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Sample records for point-of-care testing poct

  1. Inflammation markers in point-of-care testing (POCT).

    PubMed

    Pfäfflin, Albrecht; Schleicher, Erwin

    2009-03-01

    Inflammation is a central issue in medicine. Inflammatory processes may be local or systemic, acute or chronic, and they may be benign or fatal. In bacterial or viral infections fast and reliable diagnosis is essential for appropriate treatment, e.g. antimicrobial therapy. The time to diagnosis is critical because uncontrolled infections may lead to sepsis with a mortality rate close to 50%. Beside clinical signs, laboratory markers are important in detecting, differentiating, and monitoring inflammation, particularly acute infections. Currently several inflammation markers including leukocyte count and leukocyte differentiation, C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), and interleukins (IL) 6 and 8, is available, and potential future serum markers are under development. In this article the clinical use of these markers in routine laboratory and in point-of-care testing is described and the diagnostic value of the four groups of laboratory marker is compared. Current data show that leukocyte count or, better, neutrophil count, CRP, and PCT are well suited to support of rapid diagnosis of inflammation and infections in children and adults whereas measurement of IL-6 and 8 are preferable for detection of sepsis in neonates.

  2. Systems Engineering and Point of Care Testing: Report from the NIBIB POCT/Systems Engineering Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, James E; McGowan, Heather; DiResta, Ellen; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Klapperich, Catherine; Parrish, John; Korte, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    The first part of this manuscript is an introduction to systems engineering and how it may be applied to health care and point of care testing (POCT). Systems engineering is an interdisciplinary field that seeks to better understand and manage changes in complex systems and projects as whole. Systems are sets of interconnected elements which interact with each other, are dynamic, change over time and are subject to complex behaviors. The second part of this paper reports on the results of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) workshop exploring the future of point of care testing and technologies and the recognition that these new technologies do not exist in isolation. That they exist within ecosystems of other technologies and systems; and these systems influence their likelihood of success or failure and their effectiveness. In this workshop, a diverse group of individuals from around the country, from disciplines ranging from clinical care, engineering, regulatory affairs and many others to members of the three major National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded efforts in the areas the Centers for POCT for sexually transmitted disease, POCT for the future of Cancer Care, POCT primary care research network, gathered together for a modified deep dive workshop exploring the current state of the art, mapping probable future directions and developing longer term goals. The invitees were broken up into 4 thematic groups: Home, Outpatient, Public/shared space and Rural/global. Each group proceeded to explore the problem and solution space for point of care tests and technology within their theme. While each thematic area had specific challenges, many commonalities also emerged. This effort thus helped create a conceptual framework for POCT as well as identifying many of the challenges for POCT going forward. Four main dimensions were identified as defining the functional space for both point of care testing and treatment, these are

  3. Narrative review of primary care point-of-care testing (POCT) and antibacterial use in respiratory tract infection (RTI)

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Jonathan; Butler, Christopher; Hopstaken, Rogier; Dryden, Matthew Scott; McNulty, Cliodna; Hurding, Simon; Moore, Michael; Livermore, David Martin

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global problem and is being addressed through national strategies to improve diagnostics, develop new antimicrobials and promote antimicrobial stewardship. A narrative review of the literature was undertaken to ascertain the value of C reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin, measurements to guide antibacterial prescribing in adult patients presenting to GP practices with symptoms of respiratory tract infection (RTI). Studies that were included were randomised controlled trials, controlled before and after studies, cohort studies and economic evaluations. Many studies demonstrated that the use of CRP tests in patients presenting with RTI symptoms reduces antibiotic prescribing by 23.3% to 36.16%. Procalcitonin is not currently available as a point-of-care testing (POCT), but has shown value for patients with RTI admitted to hospital. GPs and patients report a good acceptability for a CRP POCT and economic evaluations show cost-effectiveness of CRP POCT over existing RTI management in primary care. POCTs increase diagnostic precision for GPs in the better management of patients with RTI. CRP POCT can better target antibacterial prescribing by GPs and contribute to national antimicrobial resistance strategies. Health services need to develop ways to ensure funding is transferred in order for POCT to be implemented. PMID:25973210

  4. Potential point of care tests (POCTs) for maternal health in Peru, perspectives of pregnant women and their partners

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Globally, no qualitative studies have explored the perspectives of women and their partners about the integration of technology – and specifically diagnostic testing technologies – into antenatal care. The study objective was to describe the demand side for pregnancy-related diagnostic tests from the perspective of Peruvian consumers, including female and male community members, by engaging participants about their awareness of and care-seeking for pregnancy-related diagnostic tests and their preferred characteristics and testing conditions for pregnancy-related point-of-care diagnostic tests (POCTs). Methods Sixty-seven mothers and fathers of children under one from the peri-urban coast and the peri-urban and rural highlands and jungle of Peru participated in ten focus groups. Results Participants think that pregnancy-related diagnostic tests are important and they and their fellow community members are committed to ensuring that pregnant women receive the tests they need. Participants expressed clear demands for pregnancy-related POCTs, including important characteristics for the tests themselves (certification, rapid, reliable results) and for test implementation (well-trained, personable good communicators as test administrators at well-equipped, convenient testing sites). Participants emphasized the importance of short waiting times and explained that many people have some ability to pay for POCTs, particularly if they are innovative, rapid or multiplex. Conclusions Engaging future POCT users as consumers who are able to make key decisions about the development and implementation of pregnancy-related POCTs is valuable and informative. PMID:24433514

  5. Barriers to hospital-based clinical adoption of point-of-care testing (POCT): A systematic narrative review.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Alistair D; Dixon, Dorian; Meenan, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in areas such as biomarker discovery and microfluidic device fabrication have allowed clinical testing to be moved ever closer to the site of patient care. The development of a range of point-of-care testing (POCT) devices that seek to provide the clinician with diagnostic test results more rapidly offer the opportunity to enhance the quality of care for the individual patient and the population at large. However, there are indications that, notwithstanding advances in the technologies that underpin the utility of POCT, their clinical uptake and utilization is less than might be expected. Moreover, the nature and relative importance of the barriers identified as being impediments to their more widespread adoption are not well understood. This article reports the findings from a systematic narrative review of published literature sources over the period 2000 to January 2014 to identify and categorize the various barriers to adoption of POCT devices within the clinical environment. Data from a total of six electronic bibliographic databases were accessed and these searches were supplemented by scrutinizing the reference lists within the key articles identified. A set of 49 key articles were assessed in detail and from these four specific categories of barrier to adoption of POCT were identified. Identification and categorization of these barriers, along with an assessment of their significance to clinical practice, is seen as necessary for developing real solutions to ensure appropriate and effective POCT uptake. The most prevalent categories were those associated with the economics of adoption and quality assurance and regulatory issues, each which were reflected in 65% of the literature articles reviewed. Device performance and data management issues were cited in 51% of the publications. Staff and operational issues were found within 35% of articles. The most significant barriers identified concerned higher cost per test of POCT in comparison to

  6. Point of care testing: diagnosis outside the virology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Blyth, Christopher C; Booy, Robert; Dwyer, Dominic E

    2011-01-01

    Numerous point-of-care tests (POCTs) are available to diagnose viral infections in both hospital and community settings. The ideal POCT is rapid, sensitive, specific, and simple to perform. This chapter will describe the benefits of POCTs, factors that can influence the accuracy of POCTs and highlight some limitations of POCT strategies. The sensitivity, specificity, and turn-around time of available POCTs are included for common conditions including respiratory viral infections (e.g. influenza, RSV) and blood-borne viral infections (e.g. HIV).

  7. Resident training in point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sheldon; Howanitz, Peter J

    2007-06-01

    Although central laboratory testing has been the norm for the last few decades and point-of-care testing (POCT) is considered an emerging area, physicians were performing POCT long before the existence of central laboratory testing. As medical directors of POCT programs, pathologists need the basic knowledge and skills associated with directing laboratory-based testing programs as well as additional knowledge and skills about testing at the point of care. Although the essential elements of quality testing are the same for laboratory-based and POCT, the enormous variety of settings, technologies, and workers involved present unique challenges. PMID:17556092

  8. Resident training in point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sheldon; Howanitz, Peter J

    2007-06-01

    Although central laboratory testing has been the norm for the last few decades and point-of-care testing (POCT) is considered an emerging area, physicians were performing POCT long before the existence of central laboratory testing. As medical directors of POCT programs, pathologists need the basic knowledge and skills associated with directing laboratory-based testing programs as well as additional knowledge and skills about testing at the point of care. Although the essential elements of quality testing are the same for laboratory-based and POCT, the enormous variety of settings, technologies, and workers involved present unique challenges.

  9. Guidelines for point-of-care testing: haematology.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Carol; Guthrie, David; Hyde, Keith; Mackie, Ian; Parker, Norman; Popek, Mary; Porter, Neil; Stephens, Clare

    2008-09-01

    This guideline provides a framework for the arrangement of point-of-care testing (POCT) services, previously known as near patient testing (patient self-testing not covered). POCT is defined as any analytical test performed outside the laboratory. Primary users are often non-laboratory healthcare workers. The guidance applies to units within hospitals as well as general practioner surgeries, community clinics and pharmacies. The head of the haematology laboratory or a point of care coordinator must take responsibility for all aspects of the POCT service, including quality and training. Depending on the size and nature of the POCT practice, a local POCT manager may also be required. Equipment selected should have received a successful independent performance evaluation. If an independent evaluation has not been performed the purchaser should assess the device according to the protocol in this document. POCT devices should generate results that are comparable to those of the local laboratory. An accredited external quality assessment programme and internal quality control system must be established. Manufacturers promoting POCT devices designed for non-laboratory sites, e.g. pharmacies, should undertake training and annual competency assessment, perhaps using a web-based system. A diagram to illustrate the stages for the implementation of a POCT service is illustrated.

  10. [Point-of-care-testing--the intensive care laboratory].

    PubMed

    Müller, M M; Hackl, W; Griesmacher, A

    1999-01-01

    After successful centralization of laboratory analyses since more than 30 years, advances in biosensors, microprocessors, measurement of undiluted whole blood and miniaturization of laboratory analyzers are leading nowadays more and more to a re-decentralization in the laboratory medicine. Point-of-care-testing (POCT), which is defined as any laboratory test performed outside central or decentralized laboratories, is becoming more and more popular. The theoretical advantages of POCT are faster turn-around-times (TAT), more rapid medical decisions, avoidance of sample identification and sample transport problems and the need of only small specimen volumes. These advantages are frequently mentioned, but are not associated with a clear clinical benefit. The disadvantages of POCT such as incorrect handling and/or maintenance of the analyzers by nontrained clinical staff, inadequate or even absent calibrations and/or quality controls, lack of cost-effectiveness because of an increased number of analyzers and more expensive reagents, insufficient documentation and difficult comparability of the obtained POCT-results with routine laboratory results, are strongly evident. According to the authors' opinion the decision for the establishing of POCT has only to be made in a close co-operation between physicians and laboratorians in order to vouch for necessity and high quality of the analyses. Taking the local situation into consideration (24-h-central laboratory, etc.) the spectrum of parameters measured by means of POCT should be rigorously restricted to the vital functions. Such analytes should be: hemoglobin or hematocrit, activated whole blood clotting time, blood gases, sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, glucose, creatinine, ammonia and lactate.

  11. The state of point-of-care testing: a european perspective

    PubMed Central

    Greig-Pylypczuk, Roman; Huisman, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) refers to any diagnostic test administered outside the central laboratory at or near the location of the patient. By performing the sample collection and data analysis steps in the same location POCT cuts down on transport and processing delays, resulting in the rapid feedback of test results to medical decision-makers. Over the past decades the availability and use of POCT have steadily increased in Europe and throughout the international community. However, concerns about overall utility and the reliability of benefits to patient care have impeded the growth of POCT in some areas. While there is no agreed-upon standard for how success should be judged, the increases in speed and mobility provided by POCT can lead to substantial advantages over traditional laboratory testing. When properly utilized, POCT has been shown to yield measurable improvements in patient care, workflow efficiency, and even provide significant financial benefits. However, important organizational and quality assurance challenges must be addressed with the implementation of POCT in any health care environment. To ensure maximal benefits it may be necessary to evaluate critically and restructure existing clinical pathways to capitalize better on the rapid test turnaround times provided by POCT. PMID:25622619

  12. Existing and Emerging Technologies for Point-of-Care Testing

    PubMed Central

    St John, Andrew; Price, Christopher P

    2014-01-01

    The volume of point-of-care testing (PoCT) has steadily increased over the 40 or so years since its widespread introduction. That growth is likely to continue, driven by changes in healthcare delivery which are aimed at delivering less costly care closer to the patient’s home. In the developing world there is the challenge of more effective care for infectious diseases and PoCT may play a much greater role here in the future. PoCT technologies can be split into two categories, but in both, testing is generally performed by technologies first devised more than two decades ago. These technologies have undoubtedly been refined and improved to deliver easier-to-use devices with incremental improvements in analytical performance. Of the two major categories the first is small handheld devices, providing qualitative or quantitative determination of an increasing range of analytes. The dominant technologies here are glucose biosensor strips and lateral flow strips using immobilised antibodies to determine a range of parameters including cardiac markers and infectious pathogens. The second category of devices are larger, often bench-top devices which are essentially laboratory instruments which have been reduced in both size and complexity. These include critical care analysers and, more recently, small haematology and immunology analysers. New emerging devices include those that are utilising molecular techniques such as PCR to provide infectious disease testing in a sufficiently small device to be used at the point of care. This area is likely to grow with many devices being developed and likely to reach the commercial market in the next few years. PMID:25336761

  13. Risk Management for Point-of-Care Testing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is growing in popularity, and with this growth comes an increased chance of errors. Risk management is a way to reduce errors. Originally developed for the manufacturing industry, risk management principles have application for improving the quality of test results in the clinical laboratory. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), EP23-A Laboratory Quality Control based on Risk Management guideline, introduces risk management to the clinical laboratory and describes how to build and implement a quality control plan for a laboratory test. A simple, unit-use blood gas analyzer is utilized as an example for developing a laboratory quality control plan. The US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has revised the Clinical and Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) interpretive guidelines to provide a new quality control option, individualized quality control plans (IQCP), for decreasing the frequency of analyzing liquid controls from two levels each day of testing to manufacturer recommended frequencies in conjunction with a device’s built-in internal control processes and the risk of error when testing with that device. IQCPs have the advantage of allowing laboratories the flexibility to adopt alternative control processes in concert with traditional liquid controls to improve efficiency and cost effectiveness while providing optimal quality POCT results for patient care.

  14. Where are we at with point-of-care testing in haematology?

    PubMed

    Briggs, Carol; Kimber, Simon; Green, Laura

    2012-09-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) in haematology has continued to grow in popularity and uptake throughout the world. The increasing demand to reduce the turnaround time of test results, coupled with rapid improvements in technology, have led to the development of several devices that are designed for use in different clinical settings, with the hope of improving patient care. The most used POCT in haematology is measurement of haemoglobin concentration. Other POCT devices (used primarily in developing countries) for malaria screening and CD4+ T-lymphocytes for quantification of human-immunodeficiency-virus are becoming the cornerstone for the diagnosis and management of these disorders. New devices are also available for red cell indices, white blood cell count and platelets. In this review clinical studies that validate the use of such devices will be discussed, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of POCT in haematology. A disadvantage of POCT is a lack of training, poor standardization in obtaining blood samples and insufficient internal/external quality assessment. As there is every reason to expect that POCT use will increase in all pathology disciplines, including haematology, it is imperative that systems are put in place to oversee these issues.

  15. ASVCP guidelines: quality assurance for point-of-care testing in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Flatland, Bente; Freeman, Kathleen P; Vap, Linda M; Harr, Kendal E

    2013-12-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) refers to any laboratory testing performed outside the conventional reference laboratory and implies close proximity to patients. Instrumental POCT systems consist of small, handheld or benchtop analyzers. These have potential utility in many veterinary settings, including private clinics, academic veterinary medical centers, the community (eg, remote area veterinary medical teams), and for research applications in academia, government, and industry. Concern about the quality of veterinary in-clinic testing has been expressed in published veterinary literature; however, little guidance focusing on POCT is available. Recognizing this void, the ASVCP formed a subcommittee in 2009 charged with developing quality assurance (QA) guidelines for veterinary POCT. Guidelines were developed through literature review and a consensus process. Major recommendations include (1) taking a formalized approach to POCT within the facility, (2) use of written policies, standard operating procedures, forms, and logs, (3) operator training, including periodic assessment of skills, (4) assessment of instrument analytical performance and use of both statistical quality control and external quality assessment programs, (5) use of properly established or validated reference intervals, (6) and ensuring accurate patient results reporting. Where possible, given instrument analytical performance, use of a validated 13s control rule for interpretation of control data is recommended. These guidelines are aimed at veterinarians and veterinary technicians seeking to improve management of POCT in their clinical or research setting, and address QA of small chemistry and hematology instruments. These guidelines are not intended to be all-inclusive; rather, they provide a minimum standard for maintenance of POCT instruments in the veterinary setting.

  16. ICSH Guideline for worldwide point-of-care testing in haematology with special reference to the complete blood count.

    PubMed

    Briggs, C; Carter, J; Lee, S-H; Sandhaus, L; Simon-Lopez, R; Vives Corrons, J-L

    2008-04-01

    These guidelines provide information on how to develop and manage a point-of-care (POCT) service so that reliable haematology results are produced regardless of where the test is performed. Many of the issues addressed here are relevant to POCT within hospitals or health centres; however, the principles are equally applicable to care in the community and doctors' offices. Other aspects discussed in this guideline are the initiation of the service (including indications for and limitations of a POCT service), staff training, type of haematology equipment selected, the blood results, monitoring of quality, accreditation, safety and cost. Equipment selected should generate results that are comparable to those of the local reference laboratory. If a complete independent evaluation of the POCT device has not been performed, the purchaser should perform a local assessment according to the protocol in this document. A literature search should also be undertaken to find independent peer reviewed evaluations on POCT equipment. Often the ideals discussed here may not be achievable in some developing countries but long-term training and education of POCT workers needs to be supported and constantly kept on government agendas to reach the recommendations advised here. Users should interpret these recommendations for their particular POCT needs and setting.

  17. Organization of the POCT Unit

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) has evolved as an important part of laboratory medicine by virtue of its compactness, portability, and the feasibility of operation by nonlaboratory personnel, where fast and accurate testing methods are a primary concern and, as a result, improving the patient care. To successfully achieve POCT quality in networks, a multidisciplinary organizational approach is required. A clearly defined organizational structure should be put in place for proper functioning and optimum utilization of each POCT unit. The POCT unit must include designated authority, responsibility, and accountability.

  18. Point-of-care testing in the overcrowded emergency department--can it make a difference?

    PubMed

    Rooney, Kevin D; Schilling, Ulf Martin

    2014-01-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) face several challenges in maintaining consistent quality care in the face of steadily increasing public demand. Improvements in the survival rate of critically ill patients in the ED are directly related to the advancement of early recognition and treatment. Frequent episodes of overcrowding and prolonged waiting times force EDs to operate beyond their capacity and threaten to impact upon patient care. The objectives of this review are as follows: (a) to establish overcrowding as a threat to patient outcomes, person-centered care, and public safety in the ED; (b) to describe scenarios in which point-of-care testing (POCT) has been found to ameliorate factors thought to contribute to overcrowding; and (c) to discuss how POCT can be used directly, and indirectly, to expedite patient care and improve outcomes. Various studies have shown that overcrowding in the ED has profound effects on operational efficiency and patient care. Several reports have quantified overcrowding in the ED and have described a relationship between heightened periods of overcrowding and delays in treatment, increased incidence of adverse events, and an even greater probability of mortality. In certain scenarios, POCT has been found to increase the number of patients discharged in a timely manner, expedite triage of urgent but non-emergency patients, and decrease delays to treatment initiation. This review concludes that POCT, when used effectively, may alleviate the negative impacts of overcrowding on the safety, effectiveness, and person-centeredness of care in the ED. PMID:25672600

  19. Critical Care Glucose Point-of-Care Testing.

    PubMed

    Narla, S N; Jones, M; Hermayer, K L; Zhu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining blood glucose concentration within an acceptable range is a goal for patients with diabetes mellitus. Point-of-care glucose meters initially designed for home self-monitoring in patients with diabetes have been widely used in the hospital settings because of ease of use and quick reporting of blood glucose information. They are not only utilized for the general inpatient population but also for critically ill patients. Many factors affect the accuracy of point-of-care glucose testing, particularly in critical care settings. Inaccurate blood glucose information can result in unsafe insulin delivery which causes poor glucose control and can be fatal. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the limitations of point-of-care glucose testing. This chapter will first introduce glucose regulation in diabetes mellitus, hyperglycemia/hypoglycemia in the intensive care unit, importance of glucose control in critical care patients, and pathophysiological variables of critically ill patients that affect the accuracy of point-of-care glucose testing. Then, we will discuss currently available point-of-care glucose meters and preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical sources of variation and error in point-of-care glucose testing. PMID:27645817

  20. Access and Quality of HIV-Related Point-of-Care Diagnostic Testing in Global Health Programs.

    PubMed

    Fonjungo, Peter N; Boeras, Debrah I; Zeh, Clement; Alexander, Heather; Parekh, Bharat S; Nkengasong, John N

    2016-02-01

    Access to point-of-care testing (POCT) improves patient care, especially in resource-limited settings where laboratory infrastructure is poor and the bulk of the population lives in rural settings. However, because of challenges in rolling out the technology and weak quality assurance measures, the promise of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related POCT in resource-limited settings has not been fully exploited to improve patient care and impact public health. Because of these challenges, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), in partnership with other organizations, recently launched the Diagnostics Access Initiative. Expanding HIV programs, including the "test and treat" strategies and the newly established UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets, will require increased access to reliable and accurate POCT results. In this review, we examine various components that could improve access and uptake of quality-assured POC tests to ensure coverage and public health impact. These components include evaluation, policy, regulation, and innovative approaches to strengthen the quality of POCT. PMID:26423384

  1. Responsibilities in point-of-care testing. An institutional perspective.

    PubMed

    Lamb, L S

    1995-10-01

    The development of "user-friendly" laboratory analyzers, combined with the need for rapid assessment of critical care patients, has led to the performance of in vitro diagnostic testing at the point of care. This strategy has been well received by most physicians who desire rapid turnaround times for laboratory tests, especially in the critical care areas. Since the primary care-giver in most critical care units is the registered nurse, much point-of-care testing has been delegated to nursing personnel. This has resulted in questions of authority, responsibility, regulation, and conflict resolution. These areas are discussed along with alternative strategies, such as vacuum transport, stat and/or satellite laboratories, unit-based phelebotomists, or "super techs," designed to achieve the goals of bedside or near-bedside testing in the critical care setting. PMID:7487383

  2. Integrating microfluidics and lensless imaging for point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sangjun; Keles, Hasan Onur; Ozcan, Aydogan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Haeggstrom, Edward; Kuritzkes, Daniel; Demirci, Utkan

    2009-07-15

    We demonstrate an integrated platform that merges a microfluidic chip with lensless imaging to target CD4(+) T-lymphocyte counts for HIV point-of-care testing at resource-limited settings. The chips were designed and fabricated simply with a laser cutter without using expensive cleanroom equipment. To capture CD4(+) T-lymphocytes from blood, anti-CD4 antibody was immobilized on only one side of the microfluidic chip. These captured cells were detected through an optically clear chip using a charge coupled device (CCD) sensor by lensless shadow imaging techniques. Gray scale image of the captured cells in a 24 mm x 4 mm x 50 microm microfluidic chip was obtained by the lensless imaging platform. The automatic cell counting software enumerated the captured cells in 3s. Captured cells were also imaged with a fluorescence microscope and manually counted to characterize functionality of the integrated platform. The integrated platform achieved 70.2+/-6.5% capture efficiency, 88.8+/-5.4% capture specificity for CD4(+) T-lymphocytes, 96+/-1.6% CCD efficiency, and 83.5+/-2.4% overall platform performance (n=9 devices) compared to the gold standard, i.e. flow cytometry count. The integrated system gives a CD4 count from blood within 10 min. The integrated platform points a promising direction for point-of-care testing (POCT) to rapidly capture, image and count subpopulations of cells from blood samples in an automated matter. PMID:19467854

  3. Review: progress in the diagnosis of dengue virus infections and importance of point of care test: a review.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Aneela; Wang, Jufang

    2015-01-01

    It is an urgent need of highly sensitive, specific and economical diagnostic tools for early and fast diagnosis of highly challenging dengue virus infections. Many laboratory methods including virus detection, genome detection, antigen detection and serological detection of such short-lived viremia were explored but promising outcomes for economical immunochromatographic tests have been reported in this review. With the trend of fast, easy operation, rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) based on immunochromatographic assays are of great importance due to point of care test (POCT) in the dengue endemic regions where it is short of laboratory equipments and cold storage conditions. Such kind of point of care diagnosis is more efficient, fast and user friendly. Moreover, the development of highly advance RDT is dependent on the use of anti-dengue monoclonal antibodies highly specific for particular analyte/antigen. PMID:25553705

  4. Point-of-Care Testing and Cardiac Biomarkers: The Standard of Care and Vision for Chest Pain Centers.

    PubMed

    Kost, Gerald J; Tran, Nam K

    2005-11-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is defined as testing at or near the site of patient care. POCTdecreases therapeutic turnaround time (TTAT), increases clinical efficiency, and improves medical and economic outcomes. TTAT represents the time from test ordering to patient treatment. POC technologies have become ubiquitous in the United States, and, therefore,so has the potential for speed, convenience, and satisfaction, strong advantages for physicians, nurses, and patients in chest pain centers. POCT is applied most beneficially through the collaborative teamwork of clinicians and laboratorians who use integrative strategies, performance maps, clinical algorithms, and care paths (critical pathways). For example, clinical investigators have shown that on-site integration of testing for cardiac injury markers (myoglobin, creatinine kinase myocardial band [CKMB],and cardiac troponin I [cTnI]) in accelerated diagnostic algorithms produces effective screening, less hospitalization, and substantial savings. Chest pain centers, which now total over 150 accredited in the United States, incorporate similar types of protocol-driven performance enhancements. This optimization allows chest pain centers to improve patient evaluation, treatment, survival, and discharge. This article focuses on cardiac biomarker POCT for chest pain centers and emergency medicine.

  5. A highly sensitive and simply operated protease sensor toward point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Park, Seonhwa; Shin, Yu Mi; Seo, Jeongwook; Song, Ji-Joon; Yang, Haesik

    2016-04-21

    Protease sensors for point-of-care testing (POCT) require simple operation, a detection period of less than 20 minutes, and a detection limit of less than 1 ng mL(-1). However, it is difficult to meet these requirements with protease sensors that are based on proteolytic cleavage. This paper reports a highly reproducible protease sensor that allows the sensitive and simple electrochemical detection of the botulinum neurotoxin type E light chain (BoNT/E-LC), which is obtained using (i) low nonspecific adsorption, (ii) high signal-to-background ratio, and (iii) one-step solution treatment. The BoNT/E-LC detection is based on two-step proteolytic cleavage using BoNT/E-LC (endopeptidase) and l-leucine-aminopeptidase (LAP, exopeptidase). Indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrodes are modified partially with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) to increase their electrocatalytic activities. Avidin is then adsorbed on the electrodes to minimize the nonspecific adsorption of proteases. Low nonspecific adsorption allows a highly reproducible sensor response. Electrochemical-chemical (EC) redox cycling involving p-aminophenol (AP) and dithiothreitol (DTT) is performed to obtain a high signal-to-background ratio. After adding a C-terminally AP-labeled oligopeptide, DTT, and LAP simultaneously to a sample solution, no further treatment of the solution is necessary during detection. The detection limits of BoNT/E-LC in phosphate-buffered saline are 0.1 ng mL(-1) for an incubation period of 15 min and 5 fg mL(-1) for an incubation period of 4 h. The detection limit in commercial bottled water is 1 ng mL(-1) for an incubation period of 15 min. The developed sensor is selective to BoNT/E-LC among the four types of BoNTs tested. These results indicate that the protease sensor meets the requirements for POCT. PMID:26980003

  6. A scalable engineering approach to improve performance of a miniaturized optical detection system for in vitro point-of-care testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Hannah; Hu, Sijung; Liu, Changqing

    2015-03-01

    The demand for rapid screening technologies, to be used outside of a traditional healthcare setting, has been vastly expanding. This is requiring a new engineering platform for faster and cost effective techniques to be easily adopted through forward-thinking manufacturing procedures, i.e., advanced miniaturisation and heterogeneous integration of high performance microfluidics based point-of-care testing (POCT) systems. Although there has been a considerable amount of research into POCT systems, there exist tremendous challenges and bottlenecks in the design and manufacturing in order to reach a clinical acceptability of sensitivity and selectivity, as well as smart microsystems for healthcare. The project aims to research how to enable scalable production of such complex systems through 1) advanced miniaturisation of a physical layout and opto-electronic component allocation through an optimal design; and 2) heterogeneous integration of multiplexed fluorescence detection (MFD) for in vitro POCT. Verification is being arranged through experimental testing with a series of dilutions of commonly used fluorescence dye, i.e. Cy5. Iterative procedures will be engaged until satisfaction of the detection limit, of Cy5 dye, 1.209x10-10 M. The research creates a new avenue of rapid screening POCT manufacturing solutions with a particular view on high performance and multifunctional detection systems not only in POCT, but also life sciences and environmental applications.

  7. Economic Evidence and Point-of-Care Testing

    PubMed Central

    St John, Andrew; Price, Christopher P

    2013-01-01

    Health economics has been an established feature of the research, policymaking, practice and management in the delivery of healthcare. However its role is increasing as the cost of healthcare begins to drive changes in most healthcare systems. Thus the output from cost effectiveness studies is now being taken into account when making reimbursement decisions, e.g. in Australia and the United Kingdom. Against this background it is also recognised that the health economic tools employed in healthcare, and particularly the output from the use of these tools however, are not always employed in the routine delivery of services. One of the notable consequences of this situation is the poor record of innovation in healthcare with respect to the adoption of new technologies, and the realisation of their benefits. The evidence base for the effectiveness of diagnostic services is well known to be limited, and one consequence of this has been a very limited literature on cost effectiveness. One reason for this situation is undoubtedly the reimbursement strategies employed in laboratory medicine for many years, simplistically based on the complexity of the test procedure, and the delivery as a cost-per-test service. This has proved a disincentive to generate the required evidence, and little effort to generate an integrated investment and disinvestment business case, associated with care pathway changes. Point-of-care testing creates a particularly challenging scenario because, on the one hand, the unit cost-per-test is larger through the loss of the economy of scale offered by automation, whilst it offers the potential of substantial savings through enabling rapid delivery of results, and reduction of facility costs. This is important when many health systems are planning for complete system redesign. We review the literature on economic assessment of point-of-care testing in the context of these developments. PMID:24151342

  8. Integrating Microfluidics and Lensless Imaging for Point-of-Care Testing

    PubMed Central

    Moon, SangJun; Keles, Hasan Onur; Ozcan, Aydogan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Hæggstrom, Edward; Kuritzkes, Daniel; Demirci, Utkan

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate an integrated platform that merges a microfluidic chip with lensless imaging to target CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts for HIV point-of-care testing at resource-limited settings. The chips were designed and fabricated simply with a laser cutter without using expensive cleanroom equipment. To capture CD4+ T lymphocytes from blood, anti-CD4 antibody was immobilized on only one side of the microfluidic chip. These captured cells were detected through an optically clear chip using a charge coupled device (CCD) sensor by lensless shadow imaging techniques. Gray scale image of the captured cells in a 24 mm × 4 mm × 50 μm microfluidic chip was obtained by the lensless imaging platform. The automatic cell counting software enumerated the captured cells in three seconds. Captured cells were also imaged with a fluorescence microscope and manually counted to characterize functionality of the integrated platform. The integrated platform achieved 70.2 ± 6.5% capture efficiency, 88.8 ± 5.4% capture specificity for CD4+ T-lymphocytes, 96 ± 1.6% CCD efficiency, and 83.5 ± 2.4% overall platform performance (n = 9 devices) compared to the gold standard, i.e. flow cytometry count. The integrated system gives a CD4 count from blood within 10 minutes. The integrated platform points a promising direction for point-of-care testing (POCT) to rapidly capture, image and count subpopulations of cells from blood samples in an automated matter. PMID:19467854

  9. Point-of-care testing in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Fries, Dietmar; Streif, Werner

    2015-02-01

    Point-of-care (POC) testing in hemostasis has experienced a significant increase in the spectrum of available tests and the number of tests performed. Short turn-around time and observation of rapid changes in test results are facilitated. The quality control process in POC testing must encompass a preanalytic (collection), analytic (measurement), and postanalytic (clinical response) phase. Erroneous interpretation of findings and difficult quality controls can outweigh the advantages of POC testing.Only a limited number of hemostatic POC tests have proven useful so far: prothrombin time POC-monitoring of oral vitamin K antagonists; activated clotting time POC-monitoring of high-dose heparin therapy; platelet function analyzer (PFA; Siemens, Marburg, Germany) closure time (CT)-detection of von Willebrand disease and severe platelet function defects; whole blood aggregometry (WBA) Multiplate (Roche Diagnostics, Rotkreuz, Switzerland), and the VerifyNow system (Accumetrics, San Diego, CA)-detection of platelet dysfunction due to antiplatelet drugs; thromboelastography-continuous observation of clot formation and fibrinolysis. The use of various agonists in WBA and thromboelastography (TEG) requires some expertise. In experienced hands the PFA CT and WBA and TEG are recommended combinations.Application of POC testing depends strictly on whether it improves medical care and patient outcome. More POC test systems are in the research pipeline, but only a few will resist the ravages of time. PMID:25611850

  10. Point-of-care HIV tests done by peers, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Dutra de Barros, Clarissa Habckost; Lobo, Tainah Dourado de Miranda; Pasini, Elisiane Nelcina; Comparini, Regina Aparecida; Caldas de Mesquita, Fábio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Problem Early diagnosis of infections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is needed – especially among key populations such as sex workers, transgender people, men who have sex with men and people who use drugs. Approach The Brazilian Ministry of Health developed a strategy called Viva Melhor Sabendo (“live better knowing”) to increase HIV testing among key populations. In partnership with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), a peer point-of-care testing intervention, using an oral fluid rapid test, was introduced at social venues for key populations at different times of the day. Local setting Key populations in Brazil can have 40 times higher HIV prevalence than the general population (14.8% versus 0.4%). Relevant changes Legislation was reinterpreted, so that oral fluid rapid tests could be administered by any person trained in rapid testing by the health ministry. Between January 2014 and March 2015, 29 723 oral fluid tests were administered; 791 (2.7%) were positive. Among the key populations, transgender people had the greatest proportion of positive results (10.7%; 172/1612), followed by men who declared themselves as commercial sex workers (8.7%; 165/1889) and men who have sex with men (4.8%; 292/6055). Lessons learnt The strategy improved access to HIV testing. Testing done by peers at times and locations suitable for key populations increased acceptance of testing. Working with relevant NGOs is a useful approach when reaching out to these key populations. PMID:27516641

  11. Distance-based microfluidic quantitative detection methods for point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Li, Jiuxing; Song, Yanling; Zhou, Leiji; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2016-04-01

    Equipment-free devices with quantitative readout are of great significance to point-of-care testing (POCT), which provides real-time readout to users and is especially important in low-resource settings. Among various equipment-free approaches, distance-based visual quantitative detection methods rely on reading the visual signal length for corresponding target concentrations, thus eliminating the need for sophisticated instruments. The distance-based methods are low-cost, user-friendly and can be integrated into portable analytical devices. Moreover, such methods enable quantitative detection of various targets by the naked eye. In this review, we first introduce the concept and history of distance-based visual quantitative detection methods. Then, we summarize the main methods for translation of molecular signals to distance-based readout and discuss different microfluidic platforms (glass, PDMS, paper and thread) in terms of applications in biomedical diagnostics, food safety monitoring, and environmental analysis. Finally, the potential and future perspectives are discussed. PMID:26928571

  12. Distance-based microfluidic quantitative detection methods for point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Li, Jiuxing; Song, Yanling; Zhou, Leiji; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2016-04-01

    Equipment-free devices with quantitative readout are of great significance to point-of-care testing (POCT), which provides real-time readout to users and is especially important in low-resource settings. Among various equipment-free approaches, distance-based visual quantitative detection methods rely on reading the visual signal length for corresponding target concentrations, thus eliminating the need for sophisticated instruments. The distance-based methods are low-cost, user-friendly and can be integrated into portable analytical devices. Moreover, such methods enable quantitative detection of various targets by the naked eye. In this review, we first introduce the concept and history of distance-based visual quantitative detection methods. Then, we summarize the main methods for translation of molecular signals to distance-based readout and discuss different microfluidic platforms (glass, PDMS, paper and thread) in terms of applications in biomedical diagnostics, food safety monitoring, and environmental analysis. Finally, the potential and future perspectives are discussed.

  13. Point-of-care test for cervical cancer in LMICs

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Sulma I.; Ren, Wen; Flowers, Lisa; Rajwa, Bartek; Chibwesha, Carla J.; Parham, Groesbeck P.; Irudayaraj, Joseph M.K.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer screening using Papanicolaou's smear test has been highly effective in reducing death from this disease. However, this test is unaffordable in low- and middle-income countries, and its complexity has limited wide-scale uptake. Alternative tests, such as visual inspection with acetic acid or Lugol's iodine and human papillomavirus DNA, are sub-optimal in terms of specificity and sensitivity, thus sensitive and affordable tests with high specificity for on-site reporting are needed. Using proteomics and bioinformatics, we have identified valosin-containing protein (VCP) as differentially expressed between normal specimens and those with cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 (CIN2/CIN3+) or worse. VCP-specific immunohistochemical staining (validated by a point-of-care technology) provided sensitive (93%) and specific (88%) identification of CIN2/CIN3+ and may serve as a critical biomarker for cervical-cancer screening. Future efforts will focus on further refinements to enhance analytic sensitivity and specificity of our proposed test, as well as on prototype development. PMID:26934314

  14. Analytical performance, agreement and user-friendliness of six point-of-care testing urine analysers for urinary tract infection in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Schot, Marjolein J C; van Delft, Sanne; Kooijman-Buiting, Antoinette M J; de Wit, Niek J; Hopstaken, Rogier M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Various point-of-care testing (POCT) urine analysers are commercially available for routine urine analysis in general practice. The present study compares analytical performance, agreement and user-friendliness of six different POCT urine analysers for diagnosing urinary tract infection in general practice. Setting All testing procedures were performed at a diagnostic centre for primary care in the Netherlands. Urine samples were collected at four general practices. Primary and secondary outcome measures Analytical performance and agreement of the POCT analysers regarding nitrite, leucocytes and erythrocytes, with the laboratory reference standard, was the primary outcome measure, and analysed by calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and Cohen's κ coefficient for agreement. Secondary outcome measures were the user-friendliness of the POCT analysers, in addition to other characteristics of the analysers. Results The following six POCT analysers were evaluated: Uryxxon Relax (Macherey Nagel), Urisys 1100 (Roche), Clinitek Status (Siemens), Aution 11 (Menarini), Aution Micro (Menarini) and Urilyzer (Analyticon). Analytical performance was good for all analysers. Compared with laboratory reference standards, overall agreement was good, but differed per parameter and per analyser. Concerning the nitrite test, the most important test for clinical practice, all but one showed perfect agreement with the laboratory standard. For leucocytes and erythrocytes specificity was high, but sensitivity was considerably lower. Agreement for leucocytes varied between good to very good, and for the erythrocyte test between fair and good. First-time users indicated that the analysers were easy to use. They expected higher productivity and accuracy when using these analysers in daily practice. Conclusions The overall performance and user-friendliness of all six commercially available POCT urine analysers was sufficient to justify routine

  15. Point-of-Care Technologies for Precision Cardiovascular Care and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    King, Kevin; Grazette, Luanda P.; Paltoo, Dina N.; McDevitt, John T.; Sia, Samuel K.; Barrett, Paddy M.; Apple, Fred S.; Gurbel, Paul A.; Weissleder, Ralph; Leeds, Hilary; Iturriaga, Erin J.; Rao, Anupama; Adhikari, Bishow; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Galis, Zorina S.; Libby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care technologies (POC or POCT) are enabling innovative cardiovascular diagnostics that promise to improve patient care across diverse clinical settings. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a working group to discuss POCT in cardiovascular medicine. The multidisciplinary working group, which included clinicians, scientists, engineers, device manufacturers, regulatory officials, and program staff, reviewed the state of the POCT field; discussed opportunities for POCT to improve cardiovascular care, realize the promise of precision medicine, and advance the clinical research enterprise; and identified barriers facing translation and integration of POCT with existing clinical systems. A POCT development roadmap emerged to guide multidisciplinary teams of biomarker scientists, technologists, health care providers, and clinical trialists as they: 1) formulate needs assessments; 2) define device design specifications; 3) develop component technologies and integrated systems; 4) perform iterative pilot testing; and 5) conduct rigorous prospective clinical testing to ensure that POCT solutions have substantial effects on cardiovascular care. PMID:26977455

  16. Performance Requirements to Achieve Cost-Effectiveness of Point-of-Care Tests for Sepsis Among Patients with Febrile Illness in Low-Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Penno, Erin C; Crump, John A; Baird, Sarah J

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial sepsis is an important cause of mortality in low- and middle-income countries, yet distinguishing patients with sepsis from those with other illnesses remains a challenge. Currently, management decisions are based on clinical assessment using algorithms such as Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illness. Efforts to develop and evaluate point-of-care tests (POCTs) for sepsis to guide decisions on the use of antimicrobials are underway. To establish the minimum performance characteristics of such a test, we varied the characteristics of a hypothetical POCT for sepsis required for it to be cost-effective and applied a decision tree model to a population of febrile patients presenting at the district hospital level in a low-resource setting. We used a case fatality probability of 20% for appropriately treated sepsis and of 50% for inappropriately treated sepsis. On the basis of clinical assessment for sepsis with established sensitivity of 0.83 and specificity of 0.62, we found that a POCT for sepsis with a sensitivity of 0.83 and a specificity of 0.94 was cost-effective, resulting in parity in survival but costing $1.14 less per live saved. A POCT with accuracy equivalent to the best malaria rapid diagnostic test was cheaper and more effective than clinical assessment. PMID:26195467

  17. Performance Requirements to Achieve Cost-Effectiveness of Point-of-Care Tests for Sepsis among Patients with Febrile Illness in Low-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Penno, Erin C.; Crump, John A.; Baird, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis is an important cause of mortality in low- and middle-income countries, yet distinguishing patients with sepsis from those with other illnesses remains a challenge. Currently, management decisions are based on clinical assessment using algorithms such as Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illness. Efforts to develop and evaluate point-of-care tests (POCTs) for sepsis to guide decisions on the use of antimicrobials are underway. To establish the minimum performance characteristics of such a test, we varied the characteristics of a hypothetical POCT for sepsis required for it to be cost-effective and applied a decision tree model to a population of febrile patients presenting at the district hospital level in a low-resource setting. We used a case fatality probability of 20% for appropriately treated sepsis and of 50% for inappropriately treated sepsis. On the basis of clinical assessment for sepsis with established sensitivity of 0.83 and specificity of 0.62, we found that a POCT for sepsis with a sensitivity of 0.83 and a specificity of 0.94 was cost-effective, resulting in parity in survival but costing $1.14 less per live saved. A POCT with accuracy equivalent to the best malaria rapid diagnostic test was cheaper and more effective than clinical assessment. PMID:26195467

  18. Ensuring quality: a key consideration in scaling-up HIV-related point-of-care testing programs

    PubMed Central

    Fonjungo, Peter N.; Osmanov, Saladin; Kuritsky, Joel; Ndihokubwayo, Jean Bosco; Bachanas, Pam; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Timperi, Ralph; Fine, Glenn; Stevens, Wendy; Habiyambere, Vincent; Nkengasong, John N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the WHO/US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief consultation was to discuss innovative strategies, offer guidance, and develop a comprehensive policy framework for implementing quality-assured HIV-related point-of-care testing (POCT). Methods: The consultation was attended by representatives from international agencies (WHO, UNICEF, UNITAID, Clinton Health Access Initiative), United States Agency for International Development, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief Cooperative Agreement Partners, and experts from more than 25 countries, including policy makers, clinicians, laboratory experts, and program implementers. Main outcomes: There was strong consensus among all participants that ensuring access to quality of POCT represents one of the key challenges for the success of HIV prevention, treatment, and care programs. The following four strategies were recommended: implement a newly proposed concept of a sustainable quality assurance cycle that includes careful planning; definition of goals and targets; timely implementation; continuous monitoring; improvements and adjustments, where necessary; and a detailed evaluation; the importance of supporting a cadre of workers [e.g. volunteer quality corps (Q-Corps)] with the role to ensure that the quality assurance cycle is followed and sustained; implementation of the new strategy should be seen as a step-wise process, supported by development of appropriate policies and tools; and joint partnership under the leadership of the ministries of health to ensure sustainability of implementing novel approaches. Conclusion: The outcomes of this consultation have been well received by program implementers in the field. The recommendations also laid the groundwork for developing key policy and quality documents for the implementation of HIV-related POCT. PMID:26807969

  19. Au@Pt nanoparticle encapsulated target-responsive hydrogel with volumetric bar-chart chip readout for quantitative point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi; Guan, Zhichao; Jia, Shasha; Lei, Zhichao; Lin, Shuichao; Zhang, Huimin; Ma, Yanli; Tian, Zhong-Qun; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2014-11-10

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) with the advantages of speed, simplicity, portability, and low cost is critical for the measurement of analytes in a variety of environments where access to laboratory infrastructure is lacking. While qualitative POCTs are widely available, quantitative POCTs present significant challenges. Here we describe a novel method that integrates an Au core/Pt shell nanoparticle (Au@PtNP) encapsulated target-responsive hydrogel with a volumetric bar-chart chip (V-Chip) for quantitative POCT. Upon target introduction, the hydrogel immediately dissolves and releases Au@PtNPs, which can efficiently catalyze the decomposition of H2 O2 to generate a large volume of O2 to move of an ink bar in the V-Chip. The concentration of the target introduced can be visually quantified by reading the traveling distance of the ink bar. This method has the potential to be used for portable and quantitative detection of a wide range of targets without any external instrument.

  20. More Than Just Accuracy: A Novel Method to Incorporate Multiple Test Attributes in Evaluating Diagnostic Tests Including Point of Care Tests

    PubMed Central

    Weigl, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, Annette; Ide, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Current frameworks for evaluating diagnostic tests are constrained by a focus on diagnostic accuracy, and assume that all aspects of the testing process and test attributes are discrete and equally important. Determining the balance between the benefits and harms associated with new or existing tests has been overlooked. Yet, this is critically important information for stakeholders involved in developing, testing, and implementing tests. This is particularly important for point of care tests (POCTs) where tradeoffs exist between numerous aspects of the testing process and test attributes. We developed a new model that multiple stakeholders (e.g., clinicians, patients, researchers, test developers, industry, regulators, and health care funders) can use to visualize the multiple attributes of tests, the interactions that occur between these attributes, and their impacts on health outcomes. We use multiple examples to illustrate interactions between test attributes (test availability, test experience, and test results) and outcomes, including several POCTs. The model could be used to prioritize research and development efforts, and inform regulatory submissions for new diagnostics. It could potentially provide a way to incorporate the relative weights that various subgroups or clinical settings might place on different test attributes. Our model provides a novel way that multiple stakeholders can use to visualize test attributes, their interactions, and impacts on individual and population outcomes. We anticipate that this will facilitate more informed decision making around diagnostic tests. PMID:27574576

  1. More Than Just Accuracy: A Novel Method to Incorporate Multiple Test Attributes in Evaluating Diagnostic Tests Including Point of Care Tests.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew; Weigl, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, Annette; Ide, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Current frameworks for evaluating diagnostic tests are constrained by a focus on diagnostic accuracy, and assume that all aspects of the testing process and test attributes are discrete and equally important. Determining the balance between the benefits and harms associated with new or existing tests has been overlooked. Yet, this is critically important information for stakeholders involved in developing, testing, and implementing tests. This is particularly important for point of care tests (POCTs) where tradeoffs exist between numerous aspects of the testing process and test attributes. We developed a new model that multiple stakeholders (e.g., clinicians, patients, researchers, test developers, industry, regulators, and health care funders) can use to visualize the multiple attributes of tests, the interactions that occur between these attributes, and their impacts on health outcomes. We use multiple examples to illustrate interactions between test attributes (test availability, test experience, and test results) and outcomes, including several POCTs. The model could be used to prioritize research and development efforts, and inform regulatory submissions for new diagnostics. It could potentially provide a way to incorporate the relative weights that various subgroups or clinical settings might place on different test attributes. Our model provides a novel way that multiple stakeholders can use to visualize test attributes, their interactions, and impacts on individual and population outcomes. We anticipate that this will facilitate more informed decision making around diagnostic tests. PMID:27574576

  2. More Than Just Accuracy: A Novel Method to Incorporate Multiple Test Attributes in Evaluating Diagnostic Tests Including Point of Care Tests.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew; Weigl, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, Annette; Ide, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Current frameworks for evaluating diagnostic tests are constrained by a focus on diagnostic accuracy, and assume that all aspects of the testing process and test attributes are discrete and equally important. Determining the balance between the benefits and harms associated with new or existing tests has been overlooked. Yet, this is critically important information for stakeholders involved in developing, testing, and implementing tests. This is particularly important for point of care tests (POCTs) where tradeoffs exist between numerous aspects of the testing process and test attributes. We developed a new model that multiple stakeholders (e.g., clinicians, patients, researchers, test developers, industry, regulators, and health care funders) can use to visualize the multiple attributes of tests, the interactions that occur between these attributes, and their impacts on health outcomes. We use multiple examples to illustrate interactions between test attributes (test availability, test experience, and test results) and outcomes, including several POCTs. The model could be used to prioritize research and development efforts, and inform regulatory submissions for new diagnostics. It could potentially provide a way to incorporate the relative weights that various subgroups or clinical settings might place on different test attributes. Our model provides a novel way that multiple stakeholders can use to visualize test attributes, their interactions, and impacts on individual and population outcomes. We anticipate that this will facilitate more informed decision making around diagnostic tests.

  3. Issues in the practical implementation of POCT: overcoming challenges.

    PubMed

    Wiencek, Joesph; Nichols, James

    2016-01-01

    There are many challenges in implementing a successful point-of-care testing (POCT) program. When compared to traditional testing, POCT results are faster and allow for rapid patient treatment. Unfortunately, the excitement of this technology is often lost due to an assortment of practical obstacles. Implementation of POCT requires consideration of the regulatory complexity and amount of documentation to be compliant. As more tests move to the site of patient care, the number of operators that need to be trained and assessed will grow. An effective POCT program rests solely on the foundation of education and training of each operator, but assuring regular competency updates for a large number of staff can be a management issue. Discussed in this article are several of the key obstacles to implementing a POCT program including laboratory quality regulations, compliance documentation and operational management challenges. PMID:26783053

  4. Point-of-care testing for HCV infection: recent advances and implications for alternative screening.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Maria Rita; Soldini, Laura; Vidoni, Gianmarino; Mabellini, Chiara; Belloni, Teresa; Brignolo, Livia; Negri, Silvia; Schlusnus, Karin; Dorigatti, Fernanda; Lazzarin, Adriano

    2014-10-01

    Over the last few years, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has emerged as one of the most significant causes of chronic liver disease worldwide, with an estimated prevalence ranging from 2.2 to 3.0%. In Italy, approximately 2% of subjects are infected with HCV. Considering that acute HCV infection is usually asymptomatic, early diagnosis is rare. Those people who develop chronic infection, even though undiagnosed, may suffer serious liver damage, making chronic HCV infection a major health problem. New initiatives are needed to identify a submerged portion of patients with chronic viral hepatitis and to propose controls and antiviral treatments to avoid the progression to liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Since January 2011, the Infectious Diseases Department of San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milan has been carrying out a prevention program called "EASY test project", using a new oral test, the OraQuick® HCV rapid antibody test (OraSure technologies, Inc.). The main objective of the project is to evaluate the acceptability of an alternative, free and anonymous HCV test offer, available in different settings (Points of Care, STDs Prevention clinics and General Practitioner clinics). From January 2011 to April 2014, 29,600 subjects were approached to inform them about HCV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases; 4,507 (15.2% of the contacted subjects) of them, total eligible volunteers, performed HCV tests on saliva and completed the interview in the alternative POCTs. Twenty-seven subjects (0.6% of the total) turned HCV oral test reactive (27/4.507) during the evaluation period; all of them were confirmed by conventional test. All 27 patients were asymptomatic and without a history of HCV-re- lated symptoms. The results from this analysis suggest that the promotion of alternative HCV test screening has not yet been fully developed as a strategy to increase levels of HCV testing among people at risk for HCV infection. Increasing

  5. Feasibility of Performing Multiple Point of Care Testing for HIV Anti-Retroviral Treatment Initiation and Monitoring from Multiple or Single Fingersticks

    PubMed Central

    Gous, Natasha; Scott, Lesley; Potgieter, Joachim; Ntabeni, Lumka; Enslin, Sharon; Newman, Ronel; Stevens, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Background Point of Care testing (POCT) provides on-site, rapid, accessible results. With current South African anti-retroviral treatment guidelines, up to 4 fingersticks /patient/clinic visit could be required if utilizing POC. We determined the feasibility and accuracy of a nurse performing multiple POCT on multiple fingersticks followed by simplification of the process by performance of multiple POC on a single fingerstick. Method and Findings Random HIV positive adult patients presenting at a HIV treatment clinic in South Africa, for ART initiation/ monitoring, were approached to participate in the study between April-June 2012. Phase I: n=150 patients approached for multiple POCT on multiple fingersticks. Phase II: n=150 patients approached for multiple POCT on a single fingerstick. The following POC tests were performed by a dedicated nurse: PIMA (CD4), HemoCue (hemoglobin), Reflotron (alanine aminotransferase, creatinine). A venepuncture specimen was taken for predicate laboratory methodology. Normal laboratory ranges and Royal College of Pathologists Australasia (RCPA) allowable differences were used as guidelines for comparison. In 67% of participants, ≥3 tests were requested per visit. All POCT were accurate but ranged in variability. Phase I: Hemoglobin was accurate (3.2%CV) while CD4, alanine aminotransferase and creatinine showed increased variability (16.3%CV; 9.3%CV; 12.9%CV respectively). PIMA generated a misclassification of 12.4%. Phase II: Hemoglobin, alanine aminotransferase and creatinine showed good accuracy (3.2%CV, 8.7%CV, 6.4%CV respectively) with increased variability on CD4 (12.4%CV) but low clinical misclassification (4.1%). No trends were observed for the sequence in which POC was performed on a single fingerstick. Overall, PIMA CD4 generated the highest error rate (16-19%). Conclusions Multiple POCT for ART initiation and/or monitoring can be performed practically by a dedicated nurse on multiple fingersticks. The process is as

  6. Pt@AuNPs integrated quantitative capillary-based biosensors for point-of-care testing application.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ze; Fu, Qiangqiang; Yu, Shiting; Sheng, Liangrong; Xu, Meng; Yao, Cuize; Xiao, Wei; Li, Xiuqing; Tang, Yong

    2016-11-15

    Current diagnostic technologies primarily rely on bulky and costly analytical instruments. Therefore, cost-effective and portable diagnosis tools that can be used for point-of-care tests (POCT) are highly desirable. In this study, we report a cost-effective, portable capillary-based biosensor for quantitative detection of biomarkers by the naked eye. This capillary-based biosensor was tested by measuring the distance of blue ink movement, which was directly correlated with the oxygen (O2) produced by efficient core-shell Pt@Au nanoparticles (Pt@AuNPs) catalysts decomposed hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). By linking the Pt@AuNPs with antibodies, capillary-based biosensor sandwich immunoassays were constructed. The concentrations of the target proteins were positively correlated with the distances of ink movement. To demonstrate their performance, the biosensors were used to detect the cancer biomarker sprostate-specific antigen (PSA) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The linear detection range (LDR) of the capillary-based biosensor for detecting PSA was from 0.02 to 2.5ng/mL, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.017ng/mL. LDR of the biosensor for detecting CEA was from 0.063 to 16ng/mL, and the LOD was 0.044ng/mL. For detection of PSA and CEA in clinical serum samples, the detection results of the capillary-based biosensor were well correlate with the results from of chemiluminescence immunoassays (CLIAs). Thus, the capillary-based biosensor may potentially be a useful strategy for point-of-care testing, in addition to being portable and cost effective. PMID:27240013

  7. Internal quality control in point-of-care testing: where's the evidence?

    PubMed

    Holt, Helen; Freedman, Danielle B

    2016-03-01

    ISO 22870 standards require protocols for performance of internal quality control for all point-of-care testing devices and training of users in its theory and practice. However, the unique setting of point-of-care testing (i.e. processes conducted by non-scientific users) means that laboratory internal quality control programmes do not easily translate to point-of-care testing. In addition, while the evidence base for internal quality control within the laboratory has been increasing, the equivalent literature surrounding point-of-care testing is very limited. This has led to wide variation in what is considered acceptable practice for internal quality control at the point of care. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that internal quality control is an area of deficiency in point-of-care testing. Internal quality control protocols used at point-of-care testing should be defined based on risk management. The protocol will therefore be dependent on analyser complexity and availability of inbuilt system checks, the risk associated with release of an incorrect patient result as well as frequency of use. The emphasis should be on designing an effective internal quality control protocol as opposed to the inherent tendency of introducing high-frequency quality control. Typically a simple pass or fail criterion is used for internal quality control in point-of-care testing based on whether internal quality control results fall within assigned ranges. While simply taught, such criteria can require broad internal quality control ranges to decrease the probability of false rejection (also reducing the probability of error detection). Customized internal quality control ranges, two-tier acceptance systems and assay-specific internal quality control can be used to improve error detection rates.

  8. Internal quality control in point-of-care testing: where's the evidence?

    PubMed

    Holt, Helen; Freedman, Danielle B

    2016-03-01

    ISO 22870 standards require protocols for performance of internal quality control for all point-of-care testing devices and training of users in its theory and practice. However, the unique setting of point-of-care testing (i.e. processes conducted by non-scientific users) means that laboratory internal quality control programmes do not easily translate to point-of-care testing. In addition, while the evidence base for internal quality control within the laboratory has been increasing, the equivalent literature surrounding point-of-care testing is very limited. This has led to wide variation in what is considered acceptable practice for internal quality control at the point of care. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that internal quality control is an area of deficiency in point-of-care testing. Internal quality control protocols used at point-of-care testing should be defined based on risk management. The protocol will therefore be dependent on analyser complexity and availability of inbuilt system checks, the risk associated with release of an incorrect patient result as well as frequency of use. The emphasis should be on designing an effective internal quality control protocol as opposed to the inherent tendency of introducing high-frequency quality control. Typically a simple pass or fail criterion is used for internal quality control in point-of-care testing based on whether internal quality control results fall within assigned ranges. While simply taught, such criteria can require broad internal quality control ranges to decrease the probability of false rejection (also reducing the probability of error detection). Customized internal quality control ranges, two-tier acceptance systems and assay-specific internal quality control can be used to improve error detection rates. PMID:26486440

  9. Validation of a point-of-care prothrombin time test after cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Meesters, M I; Kuiper, G; Vonk, A B A; Loer, S A; Boer, C

    2016-10-01

    Point-of-care coagulation monitoring can be used for the guidance of haemostasis management. However, the influence of time on point-of-care prothrombin time testing following protamine administration after cardiopulmonary bypass has not been investigated. Bland-Altman and error grid analysis were used to analyse the level of agreement between prothrombin time measurements from point-of-care and laboratory tests before cardiopulmonary bypass, and then 3 min, 6 min and 10 min after protamine administration. Prothrombin times were expressed as International Normalised Ratios. While the point-of-care and laboratory prothrombin time measurements showed a high level of agreement before bypass, this agreement deteriorated following protamine administration to a mean (SD) bias of -0.22 (0.13) [limits of agreement 0.48-0.04]. Error grid analysis revealed that 35 (70%) of the paired values showed a clinically relevant discrepancy in international normalised ratio. At 3 min, 6 min and 10 min after cardiopulmonary bypass there is a clinical unacceptable discrepancy between the point-of-care and laboratory measurement of prothrombin time. PMID:27501250

  10. Validation of a point-of-care prothrombin time test after cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Meesters, M I; Kuiper, G; Vonk, A B A; Loer, S A; Boer, C

    2016-10-01

    Point-of-care coagulation monitoring can be used for the guidance of haemostasis management. However, the influence of time on point-of-care prothrombin time testing following protamine administration after cardiopulmonary bypass has not been investigated. Bland-Altman and error grid analysis were used to analyse the level of agreement between prothrombin time measurements from point-of-care and laboratory tests before cardiopulmonary bypass, and then 3 min, 6 min and 10 min after protamine administration. Prothrombin times were expressed as International Normalised Ratios. While the point-of-care and laboratory prothrombin time measurements showed a high level of agreement before bypass, this agreement deteriorated following protamine administration to a mean (SD) bias of -0.22 (0.13) [limits of agreement 0.48-0.04]. Error grid analysis revealed that 35 (70%) of the paired values showed a clinically relevant discrepancy in international normalised ratio. At 3 min, 6 min and 10 min after cardiopulmonary bypass there is a clinical unacceptable discrepancy between the point-of-care and laboratory measurement of prothrombin time.

  11. Design and Realization of Integrated Management System for Data Interoperability between Point-of-Care Testing Equipment and Hospital Information System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki Sang; Heo, Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to design an integrated data management system based on the POCT1-A2, LIS2-A, LIS2-A2, and HL7 standard to ensure data interoperability between mobile equipment, such as point-of-care testing equipment and the existing hospital data system, its efficiency was also evaluated. Methods The method of this study was intended to design and realize a data management system which would provide a solution for the problems that occur when point-of-care testing equipment is introduced to existing hospital data, after classifying such problems into connectivity, integration, and interoperability. This study also checked if the data management system plays a sufficient role as a bridge between the point-of-care testing equipment and the hospital information system through connection persistence and reliability testing, as well as data integration and interoperability testing. Results In comparison with the existing system, the data management system facilitated integration by improving the result receiving time, improving the collection rate, and by enabling the integration of disparate types of data into a single system. And it was found out that we can solve the problems related to connectivity, integration and interoperability through generating the message in standardized types. Conclusions It is expected that the proposed data management system, which is designed to improve the integration point-of-care testing equipment with existing systems, will establish a solid foundation on which better medical service may be provided by hospitals by improving the quality of patient service. PMID:24175121

  12. Point-of-care D-dimer testing in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Udo; Apau, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Overcrowding and prolonged patient stays in emergency departments (EDs) affect patients' experiences and outcomes, and increase healthcare costs. One way of addressing these problems is through using point-of-care blood tests, laboratory testing undertaken near patient locations with rapidly available results. D-dimer tests are used to exclude venous thromboembolism (VTE), a common presentation in EDs, in low-risk patients. However, data on the effects of point-of-care D-dimer testing in EDs and other urgent care settings are scarce. This article reports the results of a literature review that examined the benefits to patients of point-of-care D-dimer testing in terms of reduced turnaround times (time to results), and time to diagnosis, discharge or referral. It also considers the benefits to organisations in relation to reduced ED crowding and increased cost effectiveness. The review concludes that undertaking point-of-care D-dimer tests, combined with pre-test probability scores, can be a quick and safe way of ruling out VTE and improving patients' experience. PMID:26344541

  13. Clinical Evaluation of 2 Point-of-Care Lateral Flow Tests for the Diagnosis of Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Nakku-Joloba, Edith; Kiragga, Agnes; Mbazira, Joshua Kimeze; Kambugu, Fred; Jett-Goheen, Mary; Ratanshi, Rosalind Parkes; Gaydos, Charlotte; Manabe, Yukari C

    2016-10-01

    A diagnostic performance study comparing the only Food and Drug Administration-approved, point-of-care (POC) treponemal test (Syphilis Health Check) and the World Health Organization pre-qualified SD Bioline POC treponemal test against a treponemal hemagglutination test (TPHA) and a sequential algorithm of nontreponemal rapid plasma reagin and TPHA found both POC tests had >85% sensitivity compared with the TPHA and >85% sensitivity and >95% specificity compared with the rapid plasma reagin and TPHA standards. PMID:27631356

  14. An integrated paper-based sample-to-answer biosensor for nucleic acid testing at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Tang, Ruihua; Gong, Yan; Feng, Shangsheng; Ren, Hui; Wen, Ting; Li, XiuJun; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-02-01

    With advances in point-of-care testing (POCT), lateral flow assays (LFAs) have been explored for nucleic acid detection. However, biological samples generally contain complex compositions and low amounts of target nucleic acids, and currently require laborious off-chip nucleic acid extraction and amplification processes (e.g., tube-based extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) prior to detection. To the best of our knowledge, even though the integration of DNA extraction and amplification into a paper-based biosensor has been reported, a combination of LFA with the aforementioned steps for simple colorimetric readout has not yet been demonstrated. Here, we demonstrate for the first time an integrated paper-based biosensor incorporating nucleic acid extraction, amplification and visual detection or quantification using a smartphone. A handheld battery-powered heating device was specially developed for nucleic acid amplification in POC settings, which is coupled with this simple assay for rapid target detection. The biosensor can successfully detect Escherichia coli (as a model analyte) in spiked drinking water, milk, blood, and spinach with a detection limit of as low as 10-1000 CFU mL(-1), and Streptococcus pneumonia in clinical blood samples, highlighting its potential use in medical diagnostics, food safety analysis and environmental monitoring. As compared to the lengthy conventional assay, which requires more than 5 hours for the entire sample-to-answer process, it takes about 1 hour for our integrated biosensor. The integrated biosensor holds great potential for detection of various target analytes for wide applications in the near future.

  15. An integrated paper-based sample-to-answer biosensor for nucleic acid testing at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Tang, Ruihua; Gong, Yan; Feng, Shangsheng; Ren, Hui; Wen, Ting; Li, XiuJun; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-02-01

    With advances in point-of-care testing (POCT), lateral flow assays (LFAs) have been explored for nucleic acid detection. However, biological samples generally contain complex compositions and low amounts of target nucleic acids, and currently require laborious off-chip nucleic acid extraction and amplification processes (e.g., tube-based extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) prior to detection. To the best of our knowledge, even though the integration of DNA extraction and amplification into a paper-based biosensor has been reported, a combination of LFA with the aforementioned steps for simple colorimetric readout has not yet been demonstrated. Here, we demonstrate for the first time an integrated paper-based biosensor incorporating nucleic acid extraction, amplification and visual detection or quantification using a smartphone. A handheld battery-powered heating device was specially developed for nucleic acid amplification in POC settings, which is coupled with this simple assay for rapid target detection. The biosensor can successfully detect Escherichia coli (as a model analyte) in spiked drinking water, milk, blood, and spinach with a detection limit of as low as 10-1000 CFU mL(-1), and Streptococcus pneumonia in clinical blood samples, highlighting its potential use in medical diagnostics, food safety analysis and environmental monitoring. As compared to the lengthy conventional assay, which requires more than 5 hours for the entire sample-to-answer process, it takes about 1 hour for our integrated biosensor. The integrated biosensor holds great potential for detection of various target analytes for wide applications in the near future. PMID:26759062

  16. A critical appraisal of point-of-care coagulation testing in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Levi, M; Hunt, B J

    2015-11-01

    Derangement of the coagulation system is a common phenomenon in critically ill patients, who may present with severe bleeding and/or conditions associated with a prothrombotic state. Monitoring of this coagulopathy can be performed with conventional coagulation assays; however, point-of-care tests have become increasingly attractive, because not only do they yield a more rapid result than clinical laboratory testing, but they may also provide a more complete picture of the condition of the hemostatic system. There are many potential areas of study and applications of point-of-care hemostatic testing in critical care, including patients who present with massive blood loss, patients with a hypercoagulable state (such as in disseminated intravascular coagulation), and monitoring of antiplatelet treatment for acute arterial thrombosis, mostly acute coronary syndromes. However, the limitations of near-patient hemostatic testing has not been fully appreciated, and are discussed here. The currently available evidence indicates that point-of-care tests may be applied to guide appropriate blood product transfusion and the use of hemostatic agents to correct the hemostatic defect or to ameliorate antithrombotic treatment. Disappointingly, however, only in cardiac surgery is there adequate evidence to show that application of near-patient thromboelastography leads to an improvement in clinically relevant outcomes, such as reductions in bleeding-related morbidity and mortality, and cost-effectiveness. More research is required to validate the utility and cost-effectiveness of near-patient hemostatic testing in other areas, especially in traumatic bleeding and postpartum hemorrhage.

  17. Microfluidics-based point-of-care test for serodiagnosis of Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Samiksha; Sridhara, Archana; Melo, Rita; Richer, Luciana; Chee, Natalie H.; Kim, Jiyoon; Linder, Vincent; Steinmiller, David; Sia, Samuel K.; Gomes-Solecki, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Currently, diagnostic testing for Lyme disease is done by determination of the serologic responses to Borrelia burgdorferi antigens, with the exception of the early localized phase of disease where diagnosis must be done clinically. Here, we describe the use of microfluidics technology to develop a multiplexed rapid lab-on-a-chip point of care (POC) assay for the serologic diagnosis of human Lyme disease. Following ELISA screening of 12 candidate antigens, we tested 8 on a microfluidic diagnostic system, called mChip-Ld, using a set of 60 serological samples. The mChip-Ld test, which can be performed in 15 minutes at the point of care, showed promising performance for detection of antibodies to B. burgdorferi using the PPO triplex test (rP100 + PepVF + rOspC-K, AUC of 0.844) compared to a gold-standard reference of culture confirmed clinical samples. The performance is comparable to the commonly used C6 peptide by lab-based ELISA. In addition, the mChip-Ld test showed promising performance for early-stage diagnosis of the disease using the antigen OspC-K (sensitivity and specificity of 84% and 92%, respectively; AUC of 0.877). Overall, this study underscores the potential of using microfluidics to aid the diagnosis of Lyme disease at the point of care. PMID:27725740

  18. Rapid visual identification of PCR amplified nucleic acids by centrifugal gel separation: Potential use for molecular point-of-care tests.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Dong-Eun; Im, Ji-Hyun; Kang, Su-Jin; Lee, Do-Hoon; Son, Sang Jun

    2016-05-15

    Recently, nucleic acid amplification and detection techniques have progressed based on advances in in microfluidics, microelectronics, and optical systems. Nucleic acids amplification based point-of-care test (POCT) in resource-limited settings requires simple visual detection methods. Several biosensing methods including lateral flow immunoassays (LFIA) were previously used to visually detect nucleic acids. However, prolonged assay time, several washing steps, and a need for specific antibodies limited their use. Here we developed a novel, rapid method to visualize amplified nucleic acids with naked eyes in clinical samples. First, we optimized conditions based on separation using very low centrifugal force and a density medium to detect human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 DNA in cervical specimens. After DNA extraction, HPV16 PCR was performed with biotin-labeled forward primer and Cy3-labeled reverse primer. PCR amplicon was mixed with streptavidin-magnetic beads, introduced into the density medium. After two-minute centrifugation, the result was visually identified. This system showed identical results with commercial HPV real-time PCR for 30 clinical samples and could detect up to 10(2)copies/mL of HPV DNA without any optical instruments. This robust and sensitive visual detection system is suitable for non-specialist personnel and point-of-care diagnosis in low-resource settings.

  19. Toward point-of-care testing for JAK2 V617F mutation on a microchip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Liu, Weiwei; Zhang, Xinju; Xu, Xiao; Kang, Zhihua; Li, Shibao; Wu, Zhiyuan; Yang, Zhiliu; Yao, Bo; Guan, Ming

    2015-09-01

    Molecular genetics now plays a crucial role in diagnosis, the identification of prognostic markers, and monitoring of hematological malignancies. Demonstration of acquired changes such as the JAK2 V617F mutation within myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) has quickly moved from a research setting to the diagnostic laboratory. Microfluidics-based assays can reduce the assay time and sample/reagent consumption and enhance the reaction efficiency; however, no current assay has integrated isothermal amplification for point-of-care MPN JAK2 V617F mutation testing with a microchip. In this report, an integrated microchip that performs the whole human blood genomic DNA extraction, loop-mediated isothermal nucleic acid amplification (LAMP) and visual detection for point-of-care genetic mutation testing is demonstrated. This method was validated on DNA from cell lines as well as on whole blood from patients with MPN. The results were compared with those obtained by unlabeled probe melting curve analysis. This chip enjoys a high accuracy, operability, and cost/time efficiency within 1h. All these benefits provide the chip with a potency toward a point-of-care genetic analysis. All samples identified as positive by unlabeled probe melting curve analysis (n=27) proved positive when tested by microchip assay. None of the 30 negative controls gave false positive results. In addition, a patient with polycythemia vera diagnosed as being JAK2 V617F-negative by unlabeled probe melting curve analysis was found to be positive by the microchip. This microchip would possibly be very attractive in developing a point-of-care platform for quick preliminary diagnosis of MPN or other severe illness in resource-limited settings. PMID:26235214

  20. Toward point-of-care testing for JAK2 V617F mutation on a microchip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Liu, Weiwei; Zhang, Xinju; Xu, Xiao; Kang, Zhihua; Li, Shibao; Wu, Zhiyuan; Yang, Zhiliu; Yao, Bo; Guan, Ming

    2015-09-01

    Molecular genetics now plays a crucial role in diagnosis, the identification of prognostic markers, and monitoring of hematological malignancies. Demonstration of acquired changes such as the JAK2 V617F mutation within myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) has quickly moved from a research setting to the diagnostic laboratory. Microfluidics-based assays can reduce the assay time and sample/reagent consumption and enhance the reaction efficiency; however, no current assay has integrated isothermal amplification for point-of-care MPN JAK2 V617F mutation testing with a microchip. In this report, an integrated microchip that performs the whole human blood genomic DNA extraction, loop-mediated isothermal nucleic acid amplification (LAMP) and visual detection for point-of-care genetic mutation testing is demonstrated. This method was validated on DNA from cell lines as well as on whole blood from patients with MPN. The results were compared with those obtained by unlabeled probe melting curve analysis. This chip enjoys a high accuracy, operability, and cost/time efficiency within 1h. All these benefits provide the chip with a potency toward a point-of-care genetic analysis. All samples identified as positive by unlabeled probe melting curve analysis (n=27) proved positive when tested by microchip assay. None of the 30 negative controls gave false positive results. In addition, a patient with polycythemia vera diagnosed as being JAK2 V617F-negative by unlabeled probe melting curve analysis was found to be positive by the microchip. This microchip would possibly be very attractive in developing a point-of-care platform for quick preliminary diagnosis of MPN or other severe illness in resource-limited settings.

  1. A Point-of-Care Prothrombin Time Test on a Microfluidic Disk Analyzer Using Alternate Spinning.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Kun-Wei; Yen, Daniel; Shih, Chih-Hsin; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Wang, Jiunn-Min; Lin, Chi-Yu

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we conducted a fully integrated point-of-care prothrombin time test on a microfluidic disk analyzer. The microfluidic functions integrated on the disk were capable of separating whole blood, decanting plasma, and mixing it with reagents in sequence under alternate spinning. The assay protocol was completed by alternate spinning without using microvalves or surface modification. Clinical sample tests on prothrombin time measurement were conducted by both the microfluidic disk analyzer and the reference instrument used in medical centers. The test results showed a good correlation and agreement between the two instruments. PMID:26353663

  2. A Point-of-Care Prothrombin Time Test on a Microfluidic Disk Analyzer Using Alternate Spinning.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Kun-Wei; Yen, Daniel; Shih, Chih-Hsin; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Wang, Jiunn-Min; Lin, Chi-Yu

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we conducted a fully integrated point-of-care prothrombin time test on a microfluidic disk analyzer. The microfluidic functions integrated on the disk were capable of separating whole blood, decanting plasma, and mixing it with reagents in sequence under alternate spinning. The assay protocol was completed by alternate spinning without using microvalves or surface modification. Clinical sample tests on prothrombin time measurement were conducted by both the microfluidic disk analyzer and the reference instrument used in medical centers. The test results showed a good correlation and agreement between the two instruments.

  3. A review of recent advances in rapid point-of-care tests for syphilis.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Claire C; Larson, Elysia; Javanbakht, Marjan; Huang, Emily; Causer, Louise; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2015-04-01

    Syphilis is a curable disease, yet over 10million people worldwide are infected with syphilis each year. Syphilis case finding and subsequent treatment are key steps in syphilis control and prevention efforts. The advent of rapid point-of-care tests - which require minimal equipment, are easy to perform and are relatively low cost - have the potential to improve syphilis control by allowing for more widespread testing in clinical and non-clinical settings. However, strategies to maximise the potential public health impact of those tests are needed, and those include regulatory oversight, effective supply-chain management and quality assurance systems. PMID:25622292

  4. What's the Point? How Point-of-Care STI Tests Can Impact Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Jill; Hesse, Elizabeth; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2010-03-01

    Point-of-care (POC) tests are an important strategy to address the epidemic of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among both adolescents and young adults. While access to care and confidentiality are major barriers to STI care, POC tests allow the clinician to provide immediate and confidential test results and treatment. In addition, POC test results constitute a "teachable moment"; that is, an opportunity to provide immediate feedback to the patient that may impact his/her risk behaviors. This paper reviews published data and manufacturer's product literature describing current point-of-care STI tests, including studies of test performance as well as impact on treatment intervals and disease spread. It presents theoretical and proposed pitfalls and solutions of implementing POC tests in clinical settings, non-traditional settings, and home care venues. We reviewed the available STI tests according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for judging POC tests: the "ASSURRED" criteria (Affordable, Sensitive, Specific, User-friendly, Rapid and Robust, Equipment-free, Delivered).

  5. What’s the Point? How Point-of-Care STI Tests Can Impact Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, Jill; Hesse, Elizabeth; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2010-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) tests are an important strategy to address the epidemic of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among both adolescents and young adults. While access to care and confidentiality are major barriers to STI care, POC tests allow the clinician to provide immediate and confidential test results and treatment. In addition, POC test results constitute a “teachable moment”; that is, an opportunity to provide immediate feedback to the patient that may impact his/her risk behaviors. This paper reviews published data and manufacturer’s product literature describing current point-of-care STI tests, including studies of test performance as well as impact on treatment intervals and disease spread. It presents theoretical and proposed pitfalls and solutions of implementing POC tests in clinical settings, non-traditional settings, and home care venues. We reviewed the available STI tests according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for judging POC tests: the “ASSURRED” criteria (Affordable, Sensitive, Specific, User-friendly, Rapid and Robust, Equipment-free, Delivered). PMID:20401167

  6. Perceptions of point-of-care infectious disease testing among European medical personnel, point-of-care test kit manufacturers, and the general public

    PubMed Central

    Kaman, Wendy E; Andrinopoulou, Eleni-Rosalina; Hays, John P

    2013-01-01

    Background The proper development and implementation of point-of-care (POC) diagnostics requires knowledge of the perceived requirements and barriers to their implementation. To determine the current requirements and perceived barriers to the introduction of POC diagnostics in the field of medical microbiology (MM)-POC a prospective online survey (TEMPOtest-QC) was established. Methods and results The TEMPOtest-QC survey was online between February 2011 and July 2012 and targeted the medical community, POC test diagnostic manufacturers, general practitioners, and the general public. In total, 293 individuals responded to the survey, including 91 (31%) medical microbiologists, 39 (13%) nonmedical microbiologists, 25 (9%) employees of POC test manufacturers, and 138 (47%) members of the general public. Responses were received from 18 different European countries, with the largest percentage of these living in The Netherlands (52%). The majority (>50%) of medical specialists regarded the development of MM-POC for blood culture and hospital acquired infections as “absolutely necessary”, but were much less favorable towards their use in the home environment. Significant differences in perceptions between medical specialists and the general public included the: (1) Effect on quality of patient care; (2) Ability to better monitor patients; (3) Home testing and the doctor-patient relationship; and (4) MM-POC interpretation. Only 34.7% of the general public is willing to pay more than a€10 ($13) for a single MM-POC test, with 85.5% preferring to purchase their MM-POC test from a pharmacy. Conclusion The requirements for the proper implementation of MM-POC were found to be generally similar between medical specialists and POC test kit manufacturers. The general public was much more favorable with respect to a perceived improvement in the quality of healthcare that these tests would bring to the hospital and home environment. PMID:23814465

  7. Feasibility of HIV point-of-care tests for resource-limited settings: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Wendy; Gous, Natasha; Ford, Nathan; Scott, Lesley E

    2014-01-01

    Improved access to anti-retroviral therapy increases the need for affordable monitoring using assays such as CD4 and/or viral load in resource-limited settings. Barriers to accessing treatment, high rates of loss to initiation and poor retention in care are prompting the need to find alternatives to conventional centralized laboratory testing in certain countries. Strong advocacy has led to a rapidly expanding repertoire of point-of-care tests for HIV. point-of-care testing is not without its challenges: poor regulatory control, lack of guidelines, absence of quality monitoring and lack of industry standards for connectivity, to name a few. The management of HIV increasingly requires a multidisciplinary testing approach involving hematology, chemistry, and tests associated with the management of non-communicable diseases, thus added expertise is needed. This is further complicated by additional human resource requirements and the need for continuous training, a sustainable supply chain, and reimbursement strategies. It is clear that to ensure appropriate national implementation either in a tiered laboratory model or a total decentralized model, clear country-specific assessments need to be conducted. PMID:25197773

  8. Qualitative research on point-of-care testing strategies and programs for HIV.

    PubMed

    Engel, Nora; Pant Pai, Nitika

    2015-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) testing in communities, home settings and primary healthcare centers plays an important role in cutting delays in HIV diagnosis and in the uptake of voluntary testing and counseling. Qualitative research methods have important potential to overcome the current challenges in expanding HIV POC testing programs and strategies, by examining the diagnostic processes, complex inter-relationships and patterns involved in making POC diagnostics work in real-world settings. This article reviews existing qualitative studies on POC testing strategies and programs for HIV. Qualitative research on POC diagnostics around the uptake of POC tests, the actual diagnostic and testing processes involved, the influence of POC tests on clinical decision-making, communication of decisions and decisions exercised by patients are limited. Equally limited are studies that explore adaptation of POC programs to various socio-cultural contexts. More qualitative research is needed to inform test developers, funders and policymakers.

  9. Quality Assurance and Quality Control in Point-of-Care Testing.

    PubMed

    Newman, Ashleigh W; Behling-Kelly, Erica

    2016-03-01

    With advancements in the standard of care in veterinary medicine and instrument technology, performing in-house laboratory work on a variety of point-of-care instruments, ranging from glucometers to benchtop chemistry analyzers, has become increasingly commonplace. However, the ability of an instrument to perform a test does not guarantee that those results are accurate. Ensuring that your in-clinic laboratory is providing reliable data requires a comprehensive plan that encompasses both common sense practices aimed at preventing errors at each stage of the testing process, as well as standard operating procedures to validate and monitor analyzer performance. These 2 arms of the plan are known as quality assurance and quality control. Although these concepts are typically out of the comfort zone for veterinarians, just as the thought of business management may deter some veterinarians from practice ownership, it is not beyond the capabilities of veterinarians to learn, understand, and incorporate them into their practice. The objectives of this article are to convey the importance of quality assurance and quality control, walk you through the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology guidelines on this topic, and provide direction to additional resources for further education on this topic, all with the focus on point-of-care testing in the in-clinic laboratory. PMID:27451043

  10. Direct writing electrodes using a ball pen for paper-based point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Li, Zedong; Li, Fei; Hu, Jie; Wee, Wei Hong; Han, Yu Long; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2015-08-21

    The integration of paper with an electrochemical device has attracted growing attention for point-of-care testing, where it is of great importance to fabricate electrodes on paper in a low-cost, easy and versatile way. In this work, we report a simple strategy for directly writing electrodes on paper using a pressure-assisted ball pen to form a paper-based electrochemical device (PED). This method is demonstrated to be capable of fabricating electrodes on paper with good electrical conductivity and electrochemical performance, holding great potential to be employed in point-of-care applications, such as in human health diagnostics and food safety detection. As examples, the PEDs fabricated using the developed method are applied for detection of glucose in artificial urine and melamine in sample solutions. Furthermore, our developed strategy is also extended to fabricate PEDs with multi-electrode arrays and write electrodes on non-planar surfaces (e.g., paper cup, human skin), indicating the potential application of our method in other fields, such as fabricating biosensors, paper electronics etc. PMID:26079757

  11. Direct writing electrodes using a ball pen for paper-based point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Li, Zedong; Li, Fei; Hu, Jie; Wee, Wei Hong; Han, Yu Long; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2015-08-21

    The integration of paper with an electrochemical device has attracted growing attention for point-of-care testing, where it is of great importance to fabricate electrodes on paper in a low-cost, easy and versatile way. In this work, we report a simple strategy for directly writing electrodes on paper using a pressure-assisted ball pen to form a paper-based electrochemical device (PED). This method is demonstrated to be capable of fabricating electrodes on paper with good electrical conductivity and electrochemical performance, holding great potential to be employed in point-of-care applications, such as in human health diagnostics and food safety detection. As examples, the PEDs fabricated using the developed method are applied for detection of glucose in artificial urine and melamine in sample solutions. Furthermore, our developed strategy is also extended to fabricate PEDs with multi-electrode arrays and write electrodes on non-planar surfaces (e.g., paper cup, human skin), indicating the potential application of our method in other fields, such as fabricating biosensors, paper electronics etc.

  12. Commercial Dengue Rapid Diagnostic Tests for Point-of-Care Application: Recent Evaluations and Future Needs?

    PubMed Central

    Blacksell, Stuart D.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome (DF/DHF/DSS) are tropical diseases that cause significant humanitarian and economic hardship. It is estimated that more than 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection and more than 100 countries have endemic dengue virus transmission. Laboratory tests are essential to provide an accurate diagnosis of dengue virus infection so that appropriate treatment and patient management may be administered. In many dengue endemic settings, laboratory diagnostic resources are limited and simple rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) provide opportunities for point-of-care diagnosis. This paper addresses current issues relating to the application of commercial dengue RDTs for the diagnosis of acute dengue virus infection, recent diagnostic evaluations, and identifies future needs. PMID:22654479

  13. Commercial dengue rapid diagnostic tests for point-of-care application: recent evaluations and future needs?

    PubMed

    Blacksell, Stuart D

    2012-01-01

    Dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome (DF/DHF/DSS) are tropical diseases that cause significant humanitarian and economic hardship. It is estimated that more than 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection and more than 100 countries have endemic dengue virus transmission. Laboratory tests are essential to provide an accurate diagnosis of dengue virus infection so that appropriate treatment and patient management may be administered. In many dengue endemic settings, laboratory diagnostic resources are limited and simple rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) provide opportunities for point-of-care diagnosis. This paper addresses current issues relating to the application of commercial dengue RDTs for the diagnosis of acute dengue virus infection, recent diagnostic evaluations, and identifies future needs.

  14. Barriers to Point-of-Care Testing in India: Results from Qualitative Research across Different Settings, Users and Major Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Nora; Ganesh, Gayatri; Patil, Mamata; Yellappa, Vijayashree; Pant Pai, Nitika; Vadnais, Caroline; Pai, Madhukar

    2015-01-01

    Background Successful point-of-care testing, namely ensuring the completion of the test and treat cycle in the same encounter, has immense potential to reduce diagnostic and treatment delays, and impact patient outcomes. However, having rapid tests is not enough, as many barriers may prevent their successful implementation in point-of-care testing programs. Qualitative research on diagnostic practices may help identify such barriers across different points of care in health systems. Methods In this exploratory qualitative study, we conducted 78 semi-structured interviews and 13 focus group discussions in an urban and rural area of Karnataka, India, with healthcare providers (doctors, nurses, specialists, traditional healers, and informal providers), patients, community health workers, test manufacturers, laboratory technicians, program managers and policy-makers. Participants were purposively sampled to represent settings of hospitals, peripheral labs, clinics, communities and homes, in both the public and private sectors. Results In the Indian context, the onus is on the patient to ensure successful point-of-care testing across homes, clinics, labs and hospitals, amidst uncoordinated providers with divergent and often competing practices, in settings lacking material, money and human resources. We identified three overarching themes affecting point-of-care testing: the main theme is ‘relationships’ among providers and between providers and patients, influenced by the cross-cutting theme of ‘infrastructure’. Challenges with both result in ‘modified practices’ often favouring empirical (symptomatic) treatment over treatment guided by testing. Conclusions Even if tests can be conducted on the spot and infrastructure challenges have been resolved, relationships among providers and between patients and providers are crucial for successful point-of-care testing. Furthermore, these barriers do not act in isolation, but are interlinked and need to be examined

  15. Simulation in coagulation testing using rotational thromboelastometry: A fast emerging, reliable point of care technique

    PubMed Central

    Gorlinger, Klaus; Bhardwaj, Vandana; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Computer simulations can come in handy to train medical personnel with necessary skills to face the clinical scenarios involving various coagulopathies. Now a days, point of care (POC) devices such as thromboelastography, Sonoclot analyzer and newly approved rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) with faster results to assess coagulopathies are available on bedside of patients. ROTEM is emerging as a quick, portable, and well-validated device to evaluate coagulopathy in critical care and perioperative setup. A novel platelet-aggregometry integrated module enables simultaneous analysis of platelets as well as coagulation tests on the same screen. The entire gamut of POC signature curves obtained with different coagulation defects can be learned with graphical simulations. These simulations can be a valuable strategy to elucidate latent conditions, for which simulation interventions can then be designed to mimic different clinical scenarios. PMID:27397458

  16. A glass fiber sheet-based electroosmotic lateral flow immunoassay for point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Yuriko; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kamiya, Koki; Kawano, Ryuji; Honjoh, Tsutomu; Shibata, Haruki; Ide, Toru; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2012-12-21

    We have developed a quantitative immunoassay chip targeting point-of-care testing. To implement a lateral flow immunoassay, a glass fiber sheet was chosen as the material for the microfluidic channel in which the negative charge on the fiber surfaces efficiently generates the electroosmotic flow (EOF). The EOF, in turn, allows controllable bound/free separation of antigen/antibody interactions on the chip and enables precise determination of the antigen concentration. In addition, the defined size of the porous matrix was suitable for the filtration of undesired large particles. We confirmed the linear relationship between the concentration of analyte and the resulting fluorescence intensity from the immunoassay of two model analytes, C-reactive protein (CRP) and insulin, demonstrating that analyte concentration was quantitatively determined within the developed chip in 20 min. The limits of detection were 8.5 ng mL(-1) and 17 ng mL(-1) for CRP and insulin, respectively. PMID:23114383

  17. Evaluating Diagnostic Point-of-Care Tests in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Drain, Paul K; Hyle, Emily P; Noubary, Farzad; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Wilson, Douglas; Bishai, William; Rodriguez, William; Bassett, Ingrid V

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic point-of-care (POC) testing is intended to minimize the time to obtain a test result, thereby allowing clinicians and patients to make an expeditious clinical decision. As POC tests expand into resource-limited settings (RLS), the benefits must outweigh the costs. To optimize POC testing in RLS, diagnostic POC tests need rigorous evaluations focused on relevant clinical outcomes and operational costs, which differ from evaluations of conventional diagnostic tests. Here, we reviewed published studies on POC testing in RLS, and found no clearly defined metric for the clinical utility of POC testing. Therefore, we propose a framework for evaluating POC tests, and suggest and define the term “test efficacy” to describe a diagnostic test’s capacity to support a clinical decision within its operational context. We also proposed revised criteria for an ideal diagnostic POC test in resource-limited settings. Through systematic evaluations, comparisons between centralized diagnostic testing and novel POC technologies can be more formalized, and health officials can better determine which POC technologies represent valuable additions to their clinical programs. PMID:24332389

  18. A Systematic Review of Point of Care Testing for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Herbst de Cortina, Sasha; Bristow, Claire C; Joseph Davey, Dvora; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Systematic review of point of care (POC) diagnostic tests for sexually transmitted infections: Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV). Methods. Literature search on PubMed for articles from January 2010 to August 2015, including original research in English on POC diagnostics for sexually transmitted CT, NG, and/or TV. Results. We identified 33 publications with original research on POC diagnostics for CT, NG, and/or TV. Thirteen articles evaluated test performance, yielding at least one test for each infection with sensitivity and specificity ≥90%. Each infection also had currently available tests with sensitivities <60%. Three articles analyzed cost effectiveness, and five publications discussed acceptability and feasibility. POC testing was acceptable to both providers and patients and was also demonstrated to be cost effective. Fourteen proof of concept articles introduced new tests. Conclusions. Highly sensitive and specific POC tests are available for CT, NG, and TV, but improvement is possible. Future research should focus on acceptability, feasibility, and cost of POC testing. While pregnant women specifically have not been studied, the results available in nonpregnant populations are encouraging for the ability to test and treat women in antenatal care to prevent adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. PMID:27313440

  19. A Systematic Review of Point of Care Testing for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Herbst de Cortina, Sasha; Bristow, Claire C.; Joseph Davey, Dvora; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Systematic review of point of care (POC) diagnostic tests for sexually transmitted infections: Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV). Methods. Literature search on PubMed for articles from January 2010 to August 2015, including original research in English on POC diagnostics for sexually transmitted CT, NG, and/or TV. Results. We identified 33 publications with original research on POC diagnostics for CT, NG, and/or TV. Thirteen articles evaluated test performance, yielding at least one test for each infection with sensitivity and specificity ≥90%. Each infection also had currently available tests with sensitivities <60%. Three articles analyzed cost effectiveness, and five publications discussed acceptability and feasibility. POC testing was acceptable to both providers and patients and was also demonstrated to be cost effective. Fourteen proof of concept articles introduced new tests. Conclusions. Highly sensitive and specific POC tests are available for CT, NG, and TV, but improvement is possible. Future research should focus on acceptability, feasibility, and cost of POC testing. While pregnant women specifically have not been studied, the results available in nonpregnant populations are encouraging for the ability to test and treat women in antenatal care to prevent adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. PMID:27313440

  20. A Systematic Review of Point of Care Testing for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Herbst de Cortina, Sasha; Bristow, Claire C; Joseph Davey, Dvora; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Systematic review of point of care (POC) diagnostic tests for sexually transmitted infections: Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV). Methods. Literature search on PubMed for articles from January 2010 to August 2015, including original research in English on POC diagnostics for sexually transmitted CT, NG, and/or TV. Results. We identified 33 publications with original research on POC diagnostics for CT, NG, and/or TV. Thirteen articles evaluated test performance, yielding at least one test for each infection with sensitivity and specificity ≥90%. Each infection also had currently available tests with sensitivities <60%. Three articles analyzed cost effectiveness, and five publications discussed acceptability and feasibility. POC testing was acceptable to both providers and patients and was also demonstrated to be cost effective. Fourteen proof of concept articles introduced new tests. Conclusions. Highly sensitive and specific POC tests are available for CT, NG, and TV, but improvement is possible. Future research should focus on acceptability, feasibility, and cost of POC testing. While pregnant women specifically have not been studied, the results available in nonpregnant populations are encouraging for the ability to test and treat women in antenatal care to prevent adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes.

  1. Point-of-Care Testing for Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea: Implications for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Natoli, Lisa; Maher, Lisa; Shephard, Mark; Hengel, Belinda; Tangey, Annie; Badman, Steven G.; Ward, James; Guy, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Point-of-care (POC) testing for chlamydia (CT) and gonorrhoea (NG) offers a new approach to the diagnosis and management of these sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in remote Australian communities and other similar settings. Diagnosis of STIs in remote communities is typically symptom driven, and for those who are asymptomatic, treatment is generally delayed until specimens can be transported to the reference laboratory, results returned and the patient recalled. The objective of this study was to explore the clinical implications of using CT/NG POC tests in routine clinical care in remote settings. Methods In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with a purposively selected group of 18 key informants with a range of sexual health and laboratory expertise. Results Participants highlighted the potential impact POC testing would have on different stages of the current STI management pathway in remote Aboriginal communities and how the pathway would change. They identified implications for offering a POC test, specimen collection, conducting the POC test, syndromic management of STIs, pelvic inflammatory disease diagnosis and management, interpretation and delivery of POC results, provision of treatment, contact tracing, management of client flow and wait time, and re-testing at 3 months after infection. Conclusions The introduction of POC testing to improve STI service delivery requires careful consideration of both its advantages and limitations. The findings of this study will inform protocols for the implementation of CT/NG POC testing, and also STI testing and management guidelines. PMID:24956111

  2. Cardiac troponin: a critical review of the case for point-of-care testing in the ED.

    PubMed

    Bingisser, Roland; Cairns, Charles; Christ, Michael; Hausfater, Pierre; Lindahl, Bertil; Mair, Johannes; Panteghini, Mauro; Price, Christopher; Venge, Per

    2012-10-01

    The measurement of cardiac troponin concentrations in the blood is a key element in the evaluation of patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes, according to current guidelines, and contributes importantly to the ruling in or ruling out of acute myocardial infarction. The introduction of point-of-care testing for cardiac troponin has the potential to reduce turnaround time for assay results, compared with central laboratory testing, optimizing resource use. Although, in general, many point-of-care cardiac troponin tests are less sensitive than cardiac troponin tests developed for central laboratory-automated analyzers, point-of-care systems have been used successfully within accelerated protocols for the reliable ruling out of acute coronary syndromes, without increasing subsequent readmission rates for this condition. The impact of shortened assay turnaround times with point-of-care technology on length of stay in the emergency department has been limited to date, with most randomized evaluations of this technology having demonstrated little or no reduction in this outcome parameter. Accordingly, the point-of-care approach has not been shown to be cost-effective relative to central laboratory testing. Modeling studies suggest, however, that reengineering overall procedures within the emergency department setting, to take full advantage of reduced therapeutic turnaround time, has the potential to improve the flow of patients through the emergency department, to shorten discharge times, and to reduce cost. To properly evaluate the potential contribution of point-of-care technology in the emergency department, including its cost-effectiveness, future evaluations of point-of-care platforms will need to be embedded completely within a local decision-making structure designed for its use. PMID:22633720

  3. A Novel Quantum Dots-Based Point of Care Test for Syphilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Li, Ding; He, Rong; Guo, Qin; Wang, Kan; Zhang, Xueqing; Huang, Peng; Cui, Daxiang

    2010-05-01

    One-step lateral flow test is recommended as the first line screening of syphilis for primary healthcare settings in developing countries. However, it generally shows low sensitivity. We describe here the development of a novel fluorescent POC (Point Of Care) test method to be used for screening for syphilis. The method was designed to combine the rapidness of lateral flow test and sensitiveness of fluorescent method. 50 syphilis-positive specimens and 50 healthy specimens conformed by Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) were tested with Quantum Dot-labeled and colloidal gold-labeled lateral flow test strips, respectively. The results showed that both sensitivity and specificity of the quantum dots-based method reached up to 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91-100%), while those of the colloidal gold-based method were 82% (95% CI, 68-91%) and 100% (95% CI, 91-100%), respectively. In addition, the naked-eye detection limit of quantum dot-based method could achieve 2 ng/ml of anti-TP47 polyclonal antibodies purified by affinity chromatography with TP47 antigen, which was tenfold higher than that of colloidal gold-based method. In conclusion, the quantum dots were found to be suitable for labels of lateral flow test strip. Its ease of use, sensitiveness and low cost make it well-suited for population-based on-the-site syphilis screening.

  4. A Novel Molecular Test to Diagnose Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis at the Point of Care.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Saldarriaga, Omar A; Tartaglino, Lilian; Gacek, Rosana; Temple, Elissa; Sparks, Hayley; Melby, Peter C; Travi, Bruno L

    2015-11-01

    Dogs are the principal reservoir hosts of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (VL) but current serological methods are not sensitive enough to detect all subclinically infected animals, which is crucial to VL control programs. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods have greater sensitivity but require expensive equipment and trained personnel, impairing its implementation in endemic areas. We developed a diagnostic test that uses isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) to detect Leishmania infantum. This method was coupled with lateral flow (LF) reading with the naked eye to be adapted as a point-of-care test. The L. infantum RPA-LF had an analytical sensitivity similar to real time-PCR, detecting DNA of 0.1 parasites spiked in dog blood, which was equivalent to 40 parasites/mL. There was no cross amplification with dog or human DNA or with Leishmania braziliensis, Leishmania amazonensis, or Trypanosoma cruzi. The test also amplified Leishmania donovani strains (N = 7). In a group of clinically normal dogs (N = 30), RPA-LF detected more subclinical infections than rK39 strip test, a standard serological method (50% versus 13.3% positivity, respectively; P = 0.005). Also, RPA-LF detected L. infantum in noninvasive mucosal samples of dogs with a sensitivity comparable to blood samples. This novel molecular test may have a positive impact in leishmaniasis control programs.

  5. A Novel Molecular Test to Diagnose Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis at the Point of Care.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Saldarriaga, Omar A; Tartaglino, Lilian; Gacek, Rosana; Temple, Elissa; Sparks, Hayley; Melby, Peter C; Travi, Bruno L

    2015-11-01

    Dogs are the principal reservoir hosts of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (VL) but current serological methods are not sensitive enough to detect all subclinically infected animals, which is crucial to VL control programs. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods have greater sensitivity but require expensive equipment and trained personnel, impairing its implementation in endemic areas. We developed a diagnostic test that uses isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) to detect Leishmania infantum. This method was coupled with lateral flow (LF) reading with the naked eye to be adapted as a point-of-care test. The L. infantum RPA-LF had an analytical sensitivity similar to real time-PCR, detecting DNA of 0.1 parasites spiked in dog blood, which was equivalent to 40 parasites/mL. There was no cross amplification with dog or human DNA or with Leishmania braziliensis, Leishmania amazonensis, or Trypanosoma cruzi. The test also amplified Leishmania donovani strains (N = 7). In a group of clinically normal dogs (N = 30), RPA-LF detected more subclinical infections than rK39 strip test, a standard serological method (50% versus 13.3% positivity, respectively; P = 0.005). Also, RPA-LF detected L. infantum in noninvasive mucosal samples of dogs with a sensitivity comparable to blood samples. This novel molecular test may have a positive impact in leishmaniasis control programs. PMID:26240156

  6. Validation of G6PD Point-of-Care Tests among Healthy Volunteers in Yangon, Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Maw, Lwin Zar; Chowwiwat, Nongnud; Bansil, Pooja; Domingo, Gonzalo J.; Htun, Moh Moh; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Htut, Ye; Nosten, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Primaquine and other 8-amnoquinoline based anti-malarials can cause haemolysis in subjects with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Correct diagnosis of G6PD status in patients is crucial for safe treatment of both relapsing stages of Plasmodium vivax and transmitting forms of Plasmodium falciparum. Lack of suitable point-of-care tests has hampered a much needed wide use of primaquine for malaria elimination. In this study we have assessed the performances of two qualitative tests, the fluorescent spot test (FST) and the G6PD CareStart test (CST), against the gold standard quantitative spectrophotometric assay in a population of 1000 random adult healthy volunteers living in Yangon, Myanmar. The prevalence of G6PD deficiency in the Bamar, Karen and in the whole sample set was 6.6% (10.1% in males), 9.2% (21.0% in males) and 6.8% (11.1% in males) respectively. The FST and CST showed comparable performances with sensitivity over 95% and specificity over 90%, however for cases with severe G6PD activity the FTS had improved performance. If used with a conservative interpretation of the signal, the CareStart test has the potential to be used in the field and, by allowing a wider use of primaquine, to help malaria elimination. PMID:27035821

  7. A Novel Molecular Test to Diagnose Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis at the Point of Care

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Saldarriaga, Omar A.; Tartaglino, Lilian; Gacek, Rosana; Temple, Elissa; Sparks, Hayley; Melby, Peter C.; Travi, Bruno L.

    2015-01-01

    Dogs are the principal reservoir hosts of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (VL) but current serological methods are not sensitive enough to detect all subclinically infected animals, which is crucial to VL control programs. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods have greater sensitivity but require expensive equipment and trained personnel, impairing its implementation in endemic areas. We developed a diagnostic test that uses isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) to detect Leishmania infantum. This method was coupled with lateral flow (LF) reading with the naked eye to be adapted as a point-of-care test. The L. infantum RPA-LF had an analytical sensitivity similar to real time-PCR, detecting DNA of 0.1 parasites spiked in dog blood, which was equivalent to 40 parasites/mL. There was no cross amplification with dog or human DNA or with Leishmania braziliensis, Leishmania amazonensis, or Trypanosoma cruzi. The test also amplified Leishmania donovani strains (N = 7). In a group of clinically normal dogs (N = 30), RPA-LF detected more subclinical infections than rK39 strip test, a standard serological method (50% versus 13.3% positivity, respectively; P = 0.005). Also, RPA-LF detected L. infantum in noninvasive mucosal samples of dogs with a sensitivity comparable to blood samples. This novel molecular test may have a positive impact in leishmaniasis control programs. PMID:26240156

  8. Point-of-care testing in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancers: Current technology and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Huddy, Jeremy R; Ni, Melody Z; Markar, Sheraz R; Hanna, George B

    2015-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) tests enable rapid results and are well established in medical practice. Recent advances in analytical techniques have led to a new generation of POC devices that will alter gastrointestinal diagnostic pathways. This review aims to identify current and new technologies for the POC diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancer. A structured search of the Embase and Medline databases was performed. Papers reporting diagnostic tests for gastrointestinal cancer available as a POC device or containing a description of feasibility for POC application were included. Studies recovered were heterogeneous and therefore results are presented as a narrative review. Six diagnostic methods were identified (fecal occult blood, fecal proteins, volatile organic compounds, pyruvate kinase isoenzyme type M2, tumour markers and DNA analysis). Fecal occult blood testing has a reported sensitivity of 66%-85% and specificity greater than 95%. The others are at a range of development and clinical application. POC devices have a proven role in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancer. Barriers to their implementation exist and the transition from experimental to clinical medicine is currently slow. New technologies demonstrate potential to provide accurate POC tests and an ability to diagnose gastrointestinal cancer at an early stage with improved clinical outcome and survival. PMID:25892860

  9. Short-Term Thermal-Humidity Shock Affects Point-of-Care Glucose Testing

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Mandy; Curtis, Corbin M.; Ferguson, William J.; Vy, John H.; Truong, Anh-Thu; Sumner, Stephanie L.; Kost, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to assess the effects of short-term (≤1 hour) static high temperature and humidity stresses on the performance of point-of-care (POC) glucose test strips and meters. Glucose meters are used by medical responders and patients in a variety of settings including hospitals, clinics, homes, and the field. Reagent test strips and instruments are potentially exposed to austere environmental conditions. Glucose test strips and meters were exposed to a mean relative humidity of 83.0% (SD = 8.0%) and temperature of 42°C (107.6°F, SD = 3.2) in a Tenney BTRC environmental chamber. Stressed and unstressed glucose reagent strips and meters were tested with spiked blood samples (n = 40 measurements per time point for each of 4 trials) after 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes of exposure. Wilcoxon’s signed rank test was applied to compare measurements test strip and meter measurements to isolate and characterize the magnitude of meter versus test strip effects individually. Stressed POC meters and test strips produced elevated glucose results, with stressed meter bias as high as 20 mg/dL (17.7% error), and stressed test strip bias as high as 13 mg/dL (12.2% error). The aggregate stress effect on meter and test strips yielded a positive bias as high as 33 mg/dL (30.1% error) after 15 minutes of exposure. Short-term exposure (15 minutes) to high temperature and humidity can significantly affect the performance of POC glucose test strips and meters, with measurement biases that potentially affect clinical decision making and patient safety. PMID:24876542

  10. Point-of-Care Testing of Troponin Levels Compared With Automated Laboratory Evaluation: A Reliability Study.

    PubMed

    Sardi, Adacilis Ramirez; Lamoureux, Julie A; Cohn, Tanya M; Phillip-Samuel, Shirley G

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, troponin levels are measured in the blood using an automated laboratory protocol, but the use of a faster technology, the point-of-care (POC) testing of troponin levels, has shown promise in the effective differential diagnosis of cardiac injury. The purpose of this study was to compare the 2 methods. A total of 1567 patients were seen in the emergency department who were tested with both the POC iSTAT troponin and laboratory troponin from a secondary analysis of retrospective data collected between June 2012 and December 2012. The values for laboratory troponin varied between 0 and 30 with a mean and standard deviation of 0.060 ± 0.842 and the values for POC testing varied between 0 and 17.2 with a mean and standard deviation of 0.042 ± 0.492. The Bland-Altman analysis showed a systematic negative bias for the POC values compared with the laboratory troponin values. Lowering the POC cut-off value for troponin to 0.035 yielded 3 out of 4 better validity coefficients compared with those with the suggested manufacturer's cut-off value of 0.08 when predicting the gold standard. The POC troponin can be used to measure troponin level and similar diagnosis if the cut-off value for the POC troponin is lowered to 0.035 instead of the 0.08 suggested manufacturer's cut-off. PMID:27575797

  11. Gene-Z: a device for point of care genetic testing using a smartphone.

    PubMed

    Stedtfeld, Robert D; Tourlousse, Dieter M; Seyrig, Gregoire; Stedtfeld, Tiffany M; Kronlein, Maggie; Price, Scott; Ahmad, Farhan; Gulari, Erdogan; Tiedje, James M; Hashsham, Syed A

    2012-04-21

    By 2012, point of care (POC) testing will constitute roughly one third of the $59 billion in vitro diagnostics market. The ability to carry out multiplexed genetic testing and wireless connectivity are emerging as key attributes of future POC devices. In this study, an inexpensive, user-friendly and compact device (termed Gene-Z) is presented for rapid quantitative detection of multiple genetic markers with high sensitivity and specificity. Using a disposable valve-less polymer microfluidic chip containing four arrays of 15 reaction wells each with dehydrated primers for isothermal amplification, the Gene-Z enables simultaneous analysis of four samples, each for multiple genetic markers in parallel, requiring only a single pipetting step per sample for dispensing. To drastically reduce the cost and size of the real-time detector necessary for quantification, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was performed with a high concentration of SYTO-81, a non-inhibiting fluorescent DNA binding dye. The Gene-Z is operated using an iPod Touch, which also receives data and carries out automated analysis and reporting via a WiFi interface. This study presents data pertaining to performance of the device including sensitivity and reproducibility using genomic DNA from Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Overall, the Gene-Z represents a significant step toward truly inexpensive and compact tools for POC genetic testing.

  12. Point-of-Care Testing as an Influenza Surveillance Tool: Methodology and Lessons Learned from Implementation.

    PubMed

    Gren, Lisa H; Porucznik, Christina A; Joy, Elizabeth A; Lyon, Joseph L; Staes, Catherine J; Alder, Stephen C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Disease surveillance combines data collection and analysis with dissemination of findings to decision makers. The timeliness of these activities affects the ability to implement preventive measures. Influenza surveillance has traditionally been hampered by delays in both data collection and dissemination. Methods. We used statistical process control (SPC) to evaluate the daily percentage of outpatient visits with a positive point-of-care (POC) influenza test in the University of Utah Primary Care Research Network. Results. Retrospectively, POC testing generated an alert in each of 4 seasons (2004-2008, median 16 days before epidemic onset), suggesting that email notification of clinicians would be 9 days earlier than surveillance alerts posted to the Utah Department of Health website. In the 2008-09 season, the algorithm generated a real-time alert 19 days before epidemic onset. Clinicians in 4 intervention clinics received email notification of the alert within 4 days. Compared with clinicians in 6 control clinics, intervention clinicians were 40% more likely to perform rapid testing (P = 0.105) and twice as likely to vaccinate for seasonal influenza (P = 0.104) after notification. Conclusions. Email notification of SPC-generated alerts provided significantly earlier notification of the epidemic onset than traditional surveillance. Clinician preventive behavior was not significantly different in intervention clinics. PMID:23691297

  13. Electrochemical K-562 cells sensor based on origami paper device for point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shenguang; Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Haiyun; Huang, Jiadong; Yan, Mei; Yu, Jinghua

    2015-12-01

    A low-cost, simple, portable and sensitive paper-based electrochemical sensor was established for the detection of K-562 cell in point-of-care testing. The hybrid material of 3D Au nanoparticles/graphene (3D Au NPs/GN) with high specific surface area and ionic liquid (IL) with widened electrochemical windows improved the good biocompatibility and high conductivity was modified on paper working electrode (PWE) by the classic assembly method and then employed as the sensing surface. IL could not only enhance the electron transfer ability but also provide sensing recognition interface for the conjugation of Con A with cells, with the cell capture efficiency and the sensitivity of biosensor strengthened simultaneously. Concanavalin A (Con A) immobilization matrix was used to capture cells. As proof-of-concept, the paper-based electrochemical sensor for the detection of K-562 cells was developed. With such sandwich-type assay format, K-562 cells as model cells were captured on the surface of Con A/IL/3D AuNPs@GN/PWE. Con A-labeled dendritic PdAg NPs were captured on the surface of K-562 cells. Such dendritic PdAg NPs worked as catalysts promoting the oxidation of thionine (TH) by H2O2 which was released from K-562 cells via the stimulation of phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). Therefore, the current signal response was dependent on the amount of PdAg NPs and the concentration of H2O2, the latter of which corresponded with the releasing amount from cells. So, the detection method of K-562 cell was also developed. Under optimized experimental conditions, 1.5×10(-14) mol of H2O2 releasing from each cell was calculated. The linear range and the detection limit for K-562 cells were determined to be 1.0×10(3)-5.0×10(6) cells/mL and 200 cells/mL, respectively. Such as-prepared sensor showed excellent analytical performance with good fabrication reproducibility, acceptable precision and satisfied accuracy, providing a novel protocol in point-of-care testing of cells.

  14. ENHANCING CRISIS STANDARDS OF CARE USING INNOVATIVE POINT-OF-CARE TESTING

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Gerald J.; Sakaguchi, Ann; Curtis, Corbin; Tran, Nam K.; Katip, Pratheep; Louie, Richard F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify strategies with tactics that enable point-of-care (POC) testing (medical testing at or near the site of care) to improve outcomes effectively in emergencies, disasters, and public health crises, especially where community infrastructure is compromised. Design Logic model-critical path-feedback identified needs for improving practices. Reverse stress analysis showed POC should be integrated, responders properly trained, and devices staged in small-world networks (SWNs). We summarize first responder POC resources, strategize test clusters, address assay environmental vulnerabilities, and design tactics useful for SWNs, alternate care facilities, shelters, point-of-distribution centers, and community hospitals. Participants and Environment Emergency-disaster needs assessment survey respondents and Center experience. Outcomes Important tactics are: a) develop training/education courses and “just-in-time” on-line web resources to assure the competency of POC coordinators and high quality testing performance; b) protect equipment from environmental extremes by sealing reagents, controlling temperature and humidity to which they are exposed, and establishing near-patient testing in defined environments that operate within current FDA licensing claims (illustrated with HIV-1/2 tests); c) position testing in defined sites within SWNs and other environments; d) harden POC devices and reagents to withstand wider ranges of environmental extremes in field applications; e) promote new POC technologies for pathogen detection and other assays, per needs assessment results; and f) select tests according to mission objectives and value propositions. Conclusions Careful implementation of POC testing will facilitate evidence-based triage, diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of victims and patients, while advancing standards of care in emergencies and disasters, as well as public health crises. PMID:22338316

  15. Infection Transmission Associated with Point of Care Testing and the Laboratory's Role in Risk Reduction.

    PubMed

    Sharon, M Geaghan

    2014-09-01

    Lack of knowledge and confusion exists regarding safe and appropriate use of blood glucose monitoring equipment. Increasing numbers of diabetics, and exponential growth in blood glucose monitoring presents increased opportunities for infection transmission between patients. Diabetics have increased exposure to blood and blood borne pathogens from frequent blood glucose monitoring. Risk factors have been identified in infectious outbreaks and by analysis of testing practice. Point of care blood glucose meters are frequently contaminated by blood. Bacterial and viral organisms survive on surfaces and in dried blood. Instrumentation is shared between patients, and is heavily utilized in institutional settings, so that serial testing is performed on multiple patients within a short timeframe. Hand hygiene, glove changes and meter disinfection between testing events has been found to be inconsistent. Time pressure for meter usage competes with proper cleaning and disinfection procedures. Meter storage areas are frequently contaminated by blood. Multi-use lancets, improperly used for serial patient blood sampling, are a source for infection transmission. Test strips in vials, frequently contaminated by bacterial organisms, present potential hazard. The responsibility of the clinical laboratory is to insure successful implementation of practices that insure patient safety. Risk reduction strategies include single-use auto-disabling skin puncture devices for blood sampling; hand hygiene and glove change for every testing event; effective meter cleaning and disinfection for every testing event; meter use restriction to a single patient; safe practices for glucose meter storage; infection control practices to reduce contamination of blood glucose test strips or changes in test strip packaging and test strip dispensing. PMID:27683466

  16. [Point-of-care diagnostics compared to standard coagulation tests in multiple trauma. Pros and cons].

    PubMed

    Johanning, K

    2014-02-01

    The haemostasiological management of patients with multiple injuries requires rapid and adequate therapy decisions due to the highly dynamic surroundings. For this, diagnostic techniques which have the ability to detect and differentiate coagulation disorders that are commonly present in multiple trauma patients are necessary. Widely used routine coagulation tests (e.g., aPTT or PT) sensitively measure impairments of the intrinsic or extrinsic pathway, but without further identification or differentiation. Important influencing parameters like acidosis, hypothermia, fibrinolysis or polymerization dysfunction but especially the clot quality are not detectable. Moreover, the turn around times of these tests are about 30-60 min. However, thrombelastography measures clot strength and stability in whole blood under the present conditions of the injured patient. Impairments of clot quality can be differentiated. Because of the visualization of the clot formation, a patient's coagulation capacity can be assessed within minutes. Admittedly the use of these point-of-care devices in the operation theatre requires human and temporal resources.

  17. Evaluation of point-of-care testing of C-reactive protein in forensic autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Mikiko; Koda, Yoshiro

    2014-04-01

    We assessed the technical performance and robustness of the point-of-care test for C-reactive protein (CRP) NycoCard CRP for use in forensic autopsy cases. The results of 17 of 39 cadaver blood samples that had CRP in the range effectively measured by the NycoCard (5-120mg/l) correlated well (r=0.99) with those of quantitative latex agglutination immunoassay (turbidimetry), and the out-of-range NycoCard results were fully consistent with those obtained by turbidimetry. For the ten sera whose CRP >120mg/l according to NycoCard, a significant correlation (r=0.98) was observed between values multiplied by the dilution ratio and those of turbidimetry. No significant differences were observed after a freeze-thaw procedure. In addition, CRP results using recombinant human CRP spiked with hemoglobin up to 80g/l were not significantly different from the unspiked results in PBS. The test allows reliable and cost-effective on-site measurement of CRP from a small volume of serum (5μl) with simple equipment. This semi-quantification method of CRP should be useful for diagnosis during autopsy.

  18. Integration of clinical point-of-care requirements in a DNA microarray genotyping test.

    PubMed

    Van Dorst, Bieke; Cremers, Amelieke; Jans, Karolien; Van Domburg, Trees; Steegen, Kim; Huang, Chengjun; Dorrer, Christian; Lagae, Liesbet; Ferwerda, Gerben; Stuyver, Lieven J

    2014-11-15

    Various proof-of-concept studies have shown the potential of biosensors with a high multiplex detection capability for the readout of DNA microarrays in a lab-on-a-chip. This is particularly interesting for the development of point-of-care genotyping tests, to screen for multiple pathogens and/or antibiotic resistance patterns. In this paper, an assay workflow is presented, suited for the development of novel lab-on-a-chips with an integrated DNA microarray. Besides the description of the different assay steps (DNA purification, amplification and detection), a control strategy is presented according to recommendations of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To use a lab-on-a-chip for diagnostic applications, the optimization and evaluation of the assay performance with clinical samples is very important. Therefore, appropriate quantification methods are described, which allow optimization and evaluation of the separate assay steps, as well as total assay performance. In order to demonstrate and evaluate the total workflow, blood samples spiked with Streptococcus pneumoniae were tested. All blood samples with ≥ 10(3)CFU S. pneumoniae per ml of human blood were successfully detected by this genotyping assay.

  19. Evaluating Operational Specifications of Point-of-Care Diagnostic Tests: A Standardized Scorecard

    PubMed Central

    Lehe, Jonathan D.; Sitoe, Nádia E.; Tobaiwa, Ocean; Loquiha, Osvaldo; Quevedo, Jorge I.; Peter, Trevor F.; Jani, Ilesh V.

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of HIV antiretroviral therapy into decentralized rural settings will increasingly require simple point-of-care (POC) diagnostic tests that can be used without laboratory infrastructure and technical skills. New POC test devices are becoming available but decisions around which technologies to deploy may be biased without systematic assessment of their suitability for decentralized healthcare settings. To address this, we developed a standardized, quantitative scorecard tool to objectively evaluate the operational characteristics of POC diagnostic devices. The tool scores devices on a scale of 1–5 across 30 weighted characteristics such as ease of use, quality control, electrical requirements, shelf life, portability, cost and service, and provides a cumulative score that ranks products against a set of ideal POC characteristics. The scorecard was tested on 19 devices for POC CD4 T-lymphocyte cell counting, clinical chemistry or hematology testing. Single and multi-parameter devices were assessed in each of test categories. The scores across all devices ranged from 2.78 to 4.40 out of 5. The tool effectively ranked devices within each category (p<0.01) except the CD4 and multi-parameter hematology products. The tool also enabled comparison of different characteristics between products. Agreement across the four scorers for each product was high (intra-class correlation >0.80; p<0.001). Use of this tool enables the systematic evaluation of diagnostic tests to facilitate product selection and investment in appropriate technology. It is particularly relevant for countries and testing programs considering the adoption of new POC diagnostic tests. PMID:23118871

  20. A miniaturised image based fluorescence detection system for point-of-care-testing of cocaine abuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Rafał; Krüger, Jan; Moynihan, Shane

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we describe a miniaturised image-based fluorescence detection system and demonstrate its viability as a highly sensitive tool for point-of-care-analysis of drugs of abuse in human sweat with a focus on monitor individuals for drugs of abuse. Investigations of miniaturised and low power optoelectronic configurations and methodologies for real-time image analysis were successfully carried out. The miniaturised fluorescence detection system was validated against a reference detection system under controlled laboratory conditions by analysing spiked sweat samples in dip stick and then strip with sample pad. As a result of the validation studies, a 1 ng mL-1 limit of detection of cocaine in sweat and full agreement of test results with the reference detection system can be reported. Results of the investigations open the way towards a detection system that integrates a hand-held fluorescence reader and a wearable skinpatch, and which can collect and in situ analyse sweat for the presence of cocaine at any point for up to tenths hours.

  1. Point of care testing of phospholipase A2 group IIA for serological diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nathan J.; Chapman, Robert; Lin, Yiyang; Mmesi, Jonas; Bentham, Andrew; Tyreman, Matthew; Abraham, Sonya; Stevens, Molly M.

    2016-02-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) was examined as a point of care marker for determining disease activity in rheumatoid (RA) and psoriatic (PsA) arthritis. Serum concentration and activity of sPLA2-IIA were measured using in-house antibodies and a novel point of care lateral flow device assay in patients diagnosed with varying severities of RA (n = 30) and PsA (n = 25) and found to correlate strongly with C-reactive protein (CRP). Levels of all markers were elevated in patients with active RA over those with inactive RA as well as both active and inactive PsA, indicating that sPLA2-IIA can be used as an analogue to CRP for RA diagnosis at point of care.Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) was examined as a point of care marker for determining disease activity in rheumatoid (RA) and psoriatic (PsA) arthritis. Serum concentration and activity of sPLA2-IIA were measured using in-house antibodies and a novel point of care lateral flow device assay in patients diagnosed with varying severities of RA (n = 30) and PsA (n = 25) and found to correlate strongly with C-reactive protein (CRP). Levels of all markers were elevated in patients with active RA over those with inactive RA as well as both active and inactive PsA, indicating that sPLA2-IIA can be used as an analogue to CRP for RA diagnosis at point of care. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08423g

  2. Point-of-care platelet function tests: detection of platelet inhibition induced by nonopioid analgesic drugs.

    PubMed

    Scharbert, Gisela; Gebhardt, Kristina; Sow, Zacharia; Duris, Monika; Deusch, Engelbert; Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle

    2007-12-01

    Detection of platelet inhibition is of clinical relevance in the preinterventional risk-benefit assessment in chronic low-back-pain patients scheduled for invasive pain therapy. We evaluated the sensitivity of various point-of-care platelet function tests for the detection of platelet inhibition induced by nonopioid analgesic drugs. After Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent, citrated whole blood from 40 patients with chronic unspecific low back pain was investigated before and 30 min after intravenous infusion of the study medication consisting of diclofenac 75 mg (plus orphenadrin 30 mg; Neodolpasse; Fresenius Kabi Austria GmbH, Austria), parecoxib 40 mg (Dynastat; Pharmacia Europe EEIG, UK), paracetamol 1 g (Perfalgan; Bieffe Medital S.P.A., Italy), or normal saline in a randomized, cross-over, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. Platelet function was assessed using the PFA-100 platelet function analyzer and thromboelastometry, as well as impedance aggregometry (in the last 17 patients recruited after it became commercially available). Sensitivity for detecting diclofenac-induced platelet inhibition was 85% for the PFA-100 using epinephrine as agonist and 94% for arachidonic acid-induced impedance aggregometry. ADP-induced platelet function tests, as well as cytochalasin D-modified thromboelastometry were unreliable. All tests had a low incidence of false-positive test results after normal saline. Paracetamol and parecoxib had no significant platelet inhibiting effect. The PFA-100 using epinephrine as agonist and arachidonic acid-induced impedance aggregometry are recommended for the detection of cyclooxygenase-I-inhibiting effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as diclofenac. Our findings confirm that a single rescue dose of paracetamol and parecoxib has no antiplatelet effect. PMID:17982319

  3. The use of upconverting phosphors in point-of-care (POC) testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanke, Hans J.; Zuiderwijk, Michel; Wiesmeijer, Karien C.; Breedveld, Robert N.; Abrams, William R.; de Dood, Claudia J.; Tjon Kon Fat, Elisa M.; Corstjens, Paul L. A. M.

    2014-03-01

    Point-of-care (POC) testing is increasingly applied as a cost effective alternative to many diagnostic tests. Key in POC testing is to create sufficient assay sensitivity with relatively low cost reagents and equipment. For this purpose we have employed a unique reporter, upconverting phosphor (UCP) particles, in combination with lateral flow (LF) assays. UCPs, submicron ceramic particles doped with rare earth ions (lanthanides), convert infrared to visible light and do not suffer from autofluorescence which limits conventional fluorescence based assays. Low cost handheld readers and microfluidics were evaluated in various applications. Designed assays are well suited for applications outside diagnostic laboratories, in resource poor settings, and can even be used by patients at home. Using two distinctly different UCP-LF assay formats, we focussed on assays for infectious diseases based on the detection of pathogen-specific antibodies and/or antigens including nucleic acids to demonstrate active infection with HIV. Only minor adaptation of the standard UCP-LF assay format is needed to render the format suitable for applications involving low affinity capture antibodies (e.g. in the detection of neurotoxin, botulism), capture of small molecules (e.g. detection of melatonin, a key hormone in chronopharmacology) or the use of dry UCP reagents (e.g. detection of protein based fruit-ripening markers, of economic interest in agriculture). Finally, we anticipate on developments in healthcare (personalized medicine) by discussing the potential of one of the UCP-LF assay formats to measure serum trough levels of immunodrugs (e.g. infliximab or adalimumab) in patients treated for inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. Future Connectivity for Disaster and Emergency Point of Care.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jimmy N; Brock, Terry Keith; Mecozzi, Daniel M; Tran, Nam K; Kost, Gerald J

    2010-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this paper is to identify strategies for connectivity that will optimize point-of-care testing (POCT) organized as small-world networks in disaster settings. METHODS: We evaluated connectivity failures during the 2010 Haiti Earthquake, applied small-world network concepts, and reviewed literature for point-of-care (POC) connectivity systems. RESULTS: Medical teams responding to the Haiti Earthquake faced connectivity failures that affected patient outcomes. Deploying robust wireless connectivity systems can enhance the efficiency of the disaster response by improving health care delivery, medical documentation, logistics, response coordination, communication, and telemedicine. Virtual POC connectivity education and training programs can enhance readiness of disaster responders. CONCLUSIONS: The admirable humanitarian efforts of more than 4000 organizations substantially impacted the lives of earthquake victims in Haiti. However, the lack of connectivity and small-world network strategies, combined with communication failures, during early stages of the relief effort must be addressed for future disaster preparedness.

  5. Future Connectivity for Disaster and Emergency Point of Care

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jimmy N.; Brock, Terry Keith; Mecozzi, Daniel M.; Tran, Nam K.; Kost, Gerald J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The goal of this paper is to identify strategies for connectivity that will optimize point-of-care testing (POCT) organized as small-world networks in disaster settings. Methods We evaluated connectivity failures during the 2010 Haiti Earthquake, applied small-world network concepts, and reviewed literature for point-of-care (POC) connectivity systems. Results Medical teams responding to the Haiti Earthquake faced connectivity failures that affected patient outcomes. Deploying robust wireless connectivity systems can enhance the efficiency of the disaster response by improving health care delivery, medical documentation, logistics, response coordination, communication, and telemedicine. Virtual POC connectivity education and training programs can enhance readiness of disaster responders. Conclusions The admirable humanitarian efforts of more than 4000 organizations substantially impacted the lives of earthquake victims in Haiti. However, the lack of connectivity and small-world network strategies, combined with communication failures, during early stages of the relief effort must be addressed for future disaster preparedness. PMID:21547239

  6. Comparison of Rapid Point-of-Care Tests for Detection of Antibodies to Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Dennis G; Hess, Kristen L; Erlyana, Erlyana; Reynolds, Grace L; Cummins, Catherine A; Alonzo, Todd A

    2015-09-01

    Background.  Hepatitis C is one of the most prevalent blood-borne diseases in the United States. Despite the benefits of early screening, among 3.2 million Americans who are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), 50%-70% are unaware of their infection status. Methods.  Data were collected between 2011 and 2014, from 1048 clients who were in the following groups: (1) injection drug users, (2) women at sexual risk, (3) gay and bisexual men, and (4) transgender individuals. The sensitivity and specificity of point-of-care tests included (1) the MedMira rapid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV antibody test, (2) MedMira hepatitis B (HBV)/HIV/HCV antibody test, (3) Chembio HCV Screen Assay used with both whole blood and (4) oral specimens, (5) Chembio HIV-HCV Assay also used with both whole blood and (6) oral specimens, (7) Chembio HIV-HCV-Syphilis Assay, and (8) OraSure HCV Rapid Antibody Test used with whole blood. The gold standard for the HCV tests were HCV enzyme immunoassay (EIA) 2.0. Results.  OraSure had the highest sensitivity at 92.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 88.8%-96.5%) followed closely by Chembio's 3 blood tests at 92.1% (95% CI = 87.7%-96.4%), 91.5% (95% CI = 87.2%-95.7%), and 92.3% (95% CI = 88.4%-96.2%). The sensitivities of MedMira HIV/HCV and MedMira HIV/HCV/HBV tests were the lowest, at 79.1% (95% CI = 72.6%-85.5%), and 81.5% (95% CI = 75.2%-87.8%), respectively. Specificity for the OraSure was 99.8% (95% CI = 99.4%-100%); specificity for the Chembio blood tests was 99.2% (95% CI = 98.6%-99.9%), 99.4% (95% CI = 98.8%-99.9%), and 99.3% (95% CI = 98.8%-99.9%); and specificity for the MedMira was100% and 100%. False-negative results were associated with HIV and hepatitis B core antibody serostatus. Conclusions.  The OraSure and Chembio blood tests (including those multiplexed with HIV and syphilis) appear to good performance characteristics. This study has identified potential limitations of rapid testing in those testing positive for

  7. Construction of effective disposable biosensors for point of care testing of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Tiago; Rodrigues, Patrícia R; Gonçalves, Ana Luisa; Moura, José J G; Jubete, Elena; Añorga, Larraitz; Piknova, Barbora; Schechter, Alan N; Silveira, Célia M; Almeida, M Gabriela

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we aim to demonstrate, as a proof-of-concept, the feasibility of the mass production of effective point of care tests for nitrite quantification in environmental, food and clinical samples. Following our previous work on the development of third generation electrochemical biosensors based on the ammonia forming nitrite reductase (ccNiR), herein we reduced the size of the electrodes' system to a miniaturized format, solved the problem of oxygen interference and performed simple quantification assays in real samples. In particular, carbon paste screen printed electrodes (SPE) were coated with a ccNiR/carbon ink composite homogenized in organic solvents and cured at low temperatures. The biocompatibility of these chemical and thermal treatments was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry showing that the catalytic performance was higher with the combination acetone and a 40°C curing temperature. The successful incorporation of the protein in the carbon ink/solvent composite, while remaining catalytically competent, attests for ccNiR's robustness and suitability for application in screen printed based biosensors. Because the direct electrochemical reduction of molecular oxygen occurs when electroanalytical measurements are performed at the negative potentials required to activate ccNiR (ca.-0.4V vs Ag/AgCl), an oxygen scavenging system based on the coupling of glucose oxidase and catalase activities was successfully used. This enabled the quantification of nitrite in different samples (milk, water, plasma and urine) in a straightforward way and with small error (1-6%). The sensitivity of the biosensor towards nitrite reduction under optimized conditions was 0.55 A M(-1) cm(-2) with a linear response range 0.7-370 μM. PMID:26003719

  8. Construction of effective disposable biosensors for point of care testing of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Tiago; Rodrigues, Patrícia R; Gonçalves, Ana Luisa; Moura, José J G; Jubete, Elena; Añorga, Larraitz; Piknova, Barbora; Schechter, Alan N; Silveira, Célia M; Almeida, M Gabriela

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we aim to demonstrate, as a proof-of-concept, the feasibility of the mass production of effective point of care tests for nitrite quantification in environmental, food and clinical samples. Following our previous work on the development of third generation electrochemical biosensors based on the ammonia forming nitrite reductase (ccNiR), herein we reduced the size of the electrodes' system to a miniaturized format, solved the problem of oxygen interference and performed simple quantification assays in real samples. In particular, carbon paste screen printed electrodes (SPE) were coated with a ccNiR/carbon ink composite homogenized in organic solvents and cured at low temperatures. The biocompatibility of these chemical and thermal treatments was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry showing that the catalytic performance was higher with the combination acetone and a 40°C curing temperature. The successful incorporation of the protein in the carbon ink/solvent composite, while remaining catalytically competent, attests for ccNiR's robustness and suitability for application in screen printed based biosensors. Because the direct electrochemical reduction of molecular oxygen occurs when electroanalytical measurements are performed at the negative potentials required to activate ccNiR (ca.-0.4V vs Ag/AgCl), an oxygen scavenging system based on the coupling of glucose oxidase and catalase activities was successfully used. This enabled the quantification of nitrite in different samples (milk, water, plasma and urine) in a straightforward way and with small error (1-6%). The sensitivity of the biosensor towards nitrite reduction under optimized conditions was 0.55 A M(-1) cm(-2) with a linear response range 0.7-370 μM.

  9. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R.; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U.; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Wallis, Carole L.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E.; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy. PMID:26717411

  10. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Frenkel, Lisa M; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Wallis, Carole L; Gupta, Ravindra K; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Gallant, Joel E; Wainberg, Mark A; Richman, Douglas D; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy. PMID:26717411

  11. 78 FR 73553 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Cripto-1 Point of Care (POC) Tests and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Cripto-1 Point of Care (POC) Tests and Kits for the Detection of Colon and Rectal Cancer, Breast Cancer..., diagnosis, monitoring, association and risk-stratification of colon and rectal cancer, breast cancer, and..., pancreas, stomach, gallbladder, breast, lung, endometrium and cervix. Current methodologies of...

  12. The efficacy of computer reminders on external quality assessment for point-of-care testing in Danish general practice: rationale and methodology for two randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Point-of-care testing (POCT) is increasingly being used in general practice to assist general practitioners (GPs) in their management of patients with diseases. However, low adherence to quality guidelines in terms of split test procedures has been observed among GPs in parts of the Capital Region in Denmark. Computer reminders embedded in GPs electronic medical records (ComRem) may facilitate improved quality control behaviour, but more research is needed to identify what types of reminders work and when. The overall aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of ComRem to improve GPs adherence to quality guidelines. This article describes the rationale and methods of the study that constitute this research project. Methods/design The study is conducted as two randomised controlled trials (RCTs) among general practices in two districts of the Capital Region in Denmark. These districts contain a total of 739 GPs in 567 practices with a total of 1.1 million patients allocated to practice lists. In the first RCT (RCT A), ComRem is compared to postal reminder letters. In the second RCT (RCT B), ComRem is compared to usual activities (no reminders) with a crossover approach. In both of these studies, outcomes are measured by the number of split tests received by the laboratory. Conclusions This study will contribute to knowledge on the efficacy of ComRem in primary care. Because the study does not explore GPs' perceptions and experiences with regard to ComRem, we will subsequently conduct a qualitative survey focusing on these aspects. Trial registrations Study A: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01152151 Study B: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01152177 PMID:21781338

  13. Field evaluation of a prototype paper-based point-of-care fingerstick transaminase test.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Nira R; McGray, Sarah; Colby, Donn J; Noubary, Farzad; Nguyen, Huyen; Nguyen, The Anh; Khormaee, Sariah; Jain, Sidhartha; Hawkins, Kenneth; Kumar, Shailendra; Rolland, Jason P; Beattie, Patrick D; Chau, Nguyen V; Quang, Vo M; Barfield, Cori; Tietje, Kathy; Steele, Matt; Weigl, Bernhard H

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring for drug-induced liver injury (DILI) via serial transaminase measurements in patients on potentially hepatotoxic medications (e.g., for HIV and tuberculosis) is routine in resource-rich nations, but often unavailable in resource-limited settings. Towards enabling universal access to affordable point-of-care (POC) screening for DILI, we have performed the first field evaluation of a paper-based, microfluidic fingerstick test for rapid, semi-quantitative, visual measurement of blood alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Our objectives were to assess operational feasibility, inter-operator variability, lot variability, device failure rate, and accuracy, to inform device modification for further field testing. The paper-based ALT test was performed at POC on fingerstick samples from 600 outpatients receiving HIV treatment in Vietnam. Results, read independently by two clinic nurses, were compared with gold-standard automated (Roche Cobas) results from venipuncture samples obtained in parallel. Two device lots were used sequentially. We demonstrated high inter-operator agreement, with 96.3% (95% C.I., 94.3-97.7%) agreement in placing visual results into clinically-defined "bins" (<3x, 3-5x, and >5x upper limit of normal), >90% agreement in validity determination, and intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.89 (95% C.I., 0.87-0.91). Lot variability was observed in % invalids due to hemolysis (21.1% for Lot 1, 1.6% for Lot 2) and correlated with lots of incorporated plasma separation membranes. Invalid rates <1% were observed for all other device controls. Overall bin placement accuracy for the two readers was 84% (84.3%/83.6%). Our findings of extremely high inter-operator agreement for visual reading-obtained in a target clinical environment, as performed by local practitioners-indicate that the device operation and reading process is feasible and reproducible. Bin placement accuracy and lot-to-lot variability data identified specific targets for device

  14. National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Point-of-Care Technology Research Network: Advancing Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ford Carleton, Penny; Parrish, John A.; Collins, John M.; Crocker, J. Benjamin; Dixon, Ronald F.; Edgman-Levitan, Susan; Lewandrowski, Kent B.; Stahl, James E.; Klapperich, Catherine; Cabodi, Mario; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Rompalo, Anne M.; Manabe, Yukari; Wang, Tza-Huei; Rothman, Richard; Geddes, Chris D.; Widdice, Lea; Jackman, Joany; Mathura, Rishi A.; Lash, Tiffani Bailey

    2016-01-01

    To advance the development of point-of-care technology (POCT), the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering established the POCT Research Network (POCTRN), comprised of Centers that emphasize multidisciplinary partnerships and close facilitation to move technologies from an early stage of development into clinical testing and patient use. This paper describes the POCTRN and the three currently funded Centers as examples of academic-based organizations that support collaborations across disciplines, institutions, and geographic regions to successfully drive innovative solutions from concept to patient care. PMID:27730014

  15. Point-of-Care Blood Glucose Testing for Diabetes Care in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Glycemic control in hospitalized patients with diabetes requires accurate near-patient glucose monitoring systems. In the past decade, point-of-care blood glucose monitoring devices have become the mainstay of near-patient glucose monitoring in hospitals across the world. In this article, we focus on its history, accuracy, clinical use, and cost-effectiveness. Point-of-care devices have evolved from 1.2 kg instruments with no informatics to handheld lightweight portable devices with advanced connectivity features. Their accuracy however remains a subject of debate, and new standards for their approval have now been issued by both the International Organization for Standardization and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. While their cost-effectiveness remains to be proved, their clinical value for managing inpatients with diabetes remains unchallenged. This evidence-based review provides an overall view of its use in the hospital setting. PMID:25355711

  16. Point-of-care testing for HIV in an Irish prison setting: results from three major Irish prisons.

    PubMed

    Bannan, Ciaran L; Lynch, Pamela A; Conroy, Emmett P; O'Dea, Siobhan; Surah, Saloni; Betts-Symonds, Graham; Lyons, Fiona E

    2016-10-01

    HIV is more prevalent in the prison population compared to the general population. Prison inmates are at an increased risk of blood-borne infections. Considerable stigma has been documented amongst inmates with HIV infection. In collaboration with the schools, healthcare facilities, prison authorities and inmate Irish Red Cross groups in Wheatfield, Cloverhill and Mountjoy prisons in Dublin, Ireland, the Department of Genito Urinary Medicine and Infectious Diseases at St James' Hospital in Dublin developed a campaign for raising awareness of HIV, educating inmates about HIV and tackling HIV stigma. Following this campaign, large-scale point-of-care testing for HIV was offered over a short period. In total, 741 inmates were screened for HIV. One inmate tested positive for HIV. We experienced a large number of invalid test results, requiring formal laboratory serum testing, and a small number of false positive results. Large-scale point-of-care testing in the Irish prison setting is acceptable and achievable.

  17. The Effect of ‘On-Line’ POCT on Patient waiting times in an Accident and Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Gilkar, Ashfaq; Fink, Richard; Eardley, Philip; Barron, Catriona

    2013-01-01

    This POCT (point of care testing) team was constructed at the start of 2012 to implement the POCT project aiming to define and test the hypothesis that interfacing POCT devices to a clinical electronic order communications system reduces patient waiting times in an NHS Accident and Emergency Department (A&E). The devices selected for evaluation initially comprised the Sysmex XS 1000i haematology analyser and the Abbott i-Stat chemistry analyser. The POCT devices were interfaced to a server (Midlynx) which in turn was connected via the hospital internal network, to the ICE system (Integrated Clinical Environment). Test orders entered on the ICE system produced a bar code label read by the individual POCT devices. Once required tests were assayed, the results were transmitted back to the ICE system, where they could be viewed by users across the hospital site. The quality of POCT analytical performance was assessed by running quality control checks as recommended by the manufacturers and by exchanging samples daily with the clinical laboratory. The I-Stat (a Chemistry analyser manufactured by ‘Abbott plc’) was also tested against material obtained from a national external quality assurance scheme (NEQAS). The time taken to produce POCT tests was calculated as the time elapsed (TE) between requesting tests, and the time at which completed results were returned to the ICE system. Patient waiting times were derived from the patient administration system (Symphony) used in the A&E department. To assess the true effect of POCT on patient waiting times the analysis was confined to cases associated with POCT tests only (n = 217). A control population (n=229) was randomly selected from the clinical laboratory database. The time interval between requesting a test and receiving the results for the POCT tests was 23 minutes and for the laboratory tests, 60 minutes. The patient waiting times (time of discharge - time of arrival) was 167 minutes for the POCT group and 208 for

  18. Point of care testing for antiretroviral therapy-related lactic acidosis in resource-poor settings.

    PubMed

    Ivers, Louise C; Mukherjee, Joia S

    2006-03-21

    Lactic acidosis is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and is commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of patients on ART. In the developing world, definitive diagnosis by laboratory measurement of lactate may be impossible. Point-of-care devices are available that provide simple, accurate measurements of lactic acid levels at relatively low cost. Their use in an HIV treatment programme in rural Haiti has greatly assisted clinical decision-making in patients with symptoms suggestive of lactic acidosis. PMID:16514312

  19. Operations research study to implement HIV and syphilis point-of-care tests and assess client perceptions in a marginalised area of Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Flores, Elaine C; Lluque, Maria E; Chiappe, Marina; Lino, Rosabel; Bayer, Angela M

    2015-09-01

    In Peru, a significant proportion of people tested for HIV and syphilis do not receive timely results. Our objective was to assess the institutional feasibility of implementing simultaneous HIV/syphilis point-of-care tests and client perceptions regarding these point-of-care tests. Point-of-care tests were implemented in a hospital consultation room in a marginalised zone of Lima. A time-series design was used to compare the proportion of tested clients who received timely results, with and without the point-of-care test intervention. Experience and satisfaction with point-of-care tests was evaluated with 149 people. In the 6 months without intervention, 69% and 61% of clients tested for HIV and syphilis, respectively, received their results within the required 45-minute window. During the 2-month point-of-care test intervention, all clients tested for HIV (n = 387) and syphilis (n = 398) received their results within 45 minutes. All clients surveyed were completely satisfied (52%) or satisfied (48%) with the simultaneous HIV/syphilis point-of-care test screening process. Additionally, 73% strongly agreed with the statement 'I feel satisfied with the rapid testing process.' Screening using point-of-care tests represents an important opportunity to reduce the time, resource and cost burden for users and institutions and increase the proportion of users receiving their test results in a timely manner.

  20. [Advance in loop-mediated isothermal amplification technique and its applications in point-of-care testing platforms].

    PubMed

    Guan, Li; Ma, Xue-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel in vitro nucleic acid amplification method conducted under isothermal conditions with the advantages of high specificity, sensitivity, rapidity and easy detection. Since it was established in 2000, it has been widely applied in various fields of analytical science including the diagnosis of a variety of pathogens, identification of embryo sex, detection of genetically modified organisms and cancer gene identification. Additionally, significant progress has been made in the optimization of the LAMP method, such as accelerated reactions, simplified sample processing, the realization of multiplex amplification, and the enhanced specificity of reaction and detection methods. LAMP technology also shows much potential to be adopted as part of point-of-care testing platforms by the micromation, automation and integration with other technologies such as Lab-on-a-Chip and digital nucleic acid amplification. This review summarizes the latest advances in the LAMP technique and its applications in developing point-of-care testing platforms.

  1. Point-of-Care Viral Load Testing for Sub-Saharan Africa: Informing a Target Product Profile

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Andrew N.; Cambiano, Valentina; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Ford, Deborah; Apollo, Tsitsi; Murungu, Joseph; Rousseau, Christine; Garnett, Geoff; Ehrenkranz, Peter; Bansi-Matharu, Loveleen; Vojnov, Lara; Katz, Zachary; Peeling, Rosanna; Revill, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care viral load tests are being developed to monitor patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa. Test design involves trade-offs between test attributes, including accuracy, complexity, robustness, and cost. We used a model of the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic and ART program in Zimbabwe and found that the attributes of a viral load testing approach that are most influential for cost effectiveness are avoidance of a high proportion of failed tests or results not received, use of an approach that best facilitates retention on ART, and the ability to facilitate greater use of differentiated care, including through expanding coverage of testing availability.

  2. Estimating Implementation and Operational Costs of an Integrated Tiered CD4 Service including Laboratory and Point of Care Testing in a Remote Health District in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Cassim, Naseem; Coetzee, Lindi M.; Schnippel, Kathryn; Glencross, Deborah K.

    2014-01-01

    Background An integrated tiered service delivery model (ITSDM) has been proposed to provide ‘full-coverage’ of CD4 services throughout South Africa. Five tiers are described, defined by testing volumes and number of referring health-facilities. These include: (1) Tier-1/decentralized point-of-care service (POC) in a single site; Tier-2/POC-hub servicing processing <30–40 samples from 8–10 health-clinics; Tier-3/Community laboratories servicing ∼50 health-clinics, processing <150 samples/day; high-volume centralized laboratories (Tier-4 and Tier-5) processing <300 or >600 samples/day and serving >100 or >200 health-clinics, respectively. The objective of this study was to establish costs of existing and ITSDM-tiers 1, 2 and 3 in a remote, under-serviced district in South Africa. Methods Historical health-facility workload volumes from the Pixley-ka-Seme district, and the total volumes of CD4 tests performed by the adjacent district referral CD4 laboratories, linked to locations of all referring clinics and related laboratory-to-result turn-around time (LTR-TAT) data, were extracted from the NHLS Corporate-Data-Warehouse for the period April-2012 to March-2013. Tiers were costed separately (as a cost-per-result) including equipment, staffing, reagents and test consumable costs. A one-way sensitivity analyses provided for changes in reagent price, test volumes and personnel time. Results The lowest cost-per-result was noted for the existing laboratory-based Tiers- 4 and 5 ($6.24 and $5.37 respectively), but with related increased LTR-TAT of >24–48 hours. Full service coverage with TAT <6-hours could be achieved with placement of twenty-seven Tier-1/POC or eight Tier-2/POC-hubs, at a cost-per-result of $32.32 and $15.88 respectively. A single district Tier-3 laboratory also ensured ‘full service coverage’ and <24 hour LTR-TAT for the district at $7.42 per-test. Conclusion Implementing a single Tier-3/community laboratory to extend and improve delivery

  3. [Future of POCT--connection to computer network of a hospital].

    PubMed

    Temma, Shinji

    2002-10-01

    Point-of-care testing[POCT] has many advantages and disadvantages. Rapid availability of the results facilitates immediate decision making, which is a most important advantage. However, the results get lost occasionally and solving this problem is essential for the successful use of POCT. We linked a portable blood gas analyzers to the computer network system in our hospital. At the same time we created a new program to automatically save results and create test orders. Thereafter, there has been no loss of results and the results can be checked quickly at any computer display in our hospital. Surveying past results has also become very easy. This rapid sharing and easy survey of results has enhanced the value of POCT by facilitating more immediate clinical decision making and improving the quality of hospital service. In the near future, POCT will have a much greater menu and be used more widely. Many types of echographic studies will be done at bed side as well. Linking POCT to computer network system and automatically saving the results are critical points to providing quality service in hospitals of the new era.

  4. Point-of-Care Testing in Bathhouses: A Narrative Inquiry into the Experience of Receiving a Positive Preliminary HIV Test Result.

    PubMed

    Genoway, Shyla; Caine, Vera; Singh, Ameeta E; Estefan, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    With a call to increase the accessibility of HIV testing, point-of-care testing for HIV is being readily adopted, but little attention has been paid to the experiences of people being tested at HIV point-of-care sites. Some testing environments, such as bathhouses, promote testing for HIV in higher-risk groups. In this narrative inquiry study we explored the experiences of people testing positive for HIV through point-of-care while at a bathhouse. Three narrative threads for reconsidering the practice were identified: (a) seeing complexities, understanding testing decisions in relation to time, place, and social context; (b) recognizing the impact and significance of secret and silent stories; and (c) tentative and tension-filled connections to care. It is important to understand testing experiences across time, place, and in diverse social contexts. These experiences are embedded within the larger life histories of people and raise questions about adequate support, follow-up, and counseling. PMID:26900014

  5. Recent Advances in Point-of-Care Diagnostics for Cardiac Markers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    National and international cardiology guidelines have recommended a 1-hour turnaround time for reporting results of cardiac troponin to emergency department personnel, measured from the time of blood collection to reporting. Use of point-of-care testing (POCT) can reduce turnaround times for cardiac markers, but current devices are not as precise or sensitive as central laboratory assays. The gap is growing as manufacturers of mainframe immunoassay instruments have or will release troponin assays that are even higher than those currently available. These assays have analytical sensitivity that enables detection of nearly 100% of all healthy subjects which is not possible for current POCT assays. Use of high sensitivity troponin results in a lower value for the 99th percentile of a healthy population. Clinically, this enables for the detection of more cases of myocardial injury. In order to compete analytically, next generation POCT assays will to make technologic advancements, such as the use of microfluidic to better control sample delivery, nanoparticles or nanotubes to increase the surface-to-volume ratios for analytes and antibodies, and novel detection schemes such as chemiluminescence and electrochemical detectors to enhance analytical sensitivity. Multi-marker analysis using POCT is also on the horizon for tests that complement cardiac troponin.

  6. Use of CLIA-waived point-of-care tests for infectious diseases in community pharmacies in the United States.

    PubMed

    Weber, Natalie C; Klepser, Michael E; Akers, Julie M; Klepser, Donald G; Adams, Alex J

    2016-01-01

    Review of point-of-care (POC) testing in community pharmacies, availability and specifications of CLIA-waived infectious disease POC tests, and provide recommendations for future community pharmacy POC models in an effort to improve patient outcomes while reducing antibiotic resistance. PubMed and Medscape were searched for the following keywords: infectious disease, community pharmacy, rapid diagnostic tests, rapid assay, and POC tests. All studies utilizing POC tests in community pharmacies for infectious disease were included. Studies, articles, recommendations, and posters were reviewed and information categorized into general implementation of POC testing in community pharmacies, CLIA-waived tests available, Influenza, Group A Streptococcus pharyngitis, Helicobacter pylori, HIV and Hepatitis C. POC testing provides a unique opportunity for community pharmacists to implement collaborative disease management programmes for infectious diseases and reduce over-prescribing of antibiotics and improve patient outcomes through early detection, treatment and/or referral to a specialist. PMID:26560318

  7. Field Trial Evaluation of the Performances of Point-of-Care Tests for Screening G6PD Deficiency in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Roca-Feltrer, Arantxa; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Chy, Sophy; Canier, Lydie; Kerleguer, Alexandra; Tor, Pety; Chuor, Char Meng; Kheng, Sim; Siv, Sovannaroth; Kachur, Patrick S.; Taylor, Walter R. J.; Hwang, Jimee; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Background User-friendly, accurate, point-of-care rapid tests to detect glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDd) are urgently needed at peripheral level to safely recommend primaquine for malaria elimination. Methods The CareStart G6PD RDT (AccessBio, New Jersey, USA), a novel rapid diagnostic test and the most commonly used test, the fluorescent spot test (FST) were assessed against the quantitatively measured G6PD enzyme activity for detecting G6PDd. Subjects were healthy males and non-pregnant females aged 18 years or older residing in six villages in Pailin Province, western Cambodia. Findings Of the 938 subjects recruited, 74 (7.9%) were severe and moderately severe G6PD deficient (enzyme activity <30%), mostly in male population; population median G6PD activity was 12.0 UI/g Hb. The performances of the CareStart G6PD RDT and the FST, according to different cut-off values used to define G6PDd were very similar. For the detection of severe and moderately severe G6PDd (enzyme activity <30%, <3.6 UI/g Hb) in males and females, sensitivity and negative (normal status) predictive value were 100% for both point-of-care tools. When the G6PDd cut-off value increased (from <40% to <60%), the sensitivity for both PoCs decreased: 93.3% to 71.7% (CareStart G6PD RDT, p = 10−6) and 95.5% to 73.2% (FST, p = 10−6) while the specificity for both PoCs remained similar: 97.4% to 98.3% (CareStart G6PD RDT, p = 0.23) and 98.7% to 99.6% (FST, p = 0.06). The cut-off values for classifying individuals as normal were 4.0 UI/g Hb and 4.3 UI/g Hb for the CareStart G6PD RDT and the FST, respectively. Conclusions The CareStart G6PD RDT reliably detected moderate and severe G6PD deficient individuals (enzyme activity <30%), suggesting that this novel point-of-care is a promising tool for tailoring appropriate primaquine treatment for malaria elimination by excluding individuals with severe G6PDd for primaquine treatment. PMID:25541721

  8. Surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy apparatus with a convergent optical system for point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Toda, Mitsuaki; Arima, Yusuke; Takiguchi, Hiromi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2014-12-15

    Surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) is a promising methodology for point-of-care (POC) testing. The SPFS devices that have been reported are equipped with an angle rotating stage to adjust the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) angle. In a clinical setting, however, the SPR angle determination is a tedious and time-consuming process. In this study, we employed an SPFS instrument with a convergent optical system that allows the omission of this procedure. We demonstrated that this instrumentation allowed the sensitive determination of low concentrations of α-fetoprotein in serum and reduced the variation effect caused by the protein concentrations in samples. The SPFS with a convergent optical system is suitable for POC testing.

  9. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Patients Accept Finger Stick Blood Collection for Point-Of-Care CD4 Testing

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Lesley; Potgieter, Joachim; Kestens, Luc; Stevens, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV-infected patients require antiretroviral treatment for life. To improve access to care, CD4 enumeration and viral load tests have been redesigned to be used as point-of-care techniques using finger-stick blood. Accurate CD4 counting in capillary blood requires a free flowing blood drop that is achieved by blade incision. The aim of this study was to assess the attitude of the patients toward blade-based finger-stick blood donation. Methods Four hundred and ninety-nine patients were included (299 patients from South Africa and 200 from Belgium). They completed a questionnaire to express their preference for finger stick or venipuncture, after undergoing both. The South African patient cohort was divided in two groups, receiving either single or multiple finger stick for CD4 and other HIV-related tests. The Belgian patients received a single finger stick for CD4 testing, and were asked to respond directly and again after two days. Results The majority of the patients preferred the finger stick to the venipuncture. The perceived pain using the blade was superior to a small needle, but similar to a large needle. They preferred up to three finger sticks over one venipuncture. Up to 30% of the patients changed their mind over two days. The main reason for choosing a finger stick was continued bleeding after venipuncture. The most cited objection to finger stick was pain/soreness. Conclusion Patient perceptions support the implementation of donating capillary blood with blade-based finger stick during CD4 point-of-care testing. PMID:27556894

  10. Evaluation of a Rapid Lateral Flow Point-of-Care Test for Detection of Cryptosporidium

    PubMed Central

    Fleece, Molly E.; Heptinstall, Jack; Khan, Shaila S.; Kabir, Mamum; Herbein, Joel; Haque, Rashidul; Petri, William A.

    2016-01-01

    A new rapid lateral flow fecal antigen detection test for Cryptosporidium was evaluated using diarrheal stool samples from a cohort of children in Bangladesh. The test had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 94% when compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antigen detection. PMID:27573629

  11. Real-World Experience With Three Point-of-Care Blood Analyzers in Deployed Environments.

    PubMed

    Peffer, John; Ley, Nathan; Wuellner, John; D'Andrea, Paolo; Rittberg, Carissa; Losch, John; Lynch, James H

    2015-01-01

    Austere environments such as Africa pose clinical challenges, which are multiplied for Special Operations Forces (SOF) providers who must face these challenges with limited resources against the tyranny of distance. These limited resources apply not only to treatment tools but to diagnostic tools as well. Laboratory diagnostics may provide critical information in diagnosis, initial triage, and/or evacuation decisions, all of which may enhance a patient's survival. However, unlike in climate-controlled, fixed-facility hospitals, the deployed SOF provider must have access to a simple, reliable device for point-of-care testing (POCT) to obtain clinically meaningful data in a practical manner given the surroundings. PMID:26630105

  12. Use of Rapid, Point-of-Care Assays by Private Practitioners in Chennai, India: Priorities for Tuberculosis Diagnostic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Ananthakrishnan, Ramya; Sukumar, Sumanya; Augustine, Sheela; Krishnan, Nalini; Pai, Madhukar; Dowdy, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Setting Private practitioners are frequently the first point of healthcare contact for patients with tuberculosis (TB) in India. As new molecular tests are developed for point-of-care (POC) diagnosis of TB, it is imperative to understand these individuals’ practices and preferences for POC testing. Objective To evaluate rapid testing practices and identify priorities for novel POC TB tests among private practitioners in Chennai. Design We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 228 practitioners practicing in the private sector from January 2014 to February 2015 who saw at least one TB patient in the previous year. Practitioners were randomly selected from both the general community and a list of practitioners who referred patients to a public-private mix program for TB treatment. We used standardized questionnaires to collect data on current practices related to point-of-care diagnosis and interest in hypothetical POC tests. We used multivariable Poisson regression with robust estimates of standard error to calculate measures of association. Results Among 228 private practitioners, about half (48%) utilized any rapid testing in their current practice, most commonly for glucose (43%), pregnancy (21%), and malaria (5%). Providers using POC tests were more likely to work in hospitals (56% vs. 43%, P = 0.05) and less likely to be chest specialists (21% vs. 54%, P<0.001). Only half (51%) of providers would use a hypothetical POC test for TB that was accurate, equipment-free, and took 20 minutes to complete. Chest specialists were half as likely to express interest in performing the hypothetical POC TB test in-house as other practitioners (aPR 0.5, 95%CI: 0.2–0.9). Key challenges to performing POC testing for TB in this study included time constraints, easy access to local private labs and lack of an attached lab facility. Conclusion As novel POC tests for TB are developed and scaled up, attention must be paid to integrating these diagnostics into healthcare

  13. Successful Integration of Hepatitis C Virus Point-of-Care Tests into the Denver Metro Health Clinic.

    PubMed

    Jewett, A; Al-Tayyib, A A; Ginnett, L; Smith, B D

    2013-01-01

    Background. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends testing and linkage to care for persons most likely infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), including persons with human immunodeficiency virus. We explored facilitators and barriers to integrating HCV point-of-care (POC) testing into standard operations at an urban STD clinic. Methods. The OraQuick HCV rapid antibody test was integrated at the Denver Metro Health Clinic (DMHC). All clients with at least one risk factor were offered the POC test. Research staff conducted interviews with clients (three HCV positive and nine HCV negative). Focus groups were conducted with triage staff, providers, and linkage-to-care counselors. Results. Clients were pleased with the ease of use and rapid return of results from the HCV POC test. Integrating the test into this setting required more time but was not overly burdensome. While counseling messages were clear to staff, clients retained little knowledge of hepatitis C infection or factors related to risk. Barriers to integrating the HCV POC test into clinic operations were loss to follow-up and access to care. Conclusion. DMHC successfully integrated HCV POC testing and piloted a HCV linkage-to-care program. Providing testing opportunities at STD clinics could increase identification of persons with HCV infection. PMID:24455220

  14. Successful Integration of Hepatitis C Virus Point-of-Care Tests into the Denver Metro Health Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Jewett, A.; Al-Tayyib, A. A.; Ginnett, L.; Smith, B. D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends testing and linkage to care for persons most likely infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), including persons with human immunodeficiency virus. We explored facilitators and barriers to integrating HCV point-of-care (POC) testing into standard operations at an urban STD clinic. Methods. The OraQuick HCV rapid antibody test was integrated at the Denver Metro Health Clinic (DMHC). All clients with at least one risk factor were offered the POC test. Research staff conducted interviews with clients (three HCV positive and nine HCV negative). Focus groups were conducted with triage staff, providers, and linkage-to-care counselors. Results. Clients were pleased with the ease of use and rapid return of results from the HCV POC test. Integrating the test into this setting required more time but was not overly burdensome. While counseling messages were clear to staff, clients retained little knowledge of hepatitis C infection or factors related to risk. Barriers to integrating the HCV POC test into clinic operations were loss to follow-up and access to care. Conclusion. DMHC successfully integrated HCV POC testing and piloted a HCV linkage-to-care program. Providing testing opportunities at STD clinics could increase identification of persons with HCV infection. PMID:24455220

  15. Point-of-care testing for assessment of adequacy of oral antiplatelet therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Sobieraj-Teague, Magdalena; Eikelboom, John W

    2010-05-01

    Studies with recently introduced point-of-care (POC) platelet function tests have shown that individuals are variably responsive to aspirin and clopidogrel therapy, and that hyporesponsiveness to antiplatelet therapy is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. However, the currently available POC tests have undergone only limited clinical evaluation and clinicians are uncertain about the best POC test, the optimal cut-off point to define hyporesponsiveness in different patient populations and clinical settings, the appropriate management of patients demonstrating hyporesponsiveness and the cost effectiveness of adjusting treatment on the basis of the results of POC platelet function testing. Several large randomized controlled trials currently underway are examining whether adjusting antiplatelet therapy on the basis of a POC test result can improve patient-important outcomes. Until these issues are resolved, POC testing to monitor antiplatelet therapy will largely remain a research tool and patients should continue to receive oral antiplatelet therapy without routine monitoring at doses that have been demonstrated to be effective in randomized controlled trials.

  16. Short-Term Thermal-Humidity Shock Affects Point-of-Care Glucose Testing: Implications for Health Professionals and Patients.

    PubMed

    Lam, Mandy; Louie, Richard F; Curtis, Corbin M; Ferguson, William J; Vy, John H; Truong, Anh-Thu; Sumner, Stephanie L; Kost, Gerald J

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to assess the effects of short-term (≤1 hour) static high temperature and humidity stresses on the performance of point-of-care (POC) glucose test strips and meters. Glucose meters are used by medical responders and patients in a variety of settings including hospitals, clinics, homes, and the field. Reagent test strips and instruments are potentially exposed to austere environmental conditions. Glucose test strips and meters were exposed to a mean relative humidity of 83.0% (SD = 8.0%) and temperature of 42°C (107.6°F, SD = 3.2) in a Tenney BTRC environmental chamber. Stressed and unstressed glucose reagent strips and meters were tested with spiked blood samples (n = 40 measurements per time point for each of 4 trials) after 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes of exposure. Wilcoxon's signed rank test was applied to compare measurements test strip and meter measurements to isolate and characterize the magnitude of meter versus test strip effects individually. Stressed POC meters and test strips produced elevated glucose results, with stressed meter bias as high as 20 mg/dL (17.7% error), and stressed test strip bias as high as 13 mg/dL (12.2% error). The aggregate stress effect on meter and test strips yielded a positive bias as high as 33 mg/dL (30.1% error) after 15 minutes of exposure. Short-term exposure (15 minutes) to high temperature and humidity can significantly affect the performance of POC glucose test strips and meters, with measurement biases that potentially affect clinical decision making and patient safety. PMID:24876542

  17. Performance of a New Rapid Immunoassay Test Kit for Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Significant Bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Ann E; Cox, Marsha E; DiNello, Robert K; Geisberg, Mark; Abbott, April; Roberts, Pacita L; Hooton, Thomas M

    2015-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequently encountered in clinical practice and most commonly caused by Escherichia coli and other Gram-negative uropathogens. We tested RapidBac, a rapid immunoassay for bacteriuria developed by Silver Lake Research Corporation (SLRC), compared with standard bacterial culture using 966 clean-catch urine specimens submitted to a clinical microbiology laboratory in an urban academic medical center. RapidBac was performed in accordance with instructions, providing a positive or negative result in 20 min. RapidBac identified as positive 245/285 (sensitivity 86%) samples with significant bacteriuria, defined as the presence of a Gram-negative uropathogen or Staphylococcus saprophyticus at ≥10(3) CFU/ml. The sensitivities for Gram-negative bacteriuria at ≥10(4) CFU/ml and ≥10(5) CFU/ml were 96% and 99%, respectively. The specificity of the test, detecting the absence of significant bacteriuria, was 94%. The sensitivity and specificity of RapidBac were similar on samples from inpatient and outpatient settings, from male and female patients, and across age groups from 18 to 89 years old, although specificity was higher in men (100%) compared with that in women (92%). The RapidBac test for bacteriuria may be effective as an aid in the point-of-care diagnosis of UTIs especially in emergency and primary care settings. PMID:26063858

  18. Infection Transmission Associated with Point of Care Testing and the Laboratory’s Role in Risk Reduction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lack of knowledge and confusion exists regarding safe and appropriate use of blood glucose monitoring equipment. Increasing numbers of diabetics, and exponential growth in blood glucose monitoring presents increased opportunities for infection transmission between patients. Diabetics have increased exposure to blood and blood borne pathogens from frequent blood glucose monitoring. Risk factors have been identified in infectious outbreaks and by analysis of testing practice. Point of care blood glucose meters are frequently contaminated by blood. Bacterial and viral organisms survive on surfaces and in dried blood. Instrumentation is shared between patients, and is heavily utilized in institutional settings, so that serial testing is performed on multiple patients within a short timeframe. Hand hygiene, glove changes and meter disinfection between testing events has been found to be inconsistent. Time pressure for meter usage competes with proper cleaning and disinfection procedures. Meter storage areas are frequently contaminated by blood. Multi-use lancets, improperly used for serial patient blood sampling, are a source for infection transmission. Test strips in vials, frequently contaminated by bacterial organisms, present potential hazard. The responsibility of the clinical laboratory is to insure successful implementation of practices that insure patient safety. Risk reduction strategies include single-use auto-disabling skin puncture devices for blood sampling; hand hygiene and glove change for every testing event; effective meter cleaning and disinfection for every testing event; meter use restriction to a single patient; safe practices for glucose meter storage; infection control practices to reduce contamination of blood glucose test strips or changes in test strip packaging and test strip dispensing.

  19. Three-dimensional paper-based slip device for one-step point-of-care testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kwi Nam; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kwon, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we developed a new type of paper-based analytical device (PAD), the three-dimensional (3D) slip-PAD, to detect infectious human norovirus for global healthcare. The 3D configuration of the papers combined with a slip design provides unique features and versatility that overcome the limitations of fluidic manipulation and sensitivity in point-of-care (POC) tests. The assay can be carried out in a single step based on a moveable slip design, making it suitable for unskilled users. The 3D fluidic network developed by layered construction of wax-patterned papers provides different fluidic paths for the sequential delivery of multiple fluids without the need for peripheral equipment. The release and mixing of enhancement reagents on the device improved the sensitivity and detection limit. The assay results could be visualized by naked eye within 10 min, with subsequent amplification of the signal over time (<60 min). The device showed a broad dynamic range of detection and high sensitivity, with a detection limit of 9.5 × 104 copies ml‑1 for human norovirus. These results demonstrate that the 3D slip-PAD is a sensitive diagnostic assay for detecting human norovirus infection that is particularly suitable for POC testing in regions where resources are scarce.

  20. Operator Influence on Blinded Diagnostic Accuracy of Point-of-Care Antigen Testing for Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Penney, Carla; Porter, Robert; O'Brien, Mary; Daley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pharyngitis caused by Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a common presentation to pediatric emergency departments (ED). Diagnosis with conventional throat culture requires 18-24 hours, which prevents point-of-care treatment decisions. Rapid antigen detection tests (RADT) are faster, but previous reports demonstrate significant operator influence on performance. Objective. To measure operator influence on the diagnostic accuracy of a RADT when performed by pediatric ED nurses and clinical microbiology laboratory technologists, using conventional culture as the reference standard. Methods. Children presenting to a pediatric ED with suspected acute pharyngitis were recruited. Three pharyngeal swabs were collected at once. One swab was used to perform the RADT in the ED, and two were sent to the clinical microbiology laboratory for RADT and conventional culture testing. Results. The RADT when performed by technologists compared to nurses had a 5.1% increased sensitivity (81.4% versus 76.3%) (p = 0.791) (95% CI for difference between technologists and nurses = -11% to +21%) but similar specificity (97.7% versus 96.6%). Conclusion. The performance of the RADT was similar between technologists and ED nurses, although adequate power was not achieved. RADT may be employed in the ED without clinically significant loss of sensitivity. PMID:27579047

  1. Three-dimensional paper-based slip device for one-step point-of-care testing

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kwi Nam; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kwon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed a new type of paper-based analytical device (PAD), the three-dimensional (3D) slip-PAD, to detect infectious human norovirus for global healthcare. The 3D configuration of the papers combined with a slip design provides unique features and versatility that overcome the limitations of fluidic manipulation and sensitivity in point-of-care (POC) tests. The assay can be carried out in a single step based on a moveable slip design, making it suitable for unskilled users. The 3D fluidic network developed by layered construction of wax-patterned papers provides different fluidic paths for the sequential delivery of multiple fluids without the need for peripheral equipment. The release and mixing of enhancement reagents on the device improved the sensitivity and detection limit. The assay results could be visualized by naked eye within 10 min, with subsequent amplification of the signal over time (<60 min). The device showed a broad dynamic range of detection and high sensitivity, with a detection limit of 9.5 × 104 copies ml−1 for human norovirus. These results demonstrate that the 3D slip-PAD is a sensitive diagnostic assay for detecting human norovirus infection that is particularly suitable for POC testing in regions where resources are scarce. PMID:27174731

  2. Operator Influence on Blinded Diagnostic Accuracy of Point-of-Care Antigen Testing for Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pharyngitis caused by Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a common presentation to pediatric emergency departments (ED). Diagnosis with conventional throat culture requires 18–24 hours, which prevents point-of-care treatment decisions. Rapid antigen detection tests (RADT) are faster, but previous reports demonstrate significant operator influence on performance. Objective. To measure operator influence on the diagnostic accuracy of a RADT when performed by pediatric ED nurses and clinical microbiology laboratory technologists, using conventional culture as the reference standard. Methods. Children presenting to a pediatric ED with suspected acute pharyngitis were recruited. Three pharyngeal swabs were collected at once. One swab was used to perform the RADT in the ED, and two were sent to the clinical microbiology laboratory for RADT and conventional culture testing. Results. The RADT when performed by technologists compared to nurses had a 5.1% increased sensitivity (81.4% versus 76.3%) (p = 0.791) (95% CI for difference between technologists and nurses = −11% to +21%) but similar specificity (97.7% versus 96.6%). Conclusion. The performance of the RADT was similar between technologists and ED nurses, although adequate power was not achieved. RADT may be employed in the ED without clinically significant loss of sensitivity. PMID:27579047

  3. Disposable dry-reagent cotton thread-based point-of-care diagnosis devices for protein and nucleic acid test.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xun; Du, Ting-E; Wang, Yiyun; Meng, Lili

    2015-03-15

    We report here for the first time by using dry-reagent cotton thread-based point-of-care diagnosis devices for low-cost, sensitive and rapid detection of a lung cancer related biomarker, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) and a human genetic disease, hereditary tyrosinemia type I related DNA sequences. A model system comprising SCCA as an analyte and a pair of monoclonal antibodies is used to demonstrate the proof-of-concept on the dry-reagent cotton thread based immunoassay device. An enhancement protocol was employed by using two kinds of gold nanoparticle labels for SCCA test which greatly improved the sensitivity of the device. The assay avoids the multiple incubation and washing steps performed in most conventional protein analyses, which is similar with the lateral flow strip technology. Under optimal conditions, the thread based immunoassay device was capable of measuring 1ng/mL SCCA in 20min which meet the requirement for clinical diagnosis. DNA detection was successfully realized by using a novel adenosine based molecular beacon probe as reporter probes in the cotton thread based device, the linear range is 75-3000fmol which is suitable for quantitative test.

  4. Three-dimensional paper-based slip device for one-step point-of-care testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kwi Nam; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kwon, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we developed a new type of paper-based analytical device (PAD), the three-dimensional (3D) slip-PAD, to detect infectious human norovirus for global healthcare. The 3D configuration of the papers combined with a slip design provides unique features and versatility that overcome the limitations of fluidic manipulation and sensitivity in point-of-care (POC) tests. The assay can be carried out in a single step based on a moveable slip design, making it suitable for unskilled users. The 3D fluidic network developed by layered construction of wax-patterned papers provides different fluidic paths for the sequential delivery of multiple fluids without the need for peripheral equipment. The release and mixing of enhancement reagents on the device improved the sensitivity and detection limit. The assay results could be visualized by naked eye within 10 min, with subsequent amplification of the signal over time (<60 min). The device showed a broad dynamic range of detection and high sensitivity, with a detection limit of 9.5 × 104 copies ml-1 for human norovirus. These results demonstrate that the 3D slip-PAD is a sensitive diagnostic assay for detecting human norovirus infection that is particularly suitable for POC testing in regions where resources are scarce.

  5. The usefulness of point-of-care (POC) tests in screening elevated glucose and ketone body levels postmortem.

    PubMed

    Walta, Anna-Mari; Keltanen, Terhi; Lindroos, Katarina; Sajantila, Antti

    2016-09-01

    The aim was to evaluate the performance of point-of-care (POC) tests in detecting glucose and ketone bodies in postmortem (PM) samples and to assess the usefulness of POC tests in sample screening for more precise analyses. Glucose and ketone body, β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), were measured from vitreous humor (VH) in 52 autopsy cases with a POC blood glucose monitoring device (BGMD). In addition glucose and ketone bodies, acetone (Ac) and acetoacetate (AcAc), were measured from urine samples in another set of 59 cases with semi-quantitative stick tests. The results were compared to the concentration in VH measured with validated methods (values ≥ 7mmol/l indicate possible hyperglycemia and total ketone body levels ≥ 3mmol/l ketoacidosis). The sensitivity for glucose with the BGMD was 1.0 and specificity 0.94 when the threshold value for the meter to predict elevated glucose was set to ≥ 10mmol/l. The correlation between the BGMD and the validated method was strong (R(2)=0.89). For detecting ketoacidosis, the BGMD had a sensitivity of 1.0 and specificity of 0.73, when the threshold value was set to 2.5mmol/l. The urine stick test presented a sensitivity of 0.89 and specificity of 0.90 for detecting elevated VH glucose concentration. The sensitivity and specificity for the stick test to detect cases with possible ketoacidosis were 0.84 and 0.68, respectively. According to the results, BGMD can be reliably applied for sample screening, although more samples need to be analyzed for delineating the correct threshold values. In the case of glucose, the urine stick tests could be indicative in detecting cases with VH glucose ≥ 10mmol/l. For predicting possible ketoacidosis with elevated VH total ketone bodies, the stick test is not reliable as the test presented both false-positive and -negative results. PMID:27348467

  6. Acceptability of Rapid Point-of-Care Hepatitis C Tests Among People Who Inject Drugs and Utilize Syringe-Exchange Programs.

    PubMed

    Barocas, Joshua A; Linas, Benjamin P; Kim, Arthur Y; Fangman, John; Westergaard, Ryan P

    2016-03-01

    People who inject drugs may benefit from point-of-care hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing offered at syringe exchanges. We sought to understand whether this population would be willing to undergo rapid HCV testing. We found that there was broad support for rapid HCV testing, especially among younger people who inject drugs with high perceived risk. PMID:27191007

  7. Acceptability of Rapid Point-of-Care Hepatitis C Tests Among People Who Inject Drugs and Utilize Syringe-Exchange Programs

    PubMed Central

    Barocas, Joshua A.; Linas, Benjamin P.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Fangman, John; Westergaard, Ryan P.

    2016-01-01

    People who inject drugs may benefit from point-of-care hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing offered at syringe exchanges. We sought to understand whether this population would be willing to undergo rapid HCV testing. We found that there was broad support for rapid HCV testing, especially among younger people who inject drugs with high perceived risk. PMID:27191007

  8. Twelve-Month Prospective Randomized Study of Pharmacists Utilizing Point-Of-Care Testing for Metabolic Syndrome and Related Conditions in Subjects Prescribed Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Shuster, Sara M.; Davey, Cynthia S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Determine the percentage of subjects taking antipsychotics who meet criteria for metabolic syndrome based on point-of-care testing analyses. Evaluate pharmacist comprehensive medication management services using point-of-care tests to reduce the mean difference in number of metabolic syndrome risk parameters at 6 and 12 months. Method: This 12-month, prospective, multisite, randomized, controlled study included 120 subjects taking antipsychotics (mean [SD] age of 42.9 [11.3] years) recruited from 3 community mental health clinics in Minnesota. Subjects consented to receive either pharmacist (PCS; n = 60) or no pharmacist (NCS; n = 60) comprehensive medication management services. Data were collected from February 2010 to January 2012. Results: No statistical differences in metabolic syndrome based on point-of-care tests were observed between the 2 groups at baseline (PCS: 85.2%, n = 46 versus NCS: 71.2%, n = 42, P = .073) or at 12 months (PCS: 84.4%, n = 38 versus NCS: 70.2%, n = 33, P = .104). Subjects, overall, screened positive at baseline for dyslipidemia (85.8%, n = 106), hypertension (52.5%, n = 63), and diabetes (22.5%, n = 27) based on point-of-care testing for metabolic risk criteria. After 12 months, a nonsignificant (P = .099) higher adjusted mean number of metabolic syndrome parameters in PCS subjects compared to NCS subjects (mean difference [95% CI] = 0.41 [−0.08 to 0.90]) were found. Conclusions: A relatively high proportion of subjects met criteria for metabolic syndrome, although no significant improvement was observed between the groups after 12 months. Point-of-care test analyses identified a high proportion of subjects meeting criteria for dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes. Utilizing point-of-care tests in mental health settings and fostering interprofessional partnerships with comprehensive medication management pharmacists may improve identification and long-term management of metabolic risks among patients prescribed

  9. Cellphone-based hand-held microplate reader for point-of-care ELISA testing (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Brandon; Cortazar, Bingen; Tseng, Derek; Ozkan, Haydar; Feng, Steve; Wei, Qingshan; Chan, Raymond Y.; Burbano, Jordi; Farooqui, Qamar; Lewinski, Michael; Di Carlo, Dino; Garner, Omai B.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a microplate format has been a gold standard first-line clinical test for diagnosis of various diseases including infectious diseases. However, this technology requires a relatively large and expensive multi-well scanning spectrophotometer to read and quantify the signal from each well, hindering its implementation in resource-limited-settings. Here, we demonstrate a cost-effective and handheld smartphone-based colorimetric microplate reader for rapid digitization and quantification of immunoserology-related ELISA tests in a conventional 96-well plate format at the point of care (POC). This device consists of a bundle of 96 optical fibers to collect the transmitted light from each well of the microplate and direct all the transmission signals from the wells onto the camera of the mobile-phone. Captured images are then transmitted to a remote server through a custom-designed app, and both quantitative and qualitative diagnostic results are returned back to the user within ~1 minute per 96-well plate by using a machine learning algorithm. We tested this mobile-phone based micro-plate reader in a clinical microbiology lab using FDA-approved mumps IgG, measles IgG, and herpes simplex virus IgG (HSV-1 and HSV-2) ELISA tests on 1138 remnant patient samples (roughly 50% training and 50% testing), and achieved an overall accuracy of ~99% or higher for each ELISA test. This handheld and cost-effective platform could be immediately useful for large-scale vaccination monitoring in low-infrastructure settings, and also for other high-throughput disease screening applications at POC.

  10. A new rapid method for Clostridium difficile DNA extraction and detection in stool: toward point-of-care diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Freifeld, Alison G; Simonsen, Kari A; Booth, Christine S; Zhao, Xing; Whitney, Scott E; Karre, Teresa; Iwen, Peter C; Viljoen, Hendrik J

    2012-01-01

    We describe a new method for the rapid diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection, with stool sample preparation and DNA extraction by heat and physical disruption in a single-use lysis microreactor (LMR), followed by a rapid PCR amplification step. All steps can be accomplished in <20 minutes overall. Gel electrophoresis is currently used to detect the amplification product, pending real-time availability with an ultra-rapid thermocycler. Compared with the dual enzyme immunoassay (EIA) screening test (C. diff Quik Chek Complete; Techlab, Blacksburg, VA), the novel LMR/PCR assay showed complete concordance with all glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) results (GDH(+)/toxin(+), n = 48; GDH(-)/toxin(-), n = 81). All 69 stool samples with discordant EIA results (GDH(+)/toxin(-)) were tested by both the LMR/PCR assay and the loop-mediated isothermal amplification test (LAMP) (Illumigene C. difficile; Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati, OH). In 64/69 EIA-discordant samples, LAMP and LMR/PCR results matched (both positive in 29 sample and both negative in 35 samples); in the remaining 5 samples, results were discrepant between the LAMP assay (all five negative) and the LMR/PCR assay (all 5 positive). Overall, LMR/PCR testing matched the current algorithm of EIA and/or LAMP reflex testing in 193/198 (97.5%) samples. The present proof-of-concept study suggests that the novel LMR/PCR technique described here may be developed as an inexpensive, rapid, and reliable point-of-care diagnostic test for C. difficile infection and other infectious diseases.

  11. Optimization of an Optical Inspection System Based on the Taguchi Method for Quantitative Analysis of Point-of-Care Testing

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chia-Hsien; Zhao, Zi-Qi; Shen, Pi-Lan; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    This study presents an optical inspection system for detecting a commercial point-of-care testing product and a new detection model covering from qualitative to quantitative analysis. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) strips (cut-off value of the hCG commercial product is 25 mIU/mL) were the detection target in our study. We used a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor to detect the colors of the test line and control line in the specific strips and to reduce the observation errors by the naked eye. To achieve better linearity between the grayscale and the concentration, and to decrease the standard deviation (increase the signal to noise ratio, S/N), the Taguchi method was used to find the optimal parameters for the optical inspection system. The pregnancy test used the principles of the lateral flow immunoassay, and the colors of the test and control line were caused by the gold nanoparticles. Because of the sandwich immunoassay model, the color of the gold nanoparticles in the test line was darkened by increasing the hCG concentration. As the results reveal, the S/N increased from 43.48 dB to 53.38 dB, and the hCG concentration detection increased from 6.25 to 50 mIU/mL with a standard deviation of less than 10%. With the optimal parameters to decrease the detection limit and to increase the linearity determined by the Taguchi method, the optical inspection system can be applied to various commercial rapid tests for the detection of ketamine, troponin I, and fatty acid binding protein (FABP). PMID:25256108

  12. Smartphone-based point-of-care testing of salivary α-amylase for personal psychological measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Wentao; Yang, Yuankui; Liu, Hong; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-11-01

    Here we report a smartphone-based potentiometric biosensor for point-of-care testing of salivary α-amylase (sAA), which is one of the most sensitive indices of autonomic nervous system activity, and therefore a promising non-invasive biomarker for mental health. The biosensing system includes a smartphone having a sAA-detection App, a potentiometric reader and a sensing chip with preloaded reagents. The saliva sample wicks into the reaction zone on the sensing chip so that the sAA reacts with the preloaded reagents, resulting in conversion of an electron mediator Fe(CN)6(3-) to Fe(CN)6(4-). The sensing chip is then pressed by fingers to push the reaction mixture into the detection zone for the potentiometric measurement. The potential measured by the smartphone-powered potentiometric reader is sent to the smartphone App via the USB port, and converted into sAA concentration based on a calibration curve. Using our method, sAA in real human sample is quantitatively analyzed within 5 min. The results are in good agreement with that obtained using a reference method, and correlated to psychological states of the subjects.

  13. Polydimethylsiloxane-Paper Hybrid Lateral Flow Assay for Highly Sensitive Point-of-Care Nucleic Acid Testing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Liu, Zhi; Hu, Jie; Tang, Ruihua; Gong, Yan; Feng, Shangsheng; Ren, Hui; Wen, Ting; Yang, Hui; Qu, Zhiguo; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-06-21

    In nucleic acid testing (NAT), gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based lateral flow assays (LFAs) have received significant attention due to their cost-effectiveness, rapidity, and the ability to produce a simple colorimetric readout. However, the poor sensitivity of AuNP-based LFAs limits its widespread applications. Even though various efforts have been made to improve the assay sensitivity, most methods are inappropriate for integration into LFA for sample-to-answer NAT at the point-of-care (POC), usually due to the complicated fabrication processes or incompatible chemicals used. To address this, we propose a novel strategy of integrating a simple fluidic control strategy into LFA. The strategy involves incorporating a piece of paper-based shunt and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) barrier to the strip to achieve optimum fluidic delays for LFA signal enhancement, resulting in 10-fold signal enhancement over unmodified LFA. The phenomena of fluidic delay were also evaluated by mathematical simulation, through which we found the movement of fluid throughout the shunt and the tortuosity effects in the presence of PDMS barrier, which significantly affect the detection sensitivity. To demonstrate the potential of integrating this strategy into a LFA with sample-in-answer-out capability, we further applied this strategy into our prototype sample-to-answer LFA to sensitively detect the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) in clinical blood samples. The proposed strategy offers great potential for highly sensitive detection of various targets for wide application in the near future. PMID:27012657

  14. Cellphone-Based Hand-Held Microplate Reader for Point-of-Care Testing of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays.

    PubMed

    Berg, Brandon; Cortazar, Bingen; Tseng, Derek; Ozkan, Haydar; Feng, Steve; Wei, Qingshan; Chan, Raymond Yan-Lok; Burbano, Jordi; Farooqui, Qamar; Lewinski, Michael; Di Carlo, Dino; Garner, Omai B; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-08-25

    Standard microplate based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) are widely utilized for various nanomedicine, molecular sensing, and disease screening applications, and this multiwell plate batched analysis dramatically reduces diagnosis costs per patient compared to nonbatched or nonstandard tests. However, their use in resource-limited and field-settings is inhibited by the necessity for relatively large and expensive readout instruments. To mitigate this problem, we created a hand-held and cost-effective cellphone-based colorimetric microplate reader, which uses a 3D-printed opto-mechanical attachment to hold and illuminate a 96-well plate using a light-emitting-diode (LED) array. This LED light is transmitted through each well, and is then collected via 96 individual optical fibers. Captured images of this fiber-bundle are transmitted to our servers through a custom-designed app for processing using a machine learning algorithm, yielding diagnostic results, which are delivered to the user within ∼1 min per 96-well plate, and are visualized using the same app. We successfully tested this mobile platform in a clinical microbiology laboratory using FDA-approved mumps IgG, measles IgG, and herpes simplex virus IgG (HSV-1 and HSV-2) ELISA tests using a total of 567 and 571 patient samples for training and blind testing, respectively, and achieved an accuracy of 99.6%, 98.6%, 99.4%, and 99.4% for mumps, measles, HSV-1, and HSV-2 tests, respectively. This cost-effective and hand-held platform could assist health-care professionals to perform high-throughput disease screening or tracking of vaccination campaigns at the point-of-care, even in resource-poor and field-settings. Also, its intrinsic wireless connectivity can serve epidemiological studies, generating spatiotemporal maps of disease prevalence and immunity. PMID:26159546

  15. Amplification-free point of care immunosensor for detecting type V collagen at a concentration level of ng/ml

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Pei-Yu; Bracho-Sanchez, Evelyn R.; Jiang, Peng; Seagrave, JeanClare; Duncan, Matthew R.; Grotendorst, Gary R.; Schultz, Gregory; Batich, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is applicable in the immediate vicinity of the patient, where timely diagnosis or prognostic information could help doctors decide the following treatment. Among types of developed POCT, gold nanoparticle based lateral flow strip technology provides advantages such as simple operation, cost-effectiveness, and a user-friendly platform. Therefore, this type of POCT is most likely to be used in battlefields and developing countries. However, conventional lateral flow strips suffer from low detection limits. Although enzyme-linked amplification was demonstrated to improve the detection limit and sensitivity by stronger visible lines or by permitting electrochemical analytical instrumentation, the enzyme labels have potential to cause interference with other enzymes in our body fluids. To eliminate this limitation, we developed an amplification-free gold nanoparticle-based immunosensor applied for detecting collagen type V, which is produced or released abnormally during rejection of lung transplants and sulfur mustard exposure. By using suitable blocking protein to stabilize gold nanoparticles as the reporter probe, a low detection limit of ng/ml was achieved. This strategy is a promising platform for clinical POCT, with potential applications in military or disaster response.

  16. Sexual health risks, service use, and views of rapid point-of-care testing among men who have sex with men attending saunas: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Horwood, Jeremy; Ingle, Suzanne M; Burton, David; Woodman-Bailey, Adam; Horner, Paddy; Jeal, Nikki

    2016-03-01

    Guidelines highlight the need to increase HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) and novel point-of-care testing provides new possibilities for delivery of care. However, it is unclear how point-of-care testing should be used to best effect. This study aimed to increase understanding of sexual risk-taking behaviour, service use, and attitudes to point-of-care testing among MSM sauna clients. Data were collected within two saunas for MSM in south west England using a self-completion survey (n = 134). Though this sample of MSM sauna clients are at high risk of acquiring a sexually transmitted infection, the testing frequency among the majority of those reporting unprotected anal intercourse is not in keeping with national guidelines. For almost all participants the introduction of rapid point-of-care testing for both genital and blood-borne infection was likely to increase testing and for the majority NHS specialist services was the preferred setting.

  17. Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of Point-Of-Care CD4 Testing on the HIV Epidemic in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ranjeeta; Fraser, Christophe; Cori, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Rapid diagnostic tools have been shown to improve linkage of patients to care. In the context of infectious diseases, assessing the impact and cost-effectiveness of such tools at the population level, accounting for both direct and indirect effects, is key to informing adoption of these tools. Point-of-care (POC) CD4 testing has been shown to be highly effective in increasing the proportion of HIV positive patients who initiate ART. We assess the impact and cost-effectiveness of introducing POC CD4 testing at the population level in South Africa in a range of care contexts, using a dynamic compartmental model of HIV transmission, calibrated to the South African HIV epidemic. We performed a meta-analysis to quantify the differences between POC and laboratory CD4 testing on the proportion linking to care following CD4 testing. Cumulative infections averted and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were estimated over one and three years. We estimated that POC CD4 testing introduced in the current South African care context can prevent 1.7% (95% CI: 0.4% - 4.3%) of new HIV infections over 1 year. In that context, POC CD4 testing was cost-effective 99.8% of the time after 1 year with a median estimated ICER of US$4,468/DALY averted. In healthcare contexts with expanded HIV testing and improved retention in care, POC CD4 testing only became cost-effective after 3 years. The results were similar when, in addition, ART was offered irrespective of CD4 count, and CD4 testing was used for clinical assessment. Our findings suggest that even if ART is expanded to all HIV positive individuals and HIV testing efforts are increased in the near future, POC CD4 testing is a cost-effective tool, even within a short time horizon. Our study also illustrates the importance of evaluating the potential impact of such diagnostic technologies at the population level, so that indirect benefits and costs can be incorporated into estimations of cost-effectiveness. PMID:27391129

  18. Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of Point-Of-Care CD4 Testing on the HIV Epidemic in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Alastair; Barber, Ella; Thomas, Ranjeeta; Fraser, Christophe; Pickles, Michael; Cori, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Rapid diagnostic tools have been shown to improve linkage of patients to care. In the context of infectious diseases, assessing the impact and cost-effectiveness of such tools at the population level, accounting for both direct and indirect effects, is key to informing adoption of these tools. Point-of-care (POC) CD4 testing has been shown to be highly effective in increasing the proportion of HIV positive patients who initiate ART. We assess the impact and cost-effectiveness of introducing POC CD4 testing at the population level in South Africa in a range of care contexts, using a dynamic compartmental model of HIV transmission, calibrated to the South African HIV epidemic. We performed a meta-analysis to quantify the differences between POC and laboratory CD4 testing on the proportion linking to care following CD4 testing. Cumulative infections averted and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were estimated over one and three years. We estimated that POC CD4 testing introduced in the current South African care context can prevent 1.7% (95% CI: 0.4% - 4.3%) of new HIV infections over 1 year. In that context, POC CD4 testing was cost-effective 99.8% of the time after 1 year with a median estimated ICER of US$4,468/DALY averted. In healthcare contexts with expanded HIV testing and improved retention in care, POC CD4 testing only became cost-effective after 3 years. The results were similar when, in addition, ART was offered irrespective of CD4 count, and CD4 testing was used for clinical assessment. Our findings suggest that even if ART is expanded to all HIV positive individuals and HIV testing efforts are increased in the near future, POC CD4 testing is a cost-effective tool, even within a short time horizon. Our study also illustrates the importance of evaluating the potential impact of such diagnostic technologies at the population level, so that indirect benefits and costs can be incorporated into estimations of cost-effectiveness.

  19. Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of Point-Of-Care CD4 Testing on the HIV Epidemic in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Alastair; Barber, Ella; Thomas, Ranjeeta; Fraser, Christophe; Pickles, Michael; Cori, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Rapid diagnostic tools have been shown to improve linkage of patients to care. In the context of infectious diseases, assessing the impact and cost-effectiveness of such tools at the population level, accounting for both direct and indirect effects, is key to informing adoption of these tools. Point-of-care (POC) CD4 testing has been shown to be highly effective in increasing the proportion of HIV positive patients who initiate ART. We assess the impact and cost-effectiveness of introducing POC CD4 testing at the population level in South Africa in a range of care contexts, using a dynamic compartmental model of HIV transmission, calibrated to the South African HIV epidemic. We performed a meta-analysis to quantify the differences between POC and laboratory CD4 testing on the proportion linking to care following CD4 testing. Cumulative infections averted and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were estimated over one and three years. We estimated that POC CD4 testing introduced in the current South African care context can prevent 1.7% (95% CI: 0.4% - 4.3%) of new HIV infections over 1 year. In that context, POC CD4 testing was cost-effective 99.8% of the time after 1 year with a median estimated ICER of US$4,468/DALY averted. In healthcare contexts with expanded HIV testing and improved retention in care, POC CD4 testing only became cost-effective after 3 years. The results were similar when, in addition, ART was offered irrespective of CD4 count, and CD4 testing was used for clinical assessment. Our findings suggest that even if ART is expanded to all HIV positive individuals and HIV testing efforts are increased in the near future, POC CD4 testing is a cost-effective tool, even within a short time horizon. Our study also illustrates the importance of evaluating the potential impact of such diagnostic technologies at the population level, so that indirect benefits and costs can be incorporated into estimations of cost-effectiveness. PMID:27391129

  20. A simple 96 well microfluidic chip combined with visual and densitometry detection for resource-poor point of care testing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Minghui; Sun, Steven; Kostov, Yordan

    2010-01-01

    There is a well-recognized need for low cost biodetection technologies for resource-poor settings with minimal medical infrastructure. Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology has the ability to perform biological assays in such settings. The aim of this work is to develop a low cost, high-throughput detection system for the analysis of 96 samples simultaneously outside the laboratory setting. To achieve this aim, several biosensing elements were combined: a syringe operated ELISA lab-on-a-chip (ELISA-LOC) which integrates fluid delivery system into a miniature 96-well plate; a simplified non-enzymatic reporter and detection approach using a gold nanoparticle-antibody conjugate as a secondary antibody and silver enhancement of the visual signal; and Carbon nanotubes (CNT) to increase primary antibody immobilization and improve assay sensitivity. Combined, these elements obviate the need for an ELISA washer, electrical power for operation and a sophisticated detector. We demonstrate the use of the device for detection of Staphylococcal enterotoxin B, a major foodborne toxin using three modes of detection, visual detection, CCD camera and document scanner. With visual detection or using a document scanner to measure the signal, the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.5ng/ml. In addition to visual detection, for precise quantitation of signal using densitometry and a CCD camera, the LOD was 0.1ng/ml for the CCD analysis and 0.5 ng/ml for the document scanner. The observed sensitivity is in the same range as laboratory-based ELISA testing. The point of care device can analyze 96 samples simultaneously, permitting high throughput diagnostics in the field and in resource poor areas without ready access to laboratory facilities or electricity. PMID:21503269

  1. SAMBA HIV semiquantitative test, a new point-of-care viral-load-monitoring assay for resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Allyson V; Ushiro-Lumb, Ines; Edemaga, Daniel; Joshi, Hrishikesh A; De Ruiter, Annemiek; Szumilin, Elisabeth; Jendrulek, Isabelle; McGuire, Megan; Goel, Neha; Sharma, Pia I; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Lee, Helen H

    2014-09-01

    Routine viral-load (VL) testing of HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is used to monitor treatment efficacy. However, due to logistical challenges, implementation of VL has been difficult in resource-limited settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the SAMBA semi-Q (simple amplification-based assay semiquantitative test for HIV-1) in London, Malawi, and Uganda. The SAMBA semi-Q can distinguish between patients with VLs above and below 1,000 copies/ml. The SAMBA semi-Q was validated with diluted clinical samples and blinded plasma samples collected from HIV-1-positive individuals. SAMBA semi-Q results were compared with results from the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 test, v2.0. Testing of 96 2- to 10-fold dilutions of four samples containing HIV-1 subtype C as well as 488 samples from patients in the United Kingdom, Malawi, and Uganda yielded an overall accuracy for the SAMBA semi-Q of 99% (95% confidence interval [CI], 93.8 to 99.9%) and 96.9% (95% CI 94.9 to 98.3%), respectively, compared to to the Roche test. Analysis of VL data from patients in Malawi and Uganda showed that the SAMBA cutoff of 1,000 copies/ml appropriately distinguished treated from untreated individuals. Furthermore, analysis of the viral loads of 232 patients on ART in Malawi and Uganda revealed similar patterns for virological control, defined as either <1,000 copies/ml (SAMBA cutoff) or <5,000 copies/ml (WHO 2010 criterion; WHO, Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection in Adults and Adolescents: Recommendations for a Public Health Approach, 2010). This study suggests that the SAMBA semi-Q has adequate concurrency with the gold standard measurements for viral load. This test can allow VL monitoring of patients on ART at the point of care in resource-limited settings.

  2. SAMBA HIV Semiquantitative Test, a New Point-of-Care Viral-Load-Monitoring Assay for Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Allyson V.; Ushiro-Lumb, Ines; Edemaga, Daniel; Joshi, Hrishikesh A.; De Ruiter, Annemiek; Szumilin, Elisabeth; Jendrulek, Isabelle; McGuire, Megan; Goel, Neha; Sharma, Pia I.; Allain, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Routine viral-load (VL) testing of HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is used to monitor treatment efficacy. However, due to logistical challenges, implementation of VL has been difficult in resource-limited settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the SAMBA semi-Q (simple amplification-based assay semiquantitative test for HIV-1) in London, Malawi, and Uganda. The SAMBA semi-Q can distinguish between patients with VLs above and below 1,000 copies/ml. The SAMBA semi-Q was validated with diluted clinical samples and blinded plasma samples collected from HIV-1-positive individuals. SAMBA semi-Q results were compared with results from the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 test, v2.0. Testing of 96 2- to 10-fold dilutions of four samples containing HIV-1 subtype C as well as 488 samples from patients in the United Kingdom, Malawi, and Uganda yielded an overall accuracy for the SAMBA semi-Q of 99% (95% confidence interval [CI], 93.8 to 99.9%) and 96.9% (95% CI 94.9 to 98.3%), respectively, compared to to the Roche test. Analysis of VL data from patients in Malawi and Uganda showed that the SAMBA cutoff of 1,000 copies/ml appropriately distinguished treated from untreated individuals. Furthermore, analysis of the viral loads of 232 patients on ART in Malawi and Uganda revealed similar patterns for virological control, defined as either <1,000 copies/ml (SAMBA cutoff) or <5,000 copies/ml (WHO 2010 criterion; WHO, Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection in Adults and Adolescents: Recommendations for a Public Health Approach, 2010). This study suggests that the SAMBA semi-Q has adequate concurrency with the gold standard measurements for viral load. This test can allow VL monitoring of patients on ART at the point of care in resource-limited settings. PMID:25031444

  3. Antenatal Syphilis Screening Using Point-of-Care Testing in Sub-Saharan African Countries: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuznik, Andreas; Lamorde, Mohammed; Nyabigambo, Agnes; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Untreated syphilis in pregnancy is associated with adverse clinical outcomes for the infant. Most syphilis infections occur in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where coverage of antenatal screening for syphilis is inadequate. Recently introduced point-of-care syphilis tests have high accuracy and demonstrate potential to increase coverage of antenatal screening. However, country-specific cost-effectiveness data for these tests are limited. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of antenatal syphilis screening for 43 countries in SSA and estimate the impact of universal screening on stillbirths, neonatal deaths, congenital syphilis, and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted. Methods and Findings The decision analytic model reflected the perspective of the national health care system and was based on the sensitivity (86%) and specificity (99%) reported for the immunochromatographic strip (ICS) test. Clinical outcomes of infants born to syphilis-infected mothers on the end points of stillbirth, neonatal death, and congenital syphilis were obtained from published sources. Treatment was assumed to consist of three injections of benzathine penicillin. Country-specific inputs included the antenatal prevalence of syphilis, annual number of live births, proportion of women with at least one antenatal care visit, per capita gross national income, and estimated hourly nurse wages. In all 43 sub-Saharan African countries analyzed, syphilis screening is highly cost-effective, with an average cost/DALY averted of US$11 (range: US$2–US$48). Screening remains highly cost-effective even if the average prevalence falls from the current rate of 3.1% (range: 0.6%–14.0%) to 0.038% (range: 0.002%–0.113%). Universal antenatal screening of pregnant women in clinics may reduce the annual number of stillbirths by up to 64,000, neonatal deaths by up to 25,000, and annual incidence of congenital syphilis by up to 32,000, and

  4. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Laboratory Confirmation of Buruli Ulcer Disease—Towards a Point-of-Care Test

    PubMed Central

    Beissner, Marcus; Phillips, Richard Odame; Battke, Florian; Bauer, Malkin; Badziklou, Kossi; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Maman, Issaka; Rhomberg, Agata; Piten, Ebekalisai; Frimpong, Michael; Huber, Kristina Lydia; Symank, Dominik; Jansson, Moritz; Wiedemann, Franz Xaver; Banla Kere, Abiba; Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; Löscher, Thomas; Bretzel, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Background As the major burden of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD) occurs in remote rural areas, development of point-of-care (POC) tests is considered a research priority to bring diagnostic services closer to the patients. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), a simple, robust and cost-effective technology, has been selected as a promising POC test candidate. Three BUD-specific LAMP assays are available to date, but various technical challenges still hamper decentralized application. To overcome the requirement of cold-chains for transport and storage of reagents, the aim of this study was to establish a dry-reagent-based LAMP assay (DRB-LAMP) employing lyophilized reagents. Methodology/Principal Findings Following the design of an IS2404 based conventional LAMP (cLAMP) assay suitable to apply lyophilized reagents, a lyophylization protocol for the DRB-LAMP format was developed. Clinical performance of cLAMP was validated through testing of 140 clinical samples from 91 suspected BUD cases by routine assays, i.e. IS2404 dry-reagent-based (DRB) PCR, conventional IS2404 PCR (cPCR), IS2404 qPCR, compared to cLAMP. Whereas qPCR rendered an additional 10% of confirmed cases and samples respectively, case confirmation and positivity rates of DRB-PCR or cPCR (64.84% and 56.43%; 100% concordant results in both assays) and cLAMP (62.64% and 52.86%) were comparable and there was no significant difference between the sensitivity of the assays (DRB PCR and cPCR, 86.76%; cLAMP, 83.82%). Likewise, sensitivity of cLAMP (95.83%) and DRB-LAMP (91.67%) were comparable as determined on a set of 24 samples tested positive in all routine assays. Conclusions/Significance Both LAMP formats constitute equivalent alternatives to conventional PCR techniques. Provided the envisaged availability of field friendly DNA extraction formats, both assays are suitable for decentralized laboratory confirmation of BUD, whereby DRB-LAMP scores with the additional advantage of not requiring cold

  5. Design and Testing of an EHR-Integrated, Busulfan Pharmacokinetic Decision Support Tool for the Point-of-Care Clinician

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rahman, Susan M.; Breitkreutz, Matthew L.; Bi, Charlie; Matzuka, Brett J.; Dalal, Jignesh; Casey, K. Leigh; Garg, Uttam; Winkle, Sara; Leeder, J. Steven; Breedlove, JeanAnn; Rivera, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Busulfan demonstrates a narrow therapeutic index for which clinicians routinely employ therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). However, operationalizing TDM can be fraught with inefficiency. We developed and tested software encoding a clinical decision support tool (DST) that is embedded into our electronic health record (EHR) and designed to streamline the TDM process for our oncology partners. Methods: Our development strategy was modeled based on the features associated with successful DSTs. An initial Requirements Analysis was performed to characterize tasks, information flow, user needs, and system requirements to enable push/pull from the EHR. Back-end development was coded based on the algorithm used when manually performing busulfan TDM. The code was independently validated in MATLAB using 10,000 simulated patient profiles. A 296-item heuristic checklist was used to guide design of the front-end user interface. Content experts and end-users (n = 28) were recruited to participate in traditional usability testing under an IRB approved protocol. Results: Decision support software was developed to systematically walk the point-of-care clinician through the TDM process. The system is accessed through the EHR which transparently imports all of the requisite patient data. Data are visually inspected and then curve fit using a model-dependent approach. Quantitative goodness-of-fit are converted to single tachometer where “green” alerts the user that the model is strong, “yellow” signals caution and “red” indicates that there may be a problem with the fitting. Override features are embedded to permit application of a model-independent approach where appropriate. Simulations are performed to target a desired exposure or dose as entered by the clinician and the DST pushes the user approved recommendation back into the EHR. Usability testers were highly satisfied with our DST and quickly became proficient with the software. Conclusions: With early

  6. Same-Day CD4 Testing to Improve Uptake of HIV Care and Treatment in South Africa: Point-of-Care Is Not Enough.

    PubMed

    Larson, Bruce A; Schnippel, Kathryn; Brennan, Alana; Long, Lawrence; Xulu, Thembi; Maotoe, Thapelo; Rosen, Sydney; Sanne, Ian; Fox, Matthew P

    2013-01-01

    Background. We evaluated whether a pilot program providing point-of-care (POC), but not rapid, CD4 testing (BD FACSCount) immediately after testing HIV-positive improved retention in care. Methods. We conducted a retrospective record review at the Themba Lethu Clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa. We compared all walk-in patients testing HIV-positive during February, July 2010 (pilot POC period) to patients testing positive during January 2008-February 2009 (baseline period). The outcome for those with a ≤250 cells/mm(3) when testing HIV-positive was initiating ART <16 weeks after HIV testing. Results. 771 patients had CD4 results from the day of HIV testing (421 pilots, 350 baselines). ART initiation within 16 weeks was 49% in the pilot period and 46% in the baseline period. While all 421 patients during the pilot period should have been offered the POC test, patient records indicate that only 73% of them were actually offered it, and among these patients only 63% accepted the offer. Conclusions. Offering CD4 testing using a point-of-care, but not rapid, technology and without other health system changes had minor impacts on the uptake of HIV care and treatment. Point-of-care technologies alone may not be enough to improve linkage to care and treatment after HIV testing.

  7. Utility of point of care test devices for infectious disease testing of blood and oral fluid and application to rapid testing in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Stephen R.; Kardos, Keith W.; Yearwood, Graham D.; Guillon, Geraldine B.; Kurtz, Lisa A.; Mokkapati, Vijaya K.

    2008-04-01

    Rapid, point of care (POC) testing has been increasingly deployed as an aid in the diagnosis of infectious disease, due to its ability to deliver rapid, actionable results. In the case of HIV, a number of rapid test devices have been FDA approved and CLIA-waived in order to enable diagnosis of HIV infection outside of traditional laboratory settings. These settings include STD clinics, community outreach centers and mobile testing units, as well as identifying HIV infection among pregnant women and managing occupational exposure to infection. The OraQuick ® rapid test platform has been widely used to identify HIV in POC settings, due to its simplicity, ease of use and the ability to utilize oral fluid as an alternative specimen to blood. More recently, a rapid test for antibodies to hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been developed on the same test platform which uses serum, plasma, finger-stick blood, venous blood and oral fluid. Clinical testing using this POC test device has shown that performance is equivalent to state of the art, laboratory based tests. These devices may be suitable for rapid field testing of blood and other body fluids for the presence of infectious agents.

  8. The New Glucose Standard POCT12-A3 Misses the Mark

    PubMed Central

    Krouwer, Jan S.

    2013-01-01

    POCT12-A3 is a Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute standard for hospitals about hospital glucose meter procedures and performance standards. I have reviewed this standard based on the attributes of an ideal performance standard. POCT12-A3 has tighter limits than its predecessor for 95% of results, the limits widen for 98% of results, and there are no limits for 2% of results. It is hard to fathom that 2% of the results are unspecified and could cause life-threatening results, as glucose meters do not perform this poorly. There should be a specification for unreported results since, by definition, point-of-care-testing assays are time sensitive. POCT12-A3 provides useful advice about the glucose testing procedure but provides evaluation guidance only about analytical performance. Moreover, the recommended protocol to assess meter performance is biased and likely to underestimate the observed performance. The guideline would be improved if its specification were based on an error grid and contained evaluation protocols for user errors. PMID:24124969

  9. Use of rapid point-of-care tests by primary health care providers in India: findings from a community-based survey.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, S; Sagili, K; Chadha, S S; Pai, M

    2014-12-21

    In a cross-sectional survey conducted in 45 districts of India, we assessed 1) use of any rapid point-of-care (POC) tests by primary health care providers, and 2) their willingness to use POC tests for tuberculosis (TB) in future. A total of 767 primary health care providers, including private and public sector practitioners, health workers and chemists, were interviewed. A quarter of the primary health care providers reported using POC tests, with pregnancy tests being the most common. Nearly half of the respondents expressed willingness to use POC tests for TB, provided the test was available free or at low cost (

  10. Use of rapid point-of-care tests by primary health care providers in India: findings from a community-based survey.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, S; Sagili, K; Chadha, S S; Pai, M

    2014-12-21

    In a cross-sectional survey conducted in 45 districts of India, we assessed 1) use of any rapid point-of-care (POC) tests by primary health care providers, and 2) their willingness to use POC tests for tuberculosis (TB) in future. A total of 767 primary health care providers, including private and public sector practitioners, health workers and chemists, were interviewed. A quarter of the primary health care providers reported using POC tests, with pregnancy tests being the most common. Nearly half of the respondents expressed willingness to use POC tests for TB, provided the test was available free or at low cost (

  11. Validation of Rapid Point-of-Care (POC) Tests for Detection of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen in Field and Laboratory Settings in the Gambia, Western Africa

    PubMed Central

    Njai, Harr Freeya; Shimakawa, Yusuke; Sanneh, Bakary; Ferguson, Lynne; Ndow, Gibril; Mendy, Maimuna; Sow, Amina; Lo, Gora; Toure-Kane, Coumba; Tanaka, Junko; Taal, Makie; D'alessandro, Umberto; Njie, Ramou; Thursz, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a leading cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Point-of-care tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) could be an ideal tool for a large-scale HBV screening/treatment program in SSA. Using data from the PROLIFICA (Prevention of Liver Fibrosis and Cancer in Africa) program, we conducted a cross-sectional study to assess the diagnostic accuracy of three point-of-care tests (Determine, Vikia, and Espline) for the detection of HBsAg in the field or a laboratory setting in the Gambia. In the field, we used finger-prick whole blood for the Determine and Vikia tests and dried blood spots for the reference standard test (AxSYM HBsAg enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]). In the laboratory we used serum for the Determine, Espline, and reference test (Architect chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay). Of 773 participants recruited at the community and 227 known chronic HBV carriers (1,000 subjects in total), 293 were positive for HBsAg. The sensitivity and specificity of the Determine test were 88.5% and 100% in the field and 95.3% and 93.3% in the laboratory setting, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity were 90.0% and 99.8% for the Vikia test (in the field) and 93.9% and 94.7% for the Espline test (in the laboratory). There was no evidence that one kit was better than another. Most of the patients with false-negative results (18/19) were classified as inactive chronic carriers. In summary, the three point-of-care tests had acceptable ranges of diagnostic accuracy. These tests may represent accurate, rapid, and inexpensive alternatives to serology testing for the screening of HBV infection at field level in SSA. PMID:25631805

  12. Clinical versus Rapid Molecular HIV Diagnosis in Hospitalized African Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial Simulating Point-of-Care Infant Testing

    PubMed Central

    McCollum, Eric D.; Preidis, Geoffrey A.; Maliwichi, Madalitso; Olson, Dan; McCrary, L. Madeline; Kazembe, Peter N.; van der Horst, Charles; Hoffman, Irving; Hosseinipour, Mina C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Many African infants fail to receive their diagnostic HIV molecular test results and subsequently, antiretroviral therapy (ART). To determine whether a point-of-care molecular HIV test increases ART access for hospitalized Malawian infants, we simulated a point-of-care test using rapid HIV RNA polymerase chain reaction (Rapid PCR) and compared patient outcomes to an optimized standard care that included assessment with the World Health Organization (WHO) clinical algorithm for HIV infection plus a DNA PCR with a turnaround time of several weeks (standard care). Design Randomized controlled trial. Methods Hospitalized HIV-exposed Malawian infants <12 months old were randomized into Rapid PCR or standard care. Rapid PCR infants obtained molecular test results within 48 hours to facilitate immediate ART, similar to a point-of-care test. Standard care infants meeting clinical criteria were also offered inpatient ART. The primary outcome was appropriate in-hospital ART for DNA or RNA PCR-confirmed HIV-infected infants. Results 300 infants were enrolled. A greater proportion of HIV-infected infants receiving Rapid PCR, versus standard care, started inpatient ART (72.3% vs 47.8%, p=0.016). Among molecular test-negative infants, 26.9% receiving standard care unnecessarily initiated inpatient ART, versus 0.0% receiving Rapid PCR (p<0.001). Rapid PCR modestly reduced the median days to ART (3.0 vs 6.5, p=0.001) but did not influence outpatient follow-up for HIV-infected infants (78.1% vs 82.4%, P = 0.418). Conclusions Rapid PCR, versus an optimized standard care, increased the proportion of hospitalized HIV-infected infants initiating ART and reduced ART exposure in molecular test-negative infants, without meaningfully impacting time to ART initiation or follow-up rates. PMID:24326604

  13. Prospective, observational study comparing automated and visual point-of-care urinalysis in general practice

    PubMed Central

    van Delft, Sanne; Goedhart, Annelijn; Spigt, Mark; van Pinxteren, Bart; de Wit, Niek; Hopstaken, Rogier

    2016-01-01

    Objective Point-of-care testing (POCT) urinalysis might reduce errors in (subjective) reading, registration and communication of test results, and might also improve diagnostic outcome and optimise patient management. Evidence is lacking. In the present study, we have studied the analytical performance of automated urinalysis and visual urinalysis compared with a reference standard in routine general practice. Setting The study was performed in six general practitioner (GP) group practices in the Netherlands. Automated urinalysis was compared with visual urinalysis in these practices. Reference testing was performed in a primary care laboratory (Saltro, Utrecht, The Netherlands). Primary and secondary outcome measures Analytical performance of automated and visual urinalysis compared with the reference laboratory method was the primary outcome measure, analysed by calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) and Cohen's κ coefficient for agreement. Secondary outcome measure was the user-friendliness of the POCT analyser. Results Automated urinalysis by experienced and routinely trained practice assistants in general practice performs as good as visual urinalysis for nitrite, leucocytes and erythrocytes. Agreement for nitrite is high for automated and visual urinalysis. κ's are 0.824 and 0.803 (ranked as very good and good, respectively). Agreement with the central laboratory reference standard for automated and visual urinalysis for leucocytes is rather poor (0.256 for POCT and 0.197 for visual, respectively, ranked as fair and poor). κ's for erythrocytes are higher: 0.517 (automated) and 0.416 (visual), both ranked as moderate. The Urisys 1100 analyser was easy to use and considered to be not prone to flaws. Conclusions Automated urinalysis performed as good as traditional visual urinalysis on reading of nitrite, leucocytes and erythrocytes in routine general practice. Implementation of automated

  14. Point-of-care procalcitonin test to reduce antibiotic exposure in patients hospitalized with acute exacerbation of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Caspar; Fally, Markus; Fabricius-Bjerre, Andreas; Mortensen, Katrine; Jensen, Birgitte Nybo; Andreassen, Helle F; Porsbjerg, Celeste; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Jensen, Jens-Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to investigate whether point-of-care (POC) procalcitonin (PCT) measurement can reduce redundant antibiotic treatment in patients hospitalized with acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD). Methods One-hundred and twenty adult patients admitted with AECOPD were enrolled in this open-label randomized trial. Patients were allocated to either the POC PCT-guided intervention arm (n=62) or the control arm, in which antibiotic therapy followed local guidelines (n=58). Results The median duration of antibiotic exposure was 3.5 (interquartile range [IQR] 0–10) days in the PCT-arm vs 8.5 (IQR 1–11) days in the control arm (P=0.0169, Wilcoxon) for the intention-to-treat population. The proportion of patients using antibiotics for ≥5 days within the 28-day follow-up was 41.9% (PCT-arm) vs 67.2% (P=0.006, Fisher’s exact) in the intention-to-treat population. For the per-protocol population, the proportions were 21.1% (PCT-arm) vs 73.9% (P<0.00001, Fisher’s exact). Within 28-day follow-up, one patient died in the PCT-arm and two died in the control arm. A composite harm end point consisting of death, rehospitalization, or intensive care unit admission, all within 28 days, showed no apparent difference. Conclusion Our study shows that the implementation of a POC PCT-guided algorithm can be used to substantially reduce antibiotic exposure in patients hospitalized with AECOPD, with no apparent harm. PMID:27382274

  15. Accuracy of a point-of-care ELISA test kit for predicting the presence of protective canine parvovirus and canine distemper virus antibody concentrations in dogs.

    PubMed

    Litster, A L; Pressler, B; Volpe, A; Dubovi, E

    2012-08-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) are highly infectious and often fatal diseases with worldwide distributions, and are important population management considerations in animal shelters. A point-of-care ELISA test kit is available to detect serum antibodies to CPV and CDV, and presumptively to predict protective status. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the test compared to CPV hemagglutination inhibition titers and CDV serum neutralization titers determined by a reference laboratory, using sera collected from dogs housed at animal shelters. The ELISA test was used under both field and laboratory conditions and duplicate specimens were processed using an extra wash step. The test kit yielded accurate results (CPV: sensitivity 92.3%, specificity 93.5%; CDV: sensitivity 75.7%, specificity 91.8%) under field conditions. CDV sensitivity was improved by performing the test under laboratory conditions and using an optical density (OD) meter (laboratory performed 94.0%; OD 88.1%). Point-of-care ELISA testing for serum CPV and CDV antibody titers was demonstrated to be a useful tool for determining antibody status when making decisions regarding the need for CPV and/or CDV vaccination and also in animal shelters for population management.

  16. Existential Threat or Dissociative Response? Examining Defensive Avoidance of Point-of-Care Testing Devices Through a Terror Management Theory Framework.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Simon; Gallagher, Pamela; Matthews, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Using a terror management theory framework, this study investigated if providing mortality reminders or self-esteem threats would lead participants to exhibit avoidant responses toward a point-of-care testing device for cardiovascular disease risk and if the nature of the device served to diminish the existential threat of cardiovascular disease. One hundred and twelve participants aged 40-55 years completed an experimental questionnaire. Findings indicated that participants were not existentially threatened by established terror management methodologies, potentially because of cross-cultural variability toward such methodologies. Highly positive appraisals of the device also suggest that similar technologies may beneficially affect the uptake of screening behaviors.

  17. Existential Threat or Dissociative Response? Examining Defensive Avoidance of Point-of-Care Testing Devices Through a Terror Management Theory Framework.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Simon; Gallagher, Pamela; Matthews, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Using a terror management theory framework, this study investigated if providing mortality reminders or self-esteem threats would lead participants to exhibit avoidant responses toward a point-of-care testing device for cardiovascular disease risk and if the nature of the device served to diminish the existential threat of cardiovascular disease. One hundred and twelve participants aged 40-55 years completed an experimental questionnaire. Findings indicated that participants were not existentially threatened by established terror management methodologies, potentially because of cross-cultural variability toward such methodologies. Highly positive appraisals of the device also suggest that similar technologies may beneficially affect the uptake of screening behaviors. PMID:24972015

  18. A nanoliter self-priming compartmentalization chip for point-of-care digital PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Qi; Gao, Yibo; Zhu, Qiangyuan; Tian, Qingchang; Yu, Bingwen; Song, Bofan; Xu, Yanan; Yuan, Maokai; Ma, Congcong; Jin, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Mu, Ying; Jin, Qinhan

    2015-01-01

    A nanoliter self-priming compartmentalization (SPC) microfluidic chip suited for the digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) analysis in point-of-care testing (POCT) has been developed. This dPCR chip is fabricated of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). After the dPCR chip is evacuated, there will be a negative pressure environment in the chip because of the gas solubility of PDMS. The negative pressure environment can provide a self-priming power so that the sample solutions can be sucked into each reaction chamber sequentially. The whole sampling process requires no external power and is valve-free. Channels that contain water are designed around each sample panel to prevent the solvent (water) from evaporating during dPCR process. A glass coverslip is also used as a waterproof layer, which is more convenient and more efficient than other waterproof methods seen in literature. This dPCR chip allows three samples to be amplified at the same time. Each sample is distributed into 1040 reaction chambers, and each chamber is only 2.08 nL. Human β-actin DNA solutions of known concentrations are used as the templates for the dPCR analyses to verify the sensitivity and accuracy of the method. Template DNA solutions diluted to concentrations of 300, 100 and 10 copies/μL are tested and shown that this simple, portable and self-priming dPCR chip can be used at any clinic as a real POCT technique. PMID:26022215

  19. A nanoliter self-priming compartmentalization chip for point-of-care digital PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Qi; Gao, Yibo; Zhu, Qiangyuan; Tian, Qingchang; Yu, Bingwen; Song, Bofan; Xu, Yanan; Yuan, Maokai; Ma, Congcong; Jin, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Mu, Ying; Jin, Qinhan

    2015-01-01

    A nanoliter self-priming compartmentalization (SPC) microfluidic chip suited for the digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) analysis in point-of-care testing (POCT) has been developed. This dPCR chip is fabricated of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). After the dPCR chip is evacuated, there will be a negative pressure environment in the chip because of the gas solubility of PDMS. The negative pressure environment can provide a self-priming power so that the sample solutions can be sucked into each reaction chamber sequentially. The whole sampling process requires no external power and is valve-free. Channels that contain water are designed around each sample panel to prevent the solvent (water) from evaporating during dPCR process. A glass coverslip is also used as a waterproof layer, which is more convenient and more efficient than other waterproof methods seen in literature. This dPCR chip allows three samples to be amplified at the same time. Each sample is distributed into 1040 reaction chambers, and each chamber is only 2.08 nL. Human β-actin DNA solutions of known concentrations are used as the templates for the dPCR analyses to verify the sensitivity and accuracy of the method. Template DNA solutions diluted to concentrations of 300, 100 and 10 copies/μL are tested and shown that this simple, portable and self-priming dPCR chip can be used at any clinic as a real POCT technique. PMID:26029750

  20. Biomarkers as point-of-care tests to guide prescription of antibiotics in patients with acute respiratory infections in primary care.

    PubMed

    Aabenhus, Rune; Jensen, Jens-Ulrik S; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Bjerrum, Lars

    2014-11-06

    Background Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are by far the most common reason for prescribing an antibiotic in primary care, even though the majority of ARIs are of viral or non-severe bacterial aetiology. Unnecessary antibiotic use will, in many cases, not be beneficial to the patients' recovery and expose them to potential side effects. Furthermore, as a causal link exists between antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance, reducing unnecessary antibiotic use is a key factor in controlling this important problem. Antibiotic resistance puts increasing burdens on healthcare services and renders patients at risk of future ineffective treatments, in turn increasing morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases. One strategy aiming to reduce antibiotic use in primary care is the guidance of antibiotic treatment by use of a point-of-care biomarker. A point-of-care biomarker of infection forms part of the acute phase response to acute tissue injury regardless of the aetiology (infection, trauma and inflammation) and may in the correct clinical context be used as a surrogate marker of infection,possibly assisting the doctor in the clinical management of ARIs.Objectives To assess the benefits and harms of point-of-care biomarker tests of infection to guide antibiotic treatment in patients presenting with symptoms of acute respiratory infections in primary care settings regardless of age.Search methods We searched CENTRAL (2013, Issue 12), MEDLINE (1946 to January 2014), EMBASE (2010 to January 2014), CINAHL (1981 to January 2014), Web of Science (1955 to January 2014) and LILACS (1982 to January 2014).Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in primary care patients with ARIs that compared use of point-of-care biomarkers with standard of care. We included trials that randomised individual patients as well as trials that randomised clusters of patients(cluster-RCTs).Two review authors independently extracted data on the following outcomes: i

  1. Hand-drawn&written pen-on-paper electrochemiluminescence immunodevice powered by rechargeable battery for low-cost point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongmei; Kong, Qingkun; Wang, Shaowei; Xu, Jinmeng; Bian, Zhaoquan; Zheng, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Chao; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, a pen-on-paper electrochemiluminescence (PoP-ECL) device was entirely hand drawn and written in commercially available crayon and pencil in turn for the first time, and a constant potential-triggered sandwich-type immunosensor was introduced into the PoP-ECL device to form a low-cost ECL immunodevice proof. Each PoP-ECL device contained a hydrophilic paper channel and two PoP electrodes, and the PoP-ECL device was produced as follows: crayon was firstly used to draw hydrophobic regions on pure cellulose paper to create the hydrophilic paper channels followed with a baking treatment, and then a 6B-type black pencil with low resistivity was applied for precision writing, as the PoP electrodes, across the hydrophilic paper channel. For further point-of-care testing, a portable, low-cost rechargeable battery was employed as the power source to provide constant potential to the PoP electrodes to trigger the ECL. Using Carbohydrate antigen 199 as model analyte, this PoP-ECL immunodevice showed a good linear response range from 0.01-200 U mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.0055 U mL(-1), a high sensitivity and stability. The proposed PoP-ECL immunodevice could be used in point-of-care testing of other tumor markers for remote regions and developing countries.

  2. Hand-drawn&written pen-on-paper electrochemiluminescence immunodevice powered by rechargeable battery for low-cost point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongmei; Kong, Qingkun; Wang, Shaowei; Xu, Jinmeng; Bian, Zhaoquan; Zheng, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Chao; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, a pen-on-paper electrochemiluminescence (PoP-ECL) device was entirely hand drawn and written in commercially available crayon and pencil in turn for the first time, and a constant potential-triggered sandwich-type immunosensor was introduced into the PoP-ECL device to form a low-cost ECL immunodevice proof. Each PoP-ECL device contained a hydrophilic paper channel and two PoP electrodes, and the PoP-ECL device was produced as follows: crayon was firstly used to draw hydrophobic regions on pure cellulose paper to create the hydrophilic paper channels followed with a baking treatment, and then a 6B-type black pencil with low resistivity was applied for precision writing, as the PoP electrodes, across the hydrophilic paper channel. For further point-of-care testing, a portable, low-cost rechargeable battery was employed as the power source to provide constant potential to the PoP electrodes to trigger the ECL. Using Carbohydrate antigen 199 as model analyte, this PoP-ECL immunodevice showed a good linear response range from 0.01-200 U mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.0055 U mL(-1), a high sensitivity and stability. The proposed PoP-ECL immunodevice could be used in point-of-care testing of other tumor markers for remote regions and developing countries. PMID:24841090

  3. Point-of-care monitoring of haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Mallett, S V; Armstrong, M

    2015-01-01

    Recent research in the management of haemorrhage has led to several changes in clinical practice. Evidence is accumulating that point-of-care testing results in fewer transfusions, improved patient outcomes, and reduced hospital costs. However, there is still insufficient high quality evidence to support transfusion guidelines and algorithms based on point-of-care tests alone, and more robust studies are needed. The implementation of point-of-care testing requires institutional support and senior clinical leadership to realise the benefits, with educational programmes, audit, and feedback regarding transfusion practice. A change in philosophy is required, from performing testing only when there is an obvious bleeding problem, towards the concept of routinely monitoring high-risk patients throughout the surgical procedure. This informs clinical practice, establishes normal ranges for that population, identifies patients at risk and allows early identification and treatment of evolving coagulopathy.

  4. The Clinical and Economic Impact of Point-of-Care CD4 Testing in Mozambique and Other Resource-Limited Settings: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hyle, Emily P.; Jani, Ilesh V.; Lehe, Jonathan; Su, Amanda E.; Wood, Robin; Quevedo, Jorge; Losina, Elena; Bassett, Ingrid V.; Pei, Pamela P.; Paltiel, A. David; Resch, Stephen; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Peter, Trevor; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Point-of-care CD4 tests at HIV diagnosis could improve linkage to care in resource-limited settings. Our objective is to evaluate the clinical and economic impact of point-of-care CD4 tests compared to laboratory-based tests in Mozambique. Methods and Findings We use a validated model of HIV testing, linkage, and treatment (CEPAC-International) to examine two strategies of immunological staging in Mozambique: (1) laboratory-based CD4 testing (LAB-CD4) and (2) point-of-care CD4 testing (POC-CD4). Model outcomes include 5-y survival, life expectancy, lifetime costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Input parameters include linkage to care (LAB-CD4, 34%; POC-CD4, 61%), probability of correctly detecting antiretroviral therapy (ART) eligibility (sensitivity: LAB-CD4, 100%; POC-CD4, 90%) or ART ineligibility (specificity: LAB-CD4, 100%; POC-CD4, 85%), and test cost (LAB-CD4, US$10; POC-CD4, US$24). In sensitivity analyses, we vary POC-CD4-specific parameters, as well as cohort and setting parameters to reflect a range of scenarios in sub-Saharan Africa. We consider ICERs less than three times the per capita gross domestic product in Mozambique (US$570) to be cost-effective, and ICERs less than one times the per capita gross domestic product in Mozambique to be very cost-effective. Projected 5-y survival in HIV-infected persons with LAB-CD4 is 60.9% (95% CI, 60.9%–61.0%), increasing to 65.0% (95% CI, 64.9%–65.1%) with POC-CD4. Discounted life expectancy and per person lifetime costs with LAB-CD4 are 9.6 y (95% CI, 9.6–9.6 y) and US$2,440 (95% CI, US$2,440–US$2,450) and increase with POC-CD4 to 10.3 y (95% CI, 10.3–10.3 y) and US$2,800 (95% CI, US$2,790–US$2,800); the ICER of POC-CD4 compared to LAB-CD4 is US$500/year of life saved (YLS) (95% CI, US$480–US$520/YLS). POC-CD4 improves clinical outcomes and remains near the very cost-effective threshold in sensitivity analyses, even if point-of-care CD4 tests have lower sensitivity

  5. Effect of point of care testing for C reactive protein and training in communication skills on antibiotic use in lower respiratory tract infections: cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Christopher C; Hopstaken, Rogier M; Hood, Kerenza; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of general practitioner testing for C reactive protein (disease approach) and receiving training in enhanced communication skills (illness approach) on antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infection. Design Pragmatic, 2×2 factorial, cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting 20 general practices in the Netherlands. Participants 40 general practitioners from 20 practices recruited 431 patients with lower respiratory tract infection. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was antibiotic prescribing at the index consultation. Secondary outcomes were antibiotic prescribing during 28 days’ follow-up, reconsultation, clinical recovery, and patients’ satisfaction and enablement. Interventions General practitioners’ use of C reactive protein point of care testing and training in enhanced communication skills separately and combined, and usual care. Results General practitioners in the C reactive protein test group prescribed antibiotics to 31% of patients compared with 53% in the no test group (P=0.02). General practitioners trained in enhanced communication skills prescribed antibiotics to 27% of patients compared with 54% in the no training group (P<0.01). Both interventions showed a statistically significant effect on antibiotic prescribing at any point during the 28 days’ follow-up. Clinicians in the combined intervention group prescribed antibiotics to 23% of patients (interaction term was non-significant). Patients’ recovery and satisfaction were similar in all study groups. Conclusion Both general practitioners’ use of point of care testing for C reactive protein and training in enhanced communication skills significantly reduced antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infection without compromising patients’ recovery and satisfaction with care. A combination of the illness and disease focused approaches may be necessary to achieve the greatest reduction in antibiotic prescribing for this

  6. The role of point-of-care platelet function testing in predicting postoperative bleeding following cardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Corredor, C; Wasowicz, M; Karkouti, K; Sharma, V

    2015-06-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis appraises the utility of point-of-care platelet function tests for predicting blood loss and transfusion requirements in cardiac surgical patients, and analyses whether their use within a transfusion management algorithm is associated with improved patient outcomes. We included 30 observational studies incorporating 3044 patients in the qualitative assessment, and nine randomised controlled trials including 1057 patients in the meta-analysis. Platelet function tests demonstrated significant variability in their ability to predict blood loss and transfusion requirements. Their use within a blood transfusion algorithm demonstrated a reduction in blood loss at longest follow-up (mean difference -102.9 ml (95% CI -149.9 to -56.1 ml), p < 0.001), and transfusion of packed red cells (RR 0.86 (95% CI 0.78-0.94), p = 0.001) and fresh frozen plasma (RR 0.42 (95% CI 0.30-0.59), p < 0.001). Viscoelastic methods used in combination with other platelet function tests achieved greater reduction in blood loss (mean difference -111.8 ml (95% CI -174.9 to -49.1 ml), p = 0.0005) compared with their use alone (mean difference -90.6 ml (95% CI 166.1-15.0 ml), p = 0.02). We conclude that incorporation of point-of-care platelet function tests into transfusion management algorithms is associated with a reduction in blood loss and transfusion requirements in cardiac surgery patients. PMID:25916344

  7. Laboratory Evaluation of a Dual-Path Platform Assay for Rapid Point-of-Care HIV and Syphilis Testing.

    PubMed

    Leon, S R; Ramos, L B; Vargas, S K; Kojima, N; Perez, D G; Caceres, C F; Klausner, J D

    2016-02-01

    We assessed the laboratory performance of the Chembio dual-path platform HIV-syphilis rapid immunodiagnostic test and electronic reader for detection of HIV and Treponema pallidum antibodies in 450 previously characterized serum specimens. For visual or electronic reader HIV antibody detection, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 98.7%. For visual T. pallidum antibody detection, the test sensitivity was 94.7% and the specificity was 100.0%; with the electronic reader, the sensitivity was 94.7% and the specificity was 99.7%. PMID:26659215

  8. Design and Testing of a Single-Element Ultrasound Viscoelastography System for Point-of-Care Edema Quantification.

    PubMed

    Pitre, John J; Koziol, Leo B; Kruger, Grant H; Vollmer, Alan; Ophir, Jonathan; Ammann, Jean-Jacques; Weitzel, William F; Bull, Joseph L

    2016-09-01

    Management of fluid overload in patients with end-stage renal disease represents a unique challenge to clinical practice because of the lack of accurate and objective measurement methods. Currently, peripheral edema is subjectively assessed by palpation of the patient's extremities, ostensibly a qualitative indication of tissue viscoelastic properties. New robust quantitative estimates of tissue fluid content would allow clinicians to better guide treatment, minimizing reactive treatment decision making. Ultrasound viscoelastography (UVE) can be used to estimate strain in viscoelastic tissue, deriving material properties that can help guide treatment. We are developing and testing a simple, low-cost UVE system using a single-element imaging transducer that is simpler and less computationally demanding than array-based systems. This benchtop validation study tested the feasibility of using the UVE system by measuring the mechanical properties of a tissue-mimicking material under large strains. We generated depth-dependent creep curves and viscoelastic parameter maps of time constants and elastic moduli for the Kelvin model of viscoelasticity. During testing, the UVE system performed well, with mean UVE-measured strain matching standard mechanical testing with maximum absolute errors ≤4%. Motion tracking revealed high correlation and signal-to-noise ratios, indicating that the system is reliable. PMID:27222246

  9. Development and validation of a point-of-care test for detecting hantavirus antibodies in human and rodent samples.

    PubMed

    Koishi, Andrea Cristine; Aoki, Mateus Nóbrega; Jorge, Taissa Ricciardi; Suzukawa, Andréia Akemi; Zanluca, Camila; Levis, Silvana; Duarte Dos Santos, Claudia Nunes

    2016-07-01

    Hantaviruses are etiologic agents of a zoonotic disease transmitted mainly from wild rodents to humans, causing Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome in Eurasia and the Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome in the Americas (HCPS), reaching a lethality rate of 40% in Brazil. Hantavirus diagnostic and seroprevalence are often based on the presence of IgM and IgG antibodies against the virus. Here we propose a rapid test assay able to identify hantavirus antibodies with sensibility and specificity similar to ELISA assays. We analyzed five groups of samples, including healthy human population and small mammals of endemic areas, suspected cases of HCPS, patients with non-related infections and a serum panel from a different geographical region. The test presented good rates of sensibility (87-100%) and specificity (97-100%) for all groups, being a promising tool suitable for both rodent and human hantavirus epidemiological surveys.

  10. Development and validation of a point-of-care test for detecting hantavirus antibodies in human and rodent samples.

    PubMed

    Koishi, Andrea Cristine; Aoki, Mateus Nóbrega; Jorge, Taissa Ricciardi; Suzukawa, Andréia Akemi; Zanluca, Camila; Levis, Silvana; Duarte Dos Santos, Claudia Nunes

    2016-07-01

    Hantaviruses are etiologic agents of a zoonotic disease transmitted mainly from wild rodents to humans, causing Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome in Eurasia and the Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome in the Americas (HCPS), reaching a lethality rate of 40% in Brazil. Hantavirus diagnostic and seroprevalence are often based on the presence of IgM and IgG antibodies against the virus. Here we propose a rapid test assay able to identify hantavirus antibodies with sensibility and specificity similar to ELISA assays. We analyzed five groups of samples, including healthy human population and small mammals of endemic areas, suspected cases of HCPS, patients with non-related infections and a serum panel from a different geographical region. The test presented good rates of sensibility (87-100%) and specificity (97-100%) for all groups, being a promising tool suitable for both rodent and human hantavirus epidemiological surveys. PMID:27155935

  11. Comparison of computed tomography pulmonary angiography and point-of-care tests for pulmonary thromboembolism diagnosis in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Goggs, R; Chan, D L; Benigni, L; Hirst, C; Kellett-Gregory, L; Fuentes, V L

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the feasibility of CT pulmonary angiography for identification of naturally occurring pulmonary thromboembolism in dogs using predefined diagnostic criteria and to assess the ability of echocardiography, cardiac troponins, D-dimers and kaolin-activated thromboelastography to predict the presence of pulmonary thromboembolism in dogs. Methods Twelve dogs with immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia and evidence of respiratory distress were prospectively evaluated. Dogs were sedated immediately before CT pulmonary angiography using intravenous butorphanol. Spiral CT pulmonary angiography was performed with a 16 detector-row CT scanner using a pressure injector to infuse contrast media through peripheral intravenous catheters. Pulmonary thromboembolism was diagnosed using predefined criteria. Contemporaneous tests included echocardiography, arterial blood gas analysis, kaolin-activated thromboelastography, D-dimers and cardiac troponins. Results Based on predefined criteria, four dogs were classified as pulmonary thromboembolism positive, three dogs were suspected to have pulmonary thromboembolism and the remaining five dogs had negative scans. The four dogs identified with pulmonary thromboembolism all had discrete filling defects in main or lobar pulmonary arteries. None of the contemporaneous tests was discriminant for pulmonary thromboembolism diagnosis, although the small sample size was limiting. Clinical Significance CT pulmonary angiography can be successfully performed in dogs under sedation, even in at-risk patients with respiratory distress and can both confirm and rule out pulmonary thromboembolism in dogs. PMID:24521253

  12. Self-driven filter-based blood plasma separator microfluidic chip for point-of-care testing.

    PubMed

    Madadi, Hojjat; Casals-Terré, Jasmina; Mohammadi, Mahdi

    2015-05-22

    There is currently a growing need for lab-on-a-chip devices for use in clinical analysis and diagnostics, especially in the area of patient care. The first step in most blood assays is plasma extraction from whole blood. This paper presents a novel, self-driven blood plasma separation microfluidic chip, which can extract more than 0.1 μl plasma from a single droplet of undiluted fresh human blood (~5 μl). This volume of blood plasma is extracted from whole blood with high purity (more than 98%) in a reasonable time frame (3 to 5 min), and without the need for any external force. This would be the first step towards the realization of a single-use, self-blood test that does not require any external force or power source to deliver and analyze a fresh whole-blood sample, in contrast to the existing time-consuming conventional blood analysis. The prototypes are manufactured in polydimethylsiloxane that has been modified with a strong nonionic surfactant (Silwet L-77) to achieve hydrophilic behavior. The main advantage of this microfluidic chip design is the clogging delay in the filtration area, which results in an increased amount of extracted plasma (0.1 μl). Moreover, the plasma can be collected in one or more 10 μm-deep channels to facilitate the detection and readout of multiple blood assays. This high volume of extracted plasma is achieved thanks to a novel design that combines maximum pumping efficiency without disturbing the red blood cells' trajectory through the use of different hydrodynamic principles, such as a constriction effect and a symmetrical filtration mode. To demonstrate the microfluidic chip's functionality, we designed and fabricated a novel hybrid microdevice that exhibits the benefits of both microfluidics and lateral flow immunochromatographic tests. The performance of the presented hybrid microdevice is validated using rapid detection of thyroid stimulating hormone within a single droplet of whole blood.

  13. Performance of a New Meter Designed for Assisted Monitoring of Blood Glucose and Point-of-Care Testing

    PubMed Central

    MacRury, Sandra; Srinivasan, Aparna; Mahoney, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Blood glucose (BG) meters used for assisted monitoring of blood glucose (AMBG) require different attributes compared with meters designed for home use. These include safety considerations (i.e., minimized risk of blood-borne pathogen transmission), capability for testing multiple blood sample types, and enhanced performance specifications. The OneTouch® Verio™Pro+ BG meter is designed to incorporate all of these attributes. Methods Meter accuracy was assessed in clinical studies with arterial, venous, and capillary blood samples with a hematocrit range of 22.9–59.8%. The effect of interferents, including anticoagulants, on accuracy was evaluated. The meter disinfection protocol was validated, and instructions for use and user acceptance of the system were assessed. Results A total of 97% (549/566) of BG measures from all blood sample types and 95.5% (191/200) of arterial blood samples were within ±12 mg/dl or 12.5% of reference measurements. The system was unaffected by 4 anticoagulants and 57 of 59 endogenous and exogenous compounds; it was affected by 2 compounds: pralidoxime iodide and xylose. Bleach wipes were sufficient to disinfect the meter. Users felt that the meter's quality control (QC) prompts would help them to comply with regulatory requirements. Conclusions The meter provided accurate measurements of different blood samples over a wide hematocrit range and was not affected by 57 physiologic and therapeutic compounds. The QC prompts and specific infection-mitigating design further aid to make this meter system practical for AMBG in care facilities. PMID:23566997

  14. A meta-analysis of point-of-care laboratory tests in the diagnosis of novel 2009 swine-lineage pandemic influenza A (H1N1).

    PubMed

    Babin, Steven M; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Rothman, Richard E; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2011-04-01

    This paper reviews 14 published studies describing performance characteristics, including sensitivity and specificity, of commercially available rapid, point-of-care (POC) influenza tests in patients affected by an outbreak of a novel swine-related influenza A (H1N1) that was declared a pandemic in 2009. Although these POC tests were not intended to be specific for this pandemic influenza strain, the nonspecialized skills required and the timeliness of results make these POC tests potentially valuable for clinical and public health use. Pooled sensitivity and specificity for the POC tests studied were 68% and 81%, respectively, but published values were not homogeneous with sensitivities and specificities ranging from 10% to 88% and 51% to 100%, respectively. Pooled positive and negative likelihood ratios were 5.94 and 0.42, respectively. These results support current recommendations for use of rapid POC tests when H1N1 is suspected, recognizing that positive results are more reliable than negative results in determining infection, especially when disease prevalence is high.

  15. Measurement of Circulating Filarial Antigen Levels in Human Blood with a Point-of-Care Test Strip and a Portable Spectrodensitometer.

    PubMed

    Chesnais, Cédric B; Vlaminck, Johnny; Kunyu-Shako, Billy; Pion, Sébastien D; Awaca-Uvon, Naomi-Pitchouna; Weil, Gary J; Mumba, Dieudonné; Boussinesq, Michel

    2016-06-01

    The Alere Filariasis Test Strip (FTS) is a qualitative, point-of-care diagnostic tool that detects Wuchereria bancrofti circulating filarial antigen (CFA) in human blood, serum, or plasma. The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis employs the FTS for mapping filariasis-endemic areas and assessing the success of elimination efforts. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between the intensity of positive test lines obtained by FTS with CFA levels as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with blood and plasma samples from 188 individuals who live in a filariasis-endemic area. The intensity of the FTS test line was assessed visually to provide a semiquantitative score (visual Filariasis Test Strip [vFTS]), and line intensity was measured with a portable spectrodensitometer (quantitative Filariasis Test Strip [qFTS]). These results were compared with antigen levels measured by ELISA in plasma from the same subjects. qFTS measurements were highly correlated with vFTS scores (ρ = 0.94; P < 0.001) and with plasma CFA levels (ρ = 0.91; P < 0.001). Thus, qFTS assessment is a convenient method for quantifying W. bancrofti CFA levels in human blood, which are correlated with adult worm burdens. This tool may be useful for assessing the impact of treatment on adult filarial worms in individuals and communities. PMID:27114288

  16. Measurement of Circulating Filarial Antigen Levels in Human Blood with a Point-of-Care Test Strip and a Portable Spectrodensitometer

    PubMed Central

    Chesnais, Cédric B.; Vlaminck, Johnny; Kunyu-Shako, Billy; Pion, Sébastien D.; Awaca-Uvon, Naomi-Pitchouna; Weil, Gary J.; Mumba, Dieudonné; Boussinesq, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The Alere Filariasis Test Strip (FTS) is a qualitative, point-of-care diagnostic tool that detects Wuchereria bancrofti circulating filarial antigen (CFA) in human blood, serum, or plasma. The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis employs the FTS for mapping filariasis-endemic areas and assessing the success of elimination efforts. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between the intensity of positive test lines obtained by FTS with CFA levels as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with blood and plasma samples from 188 individuals who live in a filariasis-endemic area. The intensity of the FTS test line was assessed visually to provide a semiquantitative score (visual Filariasis Test Strip [vFTS]), and line intensity was measured with a portable spectrodensitometer (quantitative Filariasis Test Strip [qFTS]). These results were compared with antigen levels measured by ELISA in plasma from the same subjects. qFTS measurements were highly correlated with vFTS scores (ρ = 0.94; P < 0.001) and with plasma CFA levels (ρ = 0.91; P < 0.001). Thus, qFTS assessment is a convenient method for quantifying W. bancrofti CFA levels in human blood, which are correlated with adult worm burdens. This tool may be useful for assessing the impact of treatment on adult filarial worms in individuals and communities. PMID:27114288

  17. Accuracy of point-of-care testing for circulatory cathodic antigen in the detection of schistosome infection: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Minton, Jonathan; Boamah, Daniel; Otchere, Joseph; Asmah, Richard H; Rodgers, Mark; Bosompem, Kwabena M; Eusebi, Paolo; De Vlas, Sake J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the accuracy of point-of-care testing for circulatory cathodic antigen in the diagnosis of schistosome infection. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and other bibliographic databases for studies published until 30 September 2015 that described circulatory cathodic antigen testing compared against one to three Kato–Katz tests per subject – for Schistosoma mansoni – or the filtration of one 10-ml urine sample per subject – for S. haematobium. We extracted the numbers of true positives, false positives, true negatives and false negatives for the antigen testing and performed meta-analyses using a bivariate hierarchical regression model. Findings Twenty-six studies published between 1994 and 2014 met the inclusion criteria. In the detection of S. mansoni, a single antigen test gave a pooled sensitivity of 0.90 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.84–0.94) and a pooled specificity of 0.56 (95% CI: 0.39–0.71; n = 7) when compared against a single Kato–Katz test. The corresponding values from comparisons with two to three Kato–Katz tests per subject were 0.85 (95% CI: 0.80–0.88) and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.53–0.76; n = 14), respectively. There appeared to be no advantage in using three antigen tests per subject instead of one. When compared against the results of urine filtration, antigen testing for S. haematobium showed poor sensitivity and poor specificity. The performance of antigen testing was better in areas of high endemicity than in settings with low endemicity. Conclusion Antigen testing may represent an effective tool for monitoring programmes for the control of S. mansoni. PMID:27429491

  18. Approaching a diagnostic point-of-care test for pediatric tuberculosis through evaluation of immune biomarkers across the clinical disease spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Jenum, Synne; Dhanasekaran, S.; Lodha, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Aparna; Kumar Saini, Deepak; Singh, Sarman; Singh, Varinder; Medigeshi, Guruprasad; Haks, Marielle C.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Doherty, Timothy Mark; Kabra, Sushil K.; Ritz, Christian; Grewal, Harleen M. S.

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) calls for an accurate, rapid, and simple point-of-care (POC) test for the diagnosis of pediatric tuberculosis (TB) in order to make progress “Towards Zero Deaths”. Whereas the sensitivity of a POC test based on detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is likely to have poor sensitivity (70–80% of children have culture-negative disease), host biomarkers reflecting the on-going pathological processes across the spectrum of MTB infection and disease may hold greater promise for this purpose. We analyzed transcriptional immune biomarkers direct ex-vivo and translational biomarkers in MTB-antigen stimulated whole blood in 88 Indian children with intra-thoracic TB aged 6 months to 15 years, and 39 asymptomatic siblings. We identified 12 biomarkers consistently associated with either clinical groups “upstream” towards culture-positive TB on the TB disease spectrum (CD14, FCGR1A, FPR1, MMP9, RAB24, SEC14L1, and TIMP2) or “downstream” towards a decreased likelihood of TB disease (BLR1, CD3E, CD8A, IL7R, and TGFBR2), suggesting a correlation with MTB-related pathology and high relevance to a future POC test for pediatric TB. A biomarker signature consisting of BPI, CD3E, CD14, FPR1, IL4, TGFBR2, TIMP2 and TNFRSF1B separated children with TB from asymptomatic siblings (AUC of 88%). PMID:26725873

  19. Comparative effectiveness of a rapid point-of-care test for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis among women in a clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Barnes, Mathilda R; Jett-Goheen, Mary; Blake, Diane R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a promising new point-of-care (POC) chlamydia test with traditional nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT), and to determine the characteristics that would make a POC test most cost-effective. Methods A decision tree was constructed to model chlamydia screening visits to a sexually transmitted disease clinic by a hypothetical cohort of 10 000 women. The model incorporated programmatic screening costs, treatment costs and medical costs averted through prevention of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and its sequelae. Parameter values and costs were estimated for each node in the decision tree based on primary data, published data and unpublished health data. Results For the base-case scenario (POC sensitivity 92.9%; 47.5% of women willing to wait 40 min for test results; test cost $33.48), POC was estimated to save US$5050 for each case of PID averted compared with NAAT. One-way sensitivity analyses indicated that POC would dominate NAAT if the POC test cost is test is likely to be cost-effective compared with traditional NAAT. The POC test sensitivity, cost and proportion of women willing to wait for the POC test result are key elements to determining the cost-effectiveness of any new POC test strategy. PMID:22984085

  20. Performance evaluation of low cost microfluidic chips made using a digital craft cutter for point of care applications in nucleic acid tests.

    PubMed

    Ragavendar, M S; Jayaraman, Subhadra; Ramya, V M; Roy, Rohan; Manwani, Harsha

    2014-01-01

    A point of care (POC) diagnostic system development for nucleic acid testing (NAT) for developing countries faces several challenges and barriers among which affordability is a very critical one [1,4]. Hence a study was made to evaluate the effectiveness of microfluidic chips made from a digital craft cutter to be used as a disposable cartridge. Low cost materials like double sided tapes, transparent sheets and connectors were used to realize the microfluidic chip [2]. An in-house IVD sample preparation kit for nucleic acid extraction was used as a representative assay. Modifications were made to the assay workflow considering the feature sizes, design and volume of the microfluidic chip made from the paper cutter and other POC system requirements like turnaround time (TAT). The workflow was optimized by reducing overall TAT from 50min to 15min, sample volume from 150 μL to 12.5 μL and reduced reagent volumes. The method was also optimized to work at an isothermal condition. The results showed good correlation and yield in terms of both quality and quantity when compared to results obtained from the established baseline protocol. Thus microfluidic chips made using a digital craft cutter can very well be a low cost alternative to manufacture disposable chips for POC applications in nucleic acid tests.

  1. Detection of Group A Streptococcus from Pharyngeal Swab Samples by Bacterial Culture Is Challenged by a Novel mariPOC Point-of-Care Test

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, Janne O.; Brandt, Annika; Muotiala, Anna; Liukko, Viivi; Soittu, Sari; Meriluoto, Siiri; Vesalainen, Marika; Huovinen, Pentti; Irjala, Kerttu

    2015-01-01

    mariPOC is a novel point-of-care test system for rapid detection of respiratory tract infections. We compared the performance of the mariPOC test to that of bacterial culture for detecting group A streptococcus (GAS) in 219 pharyngitis patients (ages 1–64 years) and 109 healthy asymptomatic controls (ages 19–69 years). In addition, 42 patient samples were analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Of the 219 pharyngeal patient samples, 32 were positive in a GAS bacterial culture (prevalence 15%) and 65 (30%) in the mariPOC test. The amount of GAS in samples reported positive by the mariPOC test and negative by culture was, on average, 10-fold less than that of those positive in both methods. This indicated that the negative results in bacterial cultures were due to lower sensitivity. The qPCR results were positive and in line with the mariPOC results in 43% of the discordant samples studied. Two GAS culture-positive samples were negative by the mariPOC test. The prevalences of GAS in the control subjects were 2% and 6% by culture and mariPOC results, respectively. We conclude that the mariPOC antigen detection test is more sensitive than the conventional bacterial culture for the detection of GAS among symptomatic pharyngitis patients. The higher prevalence of GAS by the mariPOC test among symptomatic patients was probably not due to carriership, since among the control patients, the difference in the prevalence of GAS by the mariPOC test and culture was not nearly as high, 15% versus 4%, respectively. Clinical trials are needed to show the clinical importance of our findings. PMID:25903570

  2. A point-of-care testing system with Love-wave sensor and immunogold staining enhancement for early detection of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yingchang; Zhang, Xi; An, Chao; Ran, Chunxue; Ying, Kejing; Wang, Ping

    2014-12-01

    It has been reported that detection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is available for studies of pulmonary diseases, especially lung disease. In order to detect lung cancer (LC) at early stage, a point-of-care testing system suitable for measurement of tumor markers in EBC is developed. The assay, based on gold nanoparticle sandwich immunoassay and subsequent gold staining, was performed on a Love-wave sensor packaged inside a chip cartridge. Benefit from high sensitivity of Love-wave sensor, oriented immobilization of coating antibodies and immunogold staining enhancement, the present immunosensor could provide a sensitive, specific and rapid measurement. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), neuron specific enolase (NSE) and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC) in EBC collected from 17 patients with LC and 13 healthy volunteers were detected by this system. Results were compared with commercial chemiluminescence immunoassay and showed high correlation between two methods. Additionally, it revealed significantly statistical differences existing between two groups of subjects. These results indicate that the present system is suitable for detection of tumor markers in EBC and could be used as assistant tools for early detection of LC.

  3. The reliability of point-of-care prothrombin time testing. A comparison of CoaguChek S and XS INR measurements with hospital laboratory monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ryan, F; O'Shea, S; Byrne, S

    2010-02-01

    The development of point-of-care (POC) testing devices enables patients to test their own international normalized ratio (INR) at home. However, previous studies have shown that when compared with clinical laboratory values, statistically significant differences may occur between the two methods of INR measurement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the CoaguChek S and XS POC meters relative to clinical laboratory measurements. As part of a randomized, crossover patient self-testing (PST) study at Cork University Hospital, patients were randomized to 6 months PST or 6 months routine care by the anticoagulation management service. During the PST arm of the study, patients measured their INR at home using the CoaguChek S or XS POC meter. External quality control was performed at enrollment, 2 months and 4 months by comparing the POC measured INR with the laboratory determined value. One hundred and fifty-one patients provided 673 paired samples. Good correlation was shown between the two methods of determination (r = 0.91), however, statistically significant differences did occur. A Bland-Altman plot illustrated good agreement of INR values between 2.0 and 3.5 INR units but there was increasing disagreement as the INR rose above 3.5. Eighty-seven per cent of all dual measurements were within the recommended 0.5 INR units of each other. This study adds to the growing evidence that POC testing is a reliable and safe alternative to hospital laboratory monitoring but highlights the importance of external quality control when these devices are used for monitoring oral anticoagulation.

  4. Impact on ART initiation of point-of-care CD4 testing at HIV diagnosis among HIV-positive youth in Khayelitsha, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Gabriela EM; Wilkinson, Lynne; Conradie, Karien; Isaakidis, Petros; Harries, Anthony D; Edginton, Mary E; De Azevedo, Virginia; van Cutsem, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Despite the rapid expansion of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes in developing countries, pre-treatment losses from care remain a challenge to improving access to treatment. Youth and adolescents have been identified as a particularly vulnerable group, at greater risk of loss from both pre-ART and ART care. Point-of-care (POC) CD4 testing has shown promising results in improving linkage to ART care. In Khayelitsha township, South Africa, POC CD4 testing was implemented at a clinic designated for youth aged 12–25 years. We assessed whether there was an associated reduction in attrition between HIV testing, assessment for eligibility and ART initiation. Methods A before-and-after observational study was conducted using routinely collected data. These were collected on patients from May 2010 to April 2011 (Group A) when baseline CD4 count testing was performed in a laboratory and results were returned to the clinic within two weeks. Same-day POC CD4 testing was implemented in June 2011, and data were collected on patients from August 2011 to July 2012 (Group B). Results A total of 272 and 304 youth tested HIV-positive in Group A and Group B, respectively. Group B patients were twice as likely to have their ART eligibility assessed compared to Group A patients: 275 (90%) vs. 183 (67%) [relative risk (RR)=2.4, 95% CI: 1.8–3.4, p<0.0001]. More patients in World Health Organization (WHO) Stage 1 disease (85% vs. 69%), with CD4 counts≥350 cells/µL (58% vs. 35%) and more males (13% vs. 7%) were detected in Group B. The proportion of eligible patients who initiated ART was 50% and 44% (p=0.6) in Groups B and A, respectively; and 50% and 43% (p=0.5) when restricted to patients with baseline CD4 count≤250 cells/µL. Time between HIV-testing and ART initiation was reduced from 36 to 28 days (p=0.6). Discussion POC CD4 testing significantly improved assessment for ART eligibility. The improvement in the proportion initiating ART and the reduction in

  5. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of point-of-care tests for the detection of hyperketonemia in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Tatone, Elise H; Gordon, Jessica L; Hubbs, Jessie; LeBlanc, Stephen J; DeVries, Trevor J; Duffield, Todd F

    2016-08-01

    Several rapid tests for use on farm have been validated for the detection of hyperketonemia (HK) in dairy cattle, however the reported sensitivity and specificity of each method varies and no single study has compared them all. Meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy is becoming more common in human medical literature but there are few veterinary examples. The objective of this work was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the point-of-care testing method with the highest combined sensitivity and specificity, the optimal threshold for each method, and to identify gaps in the literature. A comprehensive literature search resulted in 5196 references. After removing duplicates and performing relevance screening, 23 studies were included for the qualitative synthesis and 18 for the meta-analysis. The three index tests evaluated in the meta-analysis were: the Precision Xtra(®) handheld device measuring beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) concentration in whole blood, and Ketostix(®) and KetoTest(®) semi-quantitative strips measuring the concentration of acetoacetate in urine and BHB in milk, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of the 3 index tests relative to the reference standard measurement of BHB in serum or whole blood between 1.0-1.4mmol/L was compared using the hierarchical summary receiver operator characteristic (HSROC) method. Subgroup analysis was conducted for each index test to examine the accuracy at different thresholds. The impact of the reference standard threshold, the reference standard method, the prevalence of HK in the population, the primary study source and risk of bias of the primary study was explored using meta-regression. The Precision Xtra(®) device had the highest summary sensitivity in whole blood BHB at 1.2mmol/L, 94.8% (CI95%: 92.6-97.0), and specificity, 97.5% (CI95%: 96.9-98.1). The threshold employed (1.2-1.4mmol/L) did not impact the diagnostic accuracy of the test. The Ketostix(®) and KetoTest(®) strips had

  6. Scaling Down to Scale Up: A Health Economic Analysis of Integrating Point-of-Care Syphilis Testing into Antenatal Care in Zambia during Pilot and National Rollout Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Ncube, Alexander Tshaka; Sweeney, Sedona; Fleischer, Colette; Mumba, Grace Tembo; Gill, Michelle M.; Strasser, Susan; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Terris-Prestholt, Fern

    2015-01-01

    Maternal syphilis results in an estimated 500,000 stillbirths and neonatal deaths annually in Sub-Saharan Africa. Despite the existence of national guidelines for antenatal syphilis screening, syphilis testing is often limited by inadequate laboratory and staff services. Recent availability of inexpensive rapid point-of-care syphilis tests (RST) can improve access to antenatal syphilis screening. A 2010 pilot in Zambia explored the feasibility of integrating RST within prevention of mother-to-child-transmission of HIV services. Following successful demonstration, the Zambian Ministry of Health adopted RSTs into national policy in 2011. Cost data from the pilot and 2012 preliminary national rollout were extracted from project records, antenatal registers, clinic staff interviews, and facility observations, with the aim of assessing the cost and quality implications of scaling up a successful pilot into a national rollout. Start-up, capital, and recurrent cost inputs were collected, including costs of extensive supervision and quality monitoring during the pilot. Costs were analysed from a provider’s perspective, incremental to existing antenatal services. Total and unit costs were calculated and a multivariate sensitivity analysis was performed. Our accompanying qualitative study by Ansbro et al. (2015) elucidated quality assurance and supervisory system challenges experienced during rollout, which helped explain key cost drivers. The average unit cost per woman screened during rollout ($11.16) was more than triple the pilot unit cost ($3.19). While quality assurance costs were much lower during rollout, the increased unit costs can be attributed to several factors, including higher RST prices and lower RST coverage during rollout, which reduced economies of scale. Pilot and rollout cost drivers differed due to implementation decisions related to training, supervision, and quality assurance. This study explored the cost of integrating RST into antenatal care in

  7. Scaling Down to Scale Up: A Health Economic Analysis of Integrating Point-of-Care Syphilis Testing into Antenatal Care in Zambia during Pilot and National Rollout Implementation.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Katharine D; Ansbro, Éimhín M; Ncube, Alexander Tshaka; Sweeney, Sedona; Fleischer, Colette; Tembo Mumba, Grace; Gill, Michelle M; Strasser, Susan; Peeling, Rosanna W; Terris-Prestholt, Fern

    2015-01-01

    Maternal syphilis results in an estimated 500,000 stillbirths and neonatal deaths annually in Sub-Saharan Africa. Despite the existence of national guidelines for antenatal syphilis screening, syphilis testing is often limited by inadequate laboratory and staff services. Recent availability of inexpensive rapid point-of-care syphilis tests (RST) can improve access to antenatal syphilis screening. A 2010 pilot in Zambia explored the feasibility of integrating RST within prevention of mother-to-child-transmission of HIV services. Following successful demonstration, the Zambian Ministry of Health adopted RSTs into national policy in 2011. Cost data from the pilot and 2012 preliminary national rollout were extracted from project records, antenatal registers, clinic staff interviews, and facility observations, with the aim of assessing the cost and quality implications of scaling up a successful pilot into a national rollout. Start-up, capital, and recurrent cost inputs were collected, including costs of extensive supervision and quality monitoring during the pilot. Costs were analysed from a provider's perspective, incremental to existing antenatal services. Total and unit costs were calculated and a multivariate sensitivity analysis was performed. Our accompanying qualitative study by Ansbro et al. (2015) elucidated quality assurance and supervisory system challenges experienced during rollout, which helped explain key cost drivers. The average unit cost per woman screened during rollout ($11.16) was more than triple the pilot unit cost ($3.19). While quality assurance costs were much lower during rollout, the increased unit costs can be attributed to several factors, including higher RST prices and lower RST coverage during rollout, which reduced economies of scale. Pilot and rollout cost drivers differed due to implementation decisions related to training, supervision, and quality assurance. This study explored the cost of integrating RST into antenatal care in

  8. Scaling Down to Scale Up: A Health Economic Analysis of Integrating Point-of-Care Syphilis Testing into Antenatal Care in Zambia during Pilot and National Rollout Implementation.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Katharine D; Ansbro, Éimhín M; Ncube, Alexander Tshaka; Sweeney, Sedona; Fleischer, Colette; Tembo Mumba, Grace; Gill, Michelle M; Strasser, Susan; Peeling, Rosanna W; Terris-Prestholt, Fern

    2015-01-01

    Maternal syphilis results in an estimated 500,000 stillbirths and neonatal deaths annually in Sub-Saharan Africa. Despite the existence of national guidelines for antenatal syphilis screening, syphilis testing is often limited by inadequate laboratory and staff services. Recent availability of inexpensive rapid point-of-care syphilis tests (RST) can improve access to antenatal syphilis screening. A 2010 pilot in Zambia explored the feasibility of integrating RST within prevention of mother-to-child-transmission of HIV services. Following successful demonstration, the Zambian Ministry of Health adopted RSTs into national policy in 2011. Cost data from the pilot and 2012 preliminary national rollout were extracted from project records, antenatal registers, clinic staff interviews, and facility observations, with the aim of assessing the cost and quality implications of scaling up a successful pilot into a national rollout. Start-up, capital, and recurrent cost inputs were collected, including costs of extensive supervision and quality monitoring during the pilot. Costs were analysed from a provider's perspective, incremental to existing antenatal services. Total and unit costs were calculated and a multivariate sensitivity analysis was performed. Our accompanying qualitative study by Ansbro et al. (2015) elucidated quality assurance and supervisory system challenges experienced during rollout, which helped explain key cost drivers. The average unit cost per woman screened during rollout ($11.16) was more than triple the pilot unit cost ($3.19). While quality assurance costs were much lower during rollout, the increased unit costs can be attributed to several factors, including higher RST prices and lower RST coverage during rollout, which reduced economies of scale. Pilot and rollout cost drivers differed due to implementation decisions related to training, supervision, and quality assurance. This study explored the cost of integrating RST into antenatal care in

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of a point-of-care urine test for tuberculosis screening among newly-diagnosed hiv-infected adults: a prospective, clinic-based study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A rapid diagnostic test for active tuberculosis (TB) at the clinical point-of-care could expedite case detection and accelerate TB treatment initiation. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of a rapid urine lipoarabinomannan (LAM) test for TB screening among HIV-infected adults in a TB-endemic setting. Methods We prospectively enrolled newly-diagnosed HIV-infected adults (≥18 years) at 4 outpatient clinics in Durban from Oct 2011-May 2012, excluding those on TB therapy. A physician evaluated all participants and offered CD4 cell count testing. Trained study nurses collected a sputum sample for acid-fast bacilli smear microscopy (AFB) and mycobacterial culture, and performed urine LAM testing using Determine™ TB LAM in the clinic. The presence of a band regardless of intensity on the urine LAM test was considered positive. We defined as the gold standard for active pulmonary TB a positive sputum culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Diagnostic accuracy of urine LAM was assessed, alone and in combination with smear microscopy, and stratified by CD4 cell count. Results Among 342 newly-diagnosed HIV-infected participants, 190 (56%) were male, mean age was 35.6 years, and median CD4 was 182/mm3. Sixty participants had culture-positive pulmonary TB, resulting in an estimated prevalence of 17.5% (95% CI 13.7-22.0%). Forty-five (13.2%) participants were urine LAM positive. Mean time from urine specimen collection to LAM test result was 40 minutes (95% CI 34–46 minutes). Urine LAM test sensitivity was 28.3% (95% CI 17.5-41.4) overall, and 37.5% (95% CI 21.1-56.3) for those with CD4 count <100/mm3, while specificity was 90.1% (95% CI 86.0-93.3) overall, and 86.9% (95% CI 75.8-94.2) for those with CD4 < 100/mm3. When combined with sputum AFB (either test positive), sensitivity increased to 38.3% (95% CI 26.0-51.8), but specificity decreased to 85.8% (95% CI 81.1-89.7). Conclusions In this prospective, clinic-based study with trained nurses, a rapid

  10. Microfluidic Distance Readout Sweet Hydrogel Integrated Paper-Based Analytical Device (μDiSH-PAD) for Visual Quantitative Point-of-Care Testing.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaofeng; Tian, Tian; Jia, Shasha; Zhu, Zhi; Ma, Yanli; Sun, Jianjun; Lin, Zhenyu; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2016-02-16

    A disposable, equipment-free, versatile point-of-care testing platform, microfluidic distance readout sweet hydrogel integrated paper-based analytical device (μDiSH-PAD), was developed for portable quantitative detection of different types of targets. The platform relies on a target-responsive aptamer cross-linked hydrogel for target recognition, cascade enzymatic reactions for signal amplification, and microfluidic paper-based analytic devices (μPADs) for visual distance-based quantitative readout. A "sweet" hydrogel with trapped glucoamylase (GA) was synthesized using an aptamer as a cross-linker. When target is present in the sample, the "sweet" hydrogel collapses and releases enzyme GA into the sample, generating glucose by amylolysis. A hydrophilic channel on the μPADs is modified with glucose oxidase (GOx) and colorless 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) as the substrate. When glucose travels along the channel by capillary action, it is converted to H2O2 by GOx. In addition, DAB is converted into brown insoluble poly-3,3'-diaminobenzidine [poly(DAB)] by horseradish peroxidase, producing a visible brown bar, whose length is positively correlated to the concentration of targets. The distance-based visual quantitative platform can detect cocaine in urine with high selectivity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Because the target-induced cascade reaction is triggered by aptamer/target recognition, this method is widely suitable for different kinds of targets. With the advantages of low cost, ease of operation, general applicability, and disposability with quantitative readout, the μDiSH-PAD holds great potential for portable detection of trace targets in environmental monitoring, security inspection, personalized healthcare, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:26765320

  11. Antenatal Syphilis Screening Using Point-Of-Care Testing in Low- and Middle-Income Countries in Asia and Latin America: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuznik, Andreas; Muhumuza, Christine; Komakech, Henry; Marques, Elsa M. R.; Lamorde, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background Untreated syphilis in pregnancy is associated with adverse clinical outcomes to the infant. In low- and middle-income countries in Asia and Latin America, 20%-30% of women are not tested for syphilis during pregnancy. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of increasing the coverage for antenatal syphilis screening in 11 Asian and 20 Latin American countries, using a point-of-care immunochromatographic strip (ICS) test. Methods The decision analytical cost-effectiveness models reported incremental costs per disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted from the perspectives of the national health care payer. Clinical outcomes were stillbirths, neonatal deaths, and congenital syphilis. DALYs were computed using WHO disability weights. Costs included the ICS test, three injections of benzathine penicillin, and nurse wages. Country-specific inputs included the antenatal prevalence of syphilis and the proportion of women in the antenatal care setting that are screened for syphilis infection as reported in the 2014 WHO baseline report on global sexually transmitted infection surveillance. Country-specific data on the annual number of live births, proportion of women with at least one antenatal care visit, and per capita gross national income were also included in the model. Results The incremental cost/DALY averted of syphilis screening is US$53 (range: US$10-US$332; Prob<1*per capita GDP=99.71%) in Asia and US$60 (range: US$5-US$225; Prob<1*per capita GDP=99.77%) in Latin America. Universal screening may reduce the annual number of stillbirths by 20,344 and 4,270, neonatal deaths by 8,201 and 1,721, cases of congenital syphilis by 10,952 and 2,298, and avert 925,039 and 197,454 DALYs in the aggregate Asian and Latin American panel, respectively. Conclusion Antenatal syphilis screening is highly cost-effective in all the 11 Asian and 20 Latin American countries assessed. Our findings support the decision to expand syphilis screening in countries with currently

  12. Laboratory Evaluation of the Liat HIV Quant (IQuum) Whole-Blood and Plasma HIV-1 Viral Load Assays for Point-of-Care Testing in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gous, Natasha; Carmona, Sergio; Stevens, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) HIV viral load (VL) testing offers the potential to reduce turnaround times for antiretroviral therapy monitoring, offer near-patient acute HIV diagnosis in adults, extend existing centralized VL services, screen women in labor, and prompt pediatrics to early treatment. The Liat HIV Quant plasma and whole-blood assays, prerelease version, were evaluated in South Africa. The precision, accuracy, linearity, and agreement of the Liat HIV Quant whole-blood and plasma assays were compared to those of reference technologies (Roche CAP CTMv2.0 and Abbott RealTime HIV-1) on an HIV verification plasma panel (n = 42) and HIV clinical specimens (n = 163). HIV Quant plasma assay showed good performance, with a 2.7% similarity coefficient of variation (CV) compared to the Abbott assay and a 1.8% similarity CV compared to the Roche test on the verification panel, and 100% specificity. HIV Quant plasma had substantial agreement (pc [concordance correlation] = 0.96) with Roche on clinical specimens and increased variability (pc = 0.73) in the range of <3.0 log copies/ml range with the HIV Quant whole-blood assay. HIV Quant plasma assay had good linearity (2.0 to 5.0 log copies/ml; R2 = 0.99). Clinical sensitivity at a viral load of 1,000 copies/ml of the HIV Quant plasma and whole-blood assays compared to that of the Roche assay (n = 94) was 100% (confidence interval [CI], 95.3% to 100%). The specificity of HIV Quant plasma was 88.2% (CI, 63.6% to 98.5%), and that for whole blood was 41.2% (CI, 18.4% to 67.1%). No virological failure (downward misclassification) was missed. Liat HIV Quant plasma assay can be interchanged with existing VL technology in South Africa. Liat HIV Quant whole-blood assay would be advantageous for POC early infant diagnosis at birth and adult adherence monitoring and needs to be evaluated further in this clinical context. LIAT cartridges currently require cold storage, but the technology is user-friendly and robust. Clinical cost and

  13. “I Do Feel Like a Scientist at Times”: A Qualitative Study of the Acceptability of Molecular Point-Of-Care Testing for Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea to Primary Care Professionals in a Remote High STI Burden Setting

    PubMed Central

    Natoli, Lisa; Guy, Rebecca J.; Shephard, Mark; Causer, Louise; Badman, Steven G.; Hengel, Belinda; Tangey, Annie; Ward, James; Coburn, Tony; Anderson, David; Kaldor, John; Maher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Point-of-care tests for chlamydia (CT) and gonorrhoea (NG) could increase the uptake and timeliness of testing and treatment, contribute to improved disease control and reduce reproductive morbidity. The GeneXpert (Xpert CT/NG assay), suited to use at the point-of-care, is being used in the TTANGO randomised controlled trial (RCT) in 12 remote Australian health services with a high burden of sexually transmissible infections (STIs). This represents the first ever routine use of a molecular point-of-care diagnostic for STIs in primary care. The purpose of this study was to explore the acceptability of the GeneXpert to primary care staff in remote Australia. Methods In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 16 staff (registered or enrolled nurses and Aboriginal Health Workers/Practitioners) trained and experienced with GeneXpert testing. Interviews were digitally-recorded and transcribed verbatim prior to content analysis. Results Most participants displayed positive attitudes, indicating the test was both easy to use and useful in their clinical context. Participants indicated that point-of-care testing had improved management of STIs, resulting in more timely and targeted treatment, earlier commencement of partner notification, and reduced follow up efforts associated with client recall. Staff expressed confidence in point-of-care test results and treating patients on this basis, and reported greater job satisfaction. While point-of-care testing did not negatively impact on client flow, several found the manual documentation processes time consuming, suggesting that improved electronic connectivity and test result transfer between the GeneXpert and patient management systems could overcome this. Managing positive test results in a shorter time frame was challenging for some but most found it satisfying to complete episodes of care more quickly. Conclusions In the context of a RCT, health professionals working in remote primary care in Australia

  14. Sequential simulation (SqS) of clinical pathways: a tool for public and patient engagement in point-of-care diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Huddy, Jeremy R; Weldon, Sharon-Marie; Ralhan, Shvaita; Painter, Tim; Hanna, George B; Kneebone, Roger; Bello, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Public and patient engagement (PPE) is fundamental to healthcare research. To facilitate effective engagement in novel point-of-care tests (POCTs), the test and downstream consequences of the result need to be considered. Sequential simulation (SqS) is a tool to represent patient journeys and the effects of intervention at each and subsequent stages. This case study presents a process evaluation of SqS as a tool for PPE in the development of a volatile organic compound-based breath test POCT for the diagnosis of oesophagogastric (OG) cancer. Setting Three 3-hour workshops in central London. Participants 38 members of public attended a workshop, 26 (68%) had no prior experience of the OG cancer diagnostic pathway. Interventions Clinical pathway SqS was developed from a storyboard of a patient, played by an actor, noticing symptoms of oesophageal cancer and following a typical diagnostic pathway. The proposed breath testing strategy was then introduced and incorporated into a second SqS to demonstrate pathway impact. Facilitated group discussions followed each SqS. Primary and secondary outcome measures Evaluation was conducted through pre-event and postevent questionnaires, field notes and analysis of audiovisual recordings. Results 38 participants attended a workshop. All participants agreed they were able to contribute to discussions and like the idea of an OG cancer breath test. Five themes emerged related to the proposed new breath test including awareness of OG cancer, barriers to testing and diagnosis, design of new test device, new clinical pathway and placement of test device. 3 themes emerged related to the use of SqS: participatory engagement, simulation and empathetic engagement, and why participants attended. Conclusions SqS facilitated a shared immersive experience for participants and researchers that led to the coconstruction of knowledge that will guide future research activities and be of value to stakeholders concerned with the invention

  15. An integrated lateral flow assay for effective DNA amplification and detection at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Gong, Yan; Feng, Shangsheng; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-05-10

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) have been extensively explored in nucleic acid testing (NAT) for medical diagnostics, food safety analysis and environmental monitoring. However, the amount of target nucleic acid in a raw sample is usually too low to be directly detected by LFAs, necessitating the process of amplification. Even though cost-effective paper-based amplification techniques have been introduced, they have always been separately performed from LFAs, hence increasing the risk of reagent loss and cross-contaminations. To date, integrating paper-based nucleic acid amplification into colorimetric LFA in a simple, portable and cost-effective manner has not been introduced. Herein, we developed an integrated LFA with the aid of a specially designed handheld battery-powered system for effective amplification and detection of targets in resource-poor settings. Interestingly, using the integrated paper-based loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-LFA, we successfully performed highly sensitive and specific target detection, achieving a detection limit of as low as 3 × 10(3) copies of target DNA, which is comparable to the conventional tube-based LAMP-LFA in an unintegrated format. The device may serve in conjunction with a simple paper-based sample preparation to create a fully integrated paper-based sample-to-answer diagnostic device for point-of-care testing (POCT) in the near future. PMID:27010033

  16. Anesthesiology Point of Care project.

    PubMed

    McDonald, John S; Noback, Carl R; Cheng, Drew; Lee, T K; Nenov, Val

    2002-01-01

    We are developing a dynamic prototype visual communication system for the operating room environs. This has classically been viewed as an isolated and impenetrable workplace. All medical experiences and all teaching remain in a one to one closed loop with no recall or subsequent sharing for the training and education of other colleagues. The "Anesthesia Point of Care" (APOC) concept embraces the sharing of, recording of, and presentation of various physiological and pharmacological events so that real time memory can be shared at a later time for the edification of other colleagues who were not present at the time of the primary learning event. In addition it also provides a remarkably rapid tool for fellow faculty to respond to obvious stress and crisis events that can be broadcast instantly at the time of happening. Finally, it also serves as an efficient and effective means of paging and general communication throughout the daily routines among various healthcare providers in anesthesiology who work as a team unit; these include the staff, residents, CRNAs, physician assistants, and technicians. This system offers a unique opportunity to eventually develop future advanced ideas that can include training exercises, presurgical evaluations, surgical scheduling and improvements in efficiency based upon earlier than expected case completion or conversely later than expected case completion and even as a unique window to development of improved billing itemization and coordination.

  17. Combining rapid diagnostic tests and dried blood spot assays for point-of-care testing of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections in Burkina Faso, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Kania, D; Bekalé, A M; Nagot, N; Mondain, A-M; Ottomani, L; Meda, N; Traoré, M; Ouédraogo, J B; Ducos, J; Van de Perre, P; Tuaillon, E

    2013-12-01

    People screened for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) in Africa remain generally unaware of their status for hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) infections. We evaluated a two-step screening strategy in Burkina Faso, using both HIV RDTs and Dried Blood Spot (DBS) assays to confirm an HIV-positive test, and to test for HBV and HCV infections. HIV counselling and point-of-care testing were performed at a voluntary counselling and testing centre with HBV, HCV status and HIV confirmation using DBS specimens, being assessed at a central laboratory. Serological testing on plasma was used as the reference standard assay to control for the performance of DBS assays. Nineteen out of 218 participants included in the study were positive for HIV using RDTs. A fourth-generation HIV ELISA and immunoblot assays on DBS confirmed HIV status. Twenty-four out of 25 participants infected with HBV were found positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) using DBS. One sample with a low HBsAg concentration on plasma was not detected on DBS. Five participants tested positive for HCV antibodies were confirmed positive with an immunoblot assay using DBS specimens. Laboratory results were communicated within 7 days to participants with no loss to follow up of participants between the first and second post-test counselling sessions. In conclusion, DBS collection during HIV point-of-care testing enables screening and confirmation of HBV, HCV and HIV infections. Diagnosis using DBS may assist with implementation of national programmes for HBV, HCV and HIV screening and clinical care in middle- to low-income countries. PMID:23902574

  18. Development of Point of Care Testing Device for Neurovascular Coupling From Simultaneous Recording of EEG and NIRS During Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Utkarsh; Sood, Mehak; Dutta, Anirban; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a point of care testing device for neurovascular coupling (NVC) from simultaneous recording of electroencephalogram (EEG) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Here, anodal tDCS modulated cortical neural activity leading to hemodynamic response can be used to identify the impaired cerebral microvessels functionality. The impairments in the cerebral microvessels functionality may lead to impairments in the cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), where severely reduced CVR predicts the chances of transient ischemic attack and ipsilateral stroke. The neural and hemodynamic responses to anodal tDCS were studied through joint imaging with EEG and NIRS, where NIRS provided optical measurement of changes in tissue oxy-(\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$HbO2)$ \\end{document} and deoxy-(\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$Hb$ \\end{document}) hemoglobin concentration and EEG captured alterations in the underlying neuronal current generators. Then, a cross-correlation method for the assessment of NVC underlying the site of anodal tDCS is presented. The feasibility studies on healthy subjects and stroke survivors showed detectable changes in the EEG and the NIRS responses to a 0.526 A/\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\mathrm{m}^{2}$ \\end{document} of anodal tDCS. The NIRS system

  19. Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network laboratory guidelines for the use of serological tests (excluding point-of-care tests) for the diagnosis of syphilis in Canada.

    PubMed

    Levett, Paul N; Fonseca, Kevin; Tsang, Raymond Sw; Kadkhoda, Kamran; Serhir, Bouchra; Radons, Sandra M; Morshed, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis, caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, is an infection recognized since antiquity. It was first reported at the end of the 15th century in Europe. Infections may be sexually transmitted as well as spread from an infected mother to her fetus or through blood transfusions. The laboratory diagnosis of syphilis infection is complex. Because this organism cannot be cultured, serology is used as the principal diagnostic method. Some of the issues related to serological diagnoses are that antibodies take time to appear after infection, and serology screening tests require several secondary confirmatory tests that can produce complex results needing interpretation by experts in the field. Traditionally, syphilis screening was performed using either rapid plasma reagin or Venereal Disease Research Laboratory tests, and confirmed by treponemal tests such as MHA-TP, TPPA or FTA-Abs. Currently, that trend is reversed, ie, most of the laboratories in Canada now screen for syphilis using treponemal enzyme immunoassays and confirm the status of infection using rapid plasma reagin or Venereal Disease Research Laboratory tests; this approach is often referred to as the reverse algorithm. This chapter reviews guidelines for specimen types and sample collection, treponemal and non-treponemal tests utilized in Canada, the current status of serological tests for syphilis in Canada, the complexity of serological diagnosis of syphilis infection and serological testing algorithms. Both traditional and reverse sequence algorithms are recommended and the algorithm used should be based on a combination of local disease epidemiology, test volumes, performance of the proposed assays and available resources.

  20. A Colorimetric Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) Detection Platform for a Point-of-Care Dengue Detection System on a Lab-on-Compact-Disc.

    PubMed

    Thiha, Aung; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) is the gold standard clinical diagnostic tool for the detection and quantification of protein biomarkers. However, conventional ELISA tests have drawbacks in their requirement of time, expensive equipment and expertise for operation. Hence, for the purpose of rapid, high throughput screening and point-of-care diagnosis, researchers are miniaturizing sandwich ELISA procedures on Lab-on-a-Chip and Lab-on-Compact Disc (LOCD) platforms. This paper presents a novel integrated device to detect and interpret the ELISA test results on a LOCD platform. The system applies absorption spectrophotometry to measure the absorbance (optical density) of the sample using a monochromatic light source and optical sensor. The device performs automated analysis of the results and presents absorbance values and diagnostic test results via a graphical display or via Bluetooth to a smartphone platform which also acts as controller of the device. The efficacy of the device was evaluated by performing dengue antibody IgG ELISA on 64 hospitalized patients suspected of dengue. The results demonstrate high accuracy of the device, with 95% sensitivity and 100% specificity in detection when compared with gold standard commercial ELISA microplate readers. This sensor platform represents a significant step towards establishing ELISA as a rapid, inexpensive and automatic testing method for the purpose of point-of-care-testing (POCT) in resource-limited settings.

  1. A Colorimetric Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) Detection Platform for a Point-of-Care Dengue Detection System on a Lab-on-Compact-Disc

    PubMed Central

    Thiha, Aung; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) is the gold standard clinical diagnostic tool for the detection and quantification of protein biomarkers. However, conventional ELISA tests have drawbacks in their requirement of time, expensive equipment and expertise for operation. Hence, for the purpose of rapid, high throughput screening and point-of-care diagnosis, researchers are miniaturizing sandwich ELISA procedures on Lab-on-a-Chip and Lab-on-Compact Disc (LOCD) platforms. This paper presents a novel integrated device to detect and interpret the ELISA test results on a LOCD platform. The system applies absorption spectrophotometry to measure the absorbance (optical density) of the sample using a monochromatic light source and optical sensor. The device performs automated analysis of the results and presents absorbance values and diagnostic test results via a graphical display or via Bluetooth to a smartphone platform which also acts as controller of the device. The efficacy of the device was evaluated by performing dengue antibody IgG ELISA on 64 hospitalized patients suspected of dengue. The results demonstrate high accuracy of the device, with 95% sensitivity and 100% specificity in detection when compared with gold standard commercial ELISA microplate readers. This sensor platform represents a significant step towards establishing ELISA as a rapid, inexpensive and automatic testing method for the purpose of point-of-care-testing (POCT) in resource-limited settings. PMID:25993517

  2. Point of Care Assessment of Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Hyatt, Clare E; Brainard, Benjamin M

    2016-03-01

    Disorders of hemostasis can be difficult to fully elucidate but can severely affect patient outcome. The optimal therapy for coagulopathies is also not always clear. Point of care (POC) testing in veterinary medicine can assist in the diagnosis of hemostatic disorders and also direct treatment. Advantages of POC testing include rapid turnaround times, ease of use, and proximity to the patient. Disadvantages include differences in analytic performance compared with reference laboratory devices, the potential for operator error, and limited test options per device. Conventional coagulation tests such as prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and activated clotting time can be measured by POC devices and can accurately diagnose hypocoagulability, but they cannot detect hypercoagulability or disorders of fibrinolysis. Viscoelastic POC coagulation testing more accurately evaluates in vivo coagulation, and can detect hypocoagulability, hypercoagulability, and alterations in fibrinolysis. POC platelet function testing methodologies can detect platelet adhesion abnormalities including von Willebrand disease, and can be used to monitor the efficacy of antiplatelet drugs. It is unlikely that a single test would be ideal for assessing the complete coagulation status of all patients; therefore, the ideal combination of tests for a specific patient needs to be determined based on an understanding of the underlying disease, and protocols must be standardized to minimize interoperator and interinstitutional variability.

  3. Point of Care Assessment of Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Hyatt, Clare E; Brainard, Benjamin M

    2016-03-01

    Disorders of hemostasis can be difficult to fully elucidate but can severely affect patient outcome. The optimal therapy for coagulopathies is also not always clear. Point of care (POC) testing in veterinary medicine can assist in the diagnosis of hemostatic disorders and also direct treatment. Advantages of POC testing include rapid turnaround times, ease of use, and proximity to the patient. Disadvantages include differences in analytic performance compared with reference laboratory devices, the potential for operator error, and limited test options per device. Conventional coagulation tests such as prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and activated clotting time can be measured by POC devices and can accurately diagnose hypocoagulability, but they cannot detect hypercoagulability or disorders of fibrinolysis. Viscoelastic POC coagulation testing more accurately evaluates in vivo coagulation, and can detect hypocoagulability, hypercoagulability, and alterations in fibrinolysis. POC platelet function testing methodologies can detect platelet adhesion abnormalities including von Willebrand disease, and can be used to monitor the efficacy of antiplatelet drugs. It is unlikely that a single test would be ideal for assessing the complete coagulation status of all patients; therefore, the ideal combination of tests for a specific patient needs to be determined based on an understanding of the underlying disease, and protocols must be standardized to minimize interoperator and interinstitutional variability. PMID:27451044

  4. Point-of-Care Glucose and Ketone Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chong, Siew Kim; Reineke, Erica L

    2016-03-01

    Early and rapid identification of hypo- and hyperglycemia as well as ketosis is essential for the practicing veterinarian as these conditions can be life threatening and require emergent treatment. Point-of-care testing for both glucose and ketone is available for clinical use and it is important for the veterinarian to understand the limitations and potential sources of error with these tests. This article discusses the devices used to monitor blood glucose including portable blood glucose meters, point-of-care blood gas analyzers and continuous glucose monitoring systems. Ketone monitoring options discussed include the nitroprusside reagent test strips and the 3-β-hydroxybutyrate ketone meter. PMID:27451045

  5. [Analysis of the Cochrane review: biomarkers as point-of-care tests to guide prescription of antibiotics in patients with acute respiratory infections in primary care. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014,11:CD10130].

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Pedro; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the most frequent reason for prescribing antibiotics in primary health care. Since most acute respiratory infections are of viral or non-severe bacterial etiology, the use of antibiotics is not beneficial and exposes patients to side effects. In addition, the undifferentiated prescription of this drug group increases antibiotic resistance and promotes: 1. increased costs for health systems; 2. failure to future treatments, increased morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases. In the appropriate clinical setting, the use of biomarkers as point-of-care tests to assess the acute phase response to injury of tissue / organ, is a strategy in the therapeutic management of patients with acute respiratory infections in outpatient context. This Cochrane review compared the prescription of antibiotics to acute respiratory infections based: 1. exclusively in the clinic; 2. Iinn the use of biomarkers as point-of-care tests (eg C-reactive protein). The C-reactive protein in quick test seems to be associated with reduced use of antibiotics, however, there has not been a reduction in the lenght of treatment or the perception of recovery by the patient. There may be an increase of hospitalizations compared with the group of patients without the biomarker use; no mortality was register in either group.

  6. Surface Tension Triggered Wetting and Point of Care Sensor Design.

    PubMed

    Falde, Eric J; Yohe, Stefan T; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-08-01

    Rapid, simple, and inexpensive point-of-care (POC) medical tests are of significant need around the world. The transition between nonwetting and wetted states is used to create instrument-free surface tension sensors for POC diagnosis, using a layered electrospun mesh with incorporated dye to change color upon wetting.

  7. How to estimate the cost of point-of-care CD4 testing in program settings: an example using the Alere Pima Analyzer in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Larson, Bruce; Schnippel, Kathryn; Ndibongo, Buyiswa; Long, Lawrence; Fox, Matthew P; Rosen, Sydney

    2012-01-01

    Integrating POC CD4 testing technologies into HIV counseling and testing (HCT) programs may improve post-HIV testing linkage to care and treatment. As evaluations of these technologies in program settings continue, estimates of the costs of POC CD4 tests to the service provider will be needed and estimates have begun to be reported. Without a consistent and transparent methodology, estimates of the cost per CD4 test using POC technologies are likely to be difficult to compare and may lead to erroneous conclusions about costs and cost-effectiveness. This paper provides a step-by-step approach for estimating the cost per CD4 test from a provider's perspective. As an example, the approach is applied to one specific POC technology, the Pima Analyzer. The costing approach is illustrated with data from a mobile HCT program in Gauteng Province of South Africa. For this program, the cost per test in 2010 was estimated at $23.76 (material costs  = $8.70; labor cost per test  = $7.33; and equipment, insurance, and daily quality control  = $7.72). Labor and equipment costs can vary widely depending on how the program operates and the number of CD4 tests completed over time. Additional costs not included in the above analysis, for on-going training, supervision, and quality control, are likely to increase further the cost per test. The main contribution of this paper is to outline a methodology for estimating the costs of incorporating POC CD4 testing technologies into an HCT program. The details of the program setting matter significantly for the cost estimate, so that such details should be clearly documented to improve the consistency, transparency, and comparability of cost estimates.

  8. Introduction of Syphilis Point-of-Care Tests, from Pilot Study to National Programme Implementation in Zambia: A Qualitative Study of Healthcare Workers’ Perspectives on Testing, Training and Quality Assurance

    PubMed Central

    Ansbro, Éimhín M.; Gill, Michelle M.; Reynolds, Joanna; Shelley, Katharine D.; Strasser, Susan; Sripipatana, Tabitha; Ncube, Alexander Tshaka; Tembo Mumba, Grace; Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Peeling, Rosanna W.; Mabey, David

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis affects 1.4 million pregnant women globally each year. Maternal syphilis causes congenital syphilis in over half of affected pregnancies, leading to early foetal loss, pregnancy complications, stillbirth and neonatal death. Syphilis is under-diagnosed in pregnant women. Point-of-care rapid syphilis tests (RST) allow for same-day treatment and address logistical barriers to testing encountered with standard Rapid Plasma Reagin testing. Recent literature emphasises successful introduction of new health technologies requires healthcare worker (HCW) acceptance, effective training, quality monitoring and robust health systems. Following a successful pilot, the Zambian Ministry of Health (MoH) adopted RST into policy, integrating them into prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV clinics in four underserved Zambian districts. We compare HCW experiences, including challenges encountered in scaling up from a highly supported NGO-led pilot to a large-scale MoH-led national programme. Questionnaires were administered through structured interviews of 16 HCWs in two pilot districts and 24 HCWs in two different rollout districts. Supplementary data were gathered via stakeholder interviews, clinic registers and supervisory visits. Using a conceptual framework adapted from health technology literature, we explored RST acceptance and usability. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Key themes in qualitative data were explored using template analysis. Overall, HCWs accepted RST as learnable, suitable, effective tools to improve antenatal services, which were usable in diverse clinical settings. Changes in training, supervision and quality monitoring models between pilot and rollout may have influenced rollout HCW acceptance and compromised testing quality. While quality monitoring was integrated into national policy and training, implementation was limited during rollout despite financial support and mentorship. We illustrate that new

  9. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Performance of Two Point of Care Typhoid Fever Tests, Tubex TF and Typhidot, in Endemic Countries

    PubMed Central

    Thriemer, Kamala; Ley, Benedikt; Menten, Joris; Jacobs, Jan; van den Ende, Jef

    2013-01-01

    Background In the absence of well-equipped laboratory infrastructure in many developing countries the accurate diagnosis of typhoid fever is challenging. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) with good performance indicators would be helpful to improve clinical management of suspected cases. We performed a systematic literature review and meta- analysis to determine the performance of TUBEX TF and Typhidot for the diagnosis of typhoid fever using PRISMA guidelines. Methods Titles and abstracts were reviewed for relevance. Articles were screened for language, reference method and completeness. Studies were categorized according to control groups used. Meta-analysis was performed only for categories where enough data was available to combine sensitivity and specificity estimates. Sub-analysis was performed for the Typhidot test to determine the influence of indeterminate results on test performance. Results A total of seven studies per test were included. The sensitivity of TUBEX TF ranged between 56% and 95%, Specificity between 72% and 95%. Meta-analysis showed an average sensitivity of 69% (95%CI: 45–85) and an average specificity of 88% (CI95%:83–91). A formal meta-analysis for Typhidot was not possible due to limited data available. Across the extracted studies, sensitivity and specificity estimates ranged from 56% to 84% and 31% to 97% respectively. Conclusion The observed performance does not support the use of either rapid diagnostic test exclusively as the basis for diagnosis and treatment. There is a need to develop an RDT for typhoid fever that has a performance level comparable to malaria RDTs. PMID:24358109

  10. Evaluation of a point-of-care blood test for identification of Ebola virus disease at Ebola holding units, Western Area, Sierra Leone, January to February 2015.

    PubMed

    Walker, N F; Brown, C S; Youkee, D; Baker, P; Williams, N; Kalawa, A; Russell, K; Samba, A F; Bentley, N; Koroma, F; King, M B; Parker, B E; Thompson, M; Boyles, T; Healey, B; Kargbo, B; Bash-Taqi, D; Simpson, A J; Kamara, A; Kamara, T B; Lado, M; Johnson, O; Brooks, T

    2015-01-01

    Current Ebola virus disease (EVD) diagnosis relies on reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) technology, requiring skilled laboratory personnel and technical infrastructure. Lack of laboratory diagnostic capacity has led to diagnostic delays in the current West African EVD outbreak of 2014 and 2015, compromising outbreak control. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the EVD bedside rapid diagnostic antigen test (RDT) developed by the United Kingdom's Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, compared with Ebola virus RT-PCR, in an operational setting for EVD diagnosis of suspected cases admitted to Ebola holding units in the Western Area of Sierra Leone. From 22 January to 16 February 2015, 138 participants were enrolled. EVD prevalence was 11.5%. All EVD cases were identified by a positive RDT with a test line score of 6 or more, giving a sensitivity of 100% (95% confidence interval (CI): 78.2-100). The corresponding specificity was high (96.6%, 95% CI: 91.3-99.1). The positive and negative predictive values for the population prevalence were 79.0% (95% CI: 54.4-93.8) and 100% (95% CI: 96.7-100), respectively. These results, if confirmed in a larger study, suggest that this RDT could be used as a 'rule-out' screening test for EVD to improve rapid case identification and resource allocation. PMID:25846490

  11. Evaluation of a point-of-care blood test for identification of Ebola virus disease at Ebola holding units, Western Area, Sierra Leone, January to February 2015.

    PubMed

    Walker, N F; Brown, C S; Youkee, D; Baker, P; Williams, N; Kalawa, A; Russell, K; Samba, A F; Bentley, N; Koroma, F; King, M B; Parker, B E; Thompson, M; Boyles, T; Healey, B; Kargbo, B; Bash-Taqi, D; Simpson, A J; Kamara, A; Kamara, T B; Lado, M; Johnson, O; Brooks, T

    2015-03-26

    Current Ebola virus disease (EVD) diagnosis relies on reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) technology, requiring skilled laboratory personnel and technical infrastructure. Lack of laboratory diagnostic capacity has led to diagnostic delays in the current West African EVD outbreak of 2014 and 2015, compromising outbreak control. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the EVD bedside rapid diagnostic antigen test (RDT) developed by the United Kingdom's Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, compared with Ebola virus RT-PCR, in an operational setting for EVD diagnosis of suspected cases admitted to Ebola holding units in the Western Area of Sierra Leone. From 22 January to 16 February 2015, 138 participants were enrolled. EVD prevalence was 11.5%. All EVD cases were identified by a positive RDT with a test line score of 6 or more, giving a sensitivity of 100% (95% confidence interval (CI): 78.2-100). The corresponding specificity was high (96.6%, 95% CI: 91.3-99.1). The positive and negative predictive values for the population prevalence were 79.0% (95% CI: 54.4-93.8) and 100% (95% CI: 96.7-100), respectively. These results, if confirmed in a larger study, suggest that this RDT could be used as a 'rule-out' screening test for EVD to improve rapid case identification and resource allocation.

  12. Simultaneous Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Hepatitis B-Hepatitis C Point-of-Care Tests Improve Outcomes in Linkage-to-Care: Results of a Randomized Control Trial in Persons Without Healthcare Coverage.

    PubMed

    Bottero, Julie; Boyd, Anders; Gozlan, Joel; Carrat, Fabrice; Nau, Jean; Pauti, Marie-Dominique; Rougier, Hayette; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Lacombe, Karine

    2015-12-01

    Background.  In Europe and the United States, more than two thirds of individuals infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) and 15%-30% of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals are unaware of their infection status. Simultaneous HIV-, HBV-, and HCV-rapid tests could help improve infection awareness and linkage-to-care in particularly vulnerable populations. Methods.  The OptiScreen III study was a single-center, randomized, control trial conducted at a free clinic ("Médecins du Monde", Paris, France). Participants were randomized 1:1 to receive 1 of 2 interventions testing for HIV, HBV, and HCV: standard serology-based testing (S-arm) or point-of-care rapid testing (RT-arm). The main study endpoints were the proportion of participants who became aware of their HIV, HBV, and HCV status and who were linked to care when testing positive. Results.  A total of 324 individuals, representing mainly African immigrants, were included. In the S-arm, 115 of 162 (71.0%) participants performed a blood draw and 104 of 162 (64.2%) retrieved their test result. In comparison, 159 of 162 (98.2%) of participants randomized to the RT-arm obtained their results (P < .001). Of the 38 (11.7%) participants testing positive (HIV, n = 7; HBV, n = 23; HCV, n = 8), 15 of 18 (83.3%) in the S-arm and 18 of 20 (90.0%) in the RT-arm were linked-to-care (P = .7). In post hoc analysis assuming the same disease prevalence in those without obtaining test results, difference in linkage-to-care was more pronounced (S-arm = 60.0% vs RT-arm = 90.0%; P = .04). Conclusions.  In a highly at-risk population for chronic viral infections, the simultaneous use of HIV, HBV, and HCV point-of-care tests clearly improves the "cascade of screening" and quite possibly linkage-to-care. PMID:26668814

  13. Utility of point-of-care testing of natriuretic peptides (brain natriuretic peptide and n-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide) in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Nayer, Jamshed; Aggarwal, Praveen; Galwankar, Sagar

    2014-07-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of a patient with an acute disease is a challenge for emergency physicians. Natriuretic peptides have emerged as important tools for diagnosis, risk stratification and therapeutic decision making for some categories of emergency patients. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a member of a four natriuretic peptides family that shares a common 17-peptide ring structure. Atrial natriuretic peptide, C-natriuretic peptide (CNP), and D-type natriuretic peptide are the other natriuretic peptide, which share the same common 17-peptide ring structure. The N-terminal fragment of pro-BNP, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) consists of 76 amino acids, which is biologically inert, while the active component BNP contains 32 amino acids. BNP and NT-proBNP are secreted in the plasma in equimolar quantities and are frequently used in the diagnosis of congestive heart failure, and distinguishing between patients with dyspnea of cardiac or pulmonary origin. Both natriuretic peptides have also been evaluated for use in the assessment and management of several other conditions including sepsis, cirrhosis of liver and renal failure. However, one should remember that the values of natriuretic peptides are affected by age and weight of the patients, and presence of several comorbidities such as chronic renal failure, type 2 diabetes mellitus, anemia, pulmonary embolism, and acute coronary syndrome. Values of these peptides also vary depending on the type of test used. The performance characteristics of these natriuretic peptides vary depending on the patients on whom they are used. Therefore determination of reference values for these peptides represents a challenge.

  14. [Management of POCT Devices and Reagents].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Osamu

    2015-02-01

    In order to ensure the accuracy of POCT devices and reagents, it is necessary to appropriately manage and store them. There are various points to be considered for these items, such as management before and environments when using them; it is more complex than when using conventional analysis apparatuses in clinical laboratories. In addition, staff using such devices should be provided with opportunities to obtain sufficient knowledge and skills. These approaches are indispensable to ensure POCT accuracy and provide reliable data, and, in this respect, support for staff with expertise in clinical examination is crucial. PMID:26529973

  15. Point-of-care lung ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Volpicelli, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    Point-of-care lung ultrasound represents an emerging and useful technique in the management of pulmonary diseases. For many years, thoracic ultrasonography was limited to the study of pleural effusion and thoracic superficial masses because alveolar air and bones of the thoracic cage limit the propagation of the ultrasound beam. Only recently has been highlighted that, by the fact, lung ultrasound works like a real densitometer that is highly sensitive to variations of the pulmonary content and balance between air and fluids. Dynamic and static analysis of a combination of sonographic artifacts and real images makes it possible an accurate diagnosis of many lung disorders, particularly when lung ultrasound is applied in the emergency and critical care setting. Sonography is useful in the diagnostic process of lung diseases where the alveolar air is reduced and interstitial fluids are increased, but also when air or fluids are collected in the pleural space. This article analyzes the basic principles of point-of-care lung ultrasound and all the supposed limitations to the diagnostic usefulness of this technique. Moreover, the article reviews the three main fields of application for lung ultrasound: interstitial, alveolar and pleural syndromes.

  16. Point of Care Technologies for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hewlett, Indira K.

    2014-01-01

    Effective prevention of HIV/AIDS requires early diagnosis, initiation of therapy, and regular plasma viral load monitoring of the infected individual. In addition, incidence estimation using accurate and sensitive assays is needed to facilitate HIV prevention efforts in the public health setting. Therefore, more affordable and accessible point-of-care (POC) technologies capable of providing early diagnosis, HIV viral load measurements, and CD4 counts in settings where HIV is most prevalent are needed to enable appropriate intervention strategies and ultimately stop transmission of the virus within these populations to achieve the future goal of an AIDS-free generation. This review discusses the available and emerging POC technologies for future application to these unmet public health needs. PMID:24579041

  17. Head to Head Comparison of Two Point-of-care Platelet Function Tests Used for Assessment of On-clopidogrel Platelet Reactivity in Chinese Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yi; Zhang, Jia-Hui; Tang, Xiao-Fang; He, Chen; Ma, Yuan-Liang; Xu, Jing-Jing; Song, Ying; Liu, Ru; Meng, Xian-Min; Song, Lei; Wang, Miao; Gao, Run-Lin; Yuan, Jin-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Platelet function tests are widely used in clinical practice to guide personalized antiplatelet therapy. In China, the thromboelastography (TEG) test has been well accepted in clinics, whereas VerifyNow, mainly used for scientific research, has not been used in routine clinical practice. The aim of the current study was to compare these two point-of-care platelet function tests and to analyze the consistency between the two tests for evaluating on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity in Chinese acute myocardial infarction patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods: A total of 184 patients admitted to Fuwai Hospital between August 2014 and May 2015 were enrolled in the study. On-clopidogrel platelet reactivity was assessed 3 days after PCI by TEG and VerifyNow using adenosine diphosphate as an agonist. Based on the previous reports, an inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) <30% for TEG or a P2Y12 reaction unit (PRU) >230 for VerifyNow was defined as high on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity (HPR). An IPA >70% or a PRU <178 was defined as low on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity (LPR). Correlation and agreement between the two methods were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient (r) and kappa value (κ), respectively. Results: Our results showed that VerifyNow and TEG had a moderate but significant correlation in evaluating platelet reactivity (r = −0.511). A significant although poor agreement (κ = 0.225) in identifying HPR and a significantly moderate agreement in identifying LPR (κ = 0.412) were observed between TEG and VerifyNow. By using TEG as the reference for comparison, the cutoff values of VerifyNow for the Chinese patients in this study were identified as PRU >205 for HPR and PRU <169 for LPR. Conclusions: By comparing VerifyNow to TEG which has been widely used in clinics, VerifyNow could be an attractive alternative to TEG for monitoring on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity in Chinese patients. PMID:27647183

  18. The Point-of-Care Laboratory in Clinical Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Drancourt, Michel; Michel-Lepage, Audrey; Boyer, Sylvie; Raoult, Didier

    2016-07-01

    Point-of-care (POC) laboratories that deliver rapid diagnoses of infectious diseases were invented to balance the centralization of core laboratories. POC laboratories operate 24 h a day and 7 days a week to provide diagnoses within 2 h, largely based on immunochromatography and real-time PCR tests. In our experience, these tests are conveniently combined into syndrome-based kits that facilitate sampling, including self-sampling and test operations, as POC laboratories can be operated by trained operators who are not necessarily biologists. POC laboratories are a way of easily providing clinical microbiology testing for populations distant from laboratories in developing and developed countries and on ships. Modern Internet connections enable support from core laboratories. The cost-effectiveness of POC laboratories has been established for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections in both developed and developing countries. PMID:27029593

  19. Optical Imaging Techniques for Point-of-care Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongying; Isikman, Serhan O.; Mudanyali, Onur; Greenbaum, Alon; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Improving the access to effective and affordable healthcare has long been a global endeavor. In this quest, the development of cost-effective and easy-to-use medical testing equipment that enable rapid and accurate diagnosis is essential to reduce the time and costs associated with healthcare services. To this end, point-of-care (POC) diagnostics plays a crucial role in healthcare delivery in both the developed and developing countries by bringing medical testing to patients, or to sites near patients. As the diagnosis of a wide range of diseases, including various types of cancers and many endemics relies on optical techniques, numerous compact and cost-effective optical imaging platforms have been developed in recent years for use at the POC. Here, we review the state-of-the-art optical imaging techniques that can have significant impact on global health by facilitating effective and affordable POC diagnostics. PMID:23044793

  20. Internet Point of Care Learning at a Community Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinusas, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Internet point of care (PoC) learning is a relatively new method for obtaining continuing medical education credits. Few data are available to describe physician utilization of this CME activity. Methods: We describe the Internet point of care system we developed at a medium-sized community hospital and report on its first year of…

  1. Point-of-care ultrasonography by pediatric emergency medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jennifer R; Lewiss, Resa E

    2015-04-01

    Emergency physicians have used point-of-care ultrasonography since the 1990 s. Pediatric emergency medicine physicians have more recently adopted this technology. Point-of-care ultrasonography is used for various scenarios, particularly the evaluation of soft tissue infections or blunt abdominal trauma and procedural guidance. To date, there are no published statements from national organizations specifically for pediatric emergency physicians describing the incorporation of point-of-care ultrasonography into their practice. This document outlines how pediatric emergency departments may establish a formal point-of-care ultrasonography program. This task includes appointing leaders with expertise in point-of-care ultrasonography, effectively training and credentialing physicians in the department, and providing ongoing quality assurance reviews. PMID:25825532

  2. Point-of-care ultrasonography by pediatric emergency medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jennifer R; Lewiss, Resa E

    2015-04-01

    Emergency physicians have used point-of-care ultrasonography since the 1990 s. Pediatric emergency medicine physicians have more recently adopted this technology. Point-of-care ultrasonography is used for various scenarios, particularly the evaluation of soft tissue infections or blunt abdominal trauma and procedural guidance. To date, there are no published statements from national organizations specifically for pediatric emergency physicians describing the incorporation of point-of-care ultrasonography into their practice. This document outlines how pediatric emergency departments may establish a formal point-of-care ultrasonography program. This task includes appointing leaders with expertise in point-of-care ultrasonography, effectively training and credentialing physicians in the department, and providing ongoing quality assurance reviews.

  3. Paper-Based Systems for Point-of-Care Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Sherine F; Cheng, Samantha K L; Kamei, Daniel T

    2015-08-01

    Paper-based systems have been widely investigated for developing point-of-care devices because of their simplicity, affordability, and ease of use. Recent advances have resulted in paper systems that have progressed beyond the historical "single-strip" format and allow for a larger range of functions. This review provides a summary of the advances that have been made to improve the utility of paper-based diagnostic tests for biosensing. Specifically, techniques for designing paper devices, including different geometries and chemical patterning to control fluid flow, are discussed. This review also examines novel approaches to improve paper-based assay sensitivities, such as sample preconcentration, signal amplification at the detection zone, and electrochemical methods.

  4. Point-of-Care Clinical Ultrasound for Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Heiberg, J.; Hansen, L. S.; Wemmelund, K.; Sørensen, A. H.; Ilkjaer, C.; Cloete, E.; Nolte, D.; Roodt, F.; Dyer, R.; Swanevelder, J.; Sloth, E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Our institution has recently implemented a point-of-care (POC) ultrasound training program, consisting of an e-learning course and systematic practical hands-on training. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the learning outcome of this curriculum. Materials and Methods: 16 medical students with no previous ultrasound experience comprised the study group. The program covered a combination of 4 well-described point-of-care (POC) ultrasound protocols (focus assessed transthoracic echocardiography, focused assessment with sonography in trauma, lung ultrasound, and dynamic needle tip positioning for ultrasound-guided vascular access) and it consisted of an e-learning course followed by 4 h of practical hands-on training. Practical skills and image quality were tested 3 times during the study: at baseline, after e-learning, and after hands-on training. Results: Practical skills improved for all 4 protocols; after e-learning as well as after hands-on training. The number of students who were able to perform at least one interpretable image of the heart increased from 7 at baseline to 12 after e-learning, p<0.01, and to all 16 students after hands-on-training, p<0.01. The number of students able to cannulate an artificial vessel increased from 3 to 8 after e-learning and to 15 after hands-on training. Conclusion: Medical students with no previous ultrasound experience demonstrated a considerable improvement in practical skill after interactive e-learning and 4 h of hands-on training. PMID:27689155

  5. Towards point of care testing for C. difficile infection by volatile profiling, using the combination of a short multi-capillary gas chromatography column with metal oxide sensor detection

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, N D; Ewen, R J; de Lacy Costello, B; Garner, C E; Probert, C S J; Vaughan, K.; Ratcliffe, N M

    2016-01-01

    Rapid volatile profiling of stool sample headspace was achieved using a combination of short multi-capillary chromatography column (SMCC), highly sensitive heated metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) sensor and artificial neural network (ANN) software. For direct analysis of biological samples this prototype offers alternatives to conventional GC detectors and electronic nose technology. The performance was compared to an identical instrument incorporating a long single capillary column (LSCC). The ability of the prototypes to separate complex mixtures was assessed using gas standards and homogenised in house ‘standard’ stool samples, with both capable of detecting more than 24 peaks per sample. The elution time was considerably faster with the SMCC resulting in a run time of 10 minutes compared to 30 minutes for the LSCC. The diagnostic potential of the prototypes was assessed using 50 C. difficile positive and 50 negative samples. The prototypes demonstrated similar capability of discriminating between positive and negative samples with sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 80% respectively. C. difficile is an important cause of hospital acquired diarrhoea, with significant morbidity and mortality around the world. A device capable of rapidly diagnosing the disease at the point of care would reduce cases, deaths and financial burden. PMID:27212803

  6. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Versus Capillary Point-of-Care Testing for Inpatient Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Patients Hospitalized in the General Ward and Treated With a Basal Bolus Insulin Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Ana M.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.; Muñoz, Oscar M.; Herrera, Felipe; Rubio, Claudia; Aschner, Pablo; Buendia, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) may improve the management of patients with type 2 diabetes hospitalized in the general ward by facilitating the detection of hyper- and hypoglycemic episodes. However, the lack of data on the accuracy and safety of CGM have limited its application. Methods: A prospective pilot study was conducted including 38 patients hospitalized in the general ward with a known diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and hyperglycemic individuals without a history of DM with a blood sugar of 140-400 mg on admission treated with a basal bolus insulin regimen. Inpatient glycemic control and the incidence of hypoglycemic episodes were compared between detection by CGM of interstitial fluid for up to 6 days and point-of-care (POC) capillary blood glucose monitoring performed pre- and postprandially, before bedtime and at 3 am. Results: No differences in average daily glucose levels were observed between CGM and POC (176.2 ± 33.9 vs 176.6 ± 33.7 mg/dl, P = .828). However, CGM detected a higher number of hypoglycemic episodes than POC (55 vs 12, P < .01). Glucose measurements were clinically valid, with 91.9% of patients falling within the Clarke error grid A and B zones. Conclusions: Our preliminary results indicate that the use of CGM in type 2 patients hospitalized in the general ward provides accurate estimation of blood sugar levels and is more effective than POC for the detection of hypoglycemic episodes and asymptomatic hypoglycemia. PMID:26330394

  7. Towards point of care testing for C. difficile infection by volatile profiling, using the combination of a short multi-capillary gas chromatography column with metal oxide sensor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, N. D.; Ewen, R. J.; de Lacy Costello, B.; Garner, C. E.; Probert, C. S. J.; Vaughan, K.; Ratcliffe, N. M.

    2014-06-01

    Rapid volatile profiling of stool sample headspace was achieved using a combination of short multi-capillary chromatography column (SMCC), highly sensitive heated metal oxide semiconductor sensor and artificial neural network software. For direct analysis of biological samples this prototype offers alternatives to conventional gas chromatography (GC) detectors and electronic nose technology. The performance was compared to an identical instrument incorporating a long single capillary column (LSCC). The ability of the prototypes to separate complex mixtures was assessed using gas standards and homogenized in house ‘standard’ stool samples, with both capable of detecting more than 24 peaks per sample. The elution time was considerably faster with the SMCC resulting in a run time of 10 min compared to 30 min for the LSCC. The diagnostic potential of the prototypes was assessed using 50 C. difficile positive and 50 negative samples. The prototypes demonstrated similar capability of discriminating between positive and negative samples with sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 80% respectively. C. difficile is an important cause of hospital acquired diarrhoea, with significant morbidity and mortality around the world. A device capable of rapidly diagnosing the disease at the point of care would reduce cases, deaths and financial burden.

  8. Augmenting epidemiological models with point-of-care diagnostics data

    DOE PAGES

    Pullum, Laura L.; Ramanathan, Arvind; Nutaro, James J.; Ozmen, Ozgur

    2016-04-20

    Although adoption of newer Point-of-Care (POC) diagnostics is increasing, there is a significant challenge using POC diagnostics data to improve epidemiological models. In this work, we propose a method to process zip-code level POC datasets and apply these processed data to calibrate an epidemiological model. We specifically develop a calibration algorithm using simulated annealing and calibrate a parsimonious equation-based model of modified Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) dynamics. The results show that parsimonious models are remarkably effective in predicting the dynamics observed in the number of infected patients and our calibration algorithm is sufficiently capable of predicting peak loads observed in POC diagnosticsmore » data while staying within reasonable and empirical parameter ranges reported in the literature. Additionally, we explore the future use of the calibrated values by testing the correlation between peak load and population density from Census data. Our results show that linearity assumptions for the relationships among various factors can be misleading, therefore further data sources and analysis are needed to identify relationships between additional parameters and existing calibrated ones. As a result, calibration approaches such as ours can determine the values of newly added parameters along with existing ones and enable policy-makers to make better multi-scale decisions.« less

  9. Point-of-care diagnostics for niche applications.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Brian M; Ligler, Frances S; Walker, Glenn M

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care or point-of-use diagnostics are analytical devices that provide clinically relevant information without the need for a core clinical laboratory. In this review we define point-of-care diagnostics as portable versions of assays performed in a traditional clinical chemistry laboratory. This review discusses five areas relevant to human and animal health where increased attention could produce significant impact: veterinary medicine, space travel, sports medicine, emergency medicine, and operating room efficiency. For each of these areas, clinical need, available commercial products, and ongoing research into new devices are highlighted.

  10. Point-of-care diagnostics for niche applications.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Brian M; Ligler, Frances S; Walker, Glenn M

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care or point-of-use diagnostics are analytical devices that provide clinically relevant information without the need for a core clinical laboratory. In this review we define point-of-care diagnostics as portable versions of assays performed in a traditional clinical chemistry laboratory. This review discusses five areas relevant to human and animal health where increased attention could produce significant impact: veterinary medicine, space travel, sports medicine, emergency medicine, and operating room efficiency. For each of these areas, clinical need, available commercial products, and ongoing research into new devices are highlighted. PMID:26837054

  11. Point-of-care diagnostics: will the hurdles be overcome this time?

    PubMed

    Huckle, David

    2006-07-01

    Point-of-care diagnostics have been proposed as the latest development in clinical diagnostics several times in the last 30 years; however, they have not yet fully developed into a business sector to match the projections. This perspective examines the reasons for past failures and the failure of technology to meet user needs. Advances have taken place in the last few years that effectively remove technology as a barrier to the development of point-of-care testing. Even regulatory issues regarding how products are developed and claims supported have been absorbed, understood and now accepted. The emphasis here is on the possible favorable aspects that are novel this time around. These changes have arisen as a result of the situation with global healthcare economics and the pressure from patients to be treated more like customers. The final hurdles relate to the conflict between diagnosis with the patient present and treated as soon as the point-of-care result is available and the entrenched positions of the central laboratory, the suppliers and their established distribution chains, and the way in which healthcare budgets are allocated. The ultimate hurdle that encapsulates all of these issues is reimbursement, which is the final barrier to a significant point-of-care diagnostics market--without reimbursement there will be no market.

  12. A handheld point-of-care genomic diagnostic system.

    PubMed

    Myers, Frank B; Henrikson, Richard H; Bone, Jennifer M; Bone, Jennifer; Lee, Luke P

    2013-01-01

    The rapid detection and identification of infectious disease pathogens is a critical need for healthcare in both developed and developing countries. As we gain more insight into the genomic basis of pathogen infectivity and drug resistance, point-of-care nucleic acid testing will likely become an important tool for global health. In this paper, we present an inexpensive, handheld, battery-powered instrument designed to enable pathogen genotyping in the developing world. Our Microfluidic Biomolecular Amplification Reader (µBAR) represents the convergence of molecular biology, microfluidics, optics, and electronics technology. The µBAR is capable of carrying out isothermal nucleic acid amplification assays with real-time fluorescence readout at a fraction of the cost of conventional benchtop thermocyclers. Additionally, the µBAR features cell phone data connectivity and GPS sample geotagging which can enable epidemiological surveying and remote healthcare delivery. The µBAR controls assay temperature through an integrated resistive heater and monitors real-time fluorescence signals from 60 individual reaction chambers using LEDs and phototransistors. Assays are carried out on PDMS disposable microfluidic cartridges which require no external power for sample loading. We characterize the fluorescence detection limits, heater uniformity, and battery life of the instrument. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate the detection of the HIV-1 integrase gene with the µBAR using the Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) assay. Although we focus on the detection of purified DNA here, LAMP has previously been demonstrated with a range of clinical samples, and our eventual goal is to develop a microfluidic device which includes on-chip sample preparation from raw samples. The µBAR is based entirely around open source hardware and software, and in the accompanying online supplement we present a full set of schematics, bill of materials, PCB layouts, CAD drawings

  13. A Handheld Point-of-Care Genomic Diagnostic System

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Frank B.; Henrikson, Richard H.; Bone, Jennifer; Lee, Luke P.

    2013-01-01

    The rapid detection and identification of infectious disease pathogens is a critical need for healthcare in both developed and developing countries. As we gain more insight into the genomic basis of pathogen infectivity and drug resistance, point-of-care nucleic acid testing will likely become an important tool for global health. In this paper, we present an inexpensive, handheld, battery-powered instrument designed to enable pathogen genotyping in the developing world. Our Microfluidic Biomolecular Amplification Reader (µBAR) represents the convergence of molecular biology, microfluidics, optics, and electronics technology. The µBAR is capable of carrying out isothermal nucleic acid amplification assays with real-time fluorescence readout at a fraction of the cost of conventional benchtop thermocyclers. Additionally, the µBAR features cell phone data connectivity and GPS sample geotagging which can enable epidemiological surveying and remote healthcare delivery. The µBAR controls assay temperature through an integrated resistive heater and monitors real-time fluorescence signals from 60 individual reaction chambers using LEDs and phototransistors. Assays are carried out on PDMS disposable microfluidic cartridges which require no external power for sample loading. We characterize the fluorescence detection limits, heater uniformity, and battery life of the instrument. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate the detection of the HIV-1 integrase gene with the µBAR using the Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) assay. Although we focus on the detection of purified DNA here, LAMP has previously been demonstrated with a range of clinical samples, and our eventual goal is to develop a microfluidic device which includes on-chip sample preparation from raw samples. The µBAR is based entirely around open source hardware and software, and in the accompanying online supplement we present a full set of schematics, bill of materials, PCB layouts, CAD drawings

  14. ROM Plus(®): accurate point-of-care detection of ruptured fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    McQuivey, Ross W; Block, Jon E

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of rupture of fetal membranes is imperative to inform and guide gestational age-specific interventions to optimize perinatal outcomes and reduce the risk of serious complications, including preterm delivery and infections. The ROM Plus is a rapid, point-of-care, qualitative immunochromatographic diagnostic test that uses a unique monoclonal/polyclonal antibody approach to detect two different proteins found in amniotic fluid at high concentrations: alpha-fetoprotein and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1. Clinical study results have uniformly demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy and performance characteristics with this point-of-care test that exceeds conventional clinical testing with external laboratory evaluation. The description, indications for use, procedural steps, and laboratory and clinical characterization of this assay are presented in this article. PMID:27274316

  15. Prehospital coagulation monitoring of resuscitation with point-of-care devices.

    PubMed

    Schött, Ulf

    2014-05-01

    A variety of point-of-care monitors for the measurement of hematocrit, hemoglobin, blood gas with electrolytes, and lactate can be used also in the prehospital setting for optimizing and individualizing trauma resuscitation. Point-of-care coagulation testing with activated prothrombin test, prothrombin test, and activated coagulation/clotting time tests is available for prehospital use. Although robust, battery driven, and easy to handle, many devices lack documentation for use in prehospital care. Some of the devices correspond poorly to corresponding laboratory analyses in acute trauma coagulopathy and at lower hematocrits. In trauma, viscoelastic tests such as rotational thromboelastometry and thromboelastography can rapidly detect acute trauma coagulopathy and give an overall dynamic picture of the hemostatic system and the interaction between its different components: coagulation activation, fibrin polymerization, fibrin platelet interactions within the clot, and fibrinolysis. Rotational thromboelastometry is shock resistant and has the potential to be used outside the hospital setting to guide individualized coagulation factor and blood component therapies. Sonoclot and Rheorox are two small viscoelastic instruments with one-channel options, but with less documentation. The point-of-care market for coagulation tests is quickly expanding, and new devices are introduced all the time. Still they should be better adopted to prehospital conditions, small, robust, battery charged, and rapid and use small sample volumes and whole blood.

  16. Reconfigurable point-of-care systems designed with interoperability standards.

    PubMed

    Warren, Steve; Yao, Jianchu; Schmitz, Ryan; Lebak, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Interoperability standards, if properly applied to medical system design, have the potential to decrease the cost of point-of-care monitoring systems while better matching systems to patient needs. This paper presents a brief editorial overview of future monitoring environments, followed by a short listing of smart-home and wearable-device efforts. This is followed by a summary of recent efforts in the Medical Component Design Laboratory at Kansas State University to address interoperability issues in point-of-care systems by incorporating the Bluetooth Host Controller Interface, the IEEE 1073 Medical Information Bus, and Health Level 7 (HL7) into a monitoring system that hosts wearable or nearby wireless devices. This wireless demonstration system includes a wearable electrocardiogram, wearable pulse oximeter, wearable data logger, weight scale, and LabVIEW base station. Data are exchanged between local and remote MySQL databases using the HL7 standard for medical information exchange. PMID:17270979

  17. Evaluation of six commercial point-of-care tests for diagnosis of acute dengue infections: the need for combining NS1 antigen and IgM/IgG antibody detection to achieve acceptable levels of accuracy.

    PubMed

    Blacksell, Stuart D; Jarman, Richard G; Bailey, Mark S; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Jenjaroen, Kemajittra; Gibbons, Robert V; Paris, Daniel H; Premaratna, Ranjan; de Silva, H Janaka; Lalloo, David G; Day, Nicholas P J

    2011-12-01

    Six assays were evaluated in this study to determine their suitability for the diagnosis of acute dengue infection using samples from 259 Sri Lankan patients with acute fevers (99 confirmed dengue cases and 160 patients with other confirmed acute febrile illnesses): (i) the Merlin dengue fever IgG & IgM combo device (Merlin), (ii) the Standard Diagnostics Dengue Duo nonstructural 1 (NS1) antigen and IgG/IgM combo device (Standard Diagnostics, South Korea), (iii) the Biosynex Immunoquick dengue fever IgG and IgM (Biosynex, France) assay, (iv) the Bio-Rad NS1 antigen strip (Bio-Rad, France), (v) the Panbio Dengue Duo IgG/IgM Cassette (Inverness, Australia), and (vi) the Panbio dengue NS1 antigen strip (Inverness, Australia). The median number of days of fever prior to admission sample collection was 5 days (interquartile range, 3 to 7 days). Sensitivity and specificity of the NS1 antigen tests ranged from 49 to 59% and from 93 to 99%, respectively, and sensitivity and sensitivity of the IgM antibody test ranged from 71 to 80% and from 46 to 90%, respectively. Combining the NS1 antigen and IgM antibody results from the Standard Diagnostics Dengue Duo test gave the best compromise of sensitivity and specificity (93% and 89%, respectively) and provided the best sensitivity in patients presenting at different times after fever onset. The Merlin IgM/IgG antibody tests correctly classified 64% and 86% of the primary and secondary dengue infection cases, respectively, and the Standard Diagnostics IgM/IgG antibody tests correctly classified 71% and 83% of the primary and secondary dengue infection cases, respectively. This study provides strong evidence of the value of combining dengue antigen- and antibody-based test results in the rapid diagnostic test (RDT) format for the acute diagnosis of dengue.

  18. A framework for key considerations regarding point-of-care screening of newborns.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Alex R; Kus, Christopher A; Ostrander, Robert J; Comeau, Anne Marie; Boyle, Coleen A; Dougherty, Denise; Mann, Marie Y; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Green, Nancy S

    2012-12-01

    Newborn screening is performed under public health authority, with analysis carried out primarily by public health laboratories or other centralized laboratories. Increasingly, opportunities to improve infant health will arise from including screening tests that are completed at the birth centers instead of in centralized laboratories, constituting a significant shift for newborn screening. This report summarizes a framework developed by the US Secretary of Health and Human Services Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children based on a series of meetings held during 2011 and 2012. These meetings were for the purpose of evaluating whether conditions identifiable through point-of-care screening should be added to the recommended universal screening panel, and to identify key considerations for birth hospitals, public health agencies, and clinicians when point-of-care newborn screening is implemented.

  19. Thymic Tumor Extension into the Heart, a Rare Finding Found by Point-of-Care Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Elizabeth; Hunter-Behrend, Michelle; Leroux, Eric; Gharahbaghian, Laleh

    2016-01-01

    We report a cardiac mass detected by point-of-care ultrasound performed within the emergency department on a 65-year-old male with thymic cancer who presented with chronic cough and fever. Results from the initial emergency workup, which included blood tests, urinalysis, and a computerized tomography with angiography scan with venous phasing of the chest, did not result in a definitive diagnosis. A point-of-care echocardiogram was performed to evaluate for possible infective endocarditis, but alternatively identified a large mass in the right atria and ventricle. The mass was later confirmed to be metastatic tumor from the patient’s known thymic cancer. This case emphasizes the vital role ultrasound can play in the acute care setting. PMID:27625910

  20. Thymic Tumor Extension into the Heart, a Rare Finding Found by Point-of-Care Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Elizabeth; Hunter-Behrend, Michelle; Leroux, Eric; Gharahbaghian, Laleh; Lobo, Viveta

    2016-01-01

    We report a cardiac mass detected by point-of-care ultrasound performed within the emergency department on a 65-year-old male with thymic cancer who presented with chronic cough and fever. Results from the initial emergency workup, which included blood tests, urinalysis, and a computerized tomography with angiography scan with venous phasing of the chest, did not result in a definitive diagnosis. A point-of-care echocardiogram was performed to evaluate for possible infective endocarditis, but alternatively identified a large mass in the right atria and ventricle. The mass was later confirmed to be metastatic tumor from the patient's known thymic cancer. This case emphasizes the vital role ultrasound can play in the acute care setting. PMID:27625910

  1. Comparison of point-of-care-compatible lysis methods for bacteria and viruses.

    PubMed

    Heiniger, Erin K; Buser, Joshua R; Mireles, Lillian; Zhang, Xiaohong; Ladd, Paula D; Lutz, Barry R; Yager, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Nucleic acid sample preparation has been an especially challenging barrier to point-of-care nucleic acid amplification tests in low-resource settings. Here we provide a head-to-head comparison of methods for lysis of, and nucleic acid release from, several pathogenic bacteria and viruses-methods that are adaptable to point-of-care usage in low-resource settings. Digestion with achromopeptidase, a mixture of proteases and peptidoglycan-specific hydrolases, followed by thermal deactivation in a boiling water bath, effectively released amplifiable nucleic acid from Staphylococcus aureus, Bordetella pertussis, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza virus. Achromopeptidase was functional after dehydration and reconstitution, even after eleven months of dry storage without refrigeration. Mechanical lysis methods proved to be effective against a hard-to-lyse Mycobacterium species, and a miniature bead-mill, the AudioLyse, is shown to be capable of releasing amplifiable DNA and RNA from this species. We conclude that point-of-care-compatible sample preparation methods for nucleic acid tests need not introduce amplification inhibitors, and can provide amplification-ready lysates from a wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens.

  2. Comparison of point-of-care-compatible lysis methods for bacteria and viruses.

    PubMed

    Heiniger, Erin K; Buser, Joshua R; Mireles, Lillian; Zhang, Xiaohong; Ladd, Paula D; Lutz, Barry R; Yager, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Nucleic acid sample preparation has been an especially challenging barrier to point-of-care nucleic acid amplification tests in low-resource settings. Here we provide a head-to-head comparison of methods for lysis of, and nucleic acid release from, several pathogenic bacteria and viruses-methods that are adaptable to point-of-care usage in low-resource settings. Digestion with achromopeptidase, a mixture of proteases and peptidoglycan-specific hydrolases, followed by thermal deactivation in a boiling water bath, effectively released amplifiable nucleic acid from Staphylococcus aureus, Bordetella pertussis, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza virus. Achromopeptidase was functional after dehydration and reconstitution, even after eleven months of dry storage without refrigeration. Mechanical lysis methods proved to be effective against a hard-to-lyse Mycobacterium species, and a miniature bead-mill, the AudioLyse, is shown to be capable of releasing amplifiable DNA and RNA from this species. We conclude that point-of-care-compatible sample preparation methods for nucleic acid tests need not introduce amplification inhibitors, and can provide amplification-ready lysates from a wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens. PMID:27424294

  3. Smartphone based point-of-care detector of urine albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cmiel, Vratislav; Svoboda, Ondrej; Koscova, Pavlina; Provaznik, Ivo

    2016-03-01

    Albumin plays an important role in human body. Its changed level in urine may indicate serious kidney disorders. We present a new point-of-care solution for sensitive detection of urine albumin - the miniature optical adapter for iPhone with in-built optical filters and a sample slot. The adapter exploits smart-phone flash to generate excitation light and camera to measure the level of emitted light. Albumin Blue 580 is used as albumin reagent. The proposed light-weight adapter can be produced at low cost using a 3D printer. Thus, the miniaturized detector is easy to use out of lab.

  4. Toward reusable software components at the point of care.

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, M. S.; Sherertz, D. D.; Olson, N. E.; Nelson, S. J.; Erlbaum, M. S.; Keck, K. D.; Davis, A. N.; Suarez-Munist, O. N.; Lipow, S. S.; Cole, W. G.; Fagan, L. M.; Acuff, R. D.; Crangle, C. E.; Musen, M. A.; Tu, S. W.; Wiederhold, G. C.; Carlson, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    An architecture built from five software components -a Router, Parser, Matcher, Mapper, and Server -fulfills key requirements common to several point-of-care information and knowledge processing tasks. The requirements include problem-list creation, exploiting the contents of the Electronic Medical Record for the patient at hand, knowledge access, and support for semantic visualization and software agents. The components use the National Library of Medicine Unified Medical Language System to create and exploit lexical closure-a state in which terms, text and reference models are represented explicitly and consistently. Preliminary versions of the components are in use in an oncology knowledge server. PMID:8947646

  5. Fast, sensitive point of care electrochemical molecular system for point mutation and select agent detection.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, J A; Nemeth, A C; Dicke, W C; Wang, D; Manalili Wheeler, S; Hannis, J C; Collier, G B; Drader, J J

    2016-07-01

    Point of care molecular diagnostics benefits from a portable battery-operated device capable of performing a fast turnaround using reliable inexpensive cartridges. We describe a prototype device for performing a molecular diagnostics test for clinical and biodefense samples in 16 minutes using a prototype capable of an 8 minute PCR reaction, followed by hybridization and detection on an electrochemical microarray based on the i-STAT® system. We used human buccal swabs for hemochromatosis testing including in-device DNA extraction. Additional clinical and biodefense samples included influenza A and bacterial select agents Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis and Francisella tularensis. PMID:27280174

  6. 78 FR 44624 - Proposed Information Collection (Conduct the Point-of-Care Research Questionnaire); Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (Conduct the Point-of-Care Research Questionnaire)] Proposed Information Collection (Conduct the Point-of-Care Research Questionnaire); Activities Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans...) 395-7316. Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (Conduct the Point of Care Research...

  7. Selecting an A1C Point-of-Care Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Ee Vonn; Rasinen, Casey

    2015-01-01

    A1C point-of-care (POC) instruments benefit patients with diabetes by facilitating clinician decision making that results in significant glycemic improvements. Three National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP)–certified POC products are available in the United States: the handheld A1CNow (formerly manufactured by Bayer Diabetes Care but now made by Chek Diagnostics) and two bench-top models called the Axis-Shield Afinion Analyzer and the Siemens DCA Vantage. This article compares the three available NGSP-certified POC products in terms of accuracy, precision, ease of use, cost, and additional features. Its goal is to aid health care facilities in conveniently identifying the A1C POC product that best meets their needs. It additionally reviews evidence that supports the continued use of A1C POC instruments in the clinical arena. PMID:26300614

  8. Automated charge capture at the point of care increases revenue.

    PubMed

    Garrity, C E

    2001-12-01

    Group practices can reduce lost charges, denied claims, and time-to-billing rates by using automated charge capture at the point of service. One orthopedic department had been experiencing many process-related problems associated with physician charge capture. To improve revenues, the physicians began using hand-held devices to input data during patients' office visits. A 12-month analysis of charge data from the orthopedic physicians' outpatient visits using a paper-based charge process showed that 824 outpatient charges had been missed or lost, representing 6 percent of the department's annual outpatient activity and more than $54,000 in projected additional revenue. Another analysis conducted after the automated charge-capture process at the point of care was implemented showed that the orthopedic department had not missed any charges.

  9. Point-of-care platforms for salivary diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Wong, David T W

    2012-01-01

    Saliva reflects the physiologic state of the body, including emotional, endocrinal, nutritional and metabolic variations, and so can be used to monitor both oral and systemic health. In the past decade, salivary diagnostic approaches have been developed to monitor oral and systemic diseases. Along with these exciting scientific advancements, there is an emerging need to move salivary diagnostics out of the lab and into clinical practice. Point-of-care (POC) technologies specifically developed for salivary diagnostics can provide rapid, simple, low-cost and accurate measurements directly from saliva. To further transform salivary diagnostics into clinical reality, an integrated platform-based POC application is necessary, which includes sample processing, detection, a user-friendly interface and medical information technology. This review presents the requirements for POC platforms in salivary diagnostics and describes current applications of POC platforms for monitoring medical conditions using saliva. By advancing POC platforms for salivary diagnostics, dentists are anticipated to engage in chairside screening of medical conditions.

  10. PDAs bring information competence to the point-of-care.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Tanya K; Brady, Debra

    2005-01-01

    The ability of nursing faculty and students to efficiently obtain accurate information at the point-of-care is a critical aspect of providing quality patient care. Personalized Digital Assistants (PDAs) can provide instant access to entire textbooks of information where it is needed most, in the dynamic learning environment of the clinical setting. With a growing trend in higher education to include instruction on information competency in the curriculum, the use of PDAs in nursing education needs to be explored. This article discusses the use of PDAs by faculty and students within one nursing program. Results from a survey of faculty and students demonstrated a clear discrepancy in their use of PDAs. Although students recognized the benefits of PDA use in the clinical setting, they did not want owning a PDA to be a program requirement. Discussed are several approaches being used to overcome identified barriers to PDA use and ownership. PMID:16646904

  11. Present technology and future trends in point-of-care microfluidic diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kulinsky, Lawrence; Noroozi, Zahra; Madou, Marc

    2013-01-01

    This work reviews present technologies and developing trends in Point-of-Care (POC) microfluidic diagnostics platforms. First, various fluidics technologies such as pressure-driven flows, capillary flows, electromagnetically driven flows, centrifugal fluidics, acoustically driven flows, and droplet fluidics are categorized. Then three broad categories of POC microfluidic testing devices are considered: lateral flow devices, desktop and handheld POC diagnostic platforms, and emergent molecular diagnostic POC systems. Such evolving trends as miniaturization, multiplexing, networking, new more sensitive detection schemes, and the importance of sample processing are discussed. It is concluded that POC microfluidic diagnostics has a potential to improve patient treatment outcome and bring substantial savings in overall healthcare costs.

  12. An intravenous medication safety system: preventing high-risk medication errors at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Irene; Sullivan, Mark; Hutchinson, James; Thurman, Susan; Gaffney, F Andrew

    2004-10-01

    Improving medication safety at the point of care--particularly for high-risk drugs--is a major concern of nursing administrators. The medication errors most likely to cause harm are administration errors related to infusion of high-risk medications. An intravenous medication safety system is designed to prevent high-risk infusion medication errors and to capture continuous quality improvement data for best practice improvement. Initial testing with 50 systems in 2 units at Vanderbilt University Medical Center revealed that, even in the presence of a fully mature computerized prescriber order-entry system, the new safety system averted 99 potential infusion errors in 8 months.

  13. Change in Intraocular Pressure During Point-of-Care Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Cameron; Doniger, Stephanie J.; Zaia, Brita; Williams, Sarah R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Point-of-care ocular ultrasound (US) is a valuable tool for the evaluation of traumatic ocular injuries. Conventionally, any maneuver that may increase intraocular pressure (IOP) is relatively contraindicated in the setting of globe rupture. Some authors have cautioned against the use of US in these scenarios because of a theoretical concern that an US examination may cause or exacerbate the extrusion of intraocular contents. This study set out to investigate whether ocular US affects IOP. The secondary objective was to validate the intraocular pressure measurements obtained with the Diaton® as compared with standard applanation techniques (the Tono-Pen®). Methods We enrolled a convenience sample of healthy adult volunteers. We obtained the baseline IOP for each patient by using a transpalpebral tonometer. Ocular US was then performed on each subject using a high-frequency linear array transducer, and a second IOP was obtained during the US examination. A third IOP measurement was obtained following the completion of the US examination. To validate transpalpebral measurement, a subset of subjects also underwent traditional transcorneal applanation tonometry prior to the US examination as a baseline measurement. In a subset of 10 patients, we obtained baseline pre-ultrasound IOP measurements with the Diaton® and Tono-Pen®, and then compared them. Results The study included 40 subjects. IOP values during ocular US examination were slightly greater than baseline (average +1.8mmHg, p=0.01). Post-US examination IOP values were not significantly different than baseline (average −0.15mmHg, p=0.42). In a subset of 10 subjects, IOP values were not significantly different between transpalpebral and transcorneal tonometry (average +0.03mmHg, p=0.07). Conclusion In healthy volunteer subjects, point-of-care ocular US causes a small and transient increase in IOP. We also showed no difference between the Diaton® and Tono-Pen® methods of IOP measurement

  14. Phospholipase A2 as a point of care alternative to serum amylase and pancreatic lipase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nathan J.; Chapman, Robert; Lin, Yiyang; Bentham, Andrew; Tyreman, Matthew; Philips, Natalie; Khan, Shahid A.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2016-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a relatively common and potentially fatal condition, but the presenting symptoms are non-specific and diagnosis relies largely on the measurement of amylase activity by the hospital clinical laboratory. In this work we develop a point of care test for pancreatitis measuring concentration of secretory phospholipase A2 group IB (sPLA2-IB). Novel antibodies for sPLA2-IB were raised and used to design an ELISA and a lateral flow device (LFD) for the point of care measurement of sPLA2-IB concentration, which was compared to pancreatic amylase activity, lipase activity, and sPLA2-IB activity in 153 serum samples. 98 of these samples were obtained from the pathology unit of a major hospital and classified retrospectively according to presence or absence of pancreatitis, and the remaining 55 were obtained from commercial sources to serve as high lipase (n = 20), CA19-9 positive (n = 15), and healthy (n = 20) controls. sPLA2-IB concentration correlated well with the serum activity of both amylase and lipase, and performed at least as well as either markers in the differentiation of pancreatitis from controls.Acute pancreatitis is a relatively common and potentially fatal condition, but the presenting symptoms are non-specific and diagnosis relies largely on the measurement of amylase activity by the hospital clinical laboratory. In this work we develop a point of care test for pancreatitis measuring concentration of secretory phospholipase A2 group IB (sPLA2-IB). Novel antibodies for sPLA2-IB were raised and used to design an ELISA and a lateral flow device (LFD) for the point of care measurement of sPLA2-IB concentration, which was compared to pancreatic amylase activity, lipase activity, and sPLA2-IB activity in 153 serum samples. 98 of these samples were obtained from the pathology unit of a major hospital and classified retrospectively according to presence or absence of pancreatitis, and the remaining 55 were obtained from commercial sources to

  15. Connecting knowledge resources to the veterinary electronic health record: opportunities for learning at point of care.

    PubMed

    Alpi, Kristine M; Burnett, Heidi A; Bryant, Sheila J; Anderson, Katherine M

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) provide clinical learning opportunities through quick and contextual linkage of patient signalment, symptom, and diagnosis data with knowledge resources covering tests, drugs, conditions, procedures, and client instructions. This paper introduces the EHR standards for linkage and the partners-practitioners, content publishers, and software developers-necessary to leverage this possibility in veterinary medicine. The efforts of the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) Electronic Health Records Task Force to partner with veterinary practice management systems to improve the use of controlled vocabulary is a first step in the development of standards for sharing knowledge at the point of care. The Veterinary Medical Libraries Section (VMLS) of the Medical Library Association's Task Force on Connecting the Veterinary Health Record to Information Resources compiled a list of resources of potential use at point of care. Resource details were drawn from product Web sites and organized by a metric used to evaluate medical point-of-care resources. Additional information was gathered from questions sent by e-mail and follow-up interviews with two practitioners, a hospital network, two software developers, and three publishers. Veterinarians with electronic records use a variety of information resources that are not linked to their software. Systems lack the infrastructure to use the Infobutton standard that has been gaining popularity in human EHRs. While some veterinary knowledge resources are digital, publisher sites and responses do not indicate a Web-based linkage of veterinary resources with EHRs. In order to facilitate lifelong learning and evidence-based practice, veterinarians and educators of future practitioners must demonstrate to veterinary practice software developers and publishers a clinically-based need to connect knowledge resources to veterinary EHRs.

  16. Point-of-Care Diagnostics for Improving Maternal Health in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mashamba-Thompson, Tivani P; Sartorius, Benn; Drain, Paul K

    2016-01-01

    Improving maternal health is a global priority, particularly in high HIV-endemic, resource-limited settings. Failure to use health care facilities due to poor access is one of the main causes of maternal deaths in South Africa. "Point-of-care" (POC) diagnostics are an innovative healthcare approach to improve healthcare access and health outcomes in remote and resource-limited settings. In this review, POC testing is defined as a diagnostic test that is carried out near patients and leads to rapid clinical decisions. We review the current and emerging POC diagnostics for maternal health, with a specific focus on the World Health Organization (WHO) quality-ASSURED (Affordability, Sensitivity, Specificity, User friendly, Rapid and robust, Equipment free and Delivered) criteria for an ideal point-of-care test in resource-limited settings. The performance of POC diagnostics, barriers and challenges related to implementing POC diagnostics for maternal health in rural and resource-limited settings are reviewed. Innovative strategies for overcoming these barriers are recommended to achieve substantial progress on improving maternal health outcomes in these settings. PMID:27589808

  17. Wireless integrated biosensors for point-of-care diagnostic applications.

    PubMed

    Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2015-02-02

    Recent advances in integrated biosensors, wireless communication and power harvesting techniques are enticing researchers into spawning a new breed of point-of-care (POC) diagnostic devices that have attracted significant interest from industry. Among these, it is the ones equipped with wireless capabilities that drew our attention in this review paper. Indeed, wireless POC devices offer a great advantage, that of the possibility of exerting continuous monitoring of biologically relevant parameters, metabolites and other bio-molecules, relevant to the management of various morbid diseases such as diabetes, brain cancer, ischemia, and Alzheimer's. In this review paper, we examine three major categories of miniaturized integrated devices, namely; the implantable Wireless Bio-Sensors (WBSs), the wearable WBSs and the handheld WBSs. In practice, despite the aforesaid progress made in developing wireless platforms, early detection of health imbalances remains a grand challenge from both the technological and the medical points of view. This paper addresses such challenges and reports the state-of-the-art in this interdisciplinary field.

  18. Characterizing physicians' information needs at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Lauren A; Cate, Olle Ten; Moorhead, Laura L; van Stiphout, Feikje; Kramer, Bianca M R; Ter Braak, Edith; Posley, Keith; Irby, David; O'Brien, Bridget C

    2014-11-01

    Physicians have many information needs that arise at the point of care yet go unmet for a variety of reasons, including uncertainty about which information resources to select. In this study, we aimed to identify the various types of physician information needs and how these needs relate to physicians' use of the database PubMed and the evidence summary tool UpToDate. We conducted semi-structured interviews with physicians (Stanford University, United States; n = 13; and University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands; n = 9), eliciting participants' descriptions of their information needs and related use of PubMed and/or UpToDate. Using thematic analysis, we identified six information needs: refreshing, confirming, logistics, teaching, idea generating and personal learning. Participants from both institutions similarly described their information needs and selection of resources. The identification of these six information needs and their relation to PubMed and UpToDate expands upon previously identified physician information needs and may be useful to medical educators designing evidence-based practice training for physicians.

  19. Wireless Integrated Biosensors for Point-of-Care Diagnostic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in integrated biosensors, wireless communication and power harvesting techniques are enticing researchers into spawning a new breed of point-of-care (POC) diagnostic devices that have attracted significant interest from industry. Among these, it is the ones equipped with wireless capabilities that drew our attention in this review paper. Indeed, wireless POC devices offer a great advantage, that of the possibility of exerting continuous monitoring of biologically relevant parameters, metabolites and other bio-molecules, relevant to the management of various morbid diseases such as diabetes, brain cancer, ischemia, and Alzheimer’s. In this review paper, we examine three major categories of miniaturized integrated devices, namely; the implantable Wireless Bio-Sensors (WBSs), the wearable WBSs and the handheld WBSs. In practice, despite the aforesaid progress made in developing wireless platforms, early detection of health imbalances remains a grand challenge from both the technological and the medical points of view. This paper addresses such challenges and reports the state-of-the-art in this interdisciplinary field. PMID:25648709

  20. Advances in paper-based point-of-care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Wang, ShuQi; Wang, Lin; Li, Fei; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2014-04-15

    Advanced diagnostic technologies, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), have been widely used in well-equipped laboratories. However, they are not affordable or accessible in resource-limited settings due to the lack of basic infrastructure and/or trained operators. Paper-based diagnostic technologies are affordable, user-friendly, rapid, robust, and scalable for manufacturing, thus holding great potential to deliver point-of-care (POC) diagnostics to resource-limited settings. In this review, we present the working principles and reaction mechanism of paper-based diagnostics, including dipstick assays, lateral flow assays (LFAs), and microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs), as well as the selection of substrates and fabrication methods. Further, we report the advances in improving detection sensitivity, quantification readout, procedure simplification and multi-functionalization of paper-based diagnostics, and discuss the disadvantages of paper-based diagnostics. We envision that miniaturized and integrated paper-based diagnostic devices with the sample-in-answer-out capability will meet the diverse requirements for diagnosis and treatment monitoring at the POC.

  1. Point of Care and Factor Concentrate-Based Coagulation Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Theusinger, Oliver M.; Stein, Philipp; Levy, Jerrold H.

    2015-01-01

    In the last years it has become evident that the use of blood products should be reduced whenever possible. There is increasing evidence regarding serious adverse events, including higher mortality and morbidity, related to transfusions. The use of point of care (POC) devices integrated in algorithms is one of the important mechanisms to limit blood product exposure. Any type of algorithm, especially the POC-based ones, allows goal-directed transfusions of blood products and even better targeted factor concentrate substitutions. Different types of algorithms in different surgical settings (cardiac surgery, trauma, liver surgery etc.) have been established with growing interest in their use as they offer objective therapy for management and reduction of blood product use. The use of POC devices with evidence-based algorithms is important in the bleeding patient independent of its origin (traumatic vs. surgical). The use of factor concentrates compared to the classical blood products can be cost-saving, beneficial for the patient, and in agreement with the WHO-requested standard of care. The empiric and uncontrolled use of blood products such as fresh frozen plasma, red blood cells, and platelets without POC monitoring should no longer be followed with regard to actual evidence in literature. Furthermore, the use of factor concentrates may provide better outcomes and potential for cost saving. PMID:26019707

  2. Fluorescence Technology for Point of Care Wound Management.

    PubMed

    Anghel, Ersilia L; Falola, Reuben A; Kim, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    As the prevalence of chronic wounds continues to rise, the need for point of care wound assessment has also increased. While a variety of technologies have been developed to improve diagnostic abilities and monitoring of wounds, none have proven completely effective in all settings. Further, many of the stalwart wound management techniques remain costly, time consuming, and technically challenging. The two key pivotal events of ischemia and infection can lead to limb loss. A relatively new crop of fluorescence-based technologies, including devices that measure pathogenic auto-fluorescence, fluorescence angiography, or map cutaneous oxygenation, are increasingly being utilized for adjunct wound assessment-both clinical and operative settings can address these events. These technologies offer rapid, efficient, visual, and quantitative data that can aid the wound provider in evaluating the viability of tissues, ensuring adequate perfusion, and optimizing wound bed preparation. In the following review, pathogenic auto-fluorescence is compared to gross evaluation of wound infection and culture based diagnostics, indocyanine green fluorescence angiography is compared to various methods of visual and physical assessments of tissue perfusion by the practitioner, and cutaneous oxygenation is compared to clinical signs of ischemia. We focus on the current applications of fluorescence technologies in wound management, with emphasis placed on the evidence for clinical and operative implementation, a safety analyses, procedural limitations, and the future direction of this growing field of wound assessment. PMID:27175815

  3. Point-of-Care Rare Cell Cancer Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Issadore, David

    2015-01-01

    The sparse cells that are shed from tumors into peripheral circulation are an increasingly promising resource for noninvasive monitoring of cancer progression, early diagnosis of disease, and serve as a tool for improving our understanding of cancer metastasis. However, the extremely sparse concentration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood (~1–100 CTC in 7.5 mL of blood) as well as their heterogeneous biomarker expression has limited their detection using conventional laboratory techniques. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a microfluidic chip-based micro-Hall detector (μHD), which can directly measure single, immunomagnetically tagged cells in whole blood. The μHD can detect individual cells even in the presence of vast numbers of blood cells and unbound reactants, and does not require any washing or purification steps. Furthermore, this cost-effective, single-cell analytical technique is well suited for miniaturization into a mobile platform for low-cost point-of-care use. In this chapter, we describe the methodology used to design, fabricate, and apply these chips to cancer diagnostics. PMID:25626536

  4. Assessing Point-of-Care Device Specifications and Needs for Pathogen Detection in Emergencies and Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Gerald J.; Mecozzi, Daniel M.; Brock, T. Keith; Curtis, Corbin M.

    2012-01-01

    Background We assessed point-of-care device specifications and needs for pathogen detection in urgent care, emergencies, and disasters. Methods We surveyed American Association for Clinical Chemistry members and compared responses to those of disaster experts. Online SurveyMonkey questions covered performance characteristics, device design, pathogen targets, and other specifications. Results For disasters, respondents preferred direct sample collection with a disposable test cassette that stores biohazardous material (P<0.001). They identified methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, Vibrio cholerae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae as high priority pathogens. First responders were deemed the professional group who should perform POC testing in disasters (P<0.001). Conclusions Needs assessment now is requisite for competitive funding, so the results in this report will be useful to investigators preparing grant applications. Point-of-care devices used in disasters should address the needs of first responders, who give high priority to contamination-free whole-blood sampling, superior performance pathogen detection, and HIV-1/2 blood donor screening. There was surprising concordance of preferences among different professional groups, which presages formulation of global consensus guidelines to assist high impact preparedness. PMID:23049471

  5. Infectious Disease Management through Point-of-Care Personalized Medicine Molecular Diagnostic Technologies.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, Luc; Bergeron, Michel G

    2012-05-02

    Infectious disease management essentially consists in identifying the microbial cause(s) of an infection, initiating if necessary antimicrobial therapy against microbes, and controlling host reactions to infection. In clinical microbiology, the turnaround time of the diagnostic cycle (>24 hours) often leads to unnecessary suffering and deaths; approaches to relieve this burden include rapid diagnostic procedures and more efficient transmission or interpretation of molecular microbiology results. Although rapid nucleic acid-based diagnostic testing has demonstrated that it can impact on the transmission of hospital-acquired infections, we believe that such life-saving procedures should be performed closer to the patient, in dedicated 24/7 laboratories of healthcare institutions, or ideally at point of care. While personalized medicine generally aims at interrogating the genomic information of a patient, drug metabolism polymorphisms, for example, to guide drug choice and dosage, personalized medicine concepts are applicable in infectious diseases for the (rapid) identification of a disease-causing microbe and determination of its antimicrobial resistance profile, to guide an appropriate antimicrobial treatment for the proper management of the patient. The implementation of point-of-care testing for infectious diseases will require acceptance by medical authorities, new technological and communication platforms, as well as reimbursement practices such that time- and life-saving procedures become available to the largest number of patients.

  6. Assessing Point-of-Care Device Specifications and Needs for Pathogen Detection in Emergencies and Disasters.

    PubMed

    Kost, Gerald J; Mecozzi, Daniel M; Brock, T Keith; Curtis, Corbin M

    2012-06-01

    BACKGROUND: We assessed point-of-care device specifications and needs for pathogen detection in urgent care, emergencies, and disasters. METHODS: We surveyed American Association for Clinical Chemistry members and compared responses to those of disaster experts. Online SurveyMonkey questions covered performance characteristics, device design, pathogen targets, and other specifications. RESULTS: For disasters, respondents preferred direct sample collection with a disposable test cassette that stores biohazardous material (P<0.001). They identified methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, Vibrio cholerae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae as high priority pathogens. First responders were deemed the professional group who should perform POC testing in disasters (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Needs assessment now is requisite for competitive funding, so the results in this report will be useful to investigators preparing grant applications. Point-of-care devices used in disasters should address the needs of first responders, who give high priority to contamination-free whole-blood sampling, superior performance pathogen detection, and HIV-1/2 blood donor screening. There was surprising concordance of preferences among different professional groups, which presages formulation of global consensus guidelines to assist high impact preparedness.

  7. Portable point-of-care blood analysis system for global health (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, James J.; Aitchison, James Stewart; Chen, Lu; Nayyar, Rakesh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a portable blood analysis system based on a disposable cartridge and hand-held reader. The platform can perform all the sample preparation, detection and waste collection required to complete a clinical test. In order to demonstrate the utility of this approach a CD4 T cell enumeration was carried out. A handheld, point-of-care CD4 T cell system was developed based on this system. In particular we will describe a pneumatic, active pumping method to control the on-chip fluidic actuation. Reagents for the CD4 T cell counting assay were dried on a reagent plug to eliminate the need for cold chain storage when used in the field. A micromixer based on the active fluidic actuation was designed to complete sample staining with fluorescent dyes that was dried on the reagent plugs. A novel image detection and analysis algorithm was developed to detect and track the flight of target particles and cells during each analysis. The handheld, point-of-care CD4 testing system was benchmarked against clinical cytometer. The experimental results demonstrated experimental results were closely matched with the flow cytometry. The same platform can be further expanded into a bead-array detection system where other types of biomolecules such as proteins can be detected using the same detection system.

  8. International Federation for Emergency Medicine point of care ultrasound curriculum.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Paul; Bowra, Justin; Lambert, Mike; Lamprecht, Hein; Noble, Vicki; Jarman, Bob

    2015-03-01

    To meet a critical and growing need for a standardized approach to emergency point of care ultrasound (PoCUS) worldwide, emergency physicians must be trained to deliver and teach this skill in an accepted and reliable format. Currently, there is no globally recognized, standard PoCUS curriculum that defines the accepted applications, as well as standards for training and practice of PoCUS by specialists and trainees in emergency medicine. To address this deficit, the International Federation for Emergency Medicine (IFEM) convened a sub-committee of international experts in PoCUS to outline a curriculum for training of specialists in emergency PoCUS. This curriculum document represents the consensus of recommendations by this sub-committee. The curriculum is designed to provide a framework for PoCUS education in emergency medicine. The focus is on the processes required to select core and enhanced applications, as well as the key elements required for the delivery of PoCUS training from introduction through to continuing professional development and skill maintenance. It is designed not to be prescriptive but to assist educators and emergency medicine leadership to advance PoCUS education in emergency medicine no matter the training venue. The content of this curriculum is relevant not just for communities with mature emergency medicine systems but in particular for developing nations or for nations seeking to develop PoCUS training programs within the current educational structure. We anticipate that there will be wide variability in how this curriculum is implemented and taught, reflecting the existing educational environment, resources and goals of educational programs. PMID:26052968

  9. Point-of-care, portable microfluidic blood analyzer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Teimour; Fricke, Todd; Quesenberry, J. T.; Todd, Paul W.; Leary, James F.

    2012-03-01

    Recent advances in MEMS technology have provided an opportunity to develop microfluidic devices with enormous potential for portable, point-of-care, low-cost medical diagnostic tools. Hand-held flow cytometers will soon be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring. Despite much interest in miniaturizing commercially available cytometers, they remain costly, bulky, and require expert operation. In this article, we report progress on the development of a battery-powered handheld blood analyzer that will quickly and automatically process a drop of whole human blood by real-time, on-chip magnetic separation of white blood cells (WBCs), fluorescence analysis of labeled WBC subsets, and counting a reproducible fraction of the red blood cells (RBCs) by light scattering. The whole blood (WB) analyzer is composed of a micro-mixer, a special branching/separation system, an optical detection system, and electronic readout circuitry. A droplet of un-processed blood is mixed with the reagents, i.e. magnetic beads and fluorescent stain in the micro-mixer. Valve-less sorting is achieved by magnetic deflection of magnetic microparticle-labeled WBC. LED excitation in combination with an avalanche photodiode (APD) detection system is used for counting fluorescent WBC subsets using several colors of immune-Qdots, while counting a reproducible fraction of red blood cells (RBC) is performed using a laser light scatting measurement with a photodiode. Optimized branching/channel width is achieved using Comsol Multi-Physics™ simulation. To accommodate full portability, all required power supplies (40v, +/-10V, and +3V) are provided via step-up voltage converters from one battery. A simple onboard lock-in amplifier is used to increase the sensitivity/resolution of the pulse counting circuitry.

  10. Military family physicians' perceptions of a pocket point-of-care ultrasound device in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, Paul; Bornemann, Gina

    2014-12-01

    Point-of-care ultrasonography with a pocket ultrasound device, General Electric Medical Systems Vscan (Milwaukee, Wisconsin), has been shown to be effective and easy to learn. However, no studies to date have evaluated its use in the military primary care setting where its portability and value in bedside diagnosis would be especially beneficial. We tested the feasibility of the Vscan in the day-to-day care of patients by family physicians in their clinic, inpatient wards, and its potential for use in the military-deployed setting. Participants were trained and credentialed in the use of the point-of-care ultrasonography. Then, participants were provided with a pocket ultrasound device to use in their normal day-to-day practice. Additionally, participants completed surveys and provided ratings on their perceptions regarding the use of the device. According to the survey analysis, participants found the devices to be easy to use, valuable in discerning a diagnosis, and were not prohibitively time consuming. Moreover, patients were perceived by the participants to have been satisfied with the use of the device. Overall, participants had high satisfaction with the Vscan and perceived that the device would be highly valuable in the military-deployed setting.

  11. Development of a microchip Europium nanoparticle immunoassay for sensitive point-of-care HIV detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jikun; Du, Bingchen; Zhang, Panhe; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Zhao, Jiangqin; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Lee, Sherwin; DeVoe, Don L; Hewlett, Indira K

    2014-11-15

    Rapid, sensitive and specific diagnostic assays play an indispensable role in determination of HIV infection stages and evaluation of efficacy of antiretroviral therapy. Recently, our laboratory developed a sensitive Europium nanoparticle-based microtiter-plate immunoassay capable of detecting target analytes at subpicogram per milliliter levels without the use of catalytic enzymes and signal amplification processes. Encouraged by its sensitivity and simplicity, we continued to miniaturize this assay to a microchip platform for the purpose of converting the benchtop assay technique to a point-of-care test. It was found that detection capability of the microchip platform could be readily improved using Europium nanoparticle probes. We were able to routinely detect 5 pg/mL (4.6 attomoles) of HIV-1 p24 antigen at a signal-to-blank ratio of 1.5, a sensitivity level reasonably close to that of microtiter-plate Europium nanoparticle assay. Meanwhile, use of the microchip platform effectively reduced sample/reagent consumption 4.5 fold and shortened total assay time 2 fold in comparison with microtiter plate assays. Complex matrix substance in plasma negatively affected the microchip assays and the effects could be minimized by diluting the samples before loading. With further improvements in sensitivity, reproducibility, usability, assay process simplification, and incorporation of portable time-resolved fluorescence reader, Europium nanoparticle immunoassay technology could be adapted to meet the challenges of point-of-care diagnosis of HIV or other health-threatening pathogens at bedside or in resource-limited settings.

  12. Xpert Flu for point-of-care diagnosis of human influenza in industrialized countries.

    PubMed

    Salez, Nicolas; Nougairede, Antoine; Ninove, Laetitia; Zandotti, Christine; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Charrel, Rémi N

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory infections, particularly those caused by influenza viruses, represent the third-most important cause of death in the world due to infectious diseases. Nevertheless, despite the enormous publicity attracted by epidemics due to these viruses, laboratory diagnosis, documentation and recording of respiratory diseases is still unsatisfactory. Available diagnostic tests capable of providing results rapidly are either limited and insufficiently sensitive or highly sensitive and specific but insufficiently rapid. Considerable investment and research efforts have been made towards the development of new diagnostics for influenza A and B viruses and the Xpert(®) Flu assay (Cepheid(®), CA, USA) has emerged as one of the most promising. In this article, we review current knowledge of the Xpert Flu test, discuss its potential value as a point-of-care test and outline the potential leads for future development.

  13. Evidence-Based Point-of-Care Diagnostics: Current Status and Emerging Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Cangel Pui Yee; Mak, Wing Cheung; Cheung, Kwan Yee; Sin, King Keung; Yu, Cheuk Man; Rainer, Timothy H.; Renneberg, Reinhard

    2013-06-01

    Point-of-care (POC) diagnostics brings tests nearer to the site of patient care. The turnaround time is short, and minimal manual interference enables quick clinical management decisions. Growth in POC diagnostics is being continuously fueled by the global burden of cardiovascular and infectious diseases. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of treatment are crucial in the management of such patients. This review provides the rationale for the use of POC tests in acute coronary syndrome, heart failure, human immunodeficiency virus, and tuberculosis. We also consider emerging technologies that are based on advanced nanomaterials and microfluidics, improved assay sensitivity, miniaturization in device design, reduced costs, and high-throughput multiplex detection, all of which may shape the future development of POC diagnostics.

  14. Prospects for point-of-care pathogen diagnostics using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

    PubMed

    Granger, Jennifer H; Schlotter, Nicholas E; Crawford, Alexis C; Porter, Marc D

    2016-07-11

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has enabled the detection of pathogens and disease markers at extremely low levels. This review examines the potential impact of SERS in addressing unmet needs in pathogen diagnostics both in a traditional clinical setting and in the point of care (POC) arena. It begins by describing the strengths and weaknesses of today's diagnostics technologies in order to set a contextual stage for an overview which highlights a few of the many recent developments using SERS in biodefense, human and animal health, and monitoring food and water safety. These sections are followed by discussions of the challenges for the translation of these developments to POC settings, including the performance attributes and metrics for quantification of analytical and clinical figures of merit (e.g., limit of detection and clinical accuracy), and the pathways for large-scale test validation and the build-out of instrumentation and tests kits for POC deployment. PMID:27048939

  15. Point of care creatinine measurement for diagnosis of renal disease using a disposable microchip.

    PubMed

    Ávila, Mónica; Floris, Arjan; Staal, Steven; Ríos, Ángel; Eijkel, Jan; van den Berg, Albert

    2013-11-01

    A point-of-care device for the determination of elevated creatinine levels in blood is reported. This device potentially offers a new and simple clinical regime for the determination of creatinine that will give huge time savings and removal of several steps of determination. The test employs a disposable prefilled microchip and the handheld Medimate Multireader®. By optimizing the analytical conditions it was found that the LOD of the proposed method was 87 μM creatinine, close to the normal human serum levels that are in the range of 60 to 100 μM. A statistical analysis of the residual shows a normal distribution, indicating the absence of systematic errors in the proposed method. The test can be used to distinguish patients with renal insufficiency (creatinine levels >100 μM) from healthy persons. Long-term monitoring could furthermore distinguish between acute renal failure and chronic kidney disease by the rate of creatinine concentration rise.

  16. Sample to answer visualization pipeline for low-cost point-of-care blood cell counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Suzanne; Naidoo, Thegaran; Davies, Emlyn; Fourie, Louis; Nxumalo, Zandile; Swart, Hein; Marais, Philip; Land, Kevin; Roux, Pieter

    2015-03-01

    We present a visualization pipeline from sample to answer for point-of-care blood cell counting applications. Effective and low-cost point-of-care medical diagnostic tests provide developing countries and rural communities with accessible healthcare solutions [1], and can be particularly beneficial for blood cell count tests, which are often the starting point in the process of diagnosing a patient [2]. The initial focus of this work is on total white and red blood cell counts, using a microfluidic cartridge [3] for sample processing. Analysis of the processed samples has been implemented by means of two main optical visualization systems developed in-house: 1) a fluidic operation analysis system using high speed video data to determine volumes, mixing efficiency and flow rates, and 2) a microscopy analysis system to investigate homogeneity and concentration of blood cells. Fluidic parameters were derived from the optical flow [4] as well as color-based segmentation of the different fluids using a hue-saturation-value (HSV) color space. Cell count estimates were obtained using automated microscopy analysis and were compared to a widely accepted manual method for cell counting using a hemocytometer [5]. The results using the first iteration microfluidic device [3] showed that the most simple - and thus low-cost - approach for microfluidic component implementation was not adequate as compared to techniques based on manual cell counting principles. An improved microfluidic design has been developed to incorporate enhanced mixing and metering components, which together with this work provides the foundation on which to successfully implement automated, rapid and low-cost blood cell counting tests.

  17. Point-of-Care Diagnostics in Low Resource Settings: Present Status and Future Role of Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Zapatero-Rodríguez, Julia; Estrela, Pedro; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2015-08-13

    The inability to diagnose numerous diseases rapidly is a significant cause of the disparity of deaths resulting from both communicable and non-communicable diseases in the developing world in comparison to the developed world. Existing diagnostic instrumentation usually requires sophisticated infrastructure, stable electrical power, expensive reagents, long assay times, and highly trained personnel which is not often available in limited resource settings. This review will critically survey and analyse the current lateral flow-based point-of-care (POC) technologies, which have made a major impact on diagnostic testing in developing countries over the last 50 years. The future of POC technologies including the applications of microfluidics, which allows miniaturisation and integration of complex functions that facilitate their usage in limited resource settings, is discussed The advantages offered by such systems, including low cost, ruggedness and the capacity to generate accurate and reliable results rapidly, are well suited to the clinical and social settings of the developing world.

  18. Point-of-Care Diagnostics in Low Resource Settings: Present Status and Future Role of Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shikha; Zapatero-Rodríguez, Julia; Estrela, Pedro; O’Kennedy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The inability to diagnose numerous diseases rapidly is a significant cause of the disparity of deaths resulting from both communicable and non-communicable diseases in the developing world in comparison to the developed world. Existing diagnostic instrumentation usually requires sophisticated infrastructure, stable electrical power, expensive reagents, long assay times, and highly trained personnel which is not often available in limited resource settings. This review will critically survey and analyse the current lateral flow-based point-of-care (POC) technologies, which have made a major impact on diagnostic testing in developing countries over the last 50 years. The future of POC technologies including the applications of microfluidics, which allows miniaturisation and integration of complex functions that facilitate their usage in limited resource settings, is discussed The advantages offered by such systems, including low cost, ruggedness and the capacity to generate accurate and reliable results rapidly, are well suited to the clinical and social settings of the developing world. PMID:26287254

  19. Point-of-Care Quantitative Measure of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Enzyme Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Michael; Glader, Bertil; Cotten, Michael; Kleinert, Jairus; Pamula, Vamsee

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Widespread newborn screening on a point-of-care basis could prevent bilirubin neurotoxicity in newborns with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We evaluated a quantitative G6PD assay on a digital microfluidic platform by comparing its performance with standard clinical methods. METHODS: G6PD activity was measured quantitatively by using digital microfluidic fluorescence and the gold standard fluorescence biochemical test on a convenience sample of 98 discarded blood samples. Twenty-four samples were designated as G6PD deficient. RESULTS: Mean ± SD G6PD activity for normal samples using the digital microfluidic method and the standard method, respectively, was 9.7 ± 2.8 and 11.1 ± 3.0 U/g hemoglobin (Hb), respectively; for G6PD-deficient samples, it was 0.8 ± 0.7 and 1.4 ± 0.9 U/g Hb. Bland-Altman analysis determined a mean difference of –0.96 ± 1.8 U/g Hb between the digital microfluidic fluorescence results and the standard biochemical test results. The lower and upper limits for the digital microfluidic platform were 4.5 to 19.5 U/g Hb for normal samples and 0.2 to 3.7 U/g Hb for G6PD-deficient samples. The lower and upper limits for the Stanford method were 5.5 to 20.7 U/g Hb for normal samples and 0.1 to 2.8 U/g Hb for G6PD-deficient samples. The measured activity discriminated between G6PD-deficient samples and normal samples with no overlap. CONCLUSIONS: Pending further validation, a digital microfluidics platform could be an accurate point-of-care screening tool for rapid newborn G6PD screening. PMID:26459646

  20. Point-of-care quantification of blood-borne filarial parasites with a mobile phone microscope.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Michael V; Bakalar, Matthew; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Reber, Clay; Skandarajah, Arunan; Nilsson, Lina; Switz, Neil; Kamgno, Joseph; Pion, Sébastien; Boussinesq, Michel; Nutman, Thomas B; Fletcher, Daniel A

    2015-05-01

    Parasitic helminths cause debilitating diseases that affect millions of people in primarily low-resource settings. Efforts to eliminate onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis in Central Africa through mass drug administration have been suspended because of ivermectin-associated serious adverse events, including death, in patients infected with the filarial parasite Loa loa. To safely administer ivermectin for onchocerciasis or lymphatic filariasis in regions co-endemic with L. loa, a strategy termed "test and (not) treat" has been proposed whereby those with high levels of L. loa microfilariae (>30,000/ml) that put them at risk for life-threatening serious adverse events are identified and excluded from mass drug administration. To enable this, we developed a mobile phone-based video microscope that automatically quantifies L. loa microfilariae in whole blood loaded directly into a small glass capillary from a fingerprick without the need for conventional sample preparation or staining. This point-of-care device automatically captures and analyzes videos of microfilarial motion in whole blood using motorized sample scanning and onboard motion detection, minimizing input from health care workers and providing a quantification of microfilariae per milliliter of whole blood in under 2 min. To validate performance and usability of the mobile phone microscope, we tested 33 potentially Loa-infected patients in Cameroon and confirmed that automated counts correlated with manual thick smear counts (94% specificity; 100% sensitivity). Use of this technology to exclude patients from ivermectin-based treatment at the point of care in Loa-endemic regions would allow resumption/expansion of mass drug administration programs for onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis in Central Africa.

  1. Point-of-care quantification of blood-borne filarial parasites with a mobile phone microscope.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Michael V; Bakalar, Matthew; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Reber, Clay; Skandarajah, Arunan; Nilsson, Lina; Switz, Neil; Kamgno, Joseph; Pion, Sébastien; Boussinesq, Michel; Nutman, Thomas B; Fletcher, Daniel A

    2015-05-01

    Parasitic helminths cause debilitating diseases that affect millions of people in primarily low-resource settings. Efforts to eliminate onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis in Central Africa through mass drug administration have been suspended because of ivermectin-associated serious adverse events, including death, in patients infected with the filarial parasite Loa loa. To safely administer ivermectin for onchocerciasis or lymphatic filariasis in regions co-endemic with L. loa, a strategy termed "test and (not) treat" has been proposed whereby those with high levels of L. loa microfilariae (>30,000/ml) that put them at risk for life-threatening serious adverse events are identified and excluded from mass drug administration. To enable this, we developed a mobile phone-based video microscope that automatically quantifies L. loa microfilariae in whole blood loaded directly into a small glass capillary from a fingerprick without the need for conventional sample preparation or staining. This point-of-care device automatically captures and analyzes videos of microfilarial motion in whole blood using motorized sample scanning and onboard motion detection, minimizing input from health care workers and providing a quantification of microfilariae per milliliter of whole blood in under 2 min. To validate performance and usability of the mobile phone microscope, we tested 33 potentially Loa-infected patients in Cameroon and confirmed that automated counts correlated with manual thick smear counts (94% specificity; 100% sensitivity). Use of this technology to exclude patients from ivermectin-based treatment at the point of care in Loa-endemic regions would allow resumption/expansion of mass drug administration programs for onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis in Central Africa. PMID:25947164

  2. Progress in the development of paper-based diagnostics for low-resource point-of-care settings

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Samantha; Thiessen, Gregory; Fu, Elain

    2014-01-01

    This Review focuses on recent work in the field of paper microfluidics that specifically addresses the goal of translating the multistep processes that are characteristic of gold-standard laboratory tests to low-resource point-of-care settings. A major challenge is to implement multistep processes with the robust fluid control required to achieve the necessary sensitivity and specificity of a given application in a user-friendly package that minimizes equipment. We review key work in the areas of fluidic controls for automation in paper-based devices, readout methods that minimize dedicated equipment, and power and heating methods that are compatible with low-resource point-of-care settings. We also highlight a focused set of recent applications and discuss future challenges. PMID:24256361

  3. Platelet function tests: a comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Rita; Priora, Raffaella; Alessandrello Liotta, Agatina; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation – adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation – have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT) dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]). POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well-tried and innovative platelet function tests and their methodological features and clinical applications are considered. PMID:25733843

  4. ClinicalKey 2.0: Upgrades in a Point-of-Care Search Engine.

    PubMed

    Huslig, Mary Ann; Vardell, Emily

    2015-01-01

    ClinicalKey 2.0, launched September 23, 2014, offers a mobile-friendly design with a search history feature for targeting point-of-care resources for health care professionals. Browsing is improved with searchable, filterable listings of sources highlighting new resources. ClinicalKey 2.0 improvements include more than 1,400 new Topic Pages for quick access to point-of-care content. A sample search details some of the upgrades and content options.

  5. Emergency Point-of-Care Ultrasound Detection of Cancer in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Jamjoom, Roaa S; Etoom, Yousef; Solano, Tanya; Desjardins, Marie-Pier; Fischer, Jason W

    2015-08-01

    The use of point-of-care ultrasound in the pediatric emergency department is evolving beyond conventional applications as users become more expert with the technology. In this case series, we describe the potential utility of recognizing abnormal anatomy to impact care in the context of possible cancer in pediatric patients. We describe 4 patients with Langerhans histiocytosis, neuroblastoma, Wilms tumor, and rhabdomyosarcoma, in which point-of-care ultrasound was used to facilitate the diagnoses.

  6. An Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor for Point of Care Viral Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Reddington, Alexander P.; Trueb, Jacob T.; Freedman, David S.; Tuysuzoglu, Ahmet; Daaboul, George G.; Lopez, Carlos A.; Karl, W. Clem; Connor, John H.; Fawcett, Helen; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2014-01-01

    The use of in vitro diagnostic devices is transitioning from the laboratory to the primary care setting to address early disease detection needs. Time critical viral diagnoses are often made without support due to the experimental time required in today’s standard tests. Available rapid point of care (POC) viral tests are less reliable, requiring a follow-on confirmatory test before conclusions can be drawn. The development of a reliable POC viral test for the primary care setting would decrease the time for diagnosis leading to a lower chance of transmission and improve recovery. The single particle interferometric reflectance imaging sensor (SP-IRIS) has been shown to be a sensitive and specific-detection platform in serum and whole blood. This paper presents a step towards a POC viral assay through a SP-IRIS prototype with automated data acquisition and analysis and a simple, easy-to-use software interface. Decreasing operation complexity highlights the potential of SP-IRIS as a sensitive and specific POC diagnostic tool. With the integration of a microfluidic cartridge, this automated instrument will allow an untrained user to run a sample-to-answer viral assay in the POC setting. PMID:24271115

  7. Point-of-care diagnosis of periodontitis using saliva: technically feasible but still a challenge.

    PubMed

    Ji, Suk; Choi, Youngnim

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammation of the periodontium caused by persistent bacterial infection that leads to the breakdown of connective tissue and bone. Because the ability to reconstruct the periodontium is limited after alveolar bone loss, early diagnosis and intervention should be the primary goals of periodontal treatment. However, periodontitis often progresses without noticeable symptoms, and many patients do not seek professional dental care until the periodontal destruction progresses to the point of no return. Furthermore, the current diagnosis of periodontitis depends on time-consuming clinical measurements. Therefore, there is an unmet need for near-patient testing to diagnose periodontitis. Saliva is an optimal biological fluid to serve as a near-patient diagnostic tool for periodontitis. Recent developments in point-of-care (POC) testing indicate that a diagnostic test for periodontitis using saliva is now technically feasible. A number of promising salivary biomarkers associated with periodontitis have been reported. A panel of optimal biomarkers must be carefully selected based on the pathogenesis of periodontitis. The biggest hurdle for the POC diagnosis of periodontitis using saliva may be the process of validation in a large, diverse patient population. Therefore, we propose the organization of an International Consortium for Biomarkers of Periodontitis, which will gather efforts to identify, select, and validate salivary biomarkers for the diagnosis of periodontitis.

  8. Point-of-Care Diagnostics for Improving Maternal Health in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mashamba-Thompson, Tivani P.; Sartorius, Benn; Drain, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Improving maternal health is a global priority, particularly in high HIV-endemic, resource-limited settings. Failure to use health care facilities due to poor access is one of the main causes of maternal deaths in South Africa. “Point-of-care” (POC) diagnostics are an innovative healthcare approach to improve healthcare access and health outcomes in remote and resource-limited settings. In this review, POC testing is defined as a diagnostic test that is carried out near patients and leads to rapid clinical decisions. We review the current and emerging POC diagnostics for maternal health, with a specific focus on the World Health Organization (WHO) quality-ASSURED (Affordability, Sensitivity, Specificity, User friendly, Rapid and robust, Equipment free and Delivered) criteria for an ideal point-of-care test in resource-limited settings. The performance of POC diagnostics, barriers and challenges related to implementing POC diagnostics for maternal health in rural and resource-limited settings are reviewed. Innovative strategies for overcoming these barriers are recommended to achieve substantial progress on improving maternal health outcomes in these settings. PMID:27589808

  9. Diagnosing dengue at the point-of-care: utility of a rapid combined diagnostic kit in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Gan, Victor C; Tan, Li-Kiang; Lye, David C; Pok, Kwoon-Yong; Mok, Shi-Qi; Chua, Rachel Choon-Rong; Leo, Yee-Sin; Ng, Lee-Ching

    2014-01-01

    WHO recommendations for dengue diagnosis require laboratory facilities. Antibody-based rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have performed poorly, and clinical diagnosis remains the mainstay in dengue-endemic countries. We evaluated a combination antigen-antibody RDT for point-of-care testing in a high-prevalence setting. In this prospective cohort study, adults were enrolled from a tertiary infectious disease centre for evaluation of undifferentiated febrile illness from October 2011 to May 2012. SD Bioline Dengue Duo was evaluated at point-of-care against a WHO-based reference standard of viral isolation, RT-PCR, NS1-, IgM-, and IgG-ELISA. 246 adults were enrolled (median age 34 years, range 18-69), of which 197 could be confirmed definitively as either dengue or non-dengue. DENV-2 was the predominant serotype (79.5%) and the ratio of primary to secondary cases was 1∶1.1. There were no test failures and minimal interobserver variation with a Fleiss' kappa of 0.983 (95% CI 0.827-1.00). Overall sensitivity and specificity were 93.9% (95% CI 88.8-96.8%) and 92.0% (95% CI 81.2-96.9%) respectively. Using WHO clinical criteria alone for diagnosis had similar sensitivities (95.9%, 95% CI 91.4-98.1%) and lower specificities (20.0%, 95% CI 11.2-33.0%). No significant difference in performance was found when testing early versus late presenters, primary versus secondary cases, or DENV-1 versus DENV-2 infections. The use of a combination RDT fulfills WHO ASSURED criteria for point-of-care testing and can enhance dengue diagnosis in an endemic setting. This has the potential to markedly improve clinical management of dengue in the field.

  10. Potential impact of co-payment at point of care to influence emergency department utilization

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Zachary; Simmons, Michael R.; Guardiola, Jose H.; Smith, Cynthia; Carrasco, Lynn; Ha, Joann

    2016-01-01

    Background. Many proponents for healthcare reform suggest increased cost-sharing by patients as a method to reduce overall expenditures. Prior studies on the effects of co-payments for ED visits have generally not been directed toward understanding patient attitudes/behavior at point of care. Objectives. We conducted a survey at point of care to test our hypothesis that a significant number of patients with urgent chief complaints might have avoided the ED if asked to provide a co-payment. Methods. Cross-sectional study design. Stable, oriented, consenting patients at an inner-city, academic ED were consecutively enrolled at hours in which trained research associates were available to assist with data collection. Enrolled patients completed a written survey providing demographic/chief complaint information, and then were asked whether 13 interval amounts of co-payment ranging from 0 to >500 would have impacted their decision to visit the ED. Categorical data are presented as frequency of occurrence and analyzed by chi-square; continuous data presented as means ± standard deviation, analyzed by t-tests. ORs and 95% confidence intervals provided. Primary outcome parameter was the % of patients who would have avoided the ED if asked to pay any co-payment for several urgent chief complaints: chest pain, SOB, and abdominal pain. Results. A total of 581 patients were enrolled; 63.1% female, mean age 42.4 ± 15.1 years, 65% Hispanic, 71.2% income less than 20,000, 28.6% less than high school graduate, 81.3% had primary care physician, 57.6% had 2 or more ED visits/past year. Overall, 30.2% of patients chose 0 as the maximum they would have been willing to pay if it was required to be seen in the ED. 16/58 (28%; 95% CI [18–40%]) of chest pain patients, 9/43 (20.9%; 95% CI [11–35%]) of SOB patients, and 24/127 (26.8%; 95% CI [13–27%]) of abdominal pain patients would have been unwilling to pay a co-pay. Patients with income >20,000 were more willing to pay a co

  11. Accurate Point-of-Care Detection of Ruptured Fetal Membranes: Improved Diagnostic Performance Characteristics with a Monoclonal/Polyclonal Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Linda C.; Scott, Laurie; Block, Jon E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Accurate and timely diagnosis of rupture of membranes (ROM) is imperative to allow for gestational age-specific interventions. This study compared the diagnostic performance characteristics between two methods used for the detection of ROM as measured in the same patient. METHODS Vaginal secretions were evaluated using the conventional fern test as well as a point-of-care monoclonal/polyclonal immunoassay test (ROM Plus®) in 75 pregnant patients who presented to labor and delivery with complaints of leaking amniotic fluid. Both tests were compared to analytical confirmation of ROM using three external laboratory tests. Diagnostic performance characteristics were calculated including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy. RESULTS Diagnostic performance characteristics uniformly favored ROM detection using the immunoassay test compared to the fern test: sensitivity (100% vs. 77.8%), specificity (94.8% vs. 79.3%), PPV (75% vs. 36.8%), NPV (100% vs. 95.8%), and accuracy (95.5% vs. 79.1%). CONCLUSIONS The point-of-care immunoassay test provides improved diagnostic accuracy for the detection of ROM compared to fern testing. It has the potential of improving patient management decisions, thereby minimizing serious complications and perinatal morbidity. PMID:27199579

  12. Simultaneous Quantitative Detection of Helicobacter Pylori Based on a Rapid and Sensitive Testing Platform using Quantum Dots-Labeled Immunochromatiographic Test Strips.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Kan; Zhang, Jingjing; Qin, Weijian; Yan, Xinyu; Shen, Guangxia; Gao, Guo; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-12-01

    Quantum dots-labeled urea-enzyme antibody-based rapid immunochromatographic test strips have been developed as quantitative fluorescence point-of-care tests (POCTs) to detect helicobacter pylori. Presented in this study is a new test strip reader designed to run on tablet personal computers (PCs), which is portable for outdoor detection even without an alternating current (AC) power supply. A Wi-Fi module was integrated into the reader to improve its portability. Patient information was loaded by a barcode scanner, and an application designed to run on tablet PCs was developed to handle the acquired images. A vision algorithm called Kmeans was used for picture processing. Different concentrations of various human blood samples were tested to evaluate the stability and accuracy of the fabricated device. Results demonstrate that the reader can provide an easy, rapid, simultaneous, quantitative detection for helicobacter pylori. The proposed test strip reader has a lighter weight than existing detection readers, and it can run for long durations without an AC power supply, thus verifying that it possesses advantages for outdoor detection. Given its fast detection speed and high accuracy, the proposed reader combined with quantum dots-labeled test strips is suitable for POCTs and owns great potential in applications such as screening patients with infection of helicobacter pylori, etc. in near future. PMID:26842795

  13. Simultaneous Quantitative Detection of Helicobacter Pylori Based on a Rapid and Sensitive Testing Platform using Quantum Dots-Labeled Immunochromatiographic Test Strips.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Kan; Zhang, Jingjing; Qin, Weijian; Yan, Xinyu; Shen, Guangxia; Gao, Guo; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-12-01

    Quantum dots-labeled urea-enzyme antibody-based rapid immunochromatographic test strips have been developed as quantitative fluorescence point-of-care tests (POCTs) to detect helicobacter pylori. Presented in this study is a new test strip reader designed to run on tablet personal computers (PCs), which is portable for outdoor detection even without an alternating current (AC) power supply. A Wi-Fi module was integrated into the reader to improve its portability. Patient information was loaded by a barcode scanner, and an application designed to run on tablet PCs was developed to handle the acquired images. A vision algorithm called Kmeans was used for picture processing. Different concentrations of various human blood samples were tested to evaluate the stability and accuracy of the fabricated device. Results demonstrate that the reader can provide an easy, rapid, simultaneous, quantitative detection for helicobacter pylori. The proposed test strip reader has a lighter weight than existing detection readers, and it can run for long durations without an AC power supply, thus verifying that it possesses advantages for outdoor detection. Given its fast detection speed and high accuracy, the proposed reader combined with quantum dots-labeled test strips is suitable for POCTs and owns great potential in applications such as screening patients with infection of helicobacter pylori, etc. in near future.

  14. Simultaneous Quantitative Detection of Helicobacter Pylori Based on a Rapid and Sensitive Testing Platform using Quantum Dots-Labeled Immunochromatiographic Test Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Kan; Zhang, Jingjing; Qin, Weijian; Yan, Xinyu; Shen, Guangxia; Gao, Guo; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-02-01

    Quantum dots-labeled urea-enzyme antibody-based rapid immunochromatographic test strips have been developed as quantitative fluorescence point-of-care tests (POCTs) to detect helicobacter pylori. Presented in this study is a new test strip reader designed to run on tablet personal computers (PCs), which is portable for outdoor detection even without an alternating current (AC) power supply. A Wi-Fi module was integrated into the reader to improve its portability. Patient information was loaded by a barcode scanner, and an application designed to run on tablet PCs was developed to handle the acquired images. A vision algorithm called Kmeans was used for picture processing. Different concentrations of various human blood samples were tested to evaluate the stability and accuracy of the fabricated device. Results demonstrate that the reader can provide an easy, rapid, simultaneous, quantitative detection for helicobacter pylori. The proposed test strip reader has a lighter weight than existing detection readers, and it can run for long durations without an AC power supply, thus verifying that it possesses advantages for outdoor detection. Given its fast detection speed and high accuracy, the proposed reader combined with quantum dots-labeled test strips is suitable for POCTs and owns great potential in applications such as screening patients with infection of helicobacter pylori, etc. in near future.

  15. Plastic-Chip-Based Magnetophoretic Immunoassay for Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeonghyo; Jang, Minji; Lee, Kyoung G; Lee, Kil-Soo; Lee, Seok Jae; Ro, Kyung-Won; Kang, In Sung; Jeong, Byung Do; Park, Tae Jung; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Lee, Jaebeom

    2016-09-14

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a relevant infectious disease in the 21st century, and its extermination is still far from being attained. Due to the extreme infectivity of incipient TB patients, a rapid sensing system for proficient point-of-care (POC) diagnostics is required. In our study, a plastic-chip-based magnetophoretic immunoassay (pcMPI) is introduced using magnetic and gold nanoparticles (NPs) modified with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) antibodies. This pcMPI offers an ultrasensitive limit of detection (LOD) of 1.8 pg·ml(-1) for the detection of CFP-10, an MTB-secreted antigen, as a potential TB biomarker with high specificity. In addition, by combining the plastic chip with an automated spectrophotometer setup, advantages include ease of operation, rapid time to results (1 h), and cost-effectiveness. Furthermore, the pcMPI results using clinical sputum culture filtrate samples are competitively compared with and integrated with clinical data collected from conventional tools such as the acid-fast bacilli (AFB) test, mycobacteria growth indicator tube (MGIT), polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and physiological results. CFP-10 concentrations were consistently higher in patients diagnosed with MTB infection than those seen in patients infected with nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM) (P < 0.05), and this novel test can distinguish MTB and NTM while MGIT cannot. All these results indicate that this pcMPI has the potential to become a new commercial TB diagnostic POC platform in view of its sensitivity, portability, and affordability. PMID:27548010

  16. Point-of-care diagnostics for HIV and tuberculosis: landscape, pipeline, and unmet needs.

    PubMed

    Pai, Nitika Pant; Pai, Madhukar

    2012-01-01

    Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of treatment remains a key strategy to control both HIV and tuberculosis (TB). However, HIV and TB control programs have had completely contrasting successes, especially with the development and deployment of point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. Clinicians, researchers, and public health staff who work at the frontlines of HIV care and control have had access to an outstanding array of POC diagnostics at their disposal, including those used for screening, initial diagnosis, staging, treatment monitoring, and early infant diagnosis. The field has also advanced to consider over-the-counter, self-testing options for HIV and the use of multiplexed platforms that allow for simultaneous detection of infections associated with HIV. In sharp contrast to HIV, suboptimal and delayed diagnosis of TB has perpetuated the epidemic in many high-burden countries. Although the TB diagnostics pipeline is substantially better today than it was even five years ago, absence of a simple POC test continues to be a gaping hole in the pipeline. In this review, we compare the POC diagnostics landscape and pipelines for these two important infectious diseases, and highlight gaps and unmet needs. PMID:22284782

  17. Modular development of a prototype point of care molecular diagnostic platform for sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Branavan, Manoharanehru; Mackay, Ruth E; Craw, Pascal; Naveenathayalan, Angel; Ahern, Jeremy C; Sivanesan, Tulasi; Hudson, Chris; Stead, Thomas; Kremer, Jessica; Garg, Neha; Baker, Mark; Sadiq, Syed T; Balachandran, Wamadeva

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the design of a modular point of care test platform that integrates a proprietary sample collection device directly with a microfluidic cartridge. Cell lysis, within the cartridge, is conducted using a chemical method and nucleic acid purification is done on an activated cellulose membrane. The microfluidic device incorporates passive mixing of the lysis-binding buffers and sample using a serpentine channel. Results have shown extraction efficiencies for this new membrane of 69% and 57% compared to the commercial Qiagen extraction method of 85% and 59.4% for 0.1ng/µL and 100ng/µL salmon sperm DNA respectively spiked in phosphate buffered solution. Extraction experiments using the serpentine passive mixer cartridges incorporating lysis and nucleic acid purification showed extraction efficiency around 80% of the commercial Qiagen kit. Isothermal amplification was conducted using thermophillic helicase dependant amplification and recombinase polymerase amplification. A low cost benchtop real-time isothermal amplification platform has been developed capable of running six amplifications simultaneously. Results show that the platform is capable of detecting 1.32×10(6) of sample DNA through thermophillic helicase dependant amplification and 1×10(5) copy numbers Chlamydia trachomatis genomic DNA within 10min through recombinase polymerase nucleic acid amplification tests. PMID:27238759

  18. Plastic-Chip-Based Magnetophoretic Immunoassay for Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeonghyo; Jang, Minji; Lee, Kyoung G; Lee, Kil-Soo; Lee, Seok Jae; Ro, Kyung-Won; Kang, In Sung; Jeong, Byung Do; Park, Tae Jung; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Lee, Jaebeom

    2016-09-14

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a relevant infectious disease in the 21st century, and its extermination is still far from being attained. Due to the extreme infectivity of incipient TB patients, a rapid sensing system for proficient point-of-care (POC) diagnostics is required. In our study, a plastic-chip-based magnetophoretic immunoassay (pcMPI) is introduced using magnetic and gold nanoparticles (NPs) modified with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) antibodies. This pcMPI offers an ultrasensitive limit of detection (LOD) of 1.8 pg·ml(-1) for the detection of CFP-10, an MTB-secreted antigen, as a potential TB biomarker with high specificity. In addition, by combining the plastic chip with an automated spectrophotometer setup, advantages include ease of operation, rapid time to results (1 h), and cost-effectiveness. Furthermore, the pcMPI results using clinical sputum culture filtrate samples are competitively compared with and integrated with clinical data collected from conventional tools such as the acid-fast bacilli (AFB) test, mycobacteria growth indicator tube (MGIT), polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and physiological results. CFP-10 concentrations were consistently higher in patients diagnosed with MTB infection than those seen in patients infected with nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM) (P < 0.05), and this novel test can distinguish MTB and NTM while MGIT cannot. All these results indicate that this pcMPI has the potential to become a new commercial TB diagnostic POC platform in view of its sensitivity, portability, and affordability.

  19. Modular development of a prototype point of care molecular diagnostic platform for sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Branavan, Manoharanehru; Mackay, Ruth E; Craw, Pascal; Naveenathayalan, Angel; Ahern, Jeremy C; Sivanesan, Tulasi; Hudson, Chris; Stead, Thomas; Kremer, Jessica; Garg, Neha; Baker, Mark; Sadiq, Syed T; Balachandran, Wamadeva

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the design of a modular point of care test platform that integrates a proprietary sample collection device directly with a microfluidic cartridge. Cell lysis, within the cartridge, is conducted using a chemical method and nucleic acid purification is done on an activated cellulose membrane. The microfluidic device incorporates passive mixing of the lysis-binding buffers and sample using a serpentine channel. Results have shown extraction efficiencies for this new membrane of 69% and 57% compared to the commercial Qiagen extraction method of 85% and 59.4% for 0.1ng/µL and 100ng/µL salmon sperm DNA respectively spiked in phosphate buffered solution. Extraction experiments using the serpentine passive mixer cartridges incorporating lysis and nucleic acid purification showed extraction efficiency around 80% of the commercial Qiagen kit. Isothermal amplification was conducted using thermophillic helicase dependant amplification and recombinase polymerase amplification. A low cost benchtop real-time isothermal amplification platform has been developed capable of running six amplifications simultaneously. Results show that the platform is capable of detecting 1.32×10(6) of sample DNA through thermophillic helicase dependant amplification and 1×10(5) copy numbers Chlamydia trachomatis genomic DNA within 10min through recombinase polymerase nucleic acid amplification tests.

  20. DEVELOPMENTAL VALIDATION OF A POINT-OF-CARE, SALIVARY α-AMYLASE BIOSENSOR

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Vivek; Zigler, Corwin; Robles, Theodore F.; Elashoff, David; Yamaguchi, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    The translation of salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) to the ambulatory assessment of stress hinges on the development of technologies capable of speedy and accurate reporting of sAA levels. Here, we describe the developmental validation and usability testing of a point-of-care, colorimetric, sAA biosensor. A disposable test strip allows for streamlined sample collection and a corresponding hand-held reader with integrated analytic capabilities permits rapid analysis and reporting of sAA levels. Bioanalytical validation utilizing saliva samples from 20 normal subjects indicates that, within the biosensor’s linear range (10–230 U/ml), its accuracy (R2 = 0.989), precision (CV < 9%), and measurement repeatability (range −3.1% to + 3.1%) approach more elaborate laboratory-based, clinical analyzers. The truncated sampling-reporting cycle (< 1 minute) and the excellent performance characteristics of the biosensor has the potential to take sAA analysis out of the realm of dedicated, centralized laboratories and facilitate future sAA biomarker qualification studies. PMID:20696529

  1. Evaluating the barriers to point-of-care documentation for nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Kohle-Ersher, Angela; Chatterjee, Pooja; Osmanbeyoglu, Hatice Ulku; Hochheiser, Harry; Bartos, Christa

    2012-03-01

    Point-of-care documentation has been identified as a patient safety measure for improving accuracy and timeliness of data. To evaluate the barriers that nurses and nurse aide/clinical technicians encounter for electronic point-of-care documentation, we conducted surveys on a telemetry unit at a southwestern Pennsylvania community hospital. Our first survey revealed that the location of the in-room computers, perceived lack of in-room computer reliability, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act/privacy concerns, and perceptions of the patients' response to charting on computers in patient rooms were all barriers to point-of-care documentation. Our second survey revealed that workflow priority issues were also a barrier to point-of-care documentation, as staff members did not rate documentation as a high priority in terms of delivering timely medical care. Changes in both nursing practices and hospital infrastructure may be needed if these barriers to point-of-care documentation are to be overcome.

  2. Point-of-care diagnostics: an advancing sector with nontechnical issues.

    PubMed

    Huckle, David

    2008-11-01

    The particular reasons for the relative lack in development of point-of-care (PoC) diagnostics in a business context were discussed in our sister journal, Expert Review of Medical Devices, over 2 years ago. At that time, it could be seen that the concept of PoC testing was being revisited for at least the fifth time in the last 20 years. There had been important advances in technology but, with changes in global healthcare structures and funding, the overall in vitro diagnostics sector has had sluggish growth. Only molecular diagnostics and PoC testing are growing strongly. PoC testing is now a quarter of the total global in vitro diagnostics market, but largely due to use in diabetes monitoring. An increased focus on areas other than glucose self-testing has created a disturbance in the market. An implementation issue from this disturbance is that of control between central laboratories and the proposed sites for PoC testing. Evidence is presented to show that the first step is likely to be increased use in clinics and outpatient facilities closely linked with the laboratory. The aim will be to control the quality of the test, maintenance of equipment and provide support for the clinician in interpretation. The major problem for effective PoC implementation will be the significant changes to patient pathways that are required. The changes will benefit the patient and clinical outcomes but will require healthcare professionals to change their work patterns. This will be an uphill task!

  3. Determining the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) status of FIV-vaccinated cats using point-of-care antibody kits.

    PubMed

    Westman, Mark E; Malik, Richard; Hall, Evelyn; Sheehy, Paul A; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2015-10-01

    This study challenges the commonly held view that the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection status of FIV-vaccinated cats cannot be determined using point-of-care antibody test kits due to indistinguishable antibody production in FIV-vaccinated and naturally FIV-infected cats. The performance of three commercially available point-of-care antibody test kits was compared in a mixed population of FIV-vaccinated (n=119) and FIV-unvaccinated (n=239) cats in Australia. FIV infection status was assigned by considering the results of all antibody kits in concert with results from a commercially available PCR assay (FIV RealPCR™). Two lateral flow immunochromatography test kits (Witness FeLV/FIV; Anigen Rapid FIV/FeLV) had excellent overall sensitivity (100%; 100%) and specificity (98%; 100%) and could discern the true FIV infection status of cats, irrespective of FIV vaccination history. The lateral flow ELISA test kit (SNAP FIV/FeLV Combo) could not determine if antibodies detected were due to previous FIV vaccination, natural FIV infection, or both. The sensitivity and specificity of FIV RealPCR™ for detection of viral and proviral nucleic acid was 92% and 99%, respectively. These results will potentially change the way veterinary practitioners screen for FIV in jurisdictions where FIV vaccination is practiced, especially in shelter scenarios where the feasibility of mass screening is impacted by the cost of testing. PMID:26459979

  4. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy as a point-of-care diagnostic for infection in wound effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghebremedhin, Meron; Yesupriya, Shubha; Crane, Nicole J.

    2016-03-01

    In military medicine, one of the challenges in dealing with large combat-related injuries is the prevalence of bacterial infection, including multidrug resistant organisms. This can prolong the wound healing process and lead to wound dehiscence. Current methods of identifying bacterial infection rely on culturing microbes from patient material and performing biochemical tests, which together can take 2-3 days to complete. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful vibrational spectroscopy technique that allows for highly sensitive structural detection of analytes adsorbed onto specially prepared metal surfaces. In the past, we have been able to discriminate between bacterial isolates grown on solid culture media using standard Raman spectroscopic methods. Here, SERS is utilized to assess the presence of bacteria in wound effluent samples taken directly from patients. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt for the application of SERS directly to wound effluent. The utilization of SERS as a point-of-care diagnostic tool would enable physicians to determine course of treatment and drug administration in a matter of hours.

  5. The usefulness of telemedicine for the detection of infection/inflammation at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, R; Berliner, S; Fusman, R; Shapira, I; Avitzour, D; Arber, N; Zeltser, D

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the possibility of using Telemedicine to diagnose the presence of the inflammatory response and to assess its intensity at the point of care. One drop of citrated peripheral venous blood from 15 patients with infection/inflammation and 15 controls were used to prepare the slides. Unstained pictures were analyzed using a microscope, video camera and image analyzer (INFLAMETTM, Biovision, Tel Aviv, Israel). The jpg-compressed images were transferred via telephone to a physician in a remote location. A significant correlation was noted between the white blood cell count and the number of leukocytes per square mm by image analysis (r = 0.67 p < 0.0001 n = 30), between the degree of leukocyte adhesiveness/aggregation and the concentration of C-reactive protein (r = 0.42 p = 0.02 n = 29) and between the degree of erythrocyte aggregation and either fibrinogen concentrations (r = 0.73 p < 0.0001) or erythrocyte sedimentation (r = 0.83, p < 0.0001). No problems occurred during file transmission and there were no transfer errors. Physicians can successfully estimate the presence of an inflammatory response and its intensity using a simple slide test, image analysis, and Telemedicine technology.

  6. Point-of-care diagnostics for noncommunicable diseases using synthetic urinary biomarkers and paper microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Warren, Andrew D; Kwong, Gabriel A; Wood, David K; Lin, Kevin Y; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2014-03-11

    With noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) now constituting the majority of global mortality, there is a growing need for low-cost, noninvasive methods to diagnose and treat this class of diseases, especially in resource-limited settings. Molecular biomarkers combined with low-cost point-of-care assays constitute a potential solution for diagnosing NCDs, but the dearth of naturally occurring, predictive markers limits this approach. Here, we describe the design of exogenous agents that serve as synthetic biomarkers for NCDs by producing urinary signals that can be quantified by a companion paper test. These synthetic biomarkers are composed of nanoparticles conjugated to ligand-encoded reporters via protease-sensitive peptide substrates. Upon delivery, the nanoparticles passively target diseased sites, such as solid tumors or blood clots, where up-regulated proteases cleave the peptide substrates and release reporters that are cleared into urine. The reporters are engineered for detection by sandwich immunoassays, and we demonstrate their quantification directly from unmodified urine; furthermore, capture antibody specificity allows the probes to be multiplexed in vivo and quantified simultaneously by ELISA or paper lateral flow assay (LFA). We tailor synthetic biomarkers specific to colorectal cancer, a representative solid tumor, and thrombosis, a common cardiovascular disorder, and demonstrate urinary detection of these diseases in mouse models by paper diagnostic. Together, the LFA and injectable synthetic biomarkers, which could be tailored for multiple diseases, form a generalized diagnostic platform for NCDs that can be applied in almost any setting without expensive equipment or trained medical personnel. PMID:24567404

  7. Paper-based sample-to-answer molecular diagnostic platform for point-of-care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Tang, Ruihua; Wang, ShuQi; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2015-12-15

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT), as a molecular diagnostic technique, including nucleic acid extraction, amplification and detection, plays a fundamental role in medical diagnosis for timely medical treatment. However, current NAT technologies require relatively high-end instrumentation, skilled personnel, and are time-consuming. These drawbacks mean conventional NAT becomes impractical in many resource-limited disease-endemic settings, leading to an urgent need to develop a fast and portable NAT diagnostic tool. Paper-based devices are typically robust, cost-effective and user-friendly, holding a great potential for NAT at the point of care. In view of the escalating demand for the low cost diagnostic devices, we highlight the beneficial use of paper as a platform for NAT, the current state of its development, and the existing challenges preventing its widespread use. We suggest a strategy involving integrating all three steps of NAT into one single paper-based sample-to-answer diagnostic device for rapid medical diagnostics in the near future.

  8. Introducing natural thermoplastic shellac to microfluidics: A green fabrication method for point-of-care devices.

    PubMed

    Lausecker, R; Badilita, V; Gleißner, U; Wallrabe, U

    2016-07-01

    We present a sustainable fabrication method for cheap point-of-care microfluidic systems, employing hot embossing of natural shellac as a key feature of an energy-efficient fabrication method that exclusively uses renewable materials as consumables. Shellac is a low-cost renewable biomaterial that features medium hydrophilicity (e.g., a water contact angle of ca. 73°) and a high chemical stability with respect to common solvents such as cyclohexane or toluene, rendering it an interesting candidate for low-cost microfluidics and a competitor to well-known systems such as paper-based or polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidics. Moreover, its high replication accuracy for small features down to 30 μm lateral feature size and its ability to form smooth surfaces (surface roughness Ra  = 29 nm) at low embossing temperatures (glass transition temperature Tg  = 42.2 °C) enable energy-efficient hot embossing of microfluidic structures. Proof-of-concept for the implementation of shellac hot embossing as a green fabrication method for microfluidic systems is demonstrated through the successful fabrication of a microfluidic test setup and the assessment of its resource consumption. PMID:27478525

  9. Paper-based sample-to-answer molecular diagnostic platform for point-of-care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Tang, Ruihua; Wang, ShuQi; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2015-12-15

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT), as a molecular diagnostic technique, including nucleic acid extraction, amplification and detection, plays a fundamental role in medical diagnosis for timely medical treatment. However, current NAT technologies require relatively high-end instrumentation, skilled personnel, and are time-consuming. These drawbacks mean conventional NAT becomes impractical in many resource-limited disease-endemic settings, leading to an urgent need to develop a fast and portable NAT diagnostic tool. Paper-based devices are typically robust, cost-effective and user-friendly, holding a great potential for NAT at the point of care. In view of the escalating demand for the low cost diagnostic devices, we highlight the beneficial use of paper as a platform for NAT, the current state of its development, and the existing challenges preventing its widespread use. We suggest a strategy involving integrating all three steps of NAT into one single paper-based sample-to-answer diagnostic device for rapid medical diagnostics in the near future. PMID:26164488

  10. The SmartBioPhone, a point of care vision under development through two European projects: OPTOLABCARD and LABONFOIL.

    PubMed

    Ruano-López, Jesus M; Agirregabiria, Maria; Olabarria, Garbiñe; Verdoy, Dolores; Bang, Dang D; Bu, Minqiang; Wolff, Anders; Voigt, Anja; Dziuban, Jan A; Walczak, Rafał; Berganzo, Javier

    2009-06-01

    This paper describes how sixteen partners from eight different countries across Europe are working together in two EU projects focused on the development of a point of care system. This system uses disposable Lab on a Chips (LOCs) that carry out the complete assay from sample preparation to result interpretation of raw samples. The LOC is either embedded in a flexible motherboard with the form of a smartcard (Labcard) or in a Skinpatch. The first project, OPTOLABCARD, extended and tested the use of a thick photoresit (SU-8) as a structural material to manufacture LOCs by lamination. This project produced several examples where SU-8 microfluidic circuitry revealed itself as a viable material for several applications, such as the integration on chip of a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) that includes sample concentration, PCR amplification and optical detection of Salmonella spp. using clinical samples. The ongoing project, LABONFOIL, is using two results of OPTOLABCARD: the sample concentration method and the capability to fabricate flexible and ultra thin LOCs based on sheets instead of wafers. This rupture from the limited and expensive wafer surface heritage allows the development of a platform where LOCs are big enough to include all the sample preparation subcomponents at a low price. These LOCs will be used in four point of care applications: environment, food, cancer and drug monitoring. The user will obtain the results of the tests by connecting the Labcard/Skinpatch reader to a very popular interface (a smartphone), creating a new instrument namely "The SmartBioPhone". All standard smartphone capabilities will be at the disposal of the point of care instrument by a simple click. In order to guarantee the future mass production of these LOCs, the project will develop a large dry film equipment where LOCs will be fabricated at a low cost. PMID:19458852

  11. The future point-of-care detection of disease and its data capture and handling.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Barbosa, Natalia; Gamarra, Jorge D; Osma, Johann F

    2016-04-01

    Point-of-care detection is a widely studied area that attracts effort and interest from a large number of fields and companies. However, there is also increased interest from the general public in this type of device, which has driven enormous changes in the design and conception of these developments and the way data is handled. Therefore, future point-of-care detection has to include communication with front-end technology, such as smartphones and networks, automation of manufacture, and the incorporation of concepts like the Internet of Things (IoT) and cloud computing. Three key examples, based on different sensing technology, are analyzed in detail on the basis of these items to highlight a route for the future design and development of point-of-care detection devices and their data capture and handling.

  12. The future point-of-care detection of disease and its data capture and handling.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Barbosa, Natalia; Gamarra, Jorge D; Osma, Johann F

    2016-04-01

    Point-of-care detection is a widely studied area that attracts effort and interest from a large number of fields and companies. However, there is also increased interest from the general public in this type of device, which has driven enormous changes in the design and conception of these developments and the way data is handled. Therefore, future point-of-care detection has to include communication with front-end technology, such as smartphones and networks, automation of manufacture, and the incorporation of concepts like the Internet of Things (IoT) and cloud computing. Three key examples, based on different sensing technology, are analyzed in detail on the basis of these items to highlight a route for the future design and development of point-of-care detection devices and their data capture and handling. PMID:26780711

  13. Operationalizing Semantic Medline for meeting the information needs at point of care.

    PubMed

    Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Li, Dingcheng; Liu, Hongfang

    2015-01-01

    Scientific literature is one of the popular resources for providing decision support at point of care. It is highly desirable to bring the most relevant literature to support the evidence-based clinical decision making process. Motivated by the recent advance in semantically enhanced information retrieval, we have developed a system, which aims to bring semantically enriched literature, Semantic Medline, to meet the information needs at point of care. This study reports our work towards operationalizing the system for real time use. We demonstrate that the migration of a relational database implementation to a NoSQL (Not only SQL) implementation significantly improves the performance and makes the use of Semantic Medline at point of care decision support possible.

  14. Operationalizing Semantic Medline for meeting the information needs at point of care

    PubMed Central

    Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Li, Dingcheng; Liu, Hongfang

    2015-01-01

    Scientific literature is one of the popular resources for providing decision support at point of care. It is highly desirable to bring the most relevant literature to support the evidence-based clinical decision making process. Motivated by the recent advance in semantically enhanced information retrieval, we have developed a system, which aims to bring semantically enriched literature, Semantic Medline, to meet the information needs at point of care. This study reports our work towards operationalizing the system for real time use. We demonstrate that the migration of a relational database implementation to a NoSQL (Not only SQL) implementation significantly improves the performance and makes the use of Semantic Medline at point of care decision support possible. PMID:26306259

  15. Operationalizing Semantic Medline for meeting the information needs at point of care.

    PubMed

    Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Li, Dingcheng; Liu, Hongfang

    2015-01-01

    Scientific literature is one of the popular resources for providing decision support at point of care. It is highly desirable to bring the most relevant literature to support the evidence-based clinical decision making process. Motivated by the recent advance in semantically enhanced information retrieval, we have developed a system, which aims to bring semantically enriched literature, Semantic Medline, to meet the information needs at point of care. This study reports our work towards operationalizing the system for real time use. We demonstrate that the migration of a relational database implementation to a NoSQL (Not only SQL) implementation significantly improves the performance and makes the use of Semantic Medline at point of care decision support possible. PMID:26306259

  16. A Multiplexed Diagnostic Platform for Point-of-Care Pathogen Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J F; Letant, S E; Adams, K L; Mahnke, R C; Nguyen, N T; Dzenitis, J M; Hindson, B J; Hadley, D R; Makarewicz, T J; Henderer, B D; Breneman, J W; Tammero, L F; Ortiz, J I; Derlet, R W; Cohen, S; Colston, W W; McBride, M T; Birch, J M

    2008-02-04

    We developed an automated point-of-care diagnostic instrument that is capable of analyzing nasal swab samples for the presence of respiratory diseases. This robust instrument, called FluIDx, performs autonomous multiplexed RT-PCR reactions that are analyzed by microsphere xMAP technology. We evaluated the performance of FluIDx, in comparison rapid tests specific for influenza and respiratory syncytial virus, in a clinical study performed at the UC Davis Medical Center. The clinical study included samples positive for RSV (n = 71), influenza A (n = 16), influenza B (n = 4), adenovirus (n = 5), parainfluenza virus (n = 2), and 44 negative samples, according to a composite reference method. FluIDx and the rapid tests detected 85.9% and 62.0% of the RSV positive samples, respectively. Similar sensitivities were recorded for the influenza B samples; whereas the influenza A samples were poorly detected, likely due to the utilization of an influenza A signature that did not accurately match currently circulating influenza A strains. Data for all pathogens were compiled and indicate that FluIDx is more sensitive than the rapid tests, detecting 74.2% (95% C.I. of 64.7-81.9%) of the positive samples in comparison to 53.6% (95% C.I. of 43.7-63.2%) for the rapid tests. The higher sensitivity of FluIDx was partially offset by a lower specificity, 77.3% versus 100.0%. Overall, these data suggest automated flow-through PCR-based instruments that perform multiplexed assays can successfully screen clinical samples for infectious diseases.

  17. Principles of Point of Care Culture, the Spatial Care Path™, and Enabling Community and Global Resilience

    PubMed Central

    William, J. Ferguson; Laurie, E. Kost

    2014-01-01

    Goals This article a) defines point of care (POC) culture; b) presents seven underlying fundamental principles; c) describes the importance of needs assessment; d) introduces a new innovation, the spatial care path™; and e) illustrates how POC testing that properly fulfills needs and spatial care paths™ enable community and global resilience. Observations Often, POC testing supplants the conventional clinical laboratory, which may be too distant, prohibitively expensive, or simply not available in limited-resource settings. New POC technologies “fit” future medical problem solving. Screening and testing directly in the home or primary care facilitate rapid diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment. In contrast to the past where attention has been placed on emergency departments, hospitals, and referral centers, the spatial care path™ starts with the patient and guides him or her through an efficient strategy of care in small-world networks (SWNs) defined by local geography and topology, long-standing customs, public health jurisdictions, and geographic information systems (GIS). Conclusions POC testing needs in limited-resource settings are striking. Fulfillment is best guided by thorough understanding of POC culture. Quick feedback and fast decision-making by patients and physicians alike yield significant value that motivates changes in patient lifestyles and physician interactions. Culturally sensitive technology assimilation addresses leadership challenges in nations adapting to increasing populations of young and old, despite scarcity of resources. The spatial care path™ facilitates an essential balance of prevention and intervention in public health and shifts future focus to the patient, empowerment, and primary care within the context of POC culture.

  18. Principles of Point of Care Culture, the Spatial Care Path™, and Enabling Community and Global Resilience

    PubMed Central

    William, J. Ferguson; Laurie, E. Kost

    2014-01-01

    Goals This article a) defines point of care (POC) culture; b) presents seven underlying fundamental principles; c) describes the importance of needs assessment; d) introduces a new innovation, the spatial care path™; and e) illustrates how POC testing that properly fulfills needs and spatial care paths™ enable community and global resilience. Observations Often, POC testing supplants the conventional clinical laboratory, which may be too distant, prohibitively expensive, or simply not available in limited-resource settings. New POC technologies “fit” future medical problem solving. Screening and testing directly in the home or primary care facilitate rapid diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment. In contrast to the past where attention has been placed on emergency departments, hospitals, and referral centers, the spatial care path™ starts with the patient and guides him or her through an efficient strategy of care in small-world networks (SWNs) defined by local geography and topology, long-standing customs, public health jurisdictions, and geographic information systems (GIS). Conclusions POC testing needs in limited-resource settings are striking. Fulfillment is best guided by thorough understanding of POC culture. Quick feedback and fast decision-making by patients and physicians alike yield significant value that motivates changes in patient lifestyles and physician interactions. Culturally sensitive technology assimilation addresses leadership challenges in nations adapting to increasing populations of young and old, despite scarcity of resources. The spatial care path™ facilitates an essential balance of prevention and intervention in public health and shifts future focus to the patient, empowerment, and primary care within the context of POC culture. PMID:27683461

  19. Understanding Mentorship in a Research Training Program for Point-of-Care Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Black, Agnes T; Bungay, Vicky; Mackay, Martha; Balneaves, Lynda G; Garossino, Candy

    2016-09-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is essential to high-quality patient care and can contribute to healthcare cost savings, yet nurses and other clinicians at the point of care report barriers to engagement with research and translating it to the clinical setting. Mentorship has been shown to improve nurses' understanding and implementation of EBP. In this article, we describe a mentorship model in a successful program to support point-of-care nurses in conducting small-scale research projects, many of which have led to practice changes and/or cost savings. PMID:27556652

  20. Membrane-based, sedimentation-assisted plasma separator for point-of-care applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael; Gross, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D; Edelstein, Paul H; Collman, Ronald G; Bau, Haim H

    2013-11-01

    Often, high-sensitivity, point-of-care (POC) clinical tests, such as HIV viral load, require large volumes of plasma. Although centrifuges are ubiquitously used in clinical laboratories to separate plasma from whole blood, centrifugation is generally inappropriate for on-site testing. Suitable alternatives are not readily available to separate the relatively large volumes of plasma from milliliters of blood that may be needed to meet stringent limit-of-detection specifications for low-abundance target molecules. We report on a simple-to-use, low-cost, pump-free, membrane-based, sedimentation-assisted plasma separator capable of separating a relatively large volume of plasma from undiluted whole blood within minutes. This plasma separator consists of an asymmetric, porous, polysulfone membrane housed in a disposable chamber. The separation process takes advantage of both gravitational sedimentation of blood cells and size exclusion-based filtration. The plasma separator demonstrated a "blood in-plasma out" capability, consistently extracting 275 ± 33.5 μL of plasma from 1.8 mL of undiluted whole blood within less than 7 min. The device was used to separate plasma laden with HIV viruses from HIV virus-spiked whole blood with recovery efficiencies of 95.5% ± 3.5%, 88.0% ± 9.5%, and 81.5% ± 12.1% for viral loads of 35,000, 3500, and 350 copies/mL, respectively. The separation process is self-terminating to prevent excessive hemolysis. The HIV-laden plasma was then injected into our custom-made microfluidic chip for nucleic acid testing and was successfully subjected to reverse-transcriptase loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), demonstrating that the plasma is sufficiently pure to support high-efficiency nucleic acid amplification.

  1. Electricity-free amplification and detection for molecular point-of-care diagnosis of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Jered; Osborn, Jennifer L; Lillis, Lorraine; Hawkins, Kenneth; Guelig, Dylan; Price, Will; Johns, Rachel; Ebels, Kelly; Boyle, David; Weigl, Bernhard; LaBarre, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In resource-limited settings, the lack of decentralized molecular diagnostic testing and sparse access to centralized medical facilities can present a critical barrier to timely diagnosis, treatment, and subsequent control and elimination of infectious diseases. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods, including reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), are well-suited for decentralized point-of-care molecular testing in minimal infrastructure laboratories since they significantly reduce the complexity of equipment and power requirements. Despite reduced complexity, however, there is still a need for a constant heat source to enable isothermal nucleic acid amplification. This requirement poses significant challenges for laboratories in developing countries where electricity is often unreliable or unavailable. To address this need, we previously developed a low-cost, electricity-free heater using an exothermic reaction thermally coupled with a phase change material. This heater achieved acceptable performance, but exhibited considerable variability. Furthermore, as an enabling technology, the heater was an incomplete diagnostic solution. Here we describe a more precise, affordable, and robust heater design with thermal standard deviation <0.5°C at operating temperature, a cost of approximately US$.06 per test for heater reaction materials, and an ambient temperature operating range from 16°C to 30°C. We also pair the heater with nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF)-detection for a visual readout. To further illustrate the utility of the electricity-free heater and NALF-detection platform, we demonstrate sensitive and repeatable detection of HIV-1 with a ß-actin positive internal amplification control from processed sample to result in less than 80 minutes. Together, these elements are building blocks for an electricity-free platform capable of isothermal amplification and detection of a variety of pathogens.

  2. Membrane-based, sedimentation-assisted plasma separator for point-of-care applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael; Gross, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D.; Edelstein, Paul H.; Collman, Ronald G.; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Often, high sensitivity, point of care, clinical tests, such as HIV viral load, require large volumes of plasma. Although centrifuges are ubiquitously used in clinical laboratories to separate plasma from whole blood, centrifugation is generally inappropriate for on-site testing. Suitable alternatives are not readily available to separate the relatively large volumes of plasma from milliliters of blood that may be needed to meet stringent limit-of-detection specifications for low abundance target molecules. We report on a simple to use, low-cost, pump-free, membrane-based, sedimentation-assisted plasma separator capable of separating a relatively large volume of plasma from undiluted whole blood within minutes. This plasma separator consists of an asymmetric, porous, polysulfone membrane housed in a disposable chamber. The separation process takes advantage of both gravitational sedimentation of blood cells and size exclusion-based filtration. The plasma separator demonstrated a “blood in-plasma out” capability, consistently extracting 275 ±33.5 μL of plasma from 1.8 mL of undiluted whole blood in less than 7 min. The device was used to separate plasma laden with HIV viruses from HIV virus-spiked whole blood with recovery efficiencies of 95.5% ± 3.5%, 88.0% ± 9.5%, and 81.5% ± 12.1% for viral loads of 35,000, 3,500 and 350 copies/mL, respectively. The separation process is self-terminating to prevent excessive hemolysis. The HIV-laden plasma was then injected into our custom-made microfluidic chip for nucleic acid Testing And Was Successfully Subjected To Reverse Transcriptase Loop mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), demonstrating that the plasma is sufficiently pure to support high efficiency nucleic acid amplification. PMID:24099566

  3. Electricity-Free Amplification and Detection for Molecular Point-of-Care Diagnosis of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, Jered; Osborn, Jennifer L.; Lillis, Lorraine; Hawkins, Kenneth; Guelig, Dylan; Price, Will; Johns, Rachel; Ebels, Kelly; Boyle, David; Weigl, Bernhard; LaBarre, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In resource-limited settings, the lack of decentralized molecular diagnostic testing and sparse access to centralized medical facilities can present a critical barrier to timely diagnosis, treatment, and subsequent control and elimination of infectious diseases. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods, including reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), are well-suited for decentralized point-of-care molecular testing in minimal infrastructure laboratories since they significantly reduce the complexity of equipment and power requirements. Despite reduced complexity, however, there is still a need for a constant heat source to enable isothermal nucleic acid amplification. This requirement poses significant challenges for laboratories in developing countries where electricity is often unreliable or unavailable. To address this need, we previously developed a low-cost, electricity-free heater using an exothermic reaction thermally coupled with a phase change material. This heater achieved acceptable performance, but exhibited considerable variability. Furthermore, as an enabling technology, the heater was an incomplete diagnostic solution. Here we describe a more precise, affordable, and robust heater design with thermal standard deviation <0.5°C at operating temperature, a cost of approximately US$.06 per test for heater reaction materials, and an ambient temperature operating range from 16°C to 30°C. We also pair the heater with nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF)-detection for a visual readout. To further illustrate the utility of the electricity-free heater and NALF-detection platform, we demonstrate sensitive and repeatable detection of HIV-1 with a ß-actin positive internal amplification control from processed sample to result in less than 80 minutes. Together, these elements are building blocks for an electricity-free platform capable of isothermal amplification and detection of a variety of pathogens. PMID:25426953

  4. Towards detection and diagnosis of Ebola virus disease at point-of-care.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ajeet; Tiwari, Sneham; Dev Jayant, Rahul; Marty, Aileen; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-01-15

    Ebola outbreak-2014 (mainly Zaire strain related Ebola virus) has been declared most widely spread deadly persistent epidemic due to unavailability of rapid diagnostic, detection, and therapeutics. Ebola virus disease (EVD), a severe viral hemorrhagic fever syndrome caused by Ebola virus (EBOV) is transmitted by direct contact with the body fluids of infected person and objects contaminated with virus or infected animals. World Health Organization (WHO) has declared EVD epidemic as public health emergency of international concern with severe global economic burden. At fatal EBOV infection stage, patients usually die before the antibody response. Currently, rapid blood tests to diagnose EBOV infection include the antigen or antibodies capture using ELISA and RNA detection using RT/Q-PCR within 3-10 days after the onset of symptoms. Moreover, few nanotechnology-based colorimetric and paper-based immunoassay methods have been recently reported to detect Ebola virus. Unfortunately, these methods are limited to laboratory only. As state-of-the art (SoA) diagnostics time to confirm Ebola infection, varies from 6h to about 3 days, it causes delay in therapeutic approaches. Thus developing a cost-effective, rapid, sensitive, and selective sensor to detect EVD at point-of-care (POC) is certainly worth exploring to establish rapid diagnostics to decide therapeutics. This review highlights SoA of Ebola diagnostics and also a call to develop rapid, selective and sensitive POC detection of EBOV for global health care. We propose that adopting miniaturized electrochemical EBOV immunosensing can detect virus level at pM concentration within ∼40min compared to 3 days of ELISA test at nM levels.

  5. 75 FR 2549 - Clinical Accuracy Requirements for Point of Care Blood Glucose Meters; Public Meeting; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Clinical Accuracy Requirements for Point of Care Blood Glucose Meters; Public Meeting; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting; request for comments. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing...

  6. Emergency Point-of-Care Ultrasound Detection of Papilledema in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yakov, Maxim; Desjardins, Marie-Pier; Fischer, Jason W J

    2015-11-01

    The application of emergency point-of-care ultrasound has been expanding in pediatric emergency medicine for a decade. In this case series, we describe the detection of papilledema in patients presenting to the pediatric emergency department using this technology and its potential impact on their clinical care. PMID:26535499

  7. Botfly larva masquerading as periorbital cellulitis: identification by point-of-care ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Minakova, Elena; Doniger, Stephanie J

    2014-06-01

    Myiasis, or the infiltration of the botfly larvae, is a relatively frequent problem encountered by travelers to parts of Latin America. This is a novel case report that documents a Dermatobia hominis infestation of the left facial region with secondary periorbital cellulitis diagnosed by point-of-care ultrasonography.

  8. Does Radar Technology Support the Diagnosis of Pneumothorax? PneumoScan—A Diagnostic Point-of-Care Tool

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, T.; Conze, M.; Albers, C. E.; Leidel, B. A.; Levy, P.; Kleber, C.; De Moya, M.; Exadaktylos, A.; Stoupis, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. A nonrecognized pneumothorax (PTX) may become a life-threatening tension PTX. A reliable point-of-care diagnostic tool could help in reduce this risk. For this purpose, we investigated the feasibility of the use of the PneumoScan, an innovative device based on micropower impulse radar (MIR). Patients and Methods. addition to a standard diagnostic protocol including clinical examination, chest X-ray (CXR), and computed tomography (CT), 24 consecutive patients with chest trauma underwent PneumoScan testing in the shock trauma room to exclude a PTX. Results. The application of the PneumoScan was simple, quick, and reliable without functional disorder. Clinical examination and CXR each revealed one and PneumoScan three out of altogether four PTXs (sensitivity 75%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 95%). The undetected PTX did not require intervention. Conclusion. The PneumoScan as a point-of-care device offers additional diagnostic value in patient management following chest trauma. Further studies with more patients have to be performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the device. PMID:24187624

  9. A joint hospital/vendor project brings CQI and point-of-care technology to home care.

    PubMed

    Gogola, M

    1995-01-01

    A joint project team consisting of personnel from Parkview Episcopal Medical Center, Pueblo, Colorado, and Patient Care Technologies, Atlanta, Georgia, a software vendor, codeveloped a point-of-care based system of electronic patient records and administrative data capture for home health care. Well established continuous quality improvement techniques, in use at Parkview for approximately 6 years, guided the development project and the subsequent alpha and beta testing of the system. Significant results to date include an overall productivity gain approaching 20%, the potential to increase annual home care revenue $876,000 with the same staffing level, and an 83% reduction in billing errors. Although not directly measured as a part of the study, the project team believes the quality of charting has improved because it is now done at the point-of-care in the home rather than in the office--some period of time after care is delivered. Anticipated future development includes integration of the home care clinical record with the hospital's clinical data repository and explicit support of critical pathways.

  10. Evaluation of a novel in-line point-of-care blood gas analyser.

    PubMed

    Miles, L F; Giraud, K; Ferris, R; Klein, A A; Martinez, G C; Jenkins, D P; Saulankey, K

    2016-09-01

    Point-of-care testing is becoming increasingly relevant to the practice of anaesthesia and critical care medicine, especially in terms of minimisation of sample volumes and decreased time to decision making. We performed a prospective observational study to evaluate a novel, in-line blood gas analysis device against a conventional benchtop model, and assessed it while placing the enrolled patients under extreme physiological conditions, specifically deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Eight patients were studied, and had between seven and 11 samples analysed for seven variables (pH, pCO2 , pO2 , HCO3 (-) , base excess [BE], K(+) and haematocrit [Hct]), using the device during the process of cooling to 20 °C on cardiopulmonary bypass, and subsequent rewarming to normothermia. After Passing-Bablok analysis, the variables were evaluated for bias, limits of agreement and percentage error at above and below 30 °C. Of the measured variables, only pH (percentage error 2.4%) and potassium (19.8%) demonstrated acceptable (< 30%) percentage error over the full range of temperatures measured. Carbon dioxide, when stratified by temperature, was acceptable (< 30 °C percentage error 24.6%, > 30 °C percentage error 9.9%), but the overall percentage error of the dataset (45.8%) was excessively high. Bicarbonate and haematocrit both had an acceptable percentage error above 30 °C (25.2% and 18.5%, respectively), but similar to carbon dioxide, percentage error for the full range of temperatures exceeded 30%. These data differ from previous work examining this device, and highlights the difference between derived measures using different apparatuses when exposed to extreme physiological conditions.

  11. Electrochemical magnetic microbeads-based biosensor for point-of-care serodiagnosis of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Cortina, María E; Melli, Luciano J; Roberti, Mariano; Mass, Mijal; Longinotti, Gloria; Tropea, Salvador; Lloret, Paulina; Serantes, Diego A Rey; Salomón, Francisco; Lloret, Matías; Caillava, Ana J; Restuccia, Sabrina; Altcheh, Jaime; Buscaglia, Carlos A; Malatto, Laura; Ugalde, Juan E; Fraigi, Liliana; Moina, Carlos; Ybarra, Gabriel; Ciocchini, Andrés E; Comerci, Diego J

    2016-06-15

    Access to appropriate diagnostic tools is an essential component in the evaluation and improvement of global health. Additionally, timely detection of infectious agents is critical in early diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. Conventional pathogen detection methods such as culturing, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) require long assay times, and complex and expensive instruments making them not adaptable to point-of-care (PoC) needs at resource-constrained places and primary care settings. Therefore, there is an unmet need to develop portable, simple, rapid, and accurate methods for PoC detection of infections. Here, we present the development and validation of a portable, robust and inexpensive electrochemical magnetic microbeads-based biosensor (EMBIA) platform for PoC serodiagnosis of infectious diseases caused by different types of microorganisms (parasitic protozoa, bacteria and viruses). We demonstrate the potential use of the EMBIA platform for in situ diagnosis of human (Chagas disease and human brucellosis) and animal (bovine brucellosis and foot-and-mouth disease) infections clearly differentiating infected from non-infected individuals or animals. For Chagas disease, a more extensive validation of the test was performed showing that the EMBIA platform displayed an excellent diagnostic performance almost indistinguishable, in terms of specificity and sensitivity, from a fluorescent immunomagnetic assay and the conventional ELISA using the same combination of antigens. This platform technology could potentially be applicable to diagnose other infectious and non-infectious diseases as well as detection and/or quantification of biomarkers at the POC and primary care settings.

  12. Application of fluorescent tracer agent technology to point-of-care gastrointestinal permeability measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorshow, Richard B.; Shieh, Jeng-Jong; Rogers, Thomas E.; Hall-Moore, Carla; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Talcott, Michael; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2016-03-01

    Gut dysfunction, often accompanied by increased mucosal permeability to gut contents, frequently accompanies a variety of human intestinal inflammatory conditions. These disorders include inflammatory bowel diseases (e.g., Crohn's Disease) and environmental enteropathy and enteric dysfunction, a condition strongly associated with childhood malnutrition and stunting in resource poor areas of the world. The most widely used diagnostic assay for gastrointestinal permeability is the lactulose to mannitol ratio (L:M) measurement. These sugars are administered orally, differentially absorbed by the gut, and then cleared from the body by glomerular filtration in the kidney. The amount of each sugar excreted in the urine is measured. The larger sugar, lactulose, is minimally absorbed through a healthy gut. The smaller sugar, mannitol, in contrast, is readily absorbed through both a healthy and injured gut. Thus a higher ratio of lactulose to mannitol reflects increased intestinal permeability. However, several issues prevent widespread use of the L:M ratio in clinical practice. Urine needs to be collected over time intervals of several hours, the specimen then needs to be transported to an analytical laboratory, and sophisticated equipment is required to measure the concentration of each sugar in the urine. In this presentation we show that fluorescent tracer agents with molecular weights similar to those of the sugars, selected from our portfolio of biocompatible renally cleared fluorophores, mimic the L:M ratio test for gut permeability. This fluorescent tracer agent detection technology can be used to overcome the limitations of the L:M assay, and is amenable to point-of-care clinical use.

  13. Electrochemical magnetic microbeads-based biosensor for point-of-care serodiagnosis of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Cortina, María E; Melli, Luciano J; Roberti, Mariano; Mass, Mijal; Longinotti, Gloria; Tropea, Salvador; Lloret, Paulina; Serantes, Diego A Rey; Salomón, Francisco; Lloret, Matías; Caillava, Ana J; Restuccia, Sabrina; Altcheh, Jaime; Buscaglia, Carlos A; Malatto, Laura; Ugalde, Juan E; Fraigi, Liliana; Moina, Carlos; Ybarra, Gabriel; Ciocchini, Andrés E; Comerci, Diego J

    2016-06-15

    Access to appropriate diagnostic tools is an essential component in the evaluation and improvement of global health. Additionally, timely detection of infectious agents is critical in early diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. Conventional pathogen detection methods such as culturing, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) require long assay times, and complex and expensive instruments making them not adaptable to point-of-care (PoC) needs at resource-constrained places and primary care settings. Therefore, there is an unmet need to develop portable, simple, rapid, and accurate methods for PoC detection of infections. Here, we present the development and validation of a portable, robust and inexpensive electrochemical magnetic microbeads-based biosensor (EMBIA) platform for PoC serodiagnosis of infectious diseases caused by different types of microorganisms (parasitic protozoa, bacteria and viruses). We demonstrate the potential use of the EMBIA platform for in situ diagnosis of human (Chagas disease and human brucellosis) and animal (bovine brucellosis and foot-and-mouth disease) infections clearly differentiating infected from non-infected individuals or animals. For Chagas disease, a more extensive validation of the test was performed showing that the EMBIA platform displayed an excellent diagnostic performance almost indistinguishable, in terms of specificity and sensitivity, from a fluorescent immunomagnetic assay and the conventional ELISA using the same combination of antigens. This platform technology could potentially be applicable to diagnose other infectious and non-infectious diseases as well as detection and/or quantification of biomarkers at the POC and primary care settings. PMID:26802749

  14. Evolvable Smartphone-Based Platforms for Point-of-Care In-Vitro Diagnostics Applications

    PubMed Central

    Patou, François; AlZahra’a Alatraktchi, Fatima; Kjægaard, Claus; Dimaki, Maria; Madsen, Jan; Svendsen, Winnie E.

    2016-01-01

    The association of smart mobile devices and lab-on-chip technologies offers unprecedented opportunities for the emergence of direct-to-consumer in vitro medical diagnostics applications. Despite their clear transformative potential, obstacles remain to the large-scale disruption and long-lasting success of these systems in the consumer market. For instance, the increasing level of complexity of instrumented lab-on-chip devices, coupled to the sporadic nature of point-of-care testing, threatens the viability of a business model mainly relying on disposable/consumable lab-on-chips. We argued recently that system evolvability, defined as the design characteristic that facilitates more manageable transitions between system generations via the modification of an inherited design, can help remedy these limitations. In this paper, we discuss how platform-based design can constitute a formal entry point to the design and implementation of evolvable smart device/lab-on-chip systems. We present both a hardware/software design framework and the implementation details of a platform prototype enabling at this stage the interfacing of several lab-on-chip variants relying on current- or impedance-based biosensors. Our findings suggest that several change-enabling mechanisms implemented in the higher abstraction software layers of the system can promote evolvability, together with the design of change-absorbing hardware/software interfaces. Our platform architecture is based on a mobile software application programming interface coupled to a modular hardware accessory. It allows the specification of lab-on-chip operation and post-analytic functions at the mobile software layer. We demonstrate its potential by operating a simple lab-on-chip to carry out the detection of dopamine using various electroanalytical methods. PMID:27598208

  15. Evolvable Smartphone-Based Platforms for Point-of-Care In-Vitro Diagnostics Applications.

    PubMed

    Patou, François; AlZahra'a Alatraktchi, Fatima; Kjægaard, Claus; Dimaki, Maria; Madsen, Jan; Svendsen, Winnie E

    2016-01-01

    The association of smart mobile devices and lab-on-chip technologies offers unprecedented opportunities for the emergence of direct-to-consumer in vitro medical diagnostics applications. Despite their clear transformative potential, obstacles remain to the large-scale disruption and long-lasting success of these systems in the consumer market. For instance, the increasing level of complexity of instrumented lab-on-chip devices, coupled to the sporadic nature of point-of-care testing, threatens the viability of a business model mainly relying on disposable/consumable lab-on-chips. We argued recently that system evolvability, defined as the design characteristic that facilitates more manageable transitions between system generations via the modification of an inherited design, can help remedy these limitations. In this paper, we discuss how platform-based design can constitute a formal entry point to the design and implementation of evolvable smart device/lab-on-chip systems. We present both a hardware/software design framework and the implementation details of a platform prototype enabling at this stage the interfacing of several lab-on-chip variants relying on current- or impedance-based biosensors. Our findings suggest that several change-enabling mechanisms implemented in the higher abstraction software layers of the system can promote evolvability, together with the design of change-absorbing hardware/software interfaces. Our platform architecture is based on a mobile software application programming interface coupled to a modular hardware accessory. It allows the specification of lab-on-chip operation and post-analytic functions at the mobile software layer. We demonstrate its potential by operating a simple lab-on-chip to carry out the detection of dopamine using various electroanalytical methods. PMID:27598208

  16. Basic capillary microfluidic chip and highly sensitive optical detector for point of care application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Mingjin

    A cost-effective and highly sensitive portable diagnostic device is needed to enable much more widespread monitoring of health conditions in disease prevention, detection, and control. Miniaturized and easy-to-operate devices can reduce the inherent costs and inefficiencies associated with healthcare testing in central laboratories. Hence, clinicians are beginning to use point of care (POC) testing and flexible clinical chemistry testing devices which are beneficial for the patient. In our work, a low-cost and simple autonomous microfluidic device for biochemical detection was developed. The pumpless capillary system with capillary stop valves and trigger valves is fabricated on a silicon (Si) wafer and then bonded with the modified polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cover. The key point of this study is the change of the surface contact angle of the PDMS to achieve the functionalities such as timing features (capillary-driven stop valve) and basic logical functions (trigger valves). The polydimethylsiloxane-ethylene oxide polymer (PDMS-b-PEO) is utilized as a surfactant additive to make the PDMS hydrophilic. The contact angle of the modified PDMS can be adjusted from 80.9° to 21.5° with different mixing ratios. The contact angles of PEO-PDMS accepted in this work are from 80.9° to 58.5° to bring the capillary channel and valve into effect. This autonomous capillary-driven device with good microfluidic flow manipulation can be widely applied to a number of microfluidic devices and pumpless fluidic actuation mechanisms, which is suitable for cost-effective diagnostic tools in the biomedical analysis and POC testing applications. Another obstacle for miniaturization of the bio-detection system is the optical detector. We developed a novel, highly sensitive and miniaturized detector. It integrates a light source--light emitting diode (LED), all necessary optical components, and a photodiode with preamplifier into one package about 2 cm x 2 cm x 2 cm, especially for the

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of the HemoCue Hb 301, STAT-Site MHgb and URIT-12 Point-of-Care Hemoglobin Meters in a Central Laboratory and a Community Based Clinic in Durban, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Jaggernath, Manjeetha; Naicker, Rumallen; Madurai, Savathree; Brockman, Mark A.; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Gelderblom, Huub C.

    2016-01-01

    In South Africa, various point-of-care hemoglobin meters are used. However, the regulatory framework for approval, implementation and oversight of use of point-of-care hemoglobin meters is suboptimal. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of the HemoCue Hb 301, STAT-Site MHgb and URIT-12 point-of-care hemoglobin meters, compared to a central laboratory based reference assay, in a central laboratory and a community based clinic in Durban, South Africa. Differences in performance of the point-of-care assays, compared to the reference assay, were more pronounced in the community based clinic. Results were reasonable for the HemoCue Hb 301, but poor for the STAT-Site MHgb and the URIT-12. Poor test performance of point-of-care hemoglobin meters, and inadequate evaluations and oversight in South Africa, leads to suboptimal clinical care and clinical research, and increased costs. There is a need for proper evaluation and quality assurance of point-of-care tests, the results of which should be made widely available to key stakeholders. PMID:27046200

  18. A dual-readout chemiluminescent-gold lateral flow test for multiplex and ultrasensitive detection of disease biomarkers in real samples.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiping; Sun, Jiashu; Xianyu, Yunlei; Yin, Binfeng; Niu, Yajing; Wang, Songbai; Cao, Fengjing; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Yu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-08-18

    Even though the gold lateral flow test (GLFT) is low-cost and allows for point-of-care testing (POCT), its intrinsic limitations including low sensitivity and incapability of quantification significantly hinder the clinical application of GLFT for assaying disease biomarkers. To improve the performance of the GLFT without sacrificing its simplicity, we develop a chemiluminescent-gold lateral flow test (C-mode GLFT) for quantitative and multiplex detection of disease biomarkers with an ultrahigh sensitivity at a picomolar level. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and antibody (Ab) are simultaneously labeled onto the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to achieve a dual-readout (chemiluminescent and visual, C&V-mode GLFT). A red color appears at the test line caused by the accumulation of captured AuNPs in the presence of targets, while HRP on the surface of AuNPs catalyzes the chemiluminescence reaction of luminol to amplify the signal. C-mode GLFT is successfully used for detecting tumor biomarkers (alpha fetoprotein, AFP, and carcino embryonic antigen, CEA) and bacterial infection biomarkers (procalcitonin, PCT) in serum samples as well as whole blood. The excellent features of C-mode GLFT such as straightforward operation, ultrahigh sensitivity and quantitative detection, make it a promising platform for POCT of a variety of disease biomarkers in real samples. PMID:27375054

  19. Introduction of point of care analysis for prescribing warfarin at a Swedish primary care centre.

    PubMed

    Fernholm, Rita; Hermansson, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Boo Health Centre in Nacka, Sweden, manages approximately 240 patients on warfarin treatment. A risk analysis showed that testing and prescribing of warfarin involved 28 different steps and nine parties, leading to a high risk of errors. The aim of the study was to shorten and simplify the process flow for the testing and prescription of warfarin by introducing point of care analysis (POC). The aim was also to evaluate changes in time expenditure and cost related to the new processes well as the quality in form of time in therapeutic range (TTR) and number of adverse events. A study with POC was performed during six months in 2014. Time expenditure, cost, TTR, and adverse events related to warfarin treatment were recorded. An evaluation was also conducted in the form of surveys to patients and staff regarding satisfaction with the new process. The process was shortened from 28 steps and nine parties involved to nine steps and four parties involved. The patient got their test result and met with the prescribing doctor, all within the same visit, meaning that the feedback time for patients was shortened from one to three days by mail to less than 10 minutes at the medical centre. TTR did not change and the incidence of adverse events was not affected. The surveys showed that the overwhelming proportion of patients, doctors, assistant nurses, and laboratory staff were pleased with the changes and the patients would recommend others to monitor their treatment at Boo Health Centre. There was a reduction in time expenditure for the staff. The costs decreased from approximately 8 000 €/month to about 7 000 €/month. The introduction of the POC method enabled a shorter process flow with reduced time expenditure for both patients and staff and reduced costs. TTR did not change. Patients and staff were satisfied with the changes and the patients could take a more active role in their treatment. It is possible that POC analysis may have implications on improved compliance

  20. Rapid detection of Ebola virus with a reagent-free, point-of-care biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, Justin T.; Severns, Virginia; Lovato, Debbie; Branch, Darren W.; Larson, Richard S.

    2015-04-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors can rapidly detect Ebola antigens at the point-of-care without the need for added reagents, sample processing, or specialized personnel. This preliminary study demonstrates SAW biosensor detection of the Ebola virus in a concentration-dependent manner. The detection limit with this methodology is below the average level of viremia detected on the first day of symptoms by PCR. We observe a log-linear sensor response for highly fragmented Ebola viral particles, with a detection limit corresponding to 1.9 × 10⁴ PFU/mL prior to virus inactivation. We predict greatly improved sensitivity for intact, infectious Ebola virus. This point-of-care methodology has the potential to detect Ebola viremia prior to symptom onset, greatly enabling infection control and rapid treatment. This biosensor platform is powered by disposable AA batteries and can be rapidly adapted to detect other emerging diseases in austere conditions.

  1. Rapid detection of Ebola virus with a reagent-free, point-of-care biosensor

    DOE PAGES

    Baca, Justin T.; Severns, Virginia; Lovato, Debbie; Branch, Darren W.; Larson, Richard S.

    2015-04-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors can rapidly detect Ebola antigens at the point-of-care without the need for added reagents, sample processing, or specialized personnel. This preliminary study demonstrates SAW biosensor detection of the Ebola virus in a concentration-dependent manner. The detection limit with this methodology is below the average level of viremia detected on the first day of symptoms by PCR. We observe a log-linear sensor response for highly fragmented Ebola viral particles, with a detection limit corresponding to 1.9 × 10⁴ PFU/mL prior to virus inactivation. We predict greatly improved sensitivity for intact, infectious Ebola virus. This point-of-care methodologymore » has the potential to detect Ebola viremia prior to symptom onset, greatly enabling infection control and rapid treatment. This biosensor platform is powered by disposable AA batteries and can be rapidly adapted to detect other emerging diseases in austere conditions.« less

  2. Challenges of managing medications for older people at transition points of care.

    PubMed

    Manias, Elizabeth; Hughes, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, pharmacists play a very important role in identifying and correcting medication discrepancies as older patients move across transition points of care. With increasing complexity of health care needs of older people, these discrepancies are likely to increase. The major concern with identifying and correcting medication discrepancies is that medication reconciliation is considered a retrospective problem--that is, dealing with medication discrepancies after they have occurred. It is argued here that a more proactive stance should be taken where doctors, nurses and pharmacists collectively work together to prevent medication discrepancies from happening in the first place. Improved involvement of patients and family members will help to facilitate better management of medications across transition points of care. Efficient use of information technology aids, such as electronic medication reconciliation tools, should also assist with organizational systems problems associated with the working culture, heavy workloads, and staff and skill mix of health professionals.

  3. Point of Care Cardiac Ultrasound Applications in the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Arntfield, Robert T; Millington, Scott J

    2012-01-01

    The use of point of care echocardiography by non-cardiologist in acute care settings such as the emergency department (ED) or the intensive care unit (ICU) is very common. Unlike diagnostic echocardiography, the scope of such point of care exams is often restricted to address the clinical questions raised by the patient’s differential diagnosis or chief complaint in order to inform immediate management decisions. In this article, an overview of the most common applications of this focused echocardiography in the ED and ICU is provided. This includes but is not limited to the evaluation of patients experiencing hypotension, cardiac arrest, cardiac trauma, chest pain and patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:22894759

  4. Challenges of managing medications for older people at transition points of care.

    PubMed

    Manias, Elizabeth; Hughes, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, pharmacists play a very important role in identifying and correcting medication discrepancies as older patients move across transition points of care. With increasing complexity of health care needs of older people, these discrepancies are likely to increase. The major concern with identifying and correcting medication discrepancies is that medication reconciliation is considered a retrospective problem--that is, dealing with medication discrepancies after they have occurred. It is argued here that a more proactive stance should be taken where doctors, nurses and pharmacists collectively work together to prevent medication discrepancies from happening in the first place. Improved involvement of patients and family members will help to facilitate better management of medications across transition points of care. Efficient use of information technology aids, such as electronic medication reconciliation tools, should also assist with organizational systems problems associated with the working culture, heavy workloads, and staff and skill mix of health professionals. PMID:25455760

  5. Point-of-care (POC) devices by means of advanced MEMS.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Stanislav L; Tarhan, Mehmet C; Kudo, Lili C; Collard, Dominique; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have become an invaluable technology to advance the development of point-of-care (POC) devices for diagnostics and sample analyses. MEMS can transform sophisticated methods into compact and cost-effective microdevices that offer numerous advantages at many levels. Such devices include microchannels, microsensors, etc., that have been applied to various miniaturized POC products. Here we discuss some of the recent advances made in the use of MEMS devices for POC applications.

  6. Point-of-care (POC) devices by means of advanced MEMS.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Stanislav L; Tarhan, Mehmet C; Kudo, Lili C; Collard, Dominique; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have become an invaluable technology to advance the development of point-of-care (POC) devices for diagnostics and sample analyses. MEMS can transform sophisticated methods into compact and cost-effective microdevices that offer numerous advantages at many levels. Such devices include microchannels, microsensors, etc., that have been applied to various miniaturized POC products. Here we discuss some of the recent advances made in the use of MEMS devices for POC applications. PMID:26459443

  7. Design of a Wireless EEG System for Point-of-Care Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wenyan; Bai, Yicheng; Sun, Mingui; Sclabassi, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to develop a wireless EEG system to provide critical point-of-care information about brain electrical activity. A novel dry electrode, which can be installed rapidly, is used to acquire EEG from the scalp. A wireless data link between the electrode and a data port (i.e., a smartphone) is established based on the Bluetooth technology. A prototype of this system has been implemented and its performance in acquiring EEG has been evaluated. PMID:25419099

  8. Design of a Wireless EEG System for Point-of-Care Applications.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wenyan; Bai, Yicheng; Sun, Mingui; Sclabassi, Robert J

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to develop a wireless EEG system to provide critical point-of-care information about brain electrical activity. A novel dry electrode, which can be installed rapidly, is used to acquire EEG from the scalp. A wireless data link between the electrode and a data port (i.e., a smartphone) is established based on the Bluetooth technology. A prototype of this system has been implemented and its performance in acquiring EEG has been evaluated.

  9. Rapid point-of-care multiplex immunodetection using two-dimensional microarray technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Frank Y. S.; Gutierrez, Dora M.; Nguyen, Christine P.; Johnson, David C.; Palmer, Richard A.; Richards, James B.; Chang, John T.; Visuri, Steven R.; Colston, Bill W., Jr.

    2003-07-01

    In response to a broad-based need for point-of-care multiplex diagnostic capability, we have developed a novel hybrid platform to analyze optically encoded microspheres arranged on a 2-dimensional planar array. The microspheres which we have initially selected are developed by Luminex Inc. as substrates for sandwich-type fluorescent immunoassays and are typically used in conjunction with a customized flow analyzer. CCD-based optics are the essential feature which enables the development of a rugged diagnostic instrument which can be scaled for point-of-care applications. We have characterized the Multiplex Immunoassay Diagnostic System (MIDS) using a benchtop prototype built around a conventional 12-bit CCD. This system is capable of resolving up to 6 discrete classes of fluorescent microbeads, and measuring their corresponding reporter signal. The MIDS sensitivity to the phycoerythrin (PE) reporter compared favorably to that of the reference Luminex flow system, and is capable of identifying viral, bacterial, and protein simulants in laboratory samples, at concentrations less than 1μg/ml. The ability to resolve small differences in the average PE fluorescence is a direct function of CCD performance, and may be a necessary trade-off for developing a portable and economical detection system. However, we are confident that the MIDS platform can easily be scaled to meet the nominal requirements of any given point-of-care or screening application, and furthermore provide much-needed diagnostic functionality in this particular environment.

  10. Point-of-care ultrasound detection of tracheal wall thickening caused by smoke inhalation.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Toru; Fujita, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Smoke inhalation is the leading cause of death due to fires. When a patient presents with smoke inhalation, prompt assessment of the airway and breathing is necessary. Point-of-care ultrasonography (US) is used for the rapid assessment of critically ill or injured patients. We herein present a case report of a 54-year-old male who was transferred to the emergency department with shortness of breath, coughing, carbonaceous sputa, and rhinorrhea after inhaling smoke caused by a fire in his locked bedroom. He had no surface burns on the face and no edema or erosion in the oral cavity. He had hoarseness without stridor. His breath sounds were positive for expiratory wheezes. Laryngoscopy showed light edema and erosive findings on the supraglottic region. Bedside point-of-care US revealed hypoechoic thickening of the tracheal wall. The thickening was confirmed by a computed tomographic scan. The patient was carefully monitored with preparation for emergency airway management and was treated with supplemental oxygen and an aerosolized beta-2 adrenergic agonist in the intensive care unit. The symptoms were subsequently relieved, and reexamination by US after 2 days showed remission of the wall thickening. Point-of-care US may therefore be a useful modality for the rapid diagnosis and effective follow-up of tracheal wall thickening caused by smoke inhalation. PMID:25097745

  11. Seroprevalence of equine granulocytic anaplasmosis and lyme borreliosis in Canada as determined by a point-of-care enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

    PubMed

    Schvartz, Gili; Epp, Tasha; Burgess, Hilary J; Chilton, Neil B; Pearl, David L; Lohmann, Katharina L

    2015-06-01

    Equine granulocytic anaplasmosis (EGA) and Lyme borreliosis (LB) are an emerging concern in Canada. We estimated the seroprevalence of EGA and equine LB by testing 376 convenience serum samples from 3 provinces using a point-of-care SNAP(®) 4Dx(®) ELISA (IDEXX Laboratories, Westbrook, Maine, USA), and investigated the agreement between the point-of-care ELISA and laboratory-based serologic tests. The estimated seroprevalence for EGA was 0.53% overall (0.49% in Saskatchewan, 0.71% in Manitoba), while the estimated seroprevalence for LB was 1.6% overall (0.49% in Saskatchewan, 2.86% in Manitoba). There was limited agreement between the point-of-care ELISA and an indirect fluorescent antibody test for EGA (kappa 0.1, PABAK 0.47) and an ELISA/Western blot combination for LB (kappa 0.23, PABAK 0.71). While the SNAP(®) 4Dx(®) ELISA yielded expected seroprevalence estimates, further evaluation of serologic tests for the purposes of disease exposure recognition may be needed.

  12. Programmable Bio-Nano-Chip Technology for the Diagnosis of Cardiovascular Disease at the Point-of-Care

    PubMed Central

    Pierre, Floriano N.; Sanchez, Ximena; Li, Luanyi; Hocquard, Kyle; Patton, Aaron; Muldoon, Rachna; Miller, Craig S.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Redding, Spencer; Yeh, Chih-Ko; Furmaga, Wieslaw B.; Wampler, David A.; Bozkurt, Biykem; Ballantyne, Christie M.; McDevitt, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the world and continues to serve as the major contributor to healthcare costs. Likewise, there is an ever-increasing need and demand for novel and more efficient diagnostic tools for the early detection of cardiovascular disease, especially at the point-of-care (POC). This article reviews the programmable bio-nanochip (P-BNC) system, a new medical microdevice approach with the capacity to deliver both high performance and reduced cost. This fully integrated, total analysis system leverages microelectronic components, microfabrication techniques, and nanotechnology to noninvasively measure multiple cardiac biomarkers in complex fluids, such as saliva, while offering diagnostic accuracy equal to laboratory-confined reference methods. This article profiles the P-BNC approach, describes its performance in real-world testing of clinical samples, and summarizes new opportunities for medical microdevices in the field of cardiac diagnostics. PMID:22891104

  13. Economic evaluation of the use of point-of-care devices in patients with long term oral anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Gerkens, Sophie; Gailly, Jeannine; Obyn, Caroline; Devriese, Stephan; Cleemput, Irina

    2012-10-01

    To examine the cost and cost-effectiveness of the use of point-of-care (POC) devices by the general practitioner (GP), in anticoagulation clinic or by the patient in self-testing (PST) and self-management (PSM), compared with standard laboratory testing to realize international normalized ratio tests for patients on long term anticoagulation therapy. An economic evaluation was performed from the Belgian health care payer's perspective using a Markov model. Outcomes data were derived from a meta-analysis and cost data were derived from claims databases. Several scenarios were tested based on number of tests and GP's contacts and probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used to handle uncertainty. Evidence on the impact of POC on mortality was only found for PSM. Therefore, a cost-effectiveness analysis was performed for PSM and for other strategies, only a cost comparison was done. With an unchanged number of tests, POC is cost-saving compared to laboratory testing (probability > 70%). In scenarios where POC induces more tests, results were different: with 52 tests/year, only PSM kept a probability of remaining cost-saving superior to 50%. Except in the case of 100% of GP consultations maintained and 52 tests/year performed, PSM resulted in significantly more "life years gained" (LYG) than usual care and was on average cost-saving. The organisation of long term oral anticoagulation monitoring should be directed towards PSM and, to a lesser extent, PST for selected and trained patients. PMID:22437654

  14. A novel microfluidic anti-factor Xa assay device for monitoring anticoagulant therapy at the point-of-care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Leanne F.; Rainey, Paul; Castro-López, Vanessa; O'Donnell, James S.; Killard, Anthony J.

    2013-05-01

    Millions of patients worldwide are receiving anticoagulant therapy to treat hypercoagulable diseases. While standard testing is still performed in the central laboratory, point-of-care (POC) diagnostics are being developed due to the increasing number of patients requiring long-term anticoagulation and with a need for more personalized and targeted therapy. Many POC devices on the market focus on clot measurement, a technique which is limited in terms of variability, highlighting the need for more reliable assays of anticoagulant status. The anti-Xa assay, a factor specific optical assay, was developed to measure the extent to which exogenous factor Xa (FXa) is inhibited by heparinantithrombin complexes. We have developed a novel microfluidic device and assay for monitoring the effect of heparin anticoagulant therapy at the point-of-care. The assay which was also developed in our institute is based on the anti-Xa assay principle but uses fluorescence as the method of detection. Our device is a disposable laminate microfluidic strip, fabricated from the cyclic polyolefin (COP), Zeonor®, which is extremely suitable for application to fluorescent device platforms. We present data on the execution of the anti-Xa assay in this microfluidic format, demonstrating that the assay can be used to measure heparin in human plasma samples from 0 to 0.8 U/ml, with average assay reproducibility of 8% and a rapid result obtained within 60 seconds. Results indicate that with further development, the fluorogenic anti-Xa assay and device could become a successful method for monitoring anticoagulant therapy.

  15. Vein visualization using a smart phone with multispectral Wiener estimation for point-of-care applications.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae Hee; Kim, Choye; Yoo, Yangmo

    2015-03-01

    Effective vein visualization is clinically important for various point-of-care applications, such as needle insertion. It can be achieved by utilizing ultrasound imaging or by applying infrared laser excitation and monitoring its absorption. However, while these approaches can be used for vein visualization, they are not suitable for point-of-care applications because of their cost, time, and accessibility. In this paper, a new vein visualization method based on multispectral Wiener estimation is proposed and its real-time implementation on a smart phone is presented. In the proposed method, a conventional RGB camera on a commercial smart phone (i.e., Galaxy Note 2, Samsung Electronics Inc., Suwon, Korea) is used to acquire reflectance information from veins. Wiener estimation is then applied to extract the multispectral information from the veins. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, an experiment was conducted using a color calibration chart (ColorChecker Classic, X-rite, Grand Rapids, MI, USA) and an average root-mean-square error of 12.0% was obtained. In addition, an in vivo subcutaneous vein imaging experiment was performed to explore the clinical performance of the smart phone-based Wiener estimation. From the in vivo experiment, the veins at various sites were successfully localized using the reconstructed multispectral images and these results were confirmed by ultrasound B-mode and color Doppler images. These results indicate that the presented multispectral Wiener estimation method can be used for visualizing veins using a commercial smart phone for point-of-care applications (e.g., vein puncture guidance). PMID:24691170

  16. Transport and use of point-of-care ultrasound by a disaster medical assistance team.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Stefan M; Rippey, James

    2009-01-01

    The role of ultrasound in disaster medicine has not been not well established. This report describes the transport and use of point-of-care ultrasound by a Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) responding to a mass-casualty incident due to a cyclone. Ultrasound-competent physicians on the team were able to use portable ultrasound on cyclone casualties to exclude intra-abdominal hemorrhage, pericardial fluid, pneumothoraces, and hemothoraces. Information obtained using ultrasound made initial patient management, and subsequent decisions regarding triage for transport safer and based on more detailed clinical information.

  17. OPAL: a clinician driven point of care observational data management consortium.

    PubMed

    Tymms, K; Littlejohn, G

    2014-01-01

    A vast amount of important information on the various rheumatic diseases that the rheumatologist treats is available in the medical records derived from the patient consultation. Until recently, it has been difficult to assemble and interpret this data. Moreover, the 'everyday' rheumatologist seeing the 'everyday' patient often does not contribute data to better understanding of 'everyday' clinical issues. We discuss an approach to this problem by describing a blending of a customised electronic medical record with a consortium of like-minded clinicians. We feel that this approach demonstrates the powerful potential for targeted point of care data collection in rheumatology research and patient management. PMID:25365106

  18. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Sensors for DNA Detection at the Point of Care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Kuangwen

    In the post-genomic era, ever-advancing capabilities in DNA detection and analysis have become vital to the detection of infectious diseases and the diagnosis of genetic abnormalities and inheritable diseases. The benefit of such capabilities, however, has yet to reach patients outside of centralized facilities. There thus exists an increasing need to decentralize DNA detection methods and to administer such diagnostics at the "point of care." Electrochemical-based DNA sensors present a compelling approach, but have yet to deliver satisfactory sensitivity, specificity, miniaturization, and real-time monitoring capability to meet the demand of point-of-care diagnostics. Motivated by their potential and their current limitations, in this dissertation, we present a series of strategies that we have undertaken in order to address the key shortcomings of electrochemical DNA sensors and advance them toward point-of-care applications. First, we report a single-step, single reagent, label-free, isothermal electrochemical DNA sensor based on the phenomenon of enzyme catalyzed target recycling amplification. Using this technique, we achieve improved detection limit in comparison to hybridization-based sensors without amplification. We also demonstrate greater than 16-fold amplification of signal at low target concentrations. Next, we present a novel electrochemical DNA sensor that detects single-nucleotide mismatched targets with unprecedented "polarity-switching" responses. This "bipolar" sensor employs a surface-bound and redox-modified (methylene blue) DNA probe architecture, and outputs a decreased Faradaic current when hybridized to a perfectly matched (PM) target, but conversely reports an increased Faradaic current when hybridized to a single-base mismatched (SM) target. Third, we describe the microfluidic electrochemical dynamic allele specific hybridization (microE-DASH) platform for versatile and rapid detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Implementing

  19. Development of a magnetic lab-on-a-chip for point-of-care sepsis diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schotter, Joerg; Shoshi, Astrit; Brueckl, Hubert

    2009-05-01

    We present design criteria, operation principles and experimental examples of magnetic marker manipulation for our magnetic lab-on-a-chip prototype. It incorporates both magnetic sample preparation and detection by embedded GMR-type magnetoresistive sensors and is optimized for the automated point-of-care detection of four different sepsis-indicative cytokines directly from about 5 μl of whole blood. The sample volume, magnetic particle size and cytokine concentration determine the microfluidic volume, sensor size and dimensioning of the magnetic gradient field generators. By optimizing these parameters to the specific diagnostic task, best performance is expected with respect to sensitivity, analysis time and reproducibility.

  20. Magnetic droplet manipulation platforms for nucleic acid detection at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Jin; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2014-11-01

    This review summarizes recent developments in the use of magnetically actuated droplets in point-of-care molecular diagnostic platforms. We discuss the fundamentals of magnetic droplet manipulation and the various modes of actuation. The balance of forces acting on a droplet during transport and particle extraction, as well as the devices and instrumentation developed to perform these operations will be presented and discussed. Furthermore, we review some of the recent advances on the diagnostic applications of platforms utilizing magnetic manipulation for genetic assessment of biological samples.

  1. Utility of point-of-care biliary ultrasound in the evaluation of emergency patients with isolated acute non-traumatic epigastric pain.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Srikar; Morrison, Daniel; Lyon, Matthew; Zeger, Wes; Krueger, Anthony

    2014-08-01

    To determine the utility of emergency physician-performed point-of-care biliary ultrasound in the evaluation of emergency department (ED) patients with isolated acute non-traumatic epigastric pain. This was a multi-center prospective observational study of adult patients presenting to the ED with isolated acute non-traumatic epigastric pain. Patients with abdominal tenderness at any site other than the epigastric region, or with a history of gall stones, cholecystectomy, gastrointestinal bleeding, chronic abdominal pain, trauma, or altered mental status were excluded. Emergency physician investigators performed point-of-care biliary ultrasound after clinical assessment. Demographic information, history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, additional diagnostic tests, and disposition data were collected. A total of 51 patients (39 women, 12 men) were enrolled. The mean age of the patients was 36.4 years ± 13.6 (SD). All subjects had isolated epigastric tenderness. Gallstones were found in 20/51 (39%, 95% CI 26-52%) on point-of-care biliary ultrasound. Of the 20 patients who had gallstones, eight had sonographic signs of chloecystitis. The treating emergency physicians' initial evaluation did not plan to include an ultrasound in 17/20 patients with gallstones. 19/20 patients were initially given a GI cocktail by the treating emergency physicians. Point-of-care biliary ultrasound detected gall stones in more than one-third of ED patients with isolated acute non-traumatic epigastric pain. All patients presenting to the ED with non-traumatic epigastric pain should be evaluated for biliary disease with an ultrasound imaging study. Bedside ultrasound can avoid misdiagnosis and expedite management in these patients.

  2. A study to assess the influence of interprofessional point of care simulation training on safety culture in the operating theatre environment of a university teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Hinde, Theresa; Gale, Thomas; Anderson, Ian; Roberts, Martin; Sice, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional point of care or in situ simulation is used as a training tool in our operating theatre directorate with the aim of improving crisis behaviours. This study aimed to assess the impact of interprofessional point of care simulation on the safety culture of operating theatres. A validated Safety Attitude Questionnaire was administered to staff members before each simulation scenario and then re-administered to the same staff members after 6-12 months. Pre- and post-training Safety Attitude Questionnaire-Operating Room (SAQ-OR) scores were compared using paired sample t-tests. Analysis revealed a statistically significant perceived improvement in both safety (p < 0.001) and teamwork (p = 0.013) climate scores (components of safety culture) 6-12 months after interprofessional simulation training. A growing body of literature suggests that a positive safety culture is associated with improved patient outcomes. Our study supports the implementation of point of care simulation as a useful intervention to improve safety culture in theatres. PMID:26854195

  3. A study to assess the influence of interprofessional point of care simulation training on safety culture in the operating theatre environment of a university teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Hinde, Theresa; Gale, Thomas; Anderson, Ian; Roberts, Martin; Sice, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional point of care or in situ simulation is used as a training tool in our operating theatre directorate with the aim of improving crisis behaviours. This study aimed to assess the impact of interprofessional point of care simulation on the safety culture of operating theatres. A validated Safety Attitude Questionnaire was administered to staff members before each simulation scenario and then re-administered to the same staff members after 6-12 months. Pre- and post-training Safety Attitude Questionnaire-Operating Room (SAQ-OR) scores were compared using paired sample t-tests. Analysis revealed a statistically significant perceived improvement in both safety (p < 0.001) and teamwork (p = 0.013) climate scores (components of safety culture) 6-12 months after interprofessional simulation training. A growing body of literature suggests that a positive safety culture is associated with improved patient outcomes. Our study supports the implementation of point of care simulation as a useful intervention to improve safety culture in theatres.

  4. Opportunities and Challenges for Cost-Efficient Implementation of New Point-of-Care Diagnostics for HIV and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Trevor F.; Cavanaugh, Sean; Piatek, Amy S.; Young, Gloria J.; Alexander, Heather; Coggin, William; Domingo, Gonzalo J.; Ellenberger, Dennis; Ermantraut, Eugen; Jani, Ilesh V.; Katamba, Achilles; Palamountain, Kara M.; Essajee, Shaffiq; Dowdy, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Stakeholders agree that supporting high-quality diagnostics is essential if we are to continue to make strides in the fight against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis. Despite the need to strengthen existing laboratory infrastructure, which includes expanding and developing new laboratories, there are clear diagnostic needs where conventional laboratory support is insufficient. Regarding HIV, rapid point-of-care (POC) testing for initial HIV diagnosis has been successful, but several needs remain. For tuberculosis, several new diagnostic tests have recently been endorsed by the World Health Organization, but a POC test remains elusive. Human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis are coendemic in many high prevalence locations, making parallel diagnosis of these conditions an important consideration. Despite its clear advantages, POC testing has important limitations, and laboratory-based testing will continue to be an important component of future diagnostic networks. Ideally, a strategic deployment plan should be used to define where and how POC technologies can be most efficiently and cost effectively integrated into diagnostic algorithms and existing test networks prior to widespread scale-up. In this fashion, the global community can best harness the tremendous capacity of novel diagnostics in fighting these 2 scourges. PMID:22457286

  5. Nanoparticle Detection of Urinary Markers for Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyun Jung; Pellegrini, Kathryn L; Chung, Jaehoon; Wanigasuriya, Kamani; Jayawardene, Innocent; Lee, Kyungheon; Lee, Hakho; Vaidya, Vishal S; Weissleder, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of acute and chronic kidney injury due to various environmental factors such as heavy metals or chemicals has been a major problem in developing countries. However, the diagnosis of kidney injury in these areas can be more challenging due to the lack of highly sensitive and specific techniques that can be applied in point-of-care settings. To address this, we have developed a technique called 'micro-urine nanoparticle detection (μUNPD)', that allows the detection of trace amounts of molecular markers in urine. Specifically, this technique utilizes an automated on-chip assay followed by detection with a hand-held device for the read-out. Using the μUNPD technology, the kidney injury markers KIM-1 and Cystatin C were detected down to concentrations of 0.1 ng/ml and 20 ng/ml respectively, which meets the cut-off range required to identify patients with acute or chronic kidney injury. Thus, we show that the μUNPD technology enables point of care and non-invasive detection of kidney injury, and has potential for applications in diagnosing kidney injury with high sensitivity in resource-limited settings. PMID:26186708

  6. Developing rapid, point-of-care, multiplex detection for use in lateral flow devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, R. S.; Albala, J. S.; Lane, S. L.; Matthews, D. L.; Fisher, A. M.; Lambert, J. L.; Coleman, M. A.

    2005-11-01

    Immunoassays have been widely used in commercial, scientific and medical research for detection and quantification of analytes in complex mixtures. There is however a need for a point-of-care, multiplex diagnostic assays capable of providing rapid and quantitative measurements of analytes present in samples that are sufficiently simple to carry out without use of a laboratory or individuals trained in chemical analysis. We are developing a fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay platform to perform simultaneous, multiplexed detection of analytes in a complex fluid mixture along with instrumentation to optically quantitate the analytes in the sample. Our prototype imaging system is based on conventional 16-bit CCD optics, which enables the development of a rugged diagnostic instrument that can be further scaled down for point-of-care applications. We have compared protein microarrays with lateral flow assays (LFAs) to determine the sensitivity of each system for the measurement of distinct proteins in complex samples. We are pursuing the LFA platform such that it can easily be scaled to meet the requirements of any given screening application, and be implemented for use in a medical or surgical setting.

  7. Multiplexed lateral flow biosensors: Technological advances for radically improving point-of-care diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Macdonald, Joanne

    2016-09-15

    Lateral flow biosensors are a leading technology in point-of-care diagnostics due to their simplicity, rapidness and low cost. Their primacy in this arena continues through technological breakthroughs such as multiplexing: the detection of more than one biomarker in a single assay. Multiplexing capacity is critical for improving diagnostic efficiency, enhancing the diagnostic precision for specific diseases and reducing diagnostic cost. Here we review, for the first time, the various types and strategies employed for creating multiplexed lateral flow biosensors. These are classified into four main categories in terms of specific application or multiplexing level, namely linear, parameter, spatial and conceptual. We describe the practical applications and implications for each approach and compare their advantages and disadvantages. Importantly, multiplexing is still subject to limitations of the traditional lateral flow biosensor, such as sensitivity and specificity. However, by pushing the limitations of the traditional medium into the multiplex arena, several technological breakthroughs are emerging with novel solutions that further expand the utility of lateral flow biosensing for point-of-care applications.

  8. Conflict of interest in online point-of-care clinical support websites.

    PubMed

    Amber, Kyle T; Dhiman, Gaurav; Goodman, Kenneth W

    2014-08-01

    Point-of-care evidence-based medicine websites allow physicians to answer clinical queries using recent evidence at the bedside. Despite significant research into the function, usability and effectiveness of these programmes, little attention has been paid to their ethical issues. As many of these sites summarise the literature and provide recommendations, we sought to assess the role of conflicts of interest in two widely used websites: UpToDate and Dynamed. We recorded all conflicts of interest for six articles detailing treatment for the following conditions: erectile dysfunction, fibromyalgia, hypogonadism, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease. These diseases were chosen as their medical management is either controversial, or they are treated using biological drugs which are mostly available by brand name only. Thus, we hypothesised that the role of conflict of interest would be more significant in these conditions than in an illness treated with generic medications or by strict guidelines. All articles from the UpToDate articles demonstrated a conflict of interest. At times, the editor and author would have a financial relationship with a company whose drug was mentioned within the article. This is in contrast with articles on the Dynamed website, in which no author or editor had a documented conflict. We offer recommendations regarding the role of conflict of interest disclosure in these point-of-care evidence-based medicine websites.

  9. Raman Spectroscopy as a Promising Tool for Noninvasive Point-of-Care Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Bijlsma, Sabina; Fokkert, Marion J.; Slingerland, Robbert; van Veen, Sjaak J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Self-monitoring of glucose is important for managing diabetes. Noninvasive glucose monitors are not yet available, but patients would benefit highly from such a device. We present results that may lead to a novel, point-of-care noninvasive system to measure blood glucose based on Raman spectroscopy. A hospitalized cohort of 111 subjects was measured using a custom-made Raman spectrometer system. Blood glucose reference samples were used to correlate Raman data to glucose levels, using advanced preprocessing and analysis algorithms. A correlation coefficient (R 2) of .83 was found correlating independent Raman-based predictions on reference blood glucose for the full cohort. Stratification of the cohort in gender-specific groups raised correlation levels to .88 (females) and .94 (males). Glucose could be measured noninvasively with average errors as low as 0.9 mM. We conclude that this novel system shows promising results for the advance of noninvasive, point-of-care glucose monitoring. PMID:25037192

  10. Towards microfluidic reactors for cell-free protein synthesis at the point-of-care

    DOE PAGES

    Timm, Andrea C.; Shankles, Peter G.; Foster, Carmen M.; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-12-22

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) is a powerful technology that allows for optimization of protein production without maintenance of a living system. Integrated within micro- and nano-fluidic architectures, CFPS can be optimized for point-of care use. Here, we describe the development of a microfluidic bioreactor designed to facilitate the production of a single-dose of a therapeutic protein, in a small footprint device at the point-of-care. This new design builds on the use of a long, serpentine channel bioreactor and is enhanced by integrating a nanofabricated membrane to allow exchange of materials between parallel reactor and feeder channels. This engineered membrane facilitatesmore » the exchange of metabolites, energy, and inhibitory species, prolonging the CFPS reaction and increasing protein yield. Membrane permeability can be altered by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition to tune the exchange rate of small molecules. This allows for extended reaction times and improved yields. Further, the reaction product and higher molecular weight components of the transcription/translation machinery in the reactor channel can be retained. As a result, we show that the microscale bioreactor design produces higher protein yields than conventional tube-based batch formats, and that product yields can be dramatically improved by facilitating small molecule exchange within the dual-channel bioreactor.« less

  11. Point-of-care ultrasound in aerospace medicine: known and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Michael S; Garcia, Kathleen; Martin, David S

    2014-07-01

    Since its initial introduction into the bedside assessment of the trauma patient via the Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) exam, the use of point-of-care ultrasound has expanded rapidly. A growing body of literature demonstrates ultrasound can be used by nonradiologists as an extension of the physical exam to accurately diagnose or exclude a variety of conditions. These conditions include, but are not limited to, hemoperitoneum, pneumothorax, pulmonary edema, long-bone fracture, deep vein thrombosis, and elevated intracranial pressure. As ultrasound machines have become more compact and portable, their use has extended outside of hospitals to places where the physical exam and diagnostic capabilities may be limited, including the aviation environment. A number of studies using focused sonography have been performed to meet the diagnostic challenges of space medicine. The following article reviews the available literature on portable ultrasound use in aerospace medicine and highlights both known and potential applications of point-of-care ultrasound for the aeromedical clinician.

  12. Toward Microfluidic Reactors for Cell-Free Protein Synthesis at the Point-of-Care.

    PubMed

    Timm, Andrea C; Shankles, Peter G; Foster, Carmen M; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Retterer, Scott T

    2016-02-10

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) is a powerful technology that allows for optimization of protein production without maintenance of a living system. Integrated within micro and nanofluidic architectures, CFPS can be optimized for point-of-care use. Here, the development of a microfluidic bioreactor designed to facilitate the production of a single-dose of a therapeutic protein, in a small footprint device at the point-of-care, is described. This new design builds on the use of a long, serpentine channel bioreactor and is enhanced by integrating a nanofabricated membrane to allow exchange of materials between parallel "reactor" and "feeder" channels. This engineered membrane facilitates the exchange of metabolites, energy, and inhibitory species, and can be altered by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition to tune the exchange rate of small molecules. This allows for extended reaction times and improved yields. Further, the reaction product and higher molecular weight components of the transcription/translation machinery in the reactor channel can be retained. It has been shown that the microscale bioreactor design produces higher protein yields than conventional tube-based batch formats, and that product yields can be dramatically improved by facilitating small molecule exchange within the dual-channel bioreactor. PMID:26690885

  13. Measurement of biomarker proteins for point-of-care early detection and monitoring of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Challa V.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Patel, Vyomesh

    2010-01-01

    This critical review evaluates progress toward viable point-of-care protein biomarker measurements for cancer detection and diagnostics. The ability to measure panels of specific, selective cancer biomarker proteins in physicians’ surgeries and clinics has the potential to revolutionize cancer detection, monitoring, and therapy. The dream envisions reliable, cheap, automated, technically undemanding devices that can analyze a patient’s serum or saliva in a clinical setting, allowing on-the-spot diagnosis. Existing commercial products for protein assays are reliable in laboratory settings, but have limitations for point-of-care applications. A number of ultrasensitive immunosensors and some arrays have been developed, many based on nanotechnology. Multilabel detection coupled with high capture molecule density in immunosensors and arrays seems to be capable of detecting a wide range of protein concentrations with sensitivity ranging into the sub pg mL−1 level. Multilabel arrays can be designed to detect both high and ultralow abundance proteins in the same sample. However, only a few of the newer ultrasensitive methods have been evaluated with real patient samples, which is key to establishing clinical sensitivity and selectivity. PMID:20614087

  14. Multiplexed volumetric bar-chart chip for point-of-care diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yujun; Zhang, Yuanqing; Bernard, Paul E.; Reuben, James M.; Ueno, Naoto T.; Arlinghaus, Ralph B.; Zu, Youli; Qin, Lidong

    2012-01-01

    Microfluidics have become an enabling technology for point-of-care and personalized diagnostics. Desirable capabilities of microfluidics-based diagnostic devices include simplicity, portability, low cost and the performance of multiplexed and quantitative measurements, ideally in a high-throughput format. Here we present the multiplexed volumetric bar-chart chip (V-Chip), which integrates all these capabilities in one device. A key feature of the V-Chip is that quantitative results are displayed as bar charts directly on the device—without the need for optical instruments or any data processing or plotting steps. This is achieved by directly linking oxygen production by catalase, which is proportional to the concentration of the analyte, with the displacement of ink along channels on the device. We demonstrate the rapid quantification of protein biomarkers in diverse clinical samples with the V-Chip. The development of the V-Chip thus opens up the possibility of greatly simplified point-of-care and personalized diagnostics. PMID:23250413

  15. Fibre optics sensors in tear electrolyte analysis: towards a novel point of care potassium sensor.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Daniel; Hayes, Neil W; Tighe, Brian

    2012-06-01

    The diagnosis of ocular disease is increasingly important in optometric practice and there is a need for cost effective point of care assays to assist in that. Although tears are a potentially valuable source of diagnostic information difficulties associated with sample collection and limited sample size together with sample storage and transport have proved major limitations. Progressive developments in electronics and fibre optics together with innovation in sensing technology mean that the construction of inexpensive point of care fibre optic sensing devices is now possible. Tear electrolytes are an obvious family of target analytes, not least to complement the availability of devices that make the routine measurement of tear osmolarity possible in the clinic. In this paper we describe the design, fabrication and calibration of a fibre-optic based electrolyte sensor for the quantification of potassium in tears using the ex vivo contact lens as the sample source. The technology is generic and the same principles can be used in the development of calcium and magnesium sensors. An important objective of this sensor technology development is to provide information at the point of routine optometric examination, which would provide supportive evidence of tear abnormality. PMID:22409950

  16. Towards microfluidic reactors for cell-free protein synthesis at the point-of-care

    SciTech Connect

    Timm, Andrea C.; Shankles, Peter G.; Foster, Carmen M.; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-12-22

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) is a powerful technology that allows for optimization of protein production without maintenance of a living system. Integrated within micro- and nano-fluidic architectures, CFPS can be optimized for point-of care use. Here, we describe the development of a microfluidic bioreactor designed to facilitate the production of a single-dose of a therapeutic protein, in a small footprint device at the point-of-care. This new design builds on the use of a long, serpentine channel bioreactor and is enhanced by integrating a nanofabricated membrane to allow exchange of materials between parallel reactor and feeder channels. This engineered membrane facilitates the exchange of metabolites, energy, and inhibitory species, prolonging the CFPS reaction and increasing protein yield. Membrane permeability can be altered by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition to tune the exchange rate of small molecules. This allows for extended reaction times and improved yields. Further, the reaction product and higher molecular weight components of the transcription/translation machinery in the reactor channel can be retained. As a result, we show that the microscale bioreactor design produces higher protein yields than conventional tube-based batch formats, and that product yields can be dramatically improved by facilitating small molecule exchange within the dual-channel bioreactor.

  17. An Instantaneous Low-Cost Point-of-Care Anemia Detection Device

    PubMed Central

    Punter-Villagrasa, Jaime; Cid, Joan; Páez-Avilés, Cristina; Rodríguez-Villarreal, Ivón; Juanola-Feliu, Esteve; Colomer-Farrarons, Jordi; Miribel-Català, Pere Ll.

    2015-01-01

    We present a small, compact and portable device for point-of-care instantaneous early detection of anemia. The method used is based on direct hematocrit measurement from whole blood samples by means of impedance analysis. This device consists of a custom electronic instrumentation and a plug-and-play disposable sensor. The designed electronics rely on straightforward standards for low power consumption, resulting in a robust and low consumption device making it completely mobile with a long battery life. Another approach could be powering the system based on other solutions like indoor solar cells, or applying energy-harvesting solutions in order to remove the batteries. The sensing system is based on a disposable low-cost label-free three gold electrode commercial sensor for 50 μL blood samples. The device capability for anemia detection has been validated through 24 blood samples, obtained from four hospitalized patients at Hospital Clínic. As a result, the response, effectiveness and robustness of the portable point-of-care device to detect anemia has been proved with an accuracy error of 2.83% and a mean coefficient of variation of 2.57% without any particular case above 5%. PMID:25690552

  18. A 'green button' for using aggregate patient data at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Longhurst, Christopher A; Harrington, Robert A; Shah, Nigam H

    2014-07-01

    Randomized controlled trials have traditionally been the gold standard against which all other sources of clinical evidence are measured. However, the cost of conducting these trials can be prohibitive. In addition, evidence from the trials frequently rests on narrow patient-inclusion criteria and thus may not generalize well to real clinical situations. Given the increasing availability of comprehensive clinical data in electronic health records (EHRs), some health system leaders are now advocating for a shift away from traditional trials and toward large-scale retrospective studies, which can use practice-based evidence that is generated as a by-product of clinical processes. Other thought leaders in clinical research suggest that EHRs should be used to lower the cost of trials by integrating point-of-care randomization and data capture into clinical processes. We believe that a successful learning health care system will require both approaches, and we suggest a model that resolves this escalating tension: a "green button" function within EHRs to help clinicians leverage aggregate patient data for decision making at the point of care. Giving clinicians such a tool would support patient care decisions in the absence of gold-standard evidence and would help prioritize clinical questions for which EHR-enabled randomization should be carried out. The privacy rule in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 may require revision to support this novel use of patient data.

  19. Nanoparticle Detection of Urinary Markers for Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wanigasuriya, Kamani; Jayawardene, Innocent; Lee, Kyungheon; Lee, Hakho; Vaidya, Vishal S.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of acute and chronic kidney injury due to various environmental factors such as heavy metals or chemicals has been a major problem in developing countries. However, the diagnosis of kidney injury in these areas can be more challenging due to the lack of highly sensitive and specific techniques that can be applied in point-of-care settings. To address this, we have developed a technique called ‘micro-urine nanoparticle detection (μUNPD)’, that allows the detection of trace amounts of molecular markers in urine. Specifically, this technique utilizes an automated on-chip assay followed by detection with a hand-held device for the read-out. Using the μUNPD technology, the kidney injury markers KIM-1 and Cystatin C were detected down to concentrations of 0.1 ng/ml and 20 ng/ml respectively, which meets the cut-off range required to identify patients with acute or chronic kidney injury. Thus, we show that the μUNPD technology enables point of care and non-invasive detection of kidney injury, and has potential for applications in diagnosing kidney injury with high sensitivity in resource-limited settings. PMID:26186708

  20. Information technology: changing nursing processes at the point-of-care.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Karen L; Demiris, George; Alexander, Greg L

    2005-01-01

    Changing societal demographics, increasing complexity in healthcare knowledge, and increasing nursing shortages have led healthcare strategists to call for a redesign of the healthcare system. Embedded within most redesign recommendations is the increased use of technology to make nursing practice more efficient. However, information technology (IT) has the potential to go beyond simple efficiency increases. If IT is perceived truly as a part of the redesign of healthcare delivery rather than simply the automation of existing processes, then it can change nursing processes within institutions and furthermore change the point-of-care between nurses and patients. Nursing adoption of technology within the workplace is a result of the interactions between technical skills, social acceptance, and workplace culture. Nursing needs for information not only influence their adoption of particular technologies but also shape their design. The objective of this article is to illustrate how IT can change not only nursing practice and processes but also the point-of-care. A case study of the use of IT by nurses in telehomecare is presented and administrative implications are discussed. PMID:16260995

  1. A paper based graphene-nanocauliflower hybrid composite for point of care biosensing.

    PubMed

    Burrs, S L; Bhargava, M; Sidhu, R; Kiernan-Lewis, J; Gomes, C; Claussen, J C; McLamore, E S

    2016-11-15

    We demonstrate the first report of graphene paper functionalized with fractal platinum nanocauliflower for use in electrochemical biosensing of small molecules (glucose) or detection of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7). Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy show that graphene oxide-coated nanocellulose was partially reduced by both thermal treatment, and further reduced by chemical treatment (ascorbic acid). Fractal nanoplatinum with cauliflower-like morphology was formed on the reduced graphene oxide paper using pulsed sonoelectrodeposition, producing a conductive paper with an extremely high electroactive surface area (0.29±0.13cm(2)), confirmed by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The platinum surface was functionalized with either glucose oxidase (via chitosan encapsulation) or a RNA aptamer (via covalent linking) for demonstration as a point of care biosensor. The detection limit for both glucose (0.08±0.02μM) and E. coli O157:H7 (≈4 CFUmL(-1)) were competitive with, or superior to, previously reported devices in the biosensing literature. The response time (6s for glucose and 12min for E. coli) were also similar to silicon biochip and commercial electrode sensors. The results demonstrate that the nanocellulose-graphene-nanoplatinum material is an excellent paper-based platform for development of electrochemical biosensors targeting small molecules or whole cells for use in point of care biosensing. PMID:27209574

  2. Integrated electrochemical microsystems for genetic detection of pathogens at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Kuangwen; Ferguson, B Scott; Eisenstein, Michael; Plaxco, Kevin W; Soh, H Tom

    2015-04-21

    The capacity to achieve rapid, sensitive, specific, quantitative, and multiplexed genetic detection of pathogens via a robust, portable, point-of-care platform could transform many diagnostic applications. And while contemporary technologies have yet to effectively achieve this goal, the advent of microfluidics provides a potentially viable approach to this end by enabling the integration of sophisticated multistep biochemical assays (e.g., sample preparation, genetic amplification, and quantitative detection) in a monolithic, portable device from relatively small biological samples. Integrated electrochemical sensors offer a particularly promising solution to genetic detection because they do not require optical instrumentation and are readily compatible with both integrated circuit and microfluidic technologies. Nevertheless, the development of generalizable microfluidic electrochemical platforms that integrate sample preparation and amplification as well as quantitative and multiplexed detection remains a challenging and unsolved technical problem. Recognizing this unmet need, we have developed a series of microfluidic electrochemical DNA sensors that have progressively evolved to encompass each of these critical functionalities. For DNA detection, our platforms employ label-free, single-step, and sequence-specific electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensors, in which an electrode-bound, redox-reporter-modified DNA "probe" generates a current change after undergoing a hybridization-induced conformational change. After successfully integrating E-DNA sensors into a microfluidic chip format, we subsequently incorporated on-chip genetic amplification techniques including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) to enable genetic detection at clinically relevant target concentrations. To maximize the potential point-of-care utility of our platforms, we have further integrated sample preparation via immunomagnetic separation, which

  3. Flexible opto-electronics enabled microfluidics systems with cloud connectivity for point-of-care micronutrient analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephen; Aranyosi, A J; Wong, Michelle D; Hong, Ji Hyung; Lowe, Jared; Chan, Carol; Garlock, David; Shaw, Scott; Beattie, Patrick D; Kratochvil, Zachary; Kubasti, Nick; Seagers, Kirsten; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Swanson, Christina D

    2016-04-15

    In developing countries, the deployment of medical diagnostic technologies remains a challenge because of infrastructural limitations (e.g. refrigeration, electricity), and paucity of health professionals, distribution centers and transportation systems. Here we demonstrate the technical development and clinical testing of a novel electronics enabled microfluidic paper-based analytical device (EE-μPAD) for quantitative measurement of micronutrient concentrations in decentralized, resource-limited settings. The system performs immune-detection using paper-based microfluidics, instrumented with flexible electronics and optoelectronic sensors in a mechanically robust, ultrathin format comparable in size to a credit card. Autonomous self-calibration, plasma separation, flow monitoring, timing and data storage enable multiple devices to be run simultaneously. Measurements are wirelessly transferred to a mobile phone application that geo-tags the data and transmits it to a remote server for real time tracking of micronutrient deficiencies. Clinical tests of micronutrient levels from whole blood samples (n=95) show comparable sensitivity and specificity to ELISA-based tests. These results demonstrate instantaneous acquisition and global aggregation of diagnostics data using a fully integrated point of care system that will enable rapid and distributed surveillance of disease prevalence and geographical progression. PMID:26630284

  4. Flexible opto-electronics enabled microfluidics systems with cloud connectivity for point-of-care micronutrient analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephen; Aranyosi, A J; Wong, Michelle D; Hong, Ji Hyung; Lowe, Jared; Chan, Carol; Garlock, David; Shaw, Scott; Beattie, Patrick D; Kratochvil, Zachary; Kubasti, Nick; Seagers, Kirsten; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Swanson, Christina D

    2016-04-15

    In developing countries, the deployment of medical diagnostic technologies remains a challenge because of infrastructural limitations (e.g. refrigeration, electricity), and paucity of health professionals, distribution centers and transportation systems. Here we demonstrate the technical development and clinical testing of a novel electronics enabled microfluidic paper-based analytical device (EE-μPAD) for quantitative measurement of micronutrient concentrations in decentralized, resource-limited settings. The system performs immune-detection using paper-based microfluidics, instrumented with flexible electronics and optoelectronic sensors in a mechanically robust, ultrathin format comparable in size to a credit card. Autonomous self-calibration, plasma separation, flow monitoring, timing and data storage enable multiple devices to be run simultaneously. Measurements are wirelessly transferred to a mobile phone application that geo-tags the data and transmits it to a remote server for real time tracking of micronutrient deficiencies. Clinical tests of micronutrient levels from whole blood samples (n=95) show comparable sensitivity and specificity to ELISA-based tests. These results demonstrate instantaneous acquisition and global aggregation of diagnostics data using a fully integrated point of care system that will enable rapid and distributed surveillance of disease prevalence and geographical progression.

  5. Integrated quality control: implementation and validation of instrument function checks and procedural controls for a cartridge-based point-of-care system for critical care analysis.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Paul; Mansouri, Sohrab

    2013-03-01

    In this article, the process used to develop and validate an integrated quality-control system for a cartridge-based, point-of-care system for critical care analysis is outlined. Application of risk management principles has resulted in a quality control system using a combination of statistical quality control with onboard reference solutions and failure pattern recognition used to flag common failure modes during the analytical phase of the testing process. A combination of traditional external quality control, integrated quality control to monitor ongoing instrument functionality, operator training, and other laboratory-implemented monitors is most effective in controlling known failure modes during the testing process.

  6. Advances in Microfluidic PCR for Point-of-Care Infectious Disease Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seungkyung; Zhang, Yi; Lin, Shin; Wang, Tza-Huei; Yang, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Global burdens from existing or emerging infectious diseases emphasize the need for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics to enhance timely recognition and intervention. Molecular approaches based on PCR methods have made significant inroads by improving detection time and accuracy but are still largely hampered by resource-intensive processing in centralized laboratories, thereby precluding their routine bedside- or field-use. Microfluidic technologies have enabled miniaturization of PCR processes onto a chip device with potential benefits including speed, cost, portability, throughput, and automation. In this review, we provide an overview of recent advances in microfluidic PCR technologies and discuss practical issues and perspectives related to implementing them into infectious disease diagnostics. PMID:21741465

  7. Optoelectronic Capillary Sensors in Microfluidic and Point-of-Care Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Borecki, Michał; Korwin-Pawlowski, Michael L.; Beblowska, Maria; Szmidt, Jan; Jakubowski, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a review, based on the published literature and on the authors’ own research, of the current state of the art of fiber-optic capillary sensors and related instrumentation as well as their applications, with special emphasis on point-of-care chemical and biochemical sensors, systematizing the various types of sensors from the point of view of the principles of their construction and operation. Unlike classical fiber-optic sensors which rely on changes in light propagation inside the fiber as affected by outside conditions, optical capillary sensors rely on changes of light transmission in capillaries filled with the analyzed liquid, which opens the possibility of interesting new applications, while raising specific issues relating to the construction, materials and instrumentation of those sensors. PMID:22319325

  8. Point-of-care ultrasonography during rescue operations on board a Polish Medical Air Rescue helicopter.

    PubMed

    Darocha, Tomasz; Gałązkowski, Robert; Sobczyk, Dorota; Żyła, Zbigniew; Drwiła, Rafał

    2014-12-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound examination has been increasingly widely used in pre-hospital care. The use of ultrasound in rescue medicine allows for a quick differential diagnosis, identification of the most important medical emergencies and immediate introduction of targeted treatment. Performing and interpreting a pre-hospital ultrasound examination can improve the accuracy of diagnosis and thus reduce mortality. The authors' own experiences are presented in this paper, which consist in using a portable, hand-held ultrasound apparatus during rescue operations on board a Polish Medical Air Rescue helicopter. The possibility of using an ultrasound apparatus during helicopter rescue service allows for a full professional evaluation of the patient's health condition and enables the patient to be brought to a center with the most appropriate facilities for their condition. PMID:26674604

  9. Microfluidic Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors: From Principles to Point-of-Care Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Da-Shin; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a label-free, highly-sensitive, and real-time sensing technique. Conventional SPR sensors, which involve a planar thin gold film, have been widely exploited in biosensing; various miniaturized formats have been devised for portability purposes. Another type of SPR sensor which utilizes localized SPR (LSPR), is based on metal nanostructures with surface plasmon modes at the structural interface. The resonance condition is sensitive to the refractive index change of the local medium. The principles of these two types of SPR sensors are reviewed and their integration with microfluidic platforms is described. Further applications of microfluidic SPR sensors to point-of-care (POC) diagnostics are discussed. PMID:27472340

  10. Advances in addressing technical challenges of point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Wang, ShuQi; Lifson, Mark A.; Inci, Fatih; Liang, Li-Guo; Sheng, Ye-Feng; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-01-01

    The striking prevalence of HIV, TB and malaria, as well as outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases, such as influenza A (H7N9), Ebola and MERS, poses great challenges for patient care in resource-limited settings (RLS). However, advanced diagnostic technologies cannot be implemented in RLS largely due to economic constraints. Simple and inexpensive point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, which rely less on environmental context and operator training, have thus been extensively studied to achieve early diagnosis and treatment monitoring in non-laboratory settings. Despite great input from material science, biomedical engineering and nanotechnology for developing POC diagnostics, significant technical challenges are yet to be overcome. Summarized here are the technical challenges associated with POC diagnostics from a RLS perspective and the latest advances in addressing these challenges are reviewed. PMID:26777725

  11. Microfluidic Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors: From Principles to Point-of-Care Applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Shin; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2016-07-27

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a label-free, highly-sensitive, and real-time sensing technique. Conventional SPR sensors, which involve a planar thin gold film, have been widely exploited in biosensing; various miniaturized formats have been devised for portability purposes. Another type of SPR sensor which utilizes localized SPR (LSPR), is based on metal nanostructures with surface plasmon modes at the structural interface. The resonance condition is sensitive to the refractive index change of the local medium. The principles of these two types of SPR sensors are reviewed and their integration with microfluidic platforms is described. Further applications of microfluidic SPR sensors to point-of-care (POC) diagnostics are discussed.

  12. Microfluidic Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors: From Principles to Point-of-Care Applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Shin; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a label-free, highly-sensitive, and real-time sensing technique. Conventional SPR sensors, which involve a planar thin gold film, have been widely exploited in biosensing; various miniaturized formats have been devised for portability purposes. Another type of SPR sensor which utilizes localized SPR (LSPR), is based on metal nanostructures with surface plasmon modes at the structural interface. The resonance condition is sensitive to the refractive index change of the local medium. The principles of these two types of SPR sensors are reviewed and their integration with microfluidic platforms is described. Further applications of microfluidic SPR sensors to point-of-care (POC) diagnostics are discussed. PMID:27472340

  13. Point-of-care temperature and respiration monitoring sensors for smart fabric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Soyoun; Ji, Taeksoo; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2006-12-01

    Advances in smart sensors, miniaturization, and related technologies leading to the emergence of smart fabrics are prerequisites to the construction of a point-of-care (POC) system for continuous health monitoring and illness prevention. Low manufacturing cost, light weight, portability and flexibility are among the requirements for smart sensors when embedded into smart fabrics. Organic semiconductor technology has recently been envisioned to meet these requirements, and to encourage the development of organic semiconductor based sensors because of its low process temperature and potential for very low cost manufacturing. In this paper, we present flexible sensors based on an organic semiconductor capable of measuring physiological parameters such as strain and temperature, adopting pentacene thin film transistors (TFTs) and Wheatstone bridge structures. It is expected that these sensors, integrated into textile structures, will enable real time POC monitoring of a patient's respiration rate, skin temperature, body heat flow and body temperature at an early stage.

  14. Miniature swept source for point of care Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Brian D.; Nezam, S.M. Reza Motaghian; Jillella, Priyanka; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2009-01-01

    Point of care (POC) medical technologies require portable, small, robust instrumentation for practical implementation. In their current embodiment, optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) systems employ large form-factor wavelength-swept lasers, making them impractical in the POC environment. Here, we describe a first step toward a POC OFDI system by demonstrating a miniaturized swept-wavelength source. The laser is based on a tunable optical filter using a reflection grating and a miniature resonant scanning mirror. The laser achieves 75 nm of bandwidth centered at 1340 nm, a 0.24 nm instantaneous line width, a 15.3 kHz repetition rate with 12 mW peak output power, and a 30.4 kHz A-line rate when utilizing forward and backward sweeps. The entire laser system is approximately the size of a deck of cards and can operate on battery power for at least one hour. PMID:19259202

  15. A low-cost miniaturized potentiostat for point-of-care diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Andres Felipe Diaz; Norena, Nicolas; Kaushik, Ajeet; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents a novel approach of using a miniaturized potentiostat (M-P) chip (LMP91000) to perform full range cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements for the detection of biomarkers. The LMP91000 evaluation board was reconfigured to perform three-electrode CV measurements in order to achieve electrochemical cortisol immunosensing. The microelectrodes for cortisol estimation were fabricated by immobilizing monoclonal anti-cortisol antibody (Anti-M-Cab) onto self-assembled monolayer (SAM) modified Au microelectrodes. The results obtained using the M-P were compared to those obtained using a conventional potentiostat. The M-P was successful in measuring cortisol levels in the range of pM. The outcomes of the studies suggest that M-P can effectively perform biochemical measurements on three electrode systems, enabling the development of miniature systems for point-of-care (POC) diagnosis. PMID:25016332

  16. Point-of-care ultrasound education: the increasing role of simulation and multimedia resources.

    PubMed

    Lewiss, Resa E; Hoffmann, Beatrice; Beaulieu, Yanick; Phelan, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the current technology, literature, teaching models, and methods associated with simulation-based point-of-care ultrasound training. Patient simulation appears particularly well suited for learning point-of-care ultrasound, which is a required core competency for emergency medicine and other specialties. Work hour limitations have reduced the opportunities for clinical practice, and simulation enables practicing a skill multiple times before it may be used on patients. Ultrasound simulators can be categorized into 2 groups: low and high fidelity. Low-fidelity simulators are usually static simulators, meaning that they have nonchanging anatomic examples for sonographic practice. Advantages are that the model may be reused over time, and some simulators can be homemade. High-fidelity simulators are usually high-tech and frequently consist of many computer-generated cases of virtual sonographic anatomy that can be scanned with a mock probe. This type of equipment is produced commercially and is more expensive. High-fidelity simulators provide students with an active and safe learning environment and make a reproducible standardized assessment of many different ultrasound cases possible. The advantages and disadvantages of using low- versus high-fidelity simulators are reviewed. An additional concept used in simulation-based ultrasound training is blended learning. Blended learning may include face-to-face or online learning often in combination with a learning management system. Increasingly, with simulation and Web-based learning technologies, tools are now available to medical educators for the standardization of both ultrasound skills training and competency assessment. PMID:24371095

  17. A paper based graphene-nanocauliflower hybrid composite for point of care biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrs, S. L.; Sidhu, R.; Bhargava, M.; Kiernan-Lewis, J.; Schwalb, N.; Rong, Y.; Gomes, C.; Claussen, J.; Vanegas, D. C.; McLamore, E. S.

    2016-05-01

    Graphene paper has diverse applications in printed circuit board electronics, bioassays, 3D cell culture, and biosensing. Although development of nanometal-graphene hybrid composites is commonplace in the sensing literature, to date there are only a few examples of nanometal-decorated graphene paper for use in biosensing. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the synthesis and application of Pt nano cauliflower-functionalized graphene paper for use in electrochemical biosensing of small molecules (glucose, acetone, methanol) or detection of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7). Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to show that graphene oxide deposited on nanocellulose crystals was partially reduced by both thermal and chemical treatment. Fractal platinum nanostructures were formed on the reduced graphene oxide paper, producing a conductive paper with an extremely high electroactive surface area, confirmed by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. To show the broad applicability of the material, the platinum surface was functionalized with three different biomaterials: 1) glucose oxidase (via chitosan encapsulation); 2) a DNA aptamer (via covalent linking), or 3) a chemosensory protein (via his linking). We demonstrate the application of this device for point of care biosensing. The detection limit for both glucose (0.08 +/- 0.02 μM) and E. coli O157:H7 (1.3 +/- 0.1 CFU mL-1) were competitive with, or superior to, previously reported devices in the biosensing literature. The response time (6 sec for glucose and 10 min for E. coli) were also similar to silicon biochip and commercial electrode sensors. The results demonstrate that the nanocellulose-graphene-nanoplatinum material is an excellent paper-based platform for development of electrochemical biosensors targeting small molecules or whole cells for use in point of care biosensing.

  18. Point-of-care ultrasound education: the increasing role of simulation and multimedia resources.

    PubMed

    Lewiss, Resa E; Hoffmann, Beatrice; Beaulieu, Yanick; Phelan, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the current technology, literature, teaching models, and methods associated with simulation-based point-of-care ultrasound training. Patient simulation appears particularly well suited for learning point-of-care ultrasound, which is a required core competency for emergency medicine and other specialties. Work hour limitations have reduced the opportunities for clinical practice, and simulation enables practicing a skill multiple times before it may be used on patients. Ultrasound simulators can be categorized into 2 groups: low and high fidelity. Low-fidelity simulators are usually static simulators, meaning that they have nonchanging anatomic examples for sonographic practice. Advantages are that the model may be reused over time, and some simulators can be homemade. High-fidelity simulators are usually high-tech and frequently consist of many computer-generated cases of virtual sonographic anatomy that can be scanned with a mock probe. This type of equipment is produced commercially and is more expensive. High-fidelity simulators provide students with an active and safe learning environment and make a reproducible standardized assessment of many different ultrasound cases possible. The advantages and disadvantages of using low- versus high-fidelity simulators are reviewed. An additional concept used in simulation-based ultrasound training is blended learning. Blended learning may include face-to-face or online learning often in combination with a learning management system. Increasingly, with simulation and Web-based learning technologies, tools are now available to medical educators for the standardization of both ultrasound skills training and competency assessment.

  19. Optical biosensor technologies for molecular diagnostics at the point-of-care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schotter, Joerg; Schrittwieser, Stefan; Muellner, Paul; Melnik, Eva; Hainberger, Rainer; Koppitsch, Guenther; Schrank, Franz; Soulantika, Katerina; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang; Ludwig, Frank; Dieckhoff, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Label-free optical schemes for molecular biosensing hold a strong promise for point-of-care applications in medical research and diagnostics. Apart from diagnostic requirements in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and multiplexing capability, also other aspects such as ease of use and manufacturability have to be considered in order to pave the way to a practical implementation. We present integrated optical waveguide as well as magnetic nanoparticle based molecular biosensor concepts that address these aspects. The integrated optical waveguide devices are based on low-loss photonic wires made of silicon nitride deposited by a CMOS compatible plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process that allows for backend integration of waveguides on optoelectronic CMOS chips. The molecular detection principle relies on evanescent wave sensing in the 0.85 μm wavelength regime by means of Mach-Zehnder interferometers, which enables on-chip integration of silicon photodiodes and, thus, the realization of system-on-chip solutions. Our nanoparticle-based approach is based on optical observation of the dynamic response of functionalized magneticcore/ noble-metal-shell nanorods (`nanoprobes') to an externally applied time-varying magnetic field. As target molecules specifically bind to the surface of the nanoprobes, the observed dynamics of the nanoprobes changes, and the concentration of target molecules in the sample solution can be quantified. This approach is suitable for dynamic real-time measurements and only requires minimal sample preparation, thus presenting a highly promising point-of-care diagnostic system. In this paper, we present a prototype of a diagnostic device suitable for highly automated sample analysis by our nanoparticle-based approach.

  20. Point of care nucleic acid detection of viable pathogenic bacteria with isothermal RNA amplification based paper biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxing; Xing, Da; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2014-09-01

    Food-borne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes have been recognized as a major cause of human infections worldwide, leading to substantial health problems. Food-borne pathogen identification needs to be simpler, cheaper and more reliable than the current traditional methods. Here, we have constructed a low-cost paper biosensor for the detection of viable pathogenic bacteria with the naked eye. In this study, an effective isothermal amplification method was used to amplify the hlyA mRNA gene, a specific RNA marker in Listeria monocytogenes. The amplification products were applied to the paper biosensor to perform a visual test, in which endpoint detection was performed using sandwich hybridization assays. When the RNA products migrated along the paper biosensor by capillary action, the gold nanoparticles accumulated at the designated Test line and Control line. Under optimized experimental conditions, as little as 0.5 pg/μL genomic RNA from Listeria monocytogenes could be detected. The whole assay process, including RNA extraction, amplification, and visualization, can be completed within several hours. The developed method is suitable for point-of-care applications to detect food-borne pathogens, as it can effectively overcome the false-positive results caused by amplifying nonviable Listeria monocytogenes.

  1. Use of a point-of-care beta-hydroxybutyrate sensor for detection of ketonemia in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Debra W.; Schlesinger, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    The urine test strip is the most common test used to detect ketones in veterinary patients, but it can underestimate the degree of ketonuria and hence, ketonemia. Additionally, adequate urine samples for analysis may be difficult to obtain from dehydrated animals. The standard method used to detect and monitor ketonemia in human medicine is measurement of serum or whole blood beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHOB). A point-of-care (POC) analyzer has been validated for this purpose in humans. This study compared the accuracy of the POC device to an enzymatic reaction laboratory method for measurement of βHOB in dogs. Although the POC sensor tended to overestimate βHOB concentrations, there was good correlation (R2 = 0.96) and good agreement between the 2 methods with a bias +/− precision of 0.0860 +/− 0.3410 mmol/L βHOB. The POC βHOB sensor can be useful for assessing ketonemia in dogs. PMID:21119867

  2. Surface plasmon enhanced-field fluorescence biosensor for point-of-care testing using fluorescent nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Kazuyoshi; Kimura, Toshihito; Ohtsuka, Hisashi; Kasagi, Noriyuki; Oohara, Tomoya; Matsuno, Tadahiro; Hakamata, Masashi; Komatsu, Akihiro; Sendai, Tomonari

    2012-03-01

    An optical biosensor system using surface-plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence has been developed, which allows high sensitivity and fast measurement available. Intensity of fluorophores in SPFS is highly dependent upon the distance from metal surface. The resonant evanescent electric field excites fluorophores within the penetration area. On the other hand, fluorescence quenching in close proximity to a metal surface interfere with the excitation. We have developed a new technology for fluorescent nanoparticles that could receive the energy from metal surface effectively. This enables technology of detecting strong and stable SPFS signals, as well as homogeneous assay method that allows us to eliminate binding/free separation process for unreacted fluorescent particles. A rate assay method has also been employed, which resolves affect from diffusion-limited access, in order to realize a fast surface immunoreaction in a microchannel. Taking advantage of these two developments, as eliminating an enzyme response process such as CLEIA, our system reaches much faster reaction time of 2 minutes to detect thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) of canine serum sample at 0.1ng/mL. We believe our system with these new technologies is a powerful tool for in-vitro diagnosis which meets various clinical requirements.

  3. Portable guided-mode resonance biosensor platform for point-of-care testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Gun Yong; Kim, Wan-Joong; Ko, Hyunsung; Kim, Bong K.; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Huh, Chul; Hong, Jongcheol

    2012-10-01

    It represents a viable solution for the realization of a portable biosensor platform that could screen/diagnose acute myocardial infarction by measuring cardiac marker concentrations such as cardiac troponin I (cTnI), creatine kinase MB (CK-MB), and myoglobin (MYO) for application to u-health monitoring system. The portable biosensor platform introduced in this presentation has a more compact structure and a much higher measuring resolution than a conventional spectrometer system. Portable guided-mode resonance (GMR) biosensor platform was composed of a biosensor chip stage, an optical pick-up module, and a data display panel. Disposable plastic GMR biosensor chips with nano-grating patterns were fabricated by injection-molding. Whole blood filtration and label-free immunoassay were performed on these single chips, automatically. Optical pick-up module was fabricated by using the miniaturized bulk optics and the interconnecting optical fibers and a tunable VCSEL (vertical cavity surface emitting laser). The reflectance spectrum from the GMR biosensor was measured by the optical pick-up module. Cardiac markers in human serum with concentrations less than 0.1ng/mL were analyzed using a GMR biosensor. Analysis time was 30min, which is short enough to meet clinical requirements. Our results show that the GMR biosensor will be very useful in developing lowcost portable biosensors that can screen for cardiac diseases.

  4. Smartphone spectroscopy: three unique modalities for point-of-care testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Kenneth D.; Yu, Hojeong; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2015-06-01

    Here we demonstrate three principle modalities for a smartphone-based spectrometer: absorption, fluorescence, and photonic crystal (PC)-based label-free detection. When combined with some simple optical components, the rear-facing CMOS camera in a mobile device can provide spectrometric data that rivals that of laboratory instruments, but at a fraction of the cost. The use of a smartphone-based platform poses significant advantages based upon the rise of smartphone apps, which allow for user-interface and data-processing algorithms to be packaged and distributed within environments that are externally maintained with potential for integration with services such as cloud storage, GIS-tagging, and remote expert analysis. We demonstrate the absorption modality of our device by performing an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on both a cancer biomarker and a peanut allergen, demonstrating clinically relevant limits of detection (LOD). Second, we demonstrate the success of a molecular beacon (MB)-based assay on the smartphone platform, achieving an LOD of 1.3 pM for a specific RNA sequence, less than that of a commercial benchtop instrument. Finally, we use a PC biosensor to perform label-free detection of a representative biological interaction: Protein A and human immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the nanomolar regime. Our work represents the first demonstration of smartphone-based spectroscopy for biological assays, and the first mobile-device-enabled detection instrument that serves to measure three distinct sensing modalities (label-free biosensing, absorption spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy). The smartphone platform has the potential to expand the use of spectrometric analysis to environments assay from the laboratory, which may include rural or remote locations, low-resource settings, and consumer markets.

  5. CD4 Count Outperforms World Health Organization Clinical Algorithm for Point-of Care HIV Diagnosis among Hospitalized HIV-exposed Malawian Infants

    PubMed Central

    Maliwichi, Madalitso; Rosenberg, Nora E.; Macfie, Rebekah; Olson, Dan; Hoffman, Irving; van der Horst, Charles M.; Kazembe, Peter N.; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; McCollum, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine, for the WHO algorithm for point-of-care diagnosis of HIV infection, the agreement levels between pediatricians and non-physician clinicians, and to compare sensitivity and specificity profiles of the WHO algorithm and different CD4 thresholds against HIV PCR testing in hospitalized Malawian infants. Methods In 2011, hospitalized HIV-exposed infants <12 months in Lilongwe, Malawi were evaluated independently with the WHO algorithm by both a pediatrician and clinical officer. Blood was collected for CD4 and molecular HIV testing (DNA or RNA PCR). Using molecular testing as the reference, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) were determined for the WHO algorithm and CD4 count thresholds of 1500 and 2000 cells/mm3 by pediatricians and clinical officers. Results We enrolled 166 infants (50% female, 34% <2 months, 37% HIV-infected). Sensitivity was higher using CD4 thresholds (<1500, 80%; <2000, 95%) than with the algorithm (physicians, 57%; clinical officers, 71%). Specificity was comparable for CD4 thresholds (<1500, 68%, <2000, 50%) and the algorithm (pediatricians, 55%, clinical officers, 50%). The positive predictive values were slightly better using CD4 thresholds (<1500, 59%, <2000, 52%) than the algorithm (pediatricians, 43%, clinical officers 45%) at this prevalence. Conclusion Performance by the WHO algorithm and CD4 thresholds resulted in many misclassifications. Point-of-care CD4 thresholds of <1500 cells/mm3 or <2000 cells/mm3 could identify more HIV-infected infants with fewer false positives than the algorithm. However, a point-of-care option with better performance characteristics is needed for accurate, timely HIV diagnosis. PMID:24754543

  6. Cellphone camera imaging of a periodically patterned chip as a potential method for point-of-care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ritu; Reifenberger, Ronald G; Kulkarni, Giridhar U

    2014-03-26

    In this study, we demonstrate that a disposable chip periodically patterned with suitable ligands, an ordinary cellphone camera, and a simple pattern recognition software, can potentially be used for quantitative diagnostics. A key factor in this demonstration is the design of a calibration grid around the chip that, through a contrast transfer process, enables reliable analysis of the images collected under variable ambient lighting conditions. After exposure to a dispersion of amine terminated silica beads used as analyte mimicking pathogens, an epoxy-terminated glass substrate microcontact printed with octadecyltrichlorosilane (250 μm periodicity) developed a characteristic pattern of beads which could be easily imaged with a cellphone camera of 3.2 MP pixels. A simple pattern recognition algorithm using fast Fourier transform produced a quantitative estimate of the analyte concentration present in the test solution. In this method importantly, neither the chip fabrication process nor the fill-factor of the periodic pattern need be perfect to arrive at a conclusive diagnosis. The method suggests a viable platform that may potentially find use in fault-tolerant and robust point-of-care diagnostic applications.

  7. Lab-on-DVD: standard DVD drives as a novel laser scanning microscope for image based point of care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Ramachandraiah, Harisha; Amasia, Mary; Cole, Jackie; Sheard, Paul; Pickhaver, Simon; Walker, Chris; Wirta, Valtteri; Lexow, Preben; Lione, Richard; Russom, Aman

    2013-04-21

    We present a novel "Lab-on-DVD" system and demonstrate its capability for rapid and low-cost HIV diagnostics by counting CD4+ cells isolated from whole blood. We show that a commercial DVD drive can, with certain modifications, be turned into an improved DVD-based laser scanning microscope (DVD-LSM). The system consists of a multi-layered disposable polymer disc and a modified commercial DVD reader with rotational control for sample handling, temperature control for optimized bioassay, a photodiode array for detection, and software for signal processing and user interface - all the necessary components required for a truly integrated lab-on-a-chip system, with the capability to deliver high-resolution images down to 1 μm in size. Using discs modified with antibodies, we specifically captured CD4+ cells from whole blood, demonstrating single cell resolution imaging. The novel integrated DVD platform with sub-micron image resolution brings, for the first time, affordable cellular diagnostic testing to the point-of-care and should be readily applicable at resource-limited settings.

  8. An isothermal amplification reactor with an integrated isolation membrane for point-of-care detection of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Geva, Eran; Mauk, Michael; Qiu, Xianbo; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Curtis, Kelly; Owen, S. Michele; Bau, Haim H.

    2015-01-01

    A simple, point of care, inexpensive, disposable cassette for the detection of nucleic acids extracted from pathogens was designed, constructed, and tested. The cassette utilizes a single reaction chamber for isothermal amplification of nucleic acids. The chamber is equipped with an integrated, flow-through, Flinders Technology Associates (Whatman FTA®) membrane for the isolation, concentration, and purification of DNA and/or RNA. The nucleic acids captured by the membrane are used directly as templates for amplification without elution, thus simplifying the cassette’s flow control. The FTA membrane also serves another critical role—enabling the removal of inhibitors that dramatically reduce detection sensitivity. Thermal control is provided with a thin film heater external to the cassette. The amplification process was monitored in real time with a portable, compact fluorescent reader. The utility of the integrated, single-chamber cassette was demonstrated by detecting the presence of HIV-1 in oral fluids. The HIV RNA was reverse transcribed and subjected to loop-mediated, isothermal amplification (LAMP). A detection limit of less than 10 HIV particles was demonstrated. The cassette is particularly suitable for resource poor regions, where funds and trained personnel are in short supply. The cassette can be readily modified to detect nucleic acids associated with other pathogens borne in saliva, urine, and other body fluids as well as in water and food. PMID:21455542

  9. Technical Performance Evaluation of the MyT4 Point of Care Technology for CD4+ T Cell Enumeration

    PubMed Central

    Mwau, Matilu; Kadima, Silvia; Mwende, Joy; Adhiambo, Maureen; Akinyi, Catherine; Prescott, Marta; Lusike, Judi; Hungu, Jackson; Vojnov, Lara

    2014-01-01

    Objective Though absolute CD4+ T cell enumeration is the primary gateway to antiretroviral therapy initiation for HIV-positive patients in all developing countries, patient access to this critical diagnostic test is relatively poor. We technically evaluated the performance of a newly developed point-of-care CD4+ T cell technology, the MyT4, compared with conventional CD4+ T cell testing technologies. Design Over 250 HIV-positive patients were consecutively enrolled and their blood tested on the MyT4, BD FACSCalibur, and BD FACSCount. Results Compared with the BD FACSCount, the MyT4 had an r2 of 0.7269 and a mean bias of −23.37 cells/µl. Compared with the BD FACSCalibur, the MyT4 had an r2 of 0.5825 and a mean bias of −46.58 cells/µl. Kenya currently uses a CD4+ T cell test threshold of 350 cells/µl to determine patient eligibility for antiretroviral therapy. At this threshold, the MyT4 had a sensitivity of 95.3% (95% CI: 88.4–98.7%) and a specificity of 87.9% (95% CI: 82.3–92.3%) compared with the BD FACSCount and sensitivity and specificity of 88.2% (95% CI: 79.4–94.2%) and 84.2% (95% CI: 78.2–89.2%), respectively, compared with the BD FACSCalibur. Finally, the MyT4 had a coefficient of variation of 12.80% compared with 14.03% for the BD FACSCalibur. Conclusions We conclude that the MyT4 performed well at the current 350 cells/µl ART initiation eligibility threshold when used by lower cadres of health care facility staff in rural clinics compared to conventional CD4+ T cell technologies. PMID:25229408

  10. Robust ultrasensitive tunneling-FET biosensor for point-of-care diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Anran; Lu, Na; Wang, Yuelin; Li, Tie

    2016-03-01

    For point-of-care (POC) applications, robust, ultrasensitive, small, rapid, low-power, and low-cost sensors are highly desirable. Here, we present a novel biosensor based on a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible silicon nanowire tunneling field-effect transistor (SiNW-TFET). They were fabricated “top-down” with a low-cost anisotropic self-stop etching technique. Notably, the SiNW-TFET device provided strong anti-interference capacity by applying the inherent ambipolarity via both pH and CYFRA21-1 sensing. This offered a more robust and portable general protocol. The specific label-free detection of CYFRA21-1 down to 0.5 fgml-1 or ~12.5 aM was achieved using a highly responsive SiNW-TFET device with a minimum sub-threshold slope (SS) of 37 mVdec-1. Furthermore, real-time measurements highlighted the ability to use clinically relevant samples such as serum. The developed high performance diagnostic system is expected to provide a generic platform for numerous POC applications.

  11. Surgeon-performed point-of-care ultrasound in severe eye trauma: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Balac, Korana; Bhatia, Chetana Anand

    2016-01-01

    The indications of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) in the management of multiple trauma patients have been expanding. Although computed tomography (CT) scan of the orbit remains the gold standard for imaging orbital trauma, ultrasound is a quick, safe, and portable tool that can be performed bedside. Here we report two patients who had severe eye injuries with major visual impairment where surgeon-performed POCUS was very useful. One had a foreign body injury while the other had blunt trauma. POCUS was done using a linear probe under sterile conditions with minimum pressure on the eyes. Ultrasound showed a foreign body at the back of the left eye globe touching the eye globe in the first patient, and was normal in the second patient. Workup using CT scan, fundsocopy, optical coherence tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging of the orbits confirmed these findings. The first patient had vitreous and sub retinal haemorrhage and a full thickness macular hole of the left eye, while the second had traumatic optic neuropathy. POCUS gave accurate information concerning severe eye injuries. Trauma surgeons and emergency physicians should be trained in performing ocular ultrasound for eye injuries. PMID:27803918

  12. Instrument-Free Point-of-Care Molecular Detection of Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinzhao; Mauk, Michael G; Hackett, Brent A; Cherry, Sara; Bau, Haim H; Liu, Changchun

    2016-07-19

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in the Americas and its devastating impact on fetal development have prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to declare the ZIKV pandemic as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. Rapid and reliable diagnostics for ZIKV are vital because ZIKV-infected individuals display no symptoms or nonspecific symptoms similar to other viral infections. Because immunoassays lack adequate sensitivity and selectivity and are unable to identify active state of infection, molecular diagnostics are an effective means to detect ZIKV soon after infection and throughout pregnancy. We report on a highly sensitive reverse-transcription loop-mediated, isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for rapid detection of ZIKV and its implementation in a simple, easy-to-use, inexpensive, point-of-care (POC) disposable cassette that carries out all the unit operations from sample introduction to detection. For thermal control of the cassette, we use a chemically heated cup without a need for electrical power. Amplification products are detected with leuco crystal violet (LCV) dye by eye without a need for instrumentation. We demonstrated the utility of our POC diagnostic system by detecting ZIKV in oral samples with sensitivity of 5 plaque-forming units (PFU) in less than 40 min. Our system is particularly suitable for resource-poor settings, where centralized laboratory facilities, funds, and trained personnel are in short supply, and for use in doctors' offices, clinics, and at home. PMID:27306491

  13. Advanced Yellow Fever Virus Genome Detection in Point-of-Care Facilities and Reference Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pranav; Yillah, Jasmin; Weidmann, Manfred; Méndez, Jairo A.; Nakouné, Emmanuel Rivalyn; Niedrig, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Reported methods for the detection of the yellow fever viral genome are beset by limitations in sensitivity, specificity, strain detection spectra, and suitability to laboratories with simple infrastructure in areas of endemicity. We describe the development of two different approaches affording sensitive and specific detection of the yellow fever genome: a real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and an isothermal protocol employing the same primer-probe set but based on helicase-dependent amplification technology (RT-tHDA). Both assays were evaluated using yellow fever cell culture supernatants as well as spiked and clinical samples. We demonstrate reliable detection by both assays of different strains of yellow fever virus with improved sensitivity and specificity. The RT-qPCR assay is a powerful tool for reference or diagnostic laboratories with real-time PCR capability, while the isothermal RT-tHDA assay represents a useful alternative to earlier amplification techniques for the molecular diagnosis of yellow fever by field or point-of-care laboratories. PMID:23052311

  14. Synthetic biology and microbioreactor platforms for programmable production of biologics at the point-of-care.

    PubMed

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Han, Ningren; Cleto, Sara; Cao, Jicong; Purcell, Oliver; Shah, Kartik A; Lee, Kevin; Ram, Rajeev; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-01-01

    Current biopharmaceutical manufacturing systems are not compatible with portable or distributed production of biologics, as they typically require the development of single biologic-producing cell lines followed by their cultivation at very large scales. Therefore, it remains challenging to treat patients in short time frames, especially in remote locations with limited infrastructure. To overcome these barriers, we developed a platform using genetically engineered Pichia pastoris strains designed to secrete multiple proteins on programmable cues in an integrated, benchtop, millilitre-scale microfluidic device. We use this platform for rapid and switchable production of two biologics from a single yeast strain as specified by the operator. Our results demonstrate selectable and near-single-dose production of these biologics in <24 h with limited infrastructure requirements. We envision that combining this system with analytical, purification and polishing technologies could lead to a small-scale, portable and fully integrated personal biomanufacturing platform that could advance disease treatment at point-of-care. PMID:27470089

  15. Emerging Technologies for Monitoring Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis at the Point-of-Care

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Vigneshwaran; Wang, ShuQi; Inci, Fatih; De Libero, Gennaro; Singhal, Amit; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Among them, tuberculosis (TB) remains a major threat to public health, exacerbated by the emergence of multiple drug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). MDR-Mtb strains are resistant to first-line anti-TB drugs such as isoniazid and rifampicin; whereas XDR-Mtb strains are resistant to additional drugs including at least to any fluoroquinolone and at least one of the second-line anti-TB injectable drugs such as kanamycin, capreomycin, or amikacin. Clinically, these strains have significantly impacted the management of TB in high-incidence developing countries, where systemic surveillance of TB drug resistance is lacking. For effective management of TB on-site, early detection of drug resistance is critical to initiate treatment, to reduce mortality, and to thwart drug-resistant TB transmission. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic challenges to detect drug-resistant TB at the point-of-care (POC). Moreover, we present the latest advances in nano/microscale technologies that can potentially detect TB drug resistance to improve on-site patient care. PMID:24882226

  16. Smartphone-Based Accurate Analysis of Retinal Vasculature towards Point-of-Care Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiayu; Ding, Wenxiang; Wang, Xuemin; Cao, Ruofan; Zhang, Maiye; Lv, Peilin; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Retinal vasculature analysis is important for the early diagnostics of various eye and systemic diseases, making it a potentially useful biomarker, especially for resource-limited regions and countries. Here we developed a smartphone-based retinal image analysis system for point-of-care diagnostics that is able to load a fundus image, segment retinal vessels, analyze individual vessel width, and store or uplink results. The proposed system was not only evaluated on widely used public databases and compared with the state-of-the-art methods, but also validated on clinical images directly acquired with a smartphone. An Android app is also developed to facilitate on-site application of the proposed methods. Both visual assessment and quantitative assessment showed that the proposed methods achieved comparable results to the state-of-the-art methods that require high-standard workstations. The proposed system holds great potential for the early diagnostics of various diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, for resource-limited regions and countries. PMID:27698369

  17. On the Slow Diffusion of Point-of-Care Systems in Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Sanavio, Barbara; Krol, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in point-of-care (PoC) technologies show great transformative promises for personalized preventative and predictive medicine. However, fields like therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), that first allowed for personalized treatment of patients’ disease, still lag behind in the widespread application of PoC devices for monitoring of patients. Surprisingly, very few applications in commonly monitored drugs, such as anti-epileptics, are paving the way for a PoC approach to patient therapy monitoring compared to other fields like intensive care cardiac markers monitoring, glycemic controls in diabetes, or bench-top hematological parameters analysis at the local drug store. Such delay in the development of portable fast clinically effective drug monitoring devices is in our opinion due more to an inertial drag on the pervasiveness of these new devices into the clinical field than a lack of technical capability. At the same time, some very promising technologies failed in the clinical practice for inadequate understanding of the outcome parameters necessary for a relevant technological breakthrough that has superior clinical performance. We hope, by over-viewing both TDM practice and its yet unmet needs and latest advancement in micro- and nanotechnology applications to PoC clinical devices, to help bridging the two communities, the one exploiting analytical technologies and the one mastering the most advanced techniques, into translating existing and forthcoming technologies in effective devices. PMID:25767794

  18. BioPen: direct writing of functional materials at the point of care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yu Long; Hu, Jie; Genin, Guy M.; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2014-05-01

    Rapid and precise patterning of functional biomaterials is desirable for point-of-care (POC) tissue engineering and diagnostics. However, existing technologies such as dip-pen nanolithography and inkjet printing are currently unsuitable for POC applications due to issues of cost and portability. Here, we report the development of `BioPen', a portable tool for continuous, defined and scalable deposition of functional materials with micrometer spatial resolution and nanolitre volumetric resolution. BioPen is based upon the ballpoint pen but with multiple ``ink sources'' (functional material solutions) and with an apparatus that can be optimized for writing living cells, proteins, nucleic acids, etc. We demonstrate POC detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleic acid by writing on paper with BioPen using ``ink'' consisting of nucleic acid probes and nucleic acid-modified gold nanoparticles. We also demonstrate POC tissue engineering by writing a continuous pattern of living, functional, interconnected cells with a defined extracellular environment. Because it is simple, accurate, inexpensive and portable, BioPen has broad potential for POC detection of diagnostic biomarkers, and for POC engineering of tissues for a range of healing applications.

  19. BioPen: direct writing of functional materials at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu Long; Hu, Jie; Genin, Guy M; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and precise patterning of functional biomaterials is desirable for point-of-care (POC) tissue engineering and diagnostics. However, existing technologies such as dip-pen nanolithography and inkjet printing are currently unsuitable for POC applications due to issues of cost and portability. Here, we report the development of 'BioPen', a portable tool for continuous, defined and scalable deposition of functional materials with micrometer spatial resolution and nanolitre volumetric resolution. BioPen is based upon the ballpoint pen but with multiple "ink sources" (functional material solutions) and with an apparatus that can be optimized for writing living cells, proteins, nucleic acids, etc. We demonstrate POC detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleic acid by writing on paper with BioPen using "ink" consisting of nucleic acid probes and nucleic acid-modified gold nanoparticles. We also demonstrate POC tissue engineering by writing a continuous pattern of living, functional, interconnected cells with a defined extracellular environment. Because it is simple, accurate, inexpensive and portable, BioPen has broad potential for POC detection of diagnostic biomarkers, and for POC engineering of tissues for a range of healing applications. PMID:24799039

  20. Paper-based α-amylase detector for point-of-care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Satarupa; Mandal, Nilanjan; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar

    2016-04-15

    We report the fabrication of a paper-sensor for quantitative detection of α-amylase activity in human blood serum. Pieces of filter papers were coated with starch-iodine solution leading to an intense blue coloration on the surface. Dispensing α-amylase solution on the starch-iodine coated paper reduced the intensity of the color because of starch-hydrolysis catalyzed by amylase. The variation in the intensity of the color with the concentration of amylase was estimated in three stages: (i) initially, the paper-surface was illuminated with a light emitting diode, (ii) then, the transmitted (reflected) rays emitted through (from) the paper were collected on a photoresistor, and (iii) the variations in the electrical resistance of the photoresistor were correlated with the amylase concentration in analyte. The resistance of photoresistor decreased monotonically with an increase in amylase concentration because the intensity of the reflected (transmitted) rays collected from (through) the paper increased with reduction in the color intensity on the paper surface. Since a specific bio-reaction was employed to detect the activity of amylase, the sensor was found to be equally efficient in detecting unknown quantities of amylase in human blood serum. The reported sensor has shown the potential to graduate into a point-of-care detection tool for α-amylase. PMID:26655186

  1. A single FPGA-based portable ultrasound imaging system for point-of-care applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gi-Duck; Yoon, Changhan; Kye, Sang-Bum; Lee, Youngbae; Kang, Jeeun; Yoo, Yangmo; Song, Tai-kyong

    2012-07-01

    We present a cost-effective portable ultrasound system based on a single field-programmable gate array (FPGA) for point-of-care applications. In the portable ultrasound system developed, all the ultrasound signal and image processing modules, including an effective 32-channel receive beamformer with pseudo-dynamic focusing, are embedded in an FPGA chip. For overall system control, a mobile processor running Linux at 667 MHz is used. The scan-converted ultrasound image data from the FPGA are directly transferred to the system controller via external direct memory access without a video processing unit. The potable ultrasound system developed can provide real-time B-mode imaging with a maximum frame rate of 30, and it has a battery life of approximately 1.5 h. These results indicate that the single FPGA-based portable ultrasound system developed is able to meet the processing requirements in medical ultrasound imaging while providing improved flexibility for adapting to emerging POC applications.

  2. An embedded point-of-care malaria screening device for low-resource regions (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sayantan; Mandal, Subhamoy; Das, Debnath; Malviya, Richa; Garud, Hrushikesh T.; Ray, Ajoy K.

    2016-03-01

    In this article we propose a point-of-care screening device for the detection and identification of malaria parasite, plasmodium vivax, plasmodium malaria, plasmodium oval and plasmodium falciparum with a time frame of 15-20 minute. In our device we can provide 97-98% sensitivity for each species as we are using traditional staining methods for detecting the parasites. In addition, as we are also quantifying the parasites, it is possible to provide an accurate estimate about the malarial stage of the patient. The image processing approach increases the total numbers of samples screened by reducing interventions of trained pathologists. This helps in reducing the delays in screening process arising from increased number of potential cases based on seasonal and local variations. The same reduces mortality rate by faster diagnosis and reduced false negative detections (i.e. increased sensitivity). The system can also be integrated with telemedicine platform to obtain inputs from medical practitioners at tertiary healthcare units for diagnostic decision making. Through this paper, we present the functional prototype of this device containing all the integrated parts. The prototype incorporates image acquisition, image processing, storage, multimedia transmission and reporting environment for a low cost PDA device. It is a portable device capable of scanning slides. The acquired image will be preprocessed and processed to get desired output. The device is capable of transmitting and storing pathological information to database placed in a distant pathological center for further consultation.

  3. Wavelet-Based ECG Steganography for Protecting Patient Confidential Information in Point-of-Care Systems.

    PubMed

    Ibaida, Ayman; Khalil, Ibrahim

    2013-12-01

    With the growing number of aging population and a significant portion of that suffering from cardiac diseases, it is conceivable that remote ECG patient monitoring systems are expected to be widely used as point-of-care (PoC) applications in hospitals around the world. Therefore, huge amount of ECG signal collected by body sensor networks from remote patients at homes will be transmitted along with other physiological readings such as blood pressure, temperature, glucose level, etc., and diagnosed by those remote patient monitoring systems. It is utterly important that patient confidentiality is protected while data are being transmitted over the public network as well as when they are stored in hospital servers used by remote monitoring systems. In this paper, a wavelet-based steganography technique has been introduced which combines encryption and scrambling technique to protect patient confidential data. The proposed method allows ECG signal to hide its corresponding patient confidential data and other physiological information thus guaranteeing the integration between ECG and the rest. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed technique on the ECG signal, two distortion measurement metrics have been used: the percentage residual difference and the wavelet weighted PRD. It is found that the proposed technique provides high-security protection for patients data with low (less than 1%) distortion and ECG data remain diagnosable after watermarking (i.e., hiding patient confidential data) and as well as after watermarks (i.e., hidden data) are removed from the watermarked data.

  4. Low-cost fluorescence microscopy for point-of-care cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochhead, Michael J.; Ives, Jeff; Givens, Monique; Delaney, Marie; Moll, Kevin; Myatt, Christopher J.

    2010-02-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has long been a standard tool in laboratory medicine. Implementation of fluorescence microscopy for near-patient diagnostics, however, has been limited due to cost and complexity associated with traditional fluorescence microscopy techniques. There is a particular need for robust, low-cost imaging in high disease burden areas in the developing world, where access to central laboratory facilities and trained staff is limited. Here we describe a point-of-care assay that combines a disposable plastic cartridge with an extremely low cost fluorescence imaging instrument. Based on a novel, multi-mode planar waveguide configuration, the system capitalizes on advances in volume-manufactured consumer electronic components to deliver an imaging system with minimal moving parts and low power requirements. A two-color cell imager is presented, with magnification optimized for enumeration of immunostained human T cells. To demonstrate the system, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stained with fluorescently labeled anti-human-CD4 and anti-human-CD3 antibodies. Registered images were used to generate fractional CD4+ and CD3+ staining and enumeration results that show excellent correlation with flow cytometry. The cell imager is under development as a very low cost CD4+ T cell counter for HIV disease management in limited resource settings.

  5. Robust ultrasensitive tunneling-FET biosensor for point-of-care diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Anran; Lu, Na; Wang, Yuelin; Li, Tie

    2016-01-01

    For point-of-care (POC) applications, robust, ultrasensitive, small, rapid, low-power, and low-cost sensors are highly desirable. Here, we present a novel biosensor based on a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible silicon nanowire tunneling field-effect transistor (SiNW-TFET). They were fabricated “top-down” with a low-cost anisotropic self-stop etching technique. Notably, the SiNW-TFET device provided strong anti-interference capacity by applying the inherent ambipolarity via both pH and CYFRA21-1 sensing. This offered a more robust and portable general protocol. The specific label-free detection of CYFRA21-1 down to 0.5 fgml−1 or ~12.5 aM was achieved using a highly responsive SiNW-TFET device with a minimum sub-threshold slope (SS) of 37 mVdec−1. Furthermore, real-time measurements highlighted the ability to use clinically relevant samples such as serum. The developed high performance diagnostic system is expected to provide a generic platform for numerous POC applications. PMID:26932158

  6. BioPen: direct writing of functional materials at the point of care

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu Long; Hu, Jie; Genin, Guy M.; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and precise patterning of functional biomaterials is desirable for point-of-care (POC) tissue engineering and diagnostics. However, existing technologies such as dip-pen nanolithography and inkjet printing are currently unsuitable for POC applications due to issues of cost and portability. Here, we report the development of ‘BioPen', a portable tool for continuous, defined and scalable deposition of functional materials with micrometer spatial resolution and nanolitre volumetric resolution. BioPen is based upon the ballpoint pen but with multiple “ink sources” (functional material solutions) and with an apparatus that can be optimized for writing living cells, proteins, nucleic acids, etc. We demonstrate POC detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleic acid by writing on paper with BioPen using “ink” consisting of nucleic acid probes and nucleic acid-modified gold nanoparticles. We also demonstrate POC tissue engineering by writing a continuous pattern of living, functional, interconnected cells with a defined extracellular environment. Because it is simple, accurate, inexpensive and portable, BioPen has broad potential for POC detection of diagnostic biomarkers, and for POC engineering of tissues for a range of healing applications. PMID:24799039

  7. Concise gene signature for point-of-care classification of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Maertzdorf, Jeroen; McEwen, Gayle; Weiner, January; Tian, Song; Lader, Eric; Schriek, Ulrich; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Ota, Martin; Kenneth, John; Kaufmann, Stefan He

    2016-02-01

    There is an urgent need for new tools to combat the ongoing tuberculosis (TB) pandemic. Gene expression profiles based on blood signatures have proved useful in identifying genes that enable classification of TB patients, but have thus far been complex. Using real-time PCR analysis, we evaluated the expression profiles from a large panel of genes in TB patients and healthy individuals in an Indian cohort. Classification models were built and validated for their capacity to discriminate samples from TB patients and controls within this cohort and on external independent gene expression datasets. A combination of only four genes distinguished TB patients from healthy individuals in both cross-validations and on separate validation datasets with very high accuracy. An external validation on two distinct cohorts using a real-time PCR setting confirmed the predictive power of this 4-gene tool reaching sensitivity scores of 88% with a specificity of around 75%. Moreover, this gene signature demonstrated good classification power in HIV(+) populations and also between TB and several other pulmonary diseases. Here we present proof of concept that our 4-gene signature and the top classifier genes from our models provide excellent candidates for the development of molecular point-of-care TB diagnosis in endemic areas. PMID:26682570

  8. Synthetic biology and microbioreactor platforms for programmable production of biologics at the point-of-care

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Han, Ningren; Cleto, Sara; Cao, Jicong; Purcell, Oliver; Shah, Kartik A.; Lee, Kevin; Ram, Rajeev; Lu, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Current biopharmaceutical manufacturing systems are not compatible with portable or distributed production of biologics, as they typically require the development of single biologic-producing cell lines followed by their cultivation at very large scales. Therefore, it remains challenging to treat patients in short time frames, especially in remote locations with limited infrastructure. To overcome these barriers, we developed a platform using genetically engineered Pichia pastoris strains designed to secrete multiple proteins on programmable cues in an integrated, benchtop, millilitre-scale microfluidic device. We use this platform for rapid and switchable production of two biologics from a single yeast strain as specified by the operator. Our results demonstrate selectable and near-single-dose production of these biologics in <24 h with limited infrastructure requirements. We envision that combining this system with analytical, purification and polishing technologies could lead to a small-scale, portable and fully integrated personal biomanufacturing platform that could advance disease treatment at point-of-care. PMID:27470089

  9. Xurography as a Rapid Fabrication Alternative for Point-of-Care Devices: Assessment of Passive Micromixers

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-López, J. Israel; Mojica, Mauricio; Rodríguez, Ciro A.; Siller, Héctor R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the copious amount of research on the design and operation of micromixers, there are few works regarding manufacture technology aimed at implementation beyond academic environments. This work evaluates the viability of xurography as a rapid fabrication tool for the development of ultra-low cost microfluidic technology for extreme Point-of-Care (POC) micromixing devices. By eschewing photolithographic processes and the bulkiness of pumping and enclosure systems for rapid fabrication and passively driven operation, xurography is introduced as a manufacturing alternative for asymmetric split and recombine (ASAR) micromixers. A T-micromixer design was used as a reference to assess the effects of different cutting conditions and materials on the geometric features of the resulting microdevices. Inspection by stereographic and confocal microscopy showed that it is possible to manufacture devices with less than 8% absolute dimensional error. Implementation of the manufacturing methodology in modified circular shape- based SAR microdevices (balanced and unbalanced configurations) showed that, despite the precision limitations of the xurographic process, it is possible to implement this methodology to produce functional micromixing devices. Mixing efficiency was evaluated numerically and experimentally at the outlet of the microdevices with performances up to 40%. Overall, the assessment encourages further research of xurography for the development of POC micromixers. PMID:27196904

  10. Robust ultrasensitive tunneling-FET biosensor for point-of-care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Anran; Lu, Na; Wang, Yuelin; Li, Tie

    2016-01-01

    For point-of-care (POC) applications, robust, ultrasensitive, small, rapid, low-power, and low-cost sensors are highly desirable. Here, we present a novel biosensor based on a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible silicon nanowire tunneling field-effect transistor (SiNW-TFET). They were fabricated "top-down" with a low-cost anisotropic self-stop etching technique. Notably, the SiNW-TFET device provided strong anti-interference capacity by applying the inherent ambipolarity via both pH and CYFRA21-1 sensing. This offered a more robust and portable general protocol. The specific label-free detection of CYFRA21-1 down to 0.5 fgml(-1) or ~12.5 aM was achieved using a highly responsive SiNW-TFET device with a minimum sub-threshold slope (SS) of 37 mVdec(-1). Furthermore, real-time measurements highlighted the ability to use clinically relevant samples such as serum. The developed high performance diagnostic system is expected to provide a generic platform for numerous POC applications. PMID:26932158

  11. Mapping Out Point-of-Care Review Screens for Omaha System Data.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seonah

    2016-02-01

    Omaha System data are text data that consist of standardized terminology and customized descriptions. The customized descriptions related to patient care reveal changes in a client's status over time. These data help public health nurses to understand the patient's progress and to plan future care. However, most electronic health records do not provide clinicians with efficient displays of stored text data. The purpose of this study is to develop point-of-care review screens for Omaha System data on an individual patient level and examine nurse perceptions of the usefulness of the displayed data in improving patient care. Individual patients' data were organized on a Web-based overview page to present all of the health problems that a client had and on detailed pages to present all records of Omaha System data regarding each health problem. Nurse survey results indicated the usefulness of at-a-glance displays of text data on patient care and nurses' decision making. The meaningful review of patient data using a health information system supports patient-data-driven, evidence-based practice and decision making. PMID:26765656

  12. Paper-based α-amylase detector for point-of-care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Satarupa; Mandal, Nilanjan; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar

    2016-04-15

    We report the fabrication of a paper-sensor for quantitative detection of α-amylase activity in human blood serum. Pieces of filter papers were coated with starch-iodine solution leading to an intense blue coloration on the surface. Dispensing α-amylase solution on the starch-iodine coated paper reduced the intensity of the color because of starch-hydrolysis catalyzed by amylase. The variation in the intensity of the color with the concentration of amylase was estimated in three stages: (i) initially, the paper-surface was illuminated with a light emitting diode, (ii) then, the transmitted (reflected) rays emitted through (from) the paper were collected on a photoresistor, and (iii) the variations in the electrical resistance of the photoresistor were correlated with the amylase concentration in analyte. The resistance of photoresistor decreased monotonically with an increase in amylase concentration because the intensity of the reflected (transmitted) rays collected from (through) the paper increased with reduction in the color intensity on the paper surface. Since a specific bio-reaction was employed to detect the activity of amylase, the sensor was found to be equally efficient in detecting unknown quantities of amylase in human blood serum. The reported sensor has shown the potential to graduate into a point-of-care detection tool for α-amylase.

  13. A novel handheld fluorescent microarray reader for point-of-care diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Kozma, P; Lehmann, A; Wunderlich, K; Michel, D; Schumacher, S; Ehrentreich-Förster, E; Bier, F F

    2013-09-15

    A novel handheld optical sensor for quantification of fluorescent microarrays, the so-called portMD-113 has been developed. On the surface of a planar waveguide, the spots of different fluorescently labeled biological complexes are excited by the evanescent field of the guided light. The emitted fluorescence signals of the spots are independently and simultaneously detected applying our system, which consists of a pinehole array, a microlens array, an interference filter and a detector array. As it is demonstrated in comparative measurements, the detection limit of this sensor is close to that of commercial top microarray readers, e.g. of modern laser scanners, while it has remarkable and important advantages over them. Namely, the device comprises only a few low-cost, lightweight and small components without applying any moving or energy-intensive elements, which results in turn in a commercially competitive, handheld and compact design and in the possibility to be supplied simply by a battery or a personal computer. These advantageous properties open prospects e.g. for point-of-care medical checks, as well.

  14. Miniaturized nucleic acid amplification systems for rapid and point-of-care diagnostics: a review.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farhan; Hashsham, Syed A

    2012-07-01

    Point-of-care (POC) genetic diagnostics critically depends on miniaturization and integration of sample processing, nucleic acid amplification, and detection systems. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays have extensively applied for the diagnosis of genetic markers of disease. Microfluidic chips for microPCR with different materials and designs have been reported. Temperature cycling systems with varying thermal masses and conductivities, thermal cycling times, flow-rates, and cross-sectional areas, have also been developed to reduce the nucleic acid amplification time. Similarly, isothermal amplification techniques (e.g., loop-mediated isothermal amplification or LAMP), which are still are emerging, have a better potential as an alternative to PCR for POC diagnostics. Isothermal amplification techniques have: (i) moderate incubation temperature leading to simplified heating and low power consumption, (ii) yield high amount of amplification products, which can be detected either visually or by simple detectors, (iii) allow direct genetic amplification from bacterial cells due to the superior tolerance to substances that typically inhibit PCR, (iv) have high specificity, and sensitivity, and (v) result in rapid detection often within 10-20 min. The aim of this review is to provide a better understanding of the advantages and limitations of microPCR and microLAMP systems for rapid and POC diagnostics. PMID:22704369

  15. BioPen: direct writing of functional materials at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu Long; Hu, Jie; Genin, Guy M; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2014-05-06

    Rapid and precise patterning of functional biomaterials is desirable for point-of-care (POC) tissue engineering and diagnostics. However, existing technologies such as dip-pen nanolithography and inkjet printing are currently unsuitable for POC applications due to issues of cost and portability. Here, we report the development of 'BioPen', a portable tool for continuous, defined and scalable deposition of functional materials with micrometer spatial resolution and nanolitre volumetric resolution. BioPen is based upon the ballpoint pen but with multiple "ink sources" (functional material solutions) and with an apparatus that can be optimized for writing living cells, proteins, nucleic acids, etc. We demonstrate POC detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleic acid by writing on paper with BioPen using "ink" consisting of nucleic acid probes and nucleic acid-modified gold nanoparticles. We also demonstrate POC tissue engineering by writing a continuous pattern of living, functional, interconnected cells with a defined extracellular environment. Because it is simple, accurate, inexpensive and portable, BioPen has broad potential for POC detection of diagnostic biomarkers, and for POC engineering of tissues for a range of healing applications.

  16. Retrospective Review of Ocular Point-of-Care Ultrasound for Detection of Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Bradley; Lahham, Sari; Lahham, Shadi; Patel, Amy; Spann, Sophia; Fox, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Retinal detachment is an ocular emergency that commonly presents to the emergency department (ED). Ophthalmologists are able to accurately make this diagnosis with a dilated fundoscopic exam, scleral depression or ophthalmic ultrasound when a view to the retina is obstructed. Emergency physicians (EPs) are not trained to examine the peripheral retina, and thus ophthalmic ultrasound can be used to aid in diagnosis. We assessed the accuracy of ocular point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) in diagnosing retinal detachment. Methods We retrospectively reviewed charts of ED patients with suspected retinal detachment who underwent ocular POCUS between July 2012 and May 2015. Charts were reviewed for patients presenting to the ED with ocular complaints and clinical concern for retinal detachment. We compared ocular POCUS performed by EPs against the criterion reference of the consulting ophthalmologist’s diagnosis. Results We enrolled a total of 109 patients. Of the 34 patients diagnosed with retinal detachment by the ophthalmologists, 31 were correctly identified as having retinal detachment by the EP using ocular POCUS. Of the 75 patients who did not have retinal detachment, 72 were ruled out by ocular POCUS by the EP. This resulted in a POCUS sensitivity of 91% (95% CI [76–98]) and specificity of 96% (95% CI [89–99]). Conclusion This retrospective study suggests that ocular POCUS performed by EPs can aid in the diagnosis of retinal detachment in ED. PMID:26973752

  17. Instrument-Free Point-of-Care Molecular Detection of Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinzhao; Mauk, Michael G; Hackett, Brent A; Cherry, Sara; Bau, Haim H; Liu, Changchun

    2016-07-19

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in the Americas and its devastating impact on fetal development have prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to declare the ZIKV pandemic as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. Rapid and reliable diagnostics for ZIKV are vital because ZIKV-infected individuals display no symptoms or nonspecific symptoms similar to other viral infections. Because immunoassays lack adequate sensitivity and selectivity and are unable to identify active state of infection, molecular diagnostics are an effective means to detect ZIKV soon after infection and throughout pregnancy. We report on a highly sensitive reverse-transcription loop-mediated, isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for rapid detection of ZIKV and its implementation in a simple, easy-to-use, inexpensive, point-of-care (POC) disposable cassette that carries out all the unit operations from sample introduction to detection. For thermal control of the cassette, we use a chemically heated cup without a need for electrical power. Amplification products are detected with leuco crystal violet (LCV) dye by eye without a need for instrumentation. We demonstrated the utility of our POC diagnostic system by detecting ZIKV in oral samples with sensitivity of 5 plaque-forming units (PFU) in less than 40 min. Our system is particularly suitable for resource-poor settings, where centralized laboratory facilities, funds, and trained personnel are in short supply, and for use in doctors' offices, clinics, and at home.

  18. Field Demonstration of a Multiplexed Point-of-Care Diagnostic Platform for Plant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Lau, Han Yih; Wang, Yuling; Wee, Eugene J H; Botella, Jose R; Trau, Matt

    2016-08-16

    Effective disease management strategies to prevent catastrophic crop losses require rapid, sensitive, and multiplexed detection methods for timely decision making. To address this need, a rapid, highly specific and sensitive point-of-care method for multiplex detection of plant pathogens was developed by taking advantage of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) labeled nanotags and recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), which is a rapid isothermal amplification method with high specificity. In this study, three agriculturally important plant pathogens (Botrytis cinerea, Pseudomonas syringae, and Fusarium oxysporum) were used to demonstrate potential translation into the field. The RPA-SERS method was faster, more sensitive than polymerase chain reaction, and could detect as little as 2 copies of B. cinerea DNA. Furthermore, multiplex detection of the three pathogens was demonstrated for complex systems such as the Arabidopsis thaliana plant and commercial tomato crops. To demonstrate the potential for on-site field applications, a rapid single-tube RPA/SERS assay was further developed and successfully performed for a specific target outside of a laboratory setting. PMID:27403651

  19. Instrument-Free Point-of-Care Molecular Detection of Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in the Americas and its devastating impact on fetal development have prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to declare the ZIKV pandemic as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. Rapid and reliable diagnostics for ZIKV are vital because ZIKV-infected individuals display no symptoms or nonspecific symptoms similar to other viral infections. Because immunoassays lack adequate sensitivity and selectivity and are unable to identify active state of infection, molecular diagnostics are an effective means to detect ZIKV soon after infection and throughout pregnancy. We report on a highly sensitive reverse-transcription loop-mediated, isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for rapid detection of ZIKV and its implementation in a simple, easy-to-use, inexpensive, point-of-care (POC) disposable cassette that carries out all the unit operations from sample introduction to detection. For thermal control of the cassette, we use a chemically heated cup without a need for electrical power. Amplification products are detected with leuco crystal violet (LCV) dye by eye without a need for instrumentation. We demonstrated the utility of our POC diagnostic system by detecting ZIKV in oral samples with sensitivity of 5 plaque-forming units (PFU) in less than 40 min. Our system is particularly suitable for resource-poor settings, where centralized laboratory facilities, funds, and trained personnel are in short supply, and for use in doctors’ offices, clinics, and at home. PMID:27306491

  20. Smart point-of-care systems for molecular diagnostics based on nanotechnology: whole blood glucose analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devadhasan, Jasmine P.; Kim, Sanghyo

    2015-07-01

    Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors are received great attention for their high efficiency in biological applications. The present work describes a CMOS image sensor-based whole blood glucose monitoring system through a point-of-care (POC) approach. A simple poly-ethylene terephthalate (PET) film chip was developed to carry out the enzyme kinetic reaction at various concentrations of blood glucose. In this technique, assay reagent was adsorbed onto amine functionalized silica (AFSiO2) nanoparticles in order to achieve glucose oxidation on the PET film chip. The AFSiO2 nanoparticles can immobilize the assay reagent with an electrostatic attraction and eased to develop the opaque platform which was technically suitable chip to analyze by the camera module. The oxidized glucose then produces a green color according to the glucose concentration and is analyzed by the camera module as a photon detection technique. The photon number decreases with increasing glucose concentration. The simple sensing approach, utilizing enzyme immobilized AFSiO2 nanoparticle chip and assay detection method was developed for quantitative glucose measurement.

  1. Miniaturization for Point-of-Care Analysis: Platform Technology for Almost Every Biomedical Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sartorius, Dorian; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Bier, Frank F.

    2012-01-01

    Platform technologies for the changing need of diagnostics are one of the main challenges in medical device technology. From one point-of-view the demand for new and more versatile diagnostic is increasing due to a deeper knowledge of biomarkers and their combination with diseases. From another point-of-view a decentralization of diagnostics will occur since decisions can be made faster resulting in higher success of therapy. Hence, new types of technologies have to be established which enables a multiparameter analysis at the point-of-care. Within this review-like article a system called Fraunhofer ivD-platform is introduced. It consists of a credit-card sized cartridge with integrated reagents, sensors and pumps and a read-out/processing unit. Within the cartridge the assay runs fully automated within 15-20 minutes. Due to the open design of the platform different analyses such as antibody, serological or DNA-assays can be performed. Specific examples of these three different assay types are given to show the broad applicability of the system.

  2. Impact of telavancin on prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time as determined using point-of-care coagulometers.

    PubMed

    Ero, Michael P; Harvey, Nathaniel R; Harbert, Jack L; Janc, James W; Chin, Kay H; Barriere, Steven L

    2014-01-01

    Telavancin is approved in the United States, Canada, and Europe (At the time of submission, the telavancin European marketing authorization for nosocomial pneumonia was suspended until Theravance provides evidence of a new European Medicines Agency approved supplier) as an antibiotic to treat certain Gram-positive bacterial skin infections. Telavancin has been shown to prolong plasmatic prothrombin (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT) clotting times in clinical diagnostic lab-based assays. In this study, we evaluated the potential for telavancin to prolong whole blood PT/International Normalized Ratio (INR) and aPTT tests on point-of-care (POC) instruments. Whole blood collected from 8 healthy subjects was supplemented with telavancin to final concentrations of 0, 10, 20, and 100 μg/ml. Final concentrations were selected to match trough, twice trough, and peak plasma levels following the approved 10 mg/kg dose. Four widely employed POC coagulation instruments were chosen to be representative of the POC platforms currently in use.. These systems were the Roche Coaguchek XS, the Abbott iSTAT, the ITC Hemochron SIG+, and the Alere INRatio2 POC devices. The PT/INR measured by the Coaguchek XS showed the greatest sensitivity to the presence of telavancin. The PT/INR measured by the Hemochron SIG+ and iSTAT were sensitive to telavancin but to a lesser extent. The INRatio2 was the least sensitive to the presence of telavancin when testing the whole blood PT/INR. Only the Hemochron SIG+ device was capable of measuring aPTT and showed a concentration-dependent increase in aPTT. This study supports the current recommendation that PT and aPTT monitoring be conducted immediately to the next dose of telavancin when coagulation parameters are tested using POC instrumentation. PMID:24132401

  3. Swab Sample Transfer for Point-Of-Care Diagnostics: Characterization of Swab Types and Manual Agitation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Panpradist, Nuttada; Toley, Bhushan J.; Zhang, Xiaohong; Byrnes, Samantha; Buser, Joshua R.; Englund, Janet A.; Lutz, Barry R.

    2014-01-01

    Background The global need for disease detection and control has increased effort to engineer point-of-care (POC) tests that are simple, robust, affordable, and non-instrumented. In many POC tests, sample collection involves swabbing the site (e.g., nose, skin), agitating the swab in a fluid to release the sample, and transferring the fluid to a device for analysis. Poor performance in sample transfer can reduce sensitivity and reproducibility. Methods In this study, we compared bacterial release efficiency of seven swab types using manual-agitation methods typical of POC devices. Transfer efficiency was measured using quantitative PCR (qPCR) for Staphylococcus aureus under conditions representing a range of sampling scenarios: 1) spiking low-volume samples onto the swab, 2) submerging the swab in excess-volume samples, and 3) swabbing dried sample from a surface. Results Excess-volume samples gave the expected recovery for most swabs (based on tip fluid capacity); a polyurethane swab showed enhanced recovery, suggesting an ability to accumulate organisms during sampling. Dry samples led to recovery of ∼20–30% for all swabs tested, suggesting that swab structure and volume is less important when organisms are applied to the outer swab surface. Low-volume samples led to the widest range of transfer efficiencies between swab types. Rayon swabs (63 µL capacity) performed well for excess-volume samples, but showed poor recovery for low-volume samples. Nylon (100 µL) and polyester swabs (27 µL) showed intermediate recovery for low-volume and excess-volume samples. Polyurethane swabs (16 µL) showed excellent recovery for all sample types. This work demonstrates that swab transfer efficiency can be affected by swab material, structure, and fluid capacity and details of the sample. Results and quantitative analysis methods from this study will assist POC assay developers in selecting appropriate swab types and transfer methods. PMID:25181250

  4. High performance multichannel photonic biochip sensors for future point of care diagnostics: an overview on two EU-sponsored projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannone, Domenico; Kazmierczak, Andrzej; Dortu, Fabian; Vivien, Laurent; Sohlström, Hans

    2010-04-01

    We present here research work on two optical biosensors which have been developed within two separate European projects (6th and 7th EU Framework Programmes). The biosensors are based on the idea of a disposable biochip, integrating photonics and microfluidics, optically interrogated by a multichannel interrogation platform. The objective is to develop versatile tools, suitable for performing screening tests at Point of Care or for example, at schools or in the field. The two projects explore different options in terms of optical design and different materials. While SABIO used Si3N4/SiO2 ring resonators structures, P3SENS aims at the use of photonic crystal devices based on polymers, potentially a much more economical option. We discuss both approaches to show how they enable high sensitivity and multiple channel detection. The medium term objective is to develop a new detection system that has low cost and is portable but at the same time offering high sensitivity, selectivity and multiparametric detection from a sample containing various components (e.g. blood, serum, saliva, etc.). Most biological sensing devices already present on the market suffer from limitations in multichannel operation capability (either the detection of multiple analytes indicating a given pathology or the simultaneous detection of multiple pathologies). In other words, the number of different analytes that can be detected on a single chip is very limited. This limitation is a main issue addressed by the two projects. The excessive cost per test of conventional bio sensing devices is a second issue that is addressed.

  5. Home point-of-care international normalised ratio monitoring sustained by a non-selective educational program in children.

    PubMed

    Bajolle, Fanny; Lasne, Dominique; Elie, Caroline; Cheurfi, Radhia; Grazioli, Aurélie; Traore, Maladon; Souillard, Patrick; Boudjemline, Younes; Jourdain, Patrick; Bonnet, Damien

    2012-10-01

    Adverse events related to vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy might be reduced by point-of-care international normalised ratio (POC INR) monitoring supported by an education program (EP). Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a non-selective VKA paediatric EP (regardless of the social, economic, educational or linguistic levels) by analysing the time spent in the therapeutic range (TTR), VKA adverse events and compliance to treatment, and INR control prescriptions. The EP was modified from the pediatric EP previously described but improved by a specifically devised child-focused game. One hundred four consecutive children (median age 8 years) receiving VKA were included in a standardised EP. Patients were in self-testing, and dose adjustments were made by a single physician for three tolerance ranges according to the underlying disease: [2.5-4], [1.8-3.2], and [1.5-2.5]. The median follow-up was 481 days [70-1,001]. The overall TTR was 81.4% [36-100]. The TTR were 74%, 85.6% and 89% for the ranges [2.5-4], [1.8-3.2], and [1.5-2.5], respectively. These results were sustainable during the study period. Only one serious VKA adverse event was recorded. The median number of POC INR tests was 2.5 [1.6-5.7] INR per patient and month. Patients/families performed POC INR when requested in 86.9% of the cases. More than 90% of the families found the EP supportive and wished to follow a long-term reinforcement program. In conclusion, this non-selective child-focused EP for VKA therapy, strongly supported by our dedicated game, is useful in maintaining efficacy, safety and compliance to anticoagulation and its monitoring.

  6. Rapid and quantitative detection of C-reactive protein using quantum dots and immunochromatographic test strips

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xianglin; Pu, Xu; Jun, Pen; Zhu, XiaoBo; Zhu, Di; Chen, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background Rapid immunochromatographic tests can detect disease markers in 10–15 minutes, which facilitates clinical diagnosis and treatment programs. However, most immunochromatographic tests employ gold nanoparticles as reporters, and these have only moderate sensitivity and act as qualitative methods for analyzing high biomarker concentrations. Methods In this study, we introduce quantum dots (QDs) as fluorescent probes and immunochromatographic strips to develop quantitative fluorescence point-of-care tests (QF-POCT) to analyze C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Goat anti-rabbit IgG and rabbit IgG were used as control antibodies, and mouse monoclonal CRP antibody pairs were used for disease marker detection. One monoclonal CRP antibody was conjugated with QDs and served as a signal antibody, and the other monoclonal CRP antibody was dispensed onto the nitrocellulose membrane and served as a capturing antibody. In the presence of CRP, the fluorescence intensity of the monoclonal antibody-CRP-monoclonal antibody sandwich complex captured on the nitrocel