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Sample records for pointer driven microheater

  1. Oscillate boiling from microheaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, S. Roberto; Nguyen, Dang Minh; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    We report about an intriguing boiling regime occurring for small heaters embedded on the boundary in subcooled water. The microheater is realized by focusing a continuous wave laser beam to about 10 μ m in diameter onto a 165-nm-thick layer of gold, which is submerged in water. After an initial vaporous explosion a single bubble oscillates continuously and repeatedly at several 100 kHz albeit with constant laser power input. The microbubble's oscillations are accompanied with bubble pinch-off, leading to a stream of gaseous bubbles in the subcooled water. The self-driven bubble oscillation is explained with a thermally kicked oscillator caused by surface attachment and by the nonspherical collapses. Additionally, Marangoni stresses induce a recirculating streaming flow which transports cold liquid towards the microheater, reducing diffusion of heat along the substrate and therefore stabilizing the phenomenon to many million cycles. We speculate that this oscillate boiling regime may overcome the heat transfer thresholds observed during the nucleate boiling crisis and offers a new pathway for heat transfer under microgravity conditions.

  2. Microheater Array Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    By conducting pool boiling tests in microgravity, the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and the relative magnitude of other phenomena can be assessed. Data from KC-135 and sounding rocket experiments indicate little effect of gravity on boiling heat transfer at wall superheats below 25 C, despite vast differences in bubble behavior between gravity levels. In microgravity, a large primary bubble, surrounded by smaller satellite bubbles, moved over the surface, occasionally causing nucleation. Once formed, the primary bubble size remained constant for a given superheat, indicating evaporation at the bubble base is balanced with condensation on the bubble cap. The primary bubble's size increased with wall superheat. Most heaters under the primary bubble had low heat transfer rates, suggesting liquid dryout. Strong Marangoni convection developed in microgravity, forming a 'jet' into the bulk liquid that forced the bubble onto the heater. An experiment is being designed for the. Microgravity Science Glovebox. This experiment uses two 96 element microheater arrays, 2.7 and 7.0 mm in size. These heaters are individually controlled to operate at a constant temperature, measuring local heat fluxes as a function of time and space. Most boiling experiments operate at constant wall heat flux with larger heaters, allowing only time and space-averaged measurements. Each heater is about the bubble departure size in normal gravity, but significantly smaller than the bubble departure size in reduced gravity.

  3. Polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic chip with integrated microheater and thermal sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinbo; Cao, Wenbin; Wen, Weijia; Chang, Donald Choy; Sheng, Ping

    2009-01-01

    A microheater and a thermal sensor were fabricated inside elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane microchannels by injecting silver paint (or other conductive materials) into the channels. With a high-precision control scheme, microheaters can be used for rapid heating, with precise temperature control and uniform thermal distribution. Using such a microheater and feedback system, a polymerase chain reaction experiment was carried out whereas the DNA was successfully amplified in 25 cycles, with 1 min per cycle. PMID:19693386

  4. Temperature control of microheaters for localized carbon nanotube synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingyu; Xu, Ting; Miao, Jianmin

    2011-12-01

    The temperatures of microheater devices for the localized growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were brought under control to a great extent by providing the appropriate electric load (direct current or voltage) to the microheater circuit. The electrical-thermal coupled field simulations show that high temperatures only appear in very local areas under certain electric load. The infrared image of the produced microheater device agrees well with the simulation results. By applying the selected current to the fabricated microheater device and providing the mixed reaction gases, long, dense, and vertically well aligned CNT bundles were successfully grown very locally on the substrate. The control of temperatures paves the way to the localized growth of CNTs with good compatibility with CMOS process, and thus facilitating the direct integration of CNTs into future micro/nano electronics as interconnects. What's more, the method will also excite more in depth investigations on the applications of microheaters in many other fields.

  5. A quantum laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Treps, Nicolas; Grosse, Nicolai; Bowen, Warwick P; Fabre, Claude; Bachor, Hans-A; Lam, Ping Koy

    2003-08-15

    The measurement sensitivity of the pointing direction of a laser beam is ultimately limited by the quantum nature of light. To reduce this limit, we have experimentally produced a quantum laser pointer, a beam of light whose direction is measured with a precision greater than that possible for a usual laser beam. The laser pointer is generated by combining three different beams in three orthogonal transverse modes, two of them in a squeezed-vacuum state and one in an intense coherent field. The result provides a demonstration of multichannel spatial squeezing, along with its application to the improvement of beam positioning sensitivity and, more generally, to imaging.

  6. Nichrome micro-heaters as actuators for microfluidic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geca, M.; Lizak, T.; Kociubiński, A.; Borecki, M.; Korwin-Pawlowski, M. L.

    2016-09-01

    MEMS actuators are currently widely used in the industry. Micro-heaters, being a prime example, attracted much attention in recent years due to their good operating parameters and low cost fabrication process. This paper focuses on a design and development of a micro-heater to be used as an actuator in a multiparametric capillary sensor. The micro-heater is an evolution of a previous design and uses a 200nm-thick thin film of 80/20 NiCr alloy as a heating layer. The paper presents results of fabrication and testing of the micro-heater, including temperature distribution and resistance changes during the heating cycle. Additionally, is presented a PWM based control system providing the stability of power and temperature distribution.

  7. GNU Fortran Cray Pointer Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, J. A.

    2005-07-27

    The gfortran compiler is a Fortran front end to the GNU Compiler Collection. The Cray Pointer extension adds to this existing compiler support for Cray-style integer pointers. This non-standard but widely used extension adds the functionality of C-like pointers to the Fortran language.

  8. An Acoustothermal Microheater with Omni-temperature Controllability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Byung Hang; Lee, Kang Soo; Destgeer, Ghulam; Park, Jinsoo; Jung, Jin Ho; Sung, Hyung Jin

    Here we report the first observation of rapid volumetric heating of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) under cyclic loadings at a range of high (∼MHz) frequencies. Based on the finding, we developed a microheater which utilizes the vibration damping of PDMS, the most commonly used material in microfluidics, induced by sound waves generated and precisely controlled by a surface acoustic wave (SAW) microfluidic system. An omni-temperature controllability of the microheater enabled us to perform two-step continuous flow polymerase chain reaction for a billion-fold amplification of 134 bp DNA amplicon in less than 45 sec.

  9. Infrared Risley beam pointer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harford, Steven T.; Gutierrez, Homero; Newman, Michael; Pierce, Robert; Quakenbush, Tim; Wallace, John; Bornstein, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (BATC) has developed a Risley Beam Pointer (RBP) mechanism capable of agile slewing, accurate pointing and high bandwidth. The RBP is comprised of two wedged prisms that offer a wide Field of Regard (FOR) and may be manufactured and operated with diffraction limited optical quality. The tightly packaged mechanism is capable of steering a 4 inch beam over a 60° half angle cone with better than 60 μrad precision. Absolute accuracy of the beam steering is better than 1 mrad. The conformal nature of the RBP makes it an ideal mechanism for use on low altitude aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles. Unique aspects of the opto-mechanical design include i) thermal compliance to maintain bearing preload and optical figure over a wide temperature range; and ii) packaging of a remote infrared sensor that periodically reports the temperature of both prisms for accurate determination of the index of refraction. The pointing control system operates each prism independently and employs an inner rate loop nested within an outer position loop. Mathematics for the transformation between line-of-sight coordinates and prism rotation are hosted on a 200 MHz microcontroller with just 516 KB of RAM.

  10. Laser pointers and aviation safety.

    PubMed

    Nakagawara, V B; Montgomery, R W

    2000-10-01

    Laser pointers have been used by teachers and lecturers for years to highlight key areas on charts and screens during visual presentations. When used in a responsible manner, laser pointers are not considered to be hazardous. However, as the availability of such devices has increased, so have reports of their misuse. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning in December 1997 on the possibility of eye injury to children from handheld laser pointers. In October 1998, the American Academy of Ophthalmology upgraded an earlier caution to a warning, stating that laser pointers can be hazardous and should be kept away from children, after two reports of eye injuries involving young girls (age 11 and 13 yr). Of particular concern was the promotion of laser products as children's toys, such as those that can project cartoon figures and line drawings. Additionally, there have been reports involving the misuse of laser pointers (e.g., arrests made after police interpreted the red beam to be a laser-sighted weapon, spectators aiming laser lights at athletes during sporting events, cars illuminated on highways, and numerous incidents involving the illumination of aircraft). This technical note discusses physiological effects of exposure from a laser pointer, the regulation and classification of commercial laser products, and how the misuse of these pointers is a possible threat to aviation safety.

  11. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Liquids by Using a Suspended Microheater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Dong-Wook

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the traditional 3ω method is modified in order to measure the thermal conductivity of a droplet of liquid. The 3ω sensor is microfabricated using bulk silicon etching on a silicon wafer to form a microheater on a suspended bridge structure. The Si substrate of over 400 μ m thickness beneath the microheater is etched away so that the sample liquid can fill the gap created between the heater and the bottom boundary of the sensor. The frequency of the sinusoidal heating pulses that are generated from the heater is controlled such that the thermal penetration depth is much smaller than the thickness of the liquid layer. The temperature oscillation of the sample fluid is measured at the thin-film heater to calculate the thermal conductivity of the surrounding fluid. The thermal conductivity and measured values of the de-ionized water and ethanol show a good agreement with the theoretical values at room temperature.

  12. Photothermal lesions in soft tissue induced by optical fiber microheaters.

    PubMed

    Pimentel-Domínguez, Reinher; Moreno-Álvarez, Paola; Hautefeuille, Mathieu; Chavarría, Anahí; Hernández-Cordero, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Photothermal therapy has shown to be a promising technique for local treatment of tumors. However, the main challenge for this technique is the availability of localized heat sources to minimize thermal damage in the surrounding healthy tissue. In this work, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber microheaters for inducing thermal lesions in soft tissue. The proposed devices incorporate carbon nanotubes or gold nanolayers on the tips of optical fibers for enhanced photothermal effects and heating of ex vivo biological tissues. We report preliminary results of small size photothermal lesions induced on mice liver tissues. The morphology of the resulting lesions shows that optical fiber microheaters may render useful for delivering highly localized heat for photothermal therapy.

  13. Enhanced Plasmonic Wavelength Selective Infrared Emission Combined with Microheater.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hiroki; Masuno, Katsuya; Ishii, Makoto; Kumagai, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru

    2017-09-14

    The indirect wavelength selective thermal emitter that we have proposed is constructed using a new microheater, demonstrating the enhancement of the emission peak generated by the surface plasmon polariton. The thermal isolation is improved using a 2 μm-thick Si membrane having 3.6 and 5.4 mm outer diameter. The emission at around the wavelength of the absorption band of CO₂ gas is enhanced. The absorption signal increases, confirming the suitability for gas sensing. Against input power, the intensity at the peak wavelength shows a steeper increasing ratio than the background intensity. The microheater with higher thermal isolation gives larger peak intensity and its increasing ratio against the input power.

  14. Photothermal lesions in soft tissue induced by optical fiber microheaters

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel-Domínguez, Reinher; Moreno-Álvarez, Paola; Hautefeuille, Mathieu; Chavarría, Anahí; Hernández-Cordero, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Photothermal therapy has shown to be a promising technique for local treatment of tumors. However, the main challenge for this technique is the availability of localized heat sources to minimize thermal damage in the surrounding healthy tissue. In this work, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber microheaters for inducing thermal lesions in soft tissue. The proposed devices incorporate carbon nanotubes or gold nanolayers on the tips of optical fibers for enhanced photothermal effects and heating of ex vivo biological tissues. We report preliminary results of small size photothermal lesions induced on mice liver tissues. The morphology of the resulting lesions shows that optical fiber microheaters may render useful for delivering highly localized heat for photothermal therapy. PMID:27446642

  15. Development of micro-heaters with optimized temperature compensation design for gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Woo-Jin; Shin, Kyu-Sik; Roh, Ji-Hyoung; Lee, Dae-Sung; Choa, Sung-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    One of the key components of a chemical gas sensor is a MEMS micro-heater. Micro-heaters are used in both semiconductor gas sensors and NDIR gas sensors; however they each require different heat dissipation characteristics. For the semiconductor gas sensors, a uniform temperature is required over a wide area of the heater. On the other hand, for the NDIR gas sensor, the micro-heater needs high levels of infrared radiation in order to increase sensitivity. In this study, a novel design of a poly-Si micro-heater is proposed to improve the uniformity of heat dissipation on the heating plate. Temperature uniformity of the micro-heater is achieved by compensating for the variation in power consumption around the perimeter of the heater. With the power compensated design, the uniform heating area is increased by 2.5 times and the average temperature goes up by 40 °C. Therefore, this power compensated micro-heater design is suitable for a semiconductor gas sensor. Meanwhile, the poly-Si micro-heater without compensation shows a higher level of infrared radiation under equal power consumption conditions. This indicates that the micro-heater without compensation is more suitable for a NDIR gas sensor. Furthermore, the micro-heater shows a short response time of less than 20 ms, indicating a very high efficiency of pulse driving.

  16. Development of Micro-Heaters with Optimized Temperature Compensation Design for Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Woo-Jin; Shin, Kyu-Sik; Roh, Ji-Hyoung; Lee, Dae-Sung; Choa, Sung-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    One of the key components of a chemical gas sensor is a MEMS micro-heater. Micro-heaters are used in both semiconductor gas sensors and NDIR gas sensors; however they each require different heat dissipation characteristics. For the semiconductor gas sensors, a uniform temperature is required over a wide area of the heater. On the other hand, for the NDIR gas sensor, the micro-heater needs high levels of infrared radiation in order to increase sensitivity. In this study, a novel design of a poly-Si micro-heater is proposed to improve the uniformity of heat dissipation on the heating plate. Temperature uniformity of the micro-heater is achieved by compensating for the variation in power consumption around the perimeter of the heater. With the power compensated design, the uniform heating area is increased by 2.5 times and the average temperature goes up by 40 °C. Therefore, this power compensated micro-heater design is suitable for a semiconductor gas sensor. Meanwhile, the poly-Si micro-heater without compensation shows a higher level of infrared radiation under equal power consumption conditions. This indicates that the micro-heater without compensation is more suitable for a NDIR gas sensor. Furthermore, the micro-heater shows a short response time of less than 20ms, indicating a very high efficiency of pulse driving. PMID:22163756

  17. Reduction of thermal emission background in high temperature microheaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Philip R.; Mah, Merlin L.; Olson, Kyle D.; Taylor, Lucas N.; Talghader, Joseph J.

    2016-05-01

    High temperature microheaters have been designed and constructed to reduce the background thermal emission radiation produced by the heater. Such heaters allow one to probe luminescence with very low numbers of photons where the background emission would overwhelm the desired signal. Two methods to reduce background emission are described: one with low emission materials and the other with interference coating design. The first uses platforms composed of material that is transparent to mid-infrared light and therefore of low emissivity. Heating elements are embedded in the periphery of the heater. The transparent platform is composed of aluminum oxide, which is largely transparent for wavelengths less than about 8 μm. In the luminescent microscopy used to test the heater, an optical aperture blocks emission from the heating coils while passing light from the heated objects on the transparent center of the microheater. The amount of infrared light transmitted through the aperture was reduced by 90% as the aperture was moved from the highly emissive heater coils at 450 °C to the largely transparent center at the same temperature. The second method uses microheaters with integrated multilayer interference structures designed to limit background emission in the spectral range of the low-light luminescence object being measured. These heaters were composed of aluminum oxide, titanium dioxide, and platinum and were operated over a large range of temperatures, from 50 °C to 600 °C. At 600 °C, they showed a background photon emission only 1/800 that of a comparison heater without the multilayer interference structure. In this structure, the radiation background was sufficiently reduced to easily monitor weak thermoluminescent emission from CaSO4:Ce,Tb microparticles.

  18. Thread Migration in the Presence of Pointers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronk, David; Haines, Matthew; Mehrotra, Piyush

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic migration of lightweight threads supports both data locality and load balancing. However, migrating threads that contain pointers referencing data in both the stack and heap remains an open problem. In this paper we describe a technique by which threads with pointers referencing both stack and non-shared heap data can be migrated such that the pointers remain valid after migration. As a result, threads containing pointers can now be migrated between processors in a homogeneous distributed memory environment.

  19. Virus based Full Colour Pixels using a Microheater

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Geun; Kim, Kyujung; Ha, Sung-Hun; Song, Hyerin; Yu, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Chuntae; Kim, Jong-Man; Oh, Jin-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Mimicking natural structures has been received considerable attentions, and there have been a few practical advances. Tremendous efforts based on a self-assembly technique have been contributed to the development of the novel photonic structures which are mimicking nature’s inventions. We emulate the photonic structures from an origin of colour generation of mammalian skins and avian skin/feathers using M13 phage. The structures can be generated a full range of RGB colours that can be sensitively switched by temperature and substrate materials. Consequently, we developed an M13 phage-based temperature-dependent actively controllable colour pixels platform on a microheater chip. Given the simplicity of the fabrication process, the low voltage requirements and cycling stability, the virus colour pixels enable us to substitute for conventional colour pixels for the development of various implantable, wearable and flexible devices in future. PMID:26334322

  20. Virus based Full Colour Pixels using a Microheater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won-Geun; Kim, Kyujung; Ha, Sung-Hun; Song, Hyerin; Yu, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Chuntae; Kim, Jong-Man; Oh, Jin-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Mimicking natural structures has been received considerable attentions, and there have been a few practical advances. Tremendous efforts based on a self-assembly technique have been contributed to the development of the novel photonic structures which are mimicking nature’s inventions. We emulate the photonic structures from an origin of colour generation of mammalian skins and avian skin/feathers using M13 phage. The structures can be generated a full range of RGB colours that can be sensitively switched by temperature and substrate materials. Consequently, we developed an M13 phage-based temperature-dependent actively controllable colour pixels platform on a microheater chip. Given the simplicity of the fabrication process, the low voltage requirements and cycling stability, the virus colour pixels enable us to substitute for conventional colour pixels for the development of various implantable, wearable and flexible devices in future.

  1. Low-power catalytic gas sensing using highly stable silicon carbide microheaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley-Trochimczyk, Anna; Rao, Ameya; Long, Hu; Zettl, Alex; Carraro, Carlo; Maboudian, Roya

    2017-04-01

    A robust silicon carbide (SiC) microheater is used for stable low-power catalytic gas sensing at high operating temperatures, where previously developed low-power polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) microheaters are unstable. The silicon carbide microheater has low power consumption (20 mW to reach 500 °C) and exhibits an order of magnitude lower resistance drift than the polysilicon microheater after continuously heating at 500 °C for 100 h and during temperature increases up to 650 °C. With the deposition of platinum nanoparticle-loaded boron nitride aerogel, the SiC microheater-based catalytic gas sensor detects propane with excellent long-term stability while exhibiting fast response and recovery time (~1 s). The sensitivity is not affected by humidity, nor during 10% duty cycling, which yields a power consumption of only 2 mW with frequent data collection (every 2 s). With a simple change of heater material from silicon to SiC, the microheater and resulting catalytic gas sensor element show significant performance improvement.

  2. The design, fabrication and characterization of a silicon microheater for an integrated MEMS gas preconcentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Junghoon; Field, Christopher R.; Bae, Byunghoon; Masel, Richard I.; Shannon, Mark A.

    2008-12-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a microheater unit as a key component of an integrated micro gas preconcentrator that has an ultra-small preconcentrator volume (<0.25 µL) and microvalves for fast injection speeds (<1 ms). Monolithic integration of the microvalves into the microheater of the preconcentrator gives rise to challenges in designing the microheater and implementing thermal isolation for low power and energy consumption. A preconcentrator chamber, 3.5 × 1.5 mm2 in planform area and 40 µm deep, was built in the device layer of a silicon-on-insulator wafer and filled with an array of microposts with a preconcentrator volume of 0.2-0.25 µL. Different generations of the microheaters and their mating dies were fabricated to show the effects of thermal isolation and thermal mass of the system on the performance of the heater. The microheater assembly with the least thermal mass and most thermal isolation can reach 300 °C in 100 ms with 12.3 W of power and is expected to consume less than 2 J during the operation of each preconcentration cycle.

  3. Laser Pointer and the Tyndall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Eugene

    1996-05-01

    Laser pointers provide a convenient way to demonstrate the Tyndall effect to beginning students. Since my class is at 8:00 a.m. I like to use coffee and milky water parts as part of the demonstration.

  4. Optimization of metallic microheaters for high-speed reconfigurable silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Atabaki, A H; Shah Hosseini, E; Eftekhar, A A; Yegnanarayanan, S; Adibi, A

    2010-08-16

    The strong thermooptic effect in silicon enables low-power and low-loss reconfiguration of large-scale silicon photonics. Thermal reconfiguration through the integration of metallic microheaters has been one of the more widely used reconfiguration techniques in silicon photonics. In this paper, structural and material optimizations are carried out through heat transport modeling to improve the reconfiguration speed of such devices, and the results are experimentally verified. Around 4 micros reconfiguration time are shown for the optimized structures. Moreover, sub-microsecond reconfiguration time is experimentally demonstrated through the pulsed excitation of the microheaters. The limitation of this pulsed excitation scheme is also discussed through an accurate system-level model developed for the microheater response.

  5. Dynamic behaviors of approximately ellipsoidal microbubbles photothermally generated by a graphene oxide-microheater

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xiaobo; Zheng, Jiapeng; Li, Fengjia; Sun, Chao; Cai, Xiang; Zhu, Debin; Lei, Liang; Wu, Ting; Zhou, Bin; Evans, Julian; Chen, Ziyi

    2014-01-01

    Thermal microbubbles generally grow directly from the heater and are spherical to minimize surface tension. We demonstrate a novel type of microbubble indirectly generated from a graphene oxide-microheater. Graphene oxide's photothermal properties allowed for efficient generation of a thermal gradient field on the microscale. A series of approximately ellipsoidal microbubbles were generated on the smooth microwire based on heterogeneous nucleation. Other dynamic behaviors induced by the microheater such as constant growth, directional transport and coalescence were also investigated experimentally and theoretically. The results are not only helpful for understanding the bubble dynamics but also useful for developing novel photothermal bubble-based devices. PMID:25124694

  6. Development of microheaters for gas sensor with an AT-Mega 8535 temperature controller using a PWM (pulse width modulation) method

    SciTech Connect

    Megayanti, Meti; Panatarani, Camellia; Joni, I. Made

    2016-03-11

    Microheater is the main component in gas sensor characterized by their sensitivity, selectivity, and time response of gas sensor which is depend on the microheater temperature stability. A Cu microheater was developed and utilized AT-Mega 8535 controller using a PWM (pulse width modulation) method. This control system is interfaced to the PC to observe the real time temperature response of the microheater. Three initial resistance (R0) variations of microheater were developed in an open loop control system. The power characteristic of designed microheater depends on the specified microheater initial resistance. The smaller R0, the less power required to reach a temperature setting value. The developed microheater was designed to reach a temperature setting value of 250°C having resistance 0.531 Ω for 1.979 Watt and 0.265 Ω for 1.072 Watt respectively. The results of the investigation on the control performances shows microheater-control system achieved operating temperature up to 250°C. The response of the temperature control shows smallest R0 resulted in a high stability with short settling time, short delay time and small ripple for temperature setting values higher than 150°C. The obtained error of microheater temperature with R0 = 0.265 is 8.596 %. It is concluded that the developed microheater can be utilized as a component of a gas sensor.

  7. Three-Dimensional Pointers for Stereoscopic Projection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, H. J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Because class size often limits student opportunity to handle individual models, teachers use stereoscopic projections to demonstrate structural features. Describes three-dimensional pointers for use with different projection systems so teachers can indicate a particular atom or bond to entire classes, avoiding the perspective problems inherent in…

  8. Adaptive Optics Imaging in Laser Pointer Maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Sheyman, Alan T; Nesper, Peter L; Fawzi, Amani A; Jampol, Lee M

    2016-08-01

    The authors report multimodal imaging including adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) (Apaeros retinal image system AOSLO prototype; Boston Micromachines Corporation, Boston, MA) in a case of previously diagnosed unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy (UAIM) that demonstrated features of laser pointer maculopathy. The authors also show the adaptive optics images of a laser pointer maculopathy case previously reported. A 15-year-old girl was referred for the evaluation of a maculopathy suspected to be UAIM. The authors reviewed the patient's history and obtained fluorescein angiography, autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography, infrared reflectance, and AOSLO. The time course of disease and clinical examination did not fit with UAIM, but the linear pattern of lesions was suspicious for self-inflicted laser pointer injury. This was confirmed on subsequent questioning of the patient. The presence of linear lesions in the macula that are best highlighted with multimodal imaging techniques should alert the physician to the possibility of laser pointer injury. AOSLO further characterizes photoreceptor damage in this condition. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:782-785.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. The IBM HeadTracking Pointer: improvements in vision-based pointer control.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, Rick

    2008-07-01

    Vision-based head trackers have been around for some years and are even beginning to be commercialized, but problems remain with respect to usability. Users without the ability to use traditional pointing devices--the intended audience of such systems--have no alternative if the automatic bootstrapping process fails. There is room for improvement in face tracking, and the pointer movement dynamics do not support accurate and efficient pointing. This paper describes the IBM HeadTracking Pointer, a system which attempts to directly address some of these issues. Head gestures are used to provide the end user a greater level of autonomous control over the system. A novel face-tracking algorithm reduces drift under variable lighting conditions, allowing the use of absolute, rather than relative, pointer positioning. Most importantly, the pointer dynamics have been designed to take into account the constraints of head-based pointing, with a non-linear gain which allows stability in fine pointer movement, high speed on long transitions and adjustability to support users with different movement dynamics. User studies have identified some difficulties with training the system and some characteristics of the pointer motion that take time to get used to, but also good user feedback and very promising performance results.

  10. Permanent retinal injury from recreational laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Noble, Carl; Blice, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    This case report was performed to display the visually significant damage to the retina that can occur with brief exposure to a handheld laser pointer. Laser use in the military is ever increasing in form of target designators, rangefinders, or radar warning systems with powers far greater than used in this case. There is great potential for future cases of retinal damage among active duty members, and the importance of prevention through laser safety programs and recognition through trained medical personnel is paramount.

  11. Development and characterization of a microheater array device for real-time DNA mutation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Layne; Okandan, Murat; Chagovetz, Alex; Blair, Steve

    2008-02-01

    DNA analysis, specifically single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, is becoming increasingly important in rapid diagnostics and disease detection. Temperature is often controlled to help speed reaction rates and perform melting of hybridized oligonucleotides. The difference in melting temperatures, Tm, between wild-type and SNP sequences, respectively, to a given probe oligonucleotide, is indicative of the specificity of the reaction. We have characterized Tm's in solution and on a solid substrate of three sequences from known mutations associated with Cystic Fibrosis. Taking advantage of Tm differences, a microheater array device was designed to enable individual temperature control of up to 18 specific hybridization events. The device was fabricated at Sandia National Laboratories using surface micromachining techniques. The microheaters have been characterized using an IR camera at Sandia and show individual temperature control with minimal thermal cross talk. Development of the device as a real-time DNA detection platform, including surface chemistry and associated microfluidics, is described.

  12. Development and characterization of a microheater array device for real-time DNA mutation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Layne; Okandan, Murat; Chagovetz, Alex; Blair, Steve

    2008-04-01

    DNA analysis, specifically single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, is becoming increasingly important in rapid diagnostics and disease detection. Temperature is often controlled to help speed reaction rates and perform melting of hybridized oligonucleotides. The difference in melting temperatures, Tm, between wild-type and SNP sequences, respectively, to a given probe oligonucleotide, is indicative of the specificity of the reaction. We have characterized Tm's in solution and on a solid substrate of three sequences from known mutations associated with Cystic Fibrosis. Taking advantage of Tm differences, a microheater array device was designed to enable individual temperature control of up to 18 specific hybridization events. The device was fabricated at Sandia National Laboratories using surface micromachining techniques. The microheaters have been characterized using an IR camera at Sandia and show individual temperature control with minimal thermal cross talk. Development of the device as a real-time DNA detection platform, including surface chemistry and associated microfluidics, is described.

  13. Slow-light-enhanced energy efficiency for graphene microheaters on silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Yan, Siqi; Zhu, Xiaolong; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N Asger; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong

    2017-02-09

    Slow light has been widely utilized to obtain enhanced nonlinearities, enhanced spontaneous emissions and increased phase shifts owing to its ability to promote light-matter interactions. By incorporating a graphene on a slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguide, here we experimentally demonstrate an energy-efficient graphene microheater with a tuning efficiency of 1.07 nmmW(-1) and power consumption per free spectral range of 3.99 mW. The rise and decay times (10-90%) are only 750 and 525 ns, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the fastest reported response times for microheaters in silicon photonics. The corresponding figure of merit of the device is 2.543 nW s, one order of magnitude better than results reported in previous studies. The influence of the length and shape of the graphene heater to the tuning efficiency is further investigated, providing valuable guidelines for enhancing the tuning efficiency of the graphene microheater.

  14. Modeling and experimental investigation of an integrated optical microheater in silicon-on-insulator.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Saket; Das, Bijoy Krishna

    2016-04-10

    A linear piecewise model has been formulated to analyze the performance of a metallic microheater integrated with single-mode waveguides (λ∼1550  nm) in silicon-on-insulator (SOI). The model has been used to evaluate integrated optical microheaters fabricated in a SOI substrate with 2 µm device layer thickness. The Fabry-Perot modulation technique has been used to extract the effective thermo-optic phase shift and response time. The effective thermal power budget of Peff,π∼500  µW (out of actually consumed power Pπ=1.1  mW) for a π phase shift and a switching time of τ∼9  µs, have been recorded for a typical Ti heater stripe of length LH=50  µm, width WH=2  µm, and thickness tH∼150  nm, integrated with a Fabry-Perot waveguide cavity of length ∼20  mm. It has been shown that the performance of a heater improves (in terms of power budget) as the length of a microheater decreases. However, smaller heater size requires higher joule heating to obtain a desired phase shift, which is again found to be dependent on polarization of the guided mode because of thermal stress.

  15. Slow-light-enhanced energy efficiency for graphene microheaters on silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Siqi; Zhu, Xiaolong; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong

    2017-02-01

    Slow light has been widely utilized to obtain enhanced nonlinearities, enhanced spontaneous emissions and increased phase shifts owing to its ability to promote light-matter interactions. By incorporating a graphene on a slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguide, here we experimentally demonstrate an energy-efficient graphene microheater with a tuning efficiency of 1.07 nmmW-1 and power consumption per free spectral range of 3.99 mW. The rise and decay times (10-90%) are only 750 and 525 ns, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the fastest reported response times for microheaters in silicon photonics. The corresponding figure of merit of the device is 2.543 nW s, one order of magnitude better than results reported in previous studies. The influence of the length and shape of the graphene heater to the tuning efficiency is further investigated, providing valuable guidelines for enhancing the tuning efficiency of the graphene microheater.

  16. Slow-light-enhanced energy efficiency for graphene microheaters on silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Siqi; Zhu, Xiaolong; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong

    2017-01-01

    Slow light has been widely utilized to obtain enhanced nonlinearities, enhanced spontaneous emissions and increased phase shifts owing to its ability to promote light–matter interactions. By incorporating a graphene on a slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguide, here we experimentally demonstrate an energy-efficient graphene microheater with a tuning efficiency of 1.07 nmmW−1 and power consumption per free spectral range of 3.99 mW. The rise and decay times (10–90%) are only 750 and 525 ns, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the fastest reported response times for microheaters in silicon photonics. The corresponding figure of merit of the device is 2.543 nW s, one order of magnitude better than results reported in previous studies. The influence of the length and shape of the graphene heater to the tuning efficiency is further investigated, providing valuable guidelines for enhancing the tuning efficiency of the graphene microheater. PMID:28181531

  17. [The laser pointer: no demonstrated danger to the eyes].

    PubMed

    van Norren, D; Keunen, J E; Vos, J J

    1998-09-05

    If laser pointers are powerful enough (> 5 mW), they can cause ocular damage. Most laser pointers in use, however, have low power, viz. 1 mW. In the peer-reviewed scientific literature worldwide not a single case of eye damage due to laser pointers is described. A review among Dutch ophthalmologists up to June 1998 revealed no cases of permanent damage caused by laser pointers. In view of the widespread use of laser pointers, the risk of retinal damage must be minimal, even with the types now banned. Laser pointers of 1 mW emitting light red or green light have sufficient visibility on projection screens. It is advisable to prohibit the sale of more powerful pointers to prevent excesses.

  18. POINTER: Portable Intelligent Trainer for External Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, Hilbert; Rikken, Patrick J.

    1994-01-01

    Intelligent tutoring systems (ITS's) play an increasing role in training and education of people with different levels of skill and knowledge. As compared to conventional computer based training (CBT) an ITS provides more tailored instruction by trying to mimic the teaching behavior of a human instructor as much as possible and is therefore much more flexible. This paper starts with an introduction to ITS's, followed by the description of an ITS for training of an (astronaut) operator in monitoring and controlling robotic arm procedures. The robotic arm will be used for exchange of equipment between a space station and a space plane involving critical and accurate movements of the robotic arm. The ITS for this application, called Pointer, is developed by TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory and is based upon an existing ITS that includes procedural training. Pointer has been developed on a workstation whereas the target platform was a portable computer. Therefore, a lot of attention had to be paid to scaling effects and keeping up with user friendliness of the much smaller user interface. Although the learning domain was the control of a robotic arm, it is clear that use of intelligent training technologies on a portable computer has many other applications (payload operations, operation control rooms, etc.). Training can occur at any time and place in an attractive and cost effective way.

  19. Microheater as an alternative to lasers for in-vitro fertilization applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel V.; Turovets, Igor; Glazer, Rima; Reubinoff, Benjamin E.; Hilman, Dalia; Lewis, Aaron

    1999-06-01

    During the last decade various lasers have been applied to drilling of the micrometer-sized holes in the zona pellucida of oocytes for in-vitro fertilization applications. In this paper we describe an alternative approach to laser instrumentation based on microfabricated device capable of precise drilling of uniform holes in the zona pellucida of oocytes. This device consists of a thin (1 micrometer) film microheater built on the tip of glass capillary with a diameter varying between a few to a few tens of micrometers. Duration of the pulse of heat produced by this microheater determines the spatial confinement of the heat wave in the surrounding liquid medium. We have demonstrated that gradual microdrilling of the zona pellucida can be accomplished using a series of pulses with duration of about 300 microseconds when the microheater was held in contact with the zona pellucida. Pulse energy applied to 20 micrometer tip was about 4 (mu) J. In vitro development and hatching of 127 micromanipulated embryos was compared to 103 non-drilled control embryos. The technique was found to be highly efficient in creating round, uniform, well defined holes with a smooth wall surface, matching the size of the heating source. The architecture of the surrounding zona pellucida was unaffected by the drilling, as demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy. Micromanipulated embryos presented no signs of thermal damage under light microscopy. The rate of blastocyst formation and hatching was similar in the micromanipulated and control groups. Following further testing in animal models, this methodology may be used as a cost- effective alternative to laser-based instrumentation in clinical applications such as assisted hatching and embryo biopsy.

  20. 49 CFR 384.220 - Problem Driver Pointer System information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Problem Driver Pointer System information. 384.220... COMPLIANCE WITH COMMERCIAL DRIVER'S LICENSE PROGRAM Minimum Standards for Substantial Compliance by States § 384.220 Problem Driver Pointer System information. Before issuing a CLP or CDL to any person,...

  1. 49 CFR 384.220 - Problem Driver Pointer System information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Problem Driver Pointer System information. 384.220... COMPLIANCE WITH COMMERCIAL DRIVER'S LICENSE PROGRAM Minimum Standards for Substantial Compliance by States § 384.220 Problem Driver Pointer System information. Before issuing a CLP or CDL to any person,...

  2. 49 CFR 384.220 - Problem Driver Pointer System information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Problem Driver Pointer System information. 384.220... COMPLIANCE WITH COMMERCIAL DRIVER'S LICENSE PROGRAM Minimum Standards for Substantial Compliance by States § 384.220 Problem Driver Pointer System information. Before issuing a CLP or CDL to any person,...

  3. 49 CFR 384.220 - Problem Driver Pointer System information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Problem Driver Pointer System information. 384.220... COMPLIANCE WITH COMMERCIAL DRIVER'S LICENSE PROGRAM Minimum Standards for Substantial Compliance by States § 384.220 Problem Driver Pointer System information. Before issuing a CLP or CDL to any person,...

  4. X-Ray Diffraction Simulation Using Laser Pointers and Printers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil E.

    2001-01-01

    Uses a laser pointer to demonstrate the analogy between optical and X-ray diffraction and a laser printer with 600 or 1200 dot resolution to create and modify arrays, print them on transparencies, and illuminate them with laser pointers. Includes 14 references. (Author/YDS)

  5. X-Ray Diffraction Simulation Using Laser Pointers and Printers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil E.

    2001-01-01

    Uses a laser pointer to demonstrate the analogy between optical and X-ray diffraction and a laser printer with 600 or 1200 dot resolution to create and modify arrays, print them on transparencies, and illuminate them with laser pointers. Includes 14 references. (Author/YDS)

  6. Optofluidic microvalve-on-a-chip with a surface plasmon-enhanced fiber optic microheater

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhijian; Kusimo, Abisola; Yu, Miao

    2014-01-01

    We present an optofluidic microvalve utilizing an embedded, surface plasmon-enhanced fiber optic microheater. The fiber optic microheater is formed by depositing a titanium thin film on the roughened end-face of a silica optical fiber that serves as a waveguide to deliver laser light to the titanium film. The nanoscale roughness at the titanium-silica interface enables strong light absorption enhancement in the titanium film through excitation of localized surface plasmons as well as facilitates bubble nucleation. Our experimental results show that due to the unique design of the fiber optic heater, the threshold laser power required to generate a bubble is greatly reduced and the bubble growth rate is significantly increased. By using the microvalve, stable vapor bubble generation in the microchannel is demonstrated, which does not require complex optical focusing and alignment. The generated vapor bubble is shown to successfully block a liquid flow channel with a size of 125 μm × 125 μm and a flow rate of ∼10 μl/min at ∼120 mW laser power. PMID:25538813

  7. Advanced Reference Counting Pointers for Better Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinholtz, William

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements reference counting pointers (RCPs) that are lock-free, thread-safe, async-safe, and operational on a multiprocessor computer. RCPs are powerful and convenient means of managing heap memory in C++ software. Most prior RCP programs use locks to ensure thread safety and manage concurrency. The present program was developed in a continuing effort to explore ways of using the C++ programming language to develop safety-critical and mission- critical software. This effort includes exploration of lock-free algorithms because they offer potential to avoid some costly and difficult verification problems. Unlike previously published RCP software, the present program does not use locks (meaning that no thread can block progress on another thread): Instead, this program implements algorithms that exploit capabilities of central-processing- unit hardware so as to avoid locks. Once locks are eliminated, it becomes possible to realize the other attributes mentioned in the first sentence. In addition to the abovementioned attributes, this program offers several advantages over other RCP programs that use locks: It is smaller (and, hence, is faster and uses less memory), it is immune to priority inversion, and there is no way for it to cause a C++ exception.

  8. Balloon borne arcsecond pointer feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Philip R.; Deweese, Keith D.

    2003-08-01

    A major hurdle in extending the range of experiments for which balloon vehicles are useful has been the imposition of the gondola dynamics on the accuracy with which an instrument can be kept pointed at a celestial target. In this paper, the foundation for a high fidelity controller simulation is presented and it is shown that sub-arcsecond pointing stability can be achieved for a large instrument pointing at an inertial target. The flexibility of the flight train is represented through generalized modal analysis. A multiple controller scheme is introduced with a coarse azimuth pointer and a pitch-yaw gimbal mount for fine pointing. An analysis and demonstration of the necessity in eliminating static friction are provided along with a solution to eliminate static friction from the system dynamics. A control scheme involving linear accelerometers for enhanced disturbance rejection is also presented. This paper establishes that the proposed control strategy can be made robustly stable with significant design margins. Also demonstrated is the efficacy of the proposed system in rejecting disturbances larger than those considered realistic.

  9. Advantages of nonclassical pointer states in postselected weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turek, Yusuf; Maimaiti, W.; Shikano, Yutaka; Sun, Chang-Pu; Al-Amri, M.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate, within the weak measurement theory, the advantages of nonclassical pointer states over semiclassical ones for coherent, squeezed vacuum, and Schrödinger cat states. These states are utilized as pointer states for the system operator A ̂ with property Â2=I ̂ , where I ̂ represents the identity operator. We calculate the ratio between the signal-to-noise ratio of nonpostselected and postselected weak measurements. The latter is used to find the quantum Fisher information for the above pointer states. The average shifts for those pointer states with arbitrary interaction strength are investigated in detail. One key result is that we find the postselected weak measurement scheme for nonclassical pointer states to be superior to semiclassical ones. This can improve the precision of the measurement process.

  10. Low-power-Consumption metal oxide NO2 gas sensor based on micro-heater and screen printing technology.

    PubMed

    Moon, S E; Lee, H K; Choi, N J; Lee, J; Yang, W S; Kim, J; Jong, J J; Yoo, D J

    2012-07-01

    An NO2 micro gas sensor was fabricated based on a micro-heater using tin oxide nano-powders for effective gas detection and monitoring system with low power consumption and high sensitivity. The processes of the fabrication were acceptable to the conventional CMOS processes for mass-production. Semiconducting SnO2 nano-powders were synthesized via the co-precipitation method; and to increase the sensitivity of the NO2 gas rare metal dopants were added. In the structure of the micro-heater, the resistances of two semi-circular Pt heaters were connected to the spreader for thermal uniformity. The resistance of each heater becomes an electrically equal Wheatstone-bridge, which was divided in half by the heat spreading structure. Based on the aforementioned design, a low-power-consumption micro-heater was fabricated using the CMOS-compatible MEMS processes. A bridge-type micro-heater based on the Si substrate was fabricated via surface micro-machining. The NO2 sensing properties of a screen-printed tin oxide thick film device were measured The micro gas sensors showed substantial sensitivity down to 0.5 ppm NO2 at a low power consumption (34.2 mW).

  11. Proving Correctness for Pointer Programs in a Verifying Compiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulczycki, Gregory; Singh, Amrinder

    2008-01-01

    This research describes a component-based approach to proving the correctness of programs involving pointer behavior. The approach supports modular reasoning and is designed to be used within the larger context of a verifying compiler. The approach consists of two parts. When a system component requires the direct manipulation of pointer operations in its implementation, we implement it using a built-in component specifically designed to capture the functional and performance behavior of pointers. When a system component requires pointer behavior via a linked data structure, we ensure that the complexities of the pointer operations are encapsulated within the data structure and are hidden to the client component. In this way, programs that rely on pointers can be verified modularly, without requiring special rules for pointers. The ultimate objective of a verifying compiler is to prove-with as little human intervention as possible-that proposed program code is correct with respect to a full behavioral specification. Full verification for software is especially important for an agency like NASA that is routinely involved in the development of mission critical systems.

  12. Two theories of consciousness: Semantic pointer competition vs. information integration.

    PubMed

    Thagard, Paul; Stewart, Terrence C

    2014-11-01

    Consciousness results from three mechanisms: representation by firing patterns in neural populations, binding of representations into more complex representations called semantic pointers, and competition among semantic pointers to capture the most important aspects of an organism's current state. We contrast the semantic pointer competition (SPC) theory of consciousness with the hypothesis that consciousness is the capacity of a system to integrate information (IIT). We describe computer simulations to show that SPC surpasses IIT in providing better explanations of key aspects of consciousness: qualitative features, onset and cessation, shifts in experiences, differences in kinds across different organisms, unity and diversity, and storage and retrieval. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bilateral macular injury from a green laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Dirani, Ali; Chelala, Elias; Fadlallah, Ali; Antonios, Rafic; Cherfan, George

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 13-year-old boy who had a bilateral macular injury after playing with a green laser pointer for a duration of 1 minute. Clinical examination revealed a decrease in visual acuity and macular injury in both eyes, and imaging investigations revealed a bilateral macular lesion due to exposure to the laser pointer. At 3 months' follow up, visual function had improved but remained partially impaired. This case emphasizes the importance of cautious and appropriate use of laser pointer devices because of the potential vision-threatening hazards induced by mishandling of these devices.

  14. Photoconductive effect on p-i-p micro-heaters integrated in silicon microring resonators.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linjie; Zhu, Haike; Zhang, Heng; Chen, Jianping

    2014-01-27

    We study the photoconductive effect of a p-i-p micro-heater integrated in a microring resonator. Due to the surface state absorption (SSA) and two photon absorption (TPA) of optical wave around 1550 nm, free carriers are generated in the silicon waveguide, leading to the modulation of silicon conductivity and thus the current flowing through it. The current-voltage (I-V) response of the p-i-p diode is dependent on the bias voltage and can be divided into ohmic-law regime and space-charge-limited regime. The resonance peak current is more sensitive to optical power in the ohmic-law regime. Such a phenomenon can also be utilized to monitor the optical power in the waveguide.

  15. Laser pointer induced macular damage: case report and mini review.

    PubMed

    Turaka, Kiran; Bryan, J Shepard; Gordon, Alan J; Reddy, Rahul; Kwong, Henry M; Sell, Clive H

    2012-06-01

    To report laser pointer induced damage to retina and choroid and briefly review literature. A case report of a 13-year old Caucasian boy developed blurry central vision and central scotoma in right eye (OD). He was exposed for one minute to class IIIA green laser pointer of 650 nm wavelength and 5 mW power. Clinical examination showed a grayish lesion in foveal region. Ancillary testing revealed disruption of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) layer in foveal region and indocyanine green angiography demonstrated evidence of choroidal hypofluorescence suggestive of choroidal infarction in OD. Visual acuity improved from 20/100 to 20/60 in one day and he was treated with tapering doses of oral prednisolone (40 mg) for 3 weeks. Laser pointer with a power of >5 mW caused damage to RPE in the macula. Children should not be given laser pointers as toys especially those with label of danger instructions.

  16. Concepts as Semantic Pointers: A Framework and Computational Model.

    PubMed

    Blouw, Peter; Solodkin, Eugene; Thagard, Paul; Eliasmith, Chris

    2016-07-01

    The reconciliation of theories of concepts based on prototypes, exemplars, and theory-like structures is a longstanding problem in cognitive science. In response to this problem, researchers have recently tended to adopt either hybrid theories that combine various kinds of representational structure, or eliminative theories that replace concepts with a more finely grained taxonomy of mental representations. In this paper, we describe an alternative approach involving a single class of mental representations called "semantic pointers." Semantic pointers are symbol-like representations that result from the compression and recursive binding of perceptual, lexical, and motor representations, effectively integrating traditional connectionist and symbolic approaches. We present a computational model using semantic pointers that replicates experimental data from categorization studies involving each prior paradigm. We argue that a framework involving semantic pointers can provide a unified account of conceptual phenomena, and we compare our framework to existing alternatives in accounting for the scope, content, recursive combination, and neural implementation of concepts.

  17. Retinal Injury Secondary to Laser Pointers in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kunyong; Chin, Eric K; Quiram, Polly A; Davies, John B; Parke, D Wilkin; Almeida, David R P

    2016-10-01

    This case report describes 4 male children (age, 9-16) who had laser-related retinal injury to the macula of 1 eye or both eyes due to the mishandling of the laser pointer devices at a single vitreoretinal clinical practice. The presenting symptoms associated with laser pointer injury include central vision loss, central scotoma, and metamorphopsia. Clinical findings of laser-related retinal injury include reduced visual acuity, disruption of the photoreceptor ellipsoid zone, retinal pigment epithelium atrophy, and choroidal neovascular membrane formation. Disruption of the foveal ellipsoid zone (photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment layer) is the most common finding on optical coherence tomography imaging. Three patients had potential irreversible vision loss. Laser pointers are readily available and appropriate use of laser pointers in the pediatric population must be emphasized due to the potential irreversible retinal injury. Health professionals, school teachers, and parents should raise public awareness of this emerging public health issue by educating children about the dangers of laser pointers. Laser pointer devices among children should be discouraged and limited due to the possibility of permanent harm to themselves and others. Legislation and laws may be required to better control the sale and use of these devices.

  18. Self-gauged fiber-optic micro-heater with an operation temperature above 1000°C.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guigen; Sheng, Qiwen; Dam, Dustin; Hua, Jiong; Hou, Weilin; Han, Ming

    2017-04-01

    We report a fiber-optic micro-heater based on a miniature crystalline silicon Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) fusion spliced to the endface of a single-mode fiber. The silicon FPI, having a diameter of 100 μm and a length of 10 or 200 μm, is heated by a 980 nm laser diode guided through the lead-in fiber, leading to a localized hot spot with a temperature that can be conveniently tuned from the ambient temperature to >1000°C in air. In the meantime, using a white light system operating in the 1550 nm wavelength window where the silicon is transparent, the silicon FPI itself also serves as a thermometer with high resolution and high speed for convenient monitoring and precise control of the heater temperature. Due to its small size, high temperature capability, and easy operation, the micro-heater is attractive for applications in a variety of fields, such as biology, microfluidics system, mechanical engineering, and high-temperature optical sensing. As an example, the application of this micro-heater as a micro-boiler and micro-bubble generator has been demonstrated.

  19. Selection and elution of aptamers using nanoporous sol-gel arrays with integrated microheaters.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Min; Ahn, Ji-Young; Jo, Minjoung; Lee, Dong-Ki; Lis, John T; Craighead, Harold G; Kim, Soyoun

    2009-05-07

    RNA and DNA aptamers that bind to target molecules with high specificity and affinity have been a focus of diagnostics and therapeutic research. These aptamers are obtained by SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) often requiring more than 10 successive cycles of selection and amplification, where each cycle normally takes 2 days per cycle of SELEX. Here, we have demonstrated the use of sol-gel arrays of proteins in a microfluidic system for efficient selection of RNA aptamers against multiple target molecules. The microfluidic chip incorporates five sol-gel binding droplets, within which specific target proteins are imbedded. The droplets are patterned on top of individually addressable electrical microheaters used for selective elution of aptamers bound to target proteins in the sol-gel droplets. We demonstrate that specific aptamers bind their respective protein targets and can be selectively eluted by micro-heating. Finally, our microfluidic SELEX system greatly improved selection efficiency, reducing the number of selection cycles needed to produce high affinity aptamers. The process is readily scalable to larger arrays of sol-gel-embedded proteins. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a chip-based selection of aptamers using microfluidics, thereby allowing development of a high throughput and efficient SELEX procedures.

  20. Atomization of High-Viscosity Fluids for Aromatherapy Using Micro-heaters for Heterogeneous Bubble Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Junhui; Kong, Ka Wai; Chan, Ho-Yin; Sun, Winston; Li, Wen Jung; Chau, Eric Boa Fung; Chan, George Kak Man

    2017-01-01

    The development of a novel lead-free microelectromechanical-system (MEMS)-based atomizer using the principle of thermal bubble actuation is presented. It is a low-cost, lead-free design that is environmentally friendly and harmless to humans. It has been tested to be applicable over a wide range of fluid viscosities, ranging from 1 cP (e.g., water) to 200 cP (e.g., oil-like fluid) at room temperature, a range that is difficult to achieve using ordinary atomizers. The results demonstrate that the average power consumption of the atomizer is approximately 1 W with an atomization rate of 0.1 to 0.3 mg of deionized (DI) water per cycle. The relationships between the micro-heater track width and the track gap, the size of the micro-cavities and the nucleation energy were studied to obtain an optimal atomizer design. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) results indicate that the diameter of the ejected droplets ranges from 30 to 90 μm with a speed of 20 to 340 mm/s. In addition, different modes of spraying are reported for the first time. It is envisioned that the successful development of this MEMS-based atomizing technology will revolutionize the existing market for atomizers and could also benefit different industries, particularly in applications involving viscous fluids.

  1. Atomization of High-Viscosity Fluids for Aromatherapy Using Micro-heaters for Heterogeneous Bubble Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Law, Junhui; Kong, Ka Wai; Chan, Ho-Yin; Sun, Winston; Li, Wen Jung; Chau, Eric Boa Fung; Chan, George Kak Man

    2017-01-11

    The development of a novel lead-free microelectromechanical-system (MEMS)-based atomizer using the principle of thermal bubble actuation is presented. It is a low-cost, lead-free design that is environmentally friendly and harmless to humans. It has been tested to be applicable over a wide range of fluid viscosities, ranging from 1 cP (e.g., water) to 200 cP (e.g., oil-like fluid) at room temperature, a range that is difficult to achieve using ordinary atomizers. The results demonstrate that the average power consumption of the atomizer is approximately 1 W with an atomization rate of 0.1 to 0.3 mg of deionized (DI) water per cycle. The relationships between the micro-heater track width and the track gap, the size of the micro-cavities and the nucleation energy were studied to obtain an optimal atomizer design. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) results indicate that the diameter of the ejected droplets ranges from 30 to 90 μm with a speed of 20 to 340 mm/s. In addition, different modes of spraying are reported for the first time. It is envisioned that the successful development of this MEMS-based atomizing technology will revolutionize the existing market for atomizers and could also benefit different industries, particularly in applications involving viscous fluids.

  2. Atomization of High-Viscosity Fluids for Aromatherapy Using Micro-heaters for Heterogeneous Bubble Nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Law, Junhui; Kong, Ka Wai; Chan, Ho-Yin; Sun, Winston; Li, Wen Jung; Chau, Eric Boa Fung; Chan, George Kak Man

    2017-01-01

    The development of a novel lead-free microelectromechanical-system (MEMS)-based atomizer using the principle of thermal bubble actuation is presented. It is a low-cost, lead-free design that is environmentally friendly and harmless to humans. It has been tested to be applicable over a wide range of fluid viscosities, ranging from 1 cP (e.g., water) to 200 cP (e.g., oil-like fluid) at room temperature, a range that is difficult to achieve using ordinary atomizers. The results demonstrate that the average power consumption of the atomizer is approximately 1 W with an atomization rate of 0.1 to 0.3 mg of deionized (DI) water per cycle. The relationships between the micro-heater track width and the track gap, the size of the micro-cavities and the nucleation energy were studied to obtain an optimal atomizer design. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) results indicate that the diameter of the ejected droplets ranges from 30 to 90 μm with a speed of 20 to 340 mm/s. In addition, different modes of spraying are reported for the first time. It is envisioned that the successful development of this MEMS-based atomizing technology will revolutionize the existing market for atomizers and could also benefit different industries, particularly in applications involving viscous fluids. PMID:28074925

  3. Activities Using Headsticks and Optical Pointers: A Description of Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksson, Britt-Marie; And Others

    A variety of head-mounted aids have been developed in the past decade to fill in the functional gaps of children and adults unable to use their hands at standard capacity. For those with speech difficulties, the optical pointer, headstick and mouthstick also provide communication alternatives. This handbook discusses the characteristics of several…

  4. Laser pointers and the human eye: a clinicopathologic study.

    PubMed

    Robertson, D M; Lim, T H; Salomao, D R; Link, T P; Rowe, R L; McLaren, J W

    2000-12-01

    We report the absence of photic retinal injury after exposing the retina to light from class 3A laser pointers for durations of up to 15 minutes. Three patients with uveal melanomas were scheduled to have an enucleation. Each agreed to have his or her retina exposed to laser light from a class 3A laser pointer prior to enucleation. Continuous exposure was directed to the fovea for 1 minute, to the retina 5 degrees below fixation for 5 minutes, and to the retina 5 degrees above fixation for 15 minutes. Ophthalmoscopic evaluation of the cornea, lens, and retina and fluorescein angiographic studies of the retina were conducted before, 24 hours after, and 11 days after laser exposure in the first case; before and 86 hours after exposure in the second case; and before, 96 hours after, and 15 days after exposure in the third case. Other than transient afterimages that lasted only a few minutes, we were unable to document any functional, ophthalmoscopic, fluorescein angiographic, or histologic evidence of damage to any structures of the eyes. Transmission electron microscopic studies of retinal sites targeted by the laser pointers in the second and third cases revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the outer retina and the pigment epithelium that were similar to abnormalities seen in the retina approximately 8 mm away from the targeted sites. The risk to the human eye from transient exposure to light from commercially available class 3A laser pointers having powers of 1, 2, and 5 mW seems negligible.

  5. Eight Pointers on Teaching Children To Think. Research in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Laurie; Paulu, Nancy, Ed.

    Based on the research report "Thinking Skills" by Robert J. Marzano and C. L. Hutchins, this paper offers the following pointers on teaching children to think: (1) when teaching new information, have students compare it with what they already know; (2) provide students with manageable ways to evaluate information and teach them to ask…

  6. [Laser pointers are not toys; eye injury with permanent loss of visual acuity].

    PubMed

    Keunen, Jan E E; Delbecq, Ann-Laure M H; Cruysberg, J R M Hans; van Meurs, Jan C; Gan, Ivan M; Berendschot, Tos T J M

    2014-01-01

    In the nineteen-nineties, there was much hype in the European media about presumed laser pointer maculopathy. However, the recent introduction of more powerful and therefore more dangerous laser pointers and their easy availability on the internet necessitates vigilance on the issue. This is an urgent matter, as here we report three cases of proven maculopathy due to an unsafe laser pointer. Three boys aged 13, 9 and 12 years used an unsafe laser pointer as a toy and looked repeatedly into the pointer, resulting in a permanent reduction in visual acuity due to macular damage. Laser pointers are not designed to be children's toys or instruments to annoy people in a crowd. Health authorities and the ophthalmic community should be aware of the potential danger of improper use of high-output laser pointers and warn the general public before the widespread availability of unsafe laser pointers and consequently laser pointer-induced macular damage becomes a true social problem.

  7. Modelling and interpretation of gas detection using remote laser pointers.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, J; van Well, B; Padgett, M; Pride, R D

    2006-04-01

    We have developed a quantitative model of the performance of laser pointer style gas leak detectors, which are based on remote detection of backscattered radiation. The model incorporates instrumental noise limits, the reflectivity of the target background surface and a mathematical description of gas leak dispersion in constant wind speed and turbulence conditions. We have investigated optimum instrument performance and limits of detection in simulated leak detection situations. We predict that the optimum height for instruments is at eye level or above, giving an operating range of 10 m or more for most background surfaces, in wind speeds of up to 2.5 ms(-1). For ground based leak sources, we find laser pointer measurements are dominated by gas concentrations over a short distance close to the target surface, making their readings intuitive to end users in most cases. This finding is consistent with the results of field trials.

  8. Evaluation of a green laser pointer for flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Habbersett, Robert C; Naivar, Mark A; Woods, Travis A; Goddard, Gregory R; Graves, Steven W

    2007-10-01

    Flow cytometers typically incorporate expensive lasers with high-quality (TEM00) output beam structure and very stable output power, significantly increasing system cost and power requirements. Red diode lasers minimize power consumption and cost, but limit fluorophore selection. Low-cost DPSS laser pointer modules could possibly offer increased wavelength selection but presumed emission instability has limited their use. A $160 DPSS 532 nm laser pointer module was first evaluated for noise characteristics and then used as the excitation light source in a custom-built flow cytometer for the analysis of fluorescent calibration and alignment microspheres. Eight of ten modules tested were very quiet (RMS noise < or = 0.6% between 0 and 5 MHz). With a quiet laser pointer module as the light source in a slow-flow system, fluorescence measurements from alignment microspheres produced CVs of about 3.3%. Furthermore, the use of extended transit times and < or =1 mW of laser power produced both baseline resolution of all 8 peaks in a set of Rainbow microspheres, and a detection limit of <20 phycoerythrin molecules per particle. Data collected with the transit time reduced to 25 micros (in the same instrument but at 2.4 mW laser output) demonstrated a detection limit of approximately 75 phycoerythrin molecules and CVs of about 2.7%. The performance, cost, size, and power consumption of the tested laser pointer module suggests that it may be suitable for use in conventional flow cytometry, particularly if it were coupled with cytometers that support extended transit times.

  9. A robust pointer segmentation in biomedical images toward building a visual ontology for biomedical article retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Daekeun; Simpson, Matthew; Antani, Sameer; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R.

    2013-01-01

    Pointers (arrows and symbols) are frequently used in biomedical images to highlight specific image regions of interest (ROIs) that are mentioned in figure captions and/or text discussion. Detection of pointers is the first step toward extracting relevant visual features from ROIs and combining them with textual descriptions for a multimodal (text and image) biomedical article retrieval system. Recently we developed a pointer recognition algorithm based on an edge-based pointer segmentation method, and subsequently reported improvements made on our initial approach involving the use of Active Shape Models (ASM) for pointer recognition and region growing-based method for pointer segmentation. These methods contributed to improving the recall of pointer recognition but not much to the precision. The method discussed in this article is our recent effort to improve the precision rate. Evaluation performed on two datasets and compared with other pointer segmentation methods show significantly improved precision and the highest F1 score.

  10. In Situ Localized Growth of Ordered Metal Oxide Hollow Sphere Array on Microheater Platform for Sensitive, Ultra-Fast Gas Sensing.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ameya; Long, Hu; Harley-Trochimczyk, Anna; Pham, Thang; Zettl, Alex; Carraro, Carlo; Maboudian, Roya

    2017-01-25

    A simple and versatile strategy is presented for the localized on-chip synthesis of an ordered metal oxide hollow sphere array directly on a low power microheater platform to form a closely integrated miniaturized gas sensor. Selective microheater surface modification through fluorinated monolayer self-assembly and its subsequent microheater-induced thermal decomposition enables the position-controlled deposition of an ordered two-dimensional colloidal sphere array, which serves as a sacrificial template for metal oxide growth via homogeneous chemical precipitation; this strategy ensures control in both the morphology and placement of the sensing material on only the active heated area of the microheater platform, providing a major advantage over other methods of presynthesized nanomaterial integration via suspension coating or printing. A fabricated tin oxide hollow sphere-based sensor shows high sensitivity (6.5 ppb detection limit) and selectivity toward formaldehyde, and extremely fast response (1.8 s) and recovery (5.4 s) times. This flexible and scalable method can be used to fabricate high performance miniaturized gas sensors with a variety of hollow nanostructured metal oxides for a range of applications, including combining multiple metal oxides for superior sensitivity and tunable selectivity.

  11. Coupling-deformed pointer observables and weak values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Xiang; Wu, Shengjun; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-03-01

    While the novel applications of weak values have recently attracted wide attention, weak measurement, the usual way to extract weak values, suffers from risky approximations and severe quantum noises. In this paper, we show that the weak-value information can be obtained exactly in strong measurement with postselections, via measuring the coupling-deformed pointer observables, i.e., the observables selected according to the coupling strength. With this approach, we keep all the advantages claimed by weak-measurement schemes and at the same time solve some widely criticized problems thereof, such as the questionable universality, systematical bias, and drastic inefficiency.

  12. Predictability sieve, pointer states, and the classicality of quantum trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, D. A. R.; Zurek, W. H.; Dziarmaga, J.

    2005-12-15

    We study various measures of classicality of the states of open quantum systems subject to decoherence. Classical states are expected to be stable in spite of decoherence, and are thought to leave conspicuous imprints on the environment. Here these expected features of environment-induced superselection are quantified using four different criteria: predictability sieve (which selects states that produce least entropy), purification time (which looks for states that are the easiest to find out from the imprint they leave on the environment), efficiency threshold (which finds states that can be deduced from measurements on a smallest fraction of the environment), and purity loss time (that looks for states for which it takes the longest to lose a set fraction of their initial purity). We show that when pointer states--the most predictable states of an open quantum system selected by the predictability sieve--are well defined, all four criteria agree that they are indeed the most classical states. We illustrate this with two examples: an underdamped harmonic oscillator, for which coherent states are unanimously chosen by all criteria, and a free particle undergoing quantum Brownian motion, for which most criteria select almost identical Gaussian states (although, in this case, the predictability sieve does not select well defined pointer states)

  13. 'Einselection' of pointer observables: The new H-theorem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Ruth E.

    2014-11-01

    In attempting to derive irreversible macroscopic thermodynamics from reversible microscopic dynamics, Boltzmann inadvertently smuggled in a premise that assumed the very irreversibility he was trying to prove: 'molecular chaos'. The program of 'einselection' (environmentally induced superselection) within Everettian approaches faces a similar 'Loschmidt's Paradox': the universe, according to the Everettian picture, is a closed system obeying only unitary dynamics, and it therefore contains no distinguishable environmental subsystems with the necessary 'phase randomness' to effect einselection of a pointer observable. The theoretically unjustified assumption of distinguishable environmental subsystems is the hidden premise that makes the derivation of einselection circular. In effect, it presupposes the 'emergent' structures from the beginning. Thus the problem of basis ambiguity remains unsolved in Everettian interpretations.

  14. A Scalable Nonuniform Pointer Analysis for Embedded Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venet, Arnaud

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present a scalable pointer analysis for embedded applications that is able to distinguish between instances of recursively defined data structures and elements of arrays. The main contribution consists of an efficient yet precise algorithm that can handle multithreaded programs. We first perform an inexpensive flow-sensitive analysis of each function in the program that generates semantic equations describing the effect of the function on the memory graph. These equations bear numerical constraints that describe nonuniform points-to relationships. We then iteratively solve these equations in order to obtain an abstract storage graph that describes the shape of data structures at every point of the program for all possible thread interleavings. We bring experimental evidence that this approach is tractable and precise for real-size embedded applications.

  15. Open quantum dots in graphene: Scaling relativistic pointer states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, D. K.; Huang, L.; Yang, R.; Lai, Y.-C.; Akis, R.

    2010-04-01

    Open quantum dots provide a window into the connection between quantum and classical physics, particularly through the decoherence theory, in which an important set of quantum states are not "washed out" through interaction with the environment-the pointer states provide connection to trapped classical orbits which remain stable in the dots. Graphene is a recently discovered material with highly unusual properties. This single layer, one atom thick, sheet of carbon has a unique bandstructure, governed by the Dirac equation, in which charge carriers imitate relativistic particles with zero rest mass. Here, an atomic orbital-based recursive Green's function method is used for studying the quantum transport. We study quantum fluctuations in graphene and bilayer graphene quantum dots with this recursive Green's function method. Finally, we examine the scaling of the domiant fluctuation frequency with dot size.

  16. Weak value beyond conditional expectation value of the pointer readings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidman, Lev; Ben-Israel, Alon; Dziewior, Jan; Knips, Lukas; Weißl, Mira; Meinecke, Jasmin; Schwemmer, Christian; Ber, Ran; Weinfurter, Harald

    2017-09-01

    It is argued that a weak value of an observable is a robust property of a single pre- and postselected quantum system rather than a statistical property. During an infinitesimal time a system with a given weak value affected other systems as if it had been in an eigenstate with eigenvalue equal to the weak value. This differs significantly from the action of a system preselected only and possessing a numerically equal expectation value. The weak value has a physical meaning beyond a conditional average of a pointer in the weak measurement procedure. The difference between the weak value and the expectation value has been demonstrated on the example of photon polarization. In addition, the weak values for systems pre- and postselected in mixed states are considered.

  17. Designing Light Beam Transmittance Measuring Tool Using a Laser Pointer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuroso, H.; Kurniawan, W.; Marwoto, P.

    2016-08-01

    A simple instrument used for measuring light beam transmittance percentage made of window film has been developed. The instrument uses a laser pointer of 405 nm and 650 nm ±10% as a light source. Its accuracy approaches 80%. Transmittance data was found by comparing the light beam before and after passing the window film. The light intensity measuring unit was deleted by splitting the light source into two beams through a beam splitter. The light beam was changed into resistance by a NORP12 LDR sensor designed at a circuit of voltage divider rule of Khirchoff's laws. This conversion system will produce light beam intensity received by the sensor to become an equal voltage. This voltage will, then, be presented on the computer screen in the form of a real time graph via a 2.0 USB data transfer.

  18. Direct state reconstruction with coupling-deformed pointer observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuanmin; Zhang, Yu-Xiang; Wu, Shengjun

    2016-06-01

    Direct state tomography (DST) using weak measurements has received wide attention. Based on the concept of coupling-deformed pointer observables presented by Zhang et al. [Y.-X. Zhang, S. Wu, and Z.-B. Chen, Phys. Rev. A 93, 032128 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032128], a modified direct state tomography (MDST) is proposed, examined, and compared with other typical state tomography schemes. MDST has exact validity for measurements of any strength. We identify the strength needed to attain the highest efficiency level of MDST by using statistical theory. MDST is much more efficient than DST in the sense that far fewer samples are needed to reach DST's level of reconstruction accuracy. Moreover, MDST has no inherent bias when compared to DST.

  19. Study on the micro-heater geometry in In,2O3 micro electro mechanical systems gas sensor platforms and effects on NO2 gas detecting performances.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo-Seok; Kim, Bum-Joon; Lee, Hoi-Jung; Choi, Jung-Woon; Kim, Si-Dong; Min, Nam-Ki

    2012-02-01

    Micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) platforms for gas sensing devices with the co-planar type micro-heaters were designed, fabricated and its effects on the In2O3 gas sensors were investigated. Micro-heaters in MEMS gas sensor platforms were designed in the four-type heater patterns with different geometries. Electro-thermal characterizations showed that the designed platforms had highly thermal efficiency because the micro hot-plate structures were formed in the diaphragm and the thermal efficiencies were analyzed for all of 16 models and compared with each other, respectively. The designed micro-platforms were fabricated by MEMS process, and Indium oxide (In2O3) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel process and dropped on the MEMS platforms for detecting the noxious oxide gas (NO2) Fabricated micro-platforms had a very low power consumption in the fabricated 16-type models, especially, the minimum power consumption was 41 mW at the operating temperature of 250 degrees C. After experiments on gas sensing characteristics to NO2 gases, fabricated In2O3 gas sensors had almost the same gas sensitivity (Rs) at the operation temperature of 250 degrees C. It is concluded that the micro-heater geometries, pattern shapes and sizes, can be influential on the power consumption of the devices and its gas sensing characteristics.

  20. The pocket laser pointer as a teaching tool in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ursic, C M; Coates, N E; Fischer, R P

    1997-02-01

    The common pen-sized laser pointer can be used during laparoscopic procedures to indicate landmarks on the video screen and facilitate communication between surgeon and the assistants. We describe a simple and inexpensive technique that allows scrubbed members of the surgical team to use the laser pointer without the need to sterilize the instrument.

  1. SSRPT (SSR Pointer Trackeer) for Cassini Mission Operations - A Ground Data Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, E.

    1998-01-01

    Tracking the resources of the two redundant Solid State Recorders (SSR) is a necessary routine for Cassini spacecraft mission operations. Instead of relying on a full-fledged spacecraft hardware/software simulator to track and predict the SSR recording and playback pointer positions, a stand-alone SSR Pointer Tracker tool was developed as part of JPL's Multimission Spacecraft Analysis system.

  2. Effect of diet on hunting performance of English pointers.

    PubMed

    Davenport, G M; Kelley, R L; Altom, E K; Lepine, A J

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the influence of diet on hunting performance of English pointers during the quail-hunting season in southwest Georgia. Twenty-three trained dogs were assigned to two commercially available diets (i.e., Diet A = Eukanuba Premium Performance Formula, The Iams Company, Lewisburg, OH; Diet B = Diamond Premium Adult Dog Food, Diamond Pet Foods, Meta, MO). Results showed that dogs fed Diet A maintained or gained weight and body condition throughout the hunting season while dogs fed Diet B lost body weight and body condition (P < .05). Dogs fed Diet A demonstrated superior hunting performance (P < .05) compared with those fed Diet B based on total finds per hunt and on the number of birds located per hour of hunting. All blood variables were within normal ranges for adult healthy dogs throughout the season. These results imply that diet can affect the overall performance of hunting dogs and should provide useful information to trainers, handlers, and clinicians who are concerned with promoting the best performance and health in hunting dogs and other canine athletes.

  3. Retinal damage induced by mirror-reflected light from a laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Solon; Böhm, Michael R R; Meyer zu Hörste, Melissa; Schmidt, Peter-Fritz

    2015-10-05

    The safety of laser pointers is a major public health issue since class I and II laser pointers are available worldwide and used as toys by children despite several reports cautioning such use. Here we present the first case of retinal injury caused by the laser beam of a toy laser pointer operated by a school boy and directed via the rear-view mirror of a bus into the eye of the driver. This case emphasises the great importance of cautious and appropriate use of low-energy laser pointers. Laser pointers of any class should not be made available to children because they are unlikely to understand the risks of such lasers when using them in play.

  4. An automatic recognition method of pointer instrument based on improved Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li; Fang, Tian; Gao, Xiaoyu

    2015-10-01

    For the automatic recognition of pointer instrument, the method for the automatic recognition of pointer instrument based on improved Hough Transform was proposed in this paper. The automatic recognition of pointer instrument is applied to all kinds of lighting conditions, but the accuracy of it binaryzation will be influenced when the light is too strong or too dark. Therefore, the improved Ostu method was suggested to realize recognition for adaptive thresholding of pointer instrument under all kinds of lighting conditions. On the basis of dial image characteristics, Otsu method is used to get the value of maximum between-cluster variance and initial threshold than analyze its maximum between-cluster variance value to determine the light and shade of the image. When the images are too bright or too dark, the smaller pixels should be given up and then calculate the initial threshold by Otsu method again and again until the best binaryzation image was obtained. Hence, transform the pointer straight line of the binaryzation image to Hough parameter space through improved Hough Transform to determine the position of the pointer straight line by searching the maximum value of arrays of the same angle. Finally, according to angle method, the pointer reading was obtained by the linear relationship for the initial scale and angle of the pointer instrument. Results show that the improved Otsu method make pointer instrument possible to obtained the accuracy binaryzation image even though the light is too bright or too dark , which improves the adaptability of pointer instrument to automatic recognize the light under different conditions. For the pressure gauges with range of 60MPa, the relative error identification reached to 0.005 when use the improved Hough Transform Algorithm.

  5. Fast-Response, Sensitivitive and Low-Powered Chemosensors by Fusing Nanostructured Porous Thin Film and IDEs-Microheater Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhengfei; Xu, Lei; Duan, Guotao; Li, Tie; Zhang, Hongwen; Li, Yue; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yuelin; Cai, Weiping

    2013-04-01

    The chemiresistive thin film gas sensors with fast response, high sensitivity, low power consumption and mass-produced potency, have been expected for practical application. It requires both sensitive materials, especially exquisite nanomaterials, and efficient substrate chip for heating and electrical addressing. However, it is challenging to achieve repeatable microstructures across the films and low power consumption of substrate chip. Here we presented a new sensor structure via the fusion of metal-oxide nanoporous films and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based sensing chip. An interdigital-electrodes (IDEs) and microheater integrated MEMS structure is designed and employed as substrate chip to in-situ fabricate colloidal monolayer template-induced metal-oxide (egg. SnO2) nanoporous sensing films. This fused sensor demonstrates mW-level low power, ultrafast response (~1 s), and parts-per-billion lever detection for ethanol gas. Due to the controllable template strategy and mass-production potential, such micro/nano fused high-performance gas sensors will be next-generation key miniaturized/integrated devices for advanced practical applications.

  6. Fast-response, sensitivitive and low-powered chemosensors by fusing nanostructured porous thin film and IDEs-microheater chip.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhengfei; Xu, Lei; Duan, Guotao; Li, Tie; Zhang, Hongwen; Li, Yue; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yuelin; Cai, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    The chemiresistive thin film gas sensors with fast response, high sensitivity, low power consumption and mass-produced potency, have been expected for practical application. It requires both sensitive materials, especially exquisite nanomaterials, and efficient substrate chip for heating and electrical addressing. However, it is challenging to achieve repeatable microstructures across the films and low power consumption of substrate chip. Here we presented a new sensor structure via the fusion of metal-oxide nanoporous films and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based sensing chip. An interdigital-electrodes (IDEs) and microheater integrated MEMS structure is designed and employed as substrate chip to in-situ fabricate colloidal monolayer template-induced metal-oxide (egg. SnO2) nanoporous sensing films. This fused sensor demonstrates mW-level low power, ultrafast response (~1 s), and parts-per-billion lever detection for ethanol gas. Due to the controllable template strategy and mass-production potential, such micro/nano fused high-performance gas sensors will be next-generation key miniaturized/integrated devices for advanced practical applications.

  7. Fast-Response, Sensitivitive and Low-Powered Chemosensors by Fusing Nanostructured Porous Thin Film and IDEs-Microheater Chip

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhengfei; Xu, Lei; Duan, Guotao; Li, Tie; Zhang, Hongwen; Li, Yue; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yuelin; Cai, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    The chemiresistive thin film gas sensors with fast response, high sensitivity, low power consumption and mass-produced potency, have been expected for practical application. It requires both sensitive materials, especially exquisite nanomaterials, and efficient substrate chip for heating and electrical addressing. However, it is challenging to achieve repeatable microstructures across the films and low power consumption of substrate chip. Here we presented a new sensor structure via the fusion of metal-oxide nanoporous films and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based sensing chip. An interdigital-electrodes (IDEs) and microheater integrated MEMS structure is designed and employed as substrate chip to in-situ fabricate colloidal monolayer template-induced metal-oxide (egg. SnO2) nanoporous sensing films. This fused sensor demonstrates mW-level low power, ultrafast response (~1 s), and parts-per-billion lever detection for ethanol gas. Due to the controllable template strategy and mass-production potential, such micro/nano fused high-performance gas sensors will be next-generation key miniaturized/integrated devices for advanced practical applications. PMID:23591580

  8. Misdirections in slow goal-directed arm movements and pointer-setting tasks.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, J B; Sittig, A C; Denier van der Gon, J J

    1991-01-01

    Information about the direction of the virtual line between two positions in space (directional information) is used in many decision-making and motor tasks. We investigated how accurately directional information is processed by the brain. Subjects performed two types of task. In both tasks they sat at a table. In the first task they had to move their hand slowly and accurately from an initial position 40 cm in from of them to visually presented targets at a distance of 30 cm from the initial position (movement task). We analysed the initial movement direction. In the second task subjects had to position pointers in the direction of the targets as accurately as they could (perceptive task). We found that in the movement task the subjects started the movements to most targets in a direction that deviated consistently from the direction of the straight line between initial position and target position. The maximum deviation ranged from 5-10 degrees for the various subjects. The mean standard deviation was 4 degrees. In the perceptive task the subjects positioned the pointer in similarly deviating directions. Furthermore, we found that the maximum deviation in the pointer direction depended on the length of the pointer: the smaller the pointer, the larger the consistent deviations in the pointer direction. The shortest pointer showed deviations comparable to the deviations found in the movement task. These findings suggest that the deviations in the two tasks stem from the same source.

  9. Coupling-Induced Bipartite Pointer States in Arrays of Electron Billiards: Quantum Darwinism in Action?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, R.; Akis, R.; Ferry, D. K.; Kuchar, F.; Meisels, R.

    2008-07-01

    We discuss a quantum system coupled to the environment, composed of an open array of billiards (dots) in series. Beside pointer states occurring in individual dots, we observe sets of robust states which arise only in the array. We define these new states as bipartite pointer states, since they cannot be described in terms of simple linear combinations of robust single-dot states. The classical existence of bipartite pointer states is confirmed by comparing the quantum-mechanical and classical results. The ability of the robust states to create “offspring” indicates that quantum Darwinism is in action.

  10. Coupling-induced bipartite pointer states in arrays of electron billiards: quantum Darwinism in action?

    PubMed

    Brunner, R; Akis, R; Ferry, D K; Kuchar, F; Meisels, R

    2008-07-11

    We discuss a quantum system coupled to the environment, composed of an open array of billiards (dots) in series. Beside pointer states occurring in individual dots, we observe sets of robust states which arise only in the array. We define these new states as bipartite pointer states, since they cannot be described in terms of simple linear combinations of robust single-dot states. The classical existence of bipartite pointer states is confirmed by comparing the quantum-mechanical and classical results. The ability of the robust states to create "offspring" indicates that quantum Darwinism is in action.

  11. Thermal macular injury from a 154 mW green laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Maria E; Suelzer, Joseph; Moorthy, Ramana S; Vemuri, Gautam

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of accidental thermal injury due to improper use of a laser pointer obtained outside of the United States. A 13-year-old received a laser pointer as a gift and looked at a reflection of the beam. The patient underwent full ophthalmologic examination with fundus photography, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and fluorescein angiography. Visual acuity in the left eye was 20/100 at presentation. Fundus examination and ancillary tests were consistent with thermal macular injury. The laser pointer was analyzed and found to be a green diode laser with average power output of 154 mW.

  12. Demonstration of a Balloon Borne Arc-Second Pointer Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWeese, Keith D.; Ward, Philip R.

    2006-01-01

    Many designs for utilizing stratospheric balloons as low-cost platforms on which to conduct space science experiments have been proposed throughout the years. A major hurdle in extending the range of experiments for which these vehicles are useful has been the imposition of the gondola dynamics on the accuracy with which an instrument can be kept pointed at a celestial target. A significant number of scientists have sought the ability to point their instruments with jitter in the arc-second range. This paper presents the design and analysis of a stratospheric balloon borne pointing system that is able to meet this requirement. The test results of a demonstration prototype of the design with similar ability are also presented. Discussion of a high fidelity controller simulation for design analysis is presented. The flexibility of the flight train is represented through generalized modal analysis. A multiple controller scheme is utilized for coarse and fine pointing. Coarse azimuth pointing is accomplished by an established pointing system, with extensive flight history, residing above the gondola structure. A pitch-yaw gimbal mount is used for fine pointing, providing orthogonal axes when nominally on target. Fine pointing actuation is from direct drive dc motors, eliminating backlash problems. An analysis of friction nonlinearities and a demonstration of the necessity in eliminating static friction are provided. A unique bearing hub design is introduced that eliminates static friction from the system dynamics. A control scheme involving linear accelerometers for enhanced disturbance rejection is also presented. Results from a linear analysis of the total system and the high fidelity simulation are given. Results from a generalized demonstration prototype are presented. Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware was used to demonstrate the efficacy and performance of the pointer design for a mock instrument. Sub-arcsecond pointing ability from a ground hang test setup

  13. The Measurement of the Speed of Light Using a Laser Pointer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Se-yuen; Yip, Din-yan

    2000-01-01

    Presents a method for measuring the speed of light using a laser pointer with adjustable focus as the signal carrier, a signal generator to modulate the light beam, and a student oscilloscope to detect the phase shift. (Author/CCM)

  14. The Measurement of the Speed of Light Using a Laser Pointer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Se-yuen; Yip, Din-yan

    2000-01-01

    Presents a method for measuring the speed of light using a laser pointer with adjustable focus as the signal carrier, a signal generator to modulate the light beam, and a student oscilloscope to detect the phase shift. (Author/CCM)

  15. Pointers, Lessons Learned, and Rules of Thumb for Successful Vibro-Acoustic Data Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossoni, Peter

    1998-01-01

    This presentation contains helpful pointers for successful vibroacoustic data acquisition in the following three areas: Instrumentation, Vibration Control and Pyro-shock data acquisition and analysis. A helpful bibliography is provided.

  16. Retinal Damage from Laser Pointer Misuse – Case Series from the Military Sector in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Radha; Bialasiewicz, Alexander A; Bandara, Asoka; Isaac, Roshini

    2015-01-01

    Laser pointers are practical and safe training tools when used properly. If used incorrectly they can cause ocular damage, potentially resulting in devastating vision loss. The ocular and visual morbidity can result in significant expenses for medical care and inability to work (temporarily or permanently) for civilians and military personnel. We present three cases of soldiers who experienced vision loss following exposure to laser pointers, while celebrating successfull football game. PMID:26180486

  17. Retinal Damage from Laser Pointer Misuse - Case Series from the Military Sector in Oman.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Radha; Bialasiewicz, Alexander A; Bandara, Asoka; Isaac, Roshini

    2015-01-01

    Laser pointers are practical and safe training tools when used properly. If used incorrectly they can cause ocular damage, potentially resulting in devastating vision loss. The ocular and visual morbidity can result in significant expenses for medical care and inability to work (temporarily or permanently) for civilians and military personnel. We present three cases of soldiers who experienced vision loss following exposure to laser pointers, while celebrating successful football game.

  18. A sequence-based analysis of the pointer distribution of stichotrichous ciliates.

    PubMed

    Verlan, Sergey; Alhazov, Artiom; Petre, Ion

    2010-08-01

    Micronuclear genes in stichotrichous ciliates are broken into blocks separated by noncoding sequences, sometimes with the blocks in a shuffled order, some even inverted. During reproduction, all blocks are assembled in the correct order and orientation. This process is possible due to the special structure of micronuclear genes: each coding block M ends with a short nucleotide sequence (called pointer) that is repeated at the beginning of the coding block that should follow M in the assembled gene. Many of the pointers have multiple occurrences along both strands of the gene. This yields a very high number of pointer-induced possible divisions into coding and noncoding blocks. We investigate the distribution of pointers for all currently sequenced micronuclear ciliate genes with the goal of identifying what distinguishes the real gene structure among all possible coding/noncoding divisions. We find a sharp criterion in the average a/t-content of the noncoding blocks: the real division has, in most cases, the maximum such content among all possible combinations. Even for pointers as short as two nucleotides, the real division is one of very few with an average a/t-content of its noncoding blocks over 80%. The separation is most clear when the loci of pointers of up to four nucleotides (even three in the case of unscrambled genes) are fixed (e.g., through a template-based recombination mechanism).

  19. Maculopathy following exposure to visible and infrared radiation from a laser pointer: a clinical case study.

    PubMed

    Hanson, James V M; Sromicki, Julian; Mangold, Mario; Golling, Matthias; Gerth-Kahlert, Christina

    2016-04-01

    Laser pointer devices have become increasingly available in recent years, and their misuse has caused a number of ocular injuries. Online distribution channels permit trade in devices which may not conform to international standards in terms of their output power and spectral content. We present a case study of ocular injury caused by one such device. The patient was examined approximately 9 months following laser exposure using full-field and multifocal electroretinography (ERG and MF-ERG), electrooculography (EOG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT), in addition to a full ophthalmological examination. MF-ERG, OCT, and the ophthalmological examination were repeated 7 months after the first examination. The output of the laser pointer was measured. Despite severe focal damage to the central retina visible fundoscopically and with OCT, all electrophysiological examinations were quantitatively normal; however, qualitatively the central responses of the MF-ERG appeared slightly reduced. When the MF-ERG was repeated 7 months later, all findings were normal. The laser pointer was found to emit both visible and infrared radiation in dangerous amounts. Loss of retinal function following laser pointer injury may not always be detectable using standard electrophysiological tests. Exposure to non-visible radiation should be considered as a possible aggravating factor when assessing cases of alleged laser pointer injury.

  20. SD-OCT features of laser pointer maculopathy before and after systemic corticosteroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Mohammad; Bonyadi, Jabbarpour; Soheilian, Roham; Soheilian, Masoud; Peyman, Gholam A

    2011-12-16

    The authors report spectral-domain optical coherence tomography findings of laser pointer-induced maculopathy in a 25-year-old man after accidental laser pointer exposure of less than 1 second. The Class 3R laser pointer (output wavelength 532 nm and output power 3.5 to 4.5 mW [continuous wave]) had U.S. Food and Drug Administration certification. One day after exposure, he had visual blurring and metamorphopsia of his right eye. He was treated with a systemic high-dose corticosteroid. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography disclosed a hyperreflective band in the foveal region. After 1 week of treatment, disappearance of hyperreflectivity was observed on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. At 6 months, residual disruption of the outer retinal layer at the fovea remained unchanged. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography was a useful and sensitive tool for evaluating retinal damage and subsequent resolution after treatment.

  1. Photoblepharokeratoconjunctivitis caused by invisible infrared radiation emitted from a green laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Yahya A H; Khedr, Abdulla H

    2014-03-11

    There are a wide variety of laser pointers sold to the general public. Among those are the high-powered diode-pumped solid-state lasers (>5 mW), which do not follow the laser safety regulations for packing, and are sold as regular lasers without the infrared (IR) filters. In this case report, we encountered a patient with photoblepharokeratoconjunctivitis caused by the invisible IR radiations emitted from a green laser pointer. Owing to the thermal effect of the invisible IR rays led to the disease.

  2. Arc-Second Pointer for Balloon-Borne Astronomical Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Philip R.; DeWeese, Keith

    2004-01-01

    A control system has been designed to keep a balloon-borne scientific instrument pointed toward a celestial object within an angular error of the order of an arc second. The design is intended to be adaptable to a large range of instrument payloads. The initial payload to which the design nominally applies is considered to be a telescope, modeled as a simple thin-walled cylinder 24 ft (approx.= 7.3 m) long, 3 ft (approx.= 0.91 m) in diameter, weighing 1,500 lb (having a mass of .680 kg). The instrument would be mounted on a set of motor-driven gimbals in pitch-yaw configuration. The motors on the gimbals would apply the control torques needed for fine adjustments of the instrument in pitch and yaw. The pitch-yaw mount would, in turn, be suspended from a motor mount at the lower end of a pair of cables hanging down from the balloon (see figure). The motor in this mount would be used to effect coarse azimuth control of the pitch-yaw mount. A notable innovation incorporated in the design is a provision for keeping the gimbal bearings in constant motion. This innovation would eliminate the deleterious effects of static friction . something that must be done in order to achieve the desired arc-second precision. Another notable innovation is the use of linear accelerometers to provide feedback that would facilitate the early detection and counteraction of disturbance torques before they could integrate into significant angular-velocity and angular-position errors. The control software processing the sensor data would be capable of distinguishing between translational and rotational accelerations. The output of the accelerometers is combined with that of angular position and angular-velocity sensors into a proportional + integral + derivative + acceleration control law for the pitch and yaw torque motors. Preliminary calculations have shown that with appropriate gains, the power demand of the control system would be low enough to be satisfiable by means of storage

  3. Using Local Perturbations To Manipulate and Control Pointer States in Quantum Dot Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akis, Richard; Speyer, Gil; Ferry, David; Brunner, Roland

    2012-02-01

    Recently, scanning gate microscopy (SGM) was used to image scarred wave functions in an open InAs quantum dot[1]. The SGM tip provides a local potential perturbation and imaging is performed by measuring changes in conductance. Scarred wave functions, long associated with quantum chaos, have been shown in open dots to correspond to pointer states[2], eigenstates that survive the decoherence process that occurs via coupling to the environment. Pointer states modulate the conductance, yielding periodic fluctuations and the scars, normally thought unstable, are stabilized by quantum Darwinism [3]. We shall show that, beyond probing, pointer states can be manipulated by local perturbations. Particularly interesting effects occur in coupled quantum dot arrays, where a pointer state localized in one dot can be shifted over into another with a perturbation in a completely different part of the system. These nonlocal effects may perhaps be exploited to give such systems an exotic functionality. [1] A. M. Burke, R. Akis, T. E. Day, Gil Speyer, D. K. Ferry, and B. R. Bennett, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 176801 (2010). [2] D. K. Ferry, R. Akis, and J. P. Bird, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 176801 (2004). [3] R. Brunner, R. Akis,D. K. Ferry, F. Kuchar,and R. Meisels, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 024102 (2008).

  4. Pointer Animation Implementation at Development of Multimedia Learning of Java Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusli, Muhammad; Atmojo, Yohanes Priyo

    2015-01-01

    This research represents the development research using the references of previous research results related to the development of interactive multimedia learning (learner controlled), specially about the effectiveness and efficiency of multimedia learning of a content that developed by pointer animation implementation showing the content in…

  5. A Laser-Pointer-Based Spectrometer for Endpoint Detection of EDTA Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahm, Christopher E.; Hall, James W.; Mattioni, Brian E.

    2004-01-01

    A laser spectrometer for the ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) titration of magnesium or calcium ions that is designed around a handheld laser pointer as the source and a photoresistor as the detector is developed. Findings show that the use of the spectrometer reduces the degree of uncertainty and error in one part of the EDTA titrations,…

  6. Sport Instruction for Individuals with Disabilities. The Best of Practical Pointers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, Reston, VA.

    This book, written for teachers by teachers, includes articles by 14 contributing authors and is divided into three sections. Section 1 is entitled "Practical Pointers for Team Sports" and contains the following chapters: "Mainstreaming the Physically Handicapped for Team Sports" (S. J. Grosse); "Program Guide to Team…

  7. Laser Pointers: Low-Cost, Low-Tech Innovative, Interactive Instruction Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovska, Nevenka; Cech, Maureen; Beygo, Pinar; Kackley, Bob

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of laser pointers at the Engineering and Physical Sciences Library, University of Maryland, College Park, as a personal response system (PRS) tool to encourage student engagement in and interactivity with one-shot, lecture-based information literacy sessions. Unlike more sophisticated personal response systems like…

  8. Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Gaseous [I[subscript]2] Excited with a Green Laser Pointer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2007-01-01

    A green laser pointer could be used in a flashy demonstration of laser-induced fluorescence in the gas phase by directing the beam of the laser through a cell containing [I[subscript]2] at its room temperature vapor pressure. The experiment could be used to provide valuable insight into the requirements for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and the…

  9. Remote support for emergency medicine using a remote-control laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shoichi; Kuzuoka, Hideaki; Noda, Mariko; Sasaki, Hirokazu; Mishima, Shiro; Fujikawa, Tadashi; Yukioka, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a laser pointing system, the GestureLaser, which allows a remote operator to control a videocamera and a laser beam via a networked personal computer. The laser spot can be moved by the mouse cursor controlled by the remote instructor. The system was tested by giving remote instruction in thoracentesis to inexperienced operators using a training mannekin. Seven medical students received instructions using the laser pointer and another seven received instruction without the laser pointer. All operators completed the task correctly. The laser pointer group correctly identified the centesis space and performed the task on the first trial. When the laser pointer was not used, four operators (57%) made a mistake in selecting the centesis space at the first trial. The mean times for both stage 1--verbal versus GestureLaser 59 s (SD 13) versus 44 s (SD 5), p = 0.015 - and stage 2--verbal versus GestureLaser 98 s (SD 20) versus 64 s (SD 7), P = 0.002 - were significantly shorter when the GestureLaser was used. The study shows that the laser pointing system can be used to remotely instruct a novice operator in performing thoracentesis. It could improve collaboration between geographically separated sites.

  10. The Trainee Teacher and His Practice Class. Fifty Pointers for the Student-Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Alun L. W.

    1969-01-01

    This handbook, based on the author's experience of supervising the English practice-classes of trainee teachers, was originally compiled for the specific use of students at the National University of Trujillo, Peru, and consists of a list of pointers embracing the most prevalent of trainees' shortcomings observed over a period of years at all…

  11. Laser Pointers: Low-Cost, Low-Tech Innovative, Interactive Instruction Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovska, Nevenka; Cech, Maureen; Beygo, Pinar; Kackley, Bob

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of laser pointers at the Engineering and Physical Sciences Library, University of Maryland, College Park, as a personal response system (PRS) tool to encourage student engagement in and interactivity with one-shot, lecture-based information literacy sessions. Unlike more sophisticated personal response systems like…

  12. Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Gaseous [I[subscript]2] Excited with a Green Laser Pointer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2007-01-01

    A green laser pointer could be used in a flashy demonstration of laser-induced fluorescence in the gas phase by directing the beam of the laser through a cell containing [I[subscript]2] at its room temperature vapor pressure. The experiment could be used to provide valuable insight into the requirements for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and the…

  13. A Laser-Pointer-Based Spectrometer for Endpoint Detection of EDTA Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahm, Christopher E.; Hall, James W.; Mattioni, Brian E.

    2004-01-01

    A laser spectrometer for the ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) titration of magnesium or calcium ions that is designed around a handheld laser pointer as the source and a photoresistor as the detector is developed. Findings show that the use of the spectrometer reduces the degree of uncertainty and error in one part of the EDTA titrations,…

  14. VIEWCACHE: An incremental pointer-based access method for autonomous interoperable databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, N.; Sellis, Timos

    1993-01-01

    One of the biggest problems facing NASA today is to provide scientists efficient access to a large number of distributed databases. Our pointer-based incremental data base access method, VIEWCACHE, provides such an interface for accessing distributed datasets and directories. VIEWCACHE allows database browsing and search performing inter-database cross-referencing with no actual data movement between database sites. This organization and processing is especially suitable for managing Astrophysics databases which are physically distributed all over the world. Once the search is complete, the set of collected pointers pointing to the desired data are cached. VIEWCACHE includes spatial access methods for accessing image datasets, which provide much easier query formulation by referring directly to the image and very efficient search for objects contained within a two-dimensional window. We will develop and optimize a VIEWCACHE External Gateway Access to database management systems to facilitate database search.

  15. VIEWCACHE: An incremental pointer-based access method for autonomous interoperable databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, N.; Sellis, Timos

    1992-01-01

    One of biggest problems facing NASA today is to provide scientists efficient access to a large number of distributed databases. Our pointer-based incremental database access method, VIEWCACHE, provides such an interface for accessing distributed data sets and directories. VIEWCACHE allows database browsing and search performing inter-database cross-referencing with no actual data movement between database sites. This organization and processing is especially suitable for managing Astrophysics databases which are physically distributed all over the world. Once the search is complete, the set of collected pointers pointing to the desired data are cached. VIEWCACHE includes spatial access methods for accessing image data sets, which provide much easier query formulation by referring directly to the image and very efficient search for objects contained within a two-dimensional window. We will develop and optimize a VIEWCACHE External Gateway Access to database management systems to facilitate distributed database search.

  16. VIEWCACHE: An incremental pointer-based access method for autonomous interoperable databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, N.; Sellis, Timos

    1993-01-01

    One of the biggest problems facing NASA today is to provide scientists efficient access to a large number of distributed databases. Our pointer-based incremental data base access method, VIEWCACHE, provides such an interface for accessing distributed datasets and directories. VIEWCACHE allows database browsing and search performing inter-database cross-referencing with no actual data movement between database sites. This organization and processing is especially suitable for managing Astrophysics databases which are physically distributed all over the world. Once the search is complete, the set of collected pointers pointing to the desired data are cached. VIEWCACHE includes spatial access methods for accessing image datasets, which provide much easier query formulation by referring directly to the image and very efficient search for objects contained within a two-dimensional window. We will develop and optimize a VIEWCACHE External Gateway Access to database management systems to facilitate database search.

  17. VIEWCACHE: An incremental pointer-based access method for autonomous interoperable databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, N.; Sellis, Timos

    1992-01-01

    One of biggest problems facing NASA today is to provide scientists efficient access to a large number of distributed databases. Our pointer-based incremental database access method, VIEWCACHE, provides such an interface for accessing distributed data sets and directories. VIEWCACHE allows database browsing and search performing inter-database cross-referencing with no actual data movement between database sites. This organization and processing is especially suitable for managing Astrophysics databases which are physically distributed all over the world. Once the search is complete, the set of collected pointers pointing to the desired data are cached. VIEWCACHE includes spatial access methods for accessing image data sets, which provide much easier query formulation by referring directly to the image and very efficient search for objects contained within a two-dimensional window. We will develop and optimize a VIEWCACHE External Gateway Access to database management systems to facilitate distributed database search.

  18. Early changes in optic coherence tomography in a child with laser pointer maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Barahona, C; González-Martín-Moro, J; Zarallo-Gallardo, J; Lozano Escobar, I; Cobo-Soriano, R

    2017-01-01

    A 9-year-old boy referred due to visual loss in his right eye after playing with a laser pointer. In the first visit (12hours later) visual acuity (VA) was 0.15. A hypopigmented lesion was present in the fovea, and optic coherence tomography (OCT) showed vertical hyper-reflective bands. In the last visit (6 months later), VA had improved to 0.5, and OCT showed a well-defined area of outer retinal layer disruption. An inadequate use of laser pointers can induce severe and permanent visual loss. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Certified Absence of Dangling Pointers in a Language with Explicit Deallocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dios, Javier; Montenegro, Manuel; Peña, Ricardo

    Safe is a first-order eager functional language with facilities for programmer controlled destruction of data structures. It provides also regions, i.e. disjoint parts of the heap, where the program allocates data structures, so that the runtime system does not need a garbage collector. A region is a collection of cells, each one big enough to allocate a data constructor. Deallocating cells or regions may create dangling pointers. The language is aimed at inferring and certifying memory safety properties in a Proof Carrying Code like environment. Some of its analyses have been presented elsewhere. The one relevant to this paper is a type system and a type inference algorithm guaranteeing that well-typed programs will be free of dangling pointers at runtime.

  20. Capillary-driven microfluidic chips with evaporation-induced flow control and dielectrophoretic microbead trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temiz, Yuksel; Skorucak, Jelena; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2014-03-01

    This work reports our efforts on developing simple-to-use microfluidic devices for point-of-care diagnostic applications with recent extensions that include the trapping of microbeads using dielectrophoresis (DEP) and the modulation of capillary-driven flow using integrated microheaters. DEP serves the purpose of trapping microbeads coated with receptors and analytes for detection of a fluorescent signal. The microheater is actuated once the chip is filled by capillarity, creating an evaporation-induced flow tuned according to assay conditions. The chips are composed of a glass substrate patterned with 50-nm-thick Pd electrodes and microfluidic structures made using a 20-μm-thick dry-film resist (DFR). Chips are covered/sealed by low-temperature (50 °C) lamination of a 50-μm-thick DFR layer having excellent optical and mechanical properties. To separate cleaned and sealed chips from the wafer, we used an effective chip singulation technique that we informally call the "chip-olate" process. In the experimental section, we first studied dielectrophoretic trapping of 10 μm beads for flow rates ranging from 80 pL s-1 to 2.5 nL s-1 and that are generated by an external syringe pump. Then, we characterized the embedded microheater in DFR-covered chips. Flow rates as high as 8 nL s-1 were generated by evaporation-induced flow when the heater was biased by 10 V, corresponding to 270 mW power. Finally, DEP-based trapping and fluorescent detection of functionalized beads were demonstrated as the flow was generated by the combination of capillary filling and evaporation-induced flow.

  1. Student Perceptions of the Use of a Laser Pointer for Intra-Operative Guidance in Feline Castration.

    PubMed

    Badman, Märit; Höglund, Katja; Höglund, Odd V

    2016-01-01

    In veterinary clinical education, students perform surgery under guided supervision. This study aimed to determine if students' perception of how well they understood verbal guidance could be improved by using a laser pointer during feline castration. It was assumed that a teacher's use of a laser pointer could help students identify structures of importance during surgery. The hypothesis was that use of a laser pointer would improve student understanding of verbal guidance during surgery. Eighteen privately owned male cats were electively neutered by fourth- and fifth-year veterinary students at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. Each student performed orchiectomy on one cat. One testis was removed while the student received verbal guidance combined with a laser pointer, and the other testis was removed while the student received only verbal guidance. The use of a laser pointer alternated between first and second testis. After surgery, students rated how well they understood verbal guidance on a visual-analog scale (100 mm) for each instructional method. The two ratings were compared in a student's two-sided t-test. The median score with or without guidance with a laser pointer was 81 (59-96) and 54 (25-86), respectively (p<.001). This study showed that laser pointers enhanced verbal guidance given to students during surgery. The suggested mechanism of explanation is that the technology enabled a more precise guidance of location and identification of anatomic structures.

  2. Implementing MPI-IO atomic mode and shared file pointers using MPI one-sided communication.

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, R.; Ross, R.; Thakur, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2007-07-01

    The ROMIO implementation of the MPI-IO standard provides a portable infrastructure for use on top of a variety of underlying storage targets. These targets vary widely in their capabilities, and in some cases additional effort is needed within ROMIO to support all MPI-IO semantics. Two aspects of the interface that can be problematic to implement are MPI-IO atomic mode and the shared file pointer access routines. Atomic mode requires enforcing strict consistency semantics, and shared file pointer routines require communication and coordination in order to atomically update a shared resource. For some file systems, native locks may be used to implement these features, but not all file systems have lock support. In this work, we describe algorithms for implementing efficient mutex locks using MPI-1 and the one-sided capabilities from MPI-2. We then show how these algorithms may be used to implement both MPI-IO atomic mode and shared file pointer methods for ROMIO without requiring any features from the underlying file system. We show that these algorithms can outperform traditional file system lock approaches. Because of the portable nature of these algorithms, they are likely useful in a variety of situations where distributed locking or coordination is needed in the MPI-2 environment.

  3. Nanowire-Assembled Hierarchical ZnCo2O4 Microstructure Integrated with a Low-Power Microheater for Highly Sensitive Formaldehyde Detection.

    PubMed

    Long, Hu; Harley-Trochimczyk, Anna; Cheng, Siyi; Hu, Hao; Chi, Won Seok; Rao, Ameya; Carraro, Carlo; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong; Maboudian, Roya

    2016-11-23

    Nanowire-assembled 3D hierarchical ZnCo2O4 microstructure is synthesized by a facile hydrothermal route and a subsequent annealing process. In comparison to simple nanowires, the resulting dandelion-like structure yields more open spaces between nanowires, which allow for better gas diffusion and provide more active sites for gas adsorption while maintaining good electrical conductivity. The hierarchical ZnCo2O4 microstructure is integrated on a low-power microheater platform without using binders or conductive additives. The hierarchical structure of the ZnCo2O4 sensing material provides reliable electrical connection across the sensing electrodes. The resulting sensor exhibits an ultralow detection limit of 3 ppb toward formaldehyde with fast response and recovery as well as good selectivity to CO, H2, and hydrocarbons such as n-pentane, propane, and CH4. The sensor only consumes ∼5.7 mW for continuous operation at 300 °C with good long-term stability. The excellent sensing performance of this hierarchical structure based sensor suggests the advantages of combining such structures with microfabricated heaters for practical low-power sensing applications.

  4. SEQ-POINTER: Next generation, planetary spacecraft remote sensing science observation design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, Jeffrey S.

    1994-01-01

    Since Mariner, NASA-JPL planetary missions have been supported by ground software to plan and design remote sensing science observations. The software used by the science and sequence designers to plan and design observations has evolved with mission and technological advances. The original program, PEGASIS (Mariners 4, 6, and 7), was re-engineered as POGASIS (Mariner 9, Viking, and Mariner 10), and again later as POINTER (Voyager and Galileo). Each of these programs were developed under technological, political, and fiscal constraints which limited their adaptability to other missions and spacecraft designs. Implementation of a multi-mission tool, SEQ POINTER, under the auspices of the JPL Multimission Operations Systems Office (MOSO) is in progress. This version has been designed to address the limitations experienced on previous versions as they were being adapted to a new mission and spacecraft. The tool has been modularly designed with subroutine interface structures to support interchangeable celestial body and spacecraft definition models. The computational and graphics modules have also been designed to interface with data collected from previous spacecraft, or on-going observations, which describe the surface of each target body. These enhancements make SEQ POINTER a candidate for low-cost mission usage, when a remote sensing science observation design capability is required. The current and planned capabilities of the tool will be discussed. The presentation will also include a 5-10 minute video presentation demonstrating the capabilities of a proto-Cassini Project version that was adapted to test the tool. The work described in this abstract was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. Making transmission and reflection holograms using 650 nm laser diode from laser pointer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, Alexander; Brown, Eric; Martinez, Tracy; Panin, Dmitry

    2003-10-01

    We have made both transmission and reflection holograms using inexpensive set-up with a 5 mW, 650-nm diode InGaAlP laser (similar to lasers used in common red laser pointers and DVD players). The reflection holograms can be viewed both with laser sourses of light and with non-coherent moderately collimated natural sources (like Sun or light bulb). In the transmission holograms viewed with laser both real and virtual images can be seen. Our paper presents the description of experimental set-up of exposure and development techniques, and the discussion of controversial coherence length issue of laser diodes as it applies to holograms.

  6. Simplified algebraic description of weak measurements with Hermite-Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian pointer states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio; Azevedo, Sérgio; Rosas, Alexandre

    2014-11-01

    Weak measurements are recognized as a very powerful tool in measuring tiny effects that are perpendicular to the propagation direction of a light beam. In this paper, we develop a simple algebraic description of the weak measurement protocol for both Laguerre-Gaussian and Hermite-Gaussian pointer states in the Schrödinger representation. Since a novel class of position and momentum expectation values could be derived, the present scenario appeared to be very efficient and insightful when compared to analytical methods.

  7. Gyroscope-Driven Mouse Pointer with an EMOTIV® EEG Headset and Data Analysis Based on Empirical Mode Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Cholula, Gerardo; Ramirez-Cortes, Juan Manuel; Alarcon-Aquino, Vicente; Gomez-Gil, Pilar; Rangel-Magdaleno, Jose de Jesus; Reyes-Garcia, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a project on the development of a cursor control emulating the typical operations of a computer-mouse, using gyroscope and eye-blinking electromyographic signals which are obtained through a commercial 16-electrode wireless headset, recently released by Emotiv. The cursor position is controlled using information from a gyroscope included in the headset. The clicks are generated through the user's blinking with an adequate detection procedure based on the spectral-like technique called Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). EMD is proposed as a simple and quick computational tool, yet effective, aimed to artifact reduction from head movements as well as a method to detect blinking signals for mouse control. Kalman filter is used as state estimator for mouse position control and jitter removal. The detection rate obtained in average was 94.9%. Experimental setup and some obtained results are presented. PMID:23948873

  8. Gyroscope-driven mouse pointer with an EMOTIV® EEG headset and data analysis based on Empirical Mode Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Cholula, Gerardo; Ramirez-Cortes, Juan Manuel; Alarcon-Aquino, Vicente; Gomez-Gil, Pilar; Rangel-Magdaleno, Jose de Jesus; Reyes-Garcia, Carlos

    2013-08-14

    This paper presents a project on the development of a cursor control emulating the typical operations of a computer-mouse, using gyroscope and eye-blinking electromyographic signals which are obtained through a commercial 16-electrode wireless headset, recently released by Emotiv. The cursor position is controlled using information from a gyroscope included in the headset. The clicks are generated through the user's blinking with an adequate detection procedure based on the spectral-like technique called Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). EMD is proposed as a simple and quick computational tool, yet effective, aimed to artifact reduction from head movements as well as a method to detect blinking signals for mouse control. Kalman filter is used as state estimator for mouse position control and jitter removal. The detection rate obtained in average was 94.9%. Experimental setup and some obtained results are presented.

  9. Controlling mouse pointer position using an infrared head-operated joystick.

    PubMed

    Evans, D G; Drew, R; Blenkhorn, P

    2000-03-01

    This paper describes the motivation for and the design considerations of a low-cost head-operated joystick. The paper briefly summarizes the requirements of head-operated mouse pointer control for people with disabilities before discussing a set of technological approaches that can be used to satisfy these requirements. The paper focuses on the design of a head-operated joystick that uses infrared light emitting diodes (LED's) and photodetectors to determine head position, which is subsequently converted into signals that emulate a Microsoft mouse. There are two significant findings. The first is that, while nonideal device characteristics might appear to make the joystick difficult to use, users naturally compensate for nonlinearities, in a transparent manner, because of visual feedback of mouse pointer position. The second finding, from relatively informal, independent trials, indicates that disabled users prefer a head-operated device that has the characteristics of a joystick (a relative pointing device) to those of a mouse (an absolute pointing device).

  10. Fluid Flow Processes Study: from a 3D seismic data set in the Pointer Ridge offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei-Chung; Liu, Char-Shine; Chen, Liwen; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lin, Che-Chuan

    2016-04-01

    This study analyzes a 3D seismic cube in the Pointer Ridge for understanding the fluid flow processes in subsurface. Pointer Ridge is a ridge situated on the passive China continental margin and is suggested as a potential prospect for future gas hydrate development. High methane flux rate, active gas venting and seismic chimneys have been observed in this area, which are direct evidences for active ongoing fluid migration processes. To find the possible fluid conduits and to understand how the fluids have migrated along those conduits, we firstly identify the structural and sedimentary features from this 3D seismic cube in our study area. Secondly, seismic attribute analyses are carried out for detecting fluid conduits and evaluating the contribution of recognized faults/fractures for fluid flow, respectively. Finally, we propose conceptual models to illustrate how fluids have migrated along those conduits to the seafloor and how those conduits have developed. The results show: 1) a major NE-SW striking normal fault (PR Fault) separates a depositional field on the hanging wall and a erosional field on the footwall; 2) the PR Fault zone itself and the chimneys in its footwall act as main conduits for focused fluid flow migrating to the seafloor; 3) the development of the chimneys in the Pointer Ridge area are highly controlled by the erosion and deposition processes. Since the ongoing fluid flow processes will increase the seafloor instabilities and the Pointer Ridge is a gas hydrate leaking site, our results could provide useful information for further risk evaluation.

  11. Peace and Conflict Research in the Age of the Cholera: Ten Pointers to the Future of Peace Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galtung, Johan

    1996-01-01

    Presents 10 pointers that can lead to constructive peace making. Covers issues such as a definition of peace; the training of peace workers; the role of the state system in creating conflict; legitimizing peace actions; and suggestions for future peace creation. Discusses the links between direct, structural, and cultural violence. (DSK)

  12. Peace and Conflict Research in the Age of the Cholera: Ten Pointers to the Future of Peace Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galtung, Johan

    1996-01-01

    Presents 10 pointers that can lead to constructive peace making. Covers issues such as a definition of peace; the training of peace workers; the role of the state system in creating conflict; legitimizing peace actions; and suggestions for future peace creation. Discusses the links between direct, structural, and cultural violence. (DSK)

  13. Analogue mouse pointer control via an online steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John J.; Palaniappan, Ramaswamy

    2011-04-01

    The steady state visual evoked protocol has recently become a popular paradigm in brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. Typically (regardless of function) these applications offer the user a binary selection of targets that perform correspondingly discrete actions. Such discrete control systems are appropriate for applications that are inherently isolated in nature, such as selecting numbers from a keypad to be dialled or letters from an alphabet to be spelled. However motivation exists for users to employ proportional control methods in intrinsically analogue tasks such as the movement of a mouse pointer. This paper introduces an online BCI in which control of a mouse pointer is directly proportional to a user's intent. Performance is measured over a series of pointer movement tasks and compared to the traditional discrete output approach. Analogue control allowed subjects to move the pointer faster to the cued target location compared to discrete output but suffers more undesired movements overall. Best performance is achieved when combining the threshold to movement of traditional discrete techniques with the range of movement offered by proportional control.

  14. Green laser pointers for visual astronomy: how much power is enough?

    PubMed

    Bará, Salvador; Robles, Marisol; Tejelo, Isabel; Marzoa, Ramón I; González, Héctor

    2010-02-01

    Green laser pointers with output powers in the tens to hundreds of milliwatt (mW) range, clearly exceeding the limiting 5 mW of American National Standards Institute class 3a (International Electrotechnical Commission class 3R), are now easily available in the global market. They are increasingly being used in public sky observations and other nighttime outreach activities by educators and science communicators in countries where their use is not well regulated, despite the fact that such high power levels may represent a potential threat to visual health. The purpose of this study was to determine the output power reasonably required to perform satisfactorily this kind of activities. Twenty-three observers were asked to vary continuously the output power of a green laser source (wavelength 532 nm) until clearly seeing the laser beam propagating skyward through the atmosphere in a heavily light-polluted urban setting. Measurements were conducted with observers of a wide range of ages (9 to 56 years), refractions (spherical equivalents -8.50 to +1.50 diopters), and previous expertise in using lasers as pointing devices outdoors (from no experience to professional astronomers). Two measurement runs were made in different nights under different meteorological conditions. The output power chosen by observers in the first run (11 observers) averaged to 1.84 mW (+/-0.68 mW, 1 SD). The second run (17 observers) averaged to 2.91 mW (+/-1.54 mW). The global average was 2.38 mW (+/-1.30 mW). Only one observer scored 5.6 mW, just above the class 3a limit. The power chosen by the remaining 22 observers ranged from 1.37 to 3.53 mW. Green laser pointers with output powers below 5 mW (laser classes American National Standards Institute 3a or International Electrotechnical Commission 3R) appear to be sufficient for use in educational nighttime outdoors activities, providing enough bright beams at reasonable safety levels.

  15. Porcupine quill migration in the thoracic cavity of a German shorthaired pointer.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Jose L; Holmes, Elaine S; Reetz, Jennifer; Holt, David E

    2015-01-01

    A 7 yr old German shorthaired pointer presented with progressive respiratory distress and lethargy. Two weeks prior to presentation, the dog had porcupine quills removed from the left forepaw, muzzle, and sternal area. At the time of presentation, the dog had bounding pulses and friction rubs in the right dorsal lung field. Harsh lung sounds and decreased lung sounds were ausculted in multiple lung fields. Radiographs revealed a pneumothorax and rounding of the cardiac silhouette suggestive of pericardial effusion. Computed tomographic imaging was performed and revealed multiple porcupine quills in the thoracic cavity. Surgery was performed and quills were found in multiple lung lobes and the heart. Following surgery the dog remained hypotensive. A post-operative echocardiogram revealed multiple curvilinear soft-tissue opacities in the heart. Given the grave prognosis the dog was subsequently euthanized and a postmortem examination was performed. A single porcupine quill was discovered in the left atrium above the mitral valve annulus. The quill extended across the aortic root, impinging on the coronary artery below the level of the aortic valve. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first known report of porcupine quill migration through the heart.

  16. Human sound localization: measurements in untrained, head-unrestrained subjects using gaze as a pointer.

    PubMed

    Populin, Luis C

    2008-09-01

    Studies of sound localization in humans have used various behavioral measures to quantify the observers' perceptions; a non-comprehensive list includes verbal reports, head pointing, gun pointing, stylus pointing, and laser aiming. Comparison of localization performance reveals that in humans, just as in animals, different results are obtained with different experimental tasks. Accordingly, to circumvent problems associated with task selection and training, this study used gaze, an ethologically valid behavior for spatial pointing in species with a specialized area of the fovea, to measure sound localization perception of human subjects. Orienting using gaze as a pointer does not require training, preserves the natural link between perception and action, and allows for direct behavioral comparisons across species. The results revealed, unexpectedly, a large degree of variability across subjects in both accuracy and precision. The magnitude of the average angular localization errors for the most eccentric horizontal targets, however, were very similar to those documented in studies that used head pointing, whereas the magnitude of the localization errors for the frontal targets were considerably larger. In addition, an overall improvement in sound localization in the context of the memory-saccade task, as well as a lack of effect of initial eye and head position on perceived sound location were documented.

  17. A Mobile Robot Operation with Instruction of Neck Movement using Laser Pointer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Satoru; Yamamoto, Tomonori; Jindai, Mitsuru

    A human-robot system in which a mobile robot follows the movement of the laser spot projected on the floor by the laser pointer attached at the human head is considered. Human gives instruction of desired movement to the omni-directional mobile robot by rotating his or her head. The mobile robot can realize intended movement by following the movement of the laser spot on the floor. By projecting an instructive point to be followed by the mobile robot, the user can clearly recognize the relation between the direction being faced and the desired position of the mobile robot. In addition, the user can convey a motion trajectory to the mobile robot continuously. Kansei transfer function is introduced between the instruction movement of the laser spot and following motion of the robot to realize psychologically acceptable motion of the robot. In addition, three modes, stopping mode, following mode, and autonomous motion mode to the target, are considered. The effectiveness of the proposed system was discussed experimentally, and confirmed by the smooth trajectory of the following motion of the mobile robot and good psychological evaluations.

  18. Inner ear histopathology in "nervous Pointer dogs" with severe hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Angélique G; Gilbert-Gregory, Shana; Steinberg, Sheldon A; Heizmann, Claus; Poncelet, Luc

    2005-02-01

    Ten puppy dogs (82, 131 or 148 days-old) from a Pointer cross-colony, exhibiting a juvenile severe hearing loss transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait, were used for histopathological characterization of the inner ear lesion. Immunostaining with calbindin, Na,K-ATPase, cytokeratins, S100, S100A1 and S100A6 antisera were helpful in identifying the different cell types in the degenerated cochleae. Lesions, restricted to the Corti's organ and spiral ganglion, were bilateral but sometimes slightly asymmetrical. Mild to severe lesions of the Corti's organ were unevenly distributed among the different parts of the middle and basal cochlear turns while the apical turn remained unaffected at 148 days. In 82 day-old puppies (n = 2), severe lesions of the Corti's organ, meaning that it was replaced by a layer of unidentifiable cells, involved the lower middle and upper basal turns junction area, extending in the upper basal turn. Mild lesions of the Corti's organ, with both hair and supporting cells abnormalities, involved the lower middle turn and extended from the rest of upper basal turn into the lower basal turn. The outer hair cells (ohc) were more affected than the inner hair cell (ihc). The lesions extended towards the basal end of the cochlea in the 131 (n = 5) and 148 (n = 3) day-old puppies. Additionally, the number of spiral ganglion neurons was reduced in the 131 and 148 day-old puppies; it is earlier than observed in most other canine hereditary deafness. These lesions were interpreted as a degeneration of the neuroepithelial type. This possible animal model might provide information about progressive juvenile hereditary deafness and neuronal retrograde degeneration investigations in human.

  19. Automated sub-5 nm image registration in integrated correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy using cathodoluminescence pointers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haring, Martijn T.; Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Voortman, Lenard M.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2017-03-01

    In the biological sciences, data from fluorescence and electron microscopy is correlated to allow fluorescence biomolecule identification within the cellular ultrastructure and/or ultrastructural analysis following live-cell imaging. High-accuracy (sub-100 nm) image overlay requires the addition of fiducial markers, which makes overlay accuracy dependent on the number of fiducials present in the region of interest. Here, we report an automated method for light-electron image overlay at high accuracy, i.e. below 5 nm. Our method relies on direct visualization of the electron beam position in the fluorescence detection channel using cathodoluminescence pointers. We show that image overlay using cathodoluminescence pointers corrects for image distortions, is independent of user interpretation, and does not require fiducials, allowing image correlation with molecular precision anywhere on a sample.

  20. Automated sub-5 nm image registration in integrated correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy using cathodoluminescence pointers

    PubMed Central

    Haring, Martijn T.; Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Voortman, Lenard M.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2017-01-01

    In the biological sciences, data from fluorescence and electron microscopy is correlated to allow fluorescence biomolecule identification within the cellular ultrastructure and/or ultrastructural analysis following live-cell imaging. High-accuracy (sub-100 nm) image overlay requires the addition of fiducial markers, which makes overlay accuracy dependent on the number of fiducials present in the region of interest. Here, we report an automated method for light-electron image overlay at high accuracy, i.e. below 5 nm. Our method relies on direct visualization of the electron beam position in the fluorescence detection channel using cathodoluminescence pointers. We show that image overlay using cathodoluminescence pointers corrects for image distortions, is independent of user interpretation, and does not require fiducials, allowing image correlation with molecular precision anywhere on a sample. PMID:28252673

  1. Effects of trajectory exercise using a laser pointer on electromyographic activities of the gluteus maximus and erector spinae during bridging exercises.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Ri; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate activities of the hip extensors and erector spinae during bridging exercise by using instruments with a laser pointer on the pelvic belt. [Subjects] Twelve subjects (age, 23 to 33 years) with non-specific low back pain volunteered for this study. [Methods] Subjects performed bridging exercises with and without trajectory exercises by using a laser pointer fixed to a pelvic strap. The erector spinae, gluteus maximus and hamstring activities with and without trajectory exercises using a laser pointer were recorded on using electromyography. [Results] Compared to the without laser pointer group, the group that underwent bridging with trajectory exercises using a laser pointer had significantly higher gluteus maximus activity and significantly lower erector spinae activity. Significantly higher gluteus maximus/erector spinae activity ratios were observed when performing trajectory exercises using a laser pointer during bridging exercises. [Conclusion] This result suggests that trajectory exercises using a laser pointer during a bridging exercise would be effective for improving gluteus maximus activity.

  2. Effects of trajectory exercise using a laser pointer on electromyographic activities of the gluteus maximus and erector spinae during bridging exercises

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Ri; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate activities of the hip extensors and erector spinae during bridging exercise by using instruments with a laser pointer on the pelvic belt. [Subjects] Twelve subjects (age, 23 to 33 years) with non-specific low back pain volunteered for this study. [Methods] Subjects performed bridging exercises with and without trajectory exercises by using a laser pointer fixed to a pelvic strap. The erector spinae, gluteus maximus and hamstring activities with and without trajectory exercises using a laser pointer were recorded on using electromyography. [Results] Compared to the without laser pointer group, the group that underwent bridging with trajectory exercises using a laser pointer had significantly higher gluteus maximus activity and significantly lower erector spinae activity. Significantly higher gluteus maximus/erector spinae activity ratios were observed when performing trajectory exercises using a laser pointer during bridging exercises. [Conclusion] This result suggests that trajectory exercises using a laser pointer during a bridging exercise would be effective for improving gluteus maximus activity. PMID:27065555

  3. Cost-effective handoff scheme based on mobility-aware dual pointer forwarding in proxy mobile IPv6 networks.

    PubMed

    Son, Seungsik; Jeong, Jongpil

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a mobility-aware Dual Pointer Forwarding scheme (mDPF) is applied in Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIPv6) networks. The movement of a Mobile Node (MN) is classified as intra-domain and inter-domain handoff. When the MN moves, this scheme can reduce the high signaling overhead for intra-handoff/inter-handoff, because the Local Mobility Anchor (LMA) and Mobile Access Gateway (MAG) are connected by pointer chains. In other words, a handoff is aware of low mobility between the previously attached MAG (pMAG) and newly attached MAG (nMAG), and another handoff between the previously attached LMA (pLMA) and newly attached LMA (nLMA) is aware of high mobility. Based on these mobility-aware binding updates, the overhead of the packet delivery can be reduced. Also, we analyse the binding update cost and packet delivery cost for route optimization, based on the mathematical analytic model. Analytical results show that our mDPF outperforms the PMIPv6 and the other pointer forwarding schemes, in terms of reducing the total cost of signaling.

  4. The formal specification of abstract data types and their implementation in Fortran 90: implementation issues concerning the use of pointers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maley, D.; Kilpatrick, P. L.; Schreiner, E. W.; Scott, N. S.; Diercksen, G. H. F.

    1996-10-01

    In this paper we continue our investigation into the development of computational-science software based on the identification and formal specification of Abstract Data Types (ADTs) and their implementation in Fortran 90. In particular, we consider the consequences of using pointers when implementing a formally specified ADT in Fortran 90. Our aim is to highlight the resulting conflict between the goal of information hiding, which is central to the ADT methodology, and the space efficiency of the implementation. We show that the issue of storage recovery cannot be avoided by the ADT user, and present a range of implementations of a simple ADT to illustrate various approaches towards satisfactory storage management. Finally, we propose a set of guidelines for implementing ADTs using pointers in Fortran 90. These guidelines offer a way gracefully to provide disposal operations in Fortran 90. Such an approach is desirable since Fortran 90 does not provide automatic garbage collection which is offered by many object-oriented languages including Eiffel, Java, Smalltalk, and Simula.

  5. Laser-pointer-induced self-focusing effect in hybrid-aligned dye-doped liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Aihara, Yosuke; Kinoshita, Motoi; Mamiya, Jun-Ichi; Priimagi, Arri; Shishido, Atsushi

    2015-05-06

    Nonlinear optics deals with phenomena where "light controls light"; e.g., there is mediation by an intensity-dependent medium through which light propagates. This field has attracted much attention for its immense potential in applications dependent on nonlinear processes, such as frequency conversion, multiple-photon absorption, self-phase modulation, and so on. However, such nonlinearities are typically only observed at very high light intensities and thus they require costly lasers. Here, we report on a self-focusing effect induced with a 1 mW handheld laser pointer. We prepared polymer-stabilized dye-doped liquid crystals, in which the molecular director orientation gradually changes from homeotropic at one surface to homogeneous at the other. This is referred to as hybrid alignment. In such films, the threshold intensity needed to form diffraction rings was reduced by a factor of 8.5 compared to that in conventional homeotropic cells, which enabled the induction of the self-focusing effect with a laser pointer.

  6. Investigative Studies of Refractive Indices of Liquids and a Demonstration of Refraction by the Use of a Laser Pointer and a Lazy Susan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Siu Ling; Mak, Se-yuen

    2008-01-01

    We describe the design of a simple homemade apparatus for the measurement of the refractive indices of liquids and demonstration of refraction. A circular transparent plastic tank and a lazy Susan are held concentrically. A laser pointer is mounted on the lazy Susan with its laser beam pointing radially through the centre of the plastic tank.…

  7. Investigative Studies of Refractive Indices of Liquids and a Demonstration of Refraction by the Use of a Laser Pointer and a Lazy Susan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Siu Ling; Mak, Se-yuen

    2008-01-01

    We describe the design of a simple homemade apparatus for the measurement of the refractive indices of liquids and demonstration of refraction. A circular transparent plastic tank and a lazy Susan are held concentrically. A laser pointer is mounted on the lazy Susan with its laser beam pointing radially through the centre of the plastic tank.…

  8. Extreme pointer years in tree-ring records of Central Spain as evidence of climatic events and the eruption of the Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru, 1600 AD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génova, M.

    2012-04-01

    The study of pointer years of numerous tree-ring chronologies of the central Iberian Peninsula (Sierra de Guadarrama) could provide complementary information about climate variability over the last 405 yr. In total, 64 pointer years have been identified: 30 negative (representing minimum growths) and 34 positive (representing maximum growths), the most significant of these being 1601, 1963 and 1996 for the negative ones, and 1734 and 1737 for the positive ones. Given that summer precipitation was found to be the most limiting factor for the growth of Pinus in the Sierra de Guadarrama in the second half of the 20th century, it is also an explanatory factor in almost 50% of the extreme growths. Furthermore, these pointer years and intervals are not evenly distributed throughout time. Both in the first half of the 17th and in the second half of 20th, they were more frequent and more extreme and these periods are the most notable for the frequency of negative pointer years in Central Spain. The interval 1600-1602 is of special significance, being one of the most unfavourable for tree growth in the centre of Spain, with 1601 representing the minimum index in the regional chronology. We infer that this special minimum annual increase was the effect of the eruption of Huaynaputina, which occurred in Peru at the beginning of 1600 AD. This is the first time that the effects of this eruption in the tree-ring records of Southern Europe have been demonstrated.

  9. Familial cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) in the German shorthaired pointer maps to CFA18, a canine orthologue to human CLE

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Zangerl, Barbara; Werner, Petra; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Casal, Margret L.

    2011-01-01

    A familial form of lupus, termed exfoliative cutaneous lupus erythematosus (ECLE) has been recognized for decades in German shorthaired pointer dogs (GSP). Previous studies were suggestive of autosomal recessive inheritance. The disease presents as a severe dermatitis with age of onset between 16 and 40 weeks, and mirrors cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) in humans. Lameness and, in advanced cases, renal disease may be present. Most affected dogs are euthanized before reaching the age of 4 years. The diagnosis is made by clinical observations and microscopic examination of skin biopsies. In humans, many different forms of CLE exist and various genes and chromosomal locations have been implicated. The large number of potential candidate loci combined with often weak association prevented in depth screening of the dog population thus far. During the course of our studies, we developed a colony of dogs with ECLE as a model for human CLE and the genetic analysis of these dogs confirmed the autosomal recessive mode of inheritance of CLE in GSPs. Using canine patient material, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify the genomic region harboring the gene involved in the development of the disease in GSPs. We identified a SNP allele on canine chromosome 18 that segregated with the disease in the 267 dogs tested. The data generated should allow identification of the mutant gene responsible for this form of cutaneous lupus erythematosus in dogs and assist in the understanding of the development of similar disease in humans. PMID:21132284

  10. Pointers for Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessant, Helen P., Ed.

    Presented are 11 brief articles designed to help parents enhance their children's school performance and generally improve the home environment. Included is information on the following topics: the role of the social worker in parent education, home activities to improve a child's reading skills, developing listening skill through instructional…

  11. Pointers from the Americas.

    PubMed

    Aragon-choudhury, P

    1992-01-01

    During a sharing session which took place at a conference sponsored by the Philippine Institute for Social Studies and Action in 1991, Peruvian Victoria Villanueva and US citizen Margaret Ann Schuller discussed their work. Schuller reported on her upcoming book entitled "Freedom from Violence: Women's Strategies Around the World." In addition to proposing a definition of violence against women, the book will include 12 case studies from Malaysia, Bolivia, Mexico, India, Pakistan, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Brazil, Zimbabwe, Chile, Africa, and Alaska describing how national organizations of women are dealing with the problem. An important advance is the development of a framework to look at the connection which exists between violence and health issues. Villanueva described the work of the Movimiento Manuela Ramos, which was organized informally to deal with reproductive rights and abortion and has since expanded to parent groups of women who defend legal and medical cases as paid paralegals. Manuela Ramos uses popular media, traditional drama, and even state television to publicize its issues. Manuela Ramos has accomplished important work on rape, unsafe abortion, and maternal mortality, but most importantly, the women involved with the organization have had the opportunity to develop their self-esteem.

  12. Pointers for Parents, 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    This booklet was written for parents of children in the Follow Through Program. It provides useful tips on money management, home-school relationship, and health and nutrition. The section on money management discusses food stamps, social security, insurance, buying on credit and installment, budgeting hints, and shopping hints. The section on…

  13. Interpreting the macroscopic pointer by analysing the elements of reality of a Schrödinger cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. D.

    2017-10-01

    We examine Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen’s (EPR) steering nonlocality for two realisable Schrödinger cat-type states where a meso/macroscopic system (called the ‘cat’-system) is entangled with a microscopic spin-1/2 system. We follow EPR’s argument and derive the predictions for ‘elements of reality’ that would exist to describe the cat-system, under the assumption of EPR’s local realism. By showing that those predictions cannot be replicated by any local quantum state description of the cat-system, we demonstrate the EPR-steering of the cat-system. For large cat-systems, we find that a local hidden state model is near-satisfied, meaning that a local quantum state description exists (for the cat) whose predictions differ from those of the elements of reality by a vanishingly small amount. For such a local hidden state model, the EPR-steering of the cat vanishes, and the cat-system can be regarded as being in a mixture of ‘dead’ and ‘alive’ states despite it being entangled with the spin system. We therefore propose that a rigorous signature of the Schrödinger cat-type paradox is the EPR-steering of the cat-system and provide two experimental signatures. This leads to a hybrid quantum/classical interpretation of the macroscopic pointer of a measurement device and suggests that many Schrödinger cat-type paradoxes may be explained by microscopic nonlocality.

  14. Randomized control trial for evaluation of a hands-free pointer for surgical instruction during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Trejos, Ana Luisa; Siroen, Karen; Ward, Christopher D W; Hossain, Shahan; Naish, Michael D; Patel, Rajni V; Schlachta, Christopher M

    2015-12-01

    Training surgeons in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) requires surgical residents to operate under the direction of a consultant. The inability of the instructing surgeon to point at the laparoscopic monitor without releasing the instruments remains a barrier to effective instruction. The wireless hands-free surgical pointer (WHaSP) has been developed to aid instruction during MIS. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and likeability of the WHaSP as an instructional tool compared with the conventional methods. Data were successfully collected during 103 laparoscopic cholecystectomy procedures, which had been randomized to use or not use the WHaSP as a teaching tool. Audio and video from the surgeries were recorded and analyzed. Instructing surgeons, operating surgeons, and camera assistants provided feedback through a post-operative questionnaire that used a five-level Likert scale. The questionnaire results were analyzed using a Mann-Whitney U test. There were no negative effects on surgery completion time or instruction practice due to the use of the WHaSP. The number of times an instructor surgeon pointed to the laparoscopic screen with their hand was significantly reduced when the WHaSP was utilized (p < 0.001). The questionnaires showed that WHaSP users found it to be comfortable, easy to use, and easy to control. Compared to when the WHaSP was not used, users found that communication was more effective (p = 0.002), locations were easier to communicate (p < 0.001), and instructions were easier to follow (p = 0.005). The WHaSP system was successfully used in surgery. It integrated seamlessly into existing equipment within the operating room and did not affect flow. The positive outcomes of utilizing the WHaSP were improved communication in the OR, improved efficiency and safety of the surgery, easy to use, and comfortable to wear. The surgeons showed a preference for utilizing the WHaSP if given a choice.

  15. Activation during endogenous orienting of visual attention using symbolic pointers in the human parietal and frontal cortices: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Kato, C; Matsuo, K; Matsuzawa, M; Moriya, T; Glover, G H; Nakai, T

    2001-11-13

    Brain activation induced by endogenous orienting with a motor response was investigated by functional magnetic resonance imaging. We conducted four cued-attention experiments in which peripheral attention was caused by one of three symbolic pointers (eyes, squares as artificial eyes, or an arrow) that was predictive or not predictive of the target location. Attentional shift caused by the predictive and non-predictive cues induced right and left parietal activation across cue modalities, respectively. Regardless of the predictability of the target location, the eyes and arrow induced left parietal and frontal activation, and the arrow induced left parietal activation more than the squares. These results suggested that the left parieto-frontal network was involved in motor attention caused by natural or familiar pointers, whereas the right parietal cortex was involved in endogenous orienting.

  16. Teuchos::RefCountPtr beginner's guide : an introduction to the Trilinos smart reference-counted pointer class for (almost) automatic dynamic memory management in C++.

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Roscoe A

    2004-06-01

    Dynamic memory management in C++ is one of the most common areas of difficulty and errors for amateur and expert C++ developers alike. The improper use of operator new and operator delete is arguably the most common cause of incorrect program behavior and segmentation faults in C++ programs. Here we introduce a templated concrete C++ class Teuchos::RefCountPtr<>, which is part of the Trilinos tools package Teuchos, that combines the concepts of smart pointers and reference counting to build a low-overhead but effective tool for simplifying dynamic memory management in C++. We discuss why the use of raw pointers for memory management, managed through explicit calls to operator new and operator delete, is so difficult to accomplish without making mistakes and how programs that use raw pointers for memory management can easily be modified to use RefCountPtr<>. In addition, explicit calls to operator delete is fragile and results in memory leaks in the presents of C++ exceptions. In its most basic usage, RefCountPtr<> automatically determines when operator delete should be called to free an object allocated with operator new and is not fragile in the presents of exceptions. The class also supports more sophisticated use cases as well. This document describes just the most basic usage of RefCountPtr<> to allow developers to get started using it right away. However, more detailed information on the design and advanced features of RefCountPtr<> is provided by the companion document 'Teuchos::RefCountPtr : The Trilinos Smart Reference-Counted Pointer Class for (Almost) Automatic Dynamic Memory Management in C++'.

  17. Extreme pointer years in tree-ring records of Central Spain as evidence of volcanic eruptions (Huaynaputina, Peru, 1600 AC) and other climatic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génova, M.

    2011-12-01

    The study of pointer years based on the numerous tree-ring chronologies of the central Iberian Peninsula (Sierra de Guadarrama) could provide complementary information about climate variability over the last 405 years. In total, 64 pointer years have been identified: 30 negative (representing minimum growths) and 34 positive (representing maximum growths), the most significant of these being 1601, 1963 and 1996 for the negative ones, and 1734 and 1737 for the positive ones. Given that summer precipitation has been the most incident factor in the general variability of growth of Pinus in the Sierra de Guadarrama in the second half of the 20th century, it is also an explanatory factor in almost 50% of the extreme growths. Furthermore, the data show that there has been variability over the centuries in the distribution of the frequencies of pointer years and intervals. The first half of the 17th century, together with the second half of the 20th century, constitute the two most notable periods for the frequency of negative pointer years in Central Spain. This variability was sufficiently notable to affirm that, both in the 17th and 20th centuries, the macroclimatic anomalies that affected growth were more frequent and more extreme than in the other two centuries analysed. The period 1600-1602 is of special significance, being one of the most unfavourable for tree growth in the centre of Spain, with 1601 representing the minimum index in the regional chronology. It is possible to infer that these phenomena are the effect of the eruption of Huaynaputina, which occurred in Peru at the beginning of 1600 AD. This is the first time that the effects of this eruption in the tree-ring records of central and southern Europe have been demonstrated.

  18. Comparative efficacy of new interfaces for intra-procedural imaging review: the Microsoft Kinect, Hillcrest Labs Loop Pointer, and the Apple iPad.

    PubMed

    Chao, Cherng; Tan, Justin; Castillo, Edward M; Zawaideh, Mazen; Roberts, Anne C; Kinney, Thomas B

    2014-08-01

    We adapted and evaluated the Microsoft Kinect (touchless interface), Hillcrest Labs Loop Pointer (gyroscopic mouse), and the Apple iPad (multi-touch tablet) for intra-procedural imaging review efficacy in a simulation using MIM Software DICOM viewers. Using each device, 29 radiologists executed five basic interactions to complete the overall task of measuring an 8.1-cm hepatic lesion: scroll, window, zoom, pan, and measure. For each interaction, participants assessed the devices on a 3-point subjective scale (3 = highest usability score). The five individual scores were summed to calculate a subjective composite usability score (max 15 points). Overall task time to completion was recorded. Each user also assessed each device for its potential to jeopardize a sterile field. The composite usability scores were as follows: Kinect 9.9 (out of 15.0; SD = 2.8), Loop Pointer 12.9 (SD = 13.5), and iPad 13.5 (SD = 1.8). Mean task completion times were as follows: Kinect 156.7 s (SD = 86.5), Loop Pointer 51.5 s (SD = 30.6), and iPad 41.1 s (SD = 25.3). The mean hepatic lesion measurements were as follows: Kinect was 7.3 cm (SD = 0.9), Loop Pointer 7.8 cm (SD = 1.1), and iPad 8.2 cm (SD = 1.2). The mean deviations from true hepatic lesion measurement were as follows: Kinect 1.0 cm and for both the Loop Pointer and iPad, 0.9 cm (SD = 0.7). The Kinect had the least and iPad had the most subjective concern for compromising the sterile field. A new intra-operative imaging review interface may be near. Most surveyed foresee these devices as useful in procedures, and most do not anticipate problems with a sterile field. An ideal device would combine iPad's usability and accuracy with the Kinect's touchless aspect.

  19. Resonant optical device with a microheater

    DOEpatents

    Lentine, Anthony L.; DeRose, Christopher

    2017-04-04

    A resonant photonic device is provided. The device comprises an optical waveguiding element, such as an optical resonator, that includes a diode junction region, two signal terminals configured to apply a bias voltage across the junction region, and a heater laterally separated from the optical waveguiding element. A semiconductor electrical barrier element is juxtaposed to the heater. A metallic strip is electrically and thermally connected at one end to a signal terminal of the optical waveguiding element and thermally connected at another end to the barrier element.

  20. Measuring solid-state quantum yields: The conversion of a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG diode laser pointer module into a viable light source.

    PubMed

    Daglen, Bevin C; Harris, John D; Dax, Clifford D; Tyler, David R

    2007-07-01

    This article outlines the difficulties associated with measuring quantum yields for solid-state samples using a high-pressure mercury arc lamp as the irradiation source. Details are given for the conversion of an inexpensive frequency-doubled neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) diode laser pointer module into a viable irradiation source. The modified Nd:YAG laser was incorporated into a computer-controlled system, which allowed for the simultaneous irradiation and spectroscopic monitoring of the sample. The data obtained with the Nd:YAG diode laser system show far less scatter than data obtained with a high-pressure Hg arc lamp, and consequently the degradation rates obtained with the laser system could be calculated with far greater accuracy.

  1. US Coast Guard/US Maritime Administration Cooperative Research on marine engine exhaust emissions. Marine exhaust emissions measurement of the M/V Kings Pointer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.J.; Bentz, A.P.

    1996-07-01

    This report presents the results of emissions testing conducted on board the M/V KINGS POINTER in May 1995. The objective of this testing was to conduct baseline instrumentation, monitoring, and evaluation of the engine exhaust emissions as part of joint U.S. Coast Guard/Maritime Administration cooperative research on controlling air pollution from ships. The U.S. Coast Guard`s interest in emissions testing arises from both its desire to meet all federal and state air quality regulations and the fact that in the future it may be called upon to enforce regulations in the marine environment. The U.S. Maritime Administration`s interest in this and related research is based on its efforts to assure that its vessels and those of the privately-owned U.S. Flag Merchant Marine can comply with future air pollution control requirements. Underway tests were conducted of the 224-foot M/V KINGS POINTER in which two of its four diesel-electric generators were sampled for NO, NO2, CO, and SO2 in the exhaust. Additional data on fuel flow and power output were collected at five speeds over the full range of vessel operating ranges. NOx values were calculated and compared with standards proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO). Results showed that average NOx values were 9.4 g/kWh which is slightly below the 10.9 g/kWh upper limit or cap that is being proposed by the IMO for a diesel engine with a rated speed of 1200 RPM. Additional conclusions and recommendations on the technique of portable emissions monitoring instrumentation are made.

  2. Computer Workstation: Pointer/Mouse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disaster Recovery Assistance USA.gov Disability.gov Plain Writing Act Recovery Act No Fear Act U.S. Office ... Disaster Recovery Assistance USA.gov Disability.gov Plain Writing Act Recovery Act No Fear Act U.S. Office ...

  3. Familial anthropophobia in pointer dogs?

    PubMed

    Dykman, R A; Murphree, O D; Reese, W G

    1979-08-01

    This article assesses a dog model in terms of a proposed cross-species definition of phobia, the model referring to a strain of unstable dogs that has been produced by selection and inbreeding. The unstable dogs are contrasted with a strain of stable dogs. New findings are presented on approach and activity behavior toward three stimulus objects (man, another dog, and a sheet-covered chair) in a naturalistic setting. The fear response of unstable dogs to objects other than man habituates gradually, whereas the fear response to the sight of man is far more enduring, suggesting a relatively specific fear of man.

  4. Laser-Driven Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the present status and future prospects of laser-driven fusion. Current research (which is classified under three main headings: laser-matter interaction processes, compression, and laser development) is also presented. (HM)

  5. Laser-Driven Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the present status and future prospects of laser-driven fusion. Current research (which is classified under three main headings: laser-matter interaction processes, compression, and laser development) is also presented. (HM)

  6. Exfoliative cutaneous lupus erythematosus in German shorthaired pointer dogs: disease development, progression and evaluation of three immunomodulatory drugs (ciclosporin, hydroxychloroquine, and adalimumab) in a controlled environment

    PubMed Central

    Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Morris, Daniel O.; Brown, Dorothy C.; Casal, Margret L.

    2011-01-01

    Six German shorthaired pointer dogs (two females, four males) with exfoliative cutaneous lupus erythematosus (ECLE) were studied in a controlled setting until disease progression necessitated euthanasia. During investigations into the heredity of disease, five dogs received immunomodulatory drugs to alleviate clinical signs (lameness, erythema, scaling, erosions/ulcers). One dog served as a control and received only baths and oral fatty acids. Four dogs received ciclosporin (5–10 mg/kg once daily) for 4.5 months to 2 years. Ciclosporin decreased erythema and arthralgia, but did not halt worsening of lesions. Three dogs received hydroxychloroquine (5–10 mg/kg once daily) for 8 weeks, 7 months, and 9 months, respectively, with no side effects. Hydroxychloroquine appeared to slow clinical progression in two dogs on extended treatment and normalized globulin levels in all three dogs while receiving the drug. Four dogs, including the control dog, were euthanized between 1 and 4.5 years of age. Two remaining male dogs received a tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonist, adalimumab, at 0.5 mg/kg every 2 weeks for 8 weeks then weekly for 8 weeks. Serum TNF-α levels were not significantly altered nor were quantifiable changes seen in skin lesions or lameness. Subsequently, the dogs were maintained on hydroxychloroquine for another year. This is the first study to evaluate the use of a TNF-α inhibitor for canine lupus and the first to address the safety of long-term administration of hydroxychloroquine, albeit in a small number of dogs. The study documents the progression of ECLE and generally poor response to therapy. PMID:20374572

  7. Periodically driven holographic superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei-Jia; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2013-07-01

    As a first step towards our holographic investigation of the far-from-equilibrium physics of periodically driven systems at strong coupling, we explore the real time dynamics of holographic superconductor driven by a monochromatically alternating electric field with various frequencies. As a result, our holographic superconductor is driven to the final oscillating state, where the condensate is suppressed and the oscillation frequency is controlled by twice of the driving frequency. In particular, in the large frequency limit, the three distinct channels towards the final steady state are found, namely under damped to superconducting phase, over damped to superconducting and normal phase, which can be captured essentially by the low lying spectrum of quasi-normal modes in the time averaged approximation, reminiscent of the effective field theory perspective.

  8. Nanointerstice-driven microflow.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seok; Yun, Hoyoung; Kamm, Roger D

    2009-03-01

    To generate flow in microchannels, various actuation schemes such as electrokinetic, pressure-driven, and capillary-driven flow have been suggested. Capillary-driven flow is widely used in plastic disposable diagnostic platforms due to its simplicity and because it requires no external power. However, plastics such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), generally used in microfluidics, are hydrophobic, which inhibits capillary force generation and requires surface enhancement that deteriorates with age. It is shown that the microchannels made of PMMA lose their acquired hydrophilicity by oxygen plasma treatment in long-term storage and tend to generate slow capillary flow exhibiting large variability. To promote consistency and drive flow in the microchannel, nanointerstices (NI) are introduced at the side wall of the microchannel, which results in capillary flow that is less dependent on surface characteristics. The results show that NI flow generation can be a useful alternative technique to create long-term predictable flow in commercialized products with microchannels.

  9. The driven spinning top

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosu, Ioan; Featonby, David

    2016-05-01

    This driven top is quite a novelty and can, with some trials, be made using the principles outlined here. This new top has many applications in developing both understanding and skills and these are detailed in the article. Depending on reader’s available time and motivation they may feel an urge to make one themselves, or simply invest a few pounds in the one that has been designed, tested and manufactured to a high standard. Either way the unique design of the driven top can provide several hours of interesting experimentation. Our aim here is simply to inform and inspire readers to further investigation and experimentation.

  10. Electrically Driven Prosthetic Elbow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The invention relates to an improved electrically driven prosthetic elbow wherein the elbow is capable of being rigidly locked into place in any...desired position, and upon driving the arm to the fully extended position, the elbow is automatically unlocked.

  11. The Driven Spinning Top

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosu, Ioan; Featonby, David

    2016-01-01

    This driven top is quite a novelty and can, with some trials, be made using the principles outlined here. This new top has many applications in developing both understanding and skills and these are detailed in the article. Depending on reader's available time and motivation they may feel an urge to make one themselves, or simply invest a few…

  12. Argument-Driven Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Victor; Grooms, Jonathon; Walker, Joi

    2009-01-01

    Argument-Driven Inquiry (ADI) is an instructional model that enables science teachers to transform a traditional laboratory activity into a short integrated instructional unit. To illustrate how the ADI instructional model works, this article describes an ADI lesson developed for a 10th-grade chemistry class. This example lesson was designed to…

  13. The Driven Spinning Top

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosu, Ioan; Featonby, David

    2016-01-01

    This driven top is quite a novelty and can, with some trials, be made using the principles outlined here. This new top has many applications in developing both understanding and skills and these are detailed in the article. Depending on reader's available time and motivation they may feel an urge to make one themselves, or simply invest a few…

  14. Argument-Driven Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Victor; Grooms, Jonathon; Walker, Joi

    2009-01-01

    Argument-Driven Inquiry (ADI) is an instructional model that enables science teachers to transform a traditional laboratory activity into a short integrated instructional unit. To illustrate how the ADI instructional model works, this article describes an ADI lesson developed for a 10th-grade chemistry class. This example lesson was designed to…

  15. Sparsity driven ultrasound imaginga)

    PubMed Central

    Tuysuzoglu, Ahmet; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Cleveland, Robin O.; C¸etin, Müjdat; Karl, W. Clem

    2012-01-01

    An image formation framework for ultrasound imaging from synthetic transducer arrays based on sparsity-driven regularization functionals using single-frequency Fourier domain data is proposed. The framework involves the use of a physics-based forward model of the ultrasound observation process, the formulation of image formation as the solution of an associated optimization problem, and the solution of that problem through efficient numerical algorithms. The sparsity-driven, model-based approach estimates a complex-valued reflectivity field and preserves physical features in the scene while suppressing spurious artifacts. It also provides robust reconstructions in the case of sparse and reduced observation apertures. The effectiveness of the proposed imaging strategy is demonstrated using experimental data. PMID:22352501

  16. Test-driven programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Bozhidar; Georgieva, Adriana

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, are presented some possibilities concerning the implementation of a test-driven development as a programming method. Here is offered a different point of view for creation of advanced programming techniques (build tests before programming source with all necessary software tools and modules respectively). Therefore, this nontraditional approach for easier programmer's work through building tests at first is preferable way of software development. This approach allows comparatively simple programming (applied with different object-oriented programming languages as for example JAVA, XML, PYTHON etc.). It is predictable way to develop software tools and to provide help about creating better software that is also easier to maintain. Test-driven programming is able to replace more complicated casual paradigms, used by many programmers.

  17. Electrically driven optical antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Johannes; Kullock, René; Prangsma, Jord; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Hecht, Bert

    2015-09-01

    Unlike radiowave antennas, so far optical nanoantennas cannot be fed by electrical generators. Instead, they are driven by light or indirectly via excited discrete states in active materials in their vicinity. Here we demonstrate the direct electrical driving of an in-plane optical antenna by the broadband quantum-shot noise of electrons tunnelling across its feed gap. The spectrum of the emitted photons is determined by the antenna geometry and can be tuned via the applied voltage. Moreover, the direction and polarization of the light emission are controlled by the antenna resonance, which also improves the external quantum efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude. The one-material planar design offers facile integration of electrical and optical circuits and thus represents a new paradigm for interfacing electrons and photons at the nanometre scale, for example for on-chip wireless communication and highly configurable electrically driven subwavelength photon sources.

  18. Laser driven radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.; Sefcik, J.; Cowan, T.

    1997-12-20

    Intense laser (> 1021 W/cm{sup 3}) driven hard x-ray sources offer a new alternative to conventional electron accelerator Bremsstrahlung sources. These laser driven sources offer considerable simplicity in design and potential cost advantage for multiple axis views. High spatial and temporal resolution is achievable as a result of the very small source size (<100 um) and short-duration of the laser pulse. We have begun a series of experiments with the Petawatt laser at LLNL to determine the photon flux achievable with these sources and assess their potential for Stewardship applications. Additionally, we are developing a conceptual design and cost estimate of a multi-pulse, multi-axis (up to five) radiographic facility utilizing the Contained Firing Facility at site 300 and existing laser hardware.

  19. Adiabatically driven Brownian pumps.

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, Viktor M; Makhnovskii, Yurii A; Shapochkina, Irina V; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2013-07-01

    We investigate a Brownian pump which, being powered by a flashing ratchet mechanism, produces net particle transport through a membrane. The extension of the Parrondo's approach developed for reversible Brownian motors [Parrondo, Phys. Rev. E 57, 7297 (1998)] to adiabatically driven pumps is given. We demonstrate that the pumping mechanism becomes especially efficient when the time variation of the potential occurs adiabatically fast or adiabatically slow, in perfect analogy with adiabatically driven Brownian motors which exhibit high efficiency [Rozenbaum et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 041116 (2012)]. At the same time, the efficiency of the pumping mechanism is shown to be less than that of Brownian motors due to fluctuations of the number of particles in the membrane.

  20. Gas-driven microturbine

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S.; McWhorter, P.J.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Miller, W.M.

    1996-06-27

    This paper describes an invention which relates to microtechnology and the fabrication process for developing microelectrical systems. It describes a means for fabricating a gas-driven microturbine capable of providing autonomous propulsion in which the rapidly moving gases are directed through a micromachined turbine to power devices by direct linkage or turbo-electric generators components in a domain ranging from tenths of micrometers to thousands of micrometers.

  1. Entropically Driven Helix Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snir, Yehuda; Kamien, Randall

    2004-03-01

    We model the entropically driven self-assembly of a long polymer chain in the presence of non interacting spherical colloids. The polymer is forced to bend due to the thermodynamic interaction with the colloids. We model the polymer as a long bendable tube and find the equilibrium position by minimizing the depletion volume of this tube. We find that the minimal position of the tube is a helix of radius and pitch that depends only on the size of the spherical colloids.

  2. Water-driven micromotors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Pei, Allen; Wang, Joseph

    2012-09-25

    We demonstrate the first example of a water-driven bubble-propelled micromotor that eliminates the requirement for the common hydrogen peroxide fuel. The new water-driven Janus micromotor is composed of a partially coated Al-Ga binary alloy microsphere prepared via microcontact mixing of aluminum microparticles and liquid gallium. The ejection of hydrogen bubbles from the exposed Al-Ga alloy hemisphere side, upon its contact with water, provides a powerful directional propulsion thrust. Such spontaneous generation of hydrogen bubbles reflects the rapid reaction between the aluminum alloy and water. The resulting water-driven spherical motors can move at remarkable speeds of 3 mm s(-1) (i.e., 150 body length s(-1)), while exerting large forces exceeding 500 pN. Factors influencing the efficiency of the aluminum-water reaction and the resulting propulsion behavior and motor lifetime, including the ionic strength and environmental pH, are investigated. The resulting water-propelled Al-Ga/Ti motors move efficiently in different biological media (e.g., human serum) and hold considerable promise for diverse biomedical or industrial applications.

  3. Driven superconducting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2014-03-01

    Driven nonlinear quantum systems show rich phenomena in various fields of physics. Among them, superconducting quantum circuits have very attractive features such as well-controlled quantum states with design flexibility, strong nonlinearity of Josephson junctions, strong coupling to electromagnetic driving fields, little internal dissipation, and tailored coupling to the electromagnetic environment. We have investigated properties and functionalities of driven superconducting quantum circuits. A transmon qubit coupled to a transmission line shows nearly perfect spatial mode matching between the incident and scattered microwave field in the 1D mode. Dressed states under a driving field are studied there and also in a semi-infinite 1D mode terminated by a resonator containing a flux qubit. An effective Λ-type three-level system is realized under an appropriate driving condition. It allows ``impedance-matched'' perfect absorption of incident probe photons and down conversion into another frequency mode. Finally, the weak signal from the qubit is read out using a Josephson parametric amplifier/oscillator which is another nonlinear circuit driven by a strong pump field. This work was partly supported by the Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST), Project for Developing Innovation Systems of MEXT, MEXT KAKENHI ``Quantum Cybernetics,'' and the NICT Commissioned Research.

  4. System Driven Workarounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda; Wichner, David; Jakey, Abegael Marie

    2013-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) in a partnership between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), participating carriers, and labor organizations. It is designed to improve the National Airspace System by collecting and studying reports detailing unsafe conditions and events in the aviation industry. Employees are able to report safety issues or concerns with confidentiality and without fear of discipline. Safety reports highlighting system driven workarounds for the aviation community highlight the human workaround for the complex aviation system.

  5. Electrostatically Driven Nanoballoon Actuator.

    PubMed

    Barzegar, Hamid Reza; Yan, Aiming; Coh, Sinisa; Gracia-Espino, Eduardo; Dunn, Gabriel; Wågberg, Thomas; Louie, Steven G; Cohen, Marvin L; Zettl, Alex

    2016-11-09

    We demonstrate an inflatable nanoballoon actuator based on geometrical transitions between the inflated (cylindrical) and collapsed (flattened) forms of a carbon nanotube. In situ transmission electron microscopy experiments employing a nanoelectromechanical manipulator show that a collapsed carbon nanotube can be reinflated by electrically charging the nanotube, thus realizing an electrostatically driven nanoballoon actuator. We find that the tube actuator can be reliably cycled with only modest control voltages (few volts) with no apparent wear or fatigue. A complementary theoretical analysis identifies critical parameters for nanotube nanoballoon actuation.

  6. Information-Driven Inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Laughter, Mark D; Whitaker, J Michael; Lockwood, Dunbar

    2010-01-01

    New uranium enrichment capacity is being built worldwide in response to perceived shortfalls in future supply. To meet increasing safeguards responsibilities with limited resources, the nonproliferation community is exploring next-generation concepts to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of safeguards, such as advanced technologies to enable unattended monitoring of nuclear material. These include attribute measurement technologies, data authentication tools, and transmission and security methods. However, there are several conceptual issues with how such data would be used to improve the ability of a safeguards inspectorate such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to reach better safeguards conclusions regarding the activities of a State. The IAEA is pursuing the implementation of information-driven safeguards, whereby all available sources of information are used to make the application of safeguards more effective and efficient. Data from continuous, unattended monitoring systems can be used to optimize on-site inspection scheduling and activities at declared facilities, resulting in fewer, better inspections. Such information-driven inspections are the logical evolution of inspection planning - making use of all available information to enhance scheduled and randomized inspections. Data collection and analysis approaches for unattended monitoring systems can be designed to protect sensitive information while enabling information-driven inspections. A number of such inspections within a predetermined range could reduce inspection frequency while providing an equal or greater level of deterrence against illicit activity, all while meeting operator and technology holder requirements and reducing inspector and operator burden. Three options for using unattended monitoring data to determine an information-driven inspection schedule are to (1) send all unattended monitoring data off-site, which will require advances in data analysis techniques to

  7. Heat driven pulse pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Steve M (Inventor); Martins, Mario S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A heat driven pulse pump includes a chamber having an inlet port, an outlet port, two check valves, a wick, and a heater. The chamber may include a plurality of grooves inside wall of the chamber. When heated within the chamber, a liquid to be pumped vaporizes and creates pressure head that expels the liquid through the outlet port. As liquid separating means, the wick, disposed within the chamber, is to allow, when saturated with the liquid, the passage of only liquid being forced by the pressure head in the chamber, preventing the vapor from exiting from the chamber through the outlet port. A plurality of grooves along the inside surface wall of the chamber can sustain the liquid, which is amount enough to produce vapor for the pressure head in the chamber. With only two simple moving parts, two check valves, the heat driven pulse pump can effectively function over the long lifetimes without maintenance or replacement. For continuous flow of the liquid to be pumped a plurality of pumps may be connected in parallel.

  8. THERMALLY DRIVEN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Robert E.

    2010-06-20

    Accurately determining the escape rate from a planet's atmosphere is critical for determining its evolution. A large amount of Cassini data is now available for Titan's upper atmosphere and a wealth of data is expected within the next decade on escape from Pluto, Mars, and extra-solar planets. Escape can be driven by upward thermal conduction of energy deposited well below the exobase, as well as by nonthermal processes produced by energy deposited in the exobase region. Recent applications of a model for escape driven by upward thermal conduction, called the slow hydrodynamic escape model, have resulted in surprisingly large loss rates for the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Based on a molecular kinetic simulation of the exobase region, these rates appear to be orders of magnitude too large. Therefore, the slow hydrodynamic model is evaluated here. It is shown that such a model cannot give a reliable description of the atmospheric temperature profile unless it is coupled to a molecular kinetic description of the exobase region. Therefore, the present escape rates for Titan and Pluto must be re-evaluated using the atmospheric model described here.

  9. Market Driven Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavert, Raymond B.

    2004-02-01

    Market driven space exploration will have the opportunity to develop to new levels with the coming of space nuclear power and propulsion. NASA's recently established Prometheus program is expected to receive several billion dollars over the next five years for developing nuclear power and propulsion systems for future spacecraft. Not only is nuclear power and propulsion essential for long distance Jupiter type missions, but it also important for providing greater access to planets and bodies nearer to the Earth. NASA has been working with industrial partners since 1987 through its Research Partnerships Centers (RPCs) to utilize the attributes of space in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Plans are now being made to utilize the RPCs and industrial partners in extending the duration and boundaries of human space flight to create new opportunities for exploration and discovery. Private investors are considering setting up shops in LEO for commercial purposes. The trend is for more industrial involvement in space. Nuclear power and propulsion will hasten the progress. The objective of this paper is to show the progression of space market driven research and its potential for supporting space exploration given nuclear power and propulsion capabilities.

  10. Consistent model driven architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  11. Evaporatively driven morphological instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Style, Robert W.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2007-07-01

    Simple observations of evaporating solutions reveal a complex hierarchy of spatiotemporal instabilities. We analyze one such instability suggested by the qualitative observations of Du and Stone and find that it is driven by a variant of the classical morphological instability in alloy solidification. In the latter case a moving solid-liquid interface is accompanied by a solutally enriched boundary layer that is thermodynamically metastable due to constitutional supercooling. Here, we consider the evaporation of an impure film adjacent to a solid composed of the nonvolatile species. In this case, constitutional supercooling within the film is created by evaporation at the solution-vapor interface and this drives the corrugation of the solid-solution interface across the thickness of the film. The principal points of this simple theoretical study are to suggest an instability mechanism that is likely operative across a broad range of technological and natural systems and to focus future quantitative experimental searches.

  12. Muscle-driven nanogenerators

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhong L [Marietta, GA; Yang, Rusen [Atlanta, GA

    2011-03-01

    In a method of generating electricity, a plurality of living cells are grown on an array of piezoelectric nanowires so that the cells engage the piezoelectric nanowires. Induced static potentials are extracted from at least one of the piezoelectric nanowires when at least one of the cells deforms the at least one of the piezoelectric nanowires. A cell-driven electrical generator that includes a substrate and a plurality of spaced-apart piezoelectric nanowires disposed on the substrate. A plurality of spaced-apart conductive electrodes interact with the plurality of piezoelectric nanowires. A biological buffer layer that is configured to promote growth of cells is disposed on the substrate so that cells placed on the substrate will grow and engage the piezoelectric nanowires.

  13. Multilane driven diffusive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curatolo, A. I.; Evans, M. R.; Kafri, Y.; Tailleur, J.

    2016-03-01

    We consider networks made of parallel lanes along which particles hop according to driven diffusive dynamics. The particles also hop transversely from lane to lane, hence indirectly coupling their longitudinal dynamics. We present a general method for constructing the phase diagram of these systems which reveals that in many cases their physics reduce to that of single-lane systems. The reduction to an effective single-lane description legitimizes, for instance, the use of a single TASEP to model the hopping of molecular motors along the many tracks of a single microtubule. Then, we show how, in quasi-2D settings, new phenomena emerge due to the presence of non-zero transverse currents, leading, for instance, to strong ‘shear localization’ along the network.

  14. Qplus AFM driven nanostencil.

    PubMed

    Grévin, B; Fakir, M; Hayton, J; Brun, M; Demadrille, R; Faure-Vincent, J

    2011-06-01

    We describe the development of a novel setup, in which large stencils with suspended silicon nitride membranes are combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) regulation by using tuning forks. This system offers the possibility to perform separate AFM and nanostencil operations, as well as combined modes when using stencil chips with integrated tips. The flexibility and performances are demonstrated through a series of examples, including wide AFM scans in closed loop mode, probe positioning repeatability of a few tens of nanometer, simultaneous evaporation of large (several hundred of micron square) and nanoscopic metals and fullerene patterns in static, multistep, and dynamic modes. This approach paves the way for further developments, as it fully combines the advantages of conventional stenciling with the ones of an AFM driven shadow mask. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  15. Temperature-Driven Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohan, Richard J.; Vandegrift, Guy

    2003-02-01

    Warm air aloft is stable. This explains the lack of strong winds in a warm front and how nighttime radiative cooling can lead to motionless air that can trap smog. The stability of stratospheric air can be attributed to the fact that it is heated from above as ultraviolet radiation strikes the ozone layer. On the other hand, fluid heated from below is unstable and can lead to Bernard convection cells. This explains the generally turbulent nature of the troposphere, which receives a significant fraction of its heat directly from the Earth's warmer surface. The instability of cold fluid aloft explains the violent nature of a cold front, as well as the motion of Earth's magma, which is driven by radioactive heating deep within the Earth's mantle. This paper describes how both effects can be demonstrated using four standard beakers, ice, and a bit of food coloring.

  16. Steady Capillary Driven Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M.

    1996-01-01

    A steady capillary driven flow is developed for a liquid index in a circular tube which is partially coated with a surface modifier to produce a discontinuous wetting condition from one side of the tube to the other. The bulk flow is novel in that it is truly steady, and controlled solely by the physics associated with dynamic wetting. The influence of gravity on the flow is minimized through the use of small diameter tubes approximately O(1 mm) tested horizontally in a laboratory and larger tubes approximately O(10 mm) tested in the low gravity environment of a drop tower. Average steady velocities are predicted and compared against a large experimental data set which includes the effects of tube dimensions and fluid properties. The sensitivity of the velocity to surface cleanliness is dramatic and the advantages of experimentation in a microgravity environment are discussed.

  17. Soliton driven angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, L. L.; Carretero, M.; Terragni, F.; Birnir, B.

    2016-08-01

    Angiogenesis is a multiscale process by which blood vessels grow from existing ones and carry oxygen to distant organs. Angiogenesis is essential for normal organ growth and wounded tissue repair but it may also be induced by tumours to amplify their own growth. Mathematical and computational models contribute to understanding angiogenesis and developing anti-angiogenic drugs, but most work only involves numerical simulations and analysis has lagged. A recent stochastic model of tumour-induced angiogenesis including blood vessel branching, elongation, and anastomosis captures some of its intrinsic multiscale structures, yet allows one to extract a deterministic integropartial differential description of the vessel tip density. Here we find that the latter advances chemotactically towards the tumour driven by a soliton (similar to the famous Korteweg-de Vries soliton) whose shape and velocity change slowly. Analysing these collective coordinates paves the way for controlling angiogenesis through the soliton, the engine that drives this process.

  18. Pressure driven particulate flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ingher, M.S.; Mondy, L.A.

    1996-03-01

    Numerical simulations of pressure-driven particulate Stokes flows are performed in cylindrical and rectangular conduits using a parallel boundary element code. Spherical particles are randomly placed in the conduits and a pressure drop between the ends of the conduits is imposed by the boundary conditions to induce a Poiseuille-like flow field. The instantaneous velocities of the particles are then calculated, as well as the additional pressure drop necessary to maintain a constant flow rate. Because the results depend on the spatial distribution of the particles, several random configurations of particles are examined for each case. Depending on two different interpretations of the numerical results, the solid phase can be represented as either leading or lagging the fluid phase. Both of the analyses and interpretations are presented.

  19. Optically driven nanotube actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shaoxin; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2005-11-01

    Optically driven actuators have been fabricated from single-wall carbon nanotube-polymer composite sheets. Like natural muscles, the millimetre-scale actuators are assemblies of millions of individual nanotube actuators processed into macroscopic length scales and bonded to an acrylic elastomer sheet to form an actuator that have been shown to generate higher stress than natural muscles and higher strains than high-modulus piezoelectric materials. Strain measurements revealed 0.01%-0.3% elastic strain generated due to electrostatic and thermal effects under visible light intensities of 5-120 mW cm-2. An optically actuated nanotube gripper is demonstrated to show manipulation of small objects. This actuation technology overcomes some of the fundamental limitations such as the use of high voltages or electrochemical solutions for actuation, opening up possibilities for remote light-induced actuation technologies.

  20. Microheaters based on ultrasonic actuation of piezoceramic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visvanathan, Karthik; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the use of micromachined lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoceramic elements for heat generation by ultrasonic energy dissipated within the elements and surrounding media. Simulations based on three-dimensional finite-element models suggest that circular disk-shaped elements provide superior steady-state temperature rise for a given cross-sectional area, volume of the PZT element and drive voltage. Experimental validation is performed using PZT-5A heaters of 3.2 mm diameter and 0.191 mm thickness. Single-element heaters and dual-element stacks are evaluated. Although the steady-state temperature generated by these heaters reaches the maximum value at the frequency of maximum electromechanical conductance, the heating effectiveness is maximized at the frequency of maximum electromechanical impedance. Stacked PZT heaters provide 3.5 times the temperature rise and 3 times greater heating effectiveness than single elements. Furthermore, the heaters attain the maximum heating effectiveness when bonded to highly damping and non-conducting substrates. A maximum temperature of 120 °C is achieved at 160 mW input power. Experiments are performed using porcine tissue samples to show the feasibility of using PZT heaters in tissue cauterization. A PZT heater probe brands a porcine tissue in 2-3 s with 10 VRMS drive voltage. The interface temperature is ≈150 °C.

  1. Compositionally Driven Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderlund, K. M.; Schubert, G.

    2014-12-01

    It is generally believed that compositional convection driven by inner core solidification is the main driver of the geodynamo. Thermal evolution considerations make it likely that compositional convection is also behind the present dynamos of Mercury and Ganymede as well as the early dynamos in the Moon, Mars and smaller solar system bodies. Compositional buoyancy can arise in several different ways, for example, through inner core solidification and FeS flotation with upward mixing and through freezing out and sinking of iron snow near the core-mantle boundary or deeper within the core. The mode of core cooling and freezing depends on conditions of temperature and pressure in the core and the concentration of light elements such as sulfur. Different distributions of compositional buoyancy will give rise to different patterns of core convection and dynamo magnetic fields. We report here the first results of a systematic study of the distribution of compositional buoyancy on the dynamo-generated magnetic fields, with an emphasis on Mars' core evolution due to iron rain.

  2. Invention-driven marketing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, William E.

    1994-01-01

    Suppose you have just created a revolutionary bicycle suspension which allows a bike to be ridden over rough terrain at 60 miles per hour. In addition, suppose that you are deeply concerned about the plight of hungry children. Which should you do: be sure all hungry children have bicycles; transfer the technology for your new suspension to bicycle manufacturers worldwide; or start a company to supply premium sports bicycle based on your patented technology, and donate the profits to a charity which feeds hungry children? Woven through this somewhat trivial example is the paradox of technology transfer - the supplier (owner) may want to transfer technology; but to succeed, he or she must reformulate the problem as a user need for which there is a new and better solution. Successful technology transfer is little more than good marketing applied to an existing invention, process, or capability. You must identify who needs the technology, why they need it, why the new technology is better than alternatives, how much the customers are willing and able to pay for these benefits, and how to distribute products based on the technology tc the target customers. In market-driven development, the term 'technology transfer' is rarely used. The developers focus on studying user needs and designing solution They may have technology needs, but they don't have technology in search of a use.

  3. Beam Driven Stratospheric Airship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onda, Masahiko

    2003-05-01

    Even though satellite, balloons and aircraft have served admirably as aerospace platforms for remote sensing and telecommunication, requirements for a new kind of platforms - an easily modifiable, sub-orbital platform - have been widely identified. The High-Altitude Long-Range Observational Platform(HALROP) was at first conceptualized as a solar power driven unmanned LTA (Lighter-Than-Air) vehicle or an airship to maintain a station-keeping position in the lower stratosphere for long-durations and to carry out missions such as high-resolution monitoring and high-speed informational relays. Nevertheless solar power is not available in winter seasons in the high-latitudinal regions. Therefore, alternative power sources are necessary and the candidates are surface-to-air transmission of microwave energy and high-power laser beams. The author introduces a wireless power transmission test by microwave carried in 1995 in Kobe, Japan, and then, discusses possibilities of using laser beam for powering such LTA platforms.

  4. Gradient Driven Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannell, David

    2005-01-01

    We have worked with our collaborators at the University of Milan (Professor Marzio Giglio and his group-supported by ASI) to define the science required to measure gradient driven fluctuations in the microgravity environment. Such a study would provide an accurate test of the extent to which the theory of fluctuating hydrodynamics can be used to predict the properties of fluids maintained in a stressed, non-equilibrium state. As mentioned above, the results should also provide direct visual insight into the behavior of a variety of fluid systems containing gradients or interfaces, when placed in the microgravity environment. With support from the current grant, we have identified three key systems for detailed investigation. These three systems are: 1) A single-component fluid to be studied in the presence of a temperature gradient; 2) A mixture of two organic liquids to be studied both in the presence of a temperature gradient, which induces a steady-state concentration gradient, and with the temperature gradient removed, but while the concentration gradient is dying by means of diffusion; 3) Various pairs of liquids undergoing free diffusion, including a proteidbuffer solution and pairs of mixtures having different concentrations, to allow us to vary the differences in fluid properties in a controlled manner.

  5. Driven Boson Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhofen, Sonja; Bartley, Tim J.; Sansoni, Linda; Kruse, Regina; Hamilton, Craig S.; Jex, Igor; Silberhorn, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Sampling the distribution of bosons that have undergone a random unitary evolution is strongly believed to be a computationally hard problem. Key to outperforming classical simulations of this task is to increase both the number of input photons and the size of the network. We propose driven boson sampling, in which photons are input within the network itself, as a means to approach this goal. We show that the mean number of photons entering a boson sampling experiment can exceed one photon per input mode, while maintaining the required complexity, potentially leading to less stringent requirements on the input states for such experiments. When using heralded single-photon sources based on parametric down-conversion, this approach offers an ˜e -fold enhancement in the input state generation rate over scattershot boson sampling, reaching the scaling limit for such sources. This approach also offers a dramatic increase in the signal-to-noise ratio with respect to higher-order photon generation from such probabilistic sources, which removes the need for photon number resolution during the heralding process as the size of the system increases.

  6. Electromagnetically driven liquid iris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Deasung; Jeong, Jin Won; Lee, Dae Young; Kim, Dae Geun; Chung, Sang Kug

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes a tunable liquid iris driven by electromagnetic actuation for miniature cameras. To examine the magnetic effect on a ferrofluid, the contact angle modification of a sessile ferrofluid droplet is tested using a neodymium magnet and an electric coil which 2.5 A current is applied to. The contact angle variations of the ferrofluid droplet for each test are 21.3 and 18.1 degrees, respectively. As a proof of concept, a pretest of a tunable iris actuated by electromagnetic effect is performed by using a hollow cylinder cell. As applying the current, the aperture diameter is adjusted from 4.06 mm at 0A to 3.21 mm at 2.0A. Finally, a tunable liquid iris (9 x 9 x 2 mm3) , consisting of two connected circular microchannels, is realized using MEMS technology. the aperture diameter of the tunable liquid iris is able to be modified from 1.72 mm at 0 A to 1.15 mm at 2.6 A. This tunable optical iris has potential applications not only for portable electronic devices but also in biomedical fields such as optical coherence tomography and microsurgery. This work was supported by 2016 Research Fund of Myongji University.

  7. Fluid driven recipricating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus comprising a pair of fluid driven pump assemblies in a back-to-back configuration to yield a bi-directional pump. Each of the pump assemblies includes a piston or diaphragm which divides a chamber therein to define a power section and a pumping section. An intake-exhaust valve is connected to each of the power sections of the pump chambers, and function to direct fluid, such as compressed air, into the power section and exhaust fluid therefrom. At least one of the pistons or diaphragms is connected by a rod assembly which is constructed to define a signal valve, whereby the intake-exhaust valve of one pump assembly is controlled by the position or location of the piston or diaphragm in the other pump assembly through the operation of the rod assembly signal valve. Each of the pumping sections of the pump assemblies are provided with intake and exhaust valves to enable filling of the pumping section with fluid and discharging fluid therefrom when a desired pressure has been reached.

  8. Fluid driven reciprocating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, J.C.

    1997-04-01

    An apparatus is described comprising a pair of fluid driven pump assemblies in a back-to-back configuration to yield a bi-directional pump. Each of the pump assemblies includes a piston or diaphragm which divides a chamber therein to define a power section and a pumping section. An intake-exhaust valve is connected to each of the power sections of the pump chambers, and function to direct fluid, such as compressed air, into the power section and exhaust fluid therefrom. At least one of the pistons or diaphragms is connected by a rod assembly which is constructed to define a signal valve, whereby the intake-exhaust valve of one pump assembly is controlled by the position or location of the piston or diaphragm in the other pump assembly through the operation of the rod assembly signal valve. Each of the pumping sections of the pump assemblies are provided with intake and exhaust valves to enable filling of the pumping section with fluid and discharging fluid therefrom when a desired pressure has been reached. 13 figs.

  9. Fluid driven reciprocating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.C.

    1997-04-01

    An apparatus is described comprising a pair of fluid driven pump assemblies in a back-to-back configuration to yield a bi-directional pump. Each of the pump assemblies includes a piston or diaphragm which divides a chamber therein to define a power section and a pumping section. An intake-exhaust valve is connected to each of the power sections of the pump chambers, and function to direct fluid, such as compressed air, into the power section and exhaust fluid therefrom. At least one of the pistons or diaphragms is connected by a rod assembly which is constructed to define a signal valve, whereby the intake-exhaust valve of one pump assembly is controlled by the position or location of the piston or diaphragm in the other pump assembly through the operation of the rod assembly signal valve. Each of the pumping sections of the pump assemblies are provided with intake and exhaust valves to enable filling of the pumping section with fluid and discharging fluid therefrom when a desired pressure has been reached. 13 figs.

  10. Wind driven air pump

    SciTech Connect

    Beisel, V.A.

    1983-05-31

    An improved pump for lifting water from an underground source utilizes a wind motor for driving an oil-less air compressor eliminating oil contamination of ground water which is forced to the surface. The wind motor is movable to face the wind by means of a novel swivel assembly which also eliminates the formation and freezing of condensate within the airline from the compressor. The propeller blades of the wind motor and the tail section are formed from a pair of opposed convex air foil shaped surfaces which provide the propeller blades and the tail section with fast sensitivity to slight changes in wind direction and speed. A novel well tower for supporting the wind motor and compressor and for lifting the water from the underground source is an optional modification which requires no welding and eliminates the problem of condensate freezing in the airline going to the well. The wind driven air pump disclosed is lightweight, can be easily installed, is relatively inexpensive to produce and is virtually maintenance-free and capable of operating in winds exceeding 100 miles per hour.

  11. Exchange-driven growth.

    PubMed

    Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2003-09-01

    We study a class of growth processes in which clusters evolve via exchange of particles. We show that depending on the rate of exchange there are three possibilities: (I) Growth-clusters grow indefinitely, (II) gelation-all mass is transformed into an infinite gel in a finite time, and (III) instant gelation. In regimes I and II, the cluster size distribution attains a self-similar form. The large size tail of the scaling distribution is Phi(x) approximately exp(-x(2-nu)), where nu is a homogeneity degree of the rate of exchange. At the borderline case nu=2, the distribution exhibits a generic algebraic tail, Phi(x) approximately x(-5). In regime III, the gel nucleates immediately and consumes the entire system. For finite systems, the gelation time vanishes logarithmically, T approximately [lnN](-(nu-2)), in the large system size limit N--> infinity. The theory is applied to coarsening in the infinite range Ising-Kawasaki model and in electrostatically driven granular layers.

  12. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, D.H.

    1984-08-30

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water. 1 fig.

  13. Smart friction driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, Rainer; Gaul, Lothar

    2005-02-01

    Vibration properties of most assembled mechanical systems depend on frictional damping in joints. The nonlinear transfer behavior of the frictional interfaces often provides the dominant damping mechanism in a built-up structure and plays an important role in the vibratory response of the structure (Gaul and Nitsche 2001 Appl. Mech. Rev. 54 93-105). For improving the performance of systems, many studies have been carried out to predict, measure and/or enhance the energy dissipation of friction. To enhance the friction damping in joint connections a semi-active joint is investigated. A rotational joint connection is designed and manufactured such that the normal force in the friction interface can be influenced with a piezoelectric stack disc. With the piezoelectric device the normal force and thus the friction damping in the joint connection can be controlled. A control design method, namely semi-active control, is investigated. The recently developed LuGre friction model is used to describe the nonlinear transfer behavior of joints. This model is based on a bristle model and turns out to be highly suitable for systems assembled by such smart joints. Those systems can also be regarded as friction driven systems, since the energy flow is controlled by smart joints. The semi-active method is well suited for large space structures since the friction damping in joints turned out to be a major source of damping. To show the applicability of the proposed concept to large space structures a two-beam system representing a part of a large space structure is considered. Two flexible beams are connected with a semi-active joint connection. It can be shown that the damping of the system can be improved significantly by controlling the normal force in the semi-active joint connection. Experimental results validate the damping improvement due to the semi-active friction damping.

  14. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, David H.

    1986-01-01

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water.

  15. Comments on event driven animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Julian E.

    1987-01-01

    Event driven animation provides a general method of describing controlling values for various computer animation techniques. A definition and comments are provided on genralizing motion description with events. Additional comments are also provided about the implementation of twixt.

  16. Data-driven batch schuduling

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, John; Denehy, Tim; Arpaci - Dusseau, Remzi; Livny, Miron; Arpaci - Dusseau, Andrea C

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we develop data-driven strategies for batch computing schedulers. Current CPU-centric batch schedulers ignore the data needs within workloads and execute them by linking them transparently and directly to their needed data. When scheduled on remote computational resources, this elegant solution of direct data access can incur an order of magnitude performance penalty for data-intensive workloads. Adding data-awareness to batch schedulers allows a careful coordination of data and CPU allocation thereby reducing the cost of remote execution. We offer here new techniques by which batch schedulers can become data-driven. Such systems can use our analytical predictive models to select one of the four data-driven scheduling policies that we have created. Through simulation, we demonstrate the accuracy of our predictive models and show how they can reduce time to completion for some workloads by as much as 80%.

  17. Surface tension driven convection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1988-01-01

    Thermocapillary flow is driven by a thermally induced surface tension variation along a liquid free surface. In the Earth-gravity environment such flows are usually overshadowed by buoyancy driven flows, but at reduced gravity conditions their influence could be significant. A comprehensive theoretical and experimental research program was stated 12 years ago and is still being continued. Past work done at Case Western Reserve University as well as work done by others is reviewed. The justification for low-gravity experiments is presented.

  18. Test Driven Development: Performing Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bache, Emily

    The art of Test Driven Development (TDD) is a skill that needs to be learnt, and which needs time and practice to master. In this workshop a select number of conference participants with considerable skill and experience are invited to perform code katas [1]. The aim is for them to demonstrate excellence and the use of Test Driven Development, and result in some high quality code. This would be for the benefit of the many programmers attending the conference, who could come along and witness high quality code being written using TDD, and get a chance to ask questions and provide feedback.

  19. Magnetically driven quantum heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Enrique; Peña, Francisco J.

    2014-05-01

    We studied the efficiency of two different schemes for a magnetically driven quantum heat engine, by considering as the "working substance" a single nonrelativistic particle trapped in a cylindrical potential well, in the presence of an external magnetic field. The first scheme is a cycle, composed of two adiabatic and two isoenergetic reversible trajectories in configuration space. The trajectories are driven by a quasistatic modulation of the external magnetic-field intensity. The second scheme is a variant of the former, where the isoenergetic trajectories are replaced by isothermal ones, along which the system is in contact with macroscopic thermostats. This second scheme constitutes a quantum analog of the classical Carnot cycle.

  20. Programming of sensor driven pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Strobel, J S; Kay, G N

    2000-02-01

    The chronotropic response is the most important means by which cardiac output is increased and oxygen delivery is maintained in response to increased oxygen consumption during exercise or stress. When the chronotropic response is suboptimal or absent, exercise intolerance results. This condition, called chronotropic incompetence can be treated effectively with a sensor-driven rate-responsive pacemaker. The effectiveness of this therapy assumes that the pacemaker is programmed appropriately. This article focuses on the programming of sensor-driven pacemakers and provides additional suggestions for follow-up testing to ensure maximal benefit from these devices.

  1. Magnetically driven quantum heat engine.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Enrique; Peña, Francisco J

    2014-05-01

    We studied the efficiency of two different schemes for a magnetically driven quantum heat engine, by considering as the "working substance" a single nonrelativistic particle trapped in a cylindrical potential well, in the presence of an external magnetic field. The first scheme is a cycle, composed of two adiabatic and two isoenergetic reversible trajectories in configuration space. The trajectories are driven by a quasistatic modulation of the external magnetic-field intensity. The second scheme is a variant of the former, where the isoenergetic trajectories are replaced by isothermal ones, along which the system is in contact with macroscopic thermostats. This second scheme constitutes a quantum analog of the classical Carnot cycle.

  2. Capillary-driven microfluidic chips with evaporation-induced flow control and dielectrophoretic microbead trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temiz, Yuksel; Skorucak, Jelena; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2014-07-01

    This work reports our efforts on developing simple-to-use microfluidic devices for point-of-care diagnostic applications with recent extensions that include the trapping of microbeads using dielectrophoresis (DEP) and the modulation of the liquid flow using integrated microheaters. DEP serves the purpose of trapping microbeads coated with receptors and analytes for detection of a fluorescent signal. The microheater is actuated once the chip is filled by capillarity, creating an evaporation-induced flow tuned according to assay conditions. The chips are composed of a glass substrate patterned with 50-nm-thick Pd electrodes and microfluidic structures made using a 20-μm-thick dry-film resist (DFR). Chips are covered/sealed by low temperature (50°C) lamination of a 50-μm-thick DFR layer having excellent optical and mechanical properties. To separate cleaned and sealed chips from the wafer, we used an effective chip singulation technique which we informally call the "chip-olate" process. In the experimental section, we first studied dielectrophoretic trapping of 10-μm beads for flow rates ranging from 80 pL s-1 to 2.5 nL s-1 that are generated by an external syringe pump. Then, we characterized the embedded microheater in DFR-covered chips. Flow rates as high as 8 nL s-1 were generated by evaporation-induced flow when the heater was biased by 10 V, corresponding to 270-mW power. Finally, DEP-based trapping and fluorescent detection of functionalized beads were demonstrated as the flow was generated by evaporation-induced flow after the microfluidic structures were filled by capillarity.

  3. Data-Driven Proficiency Profiling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mostafavi, Behrooz; Liu, Zhongxiu; Barnes, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Deep Thought is a logic tutor where students practice constructing deductive logic proofs. Within Deep Thought is a data-driven mastery learning system (DDML), which calculates student proficiency based on rule scores weighted by expert-decided weights in order to assign problem sets of appropriate difficulty. In this study, we designed and tested…

  4. Driven shielding capacitive proximity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor); McConnell, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A capacitive proximity sensing element, backed by a reflector driven at the same voltage as and in phase with the sensor, is used to reflect the field lines away from a grounded robot arm towards an intruding object, thus dramatically increasing the sensor's range and sensitivity.

  5. Work(er)-Driven Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The focus on innovation as a foundational element of enhanced organisational performance has led to the promoting and valuing of greater levels of employee participation in innovation processes. An emergent concept of employee-driven innovation could be argued to have hindered understandings of the creative and transformative nature of…

  6. Patron-Driven Ebook Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breitbach, William; Lambert, Joy E.

    2011-01-01

    Selecting the most appropriate content for a community is a challenge librarians have faced since the dawn of libraries. Formal patron-driven acquisition (PDA) models have been around for at least a decade. These models attempt to collect materials based on known patron demand. Some libraries simply use a suggestion form, while others use…

  7. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W.-M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J.; Ayyub, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈0.25 μm) layer of 25-30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2×1018  W/cm2. However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration.

  8. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W.-M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J.; Ayyub, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈0.25 μm) layer of 25–30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2×1018  W/cm2. However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration. PMID:26153048

  9. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W-M; Trivikram, T Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangsu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J; Ayyub, P; Sheng, Z M; Krishnamurthy, M

    2015-07-08

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈ 0.25 μm) layer of 25-30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2 × 10(18)  W/cm(2). However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration.

  10. Pointers on Guidance and Counseling Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Calvin E.

    This paper assumes five basic functions for the community college guidance and counseling program: (1) applicant consulting (interpreting test results, introducing career planning, aiding the student in course selection, and explaining curricular requirements); (2) student advisement (scheduling students, explaining Senior College requirements and…

  11. Pulsed Power Driven Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.

    1999-11-22

    Pulsed power is a robust and inexpensive technology for obtaining high powers. Considerable progress has been made on developing light ion beams as a means of transporting this power to inertial fusion capsules. However, further progress is hampered by the lack of an adequate ion source. Alternatively, z-pinches can efficiently convert pulsed power into thermal radiation, which can be used to drive an inertial fusion capsule. However, a z-pinch driven fusion explosion will destroy a portion of the transmission line that delivers the electrical power to the z-pinch. They investigate several options for providing standoff for z-pinch driven fusion. Recyclable Transmission Lines (RTLs) appear to be the most promising approach.

  12. A WEIGHT-DRIVEN KYMOGRAPH.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, A R

    1928-07-20

    (1) Herein has been described a stand for supporting the drum, a device for starting and stopping the drum and a circuit-breaker for a weight-driven kymograph (2) This device has proved satisfactory for recording simple muscular contractions, for securing data for the determination of the speed of the nerve-impulse and for determining reaction times (3) With but a little training in technic, college freshmen have secured very good graphs with this apparatus (4) This machine, exclusive of the drum, has been constructed at less than one third the cost of a spring-driven kymograph, and the drum of the latter may readily be used for either, since but a few minutes are required to make the shift.

  13. Libration-driven multipolar instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cébron, D.; Vantieghem, S.; Herreman, W.

    2014-01-01

    We consider rotating flows in non-axisymmetric enclosures that are driven by libration, i.e. by a small periodic modulation of the rotation rate. Thanks to its simplicity, this model is relevant to various contexts, from industrial containers (with small oscillations of the rotation rate) to fluid layers of terrestial planets (with length-of-day variations). Assuming a multipolar $n$-fold boundary deformation, we first obtain the two-dimensional basic flow. We then perform a short-wavelength local stability analysis of the basic flow, showing that an instability may occur in three dimensions. We christen it the Libration Driven Multipolar Instability (LDMI). The growth rates of the LDMI are computed by a Floquet analysis in a systematic way, and compared to analytical expressions obtained by perturbation methods. We then focus on the simplest geometry allowing the LDMI, a librating deformed cylinder. To take into account viscous and confinement effects, we perform a global stability analysis, which shows that the LDMI results from a parametric resonance of inertial modes. Performing numerical simulations of this librating cylinder, we confirm that the basic flow is indeed established and report the first numerical evidence of the LDMI. Numerical results, in excellent agreement with the stability results, are used to explore the non-linear regime of the instability (amplitude and viscous dissipation of the driven flow). We finally provide an example of LDMI in a deformed spherical container to show that the instability mechanism is generic. Our results show that the previously studied libration driven elliptical instability simply corresponds to the particular case $n=2$ of a wider class of instabilities. Summarizing, this work shows that any oscillating non-axisymmetric container in rotation may excite intermittent, space-filling LDMI flows, and this instability should thus be easy to observe experimentally.

  14. Mission Driven Science at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Thackery, Michael; Wang, Michael; Young, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Mission driven science at Argonne means applying science and scientific knowledge to a physical and "real world" environment. Examples include testing a theoretical model through the use of formal science or solving a practical problem through the use of natural science. At the laboratory, our materials scientists are leading the way in producing energy solutions today that could help reduce and remove the energy crisis of tomorrow.

  15. Driven optical matter (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figliozzi, Patrick; Sule, Nishant; Yan, Zijie; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan; Rice, Stuart A.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2016-09-01

    Optical trapping has enabled studying a wide variety of questions and systems in chemistry, biology, physics, and materials science. For example, optical trapping has been used to understand hydrodynamic interactions in dilute and dense colloidal fluids and discover connections to granular materials. In this presentation we show that shaped optical fields and gradients can be used to study the electrodynamic interactions amongst nanoparticles (NPs) and drive them into new ordered states. We demonstrate the formation and use of NP-based optical matter to study a range of nonequilibrium phenomena in solution; field-driven barrier crossing phenomena and noise-driven ordering. Optical matter, a material that forms only in the presence of an optical field, involves NP interactions by optical scattering and interference. Metal NPs can be formed into regular arrangements in minimally shaped fields; e.g., in focused Gaussian beams, line traps, and optical ring traps. Inter-particle interactions and motions are also affected when the optical matter is driven. Particles recirculate in an optical ring vortex trap allowing long term measurements to examine rare events. In particular, particles can hop between optical binding sites, move past electrodynamic obstacles or pass each other while moving around the ring. The polarization state of the optical beam can be used to produce periodic variations of the NP electrodynamic interactions. As particles circulate this "noise" causes NP clusters to be less stable as if the temperature of the system is increased. Conversely, we observe noise-driven ordering in dense systems. We will explain these phenomena using simulations and theory.

  16. Inflation driven by unification energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Mark P.; Wilczek, Frank

    2017-03-01

    We examine the hypothesis that inflation is primarily driven by vacuum energy at a scale indicated by gauge coupling unification. Concretely, we consider a class of hybrid inflation models wherein the vacuum energy associated with a grand unified theory condensate provides the dominant energy during inflation, while a second "inflaton" scalar slow rolls. We show that it is possible to obtain significant tensor-to-scalar ratios while fitting the observed spectral index.

  17. Heterogeneity in motor driven transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabei, Ali

    2015-03-01

    I will discuss quantitative analysis of particle tracking data for motor driven vesicles inside an insulin secreting cell. We use this method to study the dynamical and structural heterogeneity inside the cell. I will discuss our effort to explain the origin of observed heterogeneity in intracellular transport. Finally, I will explain how analyzing directional correlations in transport trajectories reveals self-similarity in the diffusion media.

  18. Deformation Driven Alloying and Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-03

    OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. University of Wisconsin - Madison RESERACH & SPONSORED PROGRAMS 21 N. PARK ...Research Triangle Park , NC 27709-2211 Deformation Alloying, Mechanochemical Transduction, Multilayer, Driven System REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11...Styczynski A, Hartig C, Bohlen J, Letzig D. Scripta Mater 2004;50:943. [17] Sieber H, Park J, Weissmüller J, Perepezko J. Acta Mater 2001;49:1139

  19. Driven one-component plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzato, Felipe B.; Pakter, Renato; Levin, Yan

    2009-08-15

    A statistical theory is presented that allows the calculation of the stationary state achieved by a driven one-component plasma after a process of collisionless relaxation. The stationary Vlasov equation with appropriate boundary conditions is reduced to an ordinary differential equation, which is then solved numerically. The solution is then compared with the molecular-dynamics simulation. A perfect agreement is found between the theory and the simulations. The full current-voltage phase diagram is constructed.

  20. Kinetics of accelerator driven devices

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.T.; Buksa, J.; Houts, M.

    1994-09-01

    Kinetic calculations were made to show that subcritical accelerator driven devices are robust and stable. The calculations show that large changes in reactivity that would lead to an uncontrollable excursion in a reactor would lead only to a new power level in subcritical device. Calculations were also made to show the rate of power changes resulting from startup and shutdown, and that methods also exist for continuously monitoring the reactivity of a subcritical system.

  1. Wind driven power generating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Andruszkiw, W.; Andrushkiw, R.

    1986-10-14

    A vertically adjustable wind driven power generating apparatus comprised of, in combination, a well in which is vertically movably mounted a wind driven power generating apparatus comprised of: (i) a wind driven power generating means comprised of a tubular housing having rotatably mounted therein a horizontally extending shaft. The shaft has a centrally disposed bevel gear fixedly attached thereto and helical vanes disposed longitudinally on both sides of the bevel gear; (ii) means for vertical movement of the tubular housing within the well comprised of (a) a hollow vertical support column having a circular cross section and having one end thereof attached to the bottom of the tubular housing and (b) a vertically extending hollow tubular member having a hollow interior fixedly mounted at its bottom end in the floor of the well and being open at its other end, the tubular member adapted to telescopically receive the vertical support column in its open end; (iii) vertical movement control means comprised of (a) downward movement control means comprising an inverted wing system generating inverse-lift mounted on the tubular housing, and (b) upward movement control means comprising a cylinder having an axially movable piston therein; (iv) power transmission means comprising a vertically extending power transmitting shaft that drives a power generator.

  2. Novelty-Driven Cooperative Coevolution.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Jorge; Mariano, Pedro; Christensen, Anders Lyhne

    2015-12-14

    Cooperative coevolutionary algorithms (CCEAs) rely on multiple coevolving populations for the evolution of solutions composed of coadapted components. CCEAs enable, for instance, the evolution of cooperative multiagent systems composed of heterogeneous agents, where each agent is modelled as a component of the solution. Previous works have, however, shown that CCEAs are biased toward stability: the evolutionary process tends to converge prematurely to stable states instead of (near-)optimal solutions. In this study, we show how novelty search can be used to avoid the counterproductive attraction to stable states in coevolution. Novelty search is an evolutionary technique that drives evolution toward behavioural novelty and diversity rather than exclusively pursuing a static objective. We evaluate three novelty-based approaches that rely on, respectively (1) the novelty of the team as a whole, (2) the novelty of the agents' individual behaviour, and (3) the combination of the two. We compare the proposed approaches with traditional fitness-driven cooperative coevolution in three simulated multirobot tasks. Our results show that team-level novelty scoring is the most effective approach, significantly outperforming fitness-driven coevolution at multiple levels. Novelty-driven cooperative coevolution can substantially increase the potential of CCEAs while maintaining a computational complexity that scales well with the number of populations.

  3. Edge-driven microplate kinematics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.; Gallo, David G.

    1993-01-01

    It is known from plate tectonic reconstructions that oceanic microplates undergo rapid rotation about a vertical axis and that the instantaneous rotation axes describing the microplate's motion relative to the bounding major plates are frequently located close to its margins with those plates, close to the tips of propagating rifts. We propose a class of edge-driven block models to illustrate how slip across the microplate margins, block rotation, and propagation of rifting may be related to the relative motion of the plates on either side. An important feature of these edge-driven models is that the instantaneous rotation axes are always located on the margins between block and two bounding plates. According to those models the pseudofaults or traces of disrupted seafloor resulting from the propagation of rifting between microplate and major plates may be used independently to approximately trace the continuous kinematic evolution of the microplate back in time. Pseudofault geometries and matching rotations of the Easter microplate show that for most of its 5 m.y. history, block rotation could be driven by the drag of the Nazca and Pacific plates on the microplate's edges rather than by a shear flow of mantle underneath.

  4. Edge-driven microplate kinematics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.; Gallo, David G.

    1993-01-01

    It is known from plate tectonic reconstructions that oceanic microplates undergo rapid rotation about a vertical axis and that the instantaneous rotation axes describing the microplate's motion relative to the bounding major plates are frequently located close to its margins with those plates, close to the tips of propagating rifts. We propose a class of edge-driven block models to illustrate how slip across the microplate margins, block rotation, and propagation of rifting may be related to the relative motion of the plates on either side. An important feature of these edge-driven models is that the instantaneous rotation axes are always located on the margins between block and two bounding plates. According to those models the pseudofaults or traces of disrupted seafloor resulting from the propagation of rifting between microplate and major plates may be used independently to approximately trace the continuous kinematic evolution of the microplate back in time. Pseudofault geometries and matching rotations of the Easter microplate show that for most of its 5 m.y. history, block rotation could be driven by the drag of the Nazca and Pacific plates on the microplate's edges rather than by a shear flow of mantle underneath.

  5. Is "Market-Driven" Good Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Roger

    1995-01-01

    Discusses marketing and management strategies and evaluates the path most traveled; going beyond market-driven; proactive and reactive organizational positioning; ways to manage human and physical resources to make both market-driven and market-making contributions; and values necessary for an organization to move from market-driven to…

  6. Ontology-Driven Information Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tissot, Florence; Menzel, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Ontology-driven information integration (ODII) is a method of computerized, automated sharing of information among specialists who have expertise in different domains and who are members of subdivisions of a large, complex enterprise (e.g., an engineering project, a government agency, or a business). In ODII, one uses rigorous mathematical techniques to develop computational models of engineering and/or business information and processes. These models are then used to develop software tools that support the reliable processing and exchange of information among the subdivisions of this enterprise or between this enterprise and other enterprises.

  7. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Cork, Christopher P.; Becker, John A.; Knapp, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  8. Catastrophe-driven vs what?

    SciTech Connect

    Stever, H.G.

    1995-12-31

    The author notes that much has been accomplished by catastrophe-driven scientific effort. Examples include World War II and the social wars against crime, poverty and hunger and famine. A positive approach is suggested to be more appropriate as the drivers of science. Three tables are presented and outline a positive base for justifying scientific endeavor: (1) Examples of Major Societal Goals to Which Science and Technology Contribute. (2) Policy Areas That Would Benefit from the Articulation of Long-Term S&T Goals; and (3) Major Components of the Science and Technology Base.

  9. Driven fragmentation of granular gases.

    PubMed

    Cruz Hidalgo, Raúl; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2008-06-01

    The dynamics of homogeneously heated granular gases which fragment due to particle collisions is analyzed. We introduce a kinetic model which accounts for correlations induced at the grain collisions and analyze both the kinetics and relevant distribution functions these systems develop. The work combines analytical and numerical studies based on direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. A broad family of fragmentation probabilities is considered, and its implications for the system kinetics are discussed. We show that generically these driven materials evolve asymptotically into a dynamical scaling regime. If the fragmentation probability tends to a constant, the grain number diverges at a finite time, leading to a shattering singularity. If the fragmentation probability vanishes, then the number of grains grows monotonously as a power law. We consider different homogeneous thermostats and show that the kinetics of these systems depends weakly on both the grain inelasticity and driving. We observe that fragmentation plays a relevant role in the shape of the velocity distribution of the particles. When the fragmentation is driven by local stochastic events, the long velocity tail is essentially exponential independently of the heating frequency and the breaking rule. However, for a Lowe-Andersen thermostat, numerical evidence strongly supports the conjecture that the scaled velocity distribution follows a generalized exponential behavior f(c) approximately exp(-cn) , with n approximately 1.2 , regarding less the fragmentation mechanisms.

  10. Magnetically driven quantum heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Enrique; Pena, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    In analogy with classical thermodynamics, a quantum heat engine generates useful mechanical work from heat, by means of a reversible sequence of transformations (trajectories), where the ``working substance'' is of quantum mechanical nature. Several theoretical implementations for a quantum heat engine have been discussed in the literature, such as entangled states in a qubit, quantum mechanical versions of the Otto cycle, and photocells. In this work, we propose yet a different alternative by introducing the concept of a magnetically driven quantum heat engine. We studied the efficiency of such system, by considering as the ``working substance'' a single nonrelativistic particle trapped in a cylindrical potential well, as a model for a semiconductor quantum dot, in the presence of an external magnetic field. The trajectories are driven by a quasistatic modulation of the external magnetic-field intensity, while the system is in contact with macroscopic thermostats. The external magnetic field modulation allows to modify the effective geometric confinement, in analogy with a piston in a classical gas. E. Munoz acknowledges financial support from Fondecyt under Contract 1141146.

  11. Investigating Reaction-Driven Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.; Savage, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many metamorphic reactions lead to large volume changes, and potentially to reaction-driven cracking [1,2]. Large-scale hydration of mantle peridotite to produce serpentine or talc is invoked to explain the rheology of plate boundaries, the nature of earthquakes, and the seismic properties of slow-spread ocean crust and the 'mantle wedge' above subduction zones. Carbonation of peridotite may be an important sink in the global carbon cycle. Zones of 100% magnesite + quartz replacing peridotite, up to 200 m thick, formed where oceanic mantle was thrust over carbonate-bearing metasediments in Oman. Talc + carbonate is an important component of the matrix in subduction mélanges at Santa Catalina Island , California, and the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, Japan. Engineered systems to emulate natural mineral carbonation could provide relatively inexpensive CO2 capture and storage [3]. More generally, engineered reaction-driven cracking could supplement or replace hydraulic fracture in geothermal systems, solution mining, and extraction of tight oil and gas. The controls on reaction-driven cracking are poorly understood. Hydration and carbonation reactions can be self-limiting, since they potentially reduce permeability and armor reactive surfaces [4]. Also, in some cases, hydration or carbonation may take place at constant volume. Small changes in volume due to precipitation of solid products increases stress, destabilizing solid reactants, until precipitation and dissolution rates become equal at a steady state stress [5]. In a third case, volume change due to precipitation of solid products causes brittle failure. This has been invoked on qualitative grounds to explain, e.g., complete serpentinization of mantle peridotite [6]. Below ~ 300°C, the available potential energy for hydration and carbonation of olivine could produce stresses of 100's of MPa [2], sufficient to fracture rocks to 10 km depth or more, causing brittle failure below the steady state stress required

  12. Elasticity-Driven Backflow of Fluid-Driven Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ching-Yao; Zheng, Zhong; Dressaire, Emilie; Ramon, Guy; Huppert, Herbert E.; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-11-01

    Fluid-driven cracks are generated by the injection of pressurized fluid into an elastic medium. Once the injection pressure is released, the crack closes up due to elasticity and the fluid in the crack drains out of the crack through an outlet, which we refer to as backflow. We experimentally study the effects of crack size, elasticity of the matrix, and fluid viscosity on the backflow dynamics. During backflow, the volume of liquid remaining in the crack as a function of time exhibits a transition from a fast decay at early times to a power law behavior at late times. Our results at late times can be explained by scaling arguments balancing elastic and viscous stresses in the crack. This work may relate to the environmental issue of flowback in hydraulic fracturing. This work is supported by National Science Foundation via Grant CBET-1509347 and partially supported by Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment at Princeton University.

  13. Extreme driven ion acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, L.; Shagalov, A. G.

    2017-08-01

    The excitation of large amplitude, strongly nonlinear ion acoustic waves from trivial equilibrium by a chirped frequency drive is discussed. Under certain conditions, after passage through the linear resonance in this system, the nonlinearity and the variation of parameters work in tandem to preserve the phase-locking with the driving wave via excursion of the excited ion acoustic wave in its parameter space, yielding controlled growth of the wave amplitude. We study these autoresonant waves via a fully nonlinear warm fluid model and predict the formation of sharply peaked (extreme) ion acoustic excitations with local ion density significantly exceeding the unperturbed plasma density. The driven wave amplitude is bound by the kinetic wave-breaking, as the local maximum fluid velocity of the wave approaches the phase velocity of the drive. The Vlasov-Poisson simulations are used to confirm the results of the fluid model, and Whitham's averaged variational principle is applied for analyzing the evolution of autoresonant ion acoustic waves.

  14. Light-driven phase shifter

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.

    1990-01-01

    A light-driven phase shifter is provided for modulating a transmission light beam. A gaseous medium such as argon is provided with electron energy states excited to populate a metastable state. A tunable dye laser is selected with a wavelength effective to deplete the metastable electron state and may be intensity modulated. The dye laser is directed through the gaseous medium to define a first optical path having an index of refraction determined by the gaseous medium having a depleted metastable electron state. A transmission laser beam is also directed through the gaseous medium to define a second optical path at least partially coincident with the first optical path. The intensity of the dye laser beam may then be varied to phase modulate the transmission laser beam.

  15. Impulse-driven Micromechanism Capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Takahiro; Ishimori, Shohei; Hayashi, Teru

    We have developed a traveling small capsule, which has a smooth outer surface and is driven by inertia force and friction force. Measuring only 7 mm in diameter and 12 mm in length, it is sufficiently small to be placed in the human gullet or intestines. The capsule contains a small magnet and a coil, and an electric pulse drives the magnet to move the capsule. We performed an experimental investigation on making our capsule travel on a plastic material, which has similar elasticity characteristics to the living body. We also showed that it can travel on the surface of a pig's intestine. Our capsule may be useful for medical treatments such as inspection, drug delivery and operation.

  16. Photogated humidity-driven motility

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lidong; Liang, Haoran; Jacob, Jolly; Naumov, Panče

    2015-01-01

    Hygroinduced motion is a fundamental process of energy conversion that is essential for applications that require contactless actuation in response to the day–night rhythm of atmospheric humidity. Here we demonstrate that mechanical bistability caused by rapid and anisotropic adsorption and desorption of water vapour by a flexible dynamic element that harnesses the chemical potential across very small humidity gradients for perpetual motion can be effectively modulated with light. A mechanically robust material capable of rapid exchange of water with the surroundings is prepared that undergoes swift locomotion in effect to periodic shape reconfiguration with turnover frequency of <150 min−1. The element can lift objects ∼85 times heavier and can transport cargos ∼20 times heavier than itself. Having an azobenzene-containing conjugate as a photoactive dopant, this entirely humidity-driven self-actuation can be controlled remotely with ultraviolet light, thus setting a platform for next-generation smart biomimetic hybrids. PMID:26067649

  17. Multifunctionalities driven by ferroic domains

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J. C.; Huang, Y. L.; Chu, Y. H.; He, Q.

    2014-08-14

    Considerable attention has been paid to ferroic systems in pursuit of advanced applications in past decades. Most recently, the emergence and development of multiferroics, which exhibit the coexistence of different ferroic natures, has offered a new route to create functionalities in the system. In this manuscript, we step from domain engineering to explore a roadmap for discovering intriguing phenomena and multifunctionalities driven by periodic domain patters. As-grown periodic domains, offering exotic order parameters, periodic local perturbations and the capability of tailoring local spin, charge, orbital and lattice degrees of freedom, are introduced as modeling templates for fundamental studies and novel applications. We discuss related significant findings on ferroic domain, nanoscopic domain walls, and conjunct heterostructures based on the well-organized domain patterns, and end with future prospects and challenges in the field.

  18. Laser-driven fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hedstrom, J.C.

    1973-10-01

    A laser-driven fusion reactor consisting of concentric spherical vessels in which the thermonuclear energy is derived from a deuterium-tritium (D + T) burn within a pellet'', located at the center of the vessels and initiated by a laser pulse. The resulting alpha -particle energy and a small fraction of the neutron energy are deposited within the pellet; this pellet energy is eventually transformed into sensible heat of lithium in a condenser outside the vessels. The remaining neutron energy is dissipated in a lithium blanket, located within the concentric vessels, where the fuel ingredient, tritium, is also produced. The heat content of the blanket and of the condenser lithium is eventually transferred to a conventional thermodynamic plant where the thermal energy is converted to electrical energy in a steam Rankine cycle. (Official Gazette)

  19. Solvent-driven chemical motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsumata, Tetsu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Gong, Jian Ping; Osada, Yoshihito

    1998-10-01

    A solvent-driven chemical motor using amphiphilic polymer gel has been fabricated. The driving force of the gel originates from the surface tension of spreading organic fluid which is pumped out by osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in the gel. A tetrahydrofurane-swollen gel equipped with a spouting hole made a controlled translational motion with a velocity of 77 mm/s or rotational motion with a maximum speed of 400 rpm and a torque of 10-9-10-7 Nm on the water surface. A generator to produce an electric power with a maximum electromotive force of 15 mV and electric power of 0.2 μW has also been constructed. The successful fabrication of gel motor may produce a new era of soft machine systems which work without pollution and unnecessary intermediates.

  20. Photogated humidity-driven motility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lidong; Liang, Haoran; Jacob, Jolly; Naumov, Panče

    2015-06-11

    Hygroinduced motion is a fundamental process of energy conversion that is essential for applications that require contactless actuation in response to the day-night rhythm of atmospheric humidity. Here we demonstrate that mechanical bistability caused by rapid and anisotropic adsorption and desorption of water vapour by a flexible dynamic element that harnesses the chemical potential across very small humidity gradients for perpetual motion can be effectively modulated with light. A mechanically robust material capable of rapid exchange of water with the surroundings is prepared that undergoes swift locomotion in effect to periodic shape reconfiguration with turnover frequency of <150 min(-1). The element can lift objects ∼85 times heavier and can transport cargos ∼20 times heavier than itself. Having an azobenzene-containing conjugate as a photoactive dopant, this entirely humidity-driven self-actuation can be controlled remotely with ultraviolet light, thus setting a platform for next-generation smart biomimetic hybrids.

  1. Photogated humidity-driven motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lidong; Liang, Haoran; Jacob, Jolly; Naumov, Panče

    2015-06-01

    Hygroinduced motion is a fundamental process of energy conversion that is essential for applications that require contactless actuation in response to the day-night rhythm of atmospheric humidity. Here we demonstrate that mechanical bistability caused by rapid and anisotropic adsorption and desorption of water vapour by a flexible dynamic element that harnesses the chemical potential across very small humidity gradients for perpetual motion can be effectively modulated with light. A mechanically robust material capable of rapid exchange of water with the surroundings is prepared that undergoes swift locomotion in effect to periodic shape reconfiguration with turnover frequency of <150 min-1. The element can lift objects ~85 times heavier and can transport cargos ~20 times heavier than itself. Having an azobenzene-containing conjugate as a photoactive dopant, this entirely humidity-driven self-actuation can be controlled remotely with ultraviolet light, thus setting a platform for next-generation smart biomimetic hybrids.

  2. Asynchronous Event-Driven Particle Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A

    2007-08-30

    We present, in a unifying way, the main components of three asynchronous event-driven algorithms for simulating physical systems of interacting particles. The first example, hard-particle molecular dynamics (MD), is well-known. We also present a recently-developed diffusion kinetic Monte Carlo (DKMC) algorithm, as well as a novel stochastic molecular-dynamics algorithm that builds on the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). We explain how to effectively combine event-driven and classical time-driven handling, and discuss some promises and challenges for event-driven simulation of realistic physical systems.

  3. Asynchronous Event-Driven Particle Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A

    2007-02-28

    We present in a unifying way the main components of three examples of asynchronous event-driven algorithms for simulating physical systems of interacting particles. The first example, hard-particle molecular dynamics (MD), is well-known. We also present a recently-developed diffusion kinetic Monte Carlo (DKMC) algorithm, as well as a novel event-driven algorithm for Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). Finally, we describe how to combine MD with DSMC in an event-driven framework, and discuss some promises and challenges for event-driven simulation of realistic physical systems.

  4. Phonological Learning with Output-Driven Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesar, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    The concept of an output-driven map formally characterizes an intuitive notion about phonology: that disparities between the input and the output are introduced only to the extent necessary to satisfy restrictions on outputs. When all of the grammars definable in a phonological system are output-driven, the implied structure provides significant…

  5. Schematic driven layout of Reed Solomon encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arave, Kari; Canaris, John; Miles, Lowell; Whitaker, Sterling

    1992-01-01

    Two Reed Solomon error correcting encoders are presented. Schematic driven layout tools were used to create the encoder layouts. Special consideration had to be given to the architecture and logic to provide scalability of the encoder designs. Knowledge gained from these projects was used to create a more flexible schematic driven layout system.

  6. Are coronal type II shocks piston driven?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Kundu, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    Flare blast waves and shocks piston driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been proposed to be responsible for generating type II radio bursts in the solar corona. The idea for piston-driven shocks came primarily from temporal association of shocks and CMEs. Our compilation of CME events with simultaneous radio observations with positional information supports idea of flare blast waves.

  7. Value Driven Information Processing and Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The objective of the project is to develop a general framework for value driven decentralized information processing...information value metrics as called for by different inference tasks. Major theoretical breakthroughs have been obtained under this effort...Sep-2012 22-Oct-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Value Driven Information Processing and Fusion The views

  8. Gravity-Driven Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, L. N.; Garagash, D.; Murdoch, L. C.; Robinowitz, M.

    2014-12-01

    This study is motived by a new method for disposing of nuclear waste by injecting it as a dense slurry into a hydraulic fracture that grows downward to great enough depth to permanently isolate the waste. Disposing of nuclear waste using gravity-driven hydraulic fractures is mechanically similar to the upward growth of dikes filled with low density magma. A fundamental question in both applications is how the injected fluid controls the propagation dynamics and fracture geometry (depth and breadth) in three dimensions. Analog experiments in gelatin [e.g., Heimpel and Olson, 1994; Taisne and Tait, 2009] show that fracture breadth (the short horizontal dimension) remains nearly stationary when the process in the fracture "head" (where breadth is controlled) is dominated by solid toughness, whereas viscous fluid dissipation is dominant in the fracture tail. We model propagation of the resulting gravity-driven (buoyant or sinking), finger-like fracture of stationary breadth with slowly varying opening along the crack length. The elastic response to fluid loading in a horizontal cross-section is local and can be treated similar to the classical Perkins-Kern-Nordgren (PKN) model of hydraulic fracturing. The propagation condition for a finger-like crack is based on balancing the global energy release rate due to a unit crack extension with the rock fracture toughness. It allows us to relate the net fluid pressure at the tip to the fracture breadth and rock toughness. Unlike the PKN fracture, where breadth is known a priori, the final breadth of a finger-like fracture is a result of processes in the fracture head. Because the head is much more open than the tail, viscous pressure drop in the head can be neglected leading to a 3D analog of Weertman's hydrostatic pulse. This requires relaxing the local elasticity assumption of the PKN model in the fracture head. As a result, we resolve the breadth, and then match the viscosity-dominated tail with the 3-D, toughness

  9. Dynamics of driven superconducting vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Cynthia Olson

    1998-09-01

    Vortices in superconductors exhibit rich dynamical behaviors that are relevant to the physical properties of the material. In this thesis, we use simulations to study the dynamics of flux-gradient-driven vortices in different types of samples. We make connections between the microscopic behavior of the vortices and macroscopic experimentally observable measurements. First, we systematically quantify the effect of the pinning landscape on the macroscopic properties of vortex avalanches and vortex plastic flow. We relate the velocity field, cumulative patterns of vortex flow channels, and voltage noise measurements with statistical quantities, such as distributions of avalanche sizes. Samples with a high density of strong pinning sites produce very broad avalanche distributions. Easy-flow vortex channels appear in samples with a low pinning density, and typical avalanche sizes emerge in an otherwise broad distribution of sizes. We observe a crossover from interstitial motion in narrow channels to pin-to-pin motion in broad channels as the pin density is increased. Second, we also analyze the microscopic dynamics of vortex motion through channels that form river-like fractal networks in a variety of superconducting samples, and relate it to macroscopic measurable quantities such as the power spectrum. As a function of pinning strength, we calculate the fractal dimension, tortuosity, and the corresponding voltage noise spectrum. Above a certain pinning strength, a remarkable universal drop in both tortuosity and noise power occurs when the vortex motion changes from braiding channels to unbraided channels. Third, we also present a new dynamic phase diagram for driven vortices with varying lattice softness that indicates that, at high driving currents, at least two distinct dynamic phases of flux flow appear depending on the vortex-vortex interaction strength. When the flux lattice is soft, the vortices flow in independently moving channels with smectic structure. For

  10. Evaluation of Respondent-Driven Sampling

    PubMed Central

    McCreesh, Nicky; Frost, Simon; Seeley, Janet; Katongole, Joseph; Tarsh, Matilda Ndagire; Ndunguse, Richard; Jichi, Fatima; Lunel, Natasha L; Maher, Dermot; Johnston, Lisa G; Sonnenberg, Pam; Copas, Andrew J; Hayes, Richard J; White, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Background Respondent-driven sampling is a novel variant of link-tracing sampling for estimating the characteristics of hard-to-reach groups, such as HIV prevalence in sex-workers. Despite its use by leading health organizations, the performance of this method in realistic situations is still largely unknown. We evaluated respondent-driven sampling by comparing estimates from a respondent-driven sampling survey with total-population data. Methods Total-population data on age, tribe, religion, socioeconomic status, sexual activity and HIV status were available on a population of 2402 male household-heads from an open cohort in rural Uganda. A respondent-driven sampling (RDS) survey was carried out in this population, employing current methods of sampling (RDS sample) and statistical inference (RDS estimates). Analyses were carried out for the full RDS sample and then repeated for the first 250 recruits (small sample). Results We recruited 927 household-heads. Full and small RDS samples were largely representative of the total population, but both samples under-represented men who were younger, of higher socioeconomic status, and with unknown sexual activity and HIV status. Respondent-driven-sampling statistical-inference methods failed to reduce these biases. Only 31%-37% (depending on method and sample size) of RDS estimates were closer to the true population proportions than the RDS sample proportions. Only 50%-74% of respondent-driven-sampling bootstrap 95% confidence intervals included the population proportion. Conclusions Respondent-driven sampling produced a generally representative sample of this well-connected non-hidden population. However, current respondent-driven-sampling inference methods failed to reduce bias when it occurred. Whether the data required to remove bias and measure precision can be collected in a respondent-driven sampling survey is unresolved. Respondent-driven sampling should be regarded as a (potentially superior) form of convenience

  11. Evaluation of respondent-driven sampling.

    PubMed

    McCreesh, Nicky; Frost, Simon D W; Seeley, Janet; Katongole, Joseph; Tarsh, Matilda N; Ndunguse, Richard; Jichi, Fatima; Lunel, Natasha L; Maher, Dermot; Johnston, Lisa G; Sonnenberg, Pam; Copas, Andrew J; Hayes, Richard J; White, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Respondent-driven sampling is a novel variant of link-tracing sampling for estimating the characteristics of hard-to-reach groups, such as HIV prevalence in sex workers. Despite its use by leading health organizations, the performance of this method in realistic situations is still largely unknown. We evaluated respondent-driven sampling by comparing estimates from a respondent-driven sampling survey with total population data. Total population data on age, tribe, religion, socioeconomic status, sexual activity, and HIV status were available on a population of 2402 male household heads from an open cohort in rural Uganda. A respondent-driven sampling (RDS) survey was carried out in this population, using current methods of sampling (RDS sample) and statistical inference (RDS estimates). Analyses were carried out for the full RDS sample and then repeated for the first 250 recruits (small sample). We recruited 927 household heads. Full and small RDS samples were largely representative of the total population, but both samples underrepresented men who were younger, of higher socioeconomic status, and with unknown sexual activity and HIV status. Respondent-driven sampling statistical inference methods failed to reduce these biases. Only 31%-37% (depending on method and sample size) of RDS estimates were closer to the true population proportions than the RDS sample proportions. Only 50%-74% of respondent-driven sampling bootstrap 95% confidence intervals included the population proportion. Respondent-driven sampling produced a generally representative sample of this well-connected nonhidden population. However, current respondent-driven sampling inference methods failed to reduce bias when it occurred. Whether the data required to remove bias and measure precision can be collected in a respondent-driven sampling survey is unresolved. Respondent-driven sampling should be regarded as a (potentially superior) form of convenience sampling method, and caution is required

  12. Top Driven Asymmetric Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, C.; Anderson, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    The role of the decoupling in the low-velocity zone is crucial for understanding the mechanisms governing plate tectonics and mantle convection. Mantle convection models fail to integrate plate kinematics and thermodynamics of the mantle. We computed the volume of the plates lost along subduction zones, which is about 306 km3/yr (±15). Mass balance predicts that slabs are compensated by broad passive upwellings beneath oceans, mainly at oceanic ridges and backarc basins. These may correspond to the broad low wavespeed regions found in the upper mantle by tomography. However, W-directed slabs enter the mantle more than 3 times faster (232 km3/yr ±15) than the opposite E- or NE-directed subduction zones (74 km3/yr ±15). This is consistent with the westward drift of the outer shell relative to the underlying mantle, which accounts for the steep dip of W-directed slabs, and the asymmetry between the flanks of oceanic ridges, and the directions of ridge migration. The larger recycling volumes along W-directed subduction zones implies i) asymmetry of the cooling of the underlying mantle and ii) it constrains the "easterly" directed component of the upwelling replacement mantle. In this model, mantle convection is tuned by polarized decoupling of the advecting and shearing upper boundary layer. Return mantle flow can be envisaged as a result of passive volume balance rather than as a thermal buoyancy driven upwelling.

  13. Bubble-driven inertial micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torniainen, Erik D.; Govyadinov, Alexander N.; Markel, David P.; Kornilovitch, Pavel E.

    2012-12-01

    The fundamental action of the bubble-driven inertial micropump is investigated. The pump has no moving parts and consists of a thermal resistor placed asymmetrically within a straight channel connecting two reservoirs. Using numerical simulations, the net flow is studied as a function of channel geometry, resistor location, vapor bubble strength, fluid viscosity, and surface tension. Two major regimes of behavior are identified: axial and non-axial. In the axial regime, the drive bubble either remains inside the channel, or continues to grow axially when it reaches the reservoir. In the non-axial regime, the bubble grows out of the channel and in all three dimensions while inside the reservoir. The net flow in the axial regime is parabolic with respect to the hydraulic diameter of the channel cross-section, but in the non-axial regime it is not. From numerical modeling, it is determined that the net flow is maximal when the axial regime crosses over to the non-axial regime. To elucidate the basic physical principles of the pump, a phenomenological one-dimensional model is developed and solved. A linear array of micropumps has been built using silicon-SU8 fabrication technology that is used to manufacture thermal inkjet printheads. Semi-continuous pumping across a 2 mm-wide channel has been demonstrated experimentally. Measured net flow with respect to viscosity variation is in excellent agreement with simulation results.

  14. Light-driven polymer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Curley, Michael J.; Fields, Aisha; Adamovsky, Grigory

    2004-09-01

    We describe new light-driven actuator based on films of the polymer polyvinylidene fluoride known as PVDF. The actuator employs the photomechanic effect of bending of the polymer film caused by low power (10 mW and less) laser radiation. The photomechanic effect combines various physical mechanisms, such as thermal expansion, converse piezoelectric along with photogalvanic and pyrolelectric, while the thermal mechanism is prevailing. The force applied by the actuator to external objects was measured with a torsion balance. It is proportional to the power of laser beam and could be as high as 10-4 N for a 50-micron film illuminated with a 10-mW beam. We demonstrated mechanical oscillations of a 1-mm by 10-mm actuator at a frequency of 0.3 kHz. The frequency could reach 1 MHz and higher for actuators of micron size. The actuators could be easily made of various shapes. Illumination could be in multiple regions of the actuator body with various time delays between laser pulses in different regions. All this can provide a lot of flexibility in terms of the trajectory of mechanical motion. As an example, we demonstrated an actuator with elliptical motion that could drive inner workings of a conventional mechanical alarm clock. The proposed actuator has a potential of being used as a core element of future optical micro- and nanomotors.

  15. Driven tracers in narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cividini, J.; Mukamel, D.; Posch, H. A.

    2017-01-01

    Steady-state properties of a driven tracer moving in a narrow two-dimensional (2D) channel of quiescent medium are studied. The tracer drives the system out of equilibrium, perturbs the density and pressure fields, and gives the bath particles a nonzero average velocity, creating a current in the channel. Three models in which the confining effect of the channel is probed are analyzed and compared in this study: the first is the simple symmetric exclusion process (SSEP), for which the stationary density profile and the pressure on the walls in the frame of the tracer are computed. We show that the tracer acts like a dipolar source in an average velocity field. The spatial structure of this 2D strip is then simplified to a one-dimensional (1D) SSEP, in which exchanges of position between the tracer and the bath particles are allowed. Using a combination of mean-field theory and exact solution in the limit where no exchange is allowed gives good predictions of the velocity of the tracer and the density field. Finally, we show that results obtained for the 1D SSEP with exchanges also apply to a gas of overdamped hard disks in a narrow channel. The correspondence between the parameters of the SSEP and of the gas of hard disks is systematic and follows from simple intuitive arguments. Our analytical results are checked numerically.

  16. Adaptation Driven by Spatial Heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermsen, Rutger

    2011-03-01

    Biological evolution and ecology are intimately linked, because the reproductive success or ``fitness'' of an organism depends crucially on its ecosystem. Yet, most models of evolution (or population genetics) consider homogeneous, fixed-size populations subjected to a constant selection pressure. To move one step beyond such ``mean field'' descriptions, we discuss stochastic models of evolution driven by spatial heterogeneity. We imagine a population whose range is limited by a spatially varying environmental parameter, such as a temperature or the concentration of an antibiotic drug. Individuals in the population replicate, die and migrate stochastically. Also, by mutation, they can adapt to the environmental stress and expand their range. This way, adaptation and niche expansion go hand in hand. This mode of evolution is qualitatively different from the usual notion of a population climbing a fitness gradient. We analytically calculate the rate of adaptation by solving a first passage time problem. Interestingly, the joint effects of reproduction, death, mutation and migration result in two distinct parameter regimes depending on the relative time scales of mutation and migration. We argue that the proposed scenario may be relevant for the rapid evolution of antibiotic resistance. This work was supported by the Center for Theoretical Biological Physics sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF) (Grant PHY-0822283).

  17. Capillary-driven automatic packaging.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuzhe; Hong, Lingfei; Nie, Baoqing; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-04-21

    Packaging continues to be one of the most challenging steps in micro-nanofabrication, as many emerging techniques (e.g., soft lithography) are incompatible with the standard high-precision alignment and bonding equipment. In this paper, we present a simple-to-operate, easy-to-adapt packaging strategy, referred to as Capillary-driven Automatic Packaging (CAP), to achieve automatic packaging process, including the desired features of spontaneous alignment and bonding, wide applicability to various materials, potential scalability, and direct incorporation in the layout. Specifically, self-alignment and self-engagement of the CAP process induced by the interfacial capillary interactions between a liquid capillary bridge and the top and bottom substrates have been experimentally characterized and theoretically analyzed with scalable implications. High-precision alignment (of less than 10 µm) and outstanding bonding performance (up to 300 kPa) has been reliably obtained. In addition, a 3D microfluidic network, aligned and bonded by the CAP technique, has been devised to demonstrate the applicability of this facile yet robust packaging technique for emerging microfluidic and bioengineering applications.

  18. Staged Laser driven Electron Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Shaw, Brian; Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl; Benedetti, Carlo; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2012-10-01

    Laser plasma accelerators have made tremendous progress over the last decade. Currently electron energies around 1 GeV [W. Leemans et al., Nature Physics 2, 696 (2006)] and above can be achieved. In the acceleration process, laser energy is transferred, via generation of a plasma wakefield by the laser pulse, to the electrons. The acceleration of electrons stops, when the laser energy is depleted. To increase the electron energy in current LPA schemes, laser systems with more pulse energy are needed, thus current laser plasma accelerators are limited by laser technology. Today, several projects are using or planning to use PW class laser systems to achieve electron energies up to 10 GeV [W. P. Leemans et al., AAC proceedings (2012)]. These laser systems represent the latest development in laser technology and are able to deliver the highest achievable laser intensities today. To overcome the electron energy limitation a staged acceleration concept is necessary. In this scheme multiple acceleration stages are placed in series, each driven by a separate laser pulse. Now the final electron energy is limited by the number of stages only. In a concept study a 1TeV electron-positron collider based on staged acceleration was envisioned in reference [W. P. Leemans and E. Esarey, Physics Today, 62, 44 (2009)]. We will present the latest results on a staged laser plasma experiment in which two stages and two laser pulses are used.

  19. Cosmic ray driven Galactic winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recchia, S.; Blasi, P.; Morlino, G.

    2016-11-01

    The escape of cosmic rays from the Galaxy leads to a gradient in the cosmic ray pressure that acts as a force on the background plasma, in the direction opposite to the gravitational pull. If this force is large enough to win against gravity, a wind can be launched that removes gas from the Galaxy, thereby regulating several physical processes, including star formation. The dynamics of these cosmic ray driven winds is intrinsically non-linear in that the spectrum of cosmic rays determines the characteristics of the wind (velocity, pressure, magnetic field) and in turn the wind dynamics affects the cosmic ray spectrum. Moreover, the gradient of the cosmic ray distribution function causes excitation of Alfvén waves, that in turn determines the scattering properties of cosmic rays, namely their diffusive transport. These effects all feed into each other so that what we see at the Earth is the result of these non-linear effects. Here, we investigate the launch and evolution of such winds, and we determine the implications for the spectrum of cosmic rays by solving together the hydrodynamical equations for the wind and the transport equation for cosmic rays under the action of self-generated diffusion and advection with the wind and the self-excited Alfvén waves.

  20. Quasi-Periodically Driven Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdeny, Albert; Puig, Joaquim; Mintert, Florian

    2016-10-01

    Floquet theory provides rigorous foundations for the theory of periodically driven quantum systems. In the case of non-periodic driving, however, the situation is not so well understood. Here, we provide a critical review of the theoretical framework developed for quasi-periodically driven quantum systems. Although the theoretical footing is still under development, we argue that quasi-periodically driven quantum systems can be treated with generalisations of Floquet theory in suitable parameter regimes. Moreover, we provide a generalisation of the Floquet-Magnus expansion and argue that quasi-periodic driving offers a promising route for quantum simulations.

  1. Shock propagation in locally driven granular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, Jilmy P.; Pathak, Sudhir N.; Das, Dibyendu; Rajesh, R.

    2017-09-01

    We study shock propagation in a system of initially stationary hard spheres that is driven by a continuous injection of particles at the origin. The disturbance created by the injection of energy spreads radially outward through collisions between particles. Using scaling arguments, we determine the exponent characterizing the power-law growth of this disturbance in all dimensions. The scaling functions describing the various physical quantities are determined using large-scale event-driven simulations in two and three dimensions for both elastic and inelastic systems. The results are shown to describe well the data from two different experiments on granular systems that are similarly driven.

  2. Radio frequency driven multicusp sources (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1998-02-01

    The radio frequency (rf)-driven multicusp source was originally developed for use in the superconducting super collider injector. The source can routinely provide 30 mA of H˜ beam at 0.1% duty factor. By adding a minute quantity of cesium to the discharge, H- beam current in excess of 100 mA and e/H˜1 has been achieved. The rf-driven H˜ source is being further developed for 6% duty factor operation to be used in the national spallation neutron source. Application of the rf-driven multicusp source has been extended to radioactive ion beam production, ion projection lithography, and compact neutron tubes.

  3. Optimal protocols for slowly driven quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkowski, Patrick R.; DeWeese, Michael R.

    2015-09-01

    The design of efficient quantum information processing will rely on optimal nonequilibrium transitions of driven quantum systems. Building on a recently developed geometric framework for computing optimal protocols for classical systems driven in finite time, we construct a general framework for optimizing the average information entropy for driven quantum systems. Geodesics on the parameter manifold endowed with a positive semidefinite metric correspond to protocols that minimize the average information entropy production in finite time. We use this framework to explicitly compute the optimal entropy production for a simple two-state quantum system coupled to a heat bath of bosonic oscillators, which has applications to quantum annealing.

  4. Gas-driven filter pressing in magmas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Bacon, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    Most silicic and some mafic magmas expand via second boiling if they crystallize at depths of about 10 km or less. The buildup of gas pressure due to second boiling can be relieved by expulsion of melt out of the region of crystallization, and this process of gas-driven filter pressing assists the crystallization differentiation of magmas. For gas-driven filter pressing to be effective, the region of crystallization must inflate slowly relative to buildup of pressure and expulsion of melt These conditions are satisfied in undercooled magmatic inclusions and in thin sheets of primitive magma underplating cooler magma reservoirs. Gas-driven filter pressing thereby adds fractionated melt to magma bodies. Gas-driven filter pressing is probably the dominant process by which highly evolved melts segregate from crystal mush to form aplitic dikes in granitic plutons; this process could also account for the production of voluminous, crystal-poor rhyolites.

  5. Digitally Driven Antenna for HF Transmission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    and reception and the fast Fourier transform (FFT). From Ampere’s Law, (2) it is seen that the magnetic field is proportional to the current density... pulse train. This is defined here as the digitally driven antenna architecture. A circuit simulator with broadband equivalent-circuit models for the...HF signal from the digital pulse train. This is defined here as the digitally driven antenna architecture. A circuit simulator with broadband

  6. Stochastic Evolution Equations Driven by Fractional Noises

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-28

    Stochastic Evolution Equations Driven by Fractional Noises We have introduced a modification of the classical Euler numerical scheme for stochastic...of Papers published in peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Stochastic Evolution Equations Driven by Fractional Noises Report Title We have introduced...case the evolution form of the equation will involve a Stratonovich integral (or path-wise Young integral). The product can also be interpreted as a

  7. Radiative Interaction Between Driver and Driven Gases in an Arc-Driven Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul

    2001-01-01

    An electric-arc driven shock tube was operated with hydrogen as the driven gas and either hydrogen or helium as the driver gas. Electron density was measured behind the primary shock wave spectroscopically from the width of the Beta line of hydrogen. The measured electron density values were many times greater than the values calculated by the Rankine - Hugoniot relations. By accounting for the radiative transfer from the driver gas to the driven gas, the measured electron density values were numerically recreated.

  8. Decoding Internally and Externally Driven Movement Plans.

    PubMed

    Ariani, Giacomo; Wurm, Moritz F; Lingnau, Angelika

    2015-10-21

    During movement planning, brain activity within parietofrontal networks encodes information about upcoming actions that can be driven either externally (e.g., by a sensory cue) or internally (i.e., by a choice/decision). Here we used multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) of fMRI data to distinguish between areas that represent (1) abstract movement plans that generalize across the way in which these were driven, (2) internally driven movement plans, or (3) externally driven movement plans. In a delayed-movement paradigm, human volunteers were asked to plan and execute three types of nonvisually guided right-handed reaching movements toward a central target object: using a precision grip, a power grip, or touching the object without hand preshaping. On separate blocks of trials, movements were either instructed via color cues (Instructed condition), or chosen by the participant (Free-Choice condition). Using ROI-based and whole-brain searchlight-based MVPA, we found abstract representations of planned movements that generalize across the way these movements are selected (internally vs externally driven) in parietal cortex, dorsal premotor cortex, and primary motor cortex contralateral to the acting hand. In addition, we revealed representations specific for internally driven movement plans in contralateral ventral premotor cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, supramarginal gyrus, and in ipsilateral posterior parietotemporal regions, suggesting that these regions are recruited during movement selection. Finally, we observed representations of externally driven movement plans in bilateral supplementary motor cortex and a similar trend in presupplementary motor cortex, suggesting a role in stimulus-response mapping. The way the human brain prepares the body for action constitutes an essential part of our ability to interact with our environment. Previous studies demonstrated that patterns of neuronal activity encode upcoming movements. Here we used multivariate

  9. 46 CFR 169.623 - Power-driven steering systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power-driven steering systems. 169.623 Section 169.623... Machinery and Electrical Steering Systems § 169.623 Power-driven steering systems. (a) Power-driven steering... system must automatically resume operation after an electric power outage. (b) Control of power-driven...

  10. 46 CFR 169.623 - Power-driven steering systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power-driven steering systems. 169.623 Section 169.623... Machinery and Electrical Steering Systems § 169.623 Power-driven steering systems. (a) Power-driven steering... system must automatically resume operation after an electric power outage. (b) Control of power-driven...

  11. Sensitivity to Increased Task Demands: Contributions from Data-Driven and Conceptually Driven Information Processing Deficits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillam, Ronald B.; Hoffman, LaVae M.; Marler, Jeffrey A.; Wynn-Dancy, M. Lorraine

    2002-01-01

    This article explores evidence related to the idea that children with language impairments present co-occurring limitations in data-driven and conceptually driven processing. It concludes that together, these limitations contribute to a heightened sensitivity to increasing task demands in children with language impairments. Assessment and…

  12. Na+-driven bacterial flagellar motors.

    PubMed

    Imae, Y; Atsumi, T

    1989-12-01

    Bacterial flagellar motors are the reversible rotary engine which propels the cell by rotating a helical flagellar filament as a screw propeller. The motors are embedded in the cytoplasmic membrane, and the energy for rotation is supplied by the electrochemical potential of specific ions across the membrane. Thus, the analysis of motor rotation at the molecular level is linked to an understanding of how the living system converts chemical energy into mechanical work. Based on the coupling ions, the motors are divided into two types; one is the H+-driven type found in neutrophiles such as Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli and the other is the Na+-driven type found in alkalophilic Bacillus and marine Vibrio. In this review, we summarize the current status of research on the rotation mechanism of the Na+-driven flagellar motors, which introduces several new aspects in the analysis.

  13. Microphysics of Cosmic Ray Driven Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Brandenburg, A.; Malkov, M. A.; Osipov, S. M.

    Energetic nonthermal particles (cosmic rays, CRs) are accelerated in supernova remnants, relativistic jets and other astrophysical objects. The CR energy density is typically comparable with that of the thermal components and magnetic fields. In this review we discuss mechanisms of magnetic field amplification due to instabilities induced by CRs. We derive CR kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic equations that govern cosmic plasma systems comprising the thermal background plasma, comic rays and fluctuating magnetic fields to study CR-driven instabilities. Both resonant and non-resonant instabilities are reviewed, including the Bell short-wavelength instability, and the firehose instability. Special attention is paid to the longwavelength instabilities driven by the CR current and pressure gradient. The helicity production by the CR current-driven instabilities is discussed in connection with the dynamo mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field amplification.

  14. Microphysics of Cosmic Ray Driven Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Brandenburg, A.; Malkov, M. A.; Osipov, S. M.

    2013-10-01

    Energetic nonthermal particles (cosmic rays, CRs) are accelerated in supernova remnants, relativistic jets and other astrophysical objects. The CR energy density is typically comparable with that of the thermal components and magnetic fields. In this review we discuss mechanisms of magnetic field amplification due to instabilities induced by CRs. We derive CR kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic equations that govern cosmic plasma systems comprising the thermal background plasma, comic rays and fluctuating magnetic fields to study CR-driven instabilities. Both resonant and non-resonant instabilities are reviewed, including the Bell short-wavelength instability, and the firehose instability. Special attention is paid to the longwavelength instabilities driven by the CR current and pressure gradient. The helicity production by the CR current-driven instabilities is discussed in connection with the dynamo mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field amplification.

  15. Simple driven chaotic oscillators with complex variables.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Delmar; Sprott, J C

    2009-03-01

    Despite a search, no chaotic driven complex-variable oscillators of the form z+f(z)=e(iOmegat) or z+f(z)=e(iOmegat) are found, where f is a polynomial with real coefficients. It is shown that, for analytic functions f(z), driven complex-variable oscillators of the form z+f(z)=e(iOmegat) cannot have chaotic solutions. Seven simple driven chaotic oscillators of the form z+f(z,z)=e(iOmegat) with polynomial f(z,z) are given. Their chaotic attractors are displayed, and Lyapunov spectra are calculated. Attractors for two of the cases have symmetry across the x=-y line. The systems' behavior with Omega as a control parameter in the range of Omega=0.1-2.0 is examined, revealing cases of period doubling, intermittency, chaotic transients, and period adding as routes to chaos. Numerous cases of coexisting attractors are also observed.

  16. Metamodel-Driven Evolution with Grammar Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Barrett R.; Liu, Qichao; Mernik, Marjan

    2010-10-01

    Domain-specific modeling (DSM) has become one of the most popular techniques for incorporating model-driven engineering (MDE) into software engineering. In DSM, domain experts define metamodels to describe the essential problems in a domain. A model conforms to a schema definition represented by a metamodel in a similar manner to a programming language conforms to a grammar. Metamodel-driven evolution is when a metamodel undergoes evolutions to incorporate new concerns in the domain. However, this results in losing the ability to use existing model instances. Grammar inference is the problem of inferring a grammar from sample strings which the grammar should generate. This paper describes our work in solving the problem of metamodel-driven evolution with grammar inference, by inferring the metamodel from model instances.

  17. Three levels of data-driven science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Yasuhiko; Nagata, Kenji; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Omori, Toshiaki; Nakanishi-Ohno, Yoshinori; Okada, Masato

    2016-03-01

    A research project, called “the Initiative for High-dimensional Data-Driven Science through Deepening of Sparse Modeling” is introduced. A concept, called the three levels of data-driven science, is proposed to untie the complicated relation between many fields and many methods. This concept claims that any problem of data analysis should be discussed at different three levels: computational theory, modeling, and representation/algorithm. Based on the concept, how to choose a suitable method among several candidates is discussed through our study on spectral deconvolution. In addition, how to find a universal problem across the disciplines is presented by explaining our proposed ES-SVM method. Moreover, it is illustrated that the hierarchical structure of data analysis should be visualized and shared. From these discussions, we believe that data-driven science is mother of science, namely, a scientific framework that drives many fields of science.

  18. Light-Driven Polymeric Bimorph Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Gregory; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Curley, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are being developed as alternatives to prior electrically and optically driven actuators in advanced, highly miniaturized devices and systems exemplified by microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), micro-electro-optical-mechanical systems (MEOMS), and sensor and actuator arrays in smart structures. These light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are intended to satisfy a need for actuators that (1) in comparison with the prior actuators, are simpler and less power-hungry; (2) can be driven by low-power visible or mid-infrared light delivered through conventional optic fibers; and (3) are suitable for integration with optical sensors and multiple actuators of the same or different type. The immediate predecessors of the present light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are bimorph actuators that exploit a photorestrictive effect in lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramics. The disadvantages of the PLZT-based actuators are that (1) it is difficult to shape the PLZT ceramics, which are hard and brittle; (2) for actuation, it is necessary to use ultraviolet light (wavelengths < 380 nm), which must be generated by use of high-power, high-pressure arc lamps or lasers; (3) it is difficult to deliver sufficient ultraviolet light through conventional optical fibers because of significant losses in the fibers; (4) the response times of the PLZT actuators are of the order of several seconds unacceptably long for typical applications; and (5) the maximum mechanical displacements of the PLZT-based actuators are limited to those characterized by low strains beyond which PLZT ceramics disintegrate because of their brittleness. The basic element of a light-driven bimorph actuator of the present developmental type is a cantilever beam comprising two layers, at least one of which is a polymer that exhibits a photomechanical effect (see figure). The dominant mechanism of the photomechanical effect is a photothermal one: absorption of

  19. Advances in Electrically Driven Thermal Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2017-01-01

    Electrically Driven Thermal Management is a vibrant technology development initiative incorporating ISS based technology demonstrations, development of innovative fluid management techniques and fundamental research efforts. The program emphasizes high temperature high heat flux thermal management required for future generations of RF electronics and power electronic devices. This presentation reviews i.) preliminary results from the Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) Long Term Flight Demonstration launched on STP-H5 payload in February 2017 ii.) advances in liquid phase flow distribution control iii.) development of the Electrically Driven Liquid Film Boiling Experiment under the NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program.

  20. Statistical Transmutation in Floquet Driven Optical Lattices.

    PubMed

    Sedrakyan, Tigran A; Galitski, Victor M; Kamenev, Alex

    2015-11-06

    We show that interacting bosons in a periodically driven two dimensional (2D) optical lattice may effectively exhibit fermionic statistics. The phenomenon is similar to the celebrated Tonks-Girardeau regime in 1D. The Floquet band of a driven lattice develops the moat shape, i.e., a minimum along a closed contour in the Brillouin zone. Such degeneracy of the kinetic energy favors fermionic quasiparticles. The statistical transmutation is achieved by the Chern-Simons flux attachment similar to the fractional quantum Hall case. We show that the velocity distribution of the released bosons is a sensitive probe of the fermionic nature of their stationary Floquet state.

  1. Recent Developments in Understanding Wind Driven Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrison, J. P.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Holstein-Rathlou, C.; Knak Jensen, S.; Nørnberg, P.; Rasmussen, K. R.

    2011-10-01

    The wind driven transport of granular material is an important environmental/climatic factor on Earth and even more so on Mars. Several related aspects of Aeolian activity are presently being studied in the laboratory. These include simulating wind driven erosion in the laboratory and the study of mineral change due to mechanical activation as well as quantifying erosion rates. The generation of electric fields and the effects of these electric fields on grain transport is also being investigated using environmental wind tunnel simulators.

  2. Persistence of Value-Driven Attentional Capture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Brian A.; Yantis, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Stimuli that have previously been associated with the delivery of reward involuntarily capture attention when presented as unrewarded and task-irrelevant distractors in a subsequent visual search task. It is unknown how long such effects of reward learning on attention persist. One possibility is that value-driven attentional biases are plastic…

  3. Noise Control in Propeller-Driven Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rennison, D. C.; Wilby, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical model predicts noise levels inside propeller-driven aircraft during cruise at mach 0.8. Double wall sidewalls minimize interior noise and weight. Model applied to three aircraft with fuselages of different size (wide-body, narrow-body, and small-diameter) to determine noise reductions required to achieve A-weighted sound level not to exceed 80 dB.

  4. Terahertz-driven linear electron acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Huang, Wenqian R.; Hong, Kyung-Han; Ravi, Koustuban; Fallahi, Arya; Moriena, Gustavo; Dwayne Miller, R. J.; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2015-10-06

    The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators are dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency accelerating structures operate with 30–50 MeVm-1 gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional radio-frequency structures. However, laser-driven wakefield accelerators require intense femtosecond sources and direct laser-driven accelerators suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here we demonstrate linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically generated terahertz pulses. Terahertz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron/proton accelerators with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. As a result, these ultra-compact terahertz accelerators with extremely short electron bunches hold great potential to have a transformative impact for free electron lasers, linear colliders, ultrafast electron diffraction, X-ray science and medical therapy with X-rays and electron beams.

  5. The Glass Transition of Driven Molecular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descamps, M.; Willart, J. F.; Aumelas, A.

    2008-02-01

    There are many cases of practical interest where materials are maintained in nonequilibrium conditions by some external dynamical forcing: typical examples of these driven materials are provided by irradiation, grinding, extrusion…Contrary to usual phase transitions which are properly addressed by thermal equilibrium states, equilibrium and irreversible thermodynamics, no such general framework is available for driven systems. The purpose of this paper is to show some examples of phase transformations in driven molecular materials. These materials are considered because they are extremely sensitive to external disturbances and are generally very good glass formers. This allows investigating more easily a broad range of the parameters which possibly influence the nature of the end product. We will examine mainly the effect of grinding. Contrary to other materials, metals or minerals, systematic investigations of transformations induced by grinding of molecular materials have not yet been done despite the practical and fundamental interests of such investigations in pharmaceutical and agro-chemical science. We will address several modes of interconversions between crystalline and glassy states of the same compound. We will further discuss specific processing effects on the physical state of the glass itself. It will be shown from these investigations that rationalization and possibilities of prediction are emerging. The use of effective temperature concepts to describe the end product of milling will be discussed. These findings may be of general concern for driven materials of any chemical nature.

  6. Terahertz-driven linear electron acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Huang, Wenqian R.; Hong, Kyung-Han; Ravi, Koustuban; Fallahi, Arya; Moriena, Gustavo; Dwayne Miller, R. J.; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2015-01-01

    The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators are dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency accelerating structures operate with 30–50 MeV m−1 gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional radio-frequency structures. However, laser-driven wakefield accelerators require intense femtosecond sources and direct laser-driven accelerators suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here we demonstrate linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically generated terahertz pulses. Terahertz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron/proton accelerators with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. These ultra-compact terahertz accelerators with extremely short electron bunches hold great potential to have a transformative impact for free electron lasers, linear colliders, ultrafast electron diffraction, X-ray science and medical therapy with X-rays and electron beams. PMID:26439410

  7. Light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1979-10-10

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam-driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  8. Osmosis is not driven by water dilution.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Eric M; Myers, David R

    2013-04-01

    There is a misconception among plant scientists that osmosis is driven by the tendency of solutes to dilute water. In this opinion article, we discuss the quantitative and qualitative failures of this view, and go on to review the correct kinetic picture of osmosis as it appears in physics textbooks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mouse Driven Window Graphics for Network Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makinson, G. J.; And Others

    Computer enhanced teaching of computational mathematics on a network system driving graphics terminals is being redeveloped for a mouse-driven, high resolution, windowed environment of a UNIX work station. Preservation of the features of networked access by heterogeneous terminals is provided by the use of the X Window environment. A dmonstrator…

  10. Microwave-driven ultraviolet light sources

    DOEpatents

    Manos, Dennis M.; Diggs, Jessie; Ametepe, Joseph D.

    2002-01-29

    A microwave-driven ultraviolet (UV) light source is provided. The light source comprises an over-moded microwave cavity having at least one discharge bulb disposed within the microwave cavity. At least one magnetron probe is coupled directly to the microwave cavity.

  11. What Data for Data-Driven Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulton, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Corpora have multiple affordances, not least for use by teachers and learners of a foreign language (L2) in what has come to be known as "data-driven learning" or DDL. The corpus and concordance interface were originally conceived by and for linguists, so other users need to adopt the role of "language researcher" to make the most of them. Despite…

  12. Layzer type models for pressure driven shells

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O A

    2004-09-16

    Models for the nonlinear instability of finite thickness shells driven by pressure are constructed in the style of Layzer. Equations for both Cartesian and cylindrically convergent/divergent geometries are derived. The resulting equations are appropriate for incompressible shells with unity Atwood number. Predictions from the equations compare well with two-dimensional simulations.

  13. Persistence of Value-Driven Attentional Capture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Brian A.; Yantis, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Stimuli that have previously been associated with the delivery of reward involuntarily capture attention when presented as unrewarded and task-irrelevant distractors in a subsequent visual search task. It is unknown how long such effects of reward learning on attention persist. One possibility is that value-driven attentional biases are plastic…

  14. Making Data-Driven Decisions: Silent Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudel, Heidi

    2007-01-01

    Due in part to conflicting opinions and research results, the practice of sustained silent reading (SSR) in schools has been questioned. After a frustrating experience with SSR, the author of this article began a data-driven decision-making process to gain new insights on how to structure silent reading in a classroom, including a comparison…

  15. High-explosive driven crowbar switch

    DOEpatents

    Dike, Robert S.; Kewish, Jr., Ralph W.

    1976-01-13

    The disclosure relates to a compact explosive driven switch for use as a low resistance, low inductance crowbar switch. A high-explosive charge extrudes a deformable conductive metallic plate through a polyethylene insulating layer to achieve a hard current contact with a supportive annular conductor.

  16. Topological effects in chiral symmetric driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Derek Y. H.; Gong, Jiangbin

    2014-11-01

    Recent years have seen a strong interest in topological effects within periodically driven systems. In this work, we explore topological effects in two closely related 2-dimensional driven systems described by Floquet operators possessing chiral symmetry (CS). Our numerical and analytical results suggest the following. First, the CS is associated with the existence of the anomalous counterpropagating (ACP) modes reported recently. Specifically, we show that a particular form of CS protects the ACP modes crossing the quasienergy band gap at ±π . We also find that these modes are only present along selected boundaries, suggesting that they are a weak topological effect. Second, we find that CS can give rise to protected 0 and π quasienergy modes, and that the number of these modes may increase without bound as we tune up certain system parameters. Like the ACP modes, these 0 and π modes also appear only along selected boundaries and thus appear to be a weak topological effect. This work represents a detailed study of weak topological effects in periodically driven systems. Our findings add to the still-growing knowledge on driven topological systems.

  17. Mission Driven and Data Informed Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holter, Anthony C.; Frabutt, James M.

    2012-01-01

    The contemporary challenges facing Catholic schools and Catholic school leaders are widely known. Effective and systemic solutions to these mounting challenges are less widely known or discussed. This article highlights the skills, knowledge, and dispositions associated with mission driven and data informed leadership--an orientation to school…

  18. Terahertz-driven linear electron acceleration

    DOE PAGES

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Huang, Wenqian R.; Hong, Kyung-Han; ...

    2015-10-06

    The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators are dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency accelerating structures operate with 30–50 MeVm-1 gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional radio-frequency structures. However, laser-driven wakefield accelerators require intense femtosecond sources and direct laser-driven accelerators suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here we demonstrate linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically generated terahertz pulses. Terahertz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron/proton acceleratorsmore » with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. As a result, these ultra-compact terahertz accelerators with extremely short electron bunches hold great potential to have a transformative impact for free electron lasers, linear colliders, ultrafast electron diffraction, X-ray science and medical therapy with X-rays and electron beams.« less

  19. Layzer type models for pressure driven shells

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O.A.

    2005-05-01

    Models for the nonlinear instability of finite thickness shells driven by pressure are constructed in the style of Layzer. Equations for both Cartesian and cylindrically convergent/divergent geometries are derived. The resulting equations are appropriate for incompressible shells with unity Atwood number. Predictions from the equations compare well with two-dimensional simulations.

  20. Using Two Different Approaches to Assess Dietary Patterns: Hypothesis-Driven and Data-Driven Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Previdelli, Ágatha Nogueira; de Andrade, Samantha Caesar; Fisberg, Regina Mara; Marchioni, Dirce Maria

    2016-01-01

    The use of dietary patterns to assess dietary intake has become increasingly common in nutritional epidemiology studies due to the complexity and multidimensionality of the diet. Currently, two main approaches have been widely used to assess dietary patterns: data-driven and hypothesis-driven analysis. Since the methods explore different angles of dietary intake, using both approaches simultaneously might yield complementary and useful information; thus, we aimed to use both approaches to gain knowledge of adolescents’ dietary patterns. Food intake from a cross-sectional survey with 295 adolescents was assessed by 24 h dietary recall (24HR). In hypothesis-driven analysis, based on the American National Cancer Institute method, the usual intake of Brazilian Healthy Eating Index Revised components were estimated. In the data-driven approach, the usual intake of foods/food groups was estimated by the Multiple Source Method. In the results, hypothesis-driven analysis showed low scores for Whole grains, Total vegetables, Total fruit and Whole fruits), while, in data-driven analysis, fruits and whole grains were not presented in any pattern. High intakes of sodium, fats and sugars were observed in hypothesis-driven analysis with low total scores for Sodium, Saturated fat and SoFAA (calories from solid fat, alcohol and added sugar) components in agreement, while the data-driven approach showed the intake of several foods/food groups rich in these nutrients, such as butter/margarine, cookies, chocolate powder, whole milk, cheese, processed meat/cold cuts and candies. In this study, using both approaches at the same time provided consistent and complementary information with regard to assessing the overall dietary habits that will be important in order to drive public health programs, and improve their efficiency to monitor and evaluate the dietary patterns of populations. PMID:27669289

  1. Using Two Different Approaches to Assess Dietary Patterns: Hypothesis-Driven and Data-Driven Analysis.

    PubMed

    Previdelli, Ágatha Nogueira; de Andrade, Samantha Caesar; Fisberg, Regina Mara; Marchioni, Dirce Maria

    2016-09-23

    The use of dietary patterns to assess dietary intake has become increasingly common in nutritional epidemiology studies due to the complexity and multidimensionality of the diet. Currently, two main approaches have been widely used to assess dietary patterns: data-driven and hypothesis-driven analysis. Since the methods explore different angles of dietary intake, using both approaches simultaneously might yield complementary and useful information; thus, we aimed to use both approaches to gain knowledge of adolescents' dietary patterns. Food intake from a cross-sectional survey with 295 adolescents was assessed by 24 h dietary recall (24HR). In hypothesis-driven analysis, based on the American National Cancer Institute method, the usual intake of Brazilian Healthy Eating Index Revised components were estimated. In the data-driven approach, the usual intake of foods/food groups was estimated by the Multiple Source Method. In the results, hypothesis-driven analysis showed low scores for Whole grains, Total vegetables, Total fruit and Whole fruits), while, in data-driven analysis, fruits and whole grains were not presented in any pattern. High intakes of sodium, fats and sugars were observed in hypothesis-driven analysis with low total scores for Sodium, Saturated fat and SoFAA (calories from solid fat, alcohol and added sugar) components in agreement, while the data-driven approach showed the intake of several foods/food groups rich in these nutrients, such as butter/margarine, cookies, chocolate powder, whole milk, cheese, processed meat/cold cuts and candies. In this study, using both approaches at the same time provided consistent and complementary information with regard to assessing the overall dietary habits that will be important in order to drive public health programs, and improve their efficiency to monitor and evaluate the dietary patterns of populations.

  2. Light-field-driven currents in graphene.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takuya; Heide, Christian; Ullmann, Konrad; Weber, Heiko B; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2017-09-25

    The ability to steer electrons using the strong electromagnetic field of light has opened up the possibility of controlling electron dynamics on the sub-femtosecond (less than 10(-15) seconds) timescale. In dielectrics and semiconductors, various light-field-driven effects have been explored, including high-harmonic generation, sub-optical-cycle interband population transfer and the non-perturbative change of the transient polarizability. In contrast, much less is known about light-field-driven electron dynamics in narrow-bandgap systems or in conductors, in which screening due to free carriers or light absorption hinders the application of strong optical fields. Graphene is a promising platform with which to achieve light-field-driven control of electrons in a conducting material, because of its broadband and ultrafast optical response, weak screening and high damage threshold. Here we show that a current induced in monolayer graphene by two-cycle laser pulses is sensitive to the electric-field waveform, that is, to the exact shape of the optical carrier field of the pulse, which is controlled by the carrier-envelope phase, with a precision on the attosecond (10(-18) seconds) timescale. Such a current, dependent on the carrier-envelope phase, shows a striking reversal of the direction of the current as a function of the driving field amplitude at about two volts per nanometre. This reversal indicates a transition of light-matter interaction from the weak-field (photon-driven) regime to the strong-field (light-field-driven) regime, where the intraband dynamics influence interband transitions. We show that in this strong-field regime the electron dynamics are governed by sub-optical-cycle Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interference, composed of coherent repeated Landau-Zener transitions on the femtosecond timescale. Furthermore, the influence of this sub-optical-cycle interference can be controlled with the laser polarization state. These coherent electron dynamics in

  3. Image Filtering Driven by Level Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajwade, Ajit; Banerjee, Arunava; Rangarajan, Anand

    This paper presents an approach to image filtering that is driven by the properties of the iso-valued level curves of the image and their relationship with one another. We explore the relationship of our algorithm to existing probabilistically driven filtering methods such as those based on kernel density estimation, local-mode finding and mean-shift. Extensive experimental results on filtering gray-scale images, color images, gray-scale video and chromaticity fields are presented. In contrast to existing probabilistic methods, in our approach, the selection of the parameter that prevents diffusion across the edge is robustly decoupled from the smoothing of the density itself. Furthermore, our method is observed to produce better filtering results for the same settings of parameters for the filter window size and the edge definition.

  4. A charge-driven molecular water pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaojing; Li, Jingyuan; Lu, Hangjun; Wan, Rongzheng; Li, Jichen; Hu, Jun; Fang, Haiping

    2007-11-01

    Understanding and controlling the transport of water across nanochannels is of great importance for designing novel molecular devices, machines and sensors and has wide applications, including the desalination of seawater. Nanopumps driven by electric or magnetic fields can transport ions and magnetic quanta, but water is charge-neutral and has no magnetic moment. On the basis of molecular dynamics simulations, we propose a design for a molecular water pump. The design uses a combination of charges positioned adjacent to a nanopore and is inspired by the structure of channels in the cellular membrane that conduct water in and out of the cell (aquaporins). The remarkable pumping ability is attributed to the charge dipole-induced ordering of water confined in the nanochannels, where water can be easily driven by external fields in a concerted fashion. These findings may provide possibilities for developing water transport devices that function without osmotic pressure or a hydrostatic pressure gradient.

  5. Stellar winds driven by Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, J. W.; Olbert, S.

    1973-01-01

    Models of stellar winds were considered in which the dynamic expansion of a corona is driven by Alfven waves propagating outward along radial magnetic field lines. In the presence of Alfven waves, a coronal expansion can exist for a broad range of reference conditions which would, in the absence of waves, lead to static configurations. Wind models in which the acceleration mechanism is due to Alfven waves alone and exhibit lower mass fluxes and higher energies per particle are compared to wind models in which the acceleration is due to thermal processes. For example, winds driven by Alfven waves exhibit streaming velocities at infinity which may vary between the escape velocity at the coronal base and the geometrical mean of the escape velocity and the speed of light. Upper and lower limits were derived for the allowed energy fluxes and mass fluxes associated with these winds.

  6. Simulations of driven overdamped frictionless hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Edan; Düring, Gustavo; Wyart, Matthieu

    2013-03-01

    We introduce an event-driven simulation scheme for overdamped dynamics of frictionless hard spheres subjected to external forces, neglecting hydrodynamic interactions. Our event-driven approach is based on an exact equation of motion which relates the driving force to the resulting velocities through the geometric information characterizing the underlying network of contacts between the hard spheres. Our method allows for a robust extraction of the instantaneous coordination of the particles as well as contact force statistics and dynamics, under any chosen driving force, in addition to shear flow and compression. It can also be used for generating high-precision jammed packings under shear, compression, or both. We present a number of additional applications of our method.

  7. Phase shielding soliton in parametrically driven systems.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Marcel G; Garcia-Ñustes, Mónica A; Zárate, Yair; Coulibaly, Saliya

    2013-05-01

    Parametrically driven extended systems exhibit dissipative localized states. Analytical solutions of these states are characterized by a uniform phase and a bell-shaped modulus. Recently, a type of dissipative localized state with a nonuniform phase structure has been reported: the phase shielding solitons. Using the parametrically driven and damped nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we investigate the main properties of this kind of solution in one and two dimensions and develop an analytical description for its structure and dynamics. Numerical simulations are consistent with our analytical results, showing good agreement. A numerical exploration conducted in an anisotropic ferromagnetic system in one and two dimensions indicates the presence of phase shielding solitons. The structure of these dissipative solitons is well described also by our analytical results. The presence of corrective higher-order terms is relevant in the description of the observed phase dynamical behavior.

  8. Thermodynamics of entropy-driven phase transformations.

    PubMed

    Radosz, A; Ostasiewicz, K; Magnuszewski, P; Damczyk, J; Radosiński, Ł; Kusmartsev, F V; Samson, J H; Mituś, A C; Pawlik, G

    2006-02-01

    Thermodynamic properties of one-dimensional lattice models exhibiting entropy-driven phase transformations are discussed in quantum and classical regimes. Motivated by the multistability of compounds exhibiting photoinduced phase transitions, we consider systems with asymmetric, double, and triple well on-site potential. One finds that among a variety of regimes, quantum versus classical, discrete versus continuum, a key feature is asymmetry distinguished as a "shift" type and "shape" type in limiting cases. The behavior of the specific heat indicates one phase transformation in a "shift" type and a sequence of two phase transformations in "shape"-type systems. Future analysis in higher dimensions should allow us to identify which of these entropy-driven phase transformations would evolve into phase transitions of the first order.

  9. Surface chemistry driven actuation in nanoporous gold

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Wittstock, A; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Biener, M M; Zielasek, V; Kramer, D; Viswanath, R N; Weissmuller, J; Baumer, M; Hamza, A V

    2008-04-14

    Although actuation in biological systems is exclusively powered by chemical energy, this concept has not been realized in man-made actuator technologies, as these rely on generating heat or electricity first. Here, we demonstrate that surface-chemistry driven actuation can be realized in high surface area materials such as nanoporous gold. For example, we achieve reversible strain amplitudes in the order of a few tenths of a percent by alternating exposure of nanoporous Au to ozone and carbon monoxide. The effect can be explained by adsorbate-induced changes of the surface stress, and can be used to convert chemical energy directly into a mechanical response thus opening the door to surface-chemistry driven actuator and sensor technologies.

  10. Hydrodynamic synchronisation of optically driven rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debono, Luke J.; Box, Stuart; Phillips, David B.; Simpson, Stephen H.; Hanna, Simon

    2015-08-01

    Hydrodynamic coupling is thought to play a role in the coordinated beating of cilia and flagella, and may inform the future design of artificial swimmers and pumps. In this study, optical tweezers are used to investigate the hydrodynamic coupling between a pair of driven oscillators. The theoretical model of Lenz and Ryskin [P. Lenz and A. Ryskin, Phys. Biol. 3, 285{294 (2006)] is experimentally recreated, in which each oscillator consists of a sphere driven in a circular trajectory. The optical trap position is maintained ahead of the sphere to provide a tangential driving force. The trap is also moved radially to harmonically constrain the sphere to the circular trajectory. Analytically, it has been shown that two oscillators of this type are able to synchronise or phase-lock under certain conditions. We explore the interplay between synchronisation mechanisms and find good agreement between experiment, theory and Brownian dynamics simulations.

  11. Position Control of Tendon-Driven Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E.; Platt, Robert, Jr.; Hargrave, B.; Pementer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Conventionally, tendon-driven manipulators implement some force control scheme based on tension feedback. This feedback allows the system to ensure that the tendons are maintained taut with proper levels of tensioning at all times. Occasionally, whether it is due to the lack of tension feedback or the inability to implement sufficiently high stiffnesses, a position control scheme is needed. This work compares three position controllers for tendon-driven manipulators. A new controller is introduced that achieves the best overall performance with regards to speed, accuracy, and transient behavior. To compensate for the lack of tension feedback, the controller nominally maintains the internal tension on the tendons by implementing a two-tier architecture with a range-space constraint. These control laws are validated experimentally on the Robonaut-2 humanoid hand. I

  12. Ontology Driven Piecemeal Development of Smart Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovaska, Eila

    Software development is facing new challenges due to transformation from product based software engineering towards integration and collaboration based software engineering that embodies high degree of dynamism both at design time and run time. Short time-to-markets require cost reduction by maximizing software reuse; openness for new innovations presumes a flexible innovation platform and agile software development; and user satisfaction assumes high quality in a situation based manner. How to deal with these contradictory requirements in software engineering? The main contribution of this paper is a novel approach that is influenced by business innovation, human centered design, model driven development and ontology oriented design. The approach is called Ontology driven Piecemeal Software Engineering (OPSE). OPSE facilitates incremental software development based on software pieces that follow the design principles defined by means of ontologies. Its key elements are abstraction, aggregation and adaptivity. The approach is intended for and applied to the development of smart spaces.

  13. Light-driven artificial molecular machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yue Bing; Hao, Qingzhen; Yang, Ying-Wei; Kiraly, Brian; Chiang, I.-Kao; Huang, Tony Jun

    2010-08-01

    Artificial molecular machines represent a growing field of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Stimulated by chemical reagents, electricity, or light, artificial molecular machines exhibit precisely controlled motion at the molecular level; with this ability molecular machines have the potential to make significant impacts in numerous engineering applications. Compared with molecular machines powered by chemical or electrical energy, light-driven molecular machines have several advantages: light can be switched much faster, work without producing chemical waste, and be used for dual purposes-inducing (writing) as well as detecting (reading) molecular motions. The following issues are significant for light-driven artificial molecular machines in the following aspects: their chemical structures, motion mechanisms, assembly and characterization on solid-state surfaces. Applications in different fields of nanotechnology such as molecular electronics, nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS), nanophotonics, and nanomedicine are envisaged.

  14. A charge-driven molecular water pump.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaojing; Li, Jingyuan; Lu, Hangjun; Wan, Rongzheng; Li, Jichen; Hu, Jun; Fang, Haiping

    2007-11-01

    Understanding and controlling the transport of water across nanochannels is of great importance for designing novel molecular devices, machines and sensors and has wide applications, including the desalination of seawater. Nanopumps driven by electric or magnetic fields can transport ions and magnetic quanta, but water is charge-neutral and has no magnetic moment. On the basis of molecular dynamics simulations, we propose a design for a molecular water pump. The design uses a combination of charges positioned adjacent to a nanopore and is inspired by the structure of channels in the cellular membrane that conduct water in and out of the cell (aquaporins). The remarkable pumping ability is attributed to the charge dipole-induced ordering of water confined in the nanochannels, where water can be easily driven by external fields in a concerted fashion. These findings may provide possibilities for developing water transport devices that function without osmotic pressure or a hydrostatic pressure gradient.

  15. Solvable model of a strongly driven micromaser

    SciTech Connect

    Lougovski, P.; Walther, H.; Casagrande, F.; Lulli, A.; Englert, B.-G.; Solano, E.

    2004-02-01

    We study the dynamics of a micromaser where the pumping atoms are strongly driven by a resonant classical field during their transit through the cavity mode. We derive a master equation for this strongly driven micromaser, involving the contributions of the unitary atom-field interactions and the dissipative effects of a thermal bath. We find analytical solutions for the temporal evolution and the steady state of this system by means of phase-space techniques, providing an unusual solvable model of an open quantum system, including pumping and decoherence. We derive closed expressions for all relevant expectation values, describing the statistics of the cavity field and the detected atomic levels. The transient regime shows the buildup of mixtures of mesoscopic fields evolving towards a super-Poissonian steady-state field that, nevertheless, yields atomic correlations that exhibit stronger nonclassical features than the conventional micromaser.

  16. Building Test Cases through Model Driven Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Helaine; Lopes, Denivaldo; Abdelouahab, Zair; Hammoudi, Slimane; Claro, Daniela Barreiro

    Recently, Model Driven Engineering (MDE) has been proposed to face the complexity in the development, maintenance and evolution of large and distributed software systems. Model Driven Architecture (MDA) is an example of MDE. In this context, model transformations enable a large reuse of software systems through the transformation of a Platform Independent Model into a Platform Specific Model. Although source code can be generated from models, defects can be injected during the modeling or transformation process. In order to delivery software systems without defects that cause errors and fails, the source code must be submitted to test. In this paper, we present an approach that takes care of test in the whole software life cycle, i.e. it starts in the modeling level and finishes in the test of source code of software systems. We provide an example to illustrate our approach.

  17. Geometry-driven photorealistic facial expression synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingshan; Liu, Zicheng; Guo, Baining; Terzopoulos, Demetri; Shum, Heung-Yeung

    2006-01-01

    Expression mapping (also called performance driven animation) has been a popular method for generating facial animations. A shortcoming of this method is that it does not generate expression details such as the wrinkles due to skin deformations. In this paper, we provide a solution to this problem. We have developed a geometry-driven facial expression synthesis system. Given feature point positions (the geometry) of a facial expression, our system automatically synthesizes a corresponding expression image that includes photorealistic and natural looking expression details. Due to the difficulty of point tracking, the number of feature points required by the synthesis system is, in general, more than what is directly available from a performance sequence. We have developed a technique to infer the missing feature point motions from the tracked subset by using an example-based approach. Another application of our system is expression editing where the user drags feature points while the system interactively generates facial expressions with skin deformation details.

  18. Stable transport in proton driven fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.

    2009-09-15

    Proton beam transport in the context of proton driven fast ignition is usually assumed to be stable due to proton high inertia, but an analytical analysis of the process is still lacking. The stability of a charge and current neutralized proton beam passing through a plasma is therefore conducted here, for typical proton driven fast ignition parameters. In the cold regime, two fast growing modes are found, with an inverse growth rate much smaller than the beam time of flight to the target core. The stability issue is thus not so obvious, and kinetic effects are investigated. One unstable mode is found stabilized by the background plasma proton and electron temperatures. The second mode is also damped, providing the proton beam thermal spread is larger than {approx}10 keV. In fusion conditions, the beam propagation should therefore be stable.

  19. Laser-driven fusion etching process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Brannon, Paul J.; Gerardo, James B.

    1989-01-01

    The surfaces of solid ionic substrates are etched by a radiation-driven chemical reaction. The process involves exposing an ionic substrate coated with a layer of a reactant material on its surface to radiation, e.g. a laser, to induce localized melting of the substrate which results in the occurrance of a fusion reaction between the substrate and coating material. The resultant reaction product and excess reactant salt are then removed from the surface of the substrate with a solvent which is relatively inert towards the substrate. The laser-driven chemical etching process is especially suitable for etching ionic salt substrates, e.g., a solid inorganic salt such as LiNbO.sub.3, such as used in electro-optical/acousto-optic devices. It is also suitable for applications wherein the etching process is required to produce an etched ionic substrate having a smooth surface morphology or when a very rapid etching rate is desired.

  20. Laser-driven fusion etching process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Brannon, P.J.; Gerardo, J.B.

    1987-08-25

    The surfaces of solids are etched by a radiation-driven chemical reaction. The process involves exposing a substrate coated with a layer of a reactant material on its surface to radiation, e.g., a laser, to induce localized melting of the substrate which results in the occurrence of a fusion reaction between the substrate and coating material. The resultant reaction product and excess reactant salt are then removed from the surface of the substrate with a solvent which is relatively inert towards the substrate. The laser-driven chemical etching process is especially suitable for etching ionic substrates, e.g., LiNbO/sub 3/, such as used in electro-optical/acousto-optic devices. It is also suitable for applications wherein the etching process is required to produce an etched ionic substrate having a smooth surface morphology or when a very rapid etching rate is desired.

  1. Odd-frequency Superconductivity in Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triola, Christopher; Balatsky, Alexander

    We show that Berezinskii's classification of the symmetries of Cooper pair amplitudes in terms of parity under transformations that invert spin, space, time, and orbital degrees of freedom holds for driven systems even in the absence of translation invariance. We then discuss the conditions under which pair amplitudes which are odd in frequency can emerge in driven systems. Considering a model Hamiltonian for a superconductor coupled to an external driving potential, we investigate the influence of the drive on the anomalous Green's function, density of states, and spectral function. We find that the anomalous Green's function develops odd in frequency component in the presence of an external drive. Furthermore we investigate how these odd-frequency terms are related to satellite features in the density of states and spectral function. Supported by US DOE BES E 304.

  2. A signature for turbulence driven magnetic islands

    SciTech Connect

    Agullo, O.; Muraglia, M.; Benkadda, S.; Poyé, A.; Yagi, M.; Garbet, X.; Sen, A.

    2014-09-15

    We investigate the properties of magnetic islands arising from tearing instabilities that are driven by an interchange turbulence. We find that such islands possess a specific signature that permits an identification of their origin. We demonstrate that the persistence of a small scale turbulence maintains a mean pressure profile, whose characteristics makes it possible to discriminate between turbulence driven islands from those arising due to an unfavourable plasma current density gradient. We also find that the island poloidal turnover time, in the steady state, is independent of the levels of the interchange and tearing energy sources. Finally, we show that a mixing length approach is adequate to make theoretical predictions concerning island flattening in the island rotation frame.

  3. Photonic laser-driven accelerator for GALAXIE

    SciTech Connect

    Naranjo, B.; Ho, M.; Hoang, P.; Putterman, S.; Valloni, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2012-12-21

    We report on the design and development of an all-dielectric laser-driven accelerator to be used in the GALAXIE (GV-per-meter Acce Lerator And X-ray-source Integrated Experiment) project's compact free-electron laser. The approach of our working design is to construct eigenmodes, borrowing from the field of photonics, which yield the appropriate, highly demanding dynamics in a high-field, short wavelength accelerator. Topics discussed include transverse focusing, power coupling, bunching, and fabrication.

  4. Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement

    SciTech Connect

    David W. DePaoli; Ofodike A. Ezekoye; Costas Tsouris; Valmor F. de Almeida

    2003-01-28

    The purpose of this research project was to develop an improved understanding of how electriexecy driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume.

  5. Noise and Chaos in Driven Josephson Junctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    induced step ( n = integer), the corresponding Fokker - Planck equation is essentially the same as that for a purely dc biased junction in the zero... Planck equation which governs the two-dimensional distribution function P((j), d(t)/dt, t) will reduce to the one-dimensional Smoluchowski equation ...Junction). Its equation of motion turns out exacdy the same as a damped driven pendulum, except its characteristic frequency is about 10^-10^^ times

  6. Dynamic signatures of driven vortex motion.

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.; Lopez, D.; Olsson, R. J.; Paulius, L. M.; Petrean, A. M.; Safar, H.

    1999-09-16

    We probe the dynamic nature of driven vortex motion in superconductors with a new type of transport experiment. An inhomogeneous Lorentz driving force is applied to the sample, inducing vortex velocity gradients that distinguish the hydrodynamic motion of the vortex liquid from the elastic and-plastic motion of the vortex solid. We observe elastic depinning of the vortex lattice at the critical current, and shear induced plastic slip of the lattice at high Lorentz force gradients.

  7. Quasisteady turbulence driven by runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Muschietti, L.; Appert, K.; Vaclavik, J.

    1982-07-01

    The evolution of the turbulence driven by runaway electrons has been followed by means of a computer code based on the quasilinear equations. The evolution is not characterized by periodic relaxations as claimed in previous works but ends in a quasisteady turbulent, yet very persistent state, accessible from different initial conditions. This discrepancy is clarified as being due to the excessive stiffness of the moment equations used to demonstrate the relaxations. Moreover, a theory is developed to interpret the quasisteady state found.

  8. A User Driven Dynamic Circuit Network Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Guok, Chin; Robertson, David; Chaniotakis, Evangelos; Thompson, Mary; Johnston, William; Tierney, Brian

    2008-10-01

    The requirements for network predictability are becoming increasingly critical to the DoE science community where resources are widely distributed and collaborations are world-wide. To accommodate these emerging requirements, the Energy Sciences Network has established a Science Data Network to provide user driven guaranteed bandwidth allocations. In this paper we outline the design, implementation, and secure coordinated use of such a network, as well as some lessons learned.

  9. Chaos control of parametric driven Duffing oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Leisheng; Mei, Jie; Li, Lijie

    2014-03-31

    Duffing resonators are typical dynamic systems, which can exhibit chaotic oscillations, subject to certain driving conditions. Chaotic oscillations of resonating systems with negative and positive spring constants are identified to investigate in this paper. Parametric driver imposed on these two systems affects nonlinear behaviours, which has been theoretically analyzed with regard to variation of driving parameters (frequency, amplitude). Systematic calculations have been performed for these two systems driven by parametric pumps to unveil the controllability of chaos.

  10. Chaos control of parametric driven Duffing oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Leisheng; Mei, Jie; Li, Lijie

    2014-03-01

    Duffing resonators are typical dynamic systems, which can exhibit chaotic oscillations, subject to certain driving conditions. Chaotic oscillations of resonating systems with negative and positive spring constants are identified to investigate in this paper. Parametric driver imposed on these two systems affects nonlinear behaviours, which has been theoretically analyzed with regard to variation of driving parameters (frequency, amplitude). Systematic calculations have been performed for these two systems driven by parametric pumps to unveil the controllability of chaos.

  11. Current-driven plasma instabilities in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kempa, K.; Cen, J.; Bakshi, P.

    1989-02-01

    We examine here the possibility of current-driven plasma instabilities in superconductors in two temperature regimes. At low temperatures (Tapprox. =0) an instability can be generated in a layered system. Near the critical temperature (Tapprox. =T/sub c/) an instability can occur in a single superconductor for sufficiently large drifts which might be achievable in the new high-T/sub c/ materials. These instabilities offer possibilities for new radiation-source device applications.

  12. Fluctuation relations for a driven Brownian particle.

    PubMed

    Imparato, A; Peliti, L

    2006-08-01

    We consider a driven Brownian particle, subject to both conservative and nonconservative applied forces, whose probability evolves according to the Kramers equation. We derive a general fluctuation relation, expressing the ratio of the probability of a given Brownian path in phase space with that of the time-reversed path, in terms of the entropy flux to the heat reservoir. This fluctuation relation implies those of Seifert, Jarzynski, and Gallavotti-Cohen in different special cases.

  13. Fluctuation relations for a driven Brownian particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imparato, A.; Peliti, L.

    2006-08-01

    We consider a driven Brownian particle, subject to both conservative and nonconservative applied forces, whose probability evolves according to the Kramers equation. We derive a general fluctuation relation, expressing the ratio of the probability of a given Brownian path in phase space with that of the time-reversed path, in terms of the entropy flux to the heat reservoir. This fluctuation relation implies those of Seifert, Jarzynski, and Gallavotti-Cohen in different special cases.

  14. Engine driven heat pump program overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privon, George T.; Braun, A. T.

    This overview presentation is a brief summary of the efforts that have taken place in the small commercial-sized internal combustion engine-driven heat pump project being carried out by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Department of Energy. Aspects of the project discussed are: objectives and effort scope, the engine- compressor-seal concept, early results, recent developments, current status, and future plans.

  15. Scaling the electromagnetically driven explosive shock simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persh, Robert I.

    1987-01-01

    A heavy payload electromagnetically driven explosive shock simulator, referred to as EDESS-3, has been assembled and characterized at the Navel research Weapons Center. EDESS-3 is the logical outgrowth of the earlier EDESS 1 and 2 simulator work which explored the use of electrical pulse power technology for the generation of explosive like shocks. The features of the EDESS-3 are presented, and designs for the next generation of EDESS machines are introduced.

  16. Governor driven pump for an engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kronich, P.G.

    1987-05-05

    An oil pump is described for pumping engine lubricating oil in an internal combustion engine, the engine including a governor, the pump including: a support shaft adapted to be driven by the governor; a helical screw member supported on the support shaft; and a cylindrical chamber having a diameter slightly greater than the diameter of the helical screw member, the chamber having an inlet and an outlet for receiving and delivering engine lubricating oil, the helical screw member being disposed in the chamber.

  17. Tuned, driven, and active soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Andreas M.

    2015-02-01

    One characteristic feature of soft matter systems is their strong response to external stimuli. As a consequence they are comparatively easily driven out of their ground state and out of equilibrium, which leads to many of their fascinating properties. Here, we review illustrative examples. This review is structured by an increasing distance from the equilibrium ground state. On each level, examples of increasing degree of complexity are considered. In detail, we first consider systems that are quasi-statically tuned or switched to a new state by applying external fields. These are common liquid crystals, liquid crystalline elastomers, or ferrogels and magnetic elastomers. Next, we concentrate on systems steadily driven from outside e.g. by an imposed flow field. In our case, we review the reaction of nematic liquid crystals, of bulk-filling periodically modulated structures such as block copolymers, and of localized vesicular objects to an imposed shear flow. Finally, we focus on systems that are "active" and "self-driven". Here our range spans from idealized self-propelled point particles, via sterically interacting particles like granular hoppers, via microswimmers such as self-phoretically driven artificial Janus particles or biological microorganisms, via deformable self-propelled particles like droplets, up to the collective behavior of insects, fish, and birds. As we emphasize, similarities emerge in the features and behavior of systems that at first glance may not necessarily appear related. We thus hope that our overview will further stimulate the search for basic unifying principles underlying the physics of these soft materials out of their equilibrium ground state.

  18. Renormalization in Periodically Driven Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Eissing, A K; Meden, V; Kennes, D M

    2016-01-15

    We report on strong renormalization encountered in periodically driven interacting quantum dots in the nonadiabatic regime. Correlations between lead and dot electrons enhance or suppress the amplitude of driving depending on the sign of the interaction. Employing a newly developed flexible renormalization-group-based approach for periodic driving to an interacting resonant level we show analytically that the magnitude of this effect follows a power law. Our setup can act as a non-Markovian, single-parameter quantum pump.

  19. Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    A.J. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2009-03-20

    A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the α channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

  20. On Measures Driven by Markov Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heurteaux, Yanick; Stos, Andrzej

    2014-12-01

    We study measures on which are driven by a finite Markov chain and which generalize the famous Bernoulli products.We propose a hands-on approach to determine the structure function and to prove that the multifractal formalism is satisfied. Formulas for the dimension of the measures and for the Hausdorff dimension of their supports are also provided. Finally, we identify the measures with maximal dimension.

  1. Exploring Titan with Autonomous, Buoyancy Driven Gliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, M. T.; Woolsey, C. A.; Hagerman, G. M.

    Buoyancy driven underwater gliders are highly efficient winged underwater vehicles which locomote by modifying their internal shape. The concept, which is already well-proven in Earth's oceans, is also an appealing technology for remote terrain exploration and environmental sampling on worlds with dense atmospheres. Because of their high efficiency and their gentle, vertical take-off and landing capability, buoyancy driven gliders might perform long duration, global mapping tasks as well as light-duty, local sampling tasks. Moreover, a sufficiently strong gradient in the planetary boundary layer may enable the vehicles to perform dynamic soaring, achieving even greater locomotive efficiency. Shape Change Actuated, Low Altitude Robotic Soarers (SCALARS) are an appealing alternative to more conventional vehicle technology for exploring planets with dense atmospheres. SCALARS are buoyancy driven atmospheric gliders with a twin-hulled, inboard wing configuration. The inboard wing generates lift, which propels the vehicle forward. Symmetric changes in mass distribution induce gravitational pitch moments that provide longitudinal control. Asymmetric changes in mass distribution induce twist in the inboard wing that provides directional control. The vehicle is actuated solely by internal shape change; there are no external seals and no exposed moving parts, save for the inflatable buoyancy ballonets. Preliminary sizing analysis and dynamic modeling indicate the viability of using SCALARS to map the surface of Titan and to investigate features of interest.

  2. A gasdynamic gun driven by gaseous detonation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinping; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Shizhong; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Yu, Hongru

    2016-01-01

    A gasdynamic gun driven by gaseous detonation was developed to address the disadvantages of the insufficient driving capability of high-pressure gas and the constraints of gunpowder. The performance of this gasdynamic gun was investigated through experiments and numerical simulations. Much more powerful launching capability was achieved by this gun relative to a conventional high-pressure gas gun, owing to the use of the chemical energy of the driver gas. To achieve the same launching condition, the initial pressure required for this gun was an order of magnitude lower than that for a gun driven by high-pressure H2. Because of the presence of the detonation, however, a more complex internal ballistic process of this gun was observed. Acceleration of projectiles for this gun was accompanied by a series of impulse loads, in contrast with the smooth acceleration for a conventional one, which indicates that this gun should be used conditionally. The practical feasibility of this gun was verified by experiments. The experiments demonstrated the convenience of taking advantage of the techniques developed for detonation-driven shock tubes and tunnels.

  3. Shear and Pressure Driven Flow in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaluria, Yogesh

    2013-11-01

    In many important circumstances, microchannel flows driven by moving surfaces that impart shear to the fluid and by an imposed pressure difference across the channel are of interest. The pressure may aid or oppose the flow due to the moving surface. One such problem is the optical fiber coating process, where the entrance of the moving fiber into a reservoir of fluid, as well as its exit, results in shear driven flow in microchannels. An additional aiding or opposing pressure head is also usually applied. The transport processes influence the resulting coating very substantially. This paper discusses the basic considerations that arise in such processes, particularly the resulting flow and the menisci that are observed at the inlet and outlet regions of the two microchannels. Visualization has been an important approach to the basic understanding of these flows. Detailed flow and thermal transport results are often obtained by numerical modeling. Another important circumstance is the pressure rise in the channel for narrowing flow domains, such as those employed in dies and extruders. It is found that, in practical problems, high pressures are generated that oppose the shear effects. Then the resulting transport is affected by both shear and pressure. On the other hand, cooling of electronic systems often employs pressure-driven microchannel flows. Comparisons between the results obtained for these different flow situations indicate many interesting features, which are discussed in terms of the basic mechanisms.

  4. Electrically Driven Liquid Film Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation presents the science background and ground based results that form the basis of the Electrically Driven Liquid Film Boiling Experiment. This is an ISS experiment that is manifested for 2021. Objective: Characterize the effects of gravity on the interaction of electric and flow fields in the presence of phase change specifically pertaining to: a) The effects of microgravity on the electrically generated two-phase flow. b) The effects of microgravity on electrically driven liquid film boiling (includes extreme heat fluxes). Electro-wetting of the boiling section will repel the bubbles away from the heated surface in microgravity environment. Relevance/Impact: Provides phenomenological foundation for the development of electric field based two-phase thermal management systems leveraging EHD, permitting optimization of heat transfer surface area to volume ratios as well as achievement of high heat transfer coefficients thus resulting in system mass and volume savings. EHD replaces buoyancy or flow driven bubble removal from heated surface. Development Approach: Conduct preliminary experiments in low gravity and ground-based facilities to refine technique and obtain preliminary data for model development. ISS environment required to characterize electro-wetting effect on nucleate boiling and CHF in the absence of gravity. Will operate in the FIR - designed for autonomous operation.

  5. Precessionaly driven instability in the Lunar core.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noir, J.; Lin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Since Yoder 1981, the large dissipation at the period of precession associated with the misalignment of the lunar rotation axis with respect to the Cassini plan has been attributed to turbulent mixing in a liquid outer core. However, no precession driven instability mechanism supported this scenario without invoking unrealistic Core-Mantle boundary ellipticity. Meanwhile, recent numerical simulations (Lin et al., PoF 2014) and experiments (Goto et al., JFM 2014) have shown that internal shear layers spawned by the viscous boundary in a precessing spherical liquid shell can generate parametric-like instabilities. Based on the consistent scaling laws proposed in these two studies, we show that the present Lunar core is highly super critical, hence supporting the idea of turbulent dissipation. In my presentation I will briefly review the observations suggesting the presence of a large dissipation at the period of precession in the lunar core and present the shear driven instability mechanism, showing that precession driven turbulence is indeed plausible.

  6. Dissipative adaptation in driven self-assembly.

    PubMed

    England, Jeremy L

    2015-11-01

    In a collection of assembling particles that is allowed to reach thermal equilibrium, the energy of a given microscopic arrangement and the probability of observing the system in that arrangement obey a simple exponential relationship known as the Boltzmann distribution. Once the same thermally fluctuating particles are driven away from equilibrium by forces that do work on the system over time, however, it becomes significantly more challenging to relate the likelihood of a given outcome to familiar thermodynamic quantities. Nonetheless, it has long been appreciated that developing a sound and general understanding of the thermodynamics of such non-equilibrium scenarios could ultimately enable us to control and imitate the marvellous successes that living things achieve in driven self-assembly. Here, I suggest that such a theoretical understanding may at last be emerging, and trace its development from historic first steps to more recent discoveries. Focusing on these newer results, I propose that they imply a general thermodynamic mechanism for self-organization via dissipation of absorbed work that may be applicable in a broad class of driven many-body systems.

  7. Magnetic Control of Solutal Buoyancy Driven Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Volumetric forces resulting from local density variations and gravitational acceleration cause buoyancy induced convective motion in melts and solutions. Solutal buoyancy is a result of concentration differences in an otherwise isothermal fluid. If the fluid also exhibits variations in magnetic susceptibility with concentration then convection control by external magnetic fields can be hypothesized. Magnetic control of thermal buoyancy induced convection in ferrofluids (dispersions of ferromagnetic particles in a carrier fluid) and paramagnetic fluids have been demonstrated. Here we show the nature of magnetic control of solutal buoyancy driven convection of a paramagnetic fluid, an aqueous solution of Manganese Chloride hydrate. We predict the critical magnetic field required for balancing gravitational solutal buoyancy driven convection and validate it through a simple experiment. We demonstrate that gravity driven flow can be completely reversed by a magnetic field but the exact cancellation of the flow is not possible. This is because the phenomenon is unstable. The technique can be applied to crystal growth processes in order to reduce convection and to heat exchanger devices for enhancing convection. The method can also be applied to impose a desired g-level in reduced gravity applications.

  8. Microwave-driven smart material actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Kwak, Mia; Cutler, Andrew D.

    1999-06-01

    NASA's Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) has a large deployable, fragmented optical surface (>= 8 m in diameter) that requires autonomous correction of deployment misalignments and thermal effects. Its high and stringent resolution requirement imposes a great deal of challenge for optical correction. The threshold value for optical correction is dictated by (lambda) /20 (30 nm for NGST optics). Control of an adaptive optics array consisting of a large number of optical elements and smart material actuators is so complex that power distribution for activation and control of actuators must be done by other than hard-wired circuitry. The concept of microwave-driven smart actuators is envisioned as the best option to alleviate the complexity associated with hard-wiring. A microwave-driven actuator was studied to realize such a concept for future applications. Piezoelectric material was used as an actuator that shows dimensional change with high electric field. The actuators were coupled with microwave rectenna and tested to correlate the coupling effect of electromagnetic wave. In experiments, a 3 X 3 rectenna patch array generated more than 50 volts which is a threshold voltage for 30-nm displacement of a single piezoelectric material. Overall, the test results indicate that the microwave-driven actuator concept can be adopted for NGST applications.

  9. Magnetic Control of Solutal Buoyancy Driven Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Volumetric forces resulting from local density variations and gravitational acceleration cause buoyancy induced convective motion in melts and solutions. Solutal buoyancy is a result of concentration differences in an otherwise isothermal fluid. If the fluid also exhibits variations in magnetic susceptibility with concentration then convection control by external magnetic fields can be hypothesized. Magnetic control of thermal buoyancy induced convection in ferrofluids (dispersions of ferromagnetic particles in a carrier fluid) and paramagnetic fluids have been demonstrated. Here we show the nature of magnetic control of solutal buoyancy driven convection of a paramagnetic fluid, an aqueous solution of Manganese Chloride hydrate. We predict the critical magnetic field required for balancing gravitational solutal buoyancy driven convection and validate it through a simple experiment. We demonstrate that gravity driven flow can be completely reversed by a magnetic field but the exact cancellation of the flow is not possible. This is because the phenomenon is unstable. The technique can be applied to crystal growth processes in order to reduce convection and to heat exchanger devices for enhancing convection. The method can also be applied to impose a desired g-level in reduced gravity applications.

  10. 14 CFR 25.1127 - Exhaust driven turbo-superchargers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exhaust driven turbo-superchargers. 25.1127 Section 25.1127 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... driven turbo-superchargers. (a) Each exhaust driven turbo-supercharger must be approved or shown to...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1728 - Power-driven pulleys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Power-driven pulleys. 75.1728 Section 75.1728... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1728 Power-driven pulleys. (a) Belts, chains, and ropes shall not be guided onto power-driven moving pulleys, sprockets, or drums with...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1127 - Exhaust driven turbo-superchargers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exhaust driven turbo-superchargers. 25.1127 Section 25.1127 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... driven turbo-superchargers. (a) Each exhaust driven turbo-supercharger must be approved or shown to...

  13. 30 CFR 77.407 - Power-driven pulleys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Power-driven pulleys. 77.407 Section 77.407... for Mechanical Equipment § 77.407 Power-driven pulleys. (a) Belts, chains, and ropes shall not be guided onto power-driven moving pulleys, sprockets, or drums with the hands except on slow...

  14. 30 CFR 77.407 - Power-driven pulleys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Power-driven pulleys. 77.407 Section 77.407... for Mechanical Equipment § 77.407 Power-driven pulleys. (a) Belts, chains, and ropes shall not be guided onto power-driven moving pulleys, sprockets, or drums with the hands except on slow...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1728 - Power-driven pulleys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Power-driven pulleys. 75.1728 Section 75.1728... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1728 Power-driven pulleys. (a) Belts, chains, and ropes shall not be guided onto power-driven moving pulleys, sprockets, or drums with...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1728 - Power-driven pulleys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Power-driven pulleys. 75.1728 Section 75.1728... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1728 Power-driven pulleys. (a) Belts, chains, and ropes shall not be guided onto power-driven moving pulleys, sprockets, or drums with...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1728 - Power-driven pulleys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Power-driven pulleys. 75.1728 Section 75.1728... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1728 Power-driven pulleys. (a) Belts, chains, and ropes shall not be guided onto power-driven moving pulleys, sprockets, or drums with...

  18. 30 CFR 77.407 - Power-driven pulleys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Power-driven pulleys. 77.407 Section 77.407... for Mechanical Equipment § 77.407 Power-driven pulleys. (a) Belts, chains, and ropes shall not be guided onto power-driven moving pulleys, sprockets, or drums with the hands except on slow...

  19. 30 CFR 77.407 - Power-driven pulleys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Power-driven pulleys. 77.407 Section 77.407... for Mechanical Equipment § 77.407 Power-driven pulleys. (a) Belts, chains, and ropes shall not be guided onto power-driven moving pulleys, sprockets, or drums with the hands except on slow...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1127 - Exhaust driven turbo-superchargers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exhaust driven turbo-superchargers. 25.1127 Section 25.1127 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... driven turbo-superchargers. (a) Each exhaust driven turbo-supercharger must be approved or shown to...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1728 - Power-driven pulleys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Power-driven pulleys. 75.1728 Section 75.1728... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1728 Power-driven pulleys. (a) Belts, chains, and ropes shall not be guided onto power-driven moving pulleys, sprockets, or drums with...

  2. 46 CFR 169.623 - Power-driven steering systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power-driven steering systems. 169.623 Section 169.623... Machinery and Electrical Steering Systems § 169.623 Power-driven steering systems. (a) Power-driven steering... system must automatically resume operation after an electric power outage. (b) Control of...

  3. 30 CFR 77.407 - Power-driven pulleys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Power-driven pulleys. 77.407 Section 77.407... for Mechanical Equipment § 77.407 Power-driven pulleys. (a) Belts, chains, and ropes shall not be guided onto power-driven moving pulleys, sprockets, or drums with the hands except on slow...

  4. Strategic Planning and Market-Driven Management for Career Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chonko, Lawrence B.; Burley, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    Asserts that, when university career center pursues a strategic plan and becomes market driven, it is not only perceived to be a quality organization, it is one. Explains philosophy of market-driven management, marketing concept, and implementation of market-driven career planning and placement center. (NB)

  5. Current-Driven Filament Instabilities in Relativistic Plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Chuang

    2013-02-13

    This grant has supported a study of some fundamental problems in current- and flow-driven instabilities in plasmas and their applications in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and astrophysics. It addressed current-driven instabilities and their roles in fast ignition, and flow-driven instabilities and their applications in astrophysics.

  6. Driving Ms. Data: Creating Data-Driven Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Richard

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how driven Web sites help schools and districts maximize their IT resources by making online content more "self-service" for users. It shows how to set up the capacity to create data-driven sites. By definition, a data-driven Web site is one in which the content comes from some back-end data source, such as a…

  7. What we learn from surveillance testing of standby turbine driven and motor driven pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, B.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes a comparison of the performance information collected by the author and the respective system engineers from five standby turbine driven pumps at four commercial nuclear electric generating units in the United States and from two standby motor driven pumps at two of these generating units. Information was collected from surveillance testing and from Non-Test actuations. Most of the performance information (97%) came from surveillance testing. {open_quotes}Conditional Probabilities{close_quotes} of the pumps ability to respond to a random demand were calculated for each of the seven standby pumps and compared to the historical record of the Non-Test actuations. It appears that the Conditional Probabilities are comparable to the rate of success for Non-Test actuations. The Conditional Probabilities of the standby motor driven pumps (approximately 99%) are better than the Conditional Probabilities of the standby turbine driven pumps (82%-96% range). Recommendations were made to improve the Conditional Probabilities of the standby turbine driven pumps.

  8. 14 CFR 36.9 - Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category airplanes. 36.9 Section 36.9 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION General § 36.9 Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and...

  9. 14 CFR 36.9 - Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category airplanes. 36.9 Section 36.9 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION General § 36.9 Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and...

  10. 14 CFR 36.9 - Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category airplanes. 36.9 Section 36.9 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION General § 36.9 Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and...

  11. 14 CFR 36.9 - Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category airplanes. 36.9 Section 36.9 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION General § 36.9 Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and...

  12. 14 CFR 36.9 - Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category airplanes. 36.9 Section 36.9 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION General § 36.9 Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and...

  13. Modeling beam-driven and laser-driven plasma Wakefield accelerators with XOOPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2000-06-01

    We present 2-D particle-in-cell simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approximately} 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approximately} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications to XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  14. Physical Science Informatics: Providing Open Science Access to Microheater Array Boiling Experiment Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John; Green, Robert D.; Henrie, Ben; Miller, Teresa; Chiaramonte, Fran

    2014-01-01

    The Physical Science Informatics (PSI) system is the next step in this an effort to make NASA sponsored flight data available to the scientific and engineering community, along with the general public. The experimental data, from six overall disciplines, Combustion Science, Fluid Physics, Complex Fluids, Fundamental Physics, and Materials Science, will present some unique challenges. Besides data in textual or numerical format, large portions of both the raw and analyzed data for many of these experiments are digital images and video, requiring large data storage requirements. In addition, the accessible data will include experiment design and engineering data (including applicable drawings), any analytical or numerical models, publications, reports, and patents, and any commercial products developed as a result of the research. This objective of paper includes the following: Present the preliminary layout (Figure 2) of MABE data within the PSI database. Obtain feedback on the layout. Present the procedure to obtain access to this database.

  15. An electrical microheater technique for high-pressure and high-temperature diamond anvil cell experiments.

    PubMed

    Weir, S T; Jackson, D D; Falabella, S; Samudrala, G; Vohra, Y K

    2009-01-01

    Small electrical heating elements have been lithographically fabricated onto the culets of "designer" diamond anvils for the purpose of performing high-pressure and high-temperature experiments on metals. The thin-film geometry of the heating elements makes them very resistant to plastic deformation during high-pressure loading, and their small cross-sectional area enables them to be electrically heated to very high temperatures with relatively modest currents (approximately = 1 A). The technique also offers excellent control and temporal stability of the sample temperature. Test experiments on gold samples have been performed for pressures up to 21 GPa and temperatures of nearly 2000 K.

  16. Development of an Efficient Micro-Heat Exchanger: The Integration of Design Processing and Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    residual stress in co-sintering multiple layers between zircnonia and alumina [Lee et al., 2002; Cai et al., 1997a, 1997b; Sorenen, 2002; Shinagawa ...Society, Westerville, OH. Shinagawa , K. and Hirashima, Y., 2003, Key Engineering Materials, 233-23, 6, pp. 785- 790. Sorenson, B. F., 2002, J. Am. Ceram

  17. Triggering of high-speed neurite outgrowth using an optical microheater.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Kotaro; Zeeb, Vadim; Kawamura, Yuki; Arai, Tomomi; Gotoh, Mizuho; Itoh, Hideki; Itabashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Madoka; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2015-11-16

    Optical microheating is a powerful non-invasive method for manipulating biological functions such as gene expression, muscle contraction, and cell excitation. Here, we demonstrate its potential usage for regulating neurite outgrowth. We found that optical microheating with a water-absorbable 1,455-nm laser beam triggers directional and explosive neurite outgrowth and branching in rat hippocampal neurons. The focused laser beam under a microscope rapidly increases the local temperature from 36 °C to 41 °C (stabilized within 2 s), resulting in the elongation of neurites by more than 10 μm within 1 min. This high-speed, persistent elongation of neurites was suppressed by inhibitors of both microtubule and actin polymerization, indicating that the thermosensitive dynamics of these cytoskeletons play crucial roles in this heat-induced neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we showed that microheating induced the regrowth of injured neurites and the interconnection of neurites. These results demonstrate the efficacy of optical microheating methods for the construction of arbitrary neural networks.

  18. Gear-driven draw works have high reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrichs, P. )

    1995-02-20

    Gear-driven draw works have several advantages over conventional chain-driven draw works. Gear-driven draw works have a longer life and working availability (reliability) than chain-driven units, and these factors lead to lower operating costs because of fewer rig shut downs for repairs. The gear shift allows higher speeds and a better adaptation to the performance curve for greater operational efficiency. Additionally, more variable speed selection is possible with direct shifting from 1st to 4th speed. On failure of a gear shift, operation can be continued, with reduced performance, with the autodriller which is integrated directly into the gear shift. Additionally, the gear-driven unit makes less noise and vibration and has a compact construction for reduced weight. The oldest gear-driven draw works have been in use without any gear failure for 27 years, and other gear-driven draw works have worked for many years with no failure.

  19. Transmission with two parallel driving shafts bearing two driving gears each meshed with same driven gear on parallel driven shaft

    SciTech Connect

    Akashi, T.; Ito, H.; Yamada, S.

    1986-06-17

    A transmission mechanism for a vehicle is described for receiving input of rotational power from a power supply member which rotates in a particular rotational direction and for outputting rotational power to a power receiving member which includes: an input member connected to the power supply member and which is rotatably mounted and receives supplying of the rotational power from the power supply member; a first driving gear wheel shaft; a second driving gear wheel shaft mounted generally parallel to the first driving gear wheel shaft; a driven gear wheel shaft mounted generally parallel to the first and second driving gear wheel shafts, the driven gear wheel shaft being rotationally connected to the power receiving member; a first driven gear wheel fixedly mounted on the driven gear wheel shaft; a first driving gear wheel which is rotatably mounted on the first driving gear wheel shaft and is constant mesh with the driven gear wheel, the first driving and driven gear wheels providing a first reduction gear ratio from the first driving gear wheel shaft to the driven gear wheel shaft; a second driven gear wheel fixedly mounted on the driven gear wheel shaft; a second driving gear wheel which is rotatably mounted on the second driving gear wheel shaft and is in constant mesh with the first driven gear wheel, the second driving and the first driven gear wheels providing a second reduction gear ratio smaller than the first reduction gear ratio from the second driving gear wheel shaft to the driven gear wheel shaft; a third driving gear wheel which is rotatably mounted on the first driving gear wheel shaft and is in constant mesh with the second driven gear wheel, the third driving and the second driven gear wheels providing a third reduction gear ratio smaller than the second reduction gear ratio from the first driving gear wheel shaft to the driven gear wheel shaft.

  20. Screw dislocation driven growth of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fei; Morin, Stephen A; Forticaux, Audrey; Jin, Song

    2013-07-16

    Nanoscience and nanotechnology impact our lives in many ways, from electronic and photonic devices to biosensors. They also hold the promise of tackling the renewable energy challenges facing us. However, one limiting scientific challenge is the effective and efficient bottom-up synthesis of nanomaterials. We can approach this core challenge in nanoscience and nanotechnology from two perspectives: (a) how to controllably grow high-quality nanomaterials with desired dimensions, morphologies, and material compositions and (b) how to produce them in a large quantity at reasonable cost. Because many chemical and physical properties of nanomaterials are size- and shape-dependent, rational syntheses of nanomaterials to achieve desirable dimensionalities and morphologies are essential to exploit their utilities. In this Account, we show that the dislocation-driven growth mechanism, where screw dislocation defects provide self-perpetuating growth steps to enable the anisotropic growth of various nanomaterials at low supersaturation, can be a powerful and versatile synthetic method for a wide variety of nanomaterials. Despite significant progress in the last two decades, nanomaterial synthesis has often remained an "art", and except for a few well-studied model systems, the growth mechanisms of many anisotropic nanostructures remain poorly understood. We strive to go beyond the empirical science ("cook-and-look") and adopt a fundamental and mechanistic perspective to the anisotropic growth of nanomaterials by first understanding the kinetics of the crystal growth process. Since most functional nanomaterials are in single-crystal form, insights from the classical crystal growth theories are crucial. We pay attention to how screw dislocations impact the growth kinetics along different crystallographic directions and how the strain energy of defected crystals influences their equilibrium shapes. Furthermore, such inquiries are supported by detailed structural investigation to

  1. Evidence for Magnetically Driven Protoplanetary Disk Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Molly; Pascucci, Ilaria; Edwards, Suzan; Feng, Wanda; Rigliaco, Elisabetta; Gorti, Uma; Hollenbach, David J.; Tuttle Keane, James

    2017-01-01

    We present Keck high resolution (~7km/s) optical spectra from a sample of 32 pre-main sequence T-Tauri stars in Taurus-Auriga plus TW Hya. We focus on low-excitation forbidden emission lines like the [O I] 6300 Å and 5577 Å lines, whose high-velocity component, with blueshifts between ~30 - 150 km/s, is known to trace fast outflowing material in the form of jets (e.g. Hartigan et al. 1995). The origin of the low-velocity component (LVC), with blueshifts on the order of ~5 km/s, has been long debated. We demonstrate that the LVC can be described by a combination of a broad and a narrow line emitting region. We show that the broad line emitting region is very common, arises within ~0.5 AU from the star, and shows the expected disk wind signature, i.e. larger blueshifts associated with narrower lines and lower disc inclinations. Such winds must be magnetically driven given that the emitting region is well inside the gravitational potential well of the central star. The origin of the narrow line emitting region remains difficult to assess, in particular we cannot exclude that it traces a thermally driven (photoevaporative) wind. Disk winds, both thermally and magnetically driven, might play a major role in the evolution and eventual dispersal of protoplanetary material, which has implications for solar system architectures and planet formation more generally. Hence, it is critical to determine the rate at which mass is lost via disk winds.

  2. An Early Nutation-Driven Lunar Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, C. A.; Stevenson, D. J.; Nimmo, F.

    2010-12-01

    Paleointensity data have long been adduced as evidence of an ancient lunar magnetic dynamo and recent paleomagnetic measurements have strengthened this argument [1]. However, a driving mechanism for the dynamo has been hard to find. We investigate here the possibility of a mechanically-stirred dynamo driven by nutation. Nutation results in the stirring of a liquid core by the differential motion of the solid outer mantle. Lunar laser ranging supports a small (≈335 km) liquid core and provides an estimate of the energy dissipated at the lunar core/mantle boundary at the present-day [2]. While the current energy dissipation rate is not enough to power a dynamo, the energy available would have been much larger earlier in lunar history, when the moon was closer to Earth and the spin axis was more offset from the orbital plane. As a first step investigating the feasibility of a nutation-driven lunar paleodynamo, we considered the energy budget likely available to power a dynamo. Model A used a simple scaling argument based on the terrestrial dynamo. Model B was based on the energy flux model of [3]. For lunar semi-major axes less than ≈42 REarth (≈3 Ga), both models produce comparable results and predict surface fields greater than 1 µT (comparable to the paleointensity estimates of [1]). Furthermore, a nutation-driven dynamo would have naturally ceased to operate as the lunar orbit expanded; it would have failed when the available power (which strongly depends on semi-major axis) was no longer able to overcome the tendency of the core to cool to a subadiabatic state. Thus, mechanical stirring via nutation is a viable potential driver of a lunar dynamo and deserves further study. [1] Garrick-Bethell et al. (2009) Science 323, 356-359. [2] Williams et al. (2001) JGR-P 106, 27933-27968. [3] Christensen et al. (2009) Nature 457, 167-169.

  3. Hysteresis in Pressure-Driven DNA Denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Nicasio-Collazo, Luz Adriana; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    In the past, a great deal of attention has been drawn to thermal driven denaturation processes. In recent years, however, the discovery of stress-induced denaturation, observed at the one-molecule level, has revealed new insights into the complex phenomena involved in the thermo-mechanics of DNA function. Understanding the effect of local pressure variations in DNA stability is thus an appealing topic. Such processes as cellular stress, dehydration, and changes in the ionic strength of the medium could explain local pressure changes that will affect the molecular mechanics of DNA and hence its stability. In this work, a theory that accounts for hysteresis in pressure-driven DNA denaturation is proposed. We here combine an irreversible thermodynamic approach with an equation of state based on the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model. The latter one provides a good description of the osmotic pressure over a wide range of DNA concentrations. The resulting theoretical framework predicts, in general, the process of denaturation and, in particular, hysteresis curves for a DNA sequence in terms of system parameters such as salt concentration, density of DNA molecules and temperature in addition to structural and configurational states of DNA. Furthermore, this formalism can be naturally extended to more complex situations, for example, in cases where the host medium is made up of asymmetric salts or in the description of the (helical-like) charge distribution along the DNA molecule. Moreover, since this study incorporates the effect of pressure through a thermodynamic analysis, much of what is known from temperature-driven experiments will shed light on the pressure-induced melting issue. PMID:22496765

  4. Laser-Driven Magnetized Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Derek

    2016-10-01

    Collisionless shocks - supersonic plasma flows in which the interaction length scale is much shorter than the collisional mean free path - are common phenomena in space and astrophysical systems, including the solar wind, coronal mass ejections, supernovae remnants, and the jets of active galactic nuclei. These systems have been studied for decades, and in many the shocks are believed to efficiently accelerate particles to some of the highest observed energies. Only recently, however, have laser and diagnostic capabilities evolved sufficiently to allow the detailed study in the laboratory of the microphysics of collisionless shocks over a large parameter regime. We present experiments that demonstrate the formation of collisionless shocks utilizing the Phoenix laser laboratory and the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. We also show recent observations of magnetized collisionless shocks on the Omega EP laser facility that extend the LAPD results to higher laser energy, background magnetic field, and ambient plasma density, and that may be relevant to recent experiments on strongly driven magnetic reconnection. Lastly, we discuss a new experimental regime for shocks with results from high-repetition (1 Hz), volumetric laser-driven measurements on the LAPD. These large parameter scales allow us to probe the formation physics of collisionless shocks over several Alfvénic Mach numbers (MA), from shock precursors (magnetosonic solitons with MA < 1) to subcritical (MA < 3) and supercritical (MA > 3) shocks. The results show that collisionless shocks can be generated using a laser-driven magnetic piston, and agree well with both 2D and 3D hybrid and PIC simulations. Additionally, using radiation-hydrodynamic modeling and measurements from multiple diagnostics, the different shock regimes are characterized with dimensionless formation parameters, allowing us to place disparate experiments in a common and predictive framework.

  5. Thermodynamics of chemical Marangoni-driven engines.

    PubMed

    Krechetnikov, Rouslan

    2017-07-19

    The goal of this paper is to perform a general thermodynamic study of Marangoni-driven engines in which chemical energy is directly transformed into mechanical motion. Given that this topic has not been discussed before, we will explore here the most basic and fundamental aspects of the phenomena at work, which leads to a number of interesting observations typical of controversies in classical thermodynamics. Starting with a discussion of a few key motivating examples of chemical Marangoni-driven phenomena - tears of wine, an oscillating pendant droplet, "beating" oil lens, and traveling waves in a circular container - and contrasting homogeneous versus inhomogeneous thermodynamic systems we naturally arrive at alternative ways of storing and generating energy with the help of inhomogeneities in the bulk and surface properties of the working media. Of particular interest here are systems with interfaces - hence, in this context we discuss the nature and efficiency of the corresponding thermodynamic cycles leading to work done as a result of a non-uniform distribution of surface tension, which is in turn induced by a non-uniform surface active substance (surfactant) distribution, for both soluble and insoluble surfactants. Based on the relevant physical parameters of the working medium we can also evaluate the isothermality, i.e. temperature variations, dissipative losses, energy output and efficiency, entropy generation, and the period of such cycles in real processes. The role of singularity formation at the interface for the existence of such thermodynamic cycles is unraveled as well. Finally the discussion is concluded with a few ideas for potential applications of Marangoni-driven engines.

  6. Degassing-driven crystallisation in basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegarth, L. J.; Tuffen, H.; James, M. R.; Pinkerton, H.

    2013-01-01

    Syn-eruptive crystallisation can drastically increase magma viscosity, with profound implications for conduit dynamics, lava emplacement and volcanic hazards. There is growing evidence that crystallisation is not only cooling-driven, but can also occur almost isothermally during decompression-induced degassing on ascent from depth. Here we review field and experimental evidence for degassing-driven crystallisation in a range of magma compositions. We then present new results showing, for the first time, experimental evidence for this process in basaltic magma. Our experiments use simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry coupled with mass spectrometry (TGA-DSC-MS) to monitor degassing patterns and thermal events during heating and cooling of porphyritic basaltic samples from Mt. Etna, Italy. The partly degassed samples, which contained 0.39-0.81 wt.% total volatiles in the glass fraction, were subjected to two cycles of heating from ambient to 1250 °C. On the first heating, TGA data show that 30-60% of the total volatiles degassed slowly at < 1050 °C, and that the degassing rate increased rapidly above this temperature. DSC data indicate that this rapid increase in the degassing rate was closely followed (≤ 3.4 min) by a strongly exothermic event, which is interpreted as crystallisation. Enthalpies measured for this event suggest that up to 35% of the sample crystallises, a value supported by petrographic observations of samples quenched after the event. As neither degassing nor crystallisation was observed at high temperature during the second heating cycle we infer that the events on first heating constitute degassing-driven crystallisation. The rapidity and magnitude of the crystallisation response to degassing indicates that this process may strongly affect the rheology of basaltic magma in shallow conduits and lava flows, and thus influence the hazards posed by basaltic volcanism.

  7. Metabolic Dependencies in RAS-Driven Cancers.

    PubMed

    Kimmelman, Alec C

    2015-04-15

    The ability to inhibit the RAS oncogene has been the holy grail of oncology because of the critical role of this gene in a multitude of tumor types. In addition, RAS-mutant tumors are among the most aggressive and refractory to treatment. Although directly targeting the RAS oncogene has proven challenging, an alternative approach for treating RAS-driven cancers is to inhibit critical downstream events that are required for tumor maintenance. Indeed, much focus has been put on inhibiting signaling cascades downstream of RAS. Recent studies have shown that oncogenic RAS promotes a metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells, shifting them toward an anabolic metabolism necessary to produce biomass to support unconstrained proliferation. These cancers also use a diverse set of fuel sources to meet their metabolic needs and have even developed a variety of mechanisms to act as metabolic scavengers to obtain necessary metabolic substrates from both extracellular and intracellular sources. Collectively, these adaptations can create "metabolic bottlenecks" whereby tumor cells rely on particular pathways or rate-limiting metabolites. In this regard, inhibiting individual or combinations of these metabolic pathways can attenuate growth in preclinical models. Because these dependencies are tumor selective and downstream of oncogenic RAS, there is the opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Although targeting tumor metabolism is still in the early days of translation to patients, our continued advances in understanding critical metabolic adaptations in RAS-driven cancers, as well as the ability to study this altered metabolism in relevant tumor models, will accelerate the development of new therapeutic approaches. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1828-34. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers."

  8. Self-Rotation in Bouyancy Driven Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Saborid, Miguel; Herrada, Miguel A.; Barrero, Antonio

    2000-11-01

    The appearance of self-rotation in buoyancy driven flows has been studied experimentally in a box with square section containing water. The experimental set up is very similar to that used by Torrance (JFM, 95, 477-495, 1979). The swirling and non-swirling regimes are visualized by injecting dye and by laser illumination and the critical Grashoff number is determined from Phase Doppler laser velocimetry. A numerical computation of the full Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation has been performed using a spectral method. The results have been compared with experiments for several values of the flow parameters.

  9. Accelerator driven sub-critical core

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Peter M; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-03-17

    Systems and methods for operating an accelerator driven sub-critical core. In one embodiment, a fission power generator includes a sub-critical core and a plurality of proton beam generators. Each of the proton beam generators is configured to concurrently provide a proton beam into a different area of the sub-critical core. Each proton beam scatters neutrons within the sub-critical core. The plurality of proton beam generators provides aggregate power to the sub-critical core, via the proton beams, to scatter neutrons sufficient to initiate fission in the sub-critical core.

  10. Early Work on Defect Driven Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosterlitz, J. Michael; Thouless, David J.

    2016-12-01

    This article summarizes the early history of the theory of phase transitions driven by topological defects, such as vortices in superfluid helium films or dislocations and disclinations in two-dimensional solids. We start with a review of our two earliest papers, pointing out their errors and omissions as well as their insights. We then describe the work, partly done by Kosterlitz but mostly done by other people, which corrected these oversights, and applied these ideas to experimental systems, and to numerical and experimental simulations.

  11. Inductive currents in an rf driven plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, J.; Ehst, D.A.

    1991-08-01

    Inductive effects are included in a self-consistent current drive model for axisymmetric tokamak plasmas used in the two-dimensional current drive/MHD equilibrium code, RIP. Previous simulations of current driven equilibria allowed for the steady-state calculation of bootstrap and RF currents. The addition of an inductive current is applied to enhance accurate design and interpretation of tokamak experiments. A convenient expression for the ohmic resistance in a tokamak plasma is derived to aid in the design of reactor grade MHD equilibria. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Diffusion Driven Combustion Waves in Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldushin, A. P.; Matkowsky, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Filtration of gas containing oxidizer, to the reaction zone in a porous medium, due, e.g., to a buoyancy force or to an external pressure gradient, leads to the propagation of Filtration combustion (FC) waves. The exothermic reaction occurs between the fuel component of the solid matrix and the oxidizer. In this paper, we analyze the ability of a reaction wave to propagate in a porous medium without the aid of filtration. We find that one possible mechanism of propagation is that the wave is driven by diffusion of oxidizer from the environment. The solution of the combustion problem describing diffusion driven waves is similar to the solution of the Stefan problem describing the propagation of phase transition waves, in that the temperature on the interface between the burned and unburned regions is constant, the combustion wave is described by a similarity solution which is a function of the similarity variable x/square root of(t) and the wave velocity decays as 1/square root of(t). The difference between the two problems is that in the combustion problem the temperature is not prescribed, but rather, is determined as part of the solution. We will show that the length of samples in which such self-sustained combustion waves can occur, must exceed a critical value which strongly depends on the combustion temperature T(sub b). Smaller values of T(sub b) require longer sample lengths for diffusion driven combustion waves to exist. Because of their relatively small velocity, diffusion driven waves are considered to be relevant for the case of low heat losses, which occur for large diameter samples or in microgravity conditions, Another possible mechanism of porous medium combustion describes waves which propagate by consuming the oxidizer initially stored in the pores of the sample. This occurs for abnormally high pressure and gas density. In this case, uniformly propagating planar waves, which are kinetically controlled, can propagate, Diffusion of oxidizer decreases

  13. Coherent oscillations of driven rf SQUID metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepanier, Melissa; Zhang, Daimeng; Mukhanov, Oleg; Koshelets, V. P.; Jung, Philipp; Butz, Susanne; Ott, Edward; Antonsen, Thomas M.; Ustinov, Alexey V.; Anlage, Steven M.

    2017-05-01

    Through experiments and numerical simulations we explore the behavior of rf SQUID (radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device) metamaterials, which show extreme tunability and nonlinearity. The emergent electromagnetic properties of this metamaterial are sensitive to the degree of coherent response of the driven interacting SQUIDs. Coherence suffers in the presence of disorder, which is experimentally found to be mainly due to a dc flux gradient. We demonstrate methods to recover the coherence, specifically by varying the coupling between the SQUID meta-atoms and increasing the temperature or the amplitude of the applied rf flux.

  14. Lane formation in a driven attractive fluid.

    PubMed

    Wächtler, C W; Kogler, F; Klapp, S H L

    2016-11-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium lane formation in a generic model of a fluid with attractive interactions, that is, a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid composed of two particle species driven in opposite directions. Performing Brownian dynamics simulations for a wide range of parameters, supplemented by a stability analysis based on dynamical density functional theory, we identify generic features of lane formation in the presence of attraction, including structural properties. In fact, we find a variety of states (as compared to purely repulsive systems), as well as a close relation between laning and long-wavelength instabilities of the homogeneous phase such as demixing and condensation.

  15. Lag-driven motion in front propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Daniel R.; Fort, Joaquim

    2013-10-01

    Front propagation is a ubiquitous phenomenon. It arises in physical, biological and cross-disciplinary systems as diverse as flame propagation, superconductors, virus infections, cancer spread or transitions in human prehistory. Here we derive a single, approximate front speed from three rather different time-delayed reaction-diffusion models, suggesting a general law. According to our approximate speed, fronts are crucially driven by the lag times (periods during which individuals or particles do not move). Rather surprisingly, the approximate speed is able to explain the observed spread rates of completely different biophysical systems such as virus infections, the Neolithic transition in Europe, and postglacial tree recolonizations.

  16. Optimality of Contraction-Driven Crawling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recho, P.; Joanny, J.-F.; Truskinovsky, L.

    2014-05-01

    We study a particular mechanism of cell motility allowing a precise formulation of the condition of optimal trade-off between performance and metabolic cost. In the model, a steadily crawling fragment is represented by a layer of active gel placed on a frictional surface and driven by contraction only. We find analytically the distribution of contractile elements (pullers) ensuring that the efficiency of self-propulsion is maximal. We then show that natural assumptions about advection and diffusion of pullers produce a distribution that is remarkably close to the optimal one and is qualitatively similar to the one observed in experiments on fish keratocytes.

  17. Optically trapped and driven paddle-wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asavei, Theodor; Nieminen, Timo A.; Loke, Vincent L. Y.; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Bowman, Richard; Preece, Daryl; Padgett, Miles J.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate the control and rotation of an optically trapped object, an optical paddle-wheel, with the rotation direction normal to the beam axis. This is in contrast to the usual situation where the rotation is about the beam axis. The paddle-wheel can be optically driven and moved to any position in the field of view of the microscope, which can be of interest for various biological applications where controlled application of a fluid flow is needed in a particular location and in a specific direction. This is of particular interest in signal transduction studies in cells, especially when a cell is flat and spread out on a surface.

  18. Design of a Knowledge Driven HIS

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, T. Allan; Clayton, Paul D.; Haug, Peter J.; Wigertz, Ove

    1987-01-01

    Design of the software architecture for a knowledge driven HIS is presented. In our design the frame has been used as the basic unit of knowledge representation. The structure of the frame is being designed to be sufficiently universal to contain knowledge required to implement not only expert systems, but almost all traditional HIS functions including ADT, order entry and results review. The design incorporates a two level format for the knowledge. The first level as ASCII records is used to maintain the knowledge base while the second level converted by special knowledge compilers to standard computer languages is used for efficient implementation of the knowledge applications.

  19. Odd-frequency superconductivity in driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triola, Christopher; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2016-09-01

    We show that Berezinskii's classification of the symmetries of Cooper pair amplitudes holds for driven systems even in the absence of translation invariance. We then consider a model Hamiltonian for a superconductor coupled to an external driving potential and, treating the drive as a perturbation, we investigate the corrections to the anomalous Green's function, density of states, and spectral function. We find that in the presence of an external drive the anomalous Green's function develops terms that are odd in frequency and that the same mechanism responsible for these odd-frequency terms generates additional features in the density of states and spectral function.

  20. Arc-driven rail accelerator research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Pradosh K.

    1987-01-01

    Arc-driven rail accelerator research is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time and rate of ablation. Locations of two simultaneously accelerating arcs were determined by optical and magnetic probes and fron streak camera photographs. All three measurements provide consistent results.

  1. Towards a Chemically Driven Molecular Electron Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astumian, R. Dean; Derényi, Imre

    2001-04-01

    Charge can be pumped through a tiny gated portal from a reservoir at low electrochemical potential to one at the same or higher electrochemical potential by cyclically modulating the portal and gate energies. A theoretically and experimentally well established mechanism is Thouless adiabatic pumping, achieved by a precisely timed out-of-phase modulation of at least two parameters of the system. Here we show that stochastic modulation between two configurations of gate and portal energies can drive efficient pumping by a different, nonadiabatic, mechanism that may provide a basis for chemically driven electron pumping through a molecular wire.

  2. Model driven laboratory information management systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Gennari, John H; Brinkley, James F

    2006-01-01

    Scientists in small research labs need more robust tools than spreadsheets to manage their data. However, no suitable laboratory information management systems (LIMS) are readily available; they are either too costly or too complex. We have therefore developed Seedpod, a model driven LIMS that allows users to create an integrated model of a LIMS without programming. Seedpod then automati-cally produces a relational database from the model, and dynamically generates a web-based graphical user interface. Our goal is to make LIMS easier to use by decreasing development time and cost, thereby allowing researchers to focus on producing and collecting data.

  3. Equilibrium distributions in entropy driven balanced processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biró, Tamás S.; Néda, Zoltán

    2017-05-01

    For entropy driven balanced processes we obtain final states with Poisson, Bernoulli, negative binomial and Pólya distributions. We apply this both for complex networks and particle production. For random networks we follow the evolution of the degree distribution, Pn, in a system where a node can activate k fixed connections from K possible partnerships among all nodes. The total number of connections, N, is also fixed. For particle physics problems Pn is the probability of having n particles (or other quanta) distributed among k states (phase space cells) while altogether a fixed number of N particles reside on K states.

  4. A computer driven photoscanner for medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, P A; Hinshaw, W S; Holland, G N

    1978-03-01

    A novel and versatile instrument for producing high quality monochrome and colour hard-copy of medical images from an array of digital information is described. Images are produced on standard photographic print paper mounted on the bed of a conventional X-Y plotter by scanning a time-modulated light source over the paper using a computer driven raster. A matrix board gives control of both greyscale and colour attribution. Examples of NMR images produced by the system are presented. A refinement of the technique which allows two variables to be displayed on one image is also described.

  5. Fundamental studies on a heat driven lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed theoretical study of a heat-driven lamp has been performed. This lamp uses a plasma produced in a thermionic diode. The light is produced by the resonance transition of cesium. An important result of this study is that up to 30% of the input heat is predicted to be converted to light in this device. This is a major improvement over ordinary thermionic energy converters in which only approx. 1% is converted to resonance radiation. Efficiencies and optimum inter-electrode spacings have been found as a function of cathode temperature and the radiative escape factor. The theory developed explains the operating limits of the device.

  6. Zero curvature-surface driven small objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Xiaoxiao; Li, Shanpeng; Liu, Jianlin

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we investigate the spontaneous migration of small objects driven by surface tension on a catenoid, formed by a layer of soap constrained by two rings. Although the average curvature of the catenoid is zero at each point, the small objects always migrate to the position near the ring. The force and energy analyses have been performed to uncover the mechanism, and it is found that the small objects distort the local shape of the liquid film, thus making the whole system energetically favorable. These findings provide some inspiration to design microfluidics, aquatic robotics, and miniature boats.

  7. Diagnostics for Respondent-driven Sampling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a widely used method for sampling from hard-to-reach human populations, especially populations at higher risk for HIV. Data are collected through peer-referral over social networks. RDS has proven practical for data collection in many difficult settings and is widely used. Inference from RDS data requires many strong assumptions because the sampling design is partially beyond the control of the researcher and partially unobserved. We introduce diagnostic tools for most of these assumptions and apply them in 12 high risk populations. These diagnostics empower researchers to better understand their data and encourage future statistical research on RDS. PMID:27226702

  8. Four-level refrigerator driven by photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhui; Lai, Yiming; Ye, Zhuolin; He, Jizhou; Ma, Yongli; Liao, Qinghong

    2015-05-01

    We propose a quantum absorption refrigerator driven by photons. The model uses a four-level system as its working substance and couples simultaneously to hot, cold, and solar heat reservoirs. Explicit expressions for the cooling power Q˙c and coefficient of performance (COP) ηCOP are derived, with the purpose of revealing and optimizing the performance of the device. Our model runs most efficiently under the tight coupling condition, and it is consistent with the third law of thermodynamics in the limit T →0 .

  9. Four-level refrigerator driven by photons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhui; Lai, Yiming; Ye, Zhuolin; He, Jizhou; Ma, Yongli; Liao, Qinghong

    2015-05-01

    We propose a quantum absorption refrigerator driven by photons. The model uses a four-level system as its working substance and couples simultaneously to hot, cold, and solar heat reservoirs. Explicit expressions for the cooling power Q̇(c) and coefficient of performance (COP) η(COP) are derived, with the purpose of revealing and optimizing the performance of the device. Our model runs most efficiently under the tight coupling condition, and it is consistent with the third law of thermodynamics in the limit T→0.

  10. Lane formation in a driven attractive fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wächtler, C. W.; Kogler, F.; Klapp, S. H. L.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium lane formation in a generic model of a fluid with attractive interactions, that is, a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid composed of two particle species driven in opposite directions. Performing Brownian dynamics simulations for a wide range of parameters, supplemented by a stability analysis based on dynamical density functional theory, we identify generic features of lane formation in the presence of attraction, including structural properties. In fact, we find a variety of states (as compared to purely repulsive systems), as well as a close relation between laning and long-wavelength instabilities of the homogeneous phase such as demixing and condensation.

  11. Pressure-Driven Flow of Solid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, James; Beamish, John

    2006-03-01

    The recent torsional oscillator results of Kim and Chan show an anomalous mass decoupling, interpreted by the authors as a supersolid phase transition, in solid He4. We have used a piezoelectrically driven diaphragm to study the flow of solid helium through an array of capillaries. Our measurements showed no indication of low temperature flow, placing stringent restrictions on supersolid flow in response to a pressure difference. The average flow speed at low temperatures was less than 1.2×10-14m/s, corresponding to a supersolid velocity at least 7 orders of magnitude smaller than the critical velocities inferred from the torsional oscillator measurements.

  12. Theory of resistivity-gradient-driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, L.; Diamond, P.H.; Carreras, B.A.; Callen, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    A theory of the nonlinear evolution and saturation of resistivity driven turbulence, which evolves from linear rippling instabilities, is presented. The nonlinear saturation mechanism is identified both analytically and numerically. Saturation occurs when the turbulent diffusion of the resistivity is large enough so that dissipation due to parallel electron thermal conduction balances the nonlinearly modified resistivity gradient driving term. The levels of potential, resistivity, and density fluctuations at saturation are calculated. A combination of computational modeling and analytic treatment is used in this investigation.

  13. Ancilla-driven universal blind quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueki, Takahiro; Koshiba, Takeshi; Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2013-06-01

    Blind quantum computation is a new quantum secure protocol, which enables Alice who does not have enough quantum technology to delegate her computation to Bob who has a fully fledged quantum power without revealing her input, output, and algorithm. So far, blind quantum computation has been considered only for the circuit model and the measurement-based model. Here we consider the possibility and the limitation of blind quantum computation in the ancilla-driven model, which is a hybrid of the circuit and the measurement-based models.

  14. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOEpatents

    Engler, Bruce P.; Sleefe, Gerard E.; Striker, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    A borehole seismic tool including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric meter in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  15. Osmotically driven shape-dependent colloidal separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, T. G.

    2002-12-01

    The thermally induced motion of nanometer-sized surfactant micelles in water is used to create strong attractive forces between micron-sized disks of wax in a mixed aqueous dispersion of microdisks and microspheres. The short-ranged attractive force due to the depletion of micelles from between the microdisks is much stronger than that between two microspheres of similar size, and is largest when the disks approach face to face, so columns of microdisks form. These columns cream, whereas the spheres remain dispersed, providing a means for shape-dependent colloidal separations driven by an applied micellar osmotic pressure.

  16. Light sailboats: Laser driven autonomous microrobots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Búzás, Anrdás; Kelemen, Lóránd; Mathesz, Anna; Oroszi, László; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Vicsek, Tamás; Ormos, Pál

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a system of light driven microscopic autonomous moving particles that move on a flat surface. The design is simple, yet effective: Micrometer sized objects with wedge shape are produced by photopolymerization, and they are covered with a reflective surface. When the area of motion is illuminated perpendicularly from above, the light is deflected to the side by the wedge shaped objects, in the direction determined by the position and orientation of the particles. The momentum change during reflection provides the driving force for an effectively autonomous motion. The system is an efficient tool to study self propelled microscopic robots.

  17. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOEpatents

    Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

    1993-02-23

    A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  18. Curvature-Driven Lipid Sorting in Biomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Callan-Jones, Andrew; Sorre, Benoit; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    It has often been suggested that the high curvature of transport intermediates in cells may be a sufficient means to segregate different lipid populations based on the relative energy costs of forming bent membranes. In this review, we present in vitro experiments that highlight the essential physics of lipid sorting at thermal equilibrium: It is driven by a trade-off between bending energy, mixing entropy, and interactions between species. We collect evidence that lipid sorting depends strongly on lipid–lipid and protein–lipid interactions, and hence on the underlying composition of the membrane and on the presence of bound proteins. PMID:21421916

  19. Energy-beam-driven rapid fabrication system

    DOEpatents

    Keicher, David M.; Atwood, Clinton L.; Greene, Donald L.; Griffith, Michelle L.; Harwell, Lane D.; Jeantette, Francisco P.; Romero, Joseph A.; Schanwald, Lee P.; Schmale, David T.

    2002-01-01

    An energy beam driven rapid fabrication system, in which an energy beam strikes a growth surface to form a molten puddle thereon. Feed powder is then injected into the molten puddle from a converging flow of feed powder. A portion of the feed powder becomes incorporated into the molten puddle, forcing some of the puddle contents to freeze on the growth surface, thereby adding an additional layer of material. By scanning the energy beam and the converging flow of feed powder across the growth surface, complex three-dimensional shapes can be formed, ready or nearly ready for use. Nearly any class of material can be fabricated using this system.

  20. Coherent oscillations of driven rf SQUID metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Trepanier, Melissa; Zhang, Daimeng; Mukhanov, Oleg; Koshelets, V P; Jung, Philipp; Butz, Susanne; Ott, Edward; Antonsen, Thomas M; Ustinov, Alexey V; Anlage, Steven M

    2017-05-01

    Through experiments and numerical simulations we explore the behavior of rf SQUID (radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device) metamaterials, which show extreme tunability and nonlinearity. The emergent electromagnetic properties of this metamaterial are sensitive to the degree of coherent response of the driven interacting SQUIDs. Coherence suffers in the presence of disorder, which is experimentally found to be mainly due to a dc flux gradient. We demonstrate methods to recover the coherence, specifically by varying the coupling between the SQUID meta-atoms and increasing the temperature or the amplitude of the applied rf flux.

  1. Excess-density-driven snakes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydemir, A. Y.; Shaing, K. C.; Waelbroeck, F. L.

    2011-10-01

    ``Snakes'' refer to sinusoidal patterns observed on space-time plots of soft-X-ray signals in tokamak plasmas. They are generally attributed to persistent and localized density perturbations that form at a rational surface after pellet injection (Weller, JET 1987), and Parker, Alcator-C 1987), or impurity accumulation (Naujoks, ASDEX 1996, Delgado-Aparicio, C-Mod 2011). It is not clear whether all snake observations have a unique origin. A likely explanation is that material trapped inside an island driven by a temperature hole leads to the observed soft-X-ray signals (Wesson 1995). More recently, it has been suggested that they could be the result of saturated nonlinear internal kinks in low, or reversed-shear geometries (Cooper 2011). We have started an examination of some of these issues using ideas from neoclassical transport theory (Shaing 2007) in conjunction with various magnetohydrodynamic models. In a RMHD model, we demonstrated that excess-density-driven bootstrap current can stabilize a resistive m = 1 island at a small amplitude, leaving a radially and poloidally localized snake-like structure. Extension of this work to more sophisticated models that include diamagnetic effects, and possibly more realistic geometries, will be presented. This research was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  2. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  3. Progress of Laser-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2007-07-11

    There is a great interest worldwide in plasma accelerators driven by ultra-intense lasers which make it possible to generate ultra-high gradient acceleration and high quality particle beams in a much more compact size compared with conventional accelerators. A frontier research on laser and plasma accelerators is focused on high energy electron acceleration and ultra-short X-ray and Tera Hertz radiations as their applications. These achievements will provide not only a wide range of sciences with benefits of a table-top accelerator but also a basic science with a tool of ultrahigh energy accelerators probing an unknown extremely microscopic world.Harnessing the recent advance of ultra-intense ultra-short pulse lasers, the worldwide research has made a tremendous breakthrough in demonstrating high-energy high-quality particle beams in a compact scale, so called ''dream beams on a table top'', which represents monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators and GeV acceleration by capillary plasma-channel laser wakefield accelerators. This lecture reviews recent progress of results on laser-driven plasma based accelerator experiments to quest for particle acceleration physics in intense laser-plasma interactions and to present new outlook for the GeV-range high-energy laser plasma accelerators.

  4. Accelerating Science Driven System Design With RAMP

    SciTech Connect

    Wawrzynek, John

    2015-05-01

    Researchers from UC Berkeley, in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, are engaged in developing an Infrastructure for Synthesis with Integrated Simulation (ISIS). The ISIS Project was a cooperative effort for “application-driven hardware design” that engages application scientists in the early parts of the hardware design process for future generation supercomputing systems. This project served to foster development of computing systems that are better tuned to the application requirements of demanding scientific applications and result in more cost-effective and efficient HPC system designs. In order to overcome long conventional design-cycle times, we leveraged reconfigurable devices to aid in the design of high-efficiency systems, including conventional multi- and many-core systems. The resulting system emulation/prototyping environment, in conjunction with the appropriate intermediate abstractions, provided both a convenient user programming experience and retained flexibility, and thus efficiency, of a reconfigurable platform. We initially targeted the Berkeley RAMP system (Research Accelerator for Multiple Processors) as that hardware emulation environment to facilitate and ultimately accelerate the iterative process of science-driven system design. Our goal was to develop and demonstrate a design methodology for domain-optimized computer system architectures. The tangible outcome is a methodology and tools for rapid prototyping and design-space exploration, leading to highly optimized and efficient HPC systems.

  5. Science Goal Driven Observing and Spacecraft Autonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koratkar, Amuradha; Grosvenor, Sandy; Jones, Jeremy; Wolf, Karl

    2002-01-01

    Spacecraft autonomy will be an integral part of mission operations in the coming decade. While recent missions have made great strides in the ability to autonomously monitor and react to changing health and physical status of spacecraft, little progress has been made in responding quickly to science driven events. For observations of inherently variable targets and targets of opportunity, the ability to recognize early if an observation will meet the science goals of a program, and react accordingly, can have a major positive impact on the overall scientific returns of an observatory and on its operational costs. If the onboard software can reprioritize the schedule to focus on alternate targets, discard uninteresting observations prior to downloading, or download a subset of observations at a reduced resolution, the spacecraft's overall efficiency will be dramatically increased. The science goal monitoring (SGM) system is a proof-of-concept effort to address the above challenge. The SGM will have an interface to help capture higher level science goals from the scientists and translate them into a flexible observing strategy that SGM can execute and monitor. We are developing an interactive distributed system that will use on-board processing and storage combined with event-driven interfaces with ground-based processing and operations, to enable fast re-prioritization of observing schedules, and to minimize time spent on non-optimized observations.

  6. QA-driven Guidelines Generation for Bacteriotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pasche, Emilie; Teodoro, Douglas; Gobeill, Julien; Ruch, Patrick; Lovis, Christian

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE We propose a question-answering (QA) driven generation approach for automatic acquisition of structured rules that can be used in a knowledge authoring tool for antibiotic prescription guidelines management. METHODS: The rule generation is seen as a question-answering problem, where the parameters of the questions are known items of the rule (e.g. an infectious disease, caused by a given bacterium) and answers (e.g. some antibiotics) are obtained by a question-answering engine. RESULTS: When looking for a drug given a pathogen and a disease, top-precision of 0.55 is obtained by the combination of the Boolean engine (PubMed) and the relevance-driven engine (easyIR), which means that for more than half of our evaluation benchmark at least one of the recommended antibiotics was automatically acquired by the rule generation method. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that such an automatic text mining approach could provide a useful tool for guidelines management, by improving knowledge update and discovery. PMID:20351908

  7. Flux-driven simulations of turbulence collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Park, G. Y.; Kim, S. S.; Jhang, Hogun; Rhee, T.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, X. Q.

    2015-03-15

    Using three-dimensional nonlinear simulations of tokamak turbulence, we show that an edge transport barrier (ETB) forms naturally once input power exceeds a threshold value. Profiles, turbulence-driven flows, and neoclassical coefficients are evolved self-consistently. A slow power ramp-up simulation shows that ETB transition is triggered by the turbulence-driven flows via an intermediate phase which involves coherent oscillation of turbulence intensity and E×B flow shear. A novel observation of the evolution is that the turbulence collapses and the ETB transition begins when R{sub T} > 1 at t = t{sub R} (R{sub T}: normalized Reynolds power), while the conventional transition criterion (ω{sub E×B}>γ{sub lin} where ω{sub E×B} denotes mean flow shear) is satisfied only after t = t{sub C} ( >t{sub R}), when the mean flow shear grows due to positive feedback.

  8. Quantifying Behavior Driven Energy Savings for Hotels

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Bing; Wang, Na; Hooks, Edward; Zhao, Jie

    2016-08-12

    Hotel facilities present abundant opportunities for energy savings. In the United States, there are around 25,000 hotels that spend on an average of $2,196 on energy costs per room each year. This amounts to about 6% of the total annual hotel operating cost. However, unlike offices, there are limited studies on establishing appropriate baselines and quantifying hotel energy savings given the variety of services and amenities, unpredictable customer behaviors, and the around-the-clock operation hours. In this study, we investigate behavior driven energy savings for three medium-size (around 90,000 sf2) hotels that offer similar services in different climate zones. We first used Department of Energy Asset Scoring Tool to establish baseline models. We then conducted energy saving analysis in EnergyPlus based on a behavior model that defines the upper bound and lower bound of customer and hotel staff behavior. Lastly, we presented a probabilistic energy savings outlook for each hotel. The analysis shows behavior driven energy savings up to 25%. We believe this is the first study to incorporate behavioral factors into energy analysis for hotels. It also demonstrates a procedure to quickly create tailored baselines and identify improvement opportunities for hotels.

  9. Lagrangian descriptors of driven chemical reaction manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, Galen T.; Junginger, Andrej; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2017-08-01

    The persistence of a transition state structure in systems driven by time-dependent environments allows the application of modern reaction rate theories to solution-phase and nonequilibrium chemical reactions. However, identifying this structure is problematic in driven systems and has been limited by theories built on series expansion about a saddle point. Recently, it has been shown that to obtain formally exact rates for reactions in thermal environments, a transition state trajectory must be constructed. Here, using optimized Lagrangian descriptors [G. T. Craven and R. Hernandez, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 148301 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.148301], we obtain this so-called distinguished trajectory and the associated moving reaction manifolds on model energy surfaces subject to various driving and dissipative conditions. In particular, we demonstrate that this is exact for harmonic barriers in one dimension and this verification gives impetus to the application of Lagrangian descriptor-based methods in diverse classes of chemical reactions. The development of these objects is paramount in the theory of reaction dynamics as the transition state structure and its underlying network of manifolds directly dictate reactivity and selectivity.

  10. Test Driven Development of Scientific Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clune, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Test-Driven Development (TDD) is a software development process that promises many advantages for developer productivity and has become widely accepted among professional software engineers. As the name suggests, TDD practitioners alternate between writing short automated tests and producing code that passes those tests. Although this overly simplified description will undoubtedly sound prohibitively burdensome to many uninitiated developers, the advent of powerful unit-testing frameworks greatly reduces the effort required to produce and routinely execute suites of tests. By testimony, many developers find TDD to be addicting after only a few days of exposure, and find it unthinkable to return to previous practices. Of course, scientific/technical software differs from other software categories in a number of important respects, but I nonetheless believe that TDD is quite applicable to the development of such software and has the potential to significantly improve programmer productivity and code quality within the scientific community. After a detailed introduction to TDD, I will present the experience within the Software Systems Support Office (SSSO) in applying the technique to various scientific applications. This discussion will emphasize the various direct and indirect benefits as well as some of the difficulties and limitations of the methodology. I will conclude with a brief description of pFUnit, a unit testing framework I co-developed to support test-driven development of parallel Fortran applications.

  11. Skyrmion motion driven by oscillating magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung-Woong; Kim, Duck-Ho; Je, Soong-Geun; Chun, Byong Sun; Kim, Wondong; Qiu, Z.Q.; Choe, Sug-Bong; Hwang, Chanyong

    2016-01-01

    The one-dimensional magnetic skyrmion motion induced by an electric current has attracted much interest because of its application potential in next-generation magnetic memory devices. Recently, the unidirectional motion of large (20 μm in diameter) magnetic bubbles with two-dimensional skyrmion topology, driven by an oscillating magnetic field, has also been demonstrated. For application in high-density memory devices, it is preferable to reduce the size of skyrmion. Here we show by numerical simulation that a skyrmion of a few tens of nanometres can also be driven by high-frequency field oscillations, but with a different direction of motion from the in-plane component of the tilted oscillating field. We found that a high-frequency field for small skyrmions can excite skyrmion resonant modes and that a combination of different modes results in a final skyrmion motion with a helical trajectory. Because this helical motion depends on the frequency of the field, we can control both the speed and the direction of the skyrmion motion, which is a distinguishable characteristic compared with other methods. PMID:26847334

  12. Viscous Heating in Nanoscale Shear Driven Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bohung; Beskok, Ali

    2009-11-01

    Three-dimensional Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of heat and momentum transport in liquid Argon filled shear-driven nano-channels are performed using 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential interactions. Work done by the viscous stresses heats the fluid, which is dissipated through the channel walls, maintained at isothermal conditions via a recently developed interactive thermal wall model. Momentum transport in shear driven nano-flow is investigated as a function of the surface wettability (ɛwf/ɛ), spatial variations in the fluid density, kinematic viscosity, shear- and energy dissipation rates are presented. Temperature profiles in the nano-channel are obtained as a function of the surface wettability, shear rate and the intermolecular stiffness of wall molecules. The energy dissipation rate is almost a constant for ɛwf/ɛ<0.6, which results in parabolic temperature profiles in the domain with temperature jumps due to the well known Kapitza resistance at the liquid/solid interfaces. Using the energy dissipation rates predicted by MD simulations and the continuum energy equation subjected to the temperature jump boundary conditions developed in [Kim et al., Journal of Chemical Physics, 129, 174701, 2008], we obtain analytical solutions for the temperature profiles, which agree well with the MD results.

  13. Microwave Driven Actuators Power Allocation and Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, Timothy; Song, Kyo D.

    2000-01-01

    Design, fabrication and test of a power allocation and distribution (PAD) network for microwave driven actuators is presented in this paper. Development of a circuit that would collect power from a rectenna array amplify and distribute the power to actuators was designed and fabricated for space application in an actuator array driven by a microwave. A P-SPICE model was constructed initially for data reduction purposes, and was followed by a working real-world model. A voltage up - converter (VUC) is used to amplify the voltage from the individual rectenna. The testing yielded a 26:1 voltage amplification ratio with input voltage at 9 volts and a measured output voltage 230VDC. Future work includes the miniaturization of the circuitry, the use of microwave remote control, and voltage amplification technology for each voltage source. The objective of this work is to develop a model system that will collect DC voltage from an array of rectenna and propagate the voltage to an array of actuators.

  14. Graphene-contact electrically driven microdisk lasers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon-Ho; Kwon, Soon-Hong; Lee, Jung Min; Hwang, Min-Soo; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Park, Won Il; Park, Hong-Gyu

    2012-01-01

    Active nanophotonic devices are attractive due to their low-power consumption, ultrafast modulation speed and high-density integration. Although electrical operation is required for practical implementation of these devices, it is not straightforward to introduce a proper current path into such a wavelength-scale nanostructure without affecting the optical properties. For example, to demonstrate electrically driven nanolasers, complicated fabrication techniques have been used thus far. Here we report an electrically driven microdisk laser using a transparent graphene electrode. Current is injected efficiently through the graphene sheet covering the top surface of the microdisk cavity, and, for the first time, lasing operation was achieved with a low-threshold current of ~300 μA at room temperature. In addition, we measured significant electroluminescence from a graphene-contact subwavelength-scale single nanopillar structure. This work represents a new paradigm for the practical applications of integrated photonic systems, by conformally mounting graphene on the complex surfaces of non-planar three-dimensional nanostructures. PMID:23047681

  15. Shock-driven chemical reaction in phenylacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattelbaum, Dana; Sheffield, Stephen; Coe, Joshua; Shock and Detonation Physics Team; Physics and Chemistry of Materials Team

    2013-06-01

    Phenylacetylene (PA) comprises a covalently-linked benzene ring and acetylene moiety, presenting an interesting molecular structure for study of shock driven chemical reactions. In the present work, gas gun-driven embedded electromagnetic gauging experiments produced in situ particle velocity wave profiles at multiple Lagrangian positions at several shock input conditions. The input shock wave evolves over time and distance into a complex multiple wave structure, with a fast risetime 2nd wave, slower risetime 3rd wave, and unusual wave dynamics in the 1st wave. From the shock and particle velocities, the Hugoniot reaction condition, and intermediate and final states associated with the chemical reactions have been obtained. For example, at shock inputs just above the cusp condition, an induction time of 200 ns was observed, with the evolved first wave traveling at Us = 4.2 km/s, P = 5.6 GPa; reaction rates of a few to 10 microsec-1 were inferred. A thermodynamically complete unreacted equation of state was calibrated to estimate the temperature rise along the shock locus. Use of this EOS with the measured wave risetimes yielded highly state-sensitive global reaction rates.

  16. Ultrafast molecular motor driven nanoseparation and biosensing.

    PubMed

    Lard, Mercy; Ten Siethoff, Lasse; Kumar, Saroj; Persson, Malin; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Linke, Heiner; Månsson, Alf

    2013-10-15

    Portable biosensor systems would benefit from reduced dependency on external power supplies as well as from further miniaturization and increased detection rate. Systems built around self-propelled biological molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments hold significant promise in these regards as they are built from nanoscale components that enable nanoseparation independent of fluidic pumping. Previously reported microtubule-kinesin based devices are slow, however, compared to several existing biosensor systems. Here we demonstrate that this speed limitation can be overcome by using the faster actomyosin motor system. Moreover, due to lower flexural rigidity of the actin filaments, smaller features can be achieved compared to microtubule-based systems, enabling further miniaturization. Using a device designed through optimization by Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate extensive myosin driven enrichment of actin filaments on a detector area of less than 10 μm², with a concentration half-time of approximately 40 s. We also show accumulation of model analyte (streptavidin at nanomolar concentration in nanoliter effective volume) detecting increased fluorescence intensity within seconds after initiation of motor-driven transportation from capture regions. We discuss further optimizations of the system and incorporation into a complete biosensing workflow. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Simulating Galaxy Outflows Driven by Supersonic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scannapieco, Evan

    Feedback from supernova-driven galaxy outflows plays a crucial role in setting the properties and assembly history of low-mass galaxies. Yet, numerically modeling such outflows has been by plagued by the fact that the underlying supernovae are much too small to be directly resolved, but have cooling times that are much too short to be modeled as thermal input. Here I will present three-dimensional, adaptive mesh simulations that overcome this problem using a subgrid model to deposit supernovae energy directly into supersonic turbulence, which acts on scales much smaller than the simulation grid spacing, but much larger than the particle mean free path. In this way, we are able to simulate a starbursting galaxy modeled after NGC 1569, including realistic radiative cooling throughout the simulation. Unlike in previous approaches, pockets of supernova-driven gas sweep up thick shells of material that persist for long times due to the cooling instability, and the overlapping of high-pressure, rarefied regions leads to a collective central outflow as observed in NGC 1569 and other outflowing starbursts. Such models will be directly comparable to a host of new observational constraints.

  18. Antimatter Driven Sail for Deep Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Steven D.; Jackson, Gerald P.

    2005-02-01

    The concept of the Antimatter Driven Sail (ADS) has been examined in three major areas: Mission Architecture, Subsystem Technologies, and a Technology Roadmap. The Mission Architecture effort has focused on developing an integrated systems model to evaluate the performance of the entire spacecraft for a mission. The Subsystem Technologies investigation examined 1) the fundamental reactions between the antiprotons and the sail material and the subsequent momentum transfer, 2) a concept for storing antihydrogen at high densities, and 3) an entirely new concept for electrical power production. The new electrical-power concept may have applicability to nearer-term space missions as a power supply if the availability of antiprotons becomes common. In developing the Technology Roadmap, we examined the potential 1) for using recent developments in antiproton storage and antihydrogen formation to create a path to ultra-high density antihydrogen storage, and 2) for increasing production of antiprotons by modifying the existing Fermilab facility. Our system analysis indicates that a 10 kg instrument pay load could be sent to 250 AU in 10 years using 30 milligrams of antihydrogen. This amount of antimatter is clearly within the production potential of the US within the next 40 years using currently accepted accelerator technologies. Major aspects of the architecture remain to be investigated but the first-cut assessment of the mission profile, the subsystem technologies, and the technology development path have all been identified. The antimatter driven sail may in-fact allow humanity to consider sending probes to the stars.

  19. Development of an electrically driven molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Colin J; Sykes, E Charles H

    2014-10-01

    For molecules to be used as components in molecular machinery, methods are required that couple individual molecules to external energy sources in order to selectively excite motion in a given direction. While significant progress has been made in the construction of synthetic molecular motors powered by light and by chemical reactions, there are few experimental examples of electrically driven molecular motors. To this end, we pioneered the use of a new, stable and tunable molecular rotor system based on surface-bound thioethers to comprehensively study many aspects of molecular rotation. As biological molecular motors often operate at interfaces, our synthetic system is especially amenable to microscopic interrogation as compared to solution-based systems. Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory, we studied the rotation of surface-bound thioethers, which can be induced either thermally or by electrons from the STM tip in a two-terminal setup. Moreover, the temperature and electron flux can be adjusted to allow each rotational event to be monitored at the molecular scale in real time. This work culminated in the first experimental demonstration of a single-molecule electric motor, where the electrically driven rotation of a butyl methyl sulfide molecule adsorbed on a copper surface could be directionally biased. The direction and rate of the rotation are related to the chirality of both the molecule and the STM tip (which serves as the electrode), illustrating the importance of the symmetry of the metal contacts in atomic-scale electrical devices.

  20. A thermokinetically driven metal-hydride actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kwangmok; Kim, Kwang J.

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a novel thermokinetically-driven actuator technology based on the physics of metal hydrides (MH's). A metal hydride absorbs and desorbs hydrogen due to the imposed temperature swing(s). The MH can also work as an effective thermally-driven hydrogen compressor producing more than 5,000 psia net pressure swing. The MH actuation system can be built in a simple structure, exhibits high power, produces soft actuating, and is essentially noiseless. Moreover, it is much more powerful and compact than conventional pneumatic systems that require bulky auxiliary systems. It is our belief that the MH actuators are useful for many emerging industrial, biorobotic, and civil structural applications. In this paper, we report the recent preliminary experimental results for a laboratory-prototyped MH actuation system. In particular, the dynamic response characteristics, enhanced controllability, thermodynamic performances, and reliability of the metal hydride actuator were studied in order to estimate the actuation capability of the MH actuator. A unique design of the MH actuator was created. It encases a so-called "porous metal hydride (PMH)" in the reactor to effectively achieve desirable performance by improving overall thermal conductance.

  1. Density distributions of outflow-driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraghan, Anthony; Kim, Jongsoo; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2013-05-01

    Protostellar jets and outflows are signatures of star formation and promising mechanisms for driving supersonic turbulence in molecular clouds. We quantify outflow-driven turbulence through three-dimensional numerical simulations using an isothermal version of the robust total variation diminishing code. We drive turbulence in real space using a simplified spherical outflow model, analyse the data through density probability distribution functions (PDFs), and investigate the core formation rate per free-fall time (CFRff). The real-space turbulence-driving method produces a negatively skewed density PDF possessing an enhanced tail on the low-density side. It deviates from the log-normal distributions typically obtained from Fourier-space turbulence driving at low densities, but can provide a good fit at high densities, particularly in terms of mass-weighted rather than volume-weighted density PDF. Due to this fact, we suggest that the CFRff determined from a Fourier-driven turbulence model could be comparable to that of our particular real-space-driving model, which has a ratio of solenoidal to compressional components from the resulting turbulence velocity fields of ˜0.6.

  2. An artificial heart driven by liquid gas.

    PubMed

    Abe, Y; Chinzei, T; Imachi, K; Mabuchi, K; Atsumi, K; Fujimasa, I

    1990-01-01

    An artificial heart (AH) driving system, in which a sac or diaphragm type blood pump is liquid gas driven, is designed. The working mechanism of this system is as follows: 1) liquid gas is used for the driving source; 2) a liquid gas is stored in its liquid state in the circuit; 3) a liquid gas is vaporized, and the vaporizing pressure squeezes the blood pump, causing ejection of blood; 4) vaporized gas is aspirated and compressed by a small compressor to liquefaction through the heat exchanger, then negative pressure is applied to the blood pump and blood is aspirated; and 5) the blood pump is driven in this closed cycle. To demonstrate the mechanism of this system, a prototype was developed using Freon 114 as the liquid gas. In this system, the maximum flow of the AH at a 100 pulse per minute rate, was about 6.9 L/min, using a 90 ml sac type blood pump. The advantages of this AH driving mechanism are as follows: 1) a small system is available because pressure chambers are not necessary; 2) a biventricular system is available, with a single compressor; 3) no compliance chamber is necessary if the system is small enough to be implanted.

  3. Valveless micropump driven by acoustic streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Youngki; Sok Kim, Eun

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes two valveless micropumps built on a 260 µm thick PZT with 20 µm thick parylene acoustic Fresnel lenses with air cavities. The micropumps produce in-plane body force through acoustic streaming effect of high-intensity acoustic beam that is generated by acoustic wave interference. The fabricated micropumps were shown to move microspheres, which have a diameter of 70-90 µm and a density of 0.99 g cm-3, on the water surface to form U-shape streams of microspheres with a drift velocity of 7.3 cm s-1 when the micropumps were located 4 mm below the water surface and driven by 160 Vpeak-to-peak pulsed sinusoidal waves. The driven microspheres formed U-shape streaming even without any fluidic channel according to the serial connection of the pie-shaped lenses and top electrodes. A micropump with a straight-lined fluidic channel was also fabricated and tested to show a 9.2 cm s-1 microspheres' drift velocity and a 9.5 mL min-1 volume pumping rate when combined with the acrylic acoustic wave reflector. Both the Fresnel lens and top electrode were patterned in a pie-shape with its apex angle of 90° to form asymmetric acoustic pressure distribution at the focal plane of the acoustic Fresnel lenses in order to push water in one direction.

  4. Lagrangian descriptors of driven chemical reaction manifolds.

    PubMed

    Craven, Galen T; Junginger, Andrej; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2017-08-01

    The persistence of a transition state structure in systems driven by time-dependent environments allows the application of modern reaction rate theories to solution-phase and nonequilibrium chemical reactions. However, identifying this structure is problematic in driven systems and has been limited by theories built on series expansion about a saddle point. Recently, it has been shown that to obtain formally exact rates for reactions in thermal environments, a transition state trajectory must be constructed. Here, using optimized Lagrangian descriptors [G. T. Craven and R. Hernandez, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 148301 (2015)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.115.148301], we obtain this so-called distinguished trajectory and the associated moving reaction manifolds on model energy surfaces subject to various driving and dissipative conditions. In particular, we demonstrate that this is exact for harmonic barriers in one dimension and this verification gives impetus to the application of Lagrangian descriptor-based methods in diverse classes of chemical reactions. The development of these objects is paramount in the theory of reaction dynamics as the transition state structure and its underlying network of manifolds directly dictate reactivity and selectivity.

  5. Electrically driven phase transition in magnetite nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungbae; Fursina, Alexandra; Mayo, John T; Yavuz, Cafer T; Colvin, Vicki L; Sofin, R G Sumesh; Shvets, Igor V; Natelson, Douglas

    2008-02-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4), an archetypal transition-metal oxide, has been used for thousands of years, from lodestones in primitive compasses to a candidate material for magnetoelectronic devices. In 1939, Verwey found that bulk magnetite undergoes a transition at TV approximately 120 K from a high-temperature 'bad metal' conducting phase to a low-temperature insulating phase. He suggested that high-temperature conduction is through the fluctuating and correlated valences of the octahedral iron atoms, and that the transition is the onset of charge ordering on cooling. The Verwey transition mechanism and the question of charge ordering remain highly controversial. Here, we show that magnetite nanocrystals and single-crystal thin films exhibit an electrically driven phase transition below the Verwey temperature. The signature of this transition is the onset of sharp conductance switching in high electric fields, hysteretic in voltage. We demonstrate that this transition is not due to local heating, but instead is due to the breakdown of the correlated insulating state when driven out of equilibrium by electrical bias. We anticipate that further studies of this newly observed transition and its low-temperature conducting phase will shed light on how charge ordering and vibrational degrees of freedom determine the ground state of this important compound.

  6. Electrically driven phase transition in magnetite nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungbae; Fursina, Alexandra; Mayo, John T.; Yavuz, Cafer T.; Colvin, Vicki L.; Sumesh Sofin, R. G.; Shvets, Igor V.; Natelson, Douglas

    2008-02-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4), an archetypal transition-metal oxide, has been used for thousands of years, from lodestones in primitive compasses to a candidate material for magnetoelectronic devices. In 1939, Verwey found that bulk magnetite undergoes a transition at TV~120K from a high-temperature `bad metal' conducting phase to a low-temperature insulating phase. He suggested that high-temperature conduction is through the fluctuating and correlated valences of the octahedral iron atoms, and that the transition is the onset of charge ordering on cooling. The Verwey transition mechanism and the question of charge ordering remain highly controversial. Here, we show that magnetite nanocrystals and single-crystal thin films exhibit an electrically driven phase transition below the Verwey temperature. The signature of this transition is the onset of sharp conductance switching in high electric fields, hysteretic in voltage. We demonstrate that this transition is not due to local heating, but instead is due to the breakdown of the correlated insulating state when driven out of equilibrium by electrical bias. We anticipate that further studies of this newly observed transition and its low-temperature conducting phase will shed light on how charge ordering and vibrational degrees of freedom determine the ground state of this important compound.

  7. Periodically driven three-level systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenmoe, M. B.; Fai, L. C.

    2016-09-01

    We study the dynamics of a three-level system (ThLS) sinusoidally driven in both longitudinal and transverse directions and in the presence of a uniaxial anisotropy D entering the generic Hamiltonian through the zero-energy splitting term D (Sz)2 where Sz is the projection of the spin vector along the quantization direction. As a consequence of the addition of this term, the order of the symmetry group of the Hamiltonian is increased by a unit and we observe a sequence of cascaded SU(3) Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana (LZSM) interferometers. The study is carried out by analytically and numerically calculating the probabilities of nonadiabatic and adiabatic evolutions. For nonadiabatic evolutions, two main approximations based on the weak and strong driving limits are discussed by comparing the characteristic frequency of the longitudinal drive with the amplitudes of driven fields. For each of the cases discussed, our analytical results quite well reproduce the gross temporal profile of the exact numerical probabilities. This allows us to check the range of validity of analytical results and confirm our assumptions. For adiabatic evolutions, a general theory is constructed allowing for the description of adiabatic passages in arbitrary ThLSs in which direct transitions between states with extremal spin projections are forbidden. A compact formula for adiabatic evolutions is derived and numerically tested for some illustrative cases. Interference patterns demonstrating multiple LZSM transitions are reported. Applications of our results to the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond are discussed.

  8. Distinctive features of internally driven magnetotail reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnov, M. I.; Merkin, V. G.; Pritchett, P. L.; Swisdak, M.

    2017-04-01

    Onset of reconnection in a tail-like equilibrium with a finite Bz magnetic field component is studied using 3-D explicit particle-in-cell simulations. Due to a region of a tailward Bz gradient the onset develops spontaneously as the magnetic flux release instability with dominant earthward ion flows. The instability drives the change of magnetic field topology internally, without any external forcing. The distinctive features of this regime are: previously unreported Hall magnetic field patterns; energy conversion near the dipolarization front prior to the X line formation; asymmetry of the energy conversion, plasma heating, and anisotropy relative to the X line, with regions of ion and electron heating out of phase both along and across the tail. These features distinguish the internally driven reconnection regime from similar processes in antiparallel magnetic field configurations as well as interchange and externally driven magnetotail reconnection regimes and can be used to identify the different regimes in upcoming Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission tail season observations.

  9. ISOTROPICALLY DRIVEN VERSUS OUTFLOW DRIVEN TURBULENCE: OBSERVATIONAL CONSEQUENCES FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Jonathan J.; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.

    2010-10-10

    Feedback from protostellar outflows can influence the nature of turbulence in star-forming regions even if they are not the primary source of velocity dispersion for all scales of molecular clouds. For the rate and power expected in star-forming regions, we previously (Carroll et al.) demonstrated that outflows could drive supersonic turbulence at levels consistent with the scaling relations from Matzner although with a steeper velocity power spectrum than expected for an isotropically driven supersonic turbulent cascade. Here, we perform higher resolution simulations and combine simulations of outflow driven turbulence with those of isotropically forced turbulence. We find that the presence of outflows within an ambient isotropically driven turbulent environment produces a knee in the velocity power spectrum at the outflow scale and a steeper slope at sub-outflow scales than for a purely isotropically forced case. We also find that the presence of outflows flattens the density spectrum at large scales effectively reducing the formation of large-scale turbulent density structures. These effects are qualitatively independent of resolution. We have also carried out Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for synthetic data from our simulations. We find that PCA as a tool for identifying the driving scale of turbulence has a misleading bias toward low amplitude large-scale velocity structures even when they are not necessarily the dominant energy containing scales. This bias is absent for isotropically forced turbulence but manifests strongly for collimated outflow driven turbulence.

  10. Isotropically Driven Versus Outflow Driven Turbulence: Observational Consequences for Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Jonathan J.; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.

    2010-10-01

    Feedback from protostellar outflows can influence the nature of turbulence in star-forming regions even if they are not the primary source of velocity dispersion for all scales of molecular clouds. For the rate and power expected in star-forming regions, we previously (Carroll et al.) demonstrated that outflows could drive supersonic turbulence at levels consistent with the scaling relations from Matzner although with a steeper velocity power spectrum than expected for an isotropically driven supersonic turbulent cascade. Here, we perform higher resolution simulations and combine simulations of outflow driven turbulence with those of isotropically forced turbulence. We find that the presence of outflows within an ambient isotropically driven turbulent environment produces a knee in the velocity power spectrum at the outflow scale and a steeper slope at sub-outflow scales than for a purely isotropically forced case. We also find that the presence of outflows flattens the density spectrum at large scales effectively reducing the formation of large-scale turbulent density structures. These effects are qualitatively independent of resolution. We have also carried out Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for synthetic data from our simulations. We find that PCA as a tool for identifying the driving scale of turbulence has a misleading bias toward low amplitude large-scale velocity structures even when they are not necessarily the dominant energy containing scales. This bias is absent for isotropically forced turbulence but manifests strongly for collimated outflow driven turbulence.

  11. Fabrication of a bubble-driven arrayed actuator for a tactile display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Imamura, Tsubasa; Ukai, Shinji; Miyaji, Takaaki; Sato, Kazuo

    2008-06-01

    A chip-sized arrayed actuator device has been developed for application to a tactile display. Each actuator uses a liquid-vapour phase change to drive a microneedle that stimulates receptors in a finger in contact with the array. The actuators have a flexible diaphragm structure and a bottom plate bonded together to create a cavity between them. A microneedle and a microheater are formed on the diaphragm and plate of each actuator, respectively. The sealed cavity is filled with an operating liquid. Activating the heater and generating bubbles, which is similar to the process of a thermal ink jet, increase the pressure in the cavity. As a result, the flexible membrane deforms and it drives the needle upwards to stimulate receptors. Microelectromechanical systems technologies are used to fabricate the three components of the actuators, which are manually assembled to form a 3 × 3 arrayed actuator device. The total size of the device is 15 × 15 × 1 mm. The device performance is experimentally evaluated and a large needle displacement (61 µm) is obtained with an input energy of 457 mJ.

  12. Towards Responsible Massification: Some Pointers for Supporting Lecturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertyn, Ruth M; Machika, Pauline; Troskie-de Bruin, Christel

    2016-01-01

    Teaching large classes poses many challenges to lecturers where massification is a reality in higher education. There are implications for both teaching and effective learning in this context. The need for accountability to learners in education provision served as motivation for a study of large classes in the largest faculty of one university…

  13. Design of a terminal pointer hand controller for teleoperator applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saenger, E. L.; Woltosz, W. S.

    1973-01-01

    The design is described of a hand controller intended to achieve the highest possible compatibility with the hand of the human operator in a teleoperator system. Concepts drawings and model development are discussed along with the development of a prototype, and the mathematical control laws.

  14. Directions in healthcare research: pointers from retailing and services marketing.

    PubMed

    Van Rompay, Thomas L J; Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Although the importance of the environment in relation to healing processes has been well established, empirical evidence for environmental effects on patient well-being and behavior is sparse. In addition, few attempts have been made to integrate insights from related fields of research such as retailing and services marketing with findings from healthcare studies. In this paper, relevant findings and insights from these domains are discussed. What insights and findings from retailing and services marketing are (potentially) of interest to the healthcare context, and how should one interpret and follow up on these results in healthcare environments? Research in retailing and services marketing indicates that physical environmental factors (i.e., music and scent) and social environmental factors (i.e., crowded conditions) may affect consumer satisfaction and well-being. In addition, environmental effects have been shown to vary with contextual factors (e.g., the type of environment) and consumer needs (e.g., the extent to which consumers value social contact or stimulation in a specific setting). Although the evidence base for environmental factors in health environments is steadily growing, few attempts have been made to integrate findings from both domains. The findings presented indicate that environmental variables such as music and scent can contribute to patient well-being and overall satisfaction. In addition, findings suggest that these variables may be used to counteract the negative effects resulting from crowded conditions in different healthcare units. Taking into account recent developments in the healthcare industry, the importance of creating memorable and pleasant patient experiences is likely to grow in the years to come. Hence, the finding that subtle and relatively inexpensive manipulations may affect patient well-being in profound ways should inspire follow-up research aimed at unraveling the specifics of environmental influences in health environments.

  15. Why Am I Learning Evolution? Pointers towards Enacted Scientific Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olander, Clas

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores affordances in teaching evolution, especially those in which evolution is made relevant to and argued for in a grade 9 biology classroom, thus giving potential answers to the pupils' legitimate question,"'why am I learning evolution?" The aim of the paper is methodological in the sense that it explores whether the…

  16. Interactive Television Pointers from Three First Time Presenters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckenmyer, James A.; Kunz, David A.; Sterrett, Jack L.

    Three professors from the Harrison College of Business at Southeast Missouri State University were first-time presenters of a new ITV (interactive television) initiative at the college. This paper is an introduction to their experiences, including drawbacks and limitations of the experiences and tips for other first-time presenters. A common…

  17. Play and Recreation for Individuals with Disabilities: Practical Pointers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J., Ed.; Thompson, Donna, Ed.

    This book contains practical information that reflects new developments in sports participation for individuals with disabilities. The focus is on meeting the challenges of the outdoor environment, learning through appropriate and safe play, and keeping fit through active leisure. Specifics include practical aspects of camping and outdoor…

  18. Technology, Work and Society: Some Pointers from ILO Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Francis

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the causes of the failure of rural development projects in developing countries and concludes that governments and agencies providing assistance need to devote more attention to land reform, improvement of rural institutions and delivery systems, and adjustments in economic policies. (JOW)

  19. Automatic Tie Pointer for In-Situ Pointing Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G/

    2011-01-01

    The MARSAUTOTIE program generates tie points for use with the Mars pointing correction software "In-Situ Pointing Correction and Rover Microlocalization," (NPO-46696) Soft ware Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 9 (September 2010), page 18, in a completely automated manner, with no operator intervention. It takes the place of MARSTIE, although MARSTIE can be used to interactively edit the tie points afterwards. These tie points are used to create a mosaic whose seams (boundaries of input images) have been geometrically corrected to reduce or eliminate errors and mis-registrations. The methods used to find appropriate tie points for use in creating a mosaic are unique, having been designed to work in concert with the "MARSNAV" program to be most effective in reducing or eliminating geometric seams in a mosaic. The program takes the input images and finds overlaps according to the nominal pointing. It then finds the most interesting areas using a scene activity metric. Points with higher scene activity are more likely to correlate successfully in the next step. It then uses correlation techniques to find matching points in the overlapped image. Finally, it performs a series of steps to reduce the number of tie points to a manageable level. These steps incorporate a number of heuristics that have been devised using experience gathered by tie pointing mosaics manually during MER operations. The software makes use of the PIG library as described in "Planetary Image Geometry Library" (NPO-46658), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 12 (December 2010), page 30, so it is multi-mission, applicable without change to any in-situ mission supported by PIG. The MARSAUTOTIE algorithm is automated, so it requires no user intervention. Although at the time of this reporting it has not been done, this program should be suitable for integration into a fully automated mosaic production pipeline.

  20. Demonstration of a Balloon Borne Arc-second Pointer Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deweese, K.; Ward, P.

    Many designs for utilizing stratospheric balloons as low-cost platforms on which to conduct space science experiments have been proposed throughout the years A major hurdle in extending the range of experiments for which these vehicles are useful has been the imposition of the gondola dynamics on the accuracy with which an instrument can be kept pointed at a celestial target A significant number of scientists have sought the ability to point their instruments with jitter in the arc-second range This paper presents the design and analysis of a stratospheric balloon borne pointing system that is able to meet this requirement The test results of a demonstration prototype of the design with similar ability are also presented Discussion of a high fidelity controller simulation for design analysis is presented The flexibility of the flight train is represented through generalized modal analysis A multiple controller scheme is utilized for coarse and fine pointing Coarse azimuth pointing is accomplished by an established pointing system with extensive flight history residing above the gondola structure A pitch-yaw gimbal mount is used for fine pointing providing orthogonal axes when nominally on target Fine pointing actuation is from direct drive dc motors eliminating backlash problems An analysis of friction nonlinearities and a demonstration of the necessity in eliminating static friction are provided A unique bearing hub design is introduced that eliminates static friction from the system dynamics A control scheme involving linear

  1. Concepts as Semantic Pointers: A Framework and Computational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blouw, Peter; Solodkin, Eugene; Thagard, Paul; Eliasmith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The reconciliation of theories of concepts based on prototypes, exemplars, and theory-like structures is a longstanding problem in cognitive science. In response to this problem, researchers have recently tended to adopt either hybrid theories that combine various kinds of representational structure, or eliminative theories that replace concepts…

  2. Balloon Borne Arc-Second Pointer Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Philip R.; DeWeese, Keith D.

    2003-01-01

    For many years scientists have been utilizing stratospheric balloons as low-cost platforms on which to conduct space science experiments. A major hurdle in extending the range of experiments for which these vehicles are useful has been the imposition of the gondola dynamics on the accuracy with which an instrument can be kept pointed at a celestial target. A significant number of scientists have sought the ability to point their instruments with jitter in the arc-second range. This paper presents the design and analysis of a stratospheric balloon borne pointing system that is able to meet this requirement. The foundation for a high fidelity controller simulation is presented. The flexibility of the flight train is represented through generalized modal analysis. A multiple controller scheme is introduced for coarse and fine pointing. Coarse azimuth pointing is accomplished by an established pointing system, with extensive flight history, residing above the gondola structure. A pitch-yaw gimbal mount is used for fine pointing, providing orthogonal axes when nominally on target. Fine pointing actuation is from direct drive dc motors, eliminating backlash problems. An analysis of friction nonlinearities and a demonstration of the necessity in eliminating static fiction are provided. A unique bearing hub design is introduced that eliminates static fiction from the system dynamics. A control scheme involving linear accelerometers for enhanced disturbance rejection is also presented. Results from a linear analysis of the total system and the high fidelity simulation are given. This paper establishes that the proposed control strategy can be made robustly stable with significant design margins. Also demonstrated is the efficacy of the proposed system in rejecting disturbances larger than those considered realistic. Finally, we see that sub arc-second pointing stability can be achieved for a large instrument pointing at an inertial target.

  3. Towards Responsible Massification: Some Pointers for Supporting Lecturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertyn, Ruth M; Machika, Pauline; Troskie-de Bruin, Christel

    2016-01-01

    Teaching large classes poses many challenges to lecturers where massification is a reality in higher education. There are implications for both teaching and effective learning in this context. The need for accountability to learners in education provision served as motivation for a study of large classes in the largest faculty of one university…

  4. Living Conditions of Some Basic School Children: Pointers to Disadvantage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, D. R. B.

    This study, conducted by the Bernard Van Leer Foundation Project for Early Childhood Education (PECE), presents the results of a survey which was carried out to identify home deficits in socioeconomically disadvantaged children's preparation for schooling. The study was conducted in Jamaica during July, August, and September, 1970, and was…

  5. Play and Recreation for Individuals with Disabilities: Practical Pointers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J., Ed.; Thompson, Donna, Ed.

    This book contains practical information that reflects new developments in sports participation for individuals with disabilities. The focus is on meeting the challenges of the outdoor environment, learning through appropriate and safe play, and keeping fit through active leisure. Specifics include practical aspects of camping and outdoor…

  6. Concepts as Semantic Pointers: A Framework and Computational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blouw, Peter; Solodkin, Eugene; Thagard, Paul; Eliasmith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The reconciliation of theories of concepts based on prototypes, exemplars, and theory-like structures is a longstanding problem in cognitive science. In response to this problem, researchers have recently tended to adopt either hybrid theories that combine various kinds of representational structure, or eliminative theories that replace concepts…

  7. Living Conditions of Some Basic School Children: Pointers to Disadvantage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, D. R. B.

    This study, conducted by the Bernard Van Leer Foundation Project for Early Childhood Education (PECE), presents the results of a survey which was carried out to identify home deficits in socioeconomically disadvantaged children's preparation for schooling. The study was conducted in Jamaica during July, August, and September, 1970, and was…

  8. Solar Dynamo Driven by Periodic Flow Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Hartle, Richard E.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have proposed that the periodicity of the solar magnetic cycle is determined by wave mean flow interactions analogous to those driving the Quasi Biennial Oscillation in the Earth's atmosphere. Upward propagating gravity waves would produce oscillating flows near the top of the radiation zone that in turn would drive a kinematic dynamo to generate the 22-year solar magnetic cycle. The dynamo we propose is built on a given time independent magnetic field B, which allows us to estimate the time dependent, oscillating components of the magnetic field, (Delta)B. The toroidal magnetic field (Delta)B(sub phi) is directly driven by zonal flow and is relatively large in the source region, (Delta)(sub phi)/B(sub Theta) much greater than 1. Consistent with observations, this field peaks at low latitudes and has opposite polarities in both hemispheres. The oscillating poloidal magnetic field component, (Delta)B(sub Theta), is driven by the meridional circulation, which is difficult to assess without a numerical model that properly accounts for the solar atmosphere dynamics. Scale-analysis suggests that (Delta)B(sub Theta) is small compared to B(sub Theta) in the dynamo region. Relative to B(sub Theta), however, the oscillating magnetic field perturbations are expected to be transported more rapidly upwards in the convection zone to the solar surface. As a result, (Delta)B(sub Theta) (and (Delta)B(sub phi)) should grow relative to B(sub Theta), so that the magnetic fields reverse at the surface as observed. Since the meridional and zonai flow oscillations are out of phase, the poloidal magnetic field peaks during times when the toroidal field reverses direction, which is observed. With the proposed wave driven flow oscillation, the magnitude of the oscillating poloidal magnetic field increases with the mean rotation rate of the fluid. This is consistent with the Bode-Blackett empirical scaling law, which reveals that in massive astrophysical bodies the magnetic moment tends

  9. On the thermally-driven ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjermundsen, Ada; LaCasce, Joseph Henry; Denstad, Liv

    2017-04-01

    How will the ocean circulation respond to extensive temperature change? Warming over the Arctic Ocean due to the loss of sea ice and snow cover will impact the surface air temperature (Serreze and Farncis, 2006; Screen and Simmonds, 2010) and thereby the Northern Hemisphere (NH) temperature gradient. The ocean circulation will respond, but freshwater from ice melting and shifting storm tracks make it hard to determine the ocean response to temperature changes alone. Attempts have been made to separate the impact of wind, thermal and freshwater forcings on the large scale ocean circulation (Cai, 1994; Saenko et al., 2002; Nycander et al. 2007), but our understanding remains incomplete. Here we examine numerical solutions of the global circulation with realistic bathymetry, driven solely by surface buoyancy forcing. Explicit wind forcing is excluded, although vertical mixing is retained. The character of the resulting flow is consistent in many ways with the observed ocean circulation,with inflow to and sinking in the Nordic Seas, baroclinic western boundary currents and an overturning streamfunction which closely resembles those obtained in full GCMs and in observations. The overturning circulation exhibits two thermally-driven cells: one in the Southern Ocean (SO) and one in the Atlantic. We investigate the inter-basin transports, the relative importance of the two overturning cells for the global ocean circulation, as well as the sensitivity of the ocean circulation to changes in buoyancy forcing. We find that reduced Atlantic overturning accelerates the SO circulation, while a reduced SO circulation strengthens the Atlantic overturning considerably. References: Cai, W. (1994). Circulation driven by observed surface thermohaline fields in a coarse resolution ocean general circulation model. J. Geophys. Res.: Oceans, 99, 10163-10181. Nycander, J. et al. (2007). Thermodynamic Analysis of Ocean Circulation, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 37, 2038-2052. Saenko, O. A. et al

  10. Analytic Theory of Wind-Driven Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. E.

    2016-12-01

    Wind-driven sea is characterized by the spatial energy spectrum E(k), k - is a wave vector. The spectrum has a sharp maximum at k ≈ kp is defined by the wind velocity U and by the "wave-age" - degree of the sea development. For the"well developed sea" kp ≈ g/U2. For a typical value of U ≈ 15 m/sec (moderate gale) λp = 2π/kp≈ 100m. The minimalscale λcap < 10-3m, thus λp/λcap ≈ 105. Obviously, the wind-driven sea needs its statistical description. The wholek-space can be separated in two main regions:1. Energy-capacitive region λp > λ > λcrit, λcrit ≈ 10-2λp. This range of scales contains more then 90% of wave energy. Wave dissipation in this range is negligibly small.2. Region of energy dissipation λ < λcrit. This region contains no more than 10% of wave energy but provides dissipation of all wave energy.If the wind velocity is smooth U < 5m/sec, the sea is also smooth and the dissipation is provided by transformation of gravity waves to capillary waves. For strong winds the dissipation is realized due to wave breaking. In this case one can observe the range of scales 5•10-2m < λ < λcrit which can be called " the Phillips sea". The main message of this lecture is the following. The most interesting energy-capacitive range of wave scales can be self-consistently discribed by the method of theoretical physics. The statistical description of this part of the wind driven sea is described by the Hasselmann kinetic equation for the energy spectrum. This kinetic equation has a rich family of exact solutions, both stationary and time-dependent. It allows a comfortable and fast numerical simulations. Putting together results of the analytical theory and numerical simulations of waves it is possible to explain a bulk of facts, accumulated by experimentalists for decades.

  11. The mechanics of gravity-driven faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, L.; Barrows, V.

    2010-04-01

    Faulting can result from either of two different mechanisms. These involve fundamentally different energetics. In elastic rebound, locked-in elastic strain energy is transformed into the earthquake (seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone). In force-driven faulting, the forces that create the stress on the fault supply work or energy to the faulting process. Half of this energy is transformed into the earthquake and half goes into an increase in locked-in elastic strain. In elastic rebound the locked-in elastic strain drives slip on the fault. In force-driven faulting it stops slip on the fault. Tectonic stress is reasonably attributed to gravity acting on topography and the Earth's lateral density variations. This includes the thermal convection that ultimately drives plate tectonics. Mechanical analysis has shown the intensity of the gravitational tectonic stress that is associated with the regional topography and lateral density variations that actually exist is comparable with the stress drops that are commonly associated with tectonic earthquakes; both are in the range of tens of bar to several hundred bar. The gravity collapse seismic mechanism assumes the fault fails and slips in direct response to the gravitational tectonic stress. Gravity collapse is an example of force-driven faulting. In the simplest case, energy that is released from the gravitational potential of the stress-causing topography and lateral density variations is equally split between the earthquake and the increase in locked-in elastic strain. The release of gravitational potential energy requires a change in the Earth's density distribution. Gravitational body forces are solely dependent on density so a change in the density distribution requires a change in the body forces. This implies the existence of volumetric body-force displacements. The volumetric body-force displacements are in addition to displacements generated by slip on the fault. They must exist if gravity

  12. The Energetics of Gravity Driven Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, L.

    2007-12-01

    Faulting can result from either of two different mechanisms. These involve fundamentally different energetics. In displacement-bounded faulting, locked-in elastic strain energy is transformed into seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone. Elastic rebound is an example of displacement-bounded faulting. In force-driven faulting, the forces that create the stress on the fault supply work or energy to the faulting process. Half of this energy is transformed into seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone and half goes into an increase in locked-in elastic strain. In displacement-bounded faulting the locked-in elastic strain drives slip on the fault. In force-driven faulting it stops slip on the fault. Tectonic stress is reasonably attributed to gravity acting on topography and the Earth's lateral density variations. This includes the thermal convection that ultimately drives plate tectonics. The gravity collapse seismic mechanism assumes the fault fails and slips in direct response to the gravitational tectonic stress. Gravity collapse is an example of force-driven faulting. In the simplest case, energy that is released from the gravitational potential of the topography and internal stress-causing density variations is equally split between the seismic waves plus work done in the fault zone and the increase in locked-in elastic strain. The release of gravitational potential energy requires a change in the Earth's density distribution. Gravitational body forces are solely dependent on density so a change in the density distribution requires a change in the body forces. This implies the existence of volumetric body-force displacements. The volumetric body-force displacements are in addition to displacements generated by slip on the fault. They must exist if gravity participates in the energetics of the faulting process. From the perspective of gravitational tectonics, the gravity collapse mechanism is direct and simple. The related mechanics are a little more

  13. Gradient Driven Flow: Lattice Gas, Diffusion Equation and Measurement Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    03-200 1 Journal Article (refereed) 2001 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Gradient Driven Flow : Lattice Gas, Diffusion Equation and...time regime, the collective motion exhibits an onset of oscillation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Diffusion; Fick’s Law; Gradient Driven Flow ; Lattice Gas 16...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 20010907 062 Gradient driven flow : lattice gas, diffusion equation and measurement scales R.B

  14. A stepper motor-driven microelectrode positioner.

    PubMed

    Schmid, K; Böhmer, G

    1987-03-01

    The mechanical elements and the electronic control system from a stepper motor-driven microelectrode positioner is described. The unit embodies a high-precision small step angle hybrid motor. The compact, rugged and totally concentric design of the mechanic, by a spindle mechanism achieves the necessary precision by translating the stepwise rotations of the motor into steps of linear movement. The system takes advantage of commercially available low friction parts such as ball bearings, ball bushings and axles with hardened surfaces. The related electronic control unit is designed around the most recent integrated circuitry which is both sophisticated and economical. Though the described system is designed to be built in an average departmental workshop it compares favorably with more expensive commercial units and in some aspects outperforms them.

  15. A light-driven artificial flytrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wani, Owies M.; Zeng, Hao; Priimagi, Arri

    2017-05-01

    The sophistication, complexity and intelligence of biological systems is a continuous source of inspiration for mankind. Mimicking the natural intelligence to devise tiny systems that are capable of self-regulated, autonomous action to, for example, distinguish different targets, remains among the grand challenges in biomimetic micro-robotics. Herein, we demonstrate an autonomous soft device, a light-driven flytrap, that uses optical feedback to trigger photomechanical actuation. The design is based on light-responsive liquid-crystal elastomer, fabricated onto the tip of an optical fibre, which acts as a power source and serves as a contactless probe that senses the environment. Mimicking natural flytraps, this artificial flytrap is capable of autonomous closure and object recognition. It enables self-regulated actuation within the fibre-sized architecture, thus opening up avenues towards soft, autonomous small-scale devices.

  16. Variable Interactions in Query-Driven Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, E. Wes; Gosink, Luke J.; Anderson, John C.; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2007-10-25

    One fundamental element of scientific inquiry is discoveringrelationships, particularly the interactions between different variablesin observed or simulated phenomena. Building upon our prior work in thefield of Query-Driven Visualization, where visual data analysisprocessing is focused on subsets of large data deemed to be"scientifically interesting," this new work focuses on a novel knowledgediscovery capability suitable for use with petascale class datasets. Itenables visual presentation of the presence or absence of relationships(correlations) between variables in data subsets produced by Query-Drivenmethodologies. This technique holds great potential for enablingknowledge discovery from large and complex datasets currently emergingfrom SciDAC and INCITE projects. It is sufficiently generally to beapplicable to any time of complex, time-varying, multivariate data fromstructured, unstructured or adaptive grids.

  17. Test Driven Development of Scientific Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clune, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Test-Driven Development (TDD), a software development process that promises many advantages for developer productivity and software reliability, has become widely accepted among professional software engineers. As the name suggests, TDD practitioners alternate between writing short automated tests and producing code that passes those tests. Although this overly simplified description will undoubtedly sound prohibitively burdensome to many uninitiated developers, the advent of powerful unit-testing frameworks greatly reduces the effort required to produce and routinely execute suites of tests. By testimony, many developers find TDD to be addicting after only a few days of exposure, and find it unthinkable to return to previous practices.After a brief overview of the TDD process and my experience in applying the methodology for development activities at Goddard, I will delve more deeply into some of the challenges that are posed by numerical and scientific software as well as tools and implementation approaches that should address those challenges.

  18. Laser-Driven Mini-Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, Enrique; Lin Jun; Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Larson, C. William; Mead, Franklin B. Jr.

    2006-05-02

    Laser-driven mini-thrusters were studied using Delrin registered and PVC (Delrin registered is a registered trademark of DuPont) as propellants. TEA CO2 laser ({lambda} = 10.6 {mu}m) was used as a driving laser. Coupling coefficients were deduced from two independent techniques: force-time curves measured with a piezoelectric sensor and ballistic pendulum. Time-resolved ICCD images of the expanding plasma and combustion products were analyzed in order to determine the main process that generates the thrust. The measurements were also performed in a nitrogen atmosphere in order to test the combustion effects on thrust. A pinhole transmission experiment was performed for the study of the cut-off time when the ablation/air breakdown plasma becomes opaque to the incoming laser pulse.

  19. Zonostrophic instability driven by discrete particle noise

    DOE PAGES

    St-Onge, D. A.; Krommes, J. A.

    2017-04-01

    The consequences of discrete particle noise for a system possessing a possibly unstable collective mode are discussed. It is argued that a zonostrophic instability (of homogeneous turbulence to the formation of zonal flows) occurs just below the threshold for linear instability. The scenario provides a new interpretation of the random forcing that is ubiquitously invoked in stochastic models such as the second-order cumulant expansion or stochastic structural instability theory; neither intrinsic turbulence nor coupling to extrinsic turbulence is required. A representative calculation of the zonostrophic neutral curve is made for a simple two-field model of toroidal ion-temperature-gradient-driven modes. To themore » extent that the damping of zonal flows is controlled by the ion-ion collision rate, the point of zonostrophic instability is independent of that rate. Published by AIP Publishing.« less

  20. Laser with optically driven Q-switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An optically driven interactive Q-switch, i.e., a Q-switch that responds to a short pulse of light, for example, from external light-emitting diodes (LED's) or diode lasers, is provided for producing an output laser pulse from electronic energy stored in a laser medium. Q-switching is thus achieved on demand by electrically pulsing the light source to produce a pulse of light directed onto a Q-switch medium in the laser cavity. Electronic control of the light pulse from the external source will thus provide not only efficient Q-switching frequency but also independent control of output laser pulse width with a fast rise time for each output laser pulse.