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Sample records for pneumophila evidence suggesting

  1. Evidence for apoptosis of human macrophage-like HL-60 cells by Legionella pneumophila infection.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, A; Hacker, J; Brand, B C

    1996-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease and Pontiac fever, replicates within and eventually kills human macrophages. In this study, we show that L. pneumophila is cytotoxic to HL-60 cells, a macrophage-like cell line. We demonstrate that cell death mediated by L. pneumophila occurred at least in part through apoptosis, as shown by changes in nuclear morphology, an increase in the proportion of fragmented host cell DNA, and the typical ladder pattern of DNA fragmentation indicative of apoptosis. We further sought to determine whether potential virulence factors like the metalloprotease and the macrophage infectivity potentiator of L. pneumophila are involved in the induction of apoptosis. None of these factors are essential for the induction of apoptosis in HL-60 cells but may be involved in other cytotoxic mechanisms that lead to accidental cell death (necrosis). The ability of L. pneumophila to promote cell death may be important for the initiation of infection, bacterial survival, and escape from the host immune response. Alternatively, the triggering of apoptosis in response to bacterial infection may have evolved as a means of the host immune system to reduce or inhibit bacterial replication. PMID:8945524

  2. Legionella pneumophila strain associated with the first evidence of person-to-person transmission of Legionnaires’ disease: a unique mosaic genetic backbone

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Vítor; Nunes, Alexandra; Sampaio, Daniel A.; Vieira, Luís; Machado, Jorge; Simões, Maria J.; Gonçalves, Paulo; Gomes, João P.

    2016-01-01

    A first strong evidence of person-to-person transmission of Legionnaires’ Disease (LD) was recently reported. Here, we characterize the genetic backbone of this case-related Legionella pneumophila strain (“PtVFX/2014”), which also caused a large outbreak of LD. PtVFX/2014 is phylogenetically divergent from the most worldwide studied outbreak-associated L. pneumophila subspecies pneumophila serogroup 1 strains. In fact, this strain is also from serogroup 1, but belongs to the L. pneumophila subspecies fraseri. Its genomic mosaic backbone reveals eight horizontally transferred regions encompassing genes, for instance, involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis or encoding virulence-associated Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system (T4BSS) substrates. PtVFX/2014 also inherited a rare ~65 kb pathogenicity island carrying virulence factors and detoxifying enzymes believed to contribute to the emergence of best-fitted strains in water reservoirs and in human macrophages, as well as a inter-species transferred (from L. oakridgensis) ~37.5 kb genomic island (harboring a lvh/lvr T4ASS cluster) that had never been found intact within L. pneumophila species. PtVFX/2014 encodes another lvh/lvr cluster near to CRISPR-associated genes, which may boost L. pneumophila transition from an environmental bacterium to a human pathogen. Overall, this unique genomic make-up may impact PtVFX/2014 ability to adapt to diverse environments, and, ultimately, to be transmitted and cause human disease. PMID:27196677

  3. [Evidence that suggest the reality of reincarnation].

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Ernesto

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide, children can be found who reported that they have memories of a previous life. More than 2,500 cases have been studied and their specifications have been published and preserved in the archives of the Division of Perceptual Studies at the University of Virginia (United States). Many of those children come from countries where the majority of the inhabitants believe in reincarnation, but others come from countries with different cultures and religions that reject it. In many cases, the revelations of the children have been verified and have corresponded to a particular individual, already dead. A good number of these children have marks and birth defects corresponding to wounds on the body of his previous personality. Many have behaviors related to their claims to their former life: phobias, philias, and attachments. Others seem to recognize people and places of his supposed previous life, and some of their assertions have been made under controlled conditions. The hypothesis of reincarnation is controversial. We can never say that it does not occur, or will obtain conclusive evidence that it happens. The cases that have been described so far, isolated or combined, do not provide irrefutable proof of reincarnation, but they supply evidence that suggest its reality.

  4. Two-Step Scheme for Rapid Identification and Differentiation of Legionella pneumophila and Non-Legionella pneumophila Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Li, Lian-Qing; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2010-01-01

    A rapid two-step scheme based on PCR amplification and enzymatic digestion analysis of a 226-bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene was developed to identify the Legionella genus by PCR amplification and to differentiate the Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila species by enzymatic digestion analysis. Among 42 ATCC strains (16 strains of L. pneumophila and 26 strains of non-L. pneumophila) and 200 Legionella isolates from environmental water samples, including pools, rivers, lakes, and cooling towers in Guangdong province, 99.59% of L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila strains were correctly identified and differentiated by this scheme. The procedure of this two-step identification and differentiation scheme is simple and takes only about 4 h. These results suggest that this two-step scheme provides a simple and convenient method for the rapid identification and differentiation of L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila species. PMID:20007397

  5. Ecological distribution of Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C B; Cherry, W B; Orrison, L H; Smith, S J; Tison, D L; Pope, D H

    1980-01-01

    Bacteria were concentrated 500-fold from 20-liter water samples collected from 67 different lakes and rivers in the United States. The data suggest that Legionella pneumophila is part of the natural aquatic environment, and that the bacterium is capable of surviving extreme ranges of environmental conditions. The data further demonstrate the effectiveness of the direct fluorescent antibody technique for detecting L. pneumophila in natural aquatic systems. Smears of the concentrated samples were screened microscopically for the serogroups of L. pneumophilia by the direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) technique. Virtually all of the 793 samples were DFA-positive. Those samples (318) containing the largest numbers of DFA positive bacteria which were morphologically consistent with L. pneumophila were injected into guinea pigs for attempted isolations. Isolates were obtained from habitats with a wide range of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. Samples collected monthly from a thermally altered lake demonstrated a seasonality of guinea pig infection, with greatest infection occurring during the summer months.

  6. Ecological distribution of Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Cherry, W.B.; Orrison, L.H.; Smith, S.J.; Tison, D.L.; Pope, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Bacteria were concentrated 500-fold from 20-liter water samples collected from 67 different lakes and rivers in the United States. The data suggest the Legionella pneumophila is part of the natural aquatic environment and that the bacterium is capable of surviving extreme ranges of environmental conditions. The data further demonstrate the effectiveness of the direct fluorescent-antibody technique for detecting L. pneumophila in natural aquatic systems. Smears of the concentrated samples were screened microscopically for serogroups of L. pneumophila by the direct fluorescent-antibody technique. Virtually all of the 793 samples were found to be positive by this method. The 318 samples containing the largest numbers of positive bacteria which were morphologically consistent with L. pneumophila were injected into guinea pigs for attempted isolations. Isolates were obtained from habitats with a wide range of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. Samples collected monthly from a thermally altered lake and injected into guinea pigs demonstrated a seasonality of infection, with the highest frequency of infection occurring during the summer months.

  7. Detection of Legionella pneumophila at thermal spas.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, F; Carasi, S; Scarcella, C; Speziani, F

    2001-07-01

    Water samples were collected at three therapeutic thermal spas in the area of Brescia, between February and October 2000: 34.8% of the samples contained Legionella pneumophila; the predominant isolates (30%) belonged to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. The microorganism was present in the spa water at high concentrations, generally higher than 10000 cfu/l. The large number of positive Legionella pneumophila samples indicates a potential risk of infection to patients, especially those undergoing inhalation treatment with thermal water, or those using a whirlpool or taking a shower even if, during the study, no clinical cases of Legionnaires' disease were observed. In some inhalators in use we detected Legionella pneumophila: after a treatment to eradicate the microorganism, no sanitary fittings currently show contamination. Thus, in our opinion, they are not sources of infection when they are mantained and serviced properly. Thermal disinfection and service checks at regular intervals are suggested for contaminated systems. PMID:11497083

  8. Nutrient salvaging and metabolism by the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Maris V.; Swanson, Michele S.

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila is ubiquitous in freshwater environments as a free-swimming organism, resident of biofilms, or parasite of protozoa. If the bacterium is aerosolized and inhaled by a susceptible human host, it can infect alveolar macrophages and cause a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. A sophisticated cell differentiation program equips L. pneumophila to persist in both extracellular and intracellular niches. During its life cycle, L. pneumophila alternates between at least two distinct forms: a transmissive form equipped to infect host cells and evade lysosomal degradation, and a replicative form that multiplies within a phagosomal compartment that it has retooled to its advantage. The efficient changeover between transmissive and replicative states is fundamental to L. pneumophila's fitness as an intracellular pathogen. The transmission and replication programs of L. pneumophila are governed by a number of metabolic cues that signal whether conditions are favorable for replication or instead trigger escape from a spent host. Several lines of experimental evidence gathered over the past decade establish strong links between metabolism, cellular differentiation, and virulence of L. pneumophila. Herein, we focus on current knowledge of the metabolic components employed by intracellular L. pneumophila for cell differentiation, nutrient salvaging and utilization of host factors. Specifically, we highlight the metabolic cues that are coupled to bacterial differentiation, nutrient acquisition systems, and the strategies utilized by L. pneumophila to exploit host metabolites for intracellular replication. PMID:24575391

  9. Ciliate Paramecium is a natural reservoir of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kenta; Nakao, Ryo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Tachibana, Masato; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, replicates within alveolar macrophages and free-living amoebae. However, the lifestyle of L. pneumophila in the environment remains largely unknown. Here we established a novel natural host model of L. pneumophila endosymbiosis using the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. We also identified Legionella endosymbiosis-modulating factor A (LefA), which contributes to the change in life stage from endosymbiosis to host lysis, enabling escape to the environment. We isolated L. pneumophila strains from the environment, and they exhibited cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and induced host lysis. Acidification of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) was inhibited, and enlarged LCVs including numerous bacteria were observed in P. caudatum infected with L. pneumophila. An isogenic L. pneumophila lefA mutant exhibited decreased cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and impaired the modification of LCVs, resulting in the establishment of endosymbiosis between them. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila may have a mechanism to switch their endosymbiosis in protistan hosts in the environment. PMID:27079173

  10. Ciliate Paramecium is a natural reservoir of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenta; Nakao, Ryo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Tachibana, Masato; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, replicates within alveolar macrophages and free-living amoebae. However, the lifestyle of L. pneumophila in the environment remains largely unknown. Here we established a novel natural host model of L. pneumophila endosymbiosis using the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. We also identified Legionella endosymbiosis-modulating factor A (LefA), which contributes to the change in life stage from endosymbiosis to host lysis, enabling escape to the environment. We isolated L. pneumophila strains from the environment, and they exhibited cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and induced host lysis. Acidification of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) was inhibited, and enlarged LCVs including numerous bacteria were observed in P. caudatum infected with L. pneumophila. An isogenic L. pneumophila lefA mutant exhibited decreased cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and impaired the modification of LCVs, resulting in the establishment of endosymbiosis between them. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila may have a mechanism to switch their endosymbiosis in protistan hosts in the environment. PMID:27079173

  11. Ciliate Paramecium is a natural reservoir of Legionella pneumophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kenta; Nakao, Ryo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Tachibana, Masato; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2016-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, replicates within alveolar macrophages and free-living amoebae. However, the lifestyle of L. pneumophila in the environment remains largely unknown. Here we established a novel natural host model of L. pneumophila endosymbiosis using the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. We also identified Legionella endosymbiosis-modulating factor A (LefA), which contributes to the change in life stage from endosymbiosis to host lysis, enabling escape to the environment. We isolated L. pneumophila strains from the environment, and they exhibited cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and induced host lysis. Acidification of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) was inhibited, and enlarged LCVs including numerous bacteria were observed in P. caudatum infected with L. pneumophila. An isogenic L. pneumophila lefA mutant exhibited decreased cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and impaired the modification of LCVs, resulting in the establishment of endosymbiosis between them. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila may have a mechanism to switch their endosymbiosis in protistan hosts in the environment.

  12. Evidence suggests water once flowed vigorously on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-10-01

    "In some cases, when you do geology, a picture is worth 1000 words," Mars Science Laboratory project scientist John Grotzinger said at a 27 September news briefing to announce that imagery taken by a camera onboard NASA's Mars Curiosity rover shows evidence that water once flowed vigorously in a region on the surface of Mars. One of the pictured rock outcrops, about 10-15 centimeters thick and named Hottah after Canada's Hottah lake, "looked like somebody came along the surface of Mars with a jackhammer and lifted up a sidewalk that you might see in downtown LA in sort of a construction site," said Grotzinger, who is with the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "This is a rock that was formed in the presence of water, and we can characterize that water as being a vigorous flow on the surface of Mars," he said. "We were really excited about this because this is one of the reasons we were interested in coming to this landing site, because it presented from orbit quite a strong case that we would find evidence for water on the ground."

  13. Evidence suggesting possible SCA1 gene involvement in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, S.R.; Wange, S.; Sun, C.

    1994-09-01

    Several findings suggest a possible role for the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p in some cases of schizophrenia. First, linkage analyses in Irish pedigrees provided LOD scores up to 3.0 for one model tested using microsatellites closely linked to SCA1. Reanalysis of these data using affected sibpair methods yielded a significant result (p = 0.01) for one marker. An attempt to replicate this linkage finding was made using 44 NIMH families (206 individuals, 80 affected) and 12 Utah families (120 individuals, 49 affected). LOD scores were negative in these new families, even allowing for heterogeneity, as were results using affected sibpair methods. However, one Utah family provided a LOD score of 1.3. We also screened the SCA1 trinucleotide repeat to search for expansions characteristic of this disorder in these families and in 38 additional unrelated schizophrenics. We found 1 schizophrenic with 41 repeats, which is substantially larger than the maximum size of 36 repeats observed in previous studies of several hundred controls. We are now assessing whether the distribution of SCA1 repeats differs significantly in schizophrenia versus controls. Recent reports suggest possible anticipation in schizophrenia (also characteristic of SCA1) and a few cases of psychiatric symptoms suggesting schizophrenia have been observed in the highly related disorder DRPLA (SCA2), which is also based on trinucleotide repeat expansion. These findings suggest that further investigations of this gene and chromosome region may be a priority.

  14. Personal space invasions in the lavatory: suggestive evidence for arousal.

    PubMed

    Middlemist, R D; Knowles, E S; Matter, C F

    1976-05-01

    The hypothesis that personal space invasions produce arousal was investigated in a field experiment. A men's lavatory provided a setting where norms for privacy were salient, where personal space invasions could occur in the case of men urinating, where the opportunity for compensatory responses to invasion were minimal, and where proximity-induced arousal could be measured. Research on micturation indicates that social stressors inhibit relaxation of the external urethral sphincter, which would delay the onset of micturation, and that they increase intravesical pressure, which would shorten the duration of micturation once begun. Sixty lavatory users were randomly assigned to one of three levels of interpersonal distance and their micturation times were recorded. In a three-urinal lavatory, a confederate stood immediately adjacent to a subject, one urinal removed, or was absent. Paralleling the results of a correlational pilot study, close interpersonal distances increased the delay of onset and decreased the persistence of micturation. These findings provide objective evidence that personal space invasions produce physiological changes associated with arousal.

  15. Personal space invasions in the lavatory: suggestive evidence for arousal.

    PubMed

    Middlemist, R D; Knowles, E S; Matter, C F

    1976-05-01

    The hypothesis that personal space invasions produce arousal was investigated in a field experiment. A men's lavatory provided a setting where norms for privacy were salient, where personal space invasions could occur in the case of men urinating, where the opportunity for compensatory responses to invasion were minimal, and where proximity-induced arousal could be measured. Research on micturation indicates that social stressors inhibit relaxation of the external urethral sphincter, which would delay the onset of micturation, and that they increase intravesical pressure, which would shorten the duration of micturation once begun. Sixty lavatory users were randomly assigned to one of three levels of interpersonal distance and their micturation times were recorded. In a three-urinal lavatory, a confederate stood immediately adjacent to a subject, one urinal removed, or was absent. Paralleling the results of a correlational pilot study, close interpersonal distances increased the delay of onset and decreased the persistence of micturation. These findings provide objective evidence that personal space invasions produce physiological changes associated with arousal. PMID:1271224

  16. Legionella pneumophila Suppresses Interleukin-12 Production by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Kazuto; Klein, Thomas W.; Newton, Catherine; Friedman, Herman; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2001-01-01

    In vitro infection of macrophages with Legionella pneumophila induced interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-10, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), and MCP-3 but not IL-12. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of IL-12 was down-regulated by infection with virulent L. pneumophila, but other cytokines were not affected. In contrast, avirulent L. pneumophila or UV-killed, virulent L. pneumophila did not induce any suppression of IL-12. The IL-12 suppression occurred at the level of mRNA accumulation for IL-12 genes in response to LPS stimulation, but the infection induced a marked accumulation of mRNA for both MCP-1 and MCP-3, which are known to suppress IL-12 production in LPS-stimulated macrophages. However, pretreatment of macrophages with MCP-1 did not suppress LPS-induced IL-12 production at the concentrations induced by L. pneumophila infection. These results suggest that L. pneumophila selectively suppresses IL-12 production induced by LPS from macrophages in vitro by an MCP-independent mechanism. PMID:11179377

  17. Identification of vacuoles containing extraintestinal differentiated forms of Legionella pneumophila in colonized Caenorhabditis elegans soil nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Hellinga, Jacqueline R; Garduño, Rafael A; Kormish, Jay D; Tanner, Jennifer R; Khan, Deirdre; Buchko, Kristyn; Jimenez, Celine; Pinette, Mathieu M; Brassinga, Ann Karen C

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, is a facultative intracellular parasite of freshwater protozoa. Legionella pneumophila features a unique developmental network that involves several developmental forms including the infectious cyst forms. Reservoirs of L. pneumophila include natural and man-made freshwater systems; however, recent studies have shown that isolates of L. pneumophila can also be obtained directly from garden potting soil suggesting the presence of an additional reservoir. A previous study employing the metazoan Caenorhabditis elegans, a member of the Rhabditidae family of free-living soil nematodes, demonstrated that the intestinal lumen can be colonized with L. pneumophila. While both replicative forms and differentiated forms were observed in C. elegans, these morphologically distinct forms were initially observed to be restricted to the intestinal lumen. Using live DIC imaging coupled with focused transmission electron microscopy analyses, we report here that L. pneumophila is able to invade and establish Legionella-containing vacuoles (LCVs) in the intestinal cells. In addition, LCVs containing replicative and differentiated cyst forms were observed in the pseudocoelomic cavity and gonadal tissue of nematodes colonized with L. pneumophila. Furthermore, establishment of LCVs in the gonadal tissue was Dot/Icm dependent and required the presence of the endocytic factor RME-1 to gain access to maturing oocytes. Our findings are novel as this is the first report, to our knowledge, of extraintestinal LCVs containing L. pneumophila cyst forms in C. elegans tissues, highlighting the potential of soil-dwelling nematodes as an alternate environmental reservoir for L. pneumophila. PMID:26131925

  18. Identification of vacuoles containing extraintestinal differentiated forms of Legionella pneumophila in colonized Caenorhabditis elegans soil nematodes.

    PubMed

    Hellinga, Jacqueline R; Garduño, Rafael A; Kormish, Jay D; Tanner, Jennifer R; Khan, Deirdre; Buchko, Kristyn; Jimenez, Celine; Pinette, Mathieu M; Brassinga, Ann Karen C

    2015-08-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, is a facultative intracellular parasite of freshwater protozoa. Legionella pneumophila features a unique developmental network that involves several developmental forms including the infectious cyst forms. Reservoirs of L. pneumophila include natural and man-made freshwater systems; however, recent studies have shown that isolates of L. pneumophila can also be obtained directly from garden potting soil suggesting the presence of an additional reservoir. A previous study employing the metazoan Caenorhabditis elegans, a member of the Rhabditidae family of free-living soil nematodes, demonstrated that the intestinal lumen can be colonized with L. pneumophila. While both replicative forms and differentiated forms were observed in C. elegans, these morphologically distinct forms were initially observed to be restricted to the intestinal lumen. Using live DIC imaging coupled with focused transmission electron microscopy analyses, we report here that L. pneumophila is able to invade and establish Legionella-containing vacuoles (LCVs) in the intestinal cells. In addition, LCVs containing replicative and differentiated cyst forms were observed in the pseudocoelomic cavity and gonadal tissue of nematodes colonized with L. pneumophila. Furthermore, establishment of LCVs in the gonadal tissue was Dot/Icm dependent and required the presence of the endocytic factor RME-1 to gain access to maturing oocytes. Our findings are novel as this is the first report, to our knowledge, of extraintestinal LCVs containing L. pneumophila cyst forms in C. elegans tissues, highlighting the potential of soil-dwelling nematodes as an alternate environmental reservoir for L. pneumophila.

  19. Identification of vacuoles containing extraintestinal differentiated forms of Legionella pneumophila in colonized Caenorhabditis elegans soil nematodes.

    PubMed

    Hellinga, Jacqueline R; Garduño, Rafael A; Kormish, Jay D; Tanner, Jennifer R; Khan, Deirdre; Buchko, Kristyn; Jimenez, Celine; Pinette, Mathieu M; Brassinga, Ann Karen C

    2015-08-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, is a facultative intracellular parasite of freshwater protozoa. Legionella pneumophila features a unique developmental network that involves several developmental forms including the infectious cyst forms. Reservoirs of L. pneumophila include natural and man-made freshwater systems; however, recent studies have shown that isolates of L. pneumophila can also be obtained directly from garden potting soil suggesting the presence of an additional reservoir. A previous study employing the metazoan Caenorhabditis elegans, a member of the Rhabditidae family of free-living soil nematodes, demonstrated that the intestinal lumen can be colonized with L. pneumophila. While both replicative forms and differentiated forms were observed in C. elegans, these morphologically distinct forms were initially observed to be restricted to the intestinal lumen. Using live DIC imaging coupled with focused transmission electron microscopy analyses, we report here that L. pneumophila is able to invade and establish Legionella-containing vacuoles (LCVs) in the intestinal cells. In addition, LCVs containing replicative and differentiated cyst forms were observed in the pseudocoelomic cavity and gonadal tissue of nematodes colonized with L. pneumophila. Furthermore, establishment of LCVs in the gonadal tissue was Dot/Icm dependent and required the presence of the endocytic factor RME-1 to gain access to maturing oocytes. Our findings are novel as this is the first report, to our knowledge, of extraintestinal LCVs containing L. pneumophila cyst forms in C. elegans tissues, highlighting the potential of soil-dwelling nematodes as an alternate environmental reservoir for L. pneumophila. PMID:26131925

  20. The Legionella pneumophila kai operon is implicated in stress response and confers fitness in competitive environments

    PubMed Central

    Loza-Correa, Maria; Sahr, Tobias; Rolando, Monica; Daniels, Craig; Petit, Pierre; Skarina, Tania; Valero, Laura Gomez; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Honoré, Nadine; Savchenko, Aleksey; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Legionella pneumophila uses aquatic protozoa as replication niche and protection from harsh environments. Although L. pneumophila is not known to have a circadian clock, it encodes homologues of the KaiBC proteins of Cyanobacteria that regulate circadian gene expression. We show that L. pneumophila kaiB, kaiC and the downstream gene lpp1114, are transcribed as a unit under the control of the stress sigma factor RpoS. KaiC and KaiB of L. pneumophila do not interact as evidenced by yeast and bacterial two-hybrid analyses. Fusion of the C-terminal residues of cyanobacterial KaiB to Legionella KaiB restores their interaction. In contrast, KaiC of L. pneumophila conserved autophosphorylation activity, but KaiB does not trigger the dephosphorylation of KaiC like in Cyanobacteria. The crystal structure of L. pneumophila KaiB suggests that it is an oxidoreductase-like protein with a typical thioredoxin fold. Indeed, mutant analyses revealed that the kai operon-encoded proteins increase fitness of L. pneumophila in competitive environments, and confer higher resistance to oxidative and sodium stress. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that L. pneumophila KaiBC resemble Synechosystis KaiC2B2 and not circadian KaiB1C1. Thus, the L. pneumophila Kai proteins do not encode a circadian clock, but enhance stress resistance and adaption to changes in the environments. PMID:23957615

  1. Legionella pneumophila requires polyamines for optimal intracellular growth.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Riveroll, Angela L; Chong, Audrey; Murray, Lois E; Lewis, P Jeffrey; Garduño, Rafael A

    2011-09-01

    The Gram-negative intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila replicates in a membrane-bound compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV), into which it abundantly releases its chaperonin, HtpB. To determine whether HtpB remains within the LCV or reaches the host cell cytoplasm, we infected U937 human macrophages and CHO cells with L. pneumophila expressing a translocation reporter consisting of the Bordetella pertussisa denylate cyclase fused to HtpB. These infections led to increased cyclic AMP levels, suggesting that HtpB reaches the host cell cytoplasm. To identify potential functions of cytoplasmic HtpB, we expressed it in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where HtpB induced pseudohyphal growth. A yeast-two-hybrid screen showed that HtpB interacted with S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), an essential yeast enzyme (encoded by SPE2) that is required for polyamine biosynthesis. Increasing the copy number of SPE2 induced pseudohyphal growth in S. cerevisiae; thus, we speculated that (i) HtpB induces pseudohyphal growth by activating polyamine synthesis and (ii) L. pneumophila may require exogenous polyamines for growth. A pharmacological inhibitor of SAMDC significantly reduced L. pneumophila replication in L929 mouse cells and U937 macrophages, whereas exogenously added polyamines moderately favored intracellular growth, confirming that polyamines and host SAMDC activity promote L. pneumophila proliferation. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that most known enzymes required for polyamine biosynthesis in bacteria (including SAMDC) are absent in L. pneumophila, further suggesting a need for exogenous polyamines. We hypothesize that HtpB may function to ensure a supply of polyamines in host cells, which are required for the optimal intracellular growth of L. pneumophila.

  2. Legionella pneumophila requires polyamines for optimal intracellular growth.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Riveroll, Angela L; Chong, Audrey; Murray, Lois E; Lewis, P Jeffrey; Garduño, Rafael A

    2011-09-01

    The Gram-negative intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila replicates in a membrane-bound compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV), into which it abundantly releases its chaperonin, HtpB. To determine whether HtpB remains within the LCV or reaches the host cell cytoplasm, we infected U937 human macrophages and CHO cells with L. pneumophila expressing a translocation reporter consisting of the Bordetella pertussisa denylate cyclase fused to HtpB. These infections led to increased cyclic AMP levels, suggesting that HtpB reaches the host cell cytoplasm. To identify potential functions of cytoplasmic HtpB, we expressed it in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where HtpB induced pseudohyphal growth. A yeast-two-hybrid screen showed that HtpB interacted with S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), an essential yeast enzyme (encoded by SPE2) that is required for polyamine biosynthesis. Increasing the copy number of SPE2 induced pseudohyphal growth in S. cerevisiae; thus, we speculated that (i) HtpB induces pseudohyphal growth by activating polyamine synthesis and (ii) L. pneumophila may require exogenous polyamines for growth. A pharmacological inhibitor of SAMDC significantly reduced L. pneumophila replication in L929 mouse cells and U937 macrophages, whereas exogenously added polyamines moderately favored intracellular growth, confirming that polyamines and host SAMDC activity promote L. pneumophila proliferation. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that most known enzymes required for polyamine biosynthesis in bacteria (including SAMDC) are absent in L. pneumophila, further suggesting a need for exogenous polyamines. We hypothesize that HtpB may function to ensure a supply of polyamines in host cells, which are required for the optimal intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. PMID:21742865

  3. First Case of Legionnaire's Disease Caused by Legionella anisa in Spain and the Limitations on the Diagnosis of Legionella non-pneumophila Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vaccaro, Lucianna; Izquierdo, Fernando; Magnet, Angela; Hurtado, Carolina; Salinas, Mireya A.; Gomes, Thiago Santos; Angulo, Santiago; Salso, Santiago; Pelaez, Jesús; Tejeda, Maria Isabel; Alhambra, Almudena; Gómez, Carmen; Enríquez, Ana; Estirado, Eva; Fenoy, Soledad; del Aguila, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires’ disease is a severe form of pneumonia, with worldwide relevance, caused by Legionella spp. Approximately 90% of all cases of legionellosis are caused by Legionella pneumophila, but other species can also be responsible for this infection. These bacteria are transmitted by inhalation of aerosols or aspiration of contaminated water. In Spain, environmental studies have demonstrated the presence of Legionella non-pneumophila species in drinking water treatment plants and water distribution networks. Aware that this evidence indicates a risk factor and the lack of routine assays designed to detect simultaneously diverse Legionella species, we analyzed 210 urine samples from patients presenting clinical manifestations of pneumonia using a semi-nested PCR for partial amplification of the 16S rDNA gene of Legionella and a diagnostic method used in hospitals for Legionella antigen detection. In this study, we detected a total of 15 cases of legionellosis (7.1%) and the first case of Legionnaires’ disease caused by L. anisa in Spain. While the conventional method used in hospitals could only detect four cases (1.9%) produced by L. pneumophila serogroup 1, using PCR, the following species were identified: Legionella spp. (10/15), L. pneumophila (4/15) and L. anisa (1/15). These results suggest the need to change hospital diagnostic strategies regarding the identification of Legionella species associated with this disease. Therefore, the detection of Legionella DNA by PCR in urine samples seems to be a suitable alternative method for a sensitive, accurate and rapid diagnosis of Legionella pneumonia, caused by L. pneumophila and also for L. non-pneumophila species. PMID:27442238

  4. First Case of Legionnaire's Disease Caused by Legionella anisa in Spain and the Limitations on the Diagnosis of Legionella non-pneumophila Infections.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Lucianna; Izquierdo, Fernando; Magnet, Angela; Hurtado, Carolina; Salinas, Mireya A; Gomes, Thiago Santos; Angulo, Santiago; Salso, Santiago; Pelaez, Jesús; Tejeda, Maria Isabel; Alhambra, Almudena; Gómez, Carmen; Enríquez, Ana; Estirado, Eva; Fenoy, Soledad; Del Aguila, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a severe form of pneumonia, with worldwide relevance, caused by Legionella spp. Approximately 90% of all cases of legionellosis are caused by Legionella pneumophila, but other species can also be responsible for this infection. These bacteria are transmitted by inhalation of aerosols or aspiration of contaminated water. In Spain, environmental studies have demonstrated the presence of Legionella non-pneumophila species in drinking water treatment plants and water distribution networks. Aware that this evidence indicates a risk factor and the lack of routine assays designed to detect simultaneously diverse Legionella species, we analyzed 210 urine samples from patients presenting clinical manifestations of pneumonia using a semi-nested PCR for partial amplification of the 16S rDNA gene of Legionella and a diagnostic method used in hospitals for Legionella antigen detection. In this study, we detected a total of 15 cases of legionellosis (7.1%) and the first case of Legionnaires' disease caused by L. anisa in Spain. While the conventional method used in hospitals could only detect four cases (1.9%) produced by L. pneumophila serogroup 1, using PCR, the following species were identified: Legionella spp. (10/15), L. pneumophila (4/15) and L. anisa (1/15). These results suggest the need to change hospital diagnostic strategies regarding the identification of Legionella species associated with this disease. Therefore, the detection of Legionella DNA by PCR in urine samples seems to be a suitable alternative method for a sensitive, accurate and rapid diagnosis of Legionella pneumonia, caused by L. pneumophila and also for L. non-pneumophila species.

  5. First Case of Legionnaire's Disease Caused by Legionella anisa in Spain and the Limitations on the Diagnosis of Legionella non-pneumophila Infections.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Lucianna; Izquierdo, Fernando; Magnet, Angela; Hurtado, Carolina; Salinas, Mireya A; Gomes, Thiago Santos; Angulo, Santiago; Salso, Santiago; Pelaez, Jesús; Tejeda, Maria Isabel; Alhambra, Almudena; Gómez, Carmen; Enríquez, Ana; Estirado, Eva; Fenoy, Soledad; Del Aguila, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a severe form of pneumonia, with worldwide relevance, caused by Legionella spp. Approximately 90% of all cases of legionellosis are caused by Legionella pneumophila, but other species can also be responsible for this infection. These bacteria are transmitted by inhalation of aerosols or aspiration of contaminated water. In Spain, environmental studies have demonstrated the presence of Legionella non-pneumophila species in drinking water treatment plants and water distribution networks. Aware that this evidence indicates a risk factor and the lack of routine assays designed to detect simultaneously diverse Legionella species, we analyzed 210 urine samples from patients presenting clinical manifestations of pneumonia using a semi-nested PCR for partial amplification of the 16S rDNA gene of Legionella and a diagnostic method used in hospitals for Legionella antigen detection. In this study, we detected a total of 15 cases of legionellosis (7.1%) and the first case of Legionnaires' disease caused by L. anisa in Spain. While the conventional method used in hospitals could only detect four cases (1.9%) produced by L. pneumophila serogroup 1, using PCR, the following species were identified: Legionella spp. (10/15), L. pneumophila (4/15) and L. anisa (1/15). These results suggest the need to change hospital diagnostic strategies regarding the identification of Legionella species associated with this disease. Therefore, the detection of Legionella DNA by PCR in urine samples seems to be a suitable alternative method for a sensitive, accurate and rapid diagnosis of Legionella pneumonia, caused by L. pneumophila and also for L. non-pneumophila species. PMID:27442238

  6. From amoeba to macrophages: exploring the molecular mechanisms of Legionella pneumophila infection in both hosts.

    PubMed

    Escoll, Pedro; Rolando, Monica; Gomez-Valero, Laura; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. It replicates within amoeba and infects accidentally human macrophages. Several similarities are seen in the L. pneumophila-infection cycle in both hosts, suggesting that the tools necessary for macrophage infection may have evolved during co-evolution of L. pneumophila and amoeba. The establishment of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) within the host cytoplasm requires the remodeling of the LCV surface and the hijacking of vesicles and organelles. Then L. pneumophila replicates in a safe intracellular niche in amoeba and macrophages. In this review we will summarize the existing knowledge of the L. pneumophila infection cycle in both hosts at the molecular level and compare the factors involved within amoeba and macrophages. This knowledge will be discussed in the light of recent findings from the Acanthamoeba castellanii genome analyses suggesting the existence of a primitive immune-like system in amoeba.

  7. Caspase Exploitation by Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Kathrin; Amer, Amal O.

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila remains a major health concern, especially for hospitalized patients. L. pneumophila in the environment can survive extracellular or as protozoan parasite within amoeba. After human infection it efficiently replicates in alveolar macrophages without activating inflammasome assembly and cleavage of caspase-1. In contrast murine macrophages actively recognize intracellular L. pneumophila via inflammasome components which initiate pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, phagosomal maturation and pyroptotic cell death thereby leading to bacterial restriction. During this process flagellin-dependent and -independent signaling pathways trigger the canonical as well as the non-canonical inflammasome. This review describes the current knowledge about L. pneumophila-induced inflammasome pathways in permissive and restrictive host cells. PMID:27148204

  8. Caspase Exploitation by Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Krause, Kathrin; Amer, Amal O

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila remains a major health concern, especially for hospitalized patients. L. pneumophila in the environment can survive extracellular or as protozoan parasite within amoeba. After human infection it efficiently replicates in alveolar macrophages without activating inflammasome assembly and cleavage of caspase-1. In contrast murine macrophages actively recognize intracellular L. pneumophila via inflammasome components which initiate pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, phagosomal maturation and pyroptotic cell death thereby leading to bacterial restriction. During this process flagellin-dependent and -independent signaling pathways trigger the canonical as well as the non-canonical inflammasome. This review describes the current knowledge about L. pneumophila-induced inflammasome pathways in permissive and restrictive host cells. PMID:27148204

  9. Hippurate hydrolysis by Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Hébert, G A

    1981-01-01

    Strains of Legionella pneumophila were shown to hydrolyze sodium hippurate in an overnight test system, but strains of L. bozemanii, L. micdadei, L. dumoffii, and some other organisms similar to the legionellae did not. Although only a small number of strains of legionellae other than L. pneumophila have been classified and tested, the results indicate that the hippurate hydrolysis test may prove useful for differentiating among Legionella species. PMID:7462418

  10. Measure of Legionella pneumophila activity in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Soracco, R.J.; Pope, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila by serogroup-specific fluorescent antibodies was combined with a tetrazolium dye (INT) to measure electron transport activity. The biological uptake and reduction of the INT dye was studied in pure cultures and in natural water samples with respect to temperature. Uptake was complete within 60 minutes. Controls inhibited with formaldehyde demonstrated little activity. Both the in vitro and in situ determinations suggested that the electron transport system of Legionella was active over a temperature range of 25/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/C.

  11. Survival of Legionella pneumophila in the cold-water ciliate Tetrahymena vorax.

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Somerville, H E; Huryn, V B; Walker, C; Winters, A L

    1991-01-01

    The processing of phagosomes containing Legionella pneumophila and Escherichia coli were compared in Tetrahymena vorax, a hymenostome ciliated protozoan that prefers lower temperatures. L. pneumophila did not multiply in the ciliate when incubated at 20 to 22 degrees C, but vacuoles containing L. pneumophila were retained in the cells for a substantially longer time than vacuoles with E. coli. Electron micrographs showed no evidence of degradation of L. pneumophila cells through 12 h, while E. coli cells in the process of being digested were observed in vacuoles 75 min after the addition of the bacterium. T. vorax ingested L. pneumophila normally, but by 10 to 15 min, the vacuolar membrane appeared denser than that surrounding nascent or newly formed phagosomes. In older vacuoles, electron-dense particles lined portions of the membrane. Acidification of the phagosomes indicated by the accumulation of neutral red was similar in T. vorax containing L. pneumophila or E. coli. This ciliate could provide a model for the analysis of virulence-associated intracellular events independent of the replication of L. pneumophila. Images PMID:1768146

  12. Survival of Legionella pneumophila in the cold-water ciliate Tetrahymena vorax

    SciTech Connect

    Smith-Somerville, H.E.; Huryn, V.B.; Walker, C.; Winters, A.L. )

    1991-09-01

    The processing of phagosomes containing Legionella pneumophila and Escerichia coli were compared in Tetrahymena vorax, a hymenostome ciliated protozoan that prefers lower temperatures. L. pneumophila did not multiply in the ciliate when incubated at 20 to 22C, but vacuoles containing L. pneumophila were retained in the cells for a substantially longer time than vacuoles with E. coli. Electron micrographs showed no evidence of degradation of L. pneumophila cells through 12 h, while E. coli cells in the process of being digested were observed in vacuoles 75 min after the addition of the bacterium T. vorax ingested L. pneumophila normally, but by 10 to 15 min, the vacuolar membrane appeared denser than that surrounding nascent or newly formed phagosomes. In older vacuoles, electron-dense particles lined portions of the membrane. Acidification of the phagosomes indicated by the accumulation of neutral red was similar in T. vorax containing L. pneumophila or E. coli. This ciliate could provide a model for the analysis of virulence-associated intracellular events independent of the replication of L. pneumophila.

  13. Effects of metals on Legionella pneumophila growth in drinking water plumbing systems

    SciTech Connect

    States, S.J.; Conley, L.F.; Ceraso, M.; Stephenson, T.E.; Wolford, R.S.; Wadowsky, R.M.; McNamara, A.M.; Yee, R.B.

    1985-11-01

    Water samples were collected from hospital and institutional hot-water tanks known to have supported L. pneumophila and were analyzed for 23 chemical parameters. The chemical environment of these tanks was found to vary extensively, with the concentrations of certain metals reaching relatively high levels due to corrosion. The effect of various chemical conditions on L. pneumophila growth was then examined by observing its multiplication in a series of tap water samples artificially supplemented with various concentrations of metals. Additionally, growth of L. pneumophila was examined in a more natural setting by monitoring its multiplication in the chemically analyzed hot-water tank samples after sterilization and reinoculation with L. pneumophila. L. Pneumophila and associated microbiota used in these experiments were obtained from a hot-water tank. These strains were maintained in tap water and had never been passaged on agar. The results of the growth studies indicate that although elevated concentrations of a number of metals are toxic, lower levels of certain metals such as iron, zinc, and potassium enhance growth of naturally occurring L. pneumophila. Parallel observations on accompanying non-Legionellaceae bacteria failed to show the same relationship. These findings suggest that metal plumbing components and associated corrosion products are important factors in the survival and growth of L. pneumophila in plumbing systems and may also be important in related habitats such as cooling towers and air-conditioning systems. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  14. Role of stagnation and obstruction of water flow in isolation of Legionella pneumophila from hospital plumbing.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, C A; Blaser, M J; Wang, W L

    1984-11-01

    The stagnation of water in two of four hospital hot-water storage tanks found to contain Legionella pneumophila was reduced by keeping the two tanks continually on-line for 1 year. L. pneumophila colony counts in these two tanks fell quickly to low levels, whereas the organisms persisted in the two tanks that were not in use. L. pneumophila continued to be isolated from 50 to 100% of the hospital showerheads which were sampled during this period. We also examined aerators and other hospital faucet fixtures which obstruct water flow. L. pneumophila was isolated from 22 of 30 faucet aerators and 2 of 16 vacuum breakers but not from 26 nonobstructed faucets or 6 backflow preventers. Over a 7-month period, after nine faucet aerators were sterilized, 10 of 60 surveillance cultures revealed L. pneumophila, despite the inability to isolate the organism from the potable-water tanks in use. These data suggest that prevention of stagnation in hot-water tanks may be effective in reducing L. pneumophila concentrations in potable-water systems serving high-risk populations. We have also shown that faucet aerators, by providing a surface for L. pneumophila to colonize, can become secondary reservoirs for the organism in hospital plumbing. PMID:6508313

  15. Investigation of the population structure of Legionella pneumophila by analysis of tandem repeat copy number and internal sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Visca, Paolo; D'Arezzo, Silvia; Ramisse, Françoise; Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Benson, Gary; Vergnaud, Gilles; Fry, Norman K; Pourcel, Christine

    2011-09-01

    The population structure of the species Legionella pneumophila was investigated by multilocus variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) and sequencing of three VNTRs (Lpms01, Lpms04 and Lpms13) in selected strains. Of 150 isolates of diverse origins, 136 (86 %) were distributed into eight large MLVA clonal complexes (VACCs) and the rest were either unique or formed small clusters of up to two MLVA genotypes. In spite of the lower degree of genome-wide linkage disequilibrium of the MLVA loci compared with sequence-based typing, the clustering achieved by the two methods was highly congruent. The detailed analysis of VNTR Lpms04 alleles showed a very complex organization, with five different repeat unit lengths and a high level of internal variation. Within each MLVA-defined VACC, Lpms04 was endowed with a common recognizable pattern with some interesting exceptions. Evidence of recombination events was suggested by analysis of internal repeat variations at the two additional VNTR loci, Lpms01 and Lpms13. Sequence analysis of L. pneumophila VNTR locus Lpms04 alone provides a first-line assay for allocation of a new isolate within the L. pneumophila population structure and for epidemiological studies.

  16. Activities of tigecycline and comparators against Legionella pneumophila and Legionella micdadei extracellularly and in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Lawrence H; Baltch, Aldona L; Ritz, William J; Michelsen, Phyllis B; Smith, Raymond P

    2011-01-01

    The activity of tigecycline against Legionellae, which are intracellular pathogens, was evaluated intracellularly in human phagocytes and extracellularly, and compared to the activities of erythromycin and levofloxacin. Clinical isolates of L. pneumophila serogroups 1, 5, and 6 and L. micdadei were tested in time-kill experiments. Extracellular experiments were done using buffered yeast extract broth. For intracellular assays, monolayers of human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were infected with L. pneumophila or L. micdadei. Antibiotics (0.05-2.5 × MIC) were then added. MDM were lysed at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h and viable bacteria in the lysates were enumerated. Based on multiples of the MICs, tigecycline was less active extracellularly than levofloxacin or erythromycin. However, intracellular killing of both L. pneumophila and L. micdadei by tigecycline at 72 h was greater than for erythromycin or levofloxacin. Currently, evidence does not support the use of tigecycline as a first-line drug for treatment of Legionella infections. However, since Legionellae are intracellular pathogens, these results suggest that tigecycline should be effective for treatment of infections caused by these bacteria.

  17. Extracellular enzymes of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, T C; Miller, R D

    1981-01-01

    All strains of Legionella pneumophila tested produced detectable levels of extracellular protease, phosphatase, lipase, deoxyribonuclease, ribonuclease, and beta-lactamase activity. Weak starch hydrolysis was also demonstrated for all strains. Elastase, collagenase, phospholipase C, hyaluronidase, chondroitinase, neuraminidase, or coagulase were not detected in any of these laboratory-maintained strains. PMID:6268549

  18. Legionella pneumophila utilizes a Single Player Disulfide-Bond Oxidoreductase System to Manage Disulfide Bond Formation and Isomerization

    PubMed Central

    Kpadeh, Zegbeh Z.; Day, Shandra R.; Mills, Brandy W.; Hoffman, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila uses a single homodimeric disulfide bond (DSB) oxidoreductase DsbA2 to catalyze extracytoplasmic protein folding and to correct DSB errors through protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) activity. In Escherichia coli, these functions are separated to avoid futile cycling. In L. pneumophila, DsbA2 is maintained as a mixture of disulfides (S-S) and free thiols (SH), but when expressed in E. coli, only the SH form is observed. We provide evidence to suggest that structural differences in DsbB oxidases (LpDsbB1 and LpDsbB2) and DsbD reductases (LpDsbD1 and LpDsbD2) (compared to E. coli) permit bifunctional activities without creating a futile cycle. LpdsbB1 and LpdsbB2 partially complemented an EcdsbB mutant while neither LpdsbD1 nor LpdsbD2 complemented an EcdsbD mutant unless DsbA2 was also expressed. When the dsb genes of E. coli were replaced with those of L. pneumophila, motility was restored and DsbA2 was present as a mixture of redox forms. A dominant-negative approach to interfere with DsbA2 function in L. pneumophila determined that DSB oxidase activity was necessary for intracellular multiplication and assembly/function of the Dot/Icm Type IVb secretion system. Our studies show that a single-player system may escape the futile cycle trap by limiting transfer of reducing equivalents from LpDsbDs to DsbA2. PMID:25534767

  19. Efficiency of water disinfectants against Legionella pneumophila and Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Mathieu; Mazoua, Stéphane; Berne, Florence; Bodet, Charles; Garrec, Nathalie; Herbelin, Pascaline; Ménard-Szczebara, Florence; Oberti, Sandrine; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Soreau, Sylvie; Wallet, France; Héchard, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic by themselves and be a reservoir for bacterial pathogens, such as Legionella pneumophila. Not only could amoebae protect intra-cellular Legionella but Legionella grown within amoebae could undergo physiological modifications and become more resistant and more virulent. Therefore, it is important to study the efficiency of treatments on amoebae and Legionella grown within these amoebae to improve their application and to limit their impact on the environment. With this aim, we compared various water disinfectants against trophozoites of three Acanthamoeba strains and L. pneumophila alone or in co-culture. Three oxidizing disinfectants (chlorine, monochloramine, and chlorine dioxide) were assessed. All the samples were treated with disinfectants for 1 h and the disinfectant concentration was followed to calculate disinfectant exposure (Ct). We noticed that there were significant differences of susceptibility among the Acanthamoeba strains. However no difference was observed between infected and non-infected amoebae. Also, the comparison between the three disinfectants indicates that monochloramine was efficient at the same level towards free or co-cultured L. pneumophila while chlorine and chlorine dioxide were less efficient on co-cultured L. pneumophila. It suggests that these disinfectants should have different modes of action. Finally, our results provide for the first time disinfectant exposure values for Acanthamoeba treatments that might be used as references for disinfection of water systems.

  20. Growth of Legionella pneumophila in association with blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria)

    SciTech Connect

    Tison, D.L.; Pope, D.H.; Cherry, W.B.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1980-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila (Legionnaires disease bacterium) of serogroup 1 was isolated from an algal-bacterial mat community growing at 45/sup 0/C in a man-made thermal effluent. This isolate was grown in mineral salts medium at 45/sup 0/C in association with the blue-green alga (cyanobacterium) Fischerella sp. over a pH range of 6.9 to 7.6. L. pneumophila was apparently using algal extracellular products as its carbon and energy sources. These observations indicate that the temperature, pH, and nutritional requirements of L. pneumophila are not as stringent as those previously observed when cultured on complex media. This association between L. pneumophila and certain blue-green algae suggests an explanation for the apparent widespread distribution of the bacterium in nature.

  1. Suggestion does not de-automatize word reading: evidence from the semantically based Stroop task.

    PubMed

    Augustinova, Maria; Ferrand, Ludovic

    2012-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that the suggestion for participants to construe words as meaningless symbols reduces, or even eliminates, standard Stroop interference in highly suggestible individuals (Raz, Fan, & Posner, 2005; Raz, Kirsch, Pollard, & Nitkin-Kaner, 2006). In these studies, the researchers consequently concluded that this suggestion de-automatizes word reading. The aim of the present study was to closely examine this claim. To this end, highly suggestible individuals completed both standard and semantically based Stroop tasks, either with or without a suggestion to construe the words as meaningless symbols (manipulated in both a between-participants [Exp. 1] and a within-participants [Exp. 2] design). By showing that suggestion substantially reduced standard Stroop interference, these two experiments replicated Raz et al.'s (2006) results. However, in both experiments we also found significant semantically based Stroop effects of similar magnitudes in all suggestion conditions. Taken together, these results indicate that the suggestion to construe words as meaningless symbols does not eliminate, or even reduce, semantic activation (assessed by the semantically based Stroop effect) in highly suggestible individuals, and that such an intervention most likely reduces nonsemantic task-relevant response competition related to the standard Stroop task. In sum, contrary to Raz et al.'s claim, suggestion does not de-automatize or prevent reading (as shown by a significant amount of semantic processing), but rather seems to influence response competition. These results also add to the growing body of evidence showing that semantic activation in the Stroop task is indeed automatic.

  2. Birc1e/Naip5 rapidly antagonizes modulation of phagosome maturation by Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Anne; de Chastellier, Chantal; Balor, Stéphanie; Gros, Philippe

    2007-04-01

    Legionella survives intracellularly by preventing fusion with lysosomes, due to phagosome escape from the endocytic pathway at an early stage of phagosome maturation, and by creating a replicative organelle that acquires endoplasmic reticulum (ER) characteristics through sustained interactions and fusion with the ER. Intracellular replication of Legionella pneumophila in mouse macrophages is controlled by the Lgn1 locus. Functional complementation in vivo has identified the Birc1e/Naip5 gene as being responsible for the Lgn1 effect. To understand the function and temporal site of action of Birc1e/Naip5 in susceptibility to L. pneumophila, we examined the biogenesis of Legionella-containing vacuoles (LCVs) formed in permissive A/J macrophages and in their Birc1e/Naip5 transgenic non-permissive counterpart. Birc1e/Naip5 effects on acquisition of lysosomal and ER markers were evident within 1-2 h following infection. A significantly higher proportion of LCVs formed in Birc1e/Naip5 transgenic macrophages had acquired the lysosomal markers cathepsin D and Lamp1 by 2 h post infection, whereas a significantly higher proportion of LCVs formed in permissive macrophages were positively stained for the ER markers BAP31 and calnexin, 6 h post infection. Likewise, studies by electron microscopy showed acquisition of lysosomal contents (horseradish peroxidase), within the first hour following phagocytic uptake, by LCVs formed in Birc1e/Naip5 transgenic macrophages and delivery of the ER marker glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase) only to the lumen of LCVs formed in A/J macrophages. Finally, a larger proportion of LCVs formed in A/J macrophages were studded with ribosomes 24 h post infection, compared with LCVs formed in Birc1e/Naip5 transgenic macrophages. These results suggest that sensing of L. pneumophila products by Birc1e/Naip5 in macrophages occurs rapidly following phagocytosis, a process that antagonizes the ability of L. pneumophila to remodel its phagosome into a specialized

  3. Permissiveness of freshly isolated environmental strains of amoebae for growth of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Mathieu; Binet, Marie; Bouteleux, Celine; Herbelin, Pascaline; Soreau, Sylvie; Héchard, Yann

    2016-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacterium commonly found in water and responsible for severe pneumonia. Free-living amoebae are protozoa also found in water, which feed on bacteria by phagocytosis. Under favorable conditions, some L. pneumophila are able to resist phagocytic digestion and even multiply within amoebae. However, it is not clear whether L. pneumophila could infect at a same rate a large range of amoebae or if there is some selectivity towards specific amoebal genera or strains. Also, most studies have been performed using collection strains and not with freshly isolated strains. In our study, we assess the permissiveness of freshly isolated environmental strains of amoebae, belonging to three common genera (i.e. Acanthamoeba, Naegleria and Vermamoeba), for growth of L. pneumophila at three different temperatures. Our results indicated that all the tested strains of amoebae were permissive to L. pneumophila Lens and that there was no significant difference between the strains. Intracellular proliferation was more efficient at a temperature of 40°C. In conclusion, our work suggests that, under favorable conditions, virulent strains of L. pneumophila could equally infect a large number of isolates of common freshwater amoeba genera.

  4. Permissiveness of freshly isolated environmental strains of amoebae for growth of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Mathieu; Binet, Marie; Bouteleux, Celine; Herbelin, Pascaline; Soreau, Sylvie; Héchard, Yann

    2016-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacterium commonly found in water and responsible for severe pneumonia. Free-living amoebae are protozoa also found in water, which feed on bacteria by phagocytosis. Under favorable conditions, some L. pneumophila are able to resist phagocytic digestion and even multiply within amoebae. However, it is not clear whether L. pneumophila could infect at a same rate a large range of amoebae or if there is some selectivity towards specific amoebal genera or strains. Also, most studies have been performed using collection strains and not with freshly isolated strains. In our study, we assess the permissiveness of freshly isolated environmental strains of amoebae, belonging to three common genera (i.e. Acanthamoeba, Naegleria and Vermamoeba), for growth of L. pneumophila at three different temperatures. Our results indicated that all the tested strains of amoebae were permissive to L. pneumophila Lens and that there was no significant difference between the strains. Intracellular proliferation was more efficient at a temperature of 40°C. In conclusion, our work suggests that, under favorable conditions, virulent strains of L. pneumophila could equally infect a large number of isolates of common freshwater amoeba genera. PMID:26832643

  5. Rapid and specific SPRi detection of L. pneumophila in complex environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Foudeh, Amir M; Trigui, Hana; Mendis, Nilmini; Faucher, Sebastien P; Veres, Teodor; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2015-07-01

    Legionellosis is a very devastating disease worldwide mainly due to unpredictable outbreaks in man-made water systems. Developing a highly specific and sensitive rapid detection system that detects only metabolically active bacteria is a main priority for water quality assessment. We previously developed a versatile technique for sensitive and specific detection of synthetic RNA. In the present work, we further investigated the performance of the developed biosensor for detection of Legionella pneumophila in complex environmental samples, particularly those containing protozoa. The specificity and sensitivity of the detection system were verified using total RNA extracted from L. pneumophila in spiked water co-cultured with amoebae. We demonstrated that the expression level of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is extremely dependent on the environmental conditions. The presence of amoebae with L. pneumophila, especially in nutrition-deprived samples, increased the amount of L. pneumophila 15-fold after 1 week as measured through the expression of 16s rRNA. Using the developed surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) detection method, we were also able to successfully detect L. pneumophila within 3 h, both in the presence and absence of amoebae in the complex environmental samples obtained from a cooling water tower. These findings suggest that the developed biosensing system is a viable method for rapid, real-time and effective detection not only for L. pneumophila in environmental samples but also to assess the risk associated with the use of water contaminated with other pathogens. PMID:25935681

  6. Antimicrobials and Non-Healing Wounds. Evidence, controversies and suggestions-key messages.

    PubMed

    Gottrup, Finn; Apelqvist, Jan; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Cooper, Rose; Moore, Zena; Peters, Edgar J G; Probst, Sebastian

    2014-10-01

    This article constitutes an extraction of key messages originally presented in the Document: Antimicrobials and Non-Healing Wounds. Evidence, controversies and suggestions written by the European Wound Management Association (EWMA), and originally published by the Journal of Wound Care in 2013. All sections are shortened and some not included. For further details please refer to in the original document which can be downloaded via www.ewma.org .

  7. Cocultivation of Legionella pneumophila and free-living amoebae

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, R.L.; Domingue, E.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of the interaction of Legionella pneumophila with free-living amoebae showed that Naegleria lovaniensis and Acanthamoeba royreba could use L. pneumophia as a sole food source. However, growth of the amoebae on nonnutrient agar plates seeded with L. pneumophila was slower than growth on nonnutrient agar plates seeded with Escherichia coli. On inoculation of L. pneumophila into axenic cultures of N. lovaniensis and A. roryba, 99.9% of the L. pneumophila was destroyed within 24 h. After several weeks, however, some amoeba cultures became chronically infected and supported the growth of L. pneumophila. Amoebae exposed to L. pneumophila and containing adhered L. pneumophila, L. pneumophila antigens, or both, showed no increased pathogenic potential on intranasal inoculation of weanling mice. Similarly, L. pneumophila propagated in chronically infected amoeba cultures showed no increase in virulence on intraperitoneal inoculation of guinea pigs relative to L. pneumophila grown in yeast extract broth. 20 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  8. Deletion of potD, encoding a putative spermidine-binding protein, results in a complex phenotype in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Abdelhady, Hany; Tompkins, Nicholas P; Carson, Kaitlyn R; Garduño, Rafael A

    2014-07-01

    L. pneumophila is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in a membrane-bound compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). We previously observed that the polyamine spermidine, produced by host cells or added exogenously, enhances the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. To study this enhancing effect and determine whether polyamines are used as nutrients, we deleted potD from L. pneumophila strain JR32. The gene potD encodes a spermidine-binding protein that in other bacteria is essential for the function of the PotABCD polyamine transporter. Deletion of potD did not affect L. pneumophila growth in vitro in the presence or absence of spermidine and putrescine, suggesting that PotD plays a redundant or no role in polyamine uptake. However, deletion of potD resulted in a puzzlingly complex phenotype that included defects in L. pneumophila's ability to form filaments, tolerate Na(+), associate with macrophages and amoeba, recruit host vesicles to the LCV, and initiate intracellular growth. Moreover, the ΔpotD mutant was completely unable to grow in L929 cells treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of spermidine synthesis. These complex and disparate effects suggest that the L. pneumophila potD encodes either: (i) a multifunctional protein, (ii) a protein that interacts with, or regulates a, multifunctional protein, or (iii) a protein that contributes (directly or indirectly) to a regulatory network. Protein function studies with the L. pneumophila PotD protein are thus warranted. PMID:24928741

  9. Serospecific antigens of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Otten, S; Iyer, S; Johnson, W; Montgomery, R

    1986-01-01

    Serospecific antigens isolated by EDTA extraction from four serogroups of Legionella pneumophila were analyzed for their chemical composition, molecular heterogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunological properties. The antigens were shown to be lipopolysaccharides and to differ from the lipopolysaccharides of other gram-negative bacteria. The serospecific antigens contained rhamnose, mannose, glucosamine, and two unidentified sugars together with 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, phosphate, and fatty acids. The fatty acid composition was predominantly branched-chain acids with smaller amounts of 3-hydroxymyristic acid. The antigens contain periodate-sensitive groups; mannosyl residues were completely cleaved by periodate oxidation. Hydrolysis of the total lipopolysaccharide by acetic acid resulted in the separation of a lipid A-like material that cross-reacted with the antiserum to lipid A from Salmonella minnesota but did not comigrate with it on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. None of the four antigens contained heptose. All of the antigen preparations showed endotoxicity when tested by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. The results of this study indicate that the serogroup-specific antigens of L. pneumophila are lipopolysaccharides containing an unusual lipid A and core structure and different from those of other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:3017918

  10. Multigenome analysis identifies a worldwide distributed epidemic Legionella pneumophila clone that emerged within a highly diverse species

    PubMed Central

    Cazalet, Christel; Jarraud, Sophie; Ghavi-Helm, Yad; Kunst, Frank; Glaser, Philippe; Etienne; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Genomics can provide the basis for understanding the evolution of emerging, lethal human pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease. This bacterium replicates within amoebae and persists in the environment as a free-living microbe. Among the many Legionella species described, L. pneumophila is associated with 90% of human disease and within the 15 serogroups (Sg), L. pneumophila Sg1 causes over 84% of Legionnaires’ disease worldwide. Why L. pneumophila Sg1 is so predominant is unknown. Here, we report the first comprehensive screen of the gene content of 217 L. pneumophila and 32 non-L. pneumophila strains isolated from humans and the environment using a Legionella DNA-array. Strikingly, we uncovered a high conservation of virulence- and eukaryotic-like genes, indicating strong environmental selection pressures for their preservation. No specific hybridization profile differentiated clinical and environmental strains or strains of different serogroups. Surprisingly, the gene cluster coding the determinants of the core and the O side-chain synthesis of the lipopolysaccaride (LPS cluster) determining Sg1 was present in diverse genomic backgrounds, strongly implicating the LPS of Sg1 itself as a principal cause of the high prevalence of Sg1 strains in human disease and suggesting that the LPS cluster can be transferred horizontally. Genomic analysis also revealed that L. pneumophila is a genetically diverse species, in part due to horizontal gene transfer of mobile genetic elements among L. pneumophila strains, but also between different Legionella species. However, the genomic background also plays a role in disease causation as demonstrated by the identification of a globally distributed epidemic strain exhibiting the genotype of the sequenced L. pneumophila strain Paris. PMID:18256241

  11. The phtC-phtD Locus Equips Legionella pneumophila for Thymidine Salvage and Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Maris V.; Sauer, John-Demian; Crepin, Sebastien; Byrne, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    The phagosomal transporter (Pht) family of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is encoded by phylogenetically related intracellular gammaproteobacteria, including the opportunistic pathogen Legionella pneumophila. The location of the pht genes between the putative thymidine kinase (tdk) and phosphopentomutase (deoB) genes suggested that the phtC and phtD loci contribute to thymidine salvage in L. pneumophila. Indeed, a phtC+ allele in trans restored pyrimidine uptake to an Escherichia coli mutant that lacked all known nucleoside transporters, whereas a phtD+ allele did not. The results of phenotypic analyses of L. pneumophila strains lacking phtC or phtD strongly indicate that L. pneumophila requires PhtC and PhtD function under conditions where sustained dTMP synthesis is compromised. First, in broth cultures that mimicked thymidine limitation or starvation, L. pneumophila exhibited a marked requirement for PhtC function. Conversely, mutation of phtD conferred a survival advantage. Second, in medium that lacked thymidine, multicopy phtC+ or phtD+ alleles enhanced the survival of L. pneumophila thymidylate synthase (thyA)-deficient strains, which cannot synthesize dTMP endogenously. Third, under conditions in which transport of the pyrimidine nucleoside analog 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR) would inhibit growth, PhtC and PhtD conferred a growth advantage to L. pneumophila thyA+ strains. Finally, when cultured in macrophages, L. pneumophila required the phtC-phtD locus to replicate. Accordingly, we propose that PhtC and PhtD contribute to protect L. pneumophila from dTMP starvation during its intracellular life cycle. PMID:24478086

  12. Direct Evidence of Egestion and Salivation of Xylella fastidiosa Suggests Sharpshooters Can Be "Flying Syringes".

    PubMed

    Backus, Elaine A; Shugart, Holly J; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Morgan, J Kent; Shatters, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is unique among insect-transmitted plant pathogens because it is propagative but noncirculative, adhering to and multiplying on the cuticular lining of the anterior foregut. Any inoculation mechanism for X. fastidiosa must explain how bacterial cells exit the vector's stylets via the food canal and directly enter the plant. A combined egestion-salivation mechanism has been proposed to explain these unique features. Egestion is the putative outward flow of fluid from the foregut via hypothesized bidirectional pumping of the cibarium. The present study traced green fluorescent protein-expressing X. fastidiosa or fluorescent nanoparticles acquired from artificial diets by glassy-winged sharpshooters, Homalodisca vitripennis, as they were egested into simultaneously secreted saliva. X. fastidiosa or nanoparticles were shown to mix with gelling saliva to form fluorescent deposits and salivary sheaths on artificial diets, providing the first direct, conclusive evidence of egestion by any hemipteran insect. Therefore, the present results strongly support an egestion-salivation mechanism of X. fastidiosa inoculation. Results also support that a column of fluid is transiently held in the foregut without being swallowed. Evidence also supports (but does not definitively prove) that bacteria were suspended in the column of fluid during the vector's transit from diet to diet, and were egested with the held fluid. Thus, we hypothesize that sharpshooters could be true "flying syringes," especially when inoculation occurs very soon after uptake of bacteria, suggesting the new paradigm of a nonpersistent X. fastidiosa transmission mechanism. PMID:26020829

  13. Molecular evidence to suggest the origin of a colonization: Drosophila subobscura in America.

    PubMed

    Araúz, Pedro A; Peris-Bondia, Francesc; Latorre, Amparo; Serra, Luís; Mestres, Francesc

    2011-12-01

    The recent colonization of America by Drosophila subobscura represents a great opportunity for evolutionary biology studies. Knowledge of the populations from which the colonization started would provide an understanding of how genetic composition changed during adaptation to the new environment. Thus, a 793 nucleotide fragment of the Odh (Octanol dehydrogenase) gene was sequenced in 66 chromosomal lines from Barcelona (western Mediterranean) and in 66 from Mt. Parnes (Greece, eastern Mediterranean). No sequence of Odh fragment in Barcelona or Mt. Parnes was identical to any of those previously detected in America. However, an Odh sequence from Barcelona differed in only one nucleotide from another found in American populations. In both cases, the chromosomal lines presented the same inversion: O(7), and the Odh gene was located within this inversion. This evidence suggests a possible western Mediterranean origin for the colonization. Finally, the molecular and inversion data indicate that the colonization was not characterized by multiple reintroductions.

  14. Evidence suggesting digenic inheritance of Waardenburg syndrome type II with ocular albinism.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Pei-Wen; Spector, Elaine; McGregor, Tracy L

    2009-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a series of auditory-pigmentary disorders inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. In most patients, WS2 results from mutations in the MITF gene. MITF encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that activates transcription of tyrosinase and other melanocyte proteins. The clinical presentation of WS is highly variable, and we believe that Tietz syndrome and WS2 with ocular albinism (OA) are likely two variations of WS2 due to the presence of modifiers. One family with a molecular diagnosis of WS2 co-segregating with OA has previously been reported. A digenic mutation mechanism including both a MITF mutation and the TYR(R402Q) hypomorphic allele was proposed to be the cause of OA in this family. Here, we present a second WS2 family with OA and provide evidence suggesting the TYR(R402Q) allele does not cause OA in this family. We hypothesize the presence of a novel OCA3 mutation together with the MITF del p.R217 mutation account for the OA phenotype in this family. Since MITF is a transcription factor for pigmentation genes, a mutation in MITF plus a heterozygous mutation in OCA3 together provide an adverse effect crossing a quantitative threshold; therefore, WS2 with OA occurs. We have hypothesized previously that the clinical spectrum and mutation mechanism of OCA depend on the pigmentation threshold of an affected individual. This unique family has provided further evidence supporting this hypothesis. We suggest that by studying OCA patients alongside WS patients with various pigmentation profiles we can facilitate further understanding of the pigmentation pathway. PMID:19938076

  15. Hartmannella vermiformis inhibition of Legionella pneumophila cultivability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hartmannella vermiformis is frequently isolated from drinking water (DW) and is permissive to Legionella pneumophila intracellular replication. Thus, H. vermiformis may play an important role in the growth and survival potential of such environmental pathogens. In this study, Pag...

  16. Transcriptional down-regulation and rRNA cleavage in Dictyostelium discoideum mitochondria during Legionella pneumophila infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenyu; Kuspa, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens employ a variety of survival strategies when they invade eukaryotic cells. The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is used as a model host to study the pathogenic mechanisms that Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease, uses to kill eukaryotic cells. Here we show that the infection of D. discoideum by L. pneumophila results in a decrease in mitochondrial messenger RNAs, beginning more than 8 hours prior to detectable host cell death. These changes can be mimicked by hydrogen peroxide treatment, but not by other cytotoxic agents. The mitochondrial large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA) is also cleaved at three specific sites during the course of infection. Two LSU rRNA fragments appear first, followed by smaller fragments produced by additional cleavage events. The initial LSU rRNA cleavage site is predicted to be on the surface of the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome, while two secondary sites map to the predicted interface with the small subunit. No LSU rRNA cleavage was observed after exposure of D. discoideum to hydrogen peroxide, or other cytotoxic chemicals that kill cells in a variety of ways. Functional L. pneumophila type II and type IV secretion systems are required for the cleavage, establishing a correlation between the pathogenesis of L. pneumophila and D. discoideum LSU rRNA destruction. LSU rRNA cleavage was not observed in L. pneumophila infections of Acanthamoeba castellanii or human U937 cells, suggesting that L. pneumophila uses distinct mechanisms to interrupt metabolism in different hosts. Thus, L. pneumophila infection of D. discoideum results in dramatic decrease of mitochondrial RNAs, and in the specific cleavage of mitochondrial rRNA. The predicted location of the cleavage sites on the mitochondrial ribosome suggests that rRNA destruction is initiated by a specific sequence of events. These findings suggest that L. pneumophila specifically disrupts mitochondrial protein synthesis in D

  17. Statistical Evidence Suggests that Inattention Drives Hyperactivity/Impulsivity in Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Elena; Groot, Perry; Claassen, Tom; van Hulzen, Kimm J.; Glennon, Jeffrey C.; Franke, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous factor analytic studies consistently support a distinction between two symptom domains of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity. Both dimensions show high internal consistency and moderate to strong correlations with each other. However, it is not clear what drives this strong correlation. The aim of this paper is to address this issue. Method We applied a sophisticated approach for causal discovery on three independent data sets of scores of the two ADHD dimensions in NeuroIMAGE (total N = 675), ADHD-200 (N = 245), and IMpACT (N = 164), assessed by different raters and instruments, and further used information on gender or a genetic risk haplotype. Results In all data sets we found strong statistical evidence for the same pattern: the clear dependence between hyperactivity/impulsivity symptom level and an established genetic factor (either gender or risk haplotype) vanishes when one conditions upon inattention symptom level. Under reasonable assumptions, e.g., that phenotypes do not cause genotypes, a causal model that is consistent with this pattern contains a causal path from inattention to hyperactivity/impulsivity. Conclusions The robust dependency cancellation observed in three different data sets suggests that inattention is a driving factor for hyperactivity/impulsivity. This causal hypothesis can be further validated in intervention studies. Our model suggests that interventions that affect inattention will also have an effect on the level of hyperactivity/impulsivity. On the other hand, interventions that affect hyperactivity/impulsivity would not change the level of inattention. This causal model may explain earlier findings on heritable factors causing ADHD reported in the study of twins with learning difficulties. PMID:27768717

  18. Electroencephalographic neurofeedback: Level of evidence in mental and brain disorders and suggestions for good clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; McGonigal, A; Lopez, R; Daudet, C; Kotwas, I; Bartolomei, F

    2015-12-01

    The technique of electroencephalographic neurofeedback (EEG NF) emerged in the 1970s and is a technique that measures a subject's EEG signal, processes it in real time, extracts a parameter of interest and presents this information in visual or auditory form. The goal is to effectuate a behavioural modification by modulating brain activity. The EEG NF opens new therapeutic possibilities in the fields of psychiatry and neurology. However, the development of EEG NF in clinical practice requires (i) a good level of evidence of therapeutic efficacy of this technique, (ii) a good practice guide for this technique. Firstly, this article investigates selected trials with the following criteria: study design with controlled, randomized, and open or blind protocol, primary endpoint related to the mental and brain disorders treated and assessed with standardized measurement tools, identifiable EEG neurophysiological targets, underpinned by pathophysiological relevance. Trials were found for: epilepsies, migraine, stroke, chronic insomnia, attentional-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, addictive disorders, psychotic disorders. Secondly, this article investigates the principles of neurofeedback therapy in line with learning theory. Different underlying therapeutic models are presented didactically between two continua: a continuum between implicit and explicit learning and a continuum between the biomedical model (centred on "the disease") and integrative biopsychosocial model of health (centred on "the illness"). The main relevant learning model is to link neurofeedback therapy with the field of cognitive remediation techniques. The methodological specificity of neurofeedback is to be guided by biologically relevant neurophysiological parameters. Guidelines for good clinical practice of EEG NF concerning technical issues of electrophysiology and of learning are suggested. These require validation by

  19. Electroencephalographic neurofeedback: Level of evidence in mental and brain disorders and suggestions for good clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; McGonigal, A; Lopez, R; Daudet, C; Kotwas, I; Bartolomei, F

    2015-12-01

    The technique of electroencephalographic neurofeedback (EEG NF) emerged in the 1970s and is a technique that measures a subject's EEG signal, processes it in real time, extracts a parameter of interest and presents this information in visual or auditory form. The goal is to effectuate a behavioural modification by modulating brain activity. The EEG NF opens new therapeutic possibilities in the fields of psychiatry and neurology. However, the development of EEG NF in clinical practice requires (i) a good level of evidence of therapeutic efficacy of this technique, (ii) a good practice guide for this technique. Firstly, this article investigates selected trials with the following criteria: study design with controlled, randomized, and open or blind protocol, primary endpoint related to the mental and brain disorders treated and assessed with standardized measurement tools, identifiable EEG neurophysiological targets, underpinned by pathophysiological relevance. Trials were found for: epilepsies, migraine, stroke, chronic insomnia, attentional-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, addictive disorders, psychotic disorders. Secondly, this article investigates the principles of neurofeedback therapy in line with learning theory. Different underlying therapeutic models are presented didactically between two continua: a continuum between implicit and explicit learning and a continuum between the biomedical model (centred on "the disease") and integrative biopsychosocial model of health (centred on "the illness"). The main relevant learning model is to link neurofeedback therapy with the field of cognitive remediation techniques. The methodological specificity of neurofeedback is to be guided by biologically relevant neurophysiological parameters. Guidelines for good clinical practice of EEG NF concerning technical issues of electrophysiology and of learning are suggested. These require validation by

  20. Mixed Signals? Morphological and Molecular Evidence Suggest a Color Polymorphism in Some Neotropical Polythore Damselflies

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Kathleen M.; Ankrom, Nikole; Sherratt, Thomas N.; Hoffmann, Joachim; Van Gossum, Hans; Ware, Jessica L.; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    The study of color polymorphisms (CP) has provided profound insights into the maintenance of genetic variation in natural populations. We here offer the first evidence for an elaborate wing polymorphism in the Neotropical damselfly genus Polythore, which consists of 21 described species, distributed along the eastern slopes of the Andes in South America. These damselflies display highly complex wing colors and patterning, incorporating black, white, yellow, and orange in multiple wing bands. Wing colors, along with some components of the male genitalia, have been the primary characters used in species description; few other morphological traits vary within the group, and so there are few useful diagnostic characters. Previous research has indicated the possibility of a cryptic species existing in P. procera in Colombia, despite there being no significant differences in wing color and pattern between the populations of the two putative species. Here we analyze the complexity and diversity of wing color patterns of individuals from five described Polythore species in the Central Amazon Basin of Peru using a novel suite of morphological analyses to quantify wing color and pattern: geometric morphometrics, chromaticity analysis, and Gabor wavelet transformation. We then test whether these color patterns are good predictors of species by recovering the phylogenetic relationships among the 5 species using the barcode gene (COI). Our results suggest that, while highly distinct and discrete wing patterns exist in Polythore, these “wingforms” do not represent monophyletic clades in the recovered topology. The wingforms identified as P. victoria and P. ornata are both involved in a polymorphism with P. neopicta; also, cryptic speciation may have taking place among individuals with the P. victoria wingform. Only P. aurora and P. spateri represent monophyletic species with a single wingform in our molecular phylogeny. We discuss the implications of this polymorphism, and

  1. Mixed signals? Morphological and molecular evidence suggest a color polymorphism in some neotropical polythore damselflies.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Herrera, Melissa; Kuhn, William R; Lorenzo-Carballa, Maria Olalla; Harding, Kathleen M; Ankrom, Nikole; Sherratt, Thomas N; Hoffmann, Joachim; Van Gossum, Hans; Ware, Jessica L; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo; Beatty, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    The study of color polymorphisms (CP) has provided profound insights into the maintenance of genetic variation in natural populations. We here offer the first evidence for an elaborate wing polymorphism in the Neotropical damselfly genus Polythore, which consists of 21 described species, distributed along the eastern slopes of the Andes in South America. These damselflies display highly complex wing colors and patterning, incorporating black, white, yellow, and orange in multiple wing bands. Wing colors, along with some components of the male genitalia, have been the primary characters used in species description; few other morphological traits vary within the group, and so there are few useful diagnostic characters. Previous research has indicated the possibility of a cryptic species existing in P. procera in Colombia, despite there being no significant differences in wing color and pattern between the populations of the two putative species. Here we analyze the complexity and diversity of wing color patterns of individuals from five described Polythore species in the Central Amazon Basin of Peru using a novel suite of morphological analyses to quantify wing color and pattern: geometric morphometrics, chromaticity analysis, and Gabor wavelet transformation. We then test whether these color patterns are good predictors of species by recovering the phylogenetic relationships among the 5 species using the barcode gene (COI). Our results suggest that, while highly distinct and discrete wing patterns exist in Polythore, these "wingforms" do not represent monophyletic clades in the recovered topology. The wingforms identified as P. victoria and P. ornata are both involved in a polymorphism with P. neopicta; also, cryptic speciation may have taking place among individuals with the P. victoria wingform. Only P. aurora and P. spateri represent monophyletic species with a single wingform in our molecular phylogeny. We discuss the implications of this polymorphism, and the

  2. Fatal coinfection with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 8 and Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Guillouzouic, Aurélie; Bemer, Pascale; Gay-Andrieu, Françoise; Bretonnière, Cédric; Lepelletier, Didier; Mahé, Pierre-Joachim; Villers, Daniel; Jarraud, Sophie; Reynaud, Alain; Corvec, Stéphane

    2008-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. We report on a patient who simultaneously developed L. pneumophila serogroup 8 pneumonia and Aspergillus fumigatus lung abscesses. Despite appropriate treatments, Aspergillus disease progressed with metastasis. Coinfections caused by L. pneumophila and A. fumigatus remain exceptional. In apparently immunocompetent patients, corticosteroid therapy is a key risk factor for aspergillosis.

  3. Fatal coinfection with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 8 and Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Guillouzouic, Aurélie; Bemer, Pascale; Gay-Andrieu, Françoise; Bretonnière, Cédric; Lepelletier, Didier; Mahé, Pierre-Joachim; Villers, Daniel; Jarraud, Sophie; Reynaud, Alain; Corvec, Stéphane

    2008-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. We report on a patient who simultaneously developed L. pneumophila serogroup 8 pneumonia and Aspergillus fumigatus lung abscesses. Despite appropriate treatments, Aspergillus disease progressed with metastasis. Coinfections caused by L. pneumophila and A. fumigatus remain exceptional. In apparently immunocompetent patients, corticosteroid therapy is a key risk factor for aspergillosis. PMID:17945454

  4. Stationary phase and mature infectious forms of Legionella pneumophila produce distinct viable but non-culturable cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Bana, Badii H; Haddad, Moreen T; Garduño, Rafael A

    2014-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterial parasite of freshwater protozoa and an accidental waterborne human pathogen. L. pneumophila is highly pleomorphic showing several forms that differentiate within its developmental cycle. In water, L. pneumophila produces viable but non-culturable cells (VBNCCs), which remain largely uncharacterized. We produced VBNCCs from two developmental forms of L. pneumophila [stationary phase forms (SPFs) and mature infectious forms (MIFs)] in two water microcosms [double-deionized (dd) and tap water] at 45°C. In contrast with SPFs, MIFs upheld a robust ultrastructure and high viability in the two water microcosms. In dd-water, MIFs and SPFs lost their culturability faster than in tap water and did not consume their poly-β-hydroxybutyrate inclusions. Resuscitation in Acanthamoeba castellani was only possible for VBNCCs produced from SPFs in tap water. Addition of salts to dd-water prolonged L. pneumophila culturability to tap water levels, suggesting that L. pneumophila requires ions to maintain its readiness to resume growth. VBNCCs resisted detergent lysis and digestion in the ciliate Tetrahymena, except for VBNCCs produced from SPFs in dd-water. L. pneumophila VBNCCs thus show distinct traits according to its originating developmental form and the surrounding water microcosm. PMID:23968544

  5. Small Regulatory RNA and Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Faucher, Sébastien P.; Shuman, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterial species that is ubiquitous in almost any aqueous environment. It is the agent of Legionnaires’ disease, an acute and often under-reported form of pneumonia. In mammals, L. pneumophila replicates inside macrophages within a modified vacuole. Many protein regulators have been identified that control virulence-related properties, including RpoS, LetA/LetS, and PmrA/PmrB. In the past few years, the importance of regulation of virulence factors by small regulatory RNA (sRNAs) has been increasingly appreciated. This is also the case in L. pneumophila where three sRNAs (RsmY, RsmZ, and 6S RNA) were recently shown to be important determinants of virulence regulation and 79 actively transcribed sRNAs were identified. In this review we describe current knowledge about sRNAs and their regulatory properties and how this relates to the known regulatory systems of L. pneumophila. We also provide a model for sRNA-mediated control of gene expression that serves as a framework for understanding the regulation of virulence-related properties of L. pneumophila. PMID:21833335

  6. Significant role for ladC in initiation of Legionella pneumophila infection.

    PubMed

    Newton, Hayley J; Sansom, Fiona M; Dao, Jenny; Cazalet, Christel; Bruggemann, Holger; Albert-Weissenberger, Christiane; Buchrieser, Carmen; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2008-07-01

    Previously, we identified ladC in a cohort of genes that were present in Legionella pneumophila but absent in other Legionella species. Here we constructed a ladC mutant of L. pneumophila and assessed its ability to replicate in mammalian cell lines and Acanthamoeba castellanii. The ladC mutant was recovered in significantly lower numbers than wild-type L. pneumophila at early time points, which was reversed upon transcomplementation with ladC but not ladC(N430A/R434A), encoding a putative catalytically inactive derivative of the protein. In fact, complementation of ladC::Km with ladC(N430A/R434A) resulted in a severe replication defect within human and amoeba cell models of infection, which did not follow a typical dominant negative phenotype. Using differential immunofluorescence staining to distinguish adherent from intracellular bacteria, we found that the ladC mutant exhibited a 10-fold reduction in adherence to THP-1 macrophages but no difference in uptake by THP-1 cells. When tested in vivo in A/J mice, the competitive index of the ladC mutant dropped fivefold over 72 h, indicating a significant attenuation compared to wild-type L. pneumophila. Although localization of LadC to the bacterial inner membrane suggested that the protein may be involved in signaling pathways that regulate virulence gene expression, microarray analysis indicated that ladC does not influence the transcriptional profile of L. pneumophila in vitro or during A. castellanii infection. Although the mechanism by which LadC modulates the initial interaction between the bacterium and host cell remains unclear, we have established that LadC plays an important role in L. pneumophila infection.

  7. Influence of intra-amoebic and other growth conditions on the surface properties of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, J; Lambert, P A; Brown, M R

    1993-01-01

    The surface properties of Legionella pneumophila were examined by analyzing outer membrane (OM) proteins, lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and cellular fatty acids after growth within Acanthamoeba polyphaga and in vitro under various nutrient-depleted conditions. Intra-amoeba-grown legionellae were found to differ in several respects from cells grown in vitro; most notably, they contained a 15-kDa OM protein and a monounsaturated straight-chain fatty acid (18:1(9)). These compounds were also found in abundant quantities in the host amoeba. Immunoblot analysis of intra-amoeba-grown legionellae with antiacanthamoebic serum revealed that both the bacterial whole cells and Sarkosyl-extracted OMs contained amoebic antigens. The findings suggest that the 15-kDa OM protein is likely to be of amoebic origin and associates with the OM of the bacterium. It is proposed that disruption of amoebic membranes, as a result of intra-amoebic infection, may liberate macromolecules, including a 15-kDa polypeptide, a major constituent of the amoebic membrane, which adhere to the surface of the legionellae. Growth under specific nutrient depletions also had a significant effect on the surface composition of L. pneumophila. Cells grown under phosphate depletion were markedly sensitive to protease K digestion and contained lower levels of LPS, as observed by silver staining of the digests on polyacrylamide gels. Intra-amoeba-grown cells contained more bands than the in vitro-grown organisms, reflecting further differences in the nature of the LPS. The whole-cell fatty acids of the phosphate-depleted cells were appreciably different from those of cells grown under other nutritional conditions. We found no evidence for expression of iron-regulated OM proteins under iron depletion. Images PMID:8335382

  8. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production by human T lymphocytes upon Legionella pneumophila stimulation in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kitsukawa, K; Nakamoto, A; Koito, H; Matsuda, Y; Saito, A; Yamamoto, H

    1995-01-01

    In vitro immune responses to Legionella pneumophila were investigated. When human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy volunteers were stimulated with formalin-killed L. pneumophila for 7 days in vitro, strong proliferative responses were observed. The responding cells were shown to be a CD4 T cell subset. It was also found that the CD4 T cells secreted significant amounts of IFN-gamma into the PBL culture supernatant. The production of IFN-gamma and IL-4 by PBL was measured semiquantitatively by reverse transcriptase-assisted polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) methods. Formalin-killed or live L. pneumophila-stimulated PBL expressed the mRNA for IFN-gamma but not the mRNA for IL-4. The results suggest that the whole bacterium, as opposed to the supernatant, predominantly stimulates Th1 type helper T cells. The cloned T cells specific for L. pneumophila expressed the mRNA for IFN-gamma but not for IL-4. In contrast to formalin-killed or live L. pneumophila stimulation, when PBL were stimulated with the bacterial culture supernatant, the proliferating T cells produced the mRNA for IL-4 as well as for IFN-gamma. A significant correlation between the proliferative response to formalin-killed L. pneumophila and IFN-gamma release in culture was observed (r = 0.6932, P < 0.001) in PBL from 30 healthy volunteers. From these in vitro studies, it is suggested that the whole L. pneumophila bacterium and their soluble antigens stimulate T cells in a manner which results in a different pattern of cytokine production. PMID:7813113

  9. Event-related potential evidence suggesting voters remember political events that never happened

    PubMed Central

    Federmeier, Kara D.; Gonsalves, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Voters tend to misattribute issue positions to political candidates that are consistent with their partisan affiliation, even though these candidates have never explicitly stated or endorsed such stances. The prevailing explanation in political science is that voters misattribute candidates’ issue positions because they use their political knowledge to make educated but incorrect guesses. We suggest that voter errors can also stem from a different source: false memories. The current study examined event-related potential (ERP) responses to misattributed and accurately remembered candidate issue information. We report here that ERP responses to misattributed information can elicit memory signals similar to that of correctly remembered old information—a pattern consistent with a false memory rather than educated guessing interpretation of these misattributions. These results suggest that some types of voter misinformation about candidates may be harder to correct than previously thought. PMID:23202775

  10. Evidence suggests vocal production learning in a cross-fostered Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus).

    PubMed

    Favaro, Livio; Neves, Silvana; Furlati, Stefano; Pessani, Daniela; Martin, Vidal; Janik, Vincent M

    2016-07-01

    Vocal learning is a rare skill in mammals, and we have limited information about the contexts in which they use it. Previous studies suggested that cetaceans in general are skilled at imitating sounds, but only few species have been studied to date. To expand this investigation to another species and to investigate the possible influence of the social environment on vocal learning, we studied the whistle repertoire of a female Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) that was stranded at an early age and was subsequently raised in a group of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). We show that this cross-fostered animal produced vocal signals more akin to those of its Tursiops poolmates than those of Risso's dolphins in the wild. This is one of very few systematic cross-fostering studies in cetaceans and the first to suggest vocal production learning in the Risso's dolphin. Our findings also suggest that social experience is a major factor in the development of the vocal repertoire in this species. PMID:26874843

  11. Child and adolescent psychotherapy in research and practice contexts: review of the evidence and suggestions for improving the field.

    PubMed

    Weisz, J R; Jensen, A L

    2001-01-01

    The body of evidence on child and adolescent psychotherapy outcomes has now grown to more than 500 studies. Here we summarize key findings, focusing on effectiveness and efficacy research. Research is sparse on the effectiveness of treatment in everyday practice, but available evidence suggests little benefit. By contrast, extensive research on efficacy of structured treatments administered under controlled conditions shows very substantial evidence of benefit. We note several specific treatments for which evidence is encouraging, and we offer suggestions for future research. Particularly important will be research on treatment models most often used in practice settings, tests of outcome mediators and moderators, tests employing a broadened range of treatment delivery models, and research bridging the gap between lab-tested treatments and the conditions of real-world practice.

  12. Evidence Suggesting That Discontinuous Dosing of ALK Kinase Inhibitors May Prolong Control of ALK+ Tumors.

    PubMed

    Amin, Amit Dipak; Rajan, Soumya S; Liang, Winnie S; Pongtornpipat, Praechompoo; Groysman, Matthew J; Tapia, Edgar O; Peters, Tara L; Cuyugan, Lori; Adkins, Jonathan; Rimsza, Lisa M; Lussier, Yves A; Puvvada, Soham D; Schatz, Jonathan H

    2015-07-15

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is chromosomally rearranged in a subset of certain cancers, including 2% to 7% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) and ∼70% of anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL). The ALK kinase inhibitors crizotinib and ceritinib are approved for relapsed ALK(+) NSCLC, but acquired resistance to these drugs limits median progression-free survival on average to ∼10 months. Kinase domain mutations are detectable in 25% to 37% of resistant NSCLC samples, with activation of bypass signaling pathways detected frequently with or without concurrent ALK mutations. Here we report that, in contrast to NSCLC cells, drug-resistant ALCL cells show no evidence of bypassing ALK by activating alternate signaling pathways. Instead, drug resistance selected in this setting reflects upregulation of ALK itself. Notably, in the absence of crizotinib or ceritinib, we found that increased ALK signaling rapidly arrested or killed cells, allowing a prolonged control of drug-resistant tumors in vivo with the administration of discontinuous rather than continuous regimens of drug dosing. Furthermore, even when drug resistance mutations were detected in the kinase domain, overexpression of the mutant ALK was toxic to tumor cells. We confirmed these findings derived from human ALCL cells in murine pro-B cells that were transformed to cytokine independence by ectopic expression of an activated NPM-ALK fusion oncoprotein. In summary, our results show how ALK activation functions as a double-edged sword for tumor cell viability, with potential therapeutic implications. PMID:26018086

  13. Evidence Suggesting that Discontinuous Dosing of ALK Kinase Inhibitors May Prolong Control of ALK+ Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Amit Dipak; Rajan, Soumya S.; Liang, Winnie S.; Pongtornpipat, Praechompoo; Groysman, Matthew J.; Tapia, Edgar O.; Peters, Tara L.; Cuyugan, Lori; Adkins, Jonathan; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Lussier, Yves A.; Puvvada, Soham D.; Schatz, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase ALK is chromosomally rearranged in a subset of certain cancers, including 2–7% non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) and ~70% of anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL). The ALK kinase inhibitors crizotinib and ceritinib are approved for relapsed ALK+ NSCLC, but acquired resistance to these drugs limits median progression-free survival on average to ~10 months. Kinase domain mutations are detectable in 25–37% of resistant NSCLC samples, with activation of bypass signaling pathways detected frequently with or without concurrent ALK mutations. Here we report that, in contrast to NSCLC cells, drug resistant ALCL cells show no evidence of bypassing ALK by activating alternate signaling pathways. Instead, drug resistance selected in this setting reflects upregulation of ALK itself. Notably, in the absence of crizotinib or ceritinib, we found that increased ALK signaling rapidly arrested or killed cells, allowing a prolonged control of drug-resistant tumors in vivo with the administration of discontinuous rather than continuous regimens of drug dosing. Furthermore, even when drug resistance mutations were detected in the kinase domain, overexpression of the mutant ALK was toxic to tumor cells. We confirmed these findings derived from human ALCL cells in murine pro-B cells that were transformed to cytokine independence by ectopic expression of an activated NPM-ALK fusion oncoprotein. In summary, our results show how ALK activation functions as a double-edged sword for tumor cell viability, with potential therapeutic implications. PMID:26018086

  14. Dietary options and behavior suggested by plant biomarker evidence in an early human habitat.

    PubMed

    Magill, Clayton R; Ashley, Gail M; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Freeman, Katherine H

    2016-03-15

    The availability of plants and freshwater shapes the diets and social behavior of chimpanzees, our closest living relative. However, limited evidence about the spatial relationships shared between ancestral human (hominin) remains, edible resources, refuge, and freshwater leaves the influence of local resources on our species' evolution open to debate. Exceptionally well-preserved organic geochemical fossils--biomarkers--preserved in a soil horizon resolve different plant communities at meter scales across a contiguous 25,000 m(2) archaeological land surface at Olduvai Gorge from about 2 Ma. Biomarkers reveal hominins had access to aquatic plants and protective woods in a patchwork landscape, which included a spring-fed wetland near a woodland that both were surrounded by open grassland. Numerous cut-marked animal bones are located within the wooded area, and within meters of wetland vegetation delineated by biomarkers for ferns and sedges. Taken together, plant biomarkers, clustered bone debris, and hominin remains define a clear spatial pattern that places animal butchery amid the refuge of an isolated forest patch and near freshwater with diverse edible resources.

  15. Dietary options and behavior suggested by plant biomarker evidence in an early human habitat

    PubMed Central

    Magill, Clayton R.; Ashley, Gail M.; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2016-01-01

    The availability of plants and freshwater shapes the diets and social behavior of chimpanzees, our closest living relative. However, limited evidence about the spatial relationships shared between ancestral human (hominin) remains, edible resources, refuge, and freshwater leaves the influence of local resources on our species’ evolution open to debate. Exceptionally well-preserved organic geochemical fossils—biomarkers—preserved in a soil horizon resolve different plant communities at meter scales across a contiguous 25,000 m2 archaeological land surface at Olduvai Gorge from about 2 Ma. Biomarkers reveal hominins had access to aquatic plants and protective woods in a patchwork landscape, which included a spring-fed wetland near a woodland that both were surrounded by open grassland. Numerous cut-marked animal bones are located within the wooded area, and within meters of wetland vegetation delineated by biomarkers for ferns and sedges. Taken together, plant biomarkers, clustered bone debris, and hominin remains define a clear spatial pattern that places animal butchery amid the refuge of an isolated forest patch and near freshwater with diverse edible resources. PMID:26903646

  16. Dietary options and behavior suggested by plant biomarker evidence in an early human habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magill, Clayton R.; Ashley, Gail M.; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2016-03-01

    The availability of plants and freshwater shapes the diets and social behavior of chimpanzees, our closest living relative. However, limited evidence about the spatial relationships shared between ancestral human (hominin) remains, edible resources, refuge, and freshwater leaves the influence of local resources on our species' evolution open to debate. Exceptionally well-preserved organic geochemical fossils-biomarkers-preserved in a soil horizon resolve different plant communities at meter scales across a contiguous 25,000 m2 archaeological land surface at Olduvai Gorge from about 2 Ma. Biomarkers reveal hominins had access to aquatic plants and protective woods in a patchwork landscape, which included a spring-fed wetland near a woodland that both were surrounded by open grassland. Numerous cut-marked animal bones are located within the wooded area, and within meters of wetland vegetation delineated by biomarkers for ferns and sedges. Taken together, plant biomarkers, clustered bone debris, and hominin remains define a clear spatial pattern that places animal butchery amid the refuge of an isolated forest patch and near freshwater with diverse edible resources.

  17. Dietary options and behavior suggested by plant biomarker evidence in an early human habitat.

    PubMed

    Magill, Clayton R; Ashley, Gail M; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Freeman, Katherine H

    2016-03-15

    The availability of plants and freshwater shapes the diets and social behavior of chimpanzees, our closest living relative. However, limited evidence about the spatial relationships shared between ancestral human (hominin) remains, edible resources, refuge, and freshwater leaves the influence of local resources on our species' evolution open to debate. Exceptionally well-preserved organic geochemical fossils--biomarkers--preserved in a soil horizon resolve different plant communities at meter scales across a contiguous 25,000 m(2) archaeological land surface at Olduvai Gorge from about 2 Ma. Biomarkers reveal hominins had access to aquatic plants and protective woods in a patchwork landscape, which included a spring-fed wetland near a woodland that both were surrounded by open grassland. Numerous cut-marked animal bones are located within the wooded area, and within meters of wetland vegetation delineated by biomarkers for ferns and sedges. Taken together, plant biomarkers, clustered bone debris, and hominin remains define a clear spatial pattern that places animal butchery amid the refuge of an isolated forest patch and near freshwater with diverse edible resources. PMID:26903646

  18. “Mucosal healing” in ulcerative colitis: Between clinical evidence and market suggestion

    PubMed Central

    Pagnini, Cristiano; Menasci, Francesca; Festa, Stefano; Rizzatti, Gianenrico; Fave, Gianfranco Delle

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the prominent role of endoscopy in the management of ulcerative colitis (UC) has been translated into the concept of mucosal healing (MH) as a fundamental therapeutic end-point. This is partially the consequence of growing evidence of a positive prognostic role of MH on the disease course and partially due to market cues indicating a higher rate of MH in patients treated by novel potent biologic agents. The aim of the present review is to clarify the current knowledge of MH in UC, analyzing the definition, the putative prognostic role and the association of MH with the current drugs used to treat UC patients. Because solid data about the management of UC patients based solely on the healing of the mucosa are not yet available, a tailored approach for individual patients thatconsiders the natural history of UC and the presence of prognostic indicators of aggressive disease is desirable. Consequently, unnecessary examinations and treatment would be avoided and restricted to UC patients who require the maximum amount of effort to affect the disease course in the short and long term. PMID:24891976

  19. Genomic and archaeological evidence suggest a dual origin of domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Frantz, Laurent A F; Mullin, Victoria E; Pionnier-Capitan, Maud; Lebrasseur, Ophélie; Ollivier, Morgane; Perri, Angela; Linderholm, Anna; Mattiangeli, Valeria; Teasdale, Matthew D; Dimopoulos, Evangelos A; Tresset, Anne; Duffraisse, Marilyne; McCormick, Finbar; Bartosiewicz, László; Gál, Erika; Nyerges, Éva A; Sablin, Mikhail V; Bréhard, Stéphanie; Mashkour, Marjan; Bălăşescu, Adrian; Gillet, Benjamin; Hughes, Sandrine; Chassaing, Olivier; Hitte, Christophe; Vigne, Jean-Denis; Dobney, Keith; Hänni, Catherine; Bradley, Daniel G; Larson, Greger

    2016-06-01

    The geographic and temporal origins of dogs remain controversial. We generated genetic sequences from 59 ancient dogs and a complete (28x) genome of a late Neolithic dog (dated to ~4800 calendar years before the present) from Ireland. Our analyses revealed a deep split separating modern East Asian and Western Eurasian dogs. Surprisingly, the date of this divergence (~14,000 to 6400 years ago) occurs commensurate with, or several millennia after, the first appearance of dogs in Europe and East Asia. Additional analyses of ancient and modern mitochondrial DNA revealed a sharp discontinuity in haplotype frequencies in Europe. Combined, these results suggest that dogs may have been domesticated independently in Eastern and Western Eurasia from distinct wolf populations. East Eurasian dogs were then possibly transported to Europe with people, where they partially replaced European Paleolithic dogs.

  20. Peculiar symmetry of DNA sequences and evidence suggesting its evolutionary origin in a primeval genetic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, R.; Rothen, F.

    2001-08-01

    Statistical analysis of the distribution of codons in DNA coding sequences of bacteria or archaea suggests that, at some stage of the prebiotic world, the most successful RNA replicating sequences afforded some tendency toward a weak form of palindromic symmetry, namely complementary symmetry. As a consequence, as soon as the machinery allowing translation into proteins was beginning to settle, we assume that primeval versions of the genetic code essentially consisted of pairs of sense-antisense codons. Present-day DNA sequences display footprints of this early symmetry, provided that statistics are made over coding sequences issued from groups of organisms and not only from the genome of an individual species. These fossil traces are proven to be significant from the statistical point of view. They shed some light onto the possible evolution of the genetic code and set some constraints on the way it had to follow.

  1. Genomic and archaeological evidence suggest a dual origin of domestic dogs.

    PubMed

    Frantz, Laurent A F; Mullin, Victoria E; Pionnier-Capitan, Maud; Lebrasseur, Ophélie; Ollivier, Morgane; Perri, Angela; Linderholm, Anna; Mattiangeli, Valeria; Teasdale, Matthew D; Dimopoulos, Evangelos A; Tresset, Anne; Duffraisse, Marilyne; McCormick, Finbar; Bartosiewicz, László; Gál, Erika; Nyerges, Éva A; Sablin, Mikhail V; Bréhard, Stéphanie; Mashkour, Marjan; Bălăşescu, Adrian; Gillet, Benjamin; Hughes, Sandrine; Chassaing, Olivier; Hitte, Christophe; Vigne, Jean-Denis; Dobney, Keith; Hänni, Catherine; Bradley, Daniel G; Larson, Greger

    2016-06-01

    The geographic and temporal origins of dogs remain controversial. We generated genetic sequences from 59 ancient dogs and a complete (28x) genome of a late Neolithic dog (dated to ~4800 calendar years before the present) from Ireland. Our analyses revealed a deep split separating modern East Asian and Western Eurasian dogs. Surprisingly, the date of this divergence (~14,000 to 6400 years ago) occurs commensurate with, or several millennia after, the first appearance of dogs in Europe and East Asia. Additional analyses of ancient and modern mitochondrial DNA revealed a sharp discontinuity in haplotype frequencies in Europe. Combined, these results suggest that dogs may have been domesticated independently in Eastern and Western Eurasia from distinct wolf populations. East Eurasian dogs were then possibly transported to Europe with people, where they partially replaced European Paleolithic dogs. PMID:27257259

  2. Multiple ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases facilitate intracellular replication of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Riedmaier, Patrice; Sansom, Fiona M; Sofian, Trifina; Beddoe, Travis; Schuelein, Ralf; Newton, Hayley J; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2014-09-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an opportunistic pathogen that replicates within alveolar macrophages resulting in the onset of severe atypical pneumonia. Previously we have identified Lpg1905, a eukaryotic-type ecto-NTPDase (nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase) from L. pneumophila that was required for optimal intracellular replication and virulence in a mouse lung infection model. In the present study, we characterized the activity of a second eukaryotic-type NTPDase, Lpg0971, from L. pneumophila. We observed that recombinant Lpg0971 hydrolysed only ATP and exhibited divalent cation preference for manganese (II) ions. Similar to lpg1905, an lpg0971 mutant carrying the plasmid pMIP was attenuated in a mouse lung infection model and impaired for replication in human macrophages and amoebae. Increased trafficking of the LCV (Legionella-containing vacuole) to a LAMP-1 (lysosome-associated membrane protein-1)-positive compartment was observed for both the lpg1905 and lpg0971 mutants carrying pMIP. Complementation with either lpg1905 or lpg0971 restored intracellular replication, suggesting that a minimum level of ATPase activity was required for this function. A double lpg1905/0971 mutant was not more impaired for intracellular replication than the single mutants and complementation of the double mutant with lpg0971, but not lpg1905, restored intracellular replication. This suggested that although the NTPDases have overlapping activities they have distinct functions. Unlike many eukaryotic-type proteins from L. pneumophila, neither Lpg1905 nor Lpg0971 were translocated into the host cell by the Dot/Icm (defective in organelle trafficking/intracellular multiplication) type IV secretion system. Overall our data suggest that the ability of L. pneumophila to replicate in eukaryotic cells relies in part on the ability of the pathogen to hydrolyse ATP within an intracellular compartment.

  3. Meaningful use of health information technology: evidence suggests benefits and challenges lie ahead.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Michael F; Poon, Eric

    2011-12-01

    Less than 3 years into the passage of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, measurable results are emerging. For example, in the first 11 months during which healthcare providers ("eligible professionals") and acute care hospitals ("eligible hospitals") had the opportunity to demonstrate stage 1 "Meaningful Use" of Healthcare Information Technology (HIT), more than 20,000 "eligible professionals" and 750 "eligible hospitals" have done so. In the current issue of The American Journal of Managed Care, we showcase examples of HITECH's potential impact, as well as illustrate the opportunities and challenges ahead. Two studies in this issue illustrate how HIT can improve the capacity of our healthcare system to manage chronic illnesses. The study by Vollmer et al describes how an interactive voice recognition system can improve adherence to inhaled corticosteroids among individuals with asthma in a large health maintenance organization. Shelley's study shows that the combination of electronic medical records, clinical decision support, and performance feedback can improve the rate of blood pressure control in patients with hypertension who receive care in community health centers. Together, these studies provide hope that the nation's investment in HIT could one day yield clinical dividends. Three other studies in this issue suggest that success for HIT will require attention to both technological and sociological factors. The study by Millery et al attributes the success of an HIT-based intervention to a multi-faceted approach that involves a combination of decision support tools, systematic provider feedback, implementation support, and leadership. Results from Abramson's study suggest that the full error-reduction potential of e-prescribing may only be reached with the combination of on-line clinical decision support and support for clinicians. The study by

  4. Kinetic evidence suggests spinodal phase separation in stratum corneum models by IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Richard; Selevany, Ibrahim; Moore, David J; Mack Correa, M Catherine; Mao, Guangru; Walters, Russel M; Flach, Carol R

    2014-04-24

    Although lipid structure in models for the stratum corneum (SC), the main barrier to skin permeability, has been extensively studied, only limited data are extant concerning the kinetic mechanism for the formation of domains, lamellar phases, and lipid packing motifs. Such information would be of substantial interest in the characterization of the effects of disease states which disrupt the barrier. Kinetic IR spectroscopy measurements probed the temporal sequence of molecular events producing ordered structures in a three-component SC model of equimolar ceramide[NS] (cer[NS]), perdeuterated stearic acid-d35 (SA-d35), and cholesterol. Samples, heated above Tm, were quenched to 31 °C, and then spectra were recorded at ∼15 min intervals for a total of 20-150 h. IR provides unique molecular structure information about headgroup H-bonding, lipid packing, and lipid chain order. The following sequence for phase separation was observed: (1) Formation of ceramide amide H-bonds from disordered forms to ordered structures (0.5-4 h); (2) appearance of ordered ceramide chains with some orthorhombically packed structures (0.5-8 h); and (3) phase separation of large orthorhombic domains of SA-d35 (4-10 h). A spinodal decomposition mechanism, defined by continuous composition changes during the phase separation, suggests a qualitative description for these events.

  5. Genomic evidence for rod monochromacy in sloths and armadillos suggests early subterranean history for Xenarthra.

    PubMed

    Emerling, Christopher A; Springer, Mark S

    2015-02-01

    Rod monochromacy is a rare condition in vertebrates characterized by the absence of cone photoreceptor cells. The resulting phenotype is colourblindness and low acuity vision in dim-light and blindness in bright-light conditions. Early reports of xenarthrans (armadillos, sloths and anteaters) suggest that they are rod monochromats, but this has not been tested with genomic data. We searched the genomes of Dasypus novemcinctus (nine-banded armadillo), Choloepus hoffmanni (Hoffmann's two-toed sloth) and Mylodon darwinii (extinct ground sloth) for retinal photoreceptor genes and examined them for inactivating mutations. We performed PCR and Sanger sequencing on cone phototransduction genes of 10 additional xenarthrans to test for shared inactivating mutations and estimated the timing of inactivation for photoreceptor pseudogenes. We concluded that a stem xenarthran became an long-wavelength sensitive-cone monochromat following a missense mutation at a critical residue in SWS1, and a stem cingulate (armadillos, glyptodonts and pampatheres) and stem pilosan (sloths and anteaters) independently acquired rod monochromacy early in their evolutionary history following the inactivation of LWS and PDE6C, respectively. We hypothesize that rod monochromacy in armadillos and pilosans evolved as an adaptation to a subterranean habitat in the early history of Xenarthra. The presence of rod monochromacy has major implications for understanding xenarthran behavioural ecology and evolution. PMID:25540280

  6. Evidence suggesting a role for hydroxyl radical in passive Heymann nephritis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, S.V. )

    1988-03-01

    The authors examined the effect of scavengers of reactive oxygen metabolites on proteinuria in the passive Heymann nephritis model of membranous nephropathy. Passive Heymann nephritis was induced by a single intravenous injection of anti-Fx1A IgG in a dose of 10 mg/100 g body weight. Superoxide dismutase, a scavenger of superoxide or catalase which destroys hydrogen peroxide, did not affect the proteinuria. In contrasts, dimethylthiourea (DMTU), a scavenger of hydroxyl radical, markedly reduced the proteinuria. Experiments with {sup 125}I-labeled anti-Fx1A antibody demonstrated that DMTU did not affect the amount of antibody deposited in the kidney. Semiquantitative estimation of IgG and complement deposition in the kidneys showed no differences between the DMTU-treated and control rats. A second hydroxyl radical scavenger, sodium benzoate also resulted in marked reduction in proteinuria. Because of the participation of iron in biological systems to generate hydroxyl radical, they also examined the effect of deferoxamine (DFO) an iron chelator, on the anti-Fx1A-induced proteinuria. There was a significant reduction in proteinuria in rats treated concurrently with DFO. These results suggest a potential role of the hydroxyl radical in passive Heymann nephritis.

  7. Genomic evidence for rod monochromacy in sloths and armadillos suggests early subterranean history for Xenarthra.

    PubMed

    Emerling, Christopher A; Springer, Mark S

    2015-02-01

    Rod monochromacy is a rare condition in vertebrates characterized by the absence of cone photoreceptor cells. The resulting phenotype is colourblindness and low acuity vision in dim-light and blindness in bright-light conditions. Early reports of xenarthrans (armadillos, sloths and anteaters) suggest that they are rod monochromats, but this has not been tested with genomic data. We searched the genomes of Dasypus novemcinctus (nine-banded armadillo), Choloepus hoffmanni (Hoffmann's two-toed sloth) and Mylodon darwinii (extinct ground sloth) for retinal photoreceptor genes and examined them for inactivating mutations. We performed PCR and Sanger sequencing on cone phototransduction genes of 10 additional xenarthrans to test for shared inactivating mutations and estimated the timing of inactivation for photoreceptor pseudogenes. We concluded that a stem xenarthran became an long-wavelength sensitive-cone monochromat following a missense mutation at a critical residue in SWS1, and a stem cingulate (armadillos, glyptodonts and pampatheres) and stem pilosan (sloths and anteaters) independently acquired rod monochromacy early in their evolutionary history following the inactivation of LWS and PDE6C, respectively. We hypothesize that rod monochromacy in armadillos and pilosans evolved as an adaptation to a subterranean habitat in the early history of Xenarthra. The presence of rod monochromacy has major implications for understanding xenarthran behavioural ecology and evolution.

  8. Genomic evidence for rod monochromacy in sloths and armadillos suggests early subterranean history for Xenarthra

    PubMed Central

    Emerling, Christopher A.; Springer, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Rod monochromacy is a rare condition in vertebrates characterized by the absence of cone photoreceptor cells. The resulting phenotype is colourblindness and low acuity vision in dim-light and blindness in bright-light conditions. Early reports of xenarthrans (armadillos, sloths and anteaters) suggest that they are rod monochromats, but this has not been tested with genomic data. We searched the genomes of Dasypus novemcinctus (nine-banded armadillo), Choloepus hoffmanni (Hoffmann's two-toed sloth) and Mylodon darwinii (extinct ground sloth) for retinal photoreceptor genes and examined them for inactivating mutations. We performed PCR and Sanger sequencing on cone phototransduction genes of 10 additional xenarthrans to test for shared inactivating mutations and estimated the timing of inactivation for photoreceptor pseudogenes. We concluded that a stem xenarthran became an long-wavelength sensitive-cone monochromat following a missense mutation at a critical residue in SWS1, and a stem cingulate (armadillos, glyptodonts and pampatheres) and stem pilosan (sloths and anteaters) independently acquired rod monochromacy early in their evolutionary history following the inactivation of LWS and PDE6C, respectively. We hypothesize that rod monochromacy in armadillos and pilosans evolved as an adaptation to a subterranean habitat in the early history of Xenarthra. The presence of rod monochromacy has major implications for understanding xenarthran behavioural ecology and evolution. PMID:25540280

  9. Morphologic evidence suggestive of hypertension in western gray kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus).

    PubMed

    Kagan, R A; Kinsel, M; Gloor, K; Mylniczenko, N D; Langan, J N; Farina, L L; Terio, K A

    2009-09-01

    Marked renal vascular changes, suggestive of hypertension, were present in adult western gray kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus) from a single facility over a 14-year period. A subset of these kangaroos also had vague clinical nervous system deficits, including blindness. To characterize the vascular lesions, determine prevalence, and document other changes, case histories and archival tissue sections from 21 adult kangaroos (8 male, 13 female) that died or were euthanatized between 1994 and 2008 were reviewed. Relevant lesions included increased thickness of the renal arteriolar tunica media with smooth muscle hypertrophy and/or hyperplasia, accumulation of extracellular matrix within arterioles, increased vascular tortuosity, and varying degrees of juxtaglomerular hyperplasia. Renal tissue from two more severely affected animals was further examined by transmission electron microscopy, highlighting arteriolar endothelial cell hypertrophy and disruption of the medial architecture. Hypertrophy of arteries and arterioles in other organ systems was also present (3/21), including vessels in the brain and spinal cord of one animal with clinical neurologic signs. Four kangaroos had antemortem retinal detachment, a potential sequel of hypertension in humans and domestic mammals. The cause of these vascular lesions in this mob is uncertain. Lesions were not associated with an infectious disease process, age, underlying renal disease, or thyroid abnormalities. In the absence of other causes, hypertension was a differential. Further investigation into clinical significance and predisposing factors, such as genetics and diet, is warranted.

  10. The syndrome of continuous muscle fiber activity. Evidence to suggest proximal neurogenic causation.

    PubMed

    Irani, P F; Purohit, A V; Wadia, N H

    1977-04-01

    Four patients with the syndrome of continuous muscle fiber activity were seen in a period of 6 years. Young females predominated. Remarkable improvement followed phenytoin sodium and carbamazepine administration in three patients, one of whom was "cured" within 4 years. In the remaining patient the response was inconstant. Electromyography showed abnormal spontaneous activity with diphasic and triphasic potentials appearing as doublets and multiplets. Waxing and waning was observed. D-tubocurarine and succinylcholine abolished the spontaneous activity excluding the muscle and the myoneural junction as its source. Spinal anesthesia, thiopental sodium, sleep and baclofen had no effect on it, ruling out a central source. In three patients, nerve blocks at the knee and elbow or wrist abolished this activity pointing to a proximal site of origin in the nerve somewhere between the spinal cord and the nerve block. In the remaining patient such a block significantly reduced but did not abolished the activity suggesting a dual source above and below the block. Finally successive examinations in one of our patients led us to believe that this activity may arise from different sites at varying times. It appears that regardless of the site of origin of the activity in the motor axon the counter part clinical syndrome remains the same. PMID:857572

  11. Evidence to Suggest That Teeth Act as Human Ornament Displays Signalling Mate Quality

    PubMed Central

    Hendrie, Colin A.; Brewer, Gayle

    2012-01-01

    Ornament displays seen in animals convey information about genetic quality, developmental history and current disease state to both prospective sexual partners and potential rivals. In this context, showing of teeth through smiles etc is a characteristic feature of human social interaction. Tooth development is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Adult teeth record environmental and traumatic events, as well as the effects of disease and ageing. Teeth are therefore a rich source of information about individuals and their histories. This study examined the effects of digital manipulations of tooth colour and spacing. Results showed that deviation away from normal spacing and/or the presence of yellowed colouration had negative effects on ratings of attractiveness and that these effects were markedly stronger in female models. Whitening had no effect beyond that produced by natural colouration. This indicates that these colour induced alterations in ratings of attractiveness are mediated by increased/decreased yellowing rather than whitening per se. Teeth become yellower and darker with age. Therefore it is suggested that whilst the teeth of both sexes act as human ornament displays, the female display is more complex because it additionally signals residual reproductive value. PMID:22860076

  12. Can technical, functional and structural characteristics of dental units predict Legionella pneumophila and Pseudomonas aeruginosa contamination?

    PubMed

    Aprea, Luigi; Cannova, Lucia; Firenze, Alberto; Bivona, Maria S; Amodio, Emanuele; Romano, Nino

    2010-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are common colonizers of water environments, particularly dental unit waterlines. The aim of this study was to assess whether the technical, functional and structural characteristics of dental units can influence the presence and the levels of opportunistic pathogens. Overall, 42 water samples were collected from dental units in a teaching hospital in Palermo, Italy, including 21 samples from the 21 taps supplied by the municipal water distribution system and 21 samples from oral rinsing cups at 21 dental units. L. pneumophila was present in 16 out of 21 water samples (76.2%) from dental units, and the median concentration was higher in samples from oral rinsing cups than in those from taps (P < 0.001). P. aeruginosa was equally distributed in water samples collected from oral rinsing cups and from taps. Some characteristics of dental units (age, number of chairs per room, number of patients per day and water temperature) were slightly associated with the presence of P. aeruginosa, but not with contamination by L. pneumophila. Our experience suggests that L. pneumophila is frequently detected in dental units, as reported in previous studies, whereas P. aeruginosa is not a frequent contaminant. As a consequence, microbiological control of water quality should be routinely performed, and should include the detection of opportunistic pathogens when bacterial contamination is expected.

  13. Soluble NSF attachment protein receptor molecular mimicry by a Legionella pneumophila Dot/Icm effector.

    PubMed

    King, Nathan P; Newton, Patrice; Schuelein, Ralf; Brown, Darren L; Petru, Marketa; Zarsky, Vojtech; Dolezal, Pavel; Luo, Lin; Bugarcic, Andrea; Stanley, Amanda C; Murray, Rachael Z; Collins, Brett M; Teasdale, Rohan D; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Stow, Jennifer L

    2015-06-01

    Upon infection, Legionella pneumophila uses the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system to translocate effector proteins from the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) into the host cell cytoplasm. The effectors target a wide array of host cellular processes that aid LCV biogenesis, including the manipulation of membrane trafficking. In this study, we used a hidden Markov model screen to identify two novel, non-eukaryotic soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) homologs: the bacterial Legionella SNARE effector A (LseA) and viral SNARE homolog A proteins. We characterized LseA as a Dot/Icm effector of L. pneumophila, which has close homology to the Qc-SNARE subfamily. The lseA gene was present in multiple sequenced L. pneumophila strains including Corby and was well distributed among L. pneumophila clinical and environmental isolates. Employing a variety of biochemical, cell biological and microbiological techniques, we found that farnesylated LseA localized to membranes associated with the Golgi complex in mammalian cells and LseA interacted with a subset of Qa-, Qb- and R-SNAREs in host cells. Our results suggested that LseA acts as a SNARE protein and has the potential to regulate or mediate membrane fusion events in Golgi-associated pathways.

  14. Passage through Tetrahymena tropicalis enhances the resistance to stress and the infectivity of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Koubar, Mohamad; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Garduño, Rafael A; Frère, Jacques

    2011-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterium prevalent in fresh water which accidentally infects humans and is responsible for the disease called legionellosis. Intracellular growth of L. pneumophila in Tetrahymena is inconsistent; in the species Tetrahymena tropicalis stationary-phase forms (SPFs) of L. pneumophila differentiate into mature intracellular forms (MIFs) without apparent bacterial replication and are expelled from the ciliate as pellets containing numerous MIFS. In the present work, we tested the impact of L. pneumophila passage through T. tropicalis. We observed that MIFs released from T. tropicalis are more resistant to various stresses than SPFs. Under our conditions, MIFs harboured a higher gentamicin resistance, maintained even after 3 months as pellets. Long-term survival essays revealed that MIFs survived better in a nutrient-poor environment than SFPs, as a reduction of only about 3 logs was observed after 4 months in the MIF population, whereas no cultivable SPFs were detected after 3 months in the same medium, corresponding to a loss of about 7 logs. We have also observed that MIFs are significantly more infectious in human pneumocyte cells compared with SPFs. These results strongly suggest a potential role of ciliates in increasing the risk of legionellosis. PMID:22092856

  15. Contamination of Hospital Water Supplies in Gilan, Iran, with Legionella pneumophila, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi Jalali Moghadam, Masoumeh; Honarmand, Hamidreza; Asfaram Meshginshahr, Sajad

    2015-01-01

    This study is designed to determine the contamination degree of hospital water supplies with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, and E. coli in Gilan, Iran. Samples were collected directly into sterile containers and concentrated by centrifuge. Half part of any sample transferred to yeast extract broth and the second part transferred to Trypticase Soy Broth and incubated for 3 days. DNA was extracted by using commercial kit. Four rounds of PCR were performed as follows: multiplex PCR for detecting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Integron 1, and Metallo-β-lactamases gene; PCR for detecting Legionella pneumophila and mip gene separately; PCR for detecting E. coli; and another PCR for detecting whole bacterial presence. Contamination rates of cold, warm, and incubator water samples with P. aeruginosa, were 16.6%, 37.5%, and 6.8% consequently. Degrees of contamination with L. pneumophila were 3.3%, 9.3%, and 10.9% and with E. coli were zero, 6.2%, and zero. Total bacterial contamination of cold, warm, and incubator water samples was 93.3%, 84.4%, and 89.0% consequently. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found in 20.0% of all samples. Contamination degree with P. aeruginosa was considerable and with L. pneumophila was moderate. Metallo-β-lactamases gene was found frequently indicating widespread multiple drug resistance bacteria. We suggest using new decontamination method based on nanotechnology. PMID:26448745

  16. Discovery of a Nonclassical Siderophore, Legiobactin, Produced by Strains of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Liles, Mark R.; Scheel, Tracy Aber; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms by which Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular parasite and the agent of Legionnaires' disease, acquires iron are largely unexplained. Several earlier studies indicated that L. pneumophila does not elaborate siderophores. However, we now present evidence that supernatants from L. pneumophila cultures can contain a nonproteinaceous, high-affinity iron chelator. More specifically, when aerobically grown in a low-iron, chemically defined medium (CDM), L. pneumophila secretes a substance that is reactive in the chrome azurol S (CAS) assay. Importantly, the siderophore-like activity was only observed when the CDM cultures were inoculated to relatively high density with bacteria that had been grown overnight to log or early stationary phase in CDM or buffered yeast extract. Inocula derived from late-stationary-phase cultures, despite ultimately growing, consistently failed to result in the elaboration of siderophore-like activity. The Legionella CAS reactivity was detected in the culture supernatants of the serogroup 1 strains 130b and Philadelphia-1, as well as those from representatives of other serogroups and other Legionella species. The CAS-reactive substance was resistant to boiling and protease treatment and was associated with the <1-kDa supernatant fraction. As would also be expected for a siderophore, the addition of 0.5 or 2.0 μM iron to the cultures repressed the expression of the CAS-reactive substance. Interestingly, the supernatants were negative in the Arnow, Csáky, and Rioux assays, indicating that the Legionella siderophore was not a classic catecholate or hydroxamate and, hence, might have a novel structure. We have designated the L. pneumophila siderophore legiobactin. PMID:10633110

  17. Sel1 repeat protein LpnE is a Legionella pneumophila virulence determinant that influences vacuolar trafficking.

    PubMed

    Newton, Hayley J; Sansom, Fiona M; Dao, Jenny; McAlister, Adrian D; Sloan, Joan; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2007-12-01

    The environmental pathogen Legionella pneumophila possesses five proteins with Sel1 repeats (SLRs) from the tetratricopeptide repeat protein family. Three of these proteins, LpnE, EnhC, and LidL, have been implicated in the ability of L. pneumophila to efficiently establish infection and/or manipulate host cell trafficking events. Previously, we showed that LpnE is important for L. pneumophila entry into macrophages and epithelial cells. In further virulence studies here, we show that LpnE is also required for efficient infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii by L. pneumophila and for replication of L. pneumophila in the lungs of A/J mice. In addition, we found that the role of LpnE in host cell invasion is dependent on the eight SLR regions of the protein. A truncated form of LpnE lacking the two C-terminal SLR domains was unable to complement the invasion defect of an lpnE mutant of L. pneumophila 130b in both the A549 and THP-1 cell lines. The lpnE mutant displayed impaired avoidance of LAMP-1 association, suggesting that LpnE influenced trafficking of the L. pneumophila vacuole, similar to the case for EnhC and LidL. We also found that LpnE was present in L. pneumophila culture supernatants and that its export was independent of both the Lsp type II secretion system and the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. The fact that LpnE was exported suggested that the protein may interact with a eukaryotic protein. Using LpnE as bait, we screened a HeLa cell cDNA library for interacting partners, using the yeast two-hybrid system. Examination of the protein-protein interaction between LpnE and a eukaryotic protein, obscurin-like protein 1, suggested that LpnE can interact with eukaryotic proteins containing immunoglobulin-like folds via the SLR regions. This investigation has further characterized the contribution of LpnE to L. pneumophila virulence and, more specifically, the importance of the SLR regions to LpnE function.

  18. Cytogenetic and molecular evidence suggest multiple origins and geographical parthenogenesis in Nothoscordum gracile (Alliaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Luiz Gustavo Rodrigues; Crosa, Orfeo; Speranza, Pablo; Guerra, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Nothoscordum gracile is an apomitic tetraploid widely distributed throughout the Americas and naturalized in many temperate regions of other continents. It has been suggested to form a species complex with sexual and apomictic N. nudicaule and N. macrostemon. Tetraploids of these species also share a structurally heterozygous chromosome complement 2n = 19 (13M + 6A). In this work, the origin of N. gracile and its relationships with its related species was investigated based on cytological and molecular data. Methods Cytogenetic analyses were based on meiotic behaviour, CMA bands, localization of 5S and 45S rDNA sites, and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). Nuclear ITS and plastidial trnL-trnF sequences were also obtained for most individuals. Key Results Proximal CMA bands were observed in the long arms of all acrocentrics of 2x and 4x N. macrostemon but not in diploid and some tetraploid cytotypes of N. nudicaule. Samples of N. gracile showed a variable number of CMA bands in the long arms of acrocentrics. Analysis of ITS sequences, dot-blot, GISH, and 5S and 45S rDNA sites, revealed no differentiation among the three species. The trnL-trnF cpDNA fragment showed variation with a trend to geographical structuring irrespective of morphospecies and fully congruent with karyotype variation. Conclusions The 2n = 19 karyotype was probably formed by a centric fusion event occurring in N. nudicaule and later transmitted to tetraploid cytotypes of N. macrostemon. Diploids of N. nudicaule and N. macrostemon appeared as consistent recently diverged species, whereas tetraploid apomicts seem to constitute an assemblage of polyploid hybrids originating from multiple independent hybridization events between them, part of which are morphologically recognizable as N. gracile. PMID:22362660

  19. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from hotels of Greece.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, S D; Antoniadis, A; Papapaganagiotou, J; Stefanou, T

    1989-03-01

    Twenty water samples collected from 6 hotels situated in various areas of Greece were examined for the presence of Legionella pneumophila and Legionella-like organisms. Five of the six hotels included in this investigation were associated with cases of legionellosis. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 and 8 were isolated from four of six hotels, mainly from the hot water supply system. This is the first isolation and identification of L. pneumophila in Greece.

  20. The impact of monochloramine on the diversity and dynamics of Legionella pneumophila subpopulations in a nuclear power plant cooling circuit.

    PubMed

    Jakubek, Delphine; Le Brun, Matthieu; Leblon, Gerard; DuBow, Michael; Binet, Marie

    2013-08-01

    Members of the pathogenic Legionella genus encounter suitable growth conditions in nuclear power plant cooling circuits. To limit its proliferation and ensure that levels remain below regulatory thresholds, chemical treatment with monochloramine can be used in continuous or sequential conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of monochloramine on L. pneumophila subpopulations in the cooling circuits of a nuclear power plant. The chosen procedure involved monitoring the diversity and dynamics of L. pneumophila subpopulations every month over the course of a year in a nuclear power plant cooling circuit, which was treated for 2 months during the period under study. This study confirmed the effectiveness of monochloramine to limit L. pneumophila concentrations in cooling circuits. The culturable L. pneumophila community was strongly affected by the injection of monochloramine. Several subpopulations persisted during treatment at low concentrations (below the detection limit of standard methods), suggesting that the susceptibility of L. pneumophila is strain dependent. Although the composition of the subpopulations was not similar, the resilience of the community structure was observed. Indeed, the community eventually returned to its initial structure and presented a similar pattern of richness, diversity and uniformity to that seen before treatment.

  1. Nuclease Activity of Legionella pneumophila Cas2 Promotes Intracellular Infection of Amoebal Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Felizza F.; Mallama, Celeste A.; Fairbairn, Stephanie G.

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the primary agent of Legionnaires' disease, flourishes in both natural and man-made environments by growing in a wide variety of aquatic amoebae. Recently, we determined that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila promotes intracellular infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, the two amoebae most commonly linked to cases of disease. The Cas2 family of proteins is best known for its role in the bacterial and archeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)–CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system that constitutes a form of adaptive immunity against phage and plasmid. However, the infection event mediated by L. pneumophila Cas2 appeared to be distinct from this function, because cas2 mutants exhibited infectivity defects in the absence of added phage or plasmid and since mutants lacking the CRISPR array or any one of the other cas genes were not impaired in infection ability. We now report that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila has both RNase and DNase activities, with the RNase activity being more pronounced. By characterizing a catalytically deficient version of Cas2, we determined that nuclease activity is critical for promoting infection of amoebae. Also, introduction of Cas2, but not its catalytic mutant form, into a strain of L. pneumophila that naturally lacks a CRISPR-Cas locus caused that strain to be 40- to 80-fold more infective for amoebae, unequivocally demonstrating that Cas2 facilitates the infection process independently of any other component encoded within the CRISPR-Cas locus. Finally, a cas2 mutant was impaired for infection of Willaertia magna but not Naegleria lovaniensis, suggesting that Cas2 promotes infection of most but not all amoebal hosts. PMID:25547789

  2. Packaging of live Legionella pneumophila into pellets expelled by Tetrahymena spp. does not require bacterial replication and depends on a Dot/Icm-mediated survival mechanism.

    PubMed

    Berk, Sharon G; Faulkner, Gary; Garduño, Elizabeth; Joy, Mark C; Ortiz-Jimenez, Marco A; Garduño, Rafael A

    2008-04-01

    The freshwater ciliate Tetrahymena sp. efficiently ingested, but poorly digested, virulent strains of the gram-negative intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila. Ciliates expelled live legionellae packaged in free spherical pellets. The ingested legionellae showed no ultrastructural indicators of cell division either within intracellular food vacuoles or in the expelled pellets, while the number of CFU consistently decreased as a function of time postinoculation, suggesting a lack of L. pneumophila replication inside Tetrahymena. Pulse-chase feeding experiments with fluorescent L. pneumophila and Escherichia coli indicated that actively feeding ciliates maintain a rapid and steady turnover of food vacuoles, so that the intravacuolar residence of the ingested bacteria was as short as 1 to 2 h. L. pneumophila mutants with a defective Dot/Icm virulence system were efficiently digested by Tetrahymena sp. In contrast to pellets of virulent L. pneumophila, the pellets produced by ciliates feeding on dot mutants contained very few bacterial cells but abundant membrane whorls. The whorls became labeled with a specific antibody against L. pneumophila OmpS, indicating that they were outer membrane remnants of digested legionellae. Ciliates that fed on genetically complemented dot mutants produced numerous pellets containing live legionellae, establishing the importance of the Dot/Icm system to resist digestion. We thus concluded that production of pellets containing live virulent L. pneumophila depends on bacterial survival (mediated by the Dot/Icm system) and occurs in the absence of bacterial replication. Pellets of virulent L. pneumophila may contribute to the transmission of Legionnaires' disease, an issue currently under investigation. PMID:18245233

  3. Effect of copper and silver ionization on Legionella pneumophila eradication

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.E.; Vidic, R.D.; Stout, J.E.; Yu, V.L.

    1995-11-01

    The presence of Legionella pneumophila in water distribution systems has been epidemiologically linked to hospital-acquired Legionnaires` disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of copper and silver ions for inactivation of Legionella pneumophila. Experimental results showed that L. pneumophila was completely inactivated at copper concentration of 0.1 mg/L within the period of 2.5 hours while 6-log reduction requires a Ct value of 0.8 mg/L*hour. On the other hand, more than 24 hours was required to completely eradicate L. pneumophila at the highest silver ion concentration (0.08 mg/L) tested and only 4-log reduction is observed for Ct value of 0.8 mg/L*hour. The effective synergism of these ions in eradicating L. pneumophila was observed for copper concentrations of 0.05 and silver concentration of 0.04 mg/L. One approach for the control of L. pneumophila in water distribution systems is to initiate copper/silver ion concentrations at 0.4/0.04 mg/L to achieve complete eradication of L. pneumophila already present in the water distribution system (as established in previous studies) followed by a lower residual (0.05/0.04 mg/L) protection against L. pneumophila in the incoming water.

  4. Legionella pneumophila Secretes an Endoglucanase That Belongs to the Family-5 of Glycosyl Hydrolases and Is Dependent upon Type II Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Meghan M.; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.

    2009-01-01

    Examination of cell-free culture supernatants revealed that Legionella pneumophila strains secrete an endoglucanase activity. L. pneumophila lspF mutants were deficient for this activity, indicating that the endoglucanase is secreted by the bacterium’s type II protein secretion system. Inactivation of celA, encoding a member of the family-5 of glycosyl hydrolases, abolished the endoglucanase activity in L. pneumophila culture supernatants. The cloned celA gene conferred activity upon recombinant Escherichia coli. Thus, CelA is the major secreted endoglucanase of L. pneumophila. Mutants inactivated for celA grew normally in protozoa and macrophage, indicating that CelA is not required for the intracellular phase of L. pneumophila. The CelA endoglucanase is one of at least 25 proteins secreted by the type II system of L. pneumophila and the seventeenth type of enzyme effector associated with this pathway. Only a subset of the other Legionella species tested expressed secreted endoglucanase activity, suggesting that the type II secretion output differs among the different legionellae. Overall, this study represents the first documentation of an endoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.4) being produced by a strain of Legionella. PMID:19817866

  5. Legionella pneumophila serogroup Lansing 3 isolated from a patient with fatal pneumonia, and descriptions of L. pneumophila subsp. pneumophila subsp. nov., L. pneumophila subsp. fraseri subsp. nov., and L. pneumophila subsp. pascullei subsp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, D J; Steigerwalt, A G; Epple, P; Bibb, W F; McKinney, R M; Starnes, R W; Colville, J M; Selander, R K; Edelstein, P H; Moss, C W

    1988-01-01

    Previous DNA relatedness and enzyme electrophoretic mobility studies indicated heterogeneity among strains of Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1, 4, 5, and Lansing 3 (a new, as yet unnumbered serogroup). In this study 60 L. pneumophila strains were studied by DNA hybridization (hydroxyapatite method) to assess their genomic relatedness. These strains were also studied biochemically and serologically to determine whether they formed one or more phenotypic groups. DNA relatedness studies identified three groups. DNA group 1 contained the type strain Philadelphia 1 and strains from serogroups 1 through 14 of L. pneumophila. The average relatedness of DNA group 1 strains was 88% at 60 degrees C with 1.1% divergence in related sequences and 85% at 75 degrees C. DNA group 2 contained strain Los Angeles 1, the reference strain of serogroup 4, and strains of serogroups 1, 4, 5, and Lansing 3, an unnumbered serogroup. Average relatedness of DNA group 2 strains was 84% at 60 degrees C with 0.7% divergence and 87% at 75 degrees C. Reciprocal relatedness of DNA groups 1 and 2 was approximately 67% at 60 degrees C with 6.0% divergence and 48% at 75 degrees C. DNA group 3 strains were in serogroup 5. They were 98% related at 60 degrees C with 0.5% divergence and 97% related at 75 degrees C. Reciprocal relatedness of DNA group 3 and DNA group 1 was approximately 74% at 60 degrees C with 5.3% divergence and 43% at 75 degrees C, and reciprocal relatedness of DNA groups 3 and 2 was 66% at 60 degrees C with 5.7% divergence and 55% at 75 degrees C. The DNA groups could not be separated biochemically or serologically or by cell wall fatty acid and isoprenoid quinone composition. Three subspecies of L. pneumophila are proposed to accommodate the three DNA groups: L. pneumophila subsp. pneumophila subsp. nov. for DNA group 1, L. pneumophila subsp. fraseri subsp. nov. for DNA group 2, and pneumophila subsp. pascullei subsp. nov. for DNA group 3. PMID:3053773

  6. Evidence-based competencies for improving communication skills in graduate medical education: a review with suggestions for implementation.

    PubMed

    Henry, Stephen G; Holmboe, Eric S; Frankel, Richard M

    2013-05-01

    Communicating with patients is arguably the most common and important activity in medical practice, but this activity receives relatively little emphasis in graduate medical education. We propose 12 evidence-based communication competencies that program directors can adopt as a framework for teaching and evaluating residents' communication skills. We review supporting evidence for these competencies and argue that communication should be treated like a procedural skill that must be taught and evaluated by observing real resident-patient interactions. We make practical suggestions for implementing these competencies by addressing three critical components of a competency-based approach to communication skills: patient safety, faculty development, and direct observation of residents. This approach to teaching and assessing communication skills provides a rationale for incorporating routine direct observation into graduate medical education programs and also for designing communication skills training that ensures graduating residents develop the skills needed to provide safe, effective patient care.

  7. Legionella pneumophila Arthritis: use of medium specific for Mycobacteria for isolation of L. pneumophila in culture of articular fluid specimens.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Pascale; Leautez, Sophie; Ninin, Emmanuelle; Jarraud, Sophie; Raffi, François; Drugeon, Henri

    2002-07-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of acute purulent arthritis due to Legionella pneumophila in an immunosuppressed patient. L. pneumophila was isolated from samples of blood and articular fluid cultured with use of medium specific for mycobacteria (Bactec 13A medium).

  8. Legionella pneumophila Arthritis: use of medium specific for Mycobacteria for isolation of L. pneumophila in culture of articular fluid specimens.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Pascale; Leautez, Sophie; Ninin, Emmanuelle; Jarraud, Sophie; Raffi, François; Drugeon, Henri

    2002-07-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of acute purulent arthritis due to Legionella pneumophila in an immunosuppressed patient. L. pneumophila was isolated from samples of blood and articular fluid cultured with use of medium specific for mycobacteria (Bactec 13A medium). PMID:12060893

  9. Legionella pneumophilaRequires Polyamines for Optimal Intracellular Growth ▿

    PubMed Central

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K.; Riveroll, Angela L.; Chong, Audrey; Murray, Lois E.; Lewis, P. Jeffrey; Garduño, Rafael A.

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophilareplicates in a membrane-bound compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV), into which it abundantly releases its chaperonin, HtpB. To determine whether HtpB remains within the LCV or reaches the host cell cytoplasm, we infected U937 human macrophages and CHO cells with L. pneumophilaexpressing a translocation reporter consisting of the Bordetella pertussisadenylate cyclase fused to HtpB. These infections led to increased cyclic AMP levels, suggesting that HtpB reaches the host cell cytoplasm. To identify potential functions of cytoplasmic HtpB, we expressed it in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where HtpB induced pseudohyphal growth. A yeast-two-hybrid screen showed that HtpB interacted with S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), an essential yeast enzyme (encoded by SPE2) that is required for polyamine biosynthesis. Increasing the copy number of SPE2induced pseudohyphal growth in S. cerevisiae; thus, we speculated that (i) HtpB induces pseudohyphal growth by activating polyamine synthesis and (ii) L. pneumophilamay require exogenous polyamines for growth. A pharmacological inhibitor of SAMDC significantly reduced L. pneumophilareplication in L929 mouse cells and U937 macrophages, whereas exogenously added polyamines moderately favored intracellular growth, confirming that polyamines and host SAMDC activity promote L. pneumophilaproliferation. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that most known enzymes required for polyamine biosynthesis in bacteria (including SAMDC) are absent in L. pneumophila, further suggesting a need for exogenous polyamines. We hypothesize that HtpB may function to ensure a supply of polyamines in host cells, which are required for the optimal intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. PMID:21742865

  10. Endemicity of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3 in a hospital water supply.

    PubMed

    Franzin, L; Castellani Pastoris, M; Gioannini, P; Villani, G

    1989-04-01

    A microbiological and epidemiological investigation at the Infectious Diseases Hospital in Turin, Italy, demonstrated Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3 at 10(2) to greater than 4 X 10(3) cfu l-1 from 24 of 32 hot water samples collected from hand-basins in six separate buildings. A sample taken from the public water supply, and a hot water sample (80 degrees C) collected from hot water tanks, did not yield legionellas. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3 was found in samples taken at the first point of mixed hot and cold water (50 degrees C) at 3 X 10(2) cfu l-1. 12 of 26 samples from the shower-heads yielded 10(3) to 2.5 X 10(5) cfu l-1 and one of 12 water samples from oxygen bubble humidifiers tested yielded 1.6 X 10(4) cfu l-1. No other legionellas species or serogroups of Legionella pneumophila were isolated during the study. No cases of nosocomial pneumonia were detected among 3653 patients' records, nor was there serological evidence of Legionella infection in the 180 patients tested. PMID:2567758

  11. Comparison between standard culture and peptide nucleic acid 16S rRNA hybridization quantification to study the influence of physico-chemical parameters on Legionella pneumophila survival in drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gião, M S; Wilks, S A; Azevedo, N F; Vieira, M J; Keevil, C W

    2009-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen that is mainly transmitted by the inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In this article, the influence of several physico-chemical parameters relating to the supply of potable water was studied using a L. pneumophila peptide nucleic acid (PNA) specific probe to quantify total L. pneumophila in addition to standard culture methods. A two-stage chemostat was used to form the heterotrophic biofilms, with biofilm generating vessels fed with naturally occurring L. pneumophila. The substratum was the commonly used potable water pipe material, uPVC. It proved impossible to recover cultivable L. pneumophila due to overgrowth by other microorganisms and/or the loss of cultivability of this pathogen. Nevertheless, results obtained for total L. pneumophila cells in biofilms using a specific PNA probe showed that for the two temperatures studied (15 and 20 degrees C), there were no significant differences when shear stress was increased. However, when a source of carbon was added there was a significant increase in numbers at 20 degrees C. A comparison of the two temperatures showed that at 15 degrees C, the total cell numbers for L. pneumophila were generally higher compared with the total microbial flora, suggesting that lower temperatures support the inclusion of L. pneumophila in drinking water biofilms. The work reported in this article suggests that standard culture methods are not accurate for the evaluation of water quality in terms of L. pneumophila. This raises public health concerns since culture methods are still considered to be the gold standard for assessing the presence of this opportunistic pathogen in water.

  12. Population structure and minimum core genome typing of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Tian; Zhang, Wen; Liu, Wenbin; Zhou, Haijian; Ren, Hongyu; Shao, Zhujun; Lan, Ruiting; Xu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an important human pathogen causing Legionnaires’ disease. In this study, whole genome sequencing (WGS) was used to study the characteristics and population structure of L. pneumophila strains. We sequenced and compared 53 isolates of L. pneumophila covering different serogroups and sequence-based typing (SBT) types (STs). We found that 1,896 single-copy orthologous genes were shared by all isolates and were defined as the minimum core genome (MCG) of L. pneumophila. A total of 323,224 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified among the 53 strains. After excluding 314,059 SNPs which were likely to be results of recombination, the remaining 9,165 SNPs were referred to as MCG SNPs. Population Structure analysis based on MCG divided the 53 L. pneumophila into nine MCG groups. The within-group distances were much smaller than the between-group distances, indicating considerable divergence between MCG groups. MCG groups were also supplied by phylogenetic analysis and may be considered as robust taxonomic units within L. pneumophila. Among the nine MCG groups, eight showed high intracellular growth ability while one showed low intracellular growth ability. Furthermore, MCG typing also showed high resolution in subtyping ST1 strains. The results obtained in this study provided significant insights into the evolution, population structure and pathogenicity of L. pneumophila. PMID:26888563

  13. Exposure to Synthetic Gray Water Inhibits Amoeba Encystation and Alters Expression of Legionella pneumophila Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingrang; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Water conservation efforts have focused on gray water (GW) usage, especially for applications that do not require potable water quality. However, there is a need to better understand environmental pathogens and their free-living amoeba (FLA) hosts within GW, given their growth potential in stored gray water. Using synthetic gray water (sGW) we examined three strains of the water-based pathogen Legionella pneumophila and its FLA hosts Acanthamoeba polyphaga, A. castellanii, and Vermamoeba vermiformis. Exposure to sGW for 72 h resulted in significant inhibition (P < 0.0001) of amoebal encystation versus control-treated cells, with the following percentages of cysts in sGW versus controls: A. polyphaga (0.6 versus 6%), A. castellanii (2 versus 62%), and V. vermiformis (1 versus 92%), suggesting sGW induced maintenance of the actively feeding trophozoite form. During sGW exposure, L. pneumophila culturability decreased as early as 5 h (1.3 to 2.9 log10 CFU, P < 0.001) compared to controls (Δ0 to 0.1 log10 CFU) with flow cytometric analysis revealing immediate changes in membrane permeability. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR was performed on total RNA isolated from L. pneumophila cells at 0 to 48 h after sGW incubation, and genes associated with virulence (gacA, lirR, csrA, pla, and sidF), the type IV secretion system (lvrB and lvrE), and metabolism (ccmF and lolA) were all shown to be differentially expressed. These results suggest that conditions within GW may promote interactions between water-based pathogens and FLA hosts, through amoebal encystment inhibition and alteration of bacterial gene expression, thus warranting further exploration into FLA and L. pneumophila behavior in GW systems. PMID:25381242

  14. The effects of alcohol on gastrointestinal tract, liver and pancreas: evidence-based suggestions for clinical management.

    PubMed

    Federico, A; Cotticelli, G; Festi, D; Schiumerini, R; Addolorato, G; Ferrulli, A; Merli, M; Lucidi, C; Milani, S; Panella, C; Domenico, M; Vantini, I; Benini, L; Ubaldi, E; Romano, M; Loguercio, C

    2015-05-01

    Alcohol has a direct impact on the digestive system due to its contact with mucosal lining and interference with digestive functions. Various diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, including tumors, may be related to an excess of alcohol intake and the relationship between alcohol abuse and hepatic and pancreatic damage is well established. According to WHO, alcohol and alcohol-related diseases represent a major health problem and will probably continue to do so in the foreseeable future. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge on clinically relevant alcohol-related problems in order to provide practicing physicians with evidence-based general suggestions which might help in the management of alcohol-related gastrointestinal disorders. A thorough clinical history together with a number of questionnaires are essential for detecting alcohol dependence or abuse. Biochemical tests (nonspecific and specific) have been considered to be less sensitive than questionnaires in screening for alcohol abuse, but they may be useful in identifying relapses. Protracted behavior modification, cognitive behavioral therapy, psychological counseling, and mutual support groups have been considered the most effective long-term treatments. Several drugs have been developed that are able to interfere with the neurotransmitters involved in craving mechanisms, and we summarize the evidence of their efficacy to increase abstinence and to prevent relapse.

  15. Amoebae and Legionella pneumophila in saline environments.

    PubMed

    Gast, Rebecca J; Moran, Dawn M; Dennett, Mark R; Wurtsbaugh, Wayne A; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A

    2011-03-01

    Amoeboid protists that harbor bacterial pathogens are of significant interest as potential reservoirs of disease-causing organisms in the environment, but little is known about them in marine and other saline environments. We enriched amoeba cultures from sediments from four sites in the New England estuarine system of Mt. Hope Bay, Massachusetts and from sediments from six sites in the Great Salt Lake, Utah. Cultures of amoebae were enriched using both minimal- and non-nutrient agar plates, made with fresh water, brackish water or saltwater. Recovered amoeba cultures were assayed for the presence of Legionella species using nested polymerase chain reactions (PCR) and primers specific for the genus. Positive samples were then screened with nested amplification using primers specific for the macrophage infectivity potentiator surface protein (mip) gene from L. pneumophila. Forty-eight percent (185 out of 388) of isolated amoeba cultures were positive for the presence of Legionella species. Legionella pneumophila was detected by PCR in 4% of the amoeba cultures (17 out of 388), and most of these amoebae were growing on marine media. Our results show that amoebae capable of growing in saline environments may harbor not only a diverse collection of Legionella species, but also species potentially pathogenic to humans.

  16. Legionella pneumophila Effector LpdA Is a Palmitoylated Phospholipase D Virulence Factor.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gunnar N; Aurass, Philipp; Oates, Clare V; Tate, Edward W; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Flieger, Antje; Frankel, Gad

    2015-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a bacterial pathogen that thrives in alveolar macrophages, causing a severe pneumonia. The virulence of L. pneumophila depends on its Dot/Icm type IV secretion system (T4SS), which delivers more than 300 effector proteins into the host, where they rewire cellular signaling to establish a replication-permissive niche, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Biogenesis of the LCV requires substantial redirection of vesicle trafficking and remodeling of intracellular membranes. In order to achieve this, several T4SS effectors target regulators of membrane trafficking, while others resemble lipases. Here, we characterized LpdA, a phospholipase D effector, which was previously proposed to modulate the lipid composition of the LCV. We found that ectopically expressed LpdA was targeted to the plasma membrane and Rab4- and Rab14-containing vesicles. Subcellular targeting of LpdA required a C-terminal motif, which is posttranslationally modified by S-palmitoylation. Substrate specificity assays showed that LpdA hydrolyzed phosphatidylinositol, -inositol-3- and -4-phosphate, and phosphatidylglycerol to phosphatidic acid (PA) in vitro. In HeLa cells, LpdA generated PA at vesicles and the plasma membrane. Imaging of different phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) and organelle markers revealed that while LpdA did not impact on membrane association of various PIP probes, it triggered fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Importantly, although LpdA is translocated inefficiently into cultured cells, an L. pneumophila ΔlpdA mutant displayed reduced replication in murine lungs, suggesting that it is a virulence factor contributing to L. pneumophila infection in vivo.

  17. Legionella pneumophila Effector LpdA Is a Palmitoylated Phospholipase D Virulence Factor

    PubMed Central

    Aurass, Philipp; Oates, Clare V.; Tate, Edward W.; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Flieger, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a bacterial pathogen that thrives in alveolar macrophages, causing a severe pneumonia. The virulence of L. pneumophila depends on its Dot/Icm type IV secretion system (T4SS), which delivers more than 300 effector proteins into the host, where they rewire cellular signaling to establish a replication-permissive niche, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Biogenesis of the LCV requires substantial redirection of vesicle trafficking and remodeling of intracellular membranes. In order to achieve this, several T4SS effectors target regulators of membrane trafficking, while others resemble lipases. Here, we characterized LpdA, a phospholipase D effector, which was previously proposed to modulate the lipid composition of the LCV. We found that ectopically expressed LpdA was targeted to the plasma membrane and Rab4- and Rab14-containing vesicles. Subcellular targeting of LpdA required a C-terminal motif, which is posttranslationally modified by S-palmitoylation. Substrate specificity assays showed that LpdA hydrolyzed phosphatidylinositol, -inositol-3- and -4-phosphate, and phosphatidylglycerol to phosphatidic acid (PA) in vitro. In HeLa cells, LpdA generated PA at vesicles and the plasma membrane. Imaging of different phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) and organelle markers revealed that while LpdA did not impact on membrane association of various PIP probes, it triggered fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Importantly, although LpdA is translocated inefficiently into cultured cells, an L. pneumophila ΔlpdA mutant displayed reduced replication in murine lungs, suggesting that it is a virulence factor contributing to L. pneumophila infection in vivo. PMID:26216420

  18. Protozoa and human macrophages infection by Legionella pneumophila environmental strains belonging to different serogroups.

    PubMed

    Messi, Patrizia; Patrizia, Messi; Bargellini, Annalisa; Annalisa, Bargellini; Anacarso, Immacolata; Immacolata, Anacarso; Marchesi, Isabella; Isabella, Marchesi; de Niederhäusern, Simona; Bondi, Moreno; Moreno, Bondi

    2013-02-01

    Three Legionella pneumophila strains isolated from municipal hot tap water during a multicentric Italian survey and belonging to serogroups 1, 6, 9 and the reference strain Philadelphia-1 were studied to determine the intracellular replication capability and the cytopathogenicity in human monocyte cell line U937 and in an Acanthamoeba polyphaga strain. Our results show that both serogroups 1 and Philadelphia-1 were able to multiply into macrophages inducing cytopathogenicity, while serogroup 6 and ever more serogroup 9 were less efficient in leading to death of the infected macrophages. Both serogroups 1 and 6 displayed a quite good capability of intracellular replication in A. polyphaga, although serogroup 1 was less cytopathogenic than serogroup 6. Serogroup 9, like Philadelphia-1 strain, showed a reduced efficiency of infection and replication and a low cytopathogenicity towards the protozoan. Our study suggests that bacterial pathogenesis is linked to the difference in the virulence expression of L. pneumophila serogroups in both hosts, as demonstrated by the fact that only L. pneumophila serogroup 1 shows the contextual expression of the two virulence traits. Serogroup 6 proves to be a good candidate as pathogen since it shows a good capacity for intracellular replication in protozoan.

  19. H-NOX Regulation of c-di-GMP Metabolism and Biofilm Formation in Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Hans K.; Vance, Russell E.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Heme Nitric oxide/OXygen (H-NOX) domains are a family of hemoprotein sensors that are widespread in bacterial genomes, but limited information is available on their function. Legionella pneumophila is the only prokaryote found thus far to encode two H-NOX proteins. This paper presents data supporting a role for one of the Legionella pneumophila H-NOXs in the regulation of biofilm formation. In summary: (i) unmarked deletions in the hnox1 gene do not affect growth rate in liquid culture or replication in permissive macrophages; (ii) theΔhnox1 strain displays a hyper-biofilm phenotype; (iii) the gene adjacent to hnox1 is a GGDEF-EAL protein, lpg1057, and overexpression in Legionella pneumophila of this protein, or the well-studied diguanylate cyclase, vca0956, results in a hyper-biofilm phenotype; (iv) the Lpg1057 protein displays diguanylate cyclase activity in vitro and this activity is inhibited by the Hnox1 protein in the Fe(II)-NO ligation state, but not the Fe(II) unligated state; (v) consistent with the Hnox1 regulation of Lpg1057, unmarked deletions of lpg1057 in theΔhnox1 background results in reversion of the hyper-biofilm phenotype back to wild-type biofilm levels. Taken together, these results suggest a role for hnox1 in regulating c-di-GMP production by lpg1057 and biofilm formation in response to NO. PMID:20572940

  20. A conserved OmpA-like protein in Legionella pneumophila required for efficient intracellular replication.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Ian P; Kumova, Ogan K; Ninio, Shira

    2016-08-01

    The OmpA-like protein domain has been associated with peptidoglycan-binding proteins, and is often found in virulence factors of bacterial pathogens. The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila encodes for six proteins that contain the OmpA-like domain, among them the highly conserved uncharacterized protein we named CmpA. Here we set out to characterize the CmpA protein and determine its contribution to intracellular survival of L. pneumophila Secondary structure analysis suggests that CmpA is an inner membrane protein with a peptidoglycan-binding domain at the C-teminus. A cmpA mutant was able to replicate normally in broth, but failed to compete with an isogenic wild-type strain in an intracellular growth competition assay. The cmpA mutant also displayed significant intracellular growth defects in both the protozoan host Acanthamoeba castellanii and in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, where uptake into the cells was also impaired. The cmpA phenotypes were completely restored upon expression of CmpA in trans The data presented here establish CmpA as a novel virulence factor of L. pneumophila that is required for efficient intracellular replication in both mammalian and protozoan hosts. PMID:27421957

  1. Taxonomic investigation of Legionella pneumophila using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brindle, R J; Bryant, T N; Draper, P W

    1989-03-01

    A panel of 19 monoclonal antibodies was used to produce patterns of immunofluorescent staining of 468 isolates of Legionella pneumophila. Twelve monoclonal antibodies were selected that divided L. pneumophila into 17 phenons which, in the majority of cases, conform to serogroup divisions. These phenons are more easily defined than the present serogroups, and isolates can be placed in them with little ambiguity. The standardized set of monoclonal antibodies was also used to define the subgroups of serogroup 1. PMID:2654183

  2. Effects of three oxidizing biocides on Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1

    SciTech Connect

    Domingue, E.L.; Tyndall, R.L.; Mayberry, W.R.; Pancorbo, O.C.

    1988-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine the bactericidal effects of ozone and hydrogen peroxide relative to that of free chlorine on Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. In laboratory batch-type experiments, organisms seeded at various densities were exposed to different concentrations of these biocides in demand-free buffers. Bactericidal effects were measured by determining the ability of L. pneumophila to grow on buffered charcoal-yeast extract agar supplemented with ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate. Ozone was the most potent of the three biocide, with a greater than 99% kill of L. pneumophila occurring during a 5-min exposure to 0.10 to 0.30 ..mu..g of O/sub 3/ per ml. The bactericidal action of O/sub 3/ was not markedly affected by changes in pH or temperature. Concentrations of 0.30 and 0.40 /sup +/g of free chlorine per ml killed 99% of the L. pneumophila after 30- and 5-min exposures, respectively. A 30-min exposure to 1000 ..mu..g of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ per ml was required to effect a 99% reduction of the viable L. pneumophila population. However, no viable L. pneumophila could be detected after a 24-h exposure to 100 or 300 ..mu..g of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ per ml. Attempts were made to correlate the biocidal effects of O/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ with the oxidation of L. pneumophila fatty acids. These tests indicated that certain biocidal concentrations of O/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ resulted in a loss or severe reduction of L. pneumophila unsaturated fatty acids.

  3. Environmental surveillance of Legionella pneumophila in two Italian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tesauro, Marina; Bianchi, Annalisa; Consonni, Michela; Pregliasco, Fabrizio; Galli, Maria Gabriella

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most effective disinfection protocol to reduce the presence of Legionella pneumophila in the water system of two Italian hospitals. From 2004 to 2009, 271 samplings of hot water were carried out in 11 hospital units to detect the presence of L. pneumophila. Additionally, water samples collected from one boiler outlet and the hot water recirculation were tested. From 2004 to 2009, L. pneumophila was present in 37% of the samples. Of these, 68.3% and 18.8% were positive for serogroups 2-14 and 1, respectively. Furthermore, 12.9% of the samples were positive for both serogroups. Finally, a maximal count of 10(4) CFU/L was measured in the most distal sites. To reduce L. pneumophila colonization, a two-year long hyperchlorination (2004-2006) was carried out. Moreover, from June 2005 until now, continuous maintenance of boilers and tanks, substitution of the shower heads and increase of the boiler outlet temperature to 60 °C were performed. All these treatments led to a marked reduction of L. pneumophila colonization in the short but not in the medium-long term. Only the use of chlorine dioxide led, after four years, to a reduction of the loads of L. pneumophila to values below 100 CFU/L. However, in the distal sites a persistent degree of colonization (maximum value 700 CFU/L, average 600 CFU/L) was observed probably due to the presence of L. pneumophila in the stagnant water in dead legs. In conclusion, data show that long-term chlorination of hot water sources together with carefully aimed maintenance of water pipes can lead to an effective reduction of L. pneumophila concentration in hospital water systems. PMID:20847460

  4. Hantaviruses in Finnish soricomorphs: evidence for two distinct hantaviruses carried by Sorex araneus suggesting ancient host-switch.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jiaxin; Sironen, Tarja; Voutilainen, Liina; Hepojoki, Satu; Niemimaa, Jukka; Isoviita, Veli-Matti; Vaheri, Antti; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli

    2014-10-01

    Hantaviruses are emerging viruses carried by rodents, soricomorphs (shrews and moles) and bats. In Finland, Puumala virus (PUUV) was for years the only hantavirus detected. In 2009, however, Seewis virus (SWSV) was reported from archival common shrew (Sorex araneus) samples collected in 1982 in Finland. To elucidate the diversity of hantaviruses in soricomorphs in Finland, 180 individuals were screened, representing seven species captured from 2001 to 2012: hantavirus RNA was screened using RT-PCR, and hantaviral antigen using immunoblotting with polyclonal antibodies raised against truncated SWSV nucleocapsid protein. The overall hantavirus RNA prevalence was 14% (26/180), antigen could be demonstrated in 9 of 20 SWSV RT-PCR positive common shrews. Genetic analyses revealed that four soricomorph-borne hantaviruses circulate in Finland, including Boginia virus (BOGV) in water shrew (Neomys fodiens) and Asikkala virus (ASIV) in pygmy shrew (Sorex minutus). Interestingly, on two study sites, common shrews harbored strains of two different hantaviruses: Seewis virus and a new distinct, genetically distant (identity 57% at amino acid level) virus (Altai-like virus) which clusters together with viruses in the basal phylogroup I of hantaviruses with 62-67% identity at amino acid level. This is the first evidence of coexistence of two clearly distinct hantavirus species circulating simultaneously in one host species population. The findings suggest an ancient host-switching event from a yet unknown host to S. araneus. In addition, phylogenetic analyses of partial S and M segment sequences showed that SWSV in Finland represents a unique genotype in Europe.

  5. Interactions between Naegleria fowleri and Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Newsome, A L; Baker, R L; Miller, R D; Arnold, R R

    1985-11-01

    Using electron microscopy we documented some of the intracellular events that occur in Naegleria fowleri suspended in Page amoeba saline after ingestion of Legionella pneumophila. Photomicrographs showed intracellular vacuoles containing bacteria in the process of binary fission that was accompanied by alignment of mitochondria and ribosome-like structures along the vacuole membrane. Although these intracellular events are remarkably similar to that seen in Legionella replication within human monocytes, we could not demonstrate an increase in the number of bacteria by CFU or dark-field microscopy. However, when the Naegleria cells were allowed to ingest Legionella cells while suspended in amoeba culture medium, the number of bacteria increased, and this was contingent upon the presence of viable amoebae.

  6. Macrophage-activating T-cell factor(s) produced in an early phase of Legionella pneumophila infection in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Y; Yoshida, S; Goto, Y; Mizuguchi, Y; Kuroiwa, A

    1989-01-01

    Protective immunity of guinea pigs against Legionella pneumophila was studied by infecting the animals with a sublethal dose (about 2 x 10(4) CFU) of the organism. The bacteria multiplied in the liver, spleen, and lungs up to day 4 after the intraperitoneal infection. The live bacteria in these organs decreased quickly thereafter and were eliminated by day 7. A delayed-type skin reaction and lymphoproliferation of spleen cells to Formalin-killed L. pneumophila were detected from days 5 and 6, respectively, after infection. Peritoneal macrophages obtained from guinea pigs infected 6 days previously inhibited the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. Antigen-stimulated spleen cell factor prepared from infected guinea pigs inhibited the intracellular growth of the organism in macrophages obtained from uninfected animals. Antigen-stimulated spleen cell factor prepared from spleen cells treated with anti-guinea pig T-cell monoclonal antibody did not inhibit growth. The activity of antigen-stimulated spleen cell factor was labile to pH 2 treatment, and the factor could not be absorbed by L. pneumophila antigen, suggesting that it contains gamma interferon. Our data show that T-cell-mediated immunity begins to work from an early period of infection with L. pneumophila in guinea pigs. PMID:2807531

  7. Hantaviruses in Finnish soricomorphs: evidence for two distinct hantaviruses carried by Sorex araneus suggesting ancient host-switch.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jiaxin; Sironen, Tarja; Voutilainen, Liina; Hepojoki, Satu; Niemimaa, Jukka; Isoviita, Veli-Matti; Vaheri, Antti; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli

    2014-10-01

    Hantaviruses are emerging viruses carried by rodents, soricomorphs (shrews and moles) and bats. In Finland, Puumala virus (PUUV) was for years the only hantavirus detected. In 2009, however, Seewis virus (SWSV) was reported from archival common shrew (Sorex araneus) samples collected in 1982 in Finland. To elucidate the diversity of hantaviruses in soricomorphs in Finland, 180 individuals were screened, representing seven species captured from 2001 to 2012: hantavirus RNA was screened using RT-PCR, and hantaviral antigen using immunoblotting with polyclonal antibodies raised against truncated SWSV nucleocapsid protein. The overall hantavirus RNA prevalence was 14% (26/180), antigen could be demonstrated in 9 of 20 SWSV RT-PCR positive common shrews. Genetic analyses revealed that four soricomorph-borne hantaviruses circulate in Finland, including Boginia virus (BOGV) in water shrew (Neomys fodiens) and Asikkala virus (ASIV) in pygmy shrew (Sorex minutus). Interestingly, on two study sites, common shrews harbored strains of two different hantaviruses: Seewis virus and a new distinct, genetically distant (identity 57% at amino acid level) virus (Altai-like virus) which clusters together with viruses in the basal phylogroup I of hantaviruses with 62-67% identity at amino acid level. This is the first evidence of coexistence of two clearly distinct hantavirus species circulating simultaneously in one host species population. The findings suggest an ancient host-switching event from a yet unknown host to S. araneus. In addition, phylogenetic analyses of partial S and M segment sequences showed that SWSV in Finland represents a unique genotype in Europe. PMID:24997334

  8. Rapid quantification method for Legionella pneumophila in surface water.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Anika; Torggler, Carmen; Elsässer, Dennis; Lück, Christian; Niessner, Reinhard; Seidel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    World-wide legionellosis outbreaks caused by evaporative cooling systems have shown that there is a need for rapid screening methods for Legionella pneumophila in water. Antibody-based methods for the quantification of L. pneumophila are rapid, non-laborious, and relatively cheap but not sensitive enough for establishment as a screening method for surface and drinking water. Therefore, preconcentration methods have to be applied in advance to reach the needed sensitivity. In a basic test, monolithic adsorption filtration (MAF) was used as primary preconcentration method that adsorbs L. pneumophila with high efficiency. Ten-liter water samples were concentrated in 10 min and further reduced to 1 mL by centrifugal ultrafiltration (CeUF). The quantification of L. pneumophila strains belonging to the monoclonal subtype Bellingham was performed via flow-based chemiluminescence sandwich microarray immunoassays (CL-SMIA) in 36 min. The whole analysis process takes 90 min. A polyclonal antibody (pAb) against L. pneumophila serogroup 1-12 and a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against L. pneumophila SG 1 strain Bellingham were immobilized on a microarray chip. Without preconcentration, the detection limit was 4.0 × 10(3) and 2.8 × 10(3) CFU/mL determined by pAb and mAb 10/6, respectively. For samples processed by MAF-CeUF prior to SMIA detection, the limit of detection (LOD) could be decreased to 8.7 CFU/mL and 0.39 CFU/mL, respectively. A recovery of 99.8 ± 15.9% was achieved for concentrations between 1-1000 CFU/mL. The established combined analytical method is sensitive for rapid screening of surface and drinking water to allow fast hygiene control of L. pneumophila. PMID:26873217

  9. Rapid quantification method for Legionella pneumophila in surface water.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Anika; Torggler, Carmen; Elsässer, Dennis; Lück, Christian; Niessner, Reinhard; Seidel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    World-wide legionellosis outbreaks caused by evaporative cooling systems have shown that there is a need for rapid screening methods for Legionella pneumophila in water. Antibody-based methods for the quantification of L. pneumophila are rapid, non-laborious, and relatively cheap but not sensitive enough for establishment as a screening method for surface and drinking water. Therefore, preconcentration methods have to be applied in advance to reach the needed sensitivity. In a basic test, monolithic adsorption filtration (MAF) was used as primary preconcentration method that adsorbs L. pneumophila with high efficiency. Ten-liter water samples were concentrated in 10 min and further reduced to 1 mL by centrifugal ultrafiltration (CeUF). The quantification of L. pneumophila strains belonging to the monoclonal subtype Bellingham was performed via flow-based chemiluminescence sandwich microarray immunoassays (CL-SMIA) in 36 min. The whole analysis process takes 90 min. A polyclonal antibody (pAb) against L. pneumophila serogroup 1-12 and a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against L. pneumophila SG 1 strain Bellingham were immobilized on a microarray chip. Without preconcentration, the detection limit was 4.0 × 10(3) and 2.8 × 10(3) CFU/mL determined by pAb and mAb 10/6, respectively. For samples processed by MAF-CeUF prior to SMIA detection, the limit of detection (LOD) could be decreased to 8.7 CFU/mL and 0.39 CFU/mL, respectively. A recovery of 99.8 ± 15.9% was achieved for concentrations between 1-1000 CFU/mL. The established combined analytical method is sensitive for rapid screening of surface and drinking water to allow fast hygiene control of L. pneumophila.

  10. Detection of Legionella pneumophila by Real-Time PCR for the mip Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Deborah A.; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Reischl, Udo; Gordon, Steve M.; Procop, Gary W.

    2003-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay for the mip gene of Legionella pneumophila was tested with 27 isolates of L. pneumophila, 20 isolates of 14 other Legionella species, and 103 non-Legionella bacteria. Eight culture-positive and 40 culture-negative clinical specimens were tested. This assay was 100% sensitive and 100% specific for L. pneumophila. PMID:12843084

  11. The role of Legionella pneumophila-infected Hartmannella vermiformis as an infectious particle in a murine model of Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Brieland, J K; Fantone, J C; Remick, D G; LeGendre, M; McClain, M; Engleberg, N C

    1997-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a bacterial parasite of many species of freshwater protozoa and occasionally an intracellular pathogen of humans. While protozoa are known to play a key role in the persistence of L. pneumophila in the environment, there has been limited research addressing the potential role of L. pneumophila-infected protozoa in the pathogenesis of human infection. In this report, the potential role of an L. pneumophila-infected amoeba as an infectious particle in replicative L. pneumophila lung infection was investigated in vivo with the amoeba Hartmannella vermiformis, a natural reservoir of L. pneumophila in the environment. L. pneumophila-infected H. vermiformis organisms were prepared by coculture of the amoebae and virulent L. pneumophila cells in vitro. A/J mice, which are susceptible to replicative L. pneumophila lung infection, were subsequently inoculated intratracheally with L. pneumophila-infected H. vermiformis organisms (10(6) amoebae containing 10(5) bacteria), and intrapulmonary growth of the bacteria was assessed. A/J mice inoculated intratracheally with L. pneumophila-infected H. vermiformis organisms developed replicative L. pneumophila lung infections. Furthermore, L. pneumophila-infected H. vermiformis organisms were more pathogenic than an equivalent number of bacteria or a coinoculum of L. pneumophila cells and uninfected amoebae. These results demonstrate that L. pneumophila-infected amoebae are infectious particles in replicative L. pneumophila infections in vivo and support the hypothesis that inhaled protozoa may serve as cofactors in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disease induced by inhaled respiratory pathogens.

  12. Molecular pathogenesis of infections caused by Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Newton, Hayley J; Ang, Desmond K Y; van Driel, Ian R; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2010-04-01

    The genus Legionella contains more than 50 species, of which at least 24 have been associated with human infection. The best-characterized member of the genus, Legionella pneumophila, is the major causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a severe form of acute pneumonia. L. pneumophila is an intracellular pathogen, and as part of its pathogenesis, the bacteria avoid phagolysosome fusion and replicate within alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells in a vacuole that exhibits many characteristics of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The formation of the unusual L. pneumophila vacuole is a feature of its interaction with the host, yet the mechanisms by which the bacteria avoid classical endosome fusion and recruit markers of the ER are incompletely understood. Here we review the factors that contribute to the ability of L. pneumophila to infect and replicate in human cells and amoebae with an emphasis on proteins that are secreted by the bacteria into the Legionella vacuole and/or the host cell. Many of these factors undermine eukaryotic trafficking and signaling pathways by acting as functional and, in some cases, structural mimics of eukaryotic proteins. We discuss the consequences of this mimicry for the biology of the infected cell and also for immune responses to L. pneumophila infection.

  13. Legionella pneumophila Seropositivity-Associated Factors in Latvian Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Valciņa, Olga; Pūle, Daina; Lucenko, Irina; Krastiņa, Dita; Šteingolde, Žanete; Krūmiņa, Angelika; Bērziņš, Aivars

    2015-01-01

    Continuous environmental exposure of humans to Legionella may induce immune responses and generation of antibodies. The aim of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of Legionella pneumophila serogroups (SG) 1–6 in the general healthy population and identify the associated host-related and environmental risk factors. L. pneumophila SG 1–6 seroprevalence among a total of 2007 blood samples collected from healthy donors was 4.8%. Seroprevalence was higher in women (5.9%) than men (3.3%) and in areas with a larger number of inhabitants, ranging from 3.5% in rural regions to 6.8% in the capital, Riga. Blood samples from inhabitants of apartment buildings tested positive for L. pneumophila in more cases (5.8%) compared to those from inhabitants of single-family homes (2.7%). Residents of buildings with a municipal hot water supply system were more likely to be seropositive for L. pneumophila (OR = 3.16, 95% CI 1.26–7.91). Previous episodes of fever were additionally identified as a risk factor (OR = 2.42, 95% CI 1.43–4.1). In conclusion, centralized hot water supply, female gender and previous episodes of fever were determined as the main factors associated with L. pneumophila seropositivity in our study population. PMID:26703696

  14. Control of Host Cell Phosphorylation by Legionella Pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Haenssler, Eva; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorylation is one of the most frequent modifications in intracellular signaling and is implicated in many processes ranging from transcriptional control to signal transduction in innate immunity. Many pathogens modulate host cell phosphorylation pathways to promote growth and establish an infectious disease. The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila targets and exploits the host phosphorylation system throughout the infection cycle as part of its strategy to establish an environment beneficial for replication. Key to this manipulation is the L. pneumophila Icm/Dot type IV secretion system, which translocates bacterial proteins into the host cytosol that can act directly on phosphorylation cascades. This review will focus on the different stages of L. pneumophila infection, in which host kinases and phosphatases contribute to infection of the host cell and promote intracellular survival of the pathogen. This includes the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases during phagocytosis as well as the role of phosphoinositide metabolism during the establishment of the replication vacuole. Furthermore, L. pneumophila infection modulates the NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, two signaling pathways that are central to the host innate immune response and involved in regulation of host cell survival. Therefore, L. pneumophila infection manipulates host cell signal transduction by phosphorylation at multiple levels. PMID:21747787

  15. High-Throughput Intracellular Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative opportunistic human pathogen that causes a severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease. Notably, in the human host, the organism is believed to replicate solely within an intracellular compartment, predominantly within pulmonary macrophages. Consequently, successful therapy is predicated on antimicrobials penetrating into this intracellular growth niche. However, standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods test solely for extracellular growth inhibition. Here, we make use of a high-throughput assay to characterize intracellular growth inhibition activity of known antimicrobials. For select antimicrobials, high-resolution dose-response analysis was then performed to characterize and compare activity levels in both macrophage infection and axenic growth assays. Results support the superiority of several classes of nonpolar antimicrobials in abrogating intracellular growth. Importantly, our assay results show excellent correlations with prior clinical observations of antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, we also show the applicability of high-throughput automation to two- and three-dimensional synergy testing. High-resolution isocontour isobolograms provide in vitro support for specific combination antimicrobial therapy. Taken together, findings suggest that high-throughput screening technology may be successfully applied to identify and characterize antimicrobials that target bacterial pathogens that make use of an intracellular growth niche. PMID:26392509

  16. Phylogenetic Reconstruction of the Legionella pneumophila Philadelphia-1 Laboratory Strains through Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Ensminger, Alexander W.

    2013-01-01

    Over 20 years ago, two groups independently domesticated Legionella pneumophila from a clinical isolate of bacteria collected during the first recognized outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease (at the 1976 American Legion’s convention in Philadelphia). These two laboratory strains, JR32 and Lp01, along with their derivatives, have been disseminated to a number of laboratories around the world and form the cornerstone of much of the research conducted on this important pathogen to date. Nevertheless, no exhaustive examination of the genetic distance between these strains and their clinical progenitor has been performed thus far. Such information is of paramount importance for making sense of several phenotypic differences observed between these strains. As environmental replication of L. pneumophila is thought to exclusively occur within natural protozoan hosts, retrospective analysis of the domestication and axenic culture of the Philadelphia-1 progenitor strain by two independent groups also provides an excellent opportunity to uncover evidence of adaptation to the laboratory environment. To reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships between the common laboratory strains of L. pneumophila Philadelphia-1 and their clinical ancestor, we performed whole-genome Illumina resequencing of the two founders of each laboratory lineage: JR32 and Lp01. As expected from earlier, targeted studies, Lp01 and JR32 contain large deletions in the lvh and tra regions, respectively. By sequencing additional strains derived from Lp01 (Lp02 and Lp03), we retraced the phylogeny of these strains relative to their reported ancestor, thereby reconstructing the evolutionary dynamics of each laboratory lineage from genomic data. PMID:23717549

  17. Lead-dependent deposits in diverse synaptic vesicles: suggestive evidence for the presence of anionic binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sulzer, D.; Piscopo, I.; Ungar, F.; Holtzman, E.

    1987-09-01

    We have observed electron dense deposits dependent on incubation of aldehyde-fixed tissues with lead ions within synaptic vesicles of several types of neurons that differ in the neurotransmitters utilized and in the secretory granules of the adrenal medulla. Evidently, vesicle components that can interact with lead ions are widespread. A plausible explanation for the occurrence of the deposits is the presence of anionic binding sites within the vesicles. This would agree well with other biochemical, cytochemical, and immunocytochemical evidence, such as that indicating the presence of sulfated macromolecules in certain synaptic vesicles. Anionic binding sites could play significant roles by participating in processes such as Ca/sup 2 +/ storage, stabilization of pH gradients, or the control of osmotic phenomena.

  18. Susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to three cooling tower microbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, R.D.; Dewar, N.E.; Barnes, W.G.; Hodges, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    Investigation of epidemic outbreaks of Legionnaires disease by Center for Disease Control personnel has resulted in the isolation of Legionella pneumophila from water in the air-conditioning cooling towers or evaporative condensers at the site of the outbreak. It is suspected that improperly maintained open, recirculating water systems may play a role in the growth and dissemination of this pathogen. The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of three chemically different, commercially available, cooling tower microbicides against L. pneumophila. Using two in vitro test systems, a combination of N-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride and bis (tri-n-butyltin) oxide was found to kill L. pneumophila at a concentration 25 times less than the minimum recommended use concentration, whereas N-alkyl 1,3-propanediamine and methylene bis(thiocyanate) were active at concentrations equal to or greater than the concentrations recommended for use by the manufacturer.

  19. Susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to three cooling tower microbicides.

    PubMed Central

    Grace, R D; Dewar, N E; Barnes, W G; Hodges, G R

    1981-01-01

    Investigation of epidemic outbreaks of Legionnaires disease by Center for Disease Control personnel has resulted in the isolation of Legionella pneumophila from water in the air-conditioning cooling towers or evaporative condensers at the site of the outbreak. It is suspected that improperly maintained open, recirculating water systems may play a role in the growth and dissemination of this pathogen. The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of three chemically different, commercially available, cooling tower microbicides against L. pneumophila. Using two in vitro test systems, a combination of N-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride and bis (tri-n-butyltin) oxide was found to kill L. pneumophila at a concentration 25 times less than the minimum recommended use concentration, whereas N-alkyl 1,3-propanediamine and methylene bis (thiocyanate) were active at concentrations equal to or greater than the concentrations recommended for use by the manufacturer. PMID:7224623

  20. Biofilm-derived Legionella pneumophila evades the innate immune response in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Abu Khweek, Arwa; Fernández Dávila, Natalia S.; Caution, Kyle; Akhter, Anwari; Abdulrahman, Basant A.; Tazi, Mia; Hassan, Hoda; Novotny, Laura A.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Amer, Amal O.

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease, replicates in human alveolar macrophages to establish infection. There is no human-to-human transmission and the main source of infection is L. pneumophila biofilms established in air conditioners, water fountains, and hospital equipments. The biofilm structure provides protection to the organism from disinfectants and antibacterial agents. L. pneumophila infection in humans is characterized by a subtle initial immune response, giving time for the organism to establish infection before the patient succumbs to pneumonia. Planktonic L. pneumophila elicits a strong immune response in murine, but not in human macrophages enabling control of the infection. Interactions between planktonic L. pneumophila and murine or human macrophages have been studied for years, yet the interface between biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and macrophages has not been explored. Here, we demonstrate that biofilm-derived L. pneumophila replicates significantly more in murine macrophages than planktonic bacteria. In contrast to planktonic L. pneumophila, biofilm-derived L. pneumophila lacks flagellin expression, do not activate caspase-1 or -7 and trigger less cell death. In addition, while planktonic L. pneumophila is promptly delivered to lysosomes for degradation, most biofilm-derived bacteria were enclosed in a vacuole that did not fuse with lysosomes in murine macrophages. This study advances our understanding of the innate immune response to biofilm-derived L. pneumophila and closely reproduces the natural mode of infection in human. PMID:23750338

  1. Zinc Metalloproteinase ProA Directly Activates Legionella pneumophila PlaC Glycerophospholipid:cholesterol Acyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Christina; Rastew, Elena; Hermes, Björn; Siegbrecht, Enrico; Ahrends, Robert; Banerji, Sangeeta; Flieger, Antje

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes secreted by Legionella pneumophila, such as phospholipases A (PLAs) and glycerophospholipid:cholesterol acyltransferases (GCATs), may target host cell lipids and therefore contribute to the establishment of Legionnaires disease. L. pneumophila possesses three proteins, PlaA, PlaC, and PlaD, belonging to the GDSL family of lipases/acyltransferases. We have shown previously that PlaC is the major GCAT secreted by L. pneumophila and that the zinc metalloproteinase ProA is essential for GCAT activity. Here we characterized the mode of PlaC GCAT activation and determined that ProA directly processes PlaC. We further found that not only cholesterol but also ergosterol present in protozoa was palmitoylated by PlaC. Such ester formations were not induced by either PlaA or PlaD. PlaD was shown here to possess lysophospholipase A activity, and interestingly, all three GDSL enzymes transferred short chain fatty acids to sterols. The three single putative catalytic amino acids (Ser-37, Asp-398, and His-401) proved essential for all PlaC-associated PLA, lysophospholipase A, and GCAT activities. A further four cysteine residues are important for the PLA/GCAT activities as well as their oxidized state, and we therefore conclude that PlaC likely forms at least one disulfide loop. Analysis of cleavage site and loop deletion mutants suggested that for GCAT activation deletion of several amino acids within the loop is necessary rather than cleavage at a single site. Our data therefore suggest a novel enzyme inhibition/activation mechanism where a disulfide loop inhibits PlaC GCAT activity until the protein is exported to the external space where it is ProA-activated. PMID:22582391

  2. Confirmation of Legionella pneumophila cultures with a fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Tenover, F C; Carlson, L; Goldstein, L; Sturge, J; Plorde, J J

    1985-06-01

    We compared a fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody directed against an outer membrane protein of Legionella pneumophila (Genetic Systems Corp. [GSC], Seattle, Wash.) with a similarly labeled polyclonal reagent (L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, poly; BioDx, Inc., Denville, N.J.) for the confirmation of L. pneumophila isolates grown in culture. Duplicate suspensions of 52 organisms, including 21 L. pneumophila and 8 non-L. pneumophila species of legionella, were placed on individual glass slides, fixed, and stained with both reagents, and the results were compared. Both antisera correctly identified all L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, but only the GSC reagent produced definitive staining of the L. pneumophila isolates of serogroups 7, 8, and 9. Additionally, the GSC reagent produced more uniform staining patterns around the legionella bacilli and displayed little background fluorescence when compared with the BioDx reagent.

  3. Characterization of the structure and catalytic activity of Legionella pneumophila VipF.

    PubMed

    Young, Byron H; Caldwell, Tracy A; McKenzie, Aidan M; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Berndsen, Christopher E

    2016-10-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Legionella pneumophila is known to cause Legionnaires' Disease, a severe pneumonia that can be fatal to immunocompromised individuals and the elderly. Shohdy et al. identified the L. pneumophila vacuole sorting inhibitory protein VipF as a putative N-acetyltransferase based on sequence homology. We have characterized the basic structural and functional properties of VipF to confirm this original functional assignment. Sequence conservation analysis indicates two putative CoA-binding regions within VipF. Homology modeling and small angle X-ray scattering suggest a monomeric, dual-domain structure joined by a flexible linker. Each domain contains the characteristic beta-splay motif found in many acetyltransferases, suggesting that VipF may contain two active sites. Docking experiments suggest reasonable acetyl-CoA binding locations within each beta-splay motif. Broad substrate screening indicated that VipF is capable of acetylating chloramphenicol and both domains are catalytically active. Given that chloramphenicol is not known to be N-acetylated, this is a surprising finding suggesting that VipF is capable of O-acetyltransferase activity. Proteins 2016; 84:1422-1430. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27315603

  4. Characterization of a major 31-kilodalton peptidoglycan-bound protein of Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, C.A.; Hoffman, P.S. )

    1990-05-01

    A 31-kilodalton (kDa) protein was solubilized from the peptidoglycan (PG) fraction of Legionella pneumophila after treatment with either N-acetylmuramidase from the fungus Chalaropsis sp. or with mutanolysin from Streptomyces globisporus. The protein exhibited a ladderlike banding pattern by autoradiography when radiolabeled ((35S)cysteine or (35S)methionine) PG material was extensively treated with hen lysozyme. The banding patterns ranging between 31 and 45 kDa and between 55 and 60 kDa resolved as a single 31-kDa protein when the material was subsequently treated with N-acetylmuramidase. Analysis of the purified 31-kDa protein for diaminopimelic acid by gas chromatography revealed 1 mol of diaminopimelic acid per mol of protein. When outer membrane PG material containing the major outer membrane porin protein was treated with N-acetylmuramidase or mutanolysin, both the 28.5-kDa major outer membrane protein and the 31-kDa protein were solubilized from the PG material under reducing conditions. In the absence of 2-mercaptoethanol, a high-molecular-mass complex (100 kDa) was resolved. The results of this study indicate that a 31-kDa PG-bound protein is a major component of the cell wall of L. pneumophila whose function may be to anchor the major outer membrane protein to PG. Finally, a survey of other Legionella species and other serogroups of L. pneumophila suggested that PG-bound proteins may be a common feature of this genus.

  5. Genomic Characterization of a Large Outbreak of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 Strains in Quebec City, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Nilmini; Cantin, Philippe; Marchand, Geneviève; Charest, Hugues; Raymond, Frédéric; Huot, Caroline; Goupil-Sormany, Isabelle; Desbiens, François; Faucher, Sébastien P.; Corbeil, Jacques; Tremblay, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 2012, a major Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 outbreak occurred in Quebec City, Canada, which caused 182 declared cases of Legionnaire's disease and included 13 fatalities. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates from 23 patients as well as from 32 cooling towers located in the vicinity of the outbreak were recovered for analysis. In addition, 6 isolates from the 1996 Quebec City outbreak and 4 isolates from patients unrelated to both outbreaks were added to allow comparison. We characterized the isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, sequence-based typing, and whole genome sequencing. The comparison of patients-isolated strains to cooling tower isolates allowed the identification of the tower that was the source of the outbreak. Legionella pneumophila strain Quebec 2012 was identified as a ST-62 by sequence-based typing methodology. Two new Legionellaceae plasmids were found only in the epidemic strain. The LVH type IV secretion system was found in the 2012 outbreak isolates but not in the ones from the 1996 outbreak and only in half of the contemporary human isolates. The epidemic strains replicated more efficiently and were more cytotoxic to human macrophages than the environmental strains tested. At least four Icm/Dot effectors in the epidemic strains were absent in the environmental strains suggesting that some effectors could impact the intracellular replication in human macrophages. Sequence-based typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis combined with whole genome sequencing allowed the identification and the analysis of the causative strain including its likely environmental source. PMID:25105285

  6. Genomic characterization of a large outbreak of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains in Quebec City, 2012.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Simon; Plante, Pier-Luc; Mendis, Nilmini; Cantin, Philippe; Marchand, Geneviève; Charest, Hugues; Raymond, Frédéric; Huot, Caroline; Goupil-Sormany, Isabelle; Desbiens, François; Faucher, Sébastien P; Corbeil, Jacques; Tremblay, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 2012, a major Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 outbreak occurred in Quebec City, Canada, which caused 182 declared cases of Legionnaire's disease and included 13 fatalities. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates from 23 patients as well as from 32 cooling towers located in the vicinity of the outbreak were recovered for analysis. In addition, 6 isolates from the 1996 Quebec City outbreak and 4 isolates from patients unrelated to both outbreaks were added to allow comparison. We characterized the isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, sequence-based typing, and whole genome sequencing. The comparison of patients-isolated strains to cooling tower isolates allowed the identification of the tower that was the source of the outbreak. Legionella pneumophila strain Quebec 2012 was identified as a ST-62 by sequence-based typing methodology. Two new Legionellaceae plasmids were found only in the epidemic strain. The LVH type IV secretion system was found in the 2012 outbreak isolates but not in the ones from the 1996 outbreak and only in half of the contemporary human isolates. The epidemic strains replicated more efficiently and were more cytotoxic to human macrophages than the environmental strains tested. At least four Icm/Dot effectors in the epidemic strains were absent in the environmental strains suggesting that some effectors could impact the intracellular replication in human macrophages. Sequence-based typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis combined with whole genome sequencing allowed the identification and the analysis of the causative strain including its likely environmental source. PMID:25105285

  7. Evidence Suggesting Protozoan Predation on Rhizobium Associated with Germinating Seeds and in the Rhizosphere of Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Ramirez, C; Alexander, M

    1980-09-01

    Changes in populations of microorganisms around germinating bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds, in the rhizosphere of bean, and in a model rhizosphere were studied. Strains of Rhizobium phaseoli that were resistant to streptomycin and thiram were used, and as few as 300 R. phaseoli cells per g of soil could be enumerated with a selective medium that was devised. A direct role was not evident for bacterial competitors, lytic bacteria, antibiotic-producing microorganisms, bacteriophages, and Bdellovibrio in the suppression of R. phaseoli around germinating seeds and in the rhizosphere. Protozoa increased in numbers in the soil upon planting of the seeds. The extent of colonization of soil by R. phaseoli was inversely related to the presence of large numbers of bacteria and protozoa. Colonization of R. phaseoli was improved upon suppression of protozoa with thiram and also when the soil was amended with other protozoan inhibitors and mannitol to simulate seed and root exudation. The data support the view that the decrease in numbers of R. phaseoli is caused by an increase in protozoan predation, the protozoa increasing in number because they prey on bacteria that proliferate by using seed and root exudates as nutrients.

  8. Evidence Suggesting Protozoan Predation on Rhizobium Associated with Germinating Seeds and in the Rhizosphere of Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Carlos; Alexander, Martin

    1980-01-01

    Changes in populations of microorganisms around germinating bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds, in the rhizosphere of bean, and in a model rhizosphere were studied. Strains of Rhizobium phaseoli that were resistant to streptomycin and thiram were used, and as few as 300 R. phaseoli cells per g of soil could be enumerated with a selective medium that was devised. A direct role was not evident for bacterial competitors, lytic bacteria, antibiotic-producing microorganisms, bacteriophages, and Bdellovibrio in the suppression of R. phaseoli around germinating seeds and in the rhizosphere. Protozoa increased in numbers in the soil upon planting of the seeds. The extent of colonization of soil by R. phaseoli was inversely related to the presence of large numbers of bacteria and protozoa. Colonization of R. phaseoli was improved upon suppression of protozoa with thiram and also when the soil was amended with other protozoan inhibitors and mannitol to simulate seed and root exudation. The data support the view that the decrease in numbers of R. phaseoli is caused by an increase in protozoan predation, the protozoa increasing in number because they prey on bacteria that proliferate by using seed and root exudates as nutrients. PMID:16345628

  9. Essential roles and regulation of the Legionella pneumophila collagen-like adhesin during biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Mallegol, Julia; Duncan, Carla; Prashar, Akriti; So, Jannice; Low, Donald E; Terebeznik, Mauricio; Guyard, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Legionellosis is mostly caused by Legionella pneumophila (Lp) and is defined by a severe respiratory illness with a case fatality rate ranging from 5 to 80%. In a previous study, we showed that a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding adhesin of Lp, named Lcl, is produced during legionellosis and is unique to the L. pneumophila species. Importantly, a mutant depleted in Lcl (Δlpg2644) is impaired in adhesion to GAGs and epithelial cells and in biofilm formation. Here, we examine the molecular function(s) of Lcl and the transcriptional regulation of its encoding gene during different stages of the biofilm development. We show that the collagen repeats and the C-terminal domains of Lcl are crucial for the production of biofilm. We present evidence that Lcl is involved in the early step of surface attachment but also in intercellular interactions. Furthermore, we address the relationship between Lcl gene regulation during biofilm formation and quorum sensing (QS). In a static biofilm assay, we show that Lcl is differentially regulated during growth phases and biofilm formation. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional regulation of lpg2644, mediated by a prototype of QS signaling homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL), may play a role during the biofilm development. Thus, transcriptional down-regulation of lpg2644 may facilitate the dispersion of Lp to reinitiate biofilm colonization on a distal surface. PMID:23029523

  10. Vaccination with Legionella pneumophila membranes induces cell-mediated and protective immunity in a guinea pig model of Legionnaires' disease. Protective immunity independent of the major secretory protein of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Blander, S J; Horwitz, M A

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the capacity of Legionella pneumophila membranes to induce cell-mediated immune responses and protective immunity in a guinea pig model of Legionnaires' disease. Guinea pigs immunized by aerosol with L. pneumophila membranes developed strong cell-mediated immune responses to L. pneumophila membranes as demonstrated by cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity and in vitro splenic lymphocyte proliferation. Guinea pigs immunized by aerosol or by subcutaneous inoculation with L. pneumophila membranes developed strong protective immunity against lethal aerosol challenge with L. pneumophila. Overall, in six independent experiments, 39 of 49 (80%) guinea pigs immunized with L. pneumophila membranes survived challenge compared with 2 of 40 (5%) sham-immunized controls (P = 2 x 10(-13). In contrast, guinea pigs immunized by aerosol with formalin-killed L. pneumophila did not develop either a strong cell-mediated immune response to L. pneumophila antigens or protective immunity to lethal aerosol challenge. The capacity of L. pneumophila membranes to induce protective immunity was independent of the major secretory protein of L. pneumophila, which we previously demonstrated is an immunoprotective molecule. Purified L. pneumophila membranes did not contain detectable major secretory protein (MSP) on immunoblots; immunization of guinea pigs with L. pneumophila membranes did not induce anti-MSP antibody; and guinea pigs developed comparable protective immunity after immunization with membranes from either an L. pneumophila strain that secretes the major secretory protein or an isogenic mutant that does not. This study demonstrates that (a) immunization with L. pneumophila membranes but not formalin-killed L. pneumophila induces strong cell-mediated immune responses and protective immunity, (b) L. pneumophila membranes contain immunoprotective molecules distinct from the major secretory protein of L. pneumophila, and (c) L. pneumophila membranes have potential as

  11. Childhood and Adolescent Sexual Abuse and Subsequent Sexual Risk Behavior: Evidence from Controlled Studies, Methodological Critique, and Suggestions for Research

    PubMed Central

    Senn, Theresa E.; Carey, Michael P.; Vanable, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Childhood and adolescent sexual abuse (CSA) is associated with a wide variety of adverse psychological and health outcomes, including negative sexual health outcomes. In this paper, we review the literature investigating the relation between CSA and subsequent sexual risk behaviors among men and women. Previous research has found a relatively consistent association between CSA and higher rates of sexual risk behaviors, particularly sex trading, more sexual partners, and an earlier age of first intercourse. However, there are a number of limitations to this research, including lack of a consistent definition of CSA, failure to investigate gender as a moderator, and possible confounding of the CSA experience with some of the sexual behavior outcome variables. Further, although there appears to be an association between CSA and later sexual risk behavior, researchers have not established whether this association is causal. Suggestions for future research and implications for clinical practice are discussed. PMID:18045760

  12. Free-living freshwater amoebae differ in their susceptibility to the pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Dey, Rafik; Bodennec, Jacques; Mameri, Mouh Oulhadj; Pernin, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is known as a facultative intracellular parasite of free-living soil and freshwater amoebae, of which several species have been shown to support the growth of the pathogenic bacteria. We report for the first time the behaviour of two strains (c2c and Z503) of the amoeba Willaertia magna towards different strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 and compared it with Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, known to be L. pneumophila permissive. In contrast to the results seen with other amoebae, W. magna c2c inhibited the growth of one strain of Legionella (L. pneumophila, Paris), but not of others belonging to the same serogroup (L. pneumophila, Philadelphia and L. pneumophila, Lens). Also, the different L. pneumophila inhibited cell growth and induced cell death in A. castellanii, H. vermiformis and W. magna Z503 within 3-4 days while W. magna c2c strain remained unaffected even up to 7 days. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the formation of numerous replicative phagosomes observed within Acanthamoeba and Hartmannella is rarely seen in W. magna c2c cocultured with L. pneumophila. Moreover, the morphological differences were observed between L. pneumophila cultured either with Willaertia or other amoebae. These observations show that amoebae are not all equally permissive to L. pneumophila and highlight W. magna c2c as particularly resistant towards some strains of this bacterium.

  13. Free-living freshwater amoebae differ in their susceptibility to the pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Dey, Rafik; Bodennec, Jacques; Mameri, Mouh Oulhadj; Pernin, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is known as a facultative intracellular parasite of free-living soil and freshwater amoebae, of which several species have been shown to support the growth of the pathogenic bacteria. We report for the first time the behaviour of two strains (c2c and Z503) of the amoeba Willaertia magna towards different strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 and compared it with Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, known to be L. pneumophila permissive. In contrast to the results seen with other amoebae, W. magna c2c inhibited the growth of one strain of Legionella (L. pneumophila, Paris), but not of others belonging to the same serogroup (L. pneumophila, Philadelphia and L. pneumophila, Lens). Also, the different L. pneumophila inhibited cell growth and induced cell death in A. castellanii, H. vermiformis and W. magna Z503 within 3-4 days while W. magna c2c strain remained unaffected even up to 7 days. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the formation of numerous replicative phagosomes observed within Acanthamoeba and Hartmannella is rarely seen in W. magna c2c cocultured with L. pneumophila. Moreover, the morphological differences were observed between L. pneumophila cultured either with Willaertia or other amoebae. These observations show that amoebae are not all equally permissive to L. pneumophila and highlight W. magna c2c as particularly resistant towards some strains of this bacterium. PMID:19016880

  14. Characterization of a fluorescent compound isolated from Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila requires the presence of amino acids for growth and utilizes them for energy. Along with other amino acids, either phenylalanine or tyrosine is essential for the growth of the organism and tyrosine has been identified as an energy source. When L. pneumophila is grown in the presence of tyrosine, a brown melanin-like pigment is produced. A green fluorescent pigment, fg2, was isolated from centrifuged culture fluid after the organism was grown in the presence of tyrosine. Fg2 is water soluble with a molecular weight of 152 as determined by mass spectral analysis. A mutant of L. pneumophila unable to produce fg2 was isolated to assist in elucidation of the biosynthesis of fg2. Radiolabeling experiments were utilized to conclude that neither tyrosine nor any other amino acid was a precursor in the biosynthesis of fg2. Shikimic acid, an intermediate in tyrosine biosynthesis, was found to also be an intermediate in the biosynthesis of fg2. A series of experiments in which L. pneumophila was grown in a chemically defined medium containing various combinations of aromatic amino acids determined that fg2 and the brown pigment always occur in tandem.

  15. Susceptibilities of algae and Legionella pneumophila to cooling tower biocides

    SciTech Connect

    Soracco, R.J.; Gill, H.K.; Fliermans, C.B.; Pope, D.H.

    1983-04-01

    Nine algal strains and nine Legionella pneumophila strains were tested in laboratory culture for their susceptibility to inhibition by a variety of commercially available microbiocides. The responses ranged from ineffective to effective at 1/100 the manufacturers' recommended pulse doses. Tests were also performed to determine whether the action of the microbiocide was bacteriostatic or bacteriocidal.

  16. Legionella pneumophila lung abscess associated with immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Guy, S D; Worth, L J; Thursky, K A; Francis, P A; Slavin, M A

    2011-10-01

    Legionella species are a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia, infrequently complicated by cavitary disease. We describe Legionella pneumophila pneumonia and abscess formation in an immunosuppressed patient receiving corticosteroid therapy for metastatic breast carcinoma. The predisposing role of corticosteroids is discussed and the management of this complication is reviewed. PMID:22435900

  17. The CpxRA two-component system contributes to Legionella pneumophila virulence.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Jennifer R; Li, Laam; Faucher, Sébastien P; Brassinga, Ann Karen C

    2016-06-01

    The bacterium Legionella pneumophila is capable of intracellular replication within freshwater protozoa as well as human macrophages, the latter of which results in the serious pneumonia Legionnaires' disease. A primary factor involved in these host cell interactions is the Dot/Icm Type IV secretion system responsible for translocating effector proteins needed to establish and maintain the bacterial replicative niche. Several regulatory factors have been identified to control the expression of the Dot/Icm system and effectors, one of which is the CpxRA two-component system, suggesting essentiality for virulence. In this study, we generated cpxR, cpxA and cpxRA in-frame null mutant strains to further delineate the role of the CpxRA system in bacterial survival and virulence. We found that cpxR is essential for intracellular replication within Acanthamoeba castellanii, but not in U937-derived macrophages. Transcriptome analysis revealed that CpxRA regulates a large number of virulence-associated proteins including Dot/Icm effectors as well as Type II secreted substrates. Furthermore, the cpxR and cpxRA mutant strains were more sodium resistant than the parental strain Lp02, and cpxRA expression reaches maximal levels during postexponential phase. Taken together, our findings suggest the CpxRA system is a key contributor to L. pneumophila virulence in protozoa via virulence factor regulation. PMID:26934669

  18. Genomic, RNAseq, and molecular modeling evidence suggests that the major allergen domain in insects evolved from a homodimeric origin.

    PubMed

    Randall, Thomas A; Perera, Lalith; London, Robert E; Mueller, Geoffrey A

    2013-01-01

    The major allergen domain (MA) is widely distributed in insects. The crystal structure of a single Bla g 1 MA revealed a novel protein fold in which the fundamental structure was a duplex of two subsequences (monomers), which had diverged over time. This suggested that the evolutionary origin of the MA structure may have been a homodimer of this smaller subsequence. Using publicly available genomic data, the distribution of the basic unit of this class of proteins was determined to better understand its evolutionary history. The duplication and divergence is examined at three distinct levels of resolution: 1) within the orders Diptera and Hymenoptera, 2) within one genus Drosophila, and 3) within one species Aedes aegypti. Within the family Culicidae, we have found two separate occurrences of monomers as independent genes. The organization of the gene family in A. aegypti shows a common evolutionary origin for its monomer and several closely related MAs. Molecular modeling of the A. aegypti monomer with the unique Bla g 1 fold confirms the distant evolutionary relationship and supports the feasibility of homodimer formation from a single monomer. RNAseq data for A. aegypti confirms that the monomer is expressed in the mosquito similar to other A. aegypti MAs after a blood meal. Together, these data support the contention that the detected monomer shares similar functional characteristics to related MAs in other insects. An extensive search for this domain outside of Insecta confirms that the MAs are restricted to insects.

  19. What Is Peromyscus? Evidence from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences suggests the need for a new classification

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Roy N.; Amman, Brian R.; Keith, Megan S.; Thompson, Cody W.; Bradley, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary relationships between Peromyscus, Habromys, Isthmomys, Megadontomys, Neotomodon, Osgoodomys, and Podomys are poorly understood. In order to further explore the evolutionary boundaries of Peromyscus and compare potential taxonomic solutions for this diverse group and its relatives, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence data from alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1-I2), beta fibrinogen (Fgb-I7), interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (Rbp3), and cytochrome-b (Cytb). Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear genes produced similar topologies although levels of nodal support varied. The best-supported topology was obtained by combining nuclear and mitochondrial sequences. No monophyletic Peromyscus clade was supported. Instead, support was found for a clade containing Habromys, Megadontomys, Neotomodon, Osgoodomys, Podomys, and Peromyscus suggesting paraphyly of Peromyscus and confirming previous observations. Our analyses indicated an early divergence of Isthmomys from Peromyscus (approximately 8 million years ago), whereas most other peromyscine taxa emerged within the last 6 million years. To recover a monophyletic taxonomy from Peromyscus and affiliated lineages, we detail 3 taxonomic options in which Habromys, Megadontomys, Neotomodon, Osgoodomys, and Podomys are retained as genera, subsumed as subgenera, or subsumed as species groups within Peromyscus. Each option presents distinct taxonomic challenges, and the appropriate taxonomy must reflect the substantial levels of morphological divergence that characterize this group while maintaining the monophyletic relationships obtained from genetic data. PMID:26937047

  20. Evidence Suggests That The ACA's Tobacco Surcharges Reduced Insurance Take-Up And Did Not Increase Smoking Cessation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Abigail S; Schpero, William L; Busch, Susan H

    2016-07-01

    To account for tobacco users' excess health care costs and encourage cessation, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) allowed insurers to impose a surcharge on tobacco users' premiums for plans offered on the health insurance exchanges, or Marketplaces. Low-income tax credits for Marketplace coverage were based on premiums for non-tobacco users, which means that these credits did not offset any surcharge costs. Thus, this policy greatly increased out-of-pocket premiums for many tobacco users. Using data for 2011-14 from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we examined the effect of tobacco surcharges on insurance status and smoking cessation in the first year of the exchanges' implementation, among adults most likely to purchase insurance from them. Relative to smokers who faced no surcharges, smokers facing medium or high surcharges had significantly reduced coverage (reductions of 4.3 percentage points and 11.6 percentage points, respectively), but no significant differences in smoking cessation. In contrast, those facing low surcharges showed significantly less smoking cessation. Taken together, these findings suggest that tobacco surcharges conflicted with a major goal of the ACA-increased financial protection-without increasing smoking cessation. States should consider these potential effects when deciding whether to limit surcharges to less than the federal maximum. PMID:27385231

  1. Evidence Suggests That The ACA's Tobacco Surcharges Reduced Insurance Take-Up And Did Not Increase Smoking Cessation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Abigail S; Schpero, William L; Busch, Susan H

    2016-07-01

    To account for tobacco users' excess health care costs and encourage cessation, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) allowed insurers to impose a surcharge on tobacco users' premiums for plans offered on the health insurance exchanges, or Marketplaces. Low-income tax credits for Marketplace coverage were based on premiums for non-tobacco users, which means that these credits did not offset any surcharge costs. Thus, this policy greatly increased out-of-pocket premiums for many tobacco users. Using data for 2011-14 from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we examined the effect of tobacco surcharges on insurance status and smoking cessation in the first year of the exchanges' implementation, among adults most likely to purchase insurance from them. Relative to smokers who faced no surcharges, smokers facing medium or high surcharges had significantly reduced coverage (reductions of 4.3 percentage points and 11.6 percentage points, respectively), but no significant differences in smoking cessation. In contrast, those facing low surcharges showed significantly less smoking cessation. Taken together, these findings suggest that tobacco surcharges conflicted with a major goal of the ACA-increased financial protection-without increasing smoking cessation. States should consider these potential effects when deciding whether to limit surcharges to less than the federal maximum.

  2. Investigating population differentiation in a major African agricultural pest: evidence from geometric morphometrics and connectivity suggests high invasion potential.

    PubMed

    Karsten, M; Addison, P; Jansen van Vuuren, B; Terblanche, J S

    2016-07-01

    The distribution, spatial pattern and population dynamics of a species can be influenced by differences in the environment across its range. Spatial variation in climatic conditions can cause local populations to undergo disruptive selection and ultimately result in local adaptation. However, local adaptation can be constrained by gene flow and may favour resident individuals over migrants-both are factors critical to the assessment of invasion potential. The Natal fruit fly (Ceratitis rosa) is a major agricultural pest in Africa with a history of island invasions, although its range is largely restricted to south east Africa. Across Africa, C. rosa is genetically structured into two clusters (R1 and R2), with these clusters occurring sympatrically in the north of South Africa. The spatial distribution of these genotypic clusters remains unexamined despite their importance for understanding the pest's invasion potential. Here, C. rosa, sampled from 22 South African locations, were genotyped at 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci and assessed morphologically using geometric morphometric wing shape analyses to investigate patterns of population structure and determine connectedness of pest-occupied sites. Our results show little to no intraspecific (population) differentiation, high population connectivity, high effective population sizes and only one morphological type (R2) within South Africa. The absence of the R1 morphotype at sites where it was previously found may be a consequence of differences in thermal niches of the two morphotypes. Overall, our results suggest high invasion potential of this species, that area-wide pest management should be undertaken on a country-wide scale, and that border control is critical to preventing further invasions. PMID:27085997

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Growth Phase-Dependent Expression of Legionella pneumophila Proteins Which Involves Regulation of Bacterial Virulence Traits

    PubMed Central

    Naitou, Hirotaka; Ohashi, Norio; Imai, Yasuyuki; Miyake, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, which is a causative pathogen of Legionnaires' disease, expresses its virulent traits in response to growth conditions. In particular, it is known to become virulent at a post-exponential phase in vitro culture. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the exponential phase and post-exponential phase to identify candidates associated with L. pneumophila virulence using 2-Dimentional Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) combined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization–Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Of 68 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two growth phases, 64 were up-regulated at a post-exponential phase. The up-regulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis, ketone body biogenesis and poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) biogenesis, suggesting that L. pneumophila may utilize sugars and lipids as energy sources, when amino acids become scarce. Proteins related to motility (flagella components and twitching motility-associated proteins) were also up-regulated, predicting that they enhance infectivity of the bacteria in host cells under certain conditions. Furthermore, 9 up-regulated proteins of unknown function were found. Two of them were identified as novel bacterial factors associated with hemolysis of sheep red blood cells (SRBCs). Another 2 were found to be translocated into macrophages via the Icm/Dot type IV secretion apparatus as effector candidates in a reporter assay with Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase. The study will be helpful for virulent analysis of L. pneumophila from the viewpoint of physiological or metabolic modulation dependent on growth phase. PMID:20661449

  4. Clinical application of a multiplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection of Legionella species, Legionella pneumophila, and Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Alvaro J; Winchell, Jonas M

    2013-01-01

    We developed a single-tube multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of simultaneously detecting and discriminating Legionella spp., Legionella pneumophila, and Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 in primary specimens. Evaluation of 21 clinical specimens and 115 clinical isolates demonstrated this assay to be a rapid, high-throughput diagnostic test with 100% specificity that may aid during legionellosis outbreaks and epidemiologic investigations.

  5. Targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the 16S rRNA gene to detect and differentiate Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila species.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Hu, Chao-Hui; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2016-08-01

    A PCR-based method targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 16S rRNA gene was developed for differential identification of Legionella pneumophila and non-Legionella pneumophila. Based on the bioinformatics analysis for 176 Legionella 16S rRNA gene fragments of 56 different Legionella species, a set of SNPs, A(628)C(629) was found to be highly specific to L. pneumophila strains. A multiplex assay was designed that was able to distinguish sites with limited sequence heterogeneity between L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila in the targeted 16S rRNA gene. The assay amplified a 261-bp amplicon for Legionella spp. and a set of 203- and 97-bp amplicons only specific to L. pneumophila species. Among 49 ATCC strains and 284 Legionella isolates from environmental water and clinical samples, 100 % of L. pneumophila and non-L. pneumophila strains were correctly identified and differentiated by this assay. The assay presents a more rapid, sensitive and alternative method to the currently available PCR-sequencing detection and differentiation method.

  6. Genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships among Legionella pneumophila clinical isolates, Portugal, 1987 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Chasqueira, M J; Rodrigues, L; Nascimento, M; Ramos, M; Marques, T

    2014-11-20

    The genetic diversity of 89 clinical Legionella isolates, collected between 1987 and 2012, in 22 hospitals from the five regions of Portugal, was analysed in this study using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) of the Dresden panel and the sequence-based typing (SBT) protocol. The eBURST algorithm was used to infer levels of relatedness between isolates. All isolates collected were Legionella pneumophila, which were further characterised into four subgroups by MAbs, and 30 sequence types (STs) by SBT. Twelve of the STs were unique to Portugal; one of them (ST100) was represented by 32 epidemiologically related isolates. The ST44 was the profile with the highest number of epidemiologically unrelated isolates. The eBURST analyses indicate that, within the group formed by the 30 STs identified in this study, 17 STs were genetically close to at least another ST in the group. The comparison between the eBURST diagrams obtained with the STs from this study and the entire SBT database of the European Working Group for Legionella, showed that 24 (seven of them unique to Portugal) of our 30 STs were related with STs identified in others countries. These results suggest that the population of L. pneumophila clinical strains in Portugal includes both worldwide and local strains.

  7. Effects of alpha-amylase on in vitro growth of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Bortner, C A; Miller, R D; Arnold, R R

    1983-01-01

    Sterile parotid saliva inhibited growth of Legionella pneumophila on solid media, and the salivary component involved in this inhibition has been shown to be amylase. Disk diffusion and well plate assays were used to study possible mechanisms for this effect. The amylolytic activity of saliva copurified with inhibitory activity, and both activities were sensitive to proteinase K digestion and heat treatment. In addition, purified alpha-amylase from several sources (bacteria, fungi, porcine pancreas, and human saliva) exhibited similar activity. Incorporation of charcoal or bovine serum albumin into media blocked inhibition by amylase. Replacement of Bacto-Agar with Noble agar (both from Difco Laboratories) prevented growth inhibition in the absence of starch. However, when corn starch was present with Noble agar, amylase-induced growth inhibition occurred. Purification of starch by washing with methanol eliminated some toxic component. The toxic component from starch could be recovered from the methanol wash and inhibited growth of L. pneumophila in the absence of amylase activity. The results suggest that toxic substances exist in media components which may be unmasked during salivary amylase digestion of starch. This effect may explain, in part, the difficulty in recovery of the organism from clinical specimens containing amylase. PMID:6190756

  8. Replication of Legionella Pneumophila in Human Cells: Why are We Susceptible?

    PubMed Central

    Khweek, Arwa Abu; Amer, Amal

    2010-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, a serious and often fatal form of pneumonia. The susceptibility to L. pneumophila arises from the ability of this intracellular pathogen to multiply in human alveolar macrophages and monocytes. L. pneumophila also replicates in several professional and non-professional phagocytic human-derived cell lines. With the exception of the A/J mouse strain, most mice strains are restrictive, thus they do not support L. pneumophila replication. Mice lacking the NOD-like receptor Nlrc4 or caspase-1 are also susceptible to L. pneumophila. On the other hand, in the susceptible human hosts, L. pneumophila utilizes several strategies to ensure intracellular replication and protect itself against the host immune system. Most of these strategies converge to prevent the fusion of the L. pneumophila phagosome with the lysosome, inhibiting host cell apoptosis, activating survival pathways, and sequestering essential nutrients for replication and pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize survival mechanisms employed by L. pneumophila to maintain its replication in human cells. In addition, we highlight different human-derived cell lines that support the multiplication of this intracellular bacterium. Therefore, these in vitro models can be applicable and are reproducible when investigating L. pneumophila/phagocyte interactions at the molecular and cellular levels in the human host. PMID:21687775

  9. Immunologic response of patients with legionellosis against major protein-containing antigens of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 as shown by immunoblot analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, J S; Plikaytis, B B; Wilkinson, H W

    1986-01-01

    Major protein-containing antigens of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 were were identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis with rabbit antisera to 14 different Legionella species or serogroups. Fourteen bands were observed in immunoelectropherograms of whole-cell, sonicated cell, and heated cell preparations, seven of which appeared in the supernatant fluid from the heated cells and three of which were shown in an outer membrane fraction. Immunoblots of whole-cell antigen preparations of 14 Legionella species or serogroups revealed seven major Legionella proteins: antigens with molecular weights of 58,000, 79,000, and 154,000 were present in all Legionella sp. strains, antigens with molecular weights of 44,000 and 97,000 occurred in multiple species, and antigens with molecular weights of 14,000 and 25,000 were present only in L. pneumophila strains. All sera from 15 patients with culture-confirmed L. pneumophila serogroup 1 disease and 14 of 18 (78%) sera from serologically diagnosed patients reacted with the 58-kilodalton (kDa) common antigen. In contrast, less than one-half of the sera reacted with the L. pneumophila-specific proteins (14 and 25 kDa). Absorption of sera with Escherichia coli cells had no effect on their reactivity with the 58-kDa antigen, whereas absorption with L. pneumophila serogroup 1 cells removed reactivity. These data suggest that the 58-kDa antigen may prove useful in serodiagnostic tests for legionellosis. Images PMID:3517046

  10. [Molecular comparison of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolated in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Mehiri-Zghal, E; Essalah, L; Ghariani, A; Mahjoubi, W; Reyrolle, M; Meugnier, H; Forey, F; Jarraud, S; Freney, J; Etienne, J; Slim-Saidi, L

    2008-07-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a common cause of hospital and community-acquired pneumonia, being transmitted by inhalation of aqueous aerosols. Most outbreaks are linked to contaminated hot water systems and cooling towers. Our study was about the molecular typing of 35 strains of L. pneumophila including four clinical isolates and 31 environmental strains isolated from the distribution systems of 14 hotels. Among the clinical strains, two have the same pattern, however, all were different from the studied environmental strains. For the 31 environmental strains, ten patterns were obtained. Among which, a same pulsotype was found for four strains isolated from four different establishments. In addition, two different pulsotypes were found for strains isolated from the same establishment. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed the existence of various patterns. Although cases of legionellosis were declared in these hotels, there are no epidemiological links between the clinical and environmental strains. PMID:18191502

  11. Fulminant myocarditis caused by Legionella pneumophila: case report.

    PubMed

    Damásio, Ana Filipa; Rodrigues, Luís; Miranda, Luís; Coelho, Pedro; Banazol, Nuno; Colaço, João; Fragata, José

    2014-03-01

    Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium. The clinical manifestations of myocarditis vary from flu-like symptoms to fatal fulminant forms. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with a diagnosis of cardiogenic shock caused by fulminant myocarditis. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was used as a bridge to recovery. Etiological study revealed Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 infection. Recovery of biventricular function was seen after treatment with azithromycin.

  12. Suggestive evidence for association of human chromosome 18q12-q21 and its orthologue on rat and mouse chromosome 18 with several autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Merriman, T R; Cordell, H J; Eaves, I A; Danoy, P A; Coraddu, F; Barber, R; Cucca, F; Broadley, S; Sawcer, S; Compston, A; Wordsworth, P; Shatford, J; Laval, S; Jirholt, J; Holmdahl, R; Theofilopoulos, A N; Kono, D H; Tuomilehto, J; Tuomilehto-Wolf, E; Buzzetti, R; Marrosu, M G; Undlien, D E; Rønningen, K S; Ionesco-Tirgoviste, C; Shield, J P; Pociot, F; Nerup, J; Jacob, C O; Polychronakos, C; Bain, S C; Todd, J A

    2001-01-01

    Some immune system disorders, such as type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis (MS), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), share common features: the presence of autoantibodies and self-reactive T-cells, and a genetic association with the major histocompatibility complex. We have previously published evidence, from 1,708 families, for linkage and association of a haplotype of three markers in the D18S487 region of chromosome 18q21 with type 1 diabetes. Here, the three markers were typed in an independent set of 627 families and, although there was evidence for linkage (maximum logarithm of odds score [MLS] = 1.2; P = 0.02), no association was detected. Further linkage analysis revealed suggestive evidence for linkage of chromosome 18q21 to type 1 diabetes in 882 multiplex families (MLS = 2.2; lambdas = 1.2; P = 0.001), and by meta-analysis the orthologous region (also on chromosome 18) is linked to diabetes in rodents (P = 9 x 10(-4)). By meta-analysis, both human chromosome 18q12-q21 and the rodent orthologous region show positive evidence for linkage to an autoimmune phenotype (P = 0.004 and 2 x 10(-8), respectively, empirical P = 0.01 and 2 x 10(-4), respectively). In the diabetes-linked region of chromosome 18q12-q21, a candidate gene, deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC), was tested for association with human autoimmunity in 3,380 families with type 1 diabetes, MS, and RA. A haplotype ("2-10") of two newly characterized microsatellite markers within DCC showed evidence for association with autoimmunity (P = 5 x 10(-6)). Collectively, these data suggest that a locus (or loci) exists on human chromosome 18q12-q21 that influences multiple autoimmune diseases and that this association might be conserved between species. PMID:11147786

  13. Influence of copper surfaces on biofilm formation by Legionella pneumophila in potable water.

    PubMed

    Gião, M S; Wilks, S A; Keevil, C W

    2015-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen that can cause Legionnaires' disease, a fatal pneumonia, or Pontiac fever, a mild form of disease. Copper is an antimicrobial material used for thousands of years. Its incorporation in several surface materials to control the transmission of pathogens has been gaining importance in the past decade. In this work, the ability of copper to control the survival of L. pneumophila in biofilms was studied. For that, the incorporation of L. pneumophila in polymicrobial drinking water biofilms formed on copper, PVC and PEX, and L. pneumophila mono-species biofilms formed on copper and uPVC were studied by comparing cultivable and total numbers (quantified by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) hybridisation). L. pneumophila was never recovered by culture from heterotrophic biofilms; however, PNA-positive numbers were slightly higher in biofilms formed on copper (5.9 × 10(5) cells cm(-2)) than on PVC (2.8 × 10(5) cells cm(-2)) and PEX (1.7 × 10(5) cells cm(-2)). L. pneumophila mono-species biofilms grown on copper gave 6.9 × 10(5) cells cm(-2) for PNA-positive cells and 4.8 × 10(5) CFU cm(-2) for cultivable numbers, showing that copper is not directly effective in killing L. pneumophila. Therefore previous published studies showing inactivation of L. pneumophila by copper surfaces in potable water polymicrobial species biofilms must be carefully interpreted.

  14. Presence and Persistence of Viable, Clinically Relevant Legionella pneumophila Bacteria in Garden Soil in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van Heijnsbergen, E.; van Deursen, A.; Bouwknegt, M.; Bruin, J. P.; Schalk, J. A. C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Garden soils were investigated as reservoirs and potential sources of pathogenic Legionella bacteria. Legionella bacteria were detected in 22 of 177 garden soil samples (12%) by amoebal coculture. Of these 22 Legionella-positive soil samples, seven contained Legionella pneumophila. Several other species were found, including the pathogenic Legionella longbeachae (4 gardens) and Legionella sainthelensi (9 gardens). The L. pneumophila isolates comprised 15 different sequence types (STs), and eight of these STs were previously isolated from patients according to the European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI) database. Six gardens that were found to be positive for L. pneumophila were resampled after several months, and in three gardens, L. pneumophila was again isolated. One of these gardens was resampled four times throughout the year and was found to be positive for L. pneumophila on all occasions. IMPORTANCE Tracking the source of infection for sporadic cases of Legionnaires' disease (LD) has proven to be hard. L. pneumophila ST47, the sequence type that is most frequently isolated from LD patients in the Netherlands, is rarely found in potential environmental sources. As L. pneumophila ST47 was previously isolated from a garden soil sample during an outbreak investigation, garden soils were investigated as reservoirs and potential sources of pathogenic Legionella bacteria. The detection of viable, clinically relevant Legionella strains indicates that garden soil is a potential source of Legionella bacteria, and future research should assess the public health implication of the presence of L. pneumophila in garden soil. PMID:27316958

  15. The many forms of a pleomorphic bacterial pathogen-the developmental network of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Peter; Abdelhady, Hany; Garduño, Rafael A

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a natural intracellular bacterial parasite of free-living freshwater protozoa and an accidental human pathogen that causes Legionnaires' disease. L. pneumophila differentiates, and does it in style. Recent experimental data on L. pneumophila's differentiation point at the existence of a complex network that involves many developmental forms. We intend readers to: (i) understand the biological relevance of L. pneumophila's forms found in freshwater and their potential to transmit Legionnaires' disease, and (ii) learn that the common depiction of L. pneumophila's differentiation as a biphasic developmental cycle that alternates between a replicative and a transmissive form is but an oversimplification of the actual process. Our specific objectives are to provide updates on the molecular factors that regulate L. pneumophila's differentiation (Section The Differentiation Process and Its Regulation), and describe the developmental network of L. pneumophila (Section Dissecting Lp's Developmental Network), which for clarity's sake we have dissected into five separate developmental cycles. Finally, since each developmental form seems to contribute differently to the human pathogenic process and the transmission of Legionnaires' disease, readers are presented with a challenge to develop novel methods to detect the various L. pneumophila forms present in water (Section Practical Implications), as a means to improve our assessment of risk and more effectively prevent legionellosis outbreaks. PMID:25566200

  16. The many forms of a pleomorphic bacterial pathogen—the developmental network of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Peter; Abdelhady, Hany; Garduño, Rafael A.

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a natural intracellular bacterial parasite of free-living freshwater protozoa and an accidental human pathogen that causes Legionnaires' disease. L. pneumophila differentiates, and does it in style. Recent experimental data on L. pneumophila's differentiation point at the existence of a complex network that involves many developmental forms. We intend readers to: (i) understand the biological relevance of L. pneumophila's forms found in freshwater and their potential to transmit Legionnaires' disease, and (ii) learn that the common depiction of L. pneumophila's differentiation as a biphasic developmental cycle that alternates between a replicative and a transmissive form is but an oversimplification of the actual process. Our specific objectives are to provide updates on the molecular factors that regulate L. pneumophila's differentiation (Section The Differentiation Process and Its Regulation), and describe the developmental network of L. pneumophila (Section Dissecting Lp's Developmental Network), which for clarity's sake we have dissected into five separate developmental cycles. Finally, since each developmental form seems to contribute differently to the human pathogenic process and the transmission of Legionnaires' disease, readers are presented with a challenge to develop novel methods to detect the various L. pneumophila forms present in water (Section Practical Implications), as a means to improve our assessment of risk and more effectively prevent legionellosis outbreaks. PMID:25566200

  17. A bacterial protein promotes the recognition of the Legionella pneumophila vacuole by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Khweek, Arwa A; Caution, Kyle; Akhter, Anwari; Abdulrahman, Basant A; Tazi, Mia; Hassan, Hoda; Majumdar, Neal; Doran, Andrew; Guirado, Evelyn; Schlesinger, Larry S; Shuman, Howard; Amer, Amal O

    2013-05-01

    Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) is an intracellular bacterium of human alveolar macrophages that causes Legionnaires' disease. In contrast to humans, most inbred mouse strains are restrictive to L. pneumophila replication. We demonstrate that autophagy targets L. pneumophila vacuoles to lysosomes and that this process requires ubiquitination of L. pneumophila vacuoles and the subsequent binding of the autophagic adaptor p62/SQSTM1 to ubiquitinated vacuoles. The L. pneumophila legA9 encodes for an ankyrin-containing protein with unknown role. We show that the legA9 mutant replicate in WT mice and their bone marrow-derived macrophages. This is the first L. pneumophila mutant to be found to replicate in WT bone marrow-derived macrophages other than the Fla mutant. Less legA9 mutant-containing vacuoles acquired ubiquitin labeling and p62/SQSTM1 staining, evading autophagy uptake and avoiding lysosomal fusion. Thus, we describe a bacterial protein that targets the L. pneumophila-containing vacuole for autophagy uptake.

  18. Two Cases of Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia with Prolonged Neurologic Symptoms and Brain Hypoperfusion on Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hiromitsu; Yamazaki, Susumu; Miura, You; Seto, Akira; Kanazawa, Minoru; Nagata, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral and cerebellar symptoms are frequently associated with Legionnaires' disease. However, corresponding brain lesions are difficult to demonstrate using either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We report here two patients with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia accompanied by prolonged neurologic symptoms. In contrast to brain CT and MRI, which failed to detect any abnormalities, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed multiple sites of hypoperfusion within the brains of both patients. These cases suggest that vasculopathy, which is detectable by SPECT, might be one of the causes of neurologic symptoms in patients with Legionnaires' disease. PMID:27478660

  19. Two Cases of Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia with Prolonged Neurologic Symptoms and Brain Hypoperfusion on Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Miura, You; Seto, Akira; Kanazawa, Minoru; Nagata, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral and cerebellar symptoms are frequently associated with Legionnaires' disease. However, corresponding brain lesions are difficult to demonstrate using either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We report here two patients with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia accompanied by prolonged neurologic symptoms. In contrast to brain CT and MRI, which failed to detect any abnormalities, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed multiple sites of hypoperfusion within the brains of both patients. These cases suggest that vasculopathy, which is detectable by SPECT, might be one of the causes of neurologic symptoms in patients with Legionnaires' disease. PMID:27478660

  20. The autoinducer synthase LqsA and putative sensor kinase LqsS regulate phagocyte interactions, extracellular filaments and a genomic island of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Tiaden, André; Spirig, Thomas; Sahr, Tobias; Wälti, Martin A; Boucke, Karin; Buchrieser, Carmen; Hilbi, Hubert

    2010-05-01

    The amoebae-resistant opportunistic pathogen Legionella pneumophila employs a biphasic life cycle to replicate in host cells and spread to new niches. Upon entering the stationary growth phase, the bacteria switch to a transmissive (virulent) state, which involves a complex regulatory network including the lqs gene cluster (lqsA-lqsR-hdeD-lqsS). LqsR is a putative response regulator that promotes host-pathogen interactions and represses replication. The autoinducer synthase LqsA catalyses the production of the diffusible signalling molecule 3-hydroxypentadecan-4-one (LAI-1) that is presumably recognized by the sensor kinase LqsS. Here, we analysed L. pneumophila strains lacking lqsA or lqsS. Compared with wild-type L. pneumophila, the DeltalqsS strain was more salt-resistant and impaired for the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system-dependent uptake by phagocytes. Legionella pneumophila strains lacking lqsS, lqsR or the alternative sigma factor rpoS sedimented more slowly and produced extracellular filaments. Deletion of lqsA moderately reduced the uptake of L. pneumophila by phagocytes, and the defect was complemented by expressing lqsA in trans. Unexpectedly, the overexpression of lqsA also restored the virulence defect and reduced filament production of L. pneumophila mutant strains lacking lqsS or lqsR, but not the phenotypes of strains lacking rpoS or icmT. These results suggest that LqsA products also signal through sensors not encoded by the lqs gene cluster. A transcriptome analysis of the DeltalqsA and DeltalqsS mutant strains revealed that under the conditions tested, lqsA regulated only few genes, whereas lqsS upregulated the expression of 93 genes at least twofold. These include 52 genes clustered in a 133 kb high plasticity genomic island, which is flanked by putative DNA-mobilizing genes and encodes multiple metal ion efflux pumps. Upon overexpression of lqsA, a cluster of 19 genes in the genomic island was also upregulated, suggesting that LqsA and Lqs

  1. Two small ncRNAs jointly govern virulence and transmission in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Sahr, Tobias; Brüggemann, Holger; Jules, Matthieu; Lomma, Mariella; Albert-Weissenberger, Christiane; Cazalet, Christel; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2009-05-01

    To transit from intra- to extracellular environments, Legionella pneumophila differentiates from a replicative/non-virulent to a transmissive/virulent form using the two-component system LetA/LetS and the global repressor protein CsrA. While investigating how both regulators act co-ordinately we characterized two ncRNAs, RsmY and RsmZ, that link the LetA/LetS and CsrA regulatory networks. We demonstrate that LetA directly regulates their expression and show that RsmY and RsmZ are functional in Escherichia coli and are able to bind CsrA in vitro. Single mutants have no (ΔrsmY) or a little (ΔrsmZ) impact on virulence, but the ΔrsmYZ strain shows a drastic defect in intracellular growth in Acanthamoeba castellanii and THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. Analysis of the transcriptional programmes of the ΔletA, ΔletS and ΔrsmYZ strains revealed that the switch to the transmissive phase is partially blocked. One major difference between the ΔletA, ΔletS and ΔrsmYZ strains was that the latter synthesizes flagella. Taken together, LetA activates transcription of RsmY and RsmZ, which sequester CsrA and abolish its post-transcriptional repressive activity. However, the RsmYZ-CsrA pathway appears not to be the main or only regulatory circuit governing flagella synthesis. We suggest that rather RpoS and LetA, by influencing LetE and probably cyclic-di-GMP levels, regulate motility in L. pneumophila.

  2. Dendrimers and Polyamino-Phenolic Ligands: Activity of New Molecules Against Legionella pneumophila Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Barbieri, Federica; Ottaviani, Maria F.; Giorgi, Luca; Bruscolini, Francesca; Manti, Anita; Battistelli, Michela; Sabatini, Luigia; Pianetti, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires’ disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae). Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration 10-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall twofold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85 and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection treatments of water systems

  3. The YhhN Protein of Legionella Pneumophila is a Lysoplasmalogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Jurkowitz, Marianne S.; Patel, Aalapi; Wu, Lai-Chu; Krautwater, Annalise; Pfeiffer, Douglas R.; Bell, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Lysoplasmalogenase catalyzes hydrolytic cleavage of the vinyl-ether bond of lysoplasmalogen to yield fatty aldehyde and glycerophospho-ethanolamine or -choline. We recently purified lysoplasmalogenase from rat liver microsomes and identified the protein as TMEM86B, an integral membrane protein that is a member of the YhhN family found in numerous species of eukaryotes and bacteria. To test the hypothesis that bacterial YhhN proteins also function as lysoplasmalogenase enzymes, we cloned the Lpg1991 gene of Legionella pneumophila, which encodes a 216 amino acid YhhN protein, and expressed it in E. coli as a C-terminal-GFP-His8-fusion. Membranes were solubilized and the fusion protein was purified by nickel-affinity chromatography, cleaved with Tobacco Etch Virus protease, and subjected to a reverse nickel column to purify the un-tagged LpYhhN. Both the fusion protein and un-tagged LpYhhN exhibit robust lysoplasmalogenase activity, cleaving the vinyl-ether bond of lysoplasmalogen with a Vmax of 12 and a Km of 45 µM. LpYhhN has no activity on diradyl plasmalogen, 1-alkenyl-glycerol, monoacylglycerophospho-ethanolamine or –choline; the pH optimum is 6.5–7.0. These properties are very similar to mammalian TMEM86B. Sequence analysis suggests that YhhN proteins contain eight transmembrane helices, an N-in/C-in topology, and about 5 highly conserved amino acid residues that may form an active site. This work is the first to demonstrate a function for a bacterial YhhN protein, as a vinyl ether bond hydrolase specific for lysoplasmalogen. Since L. pneumophila does not contain endogenous plasmalogens, we hypothesize that LpYhhN may serve to protect the bacterium from lysis by lysoplasmalogen derived from plasmalogens of the host. PMID:25445671

  4. Dendrimers and Polyamino-Phenolic Ligands: Activity of New Molecules Against Legionella pneumophila Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Barbieri, Federica; Ottaviani, Maria F; Giorgi, Luca; Bruscolini, Francesca; Manti, Anita; Battistelli, Michela; Sabatini, Luigia; Pianetti, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae). Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration 10-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall twofold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85 and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection treatments of water systems in

  5. Recognition of Legionella pneumophila nucleic acids by innate immune receptors.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Larissa D; Zamboni, Dario S

    2014-12-01

    Innate immune receptors evolved to sense conserved molecules that are present in microbes or are released during non-physiological conditions. Activation of these receptors is essential for early restriction of microbial infections and generation of adaptive immunity. Among the conserved molecules sensed by innate immune receptors are the nucleic acids, which are abundantly contained in all infectious organisms including virus, bacteria, fungi and parasites. In this review we focus in the innate immune proteins that function to sense nucleic acids from the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila and the importance of these processes to the outcome of the infection.

  6. Characteristics of environmental isolates of Legionella pneumophila. [Legionella

    SciTech Connect

    Orrison, L.H.; Cherry, W.B.; Fliermans, C.B.; Dees, S.B.; McDougal, L.K.; Dodd, D.J.

    1981-07-01

    Thirty-eight cultures of Legionella pneumophila isolated from survace waters were characterized by their morphological, tinctorial, biochemical, and serological properties and by their ability to produce disease in guinea pigs. Their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents also was tested. When they were compared with clinical isolates, no important differences were found between cultures from the two sources. Sodium hippurate hydrolysis, gelatin liquefaction, pigment formation, and ..beta..-lactamase and alkaline phosphatase activity were useful in differentiating the four described species of Legionella. Hydrolysis of diacetylfluorescein and the inability to reduce nitrate help to distinguish Legionella species from other gram-negative bacterial rods.

  7. Asc-Dependent and Independent Mechanisms Contribute to Restriction of Legionella Pneumophila Infection in Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaziz, Dalia H. A.; Gavrilin, Mikhail A.; Akhter, Anwari; Caution, Kyle; Kotrange, Sheetal; Khweek, Arwa Abu; Abdulrahman, Basant A.; Hassan, Zeinab A.; El-Sharkawi, Fathia Z.; Bedi, Simranjit S.; Ladner, Katherine; Gonzalez-Mejia, M. Elba; Doseff, Andrea I.; Mostafa, Mahmoud; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Guttridge, Dennis; Marsh, Clay B.; Wewers, Mark D.; Amer, Amal O.

    2010-01-01

    The apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (Asc) is an adaptor molecule that mediates inflammatory and apoptotic signals. Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of Legionnaire's pneumonia. L. pneumophila is able to cause pneumonia in immuno-compromised humans but not in most inbred mice. Murine macrophages that lack the ability to activate caspase-1, such as caspase-1−/− and Nlrc4−/− allow L. pneumophila infection. This permissiveness is attributed mainly to the lack of active caspase-1 and the absence of its down stream substrates such as caspase-7. However, the role of Asc in control of L. pneumophila infection in mice is unclear. Here we show that caspase-1 is moderately activated in Asc−/− macrophages and that this limited activation is required and sufficient to restrict L. pneumophila growth. Moreover, Asc-independent activation of caspase-1 requires bacterial flagellin and is mainly detected in cellular extracts but not in culture supernatants. We also demonstrate that the depletion of Asc from permissive macrophages enhances bacterial growth by promoting L. pneumophila-mediated activation of the NF-κB pathway and decreasing caspase-3 activation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that L. pneumophila infection in murine macrophages is controlled by several mechanisms: Asc-independent activation of caspase-1 and Asc-dependent regulation of NF-κB and caspase-3 activation. PMID:21713115

  8. The progeny of Legionella pneumophila in human macrophages shows unique developmental traits.

    PubMed

    Abdelhady, Hany; Garduño, Rafael A

    2013-12-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular parasite of amoebae and an accidental human pathogen that causes a noncommunicable atypical pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease (LD). In some mammalian cells (e.g. HeLa), L. pneumophila follows a biphasic developmental cycle, differentiating between a replicative form that actively multiplies intracellularly, and a mature infectious form (MIF) that emerges as progeny. To date, it is not known whether the L. pneumophila progenies that emerge from amoebae and human macrophages reach similar developmental stages. Here, we demonstrate that in relation to the fully differentiated and highly infectious MIFs that emerge from amoebae, the L. pneumophila progeny that emerges from macrophages is morphologically undifferentiated, less resistant to antibiotics and less able to initiate infections. However, the L. pneumophila progeny from macrophages did not show any defects in intracellular growth. We thus concluded that macrophage infection with L. pneumophila yields a low number of bona fide MIFs. Because MIFs are the transmissive forms of L. pneumophila produced in vivo, our results showing that they are not efficiently produced in cultured macrophages provide an initial insight into why LD is not communicable. PMID:24206397

  9. The perplexing functions and surprising origins of Legionella pneumophila type IV secretion effectors.

    PubMed

    Franco, Irina S; Shuman, Howard A; Charpentier, Xavier

    2009-10-01

    Only a limited number of bacterial pathogens evade destruction by phagocytic cells such as macrophages. Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative gamma-proteobacterial species that can infect and replicate in alveolar macrophages, causing Legionnaires' disease, a severe pneumonia. L. pneumophila uses a complex secretion system to inject host cells with effector proteins capable of disrupting or altering the host cell processes. The L. pneumophila effectors target multiple processes but are essentially aimed at modifying the properties of the L. pneumophila phagosome by altering vesicular trafficking, gradually creating a specialized vacuole in which the bacteria replicate robustly. In nature, L. pneumophila is thought to parasitize free-living protists, which may have selected for traits that promote virulence of L. pneumophila in humans. Indeed, many effector genes encode proteins with eukaryotic domains and are likely to be of protozoan origin. Sustained horizontal gene transfer events within the protozoan niche may have allowed L. pneumophila to become a professional parasite of phagocytes, simultaneously giving rise to its ability to infect macrophages, cells that constitute the first line of cellular defence against bacterial infections.

  10. Necessity and Effect of Combating Legionella pneumophila in Municipal Shower Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wiik, Ragnhild; Krøvel, Anne Vatland

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to obtain research-based, holistic knowledge about necessity and effect of practiced measures against L. pneumophila in municipal shower systems in Stavanger, Norway. The effects of hot water treatment and membrane-filtering were investigated and compared to no intervention at all. The studies were done under real-world conditions. Additionally, a surveillance pilot study of municipal showers in Stavanger was performed. The validity of high total plate count (TPC) as an indication of L. pneumophila was evaluated. A simplified method, named “dripping method”, for detection and quantification of L. pneumophila was developed. The sensitivity of the dripping method is 5 colony-forming units of L. pneumophila/ml. The transference of L. pneumophila from shower water to aerosols was studied. Interviews and observational studies among the stakeholders were done in order to identify patterns of communication and behavior in a Legionella risk perspective. No substantial effects of the measures against L. pneumophila were demonstrated, except for a distally placed membrane filter. No significant positive correlation between TPC and L. pneumophila concentrations were found. L. pneumophila serogroup 2–14 was demonstrated in 21% of the 29 buildings tested in the surveillance pilot. Relatively few cells of L. pneumophila were transferred from shower water to aerosols. Anxiety appeared as the major driving force in the risk governance of Legionella. In conclusion, the risk of acquiring Legionnaires' disease from municipal shower systems is evaluated as low and uncertain. By eliminating ineffective approaches, targeted Legionella risk governance can be practiced. Risk management by surveillance is evaluated as appropriate. PMID:25490721

  11. Structure and Function of Interacting IcmR-IcmQ Domains from a Type IVb Secretion System in Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Raychaudhury, S.; Farelli, J; Montminy, T; Matthews, M; Menetret, J; Dumenil, G; Roy, C; Head, J; Isberg, R; Akey, C

    2009-01-01

    During infection, Legionella pneumophila creates a replication vacuole within eukaryotic cells and this requires a Type IVb secretion system (T4bSS). IcmQ plays a critical role in the translocase and associates with IcmR. In this paper, we show that the N-terminal domain of IcmQ (Qn) mediates self-dimerization, whereas the C-terminal domain with a basic linker promotes membrane association. In addition, the binding of IcmR to IcmQ prevents self-dimerization and also blocks membrane permeabilization. However, IcmR does not completely block membrane binding by IcmQ. We then determined crystal structures of Qn with the interacting region of IcmR. In this complex, each protein forms an ?-helical hairpin within a parallel four-helix bundle. The amphipathic nature of helices in Qn suggests two possible models for membrane permeabilization by IcmQ. The Rm-Qn structure also suggests how IcmR-like proteins in other L. pneumophila species may interact with their IcmQ partners.

  12. Incidence of Legionella pneumophila infection in tourists: Italy.

    PubMed

    Passi, C; Maddaluno, R; Pastoris, M C

    1990-05-01

    Legionella pneumophila has frequently been recognised as a cause of infection in tourists. From 1973 to 1987, 117 cases of legionellosis were reported in tourists who spent one or more weeks in Italian summer resorts. 6 (5.1%) patients died. 42 (35.9%) were sporadic cases, and 75 (64.1%) were related to clusters or outbreaks. Among the 117 cases, 63 were reported to the Istituto Superiore di Sanità by the health authorities of other countries. Some travellers became ill while in Italy, others soon after they returned home. All tourists but two had stayed in hotels. L. pneumophila was isolated from the water system of 10 hotels, and in another hotel the same Legionella species was detected by direct immunofluorescence. Persistent and/or recurrent sources of infection seem to be present in some summer resorts on the Adriatic Coast and in the Lake Garda area in northern Italy. Some groups of cases were associated with particular hotels over a period of several months and sometimes years. Investigations have implicated potable water as the likely vehicle and the source of infection for tourists. The need of a greater awareness amongst clinicians that travel is a risk factor for legionellosis, and for better international surveillance and cooperation, is stressed.

  13. The antibacterial activity of fragrance ingredients against Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Ikuko; Isshiki, Yasunori; Nomura, Harue; Sakuda, Keisuke; Sakuma, Katsuya; Kondo, Seiichi

    2009-06-01

    In the current study we investigated the antibacterial activity of fragrance ingredients against Legionella pneumophila, a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Among the 41 different fragrance ingredients tested, we found that the natural fragrance ingredients oakmoss (OM) and birch tar oil (BT), which contain many components, exhibit potent antibacterial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, % (v/v)) of OM and BT were 0.0020 and 0.0024, respectively and were lower than that of cinnamic aldehyde (0.0078), which has been previously shown to possess high antimicrobial activity. In a time-kill assay of OM and BT at MIC and two times MIC, the colony forming units (CFU) of the microbe were reduced to between 10(-3) to 10(-4) of the original CFU after 1 h co-incubation. After this time, the CFU gradually decreased in number, but remained above detection levels even after a 48-h co-incubation, except for BT at two times MIC. In contrast, at a concentration of 0.1% OM and BT (approximately 50 times MIC), CFU were not detected after co-incubation for 1 h. Another 18 fragrance ingredients including ketone, aldehyde, lactone, acid, phenol derivative, aliphatic alcohol and quinoline also exhibited a lesser degree of antibacterial activity against L. pneumophila at a MIC of less than 0.10.

  14. Survival of Mycobacterium avium, Legionella pneumophila, Escherichia coli, and caliciviruses in drinking water-associated biofilms grown under high-shear turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    Lehtola, Markku J; Torvinen, Eila; Kusnetsov, Jaana; Pitkänen, Tarja; Maunula, Leena; von Bonsdorff, Carl-Henrik; Martikainen, Pertti J; Wilks, Sandra A; Keevil, C William; Miettinen, Ilkka T

    2007-05-01

    Most of the bacteria in drinking water distribution systems are associated with biofilms. In biofilms, their nutrient supply is better than in water, and biofilms can provide shelter against disinfection. We used a Propella biofilm reactor for studying the survival of Mycobacterium avium, Legionella pneumophila, Escherichia coli, and canine calicivirus (CaCV) (as a surrogate for human norovirus) in drinking water biofilms grown under high-shear turbulent-flow conditions. The numbers of M. avium and L. pneumophila were analyzed with both culture methods and with peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) methods. Even though the numbers of pathogens in biofilms decreased during the experiments, M. avium and L. pneumophila survived in biofilms for more than 2 to 4 weeks in culturable forms. CaCV was detectable with a reverse transcription-PCR method in biofilms for more than 3 weeks. E. coli was detectable by culture for only 4 days in biofilms and 8 days in water, suggesting that it is a poor indicator of the presence of certain waterborne pathogens. With L. pneumophila and M. avium, culture methods underestimated the numbers of bacteria present compared to the FISH results. This study clearly proved that pathogenic bacteria entering water distribution systems can survive in biofilms for at least several weeks, even under conditions of high-shear turbulent flow, and may be a risk to water consumers. Also, considering the low number of virus particles needed to result in an infection, their extended survival in biofilms must be taken into account as a risk for the consumer.

  15. The htpAB operon of Legionella pneumophila cannot be deleted in the presence of the groE chaperonin operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Gagnon, Elizabeth; Orton, Dennis J; Garduño, Rafael A

    2011-11-01

    HtpB, the chaperonin of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila , displays several virulence-related functions in vitro. To confirm HtpB's role in vivo, host infections with an htpB deletion mutant would be required. However, we previously reported that the htpAB operon (encoding co-chaperonin and chaperonin) is essential. We attempted here to delete htpAB in a L. pneumophila strain carrying the groE operon (encoding the Escherichia coli co-chaperonin and chaperonin). The groE operon was inserted into the chromosome of L. pneumophila Lp02, and then allelic replacement of htpAB with a gentamicin resistance cassette was attempted. Although numerous potential postallelic replacement transformants showed a correct selection phenotype, we still detected htpAB by PCR and full-size HtpB by immunoblot. Southern blot and PCR analysis indicated that the gentamicin resistance cassette had apparently integrated in a duplicated htpAB region. However, we showed by Southern blot that strain Lp02, and the Lp02 derivative carrying the groE operon, have only one copy of htpAB. These results confirmed that the htpAB operon cannot be deleted, not even in the presence of the groE operon, and suggested that attempts to delete htpAB under strong phenotypic selection result in aberrant genetic recombinations that could involve duplication of the htpAB locus. PMID:22029459

  16. Evidence for Pulsed Hydrothermal Venting from Young Abyssal Hills on the EPR Flank Suggests Frequent Seismic Pumping of Ridge Flank Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haymon, R. M.; MacDonald, K. C.; Benjamin, S. B.; Ehrhardt, C. J.

    2004-12-01

    Although measured heat flow suggests that 40-50% of oceanic hydrothermal heat and fluid flux is from young (0.1-5 Ma) abyssal hill terrain on MOR flanks, hydrothermal vents in this setting rarely have been found. On the EPR flanks, seafloor evidence of venting from abyssal hills has been discovered recently at two sites: on ˜0.1 Ma seafloor at 10° 20'N, 103° 33.2'W ("Tevnia Site") and on ˜0.5 Ma seafloor at 9° 27'N, 104° 32.3'W ("Macrobes Site"). Manifestations of venting at these sites include: fault scarp hydrothermal mineralization and macrofauna; fault scarp flocculations containing hyperthermophilic microbes; and hilltop sediment mounds and craters possibly created by fluid "blow-outs." Hydrothermal deposits recovered at the ˜0.1 Ma "Tevnia Site" are fault breccias that record many episodes of brecciation followed by hydrothermal cementation (Benjamin et al., this session). Tubeworm casings, live crabs, and "dandelions" observed at this site indicate that the most recent episode of venting was active during, or shortly before, this site was visited with Alvin in 1994. To create the 200 m-high axis-facing fault scarp at Tevnia Site in 100,000 years, an average uplift rate of at least 2 cm/y is required. Since off-axis earthquakes located on abyssal hill fault scarps typically are evidence for recent venting at the

  17. Influence of Plumbing Materials on Biofilm Formation and Growth of Legionella pneumophila in Potable Water Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Julie; Dowsett, A. B.; Dennis, P. J.; Lee, J. V.; Keevil, C. W.

    1994-01-01

    A two-stage chemostat model of a plumbing system was developed, with tap water as the sole nutrient source. The model system was populated with a naturally occurring inoculum derived from an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease and containing Legionella pneumophila along with associated bacteria and protozoa. The model system was used to develop biofilms on the surfaces of a range of eight plumbing materials under controlled, reproducible conditions. The materials varied in their abilities to support biofilm development and the growth of L. pneumophila. Elastomeric surfaces had the most abundant biofilms supporting the highest numbers of L. pneumophila CFU; this was attributed to the leaching of nutrients for bacterial growth from the materials. No direct relationship existed between total biofouling and the numbers of L. pneumophila CFU. Images PMID:16349278

  18. Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens Legionella pneumophila and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in hospital plumbing systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens Legionella pneumophila and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in hospital plumbing systems Jill Hoelle, Michael Coughlin, Elizabeth Sotkiewicz, Jingrang Lu, Stacy Pfaller, Mark Rodgers, and Hodon Ryu U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati...

  19. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  20. Integrated real-time PCR for detection and monitoring of Legionella pneumophila in water systems.

    PubMed

    Yaradou, Diaraf Farba; Hallier-Soulier, Sylvie; Moreau, Sophie; Poty, Florence; Hillion, Yves; Reyrolle, Monique; André, Janine; Festoc, Gabriel; Delabre, Karine; Vandenesch, François; Etienne, Jerome; Jarraud, Sophie

    2007-03-01

    We evaluated a ready-to-use real-time quantitative Legionella pneumophila PCR assay system by testing 136 hot-water-system samples collected from 55 sites as well as 49 cooling tower samples collected from 20 different sites, in parallel with the standard culture method. The PCR assay was reproducible and suitable for routine quantification of L. pneumophila. An acceptable correlation between PCR and culture results was obtained for sanitary hot-water samples but not for cooling tower samples. We also monitored the same L. pneumophila-contaminated cooling tower for 13 months by analyzing 104 serial samples. The culture and PCR results were extremely variable over time, but the curves were similar. The differences between the PCR and culture results did not change over time and were not affected by regular biocide treatment. This ready-to-use PCR assay for L. pneumophila quantification could permit more timely disinfection of cooling towers. PMID:17194840

  1. Legionella pneumophila Type IV Effectors YlfA and YlfB Are SNARE-Like Proteins that Form Homo- and Heteromeric Complexes and Enhance the Efficiency of Vacuole Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Campodonico, Eva M; Roy, Craig R; Ninio, Shira

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative bacterium that can colonize both freshwater protozoa and human alveolar macrophages, the latter infection resulting in Legionnaires' disease. The intracellular lifecycle of L. pneumophila requires extensive manipulation of its host cell, which is carried out by effector proteins that are translocated into the host cell through the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. This study focuses on a pair of highly similar type IV substrates called YlfA/LegC7 and YlfB/LegC2 that were initially identified in a screen for proteins that cause growth inhibition in yeast. Analysis of truncation mutants revealed that the hydrophobic residues in the Ylf amino termini were required for localization of each protein to the membranes of host cells. Central and carboxy terminal coiled coil domains were found to mediate binding of YlfA and YlfB to themselves and to each other. In vivo, a ΔylfA ΔylfB double mutant strain of L. pneumophila was shown to be defective in establishing a vacuole that supports bacterial replication. This phenotype was subsequently correlated with a decrease in the association of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vesicles with vacuoles containing ΔylfA ΔylfB mutant bacteria. These data suggest that the Ylf proteins are membrane-associated effectors that enhance remodeling of the L. pneumophila -containing vacuole by promoting association and possibly fusion of ER-derived membrane vesicles with the bacterial compartment. PMID:27459495

  2. Legionella pneumophila Type IV Effectors YlfA and YlfB Are SNARE-Like Proteins that Form Homo- and Heteromeric Complexes and Enhance the Efficiency of Vacuole Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Campodonico, Eva M.; Roy, Craig R.; Ninio, Shira

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative bacterium that can colonize both freshwater protozoa and human alveolar macrophages, the latter infection resulting in Legionnaires’ disease. The intracellular lifecycle of L. pneumophila requires extensive manipulation of its host cell, which is carried out by effector proteins that are translocated into the host cell through the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. This study focuses on a pair of highly similar type IV substrates called YlfA/LegC7 and YlfB/LegC2 that were initially identified in a screen for proteins that cause growth inhibition in yeast. Analysis of truncation mutants revealed that the hydrophobic residues in the Ylf amino termini were required for localization of each protein to the membranes of host cells. Central and carboxy terminal coiled coil domains were found to mediate binding of YlfA and YlfB to themselves and to each other. In vivo, a ΔylfA ΔylfB double mutant strain of L. pneumophila was shown to be defective in establishing a vacuole that supports bacterial replication. This phenotype was subsequently correlated with a decrease in the association of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vesicles with vacuoles containing ΔylfA ΔylfB mutant bacteria. These data suggest that the Ylf proteins are membrane-associated effectors that enhance remodeling of the L. pneumophila -containing vacuole by promoting association and possibly fusion of ER-derived membrane vesicles with the bacterial compartment. PMID:27459495

  3. Combination of Heat Shock and Enhanced Thermal Regime to Control the Growth of a Persistent Legionella pneumophila Strain.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Emilie; Boppe, Inès; Kouamé, Serge; Martin, Philippe; Pinsonneault, Linda; Valiquette, Louis; Racine, Jules; Prévost, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Following nosocomial cases of Legionella pneumophila, the investigation of a hot water system revealed that 81.5% of sampled taps were positive for L. pneumophila, despite the presence of protective levels of copper in the water. A significant reduction of L. pneumophila counts was observed by culture after heat shock disinfection. The following corrective measures were implemented to control L. pneumophila: increasing the hot water temperature (55 to 60 °C), flushing taps weekly with hot water, removing excess lengths of piping and maintaining a water temperature of 55 °C throughout the system. A gradual reduction in L. pneumophila counts was observed using the culture method and qPCR in the 18 months after implementation of the corrective measures. However, low level contamination was retained in areas with hydraulic deficiencies, highlighting the importance of maintaining a good thermal regime at all points within the system to control the population of L. pneumophila.

  4. Combination of Heat Shock and Enhanced Thermal Regime to Control the Growth of a Persistent Legionella pneumophila Strain.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Emilie; Boppe, Inès; Kouamé, Serge; Martin, Philippe; Pinsonneault, Linda; Valiquette, Louis; Racine, Jules; Prévost, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Following nosocomial cases of Legionella pneumophila, the investigation of a hot water system revealed that 81.5% of sampled taps were positive for L. pneumophila, despite the presence of protective levels of copper in the water. A significant reduction of L. pneumophila counts was observed by culture after heat shock disinfection. The following corrective measures were implemented to control L. pneumophila: increasing the hot water temperature (55 to 60 °C), flushing taps weekly with hot water, removing excess lengths of piping and maintaining a water temperature of 55 °C throughout the system. A gradual reduction in L. pneumophila counts was observed using the culture method and qPCR in the 18 months after implementation of the corrective measures. However, low level contamination was retained in areas with hydraulic deficiencies, highlighting the importance of maintaining a good thermal regime at all points within the system to control the population of L. pneumophila. PMID:27092528

  5. Combination of Heat Shock and Enhanced Thermal Regime to Control the Growth of a Persistent Legionella pneumophila Strain

    PubMed Central

    Bédard, Emilie; Boppe, Inès; Kouamé, Serge; Martin, Philippe; Pinsonneault, Linda; Valiquette, Louis; Racine, Jules; Prévost, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Following nosocomial cases of Legionella pneumophila, the investigation of a hot water system revealed that 81.5% of sampled taps were positive for L. pneumophila, despite the presence of protective levels of copper in the water. A significant reduction of L. pneumophila counts was observed by culture after heat shock disinfection. The following corrective measures were implemented to control L. pneumophila: increasing the hot water temperature (55 to 60 °C), flushing taps weekly with hot water, removing excess lengths of piping and maintaining a water temperature of 55 °C throughout the system. A gradual reduction in L. pneumophila counts was observed using the culture method and qPCR in the 18 months after implementation of the corrective measures. However, low level contamination was retained in areas with hydraulic deficiencies, highlighting the importance of maintaining a good thermal regime at all points within the system to control the population of L. pneumophila. PMID:27092528

  6. Comparison of pulsed corona plasma and pulsed electric fields for the decontamination of water containing Legionella pneumophila as model organism.

    PubMed

    Banaschik, Robert; Burchhardt, Gerhard; Zocher, Katja; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Kolb, Juergen F; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-12-01

    Pulsed corona plasma and pulsed electric fields were assessed for their capacity to kill Legionella pneumophila in water. Electrical parameters such as in particular dissipated energy were equal for both treatments. This was accomplished by changing the polarity of the applied high voltage pulses in a coaxial electrode geometry resulting in the generation of corona plasma or an electric field. For corona plasma, generated by high voltage pulses with peak voltages of +80kV, Legionella were completely killed, corresponding to a log-reduction of 5.4 (CFU/ml) after a treatment time of 12.5min. For the application of pulsed electric fields from peak voltages of -80kV a survival of log 2.54 (CFU/ml) was still detectable after this treatment time. Scanning electron microscopy images of L. pneumophila showed rupture of cells after plasma treatment. In contrast, the morphology of bacteria seems to be intact after application of pulsed electric fields. The more efficient killing for the same energy input observed for pulsed corona plasma is likely due to induced chemical processes and the generation of reactive species as indicated by the evolution of hydrogen peroxide. This suggests that the higher efficacy and efficiency of pulsed corona plasma is primarily associated with the combined effect of the applied electric fields and the promoted reaction chemistry. PMID:27293110

  7. Comparison of pulsed corona plasma and pulsed electric fields for the decontamination of water containing Legionella pneumophila as model organism.

    PubMed

    Banaschik, Robert; Burchhardt, Gerhard; Zocher, Katja; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Kolb, Juergen F; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-12-01

    Pulsed corona plasma and pulsed electric fields were assessed for their capacity to kill Legionella pneumophila in water. Electrical parameters such as in particular dissipated energy were equal for both treatments. This was accomplished by changing the polarity of the applied high voltage pulses in a coaxial electrode geometry resulting in the generation of corona plasma or an electric field. For corona plasma, generated by high voltage pulses with peak voltages of +80kV, Legionella were completely killed, corresponding to a log-reduction of 5.4 (CFU/ml) after a treatment time of 12.5min. For the application of pulsed electric fields from peak voltages of -80kV a survival of log 2.54 (CFU/ml) was still detectable after this treatment time. Scanning electron microscopy images of L. pneumophila showed rupture of cells after plasma treatment. In contrast, the morphology of bacteria seems to be intact after application of pulsed electric fields. The more efficient killing for the same energy input observed for pulsed corona plasma is likely due to induced chemical processes and the generation of reactive species as indicated by the evolution of hydrogen peroxide. This suggests that the higher efficacy and efficiency of pulsed corona plasma is primarily associated with the combined effect of the applied electric fields and the promoted reaction chemistry.

  8. Legionella pneumophila-Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles Promote Bacterial Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Anna Lena; Stoiber, Cornelia; Herkt, Christina E.; Schulz, Christine; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Schmeck, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The formation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria. This includes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Upon its transmission into the lung, L. pneumophila primarily infects and replicates within macrophages. Here, we analyzed the influence of L. pneumophila OMVs on macrophages. To this end, differentiated THP-1 cells were incubated with increasing doses of Legionella OMVs, leading to a TLR2-dependent classical activation of macrophages with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling reduced the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs prior to infection reduced replication of L. pneumophila in THP-1 cells. Blocking of TLR2 activation or heat denaturation of OMVs restored bacterial replication in the first 24 h of infection. With prolonged infection-time, OMV pre-treated macrophages became more permissive for bacterial replication than untreated cells and showed increased numbers of Legionella-containing vacuoles and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Additionally, miRNA-146a was found to be transcriptionally induced by OMVs and to facilitate bacterial replication. Accordingly, IRAK-1, one of miRNA-146a’s targets, showed prolonged activation-dependent degradation, which rendered THP-1 cells more permissive for Legionella replication. In conclusion, L. pneumophila OMVs are initially potent pro-inflammatory stimulators of macrophages, acting via TLR2, IRAK-1, and NF-κB, while at later time points, OMVs facilitate L. pneumophila replication by miR-146a-dependent IRAK-1 suppression. OMVs might thereby promote spreading of L. pneumophila in the host. PMID:27105429

  9. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Outbreak-Associated Legionella pneumophila Isolates.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Shatavia S; Desai, Heta P; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Lapierre, Pascal; Raphael, Brian H; Musser, Kimberlee; Winchell, Jonas M

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequences of three Legionella pneumophila isolates that are associated with a Legionnaires' disease outbreak in New York in 2012. Two clinical isolates (D7630 and D7632) and one environmental isolate (D7631) were recovered from this outbreak. A single isolate-specific virulence gene was found in D7632. These isolates were included in a large study evaluating the genomic resolution of various bioinformatics approaches for L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates. PMID:27445383

  10. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Outbreak-Associated Legionella pneumophila Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shatavia S.; Desai, Heta P.; Mercante, Jeffrey W.; Lapierre, Pascal; Raphael, Brian H.; Musser, Kimberlee

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequences of three Legionella pneumophila isolates that are associated with a Legionnaires’ disease outbreak in New York in 2012. Two clinical isolates (D7630 and D7632) and one environmental isolate (D7631) were recovered from this outbreak. A single isolate-specific virulence gene was found in D7632. These isolates were included in a large study evaluating the genomic resolution of various bioinformatics approaches for L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates. PMID:27445383

  11. DISTRIBUTION OF LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA SEROGROUPS ISOLATED FROM WATER SYSTEMS OF PUBLIC FACILITIES IN BUSAN, SOUTH KOREA.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Yeong; Park, Eun-Hee; Park, Yon-Koung; Park, Sun-Hee; Sung, Gyung-Hye; Park, Hye-Young; Lee, Young-Choon

    2016-05-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the major causes of legionellosis worldwide. The distribution of L. pneumophila was investigated in water systems of public facilities in Busan, South Korea during 2007 and 2013-2014. L. pneumophila was isolated from 8.3% of 3,055 samples, of which the highest isolation rate (49%) was from ships and the lowest 4% from fountains. Serogroups of L. pneumophila isolated in 2007 were distributed among serogroups (sgs) 1-7 with the exception of sg 4, while those of isolates during 2013 and 2014 included also 11 sgs ( 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12, 13, 15). L. pneumophila sg 1 was predominated among isolates from fountains (75%), hotels (60%), buildings (44%), hospitals (38%), and public baths (37%), whereas sg 3 and sg 7 was the most prevalent from ships (46%) and factories (40%), respectively. The predominated serogroup of L. pneumophila isolates from hot and cooling tower water was sg 1 (35% and 46%, respectively), while from cold water was sg 3 (29%). These results should be useful for epidemiological surveys to identify sources of outbreaks of legionellosis in Busan, South Korea. PMID:27405130

  12. The Legionella pneumophila Collagen-Like Protein Mediates Sedimentation, Autoaggregation, and Pathogen-Phagocyte Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Nour, Mena; Duncan, Carla; Prashar, Akriti; Rao, Chitong; Ginevra, Christophe; Jarraud, Sophie; Low, Donald E.; Ensminger, Alexander W.; Terebiznik, Mauricio R.

    2014-01-01

    Although only partially understood, multicellular behavior is relatively common in bacterial pathogens. Bacterial aggregates can resist various host defenses and colonize their environment more efficiently than planktonic cells. For the waterborne pathogen Legionella pneumophila, little is known about the roles of autoaggregation or the parameters which allow cell-cell interactions to occur. Here, we determined the endogenous and exogenous factors sufficient to allow autoaggregation to take place in L. pneumophila. We show that isolates from Legionella species which do not produce the Legionella collagen-like protein (Lcl) are deficient in autoaggregation. Targeted deletion of the Lcl-encoding gene (lpg2644) and the addition of Lcl ligands impair the autoaggregation of L. pneumophila. In addition, Lcl-induced autoaggregation requires divalent cations. Escherichia coli producing surface-exposed Lcl is able to autoaggregate and shows increased biofilm production. We also demonstrate that L. pneumophila infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis is potentiated under conditions which promote Lcl dependent autoaggregation. Overall, this study shows that L. pneumophila is capable of autoaggregating in a process that is mediated by Lcl in a divalent-cation-dependent manner. It also reveals that Lcl potentiates the ability of L. pneumophila to come in contact, attach, and infect amoebae. PMID:24334670

  13. Preferential colonization and release of Legionella pneumophila from mature drinking water biofilms grown on copper versus unplasticized polyvinylchloride coupons.

    PubMed

    Buse, Helen Y; Lu, Jingrang; Struewing, Ian T; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2014-03-01

    Legionella occurrence in premise drinking water (DW) systems contributes to legionellosis outbreaks, especially in the presence of suitable protozoan hosts. This study examined L. pneumophila behavior within DW biofilms grown on copper (Cu) and unplasticized polyvinylchloride (uPVC) surfaces in the presence of Acanthamoeba polyphaga. One year-old DW biofilms were established within six CDC biofilm reactors: three each containing Cu or uPVC coupons. Biofilms were then inoculated with L. pneumophila (uPVC-Lp and Cu-Lp), or L. pneumophila and A. polyphaga (uPVC-Lp/Ap and Cu-Lp/Ap) and compared to sterile water inoculated controls (uPVC- and Cu-Control) over a 4 month period. L. pneumophila appeared more persistent by qPCR within Cu biofilms in the presence of A. polyphaga compared to uPVC biofilms with or without A. polyphaga, but maintained their cultivability in uPVC biofilms compared to Cu biofilms. Also, persistent shedding of L. pneumophila cells (assayed by qPCR) in the effluent water implied colonization of L. pneumophila within Cu-coupon reactors compared to no detection from uPVC-coupon reactor effluent 14 days after inoculation. Hence, L. pneumophila appeared to colonize Cu surfaces more effectively and may be shed from the biofilms at a greater frequency and duration compared to L. pneumophila colonized uPVC surfaces with host amoebae playing a role in L. pneumophila persistence within Cu biofilms.

  14. Predictive parameters of Legionella pneumophila occurrence in hospital water: HPCs and plumbing system installation age.

    PubMed

    Ghanizadeh, Ghader; Mirmohamadlou, Ali; Esmaeli, Davoud

    2016-09-01

    Occurrence of Legionella pneumophila can be relevant to the installation age and the presence of heterotrophic plate counts (HPCs). This research illustrates L. pneumophila contamination of hospital water in accordance with the installation age and the presence of HPCs. One hundred and fifty samples were collected from hot and cold water systems and cultured on R2A and BCYE agar. L. pneumophila identification was done via specific biochemical tests. HPCs and L. pneumophila were detected in 96 and 37.3 % of the samples, respectively. The mean of HPCs density was 947 ± 998 CFU/ml; therefore, 52 % of the samples had higher densities than 500 CFU/ml. High densities of HPCs (>500 CFU/ml) led to colonization of L. pneumophila (≥1000 CFU/ml), mainly observed in cooling systems, gynecological, sonography, and NICU wards. Chi(2) test demonstrated that higher densities (>500 CFU/ml) of HPCs and L. pneumophila contamination in cold water were more frequent than warm water (OR: 2.3 and 1.49, respectively). Univariate regressions implied a significant difference between HPCs density and installation age in positive and negative tests of L. pneumophila (OR = 1.1, p < 0.001, OR = 1.2, p < 0.001). Mann-Whitney U test implied the significant effects of HPCs and installation age on L. pneumophila occurrences (p < 0.001). Spearman correlation and multivariate linear regression revealed significant differences between L. pneumophila and HPCs densities (r s  = 0.33, p < 0.001 and ß = 0.11, p = 0.02), but nonsignificant difference with installation age (r s  = 0.33, p < 0.001 and ß = 0.0, p = 0.91). The occurrence of L. pneumophila, HPCs, and installation age are relevant; so, plumbing system renovation with appropriate materials and promotion of the effective efforts for hospital's water quality assurance is highly recommended. PMID:27573071

  15. The presence of opportunistic pathogens, Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and Mycobacterium avium complex, in South Australian reuse water distribution pipelines.

    PubMed

    Whiley, H; Keegan, A; Fallowfield, H; Bentham, R

    2015-06-01

    Water reuse has become increasingly important for sustainable water management. Currently, its application is primarily constrained by the potential health risks. Presently there is limited knowledge regarding the presence and fate of opportunistic pathogens along reuse water distribution pipelines. In this study opportunistic human pathogens Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and Mycobacterium avium complex were detected using real-time polymerase chain reaction along two South Australian reuse water distribution pipelines at maximum concentrations of 10⁵, 10³ and 10⁵ copies/mL, respectively. During the summer period of sampling the concentration of all three organisms significantly increased (P < 0.05) along the pipeline, suggesting multiplication and hence viability. No seasonality in the decrease in chlorine residual along the pipelines was observed. This suggests that the combination of reduced chlorine residual and increased water temperature promoted the presence of these opportunistic pathogens. PMID:26042986

  16. Phospholipase PlaB of Legionella pneumophila Represents a Novel Lipase Family

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Jennifer; Rydzewski, Kerstin; Broich, Markus; Schunder, Eva; Heuner, Klaus; Flieger, Antje

    2009-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila possesses several phospholipases capable of host cell manipulation and lung damage. Recently, we discovered that the major cell-associated hemolytic phospholipase A (PlaB) shares no homology to described phospholipases and is dispensable for intracellular replication in vitro. Nevertheless, here we show that PlaB is the major lipolytic activity in L. pneumophila cell infections and that PlaB utilizes a typical catalytic triad of Ser-Asp-His for effective hydrolysis of phospholipid substrates. Crucial residues were found to be located within the N-terminal half of the protein, and amino acids embedding these active sites were unique for PlaB and homologs. We further showed that catalytic activity toward phosphatidylcholine but not phosphatidylglycerol is directly linked to hemolytic potential of PlaB. Although the function of the prolonged PlaB C terminus remains to be elucidated, it is essential for lipolysis, since the removal of 15 amino acids already abolishes enzyme activity. Additionally, we determined that PlaB preferentially hydrolyzes long-chain fatty acid substrates containing 12 or more carbon atoms. Since phospholipases play an important role as bacterial virulence factors, we examined cell-associated enzymatic activities among L. pneumophila clinical isolates and non-pneumophila species. All tested clinical isolates showed comparable activities, whereas of the non-pneumophila species, only Legionella gormanii and Legionella spiritensis possessed lipolytic activities similar to those of L. pneumophila and comprised plaB-like genes. Interestingly, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase A activity and hemolytic potential were more pronounced in L. pneumophila. Therefore, hydrolysis of the eukaryotic membrane constituent phosphatidylcholine triggered by PlaB could be an important virulence tool for Legionella pathogenicity. PMID:19640837

  17. Amino Acid Uptake and Metabolism of Legionella pneumophila Hosted by Acanthamoeba castellanii*

    PubMed Central

    Schunder, Eva; Gillmaier, Nadine; Kutzner, Erika; Herrmann, Vroni; Lautner, Monika; Heuner, Klaus; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila survives and replicates within a Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) of amoebae and macrophages. Less is known about the carbon metabolism of the bacteria within the LCV. We have now analyzed the transfer and usage of amino acids from the natural host organism Acanthamoeba castellanii to Legionella pneumophila under in vivo (LCV) conditions. For this purpose, A. castellanii was 13C-labeled by incubation in buffer containing [U-13C6]glucose. Subsequently, these 13C-prelabeled amoebae were infected with L. pneumophila wild type or some mutants defective in putative key enzymes or regulators of carbon metabolism. 13C-Isotopologue compositions of amino acids from bacterial and amoebal proteins were then determined by mass spectrometry. In a comparative approach, the profiles documented the efficient uptake of Acanthamoeba amino acids into the LCV and further into L. pneumophila where they served as precursors for bacterial protein biosynthesis. More specifically, A. castellanii synthesized from exogenous [U-13C6]glucose unique isotopologue mixtures of several amino acids including Phe and Tyr, which were also observed in the same amino acids from LCV-grown L. pneumophila. Minor but significant differences were only detected in the isotopologue profiles of Ala, Asp, and Glu from the amoebal or bacterial protein fractions, respectively, indicating partial de novo synthesis of these amino acids by L. pneumophila. The similar isotopologue patterns in amino acids from L. pneumophila wild type and the mutants under study reflected the robustness of amino acid usage in the LCV of A. castellannii. PMID:24904060

  18. PCR methods for the rapid detection and identification of four pathogenic Legionella spp. and two Legionella pneumophila subspecies based on the gene amplification of gyrB.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangpeng; Cao, Boyang; Dou, Yan; Liu, Yanwei; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2011-08-01

    A total of 25 gyrB gene sequences from 20 Legionella pneumophila subsp. pneumophila strains and five L. pneumophila subsp. fraseri strains were obtained and analyzed, and a multiplex PCR for the simultaneous detection of Legionella bozemanae, Legionella longbeachae, Legionella micdadei and Legioenella pneumophila, and two single PCRs for the differentiation of L. pneumophila subsp. pneumophila and L. pneumophila subsp. fraseri were established. The multiplex PCR method was shown to be highly specific and reproducible when tested against 41 target strains and 17 strains of other bacteria species. The sensitivity of the multiplex PCR was also analyzed and was shown to detect levels as low as 1 ng of genomic DNA or 10 colony-forming units (CFUs) per milliliter in mock water samples. Sixty-three air conditioner condensed water samples from Shanghai City were examined, and the result was validated using 16S rRNA sequencing. The data reported here demonstrate that the multiplex PCR method described is efficient and convenient for the detection of Legionella species in water samples. Twenty L. pneumophila subsp. pneumophila strains and five L. pneumophila subsp. fraseri strains were used for the validation of the two L. pneumophila subspecies-specific PCR methods, and the results indicated that the two PCR methods were both highly specific and convenient for the identification of L. pneumophila at the subspecies level. PMID:21626022

  19. Role of biofilm roughness and hydrodynamic conditions in Legionella pneumophila adhesion to and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yun; Monroy, Guillermo L; Derlon, Nicolas; Janjaroen, Dao; Huang, Conghui; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2015-04-01

    Biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) could exacerbate the persistence and associated risks of pathogenic Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), thus raising human health concerns. However, mechanisms controlling adhesion and subsequent detachment of L. pneumophila associated with biofilms remain unclear. We determined the connection between L. pneumophila adhesion and subsequent detachment with biofilm physical structure characterization using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique. Analysis of the OCT images of multispecies biofilms grown under low nutrient condition up to 34 weeks revealed the lack of biofilm deformation even when these biofilms were exposed to flow velocity of 0.7 m/s, typical flow for DWDS. L. pneumophila adhesion on these biofilm under low flow velocity (0.007 m/s) positively correlated with biofilm roughness due to enlarged biofilm surface area and local flow conditions created by roughness asperities. The preadhered L. pneumophila on selected rough and smooth biofilms were found to detach when these biofilms were subjected to higher flow velocity. At the flow velocity of 0.1 and 0.3 m/s, the ratio of detached cell from the smooth biofilm surface was from 1.3 to 1.4 times higher than that from the rough biofilm surface, presumably because of the low shear stress zones near roughness asperities. This study determined that physical structure and local hydrodynamics control L. pneumophila adhesion to and detachment from simulated drinking water biofilm, thus it is the first step toward reducing the risk of L. pneumophila exposure and subsequent infections.

  20. Dictyostelium discoideum strains lacking the RtoA protein are defective for maturation of the Legionella pneumophila replication vacuole.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiru; Solomon, Jonathan M; Isberg, Ralph R

    2005-03-01

    To identify host proteins involved in Legionella pneumophila intracellular replication, the soil amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum was analysed. The absence of the amoebal RtoA protein is demonstrated here to depress L. pneumophila intracellular growth. Uptake of L. pneumophila into a D. discoideum rtoA(-) strain was marginally defective, but this effect was not sufficient to account for the defective intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. The rtoA mutant was also more resistant to high-multiplicity killing by the bacterium. A targeting assay testing the colocalization of L. pneumophila-containing vacuole with an endoplasmic reticulum/pre-Golgi intermediate compartment marker protein, GFP-HDEL, was used to analyse these defects. In parental D. discoideum, the L. pneumophila vacuole showed recruitment of GFP-HDEL within 40 min after introduction of bacteria to the amoebae. By 6 h after infection it was clear that the rtoA mutant acquired and retained the GFP-HDEL less efficiently than the parental strain, and that the mutant was defective for promoting the physical expansion of the membranous compartment surrounding the bacteria. Depressed intracellular growth of L. pneumophila in a D. discoideum rtoA(-) mutant therefore appeared to result from a lowered efficiency of vesicle trafficking events that are essential for the modification and expansion of the L. pneumophila-containing compartment. PMID:15679845

  1. Advancing Implementation of Evidence-Based Public Health in China: An Assessment of the Current Situation and Suggestions for Developing Regions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianwei; Jiang, Chenghua; Tan, Duxun; Yu, Dehua; Lu, Yuan; Sun, Pengfei; Pan, Ying; Zhang, Hanzhi; Wang, Zhaoxin; Yang, Beilei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Existing research shows a serious scarcity of EBPH practice in China and other developing regions; as an exploratory study, this study aimed to assess the current EBPH implementation status in Shanghai of China qualitatively. Methods. Using semistructured key informant interviews, we examined the status of and impediments to the lagging EBPH in China. Data were analyzed based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Results. Chinese public health practitioners knew more about evidence-based medicine but less about EBPH. The situation was worse in community healthcare centers. Participants perceived that evidence sources were limited and the quality of evidence was low. Concerning the inner setting factors, the structural characteristics, networks and communications, implementation climate, and leadership engagement were confronted with many problems. Among the outer setting factors, external government policies and incentives and low patient compliance were the key problems. Additionally, public health practitioners in Shanghai lacked sufficient awareness of EBPH. Furthermore, the current project-based EBPH lacks a systematic implementation system. Conclusions. Existing practical perspectives on EBPH indicate a lag in the advocacy of this new ideology in China. It would be advisable for healthcare institutions to take the initiative to explore feasible and multiple methods of EBPH promotion. PMID:27597958

  2. Advancing Implementation of Evidence-Based Public Health in China: An Assessment of the Current Situation and Suggestions for Developing Regions

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianwei; Tan, Duxun; Yu, Dehua; Lu, Yuan; Sun, Pengfei; Pan, Ying; Zhang, Hanzhi; Yang, Beilei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Existing research shows a serious scarcity of EBPH practice in China and other developing regions; as an exploratory study, this study aimed to assess the current EBPH implementation status in Shanghai of China qualitatively. Methods. Using semistructured key informant interviews, we examined the status of and impediments to the lagging EBPH in China. Data were analyzed based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Results. Chinese public health practitioners knew more about evidence-based medicine but less about EBPH. The situation was worse in community healthcare centers. Participants perceived that evidence sources were limited and the quality of evidence was low. Concerning the inner setting factors, the structural characteristics, networks and communications, implementation climate, and leadership engagement were confronted with many problems. Among the outer setting factors, external government policies and incentives and low patient compliance were the key problems. Additionally, public health practitioners in Shanghai lacked sufficient awareness of EBPH. Furthermore, the current project-based EBPH lacks a systematic implementation system. Conclusions. Existing practical perspectives on EBPH indicate a lag in the advocacy of this new ideology in China. It would be advisable for healthcare institutions to take the initiative to explore feasible and multiple methods of EBPH promotion.

  3. Advancing Implementation of Evidence-Based Public Health in China: An Assessment of the Current Situation and Suggestions for Developing Regions

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianwei; Tan, Duxun; Yu, Dehua; Lu, Yuan; Sun, Pengfei; Pan, Ying; Zhang, Hanzhi; Yang, Beilei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Existing research shows a serious scarcity of EBPH practice in China and other developing regions; as an exploratory study, this study aimed to assess the current EBPH implementation status in Shanghai of China qualitatively. Methods. Using semistructured key informant interviews, we examined the status of and impediments to the lagging EBPH in China. Data were analyzed based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Results. Chinese public health practitioners knew more about evidence-based medicine but less about EBPH. The situation was worse in community healthcare centers. Participants perceived that evidence sources were limited and the quality of evidence was low. Concerning the inner setting factors, the structural characteristics, networks and communications, implementation climate, and leadership engagement were confronted with many problems. Among the outer setting factors, external government policies and incentives and low patient compliance were the key problems. Additionally, public health practitioners in Shanghai lacked sufficient awareness of EBPH. Furthermore, the current project-based EBPH lacks a systematic implementation system. Conclusions. Existing practical perspectives on EBPH indicate a lag in the advocacy of this new ideology in China. It would be advisable for healthcare institutions to take the initiative to explore feasible and multiple methods of EBPH promotion. PMID:27597958

  4. Improved PCR assay for the species-specific identification and quantitation of Legionella pneumophila in water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Seok; Ahn, Tae-Young; Joh, Kiseong; Lee, Eui Seok; Park, Dong Suk

    2015-11-01

    Legionellosis outbreak is a major global health care problem. However, current Legionella risk assessments may be compromised by uncertainties in Legionella detection methods, infectious dose, and strain infectivity. These limitations may place public health at significant risk, leading to significant monetary losses in health care. However, there are still unmet needs for its rapid identification and monitoring of legionellae in water systems. Therefore, in the present study, a primer set was designed based on a LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) family protein gene of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pneumophila str. Philadelphia 1 because it was found that this gene is structurally diverse among species through BLAST searches. The specificity of the primer set was evaluated using genomic DNA from 6 strains of L. pneumophila, 5 type strains of other related Legionella species, and other 29 reference pathogenic bacteria. The primer set used in the PCR assay amplified a 264-bp product for only targeted six strains of L. pneumophila. The assay was also able to detect at least 1.39 × 10(3) copies/μl of cloned amplified target DNA using purified DNA or 7.4 × 10(0) colony-forming unit per reaction when using calibrated cell suspension. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of this assay were confirmed by successful detection of Legionella pneumophila in environmental water samples. PMID:26142386

  5. Relationship between Legionella pneumophila and Acanthamoeba polyphaga: Physiological status and susceptibility to chemical inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J.; Farrell, I. ); Brown, M.R.W.; Collier, P.J.; Gilbert, P. )

    1992-08-01

    Survival studies were conducted on Legionella pneumophila cells that had been grown intracellulary in Acanthamoeba polyphaga and then exposed to polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), benzisothiazolone (BIT), and 5-chloro-N-methylisothiazolone (CMIT). Susceptibilities were also determined for L. pneumophila grown under iron-sufficient and iron-depleted conditions. BIT was relatively ineffective against cells to PHMB and CMIT. The activities of all three biocides were greatly reduced against L. pneumophila grown in amoebae. PHMB (1 [times] MIC) gave 99.99% reductions in viability for cultures grown in broth within 6 h and no detectable survivors at 24 h but only 90 and 99.9% killing at 6 h and 24 h, respectively, for cells grown in amoebae. The antimicrobial properties of the three biocides against A. polyphaga were also determined. The majority of amoebae recovered from BIT treatment, but few, if any, survived CMIT treatment or exposure of PHMB. This study not only shows the profound effect that intra-amoebal growth has on the physiological status and antimicrobial susceptibility of L. pneumophila but also reveals PHMB to be a potential biocide for effective water treatment. In this respect, PHMB has significant activity, below its recommended use concentrations, against both the host amoeba and L. pneumophila.

  6. Relationship between Legionella pneumophila and Acanthamoeba polyphaga: physiological status and susceptibility to chemical inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, J; Brown, M R; Collier, P J; Farrell, I; Gilbert, P

    1992-01-01

    Survival studies were conducted on Legionella pneumophila cells that had been grown intracellularly in Acanthamoeba polyphaga and then exposed to polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), benzisothiazolone (BIT), and 5-chloro-N-methylisothiazolone (CMIT). Susceptibilities were also determined for L. pneumophila grown under iron-sufficient and iron-depleted conditions. BIT was relatively ineffective against cells grown under iron depletion; in contrast, iron-depleted conditions increased the susceptibilities of cells to PHMB and CMIT. The activities of all three biocides were greatly reduced against L. pneumophila grown in amoebae. PHMB (1 x MIC) gave 99.99% reductions in viability for cultures grown in broth within 6 h and no detectable survivors at 24 h but only 90 and 99.9% killing at 6 h and 24 h, respectively, for cells grown in amoebae. The antimicrobial properties of the three biocides against A. polyphaga were also determined. The majority of amoebae recovered from BIT treatment, but few, if any, survived CMIT treatment or exposure to PHMB. This study not only shows the profound effect that intra-amoebal growth has on the physiological status and antimicrobial susceptibility of L. pneumophila but also reveals PHMB to be a potential biocide for effective water treatment. In this respect, PHMB has significant activity, below its recommended use concentrations, against both the host amoeba and L. pneumophila. PMID:1514790

  7. WIN 57273 is bactericidal for Legionella pneumophila grown in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, P H; Edelstein, M A

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro antimicrobial activity of WIN 57273, a new quinolone antimicrobial agent, was determined for 21 Legionella strains, using broth macrodilution and agar dilution testing methods; ciprofloxacin and erythromycin were tested as well. Three different buffered yeast extract media were used for the agar dilution studies, two of which were made with starch rather than charcoal. Broth macrodilution susceptibility testing was performed with buffered yeast extract broth and two Legionella pneumophila strains. Antimicrobial inhibition of L. pneumophila growth in guinea pig alveolar macrophages was also studied, using a method able to detect bacterial killing. The MICs for 90% of the 21 strains of Legionella spp. grown on buffered charcoal yeast extract medium were 0.125 microgram/ml for WIN 57273, 0.25 microgram/ml for ciprofloxacin, and 1.0 micrograms/ml for erythromycin. These MICs were falsely high, because of inhibition of drug activity by the medium used. Use of less drug-antagonistic, starch-containing media did not support good growth of the test strains. The broth macrodilution MICs for two strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 were less than or equal to 0.03 microgram/ml for WIN 57273 and ciprofloxacin and 0.125 microgram/ml for erythromycin. WIN 57273, ciprofloxacin, and erythromycin all inhibited growth of L. pneumophila in guinea pig alveolar macrophages at concentrations of 1 microgram/ml, but only WIN 57273 prevented regrowth or killed L. pneumophila after removal of extracellular antimicrobial agent. PMID:2619277

  8. Improved PCR assay for the species-specific identification and quantitation of Legionella pneumophila in water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Seok; Ahn, Tae-Young; Joh, Kiseong; Lee, Eui Seok; Park, Dong Suk

    2015-11-01

    Legionellosis outbreak is a major global health care problem. However, current Legionella risk assessments may be compromised by uncertainties in Legionella detection methods, infectious dose, and strain infectivity. These limitations may place public health at significant risk, leading to significant monetary losses in health care. However, there are still unmet needs for its rapid identification and monitoring of legionellae in water systems. Therefore, in the present study, a primer set was designed based on a LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) family protein gene of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pneumophila str. Philadelphia 1 because it was found that this gene is structurally diverse among species through BLAST searches. The specificity of the primer set was evaluated using genomic DNA from 6 strains of L. pneumophila, 5 type strains of other related Legionella species, and other 29 reference pathogenic bacteria. The primer set used in the PCR assay amplified a 264-bp product for only targeted six strains of L. pneumophila. The assay was also able to detect at least 1.39 × 10(3) copies/μl of cloned amplified target DNA using purified DNA or 7.4 × 10(0) colony-forming unit per reaction when using calibrated cell suspension. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of this assay were confirmed by successful detection of Legionella pneumophila in environmental water samples.

  9. Alkaline approach to treating cooling towers for control of Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    States, S.J.; Conley, L.F.; Towner, S.G.; Wolford, R.S.; Stephenson, T.E.; McNamara, M.; Wadowsky, R.M.; Yee, R.B.

    1987-08-01

    Earlier field and laboratory studies have shown that Legionella species survive and multiply in the pH range 5.5 to 9.2. Additionally, the technical feasibility of operating cooling towers at elevated alkalinities and pH has previously been documented by published guidelines. The guidelines indicate that these conditions facilitate corrosion control and favor chlorine persistence which enhances the effectiveness of continuous chlorination in biofouling control. This information suggest that control of Legionella species in cooling towers can be accomplished by operating the towers under alkaline conditions. To test this possibility, we collected water samples over a period of months from a hospital cooling tower. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical parameters. Subsamples were pasteurized and inoculated with non-agar-passaged Legionella pneumophila which had been maintained in tap water. Correlation of subsequent Legionella growth with corresponding pH and alkalinity values revealed statistically significant inverse associations. These data support the hypothesis that operating cooling towers outside of the optimal conditions for Legionella growth (e.g., at elevated alkalinities and a pH greater than 9) may be a useful approach to controlling growth in this habitat.

  10. A comparison of Legionella pneumophila occurrence in hot water tanks and instantaneous devices in domestic, nosocomial, and community environments.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, F; Caruso, A; Moschini, L; Turano, A; Scarcella, C; Speziani, F

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the occurrence of L. pneumophila in hot water samples from hot water tanks and instantaneous devices. Tanks and devices were all operated by heat exchangers employed in the town's district heating system. Thirty-six out of 171 (21%) hot water samples tested positive for L. pneumophila isolation, with 14.6% belonging to serogroup 1 and 6.4% to serogroups 2-14. The proportion of L. pneumophila detected in hot water reservoirs (30%) was higher than that observed in hot water instantaneous devices (6.2%). Differences in L. pneumophila isolation reflected different temperatures registered at the faucet: 60 degrees C for hot water from instantaneous devices. These data emphasize the need to control temperature in hot water distribution devices, thus inhibiting the formation of biofilm and L. pneumophila colonization.

  11. [A review of the current research on prions. The evidence suggests the possibility of transmission of the mad cow disease to humans].

    PubMed

    Grandien, M; Wahren, B

    1998-11-25

    Further evidence of the transmissibility of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) across the species barrier from cow to man has been derived from epidemiological analysis and the characterisation of prion strains. Recent research has shown the persistence of prions after experimental transmission to resistant murine species, and subclinical persistence in cows. The accumulation of pathological prion proteins in tonsils and appendix has been demonstrated prior to clinical confirmation of the presence of the new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Current prion research is focused on the involvement of B lymphocytes as carriers, on the species barrier and cellular receptors, and on macromolecules involved in the conformational change from normal to pathological prion proteins.

  12. Immunohistochemical evidence for the brevican-tenascin-R interaction: colocalization in perineuronal nets suggests a physiological role for the interaction in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, K; Miura, R; Kosaki, R; Berglund, E; Ranscht, B; Yamaguchi, Y

    1999-07-26

    Brevican is one of the most abundant chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in the adult rat brain. We have recently shown that the C-type lectin domain of brevican binds fibronectin type III domains 3-5 of tenascin-R. Here we report strong evidence for a physiological basis for this interaction. Substantial brevican immunoreactivity was detected in a number of nuclei and in the reticular formations throughout the midbrain and hindbrain, including, but not limited to, the deep cerebellar nuclei, the trapezoid body, the red nucleus, the oculomotor nucleus, the vestibular nucleus, the cochlear nucleus, the gigantocellular reticular nucleus, the motor trigeminal nucleus, and the lateral superior olive. Most of the brevican immunoreactivity exhibited pericellular and reticular staining patterns. In almost all of these sites, brevican immunoreactivity colocalized with that of tenascin-R, which was also substantially codistributed with versican, another member of the lectican family. Detailed analysis revealed that the pericellular staining of brevican resembled that in perineuronal nets in which tenascin-R has been localized. Immunoelectron microscopy identified brevican immunoreactivity in the intercellular spaces surrounding presynaptic boutons and on their surfaces, but not in the synaptic clefts or in their immediate vicinity, a distribution pattern consistent with perineuronal nets. Taken together, our results provide strong evidence that the previously reported interactions between brevican and tenascin-R may play a functional role within the perineuronal nets.

  13. Rifampin resistance of Legionella pneumophila is not increased during therapy for experimental Legionnaires disease: study of rifampin resistance using a guinea pig model of Legionnaires disease.

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, P H

    1991-01-01

    Isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, obtained from guinea pigs with experimentally induced Legionnaires disease, were tested for rifampin resistance. Thirteen isolates were from animals treated with rifampin alone, four isolates were from animals treated with saline, and three isolates each were from animals treated with erythromycin or erythromycin plus rifampin; all of these isolates were derived from the same parent strain, F889. Most of the isolates were obtained from rifampin-treated animals that survived infection but had persistence of bacteria in their lungs at necropsy. No differences in rifampin agar dilution MICs were detected for the 23 isolates and parent strain that were tested. None of the 13 isolates from animals treated with rifampin alone had a high number of resistant organisms detected by using a rifampin gradient plate assay. Thirteen isolates plus the parent strain were tested by using a quantitative method of determining resistance frequency. Considerable heterogeneity among isolates was observed, but there was no evidence of increased resistance for any treatment group. The range of rifampin resistance frequencies was 10(-7) to 10(-8). No evidence for rifampin-induced resistance of L. pneumophila was found in this study. PMID:2014980

  14. Efficacy of ozone in eradication of Legionella pneumophila from hospital plumbing fixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, P H; Whittaker, R E; Kreiling, R L; Howell, C L

    1982-01-01

    The effect of ozonation of supply water for one wing of an unoccupied hospital building which had positive cultures for Legionella pneumophila from multiple potable water fixtures was studied in a prospective, controlled fashion. Mean ozone residual concentrations of 0.79 mg/liter eradicated L. pneumophila from the fixtures, but so did nonozonated water in the control wing fixtures. The efficacy of the nonozonated water was most probably due to a mechanical flushing effect and to an unexpected rise in the chlorine content of the supply water. Determination of the in vitro activity of ozone against L. pneumophila did not predict the efficacy of its eradication from water fixtures treated with ozone. PMID:7159081

  15. Efficacy of ozone in eradication of Legionella pneumophila from hospital plumbing fixtures.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, P H; Whittaker, R E; Kreiling, R L; Howell, C L

    1982-12-01

    The effect of ozonation of supply water for one wing of an unoccupied hospital building which had positive cultures for Legionella pneumophila from multiple potable water fixtures was studied in a prospective, controlled fashion. Mean ozone residual concentrations of 0.79 mg/liter eradicated L. pneumophila from the fixtures, but so did nonozonated water in the control wing fixtures. The efficacy of the nonozonated water was most probably due to a mechanical flushing effect and to an unexpected rise in the chlorine content of the supply water. Determination of the in vitro activity of ozone against L. pneumophila did not predict the efficacy of its eradication from water fixtures treated with ozone.

  16. Survival of Legionella pneumophila in a model hot water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Schofield, G M; Wright, A E

    1984-07-01

    A virulent strain of Legionella pneumophila was inoculated into an enclosed system supplied with unsterilized water from a domestic hot water supply. Growth of bacteria was monitored over 10 weeks. An increase in the number of organisms other than legionellas occurred but few amoebae were observed and none could be cultured. Viable counts of L. pneumophila in the circulation fluid decreased slightly. However, particles of debris which accumulated in the apparatus and which were stained by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique were found to be almost totally composed of L. pneumophila. On dismantling the apparatus Legionella was isolated in moderately high numbers from several different types of surfaces, particularly natural rubber and silicone. PMID:6470670

  17. Isolation and identification of Legionella pneumophila from drinking water in Basra governorate, Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Sulami, A A; Al-Taee, A M R; Yehyazarian, A A

    2013-11-01

    This study in Iraq investigated the occurrence of Legionella. pneumophila in different drinking-water sources in Basra governorate as well as the susceptibility of isolates to several antibiotics. A total of 222 water samples were collected in 2008-2009: 49 samples from water purification plants (at entry points, from precipitation tanks, from filtration tanks and at exit points), 127 samples of tap water; and 46 samples from tankers and plants supplying water by reverse osmosis. The findings confirmed the presence of L. pneumophila in sources of crude water, in general drinking water supplies and drinking water tankers. Of 258 isolates 77.1% were serotype 1 and 22.9% serotypes 2-15. All examined isolates displayed drug resistance, particularly to ampicillin, but were 100% susceptible to doxycycline. The prevalence of L. pneumophila, especially serogroup 1, is a strong indicator of unsuitability of drinking water and requires appropriate action.

  18. Real-time investigation of a Legionella pneumophila outbreak using whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Graham, R M A; Doyle, C J; Jennison, A V

    2014-11-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the main pathogen responsible for outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease, which can be related to contaminated water supplies such as cooling towers or water pipes. We combined conventional molecular methods and whole genome sequence (WGS) analysis to investigate an outbreak of L. pneumophila in a large Australian hospital. Typing of these isolates using sequence-based typing and virulence gene profiling, was unable to discriminate between outbreak and non-outbreak isolates. WGS analysis was performed on isolates during the outbreak, as well as on unlinked isolates from the Public Health Microbiology reference collection. The more powerful resolution provided by analysis of whole genome sequences allowed outbreak isolates to be distinguished from isolates that were temporally and spatially unassociated with the outbreak, demonstrating that this technology can be used in real-time to investigate L. pneumophila outbreaks. PMID:24576553

  19. Hemolytic activity of plasma and urine from rabbits experimentally infected with Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Baine, W B; Rasheed, J K; Maca, H W; Kaufmann, A F

    1979-01-01

    Rabbits were infected with Legionella pneumophila by intravenous administration of allantoic fluid from eggs infected with this organism. Heated plasma from animals with severe illness caused by L. pneumophila lysed erythrocytes from guinea pigs in a radial hemolysis assay. Plasma from control rabbits did not lyse guinea pig erythrocytes in parallel assays. Urine from two of the infected animals also showed hemolytic activity. Attempts to induce illness in rabbits by intranasal administration of L. pneumohpila were less successful. Allantoic fluid from embrynated hen eggs developed hemolytic activity when maintained eithr in vitro at room temperature or in eggs whose embryos were killed by refrigeration. Hemolytic activity in filtrates of allantoic fluid from eggs infected with L. pneumophila, as previously reported, may not be due to the presence of bacterial hemolysins in the fluid. PMID:399383

  20. Legionella pneumophila secretes a mitochondrial carrier protein during infection.

    PubMed

    Dolezal, Pavel; Aili, Margareta; Tong, Janette; Jiang, Jhih-Hang; Marobbio, Carlo M T; Marobbio, Carlo M; Lee, Sau Fung; Schuelein, Ralf; Belluzzo, Simon; Binova, Eva; Mousnier, Aurelie; Frankel, Gad; Giannuzzi, Giulia; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Gabriel, Kipros; Naderer, Thomas; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Lithgow, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    The Mitochondrial Carrier Family (MCF) is a signature group of integral membrane proteins that transport metabolites across the mitochondrial inner membrane in eukaryotes. MCF proteins are characterized by six transmembrane segments that assemble to form a highly-selective channel for metabolite transport. We discovered a novel MCF member, termed Legionellanucleotide carrier Protein (LncP), encoded in the genome of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease. LncP was secreted via the bacterial Dot/Icm type IV secretion system into macrophages and assembled in the mitochondrial inner membrane. In a yeast cellular system, LncP induced a dominant-negative phenotype that was rescued by deleting an endogenous ATP carrier. Substrate transport studies on purified LncP reconstituted in liposomes revealed that it catalyzes unidirectional transport and exchange of ATP transport across membranes, thereby supporting a role for LncP as an ATP transporter. A hidden Markov model revealed further MCF proteins in the intracellular pathogens, Legionella longbeachae and Neorickettsia sennetsu, thereby challenging the notion that MCF proteins exist exclusively in eukaryotic organisms.

  1. [Nosocomial Legionella pneumophila infection in a nephrology department].

    PubMed

    Gahrn-Hansen, B; Uldum, S A; Schmidt, J; Nielsen, B; Birkeland, S A; Jørgensen, K A

    1995-01-30

    During the autumn and winter of 1993-94 four cases of legionellosis were diagnosed in a Department of Nephrology. Three of the patients were kidney transplanted patients. Two of the patients died. The diagnosis was based on positive culture in two patients and by positive urinary antigen test in the other two patients. Serology was negative for all four patients. Legionella pneumophila was initially found in the cold and hot shower water, in ice-water from the ice machine, from the hot water tank and in the cold water inlet to the building. The isolate from patient no. one and isolates of serogroup 5 from the ice machine and the shower water had identical REA profiles, different from the profiles of the isolate from patient no. four. We concluded that at least one of the four patients was likely to have been infected from the water in the department, either by inhalation of contaminated aerosols from the shower or by aspiration of contaminated ice-water. Precautions were taken to reduce the number of Legionella in the shower- and ice-water. In addition, restrictions in the use of showers and ice-water from the ice machine were introduced.

  2. Volcanotectonic history of Crater Flat, southwestern Nevada, as suggested by new evidence from drill hole USW-VH-1 and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    New evidence for a possible resurgent dome in the caldera related to eruption of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff has been provided by recent drilling of a 762-meter (2,501-foot) hole in central Crater Flat. Although no new volcanic units were penetrated by the drill hole (USW-VH-1), the positive aeromagnetic anomaly in the vicinity of the drill hole appears to result in part from the unusually thick, densely welded tuff of the Bullfrog. Major units penetrated include alluvium, basalt of Crater Flat, Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Members of the Paintbrush Tuff, and Prow Pass and Bullfrog Members of the Crater Flat Tuff. In addition, the drill hole provided the first subsurface hydrologic information for the area. The water table in the hole is at about 180 meters (600 feet), and the temperature gradient appears slightly higher than normal for the region.

  3. Integration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Legionella pneumophila in drinking water biofilms grown on domestic plumbing materials.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Miriam M; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost

    2010-06-01

    Drinking water biofilms were grown on coupons of plumbing materials, including ethylene-propylene-diene-monomer (EPDM) rubber, silane cross-linked polyethylene (PE-X b), electron-ray cross-linked PE (PE-X c) and copper under constant flow-through of cold tap water. After 14 days, the biofilms were spiked with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila and Enterobacter nimipressuralis (10(6) cells/mL each). The test bacteria were environmental isolates from contamination events in drinking water systems. After static incubation for 24 h, water flow was resumed and continued for 4 weeks. Total cell count and heterotrophic plate count (HPC) of biofilms were monitored, and P. aeruginosa, L. pneumophila and E. nimipressuralis were quantified, using standard culture-based methods or culture-independent fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). After 14 days total cell counts and HPC values were highest on EPDM followed by the plastic materials and copper. P. aeruginosa and L. pneumophila became incorporated into drinking water biofilms and were capable to persist in biofilms on EPDM and PE-X materials for several weeks, while copper biofilms were colonized only by L. pneumophila in low culturable numbers. E. nimipressuralis was not detected in any of the biofilms. Application of the FISH method often yielded orders of magnitude higher levels of P. aeruginosa and L. pneumophila than culture methods. These observations indicate that drinking water biofilms grown under cold water conditions on domestic plumbing materials, especially EPDM and PE-X in the present study, can be a reservoir for P. aeruginosa and L. pneumophila that persist in these habitats mostly in a viable but non-culturable state. PMID:20556878

  4. Lgn1, a gene that determines susceptibility to Legionella pneumophila, maps to mouse chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, W.F.; Damron, D.M.; Lander, E.S.

    1995-04-10

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila is unable to replicate in macrophages derived from most inbred mouse strains. Here, we report the mapping of a gene, called Lgn1, that determines whether mouse macrophages are permissive for the intracellular replication of L. pneumophila. Although Lgn1 has been previously reported to map to mouse chromosome 15, we show here that it actually maps to chromosome 13, between D13Mit128 and D13Mit70. In the absence of any regional candidates for Lgn1, this map position will facilitate positional cloning attempts directed at this gene. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Improved semiselective medium for isolation of Legionella pneumophila from contaminated clinical and environmental specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, P H

    1981-01-01

    Eighteen types of media, all of which used charcoal yeast extract medium as a base, were tested for their ability to support the growth of a stock strain of Legionella pneumophila. Fifteen of these contained antimicrobial agents. Five antibiotic-containing media which performed best in growing the stock strain were then tested for the ability to grow L. pneumophila from clinical respiratory tract specimens. One of the media, BMPA alpha, which contained cefamandole, polymyxin B, anisomycin, an organic buffer, and alpha-ketoglutarate, performed from contaminated clinical specimens and, in conjunction with an acid wash treatment, facilitated recovery of the bacterium from potable water. PMID:7287886

  6. Development of a standardized subgrouping scheme for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Joly, J R; McKinney, R M; Tobin, J O; Bibb, W F; Watkins, I D; Ramsay, D

    1986-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and a subclassification scheme were developed in a collaborative project among three laboratories. The seven most useful monoclonal antibodies were selected from three previously developed panels on the basis of indirect fluorescent antibody patterns with 83 strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 that were obtained from widely distributed geographic locations. The isolates were divided into 10 major subgroups on the basis of reactivity patterns that can be readily reproduced in any laboratory and are not subject to major inconsistencies of interpretation of staining intensity. A standard protocol for the indirect fluorescent antibody procedure was also developed. PMID:3517064

  7. LtpD is a novel Legionella pneumophila effector that binds phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and inositol monophosphatase IMPA1.

    PubMed

    Harding, Clare R; Mattheis, Corinna; Mousnier, Aurélie; Oates, Clare V; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Frankel, Gad; Schroeder, Gunnar N

    2013-11-01

    The Dot/Icm type IV secretion system (T4SS) of Legionella pneumophila is crucial for the pathogen to survive in protozoa and cause human disease. Although more than 275 effector proteins are delivered into the host cell by the T4SS, the function of the majority is unknown. Here we have characterized the Dot/Icm effector LtpD. During infection, LtpD localized to the cytoplasmic face of the membrane of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). In A549 lung epithelial cells, ectopically expressed LtpD localized to large vesicular structures that contained markers of endosomal compartments. Systematic analysis of LtpD fragments identified an internal 17-kDa fragment, LtpD471-626, which was essential for targeting ectopically expressed LtpD to vesicular structures and for the association of translocated LtpD with the LCV. LtpD471-626 bound directly to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PtdIns(3)P] in vitro and colocalized with the PtdIns(3)P markers FYVE and SetA in cotransfected cells. LtpD was also found to bind the host cell enzyme inositol (myo)-1 (or 4)-monophosphatase 1, an important phosphatase involved in phosphoinositide production. Analysis of the role of LtpD in infection showed that LtpD is involved in bacterial replication in THP-1 macrophages, the larvae of Galleria mellonella, and mouse lungs. Together, these data suggest that LtpD is a novel phosphoinositide-binding L. pneumophila effector that has a role in intracellular bacterial replication.

  8. LtpD Is a Novel Legionella pneumophila Effector That Binds Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate and Inositol Monophosphatase IMPA1

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Clare R.; Mattheis, Corinna; Mousnier, Aurélie; Oates, Clare V.; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Schroeder, Gunnar N.

    2013-01-01

    The Dot/Icm type IV secretion system (T4SS) of Legionella pneumophila is crucial for the pathogen to survive in protozoa and cause human disease. Although more than 275 effector proteins are delivered into the host cell by the T4SS, the function of the majority is unknown. Here we have characterized the Dot/Icm effector LtpD. During infection, LtpD localized to the cytoplasmic face of the membrane of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). In A549 lung epithelial cells, ectopically expressed LtpD localized to large vesicular structures that contained markers of endosomal compartments. Systematic analysis of LtpD fragments identified an internal 17-kDa fragment, LtpD471-626, which was essential for targeting ectopically expressed LtpD to vesicular structures and for the association of translocated LtpD with the LCV. LtpD471-626 bound directly to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PtdIns(3)P] in vitro and colocalized with the PtdIns(3)P markers FYVE and SetA in cotransfected cells. LtpD was also found to bind the host cell enzyme inositol (myo)-1 (or 4)-monophosphatase 1, an important phosphatase involved in phosphoinositide production. Analysis of the role of LtpD in infection showed that LtpD is involved in bacterial replication in THP-1 macrophages, the larvae of Galleria mellonella, and mouse lungs. Together, these data suggest that LtpD is a novel phosphoinositide-binding L. pneumophila effector that has a role in intracellular bacterial replication. PMID:24002062

  9. When the Rule Becomes the Exception. No Evidence of Gene Flow between Two Zerynthia Cryptic Butterflies Suggests the Emergence of a New Model Group

    PubMed Central

    Vovlas, Alessio; Chelazzi, Guido; Bonelli, Simona; Balletto, Emilio; Ciofi, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that most parapatric cryptic/sister taxa are reproductively compatible across their areas of contact. Consequently, the biological species concept, which assumes absence of interbreeding, is becoming a not so effective criterion in evolutionary ecology. Nevertheless, the few parapatric sister taxa showing complete reproductive barriers represent interesting models to study speciation processes and the evolution of reproductive isolation. In this study, we examined contact populations in northwestern Italy of two butterfly species, Zerynthia polyxena and Z. cassandra, characterized by different genitalic morphotypes. We studied levels of divergence among 21 populations distributed from Sicily to France using three genetic markers (the mitochondrial COI and ND1 genes and the nuclear wingless gene) and genitalic geometric morphometrics. Moreover, we performed species distribution modelling to estimate different climatic requirements of Z. polyxena and Z. cassandra. We projected climatic data into glacial maximum scenarios in order to verify if and to which extent glacial cycles could have contributed to speciation processes. Genetic and morphometric analyses identified two main groups. All specimens showed a concordant pattern of diversification, including those individuals sampled in the contact area. Haplotype distribution and climatic models showed that during glacial maxima both species experienced a strong range contraction and presumably remained separated into different microrefugia in southern France, in the Italian Peninsula and on the islands of Elba and Sicily. Long term separation was probably favoured by reduced dispersal ability and high phylopatry, while genitalic diversification probably favoured interbreeding avoidance. Conversely, the aposematic wing pattern remained almost identical. We compared our results with those obtained in other species and concluded that Z. polyxena and Z. cassandra represent a valuable model in

  10. Multiple Legionella pneumophila Type II Secretion Substrates, Including a Novel Protein, Contribute to Differential Infection of the Amoebae Acanthamoeba castellanii, Hartmannella vermiformis, and Naegleria lovaniensis

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, Jessica Y.; Pearce, Meghan M.; Vargas, Paloma; Bagchi, Sreya; Mulhern, Brendan J.

    2013-01-01

    Type II protein secretion (T2S) by Legionella pneumophila is required for intracellular infection of host cells, including macrophages and the amoebae Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis. Previous proteomic analysis revealed that T2S by L. pneumophila 130b mediates the export of >25 proteins, including several that appeared to be novel. Following confirmation that they are unlike known proteins, T2S substrates NttA, NttB, and LegP were targeted for mutation. nttA mutants were impaired for intracellular multiplication in A. castellanii but not H. vermiformis or macrophages, suggesting that novel exoproteins which are specific to Legionella are especially important for infection. Because the importance of NttA was host cell dependent, we examined a panel of T2S substrate mutants that had not been tested before in more than one amoeba. As a result, RNase SrnA, acyltransferase PlaC, and metalloprotease ProA all proved to be required for optimal intracellular multiplication in H. vermiformis but not A. castellanii. Further examination of an lspF mutant lacking the T2S apparatus documented that T2S is also critical for infection of the amoeba Naegleria lovaniensis. Mutants lacking SrnA, PlaC, or ProA, but not those deficient for NttA, were defective in N. lovaniensis. Based upon analysis of a double mutant lacking PlaC and ProA, the role of ProA in H. vermiformis was connected to its ability to activate PlaC, whereas in N. lovaniensis, ProA appeared to have multiple functions. Together, these data document that the T2S system exports multiple effectors, including a novel one, which contribute in different ways to the broad host range of L. pneumophila. PMID:23429532

  11. Neither philopatric nor panmictic: microsatellite and mtDNA evidence suggests lack of natal homing but limits to dispersal in Pacific lamprey.

    PubMed

    Spice, Erin K; Goodman, Damon H; Reid, Stewart B; Docker, Margaret F

    2012-06-01

    Most species with lengthy migrations display some degree of natal homing; some (e.g. migratory birds and anadromous salmonids) show spectacular feats of homing. However, studies of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) indicate that this anadromous species locates spawning habitat based on pheromonal cues from larvae rather than through philopatry. Previous genetic studies in the anadromous Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) have both supported and rejected the hypothesis of natal homing. To resolve this, we used nine microsatellite loci to examine the population structure in 965 Pacific lamprey from 20 locations from central British Columbia to southern California and supplemented this analysis with mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis on a subset of 530 lamprey. Microsatellite analysis revealed (i) relatively low but often statistically significant genetic differentiation among locations (97% pairwise F(ST) values were <0.04 but 73.7% were significant); and (ii) weak but significant isolation by distance (r(2) = 0.0565, P = 0.0450) but no geographic clustering of samples. The few moderate F(ST) values involved comparisons with sites that were geographically distant or far upstream. The mtDNA analysis--although providing less resolution among sites (only 4.7%F(ST) values were significant)--was broadly consistent with the microsatellite results: (i) the southernmost site and some sites tributary to the Salish Sea were genetically distinct; and (ii) southern sites showed higher haplotype and private haplotype richness. These results are inconsistent with philopatry, suggesting that anadromous lampreys are unusual among species with long migrations, but suggest that limited dispersal at sea precludes panmixia in this species.

  12. Neither philopatric nor panmictic: microsatellite and mtDNA evidence suggests lack of natal homing but limits to dispersal in Pacific lamprey.

    PubMed

    Spice, Erin K; Goodman, Damon H; Reid, Stewart B; Docker, Margaret F

    2012-06-01

    Most species with lengthy migrations display some degree of natal homing; some (e.g. migratory birds and anadromous salmonids) show spectacular feats of homing. However, studies of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) indicate that this anadromous species locates spawning habitat based on pheromonal cues from larvae rather than through philopatry. Previous genetic studies in the anadromous Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) have both supported and rejected the hypothesis of natal homing. To resolve this, we used nine microsatellite loci to examine the population structure in 965 Pacific lamprey from 20 locations from central British Columbia to southern California and supplemented this analysis with mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis on a subset of 530 lamprey. Microsatellite analysis revealed (i) relatively low but often statistically significant genetic differentiation among locations (97% pairwise F(ST) values were <0.04 but 73.7% were significant); and (ii) weak but significant isolation by distance (r(2) = 0.0565, P = 0.0450) but no geographic clustering of samples. The few moderate F(ST) values involved comparisons with sites that were geographically distant or far upstream. The mtDNA analysis--although providing less resolution among sites (only 4.7%F(ST) values were significant)--was broadly consistent with the microsatellite results: (i) the southernmost site and some sites tributary to the Salish Sea were genetically distinct; and (ii) southern sites showed higher haplotype and private haplotype richness. These results are inconsistent with philopatry, suggesting that anadromous lampreys are unusual among species with long migrations, but suggest that limited dispersal at sea precludes panmixia in this species. PMID:22564149

  13. Pathway analysis using (13) C-glycerol and other carbon tracers reveals a bipartite metabolism of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Häuslein, Ina; Manske, Christian; Goebel, Werner; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Hilbi, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Amino acids represent the prime carbon and energy source for Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular pathogen, which can cause a life-threatening pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. Genome, transcriptome and proteome studies indicate that L. pneumophila also utilizes carbon substrates other than amino acids. We show here that glycerol promotes intracellular replication of L. pneumophila in amoeba or macrophages (but not extracellular growth) dependent on glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, GlpD. An L. pneumophila mutant strain lacking glpD was outcompeted by wild-type bacteria upon co-infection of amoeba, indicating an important role of glycerol during infection. Isotopologue profiling studies using (13) C-labelled substrates were performed in a novel minimal defined medium, MDM, comprising essential amino acids, proline and phenylalanine. In MDM, L. pneumophila utilized (13) C-labelled glycerol or glucose predominantly for gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway, while the amino acid serine was used for energy generation via the citrate cycle. Similar results were obtained for L. pneumophila growing intracellularly in amoeba fed with (13) C-labelled glycerol, glucose or serine. Collectively, these results reveal a bipartite metabolism of L. pneumophila, where glycerol and carbohydrates like glucose are mainly fed into anabolic processes, while serine serves as major energy supply. PMID:26691313

  14. Clinical and environmental distribution of Legionella pneumophila in a university hospital in Italy: efficacy of ultraviolet disinfection.

    PubMed

    Triassi, M; Di Popolo, A; Ribera D'Alcalà, G; Albanese, Z; Cuccurullo, S; Montegrosso, S; Crispino, M; Borella, P; Zarrilli, R

    2006-04-01

    The molecular epidemiology of Legionella pneumophila in the 'V. Monaldi' University Hospital was studied. Seven cases of nosocomial Legionnaires' disease were diagnosed between 1999 and 2003. Two clinical legionella strains obtained from two patients in the adult cardiac surgery unit (CSU) and 30 environmental legionella strains from the paediatric and adult CSUs, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and the cardiorespiratory intensive care unit (CR-ICU) were serotyped and genotyped. L. pneumophila serogroup 1/Philadelphia with an identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profile A was isolated from two patients in the adult CSU, and from three and one water samples taken in the adult CSU and the paediatric CSU, respectively, from 2001 to 2002. Furthermore, L. pneumophila serogroup 3 with an identical PFGE profile B was identified in 20 environmental strains from all wards, L. pneumophila serogroup 3 with PFGE profile C was identified in a single environmental strain from the CR-ICU, and non-pneumophila Legionella with identical PFGE profile D was identified in five environmental strains from the adult CSU, paediatric CSU and NICU. Ultraviolet irradiation was effective in disinfection of the hospital water supplies in the adult and paediatric CSUs contaminated by L. pneumophila clone associated with nosocomial Legionnaires' disease. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that two cases of nosocomial legionellosis were caused by the persistence of a single clone of L. pneumophila serogroup 1/Philadelphia in the hospital environment, and that disinfection by ultraviolet irradiation may represent an effective measure to prevent nosocomial Legionnaires' disease.

  15. Suggestive Evidence for the Involvement of the Second Calcium and Surface Loop in Interfacial Binding: Monoclinci and Trigonal Crystal Structures of a Quadruple Mutant of Phospholipase A2

    SciTech Connect

    Sekar,K.; Yogavel, M.; Kanaujia, S.; Sharma, A.; Velmurugan, D.; Poi, M.; Dauter, Z.; Tsai, M.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structures of the monoclinic and trigonal forms of the quadruple mutant K53,56,120,121M of recombinant bovine pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}) have been solved and refined at 1.9 and 1.1 Angstroms resolution, respectively. Interestingly, the monoclinic form reveals the presence of the second calcium ion. Furthermore, the surface-loop residues are ordered and the conformation of residues 62-66 is similar to that observed in other structures containing the second calcium ion. On the other hand, in the trigonal form the surface loop is disordered and the second calcium is absent. Docking studies suggest that the second calcium and residues Lys62 and Asp66 from the surface loop could be involved in the interaction with the polar head group of the membrane phospholipid. It is hypothesized that the two structures of the quadruple mutant, monoclinic and trigonal, represent the conformations of PLA2 at the lipid interface and in solution, respectively. A docked structure with a phospholipid molecule and with a transition-state analogue bound, one at the active site coordinating to the catalytic calcium and the other at the second calcium site, but both at the i-face, is presented.

  16. Evidence of at least two evolutionary lineages in Melipona subnitida (Apidae, Meliponini) suggested by mtDNA variability and geometric morphometrics of forewings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatti, Vanessa; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino; Franco, Fernando Faria; Francoy, Tiago Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Melipona subnitida, a tropical stingless bee, is an endemic species of the Brazilian northeast and exhibits great potential for honey and pollen production in addition to its role as one of the main pollinators of the Caatinga biome. To understand the genetic structure and better assist in the conservation of this species, we characterized the population variability of M. subnitida using geometric morphometrics of the forewing and cytochrome c oxidase I gene fragment sequencing. We collected workers from six localities in the northernmost distribution. Both methodologies indicated that the variability among the sampled populations is related both to the environment in which samples were collected and the geographical distance between the sampling sites, indicating that differentiation among the populations is due to the existence of at least evolutionary lineages. Molecular clock data suggest that this differentiation may have begun in the middle Pleistocene, approximately 396 kya. The conservation of all evolutionary lineages is important since they can present differential resistance to environmental changes, as resistance to drought and diseases.

  17. Evidence of at least two evolutionary lineages in Melipona subnitida (Apidae, Meliponini) suggested by mtDNA variability and geometric morphometrics of forewings.

    PubMed

    Bonatti, Vanessa; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino; Franco, Fernando Faria; Francoy, Tiago Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Melipona subnitida, a tropical stingless bee, is an endemic species of the Brazilian northeast and exhibits great potential for honey and pollen production in addition to its role as one of the main pollinators of the Caatinga biome. To understand the genetic structure and better assist in the conservation of this species, we characterized the population variability of M. subnitida using geometric morphometrics of the forewing and cytochrome c oxidase I gene fragment sequencing. We collected workers from six localities in the northernmost distribution. Both methodologies indicated that the variability among the sampled populations is related both to the environment in which samples were collected and the geographical distance between the sampling sites, indicating that differentiation among the populations is due to the existence of at least evolutionary lineages. Molecular clock data suggest that this differentiation may have begun in the middle Pleistocene, approximately 396 kya. The conservation of all evolutionary lineages is important since they can present differential resistance to environmental changes, as resistance to drought and diseases. PMID:24384774

  18. Evidence suggesting cis action by the TnaC leader peptide in regulating transcription attenuation in the tryptophanase operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gish, K; Yanofsky, C

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the tryptophanase (tna) operon in Escherichia coli is regulated by catabolite repression and transcription attenuation. Elevated levels of tryptophan induce transcription antitermination at one or more Rho factor-dependent termination sites in the leader region of the operon. Induction requires translation of a 24-residue coding region, tnaC, located in the 319-nucleotide transcribed leader region preceding tnaA, the structural gene for tryptophanase. In the present paper, we show that two bacterial species that lack tryptophanase activity, Enterobacter aerogenes and Salmonella typhimurium, allow tryptophanase induction and tna operon regulation when they carry a plasmid containing the E. coli tna operon. The role of tnaC in induction was examined by introducing mutations in a 24-nucleotide segment of tnaC of E. coli surrounding and including the crucial Trp codon 12. Some mutations resulted in a noninducible phenotype; these mostly introduced nonconservative amino acid substitutions in TnaC. Other mutations had little or no effect; these generally were in third positions of codons or introduced conservative amino acid replacements. A tryptophan-inserting, UGA-reading glutamine suppressor tRNA was observed to restore partial regulation when Trp codon 12 of tnaC was changed to UGA. Stop codons introduced downstream of Trp codon 12 in all three reading frames established that induction requires translation in the natural tnaC reading frame. Our findings suggest that the TnaC leader peptide acts in cis to prevent Rho-dependent termination. PMID:8522534

  19. Visual and nonvisual auditory systems in mammals. Anatomical evidence indicates two kinds of auditory pathways and suggests two kinds of hearing in mammals.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J M; Irving, R

    1966-11-11

    Examination of the structural organization of the auditory system of the brain stem shows that the system is composed of a number of separate ascending pathways. This suggests that there may be at least two auditory systems, analogous to the rod and cone pathways in vision. We examined this possibility by investigating the variation in relative size of the medial and lateral superior olivary nuclei in a number of different mammalian species. The lateral superior olive is present in the hedgehog (an insectivore), cat (acarnivore), and squirrel monkey a(primate), but the medial superior olive is absent in the hedgehog. In a group of animals of the same taxonomic order (rodents) the lateral superior olive was present in all species examined, but the medial superior olive was almost wholly absent in the mouse and very prominent in the chinchilla and guinea pig. The absence of the medial superior olive in some animals is surprising because recent anatomical and physiological work has implicated the nucleus in auditory localization. Because of this implication, the medial and lateral olivary nuclei were examined in three species of bat and one dolphin, all echolocating animals. The medial superior olive was absent in these animals, and the lateral superior olive was prominent. These observations support the idea that the medial and lateral superior olives are nuclei on two different ascending auditory systems. It was also noted that the medial superior olive was always well developed in animals with well-developed eyes, and this suggested that the nucleus is in some way related to the visual system. We examined this idea by studying the relation between the numbers of cells in the medial superior olive and in the nucleus of the 6th cranial nerve (one of the motor nuclei concerned with eye movement) in a number of mammalian species. An approximately linear function was found between the sizes of the 6th nucleus and of the medial superior olive in three primates with cone

  20. Evidence Suggesting That Francisella tularensis O-Antigen Capsule Contains a Lipid A-Like Molecule That Is Structurally Distinct from the More Abundant Free Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jason H.; Kaufman, Justin W.; Apicella, Michael A.; Weiss, Jerrold P.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the Gram-negative bacterium that causes tularemia, produces a high molecular weight capsule that is immunologically distinct from Francisella lipopolysaccharide but contains the same O-antigen tetrasaccharide. To pursue the possibility that the capsule of Francisella live vaccine strain (LVS) has a structurally unique lipid anchor, we have metabolically labeled Francisella with [14C]acetate to facilitate highly sensitive compositional analysis of capsule-associated lipids. Capsule was purified by two independent methods and yielded similar results. Autoradiographic and immunologic analysis confirmed that this purified material was largely devoid of low molecular weight LPS and of the copious amounts of free lipid A that the Francisellae accumulate. Chemical hydrolysis yielded [14C]-labeled free fatty acids characteristic of Francisella lipid A but with a different molar ratio of 3-OH C18:0 to 3-OH C16:0 and different composition of non-hydroxylated fatty acids (mainly C14:0 rather than C16:0) than that of free Francisella lipid A. Mild acid hydrolysis to induce selective cleavage of KDO-lipid A linkage yielded a [14C]-labeled product that partitioned during Bligh/Dyer extraction and migrated during thin-layer chromatography like lipid A. These findings suggest that the O-antigen capsule of Francisella contains a covalently linked and structurally distinct lipid A species. The presence of a discrete lipid A-like molecule associated with capsule raises the possibility that Francisella selectively exploits lipid A structural heterogeneity to regulate synthesis, transport, and stable bacterial surface association of the O-antigen capsular layer. PMID:27326857

  1. The Membrane Protein LasM Promotes the Culturability of Legionella pneumophila in Water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Laam; Faucher, Sébastien P.

    2016-01-01

    The water-borne pathogen Legionella pneumophila (Lp) strongly expresses the lpg1659 gene in water. This gene encodes a hypothetical protein predicted to be a membrane protein using in silico analysis. While no conserved domains were identified in Lpg1659, similar proteins are found in many Legionella species and other aquatic bacteria. RT-qPCR showed that lpg1659 is positively regulated by the alternative sigma factor RpoS, which is essential for Lp to survive in water. These observations suggest an important role of this novel protein in the survival of Lp in water. Deletion of lpg1659 did not affect cell morphology, membrane integrity or tolerance to high temperature. Moreover, lpg1659 was dispensable for growth of Lp in rich medium, and during infection of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and of THP-1 human macrophages. However, deletion of lpg1659 resulted in an early loss of culturability in water, while over-expression of this gene promoted the culturability of Lp. Therefore, these results suggest that lpg1659 is required for Lp to maintain culturability, and possibly long-term survival, in water. Since the loss of culturability observed in the absence of Lpg1659 was complemented by the addition of trace metals into water, this membrane protein is likely a transporter for acquiring essential trace metal for maintaining culturability in water and potentially in other metal-deprived conditions. Given its role in the survival of Lp in water, Lpg1659 was named LasM for Legionella aquatic survival membrane protein. PMID:27734007

  2. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO₂ hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4-8.3) × 10⁵ s(-1) and kcat/KM values of (4.7-8.5) × 10⁷ M(-1)·s(-1). In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3-90.5 nM). The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2-88.5 nM). Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets. PMID:27322334

  3. Bus water storage tank as a reservoir of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Jurčev-Savičević, Anamarija; Bradarić, Nikola; Paić, Vlado Ozic; Mulić, Rosanda; Puntarić, Dinko; Miše, Kornelija

    2014-09-01

    Health concerns associated with Legionnaires' disease have been identified as an area of the increasing public and professional interest. Any natural water or man-made water systems worldwide might be reservoirs of Legionellae. We presented a sporadic, community-acquired case of Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionellapneumophila serogroup 1 in a bus driver who used water for hand and face washing from a bus water storage tank. The history of any other usual place of exposure to Legionellae was negative. The water from the tank was dirty, filled with sediment and leaves, at the temperature of 22 degrees C. The water was heavily contaminated with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolated from each sample with the concentration of 66,000, 16,000, 42,000, 56,000 and 34,000 CFU/L. The disinfection of the bus water storage tank was made using hyperclorination with 50 mg/L of free residual chlorine. The control sampling one week after the disinfection yielded negative results. So far, there are no recommendations on regular management or disinfection of water in bus storage tanks, but it seems to be reasonable to assume that passengers as well as bus drivers may be exposed to Legionella and therefore at risk of acquiring the infection. These recommendations should include regular empting, rinsing and filling the tank with fresh tap water, at least once a week. Finally, we have to be aware that Legionella bacteria are ubiquitous and any potential mode of producing contaminated aerosol should not be overlooked during an epidemiological field investigation and proposed appropriate measures.

  4. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO2 hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4–8.3) × 105 s−1 and kcat/KM values of (4.7–8.5) × 107 M−1·s−1. In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3–90.5 nM). The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2–88.5 nM). Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets. PMID:27322334

  5. Lack of genomic evidence of AI-2 receptors suggests a non-quorum sensing role for luxS in most bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Duffy, Brion

    2008-01-01

    Background Great excitement accompanied discoveries over the last decade in several Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria of the LuxS protein, which catalyzes production of the AI-2 autoinducer molecule for a second quorum sensing system (QS-2). Since the luxS gene was found to be widespread among the most diverse bacterial taxa, it was hypothesized that AI-2 may constitute the basis of a universal microbial language, a kind of bacterial Esperanto. Many of the studies published in this field have drawn a direct correlation between the occurrence of the luxS gene in a given organism and the presence and functionality of a QS-2 therein. However, rarely hathe existence of potential AI-2 receptors been examined. This is important, since it is now well recognized that LuxS also holds a central role as a metabolic enzyme in the activated methyl cycle which is responsible for the generation of S-adenosyl-L-methionine, the major methyl donor in the cell. Results In order to assess whether the role of LuxS in these bacteria is indeed related to AI-2 mediated quorum sensing we analyzed genomic databases searching for established AI-2 receptors (i.e., LuxPQ-receptor of Vibrio harveyi and Lsr ABC-transporter of Salmonella typhimurium) and other presumed QS-related proteins and compared the outcome with published results about the role of QS-2 in these organisms. An unequivocal AI-2 related behavior was restricted primarily to organisms bearing known AI-2 receptor genes, while phenotypes of luxS mutant bacteria lacking these genes could often be explained simply by assuming deficiencies in sulfur metabolism. Conclusion Genomic analysis shows that while LuxPQ is restricted to Vibrionales, the Lsr-receptor complex is mainly present in pathogenic bacteria associated with endotherms. This suggests that QS-2 may play an important role in interactions with animal hosts. In most other species, however, the role of LuxS appears to be limited to metabolism, although in a few cases

  6. Evidence suggesting phosphodiesterase-3B regulation of NPY/AgRP gene expression in mHypoE-46 hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Anamthathmakula, Prashanth; Sahu, Maitrayee; Sahu, Abhiram

    2015-09-14

    Hypothalamic neurons expressing neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti related-protein (AgRP) are critical regulators of feeding behavior and body weight, and transduce the action of many peripheral signals including leptin and insulin. However, intracellular signaling molecules involved in regulating NPY/AgRP neuronal activity are incompletely understood. Since phosphodiesterase-3B (PDE3B) mediates the hypothalamic action of leptin and insulin on feeding, and is expressed in NPY/AgRP neurons, PDE3B could play a significant role in regulating NPY/AgRP neuronal activity. To investigate the direct regulation of NPY/AgRP neuronal activity by PDE3B, we examined the effects of gain-of-function or reduced function of PDE3B on NPY/AgRP gene expression in a clonal hypothalamic neuronal cell line, mHypoE-46, which endogenously express NPY, AgRP and PDE3B. Overexpression of PDE3B in mHypoE-46 cells with transfection of pcDNA-3.1-PDE3B expression plasmid significantly decreased NPY and AgRP mRNA levels and p-CREB levels as compared to the control plasmid. For the PDE3B knockdown study, mHypoE-46 cells transfected with lentiviral PDE3BshRNAmir plasmid or non-silencing lentiviral shRNAmir control plasmid were selected with puromycin, and stably transfected cells were grown in culture for 48h. Results showed that PDE3BshRNAmir mediated knockdown of PDE3B mRNA and protein levels (∼60-70%) caused an increase in both NPY and AgRP gene expression and in p-CREB levels. Together, these results demonstrate a reciprocal change in NPY and AgRP gene expression following overexpression and knockdown of PDE3B, and suggest a significant role for PDE3B in the regulation of NPY/AgRP gene expression in mHypoE-46 hypothalamic neurons.

  7. The Legionella pneumophila orphan sensor kinase LqsT regulates competence and pathogen-host interactions as a component of the LAI-1 circuit.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Aline; Schell, Ursula; Sahr, Tobias; Tiaden, André; Harrison, Christopher; Buchrieser, Carmen; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an amoeba-resistant opportunistic pathogen that performs cell-cell communication through the signalling molecule 3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one (LAI-1, Legionella autoinducer-1). The lqs (Legionella quorum sensing) gene cluster encodes the LAI-1 autoinducer synthase LqsA, the cognate sensor kinase LqsS and the response regulator LqsR. Here we show that the Lqs system includes an 'orphan' homologue of LqsS termed LqsT. Compared with wild-type L. pneumophila, strains lacking lqsT or both lqsS and lqsT show increased salt resistance, greatly enhanced natural competence for DNA acquisition and impaired uptake by phagocytes. Sensitive novel single round growth assays and competition experiments using Acanthamoeba castellanii revealed that ΔlqsT and ΔlqsS-ΔlqsT, as well as ΔlqsA and other lqs mutant strains are impaired for intracellular growth and cannot compete against wild-type bacteria upon co-infection. In contrast to the ΔlqsS strain, ΔlqsT does not produce extracellular filaments. The phenotypes of the ΔlqsS-ΔlqsT strain are partially complemented by either lqsT or lqsS, but are not reversed by overexpression of lqsA, suggesting that LqsT and LqsS are the sole LAI-1-responsive sensor kinases in L. pneumophila. In agreement with the different phenotypes of the ΔlqsT and ΔlqsS strains, lqsT and lqsS are differentially expressed in the post-exponential growth phase, and transcriptome studies indicated that 90% of the genes, which are downregulated in absence of lqsT, are upregulated in absence of lqsS. Reciprocally regulated genes encode components of a 133 kb genomic 'fitness island' or translocated effector proteins implicated in virulence. Together, these results reveal a unique organization of the L. pneumophila Lqs system comprising two partially antagonistic LAI-1-responsive sensor kinases, LqsT and LqsS, which regulate distinct pools of genes implicated in pathogen-host cell interactions, competence, expression of a

  8. csrT Represents a New Class of csrA-Like Regulatory Genes Associated with Integrative Conjugative Elements of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Zachary D.; Flynn, Kaitlin J.; Byrne, Brenda G.; Mukherjee, Sampriti; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial evolution is accelerated by mobile genetic elements. To spread horizontally and to benefit the recipient bacteria, genes encoded on these elements must be properly regulated. Among the legionellae are multiple integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) that each encode a paralog of the broadly conserved regulator csrA. Using bioinformatic analyses, we deduced that specific csrA paralogs are coinherited with particular lineages of the type IV secretion system that mediates horizontal spread of its ICE, suggesting a conserved regulatory interaction. As a first step to investigate the contribution of csrA regulators to this class of mobile genetic elements, we analyzed here the activity of the csrA paralog encoded on Legionella pneumophila ICE-βox. Deletion of this gene, which we name csrT, had no observed effect under laboratory conditions. However, ectopic expression of csrT abrogated the protection to hydrogen peroxide and macrophage degradation that ICE-βox confers to L. pneumophila. When ectopically expressed, csrT also repressed L. pneumophila flagellin production and motility, a function similar to the core genome's canonical csrA. Moreover, csrT restored the repression of motility to csrA mutants of Bacillus subtilis, a finding consistent with the predicted function of CsrT as an mRNA binding protein. Since all known ICEs of legionellae encode coinherited csrA-type IV secretion system pairs, we postulate that CsrA superfamily proteins regulate ICE activity to increase their horizontal spread, thereby expanding L. pneumophila versatility. IMPORTANCE ICEs are mobile DNA elements whose type IV secretion machineries mediate spread among bacterial populations. All surveyed ICEs within the Legionella genus also carry paralogs of the essential life cycle regulator csrA. It is striking that the csrA loci could be classified into distinct families based on either their sequence or the subtype of the adjacent type IV secretion system locus. To

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila JR32 and Lp01 Laboratory Strains Domesticated in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Maita, Chinatsu; Matushita, Mizue; Okubo, Torahiko; Matsuo, Junji; Miyake, Masaki; Nagai, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of two Legionella pneumophila variant strains (JR32 and Lp01_666) originally derived from a Philadelphia-1 clinical isolate, domesticated in Japan, with distinct susceptibility to amoebae. Detailed genomic analysis will allow us to better understand Legionella adaptation and survival mechanisms in host cells. PMID:27491976

  10. Side-polished fiber immunosensor based on surface plasmon resonance for detection of Legionella pneumophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Yu-Chia; Yang, Yi-Wen; Tsai, Woo-Hu; Yan, Tsong-Rong

    2008-02-01

    Side-polished fiber immunosensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) onto self-assembled protein A layer was proposed for the detection of Legionella pneumophila. A self-assembled protein A layer on gold (Au) surface was fabricated by adsorbing a mixture of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and activated by N-Ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/ N-Hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS). The formation of self-assembled protein A and gold layer on side-polished surface and the binding of antibody and antigen in series were confirmed by SPR response on spectrum. The binding protein A layer can improve the sensitivity, which indirectly supports the configurations that antibody layer is immobilized on the binding protein A layer with a well-ordered orientation. The surface morphology analyses of self-assembled protein A layer on Au substrate and monoclonal antibody against L. pneumophila immobilized on protein A were demonstrated by SPR dip shifts on optical spectrum analyzer. The SPR fiber immunosensor for detection of L. pneumophila was developed and the detection limit was 10 CFU/ml with the SPR dip shift in wavelength from 1070 to 1105nm. The current fabrication technique of a SPR immunosensor using optical fiber for the detection of Legionella pneumophila could be applied to construct other biosensor.

  11. Widespread molecular detection of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 in cold water taps across the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the United States 3,522 cases of legionellosis were reported to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in 2009. Of these reports, it is estimated that 84% are caused by the microorganism Legionella pneumophila Serogroup (Sg) 1. Legionella spp. have been isolated and r...

  12. Hidden Selection of Bacterial Resistance to Fluoroquinolones In Vivo: The Case of Legionella pneumophila and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shadoud, Lubana; Almahmoud, Iyad; Jarraud, Sophie; Etienne, Jérôme; Larrat, Sylvie; Schwebel, Carole; Timsit, Jean-François; Schneider, Dominique; Maurin, Max

    2015-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are the leading cause of human morbidity and mortality worldwide. One dramatic issue is the emergence of microbial resistance to antibiotics which is a major public health concern. Surprisingly however, such in vivo adaptive ability has not been reported yet for many intracellular human bacterial pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila. Methods We examined 82 unrelated patients with Legionnaire's disease from which 139 respiratory specimens were sampled during hospitalization and antibiotic therapy. We both developed a real time PCR assay and used deep-sequencing approaches to detect antibiotic resistance mutations in L. pneumophila and follow their selection and fate in these samples. Findings We identified the in vivo selection of fluoroquinolone resistance mutations in L. pneumophila in two infected patients treated with these antibiotics. By investigating the mutational dynamics in patients, we showed that antibiotic resistance occurred during hospitalization most likely after fluoroquinolone treatment. Interpretation In vivo selection of antibiotic resistances in L. pneumophila may be associated with treatment failures and poor prognosis. This hidden resistance must be carefully considered in the therapeutic management of legionellosis patients and in the control of the gradual loss of effectiveness of antibiotics. PMID:26501115

  13. Identification of Legionella Pneumophila in Intubated Patients With TaqMan Real Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Divan Khosroshahi, Nader; Naserpour Farivar, Taghi; Johari, Pouran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Legionellaceae contains Legionella genus with over 52 species and 64 serogroups. It is one of the most important causes of respiratory disease in human. More than 30% of hospital-acquired pneumonia is caused by Legionella. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is an infection acquired in hospital wards, particularly in intensive care unit (ICU). This disease approximately affects 9% to 20% of intubated patients. Mortality in these patients varies between 8% and 76%. Legionella is one of the important factors for infection in intubated patients. Objectives: The present study was aimed to investigate the use of molecular methods in diagnosis of infection caused by Legionella pneumophila. Materials and Methods: In this study, 109 samples of lung secretions collected from intubated patients admitted to ICU wards of four university hospitals in a three-month period were examined. Cultivation and Real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) methods were used to assess L. pneumophila colonization in these samples. Results: Eleven samples had positive results using real time PCR analysis of 16s rRNA gene fragments specific for L. pneumophila, but according to culture method on specific buffered charcoal-yeast extract medium (BCYE), no positive cases were detected. Of the total positive cases, six were males, one female and four infants. The seven adults aged 40-65 years. Conclusions: Using molecular methods in diagnosis of infection caused by L. pneumophila has a great value because of its high specificity and rapid diagnosis potency. PMID:25834717

  14. Draft Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila JR32 and Lp01 Laboratory Strains Domesticated in Japan.

    PubMed

    Maita, Chinatsu; Matushita, Mizue; Okubo, Torahiko; Matsuo, Junji; Miyake, Masaki; Nagai, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of two Legionella pneumophila variant strains (JR32 and Lp01_666) originally derived from a Philadelphia-1 clinical isolate, domesticated in Japan, with distinct susceptibility to amoebae. Detailed genomic analysis will allow us to better understand Legionella adaptation and survival mechanisms in host cells. PMID:27491976

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of the Historical Legionella pneumophila Strains OLDA and Pontiac.

    PubMed

    Mercante, Jeffrey W; Morrison, Shatavia S; Raphael, Brian H; Winchell, Jonas M

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains OLDA and Pontiac, which predate the 1976 Philadelphia Legionnaires' disease outbreak. Strain OLDA was isolated in 1947 from an apparent sporadic case, and strain Pontiac caused an explosive outbreak at a Michigan health department in 1968. PMID:27563044

  16. Identification of Legionella pneumophila serogroups and other Legionella species by mip gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Haroon, Attiya; Koide, Michio; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Fujita, Jiro

    2012-04-01

    The virulence factor known as the macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) is responsible for the intracellular survival of Legionella species. In this study, we investigated the potential of the mip gene sequence to differentiate isolates of different species of Legionella and different serogroups of Legionella pneumophila. We used 35 clinical L. pneumophila isolates and one clinical isolate each of Legionella micdadei, Legionella longbeachae, and Legionella dumoffii (collected from hospitals all over Japan between 1980 and 2007). We used 19 environmental Legionella anisa isolates (collected in the Okinawa, Nara, Osaka, and Hyogo prefectures between 1987 and 2007) and two Legionella type strains. We extracted bacterial genomic DNA and amplified out the mip gene by PCR. PCR products were purified by agarose gel electrophoresis and the mip gene was then sequenced. The L. pneumophila isolates could be divided into two groups: one group was very similar to the type strain and was composed of serogroup (SG) 1 isolates only; the second group had more sequence variations and was composed of SG1 isolates as well as SG2, SG3, SG5, and SG10 isolates. Phylogenetic analysis displayed one cluster for L. anisa isolates, while other Legionella species were present at discrete levels. Our findings show that mip gene sequencing is an effective technique for differentiating L. pneumophila strains from other Legionella species.

  17. Complete Genome Sequences of the Historical Legionella pneumophila Strains OLDA and Pontiac

    PubMed Central

    Mercante, Jeffrey W.; Morrison, Shatavia S.; Raphael, Brian H.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains OLDA and Pontiac, which predate the 1976 Philadelphia Legionnaires’ disease outbreak. Strain OLDA was isolated in 1947 from an apparent sporadic case, and strain Pontiac caused an explosive outbreak at a Michigan health department in 1968. PMID:27563044

  18. Novel Cycloheximide Derivatives Targeting the Moonlighting Protein Mip Exhibit Specific Antimicrobial Activity Against Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Janine; Theuerkorn, Martin; Ünal, Can; Heinsohn, Natascha; Tran, Stefan; Fischer, Gunter; Weiwad, Matthias; Steinert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) and Mip-like proteins are virulence factors in a wide range of pathogens including Legionella pneumophila. These proteins belong to the FK506 binding protein (FKBP) family of peptidyl-prolyl-cis/trans-isomerases (PPIases). In L. pneumophila, the PPIase activity of Mip is required for invasion of macrophages, transmigration through an in vitro lung-epithelial barrier, and full virulence in the guinea pig infection model. Additionally, Mip is a moonlighting protein that binds to collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. Here, we describe the development and synthesis of cycloheximide derivatives with adamantyl moieties as novel FKBP ligands, and analyze their effect on the viability of L. pneumophila and other bacteria. All compounds efficiently inhibited PPIase activity of the prototypic human FKBP12 as well as Mip with IC50-values as low as 180 nM and 1.7 μM, respectively. Five of these derivatives inhibited the growth of L. pneumophila at concentrations of 30-40 μM, but exhibited no effect on other tested bacterial species indicating a specific spectrum of antibacterial activity. The derivatives carrying a 3,5-dimethyladamantan-1-[yl]acetamide substitution (MT_30.32), and a 3-ethyladamantan-1-[yl]acetamide substitution (MT_30.51) had the strongest effects in PPIase- and liquid growth assays. MT_30.32 and MT_30.51 were also inhibitory in macrophage infection studies without being cytotoxic. Accordingly, by applying a combinatorial approach, we were able to generate novel, hybrid inhibitors consisting of cycloheximide and adamantane, two known FKBP inhibitors that interact with different parts of the PPIase domain, respectively. Interestingly, despite the proven Mip-inhibitory activity, the viability of a Mip-deficient strain was affected to the same degree as its wild type. Hence, we also propose that cycloheximide derivatives with adamantyl moieties are potent PPIase inhibitors with multiple targets in L. pneumophila.

  19. Amoebae-Based Screening Reveals a Novel Family of Compounds Restricting Intracellular Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher F; Chiriano, Gianpaolo; Finsel, Ivo; Manske, Christian; Hoffmann, Christine; Steiner, Bernhard; Kranjc, Agata; Patthey-Vuadens, Ophelie; Kicka, Sébastien; Trofimov, Valentin; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Soldati, Thierry; Scapozza, Leonardo; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-07-10

    The causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, Legionella pneumophila, grows in environmental amoebae and mammalian macrophages within a distinct compartment, the 'Legionella-containing vacuole' (LCV). Intracellular bacteria are protected from many antibiotics, and thus are notoriously difficult to eradicate. To identify novel compounds that restrict intracellular bacterial replication, we previously developed an assay based on a coculture of amoebae and GFP-producing L. pneumophila. This assay was used to screen a pathway-based, highly diverse chemical library, referred to as the Sinergia library. In this work, we chose to focus on a group of 11 hit compounds, the majority of which originated from the query molecule CN585, a compound that targets the protein phosphatase calcineurin. Further studies on 78 related compound variants revealed crucial structural attributes, namely a triple-ring scaffold with a central triazine moiety, substituted in positions 3 and 5 by two piperidine or pyrrolidine rings, and in position 1 by an amine group bearing a single aliphatic chain moiety. The most effective compound, ZINC00615682, inhibited intracellular replication of L. pneumophila with an IC50 of approximately 20 nM in Acanthamoeba castellanii and slightly less efficiently in Dictyostelium discoideum or macrophages. Pharmacological and genetic attempts to implicate calcineurin in the intracellular replication of L. pneumophila failed. Taken together, these results show that the amoebae-based screen and structure-activity relationship analysis is suitable for the identification of novel inhibitors of the intracellular replication of L. pneumophila. The most potent compound identified in this study targets (an) as yet unidentified host factor(s). PMID:27622823

  20. Spatial distribution of Legionella pneumophila MLVA-genotypes in a drinking water system.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Sarah; Sharaby, Yehonatan; Pecellín, Marina; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred; Halpern, Malka

    2015-06-15

    Bacteria of the genus Legionella cause water-based infections, resulting in severe pneumonia. To improve our knowledge about Legionella spp. ecology, its prevalence and its relationships with environmental factors were studied. Seasonal samples were taken from both water and biofilm at seven sampling points of a small drinking water distribution system in Israel. Representative isolates were obtained from each sample and identified to the species level. Legionella pneumophila was further determined to the serotype and genotype level. High resolution genotyping of L. pneumophila isolates was achieved by Multiple-Locus Variable number of tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA). Within the studied water system, Legionella plate counts were higher in summer and highly variable even between adjacent sampling points. Legionella was present in six out of the seven selected sampling points, with counts ranging from 1.0 × 10(1) to 5.8 × 10(3) cfu/l. Water counts were significantly higher in points where Legionella was present in biofilms. The main fraction of the isolated Legionella was L. pneumophila serogroup 1. Serogroup 3 and Legionella sainthelensis were also isolated. Legionella counts were positively correlated with heterotrophic plate counts at 37 °C and negatively correlated with chlorine. Five MLVA-genotypes of L. pneumophila were identified at different buildings of the sampled area. The presence of a specific genotype, "MLVA-genotype 4", consistently co-occurred with high Legionella counts and seemed to "trigger" high Legionella counts in cold water. Our hypothesis is that both the presence of L. pneumophila in biofilm and the presence of specific genotypes, may indicate and/or even lead to high Legionella concentration in water. This observation deserves further studies in a broad range of drinking water systems to assess its potential for general use in drinking water monitoring and management.

  1. Validation of a microbead-based format for spoligotyping of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Gomgnimbou, Michel Kiréopori; Ginevra, Christophe; Peron-Cane, Caroline; Versapuech, Margaux; Refrégier, Guislaine; Jacotin, Nathalie; Sola, Christophe; Jarraud, Sophie

    2014-07-01

    A 42-plex clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-based typing technique (spoligotyping) was recently developed at the French National Reference Center for Legionella. It allows the subtyping of the Legionella pneumophila sequence type 1/Paris pulsotype. In this report, we present the transfer of the membrane-based spoligotyping technique to a microbead-based multiplexed format. This microbead-based high-throughput assay uses devices such as Luminex 200 or the recently launched Magpix system (Luminex Corp., Austin, TX). We designated this new technique LP-SPOL (for L. pneumophila spoligotyping). We used two sets of samples previously subtyped by the membrane-based spoligotyping method to set up and validate the transfer on the two microbead-based systems. The first set of isolates (n = 56) represented the whole diversity of the CRISPR patterns known to date. These isolates were used for transfer setup (determination of spacer cutoffs for both devices). The second set of isolates (n = 245) was used to validate the transfer to the two microbead-based systems. The results obtained by the Luminex 200 system were 100% concordant with those obtained by the Magpix system for the 2 sets of isolates. In total, 10 discrepant results were observed when comparing the membrane-based method to the microbead-based method. These discrepancies were further resolved by repeating either the membrane-based or the microbead-based assay. This new assay is expected to play an emerging role for surveillance of L. pneumophila, starting with one of the most frequent genotypes, the sequence type 1/Paris pulsotype. However, the generalization of this typing method to all L. pneumophila strains is not feasible, since not all L. pneumophila strains contain CRISPRs.

  2. Novel Cycloheximide Derivatives Targeting the Moonlighting Protein Mip Exhibit Specific Antimicrobial Activity Against Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Rasch, Janine; Theuerkorn, Martin; Ünal, Can; Heinsohn, Natascha; Tran, Stefan; Fischer, Gunter; Weiwad, Matthias; Steinert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) and Mip-like proteins are virulence factors in a wide range of pathogens including Legionella pneumophila. These proteins belong to the FK506 binding protein (FKBP) family of peptidyl-prolyl-cis/trans-isomerases (PPIases). In L. pneumophila, the PPIase activity of Mip is required for invasion of macrophages, transmigration through an in vitro lung–epithelial barrier, and full virulence in the guinea pig infection model. Additionally, Mip is a moonlighting protein that binds to collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. Here, we describe the development and synthesis of cycloheximide derivatives with adamantyl moieties as novel FKBP ligands, and analyze their effect on the viability of L. pneumophila and other bacteria. All compounds efficiently inhibited PPIase activity of the prototypic human FKBP12 as well as Mip with IC50-values as low as 180 nM and 1.7 μM, respectively. Five of these derivatives inhibited the growth of L. pneumophila at concentrations of 30–40 μM, but exhibited no effect on other tested bacterial species indicating a specific spectrum of antibacterial activity. The derivatives carrying a 3,5-dimethyladamantan-1-[yl]acetamide substitution (MT_30.32), and a 3-ethyladamantan-1-[yl]acetamide substitution (MT_30.51) had the strongest effects in PPIase- and liquid growth assays. MT_30.32 and MT_30.51 were also inhibitory in macrophage infection studies without being cytotoxic. Accordingly, by applying a combinatorial approach, we were able to generate novel, hybrid inhibitors consisting of cycloheximide and adamantane, two known FKBP inhibitors that interact with different parts of the PPIase domain, respectively. Interestingly, despite the proven Mip-inhibitory activity, the viability of a Mip-deficient strain was affected to the same degree as its wild type. Hence, we also propose that cycloheximide derivatives with adamantyl moieties are potent PPIase inhibitors with multiple targets in L

  3. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Z Zhang; R Zhou; J Sauder; P Tonge; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  4. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhou, R.; Sauder, J. M.; Tonge, P. J.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-02-18

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  5. Preferential colonization and release of Legionella pneumophila from mature drinking water biofilms grown on copper versus unplasticized polyvinylchloride coupons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Legionella persistence and amplification in premise drinking water systems is a known contributor to legionellosis outbreaks, especially in the presence of suitable eukaryotic hosts. Here we examined Legionella pneumophila behavior within drinking water biofilms grown on copper ...

  6. Three Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pascullei Associated with Colonization of a Health Care Facility

    PubMed Central

    Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A.; Morrison, Shatavia S.; Sammons, Scott; Rowe, Lori A.; Sheth, Mili; Frace, Michael; Lucas, Claressa E.; Loparev, Vladimir N.; Raphael, Brian H.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences of three Legionella pneumophila subsp. pascullei strains (including both serogroup 1 and 5 strains) that were found in the same health care facility in 1982 and 2012. PMID:27151801

  7. An update on iron acquisition by Legionella pneumophila: new pathways for siderophore uptake and ferric iron reduction

    PubMed Central

    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical for the growth and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease. L. pneumophila utilizes two main modes of iron assimilation, namely ferrous iron uptake via the FeoB system and ferric iron acquisition through the action of the siderophore legiobactin. This review highlights recent studies concerning the mechanism of legiobactin assimilation, the impact of c-type cytochromes on siderophore production, the importance of legiobactin in lung infection and a newfound role for a bacterial pyomelanin in iron acquisition. These data demonstrate that key aspects of L. pneumophila iron acquisition are significantly distinct from those of long-studied, ‘model’ organisms. Indeed, L. pneumophila may represent a new paradigm for a variety of other intracellular parasites, pathogens and under-studied bacteria. PMID:26000653

  8. Occurrence of virulent genes among environmental isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains from various parts of peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Arushothy, Revathy; Ahmad, Norazah

    2008-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila are intracellular pathogens, associated with human disease, attributed to the presence and absence of certain virulent genes. In this study, virulent gene loci (lvh and rtxA regions) associated with human disease were determined. Thirty-three cooling tower water isolates, isolated between 2004 to 2006, were analyzed for the presence of these genes by PCR method. Results showed that 19 of 33 (57.5%) of the L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates have both the genes. Six (18.2%) of the isolates have only the lvh gene and 2 (6.1%) of the isolates have only the rtxA gene. However, both genes were absent in 6 (18.2%) of the L. pneumophila isolates. The result of our study provides some insight into the presence of the disease causing L. pneumophila serogroup 1 in the environment. Molecular epidemiological studies will provide better understanding of the prevalence of the disease in Malaysia. PMID:19287368

  9. Distribution of monoclonal antibody subgroups and sequence-based types among Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates derived from cooling tower water, bathwater, and soil in Japan.

    PubMed

    Amemura-Maekawa, Junko; Kikukawa, Kiyomi; Helbig, Jürgen H; Kaneko, Satoko; Suzuki-Hashimoto, Atsuko; Furuhata, Katsunori; Chang, Bin; Murai, Miyo; Ichinose, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Makoto; Kura, Fumiaki

    2012-06-01

    Legionella pneumophila serogroup (SG) 1 is the most frequent cause of legionellosis. This study analyzed environmental isolates of L. pneumophila SG 1 in Japan using monoclonal antibody (MAb) typing and sequence-based typing (SBT). Samples were analyzed from bathwater (BW; n = 50), cooling tower water (CT; n = 50), and soil (SO; n = 35). The distribution of MAb types varied by source, with the most prevalent types being Bellingham (42%), Oxford (72%), and OLDA (51%) in BW, CT, and SO, respectively. The ratios of MAb 3/1 positive isolates were 26, 2, and 14% from BW, CT, and SO, respectively. The environmental isolates from BW, CT, and SO were divided into 34 sequence types (STs; index of discrimination [IOD] = 0.973), 8 STs (IOD = 0.448), and 11 STs (IOD = 0.879), respectively. Genetic variation among CT isolates was smaller than seen in BW and SO. ST1 accounted for 74% of the CT isolates. The only common STs between (i) BW and CT, (ii) BW and SO, and (iii) CT and SO were ST1, ST129, and ST48, respectively, suggesting that each environment constitutes an independent habitat. PMID:22492442

  10. The Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Lyase (LegS2) Contributes to the Restriction of Legionella pneumophila in Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Abu Khweek, Arwa; Kanneganti, Apurva; C. Guttridge D, Denis; Amer, Amal O.

    2016-01-01

    L. pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, a human illness characterized by severe pneumonia. In contrast to those derived from humans, macrophages derived from most mouse strains restrict L. pneumophila replication. The restriction of L. pneumophila replication has been shown to require bacterial flagellin, a component of the type IV secretion system as well as the cytosolic NOD-like receptor (NLR) Nlrc4/ Ipaf. These events lead to caspase-1 activation which, in turn, activates caspase-7. Following caspase-7 activation, the phagosome-containing L. pneumophila fuses with the lysosome, resulting in the restriction of L. pneumophila growth. The LegS2 effector is injected by the type IV secretion system and functions as a sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase. It is homologous to the eukaryotic sphingosine lyase (SPL), an enzyme required in the terminal steps of sphingolipid metabolism. Herein, we show that mice Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages (BMDMs) and human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages (hMDMs) are more permissive to L. pneumophila legS2 mutants than wild-type (WT) strains. This permissiveness to L. pneumophila legS2 is neither attributed to abolished caspase-1, caspase-7 or caspase-3 activation, nor due to the impairment of phagosome-lysosome fusion. Instead, an infection with the legS2 mutant resulted in the reduction of some inflammatory cytokines and their corresponding mRNA; this effect is mediated by the inhibition of the nuclear transcription factor kappa-B (NF-κB). Moreover, BMDMs infected with L. pneumophila legS2 mutant showed elongated mitochondria that resembles mitochondrial fusion. Therefore, the absence of LegS2 effector is associated with reduced NF-κB activation and atypical morphology of mitochondria. PMID:26741365

  11. Isolation of protozoa from water associated with a legionellosis outbreak and demonstration of intracellular multiplication of Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaree, J.M.; Fields, B.S.; Feeley, J.C.; Gorman, G.W.; Martin, W.T.

    1986-02-01

    At the site of a legionellosis outbreak, amoebae and two ciliates, Tetrahymena sp. and Cyclidium sp., were isolated from cooling-tower water containing Legionella pneumophila. The Tetrahymena sp. and the amoebae repeatedly showed the ability to support intracellular multiplication of L. pneumophila. Both were isolated from cooling towers specifically implicated as the source for the spread of legionellosis. These protozoa may be reservoirs supporting the survival and multiplication of virulent legionellae in cooling-tower water.

  12. Integrative conjugative element ICE-βox confers oxidative stress resistance to Legionella pneumophila in vitro and in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Kaitlin J; Swanson, Michele S

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) are mobile blocks of DNA that can contribute to bacterial evolution by self-directed transmission of advantageous traits. Here, we analyze the activity of a putative 65-kb ICE harbored by Legionella pneumophila using molecular genetics, conjugation assays, a phenotype microarray screen, and macrophage infections. The element transferred to a naive L. pneumophila strain, integrated site-specifically, and conferred increased resistance to oxacillin, penicillin, hydrogen peroxide, and bleach. Furthermore, the element increased survival of L. pneumophila within restrictive mouse macrophages. In particular, this ICE protects L. pneumophila from phagocyte oxidase activity, since mutation of the macrophage NADPH oxidase eliminated the fitness difference between strains that carried and those that lacked the mobile element. Renamed ICE-βox (for β-lactam antibiotics and oxidative stress), this transposable element is predicted to contribute to the emergence of L. pneumophila strains that are more fit in natural and engineered water systems and in macrophages. IMPORTANCE Bacteria evolve rapidly by acquiring new traits via horizontal gene transfer. Integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) are mobile blocks of DNA that encode the machinery necessary to spread among bacterial populations. ICEs transfer antibiotic resistance and other bacterial survival factors as cargo genes carried within the element. Here, we show that Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, carries ICE-βox, which enhances the resistance of this opportunistic pathogen to bleach and β-lactam antibiotics. Moreover, L. pneumophila strains encoding ICE-βox are more resistant to macrophages that carry phagocyte oxidase. Accordingly, ICE-βox is predicted to increase the fitness of L. pneumophila in natural and engineered waters and in humans. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an ICE that confers oxidative

  13. Diverse populations of Legionella pneumophila present in the water of geographically clustered institutions served by the same water reservoir.

    PubMed

    Bezanson, G; Burbridge, S; Haldane, D; Yoell, C; Marrie, T

    1992-03-01

    We cultured potable water from seven institutions (six hospitals and one medical school) every 2 weeks for 6 months for Legionella pneumophila. All of the institutions were located close to each other and received water from the same freshwater source. Two institutions (the medical school and hospital F, a maternity hospital) never had L. pneumophila isolated from their potable water. The remaining five had 17 to 72% of their water samples positive for L. pneumophila. Most of the isolates were serogroup 1; however, in hospital B serogroup 5 accounted for 56% of the isolates. Oxford and OLDA monoclonal antibody subtypes of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 coexisted in four of the five institutions, while subtype France only was found in one institution. All 10 isolates from this institution lacked plasmids. The other four institutions had Legionella populations with plasmid profiles II, III, and VI. Two of these institutions also had isolates with no plasmids. The distribution of the plasmid types was significantly different for all institutions except C and D. The distribution of monoclonal antibody subtypes was significantly different for L. pneumophila isolates recovered from institutions C and D. There were no characteristics that distinguished the culture-positive institutions from the culture-negative areas. We conclude that diverse populations of L. pneumophila exist within these institutions despite their geographic proximity and identical potable water source. PMID:1551972

  14. Cutting edge: pulmonary Legionella pneumophila is controlled by plasmacytoid dendritic cells but not type I IFN.

    PubMed

    Ang, Desmond K Y; Oates, Clare V L; Schuelein, Ralf; Kelly, Michelle; Sansom, Fiona M; Bourges, Dorothée; Boon, Louis; Hertzog, Paul J; Hartland, Elizabeth L; van Driel, Ian R

    2010-05-15

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are well known as the major cell type that secretes type I IFN in response to viral infections. Their role in combating other classes of infectious organisms, including bacteria, and their mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We have found that pDCs play a significant role in the acute response to the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila. pDCs were rapidly recruited to the lungs of L. pneumophila-infected mice, and depletion of pDCs resulted in increased bacterial load. The ability of pDCs to combat infection did not require type I IFN. This study points to an unappreciated role for pDCs in combating bacterial infections and indicates a novel mechanism of action for this cell type.

  15. Legionella pneumophila, armed to the hilt: justifying the largest arsenal of effectors in the bacterial world.

    PubMed

    Ensminger, Alexander W

    2016-02-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use dedicated translocation systems to deliver arsenals of effector proteins to their hosts. Once inside the host cytosol, these effectors modulate eukaryotic cell biology to acquire nutrients, block microbial degradation, subvert host defenses, and enable pathogen transmission to other hosts. Among all bacterial pathogens studied to date, the gram-negative pathogen, Legionella pneumophila, maintains the largest arsenal of effectors, with over 330 effector proteins translocated by the Dot/Icm type IVB translocation system. In this review, I will discuss some of the recent work on understanding the consequences of this large arsenal. I will also present several models that seek to explain how L. pneumophila has acquired and subsequently maintained so many more effectors than its peers.

  16. A hot water supply as the source of Legionella pneumophila in incubators of a neonatology unit.

    PubMed

    Veríssimo, A; Vesey, G; Rocha, G M; Marrão, G; Colbourne, J; Dennis, P J; da Costa, M S

    1990-04-01

    The humidification trays of five of seven incubators in a neonatology unit of a hospital were found to be colonized with Legionella pneumophila, serogroup 1. Bacteriological analysis of the water in the humidification trays showed very large numbers of heterotrophic bacteria, one of which also contained Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Two hot water systems supply the neonatology unit, either of which is used to add water to the humidification trays; one system (A) is maintained at about 60 degrees C, while the other system (B) is maintained at 45 degrees C. The latter was also found to be colonized with L. pneumophila, Sg1. Monoclonal antibody (Mab) subgrouping of the isolates, indicated that system B was the source of colonization of the humidification trays of the incubators.

  17. [An outbreak of Pontiac fever due to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 7. II. Epidemiological aspects].

    PubMed

    Yabuuchi, E; Mori, M; Saito, A; Kishimoto, T; Yoshizawa, S; Arakawa, M; Kinouchi, R; Wang, L; Furuhata, K; Koide, M

    1995-06-01

    From August 20 to 22, 1994, an outbreak of acute febrile illness occurred in a Training Center building of a company in Shibuya-ku, Tokyo. All 43 trainees attended in two groups and 2 Center staffs were attacked. Illness was self- limiting, generally lasting three days. Though strains of legionellae, isolated from the water of the cooling tower located at the top of the building, were identified as Legionella pneumophila by microplate DNA-DNA hybridization, they failed to agglutinate with antisera against L. pneumophila serogroups 1 through 6. Two strains were sent to the Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, and determined as serogroup 7 of the species. Since the clinical courses agreed with the definition of Pontiac fever by Glick et al. and seroconversion in a patient against the cooling tower strain (EY3698)from 1:16 to 1:256 was determined by indirect fluorescent antibody technique, the epidemic of acute febrile illness was concluded as an outbreak of Pontiac fever due to L. pneumophila serogroup 7. The cooling tower was a cylindrical open style, with volumetric flow rate of 130 liter/min, and was used for air- conditioning exclusively to the third floor of the building. The building equipped no air-inlet, and indoor-air of the training room exchanged at every break time through windows of 168 cm in height and 72 cm in width. The cooling tower was not operated for five days before the Group A trainees checked in the Center on 18 August followed by Group B trainees on 19 August. It was speculated that high atmospheric temperature and stagnation of cooling water during this period would lead L. pneumophila to overly multiply, which could be a source of infection by flowing in through opened windows to the training rooms.

  18. Localization of Legionella pneumophila in tissue using FITC-conjugated specific antibody and a background stain

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, B.S.; Vega, F.G. Jr.; Hedlund, K.W.

    1982-05-01

    Lightly staining formalin-fixed or fresh tissue with Gram's crystal violet obviates interfering nonspecific fluorescence by acting as a metachromatic stain in ultraviolet light. Against the easily recognized background of tissues and cells fluorescein isothiocyanate-tagged Legionella pneumophila antibodies can then identify this bacterium in or on individual cells. This procedure can be run at room temperature in two hours and has the potential for further widespread applicability.

  19. The Legionella pneumophila Chaperonin - An Unusual Multifunctional Protein in Unusual Locations.

    PubMed

    Garduño, Rafael A; Chong, Audrey; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Allan, David S

    2011-01-01

    The Legionella pneumophila chaperonin, high temperature protein B (HtpB), was discovered as a highly immunogenic antigen, only a few years after the identification of L. pneumophila as the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. As its counterparts in other bacterial pathogens, HtpB did not initially receive further attention, particularly because research was focused on a few model chaperonins that were used to demonstrate that chaperonins are essential stress proteins, present in all cellular forms of life and involved in helping other proteins to fold. However, chaperonins have recently attracted increasing interest, particularly after several reports confirmed their multifunctional nature and the presence of multiple chaperonin genes in numerous bacterial species. It is now accepted that bacterial chaperonins are capable of playing a variety of protein folding-independent roles. HtpB is clearly a multifunctional chaperonin that according to its location in the bacterial cell, or in the L. pneumophila-infected cell, plays different roles. HtpB exposed on the bacterial cell surface can act as an invasion factor for non-phagocytic cells, whereas the HtpB released in the host cell can act as an effector capable of altering organelle trafficking, the organization of actin microfilaments and cell signaling pathways. The road to discover the multifunctional nature of HtpB has been exciting and here we provide a historical perspective of the key findings linked to such discovery, as well as a summary of the experimental work (old and new) performed in our laboratory. Our current understanding has led us to propose that HtpB is an ancient protein that L. pneumophila uses as a key molecular tool important to the intracellular establishment of this fascinating pathogen. PMID:21713066

  20. The purified and recombinant Legionella pneumophila chaperonin alters mitochondrial trafficking and microfilament organization.

    PubMed

    Chong, Audrey; Lima, Celia A; Allan, David S; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Garduño, Rafael A

    2009-11-01

    A portion of the total cellular pool of the Legionella pneumophila chaperonin, HtpB, is found on the bacterial cell surface, where it can mediate invasion of nonphagocytic cells. HtpB continues to be abundantly produced and released by internalized L. pneumophila and may thus have postinvasion functions. We used here two functional models (protein-coated beads and expression of recombinant proteins in CHO cells) to investigate the competence of HtpB in mimicking early intracellular trafficking events of L. pneumophila, including the recruitment of mitochondria, cytoskeletal alterations, the inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, and association with the endoplasmic reticulum. Microscopy and flow cytometry studies indicated that HtpB-coated beads recruited mitochondria in CHO cells and U937-derived macrophages and induced transient changes in the organization of actin microfilaments in CHO cells. Ectopic expression of HtpB in the cytoplasm of transfected CHO cells also led to modifications in actin microfilaments similar to those produced by HtpB-coated beads but did not change the distribution of mitochondria. Association of phagosomes containing HtpB-coated beads with the endoplasmic reticulum was not consistently detected by either fluorescence or electron microscopy studies, and only a modest delay in the fusion of TrOv-labeled lysosomes with phagosomes containing HtpB-coated beads was observed. HtpB is the first Legionella protein and the first chaperonin shown to, by means of our functional models, induce mitochondrial recruitment and microfilament rearrangements, two postinternalization events that typify the early trafficking of virulent L. pneumophila. PMID:19687203

  1. Convective Mixing in Distal Pipes Exacerbates Legionella pneumophila Growth in Hot Water Plumbing

    PubMed Central

    Rhoads, William J.; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is known to proliferate in hot water plumbing systems, but little is known about the specific physicochemical factors that contribute to its regrowth. Here, L. pneumophila trends were examined in controlled, replicated pilot-scale hot water systems with continuous recirculation lines subject to two water heater settings (40 °C and 58 °C) and three distal tap water use frequencies (high, medium, and low) with two pipe configurations (oriented upward to promote convective mixing with the recirculating line and downward to prevent it). Water heater temperature setting determined where L. pneumophila regrowth occurred in each system, with an increase of up to 4.4 log gene copies/mL in the 40 °C system tank and recirculating line relative to influent water compared to only 2.5 log gene copies/mL regrowth in the 58 °C system. Distal pipes without convective mixing cooled to room temperature (23–24 °C) during periods of no water use, but pipes with convective mixing equilibrated to 30.5 °C in the 40 °C system and 38.8 °C in the 58 °C system. Corresponding with known temperature effects on L. pneumophila growth and enhanced delivery of nutrients, distal pipes with convective mixing had on average 0.2 log more gene copies/mL in the 40 °C system and 0.8 log more gene copies/mL in the 58 °C system. Importantly, this work demonstrated the potential for thermal control strategies to be undermined by distal taps in general, and convective mixing in particular. PMID:26985908

  2. Convective Mixing in Distal Pipes Exacerbates Legionella pneumophila Growth in Hot Water Plumbing.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, William J; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc A

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is known to proliferate in hot water plumbing systems, but little is known about the specific physicochemical factors that contribute to its regrowth. Here, L. pneumophila trends were examined in controlled, replicated pilot-scale hot water systems with continuous recirculation lines subject to two water heater settings (40 °C and 58 °C) and three distal tap water use frequencies (high, medium, and low) with two pipe configurations (oriented upward to promote convective mixing with the recirculating line and downward to prevent it). Water heater temperature setting determined where L. pneumophila regrowth occurred in each system, with an increase of up to 4.4 log gene copies/mL in the 40 °C system tank and recirculating line relative to influent water compared to only 2.5 log gene copies/mL regrowth in the 58 °C system. Distal pipes without convective mixing cooled to room temperature (23-24 °C) during periods of no water use, but pipes with convective mixing equilibrated to 30.5 °C in the 40 °C system and 38.8 °C in the 58 °C system. Corresponding with known temperature effects on L. pneumophila growth and enhanced delivery of nutrients, distal pipes with convective mixing had on average 0.2 log more gene copies/mL in the 40 °C system and 0.8 log more gene copies/mL in the 58 °C system. Importantly, this work demonstrated the potential for thermal control strategies to be undermined by distal taps in general, and convective mixing in particular. PMID:26985908

  3. Subtyping of the Legionella pneumophila "Ulm" outbreak strain using the CRISPR-Cas system.

    PubMed

    Lück, Christian; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Rydzewski, Kerstin; Koshkolda, Tetyana; Sarnow, Katharina; Essig, Andreas; Heuner, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    In 2009/2010 an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease with 64 cases including four fatalities took place in the city of Ulm/Neu-Ulm in Germany. L. pneumophila serogroup 1, mAb type Knoxville, sequence type (ST) 62 was identified as the epidemic strain. This strain was isolated from eight patients and from a cooling tower in the city of Ulm. Based on whole genome sequencing data from one patient strain, we identified an Lvh type IV secretion system containing a CRISPR-Cas system. The CRISPR sequence contains 38 spacer DNA sequences. We used these variable DNA spacers to further subtype the outbreak strain as well as six epidemiologically unrelated strains of CRISPR-Cas positive ST62 strains isolated at various regions in Germany. The first 12 spacer DNAs of eight patient isolates and three environmental isolates from the suspected source of infection were analyzed and found to be identical. Spacer DNAs were identified in further six epidemiologically unrelated patient isolates of L. pneumophila of ST62 in addition to the 12 "core" spacers. The presence of new spacer DNAs at the 5' site downstream of the first repeat indicates that these CRISPR-Cas systems seem to be functional. PCR analysis revealed that not all L. pneumophila sg1 ST62 strains investigated exhibited a CRISPR-Cas system. In addition, we could demonstrate that the CRISPR-Cas system is localized on a genomic island (LpuGI-Lvh) which can be excised from the chromosome and therefore may be transferable horizontally to other L. pneumophila strains. PMID:26294350

  4. Legionella pneumophila S1P-lyase targets host sphingolipid metabolism and restrains autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Rolando, Monica; Escoll, Pedro; Nora, Tamara; Botti, Joëlle; Boitez, Valérie; Daniels, Craig; Abraham, Gilu; Stogios, Peter J.; Skarina, Tatiana; Christophe, Charlotte; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Cazalet, Christel; Hilbi, Hubert; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W. T.; Tull, Dedreia; McConville, Malcolm J.; Ong, Sze Ying; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Codogno, Patrice; Levade, Thierry; Naderer, Thomas; Savchenko, Alexei; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential component of innate immunity, enabling the detection and elimination of intracellular pathogens. Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia in humans, is able to modulate autophagy through the action of effector proteins that are translocated into the host cell by the pathogen’s Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. Many of these effectors share structural and sequence similarity with eukaryotic proteins. Indeed, phylogenetic analyses have indicated their acquisition by horizontal gene transfer from a eukaryotic host. Here we report that L. pneumophila translocates the effector protein sphingosine-1 phosphate lyase (LpSpl) to target the host sphingosine biosynthesis and to curtail autophagy. Our structural characterization of LpSpl and its comparison with human SPL reveals high structural conservation, thus supporting prior phylogenetic analysis. We show that LpSpl possesses S1P lyase activity that was abrogated by mutation of the catalytic site residues. L. pneumophila triggers the reduction of several sphingolipids critical for macrophage function in an LpSpl-dependent and -independent manner. LpSpl activity alone was sufficient to prevent an increase in sphingosine levels in infected host cells and to inhibit autophagy during macrophage infection. LpSpl was required for efficient infection of A/J mice, highlighting an important virulence role for this effector. Thus, we have uncovered a previously unidentified mechanism used by intracellular pathogens to inhibit autophagy, namely the disruption of host sphingolipid biosynthesis. PMID:26831115

  5. Legionella pneumophila S1P-lyase targets host sphingolipid metabolism and restrains autophagy.

    PubMed

    Rolando, Monica; Escoll, Pedro; Nora, Tamara; Botti, Joëlle; Boitez, Valérie; Bedia, Carmen; Daniels, Craig; Abraham, Gilu; Stogios, Peter J; Skarina, Tatiana; Christophe, Charlotte; Dervins-Ravault, Delphine; Cazalet, Christel; Hilbi, Hubert; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W T; Tull, Dedreia; McConville, Malcolm J; Ong, Sze Ying; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Codogno, Patrice; Levade, Thierry; Naderer, Thomas; Savchenko, Alexei; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-02-16

    Autophagy is an essential component of innate immunity, enabling the detection and elimination of intracellular pathogens. Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia in humans, is able to modulate autophagy through the action of effector proteins that are translocated into the host cell by the pathogen's Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. Many of these effectors share structural and sequence similarity with eukaryotic proteins. Indeed, phylogenetic analyses have indicated their acquisition by horizontal gene transfer from a eukaryotic host. Here we report that L. pneumophila translocates the effector protein sphingosine-1 phosphate lyase (LpSpl) to target the host sphingosine biosynthesis and to curtail autophagy. Our structural characterization of LpSpl and its comparison with human SPL reveals high structural conservation, thus supporting prior phylogenetic analysis. We show that LpSpl possesses S1P lyase activity that was abrogated by mutation of the catalytic site residues. L. pneumophila triggers the reduction of several sphingolipids critical for macrophage function in an LpSpl-dependent and -independent manner. LpSpl activity alone was sufficient to prevent an increase in sphingosine levels in infected host cells and to inhibit autophagy during macrophage infection. LpSpl was required for efficient infection of A/J mice, highlighting an important virulence role for this effector. Thus, we have uncovered a previously unidentified mechanism used by intracellular pathogens to inhibit autophagy, namely the disruption of host sphingolipid biosynthesis.

  6. Roles of iron in the survival, growth, and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, F.D.

    1985-01-01

    The essentially of iron for living cells has long been recognized, and the availability of host-iron has been proposed as a contributing factor to virulence in bacterial, fungal, and protozoan infections. The mechanism by which legionella pneumophila causes disease is unknown. Growth of fresh clinical or environmental isolates in pure culture requires 20 times more iron than is needed for most other bacteria. Thus, increased plasma iron levels may be needed for multiplication within human hosts. It was observed that: (1) this organism can be more readily deprived of iron by iron binding agents than all other bacteria studied, and this inhibition can be reversed by the addition of iron; (2) normal human blood serum kills L. pneumophila and the bactericidal action is decreased when complement is inactivated or enough iron to saturate serum transferrin is added to the system; (3) in assays with a radioactive isotope of iron (/sup 55/Fe), no specific iron sequestering system was detected; (4) in analysis of outer membrane proteins with /sup 55/Fe, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and autoradiography, no specific outer membrane proteins responsible for iron acquisition were observed; and (5) in assays for protease, iron does not stimulate production of extracellular proteases. These observations indicate that L. pneumophila has no specific iron uptake mechanism, but instead relies on passive diffusion and/or non-specific mechanisms to obtain its iron.

  7. Detection of Legionella, L. pneumophila and Mycobacterium Avium Complex (MAC) along Potable Water Distribution Pipelines

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, Harriet; Keegan, Alexandra; Fallowfield, Howard; Bentham, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of potable water presents a potential route of exposure to opportunistic pathogens and hence warrants significant public health concern. This study used qPCR to detect opportunistic pathogens Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and MAC at multiple points along two potable water distribution pipelines. One used chlorine disinfection and the other chloramine disinfection. Samples were collected four times over the year to provide seasonal variation and the chlorine or chloramine residual was measured during collection. Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and MAC were detected in both distribution systems throughout the year and were all detected at a maximum concentration of 103 copies/mL in the chlorine disinfected system and 106, 103 and 104 copies/mL respectively in the chloramine disinfected system. The concentrations of these opportunistic pathogens were primarily controlled throughout the distribution network through the maintenance of disinfection residuals. At a dead-end and when the disinfection residual was not maintained significant (p < 0.05) increases in concentration were observed when compared to the concentration measured closest to the processing plant in the same pipeline and sampling period. Total coliforms were not present in any water sample collected. This study demonstrates the ability of Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and MAC to survive the potable water disinfection process and highlights the need for greater measures to control these organisms along the distribution pipeline and at point of use. PMID:25046636

  8. New insights into Legionella pneumophila biofilm regulation by c-di-GMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Pécastaings, Sophie; Allombert, Julie; Lajoie, Barbora; Doublet, Patricia; Roques, Christine; Vianney, Anne

    2016-09-01

    The waterborne pathogen Legionella pneumophila grows as a biofilm, freely or inside amoebae. Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP), a bacterial second messenger frequently implicated in biofilm formation, is synthesized and degraded by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs), respectively. To characterize the c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes involved in L. pneumophila biofilm regulation, the consequences on biofilm formation and the c-di-GMP concentration of each corresponding gene inactivation were assessed in the Lens strain. The results showed that one DGC and two PDEs enhance different aspects of biofilm formation, while two proteins with dual activity (DGC/PDE) inhibit biofilm growth. Surprisingly, only two mutants exhibited a change in global c-di-GMP concentration. This study highlights that specific c-di-GMP pathways control L. pneumophila biofilm formation, most likely via temporary and/or local modulation of c-di-GMP concentration. Furthermore, Lpl1054 DGC is required to enable the formation a dense biofilm in response to nitric oxide, a signal for biofilm dispersion in many other species. PMID:27494738

  9. Subversion of Cell-Autonomous Immunity and Cell Migration by Legionella pneumophila Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvia; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria trigger host defense and inflammatory processes, such as cytokine production, pyroptosis, and the chemotactic migration of immune cells toward the source of infection. However, a number of pathogens interfere with these immune functions by producing specific so-called “effector” proteins, which are delivered to host cells via dedicated secretion systems. Air-borne Legionella pneumophila bacteria trigger an acute and potential fatal inflammation in the lung termed Legionnaires’ disease. The opportunistic pathogen L. pneumophila is a natural parasite of free-living amoebae, but also replicates in alveolar macrophages and accidentally infects humans. The bacteria employ the intracellular multiplication/defective for organelle trafficking (Icm/Dot) type IV secretion system and as many as 300 different effector proteins to govern host–cell interactions and establish in phagocytes an intracellular replication niche, the Legionella-containing vacuole. Some Icm/Dot-translocated effector proteins target cell-autonomous immunity or cell migration, i.e., they interfere with (i) endocytic, secretory, or retrograde vesicle trafficking pathways, (ii) organelle or cell motility, (iii) the inflammasome and programed cell death, or (iv) the transcription factor NF-κB. Here, we review recent mechanistic insights into the subversion of cellular immune functions by L. pneumophila. PMID:26441958

  10. Detection of Legionella, L. pneumophila and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) along potable water distribution pipelines.

    PubMed

    Whiley, Harriet; Keegan, Alexandra; Fallowfield, Howard; Bentham, Richard

    2014-07-18

    Inhalation of potable water presents a potential route of exposure to opportunistic pathogens and hence warrants significant public health concern. This study used qPCR to detect opportunistic pathogens Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and MAC at multiple points along two potable water distribution pipelines. One used chlorine disinfection and the other chloramine disinfection. Samples were collected four times over the year to provide seasonal variation and the chlorine or chloramine residual was measured during collection. Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and MAC were detected in both distribution systems throughout the year and were all detected at a maximum concentration of 103 copies/mL in the chlorine disinfected system and 106, 103 and 104 copies/mL respectively in the chloramine disinfected system. The concentrations of these opportunistic pathogens were primarily controlled throughout the distribution network through the maintenance of disinfection residuals. At a dead-end and when the disinfection residual was not maintained significant (p < 0.05) increases in concentration were observed when compared to the concentration measured closest to the processing plant in the same pipeline and sampling period. Total coliforms were not present in any water sample collected. This study demonstrates the ability of Legionella spp., L. pneumophila and MAC to survive the potable water disinfection process and highlights the need for greater measures to control these organisms along the distribution pipeline and at point of use.

  11. New insights into Legionella pneumophila biofilm regulation by c-di-GMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Pécastaings, Sophie; Allombert, Julie; Lajoie, Barbora; Doublet, Patricia; Roques, Christine; Vianney, Anne

    2016-09-01

    The waterborne pathogen Legionella pneumophila grows as a biofilm, freely or inside amoebae. Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP), a bacterial second messenger frequently implicated in biofilm formation, is synthesized and degraded by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs), respectively. To characterize the c-di-GMP-metabolizing enzymes involved in L. pneumophila biofilm regulation, the consequences on biofilm formation and the c-di-GMP concentration of each corresponding gene inactivation were assessed in the Lens strain. The results showed that one DGC and two PDEs enhance different aspects of biofilm formation, while two proteins with dual activity (DGC/PDE) inhibit biofilm growth. Surprisingly, only two mutants exhibited a change in global c-di-GMP concentration. This study highlights that specific c-di-GMP pathways control L. pneumophila biofilm formation, most likely via temporary and/or local modulation of c-di-GMP concentration. Furthermore, Lpl1054 DGC is required to enable the formation a dense biofilm in response to nitric oxide, a signal for biofilm dispersion in many other species.

  12. Sequence determination and mutational analysis of the lly locus of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Wintermeyer, E; Flügel, M; Ott, M; Steinert, M; Rdest, U; Mann, K H; Hacker, J

    1994-01-01

    The lly (legiolysin) locus codes for a 39-kDa protein which confers hemolysis, pigment production, and fluorescence on recombinant Escherichia coli K-12 clones carrying the lly gene. The nucleotide sequences of the lly genes from two Legionella pneumophila isolates were determined. The lly loci exhibited identical nucleotide sequences. They contained open reading frames of 348 amino acid residues, encoding proteins with a deduced molecular mass of 38.9 kDa. N-terminal amino acid sequencing further confirmed that the Lly protein corresponds to the open reading frame sequenced. The amino acid sequence of the Lly protein exhibits a high degree of homology with the sequences of the MelA protein responsible for melanin production in the freshwater bacterium Shewanella colwelliana and the 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase of Pseudomonas spp. 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase is involved in the degradation of aromatic amino acids in various organisms. An Lly-negative mutant of L. pneumophila Philadelphia I derivative JR32 and an Lly-positive transcomplementant were constructed. The Lly-negative mutant lost the ability to produce brown pigment and to confer fluorescence but retained hemolysis. Introduction of a plasmid carrying the lly locus restored pigment production and fluorescence. Intracellular survival of L. pneumophila in U937 macrophage-like cells and in Acanthamoeba castellanii was not affected by mutagenization of the lly locus. Images PMID:8112844

  13. A single Legionella pneumophila genotype in the freshwater system in a ship experiencing three separate outbreaks of legionellosis in 6 years

    PubMed Central

    Ahlen, Catrine; Aas, Marianne; Krusnell, Jadwiga; Iversen, Ole-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Recurrent legionella outbreaks at one and the same location are common. We have identified a single Legionella pneumophila genotype associated with recurrent Legionella outbreaks over 6 years. Methods Field emergency surveys following Legionella outbreaks were performed on a vessel in 2008, 2009 and 2013. Water samples from both the distribution and technical parts of the potable water system were analyzed with respect to L. pneumophila [Real-Time PCR, cultivation, serotyping and genotyping (PFGE)] and free-living amoebae, (FLA). Results Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was present in the ship's potable water system during every outbreak. Genotyping of the 2008 survey material showed two separate PFGE genotypes while those in 2009 and 2013 demonstrated the presence of only one of the two genotypes. FLA with intracellular L. pneumophila of the same genotype were also detected. Analyses of the freshwater system on a ship following three separate Legionella outbreaks, for L. pneumophila and FLAs, revealed a single L. pneumophila genotype and FLA (Hartmanella). Conclusions It is reasonable to assume that the L. pneumophila genotype detected in the freshwater system was the causal agent in the outbreaks onboard. Persistence of an apparently low-pathogenic L. pneumophila genotype and FLA in a potable water system represent a potential risk for recurrent outbreaks. PMID:27515183

  14. Hypnosis, suggestion, and suggestibility: an integrative model.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Steven Jay; Laurence, Jean-Roch; Kirsch, Irving

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates an integrative model of hypnosis that integrates social, cultural, cognitive, and neurophysiological variables at play both in and out of hypnosis and considers their dynamic interaction as determinants of the multifaceted experience of hypnosis. The roles of these variables are examined in the induction and suggestion stages of hypnosis, including how they are related to the experience of involuntariness, one of the hallmarks of hypnosis. It is suggested that studies of the modification of hypnotic suggestibility; cognitive flexibility; response sets and expectancies; the default-mode network; and the search for the neurophysiological correlates of hypnosis, more broadly, in conjunction with research on social psychological variables, hold much promise to further understanding of hypnosis.

  15. Different growth rates in amoeba of genotypically related environmental and clinical Legionella pneumophila strains isolated from a thermal spa.

    PubMed Central

    Molmeret, M.; Jarraud, S.; Mori, J. P.; Pernin, P.; Forey, F.; Reyrolle, M.; Vandenesch, F.; Etienne, J.; Farge, P.

    2001-01-01

    Two cases of legionellosis occurring 3 years apart were acquired in the same French thermal spa and were apparently due to the same strain of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, as shown by genomic macrorestriction analysis. Minor differences between the two isolates were found by random amplification PCR profiling which showed an additional band with one of the isolates. Analysis of 107 L. pneumophila strains isolated from the spa waters by genome macrorestriction failed to identify the infective strain, but a closely related L. pneumophila serogroup 3 strain differing from the clinical isolates by only one band was found. To determine if the clinical L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates was better adapted for intracellular multiplication than related serogroup 3 environmental isolates, the growth kinetics of six isolates were determined in co-culture with Acanthamoeba lenticulata. One clinical isolate failed to grow within amoeba, while the other clinical isolate yielded the highest increase in bacterial cell count per amoeba (1,200%) and the environmental isolates gave intermediate values. Genetic analysis of L. pneumophila isolates by DNA macrorestriction does not therefore appear to reflect their growth kinetics within amoeba, and is not sufficiently discriminatory to identify potentially virulent strains. PMID:11349974

  16. Integrative Conjugative Element ICE-βox Confers Oxidative Stress Resistance to Legionella pneumophila In Vitro and in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Kaitlin J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) are mobile blocks of DNA that can contribute to bacterial evolution by self-directed transmission of advantageous traits. Here, we analyze the activity of a putative 65-kb ICE harbored by Legionella pneumophila using molecular genetics, conjugation assays, a phenotype microarray screen, and macrophage infections. The element transferred to a naive L. pneumophila strain, integrated site-specifically, and conferred increased resistance to oxacillin, penicillin, hydrogen peroxide, and bleach. Furthermore, the element increased survival of L. pneumophila within restrictive mouse macrophages. In particular, this ICE protects L. pneumophila from phagocyte oxidase activity, since mutation of the macrophage NADPH oxidase eliminated the fitness difference between strains that carried and those that lacked the mobile element. Renamed ICE-βox (for β-lactam antibiotics and oxidative stress), this transposable element is predicted to contribute to the emergence of L. pneumophila strains that are more fit in natural and engineered water systems and in macrophages. PMID:24781744

  17. Neutrophil and Alveolar Macrophage-Mediated Innate Immune Control of Legionella pneumophila Lung Infection via TNF and ROS.

    PubMed

    Ziltener, Pascal; Reinheckel, Thomas; Oxenius, Annette

    2016-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium that lives in aquatic environments where it parasitizes amoeba. However, upon inhalation of contaminated aerosols it can infect and replicate in human alveolar macrophages, which can result in Legionnaires' disease, a severe form of pneumonia. Upon experimental airway infection of mice, L. pneumophila is rapidly controlled by innate immune mechanisms. Here we identified, on a cell-type specific level, the key innate effector functions responsible for rapid control of infection. In addition to the well-characterized NLRC4-NAIP5 flagellin recognition pathway, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also essential for effective innate immune control of L. pneumophila. While ROS are essential for the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, alveolar macrophages (AM) rely on neutrophil and monocyte-derived TNF signaling via TNFR1 to restrict bacterial replication. This TNF-mediated antibacterial mechanism depends on the acidification of lysosomes and their fusion with L. pneumophila containing vacuoles (LCVs), as well as caspases with a minor contribution from cysteine-type cathepsins or calpains, and is independent of NLRC4, caspase-1, caspase-11 and NOX2. This study highlights the differential utilization of innate effector pathways to curtail intracellular bacterial replication in specific host cells upon L. pneumophila airway infection. PMID:27105352

  18. Neutrophil and Alveolar Macrophage-Mediated Innate Immune Control of Legionella pneumophila Lung Infection via TNF and ROS

    PubMed Central

    Ziltener, Pascal; Reinheckel, Thomas; Oxenius, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium that lives in aquatic environments where it parasitizes amoeba. However, upon inhalation of contaminated aerosols it can infect and replicate in human alveolar macrophages, which can result in Legionnaires’ disease, a severe form of pneumonia. Upon experimental airway infection of mice, L. pneumophila is rapidly controlled by innate immune mechanisms. Here we identified, on a cell-type specific level, the key innate effector functions responsible for rapid control of infection. In addition to the well-characterized NLRC4-NAIP5 flagellin recognition pathway, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also essential for effective innate immune control of L. pneumophila. While ROS are essential for the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, alveolar macrophages (AM) rely on neutrophil and monocyte-derived TNF signaling via TNFR1 to restrict bacterial replication. This TNF-mediated antibacterial mechanism depends on the acidification of lysosomes and their fusion with L. pneumophila containing vacuoles (LCVs), as well as caspases with a minor contribution from cysteine-type cathepsins or calpains, and is independent of NLRC4, caspase-1, caspase-11 and NOX2. This study highlights the differential utilization of innate effector pathways to curtail intracellular bacterial replication in specific host cells upon L. pneumophila airway infection. PMID:27105352

  19. Distribution of Legionella pneumophila bacteria and Naegleria and Hartmannella amoebae in thermal saline baths used in balneotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zbikowska, Elżbieta; Walczak, Maciej; Krawiec, Arkadiusz

    2013-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the coexistence and interactions between free living amoebae of Naegleria and Hartmannella genera and pathogenic Legionella pneumophila bacteria in thermal saline baths used in balneotherapy in central Poland. Water samples were collected from November 2010 to May 2011 at intervals longer than 1 month. The microorganisms were detected with the use of a very sensitive fluorescence in situ hybridisation method. In addition, the morphology of the amoebae was studied. Despite relatively high salinity level, ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 %, L. pneumophila were found in all investigated baths, although their number never exceeded 10(6) cells dm(-3). Hartmannella were not detected, while Naegleria fowleri were found in one bath. The observation that N. fowleri and L. pneumophila may coexist in thermal saline baths is the first observation emphasising potential threat from these microorganisms in balneotherapy.

  20. Analysis of the Legionella pneumophila fliI gene: intracellular growth of a defined mutant defective for flagellum biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Merriam, J J; Mathur, R; Maxfield-Boumil, R; Isberg, R R

    1997-01-01

    Using a PCR-based strategy and degenerate oligonucleotides, we isolated a Legionella pneumophila gene that showed high sequence similarity to members of the fliI gene family. An insertion mutation that disrupted the fliI open reading frame was recombined onto the L. pneumophila chromosome and analyzed for its effects on production of flagella and intracellular growth. The mutation resulted in loss of surface-localized flagellin protein but had no effect on the ability of the bacteria to grow within cultured cells. Therefore, in spite of the fact that some aflagellar mutations render L. pneumophila unable to grow within macrophages, the isolation of this defined mutant confirms that production of flagella is not required for intracellular growth. PMID:9169800

  1. Enzymatic properties of an ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase from Legionella pneumophila: substrate specificity and requirement for virulence.

    PubMed

    Sansom, Fiona M; Riedmaier, Patrice; Newton, Hayley J; Dunstone, Michelle A; Müller, Christa E; Stephan, Holger; Byres, Emma; Beddoe, Travis; Rossjohn, Jamie; Cowan, Peter J; d'Apice, Anthony J F; Robson, Simon C; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2008-05-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the predominant cause of Legionnaires disease, a severe and potentially fatal form of pneumonia. Recently, we identified an ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) from L. pneumophila, termed Lpg1905, which enhances intracellular replication of L. pneumophila in eukaryotic cells. Lpg1905 is the first prokaryotic member of the CD39/NTPDase1 family of enzymes, which are characterized by the presence of five apyrase conserved regions and the ability to hydrolyze nucleoside tri- and diphosphates. Here we examined the substrate specificity of Lpg1905 and showed that apart from ATP and ADP, the enzyme catalyzed the hydrolysis of GTP and GDP but had limited activity against CTP, CDP, UTP, and UDP. Based on amino acid residues conserved in the apyrase conserved regions of eukaryotic NTPDases, we generated five site-directed mutants, Lpg1905E159A, R122A, N168A, Q193A, and W384A. Although the mutations E159A, R122A, Q193A, and W384A abrogated activity completely, N168A resulted in decreased activity caused by reduced affinity for nucleotides. When introduced into the lpg1905 mutant strain of L. pneumophila, only N168A partially restored the ability of L. pneumophila to replicate in THP-1 macrophages. Following intratracheal inoculation of A/J mice, none of the Lpg1905 mutants was able to restore virulence to an lpg1905 mutant during lung infection, thereby demonstrating the importance of NTPDase activity to L. pneumophila infection. Overall, the kinetic studies undertaken here demonstrated important differences to mammalian NTPDases and different sensitivities to NTPDase inhibitors that may reflect underlying structural variations.

  2. [Detection of antibodies against Legionella pneumophila from pleural effusion--a case report of Legionnaire's pneumonia with pleural effusion].

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Wang, P; Chen, S

    1994-06-01

    Using TAT and ELISA, 50 samples of pleural effusion and sera from patients infected with non-Legionella pneumophila were detected for antibodies against Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 and 6, respectively. The average titre and upper limit value (99%, mean + 2.326S) calculated. In addition, a pleural effusion and a serum from a patient with Legionnaire's pneumonia were also detected by TAT and ELISA. The result showed that the titre of this antibody in his pleural effusion was not only over the upper limit, but also higher than that in his serum.

  3. Open to Suggestion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Reading, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Offers (1) suggestions for improving college students' study skills; (2) a system for keeping track of parent, teacher, and community contacts; (3) suggestions for motivating students using tic tac toe; (4) suggestions for using etymology to improve word retention; (5) a word search grid; and (6) suggestions for using postcards in remedial reading…

  4. Activity of Six Essential Oils Extracted from Tunisian Plants against Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Chaftar, Naouel; Girardot, Marion; Quellard, Nathalie; Labanowski, Jérôme; Ghrairi, Tawfik; Hani, Khaled; Frère, Jacques; Imbert, Christine

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the composition of six essential oils extracted from Tunisian plants, i.e., Artemisia herba-alba Asso, Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck, Juniperus phoenicea L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Ruta graveolens L., and Thymus vulgaris L., and to evaluate their activity against Legionella pneumophila (microdilution assays). Eight Legionella pneumophila strains were studied, including the two well-known serogroup 1 Lens and Paris strains as controls and six environmental strains isolated from Tunisian spas belonging to serogroups 1, 4, 5, 6, and 8. The essential oils were generally active against L. pneumophila. The activities of the A. herba-alba, C. sinensis, and R. officinalis essential oils were strain-dependent, whereas those of the J. phoenicea and T. vulgaris oils, showing the highest anti-Legionella activities, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) lower than 0.03 and lower than or equal to 0.07 mg/ml, respectively, were independent of the strains' serogroup. Moreover, the microorganisms treated with T. vulgaris essential oil were shorter, swollen, and less electron-dense compared to the untreated controls. Isoborneol (20.91%), (1S)-α-pinene (18.30%) β-phellandrene (8.08%), α-campholenal (7.91%), and α-phellandrene (7.58%) were the major components isolated from the J. phoenicea oil, while carvacrol (88.50%) was the main compound of the T. vulgaris oil, followed by p-cymene (7.86%). This study highlighted the potential interest of some essential oils extracted from Tunisian plants as biocides to prevent the Legionella risk.

  5. The Legionella pneumophila Siderophore Legiobactin Is a Polycarboxylate That Is Identical in Structure to Rhizoferrin

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, Denise M.; Wu, Yuyang; Shafaie, Saman

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the agent of Legionnaires' disease, secretes a siderophore (legiobactin) that promotes bacterial infection of the lung. In past work, we determined that cytoplasmic LbtA (from Legiobactin gene A) promotes synthesis of legiobactin, inner membrane LbtB aids in export of the siderophore, and outer membrane LbtU and inner membrane LbtC help mediate ferrilegiobactin uptake and assimilation. However, the past studies examined legiobactin contained within bacterial culture supernatants. By utilizing high-pressure liquid chromatography that incorporates hydrophilic interaction-based chemistry, we have now purified legiobactin from supernatants of virulent strain 130b that is suitable for detailed chemical analysis. High-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) revealed that the molecular mass of (protonated) legiobactin is 437.140 Da. On the basis of the results obtained from both MS analysis and various forms of nuclear magnetic resonance, we found that legiobactin is composed of two citric acid residues linked by a putrescine bridge and thus is identical in structure to rhizoferrin, a polycarboxylate-type siderophore made by many fungi and several unrelated bacteria. Both purified legiobactin and rhizoferrin obtained from the fungus Cunninghamella elegans were able to promote Fe3+ uptake by wild-type L. pneumophila as well as enhance growth of iron-starved bacteria. These results did not occur with 130b mutants lacking lbtU or lbtC, indicating that both endogenously made legiobactin and exogenously derived rhizoferrin are assimilated by L. pneumophila in an LbtU- and LbtC-dependent manner. PMID:26195554

  6. Inhibitors for the bacterial ectonucleotidase Lp1NTPDase from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Fiene, Amelie; Baqi, Younis; Malik, Enas M; Newton, Patrice; Li, Wenjin; Lee, Sang-Yong; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Müller, Christa E

    2016-09-15

    Legionella pneumophila is an aerobic, Gram-negative bacterium of the genus Legionella, which constitutes the major causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. Recently a nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) from L. pneumophila was identified and termed Lp1NTPDase; it was found to be a structural and functional homolog of mammalian NTPDases catalyzing the hydrolysis of ATP to ADP and ADP to AMP. Its activity is believed to contribute to the virulence of Legionella pneumophila. Therefore Lp1NTPDase inhibitors are considered as novel antibacterial drugs. However, only weakly potent compounds are available so far. In the present study, a capillary electrophoresis (CE)-based enzyme assay for monitoring the Lp1NTPDase activity was established. The enzymatic reaction was performed in a test tube followed by separation of substrate and products by CE and subsequent quantification by UV analysis. After kinetic characterization of the enzyme, a series of 1-amino-4-ar(alk)ylamino-2-sulfoanthraquinone derivatives structurally related to the anthraquinone dye Reactive Blue 2, a non-selective ecto-NTPDase inhibitor, was investigated for inhibitory activity on Lp1NTPDase using the CE-based enzyme assay. Derivatives bearing a large lipophilic substituent (e.g., fused aromatic rings) in the 4-position of the 1-amino-2-sulfoanthraquinone showed the highest inhibitory activity. Compounds with IC50 values in the low micromolar range were identified. The most potent inhibitor was 1-amino-4-[phenanthrene-9-yl-amino]-9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydroanthracene-2-sulfonate (28, PSB-16131), with an IC50-value of 4.24μM. It represents the most potent Lp1NTPDase inhibitor described to date. These findings may serve as a starting point for further optimization. Lp1NTPDase inhibition provides a novel approach for the (immuno)therapy of Legionella infections. PMID:27522579

  7. Activity of Six Essential Oils Extracted from Tunisian Plants against Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Chaftar, Naouel; Girardot, Marion; Quellard, Nathalie; Labanowski, Jérôme; Ghrairi, Tawfik; Hani, Khaled; Frère, Jacques; Imbert, Christine

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the composition of six essential oils extracted from Tunisian plants, i.e., Artemisia herba-alba Asso, Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck, Juniperus phoenicea L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Ruta graveolens L., and Thymus vulgaris L., and to evaluate their activity against Legionella pneumophila (microdilution assays). Eight Legionella pneumophila strains were studied, including the two well-known serogroup 1 Lens and Paris strains as controls and six environmental strains isolated from Tunisian spas belonging to serogroups 1, 4, 5, 6, and 8. The essential oils were generally active against L. pneumophila. The activities of the A. herba-alba, C. sinensis, and R. officinalis essential oils were strain-dependent, whereas those of the J. phoenicea and T. vulgaris oils, showing the highest anti-Legionella activities, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) lower than 0.03 and lower than or equal to 0.07 mg/ml, respectively, were independent of the strains' serogroup. Moreover, the microorganisms treated with T. vulgaris essential oil were shorter, swollen, and less electron-dense compared to the untreated controls. Isoborneol (20.91%), (1S)-α-pinene (18.30%) β-phellandrene (8.08%), α-campholenal (7.91%), and α-phellandrene (7.58%) were the major components isolated from the J. phoenicea oil, while carvacrol (88.50%) was the main compound of the T. vulgaris oil, followed by p-cymene (7.86%). This study highlighted the potential interest of some essential oils extracted from Tunisian plants as biocides to prevent the Legionella risk. PMID:26460561

  8. Genetic Characterization of Legionella pneumophila Isolated from a Common Watershed in Comunidad Valenciana, Spain.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Coscollá, Mireia; Pinto-Carbó, Marta; Catalán, Vicente; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila infects humans to produce legionellosis and Pontiac fever only from environmental sources. In order to establish control measures and study the sources of outbreaks it is essential to know extent and distribution of strain variants of this bacterium in the environment. Sporadic and outbreak-related cases of legionellosis have been historically frequent in the Comunidad Valenciana region (CV, Spain), with a high prevalence in its Southeastern-most part (BV). Environmental investigations for the detection of Legionella pneumophila are performed in this area routinely. We present a population genetics study of 87 L. pneumophila strains isolated in 13 different localities of the BV area irrigated from the same watershed and compare them to a dataset of 46 strains isolated in different points of the whole CV. Our goal was to compare environmental genetic variation at two different geographic scales, at county and regional levels. Genetic diversity, recombination and population structure were analyzed with Sequence-Based Typing data and three intergenic regions. The results obtained reveal a low, but detectable, level of genetic differentiation between both datasets, mainly, but not only, attributed to the occurrence of unusual variants of the neuA locus present in the BV populations. This differentiation is still detectable when the 10 loci considered are analyzed independently, despite the relatively high incidence of the most common genetic variant in this species, sequence type 1 (ST-1). However, when the genetic data are considered without their associated geographic information, four major groups could be inferred at the genetic level which did not show any correlation with sampling locations. The overall results indicate that the population structure of these environmental samples results from the joint action of a global, widespread ST-1 along with genetic differentiation at shorter geographic distances, which in this case are related to

  9. Electrophoretic characterization of soluble protein extracts of Legionella pneumophila and other members of the family Legionellaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Lema, M; Brown, A

    1983-01-01

    The soluble peptides of strains of Legionella pneumophila, Tatlockia micdadei, Fluoribacter bozemanae, Fluoribacter dumoffii, and Fluoribacter gormanii were studied by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Characteristic patterns were seen for Legionella and Tatlockia strains, whereas the patterns for the Fluoribacter strains were variable as would be expected for this genetically heterogeneous group. Grouping by peptide pattern was consistent with proposed taxons based on DNA-DNA homology. By using a new silver stain technique, the sensitivity and ease of pattern recognition were enhanced significantly. This technique is an easily applied general method for distinguishing between strains in epidemiological studies. Images PMID:6874904

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an aminoglycoside kinase from Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, Christopher T.; Hwang, Jiyoung; Xiong, Bing; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2005-06-01

    Two crystal forms of the antibiotic resistance enzyme APH(9)-Ia from L. pneumophila are reported. 9-Aminoglycoside phosphotransferase type Ia [APH(9)-Ia] is a resistance factor in Legionella pneuemophila, the causative agent of legionnaires’ disease. It is responsible for providing intrinsic resistance to the antibiotic spectinomycin. APH(9)-Ia phosphorylates one of the hydroxyl moieties of spectinomycin in an ATP-dependent manner, abolishing the antibiotic properties of this drug. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of this enzyme in two crystal forms is reported. One of the these crystal forms provides diffraction data to a resolution of 1.7 Å.

  11. Isolation on Chocolate Agar Culture of Legionella pneumophila Isolates from Subcutaneous Abscesses in an Immunocompromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Cavalie, Laurent; Daviller, Benjamin; Dubois, Damien; Mantion, Benoît; Delobel, Pierre; Debard, Alexa; Prere, Marie-Françoise; Marchou, Bruno; Martin-Blondel, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous infections due to Legionella species have rarely been reported (L. J. Padrnos, J. E. Blair, S. Kusne, D. J. DiCaudo, and J. R. Mikhael, Transpl Infect Dis 16:307–314, 2014; P. W. Lowry, R. J. Blankenship, W. Gridley, N. J. Troup, and L. S. Tompkins, N Engl J Med 324:109–113, 1991; M. K. Waldor, B. Wilson, and M. Swartz, Clin Infect Dis 16:51–53, 1993). Here we report the identification of Legionella pneumophila isolates, from subcutaneous abscesses in an immunocompromised patient, that grew in an unusual medium for Legionella bacteria. PMID:26292305

  12. Isolation on Chocolate Agar Culture of Legionella pneumophila Isolates from Subcutaneous Abscesses in an Immunocompromised Patient.

    PubMed

    Barigou, Mohammed; Cavalie, Laurent; Daviller, Benjamin; Dubois, Damien; Mantion, Benoît; Delobel, Pierre; Debard, Alexa; Prere, Marie-Françoise; Marchou, Bruno; Martin-Blondel, Guillaume

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous infections due to Legionella species have rarely been reported (L. J. Padrnos, J. E. Blair, S. Kusne, D. J. DiCaudo, and J. R. Mikhael, Transpl Infect Dis 16:307-314, 2014; P. W. Lowry, R. J. Blankenship, W. Gridley, N. J. Troup, and L. S. Tompkins, N Engl J Med 324:109-113, 1991; M. K. Waldor, B. Wilson, and M. Swartz, Clin Infect Dis 16:51-53, 1993). Here we report the identification of Legionella pneumophila isolates, from subcutaneous abscesses in an immunocompromised patient, that grew in an unusual medium for Legionella bacteria. PMID:26292305

  13. The Life of Suggestions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Cathie

    2010-01-01

    Using the notion of a suggestion, or rather charting the life of suggestions, this article considers the happenings of chance and embodiment as the "problems that got away." The life of suggestions helps us to ask how connectivities are made, how desire functions, and how "immanence" rather than "transcendence" can open up the politics and ethics…

  14. Formation of a pathogen vacuole according to Legionella pneumophila: how to kill one bird with many stones.

    PubMed

    Finsel, Ivo; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-07-01

    Legionella species are ubiquitous, waterborne bacteria that thrive in numerous ecological niches. Yet, in contrast to many other environmental bacteria, Legionella spp. are also able to grow intracellularly in predatory protozoa. This feature mainly accounts for the pathogenicity of Legionella pneumophila, which causes the majority of clinical cases of a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. The pathomechanism underlying L. pneumophila infection is based on macrophage resistance, which in turn is largely defined by the opportunistic pathogen's resistance towards amoebae. L. pneumophila replicates in macrophages or amoebae in a unique membrane-bound compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). LCV formation requires the bacterial intracellular multiplication/defective for organelle trafficking (Icm/Dot) type IV secretion system and involves a plethora of translocated effector proteins, which subvert pivotal processes in the host cell. Of the ca. 300 different experimentally validated Icm/Dot substrates, about 50 have been studied and attributed a cellular function to date. The versatility and ingenuity of these effectors' mode of actions is striking. In this review, we summarize insight into the cellular functions and biochemical activities of well-characterized L. pneumophila effector proteins and the host pathways they target. Recent studies not only substantially increased our knowledge about pathogen-host interactions, but also shed light on novel biological mechanisms.

  15. Temperature diagnostic to identify high risk areas and optimize Legionella pneumophila surveillance in hot water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Emilie; Fey, Stéphanie; Charron, Dominique; Lalancette, Cindy; Cantin, Philippe; Dolcé, Patrick; Laferrière, Céline; Déziel, Eric; Prévost, Michèle

    2015-03-15

    Legionella pneumophila is frequently detected in hot water distribution systems and thermal control is a common measure implemented by health care facilities. A risk assessment based on water temperature profiling and temperature distribution within the network is proposed, to guide effective monitoring strategies and allow the identification of high risk areas. Temperature and heat loss at control points (water heater, recirculation, representative points-of-use) were monitored in various sections of five health care facilities hot water distribution systems and results used to develop a temperature-based risk assessment tool. Detailed investigations show that defective return valves in faucets can cause widespread temperature losses because of hot and cold water mixing. Systems in which water temperature coming out of the water heaters was kept consistently above 60 °C and maintained above 55 °C across the network were negative for Legionella by culture or qPCR. For systems not meeting these temperature criteria, risk areas for L. pneumophila were identified using temperature profiling and system's characterization; higher risk was confirmed by more frequent microbiological detection by culture and qPCR. Results confirmed that maintaining sufficiently high temperatures within hot water distribution systems suppressed L. pneumophila culturability. However, the risk remains as shown by the persistence of L. pneumophila by qPCR.

  16. Differential growth of Legionella pneumophila strains within a range of amoebae at various temperatures associated with in-premise plumbing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential effect of in-premise plumbing temperatures (24, 32, 37 and 41 °C) on the growth of five different L. pneumophila strains within free-living amoebae (Acanthamoeba polyphaga, Hartmannella vermiformis and Naegleria fowleri) was examined. Compared to controls only fed E...

  17. Impact of drinking water conditions and copper materials on downstream biofilm microbial communities and legionella pneumophila colonization

    EPA Science Inventory

    Legionella pneumophila, the medically important species within the genus Legionella, is a concern in engineered water systems. Its ability to amplify within free-living amoebae is well documented, but its interactions/ecology within the microbial community of drinking water biofi...

  18. [Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3 isolated from a patient of pneumonia developed after drowning in bathtub of a hot spring spa].

    PubMed

    Shiota, R; Takeshita, K; Yamamoto, K; Imada, K; Yabuuchi, E; Wang, L

    1995-12-01

    A 71-year-old Japanese female, was found unconscious by drawing, in a hot spring spa, at around noon of 20 October 1994. She recovered by emergency cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and admitted to the Takinomiya General Hospital, with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although she recovered from ARDS within 4 days after her admission, she developed severe pneumonia accompanied with the second attack of ARDS. Ordinary bacteriological culture of her respiratory specimens failed to yield any significant pathogen for her pneumonia, and neither cefazolin nor imipenem/cilastatin was effective. Thus minocyclin was given on the 7th hospital-day and this was effective for blood gas and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Intratracheal exsudate inoculated on BCYE alpha agar plate yielded grayish white colonies. Cells of the colonies were clearly agglutinated by anti-Legionella pneumophila serogroup (SG) 3 serum. Antibody titers of patient's paired sera against the strain L. pneumophila SG3 Bloomington-2 and the patient's strain (Y-1) were determined by microplate agglutination test, and a significant rise from 1:20 to 1:320 was demonstrated. Patient recovered by erythromycin treatment and was discharged on the 59th hospital day. L. pneumophila SG3 organisms were again isolated from the spa water where the patient drawn. From these findings described above, we diagnosed the patient as pneumonia due to L. pneumophila SG3, and the spa water was the most probable source of infection.

  19. Temperature diagnostic to identify high risk areas and optimize Legionella pneumophila surveillance in hot water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Emilie; Fey, Stéphanie; Charron, Dominique; Lalancette, Cindy; Cantin, Philippe; Dolcé, Patrick; Laferrière, Céline; Déziel, Eric; Prévost, Michèle

    2015-03-15

    Legionella pneumophila is frequently detected in hot water distribution systems and thermal control is a common measure implemented by health care facilities. A risk assessment based on water temperature profiling and temperature distribution within the network is proposed, to guide effective monitoring strategies and allow the identification of high risk areas. Temperature and heat loss at control points (water heater, recirculation, representative points-of-use) were monitored in various sections of five health care facilities hot water distribution systems and results used to develop a temperature-based risk assessment tool. Detailed investigations show that defective return valves in faucets can cause widespread temperature losses because of hot and cold water mixing. Systems in which water temperature coming out of the water heaters was kept consistently above 60 °C and maintained above 55 °C across the network were negative for Legionella by culture or qPCR. For systems not meeting these temperature criteria, risk areas for L. pneumophila were identified using temperature profiling and system's characterization; higher risk was confirmed by more frequent microbiological detection by culture and qPCR. Results confirmed that maintaining sufficiently high temperatures within hot water distribution systems suppressed L. pneumophila culturability. However, the risk remains as shown by the persistence of L. pneumophila by qPCR. PMID:25622002

  20. Nosocomial legionnaires' disease: epidemiologic demonstration of cooling towers as a source. [Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Garbe, P.L.; Davis, B.J.; Weisfeld, J.S.; Markowitz, L.; Miner, P. Garrity, F.; Barbaree, J.M.; Reingold, A.L.

    1985-07-26

    Investigation of a recent outbreak of nosocomial legionnaires' disease - initially thought to be due to the documented presence of Legionella pneumophila in the hospital potable water - showed that aerosols from one or more cooling towers were the actual source of infection. From June 27 to Aug 25, 1983, nosocomial legionnaires' disease developed in 15 persons at a hospital in Rhode Island. Twelve (80%) of 15 case-patients occupied rooms in building 1, unit B, compared with eight (28%) of 29 control patients (odds ratio = 10.8; 95% confidence interval = 1.4 to 85.6). Subsequent investigation demonstrated that water in a cooling tower located 100 ft upwind of unit B was heavily contaminated with L. pneumophila, serogroup 1, subgroup 1, 2, 4, 5. The same strain was isolated from nine of the patients and from the make-up water for the tower. Active surveillance during the ten months following decontamination of the cooling tower identified no additional cases of nosocomial legionnaires' disease, although the hospital potable water had not been treated. While recommendations have been made for controlling nosocomial legionnaires' disease by heating or hyperchlorination of hospital potable water, this outbreak demonstrates the importance of an adequate epidemiologic-environmental investigation in choosing the appropriate control strategy.

  1. Effects of culture conditions and biofilm formation on the iodine susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, K. L.; Pyle, B. H.; Sauer, R. L.; McFeters, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to iodination was studied with cultures grown in well water, on rich agar media, and attached to stainless-steel surfaces. Legionella pneumophila grown in water cultures in association with other microorganisms were less sensitive to disinfection by chlorine and iodine than were agar-passaged cultures. Differences in sensitivity to disinfection between water-cultured and agar-grown legionellae were determined by comparing C x T values (concentration in milligrams per litre multiplied by time in minutes to achieve 99% decrease in viability) and CM x T values (concentration in molarity). Iodine (1500x) gave a greater difference in CM x T values than did chlorine (68x). Iodine was 50 times more effective than chlorine when used with agar-grown cultures but was only twice as effective when tested against water-grown Legionella cultures. C x T x S values (C x T multiplied by percent survivors), which take into consideration the percent surviving bacteria, were used to compare sensitivities in very resistant populations, such as those in biofilms. Water cultures of legionellae associated with stainless-steel surfaces were 135 times more resistant to iodination than were unattached legionellae, and they were 210,000 times more resistant than were agar-grown cultures. These results indicate that the conditions under which legionellae are grown can dramatically affect their susceptibility to some disinfectants and must be considered when evaluating the efficacy of a disinfecting agent.

  2. Production of monoclonal antibodies to Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 and 6.

    PubMed Central

    Para, M F; Plouffe, J F

    1983-01-01

    To better define the surface antigens of Legionella pneumophila for clinical and experimental purposes, we have produced monoclonal antibodies to L. pneumophila serogroups 1 and 6. Two hybridomas were produced in serogroup 1. One antibody, LP-I-17, recognized a serogroup-common antigen. The second antibody, LP-I-81, was specific for serogroup 1. This antibody was able to agglutinate bacterial cells belonging to the serogroup 1 reference strains. Philadelphia and Knoxville. Microagglutination assays of environmental and clinical isolates revealed a subgroup of serogroup 1 environmental isolates which were not agglutinated by LP-I-81. This subset of isolates was segregated to certain buildings in the medical complex. Immunodiffusion studies showed identity between the LP-I-81 antigen and the serogroup-specific antigen of serogroup 1 organisms. This antigen could be absorbed out of the serogroup 1 organism extract with LP-I-81-coated Staphylococcus aureus, leaving the serogroup-common antigens. Three hybridomas were produced to serogroup 6. All three produced antibodies which were serogroup 6 specific and agglutinated serogroup 6 bacteria. Images PMID:6415102

  3. A simple method for the eradication of Legionella pneumophila from potable water systems.

    PubMed

    Moreno, C; de Blas, I; Miralles, F; Apraiz, D; Catalan, V

    1997-12-01

    In this paper we describe a simple method, noncorrosive to pipes, for the eradication of Legionella pneumophila from potable water systems. This method is based on the systematic purging of the pipe networks with cold water containing 1-1.5 mg residual chlorine/L. In the hot water system, a new pipe bypassing the water heater was installed, whereas in the air conditioning system, the circuit is purged with water from the tap water system. The feasibility of this method was studied in two hotels in which the presence of Legionella was detected despite treatment of the water by the hyperchlorination method. The evolution of the presence of Legionella was studied by culture and polymerase chain reaction. Eighty samples from hotel A and sixty-seven samples from hotel B were analyzed during the time that the eradication method was applied. Our results showed that this method permitted the effective elimination of L. pneumophila after 5 months in hotel A and 7 months in hotel B. PMID:9476354

  4. Hot water systems as sources of Legionella pneumophila in hospital and nonhospital plumbing fixtures.

    PubMed

    Wadowsky, R M; Yee, R B; Mezmar, L; Wing, E J; Dowling, J N

    1982-05-01

    Samples obtained from plumbing systems of hospitals, nonhospital institutions and homes were cultured for Legionella spp. by plating the samples directly on a selective medium. Swab samples were taken from the inner surfaces of faucet assemblies (aerators, spouts, and valve seats), showerheads, and shower pipes. Water and sediment were collected from the bottom of hot-water tanks. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1, 5, and 6 were recovered from plumbing fixtures of the hospitals and nonhospital institutions and one of five homes. The legionellae (7 to 13,850 colony-forming units per ml) were also present in water and sediment from hot-water tanks maintained at 30 to 54 degrees C, but not in those maintained at 71 and 77 degrees C. Legionella micdadei was isolated from one tank. Thus legionellae are present in hot-water tanks which are maintained at warm temperatures or whose design results in warm temperatures at the bottom of the tanks. We hypothesize that hot-water tanks are a breeding site and a major source of L. pneumophila for the contamination of plumbing systems. The existence of these bacteria in the plumbing systems and tanks was not necessarily associated with disease. The extent of the hazard of this contamination needs to be delineated. PMID:7103477

  5. Chemistry Curricula. Course Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    Listings of suggested topics aimed at helping university and college faculties plan courses in the main areas of the chemistry curricula are provided. The suggestions were originally offered as appendices to the American Chemical Society's (ACS) Committee on Professional Training's 1983 guidelines for ACS-approved schools. The course data included…

  6. Comparative Genomics Reveal That Host-Innate Immune Responses Influence the Clinical Prevalence of Legionella pneumophila Serogroups

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad Adil; Knox, Natalie; Prashar, Akriti; Alexander, David; Abdel-Nour, Mena; Duncan, Carla; Tang, Patrick; Amatullah, Hajera; Dos Santos, Claudia C.; Tijet, Nathalie; Low, Donald E.; Pourcel, Christine; Van Domselaar, Gary; Terebiznik, Mauricio; Ensminger, Alexander W.; Guyard, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the primary etiologic agent of legionellosis, a potentially fatal respiratory illness. Amongst the sixteen described L. pneumophila serogroups, a majority of the clinical infections diagnosed using standard methods are serogroup 1 (Sg1). This high clinical prevalence of Sg1 is hypothesized to be linked to environmental specific advantages and/or to increased virulence of strains belonging to Sg1. The genetic determinants for this prevalence remain unknown primarily due to the limited genomic information available for non-Sg1 clinical strains. Through a systematic attempt to culture Legionella from patient respiratory samples, we have previously reported that 34% of all culture confirmed legionellosis cases in Ontario (n = 351) are caused by non-Sg1 Legionella. Phylogenetic analysis combining multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis and sequence based typing profiles of all non-Sg1 identified that L. pneumophila clinical strains (n = 73) belonging to the two most prevalent molecular types were Sg6. We conducted whole genome sequencing of two strains representative of these sequence types and one distant neighbour. Comparative genomics of the three L. pneumophila Sg6 genomes reported here with published L. pneumophila serogroup 1 genomes identified genetic differences in the O-antigen biosynthetic cluster. Comparative optical mapping analysis between Sg6 and Sg1 further corroborated this finding. We confirmed an altered O-antigen profile of Sg6, and tested its possible effects on growth and replication in in vitro biological models and experimental murine infections. Our data indicates that while clinical Sg1 might not be better suited than Sg6 in colonizing environmental niches, increased bloodstream dissemination through resistance to the alternative pathway of complement mediated killing in the human host may explain its higher prevalence. PMID:23826259

  7. Enhanced chlorine resistance of tap water-adapted Legionella pneumophila as compared with agar medium-passaged strains.

    PubMed Central

    Kuchta, J M; States, S J; McGlaughlin, J E; Overmeyer, J H; Wadowsky, R M; McNamara, A M; Wolford, R S; Yee, R B

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that bacteria maintained in a low-nutrient "natural" environment such as swimming pool water are much more resistant to disinfection by various chemical agents than strains maintained on rich media. In the present study a comparison was made of the chlorine (Cl2) susceptibility of hot-water tank isolates of Legionella pneumophila maintained in tap water and strains passaged on either nonselective buffered charcoal-yeast extract or selective differential glycine-vancomycin-polymyxin agar medium. Our earlier work has shown that environmental and clinical isolates of L. pneumophila maintained on agar medium are much more resistant to Cl2 than coliforms are. Under the present experimental conditions (21 degrees C, pH 7.6 to 8.0, and 0.25 mg of free residual Cl2 per liter, we found the tap water-maintained L. pneumophila strains to be even more resistant than the agar-passaged isolates. Under these conditions, 99% kill of tap water-maintained strains of L. pneumophila was usually achieved within 60 to 90 min compared with 10 min for agar-passaged strains. Samples from plumbing fixtures in a hospital yielded legionellae which were "super"-chlorine resistant when assayed under natural conditions. After one agar passage their resistance dropped to levels of comparable strains which had not been previously exposed to additional chlorination. These studies more closely approximate natural conditions than our previous work and show that tap water-maintained L. pneumophila is even more resistant to Cl2 than its already resistant agar medium-passaged counterpart. PMID:3896142

  8. AUTOMATED DEAD-END ULTRAFILTRATION FOR ENHANCED SURVEILLANCE OF LEGIONELLA 2 PNEUMOPHILA AND LEGIONELLA SPP. IN COOLING TOWER WATERS

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.; Leskinen, S.; Kearns, E.; Jones, W.; Miller, R.; Betivas, C.; Kingsley, M.; Lim, D.

    2011-10-10

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila in cooling towers and domestic hot water systems involves concentration by centrifugation or membrane filtration prior to inoculation onto growth media or analysis using techniques such as PCR or immunoassays. The Portable Multi-use Automated Concentration System (PMACS) was designed for concentrating microorganisms from large volumes of water in the field and was assessed for enhancing surveillance of L. pneumophila at the Savannah River Site, SC. PMACS samples (100 L; n = 28) were collected from six towers between August 2010 and April 2011 with grab samples (500 ml; n = 56) being collected before and after each PMACS sample. All samples were analyzed for the presence of L. pneumophila by direct fluorescence immunoassay (DFA) using FITC-labeled monoclonal antibodies targeting serogroups 1, 2, 4 and 6. QPCR was utilized for detection of Legionella spp. in the same samples. Counts of L. pneumophila from DFA and of Legionella spp. from qPCR were normalized to cells/L tower water. Concentrations were similar between grab and PMACS samples collected throughout the study by DFA analysis (P = 0.4461; repeated measures ANOVA). The same trend was observed with qPCR. However, PMACS concentration proved advantageous over membrane filtration by providing larger volume, more representative samples of the cooling tower environment, which led to reduced variability among sampling events and increasing the probability of detection of low level targets. These data highlight the utility of the PMACS for enhanced surveillance of L. pneumophila by providing improved sampling of the cooling tower environment.

  9. Fast immunosensing technique to detect Legionella pneumophila in different natural and anthropogenic environments: comparative and collaborative trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Legionellosis is an uncommon form of pneumonia. After a clinical encounter, the necessary antibiotic treatment is available if the diagnosis is made early in the illness. Before the clinical encounter, early detection of the main pathogen involved, Legionella pneumophila, in hazardous environments is important in preventing infectious levels of this bacterium. In this study a qualitative test based on combined magnetic immunocapture and enzyme-immunoassay for the fast detection of Legionella pneumophila in water samples was compared with the standard method, in both comparative and collaborative trials. The test was based on the use of anti-Legionella pneumophila antibodies immobilized on magnetic microspheres. The final protocol included concentration by filtration, resuspension and immunomagnetic capture. The whole assay took less than 1 hour to complete. Results A comparative trial was performed against the standard culture method (ISO 11731) on both artificially and naturally contaminated water samples, for two matrices: chlorinated tap water and cooling tower water. Performance characteristics of the test used as screening with culture confirmation resulted in sensitivity, specificity, false positive, false negative, and efficiency of 96.6%, 100%, 0%, 3.4%, and 97.8%, respectively. The detection limit at the level under which the false negative rate increases to 50% (LOD50) was 93 colony forming units (CFU) in the volume examined for both tested matrices. The collaborative trial included twelve laboratories. Water samples spiked with certified reference materials were tested. In this study the coincidence level between the two methods was 95.8%. Conclusion Results demonstrate the applicability of this immunosensing technique to the rapid, simple, and efficient detection of Legionella pneumophila in water samples. This test is not based on microbial growth, so it could be used as a rapid screening technique for the detection of L. pneumophila in

  10. Open to Suggestion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Reading, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Contributors offer suggestions concerning parents as reading stimulators, book discussions, a test bank for the secondary school/college reading lab, standardized reading tests, television reading, plagiarism, vocabulary development, and book reports. (FL)

  11. [Therapy and suggestion].

    PubMed

    Barrucand, D; Paille, F

    1986-12-01

    Therapy and suggestion are closely related. That is clear for the ancient time: primitive medicine gives a good place to the Word. In plant, animal or mineral remedies, the suggestion is clearly preponderant. Towards the end of the 19th century, the "Ecole de Nancy" sets up a real theory of the suggestion, and Bernheim, its leader, bases hypnosis, then psychotherapy on this concept. Thereafter Coué will bring up the "conscious autosuggestion". Today, despite the progress of scientific medicine, the part of suggestion is still very important in medical therapy (with or without drugs), or in chirurgical therapy; this part is also very important in psychotherapies, whatever has been said in this field. This has to be known and used consciously in the doctor-patient relation, which is always essential in the therapeutic effectiveness.

  12. Interferon gamma-activated human monocytes downregulate transferrin receptors and inhibit the intracellular multiplication of Legionella pneumophila by limiting the availability of iron.

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, T F; Horwitz, M A

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the role of iron in the intracellular biology of Legionella pneumophila in human monocytes and in the effector arm of cell-mediated immune defense against this intracellular bacterial pathogen. To determine if L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication is iron dependent, we studied the effect of the iron chelator deferoxamine on L. pneumophila infection of monocytes. Deferoxamine at 15 microM completely inhibited L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication. The inhibitory effect of deferoxamine was reversed with equimolar iron-saturated transferrin but not apotransferrin. To examine the potential role of iron in monocyte activation, we investigated the influence of iron-saturated transferrin on L. pneumophila multiplication in IFN gamma-activated monocytes. Iron transferrin, but not apotransferrin, neutralized the capacity of activated monocytes to inhibit L. pneumophila multiplication. To explore a potential mechanism by which activated monocytes might limit the availability of intracellular iron, we examined transferrin receptor expression on nonactivated and activated monocytes cultured in vitro for 5 d. By fluorescence-activated flow cytometry, activated monocytes exhibited markedly fewer transferrin receptors than nonactivated monocytes. By Scatchard analysis of 125I-transferrin binding to monocytes, nonactivated monocytes had 38,300 +/- 12,700 (mean +/- SE) transferrin binding sites, whereas activated monocytes had 10,300 +/- 1,600, a reduction of 73%. Activated and nonactivated monocytes had a similar mean Kd (1.8 +/- 0.2 nM). This study demonstrates that (a) L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication is iron dependent; (b) activated monocytes inhibit L. pneumophila multiplication by limiting the availability of intracellular iron; and (c) transferrin receptors are downregulated on IFN gamma-activated monocytes. Images PMID:2496141

  13. Solution structure of the Legionella pneumophila Mip-rapamycin complex

    PubMed Central

    Ceymann, Andreas; Horstmann, Martin; Ehses, Philipp; Schweimer, Kristian; Paschke, Anne-Katrin; Steinert, Michael; Faber, Cornelius

    2008-01-01

    Background Legionella pneumphila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. A major virulence factor of the pathogen is the homodimeric surface protein Mip. It shows peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activty and is a receptor of FK506 and rapamycin, which both inhibit its enzymatic function. Insight into the binding process may be used for the design of novel Mip inhibitors as potential drugs against Legionnaires' disease. Results We have solved the solution structure of free Mip77–213 and the Mip77–213-rapamycin complex by NMR spectroscopy. Mip77–213 showed the typical FKBP-fold and only minor rearrangements upon binding of rapamycin. Apart from the configuration of a flexible hairpin loop, which is partly stabilized upon binding, the solution structure confirms the crystal structure. Comparisons to the structures of free FKBP12 and the FKBP12-rapamycin complex suggested an identical binding mode for both proteins. Conclusion The structural similarity of the Mip-rapamycin and FKBP12-rapamycin complexes suggests that FKBP12 ligands may be promising starting points for the design of novel Mip inhibitors. The search for a novel drug against Legionnaires' disease may therefore benefit from the large variety of known FKBP12 inhibitors. PMID:18366641

  14. Potential in-hospital modes of transmission of Legionella pneumophila. Demonstration experiments for dissemination by showers, humidifiers, and rinsing of ventilation bag apparatus.

    PubMed

    Woo, A H; Yu, V L; Goetz, A

    1986-04-01

    The mode of transmission of nosocomial legionellosis remains uncertain. Aerosolization of Legionella pneumophila by showers, humidifiers, and respiratory equipment rinsed in tap water was evaluated using plate-settling culture and air aspirator methods. All protocols simulated the actual hospital setting including use of humidifier equipment used in hospital patient rooms and water from faucets and showerheads in hospitals with nosocomial Legionnaires' disease. Protocols for humidifier and shower experiments mimicked the procedure actually used in hospitals by health care personnel. Showering failed to produce aerosols of L. pneumophila; however, portable humidifiers readily generated aerosols of L. pneumophila that disseminated throughout a two-bed patient room. Intensity of aerosolization directly correlated with the degree of L. pneumophila contamination of the tap water used to fill the humidifier. Rinsing of ventilation bag apparatus with tap water led to isolation of L. pneumophila from culture plates after the ventilation bags were squeezed. Thus, L. pneumophila could be aerosolized or directly instilled into a patient's bronchial tree following routine measures for cleaning ventilation bag apparatus with tap water. On the basis of these results, the use of humidifiers filled with tap water has been discontinued and sterile water is recommended for rinsing ventilation bag apparatus and tubing. PMID:3457525

  15. A few minor suggestions.

    PubMed

    Michael, J; Clark, J W

    2001-05-01

    We agree with almost all of the analysis in this excellent presentation of the molecular view of avoidance behavior. A few suggestions are made as follows: Referring to response-generated stimuli as ''readily observable" seems not quite right for the kinesthetic components of such stimuli, although their scientific legitimacy is not questioned. Interpreting response-generated stimuli as a form of positive reinforcement is contested, and an alternative interpretation is offered. A possibly simpler interpretation of the Sidman (1962) two-lever experiment is suggested. We question Dinsmoor's (2001) explanation for warning stimuli not being avoided, except for the reference to the weakness of third-order conditioning effects. A final question is raised regarding the nature of the variables that are responsible for the momentary evocation of the avoidance response.

  16. Comparison of the Legionella pneumophila population structure as determined by sequence-based typing and whole genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Legionella pneumophila is an opportunistic pathogen of humans where the source of infection is usually from contaminated man-made water systems. When an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease caused by L. pneumophila occurs, it is necessary to discover the source of infection. A seven allele sequence-based typing scheme (SBT) has been very successful in providing the means to attribute outbreaks of L. pneumophila to a particular source or sources. Particular sequence types described by this scheme are known to exhibit specific phenotypes. For instance some types are seen often in clinical cases but are rarely isolated from the environment and vice versa. Of those causing human disease some types are thought to be more likely to cause more severe disease. It is possible that the genetic basis for these differences are vertically inherited and associated with particular genetic lineages within the population. In order to provide a framework within which to test this hypothesis and others relating to the population biology of L. pneumophila, a set of genomes covering the known diversity of the organism is required. Results Firstly, this study describes a means to group L. pneumophila strains into pragmatic clusters, using a methodology that takes into consideration the genetic forces operating on the population. These clusters can be used as a standardised nomenclature, so those wishing to describe a group of strains can do so. Secondly, the clusters generated from the first part of the study were used to select strains rationally for whole genome sequencing (WGS). The data generated was used to compare phylogenies derived from SBT and WGS. In general the SBT sequence type (ST) accurately reflects the whole genome-based genotype. Where there are exceptions and recombination has resulted in the ST no longer reflecting the genetic lineage described by the whole genome sequence, the clustering technique employed detects these sequence types as being admixed

  17. A STUDY ON LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA, WATER CHEMISTRY, AND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS IN COOLING TOWERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.; Brigmon, R.

    2009-10-20

    Legionnaires disease is a pneumonia caused by the inhalation of the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. The majority of illnesses have been associated with cooling towers since these devices can harbor and disseminate the bacterium in the aerosolized mist generated by these systems. Historically, Savannah River Site (SRS) cooling towers have had occurrences of elevated levels of Legionella in all seasons of the year and in patterns that are difficult to predict. Since elevated Legionella in cooling tower water are a potential health concern a question has been raised as to the best control methodology. In this work we analyze available chemical, biological, and atmospheric data to determine the best method or key parameter for control. The SRS 4Q Industrial Hygiene Manual, 4Q-1203, 1 - G Cooling Tower Operation and the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program, states that 'Participation in the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program is MANDATORY for all operating cooling towers'. The resulting reports include L. pneumophila concentration information in cells/L. L. pneumophila concentrations >10{sup 7} cells/L are considered elevated and unsafe so action must be taken to reduce these densities. These remedial actions typically include increase biocide addition or 'shocking'. Sometimes additional actions are required if the problem persists including increase tower maintenance (e.g. cleaning). Evaluation of 14 SRS cooling towers, seven water quality parameters, and five Legionella serogroups over a three-plus year time frame demonstrated that cooling tower water Legionella densities varied widely though out this time period. In fact there was no one common consistent significant variable across all towers. The significant factors that did show up most frequently were related to suspended particulates, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen, not chlorine or bromine as might be expected. Analyses of atmospheric data showed that there were more frequent significant elevated Legionella

  18. New crystal forms of NTPDase1 from the bacterium Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Zebisch, Matthias; Schäfer, Petra; Lauble, Peter; Sträter, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases) are a large class of nucleotidases that hydrolyze the (γ/β)- and (β/α)-anhydride bonds of nucleoside triphosphates and diphosphates, respectively. NTPDases are found throughout the eukaryotic domain. In addition, a very small number of members can be found in bacteria, most of which live as parasites of eukaryotic hosts. NTPDases of intracellular and extracellular parasites are emerging as important regulators for the survival of the parasite. To deepen the knowledge of the structure and function of this enzyme class, recombinant production of the NTPDase1 from the bacterium Legionella pneumophila has been established. The protein could be crystallized in six crystal forms, of which one has been described previously. The crystals diffracted to resolutions of between 1.4 and 2.5 Å. Experimental phases determined by a sulfur SAD experiment using an orthorhombic crystal form produced an interpretable electron-density map. PMID:23519799

  19. SPR based immunosensor for detection of Legionella pneumophila in water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrico, De Lorenzis; Manera, Maria G.; Montagna, Giovanni; Cimaglia, Fabio; Chiesa, Maurizio; Poltronieri, Palmiro; Santino, Angelo; Rella, Roberto

    2013-05-01

    Detection of legionellae by water sampling is an important factor in epidemiological investigations of Legionnaires' disease and its prevention. To avoid labor-intensive problems with conventional methods, an alternative, highly sensitive and simple method is proposed for detecting L. pneumophila in aqueous samples. A compact Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) instrumentation prototype, provided with proper microfluidics tools, is built. The developed immunosensor is capable of dynamically following the binding between antigens and the corresponding antibody molecules immobilized on the SPR sensor surface. A proper immobilization strategy is used in this work that makes use of an important efficient step aimed at the orientation of antibodies onto the sensor surface. The feasibility of the integration of SPR-based biosensing setups with microfluidic technologies, resulting in a low-cost and portable biosensor is demonstrated.

  20. Investigation of a cluster of Legionella pneumophila infections among staff at a federal research facility.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, J L; Polyak, C S; Kolavic, S A; Brokaw, J K; Birkmire, S E; Valcik, J A

    2001-09-01

    An epidemiologic investigation was conducted in response to a case of Legionella pneumonia in a scientist working at a federal research facility. A survey of 80 individuals working at the facility revealed that 13 (16%) had sustained prior infections with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lps1) as measured by anti-Lps1 antibodies. Antibody-positive individuals' offices clustered around an air cooling tower and a heating, ventilation, and air conditioner unit (odds ratio = 5). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, individuals of non-white race (adjusted odds ratio = 8) and smokers (adjusted odds ratio = 36) were also found to be at higher risk of past infection. Marked Legionella growth was noted in the cooling tower's water reservoir and potable hot water system, where suboptimal operating temperatures were noted. Subsequent increase in the hot water temperatures as well as a complete renovation of the affected building's air handling and potable water systems led to a reduction in Legionella species colonization. PMID:11569435

  1. Genetic variability in environmental isolates of Legionella pneumophila from Comunidad Valenciana (Spain).

    PubMed

    Coscollá, Mireia; Gosalbes, María José; Catalán, Vicente; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2006-06-01

    Legionella pneumophila is associated to recurrent outbreaks in several Comunidad Valenciana (Spain) localities, especially in Alcoi, where social and climatic conditions seem to provide an excellent environment for bacterial growth. We have analysed the nucleotide sequences of three loci from 25 environmental isolates from Alcoi and nearby locations sampled over 3 years. The analysis of these isolates has revealed a substantial level of genetic variation, with consistent patterns of variability across loci, and comparable to that found in a large, European-wide sampling of clinical isolates. Among the tree loci studied, fliC showed the highest level of nucleotide diversity. The analysis of isolates sampled in different years revealed a clear differentiation, with samples from 2001 being significantly distinct from those obtained in 2002 and 2003. Furthermore, although linkage disequilibrium measures indicate a clonal nature for population structure in this sample, the presence of some recombination events cannot be ruled out.

  2. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 subgrouping by monoclonal antibodies--an epidemiological tool.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, I. D.; Tobin, J. O.; Dennis, P. J.; Brown, W.; Newnham, R.; Kurtz, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A panel of 10 monoclonal antibodies was used to subgroup 326 strains of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. All but two strains could be classified into three major subgroups named after their representative strains Pontiac 1, Olda and Bellingham 1. Of the 50 isolates from patients, 44 representing 32 separate incidents were of the Pontiac subgroup. This subgroup was also found in 16 of 18 buildings epidemiologically associated with Legionnaires' Disease. In contrast, strains of the Olda subgroup predominated in buildings where no infections had occurred. In 9 of the 11 incidents where isolates were available from at least one patient as well as from the suspected environmental source, the monoclonal antibody reaction patterns of strains from patients were identical to those of one or more of their environmental counterparts. PMID:3905954

  3. Analysis of population structure among Korean and Japanese Legionella pneumophila isolates using hsp60 sequences.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Geun; Kim, Byoung Jun; Kim, Hee-Youn; Yun, Yeo-Jun; Ko, Kwan Soo; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kook, Yoon-Hoh

    2012-08-01

    The population structure of Korean (150 strains) and Japanese (92 strains) Legionella pneumophila isolates along with 18 reference strains were investigated using hsp60 sequence (1647 bp) analysis. Twelve clonal subgroups (hsP-I to hsP-X and hsF-I and hsF-II) were designated on the hsp60 tree, inferred from representative sequences using the neighbor-joining method. Some of the isolates showed unique subgroups depending on the source of isolates, including hsP-I, hsF-I, and hsF-II from cooling tower water, and subgroups hsP-VIII and hsP-X from circulating hot water bath. These subgroups may be useful for epidemiological studies to chase or specify sources of infection in Korea and Japan. PMID:22672106

  4. [An outbreak of Pontiac fever due to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 7. I. Clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Mori, M; Hoshino, K; Sonoda, H; Yoshida, H; Yabuuchi, E; Yamashiro, Y; Koide, M; Saito, A; Kishimoto, T; Furuhata, K

    1995-06-01

    In August 1994, an epidemic of acute febrile illness occurred at the Education Center Building of a company in Shibuya-ku, Tokyo. All 43 trainees attended in two groups and 2 staff members of the Center fell ill. The 45 patients came to one of our hospitals in two groups, and 35 patients were treated. The patients were 4 males and 31 females, and the average age was 29.0 years. The duration until falling ill was 36 to 90 hours after entering the Center. Symptoms were fever, lumbago arthralgia, headache, dyspnea, general fatigue, etc. Physical examination revealed slightly injected mucosa of the pharynx in a patient who complained of a sore throat. On laboratory examination, leukocytosis with a left shift of the nucleus and elevation of serum CRP levels were found. Erythromycin (600 mg, daily) and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were given by mouth to almost every patient. Two patients were hospitalized. The illness was self-limited, generally lasting from two to five days. Strains of legionellae isolated from the water of the cooling tower located at the top of the Center, were identified as L. pneumophila serogroup 7. Since seroconversion in a patient against the cooling tower strain from 1:16 to 1:256 was determined and the clinical courses agreed with the definition of Pontiac fever by Glick et al, we concluded that the epidemic was an outbreak of Pontiac fever due to L. pneumophila serogroup 7. Pontiac fever is considered to be one of the community-acquired diseases. Thus, we have to note that Pontiac fever may be misdiagnosed as we examine patients who complain of the symptoms noted above.

  5. Passage through Tetrahymena tropicalis triggers a rapid morphological differentiation in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Gary; Berk, Sharon G; Garduño, Elizabeth; Ortiz-Jiménez, Marco A; Garduño, Rafael A

    2008-12-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila follows a developmental cycle in which replicative forms (RFs) differentiate into infectious stationary-phase forms (SPFs) in vitro and in vivo into highly infectious mature intracellular forms (MIFs). The potential relationships between SPFs and MIFs remain uncharacterized. Previously we determined that L. pneumophila survives, but does not replicate, while it transiently resides (for 1 to 2 h) in food vacuoles of the freshwater ciliate Tetrahymena tropicalis before being expelled as legionellae-laden pellets. We report here that SPFs have the ability to rapidly (<1 h) and directly (in the absence of bacterial replication) differentiate into MIFs while in transit through T. tropicalis, indicating that SPFs and MIFs constitute a differentiation continuum. Mutant RFs lacking the sigma factor gene rpoS, or the response regulator gene letA, were unable to produce normal SPFs in vitro and did not fully differentiate into MIFs in vivo, further supporting the existence of a common mechanism of differentiation shared by SPFs and MIFs. Mutants with a defective Dot/Icm system morphologically differentiated into MIFs while in transit through T. tropicalis. Therefore, T. tropicalis has allowed us to unequivocally conclude that SPFs can directly differentiate into MIFs and that the Dot/Icm system is not required for differentiation, two events that could not be experimentally addressed before. The Tetrahymena model can now be exploited to study the signals that trigger MIF development in vivo and is the only replication-independent model reported to date that allows the differentiation of Dot/Icm mutants into MIFs. PMID:18805971

  6. Influence of iron-limited continuous culture on physiology and virulence of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    James, B W; Mauchline, W S; Fitzgeorge, R B; Dennis, P J; Keevil, C W

    1995-11-01

    A virulent strain of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, subgroup Pontiac, was grown in continuous culture at a constant growth rate under iron-replete and iron-limited conditions. Iron limitation was achieved by the removal of ferrous sulfate and hemin from the chemically defined medium. Residual contaminating iron, 0.45 microM, was sufficient to support iron-limited growth. Typical iron-replete cultures metabolized 3.3 microM iron. Serine provided the principal source of carbon and energy for both cultures, although iron-replete cultures also depleted a number of other amino acids. There was a 40% decrease in culture biomass under iron-restricted conditions. Iron limitation did not significantly affect carbohydrate metabolism, with the molar growth yield for carbon (Ycarbon) comparable for both cultures. However, under iron-limited conditions a sixfold increase in Yiron correlated with a significant decrease in the iron content of the biomass, as the culture utilized the available iron more efficiently. Highly pleomorphic iron-replete cultures became uniform cultures of short fine rods when adapted to iron-deficient conditions. In addition to the morphological and physiological changes, iron limitation had a critical effect on culture virulence. The virulence of this strain was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced when the culture was subjected to iron-limited conditions. This phenomenon was reversible, with a significant increase in culture virulence upon reversion to iron-replete conditions. When compared in an in vitro macrophage assay, the number of culturable avirulent iron-limited cells located intracellularly after infection was significantly lower than for the virulent replete and control cultures. These results further support the role of environmental parameters in regulating the virulence of L. pneumophila. PMID:7591051

  7. First isolation of Legionella species, including L. pneumophila serogroup 1, in Greek potting soils: possible importance for public health.

    PubMed

    Velonakis, E N; Kiousi, I M; Koutis, C; Papadogiannakis, E; Babatsikou, F; Vatopoulos, A

    2010-06-01

    A total of 21 Legionella isolates were recovered from six out of 22 samples of potting soil from the Athens area, Greece. Legionella pneumophila (serogroups 1 and 2-15) and species and serotypes included in the group of L. longbeachae serogroups 1 and 2, L. bozemanii serogroups 1 and 2, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. jordanis, L. micdadei and L. anisa were isolated on BCYEalpha agar containing cysteine, GVPC and natamycin and on BCYEalpha agar containing cysteine, Wadowsky Yee supplement and natamycin. The bacterial load was 4000-120 000 CFU/g of potting soil. The isolation of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 from Greek potting soils is reported here for the first time.

  8. Classification of the Legionnaires' disease bacterium: Legionella pneumophila, genus novum, species nova, of the family Legionellaceae, familia nova.

    PubMed

    Brenner, D J; Steigerwalt, A G; McDade, J E

    1979-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) relatedness was used to classify strains of the Legionnaires' disease (LD) bacterium. These DNA comparisons showed that all strains of the LD bacterium were members of the same species. Included were strains isolated from the environment and strains with three different O-antigens. The DNA from the LD bacterium was not significantly related to DNA from any other group of bacteria that was tested. Biochemical data, growth characteristics, and guanine-plus-cytosine ratios were used to rule out the possibility that the LD bacterium was significantly related to members of genera whose DNA was not tested. In view of these data we propose that the LD bacterium be named Legionella pneumophila species nova, the type species of Legionella, genus novum. The type strain of L. pneumophila is Philadelphia 1.

  9. Detection of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila in water samples of Spain by specific real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Grúas, Cristina; Llambi, Silvia; Arruga, M Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the primary cause of the legionellosis diseases (90 %) (Yu et al. in J Infect Dis 186:127-128, 2002; Doleans et al. in J Clin Microbiol 42:458-460, 2004; Den Boer et al. in Clin Microbiol Infect 14:459-466, 2008). In this study, methodologies based on molecular biology were developed in order to provide a quick diagnosis of the bacterial presence in water samples of Spain. Multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were realized to target the 16S rRNA and macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) genes of, respectively, Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila including in the design of an internal control. The results obtained by the culture and the gene amplification methods agreed in 94.44 % for the 16S rRNA gene, and a concordance of 66.67 % of the cases was obtained for the mip gene.

  10. Crystal structures of Apo and GMP bound hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase from Legionella pneumophila and the implications in gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nannan; Gong, Xiaojian; Lu, Min; Chen, Xiaofang; Qin, Ximing; Ge, Honghua

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) (EC 2.4.2.8) reversibly catalyzes the transfer of the 5-phophoribosyl group from 5-phosphoribosyl-alpha-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to hypoxanthine or guanine to form inosine monophosphate (IMP) or guanosine monophosphate (GMP) in the purine salvage pathway. To investigate the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme in the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila, we determined the crystal structures of the L. pneumophila HGPRT (LpHGPRT) both in its apo-form and in complex with GMP. The structures reveal that LpHGPRT comprises a core domain and a hood domain which are packed together to create a cavity for GMP-binding and the enzymatic catalysis. The binding of GMP induces conformational changes of the stable loop II. This new binding site is closely related to the Gout arthritis-linked human HGPRT mutation site (Ser103Arg). Finally, these structures of LpHGPRT provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of HGPRT.

  11. Breast Cancer Screening in the Era of Density Notification Legislation: Summary of 2014 Massachusetts Experience and Suggestion of An Evidence-Based Management Algorithm by Multi-disciplinary Expert Panel

    PubMed Central

    Freer, Phoebe E.; Slanetz, Priscilla J.; Haas, Jennifer S.; Tung, Nadine M.; Hughes, Kevin S.; Armstrong, Katrina; Semine, A. Alan; Troyan, Susan L.; Birdwell, Robyn L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Stemming from breast density notification legislation in Massachusetts effective 2015, we sought to develop a collaborative evidence-based approach to density notification that could be used by practitioners across the state. Our goal was to develop an evidence-based consensus management algorithm to help patients and health care providers follow best practices to implement a coordinated, evidence-based, cost-effective, sustainable practice and to standardize care in recommendations for supplemental screening. Methods We formed the Massachusetts Breast Risk Education and Assessment Task Force (MA-BREAST) a multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary panel of expert radiologists, surgeons, primary care physicians, and oncologists to develop a collaborative approach to density notification legislation. Using evidence-based data from the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER), the Cochrane review, National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines, American Cancer Society (ACS) recommendations, and American College of Radiology (ACR) appropriateness criteria, the group collaboratively developed an evidence-based best-practices algorithm. Results The expert consensus algorithm uses breast density as one element in the risk stratification to determine the need for supplemental screening. Women with dense breasts and otherwise low risk (<15% lifetime risk), do not routinely require supplemental screening per the expert consensus. Women of high risk (>20% lifetime) should consider supplemental screening MRI in addition to routine mammography regardless of breast density. Conclusion We report the development of the multi-disciplinary collaborative approach to density notification. We propose a risk stratification algorithm to assess personal level of risk to determine the need for supplemental screening for an individual woman. PMID:26290416

  12. Improved facility and sensitivity in the use of guinea pigs for the isolation of Legionella pneumophila from cooling tower water

    SciTech Connect

    Leinbach, E.D.; Winkler, H.H.; Wood, D.O.; Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    The established criteria for the determination of the optimum time for the sacrifice of guinea pigs inoculated with samples of cooling tower water were found to be inadequate for the detection of low levels of Legionella pneumophila. By ignoring the requirement for fever and by sequentially sacrificing the infected guinea pigs on days 3 through 5 postinoculation, we simplified the procedure, and the sensitivity of detection was improved a great deal.

  13. The Structure of RalF, an ADP-Ribosylation Factor Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor from Legionella pneumophila, Reveals the Presence of a Cap over the Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Amor,J.; Swails, J.; Zhu, X.; Roy, C.; Nagai, H.; Ingmundson, A.; Cheng, X.; Kahn, R.

    2005-01-01

    The Legionella pneumophila protein RalF is secreted into host cytosol via the Dot/Icm type IV transporter where it acts to recruit ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) to pathogen-containing phagosomes in the establishment of a replicative organelle. The presence in RalF of the Sec7 domain, present in all Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors, has suggested that recruitment of Arf is an early step in pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of RalF and of the isolated Sec7 domain and found that RalF is made up of two domains. The Sec7 domain is homologous to mammalian Sec7 domains. The C-terminal domain forms a cap over the active site in the Sec7 domain and contains a conserved folding motif, previously observed in adaptor subunits of vesicle coat complexes. The importance of the capping domain and of the glutamate in the 'glutamic finger,' conserved in all Sec7 domains, to RalF functions was examined using three different assays. These data highlight the functional importance of domains other than Sec7 in Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors to biological activities and suggest novel mechanisms of regulation of those activities.

  14. Cross-reactions in IgM ELISA tests to Legionella pneumophila sg1 and Bordetella pertussis among children suspected of legionellosis; potential impact of vaccination against pertussis?

    PubMed

    Pancer, Katarzyna Wanda

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was preliminary evaluation of IgM cross-reaction in sera collected from children hospitalized because of suspected legionellosis. Sera with positive IgM results to L. pneumophila sgs1-7, B. pertussis or with simultaneous detection of IgM antibodies to L. pneumophila sgs1-7 and B. pertussis, or IgM to L. pneumophila sgs1-7 and M. pneumoniae in routine tests, were selected. In total, an adapted pre-absorption test was used for the serological confirmation of legionellosis in the sera of 19 children suspected of legionellosis, and also in 3 adult persons with confirmed Legionnaires' disease. Sera were pre-absorbed with antigens of L. pneumophila sg1, B. pertussis or both, and tested by ELISA tests. The reduction of IgM antibody level by pre-absorption with antigen/antigens was determined. Reduction of anti-Lpsgs1-7 IgM by pre-absorption with L.pneumophila sg1 antigen ranged from 1.5 to 80, and reduction of anti-Bp IgM by pre-absorption with B. pertussis ranged from 2.0 to 23.8. Reduction by both antigens varied depending on the age of the patients: among children <4 yrs.old, the reduction of anti-B. pertussis IgM by both antigens was higher than for B. pertussis antigen alone. Based on the high difference (≥ 2 times) between reduction by L.pneumophila sg1 and by B. pertussis antigen, legionellosis was confirmed in 8/19 children. The majority of them also indicated IgM positive/borderline results for B. pertussis or M.pneumoniae in routine ELISA tests. As a preliminary, we posed a hypothesis of a potential impact of an anti-pertussis vaccination on the results obtained in anti-L. pneumophila ELISA IgM tests among young children.

  15. Dot/Icm Effector Translocation by Legionella longbeachae Creates a Replicative Vacuole Similar to That of Legionella pneumophila despite Translocation of Distinct Effector Repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Rebecca E.; Newton, Patrice; Latomanski, Eleanor A.

    2015-01-01

    Legionella organisms are environmental bacteria and accidental human pathogens that can cause severe pneumonia, termed Legionnaires' disease. These bacteria replicate within a pathogen-derived vacuole termed the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Our understanding of the development and dynamics of this vacuole is based on extensive analysis of Legionella pneumophila. Here, we have characterized the Legionella longbeachae replicative vacuole (longbeachae-LCV) and demonstrated that, despite important genomic differences, key features of the replicative LCV are comparable to those of the LCV of L. pneumophila (pneumophila-LCV). We constructed a Dot/Icm-deficient strain by deleting dotB and demonstrated the inability of this mutant to replicate inside THP-1 cells. L. longbeachae does not enter THP-1 cells as efficiently as L. pneumophila, and this is reflected in the observation that translocation of BlaM-RalFLLO (where RalFLLO is the L. longbeachae homologue of RalF) into THP-1 cells by the L. longbeachae Dot/Icm system is less efficient than that by L. pneumophila. This difference is negated in A549 cells where L. longbeachae and L. pneumophila infect with similar entry dynamics. A β-lactamase assay was employed to demonstrate the translocation of a novel family of proteins, the Rab-like effector (Rle) proteins. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that these proteins enter the host cell during infection and display distinct subcellular localizations, with RleA and RleC present on the longbeachae-LCV. We observed that the host Rab GTPase, Rab1, and the v-SNARE Sec22b are also recruited to the longbeachae-LCV during the early stages of infection, coinciding with the LCV avoiding endocytic maturation. These studies further our understanding of the L. longbeachae replicative vacuole, highlighting phenotypic similarities to the vacuole of L. pneumophila as well as unique aspects of LCV biology. PMID:26216429

  16. Dot/Icm Effector Translocation by Legionella longbeachae Creates a Replicative Vacuole Similar to That of Legionella pneumophila despite Translocation of Distinct Effector Repertoires.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rebecca E; Newton, Patrice; Latomanski, Eleanor A; Newton, Hayley J

    2015-10-01

    Legionella organisms are environmental bacteria and accidental human pathogens that can cause severe pneumonia, termed Legionnaires' disease. These bacteria replicate within a pathogen-derived vacuole termed the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Our understanding of the development and dynamics of this vacuole is based on extensive analysis of Legionella pneumophila. Here, we have characterized the Legionella longbeachae replicative vacuole (longbeachae-LCV) and demonstrated that, despite important genomic differences, key features of the replicative LCV are comparable to those of the LCV of L. pneumophila (pneumophila-LCV). We constructed a Dot/Icm-deficient strain by deleting dotB and demonstrated the inability of this mutant to replicate inside THP-1 cells. L. longbeachae does not enter THP-1 cells as efficiently as L. pneumophila, and this is reflected in the observation that translocation of BlaM-RalFLLO (where RalFLLO is the L. longbeachae homologue of RalF) into THP-1 cells by the L. longbeachae Dot/Icm system is less efficient than that by L. pneumophila. This difference is negated in A549 cells where L. longbeachae and L. pneumophila infect with similar entry dynamics. A β-lactamase assay was employed to demonstrate the translocation of a novel family of proteins, the Rab-like effector (Rle) proteins. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that these proteins enter the host cell during infection and display distinct subcellular localizations, with RleA and RleC present on the longbeachae-LCV. We observed that the host Rab GTPase, Rab1, and the v-SNARE Sec22b are also recruited to the longbeachae-LCV during the early stages of infection, coinciding with the LCV avoiding endocytic maturation. These studies further our understanding of the L. longbeachae replicative vacuole, highlighting phenotypic similarities to the vacuole of L. pneumophila as well as unique aspects of LCV biology.

  17. A bacterial ecto-triphosphate diphosphohydrolase similar to human CD39 is essential for intracellular multiplication of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Sansom, Fiona M; Newton, Hayley J; Crikis, Sandra; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Cowan, Peter J; d'Apice, Anthony J F; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2007-08-01

    As part of its pathogenesis, Legionella pneumophila persists within human alveolar macrophages in non-acidified organelles that do not mature into phagolysosomes. Two L. pneumophila genes, lpg0971 and lpg1905, are predicted to encode ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (ecto-NTPDases) that share sequence similarity with human CD39/NTPDase1. The predicted products possess five apyrase conserved domains that are typical of eukaryotic ecto-NTPDases. In this study, we found that an lpg1905 mutant was recovered in lower numbers from macrophages, alveolar epithelial cells and the amoeba, Hartmannella vermiformis compared with wild-type L. pneumophila and an lpg0971 mutant. Similar to human CD39, recombinant purified Lpg1905 exhibited ATPase and ADPase activity and possessed the ability to inhibit platelet aggregation. Mutation of a conserved Glu159 residue that is essential for CD39 activity inhibited ATPase and ADPase activity of Lpg1905. In addition, enzyme activity was inhibited in the presence of the specific ecto-NTPDase inhibitor, ARL67156. The entry and replication defect of the lpg1905 mutant was reversed upon transcomplementation with lpg1905 but not lpg1905E159A encoding an enzymatically inactive form of the protein. Although several protozoan parasites exhibit ecto-NTPDase activity, including Toxoplasma gondii, Trichomonas vaginalis and Trypanosoma cruzi, this is the first time a bacterial ecto-NTPDase has been implicated in virulence.

  18. Comparative assessment of chlorine, heat, ozone, and UV light for killing Legionella pneumophila within a model plumbing system

    SciTech Connect

    Muraca, P.; Stout, J.E.; Yu, V.L.

    1987-02-01

    Nosocomial Legionnaires disease can be acquired by exposure to the organism from the hospital water distribution system. As a result, many hospitals have instituted eradication procedures, including hypercholorination and thermal eradication. We compared the efficacy of ozonation, UV light, hyperchlorination, and heat eradication using a model plumbing system constructed of copper piping, brass spigots, Plexiglas reservoir, electric hot water tank, and a pump. Legionella pneumophila was added to the system at 10(7) CFU/ml. Each method was tested under three conditions; (i) nonturbid water at 25 degrees C, (ii) turbid water at 25 degrees C, and (iii) nonturbid water at 43 degrees C. UV light and heat killed L. pneumophila most rapidly and required minimal maintenance. Both UV light and heat (60 degrees C) produced a 5 log kill in less than 1 h. In contrast, both chlorine and ozone required 5 h of exposure to produce a 5 log decrease. Neither turbidity nor the higher temperature of 43 degrees C impaired the efficacy of any of the disinfectant methods. Surprisingly, higher temperature enhanced the disinfecting efficacy of chlorine. However, higher temperature accelerated the decomposition of the chlorine residual such that an additional 120% volume of chlorine was required. All four methods proved efficacious in eradicating L. pneumophila from a model plumbing system.

  19. Effectiveness of 1-bromo-3-chloro-5,5-dimethylhydantoin against Legionella pneumophila in a cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Harvey, R.S.

    1984-06-01

    Cooling towers are considered to be man-made amplifiers of Legionella spp. Thus, the proper maintenance and choice of biocides is important. The only biocidal measure that has thus far been shown to be effective in field tests is the judicious use of chlorination. Perturbation studies with 1-bromo-3-chloro-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (Bromicide; Great Lakes Chemical Corporation, West Lafayette, Indiana) (BCD) were conducted on an industrial cooling tower shown to contain Legionella pneumophila. At the concentrations recommended by the manufacturer, neither the density nor the activity of L. pneumophila was affected. At concentrations greater than 2l0 ppm (2.0 ..mu..g/ml) free of residual, BCD was not effective in reducing L. pneumophila to source water concentrations, nor was it effective in reducing the 2-p-iodophenyl-3-p-nitrophenyl-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride activity of the bacterium in situ. The data indicate that at concentrations up to 2.0 ppm, BCD is not effective in these tower studies.

  20. Comparative assessment of chlorine, heat, ozone, and UV light for killing Legionella pneumophila within a model plumbing system.

    PubMed

    Muraca, P; Stout, J E; Yu, V L

    1987-02-01

    Nosocomial Legionnaires disease can be acquired by exposure to the organism from the hospital water distribution system. As a result, many hospitals have instituted eradication procedures, including hypercholorination and thermal eradication. We compared the efficacy of ozonation, UV light, hyperchlorination, and heat eradication using a model plumbing system constructed of copper piping, brass spigots, Plexiglas reservoir, electric hot water tank, and a pump. Legionella pneumophila was added to the system at 10(7) CFU/ml. Each method was tested under three conditions; (i) nonturbid water at 25 degrees C, (ii) turbid water at 25 degrees C, and (iii) nonturbid water at 43 degrees C. UV light and heat killed L. pneumophila most rapidly and required minimal maintenance. Both UV light and heat (60 degrees C) produced a 5 log kill in less than 1 h. In contrast, both chlorine and ozone required 5 h of exposure to produce a 5 log decrease. Neither turbidity nor the higher temperature of 43 degrees C impaired the efficacy of any of the disinfectant methods. Surprisingly, higher temperature enhanced the disinfecting efficacy of chlorine. However, higher temperature accelerated the decomposition of the chlorine residual such that an additional 120% volume of chlorine was required. All four methods proved efficacious in eradicating L. pneumophila from a model plumbing system.

  1. Chemotaxis for enhanced immobilization of Escherichia coli and Legionella pneumophila on biofunctionalized surfaces of GaAs.

    PubMed

    Hassen, Walid M; Sanyal, Hashimita; Hammood, Manar; Moumanis, Khalid; Frost, Eric H; Dubowski, Jan J

    2016-06-20

    The authors have investigated the effect of chemotaxis on immobilization of bacteria on the surface of biofunctionalized GaAs (001) samples. Escherichia coli K12 bacteria were employed to provide a proof-of-concept of chemotaxis-enhanced bacterial immobilization, and then, these results were confirmed using Legionella pneumophila. The recognition layer was based on a self-assembled monolayer of thiol functionalized with specific antibodies directed toward E. coli or L. pneumophila, together with the enzyme beta-galactosidase (β-gal). The authors hypothesized that this enzyme together with its substrate lactose would produce a gradient of glucose which would attract bacteria toward the biochip surface. The chemotaxis effect was monitored by comparing the number of bacteria bound to the biochip surface with and without attractant. The authors have observed that β-gal plus lactose enhanced the immobilization of bacteria on our biochips with a higher effect at low bacterial concentrations. At 100 and 10 bacteria/ml, respectively, for E. coli and L. pneumophila, the authors observed up to 11 and 8 times more bacteria bound to biochip surfaces assisted with the chemotaxis effect in comparison to biochips without chemotaxis. At 10(4) bacteria/ml, the immobilization enhancement rate did not exceed two times.

  2. Comparative assessment of chlorine, heat, ozone, and UV light for killing Legionella pneumophila within a model plumbing system.

    PubMed

    Muraca, P; Stout, J E; Yu, V L

    1987-02-01

    Nosocomial Legionnaires disease can be acquired by exposure to the organism from the hospital water distribution system. As a result, many hospitals have instituted eradication procedures, including hypercholorination and thermal eradication. We compared the efficacy of ozonation, UV light, hyperchlorination, and heat eradication using a model plumbing system constructed of copper piping, brass spigots, Plexiglas reservoir, electric hot water tank, and a pump. Legionella pneumophila was added to the system at 10(7) CFU/ml. Each method was tested under three conditions; (i) nonturbid water at 25 degrees C, (ii) turbid water at 25 degrees C, and (iii) nonturbid water at 43 degrees C. UV light and heat killed L. pneumophila most rapidly and required minimal maintenance. Both UV light and heat (60 degrees C) produced a 5 log kill in less than 1 h. In contrast, both chlorine and ozone required 5 h of exposure to produce a 5 log decrease. Neither turbidity nor the higher temperature of 43 degrees C impaired the efficacy of any of the disinfectant methods. Surprisingly, higher temperature enhanced the disinfecting efficacy of chlorine. However, higher temperature accelerated the decomposition of the chlorine residual such that an additional 120% volume of chlorine was required. All four methods proved efficacious in eradicating L. pneumophila from a model plumbing system. PMID:3566272

  3. Prevalence of mip virulence gene and PCR-base sequence typing of Legionella pneumophila from cooling water systems of two cities in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ahmadrajabi, Roya; Shakibaie, Mohammad Reza; Iranmanesh, Zahra; Mollaei, Hamid Reza; Sobhanipoor, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-07-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the primary respiratory pathogen and mostly transmitted to human through water cooling systems and cause mild to severe pneumonia with high mortality rate especially in elderly both in hospitals and community. However, current Legionella risk assessments may be compromised by uncertainties in Legionella detection methods. Here, we investigated the presence of L. pneumophila mip gene in water samples collected from different hospitals cooling towers, nursing homes and building/hotels water coolants from two geographical locations of Iran (Kerman and Bam cities) during summer season of 2015 by both nested and real-time PCR methods. Analysis of the 128 water samples for presence of the mip gene by nested-PCR revealed, 18 (23%) positive cases in Kerman and 7(14%) in Bam. However, when samples were tested by real-time PCR, we identified 4 more new cases of L. pneumophila in the hospitals as well as nursing homes water systems that were missed by nested-PCR. The highest rate of contamination was detected in water obtained from hospitals cooling towers in both the cities (p≤0.05). Dendrogram analysis and clonal relationship by PCR-base sequence typing (SBT) of the L. pneumophila genomic DNAs in Kerman water samples showed close clonal similarities among the isolates, in contrast, isolates identified from Bam city demonstrated two fingerprint patterns. The clones from hospital water samples were more related to the L. pneumophila serogroup- 1. PMID:27028760

  4. Prevalence of mip virulence gene and PCR-base sequence typing of Legionella pneumophila from cooling water systems of two cities in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ahmadrajabi, Roya; Shakibaie, Mohammad Reza; Iranmanesh, Zahra; Mollaei, Hamid Reza; Sobhanipoor, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-07-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the primary respiratory pathogen and mostly transmitted to human through water cooling systems and cause mild to severe pneumonia with high mortality rate especially in elderly both in hospitals and community. However, current Legionella risk assessments may be compromised by uncertainties in Legionella detection methods. Here, we investigated the presence of L. pneumophila mip gene in water samples collected from different hospitals cooling towers, nursing homes and building/hotels water coolants from two geographical locations of Iran (Kerman and Bam cities) during summer season of 2015 by both nested and real-time PCR methods. Analysis of the 128 water samples for presence of the mip gene by nested-PCR revealed, 18 (23%) positive cases in Kerman and 7(14%) in Bam. However, when samples were tested by real-time PCR, we identified 4 more new cases of L. pneumophila in the hospitals as well as nursing homes water systems that were missed by nested-PCR. The highest rate of contamination was detected in water obtained from hospitals cooling towers in both the cities (p≤0.05). Dendrogram analysis and clonal relationship by PCR-base sequence typing (SBT) of the L. pneumophila genomic DNAs in Kerman water samples showed close clonal similarities among the isolates, in contrast, isolates identified from Bam city demonstrated two fingerprint patterns. The clones from hospital water samples were more related to the L. pneumophila serogroup- 1.

  5. Total and Viable Legionella pneumophila Cells in Hot and Natural Waters as Measured by Immunofluorescence-Based Assays and Solid-Phase Cytometry ▿†

    PubMed Central

    Parthuisot, N.; Binet, M.; Touron-Bodilis, A.; Pougnard, C.; Lebaron, P.; Baudart, J.

    2011-01-01

    A new method was developed for the rapid and sensitive detection of viable Legionella pneumophila. The method combines specific immunofluorescence (IF) staining using monoclonal antibodies with a bacterial viability marker (ChemChrome V6 cellular esterase activity marker) by means of solid-phase cytometry (SPC). IF methods were applied to the detection and enumeration of both the total and viable L. pneumophila cells in water samples. The sensitivity of the IF methods coupled to SPC was 34 cells liter−1, and the reproducibility was good, with the coefficient of variation generally falling below 30%. IF methods were applied to the enumeration of total and viable L. pneumophila cells in 46 domestic hot water samples as well as in cooling tower water and natural water samples, such as thermal spring water and freshwater samples. Comparison with standard plate counts showed that (i) the total direct counts were always higher than the plate counts and (ii) the viable counts were higher than or close to the plate counts. With domestic hot waters, when the IF assay was combined with the viability test, SPC detected up to 3.4 × 103 viable but nonculturable L. pneumophila cells per liter. These direct IF methods could be a powerful tool for high-frequency monitoring of domestic hot waters or for investigating the occurrence of viable L. pneumophila in both man-made water systems and environmental water samples. PMID:21742913

  6. Total and viable Legionella pneumophila cells in hot and natural waters as measured by immunofluorescence-based assays and solid-phase cytometry.

    PubMed

    Parthuisot, N; Binet, M; Touron-Bodilis, A; Pougnard, C; Lebaron, P; Baudart, J

    2011-09-01

    A new method was developed for the rapid and sensitive detection of viable Legionella pneumophila. The method combines specific immunofluorescence (IF) staining using monoclonal antibodies with a bacterial viability marker (ChemChrome V6 cellular esterase activity marker) by means of solid-phase cytometry (SPC). IF methods were applied to the detection and enumeration of both the total and viable L. pneumophila cells in water samples. The sensitivity of the IF methods coupled to SPC was 34 cells liter(-1), and the reproducibility was good, with the coefficient of variation generally falling below 30%. IF methods were applied to the enumeration of total and viable L. pneumophila cells in 46 domestic hot water samples as well as in cooling tower water and natural water samples, such as thermal spring water and freshwater samples. Comparison with standard plate counts showed that (i) the total direct counts were always higher than the plate counts and (ii) the viable counts were higher than or close to the plate counts. With domestic hot waters, when the IF assay was combined with the viability test, SPC detected up to 3.4 × 10(3) viable but nonculturable L. pneumophila cells per liter. These direct IF methods could be a powerful tool for high-frequency monitoring of domestic hot waters or for investigating the occurrence of viable L. pneumophila in both man-made water systems and environmental water samples. PMID:21742913

  7. The structure of Legionella pneumophila LegK4 type four secretion system (T4SS) effector reveals a novel dimeric eukaryotic-like kinase

    PubMed Central

    Flayhan, Ali; Bergé, Célia; Baïlo, Nathalie; Doublet, Patricia; Bayliss, Richard; Terradot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens subvert signalling pathways to promote invasion and/or replication into the host. LegK1-4 proteins are eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinases that are translocated by the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system (T4SS) of several Legionella pneumophila strains. We present the crystal structures of an active fragment of the LegK4 protein in apo and substrate-bound states. The structure of LegK41–445 reveals a eukaryotic-like kinase domain flanked by a novel cap domain and a four-helix bundle. The protein self-assembles through interactions mediated by helices αF and αG that generate a dimeric interface not previously observed in a protein kinase. The helix αG is displaced compared to previous kinase structures, and its role in stabilization of the activation loop is taken on by the dimerisation interface. The apo-form of the protein has an open conformation with a disordered P-loop but a structured activation segment in absence of targeted phosphorylation. The nucleotide-binding site of LegK4 contains an unusual set of residues that mediate non-canonical interactions with AMP-PNP. Nucleotide binding results in limited changes in the active site, suggesting that LegK4 constitutive kinase activity does not depend on phosphorylation of the activation loop but on the stabilizing effects of the dimer. PMID:26419332

  8. Mutagenic and chemical analyses provide new insight into enzyme activation and mechanism of the type 2 iron-sulfur l-serine dehydratase from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao Lan; Grant, Gregory A

    2016-04-15

    The crystal structure of the Type 2 l-serine dehydratase from Legionella pneumophila (lpLSD), revealed a "tail-in-mouth" configuration where the C-terminal residue acts as an intrinsic competitive inhibitor. This pre-catalytic structure undergoes an activation step prior to catalytic turnover. Mutagenic analysis of residues at or near the active site cleft is consistent with stabilization of substrate binding by many of the same residues that interact with the C-terminal cysteine and highlight the critical role of certain tail residues in activity. pH-rate profiles show that a residue with pK of 5.9 must be deprotonated and a residue with a pK of 8.5 must be protonated for activity. This supports an earlier suggestion that His 61 is the likely catalytic base. An additional residue with a pK of 8.5-9 increases cooperativity when it is deprotonated. This investigation also demonstrates that the Fe-S dehydratases convert the enamine/imine intermediates of the catalytic reaction to products on the enzyme prior to release. This is in contrast to pyridoxyl 5' phosphate based dehydratases that release an enamine/imine intermediate into solution, which then hydrolyzes to produce the ketoamine product.

  9. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hilborn, Elizabeth D.; Arduino, Matthew J.; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexisting risk factors and frequently require hospitalization. Objectives The objectives of this report are to alert professionals of the impact of OPPPs, the fact that 30% of the population may be exposed to OPPPs, and the need to develop means to reduce OPPP exposure. We herein present a review of the epidemiology and ecology of these three bacterial OPPPs, specifically to identify common and unique features. Methods A Water Research Foundation–sponsored workshop gathered experts from across the United States to review the characteristics of OPPPs, identify problems, and develop a list of research priorities to address critical knowledge gaps with respect to increasing OPPP-associated disease. Discussion OPPPs share the common characteristics of disinfectant resistance and growth in biofilms in water distribution systems or premise plumbing. Thus, they share a number of habitats with humans (e.g., showers) that can lead to exposure and infection. The frequency of OPPP-infected individuals is rising and will likely continue to rise as the number of at-risk individuals is increasing. Improved reporting of OPPP disease and increased understanding of the genetic, physiologic, and structural characteristics governing the persistence and growth of OPPPs in drinking water distribution systems and premise plumbing is needed. Conclusions Because broadly effective community-level engineering interventions for the control of OPPPs have yet to be identified, and because the number of at-risk individuals will continue to rise, it is likely that OPPP-related infections will continue to increase. However, it is possible that individuals can take measures (e.g., raise hot water heater temperatures and filter

  10. Suggestive evidence for association between L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) gene haplotypes and bipolar disorder in Latinos: a family-based association study

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Suzanne; Xu, Chun; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Armas, Regina; Contreras, Salvador A; Contreras, Javier; Dassori, Albana; Leach, Robin J; Flores, Deborah; Jerez, Alvaro; Raventós, Henriette; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Escamilla, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Through recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS), several groups have reported significant association between variants in the alpha 1C subunit of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) and bipolar disorder (BP) in European and European-American cohorts. We performed a family-based association study to determine whether CACNA1C is associated with BP in the Latino population. Methods This study consisted of 913 individuals from 215 Latino pedigrees recruited from the United States, Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. The Illumina GoldenGate Genotyping Assay was used to genotype 58 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that spanned a 602.9 kb region encompassing the CACNA1C gene including two SNPs (rs7297582 and rs1006737) previously shown to associate with BP. Individual SNP and haplotype association analyses were performed using Family-Based Association Test (version 2.0.3) and Haploview (version 4.2) software. Results An eight-locus haplotype block that included these two markers showed significant association with BP (global marker permuted p = 0.0018) in the Latino population. For individual SNPs, this sample had insufficient power (10%) to detect associations with SNPs with minor effect (odds ratio = 1.15). Conclusions Although we were not able to replicate findings of association between individual CACNA1C SNPs rs7297582 and rs1006737 and BP, we were able to replicate the GWAS signal reported for CACNA1C through a haplotype analysis that encompassed these previously reported significant SNPs. These results provide additional evidence that CACNA1C is associated with BP and provides the first evidence that variations in this gene might play a role in the pathogenesis of this disorder in the Latino population. PMID:23437964

  11. Crystal structure and tartrate inhibition of Legionella pneumophila histidine acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Reilly, Thomas J; Tanner, John J

    2015-11-01

    Histidine acid phosphatases (HAPs) utilize a nucleophilic histidine residue to catalyze the transfer of a phosphoryl group from phosphomonoesters to water. HAPs function as protein phosphatases and pain suppressors in mammals, are essential for Giardia lamblia excystation, and contribute to virulence of the category A pathogen Francisella tularensis. Herein we report the first crystal structure and steady-state kinetics measurements of the HAP from Legionella pneumophila (LpHAP), also known as Legionella major acid phosphatase. The structure of LpHAP complexed with the inhibitor l(+)-tartrate was determined at 2.0 Å resolution. Kinetics assays show that l(+)-tartrate is a 50-fold more potent inhibitor of LpHAP than of other HAPs. Electrostatic potential calculations provide insight into the basis for the enhanced tartrate potency: the tartrate pocket of LpHAP is more positive than other HAPs because of the absence of an ion pair partner for the second Arg of the conserved RHGXRXP HAP signature sequence. The structure also reveals that LpHAP has an atypically expansive active site entrance and lacks the nucleotide substrate base clamp found in other HAPs. These features imply that nucleoside monophosphates may not be preferred substrates. Kinetics measurements confirm that AMP is a relatively inefficient in vitro substrate of LpHAP. PMID:26380880

  12. Lysine11-Linked Polyubiquitination of the AnkB F-Box Effector of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Bruckert, William M.

    2015-01-01

    The fate of the polyubiquitinated protein is determined by the lysine linkages involved in the polymerization of the ubiquitin monomers, which has seven lysine residues (K6, K11, K27, K29, K33, K48, and K63). The translocated AnkB effector of the intravacuolar pathogen Legionella pneumophila is a bona fide F-box protein, which is localized to the cytosolic side of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) and is essential for intravacuolar proliferation within macrophages and amoebae. The F-box domain of AnkB interacts with the host SCF1 E3 ubiquitin ligase that triggers the decoration of the LCV with K48-linked polyubiquitinated proteins that are targeted for proteasomal degradation. Here we report that AnkB becomes rapidly polyubiquitinated within the host cell, and this modification is independent of the F-box domain of AnkB, indicating host-mediated polyubiquitination. We show that the AnkB effector interacts specifically with the host E3 ubiquitin ligase Trim21. Mass spectrometry analyses have shown that AnkB is modified by K11-linked polyubiquitination, which has no effect on its stability. This work shows the first example of K11-linked polyubiquitination of a bacterial effector and its interaction with the host Trim21 ubiquitin ligase. PMID:26483404

  13. Hot water systems as sources of Legionella pneumophila in hospital and nonhospital plumbing fixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Wadowsky, R.M.; Yee, R.B.; Mezmar, L.; Wing, E.J.; Dowling, J.N.

    1982-05-01

    Samples obtained from plumbing systems of hospitals, nonhospital institutions, and homes were cultured for Legionella spp. by plating the samples directly on a selective medium. Swab samples were taken from the inner surfaces of faucet assemblies (aerators, spouts, and valve seats), showerheads, and shower pipes. Water and sediment were collected from the bottom of hot-water tanks. Legionella pnenumophila serogroups 1.5, and 6 were recovered from plubming fixtures of the hospitals and nonhospital institutions and one of five homes. The legionellae (7 to 13,850 colony-forming units per ml) were also present in water and sediment from hot-water tanks maintained at 30 to 54/sup 0/C, but not in those maintained at 71 and 77/sup 0/C. Legionella micdadei was isolated from one tank. Thus legionellae are present in hot-water tanks which are maintained at warm temperatures or whose design results in warm temperatures at the bottom of the tanks. We hypothesize that hot-water tanks are a breeding site and a major source of L. pneumophila for the contamination of plumbing systems. The existence of these bacteria in the plumbing systems and tanks was not necessarily associated with disease. The extent of the hazard of this contamination needs to be delineated.

  14. Structure of the Antibiotic Resistance Factor Spectinomycin Phosphotransferase from Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, D.; Lemke, C; Huang, J; Xiong, B; Berghuis, A

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) constitute a diverse group of enzymes that are often the underlying cause of aminoglycoside resistance in the clinical setting. Several APHs have been extensively characterized, including the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of two APH(3{prime}) isozymes and an APH(2{double_prime}) enzyme. Although many APHs are plasmid-encoded and are capable of inactivating numerous 2-deoxystreptmaine aminoglycosides with multiple regiospecificity, APH(9)-Ia, isolated from Legionella pneumophila, is an unusual enzyme among the APH family for its chromosomal origin and its specificity for a single non-2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside substrate, spectinomycin. We describe here the crystal structures of APH(9)-Ia in its apo form, its binary complex with the nucleotide, AMP, and its ternary complex bound with ADP and spectinomycin. The structures reveal that APH(9)-Ia adopts the bilobal protein kinase-fold, analogous to the APH(3{prime}) and APH(2{double_prime}) enzymes. However, APH(9)-Ia differs significantly from the other two types of APH enzymes in its substrate binding area and that it undergoes a conformation change upon ligand binding. Moreover, kinetic assay experiments indicate that APH(9)-Ia has stringent substrate specificity as it is unable to phosphorylate substrates of choline kinase or methylthioribose kinase despite high structural resemblance. The crystal structures of APH(9)-Ia demonstrate and expand our understanding of the diversity of the APH family, which in turn will facilitate the development of new antibiotics and inhibitors.

  15. Purification of Legionella pneumophila major outer membrane protein and demonstration that it is a porin.

    PubMed Central

    Gabay, J E; Blake, M; Niles, W D; Horwitz, M A

    1985-01-01

    We have purified the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Legionella pneumophila, determined that it is associated with peptidoglycan, and characterized it as a porin. To purify the MOMP, we used a simple, rapid, three-step procedure that gave us the protein in high yield. The first step of the purification procedure involved selectively extracting the MOMP from whole bacterial cells with calcium and zwitterionic detergent. The second and third steps achieved purification by ion-exchange and molecular-sieve chromatography. The dissociation of the MOMP into monomers was dependent upon the presence of a reducing agent and was enhanced by treatment at 100 degrees C. To study the relationship of the MOMP to peptidoglycan, we extracted the protein by a modification of the Rosenbusch procedure. Like the Escherichia coli porins, the MOMP was peptidoglycan associated. The MOMP was at least partially dissociated from peptidoglycan in sodium dodecyl sulfate and a high salt concentration. To study the ion channel-forming properties of the MOMP, we reconstituted the MOMP in planar lipid membranes. The MOMP formed ion-permeable channels with a single-channel conductance size of 100 picoSiemens. The MOMP channels exhibited a fourfold selectivity for cations over anions and voltage-independent gating. These findings demonstrate that the MOMP is a porin with properties similar to those of E. coli porins. Images PMID:2579942

  16. Mechanism of invasion of lung epithelial cells by filamentous Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Prashar, Akriti; Bhatia, Sonam; Tabatabaeiyazdi, Zohreh; Duncan, Carla; Garduño, Rafael A; Tang, Patrick; Low, Donald E; Guyard, Cyril; Terebiznik, Mauricio R

    2012-10-01

    Legionella, the aetiological agent responsible for Legionellosis, is an opportunistic pathogen that infects humans upon the inhalation of contaminated aerosolized water droplets. Legionella is pleomorphic and its different morphotypes exhibit varying degrees of virulence. While the filamentous forms of Legionella pneumophila (Lp) have been reported in patient samples since the first description of legionellosis, their role in disease has not been studied. Our results show that both E-cadherin and β1 integrin receptors mediate filamentous Lp (FLp) attachment to lung epithelial cells (LECs). The activation of these receptors induces the formation of actin enriched membrane surface structures that we designated 'hooks' and 'membrane wraps'. These structures entrap the filaments on the cell surface leading to their gradual internalization through a zipper mechanism of phagocytosis dependent on actomyosin activity. The supply of E-cadherin receptors from the recycling pathway and β1 integrins released from focal adhesion turnover are required to sustain this process. Intracellular FLp inhabits a vacuolar compartment where filaments differentiate into short rods and replicate to produce infective progeny. Here we are reporting a first description of the invasion mechanism used by FLp to invade LECs. Therefore, filamentous morphotype of Lp can induce its own uptake by LECs and has the potential ability to cause disease. PMID:22727141

  17. Virulent to avirulent conversion of Legionnaires' disease bacterium (Legionella pneumophila)--its effect on isolation techniques.

    PubMed

    McDade, J E; Shepard, C C

    1979-06-01

    Suspensions of the Legionnaries' disease bacterium (Legionella pneumophila; LDB) were prepared from the yolk sacs of infected egg embryos, the spleens of infected guinea pigs, and cultures of the organism propagated on enriched Mueller-Hinton agar. Each suspension was titrated to determine the number of bacterial colonies (cfu), yolk sac 50% lethal doses (YSLD50), guinea pig 50% infectious doses (GPID50), and guinea pig 50% lethal doses (GPLD50) produced by 1 ml of inoculum. The numbers of cfu/YSLD50, GPID50, and GPLD50 were then calculated for each suspension. The suspension from yolk sacs had 1 cfu/YSLD50 and 10 cfu/GPID50. The suspension from spleens of guinea pigs also had 1 cfu/YSLD50. Organisms propagated on Mueller-Hinton agar, however, had greater than 10(7) cfu/YSLD50 and 10(5) cfu/GPID50. Thus, the LDB lost virulence when it was cultivated on agar. Guinea pigs vaccinated either subcutaneously or intraperitoneally with LDB grown on Mueller-Hinton agar resisted challenge with virulent LDB. PMID:448196

  18. Caspase-11 stimulates rapid flagellin-independent pyroptosis in response to Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Case, Christopher L; Kohler, Lara J; Lima, Jonilson B; Strowig, Till; de Zoete, Marcel R; Flavell, Richard A; Zamboni, Dario S; Roy, Craig R

    2013-01-29

    A flagellin-independent caspase-1 activation pathway that does not require NAIP5 or NRLC4 is induced by the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila. Here we demonstrate that this pathway requires caspase-11. Treatment of macrophages with LPS up-regulated the host components required for this caspase-11 activation pathway. Activation by Legionella differed from caspase-11 activation using previously described agonists in that Legionella caspase-11 activation was rapid and required bacteria with a functional type IV secretion system called Dot/Icm. Legionella activation of caspase-11 induced pyroptosis by a mechanism independent of the NAIP/NLRC4 and caspase-1 axis. Legionella activation of caspase-11 stimulated activation of caspase-1 through NLRP3 and ASC. Induction of caspase-11-dependent responses occurred in macrophages deficient in the adapter proteins TRIF or MyD88 but not in macrophages deficient in both signaling factors. Although caspase-11 was produced in macrophages deficient in the type-I IFN receptor, there was a severe defect in caspase-11-dependent pyroptosis in these cells. These data indicate that macrophages respond to microbial signatures to produce proteins that mediate a capsase-11 response and that the caspase-11 system provides an alternative pathway for rapid detection of an intracellular pathogen capable of evading the canonical caspase-1 activation system that responds to bacterial flagellin. PMID:23307811

  19. Detection of Legionella pneumophila by PCR-ELISA method in industrial cooling tower water.

    PubMed

    Soheili, Majid; Nejadmoghaddam, Mohammad Reza; Babashamsi, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Jamileh; Jeddi Tehrani, Mahmood

    2007-11-15

    Water supply and Cooling Tower Water (CTW) are among the most common sources of Legionella pneumophila (LP) contamination. A nonradio active method is described to detect LP in industrial CTW samples. DNA was purified and amplified by nested -PCR with amplimers specific for the 16s rRNA gene of LP. The 5' end biotinylated oligomer probe was immobilized on sterptavidin B coated microtiter plates. The nested-PCR product was labeled with digoxigenin and then hybridized with 5'-biotinylated probes. The amplification products were detected by using proxidase-labled anti dioxygenin antibody in a colorimetric reaction. The assay detected LP present in 1 L of 5 CTW samples examined. All of the samples were Legionella positive in both culture and PCR-ELISA methods. The PCR-ELISA assay appears to exhibit high specificity and is a more rapid technique in comparison with bacterial culture method. Thus could prove suitable for use in the routine examination of industrial CTW contamination. PMID:19090273

  20. Purification of Legionella pneumophila major outer membrane protein and demonstration that it is a porin.

    PubMed

    Gabay, J E; Blake, M; Niles, W D; Horwitz, M A

    1985-04-01

    We have purified the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Legionella pneumophila, determined that it is associated with peptidoglycan, and characterized it as a porin. To purify the MOMP, we used a simple, rapid, three-step procedure that gave us the protein in high yield. The first step of the purification procedure involved selectively extracting the MOMP from whole bacterial cells with calcium and zwitterionic detergent. The second and third steps achieved purification by ion-exchange and molecular-sieve chromatography. The dissociation of the MOMP into monomers was dependent upon the presence of a reducing agent and was enhanced by treatment at 100 degrees C. To study the relationship of the MOMP to peptidoglycan, we extracted the protein by a modification of the Rosenbusch procedure. Like the Escherichia coli porins, the MOMP was peptidoglycan associated. The MOMP was at least partially dissociated from peptidoglycan in sodium dodecyl sulfate and a high salt concentration. To study the ion channel-forming properties of the MOMP, we reconstituted the MOMP in planar lipid membranes. The MOMP formed ion-permeable channels with a single-channel conductance size of 100 picoSiemens. The MOMP channels exhibited a fourfold selectivity for cations over anions and voltage-independent gating. These findings demonstrate that the MOMP is a porin with properties similar to those of E. coli porins.

  1. High-Resolution In Situ Genotyping of Legionella pneumophila Populations in Drinking Water by Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis Using Environmental DNA▿

    PubMed Central

    Kahlisch, Leila; Henne, Karsten; Draheim, Josefin; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred G.

    2010-01-01

    Central to the understanding of infections by the waterborne pathogen Legionella pneumophila is its detection at the clonal level. Currently, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) of L. pneumophila isolates can be used as a tool for high-resolution genotyping. Since L. pneumophila is difficult to isolate, the isolation of outbreak strains often fails due to a viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state of the respective environmental population. Therefore, we developed a cultivation-independent approach to detect single clones in drinking water. This approach is based on the extraction of DNA from drinking water followed by PCR using a set of eight VNTR primer pairs necessary for MLVA genotyping of L. pneumophila. The PCR amplicons were analyzed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and capillary electrophoresis to obtain the respective MLVA profiles. Parallel to the high-resolution analysis, we used the same environmental DNA to quantify the number of L. pneumophila cells in drinking water using real-time PCR with 16S rRNA gene-targeted primers. We used a set of drinking water samples from a small-scale drinking water network to test our approach. With these samples we demonstrated that the developed approach was directly applicable to DNA obtained from drinking water. We were able to detect more L. pneumophila MLVA genotypes in drinking water than we could detect by isolation. Our approach could be a valuable tool to identify outbreak strains even after the outbreak has occurred and has the potential to be applied directly to clinical material. PMID:20656879

  2. Legionella pneumophila strain 130b possesses a unique combination of type IV secretion systems and novel Dot/Icm secretion system effector proteins.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gunnar N; Petty, Nicola K; Mousnier, Aurélie; Harding, Clare R; Vogrin, Adam J; Wee, Bryan; Fry, Norman K; Harrison, Timothy G; Newton, Hayley J; Thomson, Nicholas R; Beatson, Scott A; Dougan, Gordon; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Frankel, Gad

    2010-11-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous inhabitant of environmental water reservoirs. The bacteria infect a wide variety of protozoa and, after accidental inhalation, human alveolar macrophages, which can lead to severe pneumonia. The capability to thrive in phagocytic hosts is dependent on the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system (T4SS), which translocates multiple effector proteins into the host cell. In this study, we determined the draft genome sequence of L. pneumophila strain 130b (Wadsworth). We found that the 130b genome encodes a unique set of T4SSs, namely, the Dot/Icm T4SS, a Trb-1-like T4SS, and two Lvh T4SS gene clusters. Sequence analysis substantiated that a core set of 107 Dot/Icm T4SS effectors was conserved among the sequenced L. pneumophila strains Philadelphia-1, Lens, Paris, Corby, Alcoy, and 130b. We also identified new effector candidates and validated the translocation of 10 novel Dot/Icm T4SS effectors that are not present in L. pneumophila strain Philadelphia-1. We examined the prevalence of the new effector genes among 87 environmental and clinical L. pneumophila isolates. Five of the new effectors were identified in 34 to 62% of the isolates, while less than 15% of the strains tested positive for the other five genes. Collectively, our data show that the core set of conserved Dot/Icm T4SS effector proteins is supplemented by a variable repertoire of accessory effectors that may partly account for differences in the virulences and prevalences of particular L. pneumophila strains.

  3. Legionella pneumophila Strain 130b Possesses a Unique Combination of Type IV Secretion Systems and Novel Dot/Icm Secretion System Effector Proteins▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Gunnar N.; Petty, Nicola K.; Mousnier, Aurélie; Harding, Clare R.; Vogrin, Adam J.; Wee, Bryan; Fry, Norman K.; Harrison, Timothy G.; Newton, Hayley J.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Beatson, Scott A.; Dougan, Gordon; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Frankel, Gad

    2010-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a ubiquitous inhabitant of environmental water reservoirs. The bacteria infect a wide variety of protozoa and, after accidental inhalation, human alveolar macrophages, which can lead to severe pneumonia. The capability to thrive in phagocytic hosts is dependent on the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system (T4SS), which translocates multiple effector proteins into the host cell. In this study, we determined the draft genome sequence of L. pneumophila strain 130b (Wadsworth). We found that the 130b genome encodes a unique set of T4SSs, namely, the Dot/Icm T4SS, a Trb-1-like T4SS, and two Lvh T4SS gene clusters. Sequence analysis substantiated that a core set of 107 Dot/Icm T4SS effectors was conserved among the sequenced L. pneumophila strains Philadelphia-1, Lens, Paris, Corby, Alcoy, and 130b. We also identified new effector candidates and validated the translocation of 10 novel Dot/Icm T4SS effectors that are not present in L. pneumophila strain Philadelphia-1. We examined the prevalence of the new effector genes among 87 environmental and clinical L. pneumophila isolates. Five of the new effectors were identified in 34 to 62% of the isolates, while less than 15% of the strains tested positive for the other five genes. Collectively, our data show that the core set of conserved Dot/Icm T4SS effector proteins is supplemented by a variable repertoire of accessory effectors that may partly account for differences in the virulences and prevalences of particular L. pneumophila strains. PMID:20833813

  4. Suggestive evidence of associations between liver X receptor β polymorphisms with type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity in three cohort studies: HUNT2 (Norway), MONICA (France) and HELENA (Europe)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The liver X receptors (LXR) α and β regulate lipid and carbohydrate homeostasis and inflammation. Lxrβ-/- mice are glucose intolerant and at the same time lean. We aimed to assess the associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in LXRβ and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obesity and related traits in 3 separate cohort studies. Methods Twenty LXRβ SNPs were identified by sequencing and genotyped in the HUNT2 adult nested case-control study for T2DM (n = 835 cases/1986 controls). Five tag-SNPs (rs17373080, rs2695121, rs56151148, rs2303044 and rs3219281), covering 99.3% of the entire common genetic variability of the LXRβ gene were identified and genotyped in the French MONICA adult study (n = 2318) and the European adolescent HELENA cross-sectional study (n = 1144). In silico and in vitro functionality studies were performed. Results We identified suggestive or significant associations between rs17373080 and the risk of (i) T2DM in HUNT2 (OR = 0.82, p = 0.03), (ii) obesity in MONICA (OR = 1.26, p = 0.05) and (iii) overweight/obesity in HELENA (OR = 1.59, p = 0.002). An intron 4 SNP (rs28514894, a perfect proxy for rs17373080) could potentially create binding sites for hepatic nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and nuclear factor 1 (NF1). The C allele of rs28514894 was associated with ~1.25-fold higher human LXRβ basal promoter activity in vitro. However, no differences between alleles in terms of DNA binding and reporter gene transactivation by HNF4α or NF1 were observed. Conclusions Our results suggest that rs17373080 in LXRβ is associated with T2DM and obesity, maybe via altered LXRβ expression. PMID:20939869

  5. Immunogold evidence suggests that endoplasmic reticulum is the site of protamine-type protein synthesis and participates in translocation of these proteins into the nucleus during Chara vulgaris spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Popłonska, Katarzyna; Kwiatkowska, Maria; Wojtczak, Agnieszka; Polit, Justyna

    2009-03-01

    During spermiogenesis of an alga Chara vulgaris, which in many aspects resembles that of animals, histones are replaced by protamine-type proteins. Our earlier immunocytochemical studies showed that this replacement started during the short stage V of spermiogenesis, when electronograms revealed an extensive system of cisternae and vesicles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The present studies revealed at stage V intensive incorporation of labeled (3)H-arginine and (3)H-lysine quickly translocating into a nucleus visualized with pulse-chase autoradiography of semithin sections. The immunogold technique with the use of the antibodies to protamine-type proteins isolated from Chara tomentosa show that both ER cisternae and vesicles are labeled with gold grains, which are absent from the spermatids not treated with the antibodies; thus, the ER is probably the site of the protamine-type protein synthesis. These proteins then are translocated to a nucleus through ER channels connected with the nuclear envelope, as suggested by gold labeling of an inner membrane of the nuclear envelope adjacent to condensed chromatin. The above results correspond with those of other authors showing that in animals, protamines bind with lamin B receptors localized in the inner membrane of the nuclear envelope. A hypothesis has been put forward that during Chara spermiogenesis the inner membrane of the nuclear envelope invaginates into a nucleus together with protamine-type proteins, which become separated from the membrane and penetrate into chromatin.

  6. Evaluation of an Optimal Epidemiological Typing Scheme for Legionella pneumophila with Whole-Genome Sequence Data Using Validation Guidelines.

    PubMed

    David, Sophia; Mentasti, Massimo; Tewolde, Rediat; Aslett, Martin; Harris, Simon R; Afshar, Baharak; Underwood, Anthony; Fry, Norman K; Parkhill, Julian; Harrison, Timothy G

    2016-08-01

    Sequence-based typing (SBT), analogous to multilocus sequence typing (MLST), is the current "gold standard" typing method for investigation of legionellosis outbreaks caused by Legionella pneumophila However, as common sequence types (STs) cause many infections, some investigations remain unresolved. In this study, various whole-genome sequencing (WGS)-based methods were evaluated according to published guidelines, including (i) a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based method, (ii) extended MLST using different numbers of genes, (iii) determination of gene presence or absence, and (iv) a kmer-based method. L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates (n = 106) from the standard "typing panel," previously used by the European Society for Clinical Microbiology Study Group on Legionella Infections (ESGLI), were tested together with another 229 isolates. Over 98% of isolates were considered typeable using the SNP- and kmer-based methods. Percentages of isolates with complete extended MLST profiles ranged from 99.1% (50 genes) to 86.8% (1,455 genes), while only 41.5% produced a full profile with the gene presence/absence scheme. Replicates demonstrated that all methods offer 100% reproducibility. Indices of discrimination range from 0.972 (ribosomal MLST) to 0.999 (SNP based), and all values were higher than that achieved with SBT (0.940). Epidemiological concordance is generally inversely related to discriminatory power. We propose that an extended MLST scheme with ∼50 genes provides optimal epidemiological concordance while substantially improving the discrimination offered by SBT and can be used as part of a hierarchical typing scheme that should maintain backwards compatibility and increase discrimination where necessary. This analysis will be useful for the ESGLI to design a scheme that has the potential to become the new gold standard typing method for L. pneumophila. PMID:27280420

  7. Evaluation of an Optimal Epidemiological Typing Scheme for Legionella pneumophila with Whole-Genome Sequence Data Using Validation Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Mentasti, Massimo; Tewolde, Rediat; Aslett, Martin; Harris, Simon R.; Afshar, Baharak; Underwood, Anthony; Harrison, Timothy G.

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-based typing (SBT), analogous to multilocus sequence typing (MLST), is the current “gold standard” typing method for investigation of legionellosis outbreaks caused by Legionella pneumophila. However, as common sequence types (STs) cause many infections, some investigations remain unresolved. In this study, various whole-genome sequencing (WGS)-based methods were evaluated according to published guidelines, including (i) a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based method, (ii) extended MLST using different numbers of genes, (iii) determination of gene presence or absence, and (iv) a kmer-based method. L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates (n = 106) from the standard “typing panel,” previously used by the European Society for Clinical Microbiology Study Group on Legionella Infections (ESGLI), were tested together with another 229 isolates. Over 98% of isolates were considered typeable using the SNP- and kmer-based methods. Percentages of isolates with complete extended MLST profiles ranged from 99.1% (50 genes) to 86.8% (1,455 genes), while only 41.5% produced a full profile with the gene presence/absence scheme. Replicates demonstrated that all methods offer 100% reproducibility. Indices of discrimination range from 0.972 (ribosomal MLST) to 0.999 (SNP based), and all values were higher than that achieved with SBT (0.940). Epidemiological concordance is generally inversely related to discriminatory power. We propose that an extended MLST scheme with ∼50 genes provides optimal epidemiological concordance while substantially improving the discrimination offered by SBT and can be used as part of a hierarchical typing scheme that should maintain backwards compatibility and increase discrimination where necessary. This analysis will be useful for the ESGLI to design a scheme that has the potential to become the new gold standard typing method for L. pneumophila. PMID:27280420

  8. Human and guinea pig immune responses to Legionella pneumophila protein antigens OmpS and Hsp60.

    PubMed Central

    Weeratna, R; Stamler, D A; Edelstein, P H; Ripley, M; Marrie, T; Hoskin, D; Hoffman, P S

    1994-01-01

    We studied the immune responses of guinea pigs and humans to two Legionella pneumophila antigens. Guinea pigs surviving a lethal intraperitoneal challenge dose of virulent L. pneumophila exhibited strong cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions to purified OmpS (28-kDa major outer membrane protein) and Hsp60 (heat shock protein or common antigen), while weak DTH reactions were noted for extracellular protease (major secretory protein [MSP] [ProA]) and no reaction was observed with an ovalbumin (OA) control. Lymphocyte proliferation responses (LPRs) were measured for peripheral blood and spleen lymphocytes from guinea pigs surviving sublethal and lethal challenge doses of L. pneumophila. Lymphocytes from uninfected animals showed no proliferation to Hsp60 or OmpS, while lymphocytes from sublethally and lethally challenged animals exhibited strong proliferative responses to Hsp60 and OmpS. Guinea pigs vaccinated with purified OmpS exhibited low antibody titers and strong DTH and LPRs to OmpS, whereas lymphocytes from animals vaccinated with Hsp60 exhibited weak DTH responses and high antibody titers to Hsp60. All guinea pigs immunized with OmpS survived experimental challenge with L. pneumophila (two of two in a pilot study and seven of seven in trial 2) versus zero of seven OA-immunized controls (P = 0.006 by Fisher's exact test). In three vaccine trials in which animals were vaccinated with Hsp60, only 1 guinea pig of 15 survived lethal challenge. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from humans with legionellosis showed stronger LPRs to OmpS than PBLs from humans with no history of legionellosis (P = 0.0002 by Mann-Whitney test). PBLs of humans surviving legionellosis exhibited a lower but highly significant proliferative response to Hsp60 (P < 0.0001 compared with controls by Mann-Whitney test). These studies indicate that OmpS and Hsp60 are important antigens associated with the development of protective cellular immunity. However, as determined in

  9. Phenotypic variation amongst genotypically homogeneous Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates: implications for the investigation of outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, T. G.; Saunders, N. A.; Haththotuwa, A.; Hallas, G.; Birtles, R. J.; Taylor, A. G.

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-nine isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, obtained from a site associated with an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease, were examined by monoclonal antibody subgrouping, restriction fragment length polymorphism typing, restriction endonuclease analysis and plasmid content. Nine distinct phenotypes were detected but at the genotypic level all strains were closely related. The data presented indicate that phenotypic variation of a single parent strain can occur within an environmental site. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the investigation of outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1969803

  10. Bacteriostatic and bactericidal modes of action of bis(tributyltin)oxide on Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Soracco, R.J.; Pope, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    The modes of action of bis(tributyltin)oxide (TBTO) doses between 1 X 10/sup 4/ and 6 X 10/sup 7/ molecules per cell on a single environmental isolate of Legionelia pneumophila were studied by monitoring the following parameters: (1) growth; (2) cell viability, (3) /sup 14/C-amino acid incorporation, (4) /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from /sup 14/C-amino acids, (5) (/sup 2/H)uridine incorporation, (6) (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation, (7) oxygen consumption, (8) cellular ATP levels, and (9) adenylate energy charge. The amount of TBTO associated with the cells in these laboratory cultures was also compared with that remaining in the suspending medium. Most of the TBTO (68 to 88%) was found to be associated with the cells. This result explained why the cellular responses which were measured did not correlate with the TBTO concentration, but rather with the dose of TBTO to which the cells were exposed. At the lower TBTO doses tested (10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 7/ molecules per cell) a log-normal relationship was observed between the reduction in growth rate and the TBTO concentration. At intermediate TBTO doses (ca. 10/sup 7/ molecules per cell) growth stasis occurred, with nearly 100% of the cells in these cultures remaining viable for at least 5 h after treatment. The cellular function which seemed to be primarily affected at these levels of TBTO was the energy conversion mechanism, since the decline in the rates of CO/sub 2/ production, oxygen consumption, and macromolecular synthesis was preceded by an immediate (within 1 min) drop in the intracellular levels of ATP and the adenylate energy charge. At the higher TBTO doses (>10/sup 7/ molecules per cell) an initial, precipitous, drop in the number of viable cells was observed, which was followed by a further exponential reduction of viable cells in the treated culture.

  11. Unraveling the Phosphocholination Mechanism of the Legionella pneumophila Enzyme AnkX.

    PubMed

    Gavriljuk, Konstantin; Schartner, Jonas; Seidel, Hans; Dickhut, Clarissa; Zahedi, Rene P; Hedberg, Christian; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila infects lung macrophages and injects numerous effector proteins into the host cell to establish a vacuole for proliferation. The necessary interference with vesicular trafficking of the host is achieved by modulation of the function of Rab GTPases. The effector protein AnkX chemically modifies Rab1b and Rab35 by covalent phosphocholination of serine or threonine residues using CDP-choline as a donor. So far, the phosphoryl transfer mechanism and the relevance of observed autophosphocholination of AnkX remained disputable. We designed tailored caged compounds to make this type of enzymatic reaction accessible for time-resolved Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy. By combining spectroscopic and biochemical methods, we determined that full length AnkX is autophosphocholinated at Ser521, Thr620, and Thr943. However, autophosphocholination loses specificity for these sites in shortened constructs and does not appear to be relevant for the catalysis of the phosphoryl transfer. In contrast, transient phosphocholination of His229 in the conserved catalytic motif might exist as a short-lived reaction intermediate. Upon substrate binding, His229 is deprotonated and locked in this state, being rendered capable of a nucleophilic attack on the pyrophosphate moiety of the substrate. The proton that originated from His229 is transferred to a nearby carboxylic acid residue. Thus, our combined findings support a ping-pong mechanism involving phosphocholination of His229 and subsequent transfer of phosphocholine to the Rab GTPase. Our approach can be extended to the investigation of further nucleotidyl transfer reactions, which are currently of reemerging interest in regulatory pathways of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27404583

  12. Legionella pneumophila: From potable water to treated greywater; quantification and removal during treatment.

    PubMed

    Blanky, Marina; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sara; Halpern, Malka; Friedler, Eran

    2015-11-15

    Greywater is an alternative water source that can help alleviate stress on depleted water resources. The main options for greywater reuse are toilet flushing and garden irrigation, both producing aerosols. For that reason transmission of inhalable pathogens like Legionella present a potential risk. To improve the understanding about Legionella in greywater, we traced the pathogen seasonally from the potable water system to the final steps of the greywater treatment in four houses in northern Israel. Physicochemical and microbiological parameters were analyzed in order to assess background greywater quality and to establish possible associations with Legionella. The mean concentrations of Legionella pneumophila isolated from the potable water system were 6.4×10(2) and 5.9×10(3) cfu/l in cold and hot water respectively. By amending the ISO protocol for Legionella isolation from drinking water, we succeeded in quantifying Legionella in greywater. The mean Legionella concentrations that were found in raw, treated and treated chlorinated greywater were 1.2×10(5), 2.4×10(4) and 5.7×10(3) cfu/l respectively. While Legionella counts in potable water presented a seasonal pattern with high concentrations in summer, its counts in greywater presented an almost inversed pattern. Greywater treatment resulted in 95% decrease in Legionella counts. No significant difference was found between Legionella concentrations in potable water and the treated chlorinated greywater. These findings indicate that regarding Legionella, reusing treated chlorinated greywater would exhibit a risk that is very similar to the risk associated with using potable water for the same non-potable uses.

  13. [Effect of silver and copper ions on survival of Legionella pneumophila in tap water].

    PubMed

    Rohr, U; Senger, M; Selenka, F

    1996-07-01

    In vitro studies were performed to give information about the required metal concentrations in decontaminating Legionella-loaded warm water systems with the electrochemical generation of Ag+ and Cu2+ ions. The influence of Ag and Cu ions, as single compounds and in combination, on the survival of Legionella pneumophila (serogroup 6) was determined in tap water at 45 degrees C. Marked differences were detected in the action of these metals. Ag produced a much stronger inhibition than Cu. No additive effect was demonstrated when using Ag/Cu-combinations in the ratio of 1:10. In this case only the Ag-induced inhibition was detected. After 1 h of incubation at 45 degrees C a concentration of 80 + 800 micrograms/L Ag + Cu was needed to produce the maximal inhibitory effect (a 5 log decrease). An identical effect was seen after exposure to 20 + 200 micrograms/L Ag + Cu in the long-term action (24 h of incubation). The minimum inhibitory concentration after long-term incubation was 5 + 50 micrograms/L Ag + Cu. These metal concentrations produced a 1 log reduction. The in vitro results are discussed under consideration of earlier investigations after metering Ag and Cu into a Legionella-loaded water system and generated the following conclusions: In the beginning highly contaminated water systems at 45 degrees C need concentrations between 40 and 80 micrograms/L Ag + 400 to 800 micrograms/L Cu to kill Legionellas. After effective reduction of Legionella concentration of at least some logarithmic powers a slow constant maintenance concentration of 5 to 20 micrograms/L Ag + 50 to 200 micrograms/L Cu could be applied. At 22 degrees C the in vitro inactivation response is much lower. On the other hand in warm water systems with temperatures of 50 to 60 degrees C lower metal concentrations are sufficient.

  14. The Legionella pneumophila F-box protein Lpp2082 (AnkB) modulates ubiquitination of the host protein parvin B and promotes intracellular replication.

    PubMed

    Lomma, M; Dervins-Ravault, D; Rolando, M; Nora, T; Newton, H J; Sansom, F M; Sahr, T; Gomez-Valero, L; Jules, M; Hartland, E L; Buchrieser, C

    2010-09-01

    The environmental pathogen Legionella pneumophila encodes three proteins containing F-box domains and additional protein-protein interaction domains, reminiscent of eukaryotic SCF ubiquitin-protein ligases. Here we show that the F-box proteins of L. pneumophila strain Paris are Dot/Icm effectors involved in the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins associated with the Legionella-containing vacuole. Single, double and triple mutants of the F-box protein encoding genes were impaired in infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii, THP-1 macrophages and human lung epithelial cells. Lpp2082/AnkB was essential for infection of the lungs of A/J mice in vivo, and bound Skp1, the interaction partner of the SCF complex in mammalian cells, similar to AnkB from strain AA100/130b. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen and co-immunoprecipitation analysis we identified ParvB a protein present in focal adhesions and in lamellipodia, as a target. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that ectopically expressed Lpp2082/AnkB colocalized with ParvB at the periphery of lamellipodia. Unexpectedly, ubiquitination tests revealed that Lpp2082/AnkB diminishes endogenous ubiquitination of ParvB. Based on these results we propose that L. pneumophila modulates ubiquitination of ParvB by competing with eukaryotic E3 ligases for the specific protein-protein interaction site of ParvB, thereby revealing a new mechanism by which L. pneumophila may employ translocated effector proteins to promote bacterial survival.

  15. Distribution of sequence-based types of legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains isolated from cooling towers, hot springs, and potable water systems in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tian; Zhou, Haijian; Ren, Hongyu; Guan, Hong; Li, Machao; Zhu, Bingqing; Shao, Zhujun

    2014-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 causes Legionnaires' disease. Water systems contaminated with Legionella are the implicated sources of Legionnaires' disease. This study analyzed L. pneumophila serogroup 1 strains in China using sequence-based typing. Strains were isolated from cooling towers (n = 96), hot springs (n = 42), and potable water systems (n = 26). Isolates from cooling towers, hot springs, and potable water systems were divided into 25 sequence types (STs; index of discrimination [IOD], 0.711), 19 STs (IOD, 0.934), and 3 STs (IOD, 0.151), respectively. The genetic variation among the potable water isolates was lower than that among cooling tower and hot spring isolates. ST1 was the predominant type, accounting for 49.4% of analyzed strains (n = 81), followed by ST154. With the exception of two strains, all potable water isolates (92.3%) belonged to ST1. In contrast, 53.1% (51/96) and only 14.3% (6/42) of cooling tower and hot spring, respectively, isolates belonged to ST1. There were differences in the distributions of clone groups among the water sources. The comparisons among L. pneumophila strains isolated in China, Japan, and South Korea revealed that similar clones (ST1 complex and ST154 complex) exist in these countries. In conclusion, in China, STs had several unique allelic profiles, and ST1 was the most prevalent sequence type of environmental L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates, similar to its prevalence in Japan and South Korea.

  16. Distribution of sequence-based types of legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains isolated from cooling towers, hot springs, and potable water systems in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tian; Zhou, Haijian; Ren, Hongyu; Guan, Hong; Li, Machao; Zhu, Bingqing; Shao, Zhujun

    2014-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 causes Legionnaires' disease. Water systems contaminated with Legionella are the implicated sources of Legionnaires' disease. This study analyzed L. pneumophila serogroup 1 strains in China using sequence-based typing. Strains were isolated from cooling towers (n = 96), hot springs (n = 42), and potable water systems (n = 26). Isolates from cooling towers, hot springs, and potable water systems were divided into 25 sequence types (STs; index of discrimination [IOD], 0.711), 19 STs (IOD, 0.934), and 3 STs (IOD, 0.151), respectively. The genetic variation among the potable water isolates was lower than that among cooling tower and hot spring isolates. ST1 was the predominant type, accounting for 49.4% of analyzed strains (n = 81), followed by ST154. With the exception of two strains, all potable water isolates (92.3%) belonged to ST1. In contrast, 53.1% (51/96) and only 14.3% (6/42) of cooling tower and hot spring, respectively, isolates belonged to ST1. There were differences in the distributions of clone groups among the water sources. The comparisons among L. pneumophila strains isolated in China, Japan, and South Korea revealed that similar clones (ST1 complex and ST154 complex) exist in these countries. In conclusion, in China, STs had several unique allelic profiles, and ST1 was the most prevalent sequence type of environmental L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates, similar to its prevalence in Japan and South Korea. PMID:24463975

  17. Deaf Colonials: Evidence Suggests that Some Were Literate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Cathryn

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the literacy of early Americans with deafness. Two colonials are profiled: Jonathan Lambert, who was taught reading and writing in a rural area of England noted for its number of deaf inhabitants and who founded a signing community on Martha's Vineyard; and John Edge, who attended a neighborhood school prior to the advent of formal deaf…

  18. Electrochemical Characterization of O2 Plasma Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrode for Legionella pneumophila DNA Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Eun Jin; Lee, Jun-Yong; Hyup Kim, Jun; Kug Kim, Sun; Lee, Cheol Jin; Min, Nam Ki

    2010-08-01

    An electrochemical DNA sensor for Legionella pneumophila detection was constructed using O2 plasma functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film as a working electrode (WE). The cyclic voltammetry (CV) results revealed that the electrocatalytic activity of plasma functionalized MWCNT (pf-MWCNT) significantly changed depending on O2 plasma treatment time due to some oxygen containing functional groups on the pf-MWCNT surface. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra were also presented the changes of their surface morphologies and oxygen composition before and after plasma treatment. From a comparison study, it was found that the pf-MWCNT WEs had higher electrocatalytic activity and more capability of probe DNA immobilization: therefore, electrochemical signal changes by probe DNA immobilization and hybridization on pf-MWCNT WEs were larger than on Au WEs. The pf-MWCNT based DNA sensor was able to detect a concentration range of 10 pM-100 nM of target DNA to detect L. pneumophila.

  19. Legionella pneumophila: The Paradox of a Highly Sensitive Opportunistic Waterborne Pathogen Able to Persist in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Berjeaud, Jean-Marc; Chevalier, Sylvie; Schlusselhuber, Margot; Portier, Emilie; Loiseau, Clémence; Aucher, Willy; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Verdon, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the major causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, is found in freshwater environments in close association with free-living amoebae and multispecies biofilms, leading to persistence, spread, biocide resistance, and elevated virulence of the bacterium. Indeed, legionellosis outbreaks are mainly due to the ability of this bacterium to colonize and persist in water facilities, despite harsh physical and chemical treatments. However, these treatments are not totally efficient and, after a lag period, L. pneumophila may be able to quickly re-colonize these systems. Several natural compounds (biosurfactants, antimicrobial peptides…) with anti-Legionella properties have recently been described in the literature, highlighting their specific activities against this pathogen. In this review, we first consider this hallmark of Legionella to resist killing, in regard to its biofilm or host-associated life style. Then, we focus more accurately on natural anti-Legionella molecules described so far, which could provide new eco-friendly and alternative ways to struggle against this important pathogen in plumbing. PMID:27092135

  20. Commercial potting soils as an alternative infection source of Legionella pneumophila and other Legionella species in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Casati, S; Gioria-Martinoni, A; Gaia, V

    2009-06-01

    Legionella spp. are pathogens that can cause Legionnaires' disease in humans through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. The principal reservoir for these microorganisms is water, but Legionella spp. have been isolated from composted vegetable and plant material, and from many potting mixes as well. In Australia, there have been several cases of Legionnaires' disease in which Legionella longbeachae has been isolated from potting soils. In Switzerland, the source of infection cannot always be identified as water or cooling towers: therefore, we have investigated 46 commercially available potting soils in Switzerland to determine the presence of Legionella spp. We were able to detect Legionella spp. in 45.7% (21/46) of the potting soil samples analysed by culture. Legionella pneumophila was present in 19.6% (9/46) of the samples and L. pneumophila serogroup 1 in 6.5% (3/46). Quantification by both culture and quantitative real-time PCR revealed high concentrations of legionellae in potting soils, ranging between 10(3) CFU/g and 10(5) CFU/g and 10(4) genomic units (GU)/g and 10(6) GU/g, respectively. Thus, potting soils may represent an alternative reservoir for Legionella spp. in Switzerland.

  1. Reaction mechanism of adenylyltransferase DrrA from Legionella pneumophila elucidated by time-resolved fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gavriljuk, Konstantin; Schartner, Jonas; Itzen, Aymelt; Goody, Roger S; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2014-07-01

    Modulation of the function of small GTPases that regulate vesicular trafficking is a strategy employed by several human pathogens. Legionella pneumophila infects lung macrophages and injects a plethora of different proteins into its host cell. Among these is DrrA/SidM, which catalyzes stable adenylylation of Rab1b, a regulator of endoplasmatic reticulum to Golgi trafficking, and thereby alters the function and interactions of this small GTPase. We employed time-resolved FTIR-spectroscopy to monitor the DrrA-catalyzed AMP-transfer to Tyr77 of Rab1b. A transient complex between DrrA, adenylylated Rab1b, and the pyrophosphate byproduct was resolved, allowing us to analyze the interactions at the active site. Combination of isotopic labeling and site-directed mutagenesis allowed us to derive the catalytic mechanism of DrrA from the FTIR difference spectra. DrrA shares crucial residues in the ATP-binding pocket with similar AMP-transferring enzymes such as glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase or kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase, but provides the complete active site on a single subunit. We determined that Asp112 of DrrA functions as the catalytic base for deprotonation of Tyr77 of Rab1b to enable nucleophilic attack on the ATP. The study provides detailed understanding of the Legionella pneumophila protein DrrA and of AMP-transfer reactions in general.

  2. Cross-reactions in IgM ELISA tests to Legionella pneumophila sg1 and Bordetella pertussis among children suspected of legionellosis; potential impact of vaccination against pertussis?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was preliminary evaluation of IgM cross-reaction in sera collected from children hospitalized because of suspected legionellosis. Sera with positive IgM results to L. pneumophila sgs1-7, B. pertussis or with simultaneous detection of IgM antibodies to L. pneumophila sgs1-7 and B. pertussis, or IgM to L. pneumophila sgs1-7 and M. pneumoniae in routine tests, were selected. In total, an adapted pre-absorption test was used for the serological confirmation of legionellosis in the sera of 19 children suspected of legionellosis, and also in 3 adult persons with confirmed Legionnaires’ disease. Sera were pre-absorbed with antigens of L. pneumophila sg1, B. pertussis or both, and tested by ELISA tests. The reduction of IgM antibody level by pre-absorption with antigen/antigens was determined. Reduction of anti-Lpsgs1-7 IgM by pre-absorption with L.pneumophila sg1 antigen ranged from 1.5 to 80, and reduction of anti-Bp IgM by pre-absorption with B. pertussis ranged from 2.0 to 23.8. Reduction by both antigens varied depending on the age of the patients: among children <4 yrs.old, the reduction of anti-B. pertussis IgM by both antigens was higher than for B. pertussis antigen alone. Based on the high difference (≥ 2 times) between reduction by L.pneumophila sg1 and by B. pertussis antigen, legionellosis was confirmed in 8/19 children. The majority of them also indicated IgM positive/borderline results for B. pertussis or M.pneumoniae in routine ELISA tests. As a preliminary, we posed a hypothesis of a potential impact of an anti-pertussis vaccination on the results obtained in anti-L. pneumophila ELISA IgM tests among young children. PMID:26557032

  3. The novel Legionella pneumophila type II secretion substrate NttC contributes to infection of amoebae Hartmannella vermiformis and Willaertia magna

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, Jessica Y.; Vargas, Paloma

    2014-01-01

    The type II protein secretion (T2S) system of Legionella pneumophila secretes over 25 proteins, including novel proteins that have no similarity to proteins of known function. T2S is also critical for the ability of L. pneumophila to grow within its natural amoebal hosts, including Acanthamoeba castellanii, Hartmannella vermiformis and Naegleria lovaniensis. Thus, T2S has an important role in the natural history of legionnaires’ disease. Our previous work demonstrated that the novel T2S substrate NttA promotes intracellular infection of A. castellanii, whereas the secreted RNase SrnA, acyltransferase PlaC, and metalloprotease ProA all promote infection of H. vermiformis and N. lovaniensis. In this study, we determined that another novel T2S substrate that is specific to Legionella, designated NttC, is unique in being required for intracellular infection of H. vermiformis but not for infection of N. lovaniensis or A. castellanii. Expanding our repertoire of amoebal hosts, we determined that Willaertia magna is susceptible to infection by L. pneumophila strains 130b, Philadelphia-1 and Paris. Furthermore, T2S and, more specifically, NttA, NttC and PlaC were required for infection of W. magna. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the T2S system of L. pneumophila is critical for infection of at least four types of aquatic amoebae and that the importance of the individual T2S substrates varies in a host cell-specific fashion. Finally, it is now clear that novel T2S-dependent proteins that are specific to the genus Legionella are particularly important for L. pneumophila infection of key, environmental hosts. PMID:25253612

  4. Application of TaqMan fluorescent probe-based quantitative real-time PCR assay for the environmental survey of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila in drinking water reservoirs in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Kao, Po-Min; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Ji, Wen-Tsai; Huang, Po-Hsiang; Hsueh, Chih-Jen; Chiang, Chuen-Sheue; Huang, Shih-Wei; Huang, Yu-Li

    2014-08-15

    In this study, TaqMan fluorescent quantitative real-time PCR was performed to quantify Legionella species in reservoirs. Water samples were collected from 19 main reservoirs in Taiwan, and 12 (63.2%) were found to contain Legionella spp. The identified species included uncultured Legionella spp., L. pneumophila, L. jordanis, and L. drancourtii. The concentrations of Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila in the water samples were in the range of 1.8×10(2)-2.6×10(3) and 1.6×10(2)-2.4×10(2) cells/L, respectively. The presence and absence of Legionella spp. in the reservoir differed significantly in pH values. These results highlight the importance that L. pneumophila, L. jordanis, and L. drancourtii are potential pathogens in the reservoirs. The presence of L. pneumophila in reservoirs may be a potential public health concern that must be further examined.

  5. Molecular Typing of Legionella pneumophila Isolates in the Province of Quebec from 2005 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    Lalancette, Cindy; Bernard, Kathryn; Pacheco, Ana Luisa; Dion, Réjean; Longtin, Jean; Tremblay, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Legionella is found in natural and man-made aquatic environments, such as cooling towers and hot water plumbing infrastructures. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1) is the most common etiological agent causing waterborne disease in the United States and Canada. This study reports the molecular characterization of Lp strains during a 10 year period. We conducted sequence-based typing (SBT) analysis on a large set of Lp isolates (n = 284) to investigate the province of Quebec sequence types (STs) distribution in order to identify dominant clusters. From 2005 to 2015, 181 clinical Lp isolates were typed by SBT (141 sporadic cases and 40 outbreak related cases). From the same period of time, 103 environmental isolates were also typed. Amongst the 108 sporadic cases of Lp1 typed, ST-62 was the most frequent (16.6%), followed by ST-213 (10.2%), ST-1 (8.3%) and ST-37 (8.3%). Amongst other serogroups (SG), ST-1327 (SG5) (27.3%) and ST-378 (SG10) (12.2%) were the most frequent. From the environmental isolates, ST-1 represent the more frequent SBT type (26.5%). Unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) dendrogram from the 108 sporadic cases of SG1 contains 4 major clusters (A to D) of related STs. Cluster B contains the majority of the strains (n = 61) and the three most frequent STs in our database (ST-62, ST-213 and ST-1). During the study period, we observed an important increase in the incidence rate in Quebec. All the community associated outbreaks, potentially or confirmed to be associated with a cooling tower were caused by Lp1 strains, by opposition to hospital associated outbreaks that were caused by serogroups of Lp other than SG1. The recent major Quebec City outbreak caused by ST-62, and the fact that this genotype is the most common in the province supports whole genome sequencing characterization of this particular sequence type in order to understand its evolution and associated virulence factors. PMID:27706210

  6. Deepening Sleep by Hypnotic Suggestion

    PubMed Central

    Cordi, Maren J.; Schlarb, Angelika A.; Rasch, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Slow wave sleep (SWS) plays a critical role in body restoration and promotes brain plasticity; however, it markedly declines across the lifespan. Despite its importance, effective tools to increase SWS are rare. Here we tested whether a hypnotic suggestion to “sleep deeper” extends the amount of SWS. Design: Within-subject, placebo-controlled crossover design. Setting: Sleep laboratory at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. Participants: Seventy healthy females 23.27 ± 3.17 y. Intervention: Participants listened to an auditory text with hypnotic suggestions or a control tape before napping for 90 min while high-density electroencephalography was recorded. Measurements and Results: After participants listened to the hypnotic suggestion to “sleep deeper” subsequent SWS was increased by 81% and time spent awake was reduced by 67% (with the amount of SWS or wake in the control condition set to 100%). Other sleep stages remained unaffected. Additionally, slow wave activity was significantly enhanced after hypnotic suggestions. During the hypnotic tape, parietal theta power increases predicted the hypnosis-induced extension of SWS. Additional experiments confirmed that the beneficial effect of hypnotic suggestions on SWS was specific to the hypnotic suggestion and did not occur in low suggestible participants. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of hypnotic suggestions to specifically increase the amount and duration of slow wave sleep (SWS) in a midday nap using objective measures of sleep in young, healthy, suggestible females. Hypnotic suggestions might be a successful tool with a lower risk of adverse side effects than pharmacological treatments to extend SWS also in clinical and elderly populations. Citation: Cordi MJ, Schlarb AA, Rasch B. Deepening sleep by hypnotic suggestion. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1143-1152. PMID:24882909

  7. Legal Education Reform: Modest Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Alan

    2001-01-01

    Based on harsh criticism of legal education by students, offers suggestions for improvement that do not require additional time for law studies, will increase the exposure of students both to law as practice and to law as an intellectual discipline, and involve no greater burden on law schools. A main suggestion involves elimination of teaching…

  8. Crystal structure of a Legionella pneumophila ecto -triphosphate diphosphohydrolase, a structural and functional homolog of the eukaryotic NTPDases.

    PubMed

    Vivian, Julian P; Riedmaier, Patrice; Ge, Honghua; Le Nours, Jérôme; Sansom, Fiona M; Wilce, Matthew C J; Byres, Emma; Dias, Manisha; Schmidberger, Jason W; Cowan, Peter J; d'Apice, Anthony J F; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis

    2010-02-10

    Many pathogenic bacteria have sophisticated mechanisms to interfere with the mammalian immune response. These include the disruption of host extracellular ATP levels that, in humans, is tightly regulated by the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase family (NTPDases). NTPDases are found almost exclusively in eukaryotes, the notable exception being their presence in some pathogenic prokaryotes. To address the function of bacterial NTPDases, we describe the structures of an NTPDase from the pathogen Legionella pneumophila (Lpg1905/Lp1NTPDase) in its apo state and in complex with the ATP analog AMPPNP and the subtype-specific NTPDase inhibitor ARL 67156. Lp1NTPDase is structurally and catalytically related to eukaryotic NTPDases and the structure provides a basis for NTPDase-specific inhibition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the activity of Lp1NTPDase correlates directly with intracellular replication of Legionella within macrophages. Collectively, these findings provide insight into the mechanism of this enzyme and highlight its role in host-pathogen interactions.

  9. Crystal Structure of a Legionella pneumophila Ecto -Triphosphate Diphosphohydrolase, A Structural and Functional Homolog of the Eukaryotic NTPDases

    SciTech Connect

    Vivian, Julian P.; Riedmaier, Patrice; Ge, Honghua; Le Nours, Jérôme; Sansom, Fiona M.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Byres, Emma; Dias, Manisha; Schmidberger, Jason W.; Cowan, Peter J.; d'Apice, Anthony J.F.; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis

    2010-04-19

    Many pathogenic bacteria have sophisticated mechanisms to interfere with the mammalian immune response. These include the disruption of host extracellular ATP levels that, in humans, is tightly regulated by the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase family (NTPDases). NTPDases are found almost exclusively in eukaryotes, the notable exception being their presence in some pathogenic prokaryotes. To address the function of bacterial NTPDases, we describe the structures of an NTPDase from the pathogen Legionella pneumophila (Lpg1905/Lp1NTPDase) in its apo state and in complex with the ATP analog AMPPNP and the subtype-specific NTPDase inhibitor ARL 67156. Lp1NTPDase is structurally and catalytically related to eukaryotic NTPDases and the structure provides a basis for NTPDase-specific inhibition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the activity of Lp1NTPDase correlates directly with intracellular replication of Legionella within macrophages. Collectively, these findings provide insight into the mechanism of this enzyme and highlight its role in host-pathogen interactions.

  10. First report of Legionella pneumophila in car cabin air filters. Are these a potential exposure pathway for professional drivers?

    PubMed

    Alexandropoulou, Ioanna G; Konstantinidis, Theocharis G; Parasidis, Theodoros A; Nikolaidis, Christos; Panopoulou, Maria; Constantinidis, Theodoros C

    2013-12-01

    Recent findings have identified professional drivers as being at an increased risk of Legionnaires' disease. Our hypothesis was that used car cabin air filters represent a reservoir of Legionella bacteria, and thus a potential pathway for contamination. We analysed used cabin air filters from various types of car. The filters were analysed by culture and by molecular methods. Our findings indicated that almost a third of air filters were colonized with Legionella pneumophila. Here, we present the first finding of Legionella spp. in used car cabin air filters. Further investigations are needed in order to confirm this exposure pathway. The presence of Legionella bacteria in used cabin air filters may have been an unknown source of infection until now.

  11. First report of Legionella pneumophila in car cabin air filters. Are these a potential exposure pathway for professional drivers?

    PubMed

    Alexandropoulou, Ioanna G; Konstantinidis, Theocharis G; Parasidis, Theodoros A; Nikolaidis, Christos; Panopoulou, Maria; Constantinidis, Theodoros C

    2013-12-01

    Recent findings have identified professional drivers as being at an increased risk of Legionnaires' disease. Our hypothesis was that used car cabin air filters represent a reservoir of Legionella bacteria, and thus a potential pathway for contamination. We analysed used cabin air filters from various types of car. The filters were analysed by culture and by molecular methods. Our findings indicated that almost a third of air filters were colonized with Legionella pneumophila. Here, we present the first finding of Legionella spp. in used car cabin air filters. Further investigations are needed in order to confirm this exposure pathway. The presence of Legionella bacteria in used cabin air filters may have been an unknown source of infection until now. PMID:24099652

  12. Reciprocal expression of integration host factor and HU in the developmental cycle and infectivity of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Morash, Michael G; Brassinga, Ann Karen C; Warthan, Michelle; Gourabathini, Poornima; Garduño, Rafael A; Goodman, Steven D; Hoffman, Paul S

    2009-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular parasite of protozoa that differentiates late in infection into metabolically dormant cysts that are highly infectious. Regulation of this process is poorly understood. Here we report that the small DNA binding regulatory proteins integration host factor (IHF) and HU are reciprocally expressed over the developmental cycle, with HU expressed during exponential phase and IHF expressed postexponentially. To assess the role of these regulatory proteins in development, chromosomal deletions were constructed. Single (ihfA or ihfB) and double deletion (Deltaihf) IHF mutants failed to grow in Acanthamoeba castellanii unless complemented in trans when expressed temporally from the ihfA promoter but not under P(tac) (isopropyl-beta-d-thiogalactopyranoside). In contrast, IHF mutants were infectious for HeLa cells, though electron microscopic examination revealed defects in late-stage cyst morphogenesis (thickened cell wall, intracytoplasmic membranes, and inclusions of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate), and were depressed for the developmental marker MagA. Green fluorescent protein promoter fusion assays indicated that IHF and the stationary-phase sigma factor RpoS were required for full postexponential expression of magA. Finally, defects in cyst morphogenesis noted for Deltaihf mutants in HeLa cells correlated with a loss of both detergent resistance and hyperinfectivity compared with results for wild-type cysts. These studies establish IHF and HU as markers of developmental stages and show that IHF function is required for both differentiation and full virulence of L. pneumophila in natural amoebic hosts. PMID:19201975

  13. Legionella pneumophila induces cathepsin B-dependent necrotic cell death with releasing high mobility group box1 in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Legionella pneumophila (LPN) can cause a lethal infectious disease with a marked inflammatory response in humans. However, the mechanism of this severe inflammation remains poorly understood. Since necrosis is known to induce inflammation, we investigated whether LPN induces necrosis in macrophages. We also analyzed the involvement of lysosomal cathepsin B in LPN-induced cell death. Methods The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was infected with LPN, NUL1 strain. MG132-treated cells were used as apoptotic control cells. After infection, the type of cell death was analyzed by using microscopy, LDH release and flow cytometry. As a proinflammatory mediator, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1), was measured. Cathepsin B activity was also measured and the inhibitory effects of cathepsin B on LPN-induced cell death were analyzed. Results THP-1 cells after treatment with high dose of LPN showed necrotic features with releasing HMGB-1. This necrosis and the HMGB-1 release were inhibited by a specific lysosomal cathepsin B inhibitor and were characterized by a rapid and high activation of cathepsin B that was not observed in apoptotic control cells. The necrosis was also accompanied by cathepsin B-dependent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Conclusions We demonstrate here that L. pneumophila rapidly induces cathepsin B-dependent necrosis in a dose-dependent manner and releases a proinflammatory mediator, HMGB-1, from macrophages. This report describes a novel aspect of the pathogenesis of Legionnaires' disease and provides a possible therapeutic target for the regulation of inflammation. PMID:21092200

  14. Coexistence of Legionella pneumophila Bacteria and Free-Living Amoebae in Lakes Serving as a Cooling System of a Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Zbikowska, Elżbieta; Kletkiewicz, Hanna; Walczak, Maciej; Burkowska, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed at determining whether potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae (FLA) and Legionella pneumophila can be found in lakes serving as a natural cooling system of a power plant. Water samples were collected from five lakes forming the cooling system of the power plants Pątnów and Konin (Poland). The numbers of investigated organisms were determined with the use of a very sensitive molecular method-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The result of the present study shows that thermally altered aquatic environments provide perfect conditions for the growth of L. pneumophila and amoebae. The bacteria were identified in the biofilm throughout the entire research period and in the subsurface water layer in July and August. Hartmanella sp. and/or Naegleria fowleri were identified in the biofilm throughout the entire research period. PMID:25132694

  15. Coexistence of Legionella pneumophila Bacteria and Free-Living Amoebae in Lakes Serving as a Cooling System of a Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Zbikowska, Elżbieta; Kletkiewicz, Hanna; Walczak, Maciej; Burkowska, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed at determining whether potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae (FLA) and Legionella pneumophila can be found in lakes serving as a natural cooling system of a power plant. Water samples were collected from five lakes forming the cooling system of the power plants Pątnów and Konin (Poland). The numbers of investigated organisms were determined with the use of a very sensitive molecular method-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The result of the present study shows that thermally altered aquatic environments provide perfect conditions for the growth of L. pneumophila and amoebae. The bacteria were identified in the biofilm throughout the entire research period and in the subsurface water layer in July and August. Hartmanella sp. and/or Naegleria fowleri were identified in the biofilm throughout the entire research period.

  16. The use of heteroduplex analysis of polymerase chain reaction products to support the possible transmission of Legionella pneumophila from a malfunctioning automobile air conditioner.

    PubMed

    Pinar, Ahmet; Ramirez, Julio A; Schindler, Laura L; Miller, Richard D; Summersgill, James T

    2002-03-01

    Air conditioner condensates have not been previously associated with cases of Legionnaires' disease. We report the possible transmission of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 from a malfunctioning automobile air conditioning system's leaking water onto the floorboard of a car driven for a long distance by the patient. Heteroduplex analysis of polymerase chain reaction products was used to help establish an epidemiologic link between the water specimen and the patient. PMID:11918120

  17. Seasonal distribution of Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila in a river in Taiwan evaluated with culture-confirmed and direct DNA extraction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Min-Che; Chang, Tien-Yu; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Shen, Shu-Min; Huang, Jen-Te; Kao, Po-Min; Chiu, Yi-Chou; Fan, Cheng-Wei; Huang, Yu-Li

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the presence and amount of Legionella in along a river in Taiwan, and the relations between seasonal distribution of Legionella spp. and geographic characteristics in the watershed were also evaluated. Water samples were pre-treated and analyzed with culture-confirmed and direct DNA extraction methods. For culture-confirmed method, water samples were cultivated through a series of selective media, and candidate colonies were confirmed by PCR. For direct DNA extraction method, direct DNA extraction was performed from pre-treated water samples. The DNA extracts were analyzed with PCR and DNA sequence analysis for species determination, quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed to quantify Legionella concentration in the water sample. In all, 150 water samples were included in this study, with 73 (48.6%) water samples detected with Legionella spp., and 17 with L. pneumophila. Over 80% Legionella spp. detections were through direct DNA extraction method, but more than 80% L. pneumophila detections were through culture-confirmed method. While detection of Legionella spp. was done with two methods, positive results were found through only one method. Legionella spp. was detected in all seasons with detection rate ranging between 34.3-58.8% and seasonal average concentration from 1.9 × 102 to 7.1 × 103 CFU/L. Most of the L. pneumophila detections were from samples collected in fall (38.2%) and summer (6.0%), which also coincided with increased cases of Legionellosis reported through Center of Disease Control in Taiwan. The high prevalence and concentration of Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila in the surface waters should be further evaluated for potential health risks.

  18. 10 Suggestions for Enhancing Lecturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzmann, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Criticism of the lecture method remains a staple of discussion and writing in academia--and most of the time it's deserved! Those interested in improving this aspect of their teaching might wish to consider some or all of the following suggestions for enhancing lectures. These include: (1) Lectures must start with a "grabber"; (2) Lectures must be…

  19. Models: Caveats, Reflections, and Suggestions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschling, Wayne R.

    1976-01-01

    Noting that mathematical modeling is a relatively new phenomenon in higher education and that much can be learned from the misdirections and mistakes that characterize modeling in general, the author describes major criticisms of modeling and suggests improvements, particularly in communication between modelers and potential model users. (JT)

  20. The Dot/Icm effector SdhA is necessary for virulence of Legionella pneumophila in Galleria mellonella and A/J mice.

    PubMed

    Harding, Clare R; Stoneham, Charlotte A; Schuelein, Ralf; Newton, Hayley; Oates, Clare V; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Schroeder, Gunnar N; Frankel, Gad

    2013-07-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterium that resides within amoebae and macrophages in a specialized compartment termed the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). As well as providing an intracellular niche for replication, the LCV helps to prevent the release of bacterial components into the cytoplasm. Recognition of these components as danger signals by the host activates immune responses leading to clearance of the bacterium. Here, we examined the role of two important virulence factors of L. pneumophila, the potent danger signal flagellin and the translocated Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system effector SdhA, which is crucial to maintain LCV integrity, in the Galleria mellonella infection model. We demonstrate that flagellin expression does not contribute to virulence, replication, or induction of clearance mechanisms. Conversely, SdhA expression is important for virulence. We found that in the absence of SdhA, the LCV in hemocytes showed signs of instability and leakage. Furthermore, in contrast to wild-type L. pneumophila, a ΔsdhA mutant caused a transient depletion of hemocytes and reduced mortality. Analysis of the ΔsdhA mutant in the A/J mouse model also showed a significant replication defect. Together, our data underline the crucial importance of SdhA in infection across different model organisms.

  1. The Dot/Icm Effector SdhA Is Necessary for Virulence of Legionella pneumophila in Galleria mellonella and A/J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Clare R.; Stoneham, Charlotte A.; Schuelein, Ralf; Newton, Hayley; Oates, Clare V.; Hartland, Elizabeth L.

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterium that resides within amoebae and macrophages in a specialized compartment termed the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). As well as providing an intracellular niche for replication, the LCV helps to prevent the release of bacterial components into the cytoplasm. Recognition of these components as danger signals by the host activates immune responses leading to clearance of the bacterium. Here, we examined the role of two important virulence factors of L. pneumophila, the potent danger signal flagellin and the translocated Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system effector SdhA, which is crucial to maintain LCV integrity, in the Galleria mellonella infection model. We demonstrate that flagellin expression does not contribute to virulence, replication, or induction of clearance mechanisms. Conversely, SdhA expression is important for virulence. We found that in the absence of SdhA, the LCV in hemocytes showed signs of instability and leakage. Furthermore, in contrast to wild-type L. pneumophila, a ΔsdhA mutant caused a transient depletion of hemocytes and reduced mortality. Analysis of the ΔsdhA mutant in the A/J mouse model also showed a significant replication defect. Together, our data underline the crucial importance of SdhA in infection across different model organisms. PMID:23649096

  2. Development of an improved PCR-ICT hybrid assay for direct detection of Legionellae and Legionella pneumophila from cooling tower water specimens.

    PubMed

    Horng, Yu-Tze; Soo, Po-Chi; Shen, Bin-Jon; Hung, Yu-Li; Lo, Kai-Yin; Su, Hsun-Pi; Wei, Jun-Rong; Hsieh, Shang-Chen; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2006-06-01

    A novelly improved polymerase chian reaction and immunochromatography test (PCR-ICT) hybrid assay comprising traditional multiplex-nested PCR and ICT, (a lateral-flow device) was developed for direct detection of Legionella bacteria from environmental cooling tower samples. The partial 16S rDNA (specific for Legionella spp.) and dnaJ (specific for Legionella pneumophila) genes from Legionella chromosome were first specifically amplified by multiplex-nested PCR, respectively, followed by detection using ICT strip. Reading of results was based on presence or absence of the two test lines on the strips. Presence of test line 1 indicated existence of Legionella spp. specific 16S rDNA and identified Legionella spp. Presence of test line 2 further indicated existence of dnaJ and thus specifically identified L. pneumophila. In contrast, for non-Legionellae bacteria no test line formation was observed. Results of direct detection of Legionella bacteria and L. pneumophila from water tower specimens by this assay showed 100% sensitivity, and 96.6% and 100% specificity, respectively compared with traditional culture, biochemical and serological identification methods. The PCR-ICT hybrid assay does not require sophisticated equipment and was proved to be practically useful in rapid and direct Legionellae detection from environmental water samples. PMID:16713613

  3. Virulence of patient and water isolates of Legionella pneumophila in guinea pigs and mouse L929 cells varies with bacterial genotype.

    PubMed

    Bezanson, G; Fernandez, R; Haldane, D; Burbridge, S; Marrie, T

    1994-06-01

    Thirteen isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (five from patients, eight from water) were screened for their virulence in guinea pigs after intraperitoneal injection and for their infectivity in L929 mouse cells. Since these isolates included three monoclonal antibody subtypes and four genotypes, the relative influence of these parameters on the pathogenicity of naturally occurring L. pneumophila could be assessed. There was no correlation between infectivity in the L929 assay and virulence for guinea pigs. The source of the isolate, patient or environmental, as well as the isolate's monoclonal antibody subtype did not correlate with virulence. At the p < 0.05 level, isolates with genotype IIb (20-MDa plasmid and EcoRI fragmentation pattern b) were significantly more virulent (mean log LD50 6.84) than genotype VIb (100-MDa plasmid, pattern b), IIId (72- and 96-MDa plasmids, pattern d) or Oc (no detectable plasmid, pattern c) isolates. Genotype IIId isolates were the least virulent (mean log LD50 9.49). Plasmid-containing isolates were more infective than plasmidless ones in L929 cells (p = 0.0001). We conclude that our strain types of L. pneumophila exhibit a gradation in virulence for guinea pigs and that infectivity in L929 cells does not correlate with virulence for guinea pigs. PMID:8050062

  4. Molecular diversity and high virulence of Legionella pneumophila strains isolated from biofilms developed within a warm spring of a thermal spa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several cases of legionellosis have been diagnosed in the same French thermal spa in 1986, 1994 and 1997. L. pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1) strains have been isolated from several patients, but the source of contamination was not identified despite the presence of different Lp1 in water samples of the three natural springs feeding the spa at this period. Results Our strategy was to investigate L. pneumophila (Lp) strains from natural biofilms developed in a sulphur-rich warm spring of this contaminated site. Biofilm analysis revealed the presence of three Lp serogroups (Lp1, Lp10 and Lp12). Surprisingly, Lp10 and Lp12 were not reported in the previous described studies from water samples. Besides, the new seven Lp1 we isolated exhibit a high molecular diversity and have been differentiated in five classes according to their DNA genome patterns obtained by PFGE and mip sequences. It must be noted that these DNA patterns are original and unknown in databases. Interestingly, the 27 Lp environmental strains we isolated display a higher cytotoxicity and virulence towards the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii than those of known Lp1 epidemic strains. Conclusion The characteristics of Legionella pneumophila Lp1 strains isolated from the warm spring are in agreement with their presence in biofilms and their probable long-term persistence in this ecosystem. PMID:23350929

  5. Suggestions for better election security.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.G.; Warner, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary of Common Security Mistakes: (1) Electronic voting machines that fundamentally lack security thought and features, including an ability to detect tampering or intrusion, or to be reliably locked or sealed; (2) Failure to disassemble, inspect, and thoroughly inspect (not just test) a sufficient number of voting machines before and after elections in order to detect hardware or software tampering; (3) Assuming that tamper - indicating seals will either be blatantly ripped/smashed open, or else there is no tampering. In reality, even amateurs can spoof most seals leaving (at most) subtle evidence; (4) Inadequate seal use protocols and training of seal installers and inspectors. Failure to show examples of blatantly and subtly attacked seals to seal inspectors; (5) Over confidence in use of a voter verified paper record (VVPR), a VVPR is an excellent security countermeasure, but it is not a silver bullet, especially for an election organization with poor overall security; (6) Little or no insider thr at mitigation; and (7) A poor security culture, including denial and no a priori procedures for dealing with security questions or concerns.

  6. [Comparison of conventional culture methods and quantitative real-time PCR methods for the detection of Legionella pneumophila in water samples in a large University teaching hospital in Rome, Italy].

    PubMed

    Boccia, Stefania; Laurenti, Patrizia; Leoncini, Emanuele; Amore, Rosarita; Vincenti, Sara; Arzani, Dario; Berloco, Filippo; Boninti, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Celani, Fabrizio; Damiani, Gianfranco; Di Giannantonio, Paolo; Moscato, Umberto; Posteraro, Brunella; Sezzatini, Romina; Vecchioni, Alessia; Wachocka, Malgorzata; Ricciardi, Walter; Quaranta, Gianluigi; Ficarra, Maria Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the best threshold value for the real-time PCR method in detecting the presence of Legionella pneumophila in water samples, and to evaluate the prognostic significance of negative results obtained with the molecular method. From 2011 to 2014, 77 water samples were collected from hospital wards of a large University teaching hospital in Rome (Italy) and screened for L.pneumophila by the standard culture method and by real-time PCR. The high sensitivity and negative predictive value of real-time PCR make this method suitable as a quick screening tool to exclude the presence of L. pneumophila in water samples in the hospital setting.

  7. Short-Term and Long-Term Survival and Virulence of Legionella pneumophila in the Defined Freshwater Medium Fraquil

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Nilmini; McBride, Peter; Faucher, Sébastien P.

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila (Lp) is the etiological agent responsible for Legionnaires’ disease, a potentially fatal pulmonary infection. Lp lives and multiplies inside protozoa in a variety of natural and man-made water systems prior to human infection. Fraquil, a defined freshwater medium, was used as a highly reproducible medium to study the behaviour of Lp in water. Adopting a reductionist approach, Fraquil was used to study the impact of temperature, pH and trace metal levels on the survival and subsequent intracellular multiplication of Lp in Acanthamoeba castellanii, a freshwater protozoan and a natural host of Legionella. We show that temperature has a significant impact on the short- and long-term survival of Lp, but that the bacterium retains intracellular multiplication potential for over six months in Fraquil. Moreover, incubation in Fraquil at pH 4.0 resulted in a rapid decline in colony forming units, but was not detrimental to intracellular multiplication. In contrast, variations in trace metal concentrations had no impact on either survival or intracellular multiplication in amoeba. Our data show that Lp is a resilient bacterium in the water environment, remaining infectious to host cells after six months under the nutrient-deprived conditions of Fraquil. PMID:26406895

  8. MavN is a Legionella pneumophila vacuole-associated protein required for efficient iron acquisition during intracellular growth

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Dervla T.; Laguna, Rita K.; Valtz, Nicole; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and virulence of most intravacuolar pathogens. The mechanisms by which microbes bypass host iron restriction to gain access to this metal across the host vacuolar membrane are poorly characterized. In this work, we identify a unique intracellular iron acquisition strategy used by Legionella pneumophila. The bacterial Icm/Dot (intracellular multiplication/defect in organelle trafficking) type IV secretion system targets the bacterial-derived MavN (more regions allowing vacuolar colocalization N) protein to the surface of the Legionella-containing vacuole where this putative transmembrane protein facilitates intravacuolar iron acquisition. The ΔmavN mutant exhibits a transcriptional iron-starvation signature before its growth is arrested during the very early stages of macrophage infection. This intracellular growth defect is rescued only by the addition of excess exogenous iron to the culture medium and not a variety of other metals. Consistent with MavN being a translocated substrate that plays an exclusive role during intracellular growth, the mutant shows no defect for growth in broth culture, even under severe iron-limiting conditions. Putative iron-binding residues within the MavN protein were identified, and point mutations in these residues resulted in defects specific for intracellular growth that are indistinguishable from the ΔmavN mutant. This model of a bacterial protein inserting into host membranes to mediate iron transport provides a paradigm for how intravacuolar pathogens can use virulence-associated secretion systems to manipulate and acquire host iron. PMID:26330609

  9. Structural basis for PI(4)P-specific membrane recruitment of the Legionella pneumophila effector DrrA/SidM.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Claudia M; Mishra, Ashwini K; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Roy, Craig R; Janmey, Paul A; Lambright, David G

    2014-03-01

    Recruitment of the Legionella pneumophila effector DrrA to the Legionella-containing vacuole, where it activates and AMPylates Rab1, is mediated by a P4M domain that binds phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] with high affinity and specificity. Despite the importance of PI(4)P in Golgi trafficking and its manipulation by pathogens, the structural bases for PI(4)P-dependent membrane recruitment remain poorly defined. Here, we determined the crystal structure of a DrrA fragment including the P4M domain in complex with dibutyl PI(4)P and investigated the determinants of phosphoinositide recognition and membrane targeting. Headgroup recognition involves an elaborate network of direct and water-mediated interactions with basic and polar residues in the context of a deep, constrictive binding pocket. An adjacent hydrophobic helical element packs against the acyl chains and inserts robustly into PI(4)P-containing monolayers. The structural, biochemical, and biophysical data reported here support a detailed structural mechanism for PI(4)P-dependent membrane targeting by DrrA.

  10. Rapid detection of total and viable Legionella pneumophila in tap water by immunomagnetic separation, double fluorescent staining and flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Keserue, Hans‐Anton; Baumgartner, Andreas; Felleisen, Richard; Egli, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Summary We developed a rapid detection method for Legionella pneumophila (Lp) by filtration, immunomagnetic separation, double fluorescent staining, and flow cytometry (IMS‐FCM method). The method requires 120 min and can discriminate ‘viable’ and ‘membrane‐damaged’ cells. The recovery is over 85% of spiked Lp SG 1 cells in 1 l of tap water and detection limits are around 50 and 15 cells per litre for total and viable Lp, respectively. The method was compared using water samples from house installations in a blind study with three environmental laboratories performing the ISO 11731 plating method. In 53% of the water samples from different taps and showers significantly higher concentrations of Lp were detected by flow cytometry. No correlation to the plate culture method was found. Since also ‘viable but not culturable’ (VNBC) cells are detected by our method, this result was expected. The IMS‐FCM method is limited by the specificity of the used antibodies; in the presented case they target Lp serogroups 1–12. This and the fact that no Lp‐containing amoebae are detected may explain why in 21% of all samples higher counts were observed using the plate culture method. Though the IMS‐FCM method is not yet fit to completely displace the established plating method (ISO 11731) for routine Lp monitoring, it has major advantages to plating and can quickly provide important insights into the ecology of this pathogen in water distribution systems. PMID:23062200

  11. Evidence of the Presence of a Functional Dot/Icm Type IV-B Secretion System in the Fish Bacterial Pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Fernando A.; Tobar, Jaime A.; Henríquez, Vitalia; Sola, Mariel; Altamirano, Claudia; Marshall, Sergio H.

    2013-01-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is a fish bacterial pathogen that has severely challenged the sustainability of the Chilean salmon industry since its appearance in 1989. As this Gram-negative bacterium has been poorly characterized, relevant aspects of its life cycle, virulence and pathogenesis must be identified in order to properly design prophylactic procedures. This report provides evidence of the functional presence in P. salmonis of four genes homologous to those described for Dot/Icm Type IV Secretion Systems. The Dot/Icm System, the major virulence mechanism of phylogenetically related pathogens Legionella pneumophila and Coxiella burnetii, is responsible for their intracellular survival and multiplication, conditions that may also apply to P. salmonis. Our results demonstrate that the four P. salmonis dot/icm homologues (dotB, dotA, icmK and icmE) are expressed both during in vitro tissue culture cells infection and growing in cell-free media, suggestive of their putative constitutive expression. Additionally, as it happens in other referential bacterial systems, temporal acidification of cell-free media results in over expression of all four P. salmonis genes, a well-known strategy by which SSTIV-containing bacteria inhibit phagosome-lysosome fusion to survive. These findings are very important to understand the virulence mechanisms of P. salmonis in order to design new prophylactic alternatives to control the disease. PMID:23383004

  12. Construction of recombinant Mip-FlaA dominant epitope vaccine against Legionella pneumophila and evaluation of the immunogenicity and protective immunity.

    PubMed

    He, Jinlei; Zhang, Junrong; He, Yanxia; Huang, Fan; Li, Jiao; Chen, Qiwei; Chen, Dali; Chen, Jianping

    2016-02-01

    Legionnaires' disease, a kind of systemic disease with pneumonia as the main manifestation, is caused by Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila). In order to prevent the disease, we optimized Mip and FlaA, the virulence factors of L. pneumophila, to design recombinant Mip-FlaA dominant epitope vaccine against the pathogen. Firstly, the coding sequences of mip and flaA were optimized by DNAStar software and Expasy protein analysis system, and then, the tertiary structure and function of recombinant Mip-FlaA were predicted by PHYRE2 Protein Fold Recognition Server. After that, the optimized mip, flaA and mip-flaA were cloned, expressed and purified, and the proteins were used as dominant epitope vaccines to immunize BABL/c mice. Moreover, the IgG titers, histological changes in lung and the level of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6 and IL-1β were detected to reflect the immunogenicity and protective immunity of the vaccines. The results of SDS-PAGE and Western blot proved the recombinant Mip-FlaA was successfully expressed. ELISA results of IgG titers and these cytokines showed Mip-FlaA group was capable to induce the strongest immune response, compared to PBS, Mip and FlaA groups. In addition, histopathology analysis demonstrated the mice immunized with Mip-FlaA showed better immune protection. Therefore, the work indicated that the above-described biological tools were useful in optimization of epitope vaccine. Antigenic characterization and immune protection of recombinant Mip-FlaA would be of great value in understanding the immunopathogenesis of the disease and in developing possible vaccine against the pathogen.

  13. Prevalence of Sequence Types among Clinical and Environmental Isolates of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 in the United States from 1982 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A.; Lucas, Claressa E.; Brown, Ellen; Pondo, Tracy; Taylor, Thomas H.; Frace, Michael; Miskowski, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Since the establishment of sequence-based typing as the gold standard for DNA-based typing of Legionella pneumophila, the Legionella laboratory at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has conducted routine sequence-based typing (SBT) analysis of all incoming L. pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1) isolates to identify potential links between cases and to better understand genetic diversity and clonal expansion among L. pneumophila bacteria. Retrospective genotyping of Lp1 isolates from sporadic cases and Legionnaires' disease (LD) outbreaks deposited into the CDC reference collection since 1982 has been completed. For this study, we compared the distribution of sequence types (STs) among Lp1 isolates implicated in 26 outbreaks in the United States, 571 clinical isolates from sporadic cases of LD in the United States, and 149 environmental isolates with no known association with LD. The Lp1 isolates under study had been deposited into our collection between 1982 and 2012. We identified 17 outbreak-associated STs, 153 sporadic STs, and 49 environmental STs. We observed that Lp1 STs from outbreaks and sporadic cases are more similar to each other than either group is to environmental STs. The most frequent ST for both sporadic and environmental isolates was ST1, accounting for 25% and 49% of the total number of isolates, respectively. The STs shared by both outbreak-associated and sporadic Lp1 included ST1, ST35, ST36, ST37, and ST222. The STs most commonly found in sporadic and outbreak-associated Lp1 populations may have an increased ability to cause disease and thus may require special attention when detected. PMID:24197883

  14. Comparison of radioimmunoassay and enzyme immunoassay kits for detection of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigen in both concentrated and nonconcentrated urine samples.

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, J A; Matas, L; Manterola, J M; Blavia, R; Sopena, N; Belda, F J; Padilla, E; Giménez, M; Sabrià, M; Morera, J; Ausina, V

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kit for detection of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 soluble antigen by comparing it to radioimmunoassay (RIA), using both concentrated and nonconcentrated urine samples. The sensitivity of EIA was 67.4% in nonconcentrated urine samples and 82.6% in concentrated urine samples. The sensitivity of RIA was 60.9% and 84.8% in nonconcentrated and concentrated urine samples, respectively. Our study indicates that the sensitivity and specificity of EIA are comparable to those of RIA, and that concentrating the antigen by selective ultrafiltration increases sensitivity for both EIA and RIA, with no significant decrease in specificity. PMID:9163502

  15. The Legionella pneumophila GTPase Activating Protein LepB Accelerates Rab1 Deactivation by a Non-canonical Hydrolytic Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ashwini K.; Del Campo, Claudia M.; Collins, Robert E.; Roy, Craig R.; Lambright, David G.

    2013-01-01

    GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) from pathogenic bacteria and eukaryotic host organisms deactivate Rab GTPases by supplying catalytic arginine and glutamine fingers in trans and utilizing the cis-glutamine in the DXXGQ motif of the GTPase for binding rather than catalysis. Here, we report the transition state mimetic structure of the Legionella pneumophila GAP LepB in complex with Rab1 and describe a comprehensive structure-based mutational analysis of potential catalytic and recognition determinants. The results demonstrate that LepB does not simply mimic other GAPs but instead deploys an expected arginine finger in conjunction with a novel glutamic acid finger, which forms a salt bridge with an indispensible switch II arginine that effectively locks the cis-glutamine in the DXXGQ motif of Rab1 in a catalytically competent though unprecedented transition state configuration. Surprisingly, a heretofore universal transition state interaction with the cis-glutamine is supplanted by an elaborate polar network involving critical P-loop and switch I serines. LepB further employs an unusual tandem domain architecture to clamp a switch I tyrosine in an open conformation that facilitates access of the arginine finger to the hydrolytic site. Intriguingly, the critical P-loop serine corresponds to an oncogenic substitution in Ras and replaces a conserved glycine essential for the canonical transition state stereochemistry. In addition to expanding GTP hydrolytic paradigms, these observations reveal the unconventional dual finger and non-canonical catalytic network mechanisms of Rab GAPs as necessary alternative solutions to a major impediment imposed by substitution of the conserved P-loop glycine. PMID:23821544

  16. Efficacy of copper and silver ions and reduced levels of free chlorine in inactivation of Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Landeen, L.K.; Yahya, M.T.; Gerba, C.P. )

    1989-12-01

    Water disinfection systems utilizing electrolytically generated copper and silver ions (200 and 20, 400 and 40, or 800 and 80 {mu}g/liter) and low levels of free chlorine (0.1 to 0.4 mg/liter) were evaluated at room (21 to 23{degree}C) and elevated (39 to 40{degree}C) temperatures in filtered well water (pH 7.3) for their efficacy in inactivating Legionella pneumophila (ATCC 33155). At room temperature, a contact time of at least 24 h was necessary for copper and silver (400 and 40 {mu}g/liter) to achieve a 3-log{sub 10} reduction in bacterial numbers. As the copper and silver concentration increased to 800 and 80 {mu}g/liter, the inactivation rate significantly increased. In water systems with and without copper and silver (400 and 40 {mu}g/liter), to inactivation rates significantly increased as the free chlorine concentration increased from 0.1 mg/liter to 0.4 mg/liter. Compared to room temperature, no significant differences were observed when 0.2 mg of free chlorine per liter with and without 400 and 40 {mu}g of copper and silver per liter was tested at 39 to 40{degree}C. All disinfection systems, regardless of temperature or free chlorine concentration, showed increased inactivation rates when 400 and 40 {mu}g of copper and silver per liter was added; however, this trend was significant only at 0.4 mg of free chlorine per liter.

  17. Molecular Characterization of Legionellosis Drug Target Candidate Enzyme Phosphoglucosamine Mutase from Legionella pneumophila (strain Paris): An In Silico Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Habibul Hasan; Khan, Arif; Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Chowdhury, Homaun Kabir

    2014-01-01

    The harshness of legionellosis differs from mild Pontiac fever to potentially fatal Legionnaire's disease. The increasing development of drug resistance against legionellosis has led to explore new novel drug targets. It has been found that phosphoglucosamine mutase, phosphomannomutase, and phosphoglyceromutase enzymes can be used as the most probable therapeutic drug targets through extensive data mining. Phosphoglucosamine mutase is involved in amino sugar and nucleotide sugar metabolism. The purpose of this study was to predict the potential target of that specific drug. For this, the 3D structure of phosphoglucosamine mutase of Legionella pneumophila (strain Paris) was determined by means of homology modeling through Phyre2 and refined by ModRefiner. Then, the designed model was evaluated with a structure validation program, for instance, PROCHECK, ERRAT, Verify3D, and QMEAN, for further structural analysis. Secondary structural features were determined through self-optimized prediction method with alignment (SOPMA) and interacting networks by STRING. Consequently, we performed molecular docking studies. The analytical result of PROCHECK showed that 95.0% of the residues are in the most favored region, 4.50% are in the additional allowed region and 0.50% are in the generously allowed region of the Ramachandran plot. Verify3D graph value indicates a score of 0.71 and 89.791, 1.11 for ERRAT and QMEAN respectively. Arg419, Thr414, Ser412, and Thr9 were found to dock the substrate for the most favorable binding of S-mercaptocysteine. However, these findings from this current study will pave the way for further extensive investigation of this enzyme in wet lab experiments and in that way assist drug design against legionellosis. PMID:25705169

  18. csrR, a Paralog and Direct Target of CsrA, Promotes Legionella pneumophila Resilience in Water

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Zachary D.; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Critical to microbial versatility is the capacity to express the cohort of genes that increase fitness in different environments. Legionella pneumophila occupies extensive ecological space that includes diverse protists, pond water, engineered water systems, and mammalian lung macrophages. One mechanism that equips this opportunistic pathogen to adapt to fluctuating conditions is a switch between replicative and transmissive cell types that is controlled by the broadly conserved regulatory protein CsrA. A striking feature of the legionellae surveyed is that each of 14 strains encodes 4 to 7 csrA-like genes, candidate regulators of distinct fitness traits. Here we focus on the one csrA paralog (lpg1593) that, like the canonical csrA, is conserved in all 14 strains surveyed. Phenotypic analysis revealed that long-term survival in tap water is promoted by the lpg1593 locus, which we name csrR (for “CsrA-similar protein for resilience”). As predicted by its GGA motif, csrR mRNA was bound directly by the canonical CsrA protein, as judged by electromobility shift and RNA-footprinting assays. Furthermore, CsrA repressed translation of csrR mRNA in vivo, as determined by analysis of csrR-gfp reporters, csrR mRNA stability in the presence and absence of csrA expression, and mutation of the CsrA binding site identified on the csrR mRNA. Thus, CsrA not only governs the transition from replication to transmission but also represses translation of its paralog csrR when nutrients are available. We propose that, during prolonged starvation, relief of CsrA repression permits CsrR protein to coordinate L. pneumophila’s switch to a cell type that is resilient in water supplies. PMID:26060275

  19. Major cytoplasmic membrane protein of Legionella pneumophila, a genus common antigen and member of the hsp 60 family of heat shock proteins, induces protective immunity in a guinea pig model of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Blander, S J; Horwitz, M A

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the capacity of the major cytoplasmic membrane protein (MCMP) of Legionella pneumophila, a genus common antigen and member of the hsp 60 family of heat shock proteins, to induce protective immunity in a guinea pig model of Legionnaires' disease. We purified MCMP to homogeneity from L. pneumophila by buffer extraction, ion-exchange chromatography, and molecular sieve chromatography. Guinea pigs immunized with MCMP developed a strong cell-mediated immune response to the immunogen manifest by marked cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity. Guinea pigs immunized with MCMP and then challenged with a lethal aerosol dose of L. pneumophila exhibited a high level of protective immunity. Altogether, in four independent experiments, 55 of 64 (86%) animals immunized three times with 0.6-40 micrograms MCMP including 11 of 11 (100%) animals immunized three times with 40 micrograms MCMP survived aerosol challenge with L. pneumophila compared with 1 of 29 (3%) sham-immunized control animals (P < 0.0001, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel X2 statistic for pooled data). To our knowledge, MCMP is the first member of the hsp 60 family of proteins shown to induce protective immunity to a microbial pathogen. MCMP has potential as a vaccine against Legionnaires' disease. Since MCMP is a genus common antigen, vaccination with a combination of MCMPs derived from different Legionella species has the potential of inducing protective immunity against all the major Legionella species causing human disease. Images PMID:8432872

  20. Multiplex PMA-qPCR Assay with Internal Amplification Control for Simultaneous Detection of Viable Legionella pneumophila, Salmonella typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus in Environmental Waters.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Xin, Hongyi; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2015-12-15

    Pathogenic microorganisms are responsible for many infectious diseases, and pathogen monitoring is important and necessary for water quality control. This study for the first time explored a multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technique combined with propidium monoazide (PMA) to simultaneously detect viable Legionella pneumophila, Salmonella typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus in one reaction from water samples. Sodium lauroyl sarcosinate (sarkosyl) was applied to enhance the dead bacterial permeability of PMA. The sensitivity of the multiplex PMA-qPCR assay achieved two colony-forming units (CFU) per reaction for L. pneumophila and three CFU per reaction for S. typhimurium and S. aureus. No PCR products were amplified from all nontarget control samples. Significantly, with comparable specificity and sensitivity, this newly invented multiplex PMA-qPCR assay took a much shorter time than did conventional culture assays when testing water samples with spiked bacteria and simulated environmental water treatment. The viable multiplex PMA-qPCR assay was further successfully applied to pathogen detection from rivers, canals, and tap water samples after simple water pretreatment. PMID:26512952

  1. Cytochrome c4 is required for siderophore expression by Legionella pneumophila, whereas cytochromes c1 and c5 promote intracellular infection.

    PubMed

    Yip, Emily S; Burnside, Denise M; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2011-03-01

    A panel of cytochrome c maturation (ccm) mutants of Legionella pneumophila displayed a loss of siderophore (legiobactin) expression, as measured by both the chrome azurol S assay and a Legionella-specific bioassay. These data, coupled with the finding that ccm transcripts are expressed by wild-type bacteria grown in deferrated medium, indicate that the Ccm system promotes siderophore expression by L. pneumophila. To determine the basis of this newfound role for Ccm, we constructed and tested a set of mutants specifically lacking individual c-type cytochromes. Whereas ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase (petC) mutants specifically lacking cytochrome c(1) and cycB mutants lacking cytochrome c(5) had normal siderophore expression, cyc4 mutants defective for cytochrome c(4) completely lacked legiobactin. These data, along with the expression pattern of cyc4 mRNA, indicate that cytochrome c(4) in particular promotes siderophore expression. In intracellular infection assays, petC mutants and cycB mutants, but not cyc4 mutants, had a reduced ability to infect both amoebae and macrophage hosts. Like ccm mutants, the cycB mutants were completely unable to grow in amoebae, highlighting a major role for cytochrome c(5) in intracellular infection. To our knowledge, these data represent both the first direct documentation of the importance of a c-type cytochrome in expression of a biologically active siderophore and the first insight into the relative importance of c-type cytochromes in intracellular infection events.

  2. Expression of gyrB and 16S ribosomal RNA genes as indicators of growth and physiological activities of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Toshihiro; Tani, Katsuji; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether the DNA gyrase (gyrB) and 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) genes can be used as indicators of the biological activities of Legionella pneumophila, the expression levels were estimated. The ratio of mRNA/DNA in gyrB was 0.7 in mid log phase and decreased drastically after the log phase. For 16S rRNA, the ratio was highest in mid log phase (7.0×10(3)), and the value that was about 10% of that in the log phase was maintained for six days. The rRNA may be vital in the resting or active but nonculturable cells that are not growing but physiologically active. The expression levels of gyrB mRNA and 16S rRNA can be used as indicators of the growth activity and the physiological activity of L. pneumophila, respectively. Therefore, by measurement of these indicators, we can evaluate the activities of Legionella cells in various environments.

  3. Pathogen-free screening of bacteria-specific hybridomas for selecting high-quality monoclonal antibodies against pathogen bacteria as illustrated for Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Féraudet-Tarisse, Cécile; Vaisanen-Tunkelrott, Marja-Liisa; Moreau, Karine; Lamourette, Patricia; Créminon, Christophe; Volland, Hervé

    2013-05-31

    Antibodies are potent biological tools increasingly used as detection, diagnostic and therapeutic reagents. Many technological advances have optimized and facilitated production and screening of monoclonal antibodies. We report here an original method to screen for antibodies targeting biosafety level 2 or 3 pathogens without the fastidious handling inherent to pathogen use. A double ELISA screening was performed using as coated antigen transformed Escherichia coli expressing at its surface a protein specific to the pathogenic bacteria versus control untransformed E. coli. This method was applied to Legionella, using the surface-exposed Mip protein (macrophage infectivity potentiator). This screening proved to be an excellent means of selecting mAbs that bind Legionella pneumophila 1 surface-exposed Mip protein. This method also appears more biologically relevant than screening using the recombinant Mip protein alone and less tedious than a test performed directly on Legionella bacteria. We obtained 21 mAbs that bind strongly to L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 13, and we validated their use in a rapid ELISA (performed in 4.5 h) and an immunochromatographic test (20 min).

  4. Children's Memory for Their Mother's Murder: Accuracy, Suggestibility, and Resistance to Suggestion.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Kelly; Narr, Rachel; Goodman, Gail S; Ruiz, Sandra; Mendoza, Macaria

    2013-01-31

    From its inception, child eyewitness memory research has been guided by dramatic legal cases that turn on the testimony of children. Decades of scientific research reveal that, under many conditions, children can provide veracious accounts of traumatic experiences. Scientific studies also document factors that lead children to make false statements. In this paper we describe a legal case in which children testified about their mother's murder. We discuss factors that may have influenced the accuracy of the children's eyewitness memory. Children's suggestibility and resistance to suggestion are illustrated. Expert testimony, based on scientific research, can aid the trier of fact when children provide crucial evidence in criminal investigations and courtroom trials about tragic events. PMID:23362807

  5. Application of Legionella pneumophila-specific quantitative real-time PCR combined with direct amplification and sequence-based typing in the diagnosis and epidemiological investigation of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed

    Mentasti, M; Fry, N K; Afshar, B; Palepou-Foxley, C; Naik, F C; Harrison, T G

    2012-08-01

    The detection of Legionella pneumophila DNA in clinical specimens using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) combined with direct sequence-based typing (SBT) offers rapid confirmation and timely intervention in the investigation of cases of Legionnaires' disease (LD). We assessed the utility of a specific L. pneumophila qPCR assay targeting the macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) gene and internal process control with three clinical specimen types from confirmed LD cases. The assay was completely specific for L. pneumophila, as demonstrated by positive results for 39/39 strains from all subspecies and 16 serogroups. No cross-reaction was observed with any of the 54 Legionella non-pneumophila (0/69 strains) or 21 non-Legionella (0/58 strains). All L. pneumophila culture-positive respiratory samples (81/81) were qPCR-positive. Of 80 culture-negative samples tested, 47 (58.8%) were qPCR-positive and none were inhibitory. PCR was significantly more sensitive than culture for samples taken ≤ 2 days of hospitalisation (94.7% vs. 79.6%), with the difference being even more marked for samples taken between 3 and 14 days (79.3% vs. 47.8%). Overall, the sensitivity of the qPCR was ∼30% greater than that of culture and direct typing on culture-negative PCR-positive samples resulted in full 7-allele profiles from 23/46, 5 to 6 alleles from 8/46 and ≥ 1 allele from 43/46 strains.

  6. Induction of cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 mRNAs in macrophages by Legionella pneumophila or Salmonella typhimurium attachment requires different ligand-receptor systems.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Y; Klein, T W; Friedman, H

    1996-01-01

    The attachment of bacteria to macrophages is mediated by different ligands and receptors and induces various intracellular molecular responses. In the present study, induction of cytokines and chemokines, especially granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), was examined, following bacterial attachment, with regard to the ligand-receptor systems involved. Attachment of Legionella pneumophila or Salmonella typhimurium to cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages increased the steady-state levels of cellular mRNAs for the cytokines interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and GM-CSF as well as the chemokines MIP-1beta, MIP-2, and KC. However, when macrophages were treated with alpha-methyl-D-mannoside (alphaMM), a competitor of glycopeptide ligands, induction of cytokine mRNAs was inhibited, but the levels of chemokine mRNAs were not. Pretreatment of the bacteria with fresh mouse serum enhanced the level of GM-CSF mRNA but not the level of MIP-2 mRNA. In addition, serum treatment reduced the inhibitory effect of alphaMM on GM-CSF mRNA. These results indicate that bacterial attachment increases the steady-state levels of the cytokine and chemokine mRNAs tested by at least two distinct receptor-ligand systems, namely, one linked to cytokine induction and involving mannose or other sugar residues and the other linked to chemokine induction and relatively alphaMM insensitive. Furthermore, opsonization with serum engages other pathways in the cytokine response which are relatively independent of the alphaMM-sensitive system. Regarding bacterial surface ligands involved in cytokine mRNA induction, evidence is presented that the flagellum may be important in stimulating cytokine GM-CSF message but not chemokine MIP-2 message. Analysis of cytokine GM-CSF and chemokine MIP-2 signaling pathways with protein kinase inhibitors revealed the involvement of calmodulin and myosin light-chain kinase in GM-CSF but not MIP-2 m

  7. [A technical suggestion for laboratory tests in cases of rape].

    PubMed

    Fazio Pellacchio, M C; Celli, R

    1994-01-01

    The paper suggests completing the clinical tests carried out in cases of rape by collecting material not only from the fornix of the vagina but also from the cervical canal using cotton-wool buds, and examining any spermatozoa adhering to the cotton filaments by staining with Baecchi's method. Alternatively, the paper suggests carrying out these tests in anticipation of their possible use as forensic evidence if requested by the court.

  8. A solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the antigenic detection of Legionella pneumophila (serogroup 1): A compliment for the space station diagnostic capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejtmancik, Kelly E.

    1987-01-01

    It is necessary that an adequate microbiology capability be provided as part of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) to support expected microbial disease events and environmental monitoring during long periods of space flight. The application of morphological and biochemical studies to confirm the presence of certain bacterial and fungal disease agents are currently available and under consideration. This confirmation would be facilitated through employment of serological methods to aid in the identification of bacterial, fungal, and viral agents. A number of serological approaches are currently being considered, including the use of Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) technology, which could be utilized during microgravity conditions. A solid phase, membrane supported ELISA for the detection of Legionella pneumophila, an expected disease agent, was developed to show a potential model system that would meet the HMF requirements and specifications for the future space station. These studies demonstrate the capability of membrane supported ELISA systems for identification of expected microbial disease agents as part of the HMF.

  9. A New Method To Determine In Vivo Interactomes Reveals Binding of the Legionella pneumophila Effector PieE to Multiple Rab GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Mousnier, Aurélie; Schroeder, Gunnar N.; Stoneham, Charlotte A.; So, Ernest C.; Garnett, James A.; Yu, Lu; Matthews, Steve J.; Choudhary, Jyoti S.; Hartland, Elizabeth L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, uses the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system (T4SS) to translocate more than 300 effectors into host cells, where they subvert host cell signaling. The function and host cell targets of most effectors remain unknown. PieE is a 69-kDa Dot/Icm effector containing three coiled-coil (CC) regions and 2 transmembrane (TM) helices followed by a fourth CC region. Here, we report that PieE dimerized by an interaction between CC3 and CC4. We found that ectopically expressed PieE localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and induced the formation of organized smooth ER, while following infection PieE localized to the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). To identify the physiological targets of PieE during infection, we established a new purification method for which we created an A549 cell line stably expressing the Escherichia coli biotin ligase BirA and infected the cells with L. pneumophila expressing PieE fused to a BirA-specific biotinylation site and a hexahistidine tag. Following tandem Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and streptavidin affinity chromatography, the effector-target complexes were analyzed by mass spectrometry. This revealed interactions of PieE with multiple host cell proteins, including the Rab GTPases 1a, 1b, 2a, 5c, 6a, 7, and 10. Binding of the Rab GTPases, which was validated by yeast two-hybrid binding assays, was mediated by the PieE CC1 and CC2. In summary, using a novel, highly specific strategy to purify effector complexes from infected cells, which is widely applicable to other pathogens, we identified PieE as a multidomain LCV protein with promiscuous Rab GTPase-binding capacity. PMID:25118235

  10. Identification of Legionella pneumophila rcp, a pagP-Like Gene That Confers Resistance to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides and Promotes Intracellular Infection

    PubMed Central

    Robey, Marianne; O'Connell, William; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.

    2001-01-01

    In the course of characterizing a locus involved in heme utilization, we identified a Legionella pneumophila gene predicted to encode a protein with homology to the product of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pagP gene. In Salmonella, pagP increases resistance to the bactericidal effects of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs). Mutants with insertions in the L. pneumophila pagP-like gene were generated and showed decreased resistance to different structural classes of CAMPs compared to the wild type; hence, this gene was designated rcp for resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. Furthermore, Legionella CAMP resistance was induced by growth in low-magnesium medium. To determine whether rcp had any role in intracellular survival, mutants were tested in the two most relevant host cells for Legionnaires' disease, i.e., amoebae and macrophages. These mutants exhibited a 1,000-fold-decreased recovery during a Hartmannella vermiformis coculture. Complementation of the infectivity defect could be achieved by introduction of a plasmid containing the intact rcp gene. Mutations in rcp consistently reduced both the numbers of bacteria recovered during intracellular infection and their cytopathic capacity for U937 macrophages. The rcp mutant was also more defective for lung colonization of A/J mice. Growth of rcp mutants in buffered yeast extract broth was identical to that of the wild type, indicating that the observed differences in numbers of bacteria recovered from host cells were not due to a generalized growth defect. However, in low-Mg2+ medium, the rcp mutant was impaired in stationary-phase survival. This is the first demonstration of a pagP-like gene, involved in resistance to CAMPs, being required for intracellular infection and virulence. PMID:11401964

  11. Suggestibility and negative priming: two replication studies.

    PubMed

    David, Daniel; Brown, Richard J

    2002-07-01

    Research suggests that inhibiting the effect of irrelevant stimuli on subsequent thought and action (cognitive inhibition) may be an important component of suggestibility. Two small correlation studies were conducted to address the relationship between different aspects of suggestibility and individual differences in cognitive inhibition, operationalized as the degree of negative priming generated by to-be-ignored stimuli in a semantic categorization task. The first study found significant positive correlations between negative priming, hypnotic suggestibility, and creative imagination; a significant negative correlation was obtained between negative priming and interrogative suggestibility, demonstrating the discriminant validity of the study results. The second study replicated the correlation between negative priming and hypnotic suggestibility, using a different suggestibility measurement procedure that assessed subjective experience and hypnotic involuntariness as well as objective responses to suggestions. These studies support the notion that the ability to engage in cognitive inhibition may be an important component of hypnotic responsivity and maybe of other forms of suggestibility.

  12. 29 CFR 785.45 - Suggestion systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR..., Medical Attention, Civic and Charitable Work, and Suggestion Systems § 785.45 Suggestion systems... general suggestion system is not working time, but if employees are permitted to work on...

  13. Known and suggested quaternary faulting in the midcontinent United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheeler, R.L.; Crone, A.J.

    2001-01-01

    The midcontinent United States between the Appalachian and Rocky Mountains contains 40 known faults or other potentially tectonic features for which published geologic information shows or suggests Quaternary tectonic faulting. We report results of a systematic evaluation of published and other publicly available geologic evidence of Quaternary faulting. These results benefit seismic-hazard assessments by (1) providing some constraints on the recurrence intervals and magnitudes of large, prehistoric earthquakes, and (2) identifying features that warrant additional study. For some features, suggested Quaternary tectonic faulting has been disproved, whereas, for others, the suggested faulting remains questionable. Of the 40 features, nine have clear geologic evidence of Quaternary tectonic faulting associated with prehistoric earthquakes, and another six features have evidence of nontectonic origins. An additional 12 faults, uplifts, or historical seismic zones lack reported paleoseismological evidence of large. Quaternary earthquakes. The remaining 13 features require further paleoseismological study to determine if they have had Quaternary earthquakes that were larger than any known from local historical records; seven of these 13 features are in or near urbanized areas where their study could affect urban hazard estimates. These seven are: (1) the belt of normal faults that rings the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to Texas. (2) the Northeast Ohio seismic zone, (3) the Valmont and (4) Goodpasture faults of Colorado. (5) the Champlain lowlands normal faults of New York State and Vermont, and (6) the Lexington and (7) Kentucky River fault systems of eastern Kentucky. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  14. Suggestive techniques connected to medical interventions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The paper introduces a series of articles where several detailed clinical examples will be presented on the effectiveness of using suggestive techniques in various fields of interventional medicine. The aim of this series is to raise the attention to the patients heightened openness to suggestions. By recognizing the unavoidable nature of suggestive effects on one hand we can eliminate unfavourable, negative suggestions and on the other hand go on and consciously apply positive, helpful variations. Research materials, reviews and case study will describe the way suggestions can reduce anxiety and stress connected to medical intervention, improve subjective well-being and cooperation, and increase efficiency by reducing treatment costs. PMID:24265898

  15. The influence of suggestibility on memory.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Serge; Collins, Thérèse; Gounden, Yannick; Roediger, Henry L

    2011-06-01

    We provide a translation of Binet and Henri's pioneering 1894 paper on the influence of suggestibility on memory. Alfred Binet (1857-1911) is famous as the author who created the IQ test that bears his name, but he is almost unknown as the psychological investigator who generated numerous original experiments and fascinating results in the study of memory. His experiments published in 1894 manipulated suggestibility in several ways to determine effects on remembering. Three particular modes of suggestion were employed to induce false recognitions: (1) indirect suggestion by a preconceived idea; (2) direct suggestion; and (3) collective suggestion. In the commentary we suggest that Binet and Henri's (1894) paper written over 115 years ago is still highly relevant even today. In particular, Binet's legacy lives on in modern research on misinformation effects in memory, in studies of conformity, and in experiments on the social contagion of memory.

  16. The occurrence of Legionella species other than Legionella pneumophila in clinical and environmental samples in Denmark identified by mip gene sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Svarrer, C W; Uldum, S A

    2012-10-01

    In Denmark, several laboratories use PCR as a routine diagnostic method for Legionnaires' disease, and almost all PCR-positive samples are investigated by culture. From 1993 to 2010, isolates of Legionella species other than Legionella pneumophila were obtained from respiratory samples from 33 patients, and from 1997 to 2010, 42 isolates of Legionella non-pneumophila species were obtained and saved from water samples from 39 different sites in Denmark. Macrophage infectivity potentiator gene (mip) sequencing was used as a reference method to identify the Legionella non-pneumophila species. Only one of the 75 isolates did not meet the acceptance criterion of a similarity of ≥98% to sequences in the database. The species distribution between clinical and environmental isolates varied. For the former, four species were detected, with Legionella bozemanae and Legionella micdadei predominating (both 44%). For the latter, eight species were detected, with Legionella anisa predominating (52%). The distribution among the Danish clinical isolates was different from the general distribution both in Europe and outside Europe, where L. bozemanae and Legionella longbeachae are the most commonly found clinical Legionella non-pneumophila species. The 75 isolates were also investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS): 64 were correctly identified, with a score of ≥2.0; eight had a score of <2.0, but only two of these were wrongly identified; and three gave no results with MALDI-TOF MS. Both mip sequencing and MALDI-TOF MS are robust methods for Legionella species identification.

  17. Maltreated Children's Memory: Accuracy, Suggestibility, and Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisen, Mitchell L.; Goodman, Gail S.; Qin, Jianjian; Davis, Suzanne; Crayton, John

    2007-01-01

    Memory, suggestibility, stress arousal, and trauma-related psychopathology were examined in 328 3- to 16-year-olds involved in forensic investigations of abuse and neglect. Children's memory and suggestibility were assessed for a medical examination and venipuncture. Being older and scoring higher in cognitive functioning were related to fewer…

  18. Induction Technique: Beyond Simple Response to Suggestion.

    PubMed

    Barabasz, Arreed; Barabasz, Marianne

    2016-10-01

    The hypnotic induction is intended to induce hypnosis. This implies that what is sought is intended to go beyond what might be wrought by mere suggestion, expectancy, and social influence. The experimentally controlled research showing that the induction makes a difference and how small changes in wording of suggestions can produce orthogonal responses is briefly reviewed. This article explains the principles of induction and three critical phases of hypnotic induction in detail. An arm levitation scripted protocol demonstrating how to respond to the patient using the three phases to maximize responses to hypnotic suggestions is presented. PMID:27586048

  19. Suggested Minimum Cataloging Standards for Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Sharon

    1979-01-01

    Notes problems with cataloging library materials in the small and medium sized public library and suggests interpretations of the Anglo-American cataloging rules, with recommendations for their adaptation to smaller libraries. (CWM)

  20. Measuring Children's Suggestibility in Forensic Interviews.

    PubMed

    Volpini, Laura; Melis, Manuela; Petralia, Stefania; Rosenberg, Melina D

    2016-01-01

    According to the scientific literature, childrens' cognitive development is not complete until adolescence. Therefore, the problems inherent in children serving as witnesses are crucial. In preschool-aged children, false memories may be identified because of misinformation and insight bias. Additionally, they are susceptible of suggestions. The aim of this study was to verify the levels of suggestibility in children between three and 5 years of age. Ninety-two children were examined (44 male, 48 female; M = 4.5 years, SD = 9.62). We used the correlation coefficient (Pearson's r) and the averages variance by SPSS statistical program. The results concluded that: younger children are almost always more susceptible to suggestibility. The dimension of immediate recall was negatively correlates with that of total suggestibility (r = -0.357 p < 0.001). Social compliance and source monitoring errors contribute to patterns of suggestibility, because older children shift their answers more often (r = 0.394 p < 0.001). Younger children change their answers more times (r = -0.395 p < 0.001). PMID:27404406

  1. Suggestions for Structuring a Research Article

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, James D.; Reiser, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers often experience difficulty as they attempt to prepare journal articles that describe their work. The purpose of this article is to provide researchers in the field of education with a series of suggestions as to how to clearly structure each section of a research manuscript that they intend to submit for publication in a scholarly…

  2. Technology Is Power: Suggestions for Beginning Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanklin, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Shanklin knows it can be hard for new teachers to incorporate all they know about technology with the realities of a classroom. She suggests setting incremental, monthly technology goals; investing in equipment; assessing students' grasp of the technology at their disposal and their use of it in classroom projects; searching purposefully for…

  3. Physics Courses--Some Suggested Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    To communicate the relevance and excitement of science activity to students, the use of more imaginative, and even openly speculative, case studies in physics courses is suggested. Some useful examples are Magnetic Monopoles, Constants, Black Holes, Antimatter, Zero Mass Particles, Tachyons, and the Bootstrap Hypothesis. (DF)

  4. Seven Salutary Suggestions for Counselor Stamina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Cynthia J.

    2004-01-01

    Counselor stamina is deemed essential in the midst of a consistently challenging, complex, and changing mental health care environment. Rather than perpetuating conversations about "burnout" and "burnout prevention," this article provides a salutary or health-promoting perspective. Seven suggestions for counselor stamina are presented and…

  5. Integrating Composition and Literature: Some Practical Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiker, Donald A.

    This paper suggests that it is possible to construct a course that integrates the teaching of composition with the teaching of literature without allowing the secondary goal of heightened literary understanding to overwhelm the primary goal of improved expository writing. It presents a syllabus for a four-week unit on Ernest Hemingway's "The Sun…

  6. Current Research: 2013 Summer Reading Suggestions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2013

    2013-01-01

    To supplement the summer reading of National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) members, the NSTA Committee on Research in Science Education suggested a list of science education research articles that were published in the journals of NSTA's affiliates in 2012. These articles covered a variety of topics that include learni