoglucanase That Belongs to the Family-5 of Glycosyl Hydrolases and Is Dependent upon Type II Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Meghan M.; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.

    2009-01-01

    Examination of cell-free culture supernatants revealed that Legionella pneumophila strains secrete an endoglucanase activity. L. pneumophila lspF mutants were deficient for this activity, indicating that the endoglucanase is secreted by the bacterium’s type II protein secretion system. Inactivation of celA, encoding a member of the family-5 of glycosyl hydrolases, abolished the endoglucanase activity in L. pneumophila culture supernatants. The cloned celA gene conferred activity upon recombinant Escherichia coli. Thus, CelA is the major secreted endoglucanase of L. pneumophila. Mutants inactivated for celA grew normally in protozoa and macrophage, indicating that CelA is not required for the intracellular phase of L. pneumophila. The CelA endoglucanase is one of at least 25 proteins secreted by the type II system of L. pneumophila and the seventeenth type of enzyme effector associated with this pathway. Only a subset of the other Legionella species tested expressed secreted endoglucanase activity, suggesting that the type II secretion output differs among the different legionellae. Overall, this study represents the first documentation of an endoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.4) being produced by a strain of Legionella. PMID:19817866

  3. Legionella pneumophila serogroup Lansing 3 isolated from a patient with fatal pneumonia, and descriptions of L. pneumophila subsp. pneumophila subsp. nov., L. pneumophila subsp. fraseri subsp. nov., and L. pneumophila subsp. pascullei subsp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, D J; Steigerwalt, A G; Epple, P; Bibb, W F; McKinney, R M; Starnes, R W; Colville, J M; Selander, R K; Edelstein, P H; Moss, C W

    1988-01-01

    Previous DNA relatedness and enzyme electrophoretic mobility studies indicated heterogeneity among strains of Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1, 4, 5, and Lansing 3 (a new, as yet unnumbered serogroup). In this study 60 L. pneumophila strains were studied by DNA hybridization (hydroxyapatite method) to assess their genomic relatedness. These strains were also studied biochemically and serologically to determine whether they formed one or more phenotypic groups. DNA relatedness studies identified three groups. DNA group 1 contained the type strain Philadelphia 1 and strains from serogroups 1 through 14 of L. pneumophila. The average relatedness of DNA group 1 strains was 88% at 60 degrees C with 1.1% divergence in related sequences and 85% at 75 degrees C. DNA group 2 contained strain Los Angeles 1, the reference strain of serogroup 4, and strains of serogroups 1, 4, 5, and Lansing 3, an unnumbered serogroup. Average relatedness of DNA group 2 strains was 84% at 60 degrees C with 0.7% divergence and 87% at 75 degrees C. Reciprocal relatedness of DNA groups 1 and 2 was approximately 67% at 60 degrees C with 6.0% divergence and 48% at 75 degrees C. DNA group 3 strains were in serogroup 5. They were 98% related at 60 degrees C with 0.5% divergence and 97% related at 75 degrees C. Reciprocal relatedness of DNA group 3 and DNA group 1 was approximately 74% at 60 degrees C with 5.3% divergence and 43% at 75 degrees C, and reciprocal relatedness of DNA groups 3 and 2 was 66% at 60 degrees C with 5.7% divergence and 55% at 75 degrees C. The DNA groups could not be separated biochemically or serologically or by cell wall fatty acid and isoprenoid quinone composition. Three subspecies of L. pneumophila are proposed to accommodate the three DNA groups: L. pneumophila subsp. pneumophila subsp. nov. for DNA group 1, L. pneumophila subsp. fraseri subsp. nov. for DNA group 2, and pneumophila subsp. pascullei subsp. nov. for DNA group 3. PMID:3053773

  4. Legionella pneumophila Arthritis: use of medium specific for Mycobacteria for isolation of L. pneumophila in culture of articular fluid specimens.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Pascale; Leautez, Sophie; Ninin, Emmanuelle; Jarraud, Sophie; Raffi, François; Drugeon, Henri

    2002-07-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of acute purulent arthritis due to Legionella pneumophila in an immunosuppressed patient. L. pneumophila was isolated from samples of blood and articular fluid cultured with use of medium specific for mycobacteria (Bactec 13A medium).

  5. Legionella pneumophilaRequires Polyamines for Optimal Intracellular Growth ▿

    PubMed Central

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K.; Riveroll, Angela L.; Chong, Audrey; Murray, Lois E.; Lewis, P. Jeffrey; Garduño, Rafael A.

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophilareplicates in a membrane-bound compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV), into which it abundantly releases its chaperonin, HtpB. To determine whether HtpB remains within the LCV or reaches the host cell cytoplasm, we infected U937 human macrophages and CHO cells with L. pneumophilaexpressing a translocation reporter consisting of the Bordetella pertussisadenylate cyclase fused to HtpB. These infections led to increased cyclic AMP levels, suggesting that HtpB reaches the host cell cytoplasm. To identify potential functions of cytoplasmic HtpB, we expressed it in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where HtpB induced pseudohyphal growth. A yeast-two-hybrid screen showed that HtpB interacted with S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), an essential yeast enzyme (encoded by SPE2) that is required for polyamine biosynthesis. Increasing the copy number of SPE2induced pseudohyphal growth in S. cerevisiae; thus, we speculated that (i) HtpB induces pseudohyphal growth by activating polyamine synthesis and (ii) L. pneumophilamay require exogenous polyamines for growth. A pharmacological inhibitor of SAMDC significantly reduced L. pneumophilareplication in L929 mouse cells and U937 macrophages, whereas exogenously added polyamines moderately favored intracellular growth, confirming that polyamines and host SAMDC activity promote L. pneumophilaproliferation. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that most known enzymes required for polyamine biosynthesis in bacteria (including SAMDC) are absent in L. pneumophila, further suggesting a need for exogenous polyamines. We hypothesize that HtpB may function to ensure a supply of polyamines in host cells, which are required for the optimal intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. PMID:21742865

  6. Endemicity of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3 in a hospital water supply.

    PubMed

    Franzin, L; Castellani Pastoris, M; Gioannini, P; Villani, G

    1989-04-01

    A microbiological and epidemiological investigation at the Infectious Diseases Hospital in Turin, Italy, demonstrated Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3 at 10(2) to greater than 4 X 10(3) cfu l-1 from 24 of 32 hot water samples collected from hand-basins in six separate buildings. A sample taken from the public water supply, and a hot water sample (80 degrees C) collected from hot water tanks, did not yield legionellas. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3 was found in samples taken at the first point of mixed hot and cold water (50 degrees C) at 3 X 10(2) cfu l-1. 12 of 26 samples from the shower-heads yielded 10(3) to 2.5 X 10(5) cfu l-1 and one of 12 water samples from oxygen bubble humidifiers tested yielded 1.6 X 10(4) cfu l-1. No other legionellas species or serogroups of Legionella pneumophila were isolated during the study. No cases of nosocomial pneumonia were detected among 3653 patients' records, nor was there serological evidence of Legionella infection in the 180 patients tested.

  7. Population structure and minimum core genome typing of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Tian; Zhang, Wen; Liu, Wenbin; Zhou, Haijian; Ren, Hongyu; Shao, Zhujun; Lan, Ruiting; Xu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an important human pathogen causing Legionnaires’ disease. In this study, whole genome sequencing (WGS) was used to study the characteristics and population structure of L. pneumophila strains. We sequenced and compared 53 isolates of L. pneumophila covering different serogroups and sequence-based typing (SBT) types (STs). We found that 1,896 single-copy orthologous genes were shared by all isolates and were defined as the minimum core genome (MCG) of L. pneumophila. A total of 323,224 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified among the 53 strains. After excluding 314,059 SNPs which were likely to be results of recombination, the remaining 9,165 SNPs were referred to as MCG SNPs. Population Structure analysis based on MCG divided the 53 L. pneumophila into nine MCG groups. The within-group distances were much smaller than the between-group distances, indicating considerable divergence between MCG groups. MCG groups were also supplied by phylogenetic analysis and may be considered as robust taxonomic units within L. pneumophila. Among the nine MCG groups, eight showed high intracellular growth ability while one showed low intracellular growth ability. Furthermore, MCG typing also showed high resolution in subtyping ST1 strains. The results obtained in this study provided significant insights into the evolution, population structure and pathogenicity of L. pneumophila. PMID:26888563

  8. Chemically Defined Medium for Legionella pneumophila Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    for Legionnaires disease bacteriuii I t ’In. Mi- L.egionnaire. dioa bal’teriutn ( Legionella pneumii crobiol. 8:320-32.5. phi/u n to heiiaIly defined... Legionella pneumophila Growth. W 6) JOSElPH D/HISTROPH’ KENNETH W./HEI)LUN. AND SRINIVAS/GOWIA nited States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious... Diseases . Fort Detrick Frederick,~~Maryland 21701 " A chemically defined medium containing 18 amino acids, inorganic salts, E rhamnose, choline, and

  9. Genomic Resolution of Outbreak-Associated Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 Isolates from New York State

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Brian H.; Baker, Deborah J.; Nazarian, Elizabeth; Lapierre, Pascal; Bopp, Dianna; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A.; Morrison, Shatavia S.; Lucas, Claressa E.; Mercante, Jeffrey W.; Musser, Kimberlee A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A total of 30 Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates representing 10 separate legionellosis laboratory investigations (“outbreaks”) that occurred in New York State between 2004 and 2012 were selected for evaluation of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) approaches for molecular subtyping of this organism. Clinical and environmental isolates were available for each outbreak and were initially examined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Sequence-based typing alleles were extracted from WGS data yielding complete sequence types (ST) for isolates representing 8 out of the 10 outbreaks evaluated in this study. Isolates from separate outbreaks sharing the same ST also contained the fewest differences in core genome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the greatest proportion of identical allele sequences in a whole-genome multilocus sequence typing (wgMLST) scheme. Both core SNP and wgMLST analyses distinguished isolates from separate outbreaks, including those from two outbreaks sharing indistinguishable PFGE profiles. Isolates from a hospital-associated outbreak spanning multiple years shared indistinguishable PFGE profiles but displayed differences in their genome sequences, suggesting the presence of multiple environmental sources. Finally, the rtx gene demonstrated differences in the repeat region sequence among ST1 isolates from different outbreaks, suggesting that variation in this gene may be useful for targeted molecular subtyping approaches for L. pneumophila. This study demonstrates the utility of various genome sequence analysis approaches for L. pneumophila for environmental source attribution studies while furthering the understanding of Legionella ecology. IMPORTANCE We demonstrate that whole-genome sequencing helps to improve resolution of Legionella pneumophila isolated during laboratory investigations of legionellosis compared to traditional subtyping methods. These data can be important in confirming the environmental sources

  10. Exposure to Synthetic Gray Water Inhibits Amoeba Encystation and Alters Expression of Legionella pneumophila Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingrang; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Water conservation efforts have focused on gray water (GW) usage, especially for applications that do not require potable water quality. However, there is a need to better understand environmental pathogens and their free-living amoeba (FLA) hosts within GW, given their growth potential in stored gray water. Using synthetic gray water (sGW) we examined three strains of the water-based pathogen Legionella pneumophila and its FLA hosts Acanthamoeba polyphaga, A. castellanii, and Vermamoeba vermiformis. Exposure to sGW for 72 h resulted in significant inhibition (P < 0.0001) of amoebal encystation versus control-treated cells, with the following percentages of cysts in sGW versus controls: A. polyphaga (0.6 versus 6%), A. castellanii (2 versus 62%), and V. vermiformis (1 versus 92%), suggesting sGW induced maintenance of the actively feeding trophozoite form. During sGW exposure, L. pneumophila culturability decreased as early as 5 h (1.3 to 2.9 log10 CFU, P < 0.001) compared to controls (Δ0 to 0.1 log10 CFU) with flow cytometric analysis revealing immediate changes in membrane permeability. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR was performed on total RNA isolated from L. pneumophila cells at 0 to 48 h after sGW incubation, and genes associated with virulence (gacA, lirR, csrA, pla, and sidF), the type IV secretion system (lvrB and lvrE), and metabolism (ccmF and lolA) were all shown to be differentially expressed. These results suggest that conditions within GW may promote interactions between water-based pathogens and FLA hosts, through amoebal encystment inhibition and alteration of bacterial gene expression, thus warranting further exploration into FLA and L. pneumophila behavior in GW systems. PMID:25381242

  11. Exposure to synthetic gray water inhibits amoeba encystation and alters expression of Legionella pneumophila virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Buse, Helen Y; Lu, Jingrang; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Water conservation efforts have focused on gray water (GW) usage, especially for applications that do not require potable water quality. However, there is a need to better understand environmental pathogens and their free-living amoeba (FLA) hosts within GW, given their growth potential in stored gray water. Using synthetic gray water (sGW) we examined three strains of the water-based pathogen Legionella pneumophila and its FLA hosts Acanthamoeba polyphaga, A. castellanii, and Vermamoeba vermiformis. Exposure to sGW for 72 h resulted in significant inhibition (P < 0.0001) of amoebal encystation versus control-treated cells, with the following percentages of cysts in sGW versus controls: A. polyphaga (0.6 versus 6%), A. castellanii (2 versus 62%), and V. vermiformis (1 versus 92%), suggesting sGW induced maintenance of the actively feeding trophozoite form. During sGW exposure, L. pneumophila culturability decreased as early as 5 h (1.3 to 2.9 log10 CFU, P < 0.001) compared to controls (Δ0 to 0.1 log10 CFU) with flow cytometric analysis revealing immediate changes in membrane permeability. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR was performed on total RNA isolated from L. pneumophila cells at 0 to 48 h after sGW incubation, and genes associated with virulence (gacA, lirR, csrA, pla, and sidF), the type IV secretion system (lvrB and lvrE), and metabolism (ccmF and lolA) were all shown to be differentially expressed. These results suggest that conditions within GW may promote interactions between water-based pathogens and FLA hosts, through amoebal encystment inhibition and alteration of bacterial gene expression, thus warranting further exploration into FLA and L. pneumophila behavior in GW systems.

  12. Detection of Legionella pneumophila in environmental water samples using a fluorescein conjugated monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Makin, T.; Hart, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    Sixty-three environmental water samples from various sources were examined for the presence of Legionella pneumophila with a commercially available direct fluorescent monoclonal antibody (GS), an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) and culture. GS detected L. pneumophila in 94% and 100% of environmental water samples which were culture and IFAT positive for L. pneumophila, respectively. IFAT detected 69% of L. pneumophila culture positive samples. Cultures of L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 12, 14 and non-L. pneumophila bacteria which may be found in water, and bacteria containing non-specific binding proteins, were stained by GS and IFAT. GS identified all serogroups of L. pneumophila and did not cross react with any non-L. pneumophila bacteria. L. pneumophila in environmental samples was easy to detect against a clear dark background when stained with GS. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2673821

  13. Amoebae and Legionella pneumophila in saline environments.

    PubMed

    Gast, Rebecca J; Moran, Dawn M; Dennett, Mark R; Wurtsbaugh, Wayne A; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A

    2011-03-01

    Amoeboid protists that harbor bacterial pathogens are of significant interest as potential reservoirs of disease-causing organisms in the environment, but little is known about them in marine and other saline environments. We enriched amoeba cultures from sediments from four sites in the New England estuarine system of Mt. Hope Bay, Massachusetts and from sediments from six sites in the Great Salt Lake, Utah. Cultures of amoebae were enriched using both minimal- and non-nutrient agar plates, made with fresh water, brackish water or saltwater. Recovered amoeba cultures were assayed for the presence of Legionella species using nested polymerase chain reactions (PCR) and primers specific for the genus. Positive samples were then screened with nested amplification using primers specific for the macrophage infectivity potentiator surface protein (mip) gene from L. pneumophila. Forty-eight percent (185 out of 388) of isolated amoeba cultures were positive for the presence of Legionella species. Legionella pneumophila was detected by PCR in 4% of the amoeba cultures (17 out of 388), and most of these amoebae were growing on marine media. Our results show that amoebae capable of growing in saline environments may harbor not only a diverse collection of Legionella species, but also species potentially pathogenic to humans.

  14. Legionella pneumophila Effector LpdA Is a Palmitoylated Phospholipase D Virulence Factor.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gunnar N; Aurass, Philipp; Oates, Clare V; Tate, Edward W; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Flieger, Antje; Frankel, Gad

    2015-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a bacterial pathogen that thrives in alveolar macrophages, causing a severe pneumonia. The virulence of L. pneumophila depends on its Dot/Icm type IV secretion system (T4SS), which delivers more than 300 effector proteins into the host, where they rewire cellular signaling to establish a replication-permissive niche, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Biogenesis of the LCV requires substantial redirection of vesicle trafficking and remodeling of intracellular membranes. In order to achieve this, several T4SS effectors target regulators of membrane trafficking, while others resemble lipases. Here, we characterized LpdA, a phospholipase D effector, which was previously proposed to modulate the lipid composition of the LCV. We found that ectopically expressed LpdA was targeted to the plasma membrane and Rab4- and Rab14-containing vesicles. Subcellular targeting of LpdA required a C-terminal motif, which is posttranslationally modified by S-palmitoylation. Substrate specificity assays showed that LpdA hydrolyzed phosphatidylinositol, -inositol-3- and -4-phosphate, and phosphatidylglycerol to phosphatidic acid (PA) in vitro. In HeLa cells, LpdA generated PA at vesicles and the plasma membrane. Imaging of different phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) and organelle markers revealed that while LpdA did not impact on membrane association of various PIP probes, it triggered fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Importantly, although LpdA is translocated inefficiently into cultured cells, an L. pneumophila ΔlpdA mutant displayed reduced replication in murine lungs, suggesting that it is a virulence factor contributing to L. pneumophila infection in vivo.

  15. VBNC Legionella pneumophila cells are still able to produce virulence proteins.

    PubMed

    Alleron, Laëtitia; Khemiri, Arbia; Koubar, Mohamad; Lacombe, Christian; Coquet, Laurent; Cosette, Pascal; Jouenne, Thierry; Frere, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the agent responsible for legionellosis. Numerous bacteria, including L. pneumophila, can enter into a viable but not culturable (VBNC) state under unfavorable environmental conditions. In this state, cells are unable to form colonies on standard medium but are still alive. Here we show that VBNC L. pneumophila cells, obtained by monochloramine treatment, were still able to synthesize proteins, some of which are involved in virulence. Protein synthesis was measured using (35)S-labeling and the proteomes of VBNC and culturable cells then compared. This analysis allowed the identification of nine proteins that were accumulated in the VBNC state. Among them, four were involved in virulence, i.e., the macrophage infectivity potentiator protein, the hypothetical protein lpl2247, the ClpP protease proteolytic subunit and the 27 kDa outer membrane protein. Others, i.e., the enoyl reductase, the electron transfer flavoprotein (alpha and beta subunits), the 50S ribosomal proteins (L1 and L25) are involved in metabolic and energy production pathways. However, resuscitation experiments performed with Acanthamoeba castellanii failed, suggesting that the accumulation of virulence factors by VBNC cells is not sufficient to maintain their virulence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of biofilm in protection of the replicative form of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Di Cesare, Andrea; Sabatini, Luigia; Chessa, Elisa; Sisti, Davide; Rocchi, Marco; Citterio, Barbara

    2014-12-01

    The dual nature of Legionella pneumophila enables its survival in free and intracellular environments and underpins its infection and spread mechanisms. Experiments using bacterial cultures and improved RTqPCR protocols were devised to gain fresh insights into the role of biofilm in protecting the replicative form of L. pneumophila. mip gene expression was used as a marker of virulence in sessile (biofilm-bound) and planktonic (free-floating) cells of L. pneumophila serotype 1 ATCC 33152. The ratio of mip gene expression to transcriptionally active Legionella cells increased both in sessile and free-floating cells demonstrating an up-regulation of mip gene under nutrient depletion. However, a different trend was observed between the two forms, in planktonic cells the mip gene expression/transcriptionally active Legionella cells increased until the end of the experiment, while in the biofilm such increase was observed at the end of the experiment. These findings suggest a possible association between the switch to the transmissive phase of Legionella and a mip up-regulation and a role for biofilm in preserving Legionella cells in replicative form. Moreover, it has been shown that improved RTqPCR protocols are valuable tools to explore bacterial virulence.

  17. Protozoa and human macrophages infection by Legionella pneumophila environmental strains belonging to different serogroups.

    PubMed

    Messi, Patrizia; Patrizia, Messi; Bargellini, Annalisa; Annalisa, Bargellini; Anacarso, Immacolata; Immacolata, Anacarso; Marchesi, Isabella; Isabella, Marchesi; de Niederhäusern, Simona; Bondi, Moreno; Moreno, Bondi

    2013-02-01

    Three Legionella pneumophila strains isolated from municipal hot tap water during a multicentric Italian survey and belonging to serogroups 1, 6, 9 and the reference strain Philadelphia-1 were studied to determine the intracellular replication capability and the cytopathogenicity in human monocyte cell line U937 and in an Acanthamoeba polyphaga strain. Our results show that both serogroups 1 and Philadelphia-1 were able to multiply into macrophages inducing cytopathogenicity, while serogroup 6 and ever more serogroup 9 were less efficient in leading to death of the infected macrophages. Both serogroups 1 and 6 displayed a quite good capability of intracellular replication in A. polyphaga, although serogroup 1 was less cytopathogenic than serogroup 6. Serogroup 9, like Philadelphia-1 strain, showed a reduced efficiency of infection and replication and a low cytopathogenicity towards the protozoan. Our study suggests that bacterial pathogenesis is linked to the difference in the virulence expression of L. pneumophila serogroups in both hosts, as demonstrated by the fact that only L. pneumophila serogroup 1 shows the contextual expression of the two virulence traits. Serogroup 6 proves to be a good candidate as pathogen since it shows a good capacity for intracellular replication in protozoan.

  18. The alternative sigma factor sigma28 of Legionella pneumophila restores flagellation and motility to an Escherichia coli fliA mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Heuner, K; Hacker, J; Brand, B C

    1997-01-01

    Gene expression in Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of Legionnaires' disease, can be controlled by alternative forms of RNA polymerase programmed by distinct sigma factors. To understand the regulation of L. pneumophila flagellin expression, we cloned the sigma factor (FliA) of RNA polymerase responsible for the transcription of the flagellin gene, flaA. FliA is a member of the sigma28 class of alternative sigma factors identified in several bacterial genera. The gene fliA has been isolated from an expression library of L. pneumophila isolate Corby in Escherichia coli K-12. This library was transformed into a fliA mutant of E. coli K-12 containing a plasmid carrying the L. pneumophila-specific flaA promoter fused to the reporter gene luxAB. Screening the obtained transformants for luciferase activity, we isolated the major part of the fliA gene on a 1.64-kb fragment. This fragment was sequenced and used for reverse PCR in order to recover the complete fliA gene. The resulting 1.03-kb fragment was shown to contain the entire fliA gene. L. pneumophila FliA has 55 and 43% amino acid identity with the homologous sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli. Furthermore, the L. pneumophila fliA gene was able to restore the flagellation and the motility defect of an E. coli fliA mutant. This result suggests that the L. pneumophila sigma28 protein can bind to the E. coli core RNA polymerase to direct transcription initiation from the flaA-specific promoter. PMID:8981975

  19. Comparison of liquid growth media for Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, A; Rolfe, R D; Edelstein, P H; Finegold, S M

    1981-01-01

    Ten liquid media were compared under standard conditions for their ability to support the growth of Legionella pneumophila. Modified gonococcal-ferric cysteine broth (without sodium chloride) supplemented with 1% yeast extract yielded the best overall growth of the one strain of L. pneumophila examined. Growth rates were independent of pH changes which occurred during incubation. The growth rates of 10 different strains of L.pneumophila were compared in this medium. There appeared to be little difference in the growth rates of strains passaged frequently or infrequently, or between environmental and clinical isolates. Moderate aeration resulted in a faster growth rate and in approximately a 1 log10 higher final cell concentration as compared to a static broth culture. These experiments demonstrate that there are moderate to marked differences among the various media described in the literature and that no liquid medium yet developed supports rapid growth of L. pneumophila incubated without shaking. PMID:7037831

  20. First isolation of Legionella pneumophila in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Wahala, W M; Wickramasinghe, R S

    2000-12-01

    To determine the presence of legionellae and species composition of the genus Legionella in Sri Lankan hotel cooling towers, and to determine the previous exposure of hotel workers to Legionella pneumophila. Collection of water samples from 16 cooling towers of air conditioning plants from 7 representative hotels, and blood samples from hotel workers. Department of Bacteriology, Medical Research Institute, Colombo 8. Water samples from 4 (57.4%) hotels selected were positive for legionellae. Five (38.4%) selected cooling towers yielded legionellae with viable counts ranging from 1 to 5 colony forming units (CFU)/ml. 93.7% of the isolates were Legionella pneumophila. Only one hotel worker had significant antibody levels denoting past infection to Legionella pneumophila. Legionella does occur in the Sri Lankan hotel environment and Legionella pneumophila appears to be the most common species.

  1. Effects of three oxidizing biocides on Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1

    SciTech Connect

    Domingue, E.L.; Tyndall, R.L.; Mayberry, W.R.; Pancorbo, O.C.

    1988-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine the bactericidal effects of ozone and hydrogen peroxide relative to that of free chlorine on Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. In laboratory batch-type experiments, organisms seeded at various densities were exposed to different concentrations of these biocides in demand-free buffers. Bactericidal effects were measured by determining the ability of L. pneumophila to grow on buffered charcoal-yeast extract agar supplemented with ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate. Ozone was the most potent of the three biocide, with a greater than 99% kill of L. pneumophila occurring during a 5-min exposure to 0.10 to 0.30 ..mu..g of O/sub 3/ per ml. The bactericidal action of O/sub 3/ was not markedly affected by changes in pH or temperature. Concentrations of 0.30 and 0.40 /sup +/g of free chlorine per ml killed 99% of the L. pneumophila after 30- and 5-min exposures, respectively. A 30-min exposure to 1000 ..mu..g of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ per ml was required to effect a 99% reduction of the viable L. pneumophila population. However, no viable L. pneumophila could be detected after a 24-h exposure to 100 or 300 ..mu..g of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ per ml. Attempts were made to correlate the biocidal effects of O/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ with the oxidation of L. pneumophila fatty acids. These tests indicated that certain biocidal concentrations of O/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ resulted in a loss or severe reduction of L. pneumophila unsaturated fatty acids.

  2. Inactivation of Legionella pneumophila by hypochlorite and an organic chloramine.

    PubMed Central

    Swango, L J; Wilt, G R; Killen, A D; Williams, D E; Worley, S D

    1987-01-01

    The susceptibility of a strain of Legionella pneumophila to disinfection by an organic halamine, free chlorine, and a mixture of the organic halamine and free chlorine was assessed. The organic halamine was found to have superior stability in solution and to exhibit adequate disinfectant potential over a period of 1 month of repeated reinoculations of fresh bacteria. The combined halamine exhibited great potential for use in maintaining closed-cycle cooling water systems free of L. pneumophila. PMID:3435150

  3. Environmental surveillance of Legionella pneumophila in two Italian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tesauro, Marina; Bianchi, Annalisa; Consonni, Michela; Pregliasco, Fabrizio; Galli, Maria Gabriella

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most effective disinfection protocol to reduce the presence of Legionella pneumophila in the water system of two Italian hospitals. From 2004 to 2009, 271 samplings of hot water were carried out in 11 hospital units to detect the presence of L. pneumophila. Additionally, water samples collected from one boiler outlet and the hot water recirculation were tested. From 2004 to 2009, L. pneumophila was present in 37% of the samples. Of these, 68.3% and 18.8% were positive for serogroups 2-14 and 1, respectively. Furthermore, 12.9% of the samples were positive for both serogroups. Finally, a maximal count of 10(4) CFU/L was measured in the most distal sites. To reduce L. pneumophila colonization, a two-year long hyperchlorination (2004-2006) was carried out. Moreover, from June 2005 until now, continuous maintenance of boilers and tanks, substitution of the shower heads and increase of the boiler outlet temperature to 60 °C were performed. All these treatments led to a marked reduction of L. pneumophila colonization in the short but not in the medium-long term. Only the use of chlorine dioxide led, after four years, to a reduction of the loads of L. pneumophila to values below 100 CFU/L. However, in the distal sites a persistent degree of colonization (maximum value 700 CFU/L, average 600 CFU/L) was observed probably due to the presence of L. pneumophila in the stagnant water in dead legs. In conclusion, data show that long-term chlorination of hot water sources together with carefully aimed maintenance of water pipes can lead to an effective reduction of L. pneumophila concentration in hospital water systems.

  4. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from hospital water systems in Victoria.

    PubMed

    Swann, R A; Peel, M M; Rouch, G J

    1982-09-04

    A survey of water symptoms in 12 Victorian hospitals was undertaken to establish the prevalence of Legionella pneumophila in buildings not known to be associated with cases of Legionnaires' disease. Samples of hot, cold and shower water were taken, together with water from cooling towers, and isolation was attempted by guinea-pig inoculation. Legionella pneumophila was not isolated from any of the hot, cold or shower samples, but six strains were isolated from five of the cooling towers sampled.

  5. Effect of bacterial interference on biofilm development by Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Guerrieri, Elisa; Bondi, Moreno; Sabia, Carla; de Niederhäusern, Simona; Borella, Paola; Messi, Patrizia

    2008-12-01

    In the ecology of Legionella pneumophila a crucial role may be played by its relationship with the natural flora; thus we investigated the interactions between Legionella and other aquatic bacteria, particularly within biofilms. Among 80 aquatic bacteria screened for the production of bacteriocin-like substances (BLSs), 66.2% of them were active against L. pneumophila. The possible effect of some of these aquatic bacteria on the development and stability of L. pneumophila biofilms was studied. Pseudomonas fluorescens, the best BLS producer, showed the greatest negative effect on biofilm formation and strongly enhanced the detachment of Legionella. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Pseudomonas putida, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, although producing BLSs at different levels, were less active in the biofilm experiments. Acinetobacter lwoffii did not produce any antagonistic compound and was the only one able to strongly enhance L. pneumophila biofilm. Our results highlight that BLS production may contribute to determining the fate of L. pneumophila within ecological niches. The interactions observed in this study are important features of L. pneumophila ecology, which knowledge may lead to more effective measures to control the persistence of the germ in the environment.

  6. Innate Immunity to Intracellular Pathogens: Lessons Learned from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sunny

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have the remarkable ability to manipulate host cell processes in order to establish a replicative niche within the host cell. In response, the host can initiate immune defenses that lead to the eventual restriction and clearance of intracellular infection. The bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila has evolved elaborate virulence mechanisms that allow for its survival inside protozoa within a specialized membrane-bound organelle. These strategies also enable L. pneumophila to survive and replicate within alveolar macrophages, and can result in the severe pneumonia Legionnaires' disease. Essential to L. pneumophila's intracellular lifestyle is a specialized type IV secretion system, termed Dot/Icm, that translocates bacterial effector proteins into host cells. The ease with which L. pneumophila can be genetically manipulated has facilitated the comparison of host responses to virulent and isogenic avirulent mutants lacking a functional Dot/Icm system. This has made L. pneumophila an excellent model for understanding how the host discriminates between pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria and for systematically dissecting host defense mechanisms against intracellular pathogens. In this chapter, I discuss a few examples demonstrating how the study of immune responses triggered specifically by the L. pneumophila type IV secretion system has provided unique insight into our understanding of host immunity against intracellular bacterial pathogens.

  7. High resolution structural evidence suggests the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum forms microdomains with Acidic Stores (lysosomes) in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Aston, Daniel; Capel, Rebecca A.; Ford, Kerrie L.; Christian, Helen C.; Mirams, Gary R.; Rog-Zielinska, Eva A.; Kohl, Peter; Galione, Antony; Burton, Rebecca A. B.; Terrar, Derek A.

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP) stimulates calcium release from acidic stores such as lysosomes and is a highly potent calcium-mobilising second messenger. NAADP plays an important role in calcium signalling in the heart under basal conditions and following β-adrenergic stress. Nevertheless, the spatial interaction of acidic stores with other parts of the calcium signalling apparatus in cardiac myocytes is unknown. We present evidence that lysosomes are intimately associated with the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in ventricular myocytes; a median separation of 20 nm in 2D electron microscopy and 3.3 nm in 3D electron tomography indicates a genuine signalling microdomain between these organelles. Fourier analysis of immunolabelled lysosomes suggests a sarcomeric pattern (dominant wavelength 1.80 μm). Furthermore, we show that lysosomes form close associations with mitochondria (median separation 6.2 nm in 3D studies) which may provide a basis for the recently-discovered role of NAADP in reperfusion-induced cell death. The trigger hypothesis for NAADP action proposes that calcium release from acidic stores subsequently acts to enhance calcium release from the SR. This work provides structural evidence in cardiac myocytes to indicate the formation of microdomains between acidic and SR calcium stores, supporting emerging interpretations of NAADP physiology and pharmacology in heart. PMID:28094777

  8. The effects of alcohol on gastrointestinal tract, liver and pancreas: evidence-based suggestions for clinical management.

    PubMed

    Federico, A; Cotticelli, G; Festi, D; Schiumerini, R; Addolorato, G; Ferrulli, A; Merli, M; Lucidi, C; Milani, S; Panella, C; Domenico, M; Vantini, I; Benini, L; Ubaldi, E; Romano, M; Loguercio, C

    2015-05-01

    Alcohol has a direct impact on the digestive system due to its contact with mucosal lining and interference with digestive functions. Various diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, including tumors, may be related to an excess of alcohol intake and the relationship between alcohol abuse and hepatic and pancreatic damage is well established. According to WHO, alcohol and alcohol-related diseases represent a major health problem and will probably continue to do so in the foreseeable future. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge on clinically relevant alcohol-related problems in order to provide practicing physicians with evidence-based general suggestions which might help in the management of alcohol-related gastrointestinal disorders. A thorough clinical history together with a number of questionnaires are essential for detecting alcohol dependence or abuse. Biochemical tests (nonspecific and specific) have been considered to be less sensitive than questionnaires in screening for alcohol abuse, but they may be useful in identifying relapses. Protracted behavior modification, cognitive behavioral therapy, psychological counseling, and mutual support groups have been considered the most effective long-term treatments. Several drugs have been developed that are able to interfere with the neurotransmitters involved in craving mechanisms, and we summarize the evidence of their efficacy to increase abstinence and to prevent relapse.

  9. 2-Deoxy-D-glucose inhibits intracellular multiplication and promotes intracellular killing of Legionella pneumophila in A/J mouse macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, M; Yoshida, S; Mizuguchi, Y

    1994-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila can grow intracellularly in A/J mouse macrophages. 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2dG) (0.1, 1, and 10 mM) inhibited intracellular multiplication and promoted intracellular killing of L. pneumophila dose dependently when it was added to the culture medium of macrophage monolayers, whereas it did not inhibit the bacterial growth in buffered yeast extract broth, which was used for an L. pneumophila culture. The effect of 2dG was reversible because the surviving bacteria resumed intracellular multiplication after the washing away of 2dG from the culture. The effect of 2dG was also competitively inhibited by high concentrations of glucose. The inhibitory effect of 2dG was not attributed to the inhibition of bacterial phagocytosis by macrophages. Furthermore, sodium fluoride (0.1 and 1 mM), cycloheximide (0.1 and 1 microgram/ml), and tunicamycin (1, 2, and 5 micrograms/ml) did not promote the killing of L. pneumophila in macrophages, implying that the inhibitory effect of 2dG cannot be attributed to the inhibition of glycolysis, protein synthesis, and protein glycosylation in macrophages. We suggest that 2dG promotes intracellular killing of L. pneumophila by activating some novel killing mechanism of macrophages. PMID:8262638

  10. Macrophage-activating T-cell factor(s) produced in an early phase of Legionella pneumophila infection in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Y; Yoshida, S; Goto, Y; Mizuguchi, Y; Kuroiwa, A

    1989-01-01

    Protective immunity of guinea pigs against Legionella pneumophila was studied by infecting the animals with a sublethal dose (about 2 x 10(4) CFU) of the organism. The bacteria multiplied in the liver, spleen, and lungs up to day 4 after the intraperitoneal infection. The live bacteria in these organs decreased quickly thereafter and were eliminated by day 7. A delayed-type skin reaction and lymphoproliferation of spleen cells to Formalin-killed L. pneumophila were detected from days 5 and 6, respectively, after infection. Peritoneal macrophages obtained from guinea pigs infected 6 days previously inhibited the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. Antigen-stimulated spleen cell factor prepared from infected guinea pigs inhibited the intracellular growth of the organism in macrophages obtained from uninfected animals. Antigen-stimulated spleen cell factor prepared from spleen cells treated with anti-guinea pig T-cell monoclonal antibody did not inhibit growth. The activity of antigen-stimulated spleen cell factor was labile to pH 2 treatment, and the factor could not be absorbed by L. pneumophila antigen, suggesting that it contains gamma interferon. Our data show that T-cell-mediated immunity begins to work from an early period of infection with L. pneumophila in guinea pigs. PMID:2807531

  11. A bacterial protein promotes the recognition of the Legionella pneumophila vacuole by autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Khweek, Arwa Abu; Caution, Kyle; Akhter, Anwari; Abdulrahman, Basant A.; Tazi, Mia; Hassan, Hoda; Majumdar, Neal; Doran, Andrew; Guirado, Evelyn; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Shuman, Howard; Amer, Amal O.

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) is an intracellular bacterium of human alveolar macrophages that causes Legionnaires' disease. In contrast to humans, most inbred mouse strains are restrictive to L. pneumophila replication. We demonstrate that autophagy targets L. pneumophila vacuoles to lysosomes and that this process requires ubiquitination of L. pneumophila vacuoles and the subsequent binding of the autophagic adaptor p62/SQSTM1 to ubiquitinated vacuoles. The L. pneumophila legA9 encodes for an ankyrin-containing protein with unknown role. We show that the legA9 mutant is the first L. pneumophila mutant to replicate in wild-type (WT) mice and their bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs). Less legA9 mutant- containing vacuoles acquired ubiquitin labeling and p62/SQSTM1 staining, evading autophagy uptake and avoiding lysosomal fusion. Thus, we describe a bacterial protein that targets the L. pneumophila -containing vacuole for autophagy uptake. PMID:23420491

  12. Kame deltas provide evidence for a new glacial lake and suggest early glacial retreat from central Lower Michigan, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaetzl, Randall J.; Lepper, Kenneth; Thomas, Sarah E.; Grove, Leslie; Treiber, Emma; Farmer, Alison; Fillmore, Austin; Lee, Jordan; Dickerson, Bethany; Alme, Kayleigh

    2017-03-01

    In association with an undergraduate Honors Seminar at Michigan State University, we studied two small kame deltas in north-central Lower Michigan. These recently identified deltas provide clear evidence for a previously unknown proglacial lake (Glacial Lake Roscommon) in this large basin located in an interlobate upland. Our first goal was to document and characterize the geomorphology of these deltas. Because both deltas are tied to ice-contact ridges that mark the former position of the retreating ice margin within the lake, our second goal was to establish the age of one of the deltas, thereby constraining the timing of ice retreat in this part of Michigan, for which little information currently exists. Both deltas are composed of well-sorted fine and medium sands with little gravel, and have broad, nearly flat surfaces and comparatively steep fronts. Samples taken from the upper 1.5 m of the deltas show little spatial variation in texture, aside from a general fining toward their outer margins. Gullies on the outer margins of both deltas probably postdate the formation of the deltas proper; we suggest that they formed by runoff during a permafrost period, subsequent to lake drawdown. We named the ice lobe that once covered this area the Mackinac Lobe, because it had likely advanced into the region across the Mackinac Straits area. Five of six optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages from one of the deltas had minimal scatter and were within ± 1000 years of one another, with a mean age of 23.1 ± 0.4 ka. These ages suggest that the Mackinac Lobe had started to retreat from the region considerably earlier than previously thought, even while ice was near its maximum extent in Illinois and Indiana, and the remainder of Michigan was ice-covered. This early retreat, which appears to coincide with a short-lived warm period indicated from the Greenland ice core, formed an "opening" that was at least occasionally flooded. Thick and deep, fine-textured deposits

  13. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from hospital cooling towers in Johor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Abdul Samad, B H; Suhaili, M R; Baba, N; Rajasekaran, G

    2004-08-01

    Water-based cooling towers and their water supply at two hospitals in Johor were surveyed for the presence Legionella pneumophila. L. pneumophila were grown from 19 (76%) out of 25 collected water samples. One hospital cooling tower was contaminated with L. pneumophila serogroup 1.

  14. A note on the survival of Legionella pneumophila in stagnant tap water.

    PubMed

    Schofield, G M

    1985-10-01

    Tap water, from an experimental hot water system, containing a known virulent strain of Legionella pneumophila was stored in screw-capped bottles for 14 months. Viable counts showed survival of L. pneumophila and at least three other bacterial species. This reinforces the view that L. pneumophila can survive in stagnant water for relatively long periods of time.

  15. Rapid quantification method for Legionella pneumophila in surface water.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Anika; Torggler, Carmen; Elsässer, Dennis; Lück, Christian; Niessner, Reinhard; Seidel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    World-wide legionellosis outbreaks caused by evaporative cooling systems have shown that there is a need for rapid screening methods for Legionella pneumophila in water. Antibody-based methods for the quantification of L. pneumophila are rapid, non-laborious, and relatively cheap but not sensitive enough for establishment as a screening method for surface and drinking water. Therefore, preconcentration methods have to be applied in advance to reach the needed sensitivity. In a basic test, monolithic adsorption filtration (MAF) was used as primary preconcentration method that adsorbs L. pneumophila with high efficiency. Ten-liter water samples were concentrated in 10 min and further reduced to 1 mL by centrifugal ultrafiltration (CeUF). The quantification of L. pneumophila strains belonging to the monoclonal subtype Bellingham was performed via flow-based chemiluminescence sandwich microarray immunoassays (CL-SMIA) in 36 min. The whole analysis process takes 90 min. A polyclonal antibody (pAb) against L. pneumophila serogroup 1-12 and a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against L. pneumophila SG 1 strain Bellingham were immobilized on a microarray chip. Without preconcentration, the detection limit was 4.0 × 10(3) and 2.8 × 10(3) CFU/mL determined by pAb and mAb 10/6, respectively. For samples processed by MAF-CeUF prior to SMIA detection, the limit of detection (LOD) could be decreased to 8.7 CFU/mL and 0.39 CFU/mL, respectively. A recovery of 99.8 ± 15.9% was achieved for concentrations between 1-1000 CFU/mL. The established combined analytical method is sensitive for rapid screening of surface and drinking water to allow fast hygiene control of L. pneumophila.

  16. Hantaviruses in Finnish soricomorphs: evidence for two distinct hantaviruses carried by Sorex araneus suggesting ancient host-switch.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jiaxin; Sironen, Tarja; Voutilainen, Liina; Hepojoki, Satu; Niemimaa, Jukka; Isoviita, Veli-Matti; Vaheri, Antti; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli

    2014-10-01

    Hantaviruses are emerging viruses carried by rodents, soricomorphs (shrews and moles) and bats. In Finland, Puumala virus (PUUV) was for years the only hantavirus detected. In 2009, however, Seewis virus (SWSV) was reported from archival common shrew (Sorex araneus) samples collected in 1982 in Finland. To elucidate the diversity of hantaviruses in soricomorphs in Finland, 180 individuals were screened, representing seven species captured from 2001 to 2012: hantavirus RNA was screened using RT-PCR, and hantaviral antigen using immunoblotting with polyclonal antibodies raised against truncated SWSV nucleocapsid protein. The overall hantavirus RNA prevalence was 14% (26/180), antigen could be demonstrated in 9 of 20 SWSV RT-PCR positive common shrews. Genetic analyses revealed that four soricomorph-borne hantaviruses circulate in Finland, including Boginia virus (BOGV) in water shrew (Neomys fodiens) and Asikkala virus (ASIV) in pygmy shrew (Sorex minutus). Interestingly, on two study sites, common shrews harbored strains of two different hantaviruses: Seewis virus and a new distinct, genetically distant (identity 57% at amino acid level) virus (Altai-like virus) which clusters together with viruses in the basal phylogroup I of hantaviruses with 62-67% identity at amino acid level. This is the first evidence of coexistence of two clearly distinct hantavirus species circulating simultaneously in one host species population. The findings suggest an ancient host-switching event from a yet unknown host to S. araneus. In addition, phylogenetic analyses of partial S and M segment sequences showed that SWSV in Finland represents a unique genotype in Europe.

  17. The role of Legionella pneumophila-infected Hartmannella vermiformis as an infectious particle in a murine model of Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Brieland, J K; Fantone, J C; Remick, D G; LeGendre, M; McClain, M; Engleberg, N C

    1997-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a bacterial parasite of many species of freshwater protozoa and occasionally an intracellular pathogen of humans. While protozoa are known to play a key role in the persistence of L. pneumophila in the environment, there has been limited research addressing the potential role of L. pneumophila-infected protozoa in the pathogenesis of human infection. In this report, the potential role of an L. pneumophila-infected amoeba as an infectious particle in replicative L. pneumophila lung infection was investigated in vivo with the amoeba Hartmannella vermiformis, a natural reservoir of L. pneumophila in the environment. L. pneumophila-infected H. vermiformis organisms were prepared by coculture of the amoebae and virulent L. pneumophila cells in vitro. A/J mice, which are susceptible to replicative L. pneumophila lung infection, were subsequently inoculated intratracheally with L. pneumophila-infected H. vermiformis organisms (10(6) amoebae containing 10(5) bacteria), and intrapulmonary growth of the bacteria was assessed. A/J mice inoculated intratracheally with L. pneumophila-infected H. vermiformis organisms developed replicative L. pneumophila lung infections. Furthermore, L. pneumophila-infected H. vermiformis organisms were more pathogenic than an equivalent number of bacteria or a coinoculum of L. pneumophila cells and uninfected amoebae. These results demonstrate that L. pneumophila-infected amoebae are infectious particles in replicative L. pneumophila infections in vivo and support the hypothesis that inhaled protozoa may serve as cofactors in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disease induced by inhaled respiratory pathogens. PMID:9393834

  18. The role of Legionella pneumophila-infected Hartmannella vermiformis as an infectious particle in a murine model of Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Brieland, J K; Fantone, J C; Remick, D G; LeGendre, M; McClain, M; Engleberg, N C

    1997-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a bacterial parasite of many species of freshwater protozoa and occasionally an intracellular pathogen of humans. While protozoa are known to play a key role in the persistence of L. pneumophila in the environment, there has been limited research addressing the potential role of L. pneumophila-infected protozoa in the pathogenesis of human infection. In this report, the potential role of an L. pneumophila-infected amoeba as an infectious particle in replicative L. pneumophila lung infection was investigated in vivo with the amoeba Hartmannella vermiformis, a natural reservoir of L. pneumophila in the environment. L. pneumophila-infected H. vermiformis organisms were prepared by coculture of the amoebae and virulent L. pneumophila cells in vitro. A/J mice, which are susceptible to replicative L. pneumophila lung infection, were subsequently inoculated intratracheally with L. pneumophila-infected H. vermiformis organisms (10(6) amoebae containing 10(5) bacteria), and intrapulmonary growth of the bacteria was assessed. A/J mice inoculated intratracheally with L. pneumophila-infected H. vermiformis organisms developed replicative L. pneumophila lung infections. Furthermore, L. pneumophila-infected H. vermiformis organisms were more pathogenic than an equivalent number of bacteria or a coinoculum of L. pneumophila cells and uninfected amoebae. These results demonstrate that L. pneumophila-infected amoebae are infectious particles in replicative L. pneumophila infections in vivo and support the hypothesis that inhaled protozoa may serve as cofactors in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disease induced by inhaled respiratory pathogens.

  19. Lgt: a family of cytotoxic glucosyltransferases produced by Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Belyi, Yury; Tabakova, Irina; Stahl, Michael; Aktories, Klaus

    2008-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular pathogen responsible for severe lung disease in humans, known as legionellosis or Legionnaires' disease. Previously, we reported on the approximately 60-kDa glucosyltransferase (Lgt1) from Legionella pneumophila, which modified eukaryotic elongation factor 1A. In the present study, using L. pneumophila Philadelphia-1, Lens, Paris, and Corby genome databases, we identified several genes coding for proteins with considerable sequence homology to Lgt1. These new enzymes form three subfamilies, termed Lgt1 to -3, glucosylate mammalian elongation factor eEF1A at serine-53, inhibit its activity, and subsequently kill target eukaryotic cells. Expression studies on L. pneumophila grown in broth medium or in Acanthamoeba castellanii revealed that production of Lgt1 was maximal at stationary phase of broth culture or during the late phase of Legionella-host cell interaction, respectively. In contrast, synthesis of Lgt3 peaked during the lag phase of liquid culture and at early steps of bacterium-amoeba interaction. Thus, the data indicate that members of the L. pneumophila glucosyltransferase family are differentially regulated, affect protein synthesis of host cells, and represent potential virulence factors of Legionella.

  20. Multiplication of Legionella pneumophila in unsterilized tap water.

    PubMed Central

    Yee, R B; Wadowsky, R M

    1982-01-01

    Naturally occurring Legionella pneumophila, an environmental isolate which had not been grown on artificial medium, was tested for the ability to multiply in tap water. A showerhead containing L. pneumophila and non-Legionellaceae bacteria was immersed in nonsterile tap water supplying this fixture. Also L. pneumophila and non-Legionellaceae bacteria were sedimented from tap water from a surgical intensive care unit. This bacterial suspension was inoculated into tap water from our laboratory. The legionellae in both suspensions multiplied in the tap water at 32, 37, and 42 degrees C. The non-Legionellaceae bacteria multiplied at 25, 32, and 37 degrees C. A water sample which was collected from the bottom of a hot water tank was found to contain L. pneumophila and non-Legionellaceae bacteria. These legionellae also multiplied when the water sample was incubated at 37 degrees C. These results indicate that L. pneumophila may multiply in warm water environments such as hot water plumbing fixtures, hot water tanks, and cooling towers. PMID:7103487

  1. Legionella pneumophila Seropositivity-Associated Factors in Latvian Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Valciņa, Olga; Pūle, Daina; Lucenko, Irina; Krastiņa, Dita; Šteingolde, Žanete; Krūmiņa, Angelika; Bērziņš, Aivars

    2015-01-01

    Continuous environmental exposure of humans to Legionella may induce immune responses and generation of antibodies. The aim of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of Legionella pneumophila serogroups (SG) 1–6 in the general healthy population and identify the associated host-related and environmental risk factors. L. pneumophila SG 1–6 seroprevalence among a total of 2007 blood samples collected from healthy donors was 4.8%. Seroprevalence was higher in women (5.9%) than men (3.3%) and in areas with a larger number of inhabitants, ranging from 3.5% in rural regions to 6.8% in the capital, Riga. Blood samples from inhabitants of apartment buildings tested positive for L. pneumophila in more cases (5.8%) compared to those from inhabitants of single-family homes (2.7%). Residents of buildings with a municipal hot water supply system were more likely to be seropositive for L. pneumophila (OR = 3.16, 95% CI 1.26–7.91). Previous episodes of fever were additionally identified as a risk factor (OR = 2.42, 95% CI 1.43–4.1). In conclusion, centralized hot water supply, female gender and previous episodes of fever were determined as the main factors associated with L. pneumophila seropositivity in our study population. PMID:26703696

  2. Susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to chlorine in tap water.

    PubMed

    Kuchta, J M; States, S J; McNamara, A M; Wadowsky, R M; Yee, R B

    1983-11-01

    A study was conducted to compare the susceptibility of legionellae and coliforms to disinfection by chlorine. The chlorine residuals used were similar to concentrations that might be found in the distribution systems of large public potable water supplies. The effects of various chlorine concentrations, temperatures, and pH levels were considered. A number of different Legionella strains, both environmental and clinical, were tested. The results indicate that legionellae are much more resistant to chlorine than are coliform bacteria. At 21 degrees C, pH 7.6, and 0.1 mg of free chlorine residual per liter, a 99% kill of L. pneumophila was achieved within 40 min, compared with less than 1 min for Escherichia coli. The observed resistance is enhanced as conditions for disinfection become less optimal. The required contact time for the removal of L. pneumophilia was twice as long at 4 degrees C than it was at 21 degrees C. These data suggest that legionellae can survive low levels of chlorine for relatively long periods of time.

  3. High-Throughput Intracellular Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that causes a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Notably, in the human host, the organism is believed to replicate solely within an intracellular compartment, predominantly within pulmonary macrophages. Consequently, successful therapy is predicated on antimicrobials penetrating into this intracellular growth niche. However, standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods test solely for extracellular growth inhibition. Here, we make use of a high-throughput assay to characterize intracellular growth inhibition activity of known antimicrobials. For select antimicrobials, high-resolution dose-response analysis was then performed to characterize and compare activity levels in both macrophage infection and axenic growth assays. Results support the superiority of several classes of nonpolar antimicrobials in abrogating intracellular growth. Importantly, our assay results show excellent correlations with prior clinical observations of antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, we also show the applicability of high-throughput automation to two- and three-dimensional synergy testing. High-resolution isocontour isobolograms provide in vitro support for specific combination antimicrobial therapy. Taken together, findings suggest that high-throughput screening technology may be successfully applied to identify and characterize antimicrobials that target bacterial pathogens that make use of an intracellular growth niche. PMID:26392509

  4. Usefulness of real-time PCR as a complementary tool to the monitoring of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila by culture in industrial cooling systems.

    PubMed

    Touron-Bodilis, A; Pougnard, C; Frenkiel-Lebossé, H; Hallier-Soulier, S

    2011-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of quantification by real-time PCR as a management tool to monitor concentrations of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila in industrial cooling systems and its ability to anticipate culture trends by the French standard method (AFNOR T90-431). Quantifications of Legionella bacteria were achieved by both methods on samples from nine cooling systems with different water qualities. Proportion of positive samples for L. pneumophila quantified by PCR was clearly lower in deionized or river waters submitted to a biocide treatment than in raw river waters, while positive samples for Legionella spp. were quantified for almost all the samples. For some samples containing PCR inhibitors, high quantification limits (up to 4·80 × 10(5) GU l(-1) ) did not allow us to quantify L. pneumophila, when they were quantified by culture. Finally, the monitoring of concentrations of L. pneumophila by both methods showed similar trends for 57-100% of the samples. These results suggest that, if some methodological steps designed to reduce inhibitory problems and thus decrease the quantification limits, could be developed to quantify Legionella in complex waters, the real-time PCR could be a valuable complementary tool to monitor the evolution of L. pneumophila concentrations. This study shows the possibility of using real-time PCR to monitor L. pneumophila proliferations in cooling systems and the importance to adapt nucleic acid extraction and purification protocols to raw waters. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology. No claim to French Government works.

  5. Activation of NLRC4 by flagellated bacteria triggers caspase-1-dependent and -independent responses to restrict Legionella pneumophila replication in macrophages and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo S F; Morgantetti, Giuliano F; Massis, Liliana M; Horta, Catarina V; Hori, Juliana I; Zamboni, Dario S

    2011-12-15

    Although NLRC4/IPAF activation by flagellin has been extensively investigated, the downstream signaling pathways and the mechanisms responsible for infection clearance remain unclear. In this study, we used mice deficient for the inflammasome components in addition to wild-type (WT) Legionella pneumophila or bacteria deficient for flagellin (flaA) or motility (fliI) to assess the pathways responsible for NLRC4-dependent growth restriction in vivo and ex vivo. By comparing infections with WT L. pneumophila, fliI, and flaA, we found that flagellin and motility are important for the colonization of the protozoan host Acanthamoeba castellanii. However, in macrophages and mammalian lungs, flagellin expression abrogated bacterial replication. The flagellin-mediated growth restriction was dependent on NLRC4, and although it was recently demonstrated that NLRC4 is able to recognize bacteria independent of flagellin, we found that the NLRC4-dependent restriction of L. pneumophila multiplication was fully dependent on flagellin. By examining infected caspase-1(-/-) mice and macrophages with flaA, fliI, and WT L. pneumophila, we could detect greater replication of flaA, which suggests that caspase-1 only partially accounted for flagellin-dependent growth restriction. Conversely, WT L. pneumophila multiplied better in macrophages and mice deficient for NLRC4 compared with that in macrophages and mice deficient for caspase-1, supporting the existence of a novel caspase-1-independent response downstream of NLRC4. This response operated early after macrophage infection and accounted for the restriction of bacterial replication within bacteria-containing vacuoles. Collectively, our data indicate that flagellin is required for NLRC4-dependent responses to L. pneumophila and that NLRC4 triggers caspase-1-dependent and -independent responses for bacterial growth restriction in macrophages and in vivo.

  6. Preliminary report on the pathogenicity of Legionella pneumophila for freshwater and soil amoebae.

    PubMed Central

    Rowbotham, T J

    1980-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative organism of Legionnaires' disease, is pathogenic for free living, ubiquitous, freshwater, and soil amoebae of the genera Acanthamoeba and Naegleria. Some species support the growth of strains from serogroups 1 to 6, others only strains from certain serogroups. Initial studies with seeded material indicate that amoebal enrichment could be utilised for the isolation of legionellae from clinical specimens and natural habitats. It is suggested that a vacuole, or amoeba, full of legionellae, rather than free legionellae, could be the infective particle for man. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7451664

  7. Intrapulmonary Hartmannella vermiformis: a potential niche for Legionella pneumophila replication in a murine model of legionellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Brieland, J; McClain, M; LeGendre, M; Engleberg, C

    1997-01-01

    The potential role of inhaled protozoa as a niche for intrapulmonary replication of Legionella pneumophila was investigated in vivo with mutant strains of L. pneumophila which have reduced virulence for the amoeba Hartmannella vermiformis. L. pneumophila AA488 and AA502 were derived from wild-type strain AA100 after transposon mutagenesis. These mutants have reduced virulence for H. vermiformis but are fully virulent for mononuclear phagocytic cells. A/J mice, which are susceptible to replicative L. pneumophila lung infections, were inoculated intratracheally with L. pneumophila AA100, AA488, or AA502 (10[6] bacteria per mouse) or were coinoculated with one of the L. pneumophila strains (10[6] bacteria per mouse) and uninfected H. vermiformis (10[6] amoebae per mouse). The effect of coinoculation with H. vermiformis on intrapulmonary growth of each L. pneumophila strain was subsequently assessed. In agreement with our previous studies, coinoculation with H. vermiformis significantly enhanced intrapulmonary growth of the parent L. pneumophila strain (AA100). In contrast, intrapulmonary growth of L. pneumophila AA488 or AA502 was not significantly enhanced by coinoculation of mice with H. vermiformis. These studies demonstrate that L. pneumophila virulence for amoebae is required for maximal intrapulmonary growth of the bacteria in mice coinoculated with H. vermiformis and support the hypothesis that inhaled amoebae may potentiate intrapulmonary growth of L. pneumophila by providing a niche for bacterial replication. PMID:9353084

  8. Biofilm-derived Legionella pneumophila evades the innate immune response in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Abu Khweek, Arwa; Fernández Dávila, Natalia S; Caution, Kyle; Akhter, Anwari; Abdulrahman, Basant A; Tazi, Mia; Hassan, Hoda; Novotny, Laura A; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Amer, Amal O

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease, replicates in human alveolar macrophages to establish infection. There is no human-to-human transmission and the main source of infection is L. pneumophila biofilms established in air conditioners, water fountains, and hospital equipments. The biofilm structure provides protection to the organism from disinfectants and antibacterial agents. L. pneumophila infection in humans is characterized by a subtle initial immune response, giving time for the organism to establish infection before the patient succumbs to pneumonia. Planktonic L. pneumophila elicits a strong immune response in murine, but not in human macrophages enabling control of the infection. Interactions between planktonic L. pneumophila and murine or human macrophages have been studied for years, yet the interface between biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and macrophages has not been explored. Here, we demonstrate that biofilm-derived L. pneumophila replicates significantly more in murine macrophages than planktonic bacteria. In contrast to planktonic L. pneumophila, biofilm-derived L. pneumophila lacks flagellin expression, do not activate caspase-1 or -7 and trigger less cell death. In addition, while planktonic L. pneumophila is promptly delivered to lysosomes for degradation, most biofilm-derived bacteria were enclosed in a vacuole that did not fuse with lysosomes in murine macrophages. This study advances our understanding of the innate immune response to biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and closely reproduces the natural mode of infection in human.

  9. Biofilm-derived Legionella pneumophila evades the innate immune response in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Abu Khweek, Arwa; Fernández Dávila, Natalia S.; Caution, Kyle; Akhter, Anwari; Abdulrahman, Basant A.; Tazi, Mia; Hassan, Hoda; Novotny, Laura A.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Amer, Amal O.

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease, replicates in human alveolar macrophages to establish infection. There is no human-to-human transmission and the main source of infection is L. pneumophila biofilms established in air conditioners, water fountains, and hospital equipments. The biofilm structure provides protection to the organism from disinfectants and antibacterial agents. L. pneumophila infection in humans is characterized by a subtle initial immune response, giving time for the organism to establish infection before the patient succumbs to pneumonia. Planktonic L. pneumophila elicits a strong immune response in murine, but not in human macrophages enabling control of the infection. Interactions between planktonic L. pneumophila and murine or human macrophages have been studied for years, yet the interface between biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and macrophages has not been explored. Here, we demonstrate that biofilm-derived L. pneumophila replicates significantly more in murine macrophages than planktonic bacteria. In contrast to planktonic L. pneumophila, biofilm-derived L. pneumophila lacks flagellin expression, do not activate caspase-1 or -7 and trigger less cell death. In addition, while planktonic L. pneumophila is promptly delivered to lysosomes for degradation, most biofilm-derived bacteria were enclosed in a vacuole that did not fuse with lysosomes in murine macrophages. This study advances our understanding of the innate immune response to biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and closely reproduces the natural mode of infection in human. PMID:23750338

  10. Susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to three cooling tower microbicides.

    PubMed

    Grace, R D; Dewar, N E; Barnes, W G; Hodges, G R

    1981-01-01

    Investigation of epidemic outbreaks of Legionnaires disease by Center for Disease Control personnel has resulted in the isolation of Legionella pneumophila from water in the air-conditioning cooling towers or evaporative condensers at the site of the outbreak. It is suspected that improperly maintained open, recirculating water systems may play a role in the growth and dissemination of this pathogen. The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of three chemically different, commercially available, cooling tower microbicides against L. pneumophila. Using two in vitro test systems, a combination of N-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride and bis (tri-n-butyltin) oxide was found to kill L. pneumophila at a concentration 25 times less than the minimum recommended use concentration, whereas N-alkyl 1,3-propanediamine and methylene bis (thiocyanate) were active at concentrations equal to or greater than the concentrations recommended for use by the manufacturer.

  11. Susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to three cooling tower microbicides.

    PubMed Central

    Grace, R D; Dewar, N E; Barnes, W G; Hodges, G R

    1981-01-01

    Investigation of epidemic outbreaks of Legionnaires disease by Center for Disease Control personnel has resulted in the isolation of Legionella pneumophila from water in the air-conditioning cooling towers or evaporative condensers at the site of the outbreak. It is suspected that improperly maintained open, recirculating water systems may play a role in the growth and dissemination of this pathogen. The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of three chemically different, commercially available, cooling tower microbicides against L. pneumophila. Using two in vitro test systems, a combination of N-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride and bis (tri-n-butyltin) oxide was found to kill L. pneumophila at a concentration 25 times less than the minimum recommended use concentration, whereas N-alkyl 1,3-propanediamine and methylene bis (thiocyanate) were active at concentrations equal to or greater than the concentrations recommended for use by the manufacturer. PMID:7224623

  12. Susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to three cooling tower microbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, R.D.; Dewar, N.E.; Barnes, W.G.; Hodges, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    Investigation of epidemic outbreaks of Legionnaires disease by Center for Disease Control personnel has resulted in the isolation of Legionella pneumophila from water in the air-conditioning cooling towers or evaporative condensers at the site of the outbreak. It is suspected that improperly maintained open, recirculating water systems may play a role in the growth and dissemination of this pathogen. The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of three chemically different, commercially available, cooling tower microbicides against L. pneumophila. Using two in vitro test systems, a combination of N-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride and bis (tri-n-butyltin) oxide was found to kill L. pneumophila at a concentration 25 times less than the minimum recommended use concentration, whereas N-alkyl 1,3-propanediamine and methylene bis(thiocyanate) were active at concentrations equal to or greater than the concentrations recommended for use by the manufacturer.

  13. Confirmation of Legionella pneumophila cultures with a fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Tenover, F C; Carlson, L; Goldstein, L; Sturge, J; Plorde, J J

    1985-01-01

    We compared a fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody directed against an outer membrane protein of Legionella pneumophila (Genetic Systems Corp. [GSC], Seattle, Wash.) with a similarly labeled polyclonal reagent (L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, poly; BioDx, Inc., Denville, N.J.) for the confirmation of L. pneumophila isolates grown in culture. Duplicate suspensions of 52 organisms, including 21 L. pneumophila and 8 non-L. pneumophila species of legionella, were placed on individual glass slides, fixed, and stained with both reagents, and the results were compared. Both antisera correctly identified all L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, but only the GSC reagent produced definitive staining of the L. pneumophila isolates of serogroups 7, 8, and 9. Additionally, the GSC reagent produced more uniform staining patterns around the legionella bacilli and displayed little background fluorescence when compared with the BioDx reagent. PMID:3891777

  14. Zinc Metalloproteinase ProA Directly Activates Legionella pneumophila PlaC Glycerophospholipid:cholesterol Acyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Christina; Rastew, Elena; Hermes, Björn; Siegbrecht, Enrico; Ahrends, Robert; Banerji, Sangeeta; Flieger, Antje

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes secreted by Legionella pneumophila, such as phospholipases A (PLAs) and glycerophospholipid:cholesterol acyltransferases (GCATs), may target host cell lipids and therefore contribute to the establishment of Legionnaires disease. L. pneumophila possesses three proteins, PlaA, PlaC, and PlaD, belonging to the GDSL family of lipases/acyltransferases. We have shown previously that PlaC is the major GCAT secreted by L. pneumophila and that the zinc metalloproteinase ProA is essential for GCAT activity. Here we characterized the mode of PlaC GCAT activation and determined that ProA directly processes PlaC. We further found that not only cholesterol but also ergosterol present in protozoa was palmitoylated by PlaC. Such ester formations were not induced by either PlaA or PlaD. PlaD was shown here to possess lysophospholipase A activity, and interestingly, all three GDSL enzymes transferred short chain fatty acids to sterols. The three single putative catalytic amino acids (Ser-37, Asp-398, and His-401) proved essential for all PlaC-associated PLA, lysophospholipase A, and GCAT activities. A further four cysteine residues are important for the PLA/GCAT activities as well as their oxidized state, and we therefore conclude that PlaC likely forms at least one disulfide loop. Analysis of cleavage site and loop deletion mutants suggested that for GCAT activation deletion of several amino acids within the loop is necessary rather than cleavage at a single site. Our data therefore suggest a novel enzyme inhibition/activation mechanism where a disulfide loop inhibits PlaC GCAT activity until the protein is exported to the external space where it is ProA-activated. PMID:22582391

  15. Characterization of a major 31-kilodalton peptidoglycan-bound protein of Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, C.A.; Hoffman, P.S. )

    1990-05-01

    A 31-kilodalton (kDa) protein was solubilized from the peptidoglycan (PG) fraction of Legionella pneumophila after treatment with either N-acetylmuramidase from the fungus Chalaropsis sp. or with mutanolysin from Streptomyces globisporus. The protein exhibited a ladderlike banding pattern by autoradiography when radiolabeled ((35S)cysteine or (35S)methionine) PG material was extensively treated with hen lysozyme. The banding patterns ranging between 31 and 45 kDa and between 55 and 60 kDa resolved as a single 31-kDa protein when the material was subsequently treated with N-acetylmuramidase. Analysis of the purified 31-kDa protein for diaminopimelic acid by gas chromatography revealed 1 mol of diaminopimelic acid per mol of protein. When outer membrane PG material containing the major outer membrane porin protein was treated with N-acetylmuramidase or mutanolysin, both the 28.5-kDa major outer membrane protein and the 31-kDa protein were solubilized from the PG material under reducing conditions. In the absence of 2-mercaptoethanol, a high-molecular-mass complex (100 kDa) was resolved. The results of this study indicate that a 31-kDa PG-bound protein is a major component of the cell wall of L. pneumophila whose function may be to anchor the major outer membrane protein to PG. Finally, a survey of other Legionella species and other serogroups of L. pneumophila suggested that PG-bound proteins may be a common feature of this genus.

  16. Genomic Characterization of a Large Outbreak of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 Strains in Quebec City, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Nilmini; Cantin, Philippe; Marchand, Geneviève; Charest, Hugues; Raymond, Frédéric; Huot, Caroline; Goupil-Sormany, Isabelle; Desbiens, François; Faucher, Sébastien P.; Corbeil, Jacques; Tremblay, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 2012, a major Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 outbreak occurred in Quebec City, Canada, which caused 182 declared cases of Legionnaire's disease and included 13 fatalities. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates from 23 patients as well as from 32 cooling towers located in the vicinity of the outbreak were recovered for analysis. In addition, 6 isolates from the 1996 Quebec City outbreak and 4 isolates from patients unrelated to both outbreaks were added to allow comparison. We characterized the isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, sequence-based typing, and whole genome sequencing. The comparison of patients-isolated strains to cooling tower isolates allowed the identification of the tower that was the source of the outbreak. Legionella pneumophila strain Quebec 2012 was identified as a ST-62 by sequence-based typing methodology. Two new Legionellaceae plasmids were found only in the epidemic strain. The LVH type IV secretion system was found in the 2012 outbreak isolates but not in the ones from the 1996 outbreak and only in half of the contemporary human isolates. The epidemic strains replicated more efficiently and were more cytotoxic to human macrophages than the environmental strains tested. At least four Icm/Dot effectors in the epidemic strains were absent in the environmental strains suggesting that some effectors could impact the intracellular replication in human macrophages. Sequence-based typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis combined with whole genome sequencing allowed the identification and the analysis of the causative strain including its likely environmental source. PMID:25105285

  17. Factors Influencing Survival of Legionella pneumophila Serotype 1 in Hot Spring Water and Tap Water

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Akira; Kato, Naoyuki; Yamada, Koji; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2003-01-01

    The factors involved in the survival of Legionella pneumophila in the microcosms of both hot spring water and tap water were studied by examining cultivability and metabolic activity. L. pneumophila could survive by maintaining metabolic activity but was noncultivable in all microcosms at 42°C, except for one microcosm with a pH of <2.0. Lower temperatures supported survival without loss of cultivability. The cultivability declined with increasing temperature, although metabolic activity was observed at temperatures of up to 45°C. The optimal range of pH for survival was between 6.0 and 8. The metabolic activity could be maintained for long periods even in microcosms with high concentrations of salt. The cultivability of organisms in the post-exponential phase in a tap water microcosm with a low inoculum size was more rapidly reduced than that of organisms in the exponential phase. In contrast, the loss of cultivability in microcosms of a high inoculum size was significant in the exponential phase. Random(ly) amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of microcosms where cultivability was lost but metabolic activity was retained showed no change compared to cells grown freshly, although an effect on the amplified DNA band pattern by production of stress proteins was expected. Resuscitation by the addition of Acanthamoeba castellanii to the microcosm in which cultivability was completely lost but metabolic activity was maintained was observed only in part of the cell population. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila cell populations can potentially survive as free organisms for long periods by maintaining metabolic activity but temporarily losing cultivability under strict environments and requiring resuscitation by ingestion by amoebas. PMID:12732519

  18. Lead-dependent deposits in diverse synaptic vesicles: suggestive evidence for the presence of anionic binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sulzer, D.; Piscopo, I.; Ungar, F.; Holtzman, E.

    1987-09-01

    We have observed electron dense deposits dependent on incubation of aldehyde-fixed tissues with lead ions within synaptic vesicles of several types of neurons that differ in the neurotransmitters utilized and in the secretory granules of the adrenal medulla. Evidently, vesicle components that can interact with lead ions are widespread. A plausible explanation for the occurrence of the deposits is the presence of anionic binding sites within the vesicles. This would agree well with other biochemical, cytochemical, and immunocytochemical evidence, such as that indicating the presence of sulfated macromolecules in certain synaptic vesicles. Anionic binding sites could play significant roles by participating in processes such as Ca/sup 2 +/ storage, stabilization of pH gradients, or the control of osmotic phenomena.

  19. Free-living freshwater amoebae differ in their susceptibility to the pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Dey, Rafik; Bodennec, Jacques; Mameri, Mouh Oulhadj; Pernin, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is known as a facultative intracellular parasite of free-living soil and freshwater amoebae, of which several species have been shown to support the growth of the pathogenic bacteria. We report for the first time the behaviour of two strains (c2c and Z503) of the amoeba Willaertia magna towards different strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 and compared it with Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, known to be L. pneumophila permissive. In contrast to the results seen with other amoebae, W. magna c2c inhibited the growth of one strain of Legionella (L. pneumophila, Paris), but not of others belonging to the same serogroup (L. pneumophila, Philadelphia and L. pneumophila, Lens). Also, the different L. pneumophila inhibited cell growth and induced cell death in A. castellanii, H. vermiformis and W. magna Z503 within 3-4 days while W. magna c2c strain remained unaffected even up to 7 days. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the formation of numerous replicative phagosomes observed within Acanthamoeba and Hartmannella is rarely seen in W. magna c2c cocultured with L. pneumophila. Moreover, the morphological differences were observed between L. pneumophila cultured either with Willaertia or other amoebae. These observations show that amoebae are not all equally permissive to L. pneumophila and highlight W. magna c2c as particularly resistant towards some strains of this bacterium.

  20. Identification of Two Legionella pneumophila Effectors that Manipulate Host Phospholipids Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Viner, Ram; Chetrit, David; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Segal, Gil

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila translocates a large number of effector proteins into host cells via the Icm/Dot type-IVB secretion system. Some of these effectors were shown to cause lethal effect on yeast growth. Here we characterized one such effector (LecE) and identified yeast suppressors that reduced its lethal effect. The LecE lethal effect was found to be suppressed by the over expression of the yeast protein Dgk1 a diacylglycerol (DAG) kinase enzyme and by a deletion of the gene encoding for Pah1 a phosphatidic acid (PA) phosphatase that counteracts the activity of Dgk1. Genetic analysis using yeast deletion mutants, strains expressing relevant yeast genes and point mutations constructed in the Dgk1 and Pah1 conserved domains indicated that LecE functions similarly to the Nem1-Spo7 phosphatase complex that activates Pah1 in yeast. In addition, by using relevant yeast genetic backgrounds we examined several L. pneumophila effectors expected to be involved in phospholipids biosynthesis and identified an effector (LpdA) that contains a phospholipase-D (PLD) domain which caused lethal effect only in a dgk1 deletion mutant of yeast. Additionally, LpdA was found to enhance the lethal effect of LecE in yeast cells, a phenomenon which was found to be dependent on its PLD activity. Furthermore, to determine whether LecE and LpdA affect the levels or distribution of DAG and PA in-vivo in mammalian cells, we utilized fluorescent DAG and PA biosensors and validated the notion that LecE and LpdA affect the in-vivo levels and distribution of DAG and PA, respectively. Finally, we examined the intracellular localization of both LecE and LpdA in human macrophages during L. pneumophila infection and found that both effectors are localized to the bacterial phagosome. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila utilize at least two effectors to manipulate important steps in phospholipids biosynthesis. PMID:23133385

  1. Growth temperature reversibly modulates the virulence of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Mauchline, W S; James, B W; Fitzgeorge, R B; Dennis, P J; Keevil, C W

    1994-01-01

    In chemostat culture, the virulence of two strains of Legionella pneumophila was shown to be significantly (P < 0.05) reduced when the culture temperature was lowered from 37 to 24 degrees C. This modulation was reversed by returning the temperature to 37 degrees C, which resulted in a statistically significant (P < 0.05) increase in virulence. PMID:8005687

  2. Susceptibilities of Algae and Legionella pneumophila to Cooling Tower Biocides

    PubMed Central

    Soracco, Reginald J.; Gill, Helen K.; Fliermans, Carl B.; Pope, Daniel H.

    1983-01-01

    Nine algal strains and nine Legionella pneumophila strains were tested in laboratory culture for their susceptibility to inhibition by a variety of commercially available microbiocides. The responses ranged from ineffective to effective at 1/100 the manufacturers' recommended pulse doses. Tests were also performed to determine whether the action of the microbiocide was bacteriostatic or bacteriocidal. PMID:6859846

  3. Functional type 1 secretion system involved in Legionella pneumophila virulence.

    PubMed

    Fuche, Fabien; Vianney, Anne; Andrea, Claire; Doublet, Patricia; Gilbert, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative pathogen found mainly in water, either in a free-living form or within infected protozoans, where it replicates. This bacterium can also infect humans by inhalation of contaminated aerosols, causing a severe form of pneumonia called legionellosis or Legionnaires' disease. The involvement of type II and IV secretion systems in the virulence of L. pneumophila is now well documented. Despite bioinformatic studies showing that a type I secretion system (T1SS) could be present in this pathogen, the functionality of this system based on the LssB, LssD, and TolC proteins has never been established. Here, we report the demonstration of the functionality of the T1SS, as well as its role in the infectious cycle of L. pneumophila. Using deletion mutants and fusion proteins, we demonstrated that the repeats-in-toxin protein RtxA is secreted through an LssB-LssD-TolC-dependent mechanism. Moreover, fluorescence monitoring and confocal microscopy showed that this T1SS is required for entry into the host cell, although it seems dispensable to the intracellular cycle. Together, these results underline the active participation of L. pneumophila, via its T1SS, in its internalization into host cells.

  4. lbtA and lbtB Are Required for Production of the Legionella pneumophila Siderophore Legiobactin

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Kimberly A.; Viswanathan, V. K.; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.

    2006-01-01

    Under iron stress, Legionella pneumophila secretes legiobactin, a nonclassical siderophore that is reactive in the chrome azurol S (CAS) assay. Here, we have optimized conditions for legiobactin expression, shown its biological activity, and identified two genes, lbtA and lbtB, which are involved in legiobactin production. lbtA appears to be iron repressed and encodes a protein that has significant homology with siderophore synthetases, and FrgA, a previously described iron-regulated protein of L. pneumophila. lbtB encodes a protein homologous with members of the major facilitator superfamily of multidrug efflux pumps. Mutants lacking lbtA or lbtB were defective for legiobactin, producing 40 to 70% less CAS reactivity in deferrated chemically defined medium (CDM). In bioassays, mutant CDM culture supernatants, unlike those of the wild type, did not support growth of iron-limited wild-type bacteria in 2′,2′-dipyridyl-containing buffered charcoal yeast extract (BCYE) agar and a ferrous iron transport mutant on BCYE agar without added iron. The lbtA mutant was modestly defective for growth in deferrated CDM containing the iron chelator citrate, indicating that legiobactin is required in conditions of severe iron limitation. Complementation of the lbt mutants restored both siderophore expression, as measured by the CAS assay and bioassays, and bacterial growth in deferrated, citrate-containing media. The lbtA mutant replicated as the wild type did in macrophages, amoebae, and the lungs of mice. However, L. pneumophila expresses lbtA in the macrophage, suggesting that legiobactin, though not required, may play a dispensable role in intracellular growth. The discovery of lbtAB represents the first identification of genes required for L. pneumophila siderophore expression. PMID:16452417

  5. Behavioral evidence of hunting and foraging techniques by a top predator suggests the importance of scavenging for preadults.

    PubMed

    Margalida, Antoni; Colomer, MªÀngels; Sánchez, Roberto; Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Oria, Javier; González, Luis Mariano

    2017-06-01

    Scavenging may be a regular feeding behavior for some facultative raptor species occupying low quality habitats and/or with little experience in hunting techniques. However, its importance has been largely underestimated due to methodological limitations in identifying the real proportion in the diet. Here, through direct observations, we assessed the hunting and foraging success of the threatened Spanish imperial eagle Aquila adalberti determining the influence of age, sex, breeding status, habitat quality, prey type, and landscape characteristics. From 465 observations, Spanish imperial eagles used hunting in flight (42%), scavenging (30%), hunting from a perch (16%) and kleptoparasitism (12%). Our model suggests that Prey size and Prey type best explain hunting success, followed by Landscape and Sex. Our findings suggest that Spanish imperial eagles increase hunting success with age, with scavenging and kleptoparasitism regularly used as juveniles. The absence of relationships with any of the variables considered suggests that kleptoparasitism is an opportunistic behavior used sporadically. Scavenging is also independent of habitat quality and landscape characteristics. Accordingly, low prey density is not a driver of carrion use for preadult individuals, suggesting that a lack of hunting ability obliges this age-class to use this alternative feeding technique regularly. As a result, the threatened Spanish imperial eagle population is also prone to mortality related to the illegal use of poison baits and, potentially, veterinary drugs (i.e., diclofenac).

  6. Clinical application of a multiplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection of Legionella species, Legionella pneumophila, and Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Alvaro J; Winchell, Jonas M

    2013-01-01

    We developed a single-tube multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of simultaneously detecting and discriminating Legionella spp., Legionella pneumophila, and Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 in primary specimens. Evaluation of 21 clinical specimens and 115 clinical isolates demonstrated this assay to be a rapid, high-throughput diagnostic test with 100% specificity that may aid during legionellosis outbreaks and epidemiologic investigations.

  7. Targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 16S rRNA gene to detect and differentiate Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila species.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2016-08-01

    A PCR-based method targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene was developed for differential identification of Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila. Based on the bioinformatics analysis for 176 Legionella 16S rRNA gene fragments of 56 different Legionella species, a set of SNPs, A(628)C(629) was found to be highly specific to L. pneumophila strains. A multiplex assay was designed that was able to distinguish sites with limited sequence heterogeneity between L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila in the targeted 16S rRNA gene. The assay amplified a 261-bp amplicon for Legionella spp. and a set of 203- and 97-bp amplicons only specific to L. pneumophila species. Among 49 ATCC strains and 284 Legionella isolates from environmental water and clinical samples, 100 % of L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila strains were correctly identified and differentiated by this assay. The assay presents a more rapid, sensitive and alternative method to the currently available PCR-sequencing detection and differentiation method.

  8. Risk and management in hospital water systems for Legionella pneumophila: a case study in Rio de Janeiro-Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Aldo Pacheco

    2004-12-01

    This article analyses the water used at hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The research, based on microbiological and physical-chemical aspects, suggests subsidies for normalization of hospital potable water systems and makes recommendations for standardization of operational procedures for inspection for Legionella pneumophila. A total of 16 hospitals were inspected and positive results for the presence of L. pneumophila were found at five hospitals. These hospitals were integrated in a research project aiming at the detection and quantification of this pathogen. During 10 consecutive weeks, four collections representing a total of 200 analyses were done at the five researched hospitals. In this way seven physical-chemical parameters and three microbiological parameters were observed to evaluate the quality of water in each hospital. The results showed that routine surveillance for a hospital water distribution system is fundamental for public health and must include, as a priority, monitoring of L. pneumophila. The water quality varies in accordance with the hospital water system involved. It is important and necessary to implement environmental culturing in order to minimize hospital infection, in particular, pneumonia data and also to provide the basis for disinfection of the water system.

  9. Endoplasmic Reticulum Tubule Protein Reticulon 4 Associates with the Legionella pneumophila Vacuole and with Translocated Substrate Ceg9.

    PubMed

    Haenssler, Eva; Ramabhadran, Vinay; Murphy, Connor S; Heidtman, Matthew I; Isberg, Ralph R

    2015-09-01

    Intracellular growth of Legionella pneumophila occurs in a replication vacuole constructed by host proteins that regulate vesicular traffic from the host endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This process is promoted by a combination of approximately 300 Icm/Dot translocated substrates (IDTS). One of these proteins, Ceg9, was previously identified in a screen for L. pneumophila IDTS that manipulate secretory traffic when overexpressed in yeast. Using ectopic expression of Ceg9 in mammalian cells, we demonstrate that Ceg9 interacts with isoforms of host reticulon 4 (Rtn4), a protein that regulates ER tubule formation. Binding occurs under conditions that prevent association with other known reticulon binding proteins, arguing that Ceg9 binding is stable. A tripartite complex was demonstrated among Rtn4, Ceg9, and atlastin 1, a previously characterized reticulon interacting partner. The binding of Ceg9 to Rtn4 was not due to bridging by atlastin 1 but resulted from the two interacting partners binding independently to reticulon. When Ceg9 is ectopically expressed in mammalian cells, it shows a localization pattern that is indistinguishable from that of Rtn4, perhaps due to interactions between and similar structural features of the two proteins. Consistent with Rtn4 playing a role in the formation of the Legionella-containing vacuole, it was recruited to almost 50% of the vacuoles within 20 min postinfection. Our studies suggest that L. pneumophila proteins interact with ER tubules at an early stage of replication vacuole formation.

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum Tubule Protein Reticulon 4 Associates with the Legionella pneumophila Vacuole and with Translocated Substrate Ceg9

    PubMed Central

    Haenssler, Eva; Ramabhadran, Vinay; Murphy, Connor S.; Heidtman, Matthew I.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular growth of Legionella pneumophila occurs in a replication vacuole constructed by host proteins that regulate vesicular traffic from the host endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This process is promoted by a combination of approximately 300 Icm/Dot translocated substrates (IDTS). One of these proteins, Ceg9, was previously identified in a screen for L. pneumophila IDTS that manipulate secretory traffic when overexpressed in yeast. Using ectopic expression of Ceg9 in mammalian cells, we demonstrate that Ceg9 interacts with isoforms of host reticulon 4 (Rtn4), a protein that regulates ER tubule formation. Binding occurs under conditions that prevent association with other known reticulon binding proteins, arguing that Ceg9 binding is stable. A tripartite complex was demonstrated among Rtn4, Ceg9, and atlastin 1, a previously characterized reticulon interacting partner. The binding of Ceg9 to Rtn4 was not due to bridging by atlastin 1 but resulted from the two interacting partners binding independently to reticulon. When Ceg9 is ectopically expressed in mammalian cells, it shows a localization pattern that is indistinguishable from that of Rtn4, perhaps due to interactions between and similar structural features of the two proteins. Consistent with Rtn4 playing a role in the formation of the Legionella-containing vacuole, it was recruited to almost 50% of the vacuoles within 20 min postinfection. Our studies suggest that L. pneumophila proteins interact with ER tubules at an early stage of replication vacuole formation. PMID:26099580

  11. Indoor wet screening of exhumed skeletal remains: a suggested procedure for the preparation of fragile evidence for anthropological analysis.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Ann W

    2010-07-01

    The 2007 exhumation of three children's graves, located in rural upstate New York and dating to 1979 and 1980, was warranted as their mother had come under suspicion for the death of a child she had been babysitting in late 2006. The local March weather conditions had been wet, and heavy rains fell during the 2-day process of casket removal. The extremely wet soil and the poor preservation of two wooden caskets increased the likelihood of damage to evidence. After remains' transport to the forensic center, an indoor wet-screening station was established so that skeletal elements could be (i) separated from soil matrix and (ii) preserved carefully for analysis. Not only were the remains relatively small and fragile in comparison with those of an adult, but two of the three remains were known to be fire damaged, thus the use of special laboratory preparation techniques was crucial.

  12. Legionella pneumophila 6S RNA optimizes intracellular multiplication

    PubMed Central

    Faucher, Sébastien P.; Friedlander, Gilgi; Livny, Jonathan; Margalit, Hanah; Shuman, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that infects and multiplies in a broad range of phagocytic protozoan and mammalian phagocytes. Based on the observation that small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) play an important role in controlling virulence-related genes in several pathogenic bacteria, we attempted to identify sRNAs expressed by L. pneumophila. We used computational prediction followed by experimental verification to identify and characterize sRNAs encoded in the L. pneumophila genome. A 50-mer probe microarray was constructed to test the expression of predicted sRNAs in bacteria grown under a variety of conditions. This strategy successfully identified 22 expressed RNAs, out of which 6 were confirmed by northern blot and RACE. One of the identified sRNAs is highly expressed in postexponential phase, and computational prediction of its secondary structure reveals a striking similarity to the structure of 6S RNA, a widely distributed prokaryotic sRNA, known to regulate the activity of σ70-containing RNA polymerase. A 70-mer probe microarray was used to identify genes affected by L. pneumophila 6S RNA in stationary phase. The 6S RNA positively regulates expression of genes encoding type IVB secretion system effectors, stress response genes such as groES and recA, as well as many genes involved in acquisition of nutrients and genes with unknown or hypothetical functions. Deletion of 6S RNA significantly reduced L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication in both protist and mammalian host cells, but had no detectable effect on growth in rich media. PMID:20368425

  13. Legionella pneumophila sequence type 1/Paris pulsotype subtyping by spoligotyping.

    PubMed

    Ginevra, Christophe; Jacotin, Nathalie; Diancourt, Laure; Guigon, Ghislaine; Arquilliere, Romain; Meugnier, Hélène; Descours, Ghislaine; Vandenesch, Francois; Etienne, Jerome; Lina, Gérard; Caro, Valérie; Jarraud, Sophie

    2012-03-01

    Endemic strains of Legionella pneumophila sequence type 1 (ST1), in particular the ST1/Paris pulsotype, are dispersed worldwide and represent about 10% of culture-proven clinical cases of Legionnaires' disease in France. The high rate of isolation of this strain from both clinical and environmental samples makes identification of the source of infection difficult during epidemiological investigations. The full-length genome sequence of this strain was recently determined, and it revealed the presence of a CRISPR/cas complex. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a spoligotyping tool based on the diversity of this CRISPR locus that would allow the accurate subtyping of the L. pneumophila serogroup 1 ST1/Paris pulsotype. The CRISPR loci of 28 L. pneumophila ST1/Paris pulsotype isolates were sequenced, and 42 different spacers regions were characterized. A membrane-based spoligotyping method was developed and used to determine the subtypes of 406 L. pneumophila isolates, including 233 with the ST1/Paris pulsotype profile that were collected in France from 2000 to 2011. A total of 46 different spoligotypes were detected, and 41 of these were specifically identified in the ST1/Paris pulsotype isolates. In 27 of 33 epidemiological investigations, the environmental source of contamination was confirmed by comparing spoligotypes of clinical isolates with those of environmental isolates. With an index of discrimination of 79.72% (95% confidence interval, 75.82 to 83.63), spoligotyping of the L. pneumophila ST1/Paris pulsotype has the potential to be a useful complementary genotyping tool for discriminating isolates with undistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and ST genotypes, which could help to identify environmental sources of infection.

  14. Implementing supported self-management for asthma: a systematic review and suggested hierarchy of evidence of implementation studies.

    PubMed

    Pinnock, Hilary; Epiphaniou, Eleni; Pearce, Gemma; Parke, Hannah; Greenhalgh, Trish; Sheikh, Aziz; Griffiths, Chris J; Taylor, Stephanie J C

    2015-06-01

    Asthma self-management remains poorly implemented in clinical practice despite overwhelming evidence of improved healthcare outcomes, reflected in guideline recommendations over three decades. To inform delivery in routine care, we synthesised evidence from implementation studies of self-management support interventions. We systematically searched eight electronic databases (1980 to 2012) and research registers, and performed snowball and manual searches for studies evaluating implementation of asthma self-management in routine practice. We included, and adapted systematic review methodology to reflect, a broad range of implementation study designs. We extracted data on study characteristics, process measures (for example, action plan ownership), asthma control (for example, patient reported control questionnaires, days off school/work, symptom-free days) and use of health services (for example, admissions, emergency department attendances, unscheduled consultations). We assessed quality using the validated Downs and Black checklist, and conducted a narrative synthesis informed by Kennedy's whole systems theoretical approach (considering patient, practitioner and organisational components and the interaction between these). We included 18 studies (6 randomised trials, 2 quasi-experimental studies, 8 with historical controls and 3 with retrospective comparators) from primary, secondary, community and managed care settings serving a total estimated asthma population of 800,000 people in six countries. In these studies, targeting professionals (n = 2) improved process, but had no clinically significant effect on clinical outcomes. Targeting patients (n = 6) improved some process measures, but had an inconsistent impact on clinical outcomes. Targeting the organisation (n = 3) improved process measures, but had little/no effect on clinical outcomes. Interventions that explicitly addressed patient, professional and organisational factors (n = 7) showed the most

  15. Role of gamma interferon in induction of natural killer activity by Legionella pneumophila in vitro and in an experimental murine infection model.

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, D K; Friedman, H; Stewart, W E; Klein, T W; Djeu, J Y

    1988-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been shown to induce gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) both in vitro and in vivo during experimental infections of mice. With complement-mediated serologic depletion of murine splenocytes, the cellular sources of IFN-gamma following in vitro stimulation with L. pneumophila antigens were Thy-1.2+, Lyt-2-, L3T4-, and asialo-GM1+, which is consistent with the natural killer (NK) cell phenotype. Additionally, Percoll density discontinuous centrifugation demonstrated that maximal production of IFN coincided with high NK activity in fractions which were enriched for large granular lymphocytes. Furthermore, 18- to 24-h incubation of splenocytes with L. pneumophila whole-cell vaccine resulted in augmented NK cytotoxic activity against YAC-1 tumor target cells in a 51Cr release assay. The addition of macrophages to purified large granular lymphocyte populations augmented both IFN-gamma production and NK activity, suggesting that antigen is required for optimal responses. In an experimental infection model using an intratracheal inoculation route, NK activity was enhanced in the spleen, peripheral blood, and lung cells of infected mice, with maximal stimulation in the lung leukocytes at the site of infection. The results of the present study indicate that NK cells respond in vivo and in vitro to stimulation by L. pneumophila by producing IFN-gamma and by increased cytolytic activity. PMID:3128479

  16. Close genetic relationship between Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates from sputum specimens and puddles on roads, as determined by sequence-based typing.

    PubMed

    Kanatani, Jun-ichi; Isobe, Junko; Kimata, Keiko; Shima, Tomoko; Shimizu, Miwako; Kura, Fumiaki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Watahiki, Masanori

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the prevalence of Legionella species isolated from puddles on asphalt roads. In addition, we carried out sequence-based typing (SBT) analysis on the genetic relationship between L. pneumophila serogroup 1 (SG 1) isolates from puddles and from stock strains previously obtained from sputum specimens and public baths. Sixty-nine water samples were collected from puddles on roads at 6 fixed locations. Legionella species were detected in 33 samples (47.8%) regardless of season. Among the 325 isolates from puddles, strains of L. pneumophila SG 1, a major causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, were the most frequently isolated (n = 62, 19.1%). Sixty-two isolates of L. pneumophila SG 1 from puddles were classified into 36 sequence types (STs) by SBT. ST120 and ST48 were identified as major STs. Environmental ST120 strains from puddles were found for the first time in this study. Among the 14 STs of the clinical isolates (n = 19), 4 STs (n = 6, 31.6%), including ST120, were also detected in isolates from puddles on roads, and the sources of infection in these cases remained unclear. The lag-1 gene, a tentative marker for clinical isolates, was prevalent in puddle isolates (61.3%). Our findings suggest that puddles on asphalt roads serve as potential reservoirs for L. pneumophila in the environment.

  17. Close Genetic Relationship between Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 Isolates from Sputum Specimens and Puddles on Roads, as Determined by Sequence-Based Typing

    PubMed Central

    Kanatani, Jun-ichi; Isobe, Junko; Kimata, Keiko; Shima, Tomoko; Shimizu, Miwako; Kura, Fumiaki; Sata, Tetsutaro

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence of Legionella species isolated from puddles on asphalt roads. In addition, we carried out sequence-based typing (SBT) analysis on the genetic relationship between L. pneumophila serogroup 1 (SG 1) isolates from puddles and from stock strains previously obtained from sputum specimens and public baths. Sixty-nine water samples were collected from puddles on roads at 6 fixed locations. Legionella species were detected in 33 samples (47.8%) regardless of season. Among the 325 isolates from puddles, strains of L. pneumophila SG 1, a major causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, were the most frequently isolated (n = 62, 19.1%). Sixty-two isolates of L. pneumophila SG 1 from puddles were classified into 36 sequence types (STs) by SBT. ST120 and ST48 were identified as major STs. Environmental ST120 strains from puddles were found for the first time in this study. Among the 14 STs of the clinical isolates (n = 19), 4 STs (n = 6, 31.6%), including ST120, were also detected in isolates from puddles on roads, and the sources of infection in these cases remained unclear. The lag-1 gene, a tentative marker for clinical isolates, was prevalent in puddle isolates (61.3%). Our findings suggest that puddles on asphalt roads serve as potential reservoirs for L. pneumophila in the environment. PMID:23603681

  18. Phenotypic and Molecular Evidence Suggest That Decrements in Morning and Evening Energy Are Distinct But Related Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Dhruva, Anand; Paul, Steven M.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Kober, Kord M.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Context Little is known about energy levels in oncology patients and their family caregivers (FCs). Objectives This study sought to identify latent classes of participants, based on self-reported energy levels and to evaluate for differences in phenotypic and genotypic characteristics between these classes. Methods Energy subscale scores from the Lee Fatigue Scale were used to determine latent class membership. Morning and evening energy scores were obtained just prior to, during, and for four months following the completion of radiation therapy. Genetic associations were evaluated for fifteen pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes. Results Two latent classes with distinct morning energy trajectories were identified. Participants who were younger, female, not married/partnered, Black, and had more comorbidities, and a lower functional status were more likely to be in the Low Morning Energy class. Two polymorphisms (IL2 rs1479923, NFKB1 rs4648110) were associated with morning energy latent class membership. Two latent classes with distinct evening energy trajectories were identified. Participants who were younger and male and who had more comorbidities, decreased body weight, and a lower functional status were more likely to be in the Moderate Evening Energy class. Five different polymorphisms (IL1R2 rs4141134, IL6 rs4719714, IL17A rs8193036, NFKB2 rs1056890, TNFA rs1800683) were associated with evening energy latent class membership. Conclusion This study provides preliminary evidence that decrements in morning and evening energy are associated with different phenotypic risk factors as well as cytokine gene variations. PMID:26031709

  19. Growing evidence suggests WT1 effects in the kidney development are modulated by Hsp70/NO interaction.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Luciana; Manucha, Walter

    2017-02-01

    The study of kidney development at the cellular and molecular levels remains an active area of nephrology research. The functional integrity of the kidney depends on normal development as well as on physiological cell turnover. Apoptosis induction is essential for these mechanisms. A route to cell death revealed in the past decade shows that heat shock proteins (HSPs) and their cofactors are responsible for regulating the apoptotic pathway. Specifically, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), the most ubiquitous and highly conserved HSP, helps proteins adopt native conformation or regain function after misfolding. Hsp70 is an important cofactor for the function of Wilms' tumour 1 (WT1) and suggests a potential role for this chaperone during kidney differentiation. In addition, we have demonstrated that WT1 expression is modulated by nitric oxide (NO) availability and Hsp70 interaction after neonatal unilateral ureteral obstruction. NO has been identified as playing an important role in the developing kidney. These findings suggest that Hsp70 and NO may play a critical and fundamental role in the capacity to modulate both apoptotic pathway and oxidative stress during kidney development. Furthermore, the design of experimental protocols that assess renal epithelial functionality in this context, could contribute to the understanding of renal development and alterations.

  20. Regulation of histone mRNA in the unperturbed cell cycle: evidence suggesting control at two posttranscriptional steps.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, M E; Böhni, R; Schneiderman, M H; Ramamurthy, L; Schümperli, D; Marzluff, W F

    1991-01-01

    The levels of histone mRNA increase 35-fold as selectively detached mitotic CHO cells progress from mitosis through G1 and into S phase. Using an exogenous gene with a histone 3' end which is not sensitive to transcriptional or half-life regulation, we show that 3' processing is regulated as cells progress from G1 to S phase. The half-life of histone mRNA is similar in G1- and S-phase cells, as measured after inhibition of transcription by actinomycin D (dactinomycin) or indirectly after stabilization by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Taken together, these results suggest that the change in histone mRNA levels between G1- and S-phase cells must be due to an increase in the rate of biosynthesis, a combination of changes in transcription rate and processing efficiency. In G2 phase, there is a rapid 35-fold decrease in the histone mRNA concentration which our results suggest is due primarily to an altered stability of histone mRNA. These results are consistent with a model for cell cycle regulation of histone mRNA levels in which the effects on both RNA 3' processing and transcription, rather than alterations in mRNA stability, are the major mechanisms by which low histone mRNA levels are maintained during G1. Images PMID:2017161

  1. Decreased prevalence of left-handedness among females with male co-twins: Evidence suggesting prenatal testosterone transfer in humans?

    PubMed Central

    Vuoksimaa, Eero; Peter Eriksson, C. J.; Pulkkinen, Lea; Rose, Richard J.; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2010-01-01

    Summary Studies of singletons suggest that right-handed individuals may have higher levels of testosterone than do left-handed individuals. Prenatal testosterone levels are hypothesised to be especially related to handedness formation. In humans, female members from opposite-sex twin pairs may experience elevated level of prenatal exposure to testosterone in their intra-uterine environment shared with a male. We tested for differences in rates of left-handedness/right-handedness in female twins from same-sex and opposite-sex twin pairs. Our sample consisted of 4736 subjects, about 70% of all Finnish twins born in 1983–1987, with information on measured pregnancy and birth related factors. Circulating testosterone and estradiol levels at age 14 were available on 771 and 744 of these twins, respectively. We found significantly (p<.006) lower prevalence of left-handedness in females from opposite-sex pairs (5.3%) compared to females from same-sex pairs (8.6%). The circulating levels of neither testosterone nor estradiol related to handedness in either females or males. Nor were there differences in circulating testosterone or estradiol levels between females from opposite-sex and same-sex twin pairs. Birth and pregnancy related factors for which we had information were unrelated to handedness. Our results are difficult to fully explain by postnatal factors, but they offer support to theory that relates testosterone to formation of handedness, and in a population-based sample, are suggestive of effects of prenatal testosterone transfer. PMID:20570052

  2. Decreased prevalence of left-handedness among females with male co-twins: evidence suggesting prenatal testosterone transfer in humans?

    PubMed

    Vuoksimaa, Eero; Eriksson, C J Peter; Pulkkinen, Lea; Rose, Richard J; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2010-11-01

    Studies of singletons suggest that right-handed individuals may have higher levels of testosterone than do left-handed individuals. Prenatal testosterone levels are hypothesised to be especially related to handedness formation. In humans, female members from opposite-sex twin pairs may experience elevated level of prenatal exposure to testosterone in their intrauterine environment shared with a male. We tested for differences in rates of left-handedness/right-handedness in female twins from same-sex and opposite-sex twin pairs. Our sample consisted of 4736 subjects, about 70% of all Finnish twins born in 1983-1987, with information on measured pregnancy and birth related factors. Circulating testosterone and estradiol levels at age 14 were available on 771 and 744 of these twins, respectively. We found significantly (p=.006) lower prevalence of left-handedness in females from opposite-sex pairs (5.3%) compared to females from same-sex pairs (8.6%). The circulating levels of neither testosterone nor estradiol related to handedness in either females or males. Nor were there differences in circulating testosterone or estradiol levels between females from opposite-sex and same-sex twin pairs. Birth and pregnancy related factors for which we had information were unrelated to handedness. Our results are difficult to fully explain by postnatal factors, but they offer support to theory that relates testosterone to formation of handedness, and in a population-based sample, are suggestive of effects of prenatal testosterone transfer.

  3. Haplotype transmission analysis provides evidence of association for DISC1 to schizophrenia and suggests sex-dependent effects.

    PubMed

    Hennah, William; Varilo, Teppo; Kestilä, Marjo; Paunio, Tiina; Arajärvi, Ritva; Haukka, Jari; Parker, Alex; Martin, Rory; Levitzky, Steve; Partonen, Timo; Meyer, Joanne; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Peltonen, Leena; Ekelund, Jesper

    2003-12-01

    We have previously reported a linkage peak on 1q42 in a Finnish schizophrenia sample. In this study we genotyped 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 1q42 covering the three candidate genes TRAX, DISC1 and DISC2, using a study sample of 458 Finnish families ascertained for schizophrenia. Two-point and haplotype association analysis revealed a significant region of interest within the DISC1 gene. A common haplotype (HEP3) was observed to be significantly under-transmitted to affected individuals (P=0.0031). HEP3 represents a two SNP haplotype spanning from intron 1 to exon 2 of DISC1. This haplotype also displayed sex differences in transmission distortion, the under-transmission being significant only to affected females (P=0.00024). Three other regions of interest were observed in the TRAX and DISC genes. However, analysis of only those families with complete genotype information specifically highlights the HEP3 haplotype as a true observation. The finding of a common under-transmitted SNP haplotype might imply that this particular allele offers some protection from the development of schizophrenia. Analysis of component-traits of schizophrenia, derived from the Operational Criteria Checklist of Psychotic Illness (OCCPI), displayed association of HEP3 to features of the general phenotype of schizophrenia, including traits representing delusions, hallucinations and negative symptoms. This study provides further evidence for the hypothesis that the DISC1 gene is involved in the aetiology of schizophrenia, and implies a putative sex difference for the effect of the gene. Our findings would also encourage more detailed analyses of the effect of DISC1 on the component-traits of schizophrenia.

  4. Patient-oriented evidence that matters (POEMs)™ suggest potential clinical topics for the Choosing Wisely™ campaign.

    PubMed

    Grad, Roland; Pluye, Pierre; Tang, David; Shulha, Michael; Slawson, David C; Shaughnessy, Allen F

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of identifying clinical topics for campaigns like Choosing Wisely. In the context of an ongoing continuing medication education program, we analyzed ratings on every patient-oriented evidence that matters (POEM) synopsis delivered in 2012 and 2013. Given the objective of the Choosing Wisely campaign, we focused this analysis on 1 specific item in the validated questionnaire used by physicians to rate POEMs. This questionnaire item is about "avoiding an unnecessary diagnostic test or treatment." For each POEM, we calculated frequencies and proportions for this item, then we identified the 20 POEMs that were most commonly associated with this item in 2012 and 2013. Finally, we determined whether the clinical topic of each of these POEMs was mentioned in the Choosing Wisely master list. In 2012 and 2013 we received 506,809 completed questionnaires (or ratings) linked to 530 POEMs, for an average of 956 ratings per POEM. In 59% of these POEMs (n = 312), the most commonly expected type of health benefit was "avoiding an unnecessary diagnostic test or treatment." We then identified the top 20 POEMs most commonly associated with this item in each year by ranking all 312 POEMs from the top down. The clinical topic addressed by 29 of these 40 POEMs was not addressed in the Choosing Wisely master list. These topics fell into 3 categories: diagnostic tests, medical interventions, and surgical interventions. "Big data" can identify clinical topics relevant to campaigns such as Choosing Wisely. This process represents a new way to inform the expert panel approach. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  5. Growth-related Metabolism of the Carbon Storage Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Gillmaier, Nadine; Schunder, Eva; Kutzner, Erika; Tlapák, Hana; Rydzewski, Kerstin; Herrmann, Vroni; Stämmler, Maren; Lasch, Peter; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Heuner, Klaus

    2016-03-18

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires disease, has a biphasic life cycle with a switch from a replicative to a transmissive phenotype. During the replicative phase, the bacteria grow within host cells in Legionella-containing vacuoles. During the transmissive phenotype and the postexponential (PE) growth phase, the pathogens express virulence factors, become flagellated, and leave the Legionella-containing vacuoles. Using (13)C labeling experiments, we now show that, under in vitro conditions, serine is mainly metabolized during the replicative phase for the biosynthesis of some amino acids and for energy generation. During the PE phase, these carbon fluxes are reduced, and glucose also serves as an additional carbon substrate to feed the biosynthesis of poly-3-hydroxybuyrate (PHB), an essential carbon source for transmissive L. pneumophila. Whole-cell FTIR analysis and comparative isotopologue profiling further reveal that a putative 3-ketothiolase (Lpp1788) and a PHB polymerase (Lpp0650), but not enzymes of the crotonyl-CoA pathway (Lpp0931-0933) are involved in PHB metabolism during the PE phase. However, the data also reflect that additional bypassing reactions for PHB synthesis exist in agreement with in vivo competition assays using Acanthamoeba castellannii or human macrophage-like U937 cells as host cells. The data suggest that substrate usage and PHB metabolism are coordinated during the life cycle of the pathogen.

  6. Multiple major disease-associated clones of Legionella pneumophila have emerged recently and independently

    PubMed Central

    David, Sophia; Rusniok, Christophe; Mentasti, Massimo; Gomez-Valero, Laura; Harris, Simon R.; Lechat, Pierre; Lees, John; Ginevra, Christophe; Glaser, Philippe; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Underwood, Anthony; Jarraud, Sophie; Harrison, Timothy G.; Parkhill, Julian; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium and the leading cause of Legionnaires’ disease. Just five sequence types (ST), from more than 2000 currently described, cause nearly half of disease cases in northwest Europe. Here, we report the sequence and analyses of 364 L. pneumophila genomes, including 337 from the five disease-associated STs and 27 representative of the species diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the five STs have independent origins within a highly diverse species. The number of de novo mutations is extremely low with maximum pairwise single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ranging from 19 (ST47) to 127 (ST1), which suggests emergences within the last century. Isolates sampled geographically far apart differ by only a few SNPs, demonstrating rapid dissemination. These five STs have been recombining recently, leading to a shared pool of allelic variants potentially contributing to their increased disease propensity. The oldest clone, ST1, has spread globally; between 1940 and 2000, four new clones have emerged in Europe, which show long-distance, rapid dispersal. That a large proportion of clinical cases is caused by recently emerged and internationally dispersed clones, linked by convergent evolution, is surprising for an environmental bacterium traditionally considered to be an opportunistic pathogen. To simultaneously explain recent emergence, rapid spread and increased disease association, we hypothesize that these STs have adapted to new man-made environmental niches, which may be linked by human infection and transmission. PMID:27662900

  7. Genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships among Legionella pneumophila clinical isolates, Portugal, 1987 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Chasqueira, M J; Rodrigues, L; Nascimento, M; Ramos, M; Marques, T

    2014-11-20

    The genetic diversity of 89 clinical Legionella isolates, collected between 1987 and 2012, in 22 hospitals from the five regions of Portugal, was analysed in this study using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) of the Dresden panel and the sequence-based typing (SBT) protocol. The eBURST algorithm was used to infer levels of relatedness between isolates. All isolates collected were Legionella pneumophila, which were further characterised into four subgroups by MAbs, and 30 sequence types (STs) by SBT. Twelve of the STs were unique to Portugal; one of them (ST100) was represented by 32 epidemiologically related isolates. The ST44 was the profile with the highest number of epidemiologically unrelated isolates. The eBURST analyses indicate that, within the group formed by the 30 STs identified in this study, 17 STs were genetically close to at least another ST in the group. The comparison between the eBURST diagrams obtained with the STs from this study and the entire SBT database of the European Working Group for Legionella, showed that 24 (seven of them unique to Portugal) of our 30 STs were related with STs identified in others countries. These results suggest that the population of L. pneumophila clinical strains in Portugal includes both worldwide and local strains.

  8. Effects of alpha-amylase on in vitro growth of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Bortner, C A; Miller, R D; Arnold, R R

    1983-01-01

    Sterile parotid saliva inhibited growth of Legionella pneumophila on solid media, and the salivary component involved in this inhibition has been shown to be amylase. Disk diffusion and well plate assays were used to study possible mechanisms for this effect. The amylolytic activity of saliva copurified with inhibitory activity, and both activities were sensitive to proteinase K digestion and heat treatment. In addition, purified alpha-amylase from several sources (bacteria, fungi, porcine pancreas, and human saliva) exhibited similar activity. Incorporation of charcoal or bovine serum albumin into media blocked inhibition by amylase. Replacement of Bacto-Agar with Noble agar (both from Difco Laboratories) prevented growth inhibition in the absence of starch. However, when corn starch was present with Noble agar, amylase-induced growth inhibition occurred. Purification of starch by washing with methanol eliminated some toxic component. The toxic component from starch could be recovered from the methanol wash and inhibited growth of L. pneumophila in the absence of amylase activity. The results suggest that toxic substances exist in media components which may be unmasked during salivary amylase digestion of starch. This effect may explain, in part, the difficulty in recovery of the organism from clinical specimens containing amylase. PMID:6190756

  9. Multiple major disease-associated clones of Legionella pneumophila have emerged recently and independently.

    PubMed

    David, Sophia; Rusniok, Christophe; Mentasti, Massimo; Gomez-Valero, Laura; Harris, Simon R; Lechat, Pierre; Lees, John; Ginevra, Christophe; Glaser, Philippe; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Underwood, Anthony; Jarraud, Sophie; Harrison, Timothy G; Parkhill, Julian; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-11-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium and the leading cause of Legionnaires' disease. Just five sequence types (ST), from more than 2000 currently described, cause nearly half of disease cases in northwest Europe. Here, we report the sequence and analyses of 364 L. pneumophila genomes, including 337 from the five disease-associated STs and 27 representative of the species diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the five STs have independent origins within a highly diverse species. The number of de novo mutations is extremely low with maximum pairwise single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ranging from 19 (ST47) to 127 (ST1), which suggests emergences within the last century. Isolates sampled geographically far apart differ by only a few SNPs, demonstrating rapid dissemination. These five STs have been recombining recently, leading to a shared pool of allelic variants potentially contributing to their increased disease propensity. The oldest clone, ST1, has spread globally; between 1940 and 2000, four new clones have emerged in Europe, which show long-distance, rapid dispersal. That a large proportion of clinical cases is caused by recently emerged and internationally dispersed clones, linked by convergent evolution, is surprising for an environmental bacterium traditionally considered to be an opportunistic pathogen. To simultaneously explain recent emergence, rapid spread and increased disease association, we hypothesize that these STs have adapted to new man-made environmental niches, which may be linked by human infection and transmission.

  10. Evidence of a Vocalic Proto-System in the Baboon (Papio papio) Suggests Pre-Hominin Speech Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Boë, Louis-Jean; Berthommier, Frédéric; Legou, Thierry; Captier, Guillaume; Kemp, Caralyn; Sawallis, Thomas R.; Becker, Yannick; Rey, Arnaud; Fagot, Joël

    2017-01-01

    Language is a distinguishing characteristic of our species, and the course of its evolution is one of the hardest problems in science. It has long been generally considered that human speech requires a low larynx, and that the high larynx of nonhuman primates should preclude their producing the vowel systems universally found in human language. Examining the vocalizations through acoustic analyses, tongue anatomy, and modeling of acoustic potential, we found that baboons (Papio papio) produce sounds sharing the F1/F2 formant structure of the human [ɨ æ ɑ ɔ u] vowels, and that similarly with humans those vocalic qualities are organized as a system on two acoustic-anatomic axes. This confirms that hominoids can produce contrasting vowel qualities despite a high larynx. It suggests that spoken languages evolved from ancient articulatory skills already present in our last common ancestor with Cercopithecoidea, about 25 MYA. PMID:28076426

  11. Childhood and Adolescent Sexual Abuse and Subsequent Sexual Risk Behavior: Evidence from Controlled Studies, Methodological Critique, and Suggestions for Research

    PubMed Central

    Senn, Theresa E.; Carey, Michael P.; Vanable, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Childhood and adolescent sexual abuse (CSA) is associated with a wide variety of adverse psychological and health outcomes, including negative sexual health outcomes. In this paper, we review the literature investigating the relation between CSA and subsequent sexual risk behaviors among men and women. Previous research has found a relatively consistent association between CSA and higher rates of sexual risk behaviors, particularly sex trading, more sexual partners, and an earlier age of first intercourse. However, there are a number of limitations to this research, including lack of a consistent definition of CSA, failure to investigate gender as a moderator, and possible confounding of the CSA experience with some of the sexual behavior outcome variables. Further, although there appears to be an association between CSA and later sexual risk behavior, researchers have not established whether this association is causal. Suggestions for future research and implications for clinical practice are discussed. PMID:18045760

  12. Evidence of a Vocalic Proto-System in the Baboon (Papio papio) Suggests Pre-Hominin Speech Precursors.

    PubMed

    Boë, Louis-Jean; Berthommier, Frédéric; Legou, Thierry; Captier, Guillaume; Kemp, Caralyn; Sawallis, Thomas R; Becker, Yannick; Rey, Arnaud; Fagot, Joël

    2017-01-01

    Language is a distinguishing characteristic of our species, and the course of its evolution is one of the hardest problems in science. It has long been generally considered that human speech requires a low larynx, and that the high larynx of nonhuman primates should preclude their producing the vowel systems universally found in human language. Examining the vocalizations through acoustic analyses, tongue anatomy, and modeling of acoustic potential, we found that baboons (Papio papio) produce sounds sharing the F1/F2 formant structure of the human [ɨ æ ɑ ɔ u] vowels, and that similarly with humans those vocalic qualities are organized as a system on two acoustic-anatomic axes. This confirms that hominoids can produce contrasting vowel qualities despite a high larynx. It suggests that spoken languages evolved from ancient articulatory skills already present in our last common ancestor with Cercopithecoidea, about 25 MYA.

  13. What Is Peromyscus? Evidence from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences suggests the need for a new classification.

    PubMed

    Platt, Roy N; Amman, Brian R; Keith, Megan S; Thompson, Cody W; Bradley, Robert D

    2015-08-03

    The evolutionary relationships between Peromyscus, Habromys, Isthmomys, Megadontomys, Neotomodon, Osgoodomys, and Podomys are poorly understood. In order to further explore the evolutionary boundaries of Peromyscus and compare potential taxonomic solutions for this diverse group and its relatives, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence data from alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1-I2), beta fibrinogen (Fgb-I7), interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (Rbp3), and cytochrome-b (Cytb). Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear genes produced similar topologies although levels of nodal support varied. The best-supported topology was obtained by combining nuclear and mitochondrial sequences. No monophyletic Peromyscus clade was supported. Instead, support was found for a clade containing Habromys, Megadontomys, Neotomodon, Osgoodomys, Podomys, and Peromyscus suggesting paraphyly of Peromyscus and confirming previous observations. Our analyses indicated an early divergence of Isthmomys from Peromyscus (approximately 8 million years ago), whereas most other peromyscine taxa emerged within the last 6 million years. To recover a monophyletic taxonomy from Peromyscus and affiliated lineages, we detail 3 taxonomic options in which Habromys, Megadontomys, Neotomodon, Osgoodomys, and Podomys are retained as genera, subsumed as subgenera, or subsumed as species groups within Peromyscus. Each option presents distinct taxonomic challenges, and the appropriate taxonomy must reflect the substantial levels of morphological divergence that characterize this group while maintaining the monophyletic relationships obtained from genetic data.

  14. What Is Peromyscus? Evidence from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences suggests the need for a new classification

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Roy N.; Amman, Brian R.; Keith, Megan S.; Thompson, Cody W.; Bradley, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary relationships between Peromyscus, Habromys, Isthmomys, Megadontomys, Neotomodon, Osgoodomys, and Podomys are poorly understood. In order to further explore the evolutionary boundaries of Peromyscus and compare potential taxonomic solutions for this diverse group and its relatives, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence data from alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1-I2), beta fibrinogen (Fgb-I7), interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (Rbp3), and cytochrome-b (Cytb). Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear genes produced similar topologies although levels of nodal support varied. The best-supported topology was obtained by combining nuclear and mitochondrial sequences. No monophyletic Peromyscus clade was supported. Instead, support was found for a clade containing Habromys, Megadontomys, Neotomodon, Osgoodomys, Podomys, and Peromyscus suggesting paraphyly of Peromyscus and confirming previous observations. Our analyses indicated an early divergence of Isthmomys from Peromyscus (approximately 8 million years ago), whereas most other peromyscine taxa emerged within the last 6 million years. To recover a monophyletic taxonomy from Peromyscus and affiliated lineages, we detail 3 taxonomic options in which Habromys, Megadontomys, Neotomodon, Osgoodomys, and Podomys are retained as genera, subsumed as subgenera, or subsumed as species groups within Peromyscus. Each option presents distinct taxonomic challenges, and the appropriate taxonomy must reflect the substantial levels of morphological divergence that characterize this group while maintaining the monophyletic relationships obtained from genetic data. PMID:26937047

  15. Suggestive Evidence That the “Blocking Antibodies” of Tumor-Bearing Individuals May Be Antigen-Antibody Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sjögren, H. O.; Hellström, I.; Bansal, S. C.; Hellström, K. E.

    1971-01-01

    Sera from mice carrying progressively growing sarcomas induced by Moloney virus or methylcholanthrene can block the cytotoxic effect of lymphocytes immune to the tumor-specific antigens of the respective neoplasms. The blocking effect can be specifically removed by absorbing sera with the respective types of tumor cells, and it can be recovered from these cells by elution at low pH. If the low pH is maintained, it is possible to separate out a low and a high molecular weight fraction from the eluates. If the fractions are added to the target cells for 45 minutes and then removed, neither of these fractions can block lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity, while a 1:1 mixture of them has a specific blocking effect. If they are admixed with the lymphocytes, incubated for 1 hr, and then allowed to incubate with the target cells and lymphocytes during the entire 2 days of the test, the low molecular weight fraction, as well as the mixture, but not the high molecular weight fraction, has a blocking activity. It is suggested that the blocking factor in sera from tumor-bearing animals, as regularly tested, is an antigen-antibody complex, capable of binding to the target cells and/or reacting with lymphocytes immune to their antigens, thus blocking the lymphocytes' reactivity; the latter reaction is postulated to be of a temporary nature. PMID:5288389

  16. Genomic, RNAseq, and Molecular Modeling Evidence Suggests That the Major Allergen Domain in Insects Evolved from a Homodimeric Origin

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Thomas A.; Perera, Lalith; London, Robert E.; Mueller, Geoffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    The major allergen domain (MA) is widely distributed in insects. The crystal structure of a single Bla g 1 MA revealed a novel protein fold in which the fundamental structure was a duplex of two subsequences (monomers), which had diverged over time. This suggested that the evolutionary origin of the MA structure may have been a homodimer of this smaller subsequence. Using publicly available genomic data, the distribution of the basic unit of this class of proteins was determined to better understand its evolutionary history. The duplication and divergence is examined at three distinct levels of resolution: 1) within the orders Diptera and Hymenoptera, 2) within one genus Drosophila, and 3) within one species Aedes aegypti. Within the family Culicidae, we have found two separate occurrences of monomers as independent genes. The organization of the gene family in A. aegypti shows a common evolutionary origin for its monomer and several closely related MAs. Molecular modeling of the A. aegypti monomer with the unique Bla g 1 fold confirms the distant evolutionary relationship and supports the feasibility of homodimer formation from a single monomer. RNAseq data for A. aegypti confirms that the monomer is expressed in the mosquito similar to other A. aegypti MAs after a blood meal. Together, these data support the contention that the detected monomer shares similar functional characteristics to related MAs in other insects. An extensive search for this domain outside of Insecta confirms that the MAs are restricted to insects. PMID:24253356

  17. Genomic, RNAseq, and molecular modeling evidence suggests that the major allergen domain in insects evolved from a homodimeric origin.

    PubMed

    Randall, Thomas A; Perera, Lalith; London, Robert E; Mueller, Geoffrey A

    2013-01-01

    The major allergen domain (MA) is widely distributed in insects. The crystal structure of a single Bla g 1 MA revealed a novel protein fold in which the fundamental structure was a duplex of two subsequences (monomers), which had diverged over time. This suggested that the evolutionary origin of the MA structure may have been a homodimer of this smaller subsequence. Using publicly available genomic data, the distribution of the basic unit of this class of proteins was determined to better understand its evolutionary history. The duplication and divergence is examined at three distinct levels of resolution: 1) within the orders Diptera and Hymenoptera, 2) within one genus Drosophila, and 3) within one species Aedes aegypti. Within the family Culicidae, we have found two separate occurrences of monomers as independent genes. The organization of the gene family in A. aegypti shows a common evolutionary origin for its monomer and several closely related MAs. Molecular modeling of the A. aegypti monomer with the unique Bla g 1 fold confirms the distant evolutionary relationship and supports the feasibility of homodimer formation from a single monomer. RNAseq data for A. aegypti confirms that the monomer is expressed in the mosquito similar to other A. aegypti MAs after a blood meal. Together, these data support the contention that the detected monomer shares similar functional characteristics to related MAs in other insects. An extensive search for this domain outside of Insecta confirms that the MAs are restricted to insects.

  18. Convergent Evidence from Mouse and Human Studies Suggests the Involvement of Zinc Finger Protein 326 Gene in Antidepressant Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Ying-Jay; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Cheng, Chih-Ya; Chen, Shiow-Yi; Chen, Tai-Jui; Yu, Younger W-Y; Nian, Fang-Shin; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Hong, Chen-Jee

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The forced swim test (FST) is a commonly used model to predict antidepressant efficacy. Uncovering the genetic basis of the model may unravel the mechanism of antidepressant treatment. Methods FVB/NJ (FVB) and C57BL/6J (B6) were first identified as the response and non-response strains to fluoxetine (a serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressant) treatment in the mouse FST. Simple-interval (SIM) and composite-interval (CIM) mappings were applied to map the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of the anti-immobility effect of fluoxetine in FST (FSTFLX) in 865 male B6×FVB-F2 mice. The brain mRNA expressions of the gene with the maximum QTL-linkage signal for FSTFLX after the FST were compared between B6 and FVB mice and also compared between fluoxetine and saline treatment. The association of the variants in the human homologue of the mouse FSTFLX-QTL gene with major depressive disorder (MDD) and antidepressant response were investigated in 1080 human subjects (MDD/control = 582/498). Results One linkage signal for FSTFLX-QTL was detected at an intronic SNP (rs6215396) of the mouse Zfp326 gene (maximal CIM-LOD = 9.36). The Zfp326 mRNA expression in the FVB thalamus was significantly down-regulated by fluoxetine in the FST, and the higher FVB-to-B6 Zfp326 mRNA expressions in the frontal cortex, striatum and hypothalamus diminished after fluoxetine treatment. Two coding-synonymous SNPs (rs2816881 and rs10922744) in the human homologue of Zfp326, ZNF326, were significantly associated with the 8-week antidepressant treatment response in the MDD patients (Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.004–0.028). Conclusions The findings suggest the involvement of the Zfp326 and ZNF326 genes in antidepressant treatment response. PMID:22666313

  19. Multiple evidence strands suggest that there may be as few as 19,000 human protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Ezkurdia, Iakes; Juan, David; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Frankish, Adam; Diekhans, Mark; Harrow, Jennifer; Vazquez, Jesus; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2014-11-15

    Determining the full complement of protein-coding genes is a key goal of genome annotation. The most powerful approach for confirming protein-coding potential is the detection of cellular protein expression through peptide mass spectrometry (MS) experiments. Here, we mapped peptides detected in seven large-scale proteomics studies to almost 60% of the protein-coding genes in the GENCODE annotation of the human genome. We found a strong relationship between detection in proteomics experiments and both gene family age and cross-species conservation. Most of the genes for which we detected peptides were highly conserved. We found peptides for >96% of genes that evolved before bilateria. At the opposite end of the scale, we identified almost no peptides for genes that have appeared since primates, for genes that did not have any protein-like features or for genes with poor cross-species conservation. These results motivated us to describe a set of 2001 potential non-coding genes based on features such as weak conservation, a lack of protein features, or ambiguous annotations from major databases, all of which correlated with low peptide detection across the seven experiments. We identified peptides for just 3% of these genes. We show that many of these genes behave more like non-coding genes than protein-coding genes and suggest that most are unlikely to code for proteins under normal circumstances. We believe that their inclusion in the human protein-coding gene catalogue should be revised as part of the ongoing human genome annotation effort. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Multiple evidence strands suggest that there may be as few as 19 000 human protein-coding genes

    PubMed Central

    Ezkurdia, Iakes; Juan, David; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Frankish, Adam; Diekhans, Mark; Harrow, Jennifer; Vazquez, Jesus; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the full complement of protein-coding genes is a key goal of genome annotation. The most powerful approach for confirming protein-coding potential is the detection of cellular protein expression through peptide mass spectrometry (MS) experiments. Here, we mapped peptides detected in seven large-scale proteomics studies to almost 60% of the protein-coding genes in the GENCODE annotation of the human genome. We found a strong relationship between detection in proteomics experiments and both gene family age and cross-species conservation. Most of the genes for which we detected peptides were highly conserved. We found peptides for >96% of genes that evolved before bilateria. At the opposite end of the scale, we identified almost no peptides for genes that have appeared since primates, for genes that did not have any protein-like features or for genes with poor cross-species conservation. These results motivated us to describe a set of 2001 potential non-coding genes based on features such as weak conservation, a lack of protein features, or ambiguous annotations from major databases, all of which correlated with low peptide detection across the seven experiments. We identified peptides for just 3% of these genes. We show that many of these genes behave more like non-coding genes than protein-coding genes and suggest that most are unlikely to code for proteins under normal circumstances. We believe that their inclusion in the human protein-coding gene catalogue should be revised as part of the ongoing human genome annotation effort. PMID:24939910

  1. Evidence suggesting that the cardiomyocyte circadian clock modulates responsiveness of the heart to hypertrophic stimuli in mice.

    PubMed

    Durgan, David J; Tsai, Ju-Yun; Grenett, Maximiliano H; Pat, Betty M; Ratcliffe, William F; Villegas-Montoya, Carolina; Garvey, Merissa E; Nagendran, Jeevan; Dyck, Jason R B; Bray, Molly S; Gamble, Karen L; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Young, Martin E

    2011-04-01

    Circadian dyssynchrony of an organism (at the whole-body level) with its environment, either through light-dark (LD) cycle or genetic manipulation of clock genes, augments various cardiometabolic diseases. The cardiomyocyte circadian clock has recently been shown to influence multiple myocardial processes, ranging from transcriptional regulation and energy metabolism to contractile function. The authors, therefore, reasoned that chronic dyssychrony of the cardiomyocyte circadian clock with its environment would precipitate myocardial maladaptation to a circadian challenge (simulated shiftwork; SSW). To test this hypothesis, 2- and 20-month-old wild-type and CCM (Cardiomyocyte Clock Mutant; a model with genetic temporal suspension of the cardiomyocyte circadian clock at the active-to-sleep phase transition) mice were subjected to chronic (16-wks) biweekly 12-h phase shifts in the LD cycle (i.e., SSW). Assessment of adaptation/maladaptation at whole-body homeostatic, gravimetric, humoral, histological, transcriptional, and cardiac contractile function levels revealed essentially identical responses between wild-type and CCM littermates. However, CCM hearts exhibited increased biventricular weight, cardiomyocyte size, and molecular markers of hypertrophy (anf, mcip1), independent of aging and/or SSW. Similarly, a second genetic model of selective temporal suspension of the cardiomyocyte circadian clock (Cardiomyocyte-specific BMAL1 Knockout [CBK] mice) exhibits increased biventricular weight and mcip1 expression. Wild-type mice exhibit 5-fold greater cardiac hypertrophic growth (and 6-fold greater anf mRNA induction) when challenged with the hypertrophic agonist isoproterenol at the active-to-sleep phase transition, relative to isoproterenol administration at the sleep-to-active phase transition. This diurnal variation was absent in CCM mice. Collectively, these data suggest that the cardiomyocyte circadian clock likely influences responsiveness of the heart to

  2. Evidence to suggest that gonadotropin-releasing hormone inhibits its own secretion by affecting hypothalamic amino acid neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Feleder, C; Jarry, H; Leonhardt, S; Moguilevsky, J A; Wuttke, W

    1996-10-01

    The mediobasal hypothalamus of rats contains gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors. These hypothalamic neurons also express the GnRH corresponding gene. Under these circumstances, the possibility exists that these GnRH receptors could be localized in other neurons, which are GnRH-receptive, unknowing the neurotransmitter quality. Therefore, we studied the in vitro effects of the GnRH agonist buserelin on GnRH, glutamate, gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) and taurine release from explanted superfused hypothalami of untreated and buserelin-pretreated (down-regulated) male rats. When buserelin was added to the superfusion medium it inhibited promptly the release of GnRH and the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate, but stimulated the release of the inhibitory neurotransmitters, GABA and taurine. Hypothalamic release of GnRH from hypothalami collected from buserelin-treated (30 micrograms/100 g b.w. twice daily for 4 days) male rats released significantly less GnRH, glutamate and more GABA and taurine. The inhibitory effect of buserelin was maintained when the superfusion medium continuously contained the GnRH analog. When superfusion of hypothalami from buserelin-pretreated animals was performed in the absence of buserelin, GnRH and glutamate release increased significantly within 45-60 min, whereas GABA and taurine release decreased at this time point. When buserelin was added to the superfusion medium 2 h after buserelin-free superfusion, GnRH and glutamate release decreased whereas GABA and taurine release increased instantaneously. Buserelin-treated rats showed significantly low values of LH and testosterone than the untreated rats. These results suggest that GnRH receptors may not only be present in GnRH axon terminals in the median eminence, but also on glutamatergic, GABAergic and taurinergic neurons by which GnRH may exert an autoinhibitory ultrashort loop feedback on its own secretion. This effect appears to be connected with glutamatergic

  3. Phylogenetic relationships of Mesoamerican spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi): Molecular evidence suggests the need for a revised taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Morales-Jimenez, Alba Lucia; Cortés-Ortiz, Liliana; Di Fiore, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Mesoamerican spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi sensu lato) are widely distributed from Mexico to northern Colombia. This group of primates includes many allopatric forms with morphologically distinct pelage color and patterning, but its taxonomy and phylogenetic history are poorly understood. We explored the genetic relationships among the different forms of Mesoamerican spider monkeys using mtDNA sequence data, and we offer a new hypothesis for the evolutionary history of the group. We collected up to ∼800 bp of DNA sequence data from hypervariable region 1 (HV1) of the control region, or D-loop, of the mitochondrion for multiple putative subspecies of Ateles geoffroyi sensu lato. Both maximum likelihood and Bayesian reconstructions, using Ateles paniscus as an outgroup, showed that (1) A. fusciceps and A. geoffroyi form two different monophyletic groups and (2) currently recognized subspecies of A. geoffroyi are not monophyletic. Within A. geoffroyi, our phylogenetic analysis revealed little concordance between any of the classifications proposed for this taxon and their phylogenetic relationships, therefore a new classification is needed for this group. Several possible clades with recent divergence times (1.7-0.8 Ma) were identified within Ateles geoffroyi sensu lato. Some previously recognized taxa were not separated by our data (e.g., A. g. vellerosus and A. g. yucatanensis), while one distinct clade had never been described as a different evolutionary unit based on pelage or geography (Ateles geoffroyi ssp. indet. from El Salvador). Based on well-supported phylogenetic relationships, our results challenge previous taxonomic arrangements for Mesoamerican spider monkeys. We suggest a revised arrangement based on our data and call for a thorough taxonomic revision of this group. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. What do herbalists suggest to diabetic patients in order to improve glycemic control? Evaluation of scientific evidence and potential risks.

    PubMed

    Cicero, A F G; Derosa, G; Gaddi, A

    2004-09-01

    In the course of 12 continuing education seminars given in different regions of Italy in 2001, we distributed a questionnaire to all the attending herbalists asking information about the herbal remedy and dietary supplement they mainly recommended to subjects who required a "natural" treatment to control glycemia. We distributed 720 questionnaires and we received 685 completed ones. We have compiled a short review on the efficacy and safety of the 10 most frequently advised products for each category. The 10 more frequently suggested herbal remedies were gymnema, psyllium, fenugreek, bilberry, garlic, Chinese ginseng, dandelion, burdock, prickly pear cactus, and bitter melon. The 10 most frequently recommended dietary supplements were biotin, vanadium, chromium, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc, selenium, alpha-lipoic acid, and fructooligosaccharides. The majority of the products recommended by Italian herbalists may be efficacious in reducing glycemia. If a diabetic patient is already assuming products that even slightly reduce glycemia, we risk to underestimate the level of glucose intolerance, while if the patient stops the complementary treatment after initiating pharmaceutical therapy, in the subsequent visit we may underestimate the effect of our prescription. Therefore, if doctors are to have a role in gate-keeping or advising patients about complementary and alternative medicine, they need to be familiar with this type of medicine. If they choose otherwise, then the provision of complementary and alternative medicine will continue to be patchy and largely outside the conventional care framework, perhaps through a growing network of parallel care providers involving a large number of non-medically qualified practitioners, who patients will continue to access directly.

  5. Possible evidence for contemporary doming of the Adirondack Mountains, New York, and suggested implications for regional tectonics and seismicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isachsen, Y.W.

    1975-01-01

    The Adirondack Mountain massif is a dissected elongate dome having a north-northeast axis about 190 km long, and an east-west dimension of about 140 km. The dome exposes a core of Proterozoic metamorphic rocks from which the Paleozoic cover rocks have been eroded, except in several north-northeast-trending graben. The minimum amplitude of the dome, based on a 'reconstruction' of the Proterozoic-Paleozoic unconformity is 1600 m. The Adirondack dome is an anomalous feature of the eastern edge of the North American craton. It differs from other uplifts in the Interior Lowlands of the craton not only in terms of the greater combined amplitude and area of its uplift, but in the present high elevation of its Mountains (up to 1600 m) which are unequalled on the craton except along the Rocky Mountain front and in the Torngat Mountains of northernmost Labrador. This prompted an interest in the possibility that the Adirondack dome has undergone neotectonic regeneration and may be undergoing domical uplift at the present time. Accordingly, leveling records were consulted at the National Geodetic Survey data base in Rockville, Maryland, and used to construct leveling profiles. The most informative of these extends north-south along the block-faulted eastern flank of the Adirondack dome, extending from Saratoga Springs to Rouses Point, a distance of 245 km. A comparison of the level lines for 1955 and 1973 demonstrates that arching has occurred. An uplift of 40 mm along the central portion of the line, and a corresponding subsidence of 50 mm at the northern end, has produced a net increase in the amplitude of arching of 90 mm in the 18-year interval. This differential uplift, particularly with subsidence at the northern end, argues for a tectonic rather than glacio-isostatic mechanism. Pending releveling across the center of the Adirondack dome, it is tempting to extrapolate the releveling profile and suggest that the Adirondacks as a whole may be undergoing contemporary doming

  6. Characteristics of anti-Legionella antibodies in patients infected with Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1, 6, and 10.

    PubMed Central

    van Zwet, T L; Meenhorst, P L; Leijh, P C; Daha, M R; van Furth, R

    1988-01-01

    Nosocomial infections with Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 and 10 in the Leiden University Hospital and infections with L. pneumophila serogroup 6 in neighboring hospitals gave us an opportunity to study the development of opsonizing antibodies against L. pneumophila serogroups 1, 6, and 10 in the serum of 13 patients. Seven of these patients were infected with L. pneumophila serogroup 1, two were infected with serogroup 6, and four were infected with serogroup 10. The opsonic cross-reactivity of antibodies against these serogroups of L. pneumophila and complement involvement in opsonization were also investigated. Convalescent-phase sera from patients infected with L. pneumophila serogroup 1 or 6 were able to promote ingestion of these serogroups by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, whereas ingestion of L. pneumophila serogroup 10 was enhanced only in the presence of convalescent-phase sera from patients infected with this serogroup. Opsonization of L. pneumophila serogroups 1, 6, and 10 was complement dependent. PMID:3235666

  7. Toxicity and SidJ-Mediated Suppression of Toxicity Require Distinct Regions in the SidE Family of Legionella pneumophila Effectors.

    PubMed

    Havey, James C; Roy, Craig R

    2015-09-01

    Intracellular bacteria use a variety of strategies to evade degradation and create a replicative niche. Legionella pneumophila is an intravacuolar pathogen that establishes a replicative niche through the secretion of more than 300 effector proteins. The function of most effectors remains to be determined. Toxicity in yeast has been used to identify functional domains and elucidate the biochemical function of effectors. A library of L. pneumophila effectors was screened using an expression plasmid that produces low levels of each protein. This screen identified the effector SdeA as a protein that confers a strong toxic phenotype that inhibits yeast replication. The toxicity of SdeA was suppressed in cells producing the effector SidJ. The effector SdeA is a member of the SidE family of L. pneumophila effector proteins. All SidE orthologs encoded by the Philadelphia isolate of Legionella pneumophila were toxic to yeast, and SidJ suppressed the toxicity of each. We identified a conserved central region in the SidE proteins that was sufficient to mediate yeast toxicity. Surprisingly, SidJ did not suppress toxicity when this central region was produced in yeast. We determined that the amino-terminal region of SidE was essential for SidJ-mediated suppression of toxicity. Thus, there is a genetic interaction that links the activity of SidJ and the amino-terminal region of SidE, which is required to modulate the toxic activity displayed by the central region of the SidE protein. This suggests a complex mechanism by which the L. pneumophila effector SidJ modulates the function of the SidE proteins after translocation into host cells.

  8. Cell biology and immunology lessons taught by Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenhan; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular pathogen capable of replicating within a broad range of hosts. One unique feature of this pathogen is the cohort of ca. 300 virulence factors (effectors) delivered into host cells via its Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. Study of these proteins has produced novel insights into the mechanisms of host function modulation by pathogens, the regulation of essential processes of eukaryotic cells and of immunosurveillance. In this review, we will briefly discuss the roles of some of these effectors in the creation of a niche permissive for bacterial replication in phagocytes and recent advancements in the dissection of the innate immune detection mechanisms by challenging immune cells with L. pneumophila.

  9. Virulence Properties of the Legionella Pneumophila Cell Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Shevchuk, Olga; Jäger, Jens; Steinert, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial envelope plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the structure and molecular composition of the Legionella pneumophila cell envelope. We describe lipopolysaccharides biosynthesis and the biological activities of membrane and periplasmic proteins and discuss their decisive functions during the pathogen–host interaction. In addition to adherence, invasion, and intracellular survival of L. pneumophila, special emphasis is laid on iron acquisition, detoxification, key elicitors of the immune response and the diverse functions of outer membrane vesicles. The critical analysis of the literature reveals that the dynamics and phenotypic plasticity of the Legionella cell surface during the different metabolic stages require more attention in the future. PMID:21747794

  10. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 14 from a human source.

    PubMed Central

    Pastoris, M. C.; Berchicci, C.; Pallonari, G.

    1992-01-01

    A strain of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 14 was isolated during a retrospective study, after death from the sputum of a patient who had had acute leukaemia and pneumonia. This is the third strain of that serogroup to be isolated from a human source. This event emphasises the importance of performing culture as well as serological tests, so as to detect cases of legionellosis caused by strains which rarely cause fatal clinical illness. PMID:1517467

  11. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 12 isolated from human and environmental sources.

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, W L; Wilkinson, H W; Benson, R F; Brenner, D J

    1987-01-01

    A Legionella-like organism (strain 570-CO-H [= ATCC 43290]) isolated from the lung tissue of a patient with pneumonia was shown by growth, as well as physiological, serological, and genetic characteristics, to belong to a new Legionella pneumophila serogroup, serogroup 12. Two additional strains were detected with antiserum specific for strain 570-CO-H. These strains were isolated from environmental sources. PMID:3571461

  12. Legionella pneumophila pangenome reveals strain-specific virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Legionella pneumophila subsp. pneumophila is a gram-negative γ-Proteobacterium and the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a form of epidemic pneumonia. It has a water-related life cycle. In industrialized cities L. pneumophila is commonly encountered in refrigeration towers and water pipes. Infection is always via infected aerosols to humans. Although many efforts have been made to eradicate Legionella from buildings, it still contaminates the water systems. The town of Alcoy (Valencian Region, Spain) has had recurrent outbreaks since 1999. The strain "Alcoy 2300/99" is a particularly persistent and recurrent strain that was isolated during one of the most significant outbreaks between the years 1999-2000. Results We have sequenced the genome of the particularly persistent L. pneumophila strain Alcoy 2300/99 and have compared it with four previously sequenced strains known as Philadelphia (USA), Lens (France), Paris (France) and Corby (England). Pangenome analysis facilitated the identification of strain-specific features, as well as some that are shared by two or more strains. We identified: (1) three islands related to anti-drug resistance systems; (2) a system for transport and secretion of heavy metals; (3) three systems related to DNA transfer; (4) two CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) systems, known to provide resistance against phage infections, one similar in the Lens and Alcoy strains, and another specific to the Paris strain; and (5) seven islands of phage-related proteins, five of which seem to be strain-specific and two shared. Conclusions The dispensable genome disclosed by the pangenomic analysis seems to be a reservoir of new traits that have mainly been acquired by horizontal gene transfer and could confer evolutionary advantages over strains lacking them. PMID:20236513

  13. Absence of siderophore-like activity in Legionella pneumophila supernatants.

    PubMed Central

    Liles, M R; Cianciotto, N P

    1996-01-01

    Conflicting reports have been given as to the existence of a Legionella pneumophila siderophore. Hence, we rigorously examined the reported siderophore-like activity using the chrome azurol S indicator. Although chrome azurol S reactivity was detected in supernatants, control experiments indicate that it was due to cysteine in the media. When bacteria were cultured in media without cysteine, no siderophores were detected. PMID:8613408

  14. Ribosomal Mutations Conferring Macrolide Resistance in Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Ginevra, Christophe; Jacotin, Nathalie; Forey, Françoise; Chastang, Joëlle; Kay, Elisabeth; Etienne, Jerome; Lina, Gérard; Doublet, Patricia; Jarraud, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monitoring the emergence of antibiotic resistance is a recent issue in the treatment of Legionnaires' disease. Macrolides are recommended as first-line therapy, but resistance mechanisms have not been studied in Legionella species. Our aim was to determine the molecular basis of macrolide resistance in L. pneumophila. Twelve independent lineages from a common susceptible L. pneumophila ancestral strain were propagated under conditions of erythromycin or azithromycin pressure to produce high-level macrolide resistance. Whole-genome sequencing was performed on 12 selected clones, and we investigated mutations common to all lineages. We reconstructed the dynamics of mutation for each lineage and demonstrated their involvement in decreased susceptibility to macrolides. The resistant mutants were produced in a limited number of passages to obtain a 4,096-fold increase in erythromycin MICs. Mutations affected highly conserved 5-amino-acid regions of L4 and L22 ribosomal proteins and of domain V of 23S rRNA (G2057, A2058, A2059, and C2611 nucleotides). The early mechanisms mainly affected L4 and L22 proteins and induced a 32-fold increase in the MICs of the selector drug. Additional mutations related to 23S rRNA mostly occurred later and were responsible for a major increase of macrolide MICs, depending on the mutated nucleotide, the substitution, and the number of mutated genes among the three rrl copies. The major mechanisms of the decreased susceptibility to macrolides in L. pneumophila and their dynamics were determined. The results showed that macrolide resistance could be easily selected in L. pneumophila and warrant further investigations in both clinical and environmental settings. PMID:28069647

  15. Ribosomal Mutations Conferring Macrolide Resistance in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Descours, Ghislaine; Ginevra, Christophe; Jacotin, Nathalie; Forey, Françoise; Chastang, Joëlle; Kay, Elisabeth; Etienne, Jerome; Lina, Gérard; Doublet, Patricia; Jarraud, Sophie

    2017-03-01

    Monitoring the emergence of antibiotic resistance is a recent issue in the treatment of Legionnaires' disease. Macrolides are recommended as first-line therapy, but resistance mechanisms have not been studied in Legionella species. Our aim was to determine the molecular basis of macrolide resistance in L. pneumophila Twelve independent lineages from a common susceptible L. pneumophila ancestral strain were propagated under conditions of erythromycin or azithromycin pressure to produce high-level macrolide resistance. Whole-genome sequencing was performed on 12 selected clones, and we investigated mutations common to all lineages. We reconstructed the dynamics of mutation for each lineage and demonstrated their involvement in decreased susceptibility to macrolides. The resistant mutants were produced in a limited number of passages to obtain a 4,096-fold increase in erythromycin MICs. Mutations affected highly conserved 5-amino-acid regions of L4 and L22 ribosomal proteins and of domain V of 23S rRNA (G2057, A2058, A2059, and C2611 nucleotides). The early mechanisms mainly affected L4 and L22 proteins and induced a 32-fold increase in the MICs of the selector drug. Additional mutations related to 23S rRNA mostly occurred later and were responsible for a major increase of macrolide MICs, depending on the mutated nucleotide, the substitution, and the number of mutated genes among the three rrl copies. The major mechanisms of the decreased susceptibility to macrolides in L. pneumophila and their dynamics were determined. The results showed that macrolide resistance could be easily selected in L. pneumophila and warrant further investigations in both clinical and environmental settings.

  16. Plasmid Isolation in Legionella pneumophila and Legionella-like Organisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-22

    AD-A090 844 ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH INST OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES FR-ETC FIG 6/5 PLASMID ISOLATI ON IN LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA AND LEGIONELLA -LIKE--ETC(U... Legionella -like Organisms PERRY MIKESELL, J. W. EZZELL AND GREGORY B. KNUDSON United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases Fort... Hospital , Pittsburgh, Pa.). Growth conditions. Legionella -like bacteria were cultured on charcoal yeast extract agar (5), yeast extract broth (20) or

  17. Viable Legionella Pneumophila Not Detectable by Culture on Agar Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. , N/A 1 1. TITLE (JIncJuue Security Ciaisuicarlon) Viable Legionella Pneumophila not Detectable by Culture on...COSATICODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) GROUP SUB-GROUP LEGIONELLA FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY...LEGIONNMIRES’-- DISEASE VIABLE NON-CULTURABLE CELLS co mntmue on reverse it necessary and identify by block number) ,-cesio(ri o NTIS CRA&I OTU AP- 0IDTIC

  18. Legionella Pneumophila and TATLOCK Bacterium: Simple, Effective Giemsa Stain.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-07

    presumptive diagnosis of Legionnaires ’ disease and Pittsburgh pneumonia. i9 ! I __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ THE ORGANISMS which cause so called Legionnaires ...demonstrating L. pneumophila in impression smears and scrapings of fresh or formalin-fixed lung tissue from a patient who died of Legionnaires ’ disease , and...erium- (3) in t;iem .k stai:ned impression :;mcars of Lullg tissue from suspected cases of Legionnaires ’ Disease and Pittsburgh pneumonia may be i

  19. Association of flagellum expression and intracellular growth of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Pruckler, J M; Benson, R F; Moyenuddin, M; Martin, W T; Fields, B S

    1995-01-01

    We examined the role of the flagella of Legionella pneumophila in the infection of amoebae and human monocyte-like cells. Insertional mutants were constructed with mini-Tn10. Ten mutants (F-) which did not react with polyclonal L. pneumophila antiflagellar antisera were identified. Ten randomly selected mutants (F+) that did react with the polyclonal antiflagellar antiserum were also identified. The infectivity of these 20 mutants in Hartmannella vermiformis and human U937 cells was characterized. Seven of the 10 F- mutants were attenuated in their ability to multiply in the amoebae during the first 3 days of coincubation and failed to multiply in U937 cells. Three of the 10 F- mutants multiplied as well as the wild-type parent strain did in amoebae and to a limited degree in U937 cells. None of the 10 F+ mutants were attenuated in either the amoebae or U937 cells. While the flagellar structure is not essential for virulence, the ability of L. pneumophila to infect amoebae and human phagocytic cells appears to be linked to flagellar expression. We believe that the attenuated F- mutants contain insertions in genes critical to both flagellum expression and the infection process. PMID:7591159

  20. The many forms of a pleomorphic bacterial pathogen—the developmental network of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Peter; Abdelhady, Hany; Garduño, Rafael A.

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a natural intracellular bacterial parasite of free-living freshwater protozoa and an accidental human pathogen that causes Legionnaires' disease. L. pneumophila differentiates, and does it in style. Recent experimental data on L. pneumophila's differentiation point at the existence of a complex network that involves many developmental forms. We intend readers to: (i) understand the biological relevance of L. pneumophila's forms found in freshwater and their potential to transmit Legionnaires' disease, and (ii) learn that the common depiction of L. pneumophila's differentiation as a biphasic developmental cycle that alternates between a replicative and a transmissive form is but an oversimplification of the actual process. Our specific objectives are to provide updates on the molecular factors that regulate L. pneumophila's differentiation (Section The Differentiation Process and Its Regulation), and describe the developmental network of L. pneumophila (Section Dissecting Lp's Developmental Network), which for clarity's sake we have dissected into five separate developmental cycles. Finally, since each developmental form seems to contribute differently to the human pathogenic process and the transmission of Legionnaires' disease, readers are presented with a challenge to develop novel methods to detect the various L. pneumophila forms present in water (Section Practical Implications), as a means to improve our assessment of risk and more effectively prevent legionellosis outbreaks. PMID:25566200

  1. Whole-Genome Mapping as a Novel High-Resolution Typing Tool for Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Thijs; Euser, Sjoerd M; Landman, Fabian; Bruin, Jacob P; IJzerman, Ed P; den Boer, Jeroen W; Schouls, Leo M

    2015-10-01

    Legionella is the causative agent for Legionnaires' disease (LD) and is responsible for several large outbreaks in the world. More than 90% of LD cases are caused by Legionella pneumophila, and studies on the origin and transmission routes of this pathogen rely on adequate molecular characterization of isolates. Current typing of L. pneumophila mainly depends on sequence-based typing (SBT). However, studies have shown that in some outbreak situations, SBT does not have sufficient discriminatory power to distinguish between related and nonrelated L. pneumophila isolates. In this study, we used a novel high-resolution typing technique, called whole-genome mapping (WGM), to differentiate between epidemiologically related and nonrelated L. pneumophila isolates. Assessment of the method by various validation experiments showed highly reproducible results, and WGM was able to confirm two well-documented Dutch L. pneumophila outbreaks. Comparison of whole-genome maps of the two outbreaks together with WGMs of epidemiologically nonrelated L. pneumophila isolates showed major differences between the maps, and WGM yielded a higher discriminatory power than SBT. In conclusion, WGM can be a valuable alternative to perform outbreak investigations of L. pneumophila in real time since the turnaround time from culture to comparison of the L. pneumophila maps is less than 24 h.

  2. Presence and Persistence of Viable, Clinically Relevant Legionella pneumophila Bacteria in Garden Soil in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van Heijnsbergen, E.; van Deursen, A.; Bouwknegt, M.; Bruin, J. P.; Schalk, J. A. C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Garden soils were investigated as reservoirs and potential sources of pathogenic Legionella bacteria. Legionella bacteria were detected in 22 of 177 garden soil samples (12%) by amoebal coculture. Of these 22 Legionella-positive soil samples, seven contained Legionella pneumophila. Several other species were found, including the pathogenic Legionella longbeachae (4 gardens) and Legionella sainthelensi (9 gardens). The L. pneumophila isolates comprised 15 different sequence types (STs), and eight of these STs were previously isolated from patients according to the European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI) database. Six gardens that were found to be positive for L. pneumophila were resampled after several months, and in three gardens, L. pneumophila was again isolated. One of these gardens was resampled four times throughout the year and was found to be positive for L. pneumophila on all occasions. IMPORTANCE Tracking the source of infection for sporadic cases of Legionnaires' disease (LD) has proven to be hard. L. pneumophila ST47, the sequence type that is most frequently isolated from LD patients in the Netherlands, is rarely found in potential environmental sources. As L. pneumophila ST47 was previously isolated from a garden soil sample during an outbreak investigation, garden soils were investigated as reservoirs and potential sources of pathogenic Legionella bacteria. The detection of viable, clinically relevant Legionella strains indicates that garden soil is a potential source of Legionella bacteria, and future research should assess the public health implication of the presence of L. pneumophila in garden soil. PMID:27316958

  3. Influence of copper surfaces on biofilm formation by Legionella pneumophila in potable water.

    PubMed

    Gião, M S; Wilks, S A; Keevil, C W

    2015-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen that can cause Legionnaires' disease, a fatal pneumonia, or Pontiac fever, a mild form of disease. Copper is an antimicrobial material used for thousands of years. Its incorporation in several surface materials to control the transmission of pathogens has been gaining importance in the past decade. In this work, the ability of copper to control the survival of L. pneumophila in biofilms was studied. For that, the incorporation of L. pneumophila in polymicrobial drinking water biofilms formed on copper, PVC and PEX, and L. pneumophila mono-species biofilms formed on copper and uPVC were studied by comparing cultivable and total numbers (quantified by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) hybridisation). L. pneumophila was never recovered by culture from heterotrophic biofilms; however, PNA-positive numbers were slightly higher in biofilms formed on copper (5.9 × 10(5) cells cm(-2)) than on PVC (2.8 × 10(5) cells cm(-2)) and PEX (1.7 × 10(5) cells cm(-2)). L. pneumophila mono-species biofilms grown on copper gave 6.9 × 10(5) cells cm(-2) for PNA-positive cells and 4.8 × 10(5) CFU cm(-2) for cultivable numbers, showing that copper is not directly effective in killing L. pneumophila. Therefore previous published studies showing inactivation of L. pneumophila by copper surfaces in potable water polymicrobial species biofilms must be carefully interpreted.

  4. Iron Availability Modulates the Persistence of Legionella pneumophila in Complex Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Portier, Emilie; Bertaux, Joanne; Labanowski, Jérôme; Hechard, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacteria found in biofilms in freshwater. Iron is an essential nutrient for L. pneumophila growth. In this study, complex biofilms were developed using river water spiked with L. pneumophila, and the persistence of L. pneumophila in these complex biofilms was evaluated. In order to study the role of iron in the persistence of L. pneumophila, river water was supplied with either iron pyrophosphate or iron chelators (deferoxamine mesylate, DFX for ferric iron and dipyridyl, DIP for ferrous iron) to modulate iron availability. The addition of iron pyrophosphate and DFX did not markedly affect the persistence of L. pneumophila in the biofilms, whereas that of DIP had a beneficial effect. Since DIP specifically chelates ferrous iron, we hypothesized that DIP may protect L. pneumophila from the deleterious effects of ferrous iron. In conclusion, ferrous iron appears to be important for the persistence of L. pneumophila in complex biofilms. However, further studies are needed in order to obtain a better understanding of the role of ferrous iron in the behavior of this bacterium in the environment. PMID:27629106

  5. A bacterial protein promotes the recognition of the Legionella pneumophila vacuole by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Khweek, Arwa A; Caution, Kyle; Akhter, Anwari; Abdulrahman, Basant A; Tazi, Mia; Hassan, Hoda; Majumdar, Neal; Doran, Andrew; Guirado, Evelyn; Schlesinger, Larry S; Shuman, Howard; Amer, Amal O

    2013-05-01

    Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) is an intracellular bacterium of human alveolar macrophages that causes Legionnaires' disease. In contrast to humans, most inbred mouse strains are restrictive to L. pneumophila replication. We demonstrate that autophagy targets L. pneumophila vacuoles to lysosomes and that this process requires ubiquitination of L. pneumophila vacuoles and the subsequent binding of the autophagic adaptor p62/SQSTM1 to ubiquitinated vacuoles. The L. pneumophila legA9 encodes for an ankyrin-containing protein with unknown role. We show that the legA9 mutant replicate in WT mice and their bone marrow-derived macrophages. This is the first L. pneumophila mutant to be found to replicate in WT bone marrow-derived macrophages other than the Fla mutant. Less legA9 mutant-containing vacuoles acquired ubiquitin labeling and p62/SQSTM1 staining, evading autophagy uptake and avoiding lysosomal fusion. Thus, we describe a bacterial protein that targets the L. pneumophila-containing vacuole for autophagy uptake.

  6. Temperature-dependent parasitic relationship between Legionella pneumophila and a free-living amoeba (Acanthamoeba castellanii).

    PubMed

    Ohno, Akira; Kato, Naoyuki; Sakamoto, Ryota; Kimura, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2008-07-01

    We analyzed the effects of temperature on the interaction of Legionella pneumophila with Acanthamoeba castellanii. At <20 degrees C, overexpression of type 1 metacaspase, a stimulator of A. castellanii encystation, was associated with a reduced number of bacteria within amoeba. At low temperatures, A. castellanii seems to eliminate L. pneumophila by encystation and digestion.

  7. Subtyping of Legionella pneumophila isolates by arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, E; Camaró, M L; Carbonell, E; Sacristán, T; Martí, A; Pellicer, S; Llorca, J; Herrero, P; Dasí, M A

    1995-09-01

    Arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) was used to differentiate strains of Legionella pneumophila isolated from different water sources in a resort hotel in Benidorm, Alicante, Spain, where an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease occurred among a group of tourists between 65 and 80 years of age. All isolates were L. pneumophila serogroup 1, subtype Pontiac (Knoxville 1). Five different patterns (P1 to P5) were obtained by AP-PCR. The number of bands per pattern varied between 4 and 11. Patterns P1 and P2 represented 60 and 20% of L. pneumophila isolates, respectively. Since different subpopulations of L. pneumophila coexisted (up to three different AP-PCR patterns were identified in a single room), it was not possible to link an individual L. pneumophila strain to the occurrence of this outbreak.

  8. A case of pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 12 and treated successfully with imipenem.

    PubMed

    Nishizuka, Midori; Suzuki, Hiroki; Ara, Tomoka; Watanabe, Mari; Morita, Mami; Sato, Chisa; Tsuchida, Fumihiro; Seto, Junji; Amemura-Maekawa, Junko; Kura, Fumiaki; Takeda, Hiroaki

    2014-06-01

    The patient was an 83-year-old man hospitalized for Haemophilus influenzae pneumonia, who developed recurrent pneumonia after improvement of the initial episode. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 12 was isolated from the sputum, accompanied by increased serum antibody titers to L. pneumophila serogroup 12. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed as having Legionella pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila serogroup 12. Case reports of pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila serogroup 12 are rare, and the case described herein is the first report of clinical isolation of this organism in Japan. When the genotype was determined by the protocol of The European Working Group for Legionella Infections (Sequence-Based Typing [SBT] for epidemiological typing of L. pneumophila, Version 3.1), the sequence type was ST68. Imipenem/cilastatin therapy was found to be effective for the treatment of Legionella pneumonia in this patient.

  9. Exploring the Legionella pneumophila positivity rate in hotel water samples from Antalya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sepin Özen, Nevgün; Tuğlu Ataman, Şenay; Emek, Mestan

    2017-05-01

    The genus Legionella is a fastidious Gram-negative bacteria widely distributed in natural waters and man made water supply systems. Legionella pneumophila is the aetiological agent of approximately 90% of reported Legionellosis cases, and serogroup 1 is the most frequent cause of infections. Legionnaires' disease is often associated with travel and continues to be a public health concern at present. The correct water management quality practices and rapid methods for analyzing Legionella species in environmental water is a key point for the prevention of Legionnaires' disease outbreaks. This study aimed to evaluate the positivity rates and serotyping of Legionella species from water samples in the region of Antalya, Turkey, which is an important tourism center. During January-December 2010, a total of 1403 samples of water that were collected from various hotels (n = 56) located in Antalya were investigated for Legionella pneumophila. All samples were screened for L. pneumophila by culture method according to "ISO 11731-2" criteria. The culture positive Legionella strains were serologically identified by latex agglutination test. A total of 142 Legionella pneumophila isolates were recovered from 21 (37.5%) of 56 hotels. The total frequency of L. pneumophila isolation from water samples was found as 10.1%. Serological typing of 142 Legionella isolates by latex agglutination test revealed that strains belonging to L. pneumophila serogroups 2-14 predominated in the examined samples (85%), while strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 were less numerous (15%). According to our knowledge, our study with the greatest number of water samples from Turkey demonstrates that L. pneumophila serogroups 2-14 is the most common isolate. Rapid isolation of L. pneumophila from environmental water samples is essential for the investigation of travel related outbreaks and the possible resources. Further studies are needed to have epidemiological data and to determine the types of L

  10. Essential Role for the Legionella pneumophila Rep Helicase Homologue in Intracellular Infection of Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harb, Omar S.; Abu Kwaik, Yousef

    2000-01-01

    We have previously isolated 32 mutants of Legionella pneumophila that are defective in the infection of mammalian cells but not protozoa. The mutated loci have been designated macrophage-specific infectivity (mil) loci. In this study we characterized the mil mutant GK11. This mutant was incapable of growth within U937 macrophage-like cells and WI-26 alveolar epithelial cells. This defect in intracellular replication correlated with a defect in cytopathogenicity to these cells. Sequence analysis of the GK11 locus revealed it to be highly similar to rep helicase genes of other bacteria. Since helicase mutants of Escherichia coli are hypersensitive to thymine starvation, we examined the sensitivity of GK11 to thymineless death (TLD). In the absence of thymine and thymidine, mutant GK11 did not undergo TLD but was defective for in vitro growth, and the defect was partially restored when these compounds were added to the growth medium. In addition, supplementation with thymidine or thymine partially restored the ability of GK11 to grow within and kill U937 macrophage-like cells. The data suggested that the low levels of thymine or thymidine in the L. pneumophila phagosome contributed to the defect of GK11 within macrophages. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we determined the effect of the mutation in the Rep helicase homologue on the intracellular trafficking of GK11 within macrophages. In contrast to the wild-type strain, phagosomes harboring GK11 colocalized with several late endosomal/lysosomal markers, including LAMP-1, LAMP-2, and cathepsin D. In addition, only 50% of the GK11 phagosomes colocalized with the endoplasmic reticulum marker BiP 4 h postinfection. Colocalization of BiP with GK11 phagosomes was absent 6 h postinfection, while 90% of the wild-type phagosomes colocalized with this marker at both time points. We propose that the low level of thymine within the L. pneumophila phagosome in combination with simultaneous exposure to multiple stress

  11. The major iron-containing protein of Legionella pneumophila is an aconitase homologous with the human iron-responsive element-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Mengaud, J M; Horwitz, M A

    1993-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has high iron requirements, and its intracellular growth in human monocytes is dependent on the availability of intracellular iron. To learn more about iron metabolism in L. pneumophila, we have undertaken an analysis of the iron proteins of the bacterium. We first developed an assay to identify proteins by 59Fe labelling and nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The assay revealed seven iron proteins (IPs) with apparent molecular weights of 500, 450, 250, 210, 150, 130, and 85. IP150 comigrates with superoxide dismutase activity and is probably the Fe-superoxide dismutase of L. pneumophila. IP210 is the major iron-containing protein (MICP). To identify and characterize MICP, we purified the protein and cloned and sequenced its gene. MICP is a monomeric protein containing 891 amino acids, and it has a calculated molecular mass of 98,147 Da. Analysis of the sequence revealed that MICP has two interesting homologies. First, MICP is highly homologous with the human iron-responsive element-binding protein, consistent with the hypothesis that this critical iron-regulatory molecule of humans has a prokaryotic ancestor. Second, MICP is highly homologous with the Escherichia coli aconitase and to a lesser extent with porcine heart mitochondrial aconitase. Consistent with this, we found that MICP exhibits aconitase activity. In contrast to other aconitases, MICP has a single amino acid change of a potentially deleterious type at a site thought to be critical for substrate binding and enzymatic activity. However, the specific activity of MICP is roughly comparable to that of other aconitases, suggesting that the mutation has at most a mild effect on the aconitase activity of MICP. The abundance of MICP in L. pneumophila suggests either that L. pneumophila requires high aconitase and perhaps tricarboxylic acid cycle activity or that the bacterium requires large amounts of this protein to serve an additional role in bacterial physiology. A

  12. Two Cases of Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia with Prolonged Neurologic Symptoms and Brain Hypoperfusion on Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Miura, You; Seto, Akira; Kanazawa, Minoru; Nagata, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral and cerebellar symptoms are frequently associated with Legionnaires' disease. However, corresponding brain lesions are difficult to demonstrate using either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We report here two patients with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia accompanied by prolonged neurologic symptoms. In contrast to brain CT and MRI, which failed to detect any abnormalities, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed multiple sites of hypoperfusion within the brains of both patients. These cases suggest that vasculopathy, which is detectable by SPECT, might be one of the causes of neurologic symptoms in patients with Legionnaires' disease. PMID:27478660

  13. Secreted enzymatic activities of wild-type and pilD-deficient Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Aragon, V; Kurtz, S; Flieger, A; Neumeister, B; Cianciotto, N P

    2000-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the agent of Legionnaires' disease, is an intracellular pathogen of protozoa and macrophages. Previously, we had determined that the Legionella pilD gene is involved in type IV pilus biogenesis, type II protein secretion, intracellular infection, and virulence. Since the loss of pili and a protease do not account for the infection defect exhibited by a pilD-deficient strain, we sought to define other secreted proteins absent in the mutant. Based upon the release of p-nitrophenol (pNP) from p-nitrophenyl phosphate, acid phosphatase activity was detected in wild-type but not in pilD mutant supernatants. Mutant supernatants also did not release either pNP from p-nitrophenyl caprylate and palmitate or free fatty acid from 1-monopalmitoylglycerol, suggesting that they lack a lipase-like activity. However, since wild-type samples failed to release free fatty acids from 1,2-dipalmitoylglycerol or to cleave a triglyceride derivative, this secreted activity should be viewed as an esterase-monoacylglycerol lipase. The mutant supernatants were defective for both release of free fatty acids from phosphatidylcholine and degradation of RNA, indicating that PilD-negative bacteria lack a secreted phospholipase A (PLA) and nuclease. Finally, wild-type but not mutant supernatants liberated pNP from p-nitrophenylphosphorylcholine (pNPPC). Characterization of a new set of mutants defective for pNPPC-hydrolysis indicated that this wild-type activity is due to a novel enzyme, as opposed to a PLC or another known enzyme. Some, but not all, of these mutants were greatly impaired for intracellular infection, suggesting that a second regulator or processor of the pNPPC hydrolase is critical for L. pneumophila virulence.

  14. The Surfactant of Legionella pneumophila Is Secreted in a TolC-Dependent Manner and Is Antagonistic toward Other Legionella Species ▿†

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Catherine R.; Burnside, Denise M.; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.

    2011-01-01

    When Legionella pneumophila grows on agar plates, it secretes a surfactant that promotes flagellum- and pilus-independent “sliding” motility. We isolated three mutants that were defective for surfactant. The first two had mutations in genes predicted to encode cytoplasmic enzymes involved in lipid metabolism. These genes mapped to two adjacent operons that we designated bbcABCDEF and bbcGHIJK. Backcrossing and complementation confirmed the importance of the bbc genes and suggested that the Legionella surfactant is lipid containing. The third mutant had an insertion in tolC. TolC is the outer membrane part of various trimolecular complexes involved in multidrug efflux and type I protein secretion. Complementation of the tolC mutant restored sliding motility. Mutants defective for an inner membrane partner of TolC also lacked a surfactant, confirming that TolC promotes surfactant secretion. L. pneumophila (lspF) mutants lacking type II protein secretion (T2S) are also impaired for a surfactant. When the tolC and lspF mutants were grown next to each other, the lsp mutant secreted surfactant, suggesting that TolC and T2S conjoin to mediate surfactant secretion, with one being the conduit for surfactant export and the other the exporter of a molecule that is required for induction or maturation of surfactant synthesis/secretion. Although the surfactant was not required for the extracellular growth, intracellular infection, and intrapulmonary survival of L. pneumophila, it exhibited antimicrobial activity toward seven other species of Legionella but not toward various non-Legionella species. These data suggest that the surfactant provides L. pneumophila with a selective advantage over other legionellae in the natural environment. PMID:21890700

  15. The YhhN Protein of Legionella Pneumophila is a Lysoplasmalogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Jurkowitz, Marianne S.; Patel, Aalapi; Wu, Lai-Chu; Krautwater, Annalise; Pfeiffer, Douglas R.; Bell, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Lysoplasmalogenase catalyzes hydrolytic cleavage of the vinyl-ether bond of lysoplasmalogen to yield fatty aldehyde and glycerophospho-ethanolamine or -choline. We recently purified lysoplasmalogenase from rat liver microsomes and identified the protein as TMEM86B, an integral membrane protein that is a member of the YhhN family found in numerous species of eukaryotes and bacteria. To test the hypothesis that bacterial YhhN proteins also function as lysoplasmalogenase enzymes, we cloned the Lpg1991 gene of Legionella pneumophila, which encodes a 216 amino acid YhhN protein, and expressed it in E. coli as a C-terminal-GFP-His8-fusion. Membranes were solubilized and the fusion protein was purified by nickel-affinity chromatography, cleaved with Tobacco Etch Virus protease, and subjected to a reverse nickel column to purify the un-tagged LpYhhN. Both the fusion protein and un-tagged LpYhhN exhibit robust lysoplasmalogenase activity, cleaving the vinyl-ether bond of lysoplasmalogen with a Vmax of 12 and a Km of 45 µM. LpYhhN has no activity on diradyl plasmalogen, 1-alkenyl-glycerol, monoacylglycerophospho-ethanolamine or –choline; the pH optimum is 6.5–7.0. These properties are very similar to mammalian TMEM86B. Sequence analysis suggests that YhhN proteins contain eight transmembrane helices, an N-in/C-in topology, and about 5 highly conserved amino acid residues that may form an active site. This work is the first to demonstrate a function for a bacterial YhhN protein, as a vinyl ether bond hydrolase specific for lysoplasmalogen. Since L. pneumophila does not contain endogenous plasmalogens, we hypothesize that LpYhhN may serve to protect the bacterium from lysis by lysoplasmalogen derived from plasmalogens of the host. PMID:25445671

  16. The YhhN protein of Legionella pneumophila is a Lysoplasmalogenase.

    PubMed

    Jurkowitz, Marianne S; Patel, Aalapi; Wu, Lai-Chu; Krautwater, Annalise; Pfeiffer, Douglas R; Bell, Charles E

    2015-02-01

    Lysoplasmalogenase catalyzes hydrolytic cleavage of the vinyl-ether bond of lysoplasmalogen to yield fatty aldehyde and glycerophospho-ethanolamine or glycerophospho-choline. We recently purified lysoplasmalogenase from rat liver microsomes and identified the protein as TMEM86B, an integral membrane protein that is a member of the YhhN family found in numerous species of eukaryotes and bacteria. To test the hypothesis that bacterial YhhN proteins also function as lysoplasmalogenase enzymes, we cloned the Lpg1991 gene of Legionella pneumophila, which encodes a 216 amino acid YhhN protein (LpYhhN), and expressed it in Escherichia coli as a C-terminal-GFP-His8-fusion. Membranes were solubilized and the fusion protein was purified by nickel-affinity chromatography, cleaved with Tobacco Etch Virus protease, and subjected to a reverse nickel column to purify the un-tagged LpYhhN. Both the fusion protein and un-tagged LpYhhN exhibit robust lysoplasmalogenase activity, cleaving the vinyl-ether bond of lysoplasmalogen with a Vmax of 12 µmol/min/mg protein and a Km of 45 μM. LpYhhN has no activity on diradyl plasmalogen, 1-alkenyl-glycerol, and monoacylglycerophospho-ethanolamine or monoacylglycerophospho-choline; the pH optimum is 6.5-7.0. These properties are very similar to mammalian TMEM86B. Sequence analysis suggests that YhhN proteins contain eight transmembrane helices, an N-in/C-in topology, and about 5 highly conserved amino acid residues that may form an active site. This work is the first to demonstrate a function for a bacterial YhhN protein, as a vinyl ether bond hydrolase specific for lysoplasmalogen. Since L. pneumophila does not contain endogenous plasmalogens, we hypothesize that LpYhhN may serve to protect the bacterium from lysis by lysoplasmalogen derived from plasmalogens of the host.

  17. Dendrimers and Polyamino-Phenolic Ligands: Activity of New Molecules Against Legionella pneumophila Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Barbieri, Federica; Ottaviani, Maria F.; Giorgi, Luca; Bruscolini, Francesca; Manti, Anita; Battistelli, Michela; Sabatini, Luigia; Pianetti, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires’ disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae). Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration 10-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall twofold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85 and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection treatments of water systems

  18. Legionella pneumophila Catalase-Peroxidases Are Required for Proper Trafficking and Growth in Primary Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Purnima; Byrne, Brenda; Chan, Yolande; Swanson, Michele S.; Steinman, Howard M.

    2003-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a parasite of aquatic amoebae and pathogen of pulmonary macrophages, replicates intracellularly, utilizing a type IV secretion system to subvert the trafficking of Legionella-containing phagosomes. Defense against host-derived reactive oxygen species has been proposed as critical for intracellular replication. Virulence traits of null mutants in katA and katB, encoding the two Legionella catalase-peroxidases, were analyzed to evaluate the hypothesis that L. pneumophila must decompose hydrogen peroxide to establish a replication niche in macrophages. Phagosomes containing katA or katB mutant Legionella colocalize with LAMP-1, a late endosomal-lysosomal marker, at twice the frequency of those of wild-type strain JR32 and show a decreased frequency of bacterial replication, in similarity to phenotypes of mutants with mutations in dotA and dotB, encoding components of the Type IV secretion system. Quantitative similarity of the katA/B phenotypes indicates that each contributes to virulence traits largely independently of intracellular compartmentalization (KatA in the periplasm and KatB in the cytosol). These data support a model in which KatA and KatB maintain a critically low level of H2O2 compatible with proper phagosome trafficking mediated by the type IV secretion apparatus. During these studies, we observed that dotA and dotB mutations in wild-type strain Lp02 had no effect on intracellular multiplication in the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii, indicating that certain dotA/B functions in Lp02 are dispensable in that experimental model. We also observed that wild-type JR32, unlike Lp02, shows minimal contact-dependent cytotoxicity, suggesting that cytotoxicity of JR32 is not a prerequisite for formation of replication-competent Legionella phagosomes in macrophages. PMID:12874332

  19. Application of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay to detect Legionella pneumophila in patients of community-acquired pneumonia in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Angrup, A; Chaudhry, R; Sharma, S; Valavane, A; Passi, K; Padmaja, K; Javed, S; Dey, A B; Dhawan, B; Kabra, S K

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is one of the important pathogen responsible for community -acquired pneumonia attributing for 1-5% of cases. Since early and accurate therapy reduces mortality, rapid and reliable diagnostic methods are needed. A total of 134 samples of blood, urine and respiratory tract fluids were collected. Blood was tested for IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies using commercially available kits. A total of 8 (6%) samples were found to be positive for L. pneumophila by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), compared to conventional PCR where 6 (4.4%) samples were positive. Serology was positive in a total of 32 (23%) cases though only 3 (2.2%) of the PCR-positive cases were positive by serology as well. These results suggest that real-time PCR can detect Legionella infection early in the course of the disease before serological response develops.

  20. Outbreak of Legionnaires' disease on a cruise ship linked to spa-bath filter stones contaminated with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 5.

    PubMed

    Kura, F; Amemura-Maekawa, J; Yagita, K; Endo, T; Ikeno, M; Tsuji, H; Taguchi, M; Kobayashi, K; Ishii, E; Watanabe, H

    2006-04-01

    In January 2003, two cases of Legionnaires' disease associated with a ship's cruise were registered in the database of National Epidemiological Surveillance of Infectious Diseases. A 70-year-old male heavy smoker with mild emphysema contracted the disease during a cruise. Legionella pneumophila serogroup (sg) 5 was isolated from the patient's sputum and the ship's indoor spa. The isolate from the spa matched the patient's isolate by genotyping performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The second case was in a 73-year-old female. During epidemiological investigation, a third case of Legionnaire's disease in a 71-year-old male was subsequently diagnosed among passengers on the same ship on the following cruise. Environmental investigation revealed that porous natural stones (Maifanshi) in the filters of the spas had harboured L. pneumophila, a phenomenon which has not been reported except in Japan. This is the first documented evidence of L. pneumophila sg 5 infection on a ship and of porous stones as a source of Legionella infection.

  1. A hospital-associated outbreak of Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroups 4 and 10 with a common genetic fingerprinting pattern.

    PubMed

    Bernander, Sverker; Jacobson, Kerstin; Lundholm, Monica

    2004-03-01

    An outbreak of eight cases of pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila non-serogroup 1 (non-sg 1) occurred at a Swedish university hospital in 1993. Including previous and subsequent sporadic cases, the total number of culture-positive patients was 13. Twelve available non-sg1 isolates from patients were compared to 50 environmental water isolates using a monoclonal antibody test for serogrouping and amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis (AFLP). Of the 12 hospital-associated Legionella non-sg 1 patient isolates, 4 were serogrouped as sg 4, 7 as sg 10, and one as sg 6. Using AFLP fingerprinting all serogroup (sg) 4 and 10 isolates were genetically related except for minor variations. Furthermore, sg 4 isolates were identical in AFLP to sg 10 isolates. Patient isolates were also identical to isolates found in the water system of several hospital buildings, but quite unrelated to isolates obtained in a subsequent outbreak at the same hospital caused by L. pneumophila sg 1. Serogroup variations in outbreaks may occur despite a common molecular fingerprinting pattern. Evidently, the L. pneumophila sg 4 and 10 strains were closely related genetically, which raises the question whether this variation in phenotype is due to a genetic event or to a variable phenotypic expression. Genetic fingerprinting should be used in conjunction with serogrouping in epidemiological investigations.

  2. Asc-Dependent and Independent Mechanisms Contribute to Restriction of Legionella Pneumophila Infection in Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaziz, Dalia H. A.; Gavrilin, Mikhail A.; Akhter, Anwari; Caution, Kyle; Kotrange, Sheetal; Khweek, Arwa Abu; Abdulrahman, Basant A.; Hassan, Zeinab A.; El-Sharkawi, Fathia Z.; Bedi, Simranjit S.; Ladner, Katherine; Gonzalez-Mejia, M. Elba; Doseff, Andrea I.; Mostafa, Mahmoud; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Guttridge, Dennis; Marsh, Clay B.; Wewers, Mark D.; Amer, Amal O.

    2010-01-01

    The apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (Asc) is an adaptor molecule that mediates inflammatory and apoptotic signals. Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of Legionnaire's pneumonia. L. pneumophila is able to cause pneumonia in immuno-compromised humans but not in most inbred mice. Murine macrophages that lack the ability to activate caspase-1, such as caspase-1−/− and Nlrc4−/− allow L. pneumophila infection. This permissiveness is attributed mainly to the lack of active caspase-1 and the absence of its down stream substrates such as caspase-7. However, the role of Asc in control of L. pneumophila infection in mice is unclear. Here we show that caspase-1 is moderately activated in Asc−/− macrophages and that this limited activation is required and sufficient to restrict L. pneumophila growth. Moreover, Asc-independent activation of caspase-1 requires bacterial flagellin and is mainly detected in cellular extracts but not in culture supernatants. We also demonstrate that the depletion of Asc from permissive macrophages enhances bacterial growth by promoting L. pneumophila-mediated activation of the NF-κB pathway and decreasing caspase-3 activation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that L. pneumophila infection in murine macrophages is controlled by several mechanisms: Asc-independent activation of caspase-1 and Asc-dependent regulation of NF-κB and caspase-3 activation. PMID:21713115

  3. Widespread molecular detection of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 in cold water taps across the United States.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Maura J; O'Connell, Katharine; Vesper, Stephen J; Mistry, Jatin H; King, Dawn; Kostich, Mitch; Pfaller, Stacy

    2014-03-18

    In the United States, 6,868 cases of legionellosis were reported to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in 2009-2010. Of these reports, it is estimated that 84% are caused by the microorganism Legionella pneumophila Serogroup (Sg) 1. Legionella spp. have been isolated and recovered from a variety of natural freshwater environments. Human exposure to L. pneumophila Sg1 may occur from aerosolization and subsequent inhalation of household and facility water. In this study, two primer/probe sets (one able to detect L. pneumophila and the other L. pneumophila Sg1) were determined to be highly sensitive and selective for their respective targets. Over 272 water samples, collected in 2009 and 2010 from 68 public and private water taps across the United States, were analyzed using the two qPCR assays to evaluate the incidence of L. pneumophila Sg1. Nearly half of the taps showed the presence of L. pneumophila Sg1 in one sampling event, and 16% of taps were positive in more than one sampling event. This study is the first United States survey to document the occurrence and colonization of L. pneumophila Sg1 in cold water delivered from point of use taps.

  4. Water characteristics associated with the occurrence of Legionella pneumophila in dental units.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, F; Stampi, S; De Luca, G; Fateh-Moghadam, P; Antonietta, M; Sabattini, B; Checchi, L

    2000-02-01

    This study evaluated the incidence of Legionella pneumophila in dental unit water samples and investigated how the occurrence of these bacteria may be related to some physical, chemical and bacteriological characteristics of the water. The samples were taken from the incoming tap water, oral rinsing cup, air-water syringe, ultrasonic scaler, and the turbine of 23 dental units of private and public institutions. Apart from L. pneumophila (serogroup 1 and 3) isolated in 22 out of the 101 (21.8%) water samples tested, two other species were found: L. bozemanii and L. dumoffii. The highest densities and frequency of L. pneumophila were observed in the water coming into the units and in the dental units of public institutions. A negative association between L. pneumophila and 36 degrees C and 22 degrees C heterotrophic total plate counts and other gram-negative bacteria was found. An inverse association between the concentration of L. pneumophila and water temperature was also observed. The values of pH and total hardness did not show any significant difference in the L. pneumophila-positive and -negative dental unit waters. Finally, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and residual chlorine were found to correlate positively with L. pneumophila.

  5. Soil as a source of Legionella pneumophila sequence type 47.

    PubMed

    Schalk, Johanna A C; Euser, Sjoerd M; van Heijnsbergen, Eri; Bruin, Jacob P; den Boer, Jeroen W; de Roda Husman, Ana M

    2014-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila sequence type (ST) 47 was isolated from soil in a garden. We speculate that this strain was transmitted from soil to the whirlpool in the garden where it caused an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease and Pontiac fever. In the Netherlands, ST47 is frequently isolated from patients, but hardly ever from environmental sources. It is possible that human pathogenic Legionella strains, with ST47 as one of the predominant strains, are transmitted to humans from sources such as natural soil that are currently not targeted in outbreak investigations.

  6. Necessity and Effect of Combating Legionella pneumophila in Municipal Shower Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wiik, Ragnhild; Krøvel, Anne Vatland

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to obtain research-based, holistic knowledge about necessity and effect of practiced measures against L. pneumophila in municipal shower systems in Stavanger, Norway. The effects of hot water treatment and membrane-filtering were investigated and compared to no intervention at all. The studies were done under real-world conditions. Additionally, a surveillance pilot study of municipal showers in Stavanger was performed. The validity of high total plate count (TPC) as an indication of L. pneumophila was evaluated. A simplified method, named “dripping method”, for detection and quantification of L. pneumophila was developed. The sensitivity of the dripping method is 5 colony-forming units of L. pneumophila/ml. The transference of L. pneumophila from shower water to aerosols was studied. Interviews and observational studies among the stakeholders were done in order to identify patterns of communication and behavior in a Legionella risk perspective. No substantial effects of the measures against L. pneumophila were demonstrated, except for a distally placed membrane filter. No significant positive correlation between TPC and L. pneumophila concentrations were found. L. pneumophila serogroup 2–14 was demonstrated in 21% of the 29 buildings tested in the surveillance pilot. Relatively few cells of L. pneumophila were transferred from shower water to aerosols. Anxiety appeared as the major driving force in the risk governance of Legionella. In conclusion, the risk of acquiring Legionnaires' disease from municipal shower systems is evaluated as low and uncertain. By eliminating ineffective approaches, targeted Legionella risk governance can be practiced. Risk management by surveillance is evaluated as appropriate. PMID:25490721

  7. Necessity and effect of combating Legionella pneumophila in municipal shower systems.

    PubMed

    Wiik, Ragnhild; Krøvel, Anne Vatland

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to obtain research-based, holistic knowledge about necessity and effect of practiced measures against L. pneumophila in municipal shower systems in Stavanger, Norway. The effects of hot water treatment and membrane-filtering were investigated and compared to no intervention at all. The studies were done under real-world conditions. Additionally, a surveillance pilot study of municipal showers in Stavanger was performed. The validity of high total plate count (TPC) as an indication of L. pneumophila was evaluated. A simplified method, named "dripping method", for detection and quantification of L. pneumophila was developed. The sensitivity of the dripping method is 5 colony-forming units of L. pneumophila/ml. The transference of L. pneumophila from shower water to aerosols was studied. Interviews and observational studies among the stakeholders were done in order to identify patterns of communication and behavior in a Legionella risk perspective. No substantial effects of the measures against L. pneumophila were demonstrated, except for a distally placed membrane filter. No significant positive correlation between TPC and L. pneumophila concentrations were found. L. pneumophila serogroup 2-14 was demonstrated in 21% of the 29 buildings tested in the surveillance pilot. Relatively few cells of L. pneumophila were transferred from shower water to aerosols. Anxiety appeared as the major driving force in the risk governance of Legionella. In conclusion, the risk of acquiring Legionnaires' disease from municipal shower systems is evaluated as low and uncertain. By eliminating ineffective approaches, targeted Legionella risk governance can be practiced. Risk management by surveillance is evaluated as appropriate.

  8. Legionella pneumophila type IV effectors hijack the transcription and translation machinery of the host cell.

    PubMed

    Rolando, Monica; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens modulate the host response to persist and replicate inside a eukaryotic cell and cause disease. Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, is present in freshwater environments and represents one of these pathogens. During coevolution with protozoan cells, L. pneumophila has acquired highly sophisticated and diverse strategies to hijack host cell processes. It secretes hundreds of effectors into the host cell, and these manipulate host signaling pathways and key cellular processes. Recently it has been shown that L. pneumophila is also able to alter the transcription and translation machinery of the host and to exploit epigenetic mechanisms in the cells it resides in to counteract host responses.

  9. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3 from pericardial fluid in a case of pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Lück, P C; Helbig, J H; Wunderlich, E; Foelske, H; Selbitschka, M; Wenzel, D; Pätzold, L; Witzleb, W

    1989-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman was hospitalized for fulminant pericarditis. During diagnostic work-up, an as yet unknown bronchial carcinoma was detected. In the pericardial exudate Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3 was demonstrated by direct fluorescent antibody technique and by culture. In a lung biopsy L. pneumophila serogroup 3 was found, too. Using an antigen-ELISA for L. pneumophila serogroup 1, antigenuria was demonstrated. In cases of pericarditis negative for common bacterial pathogens, all diagnostic tests for legionellae, e.g. culture, antigen detection in pericardial, pleural effusion and urine and antibody detection should be included in the diagnostic programme.

  10. Evidence and Suggested Therapeutic Approach in Psoriasis of Difficult-to-treat Areas: Palmoplantar Psoriasis, Nail Psoriasis, Scalp Psoriasis, and Intertriginous Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Nilendu

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is resistant to treatment and it shows frequent relapse; systemic treatment is often associated with toxicities, and long-term safety data are lacking for most of the newer drugs like biologics. Moreover, some body areas such as hands, feet, intertriginous areas, scalp, and nails are even more resistant. Frequently, systemic treatments are necessary considering the higher psychological impact on the patient. There is a lack of agreement on the best therapeutic modalities in the management of psoriasis involving difficult-to-treat locations. At present, there are no Indian guidelines for these conditions. Available literature has been reviewed extensively on the treatment of psoriasis involving difficult-to-treat locations; level of evidence has been evaluated as per the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine 2011 guideline, and therapeutic suggestions have been developed. Best care has been employed to consider socioeconomic, cultural, genetic, and ethnic factors to prepare a therapeutic suggestion that is appropriate and logical to be used among Indian population and people of similar ethnic and socioeconomic background. PMID:28400628

  11. Difference in virulence of environmental isolates of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Bollin, G E; Plouffe, J F; Para, M F; Prior, R B

    1985-01-01

    Endemic nosocomial Legionnaires disease has occurred at our medical center for several years. Two subtypes of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (UH-1 and RH-1) have been isolated in approximately equal numbers from hospital potable water. However, almost all clinical isolates have been UH-1. To assess potential differences in virulence, 50% lethal doses (LD50) and 50% infective doses (ID50) of UH-1 and RH-1 were determined by intraperitoneal infection in guinea pigs. The UH-1 LD50 was 7.41 X 10(6) CFU, which was significantly lower than the RH-1 LD50 of 9.12 X 10(7) CFU (P = 0.0001). The mean time to death in UH-1-infected guinea pigs was also significantly shorter than in RH-1-infected animals (P = 0.0008). The UH-1 ID50 was 5.8 X 10(3) CFU, and although it was lower than the RH-1 ID50 of 1.4 X 10(4) CFU, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.21). This study demonstrates a difference in virulence between UH-1 and RH-1 in guinea pigs. Differences in strain virulence, as demonstrated between these two subtypes, may help to explain the widespread isolation of L. pneumophila from the environment contrasted with the limited occurrence of human Legionnaires disease. PMID:3998095

  12. Differentiate to thrive: lessons from the Legionella pneumophila life cycle.

    PubMed

    Molofsky, Ari B; Swanson, Michele S

    2004-07-01

    When confronted by disparate environments, microbes routinely alter their physiology to tolerate or exploit local conditions. But some circumstances require more drastic remodelling of the bacterial cell, as sporulation by the Bacillus and Streptomyces species of soil bacteria vividly illustrates. Cellular differentiation is also crucial for pathogens, the challenge for which is to colonize one host, then be transmitted to the next. Using the Gram-negative Legionella pneumophila as a model intracellular pathogen, we describe how biogenesis of the replication vacuole is determined by the developmental state of the bacterium. Subsequently, when replicating bacteria have exhausted the nutrient supply, the pathogens couple their conversion to stationary phase physiology with expression of traits that promote transmission to a new host. The cellular differentiation of L. pneumophila is co-ordinated by a regulatory circuit that integrates several elements that are broadly conserved in the microbial world. The alarmone (p)ppGpp promotes transcription directed by the alternative sigma factors RpoS, FliA and, probably, RpoN, and also post-transcriptional control mediated by a two-component regulatory system, LetA/S (GacA/S), and an mRNA-binding protein, CsrA (RsmA). By applying knowledge of microbial differentiation in combination with tools to screen the complete genomes of pathogens, experiments can be designed to identify two distinct classes of virulence traits: factors that promote replication and those dedicated to transmission.

  13. The htpAB operon of Legionella pneumophila cannot be deleted in the presence of the groE chaperonin operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Gagnon, Elizabeth; Orton, Dennis J; Garduño, Rafael A

    2011-11-01

    HtpB, the chaperonin of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila , displays several virulence-related functions in vitro. To confirm HtpB's role in vivo, host infections with an htpB deletion mutant would be required. However, we previously reported that the htpAB operon (encoding co-chaperonin and chaperonin) is essential. We attempted here to delete htpAB in a L. pneumophila strain carrying the groE operon (encoding the Escherichia coli co-chaperonin and chaperonin). The groE operon was inserted into the chromosome of L. pneumophila Lp02, and then allelic replacement of htpAB with a gentamicin resistance cassette was attempted. Although numerous potential postallelic replacement transformants showed a correct selection phenotype, we still detected htpAB by PCR and full-size HtpB by immunoblot. Southern blot and PCR analysis indicated that the gentamicin resistance cassette had apparently integrated in a duplicated htpAB region. However, we showed by Southern blot that strain Lp02, and the Lp02 derivative carrying the groE operon, have only one copy of htpAB. These results confirmed that the htpAB operon cannot be deleted, not even in the presence of the groE operon, and suggested that attempts to delete htpAB under strong phenotypic selection result in aberrant genetic recombinations that could involve duplication of the htpAB locus.

  14. Influence of Plumbing Materials on Biofilm Formation and Growth of Legionella pneumophila in Potable Water Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Julie; Dowsett, A. B.; Dennis, P. J.; Lee, J. V.; Keevil, C. W.

    1994-01-01

    A two-stage chemostat model of a plumbing system was developed, with tap water as the sole nutrient source. The model system was populated with a naturally occurring inoculum derived from an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease and containing Legionella pneumophila along with associated bacteria and protozoa. The model system was used to develop biofilms on the surfaces of a range of eight plumbing materials under controlled, reproducible conditions. The materials varied in their abilities to support biofilm development and the growth of L. pneumophila. Elastomeric surfaces had the most abundant biofilms supporting the highest numbers of L. pneumophila CFU; this was attributed to the leaching of nutrients for bacterial growth from the materials. No direct relationship existed between total biofouling and the numbers of L. pneumophila CFU. Images PMID:16349278

  15. Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens Legionella pneumophila and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in hospital plumbing systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens Legionella pneumophila and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in hospital plumbing systems Jill Hoelle, Michael Coughlin, Elizabeth Sotkiewicz, Jingrang Lu, Stacy Pfaller, Mark Rodgers, and Hodon Ryu U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati...

  16. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  17. Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens Legionella pneumophila and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in hospital plumbing systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens Legionella pneumophila and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in hospital plumbing systems Jill Hoelle, Michael Coughlin, Elizabeth Sotkiewicz, Jingrang Lu, Stacy Pfaller, Mark Rodgers, and Hodon Ryu U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati...

  18. Micro- and macromethod assays for the ecological study of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Guerrieri, Elisa; Bondi, Moreno; Ciancio, Claudia; Borella, Paola; Messi, Patrizia

    2005-11-01

    The survival of a strain of Legionella pneumophila (Lp-1) inoculated in artificial water microcosms was investigated with and without an amoebal host and varying environmental conditions, such as biofilm formation, amount of nutrients and incubation temperature. The results obtained using short (micromethod) and long (macromethod) term methods showed that L. pneumophila Lp-1 dies rapidly at 4 degrees C in the "macromethod" assay. When the same temperature (4 degrees C) was applied to the "micromethod" assay, L. pneumophila Lp-1 survived for three weeks, although it progressively decreased. At an incubation temperature of 30 degrees C, the aquatic environment was more favourable and better survival emerged in the "macromethod"; in contrast, this favourable temperature condition did not improve the survival of L. pneumophila Lp-1 cultured with the "micromethod". The role of the protozoa Acanthamoeba polyphaga proved to be indispensable for legionella survival only when environmental conditions become unfavourable.

  19. [Microbial contamination of water by pipe and tubing material. 2. Growth of Legionella pneumophila].

    PubMed

    Schoenen, D; Schulze-Röbbecke, R; Schirdewahn, N

    1988-07-01

    In the 1st communication it was possible to show that some hoses and insufficiently cleaned high grade steel pipe can produce a microbial growth. The growth-promoting effect of materials in the water distribution system for Legionella pneumophila has been discussed before. In this investigation it was tested how L. pneumophila behaves in pipes and hoses with narrow diameter, at temperatures from 35 degrees C to 40 degrees C and over a time of half a year. L. pneumophila could be found in high numbers in the water from PVC, PE, PTFE, rubber and silicon hoses all over the time and regularly in low numbers or occasionally in glass, high-grade steel pipes and PA hose. L. pneumophila could be found only for the first 4 weeks in the copper pipe.

  20. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  1. Legionella pneumophila Type IV Effectors YlfA and YlfB Are SNARE-Like Proteins that Form Homo- and Heteromeric Complexes and Enhance the Efficiency of Vacuole Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Campodonico, Eva M.; Roy, Craig R.; Ninio, Shira

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative bacterium that can colonize both freshwater protozoa and human alveolar macrophages, the latter infection resulting in Legionnaires’ disease. The intracellular lifecycle of L. pneumophila requires extensive manipulation of its host cell, which is carried out by effector proteins that are translocated into the host cell through the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. This study focuses on a pair of highly similar type IV substrates called YlfA/LegC7 and YlfB/LegC2 that were initially identified in a screen for proteins that cause growth inhibition in yeast. Analysis of truncation mutants revealed that the hydrophobic residues in the Ylf amino termini were required for localization of each protein to the membranes of host cells. Central and carboxy terminal coiled coil domains were found to mediate binding of YlfA and YlfB to themselves and to each other. In vivo, a ΔylfA ΔylfB double mutant strain of L. pneumophila was shown to be defective in establishing a vacuole that supports bacterial replication. This phenotype was subsequently correlated with a decrease in the association of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vesicles with vacuoles containing ΔylfA ΔylfB mutant bacteria. These data suggest that the Ylf proteins are membrane-associated effectors that enhance remodeling of the L. pneumophila -containing vacuole by promoting association and possibly fusion of ER-derived membrane vesicles with the bacterial compartment. PMID:27459495

  2. Combination of Heat Shock and Enhanced Thermal Regime to Control the Growth of a Persistent Legionella pneumophila Strain

    PubMed Central

    Bédard, Emilie; Boppe, Inès; Kouamé, Serge; Martin, Philippe; Pinsonneault, Linda; Valiquette, Louis; Racine, Jules; Prévost, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Following nosocomial cases of Legionella pneumophila, the investigation of a hot water system revealed that 81.5% of sampled taps were positive for L. pneumophila, despite the presence of protective levels of copper in the water. A significant reduction of L. pneumophila counts was observed by culture after heat shock disinfection. The following corrective measures were implemented to control L. pneumophila: increasing the hot water temperature (55 to 60 °C), flushing taps weekly with hot water, removing excess lengths of piping and maintaining a water temperature of 55 °C throughout the system. A gradual reduction in L. pneumophila counts was observed using the culture method and qPCR in the 18 months after implementation of the corrective measures. However, low level contamination was retained in areas with hydraulic deficiencies, highlighting the importance of maintaining a good thermal regime at all points within the system to control the population of L. pneumophila. PMID:27092528

  3. Legionella pneumophila-Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles Promote Bacterial Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Anna Lena; Stoiber, Cornelia; Herkt, Christina E.; Schulz, Christine; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Schmeck, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The formation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria. This includes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Upon its transmission into the lung, L. pneumophila primarily infects and replicates within macrophages. Here, we analyzed the influence of L. pneumophila OMVs on macrophages. To this end, differentiated THP-1 cells were incubated with increasing doses of Legionella OMVs, leading to a TLR2-dependent classical activation of macrophages with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling reduced the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs prior to infection reduced replication of L. pneumophila in THP-1 cells. Blocking of TLR2 activation or heat denaturation of OMVs restored bacterial replication in the first 24 h of infection. With prolonged infection-time, OMV pre-treated macrophages became more permissive for bacterial replication than untreated cells and showed increased numbers of Legionella-containing vacuoles and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Additionally, miRNA-146a was found to be transcriptionally induced by OMVs and to facilitate bacterial replication. Accordingly, IRAK-1, one of miRNA-146a’s targets, showed prolonged activation-dependent degradation, which rendered THP-1 cells more permissive for Legionella replication. In conclusion, L. pneumophila OMVs are initially potent pro-inflammatory stimulators of macrophages, acting via TLR2, IRAK-1, and NF-κB, while at later time points, OMVs facilitate L. pneumophila replication by miR-146a-dependent IRAK-1 suppression. OMVs might thereby promote spreading of L. pneumophila in the host. PMID:27105429

  4. Characterization of avirulent mutant Legionella pneumophila that survive but do not multiply within human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, is a Gram-negative bacterium and a facultative intracellular parasite that multiplies in human monocytes and alveolar macrophages. In this paper, mutants of L. pneumophila avirulent for human monocytes were obtained and extensively characterized. The mutants were obtained by serial passage of wild-type L. pneumophila on suboptimal artificial medium. None of 44 such mutant clones were capable of multiplying in monocytes or exerting a cytopathic effect on monocyte monolayers. Under the same conditions, wild-type L. pneumophila multiplied 2.5-4.5 logs, and destroyed the monocyte monolayers. The basis for the avirulent phenotype was an inability of the mutants to multiply intracellularly. Both mutant and wild-type bacteria bound to and were ingested by monocytes, and both entered by coiling phagocytosis. Thereafter, their intracellular destinies diverged. The wild-type formed a distinctive ribosome-lined replicative phagosome, inhibited phagosome-lysosome fusion, and multiplied intracellularly. The mutant did not form the distinctive phagosome nor inhibit phagosome-lysosome fusion. The mutant survived intracellularly but did not replicate in the phagolysosome. In all other respects studied, the mutant and wild-type bacteria were similar. They had similar ultrastructure and colony morphology; both formed colonies of compact and diffuse type. They had similar structural and secretory protein profiles and LPS profile by PAGE. Both the mutant and wild-type bacteria were completely resistant to human complement in the presence or absence of high titer anti-L. pneumophila antibody. The mutant L. pneumophila have tremendous potential for enhancing our understanding of the intracellular biology of L. pneumophila and other parasites that follow a similar pathway through the mononuclear phagocyte. Such mutants also show promise for enhancing our understanding of immunity to L. pneumophila, and they may serve

  5. Hospital-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by Legionella pneumophila in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Lai, C-C; Tan, C-K; Chou, C-H; Hsu, H-L; Huang, Y-T; Liao, C-H; Hsueh, P-R

    2010-04-01

    The Legionella species is an important cause of communityand hospital-acquired pneumonia. Bacteremic pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila is rarely reported. We describe the first reported case of hospital-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by L. pneumophila from Taiwan in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura who received steroid treatment. The patient was successfully treated with ceftazidime and clindamycin initially, followed by ciprofloxacin for 14 days. The blood isolate was further confirmed by 16S rDNA sequence analysis.

  6. Reclamation of Ampicillin Sensitivity for the Genetic Manipulation of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Molly C.

    2012-01-01

    Research on Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, has been hampered due to the lack of selectable markers for genetic manipulation. We report the construction of a mutant strain of L. pneumophila lacking loxA, a chromosomally encoded β-lactamase, that has enhanced sensitivity to ampicillin. Also described are a method for converting Legionella strains to ampicillin sensitivity and conditions for utilizing bla as a selectable marker. PMID:22635996

  7. Importance of Legionella pneumophila in the etiology of severe community-acquired pneumonia in Santiago, Chile.

    PubMed

    Arancibia, Francisco; Cortes, Claudia P; Valdés, Marcelo; Cerda, Javier; Hernández, Antonio; Soto, Luis; Torres, Antoni

    2014-02-01

    In US and European literature, Legionella pneumophila is reported as an important etiologic agent of severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), but in Chile this information is lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and identify predictors of severe CAP caused by L pneumophila in Santiago, Chile. A multicenter, prospective clinical study lasting 18 months was conducted; it included all adult patients with severe CAP admitted to the ICUs of four hospitals in Santiago. We excluded patients who were immunocompromised, had been hospitalized in the previous 4 weeks, or presented with another disease during their hospitalization. All data for the diagnosis of severe CAP were registered, and urinary antigens for L pneumophila serogroup 1 were determined. A total of 104 patients with severe CAP were included (mean ± SD age, 58.3 ± 19.3 years; men, 64.4%; APACHE (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation) II score, 16.7 ± 6.3; Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score, 6.1 ± 3.2; Pitt Bacteremia Score, 3.4 ± 2.5; Pao2/Fio2, 170.8 ± 87.1). An etiologic agent was identified in 62 patients (59.6%), with the most frequent being Streptococcus pneumoniae (27 patients [26%]) and L pneumophila (nine patients [8.6%]). Logistic regression analysis showed that a plasma sodium level of ≤ 130 mEq/L was an independent predictor for L pneumophila severe CAP (OR, 11.3; 95% CI, 2.5-50.5; P = .002). Global mortality was 26% and 33% for L pneumophila. The Pitt bacteremia score and pneumonia score index were the best predictors of mortality. We found that in Santiago, L pneumophila was second to S pneumoniae as the etiologic agent of severe CAP. Severe hyponatremia at admission appears to be an indicator for L pneumophila etiology in severe CAP.

  8. Physiological and Antigenic Characteristics of Virulent and Attenuated Strains of Legionella pneumophila (Philadelphia 3)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    Shepard. 1979. Virulent to avirulent conversion of Legionnaires ’ disease bacterium ( Legionella pneumophila) - its effect on isolation techniques. J...8217 disease bacterium: Legionella pneumophila, genus novum, species nova, of the family Legionellaceae, familia nova. Ann. Intern, Med. 90:656-658. 5...J. C. Feeley. 1978. A microagglutination test for detecting antibodies, p. 163-168. In C. L. Jones and G. A. Hebert (ed.), " Legionnaires " the disease

  9. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Outbreak-Associated Legionella pneumophila Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shatavia S.; Desai, Heta P.; Mercante, Jeffrey W.; Lapierre, Pascal; Raphael, Brian H.; Musser, Kimberlee

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequences of three Legionella pneumophila isolates that are associated with a Legionnaires’ disease outbreak in New York in 2012. Two clinical isolates (D7630 and D7632) and one environmental isolate (D7631) were recovered from this outbreak. A single isolate-specific virulence gene was found in D7632. These isolates were included in a large study evaluating the genomic resolution of various bioinformatics approaches for L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates. PMID:27445383

  10. THP-1-derived macrophages render lung epithelial cells hypo-responsive to Legionella pneumophila - a systems biology study.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Christine; Lai, Xin; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Jung, Anna Lena; Sittka-Stark, Alexandra; Herkt, Christina Elena; Janga, Harshavadhan; Zscheppang, Katja; Stielow, Christina; Schulte, Leon; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Vera, Julio; Schmeck, Bernd

    2017-09-20

    Immune response in the lung has to protect the huge alveolar surface against pathogens while securing the delicate lung structure. Macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells constitute the first line of defense and together orchestrate the initial steps of host defense. In this study, we analysed the influence of macrophages on type II alveolar epithelial cells during Legionella pneumophila-infection by a systems biology approach combining experimental work and mathematical modelling. We found that L. pneumophila-infected THP-1-derived macrophages provoke a pro-inflammatory activation of neighboring lung epithelial cells, but in addition render them hypo-responsive to direct infection with the same pathogen. We generated a kinetic mathematical model of macrophage activation and identified a paracrine mechanism of macrophage-secreted IL-1β inducing a prolonged IRAK-1 degradation in lung epithelial cells. This intercellular crosstalk may help to avoid an overwhelming inflammatory response by preventing excessive local secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and thereby negatively regulating the recruitment of immune cells to the site of infection. This suggests an important but ambivalent immunomodulatory role of macrophages in lung infection.

  11. Comparison of pulsed corona plasma and pulsed electric fields for the decontamination of water containing Legionella pneumophila as model organism.

    PubMed

    Banaschik, Robert; Burchhardt, Gerhard; Zocher, Katja; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Kolb, Juergen F; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-12-01

    Pulsed corona plasma and pulsed electric fields were assessed for their capacity to kill Legionella pneumophila in water. Electrical parameters such as in particular dissipated energy were equal for both treatments. This was accomplished by changing the polarity of the applied high voltage pulses in a coaxial electrode geometry resulting in the generation of corona plasma or an electric field. For corona plasma, generated by high voltage pulses with peak voltages of +80kV, Legionella were completely killed, corresponding to a log-reduction of 5.4 (CFU/ml) after a treatment time of 12.5min. For the application of pulsed electric fields from peak voltages of -80kV a survival of log 2.54 (CFU/ml) was still detectable after this treatment time. Scanning electron microscopy images of L. pneumophila showed rupture of cells after plasma treatment. In contrast, the morphology of bacteria seems to be intact after application of pulsed electric fields. The more efficient killing for the same energy input observed for pulsed corona plasma is likely due to induced chemical processes and the generation of reactive species as indicated by the evolution of hydrogen peroxide. This suggests that the higher efficacy and efficiency of pulsed corona plasma is primarily associated with the combined effect of the applied electric fields and the promoted reaction chemistry.

  12. A Regulatory Feedback Loop between RpoS and SpoT Supports the Survival of Legionella pneumophila in Water

    PubMed Central

    Trigui, Hana; Dudyk, Paulina; Oh, Jinrok; Hong, Jong-In

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen, and survival in the aquatic environment is central to its transmission to humans. Therefore, identifying genes required for its survival in water could help prevent Legionnaires' disease outbreaks. In the present study, we investigate the role of the sigma factor RpoS in promoting survival in water, where L. pneumophila experiences severe nutrient deprivation. The rpoS mutant showed a strong survival defect compared to the wild-type strain in defined water medium. The transcriptome of the rpoS mutant during exposure to water revealed that RpoS represses genes associated with replication, translation, and transcription, suggesting that the mutant fails to shut down major metabolic programs. In addition, the rpoS mutant is transcriptionally more active than the wild-type strain after water exposure. This could be explained by a misregulation of the stringent response in the rpoS mutant. Indeed, the rpoS mutant shows an increased expression of spoT and a corresponding decrease in the level of (p)ppGpp, which is due to the presence of a negative feedback loop between RpoS and SpoT. Therefore, the lack of RpoS causes an aberrant regulation of the stringent response, which prevents the induction of a successful response to starvation. PMID:25416763

  13. In vivo regulation of replicative Legionella pneumophila lung infection by endogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha and nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Brieland, J K; Remick, D G; Freeman, P T; Hurley, M C; Fantone, J C; Engleberg, N C

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo role of endogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) in modulation of growth of Legionella pneumophila in the lung was assessed using a murine model of replicative L. pneumophila lung infection. Intratracheal inoculation of mice with L. pneumophila resulted in induction of endogenous TNF-alpha, which preceded clearance of L. pneumophila from the lung. Inhibition of endogenous TNF-alpha activity, via in vivo administration of TNF-alpha neutralizing antibody, or inhibition of endogenous RNIs, via administration of the nitric oxide (NO) synthetase inhibitor N-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA), resulted in enhanced growth of L. pneumophila in the lung at > or = 3 days postinfection (when compared with untreated L. pneumophila-infected mice). Because of the similar kinetics of enhanced pulmonary growth of L. pneumophila in mice treated in vivo with either anti-TNF-alpha antibody or NMMA, the immunomodulatory effect of NO on endogenous TNF-alpha activity in the lung was assessed. Administration of NMMA to L. pneumophila-infected mice resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous TNF-alpha activity in the lung during replicative L. pneumophila infections in vivo. However, administration of exogenous TNF-alpha to NMMA-treated mice failed to significantly enhance clearance of L. pneumophila from the lung. Results of these studies indicate that both endogenous NO and TNF-alpha facilitate resolution of replicative L. pneumophila lung infections and that regulation of L. pneumophila replication by TNF-alpha is mediated, at least in part, by NO. PMID:7642253

  14. Protein expression by the protozoan Hartmannella vermiformis upon contact with its bacterial parasite Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    abu Kwaik, Y; Fields, B S; Engleberg, N C

    1994-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is ingested by both human macrophages and amoebae, and it multiplies within similar endocytic compartments in both eukaryotic species. Inhibitors of eukaryotic protein synthesis, such as cycloheximide and emetine, had no effect on the uptake of L. pneumophila by macrophages but completely abolished ingestion by the amoeba Hartmannella vermiformis. Therefore, host cell protein synthesis is required for the bacterium to infect the amoeba but not human macrophages. To identify proteins expressed by H. vermiformis upon contact with L. pneumophila, we radiolabeled amoebal proteins after contact with bacteria in bacteriostatic concentrations of tetracycline to inhibit bacterial protein synthesis. We analyzed protein expression by two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and found that 33 amoebal proteins were induced; 12 of these were not detected in resting amoebae. Eleven other amoebal proteins were repressed; four of them became undetectable. In contrast, no phenotypic changes were observed in H. vermiformis upon contact with Escherichia coli or heat-killed L. pneumophila. An isogenic, avirulent variant of L. pneumophila, incapable of infecting either macrophages or amoebae, induced a different pattern of protein expression upon contact with H. vermiformis. Our data showed that amoebae manifested a specific phenotypic response upon contact with virulent L. pneumophila. This phenotypic modulation may be necessary for uptake of the bacteria into an endocytic compartment that permits bacterial survival and multiplication. Images PMID:8168950

  15. The Legionella pneumophila Collagen-Like Protein Mediates Sedimentation, Autoaggregation, and Pathogen-Phagocyte Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Nour, Mena; Duncan, Carla; Prashar, Akriti; Rao, Chitong; Ginevra, Christophe; Jarraud, Sophie; Low, Donald E.; Ensminger, Alexander W.; Terebiznik, Mauricio R.

    2014-01-01

    Although only partially understood, multicellular behavior is relatively common in bacterial pathogens. Bacterial aggregates can resist various host defenses and colonize their environment more efficiently than planktonic cells. For the waterborne pathogen Legionella pneumophila, little is known about the roles of autoaggregation or the parameters which allow cell-cell interactions to occur. Here, we determined the endogenous and exogenous factors sufficient to allow autoaggregation to take place in L. pneumophila. We show that isolates from Legionella species which do not produce the Legionella collagen-like protein (Lcl) are deficient in autoaggregation. Targeted deletion of the Lcl-encoding gene (lpg2644) and the addition of Lcl ligands impair the autoaggregation of L. pneumophila. In addition, Lcl-induced autoaggregation requires divalent cations. Escherichia coli producing surface-exposed Lcl is able to autoaggregate and shows increased biofilm production. We also demonstrate that L. pneumophila infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis is potentiated under conditions which promote Lcl dependent autoaggregation. Overall, this study shows that L. pneumophila is capable of autoaggregating in a process that is mediated by Lcl in a divalent-cation-dependent manner. It also reveals that Lcl potentiates the ability of L. pneumophila to come in contact, attach, and infect amoebae. PMID:24334670

  16. DISTRIBUTION OF LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA SEROGROUPS ISOLATED FROM WATER SYSTEMS OF PUBLIC FACILITIES IN BUSAN, SOUTH KOREA.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Yeong; Park, Eun-Hee; Park, Yon-Koung; Park, Sun-Hee; Sung, Gyung-Hye; Park, Hye-Young; Lee, Young-Choon

    2016-05-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the major causes of legionellosis worldwide. The distribution of L. pneumophila was investigated in water systems of public facilities in Busan, South Korea during 2007 and 2013-2014. L. pneumophila was isolated from 8.3% of 3,055 samples, of which the highest isolation rate (49%) was from ships and the lowest 4% from fountains. Serogroups of L. pneumophila isolated in 2007 were distributed among serogroups (sgs) 1-7 with the exception of sg 4, while those of isolates during 2013 and 2014 included also 11 sgs ( 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12, 13, 15). L. pneumophila sg 1 was predominated among isolates from fountains (75%), hotels (60%), buildings (44%), hospitals (38%), and public baths (37%), whereas sg 3 and sg 7 was the most prevalent from ships (46%) and factories (40%), respectively. The predominated serogroup of L. pneumophila isolates from hot and cooling tower water was sg 1 (35% and 46%, respectively), while from cold water was sg 3 (29%). These results should be useful for epidemiological surveys to identify sources of outbreaks of legionellosis in Busan, South Korea.

  17. molecular typing of Legionella pneumophila strains isolated from environment in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Mekkour, M; Ben Driss, E; Tai, J; Squinazi, F; Forey, F; Jarraud, S; Cohen, N

    2012-06-30

    Legionella pneumophila is a common cause of hospital and community-acquired pneumonia, being transmitted by inhalation of aqueous aerosols. Most legionellosis outbreaks are linked to contaminated hot water systems or cooling towers. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of (n= 55) environmental strains of L. pneumophila recovered from the hot water distribution systems of 16 establishments in seven Moroccan towns during the period 2009-2011. Thirteen chromosomal restriction patterns determined by Pulsed field gel electrophoresis were detected. The strains of L. pneumophila serogroup1 exhibited in 6/13 different PFGE patterns, while the strains of L. pneumophila serogroups 2-14 showed 7/13 PFGE patterns. The PFGE showed the existence of various patterns in Morocco, The pattern -XI- have tree similar profiles with the endemic L. pneumophila Paris's strain. This technique also allowed to conclude that the same pulsotype was found for many strains isolated from different establishments. Moreover, different pulsolypes were found for strains isolated from the same establishment. These results showed that PFGE analysis is a powerful tool to reveal the clonal nature and genetic differences among L. pneumophila strains.

  18. The Legionella pneumophila collagen-like protein mediates sedimentation, autoaggregation, and pathogen-phagocyte interactions.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Nour, Mena; Duncan, Carla; Prashar, Akriti; Rao, Chitong; Ginevra, Christophe; Jarraud, Sophie; Low, Donald E; Ensminger, Alexander W; Terebiznik, Mauricio R; Guyard, Cyril

    2014-02-01

    Although only partially understood, multicellular behavior is relatively common in bacterial pathogens. Bacterial aggregates can resist various host defenses and colonize their environment more efficiently than planktonic cells. For the waterborne pathogen Legionella pneumophila, little is known about the roles of autoaggregation or the parameters which allow cell-cell interactions to occur. Here, we determined the endogenous and exogenous factors sufficient to allow autoaggregation to take place in L. pneumophila. We show that isolates from Legionella species which do not produce the Legionella collagen-like protein (Lcl) are deficient in autoaggregation. Targeted deletion of the Lcl-encoding gene (lpg2644) and the addition of Lcl ligands impair the autoaggregation of L. pneumophila. In addition, Lcl-induced autoaggregation requires divalent cations. Escherichia coli producing surface-exposed Lcl is able to autoaggregate and shows increased biofilm production. We also demonstrate that L. pneumophila infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis is potentiated under conditions which promote Lcl dependent autoaggregation. Overall, this study shows that L. pneumophila is capable of autoaggregating in a process that is mediated by Lcl in a divalent-cation-dependent manner. It also reveals that Lcl potentiates the ability of L. pneumophila to come in contact, attach, and infect amoebae.

  19. Detection of Legionella Pneumophila in Urine and Serum Specimens of Neutropenic Febrile Patients with Haematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Farzi, Nastaran; Abrehdari-Tafreshi, Zahra; Zarei, Omid; Chamani-Tabriz, Leili

    2017-01-01

    Background: Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) is a gram-negative bacterium which causes ‎Legionnaires’ disease as well as Pontiac fever. The Legionella infections in patients suffering from ‎neutropenia- as a common complication of cancer chemotherapy- can distribute rapidly. We ‎aimed to detect of L. pneumophila in haematological malignancy suffering patients with ‎neutropenic fever by targeting the (macrophage infectivity potentiator) mip gene. Subjects and Methods: Serum and ‎urine specimens were obtained from 80 patients and presence of mip gene of L. pneumophila in ‎specimens was investigated by PCR. Results: The L. pneumophila infection was detected in 21 (26.2%) and 38 ‎‎(47.5%) of urine and serum specimens, respectively. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that the relative high ‎prevalence of L. pneumophila in the studied patients group which show the necessity of ‎considering this microorganism in future studies from detection and treatment point of view in ‎cancer patients. PMID:28286615

  20. Hybridoma-derived monoclonal immunoglobulin M antibodies to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 with diagnostic potential.

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, K K; Drüeke, V; Brandis, H

    1983-01-01

    Mouse hybridomas were isolated by fusing P3-X63-Ag 8.653 myeloma cells with spleen cells from mice that had been repeatedly immunized with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 organisms. In one fusion, three independent hybridoma cultures which secreted antibodies that reacted with the immunizing strain in the indirect immunofluorescent-antibody test were selected for cloning. Representative continuously growing clones, one of each hybridoma, which remained stable in producing high-titer antibodies were examined in detail. Extensive specificity tests revealed that these hybridoma-derived monoclonal antibodies were specifically directed against L. pneumophila serogroup 1 organisms and showed no cross-reactions in the indirect immunofluorescent-antibody test either with the other known serogroups of L. pneumophila or with other unrelated bacterial species. The three monoclonal antibodies F4/CB5/K18, F/4CB5/K104, and F4/JD3.8/K101 belonged to the immunoglobulin M class and were capable of agglutinating serogroup 1 organisms of L. pneumophila exquisitely. These monoclonal antibodies against L. pneumophila with defined fine specificity should enable purification and subsequent analysis of the corresponding antigenic determinant(s) and can also be used for the preparation of unlimited supplies of standard diagnostic reagents for the identification of L. pneumophila in the tissues and body fluids. PMID:6874913

  1. Galleria mellonella apolipophorin III - an apolipoprotein with anti-Legionella pneumophila activity.

    PubMed

    Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Palusińska-Szysz, Marta; Gruszecki, Wiesław I; Mak, Paweł; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2014-10-01

    The greater wax moth Galleria mellonella has been exploited worldwide as an alternative model host for studying pathogenicity and virulence factors of different pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, a causative agent of a severe form of pneumonia called Legionnaires' disease. An important role in the insect immune response against invading pathogens is played by apolipophorin III (apoLp-III), a lipid- and pathogen associated molecular pattern-binding protein able to inhibit growth of some Gram-negative bacteria, including Legionella dumoffii. In the present study, anti-L. pneumophila activity of G. mellonella apoLp-III and the effects of the interaction of this protein with L. pneumophila cells are demonstrated. Alterations in the bacteria cell surface occurring upon apoLp-III treatment, revealed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, are also documented. ApoLp-III interactions with purified L. pneumophila LPS, an essential virulence factor of the bacteria, were analysed using electrophoresis and immunoblotting with anti-apoLp-III antibodies. Moreover, FTIR spectroscopy was used to gain detailed information on the type of conformational changes in L. pneumophila LPS and G. mellonella apoLp-III induced by their mutual interactions. The results indicate that apoLp-III binding to components of bacterial cell envelope, including LPS, may be responsible for anti-L. pneumophila activity of G. mellonella apoLp-III.

  2. Legionella pneumophila Persists within Biofilms Formed by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Flavobacterium sp., and Pseudomonas fluorescens under Dynamic Flow Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Catherine R.; Muthye, Viraj; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.

    2012-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the agent of Legionnaires' disease pneumonia, is transmitted to humans following the inhalation of contaminated water droplets. In aquatic systems, L. pneumophila survives much of time within multi-organismal biofilms. Therefore, we examined the ability of L. pneumophila (clinical isolate 130b) to persist within biofilms formed by various types of aquatic bacteria, using a bioreactor with flow, steel surfaces, and low-nutrient conditions. L. pneumophila was able to intercalate into and persist within a biofilm formed by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Flavobacterium sp. or Pseudomonas fluorescens. The levels of L. pneumophila within these biofilms were as much as 4×104 CFU per cm2 of steel coupon and lasted for at least 12 days. These data document that K. pneumoniae, Flavobacterium sp., and P. fluorescens can promote the presence of L. pneumophila in dynamic biofilms. In contrast to these results, L. pneumophila 130b did not persist within a biofilm formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, confirming that some bacteria are permissive for Legionella colonization whereas others are antagonistic. In addition to colonizing certain mono-species biofilms, L. pneumophila 130b persisted within a two-species biofilm formed by K. pneumoniae and Flavobacterium sp. Interestingly, the legionellae were also able to colonize a two-species biofilm formed by K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa, demonstrating that a species that is permissive for L. pneumophila can override the inhibitory effect(s) of a non-permissive species. PMID:23185637

  3. Preferential colonization and release of Legionella pneumophila from mature drinking water biofilms grown on copper versus unplasticized polyvinylchloride coupons.

    PubMed

    Buse, Helen Y; Lu, Jingrang; Struewing, Ian T; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2014-03-01

    Legionella occurrence in premise drinking water (DW) systems contributes to legionellosis outbreaks, especially in the presence of suitable protozoan hosts. This study examined L. pneumophila behavior within DW biofilms grown on copper (Cu) and unplasticized polyvinylchloride (uPVC) surfaces in the presence of Acanthamoeba polyphaga. One year-old DW biofilms were established within six CDC biofilm reactors: three each containing Cu or uPVC coupons. Biofilms were then inoculated with L. pneumophila (uPVC-Lp and Cu-Lp), or L. pneumophila and A. polyphaga (uPVC-Lp/Ap and Cu-Lp/Ap) and compared to sterile water inoculated controls (uPVC- and Cu-Control) over a 4 month period. L. pneumophila appeared more persistent by qPCR within Cu biofilms in the presence of A. polyphaga compared to uPVC biofilms with or without A. polyphaga, but maintained their cultivability in uPVC biofilms compared to Cu biofilms. Also, persistent shedding of L. pneumophila cells (assayed by qPCR) in the effluent water implied colonization of L. pneumophila within Cu-coupon reactors compared to no detection from uPVC-coupon reactor effluent 14 days after inoculation. Hence, L. pneumophila appeared to colonize Cu surfaces more effectively and may be shed from the biofilms at a greater frequency and duration compared to L. pneumophila colonized uPVC surfaces with host amoebae playing a role in L. pneumophila persistence within Cu biofilms. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  4. Effect of Disinfectant Exposure on Legionella pneumophila Associated with Simulated Drinking Water Biofilms: Release, Inactivation, and Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yun; Huang, Conghui; Lin, Jie; Wu, Wenjing; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2017-02-21

    Legionella pneumophila, the most commonly identified causative agent in drinking water associated with disease outbreaks, can be harbored by and released from drinking water biofilms. In this study, the release of biofilm-associated L. pneumophila under simulated drinking water flow containing a disinfectant residual was examined. Meanwhile, the inactivation and infectivity (to amoebae) of the released L. pneumophila were studied. To simulate drinking water system conditions, biofilms were prepared under either disinfectant exposure (predisinfected biofilms) or disinfectant-free (untreated biofilms) conditions, respectively. For experiments with water flow containing a disinfectant to release the biofilm-associated L. pneumophila from these two types of biofilms, the L. pneumophila release kinetics values from predisinfected and untreated biofilms under flow condition were not statistically different (one-way ANOVA, p > 0.05). However, inactivation of the L. pneumophila released from predisinfected biofilms was 1-2 times higher and amoeba infectivity was 2-29 times lower than that from untreated biofilms. The higher disinfectant resistance of L. pneumophila released from untreated biofilms was presumably influenced by the detachment of a larger amount of biofilm material (determined by 16S rRNA qPCR) surrounding the released L. pneumophila. This study highlights the interaction among disinfectant residual, biofilms, and L. pneumophila, which provides guidelines to assess and control pathogen risk.

  5. Influence of aquatic microorganisms on Legionella pneumophila survival.

    PubMed

    Guerrieri, Elisa; Bondi, Moreno; Borella, Paola; Messi, Patrizia

    2007-07-01

    The ability of aquatic bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens SSD (Ps-D) and Pseudomonas putida SSC (Ps-C) to support the persistence of Legionella pneumophila (Lp-1) in an artificial water microcosm was investigated for 42 day, at two different incubation temperatures. At 4 degrees C, individually suspended Lp-1 was no longer detectable just after 24 hours, while in co-cultures with Pseudomonas, Lp1 showed a better survival capability. At 30 degrees C, Lp-1 alone displayed high survival rates over the entire period of observation. When Lp-1 was inoculated with Ps-C and Ps-D, its count showed a marked decrease, followed by a gradual and costant decline.

  6. Involvement of minerals in adherence of Legionella pneumophila to surfaces.

    PubMed

    Koubar, Mohamad; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Frère, Jacques

    2013-05-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of 90 % of Legionnaires' disease cases. This bacterium lives naturally in fresh water and can colonize biofilms, which play an important role in the protection of Legionella against environmental stress factors. Relationship between the presence of minerals in water and Legionella adherence to surfaces is not well-known. In this study, we studied influence of minerals on bacterial adherence. For the first time, to our knowledge, this report shows that calcium and magnesium in a less extent, enhances the adherence of Legionella to surfaces compared to the bacteria behavior in distilled water. Treatment with proteinase K of live cells showed that surface proteins do not seem to play a crucial role in bacteria adherence to surfaces. Our results represent a first step in understanding effect of ions on Legionella adherence to surfaces. Such field of research could be helpful to better understand biofilm colonization by this bacterium to improve Legionella risk management in water networks.

  7. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 in a birthing pool.

    PubMed

    Teare, L; Millership, S

    2012-09-01

    This report describes a risk assessment and subsequent actions following isolation of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 in the water supply to a birthing pool during a planned maintenance programme. A literature search for cases of neonatal legionellosis identified 24 reports of cases among babies aged <2 months, two of which were associated with water births. On this basis, the pool was closed until Legionella spp. were undetectable. Control proved difficult as hyperchlorination failed, and a filter fitted to the thermostatic mixer tap supplying the pool slowed filling so much that additional taps were required to achieve a satisfactory flow rate. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Limited Evidence Suggests a Protective Association Between Oral Contraceptive Pill Use and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Females: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Kathleen; Balk, Ethan M; Sevetson, Erika L; Fleming, Braden C

    2017-10-01

    Female athletes aged 14 to 18 years are at particular risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Hormonal factors are thought to predispose them to this injury. Oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) might reduce ACL injury risk, although the literature appears controversial. To evaluate the association between OCP use and ACL injuries in women. The secondary objective was to determine the rates of ACL injuries in the pre- and postovulatory phases of the menstrual cycle in OCP and non-OCP (NOCP) users. Searches were performed across 4 reference databases (PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane), abstracts from 6 specialty societies, ClinicalTrials.gov , and reference lists of relevant papers. We included studies investigating the association between OCP use and ACL injuries in females of any age or the distribution of ACL injuries across the menstrual cycle in OCP and NOCP users. Systematic review. Level 3. Data regarding study design, population characteristics, OCP details, outcome definitions, analytic methods, and results were extracted from the included studies. The methodological quality of each study was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. The search yielded 1305 citations, of which 7 retrospective observational studies met the inclusion criteria. Two large case-control studies with higher methodological quality suggested that OCP use may reduce the risk of sustaining an ACL injury. Five comparative studies examining injury distribution across the menstrual cycle in OCP and NOCP users had conflicting findings, were heterogeneous, and were limited by low methodological quality. The evidence suggests OCP use may reduce the risk of ACL injury; however, no conclusions can be drawn regarding differences in risk of ACL injuries between OCP and NOCP users across the menstrual cycle. Studies were limited by small sample sizes, heterogeneity, and methodological concerns.

  9. Influence of growth temperature on virulence of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, P H; Beer, K B; DeBoynton, E D

    1987-01-01

    The effect of growth temperature on the virulence of a strain of broth-grown serogroup 1 Legionella pneumophila (Wadsworth F889) was examined by growing the bacterium at different temperatures and then infecting guinea pigs (by intratracheal injection) and guinea pig alveolar macrophages. The 50% lethal dose for guinea pigs infected with 25 degrees C-grown F889 was log10 5.0 CFU and that for 41 degrees C-grown F889 was log10 5.7 CFU, or a fivefold difference. Guinea pig alveolar macrophages were infected in quadruplicate with log10 3.8 CFU of F889 cells grown at either 25 or 41 degrees C. Counts of F889 in the alveolar macrophages infected with 25 degrees C-grown bacteria were 40% greater after 1 day of incubation (P = 2 X 10(-4)) than were counts in the alveolar macrophage suspensions inoculated with 41 degrees C-grown bacteria. However, the counts were not significantly different after 3 days of incubation. Examination of cover slip cultures of guinea pig alveolar macrophages infected with 25 degrees C-grown or 41 degrees C-grown bacteria showed that the bacteria grown at the lower temperature were twice as likely to be macrophage-associated after 1 h of incubation than were the bacteria grown at the higher temperature. Growth at the lower temperature was also associated with a change in reactivity with monoclonal antibodies, but not with a change in plasmid content. Thus, environmental temperature may play an important role in modulating the virulence of L. pneumophila, possibly by affecting bacterial adherence to host cells. PMID:3666960

  10. Evidence for Pulsed Hydrothermal Venting from Young Abyssal Hills on the EPR Flank Suggests Frequent Seismic Pumping of Ridge Flank Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haymon, R. M.; MacDonald, K. C.; Benjamin, S. B.; Ehrhardt, C. J.

    2004-12-01

    Although measured heat flow suggests that 40-50% of oceanic hydrothermal heat and fluid flux is from young (0.1-5 Ma) abyssal hill terrain on MOR flanks, hydrothermal vents in this setting rarely have been found. On the EPR flanks, seafloor evidence of venting from abyssal hills has been discovered recently at two sites: on ˜0.1 Ma seafloor at 10° 20'N, 103° 33.2'W ("Tevnia Site") and on ˜0.5 Ma seafloor at 9° 27'N, 104° 32.3'W ("Macrobes Site"). Manifestations of venting at these sites include: fault scarp hydrothermal mineralization and macrofauna; fault scarp flocculations containing hyperthermophilic microbes; and hilltop sediment mounds and craters possibly created by fluid "blow-outs." Hydrothermal deposits recovered at the ˜0.1 Ma "Tevnia Site" are fault breccias that record many episodes of brecciation followed by hydrothermal cementation (Benjamin et al., this session). Tubeworm casings, live crabs, and "dandelions" observed at this site indicate that the most recent episode of venting was active during, or shortly before, this site was visited with Alvin in 1994. To create the 200 m-high axis-facing fault scarp at Tevnia Site in 100,000 years, an average uplift rate of at least 2 cm/y is required. Since off-axis earthquakes located on abyssal hill fault scarps typically are evidence for recent venting at the

  11. Metabolism of myo-Inositol by Legionella pneumophila Promotes Infection of Amoebae and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Manske, Christian; Schell, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legionella pneumophila is a natural parasite of environmental amoebae and the causative agent of a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. The facultative intracellular pathogen employs a bipartite metabolism, where the amino acid serine serves as the major energy supply, while glycerol and glucose are mainly utilized for anabolic processes. The L. pneumophila genome harbors the cluster lpg1653 to lpg1649 putatively involved in the metabolism of the abundant carbohydrate myo-inositol (here termed inositol). To assess inositol metabolism by L. pneumophila, we constructed defined mutant strains lacking lpg1653 or lpg1652, which are predicted to encode the inositol transporter IolT or the inositol-2-dehydrogenase IolG, respectively. The mutant strains were not impaired for growth in complex or defined minimal media, and inositol did not promote extracellular growth. However, upon coinfection of Acanthamoeba castellanii, the mutants were outcompeted by the parental strain, indicating that the intracellular inositol metabolism confers a fitness advantage to the pathogen. Indeed, inositol added to L. pneumophila-infected amoebae or macrophages promoted intracellular growth of the parental strain, but not of the ΔiolT or ΔiolG mutant, and growth stimulation by inositol was restored by complementation of the mutant strains. The expression of the Piol promoter and bacterial uptake of inositol required the alternative sigma factor RpoS, a key virulence regulator of L. pneumophila. Finally, the parental strain and ΔiolG mutant bacteria but not the ΔiolT mutant strain accumulated [U-14C6]inositol, indicating that IolT indeed functions as an inositol transporter. Taken together, intracellular L. pneumophila metabolizes inositol through the iol gene products, thus promoting the growth and virulence of the pathogen. IMPORTANCE The environmental bacterium Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. The

  12. Predictive parameters of Legionella pneumophila occurrence in hospital water: HPCs and plumbing system installation age.

    PubMed

    Ghanizadeh, Ghader; Mirmohamadlou, Ali; Esmaeli, Davoud

    2016-09-01

    Occurrence of Legionella pneumophila can be relevant to the installation age and the presence of heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs). This research illustrates L. pneumophila contamination of hospital water in accordance with the installation age and the presence of HPCs. One hundred and fifty samples were collected from hot and cold water systems and cultured on R2A and BCYE agar. L. pneumophila identification was done via specific biochemical tests. HPCs and L. pneumophila were detected in 96 and 37.3 % of the samples, respectively. The mean of HPCs density was 947 ± 998 CFU/ml; therefore, 52 % of the samples had higher densities than 500 CFU/ml. High densities of HPCs (>500 CFU/ml) led to colonization of L. pneumophila (≥1000 CFU/ml), mainly observed in cooling systems, gynecological, sonography, and NICU wards. Chi(2) test demonstrated that higher densities (>500 CFU/ml) of HPCs and L. pneumophila contamination in cold water were more frequent than warm water (OR: 2.3 and 1.49, respectively). Univariate regressions implied a significant difference between HPCs density and installation age in positive and negative tests of L. pneumophila (OR = 1.1, p < 0.001, OR = 1.2, p < 0.001). Mann-Whitney U test implied the significant effects of HPCs and installation age on L. pneumophila occurrences (p < 0.001). Spearman correlation and multivariate linear regression revealed significant differences between L. pneumophila and HPCs densities (r s  = 0.33, p < 0.001 and ß = 0.11, p = 0.02), but nonsignificant difference with installation age (r s  = 0.33, p < 0.001 and ß = 0.0, p = 0.91). The occurrence of L. pneumophila, HPCs, and installation age are relevant; so, plumbing system renovation with appropriate materials and promotion of the effective efforts for hospital's water quality assurance is highly recommended.

  13. Intracellular multiplication of Legionnaires' disease bacteria (Legionella pneumophila) in human monocytes is reversibly inhibited by erythromycin and rifampin.

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, M A; Silverstein, S C

    1983-01-01

    We have previously reported that virulent egg yolk-grown Legionella pneumophila, Philadelphia 1 strain, multiplies intracellularly in human blood monocytes and only intracellularly under tissue culture conditions. In this paper, we have investigated the effect of erythromycin and rifampin on L. pneumophila-monocyte interaction in vitro; erythromycin and rifampin are currently the drugs of choice for the treatment of Legionnaires' disease. The intracellular multiplication of L. pneumophila is inhibited by erythromycin and rifampin, as measured by colony-forming units, whether the antibiotics are added just before or just after infection of monocytes with L. pneumophila, or 2 d after infection when L. pneumophila is in the logarithmic phase of growth in monocytes. Intracellular multiplication of L. pneumophila is inhibited by 1.25 microgram/ml but not less than or equal to 0.125 microgram/ml erythromycin and 0.01 microgram/ml but not less than or equal to 0.001 microgram/ml rifampin. These concentrations of antibiotics are comparable to those that inhibit extracellular multiplication of L. pneumophila under cell-free conditions in artificial medium; the minimal inhibitory concentration is 0.37 microgram/ml for erythromycin and 0.002 microgram/ml for rifampin. Multiplication of L. pneumophila in the logarithmic phase of growth in monocytes is inhibited within 1 h of the addition of antibiotics. Intracellular bacteria inhibited from multiplying by antibiotics are not killed. By electron microscopy, the bacteria appear intact within membrane-bound vacuoles, studded with ribosomelike structures. L. pneumophila multiplying extracellularly on artificial medium is killed readily by relatively low concentrations of erythromycin and rifampin; the minimal bactericidal concentration is 1 microgram/ml for erythromycin and 0.009 microgram/ml for rifampin. In contrast, L. pneumophila multiplying intracellularly is resistant to killing by these concentrations of erythromycin and

  14. Coinoculation with Hartmannella vermiformis enhances replicative Legionella pneumophila lung infection in a murine model of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Brieland, J; McClain, M; Heath, L; Chrisp, C; Huffnagle, G; LeGendre, M; Hurley, M; Fantone, J; Engleberg, C

    1996-01-01

    The effect of inhaled amoebae on the pathogenesis of Legionnaires' disease was investigated in vivo. A/J mice, which are susceptible to replicative Legionella pneumophila infections, were inoculated intratracheally with L. pneumophila (10(6) bacteria per mouse) or were coinoculated with L. pneumophila (10(6) bacteria per mouse) and Hartmannella vermiformis (10(6) amoebae per mouse). The effect of coinoculation with H. vermiformis on bacterial clearance, histopathology, cellular recruitment into the lung, and intrapulmonary levels of cytokines including gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha was subsequently assessed. Coinoculation with H. vermiformis significantly enhanced intrapulmonary growth of L. pneumophila in A/J mice. Histopathologic and flow cytometric analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that while A/J mice inoculated with L. pneumophila alone develop multifocal pneumonitis which resolves with minimal mortality, mice coinoculated with H. vermiformis develop diffuse pneumonitis which is associated with diminished intrapulmonary recruitment of lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytic cells and significant mortality. Furthermore, coinoculation of mice with H. vermiformis resulted in a fourfold enhancement in intrapulmonary levels of gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha compared with mice infected with L. pneumophila alone. The effect of H. vermiformis on intrapulmonary growth of L. pneumophila in a resistant host (i.e., BALB/c mice) was subsequently evaluated. While BALB/c mice do not develop replicative L. pneumophila infections following inoculation with L. pneumophila alone, there was an eightfold increase in intrapulmonary L. pneumophila in BALB/c mice coinoculated with H. vermiformis. These studies, demonstrating that intrapulmonary amoebae potentiate replicative L. pneumophila lung infection in both a susceptible and a resistant host, have significant implications with regard to the potential role of protozoa in the pathogenesis of

  15. Structural basis for Rab1 de-AMPylation by the Legionella pneumophila effector SidD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Tascón, Igor; Neunuebel, M Ramona; Pallara, Chiara; Brady, Jacqueline; Kinch, Lisa N; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Rojas, Adriana L; Machner, Matthias P; Hierro, Aitor

    2013-01-01

    The covalent attachment of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to proteins, a process called AMPylation (adenylylation), has recently emerged as a novel theme in microbial pathogenesis. Although several AMPylating enzymes have been characterized, the only known virulence protein with de-AMPylation activity is SidD from the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila. SidD de-AMPylates mammalian Rab1, a small GTPase involved in secretory vesicle transport, thereby targeting the host protein for inactivation. The molecular mechanisms underlying Rab1 recognition and de-AMPylation by SidD are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of the catalytic region of SidD at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure reveals a phosphatase-like fold with additional structural elements not present in generic PP2C-type phosphatases. The catalytic pocket contains a binuclear metal-binding site characteristic of hydrolytic metalloenzymes, with strong dependency on magnesium ions. Subsequent docking and molecular dynamics simulations between SidD and Rab1 revealed the interface contacts and the energetic contribution of key residues to the interaction. In conjunction with an extensive structure-based mutational analysis, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for a remarkable adaptation of SidD to its host cell target Rab1 which explains how this effector confers specificity to the reaction it catalyses.

  16. Structural Basis for Rab1 De-AMPylation by the Legionella pneumophila Effector SidD

    PubMed Central

    Neunuebel, M. Ramona; Pallara, Chiara; Brady, Jacqueline; Kinch, Lisa N.; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Rojas, Adriana L.; Machner, Matthias P.; Hierro, Aitor

    2013-01-01

    The covalent attachment of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to proteins, a process called AMPylation (adenylylation), has recently emerged as a novel theme in microbial pathogenesis. Although several AMPylating enzymes have been characterized, the only known virulence protein with de-AMPylation activity is SidD from the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila. SidD de-AMPylates mammalian Rab1, a small GTPase involved in secretory vesicle transport, thereby targeting the host protein for inactivation. The molecular mechanisms underlying Rab1 recognition and de-AMPylation by SidD are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of the catalytic region of SidD at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure reveals a phosphatase-like fold with additional structural elements not present in generic PP2C-type phosphatases. The catalytic pocket contains a binuclear metal-binding site characteristic of hydrolytic metalloenzymes, with strong dependency on magnesium ions. Subsequent docking and molecular dynamics simulations between SidD and Rab1 revealed the interface contacts and the energetic contribution of key residues to the interaction. In conjunction with an extensive structure-based mutational analysis, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for a remarkable adaptation of SidD to its host cell target Rab1 which explains how this effector confers specificity to the reaction it catalyses. PMID:23696742

  17. Effect of quinolones and other antimicrobial agents on cell-associated Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Havlichek, D; Saravolatz, L; Pohlod, D

    1987-01-01

    We evaluated the in vitro susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila ATCC 33152 (serogroup I) to 13 antibiotics alone and in combination with rifampin (0.1 mg/liter) by three methods. Extracellular susceptibility was determined by MIC determinations and time kill curves in buffered yeast extract broth, while intracellular susceptibility was determined by peripheral human monocytes in RPMI 1640 culture medium. Antibiotic concentrations equal to or greater than the broth dilution MIC inhibited or killed L. pneumophila by the time kill method, except this was not the case for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Antibiotic concentrations below the broth dilution MIC did not inhibit Legionella growth. The only antibiotic-rifampin combinations which produced improved killing of L. pneumophila by the time kill method were those in which the logarithmic growth of L. pneumophila occurred during the experiment (rosoxacin, amifloxacin, cinoxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, clindamycin, and doxycycline). Neither direct MICs nor time kill curve assays accurately predicted intracellular L. pneumophila susceptibility. Rifampin, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, rosoxacin, enoxacin, amifloxacin, gentamicin, clindamycin, and doxycycline all inhibited intracellular L. pneumophila growth at readily achievable concentrations in serum. Cefoxitin and thienamycin showed no inhibition of growth, although they were present extracellularly at concentrations that were 20 to 1,000 times their broth dilution MICs. Clindamycin was the only antibiotic that was able to inhibit intracellular L. pneumophila growth at an extracellular concentration below its MIC. The gentamicin (5 mg/liter)-rifampin combination was the only antibiotic-rifampin combination which demonstrated decreased cell-associated Legionella survival in this model of in vitro susceptibility. PMID:3435101

  18. Identification and functional characterization of K(+) transporters encoded by Legionella pneumophila kup genes.

    PubMed

    Hori, Juliana I; Pereira, Marcelo S F; Roy, Craig R; Nagai, Hiroki; Zamboni, Dario S

    2013-12-01

    Legionnaires' disease is an emerging, severe, pneumonia-like illness caused by the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila, which are able to infect and replicate intracellularly in macrophages. Little is known regarding the mechanisms used by intracellular L. pneumophila for the acquisition of specific nutrients that are essential for bacterial replication. Here, we investigate three L. pneumophila genes with high similarity to the Escherichia coli K(+) transporters. These three genes were expressed by L. pneumophila and have been designated kupA, kupB and kupC. Investigation using the L. pneumophila kup mutants revealed that kupA is involved in K(+) acquisition during axenic growth. The kupA mutants replicated efficiently in rich axenic media, but poorly in a chemically defined medium. The kupA mutants were defective in the recruitment of polyubiquitinated proteins to the Legionella-containing vacuole that is formed in macrophages and displayed an intracellular multiplication defect during the replication in Acanthamoeba castellanii and in mouse macrophages. We found that bafilomycin treatment of macrophages was able to rescue the growth defects of kupA mutants, but itdid not influence the replication of wild-type bacteria. The defects identified in kupA mutants of L. pneumophila were complemented by the expression E. coli trkD/Kup gene in trans, a bona fide K(+) transporter encoded by E. coli. Collectively, our data indicate that KupA is a functional K(+) transporter expressed by L. pneumophila that facilitates the bacterial replication intracellularly and in nutrient-limited conditions.

  19. Identification and functional characterization of K+ transporters encoded by Legionella pneumophila kup genes

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Juliana I.; Pereira, Marcelo S.F.; Roy, Craig R.; Nagai, Hiroki; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Legionnaires’ disease is an emerging, severe, pneumonia-like illness caused by the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila, which are able to infect and replicate intracellularly in macrophages. Little is known regarding the mechanisms used by intracellular L. pneumophila for the acquisition of specific nutrients that are essential for bacterial replication. Here, we investigate three L. pneumophila genes with high similarity to the E. coli K+ transporters. These three genes were expressed by L. pneumophila and have been designated kupA, kupB and kupC. Investigation using the L. pneumophila kup mutants revealed that kupA is involved in K+ acquisition during axenic growth. The kupA mutants replicated efficiently in rich axenic media, but poorly in a chemically defined medium. The kupA mutants were defective in the recruitment of polyubiquitinated proteins to the Legionella-containing vacuole that is formed in macrophages and displayed an intracellular multiplication defect during the replication in Acanthamoeba castellanii and in mouse macrophages. We found that bafilomycin treatment of macrophages was able to rescue the growth defects of kupA mutants, but it did not influence the replication of wild-type bacteria. The defects identified in kupA mutants of L. pneumophila were complemented by the expression E. coli trkD/Kup gene in trans, a bona fide K+ transporter encoded by E. coli. Collectively, our data indicate that KupA is a functional K+ transporter expressed by L. pneumophila that facilitates the bacterial replication intracellularly and in nutrient-limited conditions. PMID:23848378

  20. Iron Limitation Triggers Early Egress by the Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huaixin; VanRheenen, Susan M.; Ghosh, Soma; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that replicates in alveolar macrophages, causing a severe form of pneumonia. Intracellular growth of the bacterium depends on its ability to sequester iron from the host cell. In the L. pneumophila strain 130b, one mechanism used to acquire this essential nutrient is the siderophore legiobactin. Iron-bound legiobactin is imported by the transport protein LbtU. Here, we describe the role of LbtP, a paralog of LbtU, in iron acquisition in the L. pneumophila strain Philadelphia-1. Similar to LbtU, LbtP is a siderophore transport protein and is required for robust growth under iron-limiting conditions. Despite their similar functions, however, LbtU and LbtP do not contribute equally to iron acquisition. The Philadelphia-1 strain lacking LbtP is more sensitive to iron deprivation in vitro. Moreover, LbtP is important for L. pneumophila growth within macrophages while LbtU is dispensable. These results demonstrate that LbtP plays a dominant role over LbtU in iron acquisition. In contrast, loss of both LbtP and LbtU does not impair L. pneumophila growth in the amoebal host Acanthamoeba castellanii, demonstrating a host-specific requirement for the activities of these two transporters in iron acquisition. The growth defect of the ΔlbtP mutant in macrophages is not due to alterations in growth kinetics. Instead, the absence of LbtP limits L. pneumophila replication and causes bacteria to prematurely exit the host cell. These results demonstrate the existence of a preprogrammed exit strategy in response to iron limitation that allows L. pneumophila to abandon the host cell when nutrients are exhausted. PMID:27185787

  1. Tafenoquine treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria: suggestive evidence that CYP2D6 reduced metabolism is not associated with relapse in the Phase 2b DETECTIVE trial.

    PubMed

    St Jean, Pamela L; Xue, Zhengyu; Carter, Nick; Koh, Gavin C K W; Duparc, Stephan; Taylor, Maxine; Beaumont, Claire; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Rueangweerayut, Ronnatrai; Krudsood, Srivicha; Green, Justin A; Rubio, Justin P

    2016-02-18

    Tafenoquine (TQ) and primaquine (PQ) are 8-aminoquinolines (8-AQ) with anti-hypnozoite activity against vivax malaria. PQ is the only FDA-approved medicine for preventing relapsing Plasmodium vivax infection and TQ is currently in phase 3 clinical trials for the same indication. Recent studies have provided evidence that cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolism via CYP2D6 plays a role in PQ efficacy against P. vivax and have suggested that this effect may extend to other 8-AQs, including TQ. Here, a retrospective pharmacogenetic (PGx) investigation was performed to assess the impact of CYP2D6 metabolism on TQ and PQ efficacy in the treatment of P. vivax in the DETECTIVE study (TAF112582), a recently completed, randomized, phase 2b dose-ranging clinical trial. The impact of CYP2D6 on TQ pharmacokinetics (PK) was also investigated in TAF112582 TQ-treated subjects and in vitro CYP metabolism of TQ was explored. A limitation of the current study is that TAF112582 was not designed to be well powered for PGx, thus our findings are based on TQ or PQ efficacy in CYP2D6 intermediate metabolizers (IM), as there were insufficient poor metabolizers (PM) to draw any conclusion on the impact of the PM phenotype on efficacy. The impact of genetically-predicted CYP2D6 reduced metabolism on relapse-free efficacy six months post-dosing of TQ or PQ, both administered in conjunction with chloroquine (CQ), was assessed using exact statistical methods in 198 P. vivax-infected study participants comparing IM to extensive metabolizers (EM). The influence of CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotypes on TQ PK was assessed comparing median TQ area under the curve (AUC). In vitro metabolism of TQ was investigated using recombinant, over-expressed human CYP enzymes and human hepatocytes. Metabolite identification experiments were performed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Reduction of CYP2D6 activity was not associated with an increase in relapse-rate in TQ-treated subjects (p = 0.57). In contrast

  2. Suggestive evidence of linkage identified at chromosomes 12q24 and 2p16 in African American prostate cancer families from Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Ledet, Elisa M; Sartor, Oliver; Rayford, Walter; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Mandal, Diptasri M

    2012-06-15

    In the United States, incidence of prostate cancer in African American men is more than twice than that of any other race. Thus far, numerous disease susceptibility loci have been identified for this cancer but definite locus-specific information is not yet established due to the tremendous amount of genetic and disease heterogeneity; additionally, despite high prevalence of prostate cancer amongst African American men, this population has been under represented in genetic studies of prostate cancer. In order to identify the susceptible locus (loci) for prostate cancer in African Americans, we have performed linkage analyses on members of 15 large high-risk families. Specifically, these families were recruited from Louisiana and represent a uniquely admixed African American population exclusive to Southern Louisiana. In addition to geographical constraints, these families were clinically homogeneous creating a well-characterized collection of large pedigrees. The families were genotyped with Illumina Infinium II SNP HumanLinkage-12 panel and extensive demographic and clinical information was documented from the hospital pathological reports and family interviews. We identified two novel regions, 12q24 and 2p16, with suggestive evidence of linkage under the dominant model of inheritance. This is the first time that chromosome 12q24 (HLOD = 2.21) and 2p16 (HLOD = 1.97) has been shown to be associated with prostate cancer in high-risk African American families. These results provide insight to prostate cancer in an exceptional, well-characterized African American population, and illustrate the significance of utilizing large unique, but homogenous pedigrees. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Distribution of Virulence Factors and Molecular Fingerprinting of Aeromonas Species Isolates from Water and Clinical Samples: Suggestive Evidence of Water-to-Human Transmission ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Khajanchi, Bijay K.; Fadl, Amin A.; Borchardt, Mark A.; Berg, Richard L.; Horneman, Amy J.; Stemper, Mary E.; Joseph, Sam W.; Moyer, Nelson P.; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2010-01-01

    A total of 227 isolates of Aeromonas obtained from different geographical locations in the United States and different parts of the world, including 28 reference strains, were analyzed to determine the presence of various virulence factors. These isolates were also fingerprinted using biochemical identification and pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Of these 227 isolates, 199 that were collected from water and clinical samples belonged to three major groups or complexes, namely, the A. hydrophila group, the A. caviae-A. media group, and the A. veronii-A. sobria group, based on biochemical profiles, and they had various pulsotypes. When virulence factor activities were examined, Aeromonas isolates obtained from clinical sources had higher cytotoxic activities than isolates obtained from water sources for all three Aeromonas species groups. Likewise, the production of quorum-sensing signaling molecules, such as N-acyl homoserine lactone, was greater in clinical isolates than in isolates from water for the A. caviae-A. media and A. hydrophila groups. Based on colony blot DNA hybridization, the heat-labile cytotonic enterotoxin gene and the DNA adenosine methyltransferase gene were more prevalent in clinical isolates than in water isolates for all three Aeromonas groups. Using colony blot DNA hybridization and PFGE, we obtained three sets of water and clinical isolates that had the same virulence signature and had indistinguishable PFGE patterns. In addition, all of these isolates belonged to the A. caviae-A. media group. The findings of the present study provide the first suggestive evidence of successful colonization and infection by particular strains of certain Aeromonas species after transmission from water to humans. PMID:20154106

  4. The presence of opportunistic pathogens, Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and Mycobacterium avium complex, in South Australian reuse water distribution pipelines.

    PubMed

    Whiley, H; Keegan, A; Fallowfield, H; Bentham, R

    2015-06-01

    Water reuse has become increasingly important for sustainable water management. Currently, its application is primarily constrained by the potential health risks. Presently there is limited knowledge regarding the presence and fate of opportunistic pathogens along reuse water distribution pipelines. In this study opportunistic human pathogens Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and Mycobacterium avium complex were detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction along two South Australian reuse water distribution pipelines at maximum concentrations of 10⁵, 10³ and 10⁵ copies/mL, respectively. During the summer period of sampling the concentration of all three organisms significantly increased (P < 0.05) along the pipeline, suggesting multiplication and hence viability. No seasonality in the decrease in chlorine residual along the pipelines was observed. This suggests that the combination of reduced chlorine residual and increased water temperature promoted the presence of these opportunistic pathogens.

  5. Role of biofilm roughness and hydrodynamic conditions in Legionella pneumophila adhesion to and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yun; Monroy, Guillermo L; Derlon, Nicolas; Janjaroen, Dao; Huang, Conghui; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2015-04-07

    Biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) could exacerbate the persistence and associated risks of pathogenic Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), thus raising human health concerns. However, mechanisms controlling adhesion and subsequent detachment of L. pneumophila associated with biofilms remain unclear. We determined the connection between L. pneumophila adhesion and subsequent detachment with biofilm physical structure characterization using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique. Analysis of the OCT images of multispecies biofilms grown under low nutrient condition up to 34 weeks revealed the lack of biofilm deformation even when these biofilms were exposed to flow velocity of 0.7 m/s, typical flow for DWDS. L. pneumophila adhesion on these biofilm under low flow velocity (0.007 m/s) positively correlated with biofilm roughness due to enlarged biofilm surface area and local flow conditions created by roughness asperities. The preadhered L. pneumophila on selected rough and smooth biofilms were found to detach when these biofilms were subjected to higher flow velocity. At the flow velocity of 0.1 and 0.3 m/s, the ratio of detached cell from the smooth biofilm surface was from 1.3 to 1.4 times higher than that from the rough biofilm surface, presumably because of the low shear stress zones near roughness asperities. This study determined that physical structure and local hydrodynamics control L. pneumophila adhesion to and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilm, thus it is the first step toward reducing the risk of L. pneumophila exposure and subsequent infections.

  6. Common epitope on the lipopolysaccharide of Legionella pneumophila recognized by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Barthe, C; Joly, J R; Ramsay, D; Boissinot, M; Benhamou, N

    1988-01-01

    Serogroup-specificity of Legionella pneumophila is related to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and few cross-reactions between serogroups have been observed with rabbit or monkey antisera. C57BL/6 mice were sequentially immunized with crude outer membrane fractions of L. pneumophila serogroups 1, 5, and 7, Legionella bozemanii, and Legionella micdadei. Spleen cells from these mice were then fused with the Sp2-0/Ag14 mouse myeloma cell line. Outer membrane-rich fractions and LPS were prepared from L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 8 and other Legionella and non-Legionella species. Immunoblots of these extracts were performed with monoclonal antibody obtained from these fusions. One of these monoclonal antibodies recognized an epitope common to all tested serogroups of L. pneumophila and attached to the major constituent of the outer membrane, LPS. This antibody did not react with other Legionella species and numerous gram-negative rods other than Pseudomonas fluorescens CDC93. This monoclonal antibody may be useful in preliminary identification of L. pneumophila as an alternative to direct fluorescent-antibody testing. Images PMID:2454935

  7. Improved PCR assay for the species-specific identification and quantitation of Legionella pneumophila in water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Seok; Ahn, Tae-Young; Joh, Kiseong; Lee, Eui Seok; Park, Dong Suk

    2015-11-01

    Legionellosis outbreak is a major global health care problem. However, current Legionella risk assessments may be compromised by uncertainties in Legionella detection methods, infectious dose, and strain infectivity. These limitations may place public health at significant risk, leading to significant monetary losses in health care. However, there are still unmet needs for its rapid identification and monitoring of legionellae in water systems. Therefore, in the present study, a primer set was designed based on a LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) family protein gene of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pneumophila str. Philadelphia 1 because it was found that this gene is structurally diverse among species through BLAST searches. The specificity of the primer set was evaluated using genomic DNA from 6 strains of L. pneumophila, 5 type strains of other related Legionella species, and other 29 reference pathogenic bacteria. The primer set used in the PCR assay amplified a 264-bp product for only targeted six strains of L. pneumophila. The assay was also able to detect at least 1.39 × 10(3) copies/μl of cloned amplified target DNA using purified DNA or 7.4 × 10(0) colony-forming unit per reaction when using calibrated cell suspension. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of this assay were confirmed by successful detection of Legionella pneumophila in environmental water samples.

  8. WIN 57273 is bactericidal for Legionella pneumophila grown in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, P H; Edelstein, M A

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro antimicrobial activity of WIN 57273, a new quinolone antimicrobial agent, was determined for 21 Legionella strains, using broth macrodilution and agar dilution testing methods; ciprofloxacin and erythromycin were tested as well. Three different buffered yeast extract media were used for the agar dilution studies, two of which were made with starch rather than charcoal. Broth macrodilution susceptibility testing was performed with buffered yeast extract broth and two Legionella pneumophila strains. Antimicrobial inhibition of L. pneumophila growth in guinea pig alveolar macrophages was also studied, using a method able to detect bacterial killing. The MICs for 90% of the 21 strains of Legionella spp. grown on buffered charcoal yeast extract medium were 0.125 microgram/ml for WIN 57273, 0.25 microgram/ml for ciprofloxacin, and 1.0 micrograms/ml for erythromycin. These MICs were falsely high, because of inhibition of drug activity by the medium used. Use of less drug-antagonistic, starch-containing media did not support good growth of the test strains. The broth macrodilution MICs for two strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 were less than or equal to 0.03 microgram/ml for WIN 57273 and ciprofloxacin and 0.125 microgram/ml for erythromycin. WIN 57273, ciprofloxacin, and erythromycin all inhibited growth of L. pneumophila in guinea pig alveolar macrophages at concentrations of 1 microgram/ml, but only WIN 57273 prevented regrowth or killed L. pneumophila after removal of extracellular antimicrobial agent. PMID:2619277

  9. Rapid Detection and Enumeration of Legionella pneumophila in Hot Water Systems by Solid-Phase Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Aurell, Helena; Catala, Philippe; Farge, Pierre; Wallet, France; Le Brun, Matthieu; Helbig, Jürgen H.; Jarraud, Sophie; Lebaron, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    A new method for the rapid and sensitive detection of Legionella pneumophila in hot water systems has been developed. The method is based on an IF assay combined with detection by solid-phase cytometry. This method allowed the enumeration of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 and L. pneumophila serogroups 2 to 6, 8 to 10, and 12 to 15 in tap water samples within 3 to 4 h. The sensitivity of the method was between 10 and 100 bacteria per liter and was principally limited by the filtration capacity of membranes. The specificity of the antibody was evaluated against 15 non-Legionella strains, and no cross-reactivity was observed. When the method was applied to natural waters, direct counts of L. pneumophila were compared with the number of CFU obtained by the standard culture method. Direct counts were always higher than culturable counts, and the ratio between the two methods ranged from 1.4 to 325. Solid-phase cytometry offers a fast and sensitive alternative to the culture method for L. pneumophila screening in hot water systems. PMID:15006790

  10. Prevalence of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 in water distribution systems in Izmir province of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uzel, Ataç; Uçar, Füsun; Hameş-Kocabaş, E Esin

    2005-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 occurrence has been investigated in 168 hot water samples from 24 hotels, situated in 6 counties in Izmir province of Turkey, from 15 June to 30 September of the year 2000. Sampling was carried out at 15-day intervals and seven samples were taken from each of the hotels' hot water reservoirs and hot water networks. The samples were (1 L) concentrated using polycarbonate filters (mesh size 0.22 microm). Isolation was achieved using selective medium, GVPC agar. The samples were concentrated by membrane filtration, divided into three portions and cultured without pretreatment, after acid treatment, and after heat treatment, on GVPC agar. One hundred and ten isolates were identified as L.pneumophila sg 1 using the Legionella Latex Test (Oxoid). Arbitrarily primed PCR (AP PCR) was employed to assess the clonal relationship between Legionella pneumophila sg 1 isolates from the hot water samples of the hotels. Three genotypes of L. pneumophila sg 1 isolates were identified. With a high prevalence of type A, 22 hotels were found to be colonized with L. pneumophila serogroup 1, while only 2 were free from the bacteria.

  11. Legionella pneumophila infection activates bystander cells differentially by bacterial and host cell vesicles.

    PubMed

    Jung, Anna Lena; Herkt, Christina Elena; Schulz, Christine; Bolte, Kathrin; Seidel, Kerstin; Scheller, Nicoletta; Sittka-Stark, Alexandra; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Schmeck, Bernd

    2017-07-24

    Extracellular vesicles from eukaryotic cells and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released from gram-negative bacteria have been described as mediators of pathogen-host interaction and intercellular communication. Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) is a causative agent of severe pneumonia. The differential effect of bacterial and host cell vesicles in L. pneumophila infection is unknown so far. We infected THP-1-derived or primary human macrophages with L. pneumophila and isolated supernatant vesicles by differential centrifugation. We observed an increase of exosomes in the 100 k pellet by nanoparticle tracking analysis, electron microscopy, and protein markers. This fraction additionally contained Legionella LPS, indicating also the presence of OMVs. In contrast, vesicles in the 16 k pellet, representing microparticles, decreased during infection. The 100 k vesicle fraction activated uninfected primary human alveolar epithelial cells, A549 cells, and THP-1 cells. Epithelial cell activation was reduced by exosome depletion (anti-CD63, or GW4869), or blocking of IL-1β in the supernatant. In contrast, the response of THP-1 cells to vesicles was reduced by a TLR2-neutralizing antibody, UV-inactivation of bacteria, or - partially - RNase-treatment of vesicles. Taken together, we found that during L. pneumophila infection, neighbouring epithelial cells were predominantly activated by exosomes and cytokines, whereas myeloid cells were activated by bacterial OMVs.

  12. Relationship between Legionella pneumophila and Acanthamoeba polyphaga: Physiological status and susceptibility to chemical inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J.; Farrell, I. ); Brown, M.R.W.; Collier, P.J.; Gilbert, P. )

    1992-08-01

    Survival studies were conducted on Legionella pneumophila cells that had been grown intracellulary in Acanthamoeba polyphaga and then exposed to polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), benzisothiazolone (BIT), and 5-chloro-N-methylisothiazolone (CMIT). Susceptibilities were also determined for L. pneumophila grown under iron-sufficient and iron-depleted conditions. BIT was relatively ineffective against cells to PHMB and CMIT. The activities of all three biocides were greatly reduced against L. pneumophila grown in amoebae. PHMB (1 [times] MIC) gave 99.99% reductions in viability for cultures grown in broth within 6 h and no detectable survivors at 24 h but only 90 and 99.9% killing at 6 h and 24 h, respectively, for cells grown in amoebae. The antimicrobial properties of the three biocides against A. polyphaga were also determined. The majority of amoebae recovered from BIT treatment, but few, if any, survived CMIT treatment or exposure of PHMB. This study not only shows the profound effect that intra-amoebal growth has on the physiological status and antimicrobial susceptibility of L. pneumophila but also reveals PHMB to be a potential biocide for effective water treatment. In this respect, PHMB has significant activity, below its recommended use concentrations, against both the host amoeba and L. pneumophila.

  13. Relationship between Legionella pneumophila and Acanthamoeba polyphaga: physiological status and susceptibility to chemical inactivation.

    PubMed

    Barker, J; Brown, M R; Collier, P J; Farrell, I; Gilbert, P

    1992-08-01

    Survival studies were conducted on Legionella pneumophila cells that had been grown intracellularly in Acanthamoeba polyphaga and then exposed to polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), benzisothiazolone (BIT), and 5-chloro-N-methylisothiazolone (CMIT). Susceptibilities were also determined for L. pneumophila grown under iron-sufficient and iron-depleted conditions. BIT was relatively ineffective against cells grown under iron depletion; in contrast, iron-depleted conditions increased the susceptibilities of cells to PHMB and CMIT. The activities of all three biocides were greatly reduced against L. pneumophila grown in amoebae. PHMB (1 x MIC) gave 99.99% reductions in viability for cultures grown in broth within 6 h and no detectable survivors at 24 h but only 90 and 99.9% killing at 6 h and 24 h, respectively, for cells grown in amoebae. The antimicrobial properties of the three biocides against A. polyphaga were also determined. The majority of amoebae recovered from BIT treatment, but few, if any, survived CMIT treatment or exposure to PHMB. This study not only shows the profound effect that intra-amoebal growth has on the physiological status and antimicrobial susceptibility of L. pneumophila but also reveals PHMB to be a potential biocide for effective water treatment. In this respect, PHMB has significant activity, below its recommended use concentrations, against both the host amoeba and L. pneumophila.

  14. Detection limits of Legionella pneumophila in environmental samples after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The efficiency of recovery and the detection limit of Legionella after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga are not known and so far no investigations have been carried out to determine the efficiency of the recovery of Legionella spp. by co-culture and compare it with that of conventional culturing methods. This study aimed to assess the detection limits of co-culture compared to culture for Legionella pneumophila in compost and air samples. Compost and air samples were spiked with known concentrations of L. pneumophila. Direct culturing and co-culture with amoebae were used in parallel to isolate L. pneumophila and recovery standard curves for both methods were produced for each sample. Results The co-culture proved to be more sensitive than the reference method, detecting 102-103 L. pneumophila cells in 1 g of spiked compost or 1 m3 of spiked air, as compared to 105-106 cells in 1 g of spiked compost and 1 m3 of spiked air. Conclusions Co-culture with amoebae is a useful, sensitive and reliable technique to enrich L. pneumophila in environmental samples that contain only low amounts of bacterial cells. PMID:23442526

  15. Relationship between Legionella pneumophila and Acanthamoeba polyphaga: physiological status and susceptibility to chemical inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, J; Brown, M R; Collier, P J; Farrell, I; Gilbert, P

    1992-01-01

    Survival studies were conducted on Legionella pneumophila cells that had been grown intracellularly in Acanthamoeba polyphaga and then exposed to polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), benzisothiazolone (BIT), and 5-chloro-N-methylisothiazolone (CMIT). Susceptibilities were also determined for L. pneumophila grown under iron-sufficient and iron-depleted conditions. BIT was relatively ineffective against cells grown under iron depletion; in contrast, iron-depleted conditions increased the susceptibilities of cells to PHMB and CMIT. The activities of all three biocides were greatly reduced against L. pneumophila grown in amoebae. PHMB (1 x MIC) gave 99.99% reductions in viability for cultures grown in broth within 6 h and no detectable survivors at 24 h but only 90 and 99.9% killing at 6 h and 24 h, respectively, for cells grown in amoebae. The antimicrobial properties of the three biocides against A. polyphaga were also determined. The majority of amoebae recovered from BIT treatment, but few, if any, survived CMIT treatment or exposure to PHMB. This study not only shows the profound effect that intra-amoebal growth has on the physiological status and antimicrobial susceptibility of L. pneumophila but also reveals PHMB to be a potential biocide for effective water treatment. In this respect, PHMB has significant activity, below its recommended use concentrations, against both the host amoeba and L. pneumophila. PMID:1514790

  16. An alkaline approach to treating cooling towers for control of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    States, S J; Conley, L F; Towner, S G; Wolford, R S; Stephenson, T E; McNamara, A M; Wadowsky, R M; Yee, R B

    1987-01-01

    Earlier field and laboratory studies have shown that Legionella species survive and multiply in the pH range 5.5 to 9.2. Additionally, the technical feasibility of operating cooling towers at elevated alkalinities and pH has previously been documented by published guidelines. The guidelines indicate that these conditions facilitate corrosion control and favor chlorine persistence which enhances the effectiveness of continuous chlorination in biofouling control. This information suggests that control of Legionella species in cooling towers can be accomplished by operating the towers under alkaline conditions. To test this possibility, we collected water samples over a period of months from a hospital cooling tower. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical parameters. Subsamples were pasteurized and inoculated with non-agar-passaged Legionella pneumophila which had been maintained in tap water. Correlation of subsequent Legionella growth with corresponding pH and alkalinity values revealed statistically significant inverse associations. These data support the hypothesis that operating cooling towers outside of the optimal conditions for Legionella growth (e.g., at elevated alkalinities and a pH greater than 9) may be a useful approach to controlling growth in this habitat. PMID:3662515

  17. Structure of lpg0406, a carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase family protein possibly involved in antioxidative response from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofang; Hu, Yanjin; Yang, Bo; Gong, Xiaojian; Zhang, Nannan; Niu, Liwen; Wu, Yun; Ge, Honghua

    2015-12-01

    Lpg0406, a hypothetical protein from Legionella pneumophila, belongs to carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase (CMD) family. We determined the crystal structure of lpg0406 both in its apo and reduced form. The structures reveal that lpg0406 forms a hexamer and have disulfide exchange properties. The protein has an all-helical fold with a conserved thioredoxin-like active site CXXC motif and a proton relay system similar to that of alkylhydroperoxidase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAhpD), suggesting that lpg0406 might function as an enzyme with peroxidase activity and involved in antioxidant defense. A comparison of the size and the surface topology of the putative substrate-binding region between lpg0406 and MtAhpD indicates that the two enzymes accommodate the different substrate preferences. The structural findings will enhance understanding of the CMD family protein structure and its various functions.

  18. Ultra-structure and localisation of formazan formed by human neutrophils and amoebae phagocytosing virulent and avirulent Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Halablab, M A; Bazin, M; Richards, L; Pacy, J

    1990-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila (LP) strains of differing virulence were incubated with a solution of nitroblue-tetrazolium (NBT) at a concentration of 1 mg.ml-1 in the presence of Acanthamoeba polyphaga or human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). Reduction of NBT to formazan occurred at a faster rate in the presence of virulent strains. Reduction appeared to be temperature dependent; at 37 degrees C the reaction rate was higher than at 20 degrees C. On microscopic examination, deposits of formazan around Legionella cells were observed inside amoebae similar to those deposited in human neutrophils. Electron microscopy revealed electron-dense particles surrounding virulent legionellae, which appeared to be associated with formazan formation. Formazan formation inside amoebae may suggest the presence of a respiratory burst against LP, which is more intense with virulent strains.

  19. Isolation and identification of Legionella pneumophila from drinking water in Basra governorate, Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Sulami, A A; Al-Taee, A M R; Yehyazarian, A A

    2013-11-01

    This study in Iraq investigated the occurrence of Legionella. pneumophila in different drinking-water sources in Basra governorate as well as the susceptibility of isolates to several antibiotics. A total of 222 water samples were collected in 2008-2009: 49 samples from water purification plants (at entry points, from precipitation tanks, from filtration tanks and at exit points), 127 samples of tap water; and 46 samples from tankers and plants supplying water by reverse osmosis. The findings confirmed the presence of L. pneumophila in sources of crude water, in general drinking water supplies and drinking water tankers. Of 258 isolates 77.1% were serotype 1 and 22.9% serotypes 2-15. All examined isolates displayed drug resistance, particularly to ampicillin, but were 100% susceptible to doxycycline. The prevalence of L. pneumophila, especially serogroup 1, is a strong indicator of unsuitability of drinking water and requires appropriate action.

  20. Real-time investigation of a Legionella pneumophila outbreak using whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Graham, R M A; Doyle, C J; Jennison, A V

    2014-11-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the main pathogen responsible for outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease, which can be related to contaminated water supplies such as cooling towers or water pipes. We combined conventional molecular methods and whole genome sequence (WGS) analysis to investigate an outbreak of L. pneumophila in a large Australian hospital. Typing of these isolates using sequence-based typing and virulence gene profiling, was unable to discriminate between outbreak and non-outbreak isolates. WGS analysis was performed on isolates during the outbreak, as well as on unlinked isolates from the Public Health Microbiology reference collection. The more powerful resolution provided by analysis of whole genome sequences allowed outbreak isolates to be distinguished from isolates that were temporally and spatially unassociated with the outbreak, demonstrating that this technology can be used in real-time to investigate L. pneumophila outbreaks.

  1. Ecological behaviour of three serogroups of Legionella pneumophila within a model plumbing system.

    PubMed

    Messi, P; Anacarso, I; Bargellini, A; Bondi, M; Marchesi, I; de Niederhäusern, S; Borella, P

    2011-02-01

    Three Legionella pneumophila strains isolated from water samples and belonging to serogroups (sgs) 1, 6 and 9 were analysed for their capacity to colonise an experimental model simulating a domestic hot water distribution system. Ecological factors that could influence the persistence of the sgs such as intracellular life within protozoan hosts and bacterial interference by the production of antagonistic compounds were also studied. Viable counts of L. pneumophila increased both in the planktonic and in the sessile phases. Sg 6 showed a marked prevalence during the whole experiment and exhibited the highest host infection efficiency. Sg 1 was significantly less represented, but showed the highest capacity to reproduce in the protozoan hosts. Sg 9 was poorly represented and less adapted to intracellular life. Among the 14 bacteria constantly isolated in the system, five (35.7%) produced antagonistic substances against Legionella, with differences according to the bacterial strain and L. pneumophila sgs.

  2. Flow cytometric determination of endocytosis of viable labelled Legionella pneumophila by Acanthamoeba palestinensis.

    PubMed

    Harf, C; Goffinet, S; Meunier, O; Monteil, H; Colin, D A

    1997-03-01

    Endocytosis of fluorescently labelled cells of Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) by free-living Acanthamoeba palestinensis (A. palestinensis) has been studied using flow cytometry. L. pneumophila cells were labelled with CM-DiI, a lipophilic fluorescent probe under conditions that did not modify viability. Coculturing the bacteria with amoebae was accompanied by rapid endocytosis; after 5 min, 90% of the amoebae had internalized bacteria. This percentage remained unchanged during further coculture, but the number of bacteria ingested per amoeba increased. Moreover, the number of ingested bacteria was found to be dependent on the size of the amoeba. The validity of the internalization analyzed by flow cytometry was confirmed by observation using epifluorescence and phase contrast microscopy. CM-DiI labelling associated with flow cytometry provides a very valuable technique for the determination of bacteria endocytosis by free-living amoeba.

  3. Dorsal Stream Deficits Suggest Hidden Dyslexia among Deaf Poor Readers: Correlated Evidence from Reduced Perceptual Speed and Elevated Coherent Motion Detection Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samar, V.J.; Parasnis, I.

    2005-01-01

    Prelingual deafness and developmental dyslexia have confounding developmental effects on reading acquisition. Therefore, standard reading assessment methods for diagnosing dyslexia in hearing people are ineffective for use with deaf people. Recently, Samar, Parasnis, and Berent (2002) reported visual evoked potential evidence that deaf poor…

  4. Rifampin resistance of Legionella pneumophila is not increased during therapy for experimental Legionnaires disease: study of rifampin resistance using a guinea pig model of Legionnaires disease.

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, P H

    1991-01-01

    Isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, obtained from guinea pigs with experimentally induced Legionnaires disease, were tested for rifampin resistance. Thirteen isolates were from animals treated with rifampin alone, four isolates were from animals treated with saline, and three isolates each were from animals treated with erythromycin or erythromycin plus rifampin; all of these isolates were derived from the same parent strain, F889. Most of the isolates were obtained from rifampin-treated animals that survived infection but had persistence of bacteria in their lungs at necropsy. No differences in rifampin agar dilution MICs were detected for the 23 isolates and parent strain that were tested. None of the 13 isolates from animals treated with rifampin alone had a high number of resistant organisms detected by using a rifampin gradient plate assay. Thirteen isolates plus the parent strain were tested by using a quantitative method of determining resistance frequency. Considerable heterogeneity among isolates was observed, but there was no evidence of increased resistance for any treatment group. The range of rifampin resistance frequencies was 10(-7) to 10(-8). No evidence for rifampin-induced resistance of L. pneumophila was found in this study. PMID:2014980

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of environmental Legionella pneumophila isolates from an endemic area (Alcoy, Spain).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Olmos, María Piedad; Camaró, María Luisa; Adrián, Francisco; Calafat, Juan Miguel; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Environmental surveillance of Legionella pneumophila is a key component of the control measures established in urban settlements to ensure water safety and quality, with the aim of minimizing and limiting opportunistic infections in humans. In this work, we present results on the detection and genetic characterization of these bacteria in the outbreak-recurrent region of Alcoy (Comunidad Valenciana, Spain) using water and biofilm samples. We were particularly interested in studying the presence and distribution of L. pneumophila in the absence of outbreak or sporadic cases of legionellosis and in comparing the efficacy of culturing from water samples with a biofilm-based detection procedure using molecular amplification. To this end, water samples were taken from 120 sites distributed all around the city and its surroundings, as well as 60 biofilm swabs from half of the sampling sites. L. pneumophila could be isolated from water in just 4 of the locations. Touchdown PCR was applied to DNA extracted from water and also biofilm swabs, as a rapid method for both routine and outbreak investigations. L. pneumophila was detected by this method in 14 of the sites in which both water and biofilms were taken, although 13 of them tested positive using only the biofilm samples. These results show a ten-fold increase in the success rate of Legionella detection over water samples. The application of this method to study the presence of L. pneumophila in the water-supply system and risk facilities of Alcoy revealed different strains distributed in different areas of the city. Sequence Type ST578, endemic in the area and responsible for most clinical cases, was detected in one of the sampling sites. The number of positive samples correlated with water temperature but not with chlorine levels. The direct analysis of biofilm swabs improves the detection rate and genetic characterization of L. pneumophila and can complement analyses based on bacterial culture. Copyright © 2014

  6. Integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Legionella pneumophila in drinking water biofilms grown on domestic plumbing materials.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Miriam M; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost

    2010-06-01

    Drinking water biofilms were grown on coupons of plumbing materials, including ethylene-propylene-diene-monomer (EPDM) rubber, silane cross-linked polyethylene (PE-X b), electron-ray cross-linked PE (PE-X c) and copper under constant flow-through of cold tap water. After 14 days, the biofilms were spiked with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila and Enterobacter nimipressuralis (10(6) cells/mL each). The test bacteria were environmental isolates from contamination events in drinking water systems. After static incubation for 24 h, water flow was resumed and continued for 4 weeks. Total cell count and heterotrophic plate count (HPC) of biofilms were monitored, and P. aeruginosa, L. pneumophila and E. nimipressuralis were quantified, using standard culture-based methods or culture-independent fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). After 14 days total cell counts and HPC values were highest on EPDM followed by the plastic materials and copper. P. aeruginosa and L. pneumophila became incorporated into drinking water biofilms and were capable to persist in biofilms on EPDM and PE-X materials for several weeks, while copper biofilms were colonized only by L. pneumophila in low culturable numbers. E. nimipressuralis was not detected in any of the biofilms. Application of the FISH method often yielded orders of magnitude higher levels of P. aeruginosa and L. pneumophila than culture methods. These observations indicate that drinking water biofilms grown under cold water conditions on domestic plumbing materials, especially EPDM and PE-X in the present study, can be a reservoir for P. aeruginosa and L. pneumophila that persist in these habitats mostly in a viable but non-culturable state.

  7. Secreted Pyomelanin of Legionella pneumophila Promotes Bacterial Iron Uptake and Growth under Iron-Limiting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huaixin; Chatfield, Christa H.; Liles, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical to the growth and virulence of Legionella pneumophila. Previously, we found that L. pneumophila uses both a ferrisiderophore pathway and ferrous iron transport to obtain iron. We now report that two molecules secreted by L. pneumophila, homogentisic acid (HGA) and its polymerized variant (HGA-melanin, a pyomelanin), are able to directly mediate the reduction of various ferric iron salts. Furthermore, HGA, synthetic HGA-melanin, and HGA-melanin derived from bacterial supernatants enhanced the ability of L. pneumophila and other species of Legionella to take up radiolabeled iron. Enhanced iron uptake was not observed with a ferrous iron transport mutant. Thus, HGA and HGA-melanin mediate ferric iron reduction, with the resulting ferrous iron being available to the bacterium for uptake. Upon further testing of L. pneumophila culture supernatants, we found that significant amounts of ferric and ferrous iron were associated with secreted HGA-melanin. Importantly, a pyomelanin-containing fraction obtained from a wild-type culture supernatant was able to stimulate the growth of iron-starved legionellae. That the corresponding supernatant fraction obtained from a nonpigmented mutant culture did not stimulate growth demonstrated that HGA-melanin is able to both promote iron uptake and enhance growth under iron-limiting conditions. Indicative of a complementary role in iron acquisition, HGA-melanin levels were inversely related to the levels of siderophore activity. Compatible with a role in the ecology and pathogenesis of L. pneumophila, HGA and HGA-melanin were effective at reducing and releasing iron from both insoluble ferric hydroxide and the mammalian iron chelates ferritin and transferrin. PMID:23980114

  8. Legionella pneumophila Secretes a Mitochondrial Carrier Protein during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dolezal, Pavel; Aili, Margareta; Tong, Janette; Jiang, Jhih-Hang; Marobbio, Carlo M.; Lee, Sau fung; Schuelein, Ralf; Belluzzo, Simon; Binova, Eva; Mousnier, Aurelie; Frankel, Gad; Giannuzzi, Giulia; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Gabriel, Kipros; Naderer, Thomas; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Lithgow, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    The Mitochondrial Carrier Family (MCF) is a signature group of integral membrane proteins that transport metabolites across the mitochondrial inner membrane in eukaryotes. MCF proteins are characterized by six transmembrane segments that assemble to form a highly-selective channel for metabolite transport. We discovered a novel MCF member, termed Legionella nucleotide carrier Protein (LncP), encoded in the genome of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease. LncP was secreted via the bacterial Dot/Icm type IV secretion system into macrophages and assembled in the mitochondrial inner membrane. In a yeast cellular system, LncP induced a dominant-negative phenotype that was rescued by deleting an endogenous ATP carrier. Substrate transport studies on purified LncP reconstituted in liposomes revealed that it catalyzes unidirectional transport and exchange of ATP transport across membranes, thereby supporting a role for LncP as an ATP transporter. A hidden Markov model revealed further MCF proteins in the intracellular pathogens, Legionella longbeachae and Neorickettsia sennetsu, thereby challenging the notion that MCF proteins exist exclusively in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:22241989

  9. [Nosocomial Legionella pneumophila infection in a nephrology department].

    PubMed

    Gahrn-Hansen, B; Uldum, S A; Schmidt, J; Nielsen, B; Birkeland, S A; Jørgensen, K A

    1995-01-30

    During the autumn and winter of 1993-94 four cases of legionellosis were diagnosed in a Department of Nephrology. Three of the patients were kidney transplanted patients. Two of the patients died. The diagnosis was based on positive culture in two patients and by positive urinary antigen test in the other two patients. Serology was negative for all four patients. Legionella pneumophila was initially found in the cold and hot shower water, in ice-water from the ice machine, from the hot water tank and in the cold water inlet to the building. The isolate from patient no. one and isolates of serogroup 5 from the ice machine and the shower water had identical REA profiles, different from the profiles of the isolate from patient no. four. We concluded that at least one of the four patients was likely to have been infected from the water in the department, either by inhalation of contaminated aerosols from the shower or by aspiration of contaminated ice-water. Precautions were taken to reduce the number of Legionella in the shower- and ice-water. In addition, restrictions in the use of showers and ice-water from the ice machine were introduced.

  10. Innate immunity against Legionella pneumophila during pulmonary infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Bonggoo; Park, Gayoung; Kim, Jiyoung; Lim, Seon Ah; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an etiological agent of the severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease (LD). This gram-negative bacterium is thought to replicate naturally in various freshwater amoebae, but also replicates in human alveolar macrophages. Inside host cells, legionella induce the production of non-endosomal replicative phagosomes by injecting effector proteins into the cytosol. Innate immune responses are first line defenses against legionella during early phases of infection, and distinguish between legionella and host cells using germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors , NOD-like receptors, and RIG-I-like receptors, which sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns that are absent in host cells. During pulmonary legionella infections, various inflammatory cells such as macrophages, neutrophils, natural killer (NK) cells, large mononuclear cells, B cells, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are recruited into infected lungs, and predominantly occupy interstitial areas to control legionella. During pulmonary legionella infections, the interplay between distinct cytokines and chemokines also modulates innate host responses to clear legionella from the lungs. Recognition by NK cell receptors triggers effector functions including secretion of cytokines and chemokines, and leads to lysis of target cells. Crosstalk between NK cells and dendritic cells, monocytes, and macrophages provides a major first-line defense against legionella infection, whereas activation of T and B cells resolves the infection and mounts legionella-specific memory in the host.

  11. Development of a standardized subgrouping scheme for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Joly, J R; McKinney, R M; Tobin, J O; Bibb, W F; Watkins, I D; Ramsay, D

    1986-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and a subclassification scheme were developed in a collaborative project among three laboratories. The seven most useful monoclonal antibodies were selected from three previously developed panels on the basis of indirect fluorescent antibody patterns with 83 strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 that were obtained from widely distributed geographic locations. The isolates were divided into 10 major subgroups on the basis of reactivity patterns that can be readily reproduced in any laboratory and are not subject to major inconsistencies of interpretation of staining intensity. A standard protocol for the indirect fluorescent antibody procedure was also developed. PMID:3517064

  12. Advancing Implementation of Evidence-Based Public Health in China: An Assessment of the Current Situation and Suggestions for Developing Regions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianwei; Jiang, Chenghua; Tan, Duxun; Yu, Dehua; Lu, Yuan; Sun, Pengfei; Pan, Ying; Zhang, Hanzhi; Wang, Zhaoxin; Yang, Beilei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Existing research shows a serious scarcity of EBPH practice in China and other developing regions; as an exploratory study, this study aimed to assess the current EBPH implementation status in Shanghai of China qualitatively. Methods. Using semistructured key informant interviews, we examined the status of and impediments to the lagging EBPH in China. Data were analyzed based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Results. Chinese public health practitioners knew more about evidence-based medicine but less about EBPH. The situation was worse in community healthcare centers. Participants perceived that evidence sources were limited and the quality of evidence was low. Concerning the inner setting factors, the structural characteristics, networks and communications, implementation climate, and leadership engagement were confronted with many problems. Among the outer setting factors, external government policies and incentives and low patient compliance were the key problems. Additionally, public health practitioners in Shanghai lacked sufficient awareness of EBPH. Furthermore, the current project-based EBPH lacks a systematic implementation system. Conclusions. Existing practical perspectives on EBPH indicate a lag in the advocacy of this new ideology in China. It would be advisable for healthcare institutions to take the initiative to explore feasible and multiple methods of EBPH promotion.

  13. Advancing Implementation of Evidence-Based Public Health in China: An Assessment of the Current Situation and Suggestions for Developing Regions

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianwei; Tan, Duxun; Yu, Dehua; Lu, Yuan; Sun, Pengfei; Pan, Ying; Zhang, Hanzhi; Yang, Beilei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Existing research shows a serious scarcity of EBPH practice in China and other developing regions; as an exploratory study, this study aimed to assess the current EBPH implementation status in Shanghai of China qualitatively. Methods. Using semistructured key informant interviews, we examined the status of and impediments to the lagging EBPH in China. Data were analyzed based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Results. Chinese public health practitioners knew more about evidence-based medicine but less about EBPH. The situation was worse in community healthcare centers. Participants perceived that evidence sources were limited and the quality of evidence was low. Concerning the inner setting factors, the structural characteristics, networks and communications, implementation climate, and leadership engagement were confronted with many problems. Among the outer setting factors, external government policies and incentives and low patient compliance were the key problems. Additionally, public health practitioners in Shanghai lacked sufficient awareness of EBPH. Furthermore, the current project-based EBPH lacks a systematic implementation system. Conclusions. Existing practical perspectives on EBPH indicate a lag in the advocacy of this new ideology in China. It would be advisable for healthcare institutions to take the initiative to explore feasible and multiple methods of EBPH promotion. PMID:27597958

  14. In Vitro Activity of Gemifloxacin (SB-265805, LB20304a) against Legionella pneumophila and Its Pharmacokinetics in Guinea Pigs with L. pneumophila Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Paul H.; Shinzato, Takashi; Doyle, Edward; Edelstein, Martha A. C.

    2001-01-01

    The activity of gemifloxacin against intracellular Legionella pneumophila and for the treatment of guinea pigs with L. pneumophila pneumonia was studied. Gemifloxacin, azithromycin, and levofloxacin (1 μg/ml) reduced bacterial counts of two L. pneumophila strains grown in guinea pig alveolar macrophages by 2 to 3 log10 units. Gemifloxacin and levofloxacin had roughly equivalent intracellular activities. In contrast, erythromycin had static activity only. Therapy studies of gemifloxacin, azithromycin, and levofloxacin were performed in guinea pigs with L. pneumophila pneumonia. When gemifloxacin (10 mg/kg) was given by the intraperitoneal (i.p.) route to infected guinea pigs, mean peak levels in plasma were 1.3 μg/ml at 0.5 h and 1.2 μg/ml at 1 h postinjection. The terminal half-life phase of elimination from plasma was 1.3 h, and the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24) was 2.1 μg · h/ml. For the same drug dose, mean levels in lungs were 3.4 μg/g at both 0.5 and 1 h, with a half-life of 1.5 h and an AUC0–24 of 6.0 μg · h/ml. All 15 L. pneumophila-infected guinea pigs treated with gemifloxacin (10 mg/kg/dose given i.p. once daily) for 2 days survived for 9 days after antimicrobial therapy, as did 13 of 14 guinea pigs treated with the same dose of gemifloxacin given for 5 days. All 12 azithromycin-treated animals (15 mg/kg/dose given i.p. once daily for 2 days) survived, as did 11 of 12 animals treated with levofloxacin (10 mg/kg/dose given i.p. once daily for 5 days). None of 12 animals treated with saline survived. Gemifloxacin is effective against L. pneumophila in infected macrophages and in a guinea pig model of Legionnaires' disease, even with an abbreviated course of therapy. These data support studies of the clinical effectiveness of gemifloxacin for the treatment of Legionnaires' disease. PMID:11451675

  15. The Legionella pneumophila tatB Gene Facilitates Secretion of Phospholipase C, Growth under Iron-Limiting Conditions, and Intracellular Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rossier, Ombeline; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.

    2005-01-01

    Our previous mutational analysis of Legionella pneumophila demonstrated a role for type II protein (Lsp) secretion and iron acquisition in intracellular infection and virulence. In gram-negative bacteria, the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is involved in secretion of proteins, including components of respiratory complexes, across the inner membrane to the periplasm. To assess the significance of Tat for L. pneumophila, tatB mutants were characterized. The mutants exhibited normal growth in standard media but grew slowly under low-iron conditions. They were also impaired in the Nadi assay, indicating that the function of cytochrome c oxidase is influenced by tatB. Consistent with this observation, a subunit of the cytochrome c reductase was shown to be a Tat substrate. Supernatants of the tatB mutants showed a 30% reduction in phospholipase C activity while maintaining normal levels of other Lsp secreted activities. When tested for infection of U937 macrophages, the tatB mutants showed a 10-fold reduction in growth. Double mutants lacking tatB and Lsp secretion were even more defective, suggesting tatB has an intracellular role that is independent of Lsp. tatB mutants were also impaired 20-fold in Hartmannella vermiformis amoebae cultured in the presence of an iron chelator. All mutant phenotypes were complemented by reintroduction of an intact tatB. Thus, L. pneumophila tatB plays a role in the formation of a respiratory complex, growth under low-iron conditions, the secretion of a phospholipase C activity, and intracellular infection. PMID:15784543

  16. The Legionella pneumophila tatB gene facilitates secretion of phospholipase C, growth under iron-limiting conditions, and intracellular infection.

    PubMed

    Rossier, Ombeline; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2005-04-01

    Our previous mutational analysis of Legionella pneumophila demonstrated a role for type II protein (Lsp) secretion and iron acquisition in intracellular infection and virulence. In gram-negative bacteria, the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is involved in secretion of proteins, including components of respiratory complexes, across the inner membrane to the periplasm. To assess the significance of Tat for L. pneumophila, tatB mutants were characterized. The mutants exhibited normal growth in standard media but grew slowly under low-iron conditions. They were also impaired in the Nadi assay, indicating that the function of cytochrome c oxidase is influenced by tatB. Consistent with this observation, a subunit of the cytochrome c reductase was shown to be a Tat substrate. Supernatants of the tatB mutants showed a 30% reduction in phospholipase C activity while maintaining normal levels of other Lsp secreted activities. When tested for infection of U937 macrophages, the tatB mutants showed a 10-fold reduction in growth. Double mutants lacking tatB and Lsp secretion were even more defective, suggesting tatB has an intracellular role that is independent of Lsp. tatB mutants were also impaired 20-fold in Hartmannella vermiformis amoebae cultured in the presence of an iron chelator. All mutant phenotypes were complemented by reintroduction of an intact tatB. Thus, L. pneumophila tatB plays a role in the formation of a respiratory complex, growth under low-iron conditions, the secretion of a phospholipase C activity, and intracellular infection.

  17. Effect of temperature, pH, and oxygen level on the multiplication of naturally occurring Legionella pneumophila in potable water.

    PubMed Central

    Wadowsky, R M; Wolford, R; McNamara, A M; Yee, R B

    1985-01-01

    A water culture containing naturally occurring Legionella pneumophila and associated microbiota was maintained in the laboratory by serially transferring the culture in tap water which had been sterilized by membrane filtration. Successful maintenance of the water culture depended upon transferring the culture when the growth of L. pneumophila was in the late-exponential to early-stationary phase. The water culture was used as a source of naturally occurring bacteria to determine some of the parameters which affect the multiplication of L. pneumophila in tap water. Naturally occurring L. pneumophila multiplied at a temperature between 25 and 37 degrees C, at pH levels of 5.5 to 9.2, and at concentrations of dissolved oxygen of 6.0 to 6.7 mg/liter. Multiplication did not occur in tap water which contained less than 2.2 mg of dissolved oxygen per liter. An association was observed between the multiplication of L. pneumophila and the non-Legionellaceae bacteria which were also present in the water culture. The method of preserving naturally occurring L. pneumophila and associated microbiota may facilitate studies on the symbiosis of L. pneumophila with other microorganisms. PMID:4004233

  18. Epidemiological and Environmental Investigations of Legionella pneumophila Infection in Cattle and Case Report of Fatal Pneumonia in a Calf

    PubMed Central

    Fabbi, Massimo; Pastoris, Maddalena Castellani; Scanziani, Eugenio; Magnino, Simone; Di Matteo, Luigi

    1998-01-01

    A fatal pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila was diagnosed in a young calf reared in a dairy herd located in northern Italy. Clinical symptoms consisted of watery diarrhea, hyperthermia, anorexia, and severe dyspnea. The pathological and histological findings were very similar to those observed in human legionellosis. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (SG1) and SG10 were isolated from the calf’s lung, and L. pneumophila SG1 was isolated from the calf’s liver. L. pneumophila SG1 was also demonstrated in the lung tissue by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical examinations. Nine of 10 L. pneumophila SG1 isolates belonged to the Olda subtype, and 1 belonged to the Camperdown subtype. A very low prevalence of antibodies to Legionella was detected in cows and calves reared in the same herd. Cultures of aqueous sediment of an old electric water heater which supplied hot water for the feeding of the calves yielded L. pneumophila SG1. Four of the colonies tested belonged to the Olda subtype. Ten clinical and four environmental isolates were examined for the presence of plasmids. Nine of them were also examined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assay, and the same patterns were found for L. pneumophila SG1 Olda strains isolated from the calf and from the electric heater. This is the first report of a documented case of a naturally occurring Legionella pneumonia in an animal. Cattle probably act as accidental hosts for legionellae, much the same as humans. PMID:9650941

  19. Clinical and environmental distribution of Legionella pneumophila in a university hospital in Italy: efficacy of ultraviolet disinfection.

    PubMed

    Triassi, M; Di Popolo, A; Ribera D'Alcalà, G; Albanese, Z; Cuccurullo, S; Montegrosso, S; Crispino, M; Borella, P; Zarrilli, R

    2006-04-01

    The molecular epidemiology of Legionella pneumophila in the 'V. Monaldi' University Hospital was studied. Seven cases of nosocomial Legionnaires' disease were diagnosed between 1999 and 2003. Two clinical legionella strains obtained from two patients in the adult cardiac surgery unit (CSU) and 30 environmental legionella strains from the paediatric and adult CSUs, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and the cardiorespiratory intensive care unit (CR-ICU) were serotyped and genotyped. L. pneumophila serogroup 1/Philadelphia with an identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profile A was isolated from two patients in the adult CSU, and from three and one water samples taken in the adult CSU and the paediatric CSU, respectively, from 2001 to 2002. Furthermore, L. pneumophila serogroup 3 with an identical PFGE profile B was identified in 20 environmental strains from all wards, L. pneumophila serogroup 3 with PFGE profile C was identified in a single environmental strain from the CR-ICU, and non-pneumophila Legionella with identical PFGE profile D was identified in five environmental strains from the adult CSU, paediatric CSU and NICU. Ultraviolet irradiation was effective in disinfection of the hospital water supplies in the adult and paediatric CSUs contaminated by L. pneumophila clone associated with nosocomial Legionnaires' disease. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that two cases of nosocomial legionellosis were caused by the persistence of a single clone of L. pneumophila serogroup 1/Philadelphia in the hospital environment, and that disinfection by ultraviolet irradiation may represent an effective measure to prevent nosocomial Legionnaires' disease.

  20. Role of Biofilm Roughness and Hydrodynamic Conditions in Legionella pneumophila Adhesion to and Detachment from Simulated Drinking Water Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yun; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Derlon, Nicolas; Janjaroen, Dao; Huang, Conghui; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A.; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) could exacerbate the persistence and associated risks of pathogenic Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), thus raising human health concerns. However, mechanisms controlling adhesion and subsequent detachment of L. pneumophila associated with biofilms remain unclear. We determined the connection between L. pneumophila adhesion and subsequent detachment with biofilm physical structure characterization using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique. Analysis of the OCT images of multispecies biofilms grown under low nutrient condition up to 34 weeks revealed the lack of biofilm deformation even when these biofilms were exposed to flow velocity of 0.7 m/s, typical flow for DWDS. L. pneumophila adhesion on these biofilm under low flow velocity (0.007 m/s) positively correlated with biofilm roughness due to enlarged biofilm surface area and local flow conditions created by roughness asperities. The preadhered L. pneumophila on selected rough and smooth biofilms were found to detach when these biofilms were subjected to higher flow velocity. At the flow velocity of 0.1 and 0.3 m/s, the ratio of detached cell from the smooth biofilm surface was from 1.3 to 1.4 times higher than that from the rough biofilm surface, presumably because of the low shear stress zones near roughness asperities. This study determined that physical structure and local hydrodynamics control adhesion and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilm, thus it is the first step toward reducing the risk of L. pneumophila exposure and subsequent infections. PMID:25699403

  1. Pathway analysis using (13) C-glycerol and other carbon tracers reveals a bipartite metabolism of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Häuslein, Ina; Manske, Christian; Goebel, Werner; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Hilbi, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Amino acids represent the prime carbon and energy source for Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular pathogen, which can cause a life-threatening pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. Genome, transcriptome and proteome studies indicate that L. pneumophila also utilizes carbon substrates other than amino acids. We show here that glycerol promotes intracellular replication of L. pneumophila in amoeba or macrophages (but not extracellular growth) dependent on glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, GlpD. An L. pneumophila mutant strain lacking glpD was outcompeted by wild-type bacteria upon co-infection of amoeba, indicating an important role of glycerol during infection. Isotopologue profiling studies using (13) C-labelled substrates were performed in a novel minimal defined medium, MDM, comprising essential amino acids, proline and phenylalanine. In MDM, L. pneumophila utilized (13) C-labelled glycerol or glucose predominantly for gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway, while the amino acid serine was used for energy generation via the citrate cycle. Similar results were obtained for L. pneumophila growing intracellularly in amoeba fed with (13) C-labelled glycerol, glucose or serine. Collectively, these results reveal a bipartite metabolism of L. pneumophila, where glycerol and carbohydrates like glucose are mainly fed into anabolic processes, while serine serves as major energy supply.

  2. Growth-supporting activity for Legionella pneumophila in tap water cultures and implication of hartmannellid amoebae as growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Wadowsky, R M; Butler, L J; Cook, M K; Verma, S M; Paul, M A; Fields, B S; Keleti, G; Sykora, J L; Yee, R B

    1988-01-01

    Photosynthetic cyanobacteria, heterotrophic bacteria, free-living amoebae, and ciliated protozoa may support growth of Legionella pneumophila. Studies were done with two tap water cultures (WS1 and WS2) containing L. pneumophila and associated microbiota to characterize growth-supporting activity and assess the relative importance of the microbiota in supporting multiplication of L. pneumophila. The water cultures were incubated in the dark at 35 degrees C. The growth-supporting factor(s) was separated from each culture by filtration through 1-micron-pore-size membrane filters. The retentate was then suspended in sterile tap water. Multiplication of L. pneumophila occurred when both the retentate suspension and the filtrate from either culture were inoculated into sterile tap water. L. pneumophila did not multiply in tap water inoculated with only the filtrate, even though filtration did not reduce the concentration of L. pneumophila or heterotrophic bacteria in either culture. Growth-supporting activity of the retentate suspension from WS1 was inactivated at 60 degrees C but unaffected at 0, 25, and 45 degrees C after 30-min incubations. Filtration experiments indicated that the growth-supporting factor(s) in WS1 was 2 to 5 micron in diameter. Ciliated protozoa were not detected in either culture. Hartmannellid amoebae were conclusively demonstrated in WS2 but not in WS1. L. pneumophila multiplied in tap water inoculated with the amoebae (10(3)/ml) and the 1-micron filtrate of WS2. No multiplication occurred in tap water inoculated with the filtrate only. Growth-supporting activity for L. pneumophila may be present in plumbing systems; hartmannellid amoebae appear to be important determinants of multiplication of L. pneumophila in some tap water cultures. PMID:3214153

  3. Volcano-tectonic history of Crater Flat, southwestern Nevada, as suggested by new evidence from drill hole USW-VH-1 and vicinity

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, W.J.

    1982-12-31

    New evidence for a possible resurgent dome in the caldera related to eruption of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff has been provided by recent drilling of a 762-meter (2501-foot) hole in central Crater Flat. Although no volcanic units were penetrated by the drill hole (USW-VH-1), the positive aeromagnetic anomaly in the vicinity of the drill hole appears to result in part from the unusually thick, densely welded tuff of the Bullfrog. Major units penetrated include alluvium, basalt of Crater Flat, Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Members of the Paintbrush Tuff, and Prow Pass and Bullfrog Members of the Crater Flat Tuff. In addition, the drill hole provided the first subsurface hydrologic information for the area. The water table in the hole is at about 180 meters (600 feet), and the temperature gradient appears slightly higher than normal for the region.

  4. Volcanotectonic history of Crater Flat, southwestern Nevada, as suggested by new evidence from drill hole USW-VH-1 and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    New evidence for a possible resurgent dome in the caldera related to eruption of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff has been provided by recent drilling of a 762-meter (2,501-foot) hole in central Crater Flat. Although no new volcanic units were penetrated by the drill hole (USW-VH-1), the positive aeromagnetic anomaly in the vicinity of the drill hole appears to result in part from the unusually thick, densely welded tuff of the Bullfrog. Major units penetrated include alluvium, basalt of Crater Flat, Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Members of the Paintbrush Tuff, and Prow Pass and Bullfrog Members of the Crater Flat Tuff. In addition, the drill hole provided the first subsurface hydrologic information for the area. The water table in the hole is at about 180 meters (600 feet), and the temperature gradient appears slightly higher than normal for the region.

  5. The Lly protein protects Legionella pneumophila from light but does not directly influence its intracellular survival in Hartmannella vermiformis.

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, M; Engelhard, H; Flügel, M; Wintermeyer, E; Hacker, J

    1995-01-01

    The lly locus (legiolysin) mediates the browning of the culture medium of Legionella pneumophila in the late stationary growth phase, presumably as a result of synthesis of homogentisic acid. Mutagenesis of the lly gene of the L. pneumophila Philadelphia I derivative JR32 did not affect intracellular replication in the natural host Hartmannella vermiformis. The Lly-negative mutant, however, showed a markedly decreased resistance to ordinary light. The cloned lly gene conferred an increased resistance to light in recombinant L. pneumophila and Escherichia coli K-12, indicating a contribution of the Lly protein to ecological adaptation of Legionella species. PMID:7793965

  6. Evaluation of a most probable number method for the enumeration of Legionella pneumophila from potable and related water samples.

    PubMed

    Sartory, D P; Spies, K; Lange, B; Schneider, S; Langer, B

    2017-04-01

    This study compared the performance of a novel MPN method (Legiolert/Quanti-Tray) with the ISO 11731-2 membrane filtration method for the enumeration of Legionella pneumophila from 100 ml potable water and related samples. Data from a multi-laboratory study analysed according to ISO 17994 showed that Legiolert™/Quanti-Tray® yielded on average higher counts of L. pneumophila. The Legiolert medium had a high specificity of 96·4%. The new method represents a significant improvement in the enumeration of L. pneumophila from drinking water-related samples.

  7. Bus water storage tank as a reservoir of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Jurčev-Savičević, Anamarija; Bradarić, Nikola; Paić, Vlado Ozic; Mulić, Rosanda; Puntarić, Dinko; Miše, Kornelija

    2014-09-01

    Health concerns associated with Legionnaires' disease have been identified as an area of the increasing public and professional interest. Any natural water or man-made water systems worldwide might be reservoirs of Legionellae. We presented a sporadic, community-acquired case of Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionellapneumophila serogroup 1 in a bus driver who used water for hand and face washing from a bus water storage tank. The history of any other usual place of exposure to Legionellae was negative. The water from the tank was dirty, filled with sediment and leaves, at the temperature of 22 degrees C. The water was heavily contaminated with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolated from each sample with the concentration of 66,000, 16,000, 42,000, 56,000 and 34,000 CFU/L. The disinfection of the bus water storage tank was made using hyperclorination with 50 mg/L of free residual chlorine. The control sampling one week after the disinfection yielded negative results. So far, there are no recommendations on regular management or disinfection of water in bus storage tanks, but it seems to be reasonable to assume that passengers as well as bus drivers may be exposed to Legionella and therefore at risk of acquiring the infection. These recommendations should include regular empting, rinsing and filling the tank with fresh tap water, at least once a week. Finally, we have to be aware that Legionella bacteria are ubiquitous and any potential mode of producing contaminated aerosol should not be overlooked during an epidemiological field investigation and proposed appropriate measures.

  8. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO2 hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4–8.3) × 105 s−1 and kcat/KM values of (4.7–8.5) × 107 M−1·s−1. In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3–90.5 nM). The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2–88.5 nM). Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets. PMID:27322334

  9. Bus water storage tank as a reservoir of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Jurčev-Savičević, Anamarija; Bradarić, Nikola; Paić, Vlado Ozic; Mulić, Rosanda; Puntarić, Dinko; Miše, Kornelija

    2014-09-01

    Health concerns associated with Legionnaires' disease have been identified as an area of the increasing public and professional interest. Any natural water or man-made water systems worldwide might be reservoirs of Legionellae. We presented a sporadic, community-acquired case of Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionellapneumophila serogroup 1 in a bus driver who used water for hand and face washing from a bus water storage tank. The history of any other usual place of exposure to Legionellae was negative. The water from the tank was dirty, filled with sediment and leaves, at the temperature of 22 degrees C. The water was heavily contaminated with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolated from each sample with the concentration of 66,000, 16,000, 42,000, 56,000 and 34,000 CFU/L. The disinfection of the bus water storage tank was made using hyperclorination with 50 mg/L of free residual chlorine. The control sampling one week after the disinfection yielded negative results. So far, there are no recommendations on regular management or disinfection of water in bus storage tanks, but it seems to be reasonable to assume that passengers as well as bus drivers may be exposed to Legionella and therefore at risk of acquiring the infection. These recommendations should include regular empting, rinsing and filling the tank with fresh tap water, at least once a week. Finally, we have to be aware that Legionella bacteria are ubiquitous and any potential mode of producing contaminated aerosol should not be overlooked during an epidemiological field investigation and proposed appropriate measures.

  10. The Legionella pneumophila orphan sensor kinase LqsT regulates competence and pathogen-host interactions as a component of the LAI-1 circuit.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Aline; Schell, Ursula; Sahr, Tobias; Tiaden, André; Harrison, Christopher; Buchrieser, Carmen; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an amoeba-resistant opportunistic pathogen that performs cell-cell communication through the signalling molecule 3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one (LAI-1, Legionella autoinducer-1). The lqs (Legionella quorum sensing) gene cluster encodes the LAI-1 autoinducer synthase LqsA, the cognate sensor kinase LqsS and the response regulator LqsR. Here we show that the Lqs system includes an 'orphan' homologue of LqsS termed LqsT. Compared with wild-type L. pneumophila, strains lacking lqsT or both lqsS and lqsT show increased salt resistance, greatly enhanced natural competence for DNA acquisition and impaired uptake by phagocytes. Sensitive novel single round growth assays and competition experiments using Acanthamoeba castellanii revealed that ΔlqsT and ΔlqsS-ΔlqsT, as well as ΔlqsA and other lqs mutant strains are impaired for intracellular growth and cannot compete against wild-type bacteria upon co-infection. In contrast to the ΔlqsS strain, ΔlqsT does not produce extracellular filaments. The phenotypes of the ΔlqsS-ΔlqsT strain are partially complemented by either lqsT or lqsS, but are not reversed by overexpression of lqsA, suggesting that LqsT and LqsS are the sole LAI-1-responsive sensor kinases in L. pneumophila. In agreement with the different phenotypes of the ΔlqsT and ΔlqsS strains, lqsT and lqsS are differentially expressed in the post-exponential growth phase, and transcriptome studies indicated that 90% of the genes, which are downregulated in absence of lqsT, are upregulated in absence of lqsS. Reciprocally regulated genes encode components of a 133 kb genomic 'fitness island' or translocated effector proteins implicated in virulence. Together, these results reveal a unique organization of the L. pneumophila Lqs system comprising two partially antagonistic LAI-1-responsive sensor kinases, LqsT and LqsS, which regulate distinct pools of genes implicated in pathogen-host cell interactions, competence, expression of a

  11. csrT Represents a New Class of csrA-Like Regulatory Genes Associated with Integrative Conjugative Elements of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Zachary D.; Flynn, Kaitlin J.; Byrne, Brenda G.; Mukherjee, Sampriti; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial evolution is accelerated by mobile genetic elements. To spread horizontally and to benefit the recipient bacteria, genes encoded on these elements must be properly regulated. Among the legionellae are multiple integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) that each encode a paralog of the broadly conserved regulator csrA. Using bioinformatic analyses, we deduced that specific csrA paralogs are coinherited with particular lineages of the type IV secretion system that mediates horizontal spread of its ICE, suggesting a conserved regulatory interaction. As a first step to investigate the contribution of csrA regulators to this class of mobile genetic elements, we analyzed here the activity of the csrA paralog encoded on Legionella pneumophila ICE-βox. Deletion of this gene, which we name csrT, had no observed effect under laboratory conditions. However, ectopic expression of csrT abrogated the protection to hydrogen peroxide and macrophage degradation that ICE-βox confers to L. pneumophila. When ectopically expressed, csrT also repressed L. pneumophila flagellin production and motility, a function similar to the core genome's canonical csrA. Moreover, csrT restored the repression of motility to csrA mutants of Bacillus subtilis, a finding consistent with the predicted function of CsrT as an mRNA binding protein. Since all known ICEs of legionellae encode coinherited csrA-type IV secretion system pairs, we postulate that CsrA superfamily proteins regulate ICE activity to increase their horizontal spread, thereby expanding L. pneumophila versatility. IMPORTANCE ICEs are mobile DNA elements whose type IV secretion machineries mediate spread among bacterial populations. All surveyed ICEs within the Legionella genus also carry paralogs of the essential life cycle regulator csrA. It is striking that the csrA loci could be classified into distinct families based on either their sequence or the subtype of the adjacent type IV secretion system locus. To

  12. csrT Represents a New Class of csrA-Like Regulatory Genes Associated with Integrative Conjugative Elements of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Zachary D; Flynn, Kaitlin J; Byrne, Brenda G; Mukherjee, Sampriti; Kearns, Daniel B; Swanson, Michele S

    2015-11-23

    Bacterial evolution is accelerated by mobile genetic elements. To spread horizontally and to benefit the recipient bacteria, genes encoded on these elements must be properly regulated. Among the legionellae are multiple integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) that each encode a paralog of the broadly conserved regulator csrA. Using bioinformatic analyses, we deduced that specific csrA paralogs are coinherited with particular lineages of the type IV secretion system that mediates horizontal spread of its ICE, suggesting a conserved regulatory interaction. As a first step to investigate the contribution of csrA regulators to this class of mobile genetic elements, we analyzed here the activity of the csrA paralog encoded on Legionella pneumophila ICE-βox. Deletion of this gene, which we name csrT, had no observed effect under laboratory conditions. However, ectopic expression of csrT abrogated the protection to hydrogen peroxide and macrophage degradation that ICE-βox confers to L. pneumophila. When ectopically expressed, csrT also repressed L. pneumophila flagellin production and motility, a function similar to the core genome's canonical csrA. Moreover, csrT restored the repression of motility to csrA mutants of Bacillus subtilis, a finding consistent with the predicted function of CsrT as an mRNA binding protein. Since all known ICEs of legionellae encode coinherited csrA-type IV secretion system pairs, we postulate that CsrA superfamily proteins regulate ICE activity to increase their horizontal spread, thereby expanding L. pneumophila versatility. ICEs are mobile DNA elements whose type IV secretion machineries mediate spread among bacterial populations. All surveyed ICEs within the Legionella genus also carry paralogs of the essential life cycle regulator csrA. It is striking that the csrA loci could be classified into distinct families based on either their sequence or the subtype of the adjacent type IV secretion system locus. To investigate whether ICE

  13. The Membrane Protein LasM Promotes the Culturability of Legionella pneumophila in Water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Laam; Faucher, Sébastien P.

    2016-01-01

    The water-borne pathogen Legionella pneumophila (Lp) strongly expresses the lpg1659 gene in water. This gene encodes a hypothetical protein predicted to be a membrane protein using in silico analysis. While no conserved domains were identified in Lpg1659, similar proteins are found in many Legionella species and other aquatic bacteria. RT-qPCR showed that lpg1659 is positively regulated by the alternative sigma factor RpoS, which is essential for Lp to survive in water. These observations suggest an important role of this novel protein in the survival of Lp in water. Deletion of lpg1659 did not affect cell morphology, membrane integrity or tolerance to high temperature. Moreover, lpg1659 was dispensable for growth of Lp in rich medium, and during infection of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and of THP-1 human macrophages. However, deletion of lpg1659 resulted in an early loss of culturability in water, while over-expression of this gene promoted the culturability of Lp. Therefore, these results suggest that lpg1659 is required for Lp to maintain culturability, and possibly long-term survival, in water. Since the loss of culturability observed in the absence of Lpg1659 was complemented by the addition of trace metals into water, this membrane protein is likely a transporter for acquiring essential trace metal for maintaining culturability in water and potentially in other metal-deprived conditions. Given its role in the survival of Lp in water, Lpg1659 was named LasM for Legionella aquatic survival membrane protein. PMID:27734007

  14. A new view on the morphology and phylogeny of eugregarines suggested by the evidence from the gregarine Ancora sagittata (Leuckart, 1860) Labbé, 1899 (Apicomplexa: Eugregarinida)

    PubMed Central

    Guillou, Laure; Diakin, Andrei Y.; Mikhailov, Kirill V.; Schrével, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Background Gregarines are a group of early branching Apicomplexa parasitizing invertebrate animals. Despite their wide distribution and relevance to the understanding the phylogenesis of apicomplexans, gregarines remain understudied: light microscopy data are insufficient for classification, and electron microscopy and molecular data are fragmentary and overlap only partially. Methods Scanning and transmission electron microscopy, PCR, DNA cloning and sequencing (Sanger and NGS), molecular phylogenetic analyses using ribosomal RNA genes (18S (SSU), 5.8S, and 28S (LSU) ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs)). Results and Discussion We present the results of an ultrastructural and molecular phylogenetic study on the marine gregarine Ancora sagittata from the polychaete Capitella capitata followed by evolutionary and taxonomic synthesis of the morphological and molecular phylogenetic evidence on eugregarines. The ultrastructure of Ancora sagittata generally corresponds to that of other eugregarines, but reveals some differences in epicytic folds (crests) and attachment apparatus to gregarines in the family Lecudinidae, where Ancora sagittata has been classified. Molecular phylogenetic trees based on SSU (18S) rDNA reveal several robust clades (superfamilies) of eugregarines, including Ancoroidea superfam. nov., which comprises two families (Ancoridae fam. nov. and Polyplicariidae) and branches separately from the Lecudinidae; thus, all representatives of Ancoroidea are here officially removed from the Lecudinidae. Analysis of sequence data also points to possible cryptic species within Ancora sagittata and the inclusion of numerous environmental sequences from anoxic habitats within the Ancoroidea. LSU (28S) rDNA phylogenies, unlike the analysis of SSU rDNA alone, recover a well-supported monophyly of the gregarines involved (eugregarines), although this conclusion is currently limited by sparse taxon sampling and the presence of fast-evolving sequences in some species. Comparative

  15. Widespread molecular detection of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 in cold water taps across the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the United States 3,522 cases of legionellosis were reported to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in 2009. Of these reports, it is estimated that 84% are caused by the microorganism Legionella pneumophila Serogroup (Sg) 1. Legionella spp. have been isolated and r...

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila subsp. fraseri Strains Detroit-1 and Dallas 1E.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Brian H; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A; Morrison, Shatavia S; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Winchell, Jonas M

    2017-02-02

    We report here the complete genome sequences of two of the earliest known strains of Legionella pneumophila subsp. fraseri Detroit-1 is serogroup 1 and was isolated from a lung biopsy specimen in 1977. Dallas 1E is serogroup 5 and was isolated in 1978 from a cooling tower.

  17. Photoreactivation of UV-irradiated Legionella pneumophila and other Legionella species.

    PubMed Central

    Knudson, G B

    1985-01-01

    Shortwave UV light was assessed as a feasible modality for the control of Legionnaires disease bacterium in water. The results of this study show that Legionella pneumophila and six other Legionella species are very sensitive to low doses of UV. However, all Legionella species tested effectively countered the germicidal effect of UV when subsequently exposed to photoreactiving light. Images PMID:4004227

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans as an alternative model host for legionella pneumophila, and protective effects of Bifidobacterium infantis.

    PubMed

    Komura, Tomomi; Yasui, Chikako; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu

    2010-06-01

    The survival times of Caenorhabditis elegans worms infected with Legionella pneumophila from day 7.5 or later after hatching were shorter than those of uninfected worms. However, nematodes fed bifidobacteria prior to Legionella infection were resistant to Legionella. These nematodes may act as a unique alternative host for Legionella research.

  19. Side-polished fiber immunosensor based on surface plasmon resonance for detection of Legionella pneumophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Yu-Chia; Yang, Yi-Wen; Tsai, Woo-Hu; Yan, Tsong-Rong

    2008-02-01

    Side-polished fiber immunosensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) onto self-assembled protein A layer was proposed for the detection of Legionella pneumophila. A self-assembled protein A layer on gold (Au) surface was fabricated by adsorbing a mixture of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and activated by N-Ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/ N-Hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS). The formation of self-assembled protein A and gold layer on side-polished surface and the binding of antibody and antigen in series were confirmed by SPR response on spectrum. The binding protein A layer can improve the sensitivity, which indirectly supports the configurations that antibody layer is immobilized on the binding protein A layer with a well-ordered orientation. The surface morphology analyses of self-assembled protein A layer on Au substrate and monoclonal antibody against L. pneumophila immobilized on protein A were demonstrated by SPR dip shifts on optical spectrum analyzer. The SPR fiber immunosensor for detection of L. pneumophila was developed and the detection limit was 10 CFU/ml with the SPR dip shift in wavelength from 1070 to 1105nm. The current fabrication technique of a SPR immunosensor using optical fiber for the detection of Legionella pneumophila could be applied to construct other biosensor.

  20. Sensitivity and resistance of Legionella pneumophila to some antibiotics and combinations of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Moffie, B G; Mouton, R P

    1988-10-01

    For the treatment of Legionella pneumophila infections erythromycin and rifampicin are the antibiotics of choice. In view of reported therapy failures other antibiotics, e.g. the quinolones, are currently under investigation. The sensitivity of L. pneumophila to four antibiotics and to combinations of antibiotics was investigated and the rate of mutations was calculated. For 20 L. pneumophila strains we determined the MIC of rifampicin (0.002-0.004 mg/l), erythromycin (0.063-0.125 mg/l), norfloxacin (0.125 mg/l) and ciprofloxacin (0.016-0.032 mg/l). Mutation rates ranged from 1 x 10(-8) for ciprofloxacin to greater than 1 x 10(-7) for erythromycin, resulting in high-level resistance to rifampicin in most strains and erythromycin resistance in one strain, but not in resistance to the quinolones. The combination of erythromycin and rifampicin was synergistic (FIC index less than 0.5) against four of the L. pneumophila strains and showed indifference (FIC index 0.5-2.0) for the remainder (mean FIC index 0.79). Combinations of ciprofloxacin and erythromycin and of rifampicin and ciprofloxacin showed only indifference (mean FIC index respectively 1.05 and 1.21). Combining rifampicin with ciprofloxacin was not effective in reducing the number of mutants for either of these antibiotics, whereas the other combinations did prevent this.

  1. Factors affecting the recovery of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 from cooling tower water systems.

    PubMed

    Lu, H F; Tsou, M F; Huang, S Y; Tsai, W C; Chung, J G; Cheng, K S

    2001-09-01

    A total of 20 water samples collected from the cooling towers at 20 different sites were analyzed under various conditions for the presence of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. A comparative assessment was performed to evaluate methods of sample collection (spray drops, beneath water at 20- to 40-cm depth, and water outlet), concentration (filtration and centrifugation), acid buffer treatment (no treatment, treatment for 3, 5, and 15 min), and CO2 incubation or candle jar incubation. The reduction in viable colonies and false negative rate were compared for the different factors. No quantitative differences in isolation of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was found among samples collected from water at a depth of 20 to 40 cm, from water outlet, and from spray drops. Treatment in an acid buffer for 15 min significantly reduced the recovery rate, with a reduction in bacterial counts of about 40%, compared with a 3-min (12%) or a 5-min (25%) treatment. Acid buffer treatment for 3 or 5 min reduced the overgrowth of commensal flora. This treatment improved the selectivity but not the sensitivity for L. pneumophila serogroup 1. Colonies on plates incubated at 37 degrees C in a candle jar with a humidified atmosphere grew better than those incubated at 35 degrees C with 5% CO2. These results demonstrate that methods of sample collection, concentration, and incubation, but not collection site, can affect the isolation rate for L. pneumophila serogroup 1.

  2. Hidden Selection of Bacterial Resistance to Fluoroquinolones In Vivo: The Case of Legionella pneumophila and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shadoud, Lubana; Almahmoud, Iyad; Jarraud, Sophie; Etienne, Jérôme; Larrat, Sylvie; Schwebel, Carole; Timsit, Jean-François; Schneider, Dominique; Maurin, Max

    2015-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are the leading cause of human morbidity and mortality worldwide. One dramatic issue is the emergence of microbial resistance to antibiotics which is a major public health concern. Surprisingly however, such in vivo adaptive ability has not been reported yet for many intracellular human bacterial pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila. Methods We examined 82 unrelated patients with Legionnaire's disease from which 139 respiratory specimens were sampled during hospitalization and antibiotic therapy. We both developed a real time PCR assay and used deep-sequencing approaches to detect antibiotic resistance mutations in L. pneumophila and follow their selection and fate in these samples. Findings We identified the in vivo selection of fluoroquinolone resistance mutations in L. pneumophila in two infected patients treated with these antibiotics. By investigating the mutational dynamics in patients, we showed that antibiotic resistance occurred during hospitalization most likely after fluoroquinolone treatment. Interpretation In vivo selection of antibiotic resistances in L. pneumophila may be associated with treatment failures and poor prognosis. This hidden resistance must be carefully considered in the therapeutic management of legionellosis patients and in the control of the gradual loss of effectiveness of antibiotics. PMID:26501115

  3. Cytopathogenicity and molecular subtyping of Legionella pneumophila environmental isolates from 17 hospitals.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Nuñez, M; Pedro-Botet, M L; Ragull, S; Sopena, N; Morera, J; Rey-Joly, C; Sabria, M

    2009-02-01

    The cytopathogenicity of 22 Legionella pneumophila isolates from 17 hospitals was determined by assessing the dose of bacteria necessary to produce 50% cytopathic effect (CPED50) in U937 human-derived macrophages. All isolates were able to infect and grow in macrophage-like cells (range log10 CPED50: 2.67-6.73 c.f.u./ml). Five groups were established and related to the serogroup, the number of PFGE patterns coexisting in the same hospital water distribution system, and the possible reporting of hospital-acquired Legionnaires' disease cases. L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates had the highest cytopathogenicity (P=0.003). Moreover, a trend to more cytopathogenic groups (groups 1-3) in hospitals with more than one PFGE pattern of L. pneumophila in the water distribution system (60% vs. 17%) and in hospitals reporting cases of hospital-acquired Legionnaires' disease (36.3% vs. 16.6%) was observed. We conclude that the cytopathogenicty of environmental L. pneumophila should be taken into account in evaluating the risk of a contaminated water reservoir in a hospital and hospital acquisition of Legionnaires' disease.

  4. Identification of Legionella pneumophila serogroups and other Legionella species by mip gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Haroon, Attiya; Koide, Michio; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Fujita, Jiro

    2012-04-01

    The virulence factor known as the macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) is responsible for the intracellular survival of Legionella species. In this study, we investigated the potential of the mip gene sequence to differentiate isolates of different species of Legionella and different serogroups of Legionella pneumophila. We used 35 clinical L. pneumophila isolates and one clinical isolate each of Legionella micdadei, Legionella longbeachae, and Legionella dumoffii (collected from hospitals all over Japan between 1980 and 2007). We used 19 environmental Legionella anisa isolates (collected in the Okinawa, Nara, Osaka, and Hyogo prefectures between 1987 and 2007) and two Legionella type strains. We extracted bacterial genomic DNA and amplified out the mip gene by PCR. PCR products were purified by agarose gel electrophoresis and the mip gene was then sequenced. The L. pneumophila isolates could be divided into two groups: one group was very similar to the type strain and was composed of serogroup (SG) 1 isolates only; the second group had more sequence variations and was composed of SG1 isolates as well as SG2, SG3, SG5, and SG10 isolates. Phylogenetic analysis displayed one cluster for L. anisa isolates, while other Legionella species were present at discrete levels. Our findings show that mip gene sequencing is an effective technique for differentiating L. pneumophila strains from other Legionella species.

  5. Outbreak of Legionnaire’s Disease Caused by Legionella pneumophila Serogroups 1 and 13

    PubMed Central

    Amemura-Maekawa, Junko; Ohya, Hitomi; Furukawa, Ichiro; Suzuki, Miyuki; Masaoka, Tomoka; Aikawa, Kastuhiro; Hibi, Kazumi; Morita, Masatomo; Lee, Ken-ichi; Ohnishi, Makoto; Kura, Fumiaki

    2017-01-01

    In Japan, hot springs and public baths are the major sources of legionellosis. In 2015, an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease occurred among 7 patients who had visited a spa house. Laboratory investigation indicated that L. pneumophila serogroup 1 and 13 strains caused the outbreak and that these strains were genetically related. PMID:28098535

  6. Hidden Selection of Bacterial Resistance to Fluoroquinolones In Vivo: The Case of Legionella pneumophila and Humans.

    PubMed

    Shadoud, Lubana; Almahmoud, Iyad; Jarraud, Sophie; Etienne, Jérôme; Larrat, Sylvie; Schwebel, Carole; Timsit, Jean-François; Schneider, Dominique; Maurin, Max

    2015-09-01

    Infectious diseases are the leading cause of human morbidity and mortality worldwide. One dramatic issue is the emergence of microbial resistance to antibiotics which is a major public health concern. Surprisingly however, such in vivo adaptive ability has not been reported yet for many intracellular human bacterial pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila. We examined 82 unrelated patients with Legionnaire's disease from which 139 respiratory specimens were sampled during hospitalization and antibiotic therapy. We both developed a real time PCR assay and used deep-sequencing approaches to detect antibiotic resistance mutations in L. pneumophila and follow their selection and fate in these samples. We identified the in vivo selection of fluoroquinolone resistance mutations in L. pneumophila in two infected patients treated with these antibiotics. By investigating the mutational dynamics in patients, we showed that antibiotic resistance occurred during hospitalization most likely after fluoroquinolone treatment. In vivo selection of antibiotic resistances in L. pneumophila may be associated with treatment failures and poor prognosis. This hidden resistance must be carefully considered in the therapeutic management of legionellosis patients and in the control of the gradual loss of effectiveness of antibiotics.

  7. Soil as a source of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1).

    PubMed

    Wallis, Lara; Robinson, Priscilla

    2005-12-01

    To investigate the potential source of a case of Legionnaires' disease caused by an unusual serotype of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1) in regional Victoria in May 2001. Epidemiological and environmental investigation of the source of infection of a case of Legionnaires' disease in regional Victoria in May 2001. Extensive environmental investigations did not reveal any cooling water tower systems close to the residence or the shopping centre that the case visited prior to illness. The sputum culture and a soil sample from the field at the plant nursery where the case worked prior to illness were both positive for Legionella pneumophilia serogroup 1, MDU pulsovar 97:103. Legionella pneumophila has been found in soil and was further found to be associated with a case of Legionella pneumophila. Public health authorities should consider exposures to soil and potting mixes when investigating cases of Legionella pneumophila where the case has no apparent association with cooling towers. Safe gardening practices should be promoted among the community.

  8. Disseminated Legionella pneumophila infection in an immunocompromised patient treated with tigecycline.

    PubMed

    Valve, Kirsi; Vaalasti, Annikki; Anttila, Veli-Jukka; Vuento, Risto

    2010-01-01

    We describe an immunocompromised patient with disseminated Legionella pneumophila infection. A chronic leg ulcer was probably the port of entry for the infection. Treatment required several operations and prolonged antimicrobial treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of Legionella soft tissue infection and pneumonia treated with tigecycline.

  9. Legionella pneumophila CsrA is a pivotal repressor of transmission traits and activator of replication.

    PubMed

    Molofsky, Ari B; Swanson, Michele S

    2003-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila can replicate inside amoebae and also alveolar macrophages to cause Legionnaires' Disease in susceptible hosts. When nutrients become limiting, a stringent-like response coordinates the differentiation of L. pneumophila to a transmissive form, a process mediated by the two-component system LetA/S and the sigma factors RpoS and FliA. Here we demonstrate that the broadly conserved RNA binding protein CsrA is a global repressor of L. pneumophila transmission phenotypes and an essential activator of intracellular replication. By analysing csrA expression and the phenotypes of csrA single and double mutants and a strain that expresses csrA constitutively, we demonstrate that, during replication in broth, CsrA represses every post-exponential phase phenotype examined, including cell shape shortening, motility, pigmentation, stress resistance, sodium sensitivity, cytotoxicity and efficient macrophage infection. At the transition to the post-exponential phase, LetA/S relieves CsrA repression to induce transmission phenotypes by both FliA-dependent and -independent pathways. For L. pneumophila to avoid lysosomal degradation in macrophages, CsrA repression must be relieved by LetA/S before phagocytosis; conversely, before intracellular bacteria can replicate, CsrA repression must be restored. The reciprocal regulation of replication and transmission exemplified by CsrA likely enhances the fitness of microbes faced with fluctuating environments.

  10. Widespread molecular detection of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 in cold water taps across the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the United States 3,522 cases of legionellosis were reported to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in 2009. Of these reports, it is estimated that 84% are caused by the microorganism Legionella pneumophila Serogroup (Sg) 1. Legionella spp. have been isolated and r...

  11. Legionella pneumophila couples fatty acid flux to microbial differentiation and virulence.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Rachel L; Dalebroux, Zachary D; Swanson, Michele S

    2009-03-01

    During its life cycle, Legionella pneumophila alternates between at least two phenotypes: a resilient, infectious form equipped for transmission and a replicative cell type that grows in amoebae and macrophages. Considering its versatility, we postulated that multiple cues regulate L. pneumophila differentiation. Beginning with a Biolog Phenotype MicroArray screen, we demonstrate that excess short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) trigger replicative cells to cease growth and activate their panel of transmissive traits. To co-ordinate their response to SCFAs, L. pneumophila utilizes the LetA/LetS two-component system, but not phosphotransacetylase or acetyl kinase, two enzymes that generate high-energy phosphate intermediates. Instead, the stringent response enzyme SpoT appears to monitor fatty acid biosynthesis to govern transmission trait expression, as an altered distribution of acylated acyl carrier proteins correlated with the SpoT-dependent differentiation of cells treated with either excess SCFAs or the fatty acid biosynthesis inhibitors cerulenin and 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid. We postulate that, by exploiting the stringent response pathway to couple cellular differentiation to its metabolic state, L. pneumophila swiftly acclimates to stresses encountered in its host or the environment, thereby enhancing its overall fitness.

  12. Resuscitation of viable but nonculturable Legionella pneumophila Philadelphia JR32 by Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, M; Emödy, L; Amann, R; Hacker, J

    1997-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an aquatic bacterium and is responsible for Legionnaires' disease in humans. Free-living amoebae are parasitized by legionellae and provide the intracellular environment required for the replication of this bacterium. In low-nutrient environments, however, L. pneumophila is able to enter a non-replicative viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state. In this study, L. pneumophila Philadelphia I JR 32 was suspended in sterilized tap water at 10(4) cells/ml. The decreasing number of bacteria was monitored by CFU measurements, acridine orange direct count (AODC), and hybridization with 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. After 125 days of incubation in water, the cells were no longer culturable on routine plating media; however, they were still detectable by AODC and by in situ hybridization. The addition of Acanthamoeba castellanii to the dormant bacteria resulted in the resuscitation of L. pneumophila JR 32 to a culturable state. A comparison of plate-grown legionellae and reactivated cells showed that the capacity for intracellular survival in human monocytes and intraperitoneally infected guinea pigs, which is considered a parameter for virulence, was not reduced in the reactivated cells. However, reactivation of dormant legionellae was not observed in the animal model. PMID:9143134

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila JR32 and Lp01 Laboratory Strains Domesticated in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Maita, Chinatsu; Matushita, Mizue; Okubo, Torahiko; Matsuo, Junji; Miyake, Masaki; Nagai, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of two Legionella pneumophila variant strains (JR32 and Lp01_666) originally derived from a Philadelphia-1 clinical isolate, domesticated in Japan, with distinct susceptibility to amoebae. Detailed genomic analysis will allow us to better understand Legionella adaptation and survival mechanisms in host cells. PMID:27491976

  14. Complete Genome Sequences of the Historical Legionella pneumophila Strains OLDA and Pontiac

    PubMed Central

    Mercante, Jeffrey W.; Morrison, Shatavia S.; Raphael, Brian H.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains OLDA and Pontiac, which predate the 1976 Philadelphia Legionnaires’ disease outbreak. Strain OLDA was isolated in 1947 from an apparent sporadic case, and strain Pontiac caused an explosive outbreak at a Michigan health department in 1968. PMID:27563044

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila subsp. fraseri Strains Detroit-1 and Dallas 1E

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Brian H.; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A.; Morrison, Shatavia S.; Mercante, Jeffrey W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the complete genome sequences of two of the earliest known strains of Legionella pneumophila subsp. fraseri. Detroit-1 is serogroup 1 and was isolated from a lung biopsy specimen in 1977. Dallas 1E is serogroup 5 and was isolated in 1978 from a cooling tower. PMID:28153889

  16. No Evidence to Suggest that the Use of Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors Confounds the Results of Two Blood-Based Biomarker Studies in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Chiam, Justin Tao Wen; Lunnon, Katie; Voyle, Nicola; Proitsi, Petroula; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel; Nelson, Sally; Johnston, Caroline; Soininen, Hilkka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Hodges, Angela; Lovestone, Simon; Newhouse, Stephen; Dobson, Richard James Butler; Kiddle, Steven John; Sattlecker, Martina

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to discover Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers that are both easily measured and reliable. Research into blood-based biomarkers for AD using transcriptomics and proteomics has been an attractive and promising area of research. However, to date researchers have not looked into the possibility of AD medication being a confounding factor in these studies. This study explored whether acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), the main class of AD medication, are a confounding factor in AD blood biomarker studies. The most promising blood transcriptomic and proteomic biomarkers from two recent studies were analyzed to determine if they were differentially expressed between AD subjects on AChEIs and subjects that were not. None of the gene or protein biomarkers analyzed were found to be significantly altered between subjects in either group. This study found no evidence that AChEIs are a confounding factor in these published AD blood biomarker studies. Further work is needed to confirm that this is also the case for other proposed biomarkers.

  17. Disruption of the acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase gene in mice: Evidence suggesting multiple cholesterol esterification enzymes in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Meiner, Vardiella L.; Cases, Sylvaine; Myers, Heather M.; Sande, Eric R.; Bellosta, Stefano; Schambelan, Morris; Pitas, Robert E.; McGuire, James; Herz, Joachim; Farese, Robert V.

    1996-01-01

    The microsomal enzyme acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT; EC 2.3.1.26) catalyzes the esterification of cellular cholesterol with fatty acids to form cholesterol esters. ACAT activity is found in many tissues, including macrophages, the adrenal glands, and the liver. In macrophages, ACAT is thought to participate in foam cell formation and thereby to contribute to atherosclerotic lesion development. Disruption of the gene for ACAT (Acact) in mice resulted in decreased cholesterol esterification in ACAT-deficient fibroblasts and adrenal membranes, and markedly reduced cholesterol ester levels in adrenal glands and peritoneal macrophages; the latter finding will be useful in testing the role of ACAT and macrophage foam cell formation in atherosclerosis. In contrast, the livers of ACAT-deficient mice contained substantial amounts of cholesterol esters and exhibited no reduction in cholesterol esterification activity. These tissue-specific reductions in cholesterol esterification provide evidence that in mammals this process involves more than one form of esterification enzyme. PMID:8943057

  18. A phylogeny of the Lampropeltis mexicana complex (Serpentes: Colubridae) based on mitochondrial DNA sequences suggests evidence for species-level polyphyly within Lampropeltis.

    PubMed

    Bryson, Robert W; Pastorini, Jennifer; Burbrink, Frank T; Forstner, Michael R J

    2007-05-01

    The systematic relationships of snakes in the Lampropeltis mexicana complex (L. mexicana, L. alterna, and L. ruthveni) are poorly known despite several taxonomic studies over the last 80 years. Mitochondrial DNA sequences were used to infer the phylogeny of the L. mexicana complex. At least one representative sample from the nine currently recognized species of Lampropeltis was sequenced. Our results suggest that a deep basal split resulted in the divergence of two groups of Lampropeltis, with one group occupying the upland areas of western United States and most of western and central Mexico, and the other northeastern Mexico and the lowland areas of the southern United States. Results also revealed that the L. mexicana complex and Lampropeltis triangulum are polyphyletic, with taxa from both groups nested together in deeply divergent northern and southern clades. These results are incongruent with previous hypotheses of phylogenetic relationships based on morphology, and suggest that morphological characters shared among the various tri-colored Lampropeltis (e.g., hemipenal structure and tri-colored pattern) may be difficult to interpret phylogenetically.

  19. Neither philopatric nor panmictic: microsatellite and mtDNA evidence suggests lack of natal homing but limits to dispersal in Pacific lamprey.

    PubMed

    Spice, Erin K; Goodman, Damon H; Reid, Stewart B; Docker, Margaret F

    2012-06-01

    Most species with lengthy migrations display some degree of natal homing; some (e.g. migratory birds and anadromous salmonids) show spectacular feats of homing. However, studies of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) indicate that this anadromous species locates spawning habitat based on pheromonal cues from larvae rather than through philopatry. Previous genetic studies in the anadromous Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) have both supported and rejected the hypothesis of natal homing. To resolve this, we used nine microsatellite loci to examine the population structure in 965 Pacific lamprey from 20 locations from central British Columbia to southern California and supplemented this analysis with mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis on a subset of 530 lamprey. Microsatellite analysis revealed (i) relatively low but often statistically significant genetic differentiation among locations (97% pairwise F(ST) values were <0.04 but 73.7% were significant); and (ii) weak but significant isolation by distance (r(2) = 0.0565, P = 0.0450) but no geographic clustering of samples. The few moderate F(ST) values involved comparisons with sites that were geographically distant or far upstream. The mtDNA analysis--although providing less resolution among sites (only 4.7%F(ST) values were significant)--was broadly consistent with the microsatellite results: (i) the southernmost site and some sites tributary to the Salish Sea were genetically distinct; and (ii) southern sites showed higher haplotype and private haplotype richness. These results are inconsistent with philopatry, suggesting that anadromous lampreys are unusual among species with long migrations, but suggest that limited dispersal at sea precludes panmixia in this species. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Gene expression in BMPR2 mutation carriers with and without evidence of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension suggests pathways relevant to disease penetrance

    PubMed Central

    West, James; Cogan, Joy; Geraci, Mark; Robinson, Linda; Newman, John; Phillips, John A; Lane, Kirk; Meyrick, Barbara; Loyd, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Background While BMPR2 mutation strongly predisposes to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), only 20% of mutation carriers develop clinical disease. This finding suggests that modifier genes contribute to FPAH clinical expression. Since modifiers are likely to be common alleles, this problem is not tractable by traditional genetic approaches. Furthermore, examination of gene expression is complicated by confounding effects attributable to drugs and the disease process itself. Methods To resolve these problems, B-cells were isolated, EBV-immortalized, and cultured from familial PAH patients with BMPR2 mutations, mutation positive but disease-free family members, and family members without mutation. This allows examination of differences in gene expression without drug or disease-related effects. These differences were assayed by Affymetrix array, with follow-up by quantitative RT-PCR and additional statistical analyses. Results By gene array, we found consistent alterations in multiple pathways with known relationship to PAH, including actin organization, immune function, calcium balance, growth, and apoptosis. Selected genes were verified by quantitative RT-PCR using a larger sample set. One of these, CYP1B1, had tenfold lower expression than control groups in female but not male PAH patients. Analysis of overrepresented gene ontology groups suggests that risk of disease correlates with alterations in pathways more strongly than with any specific gene within those pathways. Conclusion Disease status in BMPR2 mutation carriers was correlated with alterations in proliferation, GTP signaling, and stress response pathway expression. The estrogen metabolizing gene CYP1B1 is a strong candidate as a modifier gene in female PAH patients. PMID:18823550

  1. Amoebae-Based Screening Reveals a Novel Family of Compounds Restricting Intracellular Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher F; Chiriano, Gianpaolo; Finsel, Ivo; Manske, Christian; Hoffmann, Christine; Steiner, Bernhard; Kranjc, Agata; Patthey-Vuadens, Ophelie; Kicka, Sébastien; Trofimov, Valentin; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Soldati, Thierry; Scapozza, Leonardo; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-07-10

    The causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, Legionella pneumophila, grows in environmental amoebae and mammalian macrophages within a distinct compartment, the 'Legionella-containing vacuole' (LCV). Intracellular bacteria are protected from many antibiotics, and thus are notoriously difficult to eradicate. To identify novel compounds that restrict intracellular bacterial replication, we previously developed an assay based on a coculture of amoebae and GFP-producing L. pneumophila. This assay was used to screen a pathway-based, highly diverse chemical library, referred to as the Sinergia library. In this work, we chose to focus on a group of 11 hit compounds, the majority of which originated from the query molecule CN585, a compound that targets the protein phosphatase calcineurin. Further studies on 78 related compound variants revealed crucial structural attributes, namely a triple-ring scaffold with a central triazine moiety, substituted in positions 3 and 5 by two piperidine or pyrrolidine rings, and in position 1 by an amine group bearing a single aliphatic chain moiety. The most effective compound, ZINC00615682, inhibited intracellular replication of L. pneumophila with an IC50 of approximately 20 nM in Acanthamoeba castellanii and slightly less efficiently in Dictyostelium discoideum or macrophages. Pharmacological and genetic attempts to implicate calcineurin in the intracellular replication of L. pneumophila failed. Taken together, these results show that the amoebae-based screen and structure-activity relationship analysis is suitable for the identification of novel inhibitors of the intracellular replication of L. pneumophila. The most potent compound identified in this study targets (an) as yet unidentified host factor(s).

  2. Regulation, Integrase-Dependent Excision, and Horizontal Transfer of Genomic Islands in Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Lautner, Monika; Schunder, Eva; Herrmann, Vroni

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative freshwater agent which multiplies in specialized nutrient-rich vacuoles of amoebae. When replicating in human alveolar macrophages, Legionella can cause Legionnaires' disease. Recently, we identified a new type of conjugation/type IVA secretion system (T4ASS) in L. pneumophila Corby (named trb-tra). Analogous versions of trb-tra are localized on the genomic islands Trb-1 and Trb-2. Both can exist as an episomal circular form, and Trb-1 can be transferred horizontally to other Legionella strains by conjugation. In our current work, we discovered the importance of a site-specific integrase (Int-1, lpc2818) for the excision and conjugation process of Trb-1. Furthermore, we identified the genes lvrRABC (lpc2813 to lpc2816) to be involved in the regulation of Trb-1 excision. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time that a Legionella genomic island (LGI) of L. pneumophila Corby (LpcGI-2) encodes a functional type IV secretion system. The island can be transferred horizontally by conjugation and is integrated site specifically into the genome of the transconjugants. LpcGI-2 generates three different episomal forms. The predominant episomal form, form A, is generated integrase dependently (Lpc1833) and transferred by conjugation in a pilT-dependent manner. Therefore, the genomic islands Trb-1 and LpcGI-2 should be classified as integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). Coculture studies of L. pneumophila wild-type and mutant strains revealed that the int-1 and lvrRABC genes (located on Trb-1) as well as lpc1833 and pilT (located on LpcGI-2) do not influence the in vivo fitness of L. pneumophila in Acanthamoeba castellanii. PMID:23354744

  3. Identification of Legionella pneumophila genes required for growth within and killing of human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Sadosky, A B; Wiater, L A; Shuman, H A

    1993-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila was mutagenized with Tn903dIIlacZ, and a collection of mutants was screened for defects in macrophage killing (Mak-). Of 4,564 independently derived mutants, 55 (1.2%) showed a reduced or complete lack in the ability to kill HL-60-derived human macrophages. Forty-nine of the Mak- mutants could be assigned to one of 16 DNA hybridization groups. Only one group (9 of the 10 members) could be complemented for macrophage killing by a DNA fragment containing icm and dot, two recently described L. pneumophila loci that are required for macrophage killing. Phenotypic analysis showed that none of the mutants were any more sensitive than the wild type to human serum, oxidants, iron chelators, or lipophilic reagents nor did they require additional nutrients for growth. The only obvious difference between the Mak-mutants and wild-type L. pneumophila was that almost all of the Mak- mutants were resistant to NaCl. The effects of LiCl paralleled the effects of NaCl but were less pronounced. Resistance to salt and the inability to kill human macrophages are linked since both phenotypes appeared when Tn903dIIlacZ mutations from two Mak- strains were transferred to wild-type backgrounds. However, salt sensitivity is not a requisite for killing macrophages since a group of Mak- mutants containing a plasmid that restored macrophage killing remained resistant to NaCl. Mak- mutants from groups I through IX associated with HL-60 cells similarly to wild-type L. pneumophila. However, like the intracellular-multiplication-defective (icm) mutant 25D, the Mak- mutants were unable to multiply within macrophages. Thus, the ability of L. pneumophila to kill macrophages seems to be determined by many genetic loci, almost all of which are associated with sensitivity to NaCl. Images PMID:8225610

  4. Validation of a Microbead-Based Format for Spoligotyping of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Gomgnimbou, Michel Kiréopori; Ginevra, Christophe; Peron-Cane, Caroline; Versapuech, Margaux; Refrégier, Guislaine; Jacotin, Nathalie; Jarraud, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    A 42-plex clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-based typing technique (spoligotyping) was recently developed at the French National Reference Center for Legionella. It allows the subtyping of the Legionella pneumophila sequence type 1/Paris pulsotype. In this report, we present the transfer of the membrane-based spoligotyping technique to a microbead-based multiplexed format. This microbead-based high-throughput assay uses devices such as Luminex 200 or the recently launched Magpix system (Luminex Corp., Austin, TX). We designated this new technique LP-SPOL (for L. pneumophila spoligotyping). We used two sets of samples previously subtyped by the membrane-based spoligotyping method to set up and validate the transfer on the two microbead-based systems. The first set of isolates (n = 56) represented the whole diversity of the CRISPR patterns known to date. These isolates were used for transfer setup (determination of spacer cutoffs for both devices). The second set of isolates (n = 245) was used to validate the transfer to the two microbead-based systems. The results obtained by the Luminex 200 system were 100% concordant with those obtained by the Magpix system for the 2 sets of isolates. In total, 10 discrepant results were observed when comparing the membrane-based method to the microbead-based method. These discrepancies were further resolved by repeating either the membrane-based or the microbead-based assay. This new assay is expected to play an emerging role for surveillance of L. pneumophila, starting with one of the most frequent genotypes, the sequence type 1/Paris pulsotype. However, the generalization of this typing method to all L. pneumophila strains is not feasible, since not all L. pneumophila strains contain CRISPRs. PMID:24759720

  5. Genome-Scale Identification of Legionella pneumophila Effectors Using a Machine Learning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, David; Zusman, Tal; Degtyar, Elena; Viner, Ram; Segal, Gil; Pupko, Tal

    2009-01-01

    A large number of highly pathogenic bacteria utilize secretion systems to translocate effector proteins into host cells. Using these effectors, the bacteria subvert host cell processes during infection. Legionella pneumophila translocates effectors via the Icm/Dot type-IV secretion system and to date, approximately 100 effectors have been identified by various experimental and computational techniques. Effector identification is a critical first step towards the understanding of the pathogenesis system in L. pneumophila as well as in other bacterial pathogens. Here, we formulate the task of effector identification as a classification problem: each L. pneumophila open reading frame (ORF) was classified as either effector or not. We computationally defined a set of features that best distinguish effectors from non-effectors. These features cover a wide range of characteristics including taxonomical dispersion, regulatory data, genomic organization, similarity to eukaryotic proteomes and more. Machine learning algorithms utilizing these features were then applied to classify all the ORFs within the L. pneumophila genome. Using this approach we were able to predict and experimentally validate 40 new effectors, reaching a success rate of above 90%. Increasing the number of validated effectors to around 140, we were able to gain novel insights into their characteristics. Effectors were found to have low G+C content, supporting the hypothesis that a large number of effectors originate via horizontal gene transfer, probably from their protozoan host. In addition, effectors were found to cluster in specific genomic regions. Finally, we were able to provide a novel description of the C-terminal translocation signal required for effector translocation by the Icm/Dot secretion system. To conclude, we have discovered 40 novel L. pneumophila effectors, predicted over a hundred additional highly probable effectors, and shown the applicability of machine learning algorithms for

  6. Spatial distribution of Legionella pneumophila MLVA-genotypes in a drinking water system.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Sarah; Sharaby, Yehonatan; Pecellín, Marina; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred; Halpern, Malka

    2015-06-15

    Bacteria of the genus Legionella cause water-based infections, resulting in severe pneumonia. To improve our knowledge about Legionella spp. ecology, its prevalence and its relationships with environmental factors were studied. Seasonal samples were taken from both water and biofilm at seven sampling points of a small drinking water distribution system in Israel. Representative isolates were obtained from each sample and identified to the species level. Legionella pneumophila was further determined to the serotype and genotype level. High resolution genotyping of L. pneumophila isolates was achieved by Multiple-Locus Variable number of tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA). Within the studied water system, Legionella plate counts were higher in summer and highly variable even between adjacent sampling points. Legionella was present in six out of the seven selected sampling points, with counts ranging from 1.0 × 10(1) to 5.8 × 10(3) cfu/l. Water counts were significantly higher in points where Legionella was present in biofilms. The main fraction of the isolated Legionella was L. pneumophila serogroup 1. Serogroup 3 and Legionella sainthelensis were also isolated. Legionella counts were positively correlated with heterotrophic plate counts at 37 °C and negatively correlated with chlorine. Five MLVA-genotypes of L. pneumophila were identified at different buildings of the sampled area. The presence of a specific genotype, "MLVA-genotype 4", consistently co-occurred with high Legionella counts and seemed to "trigger" high Legionella counts in cold water. Our hypothesis is that both the presence of L. pneumophila in biofilm and the presence of specific genotypes, may indicate and/or even lead to high Legionella concentration in water. This observation deserves further studies in a broad range of drinking water systems to assess its potential for general use in drinking water monitoring and management.

  7. Epidemiologic, molecular, and functional evidence suggest A572D-SCN5A should not be considered an independent LQT3-susceptibility mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tester, David J.; Valdivia, Carmen; Harris-Kerr, Carole; Alders, Marielle; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Makielski, Jonathan C.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Considering that approximately 2% of Caucasian controls host rare, nonsynonymous variants in the SCN5A-encoded cardiac sodium channel, caution must be exercised when interpreting SCN5A genetic test results for long QT syndrome (LQTS). OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine if A572D-SCN5A is a pathogenic mutation, a possible functional modifier, or background “genetic noise.” METHODS The frequency of A572D was compared between 3,741 LQTS referral cases (mostly Caucasian) and 1,437 Caucasian controls. A572D-SCN5A was engineered into SCN5A using the most commonly spliced transcript (Q1077del, hH1c clone) in the setting of either H558 or R558 for heterologous expression/patch clamp studies in HEK293 cells. RESULTS A572D-SCN5A was detected in 17 (0.45%) of 3,741 cases compared with 7 (0.49%) of 1,437 controls (P = .82). Among the 17 A572D-positive LQTS referrals, 10 (59%) hosted definite LQTS-causing mutations elsewhere (5 KCNQ1, 3 KCNH2, 2 SCN5A). Functional studies showed no gating kinetic or current density differences compared with wild-type channels in the context of H558 but showed moderate dysfunction when expressed in H558R-SCN5A, with which it is invariably associated. CONCLUSION There is sufficient evidence to conclude that A572D-SCN5A is not an independent, LQT3-causative mutation. A572D is present in approximately 0.5% of both cases and controls and has a wild-type phenotype when expressed in HEK293 cells. However, in the context of H558R-SCN5A, persistent late sodium current emerges, indicating that A572D/H558R could be a proarrhythmic factor akin to S1103Y. These findings underscore the scrutiny necessary to distinguish truly pathogenic mutations from functional polymorphisms and otherwise innocuous, rare genetic variants in SCN5A. These results also question how much cellular dysfunction for a mutation is required in vitro to support pathogenicity. PMID:20403459

  8. Dealing with zero word frequencies: a review of the existing rules of thumb and a suggestion for an evidence-based choice.

    PubMed

    Brysbaert, Marc; Diependaele, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    In a critical review of the heuristics used to deal with zero word frequencies, we show that four are suboptimal, one is good, and one may be acceptable. The four suboptimal strategies are discarding words with zero frequencies, giving words with zero frequencies a very low frequency, adding 1 to the frequency per million, and making use of the Good-Turing algorithm. The good algorithm is the Laplace transformation, which consists of adding 1 to each frequency count and increasing the total corpus size by the number of word types observed. A strategy that may be acceptable is to guess the frequency of absent words on the basis of other corpora and then increasing the total corpus size by the estimated summed frequency of the missing words. A comparison with the lexical decision times of the English Lexicon Project and the British Lexicon Project suggests that the Laplace transformation gives the most useful estimates (in addition to being easy to calculate). Therefore, we recommend it to researchers.

  9. Suggestive Evidence for the Involvement of the Second Calcium and Surface Loop in Interfacial Binding: Monoclinci and Trigonal Crystal Structures of a Quadruple Mutant of Phospholipase A2

    SciTech Connect

    Sekar,K.; Yogavel, M.; Kanaujia, S.; Sharma, A.; Velmurugan, D.; Poi, M.; Dauter, Z.; Tsai, M.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structures of the monoclinic and trigonal forms of the quadruple mutant K53,56,120,121M of recombinant bovine pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}) have been solved and refined at 1.9 and 1.1 Angstroms resolution, respectively. Interestingly, the monoclinic form reveals the presence of the second calcium ion. Furthermore, the surface-loop residues are ordered and the conformation of residues 62-66 is similar to that observed in other structures containing the second calcium ion. On the other hand, in the trigonal form the surface loop is disordered and the second calcium is absent. Docking studies suggest that the second calcium and residues Lys62 and Asp66 from the surface loop could be involved in the interaction with the polar head group of the membrane phospholipid. It is hypothesized that the two structures of the quadruple mutant, monoclinic and trigonal, represent the conformations of PLA2 at the lipid interface and in solution, respectively. A docked structure with a phospholipid molecule and with a transition-state analogue bound, one at the active site coordinating to the catalytic calcium and the other at the second calcium site, but both at the i-face, is presented.

  10. Evidence of at least two evolutionary lineages in Melipona subnitida (Apidae, Meliponini) suggested by mtDNA variability and geometric morphometrics of forewings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatti, Vanessa; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino; Franco, Fernando Faria; Francoy, Tiago Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Melipona subnitida, a tropical stingless bee, is an endemic species of the Brazilian northeast and exhibits great potential for honey and pollen production in addition to its role as one of the main pollinators of the Caatinga biome. To understand the genetic structure and better assist in the conservation of this species, we characterized the population variability of M. subnitida using geometric morphometrics of the forewing and cytochrome c oxidase I gene fragment sequencing. We collected workers from six localities in the northernmost distribution. Both methodologies indicated that the variability among the sampled populations is related both to the environment in which samples were collected and the geographical distance between the sampling sites, indicating that differentiation among the populations is due to the existence of at least evolutionary lineages. Molecular clock data suggest that this differentiation may have begun in the middle Pleistocene, approximately 396 kya. The conservation of all evolutionary lineages is important since they can present differential resistance to environmental changes, as resistance to drought and diseases.

  11. Survival and multiplication of Legionella pneumophila in municipal drinking water systems.

    PubMed Central

    States, S J; Conley, L F; Kuchta, J M; Oleck, B M; Lipovich, M J; Wolford, R S; Wadowsky, R M; McNamara, A M; Sykora, J L; Keleti, G

    1987-01-01

    Studies were conducted to investigate the survival and multiplication of Legionella spp. in public drinking water supplies. An attempt was made, over a period of several years, to isolate legionellae from a municipal system. Sampling sites included the river water supply, treatment plant, finished water reservoir system, mains, and distribution taps. Despite the use of several isolation techniques, Legionella spp. could not be detected in any of the samples other than those collected from the river. It was hypothesized that this was due to the maintenance of a chlorine residual throughout the system. To investigate the potential for Legionella growth, additional water samples, collected from throughout the system, were dechlorinated, pasteurized, and inoculated with Legionella pneumophila. Subsequent growth indicated that many of these samples, especially those collected from areas affected by an accumulation of algal materials, exhibited a much greater ability to support Legionella multiplication than did river water prior to treatment. Chemical analyses were also performed on these samples. Correlation of chemical data and experimental growth results indicated that the chemical environment significantly affects the ability of the water to support multiplication, with turbidity, organic carbon, and certain metals being of particular importance. These studies indicate that the potential exists for Legionella growth within municipal systems and support the hypothesis that public water supplies may contaminate the plumbing systems of hospitals and other large buildings. The results also suggest that useful methods to control this contamination include adequate treatment plant filtration, maintenance of a chlorine residual throughout the treatment and distribution network, and effective covering of open reservoirs. PMID:3606101

  12. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhou, R.; Sauder, J. M.; Tonge, P. J.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-02-18

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  13. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Z Zhang; R Zhou; J Sauder; P Tonge; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  14. [Investigation on strains of Legionella pneumophila, isolated from a hospital of Milano, with three genotyping methods].

    PubMed

    Bianchi, A; Tesauro, M; Consonni, M; Galli, M G

    2009-01-01

    Various techniques have been developed in recent years for the molecular typing of microorganisms. Remains particularly difficult to isolate clinical strains for the low availability of cases and even more problematic matching clinical / environmental strains. We investigated 13 strains of Legionella pneumophila of clinical and environmental origin, isolated in 3 Health Facilities in Milan (2003-2006), using three molecular typing methods: Pulse-Field Gel Electrophoresis, Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism and Sequence-Based Typing. PFGE and AFLP showed the correlation between a clinical case with only one of the environmental isolates taken from the places frequented by the patient, demonstrating with certainty the nosocomial origin of the case and identifying the source of infection in the shower water (Clin. 1 and Env. 1N). Two clinical samples from patients admitted to different wards presented an identical profile, which suggests that the nosocomial origin assumed an epidemic form, even without having isolated the environmental strain due to the absence of samples drawn during the period under consideration (Clin. 2 and 3). Finally, the comparison between the isolated environmental strains demonstrated a heterogeneous presence of strains, not correlated to each other although they belong to the same serum-group, having profiles that are clearly different regarding number and position of bands (Env. 2 and 4). The profile 2,10,18,10,1,1 had never been isolated and typed previously in Europe. The SBT has proved a better technique for reproducibility and interpretation of results than PFGE and AFLP To complete studies on SBT method, now considered gold standard, is currently being the EWGLI 5th Proficiency Panel, in which we are actively involved with the genotyping of five strains according to the latest version of the protocol (4.1).

  15. A comparison of assays measuring the viability of Legionella pneumophila after treatment with copper and silver ions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The relatively high prevalence of Legionella pneumophila in premise plumbing systems has been widely reported. Published reports indicate Legionella has a comparatively high resistance to chlorine and moreover has the ability to grow in phagocytic amoeba which could p...

  16. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from cooling towers, public baths, hospitals, and fountains in Seoul, Korea, from 2010 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changkyu; Jeon, Sujin; Jung, Jihun; Oh, Younghee; Kim, Yeonsun; Lee, Jaein; Choi, Sungmin; Chae, Youngzoo; Lee, Young-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Legionnaire's disease is associated with a high mortality rate. The authors collected 3,495 water samples in Seoul, Korea, between 2010 and 2012 from public facilities (cooling towers, public baths, hospitals, and decorative fountains), which are considered the major habitats of Legionella pneumophila. In all, 527 (15.1%) isolates of L. pneumophila were obtained by microbial culture and polymerase chain reaction. Serological diagnosis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis were performed for the samples. The authors categorized the samples into four groups (A-D) on the basis of PFGE results. The analysis revealed that cooling towers containing the most samples with L. pneumophila serogroup 1 constituted the highest proportion of isolate. Samples from public facilities and serogroups could be distinctively classified by PFGE patterns. Thus, it is expected that source-specific features revealed through PFGE and serological analyses could serve as the basis for effectively coping with future outbreaks of L. pneumophila.

  17. An update on iron acquisition by Legionella pneumophila: new pathways for siderophore uptake and ferric iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical for the growth and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. L. pneumophila utilizes two main modes of iron assimilation, namely ferrous iron uptake via the FeoB system and ferric iron acquisition through the action of the siderophore legiobactin. This review highlights recent studies concerning the mechanism of legiobactin assimilation, the impact of c-type cytochromes on siderophore production, the importance of legiobactin in lung infection and a newfound role for a bacterial pyomelanin in iron acquisition. These data demonstrate that key aspects of L. pneumophila iron acquisition are significantly distinct from those of long-studied, 'model' organisms. Indeed, L. pneumophila may represent a new paradigm for a variety of other intracellular parasites, pathogens and under-studied bacteria.

  18. Three Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pascullei Associated with Colonization of a Health Care Facility

    PubMed Central

    Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A.; Morrison, Shatavia S.; Sammons, Scott; Rowe, Lori A.; Sheth, Mili; Frace, Michael; Lucas, Claressa E.; Loparev, Vladimir N.; Raphael, Brian H.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences of three Legionella pneumophila subsp. pascullei strains (including both serogroup 1 and 5 strains) that were found in the same health care facility in 1982 and 2012. PMID:27151801

  19. Preferential colonization and release of Legionella pneumophila from mature drinking water biofilms grown on copper versus unplasticized polyvinylchloride coupons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Legionella persistence and amplification in premise drinking water systems is a known contributor to legionellosis outbreaks, especially in the presence of suitable eukaryotic hosts. Here we examined Legionella pneumophila behavior within drinking water biofilms grown on copper ...

  20. Ruling out False-Positive Urinary Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 and Streptococcus pneumoniae Antigen Test Results by Heating Urine

    PubMed Central

    Pontoizeau, C.; Dangers, L.; Jarlier, V.; Luyt, C. E.; Guiller, E.; Fievet, M. H.; Lecsö-Bornet, M.; Aubry, A.

    2014-01-01

    We report here false-positive urinary Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen test results due to rabbit antilymphocyte serum treatment and provide a simple and fast solution to rule them out by heating urine. PMID:25253788

  1. Preferential colonization and release of Legionella pneumophila from mature drinking water biofilms grown on copper versus unplasticized polyvinylchloride coupons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Legionella persistence and amplification in premise drinking water systems is a known contributor to legionellosis outbreaks, especially in the presence of suitable eukaryotic hosts. Here we examined Legionella pneumophila behavior within drinking water biofilms grown on copper ...

  2. An update on iron acquisition by Legionella pneumophila: new pathways for siderophore uptake and ferric iron reduction

    PubMed Central

    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical for the growth and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease. L. pneumophila utilizes two main modes of iron assimilation, namely ferrous iron uptake via the FeoB system and ferric iron acquisition through the action of the siderophore legiobactin. This review highlights recent studies concerning the mechanism of legiobactin assimilation, the impact of c-type cytochromes on siderophore production, the importance of legiobactin in lung infection and a newfound role for a bacterial pyomelanin in iron acquisition. These data demonstrate that key aspects of L. pneumophila iron acquisition are significantly distinct from those of long-studied, ‘model’ organisms. Indeed, L. pneumophila may represent a new paradigm for a variety of other intracellular parasites, pathogens and under-studied bacteria. PMID:26000653

  3. A comparison of assays measuring the viability of Legionella pneumophila after treatment with copper and silver ions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The relatively high prevalence of Legionella pneumophila in premise plumbing systems has been widely reported. Published reports indicate Legionella has a comparatively high resistance to chlorine and moreover has the ability to grow in phagocytic amoeba which could p...

  4. Evidence Suggesting That Francisella tularensis O-Antigen Capsule Contains a Lipid A-Like Molecule That Is Structurally Distinct from the More Abundant Free Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jason H.; Kaufman, Justin W.; Apicella, Michael A.; Weiss, Jerrold P.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the Gram-negative bacterium that causes tularemia, produces a high molecular weight capsule that is immunologically distinct from Francisella lipopolysaccharide but contains the same O-antigen tetrasaccharide. To pursue the possibility that the capsule of Francisella live vaccine strain (LVS) has a structurally unique lipid anchor, we have metabolically labeled Francisella with [14C]acetate to facilitate highly sensitive compositional analysis of capsule-associated lipids. Capsule was purified by two independent methods and yielded similar results. Autoradiographic and immunologic analysis confirmed that this purified material was largely devoid of low molecular weight LPS and of the copious amounts of free lipid A that the Francisellae accumulate. Chemical hydrolysis yielded [14C]-labeled free fatty acids characteristic of Francisella lipid A but with a different molar ratio of 3-OH C18:0 to 3-OH C16:0 and different composition of non-hydroxylated fatty acids (mainly C14:0 rather than C16:0) than that of free Francisella lipid A. Mild acid hydrolysis to induce selective cleavage of KDO-lipid A linkage yielded a [14C]-labeled product that partitioned during Bligh/Dyer extraction and migrated during thin-layer chromatography like lipid A. These findings suggest that the O-antigen capsule of Francisella contains a covalently linked and structurally distinct lipid A species. The presence of a discrete lipid A-like molecule associated with capsule raises the possibility that Francisella selectively exploits lipid A structural heterogeneity to regulate synthesis, transport, and stable bacterial surface association of the O-antigen capsular layer. PMID:27326857

  5. Suggestive evidence of a multi-cytokine resistin pathway in humans and its role on cardiovascular events in high-risk individuals

    PubMed Central

    Menzaghi, Claudia; Marucci, Antonella; Antonucci, Alessandra; De Bonis, Concetta; Ortega Moreno, Lorena; Salvemini, Lucia; Copetti, Massimiliano; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Di Paola, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    In cells and tissues resistin affects IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 and TNF-α expression, thus suggesting the existence of a multi-cytokine “resistin pathway”. We investigated whether such pathway does exist in humans and, if so, if it is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and with major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Serum cytokines were measured in 280 healthy subjects from the Gargano Study 2 (GS2) whose BMI, waist circumference, HOMAIR, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure data were available and in 353 patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease from the Gargano Heart Study (GHS)-prospective design (follow-up 5.4 ± 2.5 years; 71 MACE). In GS2, cytokines mRNA levels in white blood cells were also measured. In GS2, resistin mRNA was correlated with all cytokines expression (all p < 0.001), but IL-12B. Consistently, serum resistin was correlated with all serum cytokines (all p < 0.001), but IL-12. Expression (eRPS) and serum (sRPS) resistin pathway scores (excluding IL-12) were each other correlated (p < 0.001) and both associated with cardiovascular risk factors (all p < 0.01). In GHS, sRPS was independently associated with MACE (HR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.10–1.90). Our data indicate the existence of a resistin pathway, which is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and which strongly and independently predicts MACE. PMID:28290549

  6. Peroxynitrite modification of glutathione reductase: modeling studies and kinetic evidence suggest the modification of tyrosines at the glutathione disulfide binding site.

    PubMed

    Francescutti, D; Baldwin, J; Lee, L; Mutus, B

    1996-02-01

    The catalytic properties of glutathione reductase for its substrate, glutathione disulfide, were altered following a 60 s exposure to a 100-fold molar excess of peroxynitrite; the K(M) value was increased by approximately 2.5-fold and the V(max) value was decreased by approximately 1.7-fold. The kinetic alterations are thought to result from nitrotyrosine formation as the intrinsic Tyr fluorescence is diminished. The UV-visible spectrum of glutathione reductase exhibited absorbance at approximately 423 nm, characteristic of nitrotyrosine. In addition, the presence of nitrotyrosine has been detected by Western immunoblots with an anti-nitrotyrosine antibody. The peroxynitrite-induced inactivation is not observed in the presence of excess glutathione disulfide. However, excess NADPH offered no protection against peroxynitrite-induced inactivation. These observations suggest that the modification of approximately 1.8 Tyr per subunit, at or near the glutathione disulfide binding domain, probably results in the observed catalytic alterations. To test this hypothesis, the two tyrosines closest to the glutathione disulfide binding domain (Tyr114 and Tyr106), as indicated by the X-ray crystallographic data [Karplus and Schulz (1989) J. Biol. Chem., 210, 163-180], were each converted to nitrotyrosines by molecular modeling and the structure energy was minimized. These theoretical calculations indicate that the bond lengths between Tyr114-O and the Gly-N and Cys II-N of glutathione disulfide bound to glutathione reductase (Karplus and Schulz, 1989) increased by 3.0 and 4.3 A, respectively, upon nitration. In the case of Tyr106 the 0-Cys II-N distance also increases by approximately 1.6 A. The loss of these hydrogen bonding contacts is likely to result in the observed catalytic alterations upon reaction with peroxynitrite.

  7. Energy metabolism of the untrained muscle of elite runners as observed by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy: evidence suggesting a genetic endowment for endurance exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Park, J H; Brown, R L; Park, C R; Cohn, M; Chance, B

    1988-01-01

    program, the maximum voluntary contractile force for the control subjects had declined to less than 60% of the initial value. This decline could be explained best by exhaustion of the glycolytic contribution to muscle contraction. Therefore, the residual maximum strength provided a measure of the oxidative capacity to support contraction, as is discussed. In conclusion, we suggest that a greater oxidative capacity relative to glycolytic capacity for support of contraction in untrained muscle of world-class runners reflects a genetic endowment for physical endurance. Additional systemic effects of training cannot be completely excluded. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides a noninvasive method for assessing this endowment. PMID:3194388

  8. Isolation of protozoa from water associated with a legionellosis outbreak and demonstration of intracellular multiplication of Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaree, J.M.; Fields, B.S.; Feeley, J.C.; Gorman, G.W.; Martin, W.T.

    1986-02-01

    At the site of a legionellosis outbreak, amoebae and two ciliates, Tetrahymena sp. and Cyclidium sp., were isolated from cooling-tower water containing Legionella pneumophila. The Tetrahymena sp. and the amoebae repeatedly showed the ability to support intracellular multiplication of L. pneumophila. Both were isolated from cooling towers specifically implicated as the source for the spread of legionellosis. These protozoa may be reservoirs supporting the survival and multiplication of virulent legionellae in cooling-tower water.

  9. Comparison of arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction, ribotyping, and monoclonal antibody analysis for subtyping Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Lus, P; Fields, B S; Benson, R F; Martin, W T; O'Connor, S P; Black, C M

    1993-01-01

    Arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) was used to characterize Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. Cells from a single colony could be subtyped by AP-PCR within a few hours. The discrimination between strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 by AP-PCR was equivalent to that by monoclonal antibody analysis and ribotyping. Four strains representing the monoclonal antibody pattern most frequently associated with outbreaks all yielded unique amplicon patterns by AP-PCR. Images PMID:8394380

  10. Retrospective evaluation of the Du Pont radioimmunoassay kit for detection of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Aguero-Rosenfeld, M E; Edelstein, P H

    1988-01-01

    We used the Du Pont radioimmunoassay kit for soluble Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria (Du Pont Co., Wilmington, Del.) to test 422 urine samples from patients with and without Legionnaires disease (LD). The urine specimens were collected from 23 patients with culture-proven LD and from 346 patients without LD. L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from 14 patients with culture-proven LD, and other L. pneumophila serogroups or other Legionella species were isolated from 9 patients; 58 urine specimens were tested from these 23 patients. The non-LD group was composed of 75 bacteremic patients (35 gram-negative and 40 gram-positive bacteremias), 7 patients with candidemia, 48 patients with non-LD pneumonia, 90 patients with gram-negative bacteriuria (greater than 10(5) CFU/ml), 23 patients with gram-positive bacteriuria (greater than 10(5) CFU/ml), 14 patients with candiduria (greater than 10(5) CFU/ml), and 89 outpatients with negative urine cultures. All tests were performed in duplicate, including positive and negative controls. Sample results with values greater than or equal to 3.0 times those of the negative controls were considered positive for L. pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria. The average sample-to-negative ratios were 19.1 for the L. pneumophila serogroup 1 specimens, and 1.0 for both the non-serogroup 1 legionella group and the non-LD specimens. All but one of the patients who were culture positive for L. pneumophila serogroup 1 had at least one specimen positive for serogroup 1 antigenuria; none of the non-L. pneumophila serogroup 1 patients had a positive urine test. The test was highly specific (100%) and sensitive (93%) for the detection of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria. Concentrations of urine by vacuum evaporation increased test sensitivity without apparently affecting specificity. PMID:3183024

  11. Retrospective evaluation of the Du Pont radioimmunoassay kit for detection of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria in humans.

    PubMed

    Aguero-Rosenfeld, M E; Edelstein, P H

    1988-09-01

    We used the Du Pont radioimmunoassay kit for soluble Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria (Du Pont Co., Wilmington, Del.) to test 422 urine samples from patients with and without Legionnaires disease (LD). The urine specimens were collected from 23 patients with culture-proven LD and from 346 patients without LD. L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from 14 patients with culture-proven LD, and other L. pneumophila serogroups or other Legionella species were isolated from 9 patients; 58 urine specimens were tested from these 23 patients. The non-LD group was composed of 75 bacteremic patients (35 gram-negative and 40 gram-positive bacteremias), 7 patients with candidemia, 48 patients with non-LD pneumonia, 90 patients with gram-negative bacteriuria (greater than 10(5) CFU/ml), 23 patients with gram-positive bacteriuria (greater than 10(5) CFU/ml), 14 patients with candiduria (greater than 10(5) CFU/ml), and 89 outpatients with negative urine cultures. All tests were performed in duplicate, including positive and negative controls. Sample results with values greater than or equal to 3.0 times those of the negative controls were considered positive for L. pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria. The average sample-to-negative ratios were 19.1 for the L. pneumophila serogroup 1 specimens, and 1.0 for both the non-serogroup 1 legionella group and the non-LD specimens. All but one of the patients who were culture positive for L. pneumophila serogroup 1 had at least one specimen positive for serogroup 1 antigenuria; none of the non-L. pneumophila serogroup 1 patients had a positive urine test. The test was highly specific (100%) and sensitive (93%) for the detection of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria. Concentrations of urine by vacuum evaporation increased test sensitivity without apparently affecting specificity.

  12. Identification and characterization of genes, encoding the 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and a putative lipase, in an avirulent spontaneous Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6 mutant.

    PubMed

    Scaturro, Maria; Barello, Cristina; Giusti, Melania De; Fontana, Stefano; Pinci, Federica; Giuffrida, Maria Gabriella; Ricci, Maria Luisa

    2015-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a pathogen widespread in aquatic environment, able to multiply both within amoebae and human macrophages. The aim of this study was to identify genes differently expressed in a spontaneous avirulent Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6 mutant, named Vir-, respect the parental strain (Vir+), and to determine their role in the loss of virulence. Protein profiles revealed some differences in Vir- proteomic maps, and among the identified proteins the undetectable 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (BdhA) and a down-produced lipase. Both Legionella enzymes were studied before and were here further characterized at genetic level. A significant down-regulation of both genes was observed in Vir- at the transcriptional level, but the use of defined mutants demonstrated that they did not affect the intracellular multiplication. A mutant (MS1) showed an accumulation of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules suggesting a role of bdhA gene in its degradation process. The lipase deduced amino acid sequence revealed a catalytic triad, typical of the 'lipase box' characteristic of PHB de-polymerase enzymes, that let us suppose a possible involvement of lipase in the PHB granule degradation process. Our results revealed unexpected alterations in secondary metabolic pathways possibly linking the loss of virulence to Legionella lack of energy sources.

  13. Determination of Legionella pneumophila susceptibility to Melaleuca alternifolia Cheel (tea tree) oil by an improved broth micro-dilution method under vapour controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Mondello, Francesca; Girolamo, Antonietta; Scaturro, Maria; Ricci, Maria Luisa

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro activity of Melaleuca alternifolia Cheel (tea tree) oil (TTO) against 22 strains of Legionella pneumophila of different serogroup and source of isolation. Both a standard broth micro-dilution method, with slight modifications, and a micro-atmosphere diffusion method were used. Furthermore, we have established a simple sealing procedure in the micro-dilution method to determine the antibacterial activity of TTO against Legionella in aqueous phase. The results showed that L. pneumophila, quite irrespective of serogroup and source of isolation, is exquisitely sensitive to TTO, with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranging from 0.125 to 0.5% v/v, and a bactericidal activity at 0.5% v/v. In addition, we show here that TTO vapours exert critical activity, that must be controlled for reproducible MIC determinations. Overall, our data suggest that TTO could be active as anti-Legionella disinfectant, for control of water system contamination, especially in spas, in small waterlines or in particular respiratory medical devices.

  14. Diverse populations of Legionella pneumophila present in the water of geographically clustered institutions served by the same water reservoir.

    PubMed Central

    Bezanson, G; Burbridge, S; Haldane, D; Yoell, C; Marrie, T

    1992-01-01

    We cultured potable water from seven institutions (six hospitals and one medical school) every 2 weeks for 6 months for Legionella pneumophila. All of the institutions were located close to each other and received water from the same freshwater source. Two institutions (the medical school and hospital F, a maternity hospital) never had L. pneumophila isolated from their potable water. The remaining five had 17 to 72% of their water samples positive for L. pneumophila. Most of the isolates were serogroup 1; however, in hospital B serogroup 5 accounted for 56% of the isolates. Oxford and OLDA monoclonal antibody subtypes of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 coexisted in four of the five institutions, while subtype France only was found in one institution. All 10 isolates from this institution lacked plasmids. The other four institutions had Legionella populations with plasmid profiles II, III, and VI. Two of these institutions also had isolates with no plasmids. The distribution of the plasmid types was significantly different for all institutions except C and D. The distribution of monoclonal antibody subtypes was significantly different for L. pneumophila isolates recovered from institutions C and D. There were no characteristics that distinguished the culture-positive institutions from the culture-negative areas. We conclude that diverse populations of L. pneumophila exist within these institutions despite their geographic proximity and identical potable water source. PMID:1551972

  15. Rapid on-site monitoring of Legionella pneumophila in cooling tower water using a portable microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Goto, Satoko; Fujii, Yudai; Banno, Fumiya; Edagawa, Akiko

    2017-06-08

    Legionnaires' disease, predominantly caused by the bacterium Legionella pneumophila, has increased in prevalence worldwide. The most common mode of transmission of Legionella is inhalation of contaminated aerosols, such as those generated by cooling towers. Simple, rapid and accurate methods to enumerate L. pneumophila are required to prevent the spread of this organism. Here, we applied a microfluidic device for on-chip fluorescent staining and semi-automated counting of L. pneumophila in cooling tower water. We also constructed a portable system for rapid on-site monitoring and used it to enumerate target bacterial cells rapidly flowing in the microchannel. A fluorescently-labelled polyclonal antibody was used for the selective detection of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 in the samples. The counts of L. pneumophila in cooling tower water obtained using the system and fluorescence microscopy were similar. The detection limit of the system was 10(4) cells/ml, but lower numbers of L. pneumophila cells (10(1) to 10(3) cells/ml) could be detected following concentration of 0.5-3 L of the water sample by filtration. Our technique is rapid to perform (1.5 h), semi-automated (on-chip staining and counting), and portable for on-site measurement, and it may therefore be effective in the initial screening of Legionella contamination in freshwater.

  16. Legionella pneumophila Strain 130b Evades Macrophage Cell Death Independent of the Effector SidF in the Absence of Flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Speir, Mary; Vogrin, Adam; Seidi, Azadeh; Abraham, Gilu; Hunot, Stéphane; Han, Qingqing; Dorn, Gerald W.; Masters, Seth L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Vince, James E.; Naderer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The human pathogen Legionella pneumophila must evade host cell death signaling to enable replication in lung macrophages and to cause disease. After bacterial growth, however, L. pneumophila is thought to induce apoptosis during egress from macrophages. The bacterial effector protein, SidF, has been shown to control host cell survival and death by inhibiting pro-apoptotic BNIP3 and BCL-RAMBO signaling. Using live-cell imaging to follow the L. pneumophila-macrophage interaction, we now demonstrate that L. pneumophila evades host cell apoptosis independent of SidF. In the absence of SidF, L. pneumophila was able to replicate, cause loss of mitochondria membrane potential, kill macrophages, and establish infections in lungs of mice. Consistent with this, deletion of BNIP3 and BCL-RAMBO did not affect intracellular L. pneumophila replication, macrophage death rates, and in vivo bacterial virulence. Abrogating mitochondrial cell death by genetic deletion of the effectors of intrinsic apoptosis, BAX, and BAK, or the regulator of mitochondrial permeability transition pore formation, cyclophilin-D, did not affect bacterial growth or the initial killing of macrophages. Loss of BAX and BAK only marginally limited the ability of L. pneumophila to efficiently kill all macrophages over extended periods. L. pneumophila induced killing of macrophages was delayed in the absence of capsase-11 mediated pyroptosis. Together, our data demonstrate that L. pneumophila evades host cell death responses independently of SidF during replication and can induce pyroptosis to kill macrophages in a timely manner. PMID:28261564

  17. Serological cross-reaction between Legionella pneumophila and campylobacter in the indirect fluorescent antibody test.

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, T. C.; Kudesia, G.

    1992-01-01

    Sera from 50 patients with culture-proven campylobacter gastroenteritis were examined for the presence of antibodies to Legionella pneumophila. Ten patients (20%) had a positive titre (> or = 16) as measured by indirect immunofluorescence. Antibodies were detected in only 1 of 36 acute sera but in 10 of 14 (71%) sera obtained more than 10 days after the onset of symptoms. All positive sera contained specific IgM antibodies but specific IgG or IgA could not be detected in any sample. No legionella antibodies could be detected in sera from 42 similar patients with salmonella gastroenteritis. These results were shown to be due to serological cross-reaction between L. pneumophila and campylobacter. PMID:1397117

  18. Cutting edge: pulmonary Legionella pneumophila is controlled by plasmacytoid dendritic cells but not type I IFN.

    PubMed

    Ang, Desmond K Y; Oates, Clare V L; Schuelein, Ralf; Kelly, Michelle; Sansom, Fiona M; Bourges, Dorothée; Boon, Louis; Hertzog, Paul J; Hartland, Elizabeth L; van Driel, Ian R

    2010-05-15

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are well known as the major cell type that secretes type I IFN in response to viral infections. Their role in combating other classes of infectious organisms, including bacteria, and their mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We have found that pDCs play a significant role in the acute response to the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila. pDCs were rapidly recruited to the lungs of L. pneumophila-infected mice, and depletion of pDCs resulted in increased bacterial load. The ability of pDCs to combat infection did not require type I IFN. This study points to an unappreciated role for pDCs in combating bacterial infections and indicates a novel mechanism of action for this cell type.

  19. Monitoring of Legionella pneumophila viability after chlorine dioxide treatment using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Pascale; Epalle, Thibaut; Allegra, Séverine; Girardot, Françoise; Garraud, Olivier; Riffard, Serge

    2015-04-01

    The viability of three Legionella pneumophila strains was monitored after chlorine dioxide (ClO2) treatment using a flow cytometric assay. Suspensions of L. pneumophila cells were submitted to increasing concentrations of ClO2. Culturable cells were still detected when using 4 mg/L, but could no longer be detected after exposure to 6 mg/L of ClO2, although viable but not culturable (VBNC) cells were found after exposure to 4-5 mg/L of ClO2. When testing whether these VBNC were infective, two of the strains were resuscitated after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga, but neither of them could infect macrophage-like cells.

  20. Legionella pneumophila, armed to the hilt: justifying the largest arsenal of effectors in the bacterial world.

    PubMed

    Ensminger, Alexander W

    2016-02-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use dedicated translocation systems to deliver arsenals of effector proteins to their hosts. Once inside the host cytosol, these effectors modulate eukaryotic cell biology to acquire nutrients, block microbial degradation, subvert host defenses, and enable pathogen transmission to other hosts. Among all bacterial pathogens studied to date, the gram-negative pathogen, Legionella pneumophila, maintains the largest arsenal of effectors, with over 330 effector proteins translocated by the Dot/Icm type IVB translocation system. In this review, I will discuss some of the recent work on understanding the consequences of this large arsenal. I will also present several models that seek to explain how L. pneumophila has acquired and subsequently maintained so many more effectors than its peers.

  1. [Identification of chemical structure of antibacterial components against Legionella pneumophila in a coffee beverage].

    PubMed

    Dogasaki, Chikaku; Shindo, Tetsuya; Furuhata, Katsunori; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2002-07-01

    We previously reported that certain constituents in brewed coffee exhibited antibacterial activities against a strain of Legionella pneumophila. The constituents showing antibacterial activities were included only in extracts cold with water or hot water. To determine the antibacterial substances in coffee extract, the extract was fractionated by HPLC using a UV/photodiode array detector. The optimum HPLC conditions for analysis were UV wavelength of 250 nm and eluents of methanol/acetic acid (10/90), pH 3.0. When several fractions separated by HPLC were investigated for antibacterial activities against L. pneumophila, it was found that three peak fractions exhibited strong antibacterial activities. Each product from these fractions was analyzed by NMR and LC-mass spectrometry, and the chemical structure of each was determined. It was shown that the antibacterial substances was were protocatechuic acid (3,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid), chlorogenic acid, and caffeic acid.

  2. Discovery of a Specific Inhibitor of Pyomelanin Synthesis in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Aubi, Oscar; Flydal, Marte I; Zheng, Huaixin; Skjærven, Lars; Rekand, Illimar; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S; Haug, Bengt Erik; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Martinez, Aurora; Underhaug, Jarl

    2015-11-12

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase catalyzes the first step in the synthesis of pyomelanin, a pigment that aids in the acquisition of essential iron in certain bacteria. In this work, we present the development and application of a drug discovery protocol by targeting this enzyme in Legionella pneumophila, the major causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. We employ a combination of high-throughput screening to identify small-molecule binders, enzymatic activity measurements to identify inhibitors in vitro, and the verification of the inhibitory effect in vivo. The most potent inhibitor shows an IC50 value in the low micromolar range and successfully abolishes the synthesis of pyomelanin in L. pneumophila cultures at 10 μM. Thus, this compound represents a novel and effective tool for investigating the role of pyomelanin in the biology and pathogenicity of this organism. Altogether, the results demonstrate a successful pathway for drug development focusing on binding specificity in the initial high-throughput screening steps.

  3. Major outer membrane protein of Legionella pneumophila carries a species-specific epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, F S; Conlin, C A

    1986-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (LP3IIG2) directed against a species-specific epitope of Legionella pneumophila is available from Genetic Systems Corp., Seattle, Wash., for use as a diagnostic reagent. Outer membrane protein-rich fractions were prepared from L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 8 by treatment of cell envelopes with 2% Triton X-100. Immunoblots of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels demonstrated that each membrane fraction contained two bands that reacted with LP3IIG2. The monoclonal antibody bound preferentially to a 26,000-molecular-weight band that appears to result from modification of the 29,000-molecular-weight major outer membrane protein. Images PMID:2420824

  4. The Legionella pneumophila replication vacuole: making a cosy niche inside host cells.

    PubMed

    Isberg, Ralph R; O'Connor, Tamara J; Heidtman, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila is derived from its growth within lung macrophages after aerosols are inhaled from contaminated water sources. Interest in this bacterium stems from its ability to manipulate host cell vesicular-trafficking pathways and establish a membrane-bound replication vacuole, making it a model for intravacuolar pathogens. Establishment of the replication compartment requires a specialized translocation system that transports a large cadre of protein substrates across the vacuolar membrane. These substrates regulate vesicle traffic and survival pathways in the host cell. This Review focuses on the strategies that L. pneumophila uses to establish intracellular growth and evaluates why this microorganism has accumulated an unprecedented number of translocated substrates that are targeted at host cells.