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Sample records for pns neurons derived

  1. Familial Dysautonomia (FD) Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived PNS Neurons Reveal that Synaptic Vesicular and Neuronal Transport Genes Are Directly or Indirectly Affected by IKBKAP Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Gal; Cheishvili, David; Even, Aviel; Birger, Anastasya; Turetsky, Tikva; Gil, Yaniv; Even-Ram, Sharona; Aizenman, Einat; Bashir, Nibal; Maayan, Channa; Razin, Aharon; Reubinoff, Benjamim E.; Weil, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A splicing mutation in the IKBKAP gene causes Familial Dysautonomia (FD), affecting the IKAP protein expression levels and proper development and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Here we found new molecular insights for the IKAP role and the impact of the FD mutation in the human PNS lineage by using a novel and unique human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line homozygous to the FD mutation originated by pre implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) analysis. We found that IKBKAP downregulation during PNS differentiation affects normal migration in FD-hESC derived neural crest cells (NCC) while at later stages the PNS neurons show reduced intracellular colocalization between vesicular proteins and IKAP. Comparative wide transcriptome analysis of FD and WT hESC-derived neurons together with the analysis of human brains from FD and WT 12 weeks old embryos and experimental validation of the results confirmed that synaptic vesicular and neuronal transport genes are directly or indirectly affected by IKBKAP downregulation in FD neurons. Moreover we show that kinetin (a drug that corrects IKBKAP alternative splicing) promotes the recovery of IKAP expression and these IKAP functional associated genes identified in the study. Altogether, these results support the view that IKAP might be a vesicular like protein that might be involved in neuronal transport in hESC derived PNS neurons. This function seems to be mostly affected in FD-hESC derived PNS neurons probably reflecting some PNS neuronal dysfunction observed in FD. PMID:26437462

  2. Familial Dysautonomia (FD) Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived PNS Neurons Reveal that Synaptic Vesicular and Neuronal Transport Genes Are Directly or Indirectly Affected by IKBKAP Downregulation.

    PubMed

    Lefler, Sharon; Cohen, Malkiel A; Kantor, Gal; Cheishvili, David; Even, Aviel; Birger, Anastasya; Turetsky, Tikva; Gil, Yaniv; Even-Ram, Sharona; Aizenman, Einat; Bashir, Nibal; Maayan, Channa; Razin, Aharon; Reubinoff, Benjamim E; Weil, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A splicing mutation in the IKBKAP gene causes Familial Dysautonomia (FD), affecting the IKAP protein expression levels and proper development and function of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Here we found new molecular insights for the IKAP role and the impact of the FD mutation in the human PNS lineage by using a novel and unique human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line homozygous to the FD mutation originated by pre implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) analysis. We found that IKBKAP downregulation during PNS differentiation affects normal migration in FD-hESC derived neural crest cells (NCC) while at later stages the PNS neurons show reduced intracellular colocalization between vesicular proteins and IKAP. Comparative wide transcriptome analysis of FD and WT hESC-derived neurons together with the analysis of human brains from FD and WT 12 weeks old embryos and experimental validation of the results confirmed that synaptic vesicular and neuronal transport genes are directly or indirectly affected by IKBKAP downregulation in FD neurons. Moreover we show that kinetin (a drug that corrects IKBKAP alternative splicing) promotes the recovery of IKAP expression and these IKAP functional associated genes identified in the study. Altogether, these results support the view that IKAP might be a vesicular like protein that might be involved in neuronal transport in hESC derived PNS neurons. This function seems to be mostly affected in FD-hESC derived PNS neurons probably reflecting some PNS neuronal dysfunction observed in FD.

  3. Highly efficient transduction of primary adult CNS and PNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Evgeny; Diekmann, Heike; Fischer, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Delivery and expression of recombinant genes, a key methodology for many applications in biological research, remains a challenge especially for mature neurons. Here, we report easy, highly efficient and well tolerated transduction of adult peripheral and central neuronal populations of diverse species in culture using VSV-G pseudo-typed, recombinant baculovirus (BacMam). Transduction rates of up to 80% were reliably achieved at high multiplicity of infection without apparent neuro-cytopathic effects. Neurons could be transduced either shortly after plating or after several days in culture. Co-incubation with two different baculoviruses attained near complete co-localization of fluorescent protein expression, indicating multigene delivery. Finally, evidence for functional protein expression is provided by means of cre-mediated genetic recombination and neurite outgrowth assays. Recombinant protein was already detected within hours after transduction, thereby enabling functional readouts even in relatively short-lived neuronal cultures. Altogether, these results substantiate the usefulness of baculovirus-mediated transduction of mature neurons for future research in neuroscience. PMID:27958330

  4. Alternative generation of CNS neural stem cells and PNS derivatives from neural crest-derived peripheral stem cells.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marlen; Apostolova, Galina; Widera, Darius; Mittelbronn, Michel; Dechant, Georg; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Rohrer, Hermann

    2015-02-01

    Neural crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) from the embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS) can be reprogrammed in neurosphere (NS) culture to rNCSCs that produce central nervous system (CNS) progeny, including myelinating oligodendrocytes. Using global gene expression analysis we now demonstrate that rNCSCs completely lose their previous PNS characteristics and acquire the identity of neural stem cells derived from embryonic spinal cord. Reprogramming proceeds rapidly and results in a homogenous population of Olig2-, Sox3-, and Lex-positive CNS stem cells. Low-level expression of pluripotency inducing genes Oct4, Nanog, and Klf4 argues against a transient pluripotent state during reprogramming. The acquisition of CNS properties is prevented in the presence of BMP4 (BMP NCSCs) as shown by marker gene expression and the potential to produce PNS neurons and glia. In addition, genes characteristic for mesenchymal and perivascular progenitors are expressed, which suggests that BMP NCSCs are directed toward a pericyte progenitor/mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) fate. Adult NCSCs from mouse palate, an easily accessible source of adult NCSCs, display strikingly similar properties. They do not generate cells with CNS characteristics but lose the neural crest markers Sox10 and p75 and produce MSC-like cells. These findings show that embryonic NCSCs acquire a full CNS identity in NS culture. In contrast, MSC-like cells are generated from BMP NCSCs and pNCSCs, which reveals that postmigratory NCSCs are a source for MSC-like cells up to the adult stage.

  5. In Vitro Reconstruction of Neuronal Networks Derived from Human iPS Cells Using Microfabricated Devices.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuzo; Kida, Yasuyuki S

    2016-01-01

    Morphology and function of the nervous system is maintained via well-coordinated processes both in central and peripheral nervous tissues, which govern the homeostasis of organs/tissues. Impairments of the nervous system induce neuronal disorders such as peripheral neuropathy or cardiac arrhythmia. Although further investigation is warranted to reveal the molecular mechanisms of progression in such diseases, appropriate model systems mimicking the patient-specific communication between neurons and organs are not established yet. In this study, we reconstructed the neuronal network in vitro either between neurons of the human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell derived peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS), or between PNS neurons and cardiac cells in a morphologically and functionally compartmentalized manner. Networks were constructed in photolithographically microfabricated devices with two culture compartments connected by 20 microtunnels. We confirmed that PNS and CNS neurons connected via synapses and formed a network. Additionally, calcium-imaging experiments showed that the bundles originating from the PNS neurons were functionally active and responded reproducibly to external stimuli. Next, we confirmed that CNS neurons showed an increase in calcium activity during electrical stimulation of networked bundles from PNS neurons in order to demonstrate the formation of functional cell-cell interactions. We also confirmed the formation of synapses between PNS neurons and mature cardiac cells. These results indicate that compartmentalized culture devices are promising tools for reconstructing network-wide connections between PNS neurons and various organs, and might help to understand patient-specific molecular and functional mechanisms under normal and pathological conditions.

  6. Potential for Cell-Transplant Therapy with Human Neuronal Precursors to Treat Neuropathic Pain in Models of PNS and CNS Injury: Comparison of hNT2.17 and hNT2.19 Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Mary J.; Berrocal, Yerko; Wolfe, Stacey Q.

    2012-01-01

    Effective treatment of sensory neuropathies in peripheral neuropathies and spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most difficult problems in modern clinical practice. Cell therapy to release antinociceptive agents near the injured spinal cord is a logical next step in the development of treatment modalities. But few clinical trials, especially for chronic pain, have tested the potential of transplant of cells to treat chronic pain. Cell lines derived from the human neuronal NT2 cell line parentage, the hNT2.17 and hNT2.19 lines, which synthesize and release the neurotransmitters gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and serotonin (5HT), respectively, have been used to evaluate the potential of cell-based release of antinociceptive agents near the lumbar dorsal (horn) spinal sensory cell centers to relieve neuropathic pain after PNS (partial nerve and diabetes-related injury) and CNS (spinal cord injury) damage in rat models. Both cell lines transplants potently and permanently reverse behavioral hypersensitivity without inducing tumors or other complications after grafting. Functioning as cellular minipumps for antinociception, human neuronal precursors, like these NT2-derived cell lines, would likely provide a useful adjuvant or replacement for current pharmacological treatments for neuropathic pain. PMID:22619713

  7. Consequences of brain-derived neurotrophic factor withdrawal in CNS neurons and implications in disease.

    PubMed

    Mariga, Abigail; Mitre, Mariela; Chao, Moses V

    2017-01-01

    Growth factor withdrawal has been studied across different species and has been shown to have dramatic consequences on cell survival. In the nervous system, withdrawal of nerve growth factor (NGF) from sympathetic and sensory neurons results in substantial neuronal cell death, signifying a requirement for NGF for the survival of neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In contrast to the PNS, withdrawal of central nervous system (CNS) enriched brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has little effect on cell survival but is indispensible for synaptic plasticity. Given that most early events in neuropsychiatric disorders are marked by a loss of synapses, lack of BDNF may thus be an important part of a cascade of events that leads to neuronal degeneration. Here we review reports on the effects of BDNF withdrawal on CNS neurons and discuss the relevance of the loss in disease.

  8. Consequences of brain-derived neurotrophic factor withdrawal in CNS neurons and implications in disease

    PubMed Central

    Mariga, Abigail; Mitre, Mariela; Chao, Moses V.

    2017-01-01

    Growth factor withdrawal has been studied across different species and has been shown to have dramatic consequences on cell survival. In the nervous system, withdrawal of nerve growth factor (NGF) from sympathetic and sensory neurons results in substantial neuronal cell death, signifying a requirement for NGF for the survival of neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In contrast to the PNS, withdrawal of central nervous system (CNS) enriched brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has little effect on cell survival but is indispensible for synaptic plasticity. Given that most early events in neuropsychiatric disorders are marked by a loss of synapses, lack of BDNF may thus be an important part of a cascade of events that leads to neuronal degeneration. Here we review reports on the effects of BDNF withdrawal on CNS neurons and discuss the relevance of the loss in disease. PMID:27015693

  9. Transcriptional Profiling of Intrinsic PNS Factors in the Postnatal Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robin P.; Lerch-Haner, Jessica K.; Pardinas, Jose R.; Buchser, William J.; Bixby, John L.; Lemmon, Vance P.

    2010-01-01

    Neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) display a higher capacity to regenerate after injury than those in the central nervous system, suggesting cell specific transcriptional modules underlying axon growth and inhibition. We report a systems biology based search for PNS specific transcription factors (TFs). Messenger RNAs enriched in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons compared to cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) were identified using subtractive hybridization and DNA microarray approaches. Network and transcription factor binding site enrichment analyses were used to further identify TFs that may be differentially active. Combining these techniques, we identified 32 TFs likely to be enriched and/or active in the PNS. Twenty-five of these TFs were then tested for an ability to promote CNS neurite outgrowth in an overexpression screen. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemical studies confirmed that one representative TF, STAT3, is intrinsic to PNS neurons, and that constitutively active STAT3 is sufficient to promote CGN neurite outgrowth. PMID:20696251

  10. Transcriptional profiling of intrinsic PNS factors in the postnatal mouse.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robin P; Lerch-Haner, Jessica K; Pardinas, Jose R; Buchser, William J; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2011-01-01

    Neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) display a higher capacity to regenerate after injury than those in the central nervous system, suggesting cell specific transcriptional modules underlying axon growth and inhibition. We report a systems biology based search for PNS specific transcription factors (TFs). Messenger RNAs enriched in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons compared to cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) were identified using subtractive hybridization and DNA microarray approaches. Network and transcription factor binding site enrichment analyses were used to further identify TFs that may be differentially active. Combining these techniques, we identified 32 TFs likely to be enriched and/or active in the PNS. Twenty-five of these TFs were then tested for an ability to promote CNS neurite outgrowth in an overexpression screen. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemical studies confirmed that one representative TF, STAT3, is intrinsic to PNS neurons, and that constitutively active STAT3 is sufficient to promote CGN neurite outgrowth.

  11. Peripherally-Derived BDNF Promotes Regeneration of Ascending Sensory Neurons after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng-He; Zhong, Jin-Hua; Zhou, Xin-Fu

    2008-01-01

    Background The blood brain barrier (BBB) and truncated trkB receptor on astrocytes prevent the penetration of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) applied into the peripheral (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) thus restrict its application in the treatment of nervous diseases. As BDNF is anterogradely transported by axons, we propose that peripherally derived and/or applied BDNF may act on the regeneration of central axons of ascending sensory neurons. Methodology/Principal Findings The present study aimed to test the hypothesis by using conditioning lesion of the sciatic nerve as a model to increase the expression of endogenous BDNF in sensory neurons and by injecting exogenous BDNF into the peripheral nerve or tissues. Here we showed that most of regenerating sensory neurons expressed BDNF and p-CREB but not p75NTR. Conditioning-lesion induced regeneration of ascending sensory neuron and the increase in the number of p-Erk positive and GAP-43 positive neurons was blocked by the injection of the BDNF antiserum in the periphery. Enhanced neurite outgrowth of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in vitro by conditioning lesion was also inhibited by the neutralization with the BDNF antiserum. The delivery of exogenous BDNF into the sciatic nerve or the footpad significantly increased the number of regenerating DRG neurons and regenerating sensory axons in the injured spinal cord. In a contusion injury model, an injection of BDNF into the footpad promoted recovery of motor functions. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that endogenous BDNF in DRG and spinal cord is required for the enhanced regeneration of ascending sensory neurons after conditioning lesion of sciatic nerve and peripherally applied BDNF may have therapeutic effects on the spinal cord injury. PMID:18320028

  12. Neuron-derived IgG protects neurons from complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Niu, Na; Li, Bingjie; McNutt, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    Passive immunity of the nervous system has traditionally been thought to be predominantly due to the blood-brain barrier. This concept must now be revisited based on the existence of neuron-derived IgG. The conventional concept is that IgG is produced solely by mature B lymphocytes, but it has now been found to be synthesized by murine and human neurons. However, the function of this endogenous IgG is poorly understood. In this study, we confirm IgG production by rat cortical neurons at the protein and mRNA levels, with 69.0 ± 5.8% of cortical neurons IgG-positive. Injury to primary-culture neurons was induced by complement leading to increases in IgG production. Blockage of neuron-derived IgG resulted in more neuronal death and early apoptosis in the presence of complement. In addition, FcγRI was found in microglia and astrocytes. Expression of FcγR I in microglia was increased by exposure to neuron-derived IgG. Release of NO from microglia triggered by complement was attenuated by neuron-derived IgG, and this attenuation could be reversed by IgG neutralization. These data demonstrate that neuron-derived IgG is protective of neurons against injury induced by complement and microglial activation. IgG appears to play an important role in maintaining the stability of the nervous system.

  13. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cells form spontaneously active neuronal networks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Teemu J; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Lappalainen, Riikka S; Skottman, Heli; Suuronen, Riitta; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Hyttinen, Jari A K; Narkilahti, Susanna

    2009-07-01

    The production of functional human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neuronal cells is critical for the application of hESCs in treating neurodegenerative disorders. To study the potential functionality of hESC-derived neurons, we cultured and monitored the development of hESC-derived neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays. Immunocytochemical studies revealed that these networks were positive for the neuronal marker proteins beta-tubulin(III) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2). The hESC-derived neuronal networks were spontaneously active and exhibited a multitude of electrical impulse firing patterns. Synchronous bursts of electrical activity similar to those reported for hippocampal neurons and rodent embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal networks were recorded from the differentiated cultures until up to 4 months. The dependence of the observed neuronal network activity on sodium ion channels was examined using tetrodotoxin (TTX). Antagonists for the glutamate receptors NMDA [D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid] and AMPA/kainate [6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione], and for GABAA receptors [(-)-bicuculline methiodide] modulated the spontaneous electrical activity, indicating that pharmacologically susceptible neuronal networks with functional synapses had been generated. The findings indicate that hESC-derived neuronal cells can generate spontaneously active networks with synchronous communication in vitro, and are therefore suitable for use in developmental and drug screening studies, as well as for regenerative medicine.

  14. Neurite outgrowth in human iPSC-derived neurons

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Data on morphology of rat and human neurons in cell cultureThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Druwe, I., T. Freudenrich , K. Wallace , T. Shafer , and W. Mundy. Comparison of Human Induced PluripotentStem Cell-Derived Neurons and Rat Primary CorticalNeurons as In Vitro Models of Neurite Outgrowth. Applied In vitro Toxicology. Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Larchmont, NY, USA, 2(1): 26-36, (2016).

  15. Electrophysiological Properties of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Risner-Janiczek, Jessica R.; Ungless, Mark A.; Li, Meng

    2011-01-01

    In vitro generation of functional neurons from embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem cells offers exciting opportunities for dissecting gene function, disease modelling, and therapeutic drug screening. To realize the potential of stem cells in these biomedical applications, a complete understanding of the cell models of interest is required. While rapid advances have been made in developing the technologies for directed induction of defined neuronal subtypes, most published works focus on the molecular characterization of the derived neural cultures. To characterize the functional properties of these neural cultures, we utilized an ES cell model that gave rise to neurons expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and conducted targeted whole-cell electrophysiological recordings from ES cell-derived neurons. Current-clamp recordings revealed that most neurons could fire single overshooting action potentials; in some cases multiple action potentials could be evoked by depolarization, or occurred spontaneously. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed that neurons exhibited neuronal-like currents, including an outward current typical of a delayed rectifier potassium conductance and a fast-activating, fast-inactivating inward current, typical of a sodium conductance. Taken together, these results indicate that ES cell-derived GFP+ neurons in culture display functional neuronal properties even at early stages of differentiation. PMID:21887381

  16. Physiological Characterisation of Human iPS-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro Fernandes, Hugo J.; Vowles, Jane; James, William S.; Cowley, Sally A.; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) offer the potential to study otherwise inaccessible cell types. Critical to this is the directed differentiation of hiPSCs into functional cell lineages. This is of particular relevance to research into neurological disease, such as Parkinson’s disease (PD), in which midbrain dopaminergic neurons degenerate during disease progression but are unobtainable until post-mortem. Here we report a detailed study into the physiological maturation over time of human dopaminergic neurons in vitro. We first generated and differentiated hiPSC lines into midbrain dopaminergic neurons and performed a comprehensive characterisation to confirm dopaminergic functionality by demonstrating dopamine synthesis, release, and re-uptake. The neuronal cultures include cells positive for both tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and G protein-activated inward rectifier potassium channel 2 (Kir3.2, henceforth referred to as GIRK2), representative of the A9 population of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) neurons vulnerable in PD. We observed for the first time the maturation of the slow autonomous pace-making (<10 Hz) and spontaneous synaptic activity typical of mature SNc dopaminergic neurons using a combination of calcium imaging and electrophysiology. hiPSC-derived neurons exhibited inositol tri-phosphate (IP3) receptor-dependent release of intracellular calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum in neuronal processes as calcium waves propagating from apical and distal dendrites, and in the soma. Finally, neurons were susceptible to the dopamine neuron-specific toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) which reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and altered mitochondrial morphology. Mature hiPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons provide a neurophysiologically-defined model of previously inaccessible vulnerable SNc dopaminergic neurons to bridge the gap between clinical PD and animal models. PMID:24586273

  17. Neuronal Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Exosomes Derived from Differentiating Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yuji S.; Xu, Qiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes deliver functional proteins and genetic materials to neighboring cells, and have potential applications for tissue regeneration. One possible mechanism of exosome-promoted tissue regeneration is through the delivery of microRNA (miRNA). In this study, we hypothesized that exosomes derived from neuronal progenitor cells contain miRNAs that promote neuronal differentiation. We treated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) daily with exosomes derived from PC12 cells, a neuronal cell line, for 1 week. After the treatment with PC12-derived exosomes, MSCs developed neuron-like morphology, and gene and protein expressions of neuronal markers were upregulated. Microarray analysis showed that the expression of miR-125b, which is known to play a role in neuronal differentiation of stem cells, was much higher in PC12-derived exosomes than in exosomes from B16-F10 melanoma cells. These results suggest that the delivery of miRNAs contained in PC12-derived exosomes is a possible mechanism explaining the neuronal differentiation of MSC. PMID:26248331

  18. Epibranchial placode-derived neurons produce BDNF required for early sensory neuron development.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Danielle E; Yang, Hui; Williams, Trevor; Barlow, Linda A

    2011-02-01

    In mice, BDNF provided by the developing taste epithelium is required for gustatory neuron survival following target innervation. However, we find that expression of BDNF, as detected by BDNF-driven β-galactosidase, begins in the cranial ganglia before its expression in the central (hindbrain) or peripheral (taste papillae) targets of these sensory neurons, and before gustatory ganglion cells innervate either target. To test early BDNF function, we examined the ganglia of bdnf null mice before target innervation, and found that while initial neuron survival is unaltered, early neuron development is disrupted. In addition, fate mapping analysis in mice demonstrates that murine cranial ganglia arise from two embryonic populations, i.e., epibranchial placodes and neural crest, as has been described for these ganglia in non-mammalian vertebrates. Only placodal neurons produce BDNF, however, which indicates that prior to innervation, early ganglionic BDNF produced by placode-derived cells promotes gustatory neuron development.

  19. Intrinsic Membrane Hyperexcitability of ALS Patient-Derived Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wainger, Brian J.; Kiskinis, Evangelos; Mellin, Cassidy; Wiskow, Ole; Han, Steve S.W.; Sandoe, Jackson; Perez, Numa P.; Williams, Luis A.; Lee, Seungkyu; Boulting, Gabriella; Berry, James D.; Brown, Robert H.; Cudkowicz, Merit E.; Bean, Bruce P.; Eggan, Kevin; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease of the motor nervous system. We show using multi-electrode array and patch clamp recordings that hyperexcitability detected by clinical neurophysiological studies of ALS patients is recapitulated in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived motor neurons from ALS patients harboring superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), C9orf72 and fused-in-sarcoma mutations. Motor neurons produced from a genetically corrected, but otherwise isogenic, SOD1+/+ stem cell line do not display the hyperexcitability phenotype. SOD1A4V/+ ALS patient-derived motor neurons have reduced delayed-rectifier potassium current amplitudes relative to control-derived motor neurons, a deficit that may underlie their hyperexcitability. The Kv7 channel activator retigabine both blocks the hyperexcitability and improves motor neuron survival in vitro when tested in SOD1 mutant ALS cases. Therefore, electrophysiological characterization of human stem cell-derived neurons can reveal disease-related mechanisms and identify therapeutic candidates. PMID:24703839

  20. Patient fibroblasts-derived induced neurons demonstrate autonomous neuronal defects in adult-onset Krabbe disease

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Jun; Oh, Ki-Wook; Nahm, Minyeop; Xue, Yuanchao; Choi, Jae Hyeok; Choi, Ji Young; Kim, Young-Eun; Chung, Ki Wha; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Krabbe disease (KD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by defective β-galactosylceramidase (GALC), a lysosomal enzyme responsible for cleavage of several key substrates including psychosine. Accumulation of psychosine to the cytotoxic levels in KD patients is thought to cause dysfunctions in myelinating glial cells based on a comprehensive study of demyelination in KD. However, recent evidence suggests myelin-independent neuronal death in the murine model of KD, thus indicating defective GALC in neurons as an autonomous mechanism for neuronal cell death in KD. These observations prompted us to generate induced neurons (iNeurons) from two adult-onset KD patients carrying compound heterozygous mutations (p.[K563*];[L634S]) and (p.[N228_S232delinsTP];[G286D]) to determine the direct contribution of autonomous neuronal toxicity to KD. Here we report that directly converted KD iNeurons showed not only diminished GALC activity and increased psychosine levels, as expected, but also neurite fragmentation and abnormal neuritic branching. The lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 (LAMP1) was expressed at higher levels than controls, LAMP1-positive vesicles were significantly enlarged and fragmented, and mitochondrial morphology and its function were altered in KD iNeurons. Strikingly, we demonstrated that psychosine was sufficient to induce neurite defects, mitochondrial fragmentation, and lysosomal alterations in iNeurons derived in healthy individuals, thus establishing the causal effect of the cytotoxic GALC substrate in KD and the autonomous neuronal toxicity in KD pathology. PMID:27780934

  1. Functional astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle in a human stem cell-derived neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Tarczyluk, Marta A; Nagel, David A; O'Neil, John D; Parri, H Rheinallt; Tse, Erin H Y; Coleman, Michael D; Hill, Eric J

    2013-09-01

    The NT2.D1 cell line is one of the most well-documented embryocarcinoma cell lines, and can be differentiated into neurons and astrocytes. Great focus has also been placed on defining the electrophysiological properties of the neuronal cells, and more recently we have investigated the functional properties of their associated astrocytes. We now show for the first time that human stem cell-derived astrocytes produce glycogen and that co-cultures of these cells demonstrate a functional astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS). The ANLS hypothesis proposes that during neuronal activity, glutamate released into the synaptic cleft is taken up by astrocytes and triggers glucose uptake, which is converted into lactate and released via monocarboxylate transporters for neuronal use. Using mixed cultures of NT2-derived neurons and astrocytes, we have shown that these cells modulate their glucose uptake in response to glutamate. Additionally, we demonstrate that in response to increased neuronal activity and under hypoglycaemic conditions, co-cultures modulate glycogen turnover and increase lactate production. Similar results were also shown after treatment with glutamate, potassium, isoproterenol, and dbcAMP. Together, these results demonstrate for the first time a functional ANLS in a human stem cell-derived co-culture.

  2. Modeling ALS and FTD with iPSC-derived neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sebum; Huang, Eric J

    2017-02-01

    Recent advances in genetics and neuropathology support the idea that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTD) are two ends of a disease spectrum. Although several animal models have been developed to investigate the pathogenesis and disease progression in ALS and FTD, there are significant limitations that hamper our ability to connect these models with the neurodegenerative processes in human diseases. With the technical breakthrough in reprogramming biology, it is now possible to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and disease-relevant neuron subtypes. This review provides a comprehensive summary of studies that use iPSC-derived neurons to model ALS and FTD. We discuss the unique capabilities of iPSC-derived neurons that capture some key features of ALS and FTD, and underscore their potential roles in drug discovery. There are, however, several critical caveats that require improvements before iPSC-derived neurons can become highly effective disease models. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Exploiting human neurons.

  3. Specific functions for ERK/MAPK signaling during PNS development

    PubMed Central

    Newbern, Jason M.; Li, Xiaoyan; Shoemaker, Sarah E.; Zhou, Jiang; Zhong, Jian; Wu, Yaohong; Bonder, Daniel; Hollenback, Steven; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Landreth, Gary E.; Snider, William D.

    2011-01-01

    We have established functions of the stimulus dependent MAPKs, ERK1/2 and ERK5 in DRG, motor neuron, and Schwann cell development. Surprisingly, many aspects of early DRG and motor neuron development were found to be ERK1/2 independent and Erk5 deletion had no obvious effect on embryonic PNS. In contrast, Erk1/2 deletion in developing neural crest resulted in peripheral nerves that were devoid of Schwann cell progenitors, and deletion of Erk1/2 in Schwann cell precursors caused disrupted differentiation and marked hypomyelination of axons. The Schwann cell phenotypes are similar to those reported in neuregulin-1 and ErbB mutant mice and neuregulin effects could not be elicited in glial precursors lacking Erk1/2. ERK/MAPK regulation of myelination was specific to Schwann cells, as deletion in oligodendrocyte precursors did not impair myelin formation, but reduced precursor proliferation. Our data suggest a tight linkage between developmental functions of ERK/MAPK signaling and biological actions of specific RTK-activating factors. PMID:21220101

  4. Movement Protein Pns6 of Rice dwarf phytoreovirus Has Both ATPase and RNA Binding Activities

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chunhong; Ye, Gongyin; Zhang, Zhongkai; Wu, Zujian; Xie, Lianhui; Li, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Cell-to-cell movement is essential for plant viruses to systemically infect host plants. Plant viruses encode movement proteins (MP) to facilitate such movement. Unlike the well-characterized MPs of DNA viruses and single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses, knowledge of the functional mechanisms of MPs encoded by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses is very limited. In particular, many studied MPs of DNA and ssRNA viruses bind non-specifically ssRNAs, leading to models in which ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) move from cell to cell. Thus, it will be of special interest to determine whether MPs of dsRNA viruses interact with genomic dsRNAs or their derivative sRNAs. To this end, we studied the biochemical functions of MP Pns6 of Rice dwarf phytoreovirus (RDV), a member of Phytoreovirus that contains a 12-segmented dsRNA genome. We report here that Pns6 binds both dsRNAs and ssRNAs. Intriguingly, Pns6 exhibits non-sequence specificity for dsRNA but shows preference for ssRNA sequences derived from the conserved genomic 5′- and 3′- terminal consensus sequences of RDV. Furthermore, Pns6 exhibits magnesium-dependent ATPase activities. Mutagenesis identified the RNA binding and ATPase activity sites of Pns6 at the N- and C-termini, respectively. Our results uncovered the novel property of a viral MP in differentially recognizing dsRNA and ssRNA and establish a biochemical basis to enable further studies on the mechanisms of dsRNA viral MP functions. PMID:21949821

  5. Importance of Being Nernst: Synaptic Activity and Functional Relevance in Stem Cell-derived Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-26

    dissociated primary neurons, immortalized cell lines derived from neuronal and non-neuronal tissues and, most recently, stem cells. The predictive value of...repair of damaged neural tissues [8,9]. However, SCN models must be shown to be competent to form context-appropriate, functioning neurons before...of neuronal maturation have been well-described in dissociated cultures of primary neurons, it is important to recognize that the source tissues

  6. Modeling Huntington׳s disease with patient-derived neurons.

    PubMed

    Mattis, Virginia B; Svendsen, Clive N

    2017-02-01

    Huntington׳s Disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by expanded polyglutamine repeats in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. While the gene was identified over two decades ago, it remains poorly understood why mutant HTT (mtHTT) is initially toxic to striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Models of HD using non-neuronal human patient cells and rodents exhibit some characteristic HD phenotypes. While these current models have contributed to the field, they are limited in disease manifestation and may vary in their response to treatments. As such, human HD patient MSNs for disease modeling could greatly expand the current understanding of HD and facilitate the search for a successful treatment. It is now possible to use pluripotent stem cells, which can generate any tissue type in the body, to study and potentially treat HD. This review covers disease modeling in vitro and, via chimeric animal generation, in vivo using human HD patient MSNs differentiated from embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells. This includes an overview of the differentiation of pluripotent cells into MSNs, the established phenotypes found in cell-based models and transplantation studies using these cells. This review not only outlines the advancements in the rapidly progressing field of HD modeling using neurons derived from human pluripotent cells, but also it highlights several remaining controversial issues such as the 'ideal' series of pluripotent lines, the optimal cell types to use and the study of a primarily adult-onset disease in a developmental model. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Exploiting human neurons.

  7. Morphogenetic Studies of the Drosophila DA1 Ventral Olfactory Projection Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hung-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    In the Drosophila olfactory system, odorant information is sensed by olfactory sensory neurons and relayed from the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL), to higher olfactory centers via olfactory projection neurons (PNs). A major portion of the AL is constituted with dendrites of four groups of PNs, anterodorsal PNs (adPNs), lateral PNs (lPNs), lateroventral PNs (lvPNs) and ventral PNs (vPNs). Previous studies have been focused on the development and function of adPNs and lPNs, while the investigation on those of lvPNs and vPNs received less attention. Here, we study the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the morphogenesis of a putative male-pheromone responding vPN, the DA1 vPN. Using an intersection strategy to remove background neurons labeled within a DA1 vPN-containing GAL4 line, we depicted morphological changes of the DA1 vPN that occurs at the pupal stage. We then conducted a pilot screen using RNA interference knock-down approach to identify cell surface molecules, including Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1 and Semaphorin-1a, that might play essential roles for the DA1 vPN morphogenesis. Taken together, by revealing molecular and cellular basis of the DA1 vPN morphogenesis, we should provide insights into future comprehension of how vPNs are assembled into the olfactory neural circuitry. PMID:27163287

  8. Morphogenetic Studies of the Drosophila DA1 Ventral Olfactory Projection Neuron.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hung-Chang; Wei, Jia-Yi; Chu, Sao-Yu; Chung, Pei-Chi; Hsu, Tsai-Chi; Yu, Hung-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    In the Drosophila olfactory system, odorant information is sensed by olfactory sensory neurons and relayed from the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL), to higher olfactory centers via olfactory projection neurons (PNs). A major portion of the AL is constituted with dendrites of four groups of PNs, anterodorsal PNs (adPNs), lateral PNs (lPNs), lateroventral PNs (lvPNs) and ventral PNs (vPNs). Previous studies have been focused on the development and function of adPNs and lPNs, while the investigation on those of lvPNs and vPNs received less attention. Here, we study the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the morphogenesis of a putative male-pheromone responding vPN, the DA1 vPN. Using an intersection strategy to remove background neurons labeled within a DA1 vPN-containing GAL4 line, we depicted morphological changes of the DA1 vPN that occurs at the pupal stage. We then conducted a pilot screen using RNA interference knock-down approach to identify cell surface molecules, including Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1 and Semaphorin-1a, that might play essential roles for the DA1 vPN morphogenesis. Taken together, by revealing molecular and cellular basis of the DA1 vPN morphogenesis, we should provide insights into future comprehension of how vPNs are assembled into the olfactory neural circuitry.

  9. Humanin Derivatives Inhibit Necrotic Cell Death in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Aviv; Lerner-Yardeni, Jenny; Meridor, David; Kasher, Roni; Nathan, Ilana; Parola, Abraham H

    2015-01-01

    Humanin and its derivatives are peptides known for their protective antiapoptotic effects against Alzheimer’s disease. Herein, we identify a novel function of the humanin-derivative AGA(C8R)-HNG17 (namely, protection against cellular necrosis). Necrosis is one of the main modes of cell death, which was until recently considered an unmoderated process. However, recent findings suggest the opposite. We have found that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 confers protection against necrosis in the neuronal cell lines PC-12 and NSC-34, where necrosis is induced in a glucose-free medium by either chemohypoxia or by a shift from apoptosis to necrosis. Our studies in traumatic brain injury models in mice, where necrosis is the main mode of neuronal cell death, have shown that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has a protective effect. This result is demonstrated by a decrease in a neuronal severity score and by a reduction in brain edema, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An insight into the peptide’s antinecrotic mechanism was attained through measurements of cellular ATP levels in PC-12 cells under necrotic conditions, showing that the peptide mitigates a necrosis-associated decrease in ATP levels. Further, we demonstrate the peptide’s direct enhancement of the activity of ATP synthase activity, isolated from rat-liver mitochondria, suggesting that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 targets the mitochondria and regulates cellular ATP levels. Thus, AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has potential use for the development of drug therapies for necrosis-related diseases, for example, traumatic brain injury, stroke, myocardial infarction, and other conditions for which no efficient drug-based treatment is currently available. Finally, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms underlying the antinecrotic mode of action of AGA(C8R)-HNG17. PMID:26062019

  10. Micropatterning Facilitates the Long-Term Growth and Analysis of iPSC-Derived Individual Human Neurons and Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Burbulla, Lena F; Beaumont, Kristin G; Mrksich, Milan; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and their application to patient-specific disease models offers new opportunities for studying the pathophysiology of neurological disorders. However, current methods for culturing iPSC-derived neuronal cells result in clustering of neurons, which precludes the analysis of individual neurons and defined neuronal networks. To address this challenge, cultures of human neurons on micropatterned surfaces are developed that promote neuronal survival over extended periods of time. This approach facilitates studies of neuronal development, cellular trafficking, and related mechanisms that require assessment of individual neurons and specific network connections. Importantly, micropatterns support the long-term stability of cultured neurons, which enables time-dependent analysis of cellular processes in living neurons. The approach described in this paper allows mechanistic studies of human neurons, both in terms of normal neuronal development and function, as well as time-dependent pathological processes, and provides a platform for testing of new therapeutics in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  11. Derivation of a neural field model from a network of theta neurons.

    PubMed

    Laing, Carlo R

    2014-07-01

    Neural field models are used to study macroscopic spatiotemporal patterns in the cortex. Their derivation from networks of model neurons normally involves a number of assumptions, which may not be correct. Here we present an exact derivation of a neural field model from an infinite network of theta neurons, the canonical form of a type I neuron. We demonstrate the existence of a "bump" solution in both a discrete network of neurons and in the corresponding neural field model.

  12. Orexin A and orexin receptor 1 axonal traffic in dorsal roots at the CNS/PNS interface.

    PubMed

    Colas, Damien; Manca, Annalisa; Delcroix, Jean-Dominique; Mourrain, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin neurons send long axonal projections through the dorsal spinal cord in lamina I-II of the dorsal horn (DH) at the interface with the peripheral nervous system (PNS). We show that in the DH OXA fibers colocalize with substance P (SP) positive afferents of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons known to mediate sensory processing. Further, OR1 is expressed in p75(NTR) and SP positive DRG neurons, suggesting a potential signaling pathway between orexin and DRG neurons. Interestingly, DRG sensory neurons have a distinctive bifurcating axon where one branch innervates the periphery and the other one the spinal cord (pseudo-unipolar neurons), allowing for potential functional coupling of distinct targets. We observe that OR1 is transported selectively from DRG toward the spinal cord, while OXA is accumulated retrogradely toward the DRG. We hence report a rare situation of asymmetrical neuropeptide receptor distribution between axons projected by a single neuron. These molecular and cellular data are consistent with the role of OXA/OR1 in sensory processing, including DRG neuronal modulation, and support the potential existence of an OX/HCRT circuit between CNS and PNS.

  13. The Circuitry of Olfactory Projection Neurons in the Brain of the Honeybee, Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Zwaka, Hanna; Münch, Daniel; Manz, Gisela; Menzel, Randolf; Rybak, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In the honeybee brain, two prominent tracts – the medial and the lateral antennal lobe tract – project from the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobes (ALs), to the central brain, the mushroom bodies (MBs), and the protocerebral lobe (PL). Intracellularly stained uniglomerular projection neurons were reconstructed, registered to the 3D honeybee standard brain atlas, and then used to derive the spatial properties and quantitative morphology of the neurons of both tracts. We evaluated putative synaptic contacts of projection neurons (PNs) using confocal microscopy. Analysis of the patterns of axon terminals revealed a domain-like innervation within the MB lip neuropil. PNs of the lateral tract arborized more sparsely within the lips and exhibited fewer synaptic boutons, while medial tract neurons occupied broader regions in the MB calyces and the PL. Our data show that uPNs from the medial and lateral tract innervate both the core and the cortex of the ipsilateral MB lip but differ in their innervation patterns in these regions. In the mushroombody neuropil collar we found evidence for ALT boutons suggesting the collar as a multi modal input site including olfactory input similar to lip and basal ring. In addition, our data support the conclusion drawn in previous studies that reciprocal synapses exist between PNs, octopaminergic-, and GABAergic cells in the MB calyces. For the first time, we found evidence for connections between both tracts within the AL. PMID:27746723

  14. Recording axonal conduction to evaluate the integration of pluripotent cell-derived neurons into a neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Shimba, Kenta; Sakai, Koji; Takayama, Yuzo; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    2015-10-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising therapy to treat neurodegenerative disorders, and a number of in vitro models have been developed for studying interactions between grafted neurons and the host neuronal network to promote drug discovery. However, methods capable of evaluating the process by which stem cells integrate into the host neuronal network are lacking. In this study, we applied an axonal conduction-based analysis to a co-culture study of primary and differentiated neurons. Mouse cortical neurons and neuronal cells differentiated from P19 embryonal carcinoma cells, a model for early neural differentiation of pluripotent stem cells, were co-cultured in a microfabricated device. The somata of these cells were separated by the co-culture device, but their axons were able to elongate through microtunnels and then form synaptic contacts. Propagating action potentials were recorded from these axons by microelectrodes embedded at the bottom of the microtunnels and sorted into clusters representing individual axons. While the number of axons of cortical neurons increased until 14 days in vitro and then decreased, those of P19 neurons increased throughout the culture period. Network burst analysis showed that P19 neurons participated in approximately 80% of the bursting activity after 14 days in vitro. Interestingly, the axonal conduction delay of P19 neurons was significantly greater than that of cortical neurons, suggesting that there are some physiological differences in their axons. These results suggest that our method is feasible to evaluate the process by which stem cell-derived neurons integrate into a host neuronal network.

  15. Detailed Analysis of the Genetic and Epigenetic Signatures of iPSC-Derived Mesodiencephalic Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Roessler, Reinhard; Smallwood, Sebastien A.; Veenvliet, Jesse V.; Pechlivanoglou, Petros; Peng, Su-Ping; Chakrabarty, Koushik; Groot-Koerkamp, Marian J.A.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Wesseling, Evelyn; Kelsey, Gavin; Boddeke, Erik; Smidt, Marten P.; Copray, Sjef

    2014-01-01

    Summary Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for in vitro generation of disease-relevant cell types, such as mesodiencephalic dopaminergic (mdDA) neurons involved in Parkinson’s disease. Although iPSC-derived midbrain DA neurons have been generated, detailed genetic and epigenetic characterizations of such neurons are lacking. The goal of this study was to examine the authenticity of iPSC-derived DA neurons obtained by established protocols. We FACS purified mdDA (Pitx3Gfp/+) neurons derived from mouse iPSCs and primary mdDA (Pitx3Gfp/+) neurons to analyze and compare their genetic and epigenetic features. Although iPSC-derived DA neurons largely adopted characteristics of their in vivo counterparts, relevant deviations in global gene expression and DNA methylation were found. Hypermethylated genes, mainly involved in neurodevelopment and basic neuronal functions, consequently showed reduced expression levels. Such abnormalities should be addressed because they might affect unambiguous long-term functionality and hamper the potential of iPSC-derived DA neurons for in vitro disease modeling or cell-based therapy. PMID:24749075

  16. Astrocyte morphology is controlled by neuron-derived FGF

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amit; Bergles, Dwight E.

    2014-01-01

    The highly ramified processes of astrocytes enable cellular interactions and extracellular homeostasis. In this issue of Neuron, Stork et al. (2014) report that extension and elaboration of astrocyte processes in Drosophila is controlled by the release of FGF by neurons. PMID:25033173

  17. Reconstruction of phrenic neuron identity in embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Carolina Barcellos; Kanning, Kevin C.; Kreis, Patricia; Stevenson, Danielle; Crossley, Martin; Nowak, Magdalena; Iacovino, Michelina; Kyba, Michael; Chambers, David; Blanc, Eric; Lieberam, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Air breathing is an essential motor function for vertebrates living on land. The rhythm that drives breathing is generated within the central nervous system and relayed via specialised subsets of spinal motor neurons to muscles that regulate lung volume. In mammals, a key respiratory muscle is the diaphragm, which is innervated by motor neurons in the phrenic nucleus. Remarkably, relatively little is known about how this crucial subtype of motor neuron is generated during embryogenesis. Here, we used direct differentiation of motor neurons from mouse embryonic stem cells as a tool to identify genes that direct phrenic neuron identity. We find that three determinants, Pou3f1, Hoxa5 and Notch, act in combination to promote a phrenic neuron molecular identity. We show that Notch signalling induces Pou3f1 in developing motor neurons in vitro and in vivo. This suggests that the phrenic neuron lineage is established through a local source of Notch ligand at mid-cervical levels. Furthermore, we find that the cadherins Pcdh10, which is regulated by Pou3f1 and Hoxa5, and Cdh10, which is controlled by Pou3f1, are both mediators of like-like clustering of motor neuron cell bodies. This specific Pcdh10/Cdh10 activity might provide the means by which phrenic neurons are assembled into a distinct nucleus. Our study provides a framework for understanding how phrenic neuron identity is conferred and will help to generate this rare and inaccessible yet vital neuronal subtype directly from pluripotent stem cells, thus facilitating subsequent functional investigations. PMID:24496616

  18. Reconstruction of phrenic neuron identity in embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Machado, Carolina Barcellos; Kanning, Kevin C; Kreis, Patricia; Stevenson, Danielle; Crossley, Martin; Nowak, Magdalena; Iacovino, Michelina; Kyba, Michael; Chambers, David; Blanc, Eric; Lieberam, Ivo

    2014-02-01

    Air breathing is an essential motor function for vertebrates living on land. The rhythm that drives breathing is generated within the central nervous system and relayed via specialised subsets of spinal motor neurons to muscles that regulate lung volume. In mammals, a key respiratory muscle is the diaphragm, which is innervated by motor neurons in the phrenic nucleus. Remarkably, relatively little is known about how this crucial subtype of motor neuron is generated during embryogenesis. Here, we used direct differentiation of motor neurons from mouse embryonic stem cells as a tool to identify genes that direct phrenic neuron identity. We find that three determinants, Pou3f1, Hoxa5 and Notch, act in combination to promote a phrenic neuron molecular identity. We show that Notch signalling induces Pou3f1 in developing motor neurons in vitro and in vivo. This suggests that the phrenic neuron lineage is established through a local source of Notch ligand at mid-cervical levels. Furthermore, we find that the cadherins Pcdh10, which is regulated by Pou3f1 and Hoxa5, and Cdh10, which is controlled by Pou3f1, are both mediators of like-like clustering of motor neuron cell bodies. This specific Pcdh10/Cdh10 activity might provide the means by which phrenic neurons are assembled into a distinct nucleus. Our study provides a framework for understanding how phrenic neuron identity is conferred and will help to generate this rare and inaccessible yet vital neuronal subtype directly from pluripotent stem cells, thus facilitating subsequent functional investigations.

  19. Innervation of Cochlear Hair Cells by Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Gunewardene, Niliksha; Crombie, Duncan; Dottori, Mirella; Nayagam, Bryony A

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may serve as an autologous source of replacement neurons in the injured cochlea, if they can be successfully differentiated and reconnected with residual elements in the damaged auditory system. Here, we explored the potential of hiPSC-derived neurons to innervate early postnatal hair cells, using established in vitro assays. We compared two hiPSC lines against a well-characterized hESC line. After ten days' coculture in vitro, hiPSC-derived neural processes contacted inner and outer hair cells in whole cochlear explant cultures. Neural processes from hiPSC-derived neurons also made contact with hair cells in denervated sensory epithelia explants and expressed synapsin at these points of contact. Interestingly, hiPSC-derived neurons cocultured with hair cells at an early stage of differentiation formed synapses with a higher number of hair cells, compared to hiPSC-derived neurons cocultured at a later stage of differentiation. Notable differences in the innervation potentials of the hiPSC-derived neurons were also observed and variations existed between the hiPSC lines in their innervation efficiencies. Collectively, these data illustrate the promise of hiPSCs for auditory neuron replacement and highlight the need to develop methods to mitigate variabilities observed amongst hiPSC lines, in order to achieve reliable clinical improvements for patients.

  20. Innervation of Cochlear Hair Cells by Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gunewardene, Niliksha; Crombie, Duncan; Dottori, Mirella; Nayagam, Bryony A.

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may serve as an autologous source of replacement neurons in the injured cochlea, if they can be successfully differentiated and reconnected with residual elements in the damaged auditory system. Here, we explored the potential of hiPSC-derived neurons to innervate early postnatal hair cells, using established in vitro assays. We compared two hiPSC lines against a well-characterized hESC line. After ten days' coculture in vitro, hiPSC-derived neural processes contacted inner and outer hair cells in whole cochlear explant cultures. Neural processes from hiPSC-derived neurons also made contact with hair cells in denervated sensory epithelia explants and expressed synapsin at these points of contact. Interestingly, hiPSC-derived neurons cocultured with hair cells at an early stage of differentiation formed synapses with a higher number of hair cells, compared to hiPSC-derived neurons cocultured at a later stage of differentiation. Notable differences in the innervation potentials of the hiPSC-derived neurons were also observed and variations existed between the hiPSC lines in their innervation efficiencies. Collectively, these data illustrate the promise of hiPSCs for auditory neuron replacement and highlight the need to develop methods to mitigate variabilities observed amongst hiPSC lines, in order to achieve reliable clinical improvements for patients. PMID:26966437

  1. Functional properties of in vitro excitatory cortical neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Dario; Hardingham, Giles E.; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The in vitro derivation of regionally defined human neuron types from patient‐derived stem cells is now established as a resource to investigate human development and disease. Characterization of such neurons initially focused on the expression of developmentally regulated transcription factors and neural markers, in conjunction with the development of protocols to direct and chart the fate of differentiated neurons. However, crucial to the understanding and exploitation of this technology is to determine the degree to which neurons recapitulate the key functional features exhibited by their native counterparts, essential for determining their usefulness in modelling human physiology and disease in vitro. Here, we review the emerging data concerning functional properties of human pluripotent stem cell‐derived excitatory cortical neurons, in the context of both maturation and regional specificity. PMID:26608229

  2. Ensemble Recording of Electrical Activity in Neurons Derived from P19 Embryonal Carcinoma Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Yuzo; Saito, Atushi; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    Regeneration of the central nervous system (CNS) is one of the most important research themes in neuroscience and neuroengineering. It is essential to replenish the lost neurons and to establish appropriate functional neuronal networks using pluripotent stem cells. Little is known, however, about the properties of stem cell-derived neuronal networks, particularly under the differentiation and development processes. In this work, we cultured P19 embryonal carcinoma cells on micro-electrode arrays (MEAs). P19 cells were differentiated into neurons by retinoic acid application and formed densely connected networks. Spontaneous electrical activity was extracellulary recorded through substrate electrodes and analyzed. Synchronized periodic bursts, which were the characteristic features in primary cultured CNS neurons, were observed. Pharmacological studies demonstrated that the glutamatergic excitatory synapses and the GABAergic inhibitory synapses were active in these P19-derived neuronal networks. The results suggested that MEA-based recording was useful for monitoring differentiation processes of stem cells. P19-derived neuronal networks had quite similar network properties to those of primary cultured neurons, and thus provide a novel model system to investigate stem cell-based neuronal regeneration.

  3. Partial Reprogramming of Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes into Neurons.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wenpo; Sharma, Arun; Shukla, Praveen; Li, Guang; Mall, Moritz; Rajarajan, Kuppusamy; Abilez, Oscar J; Hamaguchi, Ryoko; Wu, Joseph C; Wernig, Marius; Wu, Sean M

    2017-03-22

    Direct reprogramming of somatic cells has been demonstrated, however, it is unknown whether electrophysiologically-active somatic cells derived from separate germ layers can be interconverted. We demonstrate that partial direct reprogramming of mesoderm-derived cardiomyocytes into neurons is feasible, generating cells exhibiting structural and electrophysiological properties of both cardiomyocytes and neurons. Human and mouse pluripotent stem cell-derived CMs (PSC-CMs) were transduced with the neurogenic transcription factors Brn2, Ascl1, Myt1l and NeuroD. We found that CMs adopted neuronal morphologies as early as day 3 post-transduction while still retaining a CM gene expression profile. At week 1 post-transduction, we found that reprogrammed CMs expressed neuronal markers such as Tuj1, Map2, and NCAM. At week 3 post-transduction, mature neuronal markers such as vGlut and synapsin were observed. With single-cell qPCR, we temporally examined CM gene expression and observed increased expression of neuronal markers Dcx, Map2, and Tubb3. Patch-clamp analysis confirmed the neuron-like electrophysiological profile of reprogrammed CMs. This study demonstrates that PSC-CMs are amenable to partial neuronal conversion, yielding a population of cells exhibiting features of both neurons and CMs.

  4. Partial Reprogramming of Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes into Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Wenpo; Sharma, Arun; Shukla, Praveen; Li, Guang; Mall, Moritz; Rajarajan, Kuppusamy; Abilez, Oscar J.; Hamaguchi, Ryoko; Wu, Joseph C.; Wernig, Marius; Wu, Sean M.

    2017-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of somatic cells has been demonstrated, however, it is unknown whether electrophysiologically-active somatic cells derived from separate germ layers can be interconverted. We demonstrate that partial direct reprogramming of mesoderm-derived cardiomyocytes into neurons is feasible, generating cells exhibiting structural and electrophysiological properties of both cardiomyocytes and neurons. Human and mouse pluripotent stem cell-derived CMs (PSC-CMs) were transduced with the neurogenic transcription factors Brn2, Ascl1, Myt1l and NeuroD. We found that CMs adopted neuronal morphologies as early as day 3 post-transduction while still retaining a CM gene expression profile. At week 1 post-transduction, we found that reprogrammed CMs expressed neuronal markers such as Tuj1, Map2, and NCAM. At week 3 post-transduction, mature neuronal markers such as vGlut and synapsin were observed. With single-cell qPCR, we temporally examined CM gene expression and observed increased expression of neuronal markers Dcx, Map2, and Tubb3. Patch-clamp analysis confirmed the neuron-like electrophysiological profile of reprogrammed CMs. This study demonstrates that PSC-CMs are amenable to partial neuronal conversion, yielding a population of cells exhibiting features of both neurons and CMs. PMID:28327614

  5. Testing Synaptic Properties of Human Neurons Derived from Fragile-X Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    mental retardation , low intelligence and other cognitive abnormalities such as sensational, emotional, and behavioral problems. Most of what we have... Mental Retardation 1 (FMR1) has been deleted. We have recently found a method to generate neurons from skin fibroblasts in the mouse and more recently in...human neurons derived from Fragile -X patients PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Marius Wernig, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Stanford University

  6. Functional conservation of atonal and Math1 in the CNS and PNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Arie, N.; Hassan, B. A.; Bermingham, N. A.; Malicki, D. M.; Armstrong, D.; Matzuk, M.; Bellen, H. J.; Zoghbi, H. Y.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the extent to which atonal and its mouse homolog Math1 exhibit functional conservation, we inserted (beta)-galactosidase (lacZ) into the Math1 locus and analyzed its expression, evaluated consequences of loss of Math1 function, and expressed Math1 in atonal mutant flies. lacZ under the control of Math1 regulatory elements duplicated the previously known expression pattern of Math1 in the CNS (i.e., the neural tube, dorsal spinal cord, brainstem, and cerebellar external granule neurons) but also revealed new sites of expression: PNS mechanoreceptors (inner ear hair cells and Merkel cells) and articular chondrocytes. Expressing Math1 induced ectopic chordotonal organs (CHOs) in wild-type flies and partially rescued CHO loss in atonal mutant embryos. These data demonstrate that both the mouse and fly homologs encode lineage identity information and, more interestingly, that some of the cells dependent on this information serve similar mechanoreceptor functions.

  7. Region-Specific Integration of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neuronal Precursors into a Pre-Existing Neuronal Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Neuser, Franziska; Polack, Martin; Annaheim, Christine; Tucker, Kerry L.; Korte, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Enduring reorganization is accepted as a fundamental process of adult neural plasticity. The most dramatic example of this reorganization is the birth and continuously occurring incorporation of new neurons into the pre-existing network of the adult mammalian hippocampus. Based on this phenomenon we transplanted murine embryonic stem (ES)-cell derived neuronal precursors (ESNPs) into murine organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHC) and examined their integration. Using a precise quantitative morphological analysis combined with a detailed electrophysiology, we show a region-specific morphological integration of transplanted ESNPs into different subfields of the hippocampal tissue, resulting in pyramidal neuron-like embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs) in the Cornu Ammonis (CA1 and CA3) and granule neuron-like ESNs in the dentate gyrus (DG), respectively. Subregion specific structural maturation was accompanied by the development of dendritic spines and the generation of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). This cell type specific development does not depend upon NMDA-receptor-dependent synaptic transmission. The presented integration approach was further used to determine the cell-autonomous function of the pan-neurotrophin receptor p75 (P75NTR), as a possible negative regulator of ESN integration. By this means we used p75NTR-deficient ESNPs to study their integration into a WT organotypic environment. We show here that p75NTR is not necessary for integration per se but plays a suppressing role in dendritic development. PMID:23840491

  8. Importance of being Nernst: Synaptic activity and functional relevance in stem cell-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Aaron B; McNutt, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    Functional synaptogenesis and network emergence are signature endpoints of neurogenesis. These behaviors provide higher-order confirmation that biochemical and cellular processes necessary for neurotransmitter release, post-synaptic detection and network propagation of neuronal activity have been properly expressed and coordinated among cells. The development of synaptic neurotransmission can therefore be considered a defining property of neurons. Although dissociated primary neuron cultures readily form functioning synapses and network behaviors in vitro, continuously cultured neurogenic cell lines have historically failed to meet these criteria. Therefore, in vitro-derived neuron models that develop synaptic transmission are critically needed for a wide array of studies, including molecular neuroscience, developmental neurogenesis, disease research and neurotoxicology. Over the last decade, neurons derived from various stem cell lines have shown varying ability to develop into functionally mature neurons. In this review, we will discuss the neurogenic potential of various stem cells populations, addressing strengths and weaknesses of each, with particular attention to the emergence of functional behaviors. We will propose methods to functionally characterize new stem cell-derived neuron (SCN) platforms to improve their reliability as physiological relevant models. Finally, we will review how synaptically active SCNs can be applied to accelerate research in a variety of areas. Ultimately, emphasizing the critical importance of synaptic activity and network responses as a marker of neuronal maturation is anticipated to result in in vitro findings that better translate to efficacious clinical treatments. PMID:26240679

  9. Muscle-Derived GDNF: A Gene Therapeutic Approach for Preserving Motor Neuron Function in ALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0189 TITLE: Muscle-Derived GDNF: A Gene Therapeutic Approach for Preserving Motor Neuron Function in ALS PRINCIPAL...NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0189 Muscle-Derived GDNF: A Gene Therapeutic Approach for Preserving Motor Neuron Function in ALS 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...production in muscles. Hypothesis: Intramuscular AAV5-GDNF injection will ameliorate motor neuron function in the SOD1G93A rat model of ALS. Objectives

  10. Association of astrocytes with neurons and astrocytes derived from distinct progenitor domains in the subpallium

    PubMed Central

    Torigoe, Makio; Yamauchi, Kenta; Zhu, Yan; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Murakami, Fujio

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes play pivotal roles in metabolism and homeostasis as well as in neural development and function in a manner thought to depend on their region-specific diversity. In the mouse spinal cord, astrocytes and neurons, which are derived from a common progenitor domain (PD) and controlled by common PD-specific transcription factors, migrate radially and share their final positions. However, whether astrocytes can only interact with neurons from common PDs in the brain remains unknown. Here, we focused on subpallium-derived cells, because the subpallium generates neurons that show a diverse mode of migration. We tracked their fate by in utero electroporation of plasmids that allow for chromosomal integration of transgenes or of a Cre recombinase expression vector to reporter mice. We also used an Nkx2.1Cre mouse line to fate map the cells originating from the medial ganglionic eminence and preoptic area. We find that although neurons and astrocytes are labeled in various regions, only neurons are labeled in the neocortex, hippocampus and olfactory bulb. Furthermore, we find astrocytes derived from an Nkx 2.1-negative PD are associated with neurons from the Nkx2.1+ PD. Thus, forebrain astrocytes can associate with neurons as well as astrocytes derived from a distinct PD. PMID:26193445

  11. Review of Recent Advances in Peripheral Nerve Stimulation (PNS).

    PubMed

    Chakravarthy, Krishnan; Nava, Andrew; Christo, Paul J; Williams, Kayode

    2016-11-01

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) for the treatment of chronic pain has become an increasingly important field in the arena of neuromodulation, given the ongoing advances in electrical neuromodulation technology since 1999 permitting minimally invasive approaches using an percutaneous approach as opposed to implantable systems. Our review aims to provide clinicians with the recent advances and studies in the field, with specific emphasis on clinical data and indications that have been accumulated over the last several years. In addition, we aim to address key basic science studies to further emphasize the importance of translational research outcomes driving clinical management.

  12. Cav3-type α1T calcium channels mediate transient calcium currents that regulate repetitive firing in Drosophila antennal lobe PNs.

    PubMed

    Iniguez, Jorge; Schutte, Soleil S; O'Dowd, Diane K

    2013-10-01

    Projection neurons (PNs), located in the antennal lobe region of the insect brain, play a key role in processing olfactory information. To explore how activity is regulated at the level of single PNs within this central circuit we have recorded from these neurons in adult Drosophila melanogaster brains. Our previous study demonstrated that PNs express voltage-gated calcium currents with a transient and sustained component. We found that the sustained component is mediated by cac gene-encoded Cav2-type channels involved in regulating action potential-independent release of neurotransmitter at excitatory cholinergic synapses. The function of the transient calcium current and the gene encoding the underlying channels, however, were unknown. Here we report that the transient current blocked by prepulse inactivation is sensitive to amiloride, a vertebrate Cav3-type channel blocker. In addition PN-specific RNAi knockdown of α1T, the Drosophila Cav3-type gene, caused a dramatic reduction in the transient current without altering the sustained component. These data demonstrate that the α1T gene encodes voltage-gated calcium channels underlying the amiloride-sensitive transient current. Alterations in evoked firing and spontaneous burst firing in the α1T knockdowns demonstrate that the Cav3-type calcium channels are important in regulating excitability in adult PNs.

  13. iPSC-derived neurons as a higher-throughput readout for autism: promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, Daria; Palmer, Nathan P; Smedemark-Margulies, Niklas; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Margulies, David M; Kohane, Isaac S

    2014-02-01

    The elucidation of disease etiologies and establishment of robust, scalable, high-throughput screening assays for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have been impeded by both inaccessibility of disease-relevant neuronal tissue and the genetic heterogeneity of the disorder. Neuronal cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from autism patients may circumvent these obstacles and serve as relevant cell models. To date, derived cells are characterized and screened by assessing their neuronal phenotypes. These characterizations are often etiology-specific or lack reproducibility and stability. In this review, we present an overview of efforts to study iPSC-derived neurons as a model for autism, and we explore the plausibility of gene expression profiling as a reproducible and stable disease marker.

  14. Learning-induced synaptic potentiation in implanted neural precursor cell-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungjoon; Heo, Hwon; Han, Ma Eum; Choi, Kyuhyun; Yi, Jee Hyun; Kang, Shin Jung; Kwon, Yunhee Kim; Shin, Ki Soon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal loss caused by neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury and stroke results in cognitive dysfunctioning. Implantation of neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) can improve the brain function by replacing lost neurons. Proper synaptic integration following neuronal differentiation of implanted cells is believed to be a prerequisite for the functional recovery. In the present study, we characterized the functional properties of immortalized neural progenitor HiB5 cells implanted into the rat hippocampus with chemically induced lesion. The implanted HiB5 cells migrated toward CA1 pyramidal layer and differentiated into vGluT1-positive glutamatergic neurons with morphological and electrophysiological properties of endogenous CA1 pyramidal cells. Functional synaptic integration of HiB5 cell-derived neurons was also evidenced by immunohistochemical and electrophysiological data. Lesion-caused memory deficit was significantly recovered after the implantation when assessed by inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning. Remarkably, IA learning preferentially produced long-term potentiation (LTP) at the synapses onto HiB5 cell-derived neurons, which occluded paring protocol-induced LTP ex vivo. We conclude that the implanted HiB5 cell-derived neurons actively participate in learning process through LTP formation, thereby counteracting lesion-mediated memory impairment. PMID:26634434

  15. Neuronal cell sheet of cortical motor neuron phenotype derived from human iPS cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Noboru; Arimitsu, Nagisa; Shimizu, Jun; Takai, Kenji; Hirotsu, Chieko; Takada, Erika; Ueda, Yuji; Wakisaka, Sueshige; Fujiwara, Naruyoshi; Suzuki, Tomoko

    2017-03-17

    Transplantation of stem cells which differentiate into more mature neural cells brings about functional improvement in pre-clinical studies of stroke. Previous transplant approaches in diseased brain have utilized injection of the cells in a cell suspension. In addition, neural stem cells were preferentially used as graft. However, these cells had no specific relationship to the damaged tissue of stroke patients and brain injury. The injection of cells in a suspension destroyed the cell-cell interactions that are suggested to be important for promoting functional integrity as cortical motor neurons.

    In order to obtain suitable cell types for grafting patients with stroke and brain damage, we have modified a protocol for differentiating human iPS cells to cells phenotypically related to cortical motor neurons. Moreover, we applied cell sheet technology to neural cell transplantation due to the idea in which keeping cell-cell communications was regarded as important for the repair of host brain architecture.

    Accordingly, we developed neuronal cell sheets being positive for FEZ family zinc finger 2 (Fezf2), COUP-TF-interacting protein 2 (CTIP2), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (Igfbp4), cysteine-rich motor neuron 1 protein precursor (CRIM1) and forkhead box p2 (Foxp2). These markers are associated with cortical motoneuron which is appropriate for the transplant location in the lesions. The sheets allowed preservation of cell-cell interactions shown by synapsin1 staining after transplantation to damaged mouse brain. The sheet transplantation brought about structural restoration partly and improvement of motor functions in hemiplegic mice.

    Collectively, the cell sheets were transplanted to damaged motor cortex in a way of a novel neuronal cell sheet that maintained cell-cell interactions and improved motor functions of the hemiplegic model mice. The motoneuron cell sheets are possibly applicable for stroke patients and patients with

  16. Neuronal targeting, internalization, and biological activity of a recombinant atoxic derivative of botulinum neurotoxin A

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-toxic derivatives of Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) have potential use as neuron-targeting delivery vehicles, and as reagents to study intracellular trafficking. We have designed and expressed an atoxic derivative of BoNT/A (BoNT/A ad) as a full-length 150kDa molecule consisting of a 50 kDa lig...

  17. Xenotransplantation of embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons into the developing chick spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Wichterle, Hynek; Peljto, Mirza; Nedelec, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of specific cell types have been successfully derived from embryonic stem cells (ES cells), including a variety of neural cells. In vitro generated cells need to be extensively characterized to establish functional equivalency with their in vivo counterparts. The ultimate test for the ability of ES cell-derived neurons to functionally integrate into neural networks is transplantation into the developing central nervous system, a challenging technique limited by the poor accessibility of mammalian embryos. Here we describe xenotransplantation of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons into the developing chick neural tube as an alternative for testing the ability of in vitro generated neurons to survive, integrate, extend axons, and form appropriate synaptic contacts with functionally relevant targets in vivo. Similar methods can be adapted to study functionality of other mammalian cells, including derivatives of human ES cells.

  18. Modeling ALS with motor neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sances, Samuel; Bruijn, Lucie I; Chandran, Siddharthan; Eggan, Kevin; Ho, Ritchie; Klim, Joseph R; Livesey, Matt R; Lowry, Emily; Macklis, Jeffrey D; Rushton, David; Sadegh, Cameron; Sareen, Dhruv; Wichterle, Hynek; Zhang, Su-Chun; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-04-01

    Directing the differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells into motor neurons has allowed investigators to develop new models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, techniques vary between laboratories and the cells do not appear to mature into fully functional adult motor neurons. Here we discuss common developmental principles of both lower and upper motor neuron development that have led to specific derivation techniques. We then suggest how these motor neurons may be matured further either through direct expression or administration of specific factors or coculture approaches with other tissues. Ultimately, through a greater understanding of motor neuron biology, it will be possible to establish more reliable models of ALS. These in turn will have a greater chance of validating new drugs that may be effective for the disease.

  19. Modeling ALS using motor neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sances, S; Bruijn, LI; Chandran, S; Eggan, K; Ho, R; Klim, J; Livesey, MR; Lowry, E; Macklis, JD; Rushton, D; Sadegh, C; Sareen, D; Wichterle, H; Zhang, SC; Svendsen, CN

    2016-01-01

    Directing the differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells into motor neurons has allowed investigators to develop novel models of ALS. However, techniques vary between laboratories and the cells do not appear to mature into fully functional adult motor neurons. Here we discuss common developmental principles of both lower and upper motor neuron development that have led to specific derivation techniques. We then suggest how these motor neurons may be matured further either through direct expression or administration of specific factors or co-culture approaches with other tissues. Ultimately, through a greater understanding of motor neuron biology, it will be possible to establish more reliable models of ALS. These in turn will have a greater chance of validating new drugs that may be effective for the disease. PMID:27021939

  20. Data for the morphometric characterization of NT2-derived postmitotic neurons

    PubMed Central

    González-Burguera, Imanol; Ricobaraza, Ana; Aretxabala, Xabier; Barrondo, Sergio; García del Caño, Gontzal; López de Jesús, Maider; Sallés, Joan

    2016-01-01

    NTERA2/D1 human teratocarcinoma progenitors induced to differentiate into postmitotic neurons by either long-term treatment with retinoic acid or short-term treatment with the nucleoside analog cytosine β-D-arabinofuranoside were subjected to morphometric analysis and compared. Our data provide a methodological and conceptual framework for future investigations aiming at distinguishing neuronal phenotypes on the basis of morphometric analysis. Data presented here are related to research concurrently published in “Highly Efficient Generation of Glutamatergic/Cholinergic NT2-Derived Postmitotic Human Neurons by Short-Term treatment with the Nucleoside Analogue Cytosine β-D-Arabinofuranoside” [1]. PMID:27158648

  1. Long-term culture of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived adherent neurospheres and functional neurons.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mirian A F; Guerreiro, Juliano R; Cassola, Antonio C; Lizier, Nelson F; Kerkis, Alexandre; Camargo, Antonio C M; Kerkis, Irina

    2010-12-01

    Innumerous protocols, using the mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as model for in vitro study of neurons functional properties and features, have been developed. Most of these protocols are short lasting, which, therefore, does not allow a careful analysis of the neurons maturation, aging, and death processes. We describe here a novel and efficient long-lasting protocol for in vitro ES cells differentiation into neuronal cells. It consists of obtaining embryoid bodies, followed by induction of neuronal differentiation with retinoic acid of nonadherent embryoid bodies (three-dimensional model), which further allows their adherence and formation of adherent neurospheres (AN, bi-dimensional model). The AN can be maintained for at least 12 weeks in culture under repetitive mechanical splitting, providing a constant microenvironment (in vitro niche) for the neuronal progenitor cells avoiding mechanical dissociation of AN. The expression of neuron-specific proteins, such as nestin, sox1, beta III-tubulin, microtubule-associated protein 2, neurofilament medium protein, Tau, neuronal nuclei marker, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and 5-hydroxytryptamine, were confirmed in these cells maintained during 3 months under several splitting. Additionally, expression pattern of microtubule-associated proteins, such as lissencephaly (Lis1) and nuclear distribution element-like (Ndel1), which were shown to be essential for differentiation and migration of neurons during embryogenesis, was also studied. As expected, both proteins were expressed in undifferentiated ES cells, AN, and nonrosette neurons, although presenting different spatial distribution in AN. In contrast to previous studies, using cultured neuronal cells derived from embryonic and adult tissues, only Ndel1 expression was observed in the centrosome region of early neuroblasts from AN. Mature neurons, obtained from ES cells in this work, display ionic channels and oscillations of membrane electrical potential typical of

  2. Deriving functional structure of neuronal networks from spike train data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldt, Sarah; Hetrick, Vaughn; Berke, Joshua; Zochowski, Michal

    2009-03-01

    We present a novel algorithm for the detection of functional clusters in neural data. In contrast to many clustering techniques which convert functional interactions to topological distances to determine groupings, our algorithm directly utilizes the dynamics of the neurons to obtain functional groupings. No prior knowledge of the number of groups is needed, as the algorithm determines statistically significant clusters through a comparison to surrogate data sets. Additionally, we introduce a new synchronization measure and use this measure in the algorithm to observe known groupings in simulated data. We then apply our algorithm to experimental data obtained from the hippocampus of a freely moving mouse and show that it detects known changes in neural states associated with exploration and slow wave sleep. Finally, we show that the new synchronization measure can detect changes which are consistent with known neurophysiological processes involved in memory consolidation.

  3. Neuron-derived IgG protects dopaminergic neurons from insult by 6-OHDA and activates microglia through the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Niu, Na; Wang, Mingyu; McNutt, Michael A; Zhang, Donghong; Zhang, Baogang; Lu, Shijun; Liu, Yuqing; Liu, Zhihui

    2013-08-01

    Oxidative and immune attacks from the environment or microglia have been implicated in the loss of dopaminergic neurons of Parkinson's disease. The role of IgG which is an important immunologic molecule in the process of Parkinson's disease has been unclear. Evidence suggests that IgG can be produced by neurons in addition to its traditionally recognized source B lymphocytes, but its function in neurons is poorly understood. In this study, extensive expression of neuron-derived IgG was demonstrated in dopaminergic neurons of human and rat mesencephalon. With an in vitro Parkinson's disease model, we found that neuron-derived IgG can improve the survival and reduce apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons induced by 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity, and also depress the release of NO from microglia triggered by 6-hydroxydopamine. Expression of TNF-α and IL-10 in microglia was elevated to protective levels by neuron-derived IgG at a physiologic level via the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways and microglial activation could be attenuated by IgG blocking. All these data suggested that neuron-derived IgG may exert a self-protective function by activating microglia properly, and IgG may be involved in maintaining immunity homeostasis in the central nervous system and serve as an active factor under pathological conditions such as Parkinson's disease.

  4. Characterization of energy and neurotransmitter metabolism in cortical glutamatergic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells: A novel approach to study metabolism in human neurons.

    PubMed

    Aldana, Blanca I; Zhang, Yu; Lihme, Maria Fog; Bak, Lasse K; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Holst, Bjørn; Hyttel, Poul; Freude, Kristine K; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-02-24

    Alterations in the cellular metabolic machinery of the brain are associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Novel human cellular disease models are essential in order to study underlying disease mechanisms. In the present study, we characterized major metabolic pathways in neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). With this aim, cultures of hiPSC-derived neurons were incubated with [U-(13)C]glucose, [U-(13)C]glutamate or [U-(13)C]glutamine. Isotopic labeling in metabolites was determined using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and cellular amino acid content was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Additionally, we evaluated mitochondrial function using real-time assessment of oxygen consumption via the Seahorse XF(e)96 Analyzer. Moreover, in order to validate the hiPSC-derived neurons as a model system, a metabolic profiling was performed in parallel in primary neuronal cultures of mouse cerebral cortex and cerebellum. These serve as well-established models of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, respectively. The hiPSC-derived neurons were previously characterized as being forebrain-specific cortical glutamatergic neurons. However, a comparable preparation of predominantly mouse cortical glutamatergic neurons is not available. We found a higher glycolytic capacity in hiPSC-derived neurons compared to mouse neurons and a substantial oxidative metabolism through the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. This finding is supported by the extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption rates measured in the cultured human neurons. [U-(13)C]Glutamate and [U-(13)C]glutamine were found to be efficient energy substrates for the neuronal cultures originating from both mice and humans. Interestingly, isotopic labeling in metabolites from [U-(13)C]glutamate was higher than that from [U-(13)C]glutamine. Although the metabolic profile of hiPSC-derived neurons in vitro was

  5. Sulfur dioxide derivatives modulation of high-threshold calcium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhengqing; Meng, Ziqiang

    2006-09-11

    This study addressed the effect of sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) derivatives on high-voltage-activated calcium currents (HVA-I(Ca)) in somatic membrane of freshly isolated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by using the whole-cell configuration of patch-clamp technique. High-threshold Ca(2+) channels are highly expressed in small dorsal root ganglion neurons. SO(2) derivatives increased the amplitudes of calcium currents in a concentration-dependent and voltage-dependent manner. The 50% enhancement concentrations (EC(50)) of SO(2) derivatives on HVA-I(Ca) was about 0.4 microM. In addition, SO(2) derivatives significantly shifted the activation and inactivation curve in the depolarizing direction. Parameters for the fit of a Boltzmann equation to mean values for the activation were V(1/2)=-17.9+/-1.3 mV before and -12.5+/-1.1 mV after application 0.5 microM SO(2) derivatives 2 min (P<0.05). The half inactivation of HVA-I(Ca) was shifted 9.7 mV to positive direction (P<0.05). Furthermore, SO(2) derivatives significantly prolonged the slow constant of inactivation, slowed the fast recovery but markedly accelerated the slow recovery of HVA-I(Ca) from inactivation. From HP of -60 mV 0.5 microM SO(2) derivatives increased the amplitude of HVA-I(Ca) with a depolarizing voltage step to -10 mV about 54.0% in small DRG neurons but 33.3% in large DRG neurons. These results indicated a possible correlation between the change of calcium channels and SO(2) inhalation toxicity, which might cause periphery neurons abnormal regulation of nociceptive transmission via calcium channels.

  6. Thalamus-derived molecules promote survival and dendritic growth of developing cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Sato, Haruka; Fukutani, Yuma; Yamamoto, Yuji; Tatara, Eiichi; Takemoto, Makoto; Shimamura, Kenji; Yamamoto, Nobuhiko

    2012-10-31

    The mammalian neocortex is composed of various types of neurons that reflect its laminar and area structures. It has been suggested that not only intrinsic but also afferent-derived extrinsic factors are involved in neuronal differentiation during development. However, the role and molecular mechanism of such extrinsic factors are almost unknown. Here, we attempted to identify molecules that are expressed in the thalamus and affect cortical cell development. First, thalamus-specific molecules were sought by comparing gene expression profiles of the developing rat thalamus and cortex using microarrays, and by constructing a thalamus-enriched subtraction cDNA library. A systematic screening by in situ hybridization showed that several genes encoding extracellular molecules were strongly expressed in sensory thalamic nuclei. Exogenous and endogenous protein localization further demonstrated that two extracellular molecules, Neuritin-1 (NRN1) and VGF, were transported to thalamic axon terminals. Application of NRN1 and VGF to dissociated cell culture promoted the dendritic growth. An organotypic slice culture experiment further showed that the number of primary dendrites in multipolar stellate neurons increased in response to NRN1 and VGF, whereas dendritic growth of pyramidal neurons was not promoted. These molecules also increased neuronal survival of multipolar neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that the thalamus-specific molecules NRN1 and VGF play an important role in the dendritic growth and survival of cortical neurons in a cell type-specific manner.

  7. Hallmarks of Alzheimer's Disease in Stem-Cell-Derived Human Neurons Transplanted into Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Espuny-Camacho, Ira; Arranz, Amaia M; Fiers, Mark; Snellinx, An; Ando, Kunie; Munck, Sebastian; Bonnefont, Jerome; Lambot, Laurie; Corthout, Nikky; Omodho, Lorna; Vanden Eynden, Elke; Radaelli, Enrico; Tesseur, Ina; Wray, Selina; Ebneth, Andreas; Hardy, John; Leroy, Karelle; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre; De Strooper, Bart

    2017-03-08

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) provide a unique entry to study species-specific aspects of human disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, in vitro culture of neurons deprives them of their natural environment. Here we transplanted human PSC-derived cortical neuronal precursors into the brain of a murine AD model. Human neurons differentiate and integrate into the brain, express 3R/4R Tau splice forms, show abnormal phosphorylation and conformational Tau changes, and undergo neurodegeneration. Remarkably, cell death was dissociated from tangle formation in this natural 3D model of AD. Using genome-wide expression analysis, we observed upregulation of genes involved in myelination and downregulation of genes related to memory and cognition, synaptic transmission, and neuron projection. This novel chimeric model for AD displays human-specific pathological features and allows the analysis of different genetic backgrounds and mutations during the course of the disease.

  8. Upscaling of hiPS Cell-Derived Neurons for High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Traub, Stefanie; Stahl, Heiko; Rosenbrock, Holger; Simon, Eric; Heilker, Ralf

    2017-03-01

    The advent of human-induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell-derived neurons promised to provide better model cells for drug discovery in the context of the central nervous system. This work demonstrates both the upscaling of cellular expansion and the acceleration of neuronal differentiation to accommodate the immense material needs of a high-throughput screening (HTS) approach. Using GRowth factor-driven expansion and INhibition of NotCH (GRINCH) during maturation, the derived cells are here referred to as GRINCH neurons. GRINCH cells displayed neuronal markers, and their functional activity could be demonstrated by electrophysiological recordings. In an application of GRINCH neurons, the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-mediated activation of tropomyosin receptor kinase (TrkB) was investigated as a promising drug target to treat synaptic dysfunctions. To assess the phosphorylation of endogenous TrkB in the GRINCH cells, the highly sensitive amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assay LISA (AlphaLISA) format was established as a primary screen. A high-throughput reverse transcription (RT)-PCR format was employed as a secondary assay to analyze TrkB-mediated downstream target gene expression. In summary, an optimized differentiation protocol, highly efficient cell upscaling, and advanced assay miniaturization, combined with increased detection sensitivity, pave the way for a new generation of predictive cell-based drug discovery.

  9. Zebrafish adult-derived hypothalamic neurospheres generate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Campos, Christian; Letelier, Joaquín; Ceriani, Ricardo; Whitlock, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide essential for fertility in vertebrates. Human male patients lacking GnRH and treated with hormone therapy can remain fertile after cessation of treatment suggesting that new GnRH neurons can be generated during adult life. We used zebrafish to investigate the neurogenic potential of the adult hypothalamus. Previously we have characterized the development of GnRH cells in the zebrafish linking genetic pathways to the differentiation of neuromodulatory and endocrine GnRH cells in specific regions of the brain. Here, we developed a new method to obtain neural progenitors from the adult hypothalamus in vitro. Using this system, we show that neurospheres derived from the adult hypothalamus can be maintained in culture and subsequently differentiate glia and neurons. Importantly, the adult derived progenitors differentiate into neurons containing GnRH and the number of cells is increased through exposure to either testosterone or GnRH, hormones used in therapeutic treatment in humans. Finally, we show in vivo that a neurogenic niche in the hypothalamus contains GnRH positive neurons. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that neurospheres can be derived from the hypothalamus of the adult zebrafish and that these neural progenitors are capable of producing GnRH containing neurons. PMID:26209533

  10. Neuroprotection and neuronal differentiation studies using substantia nigra dopaminergic cells derived from transgenic mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Son, J H; Chun, H S; Joh, T H; Cho, S; Conti, B; Lee, J W

    1999-01-01

    The major pathological lesion of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the selective cell death of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in substantia nigra (SN). Although the initial cause and subsequent molecular signaling mechanisms leading to DA cell death underlying the PD process remain elusive, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is thought to exert neuroprotective as well as neurotrophic roles for the survival and differentiation of DA neurons in SN. Addressing molecular mechanisms of BDNF action in both primary embryonic mesencephalic cultures and in vivo animal models has been technically difficult because DA neurons in SN are relatively rare and present with many heterogeneous cell populations in midbrain. We have developed and characterized a DA neuronal cell line of embryonic SN origin that is more accessible to molecular analysis and can be used as an in vitro model system for studying SN DA neurons. A clonal SN DA neuronal progenitor cell line SN4741, arrested at an early DA developmental stage, was established from transgenic mouse embryos containing the targeted expression of the thermolabile SV40Tag in SN DA neurons. The phenotypic and morphological differentiation of the SN4741 cells could be manipulated by environmental cues in vitro. Exogenous BDNF treatment produced significant neuroprotection against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, glutamate, and nitric oxide-induced neurotoxicity in the SN4741 cells. Simultaneous phosphorylation of receptor tyrosine kinase B accompanied the neuroprotection. This SN DA neuronal cell line provides a unique model system to circumvent the limitations associated with primary mesencephalic cultures for the elucidation of molecular mechanisms of BDNF action on DA neurons of the SN.

  11. c-Jun Amino-Terminal Kinase is Involved in Valproic Acid-Mediated Neuronal Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic NSCs and Neurite Outgrowth of NSC-Derived Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Zhou, Hengxing; Pan, Bin; Li, Xueying; Fu, Zheng; Liu, Jun; Shi, Zhongju; Chu, Tianci; Wei, Zhijian; Ning, Guangzhi; Feng, Shiqing

    2017-04-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), an anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing drug, can induce neuronal differentiation, promote neurite extension and exert a neuroprotective effect in central nervous system (CNS) injuries; however, comparatively little is known regarding its action on mouse embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) and the underlying molecular mechanism. Recent studies suggested that c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is required for neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation during neuronal development. In the present study, we cultured mouse embryonic NSCs and treated the cells with 1 mM VPA for up to 7 days. The results indicate that VPA promotes the neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic NSCs and neurite outgrowth of NSC-derived neurons; moreover, VPA induces the phosphorylation of c-Jun by JNK. In contrast, the specific JNK inhibitor SP600125 decreased the VPA-stimulated increase in neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic NSCs and neurite outgrowth of NSC-derived neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that VPA promotes neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic NSCs and neurite outgrowth of NSC-derived neurons. Moreover, JNK activation is involved in the effects of VPA stimulation.

  12. Human Induced Pluripotent Cell-Derived Sensory Neurons for Fate Commitment of Bone Marrow-Derived Schwann Cells: Implications for Remyelination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Sa; Han, Lei; Ao, Qiang; Chan, Ying-Shing; Shum, Daisy Kwok-Yan

    2016-09-14

    : Strategies that exploit induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to derive neurons have relied on cocktails of cytokines and growth factors to bias cell-signaling events in the course of fate choice. These are often costly and inefficient, involving multiple steps. In this study, we took an alternative approach and selected 5 small-molecule inhibitors of key signaling pathways in an 8-day program to induce differentiation of human iPSCs into sensory neurons, reaching ≥80% yield in terms of marker proteins. Continuing culture in maintenance medium resulted in neuronal networks immunopositive for synaptic vesicle markers and vesicular glutamate transporters suggestive of excitatory neurotransmission. Subpopulations of the derived neurons were electrically excitable, showing tetrodotoxin-sensitive action potentials in patch-clamp experiments. Coculture of the derived neurons with rat Schwann cells under myelinating conditions resulted in upregulated levels of neuronal neuregulin 1 type III in conjunction with the phosphorylated receptors ErbB2 and ErbB3, consistent with amenability of the neuritic network to myelination. As surrogates of embryonic dorsal root ganglia neurons, the derived sensory neurons provided contact-dependent cues to commit bone marrow-derived Schwann cell-like cells to the Schwann cell fate. Our rapid and efficient induction protocol promises not only controlled differentiation of human iPSCs into sensory neurons, but also utility in the translation to a protocol whereby human bone marrow-derived Schwann cells become available for autologous transplantation and remyelination therapy.

  13. Decay in survival motor neuron and plastin 3 levels during differentiation of iPSC-derived human motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Boza-Morán, María G; Martínez-Hernández, Rebeca; Bernal, Sara; Wanisch, Klaus; Also-Rallo, Eva; Le Heron, Anita; Alías, Laura; Denis, Cécile; Girard, Mathilde; Yee, Jiing-Kuan; Tizzano, Eduardo F; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J

    2015-06-26

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease caused by mutations in Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1), leading to degeneration of alpha motor neurons (MNs) but also affecting other cell types. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived human MN models from severe SMA patients have shown relevant phenotypes. We have produced and fully characterized iPSCs from members of a discordant consanguineous family with chronic SMA. We differentiated the iPSC clones into ISL-1+/ChAT+ MNs and performed a comparative study during the differentiation process, observing significant differences in neurite length and number between family members. Analyses of samples from wild-type, severe SMA type I and the type IIIa/IV family showed a progressive decay in SMN protein levels during iPSC-MN differentiation, recapitulating previous observations in developmental studies. PLS3 underwent parallel reductions at both the transcriptional and translational levels. The underlying, progressive developmental decay in SMN and PLS3 levels may lead to the increased vulnerability of MNs in SMA disease. Measurements of SMN and PLS3 transcript and protein levels in iPSC-derived MNs show limited value as SMA biomarkers.

  14. Functional Properties of Human Stem Cell-Derived Neurons in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weick, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-derived neurons from various source materials present unique model systems to examine the fundamental properties of central nervous system (CNS) development as well as the molecular underpinnings of disease phenotypes. In order to more accurately assess potential therapies for neurological disorders, multiple strategies have been employed in recent years to produce neuronal populations that accurately represent in vivo regional and transmitter phenotypes. These include new technologies such as direct conversion of somatic cell types into neurons and glia which may accelerate maturation and retain genetic hallmarks of aging. In addition, novel forms of genetic manipulations have brought human stem cells nearly on par with those of rodent with respect to gene targeting. For neurons of the CNS, the ultimate phenotypic characterization lies with their ability to recapitulate functional properties such as passive and active membrane characteristics, synaptic activity, and plasticity. These features critically depend on the coordinated expression and localization of hundreds of ion channels and receptors, as well as scaffolding and signaling molecules. In this review I will highlight the current state of knowledge regarding functional properties of human stem cell-derived neurons, with a primary focus on pluripotent stem cells. While significant advances have been made, critical hurdles must be overcome in order for this technology to support progression toward clinical applications. PMID:27274733

  15. Recombinant Derivatives of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Engineered for Trafficking Studies and Neuronal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Band, Philip A.; Blais, Steven; Neubert, Thomas A.; Cardozo, Timothy J.; Ichtchenko, Konstantin

    2010-01-01

    Work from multiple laboratories has clarified how the structural domains of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) disable neuronal exocytosis, but important questions remain unanswered. Because BoNT/A intoxication disables its own uptake, light chain (LC) does not accumulate in neurons at detectable levels. We have therefore designed, expressed and purified a series of BoNT/A atoxic derivatives (ad) that retain the wild type features required for native trafficking. BoNT/A1adek and BoNT/A1adtev are full length derivatives rendered atoxic through double point mutations in the LC protease (E224>A; Y366>A). ΔLC-peptide-BoNT/Atev and ΔLC-GFP-BoNT/Atev are derivatives wherein the catalytic portion of the LC is replaced with a short peptide or with GFP plus the peptide. In all four derivatives, we have fused the S6 peptide sequence GDSLSWLLRLLN to the N-terminus of the proteins to enable site-specific attachment of cargo using Sfp phosphopantetheinyl transferase. Cargo can be attached in a manner that provides a homogeneous derivative population rather than a polydisperse mixture of singly and multiply-labeled molecular species. All four derivatives contain an introduced cleavage site for conversion into disulfide-bonded heterodimers. These constructs were expressed in a baculovirus system and the proteins were secreted into culture medium and purified to homogeneity in yields ranging from 1 to 30 mg per liter. These derivatives provide unique tools to study toxin trafficking in vivo, and to assess how the structure of cargo linked to the heavy chain (HC) influences delivery to the neuronal cytosol. Moreover, they create the potential to engineer BoNT-based molecular vehicles that can target therapeutic agents to the neuronal cytoplasm. PMID:20045734

  16. Functional Evaluation of Biological Neurotoxins in Networked Cultures of Stem Cell-derived Central Nervous System Neurons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-05

    derived 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER central nervous system neurons 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Hubbard, K, Beske, PH...numbers CBM.THRTOX.01.10.RC.023 and CBM.THRTOX.01.RC.014). 14. ABSTRACT See reprint. 15. SUBJECT TERMS embryonic stem cells, stem cell-derived neurons ...botulinum neurotoxin detection, electrophysiology, synapse, neuronal networks, glutamatergic synapse, GABAergic synapse 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor stimulates energy metabolism in developing cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Burkhalter, Julia; Fiumelli, Hubert; Allaman, Igor; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Martin, Jean-Luc

    2003-09-10

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes the biochemical and morphological differentiation of selective populations of neurons during development. In this study we examined the energy requirements associated with the effects of BDNF on neuronal differentiation. Because glucose is the preferred energy substrate in the brain, the effect of BDNF on glucose utilization was investigated in developing cortical neurons via biochemical and imaging studies. Results revealed that BDNF increases glucose utilization and the expression of the neuronal glucose transporter GLUT3. Stimulation of glucose utilization by BDNF was shown to result from the activation of Na+/K+-ATPase via an increase in Na+ influx that is mediated, at least in part, by the stimulation of Na+-dependent amino acid transport. The increased Na+-dependent amino acid uptake by BDNF is followed by an enhancement of overall protein synthesis associated with the differentiation of cortical neurons. Together, these data demonstrate the ability of BDNF to stimulate glucose utilization in response to an enhanced energy demand resulting from increases in amino acid uptake and protein synthesis associated with the promotion of neuronal differentiation by BDNF.

  18. Signaling defects in iPSC-derived fragile X premutation neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Koscielska, Katarzyna A; Cao, Zhengyu; Hulsizer, Susan; Grace, Natalie; Mitchell, Gaela; Nacey, Catherine; Githinji, Jackline; McGee, Jeannine; Garcia-Arocena, Dolores; Hagerman, Randi J; Nolta, Jan; Pessah, Isaac N; Hagerman, Paul J

    2012-09-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a leading monogenic neurodegenerative disorder affecting premutation carriers of the fragile X (FMR1) gene. To investigate the underlying cellular neuropathology, we produced induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from isogenic subclones of primary fibroblasts of a female premutation carrier, with each subclone bearing exclusively either the normal or the expanded (premutation) form of the FMR1 gene as the active allele. We show that neurons harboring the stably-active, expanded allele (EX-Xa) have reduced postsynaptic density protein 95 protein expression, reduced synaptic puncta density and reduced neurite length. Importantly, such neurons are also functionally abnormal, with calcium transients of higher amplitude and increased frequency than for neurons harboring the normal-active allele. Moreover, a sustained calcium elevation was found in the EX-Xa neurons after glutamate application. By excluding the individual genetic background variation, we have demonstrated neuronal phenotypes directly linked to the FMR1 premutation. Our approach represents a unique isogenic, X-chromosomal epigenetic model to aid the development of targeted therapeutics for FXTAS, and more broadly as a model for the study of common neurodevelopmental (e.g. autism) and neurodegenerative (e.g. Parkinsonism, dementias) disorders.

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mediates estradiol-induced dendritic spine formation in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D D; Cole, N B; Segal, M

    1998-09-15

    Dendritic spines are of major importance in information processing and memory formation in central neurons. Estradiol has been shown to induce an increase of dendritic spine density on hippocampal neurons in vivo and in vitro. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) recently has been implicated in neuronal maturation, plasticity, and regulation of GABAergic interneurons. We now demonstrate that estradiol down-regulates BDNF in cultured hippocampal neurons to 40% of control values within 24 hr of exposure. This, in turn, decreases inhibition and increases excitatory tone in pyramidal neurons, leading to a 2-fold increase in dendritic spine density. Exogenous BDNF blocks the effects of estradiol on spine formation, and BDNF depletion with a selective antisense oligonucleotide mimics the effects of estradiol. Addition of BDNF antibodies also increases spine density, and diazepam, which facilitates GABAergic neurotransmission, blocks estradiol-induced spine formation. These observations demonstrate a functional link between estradiol, BDNF as a potent regulator of GABAergic interneurons, and activity-dependent formation of dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons.

  20. Testing Brain Overgrowth and Synaptic Models of Autism Using NPC’s and Neurons from Patient-Derived IPS Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Models of Autism Using NPC’s and Neurons from Patient- Derived IPS Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Fred H. Gage, Ph.D...SUBTITLE Testing Brain Overgrowth and Synaptic Models of Autism Using NPC’s and Neurons from Patient- Derived IPS Cells 5a. CONTRACT...Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex neurodevelopmental

  1. Idiopathic Autism: Cellular and Molecular Phenotypes in Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaozhuo; Campanac, Emilie; Cheung, Hoi-Hung; Ziats, Mark N; Canterel-Thouennon, Lucile; Raygada, Margarita; Baxendale, Vanessa; Pang, Alan Lap-Yin; Yang, Lu; Swedo, Susan; Thurm, Audrey; Lee, Tin-Lap; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Chan, Wai-Yee; Hoffman, Dax A; Rennert, Owen M

    2016-06-29

    Autism spectrum disorder is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder whose pathophysiology remains elusive as a consequence of the unavailability for study of patient brain neurons; this deficit may potentially be circumvented by neural differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells. Rare syndromes with single gene mutations and autistic symptoms have significantly advanced the molecular and cellular understanding of autism spectrum disorders; however, in aggregate, they only represent a fraction of all cases of autism. In an effort to define the cellular and molecular phenotypes in human neurons of non-syndromic autism, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from three male autism spectrum disorder patients who had no identifiable clinical syndromes, and their unaffected male siblings and subsequently differentiated these patient-specific stem cells into electrophysiologically active neurons. iPSC-derived neurons from these autistic patients displayed decreases in the frequency and kinetics of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents relative to controls, as well as significant decreases in Na(+) and inactivating K(+) voltage-gated currents. Moreover, whole-genome microarray analysis of gene expression identified 161 unique genes that were significantly differentially expressed in autistic patient iPSC-derived neurons (>twofold, FDR < 0.05). These genes were significantly enriched for processes related to synaptic transmission, such as neuroactive ligand-receptor signaling and extracellular matrix interactions, and were enriched for genes previously associated with autism spectrum disorder. Our data demonstrate aberrant voltage-gated currents and underlying molecular changes related to synaptic function in iPSC-derived neurons from individuals with idiopathic autism as compared to unaffected siblings controls.

  2. [The research advance of brain derived neurotrophic factor].

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Chen, J

    2000-12-01

    Recent research advances in neuroscience show that neurotrophic factors are proteins that affect selectively various kinds of neurons of CNS and PNS. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is another neurotrophic factor that was first reported by Barde, a German chemist, thirty years later after the nerve growth factor had been found out. BDNF plays an important role in the growth, development, differentiation, maintenance and regeneration of various types of neurons in the CNS and has potential application to the treatment of brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, Huntington's chorea and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this paper, the structure, function and potential clinical application of BDNF were reviewed.

  3. Activation of Lumbar Spinal Wide-Dynamic Range Neurons by a Sanshool Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Carolyn M.; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Simons, Christopher T.; Slack, Jay; McCluskey, T. Scott; Furrer, Stefan; Carstens, E.

    2009-01-01

    The enigmatic sensation of tingle involves the activation of primary sensory neurons by hydroxy-α-sanshool, a tingly agent in Szechuan peppers, by inhibiting two-pore potassium channels. Central mechanisms mediating tingle sensation are unknown. We investigated whether a stable derivative of sanshool—isobutylalkenyl amide (IBA)—excites wide-dynamic range (WDR) spinal neurons that participate in transmission of chemesthetic information from the skin. In anesthetized rats, the majority of WDR and low-threshold units responded to intradermal injection of IBA in a dose-related manner over a >5-min time course and exhibited tachyphylaxis at higher concentrations (1 and 10%). Almost all WDR and low-threshold units additionally responded to the pungent agents mustard oil (allyl isothiocyanate) and/or capsaicin, prompting reclassification of the low-threshold cells as WDR. The results are discussed in terms of the functional role of WDR neurons in mediating tingle sensation. PMID:19164099

  4. Activation of lumbar spinal wide-dynamic range neurons by a sanshool derivative.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Carolyn M; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Simons, Christopher T; Slack, Jay; McCluskey, T Scott; Furrer, Stefan; Carstens, E

    2009-04-01

    The enigmatic sensation of tingle involves the activation of primary sensory neurons by hydroxy-alpha-sanshool, a tingly agent in Szechuan peppers, by inhibiting two-pore potassium channels. Central mechanisms mediating tingle sensation are unknown. We investigated whether a stable derivative of sanshool-isobutylalkenyl amide (IBA)-excites wide-dynamic range (WDR) spinal neurons that participate in transmission of chemesthetic information from the skin. In anesthetized rats, the majority of WDR and low-threshold units responded to intradermal injection of IBA in a dose-related manner over a >5-min time course and exhibited tachyphylaxis at higher concentrations (1 and 10%). Almost all WDR and low-threshold units additionally responded to the pungent agents mustard oil (allyl isothiocyanate) and/or capsaicin, prompting reclassification of the low-threshold cells as WDR. The results are discussed in terms of the functional role of WDR neurons in mediating tingle sensation.

  5. Analysis of Signaling Endosome Composition and Dynamics Using SILAC in Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Debaisieux, Solène; Encheva, Vesela; Chakravarty, Probir; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    Neurons require efficient transport mechanisms such as fast axonal transport to ensure neuronal homeostasis and survival. Neurotrophins and their receptors are conveyed via fast axonal retrograde transport of signaling endosomes to the soma, where they elicit transcriptional responses. Despite the essential roles of signaling endosomes in neuronal differentiation and survival, little is known about their molecular identity, dynamics, and regulation. Gaining a better mechanistic understanding of these organelles and their kinetics is crucial, given the growing evidence linking vesicular trafficking deficits to neurodegeneration. Here, we exploited an affinity purification strategy using the binding fragment of tetanus neurotoxin (HCT) conjugated to monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs), which in motor neurons, is transported in the same carriers as neurotrophins and their receptors. To quantitatively assess the molecular composition of HCT-containing signaling endosomes, we have developed a protocol for triple Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) in embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons. After HCT internalization, retrograde carriers were magnetically isolated at different time points and subjected to mass-spectrometry and Gene Ontology analyses. This purification strategy is highly specific, as confirmed by the presence of essential regulators of fast axonal transport in the make-up of these organelles. Our results indicate that signaling endosomes undergo a rapid maturation with the acquisition of late endosome markers following a specific time-dependent kinetics. Strikingly, signaling endosomes are specifically enriched in proteins known to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases and neuroinfection. Moreover, we highlighted the presence of novel components, whose precise temporal recruitment on signaling endosomes might be essential for proper sorting and/or transport of these organelles. This study provides the first

  6. Prevention of delayed neuronal death in gerbil hippocampus by a novel vinca alkaloid derivative (vinconate).

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kogure, K

    1989-08-01

    We investigated the effect of vinconate, a novel vinca alkaloid derivative, on delayed neuronal death using Mongolian gerbils. The animals were allowed to survive for 7 d after 3 or 5 min of forebrain ischemia induced by bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries. Morphological changes and calcium (45Ca) accumulation were evaluated in the CA1 sector of the hippocampus after ischemia. Vinconate (50, 100, and 300 mg/kg) showed protective effects against neuronal death in a dose-dependent manner when administered intraperitoneally (ip) 10 min before 5 min of ischemia. However, the administration of vinconate (100 and 300 mg/kg, ip) immediately after 5 min of ischemia showed no therapeutic effect, whereas a marked therapeutic effect of vinconate (50 and 100 mg/kg, ip) was observed when administered immediately after 3 min of ischemia. An anesthetic dose of pentobarbital (40 mg/kg, ip) also produced significant protection against neuronal death. Furthermore, a 45Ca autoradiographic study indicated that a marked calcium accumulation was found in the Ca1 sector at 7 d after 5 min of ischemia, which was consistent with the extent of histological neuronal damage. When vinconate (100 and 300 mg/kg, ip) was administered 10 min before 5 min of ischemia, the abnormal calcium accumulation was not detected in the CA1 sector. These data indicate that suppression of abnormal neuronal activity may be owing to the antagonistic action of vinconate on calcium accumulation.

  7. Glia-derived ATP inversely regulates excitability of pyramidal and CCK-positive neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhibing; Liu, Yu; Xi, Wang; Lou, Hui-fang; Zhu, Liya; Guo, Zhifei; Mei, Lin; Duan, Shumin

    2017-01-01

    Astrocyte responds to neuronal activity with calcium waves and modulates synaptic transmission through the release of gliotransmitters. However, little is known about the direct effect of gliotransmitters on the excitability of neuronal networks beyond synapses. Here we show that selective stimulation of astrocytes expressing channelrhodopsin-2 in the CA1 area specifically increases the firing frequency of CCK-positive but not parvalbumin-positive interneurons and decreases the firing rate of pyramidal neurons, phenomena mimicked by exogenously applied ATP. Further evidences indicate that ATP-induced increase and decrease of excitability are caused, respectively, by P2Y1 receptor-mediated inhibition of a two-pore domain potassium channel and A1 receptor-mediated opening of a G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel. Moreover, the activation of ChR2-expressing astrocytes reduces the power of kainate-induced hippocampal ex vivo gamma oscillation. Thus, through distinct receptor subtypes coupled with different K+ channels, astrocyte-derived ATP differentially modulates the excitability of different types of neurons and efficiently controls the activity of neuronal network. PMID:28128211

  8. Glypican 6 Enhances N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Function in Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kaoru; Takahashi, Kanako; Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; Chujo, Kaori; Sekino, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro use of neurons that are differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-neurons) is expected to improve the prediction accuracy of preclinical tests for both screening and safety assessments in drug development. To achieve this goal, hiPSC neurons are required to differentiate into functional neurons that form excitatory networks and stably express N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). Recent studies have identified some astrocyte-derived factors that are important for the functional maturation of neurons. We therefore examined the effects of the astrocyte-derived factor glypican 6 (GPC6) on hiPSC-neurons. When we pharmacologically examined which receptor subtypes mediate L-glutamate (L-Glu)-induced changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in hiPSC neurons using fura-2 Ca2+ imaging, NMDAR-mediated responses were not detected through 7 days in vitro (DIV). These cells were also not vulnerable to excitotoxicity at 7 DIV. However, a 5-days treatment with GPC6 from 3 DIV induced an NMDAR-mediated Ca2+ increase in hiPSC-neurons and increased the level of NMDARs on the cell surface. We also found that GPC6-treated hiPSC-neurons became responsive to excitotoxicity. These results suggest that GPC6 increases the level of functional NMDARs in hiPSC-neurons. Glial factors may play a key role in accelerating the functional maturation of hiPSC neurons for drug-development applications. PMID:27895553

  9. Establishment of a Human Neuronal Network Assessment System by Using a Human Neuron/Astrocyte Co-Culture Derived from Fetal Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kazuyuki; Miura, Yuji; Sawada, Kohei; Yamazaki, Kazuto; Ito, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Using human cell models mimicking the central nervous system (CNS) provides a better understanding of the human CNS, and it is a key strategy to improve success rates in CNS drug development. In the CNS, neurons function as networks in which astrocytes play important roles. Thus, an assessment system of neuronal network functions in a co-culture of human neurons and astrocytes has potential to accelerate CNS drug development. We previously demonstrated that human hippocampus-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (HIP-009 cells) were a novel tool to obtain human neurons and astrocytes in the same culture. In this study, we applied HIP-009 cells to a multielectrode array (MEA) system to detect neuronal signals as neuronal network functions. We observed spontaneous firings of HIP-009 neurons, and validated functional formation of neuronal networks pharmacologically. By using this assay system, we investigated effects of several reference compounds, including agonists and antagonists of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid receptors, and sodium, potassium, and calcium channels, on neuronal network functions using firing and burst numbers, and synchrony as readouts. These results indicate that the HIP-009/MEA assay system is applicable to the pharmacological assessment of drug candidates affecting synaptic functions for CNS drug development.

  10. Effect of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Haploinsufficiency on Stress-Induced Remodeling of Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Magariños, A.M.; Li, C.J.; Toth, J. Gal; Bath, K.G.; Jing, D.; Lee, F.S.; McEwen, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces the remodeling (i.e., retraction and simplification) of the apical dendrites of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in rats, suggesting that intrahippocampal connectivity can be affected by a prolonged stressful challenge. Since the structural maintenance of neuronal dendritic arborizations and synaptic connectivity requires neurotrophic support, we investigated the potential role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin enriched in the hippocampus and released from neurons in an activity-dependent manner, as a mediator of the stress-induced dendritic remodeling. The analysis of Golgi-impregnated hippocampal sections revealed that wild type (WT) C57BL/6 male mice showed a similar CA3 apical dendritic remodeling in response to three weeks of CRS to that previously described for rats. Haploinsufficient BDNF mice (BDNF±) did not show such remodeling, but, even without CRS, they presented shorter and simplified CA3 apical dendritic arbors, like those observed in stressed WT mice. Furthermore, unstressed BDNF± mice showed a significant decrease in total hippocampal volume. The dendritic arborization of CA1 pyramidal neurons was not affected by CRS or genotype. However, only in WT mice, CRS induced changes in the density of dendritic spine shape subtypes in both CA1 and CA3 apical dendrites. These results suggest a complex role of BDNF in maintaining the dendritic and spine morphology of hippocampal neurons and the associated volume of the hippocampal formation. The inability of CRS to modify the dendritic structure of CA3 pyramidal neurons in BDNF± mice suggests an indirect, perhaps permissive, role of BDNF in mediating hippocampal dendritic remodeling. PMID:20095008

  11. Human polymorphisms in nicotinic receptors: a functional analysis in iPS-derived dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Deflorio, Cristina; Blanchard, Stéphane; Carisì, Maria Carla; Bohl, Delphine; Maskos, Uwe

    2017-02-01

    Tobacco smoking is a public health problem, with ∼5 million deaths per year, representing a heavy burden for many countries. No effective therapeutic strategies are currently available for nicotine addiction, and it is therefore crucial to understand the etiological and pathophysiological factors contributing to this addiction. The neuronal α5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit is critically involved in nicotine dependence. In particular, the human polymorphism α5D398N corresponds to the strongest correlation with nicotine dependence risk found to date in occidental populations, according to meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies. To understand the specific contribution of this subunit in the context of nicotine addiction, an efficient screening system for native human nAChRs is needed. We have differentiated human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons and obtained a comprehensive characterization of these neurons by quantitative RT-PCR. The functional properties of nAChRs expressed in these human DA neurons, with or without the polymorphism in the α5 subunit, were studied with the patch-clamp electrophysiological technique. Our results in human DA neurons carrying the polymorphism in the α5 subunit showed an increase in EC50, indicating that, in the presence of the polymorphism, more nicotine or acetylcholine chloride is necessary to obtain the same effect. This human cell culturing system can now be used in drug discovery approaches to screen for compounds that interact specifically with human native and polymorphic nAChRs.-Deflorio, C., Blanchard, S., Carisì, M. C., Bohl, D., Maskos, U. Human polymorphisms in nicotinic receptors: a functional analysis in iPS-derived dopaminergic neurons.

  12. Effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor haploinsufficiency on stress-induced remodeling of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Magariños, A M; Li, C J; Gal Toth, J; Bath, K G; Jing, D; Lee, F S; McEwen, B S

    2011-03-01

    Chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces the remodeling (i.e., retraction and simplification) of the apical dendrites of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in rats, suggesting that intrahippocampal connectivity can be affected by a prolonged stressful challenge. Since the structural maintenance of neuronal dendritic arborizations and synaptic connectivity requires neurotrophic support, we investigated the potential role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin enriched in the hippocampus and released from neurons in an activity-dependent manner, as a mediator of the stress-induced dendritic remodeling. The analysis of Golgi-impregnated hippocampal sections revealed that wild type (WT) C57BL/6 male mice showed a similar CA3 apical dendritic remodeling in response to three weeks of CRS to that previously described for rats. Haploinsufficient BDNF mice (BDNF(±) ) did not show such remodeling, but, even without CRS, they presented shorter and simplified CA3 apical dendritic arbors, like those observed in stressed WT mice. Furthermore, unstressed BDNF(±) mice showed a significant decrease in total hippocampal volume. The dendritic arborization of CA1 pyramidal neurons was not affected by CRS or genotype. However, only in WT mice, CRS induced changes in the density of dendritic spine shape subtypes in both CA1 and CA3 apical dendrites. These results suggest a complex role of BDNF in maintaining the dendritic and spine morphology of hippocampal neurons and the associated volume of the hippocampal formation. The inability of CRS to modify the dendritic structure of CA3 pyramidal neurons in BDNF(±) mice suggests an indirect, perhaps permissive, role of BDNF in mediating hippocampal dendritic remodeling.

  13. Synaptically-competent neurons derived from canine embryonic stem cells by lineage selection with EGF and Noggin.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Jared T; Lai, Jonathan K Y; Semple, Esther; Brisson, Brigitte A; Gartley, Cathy; Armstrong, John N; Betts, Dean H

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cell lines have been generated in several domestic animal species; however, these lines traditionally show poor self-renewal and differentiation. Using canine embryonic stem cell (cESC) lines previously shown to have sufficient self-renewal capacity and potency, we generated and compared canine neural stem cell (cNSC) lines derived by lineage selection with epidermal growth factor (EGF) or Noggin along the neural default differentiation pathway, or by directed differentiation with retinoic acid (RA)-induced floating sphere assay. Lineage selection produced large populations of SOX2+ neural stem/progenitor cell populations and neuronal derivatives while directed differentiation produced few and improper neuronal derivatives. Primary canine neural lines were generated from fetal tissue and used as a positive control for differentiation and electrophysiology. Differentiation of EGF- and Noggin-directed cNSC lines in N2B27 with low-dose growth factors (BDNF/NT-3 or PDGFαα) produced phenotypes equivalent to primary canine neural cells including 3CB2+ radial progenitors, MOSP+ glia restricted precursors, VIM+/GFAP+ astrocytes, and TUBB3+/MAP2+/NFH+/SYN+ neurons. Conversely, induction with RA and neuronal differentiation produced inadequate putative neurons for further study, even though appropriate neuronal gene expression profiles were observed by RT-PCR (including Nestin, TUBB3, PSD95, STX1A, SYNPR, MAP2). Co-culture of cESC-derived neurons with primary canine fetal cells on canine astrocytes was used to test functional maturity of putative neurons. Canine ESC-derived neurons received functional GABA(A)- and AMPA-receptor mediated synaptic input, but only when co-cultured with primary neurons. This study presents established neural stem/progenitor cell populations and functional neural derivatives in the dog, providing the proof-of-concept required to translate stem cell transplantation strategies into a clinically relevant animal model.

  14. Role of lipid rafts in neuronal differentiation of dental pulp-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Vincenzo; Santacroce, Costantino; Tasciotti, Vincenzo; Martellucci, Stefano; Santilli, Francesca; Manganelli, Valeria; Piccoli, Luca; Misasi, Roberta; Sorice, Maurizio; Garofalo, Tina

    2015-12-10

    Human dental pulp-derived stem cells (hDPSCs) are characterized by a typical fibroblast-like morphology. They express specific markers for mesenchymal stem cells and are capable of differentiation into osteoblasts, adipoblasts and neurons in vitro. Previous studies showed that gangliosides are involved in the induction of early neuronal differentiation of hDPSCs. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of lipid rafts in this process. Lipid rafts are signaling microdomains enriched in glycosphingolipids, cholesterol, tyrosine kinase receptors, mono- or heterotrimeric G proteins and GPI-anchored proteins. We preliminary showed that established cells expressed multipotent mesenchymal stromal-specific surface antigens. Then, we analyzed the distribution of lipid rafts, revealing plasma membrane microdomains with GM2 and EGF-R enrichment. Following stimulation with EGF/bFGF, neuronal differentiation was observed. To analyze the functional role of lipid rafts in EGF/bFGF-induced hDPSCs differentiation, cells were preincubated with lipid raft affecting agents, i.e. [D]-PDMP or methyl-β-cyclodextrin. These compounds significantly prevented neuronal-specific antigen expression, as well as Akt and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation, induced by EGF/bFGF, indicating that lipid raft integrity is essential for EGF/bFGF-induced hDPSCs differentiation. These results suggest that lipid rafts may represent specific chambers, where multimolecular signaling complexes, including lipids (gangliosides, cholesterol) and proteins (EGF-R), play a role in hDPSCs differentiation.

  15. Synthesis of acetylcholine from choline derived from phosphatidylcholine in a human neuronal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Blusztajn, J.K.; Liscovitch, M.; Richardson, U.I.

    1987-08-01

    Cholinergic neurons are unique among cells since they alone utilize choline not only as a component of major membrane phospholipids, such as phosphatidylcholine (Ptd-Cho), but also as a precursor of their neurotransmitter acetylcholine (AcCho). It has been hypothesized that choline-phospholipids might serve as a storage pool of choline for AcCho synthesis. The selective vulnerability of cholinergic neurons in certain neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer disease, motor neuron disorders) might result from the abnormally accelerated liberation of choline (to be used a precursor of AcCho) from membrane phospholipids, resulting in altered membrane composition and function and compromised neuronal viability. However, the proposed metabolic link between membrane turnover and AcCho synthesis has been difficult to demonstrate because of the heterogeneity of the preparations used. Here the authors used a population of purely cholinergic cells (human neuroblastomas, LA-N-2), incubated in the presence of (methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine to selectively label PtdCho synthesized by methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine, the only pathway of de novo choline synthesis. Three peaks of radioactive material that cochromatographed with authentic AcCho, choline, and phosphocholine were observed when the water-soluble metabolites of the (/sup 3/H)PtdCho were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results demonstrate that AcCho can be synthesized from choline derived from the degradation of endogenous PtdCho formed de novo by methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine.

  16. Differential Maturation of the Two Regulated Secretory Pathways in Human iPSC-Derived Neurons.

    PubMed

    Emperador Melero, Javier; Nadadhur, Aishwarya G; Schut, Desiree; Weering, Jan V; Heine, Vivi M; Toonen, Ruud F; Verhage, Matthijs

    2017-03-14

    Neurons communicate by regulated secretion of chemical signals from synaptic vesicles (SVs) and dense-core vesicles (DCVs). Here, we investigated the maturation of these two secretory pathways in micro-networks of human iPSC-derived neurons. These micro-networks abundantly expressed endogenous SV and DCV markers, including neuropeptides. DCV transport was microtubule dependent, preferentially anterograde in axons, and 2-fold faster in axons than in dendrites. SV and DCV secretion were strictly Ca(2+) and SNARE dependent. DCV secretion capacity matured until day in vitro (DIV) 36, with intense stimulation releasing 6% of the total DCV pool, and then plateaued. This efficiency is comparable with mature mouse neurons. In contrast, SV secretion capacity continued to increase until DIV50, with substantial further increase in secretion efficiency and decrease in silent synapses. These data show that the two secretory pathways can be studied in human neurons and that they mature differentially, with DCV secretion reaching maximum efficiency when that of SVs is still low.

  17. MiRNAs in Astrocyte-Derived Exosomes as Possible Mediators of Neuronal Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lafourcade, Carlos; Ramírez, Juan Pablo; Luarte, Alejandro; Fernández, Anllely; Wyneken, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes use gliotransmitters to modulate neuronal function and plasticity. However, the role of small extracellular vesicles, called exosomes, in astrocyte-to-neuron signaling is mostly unknown. Exosomes originate in multivesicular bodies of parent cells and are secreted by fusion of the multivesicular body limiting membrane with the plasma membrane. Their molecular cargo, consisting of RNA species, proteins, and lipids, is in part cell type and cell state specific. Among the RNA species transported by exosomes, microRNAs (miRNAs) are able to modify gene expression in recipient cells. Several miRNAs present in astrocytes are regulated under pathological conditions, and this may have far-reaching consequences if they are loaded in exosomes. We propose that astrocyte-derived miRNA-loaded exosomes, such as miR-26a, are dysregulated in several central nervous system diseases; thus potentially controlling neuronal morphology and synaptic transmission through validated and predicted targets. Unraveling the contribution of this new signaling mechanism to the maintenance and plasticity of neuronal networks will impact our understanding on the physiology and pathophysiology of the central nervous system. PMID:27547038

  18. Genetic correction of tauopathy phenotypes in neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fong, Helen; Wang, Chengzhong; Knoferle, Johanna; Walker, David; Balestra, Maureen E; Tong, Leslie M; Leung, Laura; Ring, Karen L; Seeley, William W; Karydas, Anna; Kshirsagar, Mihir A; Boxer, Adam L; Kosik, Kenneth S; Miller, Bruce L; Huang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Tauopathies represent a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the accumulation of pathological TAU protein in brains. We report a human neuronal model of tauopathy derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) carrying a TAU-A152T mutation. Using zinc-finger nuclease-mediated gene editing, we generated two isogenic iPSC lines: one with the mutation corrected, and another with the homozygous mutation engineered. The A152T mutation increased TAU fragmentation and phosphorylation, leading to neurodegeneration and especially axonal degeneration. These cellular phenotypes were consistent with those observed in a patient with TAU-A152T. Upon mutation correction, normal neuronal and axonal morphologies were restored, accompanied by decreases in TAU fragmentation and phosphorylation, whereas the severity of tauopathy was intensified in neurons with the homozygous mutation. These isogenic TAU-iPSC lines represent a critical advancement toward the accurate modeling and mechanistic study of tauopathies with human neurons and will be invaluable for drug-screening efforts and future cell-based therapies.

  19. Conditional ablation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-TrkB signaling impairs striatal neuron development.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Yui, Daishi; Luikart, Bryan W; McKay, Renée M; Li, Yanjiao; Rubenstein, John L; Parada, Luis F

    2012-09-18

    Neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are associated with the physiology of the striatum and the loss of its normal functioning under pathological conditions. The role of BDNF and its downstream signaling in regulating the development of the striatum has not been fully investigated, however. Here we report that ablation of Bdnf in both the cortex and substantia nigra depletes BDNF in the striatum, and leads to impaired striatal development, severe motor deficits, and postnatal lethality. Furthermore, striatal-specific ablation of TrkB, the gene encoding the high-affinity receptor for BDNF, is sufficient to elicit an array of striatal developmental abnormalities, including decreased anatomical volume, smaller neuronal nucleus size, loss of dendritic spines, reduced enkephalin expression, diminished nigral dopaminergic projections, and severe deficits in striatal dopamine signaling through DARPP32. In addition, TrkB ablation in striatal neurons elicits a non-cell-autonomous reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase protein level in the axonal projections of substantia nigral dopaminergic neurons. Thus, our results establish an essential function for TrkB in regulating the development of striatal neurons.

  20. Activation of 5-HT7 receptors increases neuronal platelet-derived growth factor β receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Kruk, Jeff S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2012-03-09

    Several antipsychotics have a high affinity for 5-HT7 receptors yet despite intense interest in the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential drug target to treat psychosis, the function and signaling properties of 5-HT7 receptors in neurons remain largely uncharacterized. In primary mouse hippocampal and cortical neurons, as well as in the SH-SY5Y cell line, incubation with 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), or 5-HT7 receptor-selective agonists increases the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)β receptors. The increased PDGFβ receptor expression is cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-dependent, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptors couple to Gα(s) in primary neurons. Interestingly, up-regulated PDGFβ receptors display an increased basal phosphorylation state at the phospholipase Cγ-activating tyrosine 1021. This novel linkage between the 5-HT7 receptor and the PDGF system may be an important GPCR-neurotrophic factor signaling pathway in neurons.

  1. Human Induced Pluripotent Cell-Derived Sensory Neurons for Fate Commitment of Bone Marrow-Derived Schwann Cells: Implications for Remyelination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Sa; Han, Lei; Ao, Qiang; Chan, Ying-Shing; Shum, Daisy Kwok-Yan

    2017-02-01

    Strategies that exploit induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to derive neurons have relied on cocktails of cytokines and growth factors to bias cell-signaling events in the course of fate choice. These are often costly and inefficient, involving multiple steps. In this study, we took an alternative approach and selected 5 small-molecule inhibitors of key signaling pathways in an 8-day program to induce differentiation of human iPSCs into sensory neurons, reaching ≥80% yield in terms of marker proteins. Continuing culture in maintenance medium resulted in neuronal networks immunopositive for synaptic vesicle markers and vesicular glutamate transporters suggestive of excitatory neurotransmission. Subpopulations of the derived neurons were electrically excitable, showing tetrodotoxin-sensitive action potentials in patch-clamp experiments. Coculture of the derived neurons with rat Schwann cells under myelinating conditions resulted in upregulated levels of neuronal neuregulin 1 type III in conjunction with the phosphorylated receptors ErbB2 and ErbB3, consistent with amenability of the neuritic network to myelination. As surrogates of embryonic dorsal root ganglia neurons, the derived sensory neurons provided contact-dependent cues to commit bone marrow-derived Schwann cell-like cells to the Schwann cell fate. Our rapid and efficient induction protocol promises not only controlled differentiation of human iPSCs into sensory neurons, but also utility in the translation to a protocol whereby human bone marrow-derived Schwann cells become available for autologous transplantation and remyelination therapy. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:369-381.

  2. BMP4 is a peripherally-derived factor for motor neurons and attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hui-Ju; Lai, Dar-Ming; Huang, Cheng-Wen; McLennan, Ian S; Wang, Horng-Dar; Wang, Pei-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily, have been shown to play important roles in the nervous system, including neuronal survival and synaptogenesis. However, the physiological functions of BMP signaling in the mammalian neuromuscular system are not well understood. In this study, we found that proteins of the type II bone morphogenetic receptors (BMPRII) were detected at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), and one of its ligands, BMP4, was expressed by Schwann cells and skeletal muscle fibers. In double-ligated nerves, BMP4 proteins accumulated at the proximal and distal portions of the axons, suggesting that Schwann cell- and muscle fiber-derived BMP4 proteins were anterogradely and retrogradely transported by motor neurons. Furthermore, BMP4 mRNA was down-regulated in nerves but up-regulated in skeletal muscles following nerve ligation. The motor neuron-muscle interactions were also demonstrated using differentiated C2C12 muscle cells and NG108-15 neurons in vitro. BMP4 mRNA and immunoreactivity were significantly up-regulated in differentiated C2C12 muscle cells when the motor neuron-derived factor, agrin, was present in the culture. Peripherally-derived BMP4, on the other hand, promotes embryonic motor neuron survival and protects NG108-15 neurons from glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. Together, these data suggest that BMP4 is a peripherally-derived factor that may regulate the survival of motor neurons.

  3. Precision Modulation of Neurodegenerative Disease-Related Gene Expression in Human iPSC-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Heman-Ackah, Sabrina Mahalia; Bassett, Andrew Roger; Wood, Matthew John Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reprogram adult somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the subsequent development of protocols for their differentiation into disease-relevant cell types have enabled in-depth molecular analyses of multiple disease states as hitherto impossible. Neurons differentiated from patient-specific iPSCs provide a means to recapitulate molecular phenotypes of neurodegenerative diseases in vitro. However, it remains challenging to conduct precise manipulations of gene expression in iPSC-derived neurons towards modeling complex human neurological diseases. The application of CRISPR/Cas9 to mammalian systems is revolutionizing the utilization of genome editing technologies in the study of molecular contributors to the pathogenesis of numerous diseases. Here, we demonstrate that CRISPRa and CRISPRi can be used to exert precise modulations of endogenous gene expression in fate-committed iPSC-derived neurons. This highlights CRISPRa/i as a major technical advancement in accessible tools for evaluating the specific contributions of critical neurodegenerative disease-related genes to neuropathogenesis. PMID:27341390

  4. Using Human iPSC-Derived Neurons to Model TAU Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, An; Diels, Annick; Dijkmans, Joyce; Oyelami, Tutu; Meneghello, Giulia; Mertens, Liesbeth; Versweyveld, Sofie; Borgers, Marianne; Buist, Arjan; Peeters, Pieter; Cik, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia are amongst the most common forms of dementia characterized by the formation and deposition of abnormal TAU in the brain. In order to develop a translational human TAU aggregation model suitable for screening, we transduced TAU harboring the pro-aggregating P301L mutation into control hiPSC-derived neural progenitor cells followed by differentiation into cortical neurons. TAU aggregation and phosphorylation was quantified using AlphaLISA technology. Although no spontaneous aggregation was observed upon expressing TAU-P301L in neurons, seeding with preformed aggregates consisting of the TAU-microtubule binding repeat domain triggered robust TAU aggregation and hyperphosphorylation already after 2 weeks, without affecting general cell health. To validate our model, activity of two autophagy inducers was tested. Both rapamycin and trehalose significantly reduced TAU aggregation levels suggesting that iPSC-derived neurons allow for the generation of a biologically relevant human Tauopathy model, highly suitable to screen for compounds that modulate TAU aggregation.

  5. Three-dimensional scaffolding to investigate neuronal derivatives of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Soman, Pranav; Tobe, Brian T D; Lee, Jin Woo; Winquist, Alicia A M; Singec, Ilyas; Vecchio, Kenneth S; Snyder, Evan Y; Chen, Shaochen

    2012-10-01

    Access to unlimited numbers of live human neurons derived from stem cells offers unique opportunities for in vitro modeling of neural development, disease-related cellular phenotypes, and drug testing and discovery. However, to develop informative cellular in vitro assays, it is important to consider the relevant in vivo environment of neural tissues. Biomimetic 3D scaffolds are tools to culture human neurons under defined mechanical and physico-chemical properties providing an interconnected porous structure that may potentially enable a higher or more complex organization than traditional two-dimensional monolayer conditions. It is known that even minor variations in the internal geometry and mechanical properties of 3D scaffolds can impact cell behavior including survival, growth, and cell fate choice. In this report, we describe the design and engineering of 3D synthetic polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based and biodegradable gelatin-based scaffolds generated by a free form fabrication technique with precise internal geometry and elastic stiffnesses. We show that human neurons, derived from human embryonic stem (hESC) cells, are able to adhere to these scaffolds and form organoid structures that extend in three dimensions as demonstrated by confocal and electron microscopy. Future refinements of scaffold structure, size and surface chemistries may facilitate long term experiments and designing clinically applicable bioassays.

  6. Using Human iPSC-Derived Neurons to Model TAU Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Verheyen, An; Diels, Annick; Dijkmans, Joyce; Oyelami, Tutu; Meneghello, Giulia; Mertens, Liesbeth; Versweyveld, Sofie; Borgers, Marianne; Buist, Arjan; Peeters, Pieter; Cik, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia are amongst the most common forms of dementia characterized by the formation and deposition of abnormal TAU in the brain. In order to develop a translational human TAU aggregation model suitable for screening, we transduced TAU harboring the pro-aggregating P301L mutation into control hiPSC-derived neural progenitor cells followed by differentiation into cortical neurons. TAU aggregation and phosphorylation was quantified using AlphaLISA technology. Although no spontaneous aggregation was observed upon expressing TAU-P301L in neurons, seeding with preformed aggregates consisting of the TAU-microtubule binding repeat domain triggered robust TAU aggregation and hyperphosphorylation already after 2 weeks, without affecting general cell health. To validate our model, activity of two autophagy inducers was tested. Both rapamycin and trehalose significantly reduced TAU aggregation levels suggesting that iPSC-derived neurons allow for the generation of a biologically relevant human Tauopathy model, highly suitable to screen for compounds that modulate TAU aggregation. PMID:26720731

  7. Microcircuit formation following transplantation of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons in peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Magown, Philippe; Rafuse, Victor F; Brownstone, Robert M

    2017-04-01

    Motoneurons derived from embryonic stem cells can be transplanted in the tibial nerve, where they extend axons to functionally innervate target muscle. Here, we studied spontaneous muscle contractions in these grafts 3 mo following transplantation. One-half of the transplanted grafts generated rhythmic muscle contractions of variable patterns, either spontaneously or in response to brief electrical stimulation. Activity generated by transplanted embryonic stem cell-derived neurons was driven by glutamate and was modulated by muscarinic and GABAergic/glycinergic transmission. Furthermore, rhythmicity was promoted by the same transmitter combination that evokes rhythmic locomotor activity in spinal cord circuits. These results demonstrate that there is a degree of self-assembly of microcircuits in these peripheral grafts involving embryonic stem cell-derived motoneurons and interneurons. Such spontaneous activity is reminiscent of embryonic circuit development in which spontaneous activity is essential for proper connectivity and function and may be necessary for the grafts to form functional connections with muscle.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This manuscript demonstrates that, following peripheral transplantation of neurons derived from embryonic stem cells, the grafts are spontaneously active. The activity is produced and modulated by a number of transmitter systems, indicating that there is a degree of self-assembly of circuits in the grafts.

  8. Functional Neurons Generated from T Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Fujimori, Koki; Andoh-Noda, Tomoko; Ando, Takayuki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Toyoshima, Manabu; Tada, Hirobumi; Imaizumi, Kent; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Isoda, Miho; Zhou, Zhi; Sato, Shigeto; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Kurosawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Takahashi, Takuya; Nakanishi, Mahito; Ohyama, Manabu; Hattori, Nobutaka; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Summary Modeling of neurological diseases using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the somatic cells of patients has provided a means of elucidating pathogenic mechanisms and performing drug screening. T cells are an ideal source of patient-specific iPSCs because they can be easily obtained from samples. Recent studies indicated that iPSCs retain an epigenetic memory relating to their cell of origin that restricts their differentiation potential. The classical method of differentiation via embryoid body formation was not suitable for T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs). We developed a neurosphere-based robust differentiation protocol, which enabled TiPSCs to differentiate into functional neurons, despite differences in global gene expression between TiPSCs and adult human dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Furthermore, neurons derived from TiPSCs generated from a juvenile patient with Parkinson's disease exhibited several Parkinson's disease phenotypes. Therefore, we conclude that TiPSCs are a useful tool for modeling neurological diseases. PMID:26905201

  9. Neurons derived from patients with bipolar disorder divide into intrinsically different sub-populations of neurons, predicting the patients' responsiveness to lithium.

    PubMed

    Stern, S; Santos, R; Marchetto, M C; Mendes, A P D; Rouleau, G A; Biesmans, S; Wang, Q-W; Yao, J; Charnay, P; Bang, A G; Alda, M; Gage, F H

    2017-02-28

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a progressive psychiatric disorder with more than 3% prevalence worldwide. Affected individuals experience recurrent episodes of depression and mania, disrupting normal life and increasing the risk of suicide greatly. The complexity and genetic heterogeneity of psychiatric disorders have challenged the development of animal and cellular models. We recently reported that hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived fibroblasts of BD patients are electrophysiologically hyperexcitable. Here we used iPSCs derived from Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B-lymphocytes to verify that the hyperexcitability of DG-like neurons is reproduced in this different cohort of patients and cells. Lymphocytes are readily available for research with a large number of banked lines with associated patient clinical description. We used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of over 460 neurons to characterize neurons derived from control individuals and BD patients. Extensive functional analysis showed that intrinsic cell parameters are very different between the two groups of BD neurons, those derived from lithium (Li)-responsive (LR) patients and those derived from Li-non-responsive (NR) patients, which led us to partition our BD neurons into two sub-populations of cells and suggested two different subdisorders. Training a Naïve Bayes classifier with the electrophysiological features of patients whose responses to Li are known allows for accurate classification with more than 92% success rate for a new patient whose response to Li is unknown. Despite their very different functional profiles, both populations of neurons share a large, fast after-hyperpolarization (AHP). We therefore suggest that the large, fast AHP is a key feature of BD and a main contributor to the fast, sustained spiking abilities of BD neurons. Confirming our previous report with fibroblast-derived DG neurons, chronic Li treatment reduced

  10. Cholinergic neuron-like cells derived from bone marrow stromal cells induced by tricyclodecane-9-yl-xanthogenate promote functional recovery and neural protection after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chunhui; Shao, Jing; Su, Le; Zhao, Jing; Bi, Jianzhong; Yang, Shaonan; Zhang, Shangli; Gao, Jiangang; Miao, Junying

    2013-01-01

    The rate of neuronal differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in vivo is very low; therefore, it is necessary to elevate the number of BMSC-derived neurons to cure neurodegenerative diseases. We previously reported that tricyclodecane-9-yl-xanthogenate (D609), an inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), induced BMSCs to differentiate into neuron-like cells in vitro. However, the neuronal type is not clear, and it is still unknown whether these neuron-like cells possess physiological properties of functional neurons and whether they can contribute to the recovery of neuron dysfunction. To answer these questions, we investigated their characteristics by detecting neuronal function-related neurotransmitters and calcium image. The results showed that these cells exhibited functional cholinergic neurons in vitro. Transplantation of these cholinergic neuron-like cells promoted the recovery of spinal cord-injured mice, and they were more effective than BMSCs. The number of cholinergic neurons was increased after injection with BMSC-derived cholinergic neuron-like cells, indicating their high differentiation rate in vivo. Moreover, the proportion of cholinergic neurons in host cells and secretion of acetylcholine were increased, and preservation of neurofilament was also observed in the lesion of mice implanted with BMSC-derived neurons, suggesting the neuronal protection of BMSC-derived neurons. Our findings provide both a simple method to induce the differentiation of BMSCs into cholinergic neuron-like cells and a putative strategy for the therapy of spinal cord injuries.

  11. Optical control of muscle function by transplantation of stem cell-derived motor neurons in mice.

    PubMed

    Bryson, J Barney; Machado, Carolina Barcellos; Crossley, Martin; Stevenson, Danielle; Bros-Facer, Virginie; Burrone, Juan; Greensmith, Linda; Lieberam, Ivo

    2014-04-04

    Damage to the central nervous system caused by traumatic injury or neurological disorders can lead to permanent loss of voluntary motor function and muscle paralysis. Here, we describe an approach that circumvents central motor circuit pathology to restore specific skeletal muscle function. We generated murine embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons that express the light-sensitive ion channel channelrhodopsin-2, which we then engrafted into partially denervated branches of the sciatic nerve of adult mice. These engrafted motor neurons not only reinnervated lower hind-limb muscles but also enabled their function to be restored in a controllable manner using optogenetic stimulation. This synthesis of regenerative medicine and optogenetics may be a successful strategy to restore muscle function after traumatic injury or disease.

  12. Human iPSC-derived neurons and lymphoblastoid cells for personalized medicine research in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Gurwitz, David

    2016-09-01

    The development and clinical implementation of personalized medicine crucially depends on the availability of high-quality human biosamples; animal models, although capable of modeling complex human diseases, cannot reflect the large variation in the human genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome. Although the biosamples available from public biobanks that store human tissues and cells may represent the large human diversity for most diseases, these samples are not always sufficient for developing biomarkers for patient-tailored therapies for neuropsychiatric disorders. Postmortem human tissues are available from many biobanks; nevertheless, collections of neuronal human cells from large patient cohorts representing the human diversity remain scarce. Two tools are gaining popularity for personalized medicine research on neuropsychiatric disorders: human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and human lymphoblastoid cell lines. This review examines and contrasts the advantages and limitations of each tool for personalized medicine research.

  13. Human iPSC-derived neurons and lymphoblastoid cells for personalized medicine research in neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gurwitz, David

    2016-01-01

    The development and clinical implementation of personalized medicine crucially depends on the availability of high-quality human biosamples; animal models, although capable of modeling complex human diseases, cannot reflect the large variation in the human genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome. Although the biosamples available from public biobanks that store human tissues and cells may represent the large human diversity for most diseases, these samples are not always sufficient for developing biomarkers for patient-tailored therapies for neuropsychiatric disorders. Postmortem human tissues are available from many biobanks; nevertheless, collections of neuronal human cells from large patient cohorts representing the human diversity remain scarce. Two tools are gaining popularity for personalized medicine research on neuropsychiatric disorders: human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and human lymphoblastoid cell lines. This review examines and contrasts the advantages and limitations of each tool for personalized medicine research. PMID:27757061

  14. Human primordial germ cell-derived progenitors give rise to neurons and glia in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Yincheng; Chen, Bin; Tao, Minfang

    2009-12-18

    We derived a cell population from cultured human primordial germ cells from early human embryos. The derivates, termed embryoid body-derived (EBD) cells, displayed an extensive capacity for proliferation and expressed a panel of markers in all three germ layers. Interestingly, EBD cells were also positive for markers of neural stem/progenitor cells, such as nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein. When these cells were transplanted into the brain cavities of fetal sheep and postnatal NOD-SCID mice or nerve-degenerated tibialis anterior muscles, they readily gave rise to neurons or glial cells. To our knowledge, our data are the first to demonstrate that EBD cells can undergo further neurogenesis under suitable environments in vivo. Hence, with the abilities of extensive expansion, self-renewal, and differentiation, EBD cells may provide a useful donor source for neural stem/progenitor cells to be used in cell-replacement therapies for diseases of the nervous system.

  15. Stem Cell-Derived Immature Human Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons to Identify Peripheral Neurotoxicants

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Stefanie; Karreman, Christiaan; Grinberg, Marianna; Meisig, Johannes; Henry, Margit; Rotshteyn, Tamara; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Blüthgen, Nils; Sachinidis, Agapios; Waldmann, Tanja; Leist, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Safety sciences and the identification of chemical hazards have been seen as one of the most immediate practical applications of human pluripotent stem cell technology. Protocols for the generation of many desirable human cell types have been developed, but optimization of neuronal models for toxicological use has been astonishingly slow, and the wide, clinically important field of peripheral neurotoxicity is still largely unexplored. A two-step protocol to generate large lots of identical peripheral human neuronal precursors was characterized and adapted to the measurement of peripheral neurotoxicity. High content imaging allowed an unbiased assessment of cell morphology and viability. The computational quantification of neurite growth as a functional parameter highly sensitive to disturbances by toxicants was used as an endpoint reflecting specific neurotoxicity. The differentiation of cells toward dorsal root ganglia neurons was tracked in relation to a large background data set based on gene expression microarrays. On this basis, a peripheral neurotoxicity (PeriTox) test was developed as a first toxicological assay that harnesses the potential of human pluripotent stem cells to generate cell types/tissues that are not otherwise available for the prediction of human systemic organ toxicity. Testing of more than 30 chemicals showed that human neurotoxicants and neurite growth enhancers were correctly identified. Various classes of chemotherapeutic agents causing human peripheral neuropathies were identified, and they were missed when tested on human central neurons. The PeriTox test we established shows the potential of human stem cells for clinically relevant safety testing of drugs in use and of new emerging candidates. Significance The generation of human cells from pluripotent stem cells has aroused great hopes in biomedical research and safety sciences. Neurotoxicity testing is a particularly important application for stem cell-derived somatic cells, as

  16. Interplay Between Nitric Oxide and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Neuronal Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Biojone, Caroline; Casarotto, Plinio Cabrera; Joca, Samia Regiane; Castrén, Eero

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a gaseous neuromodulator that displays a core role in several neuronal processes. Beyond regulating the release of neurotransmitters, nitric oxide also plays a role in cell differentiation and maturation in the central nervous system. Although the mode of action of nitric oxide is not fully understood, it involves the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase as well as the nitration and S-nitrosylation of specific amino acid residues in other proteins. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is a member of neurotrophic factor family and, acting through its receptor tropomyosinrelated kinase B, increases the production of nitric oxide, modulates neuronal differentiation and survival, and plays a crucial role in synaptic plasticity, such as long-term potentiation. Furthermore, nitric oxide is an important regulator of the production of these factors. The aim of the present review is to present a condensed view of the evidence related to the interaction between nitric oxide and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Additionally, we conducted bioinformatics analysis based on the amino acid sequences of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tropomyosin-related kinase receptors, and proposed that nitric oxide might nitrate/S-nitrosylate these proteins. Thus, we suggest a putative direct mode of action between these molecules to be further explored.

  17. Generation of functional neurons from feeder-free, keratinocyte-derived equine induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ruchi; Livesey, Matthew Robert; Wyllie, David J A; Proudfoot, Christopher; Whitelaw, Christopher Bruce Alexander; Hay, David Christopher; Donadeu, Francesc Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) offer unprecedented biomedical potential not only in relation to humans but also companion animals, particularly the horse. Despite this, attempts to generate bona fide equine embryonic stem cells have been unsuccessful. A very limited number of induced PSC lines have so far been generated from equine fibroblasts but their potential for directed differentiation into clinically relevant tissues has not been explored. In this study, we used retroviral vectors to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with comparatively high efficiency from equine keratinocytes. Expression of endogenous PSC markers (OCT4, SOX2, LIN28, NANOG, DNMT3B, and REX1) was effectively restored in these cells, which could also form in vivo several tissue derivatives of the three germ layers, including functional neurons, keratinized epithelium, cartilage, bone, muscle, and respiratory and gastric epithelia. Comparative analysis of different reprogrammed cell lines revealed an association between the ability of iPSCs to form well-differentiated teratomas and the distinct endogenous expression of OCT4 and REX1 and reduced expression of viral transgenes. Importantly, unlike in previous studies, equine iPSCs were successfully expanded using simplified feeder-free culture conditions, constituting significant progress toward future biomedical applications. Further, under appropriate conditions equine iPSCs generated cells with features of cholinergic motor neurons including the ability to generate action potentials, providing the first report of functional cells derived from equine iPSCs. The ability to derive electrically active neurons in vitro from a large animal reveals highly conserved pathways of differentiation across species and opens the way for new and exciting applications in veterinary regenerative medicine.

  18. Faithful SGCE imprinting in iPSC-derived cortical neurons: an endogenous cellular model of myoclonus-dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Grütz, Karen; Seibler, Philip; Weissbach, Anne; Lohmann, Katja; Carlisle, Francesca A.; Blake, Derek J.; Westenberger, Ana; Klein, Christine; Grünewald, Anne

    2017-01-01

    In neuropathology research, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons are considered a tool closely resembling the patient brain. Albeit in respect to epigenetics, this concept has been challenged. We generated iPSC-derived cortical neurons from myoclonus-dystonia patients with mutations (W100G and R102X) in the maternally imprinted ε-sarcoglycan (SGCE) gene and analysed properties such as imprinting, mRNA and protein expression. Comparison of the promoter during reprogramming and differentiation showed tissue-independent differential methylation. DNA sequencing with methylation-specific primers and cDNA analysis in patient neurons indicated selective expression of the mutated paternal SGCE allele. While fibroblasts only expressed the ubiquitous mRNA isoform, brain-specific SGCE mRNA and ε-sarcoglycan protein were detected in iPSC-derived control neurons. However, neuronal protein levels were reduced in both mutants. Our phenotypic characterization highlights the suitability of iPSC-derived cortical neurons with SGCE mutations for myoclonus-dystonia research and, in more general terms, prompts the use of iPSC-derived cellular models to study epigenetic mechanisms impacting on health and disease. PMID:28155872

  19. Stretch Injury of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Neurons in a 96 Well Format

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Sydney A.; Phillips, Jack K.; Costa, J. Tighe; Cho, Frances S.; Oungoulian, Sevan R.; Finan, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity with limited therapeutic options. Traumatic axonal injury (TAI) is an important component of TBI pathology. It is difficult to reproduce TAI in animal models of closed head injury, but in vitro stretch injury models reproduce clinical TAI pathology. Existing in vitro models employ primary rodent neurons or human cancer cell line cells in low throughput formats. This in vitro neuronal stretch injury model employs human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons (hiPSCNs) in a 96 well format. Silicone membranes were attached to 96 well plate tops to create stretchable, culture substrates. A custom-built device was designed and validated to apply repeatable, biofidelic strains and strain rates to these plates. A high content approach was used to measure injury in a hypothesis-free manner. These measurements are shown to provide a sensitive, dose-dependent, multi-modal description of the response to mechanical insult. hiPSCNs transition from healthy to injured phenotype at approximately 35% Lagrangian strain. Continued development of this model may create novel opportunities for drug discovery and exploration of the role of human genotype in TAI pathology. PMID:27671211

  20. Increasing doublecortin expression promotes migration of human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons.

    PubMed

    Filipovic, Radmila; Santhosh Kumar, Saranya; Fiondella, Chris; Loturco, Joseph

    2012-09-01

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal progenitors (hNPs) provide a potential source for cellular replacement following neurodegenerative diseases. One of the greatest challenges for future neuron replacement therapies will be to control extensive cell proliferation and stimulate cell migration of transplanted cells. The doublecortin (DCX) gene encodes the protein DCX, a microtubule-associated protein essential for the migration of neurons in the human brain. In this study, we tested whether increasing the expression of DCX in hNPs would favorably alter their proliferation and migration. Migration and proliferation of hNPs was compared between hNPs expressing a bicistronic DCX/IRES-GFP transgene and those expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene introduced by piggyBac-mediated transposition. The DCX-transfected hNPs showed a significant decrease in their proliferation and migrated significantly further on two different substrates, Matrigel and brain slices. Additionally, a dense network of nestin-positive (+) and vimentin+ fibers were found to extend from neurospheres transplanted onto brain slices, and this fiber growth was increased from neurospheres containing DCX-transfected hNPs. In summary, our results show that increased DCX expression inhibits proliferation and promotes migration of hNPs.

  1. Tomosyn Negatively Regulates Arginine Vasopressin Secretion in Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Seiji; Iwama, Shintaro; Takagi, Hiroshi; Kiyota, Atsushi; Nakashima, Kohtaro; Izumida, Hisakazu; Fujisawa, Haruki; Iwata, Naoko; Suga, Hidetaka; Watanabe, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Oiso, Yutaka; Arima, Hiroshi; Sugimura, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is secreted via exocytosis; however, the precise molecular mechanism underlying the exocytosis of AVP remains to be elucidated. To better understand the mechanisms of AVP secretion, in our study we have identified proteins that bind with a 25 kDa synaptosomal-associated protein (SNAP25). SNAP25 plays a crucial role in exocytosis, in the posterior pituitary. Embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived AVP neurons were established to investigate the functions of the identified proteins. Using glutathione S-transferase (GST)-pulldown assays and proteomic analyses, we identified tomosyn-1 (syntaxin-binding protein 5) as a SNAP25-binding protein in the posterior pituitary. Coimmunoprecipitation assays indicated that tomosyn formed N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes with SNAP25 and syntaxin1. Immunohistochemistry showed that tomosyn localized to the posterior pituitary. Mouse ES cells self-differentiated into AVP neurons (mES-AVP) that expressed tomosyn and two transmembrane SNARE proteins, including SNAP25 and syntaxin1. KCl increased AVP secretion in mES-AVP, and overexpression of tomosyn-1 reduced KCl-stimulated AVP secretion. Downregulation of tomosyn-1 with siRNA increased KCl-stimulated AVP secretion. These results suggested that tomosyn-1 negatively regulated AVP secretion in mES-AVP and further suggest the possibility of using mES-AVP culture systems to evaluate the role of synaptic proteins from AVP neurons. PMID:27732637

  2. Modulation of the Activities of Neuronal Ion Channels by Fatty Acid-Derived Pro-Resolvents

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Geunyeol; Hwang, Sun Wook

    2016-01-01

    Progress of inflammation depends on the balance between two biological mechanisms: pro-inflammatory and pro-resolving processes. Many extracellular and intracellular molecular components including cytokines, growth factors, steroids, neurotransmitters, and lipidergic mediators and their receptors contribute to the two processes, generated from cellular participants during inflammation. Fatty acid-derived mediators are crucial in directing the inflammatory phase and orchestrating heterogeneous reactions of participants such as inflamed cells, innate immune cells, vascular components, innervating neurons, etc. As well as activating specific types of receptor molecules, lipidergic mediators can actively control the functions of various ion channels via direct binding and/or signal transduction, thereby altering cellular functions. Lipid mediators can be divided into two classes based on which of the two processes they promote: pro-inflammatory, which includes prostaglandins and leukotrienes, and pro-resolving, which includes lipoxins, resolvins, and maresins. The research on the modulations of neuronal ion channels regarding the actions of the pro-inflammatory class has begun relatively earlier while the focus is currently expanding to cover the ion channel interaction with pro-resolvents. As a result, knowledge of inhibitory mechanisms by the pro-resolvents, historically seldom found for other known endogenous modulators or pro-inflammatory mediators, is accumulating particularly upon sensory neuronal cation channels. Diverse mechanistic explanations at molecular levels are being proposed and refined. Here we overviewed the interactions of lipidergic pro-resolvents with neuronal ion channels and outcomes from the interactions, focusing on transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. We also discuss unanswered hypotheses and perspectives regarding their interactions. PMID:27877134

  3. Enhancing neuronal growth from human endometrial stem cells derived neuron-like cells in three-dimensional fibrin gel for nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Amoabedini, Ghasem; Noroozi, Abbas; Azami, Mahmoud; Asmani, Mohammad N; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Saberi, Hooshang; Ai, Armin; Ai, Jafar

    2014-08-01

    Nerve tissue engineering (NTE) is one of the most promising methods to restore central nerve systems in human health care. Three-dimensional (3D) distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold composed of nanofibers are of clinical significance for NTE. In this study, an attempt was made to develop and characterize the use of fibrin gel and human endometrial stem cells (hEnSCs)-derived neuron-like cells simultaneously to support cell behavior especially neuron outgrowth. The structural and mechanical characteristics of fibrin gel scaffold were examined with SEM and rheometer. Also, hEnSCs-derived neuron-like cells were cultured in fibrin gel and were subsequently analyzed with immunofluorescent staining against neuronal markers. In parallel, the survival and growth rates of the cells were determined by MTT assay and neurite extension. At the end, cell-matrix interactions were investigated with SEM and TEM micrographs. Mechanical properties of fabricated scaffold were studied and results indicated appropriate choice of material, SEM and TEM showed excellent integration of cells with nanofibers regarding the relation between cells and fibrin gel. Immunofluorescent staining of fibrin gel after 6 days of cell seeding and culture demonstrated well expanded and incorporated network of neurons. In addition, viability, proliferation, and neuronal growth of seeded cells were analyzed at days 1, 3, and 6. Comparing those results with 2D culture of seeded cells showed positive effect of 3D culture. Taken together, the results suggest that fibrin can provide a suitable, three-dimensional scaffold for neuronal survival and outgrowth for regeneration of the central nervous system.

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor but not neurotrophin-3 enhances differentiation of somatostatin neurons in hypothalamic cultures.

    PubMed

    Loudes, C; Petit, F; Kordon, C; Faivre-Bauman, A

    2000-09-01

    The present work investigated whether neurotrophins could differentially affect in vitro growth and maturation of two related subsets of hypothalamic neurons, hypophysiotropic somatostatin (SRIH) neurons projecting from the periventricular area and arcuate SRIH interneurons. For this purpose, the hypothalamus of 17-day-old rat fetuses was sampled and separated into a ventral and a dorsal fragment containing respectively periventricular and arcuate regions. Each fragment was dissociated and seeded separately in defined medium. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), two important members of the neurotrophin family involved in neuronal differentiation and plasticity, were added to the cultures at seeding time. After 6 or 11 days in vitro, neurons were labeled with an anti-SRIH antiserum and submitted to morphometric analysis. In parallel, SRIH mRNA was estimated by semiquantitative reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and neuronal SRIH content, basal and depolarisation-stimulated releases measured by radioimmunoassay. The response of control, non-labeled neurons was estimated by neuronal counts and by assaying glutamic acid decarboxylase, a marker of a large majority of hypothalamic neurons. BDNF markedly increased the size and the branching number of SRIH periventricular cell bodies. Expression of SRIH mRNA, as well as SRIH content and release into the culture medium, were also stimulated by the neurotrophin. Non-SRIH neurons were not affected by the treatment. Under the same conditions, arcuate neurons exhibited a weak, mostly transient response to BDNF. NT-3 was ineffective on either neuronal subset. Immunoneutralization of Trk receptors provided further evidence for BDNF effect specificity. The results indicate that BDNF is a selective activator of the differentiation of hypophysiotropic SRIH neurons in the periventricular area of the hypothalamus.

  5. Possible mechanism of PNS protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rat models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinwen; Huang, Zhenguang; Zou, Xiaoqin; Yang, Yufang; Qiu, Yue; Wen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanism of the protective effect of Panax notoginsenosides (PNS) against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via the hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)/Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3) pathway of autophagy. The rats underwent intraperitoneal injection with a single dose of cisplatin and a subset of rats were also intraperitoneally injected with 31.35 mg/kg PNS once a day. After 24 h exposure to cisplatin, the concentrations of urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (Scr) were determined. The rat renal tissue was examined using H&E-staining, and the mitochondria of renal tubular epithelial cells were observed using transmission electron microscopy. The expressions of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain (LC)3, autophagy-related gene (Atg)5, Beclin-1 and BNIP3 in rat renal tissue were detected using western blotting. The expression of HIF-1 was detected by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that PNS significantly protected against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, as evidenced by decreasing the concentration of blood BUN and Scr, the attenuation of renal histopathological changes and the mitochondrial damages of renal cells, and the increase of mitochondria autophagosome in renal tubular epithelial cells. Additionally, PNS significantly increased the expression of LC3 and the ratio of LC3II/LC3I in rat renal tissue. Moreover, PNS significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α, BNIP3, Atg5 and Beclin-1 in rat renal tissue. In conclusion, the protective effect of PNS on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was mainly due to its ability to enhancing the mitochondrial autophagy of renal tissue via the HIF-1α/BNIP3 pathway, and here is the first demonstration about it.

  6. Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor counteracts the neuronal damage induced by oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Morucci, Gabriele; Branca, Jacopo J V; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Paternostro, Ferdinando; Pacini, Alessandra; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-02-01

    Oxaliplatin-based regimens are effective in metastasized advanced cancers. However, a major limitation to their widespread use is represented by neurotoxicity that leads to peripheral neuropathy. In this study we evaluated the roles of a proven immunotherapeutic agent [Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF)] in preventing or decreasing oxaliplatin-induced neuronal damage and in modulating microglia activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage. The effects of oxaliplatin and of a commercially available formula of GcMAF [oleic acid-GcMAF (OA-GcMAF)] were studied in human neurons (SH-SY5Y cells) and in human microglial cells (C13NJ). Cell density, morphology and viability, as well as production of cAMP and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), markers of neuron regeneration [neuromodulin or growth associated protein-43 (Gap-43)] and markers of microglia activation [ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) and B7-2], were determined. OA-GcMAF reverted the damage inflicted by oxaliplatin on human neurons and preserved their viability. The neuroprotective effect was accompanied by increased intracellular cAMP production, as well as by increased expression of VEGF and neuromodulin. OA-GcMAF did not revert the effects of oxaliplatin on microglial cell viability. However, it increased microglial activation following oxaliplatin-induced damage, resulting in an increased expression of the markers Iba1 and B7-2 without any concomitant increase in cell number. When neurons and microglial cells were co-cultured, the presence of OA-GcMAF significantly counteracted the toxic effects of oxaliplatin. Our results demonstrate that OA-GcMAF, already used in the immunotherapy of advanced cancers, may significantly contribute to neutralizing the neurotoxicity induced by oxaliplatin, at the same time possibly concurring to an integrated anticancer effect. The association between these two powerful anticancer molecules would probably produce

  7. A deleterious Nav1.1 mutation selectively impairs telencephalic inhibitory neurons derived from Dravet Syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yishan; Paşca, Sergiu P; Portmann, Thomas; Goold, Carleton; Worringer, Kathleen A; Guan, Wendy; Chan, Karen C; Gai, Hui; Vogt, Daniel; Chen, Ying-Jiun J; Mao, Rong; Chan, Karrie; Rubenstein, John LR; Madison, Daniel V; Hallmayer, Joachim; Froehlich-Santino, Wendy M; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Dolmetsch, Ricardo E

    2016-01-01

    Dravet Syndrome is an intractable form of childhood epilepsy associated with deleterious mutations in SCN1A, the gene encoding neuronal sodium channel Nav1.1. Earlier studies using human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have produced mixed results regarding the importance of Nav1.1 in human inhibitory versus excitatory neurons. We studied a Nav1.1 mutation (p.S1328P) identified in a pair of twins with Dravet Syndrome and generated iPSC-derived neurons from these patients. Characterization of the mutant channel revealed a decrease in current amplitude and hypersensitivity to steady-state inactivation. We then differentiated Dravet-Syndrome and control iPSCs into telencephalic excitatory neurons or medial ganglionic eminence (MGE)-like inhibitory neurons. Dravet inhibitory neurons showed deficits in sodium currents and action potential firing, which were rescued by a Nav1.1 transgene, whereas Dravet excitatory neurons were normal. Our study identifies biophysical impairments underlying a deleterious Nav1.1 mutation and supports the hypothesis that Dravet Syndrome arises from defective inhibitory neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13073.001 PMID:27458797

  8. Direct Conversion of Equine Adipose-Derived Stem Cells into Induced Neuronal Cells Is Enhanced in Three-Dimensional Culture.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Gayle F; Hilbert, Bryan J; Trope, Gareth D; Kalle, Wouter H J; Strappe, Padraig M

    2015-12-01

    The ability to culture neurons from horses may allow further investigation into equine neurological disorders. In this study, we demonstrate the generation of induced neuronal cells from equine adipose-derived stem cells (EADSCs) using a combination of lentiviral vector expression of the neuronal transcription factors Brn2, Ascl1, Myt1l (BAM) and NeuroD1 and a defined chemical induction medium, with βIII-tubulin-positive induced neuronal cells displaying a distinct neuronal morphology of rounded and compact cell bodies, extensive neurite outgrowth, and branching of processes. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of dimensionality on neuronal transdifferentiation, comparing conventional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture against three-dimensional (3D) culture on a porous polystyrene scaffold. Neuronal transdifferentiation was enhanced in 3D culture, with evenly distributed cells located on the surface and throughout the scaffold. Transdifferentiation efficiency was increased in 3D culture, with an increase in mean percent conversion of more than 100% compared to 2D culture. Additionally, induced neuronal cells were shown to transit through a Nestin-positive precursor state, with MAP2 and Synapsin 2 expression significantly increased in 3D culture. These findings will help to increase our understanding of equine neuropathogenesis, with prospective roles in disease modeling, drug screening, and cellular replacement for treatment of equine neurological disorders.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms Responsible for Neuron-Derived Conditioned Medium (NCM)-Mediated Protection of Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chen-Hsuan; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Liao, Li-Ya; Lin, Ting-An; Hsueh, Chi-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The protective value of neuron-derived conditioned medium (NCM) in cerebral ischemia and the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia were investigated in the study. NCM was first collected from the neuronal culture growing under the in vitro ischemic condition (glucose-, oxygen- and serum-deprivation or GOSD) for 2, 4 or 6 h. Through the focal cerebral ischemia (bilateral CCAO/unilateral MCAO) animal model, we discovered that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced brain infarction was significantly reduced by NCM, given directly into the cistern magna at the end of 90 min of CCAO/MCAO. Immunoblocking and chemical blocking strategies were applied in the in vitro ischemic studies to show that NCM supplement could protect microglia, astrocytes and neurons from GOSD-induced cell death, in a growth factor (TGFβ1, NT-3 and GDNF) and p-ERK dependent manner. Brain injection with TGFβ1, NT3, GDNF and ERK agonist (DADS) alone or in combination, therefore also significantly decreased the infarct volume of ischemic brain. Moreover, NCM could inhibit ROS but stimulate IL-1β release from GOSD-treated microglia and limit the infiltration of IL-β-positive microglia into the core area of ischemic brain, revealing the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of NCM. In overall, NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia has been demonstrated for the first time in S.D. rats, due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and potentially anti-glutamate activities (NCM-induced IL-1β can inhibit the glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity) and restriction upon the infiltration of inflammatory microglia into the core area of ischemic brain. The therapeutic potentials of NCM, TGFβ1, GDNF, NT-3 and DADS in the control of cerebral ischemia in human therefore have been suggested and require further investigation. PMID:26745377

  10. Molecular Mechanisms Responsible for Neuron-Derived Conditioned Medium (NCM)-Mediated Protection of Ischemic Brain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chen-Hsuan; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Liao, Li-Ya; Lin, Ting-An; Hsueh, Chi-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The protective value of neuron-derived conditioned medium (NCM) in cerebral ischemia and the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia were investigated in the study. NCM was first collected from the neuronal culture growing under the in vitro ischemic condition (glucose-, oxygen- and serum-deprivation or GOSD) for 2, 4 or 6 h. Through the focal cerebral ischemia (bilateral CCAO/unilateral MCAO) animal model, we discovered that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced brain infarction was significantly reduced by NCM, given directly into the cistern magna at the end of 90 min of CCAO/MCAO. Immunoblocking and chemical blocking strategies were applied in the in vitro ischemic studies to show that NCM supplement could protect microglia, astrocytes and neurons from GOSD-induced cell death, in a growth factor (TGFβ1, NT-3 and GDNF) and p-ERK dependent manner. Brain injection with TGFβ1, NT3, GDNF and ERK agonist (DADS) alone or in combination, therefore also significantly decreased the infarct volume of ischemic brain. Moreover, NCM could inhibit ROS but stimulate IL-1β release from GOSD-treated microglia and limit the infiltration of IL-β-positive microglia into the core area of ischemic brain, revealing the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of NCM. In overall, NCM-mediated brain protection against cerebral ischemia has been demonstrated for the first time in S.D. rats, due to its anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and potentially anti-glutamate activities (NCM-induced IL-1β can inhibit the glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity) and restriction upon the infiltration of inflammatory microglia into the core area of ischemic brain. The therapeutic potentials of NCM, TGFβ1, GDNF, NT-3 and DADS in the control of cerebral ischemia in human therefore have been suggested and require further investigation.

  11. Blocking brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits injury-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons.

    PubMed

    Gill, Raminder; Chang, Philip K-Y; Prenosil, George A; Deane, Emily C; McKinney, Rebecca A

    2013-12-01

    Brain trauma can disrupt synaptic connections, and this in turn can prompt axons to sprout and form new connections. If these new axonal connections are aberrant, hyperexcitability can result. It has been shown that ablating tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), a receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), can reduce axonal sprouting after hippocampal injury. However, it is unknown whether inhibiting BDNF-mediated axonal sprouting will reduce hyperexcitability. Given this, our purpose here was to determine whether pharmacologically blocking BDNF inhibits hyperexcitability after injury-induced axonal sprouting in the hippocampus. To induce injury, we made Schaffer collateral lesions in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. As reported by others, we observed a 50% reduction in axonal sprouting in cultures treated with a BDNF blocker (TrkB-Fc) 14 days after injury. Furthermore, lesioned cultures treated with TrkB-Fc were less hyperexcitable than lesioned untreated cultures. Using electrophysiology, we observed a two-fold decrease in the number of CA3 neurons that showed bursting responses after lesion with TrkB-Fc treatment, whereas we found no change in intrinsic neuronal firing properties. Finally, evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potential recordings indicated an increase in network activity within area CA3 after lesion, which was prevented with chronic TrkB-Fc treatment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that blocking BDNF attenuates injury-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons. Axonal sprouting has been found in patients with post-traumatic epilepsy. Therefore, our data suggest that blocking the BDNF-TrkB signaling cascade shortly after injury may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of post-traumatic epilepsy.

  12. Fezf2 expression in layer 5 projection neurons of mature mouse motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Tantirigama, Malinda L S; Oswald, Manfred J; Clare, Alison J; Wicky, Hollie E; Day, Robert C; Hughes, Stephanie M; Empson, Ruth M

    2016-03-01

    The mature cerebral cortex contains a wide diversity of neuron phenotypes. This diversity is specified during development by neuron-specific expression of key transcription factors, some of which are retained for the life of the animal. One of these key developmental transcription factors that is also retained in the adult is Fezf2, but the neuron types expressing it in the mature cortex are unknown. With a validated Fezf2-Gfp reporter mouse, whole-cell electrophysiology with morphology reconstruction, cluster analysis, in vivo retrograde labeling, and immunohistochemistry, we identify a heterogeneous population of Fezf2(+) neurons in both layer 5A and layer 5B of the mature motor cortex. Functional electrophysiology identified two distinct subtypes of Fezf2(+) neurons that resembled pyramidal tract projection neurons (PT-PNs) and intratelencephalic projection neurons (IT-PNs). Retrograde labeling confirmed the former type to include corticospinal projection neurons (CSpPNs) and corticothalamic projection neurons (CThPNs), whereas the latter type included crossed corticostriatal projection neurons (cCStrPNs) and crossed-corticocortical projection neurons (cCCPNs). The two Fezf2(+) subtypes expressed either CTIP2 or SATB2 to distinguish their physiological identity and confirmed that specific expression combinations of key transcription factors persist in the mature motor cortex. Our findings indicate a wider role for Fezf2 within gene expression networks that underpin the diversity of layer 5 cortical projection neurons.

  13. Process Extension from Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Motor Neurons through Synthetic Extracellular Matrix Mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, Daniel Devaud

    This thesis focuses on studying the extension of motor axons through synthetic poly(ethylene glycol) PEG hydrogels that have been modified with biochemical functionalities to render them more biologically relevant. Specifically, the research strategy is to encapsulate embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons (ESMNs) in synthetic PEG hydrogels crosslinked through three different chemistries providing three mechanisms for dynamically tuning material properties. First, a covalently crosslinked, enzymatically degradable hydrogel is developed and exploited to study the biophysical dynamics of axon extension and matrix remodeling. It is demonstrated that dispersed motor neurons require a battery of adhesive peptides and growth factors to maintain viability and extend axons while those in contact with supportive neuroglial cells do not. Additionally, cell-degradable crosslinker peptides and a soft modulus mimicking that of the spinal cord are requirements for axon extension. However, because local degradation of the hydrogel results in a cellular environment significantly different than that of the bulk, enzymatically degradable peptide crosslinkers were replaced with reversible covalent hydrazone bonds to study the effect of hydrogel modulus on axon extension. This material is characterized in detail and used to measure forces involved in axon extension. Finally, a hydrogel with photocleavable linkers incorporated into the network structure is exploited to explore motor axon response to physical channels. This system is used to direct the growth of motor axons towards co-cultured myotubes, resulting in the formation of an in vitro neural circuit.

  14. A triazole derivative elicits autophagic clearance of polyglutamine aggregation in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chang Heng; Lee, Li-Ching; Leong, Wai-Yin; Yang, Tsai-Chen; Yao, Ching-Fa; Fang, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Trinucleotide CAG repeat expansion in the coding region of genes has a propensity to form polyglutamine (polyQ) aggregates that contribute to neuronal disorders. Strategies in elevating autophagy to disintegrate the insoluble aggregates without injuring cells have become a major goal for therapy. In this work, a triazole derivative, OC-13, was found accelerating autophagic clearance of polyQ aggregation in human neuroblastoma cells following induction of the enhanced green fluorescence-conjugated chimeric protein that enclosed 79 polyQ repeats (Q79-EGFP). OC-13 accelerated autophagy development and removed nuclear Q79-EGFP aggregates. The increase of Beclin-1, turnover of LC3-I to LC3-II and degradation of p62 supported autophagy activation. Pretreatment of autophagy inhibitor, bafilomycin A1, not only suppressed autophagolysome fusion, but also impeded aggregate eradication. The study also showed that c-Jun N-terminal kinase/Beclin-1 pathway was activated during OC-13 treatment and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor impaired autophagy and final breakdown. Autophagic clearance of the insoluble aggregates demonstrated the feasibility of OC-13 in alleviating neuronal disorders because of expanded glutamine stretches. PMID:27695292

  15. Involvement of reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria in neuronal injury elicited by methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Tsuji, Mayumi; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury induces oxidative stress and subsequent neuronal injury. However, the mechanism by which methylmercury elicits reactive oxygen species (ROS) production remains under debate. In this study, we investigated the involvement of mitochondrial ROS in methylmercury-induced neuronal cell injury using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y-derived ρ0 cells, which have a deletion of mitochondrial DNA and thus decreased respiratory activity. SH-SY5Y cells were cultured for 60 days in the presence of ethidium bromide to produce ρ0 cells. Our ρ0 cells showed decreases in the cytochrome c oxidase expression and activity as well as oxygen consumption compared with original SH-SY5Y cells. Methylmercury at a concentration of 1 µM induced cell death with oxidative stress in original SH-SY5Y cells, but not ρ0 cells, indicating that ρ0 cells are resistant to methylmercury-induced oxidative stress. ρ0 cells also showed tolerance against hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion, suggesting that ρ0 cells are resistant to total ROS. These data indicate that mitochondrial ROS are clearly involved in oxidative stress and subsequent cell death induced by methylmercury. Considering that the dominant mechanism of ROS generation elicited by methylmercury is due to direct antioxidant enzyme inhibition, mitochondria might play a role in amplifying ROS in methylmercury-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:27895385

  16. Design, synthesis, and examination of neuron protective properties of alkenylated and amidated dehydro-silybin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei Xiang; Huang, Ke Xin; Li, Hai Bo; Gong, Jing Xu; Wang, Feng; Feng, Yu Bing; Tao, Qiao Feng; Wu, Yi Hang; Li, Xiao Kun; Wu, Xiu Mei; Zeng, Su; Spencer, Shawn; Zhao, Yu; Qu, Jia

    2009-12-10

    A series of C7-O- and C20-O-amidated 2,3-dehydrosilybin (DHS) derivatives ((+/-)-1a-f and (+/-)-2), as well as a set of alkenylated DHS analogues ((+/-)-4a-f), were designed and de novo synthesized. A diesteric derivative of DHS ((+/-)-3) and two C23 esterified DHS analogues ((+/-)-5a and (+/-)-5b) were also prepared for comparison. The cell viability of PC12 cells, Fe(2+) chelation, lipid peroxidation (LPO), free radical scavenging, and xanthine oxidase inhibition models were utilized to evaluate their antioxidative and neuron protective properties. The study revealed that the diether at C7-OH and C20-OH as well as the monoether at C7-OH, which possess aliphatic substituted acetamides, demonstrated more potent LPO inhibition and Fe(2+) chelation compared to DHS and quercetin. Conversely, the diallyl ether at C7-OH and C20-OH was more potent in protection of PC12 cells against H(2)O(2)-induced injury than DHS and quercetin. Overall, the more lipophilic alkenylated DHS analogues were better performing neuroprotective agents than the acetamidated derivatives. The results in this study would be beneficial for optimizing the therapeutic potential of lignoflavonoids, especially in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

  17. Ancient evolutionary origin of vertebrate enteric neurons from trunk-derived neural crest.

    PubMed

    Green, Stephen A; Uy, Benjamin R; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-03-20

    The enteric nervous system of jawed vertebrates arises primarily from vagal neural crest cells that migrate to the foregut and subsequently colonize and innervate the entire gastrointestinal tract. Here we examine development of the enteric nervous system in the basal jawless vertebrate the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) to gain insight into its evolutionary origin. Surprisingly, we find no evidence for the existence of a vagally derived enteric neural crest population in the lamprey. Rather, labelling with the lipophilic dye DiI shows that late-migrating cells, originating from the trunk neural tube and associated with nerve fibres, differentiate into neurons within the gut wall and typhlosole. We propose that these trunk-derived neural crest cells may be homologous to Schwann cell precursors, recently shown in mammalian embryos to populate post-embryonic parasympathetic ganglia, including enteric ganglia. Our results suggest that neural-crest-derived Schwann cell precursors made an important contribution to the ancient enteric nervous system of early jawless vertebrates, a role that was largely subsumed by vagal neural crest cells in early gnathostomes.

  18. Identification of hypothalamic neuron-derived neurotrophic factor as a novel factor modulating appetite.

    PubMed

    Byerly, Mardi S; Swanson, Roy D; Semsarzadeh, Nina N; McCulloh, Patrick S; Kwon, Kiwook; Aja, Susan; Moran, Timothy H; Wong, G William; Blackshaw, Seth

    2013-06-15

    Disruption of finely coordinated neuropeptide signals in the hypothalamus can result in altered food intake and body weight. We identified neuron-derived neurotrophic factor (NENF) as a novel secreted protein through a large-scale screen aimed at identifying novel secreted hypothalamic proteins that regulate food intake. We observed robust Nenf expression in hypothalamic nuclei known to regulate food intake, and its expression was altered under the diet-induced obese (DIO) condition relative to the fed state. Hypothalamic Nenf mRNA was regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, itself an important regulator of appetite. Delivery of purified recombinant BDNF into the lateral cerebral ventricle decreased hypothalamic Nenf expression, while pharmacological inhibition of trkB signaling increased Nenf mRNA expression. Furthermore, recombinant NENF administered via an intracerebroventricular cannula decreased food intake and body weight and increased hypothalamic Pomc and Mc4r mRNA expression. Importantly, the appetite-suppressing effect of NENF was abrogated in obese mice fed a high-fat diet, demonstrating a diet-dependent modulation of NENF function. We propose the existence of a regulatory circuit involving BDNF, NENF, and melanocortin signaling. Our study validates the power of using an integrated experimental and bioinformatic approach to identify novel CNS-derived proteins with appetite-modulating function and reveals NENF as an important central modulator of food intake.

  19. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and the Development of Structural Neuronal Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Cory, Susana; Kidane, Adhanet H.; Shirkey, Nicole J.; Marshak, Sonya

    2010-01-01

    During development, neural networks are established in a highly organized manner which persists throughout life. Neurotrophins play crucial roles in the developing nervous system. Among the neurotrophins, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is highly conserved in gene structure and function during vertebrate evolution, and serves an important role during brain development and in synaptic plasticity. BDNF participates in the formation of appropriate synaptic connections in the brain, and disruptions in this process contribute to disorders of cognitive function. In this review, we first briefly highlight current knowledge on the expression, regulation, and secretion of BDNF. Further, we provide an overview of the possible actions of BDNF in the development of neural circuits, with an emphasis on presynaptic actions of BDNF during the structural development of central neurons. PMID:20186709

  20. Multiple Functions of Rice Dwarf Phytoreovirus Pns10 in Suppressing Systemic RNA Silencing▿

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Bo; Guo, Yuanyuan; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Peng; Wu, Feng; Meng, Zheng; Wei, Chunhong; Li, Yi

    2010-01-01

    RNA silencing is a potent mechanism of antiviral defense response in plants and other organisms. For counterdefense, viruses have evolved a variety of suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) that can inhibit distinct steps of a silencing pathway. We previously identified Pns10 encoded by Rice dwarf phytoreovirus (RDV) as a VSR, the first of its kind from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses. In this study we investigated the mechanisms of Pns10 function in suppressing systemic RNA silencing in the widely used Nicotiana benthamiana model plant. We report that Pns10 suppresses local and systemic RNA silencing triggered by sense mRNA, enhances viral replication and/or viral RNA stability in inoculated leaves, accelerates the systemic spread of viral infection, and enables viral invasion of shoot apices. Mechanistically, Pns10 interferes with the perception of silencing signals in recipient tissues, binds double-stranded small interfering RNA (siRNAs) with two-nucleotide 3′ overhangs, and causes the downregulated expression of RDR6. These results significantly deepen our mechanistic understanding of the VSR functions encoded by a dsRNA virus and contribute additional evidence that binding siRNAs and interfering with RDR6 expression are broad mechanisms of VSR functions encoded by diverse groups of viruses. PMID:20926568

  1. PNS predictions of axisymmetric hypersonic blunt-body and afterbody flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhutta, Bilal A.; Lewis, Clark H.

    1993-01-01

    A new space-marching full-body PNS algorithm capable of treating the complete blunt-body and afterbody flowfields over typical wide-bodied configurations is developed and demonstrated. A hybrid differencing scheme involving Flux-Vector Splitting (FVS) across embedded shocks and flowfield discontinuities, and central differencing in smooth (shock-free) regions is used. It is demonstrated that this new full-body PNS scheme can be marched from the spherical stagnation point over the entire body using bow-shock capturing, and provides an efficient and effective way for predicting blunt-body flowfields for various reentry application. The Mach 20 flow over a 30-deg sphere cone is predicted and comparisons are made with an existing VSL scheme for the blunt-body region and an existing PNS scheme for the conical afterbody region. The predicted flowfield and surface-measurable quantities are in excellent agreement, and demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the new full-body PNS scheme.

  2. FlyPNS, a database of the Drosophila embryonic and larval peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Orgogozo, Virginie; Grueber, Wesley B

    2005-01-01

    Background The embryonic and larval peripheral nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster is extensively studied as a very powerful model of developmental biology. One main advantage of this system is the ability to study the origin and development of individual sensory cells. However, there remain several discrepancies regarding the organization of sensory organs in each abdominal segment A1-A7. Description We have constructed a web site called FlyPNS (for Fly Peripheral Nervous System) that consolidates a wide range of published and unpublished information about the embryonic and larval sensory organs. It communicates (1) a PNS pattern that solves the discrepancies that have been found in the recent literature, (2) the correspondence between the different nomenclatures that have been used so far, (3) a comprehensive description of each sensory organ, and (4) a list of both published and unpublished markers to reliably identify each PNS cell. Conclusions The FlyPNS database integrates disparate data and nomenclature and thus helps understanding the conflicting observations that have been published recently. Furthermore, it is designed to provide assistance in the identification and study of individual sensory cells. We think it will be a useful resource for any researcher with interest in Drosophila sensory organs. PMID:15717925

  3. Mineralization of 4-aminobenzenesulfonate (4-ABS) by Agrobacterium sp. strain PNS-1.

    PubMed

    Singh, Poonam; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Iyengar, Leela; Gurunath, Ramanathan

    2006-12-01

    A bacterial strain, PNS-1, isolated from activated sludge, could utilize sulphanilic acid (4-ABS) as the sole organic carbon and energy source under aerobic conditions. Determination and comparison of 16S r DNA sequences showed that the strain PNS-1 is closely related to the species of Agrobacterium genus. Growth on 4-ABS was accompanied with ammonia and sulfate release. TOC results showed complete mineralization of sulphanilic acid. This strain was highly specific for 4-ABS as none of the sulphonated aromatics used in the present study including other ABS isomers were utilized. Strain PNS-1 could, however, utilize all the tested monocyclic aromatic compounds devoid of a sulfonate group. No intermediates could be detected either in the growth phase or with dense cell suspensions. Presence of chloramphenicol completely inhibited 4-ABS degradation by cells pregrown on succinate, indicating that degradation enzymes are inducible. No plasmid could be detected in the Agrobacterium sp. Strain PNS-1 suggesting that 4-ABS degradative genes may be chromosomal encoded.

  4. Atoxic Derivative of Botulinum Neurotoxin A as a Prototype Molecular Vehicle for Targeted Delivery to the Neuronal Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Cintron, Edwin J.; Vakulenko, Maksim; Band, Philip A.; Stanker, Larry H.; Johnson, Eric A.; Ichtchenko, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described genetic constructs and expression systems that enable facile production of recombinant derivatives of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) that retain the structural and trafficking properties of wt BoNTs. In this report we describe the properties of one such derivative, BoNT/A ad, which was rendered atoxic by introducing two amino acid mutations to the light chain (LC) of wt BoNT/A, and which is being developed as a molecular vehicle for delivering drugs to the neuronal cytoplasm. The neuronal binding, internalization, and intracellular trafficking of BoNT/A ad in primary hippocampal cultures was evaluated using three complimentary techniques: flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Neuronal binding of BoNT ad was significantly increased when neurons were incubated in depolarizing medium. Flow cytometry demonstrated that BoNT/A ad internalized into neurons but not glia. After 24 hours, the majority of the neuron-bound BoNT/A ad became internalized, as determined by its resistance to pronase E-induced proteolytic degradation of proteins associated with the plasma membrane of intact cells. Significant amounts of the atoxic LC accumulated in a Triton X-100-extractable fraction of the neurons, and persisted as such for at least 11 days with no evidence of degradation. Immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated that the LC of BoNT/A ad was translocated to the neuronal cytoplasm after uptake and was specifically targeted to SNARE proteins. The atoxic LC consistently co-localized with synaptic markers SNAP-25 and VAMP-2, but was rarely co-localized with markers for early or late endosomes. These data demonstrate that BoNT/A ad mimics the trafficking properties of wt BoNT/A, confirming that our platform for designing and expressing BoNT derivatives provides an accessible system for elucidating the molecular details of BoNT trafficking, and can potentially be used to address multiple medical and biodefense needs. PMID:24465585

  5. Overexpression of microRNA-124 promotes the neuronal differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Defeng; Chen, Yi; Han, Yaxin; Lv, Chen; Tu, Guanjun

    2014-06-15

    microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important regulatory role in the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. In this study, we examined the effects of miRNA-124 (miR-124) overexpression in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In particular, we focused on the effect of overexpression on the differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into neurons. First, we used GeneChip technology to analyze the expression of miRNAs in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, neural stem cells and neurons. miR-124 expression was substantially reduced in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells compared with the other cell types. We constructed a lentiviral vector overexpressing miR-124 and transfected it into bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Intracellular expression levels of the neuronal early markers β-III tubulin and microtubule-associated protein-2 were significantly increased, and apoptosis induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation was reduced in transfected cells. After miR-124-transfected bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured rat spinal cord, a large number of cells positive for the neuronal marker neurofilament-200 were observed in the transplanted region. The Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan locomotion scores showed that the motor function of the hind limb of rats with spinal cord injury was substantially improved. These results suggest that miR-124 plays an important role in the differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into neurons. Our findings should facilitate the development of novel strategies for enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for spinal cord injury.

  6. Digital Tomosynthesis for PNS Evaluation: Comparisons of Patient Exposure and Image Quality with Plain Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jin Young; Choi, Boram; Jung, Hye Na; Koo, Ji Hyun; Bae, Young A; Jeon, Kyeongman; Byun, Hong Sik; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objective We investigated low dose digital tomosynthesis (DT) for the evaluation of the paranasal sinus (PNS), and compared its diagnostic accuracy with a PNS radiography series (XR). Materials and Methods We enrolled 43 patients for whom XR, PNS DT, and OMU CT were performed. We measured effective doses (EDs) of XR, DT, and OMU CT using Monte Carlo simulation software. Two radiologists performed independent observation of both XR and DT. For seven PNSs, they scored anatomic conspicuity of sinuses and confidence on the presence of sinusitis using nine point scales. OMU CT was observed by the third radiologist and the findings were regarded as reference standard. We compared scores for conspicuity and sinusitis confidence between XR and DT. Results Mean EDs were 29 ± 6 µSv, 48 ± 10 µSv, and 980 ± 250 µSv, respectively, for XR, DT, and CT. Mean scores for conspicuity were 6.3 and 7.4, respectively, for XR and DT. Sensitivity per patient basis for sinusitis detection were 52% and 96%, respectively, for XR and DT in observer 1 (p = 0.001) and 80% and 92% for observer 2 (p = 0.25). Specificities for sinusitis exclusion were 100% for both XR and DT for observer 1 and 89% and 100% for observer 2 (p = 0.50). Accuracies for sinusitis diagnosis were 72% and 98%, respectively, for XR and DT for observer 1 (p = 0.001) and 84% and 95% for observer 2 (p = 0.125). Conclusion Patient radiation dose from low dose DT is comparable with that of PNS XR. Diagnostic sensitivity of DT for sinusitis was superior to PNS XR. PMID:22438680

  7. An In Vitro Model of Latency and Reactivation of Varicella Zoster Virus in Human Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Markus, Amos; Lebenthal-Loinger, Ilana; Yang, In Hong; Kinchington, Paul R.; Goldstein, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) latency in sensory and autonomic neurons has remained enigmatic and difficult to study, and experimental reactivation has not yet been achieved. We have previously shown that human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neurons are permissive to a productive and spreading VZV infection. We now demonstrate that hESC-derived neurons can also host a persistent non-productive infection lasting for weeks which can subsequently be reactivated by multiple experimental stimuli. Quiescent infections were established by exposing neurons to low titer cell-free VZV either by using acyclovir or by infection of axons in compartmented microfluidic chambers without acyclovir. VZV DNA and low levels of viral transcription were detectable by qPCR for up to seven weeks. Quiescently-infected human neuronal cultures were induced to undergo renewed viral gene and protein expression by growth factor removal or by inhibition of PI3-Kinase activity. Strikingly, incubation of cultures induced to reactivate at a lower temperature (34°C) resulted in enhanced VZV reactivation, resulting in spreading, productive infections. Comparison of VZV genome transcription in quiescently-infected to productively-infected neurons using RNASeq revealed preferential transcription from specific genome regions, especially the duplicated regions. These experiments establish a powerful new system for modeling the VZV latent state, and reveal a potential role for temperature in VZV reactivation and disease. PMID:26042814

  8. Establishment of mouse-immortalized hybrid clones expressing characteristics of differentiated neurons derived from the cerebellar and brain stem regions.

    PubMed

    Satoh, J; Gallyas, F; Endoh, M; Yamamura, T; Kunishita, T; Kobayashi, T; Tabira, T

    1992-09-01

    Two clonal immortalized neurons designated CL8c4.7 and CL8a5.2 were established by somatic cell fusion between a hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase-(HPRT-) deficient neuroblastoma N18TG2 and newborn mouse cerebellar/brain stem neurons. In the serum-containing medium without extra differentiating agents, both clones exhibited a morphology of differentiated neurons. They contained high levels of glutamate but no gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The CL8a5.2 clone synthesized choline acetyltransferase and serotonin. In immunocytochemical studies, both clones expressed 200 kD neurofilament protein, neuron-specific enolase, microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), tau protein, neuronal cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM), HNK-1, Thy-1.2, saxitoxin-binding sodium channel protein, and glutamate. Synaptophysin immunoreactivity was identified in the neuritic terminals of CL8c4.7 cells. Most of these antigens were barely detectable on N18TG2 cells. Electrophysiologically, both clones generated action potentials in response to electrical stimuli. The hybrid clones that express characteristics of differentiated neurons derived from the cerebellar and brain stem regions might be invaluable for the study of the molecular basis of neuronal differentiation and degeneration in these regions.

  9. Increased nicotine response in iPSC-derived human neurons carrying the CHRNA5 N398 allele

    PubMed Central

    Oni, Eileen N.; Halikere, Apoorva; Li, Guohui; Toro-Ramos, Alana J.; Swerdel, Mavis R.; Verpeut, Jessica L.; Moore, Jennifer C.; Bello, Nicholas T.; Bierut, Laura J.; Goate, Alison; Tischfield, Jay A.; Pang, Zhiping P.; Hart, Ronald P.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation in nicotinic receptor alpha 5 (CHRNA5) has been associated with increased risk of addiction-associated phenotypes in humans yet little is known the underlying neural basis. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were derived from donors homozygous for either the major (D398) or the minor (N398) allele of the nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs16969968, in CHRNA5. To understand the impact of these nicotinic receptor variants in humans, we differentiated these iPSCs to dopamine (DA) or glutamatergic neurons and then tested their functional properties and response to nicotine. Results show that N398 variant human DA neurons differentially express genes associated with ligand receptor interaction and synaptic function. While both variants exhibited physiological properties consistent with mature neuronal function, the N398 neuronal population responded more actively with an increased excitatory postsynaptic current response upon the application of nicotine in both DA and glutamatergic neurons. Glutamatergic N398 neurons responded to lower nicotine doses (0.1 μM) with greater frequency and amplitude but they also exhibited rapid desensitization, consistent with previous analyses of N398-associated nicotinic receptor function. This study offers a proof-of-principle for utilizing human neurons to study gene variants contribution to addiction. PMID:27698409

  10. Combined small-molecule inhibition accelerates the derivation of functional cortical neurons from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yuchen; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Renier, Nicolas; Wu, Zhuhao; Atkin, Talia; Sun, Ziyi; Ozair, M Zeeshan; Tchieu, Jason; Zimmer, Bastian; Fattahi, Faranak; Ganat, Yosif; Azevedo, Ricardo; Zeltner, Nadja; Brivanlou, Ali H; Karayiorgou, Maria; Gogos, Joseph; Tomishima, Mark; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Shi, Song-Hai; Studer, Lorenz

    2017-02-01

    Considerable progress has been made in converting human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into functional neurons. However, the protracted timing of human neuron specification and functional maturation remains a key challenge that hampers the routine application of hPSC-derived lineages in disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Using a combinatorial small-molecule screen, we previously identified conditions to rapidly differentiate hPSCs into peripheral sensory neurons. Here we generalize the approach to central nervous system (CNS) fates by developing a small-molecule approach for accelerated induction of early-born cortical neurons. Combinatorial application of six pathway inhibitors induces post-mitotic cortical neurons with functional electrophysiological properties by day 16 of differentiation, in the absence of glial cell co-culture. The resulting neurons, transplanted at 8 d of differentiation into the postnatal mouse cortex, are functional and establish long-distance projections, as shown using iDISCO whole-brain imaging. Accelerated differentiation into cortical neuron fates should facilitate hPSC-based strategies for disease modeling and cell therapy in CNS disorders.

  11. l-Serine and glycine serve as major astroglia-derived trophic factors for cerebellar Purkinje neurons

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Shigeki; Tabata, Toshihide; Mitoma, Junya; Yamada, Keiko; Yamasaki, Miwako; Makino, Asami; Yamamoto, Toshifumi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kano, Masanobu; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2000-01-01

    Glial cells support the survival and development of central neurons through the supply of trophic factors. Here we demonstrate that l-serine (l-Ser) and glycine (Gly) also are glia-derived trophic factors. These amino acids are released by astroglial cells and promote the survival, dendritogenesis, and electrophysiological development of cultured cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Although l-Ser and Gly are generally classified as nonessential amino acids, 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3PGDH), a key enzyme for their biosynthesis, is not expressed in Purkinje neurons. By contrast, the Bergman glia, a native astroglia in the cerebellar cortex, highly expresses 3PGDH. These data suggest that l-Ser and Gly mediate the trophic actions of glial cells on Purkinje neurons. PMID:11016963

  12. Immortalization and Characterization of Lineage-restricted Neuronal Progenitor Cells Derived From the Procine Olfactory Bulb

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crucial aspects in the development of in vitro neuropathogenic disease model systems are the identification, characterization, and continuous mitotic expansion of cultured neuronal cells. To facilitate long-term cultivation, we immortalized cultured porcine olfactory neuronally restricted progenitor...

  13. Targeting RNA foci in iPSC-derived motor neurons from ALS patients with C9ORF72 repeat expansion

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, D.; O’Rourke, J. G.; Meera, P.; Muhammad, A.K.M.G.; Grant, S.; Simpkinson, M.; Bell, S.; Carmona, S.; Ornelas, L.; Sahabian, A.; Gendron, T.; Petrucelli, L.; Baughn, M.; Ravits, J.; Harms, M. B.; Rigo, F.; Bennett, C. F.; Otis, T. S.; Svendsen, C. N.; Baloh, R. H.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe neurodegenerative condition characterized by loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Expansions of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the noncoding region of the C9ORF72 gene are the most common cause of the familial form of ALS (C9-ALS), as well as frontotemporal lobar degeneration and other neurological diseases. How the repeat expansion causes disease remains unclear, with both loss of function (haploinsufficiency) and gain of function (either toxic RNA or protein products) proposed. Here, we report a cellular model of C9-ALS with motor neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from ALS patients carrying the C9ORF72 repeat expansion. No significant loss of C9ORF72 expression was observed, and knockdown of the transcript was not toxic to cultured human motor neurons. Transcription of the repeat was increased leading to accumulation of GGGGCC repeat-containing RNA foci selectively in C9-ALS motor neurons. Repeat-containing RNA foci co-localized with hnRNPA1 and Pur-α, suggesting that they may be able to alter RNA metabolism. C9-ALS motor neurons showed altered expression of genes involved in membrane excitability including DPP6, and demonstrated a diminished capacity to fire continuous spikes upon depolarization compared to control motor neurons. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting the C9ORF72 transcript suppressed RNA foci formation and reversed gene expression alterations in C9-ALS motor neurons. These data show that patient-derived motor neurons can be used to delineate pathogenic events in ALS. PMID:24154603

  14. Improvement of neuronal cell survival by astrocyte-derived exosomes under hypoxic and ischemic conditions depends on prion protein.

    PubMed

    Guitart, Kathrin; Loers, Gabriele; Buck, Friedrich; Bork, Ute; Schachner, Melitta; Kleene, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Prion protein (PrP) protects neural cells against oxidative stress, hypoxia, ischemia, and hypoglycemia. In the present study we confirm that cultured PrP-deficient neurons are more sensitive to oxidative stress than wild-type neurons and present the novel findings that wild-type, but not PrP-deficient astrocytes protect wild-type cerebellar neurons against oxidative stress and that exosomes released from stressed wild-type, but not from stressed PrP-deficient astrocytes reduce neuronal cell death induced by oxidative stress. We show that neuroprotection by exosomes of stressed astrocytes depends on exosomal PrP but not on neuronal PrP and that astrocyte-derived exosomal PrP enters into neurons, suggesting neuronal uptake of astrocyte-derived exosomes. Upon exposure of wild-type astrocytes to hypoxic or ischemic conditions PrP levels in exosomes were increased. By mass spectrometry and Western blot analysis, we detected increased levels of 37/67 kDa laminin receptor, apolipoprotein E and the ribosomal proteins S3 and P0, and decreased levels of clusterin/apolipoprotein J in exosomes from wild-type astrocytes exposed to oxygen/glucose deprivation relative to exosomes from astrocytes maintained under normoxic conditions. The levels of these proteins were not altered in exosomes from stressed PrP-deficient astrocytes relative to unstressed PrP-deficient astrocytes. These results indicate that PrP in astrocytes is a sensor for oxidative stress and mediates beneficial cellular responses, e.g. release of exosomes carrying PrP and other molecules, resulting in improved survival of neurons under hypoxic and ischemic conditions.

  15. FUS affects circular RNA expression in murine embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Errichelli, Lorenzo; Dini Modigliani, Stefano; Laneve, Pietro; Colantoni, Alessio; Legnini, Ivano; Capauto, Davide; Rosa, Alessandro; De Santis, Riccardo; Scarfò, Rebecca; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Lu, Lei; Caffarelli, Elisa; Shneider, Neil A.; Morlando, Mariangela; Bozzoni, Irene

    2017-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein FUS participates in several RNA biosynthetic processes and has been linked to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia. Here we report that FUS controls back-splicing reactions leading to circular RNA (circRNA) production. We identified circRNAs expressed in in vitro-derived mouse motor neurons (MNs) and determined that the production of a considerable number of these circRNAs is regulated by FUS. Using RNAi and overexpression of wild-type and ALS-associated FUS mutants, we directly correlate the modulation of circRNA biogenesis with alteration of FUS nuclear levels and with putative toxic gain of function activities. We also demonstrate that FUS regulates circRNA biogenesis by binding the introns flanking the back-splicing junctions and that this control can be reproduced with artificial constructs. Most circRNAs are conserved in humans and specific ones are deregulated in human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived MNs carrying the FUSP525L mutation associated with ALS. PMID:28358055

  16. FUS affects circular RNA expression in murine embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Errichelli, Lorenzo; Dini Modigliani, Stefano; Laneve, Pietro; Colantoni, Alessio; Legnini, Ivano; Capauto, Davide; Rosa, Alessandro; De Santis, Riccardo; Scarfò, Rebecca; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Lu, Lei; Caffarelli, Elisa; Shneider, Neil A; Morlando, Mariangela; Bozzoni, Irene

    2017-03-30

    The RNA-binding protein FUS participates in several RNA biosynthetic processes and has been linked to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia. Here we report that FUS controls back-splicing reactions leading to circular RNA (circRNA) production. We identified circRNAs expressed in in vitro-derived mouse motor neurons (MNs) and determined that the production of a considerable number of these circRNAs is regulated by FUS. Using RNAi and overexpression of wild-type and ALS-associated FUS mutants, we directly correlate the modulation of circRNA biogenesis with alteration of FUS nuclear levels and with putative toxic gain of function activities. We also demonstrate that FUS regulates circRNA biogenesis by binding the introns flanking the back-splicing junctions and that this control can be reproduced with artificial constructs. Most circRNAs are conserved in humans and specific ones are deregulated in human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived MNs carrying the FUS(P525L) mutation associated with ALS.

  17. Mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cells reveal niches that support neuronal differentiation in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Maya-Espinosa, Guadalupe; Collazo-Navarrete, Omar; Millán-Aldaco, Diana; Palomero-Rivero, Marcela; Guerrero-Flores, Gilda; Drucker-Colín, René; Covarrubias, Luis; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena

    2015-02-01

    A neurogenic niche can be identified by the proliferation and differentiation of its naturally residing neural stem cells. However, it remains unclear whether "silent" neurogenic niches or regions suitable for neural differentiation, other than the areas of active neurogenesis, exist in the adult brain. Embryoid body (EB) cells derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are endowed with a high potential to respond to specification and neuralization signals of the embryo. Hence, to identify microenvironments in the postnatal and adult rat brain with the capacity to support neuronal differentiation, we transplanted dissociated EB cells to conventional neurogenic and non-neurogenic regions. Our results show a neuronal differentiation pattern of EB cells that was dependent on the host region. Efficient neuronal differentiation of EB cells occurred within an adjacent region to the rostral migratory stream. EB cell differentiation was initially patchy and progressed toward an even distribution along the graft by 15-21 days post-transplantation, giving rise mostly to GABAergic neurons. EB cells in the striatum displayed a lower level of neuronal differentiation and derived into a significant number of astrocytes. Remarkably, when EB cells were transplanted to the striatum of adult rats after a local ischemic stroke, increased number of neuroblasts and neurons were observed. Unexpectedly, we determined that the adult substantia nigra pars compacta, considered a non-neurogenic area, harbors a robust neurogenic environment. Therefore, neurally uncommitted cells derived from ESCs can detect regions that support neuronal differentiation within the adult brain, a fundamental step for the development of stem cell-based replacement therapies.

  18. Non-Serotonergic Neurotoxicity by MDMA (Ecstasy) in Neurons Derived from Mouse P19 Embryonal Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Popova, Dina; Forsblad, Andréas; Hashemian, Sanaz; Jacobsson, Stig O P

    2016-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) is a commonly abused recreational drug that causes neurotoxic effects in both humans and animals. The mechanism behind MDMA-induced neurotoxicity is suggested to be species-dependent and needs to be further investigated on the cellular level. In this study, the effects of MDMA in neuronally differentiated P19 mouse embryonal carcinoma cells have been examined. MDMA produces a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent toxicity in differentiated P19 neurons, as measured by intracellular MTT reduction and extracellular LDH activity assays. The P19-derived neurons express both the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT), that is functionally active, and the serotonin metabolizing enzyme monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A). The involvement of these proteins in the MDMA-induced toxicity was investigated by a pharmacological approach. The MAO inhibitors clorgyline and deprenyl, and the SERT inhibitor fluoxetine, per se or in combination, were not able to mimic the toxic effects of MDMA in the P19-derived neurons or block the MDMA-induced cell toxicity. Oxidative stress has been implicated in MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, but pre-treatment with the antioxidants α-tocopherol or N-acetylcysteine did not reveal any protective effects in the P19 neurons. Involvement of mitochondria in the MDMA-induced cytotoxicity was also examined, but MDMA did not alter the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in the P19 neurons. We conclude that MDMA produce a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent neurotoxicity and our results suggest that the mechanism behind MDMA-induced toxicity in mouse-derived neurons do not involve the serotonergic system, oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction.

  19. Non-Serotonergic Neurotoxicity by MDMA (Ecstasy) in Neurons Derived from Mouse P19 Embryonal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Dina; Forsblad, Andréas; Hashemian, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) is a commonly abused recreational drug that causes neurotoxic effects in both humans and animals. The mechanism behind MDMA-induced neurotoxicity is suggested to be species-dependent and needs to be further investigated on the cellular level. In this study, the effects of MDMA in neuronally differentiated P19 mouse embryonal carcinoma cells have been examined. MDMA produces a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent toxicity in differentiated P19 neurons, as measured by intracellular MTT reduction and extracellular LDH activity assays. The P19-derived neurons express both the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT), that is functionally active, and the serotonin metabolizing enzyme monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A). The involvement of these proteins in the MDMA-induced toxicity was investigated by a pharmacological approach. The MAO inhibitors clorgyline and deprenyl, and the SERT inhibitor fluoxetine, per se or in combination, were not able to mimic the toxic effects of MDMA in the P19-derived neurons or block the MDMA-induced cell toxicity. Oxidative stress has been implicated in MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, but pre-treatment with the antioxidants α-tocopherol or N-acetylcysteine did not reveal any protective effects in the P19 neurons. Involvement of mitochondria in the MDMA-induced cytotoxicity was also examined, but MDMA did not alter the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in the P19 neurons. We conclude that MDMA produce a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent neurotoxicity and our results suggest that the mechanism behind MDMA-induced toxicity in mouse-derived neurons do not involve the serotonergic system, oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27861613

  20. Protein hairy enhancer of split-1 expression during differentiation of muscle-derived stem cells into neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mina; Guo, Zhanpeng; Liu, Kun; Mei, Xifan; Fang, Shiqiang; Zeng, Jinhao; Wang, Yansong; Yuan, Yajiang

    2012-10-05

    Muscle-derived stem cells were isolated from the skeletal muscle of Sprague-Dawley neonatal rats aged 3 days old. Cells at passage 5 were incubated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 10% (v/v) fetal bovine serum, 20 μg/L nerve growth factor, 20 μg/L basic fibroblast growth factor and 1% (v/v) penicillin for 6 days. Cells presented with long processes, similar to nerve cells. Connections were formed between cell processes. Immunocytochemical staining with neuron specific enolase verified that cells differentiated into neuron-like cells. Immunofluorescence cytochemistry and western blot results revealed that the expression of protein hairy enhancer of split-1 was significantly reduced. These results indicate that low expression of protein hairy enhancer of split-1 participates in the differentiation of muscle-derived stem cells into neuron-like cells.

  1. Enhanced aggregation of androgen receptor in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Nihei, Yoshihiro; Ito, Daisuke; Okada, Yohei; Akamatsu, Wado; Yagi, Takuya; Yoshizaki, Takahito; Okano, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2013-03-22

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motor neuron disease caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Ligand-dependent nuclear accumulation of mutant AR protein is a critical characteristic of the pathogenesis of SBMA. SBMA has been modeled in AR-overexpressing animals, but precisely how the polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion leads to neurodegeneration is unclear. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a new technology that can be used to model human diseases, study pathogenic mechanisms, and develop novel drugs. We established SBMA patient-derived iPSCs, investigated their cellular biochemical characteristics, and found that SBMA-iPSCs can differentiate into motor neurons. The CAG repeat numbers in the AR gene of SBMA-iPSCs and also in the atrophin-1 gene of iPSCs derived from another polyQ disease, dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA), remain unchanged during reprogramming, long term passage, and differentiation, indicating that polyQ disease-associated CAG repeats are stable during maintenance of iPSCs. The level of AR expression is up-regulated by neuronal differentiation and treatment with the AR ligand dihydrotestosterone. Filter retardation assays indicated that aggregation of ARs following dihydrotestosterone treatment in neurons derived from SBMA-iPSCs increases significantly compared with neurological control iPSCs, easily recapitulating the pathological feature of mutant ARs in SBMA-iPSCs. This phenomenon was not observed in iPSCs and fibroblasts, thereby showing the neuron-dominant phenotype of this disease. Furthermore, the HSP90 inhibitor 17-allylaminogeldanamycin sharply decreased the level of aggregated AR in neurons derived from SBMA-iPSCs, indicating a potential for discovery and validation of candidate drugs. We found that SBMA-iPSCs possess disease-specific biochemical features and could thus open new avenues of research into not only SBMA, but also other polyglutamine diseases.

  2. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuron as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity Ingrid L. Druwe1, Timothy J. Shafer2, Kathleen Wallace2, Pablo Valdivia3 ,and William R. Mundy2. 1University of North Carolina, Curriculum in Toxicology...

  3. The microtubular cytoskeleton of olfactory neurons derived from patients with schizophrenia or with bipolar disorder: Implications for biomarker characterization, neuronal physiology and pharmacological screening.

    PubMed

    Benítez-King, G; Valdés-Tovar, M; Trueta, C; Galván-Arrieta, T; Argueta, J; Alarcón, S; Lora-Castellanos, A; Solís-Chagoyán, H

    2016-06-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and Bipolar Disorder (BD) are highly inheritable chronic mental disorders with a worldwide prevalence of around 1%. Despite that many efforts had been made to characterize biomarkers in order to allow for biological testing for their diagnoses, these disorders are currently detected and classified only by clinical appraisal based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Olfactory neuroepithelium-derived neuronal precursors have been recently proposed as a model for biomarker characterization. Because of their peripheral localization, they are amenable to collection and suitable for being cultured and propagated in vitro. Olfactory neuroepithelial cells can be obtained by a non-invasive brush-exfoliation technique from neuropsychiatric patients and healthy subjects. Neuronal precursors isolated from these samples undergo in vitro the cytoskeletal reorganization inherent to the neurodevelopment process which has been described as one important feature in the etiology of both diseases. In this paper, we will review the current knowledge on microtubular organization in olfactory neurons of patients with SZ and with BD that may constitute specific cytoskeletal endophenotypes and their relation with alterations in L-type voltage-activated Ca(2+) currents. Finally, the potential usefulness of neuronal precursors for pharmacological screening will be discussed.

  4. Wnt7A identifies embryonic γ-motor neurons and reveals early postnatal dependence of γ-motor neurons on a muscle spindle-derived signal.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Soha; Lalancette-Hébert, Melanie; Friese, Andreas; Sigrist, Markus; Arber, Silvia; Shneider, Neil A; Kaltschmidt, Julia A

    2012-06-20

    Motor pools comprise a heterogeneous population of motor neurons that innervate distinct intramuscular targets. While the organization of motor neurons into motor pools has been well described, the time course and mechanism of motor pool diversification into functionally distinct classes remains unclear. γ-Motor neurons (γ-MNs) and α-motor neurons (α-MNs) differ in size, molecular identity, synaptic input and peripheral target. While α-MNs innervate extrafusal skeletal muscle fibers to mediate muscle contraction, γ-MNs innervate intrafusal fibers of the muscle spindle, and regulate sensitivity of the muscle spindle in response to stretch. In this study, we find that the secreted signaling molecule Wnt7a is selectively expressed in γ-MNs in the mouse spinal cord by embryonic day 17.5 and continues to molecularly distinguish γ-from α-MNs into the third postnatal week. Our data demonstrate that Wnt7a is the earliest known γ-MN marker, supporting a model of developmental divergence between α- and γ-MNs at embryonic stages. Furthermore, using Wnt7a expression as an early marker of γ-MN identity, we demonstrate a previously unknown dependence of γ-MNs on a muscle spindle-derived, GDNF-independent signal during the first postnatal week.

  5. Morphological and functional characterization of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons (iCell Neurons) in defined culture systems.

    PubMed

    Berry, Bonnie J; Akanda, Nesar; Smith, Alec S T; Long, Christopher J; Schnepper, Mark T; Guo, Xiufang; Hickman, James J

    2015-01-01

    Pre-clinical testing of drug candidates in animal models is expensive, time-consuming, and often fails to predict drug effects in humans. Industry and academia alike are working to build human-based in vitro test beds and advanced high throughput screening systems to improve the translation of preclinical results to human drug trials. Human neurons derived from induced pluripotent stems cells (hiPSCs) are readily available for use within these test-beds and high throughput screens, but there remains a need to robustly evaluate cellular behavior prior to their incorporation in such systems. This study reports on the characterization of one source of commercially available hiPSC-derived neurons, iCell(®) Neurons, for their long-term viability and functional performance to assess their suitability for integration within advanced in vitro platforms. The purity, morphology, survival, identity, and functional maturation of the cells utilizing different culture substrates and medium combinations were evaluated over 28 days in vitro (DIV). Patch-clamp electrophysiological data demonstrated increased capacity for repetitive firing of action potentials across all culture conditions. Significant differences in cellular maturity, morphology, and functional performance were observed in the different conditions, highlighting the importance of evaluating different surface types and growth medium compositions for application in specific in vitro protocols.

  6. Humanized neuronal chimeric mouse brain generated by neonatally engrafted human iPSC-derived primitive neural progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The creation of a humanized chimeric mouse nervous system permits the study of human neural development and disease pathogenesis using human cells in vivo. Humanized glial chimeric mice with the brain and spinal cord being colonized by human glial cells have been successfully generated. However, generation of humanized chimeric mouse brains repopulated by human neurons to possess a high degree of chimerism have not been well studied. Here we created humanized neuronal chimeric mouse brains by neonatally engrafting the distinct and highly neurogenic human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)–derived rosette-type primitive neural progenitors. These neural progenitors predominantly differentiate to neurons, which disperse widely throughout the mouse brain with infiltration of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus at 6 and 13 months after transplantation. Building upon the hiPSC technology, we propose that this potentially unique humanized neuronal chimeric mouse model will provide profound opportunities to define the structure, function, and plasticity of neural networks containing human neurons derived from a broad variety of neurological disorders. PMID:27882348

  7. Integrated transcriptome analysis of human iPS cells derived from a fragile X syndrome patient during neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Chen, Xiaolong; Feng, Yun; Zeng, Qiao; Jiang, Cizhong; Zhu, Xianmin; Fan, Guoping; Xue, Zhigang

    2016-11-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) patients carry the expansion of over 200 CGG repeats at the promoter of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1), leading to decreased or absent expression of its encoded fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). However, the global transcriptional alteration by FMRP deficiency has not been well characterized at single nucleotide resolution, i.e., RNA-seq. Here, we performed in-vitro neuronal differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells that were derived from fibroblasts of a FXS patient (FXS-iPSC). We then performed RNA-seq and examined the transcriptional misregulation at each intermediate stage during in-vitro differentiation of FXS-iPSC into neurons. After thoroughly analyzing the transcriptomic data and integrating them with those from other platforms, we found up-regulation of many genes encoding TFs for neuronal differentiation (WNT1, BMP4, POU3F4, TFAP2C, and PAX3), down-regulation of potassium channels (KCNA1, KCNC3, KCNG2, KCNIP4, KCNJ3, KCNK9, and KCNT1) and altered temporal regulation of SHANK1 and NNAT in FXS-iPSC derived neurons, indicating impaired neuronal differentiation and function in FXS patients. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the FMRP deficiency in FXS patients has significant impact on the gene expression patterns during development, which will help to discover potential targeting candidates for the cure of FXS symptoms.

  8. High Density Individually Addressable Nanowire Arrays Record Intracellular Activity from Primary Rodent and Human Stem Cell Derived Neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ren; Chen, Renjie; Elthakeb, Ahmed T; Lee, Sang Heon; Hinckley, Sandy; Khraiche, Massoud L; Scott, John; Pre, Deborah; Hwang, Yoontae; Tanaka, Atsunori; Ro, Yun Goo; Matsushita, Albert K; Dai, Xing; Soci, Cesare; Biesmans, Steven; James, Anthony; Nogan, John; Jungjohann, Katherine L; Pete, Douglas V; Webb, Denise B; Zou, Yimin; Bang, Anne G; Dayeh, Shadi A

    2017-04-10

    We report a new hybrid integration scheme that offers for the first time a nanowire-on-lead approach, which enables independent electrical addressability, is scalable, and has superior spatial resolution in vertical nanowire arrays. The fabrication of these nanowire arrays is demonstrated to be scalable down to submicrometer site-to-site spacing and can be combined with standard integrated circuit fabrication technologies. We utilize these arrays to perform electrophysiological recordings from mouse and rat primary neurons and human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons, which revealed high signal-to-noise ratios and sensitivity to subthreshold postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). We measured electrical activity from rodent neurons from 8 days in vitro (DIV) to 14 DIV and from hiPSC-derived neurons at 6 weeks in vitro post culture with signal amplitudes up to 99 mV. Overall, our platform paves the way for longitudinal electrophysiological experiments on synaptic activity in human iPSC based disease models of neuronal networks, critical for understanding the mechanisms of neurological diseases and for developing drugs to treat them.

  9. Efficient Generation of Corticofugal Projection Neurons from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoqing; Ai, Zongyong; Hu, Xintian; Li, Tianqing

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to study development and function of corticofugal projection neurons (CfuPNs) in the human cerebral cortex for health and disease have been limited by the unavailability of highly enriched CfuPNs. Here, we develop a robust, two-step process for generating CfuPNs from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs): directed induction of neuroepithelial stem cells (NESCs) from hESCs and efficient differentiation of NESCs to about 80% of CfuPNs. NESCs or a NESC faithfully maintain unlimitedly self-renewal and self-organized abilities to develop into miniature neural tube-like structures. NESCs retain a stable propensity toward neuronal differentiation over culture as fate-restricted progenitors of CfuPNs and interneurons. When grafted into mouse brains, NESCs successfully integrate into the host brains, differentiate into CfuPNs and effectively reestablish specific patterns of subcortical projections and synapse structures. Efficient generation of CfuPNs in vitro and in vivo will facilitate human cortex development and offer sufficient CfuPNs for cell therapy. PMID:27346302

  10. Patient-derived olfactory mucosa for study of the non-neuronal contribution to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis pathology

    PubMed Central

    García-Escudero, Vega; Rosales, María; Muñoz, José Luis; Scola, Esteban; Medina, Javier; Khalique, Hena; Garaulet, Guillermo; Rodriguez, Antonio; Lim, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative motor neuron disease which currently has no cure. Research using rodent ALS models transgenic for mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) has implicated that glial–neuronal interactions play a major role in the destruction of motor neurons, but the generality of this mechanism is not clear as SOD1 mutations only account for less than 2% of all ALS cases. Recently, this hypothesis was backed up by observation of similar effects using astrocytes derived from post-mortem spinal cord tissue of ALS patients which did not carry SOD1 mutations. However, such necropsy samples may not be easy to obtain and may not always yield viable cell cultures. Here, we have analysed olfactory mucosa (OM) cells, which can be easily isolated from living ALS patients. Disease-specific changes observed when ALS OM cells were co-cultured with human spinal cord neurons included decreased neuronal viability, aberrant neuronal morphology and altered glial inflammatory responses. Our results show the potential of OM cells as new cell models for ALS. PMID:25807871

  11. Human fetal striatum-derived neural stem (NS) cells differentiate to mature neurons in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Monni, Emanuela; Cusulin, Carlo; Cavallaro, Maurizio; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2014-01-01

    Clonogenic neural stem (NS) cell lines grown in adherent cultures have previously been established from embryonic stem cells and fetal and adult CNS in rodents and from human fetal brain and spinal cord. Here we describe the isolation of a new cell line from human fetal striatum (hNS cells). These cells showed properties of NS cells in vitro such as monolayer growth, high proliferation rate and expression of radial glia markers. The hNS cells expressed an early neuronal marker while being in the proliferative state. Under appropriate conditions, the hNS cells were efficiently differentiated to neurons, and after 4 weeks about 50% of the cells were βIII tubulin positive. They also expressed the mature neuronal marker NeuN and markers of neuronal subtypes, GABA, calbindin, and DARPP32. After intrastriatal implantation into newborn rats, the hNS cells survived and many of them migrated outside the transplant core into the surrounding tissue. A high percentage of cells in the grafts expressed the neuroblast marker DCX, indicating their neurogenic potential, and some of the cells differentiated to NeuN+ mature neurons. The human fetal striatum-derived NS cell line described here should be a useful tool for studies on cell replacement strategies in models of the striatal neuronal loss occurring in Huntington's disease and stroke.

  12. Induction of human umbilical Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells toward motor neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Bagher, Zohreh; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Azami, Mahmoud; Mirzadeh, Hamid; Soleimani, Mansooreh; Ai, Jafar; Nourani, Mohammad Reza; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi

    2015-10-01

    The most important property of stem cells from different sources is the capacity to differentiate into various cells and tissue types. However, problems including contamination, normal karyotype, and ethical issues cause many limitations in obtaining and using these cells from different sources. The cells in Wharton's jelly region of umbilical cord represent a pool source of primitive cells with properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The aim of this study was to determine the potential of human Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (WJMSCs) for differentiation to motor neuron cells. WJMSCs were induced to differentiate into motor neuron-like cells by using different signaling molecules and neurotrophic factors in vitro. Differentiated neurons were then characterized for expression of motor neuron markers including nestin, PAX6, NF-H, Islet 1, HB9, and choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) by quantitative reverse transcription PCR and immunocytochemistry. Our results showed that differentiated WJMSCs could significantly express motor neuron biomarkers in RNA and protein levels 15 d post induction. These results suggested that WJMSCs can differentiate to motor neuron-like cells and might provide a potential source in cell therapy for neurodegenerative disease.

  13. Predicting the functional states of human iPSC-derived neurons with single-cell RNA-seq and electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Bardy, C; van den Hurk, M; Kakaradov, B; Erwin, J A; Jaeger, B N; Hernandez, R V; Eames, T; Paucar, A A; Gorris, M; Marchand, C; Jappelli, R; Barron, J; Bryant, A K; Kellogg, M; Lasken, R S; Rutten, B P F; Steinbusch, H W M; Yeo, G W; Gage, F H

    2016-11-01

    Human neural progenitors derived from pluripotent stem cells develop into electrophysiologically active neurons at heterogeneous rates, which can confound disease-relevant discoveries in neurology and psychiatry. By combining patch clamping, morphological and transcriptome analysis on single-human neurons in vitro, we defined a continuum of poor to highly functional electrophysiological states of differentiated neurons. The strong correlations between action potentials, synaptic activity, dendritic complexity and gene expression highlight the importance of methods for isolating functionally comparable neurons for in vitro investigations of brain disorders. Although whole-cell electrophysiology is the gold standard for functional evaluation, it often lacks the scalability required for disease modeling studies. Here, we demonstrate a multimodal machine-learning strategy to identify new molecular features that predict the physiological states of single neurons, independently of the time spent in vitro. As further proof of concept, we selected one of the potential neurophysiological biomarkers identified in this study-GDAP1L1-to isolate highly functional live human neurons in vitro.

  14. Early maturation and distinct tau pathology in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from patients with MAPT mutations.

    PubMed

    Iovino, Mariangela; Agathou, Sylvia; González-Rueda, Ana; Del Castillo Velasco-Herrera, Martin; Borroni, Barbara; Alberici, Antonella; Lynch, Timothy; O'Dowd, Sean; Geti, Imbisaat; Gaffney, Daniel; Vallier, Ludovic; Paulsen, Ole; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur Thóra; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2015-11-01

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease, some cases of frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, are characterized by aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein tau, which are linked to neuronal death and disease development and can be caused by mutations in the MAPT gene. Six tau isoforms are present in the adult human brain and they differ by the presence of 3(3R) or 4(4R) C-terminal repeats. Only the shortest 3R isoform is present in foetal brain. MAPT mutations found in human disease affect tau binding to microtubules or the 3R:4R isoform ratio by altering exon 10 splicing. We have differentiated neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from fibroblasts of controls and patients with N279K and P301L MAPT mutations. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons recapitulate developmental tau expression, showing the adult brain tau isoforms after several months in culture. Both N279K and P301L neurons exhibit earlier electrophysiological maturation and altered mitochondrial transport compared to controls. Specifically, the N279K neurons show abnormally premature developmental 4R tau expression, including changes in the 3R:4R isoform ratio and AT100-hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, while P301L neurons are characterized by contorted processes with varicosity-like structures, some containing both alpha-synuclein and 4R tau. The previously unreported faster maturation of MAPT mutant human neurons, the developmental expression of 4R tau and the morphological alterations may contribute to disease development.

  15. Investigation of Low-Reynolds-Number Rocket Nozzle Design Using PNS-Based Optimization Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Moin; Korte, John J.

    1996-01-01

    An optimization approach to rocket nozzle design, based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology, is investigated for low-Reynolds-number cases. This study is undertaken to determine the benefits of this approach over those of classical design processes such as Rao's method. A CFD-based optimization procedure, using the parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) equations, is used to design conical and contoured axisymmetric nozzles. The advantage of this procedure is that it accounts for viscosity during the design process; other processes make an approximated boundary-layer correction after an inviscid design is created. Results showed significant improvement in the nozzle thrust coefficient over that of the baseline case; however, the unusual nozzle design necessitates further investigation of the accuracy of the PNS equations for modeling expanding flows with thick laminar boundary layers.

  16. In vitro differentiation of neural stem cells derived from human olfactory bulb into dopaminergic-like neurons.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Rafieh; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Moradi, Fatemeh; Mohammadpour, Shahram; Ghorbani, Jahangir; Safavi, Ali; Sarbishegi, Maryam; Pirhajati Mahabadi, Vahid; Alizadeh, Leila; Hadjighassem, Mahmoudreza

    2017-03-01

    This study describes a new accessible source of neuronal stem cells that can be used in Parkinson's disease cell transplant. The human olfactory bulb contains neural stem cells (NSCs) that are responsible for neurogenesis in the brain and the replacement of damaged cellular components throughout life. NSCs are capable of differentiating into neuronal and glial cells. We isolated NSCs from the olfactory bulb of brain-death donors and differentiated them into dopaminergic neurons. The olfactory bulb tissues obtained were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/nutrient mixture F12, B27 supplemented with basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor. The NSCs and proliferation markers were assessed. The multipotentiality of olfactory bulb NSCs was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. To generate dopaminergic neurons, olfactory bulb NSCs were differentiated in neurobasal medium, supplemented with B27, and treated with sonic hedgehog, fibroblast growth factor 8 and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor from the 7th to the 21st day, followed by detection of dopaminergic neuronal markers including tyrosine hydroxylase and aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase. The cells were expanded, established in continuous cell lines and differentiated into the two classical neuronal phenotypes. The percentage of co-positive cells (microtubule-associated protein 2 and tyrosine hydroxylase; aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase and tyrosine hydroxylase) in the treated cells was significantly higher than in the untreated cells. These results illustrate the existence of multipotent NSCs in the adult human olfactory bulb that are capable of differentiating toward putative dopaminergic neurons in the presence of trophic factors. Taken together, our data encourage further investigations of the possible use of olfactory bulb NSCs as a promising cell-based therapeutic strategy for Parkinson

  17. In Vitro Activities of Kissorphin, a Novel Hexapeptide KiSS-1 Derivative, in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Milton, Nathaniel G. N.

    2012-01-01

    The primary products of the metastasis-suppressor KiSS-1 gene are the kisspeptin (KP) peptides that stimulate gonadotrophin-releasing-hormone (GnRH) release via GPR-54 receptor activation. Recent studies have suggested that the KP-10 peptide also activates neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors. The aim of the current study was to determine the activities of the KiSS-1 derivative kissorphin (KSO), which contains the first six amino acids of the KP-10 peptide, is C-terminally amidated, and shares amino acid similarities with the biologically active NPFF 3–8 sequence. The KSO peptide inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production in ND7/23 neuroblastoma cells via an action that could be inhibited by the NPFF receptor antagonist RF9. Release of GnRH by LA-N-1 neuroblastoma cells was not altered by the KSO peptide. In ND7/23 neuroblastoma cells, the KSO peptide was able to reduce forskolin neuroprotection against H2O2 toxicity. The KSO peptide was also able to prevent prostaglandin E2-induced apoptosis in rat cortical neurons. The NPFF receptor antagonist RF9 could inhibit these actions of the KSO peptide in oxidative stress and apoptosis models. In conclusion, the kissorphin peptide, comprising the amino acid sequence Tyr-Asn-Trp-Asn-Ser-Phe-NH2, has NPFF-like biological activity without showing any GnRH releasing activity and inhibits forskolin-activated cAMP release. PMID:22848794

  18. A three-dimensional upwind PNS code for chemically reacting scramjet flowfields. [Parabolized Navier Stokes

    SciTech Connect

    Wadawadigi, G.; Tannehill, J.C.; Buelow, P.E.; Lawrence, S.L. NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA )

    1992-07-01

    A new upwind, parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code has been developed to compute the three-dimensional (3D) chemically reacting flow in scramjet (supersonic combustion ramjet) engines. The code is a modification of the 3D upwind PNS (UPS) airflow code which has been extended in the present study to permit internal flow calculations with hydrogen-air chemistry. With these additions, the new code has the capability of computing aerodynamic and propulsive flowfields simultaneously. The algorithm solves the PNS equations using a finite-volume, upwind TVD method based on Roe's approximate Riemann solver that has been modified to account for 'real gas' effects. The fluid medium is assumed to be a chemically reacting mixture of thermally perfect (but calorically imperfect) gases in thermal equilibrium. The new code has been applied to two test cases. These include the Burrows-Kurkov supersonic combustion experiment and a generic 3D scramjet flowfield. The computed results compare favorably with the available experimental data. 38 refs.

  19. Rat cortex and hippocampus-derived soluble factors for the induction of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells into neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Chao; Song, Lin; Liu, Yang; Zou, Wei; Jiang, Chen; Liu, Jing

    2014-06-01

    To simulate brain microenvironment, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSC) were induced to differentiate to neuronal-like cells in rat cortex and hippocampus medium (Cox + Hip). First, isolated AMSC were characterized by flow cytometer and the capacity of adipogenesis and osteogenesis. After induction in rat cortex and hippocampus conditioned medium, the cell morphological change was examined and neural marker proteins (β-Ш-Tubulin, NSE, Nissl body) expression was detected by immunofluorescence staining. A variety of synaptic marker proteins, including GAP43, SHANK2, SHANK3 and Bassoon body, were detected. ELISA was used to measure brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) secretion at different time-points. AMSCs positively expressed CD13, CD44 and CD90 and could differentiate into osteoblasts or adipocytes. After induction in Cox + Hip medium for 14 days, cells had a typical neuronal perikaryal appearance, which was suggestive of neuronal differentiation. After 14 days of Cox + Hip treatment, the percentage of cells expressing β-Ⅲ-Tubulin, NSE and Nissl was 53.9 ± 0.8%, 51.3 ± 1.7% and 16.4 ± 2.1%, respectively. Expression of GAP43, SHANK2, SHANK3 and Bassoon body was detected, indicating synapse formation after treatment in Cox + Hip medium. Differentiated AMSCs secreted neurotrophic factors NGF and BDNF. Thus rat cortex and hippocampus-derived soluble factors can induce AMSCs to a neuronal-like phenotype, suggesting that AMSCs have a dual role in supplementing newborn neurons and secreting neurotrophic factors, and therefore could be help as a potential treatment for nervous system diseases.

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is required for axonal growth of selective groups of neurons in the arcuate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Guey-Ying; Bouyer, Karine; Kamitakahara, Anna; Sahibzada, Niaz; Wang, Chien-Hua; Rutlin, Michael; Simerly, Richard B.; Xu, Baoji

    2015-01-01

    Objective Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent regulator of neuronal development, and the Bdnf gene produces two populations of transcripts with either a short or long 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR). Deficiencies in BDNF signaling have been shown to cause severe obesity in humans; however, it remains unknown how BDNF signaling impacts the organization of neuronal circuits that control energy balance. Methods We examined the role of BDNF on survival, axonal projections, and synaptic inputs of neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARH), a structure critical for the control of energy balance, using Bdnfklox/klox mice, which lack long 3′ UTR Bdnf mRNA and develop severe hyperphagic obesity. Results We found that a small fraction of neurons that express the receptor for BDNF, TrkB, also expressed proopiomelanocortin (POMC) or neuropeptide Y (NPY)/agouti-related protein (AgRP) in the ARH. Bdnfklox/klox mice had normal numbers of POMC, NPY, and TrkB neurons in the ARH; however, retrograde labeling revealed a drastic reduction in the number of ARH axons that project to the paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) in these mice. In addition, fewer POMC and AgRP axons were found in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) and the lateral part of PVH, respectively, in Bdnfklox/klox mice. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined the impact of BDNF deficiency on inputs to ARH neurons. We found that excitatory inputs onto POMC and NPY neurons were increased and decreased, respectively, in Bdnfklox/klox mice, likely due to a compensatory response to marked hyperphagia displayed by the mutant mice. Conclusion This study shows that the majority of TrkB neurons in the ARH are distinct from known neuronal populations and that BDNF plays a critical role in directing projections from these neurons to the DMH and PVH. We propose that hyperphagic obesity due to BDNF deficiency is in part attributable to impaired axonal growth of TrkB-expressing ARH neurons. PMID:26042201

  1. Neuronal Dysfunction in iPSC-Derived Medium Spiny Neurons from Chorea-Acanthocytosis Patients Is Reversed by Src Kinase Inhibition and F-Actin Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Stanslowsky, Nancy; Reinhardt, Peter; Glass, Hannes; Kalmbach, Norman; Naujock, Maximilian; Hensel, Niko; Lübben, Verena; Pal, Arun; Venneri, Anna; Lupo, Francesca; De Franceschi, Lucia; Claus, Peter; Sterneckert, Jared; Storch, Alexander; Hermann, Andreas; Wegner, Florian

    2016-11-23

    Chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) is a fatal neurological disorder characterized by red blood cell acanthocytes and striatal neurodegeneration. Recently, severe cell membrane disturbances based on depolymerized cortical actin and an elevated Lyn kinase activity in erythrocytes from ChAc patients were identified. How this contributes to the mechanism of neurodegeneration is still unknown. To gain insight into the pathophysiology, we established a ChAc patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell model and an efficient differentiation protocol providing a large population of human striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs), the main target of neurodegeneration in ChAc. Patient-derived MSNs displayed enhanced neurite outgrowth and ramification, whereas synaptic density was similar to controls. Electrophysiological analysis revealed a pathologically elevated synaptic activity in ChAc MSNs. Treatment with the F-actin stabilizer phallacidin or the Src kinase inhibitor PP2 resulted in the significant reduction of disinhibited synaptic currents to healthy control levels, suggesting a Src kinase- and actin-dependent mechanism. This was underlined by increased G/F-actin ratios and elevated Lyn kinase activity in patient-derived MSNs. These data indicate that F-actin stabilization and Src kinase inhibition represent potential therapeutic targets in ChAc that may restore neuronal function.

  2. Neuronal uptake and propagation of a rare phosphorylated high-molecular-weight tau derived from Alzheimer's disease brain

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Shuko; Wegmann, Susanne; Cho, Hansang; DeVos, Sarah L.; Commins, Caitlin; Roe, Allyson D.; Nicholls, Samantha B.; Carlson, George A.; Pitstick, Rose; Nobuhara, Chloe K.; Costantino, Isabel; Frosch, Matthew P.; Müller, Daniel J.; Irimia, Daniel; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2015-01-01

    Tau pathology is known to spread in a hierarchical pattern in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain during disease progression, likely by trans-synaptic tau transfer between neurons. However, the tau species involved in inter-neuron propagation remains unclear. To identify tau species responsible for propagation, we examined uptake and propagation properties of different tau species derived from postmortem cortical extracts and brain interstitial fluid of tau-transgenic mice, as well as human AD cortices. Here we show that PBS-soluble phosphorylated high-molecular-weight (HMW) tau, though very low in abundance, is taken up, axonally transported, and passed on to synaptically connected neurons. Our findings suggest that a rare species of soluble phosphorylated HMW tau is the endogenous form of tau involved in propagation and could be a target for therapeutic intervention and biomarker development. PMID:26458742

  3. Coordinated Development of Voltage-Gated Na+ and K+ Currents Regulates Functional Maturation of Forebrain Neurons Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mingke; Mohamad, Osama; Chen, Dongdong

    2013-01-01

    Like embryonic stem (ES) cells, human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells can differentiate into neuronal cells. However, it is unclear how their exquisite neuronal function is electrophysiologically coordinated during differentiation and whether they are functionally identical to human ES cell-derived neurons. In this study, we differentiated hiPS and ES cells into pyramidal-like neurons and conducted electrophysiological characterization over the 4-week terminal differentiation period. The human neuron-like cells express forebrain pyramidal cell markers NeuN, neurofilament, the microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), the paired box protein Pax-6 (PAX6), Tuj1, and the forkhead box protein G1 (FoxG1). The size of developing neurons increased continuously during the 4-week culture, and cell-resting membrane potentials (RMPs) underwent a negative shift from −40 to −70 mV. Expression of the muscarinic receptor-modulated K+ currents (IM) participated in the development of cell RMPs and controlled excitability. Immature neurons at week 1 could only fire abortive action potentials (APs) and the frequency of AP firing progressively increased with neuronal maturation. Interestingly, the developmental change of voltage-gated Na+ current (INa) did not correlate with the change in the AP firing frequency. On the other hand, the transient outward K+ current (IA), but not the delayed rectifier current (IK) contributed to the high frequency firing of APs. Synaptic activities were observed throughout the 4-week development. These morphological and electrophysiological features were almost identical between iPS and ES cell-derived neurons. This is the first systematic investigation showing functional evidence that hiPS cell-derived neurons possess similar neuronal activities as ES cell-derived neurons. These data support that iPS cell-derived neural progenitor cells have the potential for replacing lost neurons in cell-based therapy. PMID:23259973

  4. A retrograde neuronal survival response: target-derived neurotrophins regulate MEF2D and bcl-w.

    PubMed

    Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F; Hans, Aymeric; Courchesne, Stephanie L; Karch, Christoph; Cosker, Katharina E; Heerssen, Heather M; Watson, Fiona L; Kim, Taekyung; Greenberg, Michael E; Segal, Rosalind A

    2009-05-20

    Survival and maturation of dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons during development depend on target-derived neurotrophins. These target-derived signals must be transmitted across long distances to alter gene expression. Here, we address the possibility that long-range retrograde signals initiated by target-derived neurotrophins activate a specialized transcriptional program. The transcription factor MEF2D is expressed in sensory neurons; we show that expression of this factor is induced in response to target-derived neurotrophins that stimulate the distal axons. We demonstrate that MEF2D regulates expression of an anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family member, bcl-w. Expression of mef2d and bcl-w is stimulated in response to activation of a Trk-dependent ERK5/MEF2 pathway, and our data indicate that this pathway promotes sensory neuron survival. We find that mef2d and bcl-w are members of a larger set of retrograde response genes, which are preferentially induced by neurotrophin stimulation of distal axons. Thus, activation of an ERK5/MEF2D transcriptional program establishes and maintains the cellular constituents of functional sensory circuits.

  5. A retrograde neuronal survival response: Target-derived neurotrophins regulate MEF2D and bcl-w

    PubMed Central

    Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F.; Hans, Aymeric; Courchesne, Stephanie L.; Karch, Christoph; Cosker, Katharina E.; Heerssen, Heather M.; Watson, Fiona L.; Kim, Taekyung; Greenberg, Michael E.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Survival and maturation of dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons during development depends on target-derived neurotrophins. These target-derived signals must be transmitted across long distances to alter gene expression. Here we address the possibility that long-range retrograde signals initiated by target-derived neurotrophins activate a specialized transcriptional program. The transcription factor MEF2D is expressed in sensory neurons; we show that expression of this factor is induced in response to target-derived neurotrophins that stimulate the distal axons. We demonstrate that MEF2D regulates expression of an anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family member, bcl-w. Expression of mef2d and bcl-w is stimulated in response to activation of a Trk-dependent ERK5/Mef2 pathway, and our data indicate that this pathway promotes sensory neuron survival. We find that mef2d and bcl-w are members of a larger set of retrograde response genes, which are preferentially induced by neurotrophin stimulation of distal axons. Thus activation of an ERK5/MEF2D transcriptional program establishes and maintains the cellular constituents of functional sensory circuits. PMID:19458239

  6. Efficient and Rapid Derivation of Primitive Neural Stem Cells and Generation of Brain Subtype Neurons From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yiping; Shin, Soojung; Jha, Balendu Shekhar; Liu, Qiuyue; Sheng, Jianting; Li, Fuhai; Zhan, Ming; Davis, Janine; Bharti, Kapil; Zeng, Xianmin; Rao, Mahendra; Malik, Nasir

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, are unique cell sources for disease modeling, drug discovery screens, and cell therapy applications. The first step in producing neural lineages from hPSCs is the generation of neural stem cells (NSCs). Current methods of NSC derivation involve the time-consuming, labor-intensive steps of an embryoid body generation or coculture with stromal cell lines that result in low-efficiency derivation of NSCs. In this study, we report a highly efficient serum-free pluripotent stem cell neural induction medium that can induce hPSCs into primitive NSCs (pNSCs) in 7 days, obviating the need for time-consuming, laborious embryoid body generation or rosette picking. The pNSCs expressed the neural stem cell markers Pax6, Sox1, Sox2, and Nestin; were negative for Oct4; could be expanded for multiple passages; and could be differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, in addition to the brain region-specific neuronal subtypes GABAergic, dopaminergic, and motor neurons. Global gene expression of the transcripts of pNSCs was comparable to that of rosette-derived and human fetal-derived NSCs. This work demonstrates an efficient method to generate expandable pNSCs, which can be further differentiated into central nervous system neurons and glia with temporal, spatial, and positional cues of brain regional heterogeneity. This method of pNSC derivation sets the stage for the scalable production of clinically relevant neural cells for cell therapy applications in good manufacturing practice conditions. PMID:24113065

  7. Improved Proliferative Capacity of NP-Like Cells Derived from Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Neuronal Transdifferentiation by Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Aguilera-Castrejon, Alejandro; Pasantes-Morales, Herminia; Montesinos, Juan José; Cortés-Medina, Lorena V; Castro-Manrreza, Marta E; Mayani, Héctor; Ramos-Mandujano, Gerardo

    2017-02-01

    Neural progenitors (NP), found in fetal and adult brain, differentiate into neurons potentially able to be used in cell replacement therapies. This approach however, raises technical and ethical problems which limit their potential therapeutic use. Alternately, NPs can be obtained by transdifferentiation of non-neural somatic cells evading these difficulties. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are suggested to transdifferentiate into NP-like cells, which however, have a low proliferation capacity. The present study demonstrates the requisite of cell adhesion for proliferation and survival of NP-like cells and re-evaluates some neuronal features after differentiation by standard procedures. Mature neuronal markers, though, were not detected by these procedures. A chemical differentiation approach was used in this study to convert MSCs-derived NP-like cells into neurons by using a cocktail of six molecules, CHIR99021, I-BET151, RepSox, DbcAMP, forskolin and Y-27632, defined after screening combinations of 22 small molecules. Direct transdifferentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells was obtained with the small molecule cocktail, without requiring the NP-like intermediate stage.

  8. Motor neurons derived from ALS-related mouse iPS cells recapitulate pathological features of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju-Hwang; Park, Hang-Soo; Hong, Sunghoi; Kang, Seongman

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a late-onset progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain. Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are known to induce ALS. Although many research models have been developed, the exact pathological mechanism of ALS remains unknown. The recently developed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology is expected to illuminate the pathological mechanisms and new means of treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. To determine the pathological mechanism of ALS, we generated mouse iPS (miPS) cells from experimental ALS transgenic mice and control mice and characterized the cells using molecular biological methods. The generated miPS cells expressed many pluripotent genes and differentiated into three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. Motor neurons derived from ALS-related miPS cells recapitulated the pathological features of ALS. The ALS-model motor neurons showed SOD1 aggregates, as well as decreased cell survival rate and neurite length compared with wild-type motor neurons. Our study will be helpful in revealing the mechanism of motor neuronal cell death in ALS. PMID:27932790

  9. Motor neurons derived from ALS-related mouse iPS cells recapitulate pathological features of ALS.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju-Hwang; Park, Hang-Soo; Hong, Sunghoi; Kang, Seongman

    2016-12-09

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a late-onset progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain. Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are known to induce ALS. Although many research models have been developed, the exact pathological mechanism of ALS remains unknown. The recently developed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology is expected to illuminate the pathological mechanisms and new means of treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. To determine the pathological mechanism of ALS, we generated mouse iPS (miPS) cells from experimental ALS transgenic mice and control mice and characterized the cells using molecular biological methods. The generated miPS cells expressed many pluripotent genes and differentiated into three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. Motor neurons derived from ALS-related miPS cells recapitulated the pathological features of ALS. The ALS-model motor neurons showed SOD1 aggregates, as well as decreased cell survival rate and neurite length compared with wild-type motor neurons. Our study will be helpful in revealing the mechanism of motor neuronal cell death in ALS.

  10. Developmental changes of TrkB signaling in response to exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xianju; Xiao, Hua; Wang, Hongbing

    2011-12-01

    Neocortical circuits are most sensitive to sensory experience during a critical period of early development. Previous studies implicate that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and GABAergic inhibition may control the timing of the critical period. By using an in vitro maturation model, we found that neurons at DIV (day in vitro) 7, around a period when functional synapses start to form and GABAergic inhibition emerges, displayed the most dynamic activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and CREB by exogenous BDNF. The BDNF-stimulated transcriptional up-regulation of CREB target genes was also the highest in DIV 7 neurons. The basal level of ERK1/2 and CREB activity, as well as the expression of CREB target genes, increased along with maturation, and neurons at DIV 13 and 22 displayed less dynamic responses to BDNF. Furthermore, we found that the developmentally regulated GABAergic inhibition correlated with the decline of BDNF-mediated signaling during maturation. BDNF stimulation along with suppression of GABAergic inhibition enhanced the activation of ERK1/2-CREB signaling and gene transcription in mature neurons. Conversely, BDNF stimulation along with enhancement of GABAergic inhibition reduced the overall induction of intracellular signaling in younger neurons. We propose that the less dynamic molecular changes may play a certain role in the loss of plasticity during maturation.

  11. Nanofiber Matrices Promote the Neuronal Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursors In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Shawn H.; Christopherson, Gregory T.; Xu, Leyan; Nasonkin, Igor; Yu, Christopher; Mao, Hai-Quan; Koliatsos, Vassilis E.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of human embryonic stem (ES) cells as experimental therapies for neuronal replacement has recently received considerable attention. In view of the organization of the mature nervous system into distinct neural circuits, key challenges of such therapies are the directed differentiation of human ES cell-derived neural precursors (NPs) into specific neuronal types and the directional growth of axons along specified trajectories. In the present study, we cultured human NPs derived from the NIH-approved ES line BGO1 on polycaprolactone fiber matrices of different diameter (i.e., nanofibers and microfibers) and orientation (i.e., aligned and random); fibers were coated with poly-L-ornithine/laminin to mimic the extracellular matrix and support the adhesion, viability, and differentiation of NPs. On aligned fibrous meshes, human NPs adopt polarized cell morphology with processes extending along the axis of the fiber, whereas NPs on plain tissue culture surfaces or random fiber substrates form nonpolarized neurite networks. Under differentiation conditions, human NPs cultured on aligned fibrous substrates show a higher rate of neuronal differentiation than other matrices; 62% and 86% of NPs become TUJ1 (+) early neurons on aligned micro- and nanofibers, respectively, whereas only 32% and 27% of NPs acquire the same fate on random micro- and nanofibers. Metabolic cell activity/viability studies reveal that fiber alignment and diameter also have an effect on NP viability, but only in the presence of mitogens. Our findings demonstrate that fibrous substrates serve as an artificial extracellular matrix and provide a microenviroment that influences key aspects of the neuronal differentiation of ES-derived NPs. PMID:20973749

  12. Zebrafish Müller glia-derived progenitors are multipotent, exhibit proliferative biases and regenerate excess neurons

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Curtis; Cornblath, Eli; Elsaeidi, Fairouz; Wan, Jin; Goldman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals, zebrafish can regenerate a damaged retina. Key to this regenerative response are Müller glia (MG) that respond to injury by reprogramming and adopting retinal stem cell properties. These reprogrammed MG divide to produce a proliferating population of retinal progenitors that migrate to areas of retinal damage and regenerate lost neurons. Previous studies have suggested that MG-derived progenitors may be biased to produce that are lost with injury. Here we investigated MG multipotency using injury paradigms that target different retinal nuclear layers for cell ablation. Our data indicate that regardless of which nuclear layer was damaged, MG respond by generating multipotent progenitors that migrate to all nuclear layers and differentiate into layer-specific cell types, suggesting that MG-derived progenitors in the injured retina are intrinsically multipotent. However, our analysis of progenitor proliferation reveals a proliferative advantage in nuclear layers where neurons were ablated. This suggests that feedback inhibition from surviving neurons may skew neuronal regeneration towards ablated cell types. PMID:27094545

  13. N-butylidenephthalide attenuates Alzheimer's disease-like cytopathy in Down syndrome induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yu; Chen, Sheng-Mei; Lu, Huai-En; Lai, Syu-Ming; Lai, Ping-Shan; Shen, Po-Wen; Chen, Pei-Ying; Shen, Ching-I; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Su, Hong-Lin

    2015-03-04

    Down syndrome (DS) patients with early-onset dementia share similar neurodegenerative features with Alzheimer's disease (AD). To recapitulate the AD cell model, DS induced pluripotent stem cells (DS-iPSCs), reprogrammed from mesenchymal stem cells in amniotic fluid, were directed toward a neuronal lineage. Neuroepithelial precursor cells with high purity and forebrain characteristics were robustly generated on day 10 (D10) of differentiation. Accumulated amyloid deposits, Tau protein hyperphosphorylation and Tau intracellular redistribution emerged rapidly in DS neurons within 45 days but not in normal embryonic stem cell-derived neurons. N-butylidenephthalide (Bdph), a major phthalide ingredient of Angelica sinensis, was emulsified by pluronic F127 to reduce its cellular toxicity and promote canonical Wnt signaling. Interestingly, we found that F127-Bdph showed significant therapeutic effects in reducing secreted Aβ40 deposits, the total Tau level and the hyperphosphorylated status of Tau in DS neurons. Taken together, DS-iPSC derived neural cells can serve as an ideal cellular model of DS and AD and have potential for high-throughput screening of candidate drugs. We also suggest that Bdph may benefit DS or AD treatment by scavenging Aβ aggregates and neurofibrillary tangles.

  14. Assessing similarity to primary tissue and cortical layer identity in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons through single-cell transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Handel, Adam E; Chintawar, Satyan; Lalic, Tatjana; Whiteley, Emma; Vowles, Jane; Giustacchini, Alice; Argoud, Karene; Sopp, Paul; Nakanishi, Mahito; Bowden, Rory; Cowley, Sally; Newey, Sarah; Akerman, Colin; Ponting, Chris P; Cader, M Zameel

    2016-03-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cortical neurons potentially present a powerful new model to understand corticogenesis and neurological disease. Previous work has established that differentiation protocols can produce cortical neurons, but little has been done to characterize these at cellular resolution. In particular, it is unclear to what extent in vitro two-dimensional, relatively disordered culture conditions recapitulate the development of in vivo cortical layer identity. Single-cell multiplex reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to interrogate the expression of genes previously implicated in cortical layer or phenotypic identity in individual cells. Totally, 93.6% of single cells derived from iPSCs expressed genes indicative of neuronal identity. High proportions of single neurons derived from iPSCs expressed glutamatergic receptors and synaptic genes. And, 68.4% of iPSC-derived neurons expressing at least one layer marker could be assigned to a laminar identity using canonical cortical layer marker genes. We compared single-cell RNA-seq of our iPSC-derived neurons to available single-cell RNA-seq data from human fetal and adult brain and found that iPSC-derived cortical neurons closely resembled primary fetal brain cells. Unexpectedly, a subpopulation of iPSC-derived neurons co-expressed canonical fetal deep and upper cortical layer markers. However, this appeared to be concordant with data from primary cells. Our results therefore provide reassurance that iPSC-derived cortical neurons are highly similar to primary cortical neurons at the level of single cells but suggest that current layer markers, although effective, may not be able to disambiguate cortical layer identity in all cells.

  15. Immature Responses to GABA in Fragile X Neurons Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Telias, Michael; Segal, Menahem; Ben-Yosef, Dalit

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited cognitive disability. However, functional deficiencies in FX neurons have been described so far almost exclusively in animal models. In a recent study we found several functional deficits in FX neurons differentiated in-vitro from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), including their inability to fire repetitive action potentials, and their lack of synaptic activity. Here, we investigated the responses of such neurons to pulse application of the neurotransmitter GABA. We found two distinct types of responses to GABA and sensitivity to the GABA-A receptor antagonist bicuculline; type 1 (mature) characterized by non-desensitized responses to GABA as well as a high sensitivity to bicuculline, and type 2 (immature) which are desensitized to GABA and insensitive to bicuculline. Type 1 responses were age-dependent and dominant in mature WT neurons. In contrast, FX neurons expressed primarily type 2 phenotype. Expression analysis of GABA-A receptor subunits demonstrated that this bias in human FX neurons was associated with a significant alteration in the expression pattern of the GABA-A receptor subunits α2 and β2. Our results indicate that FMRP may play a role in the development of the GABAergic synapse during neurogenesis. This is the first demonstration of the lack of a mature response to GABA in human FX neurons and may explain the inappropriate synaptic functions in FXS. PMID:27242433

  16. Celastrol ameliorates Cd-induced neuronal apoptosis by targeting NOX2-derived ROS-dependent PP5-JNK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chong; Wang, Xiaoxue; Gu, Chenjian; Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Ruijie; Dong, Xiaoqing; Liu, Chunxiao; Hu, Xiaoyu; Ji, Xiang; Huang, Shile; Chen, Long

    2017-04-01

    Celastrol, a plant-derived triterpene, has neuroprotective benefit in the models of neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, we have reported that cadmium (Cd) activates c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway leading to neuronal cell death by inducing ROS inactivation of protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), and celastrol prevents Cd-activated JNK pathway against neuronal apoptosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that celastrol could hinder Cd induction of ROS-dependent PP5-JNK signaling pathway from apoptosis in neuronal cells. Here, we show that celastrol attenuated Cd-induced expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and its regulatory proteins (p22(phox) , p40(phox) , p47(phox) , p67(phox) , and Rac1), as well as the generation of ROS in PC12 cells and primary neurons. Also, N-acetyl-l-cysteine, a ROS scavenger, potentiated celastrol's inhibition of the events in the cells triggered by Cd, implying neuroprotection by celastrol via blocking Cd-evoked NOX2-derived ROS. Further research revealed that celastrol was involved in the regulation of PP5 inactivation and JNK/c-Jun activation induced by Cd, as celastrol prevented Cd from reducing PP5 expression, and over-expression of wild-type PP5 or dominant negative c-Jun strengthened celastrol's inhibition of Cd-induced phosphorylation of JNK and/or c-Jun, as well as apoptosis in neuronal cells. Of importance, inhibiting NOX2 with apocynin or silencing NOX2 by RNA interference enhanced the inhibitory effects of celastrol on Cd-induced inactivation of PP5, activation of JNK/c-Jun, ROS, and apoptosis in the cells. Furthermore, we noticed that expression of wild-type PP5 or dominant negative c-Jun, or pretreatment with JNK inhibitor SP600125 reinforced celastrol's suppression of Cd-induced NOX2 and its regulatory proteins, and consequential ROS in neuronal cells. These findings indicate that celastrol ameliorates Cd-induced neuronal apoptosis via targeting NOX2-derived

  17. Growth and turning properties of adult glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor coreceptor α1 nonpeptidergic sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Guo, GuiFang; Singh, Vandana; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2014-09-01

    An overlapping population of adult primary sensory neurons that innervate the skin express the glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor coreceptor α1 (GFRα1), the lectin IB4, and the "regenerative brake" phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10. Using an adapted turning and growth assay, we analyzed the growth cone behavior of adult immunoselected GFRα1 sensory neurons. These neurons had less robust baseline growth and reluctant responsiveness to individual growth factors but responded to synergistic types of input from glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, hepatocyte growth factor, a phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 inhibitor, or a downstream Rho kinase inhibitor. Hepatocyte growth factor and the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 inhibitor were associated with growth cone turning. A gradient of protein extracted from skin samples, a primary target of GFRα1 axons, replicated the impact of synergistic support. Within the skin, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor was expressed within epidermal axons, indicating an autocrine role accompanying local hepatocyte growth factor synthesis. Taken together, our findings identify unique growth properties and plasticity of a distinct population of epidermal axons that are relevant to neurologic repair and skin reinnervation.

  18. Layered hydrogels accelerate iPSC-derived neuronal maturation and reveal migration defects caused by MeCP2 dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen-Ning; Freitas, Beatriz C.; Qian, Hao; Lux, Jacques; Acab, Allan; Trujillo, Cleber A.; Herai, Roberto H.; Nguyen Huu, Viet Anh; Wen, Jessica H.; Joshi-Barr, Shivanjali; Karpiak, Jerome V.; Engler, Adam J.; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Muotri, Alysson R.; Almutairi, Adah

    2016-03-01

    Probing a wide range of cellular phenotypes in neurodevelopmental disorders using patient-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) can be facilitated by 3D assays, as 2D systems cannot entirely recapitulate the arrangement of cells in the brain. Here, we developed a previously unidentified 3D migration and differentiation assay in layered hydrogels to examine how these processes are affected in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as Rett syndrome. Our soft 3D system mimics the brain environment and accelerates maturation of neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived NPCs, yielding electrophysiologically active neurons within just 3 wk. Using this platform, we revealed a genotype-specific effect of methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (MeCP2) dysfunction on iPSC-derived neuronal migration and maturation (reduced neurite outgrowth and fewer synapses) in 3D layered hydrogels. Thus, this 3D system expands the range of neural phenotypes that can be studied in vitro to include those influenced by physical and mechanical stimuli or requiring specific arrangements of multiple cell types.

  19. Layered hydrogels accelerate iPSC-derived neuronal maturation and reveal migration defects caused by MeCP2 dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Ning; Freitas, Beatriz C; Qian, Hao; Lux, Jacques; Acab, Allan; Trujillo, Cleber A; Herai, Roberto H; Nguyen Huu, Viet Anh; Wen, Jessica H; Joshi-Barr, Shivanjali; Karpiak, Jerome V; Engler, Adam J; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Muotri, Alysson R; Almutairi, Adah

    2016-03-22

    Probing a wide range of cellular phenotypes in neurodevelopmental disorders using patient-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) can be facilitated by 3D assays, as 2D systems cannot entirely recapitulate the arrangement of cells in the brain. Here, we developed a previously unidentified 3D migration and differentiation assay in layered hydrogels to examine how these processes are affected in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as Rett syndrome. Our soft 3D system mimics the brain environment and accelerates maturation of neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived NPCs, yielding electrophysiologically active neurons within just 3 wk. Using this platform, we revealed a genotype-specific effect of methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (MeCP2) dysfunction on iPSC-derived neuronal migration and maturation (reduced neurite outgrowth and fewer synapses) in 3D layered hydrogels. Thus, this 3D system expands the range of neural phenotypes that can be studied in vitro to include those influenced by physical and mechanical stimuli or requiring specific arrangements of multiple cell types.

  20. Layered hydrogels accelerate iPSC-derived neuronal maturation and reveal migration defects caused by MeCP2 dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Ning; Freitas, Beatriz C.; Qian, Hao; Lux, Jacques; Acab, Allan; Trujillo, Cleber A.; Herai, Roberto H.; Nguyen Huu, Viet Anh; Wen, Jessica H.; Joshi-Barr, Shivanjali; Karpiak, Jerome V.; Engler, Adam J.; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Muotri, Alysson R.; Almutairi, Adah

    2016-01-01

    Probing a wide range of cellular phenotypes in neurodevelopmental disorders using patient-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) can be facilitated by 3D assays, as 2D systems cannot entirely recapitulate the arrangement of cells in the brain. Here, we developed a previously unidentified 3D migration and differentiation assay in layered hydrogels to examine how these processes are affected in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as Rett syndrome. Our soft 3D system mimics the brain environment and accelerates maturation of neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived NPCs, yielding electrophysiologically active neurons within just 3 wk. Using this platform, we revealed a genotype-specific effect of methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (MeCP2) dysfunction on iPSC-derived neuronal migration and maturation (reduced neurite outgrowth and fewer synapses) in 3D layered hydrogels. Thus, this 3D system expands the range of neural phenotypes that can be studied in vitro to include those influenced by physical and mechanical stimuli or requiring specific arrangements of multiple cell types. PMID:26944080

  1. A simple method to generate adipose stem cell-derived neurons for screening purposes.

    PubMed

    Bossio, Caterina; Mastrangelo, Rosa; Morini, Raffaella; Tonna, Noemi; Coco, Silvia; Verderio, Claudia; Matteoli, Michela; Bianco, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    Strategies involved in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation toward neuronal cells for screening purposes are characterized by quality and quantity issues. Differentiated cells are often scarce with respect to starting undifferentiated population, and the differentiation process is usually quite long, with high risk of contamination and low yield efficiency. Here, we describe a novel simple method to induce direct differentiation of MSCs into neuronal cells, without neurosphere formation. Differentiated cells are characterized by clear morphological changes, expression of neuronal specific markers, showing functional response to depolarizing stimuli and electrophysiological properties similar to those of developing neurons. The method described here represents a valuable tool for future strategies aimed at personalized screening of therapeutic agents in vitro.

  2. Mitochondria modify exercise-induced development of stem cell-derived neurons in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Steib, Kathrin; Schäffner, Iris; Jagasia, Ravi; Ebert, Birgit; Lie, D Chichung

    2014-05-07

    Neural stem cells in the adult mammalian hippocampus continuously generate new functional neurons, which modify the hippocampal network and significantly contribute to cognitive processes and mood regulation. Here, we show that the development of new neurons from stem cells in adult mice is paralleled by extensive changes to mitochondrial mass, distribution, and shape. Moreover, exercise-a strong modifier of adult hippocampal neurogenesis-accelerates neuronal maturation and induces a profound increase in mitochondrial content and the presence of mitochondria in dendritic segments. Genetic inhibition of the activity of the mitochondrial fission factor dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) inhibits neurogenesis under basal and exercise conditions. Conversely, enhanced Drp1 activity furthers exercise-induced acceleration of neuronal maturation. Collectively, these results indicate that adult hippocampal neurogenesis requires adaptation of the mitochondrial compartment and suggest that mitochondria are targets for enhancing neurogenesis-dependent hippocampal plasticity.

  3. Nerve growth factor derivative NGF61/100 promotes outgrowth of primary sensory neurons with reduced signs of nociceptive sensitization.

    PubMed

    Severini, C; Petrocchi Passeri, P; Ciotti, M T; Florenzano, F; Petrella, C; Malerba, F; Bruni, B; D'Onofrio, M; Arisi, I; Brandi, R; Possenti, R; Calissano, P; Cattaneo, A

    2017-02-02

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is being considered as a therapeutic candidate for Alzheimer's disease. However, the development of an NGF-based therapy is limited by its potent pain activity. We have developed a "painless" derivative form of human NGF (NGF61/100), characterized by identical neurotrophic properties but a reduced nociceptive sensitization activity in vivo. Here we characterized the response of rat dorsal root ganglia neurons (DRG) to the NGF derivative NGF61/100, in comparison to that of control NGF (NGF61), analyzing the expression of noxious pro-nociceptive mediators. NGF61/100 displays a neurotrophic activity on DRG neurons comparable to that of control NGF61, despite a reduced activation of PLCγ, Akt and Erk1/2. NGF61/100 does not differ from NGF61 in its ability to up-regulate Substance P (SP) and Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP) expression. However, upon Bradykinin (BK) stimulation, NGF61/100-treated DRG neurons release a much lower amount of SP and CGRP, compared to control NGF61 pre-treated neurons. This effect of painless NGF is explained by the reduced up-regulation of BK receptor 2 (B2R), respect to control NGF61. As a consequence, BK treatment reduced phosphorylation of the transient receptor channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) in NGF61/100-treated cultures and induced a significantly lower intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, responsible for the lower release of noxious mediators. Transcriptomic analysis of DRG neurons treated with NGF61/100 or control NGF allowed identifying a small number of nociceptive-related genes that constitute an "NGF pain fingerprint", whose differential regulation by NGF61/100 provides a strong mechanistic basis for its selective reduced pain sensitizing actions.

  4. Neuronal-like cell differentiation of non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuxin; Zhang, Jinghan; Ben, Xiaoming

    2013-08-05

    Non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells from C57BL/6J mice were separated and cultured using the "pour-off" method. Non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells developed colony-forming unit-fibroblasts, and could be expanded by supplementation with epidermal growth factor. Immunocytochemistry showed that the non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells exposed to basic fibroblast growth factor/epidermal growth factor/nerve growth factor expressed the neuron specific markers, neurofilament-200 and NeuN, in vitro. Non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells from β-galactosidase transgenic mice were also transplanted into focal ischemic brain (right corpus striatum) of C57BL/6J mice. At 8 weeks, cells positive for LacZ and β-galactosidase staining were observed in the ischemic tissues, and cells co-labeled with both β-galactosidase and NeuN were seen by double immunohistochemical staining. These findings suggest that the non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells could differentiate into neuronal-like cells in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Cholinergic neurons regulate secretion of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor by skeletal muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Vianney, John-Mary; Spitsbergen, John M

    2011-05-16

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been identified as a potent survival factor for both central and peripheral neurons. GDNF has been shown to be a potent survival factor for motor neurons during programmed cell death and continuous treatment with GDNF maintains hyperinnervation of skeletal muscle in adulthood. However, little is known about factors regulating normal production of endogenous GDNF in skeletal muscle. This study aimed to examine the role that motor neurons play in regulating GDNF secretion by skeletal muscle. A co-culture of skeletal muscle cells (C2C12) and cholinergic neurons, glioma×neuroblastoma hybrid cells (NG108-15) were used to create nerve-muscle interactions in vitro. Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on nerve-myotube co-cultures were blocked with alpha-bungarotoxin (α-BTX). GDNF protein content in cells and in culture medium was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and western blotting. GDNF localization was examined by immunocytochemistry. The nerve-muscle co-culture study indicated that the addition of motor neurons to skeletal muscle cells reduced the secretion of GDNF by skeletal muscle. The results also showed that blocking AChRs with α-BTX reversed the action of neural cells on GDNF secretion by skeletal muscle. Although ELISA results showed no GDNF in differentiated NG108-15 cells grown alone, immunocytochemical analysis showed that GDNF was localized in NG108-15 cells co-cultured with C2C12 myotubes. These results suggest that motor neurons may be regulating their own supply of GDNF secreted by skeletal muscle and that activation of AChRs may be involved in this process.

  6. Transplantation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells for repair of injured spiral ganglion neurons in deaf guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sujeong; Cho, Hyong-Ho; Kim, Song-Hee; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Cho, Yong-Bum; Park, Jong-Seong; Jeong, Han-Seong

    2016-06-01

    Excessive noise, ototoxic drugs, infections, autoimmune diseases, and aging can cause loss of spiral ganglion neurons, leading to permanent sensorineural hearing loss in mammals. Stem cells have been confirmed to be able to differentiate into spiral ganglion neurons. Little has been reported on adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for repair of injured spiral ganglion neurons. In this study, we hypothesized that transplantation of neural induced-human ADSCs (NI-hADSCs) can repair the injured spiral ganglion neurons in guinea pigs with neomycin-induced sensorineural hearing loss. NI-hADSCs were induced with culture medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor and forskolin and then injected to the injured cochleae. Guinea pigs that received injection of Hanks' balanced salt solution into the cochleae were used as controls. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that at 8 weeks after cell transplantation, the number of surviving spiral ganglion neurons in the cell transplantation group was significantly increased than that in the control group. Also at 8 weeks after cell transplantation, immunohistochemical staining showed that a greater number of NI-hADSCs in the spiral ganglions were detected in the cell transplantation group than in the control group, and these NI-hADSCs expressed neuronal markers neurofilament protein and microtubule-associated protein 2. Within 8 weeks after cell transplantation, the guinea pigs in the cell transplantation group had a gradually decreased auditory brainstem response threshold, while those in the control group had almost no response to 80 dB of clicks or pure tone burst. These findings suggest that a large amount of NI-hADSCs migrated to the spiral ganglions, survived for a period of time, repaired the injured spiral ganglion cells, and thereby contributed to the recovery of sensorineural hearing loss in guinea pigs.

  7. miR-124 function during Ciona intestinalis neuronal development includes extensive interaction with the Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jerry S; Pedro, Matthew San; Zeller, Robert W

    2011-11-01

    The nervous system-enriched microRNA miR-124 is necessary for proper nervous system development, although the mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, through a comprehensive analysis of miR-124 and its gene targets, we demonstrate that, in the chordate ascidian Ciona intestinalis, miR-124 plays an extensive role in promoting nervous system development. We discovered that feedback interaction between miR-124 and Notch signaling regulates the epidermal-peripheral nervous system (PNS) fate choice in tail midline cells. Notch signaling silences miR-124 in epidermal midline cells, whereas in PNS midline cells miR-124 silences Notch, Neuralized and all three Ciona Hairy/Enhancer-of-Split genes. Furthermore, ectopic expression of miR-124 is sufficient to convert epidermal midline cells into PNS neurons, consistent with a role in modulating Notch signaling. More broadly, genome-wide target extraction with validation using an in vivo tissue-specific sensor assay indicates that miR-124 shapes neuronal progenitor fields by downregulating non-neural genes, notably the muscle specifier Macho-1 and 50 Brachyury-regulated notochord genes, as well as several anti-neural factors including SCP1 and PTBP1. 3'UTR conservation analysis reveals that miR-124 targeting of SCP1 is likely to have arisen as a shared, derived trait in the vertebrate/tunicate ancestor and targeting of PTBP1 is conserved among bilaterians except for ecdysozoans, while extensive Notch pathway targeting appears to be Ciona specific. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive insight into the specific mechanisms by which miR-124 promotes neuronal development.

  8. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote neuronal networks with functional synaptic transmission after transplantation into mice with neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jae-Sung; Han, Hyung Soo; Youn, Dong-Ho; Carter, Janet E; Modo, Michel; Schuchman, Edward H; Jin, Hee Kyung

    2007-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) improve neurological deficits when transplanted into animal models of neurological disorders. However, the precise mechanism by which this occurs remains unknown. Herein we demonstrate that BM-MSCs are able to promote neuronal networks with functional synaptic transmission after transplantation into Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) mouse cerebellum. To address the mechanism by which this occurs, we used gene microarray, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, and immunohistochemistry to evaluate expression of neurotransmitter receptors on Purkinje neurons in the NP-C cerebellum. Gene microarray analysis revealed upregulation of genes involved in both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission encoding subunits of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, AMPA) GluR4 and GABA(A) receptor beta2. We also demonstrated that BM-MSCs, when originated by fusion-like events with existing Purkinje neurons, develop into electrically active Purkinje neurons with functional synaptic formation. This study provides the first in vivo evidence that upregulation of neurotransmitter receptors may contribute to synapse formation via cell fusion-like processes after BM-MSC transplantation into mice with neurodegenerative disease. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  9. Pharmacological reversal of a pain phenotype in iPSC-derived sensory neurons and patients with inherited erythromelalgia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lishuang; McDonnell, Aoibhinn; Nitzsche, Anja; Alexandrou, Aristos; Saintot, Pierre-Philippe; Loucif, Alexandre J C; Brown, Adam R; Young, Gareth; Mis, Malgorzata; Randall, Andrew; Waxman, Stephen G; Stanley, Philip; Kirby, Simon; Tarabar, Sanela; Gutteridge, Alex; Butt, Richard; McKernan, Ruth M; Whiting, Paul; Ali, Zahid; Bilsland, James; Stevens, Edward B

    2016-04-20

    In common with other chronic pain conditions, there is an unmet clinical need in the treatment of inherited erythromelalgia (IEM). TheSCN9Agene encoding the sodium channel Nav1.7 expressed in the peripheral nervous system plays a critical role in IEM. A gain-of-function mutation in this sodium channel leads to aberrant sensory neuronal activity and extreme pain, particularly in response to heat. Five patients with IEM were treated with a new potent and selective compound that blocked the Nav1.7 sodium channel resulting in a decrease in heat-induced pain in most of the patients. We derived induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from four of five subjects and produced sensory neurons that emulated the clinical phenotype of hyperexcitability and aberrant responses to heat stimuli. When we compared the severity of the clinical phenotype with the hyperexcitability of the iPSC-derived sensory neurons, we saw a trend toward a correlation for individual mutations. The in vitro IEM phenotype was sensitive to Nav1.7 blockers, including the clinical test agent. Given the importance of peripherally expressed sodium channels in many pain conditions, our approach may have broader utility for a wide range of pain and sensory conditions.

  10. KCC2 rescues functional deficits in human neurons derived from patients with Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xin; Kim, Julie; Zhou, Li; Wengert, Eric; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Zheng; Carromeu, Cassiano; Muotri, Alysson R.; Marchetto, Maria C. N.; Gage, Fred H.; Chen, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe form of autism spectrum disorder, mainly caused by mutations of a single gene methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) on the X chromosome. Patients with Rett syndrome exhibit a period of normal development followed by regression of brain function and the emergence of autistic behaviors. However, the mechanism behind the delayed onset of symptoms is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that neuron-specific K+-Cl− cotransporter2 (KCC2) is a critical downstream gene target of MeCP2. We found that human neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with Rett syndrome showed a significant deficit in KCC2 expression and consequently a delayed GABA functional switch from excitation to inhibition. Interestingly, overexpression of KCC2 in MeCP2-deficient neurons rescued GABA functional deficits, suggesting an important role of KCC2 in Rett syndrome. We further identified that RE1-silencing transcriptional factor, REST, a neuronal gene repressor, mediates the MeCP2 regulation of KCC2. Because KCC2 is a slow onset molecule with expression level reaching maximum later in development, the functional deficit of KCC2 may offer an explanation for the delayed onset of Rett symptoms. Our studies suggest that restoring KCC2 function in Rett neurons may lead to a potential treatment for Rett syndrome. PMID:26733678

  11. KCC2 rescues functional deficits in human neurons derived from patients with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xin; Kim, Julie; Zhou, Li; Wengert, Eric; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Zheng; Carromeu, Cassiano; Muotri, Alysson R; Marchetto, Maria C N; Gage, Fred H; Chen, Gong

    2016-01-19

    Rett syndrome is a severe form of autism spectrum disorder, mainly caused by mutations of a single gene methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) on the X chromosome. Patients with Rett syndrome exhibit a period of normal development followed by regression of brain function and the emergence of autistic behaviors. However, the mechanism behind the delayed onset of symptoms is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter2 (KCC2) is a critical downstream gene target of MeCP2. We found that human neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with Rett syndrome showed a significant deficit in KCC2 expression and consequently a delayed GABA functional switch from excitation to inhibition. Interestingly, overexpression of KCC2 in MeCP2-deficient neurons rescued GABA functional deficits, suggesting an important role of KCC2 in Rett syndrome. We further identified that RE1-silencing transcriptional factor, REST, a neuronal gene repressor, mediates the MeCP2 regulation of KCC2. Because KCC2 is a slow onset molecule with expression level reaching maximum later in development, the functional deficit of KCC2 may offer an explanation for the delayed onset of Rett symptoms. Our studies suggest that restoring KCC2 function in Rett neurons may lead to a potential treatment for Rett syndrome.

  12. Pilot Study of iPS-derived Neural Cells to Examine Biological Effects of Alcohol on Human Neurons in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Richard; Levine, Eric S.; Kranzler, Henry R.; Abreu, Christine; Covault, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies of the effects of alcohol on NMDA receptor function and gene expression have depended on rodent or post-mortem human brain models. Ideally, the effects of alcohol might better be examined in living neural tissue derived from human subjects. In this study, we used new technologies to reprogram human subject-specific tissue into pluripotent cell colonies and generate human neural cultures as a model system to examine the molecular actions of alcohol. Methods Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells were generated from skin biopsies taken from 7 individuals, 4 alcohol dependent subjects and 3 social drinkers.. We differentiated the iPS cells into neural cultures and characterized them by immunocytochemistry using antibodies for the neuronal marker beta III-tubulin, glial marker s100β, and synaptic marker synpasin1. Electrophysiology was performed to characterize the iPS-derived neurons and measure the effects of acute alcohol exposure on the NMDA receptor response in chronically alcohol exposed and non-exposed neural cultures from one non-alcoholic. Finally, we examined changes in mRNA expression of the NMDA receptor subunit genes GRIN1, GRIN2A, GRIN2B, and GRIN2D after 7 days of alcohol exposure and after 24-hour withdrawal from chronic alcohol exposure. Results Immunocytochemistry revealed positive staining for neuronal, glial, and synaptic markers. iPS-derived neurons displayed spontaneous electrical properties and functional ionotropic receptors. Acute alcohol exposure significantly attenuated the NMDA response, an effect that was not observed after 7 days of chronic alcohol exposure. After 7 days of chronic alcohol exposure, there were significant increases in mRNA expression of GRIN1, GRIN2A, and GRIN2D in cultures derived from alcoholic subjects but not in cultures derived from non-alcoholics. Conclusions These findings support the potential utility of human iPS-derived neural cultures as in vitro models to examine the molecular actions of

  13. A comparison of computational methods for detecting bursts in neuronal spike trains and their application to human stem cell-derived neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Cotterill, Ellese; Charlesworth, Paul; Thomas, Christopher W; Paulsen, Ole; Eglen, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    Accurate identification of bursting activity is an essential element in the characterization of neuronal network activity. Despite this, no one technique for identifying bursts in spike trains has been widely adopted. Instead, many methods have been developed for the analysis of bursting activity, often on an ad hoc basis. Here we provide an unbiased assessment of the effectiveness of eight of these methods at detecting bursts in a range of spike trains. We suggest a list of features that an ideal burst detection technique should possess and use synthetic data to assess each method in regard to these properties. We further employ each of the methods to reanalyze microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from mouse retinal ganglion cells and examine their coherence with bursts detected by a human observer. We show that several common burst detection techniques perform poorly at analyzing spike trains with a variety of properties. We identify four promising burst detection techniques, which are then applied to MEA recordings of networks of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons and used to describe the ontogeny of bursting activity in these networks over several months of development. We conclude that no current method can provide "perfect" burst detection results across a range of spike trains; however, two burst detection techniques, the MaxInterval and logISI methods, outperform compared with others. We provide recommendations for the robust analysis of bursting activity in experimental recordings using current techniques.

  14. Kif13b Regulates PNS and CNS Myelination through the Dlg1 Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Noseda, Roberta; Guerrero-Valero, Marta; Alberizzi, Valeria; Previtali, Stefano C.; Sherman, Diane L.; Palmisano, Marilena; Huganir, Richard L.; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Cuenda, Ana; Feltri, Maria Laura; Brophy, Peter J.; Bolino, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-based kinesin motors have many cellular functions, including the transport of a variety of cargos. However, unconventional roles have recently emerged, and kinesins have also been reported to act as scaffolding proteins and signaling molecules. In this work, we further extend the notion of unconventional functions for kinesin motor proteins, and we propose that Kif13b kinesin acts as a signaling molecule regulating peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) myelination. In this process, positive and negative signals must be tightly coordinated in time and space to orchestrate myelin biogenesis. Here, we report that in Schwann cells Kif13b positively regulates myelination by promoting p38γ mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated phosphorylation and ubiquitination of Discs large 1 (Dlg1), a known brake on myelination, which downregulates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/v-AKT murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT) pathway. Interestingly, Kif13b also negatively regulates Dlg1 stability in oligodendrocytes, in which Dlg1, in contrast to Schwann cells, enhances AKT activation and promotes myelination. Thus, our data indicate that Kif13b is a negative regulator of CNS myelination. In summary, we propose a novel function for the Kif13b kinesin in glial cells as a key component of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, which controls myelination in both PNS and CNS. PMID:27070899

  15. Monosynaptic excitatory inputs to spinal lamina I anterolateral-tract-projecting neurons from neighbouring lamina I neurons.

    PubMed

    Luz, Liliana L; Szucs, Peter; Pinho, Raquel; Safronov, Boris V

    2010-11-15

    Spinal lamina I receives nociceptive primary afferent input to project through diverse ascending pathways, including the anterolateral tract (ALT). Large projection neurons (PNs) form only a few per cent of the cell population in this layer, and little is known about their local input from other lamina I neurons. We combined single-cell imaging in the isolated spinal cord, paired recordings, 3-D reconstructions of biocytin-labelled neurons and computer simulations to study the monosynaptic input to large ALT-PNs from neighbouring (somata separated by less than 80 μm) large lamina I neurons. All 11 connections identified were excitatory. We have found that an axon of a presynaptic neuron forms multiple synapses on an ALT-PN, and both Ca(2+)-permeable and Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPA receptors are involved in transmission. The monosynaptic EPSC latencies (1-12 ms) are determined by both post- and presynaptic factors. The postsynaptic delay, resulting from the electrotonic EPSC propagation in the dendrites of an ALT-PN, could be 4 ms at most. The presynaptic delay, caused by the spike propagation in a narrow highly branched axon of a local-circuit neuron, can be about 10 ms for neighbouring ALT-PNs and longer for more distant neurons. In many cases, the EPSPs evoked by release from a lamina I neuron were sufficient to elicit a spike in an ALT-PN. Our data show that ALT-PNs can receive input from both lamina I local-circuit neurons and other ALT-PNs. We suggest that lamina I is a functionally interconnected layer. The intralaminar network described here can amplify the overall output from the principal spinal nociceptive projection area.

  16. Rapamycin and Interleukin-1β Impair Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor-dependent Neuron Survival by Modulating Autophagy*

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Erica D.; Prieto, G. Aleph; Tong, Liqi; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Rice, Jeffrey D.; Steward, Oswald; Cotman, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has multiple important physiological functions, including regulation of protein synthesis, cell growth, autophagy, and synaptic plasticity. Activation of mTOR is necessary for the many beneficial effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), including dendritic translation and memory formation in the hippocampus. At present, however, the role of mTOR in BDNF's support of survival is not clear. We report that mTOR activation is necessary for BDNF-dependent survival of primary rat hippocampal neurons, as either mTOR inhibition by rapamycin or genetic manipulation of the downstream molecule p70S6K specifically blocked BDNF rescue. Surprisingly, however, BDNF did not promote neuron survival by up-regulating mTOR-dependent protein synthesis or through mTOR-dependent suppression of caspase-3 activation. Instead, activated mTOR was responsible for BDNF's suppression of autophagic flux. shRNA against the autophagic machinery Atg7 or Atg5 prolonged the survival of neurons co-treated with BDNF and rapamycin, suggesting that suppression of mTOR in BDNF-treated cells resulted in excessive autophagy. Finally, acting as a physiological analog of rapamycin, IL-1β impaired BDNF signaling by way of inhibiting mTOR activation as follows: the cytokine induced caspase-independent neuronal death and accelerated autophagic flux in BDNF-treated cells. These findings reveal a novel mechanism of BDNF neuroprotection; BDNF not only prevents apoptosis through inhibiting caspase activation but also promotes neuron survival through modulation of autophagy. This protection mechanism is vulnerable under chronic inflammation, which deregulates autophagy through impairing mTOR signaling. These results may be relevant to age-related changes observed in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24917666

  17. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics Contributes to Propofol-Induced Cell Death in Human Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Twaroski, Danielle M.; Yan, Yasheng; Zaja, Ivan; Clark, Eric; Bosnjak, Zeljko J.; Bai, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies in developing animals have shown that when anesthetic agents are administered early in life, it can lead to neuronal cell death and learning disabilities. Development of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neurons has provided a valuable tool for understanding the effects of anesthetics on developing human neurons. Unbalanced mitochondrial fusion/fission leads to various pathological conditions including neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to dissect the role of mitochondrial dynamics in propofol-induced neurotoxicity. Methods TUNEL staining was used to assess cell death in hESC-derived neurons. Mitochondrial fission was assessed using TOM20 staining and electron microscopy. Expression of mitochondrial fission-related proteins was assessed by Western blot and confocal microscopy was used to assess opening time of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Results Exposure to 6 hours of 20 μg/mL propofol increased cell death from 3.18±0.17% in the control-treated group to 9.6±0.95% and led to detrimental increases in mitochondrial fission (n=5 coverslips/group) accompanied by increased expression of activated dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), key proteins responsible for mitochondrial fission. Propofol exposure also induced earlier opening of the mPTP from 118.9±3.1 seconds in the control-treated group to 73.3±1.6 seconds. Pretreatment of the cells with mdivi-1, a mitochondrial fission blocker rescued the propofol-induced toxicity, mitochondrial fission and mPTP opening time (n=75 cells/group). Inhibiting CDK1 attenuated the increase in cell death and fission and the increase in expression of activated Drp1. Conclusions These data demonstrate for the first time that propofol-induced neurotoxicity occurs through a mitochondrial fission/mPTP-mediated pathway. PMID:26352374

  18. Mutant SOD1 microglia-generated nitroxidative stress promotes toxicity to human fetal neural stem cell-derived motor neurons through direct damage and noxious interactions with astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Thonhoff, Jason R; Gao, Junling; Dunn, Tiffany J; Ojeda, Luis; Wu, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating motor neuron disease. Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) may have the potential to replace lost motor neurons. The therapeutic efficacy of stem cell therapy depends greatly on the survival of grafted stem cell-derived motor neurons in the microenvironment of the spinal cord in ALS. After transplantation of hNSCs into the spinal cords of transgenic ALS rats, morphological analysis reveals that grafted hNSCs differentiate into motor neurons. However, hNSCs degenerate and show signs of nitroxidative damage at the disease end-stage. Using an in vitro coculture system, we systematically assess interactions between microglia and astroglia derived from both nontransgenic rats and transgenic rats expressing human mutant SOD1G93A before and after symptomatic disease onset, and determine the effects of such microglia-astroglia interactions on the survival of hNSC-derived motor neurons. We found that ALS microglia, specifically isolated after symptomatic disease onset, are directly toxic to hNSC-derived motor neurons. Furthermore, nontransgenic astrocytes not only lose their protective role in hNSC-derived motor neuron survival in vitro, but also exhibit toxic features when cocultured with mutant SOD1G93A microglia. Using inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and NADPH oxidase, we show that microglia-generated nitric oxide and superoxide partially contribute to motor neuron loss and astrocyte dysfunction in this coculture paradigm. In summary, reactive oxygen/nitrogen species released from overactivated microglia in ALS directly eliminate human neural stem cell-derived motor neurons and reduce the neuroprotective capacities of astrocytes PMID:23671793

  19. Neuronal targeting, internalization, and biological activity of a recombinant atoxic derivative of botulinum neurotoxin A

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) have the unique capacity to cross epithelial barriers, target neuromuscular junctions, and translocate active metalloprotease component to the cytosol of motor neurons. We have taken advantage of the molecular carriers responsible for this trafficking to create a family ...

  20. The effect of inflammatory cell-derived MCP-1 loss on neuronal survival during chronic neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Andrew J.; Tian, Weiming; Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K.; Rizk, Paul J.; Saltzman, W. Mark; Bellamkonda, Ravi; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial implants elicit neurodegeneration via the foreign body response (FBR) that includes BBB leakage, macrophage/microglia accumulation, and reactive astrogliosis, in addition to neuronal degradation that limit their useful lifespan. Previously, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1, also CCL2), which plays an important role in monocyte recruitment and propagation of inflammation, was shown to be critical for various aspects of the FBR in a tissue-specific manner. However, participation of MCP-1 in the brain FBR has not been evaluated. Here we examined the FBR to intracortical silicon implants in MCP-1 KO mice at 1, 2, and 8 weeks after implantation. MCP-1 KO mice had a diminished FBR compared to WT mice, characterized by reductions in BBB leakage, macrophage/microglia accumulation, and astrogliosis, and an increased neuronal density. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of MCP-1 in implant-bearing WT mice maintained the increased neuronal density. To elucidate the relative contribution of microglia and macrophages, bone marrow chimeras were generated between MCP-1 KO and WT mice. Increased neuronal density was observed only in MCP-1 knockout mice transplanted with MCP-1 knockout marrow, which indicates that resident cells in the brain are major contributors. We hypothesized that these improvements are the result of a phenotypic switch of the macrophages/microglia polarization state, which we confirmed using PCR for common activation markers. Our observations suggest that MCP-1 influences neuronal loss, which is integral to the progression of neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson disease, via BBB leakage and macrophage polarization. PMID:24881026

  1. Transcriptomic profiling of purified patient-derived dopamine neurons identifies convergent perturbations and therapeutics for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sandor, Cynthia; Robertson, Paul; Lang, Charmaine; Heger, Andreas; Booth, Heather; Vowles, Jane; Witty, Lorna; Bowden, Rory; Hu, Michele; Cowley, Sally A; Wade-Martins, Richard; Webber, Caleb

    2017-01-17

    While induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technologies enable the study of inaccessible patient cell types, cellular heterogeneity can confound the comparison of gene expression profiles between iPSC-derived cell lines. Here, we purified iPSC-derived human dopaminergic neurons (DaNs) using the intracellular marker, tyrosine hydroxylase. Once purified, the transcriptomic profiles of iPSC-derived DaNs appear remarkably similar to profiles obtained from mature post-mortem DaNs. Comparison of the profiles of purified iPSC-derived DaNs derived from Parkinson's disease (PD) patients carrying LRRK2 G2019S variants to controls identified significant functional convergence amongst differentially-expressed (DE) genes. The PD LRRK2-G2019S associated profile was positively matched with expression changes induced by the Parkinsonian neurotoxin rotenone and opposed by those induced by clioquinol, a compound with demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in multiple PD models. No functional convergence amongst DE genes was observed following a similar comparison using non-purified iPSC-derived DaN-containing populations, with cellular heterogeneity appearing a greater confound than genotypic background.

  2. Data on acylglycerophosphate acyltransferase 4 (AGPAT4) during murine embryogenesis and in embryo-derived cultured primary neurons and glia

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Ryan M.; Mardian, Emily B.; Marvyn, Phillip M.; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Beazely, Michael A.; Mielke, John G.; Duncan, Robin E.

    2015-01-01

    Whole mouse embryos at three developmental timepoints, embryonic (E) day E10.5, E14.5, and E18.5, were analyzed for Agpat4 mRNA expression. Primary cortical mouse cultures prepared from E18.5 mouse brains were used for immunohistochemistry. Our data show that Agpat4 is differentially expressed at three timepoints in murine embryogenesis and is immunodetectable in both neurons and glial cells derived from the developing mouse brain. This paper contains data related to research concurrently published in Bradley et al. (2015) [1]. PMID:26759825

  3. Gamma motor neurons express distinct genetic markers at birth and require muscle spindle-derived GDNF for postnatal survival

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gamma motor neurons (γ-MNs) selectively innervate muscle spindle intrafusal fibers and regulate their sensitivity to stretch. They constitute a distinct subpopulation that differs in morphology, physiology and connectivity from α-MNs, which innervate extrafusal muscle fibers and exert force. The mechanisms that control the differentiation of functionally distinct fusimotor neurons are unknown. Progress on this question has been limited by the absence of molecular markers to specifically distinguish and manipulate γ-MNs. Recently, it was reported that early embryonic γ-MN precursors are dependent on GDNF. Using this knowledge we characterized genetic strategies to label developing γ-MNs based on GDNF receptor expression, showed their strict dependence for survival on muscle spindle-derived GDNF and generated an animal model in which γ-MNs are selectively lost. Results In mice heterozygous for both the Hb9::GFP transgene and a tau-lacZ-labeled (TLZ) allele of the GDNF receptor Gfrα1, we demonstrated that small motor neurons with high Gfrα1-TLZ expression and lacking Hb9::GFP display structural and synaptic features of γ-MNs and are selectively lost in mutants lacking target muscle spindles. Loss of muscle spindles also results in the downregulation of Gfrα1 expression in some large diameter MNs, suggesting that spindle-derived factors may also influence populations of α-MNs with β-skeletofusimotor collaterals. These molecular markers can be used to identify γ-MNs from birth to the adult and to distinguish γ- from β-motor axons in the periphery. We also found that postnatal γ-MNs are also distinguished by low expression of the neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN). With these markers of γ-MN identity, we show after conditional elimination of GDNF from muscle spindles that the survival of γ-MNs is selectively dependent on spindle-derived GDNF during the first 2 weeks of postnatal development. Conclusion Neonatal γ-MNs display a unique molecular

  4. Data on acylglycerophosphate acyltransferase 4 (AGPAT4) during murine embryogenesis and in embryo-derived cultured primary neurons and glia.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Ryan M; Mardian, Emily B; Marvyn, Phillip M; Vasefi, Maryam S; Beazely, Michael A; Mielke, John G; Duncan, Robin E

    2016-03-01

    Whole mouse embryos at three developmental timepoints, embryonic (E) day E10.5, E14.5, and E18.5, were analyzed for Agpat4 mRNA expression. Primary cortical mouse cultures prepared from E18.5 mouse brains were used for immunohistochemistry. Our data show that Agpat4 is differentially expressed at three timepoints in murine embryogenesis and is immunodetectable in both neurons and glial cells derived from the developing mouse brain. This paper contains data related to research concurrently published in Bradley et al. (2015) [1].

  5. Differential neurogenic effects of casein-derived opioid peptides on neuronal stem cells: implications for redox-based epigenetic changes.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Malav; Zhang, Yiting; Lopez-Toledano, Miguel; Clarke, Andrew; Deth, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Food-derived peptides, such as β-casomorphin BCM7, have potential to cross the gastrointestinal tract and blood-brain barrier and are associated with neurological disorders and neurodevelopmental disorders. We previously established a novel mechanism through which BCM7 affects the antioxidant levels in neuronal cells leading to inflammatory consequences. In the current study, we elucidated the effects of casein-derived peptides on neuronal development by using the neurogenesis of neural stem cells (NSCs) as an experimental model. First, the transient changes in intracellular thiol metabolites during NSC differentiation (neurogenesis) were investigated. Next, the neurogenic effects of food-derived opioid peptides were measured, along with changes in intracellular thiol metabolites, redox status and global DNA methylation levels. We observed that the neurogenesis of NSCs was promoted by human BCM7 to a greater extent, followed by A2-derived BCM9 in contrast to bovine BCM7, which induced increased astrocyte formation. The effect was most apparent when human BCM7 was administered for 1day starting on 3days postplating, consistent with immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, neurogenic changes regulated by bovine BCM7 and morphine were associated with an increase in the glutathione/glutathione disulfide ratio and a decrease in the S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio, indicative of changes in the redox and the methylation states. Finally, bovine BCM7 and morphine decreased DNA methylation in differentiating NSCs. In conclusion, these results suggest that food-derived opioid peptides and morphine regulated neurogenesis and differentiation of NSCs through changes in the redox state and epigenetic regulation.

  6. Evaluation of PNS-computed heating and hypersonic shock tunnel data on sharp and inclined blunt cones

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the ongoing development and verification of the Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) technique, computed heat transfer rates have been compared with recently acquired experimental data. The flow fields were computer for laminar and turbulent flow over sharp, blunt tripped sphere-cones at 0/degree/ to 20/degree/ angle of attack in a hypersonic shock tunnel flow at Mach numbers of 11, 13, and 16. Grid refinement studies were performed and minimum smoothing parameters were sought. The average percent difference between the measured mean heat transfer rate and the PNS-computed value was 12% for the sharp and blunt cones at 0/degree/ angle of attack. For the blunt cones at angle of attack, the average percent difference was 11% on the windward ray and 36% on the leeward ray. PNS-predicted flow physics such as boundary layer thickness, shock standoff distance, and crossflow separation were examined. 15 refs., 12 figs.

  7. Progress in the development of parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) methodology for analyzing propulsive jet mixing problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S. M.; Wolf, D. E.; Sinha, N.; Lee, S. H.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of 2D PNS methodology is first presented which describes the specialized features of supersonic shock-capturing and subsonic pressure-split models required for the analysis of aircraft, rocket and scramjet jet mixing problems. These features include techniques for dealing with various types of embedded and interfacing subsonic regions, the inclusion of finite-rate chemistry and the direct-coupling with potential flow solutions. Preliminary 3D extensions of this PNS methodology geared to supersonic and subsonic rectangular free jet mixing problems are also reviewed. New 3D PNS work will be described which includes the development of a hybrid supersonic/subsonic free jet mixing model, and, a supersonic model geared to the analysis of turbulent mixing and combustion processes occurring in scramjet combustor/nozzle flowfields.

  8. Implementing neuronal plasticity in NeuroAIDS: the experience of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and other neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Mocchetti, Italo; Bachis, Alessia; Campbell, Lee A; Avdoshina, Valeriya

    2014-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV) causes mild or severe neurological problems, termed HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), even when HIV patients receive antiretroviral therapy. Thus, novel adjunctive therapies are necessary to reduce or abolish the neurotoxic effect of HIV. However, new therapies require a better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of HIV-induced neurotoxicity. HAND subjects are characterized by being profoundly depressed, and they experience deficits in memory, learning and movements. Experimental evidence has also shown that HIV reduces neurogenesis. These deficits resemble those occurring in premature brain aging or in a brain with impaired neural repair properties. Thus, it appears that HIV diminishes neuronal survival, along with reduced neuronal connections. These two phenomena should not occur in the adult and developing brain when synaptic plasticity is promoted by neurotrophic factors, polypeptides that are present in adult synapses. This review will outline experimental evidence as well as present emerging concepts for the use of neurotrophic factors and in particular brain-derived neurotrophic factor as an adjunct therapy to prevent HIV-mediated neuronal degeneration and restore the loss of synaptic connections.

  9. Intermediate filament protein accumulation in motor neurons derived from giant axonal neuropathy iPSCs rescued by restoration of gigaxonin

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Kerner, Bethany L.; Ahmad, Faizzan S.; Diaz, Alejandro Garcia; Greene, John Palmer; Gray, Steven J.; Samulski, Richard Jude; Chung, Wendy K.; Van Coster, Rudy; Maertens, Paul; Noggle, Scott A.; Henderson, Christopher E.; Wichterle, Hynek

    2015-01-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the GAN gene resulting in a loss of a ubiquitously expressed protein, gigaxonin. Gene replacement therapy is a promising strategy for treatment of the disease; however, the effectiveness and safety of gigaxonin reintroduction have not been tested in human GAN nerve cells. Here we report the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from three GAN patients with different GAN mutations. Motor neurons differentiated from GAN iPSCs exhibit accumulation of neurofilament (NF-L) and peripherin (PRPH) protein and formation of PRPH aggregates, the key pathological phenotypes observed in patients. Introduction of gigaxonin either using a lentiviral vector or as a stable transgene resulted in normalization of NEFL and PRPH levels in GAN neurons and disappearance of PRPH aggregates. Importantly, overexpression of gigaxonin had no adverse effect on survival of GAN neurons, supporting the feasibility of gene replacement therapy. Our findings demonstrate that GAN iPSCs provide a novel model for studying human GAN neuropathologies and for the development and testing of new therapies in relevant cell types. PMID:25398950

  10. Glia-derived neurons are required for sex-specific learning in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sammut, Michele; Cook, Steven J.; Nguyen, Ken C.Q.; Felton, Terry; Hall, David H.; Emmons, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in behaviour extend to cognitive-like processes such as learning but the underlying dimorphisms in neural circuit development and organization that generate these behavioural differences are largely unknown. Here we define at the single-cell level, from development, through neural circuit connectivity, to function, the neural basis of a sex-specific learning in the nematode C. elegans. We show that sexual conditioning, a form of associative learning, requires a pair of male-specific interneurons whose progenitors are fully differentiated glia. These neurons are born during sexual maturation and incorporated into pre-exisiting sex-shared circuits to couple chemotactic responses to reproductive priorities. Our findings reveal a general role for glia as neural progenitors across metazoan taxa and demonstrate that the addition of sex-specific neuron types to brain circuits during sexual maturation is an important mechanism for the generation of sexually dimorphic plasticity in learning. PMID:26469050

  11. Sensitive and quantitative detection of botulinum neurotoxin in neurons derived from mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pellett, Sabine; Du, Zhong-wei; Pier, Christina L.; Tepp, William H.; Zhang, Su-chun; Johnson, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the most poisonous protein toxins known, represent a serious bioterrorism threat but are also used as a unique and important bio-pharmaceutical to treat an increasing myriad of neurological disorders. The only currently accepted detection method by the United States Food and Drug Administration for biological activity of BoNTs and for potency determination of pharmaceutical preparations is the mouse bioassay (MBA). Recent advances have indicated that cell-based assays using primary neuronal cells can provide an equally sensitive and robust detection platform as the MBA to reliably and quantitatively detect biologically active BoNTs. This study reports for the first time a BoNT detection assay using mouse embryonic stem cells to produce a neuronal cell culture. The data presented indicate that this assaycan reliably detect BoNT/A with a similar sensitivity as the MBA. PMID:21130748

  12. Glia-derived neurons are required for sex-specific learning in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Sammut, Michele; Cook, Steven J; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Felton, Terry; Hall, David H; Emmons, Scott W; Poole, Richard J; Barrios, Arantza

    2015-10-15

    Sex differences in behaviour extend to cognitive-like processes such as learning, but the underlying dimorphisms in neural circuit development and organization that generate these behavioural differences are largely unknown. Here we define at the single-cell level-from development, through neural circuit connectivity, to function-the neural basis of a sex-specific learning in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that sexual conditioning, a form of associative learning, requires a pair of male-specific interneurons whose progenitors are fully differentiated glia. These neurons are generated during sexual maturation and incorporated into pre-exisiting sex-shared circuits to couple chemotactic responses to reproductive priorities. Our findings reveal a general role for glia as neural progenitors across metazoan taxa and demonstrate that the addition of sex-specific neuron types to brain circuits during sexual maturation is an important mechanism for the generation of sexually dimorphic plasticity in learning.

  13. Reprogramming of HUVECs into Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (HiPSCs), Generation and Characterization of HiPSC-Derived Neurons and Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Boakye, Paul A.; Baker, Glen; Smith, Peter A.; Murray, Allan G.; Giuliani, Fabrizio; Jahroudi, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by chronic and progressive structural or functional loss of neurons. Limitations related to the animal models of these human diseases have impeded the development of effective drugs. This emphasizes the need to establish disease models using human-derived cells. The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has provided novel opportunities in disease modeling, drug development, screening, and the potential for “patient-matched” cellular therapies in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, with the objective of establishing reliable tools to study neurodegenerative diseases, we reprogrammed human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) into iPSCs (HiPSCs). Using a novel and direct approach, HiPSCs were differentiated into cells of central nervous system (CNS) lineage, including neuronal, astrocyte and glial cells, with high efficiency. HiPSCs expressed embryonic genes such as nanog, sox2 and Oct-3/4, and formed embryoid bodies that expressed markers of the 3 germ layers. Expression of endothelial-specific genes was not detected in HiPSCs at RNA or protein levels. HiPSC-derived neurons possess similar morphology but significantly longer neurites compared to primary human fetal neurons. These stem cell-derived neurons are susceptible to inflammatory cell-mediated neuronal injury. HiPSC-derived neurons express various amino acids that are important for normal function in the CNS. They have functional receptors for a variety of neurotransmitters such as glutamate and acetylcholine. HiPSC-derived astrocytes respond to ATP and acetylcholine by elevating cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations. In summary, this study presents a novel technique to generate differentiated and functional HiPSC-derived neurons and astrocytes. These cells are appropriate tools for studying the development of the nervous system, the pathophysiology of various neurodegenerative diseases and the development of potential drugs for their

  14. Role of Dopamine D2/D3 Receptors in Development, Plasticity, and Neuroprotection in Human iPSC-Derived Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Bono, Federica; Savoia, Paola; Guglielmi, Adele; Gennarelli, Massimo; Piovani, Giovanna; Sigala, Sandra; Leo, Damiana; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Devoto, Paola; Spano, PierFranco; Missale, Cristina; Fiorentini, Chiara

    2017-01-14

    The role of dopamine D2 and D3 receptors (D2R/D3R), located on midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons, in the regulation of DA synthesis and release and in DA neuron homeostasis has been extensively investigated in rodent animal models. By contrast, the properties of D2R/D3R in human DA neurons have not been elucidated yet. On this line, the use of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for producing any types of cells has offered the innovative opportunity for investigating the human neuronal phenotypes at the molecular levels. In the present study, hiPSCs generated from human dermal fibroblasts were used to produce midbrain DA (mDA) neurons, expressing the proper set of genes and proteins typical of authentic, terminally differentiated DA neurons. In this model, the expression and the functional properties of the human D2R/D3R were investigated with a combination of biochemical and functional techniques. We observed that in hiPSC-derived mDA neurons, the activation of D2R/D3R promotes the proliferation of neuronal progenitor cells. In addition, we found that D2R/D3R activation inhibits nicotine-stimulated DA release and exerts neurotrophic effects on mDA neurons that likely occur via the activation of PI3K-dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, D2R/D3R stimulation counteracts both the aggregation of alpha-synuclein induced by glucose deprivation and the associated neuronal damage affecting both the soma and the dendrites of mDA neurons. Taken together, these data point to the D2R/D3R-related signaling events as a biochemical pathway crucial for supporting both neuronal development and survival and protection of human DA neurons.

  15. Glutamate Synaptic Inputs to Ventral Tegmental Area Neurons in the Rat Derive Primarily from Subcortical Sources

    PubMed Central

    Omelchenko, Natalia; Sesack, Susan R.

    2007-01-01

    Dopamine and GABA neurons in the ventral tegmental area project to the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex and modulate locomotor and reward behaviors as well as cognitive and affective processes. Both midbrain cell types receive synapses from glutamate afferents that provide an essential control of behaviorally-linked activity patterns, although the sources of glutamate inputs have not yet been completely characterized. We used antibodies against the vesicular glutamate transporters VGlut1 and VGlut2 to investigate the morphology and synaptic organization of axons containing these proteins as putative markers of glutamate afferents from cortical versus subcortical sites, respectively. We also characterized the ventral tegmental area cell populations receiving VGlut1+ or VGlut2+ synapses according to their transmitter phenotype (dopamine or GABA) and major projection target (nucleus accumbens or prefrontal cortex). By light and electron microscopic examination, VGlut2+ as opposed to VGlut1+ axon terminals were more numerous, had a larger average size, synapsed more proximally, and were more likely to form convergent synapses onto the same target. Both axon types formed predominantly asymmetric synapses, although VGlut2+ terminals more often formed synapses with symmetric morphology. No absolute selectivity was observed for VGlut1+ or VGlut2+ axons to target any particular cell population. However, the synapses onto mesoaccumbens neurons more often involved VGlut2+ terminals, whereas mesoprefrontal neurons received relatively equal synaptic inputs from VGlut1+ and VGlut2+ profiles. The distinct morphological features of VGlut1 and VGlut2 positive axons suggest that glutamate inputs from presumed cortical and subcortical sources, respectively, differ in the nature and intensity of their physiological actions on midbrain neurons. More specifically, our findings imply that subcortical glutamate inputs to the ventral tegmental area expressing VGlut2 predominate over

  16. A tingling sanshool derivative excites primary sensory neurons and elicits nocifensive behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Amanda H.; Sawyer, Carolyn M.; Zanotto, Karen L.; Ivanov, Margaret A.; Cheung, Susan; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Furrer, Stephan; Simons, Christopher T.; Slack, Jay P.

    2011-01-01

    Szechuan peppers contain hydroxy-α-sanshool that imparts desirable tingling, cooling, and numbing sensations. Hydroxy-α-sanshool activates a subset of sensory dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by inhibiting two-pore potassium channels. We presently investigated if a tingle-evoking sanshool analog, isobutylalkenyl amide (IBA), excites rat DRG neurons and, if so, if these neurons are also activated by agonists of TRPM8, TRPA1, and/or TRPV1. Thirty-four percent of DRG neurons tested responded to IBA, with 29% of them also responding to menthol, 29% to cinnamic aldehyde, 66% to capsaicin, and subsets responding to two or more transient receptor potential (TRP) agonists. IBA-responsive cells had similar size distributions regardless of whether they responded to capsaicin or not; cells only responsive to IBA were larger. Responses to repeated application of IBA at a 5-min interstimulus interval exhibited self-desensitization (tachyphylaxis). Capsaicin did not cross-desensitize responses to IBA to any greater extent than the tachyphylaxis observed with repeated IBA applications. These findings are consistent with psychophysical observations that IBA elicits tingle sensation accompanied by pungency and cooling, with self-desensitization but little cross-desensitization by capsaicin. Intraplantar injection of IBA elicited nocifensive responses (paw licking, shaking-flinching, and guarding) in a dose-related manner similar to the effects of intraplantar capsaicin and serotonin. IBA had no effect on thermal sensitivity but enhanced mechanical sensitivity at the highest dose tested. These observations suggest that IBA elicits an unfamiliar aversive sensation that is expressed behaviorally by the limited response repertoire available to the animal. PMID:21273322

  17. Angelman syndrome-derived neurons display late onset of paternal UBE3A silencing

    PubMed Central

    Stanurova, Jana; Neureiter, Anika; Hiber, Michaela; de Oliveira Kessler, Hannah; Stolp, Kristin; Goetzke, Roman; Klein, Diana; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Klump, Hannes; Steenpass, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon resulting in parent-of-origin-specific gene expression that is regulated by a differentially methylated region. Gene mutations or failures in the imprinting process lead to the development of imprinting disorders, such as Angelman syndrome. The symptoms of Angelman syndrome are caused by the absence of functional UBE3A protein in neurons of the brain. To create a human neuronal model for Angelman syndrome, we reprogrammed dermal fibroblasts of a patient carrying a defined three-base pair deletion in UBE3A into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In these iPSCs, both parental alleles are present, distinguishable by the mutation, and express UBE3A. Detailed characterization of these iPSCs demonstrated their pluripotency and exceptional stability of the differentially methylated region regulating imprinted UBE3A expression. We observed strong induction of SNHG14 and silencing of paternal UBE3A expression only late during neuronal differentiation, in vitro. This new Angelman syndrome iPSC line allows to study imprinted gene regulation on both parental alleles and to dissect molecular pathways affected by the absence of UBE3A protein. PMID:27484051

  18. Injured sensory neuron-derived CSF1 induces microglia proliferation and DAP12-dependent pain

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhonghui; Kuhn, Julia A.; Wang, Xidao; Colquitt, Bradley; Solorzano, Carlos; Vaman, Smitha; Guan, Andrew K.; Evans-Reinsch, Zoe; Braz, Joao; Devor, Marshall; Abboud-Werner, Sherry L.; Lanier, Lewis L.; Lomvardas, Stavros; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Although microglia are implicated in nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, how injured sensory neurons engage microglia is unclear. Here we demonstrate that peripheral nerve injury induces de novo expression of colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) in injured sensory neurons. The CSF1 is transported to the spinal cord where it targets the microglial CSF1 receptor (CSF1R). Cre-mediated sensory neuron deletion of Csf1 completely prevented nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and reduced microglia activation and proliferation. In contrast, intrathecal injection of CSF1 induces mechanical hypersensitivity and microglial proliferation. Nerve injury also upregulated CSF1 in motoneurons, where it is required for ventral horn microglial activation and proliferation. Downstream of CSF1R, we found that the microglial membrane adapter protein DAP12 is required for both nerve injury- and intrathecal CSF1-induced upregulation of pain-related microglial genes and the ensuing pain, but not for microglia proliferation. Thus, both CSF1 and DAP12 are potential targets for the pharmacotherapy of neuropathic pain. PMID:26642091

  19. Characterization of forebrain neurons derived from late-onset Huntington's disease human embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Niclis, Jonathan C.; Pinar, Anita; Haynes, John M.; Alsanie, Walaa; Jenny, Robert; Dottori, Mirella; Cram, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an incurable neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in exon 1 of the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. Recently, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines carrying atypical and aggressive (CAG60+) HD variants have been generated and exhibit disparate molecular pathologies. Here we investigate two human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines carrying CAG37 and CAG51 typical late-onset repeat expansions in comparison to wildtype control lines during undifferentiated states and throughout forebrain neuronal differentiation. Pluripotent HD lines demonstrate growth, viability, pluripotent gene expression, mitochondrial activity and forebrain specification that is indistinguishable from control lines. Expression profiles of crucial genes known to be dysregulated in HD remain unperturbed in the presence of mutant protein and throughout differentiation; however, elevated glutamate-evoked responses were observed in HD CAG51 neurons. These findings suggest typical late-onset HD mutations do not alter pluripotent parameters or the capacity to generate forebrain neurons, but that such progeny may recapitulate hallmarks observed in established HD model systems. Such HD models will help further our understanding of the cascade of pathological events leading to disease onset and progression, while simultaneously facilitating the identification of candidate HD therapeutics. PMID:23576953

  20. Angelman syndrome-derived neurons display late onset of paternal UBE3A silencing.

    PubMed

    Stanurova, Jana; Neureiter, Anika; Hiber, Michaela; de Oliveira Kessler, Hannah; Stolp, Kristin; Goetzke, Roman; Klein, Diana; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Klump, Hannes; Steenpass, Laura

    2016-08-03

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon resulting in parent-of-origin-specific gene expression that is regulated by a differentially methylated region. Gene mutations or failures in the imprinting process lead to the development of imprinting disorders, such as Angelman syndrome. The symptoms of Angelman syndrome are caused by the absence of functional UBE3A protein in neurons of the brain. To create a human neuronal model for Angelman syndrome, we reprogrammed dermal fibroblasts of a patient carrying a defined three-base pair deletion in UBE3A into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In these iPSCs, both parental alleles are present, distinguishable by the mutation, and express UBE3A. Detailed characterization of these iPSCs demonstrated their pluripotency and exceptional stability of the differentially methylated region regulating imprinted UBE3A expression. We observed strong induction of SNHG14 and silencing of paternal UBE3A expression only late during neuronal differentiation, in vitro. This new Angelman syndrome iPSC line allows to study imprinted gene regulation on both parental alleles and to dissect molecular pathways affected by the absence of UBE3A protein.

  1. Functional Maturation of Human Stem Cell-Derived Neurons in Long-Term Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Töpfer, Felix M.; Wood, Phillip G.; Busskamp, Volker; Bamberg, Ernst

    2017-01-01

    Differentiated neurons can be rapidly acquired, within days, by inducing stem cells to express neurogenic transcription factors. We developed a protocol to maintain long-term cultures of human neurons, called iNGNs, which are obtained by inducing Neurogenin-1 and Neurogenin-2 expression in induced pluripotent stem cells. We followed the functional development of iNGNs over months and they showed many hallmark properties for neuronal maturation, including robust electrical and synaptic activity. Using iNGNs expressing a variant of channelrhodopsin-2, called CatCh, we could control iNGN activity with blue light stimulation. In combination with optogenetic tools, iNGNs offer opportunities for studies that require precise spatial and temporal resolution. iNGNs developed spontaneous network activity, and these networks had excitatory glutamatergic synapses, which we characterized with single-cell synaptic recordings. AMPA glutamatergic receptor activity was especially dominant in postsynaptic recordings, whereas NMDA glutamatergic receptor activity was absent from postsynaptic recordings but present in extrasynaptic recordings. Our results on long-term cultures of iNGNs could help in future studies elucidating mechanisms of human synaptogenesis and neurotransmission, along with the ability to scale-up the size of the cultures. PMID:28052116

  2. Cord blood-derived neuronal cells by ectopic expression of Sox2 and c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Giorgetti, Alessandra; Marchetto, Maria C. N.; Yu, Diana; Fazzina, Raffaella; Mu, Yangling; Adamo, Antonio; Paramonov, Ida; Cardoso, Julio Castaño; Monasterio, Montserrat Barragan; Bardy, Cedric; Cassiani-Ingoni, Riccardo; Liu, Guang-Hui; Gage, Fred H.; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The finding that certain somatic cells can be directly converted into cells of other lineages by the delivery of specific sets of transcription factors paves the way to novel therapeutic applications. Here we show that human cord blood (CB) CD133+ cells lose their hematopoietic signature and are converted into CB-induced neuronal-like cells (CB-iNCs) by the ectopic expression of the transcription factor Sox2, a process that is further augmented by the combination of Sox2 and c-Myc. Gene-expression analysis, immunophenotyping, and electrophysiological analysis show that CB-iNCs acquire a distinct neuronal phenotype characterized by the expression of multiple neuronal markers. CB-iNCs show the ability to fire action potentials after in vitro maturation as well as after in vivo transplantation into the mouse hippocampus. This system highlights the potential of CB cells and offers an alternative means to the study of cellular plasticity, possibly in the context of drug screening research and of future cell-replacement therapies. PMID:22814375

  3. Cord blood-derived neuronal cells by ectopic expression of Sox2 and c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Giorgetti, Alessandra; Marchetto, Maria C N; Li, Mo; Yu, Diana; Fazzina, Raffaella; Mu, Yangling; Adamo, Antonio; Paramonov, Ida; Cardoso, Julio Castaño; Monasterio, Montserrat Barragan; Bardy, Cedric; Cassiani-Ingoni, Riccardo; Liu, Guang-Hui; Gage, Fred H; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2012-07-31

    The finding that certain somatic cells can be directly converted into cells of other lineages by the delivery of specific sets of transcription factors paves the way to novel therapeutic applications. Here we show that human cord blood (CB) CD133(+) cells lose their hematopoietic signature and are converted into CB-induced neuronal-like cells (CB-iNCs) by the ectopic expression of the transcription factor Sox2, a process that is further augmented by the combination of Sox2 and c-Myc. Gene-expression analysis, immunophenotyping, and electrophysiological analysis show that CB-iNCs acquire a distinct neuronal phenotype characterized by the expression of multiple neuronal markers. CB-iNCs show the ability to fire action potentials after in vitro maturation as well as after in vivo transplantation into the mouse hippocampus. This system highlights the potential of CB cells and offers an alternative means to the study of cellular plasticity, possibly in the context of drug screening research and of future cell-replacement therapies.

  4. Orexin-A suppresses postischemic glucose intolerance and neuronal damage through hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shinichi; Yamazaki, Yui; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2013-01-01

    Orexin-A (a glucose-sensing neuropeptide in the hypothalamus) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; a member of the neurotrophin family) play roles in many physiologic functions, including regulation of glucose metabolism. We previously showed that the development of postischemic glucose intolerance is one of the triggers of ischemic neuronal damage. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was an interaction between orexin-A and BDNF functions in the hypothalamus after cerebral ischemic stress. Male ddY mice were subjected to 2 hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Neuronal damage was estimated by histologic and behavioral analyses. Expression of protein levels was analyzed by Western blot. Small interfering RNA directed BDNF, orexin-A, and SB334867 [N-(2-methyl-6-benzoxazolyl)-N'-1,5-naphthyridin-4-yl urea; a specific orexin-1 receptor antagonist] were administered directly into the hypothalamus. The level of hypothalamic orexin-A, detected by immunohistochemistry, was decreased on day 1 after MCAO. Intrahypothalamic administration of orexin-A (1 or 5 pmol/mouse) significantly and dose-dependently suppressed the development of postischemic glucose intolerance on day 1 and development of neuronal damage on day 3. The MCAO-induced decrease in insulin receptor levels in the liver and skeletal muscle on day 1 was recovered to control levels by orexin-A, and this effect of orexin-A was reversed by the administration of SB334867 as well as by hypothalamic BDNF knockdown. These results suggest that suppression of postischemic glucose intolerance by orexin-A assists in the prevention of cerebral ischemic neuronal damage. In addition, hypothalamic BDNF may play an important role in this effect of orexin-A.

  5. Accelerated intoxication of GABAergic synapses by botulinum neurotoxin A disinhibits stem cell-derived neuron networks prior to network silencing

    PubMed Central

    Beske, Phillip H.; Scheeler, Stephen M.; Adler, Michael; McNutt, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely potent toxins that specifically cleave SNARE proteins in peripheral synapses, preventing neurotransmitter release. Neuronal responses to BoNT intoxication are traditionally studied by quantifying SNARE protein cleavage in vitro or monitoring physiological paralysis in vivo. Consequently, the dynamic effects of intoxication on synaptic behaviors are not well-understood. We have reported that mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs) are highly sensitive to BoNT based on molecular readouts of intoxication. Here we study the time-dependent changes in synapse- and network-level behaviors following addition of BoNT/A to spontaneously active networks of glutamatergic and GABAergic ESNs. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings indicated that BoNT/A rapidly blocked synaptic neurotransmission, confirming that ESNs replicate the functional pathophysiology responsible for clinical botulism. Quantitation of spontaneous neurotransmission in pharmacologically isolated synapses revealed accelerated silencing of GABAergic synapses compared to glutamatergic synapses, which was consistent with the selective accumulation of cleaved SNAP-25 at GAD1+ pre-synaptic terminals at early timepoints. Different latencies of intoxication resulted in complex network responses to BoNT/A addition, involving rapid disinhibition of stochastic firing followed by network silencing. Synaptic activity was found to be highly sensitive to SNAP-25 cleavage, reflecting the functional consequences of the localized cleavage of the small subpopulation of SNAP-25 that is engaged in neurotransmitter release in the nerve terminal. Collectively these findings illustrate that use of synaptic function assays in networked neurons cultures offers a novel and highly sensitive approach for mechanistic studies of toxin:neuron interactions and synaptic responses to BoNT. PMID:25954159

  6. Stimulation of μ-opioid receptors dilates retinal arterioles by neuronal nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in rats.

    PubMed

    Someya, Eriko; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Ishii, Kunio; Nakahara, Tsutomu

    2017-03-21

    Opioids contribute to the regulation of cerebral vascular tone. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of herkinorin, a non-opioid μ-opioid receptor agonist derived from salvinorin A, on blood vessels in the rat retina and to investigate the mechanism underlying the herkinorin-induced retinal vasodilatory response. Ocular fundus images were captured using an original high-resolution digital fundus camera in vivo. The retinal vascular responses were evaluated by measuring the diameter of retinal arterioles in the fundus images. Both systemic blood pressure and heart rate were continuously recorded. Herkinorin increased the retinal arteriolar diameter without significantly changing mean blood pressure and heart rate. The retinal vasodilator response to herkinorin was almost completely prevented following treatment with naloxone, a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist and H-D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP), a selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist. N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nonselective nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, or indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, significantly attenuated the herkinorin-induced retinal vasodilator responses. In addition, N(ω)-propyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of neuronal NO synthase, diminished the herkinorin-induced retinal vasodilator responses. Seven days after an intravitreal injection of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid, loss of inner retinal neurons and abolishment of the retinal vasodilator response to herkinorin were observed. These results suggest that herkinorin dilates rat retinal arterioles through stimulation of retinal μ-opioid receptors. The μ-opioid receptor-mediated retinal vasodilator response is likely mediated by NO generated by neuronal NO synthase. Retinal neurons play an important role in the retinal vasodilator mechanism involving μ-opioid receptors in rats.

  7. Binding characteristics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to its receptors on neurons from the chick embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Tebar, A.; Barde, Y.A.

    1988-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein known to support the survival of embryonic sensory neurons and retinal ganglion cells, was derivatized with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and obtained in a biologically active, radioactive form (125I-BDNF). Using dorsal root ganglion neurons from chick embryos at 9 d of development, the basic physicochemical parameters of the binding of 125I-BDNF with its receptors were established. Two different classes of receptors were found, with dissociation constants of 1.7 x 10(-11) M (high-affinity receptors) and 1.3 x 10(-9) M (low-affinity receptors). Unlabeled BDNF competed with 125I-BDNF for binding to the high-affinity receptors with an inhibition constant essentially identical to the dissociation constant of the labeled protein: 1.2 x 10(-11) M. The association and dissociation rates from both types of receptors were also determined, and the dissociation constants calculated from these kinetic experiments were found to correspond to the results obtained from steady-state binding. The number of high-affinity receptors (a few hundred per cell soma) was 15 times lower than that of low-affinity receptors. No high-affinity receptors were found on sympathetic neurons, known not to respond to BDNF, although specific binding of 125I-BDNF to these cells was detected at a high concentration of the radioligand. These results are discussed and compared with those obtained with nerve growth factor on the same neuronal populations.

  8. HDAC6 Inhibitors Rescued the Defective Axonal Mitochondrial Movement in Motor Neurons Derived from the Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with HSPB1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young Bin; Choi, Heesun; Kim, Jisoo; Choi, Hyunjung; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Ha, Nina; Kyung, Jangbeen; Koo, Soo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    The Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 2F (CMT2F) and distal hereditary motor neuropathy 2B (dHMN2B) are caused by autosomal dominantly inherited mutations of the heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1) gene and there are no specific therapies available yet. Here, we assessed the potential therapeutic effect of HDAC6 inhibitors on peripheral neuropathy with HSPB1 mutation using in vitro model of motor neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of CMT2F and dHMN2B patients. The absolute velocity of mitochondrial movements and the percentage of moving mitochondria in axons were lower both in CMT2F-motor neurons and in dHMN2B-motor neurons than those in controls, and the severity of the defective mitochondrial movement was different between the two disease models. CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons also showed reduced α-tubulin acetylation compared with controls. The newly developed HDAC6 inhibitors, CHEMICAL X4 and CHEMICAL X9, increased acetylation of α-tubulin and reversed axonal movement defects of mitochondria in CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons. Our results suggest that the neurons derived from patient-specific iPSCs can be used in drug screening including HDAC6 inhibitors targeting peripheral neuropathy. PMID:28105056

  9. Neurite Aggregation and Calcium Dysfunction in iPSC-Derived Sensory Neurons with Parkinson’s Disease-Related LRRK2 G2019S Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Andrew J.; Ebert, Allison D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most-common genetic determinants of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The G2019S mutation is detected most frequently and is associated with increased kinase activity. Whereas G2019S mutant dopamine neurons exhibit neurite elongation deficits, the effect of G2019S on other neuronal subtypes is unknown. As PD patients also suffer from non-motor symptoms that may be unrelated to dopamine neuron loss, we used induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to assess morphological and functional properties of peripheral sensory neurons. LRRK2 G2019S iPSC-derived sensory neurons exhibited normal neurite length but had large microtubule-containing neurite aggregations. Additionally, LRRK2 G2019S iPSC-derived sensory neurons displayed altered calcium dynamics. Treatment with LRRK2 kinase inhibitors resulted in significant, but not complete, morphological and functional rescue. These data indicate a role for LRRK2 kinase activity in sensory neuron structure and function, which when disrupted, may lead to sensory neuron deficits in PD. PMID:26651604

  10. HDAC6 Inhibitors Rescued the Defective Axonal Mitochondrial Movement in Motor Neurons Derived from the Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with HSPB1 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yon; Woo, So-Youn; Hong, Young Bin; Choi, Heesun; Kim, Jisoo; Choi, Hyunjung; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Ha, Nina; Kyung, Jangbeen; Koo, Soo Kyung; Jung, Sung-Chul; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2016-01-01

    The Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 2F (CMT2F) and distal hereditary motor neuropathy 2B (dHMN2B) are caused by autosomal dominantly inherited mutations of the heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1) gene and there are no specific therapies available yet. Here, we assessed the potential therapeutic effect of HDAC6 inhibitors on peripheral neuropathy with HSPB1 mutation using in vitro model of motor neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of CMT2F and dHMN2B patients. The absolute velocity of mitochondrial movements and the percentage of moving mitochondria in axons were lower both in CMT2F-motor neurons and in dHMN2B-motor neurons than those in controls, and the severity of the defective mitochondrial movement was different between the two disease models. CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons also showed reduced α-tubulin acetylation compared with controls. The newly developed HDAC6 inhibitors, CHEMICAL X4 and CHEMICAL X9, increased acetylation of α-tubulin and reversed axonal movement defects of mitochondria in CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons. Our results suggest that the neurons derived from patient-specific iPSCs can be used in drug screening including HDAC6 inhibitors targeting peripheral neuropathy.

  11. Development of a 3-D upwind PNS code for chemically reacting hypersonic flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, J. C.; Wadawadigi, G.

    1992-01-01

    Two new parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) codes were developed to compute the three-dimensional, viscous, chemically reacting flow of air around hypersonic vehicles such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The first code (TONIC) solves the gas dynamic and species conservation equations in a fully coupled manner using an implicit, approximately-factored, central-difference algorithm. This code was upgraded to include shock fitting and the capability of computing the flow around complex body shapes. The revised TONIC code was validated by computing the chemically-reacting (M(sub infinity) = 25.3) flow around a 10 deg half-angle cone at various angles of attack and the Ames All-Body model at 0 deg angle of attack. The results of these calculations were in good agreement with the results from the UPS code. One of the major drawbacks of the TONIC code is that the central-differencing of fluxes across interior flowfield discontinuities tends to introduce errors into the solution in the form of local flow property oscillations. The second code (UPS), originally developed for a perfect gas, has been extended to permit either perfect gas, equilibrium air, or nonequilibrium air computations. The code solves the PNS equations using a finite-volume, upwind TVD method based on Roe's approximate Riemann solver that was modified to account for real gas effects. The dissipation term associated with this algorithm is sufficiently adaptive to flow conditions that, even when attempting to capture very strong shock waves, no additional smoothing is required. For nonequilibrium calculations, the code solves the fluid dynamic and species continuity equations in a loosely-coupled manner. This code was used to calculate the hypersonic, laminar flow of chemically reacting air over cones at various angles of attack. In addition, the flow around the McDonnel Douglas generic option blended-wing-body was computed and comparisons were made between the perfect gas, equilibrium air, and the

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes neurite growth and survival of antennal lobe neurons in brain from the silk moth, Bombyx mori in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Sung, Dong Kyung; Park, Chan Woo; Park, Hun Hee; Park, Cheolin; Jeon, Soung-Hoo; Kang, Pil Don; Kwon, O-Yu; Lee, Bong Hee

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on the neurite growth and the survival rate of antennal lobe neurons in vitro, and secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-like neuropeptide from brain into hemolymph in the silk moth, Bombyx mori. In primary culture of antennal lobe neurons with brain-derived neurotrophic factor, it promoted both a neurite extension of putative antennal lobe projection neurons and an outgrowth of branches from principal neurites of putative antennal interneurons with significance (p<0.05). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor also increased significantly a survival rate of antennal lobe neurons (p<0.05). Results from immunolabeling of brain and retrocerebral complex, and ELISA assay of hemolymph showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-like neuropeptide was synthesized by both median and lateral neurosecretory cells of brain, then transported to corpora allata for storage, and finally secreted into hemolymph for action. These results will provide valuable information for differentiation of invertebrate brain neurons with brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  13. The endothelin receptor-B is required for the migration of neural crest-derived melanocyte and enteric neuron precursors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung-Ok; Levorse, John M; Shin, Myung K

    2003-07-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding endothelin receptor-B (Ednrb) and its ligand endothelin-3 (Edn3) affect the development of two neural crest-derived cell types, melanocytes and enteric neurons. EDNRB signaling is exclusively required between E10.5 and E12.5 during the migratory phase of melanoblast and enteric neuroblast development. To determine the fate of Ednrb-expressing cells during this critical period, we generated a strain of mice with the bacterial beta-galactosidase (lacZ) gene inserted downstream of the endogenous Ednrb promoter. The expression of the lacZ gene was detected in melanoblasts and precursors of the enteric neuron system (ENS), as well as other neural crest cells and nonneural crest-derived lineages. By comparing Ednrb(lacZ)/+ and Ednrb(lacZ)/Ednrb(lacZ) embryos, we determined that the Ednrb pathway is not required for the initial specification and dispersal of melanoblasts and ENS precursors from the neural crest progenitors. Rather, the EDNRB-mediated signaling is required for the terminal migration of melanoblasts and ENS precursors, and this pathway is not required for the survival of the migratory cells.

  14. Differentiation of rat adipose tissue-derived stem cells into neuron-like cells by valproic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Takumi; Hayashi, Daiki; Yaguchi, Takayuki; Fujita, Yudai; Sakaue, Motoharu; Suzuki, Takehito; Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Murayama, Ohoshi; Lynch, Jonathan; Miyazaki, Yoko; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Takizawa, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely used antiepileptic drug, which has recently been reported to modulate the neuronal differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) in humans and dogs. However, controversy exists as to whether VPA really acts as an inducer of neuronal differentiation of ASCs. The present study aimed to elucidate the effect of VPA in neuronal differentiation of rat ASCs. One or three days of pretreatment with VPA (2 mM) followed by neuronal induction enhanced the ratio of immature neuron marker βIII-tubulin-positive cells in a time-dependent manner, where the majority of cells also had a positive signal for neurofilament medium polypeptide (NEFM), a mature neuron marker. RT-PCR analysis revealed increases in the mRNA expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and NEFM mature neuron markers, even without neuronal induction. Three-days pretreatment of VPA increased acetylation of histone H3 of ASCs as revealed by immunofluorescence staining. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay also showed that the status of histone acetylation at H3K9 correlated with the gene expression of TUBB3 in ASCs by VPA. These results indicate that VPA significantly promotes the differentiation of rat ASCs into neuron-like cells through acetylation of histone H3, which suggests that VPA may serve as a useful tool for producing transplantable cells for future applications in clinical treatments.

  15. Atoxic derivative of botulinum neurotoxin A as a prototype vehicle for targeted delivery to neuronal cytoplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously described genetic constructs and expression systems that enable facile production of recombinant derivatives of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) that retain the structural and trafficking properties of wt BoNTs. In this report we describe the properties of one such derivative, BoNT/A...

  16. High Yield Derivation of Enriched Glutamatergic Neurons from Suspension-Cultured Mouse ESCs for Neurotoxicology Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-24

    N2 medium (Neurobasal-A medium with 1x N2 vita- mins, 2 mM glutamine and antibiotics [Life Technolo- gies]) and counted. Cells were plated at 125,000... antibiotics , 2 mM glutamine and 1x B27 vitamins [Life Technologies]). Subsequently, cells underwent full medium changes with B27 on DIV 4 and 8, and...cortical neurons is inhibited by equine estrogens via down-regulation of caspase-3 and prevention of mitochondrial cytochrome c release. BMC Neurosci

  17. ANEPIII, a new recombinant neurotoxic polypeptide derived from scorpion peptide, inhibits delayed rectifier, but not A-type potassium currents in rat primary cultured hippocampal and cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Li; Zhang, Jing-Hai; Yang, Bao-Feng; Jiao, Jun-Dong; Wang, Ling; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2006-01-15

    A new recombinant neurotoxic polypeptide ANEPIII (BmK ANEPIII) derived from Scorpion peptide, which was demonstrated with antineuroexcitation properties in animal models, was examined for its action on K+ currents in primary cultured rat hippocampal and cortical neurons using the patch clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. The delayed rectifier K+ current (I(k)) was inhibited by externally applied recombinant BmK ANEPIII, while the transient A-current (I(A)) remained virtually unaffected. BmK ANEPIII 3 microM, reduced the delayed rectifier current by 28.2% and 23.6% in cultured rat hippocampal and cortical neurons, respectively. The concentration of half-maximal block was 155.1 nM for hippocampal neurons and 227.2 nM for cortical neurons, respectively. These results suggest that BmK ANEPIII affect K+ currents, which may lead to a reduction in neuronal excitability.

  18. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor-dependent cdk1 inhibition prevents G2/M progression in differentiating tetraploid neurons.

    PubMed

    Ovejero-Benito, María C; Frade, José M

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is often associated with DNA synthesis in neurons, the latter usually remaining for a long time as tetraploid cells before dying by apoptosis. The molecular mechanism preventing G2/M transition in these neurons remains unknown, but it may be reminiscent of the mechanism that maintains tetraploid retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a G2-like state during normal development, thus preventing their death. Here we show that this latter process, known to depend on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), requires the inhibition of cdk1 by TrkB. We demonstrate that a subpopulation of chick RGCs previously shown to become tetraploid co-expresses TrkB and cdk1 in vivo. By using an in vitro system that recapitulates differentiation and cell cycle re-entry of chick retinal neurons we show that BDNF, employed at concentrations specific for the TrkB receptor, reduces the expression of cdk1 in TrkB-positive, differentiating neurons. In this system, BDNF also inhibits the activity of both endogenous cdk1 and exogenously-expressed cdk1/cyclin B1 complex. This inhibition correlates with the phosphorylation of cdk1 at Tyr15, an effect that can be prevented with K252a, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor commonly used to prevent the activity of neurotrophins through their Trk receptors. The effect of BDNF on cdk1 activity is Tyr15-specific since BDNF cannot prevent the activity of a constitutively active form of cdk1 (Tyr15Phe) when expressed in differentiating retinal neurons. We also show that BDNF-dependent phosphorylation of cdk1 at Tyr15 could not be blocked with MK-1775, a Wee1-selective inhibitor, indicating that Tyr15 phosphorylation in cdk1 does not seem to occur through the canonical mechanism observed in proliferating cells. We conclude that the inhibition of both expression and activity of cdk1 through a BDNF-dependent mechanism contributes to the maintenance of tetraploid RGCs in a G2-like state.

  19. Human Neuron Cultures: Micropatterning Facilitates the Long-Term Growth and Analysis of iPSC-Derived Individual Human Neurons and Neuronal Networks (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 15/2016).

    PubMed

    Burbulla, Lena F; Beaumont, Kristin G; Mrksich, Milan; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-08-01

    Dimitri Krainc, Milan Mrksich, and co-workers demonstrate the utility of microcontact printing technology for culturing of human neurons in defined patterns over extended periods of time on page 1894. This approach facilitates studies of neuronal development, cellular trafficking, and related mechanisms that require assessment of individual neurons and neuronal networks.

  20. Voltage-Dependent Rhythmogenic Property of Respiratory Pre-Bötzinger Complex Glutamatergic, Dbx1-Derived, and Somatostatin-Expressing Neuron Populations Revealed by Graded Optogenetic Inhibition123

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Hidehiko; Mosher, Bryan; Tariq, Mohammad F.; Zhang, Ruli

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The rhythm of breathing in mammals, originating within the brainstem pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC), is presumed to be generated by glutamatergic neurons, but this has not been directly demonstrated. Additionally, developmental expression of the transcription factor Dbx1 or expression of the neuropeptide somatostatin (Sst), has been proposed as a marker for the rhythmogenic pre-BötC glutamatergic neurons, but it is unknown whether these other two phenotypically defined neuronal populations are functionally equivalent to glutamatergic neurons with regard to rhythm generation. To address these problems, we comparatively investigated, by optogenetic approaches, the roles of pre-BötC glutamatergic, Dbx1-derived, and Sst-expressing neurons in respiratory rhythm generation in neonatal transgenic mouse medullary slices in vitro and also more intact adult perfused brainstem-spinal cord preparations in situ. We established three different triple-transgenic mouse lines with Cre-driven Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) expression selectively in glutamatergic, Dbx1-derived, or Sst-expressing neurons for targeted photoinhibition. In each line, we identified subpopulations of rhythmically active, Arch-expressing pre-BötC inspiratory neurons by whole-cell recordings in medullary slice preparations in vitro, and established that Arch-mediated hyperpolarization of these inspiratory neurons was laser power dependent with equal efficacy. By site- and population-specific graded photoinhibition, we then demonstrated that inspiratory frequency was reduced by each population with the same neuronal voltage-dependent frequency control mechanism in each state of the respiratory network examined. We infer that enough of the rhythmogenic pre-BötC glutamatergic neurons also have the Dbx1 and Sst expression phenotypes, and thus all three phenotypes share the same voltage-dependent frequency control property. PMID:27275007

  1. A Study of Neuronal Properties, Synaptic Plasticity and Network Interactions Using a Computer Reconstituted Neuronal Network Derived from Fundamental Biophysical Principles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    neuronal networks . Proceedings of the Simulation Technology Conference. (in press) n Tam, D. C. (1992) Objec. oriented programming techniques for...12/92 $259,985 USPHS BRSG Grant number RR05425-30 "Synaptic Interactions in Neuronal Networks " 6/91 - 3/92 $10,000 PENDING GRANT Office of Naval...reconstructing functional properties of biological neuronal networks . Proceedings of the Simulation Technology Conference. (in press) Tam, D. C. (1992) Object

  2. Modeling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in pure human iPSc-derived motor neurons isolated by a novel FACS double selection technique.

    PubMed

    Toli, Diana; Buttigieg, Dorothée; Blanchard, Stéphane; Lemonnier, Thomas; Lamotte d'Incamps, Boris; Bellouze, Sarah; Baillat, Gilbert; Bohl, Delphine; Haase, Georg

    2015-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe and incurable neurodegenerative disease. Human motor neurons generated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSc) offer new perspectives for disease modeling and drug testing in ALS. In standard iPSc-derived cultures, however, the two major phenotypic alterations of ALS--degeneration of motor neuron cell bodies and axons--are often obscured by cell body clustering, extensive axon criss-crossing and presence of unwanted cell types. Here, we succeeded in isolating 100% pure and standardized human motor neurons by a novel FACS double selection based on a p75(NTR) surface epitope and an HB9::RFP lentivirus reporter. The p75(NTR)/HB9::RFP motor neurons survive and grow well without forming clusters or entangled axons, are electrically excitable, contain ALS-relevant motor neuron subtypes and form functional connections with co-cultured myotubes. Importantly, they undergo rapid and massive cell death and axon degeneration in response to mutant SOD1 astrocytes. These data demonstrate the potential of FACS-isolated human iPSc-derived motor neurons for improved disease modeling and drug testing in ALS and related motor neuron diseases.

  3. Quantitative analysis of serotonin secreted by human embryonic stem cells-derived serotonergic neurons via pH-mediated online stacking-CE-ESI-MRM.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xuefei; Hao, Ling; Lu, Jianfeng; Ye, Hui; Zhang, Su-Chun; Li, Lingjun

    2016-04-01

    A CE-ESI-MRM-based assay was developed for targeted analysis of serotonin released by human embryonic stem cells-derived serotonergic neurons in a chemically defined environment. A discontinuous electrolyte system was optimized for pH-mediated online stacking of serotonin. Combining with a liquid-liquid extraction procedure, LOD of serotonin in the Krebs'-Ringer's solution by CE-ESI-MS/MS on a 3D ion trap MS was0.15 ng/mL. The quantitative results confirmed the serotonergic identity of the in vitro developed neurons and the capacity of these neurons to release serotonin in response to stimulus.

  4. Fyn Kinase regulates GluN2B subunit-dominant NMDA receptors in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Bo; Ross, P Joel; Tu, YuShan; Wang, Yongqian; Beggs, Simon; Sengar, Ameet S; Ellis, James; Salter, Michael W

    2016-04-04

    NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated fast excitatory neurotransmission is implicated in a broad range of physiological and pathological processes in the mammalian central nervous system. The function and regulation of NMDARs have been extensively studied in neurons from rodents and other non-human species, and in recombinant expression systems. Here, we investigated human NMDARs in situ by using neurons produced by directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The resultant cells showed electrophysiological characteristics demonstrating that they are bona fide neurons. In particular, human iPSC-derived neurons expressed functional ligand-gated ion channels, including NMDARs, AMPA receptors, GABAA receptors, as well as glycine receptors. Pharmacological and electrophysiological properties of NMDAR-mediated currents indicated that these were dominated by receptors containing GluN2B subunits. The NMDAR currents were suppressed by genistein, a broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The NMDAR currents were also inhibited by a Fyn-interfering peptide, Fyn(39-57), but not a Src-interfering peptide, Src(40-58). Together, these findings are the first evidence that tyrosine phosphorylation regulates the function of NMDARs in human iPSC-derived neurons. Our findings provide a basis for utilizing human iPSC-derived neurons in screening for drugs targeting NMDARs in neurological disorders.

  5. Stem cell-derived neurons in the development of targeted treatment for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Watmuff, Bradley; Liu, Bangyan; Karmacharya, Rakesh

    2017-03-27

    The recent advent of induced pluripotent stem cells has enabled the study of patient-specific and disease-related neurons in vitro and has facilitated new directions of inquiry into disease mechanisms. With these approaches, we now have the possibility of correlating ex vivo cellular phenotypes with individual patient response to treatment and/or side effects, which makes targeted treatments for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder a distinct prospect in the coming years. Here, we briefly review the current state of stem cell-based models and explore studies that are providing new insights into the disease biology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, which are laying the foundations for the development of novel targeted therapies.

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor facilitates TrkB down-regulation and neuronal injury after status epilepticus in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Unsain, Nicolás; Montroull, Laura Ester; Mascó, Daniel Hugo

    2009-10-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in many aspects of neuronal biology and hippocampal physiology. Status epilepticus (SE) is a condition in which prolonged seizures lead to neuronal degeneration. SE-induced in rodents serves as a model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis, the most frequent epilepsy in humans. We have recently described a strong correlation between TrkB decrease and p75ntr increase with neuronal degeneration (Neuroscience 154:978, 2008). In this report, we report that local, acute intra-hippocampal infusion of function-blocking antibodies against BDNF prevented both early TrkB down-regulation and neuronal degeneration after SE. Conversely, the infusion of recombinant human BDNF protein after SE greatly increased neuronal degeneration. The inhibition of BDNF mRNA translation by the infusion of antisense oligonucleotides induced a rapid decrease of BDNF protein levels, and a delayed increase. If seizures were induced at the time endogenous BDNF was decreased, SE-induced neuronal damage was prevented. On the other hand, if seizures were induced at the time endogenous BDNF was increased, SE-induced neuronal damage was exacerbated. These results indicate that under a pathological condition BDNF exacerbates neuronal injury.

  7. Rice ragged stunt virus segment S6-encoded nonstructural protein Pns6 complements cell-to-cell movement of Tobacco mosaic virus-based chimeric virus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zujian; Wu, Jianguo; Adkins, Scott; Xie, Lianhui; Li, Weimin

    2010-09-01

    The protein(s) that support intercellular movement of Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV) have not yet been identified. In this study, the role of three nonstructural proteins Pns6, Pns7 and Pns10 in cell-to-cell movement were determined with a movement-deficient Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) vector. The results showed that only the Pns6 could complement the cell-to-cell movement of the movement-deficient TMV in Nicotiana tabacum Xanthi nc and N. benthamiana plants, and both N- and C-terminal 50 amino acids of Pns6 were essential for the cell-to-cell movement. Transient expression in epidermal cells from N. benthamiana showed that the Pns6-eGFP fusion protein was present predominantly along the cell wall as well as a few punctate sites perhaps indicating plasmodesmata. Taken together with previous finding that the Pns6 has nucleic acid-binding activity (Shao et al., 2004), the possible role of Pns6 in cell-to-cell movement of RRSV were discussed.

  8. The effect of magnetic nanoparticles on neuronal differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural precursors

    PubMed Central

    Jiráková, Klára; Šeneklová, Monika; Jirák, Daniel; Turnovcová, Karolína; Vosmanská, Magda; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Veverka, Pavel; Jendelová, Pavla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is suitable for noninvasive long-term tracking. We labeled human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural precursors (iPSC-NPs) with two types of iron-based nanoparticles, silica-coated cobalt zinc ferrite nanoparticles (CZF) and poly-l-lysine-coated iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles (PLL-coated γ-Fe2O3) and studied their effect on proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Materials and methods We investigated the effect of these two contrast agents on neural precursor cell proliferation and differentiation capability. We further defined the intracellular localization and labeling efficiency and analyzed labeled cells by MR. Results Cell proliferation was not affected by PLL-coated γ-Fe2O3 but was slowed down in cells labeled with CZF. Labeling efficiency, iron content and relaxation rates measured by MR were lower in cells labeled with CZF when compared to PLL-coated γ-Fe2O3. Cytoplasmic localization of both types of nanoparticles was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemical analysis of specific markers expressed during neuronal differentiation did not show any significant differences between unlabeled cells or cells labeled with both magnetic nanoparticles. Conclusion Our results show that cells labeled with PLL-coated γ-Fe2O3 are suitable for MR detection, did not affect the differentiation potential of iPSC-NPs and are suitable for in vivo cell therapies in experimental models of central nervous system disorders. PMID:27920532

  9. Downregulation of VAPB expression in motor neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells of ALS8 patients

    PubMed Central

    Mitne-Neto, Miguel; Machado-Costa, Marcela; Marchetto, Maria C.N.; Bengtson, Mario H.; Joazeiro, Claudio A.; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Bellen, Hugo J.; Silva, Helga C.A.; Oliveira, Acary S.B.; Lazar, Monize; Muotri, Alysson R.; Zatz, Mayana

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable neuromuscular disease that leads to a profound loss of life quality and premature death. Around 10% of the cases are inherited and ALS8 is an autosomal dominant form of familial ALS caused by mutations in the vamp-associated protein B/C (VAPB) gene. The VAPB protein is involved in many cellular processes and it likely contributes to the pathogenesis of other forms of ALS besides ALS8. A number of successful drug tests in ALS animal models could not be translated to humans underscoring the need for novel approaches. The induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) technology brings new hope, since it can be used to model and investigate diseases in vitro. Here we present an additional tool to study ALS based on ALS8-iPSC. Fibroblasts from ALS8 patients and their non-carrier siblings were successfully reprogrammed to a pluripotent state and differentiated into motor neurons. We show for the first time that VAPB protein levels are reduced in ALS8-derived motor neurons but, in contrast to over-expression systems, cytoplasmic aggregates could not be identified. Our results suggest that optimal levels of VAPB may play a central role in the pathogenesis of ALS8, in agreement with the observed reduction of VAPB in sporadic ALS. PMID:21685205

  10. Successful function of autologous iPSC-derived dopamine neurons following transplantation in a non-human primate model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Penelope J; Deleidi, Michela; Astradsson, Arnar; Smith, Gaynor A.; Cooper, Oliver; Osborn, Teresia; Sundberg, Maria; Moore, Michele A.; Perez-Torres, Eduardo; Brownell, Anna-Liisa; Schumacher, James; Spealman, Roger D.; Isacson, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autologous transplantation of patient-specific iPSC-derived neurons is a potential clinical approach for treatment of neurological disease. Preclinical demonstration of long-term efficacy, feasibility and safety of iPSC-derived dopamine neurons in non human primate models will be an important step in clinical development of cell therapy. Here, we analyzed cynomolgus monkey (CM) iPSC-derived midbrain dopamine neurons for up to 2 years following autologous transplantation in a Parkinson's disease (PD) model. In one animal, with the most successful protocol, we found that unilateral engraftment of CM-iPSCs could provide a gradual onset of functional motor improvement contralateral to the side of dopamine neuron transplantation, and increased motor activity, without a need for immunosuppression. Post-mortem analyses demonstrated robust survival of midbrain-like dopaminergic neurons and extensive outgrowth into the transplanted putamen. Our proof of concept findings support further development of autologous iPSC-derived cell transplantation for treatment of PD. PMID:25732245

  11. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pfisterer, Ulrich; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-03-02

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation. Furthermore, pro-survival factors and intracellular responses depend on the type of neuron and region of the brain. Thus, in addition to some common neuronal pro-survival signaling, different types of neurons possess a variety of 'neuron type-specific' pro-survival constituents that might help them to adapt for survival in a certain brain region. This review focuses on how immature neurons survive during normal and impaired brain development, both in the embryonic/neonatal brain and in brain regions associated with adult neurogenesis, and emphasizes neuron type-specific mechanisms that help to survive for various types of immature neurons. Importantly, we mainly focus on in vivo data to describe neuronal survival specifically in the brain, without extrapolating data obtained in the PNS or spinal cord, and thus emphasize the influence of the complex brain environment on neuronal survival during development.

  12. Specificity of CNS and PNS regulatory subelements comprising pan-neural enhancers of the deadpan and scratch genes is achieved by repression.

    PubMed

    Emery, J F; Bier, E

    1995-11-01

    The Drosophila pan-neural genes deadpan (dpn) and scratch (scrt) are expressed in most or all developing neural precursor cells of the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). We have identified a cis-acting enhancer element driving full pan-neural expression of the dpn gene which is composed of independent CNS- and PNS-specific subelements. We have also identified CNS- and PNS-specific subelements of the scrt enhancer. Deletion analysis of the dpn and scrt PNS-specific subelements reveals that PNS specificity of these two evolutionarily unrelated enhancers is achieved in part by repression of CNS expression. We discuss the implications of the striking organizational similarities of the dpn, scrt, and sna pan-neural enhancers.

  13. Downregulation of microRNA-9 in iPSC-derived neurons of FTD/ALS patients with TDP-43 mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhijun; Almeida, Sandra; Lu, Yubing; Nishimura, Agnes L; Peng, Lingtao; Sun, Danqiong; Wu, Bei; Karydas, Anna M; Tartaglia, Maria C; Fong, Jamie C; Miller, Bruce L; Farese, Robert V; Moore, Melissa J; Shaw, Christopher E; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2013-01-01

    Transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a major pathological protein in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). There are many disease-associated mutations in TDP-43, and several cellular and animal models with ectopic overexpression of mutant TDP-43 have been established. Here we sought to study altered molecular events in FTD and ALS by using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) derived patient neurons. We generated multiple iPSC lines from an FTD/ALS patient with the TARDBP A90V mutation and from an unaffected family member who lacked the mutation. After extensive characterization, two to three iPSC lines from each subject were selected, differentiated into postmitotic neurons, and screened for relevant cell-autonomous phenotypes. Patient-derived neurons were more sensitive than control neurons to 100 nM straurosporine but not to other inducers of cellular stress. Three disease-relevant cellular phenotypes were revealed under staurosporine-induced stress. First, TDP-43 was localized in the cytoplasm of a higher percentage of patient neurons than control neurons. Second, the total TDP-43 level was lower in patient neurons with the A90V mutation. Third, the levels of microRNA-9 (miR-9) and its precursor pri-miR-9-2 decreased in patient neurons but not in control neurons. The latter is likely because of reduced TDP-43, as shRNA-mediated TDP-43 knockdown in rodent primary neurons also decreased the pri-miR-9-2 level. The reduction in miR-9 expression was confirmed in human neurons derived from iPSC lines containing the more pathogenic TARDBP M337V mutation, suggesting miR-9 downregulation might be a common pathogenic event in FTD/ALS. These results show that iPSC models of FTD/ALS are useful for revealing stress-dependent cellular defects of human patient neurons containing rare TDP-43 mutations in their native genetic contexts.

  14. A paracrine effect for neuron-derived BDNF in development of dorsal root ganglia: stimulation of Schwann cell myelin protein expression by glial cells.

    PubMed

    Pruginin-Bluger, M; Shelton, D L; Kalcheim, C

    1997-01-01

    Addition of neurons to cultures of non-neuronal cells derived from quail embryonic dorsal root ganglia causes a 2.5-fold increase in the proportion of cells that express the glial marker Schwann cell myelin protein (SMP) when compared to cultures devoid of neurons. This effect is mediated by BDNF because incubation with a trkB immunoadhesin that sequesters BDNF, but not with trkA or trkC immunoadhesins, abolishes this stimulation. This neuronal activity can be mimicked by treatment with soluble BDNF that stimulates specifically the conversion of SMP-negative glial cells into cells that express this phenotype. That BDNF is the endogenous neuron-derived factor affecting glial development is further supported by the observation that BDNF is extensively expressed in developing sensory neurons of the avian ganglia both in vivo and in vitro, but not by the satellite cells. These results show for the first time a paracrine role for neuronal BDNF on differentiation of peripheral glial cells. This effect of BDNF is likely to be mediated by the p75 neurotrophin receptor because: (1) p75 immunoreactive protein is expressed by a subset of satellite cells; (2) neutralization of p75 abolishes the BDNF-induced stimulation; (3) a treatment of non-neuronal cell cultures with equimolar concentrations of either soluble NGF or NT-3 also affects the proportion of cells that become SMP-positive. Whereas NGF stimulates the acquisition of this glial antigen to a similar extent as BDNF, NT-3 inhibits its expression, suggesting that distinct neurotrophins signal differentially through p75. These findings also suggest that the definitive phenotype of peripheral glia is determined by a balance between positive and inhibitory signals arising in adjacent neurons.

  15. Genetic and Morphological Features of Human iPSC-Derived Neurons with Chromosome 15q11.2 (BP1-BP2) Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Das, Dhanjit K.; Tapias, Victor; D'Aiuto, Leonardo; Chowdari, Kodavali V.; Francis, Lily; Zhi, Yun; Ghosh, Ayantika; Surti, Urvashi; Tischfield, Jay; Sheldon, Michael; Moore, Jennifer C.; Fish, Ken; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Copy number variation on chromosome 15q11.2 (BP1-BP2) causes a deletion of CYFIP1, NIPA1, NIPA2 and TUBGCP5. Furthermore, it also affects brain structure and elevates the risk for several neurodevelopmental disorders that are associated with dendritic spine abnormalities. In rodents, altered cyfip1 expression changes dendritic spine morphology, motivating analyses of human neuronal cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs; iPSC-neurons). Methods iPSCs were generated from a mother and her offspring, both carrying the 15q11.2 (BP1-BP2) deletion, and a non-deletion control. Gene expression in the deletion region was estimated using quantitative real-time PCR assays. Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and iPSC-neurons were characterized using immunocytochemistry. Results CYFIP1, NIPA1, NIPA2 and TUBGCP5 gene expression was lower in iPSCs, NPCs and iPSC-neurons from the mother and her offspring in relation to control cells. CYFIP1 and PSD-95 protein levels were lower in iPSC-neurons derived from the copy number variant-bearing individuals using Western blot analysis. Ten weeks after differentiation, iPSC-neurons appeared to show dendritic spines, and qualitative analysis suggested that dendritic morphology was altered in 15q11.2-deletion subjects compared with control cells. Conclusions The 15q11.2 (BP1-BP2) deletion is associated with a reduced expression of four genes in iPSC-derived neuronal cells; it may also be associated with altered iPSC-neuron dendritic morphology. PMID:26528485

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes vasculature-associated migration of neuronal precursors toward the ischemic striatum.

    PubMed

    Grade, Sofia; Weng, Yuan C; Snapyan, Marina; Kriz, Jasna; Malva, João O; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2013-01-01

    Stroke induces the recruitment of neuronal precursors from the subventricular zone (SVZ) into the ischemic striatum. In injured areas, de-routed neuroblasts use blood vessels as a physical scaffold to their migration, in a process that resembles the constitutive migration seen in the rostral migratory stream (RMS). The molecular mechanism underlying injury-induced vasculature-mediated migration of neuroblasts in the post-stroke striatum remains, however, elusive. Using adult mice we now demonstrate that endothelial cells in the ischemic striatum produce brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin that promotes the vasculature-mediated migration of neuronal precursors in the RMS, and that recruited neuroblasts maintain expression of p75NTR, a low-affinity receptor for BDNF. Reactive astrocytes, which are widespread throughout the damaged area, ensheath blood vessels and express TrkB, a high-affinity receptor for BDNF. Despite the absence of BDNF mRNA, we observed strong BDNF immunolabeling in astrocytes, suggesting that these glial cells trap extracellular BDNF. Importantly, this pattern of expression is reminiscent of the adult RMS, where TrkB-expressing astrocytes bind and sequester vasculature-derived BDNF, leading to the entry of migrating cells into the stationary phase. Real-time imaging of cell migration in acute brain slices revealed a direct role for BDNF in promoting the migration of neuroblasts to ischemic areas. We also demonstrated that cells migrating in the ischemic striatum display higher exploratory behavior and longer stationary periods than cells migrating in the RMS. Our findings suggest that the mechanisms involved in the injury-induced vasculature-mediated migration of neuroblasts recapitulate, at least partially, those observed during constitutive migration in the RMS.

  17. Novel Application of Stem Cell-Derived Neurons to Evaluate the Time- and Dose-Dependent Progression of Excitotoxic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gut, Ian M.; Beske, Phillip H.; Hubbard, Kyle S.; Lyman, Megan E.; Hamilton, Tracey A.; McNutt, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate receptor (GluR)-mediated neurotoxicity is implicated in a variety of disorders ranging from ischemia to neural degeneration. Under conditions of elevated glutamate, the excessive activation of GluRs causes internalization of pathologic levels of Ca2+, culminating in bioenergetic failure, organelle degradation, and cell death. Efforts to characterize cellular and molecular aspects of excitotoxicity and conduct therapeutic screening for pharmacologic inhibitors of excitogenic progression have been hindered by limitations associated with primary neuron culture. To address this, we evaluated glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in highly enriched glutamatergic neurons (ESNs) derived from murine embryonic stem cells. As of 18 days in vitro (DIV 18), ESNs were synaptically coupled, exhibited spontaneous network activity with neurotypic mEPSCs and expressed NMDARs and AMPARs with physiological current:voltage behaviors. Addition of 0.78–200 μM glutamate evoked reproducible time- and dose-dependent metabolic failure in 6 h, with a calculated EC50 value of 0.44 μM at 24 h. Using a combination of cell viability assays and electrophysiology, we determined that glutamate-induced toxicity was specifically mediated by NMDARs and could be inhibited by addition of NMDAR antagonists, increased extracellular Mg2+ or substitution of Ba2+ for Ca2+. Glutamate treatment evoked neurite fragmentation and focal swelling by both immunocytochemistry and scanning electron microscopy. Presentation of morphological markers of cell death was dose-dependent, with 0.78–200 μM glutamate resulting in apoptosis and 3000 μM glutamate generating a mixture of necrosis and apoptosis. Addition of neuroprotective small molecules reduced glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in a dose-dependent fashion. These data indicate that ESNs replicate many of the excitogenic mechanisms observed in primary neuron culture, offering a moderate-throughput model of excitotoxicity that combines the verisimilitude

  18. Complex N-Glycans Influence the Spatial Arrangement of Voltage Gated Potassium Channels in Membranes of Neuronal-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hall, M. Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A.; Edwards, Michael A. J.; Schwalbe, Ruth A.

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic electrical properties of a neuron depend on expression of voltage gated potassium (Kv) channel isoforms, as well as their distribution and density in the plasma membrane. Recently, we showed that N-glycosylation site occupancy of Kv3.1b modulated its placement in the cell body and neurites of a neuronal-derived cell line, B35 neuroblastoma cells. To extrapolate this mechanism to other N-glycosylated Kv channels, we evaluated the impact of N-glycosylation occupancy of Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 channels. Western blots revealed that wild type Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 α-subunits had complex and oligomannose N-glycans, respectively, and that abolishment of the N-glycosylation site(s) generated Kv proteins without N-glycans. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images revealed that N-glycans of Kv3.1a contributed to its placement in the cell membrane while N-glycans had no effect on the distribution of Kv1.1. Based on particle analysis of EGFP-Kv proteins in the adhered membrane, glycosylated forms of Kv3.1a, Kv1.1, and Kv3.1b had differences in the number, size or density of Kv protein clusters in the cell membrane of neurites and cell body of B35 cells. Differences were also observed between the unglycosylated forms of the Kv proteins. Cell dissociation assays revealed that cell-cell adhesion was increased by the presence of complex N-glycans of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, whereas cell adhesion was similar in the oligomannose and unglycosylated Kv1.1 subunit containing B35 cells. Our findings provide direct evidence that N-glycans of Kv3.1 splice variants contribute to the placement of these glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of neuronal-derived cells while those of Kv1.1 were absent. Further when the cell membrane distribution of the Kv channel was modified by N-glycans then the cell-cell adhesion properties were altered. Our study demonstrates that N-glycosylation of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, provides a mechanism for the distribution of these proteins to the cell

  19. Complex N-Glycans Influence the Spatial Arrangement of Voltage Gated Potassium Channels in Membranes of Neuronal-Derived Cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, M Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A; Edwards, Michael A J; Schwalbe, Ruth A

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic electrical properties of a neuron depend on expression of voltage gated potassium (Kv) channel isoforms, as well as their distribution and density in the plasma membrane. Recently, we showed that N-glycosylation site occupancy of Kv3.1b modulated its placement in the cell body and neurites of a neuronal-derived cell line, B35 neuroblastoma cells. To extrapolate this mechanism to other N-glycosylated Kv channels, we evaluated the impact of N-glycosylation occupancy of Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 channels. Western blots revealed that wild type Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 α-subunits had complex and oligomannose N-glycans, respectively, and that abolishment of the N-glycosylation site(s) generated Kv proteins without N-glycans. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images revealed that N-glycans of Kv3.1a contributed to its placement in the cell membrane while N-glycans had no effect on the distribution of Kv1.1. Based on particle analysis of EGFP-Kv proteins in the adhered membrane, glycosylated forms of Kv3.1a, Kv1.1, and Kv3.1b had differences in the number, size or density of Kv protein clusters in the cell membrane of neurites and cell body of B35 cells. Differences were also observed between the unglycosylated forms of the Kv proteins. Cell dissociation assays revealed that cell-cell adhesion was increased by the presence of complex N-glycans of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, whereas cell adhesion was similar in the oligomannose and unglycosylated Kv1.1 subunit containing B35 cells. Our findings provide direct evidence that N-glycans of Kv3.1 splice variants contribute to the placement of these glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of neuronal-derived cells while those of Kv1.1 were absent. Further when the cell membrane distribution of the Kv channel was modified by N-glycans then the cell-cell adhesion properties were altered. Our study demonstrates that N-glycosylation of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, provides a mechanism for the distribution of these proteins to the cell

  20. Single-Cell Detection of Secreted Aβ and sAPPα from Human IPSC-Derived Neurons and Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Mei-Chen; Muratore, Christina R.; Gierahn, Todd M.; Sullivan, Sarah E.; Srikanth, Priya; De Jager, Philip L.; Love, J. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Secreted factors play a central role in normal and pathological processes in every tissue in the body. The brain is composed of a highly complex milieu of different cell types and few methods exist that can identify which individual cells in a complex mixture are secreting specific analytes. By identifying which cells are responsible, we can better understand neural physiology and pathophysiology, more readily identify the underlying pathways responsible for analyte production, and ultimately use this information to guide the development of novel therapeutic strategies that target the cell types of relevance. We present here a method for detecting analytes secreted from single human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neural cells and have applied the method to measure amyloid β (Aβ) and soluble amyloid precursor protein-alpha (sAPPα), analytes central to Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Through these studies, we have uncovered the dynamic range of secretion profiles of these analytes from single iPSC-derived neuronal and glial cells and have molecularly characterized subpopulations of these cells through immunostaining and gene expression analyses. In examining Aβ and sAPPα secretion from single cells, we were able to identify previously unappreciated complexities in the biology of APP cleavage that could not otherwise have been found by studying averaged responses over pools of cells. This technique can be readily adapted to the detection of other analytes secreted by neural cells, which would have the potential to open new perspectives into human CNS development and dysfunction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We have established a technology that, for the first time, detects secreted analytes from single human neurons and astrocytes. We examine secretion of the Alzheimer's disease-relevant factors amyloid β (Aβ) and soluble amyloid precursor protein-alpha (sAPPα) and present novel findings that could not have been observed without a single

  1. Anterograde delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to striatum via nigral transduction of recombinant adeno-associated virus increases neuronal death but promotes neurogenic response following stroke.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Elin; Andsberg, Gunnar; Darsalia, Vladimer; Mohapel, Paul; Mandel, Ronald J; Kirik, Deniz; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2003-06-01

    To explore the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor for survival and generation of striatal neurons after stroke, recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors carrying brain-derived neurotrophic factor or green fluorescent protein genes were injected into right rat substantia nigra 4-5 weeks prior to 30 min ipsilateral of middle cerebral artery occlusion. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor-recombinant adeno-associated viral transduction markedly increased the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein by nigral cells. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor was transported anterogradely to the striatum and released in biologically active form, as revealed by the hypertrophic response of striatal neuropeptide Y-positive interneurons. Animals transduced with brain-derived neurotrophic factor-recombinant adeno-associated virus also exhibited abnormalities in body posture and movements, including tilted body to the right, choreiform movements of left forelimb and head, and spontaneous, so-called 'barrel' rotation along their long axis. The continuous delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor had no effect on the survival of striatal projection neurons after stroke, but exaggerated the loss of cholinergic, and parvalbumin- and neuropeptide Y-positive, gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic interneurons. The high brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in the animals subjected to stroke also gave rise to an increased number of striatal cells expressing doublecortin, a marker for migrating neuroblasts, and cells double-labelled with the mitotic marker, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-5'monophosphate, and early neuronal (Hu) or striatal neuronal (Meis2) markers. Our findings indicate that long-term anterograde delivery of high levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases the vulnerability of striatal interneurons to stroke-induced damage. Concomitantly, brain-derived neurotrophic factor potentiates the stroke-induced neurogenic response, at least at early stages.

  2. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor modulates the excitability of nociceptive trigeminal ganglion neurons via a paracrine mechanism following inflammation.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mamoru; Takahashi, Masayuki; Hara, Norifumi; Matsumoto, Shigeji

    2013-02-01

    Previous our report indicated that acute application of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) enhances the neuronal excitability of adult rat small-diameter trigeminal ganglion (TRG) neurons, which innervate the facial skin in the absence of neuropathic and inflammatory conditions. This study investigated whether under in vivo conditions, GDNF modulates the excitability of nociceptive Aδ-TRG neurons innervating the facial skin via a paracrine mechanism following inflammation. We used extracellular electrophysiological recording with multibarrel-electrodes in this study. Spontaneous Aδ-TRG neuronal activity was induced in control rats after iontophoretic application of GDNF into the trigeminal ganglia (TRGs). Noxious and non-noxious mechanical stimuli evoked Aδ-TRG neuronal firing rate were significantly increased by iontophoretic application of GDNF. The mean mechanical threshold of nociceptive TRG neurons was significantly decreased by GDNF application. The increased discharge frequency and decreased mechanical threshold induced by GDNF were antagonized by application of the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, K252b. The number of Aδ-TRG neurons with spontaneous firings and their firing rates in rats with inflammation induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant were significantly higher than control rats. The firing rates of Aδ-TRG spontaneous neuronal activity were significantly decreased by iontophoretic application of K252b in inflamed rats. K252b also inhibited Aδ-TRG neuron activity evoked by mechanical stimulation in inflamed rats. These results suggest that in vivo GDNF enhances the excitability of nociceptive Aδ-TRG neurons via a paracrine mechanism within TRGs following inflammation. GDNF paracrine mechanism could be important as a therapeutic target for trigeminal inflammatory hyperalgesia.

  3. Neuron-derived FGF9 is essential for scaffold formation of Bergmann radial fibers and migration of granule neurons in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yongshun; Chen, Lijie; Lin, Chunhong; Luo, Yongde; Tsai, Robert Y L; Wang, Fen

    2009-05-01

    Although fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) is widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), the function of FGF9 in neural development remains undefined. To address this question, we deleted the Fgf9 gene specifically in the neural tube and demonstrated that FGF9 plays a key role in the postnatal migration of cerebellar granule neurons. Fgf9-null mice showed severe ataxia associated with disrupted Bergmann fiber scaffold formation, impaired granule neuron migration, and upset Purkinje cell maturation. Ex vivo cultured wildtype or Fgf9-null glia displayed a stellate morphology. Coculture with wildtype neurons, but not Fgf9-deficient neurons, or treating with FGF1 or FGF9 induced the cells to adopt a radial glial morphology. In situ hybridization showed that Fgf9 was expressed in neurons and immunostaining revealed that FGF9 was broadly distributed in both neurons and Bergmann glial radial fibers. Genetic analyses revealed that the FGF9 activities in cerebellar development are primarily transduced by FGF receptors 1 and 2. Furthermore, inhibition of the MAP kinase pathway, but not the PI3K/AKT pathway, abrogated the FGF activity to induce glial morphological changes, suggesting that the activity is mediated by the MAP kinase pathway. This work demonstrates that granule neurons secrete FGF9 to control formation of the Bergmann fiber scaffold, which in turn, guides their own inward migration and maturation of Purkinje cells.

  4. Fully-coupled analysis of jet mixing problems. Three-dimensional PNS model, SCIP3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, D. E.; Sinha, N.; Dash, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical procedures formulated for the analysis of 3D jet mixing problems, as incorporated in the computer model, SCIP3D, are described. The overall methodology closely parallels that developed in the earlier 2D axisymmetric jet mixing model, SCIPVIS. SCIP3D integrates the 3D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) jet mixing equations, cast in mapped cartesian or cylindrical coordinates, employing the explicit MacCormack Algorithm. A pressure split variant of this algorithm is employed in subsonic regions with a sublayer approximation utilized for treating the streamwise pressure component. SCIP3D contains both the ks and kW turbulence models, and employs a two component mixture approach to treat jet exhausts of arbitrary composition. Specialized grid procedures are used to adjust the grid growth in accordance with the growth of the jet, including a hybrid cartesian/cylindrical grid procedure for rectangular jets which moves the hybrid coordinate origin towards the flow origin as the jet transitions from a rectangular to circular shape. Numerous calculations are presented for rectangular mixing problems, as well as for a variety of basic unit problems exhibiting overall capabilities of SCIP3D.

  5. Peripheral nervous system genes expressed in central neurons induce growth on inhibitory substrates.

    PubMed

    Buchser, William J; Smith, Robin P; Pardinas, Jose R; Haddox, Candace L; Hutson, Thomas; Moon, Lawrence; Hoffman, Stanley R; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2012-01-01

    Trauma to the spinal cord and brain can result in irreparable loss of function. This failure of recovery is in part due to inhibition of axon regeneration by myelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons exhibit increased regenerative ability compared to central nervous system neurons, even in the presence of inhibitory environments. Previously, we identified over a thousand genes differentially expressed in PNS neurons relative to CNS neurons. These genes represent intrinsic differences that may account for the PNS's enhanced regenerative ability. Cerebellar neurons were transfected with cDNAs for each of these PNS genes to assess their ability to enhance neurite growth on inhibitory (CSPG) or permissive (laminin) substrates. Using high content analysis, we evaluated the phenotypic profile of each neuron to extract meaningful data for over 1100 genes. Several known growth associated proteins potentiated neurite growth on laminin. Most interestingly, novel genes were identified that promoted neurite growth on CSPGs (GPX3, EIF2B5, RBMX). Bioinformatic approaches also uncovered a number of novel gene families that altered neurite growth of CNS neurons.

  6. Src Family Kinase Inhibitors Antagonize the Toxicity of Multiple Serotypes of Botulinum Neurotoxin in Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, James C.; Nuss, Jonathan E.; Wanner, Laura M.; Peyser, Brian D.; Du, Hao T.; Gomba, Glenn Y.; Kota, Krishna P.; Panchal, Rekha G.; Gussio, Rick; Kane, Christopher D.; Tessarollo, Lino

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the causative agents of botulism, are potent inhibitors of neurotransmitter release from motor neurons. There are currently no drugs to treat BoNT intoxication after the onset of the disease symptoms. In this study, we explored how modulation of key host pathways affects the process of BoNT intoxication in human motor neurons, focusing on Src family kinase (SFK) signaling. Motor neurons derived from human embryonic stem (hES) cells were treated with a panel of SFK inhibitors and intoxicated with BoNT serotypes A, B, or E (which are responsible for >95 % of human botulism cases). Subsequently, it was found that bosutinib, dasatinib, KX2-391, PP1, PP2, Src inhibitor-1, and SU6656 significantly antagonized all three of the serotypes. Furthermore, the data indicated that the treatment of hES-derived motor neurons with multiple SFK inhibitors increased the antagonistic effect synergistically. Mechanistically, the small molecules appear to inhibit BoNTs by targeting host pathways necessary for intoxication and not by directly inhibiting the toxins’ proteolytic activity. Importantly, the identified inhibitors are all well-studied with some in clinical trials while others are FDA-approved drugs. Overall, this study emphasizes the importance of targeting host neuronal pathways, rather than the toxin’s enzymatic components, to antagonize multiple BoNT serotypes in motor neurons. PMID:25782580

  7. 5-HT2 receptors mediate functional modulation of GABAa receptors and inhibitory synaptic transmissions in human iPS-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haitao; Hu, Lingli; Liu, Chunhua; Su, Zhenghui; Wang, Lihui; Pan, Guangjin; Guo, Yiping; He, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Neural progenitors differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) hold potentials for treating neurological diseases. Serotonin has potent effects on neuronal functions through multiple receptors, underlying a variety of neural disorders. Glutamate and GABA receptors have been proven functional in neurons differentiated from iPS, however, little is known about 5-HT receptor-mediated modulation in such neuronal networks. In the present study, human iPS were differentiated into cells possessing featured physiological properties of cortical neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to examine the involvement of 5-HT2 receptors in functional modulation of GABAergic synaptic transmission. We found that serotonin and DOI (a selective agonist of 5-HT2A/C receptor) reversibly reduced GABA-activated currents, and this 5-HT2A/C receptor mediated inhibition required G protein, PLC, PKC, and Ca2+ signaling. Serotonin increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), which could be mimicked by α-methylserotonin, a 5-HT2 receptor agonist. In contrast, DOI reduced both frequency and amplitude of mIPSCs. These findings suggested that in iPS-derived human neurons serotonin postsynaptically reduced GABAa receptor function through 5-HT2A/C receptors, but presynaptically other 5-HT2 receptors counteracted the action of 5-HT2A/C receptors. Functional expression of serotonin receptors in human iPS-derived neurons provides a pre-requisite for their normal behaviors after grafting. PMID:26837719

  8. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor is a survival factor for isolectin B4-positive, but not vanilloid receptor 1-positive, neurons in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Melissa; Davis, Brian M; Woodbury, C Jeffrey; Burkett, John N; Koerber, H Richard; Simpson, James F; Albers, Kathryn M

    2002-05-15

    Most, if not all, nociceptor sensory neurons are dependent on nerve growth factor (NGF) during early embryonic development. A large subpopulation of these sensory neurons loses NGF dependency between embryonic day 16 and postnatal day 14 and become responsive to glial cell line-derived growth factor (GDNF), a member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) family. To examine the survival and phenotypic effects of GDNF on sensory neurons in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress GDNF in the skin. GDNF-overexpresser mice had increased numbers of small unmyelinated sensory neurons that express the tyrosine kinase receptor Ret and bind the plant isolectin B4 (IB4). Surprisingly, in wild-type and transgenic mice, few ( approximately 2%) IB4-positive neurons expressed the vanilloid receptor VR1, a heat-sensitive receptor expressed by many IB4-positive neurons of the rat. Thus, in mouse, GDNF-dependent IB4-positive neurons must use a non-VR1 heat receptor. In addition, the behavior of GDNF-overexpresser animals to noxious heat or mechanical stimuli was indistinguishable from wild-type animals, indicating that, on a behavioral level, peripherally applied GDNF does not alter the sensitivity of the somatosensory system.

  9. MECP2e1 isoform mutation affects the form and function of neurons derived from Rett syndrome patient iPS cells.

    PubMed

    Djuric, Ugljesa; Cheung, Aaron Y L; Zhang, Wenbo; Mok, Rebecca S; Lai, Wesley; Piekna, Alina; Hendry, Jason A; Ross, P Joel; Pasceri, Peter; Kim, Dae-Sung; Salter, Michael W; Ellis, James

    2015-04-01

    MECP2 mutations cause the X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder Rett Syndrome (RTT) by consistently altering the protein encoded by the MECP2e1 alternative transcript. While mutations that simultaneously affect both MECP2e1 and MECP2e2 isoforms have been widely studied, the consequence of MECP2e1 deficiency on human neurons remains unknown. Here we report the first isoform-specific patient induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) model of RTT. RTTe1 patient iPS cell-derived neurons retain an inactive X-chromosome and express only the mutant allele. Single-cell mRNA analysis demonstrated they have a molecular signature of cortical neurons. Mutant neurons exhibited a decrease in soma size, reduced dendritic complexity and decreased cell capacitance, consistent with impaired neuronal maturation. The soma size phenotype was rescued cell-autonomously by MECP2e1 transduction in a level-dependent manner but not by MECP2e2 gene transfer. Importantly, MECP2e1 mutant neurons showed a dysfunction in action potential generation, voltage-gated Na(+) currents, and miniature excitatory synaptic current frequency and amplitude. We conclude that MECP2e1 mutation affects soma size, information encoding properties and synaptic connectivity in human neurons that are defective in RTT.

  10. Healthy human CSF promotes glial differentiation of hESC-derived neural cells while retaining spontaneous activity in existing neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Kiiski, Heikki; Aänismaa, Riikka; Tenhunen, Jyrki; Hagman, Sanna; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Aho, Antti; Yli-Hankala, Arvi; Bendel, Stepani; Skottman, Heli; Narkilahti, Susanna

    2013-06-15

    The possibilities of human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells from the basic research tool to a treatment option in regenerative medicine have been well recognized. These cells also offer an interesting tool for in vitro models of neuronal networks to be used for drug screening and neurotoxicological studies and for patient/disease specific in vitro models. Here, as aiming to develop a reductionistic in vitro human neuronal network model, we tested whether human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neural cells could be cultured in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in order to better mimic the in vivo conditions. Our results showed that CSF altered the differentiation of hESC-derived neural cells towards glial cells at the expense of neuronal differentiation. The proliferation rate was reduced in CSF cultures. However, even though the use of CSF as the culture medium altered the glial vs. neuronal differentiation rate, the pre-existing spontaneous activity of the neuronal networks persisted throughout the study. These results suggest that it is possible to develop fully human cell and culture-based environments that can further be modified for various in vitro modeling purposes.

  11. Evaluation of the rotenone-induced activation of the Nrf2 pathway in a neuronal model derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zagoura, Dimitra; Canovas-Jorda, David; Pistollato, Francesca; Bremer-Hoffmann, Susanne; Bal-Price, Anna

    2016-09-09

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are considered as a powerful tool for drug and chemical screening and development of new in vitro testing strategies in the field of toxicology, including neurotoxicity evaluation. These cells are able to expand and efficiently differentiate into different types of neuronal and glial cells as well as peripheral neurons. These human cells-based neuronal models serve as test systems for mechanistic studies on different pathways involved in neurotoxicity. One of the well-known mechanisms that are activated by chemically-induced oxidative stress is the Nrf2 signaling pathway. Therefore, in the current study, we evaluated whether Nrf2 signaling machinery is expressed in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)-derived mixed neuronal/glial culture and if so whether it becomes activated by rotenone-induced oxidative stress mediated by complex I inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. Rotenone was found to induce the activation of Nrf2 signaling particularly at the highest tested concentration (100 nM), as shown by Nrf2 nuclear translocation and the up-regulation of the Nrf2-downstream antioxidant enzymes, NQO1 and SRXN1. Interestingly, exposure to rotenone also increased the number of astroglial cells in which Nrf2 activation may play an important role in neuroprotection. Moreover, rotenone caused cell death of dopaminergic neurons since a decreased percentage of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH(+)) cells was observed. The obtained results suggest that hiPSC-derived mixed neuronal/glial culture could be a valuable in vitro human model for the establishment of neuronal specific assays in order to link Nrf2 pathway activation (biomarker of oxidative stress) with additional neuronal specific readouts that could be applied to in vitro neurotoxicity evaluation.

  12. Expression pattern of neurotrophins and their receptors during neuronal differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells in simulated microgravity condition

    PubMed Central

    Zarrinpour, Vajiheh; Hajebrahimi, Zahra; Jafarinia, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Studies have confirmed that microgravity, as a mechanical factor, influences both differentiation and function of mesenchymal stem cells. Here we investigated the effects of simulated microgravity on neural differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Materials and Methods: We have used a fast rotating clinostat (clinorotation) to simulate microgravity condition. Real-time PCR and flow cytometry analysis were used to evaluate the regulation of neurotrophins, their receptors, and neural markers by simulated microgravity and their impact on neural differentiation of cells. Results: Our data revealed that simulation microgravity up-regulated the expression of MAP-2, BDNF, TrkB, NT-3, and TrkC both before and after neural differentiation. Also, the neural cells derived from ADSCs in microgravity condition expressed more MAP-2, GFAP, and synaptophysin protein in comparison to the 1G control. Conclusion: We showed that simulated microgravity can enhance the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into neurons. Our findings provide a new strategy for differentiation of ADSCs to neural-like cells and probably other cell lineages. Meanwhile, microgravity simulation had no adverse effects on the viability of the cells and could be used as a new environment to successfully manipulate cells. PMID:28293395

  13. Nkx2.1-derived astrocytes and neurons together with Slit2 are indispensable for anterior commissure formation

    PubMed Central

    Minocha, Shilpi; Valloton, Delphine; Ypsilanti, Athena R.; Fiumelli, Hubert; Allen, Elizabeth A.; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Marin, Oscar; Chédotal, Alain; Hornung, Jean-Pierre; Lebrand, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Guidepost cells present at and surrounding the midline provide guidance cues that orient the growing axons through commissures. Here we show that the transcription factor Nkx2.1 known to control the specification of GABAergic interneurons also regulates the differentiation of astroglia and polydendrocytes within the mouse anterior commissure (AC). Nkx2.1-positive glia were found to originate from three germinal regions of the ventral telencephalon. Nkx2.1-derived glia were observed in and around the AC region by E14.5. Thereafter, a selective cell ablation strategy showed a synergistic role of Nkx2.1-derived cells, both GABAergic interneurons and astroglia, towards the proper formation of the AC. Finally, our results reveal that the Nkx2.1-regulated cells mediate AC axon guidance through the expression of the repellent cue, Slit2. These results bring forth interesting insights about the spatial and temporal origin of midline telencephalic glia, and highlight the importance of neurons and astroglia towards the formation of midline commissures. PMID:25904499

  14. Resin-acid derivatives as potent electrostatic openers of voltage-gated K channels and suppressors of neuronal excitability.

    PubMed

    Ottosson, Nina E; Wu, Xiongyu; Nolting, Andreas; Karlsson, Urban; Lund, Per-Eric; Ruda, Katinka; Svensson, Stefan; Konradsson, Peter; Elinder, Fredrik

    2015-08-24

    Voltage-gated ion channels generate cellular excitability, cause diseases when mutated, and act as drug targets in hyperexcitability diseases, such as epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia and pain. Unfortunately, many patients do not satisfactorily respond to the present-day drugs. We found that the naturally occurring resin acid dehydroabietic acid (DHAA) is a potent opener of a voltage-gated K channel and thereby a potential suppressor of cellular excitability. DHAA acts via a non-traditional mechanism, by electrostatically activating the voltage-sensor domain, rather than directly targeting the ion-conducting pore domain. By systematic iterative modifications of DHAA we synthesized 71 derivatives and found 32 compounds more potent than DHAA. The most potent compound, Compound 77, is 240 times more efficient than DHAA in opening a K channel. This and other potent compounds reduced excitability in dorsal root ganglion neurons, suggesting that resin-acid derivatives can become the first members of a new family of drugs with the potential for treatment of hyperexcitability diseases.

  15. The potential of mesenchymal stem cells derived from amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid for neuronal regenerative therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Kyung-Bon; Kim, Min Kyu

    2014-01-01

    The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are derived from the mesoderm, are considered as a readily available source for tissue engineering. They have multipotent differentiation capacity and can be differentiated into various cell types. Many studies have demonstrated that the MSCs identified from amniotic membrane (AM-MSCs) and amniotic fluid (AF-MSCs) are shows advantages for many reasons, including the possibility of noninvasive isolation, multipotency, self-renewal, low immunogenicity, anti-inflammatory and nontumorigenicity properties, and minimal ethical problem. The AF-MSCs and AM-MSCs may be appropriate sources of mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine, as an alternative to embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Recently, regenerative treatments such as tissue engineering and cell transplantation have shown potential in clinical applications for degenerative diseases. Therefore, amnion and MSCs derived from amnion can be applied to cell therapy in neuro-degeneration diseases. In this review, we will describe the potential of AM-MSCs and AF-MSCs, with particular focus on cures for neuronal degenerative diseases. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(3): 135-140] PMID:24499672

  16. Antineurodegenerative effect of phenolic extracts and caffeic acid derivatives in romaine lettuce on neuron-like PC-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Sung-Eun; Yoon, Hyungeun; Nam, Tae-Gyu; Heo, Ho Jin; Lee, Chang Yong; Kim, Dae-Ok

    2010-08-01

    In recent decades, romaine lettuce has been one of the fastest growing vegetables with respect to its consumption and production. An understanding is needed of the effect of major phenolic phytochemicals from romaine lettuce on biological protection for neuron-like PC-12 cells. Phenolics in fresh romaine lettuce were extracted, and then its total phenolics and total antioxidant capacity were measured spectrophotometrically. Neuroprotective effects of phenolic extract of romaine lettuce and its pure caffeic acid derivatives (caffeic, chicoric, chlorogenic, and isochlorogenic acids) in PC-12 cells were evaluated using two different in vitro methods: lactate dehydrogenase release and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction assays. Total phenolics and total antioxidant capacity of 100 g of fresh romaine lettuce averaged 22.7 mg of gallic acid equivalents and 31.0 mg of vitamin C equivalents, respectively. The phenolic extract of romaine lettuce protected PC-12 cells against oxidative stress caused by H(2)O(2) in a dose-dependent manner. Isochlorogenic acid, one of the phenolics in romaine lettuce, showed stronger neuroprotection than the other three caffeic acid derivatives also found in the lettuce. Although romaine lettuce had lower levels of phenolics and antioxidant capacity compared to other common vegetables, its contribution to total antioxidant capacity and antineurodegenerative effect in human diets would be higher because of higher amounts of its daily per capita consumption compared to other common vegetables.

  17. The Proliferation Study of Hips Cell-Derived Neuronal Progenitors on Poly-Caprolactone Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Havasi, Parvaneh; Soleimani, Masoud; Morovvati, Hassan; Bakhshandeh, Behnaz; Nabiuni, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The native inability of nervous system to regenerate, encourage researchers to consider neural tissue engineering as a potential treatment for spinal cord injuries. Considering the suitable characteristics of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) for tissue regeneration applications, in this study we investigated the adhesion, viability and proliferation of neural progenitors (derived from human iPSCs) on aligned poly-caprolactone (PCL) nanofibers. Methods Aligned poly-caprolactone nanofibrous scaffold was fabricated by electrospinning and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Through neural induction, neural progenitor cells were derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. After cell seeding on the scaffolds, their proliferation was investigated on different days of culture. Results According to the SEM micrographs, the electrospun PCL scaffolds were aligned along with uniformed morphology. Evaluation of adhesion and viability of neural progenitor cells on plate (control) and PCL scaffold illustrated increasing trends in proliferation but this rate was higher in scaffold group. The statistical analyses confirmed significant differences between groups on 36h and 48h. Discussion Evaluation of cell proliferation along with morphological assessments, staining and SEM finding suggested biocompatibility of the PCL scaffolds and suitability of the combination of the mentioned scaffold and human iPS cells for neural regeneration. PMID:25337369

  18. Electrical Responses and Spontaneous Activity of Human iPS-Derived Neuronal Networks Characterized for 3-month Culture with 4096-Electrode Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Hayder; Maccione, Alessandro; Marinaro, Federica; Zordan, Stefano; Nieus, Thierry; Berdondini, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The recent availability of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) holds great promise as a novel source of human-derived neurons for cell and tissue therapies as well as for in vitro drug screenings that might replace the use of animal models. However, there is still a considerable lack of knowledge on the functional properties of hiPSC-derived neuronal networks, thus limiting their application. Here, upon optimization of cell culture protocols, we demonstrate that both spontaneous and evoked electrical spiking activities of these networks can be characterized on-chip by taking advantage of the resolution provided by CMOS multielectrode arrays (CMOS-MEAs). These devices feature a large and closely-spaced array of 4096 simultaneously recording electrodes and multi-site on-chip electrical stimulation. Our results show that networks of human-derived neurons can respond to electrical stimulation with a physiological repertoire of spike waveforms after 3 months of cell culture, a period of time during which the network undergoes the expression of developing patterns of spontaneous spiking activity. To achieve this, we have investigated the impact on the network formation and on the emerging network-wide functional properties induced by different biochemical substrates, i.e., poly-dl-ornithine (PDLO), poly-l-ornithine (PLO), and polyethylenimine (PEI), that were used as adhesion promoters for the cell culture. Interestingly, we found that neuronal networks grown on PDLO coated substrates show significantly higher spontaneous firing activity, reliable responses to low-frequency electrical stimuli, and an appropriate level of PSD-95 that may denote a physiological neuronal maturation profile and synapse stabilization. However, our results also suggest that even 3-month culture might not be sufficient for human-derived neuronal network maturation. Taken together, our results highlight the tight relationship existing between substrate coatings and emerging network

  19. Electrical Responses and Spontaneous Activity of Human iPS-Derived Neuronal Networks Characterized for 3-month Culture with 4096-Electrode Arrays.

    PubMed

    Amin, Hayder; Maccione, Alessandro; Marinaro, Federica; Zordan, Stefano; Nieus, Thierry; Berdondini, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The recent availability of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) holds great promise as a novel source of human-derived neurons for cell and tissue therapies as well as for in vitro drug screenings that might replace the use of animal models. However, there is still a considerable lack of knowledge on the functional properties of hiPSC-derived neuronal networks, thus limiting their application. Here, upon optimization of cell culture protocols, we demonstrate that both spontaneous and evoked electrical spiking activities of these networks can be characterized on-chip by taking advantage of the resolution provided by CMOS multielectrode arrays (CMOS-MEAs). These devices feature a large and closely-spaced array of 4096 simultaneously recording electrodes and multi-site on-chip electrical stimulation. Our results show that networks of human-derived neurons can respond to electrical stimulation with a physiological repertoire of spike waveforms after 3 months of cell culture, a period of time during which the network undergoes the expression of developing patterns of spontaneous spiking activity. To achieve this, we have investigated the impact on the network formation and on the emerging network-wide functional properties induced by different biochemical substrates, i.e., poly-dl-ornithine (PDLO), poly-l-ornithine (PLO), and polyethylenimine (PEI), that were used as adhesion promoters for the cell culture. Interestingly, we found that neuronal networks grown on PDLO coated substrates show significantly higher spontaneous firing activity, reliable responses to low-frequency electrical stimuli, and an appropriate level of PSD-95 that may denote a physiological neuronal maturation profile and synapse stabilization. However, our results also suggest that even 3-month culture might not be sufficient for human-derived neuronal network maturation. Taken together, our results highlight the tight relationship existing between substrate coatings and emerging network

  20. hamlet, a binary genetic switch between single- and multiple- dendrite neuron morphology.

    PubMed

    Moore, Adrian W; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2002-08-23

    The dendritic morphology of neurons determines the number and type of inputs they receive. In the Drosophila peripheral nervous system (PNS), the external sensory (ES) neurons have a single nonbranched dendrite, whereas the lineally related multidendritic (MD) neurons have extensively branched dendritic arbors. We report that hamlet is a binary genetic switch between these contrasting morphological types. In hamlet mutants, ES neurons are converted to an MD fate, whereas ectopic hamlet expression in MD precursors results in transformation of MD neurons into ES neurons. Moreover, hamlet expression induced in MD neurons undergoing dendrite outgrowth drastically reduces arbor branching.

  1. Implant-derived magnesium induces local neuronal production of CGRP to improve bone-fracture healing in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifeng; Xu, Jiankun; Ruan, Ye Chun; Yu, Mei Kuen; O’Laughlin, Micheal; Wise, Helen; Chen, Di; Tian, Li; Shi, Dufang; Wang, Jiali; Chen, Sihui; Feng, Jian Q; Chow, Dick Ho Kiu; Xie, Xinhui; Zheng, Lizhen; Huang, Le; Huang, Shuo; Leung, Kwoksui; Lu, Na; Zhao, Lan; Li, Huafang; Zhao, Dewei; Guo, Xia; Chan, Kaiming; Witte, Frank; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Zheng, Yufeng; Qin, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Orthopedic implants containing biodegradable magnesium have been used for fracture repair with considerable efficacy; however, the underlying mechanisms by which these implants improve fracture healing remain elusive. Here we show the formation of abundant new bone at peripheral cortical sites after intramedullary implantation of a pin containing ultrapure magnesium into the intact distal femur in rats. This response was accompanied by substantial increases of neuronal calcitonin gene-related polypeptide-α (CGRP) in both the peripheral cortex of the femur and the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Surgical removal of the periosteum, capsaicin denervation of sensory nerves or knockdown in vivo of the CGRP-receptor-encoding genes Calcrl or Ramp1 substantially reversed the magnesium-induced osteogenesis that we observed in this model. Overexpression of these genes, however, enhanced magnesium-induced osteogenesis. We further found that an elevation of extracellular magnesium induces magnesium transporter 1 (MAGT1)-dependent and transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7)-dependent magnesium entry, as well as an increase in intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the accumulation of terminal synaptic vesicles in isolated rat DRG neurons. In isolated rat periosteum-derived stem cells, CGRP induces CALCRL-and RAMP1-dependent activation of cAMP-responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) and SP7 (also known as osterix), and thus enhances osteogenic differentiation of these stem cells. Furthermore, we have developed an innovative, magnesium-containing intramedullary nail that facilitates femur fracture repair in rats with ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. Taken together, these findings reveal a previously undefined role of magnesium in promoting CGRP-mediated osteogenic differentiation, which suggests the therapeutic potential of this ion in orthopedics. PMID:27571347

  2. ZNF804A Transcriptional Networks in Differentiating Neurons Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Human Origin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Lin, Mingyan; Hrabovsky, Anastasia; Pedrosa, Erika; Dean, Jason; Jain, Swati; Zheng, Deyou; Lachman, Herbert M

    2015-01-01

    ZNF804A (Zinc Finger Protein 804A) has been identified as a candidate gene for schizophrenia (SZ), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and bipolar disorder (BD) in replicated genome wide association studies (GWAS) and by copy number variation (CNV) analysis. Although its function has not been well-characterized, ZNF804A contains a C2H2-type zinc-finger domain, suggesting that it has DNA binding properties, and consequently, a role in regulating gene expression. To further explore the role of ZNF804A on gene expression and its downstream targets, we used a gene knockdown (KD) approach to reduce its expression in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). KD was accomplished by RNA interference (RNAi) using lentiviral particles containing shRNAs that target ZNF804A mRNA. Stable transduced NPC lines were generated after puromycin selection. A control cell line expressing a random (scrambled) shRNA was also generated. Neuronal differentiation was induced, RNA was harvested after 14 days and transcriptome analysis was carried out using RNA-seq. 1815 genes were found to be differentially expressed at a nominally significant level (p<0.05); 809 decreased in expression in the KD samples, while 1106 increased. Of these, 370 achieved genome wide significance (FDR<0.05); 125 were lower in the KD samples, 245 were higher. Pathway analysis showed that genes involved in interferon-signaling were enriched among those that were down-regulated in the KD samples. Correspondingly, ZNF804A KD was found to affect interferon-alpha 2 (IFNA2)-mediated gene expression. The findings suggest that ZNF804A may affect a differentiating neuron's response to inflammatory cytokines, which is consistent with models of SZ and ASD that support a role for infectious disease, and/or autoimmunity in a subgroup of patients.

  3. Alpha-Latrotoxin Rescues SNAP-25 from BoNT/A-Mediated Proteolysis in Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mesngon, Mariano; McNutt, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) exhibit zinc-dependent proteolytic activity against members of the core synaptic membrane fusion complex, preventing neurotransmitter release and resulting in neuromuscular paralysis. No pharmacologic therapies have been identified that clinically relieve botulinum poisoning. The black widow spider venom α-latrotoxin (LTX) has the potential to attenuate the severity or duration of BoNT-induced paralysis in neurons via the induction of synaptic degeneration and remodeling. The potential for LTX to antagonize botulinum poisoning was evaluated in embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs), using a novel screening assay designed around the kinetics of BoNT/A activation. Exposure of ESNs to 400 pM LTX for 6.5 or 13 min resulted in the nearly complete restoration of uncleaved SNAP-25 within 48 h, whereas treatment with 60 mM K+ had no effect. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that LTX treatment caused a profound increase in Ca2+ influx and evidence of excitotoxicity, though ESNs remained viable 48 h after LTX treatment. This is the first instance of a cell-based treatment that has shown the ability to eliminate BoNT activity. These data suggest that LTX treatment may provide the basis for a new class of therapeutic approach to BoNT intoxication and may contribute to an improved understanding of long-term mechanisms of BoNT intoxication and recovery. They further demonstrate that ESNs are a novel, responsive and biologically relevant model for LTX research and BoNT therapeutic drug discovery. PMID:22069721

  4. PNS and statistical experiments simulation in subcritical systems using Monte-Carlo method on example of Yalina-Thermal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovich, Sergey; Talamo, A.; Burnos, V.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Fokov, Yu.

    2014-06-01

    In subcritical systems driven by an external neutron source, the experimental methods based on pulsed neutron source and statistical techniques play an important role for reactivity measurement. Simulation of these methods is very time-consumed procedure. For simulations in Monte-Carlo programs several improvements for neutronic calculations have been made. This paper introduces a new method for simulation PNS and statistical measurements. In this method all events occurred in the detector during simulation are stored in a file using PTRAC feature in the MCNP. After that with a special code (or post-processing) PNS and statistical methods can be simulated. Additionally different shapes of neutron pulses and its lengths as well as dead time of detectors can be included into simulation. The methods described above were tested on subcritical assembly Yalina-Thermal, located in Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research SOSNY, Minsk, Belarus. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results was shown.

  5. The GUINEVERE experiment: First PNS measurements in a lead moderated sub-critical fast core

    SciTech Connect

    Thyebault, H. E.; Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecouey, J. L.; Lehaut, G.; Marie, N.; Ban, G.

    2012-07-01

    The GUINEVERE (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) experimental program is dedicated to the study of Accelerator Driven System reactivity monitoring. It was partly carried out within the EUROTRANS integrated project (EURATOM FP6). GUINEVERE consists in coupling the fast core of the VENUS-F reactor (SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium)), composed of enriched uranium and solid lead, with a T(d,n) neutron source provided by the GENEPI-3C deuteron accelerator. This neutron source can be operated in several modes: pulsed mode, continuous mode and also continuous mode with short beam interruptions (the so called 'beam trips'). In the past, the key questions of the reactivity control and monitoring in a subcritical system were studied in the MUSE experiments (1998-2004). These experiments highlighted the difficulty to determine precisely the reactivity with a single technique. This led to investigate a new strategy which is based on the combination of the relative reactivity monitoring via the core power to beam current relationship with absolute reactivity cross-checks during programmed beam interruptions. Consequently, to determine the reactivity, several dynamical techniques of reactivity determination have to be compared. In addition, their accuracy for absolute reactivity determination must be evaluated using a reference reactivity determination technique (from a critical state: rod drop and MSM measurements). The first sub-critical configuration which was studied was around k{sub eff} = 0.96 (SCI). Pulsed Neutron Source experiments (PNS) were carried out. The neutron population decrease was measured using fission chambers in different locations inside the core and the reflector. Neutron population time decrease was analyzed using fitting techniques and the Area Method Results obtained for the SCI reactivity will be shown, discussed and compared to the reference value given by the MSM method. (authors)

  6. Insulin-like growth factor-I is a differentiation factor for postmitotic CNS stem cell-derived neuronal precursors: distinct actions from those of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Arsenijevic, Y; Weiss, S

    1998-03-15

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) has been reported previously to promote the proliferation, survival, and maturation of sympathetic neuroblasts, the genesis of retinal neurons, and the survival of CNS projection and motor neurons. Here we asked whether IGF-I could promote the in vitro differentiation of postmitotic mammalian CNS neuronal precursors derived from multipotent epidermal growth factor (EGF)-responsive stem cells. In the absence of IGF-I, virtually no neurons were present in cultured stem cell progeny, whereas IGF-I increased neuron number by eight- to 40-fold. Brief exposures (2 hr) to IGF-I were sufficient to allow for neuronal differentiation without affecting proliferation or survival. IGF-I actions could be mimicked by insulin and IGF-II at concentrations that correspond to the pharmacology of the IGF-I receptor, the latter for which the mRNA was detected in undifferentiated stem cell progeny. Although ineffectual alone at low concentrations (10 nM) that would activate its own receptor, insulin was able to potentiate the actions of IGF-I by acting on mitotically active neural precursors. When neuronal precursor differentiation by IGF-I was examined in relation to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), two important observations were made: (1) BDNF could potentiate the differentiating actions of IGF-I plus insulin, and (2) BDNF could act on a separate population of precursors that did not require IGF-I plus insulin for differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that IGF-I and BDNF may act together or sequentially to promote neuronal precursor differentiation.

  7. Intracellular iron concentration of neurons with and without perineuronal nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Anja; Reinert, Tilo; Morawski, Markus; Brückner, Gert; Arendt, Thomas; Butz, Tilman

    2007-07-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease are characterized by abnormally high concentrations of iron in the affected brain areas. Iron is believed to contribute to oxidative stress by catalysing radical generation and subsequently causing neuronal death. Interestingly, subpopulations of neurons are less vulnerable against degeneration. One of these subpopulations possesses a specialized extracellular matrix arranged as a perineuronal net (PN), a structure with poorly understood functions. In order to differentiate between neurons with and without PN according to their iron concentrations we have performed a μPIXE study at the Leipzig LIPSION laboratory. PN-ensheathed neurons in selected brain areas were detected by lectin-histochemical staining with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). The staining was intensified by DAB- nickel by an established method enabling the visualisation of the PNs by nuclear microscopy. The cellular concentration of iron in the rat brain was about 1 mmol/l (ca. 30 μg/g dw). First results of subcellular analysis showed that the intracellular iron concentration of PN-ensheathed neurons tends to be slightly increased in comparison to neurons without PNs. The difference in intracellular iron concentrations could be an effect of the PNs.

  8. Microglia-derived proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta induce Purkinje neuronal apoptosis via their receptors in hypoxic neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Charanjit; Sivakumar, Viswanathan; Zou, Zhirong; Ling, Eng-Ang

    2014-01-01

    The developing cerebellum is extremely vulnerable to hypoxia which can damage the Purkinje neurons. We hypothesized that this might be mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) derived from activated microglia as in other brain areas. One-day-old rats were subjected to hypoxia following, which the expression changes of various proteins in the cerebellum including hypoxia inducible factor-1α, TNF-α, IL-1β, TNF-R1 and IL-1R1 were analyzed. Following hypoxic exposure, TNF-α and IL-1β immunoexpression in microglia was enhanced coupled by that of TNF-R1 and IL-1R1 in the Purkinje neurons. Along with this, hypoxic microglia in vitro showed enhanced release of TNF-α and IL-1β whose receptor expression was concomitantly increased in the Purkinje neurons. In addition, nitric oxide (NO) level was significantly increased in the cerebellum and cultured microglia subjected to hypoxic exposure. Moreover, cultured Purkinje neurons treated with conditioned medium derived from hypoxic microglia underwent apoptosis but the incidence was significantly reduced when the cells were treated with the same medium that was neutralized with TNF-α/IL-1β antibody. We conclude that hypoxic microglia in the neonatal cerebellum produce increased amounts of NO, TNF-α and IL-1β which when acting via their respective receptors could induce Purkinje neuron death.

  9. Genetic manipulation of single neurons in vivo reveals specific roles of flamingo in neuronal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Neal T; Li, Wenjun; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2002-07-01

    To study the roles of intracellular factors in neuronal morphogenesis, we used the mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker (MARCM) technique to visualize identifiable single multiple dendritic (MD) neurons in living Drosophila larvae. We found that individual neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) developed clear morphological polarity and diverse dendritic branching patterns in larval stages. Each MD neuron in the same dorsal cluster developed a unique dendritic field, suggesting that they have specific physiological functions. Single-neuron analysis revealed that Flamingo did not affect the general dendritic branching patterns in postmitotic neurons. Instead, Flamingo limited the extension of one or more dorsal dendrites without grossly affecting lateral branches. The dendritic overextension phenotype was partially conferred by the precocious initiation of dorsal dendrites in flamingo mutant embryos. In addition, Flamingo is required cell autonomously to promote axonal growth and to prevent premature axonal branching of PNS neurons. Our molecular analysis also indicated that the amino acid sequence near the first EGF motif is important for the proper localization and function of Flamingo. These results demonstrate that Flamingo plays a role in early neuronal differentiation and exerts specific effects on dendrites and axons.

  10. Large-scale generation of human iPSC-derived neural stem cells/early neural progenitor cells and their neuronal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    D’Aiuto, Leonardo; Zhi, Yun; Kumar Das, Dhanjit; Wilcox, Madeleine R; Johnson, Jon W; McClain, Lora; MacDonald, Matthew L; Di Maio, Roberto; Schurdak, Mark E; Piazza, Paolo; Viggiano, Luigi; Sweet, Robert; Kinchington, Paul R; Bhattacharjee, Ayantika G; Yolken, Robert; Nimgaonka, Vishwajit L

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-based technologies offer an unprecedented opportunity to perform high-throughput screening of novel drugs for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Such screenings require a robust and scalable method for generating large numbers of mature, differentiated neuronal cells. Currently available methods based on differentiation of embryoid bodies (EBs) or directed differentiation of adherent culture systems are either expensive or are not scalable. We developed a protocol for large-scale generation of neuronal stem cells (NSCs)/early neural progenitor cells (eNPCs) and their differentiation into neurons. Our scalable protocol allows robust and cost-effective generation of NSCs/eNPCs from iPSCs. Following culture in neurobasal medium supplemented with B27 and BDNF, NSCs/eNPCs differentiate predominantly into vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1) positive neurons. Targeted mass spectrometry analysis demonstrates that iPSC-derived neurons express ligand-gated channels and other synaptic proteins and whole-cell patch-clamp experiments indicate that these channels are functional. The robust and cost-effective differentiation protocol described here for large-scale generation of NSCs/eNPCs and their differentiation into neurons paves the way for automated high-throughput screening of drugs for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25629202

  11. Development of a pluripotent stem cell derived neuronal model to identify chemically induced pathway perturbations in relation to neurotoxicity: Effects of CREB pathway inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Pistollato, Francesca; Louisse, Jochem; Scelfo, Bibiana; Mennecozzi, Milena; Accordi, Benedetta; Basso, Giuseppe; Gaspar, John Antonydas; Zagoura, Dimitra; Barilari, Manuela; Palosaari, Taina; Sachinidis, Agapios; Bremer-Hoffmann, Susanne

    2014-10-15

    According to the advocated paradigm shift in toxicology, acquisition of knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the toxicity of chemicals, such as perturbations of biological pathways, is of primary interest. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), such as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), offer a unique opportunity to derive physiologically relevant human cell types to measure molecular and cellular effects of such pathway modulations. Here we compared the neuronal differentiation propensity of hESCs and hiPSCs with the aim to develop novel hiPSC-based tools for measuring pathway perturbation in relation to molecular and cellular effects in vitro. Among other fundamental pathways, also, the cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) pathway was activated in our neuronal models and gave us the opportunity to study time-dependent effects elicited by chemical perturbations of the CREB pathway in relation to cellular effects. We show that the inhibition of the CREB pathway, using 2-naphthol-AS-E-phosphate (KG-501), induced an inhibition of neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, as well as a decrease of MAP2{sup +} neuronal cells. These data indicate that a CREB pathway inhibition can be related to molecular and cellular effects that may be relevant for neurotoxicity testing, and, thus, qualify the use of our hiPSC-derived neuronal model for studying chemical-induced neurotoxicity resulting from pathway perturbations. - Highlights: • HESCs derived neuronal cells serve as benchmark for iPSC based neuronal toxicity test development. • Comparisons between hESCs and hiPSCs demonstrated variability of the epigenetic state • CREB pathway modulation have been explored in relation to the neurotoxicant exposure KG-501 • hiPSC might be promising tools to translate theoretical AoPs into toxicological in vitro tests.

  12. Three-dimensional culture of single embryonic stem-derived neural/stem progenitor cells in fibrin hydrogels: neuronal network formation and matrix remodelling.

    PubMed

    Bento, Ana R; Quelhas, Pedro; Oliveira, Maria J; Pêgo, Ana P; Amaral, Isabel F

    2016-12-29

    In an attempt to improve the efficacy of neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) based therapies, fibrin hydrogels are being explored to provide a favourable microenvironment for cell survival and differentiation following transplantation. In the present work, the ability of fibrin to support the survival, proliferation, and neuronal differentiation of NSPCs derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells under monolayer culture was explored. Single mouse ES-NSPCs were cultured within fibrin (fibrinogen concentration: 6 mg/ml) under neuronal differentiation conditions up to 14 days. The ES-NSPCs retained high cell viability and proliferated within small-sized spheroids. Neuronal differentiation was confirmed by an increase in the levels of βIII-tubulin and NF200 over time. At day 14, cell-matrix constructs mainly comprised NSPCs and neurons (46.5% βIII-tubulin(+) cells). Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and dopaminergic/noradrenergic neurons were also observed, along with a network of synaptic proteins. The ES-NSPCs expressed matriptase and secreted MMP-2/9, with MMP-2 activity increasing along time. Fibronectin, laminin and collagen type IV deposition was also detected. Fibrin gels prepared with higher fibrinogen concentrations (8/10 mg/ml) were less permissive to neurite extension and neuronal differentiation, possibly owing to their smaller pore area and higher rigidity. Overall, it is shown that ES-NSPCs within fibrin are able to establish neuronal networks and to remodel fibrin through MMP secretion and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. This three-dimensional (3D) culture system was also shown to support cell viability, neuronal differentiation and ECM deposition of human ES-NSPCs. The settled 3D platform is expected to constitute a valuable tool to develop fibrin-based hydrogels for ES-NSPC delivery into the injured central nervous system. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Changes in compressed neurons from dogs with acute and severe cauda equina constrictions following intrathecal injection of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-conjugated polymer nanoparticles☆

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Junming; Shi, Jiangang; Shi, Guodong; Liu, Yanling; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Chaoyang; Chen, Dechun; Xing, Shunming; Shen, Lianbing; Jia, Lianshun; Ye, Xiaojian; He, Hailong; Li, Jiashun

    2013-01-01

    This study established a dog model of acute multiple cauda equina constriction by experimental constriction injury (48 hours) of the lumbosacral central processes in dorsal root ganglia neurons. The repair effect of intrathecal injection of brain-derived neurotrophic factor with 15 mg encapsulated biodegradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles on this injury was then analyzed. Dorsal root ganglion cells (L7) of all experimental dogs were analyzed using hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry at 1, 2 and 4 weeks following model induction. Intrathecal injection of brain-derived neurotrophic factor can relieve degeneration and inflammation, and elevate the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in sensory neurons of compressed dorsal root ganglion. Simultaneously, intrathecal injection of brain-derived neurotrophic factor obviously improved neurological function in the dog model of acute multiple cauda equina constriction. Results verified that sustained intraspinal delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor encapsulated in biodegradable nanoparticles promoted the repair of histomorphology and function of neurons within the dorsal root ganglia in dogs with acute and severe cauda equina syndrome. PMID:25206593

  14. Isolation of Multipotent Nestin-Expressing Stem Cells Derived from the Epidermis of Elderly Humans and TAT-VHL Peptide-Mediated Neuronal Differentiation of These Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Hiroshi; Kubo, Atsuhiko; Yoshizumi, Tetsuya; Mikami, Taro; Maegawa, Jiro

    2013-01-01

    A specialized population of cells residing in the hair follicle is quiescent but shows pluripotency for differentiating into epithelial-mesenchymal lineage cells. Therefore, such cells are hoped to be useful as implantable donor cells for regenerative therapy. Recently, it was reported that intracellular delivery of TAT-VHL peptide induces neuronal differentiation of skin-derived precursors. In the present study, we successfully isolated multipotent stem cells derived from the epidermis of elderly humans, characterized these cells as being capable of sphere formation and strong expression of nestin, fibronectin, and CD34 but not of keratin 15, and identified the niche of these cells as being the outer root sheath of the hair follicles. In addition, we showed that TAT-VHL peptide induced their neuronal differentiation in vitro, and confirmed by fluorescence immunohistochemistry the neuronal differentiation of such peptide-treated cells implanted into rodent brains. These multipotent nestin-expressing stem cells derived from human epidermis are easily accessible and should be useful as donor cells for neuronal regenerative cell therapy. PMID:23644888

  15. Elevated α-synuclein caused by SNCA gene triplication impairs neuronal differentiation and maturation in Parkinson's patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, L M A; Falomir-Lockhart, L J; Botelho, M G; Lin, K-H; Wales, P; Koch, J C; Gerhardt, E; Taschenberger, H; Outeiro, T F; Lingor, P; Schüle, B; Arndt-Jovin, D J; Jovin, T M

    2015-01-01

    We have assessed the impact of α-synuclein overexpression on the differentiation potential and phenotypic signatures of two neural-committed induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from a Parkinson's disease patient with a triplication of the human SNCA genomic locus. In parallel, comparative studies were performed on two control lines derived from healthy individuals and lines generated from the patient iPS-derived neuroprogenitor lines infected with a lentivirus incorporating a small hairpin RNA to knock down the SNCA mRNA. The SNCA triplication lines exhibited a reduced capacity to differentiate into dopaminergic or GABAergic neurons and decreased neurite outgrowth and lower neuronal activity compared with control cultures. This delayed maturation phenotype was confirmed by gene expression profiling, which revealed a significant reduction in mRNA for genes implicated in neuronal differentiation such as delta-like homolog 1 (DLK1), gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptor subunit 2 (GABABR2), nuclear receptor related 1 protein (NURR1), G-protein-regulated inward-rectifier potassium channel 2 (GIRK-2) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). The differentiated patient cells also demonstrated increased autophagic flux when stressed with chloroquine. We conclude that a two-fold overexpression of α-synuclein caused by a triplication of the SNCA gene is sufficient to impair the differentiation of neuronal progenitor cells, a finding with implications for adult neurogenesis and Parkinson's disease progression, particularly in the context of bioenergetic dysfunction. PMID:26610207

  16. Genetically modified Schwann cells producing glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor inhibit neuronal apoptosis in rat spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guomin; Wang, Xukai; Shao, Guoxi; Liu, Qinyi

    2014-04-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are the major cells constituting the peripheral nerve structure and function, and also secret a variety of neurotrophic factors. Schwann cell (SC) transplantation has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury (SCI). In the present study, the ability of genetically modified SCs producing high levels of glial cell line‑derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to promote spinal cord repair was assessed. The GDNF gene was transduced into SCs. The engineered SCs were characterized by their ability to express and secrete biologically active GDNF, which was shown to inhibit apoptosis of primary rat neurons induced by radiation, and upregulate the expression of B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and downregulate the expression of Bcl‑2 associated X protein (Bax) in vitro. Following SC implantation into the spinal cord of adult rats with SCI induced by weight‑drop impact, the survival of rats with transplanted SCs, histology of the spinal cord and expression levels of Bcl‑2 and Bax were examined. Transplantation of unmodified and genetically modified SCs producing GDNF attenuated SCI by inhibiting apoptosis via the Bcl‑2/Bax pathways. The genetically modified SCs demonstrated markedly improved recovery of SCI as compared with unmodified SCs. The present study combined the outgrowth‑promoting property of SCs with the neuroprotective effects of overexpressed GDNF and identified this as a potential novel therapeutic strategy for SCI.

  17. Quantitative high-throughput gene expression profiling of human striatal development to screen stem cell–derived medium spiny neurons

    PubMed Central

    Straccia, Marco; Garcia-Diaz Barriga, Gerardo; Sanders, Phil; Bombau, Georgina; Carrere, Jordi; Mairal, Pedro Belio; Vinh, Ngoc-Nga; Yung, Sun; Kelly, Claire M; Svendsen, Clive N; Kemp, Paul J; Arjomand, Jamshid; Schoenfeld, Ryan C; Alberch, Jordi; Allen, Nicholas D; Rosser, Anne E; Canals, Josep M

    2015-01-01

    A systematic characterization of the spatio-temporal gene expression during human neurodevelopment is essential to understand brain function in both physiological and pathological conditions. In recent years, stem cell technology has provided an in vitro tool to recapitulate human development, permitting also the generation of human models for many diseases. The correct differentiation of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) into specific cell types should be evaluated by comparison with specific cells/tissue profiles from the equivalent adult in vivo organ. Here, we define by a quantitative high-throughput gene expression analysis the subset of specific genes of the whole ganglionic eminence (WGE) and adult human striatum. Our results demonstrate that not only the number of specific genes is crucial but also their relative expression levels between brain areas. We next used these gene profiles to characterize the differentiation of hPSCs. Our findings demonstrate a temporal progression of gene expression during striatal differentiation of hPSCs from a WGE toward an adult striatum identity. Present results establish a gene expression profile to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the telencephalic hPSC-derived progenitors eventually used for transplantation and mature striatal neurons for disease modeling and drug-screening. PMID:26417608

  18. DNA Microarray Highlights Nrf2-Mediated Neuron Protection Targeted by Wasabi-Derived Isothiocyanates in IMR-32 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trio, Phoebe Zapanta; Fujisaki, Satoru; Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Hisanaga, Ayami; Sakao, Kozue; Hou, De-Xing

    2016-01-01

    6-(Methylsulfinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate (6-MSITC), 6-(methylthio)hexyl isothiocyanate (6-MTITC), and 4-(methylsulfinyl)butyl isothiocyanate (4-MSITC) are isothiocyanate (ITC) bioactive compounds from Japanese Wasabi. Previous in vivo studies highlighted the neuroprotective potential of ITCs since ITCs enhance the production of antioxidant-related enzymes. Thus, in this present study, a genome-wide DNA microarray analysis was designed to profile gene expression changes in a neuron cell line, IMR-32, stimulated by these ITCs. Among these ITCs, 6-MSITC caused the expression changes of most genes (263), of which 100 genes were upregulated and 163 genes were downregulated. Gene categorization showed that most of the differentially expressed genes are involved in oxidative stress response, and pathway analysis further revealed that Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress pathway is the top of the ITC-modulated signaling pathway. Finally, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting confirmed the gene expression and protein products of the major targets by ITCs. Taken together, Wasabi-derived ITCs might target the Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress pathway to exert neuroprotective effects. PMID:27547033

  19. Alterations of Neocortical Pyramidal Neurons: Turning Points in the Genesis of Mental Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Granato, Alberto; De Giorgio, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons (PNs) represent the majority of neocortical cells and their involvement in cognitive functions is decisive. Therefore, they are the most obvious target of developmental disorders characterized by mental retardation. Genetic and non-genetic forms of intellectual disability share a few basic pathogenetic signatures that result in the anomalous function of PNs. Here, we review the key mechanisms impairing these neurons and their participation in the cortical network, with special focus on experimental models of fetal exposure to alcohol. Due to the heterogeneity of PNs, some alterations affect selectively a given cell population, which may also differ depending on the considered pathology. These specific features open new possibilities for the interpretation of cognitive defects observed in mental retardation syndromes, as well as for novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:25157343

  20. In Vitro Evaluation of Biocompatibility of Uncoated Thermally Reduced Graphene and Carbon Nanotube-Loaded PVDF Membranes with Adult Neural Stem Cell-Derived Neurons and Glia.

    PubMed

    Defteralı, Çağla; Verdejo, Raquel; Majeed, Shahid; Boschetti-de-Fierro, Adriana; Méndez-Gómez, Héctor R; Díaz-Guerra, Eva; Fierro, Daniel; Buhr, Kristian; Abetz, Clarissa; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Vuluga, Daniela; Alexandre, Michaël; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Detrembleur, Christophe; Jérôme, Christine; Abetz, Volker; López-Manchado, Miguel Ángel; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Graphene, graphene-based nanomaterials (GBNs), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being investigated as potential substrates for the growth of neural cells. However, in most in vitro studies, the cells were seeded on these materials coated with various proteins implying that the observed effects on the cells could not solely be attributed to the GBN and CNT properties. Here, we studied the biocompatibility of uncoated thermally reduced graphene (TRG) and poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes loaded with multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) using neural stem cells isolated from the adult mouse olfactory bulb (termed aOBSCs). When aOBSCs were induced to differentiate on coverslips treated with TRG or control materials (polyethyleneimine-PEI and polyornithine plus fibronectin-PLO/F) in a serum-free medium, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes were generated in all conditions, indicating that TRG permits the multi-lineage differentiation of aOBSCs. However, the total number of cells was reduced on both PEI and TRG. In a serum-containing medium, aOBSC-derived neurons and oligodendrocytes grown on TRG were more numerous than in controls; the neurons developed synaptic boutons and oligodendrocytes were more branched. In contrast, neurons growing on PVDF membranes had reduced neurite branching, and on MWCNTs-loaded membranes oligodendrocytes were lower in numbers than in controls. Overall, these findings indicate that uncoated TRG may be biocompatible with the generation, differentiation, and maturation of aOBSC-derived neurons and glial cells, implying a potential use for TRG to study functional neuronal networks.

  1. In Vitro Evaluation of Biocompatibility of Uncoated Thermally Reduced Graphene and Carbon Nanotube-Loaded PVDF Membranes with Adult Neural Stem Cell-Derived Neurons and Glia

    PubMed Central

    Defteralı, Çağla; Verdejo, Raquel; Majeed, Shahid; Boschetti-de-Fierro, Adriana; Méndez-Gómez, Héctor R.; Díaz-Guerra, Eva; Fierro, Daniel; Buhr, Kristian; Abetz, Clarissa; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Vuluga, Daniela; Alexandre, Michaël; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Detrembleur, Christophe; Jérôme, Christine; Abetz, Volker; López-Manchado, Miguel Ángel; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Graphene, graphene-based nanomaterials (GBNs), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being investigated as potential substrates for the growth of neural cells. However, in most in vitro studies, the cells were seeded on these materials coated with various proteins implying that the observed effects on the cells could not solely be attributed to the GBN and CNT properties. Here, we studied the biocompatibility of uncoated thermally reduced graphene (TRG) and poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes loaded with multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) using neural stem cells isolated from the adult mouse olfactory bulb (termed aOBSCs). When aOBSCs were induced to differentiate on coverslips treated with TRG or control materials (polyethyleneimine-PEI and polyornithine plus fibronectin-PLO/F) in a serum-free medium, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes were generated in all conditions, indicating that TRG permits the multi-lineage differentiation of aOBSCs. However, the total number of cells was reduced on both PEI and TRG. In a serum-containing medium, aOBSC-derived neurons and oligodendrocytes grown on TRG were more numerous than in controls; the neurons developed synaptic boutons and oligodendrocytes were more branched. In contrast, neurons growing on PVDF membranes had reduced neurite branching, and on MWCNTs-loaded membranes oligodendrocytes were lower in numbers than in controls. Overall, these findings indicate that uncoated TRG may be biocompatible with the generation, differentiation, and maturation of aOBSC-derived neurons and glial cells, implying a potential use for TRG to study functional neuronal networks. PMID:27999773

  2. Rapid generation of sub-type, region-specific neurons and neural networks from human pluripotent stem cell-derived neurospheres.

    PubMed

    Begum, Aynun N; Guoynes, Caleigh; Cho, Jane; Hao, Jijun; Lutfy, Kabirullah; Hong, Yiling

    2015-11-01

    Stem cell-based neuronal differentiation has provided a unique opportunity for disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Neurospheres are the most commonly used neuroprogenitors for neuronal differentiation, but they often clump in culture, which has always represented a challenge for neurodifferentiation. In this study, we report a novel method and defined culture conditions for generating sub-type or region-specific neurons from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells derived neurosphere without any genetic manipulation. Round and bright-edged neurospheres were generated in a supplemented knockout serum replacement medium (SKSRM) with 10% CO2, which doubled the expression of the NESTIN, PAX6 and FOXG1 genes compared with those cultured with 5% CO2. Furthermore, an additional step (AdSTEP) was introduced to fragment the neurospheres and facilitate the formation of a neuroepithelial-type monolayer that we termed the "neurosphederm". The large neural tube-type rosette (NTTR) structure formed from the neurosphederm, and the NTTR expressed higher levels of the PAX6, SOX2 and NESTIN genes compared with the neuroectoderm-derived neuroprogenitors. Different layers of cortical, pyramidal, GABAergic, glutamatergic, cholinergic neurons appeared within 27 days using the neurosphederm, which is a shorter period than in traditional neurodifferentiation-protocols (42-60 days). With additional supplements and timeline dopaminergic and Purkinje neurons were also generated in culture too. Furthermore, our in vivo results indicated that the fragmented neurospheres facilitated significantly better neurogenesis in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse brains compared with the non-fragmented neurospheres. Therefore, this neurosphere-based neurodifferentiation protocol is a valuable tool for studies of neurodifferentiation, neuronal transplantation and high throughput screening assays.

  3. Rapid generation of sub-type, region-specific neurons and neural networks from human pluripotent stem cell-derived neurospheres

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Aynun N.; Guoynes, Caleigh; Cho, Jane; Hao, Jijun; Lutfy, Kabirullah; Hong, Yiling

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based neuronal differentiation has provided a unique opportunity for disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Neurospheres are the most commonly used neuroprogenitors for neuronal differentiation, but they often clump in culture, which has always represented a challenge for neurodifferentiation. In this study, we report a novel method and defined culture conditions for generating sub-type or region-specific neurons from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells derived neurosphere without any genetic manipulation. Round and bright-edged neurospheres were generated in supplemented knockout serum replacement medium (SKSRM) with 10% CO2, which doubled the expression of the NESTIN, PAX6 and FOXG1 genes compared to those cultured with 5% CO2. Furthermore, an additional step (AdSTEP) was introduced to fragment the neurospheres and facilitate the formation of a neuroepithelial-type monolayer that we termed the “neurosphederm”. The large neural tube-type rosette (NTTR) structure formed from the neurosphederm, and the NTTR expressed higher levels of the PAX6, SOX2 and NESTIN genes compared to the neuroectoderm-derived neuroprogenitors. Different layers of cortical, pyramidal, GABAergic, glutamatergic, cholinergic neurons appeared within 27 days using the neurosphederm, which is a shorter period than in traditional neurodifferentiation-protocols (42–60 days). With additional supplements and timeline dopaminergic and Purkinje neurons were also generated in culture too. Furthermore, our in vivo results indicated that the fragmented neurospheres facilitated significantly better neurogenesis in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse brains compared to the non-fragmented neurospheres. Therefore, this neurosphere-based neurodifferentiation protocol is a valuable tool for studies of neurodifferentiation, neuronal transplantation and high throughput screening assays. PMID:26613348

  4. Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) enhances neurogenesis and neurite outgrowth of immature neurons in adult mice by up-regulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Shi-Wei; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Cao, Zhen; Ge, Bi-Ying; Wang, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Lin, Jin-Tao; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Li, Shao; Zhao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is a component purified from Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion venom. Although scorpions and their venom have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to treat chronic neurological disorders, the underlying mechanisms of these treatments remain unknown. We applied SVHRP in vitro and in vivo to understand its effects on the neurogenesis and maturation of adult immature neurons and explore associated molecular mechanisms. SVHRP administration increased the number of 5-bromo-2'-dexoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells, BrdU-positive/neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-positive neurons, and polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM)-positive immature neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of hippocampus. Furthermore immature neurons incubated with SVHRP-pretreated astrocyte-conditioned medium exhibited significantly increased neurite length compared with those incubated with normal astrocyte-conditioned medium. This neurotrophic effect was further confirmed in vivo by detecting an increased average single area and whole area of immature neurons in the SGZ, SVZ and olfactory bulb (OB) in the adult mouse brain. In contrast to normal astrocyte-conditioned medium, higher concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) but not nerve growth factor (NGF) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was detected in the conditioned medium of SVHRP-pretreated astrocytes, and blocking BDNF using anti-BDNF antibodies eliminated these SVHRP-dependent neurotrophic effects. In SVHRP treated mouse brain, more glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells were detected. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry revealed increased numbers of GFAP/BDNF double-positive cells, which agrees with the observed changes in the culture system. This paper describes novel effects of scorpion venom-originated peptide on the stem cells and suggests the potential therapeutic values of SVHRP.

  5. The neuronal extracellular matrix restricts distribution and internalization of aggregated Tau-protein.

    PubMed

    Suttkus, A; Holzer, M; Morawski, M; Arendt, T

    2016-01-28

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic degenerative disorder characterized by fibrillary aggregates of Aß and Tau-protein. Formation and progression of these pathological hallmarks throughout the brain follow a specific spatio-temporal pattern which provides the basis for neuropathological staging. Previously, we could demonstrate that cortical and subcortical neurons are less frequently affected by neurofibrillary degeneration if they are enwrapped by a specialized form of the hyaluronan-based extracellular matrix (ECM), the so called 'perineuronal net' (PN). PNs are composed of large aggregating chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans connected to a hyaluronan backbone, stabilized by link proteins and cross-linked via tenascin-R. Recently, PN-associated neurons were shown to be better protected against iron-induced neurodegeneration compared to neurons without PN, indicating a neuroprotective function. Here, we investigated the role of PNs in distribution and internalization of exogenous Tau-protein by using organotypic slice cultures of wildtype mice as well as mice lacking the ECM-components aggrecan, HAPLN1 or tenascin-R. We could demonstrate that PNs restrict both distribution and internalization of Tau. Accordingly, PN-ensheathed neurons were less frequently affected by Tau-internalization, than neurons without PN. Finally, the PNs as well as their three investigated components were shown to modulate the processes of distribution as well as internalization of Tau.

  6. BNN27, a 17-Spiroepoxy Steroid Derivative, Interacts With and Activates p75 Neurotrophin Receptor, Rescuing Cerebellar Granule Neurons from Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pediaditakis, Iosif; Kourgiantaki, Alexandra; Prousis, Kyriakos C.; Potamitis, Constantinos; Xanthopoulos, Kleanthis P.; Zervou, Maria; Calogeropoulou, Theodora; Charalampopoulos, Ioannis; Gravanis, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophin receptors mediate a plethora of signals affecting neuronal survival. The p75 pan-neurotrophin receptor controls neuronal cell fate after its selective activation by immature and mature isoforms of all neurotrophins. It also exerts pleiotropic effects interacting with a variety of ligands in different neuronal or non-neuronal cells. In the present study, we explored the biophysical and functional interactions of a blood-brain-barrier (BBB) permeable, C17-spiroepoxy steroid derivative, BNN27, with p75NTR receptor. BNN27 was recently shown to bind to NGF high-affinity receptor, TrkA. We now tested the p75NTR-mediated effects of BNN27 in mouse Cerebellar Granule Neurons (CGNs), expressing p75NTR, but not TrkA receptors. Our findings show that BNN27 physically interacts with p75NTR receptors in specific amino-residues of its extracellular domain, inducing the recruitment of p75NTR receptor to its effector protein RIP2 and the simultaneous release of RhoGDI in primary neuronal cells. Activation of the p75NTR receptor by BNN27 reverses serum deprivation-induced apoptosis of CGNs resulting in the decrease of the phosphorylation of pro-apoptotic JNK kinase and of the cleavage of Caspase-3, effects completely abolished in CGNs, isolated from p75NTR null mice. In conclusion, BNN27 represents a lead molecule for the development of novel p75NTR ligands, controlling specific p75NTR-mediated signaling of neuronal cell fate, with potential applications in therapeutics of neurodegenerative diseases and brain trauma. PMID:28082899

  7. Sciatic nerve injury in adult rats causes distinct changes in the central projections of sensory neurons expressing different glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptors

    PubMed Central

    Keast, Janet R.; Forrest, Shelley L.; Osborne, Peregrine B.

    2010-01-01

    Most small unmyelinated neurons in adult rat dorsal ganglia (DRG) express one or more of the co-receptors targeted by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), neurturin and artemin (GFRα1, GFRα2 and GFRα3 respectively). The function of these GDNF family ligands (GFLs) is not fully elucidated but recent evidence suggests GFLs could function in sensory neuron regeneration after nerve injury and peripheral nociceptor sensitisation. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to determine if the DRG neurons targeted by each GFL change after sciatic nerve injury. We compared complete sciatic nerve transection and the chronic constriction model and found the pattern of changes incurred by each injury was broadly similar. In lumbar spinal cord, there was a widespread increase in neuronal GFRα1 immunoreactivity (IR) in the L1-6 dorsal horn. GFRα3-IR also increased but in a more restricted area. In contrast, GFRα2-IR decreased in patches of superficial dorsal horn and this loss was more extensive after transection injury. No change in calcitonin gene-related peptide-IR was detected after either injury. Analysis of double-immunolabelled L5 DRG sections suggested the main effect of injury on GFRα1- and GFRα3-IR was to increase expression in both myelinated and unmyelinated neurons. In contrast, no change in basal expression of GFRα2-IR was detected in DRG by analysis of fluorescence intensity and there was a small but significant reduction in GFRα2-IR neurons. Our results suggest the DRG neuronal populations targeted by GDNF, neurturin or artemin, and the effect of exogenous GFLs could change significantly after a peripheral nerve injury. PMID:20533358

  8. Molecular Profiling of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hypothalamic Neurones Provides Developmental Insights into Genetic Loci for Body Weight Regulation.

    PubMed

    Yao, L; Liu, Y; Qiu, Z; Kumar, S; Curran, J E; Blangero, J; Chen, Y; Lehman, D M

    2017-02-01

    Recent data suggest that common genetic risks for metabolic disorders such as obesity may be human-specific and exert effects via the central nervous system. To overcome the limitation of human tissue access for study, we have generated induced human pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neuronal cultures that recapture many features of hypothalamic neurones within the arcuate nucleus. In the present study, we have comprehensively characterised this model across development, benchmarked these neurones to in vivo events, and demonstrate a link between obesity risk variants and hypothalamic development. The dynamic transcriptome across neuronal maturation was examined using microarray and RNA sequencing methods at nine time points. K-means clustering of the longitudinal data was conducted to identify co-regulation and microRNA control of biological processes. The transcriptomes were compared with those of 103 samples from 13 brain regions reported in the Genotype-Tissue Expression database (GTEx) using principal components analysis. Genes with proximity to body mass index (BMI)-associated genetic variants were mapped to the developmentally expressed genesets, and enrichment significance was assessed with Fisher's exact test. The human neuronal cultures have a transcriptional and physiological profile of neuropeptide Y/agouti-related peptide arcuate nucleus neurones. The neuronal transcriptomes were highly correlated with adult hypothalamus compared to any other brain region from the GTEx. Also, approximately 25% of the transcripts showed substantial changes in expression across neuronal development and potential co-regulation of biological processes that mirror neuronal development in vivo. These developmentally expressed genes were significantly enriched for genes in proximity to BMI-associated variants. We confirmed the utility of this in vitro human model for studying the development of key hypothalamic neurones involved in energy balance and show that genes at

  9. Mfn2 is Required for Mitochondrial Development and Synapse Formation in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/hiPSC Derived Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Du; Yan, Shijun; Yu, Qing; Chen, Doris; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential dynamic organelles for energy production. Mitochondria dynamically change their shapes tightly coupled to fission and fusion. Imbalance of fission and fusion can cause deficits in mitochondrial respiration, morphology and motility. Mfn2 (mitofusin 2), a mitochondrial membrane protein that participates in mitochondrial fusion in mammalian cells, contributes to the maintenance and operation of the mitochondrial network. Due to lack of applicable model systems, the mechanisms and involvement of mitochondria in neurogenesis in human brain cells have not been well explored. Here, by employing the human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) differentiation system, we fully characterized mitochondrial development, neurogenesis and synapse formation in hiPSCs-derived cortical neurons. Differentiation of hiPSCs to cortical neurons with extended period demonstrates mature neurophysiology characterization and functional synaptic network formation. Mitochondrial respiration, morphology and motility in the differentiated neurons also exhibit pronounced development during differentiation. Mfn2 knock-down results in deficits in mitochondrial metabolism and network, neurogenesis and synapse formation, while Mfn2 overexpression enhances mitochondrial bioenergetics and functions, and promotes the differentiation and maturation of neurons. Together, our data indicate that Mfn2 is essential for human mitochondrial development in neuronal maturation and differentiation, which will enhance our understanding of the role of Mfn2 in neurogenesis. PMID:27535796

  10. Squamosamide derivative FLZ protected dopaminergic neuron by activating Akt signaling pathway in 6-OHDA-induced in vivo and in vitro Parkinson's disease models.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiu-Qi; Kong, Xiang-Chen; Kong, Li-Bing; Wu, Liang-Yu; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Dan

    2014-02-14

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting up to 80% of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway. FLZ, a novel synthetic squamosamide derivative from a Chinese herb, has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in experimental PD models. In this study, we carried out a set of in vitro and in vivo experiments to address the neuroprotective effect of FLZ and related mechanism. The results showed that FLZ significantly improved motor dysfunction and dopaminergic neuronal loss of rats injured by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The beneficial effects of FLZ attributed to the elevation of dopaminergic neuron number, dopamine level and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity. Mechanistic study showed that FLZ protected TH activity and dopaminergic neurons through decreasing α-synuclein (α-Syn) expression and the interaction between α-Syn and TH. Further studies indicated the involvement of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway in the protective effect of FLZ since it showed that blocking PI3K/Akt signaling pathway prevented the expression of α-Syn and attenuated the neuroprotection of FLZ. In addition, FLZ treatment reduced the expression of RTP801, an important protein involved in the pathogenesis of PD. Taken together, these results revealed that FLZ suppressed α-Syn expression and elevated TH activity in dopaminergic neuron through activating Akt survival pathway in 6-OHDA-induced PD models. The data also provided evidence that FLZ had potent neuroprotecive effects and might become a new promising agent for PD treatment.

  11. Activated Microglia Induce Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Produce Glial Cell-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Protect Neurons Against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Bingke; Li, Feng; Fang, Jie; Xu, Limin; Sun, Chengmei; Han, Jianbang; Hua, Tian; Zhang, Zhongfei; Feng, Zhiming; Wang, Qinghua; Jiang, Xiaodan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated interactions among microglia (MG), bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and neurons in cerebral ischemia and the potential mechanisms using an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model. Rat BMSCs were incubated with conditioned medium (CM) from in vitro cultures of OGD-activated rat MG and murine BV2 MG cells. Effects of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on rat neuron viability, apoptosis, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were analyzed in this model. OGD-activated MG promoted GDNF production by BMSCs (P < 0.01). Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), but not interleukin-6 (IL6) or interleukin 1β (IL1β), promoted GDNF production by BMSCs (P < 0.001). GDNF or CM pre-treated BMSCs elevated neuronal viability and suppressed apoptosis (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01); these effects were inhibited by the RET antibody. GDNF activated MEK/ERK and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling but not JNK/c-JUN. Furthermore, GDNF upregulated B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) and heat shock 60 kDa protein 1 (HSP60) levels, suppressed LDH leakage, and promoted MMP. Thus, activated MG produce TNFα to stimulate GDNF production by BMSCs, which prevents and repairs OGD-induced neuronal injury, possibly via regulating MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling. These findings will facilitate the prevention and treatment of neuronal injury by cerebral ischemia. PMID:28018176

  12. Human cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (CB-SCs) treated with all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) give rise to dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohong; Li, Heng; Bi, Jianfen; Chen, Yana; Jain, Sumit; Zhao, Yong

    2012-03-02

    Parkinson's disease (PD) results from the chronic degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. A replacement for these neurons has the potential to provide a clinical cure and/or lasting treatment for symptoms of the disease. Human cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (CB-SCs) display embryonic stem cell characteristics, including multi-potential differentiation. To explore their therapeutic potential in PD, we examined whether CB-SCs could be induced to differentiate into dopamine neurons in the presence of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). Prior to treatment, CB-SCs expressed mRNA and protein for the key dopaminergic transcription factors Nurr1, Wnt1, and En1. Following treatment with 10 μM ATRA for 12 days, CB-SCs displayed elongated neuronal-like morphologies. Immunocytochemistry revealed that 48 ± 11% of ATRA-treated cells were positive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and 36 ± 9% of cells were positive for dopamine transporter (DAT). In contrast, control CB-SCs (culture medium only) expressed only background levels of TH and DAT. Finally, ATRA-treated CB-SCs challenged with potassium released increased levels of dopamine compared to control. These data demonstrate that ATRA induces differentiation of CB-SCs into dopaminergic neurons. This finding may lead to the development of an alternative approach to stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease.

  13. Improving and accelerating the differentiation and functional maturation of human stem cell-derived neurons: role of extracellular calcium and GABA.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Paul J; Rushton, David J; Yarova, Polina L; Schnell, Christian; Geater, Charlene; Hancock, Jane M; Wieland, Annalena; Hughes, Alis; Badder, Luned; Cope, Emma; Riccardi, Daniela; Randall, Andrew D; Brown, Jonathan T; Allen, Nicholas D; Telezhkin, Vsevolod

    2016-11-15

    Neurons differentiated from pluripotent stem cells using established neural culture conditions often exhibit functional deficits. Recently, we have developed enhanced media which both synchronize the neurogenesis of pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitors and accelerate their functional maturation; together these media are termed SynaptoJuice. This pair of media are pro-synaptogenic and generate authentic, mature synaptic networks of connected forebrain neurons from a variety of induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cell lines. Such enhanced rate and extent of synchronized maturation of pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells generates neurons which are characterized by a relatively hyperpolarized resting membrane potential, higher spontaneous and induced action potential activity, enhanced synaptic activity, more complete development of a mature inhibitory GABAA receptor phenotype and faster production of electrical network activity when compared to standard differentiation media. This entire process - from pre-patterned neural progenitor to active neuron - takes 3 weeks or less, making it an ideal platform for drug discovery and disease modelling in the fields of human neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, such as Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Schizophrenia.

  14. M2 Phenotype Microglia-derived Cytokine Stimulates Proliferation and Neuronal Differentiation of Endogenous Stem Cells in Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ja Yong; Kim, Jong Youl; Kim, Jae Young; Park, Joohyun; Lee, Won Taek

    2017-01-01

    Microglia play a key role in the immune response and inflammatory reaction that occurs in response to ischemic stroke. Activated microglia promote neuronal damage or protection in injured brain tissue. Extracellular signals polarize the microglia towards the M1/M2 phenotype. The M1/M2 phenotype microglia released pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines which induce the activation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs). In this study, we investigated how the cytokines released by microglia affect the activation of NSPCs. First, we treated BV2 cells with a lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 20 ng/ml) for M1 phenotype microglia and interleukin-4 (IL-4; 20 ng/ml) for M2 phenotype microglia in BV2 cells. Mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) for 1 h. In ex vivo, brain sections containing the subventricular zone (SVZ) were cultured in conditioned media of M1 and M2 phenotype-conditioned media for 3 d. We measured the expression of cytokines in the conditioned media by RT-PCR and ELISA. The M2 phenotype microglia-conditioned media led to the proliferation and neural differentiation of NSPCs in the ipsilateral SVZ after ischemic stroke. The RT-PCR and ELISA results showed that the expression of TGF-α mRNA was significantly higher in the M2 phenotype microglia-conditioned media. These data support that M2 phenotype microglia-derived TGF-α is one of the key factors to enhance proliferation and neural differntiation of NSPCs after ischemic stroke. PMID:28243165

  15. Functional and phenotypic differences of pure populations of stem cell-derived astrocytes and neuronal precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Kleiderman, Susanne; Sá, João V; Teixeira, Ana P; Brito, Catarina; Gutbier, Simon; Evje, Lars G; Hadera, Mussie G; Glaab, Enrico; Henry, Margit; Sachinidis, Agapios; Alves, Paula M; Sonnewald, Ursula; Leist, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    Availability of homogeneous astrocyte populations would facilitate research concerning cell plasticity (metabolic and transcriptional adaptations; innate immune responses) and cell cycle reactivation. Current protocols to prepare astrocyte cultures differ in their final content of immature precursor cells, preactivated cells or entirely different cell types. A new method taking care of all these issues would improve research on astrocyte functions. We found here that the exposure of a defined population of pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (NSC) to BMP4 results in pure, nonproliferating astrocyte cultures within 24-48 h. These murine astrocytes generated from embryonic stem cells (mAGES) expressed the positive markers GFAP, aquaporin 4 and GLT-1, supported neuronal function, and acquired innate immune functions such as the response to tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1. The protocol was applicable to several normal or disease-prone pluripotent cell lines, and the corresponding mAGES all exited the cell cycle and lost most of their nestin expression, in contrast to astrocytes generated by serum-addition or obtained as primary cultures. Comparative gene expression analysis of mAGES and NSC allowed quantification of differences between the two cell types and a definition of an improved marker set to define astrocytes. Inclusion of several published data sets in this transcriptome comparison revealed the similarity of mAGES with cortical astrocytes in vivo. Metabolic analysis of homogeneous NSC and astrocyte populations revealed distinct neurochemical features: both cell types synthesized glutamine and citrate, but only mature astrocytes released these metabolites. Thus, the homogeneous cultures allowed an improved definition of NSC and astrocyte features.

  16. ZNF804A Transcriptional Networks in Differentiating Neurons Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Human Origin

    PubMed Central

    Hrabovsky, Anastasia; Pedrosa, Erika; Dean, Jason; Jain, Swati; Zheng, Deyou; Lachman, Herbert M.

    2015-01-01

    ZNF804A (Zinc Finger Protein 804A) has been identified as a candidate gene for schizophrenia (SZ), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and bipolar disorder (BD) in replicated genome wide association studies (GWAS) and by copy number variation (CNV) analysis. Although its function has not been well-characterized, ZNF804A contains a C2H2-type zinc-finger domain, suggesting that it has DNA binding properties, and consequently, a role in regulating gene expression. To further explore the role of ZNF804A on gene expression and its downstream targets, we used a gene knockdown (KD) approach to reduce its expression in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). KD was accomplished by RNA interference (RNAi) using lentiviral particles containing shRNAs that target ZNF804A mRNA. Stable transduced NPC lines were generated after puromycin selection. A control cell line expressing a random (scrambled) shRNA was also generated. Neuronal differentiation was induced, RNA was harvested after 14 days and transcriptome analysis was carried out using RNA-seq. 1815 genes were found to be differentially expressed at a nominally significant level (p<0.05); 809 decreased in expression in the KD samples, while 1106 increased. Of these, 370 achieved genome wide significance (FDR<0.05); 125 were lower in the KD samples, 245 were higher. Pathway analysis showed that genes involved in interferon-signaling were enriched among those that were down-regulated in the KD samples. Correspondingly, ZNF804A KD was found to affect interferon-alpha 2 (IFNA2)-mediated gene expression. The findings suggest that ZNF804A may affect a differentiating neuron’s response to inflammatory cytokines, which is consistent with models of SZ and ASD that support a role for infectious disease, and/or autoimmunity in a subgroup of patients. PMID:25905630

  17. Endothelial dysfunction in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice: role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-derived hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Silva, Grazielle C; Silva, Josiane F; Diniz, Thiago F; Lemos, Virginia S; Cortes, Steyner F

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a common problem associated with hypertension and is considered a precursor to the development of micro- and macro-vascular complications. The present study investigated the involvement of nNOS (neuronal nitric oxide synthase) and H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) in the impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the mesenteric arteries of DOCA (deoxycorticosterone acetate)-salt-hypertensive mice. Myograph studies were used to investigate the endothelium-dependent vasodilator effect of ACh (acetylcholine). The expression and phosphorylation of nNOS and eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) were studied by Western blot analysis. Immunofluorescence was used to examine the localization of nNOS and eNOS in the endothelial layer of the mesenteric artery. The vasodilator effect of ACh is strongly impaired in mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Non-selective inhibition of NOS sharply reduced the effect of ACh in both DOCA-salt-hypertensive and sham mice. Selective inhibition of nNOS and catalase led to a higher reduction in the effect of ACh in sham than in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Production of H2O2 induced by ACh was significantly reduced in vessels from DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, and it was blunted after nNOS inhibition. The expression of both eNOS and nNOS was considerably lower in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, whereas phosphorylation of their inhibitory sites was increased. The presence of nNOS was confirmed in the endothelial layer of mesenteric arteries from both sham and DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. These results demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction in the mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice is associated with reduced expression and functioning of nNOS and impaired production of nNOS-derived H2O2 Such findings offer a new perspective for the understanding of endothelial dysfunction in hypertension.

  18. A high-fat, refined sugar diet reduces hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neuronal plasticity, and learning.

    PubMed

    Molteni, R; Barnard, R J; Ying, Z; Roberts, C K; Gómez-Pinilla, F

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated a potential mechanism by which a diet, similar in composition to the typical diet of most industrialized western societies rich in saturated fat and refined sugar (HFS), can influence brain structure and function via regulation of neurotrophins. We show that animals that learn a spatial memory task faster have more brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein in the hippocampus. Two months on the HFS diet were sufficient to reduce hippocampal level of BDNF and spatial learning performance. Consequent to the action of BDNF on synaptic function, downstream effectors for the action of BDNF on synaptic plasticity were reduced proportionally to BDNF levels, in the hippocampus of rats maintained on the HFS diet between 2 and 24 months. In particular, animals maintained on the HFS diet showed a decrease in levels of: (i) synapsin I mRNA and protein (total and phosphorylated), important for neurotransmitter release; (ii) cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) mRNA and protein (total and phosphorylated); CREB is required for various forms of memory and is under regulatory control of BDNF; (iii) growth-associated protein 43 mRNA, important for neurite outgrowth, neurotransmitter release, and learning and memory. Diet-related changes were specific for the hippocampus consequent to its role in memory formation, and did not involve neurotrophin-3, another member of the neurotrophin family. Our results indicate that a popularly consumed diet can influence crucial aspects of neuronal and behavioral plasticity associated with the function of BDNF.

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, but not neurotrophin-3, prevents ischaemia-induced neuronal cell death in organotypic rat hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Pringle, A K; Sundstrom, L E; Wilde, G J; Williams, L R; Iannotti, F

    1996-06-28

    We have investigated the neuroprotective actions of neurotrophins in a model of ischaemia using slice cultures. Ischaemia was induced in organotypic hippocampal cultures by simultaneous oxygen and glucose deprivation. Cell death was assessed 24 h later by propidium iodide fluorescence. Pre- but not post-ischaemic addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) produced a concentration-dependent reduction in neuronal damage. Neurotrophin-3 was not neuroprotective. These data suggest that BDNF may form part of an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism.

  20. A New Glucocerebrosidase Chaperone Reduces α-Synuclein and Glycolipid Levels in iPSC-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons from Patients with Gaucher Disease and Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Aflaki, Elma; Borger, Daniel K.; Moaven, Nima; Stubblefield, Barbara K.; Rogers, Steven A.; Patnaik, Samarjit; Schoenen, Frank J.; Westbroek, Wendy; Zheng, Wei; Sullivan, Patricia; Fujiwara, Hideji; Sidhu, Rohini; Khaliq, Zayd M; Lopez, Grisel J.; Goldstein, David S.; Ory, Daniel S.; Marugan, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Among the known genetic risk factors for Parkinson disease, mutations in GBA1, the gene responsible for the lysosomal disorder Gaucher disease, are the most common. This genetic link has directed attention to the role of the lysosome in the pathogenesis of parkinsonism. To study how glucocerebrosidase impacts parkinsonism and to evaluate new therapeutics, we generated induced human pluripotent stem cells from four patients with Type 1 (non-neuronopathic) Gaucher disease, two with and two without parkinsonism, and one patient with Type 2 (acute neuronopathic) Gaucher disease, and differentiated them into macrophages and dopaminergic neurons. These cells exhibited decreased glucocerebrosidase activity and stored the glycolipid substrates glucosylceramide and glucosylsphingosine, demonstrating their similarity to patients with Gaucher disease. Dopaminergic neurons from patients with Type 2 and Type 1 Gaucher disease with parkinsonism had reduced dopamine storage and dopamine transporter reuptake. Levels of α-synuclein, a protein present as aggregates in Parkinson disease and related synucleinopathies, were selectively elevated in neurons from the patients with parkinsonism or Type 2 Gaucher disease. The cells were then treated with NCGC607, a small-molecule noninhibitory chaperone of glucocerebrosidase identified by high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry structure optimization. This compound successfully chaperoned the mutant enzyme, restored glucocerebrosidase activity and protein levels, and reduced glycolipid storage in both iPSC-derived macrophages and dopaminergic neurons, indicating its potential for treating neuronopathic Gaucher disease. In addition, NCGC607 reduced α-synuclein levels in dopaminergic neurons from the patients with parkinsonism, suggesting that noninhibitory small-molecule chaperones of glucocerebrosidase may prove useful for the treatment of Parkinson disease. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Because GBA1 mutations are the most common

  1. Aligned Poly(ε-caprolactone) Nanofibers Guide the Orientation and Migration of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons, Astrocytes, and Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hyysalo, Anu; Ristola, Mervi; Joki, Tiina; Honkanen, Mari; Vippola, Minnamari; Narkilahti, Susanna

    2017-03-15

    Stem cell transplantations for spinal cord injury (SCI) have been studied extensively for the past decade in order to replace the damaged tissue with human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived neural cells. Transplanted cells may, however, benefit from supporting and guiding structures or scaffolds in order to remain viable and integrate into the host tissue. Biomaterials can be used as supporting scaffolds, as they mimic the characteristics of the natural cellular environment. In this study, hPSC-derived neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are cultured on aligned poly(ε-caprolactone) nanofiber platforms, which guide cell orientation to resemble that of spinal cord in vivo. All cell types are shown to efficiently spread over the nanofiber platform and orient according to the fiber alignment. Human neurons and astrocytes require extracellular matrix molecule coating for the nanofibers, but OPCs grow on nanofibers without additional treatment. Furthermore, the nanofiber platform is combined with a 3D hydrogel scaffold with controlled thickness, and nanofiber-mediated orientation of hPSC-derived neurons is also demonstrated in a 3D environment. In this work, clinically relevant materials and substrates for nanofibers, fiber coatings, and hydrogel scaffolds are used and combined with cells suitable for developing functional cell grafts for SCI repair.

  2. Quantitative assessment of neurite outgrowth in human embryonic stem-cell derived neurons using automated high-content image analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    During development neurons undergo a number of morphological changes including neurite outgrowth from the cell body. Exposure to neurotoxicants that interfere with this process may cause in permanent deficits in nervous system function. While many studies have used rodent primary...

  3. Neuron type-specific effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in rat superficial dorsal horn and their relevance to ‘central sensitization’

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Van B; Ballanyi, Klaus; Colmers, William F; Smith, Peter A

    2007-01-01

    Chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the rat sciatic nerve increases the excitability of the spinal dorsal horn. This ‘central sensitization’ leads to pain behaviours analogous to human neuropathic pain. We have established that CCI increases excitatory synaptic drive to putative excitatory, ‘delay’ firing neurons in the substantia gelatinosa but attenuates that to putative inhibitory, ‘tonic’ firing neurons. Here, we use a defined-medium organotypic culture (DMOTC) system to investigate the long-term actions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as a possible instigator of these changes. The age of the cultures and their 5–6 day exposure to BDNF paralleled the protocol used for CCI in vivo. Effects of BDNF (200 ng ml−1) in DMOTC were reminiscent of those seen with CCI in vivo. These included decreased synaptic drive to ‘tonic’ neurons and increased synaptic drive to ‘delay’ neurons with only small effects on their membrane excitability. Actions of BDNF on ‘delay’ neurons were exclusively presynaptic and involved increased mEPSC frequency and amplitude without changes in the function of postsynaptic AMPA receptors. By contrast, BDNF exerted both pre- and postsynaptic actions on ‘tonic’ cells; mEPSC frequency and amplitude were decreased and the decay time constant reduced by 35%. These selective and differential actions of BDNF on excitatory and inhibitory neurons contributed to a global increase in dorsal horn network excitability as assessed by the amplitude of depolarization-induced increases in intracellular Ca2+. Such changes and their underlying cellular mechanisms are likely to contribute to CCI-induced ‘central sensitization’ and hence to the onset of neuropathic pain. PMID:17761774

  4. Neuroprotection of Ilex latifolia and caffeoylquinic acid derivatives against excitotoxic and hypoxic damage of cultured rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Youn; Lee, Hong Kyu; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Kim, SeungHwan; Yoo, Jae Kuk; Seong, Yeon Hee

    2012-06-01

    Ilex latifolia (Aquifoliaceae), one of the primary components of "Ku-ding-cha", has been used in Chinese folk medicine to treat headaches and various inflammatory diseases. A previous study demonstrated that the ethanol extract of I. latifolia could protect against ischemic apoptotic brain damage in rats. The present study investigated the protective activity of I. latifolia against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity using cultured rat cortical neurons in order to explain a possible mechanism related to its inhibitory effect on ischemic brain damage and identified potentially active compounds from it. Exposure of cultured cortical neurons to 500 μM glutamate for 12 h triggered neuronal cell death. I. latifolia (10-100 μg/mL) inhibited glutamate-induced neuronal death, elevation of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the increase of a pro-apoptotic protein, BAX, and the decrease of an anti-apoptotic protein, BcL-2. Hypoxia-induced neuronal cell death was also inhibited by I. latifolia. 3,4-Dicaffeoylquinic acid (diCQA), 3,5-diCQA, and 3,5-diCQA methyl ester isolated from I. latifolia also inhibited the glutamate-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i), generation of ROS, the change of apoptosis-related proteins, and neuronal cell death; and hypoxia-induced neuronal cell death. These results suggest that I. latifolia and its active compounds prevented glutamate-induced neuronal cell damage by inhibiting increase of [Ca(2+)](i), generation of ROS, and resultantly apoptotic pathway. In addition, the neuroprotective effects of I. latifolia on ischemia-induced brain damage might be associated with the anti-excitatory and anti-oxidative actions and could be attributable to these active compounds, CQAs.

  5. Efficient generation of hPSC-derived midbrain dopaminergic neurons in a fully defined, scalable, 3D biomaterial platform

    PubMed Central

    Adil, Maroof M.; Rodrigues, Gonçalo M. C.; Kulkarni, Rishikesh U.; Rao, Antara T.; Chernavsky, Nicole E.; Miller, Evan W.; Schaffer, David V.

    2017-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have major potential as an unlimited source of functional cells for many biomedical applications; however, the development of cell manufacturing systems to enable this promise faces many challenges. For example, there have been major recent advances in the generation of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons from stem cells for Parkinson’s Disease (PD) therapy; however, production of these cells typically involves undefined components and difficult to scale 2D culture formats. Here, we used a fully defined, 3D, thermoresponsive biomaterial platform to rapidly generate large numbers of action-potential firing mDA neurons after 25 days of differentiation (~40% tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive, maturing into 25% cells exhibiting mDA neuron-like spiking behavior). Importantly, mDA neurons generated in 3D exhibited a 30-fold increase in viability upon implantation into rat striatum compared to neurons generated on 2D, consistent with the elevated expression of survival markers FOXA2 and EN1 in 3D. A defined, scalable, and resource-efficient cell culture platform can thus rapidly generate high quality differentiated cells, both neurons and potentially other cell types, with strong potential to accelerate both basic and translational research. PMID:28091566

  6. Gallium nitride induces neuronal differentiation markers in neural stem/precursor cells derived from rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Ruei; Li, Yi-Chen; Young, Tai-Horng

    2009-09-01

    In the present study, gallium nitride (GaN) was used as a substrate to culture neural stem/precursor cells (NSPCs), isolated from embryonic rat cerebral cortex, to examine the effect of GaN on the behavior of NSPCs in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in serum-free medium. Morphological studies showed that neurospheres maintained their initial shape and formed many long and thick processes with the fasciculate feature on GaN. Immunocytochemical characterization showed that GaN could induce the differentiation of NSPCs into neurons and astrocytes. Compared to poly-d-lysine (PDL), the most common substrate used for culturing neurons, there was considerable expression of synapsin I for differentiated neurons on GaN, suggesting GaN could induce the differentiation of NSPCs towards the mature differentiated neurons. Western blot analysis showed that the suppression of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) activity was one of the effects of GaN-promoted NSPC differentiation into neurons. Finally, compared to PDL, GaN could significantly improve cell survival to reduce cell death after long-term culture. These results suggest that GaN potentially has a combination of electric characteristics suitable for developing neuron and/or NSPC chip systems.

  7. Enhanced delivery of daidzein into fibroblasts and neuronal cells with cationic derivatives of gamma-cyclodextrin for the control of cellular glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Kamiński, Kamil; Kujdowicz, Monika; Kajta, Małgorzata; Nowakowska, Maria; Szczubiałka, Krzysztof

    2015-04-01

    Two cationic derivatives of γ-cyclodextrin (GCD) were synthesized by functionalization with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride (GTMAC) and ethylenediamine (EDA). Both these derivatives (GCD-GTMAC and GCD-EDA) have been shown to interact strongly with anionic biopolymers, unfractionated heparin (UFH) and mucin, the latter showing their mucoadhesive properties. They form inclusion complexes with daidzein (DAI), an isoflavone displaying a multitude of physiological effects, much more efficiently than the unmodified GCD. It was also shown that the complexes of these GCD derivatives with DAI and Nile Red penetrate human fibroblasts and murine hippocampal neuronal cells indicating that cationic GCD derivatives can be considered as potential delivery systems for isoflavones and other poorly water soluble compounds. Moreover, it was found that DAI delivered in cationic GCD complexes decreased the level of the cellular glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in normal fibroblasts suggesting their possible application in the control of GAGs in mucopolysaccharidoses, lysosomal storage diseases caused by pathological accumulation of GAGs in the cells.

  8. Characterizing Rat PNS Electrophysiological Response to Electrical Stimulation Using in vitro Chip-Based Human Investigational Platform (iCHIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Khani, Joshua; Prescod, Lindsay; Enright, Heather; Felix, Sarah; Osburn, Joanne; Wheeler, Elizabeth; Kulp, Kris

    2015-08-18

    Ex vivo systems and organ-on-a-chip technology offer an unprecedented approach to modeling the inner workings of the human body. The ultimate goal of LLNL’s in vitro Chip-based Human Investigational Platform (iCHIP) is to integrate multiple organ tissue cultures using microfluidic channels, multi-electrode arrays (MEA), and other biosensors in order to effectively simulate and study the responses and interactions of the major organs to chemical and physical stimulation. In this study, we focused on the peripheral nervous system (PNS) component of the iCHIP system. Specifically we sought to expound on prior research investigating the electrophysiological response of rat dorsal root ganglion cells (rDRGs) to chemical exposures, such as capsaicin. Our aim was to establish a protocol for electrical stimulation using the iCHIP device that would reliably elicit a characteristic response in rDRGs. By varying the parameters for both the stimulation properties – amplitude, phase width, phase shape, and stimulation/ return configuration – and the culture conditions – day in vitro and neural cell types - we were able to make several key observations and uncover a potential convention with a minimal number of devices tested. Future work will seek to establish a standard protocol for human DRGs in the iCHIP which will afford a portable, rapid method for determining the effects of toxins and novel therapeutics on the PNS.

  9. Up-regulation of astroglial heme oxygenase-1 by a synthetic (S)-verbenone derivative LMT-335 ameliorates oxygen-glucose deprivation-evoked injury in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Ju, Chung; Song, Sumi; Kim, Minkyoung; Choi, Yongseok; Kim, Won-Ki

    2013-02-15

    Excessive generation of free radicals is regarded as a major detrimental factor in cerebral ischemic insults. Neurons are particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to their limited anti-oxidant capacity. As an important source of antioxidants in the brain, astroglia are now thought to be attractive targets for pharmacological interventions to reduce neuronal oxidative stress in ischemic stroke. In the present study, we synthesized a novel antioxidant, the (1S)-(-)-verbenone derivative LMT-335, and investigated its anti-ischemic activities. In rat cortical neuronal/glial co-cultures, LMT-335 significantly reduced oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)/reoxygenation (R)-induced neuronal injury. Although it did not inhibit N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced excitotoxicity, LMT-335 significantly reduced OGD/R-evoked intracellular oxidative stress. However, the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay showed that the free radical scavenging activities of LMT-335 were lower than those of trolox. Instead, LMT-335 significantly increased the astroglial expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a well-known anti-oxidant stress protein, as evidenced by immunocytochemistry and immunoblot analyses. Moreover, a selective HO-1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP), significantly blocked the anti-ischemic effect of LMT-335. The present findings indicate that LMT-335 exerts neuroprotective effects against OGD/R by up-regulation of HO-1 in astroglial cells. Our data suggest that astroglial HO-1 represents a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

  10. Transcriptional activation of the human brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene promoter III by dopamine signaling in NT2/N neurons.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hung; Chartier, Joanne; Sodja, Caroline; Desbois, Angele; Ribecco-Lutkiewicz, Maria; Walker, P Roy; Sikorska, Marianna

    2003-07-18

    We have identified a functional cAMP-response element (CRE) in the human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene promoter III and established that it participated in the modulation of BDNF expression in NT2/N neurons via downstream signaling from the D1 class of dopamine (DA) receptors. The up-regulation of BDNF expression, in turn, produced neuroprotective signals through receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) and promoted cell survival under the conditions of oxygen and glucose deprivation. To our knowledge this is the first evidence showing the presence of a functional CRE in the human BDNF gene and the role of DA signaling in establishing transcriptional competence of CRE in post-mitotic NT2/N neurons. This ability of DA to regulate the expression of the BDNF survival factor has a profound significance for the nigrostriatal pathway, because it indicates the existence of a feedback loop between the neutrophin, which promotes both the maturation and survival of dopaminergic neurons, and the neurotransmitter, which the mature neurons ultimately produce and release.

  11. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Cortical Neurons for High Throughput Medication Screening in Autism: A Proof of Concept Study in SHANK3 Haploinsufficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Darville, Hélène; Poulet, Aurélie; Rodet-Amsellem, Frédérique; Chatrousse, Laure; Pernelle, Julie; Boissart, Claire; Héron, Delphine; Nava, Caroline; Perrier, Anselme; Jarrige, Margot; Cogé, Francis; Millan, Mark J; Bourgeron, Thomas; Peschanski, Marc; Delorme, Richard; Benchoua, Alexandra

    2016-07-01

    Autism spectrum disorders affect millions of individuals worldwide, but their heterogeneity complicates therapeutic intervention that is essentially symptomatic. A versatile yet relevant model to rationally screen among hundreds of therapeutic options would help improving clinical practice. Here we investigated whether neurons differentiated from pluripotent stem cells can provide such a tool using SHANK3 haploinsufficiency as a proof of principle. A library of compounds was screened for potential to increase SHANK3 mRNA content in neurons differentiated from control human embryonic stem cells. Using induced pluripotent stem cell technology, active compounds were then evaluated for efficacy in correcting dysfunctional networks of neurons differentiated from individuals with deleterious point mutations of SHANK3. Among 202 compounds tested, lithium and valproic acid showed the best efficacy at corrected SHANK3 haploinsufficiency associated phenotypes in cellulo. Lithium pharmacotherapy was subsequently provided to one patient and, after one year, an encouraging decrease in autism severity was observed. This demonstrated that pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons provide a novel cellular paradigm exploitable in the search for specific disease-modifying treatments.

  12. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family ligands enhance capsaicin-stimulated release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Schmutzler, B S; Roy, S; Hingtgen, C M

    2009-06-16

    The glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family ligands (GFLs) are a group of peptides that have been implicated as important factors in inflammation, since they are released in increased amounts during inflammation and induce thermal hyperalgesia upon injection. Mouse isolated sensory neurons in culture and freshly dissociated spinal cord slices were used to examine the enhancement in stimulated-release of the neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), as a measure of sensitization. Exposure of isolated sensory neurons in culture to GDNF, neurturin, and artemin enhanced the capsaicin-stimulated release of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide (iCGRP) two- to threefold, but did not increase potassium-stimulated release of iCGRP. A similar profile of sensitization was observed in freshly dissociated spinal cord slices. Persephin, another member of the GFL family thought to be important in development, was unable to induce an enhancement in the release of iCGRP. These results demonstrate that specific GFLs are important mediators affecting sensory neuronal sensitivity, likely through modulation of the capsaicin receptor. The sensitization of sensory neurons during inflammation, and the pain and neurogenic inflammation resulting from this sensitization, may be due in part to the effects of these selected GFLs.

  13. c-fos modulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in mouse hippocampal CA3 and dentate gyrus neurons.

    PubMed

    Dong, Mei; Wu, Yongfei; Fan, Yunxia; Xu, Ming; Zhang, Jianhua

    2006-05-29

    Excess neuronal excitation by glutamate induces neuron cell death, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of acute brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. Our previous studies using a mouse with hippocampal c-fos gene deletion showed that c-fos regulates neuronal excitability and excitotoxicity. Moreover, a delayed induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein expression in response to kainic acid (KA) treatment was found in c-fos mutant mice compared to wildtype controls, suggesting that c-fos is important in the temporal control of BDNF induction. To further investigate mechanisms of in vivo regulation of c-fos on BDNF expression, we studied the expression of BDNF mRNA and its colocalization with c-Fos protein in the hippocampal formation in the presence and absence of KA. By in situ hybridization, we observed that the c-fos mutant and wildtype mice exhibited similar basal expression of BDNF in the absence of KA. In contrast, the KA-induced BDNF mRNA levels were significantly different in wildtype and c-fos mutant mice in CA3 and dentate gyrus regions. Our findings indicate that c-fos regulates expression of BDNF in distinct neuron populations of the hippocampal formation in vivo.

  14. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Neuronal Cells Cultured on Chemically-Defined Hydrogels for Sensitive In Vitro Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Pellett, Sabine; Schwartz, Michael P.; Tepp, William H.; Josephson, Richard; Scherf, Jacob M.; Pier, Christina L.; Thomson, James A.; Murphy, William L.; Johnson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) detection provides a useful model for validating cell-based neurotoxicity screening approaches, as sensitivity is dependent on functionally competent neurons and clear quantitative endpoints are available for correlating results to approved animal testing protocols. Here, human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neuronal cells were cultured on chemically-defined poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels formed by “thiol-ene” photopolymerization and tested as a cell-based neurotoxicity assay by determining sensitivity to active BoNT/A1. BoNT/A1 sensitivity was comparable to the approved in vivo mouse bioassay for human iPSC-derived neurons and neural stem cells (iPSC-NSCs) cultured on PEG hydrogels or treated tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) surfaces. However, maximum sensitivity for BoNT detection was achieved two weeks earlier for iPSC-NSCs that were differentiated and matured on PEG hydrogels compared to TCP. Therefore, chemically-defined synthetic hydrogels offer benefits over standard platforms when optimizing culture conditions for cell-based screening and achieve sensitivities comparable to an approved animal testing protocol. PMID:26411797

  15. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Neuronal Cells Cultured on Chemically-Defined Hydrogels for Sensitive In Vitro Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Pellett, Sabine; Schwartz, Michael P; Tepp, William H; Josephson, Richard; Scherf, Jacob M; Pier, Christina L; Thomson, James A; Murphy, William L; Johnson, Eric A

    2015-09-28

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) detection provides a useful model for validating cell-based neurotoxicity screening approaches, as sensitivity is dependent on functionally competent neurons and clear quantitative endpoints are available for correlating results to approved animal testing protocols. Here, human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neuronal cells were cultured on chemically-defined poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels formed by "thiol-ene" photopolymerization and tested as a cell-based neurotoxicity assay by determining sensitivity to active BoNT/A1. BoNT/A1 sensitivity was comparable to the approved in vivo mouse bioassay for human iPSC-derived neurons and neural stem cells (iPSC-NSCs) cultured on PEG hydrogels or treated tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) surfaces. However, maximum sensitivity for BoNT detection was achieved two weeks earlier for iPSC-NSCs that were differentiated and matured on PEG hydrogels compared to TCP. Therefore, chemically-defined synthetic hydrogels offer benefits over standard platforms when optimizing culture conditions for cell-based screening and achieve sensitivities comparable to an approved animal testing protocol.

  16. Differentiation Potential of Human Chorion-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Motor Neuron-Like Cells in Two- and Three-Dimensional Culture Systems.

    PubMed

    Faghihi, Faezeh; Mirzaei, Esmaeil; Ai, Jafar; Lotfi, Abolfazl; Sayahpour, Forough Azam; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Barough, Somayeh Ebrahimi; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi

    2016-04-01

    Many people worldwide suffer from motor neuron-related disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injuries. Recently, several attempts have been made to recruit stem cells to modulate disease progression in ALS and also regenerate spinal cord injuries. Chorion-derived mesenchymal stem cells (C-MSCs), used to be discarded as postpartum medically waste product, currently represent a class of cells with self renewal property and immunomodulatory capacity. These cells are able to differentiate into mesodermal and nonmesodermal lineages such as neural cells. On the other hand, gelatin, as a simply denatured collagen, is a suitable substrate for cell adhesion and differentiation. It has been shown that electrospinning of scaffolds into fibrous structure better resembles the physiological microenvironment in comparison with two-dimensional (2D) culture system. Since there is no report on potential of human chorion-derived MSCs to differentiate into motor neuron cells in two- and three-dimensional (3D) culture systems, we set out to determine the effect of retinoic acid (RA) and sonic hedgehog (Shh) on differentiation of human C-MSCs into motor neuron-like cells cultured on tissue culture plates (2D) and electrospun nanofibrous gelatin scaffold (3D).

  17. Physiological maturation and drug responses of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neuronal networks in long-term culture.

    PubMed

    Odawara, A; Katoh, H; Matsuda, N; Suzuki, I

    2016-05-18

    The functional network of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons is a potentially powerful in vitro model for evaluating disease mechanisms and drug responses. However, the culture time required for the full functional maturation of individual neurons and networks is uncertain. We investigated the development of spontaneous electrophysiological activity and pharmacological responses for over 1 year in culture using multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). The complete maturation of spontaneous firing, evoked responses, and modulation of activity by glutamatergic and GABAergic receptor antagonists/agonists required 20-30 weeks. At this stage, neural networks also demonstrated epileptiform synchronized burst firing (SBF) in response to pro-convulsants and SBF suppression using clinical anti-epilepsy drugs. Our results reveal the feasibility of long-term MEA measurements from hiPSC-derived neuronal networks in vitro for mechanistic analyses and drug screening. However, developmental changes in electrophysiological and pharmacological properties indicate the necessity for the international standardization of culture and evaluation procedures.

  18. iPSC-derived neurons from GBA1-associated Parkinson's disease patients show autophagic defects and impaired calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Schöndorf, David C; Aureli, Massimo; McAllister, Fiona E; Hindley, Christopher J; Mayer, Florian; Schmid, Benjamin; Sardi, S Pablo; Valsecchi, Manuela; Hoffmann, Susanna; Schwarz, Lukas Kristoffer; Hedrich, Ulrike; Berg, Daniela; Shihabuddin, Lamya S; Hu, Jing; Pruszak, Jan; Gygi, Steven P; Sonnino, Sandro; Gasser, Thomas; Deleidi, Michela

    2014-06-06

    Mutations in the acid β-glucocerebrosidase (GBA1) gene, responsible for the lysosomal storage disorder Gaucher's disease (GD), are the strongest genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD) known to date. Here we generate induced pluripotent stem cells from subjects with GD and PD harbouring GBA1 mutations, and differentiate them into midbrain dopaminergic neurons followed by enrichment using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Neurons show a reduction in glucocerebrosidase activity and protein levels, increase in glucosylceramide and α-synuclein levels as well as autophagic and lysosomal defects. Quantitative proteomic profiling reveals an increase of the neuronal calcium-binding protein 2 (NECAB2) in diseased neurons. Mutant neurons show a dysregulation of calcium homeostasis and increased vulnerability to stress responses involving elevation of cytosolic calcium. Importantly, correction of the mutations rescues such pathological phenotypes. These findings provide evidence for a link between GBA1 mutations and complex changes in the autophagic/lysosomal system and intracellular calcium homeostasis, which underlie vulnerability to neurodegeneration.

  19. The role of mitochondria-mediated intrinsic death pathway in gingerdione derivative I6-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ho; Chen, Po-See; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Huang, Li-Jiau; Gean, Po-Wu; Chiu, Ted-H

    2012-03-01

    Neuronal death induced by I6 displayed apoptotic characteristics but the precise mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In the present studies, I6 at 24 h after intraperitoneal administration significantly decreased the density of surviving neurons and increased caspase-3 activity in frontal cortex, suggesting that peripherally administered I6 may cross BBB to induce CNS toxicity. In rat embryonic primary cortical cells, I6-induced reduction of mitochondrial viability and neuronal apoptosis was inhibited by vitamin E. In addition, I6-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused the disruption of mitochondria membrane potential (MMP), the release of cytochrome c, the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), resulting in activation of mitochondrial-mediated intrinsic death pathway. Pre-treatment with antioxidant vitamin E or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely abolished the I6-induced generation of ROS, loss of MMP, release of cytochrome c, activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and cleavage of PARP. Carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP), a mitochondrial uncoupler, significantly reduced I6-induced neuronal death as well as caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. These results suggest that I6 induces neuronal death by promoting intracellular ROS production to cause a loss of MMP that result in release of cytochrome c and activation of mitochondria-mediated intrinsic death pathway.

  20. Irregular spiking of pyramidal neurons organizes as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches in the awake state.

    PubMed

    Bellay, Timothy; Klaus, Andreas; Seshadri, Saurav; Plenz, Dietmar

    2015-07-07

    Spontaneous fluctuations in neuronal activity emerge at many spatial and temporal scales in cortex. Population measures found these fluctuations to organize as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches, suggesting cortical dynamics to be critical. Macroscopic dynamics, though, depend on physiological states and are ambiguous as to their cellular composition, spatiotemporal origin, and contributions from synaptic input or action potential (AP) output. Here, we study spontaneous firing in pyramidal neurons (PNs) from rat superficial cortical layers in vivo and in vitro using 2-photon imaging. As the animal transitions from the anesthetized to awake state, spontaneous single neuron firing increases in irregularity and assembles into scale-invariant avalanches at the group level. In vitro spike avalanches emerged naturally yet required balanced excitation and inhibition. This demonstrates that neuronal avalanches are linked to the global physiological state of wakefulness and that cortical resting activity organizes as avalanches from firing of local PN groups to global population activity.

  1. Peripherally driven low-threshold inhibitory inputs to lamina I local-circuit and projection neurones: a new circuit for gating pain responses

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Liliana L; Szucs, Peter; Safronov, Boris V

    2014-01-01

    Spinal lamina I is a key element of the pain processing system which relays primary afferent input to supraspinal areas. However, little is known about how the signal is modulated by its intrinsic network including local-circuit neurones (LCNs) and much less numerous anterolateral tract projection neurones (PNs). Here, we used whole-cell patch clamp recordings in an isolated spinal cord preparation to examine properties of identified LCNs (n = 85) and PNs (n = 73) in their functionally preserved local networks. Forty LCNs showed spontaneous rhythmic firing (2–7 Hz) at zero current injection, which persisted in the presence of blockers of fast synaptic transmission. In the remaining cases, most LCNs and PNs fired tonically in response to depolarizing current injections. We identified LCNs and PNs receiving low-threshold primary afferent-driven inhibitory inputs, which in many cases were disynaptic and temporally preceded classical high-threshold excitatory inputs. This direct inhibitory link between low-threshold afferents and PNs can function as a postsynaptic gate controlling the nociceptive information flow in the spinal cord. The LCNs were found to be integrated into the superficial dorsal horn network by their receipt of monosynaptic and disynaptic inputs from other lamina I and II neurones. One-third of LCNs and two-thirds of PNs tested responded to substance P application. Thus, substance P released by a noxious afferent stimulation may excite PNs in two ways: directly, and via the activation of presynaptic LCN circuitries. In conclusion, we have described important properties of identified lamina I neurones and their roles in a new circuit for gating pain responses. PMID:24421354

  2. Cell freezing protocol suitable for ATAC-Seq on motor neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Pamela; Escalante-Chong, Renan; Shelley, Brandon C.; Patel-Murray, Natasha L.; Xin, Xiaofeng; Adam, Miriam; Mandefro, Berhan; Sareen, Dhruv; Svendsen, Clive N.; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the assay for transposase-accessible chromatin using sequencing (ATAC-Seq) has become a fundamental tool of epigenomic research. However, it is difficult to perform this technique on frozen samples because freezing cells before extracting nuclei can impair nuclear integrity and alter chromatin structure, especially in fragile cells such as neurons. Our aim was to develop a protocol for freezing neuronal cells that is compatible with ATAC-Seq; we focused on a disease-relevant cell type, namely motor neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iMNs) from a patient affected by spinal muscular atrophy. We found that while flash-frozen iMNs are not suitable for ATAC-Seq, the assay is successful with slow-cooled cryopreserved cells. Using this method, we were able to isolate high quality, intact nuclei, and we verified that epigenetic results from fresh and cryopreserved iMNs quantitatively agree. PMID:27146274

  3. Peripheral Nervous System Genes Expressed in Central Neurons Induce Growth on Inhibitory Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Buchser, William J.; Smith, Robin P.; Pardinas, Jose R.; Haddox, Candace L.; Hutson, Thomas; Moon, Lawrence; Hoffman, Stanley R.; Bixby, John L.; Lemmon, Vance P.

    2012-01-01

    Trauma to the spinal cord and brain can result in irreparable loss of function. This failure of recovery is in part due to inhibition of axon regeneration by myelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons exhibit increased regenerative ability compared to central nervous system neurons, even in the presence of inhibitory environments. Previously, we identified over a thousand genes differentially expressed in PNS neurons relative to CNS neurons. These genes represent intrinsic differences that may account for the PNS’s enhanced regenerative ability. Cerebellar neurons were transfected with cDNAs for each of these PNS genes to assess their ability to enhance neurite growth on inhibitory (CSPG) or permissive (laminin) substrates. Using high content analysis, we evaluated the phenotypic profile of each neuron to extract meaningful data for over 1100 genes. Several known growth associated proteins potentiated neurite growth on laminin. Most interestingly, novel genes were identified that promoted neurite growth on CSPGs (GPX3, EIF2B5, RBMX). Bioinformatic approaches also uncovered a number of novel gene families that altered neurite growth of CNS neurons. PMID:22701605

  4. Instructing Perisomatic Inhibition by Direct Lineage Reprogramming of Neocortical Projection Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhanlei; Mostajo-Radji, Mohammed A; Brown, Juliana R; Rouaux, Caroline; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Hensch, Takao K; Arlotta, Paola

    2015-11-04

    During development of the cerebral cortex, local GABAergic interneurons recognize and pair with excitatory projection neurons to ensure the fine excitatory-inhibitory balance essential for proper circuit function. Whether the class-specific identity of projection neurons has a role in the establishment of afferent inhibitory synapses is debated. Here, we report that direct in vivo lineage reprogramming of layer 2/3 (L2/3) callosal projection neurons (CPNs) into induced corticofugal projection neurons (iCFuPNs) increases inhibitory input onto the converted neurons to levels similar to that of endogenous CFuPNs normally found in layer 5 (L5). iCFuPNs recruit increased numbers of inhibitory perisomatic synapses from parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons, with single-cell precision and despite their ectopic location in L2/3. The data show that individual reprogrammed excitatory projection neurons extrinsically modulate afferent input by local PV(+) interneurons, suggesting that projection neuron class-specific identity can actively control the wiring of the cortical microcircuit.

  5. CDKL5 ensures excitatory synapse stability by reinforcing NGL-1-PSD95 interaction in the postsynaptic compartment and is impaired in patient iPSC-derived neurons.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Sara; Ungaro, Federica; Hambrock, Melanie; Rademacher, Nils; Stefanelli, Gilda; Brambilla, Dario; Sessa, Alessandro; Magagnotti, Cinzia; Bachi, Angela; Giarda, Elisa; Verpelli, Chiara; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Sala, Carlo; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Broccoli, Vania

    2012-09-01

    Mutations of the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and netrin-G1 (NTNG1) genes cause a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with clinical features that are closely related to Rett syndrome, including intellectual disability, early-onset intractable epilepsy and autism. We report here that CDKL5 is localized at excitatory synapses and contributes to correct dendritic spine structure and synapse activity. To exert this role, CDKL5 binds and phosphorylates the cell adhesion molecule NGL-1. This phosphorylation event ensures a stable association between NGL-1 and PSD95. Accordingly, phospho-mutant NGL-1 is unable to induce synaptic contacts whereas its phospho-mimetic form binds PSD95 more efficiently and partially rescues the CDKL5-specific spine defects. Interestingly, similarly to rodent neurons, iPSC-derived neurons from patients with CDKL5 mutations exhibit aberrant dendritic spines, thus suggesting a common function of CDKL5 in mice and humans.

  6. Gene expression profiling for human iPS-derived motor neurons from sporadic ALS patients reveals a strong association between mitochondrial functions and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Chrystian J.; Dariolli, Rafael; Jorge, Frederico M.; Monteiro, Matheus R.; Maximino, Jessica R.; Martins, Roberto S.; Strauss, Bryan E.; Krieger, José E.; Callegaro, Dagoberto; Chadi, Gerson

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that leads to widespread motor neuron death, general palsy and respiratory failure. The most prevalent sporadic ALS form is not genetically inherited. Attempts to translate therapeutic strategies have failed because the described mechanisms of disease are based on animal models carrying specific gene mutations and thus do not address sporadic ALS. In order to achieve a better approach to study the human disease, human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-differentiated motor neurons were obtained from motor nerve fibroblasts of sporadic ALS and non-ALS subjects using the STEMCCA Cre-Excisable Constitutive Polycistronic Lentivirus system and submitted to microarray analyses using a whole human genome platform. DAVID analyses of differentially expressed genes identified molecular function and biological process-related genes through Gene Ontology. REVIGO highlighted the related functions mRNA and DNA binding, GTP binding, transcription (co)-repressor activity, lipoprotein receptor binding, synapse organization, intracellular transport, mitotic cell cycle and cell death. KEGG showed pathways associated with Parkinson's disease and oxidative phosphorylation, highlighting iron homeostasis, neurotrophic functions, endosomal trafficking and ERK signaling. The analysis of most dysregulated genes and those representative of the majority of categorized genes indicates a strong association between mitochondrial function and cellular processes possibly related to motor neuron degeneration. In conclusion, iPSC-derived motor neurons from motor nerve fibroblasts of sporadic ALS patients may recapitulate key mechanisms of neurodegeneration and may offer an opportunity for translational investigation of sporadic ALS. Large gene profiling of differentiated motor neurons from sporadic ALS patients highlights mitochondrial participation in the establishment of autonomous mechanisms associated with sporadic ALS

  7. The regulation of exon-specific brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression by protein kinase C in rat cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Norimitsu; Yoshida, Yosuke; Nakamura, Yoki; Hidaka, Nobue; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2013-05-06

    Although brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is localized in primary sensory neurons and has crucial roles in nociceptive transduction, the mechanisms involved in regulation of BDNF exon-specific mRNA expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons have yet to be determined. Rat primary cultures of DRG neurons were stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a potent activator of protein kinase C (PKC), which resulted in the robust expression of both BDNF mRNA and protein. Among each BDNF mRNA exon, it was found that exons I, IV and VI were especially induced after PMA stimulation. The induction of these exons was significantly blocked by Gö6983 (a broad spectrum PKC inhibitor), Gö6976 (a conventional PKCs and PKCμ inhibitor), and rottlerin (a PKCδ inhibitor), but not by a PKCε inhibitor. The effect of PMA on exons I and VI was blocked by either U0126 (a MAP kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor) or SB202190 (a p38 inhibitor), and PMA's effect on exon IV was inhibited by U0126 but not by SB202190. Furthermore, the activation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) was associated with the induction of exons I and IV, and the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) contributed to the induction of exons I, IV and VI. These results show that the activation of PKCs induces the expression of BDNF mRNA exons I, IV and VI through exon-specific mechanisms, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, CREB and NF-κB, in cultured DRG neurons. These data suggest multiple pathways in the expression of BDNF in nociceptive sensory neurons.

  8. Gene expression profiling for human iPS-derived motor neurons from sporadic ALS patients reveals a strong association between mitochondrial functions and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Alves, Chrystian J; Dariolli, Rafael; Jorge, Frederico M; Monteiro, Matheus R; Maximino, Jessica R; Martins, Roberto S; Strauss, Bryan E; Krieger, José E; Callegaro, Dagoberto; Chadi, Gerson

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that leads to widespread motor neuron death, general palsy and respiratory failure. The most prevalent sporadic ALS form is not genetically inherited. Attempts to translate therapeutic strategies have failed because the described mechanisms of disease are based on animal models carrying specific gene mutations and thus do not address sporadic ALS. In order to achieve a better approach to study the human disease, human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-differentiated motor neurons were obtained from motor nerve fibroblasts of sporadic ALS and non-ALS subjects using the STEMCCA Cre-Excisable Constitutive Polycistronic Lentivirus system and submitted to microarray analyses using a whole human genome platform. DAVID analyses of differentially expressed genes identified molecular function and biological process-related genes through Gene Ontology. REVIGO highlighted the related functions mRNA and DNA binding, GTP binding, transcription (co)-repressor activity, lipoprotein receptor binding, synapse organization, intracellular transport, mitotic cell cycle and cell death. KEGG showed pathways associated with Parkinson's disease and oxidative phosphorylation, highlighting iron homeostasis, neurotrophic functions, endosomal trafficking and ERK signaling. The analysis of most dysregulated genes and those representative of the majority of categorized genes indicates a strong association between mitochondrial function and cellular processes possibly related to motor neuron degeneration. In conclusion, iPSC-derived motor neurons from motor nerve fibroblasts of sporadic ALS patients may recapitulate key mechanisms of neurodegeneration and may offer an opportunity for translational investigation of sporadic ALS. Large gene profiling of differentiated motor neurons from sporadic ALS patients highlights mitochondrial participation in the establishment of autonomous mechanisms associated with sporadic ALS.

  9. Conditioned medium of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells mediates protection in neurons following glutamate excitotoxicity by regulating energy metabolism and GAP-43 expression.

    PubMed

    Hao, Peng; Liang, Zhanhua; Piao, Hua; Ji, Xiaofei; Wang, Yachen; Liu, Yong; Liu, Rutao; Liu, Jing

    2014-03-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity has been implicated as one of the pathological mechanisms contributing to neuronal cell death and is involved in many neurological disorders. Stem cell transplantation is a promising approach for the treatment of nervous system damage or diseases. Previous studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have important therapeutic effects in experimental animal and preclinical disease model of central nervous system pathology. However, it is not well understood whether neurogenesis of MSCs or MSC conditioned-medium (CM) containing microparticles mediates therapeutic effects. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of human adipose-derived MSCs (AMSCs) on cortical neurons using models of glutamate excitotoxicity. Following exposure to glutamate (100 μM, 15 min), cortical neurons were co-cultured with either AMSCs separated by a semiporous membrane (prohibiting direct cell-cell contact) or with AMSC-CM for 18 h. Compared to untreated control groups, AMSCs and AMSC-CM partially and similarly reduced neuronal cell damages, as indicated by reduced LDH release, a decreased number of trypan-positive cells and a decline in the number of apoptotic nuclei. Protection by CM was associated with increased GAP-43 expression and an elevated number of GAP-43-positive neurites. Furthermore, CM increased levels of ATP, NAD(+) and NADH and the ratio of NAD(+)/NADH, while preventing a glutamate-induced decline in mitochondrial membrane potential. These results demonstrate that AMSC-CM mediates direct neuroprotection by inhibiting neuronal cell damage/apoptosis, promoting nerve regeneration and repair, and restoring bioenergy following energy depletion caused by glutamate excitotoxicity.

  10. Transcriptome profile and cytogenetic analysis of immortalized neuronally restricted progenitor cells derived from the porcine olfactory bulb

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, we established and phenotypically characterized an immortalized porcine olfactory bulb neuroblast cell line, OBGF400 (Uebing-Czipura et al., 2008). To facilitate the future application of these cells in studies of neurological dysfunction and neuronal replacement therapies, a comprehensive...

  11. Flavonoids, derived from traditional Chinese medicines, show roles in the differentiation of neurons: possible targets in developing health food products.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sherry L; Zhu, Kevin Y; Bi, Cathy W C; Yan, Lu; Men, Simon W X; Dong, Tina T X; Tsim, Karl W K

    2013-12-01

    Flavonoids, a family of phenolic compounds, are distributed in a variety of fruits, vegetables, tea, and wine. More importantly, many flavonoids are served as the active ingredients in traditional Chinese herbal medicines, which in general do not have side effects. Several lines of evidence support that flavonoids have impacts on many aspects of human health, including anti-tumor, anti-oxidation, and anti-inflammation. Recently, there is significant attention focused on the neuronal beneficial effects of flavonoids, including the promotion of nervous system development, neuroprotection against neurotoxin stress, as well as the promotion of memory, learning, and cognitive functions. Here, the activities of flavonoids on the development of nervous system are being summarized and discussed. The flavonoids from diverse herbal medicines have significant effects in different developmental stages of nervous systems, including neuronal stem cell differentiation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal plasticity. These findings imply that flavonoids are potential candidates for the development of health supplements in preventing birth defects and neuronal diseases.

  12. Human neural stem cell-derived cultures in three-dimensional substrates form spontaneously functional neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Imogen; Silveirinha, Vasco; Stein, Jason L; de la Torre-Ubieta, Luis; Farrimond, Jonathan A; Williamson, Elizabeth M; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2015-02-25

    Differentiated human neural stem cells were cultured in an inert three-dimensional (3D) scaffold and, unlike two-dimensional (2D) but otherwise comparable monolayer cultures, formed spontaneously active, functional neuronal networks that responded reproducibly and predictably to conventional pharmacological treatments to reveal functional, glutamatergic synapses. Immunocytochemical and electron microscopy analysis revealed a neuronal and glial population, where markers of neuronal maturity were observed in the former. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis revealed substantial differences in gene expression conferred by culturing in a 3D vs a 2D environment. Notable and numerous differences were seen in genes coding for neuronal function, the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton. In addition to producing functional networks, differentiated human neural stem cells grown in inert scaffolds offer several significant advantages over conventional 2D monolayers. These advantages include cost savings and improved physiological relevance, which make them better suited for use in the pharmacological and toxicological assays required for development of stem cell-based treatments and the reduction of animal use in medical research. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Integration of donor mesenchymal stem cell-derived neuron-like cells into host neural network after rat spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiang; Qiu, Xue-Cheng; Ma, Yuan-Huan; Duan, Jing-Jing; Chen, Yuan-Feng; Gu, Huai-Yu; Wang, Jun-Mei; Ling, Eng-Ang; Wu, Jin-Lang; Wu, Wutian; Zeng, Yuan-Shan

    2015-06-01

    Functional deficits following spinal cord injury (SCI) primarily attribute to loss of neural connectivity. We therefore tested if novel tissue engineering approaches could enable neural network repair that facilitates functional recovery after spinal cord transection (SCT). Rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), genetically engineered to overexpress TrkC, receptor of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), were pre-differentiated into cells carrying neuronal features via co-culture with NT-3 overproducing Schwann cells in 3-dimensional gelatin sponge (GS) scaffold for 14 days in vitro. Intra-GS formation of MSC assemblies emulating neural network (MSC-GS) were verified morphologically via electron microscopy (EM) and functionally by whole-cell patch clamp recording of spontaneous post-synaptic currents. The differentiated MSCs still partially maintained prototypic property with the expression of some mesodermal cytokines. MSC-GS or GS was then grafted acutely into a 2 mm-wide transection gap in the T9-T10 spinal cord segments of adult rats. Eight weeks later, hindlimb function of the MSC-GS-treated SCT rats was significantly improved relative to controls receiving the GS or lesion only as indicated by BBB score. The MSC-GS transplantation also significantly recovered cortical motor evoked potential (CMEP). Histologically, MSC-derived neuron-like cells maintained their synapse-like structures in vivo; they additionally formed similar connections with host neurites (i.e., mostly serotonergic fibers plus a few corticospinal axons; validated by double-labeled immuno-EM). Moreover, motor cortex electrical stimulation triggered c-fos expression in the grafted and lumbar spinal cord cells of the treated rats only. Our data suggest that MSC-derived neuron-like cells resulting from NT-3-TrkC-induced differentiation can partially integrate into transected spinal cord and this strategy should be further investigated for reconstructing disrupted neural circuits.

  14. Impairments in brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced glutamate release in cultured cortical neurons derived from rats with intrauterine growth retardation: possible involvement of suppression of TrkB/phospholipase C-γ activation.

    PubMed

    Numakawa, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Chiba, Shuichi; Furuta, Miyako; Izumi, Aiko; Ninomiya-Baba, Midori; Odaka, Haruki; Hashido, Kazuo; Adachi, Naoki; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Low birth weight due to intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is suggested to be a risk factor for various psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. It has been reported that developmental cortical dysfunction and neurocognitive deficits are observed in individuals with IUGR, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB are associated with schizophrenia and play a role in cortical development. We previously demonstrated that BDNF induced glutamate release through activation of the TrkB/phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) pathway in developing cultured cortical neurons, and that, using a rat model for IUGR caused by maternal administration of thromboxane A2, cortical levels of TrkB were significantly reduced in IUGR rats at birth. These studies prompted us to hypothesize that TrkB reduction in IUGR cortex led to impairment of BDNF-dependent glutamatergic neurotransmission. In the present study, we found that BDNF-induced glutamate release was strongly impaired in cultured IUGR cortical neurons where TrkB reduction was maintained. Impairment of BDNF-induced glutamate release in IUGR neurons was ameliorated by transfection of human TrkB (hTrkB). Although BDNF-stimulated phosphorylation of TrkB and of PLC-γ was decreased in IUGR neurons, the hTrkB transfection recovered the deficits in their phosphorylation. These results suggest that TrkB reduction causes impairment of BDNF-stimulated glutamatergic function via suppression of TrkB/PLC-γ activation in IUGR cortical neurons. Our findings provide molecular insights into how IUGR links to downregulation of BDNF function in the cortex, which might be involved in the development of IUGR-related diseases such as schizophrenia.

  15. Synthesis and preliminary pharmacological evaluation of novel derivatives of L-beta-threo-benzylaspartate as inhibitors of the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAT3.

    PubMed

    Mavencamp, Terri L; Rhoderick, Joseph F; Bridges, Richard J; Esslinger, C Sean

    2008-08-15

    A series of beta-benzylaspartate derivatives were prepared from N-trityl-L-aspartate dimethyl ester and evaluated as inhibitors of neuronal glutamate transporter EAAT3. The result of the structure-activity studies suggests that the position occupied by the aromatic ring of beta-benzylaspartate within the binding site of EAAT3 may be different from that occupied by comparable groups in previously identified inhibitors, such as L-threo-benzyloxy aspartate (TBOA). Further, halogen substitutions at the 3-position of the aromatic ring of beta-benzylaspartate can increase the potency with which the analogues inhibit EAAT3.

  16. Tonic and Phasic Receptor Neurons in the Vertebrate Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Madrid, Rodolfo; Sanhueza, Magdalena; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Bacigalupo, Juan

    2003-01-01

    Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) respond to odorants with characteristic patterns of action potentials that are relevant for odor coding. Prolonged odorant exposures revealed three populations of dissociated toad ORNs, which were mimicked by depolarizing currents: tonic (TN, displaying sustained firing, 49% of 102 cells), phasic (PN, exhibiting brief action potential trains, 36%) and intermediate neurons (IN, generating trains longer than PN, 15%). We studied the biophysical properties underlying the differences between TNs and PNs, the most extreme cases among ORNs. TNs and PNs possessed similar membrane capacitances (∼4 pF), but they differed in resting potential (−82 versus −64 mV), input resistance (4.2 versus 2.9 GΩ) and unspecific current, Iu (TNs: 0 < Iu ≤ 1 pA/pF; and PNs: Iu > 1 pA/pF). Firing behavior did not correlate with differences in voltage-gated conductances. We developed a mathematical model that accurately simulates tonic and phasic patterns. Whole cell recordings from rat ORNs in fragments (∼4 mm2) of olfactory epithelium showed that such a tissue normally contains tonic and phasic receptor neurons, suggesting that this feature is common across a wide range of vertebrates. Our findings show that the individual passive electrical properties can govern the firing patterns of ORNs. PMID:12770919

  17. Changes of statistical structural fluctuations unveils an early compacted degraded stage of PNS myelin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poccia, Nicola; Campi, Gaetano; Ricci, Alessandro; Caporale, Alessandra S.; di Cola, Emanuela; Hawkins, Thomas A.; Bianconi, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Degradation of the myelin sheath is a common pathology underlying demyelinating neurological diseases from Multiple Sclerosis to Leukodistrophies. Although large malformations of myelin ultrastructure in the advanced stages of Wallerian degradation is known, its subtle structural variations at early stages of demyelination remains poorly characterized. This is partly due to the lack of suitable and non-invasive experimental probes possessing sufficient resolution to detect the degradation. Here we report the feasibility of the application of an innovative non-invasive local structure experimental approach for imaging the changes of statistical structural fluctuations in the first stage of myelin degeneration. Scanning micro X-ray diffraction, using advances in synchrotron x-ray beam focusing, fast data collection, paired with spatial statistical analysis, has been used to unveil temporal changes in the myelin structure of dissected nerves following extraction of the Xenopus laevis sciatic nerve. The early myelin degeneration is a specific ordered compacted phase preceding the swollen myelin phase of Wallerian degradation. Our demonstration of the feasibility of the statistical analysis of SµXRD measurements using biological tissue paves the way for further structural investigations of degradation and death of neurons and other cells and tissues in diverse pathological states where nanoscale structural changes may be uncovered.

  18. Derivation, Expansion, and Motor Neuron Differentiation of Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Non-Integrating Episomal Vectors and a Defined Xenogeneic-free Culture System.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wentao; He, Yongpei; Xiong, Yongjie; Lu, Hong; Chen, Hong; Hou, Limin; Qiu, Zhandong; Fang, Yu; Zhang, Suming

    2016-04-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from patient-derived somatic cells provides the opportunity for model development in order to study patient-specific disease states with the potential for drug discovery. However, use of lentivirus and exposure of iPSCs to animal-derived products limit their therapeutic utility and affect lineage differentiation and subsequent downstream functionality of iPSC derivatives. Within the context of this study, we describe a simple and practical protocol enabling the efficient reprogramming of terminally differentiated adult fibroblasts into integration-free human iPSCs (hiPSCs) using a combination of episomal plasmids with small molecules (SMs). Using this approach, there was a 10-fold increase in reprogramming efficiency over single plasmid vector-based methods. We obtained approximately 100 iPSCs colonies from 1 × 10(5) human adult dermal fibroblasts (HADFs) and achieved approximately 0.1% reprogramming efficiencies. Concurrently, we developed a highly conducive culture system using xeno-free media and human vitronectin. The resulting hiPSCs were free of DNA integration and had completely lost episomal vectors, maintained long-term self-renewal, featured a normal karyotype, expressed pluripotent stem cell markers, and possessed the capability of differentiating into components of all three germ layers in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that the integration-free hiPSCs could be differentiated into motor neurons under xeno-free culture conditions. This induction method will promote the derivation of patient-specific integration-free and xeno-free iPSCs and improve the strategy for motor neuron derivation. Our approach provides a useful tool for human disease models, drug screen, and clinical applications.

  19. [Effect of a derivative of GABA, phenibut, on behavior and the activity of visual cortex neurons of the rabbit during elaboration of a defensive reflex and internal inhibition].

    PubMed

    Shul'gina, G I; Petrishcheva, A P; Kuznetsova, G G

    1985-01-01

    In experiments on alert non-immobilized rabbits the effect of subcutaneous administration of the GABA-derivate--phenibut on behaviour, slow potentials and impulse activity of neurones of the visual cortex was studied during elaboration of a defensive reflex to light flashes and of conditioned inhibition. During the action of phenibut late negative-positive components of the evoked potentials to flashes, corresponding inhibitory pauses and postinhibitory activation gradually increased; then stable predominance of slow high-amplitude potential oscillations and corresponding neuronal group bursts appeared, separated by inhibitory pauses and in intersignal periods. Reinforcing stimulus, as before phenibut administration, lowered the amplitudes of slow potential oscillations and weakened inhibitory pauses in neuronal impulse activity. Dynamics of movements in response to the stimuli was of a phasic character. 3 hours after phenibut administration the discrimination of reinforced and inhibitory light flashes has distinctly improved. The obtained results confirm the initial concept of the significant role of the GABA-ergic inhibitory system in the process of elaboration of internal inhibition.

  20. Phosphatase Inhibitors Function as Novel, Broad Spectrum Botulinum Neurotoxin Antagonists in Mouse and Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Motor Neuron-Based Assays.

    PubMed

    Kiris, Erkan; Nuss, Jonathan E; Stanford, Stephanie M; Wanner, Laura M; Cazares, Lisa; Maestre, Michael F; Du, Hao T; Gomba, Glenn Y; Burnett, James C; Gussio, Rick; Bottini, Nunzio; Panchal, Rekha G; Kane, Christopher D; Tessarollo, Lino; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop novel treatments to counter Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) poisoning. Currently, the majority of BoNT drug development efforts focus on directly inhibiting the proteolytic components of BoNT, i.e. light chains (LC). Although this is a rational approach, previous research has shown that LCs are extremely difficult drug targets and that inhibiting multi-serotype BoNTs with a single LC inhibitor may not be feasible. An alternative approach would target neuronal pathways involved in intoxication/recovery, rather than the LC itself. Phosphorylation-related mechanisms have been implicated in the intoxication pathway(s) of BoNTs. However, the effects of phosphatase inhibitors upon BoNT activity in the physiological target of BoNTs, i.e. motor neurons, have not been investigated. In this study, a small library of phosphatase inhibitors was screened for BoNT antagonism in the context of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons (ES-MNs). Four inhibitors were found to function as BoNT/A antagonists. Subsequently, we confirmed that these inhibitors protect against BoNT/A in a dose-dependent manner in human ES-MNs. Additionally, these compounds provide protection when administered in post-intoxication scenario. Importantly, the inhibitors were also effective against BoNT serotypes B and E. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing phosphatase inhibitors as broad-spectrum BoNT antagonists.

  1. Selective and differential interactions of BNN27, a novel C17-spiroepoxy steroid derivative, with TrkA receptors, regulating neuronal survival and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pediaditakis, Iosif; Efstathopoulos, Paschalis; Prousis, Kyriakos C; Zervou, Maria; Arévalo, Juan Carlos; Alexaki, Vasileia I; Nikoletopoulou, Vassiliki; Karagianni, Efthymia; Potamitis, Constantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Margioris, Andrew N; Venihaki, Maria; Calogeropoulou, Theodora; Charalampopoulos, Ioannis; Gravanis, Achille

    2016-12-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) holds a pivotal role in brain development and maintenance, been also involved in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we provide evidence that a novel C17-spiroepoxy steroid derivative, BNN27, specifically interacts with and activates the TrkA receptor of NGF, inducing phosphorylation of TrkA tyrosine residues and down-stream neuronal survival-related kinase signaling. Additionally, BNN27 potentiates the efficacy of low levels of NGF, by facilitating its binding to the TrkA receptors and differentially inducing fast return of internalized TrkA receptors into neuronal cell membranes. Furthermore, BNN27 synergizes with NGF in promoting axonal outgrowth, effectively rescues from apoptosis NGF-dependent and TrkA positive sympathetic and sensory neurons, in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo in NGF null mice. Interestingly, BNN27 does not possess the hyperalgesic properties of NGF. BNN27 represents a lead molecule for the development of neuroprotective TrkA receptor agonists, with potential therapeutic applications in neurodegenerative diseases and in brain trauma.

  2. Viral delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor improves behavior and protects striatal neurons in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Jodi L.; Ramaswamy, Shilpa; Gasmi, Mehdi; Bartus, Raymond T.; Herzog, Christopher D.; Brandon, Eugene P.; Zhou, Lili; Pitzer, Mark R.; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth M.; Kordower, Jeffrey H.

    2006-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a fatal, genetic, neurological disorder resulting from a trinucleotide repeat expansion in the gene that encodes for the protein huntingtin. These excessive repeats confer a toxic gain of function on huntingtin, which leads to the degeneration of striatal and cortical neurons and a devastating motor, cognitive, and psychological disorder. Trophic factor administration has emerged as a compelling potential therapy for a variety of neurodegenerative disorders, including HD. We previously demonstrated that viral delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) provides structural and functional neuroprotection in a rat neurotoxin model of HD. In this report we demonstrate that viral delivery of GDNF into the striatum of presymptomatic mice ameliorates behavioral deficits on the accelerating rotorod and hind limb clasping tests in transgenic HD mice. Behavioral neuroprotection was associated with anatomical preservation of the number and size of striatal neurons from cell death and cell atrophy. Additionally, GDNF-treated mice had a lower percentage of neurons containing mutant huntingtin-stained inclusion bodies, a hallmark of HD pathology. These data further support the concept that viral vector delivery of GDNF may be a viable treatment for patients suffering from HD. PMID:16751280

  3. Inclusion complexation of pinostrobin with various cyclodextrin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kicuntod, Jintawee; Khuntawee, Wasinee; Wolschann, Peter; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook; Chavasiri, Warinthorn; Kungwan, Nawee; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada

    2016-01-01

    Pinostrobin (PNS) is one of the important flavonoids and can be abundantly found in the rhizomes of fingerroot (Boesenbergia rotrunda) and galangal (Alpinia galangal and Alpinia officinarum), the herbal basis of Southeast Asian cooking. Similar to other flavonoids, PNS exhibits anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. However, this compound has an extremely low water solubility that limits its use in pharmaceutical applications. Beta-cyclodextrin (βCD) and its derivatives, 2,6-dimethyl-βCD (2,6-DMβCD) and the three hydroxypropyl-βCDs (2-HPβCD, 6-HPβCD and 2,6-DHPβCD), have unique properties that enhance the stability and solubility of such low-soluble guest molecules. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were applied to investigate the dynamics and stability of PNS inclusion complexes with βCD and its derivatives (2,6-DMβCD, 2,6-DHPβCD, 2-HPβCD and 6-HPβCD). PNS was able to form complexes with βCD and all four of its derivatives by either the chromone (C-PNS) or phenyl (P-PNS) ring dipping toward the cavity. According to the molecular mechanics-generalized Born surface area binding free energy values, the stability of the different PNS/βCD complexes was ranked as 2,6-DHPβCD>2,6-DMβCD>2-HPβCD>6-HPβCD>βCD. These theoretical results were in good agreement with the stability constants that had been determined by the solubility method.

  4. Organ of Corti explants direct tonotopically graded morphology of spiral ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smith, Felicia L; Davis, Robin L

    2016-08-01

    The spiral ganglion is a compelling model system to examine how morphological form contributes to sensory function. While the ganglion is composed mainly of a single class of type I neurons that make simple one-to-one connections with inner hair cell sensory receptors, it has an elaborate overall morphological design. Specific features, such as soma size and axon outgrowth, are graded along the spiral contour of the cochlea. To begin to understand the interplay between different regulators of neuronal morphology, we cocultured neuron explants with peripheral target tissues removed from distinct cochlear locations. Interestingly, these "hair cell microisolates" were capable of both increasing and decreasing neuronal somata size, without adversely affecting survival. Moreover, axon characteristics elaborated de novo by the primary afferents in culture were systematically regulated by the sensory endorgan. Apparent peripheral nervous system (PNS)-like and central nervous system (CNS)-like axonal profiles were established in our cocultures allowing an analysis of putative PNS/CNS axon length ratios. As predicted from the in vivo organization, PNS-like axon bundles elaborated by apical cocultures were longer than their basal counterparts and this phenotype was methodically altered when neuron explants were cocultured with microisolates from disparate cochlear regions. Thus, location-dependent signals within the organ of Corti may set the "address" of neurons within the spiral ganglion, allowing them to elaborate the appropriate tonotopically associated morphological features in order to carry out their signaling function. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2182-2207, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Human iPS Cell-Derived Neurons Uncover the Impact of Increased Ras Signaling in Costello Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Gemma E.; Goodwin, Alice F.; Depeille, Philippe; Sharir, Amnon; Schofield, Claude M.; Yeh, Erika; Roose, Jeroen P.; Klein, Ophir D.; Rauen, Katherine A.; Weiss, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence implicates abnormal Ras signaling as a major contributor in neurodevelopmental disorders, yet how such signaling causes cortical pathogenesis is unknown. We examined the consequences of aberrant Ras signaling in the developing mouse brain and uncovered several critical phenotypes, including increased production of cortical neurons and morphological deficits. To determine whether these phenotypes are recapitulated in humans, we generated induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines from patients with Costello syndrome (CS), a developmental disorder caused by abnormal Ras signaling and characterized by neurodevelopmental abnormalities, such as cognitive impairment and autism. Directed differentiation toward a neuroectodermal fate revealed an extended progenitor phase and subsequent increased production of cortical neurons. Morphological analysis of mature neurons revealed significantly altered neurite length and soma size in CS patients. This study demonstrates the synergy between mouse and human models and validates the use of iPS cells as a platform to study the underlying cellular pathologies resulting from signaling deficits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Increasing evidence implicates Ras signaling dysfunction as a major contributor in psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders, such as cognitive impairment and autism, but the underlying cortical cellular pathogenesis remains unclear. This study is the first to reveal human neuronal pathogenesis resulting from abnormal Ras signaling and provides insights into how these phenotypic abnormalities likely contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. We also demonstrate the synergy between mouse and human models, thereby validating the use of iPS cells as a platform to study underlying cellular pathologies resulting from signaling deficits. Recapitulating human cellular pathologies in vitro facilitates the future high throughput screening of potential therapeutic agents that may reverse phenotypic and

  6. SMN deficiency does not induce oxidative stress in SMA iPSC-derived astrocytes or motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Patitucci, Teresa N; Ebert, Allison D

    2016-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disorder characterized by loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord leading to muscle atrophy and death. Although motor neurons (MNs) are the most obviously affected cells in SMA, recent evidence suggest dysfunction in multiple cell types. Astrocytes are a crucial component of the motor circuit and are intimately involved with MN health and maintenance. We have previously shown that SMA astrocytes are altered both morphologically and functionally early in disease progression, though it is unclear what causes astrocytes to become reactive. Oxidative stress is a common feature among neurodegenerative diseases. Oxidative stress can both induce apoptosis in neurons and can cause astrocytes to become reactive, which are features observed in the SMA induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) cultures. Therefore, we asked if oxidative stress contributes to SMA astrocyte pathology. We examined mitochondrial bioenergetics, transcript and protein levels of oxidative and anti-oxidant factors, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and found little evidence of oxidative stress. We did observe a significant increase in endogenous catalase expression in SMA iPSCs. While catalase knockdown in SMA iPSCs increased ROS production above basal levels, levels of ROS remained lower than in controls, further arguing against robust oxidative stress in this system. Viral delivery of survival motor neuron (SMN) reversed astrocyte activation and restored catalase levels to normal, without changing mitochondrial respiration or expression of oxidative stress markers. Taken together, these data indicate that SMN deficiency induces astrocyte reactivity, but does not do so through an oxidative stress-mediated process.

  7. Testing Brain Overgrowth and Synaptic Models of Autism Using NPCs and Neurons from Patient-Derived iPS Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0415 TITLE: Testing Brain Overgrowth and Synaptic Models of Autism Using NPCs and Neurons from...REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 15 Sept 2013 – 14 Sept 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Testing Brain Overgrowth and Synaptic Models of Autism Using...STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASD

  8. Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on cell survival, differentiation and patterning of neuronal connections and Müller glia cells in the developing retina.

    PubMed

    Pinzón-Duarte, Germán; Arango-González, Blanca; Guenther, Elke; Kohler, Konrad

    2004-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on survival, phenotype differentiation and network formation of retinal neurons and glia cells. To achieve a defined concentration and constant level of BDNF over several days, experiments were performed in an organotypic culture of the developing rat retina. After 6 days in vitro, apoptosis in the different cell layers was determined by TUNEL staining and cell-type-specific antibodies were used to identify distinct neuronal cell types and Müller cells. Cultured retinas treated with BDNF (100 ng BDNF/mL medium) were compared with untreated as well as with age-matched in vivo retinas. Quantitative morphometry was carried out using confocal microscopy. BDNF promoted the in vitro development and differentiation of the retina in general, i.e. the number of cells in the nuclear layers and the thickness of the plexiform layers were increased. For all neurons, the number of cells and the complexity of arborizations in the synaptic layers were clearly up-regulated by BDNF. In control cultures, the synaptic stratification of cone bipolar cells within the On- and Off-layer of the inner plexiform layer was disturbed and a strong reactivity of Müller cell glia was observed. These effects were not present in BDNF-treated cultures. Our data show that BDNF promotes the survival of retinal interneurons and plays an important role in establishing the phenotypes and the synaptic connections of a large number of neuronal types in the developing retina. Moreover, we show an effect of BDNF on Müller glia cells.

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and epidermal growth factor activate neuronal m-calpain via mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zadran, Sohila; Jourdi, Hussam; Rostamiani, Karoline; Qin, Qingyu; Bi, Xiaoning; Baudry, Michel

    2010-01-20

    Calpain is a calcium-dependent protease that plays a significant role in synaptic plasticity, cell motility, and neurodegeneration. Two major calpain isoforms are present in brain, with mu-calpain (calpain1) requiring micromolar calcium concentrations for activation and m-calpain (calpain2) needing millimolar concentrations. Recent studies in fibroblasts indicate that epidermal growth factor (EGF) can activate m-calpain independently of calcium via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated phosphorylation. In neurons, MAPK is activated by both brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and EGF. We therefore examined whether these growth factors could activate m-calpain by MAPK-dependent phosphorylation using cultured primary neurons and HEK-TrkB cells, both of which express BDNF and EGF receptors. Calpain activation was monitored by quantitative analysis of spectrin degradation and by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assay, which assessed the truncation of a calpain-specific peptide flanked by the FRET fluorophore pair DABCYL and EDANS. In both cell types, BDNF and EGF rapidly elicited calpain activation, which was completely blocked by MAPK and calpain inhibitors. BDNF stimulated m-calpain but not mu-calpain serine phosphorylation, an effect also blocked by MAPK inhibitors. Remarkably, BDNF- and EGF-induced calpain activation was preferentially localized in dendrites and dendritic spines of hippocampal neurons and was associated with actin polymerization, which was prevented by calpain inhibition. Our results indicate that, in cultured neurons, both BDNF and EGF activate m-calpain by MAPK-mediated phosphorylation. These results strongly support a role for calpain in synaptic plasticity and may explain why m-calpain, although widely expressed in CNS, requires nonphysiological calcium levels for activation.

  10. Feline bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) show similar phenotype and functions with regards to neuronal differentiation as human MSCs.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Jessian L; Greco, Steven J; Patel, Shyam A; Sherman, Lauren S; Bhatt, Suresh; Bhatt, Rekha S; Shrensel, Jeffrey A; Guan, Yan-Zhong; Xie, Guiqin; Ye, Jiang-Hong; Rameshwar, Pranela; Siegel, Allan

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) show promise for treatment of a variety of neurological and other disorders. Cat has a high degree of linkage with the human genome and has been used as a model for analysis of neurological disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease and motor disorders. The present study was designed to characterize bone marrow-derived MSCs from cats and to investigate the capacity to generate functional peptidergic neurons. MSCs were expanded with cells from the femurs of cats and then characterized by phenotype and function. Phenotypically, feline and human MSCs shared surface markers, and lacked hematopoietic markers, with similar morphology. As compared to a subset of human MSCs, feline MSCs showed no evidence of the major histocompatibility class II. Since the literature suggested Stro-1 as an indicator of pluripotency, we compared early and late passages feline MSCs and found its expression in >90% of the cells. However, the early passage cells showed two distinct populations of Stro-1-expressing cells. At passage 5, the MSCs were more homogeneous with regards to Stro-1 expression. The passage 5 MSCs differentiated to osteogenic and adipogenic cells, and generated neurons with electrophysiological properties. This correlated with the expression of mature neuronal markers with concomitant decrease in stem cell-associated genes. At day 12 induction, the cells were positive for MAP2, Neuronal Nuclei, tubulin βIII, Tau and synaptophysin. This correlated with electrophysiological maturity as presented by excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). The findings indicate that the cat may constitute a promising biomedical model for evaluation of novel therapies such as stem cell therapy in such neurological disorders as Alzheimer's disease and stroke.

  11. Neurons derived from different brain regions are inherently different in vitro: a novel multiregional brain-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Dauth, Stephanie; Maoz, Ben M; Sheehy, Sean P; Hemphill, Matthew A; Murty, Tara; Macedonia, Mary Kate; Greer, Angie M; Budnik, Bogdan; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2017-03-01

    Brain in vitro models are critically important to developing our understanding of basic nervous system cellular physiology, potential neurotoxic effects of chemicals, and specific cellular mechanisms of many disease states. In this study, we sought to address key shortcomings of current brain in vitro models: the scarcity of comparative data for cells originating from distinct brain regions and the lack of multiregional brain in vitro models. We demonstrated that rat neurons from different brain regions exhibit unique profiles regarding their cell composition, protein expression, metabolism, and electrical activity in vitro. In vivo, the brain is unique in its structural and functional organization, and the interactions and communication between different brain areas are essential components of proper brain function. This fact and the observation that neurons from different areas of the brain exhibit unique behaviors in vitro underline the importance of establishing multiregional brain in vitro models. Therefore, we here developed a multiregional brain-on-a-chip and observed a reduction of overall firing activity, as well as altered amounts of astrocytes and specific neuronal cell types compared with separately cultured neurons. Furthermore, this multiregional model was used to study the effects of phencyclidine, a drug known to induce schizophrenia-like symptoms in vivo, on individual brain areas separately while monitoring downstream effects on interconnected regions. Overall, this work provides a comparison of cells from different brain regions in vitro and introduces a multiregional brain-on-a-chip that enables the development of unique disease models incorporating essential in vivo features.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Due to the scarcity of comparative data for cells from different brain regions in vitro, we demonstrated that neurons isolated from distinct brain areas exhibit unique behaviors in vitro. Moreover, in vivo proper brain function is dependent on the

  12. VCE-003.2, a novel cannabigerol derivative, enhances neuronal progenitor cell survival and alleviates symptomatology in murine models of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Alonso, Javier; Paraíso-Luna, Juan; Navarrete, Carmen; Del Río, Carmen; Cantarero, Irene; Palomares, Belén; Aguareles, José; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Bellido, María Luz; Pollastro, Federica; Appendino, Giovanni; Calzado, Marco A; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2016-07-19

    Cannabinoids have shown to exert neuroprotective actions in animal models by acting at different targets including canonical cannabinoid receptors and PPARγ. We previously showed that VCE-003, a cannabigerol (CBG) quinone derivative, is a novel neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory cannabinoid acting through PPARγ. We have now generated a non-thiophilic VCE-003 derivative named VCE-003.2 that preserves the ability to activate PPARγ and analyzed its neuroprotective activity. This compound exerted a prosurvival action in progenitor cells during neuronal differentiation, which was prevented by a PPARγ antagonist, without affecting neural progenitor cell proliferation. In addition, VCE-003.2 attenuated quinolinic acid (QA)-induced cell death and caspase-3 activation and also reduced mutant huntingtin aggregates in striatal cells. The neuroprotective profile of VCE-003.2 was analyzed using in vivo models of striatal neurodegeneration induced by QA and 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) administration. VCE-003.2 prevented medium spiny DARPP32(+) neuronal loss in these Huntington's-like disease mice models improving motor deficits, reactive astrogliosis and microglial activation. In the 3NP model VCE-003.2 inhibited the upregulation of proinflammatory markers and improved antioxidant defenses in the brain. These data lead us to consider VCE-003.2 to have high potential for the treatment of Huntington's disease (HD) and other neurodegenerative diseases with neuroinflammatory traits.

  13. VCE-003.2, a novel cannabigerol derivative, enhances neuronal progenitor cell survival and alleviates symptomatology in murine models of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Alonso, Javier; Paraíso-Luna, Juan; Navarrete, Carmen; del Río, Carmen; Cantarero, Irene; Palomares, Belén; Aguareles, José; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Bellido, María Luz; Pollastro, Federica; Appendino, Giovanni; Calzado, Marco A.; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoids have shown to exert neuroprotective actions in animal models by acting at different targets including canonical cannabinoid receptors and PPARγ. We previously showed that VCE-003, a cannabigerol (CBG) quinone derivative, is a novel neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory cannabinoid acting through PPARγ. We have now generated a non-thiophilic VCE-003 derivative named VCE-003.2 that preserves the ability to activate PPARγ and analyzed its neuroprotective activity. This compound exerted a prosurvival action in progenitor cells during neuronal differentiation, which was prevented by a PPARγ antagonist, without affecting neural progenitor cell proliferation. In addition, VCE-003.2 attenuated quinolinic acid (QA)-induced cell death and caspase-3 activation and also reduced mutant huntingtin aggregates in striatal cells. The neuroprotective profile of VCE-003.2 was analyzed using in vivo models of striatal neurodegeneration induced by QA and 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) administration. VCE-003.2 prevented medium spiny DARPP32+ neuronal loss in these Huntington’s-like disease mice models improving motor deficits, reactive astrogliosis and microglial activation. In the 3NP model VCE-003.2 inhibited the upregulation of proinflammatory markers and improved antioxidant defenses in the brain. These data lead us to consider VCE-003.2 to have high potential for the treatment of Huntington’s disease (HD) and other neurodegenerative diseases with neuroinflammatory traits. PMID:27430371

  14. Ca(2+) handling in isolated brain mitochondria and cultured neurons derived from the YAC128 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Pellman, Jessica J; Hamilton, James; Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2015-08-01

    We investigated Ca(2+) handling in isolated brain synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria and in cultured striatal neurons from the YAC128 mouse model of Huntington's disease. Both synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria from 2- and 12-month-old YAC128 mice had larger Ca(2+) uptake capacity than mitochondria from YAC18 and wild-type FVB/NJ mice. Synaptic mitochondria from 12-month-old YAC128 mice had further augmented Ca(2+) capacity compared with mitochondria from 2-month-old YAC128 mice and age-matched YAC18 and FVB/NJ mice. This increase in Ca(2+) uptake capacity correlated with an increase in the amount of mutant huntingtin protein (mHtt) associated with mitochondria from 12-month-old YAC128 mice. We speculate that this may happen because of mHtt-mediated sequestration of free fatty acids thereby increasing resistance of mitochondria to Ca(2+)-induced damage. In experiments with striatal neurons from YAC128 and FVB/NJ mice, brief exposure to 25 or 100 μM glutamate produced transient elevations in cytosolic Ca(2+) followed by recovery to near resting levels. Following recovery of cytosolic Ca(2+), mitochondrial depolarization with FCCP produced comparable elevations in cytosolic Ca(2+), suggesting similar Ca(2+) release and, consequently, Ca(2+) loads in neuronal mitochondria from YAC128 and FVB/NJ mice. Together, our data argue against a detrimental effect of mHtt on Ca(2+) handling in brain mitochondria of YAC128 mice. We demonstrate that mutant huntingtin (mHtt) binds to brain synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria and the amount of mitochondria-bound mHtt correlates with increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake capacity. We propose that this may happen due to mHtt-mediated sequestration of free fatty acids thereby increasing resistance of mitochondria to Ca(2+)-induced damage.

  15. The effect of fluorescent nanodiamonds on neuronal survival and morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yung-An; Kao, Chun-Wei; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Huang, Hou-Syun; Chiang, Ming-Han; Soo, Ching-Ren; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Chiu, Tzai-Wen; Chao, Jui-I.; Hwang, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) has emerged as a promising carbon nanomaterial for therapeutic applications. In previous studies, ND has been reported to have outstanding biocompatibility and high uptake rate in various cell types. ND containing nitrogen-vacancy centers exhibit fluorescence property is called fluorescent nanodiamond (FND), and has been applied for bio-labeling agent. However, the influence and application of FND on the nervous system remain elusive. In order to study the compatibility of FND on the nervous system, neurons treated with FNDs in vitro and in vivo were examined. FND did not induce cytotoxicity in primary neurons from either central (CNS) or peripheral nervous system (PNS); neither did intracranial injection of FND affect animal behavior. The neuronal uptake of FNDs was confirmed using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. However, FND caused a concentration-dependent decrease in neurite length in both CNS and PNS neurons. Time-lapse live cell imaging showed that the reduction of neurite length was due to the spatial hindrance of FND on advancing axonal growth cone. These findings demonstrate that FNDs exhibit low neuronal toxicity but interfere with neuronal morphogenesis, and should be taken into consideration when applications involve actively growing neurites (e.g. nerve regeneration).

  16. The effect of fluorescent nanodiamonds on neuronal survival and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yung-An; Kao, Chun-Wei; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Huang, Hou-Syun; Chiang, Ming-Han; Soo, Ching-Ren; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Chiu, Tzai-Wen; Chao, Jui-I; Hwang, Eric

    2014-11-05

    Nanodiamond (ND) has emerged as a promising carbon nanomaterial for therapeutic applications. In previous studies, ND has been reported to have outstanding biocompatibility and high uptake rate in various cell types. ND containing nitrogen-vacancy centers exhibit fluorescence property is called fluorescent nanodiamond (FND), and has been applied for bio-labeling agent. However, the influence and application of FND on the nervous system remain elusive. In order to study the compatibility of FND on the nervous system, neurons treated with FNDs in vitro and in vivo were examined. FND did not induce cytotoxicity in primary neurons from either central (CNS) or peripheral nervous system (PNS); neither did intracranial injection of FND affect animal behavior. The neuronal uptake of FNDs was confirmed using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. However, FND caused a concentration-dependent decrease in neurite length in both CNS and PNS neurons. Time-lapse live cell imaging showed that the reduction of neurite length was due to the spatial hindrance of FND on advancing axonal growth cone. These findings demonstrate that FNDs exhibit low neuronal toxicity but interfere with neuronal morphogenesis, and should be taken into consideration when applications involve actively growing neurites (e.g. nerve regeneration).

  17. Directed Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Toward Placode-Derived Spiral Ganglion-Like Sensory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Akihiro J; Morrissey, Zachery D; Zhang, Chaoying; Homma, Kazuaki; Belmadani, Abdelhak; Miller, Charles A; Chadly, Duncan M; Kobayashi, Shun; Edelbrock, Alexandra N; Tanaka-Matakatsu, Miho; Whitlon, Donna S; Lyass, Ljuba; McGuire, Tammy L; Stupp, Samuel I; Kessler, John A

    2017-03-01

    The ability to generate spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) from stem cells is a necessary prerequisite for development of cell-replacement therapies for sensorineural hearing loss. We present a protocol that directs human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) toward a purified population of otic neuronal progenitors (ONPs) and SGN-like cells. Between 82% and 95% of these cells express SGN molecular markers, they preferentially extend neurites to the cochlear nucleus rather than nonauditory nuclei, and they generate action potentials. The protocol follows an in vitro stepwise recapitulation of developmental events inherent to normal differentiation of hESCs into SGNs, resulting in efficient sequential generation of nonneuronal ectoderm, preplacodal ectoderm, early prosensory ONPs, late ONPs, and cells with cellular and molecular characteristics of human SGNs. We thus describe the sequential signaling pathways that generate the early and later lineage species in the human SGN lineage, thereby better describing key developmental processes. The results indicate that our protocol generates cells that closely replicate the phenotypic characteristics of human SGNs, advancing the process of guiding hESCs to states serving inner-ear cell-replacement therapies and possible next-generation hybrid auditory prostheses. © Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:923-936.

  18. Phytoalexin Phenalenone Derivatives Inactivate Mosquito Larvae and Root-knot Nematode as Type-II Photosensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Runjiang; Feng, Yian; Wang, Donghui; Xu, Zhiping; Li, Zhong; Shao, Xusheng

    2017-02-01

    Phytoalexins phenalenones (PNs) are phytochemicals biosynthesized inside the plant in responsive to exterior threat. PNs are excellent type-II photosensitizers, which efficiently produce singlet oxygen upon light irradiation. Based on the core functional structure of PNs, novel PN derivatives were synthesized here and their singlet oxygen generating abilities and their phototoxicity were evaluated. At the presence of light, these PNs have photoinduced toxicity towards Aedes albopictus larvae and nematode Meloidogyne incognita, while the activity lost in the dark. The obvious tissue damage was observed on the treated mosquito larvae and nematode due to the generation of singlet oxygen. Our results revealed the potential of phenalenones as photoactivated agents for mosquito and root-knot nematode management together with light.

  19. Phytoalexin Phenalenone Derivatives Inactivate Mosquito Larvae and Root-knot Nematode as Type-II Photosensitizer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Runjiang; Feng, Yian; Wang, Donghui; Xu, Zhiping; Li, Zhong; Shao, Xusheng

    2017-01-01

    Phytoalexins phenalenones (PNs) are phytochemicals biosynthesized inside the plant in responsive to exterior threat. PNs are excellent type-II photosensitizers, which efficiently produce singlet oxygen upon light irradiation. Based on the core functional structure of PNs, novel PN derivatives were synthesized here and their singlet oxygen generating abilities and their phototoxicity were evaluated. At the presence of light, these PNs have photoinduced toxicity towards Aedes albopictus larvae and nematode Meloidogyne incognita, while the activity lost in the dark. The obvious tissue damage was observed on the treated mosquito larvae and nematode due to the generation of singlet oxygen. Our results revealed the potential of phenalenones as photoactivated agents for mosquito and root-knot nematode management together with light. PMID:28169356

  20. Poly(GR) in C9ORF72-Related ALS/FTD Compromises Mitochondrial Function and Increases Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in iPSC-Derived Motor Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Lu, Yubing; Gendron, Tania F; Karydas, Anna; Tran, Helene; Yang, Dejun; Petrucelli, Leonard; Miller, Bruce L; Almeida, Sandra; Gao, Fen-Biao

    2016-10-19

    GGGGCC repeat expansions in C9ORF72 are the most common genetic cause of both ALS and FTD. To uncover underlying pathogenic mechanisms, we found that DNA damage was greater, in an age-dependent manner, in motor neurons differentiated from iPSCs of multiple C9ORF72 patients than control neurons. Ectopic expression of the dipeptide repeat (DPR) protein (GR)80 in iPSC-derived control neurons increased DNA damage, suggesting poly(GR) contributes to DNA damage in aged C9ORF72 neurons. Oxidative stress was also increased in C9ORF72 neurons in an age-dependent manner. Pharmacological or genetic reduction of oxidative stress partially rescued DNA damage in C9ORF72 neurons and control neurons expressing (GR)80 or (GR)80-induced cellular toxicity in flies. Moreover, interactome analysis revealed that (GR)80 preferentially bound to mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and caused mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus, poly(GR) in C9ORF72 neurons compromises mitochondrial function and causes DNA damage in part by increasing oxidative stress, revealing another pathogenic mechanism in C9ORF72-related ALS and FTD.

  1. Area-specific effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genetic ablation on various neuronal subtypes of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Gisela; Djalali, Susann; Deng, Dong Rui; Höltje, Markus; Hinz, Britta; Schwartzkopff, Katharina; Cygon, Marcel; Rothe, Thomas; Stroh, Thomas; Hellweg, Rainer; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Hörtnag, Heide

    2005-05-12

    The effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on the development of presynaptic terminals and of neuronal subtypes in various brain areas were studied in BDNF-knockout (BDNF-/-) mice at postnatal days 15-17. Western analysis revealed no changes in the overall amount of a variety of synaptic proteins in BDNF-/- mice as compared to wild type mice. In addition, the complex between the vesicular proteins, synaptophysin and synaptobrevin, as well as their respective homodimers were unaltered. Moreover, no changes in the density of neurons were found in, e.g., the CA3 region of the hippocampus and the nucleus nervi facialis of BDNF-/- mice. However, cholinergic cells were reduced by 20% in the medial septum of BDNF-/- mice associated with a decrease in the activity of choline acetyltransferase and protein levels of nerve growth factor in the hippocampus by 16% and 44%, respectively. In the striatum, however, the total number of cholinergic cells were comparable in both groups, although the activity of choline acetyltransferase was decreased by 46%. In GABAergic interneurons, the expression of neuropeptides in various brain areas was differentially affected by BDNF deletion as revealed by immunohistochemistry. In the hippocampus and cortex of BDNF-/- mice, the density of neuropeptide Y-, somatostatin-, and parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells was drastically reduced, whereas the density of calretinin-positive cells was increased. The extent of these changes in neuropeptide-containing cells varied among hippocampal subregions. In the striatum, only the density of parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells was decreased by approximately 45%. In conclusion, BDNF deficiency is accompanied by a differential dysregulation in the expression of neuropeptides and calcium-binding proteins in otherwise intact GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons in a region-specific manner.

  2. Phosphatase Inhibitors Function as Novel, Broad Spectrum Botulinum Neurotoxin Antagonists in Mouse and Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Motor Neuron-Based Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kiris, Erkan; Nuss, Jonathan E.; Stanford, Stephanie M.; Wanner, Laura M.; Cazares, Lisa; Maestre, Michael F.; Du, Hao T.; Gomba, Glenn Y.; Burnett, James C.; Gussio, Rick; Bottini, Nunzio; Panchal, Rekha G.; Kane, Christopher D.; Tessarollo, Lino; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop novel treatments to counter Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) poisoning. Currently, the majority of BoNT drug development efforts focus on directly inhibiting the proteolytic components of BoNT, i.e. light chains (LC). Although this is a rational approach, previous research has shown that LCs are extremely difficult drug targets and that inhibiting multi-serotype BoNTs with a single LC inhibitor may not be feasible. An alternative approach would target neuronal pathways involved in intoxication/recovery, rather than the LC itself. Phosphorylation-related mechanisms have been implicated in the intoxication pathway(s) of BoNTs. However, the effects of phosphatase inhibitors upon BoNT activity in the physiological target of BoNTs, i.e. motor neurons, have not been investigated. In this study, a small library of phosphatase inhibitors was screened for BoNT antagonism in the context of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons (ES-MNs). Four inhibitors were found to function as BoNT/A antagonists. Subsequently, we confirmed that these inhibitors protect against BoNT/A in a dose-dependent manner in human ES-MNs. Additionally, these compounds provide protection when administered in post-intoxication scenario. Importantly, the inhibitors were also effective against BoNT serotypes B and E. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing phosphatase inhibitors as broad-spectrum BoNT antagonists. PMID:26061731

  3. Hypothyroidism in the Adult Rat Causes Incremental Changes in Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Neuronal and Astrocyte Apoptosis, Gliosis, and Deterioration of Postsynaptic Density

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Claudia; Eugenin, Eliseo; Aliaga, Esteban; Carreño, Leandro J.; Bueno, Susan M.; Gonzalez, Pablo A.; Gayol, Silvina; Naranjo, David; Noches, Verónica; Marassi, Michelle P.; Rosenthal, Doris; Jadue, Cindy; Ibarra, Paula; Keitel, Cecilia; Wohllk, Nelson; Court, Felipe; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Adult hypothyroidism is a highly prevalent condition that impairs processes, such as learning and memory. Even though tetra-iodothyronine (T4) treatment can overcome the hypothyroidism in the majority of cases, it cannot fully recover the patient's learning capacity and memory. In this work, we analyzed the cellular and molecular changes in the adult brain occurring with the development of experimental hypothyroidism. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) for 20 days to induce hypothyroidism. Neuronal and astrocyte apoptosis were analyzed in the hippocampus of control and hypothyroid adult rats by confocal microscopy. The content of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and in situ hybridization. The glutamatergic synapse and the postsynaptic density (PSD) were analyzed by electron microscopy. The content of PSD proteins like tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB), p75, and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) were analyzed by immunoblot. Results : We observed that the hippocampus of hypothyroid adult rats displayed increased apoptosis levels in neurons and astrocyte and reactive gliosis compared with controls. Moreover, we found that the amount of BDNF mRNA was higher in the hippocampus of hypothyroid rats and the content of TrkB, the receptor for BDNF, was reduced at the PSD of the CA3 region of hypothyroid rats, compared with controls. We also observed that the glutamatergic synapses from the stratum radiatum of CA3 from hypothyroid rats, contained thinner PSDs than control rats. This observation was in agreement with a reduced content of NMDAr subunits at the PSD in hypothyroid animals. Conclusions Our data suggest that adult hypothyroidism affects the hippocampus by a mechanism that alters the composition of PSD, reduces neuronal and astrocyte survival, and alters the content of the signaling neurotrophic factors, such as BDNF. PMID:22870949

  4. Phenotype of cerebellar glutamatergic neurons is altered in stargazer mutant mice lacking brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Christine A; Leitch, Beulah

    2005-01-10

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) influences neuronal survival, differentiation, and maturation. More recently, its role in synapse formation and plasticity has also emerged. In the cerebellum of the spontaneous recessive mutant mouse stargazer (stg) there is a specific and pronounced deficit in BDNF mRNA expression. BDNF protein levels in the cerebellum as a whole are reduced by 70%, while in the granule cells (GCs) there is a selective and near total reduction in BDNF mRNA expression. Recently, we published data demonstrating that inhibitory neurons in the cerebella of stgs have significantly reduced levels (approximately 50%) of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and fewer, smaller inhibitory synapses compared to wildtype (WT) controls. Our current investigations indicate that the stargazer mutation has an even more pronounced effect on the phenotype of glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellum. There is a profound decrease in the levels of glutamate-immunoreactivity (up to 77%) in stg compared to WT controls. The distribution profile of presynaptic vesicles is also markedly different: stgs have proportionally fewer docked vesicles and fewer vesicles located adjacent to the active zone ready to dock than WTs. Furthermore, the thickness of the postsynaptic density (PSD) at mossy fiber-granule cell (MF-GC) and parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (PF-PC) synapses is severely reduced (up to 33% less than WT controls). The number and length of excitatory synapses, however, appear to be relatively unchanged. It is possible that at least some of theses changes in phenotype are directly attributable to the lack of BDNF in the cerebellum of the stg mutant.

  5. Amniotic fluid derived stem cells give rise to neuron-like cells without a further differentiation potential into retina-like cells.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, K; Raabe, O; Wenisch, S; Arnhold, S

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic fluid contains heterogeneous cell types and has become an interesting source for obtaining fetal stem cells. These stem cells have a high proliferative capacity and a good differentiation potential and may thus be suitable for regenerative medicine. As there is increasing evidence, that these stem cells are also able to be directed into the neural lineage, in our study we investigated the neuronal and glial differentiation potential of these cells, so that they may also be applied to cure degenerative diseases of the retina. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from routine prenatal amniocentesis at 15 to 18 weeks of pregnancy of human amniotic fluid and expanded in the cell culture. Cells were cultivated according to standard procedures for mesenchymal stem cells and were differentiated along the neural lineage using various protocols. Furthermore, it was also tried to direct them into cell types of the retina as well as into endothelial cells. Cells of more than 72 amniotic fluid samples were collected and characterized. While after induction neural-like phenotypes could actually be detected, which was confirmed using neural marker proteins such as GFAP and ßIII tubulina further differentiation into retinal like cells could not reliably be shown. These data suggest that amniotic fluid derived cells are an interesting cell source, which may also give rise to neural-like cells. However, a more specific differentiation into neuronal and glial cells could not unequivocally be shown, so that further investigations have to becarried out.

  6. Neuroprotection of Alpinia katsumadai Seed Extract against Neuronal Damage in the Ischemic Gerbil Hippocampus is Linked to Altered Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Park, Joon Ha; Yan, Bingchun; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Lee, Choong Hyun; Choi, Jung Hoon; Hwang, In Koo; Won, Moo-Ho

    2011-03-01

    The extract of Alpinia katsumadai, a member of the family Zingiberaceae, shows anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activity. We observed the neuroprotective effects of the extract from Alpinia katsumadai seed (EAKS) against ischemic damage in gerbils administered oral EAKS (25, and 50 mg/kg) once a day for 7 days before transient cerebral ischemia. In the 50 mg/kg EAKS-treated ischemia group, about 67% of neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region (CA1) survived after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) based on cresyl violet staining. We observed that EAKS treatment significantly maintained brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) immunoreactivity in the ischemic CA1 region after I/R. In addition, protein levels of BDNF in the 50 mg/kg EAKS-treated ischemia group were much higher than those in the vehicle-treated ischemia group after I/R. These findings indicate that repeated supplementation of EAKS protects neurons from ischemic damage, such that BDNF is distinctively maintained in ischemic areas.

  7. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated retrograde signaling required for the induction of long-term potentiation at inhibitory synapses of visual cortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Tsuyoshi; Begum, Tahamina; Reza, Faruque; Horibe, Shoko; Inaba, Mie; Yoshimura, Yumiko; Komatsu, Yukio

    2008-06-01

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) induces long-term potentiation (LTP) at inhibitory synapses of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in developing rat visual cortex. This LTP requires postsynaptic Ca2+ rise for induction, while the maintenance mechanism is present at the presynaptic site, suggesting presynaptic LTP expression and the necessity of retrograde signaling. We investigated whether the supposed signal is mediated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is expressed in pyramidal neurons but not inhibitory interneurons. LTP did not occur when HFS was applied in the presence of the Trk receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252a in the perfusion medium. HFS produced LTP when bath application of K252a was started after HFS or when K252a was loaded into postsynaptic cells. LTP did not occur in the presence of TrkB-IgG scavenging BDNF or function-blocking anti-BDNF antibody in the medium. In cells loaded with the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA, the addition of BDNF to the medium enabled HFS to induce LTP without affecting baseline synaptic transmission. These results suggest that BDNF released from postsynaptic cells activates presynaptic TrkB, leading to LTP. Because BDNF, expressed activity dependently, regulates the maturation of cortical inhibition, inhibitory LTP may contribute to this developmental process, and hence experience-dependent functional maturation of visual cortex.

  8. Activated β-catenin forces N2A cell-derived neurons back to tumor-like neuroblasts and positively correlates with a risk for human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Feng; Gong, Guangming; Xu, Yan; Zhu, Yan; Hu, Die; Yang, Yilin; Hu, Yiqiao

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonic malignancy arising from neuroblasts. The mechanisms that regulate the origination of neuroblastoma are still not very clear. In this study, we revealed that 6-bromoindirubin 3'-oxime (BIO), a specific GSK-3β inhibitor, promoted N2A cells-derived neurons to become tumor-like neuroblasts. Moreover, constitutively activated β-catenin (S33Y) also promoted this process, whereas, silencing endogenous expression of β-catenin abolished BIO-induced effects. These results implicated the potential relationship between the Wnt/β-catenin signaling and neuroblastoma formation. Indeed, we found that the amount of β-catenin in nucleus, which indicated the activation of Wnt/β-catnin signaling, was accumulated in human neuroblastoma specimens and positively correlated with clinical risk of neuroblastoma. These results give us a new sight into the neuroblastoma initiation and progression, and provide a potential drug target for neuroblastoma treatment.

  9. Quantitation and localization of intracellular redox active metals by X-ray fluorescence microscopy in cortical neurons derived from APP and APLP2 knockout tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D.; James, Simon A.; Altissimo, Matteo; Paterson, David; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; de Jonge, Martin D.; Howard, Daryl L.; Bush, Ashley I.; Cappai, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene family includes APP and the amyloid precursor-like proteins, APLP1 and APLP2. These proteins contain metal binding sites for copper, zinc and iron and are known to have physiological roles in modulating the metal homeostasis in brain cells. Here we report the application of X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to investigate the subcellular distribution patterns of the metal ions Cu, Zn, Fe, and Ca in individual neurons derived from APP and APLP2 knockout mice brains to further define their role in metal homeostasis. These studies add to the growing body of data that the APP family of proteins are metalloproteins that have shared as well as distinct effects on metals. As we continue to delineate the cellular effects of the APP family of proteins it is important to consider how metals are involved in their actions.

  10. Quantitation and localization of intracellular redox active metals by X-ray fluorescence microscopy in cortical neurons derived from APP and APLP2 knockout tissue

    DOE PAGES

    Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D.; James, Simon A.; Altissimo, Matteo; ...

    2014-10-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene family includes APP and the amyloid precursor-like proteins, APLP1 and APLP2. These proteins contain metal binding sites for copper, zinc and iron and are known to have physiological roles in modulating the metal homeostasis in brain cells. Here we report the application of X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to investigate the subcellular distribution patterns of the metal ions Cu, Zn, Fe, and Ca in individual neurons derived from APP and APLP2 knockout mice brains to further define their role in metal homeostasis. These studies add to the growing body of data that the APP familymore » of proteins are metalloproteins that have shared as well as distinct effects on metals. As we continue to delineate the cellular effects of the APP family of proteins it is important to consider how metals are involved in their actions.« less

  11. A simple procedure for morphometric analysis of processes and growth cones of neurons in culture using parameters derived from the contour and convex hull of the object.

    PubMed

    Kawa, A; Stahlhut, M; Berezin, A; Bock, E; Berezin, V

    1998-01-31

    Morphometric estimation of neuronal processes is currently laborious and time-consuming, since the individual processes (axons and dendrites) have to be traced manually. In order to facilitate the measurement of cellular processes, we have tested a series of parameters derived from the contour and the convex hull of an object and estimated to which extent they reflect process length and number. The parameters included the area, perimeter and form factor of the object and convex hull, their ratios as well as object length, breadth, width, length/width and spreading index. Some new parameters derived from the contour and convex hull of the object, were also computed: process index (the number of areas contained within the convex hull outside the object contour), process domain (the total area contained within the convex hull outside the object contour), their ratio and the square root of the process domain (SR process domain). In total, 18 parameters were estimated. Populations of motoneurons, growth cones of cerebellar granule cells and N2a neuroblastoma cells were utilized due to their diversity in morphological features. The processes of each object were drawn by hand to establish the actual length and number. Total process length per object correlated strongly with object perimeter, process domain and SR process domain. The number of processes per object correlated well with perimeter ratio, process index and form factor, whereas object length, convex hull perimeter and spreading index correlated acceptably with the average process length. Using these parameters for the evaluation of neurite outgrowth in developing of hippocampal neurons in vitro, variables such as object perimeter, process domain and SR process domain were found to be very well suited for estimation of the total length of neurites. We conclude that based on the contour and convex hull of an object it is possible to calculate a series of parameters which may substitute direct measurements of

  12. Pharmacologically active microcarriers delivering BDNF within a hydrogel: Novel strategy for human bone marrow-derived stem cells neural/neuronal differentiation guidance and therapeutic secretome enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kandalam, Saikrishna; Sindji, Laurence; Delcroix, Gaëtan J-R; Violet, Fabien; Garric, Xavier; André, Emilie M; Schiller, Paul C; Venier-Julienne, Marie-Claire; des Rieux, Anne; Guicheux, Jérôme; Montero-Menei, Claudia N

    2017-02-01

    Stem cells combined with biodegradable injectable scaffolds releasing growth factors hold great promises in regenerative medicine, particularly in the treatment of neurological disorders. We here integrated human marrow-isolated adult multilineage-inducible (MIAMI) stem cells and pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs) into an injectable non-toxic silanized-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (Si-HPMC) hydrogel. The goal is to obtain an injectable non-toxic cell and growth factor delivery device. It should direct the survival and/or neuronal differentiation of the grafted cells, to safely transplant them in the central nervous system, and enhance their tissue repair properties. A model protein was used to optimize the nanoprecipitation conditions of the neuroprotective brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF nanoprecipitate was encapsulated in fibronectin-coated (FN) PAMs and the in vitro release profile evaluated. It showed a prolonged, bi-phasic, release of bioactive BDNF, without burst effect. We demonstrated that PAMs and the Si-HPMC hydrogel increased the expression of neural/neuronal differentiation markers of MIAMI cells after 1week. Moreover, the 3D environment (PAMs or hydrogel) increased MIAMI cells secretion of growth factors (b-NGF, SCF, HGF, LIF, PlGF-1, SDF-1α, VEGF-A & D) and chemokines (MIP-1α & β, RANTES, IL-8). These results show that PAMs delivering BDNF combined with Si-HPMC hydrogel represent a useful novel local delivery tool in the context of neurological disorders. It not only provides neuroprotective BDNF but also bone marrow-derived stem cells that benefit from that environment by displaying neural commitment and an improved neuroprotective/reparative secretome. It provides preliminary evidence of a promising pro-angiogenic, neuroprotective and axonal growth-promoting device for the nervous system.

  13. Fusion of Golgi-derived vesicles mediated by SNAP-25 is essential for sympathetic neuron outgrowth but relatively insensitive to botulinum neurotoxins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gary W; Wang, Jiafu; Brin, Mitchell F; Aoki, K Roger; Wheeler, Larry; Dolly, J Oliver

    2014-07-01

    Sympathetic neurons ramify to innervate multiple cells in target tissues. In compartmentalized cultures of rat superior cervical ganglion neurons, cleavage of synaptosomal-associated protein of Mr  = 25 000 (SNAP-25) in neurites exposed to botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) arrested their growth and collapsed interstitial branches, but this required large, nonclinical doses. A protease-inactive mutant proved ineffective, confirming involvement of SNAP-25 in neurite extension and arborization. BoNT/C1 acted like BoNT/A, but BoNT/E caused only mild inhibition, likely due to transient SNAP-25 proteolysis. Near-total lack of susceptibility to BoNT/B or BoNT/D revealed that vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMPs) isoforms 1-3 are not essential. Neurite length was not reduced when either BoNT/A or BoNT/C1 was applied to the somata, with no detrimental effect on neuron viability being observed. Treatments that protect cells from deprivation of nerve growth factor failed to prevent the toxin-induced loss of neurites. Inactivation of SNAP-25 caused the accumulation at neurite branch sites of Golgi-derived organelles labelled with N-(4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-pentanoyl)-sphingosine conjugated to bovine serum albumin, prior to the collapse of arbors. Notably, neurite growth was ~ 1000-fold less susceptible to BoNT/A than cholinergic transmission in these neurons. Accordingly, a BoNT/A acceptor synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2) was found to be colocalized with VAMP 1-3, but not with VAMP 7, which is implicated in the growth of neurites. In conclusion, neurites depend on SNAP-25 for extension but this is quite resistant to BoNT/A, possibly, because of a low density of SV2 at growth sites that are distant from the highly susceptible regions of neurotransmitter release.

  14. Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells into Neuron-Like Cells Which Are Compatible with Photocurable Three-Dimensional Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shane; Zhao, Peng; Lin, Chao; Sun, Yuxi; Wang, Yilei; Zhou, Zhichong; Yang, Danjing; Wang, Xianli; Xu, Hongzhen; Zhou, Fei; Cao, Limei; Zhou, Wei; Ning, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Multipotent human adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (hADSCs) hold a great promise for cell-based therapy for many devastating human diseases, such as spinal cord injury and stroke. If exogenous hADSCs can be cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold with effective proliferation and differentiation capacity, it will better mimic the in vivo environment, which will have profound impact on the therapeutic application of hADSCs. In this study, a group of elastic-dominant, porous bioscaffolds from photocurable chitosan and gelatin were fabricated and proven to be biocompatible with both hADSCs and hADSC-derived neuron-like cells (hADSC-NLCs) in vitro. The identity of harvested hADSCs was confirmed by their positive immunostaining of mesenchymal stem cell surface markers, CD29, CD44, and CD105, and also positive expression of stem markers, Sox-2, Oct-4, c-Myc, Nanog, and Klf4. Their multipotency was further confirmed by trilineage differentiation of hADSCs toward adipocyte, osteoblast, and chondrocyte. It was found that hADSCs could be conditioned to differentiate into neurons in vitro as determined by immunostaining the markers of Tuj1, MAP2, NeuN, and Synapsin. The hADSCs and hADSC-NLCs were proven to be biocompatible with 3D scaffold, which actually facilitated the proliferation and differentiation of hADSCs in vitro, by MTT assay and their neuronal gene expression profiling. Moreover, hADSC-NLCs, which were mixed with 3D scaffold and transplanted into traumatic brain injury mouse model, survived in vivo and led to the better repair of the damaged brain area. The immunohistochemical studies revealed that 3D scaffold indeed improved the viability of transplanted cells, their ability to incorporate into the in vivo neural circuit, and their capacity for tissue repair. This study indicates that hADSCs would have great therapeutic application potential as seeding cells for in vivo transplantation to treat various neurological diseases when co-applied with porous

  15. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) protects cortical neurons in vitro from oxidant injury by activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and induction of Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, A; Tripathy, D; Yin, X; Luo, J; Martinez, J; Grammas, P

    2012-01-01

    Mitigating oxidative stress-induced damage is critical to preserve neuronal function in diseased or injured brains. This study explores the mechanisms contributing to the neuroprotective effects of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) in cortical neurons. Cultured primary neurons are exposed to PEDF and H₂O₂ as well as inhibitors of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) or extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Neuronal survival, cell death and levels of caspase 3, PEDF, phosphorylated ERK1/2, and Bcl-2 are measured. The data show cortical cultures release PEDF and that H₂O₂ treatment causes cell death, increases activated caspase 3 levels and decreases release of PEDF. Exogenous PEDF induces a dose-dependent increase in Bcl-2 expression and neuronal survival. Blocking Bcl-2 expression by siRNA reduced PEDF-induced increases in neuronal survival. Treating cortical cultures with PEDF 24 h before H₂O₂ exposure mitigates oxidant-induced decreases in neuronal survival, Bcl-2 expression, and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and also reduces elevated caspase 3 level and activity. PEDF pretreatment effect on survival is blocked by inhibiting ERK or PI3K. However, only inhibition of ERK reduced the ability of PEDF to protect neurons from H₂O₂-induced Bcl-2 decrease and neuronal death. These data demonstrate PEDF-mediated neuroprotection against oxidant injury is largely mediated via ERK1/2 and Bcl-2 and suggest the utility of PEDF in preserving the viability of oxidatively challenged neurons.

  16. Cortical neurons immunoreactive for the potassium channel Kv3.1b subunit are predominantly surrounded by perineuronal nets presumed as a buffering system for cations.

    PubMed

    Härtig, W; Derouiche, A; Welt, K; Brauer, K; Grosche, J; Mäder, M; Reichenbach, A; Brückner, G

    1999-09-18

    Perineuronal nets (PNs) are known as chondroitin sulphate-rich, lattice-like coatings of the extracellular matrix. In the cortex of mammalian species investigated so far, they were mainly found around GABAergic neurons, but to a lesser degree also around pyramidal cells. Previous investigations in the rat revealed similar distribution patterns of fast-firing neurons expressing both the Kv3.1b subunit of voltage-gated potassium channels and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin. In the present study, triple fluorescence labelling was applied for the simultaneous demonstration of PNs with the N-acetylgalactosamine-specific Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA), parvalbumin-immunoreactivity (ir) with a monoclonal antibody and of Kv3.1b-ir with several rabbit antibodies. Subsets of non-pyramidal neurons - enwrapped by PNs and expressing parvalbumin and Kv3.1b - were detected in the rat and monkey neocortex and hippocampus. In the rat, faintly stained PNs were additionally found around several layer II/III and V pyramidal cells immunonegative for Kv3.1b, but contacted by Kv3.1b-containing boutons. In the monkey, more intensely labelled PNs frequently occurred around pyramidal cells which themselves appeared to be Kv3. 1b-immunopositive. We also observed minor Kv3.1b-ir and parvalbumin-ir cortical cell populations which were devoid of PNs; occasionally, nets were detected around neurons lacking both immunoreactivities. By confocal laser scanning microscopy, Kv3.1b-ir and WFA-binding sites were found adjoining at the soma and proximal dendritic surface, while lectin-binding sites usually extended on more distal dendritic segments and the axon initial segments which failed to express detectable Kv3.1b-ir. This spatial relationship of both markers was also confirmed by combined WFA-gold labelling and Kv3.1b-immunoperoxidase staining at the electron microscopic level. The data are used for a critical examination of current hypotheses concerning the functional role of PNs

  17. Evaluation of the synuclein-y (SNCG) gene as a PPARy target in murine adipocytes, dorsal root ganglia somatosensory neurons, and human adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synuclein-gamma is highly expressed in both adipocytes and peripheral nervous system (PNS) somatosensory neurons. Its mRNA is induced during adipogenesis, increased in obese human white adipose tissue (WAT), may be coordinately regulated with leptin, and is decreased following treatment of murine 3T...

  18. [Musculoskeletal disorders in HIV-infected patients.National AIDS Plan (PNS) and the AIDS Study Group (GESIDA)].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the most relevant musculoskeletal disorders, their diagnosis and treatment to the scientific community and the professionals in charge of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. These recommendations have been agreed by a panel of experts from the National AIDS Plan (PNS) and the AIDS Study Group (GESIDA). The group have reviewed the efficacy and safety results of clinical trials, cohort studies and pharmacokinetic studies published in biomedical journals (PubMed and Embase), or presented at conferences. Three levels of evidence have been defined according to the sources of data: level A, randomized controlled trials; level B, cohort or case-control; and level C, descriptive studies and expert opinion. Based on this evidence, the authors have decided to recommend, consider or not recommend for each situation. The decrease in bone mineral density is common in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral treatment, especially during the first year (from 2 to 4%), with a subsequent partial recovery. A dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan is recommended in patients over 50 years old with HIV infection, history of bone fractures and/or risk factors. Treatment with bisphosphonates has been shown to be effective. Osteoarticular infections are more frequent than in the non-infected population. The level of immunosuppression, risk practice, and antiretroviral treatment should be considered for a proper diagnosis and therapeutic approach. Laboratory and imaging procedures recommended for the study of musculoskeletal processes in HIV infected subjects are the same as in the general population. Osteonecrosis and decreased bone mineral density are the most frequent alterations in children. An early diagnosis of bone disorders is needed. The influence of modifiable risk factors must be avoided and initiate treatment when necessary. Bisphosphonates have been effective in osteoporosis.

  19. Signal Factors Secreted by 2D and Spheroid Mesenchymal Stem Cells and by Cocultures of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived Microvesicles and Retinal Photoreceptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Mao; Zhou, Liang

    2017-01-01

    We aim to identify levels of signal factors secreted by MSCs cultured in 2D monolayers (2D-MSCs), spheroids (spheroids MSCs), and cocultures of microvesicles (MVs) derived from 2D-MSCs or spheroid MSCs and retinal photoreceptor neurons. We seeded 2D-MSCs, spheroid MSCs, and cells derived from spheroids MSCs at equal numbers. MVs isolated from all 3 culture conditions were incubated with 661W cells. Levels of 51 signal factors in conditioned medium from those cultured conditions were quantified with bead-based assay. We found that IL-8, IL-6, and GROα were the top three most abundant signal factors. Moreover, compared to 2D-MSCs, levels of 11 cytokines and IL-2Rα were significantly increased in conditioned medium from spheroid MSCs. Finally, to test if enhanced expression of these factors reflects altered immunomodulating activities, we assessed the effect of 2D-MSC-MVs and 3D-MSC-MVs on CD14+ cell chemoattraction. Compared to 2D-MSC-MVs, 3D-MSC-MVs significantly decreased the chemotactic index of CD14+ cells. Our results suggest that spheroid culture conditions improve the ability of MSCs to selectively secrete signal factors. Moreover, 3D-MSC-MVs also possessed an enhanced capability to promote signal factors secretion compared to 2D-MSC-MVs and may possess enhanced immunomodulating activities and might be a better regenerative therapy for retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:28194184

  20. Control of dendritic field formation in Drosophila: the roles of flamingo and competition between homologous neurons.

    PubMed

    Gao, F B; Kohwi, M; Brenman, J E; Jan, L Y; Jan, Y N

    2000-10-01

    Neurons elaborate dendrites with stereotypic branching patterns, thereby defining their receptive fields. These branching patterns may arise from properties intrinsic to the neurons or competition between neighboring neurons. Genetic and laser ablation studies reported here reveal that different multiple dendritic neurons in the same dorsal cluster in the Drosophila embryonic PNS do not compete with one another for dendritic fields. In contrast, when dendrites from homologous neurons in the two hemisegments meet at the dorsal midline in larval stages, they appear to repel each other. The formation of normal dendritic fields and the competition between dendrites of homologous neurons require the proper expression level of Flamingo, a G protein-coupled receptor-like protein, in embryonic neurons. Whereas Flamingo functions downstream of Frizzled in specifying planar polarity, Flamingo-dependent dendritic outgrowth is independent of Frizzled.

  1. Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons Grown on Multi-Electrode Arrays as a Novel In vitro Bioassay for the Detection of Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Jenkinson, Stephen P.; Grandgirard, Denis; Heidemann, Martina; Tscherter, Anne; Avondet, Marc-André; Leib, Stephen L.

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most poisonous naturally occurring protein toxins known to mankind and are the causative agents of the severe and potentially life-threatening disease botulism. They are also known for their application as cosmetics and as unique bio-pharmaceuticals to treat an increasing number of neurological and non-neurological disorders. Currently, the potency of biologically active BoNT for therapeutic use is mainly monitored by the murine LD50-assay, an ethically disputable test causing suffering and death of a considerable number of mice. The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro assay as an alternative to the widely used in vivo mouse bioassay. We report a novel BoNT detection assay using mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (mESN) cultured on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). After 21 days in culture, the mESN formed a neuronal network showing spontaneous bursting activity based on functional synapses and express the necessary target proteins for BoNTs. Treating cultures for 6 h with 16.6 pM of BoNT serotype A and incubation with 1.66 pM BoNT/A or 33 Units/ml of Botox® for 24 h lead to a significant reduction of both spontaneous network bursts and average spike rate. This data suggests that mESN cultured on MEAs pose a novel, biologically relevant model that can be used to detect and quantify functional BoNT effects, thus accelerating BoNT research while decreasing animal use. PMID:28280466

  2. Oligomerised lychee fruit-derived polyphenol attenuates cognitive impairment in senescence-accelerated mice and endoplasmic reticulum stress in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takuya; Kitadate, Kentaro; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hajime; Ogasawara, Junetsu; Kizaki, Takako; Sato, Shogo; Fujiwara, Tomonori; Akagawa, Kimio; Izawa, Tetsuya; Ohno, Hideki

    2013-11-14

    Recently, the ability of polyphenols to reduce the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) has attracted a great deal of interest. In the present study, we investigated the attenuating effects of oligomerised lychee fruit-derived polyphenol (OLFP, also called Oligonol) on early cognitive impairment. Male senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice (4 months old) were given OLFP (100 mg/kg per d) for 2 months, and then conditioned fear memory testing was conducted. Contextual fear memory, which is considered hippocampus-dependent memory, was significantly impaired in SAMP8 mice compared with non-senescence-accelerated mice. OLFP attenuated cognitive impairment in SAMP8 mice. Moreover, the results of real-time PCR analysis that followed DNA array analysis in the hippocampus revealed that, compared with SAMP8 mice, the mRNA expression of Wolfram syndrome 1 (Wfs1) was significantly higher in SAMP8 mice administered with OLFP. Wfs1 reportedly helps to protect against endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is thought to be one of the causes for AD. The expression of Wfs1 was significantly up-regulated in NG108-15 neuronal cells by the treatment with OLFP, and the up-regulation was inhibited by the treatment of the cells with a c-Jun N-terminal kinase-specific inhibitor rather than with an extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor. Moreover, OLFP significantly attenuated the tunicamycin-induced expression of the ER stress marker BiP (immunoglobulin heavy chain-binding protein) in the cells. These results suggest that OLFP has an attenuating effect on early cognitive impairment in SAMP8 mice, and diminishes ER stress in neuronal cells.

  3. Positive feedback regulation between gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor signaling and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release in developing neurons.

    PubMed

    Porcher, Christophe; Hatchett, Caroline; Longbottom, Rebecca E; McAinch, Kristina; Sihra, Talvinder S; Moss, Stephen J; Thomson, Alex M; Jovanovic, Jasmina N

    2011-06-17

    During the early development of the nervous system, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated signaling parallels the neurotrophin/tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk)-dependent signaling in controlling a number of processes from cell proliferation and migration, via dendritic and axonal outgrowth, to synapse formation and plasticity. Here we present the first evidence that these two signaling systems regulate each other through a complex positive feedback mechanism. We first demonstrate that GABA(A)R activation leads to an increase in the cell surface expression of these receptors in cultured embryonic cerebrocortical neurons, specifically at the stage when this activity causes depolarization of the plasma membrane and Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. We further demonstrate that GABA(A)R activity triggers release of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which, in turn by activating TrkB receptors, mediates the observed increase in cell surface expression of GABA(A)Rs. This BDNF/TrkB-dependent increase in surface levels of GABA(A)Rs requires the activity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) and does not involve the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activity. The increase in GABA(A)R surface levels occurs due to an inhibition of the receptor endocytosis by BDNF, whereas the receptor reinsertion into the plasma membrane remains unaltered. Thus, GABA(A)R activity is a potent regulator of the BDNF release during neuronal development, and at the same time, it is strongly enhanced by the activity of the BDNF/TrkB/PI3K/PKC signaling pathway.

  4. Regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression and release from hippocampal neurons is mediated by non-NMDA type glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, C; Olson, L; Bean, A J

    1994-03-01

    We have examined the influence of glutamate on cortical brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Kainic acid (KA) produced an upregulation of hippocampal and neocortical BDNF mRNA as well as BDNF protein that was blocked by a non-NMDA antagonist, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), but was not affected by the NMDA antagonist 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (AP7). Basal levels of BDNF mRNA were not affected by NMDA, DNQX, or AP7 treatment. BDNF protein was also increased after kainate exposure with a spatial and temporal course distinct from that seen for the expression of BDNF mRNA. A dramatic shift in BDNF immunoreactivity (-IR) was observed from intracellular compartments to the neuropil surrounding CA3 pyramidal cells 2-3 hr after KA exposure. This shift in localization of BDNF-IR suggests a constitutive release of BDNF at the level of the cell body and dendrites. Moreover, we have localized mRNAs for full-length and truncated trkB, to a co-incident population of neurons and glia. These data suggest the neurons that produce BDNF also express components necessary for a biological response to the same neurotrophic factor. The present study also demonstrates increased BDNF-IR in the mossy fiber terminal zone of hippocampus after exposure to KA, as well as an increase in trkB mRNA, and provides evidence of local release of this neurotrophin into the surrounding neuropil where it would be available for local utilization. The synthesis and putative release of BDNF from somatic and/or dendritic sites within the hippocampus provide evidence of a potential autocrine or paracrine role for BDNF, and establish a local source of trophic support for the maintenance of synaptic plasticity and anatomic reorganization in the mature nervous system.

  5. Projection neurons in Drosophila antennal lobes signal the acceleration of odor concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Anmo J; Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B

    2015-05-14

    Temporal experience of odor gradients is important in spatial orientation of animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster exhibits robust odor-guided behaviors in an odor gradient field. In order to investigate how early olfactory circuits process temporal variation of olfactory stimuli, we subjected flies to precisely defined odor concentration waveforms and examined spike patterns of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and projection neurons (PNs). We found a significant temporal transformation between OSN and PN spike patterns, manifested by the PN output strongly signaling the OSN spike rate and its rate of change. A simple two-dimensional model admitting the OSN spike rate and its rate of change as inputs closely predicted the PN output. When cascaded with the rate-of-change encoding by OSNs, PNs primarily signal the acceleration and the rate of change of dynamic odor stimuli to higher brain centers, thereby enabling animals to reliably respond to the onsets of odor concentrations.

  6. Rapid and slow chemical synaptic interactions of cholinergic projection neurons and GABAergic local interneurons in the insect antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ben; Kloppenburg, Peter

    2014-09-24

    The antennal lobe (AL) of insects constitutes the first synaptic relay and processing center of olfactory information, received from olfactory sensory neurons located on the antennae. Complex synaptic connectivity between olfactory neurons of the AL ultimately determines the spatial and temporal tuning profile of (output) projection neurons to odors. Here we used paired whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in the cockroach Periplaneta americana to characterize synaptic interactions between cholinergic uniglomerular projection neurons (uPNs) and GABAergic local interneurons (LNs), both of which are key components of the insect olfactory system. We found rapid, strong excitatory synaptic connections between uPNs and LNs. This rapid excitatory transmission was blocked by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor blocker mecamylamine. IPSPs, elicited by synaptic input from a presynaptic LN, were recorded in both uPNs and LNs. IPSPs were composed of both slow, sustained components and fast, transient components which were coincident with presynaptic action potentials. The fast IPSPs were blocked by the GABAA receptor chloride channel blocker picrotoxin, whereas the slow sustained IPSPs were blocked by the GABAB receptor blocker CGP-54626. This is the first study to directly show the predicted dual fast- and slow-inhibitory action of LNs, which was predicted to be key in shaping complex odor responses in the AL of insects. We also provide the first direct characterization of rapid postsynaptic potentials coincident with presynaptic spikes between olfactory processing neurons in the AL.

  7. The behavior of neuronal cells on tendon-derived collagen sheets as potential substrates for nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Kyle A; Hopkins, Amy M; Tang-Schomer, Min D; Kaplan, David L; Xu, Qiaobing

    2014-04-01

    Peripheral nervous system injuries result in a decreased quality of life, and generally require surgical intervention for repair. Currently, the gold standard of nerve autografting, based on the use of host tissue such as sensory nerves is suboptimal as it results in donor-site loss of function and requires a secondary surgery. Nerve guidance conduits fabricated from natural polymers such as collagen are a common alternative to bridge nerve defects. In the present work, tendon sections derived through a process named bioskiving were studied for their potential for u