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Sample records for point cutting tool

  1. Manual bamboo cutting tool.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Mariana Pereira; Correia, Walter Franklin Marques; da Costa Campos, Fabio Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the development of a cutting tool guide, specifically for the harvest of bamboo. The development was made based on precepts of eco-design and ergonomics, for prioritizing the physical health of the operator and the maintenance of the environment, as well as meet specific requirements of bamboo. The main goal is to spread the use of bamboo as construction material, handicrafts, among others, from a handy, easy assembly and material available tool.

  2. Application of high-rate cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, John L., Jr.

    1989-03-01

    Widespread application of the newest high-rate cutting tools to the most appropriate jobs is slowed by the sheer magnitude of developments in tool types, materials, workpiece applications, and by the rapid pace of change. Therefore, a study of finishing and roughing sizes of coated carbide inserts having a variety of geometries for single point turning was completed. The cutting tools were tested for tool life, chip quality, and workpiece surface finish at various cutting conditions with medium alloy steel. An empirical wear-life data base was established, and a computer program was developed to facilitate technology transfer, assist selection of carbide insert grades, and provide machine operating parameters. A follow-on test program was implemented suitable for next generation coated carbides, rotary cutting tools, cutting fluids, and ceramic tool materials.

  3. Cutting tool form compensaton system and method

    DOEpatents

    Barkman, William E.; Babelay, Jr., Edwin F.; Klages, Edward J.

    1993-01-01

    A compensation system for a computer-controlled machining apparatus having a controller and including a cutting tool and a workpiece holder which are movable relative to one another along a preprogrammed path during a machining operation utilizes a camera and a vision computer for gathering information at a preselected stage of a machining operation relating to the actual shape and size of the cutting edge of the cutting tool and for altering the preprogrammed path in accordance with detected variations between the actual size and shape of the cutting edge and an assumed size and shape of the cutting edge. The camera obtains an image of the cutting tool against a background so that the cutting tool and background possess contrasting light intensities, and the vision computer utilizes the contrasting light intensities of the image to locate points therein which correspond to points along the actual cutting edge. Following a series of computations involving the determining of a tool center from the points identified along the tool edge, the results of the computations are fed to the controller where the preprogrammed path is altered as aforedescribed.

  4. Cutting tool form compensation system and method

    DOEpatents

    Barkman, W.E.; Babelay, E.F. Jr.; Klages, E.J.

    1993-10-19

    A compensation system for a computer-controlled machining apparatus having a controller and including a cutting tool and a workpiece holder which are movable relative to one another along a preprogrammed path during a machining operation utilizes a camera and a vision computer for gathering information at a preselected stage of a machining operation relating to the actual shape and size of the cutting edge of the cutting tool and for altering the preprogrammed path in accordance with detected variations between the actual size and shape of the cutting edge and an assumed size and shape of the cutting edge. The camera obtains an image of the cutting tool against a background so that the cutting tool and background possess contrasting light intensities, and the vision computer utilizes the contrasting light intensities of the image to locate points therein which correspond to points along the actual cutting edge. Following a series of computations involving the determining of a tool center from the points identified along the tool edge, the results of the computations are fed to the controller where the preprogrammed path is altered as aforedescribed. 9 figures.

  5. Composite structure for cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Radd, F.J.; Haden, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    A cutting tool comprises a compact bundle of elongated, substantially cylindrical fibers or rods formed from a cemented metal carbide material. The bundle of fibers is shrink-fitted within a metal collar to form a long-wearing cutting tool.

  6. A Flexure-Based Tool Holder for Sub-(micro)m Positioning of a Single Point Cutting Tool on a Four-axis Lathe

    SciTech Connect

    Bono, M J; Hibbard, R L

    2005-12-05

    A tool holder was designed to facilitate the machining of precision meso-scale components with complex three-dimensional shapes with sub-{micro}m accuracy on a four-axis lathe. A four-axis lathe incorporates a rotary table that allows the cutting tool to swivel with respect to the workpiece to enable the machining of complex workpiece forms, and accurately machining complex meso-scale parts often requires that the cutting tool be aligned precisely along the axis of rotation of the rotary table. The tool holder designed in this study has greatly simplified the process of setting the tool in the correct location with sub-{micro}m precision. The tool holder adjusts the tool position using flexures that were designed using finite element analyses. Two flexures adjust the lateral position of the tool to align the center of the nose of the tool with the axis of rotation of the B-axis, and another flexure adjusts the height of the tool. The flexures are driven by manual micrometer adjusters, each of which provides a minimum increment of motion of 20 nm. This tool holder has simplified the process of setting a tool with sub-{micro}m accuracy, and it has significantly reduced the time required to set a tool.

  7. Tubing and cable cutting tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsmith, D. D.; Richardson, J. I. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A hand held hydraulic cutting tool was developed which is particularly useful in deactivating ejection seats in military aircraft rescue operations. The tool consists primarily of a hydraulic system composed of a fluid reservoir, a pumping piston, and an actuator piston. Mechanical cutting jaws are attached to the actuator piston rod. The hydraulic system is controlled by a pump handle. As the pump handle is operated the actuator piston rod is forced outward and thus the cutting jaws are forced together. The frame of the device is a flexible metal tubing which permits easy positioning of the tool cutting jaws in remote and normally inaccessible locations. Bifurcated cutting edges ensure removal of a section of the tubing or cable to thereby reduce the possibility of accidental reactivation of the tubing or cable being severed.

  8. Determining the cut-off point of osteoporosis based on the osteoporosis self-assessment tool, body mass index and weight in Taiwanese young adult women.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu Fang; Yang, Rong Sen

    2014-09-01

    To examine the cut-off point of the osteoporosis self-assessment tool, age, weight and body mass index for osteoporosis among young adult Taiwanese women, using a large-scale health examination database containing bone mineral density tests. The cut-off points of osteoporosis risk factors identified earlier focus on menopausal or senior Caucasian and Asian women. However, young adult Asian women have seldom been identified. A retrospective historical cohort study. Using the 2009-2011 health examination database of a large-scale medical centre in northern Taiwan, this study investigated young adult Asian women (i.e. range in age from 30-49 years) in Taiwan who had received dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry test. This study also explored the cut-off point, sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of receiver operating characteristics of osteoporosis among young adult females in Taiwan. This study collected 2454 young adult Asian women in Taiwan. Cochran-Armitage analysis results indicated that the prevalence of osteoporosis increased with decreasing weight, body mass index and osteoporosis self-assessment method quartiles. According to the results of receiver operating characteristics, weight, body mass index and osteoporosis self-assessment tool approaches can generally be used as indicators to predict osteoporosis among young adult Asian women. Results of this study demonstrate that Taiwanese women contracting osteoporosis tend to be young and underweight, as well as having a low body mass index and osteoporosis self-assessment scores. Those results further suggest that the assessment indicators for cut-off points are appropriately suitable for young adult women in Taiwan. Early detection is the only available means of preventing osteoporosis. Professional nurses should apply convenient and accurate assessment procedures to help young adult women to adopt preventive strategies against osteoporosis early, thus eliminating the probability of osteoporotic

  9. Refrigerated cutting tools improve machining of superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, G. M.

    1971-01-01

    Freon-12 applied to tool cutting edge evaporates quickly, leaves no residue, and permits higher cutting rate than with conventional coolants. This technique increases cutting rate on Rene-41 threefold and improves finish of machined surface.

  10. Advanced cryogenics for cutting tools. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to determine if cryogenic treatment improved the life and cost effectiveness of perishable cutting tools over other treatments or coatings. Test results showed that in five of seven of the perishable cutting tools tested there was no improvement in tool life. The other two tools showed a small gain in tool life, but not as much as when switching manufacturers of the cutting tool. The following conclusions were drawn from this study: (1) titanium nitride coatings are more effective than cryogenic treatment in increasing the life of perishable cutting tools made from all cutting tool materials, (2) cryogenic treatment may increase tool life if the cutting tool is improperly heat treated during its origination, and (3) cryogenic treatment was only effective on those tools made from less sophisticated high speed tool steels. As a part of a recent detailed investigation, four cutting tool manufacturers and two cutting tool laboratories were queried and none could supply any data to substantiate cryogenic treatment of perishable cutting tools.

  11. Ductile cutting of silicon microstructures with surface inclination measurement and compensation by using a force sensor integrated single point diamond tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuan-Liu; Cai, Yindi; Shimizu, Yuki; Ito, So; Gao, Wei; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a measurement and compensation method of surface inclination for ductile cutting of silicon microstructures by using a diamond tool with a force sensor based on a four-axis ultra-precision lathe. The X- and Y-directional inclinations of a single crystal silicon workpiece with respect to the X- and Y-motion axes of the lathe slides were measured respectively by employing the diamond tool as a touch-trigger probe, in which the tool-workpiece contact is sensitively detected by monitoring the force sensor output. Based on the measurement results, fabrication of silicon microstructures can be thus carried out directly along the tilted silicon workpiece by compensating the cutting motion axis to be parallel to the silicon surface without time-consuming pre-adjustment of the surface inclination or turning of a flat surface. A diamond tool with a negative rake angle was used in the experiment for superior ductile cutting performance. The measurement precision by using the diamond tool as a touch-trigger probe was investigated. Experiments of surface inclination measurement and ultra-precision ductile cutting of a micro-pillar array and a micro-pyramid array with inclination compensation were carried out respectively to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  12. Vee-notch tool cuts specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spier, R. A.

    1970-01-01

    Triangular cutting tool uses carbide tips for notching heat-treated or abrasive materials, and alloys subjected to high structural stresses. The tool is rigidly mounted in a slot of mating contour to prevent deflection during cutting of tensile specimens. No other expensive machine equipment is required.

  13. An FMS Dynamic Production Scheduling Algorithm Considering Cutting Tool Failure and Cutting Tool Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, A.; Wangsaputra, R.; Martawirya, Y. Y.; Halim, A. H.

    2016-02-01

    This paper deals with Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS) production rescheduling due to unavailability of cutting tools caused either of cutting tool failure or life time limit. The FMS consists of parallel identical machines integrated with an automatic material handling system and it runs fully automatically. Each machine has a same cutting tool configuration that consists of different geometrical cutting tool types on each tool magazine. The job usually takes two stages. Each stage has sequential operations allocated to machines considering the cutting tool life. In the real situation, the cutting tool can fail before the cutting tool life is reached. The objective in this paper is to develop a dynamic scheduling algorithm when a cutting tool is broken during unmanned and a rescheduling needed. The algorithm consists of four steps. The first step is generating initial schedule, the second step is determination the cutting tool failure time, the third step is determination of system status at cutting tool failure time and the fourth step is the rescheduling for unfinished jobs. The approaches to solve the problem are complete-reactive scheduling and robust-proactive scheduling. The new schedules result differences starting time and completion time of each operations from the initial schedule.

  14. [Cutting and incision tools: the scalpel: handles].

    PubMed

    Illana Esteban, Emilio

    2006-10-01

    In its current version, a scalpel is the best known cutting tool. It comes with a versatile metallic handle, available in a variety of models having differentiated characteristics. With a few simple movements, all models enable you to articulate and extract multiple cutting blades.

  15. New tooling for plasma cutting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkikh, M. T.; Shaterin, M. A.; Shterin, V. B.

    1985-03-01

    When milling the edges of sheet intermediate products made of high strength manganese and other special steels and alloys with plasma preheating, milling cutters equipped with plates of metal-ceramic hard alloys are used. With plasma heating, it is most advisable to use cylindrical milling tools. The tooth of the milling tool cuts into the soft metal which reduces the unit loads on the cutting wedge of the tool. It becomes possible to use plates with the slope angle of the cutting edge equal or near zero, which considerably simplifies the making of the tool. The milling tool design makes it technologically efficient to produce basing surfaces for setting the cutting components. The through wedge grooves of the rings may be ground which produces very flat supporting surfaces and, therefore, high rigidity of the interface between the plate and the support. The use of tetrahedral plates with a flat forward surface with a 90 deg tip angle utilizes all eight cutting edges of the plate. The use of such milling tools with plasma preheating of the intermediate product insures high machining productivity even if the tool is equipped with hard alloy plates without tungsten.

  16. Robotic Tool For Tightening And Cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooney, Earl T.

    1989-01-01

    Robot end effector designed for tightening tube couplers and for cutting tubes. Tool operable by simple movements and thus manipulated by technician wearing heavy protective clothing. Operates on principle of worm and pinion gear. Intended for use in building structures in space, end effector also used as hand tool for assembling truss structures for terrestrial buildings, tents, and oil rigs. Also used in place of pipe wrench in plumbing work.

  17. Study on optimal surface property of WC-Co cutting tool for aluminium alloy cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizar, Mohd; Arimatsu, Naoya; Kawamitsu, Hiroshi; Takai, Kazuteru; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    The light weight property as well as high corrosion resistance of aluminium alloy has increased their demand especially in automobile industries. Aluminium alloy as a matter of fact has a low melting point and high ductility that severely adhere to the cutting tool surface and cause deterioration of chip evacuation. This problem often resulting in tools breakage. In this paper, in order to impart functions of anti-adhesion, we propose a technique by controlling the grinding marks micro texture on the tool surface by using the blast polishing treatment without any coating technologies. The results show that the tool which underwent polishing treatment reduces the cutting force as well as the aluminium adherence during the initial cutting process, and become worst as the process cutting continues. These results indicate that grinding mark texture improves the anti-adhesion by reducing the contact area during cutting and provide storage for the lubricant. In addition, too much polishing on the tool surface may remove these textures and resultantly worsen the tool performance.

  18. Testing Of Choiced Ceramics Cutting Tools At Irregular Interrupted Cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyncl, Ladislav; Malotová, Šárka; Nováček, Pavel; Nicielnik, Henryk; Šoková, Dagmar; Hemžský, Pavel; Pitela, David; Holubjak, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article discusses the test of removable ceramic cutting inserts during machining irregular interrupted cut. Tests were performed on a lathe, with the preparation which simulated us the interrupted cut. By changing the number of plates mounted in a preparation it simulate us a regular or irregular interrupted cut. When with four plates it was regular interrupted cut, the remaining three variants were already irregular cut. It was examined whether it will have the irregular interrupted cutting effect on the insert and possibly how it will change life of inserts during irregular interrupted cut (variable delay between shocks).

  19. Tool for cutting insulation from electrical cables

    DOEpatents

    Harless, Charles E.; Taylor, Ward G.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an efficient hand tool for precisely slitting the sheath of insulation on an electrical cable--e.g., a cable two inches in diameter--in a manner facilitating subsequent peeling or stripping of the insulation. The tool includes a rigid frame which is slidably fitted on an end section of the cable. The frame carries a rigidly affixed handle and an opposed, elongated blade-and-handle assembly. The blade-and-handle assembly is pivotally supported by a bracket which is slidably mounted on the frame for movement toward and away from the cable, thus providing an adjustment for the depth of cut. The blade-and-handle assembly is mountable to the bracket in two pivotable positions. With the assembly mounted in the first position, the tool is turned about the cable to slit the insulation circumferentially. With the assembly mounted in the second position, the tool is drawn along the cable to slit the insulation axially. When cut both circumferentially and axially, the insulation can easily be peeled from the cable.

  20. Performance of Uncoated Carbide Cutting Tool when Machining Cast Iron in Dry Cutting Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaharah, A. G.; Che Hassan, C. H.; Ghazali, M. J.; Sulong, A. B.; Omar, M. Z.; Nuawi, M. Z.; Ismail, A. R.

    This paper presents the performance of uncoated carbide cutting tool when machining cast iron in dry cutting conditions. Experiments were conducted at various cutting speeds, feed rates, and depths of cut according to Taguchi method design of experiment using a standard orthogonal array L9(34). The effects of cutting speeds (100-146 m/min), feed rates (0.20-0.35 mm/tooth) and depths of cut (1.0-2.0 mm) on the tool life, surface roughness and cutting forces were evaluated using ANOVA. Results showed that the effects of cutting speed, depth of cut and the feed rate were similar affecting the failure of the carbide cutting tools within the range of tested machining parameters. The contribution of cutting speed, feed rate, and depth of cut in controlling the tool life were 32.12%, 38.56% and 29.32% respectively. Whereas, the cutting speed was the main factor influencing the average surface roughness (Ra) value followed by feed rate. These factors contribute 60.53% and 35.59% respectively to the Ra value. On the other hand, cutting forces generated were greatly influenced by the depth of cut (66.52%) and the feed rate (32.6%). Cutting speed was found insignificant in controlling the generated cutting forces.

  1. Accelerometer Cut-Points and Youth Physical Activity Prevalence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mota, Jorge; Valente, Monica; Aires, Luisa; Silva, Pedro; Santos, Maria Paula; Ribeiro, Jose Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to examine the effects of specific cut-off scoring points (on the estimated prevalence of meeting health-related guidelines for physical activity in youth) and, second, to document the differences in gender physical activity patterns according to two different cut-off points. The sample comprised 62…

  2. Accelerometer Cut-Points and Youth Physical Activity Prevalence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mota, Jorge; Valente, Monica; Aires, Luisa; Silva, Pedro; Santos, Maria Paula; Ribeiro, Jose Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to examine the effects of specific cut-off scoring points (on the estimated prevalence of meeting health-related guidelines for physical activity in youth) and, second, to document the differences in gender physical activity patterns according to two different cut-off points. The sample comprised 62…

  3. Laser Cutting of Leather: Tool for Industry or Designers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Alexander; Manninen, Matti; Pärnänen, Inni; Hirvimäki, Marika; Salminen, Antti

    Currently technologies which are applied for leather cutting include slitting knifes, die press techniques and manual cutting. Use of laser technology has grown significantly during recent years due to number of advantages over conventional cutting methods; flexibility, high production speed, possibility to cut complex geometries, easier cutting of customized parts, and less leftovers of leather makes laser cutting more and more economically attractive to apply for leather cutting. Laser technology provides advantages in cutting complex geometries, stable cutting quality and possibility to utilize leather material in economically best way. Constant quality is important in industrial processes and laser technology fulfills this requirement: properly chosen laser cutting parameters provides identical cuts. Additionally, laser technology is very flexible in terms of geometries: complex geometries, individual designs, prototypes and small scale products can be manufactured by laser cutting. Variety of products, which needed to be cut in small volumes, is also the application where laser cutting can be more beneficial due to possibility to change production from one product to another only by changing geometry without a need to change cutting tool. Disadvantages of laser processing include high initial investment costs and some running costs due to maintenance and required gas supply for the laser. Higher level of operator's expertise is required due to more complicated machinery in case of laser cutting. This study investigates advantages and disadvantages of laser cutting in different areas of application and provides comparison between laser cutting and mechanical cutting of leather.

  4. The Effects of Cryogenic Treatment on Cutting Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Satish; Khedkar, Nitin K.; Jagtap, Bhushan; Singh, T. P.

    2017-08-01

    Enhancing the cutting tool life is important and economic factor to reduce the tooling as well as manufacturing cost. The tool life is improved considerably by 92 % after cryogenic treatment. The cryogenic treatment is a one-time permanent, sub-zero heat treatment that entirely changes cross-section of cutting tool. The cryogenic treatment is carried out with deep freezing of cutting tool materials to enhance physical and mechanical properties. The cryogenic treatment improves mechanical such as hardness, toughness and tribological properties such as wear resistance, coefficient of friction, surface finish, dimensional stability and stress relief. The deep cryogenic treatment is the most beneficial treatment applied on cutting tools. The cryogenic treatment is the most advanced heat treatment and popular to improve performance of the cutting tool. The optimization of cryogenic treatment variables is necessary to improve tool life. This study reviews the effects of cryogenic treatment on microstructure, tribological properties of tool steels and machining applications of cutting tool by investigating the surface and performing the surface characterization test like SEM. The economy of cutting tool can be achieved by deep cryogenic treatment.

  5. Surface dimpling on rotating work piece using rotation cutting tool

    DOEpatents

    Bhapkar, Rohit Arun; Larsen, Eric Richard

    2015-03-31

    A combined method of machining and applying a surface texture to a work piece and a tool assembly that is capable of machining and applying a surface texture to a work piece are disclosed. The disclosed method includes machining portions of an outer or inner surface of a work piece. The method also includes rotating the work piece in front of a rotating cutting tool and engaging the outer surface of the work piece with the rotating cutting tool to cut dimples in the outer surface of the work piece. The disclosed tool assembly includes a rotating cutting tool coupled to an end of a rotational machining device, such as a lathe. The same tool assembly can be used to both machine the work piece and apply a surface texture to the work piece without unloading the work piece from the tool assembly.

  6. Statistical considerations for calculation of immunogenicity screening assay cut points.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, David; Berger, Marion

    2011-10-28

    Most therapeutic proteins induce an unwanted immune response. Antibodies elicited by these therapeutic proteins may significantly alter drug safety and efficacy, highlighting the need for the strategic assessment of immunogenicity at various stages of clinical development. Immunogenicity testing is generally conducted by a multi-tiered approach whereby patient samples are initially screened for the presence of anti-drug antibodies in a screening assay. The screening assay cut point is statistically determined by evaluation of drug-naïve samples and is typically chosen to correspond to a false positive rate of 5%. While various statistical approaches for determination of this screening cut point have been commonly adopted and described in the immunogenicity literature, the performance of these approaches has not been fully evaluated. This paper reviews various statistical approaches for cut point calculation, evaluates the impact of sampling design and variability on the performance of each statistical approach, and highlights the difference between an 'average' or 'confidence-level' cut point in order to develop more specific recommendations regarding the statistical calculation of immunogenicity screening cut points.

  7. Defining obesity cut points in a multiethnic population.

    PubMed

    Razak, Fahad; Anand, Sonia S; Shannon, Harry; Vuksan, Vladimir; Davis, Bonnie; Jacobs, Ruby; Teo, Koon K; McQueen, Matthew; Yusuf, Salim

    2007-04-24

    Body mass index (BMI) is widely used to assess risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Cut points for the classification of obesity (BMI >30 kg/m2) have been developed and validated among people of European descent. It is unknown whether these cut points are appropriate for non-European populations. We assessed the metabolic risk associated with BMI among South Asians, Chinese, Aboriginals, and Europeans. We randomly sampled 1078 subjects from 4 ethnic groups (289 South Asians, 281 Chinese, 207 Aboriginals, and 301 Europeans) from 4 regions in Canada. Principal components factor analysis was used to derive underlying latent or "hidden" factors associated with 14 clinical and biochemical cardiometabolic markers. Ethnic-specific BMI cut points were derived for 3 cardiometabolic factors. Three primary latent factors emerged that accounted for 56% of the variation in markers of glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and blood pressure. For a given BMI, elevated levels of glucose- and lipid-related factors were more likely to be present in South Asians, Chinese, and Aboriginals compared with Europeans, and elevated levels of the blood pressure-related factor were more likely to be present among Chinese compared with Europeans. The cut point to define obesity, as defined by distribution of glucose and lipid factors, is lower by approximately 6 kg/m2 among non-European groups compared with Europeans. Revisions may be warranted for BMI cut points to define obesity among South Asians, Chinese, and Aboriginals. Using these revised cut points would greatly increase the estimated burden of obesity-related metabolic disorders among non-European populations.

  8. Generalized interactions using virtual tools within the spring framework: cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Kevin; Bruyns, Cynthia D.

    2002-01-01

    We present schemes for real-time generalized mesh cutting. Starting with the a basic example, we describe the details of implementing cutting on single and multiple surface objects as well as hybrid and volumetric meshes using virtual tools with single and multiple cutting surfaces. These methods have been implemented in a robust surgical simulation environment allowing us to model procedures ranging from animal dissection to cleft lip correction.

  9. Generalized interactions using virtual tools within the spring framework: cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Kevin; Bruyns, Cynthia D.

    2002-01-01

    We present schemes for real-time generalized mesh cutting. Starting with the a basic example, we describe the details of implementing cutting on single and multiple surface objects as well as hybrid and volumetric meshes using virtual tools with single and multiple cutting surfaces. These methods have been implemented in a robust surgical simulation environment allowing us to model procedures ranging from animal dissection to cleft lip correction.

  10. Ultrasonic excitation affects friction interactions between food materials and cutting tools.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Yvonne; Zahn, Susann; Schindler, Claudia; Rohm, Harald

    2009-06-01

    In the food industry, ultrasonic cutting is used to improve separation by a reduction of the cutting force. This reduction can be attributed to the modification of tool-workpiece interactions at the cutting edge and along the tool flanks because of the superposition of the cutting movement with ultrasonic vibration of the cutting tool. In this study, model experiments were used to analyze friction between the flanks of a cutting tool and the material to be cut. Friction force at a commercial cutting sonotrode was quantified using combined cutting-friction experiments, and sliding friction tests were carried out by adapting a standard draw-off assembly and using an ultrasonic welding sonotrode as sliding surface. The impact of material parameters, ultrasonic amplitude, and the texture of the contacting food surface on friction force was investigated. The results show that ultrasonic vibration significantly reduces the sliding friction force. While the amplitude showed no influence within the tested range, the texture of the contact surface of the food affects the intensity of ultrasonic transportation effects. These effects are a result of mechanical interactions and of changes in material properties of the contact layer, which are induced by the deformation of contact points, friction heating and absorption heating because of the dissipation of mechanical vibration energy.

  11. 10. CANAL CUT THROUGH SHALE BEDROCK ON PROMINENT POINT, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. CANAL CUT THROUGH SHALE BEDROCK ON PROMINENT POINT, LOOKING NORTH-NORTHEAST. NOTE CONCRETE ABUTMENTS PROBABLY INSTALLED IN 1935 TO PREVENT WATER FROM ESCAPING THROUGH A CANAL BANK BREACH. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  12. Cutting tool study: 21-6-9 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    McManigle, A.P.

    1992-07-29

    The Rocky Flats Plant conducted a study to test cermet cutting tools by performing machinability studies on War Reserve product under controlled conditions. The purpose of these studies was to determine the most satisfactory tools that optimize tool life, minimize costs, improve reliability and chip control, and increase productivity by performing the operations to specified Accuracies. This study tested three manufacturers' cermet cutting tools and a carbide tool used previously by the Rocky Flats Plant for machining spherical-shaped 21-6-9 stainless steel forgings (Figure 1). The 80-degree diamond inserts were tested by experimenting with various chip-breaker geometries, cutting speeds, feedrates, and cermet grades on the outside contour roughing operation. The cermets tested were manufactured by Kennametal, Valenite, and NTK. The carbide tool ordinarily used for this operation is manufactured by Carboloy. Evaluation of tho tools was conducted by investigating the number of passes per part and parts per insert, tool wear, cutting time, tool life, surface finish, and stem taper. Benefits to be gained from this study were: improved part quality, better chip control, increased tool life and utilization, and greater fabrication productivity. This was to be accomplished by performing the operation to specified accuracies within the scope of the tools tested.

  13. Cutting tool study: 21-6-9 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    McManigle, A.P.

    1992-07-29

    The Rocky Flats Plant conducted a study to test cermet cutting tools by performing machinability studies on War Reserve product under controlled conditions. The purpose of these studies was to determine the most satisfactory tools that optimize tool life, minimize costs, improve reliability and chip control, and increase productivity by performing the operations to specified Accuracies. This study tested three manufacturers` cermet cutting tools and a carbide tool used previously by the Rocky Flats Plant for machining spherical-shaped 21-6-9 stainless steel forgings (Figure 1). The 80-degree diamond inserts were tested by experimenting with various chip-breaker geometries, cutting speeds, feedrates, and cermet grades on the outside contour roughing operation. The cermets tested were manufactured by Kennametal, Valenite, and NTK. The carbide tool ordinarily used for this operation is manufactured by Carboloy. Evaluation of tho tools was conducted by investigating the number of passes per part and parts per insert, tool wear, cutting time, tool life, surface finish, and stem taper. Benefits to be gained from this study were: improved part quality, better chip control, increased tool life and utilization, and greater fabrication productivity. This was to be accomplished by performing the operation to specified accuracies within the scope of the tools tested.

  14. Numerical modelling of tool wear in turning with cemented carbide cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, P.; Estrems, M.; Faura, F.

    2007-04-07

    A numerical model is proposed for analysing the flank and crater wear resulting from the loss of material on cutting tool surface in turning processes due to wear mechanisms of adhesion, abrasion and fracture. By means of this model, the material loss along cutting tool surface can be analysed, and the worn surface shape during the workpiece machining can be determined. The proposed model analyses the gradual degradation of cutting tool during turning operation, and tool wear can be estimated as a function of cutting time. Wear-land width (VB) and crater depth (KT) can be obtained for description of material loss on cutting tool surface, and the effects of the distinct wear mechanisms on surface shape can be studied. The parameters required for the tool wear model are obtained from bibliography and experimental observation for AISI 4340 steel turning with WC-Co cutting tools.

  15. [ANTHROPOMETRIC PARAMETERS' CUT-OFF POINTS FOR DIAGNOSIS OF SARCOPENIA].

    PubMed

    Canda Moreno, Alicia S

    2015-08-01

    sarcopenia is a syndrome characterized by loss of muscle mass associated with reduced muscle strength and/or reduced functional capacity. The ageing of our population is producing an increase of the prevalence related with age in addition to other factors related to malnutrition and certain diseases. The aim of this study was to provide a tool for diagnosing sarcopenia while determining in an accessible way the loss of muscle mass. an anthropometric standardized protocol was completed on 883 men and 506 women, healthy and active, aged 20-39 years. The following muscular development indices were calculated: body circumferences (upper arm, forearm, thigh, and calf) corrected circumferences (upper arm, thigh and calf), cross-sectional area (CSA, upper arm, thigh, and calf) and whole- body muscle mass (kg), and as a percentage (%) and in relation to height (kg/m²) by Lee's equation. The cutoff point was established as the 2.5 percentile (lower endpoint of the 95% confidence interval) for the analyzed studied. significant differences by gender (p < 0.0001) were found in all the indicators analyzed. The cut-off points of the loss of skeletal muscle mass were 9,1 kg/m² in men; and 7.3 kg/m² in women. And in the CSA (cm²), men vs. women: upper arm, 37.7 vs. 24.2; , thigh, 154.3 vs. 115.8; and calf, 78.8 vs. 60.2. there is sexual dimorphism which requires considering differentiated diagnostic criteria. The anthropometric technique can serve as screening method for sarcopenia on the study of large populations. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. Gear-Cutting Tool for Screw-Compressor Rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Katsumi; Kawasaki, Kazumasa; Tamura, Hisashi

    A built-up hob for a screw-compressor rotor is proposed. The hob is composed of cutter blades and a hob head. The blade is cut out from a tempered planar plate of high speed tool steel by wire-cut electrodischarge machining (EDM). During the wire cutting process, the wire electrode has a fixed angle to ensure both the side and the end relief angle of the cutting edge, so that the rake face regrinding sharpens the cutting edge without changing the profile of the rake face. In other words, theoretically, the hob has no accuracy deterioration due to rake face regrinding. The formulae of rack tooth profile are derived from the female rotor tooth profile experssed by numerical formulae. Next, the fundamental helicoid of the hob the profile of the cutting edge of the blade are calculated. The hob was fabricated and the rotor hobbing was carried out.

  17. Diamond tool wear vs cutting distance on electroless nickel mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Taylor, J.S.; Donaldson, R.R.

    1986-10-14

    Wear data are presented for diamond tools cutting electroless nickel (eNi) for cut lengths up to 70,000 ft (13 miles). Two tools having different infrared absorption characteristics were used to cut an eNi preparation that had yielded minimum values for surface roughness and tool wear rate in a previous study. The data include Talystep measurement of the rms amplitude of the feed-marks versus cumulative cutting distance, representative examples of shape changes for the feed-mark profiles, SEM and optical micrographs of the tool rake and flank face wear zones, and measurements of the cutting edge profile and edge recession distance by a tool-nose replication technique. Feed-mark roughness values were found to increase from 5 to 90 A rms over the duration of the test, with an associated edge recession of about 1000 A and the development of a periodic tool edge grooving indicative of burnishing of the part surface. The ir absorption data successfully predicted the order of the two tools in terms of wear rate and fracture toughness.

  18. Tool post modification allows easy turret lathe cutting-tool alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fouts, L.

    1966-01-01

    Modified tool holder and tool post permit alignment of turret lathe cutting tools on the center of the spindle. The tool is aligned with the spindle by the holder which is kept in position by a hydraulic lock in feature of the tool post. The tool post is used on horizontal and vertical turret lathes and other engine lathes.

  19. Defining Obesity Cut-Off Points for Migrant South Asians

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Laura J.; Yates, Thomas; Davies, Melanie J.; Brady, Emer; Webb, David R.; Sattar, Naveed; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2011-01-01

    Background Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) are used to define cardiovascular and type 2 diabetes risk. We aimed to derive appropriate BMI and WC obesity cut-off points in a migrant South Asian population. Methods 4688 White Europeans and 1333 South Asians resident in the UK aged 40–75 years inclusive were screened for type 2 diabetes. Principal components analysis was used to derive a glycaemia, lipid, and a blood pressure factor. Regression models for each factor, adjusted for age and stratified by sex, were used to identify BMI and WC cut-off points in South Asians that correspond to those defined for White Europeans. Findings For South Asian males, derived BMI obesity cut-off points equivalent to 30.0 kg/m2 in White Europeans were 22.6 kg/m2 (95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) 20.7 kg/m2 to 24.5 kg/m2) for the glycaemia factor, 26.0 kg/m2 (95% CI 24.7 kg/m2 to 27.3 kg/m2) for the lipid factor, and 28.4 kg/m2 (95% CI 26.5 kg/m2 to 30.4 kg/m2) for the blood pressure factor. For WC, derived cut-off points for South Asian males equivalent to 102 cm in White Europeans were 83.8 cm (95% CI 79.3 cm to 88.2 cm) for the glycaemia factor, 91.4 cm (95% CI 86.9 cm to 95.8 cm) for the lipid factor, and 99.3 cm (95% CI 93.3 cm to 105.2 cm) for the blood pressure factor. Lower ethnicity cut-off points were seen for females for both BMI and WC. Conclusions Substantially lower obesity cut-off points are needed in South Asians to detect an equivalent level of dysglycemia and dyslipidemia as observed in White Europeans. South Asian ethnicity could be considered as a similar level of risk as obesity (in White Europeans) for the development of type 2 diabetes. PMID:22039493

  20. Finite element analyses of tool stresses in metal cutting processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kistler, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    In this report, we analytically predict and examine stresses in tool tips used in high speed orthogonal machining operations. Specifically, one analysis was compared to an existing experimental measurement of stresses in a sapphire tool tip cutting 1020 steel at slow speeds. In addition, two analyses were done of a carbide tool tip in a machining process at higher cutting speeds, in order to compare to experimental results produced as part of this study. The metal being cut was simulated using a Sandia developed damage plasticity material model, which allowed the cutting to occur analytically without prespecifying the line of cutting/failure. The latter analyses incorporated temperature effects on the tool tip. Calculated tool forces and peak stresses matched experimental data to within 20%. Stress contours generally agreed between analysis and experiment. This work could be extended to investigate/predict failures in the tool tip, which would be of great interest to machining shops in understanding how to optimize cost/retooling time.

  1. Sample size consideration for immunoassay screening cut-point determination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianchun; Zhang, Lanju; Yang, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Past decades have seen a rapid growth of biopharmaceutical products on the market. The administration of such large molecules can generate antidrug antibodies that can induce unwanted immune reactions in the recipients. Assessment of immunogenicity is required by regulatory agencies in clinical and nonclinical development, and this demands a well-validated assay. One of the important performance characteristics during assay validation is the cut point, which serves as a threshold between positive and negative samples. To precisely determine the cut point, a sufficiently large data set is often needed. However, there is no guideline other than some rule-of-thumb recommendations for sample size requirement in immunoassays. In this article, we propose a systematic approach to sample size determination for immunoassays and provide tables that facilitate its applications by scientists.

  2. Estimating cut points: A simple method for new wearables.

    PubMed

    Hickey, A; Newham, J; Slawinska, M M; Kwasnicka, D; McDonald, S; Del Din, S; Sniehotta, F F; Davis, P A; Godfrey, A

    2016-01-01

    Wearable technology is readily available for continuous assessment due to a growing number of commercial devices with increased data capture capabilities. However, many commercial devices fail to support suitable parameters (cut points) derived from the literature to help quantify physical activity (PA) due to differences in manufacturing. A simple metric to estimate cut points for new wearables is needed to aid data analysis. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate a simple methodology to determine cut points based on ratios between sedentary behaviour (SB) and PA intensities for a new wrist worn device (PRO-Diary™) by comparing its output to a validated and well characterised 'gold standard' (ActiGraph™). Twelve participants completed a semi-structured (four-phase) treadmill protocol encompassing SB and three PA intensity levels (light, moderate, vigorous). The outputs of the devices were compared accounting for relative intensity. Count ratios (6.31, 7.68, 4.63, 3.96) were calculated to successfully determine cut-points for the new wrist worn wearable technology during SB (0-426) as well as light (427-803), moderate (804-2085) and vigorous (≥ 2086) activities, respectively. Our findings should be utilised as a primary reference for investigations seeking to use new (wrist worn) wearable technology similar to that used here (i.e., PRO-Diary™) for the purposes of quantifying SB and PA intensities. The utility of count ratios may be useful in comparing devices or SB/PA values estimated across different studies. However, a more robust examination is required for different devices, attachment locations and on larger/diverse cohorts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Selection and Implementation of a Replacement Cutting Tool Selection Application

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Gordon

    2008-10-06

    A new commercial cutting tool software package replaced an internally created legacy system. This report describes the issues that surfaced during the migration and installation of the commercial package and the solutions employed. The primary issues discussed are restructuring the data between two drastically different database schemas and the creation of individual component graphics.

  4. Enhancing efficiency and quality of statistical estimation of immunogenicity assay cut points through standardization and automation.

    PubMed

    Su, Cheng; Zhou, Lei; Hu, Zheng; Weng, Winnie; Subramani, Jayanthi; Tadkod, Vineet; Hamilton, Kortney; Bautista, Ami; Wu, Yu; Chirmule, Narendra; Zhong, Zhandong Don

    2015-10-01

    Biotherapeutics can elicit immune responses, which can alter the exposure, safety, and efficacy of the therapeutics. A well-designed and robust bioanalytical method is critical for the detection and characterization of relevant anti-drug antibody (ADA) and the success of an immunogenicity study. As a fundamental criterion in immunogenicity testing, assay cut points need to be statistically established with a risk-based approach to reduce subjectivity. This manuscript describes the development of a validated, web-based, multi-tier customized assay statistical tool (CAST) for assessing cut points of ADA assays. The tool provides an intuitive web interface that allows users to import experimental data generated from a standardized experimental design, select the assay factors, run the standardized analysis algorithms, and generate tables, figures, and listings (TFL). It allows bioanalytical scientists to perform complex statistical analysis at a click of the button to produce reliable assay parameters in support of immunogenicity studies.

  5. Diagnostics of Breakdown of Cutting Tools of Axial Cutting Head of the П110-04 Type Heading Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabaev, O. E.; Bridun, I. I.; Moroz, O. K.

    2017-06-01

    The operation of a heading machine with an out-of-work cutting tool can cause essential reduction of the machine element resource. The diagnostics of the cutting tool breakdown on the longitudinal axial cutting head in the real - time mode can be implemented on the basis of the spectral decomposition of the current of the cutting engine of the cutting unit. The ratio of the coefficients of the spectral decomposition corresponding to the cutting head rotation frequency and its threefold value can be the parameter under the diagnosis.

  6. Wear reduction in cutting tools: Tribological properties of hard coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, B.P. ); Fabiszak, E. ); Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The cutting tool industry has become the pioneer in the use of hard coatings on different types of tools. Hard coatings, which improve the performance and lifetime of cutting tools, have been used for more than 20 years. In the study reported here, performance evaluations were made of high-speed steel and carbide tool inserts that were coated with tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}), titanium nitride (TiN), and with TiN and then with WS{sub 2}; uncoated inserts were also evaluated. The aim was to determine whether the WS{sub 2} coating improved tool life and reduced cutting-force requirements. The WS{sub 2}-coated inserts demonstrated significantly lower flank wear than the uncoated inserts. Use of WS{sub 2} also reduced flank and notch wear of uncoated and TiN-coated inserts. The greatest wear reductions were observed for inserts coated with both TiN and WS{sub 2}.

  7. Robot based deposition of WC-Co HVOF coatings on HSS cutting tools as a substitution for solid cemented carbide cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Schaak, C.; Biermann, D.; Aßmuth, R.; Goeke, S.

    2017-03-01

    Cemented carbide (hard metal) cutting tools are the first choice to machine hard materials or to conduct high performance cutting processes. Main advantages of cemented carbide cutting tools are their high wear resistance (hardness) and good high temperature strength. In contrast, cemented carbide cutting tools are characterized by a low toughness and generate higher production costs, especially due to limited resources. Usually, cemented carbide cutting tools are produced by means of powder metallurgical processes. Compared to conventional manufacturing routes, these processes are more expensive and only a limited number of geometries can be realized. Furthermore, post-processing and preparing the cutting edges in order to achieve high performance tools is often required. In the present paper, an alternative method to substitute solid cemented carbide cutting tools is presented. Cutting tools made of conventional high speed steels (HSS) were coated with thick WC-Co (88/12) layers by means of thermal spraying (HVOF). The challenge is to obtain a dense, homogenous, and near-net-shape coating on the flanks and the cutting edge. For this purpose, different coating strategies were realized using an industrial robot. The coating properties were subsequently investigated. After this initial step, the surfaces of the cutting tools were ground and selected cutting edges were prepared by means of wet abrasive jet machining to achieve a smooth and round micro shape. Machining tests were conducted with these coated, ground and prepared cutting tools. The occurring wear phenomena were analyzed and compared to conventional HSS cutting tools. Overall, the results of the experiments proved that the coating withstands mechanical stresses during machining. In the conducted experiments, the coated cutting tools showed less wear than conventional HSS cutting tools. With respect to the initial wear resistance, additional benefits can be obtained by preparing the cutting edge by means

  8. Hand-grip strength cut points to screen older persons at risk for mobility limitation.

    PubMed

    Sallinen, Janne; Stenholm, Sari; Rantanen, Taina; Heliövaara, Markku; Sainio, Päivi; Koskinen, Seppo

    2010-09-01

    To determine optimal hand-grip strength cut points for likelihood of mobility limitation in older people and to study whether these cut points differ according to body mass index (BMI). Cross-sectional analysis of data. Data collected in the Finnish population-based Health 2000 Survey. One thousand eighty-four men and 1,562 women aged 55 and older with complete data on anthropometry, hand-grip strength and self-reported mobility. Mobility limitation was defined as difficulty walking 0.5 km or climbing stairs. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to estimate hand-grip strength cut points for likelihood of mobility limitation. The overall hand-grip strength cut points for likelihood of mobility limitation were 37 kg (sensitivity 62%; specificity 76%) for men and 21 kg (sensitivity 67%; specificity 73%) for women. The effect of the interaction between hand-grip strength and BMI on mobility limitation was significant in men (P=.02), but no such interaction was observed in women (P=.16). In men, the most-optimal cutoff points were 33 kg (sensitivity 73%; specificity 79%) for normal-weight men, 39 kg (sensitivity 67%; specificity 71%) for overweight men, and 40 kg (sensitivity 57%; specificity 68%) for obese men. In women, BMI-specific hand-grip strength cutoff values was not markedly more accurate than the overall cutoff value. The hand-grip strength test is a useful tool to identify persons at risk of mobility limitation. In men, hand-grip strength cut points for mobility increased with BMI, whereas in women, only one hand-grip strength threshold was identified. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.

  9. Investigating Clinically and Scientifically Useful Cut Points on the Compulsive Sexual Behavior Inventory.

    PubMed

    Miner, Michael H; Raymond, Nancy; Coleman, Eli; Swinburne Romine, Rebecca

    2017-05-01

    clinical screening tool and the other, more conservative measurement that is useful for etiologic and epidemiologic research. Miner MH, Raymond N, Coleman E, Swinburne Romine R. Investigating Clinically and Scientifically Useful Cut Points on the Compulsive Sexual Behavior Inventory. J Sex Med 2017;14:715-720. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of Fiber Orientation on Single-Point Cutting Fracture Behavior of Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy Prepreg Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yingying; An, Qinglong; Cai, Xiaojiang; Chen, Ming; Ming, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the influences of carbon fibers on the fracture mechanism of carbon fibers both in macroscopic view and microscopic view by using single-point flying cutting method. Cutting tools with three different materials were used in this research, namely, PCD (polycrystalline diamond) tool, CVD (chemical vapor deposition) diamond thin film coated carbide tool and uncoated carbide tool. The influence of fiber orientation on the cutting force and fracture topography were analyzed and conclusions were drawn that cutting forces are not affected by cutting speeds but significantly influenced by the fiber orientation. Cutting forces presented smaller values in the fiber orientation of 0/180° and 15/165° but the highest one in 30/150°. The fracture mechanism of carbon fibers was studied in different cutting conditions such as 0° orientation angle, 90° orientation angle, orientation angles along fiber direction, and orientation angles inverse to the fiber direction. In addition, a prediction model on the cutting defects of carbon fiber reinforced plastic was established based on acoustic emission (AE) signals. PMID:28793597

  11. Exact confidence interval estimation for the Youden index and its corresponding optimal cut-point.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chin-Ying; Tian, Lili; Schisterman, Enrique F

    2012-05-01

    In diagnostic studies, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and the area under the ROC curve are important tools in assessing the utility of biomarkers in discriminating between non-diseased and diseased populations. For classifying a patient into the non-diseased or diseased group, an optimal cut-point of a continuous biomarker is desirable. Youden's index (J), defined as the maximum vertical distance between the ROC curve and the diagonal line, serves as another global measure of overall diagnostic accuracy and can be used in choosing an optimal cut-point. The proposed approach is to make use of a generalized approach to estimate the confidence intervals of the Youden index and its corresponding optimal cut-point. Simulation results are provided for comparing the coverage probabilities of the confidence intervals based on the proposed method with those based on the large sample method and the parametric bootstrap method. Finally, the proposed method is illustrated via an application to a data set from a study on Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).

  12. Effect of cut-off points on performance of laser fluorescence for detecting occlusal caries.

    PubMed

    Braga, Mariana M; Mendes, Fausto M; Imparato, José Carlos P; Rodrigues, Célia R M D

    2007-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the influence of cut-off points on the performance of laser fluorescence (LF) in detecting occlusal caries in permanent and primary teeth. The use of different cut-off points influenced the performance of LF device in detection of occlusal caries in both kind of teeth, but the performance in permanent teeth suffered more influence from variation of cut-off points scales than in primary group.

  13. Sedentary Behaviour Profiling of Office Workers: A Sensitivity Analysis of Sedentary Cut-Points.

    PubMed

    Boerema, Simone T; Essink, Gerard B; Tönis, Thijs M; van Velsen, Lex; Hermens, Hermie J

    2015-12-25

    Measuring sedentary behaviour and physical activity with wearable sensors provides detailed information on activity patterns and can serve health interventions. At the basis of activity analysis stands the ability to distinguish sedentary from active time. As there is no consensus regarding the optimal cut-point for classifying sedentary behaviour, we studied the consequences of using different cut-points for this type of analysis. We conducted a battery of sitting and walking activities with 14 office workers, wearing the Promove 3D activity sensor to determine the optimal cut-point (in counts per minute (m·s(-2))) for classifying sedentary behaviour. Then, 27 office workers wore the sensor for five days. We evaluated the sensitivity of five sedentary pattern measures for various sedentary cut-points and found an optimal cut-point for sedentary behaviour of 1660 × 10(-3) m·s(-2). Total sedentary time was not sensitive to cut-point changes within ±10% of this optimal cut-point; other sedentary pattern measures were not sensitive to changes within the ±20% interval. The results from studies analyzing sedentary patterns, using different cut-points, can be compared within these boundaries. Furthermore, commercial, hip-worn activity trackers can implement feedback and interventions on sedentary behaviour patterns, using these cut-points.

  14. Mechanism study on the wear of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yunhai; Li, Jiangang

    2010-12-01

    The samples of bearing steel, alloy cold-die steel, cold-harden cast iron were continuous machined by polycrystalline cubic boron nitride(PcBN) cutting tools dry turning. After the machining, the phases of cutting tools blade-edge were analyzed by X-ray diffraction analyzer and cutting tools blade-edge microstructure were observed by scanning electronic microscope. And then, the wear mechanism of PcBN cutting tools in turing process was studied. The result showed that the oxidation wear and felt wear were main invalidation factors using PcBN cutting tools dry turning bearing steel and alloy cold-die steel samples; chemical wear and oxidation wear were main invalidation factors using PcBN cutting tools dry turning cold-harden cast iron. In turning process, the granularity of cBN, the heated-stability and chemical characteristic of felt material have key function to cutting tools wear.

  15. Effects of pretreatment on the performance of diamond-coated cemented carbide cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Qing; Wang, S. G.; Yoon, S. F.; Ahn, J.; Zhao, Biaoqin; Tang, W. Z.; Miao, J. Q.; Lu, F. X.

    2003-11-01

    We studied the cutting performance of diamond-coated cemented carbide cutting tools pretreated using acid etching, Murakami reagent etching, interlayer addition, and boronization techniques. The Rockwell indentation test indicates that the best adhesion is obtained from the diamond-coated cutting tool pretreated using boronization by forming a boronized cobalt compound layer composed of CoW2B2, CoWB, and CoB. The end-milling test shows that this sample exhibits the longest lifetime among diamond-coated cutting tools, 26-times longer than that of the uncoated cutting tool. The wearing mechanism of the cutting tools used is also discussed. During the milling period, the failure of the diamond-coated tool pretreated by boronization was dominated by how the diamond grains were gradually removed from the diamond coating by the workpiece scraps, instead of the peeling off of the diamond coating. This also reveals that the diamond coating exhibits good adhesion and cutting performance.

  16. Diamond-coated cutting tools for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. J.; Hyde, L. J.; Ahmed, W.; Sein, H.; Flaxman, R. P.

    2004-08-01

    Diamond coatings are attractive for cutting processes due to their high-hardness, low-friction coefficient; excellent wear resistance, and chemical inertness. The application of diamond coatings on cemented, tungsten carbide (WC-Co) burs has been the subject of much attention in recent years as a method to improve cutting performance and tool life. WC-Co burs containing 6% Co and 94% WC substrate, with an average grain size of 1 3 µm, were used in this study. To improve the adhesion between diamond and WC substrates, it is necessary to etch away the surface Co and prepare the surface for subsequent diamond growth. Hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD), with a modified vertical filament arrangement, has been used for the deposition of diamond films. Diamond film quality and purity has been characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The performance of diamond-coated WC-Co burs, uncoated WC-Co burs, and diamond-embedded (sintered) burs have been compared by drilling a series of holes into various materials such as human teeth, borosilicate glass, and acrylic teeth. Flank wear has been used to assess the wear rates of the burs when machining biomedical materials such as those just described.

  17. Large cutting tools in the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region, central China.

    PubMed

    Kuman, Kathleen; Li, Chaorong; Li, Hao

    2014-11-01

    Handaxe-bearing sites in China are currently known to occur in a number of alluvial basins, the best known being Dingcun, Bose and Luonan. Bose in the south and Luonan in central China on the northern margin of the Qinling Mountains are most familiar to English-speaking researchers. Here we document the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region (DRR) as another major area for large cutting tools (LCTs), located in central China on the southeastern edge of the Qinling Mountains. Large cutting tools are preserved in three terraces of the Han and Dan Rivers in Hubei and Henan Provinces, with dates from ca. 0.8 Ma (millions of years ago) (Terrace 4) to the first half of the Middle Pleistocene (Terrace 3), and possibly to the Late Pleistocene (Terrace 2). This paper reports on LCTs discovered in Terraces 3 and 2, with a majority from the older terrace (and one specimen from Terrace 4). Regional environments during the Middle Pleistocene were relatively warm, humid and stable. Despite the poor quality of raw materials (predominantly quartz phyllite and trachyte for the LCTs), good examples of both handaxes and cleavers are present, plus two types of picks. The LCT technology is compared and contrasted with other Asian industries and with the Acheulean. Overall the DRR LCTs show both technological and morphological similarities with Acheulean LCTs, with some differences that are mainly attributed to raw material properties, subsistence ecology, and 'cultural drift.' The DRR LCTs expand the range of morphological variability of the East Asian material and highlight the need for greater reliance on technological analysis and raw material evaluation for best comparison of Chinese assemblages with the Acheulean tradition.

  18. Determining BMI cut points based on excess percent body fat in US children and adolescents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Current cut points for overweight were derived statistically from BMI distribution. The study aimed at determining age-, gender-, and ethnic-specific BMI cut points based on excess body fat in US children and adolescents aged 8-17 years, who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examinat...

  19. TSH cut off point based on depression in hypothyroid patients.

    PubMed

    Talaei, A; Rafee, N; Rafei, F; Chehrei, A

    2017-09-07

    The prevalence of depressive symptoms in hypothyroidism is high. Considering that hypothyroidism and depression share some clinical features, some researchers use the "brain hypothyroidism" hypothesis to explain the pathogenesis of depression. We aimed to detect a new TSH cut-off value in hypothyroidism based on depression symptoms. A cross-sectional study was conducted on hypothyroid patients referred to endocrine clinics. Individuals who had developed euthyroid state under treatment with levothyroxine with TSH levels of 0.5-5 MIU/L with no need for dosage change were included in the study. After comprehensive history taking, laboratory tests including TSH, T4 and T3 were performed. Beck depression questionnaire was completed for all patients by trained interviewers. TSH cut-off values based on depression was determined by Roc Curve analysis. The participants were 174 hypothyroid patients (Female; 116: 66.7%, Male; 58: 33.3%) with mean age 45.5 ± 11.7 (19-68) years old. Based on Beck depression test, scores less than 10 was considered healthy and more than 10 were considered depressed. According to Roc curve analysis, the optimal cut- off value of TSH was 2.5 MIU/L with 89.66% sensitivity. The optimal TSH cut- off based on severe depression was 4 MIU/L. The present study suggests that a clinically helpful TSH cut-off value for hypothyroidism should be based on associated symptoms, not just in population studies. Based on the assessment of depression, our study concludes that a TSH cutofff value of 2.5 MIU/L is optimal.

  20. Effect of tool geometry and cutting parameters on delamination and thrust forces in drilling CFRP/Al-Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bouami, Souhail; Habak, Malek; Franz, Gérald; Velasco, Raphaël; Vantomme, Pascal

    2016-10-01

    Composite materials are increasingly used for structural parts in the aeronautic industries. Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) are often used in combination with metallic materials, mostly aluminium alloys. This raises new problems in aircraft assembly. Delamination is one of these problems. In this study, CFRP/Al-Li stacks is used as experimental material for investigation effect of interaction of cutting parameters (cutting speed and feed rate) and tool geometry on delamination and thrust forces in drilling operation. A plan of experiments, based on Taguchi design method, was employed to investigate the influence of tool geometry and in particular the point angle and cutting parameters on delamination and axial effort. The experimental results demonstrate that the feed rate is the major parameter and the importance of tool point angle in delamination and thrust forces in the stacks were shown.

  1. Monitoring cutting tool operation and condition with a magnetoelastic rate of change of torque sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Garshelis, Ivan J.; Kari, Ryan J.; Tollens, Stijn P. L.; Cuseo, James M.

    2008-04-01

    Application of a magnetoelastic rate of change of torque sensor to monitor the condition of milling cutters and operating parameters is described. Cutting tools naturally degrade with use by wear, chipping, or fracture, and the efficiency and quality of the product are highly dependent on the tool condition. The theoretical analysis is compared to experimental data in detecting changes in torque during each cutting event, and the rate of change of torque signal is investigated for a variety of cutting tool conditions.

  2. Comparison of Mechanical Properties and Calculation of Cutting Force Between Uncoated Tungsten Carbide & ti Coated Tip Tungsten Carbide with the Help of Lathe Tool Dynamometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehra, Deepak; Rakhecha, Khushwant

    The keyword for manufacturers of cutting tools and coatings for cutting tools is productivity: a 30%; reduction of tool costs, or a 50%; increase in tool lifetime results only in a 1%; reduction of manufacturing costs. But an increase in cutting data by 20%; reduces manufacturing costs by 15%;. In order to achieve higher productivity different approaches - High Performance Cutting (HPC) and High Speed Cutting (HSC) can be chosen. The performance of Carbide tools was studied to investigate the tool life and wear behavior at various machining parameters. This study presents tool wear characterization of carbide cutting tool inserts coated with titanium nitride (TiN) on a single point turning operation on copper, aluminum. A set of experiments with conditions of cutting speed, depth of cut and feed rate were performed on a lathe machine. Force analysis is done on Lathe Tool Dynamometer. From the result, cutting speed was found to be the main factor to have significant effect on surface roughness. At the end of this study, optimization was made by suggesting the most suitable sets of parameter settings to produce minimum surface roughness. Suggestion on parameter settings to obtain minimum surface roughness made.

  3. Tool holder for preparation and inspection of a radiused edge cutting tool

    DOEpatents

    Asmanes, Charles

    1979-01-01

    A tool holding fixture is provided for removably holding a radiused edge cutting tool in a tool edge lapping apparatus. The fixture allows the operator to preset the lapping radius and angle before the tool holder is placed in the fixture and the holder may be removed from the lapping apparatus to inspect the tool and simply replaced in the fixture to continue lapping in accordance with a precise alignment without realignment of the tool relative to the lap. The tool holder includes a pair of self aligning bearings in the form of precision formed steel balls connected together by a rigid shaft. The tool is held by an arm extending from the shaft and the balls set in fixed position bearing cups and the holder is oscillated back and forth about a fixed axis of rotation to lap the tool radius by means of a reversibly driven belt-pulley arrangement coupled to the shaft between the bearings. To temporarily remove the holder, the drive belt is slipped over the rearward end of the holder and the holder is lifted out of the bearing cups.

  4. Cutting performance of alumina-based ceramic tools when machining high tensile steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.S.; Low, I.M.; O`Conner, B.H.; Wager, J.G.; Perera, D.S.

    1993-12-31

    Three types of alumina-based ceramic tools SN60, AZ5000 (zirconia toughened), A65, HC2 (titanium carbide reinforced) and CC670 (silicon carbide whisker reinforced) were used for the evaluation of cutting performance when machining a high tensile steel (AISI 4340). Experimental studies were carried out at various cutting speeds (200--600 m/min), feeds (0.1--0.4 mm/rev) and depths of cut (0.5--2.0 mm), in dry conditions. The cutting performance of alumina-based ceramic tools was judged according to the cutting force produced during the process of machining, surface roughness of the workpiece and wear rate of the cutting inserts. A piezoelectric dynamometer was employed to measure the cutting forces. The flank wear was used to determine the tool-life of these inserts. The cutting performance of these alumina-based ceramic tools was analyzed and compared. The influence of cutting parameters (i. e. cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut) on cutting performance is discussed.

  5. High power laser downhole cutting tools and systems

    DOEpatents

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2015-01-20

    Downhole cutting systems, devices and methods for utilizing 10 kW or more laser energy transmitted deep into the earth with the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems and devices for the laser cutting operations within a borehole in the earth. These systems and devices can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perform cutting operations in such boreholes deep within the earth.

  6. Effects of Different Cutting Patterns and Experimental Conditions on the Performance of a Conical Drag Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copur, Hanifi; Bilgin, Nuh; Balci, Cemal; Tumac, Deniz; Avunduk, Emre

    2017-06-01

    This study aims at determining the effects of single-, double-, and triple-spiral cutting patterns; the effects of tool cutting speeds on the experimental scale; and the effects of the method of yield estimation on cutting performance by performing a set of full-scale linear cutting tests with a conical cutting tool. The average and maximum normal, cutting and side forces; specific energy; yield; and coarseness index are measured and compared in each cutting pattern at a 25-mm line spacing, at varying depths of cut per revolution, and using two cutting speeds on five different rock samples. The results indicate that the optimum specific energy decreases by approximately 25% with an increasing number of spirals from the single- to the double-spiral cutting pattern for the hard rocks, whereas generally little effect was observed for the soft- and medium-strength rocks. The double-spiral cutting pattern appeared to be more effective than the single- or triple-spiral cutting pattern and had an advantage of lower side forces. The tool cutting speed had no apparent effect on the cutting performance. The estimation of the specific energy by the yield based on the theoretical swept area was not significantly different from that estimated by the yield based on the muck weighing, especially for the double- and triple-spiral cutting patterns and with the optimum ratio of line spacing to depth of cut per revolution. This study also demonstrated that the cutterhead and mechanical miner designs, semi-theoretical deterministic computer simulations and empirical performance predictions and optimization models should be based on realistic experimental simulations. Studies should be continued to obtain more reliable results by creating a larger database of laboratory tests and field performance records for mechanical miners using drag tools.

  7. Prevalence of energy intake misreporting in Malay children varies based on application of different cut points.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wai Yew; Burrows, Tracy; Collins, Clare E; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley; Williams, Lauren T; Chee, Winnie Siew Swee

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to identify the prevalence of energy misreporting amongst a sample of Malay children aged 9-11 years (n = 14) using a range of commonly used cut points. Participants were interviewed using repeated 24 h dietary recalls over three occasions. The Goldberg equations (1991 and 2000), Torun cut points and the Black and Cole method were applied to the data. Up to 11 of 14 children were classified as misreporters, with more under-reporters (between seven and eight children) than over-reporters (four or less children). There were significant differences in the proportion of children classified as energy misreporters when applying basal metabolic rate calculated using FAO/UNU/WHO (1985) and Malaysian-specific equations (p < 0.05). The results show that energy misreporting is common amongst Malay children, varying according to cut point chosen. Objective evaluation of total energy expenditure would help identify which cut point is appropriate for use in Malay paediatric populations.

  8. Evaluation of the tool life and fracture toughness of cutting tools boronized by the paste boriding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, I.; Farah, M.; López, N.; Bermúdez, G.; Rodríguez, G.; VillaVelázquez, C.

    2008-03-01

    The present study evaluates the tool life and the fracture toughness of AISI M2 steel cutting tools boronized by the paste boriding process. The treatment was done in selective form on the tool tips of the steels. The temperatures were set at 1173 and 1273 K with 4 h of exposure time and modifying the boron carbide paste thicknesses in 3 and 4 mm. Microindentation fracture toughness method was used on the borided tool at the temperature of 1273 K and a 4 mm paste thickness, with a 100 g load at different distances from the surface. Also, the borided cutting tools were worn by the turning process that implied the machining of AISI 1018 steel increasing the nominal cutting speed, of 55 m/min, in 10 and 25% and maintaining the feed and the depth cut constants. The tool life was evaluated by the Taylor's equation that shows the dependence of the experimental parameters of the boriding process.

  9. A short cut diagnostic tool in cystinosis: Bone marrow aspiration.

    PubMed

    Sürmeli Döven, Serra; Delibaş, Ali; Karacan, Uğur Raşit; Ünal, Selma

    2017-09-04

    Cystinosis is a rare metabolic genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the cystinosin lysosomal cystine transporter (CTNS) gene. The diagnosis of nephropathic cystinosis (NC) is made by observing corneal cystine crystals and/or measuring the cystine content of leukocytes. Analysis by the CTNS gene mutation confirms the diagnosis of cystinosis. But leukocyte cystine level measurement and CTNS gene analysis haven't been widely available and cystine crystals in the cornea may not be apparent in the first months of life. Cystine crystal deposition can be seen in bone marrow of patients with NC earlier than corneal deposition. Ten patients of whom cystinosis diagnosis was made were included in the study. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively to collect the demographic and clinical data of the patients such as age of diagnosis, disease presentation, parental consanguinity, family history, corneal cystine deposition, leucocyte cystine level, bone marrow cystine deposition, presence of renal failure, follow-up time and prognosis. Cystine crystals were seen in all of the patients's fresh bone marrow aspiration samples. Eight patients had corneal cystine deposition. Leucocyte cystine measurement could have been performed in four patients. Complications such as pulmonary hypertension and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) were observed in two patients. Bone marrow aspiration might be an easy and short cut diagnostic tool for NC especially when it is not possible to measure fibroblast cystine content. Additionally some rare complications such as pulmonary hypertension and IIH can be encountered during the course of NC. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Body mass index and mortality in asian populations: implications for obesity cut-points.

    PubMed

    Stevens, June; Nowicki, Eric M

    2003-03-01

    Investigators have questioned whether body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) cut-points for obesity used in the United States and Europe are appropriate for Asian countries. A recent study examined the association between BMI and mortality in a population-based cohort of Japanese men and women. These and other results did not indicate a need for lower cut-points in Asians.

  11. Novel tool wear monitoring method in milling difficult-to-machine materials using cutting chip formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P. P.; Guo, Y.; Wang, B.

    2017-05-01

    The main problems in milling difficult-to-machine materials are the high cutting temperature and rapid tool wear. However it is impossible to investigate tool wear in machining. Tool wear and cutting chip formation are two of the most important representations for machining efficiency and quality. The purpose of this paper is to develop the model of tool wear with cutting chip formation (width of chip and radian of chip) on difficult-to-machine materials. Thereby tool wear is monitored by cutting chip formation. A milling experiment on the machining centre with three sets cutting parameters was performed to obtain chip formation and tool wear. The experimental results show that tool wear increases gradually along with cutting process. In contrast, width of chip and radian of chip decrease. The model is developed by fitting the experimental data and formula transformations. The most of monitored errors of tool wear by the chip formation are less than 10%. The smallest error is 0.2%. Overall errors by the radian of chip are less than the ones by the width of chip. It is new way to monitor and detect tool wear by cutting chip formation in milling difficult-to-machine materials.

  12. Producing Fe-W-Co-Cr-C Alloy Cutting Tool Material Through Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta Banik, Bibhas; Dutta, Debasish; Ray, Siddhartha

    2016-06-01

    High speed steel tools can withstand high impact forces as they are tough in nature. But they cannot retain their hardness at elevated temperature i.e. their hot hardness is low. Therefore permissible cutting speed is low and tools wear out easily. Use of lubricants is essential for HSS cutting tools. On the other hand cemented carbide tools can withstand greater compressive force, but due to lower toughness the tool can break easily. Moreover the cost of the tool is comparatively high. To achieve a better machining economy, Fe-W-Co-Cr-C alloys are being used nowadays. Their toughness is as good as HSS tools and hardness is very near to carbide tools. Even, at moderate cutting speeds they can be safely used in old machines having vibration. Moreover it is much cheaper than carbide tools. This paper highlights the Manufacturing Technology of the alloy and studies the comparative tribological properties of the alloy and tungsten mono carbide.

  13. Producing Fe-W-Co-Cr-C Alloy Cutting Tool Material Through Powder Metallurgy Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta Banik, Bibhas; Dutta, Debasish; Ray, Siddhartha

    2017-04-01

    High speed steel tools can withstand high impact forces as they are tough in nature. But they cannot retain their hardness at elevated temperature i.e. their hot hardness is low. Therefore permissible cutting speed is low and tools wear out easily. Use of lubricants is essential for HSS cutting tools. On the other hand cemented carbide tools can withstand greater compressive force, but due to lower toughness the tool can break easily. Moreover the cost of the tool is comparatively high. To achieve a better machining economy, Fe-W-Co-Cr-C alloys are being used nowadays. Their toughness is as good as HSS tools and hardness is very near to carbide tools. Even, at moderate cutting speeds they can be safely used in old machines having vibration. Moreover it is much cheaper than carbide tools. This paper highlights the Manufacturing Technology of the alloy and studies the comparative tribological properties of the alloy and tungsten mono carbide.

  14. A Distance-Weighted Graph-Cut Method for the Segmentation of Laser Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, A.; Engels, J.; Hahn, M.

    2014-08-01

    Normalized Cut according to (Shi and Malik 2000) is a well-established divisive image segmentation method. Here we use Normalized Cut for the segmentation of laser point clouds in urban areas. In particular we propose an edge weight measure which takes local plane parameters, RGB values and eigenvalues of the covariance matrices of the local point distribution into account. Due to its target function, Normalized Cut favours cuts with "small cut lines/surfaces", which appears to be a drawback for our application. We therefore modify the target function, weighting the similarity measures with distant-depending weights. We call the induced minimization problem "Distance-weighted Cut" (DWCut). The new target function leads to a slightly more complicated generalized eigenvalue problem than in case of the Normalized Cut; on the other hand, the new target function is easier to interpret and avoids the just-mentioned drawback. DWCut can be beneficially combined with an aggregation in order to reduce the computational effort and to avoid shortcomings due to insufficient plane parameters. Finally we present examples for the successful application of the Distance-weighted Cut principle. The method was implemented as a plugin into the free and open source geographic information system SAGA; for preprocessing steps the proprietary SAGA-based LiDAR software LIS was applied.

  15. Validation of the PDPAR as an adolescent diary: effect of accelerometer cut points.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Cheryl B; Hagströmer, Maria; Yngve, Agneta

    2005-07-01

    To evaluate the validity of the Previous Day Physical Activity Recall (PDPAR) as a physical activity diary in adolescents using two accelerometer intensity classifications. One hundred eighth graders (47 boys, 53 girls) used the PDPAR as a daily diary and wore MTI accelerometers for four consecutive days. Measured time spent in moderate (> or = 3 METs) and vigorous (> or = 6 METs) activity was based on two published MTI cut-point limits (that of Freedson et al./Trost et al. and that of Puyau et al.). Spearman rank order correlations and Bland-Altman plots were used to examine agreement between MTI and PDPAR diary estimates of activity. MTI estimates of mean minutes per day of total moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were 65.2 (+/-43.2) using the Freedson et al./Trost et al. cutoffs and 17.5 (+/-18.5) using those of Puyau et al., while students self-reported 105.1 (+/-80.1) min.d(-1). Significant relationships were observed between the diary and MTI for total MVPA using either the Freedson et al./Trost et al. (r = 0.42) or Puyau et al. (r = 0.41) cutoff as well as raw counts (r = 0.44). Plots showed reasonable agreement between the diary and Freedson et al./Trost et al. MTI estimates of MVPA for daily totals of < or = 60 min, but the Puyau et al. estimates were consistently lower. Diaries overestimated activity as time increased when compared to either MTI cut point, especially on vigorous activity. Time estimates of MVPA differed by assessment tool, but diary estimates showed adequate association with the MTI. Diaries reflected intensity-specific activity, corresponding most closely with the Freedson et al./Trost et al. classification of moderate, but substantially overestimated vigorous activity regardless of cut-point method. This is likely due to the measurement characteristics of the PDPAR, which classifies activities in 30-min blocks, as well as the nature of common activities in which high levels of intensity are not sustained.

  16. Development of Cutting Tool Through Superplastic Boronizing of Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauhari, Iswadi; Harun, Sunita; Jamlus, Siti Aida; Sabri, Mohd Faizul Mohd

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a cutting tool is developed from duplex stainless steel (DSS) using the superplastic boronizing technique. The feasibility of the development process is studied, and the cutting performances of the cutting tool are evaluated and compared with commercially available carbide and high-speed steel (HSS) tools. The superplastically boronized (SPB) cutting tool yielded a dense boronized layer of 50.5 µm with a surface hardness of 3956 HV. A coefficient of friction value of 0.62 is obtained, which is lower than 1.02 and 0.8 of the carbide and HSS tools. When tested on an aluminum 6061 surface under dry condition, the SPB cutting tool is also able to produce turning finishing below 0.4 µm, beyond the travel distance of 3000 m, which is comparable to the carbide tool, but produces much better results than HSS tool. Through superplastic boronizing of DSS, it is possible to produce a high-quality metal-based cutting tool that is comparable to the conventional carbide tool.

  17. Development of Cutting Tool Through Superplastic Boronizing of Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauhari, Iswadi; Harun, Sunita; Jamlus, Siti Aida; Sabri, Mohd Faizul Mohd

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a cutting tool is developed from duplex stainless steel (DSS) using the superplastic boronizing technique. The feasibility of the development process is studied, and the cutting performances of the cutting tool are evaluated and compared with commercially available carbide and high-speed steel (HSS) tools. The superplastically boronized (SPB) cutting tool yielded a dense boronized layer of 50.5 µm with a surface hardness of 3956 HV. A coefficient of friction value of 0.62 is obtained, which is lower than 1.02 and 0.8 of the carbide and HSS tools. When tested on an aluminum 6061 surface under dry condition, the SPB cutting tool is also able to produce turning finishing below 0.4 µm, beyond the travel distance of 3000 m, which is comparable to the carbide tool, but produces much better results than HSS tool. Through superplastic boronizing of DSS, it is possible to produce a high-quality metal-based cutting tool that is comparable to the conventional carbide tool.

  18. Effect of Flexural Rigidity of Tool on Machining Accuracy during Microgrooving by Ultrasonic Vibration Cutting Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Toshiaki

    2010-12-01

    It is necessary to form fine holes and grooves by machining in the manufacture of equipment in the medical or information field and the establishment of such a machining technology is required. In micromachining, the use of the ultrasonic vibration cutting method is expected and examined. In this study, I experimentally form microgrooves in stainless steel SUS304 by the ultrasonic vibration cutting method and examine the effects of the shape and material of the tool on the machining accuracy. As a result, the following are clarified. The evaluation of the machining accuracy of the straightness of the finished surface revealed that there is an optimal rake angle of the tools related to the increase in cutting resistance as a result of increases in work hardening and the cutting area. The straightness is improved by using a tool with low flexural rigidity. In particular, Young's modulus more significantly affects the cutting accuracy than the shape of the tool.

  19. Influence of Cooling Lubricants on the Surface Roughness and Energy Efficiency of the Cutting Machine Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jersák, J.; Simon, S.

    2017-08-01

    The Technical University of Liberec and Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg investigated the influence of cooling lubricants on the surface roughness and energy efficiency of cutting machine tools. After summarizing the achieved experimental results, the authors conclude that cooling lubricants extensively influence the cutting temperature, cutting forces and energy consumption. Also, it is recognizable that cooling lubricants affect the cutting tools lifetime and the workpiece surface quality as well. Furthermore, costs of these cooling lubricants and the related environmental burden need to be considered. A current trend is to reduce the amount of lubricants that are used, e.g., when the Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) technique is applied. The lubricant or process liquid is thereby transported by the compressed air in the form of an aerosol to the contact area between the tool and workpiece. The cutting process was monitored during testing by the three following techniques: lubricant-free cutting, cutting with the use of a lubricant with the MQL technique, and only utilizing finish-turning and finish-face milling. The research allowed the authors to monitor the cutting power and mark the achieved surface quality in relation to the electrical power consumption of the cutting machine. In conclusions, the coherence between energy efficiency of the cutting machine and the workpiece surface quality regarding the used cooling lubricant is described.

  20. Smart Cutting Tools and Smart Machining: Development Approaches, and Their Implementation and Application Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kai; Niu, Zhi-Chao; Wang, Robin C.; Rakowski, Richard; Bateman, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Smart machining has tremendous potential and is becoming one of new generation high value precision manufacturing technologies in line with the advance of Industry 4.0 concepts. This paper presents some innovative design concepts and, in particular, the development of four types of smart cutting tools, including a force-based smart cutting tool, a temperature-based internally-cooled cutting tool, a fast tool servo (FTS) and smart collets for ultraprecision and micro manufacturing purposes. Implementation and application perspectives of these smart cutting tools are explored and discussed particularly for smart machining against a number of industrial application requirements. They are contamination-free machining, machining of tool-wear-prone Si-based infra-red devices and medical applications, high speed micro milling and micro drilling, etc. Furthermore, implementation techniques are presented focusing on: (a) plug-and-produce design principle and the associated smart control algorithms, (b) piezoelectric film and surface acoustic wave transducers to measure cutting forces in process, (c) critical cutting temperature control in real-time machining, (d) in-process calibration through machining trials, (e) FE-based design and analysis of smart cutting tools, and (f) application exemplars on adaptive smart machining.

  1. PCD-tipped cutting tool systems for best-in-class manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Erdel, B.P.

    1995-12-31

    To meet the stringent demands on today`s manufacturing, cutting tool systems had to be developed with innovative design features built-in. In nearly all applications involving non-ferrous metals, these cutting tools are diamond tipped. They dramatically outperform any other {open_quotes}conventional{close_quotes} or substitute cutting material. They can be run up to 50% faster than carbide grades and simultaneously even extend tool life up to 10-fold while improved workpiece quality, increased productivity and reduced production costs are just a bonus.

  2. The generalized mathematical model of the failure of the cutting tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasko, N. I.; Antsev, A. V.; Antseva, N. V.; Fyodorov, V. P.

    2017-02-01

    We offer a mathematical model which takes into account the following factors: the spread of the cutting properties of the tool, parameters spread of gear blanks and consideration of the factor of a possible fracture of the cutting wedge tool. The reliability function, taking into account the above-mentioned factors, has five parameters for which assessment we propose a method according to our experience. A numerical illustration of the method is shown in the article. We suggest using the model in the optimization mode of the cutting tool preventive measures.

  3. Cross-validation of Waist-Worn GENEA Accelerometer Cut-Points

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Whitney A.; Bassett, David R.; Freedson, Patty S.; John, Dinesh; Steeves, Jeremy A.; Conger, Scott A.; Ceaser, Tyrone G.; Howe, Cheryl A.; Sasaki, Jeffer E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the classification accuracy of the waist GENEA cut-points developed by Esliger et al. for predicting intensity categories across a range of lifestyle activities. Methods Each participant performed one of two routines, consisting of seven lifestyle activities (home/office, ambulatory, and sport). The GENEA was worn on the right waist and oxygen uptake was continuously measured using the Oxycon mobile. A one-way chi-square was used to determine the classification accuracy of the GENEA cut-points. Cross tabulation tables provided information on under- and over-estimations, and sensitivity and specificity analyses of the waist cut-points were also performed. Results Spearman’s rank order correlation for the GENEA SVMgs and Oxycon mobile MET values was 0.73. For all activities combined, the GENEA accurately predicted intensity classification 55.3% of the time, and increased to 58.3% when stationary cycling was removed from the analysis. The sensitivity of the cut-points for the four intensity categories ranged from 0.244 to 0.958 and the specificity ranged from 0.576 to 0.943. Conclusion In this cross-validation study, the proposed GENEA cut-points had a low overall accuracy rate for classifying intensity (55.3%) when engaging in 14 different lifestyle activities. PMID:24496118

  4. Detection of fallen trees in ALS point clouds by learning the Normalized Cut similarity function from simulated samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polewski, P.; Yao, W.; Heurich, M.; Krzystek, P.; Stilla, U.

    2014-08-01

    Fallen trees participate in several important forest processes, which motivates the need for information about their spatial distribution in forest ecosystems. Several studies have shown that airborne LiDAR is a valuable tool for obtaining such information. In this paper, we propose an integrated method of detecting fallen trees from ALS point clouds based on merging small segments into entire fallen stems via the Normalized Cut algorithm. A new approach to specifying the segment similarity function for the clustering algorithm is introduced, where the attribute weights are learned from labeled data instead of being determined manually. We notice the relationship between Normalized Cut's similarity function and a class of regression models, which leads us to the idea of approximating the task of learning the similarity function with the simpler task of learning a classifier. Moreover, we set up a virtual fallen tree generation scheme to simulate complex forest scenarios with multiple overlapping fallen stems. The classifier trained on this simulated data yields a similarity function for Normalized Cut. Tests on two sample plots from the Bavarian Forest National Park with manually labeled reference data show that the trained function leads to high-quality segmentations. Our results indicate that the proposed data-driven approach can be a successful alternative to time consuming trial-and-error or grid search methods of finding good feature weights for graph cut algorithms. Also, the methodology can be generalized to other applications of graph cut clustering in remote sensing.

  5. Influence of machining parameters on cutting tool life while machining aluminum alloy fly ash composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, C. R. Prakash; chandra, Poorna; Kiran, R.; Asha, P. B.

    2016-09-01

    Metal matrix composites containing fly ash as reinforcement are primarily preferred because these materials possess lower density and higher strength to weight ratio. The metal matrix composites possess hetrogeneous microstructure which is due to the presence of hard ceramic particles. While turning composites, the catastrophic failure of cutting tools is attributed to the presence of hard particles. Selection of optimal cutting conditions for a given machining process and grade of cutting tools are of utmost importance to enhance the tool life during turning operation. Thus the research work was aimed at the experimental investigation of the cutting tool life while machining aluminum alloy composite containing 0-15% fly-ash. The experiments carried out following ISO3685 standards. The carbide inserts of grade K10 and style CGGN120304 were the turning tools. The cutting speed selected was between 200m/min to 500m/min in step of 100m/min, feed of 0.08 & 0.16 mm/revolution and constant depth of cut of 1.0 mm. The experimental results revealed that the performance of K10 grade carbide insert found better while machining composite containing 5% filler, at all cutting speeds and 0.08mm/revolution feed. The failures of carbide tools are mainly due to notch wear followed by built up edge and edge chipping.

  6. Effects of machining parameters on tool life and its optimization in turning mild steel with brazed carbide cutting tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, S.; Mukherjee, S.

    2016-09-01

    One of the most significant factors in metal cutting is tool life. In this research work, the effects of machining parameters on tool under wet machining environment were studied. Tool life characteristics of brazed carbide cutting tool machined against mild steel and optimization of machining parameters based on Taguchi design of experiments were examined. The experiments were conducted using three factors, spindle speed, feed rate and depth of cut each having three levels. Nine experiments were performed on a high speed semi-automatic precision central lathe. ANOVA was used to determine the level of importance of the machining parameters on tool life. The optimum machining parameter combination was obtained by the analysis of S/N ratio. A mathematical model based on multiple regression analysis was developed to predict the tool life. Taguchi's orthogonal array analysis revealed the optimal combination of parameters at lower levels of spindle speed, feed rate and depth of cut which are 550 rpm, 0.2 mm/rev and 0.5mm respectively. The Main Effects plot reiterated the same. The variation of tool life with different process parameters has been plotted. Feed rate has the most significant effect on tool life followed by spindle speed and depth of cut.

  7. The Potential of Established Fitness Cut-off Points for Monitoring Women with Fibromyalgia: The al-Ándalus Project.

    PubMed

    Castro-Piñero, José; Aparicio, Virginia A; Estévez-López, Fernando; Álvarez-Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Borges-Cosic, Milkana; Soriano-Maldonado, Alberto; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel; Segura-Jiménez, Víctor

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to determinate whether fitness cut-off points discriminate the severity of major fibromyalgia symptoms and health-related quality of life. Additionally, we investigated which American Colleague of Rheumatology (ACR) fibromyalgia criteria (1990 vs. modified 2010) better discriminate fibromyalgia symptomatology. A total of 488 women with fibromyalgia and 200 non-fibromyalgia (control) women participated. All participants underwent both the 1990 and the modified 2010 ACR preliminary criteria (hereinafter 1990c and m-2010c, respectively). We used fitness cut-off points (Senior Fitness Tests Battery plus handgrip strength test) to discriminate between presence and absence of fibromyalgia. Additionally, we employed several instruments to assess fibromyalgia symptoms. Fitness cut-off points discriminated between high and low levels of the main symptoms the disease in all age groups (P from <0.001 to 0.01). Overall, the arm-curl and the 30-s chair stand tests presented the highest effect sizes in all symptoms, reinforcing the inclusion of fitness testing as a complementary tool for fibromyalgia diagnosis and monitoring. Moreover, the effect size of the differences in symptoms between women with fibromyalgia and controls were overall larger using the m-2010c compared with the 1990c, except for the tender points count, reflecting better the polysymptomatic distress condition of fibromyalgia. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. View of a stone age adze cutting tool floating freely in the flight deck.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    View of a stone age adze cutting tool floating freely in the forward flight deck and framed by the forward and side windows. On the Earth below, the big island of Hawaii can be seen through the window.

  9. Is the hymen a suitable cut-off point for clinically relevant pelvic organ prolapse?

    PubMed

    Wiegersma, Marian; Panman, Chantal M C R; Kollen, Boudewijn J; Berger, Marjolein Y; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Dekker, Janny H

    2017-05-01

    The primary objective was to evaluate the ability of different anatomic cut-off points, as established in specialist urogynecology populations, to identify clinically relevant prolapse in a population of postmenopausal women with pelvic floor symptoms recruited from primary care. Cross-sectional study among 890 women (≥55 years) screened for pelvic floor symptoms. The Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory 20 was used to measure symptoms, and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) system was used to assess prolapse. Areas under the curves, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated for the hymen as a cut-off point for symptomatic prolapse of the anterior and posterior vaginal wall. For the apical compartment, a cut-off point of -5cm relative to the hymen was used. Vaginal bulging was the only symptom reported more often with increasing POP-Q stages. Areas under the curves (95% confidence intervals) to discriminate between women with and without vaginal bulging symptoms were 0.66 (0.61-0.72), 0.56 (0.50-0.63), and 0.61 (0.55-0.66) for the anterior (Ba), posterior (Bp) and apical (C) compartment, respectively. When the hymen was used as the cut-off point, Ba had a sensitivity of 38.1% and a specificity of 82.4%, and Bp had a sensitivity of 13.3% and a specificity of 96.5%. For C, the cut-off point of -5cm relative to the hymen had a sensitivity of 37.9% and a specificity of 73.1%. The anatomic cut-off points for clinically relevant prolapse established in the specialist urogynecology population cannot adequately identify symptomatic prolapse in a population of postmenopausal women with pelvic floor symptoms recruited from primary care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Using appropriate body mass index cut points for overweight and obesity among Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Jih, Jane; Mukherjea, Arnab; Vittinghoff, Eric; Nguyen, Tung T; Tsoh, Janice Y; Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Bender, Melinda S; Tseng, Winston; Kanaya, Alka M

    2014-08-01

    Asian Americans have low prevalence of overweight/obesity based on standard BMI cut points yet have higher rates of diabetes. We examined the prevalence of overweight/obesity, using lower BMI cut points recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for Asians, and diabetes in Asian American subgroups in California. Secondary analysis of the 2009 adult California Health Interview Survey (n=45,946) of non-Hispanic Whites (NHW), African Americans, Hispanics and Asians (Vietnamese, Chinese, Korean, Filipino, South Asian and Japanese). WHO Asian BMI cut points (overweight=23-27.5kg/m(2); obese≥27.5kg/m(2)) were used for Asian subgroups. Standard BMI cut points (overweight=25-29.9kg/m(2); obese≥30kg/m(2)) were applied for other groups. Among Asian subgroups, overweight/obesity was highest among Filipinos (78.6%), which was higher than NHWs (p<0.001) but similar to African Americans and Hispanics. Compared to NHW, diabetes prevalence was higher for Vietnamese, Koreans, Filipinos and South Asians with BMI=23-24.9kg/m(2) and Koreans, Filipinos and Japanese with BMI=27.5-29.9kg/m(2), the ranges WHO recommends as overweight or obese for Asians but not for other groups. Filipinos should be a priority population for overweight/obesity screening. Filipinos, Vietnamese, Korean, South Asians and Japanese have higher diabetes prevalence at lower BMI cut points. WHO Asian BMI cut points may have clinical utility to identify at-risk Asian Americans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Body mass index cut-points to identify cardiometabolic risk in black South Africans.

    PubMed

    Kruger, H Salome; Schutte, Aletta E; Walsh, Corinna M; Kruger, Annamarie; Rennie, Kirsten L

    2017-02-01

    To determine optimal body mass index (BMI) cut-points for the identification of cardiometabolic risk in black South African adults. We performed a cross-sectional study of a weighted sample of healthy black South Africans aged 25-65 years (721 men, 1386 women) from the North West and Free State Provinces. Demographic, lifestyle and anthropometric measures were taken, and blood pressure, fasting serum triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and blood glucose were measured. We defined elevated cardiometabolic risk as having three or more risk factors according to international metabolic syndrome criteria. Receiver operating characteristic curves were applied to identify an optimal BMI cut-point for men and women. BMI had good diagnostic performance to identify clustering of three or more risk factors, as well as individual risk factors: low HDL-cholesterol, elevated fasting glucose and triglycerides, with areas under the curve >.6, but not for high blood pressure. Optimal BMI cut-points averaged 22 kg/m(2) for men and 28 kg/m(2) for women, respectively, with better sensitivity in men (44.0-71.9 %), and in women (60.6-69.8 %), compared to a BMI of 30 kg/m(2) (17-19.1, 53-61.4 %, respectively). Men and women with a BMI >22 and >28 kg/m(2), respectively, had significantly increased probability of elevated cardiometabolic risk after adjustment for age, alcohol use and smoking. In black South African men, a BMI cut-point of 22 kg/m(2) identifies those at cardiometabolic risk, whereas a BMI of 30 kg/m(2) underestimates risk. In women, a cut-point of 28 kg/m(2), approaching the WHO obesity cut-point, identifies those at risk.

  12. Using appropriate body mass index cut points for overweight and obesity among Asian Americans

    PubMed Central

    Jih, Jane; Mukherjea, Arnab; Vittinghoff, Eric; Nguyen, Tung T.; Tsoh, Janice Y.; Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Bender, Melinda S.; Tseng, Winston; Kanaya, Alka M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Asian Americans have low prevalence of overweight/obesity based on standard BMI cut points yet have higher rates of diabetes. We examined the prevalence of overweight/obesity, using lower BMI cut points recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for Asians, and diabetes in Asian American subgroups in California. Method Secondary analysis of the 2009 adult California Health Interview Survey (n = 45,946) of non-Hispanic Whites (NHW), African Americans, Hispanics and Asians (Vietnamese, Chinese, Korean, Filipino, South Asian and Japanese). WHO Asian BMI cut points (overweight = 23–27.5 kg/m2; obese ≥ 27.5 kg/m2) were used for Asian subgroups. Standard BMI cut points (overweight = 25–29.9 kg/m2; obese ≥ 30 kg/m2) were applied for other groups. Results Among Asian subgroups, overweight/obesity was highest among Filipinos (78.6%), which was higher than NHWs (p < 0.001) but similar to African Americans and Hispanics. Compared to NHW, diabetes prevalence was higher for Vietnamese, Koreans, Filipinos and South Asians with BMI = 23–24.9 kg/m2 and Koreans, Filipinos and Japanese with BMI = 27.5–29.9 kg/m2, the ranges WHO recommends as overweight or obese for Asians but not for other groups. Conclusions Filipinos should be a priority population for overweight/obesity screening. Filipinos, Vietnamese, Korean, South Asians and Japanese have higher diabetes prevalence at lower BMI cut points. WHO Asian BMI cut points may have clinical utility to identify at-risk Asian Americans. PMID:24736092

  13. Modelling and Optimization of Technological Process for Magnetron Synthesis of Altin Nanocomposite Films on Cutting Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhina, T. D.

    2016-04-01

    The paper highlights the results of the research on developing the mechanism to model the technological process for magnetron synthesis of nanocomposite films on cutting tools, which provides their specified physical and mechanical characteristics by controlling pulsed plasma parameters. The paper presents optimal conditions for AlTiN coating deposition on cutting tools according to the ion energy of sputtered atoms in order to provide their specified physical and mechanical characteristics.

  14. Computation of the spectral density of two-point functions: Complex masses, cut rules, and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Dudal, David; Guimaraes, Marcelo S.

    2011-02-15

    We present a steepest descent calculation of the Kaellen-Lehmann spectral density of two-point functions involving complex conjugate masses in Euclidean space. This problem occurs in studies of (gauge) theories with Gribov-like propagators. As the presence of complex masses and the use of Euclidean space brings the theory outside of the strict validity of the Cutkosky cut rules, we discuss an alternative method based on the Widder inversion operator of the Stieltjes transformation. It turns out that the results coincide with those obtained by naively applying the cut rules. We also point out the potential usefulness of the Stieltjes (inversion) formalism when nonstandard propagators are used, in which case cut rules are not available at all.

  15. Cutting tool performance characteristics in the machining of a nickel aluminide intermetallic compound

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, S.; Srivatsan, T.S.; Giusti, P.

    1994-05-01

    Ductile nickel aluminide, Ni{sub 3}Al, containing traces of boron, is an intermetallic compound with high strength, making it a promising structural material for elevated, ambient and cryogenic temperature applications. In order to be able to use alloys, they must be capable of being fabricated by machining. The machinability of a cast nickel aluminide, Ni{sub 3}Al, alloy containing boron was studied by conventional machining using the lathe. Three different cutting tool inserts and two types of coolants, namely kerosene oil mist and soluble oil, were chosen. The machining performance of the cutting tool insert and the influence of coolant type were established through measurements of volume of material removed and tool wear. The tool wear analysis was made using microscopic examination of the cutting tool insert in order to elucidate information of the influence of machining parameters and choice of coolant on performance capability of the insert. The overall machinability performance of these materials is rationalized.

  16. Laser Processing of Coarse Grain Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Cutting Tool Inserts using Picosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dold, C.; Henerichs, M.; Gilgen, P.; Wegener, K.

    Manufacturing of cutting edges in PCD cutting tool inserts (CTI) using picosecond pulsewidth laser sources is presented. Cutting edge radii of redge = 5 to 6 μm are achieved. Validation experiments are carried out on a turning lathe using lasered and ground CTI on machining carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) which is mainly used for aircraft structures. Experiments are done on fine and coarse grain PCD structures (average grain sizes are 2-4 μm and 25 μm resepectively) which are not economical in the latter case if manufactured conventionally, e.g. using grinding processes. Wear resistance, tool lifetime and process forces can be improved if laser processed coarse grain cutting tools are employed.

  17. Development and testing of an integrated smart tool holder for four-component cutting force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhengyou; Lu, Yong; Li, Jianguang

    2017-09-01

    Cutting force measurement is a significant requirement for monitoring and controlling the machining processes. Hence, various methods of measuring the cutting force have been proposed by many researchers. In this study, an innovative integrated smart tool holder system based on capacitive sensors is designed, constructed and tested, which is capable of measuring triaxial cutting force and a torque simultaneously in a wireless environment system. A standard commercial tool holder is modified to make itself be the force sensing element that has advantages of simple structure and easy machining. Deformable beams are created in the tool holder, and the tiny deformations of which used to calculate the four-component cutting force are detected by six high precision capacitive sensors. All the sensors and other electronics, like data acquisition and transmitting unit, and wireless power unit, are incorporated into the tool holder as a whole system. The device is intended to be used in a rotating spindle such as in milling and drilling processes. Eventually, the static and dynamic characteristics of the smart tool holder have been determined by a series of tests. Cutting tests have also been carried out and the results show it is stable and practical to measure the cutting force in milling and drilling processes.

  18. On-line Monitoring for Cutting Tool Wear Condition Based on the Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fenghua; Xie, Feng

    2017-07-01

    In the process of cutting tools, it is very important to monitor the working state of the tools. On the basis of acceleration signal acquisition under the constant speed, time domain and frequency domain analysis of relevant indicators monitor the online of tool wear condition. The analysis results show that the method can effectively judge the tool wear condition in the process of machining. It has certain application value.

  19. Influence of water-miscible cutting fluid on tool wear behavior of various coated high-speed steel tools in hobbing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuta; Matsuoka, Hironori; Kubo, Akio; Ono, Hajime; Ryu, Takahiro; Qiu, Hua; Nakae, Takashi; Shuto, Shuichi; Watanabe, Suguru; Anan, Ruito

    2017-04-01

    This paper deals with the influence of water-miscible cutting fluid on tool life (flank wear) compared with that with dry cutting and water-insoluble cutting oil in hobbing. Experiments were conducted by simulating hobbing by fly tool cutting on a milling machine. The following results were clarified. (1) The water-miscible cutting fluid used in the test prolongs the tool life for TiN-, TiAlN-, TiSiN- and AlCrSiN-coated tools in comparison with that obtained by dry cutting and water-insoluble cutting oil. (2) It was presumed that the tool wear decreases and the tool life is improved by the lubrication effect of the synthetic lubrication additive, mineral oil and sulfuric EP additive contained in the water-miscible cutting fluid, and also by the cooling effect.

  20. Effects of cyclone diameter on performance of 1D3D cyclones: Cut point and slope

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cyclones are a commonly used air pollution abatement device for separating particulate matter (PM) from air streams in industrial processes. Several mathematical models have been proposed to predict the cut point of cyclones as cyclone diameter varies. The objective of this research was to determine...

  1. Ethnic-specific body mass index cut-off points for overweight and obesity in girls.

    PubMed

    Duncan, J Scott; Duncan, Elizabeth K; Schofield, Grant

    2010-03-19

    To develop ethnic-specific body mass index (BMI) cut-off points for overweight and obesity in girls from New Zealand's five major ethnic groups. A total of 1676 girls (41% European, 21% Pacific Island, 15% East Asian, 13% Māori, and 11% South Asian) aged 5-16 years participated in this study. BMI was determined from height and weight, and body fat percentage (%BF) was obtained from hand-to-foot bioelectrical impedance measurements. Using stepwise multiple regression, a series of ethnic-specific BMI cut-off points were developed that corresponded to the equivalent %BF of European girls at the BMI reference values provided by the International Obesity TaskForce (IOTF). The adjusted cut-off points for overweight and obesity ranged from an average of 3.3 and 3.8 kg.m(-2) (respectively) lower than the IOTF standards in South Asian girls to 1.5 and 1.9 kg.m(-2) higher in Pacific Island girls. We conclude that the ethnic-specific BMI cut-off points developed in this study are more appropriate than universal definitions of overweight and obesity for predicting excess adiposity in New Zealand girls.

  2. Wall sticking of high water-cut crude oil transported at temperatures below the gel point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Haimin; Huang, Qiyu; Wang, Changhui

    2015-12-01

    Some high water-cut crude oils can flow in the temperature below the oil gel point, while oil particles may adhere to the pipe wall as paste; this process is known as ‘wall sticking’. This can cause partial or even total blocking of the transportation pipe. Several experiments using a laboratory flow loop were conducted to study the wall sticking characteristics of high water-cut crude oils. The experimental results indicated that the predominant influencing factors of wall sticking included shear stress, water-cut and differences between gel point and wall temperature. The wall sticking rate and occurrence temperature decrease with the increase of water-cut and shear stress. The criterion for the wall sticking occurrence temperature (WSOT), and the regression formula of the wall sticking thickness for high water-cut crude oil were then established. Typical case studies indicated that the prediction results obtained from the WSOT criterion and the wall sticking thickness regression formula were in accordance with the measured values. The wall sticking rate and WSOT vary widely under different conditions and it is necessary to consider its non-uniformity in production.

  3. [Validation of cut points of skeletal muscle mass index for identifying sarcopenia in Chilean older people].

    PubMed

    Lera, Lydia; Ángel, Bárbara; Sánchez, Hugo; Picrin, Yaisy; Hormazabal, María José; Quiero, Andrea; Albala, Cecilia

    2014-09-28

    To estimate and validate cut-off points of skeletal muscle mass index (SMI) in Chilean population, for using in an algorithm for a diagnosis of sarcopenia developed by European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP). Secondary analysis of Cross-sectional data in 440 Chilean older subjects to estimate cut-off points of SMI determined by DEXA and predicted by an anthropometric equation. Afterward a cross-sectional validation in a sample of 164 older people was performed. Anthropometric measures, self-reported health status, physical performance tests and DEXA were carried out. Decreased muscle strength was defined as handgrip strength <15 kg in women and <27 kg in male. Cut-off points of SMI were defined as values under 20th percentile for DEXA measures and estimated through ROC curves for the anthropometric model. Biological validity of the algorithm was tested by contrasting the diagnosis with physical performance tests and functionality. Cut-off points of SMI obtained by DEXA were 7.19 kg/m² in men and 5.77 kg/m² in women and 7.45 kg/ m² and 5.88 kg/m², respectively for the predicted by the model. Sensibility and specificity of estimations vs DEXA measures were 80% and 92% in men and 77% and 89% in women. We obtained cut-off points of SMI for DEXA and for a prediction equation for older adults Chilean, with good sensibility and specificity for the measurement by DEXA. It will allow to apply the EWGSOP algorithm to the early diagnosis of sarcopenia and to develop programs for prevention, delay or reversion this syndrome. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinically Relevant Cut-off Points for the Diagnosis of Sarcopenia in Older Korean People.

    PubMed

    Choe, Yu-Ri; Joh, Ju-Youn; Kim, Yeon-Pyo

    2017-04-21

    The optimal criteria applied to older Korean people have not been defined. We aimed to define clinically relevant cut-off points for older Korean people and to compare the predictive validity with other definitions of sarcopenia. Nine hundred and sixteen older Koreans (≥65 years) were included in this cross-sectional observational study. We used conditional inference tree analysis to determine cut-off points for height-adjusted grip strength (GS) and appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM), for use in the diagnosis of sarcopenia. We then compared the Korean sarcopenia criteria with the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health and Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia criteria, using frailty, assessed with the Korean Frailty Index, as an outcome variable. For men, a residual GS (GSre) of ≤ 0.25 was defined as weak, and a residual ASM (ASMre) of ≤ 1.29 was defined as low. Corresponding cut-off points for women were a GSre of ≤ 0.17 and an ASMre of ≤ 0.69. GSre and ASMre values were adjusted for height. In logistic regression analysis with new cut-off points, the adjusted odds ratios for pre-frail or frail status in the sarcopenia group were 3.23 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.33-7.83) for the men and 1.74 (95% CI 0.91-3.35) for the women. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the unadjusted area under the curve for Korean sarcopenia criteria in men and women were 0.653 and 0.608, respectively (p < .001). Our proposed cut-off points for low GS and low ASM should be useful in the diagnosis of sarcopenia in older Korean people.

  5. Polypharmacy cut-points in older people with cancer: how many medications are too many?

    PubMed

    Turner, Justin P; Jamsen, Kris M; Shakib, Sepehr; Singhal, Nimit; Prowse, Robert; Bell, J Simon

    2016-04-01

    Polypharmacy is often defined as use of 'five-or-more-medications'. However, the optimal polypharmacy cut-point for predicting clinically important adverse events in older people with cancer is unclear. The aim was to determine the sensitivities and specificities of a range of polypharmacy cut-points in relation to a variety of adverse events in older people with cancer. Data on medication use, falls and frailty criteria were collected from 385 patients aged ≥70 years presenting to a medical oncology outpatient clinic. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were produced to examine sensitivities and specificities for varying definitions of polypharmacy in relation to exhaustion, falls, physical function, Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) and frailty. Sub-analyses were performed when stratifying by age, sex, comorbidity status and analgesic use. Patients had a mean age of 76.7 years. Using Youden's index, the optimal polypharmacy cut-point was 6.5 medications for predicting frailty (specificity 67.0 %, sensitivity 70.0 %), physical function (80.2 %, 49.3 %) and KPS (69.8 %, 52.1 %), 5.5 for falls (59.2 %, 73.0 %) and 3.5 for exhaustion (43.4 %, 74.5 %). For polypharmacy defined as five-or-more-medications, the specificities and sensitivities were frailty (44.9 %, 77.5 %), physical function (58.0 %, 69.7 %), KPS (47.7 %, 69.4 %), falls (44.5 %, 75.7 %) and exhaustion (52.6 %, 64.1 %). The optimal polypharmacy cut-points were similar when the sample was stratified by age, sex, comorbidity status and analgesic use. Our results suggest that no single polypharmacy cut-point is optimal for predicting multiple adverse events in older people with cancer. In this population, the common definition of five-or-more-medications is reasonable for identifying 'at-risk' patients for medication review.

  6. Reliability estimation for cutting tools based on logistic regression model using vibration signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baojia; Chen, Xuefeng; Li, Bing; He, Zhengjia; Cao, Hongrui; Cai, Gaigai

    2011-10-01

    As an important part of CNC machine, the reliability of cutting tools influences the whole manufacturing effectiveness and stability of equipment. The present study proposes a novel reliability estimation approach to the cutting tools based on logistic regression model by using vibration signals. The operation condition information of the CNC machine is incorporated into reliability analysis to reflect the product time-varying characteristics. The proposed approach is superior to other degradation estimation methods in that it does not necessitate any assumption about degradation paths and probability density functions of condition parameters. The three steps of new reliability estimation approach for cutting tools are as follows. First, on-line vibration signals of cutting tools are measured during the manufacturing process. Second, wavelet packet (WP) transform is employed to decompose the original signals and correlation analysis is employed to find out the feature frequency bands which indicate tool wear. Third, correlation analysis is also used to select the salient feature parameters which are composed of feature band energy, energy entropy and time-domain features. Finally, reliability estimation is carried out based on logistic regression model. The approach has been validated on a NC lathe. Under different failure threshold, the reliability and failure time of the cutting tools are all estimated accurately. The positive results show the plausibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach, which can facilitate machine performance and reliability estimation.

  7. Metal Cutting Theory and Friction Stir Welding Tool Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payton, Lewis N.

    2003-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively new industrial process that was invented at The Weld Institute (TWI, United Kingdom) and patented in 1992 under research funded by in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Often quoted advantages of the process include good strength and ductility along with minimization of residual stress and distortion. Less well advertised are the beneficial effects of this solid state welding process in the field of occupational and environmental safety. It produces superior weld products in difficult to weld materials without producing any toxic fumes or solid waste that must be controlled as hazardous waste. In fact, it reduces noise pollution in the workspace as well. In the early days of FSW, most welding was performed on modified machine tools, in particular on milling machines with modified milling cutters. In spite of the obvious milling heritage of the process, the techniques and lessons learned from almost 250 years of successful metalworking with milling machines have not been applied in the field of modern Friction Stir Welding. The goal of the current research was to study currently successful FSW tools and parameterize the process in such a way that the design of new tools for new materials could be accelerated. Along the way, several successful new tooling designs were developed for current issues at the Marshall Space Flight Center with accompanying patent disclosures

  8. The effect of machining parameters on force signal and tool wear in stone cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    yousefi, Reza; Gorjizadeh, Ashkan; Mikaeil, Reza

    2011-01-01

    The application of sensor system is becoming more commonplace in improving productivity and reliability. Although measuring force signal have been widely used for monitoring of metal machining process that their application to stone cutting has not been well investigated. In this paper, the effect of machining parameter on force signal and tool wear was investigated. The result indicate that increasing of the depth of cut and spindle speed will increase the force and tool wear while increasing feed rate will increase force and decrease tool wear.

  9. Cutting precision in a novel aortic valve resection tool. Research in progress.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Daniel; Stühle, Sebastian; Wendt, Hermann; Thielmann, Matthias; Kipfmüller, Brigitte; Hauck, Florian; Vogel, Bernd; Jakob, Heinz

    2009-10-01

    We recently demonstrated the first in-vitro cutting results of a minimal-invasive aortic valve resection tool. The current study was designed to assess the cutting accuracy of this new device improved by the implementation of a linear motor-based propulsion unit. Native aortic valves of isolated swine hearts (valve diameter 17.8+/-0.9 mm, mean+/-S.D.) were artificially stenosed and calcified (n=7). Subsequently, valves were resected by the use of a new aortic valve resection tool. The cutting process was performed by fitting the instrument with foldable Nitinol cutting blades (diameter 15 mm) and two software-operated linear motors combined with separated manual rotation. Aortic valve area was measured pre- and postprocedure by software-guided binary area calculation. Aortic valve residue has been determined and the grade of accuracy has been assessed via calculating the average midpoint of the neoannulus. Furthermore, radial deviation of concentricity was calculated and cutting time was measured. Aortic valve resection was successful in all cases and nearly all leaflets (2.5+/-0.4) with a weight of 0.22+/-0.12 g were cut. Aortic valve area increased significantly (0.3+/-0.1 cm(2) vs. 1.1+/-0.2 cm(2), P<0.001) with a mean cutting time of 49.7+/-15.0 s. Mean lateral leaflet rim within the annulus was 3.2+/-3.2 mm. Cutting precision revealed a median deviation of the cutting ring from the desired position of 1.3+/-0.6 mm (y-axis) and 1.4+/-0.5 mm (x-axis). Median center deviation of the cutting ring was 2.6+/-0.8 mm. The present study clearly confirmed ability of an accelerated cutting of stenotic aortic valve by the aortic valve resection tool. Nearly all leaflets were cut and a small rim was left within the annulus, hence providing an ideal 'landing zone' for the new prosthesis. Nevertheless, the aortic valve resection tool should be enhanced by adding a centering mechanism, thus achieving a more precise cutting process in order to avoid secondary damage.

  10. Information Technology: A Tool to Cut Health Care Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, Ravi; Maly, K. J.; Overstreet, C. M.; Foudriat, E. C.

    1996-01-01

    Old Dominion University embarked on a project to see how current computer technology could be applied to reduce the cost and or to improve the efficiency of health care services. We designed and built a prototype for an integrated medical record system (MRS). The MRS is written in Tool control language/Tool kit (Tcl/Tk). While the initial version of the prototype had patient information hard coded into the system, later versions used an INGRES database for storing patient information. Currently, we have proposed an object-oriented model for implementing MRS. These projects involve developing information systems for physicians and medical researchers to enhance their ability for improved treatment at reduced costs. The move to computerized patient records is well underway, several standards exist for laboratory records, and several groups are working on standards for other portions of the patient record.

  11. How to Train a Cell–Cutting-Edge Molecular Tools

    PubMed Central

    Czapiński, Jakub; Kiełbus, Michał; Kałafut, Joanna; Kos, Michał; Stepulak, Andrzej; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo

    2017-01-01

    In biological systems, the formation of molecular complexes is the currency for all cellular processes. Traditionally, functional experimentation was targeted to single molecular players in order to understand its effects in a cell or animal phenotype. In the last few years, we have been experiencing rapid progress in the development of ground-breaking molecular biology tools that affect the metabolic, structural, morphological, and (epi)genetic instructions of cells by chemical, optical (optogenetic) and mechanical inputs. Such precise dissection of cellular processes is not only essential for a better understanding of biological systems, but will also allow us to better diagnose and fix common dysfunctions. Here, we present several of these emerging and innovative techniques by providing the reader with elegant examples on how these tools have been implemented in cells, and, in some cases, organisms, to unravel molecular processes in minute detail. We also discuss their advantages and disadvantages with particular focus on their translation to multicellular organisms for in vivo spatiotemporal regulation. We envision that further developments of these tools will not only help solve the processes of life, but will give rise to novel clinical and industrial applications. PMID:28344971

  12. How to Train a Cell - Cutting-Edge Molecular Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapiński, Jakub; Kiełbus, Michał; Kałafut, Joanna; Kos, Michał; Stepulak, Andrzej; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo

    2017-03-01

    In biological systems, the formation of molecular complexes is the currency for all cellular processes. Traditionally, functional experimentation was targeted to single molecular players in order to understand its effects in a cell or animal phenotype. In the last few years, we have been experiencing rapid progress in the development of ground-breaking molecular biology tools that affect the metabolic, structural, morphological, and (epi)genetic instructions of cells by chemical, optical (optogenetic) and mechanical inputs. Such precise dissection of cellular processes is not only essential for a better understanding of biological systems, but will also allow us to better diagnose and fix common dysfunctions. Here, we present several of these emerging and innovative techniques by providing the reader with elegant examples on how these tools have been implemented in cells, and, in some cases, organisms, to unravel molecular processes in minute detail. We also discuss their advantages and disadvantages with particular focus on their translation to multicellular organisms for in vivo spatiotemporal regulation. We envision that further developments of these tools will not only help solve the processes of life, but will give rise to novel clinical and industrial applications.

  13. Effects of cutting parameters on tool insert wear in end milling of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming; Wang, Jing; Wu, Baohai; Zhang, Dinghua

    2017-01-01

    Titanium alloy is a kind of typical hard-to-cut material due to its low thermal conductivity and high strength at elevated temperatures, this contributes to the fast tool wear in the milling of titanium alloys. The influence of cutting conditions on tool wear has been focused on the turning process, and their influence on tool wear in milling process as well as the influence of tool wear on cutting force coefficients has not been investigated comprehensively. To fully understand the tool wear behavior in milling process with inserts, the influence of cutting parameters on tool wear in the milling of titanium alloys Ti6Al4V by using indexable cutters is investigated. The tool wear rate and trends under different feed per tooth, cutting speed, axial depth of cut and radial depth of cut are analyzed. The results show that the feed rate per tooth and the radial depth of cut have a large influence on tool wear in milling Ti6Al4V with coated insert. To reduce tool wear, cutting parameters for coated inserts under experimental cutting conditions are set as: feed rate per tooth less than 0.07 mm, radial depth of cut less than 1.0 mm, and cutting speed sets between 60 and 150 m/min. Investigation on the relationship between tool wear and cutting force coefficients shows that tangential edge constant increases with tool wear and cutter edge chipping can lead to a great variety of tangential cutting force coefficient. The proposed research provides the basic data for evaluating the machinability of milling Ti6Al4V alloy with coated inserts, and the recommend cutting parameters can be immediately applied in practical production.

  14. Effects of cutting parameters on tool insert wear in end milling of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming; Wang, Jing; Wu, Baohai; Zhang, Dinghua

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloy is a kind of typical hard-to-cut material due to its low thermal conductivity and high strength at elevated temperatures, this contributes to the fast tool wear in the milling of titanium alloys. The influence of cutting conditions on tool wear has been focused on the turning process, and their influence on tool wear in milling process as well as the influence of tool wear on cutting force coefficients has not been investigated comprehensively. To fully understand the tool wear behavior in milling process with inserts, the influence of cutting parameters on tool wear in the milling of titanium alloys Ti6Al4V by using indexable cutters is investigated. The tool wear rate and trends under different feed per tooth, cutting speed, axial depth of cut and radial depth of cut are analyzed. The results show that the feed rate per tooth and the radial depth of cut have a large influence on tool wear in milling Ti6Al4V with coated insert. To reduce tool wear, cutting parameters for coated inserts under experimental cutting conditions are set as: feed rate per tooth less than 0.07 mm, radial depth of cut less than 1.0 mm, and cutting speed sets between 60 and 150 m/min. Investigation on the relationship between tool wear and cutting force coefficients shows that tangential edge constant increases with tool wear and cutter edge chipping can lead to a great variety of tangential cutting force coefficient. The proposed research provides the basic data for evaluating the machinability of milling Ti6Al4V alloy with coated inserts, and the recommend cutting parameters can be immediately applied in practical production.

  15. The optimum cut-off radius in Monte Carlo simulation of Yukawa potential point particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwan, I.; Hussein, H.; Hussein, A.; Daragmeh, M.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, infinite systems of point particles with Yukawa potential and periodic boundary conditions are simulated using Monte Carlo technique in three dimensions. Because of the short range nature of the Yukawa potential, cut-off radius rcut is considered in calculations (i.e, for each particle i, the effect of the other particles on it inside a sphere of radius rcut is taken into account). The cut-off radius used in Monte Carlo simulation affects the physical behavior of the system being simulated. A sequence of rcut values are used. When the change in the total potential energy becomes negligible, the optimum value of the cut-off radius is determined. This value is found to be independent of density and temperature in the NVT-ensemble case.

  16. Modelling and Development of a High Performance Milling Process with Monolithic Cutting Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Ozturk, E.; Taylor, C. M.; Turner, S.; Devey, M.

    2011-05-04

    Critical aerospace components usually require difficult to machine workpiece materials like nickel based alloys. Moreover; there is a pressing need to maximize the productivity of machining operations. This need can be satisfied by selection of higher feed velocity, axial and radial depths. But there may be several problems during machining in this case. Due to high cutting speeds in high performance machining, the tool life may be unacceptably low. If magnitudes of cutting forces are high, out of tolerance static form errors may result; moreover in the extreme cases, the cutting tool may break apart. Forced vibrations may deteriorate the surface quality. Chatter vibrations may develop if the selected parameters result in instability. In this study, in order to deal with the tool life issue, several experimental cuts are made with different tool geometries, and the best combination in terms of tool life is selected. A force model is developed and the results of the force model are verified by experimental results. The force model is used in predicting the effect of process parameters on cutting forces. In order to account for the other concerns such as static form errors, forced and chatter vibrations, additional process models are currently under development.

  17. Operation Reliability Assessment for Cutting Tools by Applying a Proportional Covariate Model to Condition Monitoring Information

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Gaigai; Chen, Xuefeng; Li, Bing; Chen, Baojia; He, Zhengjia

    2012-01-01

    The reliability of cutting tools is critical to machining precision and production efficiency. The conventional statistic-based reliability assessment method aims at providing a general and overall estimation of reliability for a large population of identical units under given and fixed conditions. However, it has limited effectiveness in depicting the operational characteristics of a cutting tool. To overcome this limitation, this paper proposes an approach to assess the operation reliability of cutting tools. A proportional covariate model is introduced to construct the relationship between operation reliability and condition monitoring information. The wavelet packet transform and an improved distance evaluation technique are used to extract sensitive features from vibration signals, and a covariate function is constructed based on the proportional covariate model. Ultimately, the failure rate function of the cutting tool being assessed is calculated using the baseline covariate function obtained from a small sample of historical data. Experimental results and a comparative study show that the proposed method is effective for assessing the operation reliability of cutting tools. PMID:23201980

  18. Operation reliability assessment for cutting tools by applying a proportional covariate model to condition monitoring information.

    PubMed

    Cai, Gaigai; Chen, Xuefeng; Li, Bing; Chen, Baojia; He, Zhengjia

    2012-09-25

    The reliability of cutting tools is critical to machining precision and production efficiency. The conventional statistic-based reliability assessment method aims at providing a general and overall estimation of reliability for a large population of identical units under given and fixed conditions. However, it has limited effectiveness in depicting the operational characteristics of a cutting tool. To overcome this limitation, this paper proposes an approach to assess the operation reliability of cutting tools. A proportional covariate model is introduced to construct the relationship between operation reliability and condition monitoring information. The wavelet packet transform and an improved distance evaluation technique are used to extract sensitive features from vibration signals, and a covariate function is constructed based on the proportional covariate model. Ultimately, the failure rate function of the cutting tool being assessed is calculated using the baseline covariate function obtained from a small sample of historical data. Experimental results and a comparative study show that the proposed method is effective for assessing the operation reliability of cutting tools.

  19. Wear of Cutting Tool with Excel Geometry in Turning Process of Hardened Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samardžiová, Michaela

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with hard turning using a cutting tool with Xcel geometry. This is one of the new geometries, and there is not any information about Xcel wear in comparison to the conventional geometry. It is already known from cutting tools producers that using the Xcel geometry leads to higher quality of machined surface, perticularly surface roughness. It is possible to achieve more than 4 times lower Ra and Rz values after turning than after using conventional geometry with radius. The workpiece material was 100Cr6 hardened steel with hardness of 60 ± 1 HRC. The machine used for the experiment was a lathe with counter spindle DMG CTX alpha 500, which is located in the Centre of Excellence of 5-axis Machining at the Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava. The cutting tools made by CBN were obtained from Sandvik COROMANT Company. The aim of this paper is to investigate the cutting tool wear in hard turning process by the Xcel cutting tool geometry.

  20. Thermal modelling of cooling tool cutting when milling by electrical analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabid, F.; Arrouf, M.; Assas, M.; Benmoussa, H.

    2010-06-01

    Measurement temperatures by (some devises) are applied immediately after shut-down and may be corrected for the temperature drop that occurs in the interval between shut-down and measurement. This paper presents a new procedure for thermal modelling of the tool cutting used just after machining; when the tool is out off the chip in order to extrapolate the cutting temperature from the temperature measured when the tool is at stand still. A fin approximation is made in enhancing heat loss (by conduction and convection) to air stream is used. In the modelling we introduce an equivalent thermal network to estimate the cutting temperature as a function of specific energy. In another hand, a local modified element lumped conduction equation is used to predict the temperature gradient with time when the tool is being cooled, with initial and boundary conditions. These predictions provide a detailed view of the global heat transfer coefficient as a function of cutting speed because the heat loss for the tool in air stream is an order of magnitude larger than in normal environment. Finally we deduct the cutting temperature by inverse method.

  1. Built-up edge effect on tool wear when turning steels at low cutting speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassier, Zulay; Prato, Yidney; Muñoz-Escalona, Patricia

    2004-10-01

    In any machining process, it is very important to control the cutting variables used during the process because these will affect, for example, tool life and workpiece surface roughness. Since the built-up edge (BUE) increases the wear of the tool and affects the surface roughness of the workpiece, the study of this phenomenon is very important in predicting and minimizing the wear of a cutting tool. This research studies the influence of the BUE formation for coated carbide tools when turning medium- and high-strength steels. Different mathematical expressions were obtained to quantify this effect. Mathematical expressions for uncoated carbide tools were not possible to obtain, due to the fact that for these tools an increase in the wear and their premature fracture was observed.

  2. Kinect, a Novel Cutting Edge Tool in Pavement Data Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudzadeh, A.; Firoozi Yeganeh, S.; Golroo, A.

    2015-12-01

    Pavement roughness and surface distress detection is of interest of decision makers due to vehicle safety, user satisfaction, and cost saving. Data collection, as a core of pavement management systems, is required for these detections. There are two major types of data collection: traditional/manual data collection and automated/semi-automated data collection. This paper study different non-destructive tools in detecting cracks and potholes. For this purpose, automated data collection tools, which have been utilized recently are discussed and their applications are criticized. The main issue is the significant amount of money as a capital investment needed to buy the vehicle. The main scope of this paper is to study the approach and related tools that not only are cost-effective but also precise and accurate. The new sensor called Kinect has all of these specifications. It can capture both RGB images and depth which are of significant use in measuring cracks and potholes. This sensor is able to take image of surfaces with adequate resolution to detect cracks along with measurement of distance between sensor and obstacles in front of it which results in depth of defects. This technology has been very recently studied by few researchers in different fields of studies such as project management, biomedical engineering, etc. Pavement management has not paid enough attention to use of Kinect in monitoring and detecting distresses. This paper is aimed at providing a thorough literature review on usage of Kinect in pavement management and finally proposing the best approach which is cost-effective and precise.

  3. Effect of Plasma Nitriding on the Performance of WC-Co Cutting Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzaoglu, Ebru; Yilmaz, Safak; Gulmez, Turgut

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the effect of nitriding process parameters on the cutting performance of WC-Co tools. The cutting performance was measured by CNC machining of GG25 cast iron parts. The hardness and phase composition of nitrided layer were determined for different plasma nitriding temperatures and times. The hardness of the nitrided layer increased at all plasma nitrided conditions investigated. However, the machining performance of the cutting inserts varied in the range between a 60% increase and a 40% decrease after plasma nitriding. The maximum number of machined parts was seen when the insert was nitrided at 600 °C-4 h and at 500 °C-4 h.

  4. Experimental Choice of Suitable Cutting Tool for Machining of Plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokova, Dagmar; Cep, Robert; Cepova, Lenka; Kocifajova, Simona

    2014-12-01

    In today's competitive times overall development of the technology is moving somewhere further, including automotive industry, which went toward relieving material. One of the many materials which are applied in the automotive industry, are polymers. The aim of the article was to test three different types of cutters for machining material group N - nonferrous metals. The article was tested three different types of cutters from different vendors on electro material SKLOTEXTIT G 11 and samples size 12x100x500mm. The entire experiment was conducted in a company Slavík- Technické plasty on the machine tool SCM RECORD 220. In the conclusion are technical-evaluation, experimental results and conclusions for company.

  5. PIXE as a characterization technique in the cutting tool industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freemantle, C. S.; Sacks, N.; Topic, M.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Two WC-Co powders have been analyzed using micro-PIXE to identify elemental concentration and distribution. A powder recycled primarily from used mining components and a powder produced exclusively from fresh raw materials was studied. Elemental mapping of major elements as well as impurities, within powder granule cross sections, was performed. Contaminants (e.g. Fe and Ni) from manufacturing processes, as well as trace impurities (e.g. Cr, Cl, Ca and S) from recycling were detected, quantified and compared. The extent of increased concentrations of impurities resulting from recycling were observed, demonstrating the potential for PIXE as a characterization tool for detecting trace elements in cemented carbides, allowing for future improvements in the manufacturing and recycling processes.

  6. Artificial Intelligence Based Selection of Optimal Cutting Tool and Process Parameters for Effective Turning and Milling Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saranya, Kunaparaju; John Rozario Jegaraj, J.; Ramesh Kumar, Katta; Venkateshwara Rao, Ghanta

    2016-06-01

    With the increased trend in automation of modern manufacturing industry, the human intervention in routine, repetitive and data specific activities of manufacturing is greatly reduced. In this paper, an attempt has been made to reduce the human intervention in selection of optimal cutting tool and process parameters for metal cutting applications, using Artificial Intelligence techniques. Generally, the selection of appropriate cutting tool and parameters in metal cutting is carried out by experienced technician/cutting tool expert based on his knowledge base or extensive search from huge cutting tool database. The present proposed approach replaces the existing practice of physical search for tools from the databooks/tool catalogues with intelligent knowledge-based selection system. This system employs artificial intelligence based techniques such as artificial neural networks, fuzzy logic and genetic algorithm for decision making and optimization. This intelligence based optimal tool selection strategy is developed using Mathworks Matlab Version 7.11.0 and implemented. The cutting tool database was obtained from the tool catalogues of different tool manufacturers. This paper discusses in detail, the methodology and strategies employed for selection of appropriate cutting tool and optimization of process parameters based on multi-objective optimization criteria considering material removal rate, tool life and tool cost.

  7. Determining cut-off points in functional assessment scales in stroke.

    PubMed

    Balasch i Bernat, Mercè; Balasch i Parisi, Sebastiá; Sebastián, Enrique Noé; Moscardó, Lirios Dueñas; Ferri Campos, Joan; López Bueno, Laura

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of well-validated assessment scales of functioning and disability have been developed for stroke population. However, these instruments have limitations in their interpretation. Therefore, determining cut-off points for their categorization becomes necessary. To determine cut-off points for the BI, FIM and FAM scales to differentiate clinical disability categories and to establish the relationship between mRS and DOS scales. One hundred and six adults with ischemic or haemorrhagic stroke were mainly recruited from a rehabilitation facility (Hospitales Nisa, Valencia, Spain). A high correlation was observed between the DOS and mRS scales (Kendall's tau-b = 0.475; p = 0.000) although a certain amount of disagreement between the two scales was detected. The cut-off points were 62.90 (95% CI, 57.26-69.29) and 21.30 (95% CI, 16.34-26.03) for the BI; 70.62 (95% CI, 66.65-75.22) and 38.29 (95% CI, 34.07-42.25) for the FIM; and 116.07 (95% CI, 110.30-122.68) and 66.02 (95% CI, 59.20-72.35) for the FAM. DOS was observed to be more demanding than the mRS, in terms of patient independence. Additionally, the lower cut-off points separating the levels of severe and moderate disability in the BI, FIM and FAM were determined. These findings would facilitate practitioners clinical interpretation of disability levels in post-stroke patients.

  8. Oriented microtexturing on the surface of high-speed steel cutting tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Podgornyh, O. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Filippova, E. O.

    2016-11-01

    Microtexturing the metal cutting tool surfaces is a novel technique intended for enhancing the workability of these tools. The microtexturing is used in machining the titanium alloys for air-space applications for reducing the adhesion wear of metal cutting blades. This paper is focused on forming the microtextured dotted, banded and overlapped areas on the surfaces of high-speed steel samples. The treated areas have been examined using laser scanning microscopy for the microtexture pattern and roughness. It has been shown that the microtextured surfaces obtained on the high-speed steel samples were free of cracks. Surface pattern and roughness of all three microtextured areas have been examined and analyzed.

  9. Is the present cut-point to define type 2 diabetes appropriate in Latin-Americans?

    PubMed Central

    López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Velandia-Carrillo, Carlos; Gómez-Arbeláez, Diego; Aldana-Campos, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) is based either on increased plasma glucose or Glycated hemoglobin levels. Since these measures are the only means for diagnosis of DM2, they must be well adapted to each population according to their metabolic characteristics, given that these may vary in each population. The World Health Organization (WHO) determined the cut-points of plasma glucose levels for the diagnosis of DM2 by associating hyperglycemia with the risk of a specific microvascular complication-retinopathy. Cardiovascular diseases are however the principal causes of mortality in patients with DM2 and we reported that in the Colombo-Ecuadorian population impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance are both risk markers for myocardial infarction. We propose that the current cut-points accepted by the WHO need to be revaluated in populations such as Latin America and that there should be lower cut points for glycaemia in this population, to reduce the prevalence of cardiovascular complications associated with DM2. PMID:25512777

  10. Cutting performance and wear mechanisms of PVD coated carbide tools during dry drilling of newly produced ADI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, Anil; El Mansori, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    The austempered ductile iron (ADI) material is widely used for automotive and structural applications. However, it is considered a difficult to machine material due to its strain hardening behavior and low thermal conductivity characteristics; thus delivering higher mechanical and thermal loads at the tool-chip interface, which significantly affects the tool wear and surface quality. The paper thus overviews the cutting performance and wear behavior of different cutting tools during dry drilling of newly produced ADI material. Cutting performance was evaluated in terms of specific cutting energy, workpiece surface integrity and tool wear behavior. Tool wear behavior shows crater wear mode and workpiece adhesion. The surface alteration at the machined subsurface was confirmed from the hardness variation. Multilayer (Ti,Al,Cr)N coated tool shows improved cutting performance and wear behavior due to its enhanced tribological adaptability as compared to another PVD coating leading to the reduction in specific cutting energy by 25%.

  11. Comparison of cutting and pencil-point spinal needle in spinal anesthesia regarding postdural puncture headache

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Liu, Yang; Song, WenYe; Kan, ShunLi; Liu, FeiFei; Zhang, Di; Ning, GuangZhi; Feng, ShiQing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Postdural puncture headache (PDPH), mainly resulting from the loss of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), is a well-known iatrogenic complication of spinal anesthesia and diagnostic lumbar puncture. Spinal needles have been modified to minimize complications. Modifiable risk factors of PDPH mainly included needle size and needle shape. However, whether the incidence of PDPH is significantly different between cutting-point and pencil-point needles was controversial. Then we did a meta-analysis to assess the incidence of PDPH of cutting spinal needle and pencil-point spinal needle. Methods: We included all randomly designed trials, assessing the clinical outcomes in patients given elective spinal anesthesia or diagnostic lumbar puncture with either cutting or pencil-point spinal needle as eligible studies. All selected studies and the risk of bias of them were assessed by 2 investigators. Clinical outcomes including success rates, frequency of PDPH, reported severe PDPH, and the use of epidural blood patch (EBP) were recorded as primary results. Results were evaluated using risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous variables. Rev Man software (version 5.3) was used to analyze all appropriate data. Results: Twenty-five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in our study. The analysis result revealed that pencil-point spinal needle would result in lower rate of PDPH (RR 2.50; 95% CI [1.96, 3.19]; P < 0.00001) and severe PDPH (RR 3.27; 95% CI [2.15, 4.96]; P < 0.00001). Furthermore, EBP was less used in pencil-point spine needle group (RR 3.69; 95% CI [1.96, 6.95]; P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Current evidences suggest that pencil-point spinal needle was significantly superior compared with cutting spinal needle regarding the frequency of PDPH, PDPH severity, and the use of EBP. In view of this, we recommend the use of pencil-point spinal needle in spinal anesthesia and lumbar puncture. PMID:28383416

  12. New flame-cutting technique of vertical suspended pipe makes horizontal drilling tools

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    New methods of pipe cutting are being used to manufacture flexible drill collars for horizontal drilling. The flexible collars start as 20-ft lengths of 3.25 in. OD mild steel pipe with a wall thickness of 0.75 in. Every 11 in. along the length of the pipe, a baseball stitch pattern (also called light bulb pattern) is cut into the pipe, producing flexibility by degrees. The first cut allows the pipe to bend slightly at the gap. Each new cut adds about 2/sup 0/ flexibility. The resulting drill collar performs radical changes in well direction. These collars can turn 90/sup 0/ in a 30-ft radius for deflection to horizontal. This drilling method is used for drilling lateral wells or drainholes. The collars are manufactured for Parliament Properties' new venture, Sidewinder Tool Co., Tulsa, by H and M Pipe Beveling Machine Co. Inc., Tulsa.

  13. THRESHOLD AND OPTIMAL CUT-POINTS FOR ALCOHOL USE DISORDERS AMONG PATIENTS IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Guilherme; Cherpitel, Cheryl J.; Ye, Yu; Bond, Jason; Cremonte, Mariana; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Swiatkiewicz, Grazyna

    2011-01-01

    Background Current research suggests that DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence form an unidimensional continuum in emergency department (ED) patients in four countries: Argentina, Mexico, Poland and the United States. In this continuum of alcohol use disorder (AUD), there are no clear-cut distinctions between the criteria for dependence and abuse in the severity dimension based on prior results from Item Response Theory (IRT) analysis. Nevertheless, it is desirable to find a threshold for identifying cases for clinical practice and cut-points of clinical utility in this continuum to distinguish between patients more or less affected by an AUD, using a scale of symptoms count. Methods Data from 5193 patients in 7 ED sites in the same 4 countries (3191 current drinkers) were used to study the structure, threshold and possible cut-points for the diagnoses of AUD. Results The proposed changes in the DSM-V, dropping the abuse item “legal problems” and adding an item on “craving”, did not impact the IRT performance and unidimensionality of alcohol use disorder in this sample. With a total set of 11 items (deleting “legal problems” and adding “craving” to the current set of DSM criteria) an endorsement of 2 or more criteria can be used as the threshold to define those with an AUD in clinical practice. Furthermore, we can distinguish at least 2 levels of clinical severity, 2–3 criteria (moderate) and 4 or more criteria (severe). Conclusions A dimensional approach to AUD using the proposed new set of criteria for the DSM-V can be used to propose a threshold and levels of severity. More research in different populations and countries is needed to further substantiate a threshold and cut-points that could be used in new formulations of substance use disorders. PMID:21352249

  14. Physical Modeling of Contact Processes on the Cutting Tools Surfaces of STM When Turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belozerov, V. A.; Uteshev, M. H.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes how to create an optimization model of the process of fine turning of superalloys and steel tools from STM on CNC machines, flexible manufacturing units (GPM), machining centers. Creation of the optimization model allows you to link (unite) contact processes simultaneously on the front and back surfaces of the tool from STM to manage contact processes and the dynamic strength of the cutting tool at the top of the STM. Established optimization model of management of the dynamic strength of the incisors of the STM in the process of fine turning is based on a previously developed thermomechanical (physical, heat) model, which allows the system thermomechanical approach to choosing brands STM (domestic and foreign) for cutting tools from STM designed for fine turning of heat resistant alloys and steels.

  15. Cutting Tools, Files and Abrasives. Pre-Apprenticeship Phase 1 Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This self-paced student training module on cutting tools, files, and abrasives is one of a number of modules developed for Pre-apprenticeship Phase 1 Training. Purpose of the module is to enable students to identify and explain the proper use and care of various knives, saws, snips, chisels, and abrasives. The module may contain some or all of the…

  16. Detection of fallen trees in ALS point clouds using a Normalized Cut approach trained by simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polewski, Przemyslaw; Yao, Wei; Heurich, Marco; Krzystek, Peter; Stilla, Uwe

    2015-07-01

    Downed dead wood is regarded as an important part of forest ecosystems from an ecological perspective, which drives the need for investigating its spatial distribution. Based on several studies, Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) has proven to be a valuable remote sensing technique for obtaining such information. This paper describes a unified approach to the detection of fallen trees from ALS point clouds based on merging short segments into whole stems using the Normalized Cut algorithm. We introduce a new method of defining the segment similarity function for the clustering procedure, where the attribute weights are learned from labeled data. Based on a relationship between Normalized Cut's similarity function and a class of regression models, we show how to learn the similarity function by training a classifier. Furthermore, we propose using an appearance-based stopping criterion for the graph cut algorithm as an alternative to the standard Normalized Cut threshold approach. We set up a virtual fallen tree generation scheme to simulate complex forest scenarios with multiple overlapping fallen stems. This simulated data is then used as a basis to learn both the similarity function and the stopping criterion for Normalized Cut. We evaluate our approach on 5 plots from the strictly protected mixed mountain forest within the Bavarian Forest National Park using reference data obtained via a manual field inventory. The experimental results show that our method is able to detect up to 90% of fallen stems in plots having 30-40% overstory cover with a correctness exceeding 80%, even in quite complex forest scenes. Moreover, the performance for feature weights trained on simulated data is competitive with the case when the weights are calculated using a grid search on the test data, which indicates that the learned similarity function and stopping criterion can generalize well on new plots.

  17. Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity Among Postmenopausal Women: Discrepancies in Accelerometry-Based Cut-Points.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Tiego A; Rossi, Fabricio E; Rosa, Clara Suemi da Costa; Mota, Jorge; Freitas-Junior, Ismael F

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), minutes per week (min/wk), and fulfillment of the current recommendation (150 min/wk of MVPA) based on different cut-points in postmenopausal women. The sample was composed of 233 postmenopausal women aged 59.8 ± 6.7 years old. MVPA was measured using triaxial accelerometers. Accelerometers were initialized to collect in 60-s epochs. Participants were included if using at least 5 days. MVPA min/wk were obtained using Freedson, Troiano, Copeland, and Sasaki cut-points. Box-plot indicated large mean differences between almost all cut-points, except for Freedson and Troiano (9.3 [95% LoA: -5.6; 24.3] min/wk). The proportion of women who achieved 150 min/wk of MVPA was similar between Freedson and Troiano (31% vs. 30%). Sasaki and Copeland cut-points resulted in a greater proportion than other cut-points. We concluded that the cut-points analyzed generated different results in MVPA min/wk and low agreement when using current guidelines for MVPA pattern classification, except for the comparisons between Freedson and Troiano cut-points.

  18. Modelling of tunnelling processes and rock cutting tool wear with the particle finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, Josep Maria; Oñate, Eugenio; Suárez, Benjamín

    2013-09-01

    Underground construction involves all sort of challenges in analysis, design, project and execution phases. The dimension of tunnels and their structural requirements are growing, and so safety and security demands do. New engineering tools are needed to perform a safer planning and design. This work presents the advances in the particle finite element method (PFEM) for the modelling and the analysis of tunneling processes including the wear of the cutting tools. The PFEM has its foundation on the Lagrangian description of the motion of a continuum built from a set of particles with known physical properties. The method uses a remeshing process combined with the alpha-shape technique to detect the contacting surfaces and a finite element method for the mechanical computations. A contact procedure has been developed for the PFEM which is combined with a constitutive model for predicting the excavation front and the wear of cutting tools. The material parameters govern the coupling of frictional contact and wear between the interacting domains at the excavation front. The PFEM allows predicting several parameters which are relevant for estimating the performance of a tunnelling boring machine such as wear in the cutting tools, the pressure distribution on the face of the boring machine and the vibrations produced in the machinery and the adjacent soil/rock. The final aim is to help in the design of the excavating tools and in the planning of the tunnelling operations. The applications presented show that the PFEM is a promising technique for the analysis of tunnelling problems.

  19. Application of CBR method for adding the process of cutting tools and parameters selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ociepka, P.; Herbus, K.

    2015-11-01

    Modem enterprises must face with the dynamically changing market demand what influences the designing process. It is possible by linking computer tools with information gathered by experienced designers teams. The article describes the method basing on engineering knowledge and experience to adding the process of tools selection and cutting parameters determination for a turning operation. The method, proposed by the authors, is based on the CBR (Case Based Reasoning) method. CBR is a method of problem solving that involves searching for an analogy (similarity) between the current task to be solved, and the earlier cases that properly described, are stored in a computer memory. This article presents an algorithm and a formalized description of the developed method. It was discussed the range of its utilization, as well as it was illustrated the method of its functioning on the example of the tools and cutting parameters selection with respect to the turning process.

  20. Detection of Cutting Tool Wear using Statistical Analysis and Regression Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Jaharah A.; Rizal, Muhammad; Nuawi, Mohd Zaki; Haron, Che Hassan Che; Ramli, Rizauddin

    2010-10-01

    This study presents a new method for detecting the cutting tool wear based on the measured cutting force signals. A statistical-based method called Integrated Kurtosis-based Algorithm for Z-Filter technique, called I-kaz was used for developing a regression model and 3D graphic presentation of I-kaz 3D coefficient during machining process. The machining tests were carried out using a CNC turning machine Colchester Master Tornado T4 in dry cutting condition. A Kistler 9255B dynamometer was used to measure the cutting force signals, which were transmitted, analyzed, and displayed in the DasyLab software. Various force signals from machining operation were analyzed, and each has its own I-kaz 3D coefficient. This coefficient was examined and its relationship with flank wear lands (VB) was determined. A regression model was developed due to this relationship, and results of the regression model shows that the I-kaz 3D coefficient value decreases as tool wear increases. The result then is used for real time tool wear monitoring.

  1. Heuristic algorithms for solving of the tool routing problem for CNC cutting machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chentsov, P. A.; Petunin, A. A.; Sesekin, A. N.; Shipacheva, E. N.; Sholohov, A. E.

    2015-11-01

    The article is devoted to the problem of minimizing the path of the cutting tool to shape cutting machines began. This problem can be interpreted as a generalized traveling salesman problem. Earlier version of the dynamic programming method to solve this problem was developed. Unfortunately, this method allows to process an amount not exceeding thirty circuits. In this regard, the task of constructing quasi-optimal route becomes relevant. In this paper we propose options for quasi-optimal greedy algorithms. Comparison of the results of exact and approximate algorithms is given.

  2. Optimum BMI Cut Points to Screen Asian Americans for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kanaya, Alka M.; Hsu, William C.; Chang, Healani K.; Grandinetti, Andrew; Boyko, Edward J.; Hayashi, Tomoshige; Kahn, Steven E.; Leonetti, Donna L.; McNeely, Marguerite J.; Onishi, Yukiko; Sato, Kyoko K.; Fujimoto, Wilfred Y.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Asian Americans manifest type 2 diabetes at low BMI levels but may not undergo diagnostic testing for diabetes if the currently recommended BMI screening cut point of ≥25 kg/m2 is followed. We aimed to ascertain an appropriate lower BMI cut point among Asian-American adults without a prior diabetes diagnosis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We consolidated data from 1,663 participants, ages ≥45 years, without a prior diabetes diagnosis, from population- and community-based studies, including the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America study, the North Kohala Study, the Seattle Japanese American Community Diabetes Study, and the University of California San Diego Filipino Health Study. Clinical measures included a 2-h 75-g oral glucose tolerance test, BMI, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). RESULTS Mean age was 59.7 years, mean BMI was 25.4 kg/m2, 58% were women, and type 2 diabetes prevalence (American Diabetes Association 2010 criteria) was 16.9%. At BMI ≥25 kg/m2, sensitivity (63.7%), specificity (52.8%), and Youden index (0.16) values were low; limiting screening to BMI ≥25 kg/m2 would miss 36% of Asian Americans with type 2 diabetes. For screening purposes, higher sensitivity is desirable to minimize missing cases, especially if the diagnostic test is relatively simple and inexpensive. At BMI ≥23 kg/m2, sensitivity (84.7%) was high in the total sample and by sex and Asian-American subgroup and would miss only ∼15% of Asian Americans with diabetes. CONCLUSIONS The BMI cut point for identifying Asian Americans who should be screened for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes should be <25 kg/m2, and ≥23 kg/m2 may be the most practical. PMID:25665815

  3. Finite Element Modelling of the effect of tool rake angle on tool temperature and cutting force during high speed machining of AISI 4340 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, S.; Roshan, A.; Ariffin, M. K. A.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a Finite Element Method (FEM) based on the ABAQUS explicit software which involves Johnson-Cook material model was used to simulate cutting force and tool temperature during high speed machining (HSM) of AISI 4340 steel. In this simulation work, a tool rake angle ranging from 0° to 20° and a range of cutting speeds between 300 to 550 m/min was investigated. The purpose of this simulation analysis was to find optimum tool rake angle where cutting force is smallest as well as tool temperature is lowest during high speed machining. It was found that cutting forces to have a decreasing trend as rake angle increased to positive direction. The optimum rake angle observed between 10° and 18° due to decrease of cutting force as 20% for all simulated cutting speeds. In addition, increasing cutting tool rake angle over its optimum value had negative influence on tool's performance and led to an increase in cutting temperature. The results give a better understanding and recognition of the cutting tool design for high speed machining processes.

  4. Preset pivotal tool holder

    DOEpatents

    Asmanes, Charles

    1979-01-01

    A tool fixture is provided for precise pre-alignment of a radiused edge cutting tool in a tool holder relative to a fixed reference pivot point established on said holder about which the tool holder may be selectively pivoted relative to the fixture base member to change the contact point of the tool cutting edge with a workpiece while maintaining the precise same tool cutting radius relative to the reference pivot point.

  5. Defining a BMI Cut-Off Point for the Iranian Population: The Shiraz Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Babai, Mohammad Ali; Arasteh, Peyman; Hadibarhaghtalab, Maryam; Naghizadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Salehi, Alireza; Askari, Alireza; Homayounfar, Reza

    2016-01-01

    In this study we evaluated and redefined the optimum body mass index (BMI) cut-off point for the Iranian population based on metabolic syndrome (MeS) risk factors. We further evaluated BMI cut-off points with and without waist circumference (WC) as a cofactor of risk and compared the differences. This study is part of the largest surveillance programs conducted in Shiraz, Iran, termed the Shiraz Heart study. Our study sample included subjects between the ages of 20 to 65 years old. After excluding pregnant women, those with missing data and those with comorbid disease, a total of 12283 made up the study population. The participants underwent a series of tests and evaluations by trained professionals in accordance with WHO recommendations. Hypertension, abnormal fasting blood sugar (FBS), triglyceride (TG) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) (in the context of the definition of metabolic syndrome) were prevalent among 32.4%, 27.6%, 42.1 and 44.2% of our participants, respectively. Women displayed higher rates of overall obesity compared to men (based on the definition by the WHO as higher than 30 kg/m2). Regarding MeS, 38.9% of our population had the all symptoms of MeS which was more prevalent among women (41.5% vs. 36%). When excluding WC in the definition of MeS, results showed that males tend to show a higher rate of metabolic risk factors (19.2% vs. 15.6%). Results of multivariate analysis showed that parallel to an increase in BMI, the odds ratio (OR) for acquiring each component of the metabolic syndrome increased (OR = 1.178; CI: 1.166–1.190). By excluding WC, the previous OR decreased (OR = 1.105; CI: 1.093–1.118). Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that the optimum BMI cut-off point for predicting metabolic syndrome was 26.1 kg/m2 and 26.2 kg/m2 [Accuracy (Acc) = 69% and 61%, respectively)] for males and females, respectively. The overall BMI cut-off for both sexes was 26.2 kg/m2 (Acc = 65%) with sensitivity and

  6. Cutting tool temperatures in contour turning: Transient analysis and experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, D.A.; Jen, T.C.; Lavine, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a model for predicting cutting tool temperatures under transient conditions. It is applicable to processes such as contour turning, in which the cutting speed, feed rate, and depth of cut may vary continuously with time. The model is intended for use in process development and trouble shooting. Therefore, emphasis is given in the model development to enable rapid computation and to avoid the need to specify parameters such as thermal contact resistances and convection coefficients which are not known in practice. Experiments were conducted to validate the predictive model. The model predictions with two different boundary conditions bound the experimental results. An example is presented which shows the utility of the model for process planning.

  7. Influence of Cutting Parameters and Tool Wear on the Surface Integrity of Cobalt-Based Stellite 6 Alloy When Machined Under a Dry Cutting Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingfei, Ge; de Escalona, Patricia Muñoz; Galloway, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    The efficiency of a machining process can be measured by evaluating the quality of the machined surface and the tool wear rate. The research reported herein is mainly focused on the effect of cutting parameters and tool wear on the machined surface defects, surface roughness, deformation layer and residual stresses when dry milling Stellite 6, deposited by overlay on a carbon steel surface. The results showed that under the selected cutting conditions, abrasion, diffusion, peeling, chipping and breakage were the main tool wear mechanisms presented. Also the feed rate was the primary factor affecting the tool wear with an influence of 83%. With regard to the influence of cutting parameters on the surface roughness, the primary factors were feed rate and cutting speed with 57 and 38%, respectively. In addition, in general, as tool wear increased, the surface roughness increased and the deformation layer was found to be influenced more by the cutting parameters rather than the tool wear. Compressive residual stresses were observed in the un-machined surface, and when machining longer than 5 min, residual stress changed 100% from compression to tension. Finally, results showed that micro-crack initiation was the main mechanism for chip formation.

  8. Influence of Cutting Parameters and Tool Wear on the Surface Integrity of Cobalt-Based Stellite 6 Alloy When Machined Under a Dry Cutting Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingfei, Ge; de Escalona, Patricia Muñoz; Galloway, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The efficiency of a machining process can be measured by evaluating the quality of the machined surface and the tool wear rate. The research reported herein is mainly focused on the effect of cutting parameters and tool wear on the machined surface defects, surface roughness, deformation layer and residual stresses when dry milling Stellite 6, deposited by overlay on a carbon steel surface. The results showed that under the selected cutting conditions, abrasion, diffusion, peeling, chipping and breakage were the main tool wear mechanisms presented. Also the feed rate was the primary factor affecting the tool wear with an influence of 83%. With regard to the influence of cutting parameters on the surface roughness, the primary factors were feed rate and cutting speed with 57 and 38%, respectively. In addition, in general, as tool wear increased, the surface roughness increased and the deformation layer was found to be influenced more by the cutting parameters rather than the tool wear. Compressive residual stresses were observed in the un-machined surface, and when machining longer than 5 min, residual stress changed 100% from compression to tension. Finally, results showed that micro-crack initiation was the main mechanism for chip formation.

  9. Prototype of Partial Cutting Tool of Geological Map Images Distributed by Geological Web Map Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonogaki, S.; Nemoto, T.

    2014-12-01

    Geological maps and topographical maps play an important role in disaster assessment, resource management, and environmental preservation. These map information have been distributed in accordance with Web services standards such as Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Map Tile Service (WMTS) recently. In this study, a partial cutting tool of geological map images distributed by geological WMTS was implemented with Free and Open Source Software. The tool mainly consists of two functions: display function and cutting function. The former function was implemented using OpenLayers. The latter function was implemented using Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL). All other small functions were implemented by PHP and Python. As a result, this tool allows not only displaying WMTS layer on web browser but also generating a geological map image of intended area and zoom level. At this moment, available WTMS layers are limited to the ones distributed by WMTS for the Seamless Digital Geological Map of Japan. The geological map image can be saved as GeoTIFF format and WebGL format. GeoTIFF is one of the georeferenced raster formats that is available in many kinds of Geographical Information System. WebGL is useful for confirming a relationship between geology and geography in 3D. In conclusion, the partial cutting tool developed in this study would contribute to create better conditions for promoting utilization of geological information. Future work is to increase the number of available WMTS layers and the types of output file format.

  10. Correction method for the error of diamond tool's radius in ultra-precision cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Yu, Jing-chi

    2010-10-01

    The compensation method for the error of diamond tool's cutting edge is a bottle-neck technology to hinder the high accuracy aspheric surface's directly formation after single diamond turning. Traditional compensation was done according to the measurement result from profile meter, which took long measurement time and caused low processing efficiency. A new compensation method was firstly put forward in the article, in which the correction of the error of diamond tool's cutting edge was done according to measurement result from digital interferometer. First, detailed theoretical calculation related with compensation method was deduced. Then, the effect after compensation was simulated by computer. Finally, φ50 mm work piece finished its diamond turning and new correction turning under Nanotech 250. Testing surface achieved high shape accuracy pv 0.137λ and rms=0.011λ, which approved the new compensation method agreed with predictive analysis, high accuracy and fast speed of error convergence.

  11. A review of the use of wear-resistant coatings in the cutting-tool industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.

    1983-01-01

    The main mechanisms involved in the wear of cutting tools are reviewed. Evaluation of the different coating properties required for the reduction of the different kinds of wear was also reviewed. The types of coatings and their ranges of applicability are presented and discussed in view of their properties. Various coating processes as well as their advantages and shortcomings are described. Potential future developments in the field of wear-resistant coatings are discussed.

  12. Research concerning optimum cutting parameters according with tool path strategy for finishing procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, A. E.; Anania, F. D.; Zapciu, M.

    2015-11-01

    Optimization of cutting parameters in NC milling needs to be studied because of its influence on machining time and cost. Today, any CAM software offers many tool path strategies to milling free form geometries. However, the users must have the know-how to choose the strategies according to geometry complexity, cutting tool geometry and its contact on the machined surface. Choosing the right strategy with the right cutting parameter is a rather difficult task to do on the machine tool. In this paper we try to take into account the influence of the toolpath over the surface quality for finishing operation. The main goal is to establish a direct link between machining parameters and toolpath in order to obtain the same surface quality for different trajectories. The first step consist in making a series of experiments for standards toolpaths (which can be found in any CAM software) like one-way, zig-zag, spiral from outside to inside, zig-zag at 45 dgr on a milling center. Based on the results, a correction coefficient for the feed rate was established.

  13. Point-cloud-to-point-cloud technique on tool calibration for dental implant surgical path tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorsakul, Auranuch; Suthakorn, Jackrit; Sinthanayothin, Chanjira

    2008-03-01

    Dental implant is one of the most popular methods of tooth root replacement used in prosthetic dentistry. Computerize navigation system on a pre-surgical plan is offered to minimize potential risk of damage to critical anatomic structures of patients. Dental tool tip calibrating is basically an important procedure of intraoperative surgery to determine the relation between the hand-piece tool tip and hand-piece's markers. With the transferring coordinates from preoperative CT data to reality, this parameter is a part of components in typical registration problem. It is a part of navigation system which will be developed for further integration. A high accuracy is required, and this relation is arranged by point-cloud-to-point-cloud rigid transformations and singular value decomposition (SVD) for minimizing rigid registration errors. In earlier studies, commercial surgical navigation systems from, such as, BrainLAB and Materialize, have flexibility problem on tool tip calibration. Their systems either require a special tool tip calibration device or are unable to change the different tool. The proposed procedure is to use the pointing device or hand-piece to touch on the pivot and the transformation matrix. This matrix is calculated every time when it moves to the new position while the tool tip stays at the same point. The experiment acquired on the information of tracking device, image acquisition and image processing algorithms. The key success is that point-to-point-cloud requires only 3 post images of tool to be able to converge to the minimum errors 0.77%, and the obtained result is correct in using the tool holder to track the path simulation line displayed in graphic animation.

  14. Proposing a tentative cut point for the Compulsive Sexual Behavior Inventory.

    PubMed

    Storholm, Erik David; Fisher, Dennis G; Napper, Lucy E; Reynolds, Grace L; Halkitis, Perry N

    2011-12-01

    Bivariate analyses were utilized in order to identify the relations between scores on the Compulsive Sexual Behavior Inventory (CSBI) and self-report of risky sexual behavior and drug abuse among 482 racially and ethnically diverse men and women. CSBI scores were associated with both risky sexual behavior and drug abuse among a diverse non-clinical sample, thereby providing evidence of criterion-related validity. The variables that demonstrated a high association with the CSBI were subsequently entered into a multiple regression model. Four variables (number of sexual partners in the last 30 days, self-report of trading drugs for sex, having paid for sex, and perceived chance of acquiring HIV) were retained as variables with good model fit. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were conducted in order to determine the optimal tentative cut point for the CSBI. The four variables retained in the multiple regression model were utilized as exploratory gold standards in order to construct ROC curves. The ROC curves were then compared to one another in order to determine the point that maximized both sensitivity and specificity in the identification of compulsive sexual behavior with the CSBI scale. The current findings suggest that a tentative cut point of 40 may prove clinically useful in discriminating between persons who exhibit compulsive sexual behavior and those who do not. Because of the association between compulsive sexual behavior and HIV, STIs, and drug abuse, it is paramount that a psychometrically sound measure of compulsive sexual behavior is made available to all healthcare professionals working in disease prevention and other areas.

  15. Proposing a Tentative Cut Point for the Compulsive Sexual Behavior Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Storholm, Erik David; Fisher, Dennis G.; Napper, Lucy E.; Reynolds, Grace L.

    2015-01-01

    Bivariate analyses were utilized in order to identify the relations between scores on the Compulsive Sexual Behavior Inventory (CSBI) and self-report of risky sexual behavior and drug abuse among 482 racially and ethnically diverse men and women. CSBI scores were associated with both risky sexual behavior and drug abuse among a diverse non-clinical sample, thereby providing evidence of criterion-related validity. The variables that demonstrated a high association with the CSBI were subsequently entered into a multiple regression model. Four variables (number of sexual partners in the last 30 days, self-report of trading drugs for sex, having paid for sex, and perceived chance of acquiring HIV) were retained as variables with good model fit. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were conducted in order to determine the optimal tentative cut point for the CSBI. The four variables retained in the multiple regression model were utilized as exploratory gold standards in order to construct ROC curves. The ROC curves were then compared to one another in order to determine the point that maximized both sensitivity and specificity in the identification of compulsive sexual behavior with the CSBI scale. The current findings suggest that a tentative cut point of 40 may prove clinically useful in discriminating between persons who exhibit compulsive sexual behavior and those who do not. Because of the association between compulsive sexual behavior and HIV, STIs, and drug abuse, it is paramount that a psychometrically sound measure of compulsive sexual behavior is made available to all healthcare professionals working in disease prevention and other areas. PMID:21203814

  16. What should be the optimal cut points for mild, moderate, and severe pain?

    PubMed

    Li, Kathy K; Harris, Kristin; Hadi, Stephanie; Chow, Edward

    2007-12-01

    Grouping patients' rating of pain intensity from 0 to 10 into categories of mild, moderate, and severe pain is useful for informing treatment decisions, interpreting study outcomes, as well as aiding policy or clinical practice guidelines development. In 1995, Serlin and colleagues developed a technique to establish the cut points for mild, moderate, and severe pain by grading pain intensity with functional interference. Since then, a number of studies attempted to confirm these findings in similar or different populations but had different results. Such inconsistencies in the literature prompt for more research to establish the definition of mild, moderate and severe pain. Thus, the purpose of the current study was to identify optimal cut points (CP) of the three pain severity categories for worst, average, and current pain. The study population (n = 199) was patients with symptomatic bone metastases referred to a palliative radiotherapy clinic. Using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), patients reported their worst, average, and current pain intensity, as well as the degree of functional interference due to pain. All possible combinations for the CPs, between 2 and 8, were created and related to the set of 7 interference items from the BPI using the multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). The criteria used to determine the optimal set of cut points for mild, moderate and severe pain was a MANOVA among pain severity categories that yielded the largest F ratio for the between-category effect on the 7 interference items as indicated by Pillai's trace, Wilk's lambda, and Hotelling's trace F statistics. Results confirmed a non-linear relationship between cancer pain severity and functional interference. The optimal CP for worst and average pain was CP4, 6 (mild = 1-4, moderate = 5-6, and severe = 7-10), confirming Serlin and colleagues's findings. These findings are pivotal in further understanding the meaning of pain intensity levels and the assessment of pain in

  17. A review of the cut-off points for the diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency in the general population.

    PubMed

    Aparicio-Ugarriza, Raquel; Palacios, Gonzalo; Alder, Monika; González-Gross, Marcela

    2015-07-01

    Vitamin B12 deficit is one of the most common vitamin deficiencies. However, there is no consensus on the cut-off points for vitamin B12 and its co-markers, such as folate, holotranscobalamin, methylmalonic acid and homocysteine. In order to establish the state of the art about cut-off points used to determine vitamin B12 deficiency in the last decades, the database MEDLINE was used for searching studies published in adults between December 1992 and May 2014 (69 articles), using search terms like 'vitamin B12', 'cobalamin', 'cut-off', 'deficiency' alone or in combinations. Broad ranges of cut-off points for vitamin B12 and its biomarkers were identified: vitamin B12 ranged between 100 pmol/L and 350 pmol/L, holotranscobalamin 20-50 pmol/L, methylmalonic acid 0.210-0.470 μmol/L, homocysteine 10-21.6 μmol/L, serum folate 3.7-15.9 nmol/L and red blood cell 124-397 nmol/L. For the majority of studies, the potential influence of age, analytical methods, gender and fortified food consumption was not taken in account when choosing cut-off values. This could explain the discrepancies between studies on vitamin B12 and folate deficiency prevalences. We conclude that there is inconsistency in the literature regarding vitamin B12 cut-offs. It would be necessary to establish different reference cut-offs according to age, considering the analytical methods used.

  18. Penetration of cutting tool into cortical bone: experimental and numerical investigation of anisotropic mechanical behaviour.

    PubMed

    Li, Simin; Abdel-Wahab, Adel; Demirci, Emrah; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2014-03-21

    An anisotropic mechanical behaviour of cortical bone and its intrinsic hierarchical microstructure act as protective mechanisms to prevent catastrophic failure due to natural loading conditions; however, they increase the extent of complexity of a penetration process in the case of orthopaedic surgery. Experimental results available in literature provide only limited information about processes in the vicinity of a tool-bone interaction zone. Also, available numerical models the bone-cutting process do not account for material anisotropy or the effect of damage mechanisms. In this study, both experimental and numerical studies were conducted to address these issues and to elucidate the effect of anisotropic mechanical behaviour of cortical bone tissue on penetration of a sharp cutting tool. First, a set of tool-penetration experiments was performed in directions parallel and perpendicular to bone axis. Also, these experiments included bone samples cut from four different cortices to evaluate the effect of spatial variability and material anisotropy on the penetration processes. Distinct deformation and damage mechanisms linked to different microstructure orientations were captured using a micro-lens high-speed camera. Then, a novel hybrid FE model employing a smoothed-particle-hydrodynamic domain embedded into a continuum FE one was developed based on the experimental configuration to characterise the anisotropic deformation and damage behaviour of cortical bone under a penetration process. The results of our study revealed a clear anisotropic material behaviour of the studied cortical bone tissue and the influence of the underlying microstructure. The proposed FE model reflected adequately the experimental results and demonstrated the need for the use of the anisotropic and damage material model to analyse cutting of the cortical-bone tissue. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Analyzing the effect of cutting parameters on surface roughness and tool wear when machining nickel based hastelloy - 276

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khidhir, Basim A.; Mohamed, Bashir

    2011-02-01

    Machining parameters has an important factor on tool wear and surface finish, for that the manufacturers need to obtain optimal operating parameters with a minimum set of experiments as well as minimizing the simulations in order to reduce machining set up costs. The cutting speed is one of the most important cutting parameter to evaluate, it clearly most influences on one hand, tool life, tool stability, and cutting process quality, and on the other hand controls production flow. Due to more demanding manufacturing systems, the requirements for reliable technological information have increased. For a reliable analysis in cutting, the cutting zone (tip insert-workpiece-chip system) as the mechanics of cutting in this area are very complicated, the chip is formed in the shear plane (entrance the shear zone) and is shape in the sliding plane. The temperature contributed in the primary shear, chamfer and sticking, sliding zones are expressed as a function of unknown shear angle on the rake face and temperature modified flow stress in each zone. The experiments were carried out on a CNC lathe and surface finish and tool tip wear are measured in process. Machining experiments are conducted. Reasonable agreement is observed under turning with high depth of cut. Results of this research help to guide the design of new cutting tool materials and the studies on evaluation of machining parameters to further advance the productivity of nickel based alloy Hastelloy - 276 machining.

  20. Probability distribution of the entanglement across a cut at an infinite-randomness fixed point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devakul, Trithep; Majumdar, Satya N.; Huse, David A.

    2017-03-01

    We calculate the probability distribution of entanglement entropy S across a cut of a finite one-dimensional spin chain of length L at an infinite-randomness fixed point using Fisher's strong randomness renormalization group (RG). Using the random transverse-field Ising model as an example, the distribution is shown to take the form p (S |L ) ˜L-ψ (k ) , where k ≡S /ln[L /L0] , the large deviation function ψ (k ) is found explicitly, and L0 is a nonuniversal microscopic length. We discuss the implications of such a distribution on numerical techniques that rely on entanglement, such as matrix-product-state-based techniques. Our results are verified with numerical RG simulations, as well as the actual entanglement entropy distribution for the random transverse-field Ising model which we calculate for large L via a mapping to Majorana fermions.

  1. Determining activity count cut-points for measurement of physical activity using the Actiwatch2 accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Neil-Sztramko, Sarah E; Rafn, Bolette Skjødt; Gotay, Carolyn C; Campbell, Kristin L

    2017-05-01

    Sleep and physical activity are important contributors to many aspects of health. Obtaining accurate, objective measures of both behaviours is critical to health research. The Actiwatch2 is a wrist-worn sleep-monitoring device that has the potential to measure physical activity. Currently, interpretation of the Actiwatch2 physical activity data is limited by a lack of published thresholds for interpreting exercise intensity. This limits the ability to collect information on both behaviours simultaneously using one monitor. This study aims to develop thresholds to differentiate between light, moderate and vigorous-intensity physical activity and sedentary time for the Actiwatch2. Thirty females, 40±14.9years, completed eight exercise tasks while wearing a Cosmed portable metabolic cart, the Actiwatch2 and the Actigraph GT3X+. Correlations between 1) activity counts from both the Actiwatch2 and Actigraph and metabolic equivalent (MET) values, and 2) activity counts from the two monitors were calculated. Area Under the Curve (AUC) was calculated, and cut points that maximized sensitivity and specificity were determined. The correlations between MET values and Actiwatch2 counts (r=0.69) and Actigraph (r=0.69) were strong. Correlation between the two activity monitors was very strong (r=0.84). The discrimination of sedentary behaviour was almost perfect (AUC=0.96) using a threshold of 145cpm. Discrimination of moderate (AUC=0.92) and vigorous (AUC=0.77) activity was acceptable using a threshold of 274 and 597cpm respectively. The Actiwatch2 demonstrated the ability to discriminate different intensities of physical activity among adult females. With these reported cut points, the Actiwatch2 can be used to simultaneously measure sleep and physical activity - two key outcomes in health research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Establishing school day pedometer step count cut-points using ROC curves in low-income children.

    PubMed

    Burns, Ryan D; Brusseau, Timothy A; Fu, You; Hannon, James C

    2016-05-01

    Previous research has not established pedometer step count cut-points that discriminate children that meet school day physical activity recommendations using a tri-axial ActiGraph accelerometer criterion. The purpose of this study was to determine step count cut-points that associate with 30min of school day moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in school-aged children. Participants included 1053 school-aged children (mean age=8.4±1.8years) recruited from three low-income schools from the state of Utah in the U.S. Physical activity was assessed using Yamax DigiWalker CW600 pedometers and ActiGraph wGT3X-BT triaxial accelerometers that were concurrently worn during school hours. Data were collected at each school during the 2014-2015 school year. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine pedometer step count cut-points that associated with at least 30min of MVPA during school hours. Cut-points were determined using the maximum Youden's J statistic (J max). For the total sample, the area-under-the-curve (AUC) was 0.77 (p<0.001) with a pedometer cut-point of 5505 steps (J max=0.46, Sensitivity=63%, Specificity=84%; Accuracy=76%). Step counts showed greater diagnostic ability in girls (AUC=0.81, p<0.001; Cut-point=5306 steps; Accuracy=78.8%) compared to boys (AUC=0.72, p<0.01; Cut-point=5786 steps; Accuracy=71.4%). Pedometer step counts showed good diagnostic ability in girls and fair diagnostic ability in boys for discriminating children that met at least 30min of MVPA during school hours.

  3. Multivariate meta-analysis of prognostic factor studies with multiple cut-points and/or methods of measurement.

    PubMed

    Riley, Richard D; Elia, Eleni G; Malin, Gemma; Hemming, Karla; Price, Malcolm P

    2015-07-30

    A prognostic factor is any measure that is associated with the risk of future health outcomes in those with existing disease. Often, the prognostic ability of a factor is evaluated in multiple studies. However, meta-analysis is difficult because primary studies often use different methods of measurement and/or different cut-points to dichotomise continuous factors into 'high' and 'low' groups; selective reporting is also common. We illustrate how multivariate random effects meta-analysis models can accommodate multiple prognostic effect estimates from the same study, relating to multiple cut-points and/or methods of measurement. The models account for within-study and between-study correlations, which utilises more information and reduces the impact of unreported cut-points and/or measurement methods in some studies. The applicability of the approach is improved with individual participant data and by assuming a functional relationship between prognostic effect and cut-point to reduce the number of unknown parameters. The models provide important inferential results for each cut-point and method of measurement, including the summary prognostic effect, the between-study variance and a 95% prediction interval for the prognostic effect in new populations. Two applications are presented. The first reveals that, in a multivariate meta-analysis using published results, the Apgar score is prognostic of neonatal mortality but effect sizes are smaller at most cut-points than previously thought. In the second, a multivariate meta-analysis of two methods of measurement provides weak evidence that microvessel density is prognostic of mortality in lung cancer, even when individual participant data are available so that a continuous prognostic trend is examined (rather than cut-points).

  4. Cut points on 0-10 numeric rating scales for symptoms included in the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale in cancer patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Oldenmenger, Wendy H; de Raaf, Pleun J; de Klerk, Cora; van der Rijt, Carin C D

    2013-06-01

    To improve the management of cancer-related symptoms, systematic screening is necessary, often performed by using 0-10 numeric rating scales. Cut points are used to determine if scores represent clinically relevant burden. The aim of this systematic review was to explore the evidence on cut points for the symptoms of the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale. Relevant literature was searched in PubMed, CINAHL®, Embase, and PsycINFO®. We defined a cut point as the lower bound of the scores representing moderate or severe burden. Eighteen articles were eligible for this review. Cut points were determined using the interference with daily life, another symptom-related method, or a verbal scale. For pain, cut point 5 and, to a lesser extent, cut point 7 were found as the optimal cut points for moderate pain and severe pain, respectively. For moderate tiredness, the best cut point seemed to be cut point 4. For severe tiredness, both cut points 7 and 8 were suggested frequently. A lack of evidence exists for nausea, depression, anxiety, drowsiness, appetite, well-being, and shortness of breath. Few studies suggested a cut point below 4. For many symptoms, there is no clear evidence as to what the optimal cut points are. In daily clinical practice, a symptom score ≥4 is recommended as a trigger for a more comprehensive symptom assessment. Until there is more evidence on the optimal cut points, we should hold back using a certain cut point in quality indicators and be cautious about strongly recommending a certain cut point in guidelines. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Vibration suppression in cutting tools using collocated piezoelectric sensors/actuators with an adaptive control algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Radecki, Peter P; Farinholt, Kevin M; Park, Gyuhae; Bement, Matthew T

    2008-01-01

    The machining process is very important in many engineering applications. In high precision machining, surface finish is strongly correlated with vibrations and the dynamic interactions between the part and the cutting tool. Parameters affecting these vibrations and dynamic interactions, such as spindle speed, cut depth, feed rate, and the part's material properties can vary in real-time, resulting in unexpected or undesirable effects on the surface finish of the machining product. The focus of this research is the development of an improved machining process through the use of active vibration damping. The tool holder employs a high bandwidth piezoelectric actuator with an adaptive positive position feedback control algorithm for vibration and chatter suppression. In addition, instead of using external sensors, the proposed approach investigates the use of a collocated piezoelectric sensor for measuring the dynamic responses from machining processes. The performance of this method is evaluated by comparing the surface finishes obtained with active vibration control versus baseline uncontrolled cuts. Considerable improvement in surface finish (up to 50%) was observed for applications in modern day machining.

  6. Nanostructured Multilayer Composite Coatings on Ceramic Cutting Tools for Finishing Treatment of High-Hardness Quenched Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereshchaka, A. A.; Batako, A. D.; Sotova, E. S.; Vereshchaka, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The functional role of nanostructured multilayer composite coatings (NMCC) deposited on the operating surfaces of replaceable faceted cutting inserts (CI) from cutting ceramics based on aluminum oxides with additives of titanium carbides is studied. It is shown that the developed NMCC not only raise substantially the endurance of the ceramic tools under high-speed dry treatment of quenched steels but also improve the quality and accuracy of processing of the parts and the ecological parameters of the cutting process.

  7. Taguchi Optimization of Cutting Parameters in Turning AISI 1020 MS with M2 HSS Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonowal, Dharindom; Sarma, Dhrupad; Bakul Barua, Parimal; Nath, Thuleswar

    2017-08-01

    In this paper the effect of three cutting parameters viz. Spindle speed, Feed and Depth of Cut on surface roughness of AISI 1020 mild steel bar in turning was investigated and optimized to obtain minimum surface roughness. All the experiments are conducted on HMT LB25 lathe machine using M2 HSS cutting tool. Ranges of parameters of interest have been decided through some preliminary experimentation (One Factor At a Time experiments). Finally a combined experiment has been carried out using Taguchi’s L27 Orthogonal Array (OA) to study the main effect and interaction effect of the all three parameters. The experimental results were analyzed with raw data ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) and S/N data (Signal to Noise ratio) ANOVA. Results show that Spindle speed, Feed and Depth of Cut have significant effects on both mean and variation of surface roughness in turning AISI 1020 mild steel. Mild two factors interactions are observed among the aforesaid factors with significant effects only on the mean of the output variable. From the Taguchi parameter optimization the optimum factor combination is found to be 630 rpm spindle speed, 0.05 mm/rev feed and 1.25 mm depth of cut with estimated surface roughness 2.358 ± 0.970 µm. A confirmatory experiment was conducted with the optimum factor combination to verify the results. In the confirmatory experiment the average value of surface roughness is found to be 2.408 µm which is well within the range (0.418 µm to 4.299 µm) predicted for confirmatory experiment.

  8. Thermal properties of coating materials and their effect on the efficiency of coated cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porat, R.; Yaniv, R.

    Various combinations of coating layers -- of carbides, nitrides and oxides on substrates of cemented carbides -- produced by the chemical vapor deposition process and the resulting increases in tool life and machining speeds are discussed. The thermal conductivity of both carbides and nitrides increases with higher temperatures, but at a lower value for nitrides than carbides; whereas the thermal conductivity of oxides decreases with an increase in temperature. It follows, therefore, that at low machining speeds there is an advantage to coating with nitrides, and at high machining speeds there is an advantage to coating with oxides. A combination of the two on the tool surface gives the best ability to withstand wear in a wide range of machining speeds. When combining both at the surface layer, and also at the layer lying between the surface and the substrate, the result in addition to good wear resistance is an increased ability to withstand high cutting speeds without actual damage to the tool itself.

  9. Pediatric Care Online: A Pediatric Point-of-Care Tool.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric Care Online is the American Academy of Pediatrics' point-of-care tool designed for health care providers. Pediatric Care Online builds on content from Red Book Online and Pediatric Patient Education and features Quick Reference topic pages for more than 250 pediatric health care topics. The multitude of resources available within Pediatric Care Online will be reviewed in this column, and a sample search will be used to illustrate the type of information available within this point-of-care pediatric resource.

  10. Studies of the frictional heating of polycrystalline diamond compact drag tools during rock cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, A.; Glowka, D.A.

    1982-06-01

    A numerical-analytical model is developed to analyze temperatures in polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drag tools subject to localized frictional heating at a worn flat area and convective cooling at exposed lateral surfaces. Experimental measurements of convective heat transfer coefficients of PDC cutters in a uniform crossflow are presented and used in the model to predict temperatures under typical drilling conditions with fluid flow. The analysis compares favorably with measurements of frictional temperatures in controlled cutting tests on Tennessee marble. It is found that average temperatures at the wearflat contact zone vary directly with frictional force per unit area and are proportional to the one-half power of the cutting speed at the velocities investigated. Temperatures are found to be much more sensitive to decreases in the dynamic friction by lubrication than to increases in convective cooling rates beyond currently achievable levels with water or drilling fluids. It is shown that use of weighted drilling fluids may actually decrease cooling rates compared to those achieved with pure water. It is doubtful that tool temperatures can be kept below critical levels (750/sup 0/C) if air is employed as the drilling fluid. The degree of tool wear is found to have a major influence on the thermal response of the friction contact zone, so that for equal heating per contact area, a worn tool will run much hotter than a sharp tool. It is concluded that tool temperatures may be kept below critical levels with conventional water or mud cooling as long as the fluid provides good cutter-rock lubrication.

  11. ForceViewer: A Starting Point Force Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    to assemble the list of capabilities forming the Starting Point Force ( SPF ). This SPF is used by a number of organisations within Defence and in...particular by the Force Structure Review (FSR) team. The SPF is usually assembled using Microsoft Word and Excel to store and derive which capability...better tool that delivers the SPF was identified by Joint Operations Divi- sion, Joint Decisions Support Centre (JDSC) task. This was translated into

  12. A comparison of the dentin cutting efficiency of 4 pointed ultrasonic tips.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Matthew P; Kulild, James C; Walker, Mary P

    2013-07-01

    Pointed ultrasonic tips can be used for several applications including troughing around intracanal obstructions. With the variety of pointed ultrasonic tips available, the purpose of this in vitro investigation was to compare the dentin cutting efficiency of 4 commonly used pointed ultrasonic tips. The ultrasonic tips (n = 5 tips/group) included in the study were the following: CPR-3D (Obtura Spartan, Algonquin, IL), BL 6A (B&L Biotech, Bala Cynwyd, PA), PUENDO2 (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK), and WH1 (eie2, San Diego, CA). The tips were attached to a testing apparatus that produced linear movement and a 15-g axial force during instrumentation of a human dentin specimen. For all tips, instrumentation was completed at the same power setting, which fell within the power setting range recommended by each manufacturer. Dentin specimens were weighed at baseline and after 6 minutes of instrumentation to measure dentin loss to the nearest 0.01 mg. A qualitative analysis of the shape and surface topography of new and used ultrasonic tips was performed via scanning electron microscopy. A 1-factor analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc analysis of dentin removal revealed a statistically significant difference between the 4 ultrasonic tips (P < .05). The CPR-3D removed more dentin than the other 3 tips, whereas the BL 6A removed more dentin than the WH1. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed the CPR-3D as having the least change to tip shape and topography as compared with the other tips. Within the limits of this study, CPR-3D showed the greatest dentin removal, which may be linked to the stability of the CPR-3D tip shape and topography. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Machinability of hastelloy C-276 using Hot-pressed sintered Ti(C7N3)-based cermet cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kaitao; Zou, Bin; Huang, Chuanzhen; Yao, Yang; Zhou, Huijun; Liu, Zhanqiang

    2015-05-01

    C-276 nickel-based alloy is a difficult-to-cut material. In high-speed machining of Hastelloy C-276, notching is a prominent failure mode due to high mechanical properties of work piece, which results in the short tool life and low productivity. In this paper, a newly developed Ti(C7N3)-based cermet insert manufactured by a hot-pressing method is used to machine the C-276 nickel-based alloy, and its cutting performances are studied. Based on orthogonal experiment method, the influence of cutting parameters on tool life, material removal rates and surface roughness are investigated. Experimental research results indicate that the optimal cutting condition is a cutting speed of 50 m/min, depth of cut of 0.4 mm and feed rate of 0.15 mm/r if the tool life and material removal rates are considered comprehensively. In this case, the tool life is 32 min and material removal rates are 3000 mm3/min, which is appropriate to the rough machining. If the tool life and surface roughness are considered, the better cutting condition is a cutting speed of 75 m/min, depth of cut of 0.6 mm and feed rate of 0.1 mm/r. In this case, the surface roughness is 0.59μm. Notch wear, flank wear, chipping at the tool nose, built-up edge(BUE) and micro-cracks are found when Ti(C7N3)-based cermet insert turned Hastelloy C-276. Oxidation, adhesive, abrasive and diffusion are the wear mechanisms, which can be investigated by the observations of scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. This research will help to guide studies on the evaluation of machining parameters to further advance the productivity of nickel based alloy Hastelloy C-276 machining.

  14. Some statistical tools for change-points detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebarbier, E.

    2012-04-01

    The homogenization of climatological series sometimes amounts at finding change-points in the distribution of the observation along time. This problem is refereed to as 'segmentation' in the statistical literature. Segmentation raises interesting issues in terms of both statistical modeling, model selection and algorithmics. We will make a brief overview of these issues and present several solutions that have been recently proposed. We will also consider the joint segmentation of several series. Eventually, we will introduce the R package 'CGHseg' (cran.r-project.org/web/packages/cghseg/index.html) that as been originally developed for biological applications, and contains several useful tools for the analysis of climatological series.

  15. Effect of cutting parameters on sustainable machining performance of coated carbide tool in dry turning process of stainless steel 316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagaber, Salem A.; Yusoff, Ahmed Razlan

    2017-04-01

    The manufacturing industry aims to produce many products of high quality with relatively less cost and time. Different cutting parameters affect the machining performance of surface roughness, cutting force, and material removal rate. Nevertheless, a few studies reported on the effects of sustainable factors such as power consumed, cycle time during machining, and tool life on the dry turning of AISI 316. The present study aims to evaluate the machining performance of coated carbide in the machining of hard steel AISI 316 under the dry turning process. The influence of cutting parameters of cutting speed, feed rate, and depth of cut with their five (5) levels is established by a central composite design. Highly significant parameters were determined by analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the main effects of power consumed and time during machining, surface roughness, and tool wear were observed. Results showed that the cutting speed was proportional to power consumption and tool wear. Meanwhile, insignificant to surface roughness, feed rate most significantly affected surface roughness and power consumption followed by depth of cut.

  16. Evaluation of alternate categorical tumor metrics and cut points for response categorization using the RECIST 1.1 data warehouse.

    PubMed

    Mandrekar, Sumithra J; An, Ming-Wen; Meyers, Jeffrey; Grothey, Axel; Bogaerts, Jan; Sargent, Daniel J

    2014-03-10

    We sought to test and validate the predictive utility of trichotomous tumor response (TriTR; complete response [CR] or partial response [PR] v stable disease [SD] v progressive disease [PD]), disease control rate (DCR; CR/PR/SD v PD), and dichotomous tumor response (DiTR; CR/PR v others) metrics using alternate cut points for PR and PD. The data warehouse assembled to guide the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) version 1.1 was used. Data from 13 trials (5,480 patients with metastatic breast cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer, or colorectal cancer) were randomly split (60:40) into training and validation data sets. In all, 27 pairs of cut points for PR and PD were considered: PR (10% to 50% decrease by 5% increments) and PD (10% to 20% increase by 5% increments), for which 30% and 20% correspond to the RECIST categorization. Cox proportional hazards models with landmark analyses at 12 and 24 weeks stratified by study and number of lesions (fewer than three v three or more) and adjusted for average baseline tumor size were used to assess the impact of each metric on overall survival (OS). Model discrimination was assessed by using the concordance index (c-index). Standard RECIST cut points demonstrated predictive ability similar to the alternate PR and PD cut points. Regardless of tumor type, the TriTR, DiTR, and DCR metrics had similar predictive performance. The 24-week metrics (albeit with higher c-index point estimate) were not meaningfully better than the 12-week metrics. None of the metrics did particularly well for breast cancer. Alternative cut points to RECIST standards provided no meaningful improvement in OS prediction. Metrics assessed at 12 weeks have good predictive performance.

  17. Evaluation of Alternate Categorical Tumor Metrics and Cut Points for Response Categorization Using the RECIST 1.1 Data Warehouse

    PubMed Central

    Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; An, Ming-Wen; Meyers, Jeffrey; Grothey, Axel; Bogaerts, Jan; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We sought to test and validate the predictive utility of trichotomous tumor response (TriTR; complete response [CR] or partial response [PR] v stable disease [SD] v progressive disease [PD]), disease control rate (DCR; CR/PR/SD v PD), and dichotomous tumor response (DiTR; CR/PR v others) metrics using alternate cut points for PR and PD. The data warehouse assembled to guide the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) version 1.1 was used. Methods Data from 13 trials (5,480 patients with metastatic breast cancer, non–small-cell lung cancer, or colorectal cancer) were randomly split (60:40) into training and validation data sets. In all, 27 pairs of cut points for PR and PD were considered: PR (10% to 50% decrease by 5% increments) and PD (10% to 20% increase by 5% increments), for which 30% and 20% correspond to the RECIST categorization. Cox proportional hazards models with landmark analyses at 12 and 24 weeks stratified by study and number of lesions (fewer than three v three or more) and adjusted for average baseline tumor size were used to assess the impact of each metric on overall survival (OS). Model discrimination was assessed by using the concordance index (c-index). Results Standard RECIST cut points demonstrated predictive ability similar to the alternate PR and PD cut points. Regardless of tumor type, the TriTR, DiTR, and DCR metrics had similar predictive performance. The 24-week metrics (albeit with higher c-index point estimate) were not meaningfully better than the 12-week metrics. None of the metrics did particularly well for breast cancer. Conclusion Alternative cut points to RECIST standards provided no meaningful improvement in OS prediction. Metrics assessed at 12 weeks have good predictive performance. PMID:24516033

  18. Anthropometric parameters' cut-off points and predictive value for metabolic syndrome in women from Cartagena, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Mora-García, Gustavo José; Gómez-Camargo, Doris; Mazenett, Enrique; Alario, Ángelo; Fortich, Álvaro; Gómez-Alegría, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Objective. To estimate anthropometric parameters' (APs) cut-off points and association for metabolic syndrome (MetS). Materials and methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out with a total of 434 adult women from Cartagena de Indias, Colombia, in 2012. APs measured were waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI), body adiposity index (BAI), waist-hip ratio (WHR) and waist-height ratio (WHtR). Cut-off points were estimated by a receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC). Logistic regression was applied to estimate possible associations. Results. Cut-off points for WC, BMI, BAI, WHR and WHtR were 85 cm, 28 kg/m(2), 39%, 0.80 and 56, respectively. Only WHtR was associated to MetS (OR=1.11, CI95% [1.07-1.15]). Conclusion. WC cut-off point was higher than those proposed for Latin-American women by the Joint Interim Statement (JIS). WHtR had a low predictive value for MetS.

  19. Combinations of Epoch Durations and Cut-Points to Estimate Sedentary Time and Physical Activity among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fröberg, Andreas; Berg, Christina; Larsson, Christel; Boldemann, Cecilia; Raustorp, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate how combinations of different epoch durations and cut-points affect the estimations of sedentary time and physical activity in adolescents. Accelerometer data from 101 adolescents were derived and 30 combinations were used to estimate sedentary time, light, moderate, vigorous, and combined…

  20. Cut points on the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) that predict response to cognitive-behavioral treatments for depression.

    PubMed

    Schueller, Stephen M; Kwasny, Mary J; Dear, Blake F; Titov, Nickolai; Mohr, David C

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring depressive symptoms during treatment can guide clinical decision making and improve outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore values on the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) that could predict response to treatment. Data came from two independent trials, including three treatment modalities of cognitive-behavioral treatment for depression. Four hundred eighty-seven participants who either met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition criteria for major depressive disorder or had PHQ-9 scores consistent with a diagnosis of depression were included in our analyses. Participants either received 18 weeks of telephone or face-to-face (n=279) or 8 weeks of Web-delivered (n=208) cognitive-behavioral therapy. Depressive symptoms, evaluated using the PHQ-9, were reported every 4 weeks in the telephone and face-to-face trial and weekly in the Web-delivered intervention trial. Optimal cut points for predicting end-of-treatment response were consistent in both trials. Our results suggested using cut points of a PHQ-9 ≥17 at Week 4, and PHQ-9 ≥13 at Week 9 and PHQ-9 ≥9 at Week 14. Consistent cut points were found within the included trials. These cut points may be valuable for algorithms to support clinical decision making. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The CDC and IOTF cut points show inconsistent prevalence of underweight and overweight in chinese, indonesian, and vietnamese children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    No nationally representative data from middle and low-income countries have been analyzed to compare prevalence of underweight and overweight defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) BMI cut points. We evaluated the consistency i...

  2. Cut Points on the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) that Predict Response to Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Kwasny, Mary J.; Dear, Blake F.; Titov, Nickolai; Mohr, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Monitoring depressive symptoms during treatment can guide clinical decision-making and improve outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore values on the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) that could predict response to treatment. Method Data came from two independent trials, including three treatment modalities of cognitive-behavioral treatment for depression. Four hundred eighty-seven participants who either met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder or had PHQ-9 scores consistent with a diagnosis of depression were included in our analyses. Participants either received 18 weeks of telephone or face-to-face (n = 279), or 8 weeks of web-delivered (n = 208) cognitive-behavioral therapy. Depressive symptoms, evaluated using the PHQ-9, were reported every 4 weeks in the telephone and face-to-face trial and weekly in the web-delivered intervention trial. Results Optimal cut points for predicting end of treatment response were consistent in both trials. Our results suggested using cut points of a PHQ-9 ≥17 at Week 4, and PHQ-9 ≥13 at Week 9 and PHQ-9 ≥ 9 at Week 14. Conclusions Consistent specified cut points were found within trials included. These cut points may be valuable for algorithms to support clinical decision-making. PMID:26077754

  3. Determination of most suitable cut off point of waist circumference for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in Kerman.

    PubMed

    Gozashti, Mohammad Hossein; Najmeasadat, Fedaei; Mohadeseh, Shojaei; Najafipour, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a determining indicator of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Abdominal obesity, determined by measuring waist circumference, is one of the most important criteria for diagnosing this syndrome. This criterion varies between men and women and among different races. The present study aims at the assessment of the sensitivity and specificity of the commonly used cut off point of waist circumference, and the estimation of the most suitable cut off point of waist circumference for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in the urban society of Kerman. 5332 subjects consisting of 2966 women and 2366 men, 20 years old and above were studied in a population based, cross sectional study. Waist circumference, blood pressure, blood sugar, and blood lipids were measured. People with at least two of the NCEP ATP III criteria - high blood pressure (BP>130/80), high triglycerides (TG>150), high glucose (FBG>100) and low HDL (HDL<40 in men and <50 in women) - were taken as population at risk. ROC analysis was used for determining the most suitable cut off point of waist circumference. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was then assessed based on IDF, NCEP criteria and the proposed criterion, and agreement among the three methods in diagnosing people suffering from metabolic syndrome was examined. The average±standard deviation of waist circumference in women and in men was 83.90±12.55 and 87.99±11.94 cm respectively. The most suitable cut off point of waist circumference for metabolic syndrome diagnosis was 86 in women and 89 in men. These circumferences had the highest specificity and sensitivity. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in IDF, NCPE, and the proposed criterion was 30.4%, 27.7%, and 35.2% respectively. The new criterion and the NCEP criterion achieved the highest agreement (kappa factor=83%). The cuts off point of waist circumference in men and women are close. It is possible, then, to determine a common cut off point of waist circumference

  4. Relationship between glycated haemoglobin and microvascular complications: is there a natural cut-off point for the diagnosis of diabetes?

    PubMed

    Sabanayagam, C; Liew, G; Tai, E S; Shankar, A; Lim, S C; Subramaniam, T; Wong, T Y

    2009-07-01

    This study was designed to determine whether the relationship of glycated haemoglobin to diabetic microvascular complications shows any natural thresholds that could be useful in diagnosing diabetes. We examined a population-based sample of 3,190 Malay adults aged 40-80 years in Singapore. The microvascular outcomes of interest were: (1) any retinopathy, defined from fundus photographs; (2) mild retinopathy, defined as in (1); (3) moderate retinopathy, defined as in (1); (4) chronic kidney disease, defined from estimated glomerular filtration rate; (5) micro- or macroalbuminuria, defined from urinary albumin to creatinine ratio; and (6) peripheral neuropathy, defined from neurothesiometer or monofilament sensory testing. Increasing HbA(1c) was associated with all microvascular complications. The optimal cut-off points for detecting mild and moderate retinopathy were 6.6% (87.0% sensitivity, 77.1% specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristics [ROC] curve 0.899) and 7.0% (82.9% sensitivity, 82.3% specificity and area under ROC curve 0.904). The prevalences of mild and moderate retinopathy were <1% below the optimal cut-off points. For other complications, the association with HbA(1c) was linear without evidence of a distinct threshold. Although ROC analysis for these other complications also suggested optimal cut-off points between 6.6% and 7.0%, the sensitivity at these cut-off points was considerably lower than for mild and moderate retinopathy, ranging from 31.8% to 66.5%. Higher levels of HbA(1c) were associated with microvascular complications. Our data support use of an HbA(1c) cut-off point of between 6.6 and 7.0% in diagnosing diabetes. Cut-off points in this range were best for the identification of individuals with mild and moderate retinopathy. Any retinopathy, chronic kidney disease, albuminuria and peripheral neuropathy are less well detected at these cut-off points.

  5. Effects of the diamond grit sizes of the commercial dental diamond points on the weight-load cutting of bovine enamel and glass-ceramic Typodont teeth.

    PubMed

    Taira, M; Wakasa, K; Yamaki, M; Matsui, A

    1990-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of the diamond grit size of commercial dental diamond points on the dental cutting, we conducted weight-load cutting tests on bovine enamel and glass-ceramic typodont teeth using 3 different diamond grit sizes and air-bearing and ball-bearing air-turbine driven handpieces. With the transverse load applied on the diamond point varied between 20 and 80 g, we measured rotational cutting speed and cutting volume. Generally, increases in applied load caused decreases in rotational cutting speed and increases in cutting volume. The intensity of this trend, however, differed between grit sizes. Regular grit diamond points most strongly showed this tendency, while super-fine grit diamond points were least affected. Fine grit diamond points behaved in a manner similar to regular grit points.

  6. An alternative method for Frailty Index cut-off points to define frailty categories.

    PubMed

    Romero-Ortuno, Roman

    2013-11-01

    the Frailty Index (FI) is a popular operationalization of frailty. FI cut-off points have been proposed to define, regardless of age, frailty categories with increasing risk. Here, an alternative method is described that takes age into account. 29,905 participants aged ≥ 50 from the first wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. The mean follow-up for mortality was 2.4 years. Curve estimation procedures were carried out between age and a FI, and 50% Confidence Intervals (CI) for the regression mean were derived. As opposed to the usual method (FI ≤ 0.08: non-frail; FI ≥ 0.25: frail; rest: pre-frail), the alternative method defines as 'fit for their age' those with a FI below the lower 50% CI; 'frail for their age' those with a FI above the upper 50% CI; the rest as 'average for their age'. Using both methods, the prevalence of the frailty categories and their associated mortality rates were compared for each age group. The best fit between age the FI was by cubic regression (R(2) = 0.174, P < 0.001). Among those in their 50s, 5% were frail by the usual method (mortality: 5%) and 14% by the alternative (mortality: 2%). Among those in their 90s, 64% were frail by the usual method (mortality: 43%) and 41% by the alternative (mortality: 48%). the alternative method may be more sensitive in younger ages and more specific in older ages. This may have implications for population screening.

  7. An alternative method for Frailty Index cut-off points to define frailty categories

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Ortuno, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Purpose the Frailty Index (FI) is a popular operationalization of frailty. FI cut-off points have been proposed to define, regardless of age, frailty categories with increasing risk. Here, an alternative method is described that takes age into account. Subjects and methods 29,905 participants aged ≥ 50 from the first wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. The mean follow-up for mortality was 2.4 years. Curve estimation procedures were carried out between age and a FI, and 50% Confidence Intervals (CI) for the regression mean were derived. As opposed to the usual method (FI ≤ 0.08: non-frail; FI ≥ 0.25: frail; rest: pre-frail), the alternative method defines as ‘fit for their age’ those with a FI below the lower 50% CI; ‘frail for their age’ those with a FI above the upper 50% CI; the rest as ‘average for their age’. Using both methods, the prevalence of the frailty categories and their associated mortality rates were compared for each age group. Results The best fit between age the FI was by cubic regression (R2 = 0.174, P < 0.001). Among those in their 50s, 5% were frail by the usual method (mortality: 5%) and 14% by the alternative (mortality: 2%). Among those in their 90s, 64% were frail by the usual method (mortality: 43%) and 41% by the alternative (mortality: 48%). Conclusion the alternative method may be more sensitive in younger ages and more specific in older ages. This may have implications for population screening. PMID:24379896

  8. Metabolic syndrome in adolescents: definition based on regression of IDF adult cut-off points.

    PubMed

    Benmohammed, K; Valensi, P; Balkau, B; Lezzar, A

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to derive a sex- and age-specific definition of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its abnormalities for adolescents. This is a cross-sectional study. A total of 1100 adolescent students, aged 12-18 y, were randomly selected from schools and classrooms in the city of Constantine, Algeria; all had anthropometric measurements taken, and 989 had blood tests. Gender-specific growth curves for components of the MetS were derived, using the LMS (lambda-mu-sigma) method, and the percentiles corresponding to the thresholds of the MetS components proposed for adults by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) were identified. The prevalence of the MetS using this new definition was 4.3% for boys and 3.7% for girls (P = 0.64). Overall, a high waist circumference was the most frequent of the syndrome components, but the frequency was much higher in girls than that in boys, 33.6% and 6.9%, respectively. In contrast, a high systolic blood pressure was seen in 26.8% of the boys and only 11.4% of the girls. The prevalence of the MetS was higher among adolescents with a body mass index (BMI) ≥95th percentile of the study population, 28.8%, against 9.8% in adolescents with a BMI between the 95th and 85th percentile and 1.8% in those with a BMI <85th percentile (P < 0.0001). MetS during adolescence requires more studies to establish a consensus definition. For clinical practice, we propose a simplified definition for boys and girls based on regression of IDF adult cut-off points. This definition should be tested in further studies with other adolescent populations. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Cut-off point of epicardial adipose tissue thickness for predicting metabolic syndrome in Venezuelan population].

    PubMed

    Lima-Martínez, Marcos M; Paoli, Mariela; Donis, José H; Odreman, Rodolfo; Torres, Christopher; Iacobellis, Gianluca

    2013-12-01

    To define an echocardiographically-assessed cut-off point for epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) thickness associated to metabolic syndrome (MS) components in Venezuelan subjects. Fifty-two subjects aged 20-65 years diagnosed with MS according to International Diabetes Federation criteria and 45 sex- and age-matched controls were selected. Blood glucose and plasma lipids were tested; EAT thickness and left ventricular mass were measured by echocardiography. No significant age and sex differences were found between the two groups. Body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly higher (P=.0001) in the MS group. This group showed significantly higher levels of fasting blood glucose (P=.0001), total cholesterol (P=.002), LDL-C (P=.007), non-HDL-C (P=.0001), triglycerides (P=.0001), Tg-HDL-C ratio (P=.0001), and lower HDL-C levels (P=.0001) as compared to the control group. EAT thickness (P=.0001) and left ventricular mass (P=.017) were significantly higher in the MS group. The ROC curve showed an AUC of 0.852 (P=.0001) with a power of the test of 0.99. A 5-mm EAT thickness showed a sensitivity of 84.62% (95%CI: 71.9-93.1) and a specificity of 71.11% (95%CI: 55.7-83.6) for predicting MS. The odds ratio of this population for experiencing MS due to an EAT ≥ 5 mm was 8.25 (95%CI: 3.15-21.56; P=.0001). An EAT value ≥ 5 mm has good sensitivity and specificity for predicting MS in the Venezuelan population. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. What Should Be the Cut Point for Classification Criteria of Studies in Gout? A Conjoint Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Jaap; Kievit, Wietske; Neogi, Tuhina; Schumacher, Ralph; Jansen, Tim; Dalbeth, Nicola; Taylor, William J

    2016-11-01

    To determine the acceptable level of positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for classification criteria for gout, given the type of study. We conducted an international web-based survey with 91 general practitioners and rheumatologists experienced in gout. Conjoint analysis was used as the framework for designing and analyzing pairs of 2 profiles, each describing a study type, a PPV, and an NPV. There were 5 study types presented: a phase III randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug versus prednisone for acute gout flares, a phase III RCT of a biologic agent for acute gout flares, a phase II RCT of a novel uricosuric drug of unknown efficacy and limited toxicity data, a case-control, genome-wide association study of gout, and a cohort study examining long-term outcomes of gout. PPV and NPV both had 5 levels ranging from 60-99%. The panelists in majority were male (65%) rheumatologists (93%) with an average of 19 years of practice, seeing 5 to 60 gout patients monthly. PPV was most highly weighted in decision making: the relative importance was 59% for PPV, 29% for NPV, and 13% for study type. The preferred PPV was 90% or 80%, with an accompanying NPV of 70% or 80%, dependent on study type. Preferred PPVs and NPVs range between 70% and 90% and differ by study type. A single cut point can be a reasonable approach for all study types if a PPV of 90% and NPV of 80% is approximated. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Surface Quality of Ti-6%Al-4%V ELI When Machined Using CVD-Carbide Tools at High Cutting Speed

    SciTech Connect

    Gusri, A. I.; Che Hassan, C. H.; Jaharah, A. G.; Yasir, A.; Zaid, Y.; Yanuar, B.

    2011-01-17

    Machining of Ti-6Al-4V ELI becomes more interested topic due to extremely weight-to-strength ratio and resistance to corrosion at elevated temperature. Quality of machined surface is presented by surface roughness, surface texture and damages of microstructure of titanium alloys. The turning parameters evaluated are cutting speed of 55-95 m/min, feed rate of 0.15-0.35 mm/rev, depth of cut of 0.10-0.20 mm and tool grade of CVD carbide tools. The results show the trend lines of surface roughness value are higher at the initial machining and the surface texture profile has a strong correlation with the feed rate. At the machining condition of cutting speed of 95 m/min, feed rate of 0.35 mm/rev and depth of cut of 0.10 mm produced the with layer with thickness of 2.0 {mu}m.

  12. Machining Performance of Hot-Pressed Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Alumina Cutting Tool Insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Snehashis; Das, Santanu; Sarkar, Soumya; Das, Probal Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Machining performance of monolithic alumina (Al2O3) tool inserts for metal cutting through carbon nanotube (CNT) incorporation was studied in this work. 0.3 vol% multiwalled CNT(MWCNT)-Al2O3 nanocomposite was prepared by hot-pressing at 1550°C with a dwell of 1 h under 2.5 MPa uniaxial pressure in static argon atmosphere. The hot-pressed nanocomposite achieved >99.5% of its theoretical density. The specimen also offered improved fracture toughness, KIC ( 23% higher), flexural strength, σFS ( 10% higher), hardness, HV1 ( 7.5% higher) and thermal conductivity, κ ( 30% higher) compared to those of pure Al2O3 (KIC = 5.23 MPa-m0.5, σFS = 341.01 MPa, HV1 = 18.80 GPa, κ = 23.69 W/mK). Inserts developed with this nanocomposite having 0.8 and 1 mm nose radii demonstrated successful machining during turning of AISI 4340 steel rod (hardness = 38 HRC) in dry environment under different cutting conditions and showed promising applicability in machining industry.

  13. WWBT? What Would Ben Think about Killer Apps, Cutting Edges, and Tipping Points in the History of Weather and Climate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    This paper examines the history of weather and climate since 1706 along three intertwined analytical axes: technology (killer apps), science (cutting edges), and social issues (tipping points). For example, Franklin's best-known killer app, the lightning rod, gains added significance when seen in light of his cutting edge contributions to the science of electricity, his lifelong promotion of useful knowledge, and the societal tipping point his work triggered in our relationship to the sky. Subsequently, other major tipping points and conceptual shifts followed the introduction of telegraphy, radio, television, digital computers, and rocketry into meteorology. Following an analysis of the career and contributions of Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), the paper examines later historical moments and watersheds, not merely in retrospect, but from the perspective of leading participants at the time. It focuses on technologies of significant promise, especially those involving electro- magnetism, up to and including the dawn of the twenty-first century, and asks playfully, "What would Ben think?"

  14. Cut-off point for WHOQOL-bref as a measure of quality of life of older adults.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patrícia Aparecida Barbosa; Soares, Sônia Maria; Santos, Joseph Fabiano Guimarães; Silva, Líliam Barbosa

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To propose a cut-off for the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Bref (WHOQOL-bref) as a predictor of quality of life in older adults.METHODS Cross-sectional study with 391 older adults registered in the Northwest Health District in Belo Horizonte, MG, Southeastern Brazil, between October 8, 2010 and May 23, 2011. The older adults' quality of life was measured using the WHOQOL-bref. The analysis was rationalized by outlining two extreme and simultaneous groups according to perceived quality of life and satisfaction with health (quality of life good/satisfactory - good or very good self-reported quality of life and being satisfied or very satisfied with health - G5; and poor/very poor quality of life - poor or very poor self-reported quality of life and feeling dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with health - G6). A Receiver-Operating Characteristic curve (ROC) was created to assess the diagnostic ability of different cut-off points of the WHOQOL-bref.RESULTS ROC curve analysis indicated a critical value 60 as the optimal cut-off point for assessing perceived quality of life and satisfaction with health. The area under the curve was 0.758, with a sensitivity of 76.8% and specificity of 63.8% for a cut-off of ≥ 60 for overall quality of life (G5) and sensitivity 95.0% and specificity of 54.4% for a cut-off of < 60 for overall quality of life (G6).CONCLUSIONS Diagnostic interpretation of the ROC curve revealed that cut-off < 60 for overall quality of life obtained excellent sensitivity and negative predictive value for tracking older adults with probable worse quality of life and dissatisfied with health.

  15. Cut-off point for WHOQOL-bref as a measure of quality of life of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patrícia Aparecida Barbosa; Soares, Sônia Maria; Santos, Joseph Fabiano Guimarães; Silva, Líliam Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To propose a cut-off for the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Bref (WHOQOL-bref) as a predictor of quality of life in older adults. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 391 older adults registered in the Northwest Health District in Belo Horizonte, MG, Southeastern Brazil, between October 8, 2010 and May 23, 2011. The older adults’ quality of life was measured using the WHOQOL-bref. The analysis was rationalized by outlining two extreme and simultaneous groups according to perceived quality of life and satisfaction with health (quality of life good/satisfactory – good or very good self-reported quality of life and being satisfied or very satisfied with health – G5; and poor/very poor quality of life – poor or very poor self-reported quality of life and feeling dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with health – G6). A Receiver-Operating Characteristic curve (ROC) was created to assess the diagnostic ability of different cut-off points of the WHOQOL-bref. RESULTS ROC curve analysis indicated a critical value 60 as the optimal cut-off point for assessing perceived quality of life and satisfaction with health. The area under the curve was 0.758, with a sensitivity of 76.8% and specificity of 63.8% for a cut-off of ≥ 60 for overall quality of life (G5) and sensitivity 95.0% and specificity of 54.4% for a cut-off of < 60 for overall quality of life (G6). CONCLUSIONS Diagnostic interpretation of the ROC curve revealed that cut-off < 60 for overall quality of life obtained excellent sensitivity and negative predictive value for tracking older adults with probable worse quality of life and dissatisfied with health. PMID:25119934

  16. Study on Platinum Coating Depth in Focused Ion Beam Diamond Cutting Tool Milling and Methods for Removing Platinum Layer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woong Kirl; Baek, Seung Yub

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, nanomachining has attracted increasing attention in advanced manufacturing science and technologies as a value-added processes to control material structures, components, devices, and nanoscale systems. To make sub-micro patterns on these products, micro/nanoscale single-crystal diamond cutting tools are essential. Popular non-contact methods for the macro/micro processing of diamond composites are pulsed laser ablation (PLA) and electric discharge machining (EDM). However, for manufacturing nanoscale diamond tools, these machining methods are not appropriate. Despite diamond’s extreme physical properties, diamond can be micro/nano machined relatively easily using a focused ion beam (FIB) technique. In the FIB milling process, the surface properties of the diamond cutting tool is affected by the amorphous damage layer caused by the FIB gallium ion collision and implantation and these influence the diamond cutting tool edge sharpness and increase the processing procedures. To protect the diamond substrate, a protection layer—platinum (Pt) coating is essential in diamond FIB milling. In this study, the depth of Pt coating layer which could decrease process-induced damage during FIB fabrication is investigated, along with methods for removing the Pt coating layer on diamond tools. The optimum Pt coating depth has been confirmed, which is very important for maintaining cutting tool edge sharpness and decreasing processing procedures. The ultra-precision grinding method and etching with aqua regia method have been investigated for removing the Pt coating layer. Experimental results show that when the diamond cutting tool width is bigger than 500 nm, ultra-precision grinding method is appropriate for removing Pt coating layer on diamond tool. However, the ultra-precision grinding method is not recommended for removing the Pt coating layer when the cutting tool width is smaller than 500 nm, because the possibility that the diamond cutting tool is

  17. Study on Platinum Coating Depth in Focused Ion Beam Diamond Cutting Tool Milling and Methods for Removing Platinum Layer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woong Kirl; Baek, Seung Yub

    2015-09-22

    In recent years, nanomachining has attracted increasing attention in advanced manufacturing science and technologies as a value-added processes to control material structures, components, devices, and nanoscale systems. To make sub-micro patterns on these products, micro/nanoscale single-crystal diamond cutting tools are essential. Popular non-contact methods for the macro/micro processing of diamond composites are pulsed laser ablation (PLA) and electric discharge machining (EDM). However, for manufacturing nanoscale diamond tools, these machining methods are not appropriate. Despite diamond's extreme physical properties, diamond can be micro/nano machined relatively easily using a focused ion beam (FIB) technique. In the FIB milling process, the surface properties of the diamond cutting tool is affected by the amorphous damage layer caused by the FIB gallium ion collision and implantation and these influence the diamond cutting tool edge sharpness and increase the processing procedures. To protect the diamond substrate, a protection layer-platinum (Pt) coating is essential in diamond FIB milling. In this study, the depth of Pt coating layer which could decrease process-induced damage during FIB fabrication is investigated, along with methods for removing the Pt coating layer on diamond tools. The optimum Pt coating depth has been confirmed, which is very important for maintaining cutting tool edge sharpness and decreasing processing procedures. The ultra-precision grinding method and etching with aqua regia method have been investigated for removing the Pt coating layer. Experimental results show that when the diamond cutting tool width is bigger than 500 nm, ultra-precision grinding method is appropriate for removing Pt coating layer on diamond tool. However, the ultra-precision grinding method is not recommended for removing the Pt coating layer when the cutting tool width is smaller than 500 nm, because the possibility that the diamond cutting tool is damaged

  18. The Cut-Score Operating Function: A New Tool to Aid in Standard Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabovsky, Irina; Wainer, Howard

    2017-01-01

    In this essay, we describe the construction and use of the Cut-Score Operating Function in aiding standard setting decisions. The Cut-Score Operating Function shows the relation between the cut-score chosen and the consequent error rate. It allows error rates to be defined by multiple loss functions and will show the behavior of each loss…

  19. Tool Forces and Chip Formation In Orthogonal Cutting Of Loblolly Pine

    Treesearch

    George E. Woodson; Peter Koch

    1970-01-01

    Specimens of earlywood and latewood of Pinus taeda L. were excised so that length along the grain was 3 inches and thickness was 0.1 inch. These specimens were cut orthogonally-as with a carpenter's plane-in the three major directions. Cutting velocity was 2 inches per minute. When cutting was in the planing (90-O) direction, thin chips,...

  20. [Receiver operating characteristic analysis and the cost--benefit analysis in determination of the optimal cut-off point].

    PubMed

    Vránová, J; Horák, J; Krátká, K; Hendrichová, M; Kovaírková, K

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the use of Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis within medicine is provided. A survey of the theory behind the analysis is offered together with a presentation on how to create a ROC curve and how to use Cost--Benefit analysis to determine the optimal cut-off point or threshold. The use of ROC analysis is exemplified in the "Cost--Benefit analysis" section of the paper. In these examples, it can be seen that the determination of the optimal cut-off point is mainly influenced by the prevalence and the severity of the disease, by the risks and adverse events of treatment or the diagnostic testing, by the overall costs of treating true and false positives (TP and FP), and by the risk of deficient or non-treatment of false negative (FN) cases.

  1. Teacher Education Budget Cuts in Romania and the US: Points of Contrast and Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ives, B.; Alama, M.; Mosora, C. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Budgets for teacher education programmes have been substantially reduced as a result of the global economic crisis. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the teacher education budget cutting processes and procedures for universities in Romania versus one university in the United States. Sample: The data were collected from…

  2. Teacher Education Budget Cuts in Romania and the US: Points of Contrast and Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ives, B.; Alama, M.; Mosora, C. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Budgets for teacher education programmes have been substantially reduced as a result of the global economic crisis. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the teacher education budget cutting processes and procedures for universities in Romania versus one university in the United States. Sample: The data were collected from…

  3. Measuring physical activity in older adults: calibrating cut-points for the MotionWatch 8©

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Glenn J.; Falck, Ryan S.; Beets, Michael W.; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Given the world’s aging population, the staggering economic impact of dementia, the lack of effective treatments, and the fact a cure for dementia is likely many years away – there is an urgent need to develop interventions to prevent or at least delay dementia’s progression. Thus, lifestyle approaches to promote healthy aging are an important line of scientific inquiry. Good sleep quality and physical activity (PA) are pillars of healthy aging, and as such, are an increasing focus for intervention studies aimed at promoting health and cognitive function in older adults. However, PA and sleep quality are difficult constructs to evaluate empirically. Wrist-worn actigraphy (WWA) is currently accepted as a valid objective measure of sleep quality. The MotionWatch 8© (MW8) is the latest WWA, replacing the discontinued Actiwatch 4 and Actiwatch 7. In the current study, concurrent measurement of WWA and indirect calorimetry was performed during 10 different activities of daily living for 23 healthy older adults (aged 57–80 years) to determine cut-points for sedentary and moderate-vigorous PA – using receiver operating characteristic curves – with the cut-point for light activity being the boundaries between sedentary and moderate to vigorous PA. In addition, simultaneous multi-unit reliability was determined for the MW8 using inter-class correlations. The current study is the first to validate MW8 activity count cut-points – for sedentary, light, and moderate to vigorous PA – specifically for use with healthy older adults. These cut-points provide important context for better interpretation of MW8 activity counts, and a greater understanding of what these counts mean in terms of PA. Hence, our results validate another level of analysis for researchers using the MW8 in studies aiming to examine PA and sleep quality concurrently in older adults. PMID:26379546

  4. Measuring physical activity in older adults: calibrating cut-points for the MotionWatch 8(©).

    PubMed

    Landry, Glenn J; Falck, Ryan S; Beets, Michael W; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Given the world's aging population, the staggering economic impact of dementia, the lack of effective treatments, and the fact a cure for dementia is likely many years away - there is an urgent need to develop interventions to prevent or at least delay dementia's progression. Thus, lifestyle approaches to promote healthy aging are an important line of scientific inquiry. Good sleep quality and physical activity (PA) are pillars of healthy aging, and as such, are an increasing focus for intervention studies aimed at promoting health and cognitive function in older adults. However, PA and sleep quality are difficult constructs to evaluate empirically. Wrist-worn actigraphy (WWA) is currently accepted as a valid objective measure of sleep quality. The MotionWatch 8(©) (MW8) is the latest WWA, replacing the discontinued Actiwatch 4 and Actiwatch 7. In the current study, concurrent measurement of WWA and indirect calorimetry was performed during 10 different activities of daily living for 23 healthy older adults (aged 57-80 years) to determine cut-points for sedentary and moderate-vigorous PA - using receiver operating characteristic curves - with the cut-point for light activity being the boundaries between sedentary and moderate to vigorous PA. In addition, simultaneous multi-unit reliability was determined for the MW8 using inter-class correlations. The current study is the first to validate MW8 activity count cut-points - for sedentary, light, and moderate to vigorous PA - specifically for use with healthy older adults. These cut-points provide important context for better interpretation of MW8 activity counts, and a greater understanding of what these counts mean in terms of PA. Hence, our results validate another level of analysis for researchers using the MW8 in studies aiming to examine PA and sleep quality concurrently in older adults.

  5. Improved nonparametric estimation of the optimal diagnostic cut-off point associated with the Youden index under different sampling schemes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jingjing; Samawi, Hani; Linder, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    A diagnostic cut-off point of a biomarker measurement is needed for classifying a random subject to be either diseased or healthy. However, the cut-off point is usually unknown and needs to be estimated by some optimization criteria. One important criterion is the Youden index, which has been widely adopted in practice. The Youden index, which is defined as the maximum of (sensitivity + specificity -1), directly measures the largest total diagnostic accuracy a biomarker can achieve. Therefore, it is desirable to estimate the optimal cut-off point associated with the Youden index. Sometimes, taking the actual measurements of a biomarker is very difficult and expensive, while ranking them without the actual measurement can be relatively easy. In such cases, ranked set sampling can give more precise estimation than simple random sampling, as ranked set samples are more likely to span the full range of the population. In this study, kernel density estimation is utilized to numerically solve for an estimate of the optimal cut-off point. The asymptotic distributions of the kernel estimators based on two sampling schemes are derived analytically and we prove that the estimators based on ranked set sampling are relatively more efficient than that of simple random sampling and both estimators are asymptotically unbiased. Furthermore, the asymptotic confidence intervals are derived. Intensive simulations are carried out to compare the proposed method using ranked set sampling with simple random sampling, with the proposed method outperforming simple random sampling in all cases. A real data set is analyzed for illustrating the proposed method. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Validity, cut-points, and minimally important differences for two hot flash-related daily interference scales.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Janet S; Bakoyannis, Giorgos; Otte, Julie L; Chen, Chen X; Rand, Kevin L; Woods, Nancy; Newton, Katherine; Joffe, Hadine; Manson, JoAnn E; Freeman, Ellen W; Guthrie, Katherine A

    2017-08-01

    To conduct psychometric analyses to condense the Hot Flash-Related Daily Interference Scale (HFRDIS) into a shorter form termed the Hot Flash Interference (HFI) scale; evaluate cut-points for both scales; and establish minimally important differences (MIDs) for both scales. We analyzed baseline and postrandomization patient-reported data pooled across three randomized trials aimed at reducing vasomotor symptoms (VMS) in 899 midlife women. Trials were conducted across five MsFLASH clinical sites between July 2009 and October 2012. We eliminated HFRDIS items based on experts' content validity ratings and confirmatory factor analysis, and evaluated cut-points and established MIDs by mapping HFRDIS and HFI to other measures. The three-item HFI (interference with sleep, mood, and concentration) demonstrated strong internal consistency (alphas of 0.830 and 0.856), showed good fit to the unidimensional "hot flash interference factor," and strong convergent validity with HFRDIS scores, diary VMS, and menopausal quality of life. For both scales, cut-points of mild (0-3.9), moderate (4-6.9), and severe (7-10) interference were associated with increasing diary VMS ratings, sleep, and anxiety. The average MID was 1.66 for the HFRDIS and 2.34 for the HFI. The HFI is a brief assessment of VMS interference and will be useful in busy clinics to standardize VMS assessment or in research studies where response burden may be an issue. The scale cut-points and MIDs should prove useful in targeting those most in need of treatment, monitoring treatment response, and interpreting existing and future research findings.

  7. Study of PVD AlCrN Coating for Reducing Carbide Cutting Tool Deterioration in the Machining of Titanium Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Cadena, Natalia L.; Cue-Sampedro, Rodrigo; Siller, Héctor R.; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana M.; Rivera-Solorio, Carlos I.; Di-Nardo, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    The manufacture of medical and aerospace components made of titanium alloys and other difficult-to-cut materials requires the parallel development of high performance cutting tools coated with materials capable of enhanced tribological and resistance properties. In this matter, a thin nanocomposite film made out of AlCrN (aluminum–chromium–nitride) was studied in this research, showing experimental work in the deposition process and its characterization. A heat-treated monolayer coating, competitive with other coatings in the machining of titanium alloys, was analyzed. Different analysis and characterizations were performed on the manufactured coating by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDXS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Furthermore, the mechanical behavior of the coating was evaluated through hardness test and tribology with pin-on-disk to quantify friction coefficient and wear rate. Finally, machinability tests using coated tungsten carbide cutting tools were executed in order to determine its performance through wear resistance, which is a key issue of cutting tools in high-end cutting at elevated temperatures. It was demonstrated that the specimen (with lower friction coefficient than previous research) is more efficient in machinability tests in Ti6Al4V alloys. Furthermore, the heat-treated monolayer coating presented better performance in comparison with a conventional monolayer of AlCrN coating. PMID:28809266

  8. Study of PVD AlCrN Coating for Reducing Carbide Cutting Tool Deterioration in the Machining of Titanium Alloys.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Natalia L; Cue-Sampedro, Rodrigo; Siller, Héctor R; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana M; Rivera-Solorio, Carlos I; Di-Nardo, Santiago

    2013-05-24

    The manufacture of medical and aerospace components made of titanium alloys and other difficult-to-cut materials requires the parallel development of high performance cutting tools coated with materials capable of enhanced tribological and resistance properties. In this matter, a thin nanocomposite film made out of AlCrN (aluminum-chromium-nitride) was studied in this research, showing experimental work in the deposition process and its characterization. A heat-treated monolayer coating, competitive with other coatings in the machining of titanium alloys, was analyzed. Different analysis and characterizations were performed on the manufactured coating by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDXS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Furthermore, the mechanical behavior of the coating was evaluated through hardness test and tribology with pin-on-disk to quantify friction coefficient and wear rate. Finally, machinability tests using coated tungsten carbide cutting tools were executed in order to determine its performance through wear resistance, which is a key issue of cutting tools in high-end cutting at elevated temperatures. It was demonstrated that the specimen (with lower friction coefficient than previous research) is more efficient in machinability tests in Ti6Al4V alloys. Furthermore, the heat-treated monolayer coating presented better performance in comparison with a conventional monolayer of AlCrN coating.

  9. Predictive Validity of Established Cut Points for Risk and Protective Factor Scales from the Communities That Care Youth Survey

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric C.; Hawkins, J. David; Arthur, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Community coalitions are a popular strategy to coordinate activities and resources to prevent adolescent substance use and delinquent behavior. Despite early evidence of their lack of effectiveness, a new generation of community coalitions has shown positive results in preventing youth substance use and delinquency. This success can be attributed to coalition decision making focused on reducing local risk factors and increasing local protective factors through the use of evidence-based prevention programs. A previous study using cross-sectional data established cut point values for scales measuring risk and protective factors on the Communities That Care Youth Survey (CTCYS) to identify high levels of risk and low levels of protection in communities on each scale. The current study extended this previous research by using longitudinal data to assess the validity of risk and protective factor cut point values in predicting substance use and delinquent behavior 1 year after risk and protection were measured. The findings demonstrate the predictive validity of cut points for risk and protective factor scales measured by the CTCYS and suggest their utility in guiding prevention efforts. PMID:23143070

  10. Establishment of a cut-point value of serum TNF-alpha levels in the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gurrola-Díaz, Carmen M; Sánchez-Enriquez, Sergio; Oregon-Romero, Edith; García-López, Pedro M; Garzón de la Mora, Pedro; Bastidas-Ramírez, Blanca E; González-Hita, Mercedes; Muñoz-Valle, José F

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes are the major causes of mortality in Mexico. Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of factors that increase the risk to develop such diseases. Previous studies have shown that MS is associated with high tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) levels. In fact, TNF-alpha has been proposed to be a useful marker for clinical diagnosis of inflammation at an early stage. Therefore, we analyzed TNF-alpha concentrations in Mexican individuals with or without MS and related these levels to the associated MS components. Clinical, anthropometric, and biochemical data were analyzed in 41 healthy and 39 MS individuals. Individuals were similarly grouped by age and gender.The serum TNF-alpha levels measured by a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit were increased significantly in MS subjects compared with healthy individuals (P<0.001). The assay showed 78.1% sensitivity and 61.5% specificity with a cut-point level of 1.36 pg/mL. TNF-alpha levels higher than the cut-point value were correlated with insulin resistance indices. These findings support the hypothesis that serum TNF-alpha concentration could be a useful marker for early MS diagnosis. Nevertheless, we suggest the establishment of specific cut-point values in each studied population to evaluate potential clinical applications.

  11. Predictive validity of established cut points for risk and protective factor scales from the communities that care youth survey.

    PubMed

    Briney, John S; Brown, Eric C; Hawkins, J David; Arthur, Michael W

    2012-12-01

    Community coalitions are a popular strategy to coordinate activities and resources to prevent adolescent substance use and delinquent behavior. Despite early evidence of their lack of effectiveness, a new generation of community coalitions has shown positive results in preventing youth substance use and delinquency. This success can be attributed to coalition decision making focused on reducing local risk factors and increasing local protective factors through the use of evidence-based prevention programs. A previous study using cross-sectional data established cut point values for scales measuring risk and protective factors on the Communities That Care Youth Survey (CTCYS) to identify high levels of risk and low levels of protection in communities on each scale. The current study extended this previous research by using longitudinal data to assess the validity of risk and protective factor cut point values in predicting substance use and delinquent behavior 1 year after risk and protection were measured. The findings demonstrate the predictive validity of cut points for risk and protective factor scales measured by the CTCYS and suggest their utility in guiding prevention efforts.

  12. Insulin sensitivity indices: a proposal of cut-off points for simple identification of insulin-resistant subjects.

    PubMed

    Radikova, Z; Koska, J; Huckova, M; Ksinantova, L; Imrich, R; Vigas, M; Trnovec, T; Langer, P; Sebokova, E; Klimes, I

    2006-05-01

    Demanding measurement of insulin sensitivity using clamp methods does not simplify the identification of insulin resistant subjects in the general population. Other approaches such as fasting- or oral glucose tolerance test-derived insulin sensitivity indices were proposed and validated with the euglycemic clamp. Nevertheless, a lack of reference values for these indices prevents their wider use in epidemiological studies and clinical practice. The aim of our study was therefore to define the cut-off points of insulin resistance indices as well as the ranges of the most frequently obtained values for selected indices. A standard 75 g oral glucose tolerance test was carried out in 1156 subjects from a Caucasian rural population with no previous evidence of diabetes or other dysglycemias. Insulin resistance/sensitivity indices (HOMA-IR, HOMA-IR2, ISI Cederholm, and ISI Matsuda) were calculated. The 75th percentile value as the cut-off point to define IR corresponded with a HOMA-IR of 2.29, a HOMA-IR2 of 1.21, a 25th percentile for ISI Cederholm, and ISI Matsuda of 57 and 5.0, respectively. For the first time, the cut-off points for selected indices and their most frequently obtained values were established for groups of subjects as defined by glucose homeostasis and BMI. Thus, insulin-resistant subjects can be identified using this simple approach.

  13. Comparison of cutting and pencil-point spinal needle in spinal anesthesia regarding postdural puncture headache: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Liu, Yang; Song, WenYe; Kan, ShunLi; Liu, FeiFei; Zhang, Di; Ning, GuangZhi; Feng, ShiQing

    2017-04-01

    Postdural puncture headache (PDPH), mainly resulting from the loss of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), is a well-known iatrogenic complication of spinal anesthesia and diagnostic lumbar puncture. Spinal needles have been modified to minimize complications. Modifiable risk factors of PDPH mainly included needle size and needle shape. However, whether the incidence of PDPH is significantly different between cutting-point and pencil-point needles was controversial. Then we did a meta-analysis to assess the incidence of PDPH of cutting spinal needle and pencil-point spinal needle. We included all randomly designed trials, assessing the clinical outcomes in patients given elective spinal anesthesia or diagnostic lumbar puncture with either cutting or pencil-point spinal needle as eligible studies. All selected studies and the risk of bias of them were assessed by 2 investigators. Clinical outcomes including success rates, frequency of PDPH, reported severe PDPH, and the use of epidural blood patch (EBP) were recorded as primary results. Results were evaluated using risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous variables. Rev Man software (version 5.3) was used to analyze all appropriate data. Twenty-five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in our study. The analysis result revealed that pencil-point spinal needle would result in lower rate of PDPH (RR 2.50; 95% CI [1.96, 3.19]; P < 0.00001) and severe PDPH (RR 3.27; 95% CI [2.15, 4.96]; P < 0.00001). Furthermore, EBP was less used in pencil-point spine needle group (RR 3.69; 95% CI [1.96, 6.95]; P < 0.0001). Current evidences suggest that pencil-point spinal needle was significantly superior compared with cutting spinal needle regarding the frequency of PDPH, PDPH severity, and the use of EBP. In view of this, we recommend the use of pencil-point spinal needle in spinal anesthesia and lumbar puncture.

  14. The wear of the carbide cutting tools coated with TiN during the milling of Inconel 738

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebhi, A.; Douib, N.

    2017-02-01

    The machining of superalloy parts still an area not very clear in mechanical manufacturing. It is found to be used in particular areas such as gas turbine, rocket engine, space ships, nuclear reactors, and pumps. The machining of Inconel 738 superalloy has been studied in this context, with the aim to understand the wear behavior with carbide inserts coated with TiN and in order to optimize the cutting parameters before starting the production. The wear behavior of the inserts during the machining process of a very tough austenitic superalloy is unclear, and requires a series of well determined tests. The life of the insert under high stress such as pressure, cutting speed, high temperature, in a hostile zone and in contact with a very tough and harder material is determined. The generated process of wear is very complex, because it is followed by physico-chemical phenomenon appearing on the contact surfaces between the active part of the tool and workpiece.The lifetime of machine tools often depends on the tribological characteristics of the material couples (cutting tool / material to be machined). It has been shown that the most influential parameter is the coating, then comes the sliding speed. A relationship between the wear VB and the roughness Ra is proposed to collect information on the cutting edge and the quality of the tool by measuring the roughness. For wear measurement, an indirect method is used in coupling a Touptek photonics camera to capture and Ttoupview analysis software.

  15. Technical Manual for the Conceptual Learning and Development Assessment Series II: Cutting Tool. Technical Report No. 435. Reprinted December 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiLuzio, Geneva J.; And Others

    This document accompanies Conceptual Learning and Development Assessment Series II: Cutting Tool, a test constructed to chart the conceptual development of individuals. As a technical manual, it contains information on the rationale, development, standardization, and reliability of the test, as well as essential information and statistical data…

  16. Effects of image orientation and ground control points distribution on unmanned aerial vehicle photogrammetry projects on a road cut slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal-Ramírez, Fernando; Agüera-Vega, Francisco; Martínez-Carricondo, Patricio J.

    2016-07-01

    The morphology of road cut slopes, such as length and high slopes, is one of the most prevalent causes of landslides and terrain stability troubles. Digital elevation models (DEMs) and orthoimages are used for land management purposes. Two flights with different orientations with respect to the target surface were planned, and four photogrammetric projects were carried out during these flights to study the image orientation effects. Orthogonal images oriented to the cut slope with only sidelaps were compared to the classical vertical orientation, with sidelapping, endlapping, and both types of overlapping simultaneously. DEM and orthoimages obtained from the orthogonal project showed smaller errors than those obtained from the other three photogrammetric projects, with the first one being much easier to manage. One additional flight and six photogrammetric projects were used to establish an objective criterion to locate the three ground control points for georeferencing and rectification DEMs and orthoimages. All possible sources of errors were evaluated in the DEMs and orthoimages.

  17. The research about the effect of initiation point to the forming of cutting MEFP and the penetration characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. L.; Li, W. B.; Shen, X. J.

    2017-09-01

    In order to study the effect of the initiation point position to the molding of cutting MEFP, divergence angle and 45 steel penetration, we used LS-DYNA dynamic finite element program, and adopted the fluid solid coupling method, then we made numerical simulation about the process of the formation of cutting MEFP and penetration plate, and the simulation results fit with the tests results. The research indicates that the head velocity of the formation of MEFP in bottom initiation increased by 27% than in top initiation, tail speed increased by 14%, divergence angle reduced by 39%, and penetration aperture reduced by 12%. The 25 sub-EFP formed by the warhead are possessed with certain quality and direction, and can penetrate 45 steel target of 9mm in 8m distance.

  18. A short guide to pure point diffraction in cut-and-project sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Christoph; Strungaru, Nicolae

    2017-04-01

    We briefly review the diffraction of quasicrystals and then give an elementary alternative proof of the diffraction formula for regular cut-and-project sets, which is based on Bochner’s theorem from Fourier analysis. This clarifies a common view that the diffraction of a quasicrystal is determined by the diffraction of its underlying lattice. To illustrate our approach, we will also treat a number of well-known explicitly solvable examples. We dedicate this work to Tony Guttmann on the occasion of his 70th birthday

  19. Extent of microcytic anemia among children in a low-income, peri-urban community in the Dominican Republic using different cut-points.

    PubMed

    McLennan, John D; Steele, MacGregor

    2015-04-01

    Response to anemia in low-resource settings may entail presumptive iron treatment for those with Hemoglobin (Hb) levels falling below certain cut points. This study aimed to inform an anemia screening and treatment service in a low-income community in the Dominican Republic by determining (i) the prevalence of anemia in young children attending this service using different Hb cut points and (ii) the extent of microcytosis using different recommended cut points for the mean corpuscular volume (MCV). Using the WHO recommended cut point of <11.0 g/dl, 69.9% of 292 children would be classified as anemic, while using a more conservative cut point, <10.0 g/dl, 34.6% would be identified. Depending on the Hb cut point and which of two age-based MCV cut points are used, the prevalence of microcytosis within the anemic subsamples ranged from 23.5% to 80.2%. With increasing availability of complete blood counts in low resource settings (vs. Hb only), more sophisticated management algorithms are necessary to guide primary care efforts. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Fundamental underwater cutting method experiment as a dismantling tool for a commercial atomic reactor vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Hamasaki, M.; Murao, Y.; Tateiwa, F.

    1982-10-01

    A new underwater cutting technique applying underwater dismantling to commercial atomic reactor vessels has been developed. This technique involves gas cutting the mild steel underwater after removing the stainless steel cladding by arc gouging. The arc gouging is achieved by blowing out metal--which is melted by an arc between a mild steel electrode wire and the stainless steel--by jetting water from a rear water nozzle. The fuel gas employed for preheating for the gas cutting was a mixed gas of propane and 30% methylacetylene. The test piece used was made of 300-mm-thick mild steel with 8-mm-thick stainless steel cladding. The fundamental cutting experiment was carried out successfully under a cutting speed condition of 15 cm/min at a water depth of 20 cm. This apparatus is easy to handle, compact, and cheap.

  1. Bone cutting.

    PubMed

    Giraud, J Y; Villemin, S; Darmana, R; Cahuzac, J P; Autefage, A; Morucci, J P

    1991-02-01

    Bone cutting has always been a problem for surgeons because bone is a hard living material, and many osteotomes are still very crude tools. Technical improvement of these surgical tools has first been their motorization. Studies of the bone cutting process have indicated better features for conventional tools. Several non-conventional osteotomes, particularly ultrasonic osteotomes are described. Some studies on the possible use of lasers for bone cutting are also reported. Use of a pressurised water jet is also briefly examined. Despite their advantages, non-conventional tools still require improvement if they are to be used by surgeons.

  2. Bronchodilator response cut-off points and FEV 0.75 reference values for spirometry in preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Burity, Edjane Figueiredo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Sayão, Larissa Bouwman; de Andrade, Armèle Dornelas; de Britto, Murilo Carlos Amorim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the cut-off points for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75% bronchodilator responses in healthy preschool children and to generate reference values for FEV0.75. Methods: This was a cross-sectional community-based study involving children 3-5 years of age. Healthy preschool children were selected by a standardized questionnaire. Spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator use. The cut-off point of the response was defined as the 95th percentile of the change in each parameter. Results: We recruited 266 children, 160 (60%) of whom were able to perform acceptable, reproducible expiratory maneuvers before and after bronchodilator use. The mean age and height were 57.78 ± 7.86 months and 106.56 ± 6.43 cm, respectively. The success rate for FEV0.5 was 35%, 68%, and 70% in the 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds, respectively. The 95th percentile of the change in the percentage of the predicted value in response to bronchodilator use was 11.6%, 16.0%, 8.5%, and 35.5% for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75%, respectively. Conclusions: Our results provide cut-off points for bronchodilator responsiveness for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75% in healthy preschool children. In addition, we proposed gender-specific reference equations for FEV0.75. Our findings could improve the physiological assessment of respiratory function in preschool children. PMID:27812631

  3. The usefulness of plasma histamine and different tryptase cut-off points in the diagnosis of peranaesthetic hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Berroa, F; Lafuente, A; Javaloyes, G; Ferrer, M; Moncada, R; Goikoetxea, M J; Urbain, C M; Sanz, M L; Gastaminza, G

    2014-02-01

    Anaesthetic hypersensitivity reactions can be IgE- or not IgE-mediated and are a challenge to find the causal agent. Histamine and tryptase determination are classically considered useful in the diagnosis of these reactions. The aim of our study was to assess the diagnostic usefulness of plasma histamine and different cut-off points of serum tryptase. Patients suffering a reaction suggestive of hypersensitivity during general anaesthesia in Clínica Universidad de Navarra (2008-2012) were included. Serum tryptase and plasma histamine were measured at the time of the reaction and 2 h later. Baseline tryptase was also determined. Four to eight weeks after the reaction an allergological study was performed to all the drugs or products involved in the reaction. Sixty-five patients suffered an immediate hypersensitivity reaction during the period of the study. Thirty-seven patients (20 male) with median age 48 years (12-79) were included because they completed allergological study, and histamine and tryptase were correctly obtained. Elevated plasma histamine was observed in 34 cases (92%). Tryptase exceeded twice the basal values in 10 patients (31%). Using different cut-off points of tryptase, the number of patients with elevated tryptase would be 15 patients (41%) for a cut-off point of 5 μg/L; 12 patients (32%) for a cut-off point of 8.23 μg/L; nine patients (24%) for 10.5 μg/L; and eight patients (22%) for 11.4 μg/L. The median tryptase level for the IgE-mediated reactions was 9.0 μg/L (2-70 μg/L) and 4.0 μg/L (3-13 μg/L) in non-IgE-mediated reactions (P < 0.01). Median tryptase levels were higher in more severe reactions (grade 2 or 3) in comparison with grade 1. The best ratio for serum-tryptase-during-reaction/basal-serum-tryptase to discriminate between IgE and non-IgE reactions was 2.0. The best criterion for discriminating IgE- and non IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in anaesthesia was a tryptase value exceeding twice the basal one

  4. Cross-validation of pedometer-determined cut-points for healthy weight in British children from White and South Asian backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Michael J; Eyre, Emma L J; Bryant, Elizabeth; Birch, Samantha L

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based pedometer cut-points for health have not been sufficiently examined in the context of ethnicity. To (1) evaluate previously described steps/day cut-points in a sample of White and South Asian British primary school children and (2) use ROC analysis to generate alternative, ethnic specific, steps/day cut-offs for children. Height, body mass and pedometer determined physical activity were assessed in 763 British children (357 boys and 406 girls) from White (n = 593) and South Asian (n = 170) ethnic groups, aged 8-11 years. The Vincent and Pangrazi cut-points significantly predicted BMI in white (p = 0.006, Adjusted R(2 )= 0.08) and South Asian children (p = 0.039, Adjusted R(2 )= 0.078). The Tudor-Locke et al. cut-points significantly predicted BMI in White children (p = 0.0001, Adjusted R(2 )= 0.079) but not South Asian children (p < 0.05). ROC analysis indicated significant alternative cut-points in White and South Asian boys and girls (all p = 0.04 or better, Adjusted R(2 )= 0.091 for White and 0.09 for South Asian children). Subsequent cut-points associated with healthy weight, when translated to steps/day were 13,625 for White boys, 13,135 for White girls, 10,897 for South Asian boys and 10,161 for South Asian girls. Previously published steps/day cut-points for healthy weight may not account for known ethnic variation in physical activity between White and South Asian children in the UK. Alternative, ethnic-specific, cut-points may be better placed to distinguish British children based on pedometer-determined physical activity.

  5. Microstructural characterization of WC-TiC-Co cutting tools during high-speed machining of P20 mold steel

    SciTech Connect

    Farhat, Z.N

    2003-10-15

    The wear behavior of tungsten carbide (WC)-TiC-Co cutting tools during cutting P20 tool steel was investigated. Orthogonal cutting tests were performed on a CNC lathe using five speeds, namely, 60, 120, 240, 380 and 600 m/min. Wear, as the width of the wear land, was monitored at five time intervals. Wear characterization of the rake and the flank surfaces as well as the collected chips was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), backscattered electron imaging and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Microhardness of collected chips was also performed to monitor strain hardening effects during cutting. Two dominant wear mechanisms were identified: at high speed (380-600 m/min), wear was found to occur by a melt wear mechanism; at low speed (60-120 m/min), adhesion (built-up edge) followed by delamination was found to be the cause of wear damage. It was also found that deformation in the chips occurred by localized shear deformation.

  6. Prescribed fire and cutting as tools for reducing woody plant succession in a created salt marsh

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owens, A.B.; Proffitt, C.E.; Grace, J.B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on efforts to reduce woody successional growth by the native shrub Iva frutescens L. in a created salt marsh by using prescribed fire and cutting. Experimental treatments included a winter burn, cutting plants at ground level, and a combination burn-and-cut treatment, with replicate plots of each. Iva frutescens proved to be extremely hardy, with zero mortality following the cutting, burning, or combination treatment; similar levels of regrowth were observed for all treatments. Individual shrub response, however, was found to be related to initial plant size, ground water level and salinity, and two fire characteristics (total heating >60??C and total heat index >60??C). Fire severity, sediment nutrient concentrations, and other abiotic factors had no observable effects. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  7. Tool Forces and Chip Types In Orthogonal Cutting Of Southern Hardwoods

    Treesearch

    G.E. Woodson

    1979-01-01

    Specimens (l/8 to l/4 inch thick) from 5 trees of each of 22 hardwood species were cut orthogonally at 5 inches per minute. Average parallel and normal cutting forces for various rake angles (50, 60, and 70 degrees for veneer; 10, 20, and 30 degrees for planing; 20, 30, and 40 degrees for crosscutting) were measured at three moisture contents (10 percent, 20 percent,...

  8. Thermo-radiative and optical properties of a cutting tool based on polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González de Arrieta, I.; Echániz, T.; Pérez-Sáez, R. B.; Tello, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    The normal spectral emissivity of a cutting tool based on polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) between 400 °C and 1000 °C has been measured. Its shape shows significant differences with respect to that of pure cubic boron nitride (c-BN). Therefore, while the reflectance spectrum of pure c-BN can be fitted to a Lorentz model for linear dielectrics, the reflectance spectrum of the cutting tool (calculated from the emissivity using Kirchhoff’s laws) requires a combination of a four-parameter Kurosawa model with a double-damping Drude one. A detailed study of the dependence of the emissivity spectrum with temperature is also performed. The experimental data of this paper is required for accurate temperature measurements with radiation thermometers in machining processes.

  9. [Distribution patterns of PAHs in soils from coking plant and the particle-size cut points of soil washing].

    PubMed

    Li, He-Lian; Chen, Jia-Jun; Wu, Wei; Piao, Xue-Song; Jiang, Lin; Shi, Zhen-Tian; Sun, Tian-Wei

    2011-04-01

    Soil particle size distribution and contaminants distribution patterns in different soil size fractions are the basis of soil treatability using soil washing method. Soil particle-size cut points are important parameters of soil washing process. According to ex situ soil washing technology, soil samples were collected in a former coking plant. The soil particle size distribution and the concentrations of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in USEPA priority list were analyzed. Tween 80 and Triton X-100 solutions were used to clean the polluted soil with different particle size. Results showed that the total concentrations of 16 PAHs ranged from 6.27 to 40.18 mg/kg dry weight in the six soil size fractions and present a bimodal distribution. The maximum individual PAH concentration mostly occurred in the 250-500 microm size fraction. The lowest individual PAH concentration was in the 50-75 microm size fraction. The removal efficiencies of PAHs in different soil size fractions depended on their initial concentrations and the characteristics of soil. The PAHs removal efficiencies in coarser size fractions were lower than that in the finer size fractions owing to their higher organic carbon content. Based on the removal efficiency of PAHs in each soil size fractions by surfactant solution and the requirements of waste volume reduction, 50 microm was determined as the particle-size cut point. Then, 82.95% volume reduction can be achieved.

  10. An immunoinhibition approach to overcome the impact of pre-existing antibodies on cut point establishment for immunogenicity assessment of moxetumomab pasudotox.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Amy K; Vainshtein, Inna; Roskos, Lorin K; Chavez, Carlos; Sun, Bo; Liang, Meina

    2016-08-01

    Immunogenicity can impact PK, PD, efficacy and safety of biopharmaceuticals, and is often evaluated as a secondary objective in clinical studies. Methods to detect anti-drug antibodies (ADA) and neutralizing ADA (NAb) are semi-quantitative and utilize cut points to determine positive or negative samples. Assay cut points are established by the statistical analysis of treatment-naïve subject specimens that are assumed ADA and NAb-negative. Pre-existing antibodies to various biopharmaceuticals have been observed in treatment-naïve subjects and may artificially elevate the cut point, resulting in compromised assay sensitivities, inaccuracy in immunogenicity reporting and ultimately misleading assessment of the impact of immunogenicity on clinical outcomes. Although several approaches such as removal of pre-existing antibody samples or increasing the sample dilution could be used for cut point establishment to mitigate impact of pre-existing antibodies, they each have limitations, especially when a high prevalence of pre-existing antibodies is observed. Here we describe an innovative approach used to establish cut points for ADA and NAb assays of moxetumomab pasudotox (moxetumomab), a recombinant anti-CD22 immunotoxin, to which a high prevalence of pre-existing antibodies was observed. In order to overcome the challenges associated with this high prevalence and prevent establishment of an artificially elevated cut point, we developed an immunoinhibition approach that allowed generation of pseudo ADA and NAb-negative populations for cut point determination. Immunoinhibition was performed by adding excess moxetumomab (for ADA) or a non-CD22 binding PE38-containing immunotoxin, CAT-5001 (for NAb), to treatment-naive samples prior to evaluating samples for cut point establishment. This approach successfully eliminated pre-existing antibody activity in treatment-naive samples, enabling establishment of more accurate ADA and NAb assay cut points. A comparative analysis of

  11. The DSM-5 Self-Rated Level 1 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure as a Screening Tool.

    PubMed

    Bastiaens, Leo; Galus, James

    2017-05-19

    The DSM-5 Self-Rated Level 1 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure was developed to aid clinicians with a dimensional assessment of psychopathology; however, this measure resembles a screening tool for several symptomatic domains. The objective of the current study was to examine the basic parameters of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive power of the measure as a screening tool. One hundred and fifty patients in a correctional community center filled out the measure prior to a psychiatric evaluation, including the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview screen. The above parameters were calculated for the domains of depression, mania, anxiety, and psychosis. The results showed that the sensitivity and positive predictive power of the studied domains was poor because of a high rate of false positive answers on the measure. However, when the lowest threshold on the Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure was used, the sensitivity of the anxiety and psychosis domains and the negative predictive values for mania, anxiety and psychosis were good. In conclusion, while it is foreseeable that some clinicians may use the DSM-5 Self-Rated Level 1 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure as a screening tool, it should not be relied on to identify positive findings. It functioned well in the negative prediction of mania, anxiety and psychosis symptoms.

  12. Screening for Congenital Hypothyroidism: Comparison of Borderline Screening Cut-Off Points and the Effect on the Number of Children Treated with Levothyroxine

    PubMed Central

    Langham, Shirley; Hindmarsh, Peter; Krywawych, Steven; Peters, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Background The newborn screening programme for congenital hypothyroidism (CH) has led to the prevention of severe developmental delay associated with this condition. In the UK, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) screening cut-off points have changed over time, in some instances prompted by changing methodological platforms. The use of borderline cut-off points varies throughout the country. Objective To use discordance in cut-off points to assess the performance of the UK Newborn Screening Programme Centre (UKNSPC) definitions. Methods Between January 2006 and December 2007, 223,658 newborn infants were screened by the Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) for CH. All children with positive results and those with blood-spot TSH concentrations >6 mU/l on repeat screening were referred to GOSH. We compared the numbers of children detected and treated for CH using the GOSH cut-off points (>6 mU/l) and those of the national screening programme (>10 mU/l). Children were defined as transient CH if levothyroxine treatment had been discontinued by 3 years. Results Of the children screened between January 2006 and December 2007, 167 out of 223,658 fulfilled the GOSH screening criteria; 136 of these required levothyroxine treatment, but 29 (21%) of the children treated would not have been detected by the current UKNSPC guidelines. Transient CH was found in 17/47 (36%) of the treated children detected with a cut-off point >6 mU/l. Raising the cut-off point to >10 mU/l reduced the number of children treated for transient CH to 4/18 (22%). Conclusion A significant number of children with true and transient CH are missed with a screening cut-off point of >10 mU/l. Our data suggests that a cut-off point of 6 mU/l is appropriate. PMID:24847451

  13. Large prospective study of ovarian cancer screening in high-risk women: CA125 cut-point defined by menopausal status.

    PubMed

    Skates, Steven J; Mai, Phuong; Horick, Nora K; Piedmonte, Marion; Drescher, Charles W; Isaacs, Claudine; Armstrong, Deborah K; Buys, Saundra S; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Horowitz, Ira R; Berchuck, Andrew; Daly, Mary B; Domchek, Susan; Cohn, David E; Van Le, Linda; Schorge, John O; Newland, William; Davidson, Susan A; Barnes, Mack; Brewster, Wendy; Azodi, Masoud; Nerenstone, Stacy; Kauff, Noah D; Fabian, Carol J; Sluss, Patrick M; Nayfield, Susan G; Kasten, Carol H; Finkelstein, Dianne M; Greene, Mark H; Lu, Karen

    2011-09-01

    Previous screening trials for early detection of ovarian cancer in postmenopausal women have used the standard CA125 cut-point of 35 U/mL, the 98th percentile in this population yielding a 2% false positive rate, whereas the same cut-point in trials of premenopausal women results in substantially higher false positive rates. We investigated demographic and clinical factors predicting CA125 distributions, including 98th percentiles, in a large population of high-risk women participating in two ovarian cancer screening studies with common eligibility criteria and screening protocols. Baseline CA125 values and clinical and demographic data from 3,692 women participating in screening studies conducted by the National Cancer Institute-sponsored Cancer Genetics Network and Gynecologic Oncology Group were combined for this preplanned analysis. Because of the large effect of menopausal status on CA125 levels, statistical analyses were conducted separately in pre- and postmenopausal subjects to determine the impact of other baseline factors on predicted CA125 cut-points on the basis of 98th percentile. The primary clinical factor affecting CA125 cut-points was menopausal status, with premenopausal women having a significantly higher cut-point of 50 U/mL, while in postmenopausal subjects the standard cut-point of 35 U/mL was recapitulated. In premenopausal women, current oral contraceptive (OC) users had a cut-point of 40 U/mL. To achieve a 2% false positive rate in ovarian cancer screening trials and in high-risk women choosing to be screened, the cut-point for initial CA125 testing should be personalized primarily for menopausal status (50 for premenopausal women, 40 for premenopausal on OC, and 35 for postmenopausal women).

  14. The damage of the cutting tools out of carbide metallic during the turning of a soaked and not hardened steel XC38

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghouani, M.; Tafraoui, A.; Lebaili, S.

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study widened knowledge on the use of the cutting tools out of metal carbide and to define of it the influence of the elements of the mode of cut on the behaviour of these tools during the machining of treated steel XC38 and untreated. This work aims at evolution determined in experiments of the wear of a cutting tool out of metal carbide with plate reported of P30 nuance for an operation of slide-lathing in turning on soaked and not hardened steel XC38 test-tubes. This research is based on the model of Taylor to determine the lifespan of the cutting tool according to the various parameters of cut, like the cutting speed Vc, the advance of cut a, the depth of cutting P. In order to express the operational limits of the tool for slide-lathing in a preventive way. The model makes it possible to determine the time of change of the tool and to regard it as constraint for the respect of the roughness of the work piece during a work of series in conventional machining.

  15. A comparative investigation of bone surface after cutting with mechanical tools and Er:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kyung-Won; Deibel, Waldemar; Marinov, Dilyan; Griessen, Mathias; Dard, Michel; Bruno, Alfredo; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian; Cattin, Philippe; Juergens, Philipp

    2015-07-01

    Despite of the long history of medical application, laser ablation of bone tissue became successful only recently. Laser bone cutting is proven to have higher accuracy and to increase bone healing compared to conventional mechanical bone cutting. But the reason of subsequent better healing is not biologically explained yet. In this study we present our experience with an integrated miniaturized laser system mounted on a surgical lightweight robotic arm. An Erbium-doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Er:YAG) laser and a piezoelectric (PZE) osteotome were used for comparison. In six grown up female Göttingen minipigs, comparative surgical interventions were done on the edentulous mandibular ridge. Our laser system was used to create different shapes of bone defects on the left side of the mandible. On the contralateral side, similar bone defects were created by PZE osteotome. Small bone samples were harvested to compare the immediate post-operative cut surface. The analysis of the cut surface of the laser osteotomy and conventional mechanical osteotomy revealed an essential difference. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed biologically open cut surfaces from the laser osteotomy. The samples from PZE osteotomy showed a flattened tissue structure over the cut surface, resembling the "smear layer" from tooth preparation. We concluded that our new finding with the mechanical osteotomy suggests a biological explanation to the expected difference in subsequent bone healing. Our hypothesis is that the difference of surface characteristic yields to different bleeding pattern and subsequently results in different bone healing. The analyses of bone healing will support our hypothesis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cut-Point Levels of Phosphatidylethanol to Identify Alcohol Misuse in a Mixed Cohort Including Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Majid; Burnham, Ellen L; Joyce, Cara; Clark, Brendan J; Yong, Meagan; Gaydos, Jeannette; Cooper, Richard S; Smith, Gordon S; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Lowery, Erin M

    2017-10-01

    Although alcohol misuse is associated with deleterious outcomes in critically ill patients, its detection by either self-report or examination of biomarkers is difficult to obtain consistently. Phosphatidylethanol (PEth) is a direct alcohol biomarker that can characterize alcohol consumption patterns; however, its diagnostic accuracy in identifying misuse in critically ill patients is unknown. PEth values were obtained in a mixed cohort comprising 122 individuals from medical and burn intensive care units (n = 33), alcohol detoxification unit (n = 51), and healthy volunteers (n = 38). Any alcohol misuse and severe misuse were referenced by Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and AUDIT-C scores separately. Mixed-effects logistic regression analysis was performed, and the discrimination of PEth was evaluated using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The area under the ROC curve for PEth was 0.927 (95% CI: 0.877, 0.977) for any misuse and 0.906 (95% CI: 0.850, 0.962) for severe misuse defined by AUDIT. By AUDIT-C, the area under the ROC curves was 0.948 (95% CI: 0.910, 0.956) for any misuse and 0.913 (95% CI: 0.856, 0.971) for severe misuse. The PEth cut-points of ≥250 and ≥400 ng/ml provided optimal discrimination for any misuse and severe misuse, respectively. The positive predictive value for ≥250 ng/ml was 88.7% (95% CI: 77.5, 95.0), and the negative predictive value was 86.7% (95% CI: 74.9, 93.7). PEth ≥ 400 ng/ml achieved similar values, and similar results were shown for AUDIT-C. In a subgroup analysis of critically ill patients only, test characteristics were similar to the mixed cohort. PEth is a strong predictor and has good discrimination for any and severe alcohol misuse in a mixed cohort that includes critically ill patients. Cut-points at 250 ng/ml for any, and 400 ng/ml for severe, are favorable. External validation will be required to establish these cut-points in critically ill patients

  17. Trend, projection, and appropriate body mass index cut-off point for diabetes and hypertension in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mizanur; Akter, Shamima; Jung, Jenny; Rahman, Md Shafiur; Sultana, Papia

    2017-04-01

    Rapid increasing of high body mass index (BMI) is a global health concern. Population with high BMI predicts an increased risk of diabetes and hypertension. The objective of the present study is to estimate the trend and prediction of diabetes and hypertension in Bangladesh, to examine the association of BMI with risk of diabetes and hypertension, and to ascertain an appropriate BMI cut-off point for screening diabetes. We searched PubMed from inception to August 2016 and identified studies reporting diabetes and hypertension prevalence in Bangladesh. Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2011 data was also included in this study. Bayesian model was used to estimate trend and projection in diabetes and hypertension prevalence by sex and residence. Receiver operating characteristic curves was used to determine the optimal BMI cut-off point for screening diabetes. Of 535 articles reviewed, 35 studies reported prevalence of diabetes and hypertension. Prevalence of diabetes (95% credible interval) increased between 1992 and 2015 from 3.2% (2.2-4.3) to 12.1% (9.1-15.4) in men, and from 2.5% (1.8-3.5) to 13.4% (9.7-17.6) in women. Diabetes prevalence in 2030 is expected to reach 23.6% (13.6-36.3) for men and 33.5% (19.9-50.9) for women. Hypertension prevalence increased between 1992 and 2015 from 11.0% (8.6-13.7) to 20.4% (18.4-22.4%) in 2015 in men, and from 14.0% (10.3-19.0) to 21.3% (19.0-23.6) in women. Annual average rate of change for diabetes prevalence was higher among women and in rural areas, while for hypertension prevalence it was higher in men and urban areas. Adults with BMI of 22.5kg/m(2) or above had a higher risk of diabetes and hypertension in this study. The optimal BMI cut-off point for screening diabetes was 23kg/m(2) for overall population, 22kg/m(2) for men, and 23kg/m(2) for women. Diabetes is more prevalent among women and rural population groups, while hypertension is more prevalent among men and urban population groups in Bangladesh. A BMI

  18. Steam as a pre-plant soil disinfestant tool in California cut flower production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methyl bromide (MB) has been widely used in California cut flower production for effective control of a broad range of soil pests including plant pathogens and weeds. However, MB has been classified as an ozone depleting substance, and its availability to growers is limited according to the Montreal...

  19. Microstructure, Mechanical and Wear Behaviors of Hot-Pressed Copper-Nickel-Based Materials for Diamond Cutting Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, G.; Ferreira, P.; Buciumeanu, M.; Cabral, A.; Fredel, M.; Silva, F. S.; Henriques, B.

    2017-08-01

    The current trend to replace cobalt in diamond cutting tools (DCT) for stone cutting has motivated the study of alternative materials for this end. The present study characterizes several copper-nickel-based materials (Cu-Ni; Cu-Ni-10Sn, Cu-Ni-15Sn, Cu-Ni-Sn-2WC and Cu-Ni-Sn-10WC) for using as matrix material for diamond cutting tools for stone. Copper-nickel-based materials were produced by hot pressing, at a temperature of 850 °C during 15 min and under an applied pressure of 50 MPa. The mechanical properties were evaluated though the shear strength and hardness values. The microstructures and fracture surfaces were analyzed by SEM. The wear behavior of all specimens was assessed using a reciprocating ball-on-plate tribometer. The hot pressing produced compacts with good densification. Sn and WC promoted enhanced mechanical properties and wear performance to Cu-Ni alloys. Cu-Ni-10Sn and Cu-Ni-10Sn-2WC displayed the best compromise between mechanical and wear performance.

  20. Animated PowerPoint as a tool to teach anatomy.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, S W; Pawlina, W

    2000-04-15

    Anatomy is a visual science. For centuries, anatomic information has been conveyed through drawings that have been presented to students through every available medium. The projection of animated images from a computer is a medium that offers great promise in effecting improved communication of anatomic information. Using Microsoft PowerPoint software, we have developed animated presentations for all of our lectures in Gross and Developmental Anatomy. As a starting point, we scan pen-and-ink drawings to create a digital image. The image may be edited and manipulated in an image processing program. Next, the image is imported into a PowerPoint slide where it is labeled and otherwise enhanced (arteries overlaid with red color, veins in blue, etc.) and the enhancements are animated, as we describe here step by step. For the lecture, the file is loaded on a server that is accessible through a network from a computer in the lecture hall. The output is directed to a video projector and the PowerPoint presentation is projected in the "Slide Show" mode. We use a wireless mouse that allows us to control the presentation from anywhere in the room. Before the lecture, students are provided with the same unlabeled drawings as handouts, and during the lecture the students are actively engaged in labeling the drawings and making related notes. After the lecture, the file is saved in HTML format and posted on our course web site where students can access the slides. Evaluation by the students at the end of the course demonstrated that this style of presentation was very favorably received.

  1. Prediction of boiling points of organic compounds by QSPR tools.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yi-min; Zhu, Zhi-ping; Cao, Zhong; Zhang, Yue-fei; Zeng, Ju-lan; Li, Xun

    2013-07-01

    The novel electro-negativity topological descriptors of YC, WC were derived from molecular structure by equilibrium electro-negativity of atom and relative bond length of molecule. The quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPR) between descriptors of YC, WC as well as path number parameter P3 and the normal boiling points of 80 alkanes, 65 unsaturated hydrocarbons and 70 alcohols were obtained separately. The high-quality prediction models were evidenced by coefficient of determination (R(2)), the standard error (S), average absolute errors (AAE) and predictive parameters (Qext(2),RCV(2),Rm(2)). According to the regression equations, the influences of the length of carbon backbone, the size, the degree of branching of a molecule and the role of functional groups on the normal boiling point were analyzed. Comparison results with reference models demonstrated that novel topological descriptors based on the equilibrium electro-negativity of atom and the relative bond length were useful molecular descriptors for predicting the normal boiling points of organic compounds.

  2. Drilling High Precision Holes in Ti6Al4V Using Rotary Ultrasonic Machining and Uncertainties Underlying Cutting Force, Tool Wear, and Production Inaccuracies.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, M A K; Sharif Ullah, A M M; Anwar, Saqib

    2017-09-12

    Ti6Al4V alloys are difficult-to-cut materials that have extensive applications in the automotive and aerospace industry. A great deal of effort has been made to develop and improve the machining operations of Ti6Al4V alloys. This paper presents an experimental study that systematically analyzes the effects of the machining conditions (ultrasonic power, feed rate, spindle speed, and tool diameter) on the performance parameters (cutting force, tool wear, overcut error, and cylindricity error), while drilling high precision holes on the workpiece made of Ti6Al4V alloys using rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM). Numerical results were obtained by conducting experiments following the design of an experiment procedure. The effects of the machining conditions on each performance parameter have been determined by constructing a set of possibility distributions (i.e., trapezoidal fuzzy numbers) from the experimental data. A possibility distribution is a probability-distribution-neural representation of uncertainty, and is effective in quantifying the uncertainty underlying physical quantities when there is a limited number of data points which is the case here. Lastly, the optimal machining conditions have been identified using these possibility distributions.

  3. Drilling High Precision Holes in Ti6Al4V Using Rotary Ultrasonic Machining and Uncertainties Underlying Cutting Force, Tool Wear, and Production Inaccuracies

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, M. A. K.

    2017-01-01

    Ti6Al4V alloys are difficult-to-cut materials that have extensive applications in the automotive and aerospace industry. A great deal of effort has been made to develop and improve the machining operations of Ti6Al4V alloys. This paper presents an experimental study that systematically analyzes the effects of the machining conditions (ultrasonic power, feed rate, spindle speed, and tool diameter) on the performance parameters (cutting force, tool wear, overcut error, and cylindricity error), while drilling high precision holes on the workpiece made of Ti6Al4V alloys using rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM). Numerical results were obtained by conducting experiments following the design of an experiment procedure. The effects of the machining conditions on each performance parameter have been determined by constructing a set of possibility distributions (i.e., trapezoidal fuzzy numbers) from the experimental data. A possibility distribution is a probability-distribution-neural representation of uncertainty, and is effective in quantifying the uncertainty underlying physical quantities when there is a limited number of data points which is the case here. Lastly, the optimal machining conditions have been identified using these possibility distributions. PMID:28895876

  4. Effect of microscale texture on cutting performance of WC/Co-based TiAlN coated tools under different lubrication conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kedong; Deng, Jianxin; Xing, Youqiang; Li, Shipeng; Gao, Huanhuan

    2015-01-01

    Commonly known the severe friction between the tool and chip affects the tool life and the quality of the machined surfaces. Introducing a lubricant into the tool-chip interface can be used to alleviate the friction, the effectiveness of which may be improved by surface texturing of the tools. Thus, surface textures were fabricated using laser on the rake of the cemented carbide (WC/Co) inserts, then TiAlN films were coated on the textured tools. The effect of the textures on the cutting performance was investigated using the textured coated tools and conventional coated tools in cutting AISI 1045 hardened steel tests. Two batches of cutting tests were carried out, in regimes of full and starved lubrication. The machining performance was assessed in terms of the cutting forces, friction coefficient at the tool-chip interface, surface roughness of machined workpiece and tool wear on the rake face. Results show that the cutting performance of textured tools was enhanced, especially under the full lubrication condition.

  5. Evaluation of the Seat Index Point Tool for Military Seats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    FORCE and PRESSURE or STRESS lbf poundforce 4.45 newtons N lbf/in2 poundforce per square 6.89 kilopascals kPa ! 4! inch LENGTH mm millimeters...T TEMPERATURE (exact degrees) oC Celsius 1.8C+32 Fahrenheit oF FORCE and PRESSURE or STRESS N Newtons 0.225 poundforce lbf kPa kilopascals...articulation points at the hip, knee and ankle. When the manikin is installed in a seat, body segment weights are applied to provide seat penetration

  6. Evaluation of the Seat Index Point Tool for Military Seats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    1.8 Celsius oC FORCE and PRESSURE or STRESS lbf poundforce 4.45 newtons N 2 | P a g e DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for Public Release lbf/in2...lb Mg (or "t") megagrams (or "metric ton") 1.103 short tons (2000 lb) T TEMPERATURE (exact degrees) oC Celsius 1.8C+32 Fahrenheit oF FORCE and...articulation points at the hip, knee and ankle. When the manikin is installed in a seat, body segment weights are applied to provide seat penetration

  7. Effects of Varying Epoch Lengths, Wear Time Algorithms, and Activity Cut-Points on Estimates of Child Sedentary Behavior and Physical Activity from Accelerometer Data.

    PubMed

    Banda, Jorge A; Haydel, K Farish; Davila, Tania; Desai, Manisha; Bryson, Susan; Haskell, William L; Matheson, Donna; Robinson, Thomas N

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effects of accelerometer epoch lengths, wear time (WT) algorithms, and activity cut-points on estimates of WT, sedentary behavior (SB), and physical activity (PA). 268 7-11 year-olds with BMI ≥ 85th percentile for age and sex wore accelerometers on their right hips for 4-7 days. Data were processed and analyzed at epoch lengths of 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-, 30-, and 60-seconds. For each epoch length, WT minutes/day was determined using three common WT algorithms, and minutes/day and percent time spent in SB, light (LPA), moderate (MPA), and vigorous (VPA) PA were determined using five common activity cut-points. ANOVA tested differences in WT, SB, LPA, MPA, VPA, and MVPA when using the different epoch lengths, WT algorithms, and activity cut-points. WT minutes/day varied significantly by epoch length when using the NHANES WT algorithm (p < .0001), but did not vary significantly by epoch length when using the ≥ 20 minute consecutive zero or Choi WT algorithms. Minutes/day and percent time spent in SB, LPA, MPA, VPA, and MVPA varied significantly by epoch length for all sets of activity cut-points tested with all three WT algorithms (all p < .0001). Across all epoch lengths, minutes/day and percent time spent in SB, LPA, MPA, VPA, and MVPA also varied significantly across all sets of activity cut-points with all three WT algorithms (all p < .0001). The common practice of converting WT algorithms and activity cut-point definitions to match different epoch lengths may introduce significant errors. Estimates of SB and PA from studies that process and analyze data using different epoch lengths, WT algorithms, and/or activity cut-points are not comparable, potentially leading to very different results, interpretations, and conclusions, misleading research and public policy.

  8. Maturity negates the gender-related difference in physical activity among youth. Is this equally justified whatever the accelerometer cut-off point used?

    PubMed

    Zitouni, Djamel; Guinhouya, Benjamin C

    2012-07-01

    To examine the consistency in findings about the influence of maturity on the gender-difference in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) of children using different cut-off points for MVPA. Cross-sectional observation study. The sample involved 253 children (139 boys) of 9.9±0.9 years. Their physical activity was evaluated using an Actigraph accelerometer. The biological age of children was determined with their estimated age at the peak height velocity, and maturity categories were gender-specific defined. Boys spent more time in MVPA than girls (P<0.0001), and no maturity-related differences were obtained on the whole sample. It was only among boys that differences were found between maturity groups with cut-off points of 3000 cpm (P=0.034), 3200 cpm (P=0.024), and 3600 cpm (P=0.011). At a given maturity level, boys spent significantly more time in MVPA than girls, except with the cut-off point of 1000 cpm (P=0.07). There were higher proportions of sufficiently active boys, but significances were reached only with cut-off points above 3000 cpm. There were no maturity-related differences in the proportion of sufficiently active children as MVPA was computed using cut-off points of 1000 cpm, 2000 cpm or 3000 cpm. The role of maturity in the gender-difference in MVPA seems unclear as one another cut-off point is used among children. Even if a relatively greater consistency was found with the three cut-off points above 3000 cpm, data comparison may require a conversion system until a consensus is reached about the exact value to be used among children. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Body mass index, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio cut-off points for categorisation of obesity among Omani Arabs.

    PubMed

    Al-Lawati, Jawad A; Jousilahti, Pekka

    2008-01-01

    There are no data on optimal cut-off points to classify obesity among Omani Arabs. The existing cut-off points were obtained from studies of European populations. To determine gender-specific optimal cut-off points for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) associated with elevated prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among Omani Arabs. A community-based cross-sectional study. The survey was conducted in the city of Nizwa in Oman in 2001. The study contained a probabilistic random sample of 1421 adults aged > or =20 years. Prevalent CVD risk was defined as the presence of at least two of the following three risk factors: hyperglycaemia, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Logistic regression and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were used to determine optimal cut-off points for BMI, WC and WHR in relation to the area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity and specificity. Over 87% of Omanis had at least one CVD risk factor (38% had hyperglycaemia, 19% hypertension and 34.5% had high total cholesterol). All three indices including BMI (AUC = 0.766), WC (AUC = 0.772) and WHR (AUC = 0.767) predicted prevalent CVD risk factors equally well. The optimal cut-off points for men and women respectively were 23.2 and 26.8 kg m-2 for BMI, 80.0 and 84.5 cm for WC, and 0.91 and 0.91 for WHR. To identify Omani subjects of Arab ethnicity at high risk of CVD, cut-off points lower than currently recommended for BMI, WC and WHR are needed for men while higher cut-off points are suggested for women.

  10. The current waist circumference cut point used for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in sub-Saharan African women is not appropriate.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Nigel J; Norris, Shane A

    2012-01-01

    The waist circumference cut point for diagnosing the metabolic syndrome in sub-Saharan African subjects is based on that obtained from studies in European populations. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of obesity and related metabolic disorders in an urban population of African females, a group at high risk for such diseases, and to determine the appropriate waist cut point for diagnosing the metabolic syndrome. Anthropometry and fasting lipid, glucose and insulin levels were measured in a cohort of 1251 African females participating in the Birth to Twenty cohort study in Soweto, Johannesburg. The waist circumference cut points for diagnosing metabolic syndrome (as defined using the new harmonised guidelines), insulin resistance, dysglycaemia, hypertension and dyslipidaemia were obtained using receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. The prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome were 50.1%, 14.3% and 42.1%, respectively. The appropriate waist cut point for diagnosing metabolic syndrome was found to be 91.5 cm and was similar to the cuts points obtained for detecting increased risk of insulin resistance (89.0 cm), dysglycaemia (88.4 cm), hypertension (90.1 cm), hypo-high density lipoproteinaemia (87.6 cm) and hyper-low density lipoproteinaemia (90.5 cm). The present data demonstrates that urban, African females have a high prevalence of obesity and related disorders and the waist cut point currently recommended for the diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome (80.0 cm) in this population should be increased to 91.5 cm. This latter finding demonstrates a clear ethnic difference in the relationship between abdominal adiposity and metabolic disease risk. The similar waist cut points identified for the detection of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome and related cardiovascular risk factors demonstrates that the risk for different metabolic diseases increases at the same level of abdominal adiposity suggesting a

  11. The Current Waist Circumference Cut Point Used for the Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome in Sub-Saharan African Women Is Not Appropriate

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Nigel J.; Norris, Shane A.

    2012-01-01

    The waist circumference cut point for diagnosing the metabolic syndrome in sub-Saharan African subjects is based on that obtained from studies in European populations. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of obesity and related metabolic disorders in an urban population of African females, a group at high risk for such diseases, and to determine the appropriate waist cut point for diagnosing the metabolic syndrome. Anthropometry and fasting lipid, glucose and insulin levels were measured in a cohort of 1251 African females participating in the Birth to Twenty cohort study in Soweto, Johannesburg. The waist circumference cut points for diagnosing metabolic syndrome (as defined using the new harmonised guidelines), insulin resistance, dysglycaemia, hypertension and dyslipidaemia were obtained using receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. The prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome were 50.1%, 14.3% and 42.1%, respectively. The appropriate waist cut point for diagnosing metabolic syndrome was found to be 91.5 cm and was similar to the cuts points obtained for detecting increased risk of insulin resistance (89.0 cm), dysglycaemia (88.4 cm), hypertension (90.1 cm), hypo-high density lipoproteinaemia (87.6 cm) and hyper-low density lipoproteinaemia (90.5 cm). The present data demonstrates that urban, African females have a high prevalence of obesity and related disorders and the waist cut point currently recommended for the diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome (80.0 cm) in this population should be increased to 91.5 cm. This latter finding demonstrates a clear ethnic difference in the relationship between abdominal adiposity and metabolic disease risk. The similar waist cut points identified for the detection of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome and related cardiovascular risk factors demonstrates that the risk for different metabolic diseases increases at the same level of abdominal adiposity suggesting a

  12. Cut points for mild, moderate, and severe pain on the VAS for children and adolescents: what can be learned from 10 million ANOVAs?

    PubMed

    Hirschfeld, Gerrit; Zernikow, Boris

    2013-12-01

    Cut points that classify pain intensity into mild, moderate, and severe levels are widely used in pain research and clinical practice. At present, there are no agreed-upon cut points for the visual analog scale (VAS) in pediatric samples. We applied a method based on Serlin and colleagues' procedure (Serlin RC, Mendoza TR, Nakamura Y, Edwards KR, Cleeland CS. When is cancer pain mild, moderate or severe? Grading pain severity by its interference with function. PAIN(®) 1995;61:277-84) that was previously only used for the 0 to 10 numerical rating scale to empirically establish optimal cut points (OCs) for the VAS and used bootstrapping to estimate the variability of these thresholds. We analyzed data from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS) study and defined OCs both for parental ratings of their children's pain and adolescents' self-ratings of pain intensity. Data from 2276 children (3 to 10 years; 54% female) and 2982 adolescents (11 to 17 years; 61% female) were analyzed. OCs were determined in a by-millimeter analysis that tested all possible 4851 OC combinations, and a truncated analysis were OCs were spaced 5 mm apart, resulting in 171 OC combinations. The OC method identified 2 different OCs for parental ratings and self-report, both in the by-millimeter and truncated analyses. When we estimated the variability of the by-millimeter analysis, we found that the specific OCs were only found in 11% of the samples. The truncated analysis revealed, however, that cut points of 35:60 are identified as optimal in both samples and are a viable alternative to separate cut points. We found a set of cut points that can be used both parental ratings of their children's pain and self-reports for adolescents. Adopting these cut points greatly enhances the comparability of trials. We call for more systematic assessment of diagnostic procedures in pain research.

  13. Active control of residual tool marks for freeform optics functionalization by novel biaxial servo assisted fly cutting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiwei; To, Suet; Zhang, Shaojian

    2015-09-01

    The inherent residual tool marks (RTM) with particular patterns highly affect optical functions of the generated freeform optics in fast tool servo or slow tool servo (FTS/STS) diamond turning. In the present study, a novel biaxial servo assisted fly cutting (BSFC) method is developed for flexible control of the RTM to be a functional micro/nanotexture in freeform optics generation, which is generally hard to achieve in FTS/STS diamond turning. In the BSFC system, biaxial servo motions along the z-axis and side-feeding directions are mainly adopted for primary surface generation and RTM control, respectively. Active control of the RTM from the two aspects, namely, undesired effect elimination or effective functionalization, are experimentally demonstrated by fabricating a typical F-theta freeform surface with scattering homogenization and two functional microstructures with imposition of secondary phase gratings integrating both reflective and diffractive functions.

  14. Discrete element thermomechanical modelling of rock cutting with valuation of tool wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojek, Jerzy

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents a thermomechanical discrete element model of rock cutting process. The thermomechanical formulation of the discrete element method considers mechanical and thermal phenomena and their reciprocal influence. The thermal model developed for transient heat conduction problems takes into account conductive heat transfer at the contact between particles and convection on the free surface. The thermal and mechanical problems are coupled by consideration of: (1) heat generated due to friction which is calculated in the mechanical problem and passed to the thermal solution, (2) influence of thermal expansion on mechanical interaction between particles. Estimation of temperature dependent wear has been included into the contact model. The coupled problem is solved using the staggered scheme.The thermomechanical algorithm has been implemented in a discrete element program and applied to simulation of rock cutting with single pick of a dredge cutter head. Numerical results confirm good performance of the developed algorithm.

  15. X-Lase CoreScriber, Picosecond Fiber Laser Tool for High-Precision Scribing and Cutting of Transparent Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivistö, S.; Amberla, T.; Konnunaho, T.; Kangastupa, J.; Sillanpää, J.

    We have developed various industrial transparent material scribing processes and a laser tool, picosecond MHz-range all- fiber laser X-Lase CoreScriber. The remarkably high peak power, exceptionally good beam quality, and integrability of the X-Lase CoreScriber combined with high achievable material processing speeds provide tempting solutions for high- precision glass processing. Here presented sapphire and Gorilla glass dicing processes are based on transparent material internal modification with short and intense high repetition rate ps-laser pulses. Increased processing speeds and cutting qualities in comparison to other conventional processing methods are presented.

  16. Evaluating Gaze-Based Interface Tools to Facilitate Point-and-Select Tasks with Small Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skovsgaard, Henrik; Mateo, Julio C.; Hansen, John Paulin

    2011-01-01

    Gaze interaction affords hands-free control of computers. Pointing to and selecting small targets using gaze alone is difficult because of the limited accuracy of gaze pointing. This is the first experimental comparison of gaze-based interface tools for small-target (e.g. less than 12 x 12 pixels) point-and-select tasks. We conducted two…

  17. Evaluating Gaze-Based Interface Tools to Facilitate Point-and-Select Tasks with Small Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skovsgaard, Henrik; Mateo, Julio C.; Hansen, John Paulin

    2011-01-01

    Gaze interaction affords hands-free control of computers. Pointing to and selecting small targets using gaze alone is difficult because of the limited accuracy of gaze pointing. This is the first experimental comparison of gaze-based interface tools for small-target (e.g. less than 12 x 12 pixels) point-and-select tasks. We conducted two…

  18. An interactive mapping tool for visualizing lacunarity of laser scanned point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kania, Adam; Székely, Balázs

    2016-04-01

    Lacunarity, a measure of the spatial distribution of the empty space in a certain model or real space over large spatial scales, is found to be a useful descriptive quantity in many fields using imagery, including, among others, geology, dentistry, neurology. Its application in ecology was suggested more than 20 years ago. The main problem of its application was the lack of appropriate high resolution data. Nowadays, full-waveform laser scanning, also known as FWF LiDAR, provides the tool for mapping the vegetation in unprecedented details and accuracy. Consequently, the lacunarity concept can be revitalized, in order to study the structure of the vegetation in this sense as well. Calculation of lacunarity, even if it is done in two dimensions (2D), is still has its problems: on one hand it is a number-crunching procedure, on the other hand, it produces 4D results: at each 3D point it returns a set of data that are function of scale. These data sets are difficult to visualize, to evaluate, and to compare. In order to solve this problem, an interactive mapping tool has been conceptualized that is designed to manipulate and visualize the data, lets the user set parameters for best visualization or comparison results. The system is able to load large amounts of data, visualize them as lacunarity curves, or map view as horizontal slices or in 3D point clouds coloured according to the user's choice. Lacunarity maps are presented as a series of (usually) horizontal profiles, e.g. rasters, which cells contain color-mapped values of selected lacunarity of the point cloud. As lacunarity is usually analysed in a series of successive windows sizes, the tool can show a series of rasters with sequentially animated lacunarity maps calculated for various window sizes. A very fast switching of colour schemes is possible to facilitate rapid visual feedback to better understand underlying data patterns exposed by lacunarity functions. In the comparison mode, two sites (or two areas

  19. Screen Twice, Cut Once: Assessing the Predictive Validity of Teacher Selection Tools. Working Paper 120

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhaber, Dan; Grout, Cyrus; Huntington-Klein, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests that teacher hiring in public schools is ad hoc and often fails to result in good selection among applicants. Some districts use structured selection instruments in the hiring process, but we know little about the efficacy of such tools. In this paper, we evaluate the ability of applicant selection tools used by the Spokane…

  20. The Influence of Tool Path Strategies on Cutting Force and Surface Texture during Ball End Milling of Low Curvature Convex Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mohammad Hossein; Hassanpour, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in machining technology of curved surfaces for various engineering applications is increasing. Various methodologies and computer tools have been developed by the manufacturers to improve efficiency of freeform surface machining. Selection of the right sets of cutter path strategies and appropriate cutting conditions is extremely important in ensuring high productivity rate, meeting the better quality level, and lower cutting forces. In this paper, cutting force as a new decision criterion for the best selection of tool paths on convex surfaces is presented. Therefore, this work aims at studying and analyzing different finishing strategies to assess their influence on surface texture, cutting forces, and machining time. Design and analysis of experiments are performed by means of Taguchi technique and analysis of variance. In addition, the significant parameters affecting the cutting force in each strategy are introduced. Machining strategies employed include raster, 3D-offset, radial, and spiral. The cutting parameters were feed rate, cutting speed, and step over. The experiments were carried out on low curvature convex surfaces of stainless steel 1.4903. The conclusion is that radial strategy provokes the best surface texture and the lowest cutting forces and spiral strategy signifies the worst surface texture and the highest cutting forces. PMID:24701163

  1. The influence of tool path strategies on cutting force and surface texture during ball end milling of low curvature convex surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shajari, Shaghayegh; Sadeghi, Mohammad Hossein; Hassanpour, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in machining technology of curved surfaces for various engineering applications is increasing. Various methodologies and computer tools have been developed by the manufacturers to improve efficiency of freeform surface machining. Selection of the right sets of cutter path strategies and appropriate cutting conditions is extremely important in ensuring high productivity rate, meeting the better quality level, and lower cutting forces. In this paper, cutting force as a new decision criterion for the best selection of tool paths on convex surfaces is presented. Therefore, this work aims at studying and analyzing different finishing strategies to assess their influence on surface texture, cutting forces, and machining time. Design and analysis of experiments are performed by means of Taguchi technique and analysis of variance. In addition, the significant parameters affecting the cutting force in each strategy are introduced. Machining strategies employed include raster, 3D-offset, radial, and spiral. The cutting parameters were feed rate, cutting speed, and step over. The experiments were carried out on low curvature convex surfaces of stainless steel 1.4903. The conclusion is that radial strategy provokes the best surface texture and the lowest cutting forces and spiral strategy signifies the worst surface texture and the highest cutting forces.

  2. Use of hypereutectoid high-speed steel 11M5F for the production of cutting and cold-stamping tools in the Avtovaz Joint-Stock Company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakhov, V. V.; Yartsev, A. N.; Buyanskaya, T. A.; Matveev, S. V.; Berdnikova, L. N.

    1997-05-01

    The development of low-alloy high-speed steels that reduce the production cost of cutting tools and dies can present practical interest for plants and small enterprises manufacturing tools for their special purposes. The present paper gives the results of an investigation of hypereutectoid low-alloy high-speed steel 11M5F and a widely used steel of grade R6M5. The basic and technological properties of these steels are compared, and the results of industrial tests of cutting, thread-rolling, cold-stamping tools and tools for semihot deformation operating under various conditions are described.

  3. Tool life and cutting speed for the maximum productivity at the drilling of the stainless steel X22CrMoV12-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlase, A.; Blăjină, O.; Iacob, M.; Darie, V.

    2015-11-01

    Two addressed issues in the research regarding the cutting machinability, establishing of the optimum cutting processing conditions and the optimum cutting regime, do not yet have sufficient data for solving. For this reason, in the paper it is proposed the optimization of the tool life and the cutting speed at the drilling of a certain stainless steel in terms of the maximum productivity. For this purpose, a nonlinear programming mathematical model to maximize the productivity at the drilling of the steel is developed in the paper. The optimum cutting tool life and the associated cutting tool speed are obtained by solving the numerical mathematical model. Using this proposed model allows increasing the accuracy in the prediction of the productivity for the drilling of a certain stainless steel and getting the optimum tool life and the optimum cutting speed for the maximum productivity. The results presented in this paper can be used in the production activity, in order to increase the productivity of the stainless steels machining. Also new research directions for the specialists in this interested field may come off from this paper.

  4. Process of vacuum hardening of cutting and sharpening tools of high-speed steels in belt furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasovi, A. N.

    1996-12-01

    The technical possibilities of vacuum elevator and bell furnaces commonly used for brazing and annealing precision parts in instrument-making and electronics can be widened. Small thin-blade tools of powder steels R6M5-P, 10R6M5-MP and "silver" steels R6M5, R6M5K5 with a minimum tolerance for sizing after hardening at a low cooling rate have high operational properties. The present paper is devoted to the process of heat treatment of special tools of the listed steels used to cut and shape ribbons, rods, and foils of alloys 36NKhTYu, 29NK, BrB2 in vacuum bcil furnaces under conditions of batch and small-batch production in electrical-engineering enterprises.

  5. Pointing, acquisition, and tracking architecture tools for deep-space optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Swati; Alvarez-Salazar, Oscar; Birnbaum, Kevin; Biswas, Abhijit; Farr, William; Hemmati, Hamid; Johnson, Shawn; Ortiz, Geraldo; Quirk, Kevin; Rahman, Zahidul; Regher, Martin; Rizvi, Farheen; Shields, Joel; Srinivasan, Meera

    2014-03-01

    Deep-Space Optical Communications is a key emerging technology that is being pursued for high data-rate communications, which may enable rates up to ten times more than current Ka-band technology. Increasing the frequency of communication, from Ka-band to optical, allows for a higher data rate transfers. However, as the frequency of communication increases, the beam divergence decreases. Less beam divergence requires more accurate and precise pointing to make contact with the receiver. This would require a three-order-of-magnitude improvement from Ka-Band (~ 1 mrad) to optical (~ 1 urad) in the required pointing. Finding an architecture that can provide the necessary pointing capability is driven by many factors, such as allocated signal loss due to pointing, range to Earth, spacecraft disturbance profile, spacecraft base pointing capability, isolation scheme, and detector characteristics. We have developed a suite of tools to 1) flow down a set of pointing requirements (Error Budget Tool), 2) determine a set of architectures capable of meeting the requirements (Pointing Architecture Tool), and 3) assess the performance of possible architecture over the mission trajectory (Systems Engineering Tool). This paper describes the three tools and details their use through the case study of the Asteroid Retrieval Mission. Finally, this paper details which aspects of the pointing, acquisition, and tracking subsystem still require technology infusion, and the future steps needed to implement these pointing architectures.

  6. Bronchodilator response cut-off points and FEV 0.75 reference values for spirometry in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Burity, Edjane Figueiredo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Sayão, Larissa Bouwman; Andrade, Armèle Dornelas de; Britto, Murilo Carlos Amorim de

    2016-01-01

    To determine the cut-off points for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75% bronchodilator responses in healthy preschool children and to generate reference values for FEV0.75. This was a cross-sectional community-based study involving children 3-5 years of age. Healthy preschool children were selected by a standardized questionnaire. Spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator use. The cut-off point of the response was defined as the 95th percentile of the change in each parameter. We recruited 266 children, 160 (60%) of whom were able to perform acceptable, reproducible expiratory maneuvers before and after bronchodilator use. The mean age and height were 57.78 ± 7.86 months and 106.56 ± 6.43 cm, respectively. The success rate for FEV0.5 was 35%, 68%, and 70% in the 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds, respectively. The 95th percentile of the change in the percentage of the predicted value in response to bronchodilator use was 11.6%, 16.0%, 8.5%, and 35.5% for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75%, respectively. Our results provide cut-off points for bronchodilator responsiveness for FEV1, FEV0.75, FEV0.5, and FEF25-75% in healthy preschool children. In addition, we proposed gender-specific reference equations for FEV0.75. Our findings could improve the physiological assessment of respiratory function in preschool children. Determinar os pontos de corte de resposta ao broncodilatador do VEF1, VEF0,75, VEF0,5 e FEF25-75% em crianças pré-escolares saudáveis e gerar valores de referência para o VEF0,75. Foi realizado um estudo transversal de base comunitária em crianças de 3-5 anos de idade. Pré-escolares saudáveis foram selecionados por um questionário padronizado. Foi realizada espirometria antes e depois do uso de broncodilatador. Foram definidos os pontos de corte dessa resposta como o percentil 95 de variação em cada parâmetro. Foram recrutadas 266 crianças, e 160 (60,0%) foram capazes de gerar manobras expiratórias aceitáveis e reprodut

  7. Multiscale Analysis of Surface Topography from Single Point Incremental Forming using an Acetal Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, M.; Powers, B. M.; Loiselle, J.

    2014-03-01

    Single point incremental forming (SPIF) is a sheet metal manufacturing process that forms a part by incrementally applying point loads to the material to achieve the desired deformations and final part geometry. This paper investigates the differences in surface topography between a carbide tool and an acetal-tipped tool. Area-scale analysis is performed on the confocal areal surface measurements per ASME B46. The objective of this paper is to determine at which scales surfaces formed by two different tool materials can be differentiated. It is found that the surfaces in contact with the acetal forming tool have greater relative areas at all scales greater than 5 × 104 μm2 than the surfaces in contact with the carbide tools. The surfaces not in contact with the tools during forming, also referred to as the free surface, are unaffected by the tool material.

  8. Thermal Error Modeling Method with the Jamming of Temperature-Sensitive Points' Volatility on CNC Machine Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MIAO, Enming; LIU, Yi; XU, Jianguo; LIU, Hui

    2017-05-01

    Aiming at the deficiency of the robustness of thermal error compensation models of CNC machine tools, the mechanism of improving the models' robustness is studied by regarding the Leaderway-V450 machining center as the object. Through the analysis of actual spindle air cutting experimental data on Leaderway-V450 machine, it is found that the temperature-sensitive points used for modeling is volatility, and this volatility directly leads to large changes on the collinear degree among modeling independent variables. Thus, the forecasting accuracy of multivariate regression model is severely affected, and the forecasting robustness becomes poor too. To overcome this effect, a modeling method of establishing thermal error models by using single temperature variable under the jamming of temperature-sensitive points' volatility is put forward. According to the actual data of thermal error measured in different seasons, it is proved that the single temperature variable model can reduce the loss of forecasting accuracy resulted from the volatility of temperature-sensitive points, especially for the prediction of cross quarter data, the improvement of forecasting accuracy is about 5 μm or more. The purpose that improving the robustness of the thermal error models is realized, which can provide a reference for selecting the modeling independent variable in the application of thermal error compensation of CNC machine tools.

  9. Thermal Error Modeling Method with the Jamming of Temperature-Sensitive Points' Volatility on CNC Machine Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MIAO, Enming; LIU, Yi; XU, Jianguo; LIU, Hui

    2017-03-01

    Aiming at the deficiency of the robustness of thermal error compensation models of CNC machine tools, the mechanism of improving the models' robustness is studied by regarding the Leaderway-V450 machining center as the object. Through the analysis of actual spindle air cutting experimental data on Leaderway-V450 machine, it is found that the temperature-sensitive points used for modeling is volatility, and this volatility directly leads to large changes on the collinear degree among modeling independent variables. Thus, the forecasting accuracy of multivariate regression model is severely affected, and the forecasting robustness becomes poor too. To overcome this effect, a modeling method of establishing thermal error models by using single temperature variable under the jamming of temperature-sensitive points' volatility is put forward. According to the actual data of thermal error measured in different seasons, it is proved that the single temperature variable model can reduce the loss of forecasting accuracy resulted from the volatility of temperature-sensitive points, especially for the prediction of cross quarter data, the improvement of forecasting accuracy is about 5 μm or more. The purpose that improving the robustness of the thermal error models is realized, which can provide a reference for selecting the modeling independent variable in the application of thermal error compensation of CNC machine tools.

  10. The Effect of the Gas Inlet on the Fluid Field during Fabricating Hfcvd Diamond-Coated Cutting Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bin; Chen, Sulin; Cheng, Lei; Sun, Fanghong

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, the fluid field in a process of fabricating diamond coated cutting tools using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) method is investigated using the finite volume method (FVM), in which the effects of the inlet height, gas initial velocity, inlet radius and arrangement are illustrated in terms of the gas velocity magnitude and vector distribution near the filaments and the flute surface of cutting tools. In the simulations, the coupling effect of the temperature and the gas field is also considered by simultaneously calculating the temperature distribution. The simulation results suggest that either shortening the distance between the gas inlet and filaments, or increasing the gas initial velocity is helpful for the reactive gas arriving at filaments surface and being dissociated. Furthermore, increasing the inlet area is able to significantly increase the velocity of gas field around the filaments, as well as produce a much more uniform gas velocity field. Based on this conclusion, two novel multi-inlets setups are proposed to further improve the generated gas field and the simulation results show that the most superior gas field can be achieved with the one including 8 larger central inlets and 24 smaller outskirt inlets. Finally, an actual deposition experiment is carried out and its result indicates that adopting the optimized such inlet arrangement could generate a highly uniform and homogeneous growth environment on whole deposition area.

  11. Age-related differences in recommended anthropometric cut-off point validity to identify cardiovascular risk factors in ostensibly healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Björkelund, Cecilia; Guo, Xinxin; Skoog, Ingmar; Bosaeus, Ingvar; Lissner, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate validity of widely recommended anthropometric and total fat percentage cut-off points in screening for cardiovascular risk factors in women of different ages. Methods: A population-based sample of 1002 Swedish women aged 38, 50, 75 (younger, middle-aged and elderly, respectively) underwent anthropometry, health examinations and blood tests. Total fat was estimated (bioimpedance) in 670 women. Sensitivity, specificity of body mass index (BMI; ≥25 and ≥30), waist circumference (WC; ≥80 cm and ≥88 cm) and total fat percentage (TF; ≥35%) cut-off points for cardiovascular risk factors (dyslipidaemias, hypertension and hyperglycaemia) were calculated for each age. Cut-off points yielding high sensitivity together with modest specificity were considered valid. Women reporting hospital admission for cardiovascular disease were excluded. Results: The sensitivity of WC ≥80 cm for one or more risk factors was ~60% in younger and middle-aged women, and 80% in elderly women. The specificity of WC ≥80 cm for one or more risk factors was 69%, 57% and 40% at the three ages (p < .05 for age trends). WC ≥80 cm yielded ~80% sensitivity for two or more risk factors across all ages. However, specificity decreased with increasing age (p < .0001), being 33% in elderly. WC ≥88 cm provided better specificity in elderly women. BMI and TF % cut-off points were not better than WC. Conclusions: Validity of recommended anthropometric cut-off points in screening asymptomatic women varies with age. In younger and middle-age, WC ≥80 cm yielded high sensitivity and modest specificity for two or more risk factors, however, sensitivity for one or more risk factor was less than optimal. WC ≥88 cm showed better validity than WC ≥80 cm in elderly. Our results support age-specific screening cut-off points for women. PMID:25294689

  12. ActiGraph GT3X+ cut-points for identifying sedentary behaviour in older adults in free-living environments.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Farías, Nicolás; Brown, Wendy J; Peeters, G M E E Geeske

    2014-05-01

    To determine the ActiGraph GT3X+ cut-points with the highest accuracy for estimating time spent in sedentary behaviour in older adults in free-living environments. ActivPAL(3)™ was used as the reference standard. Cross-sectional study. 37 participants (13 males and 24 females, 73.5 ± 7.3 years old) wore an ActiGraph GT3X+ and an ActivPAL(3)™ for 7 consecutive days. For ActivPAL(3)™, variables were created based on posture. For ActiGraph GT3X+, sedentary behaviour was defined as (1) vector magnitude and (2) vertical axis counts for 1-s, 15-s and 1-min epochs, with cut-points for 1-s epochs of <1 to <10 counts, for 15-s epochs of <1 to <100 counts and for 1-min epochs of <1 to <400 counts. For each of the ActiGraph GT3X+ cut-points, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (area under the curve), sensitivity, specificity, and percentage correctly classified were calculated. Bias and 95% limits of agreement were calculated using the Bland-Altman method. The highest areas under the curve were obtained for the vector magnitude cut-points: <1 count/s, <70 counts/15-s, and <200 counts/min; and for the vertical axis cut-points: <1 count/s, <10 counts/15-s and <25 counts/min. Mean biases ranged from -4.29 to 124.28 min/day. The 95% limits of agreement for these cut-points were ± 2 h suggesting great inter-individual variation. The results suggest that cut-points are dependent on unit of analyses (i.e. epoch length and axes); cut-points for a given epoch length and axis cannot simply be extrapolated to other epoch lengths. Limitations regarding inter-individual variability and misclassification of standing activity as sitting/lying must be considered. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Improved tool grinding machine

    DOEpatents

    Dial, C.E. Sr.

    The present invention relates to an improved tool grinding mechanism for grinding single point diamond cutting tools to precise roundness and radius specifications. The present invention utilizes a tool holder which is longitudinally displaced with respect to the remainder of the grinding system due to contact of the tool with the grinding surface with this displacement being monitored so that any variation in the grinding of the cutting surface such as caused by crystal orientation or tool thicknesses may be compensated for during the grinding operation to assure the attainment of the desired cutting tool face specifications.

  14. Tool grinding machine

    DOEpatents

    Dial, Sr., Charles E.

    1980-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved tool grinding mechanism for grinding single point diamond cutting tools to precise roundness and radius specifications. The present invention utilizes a tool holder which is longitudinally displaced with respect to the remainder of the grinding system due to contact of the tool with the grinding surface with this displacement being monitored so that any variation in the grinding of the cutting surface such as caused by crystal orientation or tool thickness may be compensated for during the grinding operation to assure the attainment of the desired cutting tool face specifications.

  15. Ream-while-drilling tool cuts costs of three Venezuelan wells

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, J.R.; Carre C., L.J.; Portillo, R.; Leal, M.

    1997-01-13

    A new tool that permits simultaneous drilling and hole enlargement reduced drilling costs by more than $780,000 on three wells in eastern Venezuela. The new ream-while-drilling (RWD) tool was used for the first time in Venezuela in Lagoven SA`s exploratory well PTL-4X, in which an influx of formation gas in the top hole required an unexpected alteration of the original casing program. The modification of the casing program necessitated underreaming for the first time in the new field, located in the State of Monagas. On the basis of eliminating the additional 36 days of rig time and other expenses associated with the conventional reaming undertaken in similar wells in the area, the one-pass operation saved an estimated $634,834 in drilling costs. Because of the success of the PTL-4X operation, Corpoven SA subsequently used the RWD system in the Mulata field, where offset wells traditionally required an average of 1,973 ft of underreaming. One tool successfully drilled and reamed two wells and remained in a condition suitable for reuse. Corpoven ran the tool under a rental agreement and saved $146,782, when compared to three Mulata offsets. The paper discusses reaming experience, RWD tool design, and economic analysis.

  16. The effect of tool geometry on subsurface damage and material removal in nanometric cutting single-crystal silicon by a molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Houfu; Chen, Genyu; Fang, Qihong; Yin, Jiu

    2016-09-01

    Molecular dynamics is employed to investigate the nanoscale cutting process of monocrystalline silicon with diamond tool. Materials removal behavior of workpiece through diamond cutting is studied. The effects of tool geometry on the deformation of material including rake angle, clearance angle and edge radius were carefully explored by analyzing the phase transformation, chips, hydrostatic stress, shear stress and workpiece deformation. The investigation shows that a positive rake angle tip, a larger clearance angle tip or a small edge radius tip would result in a smaller cutting force, a better subsurface and a larger chipping volume. Moreover, a bigger negative rake angle tip cutting has a larger hydrostatic stress and shear stress. However, a positive rake angle tip cutting has a larger average friction coefficient than a negative rake angle tip cutting, which means that negative rake angle tip cutting experiences a lower resistance rate. It is also found that a tip with positive rake angle or smaller edge radius will improve the smoothness of a ground surface. In addition, a bigger clearance angle tip cutting generates a lower temperature in workpiece.

  17. Validation of BDI-II response and remission cut-points for assessment of seasonal affective disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Gloria M.; Rohan, Kelly J.; Langenberg, Patricia; Snitker, Soren; Postolache, Teodor T.

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to define treatment response and remission cut-point scores for the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II) when used to monitor a seasonal affective disorder (SAD) episode. Methods Data from two published randomized clinical trials for SAD were utilized to complete a ROC analysis to define response and remission thresholds for the BDI-II. The Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-Seasonal Affective Disorder Version (SIGH-SAD) was used as a reference standard. Data from the two trials included BDI-II and SIGH-SAD scores for patients at baseline, 6 weeks (post-treatment), and 1 year (next winter). Results BDI-II score of ≤9 was the derived criterion for remission of SAD, and BDI-II score decrease of 50% from baseline was the criterion for treatment response. Limitations Study participants were primarily female (94%) and Caucasian (80%) so demographic diversity of the sample was limited. Conclusion This study validated BDI-II scores compared to the SIGH-SAD reference standard. The BDI-II has greater potential for widespread use by clinicians than the SIGH-SAD to monitor SAD patients because it is a brief self-report instrument that can be conveniently administered in the waiting room. PMID:22277151

  18. Application of Taguchi Method for Analyzing Factors Affecting the Performance of Coated Carbide Tool When Turning FCD700 in Dry Cutting Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Jaharah A.; Mohd Rodzi, Mohd Nor Azmi; Zaki Nuawi, Mohd; Othman, Kamal; Rahman, Mohd. Nizam Ab.; Haron, Che Hassan Che; Deros, Baba Md

    2011-01-01

    Machining is one of the most important manufacturing processes in these modern industries especially for finishing an automotive component after the primary manufacturing processes such as casting and forging. In this study the turning parameters of dry cutting environment (without air, normal air and chilled air), various cutting speed, and feed rate are evaluated using a Taguchi optimization methodology. An orthogonal array L27 (313), signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and analysis of variance (ANOVA) are employed to analyze the effect of these turning parameters on the performance of a coated carbide tool. The results show that the tool life is affected by the cutting speed, feed rate and cutting environment with contribution of 38%, 32% and 27% respectively. Whereas for the surface roughness, the feed rate is significantly controlled the machined surface produced by 77%, followed by the cutting environment of 19%. The cutting speed is found insignificant in controlling the machined surface produced. The study shows that the dry cutting environment factor should be considered in order to produce longer tool life as well as for obtaining a good machined surface.

  19. Picosecond laser fabrication of micro cutting tool geometries on polycrystalline diamond composites using a high-numerical aperture micro scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Gregory; Dold, Claus; Wegener, Konrad

    2015-03-01

    The generation of microsized components found in LEDs, watches, molds as well as other types of micromechanics and microelectronics require a corresponding micro cutting tool in order to be manufactured, typically by milling or turning. Micro cutting tools are made of cemented tungsten carbide and are conventionally fabricated either by electrical discharge machining (EDM) or by grinding. An alternative method is proposed through a laser-based solution operating in the picosecond pulse duration whereby the beam is deflected using a modified galvanometer-driven micro scanning system exhibiting a high numerical aperture. A micro cutting tool material which cannot be easily processed using conventional methods is investigated, which is a fine grain polycrystalline diamond composite (PCD). The generation of various micro cutting tool relevant geometries, such as chip breakers and cutting edges, are demonstrated. The generated geometries are subsequently evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and quality is measured in terms of surface roughness and cutting edge sharpness. Additionally, two processing strategies in which the laser beam processes tangentially and orthogonally are compared in terms of quality.

  20. Perpetual Points: New Tool for Localization of Coexisting Attractors in Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Prasad, Awadhesh; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    Perpetual points (PPs) are special critical points for which the magnitude of acceleration describing the dynamics drops to zero, while the motion is still possible (stationary points are excluded), e.g. considering the motion of the particle in the potential field, at perpetual point, it has zero acceleration and nonzero velocity. We show that using PPs we can trace all the stable fixed points in the system, and that the structure of trajectories leading from former points to stable equilibria may be similar to orbits obtained from unstable stationary points. Moreover, we argue that the concept of perpetual points may be useful in tracing unexpected attractors (hidden or rare attractors with small basins of attraction). We show potential applicability of this approach by analyzing several representative systems of physical significance, including the damped oscillator, pendula, and the Henon map. We suggest that perpetual points may be a useful tool for localizing coexisting attractors in dynamical systems.

  1. Responses to dural puncture during institution of combined spinal-epidural analgesia: a comparison of 27 gauge pencil-point and 27 gauge cutting-edge needles.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, A A; Ghatge, S; Armendariz, G; Cornelius, D; Wang, S

    2011-03-01

    Pencil-point spinal needles are popular for combined spinal-epidural analgesia because they cause less dural puncture headache than cutting-edge spinal needles. However many parturients move, grimace, vocalise or experience paraesthesia or dysaesthesia during dural puncture when performing 'needle through needle' combined spinal-epidural analgesia. We compared dural puncture responses induced by pencil-point and cutting-edge needles (both 27 gauge). With institutional approval, 115 parturients presenting for elective caesarean section or labour analgesia were audited. After lignocaine infiltration, a Tuohy-type needle was inserted to loss of resistance to saline at a mid-lumbar interspace, and either a 27 gauge cutting-edge or 27 gauge pencil-point needle was inserted 'needle through needle' through the dura. During dural penetration, the occurrence of patient movement, grimacing or vocalisation was noted by a blinded observer, as was the patient's response to the question "Did you feel that?" asked by the anaesthetist. The audit comprised two similar groups of patients (caesarean section, n=30; labour analgesia, n=85). In both groups, grimacing and movement during thecal penetration occurred more frequently with pencil-point needles (P < 0.05 and P < 0.025, respectively). Pooled data analysis revealed that pencil-point and cutting-edge needles induced grimacing and movement in 17 (22%) and 2 (5%), spontaneous vocalisation in 4 (5%) and 1 (3%) and was perceived by 13 (17%) and 3 (8%) parturients (P < 0.025, P=NS, P=NS), respectively. Overall, 34 and 6 objective and subjective patient responses (P < 0.005) occurred when inserting these needles, respectively. Dural puncture by a 27 gauge pencil-point needle inserted 'needle through needle' when instituting combined spinal-epidural analgesia induces more iatrogenic responses than a 27 gauge cutting-edge needle.

  2. Laser Physical Vapor Deposition of Nanocrystalline Boron Carbide Films to Enhance Cutting Tool Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Jagannadham, K.; Watkins, Thomas R; Lance, Michael J; Riester, Laura; Lemaster, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Laser physical vapor deposition was used to deposit thin films of boron carbide on Si (100) and WC-Co substrates at 550 C under different pressures of methane atmosphere. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was used to identify a boron carbide phase, which exhibited weak peaks. The presence of particulates in the size range of 50 nm-3 {micro}m embedded in an amorphous matrix was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy indicated that as methane partial pressure was increased during deposition, the amount of disorder with the boron carbide structure also increased. Also, the nanoindentation hardness decreased, while the coefficient of friction and scratch adhesion strength increased. These effects are attributed to an increase in amorphous phase/disorder in the films. Wear tests conducted by machining particleboard using boron carbide coated WC-Co tools in the absence of methane showed the same wear rate as tools coated under higher methane pressures.

  3. Use of the subcritical-plasticity effect in manufacturing preforms for cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakhov, V. V.; Buyanskaya, T. A.; Yartsev, A. N.; Matveev, S. V.; Andreev, V. V.

    1996-10-01

    Increasing the efficiency of utilization of expensive high-speed steels is an important problem of modern production. It is solved by VAZ specialists by introducing low-waste technological processes in manufacturing tool preforms. At present, side milling cutters and edging saws are blanked out from square preforms of rolled sheets. Up to 40% of the sheet goes to waste in blanking. Gear cutters and shavers are commonly produced from forged preforms with a considerable (up to 15 mm for each dimension) size allowance for mechanical treatment. It should also be noted that the microstructure of the forgings often contains coarse grains and grains of different sizes. The aim of the present work consists in determining the possibility of using deformation at a subcritical temperature in industrial-scale production of tools (side milling cutters, edging saws, gear cutters, shavers).

  4. A Covariance Analysis Tool for Assessing Fundamental Limits of SIM Pointing Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Kang, Bryan H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a performance analysis of the instrument pointing control system for NASA's Space Interferometer Mission (SIM). SIM has a complex pointing system that uses a fast steering mirror in combination with a multirate control architecture to blend feed forward information with feedback information. A pointing covariance analysis tool (PCAT) is developed specifically to analyze systems with such complexity. The development of PCAT as a mathematical tool for covariance analysis is outlined in the paper. PCAT is then applied to studying performance of SIM's science pointing system. The analysis reveals and clearly delineates a fundamental limit that exists for SIM pointing performance. The limit is especially stringent for dim star targets. Discussion of the nature of the performance limit is provided, and methods are suggested to potentially improve pointing performance.

  5. The Relationship of Actigraph Accelerometer Cut-Points for Estimating Physical Activity with Selected Health Outcomes: Results from NHANES 2003-06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loprinzi, Paul D.; Lee, Hyo; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Crespo, Carlos J.; Andersen, Ross E.; Smit, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of child and adult cut-points on physical activity (PA) intensity, the prevalence of meeting PA guidelines, and association with selected health outcomes. Participants (6,578 adults greater than or equal to 18 years, and 3,174 children and adolescents less than or equal to 17 years) from the…

  6. The Relationship of Actigraph Accelerometer Cut-Points for Estimating Physical Activity with Selected Health Outcomes: Results from NHANES 2003-06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loprinzi, Paul D.; Lee, Hyo; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Crespo, Carlos J.; Andersen, Ross E.; Smit, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of child and adult cut-points on physical activity (PA) intensity, the prevalence of meeting PA guidelines, and association with selected health outcomes. Participants (6,578 adults greater than or equal to 18 years, and 3,174 children and adolescents less than or equal to 17 years) from the…

  7. Classification of Physical Activity Cut-Points and the Estimation of Energy Expenditure during Walking Using the GT3X+ Accelerometer in Overweight and Obese Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Christopher C. F.; Moir, Hannah J.; Easton, Chris

    2017-01-01

    This study establishes tri-axial activity count (AC) cut-points for the GT3X+ accelerometer to classify physical activity intensity in overweight and obese adults. Further, we examined the accuracy of established and novel energy expenditure (EE) prediction equations based on AC and other metrics. "Part 1": Twenty overweight or obese…

  8. Age, sex and ethnic differences in the prevalence of underweight and overweight, defined by using the CDC and IOTF cut points in Asian culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    No nationally representative data from middle- and low-income countries have been analyzed to compare the prevalence of underweight and overweight, defined by using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the International Obesity TaskForce (IOTF) body mass index cut points. To exa...

  9. Identification of cut-points in commonly used hip osteoarthritis-related outcome measures that define the patient acceptable symptom state (PASS).

    PubMed

    Emerson Kavchak, Alicia J; Cook, Chad; Hegedus, Eric J; Wright, Alexis A

    2013-11-01

    To determine patient acceptable symptom state (PASS) estimates in outcome measures commonly used in hip osteoarthritis (OA). Identification of cut-points on commonly used outcome measures associated with patient satisfaction with their current state of health. As part of a randomized controlled trial, 70 patients with a clinical diagnosis of hip OA undergoing a 9-session physiotherapy treatment program completed four physical performance measures and three self-report measures at 9 weeks and 1 year. Upon completion of treatment, patients assessed their current health status according to the PASS question. Cut-points were estimated using receiver operating characteristic curves (anchor-based method), based on the patient's response to the PASS question. At 9 weeks and 1 year, identified cut-points were, respectively, ≤10 and ≤11 for the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale; ≤35 and ≤40 on the WOMAC physical function subscale; ≥+5 and ≥+6 on the global rating of change score; ≤6.05 and ≤5.30 s for the timed-up-and-go; ≤28.3 and ≤24.9 for the 40-m self-paced walk test; ≥11 and ≥12 repetitions for the 30-s chair stand test; and ≥46 repetitions for the 20-cm step test. Initial target cut-points signaling patient satisfaction with their current symptom state following physiotherapy in patients with hip osteoarthritis were determined for seven outcome measures over 1 year.

  10. Cutting assembly

    DOEpatents

    Racki, Daniel J.; Swenson, Clark E.; Bencloski, William A.; Wineman, Arthur L.

    1984-01-01

    A cutting apparatus includes a support table mounted for movement toward and away from a workpiece and carrying a mirror which directs a cutting laser beam onto the workpiece. A carrier is rotatably and pivotally mounted on the support table between the mirror and workpiece and supports a conduit discharging gas toward the point of impingement of the laser beam on the workpiece. Means are provided for rotating the carrier relative to the support table to place the gas discharging conduit in the proper positions for cuts made in different directions on the workpiece.

  11. Ethnicity-specific obesity cut-points in the development of Type 2 diabetes – a prospective study including three ethnic groups in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Tillin, T; Sattar, N; Godsland, I F; Hughes, A D; Chaturvedi, N; Forouhi, N G

    2015-01-01

    Aims Conventional definitions of obesity, e.g. body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2 or waist circumference cut-points of 102 cm (men) and 88 cm (women), may underestimate metabolic risk in non-Europeans. We prospectively identified equivalent ethnicity-specific obesity cut-points for the estimation of diabetes risk in British South Asians, African-Caribbeans and Europeans. Methods We studied a population-based cohort from London, UK (1356 Europeans, 842 South Asians, 335 African-Caribbeans) who were aged 40–69 years at baseline (1988–1991), when they underwent anthropometry, fasting and post-load (75 g oral glucose tolerance test) blood tests. Incident Type 2 diabetes was identified from primary care records, participant recall and/or follow-up biochemistry. Ethnicity-specific obesity cut-points in association with diabetes incidence were estimated using negative binomial regression. Results Diabetes incidence rates (per 1000 person years) at a median follow-up of 19 years were 20.8 (95% CI: 18.4, 23.6) and 12.0 (8.3, 17.2) in South Asian men and women, 16.5 (12.7, 21.4) and 17.5 (13.0, 23.7) in African-Caribbean men and women, and 7.4 (6.3, 8.7), and 7.2 (5.3, 9.8) in European men and women. For incidence rates equivalent to those at a BMI of 30 kg/m2 in European men and women, age- and sex-adjusted cut-points were: South Asians, 25.2 (23.4, 26.6) kg/m2; and African-Caribbeans, 27.2 (25.2, 28.6) kg/m2. For South Asian and African-Caribbean men, respectively, waist circumference cut-points of 90.4 (85.0, 94.5) and 90.6 (85.0, 94.5) cm were equivalent to a value of 102 cm in European men. Waist circumference cut-points of 84.0 (74.0, 90.0) cm in South Asian women and 81.2 (71.4, 87.4) cm in African-Caribbean women were equivalent to a value of 88 cm in European women. Conclusions In prospective analyses, British South Asians and African-Caribbeans had equivalent diabetes incidence rates at substantially lower obesity levels than the conventional European cut-points

  12. Ethnicity-specific obesity cut-points in the development of Type 2 diabetes - a prospective study including three ethnic groups in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Tillin, T; Sattar, N; Godsland, I F; Hughes, A D; Chaturvedi, N; Forouhi, N G

    2015-02-01

    Conventional definitions of obesity, e.g. body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m² or waist circumference cut-points of 102 cm (men) and 88 cm (women), may underestimate metabolic risk in non-Europeans. We prospectively identified equivalent ethnicity-specific obesity cut-points for the estimation of diabetes risk in British South Asians, African-Caribbeans and Europeans. We studied a population-based cohort from London, UK (1356 Europeans, 842 South Asians, 335 African-Caribbeans) who were aged 40-69 years at baseline (1988-1991), when they underwent anthropometry, fasting and post-load (75 g oral glucose tolerance test) blood tests. Incident Type 2 diabetes was identified from primary care records, participant recall and/or follow-up biochemistry. Ethnicity-specific obesity cut-points in association with diabetes incidence were estimated using negative binomial regression. Diabetes incidence rates (per 1000 person years) at a median follow-up of 19 years were 20.8 (95% CI: 18.4, 23.6) and 12.0 (8.3, 17.2) in South Asian men and women, 16.5 (12.7, 21.4) and 17.5 (13.0, 23.7) in African-Caribbean men and women, and 7.4 (6.3, 8.7), and 7.2 (5.3, 9.8) in European men and women. For incidence rates equivalent to those at a BMI of 30 kg/m² in European men and women, age- and sex-adjusted cut-points were: South Asians, 25.2 (23.4, 26.6) kg/m²; and African-Caribbeans, 27.2 (25.2, 28.6) kg/m². For South Asian and African-Caribbean men, respectively, waist circumference cut-points of 90.4 (85.0, 94.5) and 90.6 (85.0, 94.5) cm were equivalent to a value of 102 cm in European men. Waist circumference cut-points of 84.0 (74.0, 90.0) cm in South Asian women and 81.2 (71.4, 87.4) cm in African-Caribbean women were equivalent to a value of 88 cm in European women. In prospective analyses, British South Asians and African-Caribbeans had equivalent diabetes incidence rates at substantially lower obesity levels than the conventional European cut-points. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic

  13. Acoustic emission from single point machining: Part 2, Signal changes with tool wear

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Carpenter, S.H.; Armentrout, D.L.; McManigle, A.P.

    1989-01-01

    Changes in acoustic emission signal characteristics with tool wear were monitored during single point machining of 4340 steel and Ti-6Al-4V heat treated to several strength levels, 606l-T6 aluminum, 304 stainless steel, 17-4PH stainless steel, 410 stainless steel, lead, and teflon. No signal characteristic changed in the same way with tool wear for all materials tested. A single change in a particular AE signal characteristic with tool wear valid for all materials probably does not exist. Nevertheless, changes in various signal characteristic with wear for a given material may be sufficient to be used to monitor tool wear.

  14. Acoustic emission from single point machining: Part 2, Signal changes with tool wear. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Carpenter, S.H.; Armentrout, D.L.; McManigle, A.P.

    1989-12-31

    Changes in acoustic emission signal characteristics with tool wear were monitored during single point machining of 4340 steel and Ti-6Al-4V heat treated to several strength levels, 606l-T6 aluminum, 304 stainless steel, 17-4PH stainless steel, 410 stainless steel, lead, and teflon. No signal characteristic changed in the same way with tool wear for all materials tested. A single change in a particular AE signal characteristic with tool wear valid for all materials probably does not exist. Nevertheless, changes in various signal characteristic with wear for a given material may be sufficient to be used to monitor tool wear.

  15. Epidemiologic Behavior and Estimation of an Optimal Cut-Off Point for Homeostasis Model Assessment-2 Insulin Resistance: A Report from a Venezuelan Population

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez, Valmore; Martínez, María Sofía; Apruzzese, Vanessa; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Gonzalez, Robys; Torres, Yaquelín; Bello, Luis; Añez, Roberto; Chacín, Maricarmen; Toledo, Alexandra; Cabrera, Mayela; Mengual, Edgardo; Ávila, Raquel; López-Miranda, José

    2014-01-01

    Background. Mathematical models such as Homeostasis Model Assessment have gained popularity in the evaluation of insulin resistance (IR). The purpose of this study was to estimate the optimal cut-off point for Homeostasis Model Assessment-2 Insulin Resistance (HOMA2-IR) in an adult population of Maracaibo, Venezuela. Methods. Descriptive, cross-sectional study with randomized, multistaged sampling included 2,026 adult individuals. IR was evaluated through HOMA2-IR calculation in 602 metabolically healthy individuals. For cut-off point estimation, two approaches were applied: HOMA2-IR percentile distribution and construction of ROC curves using sensitivity and specificity for selection. Results. HOMA2-IR arithmetic mean for the general population was 2.21 ± 1.42, with 2.18 ± 1.37 for women and 2.23 ± 1.47 for men (P = 0.466). When calculating HOMA2-IR for the healthy reference population, the resulting p75 was 2.00. Using ROC curves, the selected cut-off point was 1.95, with an area under the curve of 0.801, sensibility of 75.3%, and specificity of 72.8%. Conclusions. We propose an optimal cut-off point of 2.00 for HOMA2-IR, offering high sensitivity and specificity, sufficient for proper assessment of IR in the adult population of our city, Maracaibo. The determination of population-specific cut-off points is needed to evaluate risk for public health problems, such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27379332

  16. Finer gauge of cutting but not pencil-point needles correlate with lower incidence of post-dural puncture headache: a meta-regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Zorrilla-Vaca, Andres; Healy, Ryan; Zorrilla-Vaca, Carolina

    2016-10-01

    Post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) is a well-known neurological outcome caused by leakage of cerebrospinal fluid during neuraxial anesthesia. Studies aimed at assessing the efficacy of finer gauged spinal needles to reduce the incidence of PDPH have produced conflicting results. We have therefore examined the effect of the gauge of cutting needles and pencil-point needles, separately, on the incidence of PDPH. The PubMed, EMBASE and Google Scholar databases were searched for randomized studies which compared PDPH incidence in a head-to-head analysis of individual needle gauges of similar needle designs (cutting and pencil-point). A meta-regression analysis was performed taking into account various covariates, such as needle gauge and design, mean age of patient population, surgery type, percentage of males and females in study population and year of publication. Of the 22 studies (n = 5631) included in the analysis, 12 (n = 3148) and ten (n = 2483) compared different gauges of cutting needles and pencil-point needles, respectively. After adjusting for covariates, meta-regression analysis was performed for all studies that randomly compared individual needle gauges of similar needle design. Whereas the incidence of PDPH inversely correlated with gauge in cutting needles (β = -1.36 % per gauge, P = 0.037), no relationship was noted in pencil-point needles (β = -0.32 % per gauge, P = 0.114). Female gender was the only covariate that reached a statistically significant correlation with the incidence of PDPH in both models. A significant relationship between needle gauge and subsequent rate of PDPH was noted in cutting needles, but not pencil-point needles.

  17. The CRAFFT cut-points and DSM-5 criteria for alcohol and other drugs: A re-evaluation and re-examination

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Kelly, Sharon M.; Gryczynski, Jan; Myers, C. Patrick; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Kirk, Arethusa S.; Schwartz, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The CRAFFT, previously validated against DSM-IV diagnostic criteria, is the most widely used screening instrument for alcohol and other substance misuse in adolescents. The present secondary analysis study sought to compare the CRAFFT with the new DSM-5 diagnostic criteria in order to assess the CRAFFT’s psychometric properties and determine the optimal cut-point for identifying adolescents in need of further assessment. Methods: Participants were primary care patients ages 12-17 (N=525) who were recruited while waiting for a medical appointment in an urban federally qualified health center in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Participants were administered the CRAFFT and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, second edition, modified to include the new DSM-5 craving item. We examined the performance of the CRAFFT in identifying any problem use (defined as 1 or more DSM-5 criteria) and any DSM-5 substance use disorder (2 or more DSM-5 criteria) for alcohol or drugs other than tobacco. We examined sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating characteristic areas under the curve (AUC) to determine the optimal CRAFFT cut-point(s) for predicting any problem use and any DSM-5 substance use disorder (SUD). Results: Examining the CRAFFT as a continuous measure, AUC values were 0.93 for problem use or higher, and 0.97 for DSM-5 SUD. Consistent with previously recommended cut-points for the CRAFFT, the cut-point of 2 performed optimally for identifying adolescents both exhibiting problem use of alcohol or drugs and meeting DSM-5 SUD criteria for alcohol or other drugs. Conclusions: Despite changes in the DSM substance use diagnostic criteria, the CRAFFT continues to demonstrate excellent sensitivity and specificity at its established cut-point of 2. Additional studies examining the CRAFFT in light of the new DSM-5 diagnostic criteria with more diverse populations are warranted. PMID:25036144

  18. Youden Index and optimal cut-point estimated from observations affected by a lower limit of detection.

    PubMed

    Ruopp, Marcus D; Perkins, Neil J; Whitcomb, Brian W; Schisterman, Enrique F

    2008-06-01

    The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is used to evaluate a biomarker's ability for classifying disease status. The Youden Index (J), the maximum potential effectiveness of a biomarker, is a common summary measure of the ROC curve. In biomarker development, levels may be unquantifiable below a limit of detection (LOD) and missing from the overall dataset. Disregarding these observations may negatively bias the ROC curve and thus J. Several correction methods have been suggested for mean estimation and testing; however, little has been written about the ROC curve or its summary measures. We adapt non-parametric (empirical) and semi-parametric (ROC-GLM [generalized linear model]) methods and propose parametric methods (maximum likelihood (ML)) to estimate J and the optimal cut-point (c *) for a biomarker affected by a LOD. We develop unbiased estimators of J and c * via ML for normally and gamma distributed biomarkers. Alpha level confidence intervals are proposed using delta and bootstrap methods for the ML, semi-parametric, and non-parametric approaches respectively. Simulation studies are conducted over a range of distributional scenarios and sample sizes evaluating estimators' bias, root-mean square error, and coverage probability; the average bias was less than one percent for ML and GLM methods across scenarios and decreases with increased sample size. An example using polychlorinated biphenyl levels to classify women with and without endometriosis illustrates the potential benefits of these methods. We address the limitations and usefulness of each method in order to give researchers guidance in constructing appropriate estimates of biomarkers' true discriminating capabilities. Copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  19. Cut points for mild, moderate, and severe pain among cancer and non-cancer patients: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Woo, Aaron; Lechner, Breanne; Fu, Terence; Wong, C Shun; Chiu, Nicholas; Lam, Henry; Pulenzas, Natalie; Soliman, Hany; DeAngelis, Carlo; Chow, Edward

    2015-10-01

    Defining cut points (CPs) for varying levels of pain intensity is important for assessing changes in patient's functional status, and guiding the development and evaluation of treatment options. We aimed to summarize CPs identified in the literature for mild, moderate, and severe pain on the numeric rating scale (NRS), and recommend optimal CPs for cancer and non-cancer patients. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE (inception to May 2015) for studies that used CPs to classify pain intensity on the NRS among patients with cancer or non-cancer conditions leading to acute or chronic pain. A CP was defined as the upper bound of a mild or moderate pain category. Of 1,556 identified articles, 27 were included for review. Among patients with cancer pain, mild-moderate pain CPs ranged from 1 to 4 (mean, 3.5±1.08), with CP4 being the most recommended CP (80%). For moderate-severe pain, CPs ranged from 4 to 7 (mean, 6.2±0.92), and CP6 (50%) was the optimal CPs. Among patients with non-cancer pain, mild-moderate pain CPs ranged from 2 to 5 (mean, 3.62±0.78), and CP4 was the most frequently used CP (52.9%). For moderate-severe non-cancer pain, CPs ranged from 4 to 8 (mean, 6.5±0.99), and CP6 (41.2%) was the most frequently recommended CP. A wide range of CPs for mild, moderate, and severe pain categories were identified in the literature among both cancer and non-cancer patient populations. Further studies are needed to delineate more accurate and precise CPs for pain intensity.

  20. Sex and ethnic-origin specific BMI cut points improve prediction of 40-year mortality: the Israel GOH study.

    PubMed

    Dankner, Rachel; Shanik, Michael; Roth, Jesse; Luski, Ayala; Lubin, Flora; Chetrit, Angela

    2015-07-01

    Although obesity has been associated with a higher risk for premature death, the sex and ethnic-origin specific body mass index (BMI) levels that are associated with increased mortality are controversial. We investigated the 40-year cumulative all-cause mortality, in relation to the BMI in adult life, among men and women originating from Yemen, Europe/America, Middle East and North Africa, using sex and ethnic-origin specific BMI cut points. A random stratified cohort (n = 5710) was sampled from the central population registry and followed since 1969 for vital status. Weight, height and blood pressure were measured, and smoking status was recorded at baseline. BMI was analysed according to conventional categories and according to sex and ethnic-origin specific quintiles. Elevated and significant mortality hazard ratios (HRs) of 1.21 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.45] for women and 1.22 (95%CI 1.03-1.44) for men were found for the highest origin-specific BMI quintile. In men, the lowest ethnic-origin specific quintile was also significantly associated with increased mortality (HR of 1.22 95% CI 1.03-1.45), adjusting for age, smoking and blood pressure. Obesity was associated with mortality in non-smokers (HR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.61 in men and HR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.19-1.79 in women), whereas leanness was associated with mortality only among smoking men (HR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.09-1.77). Refinement of BMI categories using country of origin specific quintiles demonstrated significantly increased mortality in the upper quintile in both sexes, while according to the conventional values this association did not prevail in men. We propose the establishment of sex and origin-specific BMI categories when setting goals for disease prevention. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Developing and using a rubric for evaluating evidence-based medicine point-of-care tools

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Margaret J

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The research sought to establish a rubric for evaluating evidence-based medicine (EBM) point-of-care tools in a health sciences library. Methods: The authors searched the literature for EBM tool evaluations and found that most previous reviews were designed to evaluate the ability of an EBM tool to answer a clinical question. The researchers' goal was to develop and complete rubrics for assessing these tools based on criteria for a general evaluation of tools (reviewing content, search options, quality control, and grading) and criteria for an evaluation of clinical summaries (searching tools for treatments of common diagnoses and evaluating summaries for quality control). Results: Differences between EBM tools' options, content coverage, and usability were minimal. However, the products' methods for locating and grading evidence varied widely in transparency and process. Conclusions: As EBM tools are constantly updating and evolving, evaluation of these tools needs to be conducted frequently. Standards for evaluating EBM tools need to be established, with one method being the use of objective rubrics. In addition, EBM tools need to provide more information about authorship, reviewers, methods for evidence collection, and grading system employed. PMID:21753917

  2. Application of the CBR method for adding the process of cutting tools and parameters selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ociepka, P.; Herbuś, K.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents a method, basing on engineering knowledge and experience, designated to aid the selection of tools and machining parameters for the processes of turning. In this method, the informatics system is built basing on a Case Based Reasoning (CBR) method. This is a method of problems solving based on experience. It consists in finding analogies between the currently being solved task, and earlier realized tasks that have been stored in the database of the CBR system. The article presents the structure of the developed software, as well as the functioning of the CBR method. It also presents the possibility of integrating the developed method with the CAM module of the SIEMENS PLM NX program.

  3. Effect of cutting edge radius on surface roughness in diamond tool turning of transparent MgAl2O4 spinel ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xiaobin; Xu, Min; Du, Wenhao; Chu, Chong

    2017-09-01

    Transparent magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4) ceramic is one of an important optical materials. However, due to its pronounced hardness and brittleness, the optical machining of this material is very difficult. Diamond turning has advantages over the grinding process in flexibility and material removal rate. However, there is a lack of research that could support the use of diamond turning technology in the machining of MgAl2O4 spinel ceramic. Using brittle-ductile transition theory of brittle material machining, this work provides critical information that may help to realize ductile-regime turning of MgAl2O4 spinel ceramic. A characterization method of determination the cutting edge radius is introduced here. Suitable diamond tools were measured for sharpness and then chosen from a large number of candidate tools. The influence of rounded cutting edges on surface roughness of the MgAl2O4 spinel ceramic is also investigated. These results indicate that surface quality of MgAl2O4 spinel is relate to the radius of diamond tool's cutting edge, cutting speed, and feed rate. Sharp diamond tools (small radius of cutting edge) facilitated ductile-regime turning of MgAl2O4 spinel and shows great potential to reduce surface roughness and produce smoother final surface.

  4. search.bioPreprint: a discovery tool for cutting edge, preprint biomedical research articles

    PubMed Central

    Iwema, Carrie L.; LaDue, John; Zack, Angela; Chattopadhyay, Ansuman

    2016-01-01

    The time it takes for a completed manuscript to be published traditionally can be extremely lengthy. Article publication delay, which occurs in part due to constraints associated with peer review, can prevent the timely dissemination of critical and actionable data associated with new information on rare diseases or developing health concerns such as Zika virus. Preprint servers are open access online repositories housing preprint research articles that enable authors (1) to make their research immediately and freely available and (2) to receive commentary and peer review prior to journal submission. There is a growing movement of preprint advocates aiming to change the current journal publication and peer review system, proposing that preprints catalyze biomedical discovery, support career advancement, and improve scientific communication. While the number of articles submitted to and hosted by preprint servers are gradually increasing, there has been no simple way to identify biomedical research published in a preprint format, as they are not typically indexed and are only discoverable by directly searching the specific preprint server websites. To address this issue, we created a search engine that quickly compiles preprints from disparate host repositories and provides a one-stop search solution. Additionally, we developed a web application that bolsters the discovery of preprints by enabling each and every word or phrase appearing on any web site to be integrated with articles from preprint servers. This tool, search.bioPreprint, is publicly available at http://www.hsls.pitt.edu/resources/preprint. PMID:27508060

  5. Simulation of router action on a lathe to test the cutting tool performance in edge-trimming of graphite/epoxy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramulu, M.; Rogers, E.

    1994-04-01

    The predominant machining application with graphite/epoxy composite materials in aerospace industry is peripheral trimming. The computer numerically controlled (CNC) high speed routers required to do edge trimming work are generally scheduled for production work in industry and are not available for extensive cutter testing. Therefore, an experimental method of simulating the conditions of periphery trim using a lathe is developed in this paper. The validity of the test technique will be demonstrated by conducting carbide tool wear tests under dry cutting conditions. The experimental results will be analyzed to characterize the wear behavior of carbide cutting tools in machining the composite materials.

  6. Method and device for determining the position of a cutting tool relative to the rotational axis of a spindle-mounted workpiece

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.R.

    1980-09-03

    The present invention is directed to a method and device for determining the location of a cutting tool with respect to the rotational axis of a spindle-mounted workpiece. A vacuum cup supporting a machinable sacrificial pin is secured to the workpiece at a location where the pin will project along and encompass the rotational axis of the workpiece. The pin is then machined into a cylinder. The position of the surface of the cutting tool contacting the machine cylinder is spaced from the rotational axis of the workpiece a distance equal to the radius of the cylinder.

  7. Method and device for determining the position of a cutting tool relative to the rotational axis of a spindle-mounted workpiece

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard R.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method and device for determining the location of a cutting tool with respect to the rotational axis of a spindle-mounted workpiece. A vacuum cup supporting a machinable sacrifical pin is secured to the workpiece at a location where the pin will project along and encompass the rotational axis of the workpiece. The pin is then machined into a cylinder. The position of the surface of the cutting tool contacting the machine cylinder is spaced from the rotational aixs of the workpiece a distance equal to the radius of the cylinder.

  8. High precision batch mode micro-electro-discharge machining of metal alloys using DRIE silicon as a cutting tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Bai, Qing; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports recent advances in batch mode micro-electro-discharge machining (µEDM) for high precision micromachining of metal alloys such as stainless steel. High-aspect-ratio silicon microstructures with fine feature sizes formed by deep reactive ion etching are used as cutting tools. To machine workpiece features with widths ≤10 µm, a silicon dioxide coating is necessary to passivate the sidewalls of the silicon tools from spurious discharges. In the machined workpieces, a minimum feature size of ≈7 µm and an aspect ratio up to 3.2 are demonstrated by the batch mode µEDM of stainless steel 304 and titanium (Grade 1) substrates. Machining rates up to ≈5 µm min-1 in feature depth are achieved in batch mode micromachining of typical microfluidic structures, including arrays of channels and cavities of different sizes. The machined features are uniform across a die-scale area of 5 × 5 mm2. Other machining characteristics are also discussed.

  9. MGDS: Free, on-line, cutting-edge tools to enable the democratisation of geoscience data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Ryan, W. B.; O'Hara, S.; Ferrini, V.; Arko, R. A.; Coplan, J.; Chan, S.; Carbotte, S. M.; Nitsche, F. O.; Bonczkowski, J.; Morton, J. J.; Weissel, R.; Leung, A.

    2010-12-01

    The availability of user-friendly, effective cyber-information resources for accessing and manipulating geoscience data has grown rapidly in recent years. Based at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory the MGDS group has developed a number of free tools that have wide application across the geosciences for both educators and researchers. A simple web page (http://www.marine-geo.org/) allows users to search for and download many types of data by key word, geographical region, or published citation. The popular Create Maps and Grids function and the downloadable Google Earth-compatible KML files appeal to a wide user base. MGDS MediaBank galleries (http://media.marine-geo.org/) enable users to view and download compelling images that are purposefully selected for their educational value from NSF-funded field programs. GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org), a free map-based interactive tool that works on any machine, is increasingly being adopted across a broad suite of users from middle school students to university researchers. GeoMapApp allows users to plot, manipulate and present data in an intuitive geographical reference frame. GeoMapApp offers a convenient way to explore the wide range of built-in data sets, to quickly generate maps and images that aid visualisation and, when importing their own gridded and tabular data sets, to access the same rich built-in functionality. A user guide, short multi-media tutorials, and webinar are available on-line. The regularly-updated Global Multi-Resolution Topography (GMRT) Synthesis is used as the default GeoMapApp base map and is an increasingly popular means to rapidly create location maps. Additionally, the layer manager offers a fast way to overlay and compare multiple data sets and is augmented by the ability to alter layer transparency so that underlying layers become visible. Examples of GeoMapApp built-in data sets include high-resolution land topography and ocean floor bathymetry derived from satellite and multi

  10. Standardizing the Definition of Biochemical Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy-What Prostate Specific Antigen Cut Point Best Predicts a Durable Increase and Subsequent Systemic Progression?

    PubMed

    Toussi, Amir; Stewart-Merrill, Suzanne B; Boorjian, Stephen A; Psutka, Sarah P; Thompson, R Houston; Frank, Igor; Tollefson, Matthew K; Gettman, Matthew T; Carlson, Rachel E; Rangel, Laureano J; Karnes, R Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    Multiple definitions of biochemical recurrence for prostate cancer exist after radical prostatectomy, and variation continues in prostate cancer outcome reporting and secondary treatment initiation. We reviewed long-term prostatectomy outcomes to assess the most appropriate prostate specific antigen cut point that predicts future disease progression. We identified 13,512 patients with cT1-2N0M0 prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy between 1987 and 2010. Single prostate specific antigen cut points of 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 ng/ml or greater, as well as confirmatory prostate specific antigen value definitions of 0.2 ng/ml or greater followed by prostate specific antigen greater than 0.2 ng/ml and 0.4 ng/ml or greater followed by prostate specific antigen greater than 0.4 ng/ml were tested. Continued prostate specific antigen increase after a designated cut point definition was estimated using cumulative incidence. The strength of association between biochemical recurrence definitions and subsequent systemic progression were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard models and the O'Quigley event based R(2) test. At a median postoperative followup of 9.1 years (IQR 4.9-14.3) a detectable prostate specific antigen developed in 5,041 patients and systemic progression developed in 512. After reaching the prostate specific antigen cut point of 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 ng/ml, the percentage of patients experiencing a continued prostate specific antigen increase over 5 years was 61%, 67% and 74%, respectively, plateauing at 0.4 ng/ml. The strongest association between biochemical recurrence and systemic progression occurred using a single prostate specific antigen cut point of 0.4 ng/ml or greater (HR 36, R(2) 0.92). A prostate specific antigen cut point of 0.4 ng/ml or greater reflects the threshold at which a prostate specific antigen increase becomes durable and shows the strongest correlation with subsequent systemic progression. Consideration should be given to using

  11. Anthropometric Cut Points for Definition of Sarcopenia Based on Incident Mobility and Physical Limitation in Older Chinese People.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jean; Leung, Jason

    2016-07-01

    The Foundation of the National Institutes for Health (FNIH) Sarcopenia Project derived cut points in appendicular lean mass (ALM) and grip strength, in relation to mobility limitation defined as a walking speed less than 0.8 m/s. Using data from the Mr and Ms Os cohort of 4,000 community-dwelling Chinese men and women aged 65 years and older and a similar data-driven approach, we examined whether the cutoff values are the same for Chinese people using baseline walking speed, incident physical limitation, and incident slow walking speed at 4 years. Physical limitation was determined by interviewer-administered questionnaire. Height, weight, body composition (using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), grip strength, and walking speed were measured. Cutoff values identified by Classification and Regression Tree (CART) analysis for grip strength were less than 27kg for men and less than 17kg for women. The values for ALM were less than 15.61kg in men and less than 12.42kg in women; the values for ALM/body mass index (BMI) were less than 0.72 in men and less than 0.47 in women. Using presence of physical limitation at 4 years as the outcome measure, cutoff values identified by CART analysis for grip strength were less than 27kg for men and less than 19kg for women; for ALM, less than 15.65kg for men and less than 11.26kg for women; for ALM/BMI, less than 0.69 for men and 0.52 for women. Cutoff values for grip strength were less than 28.5kg for men and less than 19kg for women; for ALM, less than 17.61kg for men and less than 10.84kg for women; for ALM/BMI, less than 0.81 for men and less than 0.53 for women. Cutoff values may differ between ethnic groups as a result of differences in body size and lifestyles. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Effect of Accelerometer Cut-Off Points on the Recommended Level of Physical Activity for Obesity Prevention in Children

    PubMed Central

    Dygrýn, Jan; Mitáš, Josef; Jakubec, Lukáš; Frömel, Karel

    2016-01-01

    There is no general consensus regarding which accelerometer cut-off point (CoP) is most acceptable to estimate the time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in children and choice of an appropriate CoP primarily remains a subjective decision. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the influence of CoP selection on the mean MVPA and to define the optimal thresholds of MVPA derived from different accelerometer CoPs to avoid overweight/obesity and adiposity in children aged 7 to 12 years. Three hundred six children participated. Physical activity (PA) was monitored for seven consecutive days using an ActiGraph accelerometer (model GT3X) and the intensity of PA was estimated using the five most frequently published CoPs. Body adiposity was assessed using a multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis. There was found a wide range of mean levels of MVPA that ranged from 27 (Puyau CoP) to 231 min∙d–1 (Freedson 2005 CoP). A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that the optimal thresholds for counts per minute (cpm) and MVPA derived from the Puyau CoP was the most useful in classifying children according to their body mass index (BMI) and fat mass percentage (FM%). In the total sample, the optimal thresholds of the MVPA derived from the Puyau CoP were 22 and 23 min∙d–1 when the categories based on BMI and FM%, respectively, were used. The children who did not meet these optimal thresholds had a significantly increased risk of being overweight/obese (OR = 2.88, P < 0.01) and risk of having excess fat mass (OR = 2.41, P < 0.01). In conclusion, the decision of selecting among various CoPs significantly influences the optimal levels of MVPA. The Puyau CoP of 3 200 cmp seems to be the most useful for defining the optimal level of PA for pediatric obesity prevention. PMID:27723835

  13. Combined influence of epoch length, cut-point and bout duration on accelerometry-derived physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is difficult to compare accelerometer-derived estimates of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) between studies due to differences in data processing procedures. We aimed to evaluate the effects of accelerometer processing options on total and bout-accumulated time spent in MVPA in adults. Methods 267 participants from the ProActive Trial provided 1236 days of valid physical activity (PA) data, collected using a 5-s epoch with ActiGraph GT1M accelerometers. We integrated data over 5-s to 60-s epoch lengths (EL) and applied two-level mixed effects regression models to MVPA time, defined using 1500 to 2500 counts/minute (cpm) cut-points (CP) and bout durations (BD) from 1 to 15 min. Results Total MVPA time was lower on longer EL and higher CP (47 vs 26 min/day and 26 vs 5 min/day on 1500 vs 2500 cpm on 5-s and 60-s epoch, respectively); this could be approximated as MVPA = exp[2.197 + 0.279*log(CP) + 6.120*log(EL) - 0.869*log(CP)*log(EL)] with an 800 min/day wear-time. In contrast, EL was positively associated with time spent in bout-accumulated MVPA; the approximating equation being MVPA = exp[54.679 - 6.268*log(CP) + 6.387*log(EL) - 10.000*log(BD) - 0.162*log(EL)*log(BD) - 0.626*log(CP)*log(EL) + 1.033*log(CP)*log(BD)]. BD and CP were inversely associated with MVPA, with higher values attenuating the influence of EL. Conclusions EL, CP and BD interact to influence estimates of accelerometer-determined MVPA. In general, higher CP and longer BD result in lower MVPA but the direction of association for EL depends on BD. Reporting scaling coefficients for these key parameters across their frequently used ranges would facilitate comparisons of population-level accelerometry estimates of MVPA. PMID:24612726

  14. A tool for accelerating material calculations through the generation of highly efficient k-point grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Tim; Wisesa, Pandu

    The calculation of many material properties requires the evaluation of an integral over the Brillouin zone, which is commonly approximated by sampling a regular grid of points, known as k-points, in reciprocal space. We have developed an automated tool for generating k-point grids that significantly accelerates the calculation of material properties compared to commonly used methods. Our tool, which is being made freely available to the public, is capable of generating highly efficient k-point grids in a fraction of a second for any crystalline material. We present an overview of our method, benchmark results, and a discussion of how it can be integrated into a high-throughput computing environment.

  15. Recombinant yeast technology at the cutting edge: robust tools for both designed catalysts and new biologicals.

    PubMed

    Kovar, Karin; Looser, Verena; Hyka, Petr; Merseburger, Tobias; Meier, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Health and safety concerns, enhanced quality criteria, and environmental sustainability, have prompted investigations into production using recombinant yeasts as a feasible alternative for isolation of proteins from natural animal or plant sources, as well as for processes utilising either mammalian cell cultures or bacterial systems. An overview of recent research papers and review articles provides readers with a comprehensive insight into the field of next-generation yeast expression systems. Major breakthroughs in recombinant yeast technology linked to Pichia pastoris are (i) the public availability of tools to generate proteins with tailored and highly homogenous N-glycan structures, similar to the forms assembled in humans, (ii) the recent accomplishment of the annotation of its genome sequence, and finally, (iii) the presence of the first few (non-glycosylated) therapeutic proteins in Pichia on the market. The P. pastoris expression platform is now well developed, as proven by multiple products used in human and veterinary medicine and in industry (e.g., enzymes for chemical synthesis and for the modification/synthesis of pharmaceuticals, drug target proteins used for structural analysis or for high throughput screening, proteins for diagnostics, proteinous biomaterials, vaccines, and therapeutic proteins). Nevertheless, the complexity of protein analysis (monitoring) continues to restrict process development for recombinant products. Drawing on combined expertise in molecular biology and process technology, the Institute of Biotechnology (IBT) at the Zurich University of Applied Science (ZHAW) and its international partners have developed solutions which (i) fully eliminate (or partially reduce) the use of methanol, which is undesirable in high-cell-density and high-productivity processes, (ii) match both strain construction and process design with the target protein characteristics to the benefit of the cells' physiological shape, and (iii) allow multi

  16. Cut-off points to identify sarcopenia according to European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) definition.

    PubMed

    Bahat, Gulistan; Tufan, Asli; Tufan, Fatih; Kilic, Cihan; Akpinar, Timur Selçuk; Kose, Murat; Erten, Nilgun; Karan, Mehmet Akif; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2016-12-01

    The reported prevalence of sarcopenia ranges widely depending on its definition criterion. European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) developed a practical clinical definition and consensus diagnostic criteria. This definition recommends using normative data of the study population rather than other reference populations. We aimed to define the reference cut-off values for muscle mass, muscle strength and calf circumference in Turkey in order to improve general applicability of EWGSOP criteria. Healthy young adults between 18 and 39 years of age with no known chronic disease or chronic drug usage were included in our study to serve as reference population for assessing muscle mass. Community-dwelling older outpatients were prospectively recruited from the geriatrics outpatient clinics of a university hospital for assessing hand grip strength and calf circumference. Body composition was assessed by bioimpedance analysis. Muscle strength was assessed measuring hand grip strength with a Jamar hand dynamometer. The cut-off thresholds for muscle mass were defined as the mean-2SD of the values of the young reference study population; for grip strength were calculated from ROC analyses using cut-off values that predicted gait speed < 0.8 m/s; and for calf circumference were calculated from ROC analyses using cut-off values that predicted low muscle mass. The young reference group included a total of 301 participants (187 male, 114 female; mean age: 26.5 ± 4.6 years). The cut-off thresholds for skeletal muscle mass indexes were 9.2 kg/m(2) and 7.4 kg/m(2) in males and females, respectively. The older community dwelling group included 406 subjects (123 male, 283 female, mean age: 76.6 ± 6.7 years). The cut-off thresholds for hand grip strength were 32 kg and 22 kg for males and females. The cut-off threshold for calf circumference was 33 cm for both males and females. The cut-off thresholds for muscle mass, grip strength and calf

  17. Comparison of Interferon-γ Release Assay to Two Cut-Off Points of Tuberculin Skin Test to Detect Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Primary Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Fernanda Mattos; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; Pinheiro, Jair dos Santos; Peres, Renata Lyrio; Lacerda, Thamy Carvalho; Loureiro, Rafaela Borge; Carvalho, Jose Américo; Fregona, Geisa; Dias, Elias Santos; Cosme, Lorrayne Beliqui; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Riley, Lee Wood; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia

    2014-01-01

    Background An interferon-γ release assay, QuantiFERON-TB (QFT) test, has been introduced an alternative test for the diagnosis of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Here, we compared the performance of QFT with tuberculin skin test (TST) measured at two different cut-off points among primary health care work (HCW) in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among HCWs in four Brazilian cities with a known history of high incidence of TB. Results of the QFT were compared to TST results based on both ≥5 mm and ≥10 mm as cut-off points. Results We enrolled 632 HCWs. When the cut-off value of ≥10 mm was used, agreement between QFT and TST was 69% (k = 0.31), and when the cut-off of ≥5 mm was chosen, the agreement was 57% (k = 0.22). We investigated possible factors of discordance of TST vs QFT. Compared to the TST−/QFT− group, risk factors for discordance in the TST+/QFT− group with TST cut-off of ≥5 mm included age between 41–45 years [OR = 2.70; CI 95%: 1.32–5.51] and 46–64 years [OR = 2.04; CI 95%: 1.05–3.93], BCG scar [OR = 2.72; CI 95%: 1.40–5.25], and having worked only in primary health care [OR = 2.30; CI 95%: 1.09–4.86]. On the other hand, for the cut-off of ≥10 mm, BCG scar [OR = 2.26; CI 95%: 1.03–4.91], being a household contact of a TB patient [OR = 1.72; CI 95%: 1.01–2.92] and having had a previous TST [OR = 1.66; CI 95%: 1.05–2.62], were significantly associated with the TST+/QFT− group. No statistically significant associations were found among the TST−/QFT+ discordant group with either TST cut-off value. Conclusions Although we identified BCG vaccination to contribute to the discordance at both TST cut-off measures, the current Brazilian recommendation for the initiation of LTBI treatment, based on information gathered from medical history, TST, chest radiograph and physical examination, should not be changed. PMID:25137040

  18. Comparison of interferon-γ release assay to two cut-off points of tuberculin skin test to detect latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in primary health care workers.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Fernanda Mattos; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; Pinheiro, Jair dos Santos; Peres, Renata Lyrio; Lacerda, Thamy Carvalho; Loureiro, Rafaela Borge; Carvalho, Jose Américo; Fregona, Geisa; Dias, Elias Santos; Cosme, Lorrayne Beliqui; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Riley, Lee Wood; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia

    2014-01-01

    An interferon-γ release assay, QuantiFERON-TB (QFT) test, has been introduced an alternative test for the diagnosis of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Here, we compared the performance of QFT with tuberculin skin test (TST) measured at two different cut-off points among primary health care work (HCW) in Brazil. A cross-sectional study was carried out among HCWs in four Brazilian cities with a known history of high incidence of TB. Results of the QFT were compared to TST results based on both ≥5 mm and ≥10 mm as cut-off points. We enrolled 632 HCWs. When the cut-off value of ≥10 mm was used, agreement between QFT and TST was 69% (k = 0.31), and when the cut-off of ≥5 mm was chosen, the agreement was 57% (k = 0.22). We investigated possible factors of discordance of TST vs QFT. Compared to the TST-/QFT- group, risk factors for discordance in the TST+/QFT- group with TST cut-off of ≥5 mm included age between 41-45 years [OR = 2.70; CI 95%: 1.32-5.51] and 46-64 years [OR = 2.04; CI 95%: 1.05-3.93], BCG scar [OR = 2.72; CI 95%: 1.40-5.25], and having worked only in primary health care [OR = 2.30; CI 95%: 1.09-4.86]. On the other hand, for the cut-off of ≥10 mm, BCG scar [OR = 2.26; CI 95%: 1.03-4.91], being a household contact of a TB patient [OR = 1.72; CI 95%: 1.01-2.92] and having had a previous TST [OR = 1.66; CI 95%: 1.05-2.62], were significantly associated with the TST+/QFT- group. No statistically significant associations were found among the TST-/QFT+ discordant group with either TST cut-off value. Although we identified BCG vaccination to contribute to the discordance at both TST cut-off measures, the current Brazilian recommendation for the initiation of LTBI treatment, based on information gathered from medical history, TST, chest radiograph and physical examination, should not be changed.

  19. Determinants of self-reported smoking and misclassification during pregnancy, and analysis of optimal cut-off points for urinary cotinine: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Aurrekoetxea, Juan J; Murcia, Mario; Rebagliato, Marisa; López, María José; Castilla, Ane Miren; Santa-Marina, Loreto; Guxens, Mónica; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Espada, Mercedes; Lertxundi, Aitana; Tardón, Adonina; Ballester, Ferran

    2013-01-24

    To estimate the prevalence and factors associated with smoking and misclassification in pregnant women from INMA (INfancia y Medio Ambiente, Environment and Childhood) project, Spain, and to assess the optimal cut-offs for urinary cotinine (UC) that best distinguish daily and occasional smokers with varying levels of second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure. We used logistic regression models to study the relationship between sociodemographic variables and self-reported smoking and misclassification (self-reported non-smokers with UC >50 ng/ml). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to calculate the optimal cut-off point for discriminating smokers. The cut-offs were also calculated after stratification among non-smokers by the number of sources of SHS exposure. The cut-off points used to discriminate smoking status were the level of UC given by Youden's index and for 50 and 100 ng/ml for daily smokers, or 25 and 50 ng/ml for occasional smokers. At the third trimester of pregnancy, 2263 pregnant women of the INMA Project were interviewed between 2004 and 2008 and a urine sample was collected. Prevalence of self-reported smokers at the third trimester of pregnancy was 18.5%, and another 3.9% misreported their smoking status. Variables associated with self-reported smoking and misreporting were similar, including born in Europe, educational level and exposure to SHS. The optimal cut-off was 82 ng/ml (95% CI 42 to 133), sensitivity 95.2% and specificity 96.6%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.986 (95% CI 0.982 to 0.990). The cut-offs varied according to the SHS exposure level being 42 (95% CI 27 to 57), 82 (95% CI 46 to 136) and 106 ng/ml (95% CI 58 to 227) for not being SHS exposed, exposed to one, and to two or more sources of SHS, respectively. The optimal cut-off for discriminating occasional smokers from non-smokers was 27 ng/ml (95% CI 11 to 43). Prevalence of smoking during pregnancy in Spain remains high. UC is a reliable biomarker for classifying

  20. Determinants of self-reported smoking and misclassification during pregnancy, and analysis of optimal cut-off points for urinary cotinine: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Aurrekoetxea, Juan J; Murcia, Mario; Rebagliato, Marisa; López, María José; Castilla, Ane Miren; Santa-Marina, Loreto; Guxens, Mónica; Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Espada, Mercedes; Lertxundi, Aitana; Tardón, Adonina; Ballester, Ferran

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence and factors associated with smoking and misclassification in pregnant women from INMA (INfancia y Medio Ambiente, Environment and Childhood) project, Spain, and to assess the optimal cut-offs for urinary cotinine (UC) that best distinguish daily and occasional smokers with varying levels of second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure. Design We used logistic regression models to study the relationship between sociodemographic variables and self-reported smoking and misclassification (self-reported non-smokers with UC >50 ng/ml). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to calculate the optimal cut-off point for discriminating smokers. The cut-offs were also calculated after stratification among non-smokers by the number of sources of SHS exposure. The cut-off points used to discriminate smoking status were the level of UC given by Youden's index and for 50 and 100 ng/ml for daily smokers, or 25 and 50 ng/ml for occasional smokers. Participants At the third trimester of pregnancy, 2263 pregnant women of the INMA Project were interviewed between 2004 and 2008 and a urine sample was collected. Results Prevalence of self-reported smokers at the third trimester of pregnancy was 18.5%, and another 3.9% misreported their smoking status. Variables associated with self-reported smoking and misreporting were similar, including born in Europe, educational level and exposure to SHS. The optimal cut-off was 82 ng/ml (95% CI 42 to 133), sensitivity 95.2% and specificity 96.6%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.986 (95% CI 0.982 to 0.990). The cut-offs varied according to the SHS exposure level being 42 (95% CI 27 to 57), 82 (95% CI 46 to 136) and 106 ng/ml (95% CI 58 to 227) for not being SHS exposed, exposed to one, and to two or more sources of SHS, respectively. The optimal cut-off for discriminating occasional smokers from non-smokers was 27 ng/ml (95% CI 11 to 43). Conclusions Prevalence of smoking during pregnancy in

  1. Sensitivity and Specificity Improvement in Abdominal Obesity Diagnosis Using Cluster Analysis during Waist Circumference Cut-Off Point Selection

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez, Valmore; Añez, Roberto; Toledo, Alexandra; Bello, Luis; Apruzzese, Vanessa; González, Robys; Chacín, Maricarmen; Cabrera, Mayela; Cano, Clímaco; Velasco, Manuel; López-Miranda, José

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of metabolic phenotypes during the construction of ROC curves for waist circumference (WC) cutpoint selection. Materials and Methods. A total of 1,902 subjects of both genders were selected from the Maracaibo City Metabolic Syndrome Prevalence Study database. Two-Step Cluster Analysis (TSCA) was applied to select metabolically healthy and sick men and women. ROC curves were constructed to determine WC cutoff points by gender. Results. Through TSCA, metabolic phenotype predictive variables were selected: HOMA2-IR and HOMA2-βcell for women and HOMA2-IR, HOMA2-βcell, and TAG for men. Subjects were classified as healthy normal weight, metabolically obese normal weight, healthy and metabolically disturbed overweight, and healthy and metabolically disturbed obese. Final WC cutpoints were 91.50 cm for women (93.4% sensitivity, 93.7% specificity) and 98.15 cm for men (96% sensitivity, 99.5% specificity). Conclusions. TSCA in the selection of the groups used in ROC curves construction proved to be an important tool, aiding in the detection of MOWN and MHO which cannot be identified with WC alone. The resulting WC cutpoints were <91.00 cm for women and <98.00 cm for men. Furthermore, anthropometry is insufficient to determine healthiness, and, biochemical analysis is needed to properly filter subjects during classification. PMID:25945356

  2. Validation of the Phillips et al. GENEActiv accelerometer wrist cut-points in children aged 5-8 years old.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Michael J; Wilson, Susie; Tallis, Jason; Eyre, Emma

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the accuracy of the Phillips et al. GENEActiv accelerometer wrist worn cut-points in children aged 5-8. Fifteen children (six girls, nine boys) aged 5-8 years wore a GENEActiv monitor on their non-dominant wrist while undertaking 5 min bouts of lying supine, playing Lego, walking at slow, medium and fast pace and running. Receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis was employed to establish how well the Phillips et al. (2013) cut-points classified intensity of the activities compared to the actual intensity determined by indirect calorimetry. Area under the curve (AUC) values were high for sedentary (.970), moderate (.815) and vigorous (.974) activity.

  3. Microsoft Producer: A Software Tool for Creating Multimedia PowerPoint[R] Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leffingwell, Thad R.; Thomas, David G.; Elliott, William H.

    2007-01-01

    Microsoft[R] Producer[R] is a powerful yet user-friendly PowerPoint companion tool for creating on-demand multimedia presentations. Instructors can easily distribute these presentations via compact disc or streaming media over the Internet. We describe the features of the software, system requirements, and other required hardware. We also describe…

  4. Cut-off points for mild, moderate, and severe pain on the visual analogue scale for pain in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Anne M; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica R; Balk, Gerlof A; Stewart, Roy E

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to find the cut-off points on the visual analogue scale (VAS) to distinguish among mild, moderate, and severe pain, in relation to the following: pain-related interference with functioning; verbal description of the VAS scores; and latent class analysis for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. A total of 456 patients were included. Pain was assessed using the VAS and verbal rating scale; functioning was assessed using the domains of the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36). Eight cut-off point schemes were tested using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), ordinal logistic regression, and latent class analysis. The study results showed that VAS scores ⩽ 3.4 corresponded to mild interference with functioning, whereas 3.5 to 6.4 implied moderate interference, and ⩾ 6.5 implied severe interference. VAS scores ⩽ 3.4 were best described for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain as mild pain, 3.5 to 7.4 as moderate pain, and ⩾ 7.5 as severe pain. Latent class analysis found that a 3-class solution fitted best, resulting in the classes 0.1 to 3.8, 3.9 to 5.7, and 5.8 to 10 cm. Findings from our study agree with those of some other studies, although many other studies found different optimal cut-off point schemes. As there appear to be no universally accepted cut-off points, and in view of the low-to-moderate associations between VAS scores and functioning and between VAS and verbal rating scale scores, the correct classification of VAS scores as mild, moderate. or severe in clinical practice seems doubtful.

  5. The Childhood Asthma Control Test: retrospective determination and clinical validation of a cut point to identify children with very poorly controlled asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Andrew H; Zeiger, Robert S; Sorkness, Christine A; Ostrom, Nancy K; Chipps, Bradley E; Rosa, Kathleen; Watson, Maria E; Kaplan, Michael S; Meurer, John R; Mahr, Todd A; Blaiss, Michael S; Piault-Louis, Elisabeth; McDonald, Jeffrey

    2010-08-01

    The Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) has demonstrated validity in classifying children aged 4 to 11 years as having either "well-controlled" or "not well-controlled" asthma. However, new asthma management guidelines distinguish 3 levels of asthma control. We sought to determine a second cut point on the C-ACT to identify children with "very poorly controlled" asthma. Binomial logistic regression was performed on data from 671 children. The specialist's rating of control was the criterion measure. Specialists' severity ratings, specialists' assessment of therapy, and FEV(1) percent predicted were used to assess the clinical validity of the cut point. A cut point of 12 was selected because it correctly classified the highest percentage of participants (66.3%) as having "very poorly controlled" (vs "not well controlled") asthma and demonstrated high specificity (89.8%) and moderate positive predictive value (69.1%). Children scoring 12 or less versus 13 to 19 had lower mean FEV(1) percent predicted (79.8% vs 92.6%, P = .0002) and were more frequently stepped up in therapy (72.9% vs 53.6%, P = .0131) and rated as having severe asthma (13.6% vs 4.5%, P = .0005). One month later, significant differences in C-ACT scores and lung function between these 2 groups persisted. The mean C-ACT score of participants classified as "very poorly controlled" was significantly lower than that of participants classified as "not well-controlled" (17.2 vs 20.3, respectively; P = .0001). A second cut point of 12 or less on the C-ACT identifies children with the lowest level of control, who are at risk for poorer outcomes, and is conceptually consistent with the classification of "very poorly controlled" asthma adopted by asthma management guidelines. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of Way Point Planning Tool in Response to NASA Field Campaign Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, M.; Hardin, D. M.; Conover, H.; Graves, S. J.; Meyer, P.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Goodman, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Airborne real time observations are a major component of NASA's Earth Science research and satellite ground validation studies. For mission scientists, planning a research aircraft mission within the context of meeting the science objectives is a complex task because it requires real time situational awareness of the weather conditions that affect the aircraft track. Multiple aircrafts are often involved in NASA field campaigns. The coordination of the aircrafts with satellite overpasses, other airplanes and the constantly evolving, dynamic weather conditions often determines the success of the campaign. A flight planning tool is needed to provide situational awareness information to the mission scientists, and help them plan and modify the flight tracks. Scientists at the University of Alabama-Huntsville and the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center developed the Waypoint Planning Tool, an interactive software tool that enables scientists to develop their own flight plans (also known as waypoints) with point-and-click mouse capabilities on a digital map filled with real time raster and vector data. The development of this Waypoint Planning Tool demonstrates the significance of mission support in responding to the challenges presented during NASA field campaigns. Analysis during and after each campaign helped identify both issues and new requirements, and initiated the next wave of development. Currently the Waypoint Planning Tool has gone through three rounds of development and analysis processes. The development of this waypoint tool is directly affected by the technology advances on GIS/Mapping technologies. From the standalone Google Earth application and simple KML functionalities, to Google Earth Plugin and Java Web Start/Applet on web platform, and to the rising open source GIS tools with new JavaScript frameworks, the Waypoint Planning Tool has entered its third phase of technology advancement. The newly innovated, cross-platform, modular designed Java

  7. Cutting fluid study for single crystal silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Chargin, D.

    1998-05-05

    An empirical study was conducted to evaluate cutting fluids for Single Point Diamond Turning (SPDT) of single crystal silicon. The pH of distilled waster was adjusted with various additives the examine the effect of pH on cutting operations. Fluids which seemed to promote ductile cutting appeared to increase tool wear as well, an undesirable tradeoff. High Ph sodium hydroxide solutions showed promise for further research, as they yielded the best combination of reduced tool wear and good surface finish in the ductile regime. Negative rake tools were verified to improve the surface finish, but the negative rake tools used in the experiments also showed much higher wear than conventional 0{degree} rake tools. Effects of crystallographic orientation on SPDT, such as star patterns of fracture damage forming near the center of the samples, were observed to decrease with lower feedrates. Silicon chips were observed and photographed, indicative of a ductile materials removal process.

  8. The Way Point Planning Tool: Real Time Flight Planning for Airborne Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Yubin; Blakeslee, Richard; Goodman, Michael; Hall, John

    2012-01-01

    Airborne real time observation are a major component of NASA's Earth Science research and satellite ground validation studies. For mission scientist, planning a research aircraft mission within the context of meeting the science objective is a complex task because it requires real time situational awareness of the weather conditions that affect the aircraft track. Multiple aircraft are often involved in the NASA field campaigns the coordination of the aircraft with satellite overpasses, other airplanes and the constantly evolving dynamic weather conditions often determine the success of the campaign. A flight planning tool is needed to provide situational awareness information to the mission scientist and help them plan and modify the flight tracks successfully. Scientists at the University of Alabama Huntsville and the NASA Marshal Space Flight Center developed the Waypoint Planning Tool (WPT), an interactive software tool that enables scientist to develop their own flight plans (also known as waypoints), with point and click mouse capabilities on a digital map filled with time raster and vector data. The development of this Waypoint Planning Tool demonstrates the significance of mission support in responding to the challenges presented during NASA field campaigns. Analyses during and after each campaign helped identify both issues and new requirements, initiating the next wave of development. Currently the Waypoint Planning Tool has gone through three rounds of development and analysis processes. The development of this waypoint tool is directly affected by the technology advances on GIS/Mapping technologies. From the standalone Google Earth application and simple KML functionalities to the Google Earth Plugin and Java Web Start/Applet on web platform, as well as to the rising open source GIS tools with new JavaScript frameworks, the Waypoint planning Tool has entered its third phase of technology advancement. The newly innovated, cross-platform, modular designed

  9. Experimental Investigation on Cutting Characteristics in Nanometric Plunge-Cutting of BK7 and Fused Silica Glasses

    PubMed Central

    An, Qinglong; Ming, Weiwei; Chen, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Ductile cutting are most widely used in fabricating high-quality optical glass components to achieve crack-free surfaces. For ultra-precision machining of brittle glass materials, critical undeformed chip thickness (CUCT) commonly plays a pivotal role in determining the transition point from ductile cutting to brittle cutting. In this research, cutting characteristics in nanometric cutting of BK7 and fused silica glasses, including machined surface morphology, surface roughness, cutting force and specific cutting energy, were investigated with nanometric plunge-cutting experiments. The same cutting speed of 300 mm/min was used in the experiments with single-crystal diamond tool. CUCT was determined according to the mentioned cutting characteristics. The results revealed that 320 nm was found as the CUCT in BK7 cutting and 50 nm was determined as the size effect of undeformed chip thickness. A high-quality machined surface could be obtained with the undeformed chip thickness between 50 and 320 nm at ductile cutting stage. Moreover, no CUCT was identified in fused silica cutting with the current cutting conditions, and brittle-fracture mechanism was confirmed as the predominant chip-separation mode throughout the nanometric cutting operation. PMID:28788010

  10. Material Behavior At The Extreme Cutting Edge In Bandsawing

    SciTech Connect

    Sarwar, Mohammed; Haider, Julfikar; Persson, Martin; Hellbergh, Haakan

    2011-01-17

    In recent years, bandsawing has been widely accepted as a favourite option for metal cutting off operations where the accuracy of cut, good surface finish, low kerf loss, long tool life and high material removal rate are required. Material removal by multipoint cutting tools such as bandsaw is a complex mechanism owing to the geometry of the bandsaw tooth (e.g., limited gullet size, tooth setting etc.) and the layer of material removed or undeformed chip thickness or depth of cut (5 {mu}m-50 {mu}m) being smaller than or equal to the cutting edge radius (5 {mu}m-15 {mu}m). This situation can lead to inefficient material removal in bandsawing. Most of the research work are concentrated on the mechanics of material removal by single point cutting tool such as lathe tool. However, such efforts are very limited in multipoint cutting tools such as in bandsaw. This paper presents the fundamental understanding of the material behaviour at the extreme cutting edge of bandsaw tooth, which would help in designing and manufacturing of blades with higher cutting performance and life. ''High Speed Photography'' has been carried out to analyse the material removal process at the extreme cutting edge of bandsaw tooth. Geometric model of chip formation mechanisms based on the evidences found during ''High Speed Photography'' and ''Quick Stop'' process is presented. Wear modes and mechanism in bimetal and carbide tipped bandsaw teeth are also presented.

  11. Material Behavior At The Extreme Cutting Edge In Bandsawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, Mohammed; Haider, Julfikar; Persson, Martin; Hellbergh, Hâkan

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, bandsawing has been widely accepted as a favourite option for metal cutting off operations where the accuracy of cut, good surface finish, low kerf loss, long tool life and high material removal rate are required. Material removal by multipoint cutting tools such as bandsaw is a complex mechanism owing to the geometry of the bandsaw tooth (e.g., limited gullet size, tooth setting etc.) and the layer of material removed or undeformed chip thickness or depth of cut (5 μm-50 μm) being smaller than or equal to the cutting edge radius (5 μm-15 μm). This situation can lead to inefficient material removal in bandsawing. Most of the research work are concentrated on the mechanics of material removal by single point cutting tool such as lathe tool. However, such efforts are very limited in multipoint cutting tools such as in bandsaw. This paper presents the fundamental understanding of the material behaviour at the extreme cutting edge of bandsaw tooth, which would help in designing and manufacturing of blades with higher cutting performance and life. "High Speed Photography" has been carried out to analyse the material removal process at the extreme cutting edge of bandsaw tooth. Geometric model of chip formation mechanisms based on the evidences found during "High Speed Photography" and "Quick Stop" process is presented. Wear modes and mechanism in bimetal and carbide tipped bandsaw teeth are also presented.

  12. TiConverter: A training image converting tool for multiple-point geostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadlelmula F., Mohamed M.; Killough, John; Fraim, Michael

    2016-11-01

    TiConverter is a tool developed to ease the application of multiple-point geostatistics whether by the open source Stanford Geostatistical Modeling Software (SGeMS) or other available commercial software. TiConverter has a user-friendly interface and it allows the conversion of 2D training images into numerical representations in four different file formats without the need for additional code writing. These are the ASCII (.txt), the geostatistical software library (GSLIB) (.txt), the Isatis (.dat), and the VTK formats. It performs the conversion based on the RGB color system. In addition, TiConverter offers several useful tools including image resizing, smoothing, and segmenting tools. The purpose of this study is to introduce the TiConverter, and to demonstrate its application and advantages with several examples from the literature.

  13. Prevalence of body mass index and body weight cut-off points for in vitro fertilization treatment at U.S. clinics and current clinic weight loss strategy recommendations.

    PubMed

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M; Grant, Breănna L

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this study was to determine how many clinics providing in vitro fertilization (IVF) in the United States require a body mass index (BMI) or body weight cut-off point to determine treatment eligibility. US clinics listed as members on the Society of Assisted Reproduction website in late 2013 were contacted by phone between January and March 2014. Clinic personnel were asked if a BMI or body weight cut-off points was used to determine IVF treatment eligibility and what strategies they recommended for their patients to achieve a healthy body weight. Of the 379 clinics contacted, 347 responded (92% response rate) and 35% (n = 120) reported using a BMI or body weight cut-off points to determine eligibility for IVF treatment. Mean BMI (± SD) cut-off points was 38.4 ± 5.2 kg/m(2) and mean body weight (± SD) cut-off points was 130.2 ± 14.8 kg. Of the clinics using a set cut-off points, half (46%) provided no weight loss recommendations for patients. A sizable portion of US IVF clinics report a required or preferred BMI or body weight cut-off points for treatment. Despite this, most clinics did not provide a recommended program or approach for weight loss with very few clinics reporting an in-house program.

  14. Using Microsoft PowerPoint as an Astronomical Image Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck-Winchatz, Bernhard

    2006-12-01

    Engaging students in the analysis of authentic scientific data is an effective way to teach them about the scientific process and to develop their problem solving, teamwork and communication skills. In astronomy several image processing and analysis software tools have been developed for use in school environments. However, the practical implementation in the classroom is often difficult because the teachers may not have the comfort level with computers necessary to install and use these tools, they may not have adequate computer privileges and/or support, and they may not have the time to learn how to use specialized astronomy software. To address this problem, we have developed a set of activities in which students analyze astronomical images using basic tools provided in PowerPoint. These include measuring sizes, distances, and angles, and blinking images. In contrast to specialized software, PowerPoint is broadly available on school computers. Many teachers are already familiar with PowerPoint, and the skills developed while learning how to analyze astronomical images are highly transferable. We will discuss several practical examples of measurements, including the following: -Variations in the distances to the sun and moon from their angular sizes -Magnetic declination from images of shadows -Diameter of the moon from lunar eclipse images -Sizes of lunar craters -Orbital radii of the Jovian moons and mass of Jupiter -Supernova and comet searches -Expansion rate of the universe from images of distant galaxies

  15. Determination of the accuracy and optimal cut-off point for ELISA test in diagnosis of human brucellosis in Iran.

    PubMed

    Hasibi, Mehrdad; Jafari, Sirus; Mortazavi, Habibollah; Asadollahi, Marjan; Esmaeeli Djavid, Gholamreza

    2013-01-01

    In endemic area the most challenging problem for brucellosis is to find a reliable diagnostic method. In this case-control study, we investigated the accuracy of ELISA test for diagnosis of human brucellosis and determined the optimal cut-off value for ELISA results in Iran. The laboratory diagnosis of brucellosis was performed by blood isolation of Brucella organism with a BACTEC 9240 system and/or detection of Brucella antibodies by standard agglutination test (titer ≥ 1:160). Serum level of ELISA IgG and ELISA IgM from 56 confirmed cases of brucellosis and 126 controls were compared with each other by Box plot graph and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. Box plot graphs showed the high degree of dispersion for IgG and IgM data in patients compared with all controls. We observed partially overlapping for IgM data (not for IgG) between cases and controls in graphs. The area under ROC curve for distinguishing between cases and controls was larger for IgG compared to IgM. Based on results of this study, ELISA IgG test was more reliable than ELISA IgM test in diagnosis of human brucellosis in Iran. Using a cut-off of 10 IU/ml and 50 IU/ml had most sensitivity (92.9%) and most specificity (100%) for ELISA IgG test, respectively.

  16. Optimal cut points of waist circumference (WC) and visceral fat area (VFA) predicting for metabolic syndrome (MetS) in elderly population in the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging (KLoSHA).

    PubMed

    Lim, Soo; Kim, Jung Hee; Yoon, Ji Won; Kang, Seon Mee; Choi, Sung Hee; Park, Young Joo; Kim, Ki Woong; Cho, Nam Han; Shin, Hayley; Park, Kyong Soo; Jang, Hak Chul

    2012-01-01

    Optimal cut points of central obesity identifying subjects at risk for MetS were proposed ethnic-specifically, but have not been established yet. Of particular interest are the values for elderly persons, which have not been identified previously. We investigated the appropriate cut points of WC and VFA for elderly in a community-based cohort in Korea. We recruited 294 men and 313 women aged 65 or over who participated in the KLoSHA. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to estimate the optimal cut points of WC and VFA indicative of MetS. The optimal cut points for predicting MetS were 87 cm for WC, 140 cm(2) for VFA in men, and 85 cm for WC, 100 cm(2) for VFA in women with the Youden index. Similar cut points were obtained with the closest-to-(0, 1) criterion except for VFA in men, which was 122 cm(2). When adjusted for age, exercise, smoking, and alcohol consumption, men with ≥122 cm(2) and women with ≥100 cm(2) of VFA had a higher risk of MetS than subjects with lower values. The cut points of VFA and WC at risk for MetS were higher in men than women. In this community-based elderly cohort, the optimal cut points of WC at risk for MetS were lower than the Western criteria. Compared with the cut points in middle-aged Koreans, the cut points for elderly were lower in men and similar in women.

  17. A Study of Point of View and Character in Preparation for Oral Performance of Cuttings from "The Optimist's Daughter."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Nancy Hill

    In the process of perfecting oral performances of selected scenes from Eudora Welty's "The Optimist's Daughter," it is important to study point of view and character as they pertain to the play. Four aspects should be considered to understand the point of view: (1) the character's story, (2) the position from which the narrator speaks,…

  18. A Study of Point of View and Character in Preparation for Oral Performance of Cuttings from "The Optimist's Daughter."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Nancy Hill

    In the process of perfecting oral performances of selected scenes from Eudora Welty's "The Optimist's Daughter," it is important to study point of view and character as they pertain to the play. Four aspects should be considered to understand the point of view: (1) the character's story, (2) the position from which the narrator speaks,…

  19. Use of Hyperlinks in PowerPoint Presentations as an Educational Tool.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Gregory Scott; Thiel, Steven G

    2017-10-01

    PowerPoint software (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) has become a popular tool for creating and displaying electronic presentations. The "hyperlink" function in PowerPoint allows users to advance from one slide to another slide in the presentation when they click on a predetermined word, shape, or image, thereby allowing for a more dynamic and interactive experience than can be obtained with serial presentation of slides alone. The objective of this article is to provide a tutorial describing the necessary steps to create hyperlinks and incorporate them in a variety of ways into a PowerPoint presentation. Hyperlinks can turn a passive learning experience into an active one by allowing the participant to become more engaged with the presentation. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of cutting parameters on the depth of subsurface deformed layer in nano-cutting process of single crystal copper.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanlong; Bai, Qingshun; Chen, Jiaxuan; Su, Hao; Wang, Zhiguo; Xie, Wenkun

    2015-12-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation is performed to study the nano-cutting process of single crystal copper realized by single-point diamond cutting tool in this paper. The centro-symmetry parameter is adopted to characterize the subsurface deformed layers and the distribution and evolution of the subsurface defect structures. Three-dimensional visualization and measurement technology are used to measure the depth of the subsurface deformed layers. The influence of cutting speed, cutting depth, cutting direction, and crystallographic orientation on the depth of subsurface deformed layers is systematically investigated. The results show that a lot of defect structures are formed in the subsurface of workpiece during nano-cutting process, for instance, stair-rod dislocations, stacking fault tetrahedron, atomic clusters, vacancy defects, point defects. In the process of nano-cutting, the depth of subsurface deformed layers increases with the cutting distance at the beginning, then decreases at stable cutting process, and basically remains unchanged when the cutting distance reaches up to 24 nm. The depth of subsurface deformed layers decreases with the increase in cutting speed between 50 and 300 m/s. The depth of subsurface deformed layer increases with cutting depth, proportionally, and basically remains unchanged when the cutting depth reaches over 6 nm.

  1. Optimal cut-off points of fasting plasma glucose for two-step strategy in estimating prevalence and screening undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes in Harbin, China.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chundan; Zhang, Dianfeng; Sun, Bo; Lan, Li; Cui, Wenxiu; Xu, Guohua; Sui, Conglan; Wang, Yibaina; Zhao, Yashuang; Wang, Jian; Li, Hongyuan

    2015-01-01

    To identify optimal cut-off points of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) for two-step strategy in screening abnormal glucose metabolism and estimating prevalence in general Chinese population. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted on 7913 people aged 20 to 74 years in Harbin. Diabetes and pre-diabetes were determined by fasting and 2 hour post-load glucose from the oral glucose tolerance test in all participants. Screening potential of FPG, cost per case identified by two-step strategy, and optimal FPG cut-off points were described. The prevalence of diabetes was 12.7%, of which 65.2% was undiagnosed. Twelve percent or 9.0% of participants were diagnosed with pre-diabetes using 2003 ADA criteria or 1999 WHO criteria, respectively. The optimal FPG cut-off points for two-step strategy were 5.6 mmol/l for previously undiagnosed diabetes (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of FPG 0.93; sensitivity 82.0%; cost per case identified by two-step strategy ¥261), 5.3 mmol/l for both diabetes and pre-diabetes or pre-diabetes alone using 2003 ADA criteria (0.89 or 0.85; 72.4% or 62.9%; ¥110 or ¥258), 5.0 mmol/l for pre-diabetes using 1999 WHO criteria (0.78; 66.8%; ¥399), and 4.9 mmol/l for IGT alone (0.74; 62.2%; ¥502). Using the two-step strategy, the underestimates of prevalence reduced to nearly 38% for pre-diabetes or 18.7% for undiagnosed diabetes, respectively. Approximately a quarter of the general population in Harbin was in hyperglycemic condition. Using optimal FPG cut-off points for two-step strategy in Chinese population may be more effective and less costly for reducing the missed diagnosis of hyperglycemic condition.

  2. Synergistically toughening effect of SiC whiskers and nanoparticles in Al2O3-based composite ceramic cutting tool material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuefei; Liu, Hanlian; Huang, Chuanzhen; Wang, Limei; Zou, Bin; Zhao, Bin

    2016-09-01

    In recent decades, many additives with different characteristics have been applied to strengthen and toughen Al2O3-based ceramic cutting tool materials. Among them, SiC whiskers and SiC nanoparticles showed excellent performance in improving the material properties. While no attempts have been made to add SiC whiskers and SiC nanoparticles together into the ceramic matrix and the synergistically toughening effects of them have not been studied. An Al2O3-SiCw-SiCnp advanced ceramic cutting tool material is fabricated by adding both one-dimensional SiC whiskers and zero-dimensional SiC nanoparticles into the Al2O3 matrix with an effective dispersing and mixing process. The composites with 25 vol% SiC whiskers and 25 vol% SiC nanoparticles alone are also investegated for comparison purposes. Results show that the Al2O3-SiCw-SiCnp composite with both 20 vol% SiC whiskers and 5 vol% SiC nanoparticles additives have much improved mechanical properties. The flexural strength of Al2O3-SiCw-SiCnp is 730±95 MPa and fracture toughness is 5.6±0.6 MPa·m1/2. The toughening and strengthening mechanisms of SiC whiskers and nanoparticles are studied when they are added either individually or in combination. It is indicated that when SiC whiskers and nanoparticles are added together, the grains are further refined and homogenized, so that the microstructure and fracture mode ratio is modified. The SiC nanoparticles are found helpful to enhance the toughening effects of the SiC whiskers. The proposed research helps to enrich the types of ceramic cutting tool and is benefit to expand the application range of ceramic cutting tool.

  3. Faulting at Mormon Point, Death Valley, California: A low-angle normal fault cut by high-angle faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keener, Charles; Serpa, Laura; Pavlis, Terry L.

    1993-04-01

    New geophysical and fault kinematic studies indicate that late Cenozoic basin development in the Mormon Point area of Death Valley, California, was accommodated by fault rotations. Three of six fault segments recognized at Mormon Point are now inactive and have been rotated to low dips during extension. The remaining three segments are now active and moderately to steeply dipping. From the geophysical data, one active segment appears to offset the low-angle faults in the subsurface of Death Valley.

  4. Laser cutting plastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Cleave, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    A 1000-watt CO/sub 2/ laser has been demonstrated as a reliable production machine tool for cutting of plastics, high strength reinforced composites, and other nonmetals. More than 40 different plastics have been laser cut, and the results are tabulated. Applications for laser cutting described include fiberglass-reinforced laminates, Kevlar/epoxy composites, fiberglass-reinforced phenolics, nylon/epoxy laminates, ceramics, and disposable tooling made from acrylic.

  5. PypeTree: a tool for reconstructing tree perennial tissues from point clouds.

    PubMed

    Delagrange, Sylvain; Jauvin, Christian; Rochon, Pascal

    2014-03-04

    The reconstruction of trees from point clouds that were acquired with terrestrial LiDAR scanning (TLS) may become a significant breakthrough in the study and modelling of tree development. Here, we develop an efficient method and a tool based on extensive modifications to the skeletal extraction method that was first introduced by Verroust and Lazarus in 2000. PypeTree, a user-friendly and open-source visual modelling environment, incorporates a number of improvements into the original skeletal extraction technique, making it better adapted to tackle the challenge of tree perennial tissue reconstruction. Within PypeTree, we also introduce the idea of using semi-supervised adjustment tools to address methodological challenges that are associated with imperfect point cloud datasets and which further improve reconstruction accuracy. The performance of these automatic and semi-supervised approaches was tested with the help of synthetic models and subsequently validated on real trees. Accuracy of automatic reconstruction greatly varied in terms of axis detection because small (length < 3.5 cm) branches were difficult to detect. However, as small branches account for little in terms of total skeleton length, mean reconstruction error for cumulated skeleton length only reached 5.1% and 1.8% with automatic or semi-supervised reconstruction, respectively. In some cases, using the supervised tools, a perfect reconstruction of the perennial tissue could be achieved.

  6. Measurement of Transient Tool Internal Temperature Fields by Novel Micro Thin Film Sensors Embedded in Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride Cutting Inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werschmoeller, Dirk

    Monitoring and control of thermomechanical phenomena in tooling are imperative for advancing fundamental understanding, enhancing reliability, and improving workpiece quality in material removal processes. Polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) tools are being used heavily in numerous machining processes, e.g., machining of hardened low carbon steel and superalloys. These processes are very sensitive to variations in local cutting conditions at, or close to, the tool-workpiece interface, but lack a thorough understanding of fundamental transient thermo-mechanical phenomena present. As a result, abrupt catastrophic tool failures and degraded machined surfaces frequently occur. Existing sensors are not suitable for process control and monitoring, as they are either destructively embedded and/or do not possess the necessary spatial and temporal resolution to provide relevant data during machining. This research presents a novel approach for obtaining thermomechanical data from the close vicinity (i.e., 10s of micrometers) of the tool-workpiece interface. Arrays of micro thin film thermocouples with junction size 5 x 5 mum were fabricated by standard microfabrication methods and have been successfully embedded into PCBN using diffusion bonding. Electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy were employed to examine material interactions at the bonding interface and to determine optimal bonding parameters. Static and dynamic sensor performances have been characterized. The sensors exhibit excellent linearity up to 1300 °C, fast rise time of 150 ns, and possess good sensitivity. The inserts instrumented with embedded thin film C-type thermocouples were successfully applied to measure internal tool temperatures as close as 70 mum to the cutting edge while machining aluminum and hardened steel workpieces at industrially relevant cutting parameters. Acquired temperature data follow theoretical trends very well. Correlations between temperature and cutting parameters have

  7. Cut-off points of the visceral adiposity index (VAI) identifying a visceral adipose dysfunction associated with cardiometabolic risk in a Caucasian Sicilian population.

    PubMed

    Amato, Marco C; Giordano, Carla; Pitrone, Maria; Galluzzo, Aldo

    2011-10-19

    The Visceral Adiposity Index (VAI) is a sex-specific mathematical index, based on Waist Circumference (WC), Body Mass Index (BMI), triglycerides (TG) and HDL cholesterol (HDL) levels, indirectly expressing visceral adipose function and insulin sensitivity. Our aim was to find the optimal cut-off points of VAI identifying a visceral adipose dysfunction (VAD) associated with cardiometabolic risk in a Caucasian Sicilian population. Medical check-up data of 1,764 Primary Care patients (PC patients) were retrospectively and cross-sectionally examined using a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve to determine appropriate stratified-for-age cut-off of VAI, for the identification of PC patients with Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) according to the NCEP-ATP III criteria. The PC patients with higher VAI scores were subdivided into three groups according to VAI tertiles (i.e. PC patients with mild VAD, moderate VAD or severe VAD). Finally, VAD classes were compared to classical cardio- and cerebrovascular risk factors as independent predictors of coronary heart disease and/or myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack and/or ischemic stroke. Moderate and severe VADs proved to be independently associated with cardiovascular events [(OR: 5.35; 95% CI: 1.92-14.87; p = 0.001) and (OR: 7.46; 95% CI: 2.64-21.05; p < 0.001) respectively]. Mild, moderate and severe VADs were found to be independently associated with cerebrovascular events [(OR: 2.73; 95% CI: 1.12-6.65; p = 0.027), (OR: 4.20; 95% CI: 1.86-9.45; p = 0.001) and (OR: 5.10; 95% CI: 2.14-12.17; p < 0.001) respectively]. Our study suggests that among Caucasian Sicilian subjects there are clear cut-off points of VAI able to identify a VAD strongly associated with cardiometabolic risk.

  8. An interactive tool for design and support of lunar, gravity assist, and libration point trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrico, J.; Schiff, C.; Roszman, L.; Hooper, H.; Folta, D.; Richon, K.

    1993-01-01

    The 'Swingby' interactive tool for design, analysis, and support of maneuver planning for missions that involve transfers to the moon, the lunar orbits, multiple-gravity assists, and the libration-point orbits, runs on a PC and uses pull-down and pop-up menus to allow users to change physical constants and select perturbations for inclusion. Swingby can also target by ascertain parameters, or allow the computer to generate goals on the basis of mission requirements. Rapid mission analyses, operational maneuvers, and contingency plans are thereby obtainable.

  9. Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference Cut-Points in Multi-Ethnic Populations from the UK and India: The ADDITION-Leicester, Jaipur Heart Watch and New Delhi Cross-Sectional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bodicoat, Danielle H.; Gray, Laura J.; Henson, Joseph; Webb, David; Guru, Arvind; Misra, Anoop; Gupta, Rajeev; Vikram, Naval; Sattar, Naveed; Davies, Melanie J.; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    Aims To derive cut-points for body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) for minority ethnic groups that are risk equivalent based on endogenous glucose levels to cut-points for white Europeans (BMI 30 kg/m2; WC men 102 cm; WC women 88 cm). Materials and Methods Cross-sectional data from participants aged 40–75 years: 4,672 white and 1,348 migrant South Asian participants from ADDITION-Leicester (UK) and 985 indigenous South Asians from Jaipur Heart Watch/New Delhi studies (India). Cut-points were derived using fractional polynomial models with fasting and 2-hour glucose as outcomes, and ethnicity, objectively-measured BMI/WC, their interaction and age as covariates. Results Based on fasting glucose, obesity cut-points were 25 kg/m2 (95% Confidence Interval: 24, 26) for migrant South Asian, and 18 kg/m2 (16, 20) for indigenous South Asian populations. For men, WC cut-points were 90 cm (85, 95) for migrant South Asian, and 87 cm (82, 91) for indigenous South Asian populations. For women, WC cut-points were 77 cm (71, 82) for migrant South Asian, and 54 cm (20, 63) for indigenous South Asian populations. Cut-points based on 2-hour glucose were lower than these. Conclusions These findings strengthen evidence that health interventions are required at a lower BMI and WC for South Asian individuals. Based on our data and the existing literature, we suggest an obesity threshold of 25 kg/m2 for South Asian individuals, and a very high WC threshold of 90 cm for South Asian men and 77 cm for South Asian women. Further work is required to determine whether lower cut-points are required for indigenous, than migrant, South Asians. PMID:24599391

  10. Body mass index and waist circumference cut-points in multi-ethnic populations from the UK and India: the ADDITION-Leicester, Jaipur heart watch and New Delhi cross-sectional studies.

    PubMed

    Bodicoat, Danielle H; Gray, Laura J; Henson, Joseph; Webb, David; Guru, Arvind; Misra, Anoop; Gupta, Rajeev; Vikram, Naval; Sattar, Naveed; Davies, Melanie J; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    To derive cut-points for body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) for minority ethnic groups that are risk equivalent based on endogenous glucose levels to cut-points for white Europeans (BMI 30 kg/m2; WC men 102 cm; WC women 88 cm). Cross-sectional data from participants aged 40-75 years: 4,672 white and 1,348 migrant South Asian participants from ADDITION-Leicester (UK) and 985 indigenous South Asians from Jaipur Heart Watch/New Delhi studies (India). Cut-points were derived using fractional polynomial models with fasting and 2-hour glucose as outcomes, and ethnicity, objectively-measured BMI/WC, their interaction and age as covariates. Based on fasting glucose, obesity cut-points were 25 kg/m2 (95% Confidence Interval: 24, 26) for migrant South Asian, and 18 kg/m2 (16, 20) for indigenous South Asian populations. For men, WC cut-points were 90 cm (85, 95) for migrant South Asian, and 87 cm (82, 91) for indigenous South Asian populations. For women, WC cut-points were 77 cm (71, 82) for migrant South Asian, and 54 cm (20, 63) for indigenous South Asian populations. Cut-points based on 2-hour glucose were lower than these. These findings strengthen evidence that health interventions are required at a lower BMI and WC for South Asian individuals. Based on our data and the existing literature, we suggest an obesity threshold of 25 kg/m2 for South Asian individuals, and a very high WC threshold of 90 cm for South Asian men and 77 cm for South Asian women. Further work is required to determine whether lower cut-points are required for indigenous, than migrant, South Asians.

  11. Structure Based Thermostability Prediction Models for Protein Single Point Mutations with Machine Learning Tools.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lei; Yarlagadda, Ramya; Reed, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Thermostability issue of protein point mutations is a common occurrence in protein engineering. An application which predicts the thermostability of mutants can be helpful for guiding decision making process in protein design via mutagenesis. An in silico point mutation scanning method is frequently used to find "hot spots" in proteins for focused mutagenesis. ProTherm (http://gibk26.bio.kyutech.ac.jp/jouhou/Protherm/protherm.html) is a public database that consists of thousands of protein mutants' experimentally measured thermostability. Two data sets based on two differently measured thermostability properties of protein single point mutations, namely the unfolding free energy change (ddG) and melting temperature change (dTm) were obtained from this database. Folding free energy change calculation from Rosetta, structural information of the point mutations as well as amino acid physical properties were obtained for building thermostability prediction models with informatics modeling tools. Five supervised machine learning methods (support vector machine, random forests, artificial neural network, naïve Bayes classifier, K nearest neighbor) and partial least squares regression are used for building the prediction models. Binary and ternary classifications as well as regression models were built and evaluated. Data set redundancy and balancing, the reverse mutations technique, feature selection, and comparison to other published methods were discussed. Rosetta calculated folding free energy change ranked as the most influential features in all prediction models. Other descriptors also made significant contributions to increasing the accuracy of the prediction models.

  12. Fatty acid ethyl esters in hair as alcohol markers: estimating a reliable cut-off point by evaluation of 1,057 autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Hastedt, Martin; Bossers, Lydia; Krumbiegel, Franziska; Herre, Sieglinde; Hartwig, Sven

    2013-06-01

    Alcohol abuse is a widespread problem, especially in Western countries. Therefore, it is important to have markers of alcohol consumption with validated cut-off points. For many years research has focused on analysis of hair for alcohol markers, but data on the performance and reliability of cut-off values are still lacking. Evaluating 1,057 cases from 2005 to 2011, included a large sample group for the estimation of an applicable cut-off value when compared to earlier studies on fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in hair. The FAEEs concentrations in hair, police investigation reports, medical history, and the macroscopic and microscopic alcohol-typical results from autopsy, such as liver, pancreas, and cardiac findings, were taken into account in this study. In 80.2 % of all 1,057 cases pathologic findings that may be related to alcohol abuse were reported. The cases were divided into social drinkers (n = 168), alcohol abusers (n = 502), and cases without information on alcohol use. The median FAEEs concentration in the group of social drinkers was 0.302 ng/mg (range 0.008-14.3 ng/mg). In the group of alcohol abusers a median of 1.346 ng/mg (range 0.010-83.7 ng/mg) was found. Before June 2009 the hair FAEEs test was routinely applied to a proximal hair segment of 0-6 cm, changing to a routinely investigated hair length of 3 cm after 2009, as proposed by the Society of Hair Testing (SoHT). The method showed significant differences between the groups of social drinkers and alcoholics, leading to an improvement in the postmortem detection of alcohol abuse. Nevertheless, the performance of the method was rather poor, with an area under the curve calculated from receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve AUC) of 0.745. The optimum cut-off value for differentiation between social and chronic excessive drinking calculated for hair FAEEs was 1.08 ng/mg, with a sensitivity of 56 % and a specificity of 80 %. In relation to the "Consensus on Alcohol Markers 2012

  13. Ultrasonic Cutting of Foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Yvonne; Zahn, Susann; Rohm, Harald

    In the field of food engineering, cutting is usually classified as a mechanical unit operation dealing with size reduction by applying external forces on a bulk product. Ultrasonic cutting is realized by superpositioning the macroscopic feed motion of the cutting device or of the product with a microscopic vibration of the cutting tool. The excited tool interacts with the product and generates a number of effects. Primary energy concentration in the separation zone and the modification of contact friction along the tool flanks arise from the cyclic loading and are responsible for benefits such as reduced cutting force, smooth cut surface, and reduced product deformation. Secondary effects such as absorption and cavitation originate from the propagation of the sound field in the product and are closely related to chemical and physical properties of the material to be cut. This chapter analyzes interactions between food products and ultrasonic cutting tools and relates these interactions with physical and chemical product properties as well as with processing parameters like cutting velocity, ultrasonic amplitude and frequency, and tool design.

  14. MAPT and PAICE: Tools for time series and single time point transcriptionist visualization and knowledge discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Parsa; Tremblay, Arianne; Matthews, Benjamin F; Alkharouf, Nadim W

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of next-generation sequencing, -omics fields such as transcriptomics have experienced increases in data throughput on the order of magnitudes. In terms of analyzing and visually representing these huge datasets, an intuitive and computationally tractable approach is to map quantified transcript expression onto biochemical pathways while employing datamining and visualization principles to accelerate knowledge discovery. We present two cross-platform tools: MAPT (Mapping and Analysis of Pathways through Time) and PAICE (Pathway Analysis and Integrated Coloring of Experiments), an easy to use analysis suite to facilitate time series and single time point transcriptomics analysis. In unison, MAPT and PAICE serve as a visual workbench for transcriptomics knowledge discovery, data-mining and functional annotation. Both PAICE and MAPT are two distinct but yet inextricably linked tools. The former is specifically designed to map EC accessions onto KEGG pathways while handling multiple gene copies, detection-call analysis, as well as UN/annotated EC accessions lacking quantifiable expression. The latter tool integrates PAICE datasets to drive visualization, annotation, and data-mining. Availability The database is available for free at http://sourceforge.net/projects/paice/http://sourceforge.net/projects/mapt/ PMID:22493539

  15. Development of flank wear model of cutting tool by using adaptive feedback linear control system on machining AISI D2 steel and AISI 4340 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orra, Kashfull; Choudhury, Sounak K.

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to build an adaptive feedback linear control system to check the variation of cutting force signal to improve the tool life. The paper discusses the use of transfer function approach in improving the mathematical modelling and adaptively controlling the process dynamics of the turning operation. The experimental results shows to be in agreement with the simulation model and error obtained is less than 3%. The state space approach model used in this paper successfully check the adequacy of the control system through controllability and observability test matrix and can be transferred from one state to another by appropriate input control in a finite time. The proposed system can be implemented to other machining process under varying range of cutting conditions to improve the efficiency and observability of the system.

  16. Breslow thickness and (18)F-FDG PET-CT result in initial staging of cutaneous melanoma: Can a cut-off point be established?

    PubMed

    Ortega-Candil, A; Rodríguez-Rey, C; Cano-Carrizal, R; Cala-Zuluaga, E; González Larriba, J L; Jiménez-Ballvé, A; Fuentes-Ferrer, M E; Cabrera-Martín, M N; Pérez-Castejón, M J; García García-Esquinas, M; Lapeña-Gutierrez, L; Carreras-Delgado, J L

    2016-01-01

    To establish a Breslow Thickness (BT) cut-off point for indication of PET-CT of cutaneous melanoma in early stages and evaluate its prognostic value. Retrospective analysis of 347 PET-CT studies with diagnosis of melanoma, of which 108 were performed for initial staging. Thirty-one patients were excluded, and a final sample of 77 patients remained. A ROC curve analysis was performed to establish an optimal cut-off point. A survival analysis was performed, considering death assignable to melanoma as the main event, for the evaluation of its prognostic value. Forty-seven (61.04%) of all 77 patients selected were men, and 11 (14.29%) had a positive PET-CT result. Mean age was 65.17±15.00 years. The median BT in patients with a negative PET-CT result was 2.75 mm (IQR 1.83-4.50) and in the positive group 6.25 mm (IQR 5.40-7.50) (P=.0013). In the ROC curve analysis (AUC 0.804, SE 0.054), an optimal value of 5 mm BT with the following values was obtained: sensitivity 90.91%, specificity 78.79%, negative predictive value (NPV) 98.1%, positive predictive value (PPV) 41.7%, diagnostic OR 37.1, and accuracy 80.52%. Mean follow-up was 18.66±14,35 months, detecting 2/53 (3.77%) deaths in the BT<5 mm group, and 7/24 (29.17%) in the BT≥5 mm group. Survival curves between both groups were significantly different (P=.0013). A 5 mm cut-off point correctly distinguishes those patients with positive PET-CT from those with negative results in the early stages of cutaneous melanoma; therefore it could be included in initial staging of this subgroup of patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  17. Laser pointing camera: a valuable tool for the LGS-AO operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrone, M.; Bonaccini Calia, D.; Pedichini, F.; Cerruto, A.; Ricciardi, A.; Ambrosino, F.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the design, functionalities and commissioning results of the Laser Pointing Camera, developed at INAF-OAR in collaboration with ESO and Astrel for the 4LGSF of the ESO Adaptive Optics Facility. The LPC has proven a fundamental tool during commissioning and operation of the 4LGSF. It allows to calibrate the pointing and focusing models of the four LGS, to reduce to zero the overhead time for the open-loop acquisition of the LGS in the wavefront sensor. During LGS-AO operation it collects regularly the LGS photometry, the LGS fwhm and the cirrus clouds scattering levels. By recognizing via astrometric software the field stars as well as the multiple LGS, LPC is insensitive to flexures of the laser launch telescope or of the receiver telescope opto-mechanics. We present the Commissioning results of the Laser Pointing Camera, obtained at the ESO VLT during the all 4LGSF Laser Guide Star Units Commissioning, and will discuss its possible extension for the ELT operations.

  18. Age-stratified cut-off points for the nocturnal penile tumescence measurement using Nocturnal Electrobioimpedance Volumetric Assessment (NEVA(®) ) in sexually active healthy men.

    PubMed

    Tok, A; Eminaga, O; Burghaus, L; Herden, J; Akbarov, I; Engelmann, U; Wille, S

    2016-08-01

    The current nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) measurement is based on standard cut-off levels defined regardless of age. This study was conducted to provide age-stratified cut-off points for NPT measurement. Forty sexually active healthy men between 20 and 60 years old were enrolled and divided equally into four groups defined by age (20-29, 30-39, 40-49 and 50-60 years.). None of the candidates had sexual dysfunction or sleep disturbance or used supportive medication to enhance sexual function. Erectile function was evaluated by using the 5-item version of the international index of erectile function (IIEF-5). NPT was observed using the nocturnal electrobioimpedance volumetric assessment (NEVA(®) ). The NPT values of healthy men aged 20-60 years varied from 268.7% to 202.3%. The NPT differed significantly between age groups (P < 0.0009); however, no significant differences between men aged 30-39 and 40-49 (P = 0.593) were observed. Age was weakly associated with IIEF-5 scores (P = 0.004), whereas a strong and negative correlation between age and NPT (P < 0.0001) was found. IEF-5 scores were not significantly associated with NPT (P = 0.95). Therefore, the standard values for NPT testing should be considered in the evaluation of the nocturnal penile activity of men of all ages. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. The Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale: psychometric features within a clinical population and a cut-off point to differentiate clinical patients from healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Krabbenborg, Manon A M; Danner, Unna N; Larsen, Junilla K; van der Veer, Nienke; van Elburg, Annemarie A; de Ridder, Denise T D; Evers, Catharine; Stice, Eric; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2012-07-01

    The Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (EDDS) is a brief self-report measure for diagnosing anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. Research has provided evidence of the reliability and validity of this scale in non-clinical populations. Our study is the first to examine the psychometric features of the EDDS in a clinical population of eating disordered patients. We identified a cut-off point that differentiates clinical patients from healthy controls. A clinical group of 59 Dutch female eating disordered patients and a control group of 45 Dutch students completed the EDDS, the Eating Disorder Examination Interview, the Body Attitude Test and the Beck Depression Inventory--II. The EDDS showed good test-retest reliability, internal consistency, criterion validity and convergent validity with other scales assessing eating and general pathology. An overall symptom composite cut-off score of 16.5 accurately distinguished clinical patients from healthy controls. The EDDS may be a useful instrument in clinical settings and in aetiologic, prevention and treatment research.

  20. CUTTING AND WEDGING JACKET REMOVER

    DOEpatents

    Freedman, M.; Raynor, S.

    1959-04-01

    A tool is presented for stripping cladded jackets from fissionable fuel elements. The tool is a tube which fits closely around the jacket and which has two cutting edges at opposite sides of one end. These cutting edges are adjusted to penetrate only the jacket so that by moving the edges downward the jacket is cut into two pieces.

  1. Stress analysis and design considerations for Shuttle pointed autonomous research tool for astronomy /SPARTAN/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferragut, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    The Shuttle Pointed Autonomous Research Tool for Astronomy (SPARTAN) family of spacecraft are intended to operate with minimum interfaces with the U.S. Space Shuttle in order to increase flight opportunities. The SPARTAN I Spacecraft was designed to enhance structural capabilities and increase reliability. The approach followed results from work experience which evolved from sounding rocket projects. Structural models were developed to do the analyses necessary to satisfy safety requirements for Shuttle hardware. A loads analysis must also be performed. Stress analysis calculations will be performed on the main structural elements and subcomponents. Attention is given to design considerations and program definition, the schematic representation of a finite element model used for SPARTAN I spacecraft, details of loads analysis, the stress analysis, and fracture mechanics plan implications.

  2. PointCloudXplore: a visualization tool for 3D gene expressiondata

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Fowlkes,Charles C.; Luengo Hendriks, Cristian L.; Simirenko, Lisa; Shah, NameetaY.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggn, Mark D.; Hagen, Hans; Sudar, Damir J.; Malik, Jitendra; Knowles, David W.; Hamann, Bernd

    2006-10-01

    The Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project (BDTNP) has developed a suite of methods that support quantitative, computational analysis of three-dimensional (3D) gene expression patterns with cellular resolution in early Drosophila embryos, aiming at a more in-depth understanding of gene regulatory networks. We describe a new tool, called PointCloudXplore (PCX), that supports effective 3D gene expression data exploration. PCX is a visualization tool that uses the established visualization techniques of multiple views, brushing, and linking to support the analysis of high-dimensional datasets that describe many genes' expression. Each of the views in PointCloudXplore shows a different gene expression data property. Brushing is used to select and emphasize data associated with defined subsets of embryo cells within a view. Linking is used to show in additional views the expression data for a group of cells that have first been highlighted as a brush in a single view, allowing further data subset properties to be determined. In PCX, physical views of the data are linked to abstract data displays such as parallel coordinates. Physical views show the spatial relationships between different genes' expression patterns within an embryo. Abstract gene expression data displays on the other hand allow for an analysis of relationships between different genes directly in the gene expression space. We discuss on parallel coordinates as one example abstract data view currently available in PCX. We have developed several extensions to standard parallel coordinates to facilitate brushing and the visualization of 3D gene expression data.

  3. About one algorithm of the broken line approximation and a modeling of tool path for CNC plate cutting machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennov, D. V.; Petunin, A. A.; Repnitskii, V. B.; Shipacheva, E. N.

    2016-12-01

    The problem of approximating two-dimensional broken line with composite curve consisting of arc and line segments is considered. The resulting curve nodes have to coincide with source broken line nodes. This problem arises in the development of control programs for CNC (computer numerical control) cutting machines, permitting circular interpolation. An original algorithm is proposed minimizing the number of nodes for resulting composite curve. The algorithm is implemented in the environment of the Russian CAD system T-Flex CAD using its API (Application Program Interface). The algorithm optimality is investigated. The result of test calculation along with its geometrical visualization is given.

  4. Beyond Jeopardy and Lectures: Using "Microsoft PowerPoint" as a Game Design Tool to Teach Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siko, Jason; Barbour, Michael; Toker, Sacip

    2011-01-01

    To date, research involving homemade PowerPoint games as an instructional tool has not shown statistically significant gains in student performance. This paper examines the results of a study comparing the performance of students in a high school chemistry course who created homemade PowerPoint games as a test review with the students who used a…

  5. A survey of ground operations tools developed to simulate the pointing of space telescopes and the design for WISE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabinsky, Beth

    2006-01-01

    WISE, the Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer, is scheduled for launch in June 2010. The mission operations system for WISE requires a software modeling tool to help plan, integrate and simulate all spacecraft pointing and verify that no attitude constraints are violated. In the course of developing the requirements for this tool, an investigation was conducted into the design of similar tools for other space-based telescopes. This paper summarizes the ground software and processes used to plan and validate pointing for a selection of space telescopes; with this information as background, the design for WISE is presented.

  6. Laser cutting of various materials: Kerf width size analysis and life cycle assessment of cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shaukat, Mian Mobeen; Ashraf, Farhan

    2017-08-01

    Laser cutting of various materials including Ti-6Al-4V alloy, steel 304, Inconel 625, and alumina is carried out to assess the kerf width size variation along the cut section. The life cycle assessment is carried out to determine the environmental impact of the laser cutting in terms of the material waste during the cutting process. The kerf width size is formulated and predicted using the lump parameter analysis and it is measured from the experiments. The influence of laser output power and laser cutting speed on the kerf width size variation is analyzed using the analytical tools including scanning electron and optical microscopes. In the experiments, high pressure nitrogen assisting gas is used to prevent oxidation reactions in the cutting section. It is found that the kerf width size predicted from the lump parameter analysis agrees well with the experimental data. The kerf width size variation increases with increasing laser output power. However, this behavior reverses with increasing laser cutting speed. The life cycle assessment reveals that material selection for laser cutting is critical for the environmental protection point of view. Inconel 625 contributes the most to the environmental damages; however, recycling of the waste of the laser cutting reduces this contribution.

  7. Joint-Angle Coordination Patterns Ensure Stabilization of a Body-Plus-Tool System in Point-to-Point Movements with a Rod.

    PubMed

    Valk, Tim A; Mouton, Leonora J; Bongers, Raoul M

    2016-01-01

    When performing a goal-directed action with a tool, it is generally assumed that the point of control of the action system is displaced from the hand to the tool, implying that body and tool function as one system. Studies of how actions with tools are performed have been limited to studying either end-effector kinematics or joint-angle coordination patterns. Because joint-angle coordination patterns affect end-effector kinematics, the current study examined them together, with the aim of revealing how body and tool function as one system. Seated participants made point-to-point movements with their index finger, and with rods of 10, 20, and 30 cm attached to their index finger. Start point and target were presented on a table in front of them, and in half of the conditions a participant displacement compensated for rod length. Results revealed that the kinematics of the rod's tip showed higher peak velocity, longer deceleration time, and more curvature with longer rods. End-effector movements were more curved in the horizontal plane when participants were not displaced. Joint-angle trajectories were similar across rod lengths when participants were displaced, whereas more extreme joint-angles were used with longer rods when participants were not displaced. Furthermore, in every condition the end-effector was stabilized to a similar extent; both variability in joint-angle coordination patterns that affected end-effector position and variability that did not affect end-effector position increased in a similar way vis-à-vis rod length. Moreover, the increase was higher in those conditions, in which participants were not displaced. This suggests that during tool use, body and tool are united in a single system so as to stabilize the end-effector kinematics in a similar way that is independent of tool length. In addition, the properties of the actual trajectory of the end-effector, as well as the actual joint-angles used, depend on the length of the tool and the

  8. Do pencil-point spinal needles decrease the incidence of postdural puncture headache in reality? A comparative study between pencil-point 25G Whitacre and cutting-beveled 25G Quincke spinal needles in 320 obstetric patients

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Anirban; Acharya, Amita; Pal, Nidhi Dawar; Dawn, Satrajit; Biswas, Jhuma

    2011-01-01

    Background: Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) is a distressing complication of the subarachnoid block. The previous studies conducted, including the recent ones, do not conclusively prove that pencil-point spinal needles decrease the incidence of PDPH. In this study, we have tried to find out whether a pencil-point Whitacre needle is a better alternative than the classic cutting beveled, commonly used, Quincke spinal needle, in patients at risk of PDPH. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and twenty obstetric patients, 20-36 years of age, ASA I and II, posted for Cesarean section under subarachnoid block, were randomly assigned into two groups W and Q, where 25G Whitacre and 25G Quincke spinal needles were used, respectively. The primary objective of the study was to find out the difference in incidence of PDPH, if any, between the two groups, by using the t test and Chi square test. Results: The incidence of PDPH was 5% in group W and 28.12% in group Q, and the difference in incidence was statistically significant (P<0.001). Conclusion: The pencil-point 25G Whitacre spinal needle causes less incidence of PDPH compared to the classic 25G Quincke needle, and is recommended for use in patients at risk of PDPH. PMID:25885381

  9. Scholarly activity points: a new tool to evaluate resident scholarly productivity.

    PubMed

    Emerick, T; Metro, D; Patel, R; Sakai, T

    2013-09-01

    Scholarly activity is an important aspect of a resident's educational experience; however, evaluation methods have remained underdeveloped despite the increased focus over the last decade. A new scoring system is proposed as a comprehensive evaluation tool. In this scoring system, each scholarly activity (i.e. abstracts, manuscripts, book chapters, research protocols, and research grants) are converted into a numerical score, Scholarly Activity Points (SAPs), which reflects the complexity of the project and the degree of resident's involvement. First, a relative weight value is given to each scholarly category based on its complexity (i.e. 50 points to an abstract, 150 to a manuscript). Then SAPs are calculated with modifiers specific to each scholarly activity (i.e. for an abstract, meeting venue, repeated presentation, authorship, abstract category, and awards). To demonstrate how the system works, a list of scholarly activities by anaesthesia residents graduating from a university programme between 2003 and 2010 was obtained. SAP scores of graduating classes were analysed. During the 2003-2010 academic years, a total of 106 residents (the mean of 13 per class, ranging from 9 to 19) graduated from the full 3 yr residency programme. The SAP system allowed statistical comparison among the graduated classes of overall scholarly productivity; significant increases were noted in the average SAPs per resident among the classes of 2009 {154 (204), [mean (sd)]} and 2010 [524 (471)] compared with those by the classes of 2003-2006 [90 (188), 45 (73), 126 (349), 83 (205), respectively]. A new scoring system enabled a comprehensive statistical evaluation of residents' scholarly productivity.

  10. The 5-point Investigator's Global Assessment (IGA) Scale: A modified tool for evaluating plaque psoriasis severity in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Langley, Richard G B; Feldman, Steven R; Nyirady, Judit; van de Kerkhof, Peter; Papavassilis, Charis

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate new psoriasis treatments, clinicians, regulators and pharmaceutical developers require well-accepted, clinically meaningful measures of disease severity. The Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score is most widely used as a primary endpoint in clinical trials, although it is not routinely used in clinical practice. Characterize a 5-point Investigator's Global Assessment (IGA) tool and evaluate whether it meets the needs for a valid, clinically meaningful measure. A 5-point IGA tool was developed with input from regulatory authorities and clinical trial investigators involved with psoriasis drug development and evaluation. Associations between IGA 0/1 responder rates and PASI scores were evaluated using data from two phase 2 studies with the anti-interleukin (IL)-17A monoclonal antibody secukinumab (AIN457) that utilized a similar 6-point IGA. The 5-point IGA has a more stringent definition for a score of 1 ("almost clear") compared with 6-point IGA/Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) tools used in previous trials of other biologics in moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Whereas IGA/PGA 0/1 responder rates for earlier scales are strongly associated with PASI 75, the IGA 0/1 rate for the secukinumab 6-point scale was more robust, demonstrating a strong association with PASI 90, and the results for the 5-point IGA are expected to show the same association. The 5-point IGA is a valid measure of disease severity and meets the need for a clinically meaningful measure of success for psoriasis treatment studies.

  11. Starting Trees from Cuttings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a procedure for starting tree cuttings from woody plants, explaining "lag time," recommending materials, and giving step-by-step instructions for rooting and planting. Points out species which are likely candidates for cuttings and provides tips for teachers for developing a unit. (JM)

  12. CaFE: a tool for binding affinity prediction using end-point free energy methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Hou, Tingjun

    2016-07-15

    Accurate prediction of binding free energy is of particular importance to computational biology and structure-based drug design. Among those methods for binding affinity predictions, the end-point approaches, such as MM/PBSA and LIE, have been widely used because they can achieve a good balance between prediction accuracy and computational cost. Here we present an easy-to-use pipeline tool named Calculation of Free Energy (CaFE) to conduct MM/PBSA and LIE calculations. Powered by the VMD and NAMD programs, CaFE is able to handle numerous static coordinate and molecular dynamics trajectory file formats generated by different molecular simulation packages and supports various force field parameters. CaFE source code and documentation are freely available under the GNU General Public License via GitHub at https://github.com/huiliucode/cafe_plugin It is a VMD plugin written in Tcl and the usage is platform-independent. tingjunhou@zju.edu.cn. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. The effect of cutting conditions on power inputs when machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrushin, S. I.; Gruby, S. V.; Nosirsoda, Sh C.

    2016-08-01

    Any technological process involving modification of material properties or product form necessitates consumption of a certain power amount. When developing new technologies one should take into account the benefits of their implementation vs. arising power inputs. It is revealed that procedures of edge cutting machining are the most energy-efficient amongst the present day forming procedures such as physical and technical methods including electrochemical, electroerosion, ultrasound, and laser processing, rapid prototyping technologies etc, such as physical and technical methods including electrochemical, electroerosion, ultrasound, and laser processing, rapid prototyping technologies etc. An expanded formula for calculation of power inputs is deduced, which takes into consideration the mode of cutting together with the tip radius, the form of the replaceable multifaceted insert and its wear. Having taken as an example cutting of graphite iron by the assembled cutting tools with replaceable multifaceted inserts the authors point at better power efficiency of high feeding cutting in comparison with high-speed cutting.

  14. INTERNAL CUTTING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Russell, W.H. Jr.

    1959-06-30

    A device is described for removing material from the interior of a hollow workpiece so as to form a true spherical internal surface in a workpiece, or to cut radial slots of an adjustable constant depth in an already established spherical internal surface. This is accomplished by a spring loaded cutting tool adapted to move axially wherein the entire force urging the tool against the workpiece is derived from the spring. Further features of importance involve the provision of a seal between the workpiece and the cutting device and a suction device for carrying away particles of removed material.

  15. In-situ fabricated TiB2 particle-whisker synergistically toughened Ti(C, N)-based ceramic cutting tool material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanlian; Shi, Qiang; Huang, Chuanzhen; Zou, Bin; Xu, Liang; Wang, Jun

    2015-03-01

    The mechanical properties of ceramic cutting tool materials can be modified by introducing proper content of nanoparticles or whiskers. However, the process of adding whiskers or nanoparticles has the disadvantages of high cost and health hazard as well as the agglomeration; although a new in-situ two-step sintering process can solve the above problems to some extent, yet the problems of low conversion ratio of the raw materials and the abnormal grain growth exist in this process. In this paper, an in-situ one-step synthesis technology is proposed, which means the growth of whiskers or nanoparticles and the sintering of the compact can be accomplished by one time in furnace. A kind of Ti(C, N)-based ceramic cutting tool material synergistically toughened by TiB2 particles and whiskers is fabricated with this new process. The phase compositions, relationships between microstructure and mechanical properties as well as the toughening mechanisms are analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The composite which is sintered under a pressure of 32 MPa at a temperature of 1700°C in vacuum holding for 60 min can get the optimal mechanical properties. Its flexural strength, fracture toughness and Vickers hardness are 540 MPa, 7.81 MPa · m1/2 and 20.42 GPa, respectively. The composite has relatively high density, and the in-situ synthesized TiB2 whiskers have good surface integrity, which is beneficial for the improvement of the fracture toughness. It is concluded that the main toughening mechanisms of the present composite are whiskers pulling-out and crack deflection induced by whiskers, crack bridging by whiskers/particles and multi-scale particles synergistically toughening. This study proposes an in-situ one-step synthesis technology which can be well used for fabricating particles and whiskers synergistically toughened ceramic tool materials.

  16. Revised GH and cortisol cut-points for the glucagon stimulation test in the evaluation of GH and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axes in adults: results from a prospective randomized multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Hamrahian, Amir H; Yuen, Kevin C J; Gordon, Murray B; Pulaski-Liebert, Karen J; Bena, James; Biller, Beverly M K

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies suggest using lower GH cut-points for the glucagon stimulation test (GST) in diagnosing adult GH deficiency (GHD), especially in obese patients. There are limited data on evaluating GH and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axes using weight-based dosing for the GST. To define GH and cortisol cut-points to diagnose adult GHD and secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) using the GST, and to compare fixed-dose (FD: 1 or 1.5 mg in patients >90 kg) with weight-based dosing (WB: 0.03 mg/kg). Response to the insulin tolerance test (ITT) was considered the gold standard, using GH and cortisol cut-points of ≥3 ng/ml and ≥18 µg/dL, respectively. 28 Patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disease and 1-2 (n = 14) or ≥3 (n = 14) pituitary hormone deficiencies, and 14 control subjects matched for age, sex, estrogen status and body mass index (BMI) underwent the ITT, FD- and WB-GST in random order. Age, sex ratio and BMI were comparable between the three groups. The best GH cut-point for diagnosis of GHD was 1.0 (92 % sensitivity, 100 % specificity) and 2.0 ng/mL (96 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity) for FD- and WB-GST, respectively. Age negatively correlated with peak GH during FD-GST (r = -0.32, P = 0.04), but not WB-GST. The best cortisol cut-point for diagnosis of SAI was 8.8 µg/dL (92 % sensitivity, 100 % specificity) and 11.2 µg/dL (92 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity) for FD-GST and WB-GST, respectively. Nausea was the most common side effect, and one patient had a seizure during the FD-GST. The GST correctly classified GHD using GH cut-points of 1 ng/ml for FD-GST and 2 ng/ml for WB-GST, hence using 3 ng/ml as the GH cut-point will misclassify some GH-sufficient adults. The GST may also be an acceptable alternative to the ITT for evaluating the HPA axis utilizing cortisol cut-points of 9 µg/dL for FD-GST and 11 µg/dL for WB-GST.

  17. Breadth of Coverage, Ease of Use, and Quality of Mobile Point-of-Care Tool Information Summaries: An Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jinma

    2016-01-01

    Background With advances in mobile technology, accessibility of clinical resources at the point of care has increased. Objective The objective of this research was to identify if six selected mobile point-of-care tools meet the needs of clinicians in internal medicine. Point-of-care tools were evaluated for breadth of coverage, ease of use, and quality. Methods Six point-of-care tools were evaluated utilizing four different devices (two smartphones and two tablets). Breadth of coverage was measured using select International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes if information on summary, etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis was provided. Quality measures included treatment and diagnostic inline references and individual and application time stamping. Ease of use covered search within topic, table of contents, scrolling, affordance, connectivity, and personal accounts. Analysis of variance based on the rank of score was used. Results Breadth of coverage was similar among Medscape (mean 6.88), Uptodate (mean 6.51), DynaMedPlus (mean 6.46), and EvidencePlus (mean 6.41) (P>.05) with DynaMed (mean 5.53) and Epocrates (mean 6.12) scoring significantly lower (P<.05). Ease of use had DynaMedPlus with the highest score, and EvidencePlus was lowest (6.0 vs 4.0, respectively, P<.05). For quality, reviewers rated the same score (4.00) for all tools except for Medscape, which was rated lower (P<.05). Conclusions For breadth of coverage, most point-of-care tools were similar with the exception of DynaMed. For ease of use, only UpToDate and DynaMedPlus allow for search within a topic. All point-of-care tools have remote access with the exception of UpToDate and Essential Evidence Plus. All tools except Medscape covered criteria for quality evaluation. Overall, there was no significant difference between the point-of-care tools with regard to coverage on common topics used by internal medicine clinicians. Selection of

  18. Calibration of response and remission cut-points on the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition for monitoring seasonal affective disorder treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Gloria M; Rohan, Kelly J; Langenberg, Patricia; Snitker, Soren; Postolache, Teodor T

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to define treatment response and remission cut-point scores for the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II) when used to monitor seasonal affective disorder (SAD) treatment. Data from two published randomized clinical trials for SAD were utilized to complete a ROC analysis to define response and remission thresholds for the BDI-II. The Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-Seasonal Affective Disorder Version (SIGH-SAD) was used as a reference standard. Data from the two trials included BDI-II and SIGH-SAD scores for patients at baseline, 6 weeks (post-treatment), and 1 year (next winter). BDI-II score of ≤ 9 was the derived criterion for remission of SAD, and BDI-II score decrease of 50% from baseline was the criterion for treatment response. Study participants were primarily female (94%) and Caucasian (80%) so demographic diversity of the sample was limited. This study validated BDI-II scores compared to the SIGH-SAD reference standard. The BDI-II has greater potential for widespread use by clinicians than the SIGH-SAD to monitor SAD patients because it is a brief self-report instrument that can be conveniently administered in the waiting room. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cut-Off Points for Mild, Moderate, and Severe Pain on the Numeric Rating Scale for Pain in Patients with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: Variability and Influence of Sex and Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Köke, Albère J. A.; Oosterwijk, René F. A.; Swaan, Jeannette L.; Schreurs, Karlein M. G.; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The 0–10 Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) is often used in pain management. The aims of our study were to determine the cut-off points for mild, moderate, and severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain, to measure the variability of the optimal cut-off points, and to determine the influence of patients’ catastrophizing and their sex on these cut-off points. Methods: 2854 patients were included. Pain was assessed by the NRS, functioning by the Pain Disability Index (PDI) and catastrophizing by the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Cut-off point schemes were tested using ANOVAs with and without using the PSC scores or sex as co-variates and with the interaction between CP scheme and PCS score and sex, respectively. The variability of the optimal cut-off point schemes was quantified using bootstrapping procedure. Results and conclusion: The study showed that NRS scores ≤ 5 correspond to mild, scores of 6–7 to moderate and scores ≥8 to severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning. Bootstrapping analysis identified this optimal NRS cut-off point scheme in 90% of the bootstrapping samples. The interpretation of the NRS is independent of sex, but seems to depend on catastrophizing. In patients with high catastrophizing tendency, the optimal cut-off point scheme equals that for the total study sample, but in patients with a low catastrophizing tendency, NRS scores ≤ 3 correspond to mild, scores of 4–6 to moderate and scores ≥7 to severe pain in terms of interference with functioning. In these optimal cut-off schemes, NRS scores of 4 and 5 correspond to moderate interference with functioning for patients with low catastrophizing tendency and to mild interference for patients with high catastrophizing tendency. Theoretically one would therefore expect that among the patients with NRS scores 4 and 5 there would be a higher average PDI score for those with low

  20. Cut-Off Points for Mild, Moderate, and Severe Pain on the Numeric Rating Scale for Pain in Patients with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: Variability and Influence of Sex and Catastrophizing.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Anne M; Stewart, Roy E; Köke, Albère J A; Oosterwijk, René F A; Swaan, Jeannette L; Schreurs, Karlein M G; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The 0-10 Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) is often used in pain management. The aims of our study were to determine the cut-off points for mild, moderate, and severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain, to measure the variability of the optimal cut-off points, and to determine the influence of patients' catastrophizing and their sex on these cut-off points. Methods: 2854 patients were included. Pain was assessed by the NRS, functioning by the Pain Disability Index (PDI) and catastrophizing by the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Cut-off point schemes were tested using ANOVAs with and without using the PSC scores or sex as co-variates and with the interaction between CP scheme and PCS score and sex, respectively. The variability of the optimal cut-off point schemes was quantified using bootstrapping procedure. Results and conclusion: The study showed that NRS scores ≤ 5 correspond to mild, scores of 6-7 to moderate and scores ≥8 to severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning. Bootstrapping analysis identified this optimal NRS cut-off point scheme in 90% of the bootstrapping samples. The interpretation of the NRS is independent of sex, but seems to depend on catastrophizing. In patients with high catastrophizing tendency, the optimal cut-off point scheme equals that for the total study sample, but in patients with a low catastrophizing tendency, NRS scores ≤ 3 correspond to mild, scores of 4-6 to moderate and scores ≥7 to severe pain in terms of interference with functioning. In these optimal cut-off schemes, NRS scores of 4 and 5 correspond to moderate interference with functioning for patients with low catastrophizing tendency and to mild interference for patients with high catastrophizing tendency. Theoretically one would therefore expect that among the patients with NRS scores 4 and 5 there would be a higher average PDI score for those with low

  1. Calculation of the ELISA’s cut-off based on the change-point analysis method for detection of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Bolivian dogs in the absence of controls

    PubMed Central

    Lardeux, Frédéric; Torrico, Gino; Aliaga, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    In ELISAs, sera of individuals infected by Trypanosoma cruzi show absorbance values above a cut-off value. The cut-off is generally computed by means of formulas that need absorbance readings of negative (and sometimes positive) controls, which are included in the titer plates amongst the unknown samples. When no controls are available, other techniques should be employed such as change-point analysis. The method was applied to Bolivian dog sera processed by ELISA to diagnose T. cruzi infection. In each titer plate, the change-point analysis estimated a step point which correctly discriminated among known positive and known negative sera, unlike some of the six usual cut-off formulas tested. To analyse the ELISAs results, the change-point method was as good as the usual cut-off formula of the form “mean + 3 standard deviation of negative controls”. Change-point analysis is therefore an efficient alternative method to analyse ELISA absorbance values when no controls are available. PMID:27384081

  2. Reducing silica and dust exposures in construction during use of powered concrete-cutting hand tools: efficacy of local exhaust ventilation on hammer drills.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, S; Woskie, S R; Holcroft, C; Ellenbecker, M

    2009-01-01

    Concrete cutting in construction is a major source of exposure to respirable crystalline silica. To reduce exposures, local exhaust ventilation (LEV) may be integrated into the hand tools used in concrete cutting. Volunteers from the New England Laborers Training Center participated in a field study focused on the use of LEV on concrete-cutting hammer drills. A randomized block design field experiment employing four workers measured the efficacy of four hood-vacuum source combinations compared with no LEV in reducing dust and silica exposures. Using four-stage personal cascade impactors (Marple 294) to measure dust exposure, a total of 18 personal samples were collected. Reductions of over 80% in all three biologically relevant size fractions of dust (inhalable, thoracic, and respirable) were obtained by using any combination of hood and vacuum source. This study found that respirable dust concentrations were reduced from 3.77 mg/m(3) to a range of 0.242 to 0.370 mg/m(3); thoracic dust concentrations from 12.5 mg/m(3) to a range of 0.774 to 1.23 mg/m(3); and inhalable dust concentration from 47.2 mg/m(3) to a range of 2.13 to 6.09 mg/m(3). Silica concentrations were reduced from 0.308 mg/m(3) to a range of 0.006 to 0.028 mg/m(3) in the respirable size fraction, from 0.821 mg/m(3) to a range of 0.043 to 0.090 mg/m(3) in the thoracic size fraction, and from 2.71 mg/m(3) to a range of 0.124 to 0.403 mg/m(3) in the inhalable size fraction. Reductions in dust concentrations while using the four LEV systems were not statistically significantly different from each other.

  3. Analysis of Accuracy in Pointing with Redundant Hand-held Tools: A Geometric Approach to the Uncontrolled Manifold Method

    PubMed Central

    Campolo, Domenico; Widjaja, Ferdinan; Xu, Hong; Ang, Wei Tech; Burdet, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    This work introduces a coordinate-independent method to analyse movement variability of tasks performed with hand-held tools, such as a pen or a surgical scalpel. We extend the classical uncontrolled manifold (UCM) approach by exploiting the geometry of rigid body motions, used to describe tool configurations. In particular, we analyse variability during a static pointing task with a hand-held tool, where subjects are asked to keep the tool tip in steady contact with another object. In this case the tool is redundant with respect to the task, as subjects control position/orientation of the tool, i.e. 6 degrees-of-freedom (dof), to maintain the tool tip position (3dof) steady. To test the new method, subjects performed a pointing task with and without arm support. The additional dof introduced in the unsupported condition, injecting more variability into the system, represented a resource to minimise variability in the task space via coordinated motion. The results show that all of the seven subjects channeled more variability along directions not directly affecting the task (UCM), consistent with previous literature but now shown in a coordinate-independent way. Variability in the unsupported condition was only slightly larger at the endpoint but much larger in the UCM. PMID:23592956

  4. X-Z-Theta cutting method

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, L.F.

    1993-01-12

    A method for machining a workpiece. The method includes the use of a rotary cutting tool mounted on the end of a movable arm. The arm is adapted to move in a plane perpendicular to the axis of rotation of the cutting tool. The cutting tool has cutting teeth to cut chips of material off of the workpiece in a predetermined size and shape to facilitate better removal of the chips from the workpiece. The teeth can be of different type and length to permit the tool to both rough cut and finish cut the workpiece during machining. The total depth of cut is divided by the number of tool teeth, so that the longest tool always performs the finishing cut.

  5. The Optimal Ethnic-Specific Waist-Circumference Cut-Off Points of Metabolic Syndrome among Low-Income Rural Uyghur Adults in Far Western China and Implications in Preventive Public Health.

    PubMed

    He, Jia; Ma, Rulin; Liu, Jiaming; Zhang, Mei; Ding, Yusong; Guo, Heng; Mu, Lati; Zhang, Jingyu; Wei, Bin; Yan, Yizhong; Ma, Jiaolong; Pang, Hongrui; Li, Shugang; Guo, Shuxia

    2017-02-08

    Background: Metabolic syndrome is pandemic; however, the cut-off values for waist circumference (WC) vary widely depending on the ethnic groups studied and the criteria applied for WC measurement. Previous studies for defining optimal WC cut-off points included high-income and urban settings, and did not cover low-income, rural settings, especially for ethnic minorities. This study aimed at defining optimal ethnic-specific WC cut-off points in a low-income, rural population comprising the largest inhabitant minority group residing in far Western China. Methods: Questionnaire-based surveys, physical examinations, and blood testing of 3542 individuals were conducted in 2010, using a stratified cluster random sampling method in rural Uyghur residents (≥18 years old) from 12 villages in Xinjiang, China, approximately 4407 km away from the capital city, Beijing. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Optimal, ethnic-specific WC cut-off values for diagnosing metabolic syndrome were determined using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: As WC increased, there was a significant, increasing trend of detection and risk in rural Uyghur adults, regardless of the presence of ≥1 or ≥2 components of metabolic syndrome by IDF criteria. The optimal ethnic-specific WC cut-off point to predict the presence of metabolic syndrome was 85 cm for men and 82 cm for women. With these cut-off points, the prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome among men, women, and overall population in Uyghur adults were 19.5%, 23.0%, and 21.3%, respectively. Conclusions: We report a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome, especially in women, among rural Uyghurs in Western China. A WC cut-off of 85 cm in men and 82 cm in women was the best predictor of metabolic syndrome in this population. Because of the cost-effectiveness in measuring WC, we recommend that these WC cut-off points be integrated into local preventive

  6. The Optimal Ethnic-Specific Waist-Circumference Cut-Off Points of Metabolic Syndrome among Low-Income Rural Uyghur Adults in Far Western China and Implications in Preventive Public Health

    PubMed Central

    He, Jia; Ma, Rulin; Liu, Jiaming; Zhang, Mei; Ding, Yusong; Guo, Heng; Mu, Lati; Zhang, Jingyu; Wei, Bin; Yan, Yizhong; Ma, Jiaolong; Pang, Hongrui; Li, Shugang; Guo, Shuxia

    2017-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome is pandemic; however, the cut-off values for waist circumference (WC) vary widely depending on the ethnic groups studied and the criteria applied for WC measurement. Previous studies for defining optimal WC cut-off points included high-income and urban settings, and did not cover low-income, rural settings, especially for ethnic minorities. This study aimed at defining optimal ethnic-specific WC cut-off points in a low-income, rural population comprising the largest inhabitant minority group residing in far Western China. Methods: Questionnaire-based surveys, physical examinations, and blood testing of 3542 individuals were conducted in 2010, using a stratified cluster random sampling method in rural Uyghur residents (≥18 years old) from 12 villages in Xinjiang, China, approximately 4407 km away from the capital city, Beijing. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Optimal, ethnic-specific WC cut-off values for diagnosing metabolic syndrome were determined using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: As WC increased, there was a significant, increasing trend of detection and risk in rural Uyghur adults, regardless of the presence of ≥1 or ≥2 components of metabolic syndrome by IDF criteria. The optimal ethnic-specific WC cut-off point to predict the presence of metabolic syndrome was 85 cm for men and 82 cm for women. With these cut-off points, the prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome among men, women, and overall population in Uyghur adults were 19.5%, 23.0%, and 21.3%, respectively. Conclusions: We report a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome, especially in women, among rural Uyghurs in Western China. A WC cut-off of 85 cm in men and 82 cm in women was the best predictor of metabolic syndrome in this population. Because of the cost-effectiveness in measuring WC, we recommend that these WC cut-off points be integrated into local preventive

  7. Specific Energy as an Index to Identify the Critical Failure Mode Transition Depth in Rock Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xianqun; Xu, Chaoshui

    2016-04-01

    Rock cutting typically involves driving a rigid cutter across the rock surface at certain depth of cut and is used to remove rock material in various engineering applications. It has been established that there exist two distinct failure modes in rock cutting, i.e. ductile mode and brittle mode. The ductile mode takes precedence when the cut is shallow and the increase in the depth of cut leads to rock failure gradually shifted to brittle-dominant mode. The threshold depth or the critical transition depth, at which rock failure under cutting changes from the ductile to the brittle mode, is associated with not only the rock properties but also the cutting operational parameters and the understanding of this threshold is important to optimise the tool design and operational parameters. In this study, a new method termed the specific cutting energy transition model is proposed from an energy perspective which is demonstrated to be much more effective in identifying the critical transition depth compared with existing approaches. In the ductile failure cutting mode, the specific cutting energy is found to be independent of the depth of cut; but in the brittle failure cutting mode, the specific cutting energy is found to be dependent on the depth of cut following a power-law relationship. The critical transition depth is identified as the intersection point between these two relationships. Experimental tests on two types of rocks with different combinations of cutting velocity, depth of cut and back rake angle are conducted and the application of the proposed model on these cutting datasets has demonstrated that the model can provide a very effective tool to analyse the cutting mechanism and to identify the critical transition depth.

  8. Personal Digital Assistants as Point-of-Care Tools in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qadri, Syeda S.; Wang, Jia; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Roos, Bernard A.

    2009-01-01

    This study used both survey and interview questionnaires. It was designed to assess the feasibility, usability, and utility of two point-of-care tools especially prepared with information relevant for dementia care by staff nurses in a small, a medium-sized, and a large nursing home in Florida. Twenty-five LPN or RN nurses were recruited for the…

  9. Python Spectral Analysis Tool (PySAT) for Preprocessing, Multivariate Analysis, and Machine Learning with Point Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. B.; Finch, N.; Clegg, S.; Graff, T.; Morris, R. V.; Laura, J.

    2017-06-01

    We present a Python-based library and graphical interface for the analysis of point spectra. The tool is being developed with a focus on methods used for ChemCam data, but is flexible enough to handle spectra from other instruments.

  10. The Significance of Body Mass Index in Calculating the Cut-Off Points for Low Muscle Mass in the Elderly: Methodological Issues

    PubMed Central

    Dworak, Lechoslaw B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Cut-off points (COPs) for appendicular lean mass (ALM) index, essential to define low muscle mass (LMM) in the elderly, have never been officially defined for Poland. The aim of the study was to establish them. Additionally, the significance of body mass index (BMI) for correctly defining the COPs in a young, healthy reference group was assessed. Methods. The study was composed of reference group (n = 1113) and the elderly group (n = 200). In all subjects, body composition was assessed by bioimpedance analysis, and ALM index was calculated. Next, COPs (kg/m2) were set up for the whole reference group and for particular subgroups with different BMIs separately. They were used to diagnose sarcopenia in the elderly. Results. COP for all young females was 5.37 (COP-F), while it was equal to 5.52 (COP-F2) when only those with a recommended BMI (18.50–24.99 kg/m2) were taken into consideration. For males, it was 7.32 and 7.29, respectively. Only 7% of elderly females had LMM based on COP-F and 15% had LMM based on COP-F2 (P < 0.05); for males, the percentages were 18% and 16%, respectively. Conclusions. COPs for LMM for Poland are 5.52 kg/m2 (females) and 7.29 kg/m2 (males). The reference group BMI is an important factor in establishing COPs for low muscle mass. PMID:25506592

  11. A Novel Mobile Testing Equipment for Rock Cuttability Assessment: Vertical Rock Cutting Rig (VRCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasar, Serdar; Yilmaz, Ali Osman

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a new mobile rock cutting testing apparatus was designed and produced for rock cuttability assessment called vertical rock cutting rig (VRCR) which was designed specially to fit into hydraulic press testing equipment which are available in almost every rock mechanics laboratory. Rock cutting trials were initiated just after the production of VRCR along with calibration of the measuring load cell with an external load cell to validate the recorded force data. Then, controlled rock cutting tests with both relieved and unrelieved cutting modes were implemented on five different volcanic rock samples with a standard simple-shaped wedge tool. Additionally, core cutting test which is an important approach for roadheader performance prediction was simulated with VRCR. Mini disc cutters and point attack tools were used for execution of experimental trials. Results clearly showed that rock cutting tests were successfully realized and measuring system is delicate to rock strength, cutting depth and other variables. Core cutting test was successfully simulated, and it was also shown that rock cutting tests with mini disc cutters and point attack tools are also successful with VRCR.

  12. Pointing gestures as a cognitive tool in young children: experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Begoña; Gómez, Juan Carlos; Sarriá, Encarnación

    2011-11-01

    This article explores the possible cognitive function associated with pointing gestures from a Vygotskian perspective. In Study 1, 39 children who were 2-4years of age were observed in a solitary condition while solving a mnemonic task with or without an explicit memory demand. A discriminant analysis showed that children used noncommunicative pointing gestures only in the task with an explicit memory demand. In Study 2, 39 children who were 4-6years of age completed an attentional task with and without the possibility of pointing. An analysis of variance showed that only those children who spontaneously pointed to solve the first task performed significantly worse in a second condition where pointing was impossible. These results suggest that besides its social interactive functions, pointing may also subserve private cognitive functions for children.

  13. Fundamentals of cutting

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J. G.; Patel, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The process of cutting is analysed in fracture mechanics terms with a view to quantifying the various parameters involved. The model used is that of orthogonal cutting with a wedge removing a layer of material or chip. The behaviour of the chip is governed by its thickness and for large radii of curvature the chip is elastic and smooth cutting occurs. For smaller thicknesses, there is a transition, first to plastic bending and then to plastic shear for small thicknesses and smooth chips are formed. The governing parameters are tool geometry, which is principally the wedge angle, and the material properties of elastic modulus, yield stress and fracture toughness. Friction can also be important. It is demonstrated that the cutting process may be quantified via these parameters, which could be useful in the study of cutting in biology. PMID:27274798

  14. Fundamentals of cutting.

    PubMed

    Williams, J G; Patel, Y

    2016-06-06

    The process of cutting is analysed in fracture mechanics terms with a view to quantifying the various parameters involved. The model used is that of orthogonal cutting with a wedge removing a layer of material or chip. The behaviour of the chip is governed by its thickness and for large radii of curvature the chip is elastic and smooth cutting occurs. For smaller thicknesses, there is a transition, first to plastic bending and then to plastic shear for small thicknesses and smooth chips are formed. The governing parameters are tool geometry, which is principally the wedge angle, and the material properties of elastic modulus, yield stress and fracture toughness. Friction can also be important. It is demonstrated that the cutting process may be quantified via these parameters, which could be useful in the study of cutting in biology.

  15. Wear mechanisms of milling inserts: Dry and wet cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, J.; Tung, S.C.; Barber, G.C.

    1998-07-01

    There is less literature on wear of milling tools than on wear of turning tools because milling is one of the most complicated machining operations. The intermittent milling action creates mechanical and thermal surges that distinguish milling from single-point machining. A systematic tool life study for face milling inserts was conducted with and without coolant. Workpieces made of 4140 steel were cut by C5 grade carbide inserts under various cutting conditions. The comparison between dry and wet cutting shows that caution should be taken when applying a coolant for milling operations. Special tests should be carried out in evaluating potential coolant candidates. It is not always true that coolant enhances tool life for milling. Wear mechanisms are presented by means of war maps. Identified wear mechanisms are: micro-attrition, micro-abrasion, mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, thermal pitting, and edge chipping.

  16. Beyond Presentations: Using PowerPoint as an Effective Instructional Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wet, Catharina F.

    2006-01-01

    PowerPoint presentations can be a very effective way of involving all the senses and attention of gifted students. While PowerPoint is a wizard-driven and conceptually easy to use, the use of it should be thought through very carefully--as carefully as any other instructional strategy. Teachers can master the basic principles of effective…

  17. Laser Cutting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    lasers that are optically modified to produce high beam quality at reduced power levels for precision drilling and trepanning. * Nd:YAG lasers with...a smooth, dross-free cut face while the marking consists of a series of precisely placed shallow pits where surface finish and dross are not usually...neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) pulsed cutting data because the technique is considered vital in meeting the detailed precision cutting

  18. A research protocol for developing a Point-Of-Care Key Evidence Tool 'POCKET': a checklist for multidimensional evidence reporting on point-of-care in vitro diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Huddy, Jeremy R; Ni, Melody; Mavroveli, Stella; Barlow, James; Williams, Doris-Ann; Hanna, George B

    2015-07-10

    Point-of-care in vitro diagnostics (POC-IVD) are increasingly becoming widespread as an acceptable means of providing rapid diagnostic results to facilitate decision-making in many clinical pathways. Evidence in utility, usability and cost-effectiveness is currently provided in a fragmented and detached manner that is fraught with methodological challenges given the disruptive nature these tests have on the clinical pathway. The Point-of-care Key Evidence Tool (POCKET) checklist aims to provide an integrated evidence-based framework that incorporates all required evidence to guide the evaluation of POC-IVD to meet the needs of policy and decisionmakers in the National Health Service (NHS). A multimethod approach will be applied in order to develop the POCKET. A thorough literature review has formed the basis of a robust Delphi process and validation study. Semistructured interviews are being undertaken with POC-IVD stakeholders, including industry, regulators, commissioners, clinicians and patients to understand what evidence is required to facilitate decision-making. Emergent themes will be translated into a series of statements to form a survey questionnaire that aims to reach a consensus in each stakeholder group to what needs to be included in the tool. Results will be presented to a workshop to discuss the statements brought forward and the optimal format for the tool. Once assembled, the tool will be field-tested through case studies to ensure validity and usability and inform refinement, if required. The final version will be published online with a call for comments. Limitations include unpredictable sample representation, development of compromise position rather than consensus, and absence of blinding in validation exercise. The Imperial College Joint Research Compliance Office and the Imperial College Hospitals NHS Trust R&D department have approved the protocol. The checklist tool will be disseminated through a PhD thesis, a website, peer

  19. Laser cutting system

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, Thomas J

    2015-03-03

    A workpiece cutting apparatus includes a laser source, a first suction system, and a first finger configured to guide a workpiece as it moves past the laser source. The first finger includes a first end provided adjacent a point where a laser from the laser source cuts the workpiece, and the first end of the first finger includes an aperture in fluid communication with the first suction system.

  20. Exposure Assessment Tools by Approaches - Direct Measurement (Point-of-Contact Measurement)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA ExpoBox is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases, mode

  1. MCNP-REN - A Monte Carlo Tool for Neutron Detector Design Without Using the Point Model

    SciTech Connect

    Abhold, M.E.; Baker, M.C.

    1999-07-25

    The development of neutron detectors makes extensive use of the predictions of detector response through the use of Monte Carlo techniques in conjunction with the point reactor model. Unfortunately, the point reactor model fails to accurately predict detector response in common applications. For this reason, the general Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP) was modified to simulate the pulse streams that would be generated by a neutron detector and normally analyzed by a shift register. This modified code, MCNP - Random Exponentially Distributed Neutron Source (MCNP-REN), along with the Time Analysis Program (TAP) predict neutron detector response without using the point reactor model, making it unnecessary for the user to decide whether or not the assumptions of the point model are met for their application. MCNP-REN is capable of simulating standard neutron coincidence counting as well as neutron multiplicity counting. Measurements of MOX fresh fuel made using the Underwater Coincidence Counter (UWCC) as well as measurements of HEU reactor fuel using the active neutron Research Reactor Fuel Counter (RRFC) are compared with calculations. The method used in MCNP-REN is demonstrated to be fundamentally sound and shown to eliminate the need to use the point model for detector performance predictions.

  2. Precise Countersinking Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Eric S.; Smith, William N.

    1992-01-01

    Tool countersinks holes precisely with only portable drill; does not require costly machine tool. Replaceable pilot stub aligns axis of tool with centerline of hole. Ensures precise cut even with imprecise drill. Designed for relatively low cutting speeds.

  3. The Effect of the Double-Deck Filament Setup on Enhancing the Uniformity of Temperature Field on Long-Flute Cutting Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bin; Chen, Sulin; Cheng, Lei; Sun, Fanghong

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, a double-deck filament setup is proposed for the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) method and an optimization method is presented to determine its optimal geometry that is able to produce a highly uniform temperature field on the whole flute surface of long-flute cutting tools. The optimization method is based on the finite volume method (FVM) simulation and the Taguchi method. The simulation results show that this double-deck filament setup always produce a highly uniform temperature distribution along the filament direction. Comparatively, for the temperature uniformity along the drill axis, the heights of the two filament decks present virtually significant influence, while the separations between the two filaments in either deck exhibit a relative weak effect. An optimized setup is obtained that can produce a highly uniform temperature field with an average temperature of 834°C, a standard deviation (σ) of 2.59°C and a temperature range (R) of 11.75°C. Finally, the precision of the proposed simulation method is verified by an additional temperature measurement. The measured temperature results show that a highly uniform temperature fields with σ/R = 9.6/35.2°C can be generated by the optimized setup and the deviation of the simulated results from the measured actual temperatures are within 0.5-3.5%, which justifies the correctness of the simulation method proposed in present study.

  4. Nonparaxial Fourier propagation tool for aberration analysis and point spread function calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Stephen C.; Watts, Tatsuki

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a Fourier propagator for computing the impulse response of an optical system, while including terms ignored in Fresnel and Fraunhofer calculations. The propagator includes a Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction formula calculation from a distant point through the optical system to its image point predicted by geometric optics. The propagator then approximates the neighboring field points via the traditional binomial approximation of the Taylor series expansion around that field point. This technique results in a propagator that combines the speed of a Fourier transform operation with the accuracy of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction formula calculation and extends Fourier optics to cases that are nonparaxial. The proposed propagator facilitates direct calculation of aberration coefficients, making it more versatile than the angular spectrum propagator. Bounds on the phase error introduced by the approximations are derived, which show that it should be more widely applicable than the Fresnel propagator. Guidance on how to sample the pupil and detector planes of a simulated imaging system is provided. This report concludes by showing examples of diffraction calculations for a laboratory setup and comparing them to measured diffraction patterns to demonstrate the utility of the propagator.

  5. Analysis of 2014 Post UTME Score of Candidates in the University of Ibadan with Two Methods of Standard Setting to Set Cut Off Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oladele, Babatunde

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to analyse the 2014 Post UTME scores of candidates in the university of Ibadan towards the establishment of cut off using two methods of standard settings. Prospective candidates who seek admission to higher institution are often denied admission through the Post UTME exercise. There is no single recommended…

  6. Estimation of Saliva Cotinine Cut-Off Points for Active and Passive Smoking during Pregnancy-Polish Mother and Child Cohort (REPRO_PL).

    PubMed

    Polanska, Kinga; Krol, Anna; Kaluzny, Pawel; Ligocka, Danuta; Mikolajewska, Karolina; Shaheen, Seif; Walton, Robert; Hanke, Wojciech

    2016-12-08

    A reliable assessment of smoking status has significant public health implications and is essential for research purposes. The aim of this study was to determine optimal saliva cotinine cut-off values for smoking during pregnancy. The analyses were based on data from 1771 women from the Polish Mother and Child Cohort. Saliva cotinine concentrations were assessed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI + MS/MS). The saliva cotinine cut-off value for active smoking was established at 10 ng/mL (sensitivity 96%, specificity 95%) and for passive smoking at 1.5 ng/mL (sensitivity 63%, specificity 71%). About 5% of the self-reported non-smoking women were classified as smokers based on the cotinine cut-off value. Significantly more younger, single, and less educated self-reported non-smokers had a cotinine concentration higher than 10 ng/mL compared to those who were older, married, and who had a university degree. Close to 30% of the non-smokers who indicated that smoking was not allowed in their home could be classified as exposed to passive smoking based on the cut-off value. The study suggests that self-reported smoking status is a valid measure of active smoking, whereas in the case of passive smoking, a combination of questionnaire data and biomarker verification may be required.

  7. Estimation of Saliva Cotinine Cut-Off Points for Active and Passive Smoking during Pregnancy—Polish Mother and Child Cohort (REPRO_PL)

    PubMed Central

    Polanska, Kinga; Krol, Anna; Kaluzny, Pawel; Ligocka, Danuta; Mikolajewska, Karolina; Shaheen, Seif; Walton, Robert; Hanke, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    A reliable assessment of smoking status has significant public health implications and is essential for research purposes. The aim of this study was to determine optimal saliva cotinine cut-off values for smoking during pregnancy. The analyses were based on data from 1771 women from the Polish Mother and Child Cohort. Saliva cotinine concentrations were assessed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI + MS/MS). The saliva cotinine cut-off value for active smoking was established at 10 ng/mL (sensitivity 96%, specificity 95%) and for passive smoking at 1.5 ng/mL (sensitivity 63%, specificity 71%). About 5% of the self-reported non-smoking women were classified as smokers based on the cotinine cut-off value. Significantly more younger, single, and less educated self-reported non-smokers had a cotinine concentration higher than 10 ng/mL compared to those who were older, married, and who had a university degree. Close to 30% of the non-smokers who indicated that smoking was not allowed in their home could be classified as exposed to passive smoking based on the cut-off value. The study suggests that self-reported smoking status is a valid measure of active smoking, whereas in the case of passive smoking, a combination of questionnaire data and biomarker verification may be required. PMID:27941658

  8. Surgical Cutting Simulation and Topology Refinement of Bio-Tissues and Bio-Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiyong; Lee, Yuan-Shin; Narayan, Roger J.

    In this paper, we propose methodology and algorithms to generate realistic cuts on heterogeneous deformable object models. A three-dimensional node snapping algorithm is presented to modify the topology of deformable models, without adding new elements. Smooth cut is generated by duplicating and displacing mass points that have been snapped along the cutting path. Several sets of triangles representing different soft tissues are generated along the new cut to present the internal structures and material properties of heterogeneous deformable objects. A haptic device is integrated into cutting simulation system as a cutting tool. The proposed cutting techniques can be used in surgical simulation or other virtual simulations involving topological modification of heterogeneous soft materials to enhance the fidelity and realism.

  9. Cutting force predication based on integration of symmetric fuzzy number and finite element method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanli; Hu, Yanjuan; Wang, Yao; Dong, Chao; Pang, Zaixiang

    2014-01-01

    In the process of turning, pointing at the uncertain phenomenon of cutting which is caused by the disturbance of random factors, for determining the uncertain scope of cutting force, the integrated symmetric fuzzy number and the finite element method (FEM) are used in the prediction of cutting force. The method used symmetric fuzzy number to establish fuzzy function between cutting force and three factors and obtained the uncertain interval of cutting force by linear programming. At the same time, the change curve of cutting force with time was directly simulated by using thermal-mechanical coupling FEM; also the nonuniform stress field and temperature distribution of workpiece, tool, and chip under the action of thermal-mechanical coupling were simulated. The experimental result shows that the method is effective for the uncertain prediction of cutting force.

  10. Cutting Force Predication Based on Integration of Symmetric Fuzzy Number and Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhanli; Hu, Yanjuan; Wang, Yao; Dong, Chao; Pang, Zaixiang

    2014-01-01

    In the process of turning, pointing at the uncertain phenomenon of cutting which is caused by the disturbance of random factors, for determining the uncertain scope of cutting force, the integrated symmetric fuzzy number and the finite element method (FEM) are used in the prediction of cutting force. The method used symmetric fuzzy number to establish fuzzy function between cutting force and three factors and obtained the uncertain interval of cutting force by linear programming. At the same time, the change curve of cutting force with time was directly simulated by using thermal-mechanical coupling FEM; also the nonuniform stress field and temperature distribution of workpiece, tool, and chip under the action of thermal-mechanical coupling were simulated. The experimental result shows that the method is effective for the uncertain prediction of cutting force. PMID:24790556

  11. Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) point to inform a human about the location of a tool.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Felizitas; Zemke, Franziska; Call, Josep; Gómez, Juan Carlos

    2009-03-01

    Although pointing is not part of great apes' natural gestural repertoire, they can learn to point to food, in order to request it. To assess the flexibility with which they can use this gesture, one can vary the potential referent of the point. In two previous studies, three orangutans (two of them human-reared) have shown the ability to point to the location of a tool which a human experimenter needed in order to give them food. Here, we tested six orangutans and five bonobos using a set-up in which our subjects had to guide a human experimenter to the hiding place of a fork which was needed in order to retrieve a piece of food for the subject out of a vertical tube. We further examined the potential role of a competitive/deceptive context by varying the identity of the person responsible for hiding the tool. In addition, we implemented three different control conditions in which an object was hidden but it was not necessary to indicate its location to get the food. We found that the majority of subjects spontaneously guided the experimenter to the hiding place of the fork by pointing to it when it was necessary and they did so significantly less in control conditions. We did not find an effect of the person hiding the fork. Our results show that mother-reared orangutans and bonobos are able to point to inform a human about the location of an object that the human needs to procure food for the subject and that they can take into account whether it is relevant or not to do so.

  12. Optimal cut-points for body mass index, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio using the Framingham coronary heart disease risk score in an Arab population of the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Al-Lawati, Jawad A; Barakat, Nabil M; Al-Lawati, Alya M; Mohammed, Ali J

    2008-11-01

    We aimed to determine the gender-specific optimal cut-points for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) associated with risk of cardiovascular disease, using Framingham risk score and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, among Omani Arabs. Nine percent of men, compared to 3% of women, had a 10-year total coronary heart disease (CHD) risk > or = 20%. In both genders, WHR was a better predictor of CHD (area under the ROC curve 0.771 for men and 0.802 for women), followed by WC (0.710 and 0.727) and BMI (0.601 and 0.639), respectively. For a 10-year CHD risk of > or = 20%, the optimal cut-points to assess adiposity in Omani men and women were > 22.6 and 22.9 kg/m2 for BMI, > 78.5 and 84.5 cm for WC, and > 0.96 and > 0.98 for WHR, respectively. To identify obesity among Omani Arabs, different cut-points for BMI, WC and WHR than the currently recommended ones are needed.

  13. Operationalizing hippocampal volume as an enrichment biomarker for amnestic mild cognitive impairment trials: effect of algorithm, test-retest variability, and cut point on trial cost, duration, and sample size.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng; Sun, Jia; Wolz, Robin; Stephenson, Diane; Brewer, James; Fox, Nick C; Cole, Patricia E; Jack, Clifford R; Hill, Derek L G; Schwarz, Adam J

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of computational algorithm, measurement variability, and cut point on hippocampal volume (HCV)-based patient selection for clinical trials in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We used normal control and amnestic MCI subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 1 (ADNI-1) as normative reference and screening cohorts. We evaluated the enrichment performance of 4 widely used hippocampal segmentation algorithms (FreeSurfer, Hippocampus Multi-Atlas Propagation and Segmentation (HMAPS), Learning Embeddings Atlas Propagation (LEAP), and NeuroQuant) in terms of 2-year changes in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog), and Clinical Dementia Rating Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB). We modeled the implications for sample size, screen fail rates, and trial cost and duration. HCV based patient selection yielded reduced sample sizes (by ∼40%-60%) and lower trial costs (by ∼30%-40%) across a wide range of cut points. These results provide a guide to the choice of HCV cut point for amnestic MCI clinical trials, allowing an informed tradeoff between statistical and practical considerations.

  14. Electron scattering as a tool to study zero-point kinetic energies of atoms in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreh, R.; Finkelstein, Y.; Vos, M.

    2015-07-01

    High resolution electron compton scattering (ECS) is being used to study the atomic momentum distributions and hence the zero-point kinetic energies (ZPKE) of the scattering atoms. Such studies have shown that the scattering is from a single atom of the scattering sample. For an electron beam with a well defined incident energy, the scattered electron energy at any angle from each atomic species is Doppler broadened. The broadening reflects the atomic momentum distribution contributed by both the internal and external motions of the molecular system. By measuring the Doppler broadening of the scattered electron lines it was possible to determine the kinetic energy of the scattering atom including that of its zero-point motion. Thus, the atomic kinetic energies in gases such as H2, D2, HD, CH4 and in H2O, D2O and NH3 were measured and compared with those calculated semi-empirically using the measured optical infra red (IR) and Raman frequencies of the internal vibrations of the molecules. In general, good agreement between the measured and calculated values was found. Electron scattering was also used to study the ratio of e-scattering intensities from the H- and O-atoms in water (H2O), where some anomalies were reported to exist.

  15. Use of PowerPoint presentation as a teaching tool for undergraduate students in the subject of gerodontology.

    PubMed

    Shigli, Kamal; Agrawal, Neha; Nair, Chandrasekharan; Sajjan, Suresh; Kakodkar, Pradnya; Hebbal, Mamata

    2016-01-01

    Though different teaching learning media have been employed in the instruction of geriatric dentistry, their efficacy has not been adequately evaluated. This study was conducted with the aim to determine the efficacy of a PowerPoint presentation in teaching gerodontology. This is a prospective follow-up study using a pre- and post-intervention assessment. A pilot study was conducted on the final year students to check the feasibility of the study. A convenience sampling procedure was used. All interns (n = 80) of the Modern Dental College and Research Centre, Indore, India were invited to participate. Interns completed a 24-item questionnaire documenting their current knowledge on gerodontology. One week after a 30 min PowerPoint presentation on gerodontology, the same interns completed the same questionnaire again, providing an indication of the efficacy of the learning tool. Paired t-test and McNemar test were employed for statistical analysis. A statistically significant difference was observed in pre- and post-intervention scores (P < 0.05). The results of this study indicated that PowerPoint presentation can be used as an effective tool for improving the knowledge regarding gerodontology.

  16. Use of PowerPoint presentation as a teaching tool for undergraduate students in the subject of gerodontology

    PubMed Central

    Shigli, Kamal; Agrawal, Neha; Nair, Chandrasekharan; Sajjan, Suresh; Kakodkar, Pradnya; Hebbal, Mamata

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Though different teaching learning media have been employed in the instruction of geriatric dentistry, their efficacy has not been adequately evaluated. This study was conducted with the aim to determine the efficacy of a PowerPoint presentation in teaching gerodontology. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective follow-up study using a pre- and post-intervention assessment. A pilot study was conducted on the final year students to check the feasibility of the study. A convenience sampling procedure was used. All interns (n = 80) of the Modern Dental College and Research Centre, Indore, India were invited to participate. Interns completed a 24-item questionnaire documenting their current knowledge on gerodontology. One week after a 30 min PowerPoint presentation on gerodontology, the same interns completed the same questionnaire again, providing an indication of the efficacy of the learning tool. Paired t-test and McNemar test were employed for statistical analysis. Results: A statistically significant difference was observed in pre- and post-intervention scores (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that PowerPoint presentation can be used as an effective tool for improving the knowledge regarding gerodontology. PMID:27141170

  17. Improvement Cut

    Treesearch

    J. W. Johnson

    1950-01-01

    Early, effects of partial cutting on diameter growth in bottomland hardwood forests have been measured recently near Vance, Mississippi, according to a report by J. W. Johnson of the Southern Forest Experiment Station, New Orleans, LA.

  18. Cutting Candles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranucci, Ernest R.

    1973-01-01

    Different regular-polygon-shaped candles wound with a sheet of paper are cut through obliquely. When the papers are unwound, unique patterns are revealed. Investigation of these patterns leads to the discovery of geometric concepts. (JP)

  19. The CZMIL manual editor (CME): a new tool for analyzing bathymetric lidar waveforms and editing point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Gary Q.; Depner, Jan; Hilderbrand, Ronnie; Ramnath, Vinod

    2010-04-01

    The University of Southern Mississippi's Center of Higher Learning has developed a Waveform Viewer, Attribute Viewer, and a 3D Editor for use in the CZMIL Point Cloud Manual Editor (CME). The Waveform Viewer displays various channels of CZMIL waveforms within the 2D/3D editor interface of CME. This module provides the user an interactive tool set consisting of a cross sectioning mechanism for the intensity time-bin relationship, waveform file output, and zooming capabilities. The Attribute Viewer provides the data analyst with information to analyze various environmental and spatial parameters that might contribute to errors in the measured points. The 3D Editor offers the benefits of capturing depth outliers; an intuitive visual connectivity with the 2D editor; and the implementation of volumetric directional slice isolation of data outliers.

  20. Optimal waist circumference cut-off points and ability of different metabolic syndrome criteria for predicting diabetes in Japanese men and women: Japan Epidemiology Collaboration on Occupational Health Study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huanhuan; Kurotani, Kayo; Sasaki, Naoko; Murakami, Taizo; Shimizu, Chii; Shimizu, Makiko; Nakagawa, Tohru; Honda, Toru; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Okazaki, Hiroko; Nagahama, Satsue; Uehara, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Makoto; Tomita, Kentaro; Imai, Teppei; Nishihara, Akiko; Kochi, Takeshi; Eguchi, Masafumi; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Hori, Ai; Kuwahara, Keisuke; Akter, Shamima; Kashino, Ikuko; Kabe, Isamu; Liu, Weiping; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Kunugita, Naoki; Dohi, Seitaro

    2016-03-03

    We sought to establish the optimal waist circumference (WC) cut-off point for predicting diabetes mellitus (DM) and to compare the predictive ability of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) criteria of the Joint Interim Statement (JIS) and the Japanese Committee of the Criteria for MetS (JCCMS) for DM in Japanese. Participants of the Japan Epidemiology Collaboration on Occupational Health Study, who were aged 20-69 years and free of DM at baseline (n = 54,980), were followed-up for a maximum of 6 years. Time-dependent receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to determine the optimal cut-off points of WC for predicting DM. Time-dependent sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the prediction of DM were compared between the JIS and JCCMS MetS criteria. During 234,926 person-years of follow-up, 3180 individuals developed DM. Receiver operating characteristic analysis suggested that the most suitable cut-off point of WC for predicting incident DM was 85 cm for men and 80 cm for women. MetS was associated with 3-4 times increased hazard for developing DM in men and 7-9 times in women. Of the MetS criteria tested, the JIS criteria using our proposed WC cut-off points (85 cm for men and 80 cm for women) had the highest sensitivity (54.5 % for men and 43.5 % for women) for predicting DM. The sensitivity and specificity of the JCCMS MetS criteria were ~37.7 and 98.9 %, respectively. Data from the present large cohort of workers suggest that WC cut-offs of 85 cm for men and 80 cm for women may be appropriate for predicting DM for Japanese. The JIS criteria can detect more people who later develop DM than does the JCCMS criteria.

  1. Point-of-care Diagnostic Tools to Detect Circulating MicroRNAS as Biomarkers of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaca, Luis

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs or miRNAs are a form of small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of 19–22 nucleotides in length in their mature form. miRNAs are transcribed in the nucleus of all cells from large precursors, many of which have several kilobases in length. Originally identified as intracellular modulators of protein synthesis via posttranscriptional gene silencing, more recently it has been found that miRNAs can travel in extracellular human fluids inside specialized vesicles known as exosomes. We will be referring to this miRNAs as circulating microRNAs. More interestingly, the miRNA content inside exosomes changes during pathological events. In the present review we analyze the literature about circulating miRNAs and their possible use as biomarkers. Furthermore, we explore their future in point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and provide an example of a portable POC apparatus useful in the detection of circulating miRNAs. PMID:24858962

  2. Floating-Point Modules Targeted for Use with RC Compilation Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahin, Ibrahin; Gloster, Clay S.

    2000-01-01

    Reconfigurable Computing (RC) has emerged as a viable computing solution for computationally intensive applications. Several applications have been mapped to RC system and in most cases, they provided the smallest published execution time. Although RC systems offer significant performance advantages over general-purpose processors, they require more application development time than general-purpose processors. This increased development time of RC systems provides the motivation to develop an optimized module library with an assembly language instruction format interface for use with future RC system that will reduce development time significantly. In this paper, we present area/performance metrics for several different types of floating point (FP) modules that can be utilized to develop complex FP applications. These modules are highly pipelined and optimized for both speed and area. Using these modules, and example application, FP matrix multiplication, is also presented. Our results and experiences show, that with these modules, 8-10X speedup over general-purpose processors can be achieved.

  3. Floating-Point Modules Targeted for Use with RC Compilation Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahin, Ibrahin; Gloster, Clay S.

    2000-01-01

    Reconfigurable Computing (RC) has emerged as a viable computing solution for computationally intensive applications. Several applications have been mapped to RC system and in most cases, they provided the smallest published execution time. Although RC systems offer significant performance advantages over general-purpose processors, they require more application development time than general-purpose processors. This increased development time of RC systems provides the motivation to develop an optimized module library with an assembly language instruction format interface for use with future RC system that will reduce development time significantly. In this paper, we present area/performance metrics for several different types of floating point (FP) modules that can be utilized to develop complex FP applications. These modules are highly pipelined and optimized for both speed and area. Using these modules, and example application, FP matrix multiplication, is also presented. Our results and experiences show, that with these modules, 8-10X speedup over general-purpose processors can be achieved.

  4. Programmable nano-bio-chips: multifunctional clinical tools for use at the point-of-care

    PubMed Central

    Jokerst, Jesse V

    2011-01-01

    A new generation of programmable diagnostic devices is needed to take advantage of information generated from the study of genomics, proteomics, metabolomics and glycomics. This report describes the ‘programmable nano-bio-chip’ with potential to bridge the significant scientific, technology and clinical gaps through the creation of a diagnostic platform to measure the molecules of life. This approach, with results at the point-of-care, possesses capabilities for measuring such diverse analyte classes as cells, proteins, DNA and small molecules in the same compact device. Applications such as disease diagnosis and prognosis for areas including cancer, heart disease and HIV are described. New diagnostic panels are inserted as ‘plug and play’ elements into the modular platform with universal assay operating systems and standard read out sequences. The nano-bio-chip ensemble exhibits excellent analytical performance and cost-effectiveness with extensive validation versus standard reference methods (R2 = 0.95–0.99). This report describes the construction and use of two major classes of nano-bio-chip designs that serve as cellular and chemical processing units, and provides perspective on future growth in this newly emerging field of programmable nano-bio-chip sensor systems. PMID:20025471

  5. Optimal Cut-Off Points on the Health Anxiety Inventory, Illness Attitude Scales and Whiteley Index to Identify Severe Health Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Hedman, Erik; Lekander, Mats; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Lindefors, Nils; Rück, Christian; Andersson, Gerhard; Andersson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Background Health anxiety can be viewed as a dimensional phenomenon where severe health anxiety in form of DSM-IV hypochondriasis represents a cut-off where the health anxiety becomes clinically significant. Three of the most reliable and used self-report measures of health anxiety are the Health Anxiety Inventory (HAI), the Illness Attitude Scales (IAS) and the Whiteley Index (WI). Identifying the optimal cut-offs for classification of presence of a diagnosis of severe health anxiety on these measures has several advantages in clinical and research settings. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the HAI, IAS and WI as proximal diagnostic instruments for severe health anxiety defined as DSM-IV hypochondriasis. Methods We investigated sensitivity, specificity and predictive value on the HAI, IAS and WI using a total of 347 adult participants of whom 158 had a diagnosis of severe health anxiety, 97 had obsessive-compulsive disorder and 92 were healthy non-clinical controls. Diagnostic assessments were conducted using the Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule. Results Optimal cut-offs for identifying a diagnosis of severe health anxiety was 67 on the HAI, 47 on the IAS, and 5 on the WI. Sensitivity and specificity were high, ranging from 92.6 to 99.4%. Positive and negative predictive values ranged from 91.6 to 99.4% using unadjusted prevalence rates. Conclusions The HAI, IAS and WI have very good properties as diagnostic indicators of severe health anxiety and can be used as cost-efficient proximal estimates of the diagnosis. PMID:25849477

  6. Heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in patients in an emergency department setting, suspected of acute coronary syndrome: optimal cut-off point, diagnostic value and future opportunities in primary care.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Robert T A; van Severen, Evie; Vandervoort, Pieter M; Grieten, Lars; Buntinx, Frank; Glatz, Jan F C; Dinant, Geert Jan

    2015-01-01

    Most patients presenting chest complaints in primary care are referred to secondary care facilities, whereas only a few are diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aim is to determine the optimal cut-off value for a point-of-care heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) test in patients presenting to the emergency department and to evaluate a possible future role of H-FABP in safely ruling out ACS in primary care. Serial plasma H-FABP (index test) and high sensitivity troponin T (hs-cTnT) (reference test) were determined in patients with any new-onset chest complaint. In a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the optimal cut-off value of H-FABP for ACS was determined. Predictive values of H-FABP for ACS were calculated. For 202 consecutive patients (prevalence ACS 59%), the ROC curve based on the results of the first H-FABP was equal to the ROC curve of hs-cTnT (AUC 0.79 versus 0.80). Using a cut-off value of 4.0 ng/ml for H-FABP, sensitivity for ACS of the H-FABP (hs-cTnT) tests was 73.9% (70.6%). Negative predictive value (NPV) of H-FABP for ACS in a population representative for primary care (incidence of ACS 22%) thus could reach 90.8%. In patients presenting chest pain, plasma H-FABP reaches the highest diagnostic value when a cut-off value of 4 ng/ml is used. Diagnostic values of an algorithm combining point-of-care H-FABP measurement and a score of signs and symptoms should be studied in primary care, to learn if such an algorithm could safely reduce referral rate by GPs.

  7. Cutting Head for Ultrasonic Lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, Earl D. (Inventor); Goodfriend, Roger (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A cutting head for attachment to the end of the wire probe of an ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration instrument. The cutting head has a plurality of circumferentially arranged teeth formed at one end thereof to provide a cup-shaped receptacle for kidney stones encountered during the disintegration procedure. An integral reduced diameter collar diminishes stress points in the wire and reduces breakage thereof.

  8. Influence of the Rigid Connection Between Discs in the Tetrahedral Prisms on Equivalent Stresses When Cutting Work Faces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoreshok, A. A.; Mametyev, L. E.; Borisov, A. Yu; Vorobyev, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results of modeling of the stressed state of structural elements of the paired fastening points of the two disc tools to the tetrahedral prisms of the working bodies of the roadheaders of selective action when cutting work faces of heterogeneous structure. The advantages of cooperative mode rotation to separate two disc tools on each of the tetrahedral prisms placed between the axial cutting crowns.

  9. Assessing normative cut points through differential item functioning analysis: an example from the adaptation of the Middlesex Elderly Assessment of Mental State (MEAMS) for use as a cognitive screening test in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Alan; Küçükdeveci, Ayse A; Kutlay, Sehim; Elhan, Atilla H

    2006-03-23

    The Middlesex Elderly Assessment of Mental State (MEAMS) was developed as a screening test to detect cognitive impairment in the elderly. It includes 12 subtests, each having a 'pass score'. A series of tasks were undertaken to adapt the measure for use in the adult population in Turkey and to determine the validity of existing cut points for passing subtests, given the wide range of educational level in the Turkish population. This study focuses on identifying and validating the scoring system of the MEAMS for Turkish adult population. After the translation procedure, 350 normal subjects and 158 acquired brain injury patients were assessed by the Turkish version of MEAMS. Initially, appropriate pass scores for the normal population were determined through ANOVA post-hoc tests according to age, gender and education. Rasch analysis was then used to test the internal construct validity of the scale and the validity of the cut points for pass scores on the pooled data by using Differential Item Functioning (DIF) analysis within the framework of the Rasch model. Data with the initially modified pass scores were analyzed. DIF was found for certain subtests by age and education, but not for gender. Following this, pass scores were further adjusted and data re-fitted to the model. All subtests were found to fit the Rasch model (mean item fit 0.184, SD 0.319; person fit -0.224, SD 0.557) and DIF was then found to be absent. Thus the final pass scores for all subtests were determined. The MEAMS offers a valid assessment of cognitive state for the adult Turkish population, and the revised cut points accommodate for age and education. Further studies are required to ascertain the validity in different diagnostic groups.

  10. Hair cut

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-10

    ISS033-E-018986 (10 Nov. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Evgeny Tarelkin, Expedition 33 flight engineer, trims the hair of Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy, flight engineer, in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Tarelkin used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair. NASA astronaut Kevin Ford, flight engineer, is visible in the background.

  11. Hair cut

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-10

    ISS033-E-018991 (10 Nov. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy, Expedition 33 flight engineer, trims the hair of Russian cosmonaut Evgeny Tarelkin, flight engineer, in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Novitskiy used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  12. Rotary fast tool servo system and methods

    DOEpatents

    Montesanti, Richard C.; Trumper, David L.

    2007-10-02

    A high bandwidth rotary fast tool servo provides tool motion in a direction nominally parallel to the surface-normal of a workpiece at the point of contact between the cutting tool and workpiece. Three or more flexure blades having all ends fixed are used to form an axis of rotation for a swing arm that carries a cutting tool at a set radius from the axis of rotation. An actuator rotates a swing arm assembly such that a cutting tool is moved in and away from the lathe-mounted, rotating workpiece in a rapid and controlled manner in order to machine the workpiece. A pair of position sensors provides rotation and position information for a swing arm to a control system. A control system commands and coordinates motion of the fast tool servo with the motion of a spindle, rotating table, cross-feed slide, and in-feed slide of a precision lathe.

  13. Specific cut-off points for waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio as predictors of cardiometabolic risk in Black subjects: a cross-sectional study in Benin and Haiti.

    PubMed

    El Mabchour, Asma; Delisle, Hélène; Vilgrain, Colette; Larco, Philippe; Sodjinou, Roger; Batal, Malek

    2015-01-01

    Waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) are widely used as indicators of abdominal adiposity and the cut-off values have been validated primarily in Caucasians. In this study we identified the WC and WHtR cut-off points that best predicted cardiometabolic risk (CMR) in groups of African (Benin) and African ancestry (Haiti) Black subjects. This cross-sectional study included 452 apparently healthy subjects from Cotonou (Benin) and Port-au-Prince (Haiti), 217 women and 235 men from 25 to 60 years. CMR biomarkers were the metabolic syndrome components. Additional CMR biomarkers were a high atherogenicity index (total serum cholesterol/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥4 in women and ≥5 in men); insulin resistance set at the 75th percentile of the calculated Homeostasis Model Assessment index (HOMA-IR); and inflammation defined as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentrations between 3 and 10 mg/L. WC and WHtR were tested as predictors of two out of the three most prevalent CMR biomarkers. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, Youden's index, and likelihood ratios were used to assess the performance of specific WC and WHtR cut-offs. High atherogenicity index (59.5%), high blood pressure (23.2%), and insulin resistance (25% by definition) were the most prevalent CMR biomarkers in the study groups. WC and WHtR were equally valid as predictors of CMR. Optimal WC cut-offs were 80 cm and 94 cm in men and women, respectively, which is exactly the reverse of the generic cut-offs. The standard 0.50 cut-off of WHtR appeared valid for men, but it had to be increased to 0.59 in women. CMR was widespread in these population groups. The present study suggests that in order to identify Africans with high CMR, WC thresholds will have to be increased in women and lowered in men. Data on larger samples are needed.

  14. Specific cut-off points for waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio as predictors of cardiometabolic risk in Black subjects: a cross-sectional study in Benin and Haiti

    PubMed Central

    EL Mabchour, Asma; Delisle, Hélène; Vilgrain, Colette; Larco, Philippe; Sodjinou, Roger; Batal, Malek

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) are widely used as indicators of abdominal adiposity and the cut-off values have been validated primarily in Caucasians. In this study we identified the WC and WHtR cut-off points that best predicted cardiometabolic risk (CMR) in groups of African (Benin) and African ancestry (Haiti) Black subjects. Methods This cross-sectional study included 452 apparently healthy subjects from Cotonou (Benin) and Port-au-Prince (Haiti), 217 women and 235 men from 25 to 60 years. CMR biomarkers were the metabolic syndrome components. Additional CMR biomarkers were a high atherogenicity index (total serum cholesterol/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥4 in women and ≥5 in men); insulin resistance set at the 75th percentile of the calculated Homeostasis Model Assessment index (HOMA-IR); and inflammation defined as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentrations between 3 and 10 mg/L. WC and WHtR were tested as predictors of two out of the three most prevalent CMR biomarkers. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, Youden’s index, and likelihood ratios were used to assess the performance of specific WC and WHtR cut-offs. Results High atherogenicity index (59.5%), high blood pressure (23.2%), and insulin resistance (25% by definition) were the most prevalent CMR biomarkers in the study groups. WC and WHtR were equally valid as predictors of CMR. Optimal WC cut-offs were 80 cm and 94 cm in men and women, respectively, which is exactly the reverse of the generic cut-offs. The standard 0.50 cut-off of WHtR appeared valid for men, but it had to be increased to 0.59 in women. Conclusion CMR was widespread in these population groups. The present study suggests that in order to identify Africans with high CMR, WC thresholds will have to be increased in women and lowered in men. Data on larger samples are needed. PMID:26604808

  15. The opioid manager: a point-of-care tool to facilitate the use of the Canadian Opioid Guideline.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Andrea D; Reardon, Rhoda; Salach, Lena

    2012-01-01

    The Opioid Manager is designed to be used as a point-of-care tool for providers prescribing opioids for chronic noncancer pain. It condenses the key elements from the Canadian Opioid Guideline and can be used as a chart insert. The Opioid Manager has been validated and is available for download from the Guideline's Web site http://nationalpaincentre.mcmaster.ca/opioidmanager/. The Opioid Manager is divided into the following four parts: A) before you write the first script, B) initiation trial, C) maintenance and monitoring, and D) when is it time to decrease the dose or stop the opioid completely? The Opioid Manager has been downloaded by 1,432 users: 47 percent family physicians, 18 percent pharmacists, 13 percent other physicians, and 22 percent miscellaneous. To show how to use the Opioid Manager, the authors created a 10-minute video that is available on the Internet. The Opioid Manager is being translated to French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Farsi.

  16. The Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index (RAPI): A Comparison of Cut-Points in First Nations Mi'kmaq and Non-Aboriginal Adolescents in Rural Nova Scotia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel, Melanie; O'Connor, Roisin M.; Boudreau, Brock; Mushquash, Christopher J.; Comeau, M. Nancy; Stevens, Doreen; Stewart, Sherry H.

    2010-01-01

    Important to the assessment of adolescent alcohol misuse is examination of alcohol-related problems. However, most measurement tools have only been validated among Euro-American cultures. The present study assessed the ability of the Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index (RAPI) to identify problem drinkers among groups of First Nations Mi'kmaq and…

  17. Optical tools and techniques for aligning solar payloads with the SPARCS control system. [Solar Pointing Aerobee Rocket Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, N. L.; Chisel, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The success of a rocket-borne experiment depends not only on the pointing of the attitude control system, but on the alignment of the attitude control system to the payload. To ensure proper alignment, special optical tools and alignment techniques are required. Those that were used in the SPARCS program are described and discussed herein. These tools include theodolites, autocollimators, a 38-cm diameter solar simulator, a high-performance 1-m heliostat to provide a stable solar source during the integration of the rocket payload, a portable 75-cm sun tracker for use at the launch site, and an innovation called the Solar Alignment Prism. Using the real sun as the primary reference under field conditions, the Solar Alignment Prism facilitates the coalignment of the attitude sun sensor with the payload. The alignment techniques were developed to ensure the precise alignment of the solar payloads to the SPARCS attitude sensors during payload integration and to verify the required alignment under field conditions just prior to launch.

  18. Optical tools and techniques for aligning solar payloads with the SPARCS control system. [Solar Pointing Aerobee Rocket Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, N. L.; Chisel, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The success of a rocket-borne experiment depends not only on the pointing of the attitude control system, but on the alignment of the attitude control system to the payload. To ensure proper alignment, special optical tools and alignment techniques are required. Those that were used in the SPARCS program are described and discussed herein. These tools include theodolites, autocollimators, a 38-cm diameter solar simulator, a high-performance 1-m heliostat to provide a stable solar source during the integration of the rocket payload, a portable 75-cm sun tracker for use at the launch site, and an innovation called the Solar Alignment Prism. Using the real sun as the primary reference under field conditions, the Solar Alignment Prism facilitates the coalignment of the attitude sun sensor with the payload. The alignment techniques were developed to ensure the precise alignment of the solar payloads to the SPARCS attitude sensors during payload integration and to verify the required alignment under field conditions just prior to launch.

  19. Cutting forces in orthogonal cutting of unidirectional GFRP composites

    SciTech Connect

    Caprino, G.; Nele, L.

    1996-07-01

    The results of orthogonal cutting tests carried out on unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastic composites, using HSS tools, are presented and discussed. During the tests, performed on a milling machine at very low cutting speed to avoid thermal effects, the cutting speed was held constant and parallel to the fiber direction. Three parameters, namely the tool rake angle {alpha}, the tool relief angle {gamma}, and the depth of cut t, were varied. According to the experimental results, the horizontal force per unit width, F{sub hu}, undergoes a dramatic decrease, never verified for metals, with increasing {alpha}. Besides, F{sub hu} is only negligibly affected by the relief angle, and linearly increases with t. Similarly to metals, an effect of the depth of cut on the specific energy (size effect) is found also for composites. However, the presented results indicate that the size effect can be analytically modeled in a simple way in the case of composites. The vertical force per unit width, F{sub vu}, exhibits a marked reduction when the relief angle is increased. F{sub vu} is also very sensitive to the rake angle: the lower {alpha}, the higher is F{sub vu}. It is shown that this behavior probably reflects a strong influence of the rake angle on the forces developing at the flank. A linear dependence of the vertical force on the depth of cut is also demonstrated. Finally, the experimental data are utilized to obtain empirical formulae, allowing an approximate evaluation of cutting forces.

  20. Sanitation Can Be A Foundation Disease Management Tool: Potential Of Spreading Binucleate Rhizoctonia from Nursery Propagation Floors To Trays Containing Azalea Stem Cuttings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Binucelate Rhizoctonia spp. (BNR), the cause of web blight, are present all year on container-grown azaleas in the southern U.S. BNR can be eliminated during vegetative propagation by submerging stem cuttings in 50°C water for 21 minutes. The objective was to evaluate risk of rooting trays being con...

  1. Laser Cutting of Thin Nickel Bellows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    Laser cutting technique produces narrow, precise, fast, and repeatable cuts in thin nickel-allow bellows material. Laser cutting operation uses intense focused beam to melt material and assisting gas to force melted material through part thickness, creating void. When part rotated or moved longitudinally, melting and material removal continuous and creates narrow, fast, precise, and repeatable cut. Technique used to produce cuts of specified depths less than material thickness. Avoids distortion, dents, and nicks produced in delicate materials during lathe trimming operations, which require high cutting-tool pressure and holding-fixture forces.

  2. Cost minimizing of cutting process for CNC thermal and water-jet machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavaeva, Anastasia; Kurennov, Dmitry

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with optimization problem of cutting process for CNC thermal and water-jet machines. The accuracy of objective function parameters calculation for optimization problem is investigated. This paper shows that working tool path speed is not constant value. One depends on some parameters that are described in this paper. The relations of working tool path speed depending on the numbers of NC programs frames, length of straight cut, configuration part are presented. Based on received results the correction coefficients for working tool speed are defined. Additionally the optimization problem may be solved by using mathematical model. Model takes into account the additional restrictions of thermal cutting (choice of piercing and output tool point, precedence condition, thermal deformations). At the second part of paper the non-standard cutting techniques are considered. Ones may lead to minimizing of cutting cost and time compared with standard cutting techniques. This paper considers the effectiveness of non-standard cutting techniques application. At the end of the paper the future research works are indicated.

  3. Cutting Frozen Ground with Disc Saws

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-01

    a (actor ot 5. taking a depth widtli ratio toi the uncut nbs ol 2. Axle torces on the cutter wheel depend on the design ol the cutting teeth and on...position. If the shoulder of the cutting tool behind the cutting edge is exactly tangential, it will grind against uncut material and...AD-A012 114 CUTTING FROZEN GROUND UITH DISC SAWS Mai colm Mel lor Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory Hanover, New

  4. Tool Blunts Cotter Pin Legs for Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, J. A.; Helble, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Jaws on new insertion tool contain upset point and anvil. Point forces cotter-pin legs into loop as it engages anvil. Cotter pin before insertion consists of loop and straight shaft composed of two legs welded together as tips. After insertion, welded legs have been shaped into loop. Tool used to prevent bent loose ends of cotter pins from scratching workers' fingers or cutting and entangling wires.

  5. Expert Facilitated Development of an Objective Assessment Tool for Point-of-Care Ultrasound Performance in Undergraduate Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Black, Holly; Sheppard, Gillian; Metcalfe, Brian; Stone-McLean, Jordan; McCarthy, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Background: With the various applications of point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) steadily increasing, many medical schools across North America are incorporating PoCUS training into their undergraduate curricula. The Faculty of Medicine at Memorial University also intends to introduce PoCUS training into its own undergraduate medical program. The proposed approach is to introduce a PoCUS curriculum focusing on anatomy and physiology while developing cognitive and psychomotor skills that are later transferred into clinical applications. This has been the common approach taken by most undergraduate ultrasound programs in the United States. This project highlights the development and the challenges involved in creating an objective assessment tool that meets the unique needs of this proposed undergraduate ultrasound curriculum. Methods: After a thorough review of existing literature and input from experts in PoCUS, a prototype global rating scale (GRS) and three exam-specific checklists were created by researchers. The exam-specific checklists include aorta exam, subxiphoid cardiac exam, and focused abdominal exam. A panel of 18 emergency room physicians certified in PoCUS were recruited to evaluate the GRS and three checklists. This was accomplished using a modified Delphi technique. The items were rated on a 5-point Likert scale. If an item received a mean score of less than 4, it was deemed unimportant for the assessment of PoCUS performance in undergraduate medical learners and was excluded. Experts were also encouraged to provide comments and suggest further items to be added to the GRS or checklists. Items were modified according to these comments. All of the edits were then sent back to the experts for revisions. Results: A consensus was achieved after three rounds of surveys, with the final GRS containing nine items. The final aorta checklist contained nine items, and the subxiphoid cardiac and focused abdominal checklists each contained 11 items. Conclusion: By

  6. The CAM test: a novel tool to quantify the decline in vertical upper limb pointing movements with ageing.

    PubMed

    Ansay, Caroline; Manto, Mario; Camut, Stéphane; van Dun, Kim; Mariën, Peter; Habas, Christophe; Bodranghien, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Although upper limb movements in the vertical plane are very commonly used during the activities of daily life, there is still a lack of a reliable and easy standardized procedure to quantify them. In particular, ageing is associated with a decline in performances of coordinated movements, but a tool to quantify this decline is missing. We created a novel portable test called counting arm movement test (CAM test). Participants were asked to perform fast and accurate successive pointing movements towards two fixed targets (mechanical counters) located in a vertical plane in the parasagittal axis during three different time periods (15, 30, 45 s). Each upper limb was assessed separately. The test was evaluated in a group of 63 healthy subjects (mean age ± SD 49.1 ± 19.8 years; F/M 33/30; range 18-87 years). Motor performances (number of clicks) significantly decreased as a function of age for both the dominant side (age effect; linear regression; p < 0.0001 for 15, 30 and 45 s) and the non-dominant side (linear regression; p < 0.0001 for 15, 30 and 45 s). Performances on the dominant and non-dominant side were linearly correlated with the time periods (p < 0.0001 on both sides). The symmetry index (ratio of performance on the dominant side divided by performance on the non-dominant side) was correlated linearly and positively with the duration of the test (y = 0.002x + 1.053; p = 0.0056). We also found a linear relationship between upper limb length and motor performance on the non-dominant side for 15 s (p = 0.023) and 45 s (p = 0.041). The test was characterized by a very high correlation between the results obtained by two investigators during two successive sessions in a subgroup of 7 subjects (Pearson product moment correlation: 0.989 for the dominant side and 0.988 for the non-dominant side). The CAM test appears as a robust and low cost tool to quantify upper limb pointing movements. In particular, the test strongly discriminates

  7. Internet-Based Software Tools for Analysis and Processing of LIDAR Point Cloud Data via the OpenTopography Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandigam, V.; Crosby, C. J.; Baru, C.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2009-12-01

    LIDAR is an excellent example of the new generation of powerful remote sensing data now available to Earth science researchers. Capable of producing digital elevation models (DEMs) more than an order of magnitude higher resolution than those currently available, LIDAR data allows earth scientists to study the processes that contribute to landscape evolution at resolutions not previously possible, yet essential for their appropriate representation. Along with these high-resolution datasets comes an increase in the volume and complexity of data that the user must efficiently manage and process in order for it to be scientifically useful. Although there are expensive commercial LIDAR software applications available, processing and analysis of these datasets are typically computationally inefficient on the conventional hardware and software that is currently available to most of the Earth science community. We have designed and implemented an Internet-based system, the OpenTopography Portal, that provides integrated access to high-resolution LIDAR data as well as web-based tools for processing of these datasets. By using remote data storage and high performance compute resources, the OpenTopography Portal attempts to simplify data access and standard LIDAR processing tasks for the Earth Science community. The OpenTopography Portal allows users to access massive amounts of raw point cloud LIDAR data as well as a suite of DEM generation tools to enable users to generate custom digital elevation models to best fit their science applications. The Cyberinfrastructure software tools for processing the data are freely available via the portal and conveniently integrated with the data selection in a single user-friendly interface. The ability to run these tools on powerful Cyberinfrastructure resources instead of their own labs provides a huge advantage in terms of performance and compute power. The system also encourages users to explore data processing methods and the

  8. Cardiorespiratory fitness cut points to avoid cardiovascular disease risk in children and adolescents; what level of fitness should raise a red flag? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jonatan R; Cavero-Redondo, Ivan; Ortega, Francisco B; Welk, Gregory J; Andersen, Lars B; Martinez-Vizcaino, Vicente

    2016-09-26

    Poor cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors. To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the relationship between poor cardiorespiratory fitness and cardiovascular disease risk in children and adolescents. Systematic literature search (1980 to 11 April 2015) for studies that determined a cardiorespiratory fitness cut point that predicted cardiovascular disease risk in children and adolescents. We identified 7 studies that included 9280 children and adolescents (49% girls) aged 8-19 years from 14 countries. Cardiovascular disease risk was already present in boys (6-39%) and girls (6-86%). Boys with low fitness (<41.8 mL/kg/min) had a 5.7 times greater likelihood of having cardiovascular disease risk (95% CI 4.8 to 6.7). The comparable diagnostic OR for girls with low fitness (<34.6 mL/kg/min) was 3.6 (95% CI 3.0 to 4.3). The 95% confidence region of cardiorespiratory fitness associated with low cardiovascular disease risk ranges, 41.8-47.0 mL/kg/min in boys (eg, stages 6-8 for a boy aged 15 years) and 34.6-39.5 mL/kg/min in girls (eg, stages 3-5 for a girl aged 15 years). The cardiorespiratory fitness cut point to avoid cardiovascular disease risk ranged 41.8 mL/kg/min in boys and was 34.6 mL/kg/min in girls. Fitness levels below 42 and 35 mL/kg/min for boys and girls, respectively, should raise a red flag. These translate to 6 and 3 stages on the shuttle run test for a boy and a girl, both aged 15 years, respectively. These cut points identify children and adolescents who may benefit from primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention programming. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Interactive cutting path analysis programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, J. M.; Williams, D. S.; Colley, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    The operation of numerically controlled machine tools is interactively simulated. Four programs were developed to graphically display the cutting paths for a Monarch lathe, Cintimatic mill, Strippit sheet metal punch, and the wiring path for a Standard wire wrap machine. These programs are run on a IMLAC PDS-ID graphic display system under the DOS-3 disk operating system. The cutting path analysis programs accept input via both paper tape and disk file.

  10. What PASSes for good? Experience-based Swedish and hypothetical British EuroQol 5-Dimensions preference sets yield markedly different point estimates and patient acceptable symptom state cut-off values in chronic arthritis patients on TNF blockade.

    PubMed

    Cooper, A; Wallman, J K; Gülfe, A

    2016-11-01

    Health utilities derived from answers to generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaires such as the EuroQol 5-Dimensions (EQ-5D) are often used in cost-utility analyses (CUAs) of new and expensive treatments. Different preference sets (tariffs) used in the computation of utility values and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) from questionnaire responses (health states) yield varying results, potentially affecting decisions of resource allocation. The objective of the present study was to compare British (UK), hypothetical, and Swedish (SE), experience-based, EQ-5D utilities using data from clinical practice. UK and SE EQ-5D utilities were computed in an observational cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treated with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers, comparing point estimates and patient acceptable symptom state (PASS) cut-off levels. SE utilities were found to be consistently higher than UK utilities, and PASS cut-offs were essentially stable over time. With higher baseline utilities, there may be less room for improvement after an intervention and thus less accumulation of QALYs in CUAs applying the SE, as opposed to the UK, EQ-5D tariff.

  11. First Cut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Lockheed Martin and a Northrop Grumman/Boeing team expect the Crew Exploration Vehicle proposals they submitted last week to change, given the new top-down push at NASA to close the gap between space shuttle retirement and launch of the new crew carrier. Still, delivery of the proposals gives a first glimpse of at least one of the concepts for a space shuttle replacement. Instead of the ballistic capsule approach put forward in some early CEV concept work, Lockheed Martin proposed a lifting body shape with a two-stage thermal protection system, coupled with a cylindrical mission module to give crews of four to six extra room on trips to the Moon, and a trans-Earth injection module (TEIM) for the return powered-at least in the first cut-by a couple of Pratt & Whitney RL10 rocket engines.

  12. Design and Testing of an EHR-Integrated, Busulfan Pharmacokinetic Decision Support Tool for the Point-of-Care Clinician

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rahman, Susan M.; Breitkreutz, Matthew L.; Bi, Charlie; Matzuka, Brett J.; Dalal, Jignesh; Casey, K. Leigh; Garg, Uttam; Winkle, Sara; Leeder, J. Steven; Breedlove, JeanAnn; Rivera, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Busulfan demonstrates a narrow therapeutic index for which clinicians routinely employ therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). However, operationalizing TDM can be fraught with inefficiency. We developed and tested software encoding a clinical decision support tool (DST) that is embedded into our electronic health record (EHR) and designed to streamline the TDM process for our oncology partners. Methods: Our development strategy was modeled based on the features associated with successful DSTs. An initial Requirements Analysis was performed to characterize tasks, information flow, user needs, and system requirements to enable push/pull from the EHR. Back-end development was coded based on the algorithm used when manually performing busulfan TDM. The code was independently validated in MATLAB using 10,000 simulated patient profiles. A 296-item heuristic checklist was used to guide design of the front-end user interface. Content experts and end-users (n = 28) were recruited to participate in traditional usability testing under an IRB approved protocol. Results: Decision support software was developed to systematically walk the point-of-care clinician through the TDM process. The system is accessed through the EHR which transparently imports all of the requisite patient data. Data are visually inspected and then curve fit using a model-dependent approach. Quantitative goodness-of-fit are converted to single tachometer where “green” alerts the user that the model is strong, “yellow” signals caution and “red” indicates that there may be a problem with the fitting. Override features are embedded to permit application of a model-independent approach where appropriate. Simulations are performed to target a desired exposure or dose as entered by the clinician and the DST pushes the user approved recommendation back into the EHR. Usability testers were highly satisfied with our DST and quickly became proficient with the software. Conclusions: With early

  13. Design and Testing of an EHR-Integrated, Busulfan Pharmacokinetic Decision Support Tool for the Point-of-Care Clinician.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; Breitkreutz, Matthew L; Bi, Charlie; Matzuka, Brett J; Dalal, Jignesh; Casey, K Leigh; Garg, Uttam; Winkle, Sara; Leeder, J Steven; Breedlove, JeanAnn; Rivera, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Busulfan demonstrates a narrow therapeutic index for which clinicians routinely employ therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). However, operationalizing TDM can be fraught with inefficiency. We developed and tested software encoding a clinical decision support tool (DST) that is embedded into our electronic health record (EHR) and designed to streamline the TDM process for our oncology partners. Our development strategy was modeled based on the features associated with successful DSTs. An initial Requirements Analysis was performed to characterize tasks, information flow, user needs, and system requirements to enable push/pull from the EHR. Back-end development was coded based on the algorithm used when manually performing busulfan TDM. The code was independently validated in MATLAB using 10,000 simulated patient profiles. A 296-item heuristic checklist was used to guide design of the front-end user interface. Content experts and end-users (n = 28) were recruited to participate in traditional usability testing under an IRB approved protocol. Decision support software was developed to systematically walk the point-of-care clinician through the TDM process. The system is accessed through the EHR which transparently imports all of the requisite patient data. Data are visually inspected and then curve fit using a model-dependent approach. Quantitative goodness-of-fit are converted to single tachometer where "green" alerts the user that the model is strong, "yellow" signals caution and "red" indicates that there may be a problem with the fitting. Override features are embedded to permit application of a model-independent approach where appropriate. Simulations are performed to target a desired exposure or dose as entered by the clinician and the DST pushes the user approved recommendation back into the EHR. Usability testers were highly satisfied with our DST and quickly became proficient with the software. With early and broad stake-holder engagement we developed a clinical

  14. Proposed method of producing large optical mirrors Single-point diamond crushing followed by polishing with a small-area tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, G.; Bryan, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    Faster production of large optical mirrors may result from combining single-point diamond crushing of the glass with polishing using a small area tool to smooth the surface and remove the damaged layer. Diamond crushing allows a surface contour accurate to 0.5 microns to be generated, and the small area computer-controlled polishing tool allows the surface roughness to be removed without destroying the initial contour. Final contours with an accuracy of 0.04 microns have been achieved.

  15. Application of the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX(®)) and determination of suitable cut-off values during primary screening in specific health check-ups in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakatoh, Shinichi; Takemaru, Yuki

    2013-11-01

    Specific health check-ups, which do not include osteoporosis screening, are conducted more frequently than periodic osteoporosis screening in Japan. In this study, we investigated the usefulness of the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX(®)) during specific health check-ups, evaluated the variations in its usefulness for 2 consecutive years, and determined FRAX(®) cut-off values for osteoporosis screening. FRAX(®) questionnaires were distributed to subjects who underwent specific health check-ups in 2009 and 2010 at Asahi-machi. Subjects who exhibited FRAX(®) cut-off values of ≥10 % were advised to be screened at a medical institution. Bone mineral densities (BMDs) were measured in 201 subjects in 2009 and 105 subjects in 2010 after specific health check-ups, and treatment was initiated for 79 subjects in 2009 and 24 subjects in 2010. The number of subjects examined and the rate of treatment initiation following specific health check-ups were higher than those in subjects following periodic osteoporosis screening in 2009. However, the number and the rate following specific health check-ups dropped in 2010. According to receiver operating characteristic curves analyses, the sensitivity and specificity of FRAX(®) to determine osteoporosis treatment were highest when the cut-off values were 8 % for men and 10.5 % for women. In conclusion, the combination of FRAX(®) and specific health check-ups was more useful than periodic osteoporosis screening to narrow down the subjects and to motivate them to seek follow-up. Cut-off values for specific health check-up using FRAX(®) should be approximately 8 % for men and 10.5 % for women.

  16. 50 CFR Figures 18a, 18b and 18c to... - Large Frame TED Escape Opening; Minimum Dimensions Using All-Bar Cuts (Triangular Cuts); Large...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Dimensions Using All-Bar Cuts (Triangular Cuts); Large Frame TED Escape Opening; Minimum Dimensions Using All-Bar Cuts and Leading Edge Cut; Large Frame TED Escape Opening; Minimum Dimensions Using All-Points...—Large Frame TED Escape Opening; Minimum Dimensions Using All-Bar Cuts (Triangular Cuts); Large Frame TED...

  17. 50 CFR Figures 18a, 18b and 18c to... - Large Frame TED Escape Opening; Minimum Dimensions Using All-Bar Cuts (Triangular Cuts); Large...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Dimensions Using All-Bar Cuts (Triangular Cuts); Large Frame TED Escape Opening; Minimum Dimensions Using All-Bar Cuts and Leading Edge Cut; Large Frame TED Escape Opening; Minimum Dimensions Using All-Points...—Large Frame TED Escape Opening; Minimum Dimensions Using All-Bar Cuts (Triangular Cuts); Large Frame TED...

  18. 50 CFR Figures 18a, 18b and 18c to... - Large Frame TED Escape Opening; Minimum Dimensions Using All-Bar Cuts (Triangular Cuts); Large...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Dimensions Using All-Bar Cuts (Triangular Cuts); Large Frame TED Escape Opening; Minimum Dimensions Using All-Bar Cuts and Leading Edge Cut; Large Frame TED Escape Opening; Minimum Dimensions Using All-Points...—Large Frame TED Escape Opening; Minimum Dimensions Using All-Bar Cuts (Triangular Cuts); Large Frame TED...

  19. Cutting head for ultrasonic lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anguluo, E. D.; Goodfriend, R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A cutting head for attachment to the end of the wire probe of an ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration instrument is described. The cutting head has a plurality of circumferentially arranged teeth formed at one end thereof to provide a cup shaped receptacle for kidney stones encountered during the disintegration procedure. An integral reduced diameter collar diminishes stress points in the wire and reduce breakage thereof.

  20. Online machining error estimation method of numerical control gear grinding machine tool based on data analysis of internal sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fei; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Guilin; Chen, Chinyin

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an online estimation method of cutting error by analyzing of internal sensor readings. The internal sensors of numerical control (NC) machine tool are selected to avoid installation problem. The estimation mathematic model of cutting error was proposed to compute the relative position of cutting point and tool center point (TCP) from internal sensor readings based on cutting theory of gear. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed model, it was simulated and experimented in gear generating grinding process. The cutting error of gear was estimated and the factors which induce cutting error were analyzed. The simulation and experiments verify that the proposed approach is an efficient way to estimate the cutting error of work-piece during machining process.

  1. Automated Laser Cutting In Three Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, Lisa T.; Yvanovich, Mark A.; Angell, Terry R.; Bishop, Patricia J.; Dai, Weimin; Dobbs, Robert D.; He, Mingli; Minardi, Antonio; Shelton, Bret A.

    1995-01-01

    Computer-controlled machine-tool system uses laser beam assisted by directed flow of air to cut refractory materials into complex three-dimensional shapes. Velocity, position, and angle of cut varied. In original application, materials in question were thermally insulating thick blankets and tiles used on space shuttle. System shapes tile to concave or convex contours and cuts beveled edges on blanket, without cutting through outer layer of quartz fabric part of blanket. For safety, system entirely enclosed to prevent escape of laser energy. No dust generated during cutting operation - all material vaporized; larger solid chips dislodged from workpiece easily removed later.

  2. Machining Challenges: Macro to Micro Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shunmugam, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    Metal cutting is an important machining operation in the manufacture of almost all engineering components. Cutting technology has undergone several changes with the development of machine tools and cutting tools to meet challenges posed by newer materials, complex shapes, product miniaturization and competitive environments. In this paper, challenges in macro and micro cutting are brought out. Conventional and micro end-milling are included as illustrative examples and details are presented along with discussion. Lengthy equations are avoided to the extent possible, as the emphasis is on the basic concepts.

  3. Ultrasensitive self-powered cytosensors based on exogenous redox-free enzyme biofuel cells as point-of-care tools for early cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gai, Panpan; Song, Rongbin; Zhu, Cheng; Ji, Yusheng; Wang, Wengjing; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-12-07

    An exogenous redox-free, membrane-less enzyme biofuel cell-based ultrasensitive self-powered cytosensing platform was fabricated. With the ultrahigh sensitivity and the merits of not requiring external power sources or exogenous reagents, the device has great potential as a point-of-care tool for early diagnosis of cancer in vivo.

  4. Robust approximation of the Medial Axis Transform of LiDAR point clouds as a tool for visualisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ravi; Ledoux, Hugo

    2016-05-01

    Governments and companies around the world collect point clouds (datasets containing elevation points) because these are useful for many applications, e.g. to reconstruct 3D city models, to understand and predict the impact of floods, and to monitor dikes. We address in this paper the visualisation of point clouds, which is perhaps the most essential instrument a practitioner or a scientist has to analyse and understand such datasets. We argue that it is currently hampered by two main problems: (1) point clouds are often massive (several billion points); (2) the viewer's perception of depth and structure is often lost (because of the sparse and unstructured points). We propose solving both problems by using the Medial Axis Transform (MAT) and its properties. This allows us to (1) smartly simplify a point cloud in a geometry-dependent way (to preserve only significant features), and (2) to render splats whose radii are adaptive to the distribution of points (and thus obtain less "holes" in the surface). Our main contribution is a series of heuristics that allows us to compute the MAT robustly for noisy real-world LiDAR point clouds, and to compute the MAT for point clouds that do not fit into the main memory. We have implemented our algorithms, we report on experiments made with point clouds (of more than one billion points), and we demonstrate that we are able to render scenes with much less points than in the original point cloud (we preserve around 10%) while retaining good depth-perception and a sense of structure at close viewing distances.

  5. Modern trends in increasing the quality of the steels intended for cutting and metal-working tools: I. Improvement of granule metallurgy processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyanchikov, L. N.

    2008-12-01

    The following new technological processes for producing fine gas-atomized powders of tool and high-speed steels with a low content of nonmetallic inclusions are considered: the process designed by Böhler Uddeholm Powder Technology (Austria) and processes involving a heated gas. In the former process, a metal is poured from a ladle with electroslag heating, and the atomizing unit consists of three injectors. A new process of producing tools from fine powders by three-dimensional printing, i.e., so-called 3D-printing, is described.

  6. Smart tool holder

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert Dean; Foreman, Larry R.; Hatch, Douglas J.; Meadows, Mark S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided an apparatus for machining surfaces to accuracies within the nanometer range by use of electrical current flow through the contact of the cutting tool with the workpiece as a feedback signal to control depth of cut.

  7. "Delirium Day": a nationwide point prevalence study of delirium in older hospitalized patients using an easy standardized diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Bellelli, Giuseppe; Morandi, Alessandro; Di Santo, Simona G; Mazzone, Andrea; Cherubini, Antonio; Mossello, Enrico; Bo, Mario; Bianchetti, Angelo; Rozzini, Renzo; Zanetti, Ermellina; Musicco, Massimo; Ferrari, Alberto; Ferrara, Nicola; Trabucchi, Marco

    2016-07-18

    To date, delirium prevalence in adult acute hospital populations has been estimated generally from pooled findings of single-center studies and/or among specific patient populations. Furthermore, the number of participants in these studies has not exceeded a few hundred. To overcome these limitations, we have determined, in a multicenter study, the prevalence of delirium over a single day among a large population of patients admitted to acute and rehabilitation hospital wards in Italy. This is a point prevalence study (called "Delirium Day") including 1867 older patients (aged 65 years or more) across 108 acute and 12 rehabilitation wards in Italian hospitals. Delirium was assessed on the same day in all patients using the 4AT, a validated and briefly administered tool which does not require training. We also collected data regarding motoric subtypes of delirium, functional and nutritional status, dementia, comorbidity, medications, feeding tubes, peripheral venous and urinary catheters, and physical restraints. The mean sample age was 82.0 ± 7.5 years (58 % female). Overall, 429 patients (22.9 %) had delirium. Hypoactive was the commonest subtype (132/344 patients, 38.5 %), followed by mixed, hyperactive, and nonmotoric delirium. The prevalence was highest in Neurology (28.5 %) and Geriatrics (24.7 %), lowest in Rehabilitation (14.0 %), and intermediate in Orthopedic (20.6 %) and Internal Medicine wards (21.4 %). In a multivariable logistic regression, age (odds ratio [OR] 1.03, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.05), Activities of Daily Living dependence (OR 1.19, 95 % CI 1.12-1.27), dementia (OR 3.25, 95 % CI 2.41-4.38), malnutrition (OR 2.01, 95 % CI 1.29-3.14), and use of antipsychotics (OR 2.03, 95 % CI 1.45-2.82), feeding tubes (OR 2.51, 95 % CI 1.11-5.66), peripheral venous catheters (OR 1.41, 95 % CI 1.06-1.87), urinary catheters (OR 1.73, 95 % CI 1.30-2.29), and physical restraints (OR 1.84, 95 % CI 1.40-2.40) were associated with delirium. Admission

  8. Method for machining steel with diamond tools

    DOEpatents

    Casstevens, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for machining optical quality inishes and contour accuracies of workpieces of carbon-containing metals such as steel with diamond tooling. The wear rate of the diamond tooling is significantly reduced by saturating the atmosphere at the interface of the workpiece and the diamond tool with a gaseous hydrocarbon during the machining operation. The presence of the gaseous hydrocarbon effectively eliminates the deterioration of the diamond tool by inhibiting or preventing the conversion of the diamond carbon to graphite carbon at the point of contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece.

  9. Method for machining steel with diamond tools

    DOEpatents

    Casstevens, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for machine optical quality finishes and contour accuracies of workpieces of carbon-containing metals such as steel with diamond tooling. The wear rate of the diamond tooling is significantly reduced by saturating the atmosphere at the interface of the workpiece and the diamond tool with a gaseous hydrocarbon during the machining operation. The presence of the gaseous hydrocarbon effectively eliminates the deterioration of the diamond tool by inhibiting or preventing the conversion of the diamond carbon to graphite carbon at the point of contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece.

  10. Bifurcation of stationary manifolds formed in the neighborhood of the equilibrium in a dynamic system of cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakovorotny, Vilor L.; Lukyanov, Alexandr D.; Gubanova, Alexandra A.; Hristoforova, Veronica V.

    2016-04-01

    The problems related to nonlinear dynamics of material processing by cutting are reviewed in this study. A mathematical model of a dynamic system that considers the dynamic link, formed by the cutting process, is proposed. The following key features of the dynamic links are examined: the dependence of the cutting forces on the area of the shear layer, lag of forces with respect to the elastic deformation displacement of the tool relative to the workpiece, the restrictions imposed on the movement of the tool toward the rear end of the instrument with the treated part of the workpiece, the dependence of the forces on the cutting speed, and the change of force components at varying angles of the tool with respect to the direction of movement of the tool relative to the workpiece. The dynamic subsystem of the tool is presented by a linear dynamic system in the plane normal to the cutting surface. The focus of this study is on the analysis of attracting sets formed near the equilibrium point (orbitally asymptotically stable limit cycles, two-dimensional invariant tori, and chaotic attractors). It is shown that by considering the bending deformation of the tool, there is a possibility of branching of equilibrium points during changes of control parameters. Data on the bifurcations of the parametric space and the space of control parameters are shown. The general laws of buckling equilibrium of the system are reviewed.

  11. Numerical modelling of orthogonal cutting: application to woodworking with a bench plane

    PubMed Central

    Nairn, John A.

    2016-01-01

    A numerical model for orthogonal cutting using the material point method was applied to woodcutting using a bench plane. The cutting process was modelled by accounting for surface energy associated with wood fracture toughness for crack growth parallel to the grain. By using damping to deal with dynamic crack propagation and modelling all contact between wood and the plane, simulations could initiate chip formation and proceed into steady-state chip propagation including chip curling. Once steady-state conditions were achieved, the cutting forces became constant and could be determined as a function of various simulation variables. The modelling details included a cutting tool, the tool's rake and grinding angles, a chip breaker, a base plate and a mouth opening between the base plate and the tool. The wood was modelled as an anisotropic elastic–plastic material. The simulations were verified by comparison to an analytical model and then used to conduct virtual experiments on wood planing. The virtual experiments showed interactions between depth of cut, chip breaker location and mouth opening. Additional simulations investigated the role of tool grinding angle, tool sharpness and friction. PMID:27274800

  12. Cutting the Cord-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the rear hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting from the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn took place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  13. Cutting the Cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting off the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn could take place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  14. Cutting the Cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the front hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting off the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn could take place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  15. Cutting the Cord-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the view from the rear hazard avoidance cameras on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as the rover turns 45 degrees clockwise. This maneuver is the first step in a 3-point turn that will rotate the rover 115 degrees to face west. The rover must make this turn before rolling off the lander because airbags are blocking it from exiting from the front lander petal. Before this crucial turn took place, engineers instructed the rover to cut the final cord linking it to the lander. The turn took around 30 minutes to complete.

  16. HIGH-SPEED CUTTING OF LARGE CROSS SECTION OF COLD METAL,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CASTINGS, * CUTTING ), (*COLD WORKING, EFFECTIVENESS), CUTTING TOOLS, STEEL, ALLOYS, RECTANGULAR BODIES, STRESSES, MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS, RODS, DEFORMATION, MICROSTRUCTURE, CRACK PROPAGATION, TIME, USSR

  17. TopCAT and PySESA: Open-source software tools for point cloud decimation, roughness analyses, and quantitative description of terrestrial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensleigh, J.; Buscombe, D.; Wheaton, J. M.; Brasington, J.; Welcker, C. W.; Anderson, K.

    2015-12-01

    The increasing use of high-resolution topography (HRT) constructed from point clouds obtained from technology such as LiDAR, SoNAR, SAR, SfM and a variety of range-imaging techniques, has created a demand for custom analytical tools and software for point cloud decimation (data thinning and gridding) and spatially explicit statistical analysis of terrestrial surfaces. We will present on a number of analytical and computational tools designed to quantify surface roughness and texture, directly from point clouds in a variety of ways (using spatial- and frequency-domain statistics). TopCAT (Topographic Point Cloud Analysis Toolkit; Brasington et al., 2012) and PySESA (Python program for Spatially Explicit Spectral Analysis) both work by applying a small moving window to (x,y,z) data to calculate a suite of (spatial and spectral domain) statistics, which are then spatially-referenced on a regular (x,y) grid at a user-defined resolution. Collectively, these tools facilitate quantitative description of surfaces and may allow, for example, fully automated texture characterization and segmentation, roughness and grain size calculation, and feature detection and classification, on very large point clouds with great computational efficiency. Using tools such as these, it may be possible to detect geomorphic change in surfaces which have undergone minimal elevation difference, for example deflation surfaces which have coarsened but undergone no net elevation change, or surfaces which have eroded and accreted, leaving behind a different textural surface expression than before. The functionalities of the two toolboxes are illustrated with example high-resolution bathymetric point cloud data collected with multibeam echosounder, and topographic data collected with LiDAR.

  18. Dismantling of Evaporators by Laser Cutting Measurement of Secondary Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Pilot, Guy; Fauvel, Sylvain; Gosse, Xavier; De Dinechin, Guillaume

    2006-07-01

    In order to dismantle the evaporators of an obsolete reprocessing plant in Marcoule, studies were carried out by IRSN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire) / DSU/SERAC in cooperation with CEA (power laser group) on the laser cutting of steel structures, on the request of COGEMA (now AREVA NC) /Marcoule (UP1 dismantling project manager) and CEA/UMODD (UP1 dismantling owner). The aim of these studies was: - to quantify and to characterize the secondary emissions produced by Nd-YAG laser cutting of Uranus 65 steel pieces representative of UP1 evaporator elements and to examine the influence of different parameters, - to qualify a pre-filtration technique and particularly an electrostatic precipitator, - to compare the Nd-YAG used with other cutting tools previously studied. The experiments, which took place in a 35 m{sup 3} ventilated cutting cell, allow to underline the following points: for the Uranus 65 steel, the sedimented dross, the deposits on the walls of the cutting cell and the aerosols drawn in the ventilation exhaust duct ({approx} 275 m{sup 3}/h), represent respectively between 92% and 99%, between 0.01% and 0.25% and between 1% and 8% of the total collected mass, the attached slag varies much from one configuration to the other and can sometimes amount to a relatively important fraction of the total mass, the kerves vary from 2 mm up to 7 mm for the Uranus 65 steel plates (thickness: 13.8 mm for the single plate and 12.8 + 3.5 mm for the double plate), the exhausted aerosol mass per cut length (g/m) decreases with the cutting speed, varies neither with the stand-off nor with the gas pressure, is dependent upon the gas nature (for the double plate), increases with the laser power, is strongly affected by the nature of the steel (stainless steel or mild steel) and is independent upon the plate position, the size distribution of aerosols is multimodal with a main mode often around 0.45 {mu}m, the electrostatic precipitator has been a

  19. Precision-Cut Liver Slices of Salmo salar as a tool to investigate the oxidative impact of CYP1A-mediated PCB 126 and 3-methylcholanthrene metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Benjamin; Beck, Michaël; Jaspart, Mélanie; Debier, Cathy; Calderon, Pedro Buc; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Rees, Jean-François

    2011-02-01

    Fish isolated cell systems have long been used to predict in vivo toxicity of man-made chemicals. In present study, we tested the suitability of Precision-Cut Liver Slices (PCLS) as an alternative to these models that allows the evaluation of a global tissue response to toxicants, to investigate oxidative stress response to cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) induction in fish liver. PCLS of Salmo salar were exposed for 21 h to increasing doses of 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) and Polychlorobiphenyl 126 (PCB 126). 3-MC (25 μM) strongly induced CYP1A transcription. In dose-response analysis (25-100 μM), EROD activity was strongly increased at intermediate 3-MC concentrations. We found the counter-intuitive decline of EROD at the highest 3-MC doses to result from reversible competition with ethoxyresorufin. No increases of H(2)O(2) production, antioxidant enzymes activities or oxidative damage to lipids were found with 3-MC treatments. PCLS subjected to PCB 126 (2-200 nM) showed increased contamination levels and a parallel increased CYP1A mRNA synthesis and EROD activity. H(2)O(2) production tended to increase but no oxidative damage to lipids was found. As antioxidant enzymes activities declined at the highest PCB 126 dose, it is suggested that longer incubation periods could be required to generate oxidative stress in PCLS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Corrosion resistance appraisal of TiN, TiCN and TiAlN coatings deposited by CAE-PVD method on WC-Co cutting tools exposed to artificial sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, A. A.; Pencea, I.; Branzei, M.; Trancă, D. E.; Ţepeş, G.; Sfăt, C. E.; Ciovica (Coman), E.; Gherghilescu, A. I.; Stanciu, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    A new advanced sintered composite cutting tool has been developed based on tungsten carbide matrix ligated with cobalt (WC-Co) additivated with tantalum carbide (TaC), titanium carbide (TiC) and niobium carbide (NbC) as grain growth inhibitors. Titanium nitride (TiN), titanium carbonitride (TiCN) and titanium aluminium nitride (TiAlN) coatings were deposited on these tools by CAE-PVD technique to find out the best solution to improve the corrosion resistance of this tool in marine environment. The electrochemical behaviours of the specimens in 3.5% NaCl water solution were estimated by potentiodynamic polarization measurements i.e. the open circuit potential (Eoc), corrosion potential (Ecorr) and corrosion current density (icorr). Wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), optical microscopy (OM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations have been carried on tested and untested specimens to substantiate the corrosion resistance of the tested specimens. Based on the open circuit potential (Eoc) and corrosion potential (Ecorr) results, the tested specimens were ranked as TiN, TiAlN, TiCN and WC-Co while on corrosion current density (icorr) and protective efficiency (P) values they have been ranked as TiN, TiAlN, WC-Co and TiCN. The WAXD, MO and AFM results unambiguously show that the corrosion resistance depends on the nature and morphology of the coating.

  1. Effects of heat on cut mark characteristics.

    PubMed

    Waltenberger, Lukas; Schutkowski, Holger

    2017-02-01

    Cut marks on bones provide crucial information about tools used and their mode of application, both in archaeological and forensic contexts. Despite a substantial amount of research on cut mark analysis and the influence of fire on bones (shrinkage, fracture pattern, recrystallisation), there is still a lack of knowledge in cut mark analysis on burnt remains. This study provides information about heat alteration of cut marks and whether consistent features can be observed that allow direct interpretation of the implemented tools used. In a controlled experiment, cut marks (n=25) were inflicted on pig ribs (n=7) with a kitchen knife and examined using micro-CT and digital microscopy. The methods were compared in terms of their efficacy in recording cut marks on native and heat-treated bones. Statistical analysis demonstrates that floor angles and the maximum slope height of cuts undergo significant alteration, whereas width, depth, floor radius, slope, and opening angle remain stable. Micro-CT and digital microscopy are both suitable methods for cut mark analysis. However, significant differences in measurements were detected between both methods, as micro-CT is less accurate due to the lower resolution. Moreover, stabbing led to micro-fissures surrounding the cuts, which might also influence the alteration of cut marks.

  2. Microwave interferometer controls cutting depth of plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.

    1969-01-01

    Microwave interferometer system controls the cutting of plastic materials to a prescribed depth. The interferometer is mounted on a carriage with a spindle and cutting tool. A cross slide, mounted on the carriage, allows the interferometer and cutter to move toward or away from the plastic workpiece.

  3. Scissors: More than a Cut Above

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzanne, Teri

    2005-01-01

    Scissors are a unique interactive tool when successfully used, allowing teachers and students to recognize and explore each other's creative ability while nurturing mutual communication. Freehand cutting gives children freedom to create as they cut. Scissors have the power to improve fine motor skills, stimulate creative imagination, reinforce…

  4. Scissors: More than a Cut Above

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzanne, Teri

    2005-01-01

    Scissors are a unique interactive tool when successfully used, allowing teachers and students to recognize and explore each other's creative ability while nurturing mutual communication. Freehand cutting gives children freedom to create as they cut. Scissors have the power to improve fine motor skills, stimulate creative imagination, reinforce…

  5. Nanometric mechanical cutting of metallic glass investigated using atomistic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Da; Fang, Te-Hua; Su, Jih-Kai

    2017-02-01

    The effects of cutting depth, tool nose radius, and temperature on the cutting mechanism and mechanics of amorphous NiAl workpieces are studied using molecular dynamics simulations based on the second-moment approximation of the many-body tight-binding potential. These effects are investigated in terms of atomic trajectories and flow field, shear strain, cutting force, resistance factor, cutting ratio, and pile-up characteristics. The simulation results show that a nanoscale chip with a shear plane of 135° is extruded by the tool from a workpiece surface during the cutting process. The workpiece atoms underneath the tool flow upward due to the adhesion force and elastic recovery. The required tangential force and normal force increase with increasing cutting depth and tool nose radius; both forces also increase with decreasing t