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Sample records for poised lineage specification

  1. Matrix elasticity directs stem cell lineage specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis

    2010-03-01

    Adhesion of stem cells - like most cells - is not just a membrane phenomenon. Most tissue cells need to adhere to a ``solid'' for viability, and over the last decade it has become increasingly clear that the physical ``elasticity'' of that solid is literally ``felt'' by cells. Here we show that Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) specify lineage and commit to phenotypes with extreme sensitivity to the elasticity typical of tissues [1]. In serum only media, soft matrices that mimic brain appear neurogenic, stiffer matrices that mimic muscle are myogenic, and comparatively rigid matrices that mimic collagenous bone prove osteogenic. Inhibition of nonmuscle myosin II activity blocks all elasticity directed lineage specification, which indicates that the cytoskeleton pulls on matrix through adhesive attachments. Results have significant implications for `therapeutic' stem cells and have motivated development of a proteomic-scale method to identify mechano-responsive protein structures [2] as well as deeper physical studies of matrix physics [3] and growth factor pathways [4]. [4pt] [1] A. Engler, et al. Matrix elasticity directs stem cell lineage specification. Cell (2006).[0pt] [2] C.P. Johnson, et al. Forced unfolding of proteins within cells. Science (2007).[0pt] [3] A.E.X. Brown, et al. Multiscale mechanics of fibrin polymer: Gel stretching with protein unfolding and loss of water. Science (2009).[0pt] [4] D.E. Discher, et al. Growth factors, matrices, and forces combine and control stem cells. Science (2009).

  2. [Advances in lineage-specific genes].

    PubMed

    Huanping, Zhang; Tongming, Yin

    2015-06-01

    Lineage-specific genes (LSGs) are defined as genes found in one particular taxonomic group but have no significant sequence similarity with genes from other lineages, which compose about 10%?20% of the total genes in the genome of a focal organism. LSGs were first uncovered in the yeast genome in 1996. The development of the whole genome sequencing leads to the emergence of studies on LSGs as a hot topic in comparative genomics. LSGs have been extensively studied on microbial species, lower marine organisms, plant (such as Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Populus), insects, primate, etc; the biological functions of LSGs are important to clarify the evolution and adaptability of a species. In this review, we summarize the progress of LSGs studies, including LSGs identification, gene characterization, origin and evolution of LSGs, biological function, and expression analysis of LSGs. In addition, we discuss the existing problems and future directions for studies in this area. Our purpose is to provide some unique insights into the researches of LSGs.

  3. Digital development: a database of cell lineage differentiation in C. elegans with lineage phenotypes, cell-specific gene functions and a multiscale model

    PubMed Central

    Santella, Anthony; Kovacevic, Ismar; Herndon, Laura A.; Hall, David H.; Du, Zhuo; Bao, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    Developmental systems biology is poised to exploit large-scale data from two approaches: genomics and live imaging. The combination of the two offers the opportunity to map gene functions and gene networks in vivo at single-cell resolution using cell tracking and quantification of cellular phenotypes. Here we present Digital Development (http://www.digital-development.org), a database of cell lineage differentiation with curated phenotypes, cell-specific gene functions and a multiscale model. The database stores data from recent systematic studies of cell lineage differentiation in the C. elegans embryo containing ∼200 conserved genes, 1400 perturbed cell lineages and 600 000 digitized single cells. Users can conveniently browse, search and download four categories of phenotypic and functional information from an intuitive web interface. This information includes lineage differentiation phenotypes, cell-specific gene functions, differentiation landscapes and fate choices, and a multiscale model of lineage differentiation. Digital Development provides a comprehensive, curated, multidimensional database for developmental biology. The scale, resolution and richness of biological information presented here facilitate exploration of gene-specific and systems-level mechanisms of lineage differentiation in Metazoans. PMID:26503254

  4. Lineage-specific mapping of quantitative trait loci

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C; Ritland, K

    2013-01-01

    We present an approach for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, termed as ‘lineage-specific QTL mapping', for inferring allelic changes of QTL evolution along with branches in a phylogeny. We describe and analyze the simplest case: by adding a third taxon into the normal procedure of QTL mapping between pairs of taxa, such inferences can be made along lineages to a presumed common ancestor. Although comparisons of QTL maps among species can identify homology of QTLs by apparent co-location, lineage-specific mapping of QTL can classify homology into (1) orthology (shared origin of QTL) versus (2) paralogy (independent origin of QTL within resolution of map distance). In this light, we present a graphical method that identifies six modes of QTL evolution in a three taxon comparison. We then apply our model to map lineage-specific QTLs for inbreeding among three taxa of yellow monkey-flower: Mimulus guttatus and two inbreeders M. platycalyx and M. micranthus, but critically assuming outcrossing was the ancestral state. The two most common modes of homology across traits were orthologous (shared ancestry of mutation for QTL alleles). The outbreeder M. guttatus had the fewest lineage-specific QTL, in accordance with the presumed ancestry of outbreeding. Extensions of lineage-specific QTL mapping to other types of data and crosses, and to inference of ancestral QTL state, are discussed. PMID:23612690

  5. Phylogenetic plant community structure along elevation is lineage specific

    PubMed Central

    Ndiribe, Charlotte; Pellissier, Loïc; Antonelli, Silvia; Dubuis, Anne; Pottier, Julien; Vittoz, Pascal; Guisan, Antoine; Salamin, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The trend of closely related taxa to retain similar environmental preferences mediated by inherited traits suggests that several patterns observed at the community scale originate from longer evolutionary processes. While the effects of phylogenetic relatedness have been previously studied within a single genus or family, lineage-specific effects on the ecological processes governing community assembly have rarely been studied for entire communities or flora. Here, we measured how community phylogenetic structure varies across a wide elevation gradient for plant lineages represented by 35 families, using a co-occurrence index and net relatedness index (NRI). We propose a framework that analyses each lineage separately and reveals the trend of ecological assembly at tree nodes. We found prevailing phylogenetic clustering for more ancient nodes and overdispersion in more recent tree nodes. Closely related species may thus rapidly evolve new environmental tolerances to radiate into distinct communities, while older lineages likely retain inherent environmental tolerances to occupy communities in similar environments, either through efficient dispersal mechanisms or the exclusion of older lineages with more divergent environmental tolerances. Our study illustrates the importance of disentangling the patterns of community assembly among lineages to better interpret the ecological role of traits. It also sheds light on studies reporting absence of phylogenetic signal, and opens new perspectives on the analysis of niche and trait conservatism across lineages. PMID:24455126

  6. LineageSpecificSeqgen: generating sequence data with lineage-specific variation in the proportion of variable sites

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Commonly used phylogenetic models assume a homogeneous evolutionary process throughout the tree. It is known that these homogeneous models are often too simplistic, and that with time some properties of the evolutionary process can change (due to selection or drift). In particular, as constraints on sequences evolve, the proportion of variable sites can vary between lineages. This affects the ability of phylogenetic methods to correctly estimate phylogenetic trees, especially for long timescales. To date there is no phylogenetic model that allows for change in the proportion of variable sites, and the degree to which this affects phylogenetic reconstruction is unknown. Results We present LineageSpecificSeqgen, an extension to the seq-gen program that allows generation of sequences with both changes in the proportion of variable sites and changes in the rate at which sites switch between being variable and invariable. In contrast to seq-gen and its derivatives to date, we interpret branch lengths as the mean number of substitutions per variable site, as opposed to the mean number of substitutions per site (which is averaged over all sites, including invariable sites). This allows specification of the substitution rates of variable sites, independently of the proportion of invariable sites. Conclusion LineageSpecificSeqgen allows simulation of DNA and amino acid sequence alignments under a lineage-specific evolutionary process. The program can be used to test current models of evolution on sequences that have undergone lineage-specific evolution. It facilitates the development of both new methods to identify such processes in real data, and means to account for such processes. The program is available at: http://awcmee.massey.ac.nz/downloads.htm. PMID:19021917

  7. Principles Governing DNA Methylation during Neuronal Lineage and Subtype Specification

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ali; Klein, Shifra S.; Barboza, Luendreo; Lohdi, Niraj

    2016-01-01

    Although comprehensively described during early neuronal development, the role of DNA methylation/demethylation in neuronal lineage and subtype specification is not well understood. By studying two distinct neuronal progenitors as they differentiate to principal neurons in mouse hippocampus and striatum, we uncovered several principles governing neuronal DNA methylation during brain development. (1) The program consists of three stages: an initial genome-wide methylation during progenitor proliferation is followed by loss of methylation during the transition of regional progenitors to “young” hippocampal/striatal neurons, which is then reversed by gain in methylation during maturation to subtype-specific neurons. (2) At the first two stages, gain and loss of methylation are limited to CpGs, whereas during the third maturation stage, methylation also occurs at non-CpG sites in both lineages. (3) Methylation/demethylation, similar to transcription, are initially highly similar in the two lineages, whereas diversification in methylation and transcription during maturation creates subtype-specific methylation differences. (4) Initially, methylation targets all genomic locations, whereas later, during early and late differentiation, the preferred targets are intronic/intergenic sequences with enhancer-like activity. (5) Differentially methylated genes are enriched in sequential neurodevelopmental functions (such as progenitor proliferation, migration, neuritogenesis, and synaptic transmission); upregulated genes represent current and consecutive stage-specific functions, and downregulated genes represent preceding functions that are no longer required. The main conclusion of our work is that the neuronal methylation/demethylation program is predominantly developmental with minimal lineage specificity, except in the final stage of development when neuron subtype-specific differences also emerge. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our work is the first to describe a set of

  8. Mapping the route from naive pluripotency to lineage specification

    PubMed Central

    Kalkan, Tüzer; Smith, Austin

    2014-01-01

    In the mouse blastocyst, epiblast cells are newly formed shortly before implantation. They possess a unique developmental plasticity, termed naive pluripotency. For development to proceed, this naive state must be subsumed by multi-lineage differentiation within 72 h following implantation. In vitro differentiation of naive embryonic stem cells (ESCs) cultured in controlled conditions provides a tractable system to dissect and understand the process of exit from naive pluripotency and entry into lineage specification. Exploitation of this system in recent large-scale RNAi and mutagenesis screens has uncovered multiple new factors and modules that drive or facilitate progression out of the naive state. Notably, these studies show that the transcription factor network that governs the naive state is rapidly dismantled prior to upregulation of lineage specification markers, creating an intermediate state that we term formative pluripotency. Here, we summarize these findings and propose a road map for state transitions in ESC differentiation that reflects the orderly dynamics of epiblast progression in the embryo. PMID:25349449

  9. Identification of Transcription Factors for Lineage-Specific ESC Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Piao, Yulan; Sharov, Alexei A.; Zsiros, Veronika; Yu, Hong; Nakazawa, Kazu; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S.H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A network of transcription factors (TFs) determines cell identity, but identity can be altered by overexpressing a combination of TFs. However, choosing and verifying combinations of TFs for specific cell differentiation have been daunting due to the large number of possible combinations of ∼2,000 TFs. Here, we report the identification of individual TFs for lineage-specific cell differentiation based on the correlation matrix of global gene expression profiles. The overexpression of identified TFs—Myod1, Mef2c, Esx1, Foxa1, Hnf4a, Gata2, Gata3, Myc, Elf5, Irf2, Elf1, Sfpi1, Ets1, Smad7, Nr2f1, Sox11, Dmrt1, Sox9, Foxg1, Sox2, or Ascl1—can direct efficient, specific, and rapid differentiation into myocytes, hepatocytes, blood cells, and neurons. Furthermore, transfection of synthetic mRNAs of TFs generates their appropriate target cells. These results demonstrate both the utility of this approach to identify potent TFs for cell differentiation, and the unanticipated capacity of single TFs directly guides differentiation to specific lineage fates. PMID:24371809

  10. Lineage-specific laminar organization of cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Ciceri, Gabriele; Dehorter, Nathalie; Sols, Ignasi; Huang, Z Josh; Maravall, Miguel; Marín, Oscar

    2013-09-01

    In the cerebral cortex, pyramidal cells and interneurons are generated in distant germinal zones, and so the mechanisms that control their precise assembly into specific microcircuits remain an enigma. Here we report that cortical interneurons labeled at the clonal level do not distribute randomly but rather have a strong tendency to cluster in the mouse neocortex. This behavior is common to different classes of interneurons, independently of their origin. Interneuron clusters are typically contained within one or two adjacent cortical layers, are largely formed by isochronically generated neurons and populate specific layers, as revealed by unbiased hierarchical clustering methods. Our results suggest that different progenitor cells give rise to interneurons populating infra- and supragranular cortical layers, which challenges current views of cortical neurogenesis. Thus, specific lineages of cortical interneurons seem to be produced to primarily mirror the laminar structure of the cerebral cortex, rather than its columnar organization.

  11. Biological characteristics of megakaryocytes: specific lineage commitment and associated disorders.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Hwang, William Ying Khee; Aw, Swee Eng

    2006-01-01

    Megakayocytes (Megakaryocytes) are among the rarest type of haematopoietic cells and highly specialized precursors for platelets. Normal mature megakaryocytes are, perhaps, the largest cells in the marrow. In contrast, their annucleated platelets progeny are the smallest subcellular fragments in the circulation, which in spite of their size, play crucial roles in thrombostasis and haemostasis. Megakaryopoiesis involves complicated and multi-step biological processes. Research over the last decade has resulted in certain important new discoveries, such as the specific megakaryocyte-forming haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subpopulation, thrombopoietin (Tpo), formation and release of platelets, etc. Substantial understanding of the specific lineage commitment, differentiation, and the molecular regulatory mechanisms of megakaryopoiesis has also been achieved. Despite existing controversies and questions, megakaryopoiesis remains an exciting field in biomedical research. Certain recent biological findings as well as future research in megakaryopoiesis are summarised in this article. Certain pathological changes associated with megakaryocytes, such as immune thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP), acute megakayoblastic leukaemia, etc., are also discussed in this article.

  12. DLGP: A database for lineage-conserved and lineage-specific gene pairs in animal and plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng

    2016-01-15

    The conservation of gene organization in the genome with lineage-specificity is an invaluable resource to decipher their potential functionality with diverse selective constraints, especially in higher animals and plants. Gene pairs appear to be the minimal structure for such kind of gene clusters that tend to reside in their preferred locations, representing the distinctive genomic characteristics in single species or a given lineage. Despite gene families having been investigated in a widespread manner, the definition of gene pair families in various taxa still lacks adequate attention. To address this issue, we report DLGP (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/DLGP/) that stores the pre-calculated lineage-based gene pairs in currently available 134 animal and plant genomes and inspect them under the same analytical framework, bringing out a set of innovational features. First, the taxonomy or lineage has been classified into four levels such as Kingdom, Phylum, Class and Order. It adopts all-to-all comparison strategy to identify the possible conserved gene pairs in all species for each gene pair in certain species and reckon those that are conserved in over a significant proportion of species in a given lineage (e.g. Primates, Diptera or Poales) as the lineage-conserved gene pairs. Furthermore, it predicts the lineage-specific gene pairs by retaining the above-mentioned lineage-conserved gene pairs that are not conserved in any other lineages. Second, it carries out pairwise comparison for the gene pairs between two compared species and creates the table including all the conserved gene pairs and the image elucidating the conservation degree of gene pairs in chromosomal level. Third, it supplies gene order browser to extend gene pairs to gene clusters, allowing users to view the evolution dynamics in the gene context in an intuitive manner. This database will be able to facilitate the particular comparison between animals and plants, between vertebrates and arthropods, and

  13. H3K4/H3K9me3 Bivalent Chromatin Domains Targeted by Lineage-Specific DNA Methylation Pauses Adipocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yoshihiro; Nakaki, Ryo; Inagaki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ayano; Kano, Yuka; Kimura, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshiya; Tsutsumi, Shuichi; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Doi, Takefumi; Fukami, Kiyoko; Osborne, Timothy F; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Juro

    2015-11-19

    Bivalent H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 chromatin domains in embryonic stem cells keep active developmental regulatory genes expressed at very low levels and poised for activation. Here, we show an alternative and previously unknown bivalent modified histone signature in lineage-committed mesenchymal stem cells and preadipocytes that pairs H3K4me3 with H3K9me3 to maintain adipogenic master regulatory genes (Cebpa and Pparg) expressed at low levels yet poised for activation when differentiation is required. We show lineage-specific gene-body DNA methylation recruits H3K9 methyltransferase SETDB1, which methylates H3K9 immediately downstream of transcription start sites marked with H3K4me3 to establish the bivalent domain. At the Cebpa locus, this prevents transcription factor C/EBPβ binding, histone acetylation, and further H3K4me3 deposition and is associated with pausing of RNA polymerase II, which limits Cebpa gene expression and adipogenesis.

  14. Neuroblast lineage identification and lineage-specific Hox gene action during postembryonic development of the subesophageal ganglion in the Drosophila central brain.

    PubMed

    Kuert, Philipp A; Hartenstein, Volker; Bello, Bruno C; Lovick, Jennifer K; Reichert, Heinrich

    2014-06-15

    The central brain of Drosophila consists of the supraesophageal ganglion (SPG) and the subesophageal ganglion (SEG), both of which are generated by neural stem cell-like neuroblasts during embryonic and postembryonic development. Considerable information has been obtained on postembryonic development of the neuroblasts and their lineages in the SPG. In contrast, very little is known about neuroblasts, neural lineages, or any other aspect of the postembryonic development in the SEG. Here we characterize the neuroanatomy of the larval SEG in terms of tracts, commissures, and other landmark features as compared to a thoracic ganglion. We then use clonal MARCM labeling to identify all adult-specific neuroblast lineages in the late larval SEG and find a surprisingly small number of neuroblast lineages, 13 paired and one unpaired. The Hox genes Dfd, Scr, and Antp are expressed in a lineage-specific manner in these lineages during postembryonic development. Hox gene loss-of-function causes lineage-specific defects in axonal targeting and reduction in neural cell numbers. Moreover, it results in the formation of novel ectopic neuroblast lineages. Apoptosis block also results in ectopic lineages suggesting that Hox genes are required for lineage-specific termination of proliferation through programmed cell death. Taken together, our findings show that postembryonic development in the SEG is mediated by a surprisingly small set of identified lineages and requires lineage-specific Hox gene action to ensure the correct formation of adult-specific neurons in the Drosophila brain.

  15. SWI/SNF-directed stem cell lineage specification: dynamic composition regulates specific stages of skeletal myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Toto, Paula Coutinho; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Albini, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes are key regulators of the epigenetic modifications that determine whether stem cells maintain pluripotency or commit toward specific lineages through development and during postnatal life. Dynamic combinatorial assembly of multiple variants of SWI/SNF subunits is emerging as the major determinant of the functional versatility of SWI/SNF. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the structural and functional properties of the alternative SWI/SNF complexes that direct stem cell fate toward skeletal muscle lineage and control distinct stages of skeletal myogenesis. In particular, we will refer to recent evidence pointing to the essential role of two SWI/SNF components not expressed in embryonic stem cells—the catalytic subunit BRM and the structural component BAF60C—whose induction in muscle progenitors coincides with the expansion of their transcriptional repertoire. PMID:27207468

  16. Directional DNA methylation changes and complex intermediate states accompany lineage specificity in the adult hematopoietic compartment.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Emily; Molaro, Antoine; Dos Santos, Camila O; Thekkat, Pramod; Song, Qiang; Uren, Philip J; Park, Jin; Butler, Jason; Rafii, Shahin; McCombie, W Richard; Smith, Andrew D; Hannon, Gregory J

    2011-10-07

    DNA methylation has been implicated as an epigenetic component of mechanisms that stabilize cell-fate decisions. Here, we have characterized the methylomes of human female hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) and mature cells from the myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Hypomethylated regions (HMRs) associated with lineage-specific genes were often methylated in the opposing lineage. In HSPCs, these sites tended to show intermediate, complex patterns that resolve to uniformity upon differentiation, by increased or decreased methylation. Promoter HMRs shared across diverse cell types typically display a constitutive core that expands and contracts in a lineage-specific manner to fine-tune the expression of associated genes. Many newly identified intergenic HMRs, both constitutive and lineage specific, were enriched for factor binding sites with an implied role in genome organization and regulation of gene expression, respectively. Overall, our studies represent an important reference data set and provide insights into directional changes in DNA methylation as cells adopt terminal fates.

  17. Lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind the Gata3 Tce1 enhancer to mediate lineage-specific programs

    PubMed Central

    Ohmura, Sakie; Mizuno, Seiya; Oishi, Hisashi; Ku, Chia-Jui; Hermann, Mary; Hosoya, Tomonori; Takahashi, Satoru; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is essential for the genesis and maturation of the T cell lineage, and GATA3 dysregulation has pathological consequences. Previous studies have shown that GATA3 function in T cell development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and that the Notch nuclear effector, RBP-J, binds specifically to the Gata3 promoter. We previously identified a T cell–specific Gata3 enhancer (Tce1) lying 280 kb downstream from the structural gene and demonstrated in transgenic mice that Tce1 promoted T lymphocyte–specific transcription of reporter genes throughout T cell development; however, it was not clear if Tce1 is required for Gata3 transcription in vivo. Here, we determined that the canonical Gata3 promoter is insufficient for Gata3 transcriptional activation in T cells in vivo, precluding the possibility that promoter binding by a host of previously implicated transcription factors alone is responsible for Gata3 expression in T cells. Instead, we demonstrated that multiple lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind to Tce1 and that this enhancer confers T lymphocyte–specific Gata3 activation in vivo, as targeted deletion of Tce1 in a mouse model abrogated critical functions of this T cell–regulatory element. Together, our data show that Tce1 is both necessary and sufficient for critical aspects of Gata3 T cell–specific transcriptional activity. PMID:26808502

  18. Venus trap in the mouse embryo reveals distinct molecular dynamics underlying specification of first embryonic lineages.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jens-Erik; Panavaite, Laura; Gunther, Stefan; Wennekamp, Sebastian; Groner, Anna C; Pigge, Anton; Salvenmoser, Stefanie; Trono, Didier; Hufnagel, Lars; Hiiragi, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian development begins with the segregation of embryonic and extra-embryonic lineages in the blastocyst. Recent studies revealed cell-to-cell gene expression heterogeneity and dynamic cell rearrangements during mouse blastocyst formation. Thus, mechanistic understanding of lineage specification requires quantitative description of gene expression dynamics at a single-cell resolution in living embryos. However, only a few fluorescent gene expression reporter mice are available and quantitative live image analysis is limited so far. Here, we carried out a fluorescence gene-trap screen and established reporter mice expressing Venus specifically in the first lineages. Lineage tracking, quantitative gene expression and cell position analyses allowed us to build a comprehensive lineage map of mouse pre-implantation development. Our systematic analysis revealed that, contrary to the available models, the timing and mechanism of lineage specification may be distinct between the trophectoderm and the inner cell mass. While expression of our trophectoderm-specific lineage marker is upregulated in outside cells upon asymmetric divisions at 8- and 16-cell stages, the inside-specific upregulation of the inner-cell-mass marker only becomes evident at the 64-cell stage. This study thus provides a framework toward systems-level understanding of embryogenesis marked by high dynamicity and stochastic variability.

  19. Pancreas lineage allocation and specification are regulated by sphingosine-1-phosphate signalling

    PubMed Central

    Serafimidis, Ioannis; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Lesche, Mathias; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Takuwa, Yoh; Dahl, Andreas; Pan, Duojia; Gavalas, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    During development, progenitor expansion, lineage allocation, and implementation of differentiation programs need to be tightly coordinated so that different cell types are generated in the correct numbers for appropriate tissue size and function. Pancreatic dysfunction results in some of the most debilitating and fatal diseases, including pancreatic cancer and diabetes. Several transcription factors regulating pancreas lineage specification have been identified, and Notch signalling has been implicated in lineage allocation, but it remains unclear how these processes are coordinated. Using a combination of genetic approaches, organotypic cultures of embryonic pancreata, and genomics, we found that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1p), signalling through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) S1pr2, plays a key role in pancreas development linking lineage allocation and specification. S1pr2 signalling promotes progenitor survival as well as acinar and endocrine specification. S1pr2-mediated stabilisation of the yes-associated protein (YAP) is essential for endocrine specification, thus linking a regulator of progenitor growth with specification. YAP stabilisation and endocrine cell specification rely on Gαi subunits, revealing an unexpected specificity of selected GPCR intracellular signalling components. Finally, we found that S1pr2 signalling posttranscriptionally attenuates Notch signalling levels, thus regulating lineage allocation. Both S1pr2-mediated YAP stabilisation and Notch attenuation are necessary for the specification of the endocrine lineage. These findings identify S1p signalling as a novel key pathway coordinating cell survival, lineage allocation, and specification and linking these processes by regulating YAP levels and Notch signalling. Understanding lineage allocation and specification in the pancreas will shed light in the origins of pancreatic diseases and may suggest novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:28248965

  20. Mapping cell type-specific transcriptional enhancers using high affinity, lineage-specific Ep300 bioChIP-seq

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Pingzhu; Gu, Fei; Zhang, Lina; Akerberg, Brynn N; Ma, Qing; Li, Kai; He, Aibin; Lin, Zhiqiang; Stevens, Sean M; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William T

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate cell type-specific transcriptional programs requires developing a lexicon of their genomic regulatory elements. We developed a lineage-selective method to map transcriptional enhancers, regulatory genomic regions that activate transcription, in mice. Since most tissue-specific enhancers are bound by the transcriptional co-activator Ep300, we used Cre-directed, lineage-specific Ep300 biotinylation and pulldown on immobilized streptavidin followed by next generation sequencing of co-precipitated DNA to identify lineage-specific enhancers. By driving this system with lineage-specific Cre transgenes, we mapped enhancers active in embryonic endothelial cells/blood or skeletal muscle. Analysis of these enhancers identified new transcription factor heterodimer motifs that likely regulate transcription in these lineages. Furthermore, we identified candidate enhancers that regulate adult heart- or lung- specific endothelial cell specialization. Our strategy for tissue-specific protein biotinylation opens new avenues for studying lineage-specific protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22039.001 PMID:28121289

  1. Transcriptomes of lineage-specific Drosophila neuroblasts profiled by genetic targeting and robotic sorting

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Po; Fu, Chi-Cheng; Sugino, Ken; Liu, Zhiyong; Ren, Qingzhong; Liu, Ling-Yu; Yao, Xiaohao; Lee, Luke P.; Lee, Tzumin

    2016-01-01

    A brain consists of numerous distinct neurons arising from a limited number of progenitors, called neuroblasts in Drosophila. Each neuroblast produces a specific neuronal lineage. To unravel the transcriptional networks that underlie the development of distinct neuroblast lineages, we marked and isolated lineage-specific neuroblasts for RNA sequencing. We labeled particular neuroblasts throughout neurogenesis by activating a conditional neuroblast driver in specific lineages using various intersection strategies. The targeted neuroblasts were efficiently recovered using a custom-built device for robotic single-cell picking. Transcriptome analysis of mushroom body, antennal lobe and type II neuroblasts compared with non-selective neuroblasts, neurons and glia revealed a rich repertoire of transcription factors expressed among neuroblasts in diverse patterns. Besides transcription factors that are likely to be pan-neuroblast, many transcription factors exist that are selectively enriched or repressed in certain neuroblasts. The unique combinations of transcription factors present in different neuroblasts may govern the diverse lineage-specific neuron fates. PMID:26700685

  2. Parallel and lineage-specific molecular adaptation to climate in boreal black spruce.

    PubMed

    Prunier, Julien; Gérardi, Sébastien; Laroche, Jérôme; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2012-09-01

    In response to selective pressure, adaptation may follow different genetic pathways throughout the natural range of a species due to historical differentiation in standing genetic variation. Using 41 populations of black spruce (Picea mariana), the objectives of this study were to identify adaptive genetic polymorphisms related to temperature and precipitation variation across the transcontinental range of the species, and to evaluate the potential influence of historical events on their geographic distribution. Population structure was first inferred using 50 control nuclear markers. Then, 47 candidate gene SNPs identified in previous genome scans were tested for relationship with climatic factors using an F(ST) -based outlier method and regressions between allele frequencies and climatic variations. Two main intraspecific lineages related to glacial vicariance were detected at the transcontinental scale. Within-lineage analyses of allele frequencies allowed the identification of 23 candidate SNPs significantly related to precipitation and/or temperature variation, among which seven were common to both lineages, eight were specific to the eastern lineage and eight were specific to the western lineage. The implication of these candidate SNPs in adaptive processes was further supported by gene functional annotations. Multiple evidences indicated that the occurrence of lineage-specific adaptive SNPs was better explained by selection acting on historically differentiated gene pools rather than differential selection due to heterogeneity of interacting environmental factors and pleiotropic effects. Taken together, these findings suggest that standing genetic variation of potentially adaptive nature has been modified by historical events, hence affecting the outcome of recent selection and leading to different adaptive routes between intraspecific lineages.

  3. Rewiring mesenchymal stem cell lineage specification by switching the biophysical microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2014-06-01

    The propensity of stem cells to specify and commit to a particular lineage program is guided by dynamic biophysical and biochemical signals that are temporally regulated. However, most in vitro studies rely on ``snapshots'' of cell state under static conditions. Here we asked whether changing the biophysical aspects of the substrate could modulate the degree of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) lineage specification. We chose to explore two diverse differentiation outcomes: MSC osteogenesis and trans-differentiation to neuron-like cells. MSCs were cultured on soft (~0.5 kPa) or stiff (~40 kPa) hydrogels followed by transfer to gels of the opposite stiffness. MSCs on soft gels express elevated neurogenesis markers while MSCs on stiff substrates express elevated osteogenesis markers. Transfer of MSCs from soft to stiff or stiff to soft substrates led to a switch in lineage specification. However, MSCs transferred from stiff to soft substrates maintained elevated osteogenesis markers, suggesting a degree of irreversible activation. Transferring MSCs to micropatterned substrates reveal geometric cues that further modulate lineage reversal. Taken together, this study demonstrates that MSCs remain susceptible to the biophysical properties of the extracellular matrix--even after several weeks of culture--and can redirect lineage specification in response to changes in the microenvironment.

  4. Lineage-specific molecular probing reveals novel diversity and ecological partitioning of haplosporidians

    PubMed Central

    Hartikainen, Hanna; Ashford, Oliver S; Berney, Cédric; Okamura, Beth; Feist, Stephen W; Baker-Austin, Craig; Stentiford, Grant D; Bass, David

    2014-01-01

    Haplosporidians are rhizarian parasites of mostly marine invertebrates. They include the causative agents of diseases of commercially important molluscs, including MSX disease in oysters. Despite their importance for food security, their diversity and distributions are poorly known. We used a combination of group-specific PCR primers to probe environmental DNA samples from planktonic and benthic environments in Europe, South Africa and Panama. This revealed several highly distinct novel clades, novel lineages within known clades and seasonal (spring vs autumn) and habitat-related (brackish vs littoral) variation in assemblage composition. High frequencies of haplosporidian lineages in the water column provide the first evidence for life cycles involving planktonic hosts, host-free stages or both. The general absence of haplosporidian lineages from all large online sequence data sets emphasises the importance of lineage-specific approaches for studying these highly divergent and diverse lineages. Combined with host-based field surveys, environmental sampling for pathogens will enhance future detection of known and novel pathogens and the assessment of disease risk. PMID:23966100

  5. Early cell lineage specification in a marsupial: a case for diverse mechanisms among mammals.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, Stephen; Shaw, Geoff; Freyer, Claudia; Pask, Andrew J; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2013-03-01

    Early cell lineage specification in eutherian mammals results in the formation of a pluripotent inner cell mass (ICM) and trophoblast. By contrast, marsupials have no ICM. Here, we present the first molecular analysis of mechanisms of early cell lineage specification in a marsupial, the tammar wallaby. There was no overt differential localisation of key lineage-specific transcription factors in cleavage and early unilaminar blastocyst stages. Pluriblast cells (equivalent to the ICM) became distinguishable from trophoblast cells by differential expression of POU5F1 and, to a greater extent, POU2, a paralogue of POU5F1. Unlike in the mouse, pluriblast-trophoblast differentiation coincided with a global nuclear-to-cytoplasmic transition of CDX2 localisation. Also unlike in the mouse, Hippo pathway factors YAP and WWTR1 showed mutually distinct localisation patterns that suggest non-redundant roles. NANOG and GATA6 were conserved as markers of epiblast and hypoblast, respectively, but some differences to the mouse were found in their mode of differentiation. Our results suggest that there is considerable evolutionary plasticity in the mechanisms regulating early lineage specification in mammals.

  6. Spatial protein quality control and the evolution of lineage-specific ageing

    PubMed Central

    Nyström, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Propagation of a species requires periodic cell renewal to avoid clonal extinction. Sexual reproduction and the separation of germ cells from the soma provide a mechanism for such renewal, but are accompanied by an apparently mandatory ageing of the soma. Data obtained during the last decade suggest that a division of labour exists also between cells of vegetatively reproducing unicellular organisms, leading to the establishment of a soma-like and germ-like lineage with distinct fitness and longevity characteristics. This division of labour in both bacteria and yeast entails segregation of damaged and aggregated proteins such that the germ-like lineage is kept free of damage to the detriment of the soma-like lineage. In yeast, this spatial protein quality control (SQC) encompasses a CCT-chaperonin-dependent translocation and merging of cytotoxic protein aggregates. This process is regulated by Sir2, a protein deacetylase that modulates the rate of ageing in organisms ranging from yeast to worms and flies. Recent data also demonstrate that SQC is intimately integrated with the machinery establishing proper cell polarity and that this machinery is required for generating a soma-like and germ-like lineage in yeast. Deciphering the details of the SQC network may increase our understanding of the development of age-related protein folding disorders and shed light on the selective forces that paved the way for polarity and lineage-specific ageing to evolve. PMID:21115532

  7. Cell lineage-specific expression of modulo, a dose-dependent modifier of variegation in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Garzino, V; Pereira, A; Laurenti, P; Graba, Y; Levis, R W; Le Parco, Y; Pradel, J

    1992-01-01

    Variegation in Drosophila is a manifest illustration of the important role played by chromatin structure in gene expression. We have isolated mutants of modulo (mod) and shown that this gene is a dominant suppressor of variegation. Null mutants are recessive lethal with a melanotic tumour phenotype. The mod protein directly binds DNA, which indicates that it may serve to anchor multimeric complexes promoting chromatin compaction and silencing. Using a specific monoclonal antibody we examined by immunocytochemistry the accumulation pattern of mod protein during embryogenesis. The protein is first detected before the blastoderm cellularization in all somatic nuclei, precisely when pericentromeric heterochromatin becomes visible. After the first cell division, mod protein is expressed in lineages of specific embryonic primordia. Based on its dominant phenotype, expression pattern and DNA-binding activity of its product, we propose that mod regulates chromatin structure and activity in specific cell lineages. Images PMID:1425581

  8. Tcf7l1 prepares epiblast cells in the gastrulating mouse embryo for lineage specification

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Jackson A.; Wu, Chun-I; Merrill, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    The core gene regulatory network (GRN) in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) integrates activities of the pro-self-renewal factors Oct4 (Pou5f1), Sox2 and Nanog with that of an inhibitor of self-renewal, Tcf7l1 (Tcf3). The inhibitor function of Tcf7l1 causes dependence on extracellular Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity, making its embryonic role within the ESC GRN unclear. By analyzing intact mouse embryos, we demonstrate that the function of Tcf7l1 is necessary for specification of cell lineages to occur concomitantly with the elaboration of a three-dimensional body plan during gastrulation. In Tcf7l1-/- embryos, specification of mesoderm is delayed, effectively uncoupling it from the induction of the primitive streak. Tcf7l1 repressor activity is necessary for a rapid switch in the response of pluripotent cells to Wnt/β-catenin stimulation, from one of self-renewal to a mesoderm specification response. These results identify Tcf7l1 as a unique factor that is necessary in pluripotent cells to prepare them for lineage specification. We suggest that the role of Tcf7l1 in mammals is to inhibit the GRN to ensure the coordination of lineage specification with the dynamic cellular events occurring during gastrulation. PMID:23487311

  9. Evolution of the globin gene family in deuterostomes: lineage-specific patterns of diversification and attrition.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Federico G; Opazo, Juan C; Hoogewijs, David; Hankeln, Thomas; Ebner, Bettina; Vinogradov, Serge N; Bailly, Xavier; Storz, Jay F

    2012-07-01

    In the Metazoa, globin proteins display an underlying unity in tertiary structure that belies an extraordinary diversity in primary structures, biochemical properties, and physiological functions. Phylogenetic reconstructions can reveal which of these functions represent novel, lineage-specific innovations, and which represent ancestral functions that are shared with homologous globin proteins in other eukaryotes and even prokaryotes. To date, our understanding of globin diversity in deuterostomes has been hindered by a dearth of genomic sequence data from the Ambulacraria (echinoderms + hemichordates), the sister group of chordates, and the phylum Xenacoelomorpha, which includes xenoturbellids, acoelomorphs, and nemertodermatids. Here, we report the results of a phylogenetic and comparative genomic analysis of the globin gene repertoire of deuterostomes. We first characterized the globin genes of the acorn worm, Saccoglossus kowalevskii, a representative of the phylum Hemichordata. We then integrated genomic sequence data from the acorn worm into a comprehensive analysis of conserved synteny and phylogenetic relationships among globin genes from representatives of the eight lineages that comprise the superphylum Deuterostomia. The primary aims were 1) to unravel the evolutionary history of the globin gene superfamily in deuterostomes and 2) to use the estimated phylogeny to gain insights into the functional evolution of deuterostome globins. Results of our analyses indicate that the deuterostome common ancestor possessed a repertoire of at least four distinct globin paralogs and that different subsets of these ancestral genes have been retained in each of the descendant organismal lineages. In each major deuterostome group, a different subset of ancestral precursor genes underwent lineage-specific expansions of functional diversity through repeated rounds of gene duplication and divergence. By integrating results of the phylogenetic analysis with available

  10. Lineage specification of Flk-1+ progenitors is associated with divergent Sox7 expression in cardiopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Timothy J; Chiriac, Anca; Faustino, Randolph S; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J; Behfar, Atta; Terzic, Andre

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Embryonic stem cell differentiation recapitulates the diverse phenotypes of a developing embryo, traceable according to markers of lineage specification. At gastrulation, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, Flk-1 (KDR), identifies a mesoderm-restricted potential of embryonic stem cells. The multi-lineage propensity of Flk-1+ progenitors mandates the mapping of fate-modifying co-factors in order to stratify differentiating cytotypes and predict lineage competency. Here, Flk-1 based selection of early embryonic stem cell progeny separated a population depleted of pluripotent (Oct4, Sox2) and endoderm (Sox17) markers. The gene expression profile of the Flk-1+ population was notable for a significant upregulation in the vasculogenic Sox7 transcription factor, which overlapped with the emergence of primordial cardiac transcription factors GATA-4, Myocardin and Nkx2.5. Sorting the parental Flk-1+ pool with the chemokine receptor CXCR4 to enrich the cardiopoietic subpopulation uncovered divergent Sox7 expression, with a 7-fold induction in non-cardiac compared to cardiac progenitors. Bioinformatic resolution sequestered a framework gene expression relationships between Sox transcription factor family members and the Flk-1/CXCR4 axes with significant integration of β-catenin signaling. Thus, differential Sox7 gene expression presents a novel biomarker profile, and possible regulatory switch, to distinguish cardiovascular pedigrees within Flk-1+ multi-lineage progenitors. PMID:19272523

  11. Evolutionary impact of transposable elements on genomic diversity and lineage-specific innovation in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ian A; Naville, Magali; Chalopin, Domitille; Levin, Perrine; Berger, Chloé Suzanne; Galiana, Delphine; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Since their discovery, a growing body of evidence has emerged demonstrating that transposable elements are important drivers of species diversity. These mobile elements exhibit a great variety in structure, size and mechanisms of transposition, making them important putative actors in organism evolution. The vertebrates represent a highly diverse and successful lineage that has adapted to a wide range of different environments. These animals also possess a rich repertoire of transposable elements, with highly diverse content between lineages and even between species. Here, we review how transposable elements are driving genomic diversity and lineage-specific innovation within vertebrates. We discuss the large differences in TE content between different vertebrate groups and then go on to look at how they affect organisms at a variety of levels: from the structure of chromosomes to their involvement in the regulation of gene expression, as well as in the formation and evolution of non-coding RNAs and protein-coding genes. In the process of doing this, we highlight how transposable elements have been involved in the evolution of some of the key innovations observed within the vertebrate lineage, driving the group's diversity and success.

  12. Lineage-Specific Gene Duplication and Loss in Human and Great Ape Evolution

    PubMed Central

    MacLaren, Erik; Marshall, Kriste; Hahn, Gretchen; Meltesen, Lynne; Brenton, Matthew; Hink, Raquel; Burgers, Sonya; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Glueck, Deborah; McGavran, Loris; Berry, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Given that gene duplication is a major driving force of evolutionary change and the key mechanism underlying the emergence of new genes and biological processes, this study sought to use a novel genome-wide approach to identify genes that have undergone lineage-specific duplications or contractions among several hominoid lineages. Interspecies cDNA array-based comparative genomic hybridization was used to individually compare copy number variation for 39,711 cDNAs, representing 29,619 human genes, across five hominoid species, including human. We identified 1,005 genes, either as isolated genes or in clusters positionally biased toward rearrangement-prone genomic regions, that produced relative hybridization signals unique to one or more of the hominoid lineages. Measured as a function of the evolutionary age of each lineage, genes showing copy number expansions were most pronounced in human (134) and include a number of genes thought to be involved in the structure and function of the brain. This work represents, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide gene-based survey of gene duplication across hominoid species. The genes identified here likely represent a significant majority of the major gene copy number changes that have occurred over the past 15 million years of human and great ape evolution and are likely to underlie some of the key phenotypic characteristics that distinguish these species. PMID:15252450

  13. Curiosity Poised to Begin Ambitious Exploration

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity is poised to liftoff on an Atlas V rocket bound for the red planet on an exploration mission unprecedented in goals and machinery. The wheeled robot is carryin...

  14. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Identified stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type gastric cancer. •In silico pathway scanning identified estrogen-α signaling is a putative regulator of SLSGS in gastric cancer. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. -- Abstract: Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  15. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya; Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  16. Evolutionary origins of the vertebrate heart: Specification of the cardiac lineage in Ciona intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Brad; Levine, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Here we exploit the extensive cell lineage information and streamlined genome of the ascidian, Ciona intestinalis, to investigate heart development in a basal chordate. Several cardiac genes were analyzed, including the sole Ciona ortholog of the Drosophila tinman gene, and tissue-specific enhancers were isolated for some of the genes. Conserved sequence motifs within these enhancers facilitated the isolation of a heart enhancer for the Ciona Hand-like gene. Altogether, these studies provide a regulatory framework for the differentiation of the cardiac mesoderm, beginning at the 110-cell stage, and extending through the fusion of cardiac progenitors during tail elongation. The cardiac lineage shares a common origin with the germ line, and zygotic transcription is first detected in the heart progenitors only after its separation from the germ line at the 64-cell stage. We propose that germ-line determinants influence the specification of the cardiac mesoderm, both by inhibiting inductive signals required for the development of noncardiac mesoderm lineages, and by providing a localized source of Wnt-5 and other signals required for heart development. We discuss the possibility that the germ line also influences the specification of the vertebrate heart. PMID:14500781

  17. Lineage-specific gene radiations underlie the evolution of novel betalain pigmentation in Caryophyllales

    PubMed Central

    Brockington, Samuel F; Yang, Ya; Gandia-Herrero, Fernando; Covshoff, Sarah; Hibberd, Julian M; Sage, Rowan F; Wong, Gane K S; Moore, Michael J; Smith, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Betalain pigments are unique to the Caryophyllales and structurally and biosynthetically distinct from anthocyanins. Two key enzymes within the betalain synthesis pathway have been identified: 4,5-dioxygenase (DODA) that catalyzes the formation of betalamic acid and CYP76AD1, a cytochrome P450 gene that catalyzes the formation of cyclo-DOPA. We performed phylogenetic analyses to reveal the evolutionary history of the DODA and CYP76AD1 lineages and in the context of an ancestral reconstruction of pigment states we explored the evolution of these genes in relation to the complex evolution of pigments in Caryophylalles. Duplications within the CYP76AD1 and DODA lineages arose just before the origin of betalain pigmentation in the core Caryophyllales. The duplications gave rise to DODA-α and CYP76AD1-α isoforms that appear specific to betalain synthesis. Both betalain-specific isoforms were then lost or downregulated in the anthocyanic Molluginaceae and Caryophyllaceae. Our findings suggest a single origin of the betalain synthesis pathway, with neofunctionalization following gene duplications in the CYP76AD1 and DODA lineages. Loss of DODA-α and CYP76AD1-α in anthocyanic taxa suggests that betalain pigmentation has been lost twice in Caryophyllales, and exclusion of betalain pigments from anthocyanic taxa is mediated through gene loss or downregulation. [Correction added after online publication 13 May 2015: in the last two paragraphs of the Summary the gene name CYP761A was changed to CYP76AD1.] PMID:25966996

  18. Pharmacogenomic identification of small molecules for lineage specific manipulation of subventricular zone germinal activity

    PubMed Central

    Marcy, Guillaume; Pieropan, Francesca; Rivera, Andrea; Donega, Vanessa; Cantù, Claudio; Williams, Gareth; Berninger, Benedikt; Butt, Arthur M.; Raineteau, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Strategies for promoting neural regeneration are hindered by the difficulty of manipulating desired neural fates in the brain without complex genetic methods. The subventricular zone (SVZ) is the largest germinal zone of the forebrain and is responsible for the lifelong generation of interneuron subtypes and oligodendrocytes. Here, we have performed a bioinformatics analysis of the transcriptome of dorsal and lateral SVZ in early postnatal mice, including neural stem cells (NSCs) and their immediate progenies, which generate distinct neural lineages. We identified multiple signaling pathways that trigger distinct downstream transcriptional networks to regulate the diversity of neural cells originating from the SVZ. Next, we used a novel in silico genomic analysis, searchable platform-independent expression database/connectivity map (SPIED/CMAP), to generate a catalogue of small molecules that can be used to manipulate SVZ microdomain-specific lineages. Finally, we demonstrate that compounds identified in this analysis promote the generation of specific cell lineages from NSCs in vivo, during postnatal life and adulthood, as well as in regenerative contexts. This study unravels new strategies for using small bioactive molecules to direct germinal activity in the SVZ, which has therapeutic potential in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28350803

  19. Lineage-specific gene radiations underlie the evolution of novel betalain pigmentation in Caryophyllales.

    PubMed

    Brockington, Samuel F; Yang, Ya; Gandia-Herrero, Fernando; Covshoff, Sarah; Hibberd, Julian M; Sage, Rowan F; Wong, Gane K S; Moore, Michael J; Smith, Stephen A

    2015-09-01

    Betalain pigments are unique to the Caryophyllales and structurally and biosynthetically distinct from anthocyanins. Two key enzymes within the betalain synthesis pathway have been identified: 4,5-dioxygenase (DODA) that catalyzes the formation of betalamic acid and CYP76AD1, a cytochrome P450 gene that catalyzes the formation of cyclo-DOPA. We performed phylogenetic analyses to reveal the evolutionary history of the DODA and CYP76AD1 lineages and in the context of an ancestral reconstruction of pigment states we explored the evolution of these genes in relation to the complex evolution of pigments in Caryophylalles. Duplications within the CYP76AD1 and DODA lineages arose just before the origin of betalain pigmentation in the core Caryophyllales. The duplications gave rise to DODA-α and CYP76AD1-α isoforms that appear specific to betalain synthesis. Both betalain-specific isoforms were then lost or downregulated in the anthocyanic Molluginaceae and Caryophyllaceae. Our findings suggest a single origin of the betalain synthesis pathway, with neofunctionalization following gene duplications in the CYP76AD1 and DODA lineages. Loss of DODA-α and CYP76AD1-α in anthocyanic taxa suggests that betalain pigmentation has been lost twice in Caryophyllales, and exclusion of betalain pigments from anthocyanic taxa is mediated through gene loss or downregulation. [Correction added after online publication 13 May 2015: in the last two paragraphs of the Summary the gene name CYP761A was changed to CYP76AD1.].

  20. Chromatin Dynamics Regulate Mesenchymal Stem Cell Lineage Specification and Differentiation to Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hai; Gordon, Jonathan A.R.; Whitfield, Troy W.; Tai, Phillip W.L.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2017-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are critical for regeneration of multiple tissues. Epigenetic mechanisms are fundamental regulators of lineage specification and cell fate, and as such, we addressed the question of which epigenetic modifications characterize the transition of nascent MSCs to a tissue specific MSC-derived phenotype. By profiling the temporal changes of seven histone marks correlated to gene expression during proliferation, early commitment, matrix deposition, and mineralization stages, we identified distinct epigenetic mechanisms that regulate transcriptional programs necessary for tissue-specific phenotype development. Patterns of stage-specific enrichment of histone modifications revealed distinct modes of repression and activation of gene expression that would not be detected using single endpoint analysis. We discovered that at commitment, H3K27me3 is removed from genes that are upregulated and is not acquired on downregulated genes. Additionally, we found that the absence of H3K4me3 modification at promoters defined a subset of osteoblast-specific upregulated genes, indicating acquisition of acetyl modifications drive activation of these genes. Significantly, loss or gain of H3K36me3 was the primary predictor of dynamic changes in temporal gene expression. Using unsupervised pattern discovery analysis the signature of osteogenic-related histone modifications identified novel functional cis regulatory modules associated with enhancer regions that control tissue-specific genes. Our work provides a cornerstone to understand the epigenetic regulation of transcriptional programs that are important for MSC lineage commitment and lineage, as well as insights to facilitate MSC-based therapeutic interventions. PMID:28077316

  1. Conformational Adaptation of Asian Macaque TRIMCyp Directs Lineage Specific Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Hué, Stéphane; Rose, Nicola J.; Marzetta, Flavia; James, Leo C.; Towers, Greg J.

    2010-01-01

    TRIMCyps are anti-retroviral proteins that have arisen independently in New World and Old World primates. All TRIMCyps comprise a CypA domain fused to the tripartite domains of TRIM5α but they have distinct lentiviral specificities, conferring HIV-1 restriction in New World owl monkeys and HIV-2 restriction in Old World rhesus macaques. Here we provide evidence that Asian macaque TRIMCyps have acquired changes that switch restriction specificity between different lentiviral lineages, resulting in species-specific alleles that target different viruses. Structural, thermodynamic and viral restriction analysis suggests that a single mutation in the Cyp domain, R69H, occurred early in macaque TRIMCyp evolution, expanding restriction specificity to the lentiviral lineages found in African green monkeys, sooty mangabeys and chimpanzees. Subsequent mutations have enhanced restriction to particular viruses but at the cost of broad specificity. We reveal how specificity is altered by a scaffold mutation, E143K, that modifies surface electrostatics and propagates conformational changes into the active site. Our results suggest that lentiviruses may have been important pathogens in Asian macaques despite the fact that there are no reported lentiviral infections in current macaque populations. PMID:20808866

  2. Lineage-Specific and Non-specific Cytokine-Sensing Genes Respond Differentially to the Master Regulator STAT5.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xianke; Willi, Michaela; Shin, Ha Youn; Hennighausen, Lothar; Wang, Chaochen

    2016-12-20

    STAT5, a member of the family of signal transducers and activators of transcription, senses cytokines and controls the biology of cell lineages, including mammary, liver, and T cells. Here, we show that STAT5 activates lineage-specific and widely expressed genes through different mechanisms. STAT5 preferentially binds to promoter sequences of cytokine-responsive genes expressed across cell types and to putative enhancers of lineage-specific genes. While chromatin accessibility of STAT5-based enhancers was dependent on cytokine exposure, STAT5-responsive promoters of widely expressed target genes were generally constitutively accessible. While the contribution of STAT5 to enhancers is well established, its role on promoters is poorly understood. To address this, we focused on Socs2, a widely expressed cytokine-sensing gene. Upon deletion of the STAT5 response elements from the Socs2 promoter in mice, cytokine induction was abrogated, while basal activity remained intact. Our data suggest that promoter-bound STAT5 modulates cytokine responses and enhancer-bound STAT5 is mandatory for gene activation.

  3. Genome-wide identification of lineage-specific genes within Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kun; Huang, Beibei; Zou, Ming; Lu, Dandan; He, Shunping; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-10-01

    With the rapid growth of sequencing technology, a number of genomes and transcriptomes of various species have been sequenced, contributing to the study of lineage-specific genes (LSGs). We identified two sets of LSGs using BLAST: one included Caenorhabditis elegans species-specific genes (1423, SSGs), and the other consisted of Caenorhabditis genus-specific genes (4539, GSGs). The subsequent characterization and analysis of the SSGs and GSGs showed that they have significant differences in evolution and that most LSGs were generated by gene duplication and integration of transposable elements (TEs). We then performed temporal expression profiling and protein function prediction and observed that many SSGs and GSGs are expressed and that genes involved with sex determination, specific stress, immune response, and morphogenesis are over-represented, suggesting that these specific genes may be related to the Caenorhabditis nematodes' special ability to survive in severe and extreme environments.

  4. Characterisation of monotreme caseins reveals lineage-specific expansion of an ancestral casein locus in mammals.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Christophe M; Sharp, Julie A; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2009-01-01

    Using a milk-cell cDNA sequencing approach we characterised milk-protein sequences from two monotreme species, platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and found a full set of caseins and casein variants. The genomic organisation of the platypus casein locus is compared with other mammalian genomes, including the marsupial opossum and several eutherians. Physical linkage of casein genes has been seen in the casein loci of all mammalian genomes examined and we confirm that this is also observed in platypus. However, we show that a recent duplication of beta-casein occurred in the monotreme lineage, as opposed to more ancient duplications of alpha-casein in the eutherian lineage, while marsupials possess only single copies of alpha- and beta-caseins. Despite this variability, the close proximity of the main alpha- and beta-casein genes in an inverted tail-tail orientation and the relative orientation of the more distant kappa-casein genes are similar in all mammalian genome sequences so far available. Overall, the conservation of the genomic organisation of the caseins indicates the early, pre-monotreme development of the fundamental role of caseins during lactation. In contrast, the lineage-specific gene duplications that have occurred within the casein locus of monotremes and eutherians but not marsupials, which may have lost part of the ancestral casein locus, emphasises the independent selection on milk provision strategies to the young, most likely linked to different developmental strategies. The monotremes therefore provide insight into the ancestral drivers for lactation and how these have adapted in different lineages.

  5. Lineage-specific regulation of epigenetic modifier genes in human liver and brain.

    PubMed

    Weng, Matthias K; Natarajan, Karthick; Scholz, Diana; Ivanova, Violeta N; Sachinidis, Agapios; Hengstler, Jan G; Waldmann, Tanja; Leist, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Despite an abundance of studies on chromatin states and dynamics, there is an astonishing dearth of information on the expression of genes responsible for regulating histone and DNA modifications. We used here a set of 156 defined epigenetic modifier genes (EMG) and profiled their expression pattern in cells of different lineages. As reference value, expression data from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) were used. Hepatocyte-like cells were generated from hESC, and their EMG expression was compared to primary human liver cells. In parallel, we generated postmitotic human neurons (Lu d6), and compared their relative EMG expression to human cortex (Ctx). Clustering analysis of all cell types showed that neuronal lineage samples grouped together (94 similarly regulated EMG), as did liver cells (61 similarly-regulated), while the two lineages were clearly distinct. The general classification was followed by detailed comparison of the major EMG groups; genes that were higher expressed in differentiated cells than in hESC included the acetyltransferase KAT2B and the methyltransferase SETD7. Neuro-specific EMGs were the histone deacetylases HDAC5 and HDAC7, and the arginine-methyltransferase PRMT8. Comparison of young (Lu d6) and more aged (Ctx) neuronal samples suggested a maturation-dependent switch in the expression of functionally homologous proteins. For instance, the ratio of the histone H3 K27 methyltransfereases, EZH1 to EZH2, was high in Ctx and low in Lu d6. The same was observed for the polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) subunits CBX7 and CBX8. A large proportion of EMGs in differentiated cells was very differently expressed than in hESC, and absolute levels were significantly higher in neuronal samples than in hepatic cells. Thus, there seem to be distinct qualitative and quantitative differences in EMG expression between cell lineages.

  6. The Lineage-Specific Transcription Factor PU.1 Prevents Polycomb-Mediated Heterochromatin Formation at Macrophage-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tagore, Mohita; McAndrew, Michael J.; Gjidoda, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Lineage-specific transcription factors (TFs) are important determinants of cellular identity, but their exact mode of action has remained unclear. Here we show using a macrophage differentiation system that the lineage-specific TF PU.1 keeps macrophage-specific genes accessible during differentiation by preventing Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) binding to transcriptional regulatory elements. We demonstrate that the distal enhancer of a gene becomes bound by PRC2 as cells differentiate in the absence of PU.1 binding and that the gene is wrapped into heterochromatin, which is characterized by increased nucleosome occupancy and H3K27 trimethylation. This renders the gene inaccessible to the transcriptional machinery and prevents induction of the gene in response to an external signal in mature cells. In contrast, if PU.1 is bound at the transcriptional regulatory region of a gene during differentiation, PRC2 is not recruited, nucleosome occupancy is kept low, and the gene can be induced in mature macrophages. Similar results were obtained at the enhancers of other macrophage-specific genes that fail to bind PU.1 as an estrogen receptor fusion (PUER) in this system. These results show that one role of PU.1 is to exclude PRC2 and to prevent heterochromatin formation at macrophage-specific genes. PMID:26012552

  7. Lineage-Specific Evolutionary Histories and Regulation of Major Starch Metabolism Genes during Banana Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Jourda, Cyril; Cardi, Céline; Gibert, Olivier; Giraldo Toro, Andrès; Ricci, Julien; Mbéguié-A-Mbéguié, Didier; Yahiaoui, Nabila

    2016-01-01

    Starch is the most widespread and abundant storage carbohydrate in plants. It is also a major feature of cultivated bananas as it accumulates to large amounts during banana fruit development before almost complete conversion to soluble sugars during ripening. Little is known about the structure of major gene families involved in banana starch metabolism and their evolution compared to other species. To identify genes involved in banana starch metabolism and investigate their evolutionary history, we analyzed six gene families playing a crucial role in plant starch biosynthesis and degradation: the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases (AGPases), starch synthases (SS), starch branching enzymes (SBE), debranching enzymes (DBE), α-amylases (AMY) and β-amylases (BAM). Using comparative genomics and phylogenetic approaches, these genes were classified into families and sub-families and orthology relationships with functional genes in Eudicots and in grasses were identified. In addition to known ancestral duplications shaping starch metabolism gene families, independent evolution in banana and grasses also occurred through lineage-specific whole genome duplications for specific sub-families of AGPase, SS, SBE, and BAM genes; and through gene-scale duplications for AMY genes. In particular, banana lineage duplications yielded a set of AGPase, SBE and BAM genes that were highly or specifically expressed in banana fruits. Gene expression analysis highlighted a complex transcriptional reprogramming of starch metabolism genes during ripening of banana fruits. A differential regulation of expression between banana gene duplicates was identified for SBE and BAM genes, suggesting that part of starch metabolism regulation in the fruit evolved in the banana lineage. PMID:27994606

  8. Lineage-Specific Changes in Biomarkers in Great Apes and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ronke, Claudius; Dannemann, Michael; Halbwax, Michel; Fischer, Anne; Helmschrodt, Christin; Brügel, Mathias; André, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Mugisha, Lawrence; Scholz, Markus; Ceglarek, Uta; Thiery, Joachim; Pääbo, Svante; Prüfer, Kay; Kelso, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Although human biomedical and physiological information is readily available, such information for great apes is limited. We analyzed clinical chemical biomarkers in serum samples from 277 wild- and captive-born great apes and from 312 healthy human volunteers as well as from 20 rhesus macaques. For each individual, we determined a maximum of 33 markers of heart, liver, kidney, thyroid and pancreas function, hemoglobin and lipid metabolism and one marker of inflammation. We identified biomarkers that show differences between humans and the great apes in their average level or activity. Using the rhesus macaques as an outgroup, we identified human-specific differences in the levels of bilirubin, cholinesterase and lactate dehydrogenase, and bonobo-specific differences in the level of apolipoprotein A-I. For the remaining twenty-nine biomarkers there was no evidence for lineage-specific differences. In fact, we find that many biomarkers show differences between individuals of the same species in different environments. Of the four lineage-specific biomarkers, only bilirubin showed no differences between wild- and captive-born great apes. We show that the major factor explaining the human-specific difference in bilirubin levels may be genetic. There are human-specific changes in the sequence of the promoter and the protein-coding sequence of uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase 1 (UGT1A1), the enzyme that transforms bilirubin and toxic plant compounds into water-soluble, excretable metabolites. Experimental evidence that UGT1A1 is down-regulated in the human liver suggests that changes in the promoter may be responsible for the human-specific increase in bilirubin. We speculate that since cooking reduces toxic plant compounds, consumption of cooked foods, which is specific to humans, may have resulted in relaxed constraint on UGT1A1 which has in turn led to higher serum levels of bilirubin in humans. PMID:26247603

  9. Lineage-Specific Changes in Biomarkers in Great Apes and Humans.

    PubMed

    Ronke, Claudius; Dannemann, Michael; Halbwax, Michel; Fischer, Anne; Helmschrodt, Christin; Brügel, Mathias; André, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Mugisha, Lawrence; Scholz, Markus; Ceglarek, Uta; Thiery, Joachim; Pääbo, Svante; Prüfer, Kay; Kelso, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Although human biomedical and physiological information is readily available, such information for great apes is limited. We analyzed clinical chemical biomarkers in serum samples from 277 wild- and captive-born great apes and from 312 healthy human volunteers as well as from 20 rhesus macaques. For each individual, we determined a maximum of 33 markers of heart, liver, kidney, thyroid and pancreas function, hemoglobin and lipid metabolism and one marker of inflammation. We identified biomarkers that show differences between humans and the great apes in their average level or activity. Using the rhesus macaques as an outgroup, we identified human-specific differences in the levels of bilirubin, cholinesterase and lactate dehydrogenase, and bonobo-specific differences in the level of apolipoprotein A-I. For the remaining twenty-nine biomarkers there was no evidence for lineage-specific differences. In fact, we find that many biomarkers show differences between individuals of the same species in different environments. Of the four lineage-specific biomarkers, only bilirubin showed no differences between wild- and captive-born great apes. We show that the major factor explaining the human-specific difference in bilirubin levels may be genetic. There are human-specific changes in the sequence of the promoter and the protein-coding sequence of uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase 1 (UGT1A1), the enzyme that transforms bilirubin and toxic plant compounds into water-soluble, excretable metabolites. Experimental evidence that UGT1A1 is down-regulated in the human liver suggests that changes in the promoter may be responsible for the human-specific increase in bilirubin. We speculate that since cooking reduces toxic plant compounds, consumption of cooked foods, which is specific to humans, may have resulted in relaxed constraint on UGT1A1 which has in turn led to higher serum levels of bilirubin in humans.

  10. Lineage-specific enhancers activate self-renewal genes in macrophages and embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Soucie, Erinn L.; Weng, Ziming; Geirsdóttir, Laufey; Molawi, Kaaweh; Maurizio, Julien; Fenouil, Romain; Mossadegh-Keller, Noushine; Gimenez, Gregory; VanHille, Laurent; Beniazza, Meryam; Favret, Jeremy; Berruyer, Carole; Perrin, Pierre; Hacohen, Nir; Andrau, J.-C.; Ferrier, Pierre; Dubreuil, Patrice; Sidow, Arend; Sieweke, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated macrophages can self-renew in tissues and expand long-term in culture, but the gene regulatory mechanisms that accomplish self-renewal in the differentiated state have remained unknown. Here we show that in mice, the transcription factors MafB and c-Maf repress a macrophage-specific enhancer repertoire associated with a gene network controlling self-renewal. Single cell analysis revealed that, in vivo, proliferating resident macrophages can access this network by transient down-regulation of Maf transcription factors. The network also controls embryonic stem cell self-renewal but is associated with distinct embryonic stem cell-specific enhancers. This indicates that distinct lineage-specific enhancer platforms regulate a shared network of genes that control self-renewal potential in both stem and mature cells. PMID:26797145

  11. An LTR Retrotransposon-Derived Gene Displays Lineage-Specific Structural and Putative Species-Specific Functional Variations in Eutherians

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Masahito; Koga, Akihiko; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amongst the 11 eutherian-specific genes acquired from a sushi-ichi retrotransposon is the CCHC type zinc-finger protein-encoding gene SIRH11/ZCCHC16. Its contribution to eutherian brain evolution is implied because of its involvement in cognitive function in mice, possibly via the noradrenergic system. Although, the possibility that Sirh11/Zcchc16 functions as a non-coding RNA still remains, dN/dS ratios in pairwise comparisons between its orthologs have provided supportive evidence that it acts as a protein. It became a pseudogene in armadillos (Cingulata) and sloths (Pilosa), the only two extant orders of xenarthra, which prompted us to examine the lineage-specific variations of SIRH11/ZCCHC16 in eutherians. We examined the predicted SIRH11/ZCCHC16 open reading frame (ORF) in 95 eutherian species based on the genomic DNA information in GenBank. A large variation in the SIRH11/ZCCHC16 ORF was detected in several lineages. These include a lack of a CCHC RNA-binding domain in its C-terminus, observed in gibbons (Hylobatidae: Primates) and megabats (Megachiroptera: Chiroptera). A lack of the N-terminal half, on the other hand, was observed in New World monkeys (Platyrrhini: Primates) and species belonging to New World and African Hystricognaths (Caviomorpha and Bathyergidae: Rodents) along with Cetacea and Ruminantia (Cetartiodactyla). Among the hominoids, interestingly, three out of four genera of gibbons have lost normal SIRH11/ZCCHC16 function by deletion or the lack of the CCHC RNA-binding domain. Our extensive dN/dS analysis suggests that such truncated SIRH11/ZCCHC16 ORFs are functionally diversified even within lineages. Combined, our results show that SIRH11/ZCCHC16 may contribute to the diversification of eutherians by lineage-specific structural changes after its domestication in the common eutherian ancestor, followed by putative species-specific functional changes that enhanced fitness and occurred as a consequence of complex natural selection events

  12. FOXA1 potentiates lineage-specific enhancer activation through modulating TET1 expression and function

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yeqing A.; Zhao, Jonathan C.; Fong, Ka-wing; Kim, Jung; Li, Shangze; Song, Chunxiao; Song, Bing; Zheng, Bin; He, Chuan; Yu, Jindan

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box A1 (FOXA1) is an FKHD family protein that plays pioneering roles in lineage-specific enhancer activation and gene transcription. Through genome-wide location analyses, here we show that FOXA1 expression and occupancy are, in turn, required for the maintenance of these epigenetic signatures, namely DNA hypomethylation and histone 3 lysine 4 methylation. Mechanistically, this involves TET1, a 5-methylcytosine dioxygenase. We found that FOXA1 induces TET1 expression via direct binding to its cis-regulatory elements. Further, FOXA1 physically interacts with the TET1 protein through its CXXC domain. TET1 thus co-occupies FOXA1-dependent enhancers and mediates local DNA demethylation and concomitant histone 3 lysine 4 methylation, further potentiating FOXA1 recruitment. Consequently, FOXA1 binding events are markedly reduced following TET1 depletion. Together, our results suggest that FOXA1 is not only able to recognize but also remodel the epigenetic signatures at lineage-specific enhancers, which is mediated, at least in part, by a feed-forward regulatory loop between FOXA1 and TET1. PMID:27257062

  13. Two different lineages of bedbug (Cimex lectularius) reflected in host specificity.

    PubMed

    Wawrocka, Kamila; Bartonička, Tomáš

    2013-11-01

    Co-speciation between host-parasite species is generally thought to result in mirror-image congruent phylogenies. For the last several centuries, many bat species have been turning synanthropic, especially those that are hosted by bedbugs in Europe. There is evidence of only limited gene flow from the population of people to the population of bats. This study was focused on comparison of survival, development, and the reproduction rate based on cross-feeding experiments. In our research, we used two bedbugs groups of Cimex lectularius-bat- and human-associated and respectively as specific/non-specific host bat and commercial human blood. Both lineages show different behavior according to their host preferences. During the bat blood experiment, we found significant differences between both human- and bat-associated bedbugs (Log rank test fourth χ(2) = 9.93, p > 0.05; fifth χ(2) = 11.33, p < 0.05), while no differences occurred with the human blood experiment between the survival levels. In molting, differences between both groups were significant particularly in the case of the bat blood experiment (fourth χ(2)  = 5.91, p < 0.05). In the case of the bat blood experiment, we found a higher probability of molting in bat-associated groups than in human-associated groups. In the case of the human blood experiment, molting probability was stable in both specific and non-specific, showing similar pattern in both cases for all stages. Our results indicate an occurrence of two ecotypes within the one species C. lectularius. These findings support earlier data about morphological and mitochondrial DNA differences. The differentiation of both lineages fits the concept of specific host choice.

  14. Genome-wide identification of lineage-specific genes in Arabidopsis, Oryza and Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaohan; Jawdy, Sara; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2009-01-01

    Protein sequences were compared among Arabidopsis, Oryza and Populus to identify differential gene (DG) sets that are in one but not the other two genomes. The DG sets were screened against a plant transcript database, the NR protein database and six newly-sequenced genomes (Carica, Glycine, Medicago, Sorghum, Vitis and Zea) to identify a set of species-specific genes (SS). Gene expression, protein motif and intron number were examined. 192, 641 and 109 SS genes were identified in Arabidopsis, Oryza and Populus, respectively. Some SS genes were preferentially expressed in flowers, roots, xylem and cambium or up-regulated by stress. Six conserved motifs in Arabidopsis and Oryza SS proteins were found in other distant lineages. The SS gene sets were enriched with intronless genes. The results reflect functional and/or anatomical differences between monocots and eudicots or between herbaceous and woody plants. The Populus-specific genes are candidates for carbon sequestration and biofuel research.

  15. Stage-specific differentiation of iPSCs toward retinal ganglion cell lineage

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fei; Chen, Mengfei; Liu, Ying; Hu, Huiling; Xiong, Yunfan; Xu, Chaochao; Liu, Yuchun; Li, Kangjun; Zhuang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose As an alternative and desirable approach for regenerative medicine, human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technology raises the possibility of developing patient-tailored cell therapies to treat intractable degenerative diseases in the future. This study was undertaken to guide human Tenon’s capsule fibroblasts-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs) to differentiate along the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) lineage, aiming at producing appropriate cellular material for RGC regeneration. Methods By mimicking RGC genesis, we deliberately administered the whole differentiation process and directed the stage-specific differentiation of human TiPSCs toward an RGC fate via manipulation of the retinal inducers (DKK1+Noggin+Lefty A) alongside master gene (Atoh7) sequentially. Throughout this stepwise differentiation process, changes in primitive neuroectodermal, eye field, and RGC marker expression were monitored with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), immunocytochemistry, and/or flow cytometry. Results Upon retinal differentiation, a large fraction of the cells developed characteristics of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) in response to simulated environment signaling (DKK1+Noggin+Lefty A), which was selectively recovered with manual isolation approaches and then maintained in the presence of mitogen for multiple passages. Thereafter, overexpression of ATOH7 further promoted RGC specification in TiPSC-derived RPCs. A subset of transfected cells displayed RGC-specific expression patterns, including Brn3b, iSlet1, calretinin, and Tuj, and approximately 23% of Brn3b-positive RGC-like cells were obtained finally. Conclusions Our DKK1+Noggin+Lefty A/Atoh7-based RGC-induction regime could efficiently direct TiPSCs to differentiate along RGC lineage in a stage-specific manner, which may provide a benefit to develop possible cell therapies to treat retinal degenerative diseases such as glaucoma. PMID:27293372

  16. Alu-Derived Alternative Splicing Events Specific to Macaca Lineages in CTSF Gene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ja-Rang; Park, Sang-Je; Kim, Young-Hyun; Choe, Se-Hee; Cho, Hyeon-Mu; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Ji-Su; Sim, Bo-Woong; Song, Bong-Seok; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Lee, Youngjeon; Jin, Yeung Bae; Kang, Philyong; Huh, Jae-Won; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Cathepsin F, which is encoded by CTSF, is a cysteine proteinase ubiquitously expressed in several tissues. In a previous study, novel transcripts of the CTSF gene were identified in the crab-eating monkey deriving from the integration of an Alu element–AluYRa1. The occurrence of AluYRa1-derived alternative transcripts and the mechanism of exonization events in the CTSF gene of human, rhesus monkey, and crab-eating monkey were investigated using PCR and reverse transcription PCR on the genomic DNA and cDNA isolated from several tissues. Results demonstrated that AluYRa1 was only integrated into the genome of Macaca species and this lineage-specific integration led to exonization events by producing a conserved 3′ splice site. Six transcript variants (V1–V6) were generated by alternative splicing (AS) events, including intron retention and alternative 5′ splice sites in the 5′ and 3′ flanking regions of CTSF_AluYRa1. Among them, V3–V5 transcripts were ubiquitously expressed in all tissues of rhesus monkey and crab-eating monkey, whereas AluYRa1-exonized V1 was dominantly expressed in the testis of the crab-eating monkey, and V2 was only expressed in the testis of the two monkeys. These five transcript variants also had different amino acid sequences in the C-terminal region of CTSF, as compared to reference sequences. Thus, species-specific Alu-derived exonization by lineage-specific integration of Alu elements and AS events seems to have played an important role during primate evolution by producing transcript variants and gene diversification. PMID:28196413

  17. The Lineage-Specific Evolution of Aquaporin Gene Clusters Facilitated Tetrapod Terrestrial Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Roderick Nigel; Chauvigné, François; Hlidberg, Jón Baldur; Cutler, Christopher P.; Cerdà, Joan

    2014-01-01

    A major physiological barrier for aquatic organisms adapting to terrestrial life is dessication in the aerial environment. This barrier was nevertheless overcome by the Devonian ancestors of extant Tetrapoda, but the origin of specific molecular mechanisms that solved this water problem remains largely unknown. Here we show that an ancient aquaporin gene cluster evolved specifically in the sarcopterygian lineage, and subsequently diverged into paralogous forms of AQP2, -5, or -6 to mediate water conservation in extant Tetrapoda. To determine the origin of these apomorphic genomic traits, we combined aquaporin sequencing from jawless and jawed vertebrates with broad taxon assembly of >2,000 transcripts amongst 131 deuterostome genomes and developed a model based upon Bayesian inference that traces their convergent roots to stem subfamilies in basal Metazoa and Prokaryota. This approach uncovered an unexpected diversity of aquaporins in every lineage investigated, and revealed that the vertebrate superfamily consists of 17 classes of aquaporins (Aqp0 - Aqp16). The oldest orthologs associated with water conservation in modern Tetrapoda are traced to a cluster of three aqp2-like genes in Actinistia that likely arose >500 Ma through duplication of an aqp0-like gene present in a jawless ancestor. In sea lamprey, we show that aqp0 first arose in a protocluster comprised of a novel aqp14 paralog and a fused aqp01 gene. To corroborate these findings, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of five syntenic nuclear receptor subfamilies, which, together with observations of extensive genome rearrangements, support the coincident loss of ancestral aqp2-like orthologs in Actinopterygii. We thus conclude that the divergence of sarcopterygian-specific aquaporin gene clusters was permissive for the evolution of water conservation mechanisms that facilitated tetrapod terrestrial adaptation. PMID:25426855

  18. Lineage-specific effects of Notch/Numb signaling in post-embryonic development of the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Suewei; Lai, Sen-Lin; Yu, Huang-Hsiang; Chihara, Takahiro; Luo, Liqun; Lee, Tzumin

    2010-01-01

    Numb can antagonize Notch signaling to diversify the fates of sister cells. We report here that paired sister cells acquire different fates in all three Drosophila neuronal lineages that make diverse types of antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs). Only one in each pair of postmitotic neurons survives into the adult stage in both anterodorsal (ad) and ventral (v) PN lineages. Notably, Notch signaling specifies the PN fate in the vPN lineage but promotes programmed cell death in the missing siblings in the adPN lineage. In addition, Notch/Numb-mediated binary sibling fates underlie the production of PNs and local interneurons from common precursors in the lAL lineage. Furthermore, Numb is needed in the lateral but not adPN or vPN lineages to prevent the appearance of ectopic neuroblasts and to ensure proper self-renewal of neural progenitors. These lineage-specific outputs of Notch/Numb signaling show that a universal mechanism of binary fate decision can be utilized to govern diverse neural sibling differentiations.

  19. Lineage-specific and single cell chromatin accessibility charts human hematopoiesis and leukemia evolution

    PubMed Central

    Corces, M. Ryan; Buenrostro, Jason D.; Wu, Beijing; Greenside, Peyton G.; Chan, Steven M.; Koenig, Julie L.; Snyder, Michael P.; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Kundaje, Anshul; Greenleaf, William J.; Majeti, Ravindra; Chang, Howard Y.

    2016-01-01

    We define the chromatin accessibility and transcriptional landscapes in thirteen human primary blood cell types that traverse the hematopoietic hierarchy. Exploiting the finding that the enhancer landscape better reflects cell identity than mRNA levels, we enable “enhancer cytometry” for enumeration of pure cell types from complex populations. We identify regulators governing hematopoietic differentiation and further reveal the lineage ontogeny of genetic elements linked to diverse human diseases. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chromatin accessibility reveals unique regulatory evolution in cancer cells with progressive mutation burden. Single AML cells exhibit distinctive mixed regulome profiles of disparate developmental stages. A method to account for this regulatory heterogeneity identified cancer-specific deviations and implicated HOX factors as key regulators of pre-leukemic HSC characteristics. Thus, regulome dynamics can provide diverse insights into hematopoietic development and disease. PMID:27526324

  20. Lineage-specific BCL11A knockdown circumvents toxicities and reverses sickle phenotype.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Christian; Guda, Swaroopa; Renella, Raffaele; Bauer, Daniel E; Canver, Matthew C; Kim, Young-Jo; Heeney, Matthew M; Klatt, Denise; Fogel, Jonathan; Milsom, Michael D; Orkin, Stuart H; Gregory, Richard I; Williams, David A

    2016-10-03

    Reducing expression of the fetal hemoglobin (HbF) repressor BCL11A leads to a simultaneous increase in γ-globin expression and reduction in β-globin expression. Thus, there is interest in targeting BCL11A as a treatment for β-hemoglobinopathies, including sickle cell disease (SCD) and β-thalassemia. Here, we found that using optimized shRNAs embedded within an miRNA (shRNAmiR) architecture to achieve ubiquitous knockdown of BCL11A profoundly impaired long-term engraftment of both human and mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) despite a reduction in nonspecific cellular toxicities. BCL11A knockdown was associated with a substantial increase in S/G2-phase human HSCs after engraftment into immunodeficient (NSG) mice, a phenotype that is associated with HSC exhaustion. Lineage-specific, shRNAmiR-mediated suppression of BCL11A in erythroid cells led to stable long-term engraftment of gene-modified cells. Transduced primary normal or SCD human HSCs expressing the lineage-specific BCL11A shRNAmiR gave rise to erythroid cells with up to 90% reduction of BCL11A protein. These erythrocytes demonstrated 60%-70% γ-chain expression (vs. < 10% for negative control) and a corresponding increase in HbF. Transplantation of gene-modified murine HSCs from Berkeley sickle cell mice led to a substantial improvement of sickle-associated hemolytic anemia and reticulocytosis, key pathophysiological biomarkers of SCD. These data form the basis for a clinical trial application for treating sickle cell disease.

  1. Lineage-specific BCL11A knockdown circumvents toxicities and reverses sickle phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Brendel, Christian; Guda, Swaroopa; Renella, Raffaele; Bauer, Daniel E.; Canver, Matthew C.; Kim, Young-Jo; Heeney, Matthew M.; Klatt, Denise; Fogel, Jonathan; Milsom, Michael D.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Gregory, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Reducing expression of the fetal hemoglobin (HbF) repressor BCL11A leads to a simultaneous increase in γ-globin expression and reduction in β-globin expression. Thus, there is interest in targeting BCL11A as a treatment for β-hemoglobinopathies, including sickle cell disease (SCD) and β-thalassemia. Here, we found that using optimized shRNAs embedded within an miRNA (shRNAmiR) architecture to achieve ubiquitous knockdown of BCL11A profoundly impaired long-term engraftment of both human and mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) despite a reduction in nonspecific cellular toxicities. BCL11A knockdown was associated with a substantial increase in S/G2-phase human HSCs after engraftment into immunodeficient (NSG) mice, a phenotype that is associated with HSC exhaustion. Lineage-specific, shRNAmiR-mediated suppression of BCL11A in erythroid cells led to stable long-term engraftment of gene-modified cells. Transduced primary normal or SCD human HSCs expressing the lineage-specific BCL11A shRNAmiR gave rise to erythroid cells with up to 90% reduction of BCL11A protein. These erythrocytes demonstrated 60%–70% γ-chain expression (vs. < 10% for negative control) and a corresponding increase in HbF. Transplantation of gene-modified murine HSCs from Berkeley sickle cell mice led to a substantial improvement of sickle-associated hemolytic anemia and reticulocytosis, key pathophysiological biomarkers of SCD. These data form the basis for a clinical trial application for treating sickle cell disease. PMID:27599293

  2. Lineage-specific RUNX3 hypomethylation marks the preneoplastic immune component of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kurklu, B; Whitehead, R H; Ong, E K; Minamoto, T; Fox, J G; Mann, J R; Judd, L M; Giraud, A S; Menheniott, T R

    2015-05-28

    Runt domain transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) is widely regarded as a tumour-suppressor gene inactivated by DNA hypermethylation of its canonical CpG (cytidine-phosphate-guanidine) island (CGI) promoter in gastric cancer (GC). Absence of RUNX3 expression from normal gastric epithelial cells (GECs), the progenitors to GC, coupled with frequent RUNX3 overexpression in GC progression, challenge this longstanding paradigm. However, epigenetic models to better describe RUNX3 deregulation in GC have not emerged. Here, we identify lineage-specific DNA methylation at an alternate, non-CGI promoter (P1) as a new mechanism of RUNX3 epigenetic control. In normal GECs, P1 was hypermethylated and repressed, whereas in immune lineages P1 was hypomethylated and widely expressed. In human GC development, we detected aberrant P1 hypomethylation signatures associated with the early inflammatory, preneoplastic and tumour stages. Aberrant P1 hypomethylation was fully recapitulated in mouse models of gastric inflammation and tumorigenesis. Cell sorting showed that P1 hypomethylation reflects altered cell-type composition of the gastric epithelium/tumour microenvironment caused by immune cell recruitment, not methylation loss. Finally, via long-term culture of gastric tumour epithelium, we revealed that de novo methylation of the RUNX3 canonical CGI promoter is a bystander effect of oncogenic immortalization and not likely causal in GC pathogenesis as previously argued. We propose a new model of RUNX3 epigenetic control in cancer, based on immune-specific, non-CGI promoter hypomethylation. This novel epigenetic signature may have utility in early detection of GC and possibly other epithelial cancers with premalignant immune involvement.

  3. Lineage-Specific Biology Revealed by a Finished Genome Assembly of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hillier, LaDeana W.; Zody, Michael C.; Goldstein, Steve; She, Xinwe; Bult, Carol J.; Agarwala, Richa; Cherry, Joshua L.; DiCuccio, Michael; Hlavina, Wratko; Kapustin, Yuri; Meric, Peter; Maglott, Donna; Birtle, Zoë; Marques, Ana C.; Graves, Tina; Zhou, Shiguo; Teague, Brian; Potamousis, Konstantinos; Churas, Christopher; Place, Michael; Herschleb, Jill; Runnheim, Ron; Forrest, Daniel; Amos-Landgraf, James; Schwartz, David C.; Cheng, Ze; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Eichler, Evan E.; Ponting, Chris P.

    2009-01-01

    The mouse (Mus musculus) is the premier animal model for understanding human disease and development. Here we show that a comprehensive understanding of mouse biology is only possible with the availability of a finished, high-quality genome assembly. The finished clone-based assembly of the mouse strain C57BL/6J reported here has over 175,000 fewer gaps and over 139 Mb more of novel sequence, compared with the earlier MGSCv3 draft genome assembly. In a comprehensive analysis of this revised genome sequence, we are now able to define 20,210 protein-coding genes, over a thousand more than predicted in the human genome (19,042 genes). In addition, we identified 439 long, non–protein-coding RNAs with evidence for transcribed orthologs in human. We analyzed the complex and repetitive landscape of 267 Mb of sequence that was missing or misassembled in the previously published assembly, and we provide insights into the reasons for its resistance to sequencing and assembly by whole-genome shotgun approaches. Duplicated regions within newly assembled sequence tend to be of more recent ancestry than duplicates in the published draft, correcting our initial understanding of recent evolution on the mouse lineage. These duplicates appear to be largely composed of sequence regions containing transposable elements and duplicated protein-coding genes; of these, some may be fixed in the mouse population, but at least 40% of segmentally duplicated sequences are copy number variable even among laboratory mouse strains. Mouse lineage-specific regions contain 3,767 genes drawn mainly from rapidly-changing gene families associated with reproductive functions. The finished mouse genome assembly, therefore, greatly improves our understanding of rodent-specific biology and allows the delineation of ancestral biological functions that are shared with human from derived functions that are not. PMID:19468303

  4. Lineage-specific biology revealed by a finished genome assembly of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Church, Deanna M; Goodstadt, Leo; Hillier, Ladeana W; Zody, Michael C; Goldstein, Steve; She, Xinwe; Bult, Carol J; Agarwala, Richa; Cherry, Joshua L; DiCuccio, Michael; Hlavina, Wratko; Kapustin, Yuri; Meric, Peter; Maglott, Donna; Birtle, Zoë; Marques, Ana C; Graves, Tina; Zhou, Shiguo; Teague, Brian; Potamousis, Konstantinos; Churas, Christopher; Place, Michael; Herschleb, Jill; Runnheim, Ron; Forrest, Daniel; Amos-Landgraf, James; Schwartz, David C; Cheng, Ze; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Eichler, Evan E; Ponting, Chris P

    2009-05-05

    The mouse (Mus musculus) is the premier animal model for understanding human disease and development. Here we show that a comprehensive understanding of mouse biology is only possible with the availability of a finished, high-quality genome assembly. The finished clone-based assembly of the mouse strain C57BL/6J reported here has over 175,000 fewer gaps and over 139 Mb more of novel sequence, compared with the earlier MGSCv3 draft genome assembly. In a comprehensive analysis of this revised genome sequence, we are now able to define 20,210 protein-coding genes, over a thousand more than predicted in the human genome (19,042 genes). In addition, we identified 439 long, non-protein-coding RNAs with evidence for transcribed orthologs in human. We analyzed the complex and repetitive landscape of 267 Mb of sequence that was missing or misassembled in the previously published assembly, and we provide insights into the reasons for its resistance to sequencing and assembly by whole-genome shotgun approaches. Duplicated regions within newly assembled sequence tend to be of more recent ancestry than duplicates in the published draft, correcting our initial understanding of recent evolution on the mouse lineage. These duplicates appear to be largely composed of sequence regions containing transposable elements and duplicated protein-coding genes; of these, some may be fixed in the mouse population, but at least 40% of segmentally duplicated sequences are copy number variable even among laboratory mouse strains. Mouse lineage-specific regions contain 3,767 genes drawn mainly from rapidly-changing gene families associated with reproductive functions. The finished mouse genome assembly, therefore, greatly improves our understanding of rodent-specific biology and allows the delineation of ancestral biological functions that are shared with human from derived functions that are not.

  5. Lineage-specific evolution of the vertebrate Otopetrin gene family revealed by comparative genomic analyses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mutations in the Otopetrin 1 gene (Otop1) in mice and fish produce an unusual bilateral vestibular pathology that involves the absence of otoconia without hearing impairment. The encoded protein, Otop1, is the only functionally characterized member of the Otopetrin Domain Protein (ODP) family; the extended sequence and structural preservation of ODP proteins in metazoans suggest a conserved functional role. Here, we use the tools of sequence- and cytogenetic-based comparative genomics to study the Otop1 and the Otop2-Otop3 genes and to establish their genomic context in 25 vertebrates. We extend our evolutionary study to include the gene mutated in Usher syndrome (USH) subtype 1G (Ush1g), both because of the head-to-tail clustering of Ush1g with Otop2 and because Otop1 and Ush1g mutations result in inner ear phenotypes. Results We established that OTOP1 is the boundary gene of an inversion polymorphism on human chromosome 4p16 that originated in the common human-chimpanzee lineage more than 6 million years ago. Other lineage-specific evolutionary events included a three-fold expansion of the Otop genes in Xenopus tropicalis and of Ush1g in teleostei fish. The tight physical linkage between Otop2 and Ush1g is conserved in all vertebrates. To further understand the functional organization of the Ushg1-Otop2 locus, we deduced a putative map of binding sites for CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), a mammalian insulator transcription factor, from genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) data in mouse and human embryonic stem (ES) cells combined with detection of CTCF-binding motifs. Conclusions The results presented here clarify the evolutionary history of the vertebrate Otop and Ush1g families, and establish a framework for studying the possible interaction(s) of Ush1g and Otop in developmental pathways. PMID:21261979

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis Indicates Lineage-Specific Gene Loss during Papilionoideae Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yongzhe; Xing, Shilai; He, Chaoying

    2016-01-01

    Gene loss is the driving force for changes in genome and morphology; however, this particular evolutionary event has been poorly investigated in leguminous plants. Legumes (Fabaceae) have some lineage-specific and diagnostic characteristics that are distinct from other angiosperms. To understand the potential role of gene loss in the evolution of legumes, we compared six genome-sequenced legume species of Papilionoideae, the largest representative clade of Fabaceae, such as Glycine max, with 34 nonlegume plant species, such as Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed that the putative orthologs of the 34 Arabidopsis genes belonging to 29 gene families were absent in these legume species but these were conserved in the sequenced nonlegume angiosperm lineages. Further evolutionary analyses indicated that the orthologs of these genes were almost completely lost in the Papillionoideae ancestors, thus designated as the legume lost genes (LLGs), and these underwent purifying selection in nonlegume plants. Most LLGs were functionally unknown. In Arabidopsis, two LLGs were well-known genes that played a role in plant immunity such as HARMLESS TO OZONE LAYER 1 and HOPZ-ACTIVATED RESISTANCE 1, and 16 additional LLGs were predicted to participate in plant–pathogen interactions in in silico expression and protein–protein interaction network analyses. Most of these LLGs’ orthologs in various plants were also found to be associated with biotic stress response, indicating the conserved role of these genes in plant defense. The evolutionary implication of LLGs during the development of the ability of symbiotic nitrogen fixation involving plant and bacterial interactions, which is a well-known characteristic of most legumes, is also discussed. Our work sheds light on the evolutionary implication of gene loss events in Papilionoideae evolution, as well as provides new insights into crop design to improve nitrogen fixation capacity. PMID:26868598

  7. Comparative genomics of rhizobia nodulating soybean suggests extensive recruitment of lineage-specific genes in adaptations.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chang Fu; Zhou, Yuan Jie; Zhang, Yan Ming; Li, Qin Qin; Zhang, Yun Zeng; Li, Dong Fang; Wang, Shuang; Wang, Jun; Gilbert, Luz B; Li, Ying Rui; Chen, Wen Xin

    2012-05-29

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis has been widely studied as the model of mutualistic evolution and the essential component of sustainable agriculture. Extensive genetic and recent genomic studies have led to the hypothesis that many distinct strategies, regardless of rhizobial phylogeny, contributed to the varied rhizobium-legume symbiosis. We sequenced 26 genomes of Sinorhizobium and Bradyrhizobium nodulating soybean to test this hypothesis. The Bradyrhizobium core genome is disproportionally enriched in lipid and secondary metabolism, whereas several gene clusters known to be involved in osmoprotection and adaptation to alkaline pH are specific to the Sinorhizobium core genome. These features are consistent with biogeographic patterns of these bacteria. Surprisingly, no genes are specifically shared by these soybean microsymbionts compared with other legume microsymbionts. On the other hand, phyletic patterns of 561 known symbiosis genes of rhizobia reflected the species phylogeny of these soybean microsymbionts and other rhizobia. Similar analyses with 887 known functional genes or the whole pan genome of rhizobia revealed that only the phyletic distribution of functional genes was consistent with the species tree of rhizobia. Further evolutionary genetics revealed that recombination dominated the evolution of core genome. Taken together, our results suggested that faithfully vertical genes were rare compared with those with history of recombination including lateral gene transfer, although rhizobial adaptations to symbiotic interactions and other environmental conditions extensively recruited lineage-specific shell genes under direct or indirect control through the speciation process.

  8. Atypical Listeria monocytogenes Serotype 4b strains harboring a lineage II-specific gene cassette

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes is the etiological agent of listeriosis, a severe foodborne illness. The population of L. monocytogenes is divided into four lineages (I-IV) and serotype 4b in lineage I has been involved in numerous outbreaks. Several serotype 4b epidemic-associated clonal groups (ECI, II, an...

  9. Potential merger of ancient lineages in a passerine bird discovered based on evidence from host-specific ectoparasites

    PubMed Central

    Block, Nicholas L; Goodman, Steven M; Hackett, Shannon J; Bates, John M; Raherilalao, Marie J

    2015-01-01

    The merger of formerly isolated lineages is hypothesized to occur in vertebrates under certain conditions. However, despite many demonstrated instances of introgression between taxa in secondary contact, examples of lineage mergers are rare. Preliminary mtDNA sequencing of a Malagasy passerine, Xanthomixis zosterops (Passeriformes: Bernieridae), indicated a possible instance of merging lineages. We tested the hypothesis that X. zosterops lineages are merging by comparing mtDNA sequence and microsatellite data, as well as mtDNA sequence data from host-specific feather lice in the genus Myrsidea (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae). Xanthomixis zosterops comprises four deeply divergent, broadly sympatric, cryptic mtDNA clades that likely began diverging approximately 3.6 million years ago. Despite this level of divergence, the microsatellite data indicate that the X. zosterops mtDNA clades are virtually panmictic. Three major phylogroups of Myrsidea were found, supporting previous allopatry of the X. zosterops clades. In combination, the datasets from X. zosterops and its Myrsidea document a potential merger of previously allopatric lineages that likely date to the Pliocene. This represents the first report of sympatric apparent hybridization among more than two terrestrial vertebrate lineages. Further, the mtDNA phylogeographic pattern of X. zosterops, namely the syntopy of more than two deeply divergent cryptic clades, appears to be a novel scenario among vertebrates. We highlight the value of gathering multiple types of data in phylogeographic studies to contribute to the study of vertebrate speciation. PMID:26380702

  10. Potential merger of ancient lineages in a passerine bird discovered based on evidence from host-specific ectoparasites.

    PubMed

    Block, Nicholas L; Goodman, Steven M; Hackett, Shannon J; Bates, John M; Raherilalao, Marie J

    2015-09-01

    The merger of formerly isolated lineages is hypothesized to occur in vertebrates under certain conditions. However, despite many demonstrated instances of introgression between taxa in secondary contact, examples of lineage mergers are rare. Preliminary mtDNA sequencing of a Malagasy passerine, Xanthomixis zosterops (Passeriformes: Bernieridae), indicated a possible instance of merging lineages. We tested the hypothesis that X. zosterops lineages are merging by comparing mtDNA sequence and microsatellite data, as well as mtDNA sequence data from host-specific feather lice in the genus Myrsidea (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae). Xanthomixis zosterops comprises four deeply divergent, broadly sympatric, cryptic mtDNA clades that likely began diverging approximately 3.6 million years ago. Despite this level of divergence, the microsatellite data indicate that the X. zosterops mtDNA clades are virtually panmictic. Three major phylogroups of Myrsidea were found, supporting previous allopatry of the X. zosterops clades. In combination, the datasets from X. zosterops and its Myrsidea document a potential merger of previously allopatric lineages that likely date to the Pliocene. This represents the first report of sympatric apparent hybridization among more than two terrestrial vertebrate lineages. Further, the mtDNA phylogeographic pattern of X. zosterops, namely the syntopy of more than two deeply divergent cryptic clades, appears to be a novel scenario among vertebrates. We highlight the value of gathering multiple types of data in phylogeographic studies to contribute to the study of vertebrate speciation.

  11. Comparative phylogeography of two sympatric beeches in subtropical China: Species-specific geographic mosaic of lineages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Rong; Wang, Qun; Zhang, Zhi-Rong; López-Pujol, Jordi; Fan, Deng-Mei; Li, De-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    In subtropical China, large-scale phylogeographic comparisons among multiple sympatric plants with similar ecological preferences are scarce, making generalizations about common response to historical events necessarily tentative. A phylogeographic comparison of two sympatric Chinese beeches (Fagus lucida and F. longipetiolata, 21 and 28 populations, respectively) was conducted to test whether they have responded to historical events in a concerted fashion and to determine whether their phylogeographic structure is exclusively due to Quaternary events or it is also associated with pre-Quaternary events. Twenty-three haplotypes were recovered for F. lucida and F. longipetiolata (14 each one and five shared). Both species exhibited a species-specific mosaic distribution of haplotypes, with many of them being range-restricted and even private to populations. The two beeches had comparable total haplotype diversity but F. lucida had much higher within-population diversity than F. longipetiolata. Molecular dating showed that the time to most recent common ancestor of all haplotypes was 6.36 Ma, with most haplotypes differentiating during the Quaternary. [Correction added on 14 October 2013, after first online publication: the timeunit has been corrected to ‘6.36’.] Our results support a late Miocene origin and southwards colonization of Chinese beeches when the aridity in Central Asia intensified and the monsoon climate began to dominate the East Asia. During the Quaternary, long-term isolation in subtropical mountains of China coupled with limited gene flow would have lead to the current species-specific mosaic distribution of lineages. PMID:24340187

  12. Lineage-Specific Expansion of IFIT Gene Family: An Insight into Coevolution with IFN Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yi-Bing; Liu, Ting-Kai; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, IFIT (Interferon [IFN]-induced proteins with Tetratricopeptide Repeat [TPR] motifs) family genes are involved in many cellular and viral processes, which are tightly related to mammalian IFN response. However, little is known about non-mammalian IFIT genes. In the present study, IFIT genes are identified in the genome databases from the jawed vertebrates including the cartilaginous elephant shark but not from non-vertebrates such as lancelet, sea squirt and acorn worm, suggesting that IFIT gene family originates from a vertebrate ancestor about 450 million years ago. IFIT family genes show conserved gene structure and gene arrangements. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that this gene family has expanded through lineage-specific and species-specific gene duplication. Interestingly, IFN gene family seem to share a common ancestor and a similar evolutionary mechanism; the function link of IFIT genes to IFN response is present early since the origin of both gene families, as evidenced by the finding that zebrafish IFIT genes are upregulated by fish IFNs, poly(I:C) and two transcription factors IRF3/IRF7, likely via the IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE) within the promoters of vertebrate IFIT family genes. These coevolution features creates functional association of both family genes to fulfill a common biological process, which is likely selected by viral infection during evolution of vertebrates. Our results are helpful for understanding of evolution of vertebrate IFN system. PMID:23818968

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate CXC chemokines reveals novel lineage specific groups in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Xu, Qiaoqing; Wang, Tiehui; Collet, Bertrand; Corripio-Miyar, Yolanda; Bird, Steve; Xie, Ping; Nie, Pin; Secombes, Christopher J; Zou, Jun

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we have identified 421 molecules across the vertebrate spectrum and propose a unified nomenclature for CXC chemokines in fish, amphibians and reptiles based on phylogenetic analysis. Expanding on earlier studies in teleost fish, lineage specific CXC chemokines that have no apparent homologues in mammals were confirmed. Furthermore, in addition to the two subgroups of the CXCL8 homologues known in teleost fish, a third group was identified (termed CXCL8_L3), as was a further subgroup of the fish CXC genes related to CXCL11. Expression of the CXC chemokines found in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, was studied in response to stimulation with inflammatory and antiviral cytokines, and bacterial. Tissue distribution analysis revealed distinct expression profiles for these trout CXC chemokines. Lastly three of the trout chemokines, including two novel fish specific CXC chemokines containing three pairs of cysteines, were produced as recombinant proteins and their effect on trout leucocyte migration studied. These molecules increased the relative expression of CD4 and MCSFR in migrated cells in an in vitro chemotaxis assay.

  14. Human Lineage-Specific Transcriptional Regulation through GA-Binding Protein Transcription Factor Alpha (GABPa)

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Nowick, Katja; Piccini, Ilaria; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Querfurth, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A substantial fraction of phenotypic differences between closely related species are likely caused by differences in gene regulation. While this has already been postulated over 30 years ago, only few examples of evolutionary changes in gene regulation have been verified. Here, we identified and investigated binding sites of the transcription factor GA-binding protein alpha (GABPa) aiming to discover cis-regulatory adaptations on the human lineage. By performing chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing experiments in a human cell line, we found 11,619 putative GABPa binding sites. Through sequence comparisons of the human GABPa binding regions with orthologous sequences from 34 mammals, we identified substitutions that have resulted in 224 putative human-specific GABPa binding sites. To experimentally assess the transcriptional impact of those substitutions, we selected four promoters for promoter-reporter gene assays using human and African green monkey cells. We compared the activities of wild-type promoters to mutated forms, where we have introduced one or more substitutions to mimic the ancestral state devoid of the GABPa consensus binding sequence. Similarly, we introduced the human-specific substitutions into chimpanzee and macaque promoter backgrounds. Our results demonstrate that the identified substitutions are functional, both in human and nonhuman promoters. In addition, we performed GABPa knock-down experiments and found 1,215 genes as strong candidates for primary targets. Further analyses of our data sets link GABPa to cognitive disorders, diabetes, KRAB zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF), and human-specific genes. Thus, we propose that differences in GABPa binding sites played important roles in the evolution of human-specific phenotypes. PMID:26814189

  15. Development of Peptide-Based Lineage-Specific Serology for Chronic Chagas Disease: Geographical and Clinical Distribution of Epitope Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Tapan; Falconar, Andrew K.; Luquetti, Alejandro O.; Costales, Jaime A.; Grijalva, Mario J.; Lewis, Michael D.; Messenger, Louisa A.; Tran, Trang T.; Ramirez, Juan-David; Guhl, Felipe; Carrasco, Hernan J.; Diosque, Patricio; Garcia, Lineth; Litvinov, Sergey V.; Miles, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health issue in Latin America. Genetically diverse, the species is sub-divided into six lineages, known as TcI–TcVI, which have disparate geographical and ecological distributions. TcII, TcV, and TcVI are associated with severe human disease in the Southern Cone countries, whereas TcI is associated with cardiomyopathy north of the Amazon. T. cruzi persists as a chronic infection, with cardiac and/or gastrointestinal symptoms developing years or decades after initial infection. Identifying an individual's history of T. cruzi lineage infection directly by genotyping of the parasite is complicated by the low parasitaemia and sequestration in the host tissues. Methodology/Principal Findings We have applied here serology against lineage-specific epitopes of the T. cruzi surface antigen TSSA, as an indirect approach to allow identification of infecting lineage. Chagasic sera from chronic patients from a range of endemic countries were tested by ELISA against synthetic peptides representing lineage-specific TSSA epitopes bound to avidin-coated ELISA plates via a biotin labelled polyethylene glycol-glycine spacer to increase rotation and ensure each amino acid side chain could freely interact with their antibodies. 79/113 (70%) of samples from Brazil, Bolivia, and Argentina recognised the TSSA epitope common to lineages TcII/TcV/TcVI. Comparison with clinical information showed that a higher proportion of Brazilian TSSApep-II/V/VI responders had ECG abnormalities than non-responders (38% vs 17%; p<0.0001). Among northern chagasic sera 4/20 (20%) from Ecuador reacted with this peptide; 1/12 Venezuelan and 1/34 Colombian samples reacted with TSSApep-IV. In addition, a proposed TcI-specific epitope, described elsewhere, was demonstrated here to be highly conserved across lineages and therefore not applicable to lineage-specific serology. Conclusions

  16. Aging-like Phenotype and Defective Lineage Specification in SIRT1-Deleted Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Bigarella, Carolina L.; Liang, Raymond; Izac, Brigitte; Dieguez-Gonzalez, Rebeca; Barbet, Gaetan; Donovan, Michael; Brugnara, Carlo; Blander, Julie M.; Sinclair, David A.; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aging hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit defective lineage specification that is thought to be central to increased incidence of myeloid malignancies and compromised immune competence in the elderly. Mechanisms underlying these age-related defects remain largely unknown. We show that the deacetylase Sirtuin (SIRT)1 is required for homeostatic HSC maintenance. Differentiation of young SIRT1-deleted HSCs is skewed toward myeloid lineage associated with a significant decline in the lymphoid compartment, anemia, and altered expression of associated genes. Combined with HSC accumulation of damaged DNA and expression patterns of age-linked molecules, these have striking overlaps with aged HSCs. We further show that SIRT1 controls HSC homeostasis via the longevity transcription factor FOXO3. These findings suggest that SIRT1 is essential for HSC homeostasis and lineage specification. They also indicate that SIRT1 might contribute to delaying HSC aging. PMID:25068121

  17. Aging-like phenotype and defective lineage specification in SIRT1-deleted hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Bigarella, Carolina L; Liang, Raymond; Izac, Brigitte; Dieguez-Gonzalez, Rebeca; Barbet, Gaetan; Donovan, Michael; Brugnara, Carlo; Blander, Julie M; Sinclair, David A; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2014-07-08

    Aging hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit defective lineage specification that is thought to be central to increased incidence of myeloid malignancies and compromised immune competence in the elderly. Mechanisms underlying these age-related defects remain largely unknown. We show that the deacetylase Sirtuin (SIRT)1 is required for homeostatic HSC maintenance. Differentiation of young SIRT1-deleted HSCs is skewed toward myeloid lineage associated with a significant decline in the lymphoid compartment, anemia, and altered expression of associated genes. Combined with HSC accumulation of damaged DNA and expression patterns of age-linked molecules, these have striking overlaps with aged HSCs. We further show that SIRT1 controls HSC homeostasis via the longevity transcription factor FOXO3. These findings suggest that SIRT1 is essential for HSC homeostasis and lineage specification. They also indicate that SIRT1 might contribute to delaying HSC aging.

  18. Evolution of lineage-specific functions in ancient cis-regulatory modules.

    PubMed

    Pauls, Stefan; Goode, Debbie K; Petrone, Libero; Oliveri, Paola; Elgar, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Morphological evolution is driven both by coding sequence variation and by changes in regulatory sequences. However, how cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) evolve to generate entirely novel expression domains is largely unknown. Here, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of a lens enhancer located within a CRM that not only predates the lens, a vertebrate innovation, but bilaterian animals in general. Alignments of orthologous sequences from different deuterostomes sub-divide the CRM into a deeply conserved core and a more divergent flanking region. We demonstrate that all deuterostome flanking regions, including invertebrate sequences, activate gene expression in the zebrafish lens through the same ancient cluster of activator sites. However, levels of gene expression vary between species due to the presence of repressor motifs in flanking region and core. These repressor motifs are responsible for the relatively weak enhancer activity of tetrapod flanking regions. Ray-finned fish, however, have gained two additional lineage-specific activator motifs which in combination with the ancient cluster of activators and the core constitute a potent lens enhancer. The exploitation and modification of existing regulatory potential in flanking regions but not in the highly conserved core might represent a more general model for the emergence of novel regulatory functions in complex CRMs.

  19. Intelligent bioengineering in vitiligo treatment: transdermal protein transduction of melanocyte-lineage-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yi; Jiang, Xian; Du, Yu; Xue, Li

    2012-12-01

    Vitiligo is a common, incurable skin disease with a prevalence of about 1%. Although many vitiligo therapies are available in clinics, there is almost no one method that causes significant improvement in all vitiligo patients. Some have hypothesized that melanocyte dysfunction or deficiency underlies the loss of skin pigmentation observed in vitiligo. The autoimmune-mediated apoptosis of melanocytes might be an important part of the etiology of vitiligo, which prevents the formation of melanocytes in the skin. Here we propose a novel hypothesis for vitiligo treatment using in situ melanocyte regeneration induced by melanocyte-lineage-specific genes (MLSGs). This may serve as an intelligent bioengineering prototype. The hypothesis is based on the fact that MLSGs regulate melanocyte differentiation through epigenetic reprogramming, which includes microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), paired box 3 (PAX3), and Notch signaling. MITF directs the terminal differentiation of melanocytes, and PAX3 helps to establish the properties of the melanocyte stem cells. Notch signaling promotes adult stem cell proliferation and self-renewal. This process could be mimicked by Notch intracellular domain (NICD). MLSGs could also stimulate anti-apoptotic gene expression. Recent improvements in relevant biotechniques allow the transdermal delivery of MLSG proteins into the patient, where they enter cells through protein transduction. This process may promote melanocyte regeneration in situ with little impact on the hair follicular cycle or on carcinogenesis. This simple and efficient treatment may have significant impact on the treatment of vitiligo patients.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Protein Expression to Study Lineage Specification in Mouse Preimplantation Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Saiz, Nestor; Kang, Minjung; Schrode, Nadine; Lou, Xinghua; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2016-01-01

    This protocol presents a method to perform quantitative, single-cell in situ analyses of protein expression to study lineage specificationin mouse preimplantation embryos. The procedures necessary for embryo collection, immunofluorescence, imaging on a confocal microscope, and image segmentation and analysis are described. This method allows quantitation of the expression of multiple nuclear markers and the spatial (XYZ) coordinates of all cells in the embryo. It takes advantage of MINS, an image segmentation software tool specifically developed for the analysis of confocal images of preimplantation embryos and embryonic stem cell (ESC) colonies. MINS carries out unsupervised nuclear segmentation across the X, Y and Z dimensions, and produces information on cell position in three-dimensional space, as well as nuclear fluorescence levels for all channels with minimal user input. While this protocol has been optimized for the analysis of images of preimplantation stage mouse embryos, it can easily be adapted to the analysis of any other samples exhibiting a good signal-to-noise ratio and where high nuclear density poses a hurdle to image segmentation (e.g., expression analysis of embryonic stem cell (ESC) colonies, differentiating cells in culture, embryos of other species or stages, etc.). PMID:26967230

  1. The SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex is required for maintenance of lineage specific enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Alver, Burak H.; Kim, Kimberly H.; Lu, Ping; Wang, Xiaofeng; Manchester, Haley E.; Wang, Weishan; Haswell, Jeffrey R.; Park, Peter J.; Roberts, Charles W. M.

    2017-01-01

    Genes encoding subunits of SWI/SNF (BAF) chromatin remodelling complexes are collectively altered in over 20% of human malignancies, but the mechanisms by which these complexes alter chromatin to modulate transcription and cell fate are poorly understood. Utilizing mouse embryonic fibroblast and cancer cell line models, here we show via ChIP-seq and biochemical assays that SWI/SNF complexes are preferentially targeted to distal lineage specific enhancers and interact with p300 to modulate histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation. We identify a greater requirement for SWI/SNF at typical enhancers than at most super-enhancers and at enhancers in untranscribed regions than in transcribed regions. Our data further demonstrate that SWI/SNF-dependent distal enhancers are essential for controlling expression of genes linked to developmental processes. Our findings thus establish SWI/SNF complexes as regulators of the enhancer landscape and provide insight into the roles of SWI/SNF in cellular fate control. PMID:28262751

  2. The evolution of lineage-specific regulatory activities in the human embryonic limb.

    PubMed

    Cotney, Justin; Leng, Jing; Yin, Jun; Reilly, Steven K; DeMare, Laura E; Emera, Deena; Ayoub, Albert E; Rakic, Pasko; Noonan, James P

    2013-07-03

    The evolution of human anatomical features likely involved changes in gene regulation during development. However, the nature and extent of human-specific developmental regulatory functions remain unknown. We obtained a genome-wide view of cis-regulatory evolution in human embryonic tissues by comparing the histone modification H3K27ac, which provides a quantitative readout of promoter and enhancer activity, during human, rhesus, and mouse limb development. Based on increased H3K27ac, we find that 13% of promoters and 11% of enhancers have gained activity on the human lineage since the human-rhesus divergence. These gains largely arose by modification of ancestral regulatory activities in the limb or potential co-option from other tissues and are likely to have heterogeneous genetic causes. Most enhancers that exhibit gain of activity in humans originated in mammals. Gains at promoters and enhancers in the human limb are associated with increased gene expression, suggesting they include molecular drivers of human morphological evolution.

  3. The lineage-specific gene ponzr1 is essential for zebrafish pronephric and pharyngeal arch development.

    PubMed

    Bedell, Victoria M; Person, Anthony D; Larson, Jon D; McLoon, Anna; Balciunas, Darius; Clark, Karl J; Neff, Kevin I; Nelson, Katie E; Bill, Brent R; Schimmenti, Lisa A; Beiraghi, Soraya; Ekker, Stephen C

    2012-02-01

    The Homeobox (Hox) and Paired box (Pax) gene families are key determinants of animal body plans and organ structure. In particular, they function within regulatory networks that control organogenesis. How these conserved genes elicit differences in organ form and function in response to evolutionary pressures is incompletely understood. We molecularly and functionally characterized one member of an evolutionarily dynamic gene family, plac8 onzin related protein 1 (ponzr1), in the zebrafish. ponzr1 mRNA is expressed early in the developing kidney and pharyngeal arches. Using ponzr1-targeting morpholinos, we show that ponzr1 is required for formation of the glomerulus. Loss of ponzr1 results in a nonfunctional glomerulus but retention of a functional pronephros, an arrangement similar to the aglomerular kidneys found in a subset of marine fish. ponzr1 is integrated into the pax2a pathway, with ponzr1 expression requiring pax2a gene function, and proper pax2a expression requiring normal ponzr1 expression. In addition to pronephric function, ponzr1 is required for pharyngeal arch formation. We functionally demonstrate that ponzr1 can act as a transcription factor or co-factor, providing the first molecular mode of action for this newly described gene family. Together, this work provides experimental evidence of an additional mechanism that incorporates evolutionarily dynamic, lineage-specific gene families into conserved regulatory gene networks to create functional organ diversity.

  4. Lineage-specific evolutionary rate in plants: Contributions of a screening for Cereus (Cactaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Romeiro-Brito, Monique; Moraes, Evandro M.; Taylor, Nigel P.; Zappi, Daniela C.; Franco, Fernando F.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Predictable chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequences have been listed for the shallowest taxonomic studies in plants. We investigated whether plastid regions that vary between closely allied species could be applied for intraspecific studies and compared the variation of these plastid segments with two nuclear regions. Methods: We screened 16 plastid and two nuclear intronic regions for species of the genus Cereus (Cactaceae) at three hierarchical levels (species from different clades, species of the same clade, and allopatric populations). Results: Ten plastid regions presented interspecific variation, and six of them showed variation at the intraspecific level. The two nuclear regions showed both inter- and intraspecific variation, and in general they showed higher levels of variability in almost all hierarchical levels than the plastid segments. Discussion: Our data suggest no correspondence between variation of plastid regions at the interspecific and intraspecific level, probably due to lineage-specific variation in cpDNA, which appears to have less effect in nuclear data. Despite the heterogeneity in evolutionary rates of cpDNA, we highlight three plastid segments that may be considered in initial screenings in plant phylogeographic studies. PMID:26819857

  5. Comparative analysis of mammalian Y chromosomes illuminates ancestral structure and lineage-specific evolution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Davis, Brian W.; Raudsepp, Terje; Pearks Wilkerson, Alison J.; Mason, Victor C.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm; O'Brien, Patricia C.; Waters, Paul D.; Murphy, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Although more than thirty mammalian genomes have been sequenced to draft quality, very few of these include the Y chromosome. This has limited our understanding of the evolutionary dynamics of gene persistence and loss, our ability to identify conserved regulatory elements, as well our knowledge of the extent to which different types of selection act to maintain genes within this unique genomic environment. Here, we present the first MSY (male-specific region of the Y chromosome) sequences from two carnivores, the domestic dog and cat. By combining these with other available MSY data, our multiordinal comparison allows for the first accounting of levels of selection constraining the evolution of eutherian Y chromosomes. Despite gene gain and loss across the phylogeny, we show the eutherian ancestor retained a core set of 17 MSY genes, most being constrained by negative selection for nearly 100 million years. The X-degenerate and ampliconic gene classes are partitioned into distinct chromosomal domains in most mammals, but were radically restructured on the human lineage. We identified multiple conserved noncoding elements that potentially regulate eutherian MSY genes. The acquisition of novel ampliconic gene families was accompanied by signatures of positive selection and has differentially impacted the degeneration and expansion of MSY gene repertoires in different species. PMID:23788650

  6. Divergent expression patterns of Sox9 duplicates in teleosts indicate a lineage specific subfunctionalization.

    PubMed

    Klüver, Nils; Kondo, Mariko; Herpin, Amaury; Mitani, Hiroshi; Schartl, Manfred

    2005-06-01

    Sry-related HMG-box genes are key regulators of several developmental processes. Sox9 encodes a transcription factor required for cartilage formation and testis determination in mammals. In zebrafish (Danio rerio) and stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) two co-orthologs of Sox9 are present. To date, only one Sox9 had been identified in medaka (Oryzias latipes). We have now isolated the second Sox9 gene. Sequence analysis, phylogenetic data, linkage mapping as well as expression pattern all together suggest that the medaka Sox9a and Sox9b are co-orthologs. During embryogenesis, the expression pattern of Sox9a and Sox9b are distinct but overlap considerably in craniofacial cartilage elements. Comparing the zebrafish Sox9a and Sox9b expression patterns with medaka Sox9a and Sox9b expression domains revealed that some are identical but others are clearly different. We conclude that Sox9 regulatory subfunctions were not partitioned before divergence of the teleosts and evolved to lineage-specific expression domains.

  7. FoxA1 as a lineage-specific oncogene in luminal type breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Ito, Emi; Azuma, Sakura; Honma, Reiko; Yanagisawa, Yuka; Nishikawa, Akira; Kawamura, Mika; Imai, Jun-ichi

    2008-01-25

    The forkhead transcription factor FoxA1 is thought to be involved in mammary tumorigenesis. However, the precise role of FoxA1 in breast cancer development is controversial. We examined expression of FoxA1 in 35 human breast cancer cell lines and compared it with that of ErbB2, a marker of poor prognosis in breast cancer. We found that FoxA1 is expressed at high levels in all ErbB2-positive cell lines and a subset of ErbB2-negative cell lines. Down-regulation of FoxA1 by RNA interference significantly suppressed proliferation of ErbB2-negative and FoxA1-positive breast cancer cell lines. Down-regulation of FoxA1 also enhanced the toxic effect of Herceptin on ErbB2-positive cell lines through induction of apoptosis. Taken together with previous data that FoxA1 is a marker of luminal cells in mammary gland, our present results suggest that FoxA1 plays an important role as a lineage-specific oncogene in proliferation of cancer cells derived from mammary luminal cells.

  8. Evolution of lineage-specific functions in ancient cis-regulatory modules

    PubMed Central

    Pauls, Stefan; Goode, Debbie K.; Petrone, Libero; Oliveri, Paola; Elgar, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Morphological evolution is driven both by coding sequence variation and by changes in regulatory sequences. However, how cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) evolve to generate entirely novel expression domains is largely unknown. Here, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of a lens enhancer located within a CRM that not only predates the lens, a vertebrate innovation, but bilaterian animals in general. Alignments of orthologous sequences from different deuterostomes sub-divide the CRM into a deeply conserved core and a more divergent flanking region. We demonstrate that all deuterostome flanking regions, including invertebrate sequences, activate gene expression in the zebrafish lens through the same ancient cluster of activator sites. However, levels of gene expression vary between species due to the presence of repressor motifs in flanking region and core. These repressor motifs are responsible for the relatively weak enhancer activity of tetrapod flanking regions. Ray-finned fish, however, have gained two additional lineage-specific activator motifs which in combination with the ancient cluster of activators and the core constitute a potent lens enhancer. The exploitation and modification of existing regulatory potential in flanking regions but not in the highly conserved core might represent a more general model for the emergence of novel regulatory functions in complex CRMs. PMID:26538567

  9. Evolved structure of language shows lineage-specific trends in word-order universals.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Michael; Greenhill, Simon J; Levinson, Stephen C; Gray, Russell D

    2011-05-05

    Languages vary widely but not without limit. The central goal of linguistics is to describe the diversity of human languages and explain the constraints on that diversity. Generative linguists following Chomsky have claimed that linguistic diversity must be constrained by innate parameters that are set as a child learns a language. In contrast, other linguists following Greenberg have claimed that there are statistical tendencies for co-occurrence of traits reflecting universal systems biases, rather than absolute constraints or parametric variation. Here we use computational phylogenetic methods to address the nature of constraints on linguistic diversity in an evolutionary framework. First, contrary to the generative account of parameter setting, we show that the evolution of only a few word-order features of languages are strongly correlated. Second, contrary to the Greenbergian generalizations, we show that most observed functional dependencies between traits are lineage-specific rather than universal tendencies. These findings support the view that-at least with respect to word order-cultural evolution is the primary factor that determines linguistic structure, with the current state of a linguistic system shaping and constraining future states.

  10. dbx mediates neuronal specification and differentiation through cross-repressive, lineage-specific interactions with eve and hb9.

    PubMed

    Lacin, Haluk; Zhu, Yi; Wilson, Beth A; Skeath, James B

    2009-10-01

    Individual neurons adopt and maintain defined morphological and physiological phenotypes as a result of the expression of specific combinations of transcription factors. In particular, homeodomain-containing transcription factors play key roles in determining neuronal subtype identity in flies and vertebrates. dbx belongs to the highly divergent H2.0 family of homeobox genes. In vertebrates, Dbx1 and Dbx2 promote the development of a subset of interneurons, some of which help mediate left-right coordination of locomotor activity. Here, we identify and show that the single Drosophila ortholog of Dbx1/2 contributes to the development of specific subsets of interneurons via cross-repressive, lineage-specific interactions with the motoneuron-promoting factors eve and hb9 (exex). dbx is expressed primarily in interneurons of the embryonic, larval and adult central nervous system, and these interneurons tend to extend short axons and be GABAergic. Interestingly, many Dbx(+) interneurons share a sibling relationship with Eve(+) or Hb9(+) motoneurons. The non-overlapping expression of dbx and eve, or dbx and hb9, within pairs of sibling neurons is initially established as a result of Notch/Numb-mediated asymmetric divisions. Cross-repressive interactions between dbx and eve, and dbx and hb9, then help maintain the distinct expression profiles of these genes in their respective pairs of sibling neurons. Strict maintenance of the mutually exclusive expression of dbx relative to that of eve and hb9 in sibling neurons is crucial for proper neuronal specification, as misexpression of dbx in motoneurons dramatically hinders motor axon outgrowth.

  11. Cyanobacterial symbionts diverged in the late Cretaceous towards lineage-specific nitrogen fixation factories in single-celled phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M.; Cabello, Ana M.; Salazar, Guillem; Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Hingamp, Pascal; Alberti, Adriana; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Raes, Jeroen; Bowler, Chris; Wincker, Patrick; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Gasol, Josep M.; Massana, Ramon; Acinas, Silvia G.

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium UCYN-A, one of the major contributors to nitrogen fixation in the open ocean, lives in symbiosis with single-celled phytoplankton. UCYN-A includes several closely related lineages whose partner fidelity, genome-wide expression and time of evolutionary divergence remain to be resolved. Here we detect and distinguish UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 lineages in symbiosis with two distinct prymnesiophyte partners in the South Atlantic Ocean. Both symbiotic systems are lineage specific and differ in the number of UCYN-A cells involved. Our analyses infer a streamlined genome expression towards nitrogen fixation in both UCYN-A lineages. Comparative genomics reveal a strong purifying selection in UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 with a diversification process ∼91 Myr ago, in the late Cretaceous, after the low-nutrient regime period occurred during the Jurassic. These findings suggest that UCYN-A diversified in a co-evolutionary process, wherein their prymnesiophyte partners acted as a barrier driving an allopatric speciation of extant UCYN-A lineages. PMID:27002549

  12. Cyanobacterial symbionts diverged in the late Cretaceous towards lineage-specific nitrogen fixation factories in single-celled phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Cabello, Ana M; Salazar, Guillem; Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Hingamp, Pascal; Alberti, Adriana; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Raes, Jeroen; Bowler, Chris; Wincker, Patrick; Zehr, Jonathan P; Gasol, Josep M; Massana, Ramon; Acinas, Silvia G

    2016-03-22

    The unicellular cyanobacterium UCYN-A, one of the major contributors to nitrogen fixation in the open ocean, lives in symbiosis with single-celled phytoplankton. UCYN-A includes several closely related lineages whose partner fidelity, genome-wide expression and time of evolutionary divergence remain to be resolved. Here we detect and distinguish UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 lineages in symbiosis with two distinct prymnesiophyte partners in the South Atlantic Ocean. Both symbiotic systems are lineage specific and differ in the number of UCYN-A cells involved. Our analyses infer a streamlined genome expression towards nitrogen fixation in both UCYN-A lineages. Comparative genomics reveal a strong purifying selection in UCYN-A1 and UCYN-A2 with a diversification process ∼91 Myr ago, in the late Cretaceous, after the low-nutrient regime period occurred during the Jurassic. These findings suggest that UCYN-A diversified in a co-evolutionary process, wherein their prymnesiophyte partners acted as a barrier driving an allopatric speciation of extant UCYN-A lineages.

  13. Evaluation of Customised Lineage-Specific Sets of MIRU-VNTR Loci for Genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Isolates in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Asante-Poku, Adwoa; Nyaho, Michael Selasi; Borrell, Sonia; Comas, Iñaki; Gagneux, Sebastien; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    Background Different combinations of variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) loci have been proposed for genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Existing VNTR schemes show different discriminatory capacity among the six human MTBC lineages. Here, we evaluated the discriminatory power of a “customized MIRU12” loci format proposed previously by Comas et al. based on the standard 24 loci defined by Supply et al. for VNTR-typing of MTBC in Ghana. Method One hundred and fifty-eight MTBC isolates classified into Lineage 4 and Lineage 5 were used to compare a customized lineage-specific panel of 12 MIRU-VNTR loci (“customized MIRU-12″) to the standard MIRU-15 genotyping scheme. The resolution power of each typing method was determined based on the Hunter-Gaston- Discriminatory Index (HGDI). A minimal set of customized MIRU-VNTR loci for typing Lineages 4 (Euro-American) and 5 (M. africanum West African 1) strains from Ghana was defined based on the cumulative HGDI. Results and Conclusion Among the 106 Lineage 4 strains, the customized MIRU-12 identified a total of 104 distinct genotypes consisting of 2 clusters of 2 isolates each (clustering rate 1.8%), and 102 unique strains while standard MIRU-15 yielded a total of 105 different genotypes, including 1 cluster of 2 isolates (clustering rate: 0.9%) and 104 singletons. Among, 52 Lineage 5 isolates, customized MIRU-12 genotyping defined 51 patterns with 1 cluster of 2 isolates (clustering rate: 0.9%) and 50 unique strains whereas MIRU-15 classified all 52 strains as unique. Cumulative HGDI values for customized MIRU-12 for Lineages 4 and 5 were 0.98 respectively whilst that of standard MIRU-15 was 0.99. A union of loci from the customised MIRU-12 and standard MIRU-15 revealed a set of customized eight highly discriminatory loci: 4052, 2163B, 40, 4165, 2165, 10,16 and 26 with a cumulative HGDI of 0.99 for genotyping Lineage 4 and 5 strains from Ghana. PMID:24667333

  14. Comparative host specificity of human- and pig- associated Staphylococcus aureus clonal lineages.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Arshnee; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Nielsen, Søren S; McCarthy, Alex J; Lindsay, Jodi A; Guardabassi, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion is a crucial step in colonization of the skin. In this study, we investigated the differential adherence to human and pig corneocytes of six Staphylococcus aureus strains belonging to three human-associated [ST8 (CC8), ST22 (CC22) and ST36(CC30)] and two pig-associated [ST398 (CC398) and ST433(CC30)] clonal lineages, and their colonization potential in the pig host was assessed by in vivo competition experiments. Corneocytes were collected from 11 humans and 21 pigs using D-squame® adhesive discs, and bacterial adherence to corneocytes was quantified by a standardized light microscopy assay. A previously described porcine colonization model was used to assess the potential of the six strains to colonize the pig host. Three pregnant, S. aureus-free sows were inoculated intravaginally shortly before farrowing with different strain mixes [mix 1) human and porcine ST398; mix 2) human ST36 and porcine ST433; and mix 3) human ST8, ST22, ST36 and porcine ST398] and the ability of individual strains to colonize the nasal cavity of newborn piglets was evaluated for 28 days after birth by strain-specific antibiotic selective culture. In the corneocyte assay, the pig-associated ST433 strain and the human-associated ST22 and ST36 strains showed significantly greater adhesion to porcine and human corneocytes, respectively (p<0.0001). In contrast, ST8 and ST398 did not display preferential host binding patterns. In the in vivo competition experiment, ST8 was a better colonizer compared to ST22, ST36, and ST433 prevailed over ST36 in colonizing the newborn piglets. These results are partly in agreement with previous genetic and epidemiological studies indicating the host specificity of ST22, ST36 and ST433 and the broad-host range of ST398. However, our in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed an unexpected ability of ST8 to adhere to porcine corneocytes and persist in the nasal cavity of pigs.

  15. Lineage-Specific Patterns of Functional Diversification in the α- and β-Globin Gene Families of Tetrapod Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Jay F.; Gorr, Thomas A.; Opazo, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    The α- and β-globin gene families of jawed vertebrates have diversified with respect to both gene function and the developmental timing of gene expression. Phylogenetic reconstructions of globin gene family evolution have provided suggestive evidence that the developmental regulation of hemoglobin synthesis has evolved independently in multiple vertebrate lineages. For example, the embryonic β-like globin genes of birds and placental mammals are not 1:1 orthologs. Despite the similarity in developmental expression profiles, the genes are independently derived from lineage-specific duplications of a β-globin pro-ortholog. This suggests the possibility that other vertebrate taxa may also possess distinct repertoires of globin genes that were produced by repeated rounds of lineage-specific gene duplication and divergence. Until recently, investigations into this possibility have been hindered by the dearth of genomic sequence data from nonmammalian vertebrates. Here, we report new insights into globin gene family evolution that were provided by a phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate globins combined with a comparative genomic analysis of three key sauropsid taxa: a squamate reptile (anole lizard, Anolis carolinensis), a passeriform bird (zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata), and a galliform bird (chicken, Gallus gallus). The main objectives of this study were 1) to characterize evolutionary changes in the size and membership composition of the α- and β-globin gene families of tetrapod vertebrates and 2) to test whether functional diversification of the globin gene clusters occurred independently in different tetrapod lineages. Results of our comparative genomic analysis revealed several intriguing patterns of gene turnover in the globin gene clusters of different taxa. Lineage-specific differences in gene content were especially pronounced in the β-globin gene family, as phylogenetic reconstructions revealed that amphibians, lepidosaurs (as represented by anole

  16. BMP-mediated specification of the erythroid lineage suppresses endothelial development in blood island precursors

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Candace T.

    2013-01-01

    The developmental relationship between the blood and endothelial cell (EC) lineages remains unclear. In the extra-embryonic blood islands of birds and mammals, ECs and blood cells are closely intermixed, and blood island precursor cells in the primitive streak express many of the same molecular markers, leading to the suggestion that both lineages arise from a common precursor, called the hemangioblast. Cells within the blood island of Xenopus also coexpress predifferentiation markers of the blood and EC lineages. However, using multiple assays, we find that precursor cells in the Xenopus blood island do not normally differentiate into ECs, suggesting that classic hemangioblasts are rare or nonexistent in Xenopus. What prevents these precursor cells from developing into mature ECs? We have found that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is essential for erythroid differentiation, and in the absence of BMP signaling, precursor cells adopt an EC fate. Furthermore, inhibition of the erythroid transcription pathway leads to endothelial differentiation. Our results indicate that bipotential endothelial/erythroid precursor cells do indeed exist in the Xenopus blood island, but BMP signaling normally acts to constrain EC fate. More generally, these results provide evidence that commitment to the erythroid lineage limits development of bipotential precursors toward an endothelial fate. PMID:24100450

  17. Topologically associated domains enriched for lineage-specific genes reveal expression-dependent nuclear topologies during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Neems, Daniel S.; Garza-Gongora, Arturo G.; Smith, Erica D.; Kosak, Steven T.

    2016-01-01

    The linear distribution of genes across chromosomes and the spatial localization of genes within the nucleus are related to their transcriptional regulation. The mechanistic consequences of linear gene order, and how it may relate to the functional output of genome organization, remain to be fully resolved, however. Here we tested the relationship between linear and 3D organization of gene regulation during myogenesis. Our analysis has identified a subset of topologically associated domains (TADs) that are significantly enriched for muscle-specific genes. These lineage-enriched TADs demonstrate an expression-dependent pattern of nuclear organization that influences the positioning of adjacent nonenriched TADs. Therefore, lineage-enriched TADs inform cell-specific genome organization during myogenesis. The reduction of allelic spatial distance of one of these domains, which contains Myogenin, correlates with reduced transcriptional variability, identifying a potential role for lineage-specific nuclear topology. Using a fusion-based strategy to decouple mitosis and myotube formation, we demonstrate that the cell-specific topology of syncytial nuclei is dependent on cell division. We propose that the effects of linear and spatial organization of gene loci on gene regulation are linked through TAD architecture, and that mitosis is critical for establishing nuclear topologies during cellular differentiation. PMID:26957603

  18. A reporter mouse reveals lineage-specific and heterogeneous expression of IRF8 during lymphoid and myeloid cell differentiation1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongsheng; Yan, Ming; Sun, Jiafang; Jain, Shweta; Yoshimi, Ryusuke; Abolfath, Sanaz Momben; Ozato, Keiko; Coleman, William G.; Ng, Ashley P.; Metcalf, Donald; DiRago, Ladina; Nutt, Stephen L.; Morse, Herbert C.

    2014-01-01

    The interferon regulatory factor family member 8 (IRF8) regulates differentiation of lymphoid and myeloid lineage cells by promoting or suppressing lineage-specific genes. How IRF8 promotes hematopoietic progenitors to commit to one lineage while preventing the development of alternative lineages is not known. Here we report an IRF8-EGFP fusion protein reporter mouse that revealed previously unrecognized patterns of IRF8 expression. Differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into oligopotent progenitors is associated with progressive increases in IRF8-EGFP expression. However, significant induction of IRF8-EGFP is found in granulocyte-myeloid progenitors (GMPs) and the common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs) but not the megakaryocytic-erythroid progenitors. Surprisingly, IRF8-EGFP identifies three subsets of the seemingly homogeneous GMPs with an intermediate level of expression of EGFP defining bipotent progenitors that differentiation into either EGFPhi monocytic progenitors or EGFPlo granulocytic progenitors. Also surprisingly, IRF8-EGFP revealed a highly heterogeneous pre-pro-B population with a fluorescence intensity ranging from background to 4 orders above background. Interestingly, IRF8-EGFP readily distinguishes true B cell-committed (EGFPint) from those that are non-committed. Moreover, dendritic cell progenitors expressed extremely high levels of IRF8-EGFP. Taken together, the IRF8-EGFP reporter revealed previously unrecognized subsets with distinct developmental potentials in phenotypically well-defined oligopotent progenitors, providing new insights into the dynamic heterogeneity of developing hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:25024380

  19. Drosophila poised enhancers are generated during tissue patterning with the help of repression

    PubMed Central

    Koenecke, Nina; Johnston, Jeff; He, Qiye; Meier, Samuel; Zeitlinger, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Histone modifications are frequently used as markers for enhancer states, but how to interpret enhancer states in the context of embryonic development is not clear. The poised enhancer signature, involving H3K4me1 and low levels of H3K27ac, has been reported to mark inactive enhancers that are poised for future activation. However, future activation is not always observed, and alternative reasons for the widespread occurrence of this enhancer signature have not been investigated. By analyzing enhancers during dorsal-ventral (DV) axis formation in the Drosophila embryo, we find that the poised enhancer signature is specifically generated during patterning in the tissue where the enhancers are not induced, including at enhancers that are known to be repressed by a transcriptional repressor. These results suggest that, rather than serving exclusively as an intermediate step before future activation, the poised enhancer state may be a mark for spatial regulation during tissue patterning. We discuss the possibility that the poised enhancer state is more generally the result of repression by transcriptional repressors. PMID:27979994

  20. Lineage-specific detection of influenza B virus using real-time polymerase chain reaction with melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Tewawong, Nipaporn; Chansaenroj, Jira; Klinfueng, Sirapa; Vichiwattana, Preeyaporn; Korkong, Sumeth; Thongmee, Thanunrat; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Payungporn, Sunchai; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Poovorawan, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Influenza B viruses comprise two lineages, Victoria (B/Vic) and Yamagata (B/Yam), which co-circulate globally. The surveillance data on influenza B virus lineages in many countries often underestimate the true prevalence due to the lack of a rapid, accurate, and cost-effective method for virus detection. We have developed a real-time PCR with melting curve analysis for lineage-specific differential detection of influenza B virus. By amplifying a region of the hemagglutinin gene using real-time PCR with SYBR Green I dye, B/Vic and B/Yam could be differentiated based on their melting temperature peaks. This method was efficient (B/Vic = 93.2 %; B/Yam 97.7 %), sensitive (B/Vic, 94.6 %; B/Yam, 96.3 %), and specific (B/Vic, 97.7 %; B/Yam, 97.1 %). The lower detection limit was 10(2) copies per microliter. The assay was evaluated using 756 respiratory specimens that were positive for influenza B virus, obtained between 2010 and 2015. The incidence of influenza B virus was approximately 18.9 % of all influenza cases, and the percentage was highest among children aged 6-17 years (7.57 %). The overall percentage of mismatched influenza B vaccine was 21.1 %. Our findings suggest that real-time PCR with melting curve analysis can provide a rapid, simple, and sensitive lineage-specific influenza B virus screening method to facilitate influenza surveillance.

  1. Ttk69 acts as a master repressor of enteroendocrine cell specification in Drosophila intestinal stem cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Guo, Xingting; Dou, Kun; Chen, Hongyan; Xi, Rongwen

    2015-10-01

    In adult Drosophila midgut, intestinal stem cells (ISCs) periodically produce progenitor cells that undergo a binary fate choice determined primarily by the levels of Notch activity that they receive, before terminally differentiating into enterocytes (ECs) or enteroendocrine (EE) cells. Here we identified Ttk69, a BTB domain-containing transcriptional repressor, as a master repressor of EE cell specification in the ISC lineages. Depletion of ttk69 in progenitor cells induced ISC proliferation and caused all committed progenitor cells to adopt EE fate, leading to the production of supernumerary EE cells in the intestinal epithelium. Conversely, forced expression of Ttk69 in progenitor cells was sufficient to prevent EE cell specification. The expression of Ttk69 was not regulated by Notch signaling, and forced activation of Notch, which is sufficient to induce EC specification of normal progenitor cells, failed to prevent EE cell specification of Ttk69-depleted progenitors. Loss of Ttk69 led to derepression of the acheate-scute complex (AS-C) genes scute and asense, which then induced prospero expression to promote EE cell specification. These studies suggest that Ttk69 functions in parallel with Notch signaling and acts as a master repressor of EE cell specification in Drosophila ISC lineages primarily by suppressing AS-C genes.

  2. The ubiquitous transcription factor CTCF promotes lineage-specific epigenomic remodeling and establishment of transcriptional networks driving cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dubois-Chevalier, Julie; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cell differentiation relies on tissue-specific transcription factors (TFs) that cooperate to establish unique transcriptomes and phenotypes. However, the role of ubiquitous TFs in these processes remains poorly defined. Recently, we have shown that the CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is required for adipocyte differentiation through epigenomic remodelling of adipose tissue-specific enhancers and transcriptional activation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG), the main driver of the adipogenic program (PPARG), and its target genes. Here, we discuss how these findings, together with the recent literature, illuminate a functional role for ubiquitous TFs in lineage-determining transcriptional networks.

  3. The ubiquitous transcription factor CTCF promotes lineage-specific epigenomic remodeling and establishment of transcriptional networks driving cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dubois-Chevalier, Julie; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Eeckhoute, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cell differentiation relies on tissue-specific transcription factors (TFs) that cooperate to establish unique transcriptomes and phenotypes. However, the role of ubiquitous TFs in these processes remains poorly defined. Recently, we have shown that the CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is required for adipocyte differentiation through epigenomic remodelling of adipose tissue-specific enhancers and transcriptional activation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG), the main driver of the adipogenic program (PPARG), and its target genes. Here, we discuss how these findings, together with the recent literature, illuminate a functional role for ubiquitous TFs in lineage-determining transcriptional networks. PMID:25565413

  4. Sex-and lineage-specific inheritance of depression-like behavior in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Leah C.; Baum, Amber E.; Ahmadiyeh, Nasim; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Li, Renhua; Turek, Fred W.; Churchil, Gary A.; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Redei, Eva E.

    2013-01-01

    The Wistar–Kyoto (WKY) rat exhibits physiological and behavioral similarities to endophenotypes of human depression. In the forced swim test (FST), a wel-characterized antidepressant-reversible test for behavioral despair in rodents, WKYs express characteristics of behavioral despair; increased immobility, and decreased climbing. To map genetic loci linked to behavior in the FST, we conducted a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of the segregating F2 generation of a WKY · Fisher 344 (F344) reciprocal intercross. Using linear-model-based genome scans to include covariate (sex or lineage) by-QTL interaction effects, four significant QTL influencing climbing behavior were identified. In addition, we identified three, seven, and two suggestive QTL for climbing, immobility, and swimming, respectively. One of these loci was pleiotropic, affecting both immobility and climbing. As found in human linkage studies, several of these QTL showed sex-and/or lineage-dependent effects. A simultaneous search strategy identified three epistatic locus pairs for climbing. Multiple regression analysis was employed to characterize the joint contributions of these QTL and to clarify the sex-and lineage-dependent effects. As expected for complex traits, FST behavior is influenced by multiple QTL of smal effect, each contributing 5%–10%, accounting for a total 10%–30% of the phenotypic variance. A number of loci mapped in this study share overlapping candidate regions with previously identified emotionality QTL in mice as wel as with susceptibility loci recognized by linkage or genome scan analyses for major depression or bipolar disorder in humans. The presence of these loci across species suggests that these QTL may represent universal genetic factors contributing to mood disorders. PMID:15457344

  5. Sex- and lineage-specific inheritance of depression-like behavior in the rat.

    PubMed

    Solberg, Leah C; Baum, Amber E; Ahmadiyeh, Nasim; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Li, Renhua; Turek, Fred W; Churchill, Gary A; Takahashi, Joseph S; Redei, Eva E

    2004-08-01

    The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat exhibits physiological and behavioral similarities to endophenotypes of human depression. In the forced swim test (FST), a well-characterized antidepressant-reversible test for behavioral despair in rodents, WKYs express characteristics of behavioral despair; increased immobility, and decreased climbing. To map genetic loci linked to behavior in the FST, we conducted a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of the segregating F2 generation of a WKY x Fisher 344 (F344) reciprocal intercross. Using linear-model-based genome scans to include covariate (sex or lineage)-by-QTL interaction effects, four significant QTL influencing climbing behavior were identified. In addition, we identified three, seven, and two suggestive QTL for climbing, immobility, and swimming, respectively. One of these loci was pleiotropic, affecting both immobility and climbing. As found in human linkage studies, several of these QTL showed sex- and/or lineage-dependent effects. A simultaneous search strategy identified three epistatic locus pairs for climbing. Multiple regression analysis was employed to characterize the joint contributions of these QTL and to clarify the sex- and lineage-dependent effects. As expected for complex traits, FST behavior is influenced by multiple QTL of small effect, each contributing 5%-10%, accounting for a total 10%-30% of the phenotypic variance. A number of loci mapped in this study share overlapping candidate regions with previously identified emotionality QTL in mice as well as with susceptibility loci recognized by linkage or genome scan analyses for major depression or bipolar disorder in humans. The presence of these loci across species suggests that these QTL may represent universal genetic factors contributing to mood disorders.

  6. Ecological and Lineage-Specific Factors Drive the Molecular Evolution of Rhodopsin in Cichlid Fishes.

    PubMed

    Torres-Dowdall, Julián; Henning, Frederico; Elmer, Kathryn R; Meyer, Axel

    2015-11-01

    The visual system in the colorful cichlid fishes from the African great lakes is believed to be important for their adaptive radiations. However, few studies have attempted to compare the visual system of radiating cichlid lineages with that of cichlids that have not undergone recent radiations. One such study published in this journal (Schott RK, Refvik SP, Hauser FE, López-Fernández H, Chang BSW. 2014. Divergent positive selection in rhodopsin from lake and riverine cichlid fishes. Mol Biol Evol. 31:1149-1165) found divergent selection on rhodopsin between African lacustrine and riverine cichlid species and riverine Neotropical cichlids, concluding that ecology drives the molecular evolution of this opsin. Here, we expand this analysis by incorporating rhodopsin sequences from Neotropical lacustrine cichlids and show that both ecology and phylogeny are important drivers of the molecular evolution of rhodopsin in cichlids. We found little overlap of sites under selection between African and Neotropical lineages and a faster rate of molecular evolution in African compared with Neotropical cichlids. These results support the notion that genetic or population genetic features particular to African cichlids contributed to their radiations.

  7. Lineage-specific function of Engrailed-2 in the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia to T-cell blast crisis.

    PubMed

    Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Inés; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; González, Marcos; Segura, Víctor; Blanco, Oscar; Martínez-Climent, José Angel; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Cobaleda, César

    2014-01-01

    In hematopoietic malignancies, oncogenic alterations interfere with cellular differentiation and lead to tumoral development. Identification of the proteins regulating differentiation is essential to understand how they are altered in malignancies. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a biphasic disease initiated by an alteration taking place in hematopoietic stem cells. CML progresses to a blast crisis (BC) due to a secondary differentiation block in any of the hematopoietic lineages. However, the molecular mechanisms of CML evolution to T-cell BC remain unclear. Here, we have profiled the changes in DNA methylation patterns in human samples from BC-CML, in order to identify genes whose expression is epigenetically silenced during progression to T-cell lineage-specific BC. We have found that the CpG-island of the ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) gene becomes methylated in this progression. Afterwards, we demonstrate that En2 is expressed during T-cell development in mice and humans. Finally, we further show that genetic deletion of En2 in a CML transgenic mouse model induces a T-cell lineage BC that recapitulates human disease. These results identify En2 as a new regulator of T-cell differentiation whose disruption induces a malignant T-cell fate in CML progression, and validate the strategy used to identify new developmental regulators of hematopoiesis.

  8. Lineage-specific function of Engrailed-2 in the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia to T-cell blast crisis

    PubMed Central

    Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Inés; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; González, Marcos; Segura, Víctor; Blanco, Óscar; Martínez-Climent, José Ángel; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Cobaleda, César

    2014-01-01

    In hematopoietic malignancies, oncogenic alterations interfere with cellular differentiation and lead to tumoral development. Identification of the proteins regulating differentiation is essential to understand how they are altered in malignancies. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a biphasic disease initiated by an alteration taking place in hematopoietic stem cells. CML progresses to a blast crisis (BC) due to a secondary differentiation block in any of the hematopoietic lineages. However, the molecular mechanisms of CML evolution to T-cell BC remain unclear. Here, we have profiled the changes in DNA methylation patterns in human samples from BC-CML, in order to identify genes whose expression is epigenetically silenced during progression to T-cell lineage-specific BC. We have found that the CpG-island of the ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) gene becomes methylated in this progression. Afterwards, we demonstrate that En2 is expressed during T-cell development in mice and humans. Finally, we further show that genetic deletion of En2 in a CML transgenic mouse model induces a T-cell lineage BC that recapitulates human disease. These results identify En2 as a new regulator of T-cell differentiation whose disruption induces a malignant T-cell fate in CML progression, and validate the strategy used to identify new developmental regulators of hematopoiesis. PMID:24675889

  9. An in vitro adherence assay reveals that Helicobacter pylori exhibits cell lineage-specific tropism in the human gastric epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Falk, P; Roth, K A; Borén, T; Westblom, T U; Gordon, J I; Normark, S

    1993-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic bacterium found in the stomach of asymptomatic humans as well as patients with acid peptic disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. We have developed an in situ adherence assay to examine the cell lineage-specific nature of binding of this organism and to characterize the nature of cell surface receptors that recognize its adhesin. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled H. pylori strains were bound to surface mucous cells present in the pit region of human and rat gastric units but not to mucous neck, parietal, or chief cell lineages present in the glandular domains of these units. Binding was abolished by proteinase K treatment of tissue sections and by pretreatment of the bacteria with bovine submaxillary gland mucin, a rich source of fucosylated and sialylated carbohydrates. Several lines of evidence suggest that binding to surface mucous cells is not dependent upon terminal nonsubstituted alpha 2,3- and alpha 2,6-linked sialic acids in the adhesin receptor: (i) binding was not inhibited by incubating H. pylori strains with sialylated glycoconjugates such as fetuin and free sialyllactose; (ii) immunohistochemical stainings using the sialic acid-specific Sambucus nigra and Maackia amurensis lectins and the cholera toxin B subunit did not detect any sialylated glycoconjugates in these epithelial cells; and (iii) binding was not sensitive to metaperiodate under conditions that selectively cleaved carbons 8 and 9 of terminal nonmodified sialic acids. A role for fucosylated epitopes in the glycoprotein(s) that mediate binding of H. pylori to surface mucous cells was suggested by the facts that this lineage coexpresses the adhesin receptor and major fucosylated histo-blood group antigens, that monoclonal antibodies specific for histo-blood group antigens H, B, and Leb block binding, and that the lectin Ulex europaeus type 1 agglutinin, which is specific for alpha-L-fucose, also bound to the same cells that bound the bacteria

  10. Directing lineage specification of human mesenchymal stem cells by decoupling electrical stimulation and physical patterning on unmodified graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balikov, Daniel A.; Fang, Brian; Chun, Young Wook; Crowder, Spencer W.; Prasai, Dhiraj; Lee, Jung Bok; Bolotin, Kiril I.; Sung, Hak-Joon

    2016-07-01

    The organization and composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to impact the propagation of electrical signals in multiple tissue types. To date, many studies with electroactive biomaterial substrates have relied upon passive electrical stimulation of the ionic media to affect cell behavior. However, development of cell culture systems in which stimulation can be directly applied to the material - thereby isolating the signal to the cell-material interface and cell-cell contracts - would provide a more physiologically-relevant paradigm for investigating how electrical cues modulate lineage-specific stem cell differentiation. In the present study, we have employed unmodified, directly-stimulated, (un)patterned graphene as a cell culture substrate to investigate how extrinsic electrical cycling influences the differentiation of naïve human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) without the bias of exogenous biochemicals. We first demonstrated that cyclic stimulation does not deteriorate the cell culture media or result in cytotoxic pH, which are critical experiments for correct interpretation of changes in cell behavior. We then measured how the expression of osteogenic and neurogenic lineage-specific markers were altered simply by exposure to electrical stimulation and/or physical patterns. Expression of the early osteogenic transcription factor RUNX2 was increased by electrical stimulation on all graphene substrates, but the mature marker osteopontin was only modulated when stimulation was combined with physical patterns. In contrast, the expression of the neurogenic markers MAP2 and β3-tubulin were enhanced in all electrical stimulation conditions, and were less responsive to the presence of patterns. These data indicate that specific combinations of non-biological inputs - material type, electrical stimulation, physical patterns - can regulate hMSC lineage specification. This study represents a substantial step in understanding how the interplay of

  11. Lineage-specific roles of the cytoplasmic polyadenylation factor CPEB4 in the regulation of melanoma drivers

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Guijarro, Eva; Karras, Panagiotis; Cifdaloz, Metehan; Martínez-Herranz, Raúl; Cañón, Estela; Graña, Osvaldo; Horcajada-Reales, Celia; Alonso-Curbelo, Direna; Calvo, Tonantzin G.; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Bellora, Nicolas; Riveiro-Falkenbach, Erica; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L.; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L.; Maestre, Lorena; Roncador, Giovanna; de Agustín Asensio, Juan C.; Goding, Colin R.; Eyras, Eduardo; Megías, Diego; Méndez, Raúl; Soengas, María S.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear 3'-end-polyadenylation is essential for the transport, stability and translation of virtually all eukaryotic mRNAs. Poly(A) tail extension can also occur in the cytoplasm, but the transcripts involved are incompletely understood, particularly in cancer. Here we identify a lineage-specific requirement of the cytoplasmic polyadenylation binding protein 4 (CPEB4) in malignant melanoma. CPEB4 is upregulated early in melanoma progression, as defined by computational and histological analyses. Melanoma cells are distinct from other tumour cell types in their dependency on CPEB4, not only to prevent mitotic aberrations, but to progress through G1/S cell cycle checkpoints. RNA immunoprecipitation, sequencing of bound transcripts and poly(A) length tests link the melanoma-specific functions of CPEB4 to signalling hubs specifically enriched in this disease. Essential in these CPEB4-controlled networks are the melanoma drivers MITF and RAB7A, a feature validated in clinical biopsies. These results provide new mechanistic links between cytoplasmic polyadenylation and lineage specification in melanoma. PMID:27857118

  12. Parallel Evolution and Lineage-Specific Expansion of RNA Editing in Ctenophores

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Andrea B.; Sanford, Rachel S.; Yoshida, Masa-aki; Moroz, Leonid L.

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing is a process of targeted alterations of nucleotides in all types of RNA molecules (e.g., rRNA, tRNA, mRNA, and miRNA). As a result, the transcriptional output differs from its genomic DNA template. RNA editing can be defined both by biochemical mechanisms and by enzymes that perform these reactions. There are high levels of RNA editing detected in the mammalian nervous system, suggesting that nervous systems use this mechanism to increase protein diversity, because the post-transcription modifications lead to new gene products with novel functions. By re-annotating the ctenophore genomes, we found that the number of predicted RNA-editing enzymes is comparable to the numbers in mammals, but much greater than in other non-bilaterian basal metazoans. However, the overall molecular diversity of RNA-editing enzymes in ctenophores is lower, suggesting a possible “compensation” by an expansion of the ADAT1-like subfamily in this lineage. In two genera of ctenophores, Pleurobrachia and Mnemiopsis, there are high levels of expression for RNA-editing enzymes in their aboral organs, the integrative center involved in control of locomotion and geotaxis. This finding supports the hypothesis that RNA editing is correlated with the complexity of tissues and behaviors. Smaller numbers of RNA-editing enzymes in Porifera and Placozoa also correlates with the primary absence of neural and muscular systems in these lineages. In ctenophores, the expansion of the RNA-editing machinery can also provide mechanisms that support the remarkable capacity for regeneration in these animals. In summary, despite their compact genomes, a wide variety of epigenomic mechanisms employed by ctenophores and other non-bilaterian basal metazoans can provide novel insights into the evolutionary origins of biological novelties. PMID:26089435

  13. Lineage-specific loss of FGF17 within the avian orders Galliformes and Passeriformes

    PubMed Central

    Abramyan, John

    2015-01-01

    The genomic and developmental complexity of vertebrates is commonly attributed to two rounds of whole genome duplications which occurred at the base of the vertebrate radiation. These duplications led to the rise of several, multi-gene families of developmental proteins like the Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs); a signaling protein family which functions at various stages of embryonic development. One of the major FGF assemblages arising from these duplications is the FGF8 subfamily, which includes FGF8, FGF17, and FGF18 in tetrapods. While FGF8 and FGF18 are found in all tetrapods and are critical for embryonic survival, genomic analyses suggest putative loss of FGF17 in various lineages ranging from frogs and fish, to the chicken. This study utilizes 27 avian genomes in conjunction with molecular analyses of chicken embryos to confirm the loss of FGF17 in chicken as a true, biological occurrence. FGF17 is also missing in the turkey, black grouse, Japanese quail and the northern bobwhite genomes. These species, along with chicken, form a monophyletic clade in the order Galliformes. Four additional species, members of the clade Passeroidea, within the order Passeriformes, are also missing FGF17. Additionally, analysis of intact FGF17 in other avian lineages reveals that it is still under strong purifying selection, despite being seemingly dispensable. Thus, FGF17 likely represents a molecular spandrel arising from a genome duplication event and due to its high connectivity with FGF8/FGF18, and potential for interference with their function, is retained under strong purifying selection, despite itself not having a strong selective advantage. PMID:25791492

  14. Parallel Evolution and Lineage-Specific Expansion of RNA Editing in Ctenophores.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Andrea B; Sanford, Rachel S; Yoshida, Masa-aki; Moroz, Leonid L

    2015-12-01

    RNA editing is a process of targeted alterations of nucleotides in all types of RNA molecules (e.g., rRNA, tRNA, mRNA, and miRNA). As a result, the transcriptional output differs from its genomic DNA template. RNA editing can be defined both by biochemical mechanisms and by enzymes that perform these reactions. There are high levels of RNA editing detected in the mammalian nervous system, suggesting that nervous systems use this mechanism to increase protein diversity, because the post-transcription modifications lead to new gene products with novel functions. By re-annotating the ctenophore genomes, we found that the number of predicted RNA-editing enzymes is comparable to the numbers in mammals, but much greater than in other non-bilaterian basal metazoans. However, the overall molecular diversity of RNA-editing enzymes in ctenophores is lower, suggesting a possible "compensation" by an expansion of the ADAT1-like subfamily in this lineage. In two genera of ctenophores, Pleurobrachia and Mnemiopsis, there are high levels of expression for RNA-editing enzymes in their aboral organs, the integrative center involved in control of locomotion and geotaxis. This finding supports the hypothesis that RNA editing is correlated with the complexity of tissues and behaviors. Smaller numbers of RNA-editing enzymes in Porifera and Placozoa also correlates with the primary absence of neural and muscular systems in these lineages. In ctenophores, the expansion of the RNA-editing machinery can also provide mechanisms that support the remarkable capacity for regeneration in these animals. In summary, despite their compact genomes, a wide variety of epigenomic mechanisms employed by ctenophores and other non-bilaterian basal metazoans can provide novel insights into the evolutionary origins of biological novelties.

  15. Pan-genome analyses identify lineage- and niche-specific markers of evolution and adaptation in Epsilonproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Sievert, Stefan M.

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly increasing availability of complete bacterial genomes has created new opportunities for reconstructing bacterial evolution, but it has also highlighted the difficulty to fully understand the genomic and functional variations occurring among different lineages. Using the class Epsilonproteobacteria as a case study, we investigated the composition, flexibility, and function of its pan-genomes. Models were constructed to extrapolate the expansion of pan-genomes at three different taxonomic levels. The results show that, for Epsilonproteobacteria the seemingly large genome variations among strains of the same species are less noticeable when compared with groups at higher taxonomic ranks, indicating that genome stability is imposed by the potential existence of taxonomic boundaries. The analyses of pan-genomes has also defined a set of universally conserved core genes, based on which a phylogenetic tree was constructed to confirm that thermophilic species from deep-sea hydrothermal vents represent the most ancient lineages of Epsilonproteobacteria. Moreover, by comparing the flexible genome of a chemoautotrophic deep-sea vent species to (1) genomes of species belonging to the same genus, but inhabiting different environments, and (2) genomes of other vent species, but belonging to different genera, we were able to delineate the relative importance of lineage-specific versus niche-specific genes. This result not only emphasizes the overall importance of phylogenetic proximity in shaping the variable part of the genome, but also highlights the adaptive functions of niche-specific genes. Overall, by modeling the expansion of pan-genomes and analyzing core and flexible genes, this study provides snapshots on how the complex processes of gene acquisition, conservation, and removal affect the evolution of different species, and contribute to the metabolic diversity and versatility of Epsilonproteobacteria. PMID:24678308

  16. Comparative cell-specific transcriptomics reveals differentiation of C4 photosynthesis pathways in switchgrass and other C4 lineages

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Xiaolan; Lu, Nan; Li, Guifen; Nakashima, Jin; Tang, Yuhong; Dixon, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Almost all C4 plants require the co-ordination of the adjacent and fully differentiated cell types, mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS). The C4 photosynthetic pathway operates through two distinct subtypes based on how malate is decarboxylated in BS cells; through NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) or NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME). The diverse or unique cell-specific molecular features of M and BS cells from separate C4 subtypes of independent lineages remain to be determined. We here provide an M/BS cell type-specific transcriptome data set from the monocot NAD-ME subtype switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). A comparative transcriptomics approach was then applied to compare the M/BS mRNA profiles of switchgrass, monocot NADP-ME subtype C4 plants maize and Setaria viridis, and dicot NAD-ME subtype Cleome gynandra. We evaluated the convergence in the transcript abundance of core components in C4 photosynthesis and transcription factors to establish Kranz anatomy, as well as gene distribution of biological functions, in these four independent C4 lineages. We also estimated the divergence between NAD-ME and NADP-ME subtypes of C4 photosynthesis in the two cell types within C4 species, including differences in genes encoding decarboxylating enzymes, aminotransferases, and metabolite transporters, and differences in the cell-specific functional enrichment of RNA regulation and protein biogenesis/homeostasis. We suggest that C4 plants of independent lineages in both monocots and dicots underwent convergent evolution to establish C4 photosynthesis, while distinct C4 subtypes also underwent divergent processes for the optimization of M and BS cell co-ordination. The comprehensive data sets in our study provide a basis for further research on evolution of C4 species. PMID:26896851

  17. Comparative cell-specific transcriptomics reveals differentiation of C4 photosynthesis pathways in switchgrass and other C4 lineages.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiaolan; Lu, Nan; Li, Guifen; Nakashima, Jin; Tang, Yuhong; Dixon, Richard A

    2016-03-01

    Almost all C4 plants require the co-ordination of the adjacent and fully differentiated cell types, mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS). The C4 photosynthetic pathway operates through two distinct subtypes based on how malate is decarboxylated in BS cells; through NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) or NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME). The diverse or unique cell-specific molecular features of M and BS cells from separate C4 subtypes of independent lineages remain to be determined. We here provide an M/BS cell type-specific transcriptome data set from the monocot NAD-ME subtype switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). A comparative transcriptomics approach was then applied to compare the M/BS mRNA profiles of switchgrass, monocot NADP-ME subtype C4 plants maize and Setaria viridis, and dicot NAD-ME subtype Cleome gynandra. We evaluated the convergence in the transcript abundance of core components in C4 photosynthesis and transcription factors to establish Kranz anatomy, as well as gene distribution of biological functions, in these four independent C4 lineages. We also estimated the divergence between NAD-ME and NADP-ME subtypes of C4 photosynthesis in the two cell types within C4 species, including differences in genes encoding decarboxylating enzymes, aminotransferases, and metabolite transporters, and differences in the cell-specific functional enrichment of RNA regulation and protein biogenesis/homeostasis. We suggest that C4 plants of independent lineages in both monocots and dicots underwent convergent evolution to establish C4 photosynthesis, while distinct C4 subtypes also underwent divergent processes for the optimization of M and BS cell co-ordination. The comprehensive data sets in our study provide a basis for further research on evolution of C4 species.

  18. An autonomous CEBPA enhancer specific for myeloid-lineage priming and neutrophilic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Avellino, Roberto; Havermans, Marije; Erpelinck, Claudia; Sanders, Mathijs A.; Hoogenboezem, Remco; van de Werken, Harmen J. G.; Rombouts, Elwin; van Lom, Kirsten; van Strien, Paulina M. H.; Gebhard, Claudia; Rehli, Michael; Pimanda, John; Beck, Dominik; Erkeland, Stefan; Kuiken, Thijs; de Looper, Hans; Gröschel, Stefan; Touw, Ivo; Bindels, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophilic differentiation is dependent on CCAAT enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), a transcription factor expressed in multiple organs including the bone marrow. Using functional genomic technologies in combination with clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 genome editing and in vivo mouse modeling, we show that CEBPA is located in a 170-kb topological-associated domain that contains 14 potential enhancers. Of these, 1 enhancer located +42 kb from CEBPA is active and engages with the CEBPA promoter in myeloid cells only. Germ line deletion of the homologous enhancer in mice in vivo reduces Cebpa levels exclusively in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and myeloid-primed progenitor cells leading to severe defects in the granulocytic lineage, without affecting any other Cebpa-expressing organ studied. The enhancer-deleted progenitor cells lose their myeloid transcription program and are blocked in differentiation. Deletion of the enhancer also causes loss of HSC maintenance. We conclude that a single +42-kb enhancer is essential for CEBPA expression in myeloid cells only. PMID:26966090

  19. miRNA-embedded shRNAs for Lineage-specific BCL11A Knockdown and Hemoglobin F Induction

    PubMed Central

    Guda, Swaroopa; Brendel, Christian; Renella, Raffaele; Du, Peng; Bauer, Daniel E; Canver, Matthew C; Grenier, Jennifer K; Grimson, Andrew W; Kamran, Sophia C; Thornton, James; de Boer, Helen; Root, David E; Milsom, Michael D; Orkin, Stuart H; Gregory, Richard I; Williams, David A

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) expressed via RNA polymerase (pol) III promoters has been widely exploited to modulate gene expression in a variety of mammalian cell types. For certain applications, such as lineage-specific knockdown, embedding targeting sequences into pol II-driven microRNA (miRNA) architecture is required. Here, using the potential therapeutic target BCL11A, we demonstrate that pol III-driven shRNAs lead to significantly increased knockdown but also increased cytotoxcity in comparison to pol II-driven miRNA adapted shRNAs (shRNAmiR) in multiple hematopoietic cell lines. We show that the two expression systems yield mature guide strand sequences that differ by a 4 bp shift. This results in alternate seed sequences and consequently influences the efficacy of target gene knockdown. Incorporating a corresponding 4 bp shift into the guide strand of shRNAmiRs resulted in improved knockdown efficiency of BCL11A. This was associated with a significant de-repression of the hemoglobin target of BCL11A, human γ-globin or the murine homolog Hbb-y. Our results suggest the requirement for optimization of shRNA sequences upon incorporation into a miRNA backbone. These findings have important implications in future design of shRNAmiRs for RNAi-based therapy in hemoglobinopathies and other diseases requiring lineage-specific expression of gene silencing sequences. PMID:26080908

  20. Reconstruction of cyclooxygenase evolution in animals suggests variable, lineage-specific duplications, and homologs with low sequence identity.

    PubMed

    Havird, Justin C; Kocot, Kevin M; Brannock, Pamela M; Cannon, Johanna T; Waits, Damien S; Weese, David A; Santos, Scott R; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2015-04-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymatically converts arachidonic acid into prostaglandin G/H in animals and has importance during pregnancy, digestion, and other physiological functions in mammals. COX genes have mainly been described from vertebrates, where gene duplications are common, but few studies have examined COX in invertebrates. Given the increasing ease in generating genomic data, as well as recent, although incomplete descriptions of potential COX sequences in Mollusca, Crustacea, and Insecta, assessing COX evolution across Metazoa is now possible. Here, we recover 40 putative COX orthologs by searching publicly available genomic resources as well as ~250 novel invertebrate transcriptomic datasets. Results suggest the common ancestor of Cnidaria and Bilateria possessed a COX homolog similar to those of vertebrates, although such homologs were not found in poriferan and ctenophore genomes. COX was found in most crustaceans and the majority of molluscs examined, but only specific taxa/lineages within Cnidaria and Annelida. For example, all octocorallians appear to have COX, while no COX homologs were found in hexacorallian datasets. Most species examined had a single homolog, although species-specific COX duplications were found in members of Annelida, Mollusca, and Cnidaria. Additionally, COX genes were not found in Hemichordata, Echinodermata, or Platyhelminthes, and the few previously described COX genes in Insecta lacked appreciable sequence homology (although structural analyses suggest these may still be functional COX enzymes). This analysis provides a benchmark for identifying COX homologs in future genomic and transcriptomic datasets, and identifies lineages for future studies of COX.

  1. Early preimplantation cells expressing Cdx2 exhibit plasticity of specification to TE and ICM lineages through positional changes.

    PubMed

    Toyooka, Yayoi; Oka, Sanae; Fujimori, Toshihiko

    2016-03-01

    The establishment of the trophectoderm (TE) and the inner cell mass (ICM) is the first cell lineage segregation to occur in mouse preimplantation development. These two cell lineages arise in a position-dependent manner at the blastocyst stage: the outer cells form TE, which will generate the future placenta, while the inner cells give rise to the ICM, from which the epiblast (EPI) and primitive endoderm (PrE) arise. Previous studies have shown that a portion of cells relocate from the outside position to the inside during this preimplantation stage, but few studies have investigated the correlation between cell relocation and the expression of key transcription factors critical for cell differentiation. To monitor cell movement and the status of the TE-specification pathway in living embryos, we established Cdx2-GFP reporter mice allowing us to visualize the expression of Caudal-type transcriptional factor (Cdx2), a key regulator of the initiation of TE differentiation. Observation of Cdx2-GFP preimplantation embryos by live cell imaging revealed that all cells localized in an initial outer position initiated the expression of Cdx2. Subsequently, cells that changed their position from an outer to an inner position downregulated Cdx2 expression and contributed to the ICM. Finally we showed that internalized cells likely contribute to both the EPI and PrE. Our datas indicate that cells expressing even high levels of Cdx2 can internalize, deactivate an activated TE-specification molecular pathway and integrate into the pluripotent cell population.

  2. Dynamics of 5-carboxylcytosine during hepatic differentiation: potential general role for active demethylation by DNA repair in lineage specification.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Lara C; Lo, Peggy Cho Kiu; Foster, Jeremy M; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Ivan R; Durczak, Paulina M; Duncan, Gary; Ramsawhook, Ashley; Aithal, Guruprasad Padur; Denning, Chris; Hannan, Nicholas R F; Ruzov, Alexey

    2017-03-07

    Patterns of DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine, 5mC) are rearranged during differentiation contributing to the regulation of cell type-specific gene expression. TET proteins oxidize 5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC). Both 5fC and 5caC can be recognized and excised from DNA by thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) followed by the subsequent incorporation of unmodified cytosine into the abasic site via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. We previously demonstrated that 5caC accumulates during lineage specification of neural stem cells (NSCs) suggesting that such active demethylation pathway is operative in this system; however, it is still unknown if TDG/BER-dependent demethylation is utilized during other types of cellular differentiation. Here we analyze dynamics of the global levels of 5hmC and 5caC during differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells towards hepatic endoderm. We show that, similar to differentiating NSCs, 5caC transiently accumulates during hepatic differentiation. The levels of 5caC increase during specification of foregut, peak at the stage of hepatic endoderm commitment, and drop in differentiating cells concurrently with the onset of expression of alpha fetoprotein, a marker of committed hepatic progenitors. Moreover, we show that 5caC accumulates at promoter regions of several genes expressed during hepatic specification at differentiation stages corresponding to the beginning of their expression. Our data indicate that transient 5caC accumulation is a common feature of two different types (neural/glial and endoderm/hepatic) of cellular differentiation. This suggests that oxidation of 5mC may represent a general mechanism of rearrangement of 5mC profiles during lineage specification of somatic cells in mammals.

  3. Lineage-specific diversification of killer cell Ig-like receptors in the owl monkey, a New World primate.

    PubMed

    Cadavid, Luis F; Lun, Cheng-Man

    2009-01-01

    Killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs) modulate the cytotoxic effects of natural killer cells. In primates, the KIRs are highly diverse as a consequence of variation in gene content, alternative domain composition, and loci polymorphism. We analyzed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone draft sequence spanning the owl monkey KIR cluster. The draft sequence had seven ordered yet unconnected contigs containing six full-length and two partial gene models, flanked by the LILRB and FcAR framework genes. Gene models were predicted to encode KIRs with inhibitory, activating, or dual functionality. Four gene models encoded three Ig domain receptors, while three others encoded molecules with four Ig domains. The additional domain resulted from an insertion in tandem of a 2,101 bp fragment containing the last 289 bp of intron 2, exon 3, and intron 3, resulting in molecules with two D0 domains. Re-screening of the owl monkey BAC library and sequencing of partial cDNAs from an owl monkey yielded five additional KIRs, four of which encoded receptors with short cytoplasmic domains with premature stop codons due to either a single nucleotide substitution or deletion or the absence of exon 8. Phylogenetic analysis by domains showed that owl monkey KIRs were monophyletic, clustering independently from other primate KIR lineages. Retroelements found in introns, however, were shared by KIRs from different primate lineages. This suggests that the owl monkey inherited a KIR cluster with a rich history of exon shuffling upon which positive selection for ligand binding operated to diversify the receptors in a lineage-specific fashion.

  4. Dynamic changes in replication timing and gene expression during lineage specification of human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Mulia, Juan Carlos; Buckley, Quinton; Sasaki, Takayo; Zimmerman, Jared; Didier, Ruth A.; Nazor, Kristopher; Loring, Jeanne F.; Lian, Zheng; Weissman, Sherman; Robins, Allan J.; Schulz, Thomas C.; Menendez, Laura; Kulik, Michael J.; Dalton, Stephen; Gabr, Haitham; Kahveci, Tamer; Gilbert, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Duplication of the genome in mammalian cells occurs in a defined temporal order referred to as its replication-timing (RT) program. RT changes dynamically during development, regulated in units of 400–800 kb referred to as replication domains (RDs). Changes in RT are generally coordinated with transcriptional competence and changes in subnuclear position. We generated genome-wide RT profiles for 26 distinct human cell types, including embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived, primary cells and established cell lines representing intermediate stages of endoderm, mesoderm, ectoderm, and neural crest (NC) development. We identified clusters of RDs that replicate at unique times in each stage (RT signatures) and confirmed global consolidation of the genome into larger synchronously replicating segments during differentiation. Surprisingly, transcriptome data revealed that the well-accepted correlation between early replication and transcriptional activity was restricted to RT-constitutive genes, whereas two-thirds of the genes that switched RT during differentiation were strongly expressed when late replicating in one or more cell types. Closer inspection revealed that transcription of this class of genes was frequently restricted to the lineage in which the RT switch occurred, but was induced prior to a late-to-early RT switch and/or down-regulated after an early-to-late RT switch. Analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks showed that this class of genes contains strong regulators of genes that were only expressed when early replicating. These results provide intriguing new insight into the complex relationship between transcription and RT regulation during human development. PMID:26055160

  5. Farm-specific lineages of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 398 in Danish pig farms.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Gongora, C; Larsen, J; Moodley, A; Nielsen, J P; Skov, R L; Andreasen, M; Guardabassi, L

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic diversity of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex (CC) 398 using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Dust and pigs at five age groups were sampled in six Danish MRSA-positive pig farms. MRSA CC398 was isolated from 284 of the 391 samples tested, including 230 (74%) animal and 54 (68%) environmental samples. PFGE analysis of a subset of 48 isolates, including the six strains previously isolated from farm workers, revealed the existence of farm-specific pulsotypes. With a single exception, human, environmental and porcine isolates originating from the same farm clustered together in the PFGE cluster analysis, indicating that spread of MRSA CC398 in Danish pig farms is mainly due to clonal dissemination of farm-specific lineages that can be discriminated by PFGE. This finding has important implications for planning future epidemiological studies investigating the spread of CC398 in pig farming.

  6. BDE-99 impairs differentiation of human and mouse NPCs into the oligodendroglial lineage by species-specific modes of action

    PubMed Central

    Dach, Katharina; Bendt, Farina; Huebenthal, Ulrike; Giersiefer, Susanne; Lein, Pamela J.; Heuer, Heike; Fritsche, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are bioaccumulating flame retardants causing developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) in humans and rodents. Their DNT effects are suspected to involve thyroid hormone (TH) signaling disruption. Here, we tested the hypothesis whether disturbance of neural progenitor cell (NPC) differentiation into the oligodendrocyte lineage (O4+ cells) by BDE-99 involves disruption of TH action in human and mouse (h,m)NPCs. Therefore, we quantified differentiation of NPCs into O4+ cells and measured their maturation via expression of myelin-associated genes (hMBP, mMog) in presence and absence of TH and/or BDE-99. T3 promoted O4+ cell differentiation in mouse, but not hNPCs, and induced hMBP/mMog gene expression in both species. BDE-99 reduced generation of human and mouse O4+ cells, but there is no indication for BDE-99 interfering with cellular TH signaling during O4+ cell formation. BDE-99 reduced hMBP expression due to oligodendrocyte reduction, but concentrations that did not affect the number of mouse O4+ cells inhibited TH-induced mMog transcription by a yet unknown mechanism. In addition, ascorbic acid antagonized only the BDE-99-dependent loss of human, not mouse, O4+ cells by a mechanism probably independent of reactive oxygen species. These data point to species-specific modes of action of BDE-99 on h/mNPC development into the oligodendrocyte lineage. PMID:28317842

  7. Flagellated algae protein evolution suggests the prevalence of lineage-specific rules governing evolutionary rates of eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting-Yan; Liao, Ben-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the general rules governing the rate of protein evolution is fundamental to evolutionary biology. However, attempts to address this issue in yeasts and mammals have revealed considerable differences in the relative importance of determinants for protein evolutionary rates. This phenomenon was previously explained by the fact that yeasts and mammals are different in many cellular and genomic properties. Flagellated algae species have several cellular and genomic characteristics that are intermediate between yeasts and mammals. Using partial correlation analyses on the evolution of 6,921 orthologous proteins from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri, we examined factors influencing evolutionary rates of proteins in flagellated algae. Previous studies have shown that mRNA abundance and gene compactness are strong determinants for protein evolutionary rates in yeasts and mammals, respectively. We show that both factors also influence algae protein evolution with mRNA abundance having a larger impact than gene compactness on the rates of algae protein evolution. More importantly, among all the factors examined, coding sequence (CDS) length has the strongest (positive) correlation with protein evolutionary rates. This correlation between CDS length and the rates of protein evolution is not due to alignment-related issues or domain density. These results suggest no simple and universal rules governing protein evolutionary rates across different eukaryotic lineages. Instead, gene properties influence the rate of protein evolution in a lineage-specific manner.

  8. High-affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal myeloid lineage without HSC toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lynn, R C; Feng, Y; Schutsky, K; Poussin, M; Kalota, A; Dimitrov, D S; Powell, D J

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here we isolated a high-affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific single-chain variable fragment (2.48 nm KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ(+) AML in vitro and in vivo compared with a low-affinity FRβ CAR (54.3 nm KD). Using the HA-FRβ immunoglobulin G, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T cells lysed mature CD14(+) monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T cells retained effective antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity.

  9. Twist-ing cell fate: mechanistic insights into the role of twist in lineage specification/differentiation and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Cakouros, D; Raices, R M; Gronthos, S; Glackin, C A

    2010-08-15

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), are multipotent cells that give rise to multiple lineages including osteoblasts, adipocytes, muscle, and fibroblasts. MSCs are useful for clinical applications such as cell therapy because they can be isolated from an individual and expanded for use in tissue repair, as well as other therapeutic applications, without immune rejection. However, one of the key problems in the use of MSCs for these applications is the efficiency of these cells to engraft and fully regenerate damaged tissues. Therefore, to optimize this process, a comprehensive understanding of the key regulators of MSCs self-renewal and maintenance are critical to the success of future cell therapy as well as other clinical applications. The basic helix loop helix transcription factor, Twist, plays a master regulatory role in all of these processes and, therefore, a thorough understanding of the mechanistic insights in the role of Twist in lineage specification/differentiation and tumorigenesis is vital to the success of future clinical applications for the therapeutic use of MSCs. In this article, we highlight the basic mechanisms and signaling pathways that are important to MSC fate, maintenance, and differentiation, as well as the critical role that Twist plays in these processes. In addition, we review the known literature suggesting a critical role for Twist in the generation of cancer stem cells, as this information may contribute to a broader understanding of stem cell biology and stem-cell-based therapeutics.

  10. Recruitment of Mediator Complex by Cell Type and Stage-Specific Factors Required for Tissue-Specific TAF Dependent Gene Activation in an Adult Stem Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chenggang; Fuller, Margaret T.

    2015-01-01

    Onset of terminal differentiation in adult stem cell lineages is commonly marked by robust activation of new transcriptional programs required to make the appropriate differentiated cell type(s). In the Drosophila male germ line stem cell lineage, the switch from proliferating spermatogonia to spermatocyte is accompanied by one of the most dramatic transcriptional changes in the fly, as over 1000 new transcripts turn on in preparation for meiosis and spermatid differentiation. Here we show that function of the coactivator complex Mediator is required for activation of hundreds of new transcripts in the spermatocyte program. Mediator appears to act in a sequential hierarchy, with the testis activating Complex (tMAC), a cell type specific form of the Mip/dREAM general repressor, required to recruit Mediator subunits to the chromatin, and Mediator function required to recruit the testis TAFs (tTAFs), spermatocyte specific homologs of subunits of TFIID. Mediator, tMAC and the tTAFs co-regulate expression of a major set of spermatid differentiation genes. The Mediator subunit Med22 binds the tMAC component Topi when the two are coexpressed in S2 cells, suggesting direct recruitment. Loss of Med22 function in spermatocytes causes meiosis I maturation arrest male infertility, similar to loss of function of the tMAC subunits or the tTAFs. Our results illuminate how cell type specific versions of the Mip/dREAM complex and the general transcription machinery cooperate to drive selective gene activation during differentiation in stem cell lineages. PMID:26624996

  11. An analysis of the gene complement of a marsupial, Monodelphis domestica: evolution of lineage-specific genes and giant chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Heger, Andreas; Webber, Caleb; Ponting, Chris P

    2007-07-01

    The newly sequenced genome of Monodelphis domestica not only provides the out-group necessary to better understand our own eutherian lineage, but it enables insights into the innovative biology of metatherians. Here, we compare Monodelphis with Homo sequences from alignments of single nucleotides, genes, and whole chromosomes. Using PhyOP, we have established orthologs in Homo for 82% (15,250) of Monodelphis gene predictions. Those with single orthologs in each species exhibited a high median synonymous substitution rate (d(S) = 1.02), thereby explaining the relative paucity of aligned regions outside of coding sequences. Orthology assignments were used to construct a synteny map that illustrates the considerable fragmentation of Monodelphis and Homo karyotypes since their therian last common ancestor. Fifteen percent of Monodelphis genes are predicted, from their low divergence at synonymous sites, to have been duplicated in the metatherian lineage. The majority of Monodelphis-specific genes possess predicted roles in chemosensation, reproduction, adaptation to specific diets, and immunity. Using alignments of Monodelphis genes to sequences from either Homo or Trichosurus vulpecula (an Australian marsupial), we show that metatherian X chromosomes have elevated silent substitution rates and high G+C contents in comparison with both metatherian autosomes and eutherian chromosomes. Each of these elevations is also a feature of subtelomeric chromosomal regions. We attribute these observations to high rates of female-specific recombination near the chromosomal ends and within the X chromosome, which act to sustain or increase G+C levels by biased gene conversion. In particular, we propose that the higher G+C content of the Monodelphis X chromosome is a direct consequence of its small size relative to the giant autosomes.

  12. An analysis of the gene complement of a marsupial, Monodelphis domestica: Evolution of lineage-specific genes and giant chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Goodstadt, Leo; Heger, Andreas; Webber, Caleb; Ponting, Chris P.

    2007-01-01

    The newly sequenced genome of Monodelphis domestica not only provides the out-group necessary to better understand our own eutherian lineage, but it enables insights into the innovative biology of metatherians. Here, we compare Monodelphis with Homo sequences from alignments of single nucleotides, genes, and whole chromosomes. Using PhyOP, we have established orthologs in Homo for 82% (15,250) of Monodelphis gene predictions. Those with single orthologs in each species exhibited a high median synonymous substitution rate (dS = 1.02), thereby explaining the relative paucity of aligned regions outside of coding sequences. Orthology assignments were used to construct a synteny map that illustrates the considerable fragmentation of Monodelphis and Homo karyotypes since their therian last common ancestor. Fifteen percent of Monodelphis genes are predicted, from their low divergence at synonymous sites, to have been duplicated in the metatherian lineage. The majority of Monodelphis-specific genes possess predicted roles in chemosensation, reproduction, adaptation to specific diets, and immunity. Using alignments of Monodelphis genes to sequences from either Homo or Trichosurus vulpecula (an Australian marsupial), we show that metatherian X chromosomes have elevated silent substitution rates and high G+C contents in comparison with both metatherian autosomes and eutherian chromosomes. Each of these elevations is also a feature of subtelomeric chromosomal regions. We attribute these observations to high rates of female-specific recombination near the chromosomal ends and within the X chromosome, which act to sustain or increase G+C levels by biased gene conversion. In particular, we propose that the higher G+C content of the Monodelphis X chromosome is a direct consequence of its small size relative to the giant autosomes. PMID:17495010

  13. Discrimination between lineage-specific shelters by bat- and human-associated bed bugs does not constitute a stable reproductive barrier.

    PubMed

    Balvín, Ondřej; Bartonička, Tomáš; Pilařová, Kateřina; DeVries, Zachary; Schal, Coby

    2017-01-01

    The common bed bug Cimex lectularius, has been recently shown to constitute two host races, which are likely in the course of incipient speciation. The human-associated lineage splits from the ancestral bat-associated species deep in the history of modern humans, likely even prior to the Neolithic Period and establishment of the first permanent human settlements. Hybridization experiments between these two lineages show that post-mating reproductive barriers are incomplete due to local variation. As mating takes place in off-host refugia marked by aggregation semiochemicals, the present investigation tested the hypothesis that bed bugs use these semiochemicals to differentiate between refugia marked by bat- and human-associated bed bugs; this would constitute a pre-copulation isolation mechanism. The preference for lineage-specific odors was tested using artificial shelters conditioned by a group of either male or female bed bugs. Adult males were assayed individually in four-choice assays that included two clean unconditioned control shelters. In most assays, bed bugs preferred to rest in conditioned shelters, with no apparent fidelity to shelters conditioned by their specific lineage. However, 51 % of the bat-associated males preferred unconditioned shelters over female-conditioned shelters of either lineage. Thus, bed bugs show no preferences for lineage-specific shelters, strongly suggesting that semiochemicals associated with shelters alone do not function in reproductive isolation.

  14. Influenza B virus-specific CD8+ T-lymphocytes strongly cross-react with viruses of the opposing influenza B lineage.

    PubMed

    van de Sandt, Carolien E; Dou, YingYing; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E; Westgeest, Kim B; Pronk, Mark R; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Hillaire, Marine L B

    2015-08-01

    Influenza B viruses fall in two antigenically distinct lineages (B/Victoria/2/1987 and B/Yamagata/16/1988 lineage) that co-circulate with influenza A viruses of the H3N2 and H1N1 subtypes during seasonal epidemics. Infections with influenza B viruses contribute considerably to morbidity and mortality in the human population. Influenza B virus neutralizing antibodies, elicited by natural infections or vaccination, poorly cross-react with viruses of the opposing influenza B lineage. Therefore, there is an increased interest in identifying other correlates of protection which could aid the development of broadly protective vaccines. blast analysis revealed high sequence identity of all viral proteins. With two online epitope prediction algorithms, putative conserved epitopes relevant for study subjects used in the present study were predicted. The cross-reactivity of influenza B virus-specific polyclonal CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) populations obtained from HLA-typed healthy study subjects, with intra-lineage drift variants and viruses of the opposing lineage, was determined by assessing their in vitro IFN-γ response and lytic activity. Here, we show for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that CTLs directed to viruses of the B/Victoria/2/1987 lineage cross-react with viruses of the B/Yamagata/16/1988 lineage and vice versa.

  15. DNMT3A and TET2 compete and cooperate to repress lineage-specific transcription factors in hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Su, Jianzhong; Jeong, Mira; Ko, Myunggon; Huang, Yun; Park, Hyun Jung; Guzman, Anna; Lei, Yong; Huang, Yung-Hsin; Rao, Anjana; Li, Wei; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the epigenetic modifiers DNMT3A and TET2 non-randomly co-occur in lymphoma and leukemia despite their epistasis in the methylation-hydroxymethylation pathway. Using Dnmt3a and Tet2 double knock-out (DKO) mice in which malignancy development is accelerated, we show that the DKO methylome reflects regions of independent, competitive and cooperative activity. Expression of lineage-specific transcription factors, including the erythroid regulator Klf1 is upregulated in DKO HSCs. DNMT3A and TET2 both repress Klf1 suggesting a model of cooperative inhibition by the epigenetic modifiers. These data demonstrate a dual role for TET2 in promoting and inhibiting HSC differentiation, loss of which, along with DNMT3A, obstructs differentiation leading to transformation. PMID:27428748

  16. miRNA-embedded shRNAs for Lineage-specific BCL11A Knockdown and Hemoglobin F Induction.

    PubMed

    Guda, Swaroopa; Brendel, Christian; Renella, Raffaele; Du, Peng; Bauer, Daniel E; Canver, Matthew C; Grenier, Jennifer K; Grimson, Andrew W; Kamran, Sophia C; Thornton, James; de Boer, Helen; Root, David E; Milsom, Michael D; Orkin, Stuart H; Gregory, Richard I; Williams, David A

    2015-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) expressed via RNA polymerase (pol) III promoters has been widely exploited to modulate gene expression in a variety of mammalian cell types. For certain applications, such as lineage-specific knockdown, embedding targeting sequences into pol II-driven microRNA (miRNA) architecture is required. Here, using the potential therapeutic target BCL11A, we demonstrate that pol III-driven shRNAs lead to significantly increased knockdown but also increased cytotoxcity in comparison to pol II-driven miRNA adapted shRNAs (shRNA(miR)) in multiple hematopoietic cell lines. We show that the two expression systems yield mature guide strand sequences that differ by a 4 bp shift. This results in alternate seed sequences and consequently influences the efficacy of target gene knockdown. Incorporating a corresponding 4 bp shift into the guide strand of shRNA(miR)s resulted in improved knockdown efficiency of BCL11A. This was associated with a significant de-repression of the hemoglobin target of BCL11A, human γ-globin or the murine homolog Hbb-y. Our results suggest the requirement for optimization of shRNA sequences upon incorporation into a miRNA backbone. These findings have important implications in future design of shRNA(miR)s for RNAi-based therapy in hemoglobinopathies and other diseases requiring lineage-specific expression of gene silencing sequences.

  17. Prey choice by carabid beetles feeding on an earthworm community analysed using species- and lineage-specific PCR primers.

    PubMed

    King, R Andrew; Vaughan, Ian P; Bell, James R; Bohan, David A; Symondson, William O C

    2010-04-01

    The carabid beetle Pterostichus melanarius is a major natural enemy of pests, such as aphids and slugs in agricultural systems. Earthworms are a dominant non-pest component of the diet of P. melanarius which help sustain the beetles during periods when the pest population is low or absent. In this study we wanted to test whether this predator exercises prey choice among different earthworm species or ecological groups. High levels of genetic diversity within morphological species of earthworm necessitated the development of primers that were specific not just to species but lineages and sub-lineages within species as well. Gut samples from beetles were analysed using multiplex-PCR and fluorescent-labelled primers. Calibratory feeding trials were undertaken to calculate median detection times for prey DNA following ingestion. Extensive testing demonstrated that the primers were species-specific, that detection periods were negatively related to amplicon size and that meal size had a highly significant effect on detection periods. Monte Carlo simulations showed that, in general, worms were being predated in proportion to their densities in the field with little evidence of prey choice, other than probable avoidance of the larger, deep-living species. There was no evidence that epigeic species were being taken preferentially in comparison with endogeic species. There was also no evidence that defensive secretions by Allolobophora chlorotica reduced predation pressure on this species by P. melanarius. We concluded that any management system that increases earthworm densities generally, regardless of component species, is likely to be optimal for increasing numbers of this beneficial beetle predator.

  18. Direct lineage reprogramming reveals disease-specific phonotypes of motor neurons from human ALS patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng-Lu; Zang, Tong; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Subtype-specific neurons obtained from adult humans will be critical to modeling neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here we show that adult human skin fibroblasts can be directly and efficiently converted into highly pure motor neurons without passing through an induced pluripotent stem cell stage. These adult human induced motor neurons (hiMNs) exhibit the cytological and electrophysiological features of spinal motor neurons and form functional neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) with skeletal muscles. Importantly, hiMNs converted from ALS-patient fibroblasts show disease-specific degeneration manifested through poor survival, soma shrinkage, hypoactivity, and an inability to form NMJs. A chemical screen revealed that the degenerative features of ALS-hiMNs can be remarkably rescued by the small molecule kenpaullone. Taken together, our results define a direct and efficient strategy to obtain disease-relevant neuronal subtypes from adult human patients and reveal their promising value in disease modeling and drug identification. PMID:26725112

  19. Direct Lineage Reprogramming Reveals Disease-Specific Phenotypes of Motor Neurons from Human ALS Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng-Lu; Zang, Tong; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2016-01-05

    Subtype-specific neurons obtained from adult humans will be critical to modeling neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here, we show that adult human skin fibroblasts can be directly and efficiently converted into highly pure motor neurons without passing through an induced pluripotent stem cell stage. These adult human induced motor neurons (hiMNs) exhibit the cytological and electrophysiological features of spinal motor neurons and form functional neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) with skeletal muscles. Importantly, hiMNs converted from ALS patient fibroblasts show disease-specific degeneration manifested through poor survival, soma shrinkage, hypoactivity, and an inability to form NMJs. A chemical screen revealed that the degenerative features of ALS hiMNs can be remarkably rescued by the small molecule kenpaullone. Taken together, our results define a direct and efficient strategy to obtain disease-relevant neuronal subtypes from adult human patients and reveal their promising value in disease modeling and drug identification.

  20. The GreenCut2 Resource, a Phylogenomically Derived Inventory of Proteins Specific to the Plant Lineage*

    PubMed Central

    Karpowicz, Steven J.; Prochnik, Simon E.; Grossman, Arthur R.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2011-01-01

    The plastid is a defining structure of photosynthetic eukaryotes and houses many plant-specific processes, including the light reactions, carbon fixation, pigment synthesis, and other primary metabolic processes. Identifying proteins associated with catalytic, structural, and regulatory functions that are unique to plastid-containing organisms is necessary to fully define the scope of plant biochemistry. Here, we performed phylogenomics on 20 genomes to compile a new inventory of 597 nucleus-encoded proteins conserved in plants and green algae but not in non-photosynthetic organisms. 286 of these proteins are of known function, whereas 311 are not characterized. This inventory was validated as applicable and relevant to diverse photosynthetic eukaryotes using an additional eight genomes from distantly related plants (including Micromonas, Selaginella, and soybean). Manual curation of the known proteins in the inventory established its importance to plastid biochemistry. To predict functions for the 52% of proteins of unknown function, we used sequence motifs, subcellular localization, co-expression analysis, and RNA abundance data. We demonstrate that 18% of the proteins in the inventory have functions outside the plastid and/or beyond green tissues. Although 32% of proteins in the inventory have homologs in all cyanobacteria, unexpectedly, 30% are eukaryote-specific. Finally, 8% of the proteins of unknown function share no similarity to any characterized protein and are plant lineage-specific. We present this annotated inventory of 597 proteins as a resource for functional analyses of plant-specific biochemistry. PMID:21515685

  1. Genome-wide lineage-specific transcriptional networks underscore Ikaros-dependent lymphoid priming in hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ng, Samuel Yao-Ming; Yoshida, Toshimi; Zhang, Jiangwen; Georgopoulos, Katia

    2009-04-17

    The mechanisms regulating lineage potential during early hematopoiesis were investigated. First, a cascade of lineage-affiliated gene expression signatures, primed in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and differentially propagated in lineage-restricted progenitors, was identified. Lymphoid transcripts were primed as early as the HSC, together with myeloid and erythroid transcripts. Although this multilineage priming was resolved upon subsequent lineage restrictions, an unexpected cosegregation of lymphoid and myeloid gene expression and potential past a nominal myeloid restriction point was identified. Finally, we demonstrated that whereas the zinc finger DNA-binding factor Ikaros was required for induction of lymphoid lineage priming in the HSC, it was also necessary for repression of genetic programs compatible with self-renewal and multipotency downstream of the HSC. Taken together, our studies provide new insight into the priming and restriction of lineage potentials during early hematopoiesis and identify Ikaros as a key bivalent regulator of this process.

  2. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells.

    PubMed

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher T; Waldron, Levi; Quattrone, Alessandro; Brunak, Søren

    2014-09-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two programs. Functional analysis gathered insights in fate-specific candidates of interface functionalities. The non-transcriptionally regulated interface proteins were found to be highly regulated by post-translational ubiquitylation modification, which may synchronize the transition between cell proliferation and differentiation in ESCs.

  3. Lineage and species-specific long noncoding RNAs during erythro-megakaryocytic development

    PubMed Central

    Paralkar, Vikram R.; Mishra, Tejaswini; Luan, Jing; Yao, Yu; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Anderson, Stacie M.; Dunagin, Margaret; Pimkin, Maxim; Gore, Meghneel; Sun, Diana; Konuthula, Neeraja; Raj, Arjun; An, Xiuli; Mohandas, Narla; Bodine, David M.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2014-01-01

    Mammals express thousands of long noncoding (lnc) RNAs, a few of which are known to function in tissue development. However, the entire repertoire of lncRNAs in most tissues and species is not defined. Indeed, most lncRNAs are not conserved, raising questions about function. We used RNA sequencing to identify 1109 polyadenylated lncRNAs expressed in erythroblasts, megakaryocytes, and megakaryocyte-erythroid precursors of mice, and 594 in erythroblasts of humans. More than half of these lncRNAs were unannotated, emphasizing the opportunity for new discovery through studies of specialized cell types. Analysis of the mouse erythro-megakaryocytic polyadenylated lncRNA transcriptome indicates that ∼75% arise from promoters and 25% from enhancers, many of which are regulated by key transcription factors including GATA1 and TAL1. Erythroid lncRNA expression is largely conserved among 8 different mouse strains, yet only 15% of mouse lncRNAs are expressed in humans and vice versa, reflecting dramatic species-specificity. RNA interference assays of 21 abundant erythroid-specific murine lncRNAs in primary mouse erythroid precursors identified 7 whose knockdown inhibited terminal erythroid maturation. At least 6 of these 7 functional lncRNAs have no detectable expression in human erythroblasts, suggesting that lack of conservation between mammalian species does not predict lack of function. PMID:24497530

  4. Identification of focally amplified lineage-specific super-enhancers in human epithelial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyang; Choi, Peter S.; Francis, Joshua M.; Imielinski, Marcin; Watanabe, Hideo; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome analysis approaches are revealing recurrent cancer-associated somatic alterations in non-coding DNA regions. We combined somatic copy number analysis of 12 tumor types with tissue-specific epigenetic profiling to identify significant regions of focal amplification harboring super-enhancers. Copy-number gains of non-coding regions harboring super-enhancers near KLF5, USP12, PARD6B and MYC are associated with over-expression of these cancer-related genes. We show that two distinct focal amplifications of super-enhancers 3′ to MYC in lung adenocarcinoma (MYC-LASE) and endometrial carcinoma (MYC-ECSE), are physically associated with the MYC promoter and correlate with MYC over-expression. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated repression or deletion of a constituent enhancer within the MYC-LASE region led to significant reductions in the expression of MYC and its target genes, and to the impairment of anchorage-independent and clonogenic growth, consistent with an oncogenic function. Our results demonstrate that genomic amplification of super-enhancers represents a common mechanism to activate cancer driver genes in multiple cancer types. PMID:26656844

  5. Phylogenetics of lophotrochozoan bHLH genes and the evolution of lineage-specific gene duplicates.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yongbo; Xu, Fei; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2017-03-11

    The gain and loss of genes encoding transcription factors is of importance to understanding the evolution of gene regulatory complexity. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes encode a large superfamily of transcription factors. We systematically classify the bHLH genes from five mollusc, two annelid and one brachiopod genomes, tracing the pattern of bHLH gene evolution across these poorly-studied Phyla. 56 to 88 bHLH genes were identified in each genome, with most identifiable as members of previously described bilaterian families, or of new families we define. Of such families only one, Mesp, appears lost by all these species. Additional duplications have also played a role in the evolution of the bHLH gene repertoire, with many new lophotrochozoan-, mollusc-, bivalve- or gastropod-specific genes defined. Using a combination of transcriptome mining, RT-PCR and in situ hybridization we compared the expression of several of these novel genes in tissues and embryos of the molluscs Crassostrea gigas and Patella vulgata, finding both conserved expression and evidence for neofunctionalisation. We also map the positions of the genes across these genomes, identifying numerous gene linkages. Some reflect recent paralogue divergence by tandem duplication, others are remnants of ancient tandem duplications dating to the lophotrochozoan or bilaterian common ancestors. These data are built into a model of the evolution of bHLH genes in molluscs, showing formidable evolutionary stasis at the family level but considerable within-family diversification by tandem gene duplication.

  6. Preferential Lineage-Specific Differentiation of Osteoblast-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells into Osteoprogenitors

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Casey L.; Chen, Silvia S.; Murchison, Angela C.; Ogle, Rebecca A.; Francis, Michael P.; Ogle, Roy C.

    2017-01-01

    While induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great clinical promise, one hurdle that remains is the existence of a parental germ-layer memory in reprogrammed cells leading to preferential differentiation fates. While it is problematic for generating cells vastly different from the reprogrammed cells' origins, it could be advantageous for the reliable generation of germ-layer specific cell types for future therapeutic use. Here we use human osteoblast-derived iPSCs (hOB-iPSCs) to generate induced osteoprogenitors (iOPs). Osteoblasts were successfully reprogrammed and demonstrated by endogenous upregulation of Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, TRA-1-81, TRA-16-1, SSEA3, and confirmatory hPSC Scorecard Algorithmic Assessment. The hOB-iPSCs formed embryoid bodies with cells of ectoderm and mesoderm but have low capacity to form endodermal cells. Differentiation into osteoprogenitors occurred within only 2–6 days, with a population doubling rate of less than 24 hrs; however, hOB-iPSC derived osteoprogenitors were only able to form osteogenic and chondrogenic cells but not adipogenic cells. Consistent with this, hOB-iOPs were found to have higher methylation of PPARγ but similar levels of methylation on the RUNX2 promoter. These data demonstrate that iPSCs can be generated from human osteoblasts, but variant methylation patterns affect their differentiation capacities. Therefore, epigenetic memory can be exploited for efficient generation of clinically relevant quantities of osteoprogenitor cells. PMID:28250775

  7. SUMOylation of DRIL1 Directs Its Transcriptional Activity Towards Leukocyte Lineage-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    van Lohuizen, Maarten; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    DRIL1 is an ARID family transcription factor that can immortalize primary mouse fibroblasts, bypass RASV12-induced cellular senescence and collaborate with RASV12 or MYC in mediating oncogenic transformation. It also activates immunoglobulin heavy chain transcription and engages in heterodimer formation with E2F to stimulate E2F-dependent transcription. Little, however, is known about the regulation of DRIL1 activity. Recently, DRIL1 was found to interact with the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9, but the functional relevance of this association has not been assessed. Here, we show that DRIL1 is sumoylated both in vitro and in vivo at lysine 398. Moreover, we provide evidence that PIASy functions as a specific SUMO E3-ligase for DRIL1 and promotes its sumoylation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, consistent with the subnuclear localization of PIASy in the Matrix-Associated Region (MAR), SUMO-modified DRIL1 species are found exclusively in the MAR fraction. This post-translational modification interferes neither with the subcellular localization nor the DNA-binding activity of the protein. In contrast, DRIL1 sumoylation impairs its interaction with E2F1 in vitro and modifies its transcriptional activity in vivo, driving transcription of subset of genes regulating leukocyte fate. Taken together, these results identify sumoylation as a novel post-translational modification of DRIL1 that represents an important mechanism for targeting and modulating DRIL1 transcriptional activity. PMID:19436740

  8. Regulative germ cell specification in axolotl embryos: a primitive trait conserved in the mammalian lineage.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Andrew D; Crother, Brian; White, Mary E; Patient, Roger; Bachvarova, Rosemary F; Drum, Matthew; Masi, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    How germ cells are specified in the embryos of animals has been a mystery for decades. Unlike most developmental processes, which are highly conserved, embryos specify germ cells in very different ways. Curiously, in mouse embryos germ cells are specified by extracellular signals; they are not autonomously specified by maternal germ cell determinants (germ plasm), as are the germ cells in most animal model systems. We have developed the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), a salamander, as an experimental system, because classic experiments have shown that the germ cells in this species are induced by extracellular signals in the absence of germ plasm. Here, we provide evidence that the germ cells in axolotls arise from naive mesoderm in response to simple inducing agents. In addition, by analysing the sequences of axolotl germ-cell-specific genes, we provide evidence that mice and urodele amphibians share a common mechanism of germ cell development that is ancestral to tetrapods. Our results imply that germ plasm, as found in species such as frogs and teleosts, is the result of convergent evolution. We discuss the evolutionary implications of our findings. PMID:14511484

  9. Lineage-specific evolution of echinoderm mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit 8.

    PubMed

    De Giorgi, C; Martiradonna, A; Pesole, G; Saccone, C

    1997-06-01

    Peculiar evolutionary properties of the subunit 8 of mitochondrial ATP synthase (ATPase8) are revealed by comparative analyses carried out between both closely and distantly related species of echinoderms. The analysis of nucleotide substitution in the three echinoids demonstrated a relaxation of amino acid functional constraints. The deduced protein sequences display a well conserved domain at the N-terminus, while the central part is very variable. At the C-terminus, the broad distribution of positively charged amino acids, which is typical of other organisms, is not conserved in the two different echinoderm classes of the sea urchins and of the sea stars. Instead, a motif of three amino acids, so far not described elsewhere, is conserved in sea urchins and is found to be very similar to the motif present in the sea stars. Our results indicate that the N-terminal region seems to follow the same evolutionary pattern in different organisms, while the maintenance of the C-terminal part in a phylum-specific manner may reflect the co-evolution of mitochondrial and nuclear genes.

  10. Phylogenetics of Lophotrochozoan bHLH Genes and the Evolution of Lineage-Specific Gene Duplicates

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yongbo

    2017-01-01

    The gain and loss of genes encoding transcription factors is of importance to understanding the evolution of gene regulatory complexity. The basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) genes encode a large superfamily of transcription factors. We systematically classify the bHLH genes from five mollusc, two annelid and one brachiopod genomes, tracing the pattern of bHLH gene evolution across these poorly studied Phyla. In total, 56–88 bHLH genes were identified in each genome, with most identifiable as members of previously described bilaterian families, or of new families we define. Of such families only one, Mesp, appears lost by all these species. Additional duplications have also played a role in the evolution of the bHLH gene repertoire, with many new lophotrochozoan-, mollusc-, bivalve-, or gastropod-specific genes defined. Using a combination of transcriptome mining, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization we compared the expression of several of these novel genes in tissues and embryos of the molluscs Crassostrea gigas and Patella vulgata, finding both conserved expression and evidence for neofunctionalization. We also map the positions of the genes across these genomes, identifying numerous gene linkages. Some reflect recent paralog divergence by tandem duplication, others are remnants of ancient tandem duplications dating to the lophotrochozoan or bilaterian common ancestors. These data are built into a model of the evolution of bHLH genes in molluscs, showing formidable evolutionary stasis at the family level but considerable within-family diversification by tandem gene duplication. PMID:28338988

  11. Functional microRNAs and target sites are created by lineage-specific transposition

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Ryan M.; Oakley, Clayton K.; Davidson, Beverly L.

    2014-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) account for nearly one-half of the sequence content in the human genome, and de novo germline transposition into regulatory or coding sequences of protein-coding genes can cause heritable disorders. TEs are prevalent in and around protein-coding genes, providing an opportunity to impart regulation. Computational studies reveal that microRNA (miRNA) genes and miRNA target sites reside within TE sequences, but there is little experimental evidence supporting a role for TEs in the birth of miRNAs, or as platform for gene regulation by miRNAs. In this work, we validate miRNAs and target sites derived from TE families prevalent in the human genome, including the ancient long interspersed nuclear element 2 (LINE2/L2), mammalian-wide interspersed repeat (MIR) retrotransposons and the primate-specific Alu family. We show that genes with 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR) MIR elements are enriched for let-7 targets and that these sites are conserved and responsive to let-7 expression. We also demonstrate that 3′ UTR-embedded Alus are a source of miR-24 and miR-122 target sites and that a subset of active genomic Alus provide for de novo target site creation. Finally, we report that although the creation of miRNA genes by Alu elements is relatively uncommon relative to their overall genomic abundance, Alu-derived miR-1285-1 is efficiently processed from its genomic locus and regulates genes with target sites contained within homologous elements. Taken together, our data provide additional evidence for TEs as a source for miRNAs and miRNA target sites, with instances of conservation through the course of mammalian evolution. PMID:24234653

  12. Functional microRNAs and target sites are created by lineage-specific transposition.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Ryan M; Oakley, Clayton K; Davidson, Beverly L

    2014-04-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) account for nearly one-half of the sequence content in the human genome, and de novo germline transposition into regulatory or coding sequences of protein-coding genes can cause heritable disorders. TEs are prevalent in and around protein-coding genes, providing an opportunity to impart regulation. Computational studies reveal that microRNA (miRNA) genes and miRNA target sites reside within TE sequences, but there is little experimental evidence supporting a role for TEs in the birth of miRNAs, or as platform for gene regulation by miRNAs. In this work, we validate miRNAs and target sites derived from TE families prevalent in the human genome, including the ancient long interspersed nuclear element 2 (LINE2/L2), mammalian-wide interspersed repeat (MIR) retrotransposons and the primate-specific Alu family. We show that genes with 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) MIR elements are enriched for let-7 targets and that these sites are conserved and responsive to let-7 expression. We also demonstrate that 3' UTR-embedded Alus are a source of miR-24 and miR-122 target sites and that a subset of active genomic Alus provide for de novo target site creation. Finally, we report that although the creation of miRNA genes by Alu elements is relatively uncommon relative to their overall genomic abundance, Alu-derived miR-1285-1 is efficiently processed from its genomic locus and regulates genes with target sites contained within homologous elements. Taken together, our data provide additional evidence for TEs as a source for miRNAs and miRNA target sites, with instances of conservation through the course of mammalian evolution.

  13. MYC-induced apoptosis in mammary epithelial cells is associated with repression of lineage-specific gene signatures

    PubMed Central

    Haikala, Heidi M.; Klefström, Juha; Eilers, Martin; Wiese, Katrin E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apoptosis caused by deregulated MYC expression is a prototype example of intrinsic tumor suppression. However, it is still unclear how supraphysiological MYC expression levels engage specific sets of target genes to promote apoptosis. Recently, we demonstrated that repression of SRF target genes by MYC/MIZ1 complexes limits AKT-dependent survival signaling and contributes to apoptosis induction. Here we report that supraphysiological levels of MYC repress gene sets that include markers of basal-like breast cancer cells, but not luminal cancer cells, in a MIZ1-dependent manner. Furthermore, repressed genes are part of a conserved gene signature characterizing the basal subpopulation of both murine and human mammary gland. These repressed genes play a role in epithelium and mammary gland development and overlap with genes mediating cell adhesion and extracellular matrix organization. Strikingly, acute activation of oncogenic MYC in basal mammary epithelial cells is sufficient to induce luminal cell identity markers. We propose that supraphysiological MYC expression impacts on mammary epithelial cell identity by repressing lineage-specific target genes. Such abrupt cell identity switch could interfere with adhesion-dependent survival signaling and thus promote apoptosis in pre-malignant epithelial tissue. PMID:26873145

  14. Population Structure of Phytophthora nicotianae Reveals Host-Specific Lineages on Brinjal, Ridge Gourd, and Tomato in South India.

    PubMed

    Chowdappa, P; Kumar, B J Nirmal; Kumar, S P Mohan; Madhura, S; Bhargavi, B Reddi; Lakshmi, M Jyothi

    2016-12-01

    Severe outbreaks of Phytophthora fruit rot on brinjal, ridge gourd, and tomato have been observed since 2011 in Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Telangana, and Tamil Nadu states of India. Therefore, 76 Phytophthora nicotianae isolates, recovered from brinjal (17), ridge gourd (40), and tomato (19) from different localities in these states during the June to December cropping season of 2012 and 2013, were characterized based on phenotypic and genotypic analyses and aggressiveness on brinjal, tomato, and ridge gourd. All brinjal and ridge gourd isolates were A2, while tomato isolates were both A1 (13) and A2 (6). All isolates were metalaxyl sensitive. In addition, isolates were genotyped for three mitochondrial (ribosomal protein L5-small subunit ribosomal RNA [rpl5-rns], small subunit ribosomal RNA-cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 [rns-cox2], and cox2+spacer) and three nuclear loci (hypothetical protein [hyp], scp-like extracellular protein [scp], and beta-tubulin [β-tub]). All regions were polymorphic but nuclear regions were more variable than mitochondrial regions. The network analysis of genotypes using the combined dataset of three nuclear regions revealed a host-specific association. However, the network generated using mitochondrial regions limited such host-specific groupings only to brinjal isolates. P. nicotianae isolates were highly aggressive and produced significantly (P ≤ 0.01) larger lesions on their respective host of origin than on other hosts. The results indicate significant genetic variation in the population of P. nicotianae, leading to identification of host-specific lineages responsible for severe outbreaks on brinjal, ridge gourd, and tomato.

  15. Lineage-Specific Reductions of Plastid Genomes in an Orchid Tribe with Partially and Fully Mycoheterotrophic Species

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yan-Lei; Wicke, Susann; Li, Jian-Wu; Han, Yu; Lin, Choun-Sea; Li, De-Zhu; Zhou, Ting-Ting; Huang, Wei-Chang; Huang, Lu-Qi; Jin, Xiao-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The plastid genome (plastome) of heterotrophic plants like mycoheterotrophs and parasites shows massive gene losses in consequence to the relaxation of functional constraints on photosynthesis. To understand the patterns of this convergent plastome reduction syndrome in heterotrophic plants, we studied 12 closely related orchids of three different lifeforms from the tribe Neottieae (Orchidaceae). We employ a comparative genomics approach to examine structural and selectional changes in plastomes within Neottieae. Both leafy and leafless heterotrophic species have functionally reduced plastid genome. Our analyses show that genes for the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex, the photosystems, and the RNA polymerase have been lost functionally multiple times independently. The physical reduction proceeds in a highly lineage-specific manner, accompanied by structural reconfigurations such as inversions or modifications of the large inverted repeats. Despite significant but minor selectional changes, all retained genes continue to evolve under purifying selection. All leafless Neottia species, including both visibly green and nongreen members, are fully mycoheterotrophic, likely evolved from leafy and partially mycoheterotrophic species. The plastomes of Neottieae span many stages of plastome degradation, including the longest plastome of a mycoheterotroph, providing invaluable insights into the mechanisms of plastome evolution along the transition from autotrophy to full mycoheterotrophy. PMID:27412609

  16. Role of RNA splicing in mediating lineage-specific expression of the von Willebrand factor gene in the endothelium.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lei; Janes, Lauren; Beeler, David; Spokes, Katherine C; Smith, Joshua; Li, Dan; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Oettgen, Peter; Aird, William C

    2013-05-23

    We previously demonstrated that the first intron of the human von Willebrand factor (vWF) is required for gene expression in the endothelium of transgenic mice. Based on this finding, we hypothesized that RNA splicing plays a role in mediating vWF expression in the vasculature. To address this question, we used transient transfection assays in human endothelial cells and megakaryocytes with intron-containing and intronless human vWF promoter-luciferase constructs. Next, we generated knockin mice in which LacZ was targeted to the endogenous mouse vWF locus in the absence or presence of the native first intron or heterologous introns from the human β-globin, mouse Down syndrome critical region 1, or hagfish coagulation factor X genes. In both the in vitro assays and the knockin mice, the loss of the first intron of vWF resulted in a significant reduction of reporter gene expression in endothelial cells but not megakaryocytes. This effect was rescued to varying degrees by the introduction of a heterologous intron. Intron-mediated enhancement of expression was mediated at a posttranscriptional level. Together, these findings implicate a role for intronic splicing in mediating lineage-specific expression of vWF in the endothelium.

  17. Divergent Evolutionary and Expression Patterns between Lineage Specific New Duplicate Genes and Their Parental Paralogs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Marowsky, Nicholas C.; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2013-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important mechanism for the origination of functional novelties in organisms. We performed a comparative genome analysis to systematically estimate recent lineage specific gene duplication events in Arabidopsis thaliana and further investigate whether and how these new duplicate genes (NDGs) play a functional role in the evolution and adaption of A. thaliana. We accomplished this using syntenic relationship among four closely related species, A. thaliana, A. lyrata, Capsella rubella and Brassica rapa. We identified 100 NDGs, showing clear origination patterns, whose parental genes are located in syntenic regions and/or have clear orthologs in at least one of three outgroup species. All 100 NDGs were transcribed and under functional constraints, while 24% of the NDGs have differential expression patterns compared to their parental genes. We explored the underlying evolutionary forces of these paralogous pairs through conducting neutrality tests with sequence divergence and polymorphism data. Evolution of about 15% of NDGs appeared to be driven by natural selection. Moreover, we found that 3 NDGs not only altered their expression patterns when compared with parental genes, but also evolved under positive selection. We investigated the underlying mechanisms driving the differential expression of NDGs and their parents, and found a number of NDGs had different cis-elements and methylation patterns from their parental genes. Overall, we demonstrated that NDGs acquired divergent cis-elements and methylation patterns and may experience sub-functionalization or neo-functionalization influencing the evolution and adaption of A. thaliana. PMID:24009676

  18. Dissecting cell-type-specific roles of androgen receptor in prostate homeostasis and regeneration through lineage tracing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qing; Liu, Yueli; Cai, Tao; Horton, Corrigan; Stefanson, Joshua; Wang, Zhu A.

    2017-01-01

    Androgen signals through androgen receptor (AR) to influence prostate development and cancer. How stromal and epithelial AR regulate prostate homeostasis remains unclear. Using genetic lineage tracing, we systematically investigated the role of cell-autonomous AR in different prostate epithelial cell types. Here we show that AR is dispensable for basal cell maintenance, but is cell-autonomously required for the luminal differentiation of rare basal stem cells. In contrast, AR deletion in luminal cells alters cell morphology and induces transient over-proliferation, without affecting androgen-mediated luminal cell survival or regeneration. However, AR is selectively required for the maintenance of daughter cells produced by castration-resistant Nkx3.1-expressing luminal stem cells (CARNs). Notably, Pten loss can override AR-loss effects in both basal and luminal compartments to initiate tumours. Our data reveal distinct cell-type-specific roles of epithelial AR in orchestrating prostate homeostasis, and question the notion that epithelial AR serves as a tumour suppressor in early cancer initiation. PMID:28112153

  19. Dissecting cell-type-specific roles of androgen receptor in prostate homeostasis and regeneration through lineage tracing.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qing; Liu, Yueli; Cai, Tao; Horton, Corrigan; Stefanson, Joshua; Wang, Zhu A

    2017-01-23

    Androgen signals through androgen receptor (AR) to influence prostate development and cancer. How stromal and epithelial AR regulate prostate homeostasis remains unclear. Using genetic lineage tracing, we systematically investigated the role of cell-autonomous AR in different prostate epithelial cell types. Here we show that AR is dispensable for basal cell maintenance, but is cell-autonomously required for the luminal differentiation of rare basal stem cells. In contrast, AR deletion in luminal cells alters cell morphology and induces transient over-proliferation, without affecting androgen-mediated luminal cell survival or regeneration. However, AR is selectively required for the maintenance of daughter cells produced by castration-resistant Nkx3.1-expressing luminal stem cells (CARNs). Notably, Pten loss can override AR-loss effects in both basal and luminal compartments to initiate tumours. Our data reveal distinct cell-type-specific roles of epithelial AR in orchestrating prostate homeostasis, and question the notion that epithelial AR serves as a tumour suppressor in early cancer initiation.

  20. Highly Synchronized Expression of Lineage-Specific Genes during In Vitro Hepatic Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ghosheh, Nidal; Olsson, Björn; Edsbagge, Josefina; Küppers-Munther, Barbara; Van Giezen, Mariska; Asplund, Annika; Andersson, Tommy B.; Björquist, Petter; Carén, Helena; Simonsson, Stina; Sartipy, Peter; Synnergren, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells- (hPSCs-) derived hepatocytes have the potential to replace many hepatic models in drug discovery and provide a cell source for regenerative medicine applications. However, the generation of fully functional hPSC-derived hepatocytes is still a challenge. Towards gaining better understanding of the differentiation and maturation process, we employed a standardized protocol to differentiate six hPSC lines into hepatocytes and investigated the synchronicity of the hPSC lines by applying RT-qPCR to assess the expression of lineage-specific genes (OCT4, NANOG, T, SOX17, CXCR4, CER1, HHEX, TBX3, PROX1, HNF6, AFP, HNF4a, KRT18, ALB, AAT, and CYP3A4) which serve as markers for different stages during liver development. The data was evaluated using correlation and clustering analysis, demonstrating that the expression of these markers is highly synchronized and correlated well across all cell lines. The analysis also revealed a distribution of the markers in groups reflecting the developmental stages of hepatocytes. Functional analysis of the differentiated cells further confirmed their hepatic phenotype. Taken together, these results demonstrate, on the molecular level, the highly synchronized differentiation pattern across multiple hPSC lines. Moreover, this study provides additional understanding for future efforts to improve the functionality of hPSC-derived hepatocytes and thereby increase the value of related models. PMID:26949401

  1. A Poised Chromatin Platform for TGF-[beta] Access to Master Regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Qiaoran; Wang, Zhanxin; Zaromytidou, Alexia-Ileana; Zhang, Xiang H.-F.; Chow-Tsang, Lai-Fong; Liu, Jing X.; Kim, Hyesoo; Barlas, Afsar; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Kaartinen, Vesa; Studer, Lorenz; Mark, Willie; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Massagué, Joan

    2012-02-07

    Specific chromatin marks keep master regulators of differentiation silent yet poised for activation by extracellular signals. We report that nodal TGF-{beta} signals use the poised histone mark H3K9me3 to trigger differentiation of mammalian embryonic stem cells. Nodal receptors induce the formation of companion Smad4-Smad2/3 and TRIM33-Smad2/3 complexes. The PHD-Bromo cassette of TRIM33 facilitates binding of TRIM33-Smad2/3 to H3K9me3 and H3K18ac on the promoters of mesendoderm regulators Gsc and Mixl1. The crystal structure of this cassette, bound to histone H3 peptides, illustrates that PHD recognizes K9me3, and Bromo binds an adjacent K18ac. The interaction between TRIM33-Smad2/3 and H3K9me3 displaces the chromatin-compacting factor HP1, making nodal response elements accessible to Smad4-Smad2/3 for Pol II recruitment. In turn, Smad4 increases K18 acetylation to augment TRIM33-Smad2/3 binding. Thus, nodal effectors use the H3K9me3 mark as a platform to switch master regulators of stem cell differentiation from the poised to the active state.

  2. Electrospun Scaffolds: Enhanced Lineage-Specific Differentiation Efficiency of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Engineering Colony Dimensionality Using Electrospun Scaffolds (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 12/2016).

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Maricela; Ico, Gerardo; Low, Karen; Luu, Rebeccah J; Nam, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Electrospun scaffolds provide soft nanofibrous networks pliable by human induced pluripotent stem cells. J. Nam and co-workers show on page 1408 that such compliant scaffolding leads to the formation of stem cell colonies with a distinctive three-dimensional morphology. The morphological modulation resulted in the lineage-specific differentiation, suggesting a potential means to enhance translational applications of the stem cells.

  3. AFLP markers resolve intra-specific relationships and infer genetic structure among lineages of the canyon treefrog, Hyla arenicolor.

    PubMed

    Klymus, Katy E; Carl Gerhardt, H

    2012-11-01

    The canyon treefrog, Hyla arenicolor, is a wide-ranging hylid found from southwestern US into southern Mexico. Recent studies have shown this species to have a complex evolutionary history, with several phylogeographically distinct lineages, a probable cryptic species, and multiple episodes of mitochondrial introgression with the sister group, the H. eximia complex. We aimed to use genome wide AFLP markers to better resolve relationships within this group. As in other studies, our inferred phylogeny not only provides evidence for repeated mitochondrial introgression between H. arenicolor lineages and H. eximia/H. wrightorum, but it also affords more resolution within the main H. arenicolor clade than was previously achieved with sequence data. However, as with a previous study, the placement of a lineage of H. arenicolor whose distribution is centered in the Balsas Basin of Mexico remains poorly resolved, perhaps due to past hybridization with the H. eximia complex. Furthermore, the AFLP data set shows no differentiation among lineages from the Grand Canyon and Colorado Plateau despite their large mitochondrial sequence divergence. Finally, our results infer a well-supported sister relationship between this combined Colorado Plateau/Grand Canyon lineage and the Sonoran Desert lineage, a relationship that strongly contradicts conclusions drawn from the mtDNA evidence. Our study provides a basis for further behavioral and ecological speciation studies of this system and highlights the importance of multi-taxon (species) sampling in phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies.

  4. Gene Loss and Lineage-Specific Restriction-Modification Systems Associated with Niche Differentiation in the Campylobacter jejuni Sequence Type 403 Clonal Complex.

    PubMed

    Morley, Laura; McNally, Alan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Corander, Jukka; Méric, Guillaume; Sheppard, Samuel K; Blom, Jochen; Manning, Georgina

    2015-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a highly diverse species of bacteria commonly associated with infectious intestinal disease of humans and zoonotic carriage in poultry, cattle, pigs, and other animals. The species contains a large number of distinct clonal complexes that vary from host generalist lineages commonly found in poultry, livestock, and human disease cases to host-adapted specialized lineages primarily associated with livestock or poultry. Here, we present novel data on the ST403 clonal complex of C. jejuni, a lineage that has not been reported in avian hosts. Our data show that the lineage exhibits a distinctive pattern of intralineage recombination that is accompanied by the presence of lineage-specific restriction-modification systems. Furthermore, we show that the ST403 complex has undergone gene decay at a number of loci. Our data provide a putative link between the lack of association with avian hosts of C. jejuni ST403 and both gene gain and gene loss through nonsense mutations in coding sequences of genes, resulting in pseudogene formation.

  5. Dual DNA methylation patterns in the CNS reveal developmentally poised chromatin and monoallelic expression of critical genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhui; Valo, Zuzana; Bowers, Chauncey W; Smith, David D; Liu, Zheng; Singer-Sam, Judith

    2010-11-04

    As a first step towards discovery of genes expressed from only one allele in the CNS, we used a tiling array assay for DNA sequences that are both methylated and unmethylated (the MAUD assay). We analyzed regulatory regions of the entire mouse brain transcriptome, and found that approximately 10% of the genes assayed showed dual DNA methylation patterns. They include a large subset of genes that display marks of both active and silent, i.e., poised, chromatin during development, consistent with a link between differential DNA methylation and lineage-specific differentiation within the CNS. Sixty-five of the MAUD hits and 57 other genes whose function is of relevance to CNS development and/or disorders were tested for allele-specific expression in F(1) hybrid clonal neural stem cell (NSC) lines. Eight MAUD hits and one additional gene showed such expression. They include Lgi1, which causes a subtype of inherited epilepsy that displays autosomal dominance with incomplete penetrance; Gfra2, a receptor for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor GDNF that has been linked to kindling epilepsy; Unc5a, a netrin-1 receptor important in neurodevelopment; and Cspg4, a membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan associated with malignant melanoma and astrocytoma in human. Three of the genes, Camk2a, Kcnc4, and Unc5a, show preferential expression of the same allele in all clonal NSC lines tested. The other six genes show a stochastic pattern of monoallelic expression in some NSC lines and bi-allelic expression in others. These results support the estimate that 1-2% of genes expressed in the CNS may be subject to allelic exclusion, and demonstrate that the group includes genes implicated in major disorders of the CNS as well as neurodevelopment.

  6. Ring1-mediated ubiquitination of H2A restrains poised RNA polymerase II at bivalent genes in mouse ES cells.

    PubMed

    Stock, Julie K; Giadrossi, Sara; Casanova, Miguel; Brookes, Emily; Vidal, Miguel; Koseki, Haruhiko; Brockdorff, Neil; Fisher, Amanda G; Pombo, Ana

    2007-12-01

    Changes in phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNAP) are associated with transcription initiation, elongation and termination. Sites of active transcription are generally characterized by hyperphosphorylated RNAP, particularly at Ser 2 residues, whereas inactive or poised genes may lack RNAP or may bind Ser 5-phosphorylated RNAP at promoter proximal regions. Recent studies have demonstrated that silent developmental regulator genes have an unusual histone modification profile in ES cells, being simultaneously marked with Polycomb repressor-mediated histone H3K27 methylation, and marks normally associated with gene activity. Contrary to the prevailing view, we show here that this important subset of developmental regulator genes, termed bivalent genes, assemble RNAP complexes phosphorylated on Ser 5 and are transcribed at low levels. We provide evidence that this poised RNAP configuration is enforced by Polycomb Repressor Complex (PRC)-mediated ubiquitination of H2A, as conditional deletion of Ring1A and Ring1B leads to the sequential loss of ubiquitination of H2A, release of poised RNAP, and subsequent gene de-repression. These observations provide an insight into the molecular mechanisms that allow ES cells to self-renew and yet retain the ability to generate multiple lineage outcomes.

  7. Lineage-specific differences between human and simian immunodeficiency virus regulation of gp120 trimer association and CD4 binding.

    PubMed

    Finzi, Andrés; Pacheco, Beatriz; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Pancera, Marie; Herschhorn, Alon; Wang, Liping; Zeng, Xing; Desormeaux, Anik; Kwong, Peter D; Sodroski, Joseph

    2012-09-01

    Metastable conformations of the gp120 and gp41 envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) must be maintained in the unliganded state of the envelope glycoprotein trimer. Binding of gp120 to the primary receptor, CD4, triggers the transition to an open conformation of the trimer, promoting interaction with the CCR5 chemokine receptor and ultimately leading to gp41-mediated virus-cell membrane fusion and entry. Topological layers in the gp120 inner domain contribute to gp120-trimer association in the unliganded state and to CD4 binding. Here we describe similarities and differences between HIV-1 and SIVmac gp120. In both viruses, the gp120 N/C termini and the inner domain β-sandwich and layer 2 support the noncovalent association of gp120 with the envelope glycoprotein trimer. Layer 1 of the SIVmac gp120 inner domain contributes more to trimer association than the corresponding region of HIV-1 gp120. On the other hand, layer 1 plays an important role in stabilizing the CD4-bound conformation of HIV-1 but not SIVmac gp120 and thus contributes to HIV-1 binding to CD4. In SIVmac, CD4 binding is instead enhanced by tryptophan 375, which fills the Phe 43 cavity of gp120. Activation of SIVmac by soluble CD4 is dependent on tryptophan 375 and on layer 1 residues that determine a tight association of gp120 with the trimer. Distinct biological requirements for CD4 usage have resulted in lineage-specific differences in the HIV-1 and SIV gp120 structures that modulate trimer association and CD4 binding.

  8. The Evaluation of Nerve Growth Factor Over Expression on Neural Lineage Specific Genes in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Yousef; Sheikhsaran, Fatemeh; Khamisipour, Gholamreza Khamisipour; Soleimani, Masoud; Teimuri, Ali; Shokri, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Treatment and repair of neurodegenerative diseases such as brain tumors, spinal cord injuries, and functional disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, are challenging problems. A common treatment approach for such disorders involves the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as an alternative cell source to replace injured cells. However, use of these cells in hosts may potentially cause adverse outcomes such as tumorigenesis and uncontrolled differentiation. In attempt to generate mesenchymal derived neural cells, we have infected MSCs with recombinant lentiviruses that expressed nerve growth factor (NGF) and assessed their neural lineage genes. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we cloned the NGF gene sequence into a helper dependent lentiviral vector that contained the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. The recombinant vector was amplified in DH5 bacterial cells. Recombinant viruses were generated in the human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) packaging cell line with the helper vectors and analyzed under fluorescent microscopy. Bone marrow mesenchymal cells were infected by recombinant viruses for three days followed by assessment of neural differentiation. We evaluated expression of NGF through measurement of the NGF protein in culture medium by ELISA; neural specific genes were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results We observed neural morphological changes after three days. Quantitative PCR showed that expressions of NESTIN, glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) genes increased following induction of NGF overexpression, whereas expressions of endogenous NGF and brain derived neural growth factor (BDNF) genes reduced. Conclusion Ectopic expression of NGF can induce neurogenesis in MSCs. Direct injection of MSCs may cause tumorigenesis and an undesirable outcome. Therefore an alternative choice to overcome this obstacle may

  9. Therapeutic transdifferentiation of human fibroblasts into endothelial cells using forced expression of lineage-specific transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wing Tak; Cooke, John P

    2016-01-01

    Transdifferentiation is the direct conversion from one somatic cell type into another desired somatic cell type. This reprogramming method offers an attractive approach for regenerative medicine. Here, we demonstrate that neonatal fibroblasts can be transdifferentiated into endothelial cells using only four endothelial transcription factors, namely, ETV2, FLI1, GATA2, and KLF4. We observed a significant up-regulation of endothelial genes including KDR, CD31, CD144, and vWF in human neonatal foreskin (BJ) fibroblasts infected with the lentiviral construct encoding the open reading frame of the four transcription factors. We observed morphological changes in BJ fibroblasts from the fibroblastic spindle shape into a more endothelial-like cobblestone structures. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that ~16% of the infected cells with the lentiviral constructs encoding 4F expressed CD31. The sorted cells were allowed to expand for 2 weeks and these cells were immunostained and found to express endothelial markers CD31. The induced endothelial cells also incorporated fluorescence-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein and efficiently formed capillary-like networks when seeded on Matrigel. These results suggested that the induced endothelial cells were functional in vitro. Taken together, we successfully demonstrated the direct conversion of human neonatal fibroblasts into endothelial cells by transduction of lentiviral constructs encoding endothelial lineage-specific transcription factors ETV2, FLI1, GATA2, and KLF4. The directed differentiation of fibroblasts into endothelial cells may have significant utility in diseases characterized by fibrosis and loss of microvasculature.

  10. Modulation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellar motility by redox poise

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; King, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Redox-based regulatory systems are essential for many cellular activities. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits alterations in motile behavior in response to different light conditions (photokinesis). We hypothesized that photokinesis is signaled by variations in cytoplasmic redox poise resulting from changes in chloroplast activity. We found that this effect requires photosystem I, which generates reduced NADPH. We also observed that photokinetic changes in beat frequency and duration of the photophobic response could be obtained by altering oxidative/reductive stress. Analysis of reactivated cell models revealed that this redox poise effect is mediated through the outer dynein arms (ODAs). Although the global redox state of the thioredoxin-related ODA light chains LC3 and LC5 and the redox-sensitive Ca2+-binding subunit of the docking complex DC3 did not change upon light/dark transitions, we did observe significant alterations in their interactions with other flagellar components via mixed disulfides. These data indicate that redox poise directly affects ODAs and suggest that it may act in the control of flagellar motility. PMID:16754958

  11. Mouse model of chromosome mosaicism reveals lineage-specific depletion of aneuploid cells and normal developmental potential

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Helen; Graham, Sarah J. L.; Van der Aa, Niels; Kumar, Parveen; Theunis, Koen; Fernandez Gallardo, Elia; Voet, Thierry; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Most human pre-implantation embryos are mosaics of euploid and aneuploid cells. To determine the fate of aneuploid cells and the developmental potential of mosaic embryos, here we generate a mouse model of chromosome mosaicism. By treating embryos with a spindle assembly checkpoint inhibitor during the four- to eight-cell division, we efficiently generate aneuploid cells, resulting in embryo death during peri-implantation development. Live-embryo imaging and single-cell tracking in chimeric embryos, containing aneuploid and euploid cells, reveal that the fate of aneuploid cells depends on lineage: aneuploid cells in the fetal lineage are eliminated by apoptosis, whereas those in the placental lineage show severe proliferative defects. Overall, the proportion of aneuploid cells is progressively depleted from the blastocyst stage onwards. Finally, we show that mosaic embryos have full developmental potential, provided they contain sufficient euploid cells, a finding of significance for the assessment of embryo vitality in the clinic. PMID:27021558

  12. Myocardial Lineage Development

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Sylvia M.; Yelon, Deborah; Conlon, Frank L.; Kirby, Margaret L.

    2010-01-01

    The myocardium of the heart is composed of multiple highly specialized myocardial lineages, including those of the ventricular and atrial myocardium, and the specialized conduction system. Specification and maturation of each of these lineages during heart development is a highly ordered, ongoing process involving multiple signaling pathways and their intersection with transcriptional regulatory networks. Here, we attempt to summarize and compare much of what we know about specification and maturation of myocardial lineages from studies in several different vertebrate model systems. To date, most research has focused on early specification, and while there is still more to learn, less is known about factors that promote subsequent maturation of myocardial lineages required to build the functioning adult heart. PMID:21148449

  13. Nitric Oxide-cGMP Signaling Stimulates Erythropoiesis through Multiple Lineage-Specific Transcription Factors: Clinical Implications and a Novel Target for Erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Ikuta, Tohru; Sellak, Hassan; Odo, Nadine; Adekile, Adekunle D.; Gaensler, Karin M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Much attention has been directed to the physiological effects of nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP signaling, but virtually nothing is known about its hematologic effects. We reported for the first time that cGMP signaling induces human γ-globin gene expression. Aiming at developing novel therapeutics for anemia, we examined here the hematologic effects of NO-cGMP signaling in vivo and in vitro. We treated wild-type mice with NO to activate soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a key enzyme of cGMP signaling. Compared to untreated mice, NO-treated mice had higher red blood cell counts and total hemoglobin but reduced leukocyte counts, demonstrating that when activated, NO-cGMP signaling exerts hematopoietic effects on multiple types of blood cells in vivo. We next generated mice which overexpressed rat sGC in erythroid and myeloid cells. The forced expression of sGCs activated cGMP signaling in both lineage cells. Compared with non-transgenic littermates, sGC mice exhibited hematologic changes similar to those of NO-treated mice. Consistently, a membrane-permeable cGMP enhanced the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors toward erythroid-lineage cells but inhibited them toward myeloid-lineage cells by controlling multiple lineage-specific transcription factors. Human γ-globin gene expression was induced at low but appreciable levels in sGC mice carrying the human β-globin locus. Together, these results demonstrate that NO-cGMP signaling is capable of stimulating erythropoiesis in both in vitro and vivo settings by controlling the expression of multiple lineage-specific transcription factors, suggesting that cGMP signaling upregulates erythropoiesis at the level of gene transcription. The NO-cGMP signaling axis may constitute a novel target to stimulate erythropoiesis in vivo. PMID:26727002

  14. Evolutionary Convergence of Cell-Specific Gene Expression in Independent Lineages of C4 Grasses1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    John, Christopher R.; Smith-Unna, Richard D.; Woodfield, Helen; Covshoff, Sarah; Hibberd, Julian M.

    2014-01-01

    Leaves of almost all C4 lineages separate the reactions of photosynthesis into the mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS). The extent to which messenger RNA profiles of M and BS cells from independent C4 lineages resemble each other is not known. To address this, we conducted deep sequencing of RNA isolated from the M and BS of Setaria viridis and compared these data with publicly available information from maize (Zea mays). This revealed a high correlation (r = 0.89) between the relative abundance of transcripts encoding proteins of the core C4 pathway in M and BS cells in these species, indicating significant convergence in transcript accumulation in these evolutionarily independent C4 lineages. We also found that the vast majority of genes encoding proteins of the C4 cycle in S. viridis are syntenic to homologs used by maize. In both lineages, 122 and 212 homologous transcription factors were preferentially expressed in the M and BS, respectively. Sixteen shared regulators of chloroplast biogenesis were identified, 14 of which were syntenic homologs in maize and S. viridis. In sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), a third C4 grass, we found that 82% of these trans-factors were also differentially expressed in either M or BS cells. Taken together, these data provide, to our knowledge, the first quantification of convergence in transcript abundance in the M and BS cells from independent lineages of C4 grasses. Furthermore, the repeated recruitment of syntenic homologs from large gene families strongly implies that parallel evolution of both structural genes and trans-factors underpins the polyphyletic evolution of this highly complex trait in the monocotyledons. PMID:24676859

  15. Specific Preferences in Lineage Choice and Phenotypic Plasticity of Glioma Stem Cells Under BMP4 and Noggin Influence.

    PubMed

    Videla Richardson, Guillermo Agustín; Garcia, Carolina Paola; Roisman, Alejandro; Slavutsky, Irma; Fernandez Espinosa, Damián Darío; Romorini, Leonardo; Miriuka, Santiago Gabriel; Arakaki, Naomi; Martinetto, Horacio; Scassa, María Elida; Sevlever, Gustavo Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Although BMP4-induced differentiation of glioma stem cells (GSCs) is well recognized, details of the cellular responses triggered by this morphogen are still poorly defined. In this study, we established several GSC-enriched cell lines (GSC-ECLs) from high-grade gliomas. The expansion of these cells as adherent monolayers, and not as floating neurospheres, enabled a thorough study of the phenotypic changes that occurred during their differentiation. Herein, we evaluated GSC-ECLs' behavior toward differentiating conditions by depriving them of growth factors and/or by adding BMP4 at different concentrations. After analyzing cellular morphology, proliferation and lineage marker expression, we determined that GSC-ECLs have distinct preferences in lineage choice, where some of them showed an astrocyte fate commitment and others a neuronal one. We found that this election seems to be dictated by the expression pattern of BMP signaling components present in each GSC-ECL. Additionally, treatment of GSC-ECLs with the BMP antagonist, Noggin, also led to evident phenotypic changes. Interestingly, under certain conditions, some GSC-ECLs adopted an unexpected smooth muscle-like phenotype. As a whole, our findings illustrate the wide differentiation potential of GSCs, highlighting their molecular complexity and paving a way to facilitate personalized differentiating therapies.

  16. Molecular Signatures of Self-Renewal, Differentiation, and Lineage Choice in Multipotential Hemopoietic Progenitor Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Ludovica; Hoffmann, Reinhard; McBlane, Fraser; Brown, John; Gupta, Rajeev; Joshi, Chirag; Pearson, Stella; Seidl, Thomas; Heyworth, Clare; Enver, Tariq

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing self-renewal, differentiation, and lineage specification remain unknown. Transcriptional profiling is likely to provide insight into these processes but, as yet, has been confined to “static” molecular profiles of stem and progenitors cells. We now provide a comprehensive, statistically robust, and “dynamic” analysis of multipotent hemopoietic progenitor cells undergoing self-renewal in response to interleukin-3 (IL-3) and multilineage differentiation in response to lineage-affiliated cytokines. Cells undergoing IL-3-dependent proliferative self-renewal displayed striking complexity, including expression of genes associated with different lineage programs, suggesting a highly responsive compartment poised to rapidly execute intrinsically or extrinsically initiated cell fate decisions. A remarkable general feature of early differentiation was a resolution of complexity through the downregulation of gene expression. Although effector genes characteristic of mature cells were upregulated late, coincident with morphological changes, lineage-specific changes in gene expression were observed prior to this, identifying genes which may provide early harbingers of unilineage commitment. Of particular interest were genes that displayed differential behavior irrespective of the lineage elaborated, many of which were rapidly downregulated within 4 to 8 h after exposure to a differentiation cue. These are likely to include genes important in self-renewal, the maintenance of multipotentiality, or the negative regulation of differentiation per se. PMID:14701746

  17. Well-poised generation of Apery-like recursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zudilin, Wadim

    2005-06-01

    The idea to use classical hypergeometric series and, in particular, well-poised hypergeometric series in diophantine problems of the values of the polylogarithms has led to several novelties in number theory and neighbouring areas of mathematics. Here, we present a systematic approach to derive second-order polynomial recursions for approximations to some values of the Lerch zeta function, depending on the fixed (but not necessarily real) parameter [alpha] satisfying the condition Re([alpha]). Substituting [alpha]=0 into the resulting recurrence equations produces the famous recursions for rational approximations to [zeta](2), [zeta](3) due to Apery, as well as the known recursion for rational approximations to [zeta](4). Multiple integral representations for solutions of the constructed recurrences are also given.

  18. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: spread of specific lineages among patients in different wards at a Brazilian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, F S; Schuenck, R P; Ferreira, D C; da Costa, C R; Nouér, S A; dos Santos, K R N

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to characterize meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) lineages circulating in a Brazilian teaching hospital. MRSA isolates from nasal swabs were evaluated to assess antimicrobial susceptibility, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), Panton-Valentine leucocidin status, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile and multi-locus sequence type (MLST) analysis. Eighty-three MRSA isolates were analysed. SCCmec III (43.4%) and IV (49.4%) were predominant. ST1-IV (USA400) was more common in internal medicine (P = 0.002) whereas 'clone M' (SCCmec III) was more common in the medical and surgical intensive care unit (P = 0.004), and all isolates were ST5-IV (USA800) in dermatology (P < 0.001). These data improved the understanding of the MRSA epidemiology inside the hospital and helped to establish effective control measures.

  19. Gain of a New Exon by a Lineage-Specific Alu Element-Integration Event in the BCS1L Gene during Primate Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Je; Kim, Young-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Rae; Choe, Se-Hee; Kim, Myung-Jin; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Ji-Su; Sim, Bo-Woong; Song, Bong-Seok; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Jin, Yeung-Bae; Lee, Youngjeon; Park, Young-Ho; Park, Young Il; Huh, Jae-Won; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2015-01-01

    BCS1L gene encodes mitochondrial protein and is a member of conserved AAA protein family. This gene is involved in the incorporation of Rieske FeS and Qcr10p into complex III of respiratory chain. In our previous study, AluYRa2-derived alternative transcript in rhesus monkey genome was identified. However, this transcript has not been reported in human genome. In present study, we conducted evolutionary analysis of AluYRa2-exonized transcript with various primate genomic DNAs and cDNAs from humans, rhesus monkeys, and crab-eating monkeys. Remarkably, our results show that AluYRa2 element has only been integrated into genomes of Macaca species. This Macaca lineage-specific integration of AluYRa2 element led to exonization event in the first intron region of BCS1L gene by producing a conserved 3′ splice site. Intriguingly, in rhesus and crab-eating monkeys, more diverse transcript variants by alternative splicing (AS) events, including exon skipping and different 5′ splice sites from humans, were identified. Alignment of amino acid sequences revealed that AluYRa2-exonized transcript has short N-terminal peptides. Therefore, AS events play a major role in the generation of various transcripts and proteins during primate evolution. In particular, lineage-specific integration of Alu elements and species-specific Alu-derived exonization events could be important sources of gene diversification in primates. PMID:26537194

  20. Development of an RT-qPCR assay for the specific detection of a distinct genetic lineage of the infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Gonzalo; Hernández, Martín; Marandino, Ana; Techera, Claudia; Grecco, Sofia; Hernández, Diego; Banda, Alejandro; Panzera, Yanina; Pérez, Ruben

    2017-04-01

    The infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a major health threat to the world's poultry industry despite intensive controls including proper biosafety practices and vaccination. IBDV (Avibirnavirus, Birnaviridae) is a non-enveloped virus with a bisegmented double-stranded RNA genome. The virus is traditionally classified into classic, variant and very virulent strains, each with different epidemiological relevance and clinical implications. Recently, a novel worldwide spread genetic lineage was described and denoted as distinct (d) IBDV. Here, we report the development and validation of a reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay for the specific detection of dIBDVs in the global poultry industry. The assay employs a TaqMan-MGB probe that hybridizes with a unique molecular signature of dIBDV. The assay successfully detected all the assessed strains belonging to the dIBDV genetic lineage, showing high specificity and absence of cross-reactivity with non-dIBDVs, IBDV-negative samples and other common avian viruses. Using serial dilutions of in vitro-transcribed RNA we obtained acceptable PCR efficiencies and determination coefficients, and relatively small intra- and inter-assay variability. The assay demonstrated a wide dynamic range between 10(3) and 10(8) RNA copies/reaction. This rapid, specific and quantitative assay is expected to improve IBDV surveillance and control worldwide and to increase our understanding of the molecular epidemiology of this economically detrimental poultry pathogen.

  1. Lineage-specific responses of tooth shape in murine rodents (murinae, rodentia) to late Miocene dietary change in the Siwaliks of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuri; Jacobs, Louis L; Flynn, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    Past ecological responses of mammals to climate change are recognized in the fossil record by adaptive significance of morphological variations. To understand the role of dietary behavior on functional adaptations of dental morphology in rodent evolution, we examine evolutionary change of tooth shape in late Miocene Siwalik murine rodents, which experienced a dietary shift toward C4 diets during late Miocene ecological change indicated by carbon isotopic evidence. Geometric morphometric analysis in the outline of upper first molars captures dichotomous lineages of Siwalik murines, in agreement with phylogenetic hypotheses of previous studies (two distinct clades: the Karnimata and Progonomys clades), and indicates lineage-specific functional responses to mechanical properties of their diets. Tooth shapes of the two clades are similar at their sympatric origin but deviate from each other with decreasing overlap through time. Shape change in the Karnimata clade is associated with greater efficiency of propalinal chewing for tough diets than in the Progonomys clade. Larger body mass in Karnimata may be related to exploitation of lower-quality food items, such as grasses, than in smaller-bodied Progonomys. The functional and ecophysiological aspects of Karnimata exploiting C4 grasses are concordant with their isotopic dietary preference relative to Progonomys. Lineage-specific selection was differentially greater in Karnimata, and a faster rate of shape change toward derived Karnimata facilitated inclusion of C4 grasses in the diet. Sympatric speciation in these clades is most plausibly explained by interspecific competition on resource utilization between the two, based on comparisons of our results with the carbon isotope data. Interspecific competition with Karnimata may have suppressed morphological innovation of the Progonomys clade. Pairwise analyses of morphological and carbon isotope data can uncover ecological causes of sympatric speciation and define

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis, Lineage-Specific Expansion and Functional Divergence of seed dormancy 4-Like Genes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Subburaj, Saminathan; Cao, Shuanghe; Xia, Xianchun; He, Zhonghu

    2016-01-01

    The rice gene seed dormancy 4 (OsSdr4) functions in seed dormancy and is a major factor associated with pre-harvest sprouting (PHS). Although previous studies of this protein family were reported for rice and other species, knowledge of the evolution of genes homologous to OsSdr4 in plants remains inadequate. Fifty four Sdr4-like (hereafter designated Sdr4L) genes were identified in nine plant lineages including 36 species. Phylogenetic analysis placed these genes in eight subfamilies (I-VIII). Genes from the same lineage clustered together, supported by analysis of conserved motifs and exon-intron patterns. Segmental duplications were present in both dicot and monocot clusters, while tandemly duplicated genes occurred only in monocot clusters indicating that both tandem and segmental duplications contributed to expansion of the grass I and II subfamilies. Estimation of the approximate ages of the duplication events indicated that ancestral Sdr4 genes evolved from a common angiosperm ancestor, about 160 million years ago (MYA). Moreover, diversification of Sdr4L genes in mono and dicot plants was mainly associated with genome-wide duplication and speciation events. Functional divergence was observed in all subfamily pairs, except IV/VIIIa. Further analysis indicated that functional constraints between subfamily pairs I/II, I/VIIIb, II/VI, II/VIIIb, II/IV, and VI/VIIIb were statistically significant. Site and branch-site model analyses of positive selection suggested that these genes were under strong adaptive selection pressure. Critical amino acids detected for both functional divergence and positive selection were mostly located in the loops, pointing to functional importance of these regions in this protein family. In addition, differential expression studies by transcriptome atlas of 11 Sdr4L genes showed that the duplicated genes may have undergone divergence in expression between plant species. Our findings showed that Sdr4L genes are functionally divergent

  3. Dissemination of Cephalosporin Resistance Genes between Escherichia coli Strains from Farm Animals and Humans by Specific Plasmid Lineages

    PubMed Central

    de Toro, María; Scharringa, Jelle; Dohmen, Wietske; Du, Yu; Hu, Juan; Lei, Ying; Li, Ning; Tooming-Klunderud, Ave; Heederik, Dick J. J.; Fluit, Ad C.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Willems, Rob J. L.; de la Cruz, Fernando; van Schaik, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Third-generation cephalosporins are a class of β-lactam antibiotics that are often used for the treatment of human infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, especially Escherichia coli. Worryingly, the incidence of human infections caused by third-generation cephalosporin-resistant E. coli is increasing worldwide. Recent studies have suggested that these E. coli strains, and their antibiotic resistance genes, can spread from food-producing animals, via the food-chain, to humans. However, these studies used traditional typing methods, which may not have provided sufficient resolution to reliably assess the relatedness of these strains. We therefore used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to study the relatedness of cephalosporin-resistant E. coli from humans, chicken meat, poultry and pigs. One strain collection included pairs of human and poultry-associated strains that had previously been considered to be identical based on Multi-Locus Sequence Typing, plasmid typing and antibiotic resistance gene sequencing. The second collection included isolates from farmers and their pigs. WGS analysis revealed considerable heterogeneity between human and poultry-associated isolates. The most closely related pairs of strains from both sources carried 1263 Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) per Mbp core genome. In contrast, epidemiologically linked strains from humans and pigs differed by only 1.8 SNPs per Mbp core genome. WGS-based plasmid reconstructions revealed three distinct plasmid lineages (IncI1- and IncK-type) that carried cephalosporin resistance genes of the Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL)- and AmpC-types. The plasmid backbones within each lineage were virtually identical and were shared by genetically unrelated human and animal isolates. Plasmid reconstructions from short-read sequencing data were validated by long-read DNA sequencing for two strains. Our findings failed to demonstrate evidence for recent clonal transmission of cephalosporin-resistant E

  4. Dynamic Analysis of Gene Expression and Genome-wide Transcription Factor Binding during Lineage Specification of Multipotent Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    May, Gillian; Soneji, Shamit; Tipping, Alex J.; Teles, Jose; McGowan, Simon J.; Wu, Mengchu; Guo, Yanping; Fugazza, Cristina; Brown, John; Karlsson, Göran; Pina, Cristina; Olariu, Victor; Taylor, Stephen; Tenen, Daniel G.; Peterson, Carsten; Enver, Tariq

    2013-01-01

    Summary We used the paradigmatic GATA-PU.1 axis to explore, at the systems level, dynamic relationships between transcription factor (TF) binding and global gene expression programs as multipotent cells differentiate. We combined global ChIP-seq of GATA1, GATA2, and PU.1 with expression profiling during differentiation to erythroid and neutrophil lineages. Our analysis reveals (1) differential complexity of sequence motifs bound by GATA1, GATA2, and PU.1; (2) the scope and interplay of GATA1 and GATA2 programs within, and during transitions between, different cell compartments, and the extent of their hard-wiring by DNA motifs; (3) the potential to predict gene expression trajectories based on global associations between TF-binding data and target gene expression; and (4) how dynamic modeling of DNA-binding and gene expression data can be used to infer regulatory logic of TF circuitry. This rubric exemplifies the utility of this cross-platform resource for deconvoluting the complexity of transcriptional programs controlling stem/progenitor cell fate in hematopoiesis. PMID:24120743

  5. Dynamic analysis of gene expression and genome-wide transcription factor binding during lineage specification of multipotent progenitors.

    PubMed

    May, Gillian; Soneji, Shamit; Tipping, Alex J; Teles, Jose; McGowan, Simon J; Wu, Mengchu; Guo, Yanping; Fugazza, Cristina; Brown, John; Karlsson, Göran; Pina, Cristina; Olariu, Victor; Taylor, Stephen; Tenen, Daniel G; Peterson, Carsten; Enver, Tariq

    2013-12-05

    We used the paradigmatic GATA-PU.1 axis to explore, at the systems level, dynamic relationships between transcription factor (TF) binding and global gene expression programs as multipotent cells differentiate. We combined global ChIP-seq of GATA1, GATA2, and PU.1 with expression profiling during differentiation to erythroid and neutrophil lineages. Our analysis reveals (1) differential complexity of sequence motifs bound by GATA1, GATA2, and PU.1; (2) the scope and interplay of GATA1 and GATA2 programs within, and during transitions between, different cell compartments, and the extent of their hard-wiring by DNA motifs; (3) the potential to predict gene expression trajectories based on global associations between TF-binding data and target gene expression; and (4) how dynamic modeling of DNA-binding and gene expression data can be used to infer regulatory logic of TF circuitry. This rubric exemplifies the utility of this cross-platform resource for deconvoluting the complexity of transcriptional programs controlling stem/progenitor cell fate in hematopoiesis.

  6. Identification of a cell lineage-specific gene coding for a sea urchin alpha 2(IV)-like collagen chain.

    PubMed

    Exposito, J Y; Suzuki, H; Geourjon, C; Garrone, R; Solursh, M; Ramirez, F

    1994-05-06

    We report the isolation of several overlapping cDNAs from an embryonic library of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus coding for a novel sea urchin collagen chain. The conceptual amino acid translation of the cDNAs indicated that the protein displays the structural features of a vertebrate type IV-like collagen alpha chain. In addition to a putative 31-residue signal peptide, the sea urchin molecule contains a 14-residue amino-terminal non-collagenous segment, a discontinuous 1,477-amino acid triple helical domain, and a 225-residue carboxyl-terminal domain rich in cysteines. The amino- and carboxyl-terminal non-collagenous regions of the echinoid molecule are remarkably similar to the 7 S and carboxyl-terminal non-collagenous (NC1) domains of the alpha 1 and alpha 2 chains of vertebrate type IV collagen. The sequence similarity and distinct structural features of the 7 S and NC1 domains strongly suggest that the sea urchin polypeptide is evolutionarily related to the alpha 2(IV) class of collagen chains. Finally, in situ hybridizations revealed that expression of this collagen gene is restricted to the mesenchyme cell lineage of the developing sea urchin embryo.

  7. Bacterial Microbiota Associated with the Glacier Ice Worm Is Dominated by Both Worm-Specific and Glacier-Derived Facultative Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Takumi; Segawa, Takahiro; Dial, Roman; Takeuchi, Nozomu; Kohshima, Shiro; Hongoh, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    The community structure of bacteria associated with the glacier ice worm Mesenchytraeus solifugus was analyzed by amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and their transcripts. Ice worms were collected from two distinct glaciers in Alaska, Harding Icefield and Byron Glacier, and glacier surfaces were also sampled for comparison. Marked differences were observed in bacterial community structures between the ice worm and glacier surface samples. Several bacterial phylotypes were detected almost exclusively in the ice worms, and these bacteria were phylogenetically affiliated with either animal-associated lineages or, interestingly, clades mostly consisting of glacier-indigenous species. The former included bacteria that belong to Mollicutes, Chlamydiae, Rickettsiales, and Lachnospiraceae, while the latter included Arcicella and Herminiimonas phylotypes. Among these bacteria enriched in ice worm samples, Mollicutes, Arcicella, and Herminiimonas phylotypes were abundantly and consistently detected in the ice worm samples; these phylotypes constituted the core microbiota associated with the ice worm. A fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that Arcicella cells specifically colonized the epidermis of the ice worms. Other bacterial phylotypes detected in the ice worm samples were also abundantly recovered from the respective habitat glaciers; these bacteria may be food for ice worms to digest or temporary residents. Nevertheless, some were overrepresented in the ice worm RNA samples; they may also function as facultative gut bacteria. Our results indicate that the community structure of bacteria associated with ice worms is distinct from that in the associated glacier and includes worm-specific and facultative, glacier-indigenous lineages. PMID:28302989

  8. Historical Selection, Amino Acid Polymorphism and Lineage-Specific Divergence at the G6pd Locus in Drosophila Melanogaster and D. Simulans

    PubMed Central

    Eanes, W. F.; Kirchner, M.; Yoon, J.; Biermann, C. H.; Wang, I. N.; McCartney, M. A.; Verrelli, B. C.

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide diversity across 1705 bp of the G6pd gene is studied in 50 Drosophila melanogaster and 12 D. simulans lines. Our earlier report contrasted intraspecific polymorphism and interspecific differences at silent and replacement sites in these species. This report expands the number of European and African lines and examines the pattern of polymorphism with respect to the common A/B allozymes. In D. melanogaster the silent nucleotide diversity varies 2.8-fold across localities. The B allele sequences are two- to fourfold more variable than the derived A allele, and differences between allozymes are twice as among B alleles. There is strong linkage disequilibrium across the G6pd region. In both species the level of silent polymorphism increases from the 5' to 3' ends, while there is no comparable pattern in level of silent site divergence or fixation. The neutral model is not rejected in either species. Using D. yakuba as an outgroup, the D. melanogaster lineage shows a twofold greater rate of silent fixation, but less than half the rate of amino acid replacement. Lineage-specific differences in mutation fixation are inconsistent with neutral expectations and suggest the interaction of species-specific population size differences with both weakly advantageous and deleterious selection. PMID:8913747

  9. The AAV Vector Toolkit: Poised at the Clinical Crossroads.

    PubMed

    Asokan, Aravind; Schaffer, David V; Jude Samulski, R

    2012-04-01

    The discovery of naturally occurring adeno-associated virus (AAV) isolates in different animal species and the generation of engineered AAV strains using molecular genetics tools have yielded a versatile AAV vector toolkit. Promising results in preclinical animal models of human disease spurred the much awaited transition toward clinical application, and early successes in phase I/II clinical trials for a broad spectrum of genetic diseases have recently been reported. As the gene therapy community forges ahead with cautious optimism, both preclinical and clinical studies using first generation AAV vectors have highlighted potential challenges. These include cross-species variation in vector tissue tropism and gene transfer efficiency, pre-existing humoral immunity to AAV capsids and vector dose-dependent toxicity in patients. A battery of second generation AAV vectors, engineered through rational and combinatorial approaches to address the aforementioned concerns, are now available. This review will provide an overview of preclinical studies with the ever-expanding AAV vector portfolio in large animal models and an update on new lead AAV vector candidates poised for clinical translation.

  10. The AAV vector toolkit: poised at the clinical crossroads.

    PubMed

    Asokan, Aravind; Schaffer, David V; Samulski, R Jude

    2012-04-01

    The discovery of naturally occurring adeno-associated virus (AAV) isolates in different animal species and the generation of engineered AAV strains using molecular genetics tools have yielded a versatile AAV vector toolkit. Promising results in preclinical animal models of human disease spurred the much awaited transition toward clinical application, and early successes in phase I/II clinical trials for a broad spectrum of genetic diseases have recently been reported. As the gene therapy community forges ahead with cautious optimism, both preclinical and clinical studies using first generation AAV vectors have highlighted potential challenges. These include cross-species variation in vector tissue tropism and gene transfer efficiency, pre-existing humoral immunity to AAV capsids and vector dose-dependent toxicity in patients. A battery of second generation AAV vectors, engineered through rational and combinatorial approaches to address the aforementioned concerns, are now available. This review will provide an overview of preclinical studies with the ever-expanding AAV vector portfolio in large animal models and an update on new lead AAV vector candidates poised for clinical translation.

  11. Protist homologs of the meiotic Spo11 gene and topoisomerase VI reveal an evolutionary history of gene duplication and lineage-specific loss.

    PubMed

    Malik, Shehre-Banoo; Ramesh, Marilee A; Hulstrand, Alissa M; Logsdon, John M

    2007-12-01

    Spo11 is a meiotic protein of fundamental importance as it is a conserved meiosis-specific transesterase required for meiotic recombination initiation in fungi, animals, and plants. Spo11 is homologous to the archaebacterial topoisomerase VIA (Top6A) gene, and its homologs are broadly distributed among eukaryotes, with some eukaryotes having more than one homolog. However, the evolutionary relationships among these genes are unclear, with some debate as to whether eukaryotic homologs originated by lateral gene transfer. We have identified and characterized protist Spo11 homologs by degenerate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing and by analyses of sequences from public databases. Our phylogenetic analyses show that Spo11 homologs evolved by two ancient eukaryotic gene duplication events prior to the last common ancestor of extant eukaryotes, resulting in three eukaryotic paralogs: Spo11-1, Spo11-2, and Spo11-3. Spo11-1 orthologs encode meiosis-specific proteins and are distributed broadly among eukaryotic lineages, though Spo11-1 is absent from some protists. This absence coincides with the presence of Spo11-2 orthologs, which are meiosis-specific in Arabidopsis and are found in plants, red algae, and some protists but absent in animals and fungi. Spo11-3 encodes a Top6A subunit that interacts with topoisomerase VIB (Top6B) subunits, which together play a role in vegetative growth in Arabidopsis. We identified Spo11-3 (Top6A) and Top6B homologs in plants, red algae, and a few protists, establishing a broader distribution of these genes among eukaryotes, indicating their likely vertical descent followed by lineage-specific loss.

  12. Variability among the Most Rapidly Evolving Plastid Genomic Regions is Lineage-Specific: Implications of Pairwise Genome Comparisons in Pyrus (Rosaceae) and Other Angiosperms for Marker Choice

    PubMed Central

    Ter-Voskanyan, Hasmik; Allgaier, Martin; Borsch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Plastid genomes exhibit different levels of variability in their sequences, depending on the respective kinds of genomic regions. Genes are usually more conserved while noncoding introns and spacers evolve at a faster pace. While a set of about thirty maximum variable noncoding genomic regions has been suggested to provide universally promising phylogenetic markers throughout angiosperms, applications often require several regions to be sequenced for many individuals. Our project aims to illuminate evolutionary relationships and species-limits in the genus Pyrus (Rosaceae)—a typical case with very low genetic distances between taxa. In this study, we have sequenced the plastid genome of Pyrus spinosa and aligned it to the already available P. pyrifolia sequence. The overall p-distance of the two Pyrus genomes was 0.00145. The intergenic spacers between ndhC–trnV, trnR–atpA, ndhF–rpl32, psbM–trnD, and trnQ–rps16 were the most variable regions, also comprising the highest total numbers of substitutions, indels and inversions (potentially informative characters). Our comparative analysis of further plastid genome pairs with similar low p-distances from Oenothera (representing another rosid), Olea (asterids) and Cymbidium (monocots) showed in each case a different ranking of genomic regions in terms of variability and potentially informative characters. Only two intergenic spacers (ndhF–rpl32 and trnK–rps16) were consistently found among the 30 top-ranked regions. We have mapped the occurrence of substitutions and microstructural mutations in the four genome pairs. High AT content in specific sequence elements seems to foster frequent mutations. We conclude that the variability among the fastest evolving plastid genomic regions is lineage-specific and thus cannot be precisely predicted across angiosperms. The often lineage-specific occurrence of stem-loop elements in the sequences of introns and spacers also governs lineage-specific mutations

  13. Fidelity of pathogen-specific CD4+ T cells to the Th1 lineage is controlled by exogenous cytokines, interferon-γ expression and pathogen lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Meredith M.; Rowell, Emily; Shafiani, Shahin; Negash, Amina; Urdahl, Kevin B.; Wilson, Christopher B.; Way, Sing Sing

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The degree of lineage stability achieved by pathogen-specific CD4+ T cells in vivo, and how this impacts host defense against infection, remains unclear. We demonstrate that in response to Th1-polarizing intracellular bacterial or viral pathogens, only 80–90% of responding polyclonal T cells become indelibly committed to this lineage. Th1 commitment was nearly invariant in cells that proliferated extensively, but perturbations to the extrinsic cytokine milieu or the pathogen’s ability to enter the cytosol impeded commitment and promoted plasticity for future IL-17 expression. Conversely, cell intrinsic interferon-γ expression and acquisition of permissive chromatin at the Ifng gene during priming predicted heritable Th1 commitment. Importantly, CD4+ T cells that retained plasticity conferred protection against M. tuberculosis, while these protective effects were abolished with Th17 polarization. These findings illustrate the immune signals that induce memory CD4+ T cell responses required for maintaining host defense against infection yet are adaptable in novel environmental contexts. PMID:20709293

  14. A genome survey sequencing of the Java mouse deer (Tragulus javanicus) adds new aspects to the evolution of lineage specific retrotransposons in Ruminantia (Cetartiodactyla).

    PubMed

    Gallus, S; Kumar, V; Bertelsen, M F; Janke, A; Nilsson, M A

    2015-10-25

    Ruminantia, the ruminating, hoofed mammals (cow, deer, giraffe and allies) are an unranked artiodactylan clade. Around 50-60 million years ago the BovB retrotransposon entered the ancestral ruminantian genome through horizontal gene transfer. A survey genome screen using 454-pyrosequencing of the Java mouse deer (Tragulus javanicus) and the lesser kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis) was done to investigate and to compare the landscape of transposable elements within Ruminantia. The family Tragulidae (mouse deer) is the only representative of Tragulina and phylogenetically important, because it represents the earliest divergence in Ruminantia. The data analyses show that, relative to other ruminantian species, the lesser kudu genome has seen an expansion of BovB Long INterspersed Elements (LINEs) and BovB related Short INterspersed Elements (SINEs) like BOVA2. In comparison the genome of Java mouse deer has fewer BovB elements than other ruminants, especially Bovinae, and has in addition a novel CHR-3 SINE most likely propagated by LINE-1. By contrast the other ruminants have low amounts of CHR SINEs but high numbers of actively propagating BovB-derived and BovB-propagated SINEs. The survey sequencing data suggest that the transposable element landscape in mouse deer (Tragulina) is unique among Ruminantia, suggesting a lineage specific evolutionary trajectory that does not involve BovB mediated retrotransposition. This shows that the genomic landscape of mobile genetic elements can rapidly change in any lineage.

  15. A single-chain triplebody with specificity for CD19 and CD33 mediates effective lysis of mixed lineage leukemia cells by dual targeting.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Ingo; Kellner, Christian; Stein, Christoph; Kügler, Markus; Schwenkert, Michael; Saul, Domenica; Mentz, Kristin; Singer, Heiko; Stockmeyer, Bernhard; Hillen, Wolfgang; Mackensen, Andreas; Fey, Georg H

    2011-01-01

    A single-chain triplebody (sctb) 33-ds16-ds19 comprising two distal single-chain Fv fragments (scFvs) specific for the lymphoid antigen CD19 and the myeloid antigen CD33 flanking a central scFv specific for CD16, which is the low affinity Fc-receptor (FcγRIII) present on natural killer cells and macrophages, was produced and its properties were investigated. CD33 and CD19 in combination are present on acute leukemiablasts with mixed lineage phenotype, but not on normal human hematopoietic cells. For comparison, two bispecific scFvs (bsscFvs), ds19-ds16 and 33-ds16, with monovalent binding to CD19 and CD33, respectively, were also studied. The sctb 33-ds16-ds19 specifically interacted with all 3 antigens. On the antigen double-positive cell line BV-173, the sctb bound with 2-fold greater avidity than bsscFv ds19-ds16 (KD = 21 vs. 42 nM) and with 1.4-fold greater avidity than bsscFv 33-ds16 (KD = 29 nM). All 3 fusion proteins had similar affinity for CD16 and sufficient thermic stability in human serum. In antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) reactions with human mononuclear cells as effectors, the sctb promoted lysis of BV-173 cells at 23-fold lower concentrations than bsscFv ds19-ds16 and at 1.4-fold lower concentrations than bsscFv 33-ds16. The sctb also mediated potent ADCC of the antigen double-positive mixed lineage leukemia cell line SEM, and the half-maximal concentration EC50 for BV-173 cells was 7 pM. Therefore, CD19 and CD33 are present on the surface of these leukemic cell lines such that they can be connected by a single sctb molecule, permitting the recruitment of NK cells via CD16 and tumor cell lysis.

  16. Consequences of Lineage-Specific Gene Loss on Functional Evolution of Surviving Paralogs: ALDH1A and Retinoic Acid Signaling in Vertebrate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Cañestro, Cristian; Catchen, Julian M.; Rodríguez-Marí, Adriana; Yokoi, Hayato; Postlethwait, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Genome duplications increase genetic diversity and may facilitate the evolution of gene subfunctions. Little attention, however, has focused on the evolutionary impact of lineage-specific gene loss. Here, we show that identifying lineage-specific gene loss after genome duplication is important for understanding the evolution of gene subfunctions in surviving paralogs and for improving functional connectivity among human and model organism genomes. We examine the general principles of gene loss following duplication, coupled with expression analysis of the retinaldehyde dehydrogenase Aldh1a gene family during retinoic acid signaling in eye development as a case study. Humans have three ALDH1A genes, but teleosts have just one or two. We used comparative genomics and conserved syntenies to identify loss of ohnologs (paralogs derived from genome duplication) and to clarify uncertain phylogenies. Analysis showed that Aldh1a1 and Aldh1a2 form a clade that is sister to Aldh1a3-related genes. Genome comparisons showed secondarily loss of aldh1a1 in teleosts, revealing that Aldh1a1 is not a tetrapod innovation and that aldh1a3 was recently lost in medaka, making it the first known vertebrate with a single aldh1a gene. Interestingly, results revealed asymmetric distribution of surviving ohnologs between co-orthologous teleost chromosome segments, suggesting that local genome architecture can influence ohnolog survival. We propose a model that reconstructs the chromosomal history of the Aldh1a family in the ancestral vertebrate genome, coupled with the evolution of gene functions in surviving Aldh1a ohnologs after R1, R2, and R3 genome duplications. Results provide evidence for early subfunctionalization and late subfunction-partitioning and suggest a mechanistic model based on altered regulation leading to heterochronic gene expression to explain the acquisition or modification of subfunctions by surviving ohnologs that preserve unaltered ancestral developmental programs in

  17. MtDNA Haplogroup A10 Lineages in Bronze Age Samples Suggest That Ancient Autochthonous Human Groups Contributed to the Specificity of the Indigenous West Siberian Population

    PubMed Central

    Pilipenko, Aleksandr S.; Trapezov, Rostislav O.; Zhuravlev, Anton A.; Molodin, Vyacheslav I.; Romaschenko, Aida G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The craniometric specificity of the indigenous West Siberian human populations cannot be completely explained by the genetic interactions of the western and eastern Eurasian groups recorded in the archaeology of the area from the beginning of the 2nd millennium BC. Anthropologists have proposed another probable explanation: contribution to the genetic structure of West Siberian indigenous populations by ancient human groups, which separated from western and eastern Eurasian populations before the final formation of their phenotypic and genetic features and evolved independently in the region over a long period of time. This hypothesis remains untested. From the genetic point of view, it could be confirmed by the presence in the gene pool of indigenous populations of autochthonous components that evolved in the region over long time periods. The detection of such components, particularly in the mtDNA gene pool, is crucial for further clarification of early regional genetic history. Results and Conclusion We present the results of analysis of mtDNA samples (n = 10) belonging to the A10 haplogroup, from Bronze Age populations of West Siberian forest-steppe (V—I millennium BC), that were identified in a screening study of a large diachronic sample (n = 96). A10 lineages, which are very rare in modern Eurasian populations, were found in all the Bronze Age groups under study. Data on the A10 lineages’ phylogeny and phylogeography in ancient West Siberian and modern Eurasian populations suggest that A10 haplogroup underwent a long-term evolution in West Siberia or arose there autochthonously; thus, the presence of A10 lineages indicates the possible contribution of early autochthonous human groups to the genetic specificity of modern populations, in addition to contributions of later interactions of western and eastern Eurasian populations. PMID:25950581

  18. Hominoid lineage specific amplification of low-copy repeats on 22q11.2 (LCR22s) associated with velo-cardio-facial/digeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Melanie; Yatsenko, Svetlana; Hopkins, Janet; Brenton, Matthew; Cao, Qing; de Jong, Pieter; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Lupski, James R; Sikela, James M; Morrow, Bernice E

    2007-11-01

    Segmental duplications or low-copy repeats (LCRs) constitute approximately 5% of the sequenced portion of the human genome and are associated with many human congenital anomaly disorders. The low-copy repeats on chromosome 22q11.2 (LCR22s) mediate chromosomal rearrangements resulting in deletions, duplications and translocations. The evolutionary mechanisms leading to LCR22 formation is unknown. Four genes, USP18, BCR, GGTLA and GGT, map adjacent to the LCR22s and pseudogene copies are located within them. It has been hypothesized that gene duplication occurred during primate evolution, followed by recombination events, forming pseudogene copies. We investigated whether gene duplication could be detected in non-human hominoid species. FISH mapping was performed using probes to the four functional gene loci. There was evidence for a single copy in humans but additional copies in hominoid species. We then compared LCR22 copy number using LCR22 FISH probes. Lineage specific LCR22 variation was detected in the hominoid species supporting the hypothesis. To independently validate initial findings, real time PCR, and screening of gorilla BAC library filters were performed. This was compared to array comparative genome hybridization data available. The most striking finding was a dramatic amplification of LCR22s in the gorilla. The LCR22s localized to the telomeric or subtelomeric bands of gorilla chromosomes. The most parsimonious explanation is that the LCR22s became amplified by inter-chromosomal recombination between telomeric bands. In summary, our results are consistent with a lineage specific coupling between gene and LCR22 duplication events. The LCR22s thus serve as an important model for evolution of genome variation.

  19. Double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase PKR of fishes and amphibians: Varying the number of double-stranded RNA binding domains and lineage-specific duplications

    PubMed Central

    Rothenburg, Stefan; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Dey, Madhusudan; Dever, Thomas E; Tazi, Loubna

    2008-01-01

    Background Double-stranded (ds) RNA, generated during viral infection, binds and activates the mammalian anti-viral protein kinase PKR, which phosphorylates the translation initiation factor eIF2α leading to the general inhibition of protein synthesis. Although PKR-like activity has been described in fish cells, the responsible enzymes eluded molecular characterization until the recent discovery of goldfish and zebrafish PKZ, which contain Z-DNA-binding domains instead of dsRNA-binding domains (dsRBDs). Fish and amphibian PKR genes have not been described so far. Results Here we report the cloning and identification of 13 PKR genes from 8 teleost fish and amphibian species, including zebrafish, demonstrating the coexistence of PKR and PKZ in this latter species. Analyses of their genomic organization revealed up to three tandemly arrayed PKR genes, which are arranged in head-to-tail orientation. At least five duplications occurred independently in fish and amphibian lineages. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the kinase domains of fish PKR genes are more closely related to those of fish PKZ than to the PKR kinase domains of other vertebrate species. The duplication leading to fish PKR and PKZ genes occurred early during teleost fish evolution after the divergence of the tetrapod lineage. While two dsRBDs are found in mammalian and amphibian PKR, one, two or three dsRBDs are present in fish PKR. In zebrafish, both PKR and PKZ were strongly upregulated after immunostimulation with some tissue-specific expression differences. Using genetic and biochemical assays we demonstrate that both zebrafish PKR and PKZ can phosphorylate eIF2α in yeast. Conclusion Considering the important role for PKR in host defense against viruses, the independent duplication and fixation of PKR genes in different lineages probably provided selective advantages by leading to the recognition of an extended spectrum of viral nucleic acid structures, including both dsRNA and Z-DNA/RNA, and

  20. Smad2 and Smad3 have differential sensitivity in relaying TGFβ signaling and inversely regulate early lineage specification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Liu, Xu; Ren, Xudong; Tian, Yue; Chen, Zhenyu; Xu, Xiangjie; Du, Yanhua; Jiang, Cizhong; Fang, Yujiang; Liu, Zhongliang; Fan, Beibei; Zhang, Quanbin; Jin, Guohua; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Xiaoqing

    2016-02-24

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) related signaling is one of the most important signaling pathways regulating early developmental events. Smad2 and Smad3 are structurally similar and it is mostly considered that they are equally important in mediating TGFβ signals. Here, we show that Smad3 is an insensitive TGFβ transducer as compared with Smad2. Smad3 preferentially localizes within the nucleus and is thus sequestered from membrane signaling. The ability of Smad3 in oligomerization with Smad4 upon agonist stimulation is also impaired given its unique linker region. Smad2 mediated TGFβ signaling plays a crucial role in epiblast development and patterning of three germ layers. However, signaling unrelated nuclear localized Smad3 is dispensable for TGFβ signaling-mediated epiblast specification, but important for early neural development, an event blocked by TGFβ/Smad2 signaling. Both Smad2 and Smad3 bind to the conserved Smads binding element (SBE), but they show nonoverlapped target gene binding specificity and differential transcriptional activity. We conclude that Smad2 and Smad3 possess differential sensitivities in relaying TGFβ signaling and have distinct roles in regulating early developmental events.

  1. Smad2 and Smad3 have differential sensitivity in relaying TGFβ signaling and inversely regulate early lineage specification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling; Liu, Xu; Ren, Xudong; Tian, Yue; Chen, Zhenyu; Xu, Xiangjie; Du, Yanhua; Jiang, Cizhong; Fang, Yujiang; Liu, Zhongliang; Fan, Beibei; Zhang, Quanbin; Jin, Guohua; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Xiaoqing

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) related signaling is one of the most important signaling pathways regulating early developmental events. Smad2 and Smad3 are structurally similar and it is mostly considered that they are equally important in mediating TGFβ signals. Here, we show that Smad3 is an insensitive TGFβ transducer as compared with Smad2. Smad3 preferentially localizes within the nucleus and is thus sequestered from membrane signaling. The ability of Smad3 in oligomerization with Smad4 upon agonist stimulation is also impaired given its unique linker region. Smad2 mediated TGFβ signaling plays a crucial role in epiblast development and patterning of three germ layers. However, signaling unrelated nuclear localized Smad3 is dispensable for TGFβ signaling-mediated epiblast specification, but important for early neural development, an event blocked by TGFβ/Smad2 signaling. Both Smad2 and Smad3 bind to the conserved Smads binding element (SBE), but they show nonoverlapped target gene binding specificity and differential transcriptional activity. We conclude that Smad2 and Smad3 possess differential sensitivities in relaying TGFβ signaling and have distinct roles in regulating early developmental events. PMID:26905010

  2. Apoptosis of limb innervating motor neurons and erosion of motor pool identity upon lineage specific dicer inactivation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-An; Wichterle, Hynek

    2012-01-01

    Diversification of mammalian spinal motor neurons into hundreds of subtypes is critical for the maintenance of body posture and coordination of complex movements. Motor neuron differentiation is controlled by extrinsic signals that regulate intrinsic genetic programs specifying and consolidating motor neuron subtype identity. While transcription factors have been recognized as principal regulators of the intrinsic program, the role of posttranscriptional regulations has not been systematically tested. MicroRNAs produced by Dicer mediated cleavage of RNA hairpins contribute to gene regulation by posttranscriptional silencing. Here we used Olig2-cre conditional deletion of Dicer gene in motor neuron progenitors to examine effects of miRNA biogenesis disruption on postmitotic spinal motor neurons. We report that despite the initial increase in the number of motor neuron progenitors, disruption of Dicer function results in a loss of many limb- and sympathetic ganglia-innervating spinal motor neurons. Furthermore, it leads to defects in motor pool identity specification. Thus, our results indicate that miRNAs are an integral part of the genetic program controlling motor neuron survival and acquisition of subtype specific properties.

  3. Loss of lager specific genes and subtelomeric regions define two different Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineages for Saccharomyces pastorianus Group I and II strains.

    PubMed

    Monerawela, Chandre; James, Tharappel C; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Bond, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Lager yeasts, Saccharomyces pastorianus, are interspecies hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus and are classified into Group I and Group II clades. The genome of the Group II strain, Weihenstephan 34/70, contains eight so-called 'lager-specific' genes that are located in subtelomeric regions. We evaluated the origins of these genes through bioinformatic and PCR analyses of Saccharomyces genomes. We determined that four are of cerevisiae origin while four originate from S. eubayanus. The Group I yeasts contain all four S. eubayanus genes but individual strains contain only a subset of the cerevisiae genes. We identified S. cerevisiae strains that contain all four cerevisiae 'lager-specific' genes, and distinct patterns of loss of these genes in other strains. Analysis of the subtelomeric regions uncovered patterns of loss in different S. cerevisiae strains. We identify two classes of S. cerevisiae strains: ale yeasts (Foster O) and stout yeasts with patterns of 'lager-specific' genes and subtelomeric regions identical to Group I and II S. pastorianus yeasts, respectively. These findings lead us to propose that Group I and II S. pastorianus strains originate from separate hybridization events involving different S. cerevisiae lineages. Using the combined bioinformatic and PCR data, we describe a potential classification map for industrial yeasts.

  4. The Epigenome of Schistosoma mansoni Provides Insight about How Cercariae Poise Transcription until Infection

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Michael; Parrinello, Hugues; Groth, Marco; Emans, Rémi; Cosseau, Céline; Grunau, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Chromatin structure can control gene expression and can define specific transcription states. For example, bivalent methylation of histone H3K4 and H3K27 is linked to poised transcription in vertebrate embryonic stem cells (ESC). It allows them to rapidly engage specific developmental pathways. We reasoned that non-vertebrate metazoans that encounter a similar developmental constraint (i.e. to quickly start development into a new phenotype) might use a similar system. Schistosomes are parasitic platyhelminthes that are characterized by passage through two hosts: a mollusk as intermediate host and humans or rodents as definitive host. During its development, the parasite undergoes drastic changes, most notable immediately after infection of the definitive host, i.e. during the transition from the free-swimming cercariae into adult worms. Methodology/Principal Findings We used Chromatin Immunoprecipitation followed by massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) to analyze genome-wide chromatin structure of S. mansoni on the level of histone modifications (H3K4me3, H3K27me3, H3K9me3, and H3K9ac) in cercariae, schistosomula and adults (available at http://genome.univ-perp.fr). We saw striking differences in chromatin structure between the developmental stages, but most importantly we found that cercariae possess a specific combination of marks at the transcription start sites (TSS) that has similarities to a structure found in ESC. We demonstrate that in cercariae no transcription occurs, and we provide evidences that cercariae do not possess large numbers of canonical stem cells. Conclusions/Significance We describe here a broad view on the epigenome of a metazoan parasite. Most notably, we find bivalent histone H3 methylation in cercariae. Methylation of H3K27 is removed during transformation into schistosomula (and stays absent in adults) and transcription is activated. In addition, shifts of H3K9 methylation and acetylation occur towards upstream and

  5. Sex-specific autophagy modulation in osteoblastic lineage: a critical function to counteract bone loss in female

    PubMed Central

    Camuzard, Olivier; Santucci-Darmanin, Sabine; Breuil, Véronique; Cros, Chantal; Gritsaenko, Tatiana; Pagnotta, Sophie; Cailleteau, Laurence; Battaglia, Séverine; Panaïa-Ferrari, Patricia; Heymann, Dominique; Carle, Georges F.; Pierrefite-Carle, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Age-related bone loss is associated with an increased oxidative stress which is worsened by estrogen fall during menauposis. This observation has drawn attention to autophagy, a major cellular catabolic process, able to alleviate oxidative stress in osteoblasts (OB) and osteocytes (OST), two key bone cell types. Moreover, an autophagy decline can be associated with aging, suggesting that an age-related autophagy deficiency in OB and/or OST could contribute to skeletal aging and osteoporosis onset. In the present work, autophagy activity was analyzed in OST and OB in male and female mice according to their age and hormonal status. In OST, autophagy decreases with aging in both sexes. In OB, although a 95% decrease in autophagy is observed in OB derived from old females, this activity remains unchanged in males. In addition, while ovariectomy has no effect on OB autophagy levels, orchidectomy appears to stimulate this process. An inverse correlation between autophagy and the oxidative stress level was observed in OB derived from males or females. Finally, using OB-specific autophagy-deficient mice, we showed that autophagy deficiency aggravates the bone loss associated with aging and estrogen deprivation. Taken together, our data indicate that autophagic modulation in bone cells differs according to sex and cell type. The lowering of autophagy in female OB, which is associated with an increased oxidative stress, could play a role in osteoporosis pathophysiology and suggests that autophagy could be a new therapeutic target for osteoporosis in women. PMID:27634908

  6. Expansion of banana (Musa acuminata) gene families involved in ethylene biosynthesis and signalling after lineage-specific whole-genome duplications.

    PubMed

    Jourda, Cyril; Cardi, Céline; Mbéguié-A-Mbéguié, Didier; Bocs, Stéphanie; Garsmeur, Olivier; D'Hont, Angélique; Yahiaoui, Nabila

    2014-05-01

    Whole-genome duplications (WGDs) are widespread in plants, and three lineage-specific WGDs occurred in the banana (Musa acuminata) genome. Here, we analysed the impact of WGDs on the evolution of banana gene families involved in ethylene biosynthesis and signalling, a key pathway for banana fruit ripening. Banana ethylene pathway genes were identified using comparative genomics approaches and their duplication modes and expression profiles were analysed. Seven out of 10 banana ethylene gene families evolved through WGD and four of them (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS), ethylene-insensitive 3-like (EIL), ethylene-insensitive 3-binding F-box (EBF) and ethylene response factor (ERF)) were preferentially retained. Banana orthologues of AtEIN3 and AtEIL1, two major genes for ethylene signalling in Arabidopsis, were particularly expanded. This expansion was paralleled by that of EBF genes which are responsible for control of EIL protein levels. Gene expression profiles in banana fruits suggested functional redundancy for several MaEBF and MaEIL genes derived from WGD and subfunctionalization for some of them. We propose that EIL and EBF genes were co-retained after WGD in banana to maintain balanced control of EIL protein levels and thus avoid detrimental effects of constitutive ethylene signalling. In the course of evolution, subfunctionalization was favoured to promote finer control of ethylene signalling.

  7. Lineage-Specific Expansion of Vomeronasal Type 2 Receptor-Like (OlfC) Genes in Cichlids May Contribute to Diversification of Amino Acid Detection Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Masato; Suzuki, Hikoyu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Hagino-Yamagishi, Kimiko; Kocher, Thomas D.; Carleton, Karen; Okada, Norihiro

    2013-01-01

    Fish use olfaction to sense a variety of nonvolatile chemical signals in water. However, the evolutionary importance of olfaction in species-rich cichlids is controversial. Here, we determined an almost complete sequence of the vomeronasal type 2 receptor-like (OlfC: putative amino acids receptor in teleosts) gene cluster using the bacterial artificial chromosome library of the Lake Victoria cichlid, Haplochromis chilotes. In the cluster region, we found 61 intact OlfC genes, which is the largest number of OlfC genes identified among the seven teleost fish investigated to date. Data mining of the Oreochromis niloticus (Nile tilapia) draft genome sequence, and genomic Southern hybridization analysis revealed that the ancestor of all modern cichlids had already developed almost the same OlfC gene repertoire, which was accomplished by lineage-specific gene expansions. Furthermore, comparison of receptor sequences showed that recently duplicated paralogs are more variable than orthologs of different species at particular sites that were predicted to be involved in amino acid selectivity. Thus, the increase of paralogs through gene expansion may lead to functional diversification in detection of amino acids. This study implies that cichlids have developed a potent capacity to detect a variety of amino acids (and their derivatives) through OlfCs, which may have contributed to the extraordinary diversity of their feeding habitats. PMID:23501830

  8. Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5) Protein Stability Is Cooperatively Regulated by O-GlcNac Transferase (OGT) and Ubiquitin Specific Protease 7 (USP7)

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaodan; Jiang, Wei; Zhou, Peipei; Liu, Lulu; Wan, Xiaoling; Yuan, Xiujie; Wang, Xizi; Chen, Miao; Chen, Jun; Yang, Jing; Kong, Chao; Li, Bin; Peng, Chao; Wong, Catherine C. L.; Hou, Fajian; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Mixed lineage leukemia 5 (MLL5) protein is a trithorax family histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase that regulates diverse biological processes, including cell cycle progression, hematopoiesis and cancer. The mechanisms by which MLL5 protein stability is regulated have remained unclear to date. Here, we showed that MLL5 protein stability is cooperatively regulated by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7). Depletion of OGT in cells led to a decrease in the MLL5 protein level through ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent proteolytic degradation, whereas ectopic expression of OGT protein suppressed MLL5 ubiquitylation. We further identified deubiquitinase USP7 as a novel MLL5-associated protein using mass spectrometry. USP7 stabilized the MLL5 protein through direct binding and deubiquitylation. Loss of USP7 induced degradation of MLL5 protein. Conversely, overexpression of USP7, but not a catalytically inactive USP7 mutant, led to decreased ubiquitylation and increased MLL5 stability. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunostaining assays revealed that MLL5, OGT and USP7 interact with each other to form a stable ternary complex that is predominantly located in the nucleus. In addition, upregulation of MLL5 expression was correlated with increased expression of OGT and USP7 in human primary cervical adenocarcinomas. Our results collectively reveal a novel molecular mechanism underlying regulation of MLL5 protein stability and provide new insights into the functional interplay among O-GlcNAc transferase, deubiquitinase and histone methyltransferase. PMID:26678539

  9. primers4clades: a web server that uses phylogenetic trees to design lineage-specific PCR primers for metagenomic and diversity studies.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Sachman-Ruiz, Bernardo; Figueroa-Palacios, Iraís; Vinuesa, Pablo

    2009-07-01

    Primers4clades is an easy-to-use web server that implements a fully automatic PCR primer design pipeline for cross-species amplification of novel sequences from metagenomic DNA, or from uncharacterized organisms, belonging to user-specified phylogenetic clades or taxa. The server takes a set of non-aligned protein coding genes, with or without introns, aligns them and computes a neighbor-joining tree, which is displayed on screen for easy selection of species or sequence clusters to design lineage-specific PCR primers. Primers4clades implements an extended CODEHOP primer design strategy based on both DNA and protein multiple sequence alignments. It evaluates several thermodynamic properties of the oligonucleotide pairs, and computes the phylogenetic information content of the predicted amplicon sets from Shimodaira-Hasegawa-like branch support values of maximum likelihood phylogenies. A non-redundant set of primer formulations is returned, ranked according to their thermodynamic properties. An amplicon distribution map provides a convenient overview of the coverage of the target locus. Altogether these features greatly help the user in making an informed choice between alternative primer pair formulations. Primers4clades is available at two mirror sites: http://maya.ccg.unam.mx/primers4clades/and http://floresta.eead.csic.es/primers4clades/. Three demo data sets and a comprehensive documentation/tutorial page are provided for easy testing of the server's capabilities and interface.

  10. Whole genome sequencing of a banana wild relative Musa itinerans provides insights into lineage-specific diversification of the Musa genus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Yang, Yu-Lan; He, Wei-Ming; Rouard, Mathieu; Li, Wei-Ming; Xu, Meng; Roux, Nicolas; Ge, Xue-Jun

    2016-08-17

    Crop wild relatives are valuable resources for future genetic improvement. Here, we report the de novo genome assembly of Musa itinerans, a disease-resistant wild banana relative in subtropical China. The assembled genome size was 462.1 Mb, covering 75.2% of the genome (615.2Mb) and containing 32, 456 predicted protein-coding genes. Since the approximate divergence around 5.8 million years ago, the genomes of Musa itinerans and Musa acuminata have shown conserved collinearity. Gene family expansions and contractions enrichment analysis revealed that some pathways were associated with phenotypic or physiological innovations. These include a transition from wood to herbaceous in the ancestral Musaceae, intensification of cold and drought tolerances, and reduced diseases resistance genes for subtropical marginally distributed Musa species. Prevalent purifying selection and transposed duplications were found to facilitate the diversification of NBS-encoding gene families for two Musa species. The population genome history analysis of M. itinerans revealed that the fluctuated population sizes were caused by the Pleistocene climate oscillations, and that the formation of Qiongzhou Strait might facilitate the population downsizing on the isolated Hainan Island about 10.3 Kya. The qualified assembly of the M. itinerans genome provides deep insights into the lineage-specific diversification and also valuable resources for future banana breeding.

  11. Whole genome sequencing of a banana wild relative Musa itinerans provides insights into lineage-specific diversification of the Musa genus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Yang, Yu-Lan; He, Wei-Ming; Rouard, Mathieu; Li, Wei-Ming; Xu, Meng; Roux, Nicolas; Ge, Xue-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Crop wild relatives are valuable resources for future genetic improvement. Here, we report the de novo genome assembly of Musa itinerans, a disease-resistant wild banana relative in subtropical China. The assembled genome size was 462.1 Mb, covering 75.2% of the genome (615.2Mb) and containing 32, 456 predicted protein-coding genes. Since the approximate divergence around 5.8 million years ago, the genomes of Musa itinerans and Musa acuminata have shown conserved collinearity. Gene family expansions and contractions enrichment analysis revealed that some pathways were associated with phenotypic or physiological innovations. These include a transition from wood to herbaceous in the ancestral Musaceae, intensification of cold and drought tolerances, and reduced diseases resistance genes for subtropical marginally distributed Musa species. Prevalent purifying selection and transposed duplications were found to facilitate the diversification of NBS-encoding gene families for two Musa species. The population genome history analysis of M. itinerans revealed that the fluctuated population sizes were caused by the Pleistocene climate oscillations, and that the formation of Qiongzhou Strait might facilitate the population downsizing on the isolated Hainan Island about 10.3 Kya. The qualified assembly of the M. itinerans genome provides deep insights into the lineage-specific diversification and also valuable resources for future banana breeding. PMID:27531320

  12. Comparative genomic analysis reveals multiple long terminal repeats, lineage-specific amplification, and frequent interelement recombination for Cassandra retrotransposon in pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.).

    PubMed

    Yin, Hao; Du, Jianchang; Li, Leiting; Jin, Cong; Fan, Lian; Li, Meng; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Shaoling

    2014-06-04

    Cassandra transposable elements belong to a specific group of terminal-repeat retrotransposons in miniature (TRIM). Although Cassandra TRIM elements have been found in almost all vascular plants, detailed investigations on the nature, abundance, amplification timeframe, and evolution have not been performed in an individual genome. We therefore conducted a comprehensive analysis of Cassandra retrotransposons using the newly sequenced pear genome along with four other Rosaceae species, including apple, peach, mei, and woodland strawberry. Our data reveal several interesting findings for this particular retrotransposon family: 1) A large number of the intact copies contain three, four, or five long terminal repeats (LTRs) (∼20% in pear); 2) intact copies and solo LTRs with or without target site duplications are both common (∼80% vs. 20%) in each genome; 3) the elements exhibit an overall unbiased distribution among the chromosomes; 4) the elements are most successfully amplified in pear (5,032 copies); and 5) the evolutionary relationships of these elements vary among different lineages, species, and evolutionary time. These results indicate that Cassandra retrotransposons contain more complex structures (elements with multiple LTRs) than what we have known previously, and that frequent interelement unequal recombination followed by transposition may play a critical role in shaping and reshaping host genomes. Thus this study provides insights into the property, propensity, and molecular mechanisms governing the formation and amplification of Cassandra retrotransposons, and enhances our understanding of the structural variation, evolutionary history, and transposition process of LTR retrotransposons in plants.

  13. Direct somatic lineage conversion

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Koji; Haag, Daniel; Wernig, Marius

    2015-01-01

    The predominant view of embryonic development and cell differentiation has been that rigid and even irreversible epigenetic marks are laid down along the path of cell specialization ensuring the proper silencing of unrelated lineage programmes. This model made the prediction that specialized cell types are stable and cannot be redirected into other lineages. Accordingly, early attempts to change the identity of somatic cells had little success and was limited to conversions between closely related cell types. Nuclear transplantation experiments demonstrated, however, that specialized cells even from adult mammals can be reprogrammed into a totipotent state. The discovery that a small combination of transcription factors can reprogramme cells to pluripotency without the need of oocytes further supported the view that these epigenetic barriers can be overcome much easier than assumed, but the extent of this flexibility was still unclear. When we showed that a differentiated mesodermal cell can be directly converted to a differentiated ectodermal cell without a pluripotent intermediate, it was suggested that in principle any cell type could be converted into any other cell type. Indeed, the work of several groups in recent years has provided many more examples of direct somatic lineage conversions. Today, the question is not anymore whether a specific cell type can be generated by direct reprogramming but how it can be induced. PMID:26416679

  14. Applications of myeloid-specific promoters in transgenic mice support in vivo imaging and functional genomics but do not support the concept of distinct macrophage and dendritic cell lineages or roles in immunity.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A

    2011-04-01

    Myeloid lineage cells contribute to innate and acquired immunity, homeostasis, wound repair, and inflammation. There is considerable interest in manipulation of their function in transgenic mice using myeloid-specific promoters. This review considers the applications and specificity of some of the most widely studied transgenes, driven by promoter elements of the lysM, csf1r, CD11c, CD68, macrophage SRA, and CD11b genes, as well as several others. Transgenes have been used in mice to generate myeloid lineage-specific cell ablation, expression of genes of interest, including fluorescent reporters, or deletion via recombination. In general, the specificity of such transgenes has been overinterpreted, and none of them provide well-documented, reliable, differential expression in any specific myeloid cell subset, macrophages, granulocytes, or myeloid DCs. Nevertheless, they have proved valuable in cell isolation, functional genomics, and live imaging of myeloid cell behavior in many different pathologies.

  15. Protruding disordered loop of gC1qR is specifically exposed and related to antiapoptotic property in germ cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Sohei; Takenaka, Atsushi; Kondo, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Akira; Kitazawa, Riko

    2006-12-01

    We established a monoclonal antibody (MAb), 5G9, with the use of a fixed seminoma tissue from an archival paraffin-embedded specimen, as an immunogen. Without antigen retrieval, positive 5G9-immunohistochemical staining was confined mostly to primordial germ cells, spermatogonia and various germ cell tumors. 5G9 recognized a mitochondrial 32-kD protein with an isoelectric point of pH 4.2, identified as a multifunctional ubiquitous protein, receptor for globular head of C1q (gC1qR), whose epitope was mapped in a disordered loop connecting the beta3 and the beta4 strands. Reflecting the ubiquitous distribution of gC1qR, with antigen retrieval, 5G9 was found reactive to a wide range of normal and tumor tissues. Since several co-precipitated and phosphorylated bands were observed in various human cell lines but not in germ cell tumor cell lines by in vitro phosphorylation assay, we speculate that the epitope of gC1qR is specifically unmasked in the germ cell lineage. By reducing gC1qR by siRNA, a significant increase was observed in the number of apoptotic cells in ITO-II and TCam-2 cell lines, but to a lesser extent in the Colo201 colon cancer cell line, showing an antiapoptotic property of gC1qR in the germ cells. Since protein-protein interaction is partially preserved by fixation, archival paraffin-embedded specimens can be a valuable source of immunogens for generating monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize tissue-specific protein conformation.

  16. Integrative View of α2,3-Sialyltransferases (ST3Gal) Molecular and Functional Evolution in Deuterostomes: Significance of Lineage-Specific Losses

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Daniel; Teppa, Elin; Mir, Anne-Marie; Vicogne, Dorothée; Thisse, Christine; Thisse, Bernard; Filloux, Cyril; Harduin-Lepers, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Sialyltransferases are responsible for the synthesis of a diverse range of sialoglycoconjugates predicted to be pivotal to deuterostomes’ evolution. In this work, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of the metazoan α2,3-sialyltransferases family (ST3Gal), a subset of sialyltransferases encompassing six subfamilies (ST3Gal I–ST3Gal VI) functionally characterized in mammals. Exploration of genomic and expressed sequence tag databases and search of conserved sialylmotifs led to the identification of a large data set of st3gal-related gene sequences. Molecular phylogeny and large scale sequence similarity network analysis identified four new vertebrate subfamilies called ST3Gal III-r, ST3Gal VII, ST3Gal VIII, and ST3Gal IX. To address the issue of the origin and evolutionary relationships of the st3gal-related genes, we performed comparative syntenic mapping of st3gal gene loci combined to ancestral genome reconstruction. The ten vertebrate ST3Gal subfamilies originated from genome duplication events at the base of vertebrates and are organized in three distinct and ancient groups of genes predating the early deuterostomes. Inferring st3gal gene family history identified also several lineage-specific gene losses, the significance of which was explored in a functional context. Toward this aim, spatiotemporal distribution of st3gal genes was analyzed in zebrafish and bovine tissues. In addition, molecular evolutionary analyses using specificity determining position and coevolved amino acid predictions led to the identification of amino acid residues with potential implication in functional divergence of vertebrate ST3Gal. We propose a detailed scenario of the evolutionary relationships of st3gal genes coupled to a conceptual framework of the evolution of ST3Gal functions. PMID:25534026

  17. Lv4 Is a Capsid-Specific Antiviral Activity in Human Blood Cells That Restricts Viruses of the SIVMAC/SIVSM/HIV-2 Lineage Prior to Integration.

    PubMed

    Pizzato, Massimo; McCauley, Sean Matthew; Neagu, Martha R; Pertel, Thomas; Firrito, Claudia; Ziglio, Serena; Dauphin, Ann; Zufferey, Madeleine; Berthoux, Lionel; Luban, Jeremy

    2015-07-01

    HIV-2 and SIVMAC are AIDS-causing, zoonotic lentiviruses that jumped to humans and rhesus macaques, respectively, from SIVSM-bearing sooty mangabey monkeys. Cross-species transmission events such as these sometimes necessitate virus adaptation to species-specific, host restriction factors such as TRIM5. Here, a new human restriction activity is described that blocks viruses of the SIVSM/SIVMAC/HIV-2 lineage. Human T, B, and myeloid cell lines, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and dendritic cells were 4 to >100-fold less transducible by VSV G-pseudotyped SIVMAC, HIV-2, or SIVSM than by HIV-1. In contrast, transduction of six epithelial cell lines was equivalent to that by HIV-1. Substitution of HIV-1 CA with the SIVMAC or HIV-2 CA was sufficient to reduce HIV-1 transduction to the level of the respective vectors. Among such CA chimeras there was a general trend such that CAs from epidemic HIV-2 Group A and B isolates were the most infectious on human T cells, CA from a 1° sooty mangabey isolate was the least infectious, and non-epidemic HIV-2 Group D, E, F, and G CAs were in the middle. The CA-specific decrease in infectivity was observed with either HIV-1, HIV-2, ecotropic MLV, or ALV Env pseudotypes, indicating that it was independent of the virus entry pathway. As2O3, a drug that suppresses TRIM5-mediated restriction, increased human blood cell transduction by SIVMAC but not by HIV-1. Nonetheless, elimination of TRIM5 restriction activity did not rescue SIVMAC transduction. Also, in contrast to TRIM5-mediated restriction, the SIVMAC CA-specific block occurred after completion of reverse transcription and the formation of 2-LTR circles, but before establishment of the provirus. Transduction efficiency in heterokaryons generated by fusing epithelial cells with T cells resembled that in the T cells, indicative of a dominant-acting SIVMAC restriction activity in the latter. These results suggest that the nucleus of human blood cells possesses a restriction factor

  18. COX-2 inhibitor prevents tumor induced down regulation of classical DC lineage specific transcription factor Zbtb46 resulting in immunocompetent DC and decreased tumor burden.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vipul K; Amin, Prayag J; Shankar, Bhavani S

    2017-04-01

    The interaction between the immune and tumor cells in the microenvironment is an important factor deciding the progression of cancer. Though many of the soluble mediators in the microenvironment that mediate immunosuppression are known, the mechanism by which the tumor affects the distal progenitors is not known. We report that the tumor derived prostanoids down regulated classical dendritic cells DC (cDC) lineage specific transcription factor Zbtb46 in the progenitor cells which affects its differentiation. Prostanoids also induced ERK/CREB/IL-10 signaling pathway in DC that is more important for maturation of DC. This was observed under in vitro as well as in vivo conditions leading to phenotypic and functional impairment of DC. siRNA mediated knockdown of Zbtb46 and not exogenous IL-10 mimicked the effects of tumor conditioned medium (TCM) on suppression of maturation markers. Treatment of tumor cells with COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 averted TCM induced phenotypic impairment of DC in vitro. Treatment of tumor bearing mice with NS-398 prevented tumor induced down regulation of Zbtb46 resulting in immunocompetent DC which in turn led to a decrease in tumor burden. The effects of NS-398 was indeed through immunomodulation was corroborated by no such response in SCID mice. Our study provides novel insight into the distal regulation of progenitor cells by tumor and the importance of Zbtb46 expression in anti-tumor immunity. These results identify Zbtb46 expression as an indicator of immunocompetent DC in tumor and also highlights that COX-2 inhibitors could be useful in cancer immunotherapy.

  19. Urogenital development in Pallister–Hall syndrome is disrupted in a cell-lineage-specific manner by constitutive expression of GLI3 repressor

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Joshua; Hu, Di; Cain, Jason E.; Rosenblum, Norman D.

    2016-01-01

    Pallister–Hall syndrome (PHS) is a rare disorder caused by mutations in GLI3 that produce a transcriptional repressor (GLI3R). Individuals with PHS present with a variably penetrant variety of urogenital system malformations, including renal aplasia or hypoplasia, hydroureter, hydronephrosis or a common urogenital sinus. The embryologic mechanisms controlled by GLI3R that result in these pathologic phenotypes are undefined. We demonstrate that germline expression of GLI3R causes renal hypoplasia, associated with decreased nephron number, and hydroureter and hydronephrosis, caused by blind-ending ureters. Mice with obligate GLI3R expression also displayed duplication of the ureters that was caused by aberrant common nephric duct patterning and ureteric stalk outgrowth. These developmental abnormalities are associated with suppressed Hedgehog signaling activity in the cloaca and adjacent vesicular mesenchyme. Mice with conditional expression of GLI3R were utilized to identify lineage-specific effects of GLI3R. In the ureteric bud, GLI3R expression decreased branching morphogenesis. In Six2-positive nephrogenic progenitors, GLI3R decreased progenitor cell proliferation reducing the number of nephrogenic precursor structures. Using mutant mice with Gli3R and Gli3 null alleles, we demonstrate that urogenital system patterning and development is controlled by the levels of GLI3R and not by an absence of full-length GLI3. We conclude that the urogenital system phenotypes observed in PHS are caused by GLI3R-dependent perturbations in nephric duct patterning, renal branching morphogenesis and nephrogenic progenitor self-renewal. PMID:26604140

  20. Variation in host specificity and gene content in strains from genetically isolated lineages of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus s. lat.

    PubMed

    Hedh, Jenny; Johansson, Tomas; Tunlid, Anders

    2009-10-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are known to vary in host range. Some fungi can enter into symbiosis with multiple plant species, while others have restricted host ranges. The aim of this study was to examine variation in host specificity among strains from the basidiomycete Paxillus involutus s. lat. Recent studies have shown that this fungus consists of at least four genetically isolated lineages, phylogenetic species (PS) I (which corresponds to the morphological species Paxillus obscurosporus), PS II (P. involutus s. str.), PS III (Paxillus validus), and PS IV (not yet supported by any reference material). Thirty-five Paxillus strains of PS I to IV were examined in microcosms for their capacity to infect birch (Betula pendula) and spruce (Picea abies). Seventeen strains were compatible and formed mycorrhizae with both tree species. Seven strains were incompatible with both birch and spruce. The gene content in three pairs of incompatible and compatible strains PS I, II, and III were compared using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridizations. Of 4,113 P. involutus gene representatives analyzed, 390 varied in copy numbers in at least one of the three pairwise comparisons. Only three reporters showed significant changes in all three pairwise comparisons, and none of these were changed in a similar way in three comparisons. Our data indicate that changes in host range have occurred frequently and independently among strains in P. obscurosporus, P. involutus s. str., and P. validus. No evidence was obtained demonstrating that these changes have been associated with the gain or loss of similar genes in these three species.

  1. H2A.Z.1 mono-ubiquitylation antagonizes BRD2 to maintain poised chromatin in ESCs

    PubMed Central

    Surface, Lauren E.; Fields, Paul A.; Subramanian, Vidya; Behmer, Russell; Udeshi, Namrata; Peach, Sally E.; Jaffe, Jacob D.; Boyer, Laurie A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone variant H2A.Z occupies the promoters of active and poised, bivalent genes in ESCs to regulate developmental programs, yet how it contributes to these contrasting states is poorly understood. Here, we investigate the function of H2A.Z.1 mono-ubiquitylation (H2A.Z.1ub) by mutation of the PRC1 target residues (H2A.Z.1K3R3). We show that H2A.Z.1K3R3 is properly incorporated at target promoters in murine ESCs (mESCs), however, loss of mono-ubiquitylation leads to de-repression of bivalent genes, loss of Polycomb binding, and to faulty lineage commitment. Using quantitative proteomics, we find that tandem bromodomain proteins, including the BET family member Brd2, are enriched in H2A.Z.1 chromatin. We further show that Brd2 is gained at de-repressed promoters in H2A.Z.1K3R3 mESCs whereas Brd2 inhibition restores gene silencing at these sites. Together, our study reveals an antagonistic relationship between H2A.Z.1ub and Brd2 to regulate the transcriptional balance at bivalent genes to enable proper execution of developmental programs. PMID:26804911

  2. The Transition of Poised RNA Polymerase II to an Actively Elongating State Is a "Complex" Affair.

    PubMed

    Yearling, Marie N; Radebaugh, Catherine A; Stargell, Laurie A

    2011-01-01

    The initial discovery of the occupancy of RNA polymerase II at certain genes prior to their transcriptional activation occurred a quarter century ago in Drosophila. The preloading of these poised complexes in this inactive state is now apparent in many different organisms across the evolutionary spectrum and occurs at a broad and diverse set of genes. In this paper, we discuss the genetic and biochemical efforts in S. cerevisiae to describe the conversion of these poised transcription complexes to the active state for productive elongation. The accumulated evidence demonstrates that a multitude of coactivators and chromatin remodeling complexes are essential for this transition.

  3. Some Remarks on Very-Well-Poised 8phi7 Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokman, Jasper V.

    2012-06-01

    Nonpolynomial basic hypergeometric eigenfunctions of the Askey-Wilson second order difference operator are known to be expressible as very-well-poised {}_8φ_7 series. In this paper we use this fact to derive various basic hypergeometric and theta function identities. We relate most of them to identities from the existing literature on basic hypergeometric series. This leads for example to a new derivation of a known quadratic transformation formula for very-well-poised {}_8φ_7 series. We also provide a link to Chalykh's theory on (rank one, BC type) Baker-Akhiezer functions.

  4. Tuberculosis - A global emergency: Tools and methods to monitor, understand, and control the epidemic with specific example of the Beijing lineage.

    PubMed

    Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin

    2015-06-01

    We argue in favor of a concerted and coordinated response to stop tuberculosis (TB) by monitoring global TB spread, drug-resistance surveillance and populations at risk using available molecular and web tools to identify circulating clones of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). We took specific example of the Beijing lineage associated with worldwide emergence of both multiple, and extensively drug resistant (MDR/XDR)-TB. The study dataset (n=10,850 isolates, 92 countries of patient origin) was extracted from our multimarker SITVIT2 database on MTBC genotyping (n=111,635 isolates, 169 countries of patient origin). Epidemiological and demographic information in conjunction with spoligotyping (n=10,850), MIRU-VNTR minisatellites (n=2896), and drug resistance (n=2846) data was mapped at macro-geographical (United Nations subregions) and country level, followed by statistical, bioinformatical, and phylogenetical analysis. The global male/female sex ratio was 1.96, the highest being 4.93 in Russia vs. range of 0.8-1.13 observed in Central America, Caribbean, Eastern Africa and Northern Europe (p < 0.0001). The major patient age-group was 21-40 yrs worldwide except Japan (with majority of patients >60 yrs). Younger patients were more common in South America, South Asia, and Western Africa since 25-33% of TB cases due to Beijing genotype occurred in the age group 0-20 yrs. A continuous progression in the proportion of MDR and XDR strains is visible worldwide since 2003 and 2009 respectively. Pansusceptible TB mainly concerned older patients >60 yrs (44%) whereas Drug resistant, MDR and XDR-TB concerned patients preferentially aged 21-40 yrs (between 52 and 58%). Although the proportion of SIT1 pattern vs. other patterns was very high (93%); the proportion of MDR was highest for an emerging genotype SIT190 (p < 0.0001). Lastly, proportion of pansusceptible strains was highest in Japan, while MDR/XDR strains were most common in Russia and Northern Europe. We

  5. Broad-range detection of arboviruses belonging to Simbu serogroup lineage 1 and specific detection of Akabane, Aino and Peaton viruses by newly developed multiple TaqMan assays.

    PubMed

    Shirafuji, Hiroaki; Yazaki, Ryu; Shuto, Yozo; Yanase, Tohru; Kato, Tomoko; Ishikura, Youji; Sakaguchi, Zenjiro; Suzuki, Moemi; Yamakawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    TaqMan assays were developed for the broad-range detection of arboviruses belonging to Simbu serogroup lineage 1 in the genus Orthobunyavirus and also for the specific detection of three viruses in the lineage, Akabane, Aino and Peaton viruses (AKAV, AINOV and PEAV, respectively). A primer and probe set was designed for the broad-range detection of Simbu serogroup lineage 1 (Pan-Simbu1 set) mainly targeting AKAV, AINOV, PEAV, Sathuperi and Shamonda viruses (SATV and SHAV), and the forward and reverse primers of the Pan-Simbu1 set were also used for the specific detection of AKAV with another probe (AKAV-specific set). In addition, two more primer and probe sets were designed for AINOV- and PEAV-specific detection, respectively (AINOV- and PEAV-specific sets). All of the four primer and probe sets successfully detected targeted viruses, and thus broad-range and specific detection of all the targeted viruses can be achieved by using two multiplex assays and a single assay in a dual (two-color) assay format when another primer and probe set for a bovine β-actin control is also used. The assays had an analytical sensitivity of 10 copies/tube for AKAV, at least 100 copies/tube for AINOV, 100 copies/tube for PEAV, one copy/tube for SATV and at least 10 copies/tube for SHAV, respectively. Diagnostic sensitivity of the assays was tested with field-collected bovine samples, and the results suggested that the sensitivity was higher than that of a conventional RT-PCR. These data indicate that the newly developed TaqMan assays will be useful tools for the diagnosis and screening of field-collected samples for infections of AKAV and several other arboviruses belonging to the Simbu serogroup lineage 1.

  6. Clonal analysis of kit ligand a functional expression reveals lineage-specific competence to promote melanocyte rescue in the mutant regenerating caudal fin.

    PubMed

    Tryon, Robert C; Johnson, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    The study of regeneration in an in vivo vertebrate system has the potential to reveal targetable genes and pathways that could improve our ability to heal and repair damaged tissue. We have developed a system for clonal labeling of discrete cell lineages and independently inducing gene expression under control of the heat shock promoter in the zebrafish caudal fin. Consequently we are able to test the affects of overexpressing a single gene in the context of regeneration within each of the nine different cell lineage classes that comprise the caudal fin. This can test which lineage is necessary or sufficient to provide gene function. As a first example to demonstrate this approach, we explored which lineages were competent to functionally express the kit ligand a protein as assessed by the local complementation of the mutation in the sparse-like (kitlgatc244b) background. We show that dermal fibroblast expression of kit ligand a robustly supports the rescue of melanocytes in the regenerating caudal fin. kit ligand a expression from skin and osteoblasts results in more modest and variable rescue of melanocytes, while lateral line expression was unable to complement the mutation.

  7. The chromatin remodeling complex NuRD establishes the poised state of rRNA genes characterized by bivalent histone modifications and altered nucleosome positions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenbing; Ling, Te; Zhou, Yonggang; Feng, Weijun; Zhu, Qiaoyun; Stunnenberg, Henk G; Grummt, Ingrid; Tao, Wei

    2012-05-22

    rRNA genes (rDNA) exist in two distinct epigenetic states, active promoters being unmethylated and marked by euchromatic histone modifications, whereas silent ones are methylated and exhibit heterochromatic features. Here we show that the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD) complex establishes a specific chromatin structure at rRNA genes that are poised for transcription activation. The promoter of poised rRNA genes is unmethylated, associated with components of the preinitiation complex, marked by bivalent histone modifications and covered by a nucleosome in the "off" position, which is refractory to transcription initiation. Repression of rDNA transcription in growth-arrested and differentiated cells correlates with elevated association of NuRD and increased levels of poised rRNA genes. Reactivation of transcription requires resetting the promoter-bound nucleosome into the "on" position by the DNA-dependent ATPase CSB (Cockayne syndrome protein B). The results uncover a unique mechanism by which ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes with opposing activities establish a specific chromatin state and regulate transcription.

  8. Dehydrogenase activity in association with poised potential during biohydrogen production in single chamber microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Venkata Mohan, S; Lenin Babu, M

    2011-09-01

    Variation in the dehydrogenase (DH) activity and its simultaneous influence on hydrogen (H2) production, substrate degradation rate (SDR) and volatile fatty acid (VFA) generation was investigated with respect to varying poised potential in single chambered membrane-less microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) using anaerobic consortia as biocatalyst. Poised potential showed significant influence on H2 production and DH activity. Maximum H2 production was observed at 1.0V whereas the control system showed least H2 production among the experimental variations studied. DH activity was observed maximum at 0.6V followed by 0.8, 0.9 and 1.0V, suggests the influence of poised potential on the microbial metabolism. Almost complete degradation of substrate was observed in all the experimental conditions studied irrespective of the applied potential. Experimental data was also analysed employing multiple regression analysis and 3D-surface plots to find out the best theoretical poised potential for maximum H2 production and DH activity.

  9. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis distinctly alters mitochondrial and cytosolic redox poise

    PubMed Central

    Hanafin, William P; Beaudoin, Jessica N; Bica, Denisa E; DiLiberto, Stephen J; Kenis, Paul JA; Gaskins, H Rex

    2014-01-01

    The glutathione couple GSH/GSSG is the most abundant cellular redox buffer and is not at equilibrium among intracellular compartments. Perturbation of glutathione poise has been associated with tumorigenesis; however, due to analytical limitations, the underlying mechanisms behind this relationship are poorly understood. In this regard, we have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real-time glutathione redox potentials in the cytosol and mitochondrial matrix of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells. First, we demonstrated that recovery time in both compartments depended upon the length of exposure to oxidative challenge with diamide, a thiol-oxidizing agent. We then monitored changes in glutathione poise in cytosolic and mitochondrial matrices following inhibition of glutathione (GSH) synthesis with L-buthionine sulphoximine (BSO). The mitochondrial matrix showed higher oxidation in the BSO-treated cells indicating distinct compartmental alterations in redox poise. Finally, the contributory role of the p53 protein in supporting cytosolic redox poise was demonstrated. Inactivation of the p53 pathway by expression of a dominant-negative p53 protein sensitized the cytosol to oxidation in BSO-treated tumor cells. As a result, both compartments of PF161-T + 53DD cells were equally oxidized ≈20 mV by inhibition of GSH synthesis. Conversely, mitochondrial oxidation was independent of p53 status in GSH-deficient tumor cells. Taken together, these findings indicate different redox requirements for the glutathione thiol/disulfide redox couple within the cytosol and mitochondria of resting cells and reveal distinct regulation of their redox poise in response to inhibition of glutathione biosynthesis. PMID:24586100

  10. The analysis of novel distal Cebpa enhancers and silencers using a transcriptional model reveals the complex regulatory logic of hematopoietic lineage specification.

    PubMed

    Bertolino, Eric; Reinitz, John; Manu

    2016-05-01

    C/EBPα plays an instructive role in the macrophage-neutrophil cell-fate decision and its expression is necessary for neutrophil development. How Cebpa itself is regulated in the myeloid lineage is not known. We decoded the cis-regulatory logic of Cebpa, and two other myeloid transcription factors, Egr1 and Egr2, using a combined experimental-computational approach. With a reporter design capable of detecting both distal enhancers and silencers, we analyzed 46 putative cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in cells representing myeloid progenitors, and derived early macrophages or neutrophils. In addition to novel enhancers, this analysis revealed a surprisingly large number of silencers. We determined the regulatory roles of 15 potential transcriptional regulators by testing 32,768 alternative sequence-based transcriptional models against CRM activity data. This comprehensive analysis allowed us to infer the cis-regulatory logic for most of the CRMs. Silencer-mediated repression of Cebpa was found to be effected mainly by TFs expressed in non-myeloid lineages, highlighting a previously unappreciated contribution of long-distance silencing to hematopoietic lineage resolution. The repression of Cebpa by multiple factors expressed in alternative lineages suggests that hematopoietic genes are organized into densely interconnected repressive networks instead of hierarchies of mutually repressive pairs of pivotal TFs. More generally, our results demonstrate that de novo cis-regulatory dissection is feasible on a large scale with the aid of transcriptional modeling. Current address: Department of Biology, University of North Dakota, 10 Cornell Street, Stop 9019, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9019, USA.

  11. Young Stars Poised for Production of Rocky Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    "signatures" of crystalline pyroxene and olivine, i.e. peaks at wavelength 9.2 and 11.3 µm, respectively, are clearly visible in the spectrum of the inner stellar disc, demonstrating the presence of these species in that region of the disc. The Sun was born about 4,500 million years ago from a cold and massive cloud of interstellar gas and dust that collapsed under its own gravitational pull. A dusty disc was present around the young star, in which the Earth and other planets, as well as comets and asteroids were later formed. This epoch is long gone, but we may still witness that same process by observing the infrared emission from very young stars and the dusty protoplanetary discs around them. So far, however, the available instrumentation did not allow a study of the distribution of the different components of the dust in such discs; even the closest known are too far away for the best single telescopes to resolve them. But now, as Francesco Paresce, Project Scientist for the VLT Interferometer and a member of the team from ESO explains, "With the VLTI we can combine the light from two well-separated large telescopes to obtain unprecedented angular resolution. This has allowed us, for the first time, to peer directly into the innermost region of the discs around some nearby young stars, right in the place where we expect planets like our Earth are forming or will soon form". Specifically, new interferometric observations of three young stars by an international team [2], using the combined power of two 8.2-m VLT telescopes a hundred metres apart, has achieved sufficient image sharpness (about 0.02 arcsec) to measure the infrared emission from the inner region of the discs around three stars (corresponding approximately to the size of the Earth's orbit around the Sun) and the emission from the outer part of those discs. The corresponding infrared spectra have provided crucial information about the chemical composition of the dust in the discs and also about the average

  12. Biome specificity of distinct genetic lineages within the four-striped mouse Rhabdomys pumilio (Rodentia: Muridae) from southern Africa with implications for taxonomy.

    PubMed

    du Toit, Nina; van Vuuren, Bettine Jansen; Matthee, Sonja; Matthee, Conrad A

    2012-10-01

    Within southern Africa, a link between past climatic changes and faunal diversification has been hypothesized for a diversity of taxa. To test the hypothesis that evolutionary divergences may be correlated to vegetation changes (induced by changes in climate), we selected the widely distributed four-striped mouse, Rhabdomys, as a model. Two species are currently recognized, the mesic-adapted R. dilectus and arid-adapted R. pumilio. However, the morphology-based taxonomy and the distribution boundaries of previously described subspecies remain poorly defined. The current study, which spans seven biomes, focuses on the spatial genetic structure of the arid-adapted R. pumilio (521 specimens from 31 localities), but also includes limited sampling of the mesic-adapted R. dilectus (33 specimens from 10 localities) to act as a reference for interspecific variation within the genus. The mitochondrial COI gene and four nuclear introns (Eef1a1, MGF, SPTBN1, Bfib7) were used for the construction of gene trees. Mitochondrial DNA analyses indicate that Rhabdomys consists of four reciprocally monophyletic, geographically structured clades, with three distinct lineages present within the arid-adapted R. pumilio. These monophyletic lineages differ by at least 7.9% (±0.3) and these results are partly confirmed by a multilocus network of the combined nuclear intron dataset. Ecological niche modeling in MaxEnt supports a strong correlation between regional biomes and the distribution of distinct evolutionary lineages of Rhabdomys. A Bayesian relaxed molecular clock suggests that the geographic clades diverged between 3.09 and 4.30Ma, supporting the hypothesis that the radiation within the genus coincides with paleoclimatic changes (and the establishment of the biomes) characterizing the Miocene-Pliocene boundary. Marked genetic divergence at the mitochondrial DNA level, coupled with strong nuclear and mtDNA signals of non-monophyly of R. pumilio, support the notion that a taxonomic

  13. Lineage sorting in apes.

    PubMed

    Mailund, Thomas; Munch, Kasper; Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    2014-01-01

    Recombination allows different parts of the genome to have different genealogical histories. When a species splits in two, allelic lineages sort into the two descendant species, and this lineage sorting varies along the genome. If speciation events are close in time, the lineage sorting process may be incomplete at the second speciation event and lead to gene genealogies that do not match the species phylogeny. We review different recent approaches to model lineage sorting along the genome and show how it is possible to learn about population sizes, natural selection, and recombination rates in ancestral species from application of these models to genome alignments of great ape species.

  14. Perioperative aspirin management after POISE-2: some answers, but questions remain.

    PubMed

    Gerstein, Neal Stuart; Carey, Michael Christopher; Cigarroa, Joaquin E; Schulman, Peter M

    2015-03-01

    Aspirin constitutes important uninterrupted lifelong therapy for many patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease or significant (CV) risk factors. However, whether aspirin should be continued or withheld in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery is a common clinical conundrum that balances the potential of aspirin for decreasing thrombotic risk with its possibility for increasing perioperative blood loss. In this focused review, we describe the role of aspirin in treating and preventing cardiovascular disease, summarize the most important literature on the perioperative use of aspirin (including the recently published PeriOperative ISchemic Evaluation [POISE]-2 trial), and offer current recommendations for managing aspirin during the perioperative period. POISE-2 suggests that aspirin administration during the perioperative period does not change the risk of a cardiovascular event and may result in increased bleeding. However, these findings are tempered by a number of methodological issues related to the study. On the basis of currently available literature, including POISE-2, aspirin should not be administered to patients undergoing surgery unless there is a definitive guideline-based primary or secondary prevention indication. Aside from closed-space procedures, intramedullary spine surgery, or possibly prostate surgery, moderate-risk patients taking lifelong aspirin for a guideline-based primary or secondary indication may warrant continuation of their aspirin throughout the perioperative period.

  15. Coreceptor gene imprinting governs thymocyte lineage fate

    PubMed Central

    Adoro, Stanley; McCaughtry, Thomas; Erman, Batu; Alag, Amala; Van Laethem, François; Park, Jung-Hyun; Tai, Xuguang; Kimura, Motoko; Wang, Lie; Grinberg, Alex; Kubo, Masato; Bosselut, Remy; Love, Paul; Singer, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    Immature thymocytes are bipotential cells that are signalled during positive selection to become either helper- or cytotoxic-lineage T cells. By tracking expression of lineage determining transcription factors during positive selection, we now report that the Cd8 coreceptor gene locus co-opts any coreceptor protein encoded within it to induce thymocytes to express the cytotoxic-lineage factor Runx3 and to adopt the cytotoxic-lineage fate, findings we refer to as ‘coreceptor gene imprinting'. Specifically, encoding CD4 proteins in the endogenous Cd8 gene locus caused major histocompatibility complex class II-specific thymocytes to express Runx3 during positive selection and to differentiate into CD4+ cytotoxic-lineage T cells. Our findings further indicate that coreceptor gene imprinting derives from the dynamic regulation of specific cis Cd8 gene enhancer elements by positive selection signals in the thymus. Thus, for coreceptor-dependent thymocytes, lineage fate is determined by Cd4 and Cd8 coreceptor gene loci and not by the specificity of T-cell antigen receptor/coreceptor signalling. This study identifies coreceptor gene imprinting as a critical determinant of lineage fate determination in the thymus. PMID:22036949

  16. AML1/ETO promotes the maintenance of early hematopoietic progenitors in NOD/SCID mice but does not abrogate their lineage specific differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bäsecke, Jörg; Schwieger, Maike; Griesinger, Frank; Schiedlmeier, Bernd; Wulf, Gerald; Trümper, Lorenz; Stocking, Carol

    2005-02-01

    AML1-ETO is generated by the t(8;21) translocation found in approximately 12% of acute myelogenous leukemia. Studies to delineate the mechanism by which AML1-ETO induces leukemia have primarily relied on transformed human cell lines or murine model systems. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of AML1-ETO expression on primary human hematopoietic cells in vitro and in a xenograft model. We used a FMEV retroviral vector for the transfer of AML1/ETO into human CD34 + cells. The repopulation, self-renewal, and differentiation potential of infected cells were assessed in serum-free liquid culture, colony assays, and in transplanted NOD-SCID mice. High transcription levels were confirmed by real-time PCR. AML1-ETO expressing cells were expandable for up to 12 weeks and retained an immature morphology. The capacity for prolonged survival, however, did not abrogate maturation, as AML1-ETO cells gave rise to normal colonies in a CFU-assay. AML1/ETO-expressing cells also contributed to myeloid (CD15, CD33), B-lymphoid (CD20), NK-cell (CD56) and erythroid (GPA) lineages in xenografted NOD/SCID mice. Although able to engraft all major lineages, AML1/ETO transplanted cells were primarily found in less differentiated fractions as measured by cell surface markers CD34 and CD38. In spite of a good engraftment and prolonged observation period none of the NOD/SCID-mice developed an acute myelogenous leukemia. Our findings demonstrate that AML1/ETO promotes the maintenance of early human hematopoietic progenitors, but does not abrogate their physiologic differentiation. Furthermore, the leukemogenic potential of AML1/ETO expressed in human progenitors is low, despite transcription levels equivalent to those found in AMLs.

  17. Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus isolates: the "mec alphabet" with specific consideration of mecC, a mec homolog associated with zoonotic S. aureus lineages.

    PubMed

    Becker, Karsten; Ballhausen, Britta; Köck, Robin; Kriegeskorte, André

    2014-10-01

    Livestock-associated (LA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have globally emerged during the past decade. In Europe, this was particularly due to the occurrence of LA-MRSA strains associated with the clonal complex (CC) 398 as defined by multilocus sequence typing. However, more recently animal-adapted clonal lineages of S. aureus showing phenotypic methicillin resistance have been identified such as CC130, CC599, CC59, CC1943 and CC425. These newly emerging LA-MRSA CCs/STs caused infections in animals and zoonoses in humans. In contrast to other S. aureus clonal lineages, the methicillin resistance of the latter CCs/STs is based on a mecA gene homolog, designated mecC, which is part of a distinct SCCmec type (SCCmec XI). Including mecB found in Macrococcus caseolyticus, henceforth, the "mec alphabet" comprises three major gene types with several allotypes. As known for mecA, the gene homolog mecC is also not restricted to S. aureus, but found in several staphylococcal species including S. sciuri, S. stepanovicii and S. xylosus (mecC1 allotype). First investigations showed a wide geographical distribution of mecC-MRSA in Europe and a broad diversity of host species including livestock, companion and wildlife animals. In particular, wild rodents and insectivores might serve as reservoir for staphylococci harboring mecC. Economic burden may be caused by mastitis of dairy cattle. Livestock animals may likely serve as source for human infections with mecC-MRSA; reported cases comprise skin and soft tissue infections, osteomyelitis and bacteremia. Due to the divergent molecular nature of mecC-MRSA, its diagnostics is hampered by difficulties to verify the methicillin resistance using phenotypic as well as DNA-based procedures, which could have negative consequences for therapy of mecC-MRSA-caused infections.

  18. The phylogenetic distribution of non-CTCF insulator proteins is limited to insects and reveals that BEAF-32 is Drosophila lineage specific.

    PubMed

    Schoborg, Todd A; Labrador, Mariano

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin insulators are DNA sequences found in eukaryotes that may organize genomes into chromatin domains by blocking enhancer-promoter interactions and preventing heterochromatin spreading. Considering that insulators play important roles in organizing higher order chromatin structure and modulating gene expression, very little is known about their phylogenetic distribution. To date, six insulators and their associated proteins have been characterized, including Su(Hw), Zw5, CTCF, GAF, Mod(mdg4), and BEAF-32. However, all insulator proteins, with the exception of CTCF, which has also been identified in vertebrates and worms, have been exclusively described in Drosophila melanogaster. In this work, we have performed database searches utilizing each D. melanogaster insulator protein as a query to find orthologs in other organisms, revealing that except for CTCF all known insulator proteins are restricted to insects. In particular, the boundary element-associated factor of 32 kDa (BEAF-32), which binds to thousands of sites throughout the genome, was only found in the Drosophila lineage. Accordingly, we also found a significant bias of BEAF-32 binding sites in relation to transcription start sites (TSSs) in D. melanogaster but not in Anopheles gambiae, Apis mellifera, or Tribolium castaneum. These data suggest that DNA binding proteins such as BEAF-32 may have a dramatic impact in the genome of single evolutionary lineages. A more thorough evaluation of the phylogenetic distribution of insulator proteins will allow for a better understanding of whether the mechanism by which these proteins exert their function is conserved across phyla and their impact in genome evolution.

  19. Large-Scale, Lineage-Specific Expansion of a Bric-a-Brac/Tramtrack/Broad Complex Ubiquitin-Ligase Gene Family in Rice[W

    PubMed Central

    Gingerich, Derek J.; Hanada, Kousuke; Shiu, Shin-Han; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Selective ubiquitination of proteins is directed by diverse families of ubiquitin-protein ligases (or E3s) in plants. One important type uses Cullin-3 as a scaffold to assemble multisubunit E3 complexes containing one of a multitude of bric-a-brac/tramtrack/broad complex (BTB) proteins that function as substrate recognition factors. We previously described the 80-member BTB gene superfamily in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we describe the complete BTB superfamily in rice (Oryza sativa spp japonica cv Nipponbare) that contains 149 BTB domain–encoding genes and 43 putative pseudogenes. Amino acid sequence comparisons of the rice and Arabidopsis superfamilies revealed a near equal repertoire of putative substrate recognition module types. However, phylogenetic comparisons detected numerous gene duplication and/or loss events since the rice and Arabidopsis BTB lineages split, suggesting possible functional specialization within individual BTB families. In particular, a major expansion and diversification of a subset of BTB proteins containing Meprin and TRAF homology (MATH) substrate recognition sites was evident in rice and other monocots that likely occurred following the monocot/dicot split. The MATH domain of a subset appears to have evolved significantly faster than those in a smaller core subset that predates flowering plants, suggesting that the substrate recognition module in many monocot MATH-BTB E3s are diversifying to ubiquitinate a set of substrates that are themselves rapidly changing. Intriguing possibilities include pathogen proteins attempting to avoid inactivation by the monocot host. PMID:17720868

  20. Diversification of two lineages of symbiotic Photobacterium.

    PubMed

    Urbanczyk, Henryk; Urbanczyk, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Ogura, Yoshitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of processes driving bacterial speciation requires examination of closely related, recently diversified lineages. To gain an insight into diversification of bacteria, we conducted comparative genomic analysis of two lineages of bioluminescent symbionts, Photobacterium leiognathi and 'P. mandapamensis'. The two lineages are evolutionary and ecologically closely related. Based on the methods used in bacterial taxonomy for classification of new species (DNA-DNA hybridization and ANI), genetic relatedness of the two lineages is at a cut-off point for species delineation. In this study, we obtained the whole genome sequence of a representative P. leiognathi strain lrivu.4.1, and compared it to the whole genome sequence of 'P. mandapamensis' svers.1.1. Results of the comparative genomic analysis suggest that P. leiognathi has a more plastic genome and acquired genes horizontally more frequently than 'P. mandapamensis'. We predict that different rates of recombination and gene acquisition contributed to diversification of the two lineages. Analysis of lineage-specific sequences in 25 strains of P. leiognathi and 'P. mandapamensis' found no evidence that bioluminescent symbioses with specific host animals have played a role in diversification of the two lineages.

  1. Diversification of Two Lineages of Symbiotic Photobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Urbanczyk, Henryk; Urbanczyk, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Ogura, Yoshitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of processes driving bacterial speciation requires examination of closely related, recently diversified lineages. To gain an insight into diversification of bacteria, we conducted comparative genomic analysis of two lineages of bioluminescent symbionts, Photobacterium leiognathi and ‘P. mandapamensis’. The two lineages are evolutionary and ecologically closely related. Based on the methods used in bacterial taxonomy for classification of new species (DNA-DNA hybridization and ANI), genetic relatedness of the two lineages is at a cut-off point for species delineation. In this study, we obtained the whole genome sequence of a representative P. leiognathi strain lrivu.4.1, and compared it to the whole genome sequence of ‘P. mandapamensis’ svers.1.1. Results of the comparative genomic analysis suggest that P. leiognathi has a more plastic genome and acquired genes horizontally more frequently than ‘P. mandapamensis’. We predict that different rates of recombination and gene acquisition contributed to diversification of the two lineages. Analysis of lineage-specific sequences in 25 strains of P. leiognathi and ‘P. mandapamensis’ found no evidence that bioluminescent symbioses with specific host animals have played a role in diversification of the two lineages. PMID:24349398

  2. Phylogenetic lineages in Entomophthoromycota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomophthoromycota Humber is one of five major phylogenetic lineages among the former phylum Zygomycota. These early terrestrial fungi share evolutionarily ancestral characters such as coenocytic mycelium and gametangiogamy as a sexual process resulting in zygospore formation. Previous molecular st...

  3. Proceedings of the 2011 Space Cryogenics Workshop: "Poised for the Future, Reflecting on the Past"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. L. (Editor); Schnell, A. R. (Editor); Huget, L. (Editor)

    2013-01-01

    The 24th Space Cryogenics Workshop was held at the Best Western Coeur d Alene Inn and Conference Center, Coeur d Alene, Idaho, June 8-10, 2011. The workshop was organized and sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, with a theme of "Poised for the Future, Reflecting on the Past." Over 100 scientists and engineers from around the world came together to discuss space applications for cryogenics, renew old acquaintances, and meet new practitioners in the field of space cryogenics.

  4. A DR4:tBID axis drives the p53 apoptotic response by promoting oligomerization of poised BAX

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Ryan E; Andrysik, Zdenek; París, Ramiro; Galbraith, Matthew D; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2012-01-01

    The cellular response to p53 activation varies greatly in a stimulus- and cell type-specific manner. Dissecting the molecular mechanisms defining these cell fate choices will assist the development of effective p53-based cancer therapies and also illuminate fundamental processes by which gene networks control cellular behaviour. Using an experimental system wherein stimulus-specific p53 responses are elicited by non-genotoxic versus genotoxic agents, we discovered a novel mechanism that determines whether cells undergo proliferation arrest or cell death. Strikingly, we observe that key mediators of cell-cycle arrest (p21, 14-3-3σ) and apoptosis (PUMA, BAX) are equally activated regardless of outcome. In fact, arresting cells display strong translocation of PUMA and BAX to the mitochondria, yet fail to release cytochrome C or activate caspases. Surprisingly, the key differential events in apoptotic cells are p53-dependent activation of the DR4 death receptor pathway, caspase 8-mediated cleavage of BID, and BID-dependent activation of poised BAX at the mitochondria. These results reveal a previously unappreciated role for DR4 and the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in cell fate choice following p53 activation. PMID:22246181

  5. Seagrass (Zostera marina) Colonization Promotes the Accumulation of Diazotrophic Bacteria and Alters the Relative Abundances of Specific Bacterial Lineages Involved in Benthic Carbon and Sulfur Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Feifei; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qianqian; Liu, Fanghua

    2015-01-01

    Seagrass colonization changes the chemistry and biogeochemical cycles mediated by microbes in coastal sediments. In this study, we molecularly characterized the diazotrophic assemblages and entire bacterial community in surface sediments of a Zostera marina-colonized coastal lagoon in northern China. Higher nitrogenase gene (nifH) copy numbers were detected in the sediments from the vegetated region than in the sediments from the unvegetated region nearby. The nifH phylotypes detected were mostly affiliated with the Geobacteraceae, Desulfobulbus, Desulfocapsa, and Pseudomonas. Redundancy analysis based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that the distribution of nifH genotypes was mostly shaped by the ratio of total organic carbon to total organic nitrogen, the concentration of cadmium in the sediments, and the pH of the overlying water. High-throughput sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of bacterial 16S rRNA genes also indicated the presence of Geobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae phylotypes in these samples. A comparison of these results with those of previous studies suggests the prevalence and predominance of iron(III)-reducing Geobacteraceae and sulfate-reducing Desulfobulbaceae diazotrophs in coastal sedimentary environments. Although the entire bacterial community structure was not significantly different between these two niches, Desulfococcus (Deltaproteobacteria) and Anaerolineae (Chloroflexi) presented with much higher proportions in the vegetated sediments, and Flavobacteriaceae (Bacteroidetes) occurred more frequently in the bare sediments. These data suggest that the high bioavailability of organic matter (indicated by relatively lower carbon-to-nitrogen ratios) and the less-reducing anaerobic condition in vegetated sediments may favor Desulfococcus and Anaerolineae lineages, which are potentially important populations in benthic carbon and sulfur cycling in the highly productive seagrass ecosystem. PMID:26209674

  6. Regional and Stage-Specific Effects of Prospectively Purified Vascular Cells on the Adult V-SVZ Neural Stem Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Elizabeth E.; Liu, Chang; Silva-Vargas, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Adult neural stem cells reside in specialized niches. In the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), quiescent neural stem cells (qNSCs) become activated (aNSCs), and generate transit amplifying cells (TACs), which give rise to neuroblasts that migrate to the olfactory bulb. The vasculature is an important component of the adult neural stem cell niche, but whether vascular cells in neurogenic areas are intrinsically different from those elsewhere in the brain is unknown. Moreover, the contribution of pericytes to the neural stem cell niche has not been defined. Here, we describe a rapid FACS purification strategy to simultaneously isolate primary endothelial cells and pericytes from brain microregions of nontransgenic mice using CD31 and CD13 as surface markers. We compared the effect of purified vascular cells from a neurogenic (V-SVZ) and non-neurogenic brain region (cortex) on the V-SVZ stem cell lineage in vitro. Endothelial and pericyte diffusible signals from both regions differentially promote the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of qNSCs, aNSCs, and TACs. Unexpectedly, diffusible cortical signals had the most potent effects on V-SVZ proliferation and neurogenesis, highlighting the intrinsic capacity of non-neurogenic vasculature to support stem cell behavior. Finally, we identify PlGF-2 as an endothelial-derived mitogen that promotes V-SVZ cell proliferation. This purification strategy provides a platform to define the functional and molecular contribution of vascular cells to stem cell niches and other brain regions under different physiological and pathological states. PMID:25788671

  7. Seagrass (Zostera marina) Colonization Promotes the Accumulation of Diazotrophic Bacteria and Alters the Relative Abundances of Specific Bacterial Lineages Involved in Benthic Carbon and Sulfur Cycling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feifei; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Qianqian; Liu, Fanghua; Zhang, Jianping; Gong, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Seagrass colonization changes the chemistry and biogeochemical cycles mediated by microbes in coastal sediments. In this study, we molecularly characterized the diazotrophic assemblages and entire bacterial community in surface sediments of a Zostera marina-colonized coastal lagoon in northern China. Higher nitrogenase gene (nifH) copy numbers were detected in the sediments from the vegetated region than in the sediments from the unvegetated region nearby. The nifH phylotypes detected were mostly affiliated with the Geobacteraceae, Desulfobulbus, Desulfocapsa, and Pseudomonas. Redundancy analysis based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that the distribution of nifH genotypes was mostly shaped by the ratio of total organic carbon to total organic nitrogen, the concentration of cadmium in the sediments, and the pH of the overlying water. High-throughput sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of bacterial 16S rRNA genes also indicated the presence of Geobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae phylotypes in these samples. A comparison of these results with those of previous studies suggests the prevalence and predominance of iron(III)-reducing Geobacteraceae and sulfate-reducing Desulfobulbaceae diazotrophs in coastal sedimentary environments. Although the entire bacterial community structure was not significantly different between these two niches, Desulfococcus (Deltaproteobacteria) and Anaerolineae (Chloroflexi) presented with much higher proportions in the vegetated sediments, and Flavobacteriaceae (Bacteroidetes) occurred more frequently in the bare sediments. These data suggest that the high bioavailability of organic matter (indicated by relatively lower carbon-to-nitrogen ratios) and the less-reducing anaerobic condition in vegetated sediments may favor Desulfococcus and Anaerolineae lineages, which are potentially important populations in benthic carbon and sulfur cycling in the highly productive seagrass ecosystem.

  8. CopyRighter: a rapid tool for improving the accuracy of microbial community profiles through lineage-specific gene copy number correction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Culture-independent molecular surveys targeting conserved marker genes, most notably 16S rRNA, to assess microbial diversity remain semi-quantitative due to variations in the number of gene copies between species. Results Based on 2,900 sequenced reference genomes, we show that 16S rRNA gene copy number (GCN) is strongly linked to microbial phylogenetic taxonomy, potentially under-representing Archaea in amplicon microbial profiles. Using this relationship, we inferred the GCN of all bacterial and archaeal lineages in the Greengenes database within a phylogenetic framework. We created CopyRighter, new software which uses these estimates to correct 16S rRNA amplicon microbial profiles and associated quantitative (q)PCR total abundance. CopyRighter parses microbial profiles and, because GCN estimates are pre-computed for all taxa in the reference taxonomy, rapidly corrects GCN bias. Software validation with in silico and in vitro mock communities indicated that GCN correction results in more accurate estimates of microbial relative abundance and improves the agreement between metagenomic and amplicon profiles. Analyses of human-associated and anaerobic digester microbiomes illustrate that correction makes tangible changes to estimates of qPCR total abundance, α and β diversity, and can significantly change biological interpretation. For example, human gut microbiomes from twins were reclassified into three rather than two enterotypes after GCN correction. Conclusions The CopyRighter bioinformatic tools permits rapid correction of GCN in microbial surveys, resulting in improved estimates of microbial abundance, α and β diversity. PMID:24708850

  9. Chromatin poises miRNA- and protein-coding genes for expression.

    PubMed

    Barski, Artem; Jothi, Raja; Cuddapah, Suresh; Cui, Kairong; Roh, Tae-Young; Schones, Dustin E; Zhao, Keji

    2009-10-01

    Chromatin modifications have been implicated in the regulation of gene expression. While association of certain modifications with expressed or silent genes has been established, it remains unclear how changes in chromatin environment relate to changes in gene expression. In this article, we used ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing) to analyze the genome-wide changes in chromatin modifications during activation of total human CD4(+) T cells by T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Surprisingly, we found that the chromatin modification patterns at many induced and silenced genes are relatively stable during the short-term activation of resting T cells. Active chromatin modifications were already in place for a majority of inducible protein-coding genes, even while the genes were silent in resting cells. Similarly, genes that were silenced upon T-cell activation retained positive chromatin modifications even after being silenced. To investigate if these observations are also valid for miRNA-coding genes, we systematically identified promoters for known miRNA genes using epigenetic marks and profiled their expression patterns using deep sequencing. We found that chromatin modifications can poise miRNA-coding genes as well. Our data suggest that miRNA- and protein-coding genes share similar mechanisms of regulation by chromatin modifications, which poise inducible genes for activation in response to environmental stimuli.

  10. [China is poised to build a better healthcare delivery system using the integrative health paradigm].

    PubMed

    Hui, Ka Kit; Zhang, Wei-jun

    2011-01-01

    China and the United States share similar goals regarding their health care reform: expanding coverage, bending the curve of healthcare expenditure, and ensuring quality improvement and effectiveness of healthcare. Though many differences in the two health care systems exist, there are still many innovative strategies both countries can learn from each other. This paper first discusses two major problems in the America's health care system: an increasing aging population coupled with ineffective chronic disease management; and a failing primary care system. Next it discusses the role of integrative medicine in the United States health care reform. We also review some key strategies in China's health care reform, which we believe if these policies are implemented fully and effectively, China is poised to build a better healthcare delivery system using the integrative health paradigm.

  11. Peer Observed Interaction and Structured Evaluation (POISE): a Canadian experience with peer supervision for genetic counselors.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Claire; Honeywell, Christina; Mettler, Gabrielle

    2011-04-01

    Peer observation, while often used in other professions, has not been formally applied in genetic counseling. The objective of this study was to pilot a method of peer evaluation whereby genetic counselors observed, and were observed by, each other during patient interaction. All of the available genetic counselors participated in both rounds of the pilot study (six in round one, seven in round two). The genetic counselors that observed the session used an observation room. Most participants reported learning a new skill. Sensitivity to, and comfort with, the feedback process improved. We conclude that Peer-Observed Interaction and Structured Evaluation (POISE) provides an opportunity to refresh counseling approaches and develop feedback skills without causing undue team discord. This new approach to peer supervision in genetic counselling offers a live observation approach for genetic counsellor supervision.

  12. A novel begomovirus isolated from sida contains putative cis- and trans-acting replication specificity determinants that have evolved independently in several geographical lineages.

    PubMed

    Mauricio-Castillo, J A; Torres-Herrera, S I; Cárdenas-Conejo, Y; Pastor-Palacios, G; Méndez-Lozano, J; Argüello-Astorga, G R

    2014-09-01

    A novel begomovirus isolated from a Sida rhombifolia plant collected in Sinaloa, Mexico, was characterized. The genomic components of sida mosaic Sinaloa virus (SiMSinV) shared highest sequence identity with DNA-A and DNA-B components of chino del tomate virus (CdTV), suggesting a vertical evolutionary relationship between these viruses. However, recombination analysis indicated that a short segment of SiMSinV DNA-A encompassing the plus-strand replication origin and the 5´-proximal 43 codons of the Rep gene was derived from tomato mottle Taino virus (ToMoTV). Accordingly, the putative cis- and trans-acting replication specificity determinants of SiMSinV were identical to those of ToMoTV but differed from those of CdTV. Modeling of the SiMSinV and CdTV Rep proteins revealed significant differences in the region comprising the small β1/β5 sheet element, where five putative DNA-binding specificity determinants (SPDs) of Rep (i.e., amino acid residues 5, 8, 10, 69 and 71) were previously identified. Computer-assisted searches of public databases led to identification of 33 begomoviruses from three continents encoding proteins with SPDs identical to those of the Rep encoded by SiMSinV. Sequence analysis of the replication origins demonstrated that all 33 begomoviruses harbor potential Rep-binding sites identical to those of SiMSinV. These data support the hypothesis that the Rep β1/β5 sheet region determines specificity of this protein for DNA replication origin sequences.

  13. The Transition of Poised RNA Polymerase II to an Actively Elongating State Is a “Complex” Affair

    PubMed Central

    Yearling, Marie N.; Radebaugh, Catherine A.; Stargell, Laurie A.

    2011-01-01

    The initial discovery of the occupancy of RNA polymerase II at certain genes prior to their transcriptional activation occurred a quarter century ago in Drosophila. The preloading of these poised complexes in this inactive state is now apparent in many different organisms across the evolutionary spectrum and occurs at a broad and diverse set of genes. In this paper, we discuss the genetic and biochemical efforts in S. cerevisiae to describe the conversion of these poised transcription complexes to the active state for productive elongation. The accumulated evidence demonstrates that a multitude of coactivators and chromatin remodeling complexes are essential for this transition. PMID:22567346

  14. Site-specific deletions involving the tal-1 and sil genes are restricted to cells of the T cell receptor alpha/beta lineage: T cell receptor delta gene deletion mechanism affects multiple genes

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Site-specific deletions in the tal-1 gene are reported to occur in 12- 26% of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALL). So far two main types of tal-1 deletions have been described. Upon analysis of 134 T- ALL we have found two new types of tal-1 deletions. These four types of deletions juxtapose the 5' part of the tal-1 gene to the sil gene promoter, thereby deleting all coding sil exons but leaving the coding tal-1 exons undamaged. The recombination signal sequences (RSS) and fusion regions of the tal-1 deletion breakpoints strongly resemble the RSS and junctional regions of immunoglobulin/T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements, which implies that they are probably caused by the same V(D)J recombinase complex. Analysis of the 134 T-ALL suggested that the occurrence of tal-1 deletions is associated with the CD3 phenotype, because no tal-1 deletions were found in 25 TCR-gamma/delta + T-ALL, whereas 8 of the 69 CD3- T-ALL and 11 of the 40 TCR-alpha/beta + T-ALL contained such a deletion. Careful examination of all TCR genes revealed that tal-1 deletions exclusively occurred in CD3- or CD3+ T- ALL of the alpha/beta lineage with a frequency of 18% in T-ALL with one deleted TCR-delta allele, and a frequency of 34% in T-ALL with TCR- delta gene deletions on both alleles. Therefore, we conclude that alpha/beta lineage commitment of the T-ALL and especially the extent of TCR-delta gene deletions determines the chance of a tal-1 deletion. This suggests that tal-1 deletions are mediated via the same deletion mechanism as TCR-delta gene deletions. PMID:8459224

  15. Transgenic mice demonstrate that epithelial homing of gamma/delta T cells is determined by cell lineages independent of T cell receptor specificity

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    gamma/delta T cells with different TCR repertoires are compartmentalized in different epithelia. This raises the possibility that the TCR-gamma/delta directs homing of T cells to these epithelia. Alternatively, the signals that induce TCR-gamma/delta expression in developing T cells may also induce homing properties in such cells, presumably in the form of cell surface receptors. We have examined this issue by studying the homing of gamma/delta T cells in transgenic mice constructed with specific pairs of rearranged gamma and delta genes. In such mice, most gamma/delta T cells express the transgene-encoded TCR. We find that homing to both skin and gut epithelia is a property of T cells and is not determined by the type of gamma and delta genes used to encode their TCR. We also studied the effect of TCR replacement on the expression of Thy-1 and CD8 proteins on the gamma/delta T cells associated with gut epithelia. Our results show that the expression of the appropriate type of TCR-gamma/delta is not required for the Thy-1 expression by these T cells, suggesting that Thy-1 is not an activation marker. In contrast, CD8 expression by gut gamma/delta T cells seems to depend on the expression of the appropriate type of TCR. PMID:2109035

  16. Poised for survival: criticality, natural selection, and excitation-transcription coupling.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ron

    2015-04-01

    Neurologically-complex species utilize two intricately coupled information-processing systems to adapt to their social and natural environments. Action potentials (APs) facilitate rapid responses to the nearly continuous fluctuations in the animal's surroundings. By contrast, genetic encodings comprise a molecular memory of ancient adaptive responses expressed as cognitive, emotional, or behavioral phenotypes. The linking of the two systems via intracellular Ca(2+) networks which address transcription factors - e.g., cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) - is an appropriate focus for the biology of human behavior. Computational modeling utilizing Boolean networks (BNs) is a suitable qualitative method, requiring no kinetic information, for eliciting the systems' architectural properties. In particular, BNs can reveal critical intracellular regimes of possible evolutionary significance. As a platform for future research, we propose that those networks sufficiently robust to attenuate damaging intracellular noise and deleterious mutations, yet sufficiently close to chaos to permit or amplify adaptive noise and favorable mutations, would be favored by natural selection. Critical regimes of this type would be, literally, "poised for survival", and would stabilize and promote the survival of their correlated cultural phenotypes.

  17. Metazoan Nuclear Pores Provide a Scaffold for Poised Genes and Mediate Induced Enhancer-Promoter Contacts.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Garcia, Pau; Debo, Brian; Aleman, Jennifer R; Talamas, Jessica A; Lan, Yemin; Nguyen, Nha H; Won, Kyoung J; Capelson, Maya

    2017-04-06

    Nuclear pore complex components (Nups) have been implicated in transcriptional regulation, yet what regulatory steps are controlled by metazoan Nups remains unclear. We identified the presence of multiple Nups at promoters, enhancers, and insulators in the Drosophila genome. In line with this binding, we uncovered a functional role for Nup98 in mediating enhancer-promoter looping at ecdysone-inducible genes. These genes were found to be stably associated with nuclear pores before and after activation. Although changing levels of Nup98 disrupted enhancer-promoter contacts, it did not affect ongoing transcription but instead compromised subsequent transcriptional activation or transcriptional memory. In support of the enhancer-looping role, we found Nup98 to gain and retain physical interactions with architectural proteins upon stimulation with ecdysone. Together, our data identify Nups as a class of architectural proteins for enhancers and supports a model in which animal genomes use the nuclear pore as an organizing scaffold for inducible poised genes.

  18. Analysis of a new strain of Euphorbia mosaic virus with distinct replication specificity unveils a lineage of begomoviruses with short Rep sequences in the DNA-B intergenic region

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Euphorbia mosaic virus (EuMV) is a member of the SLCV clade, a lineage of New World begomoviruses that display distinctive features in their replication-associated protein (Rep) and virion-strand replication origin. The first entirely characterized EuMV isolate is native from Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico; subsequently, EuMV was detected in weeds and pepper plants from another region of Mexico, and partial DNA-A sequences revealed significant differences in their putative replication specificity determinants with respect to EuMV-YP. This study was aimed to investigate the replication compatibility between two EuMV isolates from the same country. Results A new isolate of EuMV was obtained from pepper plants collected at Jalisco, Mexico. Full-length clones of both genomic components of EuMV-Jal were biolistically inoculated into plants of three different species, which developed symptoms indistinguishable from those induced by EuMV-YP. Pseudorecombination experiments with EuMV-Jal and EuMV-YP genomic components demonstrated that these viruses do not form infectious reassortants in Nicotiana benthamiana, presumably because of Rep-iteron incompatibility. Sequence analysis of the EuMV-Jal DNA-B intergenic region (IR) led to the unexpected discovery of a 35-nt-long sequence that is identical to a segment of the rep gene in the cognate viral DNA-A. Similar short rep sequences ranging from 35- to 51-nt in length were identified in all EuMV isolates and in three distinct viruses from South America related to EuMV. These short rep sequences in the DNA-B IR are positioned downstream to a ~160-nt non-coding domain highly similar to the CP promoter of begomoviruses belonging to the SLCV clade. Conclusions EuMV strains are not compatible in replication, indicating that this begomovirus species probably is not a replicating lineage in nature. The genomic analysis of EuMV-Jal led to the discovery of a subgroup of SLCV clade viruses that contain in the non-coding region of

  19. Tracing the Tumor Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Navin, Nicholas E.; Hicks, James

    2010-01-01

    Defining the pathways through which tumors progress is critical to our understanding and treatment of cancer. We do not routinely sample patients at multiple time points during the progression of their disease, and thus our research is limited to inferring progression a posteriori from the examination of a single tumor sample. Despite this limitation, inferring progression is possible because the tumor genome contains a natural history of the mutations that occur during the formation of the tumor mass. There are two approaches to reconstructing a lineage of progression: (1) inter-tumor comparisons, and (2) intra-tumor comparisons. The inter-tumor approach consists of taking single samples from large collections of tumors and comparing the complexity of the genomes to identify early and late mutations. The intra-tumor approach involves taking multiple samples from individual heterogeneous tumors to compare divergent clones and reconstruct a phylogenetic lineage. Here we discuss how these approaches can be used to interpret the current models for tumor progression. We also compare data from primary and metastatic copy number profiles to shed light on the final steps of breast cancer progression. Finally, we discuss how recent technical advances in single cell genomics will herald a new era in understanding the fundamental basis of tumor heterogeneity and progression. PMID:20537601

  20. Instruction of hematopoietic lineage choice by cytokine signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Endele, Max; Etzrodt, Martin; Schroeder, Timm

    2014-12-10

    Hematopoiesis is the cumulative consequence of finely tuned signaling pathways activated through extrinsic factors, such as local niche signals and systemic hematopoietic cytokines. Whether extrinsic factors actively instruct the lineage choice of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells or are only selectively allowing survival and proliferation of already intrinsically lineage-committed cells has been debated over decades. Recent results demonstrated that cytokines can instruct lineage choice. However, the precise function of individual cytokine-triggered signaling molecules in inducing cellular events like proliferation, lineage choice, and differentiation remains largely elusive. Signal transduction pathways activated by different cytokine receptors are highly overlapping, but support the production of distinct hematopoietic lineages. Cellular context, signaling dynamics, and the crosstalk of different signaling pathways determine the cellular response of a given extrinsic signal. New tools to manipulate and continuously quantify signaling events at the single cell level are therefore required to thoroughly interrogate how dynamic signaling networks yield a specific cellular response. - Highlights: • Recent studies provided definite proof for lineage-instructive action of cytokines. • Signaling pathways involved in hematopoietic lineage instruction remain elusive. • New tools are emerging to quantitatively study dynamic signaling networks over time.

  1. Slit/Robo signaling regulates cell fate decisions in the intestinal stem cell lineage of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Biteau, Benoît; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-06-26

    In order to maintain tissue homeostasis, cell fate decisions within stem cell lineages have to respond to the needs of the tissue. This coordination of lineage choices with regenerative demand remains poorly characterized. Here, we identify a signal from enteroendocrine cells (EEs) that controls lineage specification in the Drosophila intestine. We find that EEs secrete Slit, a ligand for the Robo2 receptor in intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that limits ISC commitment to the endocrine lineage, establishing negative feedback control of EE regeneration. Furthermore, we show that this lineage decision is made within ISCs and requires induction of the transcription factor Prospero in ISCs. Our work identifies a function for the conserved Slit/Robo pathway in the regulation of adult stem cells, establishing negative feedback control of ISC lineage specification as a critical strategy to preserve tissue homeostasis. Our results further amend the current understanding of cell fate commitment within the Drosophila ISC lineage.

  2. Ancient wolf lineages in India.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dinesh K; Maldonado, Jesus E; Jhala, Yadrendradev V; Fleischer, Robert C

    2004-01-01

    All previously obtained wolf (Canis lupus) and dog (Canis familiaris) mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences fall within an intertwined and shallow clade (the 'wolf-dog' clade). We sequenced mtDNA of recent and historical samples from 45 wolves from throughout lowland peninsular India and 23 wolves from the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau and compared these sequences with all available wolf and dog sequences. All 45 lowland Indian wolves have one of four closely related haplotypes that form a well-supported, divergent sister lineage to the wolf-dog clade. This unique lineage may have been independent for more than 400,000 years. Although seven Himalayan wolves from western and central Kashmir fall within the widespread wolf-dog clade, one from Ladakh in eastern Kashmir, nine from Himachal Pradesh, four from Nepal and two from Tibet form a very different basal clade. This lineage contains five related haplotypes that probably diverged from other canids more than 800,000 years ago, but we find no evidence of current barriers to admixture. Thus, the Indian subcontinent has three divergent, ancient and apparently parapatric mtDNA lineages within the morphologically delineated wolf. No haplotypes of either novel lineage are found within a sample of 37 Indian (or other) dogs. Thus, we find no evidence that these two taxa played a part in the domestication of canids. PMID:15101402

  3. Lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Alicia L.; Kelley, Philip M.; Tempero, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Post natal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis presumably requires precise regulatory processes to properly assemble proliferating lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). The specific mechanisms that regulate the assembly of LECs during new lymphatic vessel synthesis are unclear. Dynamic endothelial shuffling and rearrangement has been proposed as a mechanism of blood vessel growth. We developed genetic lineage tracing strategies using an inductive transgenic technology to track the fate of entire tandem dimer tomato positive (tdT) lymphatic vessels or small, in some cases clonal, populations of LECs. We coupled this platform with a suture induced mouse model of corneal lymphangiogenesis and used different analytic microscopy techniques including serial live imaging to study the spatial properties of proliferating tdT+ LEC progenies. LEC precursors and their progeny expanded from the corneal limbal lymphatic vessel and were assembled contiguously to comprise a subunit within a new lymphatic vessel. VE-cadherin blockade induced morphologic abnormalities in newly synthesized lymphatic vessels, but did not disrupt the tdT+ lymphatic endothelial lineage assembly. Analysis of this static and dynamic data based largely on direct in vivo observations supports a model of lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26658452

  4. C5-amino acid functionalized LNA: positively poised for antisense applications.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Dale C; Kumar, Pawan; Anderson, Brooke A; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2014-08-18

    Incorporation of positively charged C5-amino acid functionalized LNA uridines into oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ONs) results in extraordinary RNA affinity, binding specificity and stability towards 3'-exonucleases.

  5. Comprehensive profiling reveals mechanisms of SOX2-mediated cell fate specification in human ESCs and NPCs

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chenlin; Yang, Xiaoqin; Sun, Yiyang; Yu, Hongyao; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Ying

    2016-01-01

    SOX2 is a key regulator of multiple types of stem cells, especially embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Understanding the mechanism underlying the function of SOX2 is of great importance for realizing the full potential of ESCs and NPCs. Here, through genome-wide comparative studies, we show that SOX2 executes its distinct functions in human ESCs (hESCs) and hESC-derived NPCs (hNPCs) through cell type- and stage-dependent transcription programs. Importantly, SOX2 suppresses non-neural lineages in hESCs and regulates neurogenesis from hNPCs by inhibiting canonical Wnt signaling. In hESCs, SOX2 achieves such inhibition by direct transcriptional regulation of important Wnt signaling modulators, WLS and SFRP2. Moreover, SOX2 ensures pluripotent epigenetic landscapes via interacting with histone variant H2A.Z and recruiting polycomb repressor complex 2 to poise developmental genes in hESCs. Together, our results advance our understanding of the mechanism by which cell type-specific transcription factors control lineage-specific gene expression programs and specify cell fate. PMID:26809499

  6. Genome Diversification in Phylogenetic Lineages I and II of Listeria monocytogenes: Identification of Segments Unique to Lineage II Populations†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chaomei; Zhang, Min; Ju, Jingliang; Nietfeldt, Joseph; Wise, John; Terry, Philip M.; Olson, Michael; Kachman, Stephen D.; Wiedmann, Martin; Samadpour, Mansour; Benson, Andrew K.

    2003-01-01

    Thirteen different serotypes of Listeria monocytogenes can be distinguished on the basis of variation in somatic and flagellar antigens. Although the known virulence genes are present in all serotypes, greater than 90% of human cases of listeriosis are caused by serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b and nearly all outbreaks of food-borne listeriosis have been caused by serotype 4b strains. Phylogenetic analysis of these three common clinical serotypes places them into two different lineages, with serotypes 1/2b and 4b belonging to lineage I and 1/2a belonging to lineage II. To begin examining evolution of the genome in these serotypes, DNA microarray analysis was used to identify lineage-specific and serotype-specific differences in genome content. A set of 44 strains representing serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b was probed with a shotgun DNA microarray constructed from the serotype 1/2a strain 10403s. Clones spanning 47 different genes in 16 different contiguous segments relative to the lineage II 1/2a genome were found to be absent in all lineage I strains tested (serotype 4b and 1/2b) and an additional nine were altered exclusively in 4b strains. Southern hybridization confirmed that conserved alterations were, in all but two loci, due to absence of the segments from the genome. Genes within these contiguous segments comprise five functional categories, including genes involved in synthesis of cell surface molecules and regulation of virulence gene expression. Phylogenetic reconstruction and examination of compositional bias in the regions of difference are consistent with a model in which the ancestor of the two lineages had the 1/2 somatic serotype and the regions absent in the lineage I genome arose by loss of ancestral sequences. PMID:12949110

  7. Phylogenetic lineages in Pseudocercospora

    PubMed Central

    Crous, P.W.; Braun, U.; Hunter, G.C.; Wingfield, M.J.; Verkley, G.J.M.; Shin, H.-D.; Nakashima, C.; Groenewald, J.Z.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudocercospora is a large cosmopolitan genus of plant pathogenic fungi that are commonly associated with leaf and fruit spots as well as blights on a wide range of plant hosts. They occur in arid as well as wet environments and in a wide range of climates including cool temperate, sub-tropical and tropical regions. Pseudocercospora is now treated as a genus in its own right, although formerly recognised as either an anamorphic state of Mycosphaerella or having mycosphaerella-like teleomorphs. The aim of this study was to sequence the partial 28S nuclear ribosomal RNA gene of a selected set of isolates to resolve phylogenetic generic limits within the Pseudocercospora complex. From these data, 14 clades are recognised, six of which cluster in Mycosphaerellaceae. Pseudocercospora s. str. represents a distinct clade, sister to Passalora eucalypti, and a clade representing the genera Scolecostigmina, Trochophora and Pallidocercospora gen. nov., taxa formerly accommodated in the Mycosphaerella heimii complex and characterised by smooth, pale brown conidia, as well as the formation of red crystals in agar media. Other clades in Mycosphaerellaceae include Sonderhenia, Microcyclosporella, and Paracercospora. Pseudocercosporella resides in a large clade along with Phloeospora, Miuraea, Cercospora and Septoria. Additional clades represent Dissoconiaceae, Teratosphaeriaceae, Cladosporiaceae, and the genera Xenostigmina, Strelitziana, Cyphellophora and Thedgonia. The genus Phaeomycocentrospora is introduced to accommodate Mycocentrospora cantuariensis, primarily distinguished from Pseudocercospora based on its hyaline hyphae, broad conidiogenous loci and hila. Host specificity was considered for 146 species of Pseudocercospora occurring on 115 host genera from 33 countries. Partial nucleotide sequence data for three gene loci, ITS, EF-1α, and ACT suggest that the majority of these species are host specific. Species identified on the basis of host, symptomatology and general

  8. Green fluorescent protein-based monitoring of endoplasmic reticulum redox poise

    PubMed Central

    Birk, Julia; Ramming, Thomas; Odermatt, Alex; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Pathological endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is tightly linked to the accumulation of reactive oxidants, which can be both upstream and downstream of ER stress. Accordingly, detrimental intracellular stress signals are amplified through establishment of a vicious cycle. An increasing number of human diseases are characterized by tissue atrophy in response to ER stress and oxidative injury. Experimental monitoring of stress-induced, time-resolved changes in ER reduction-oxidation (redox) states is therefore important. Organelle-specific examination of redox changes has been facilitated by the advent of genetically encoded, fluorescent probes, which can be targeted to different subcellular locations by means of specific amino acid extensions. These probes include redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (roGFPs) and the yellow fluorescent protein-based redox biosensor HyPer. In the case of roGFPs, variants with known specificity toward defined redox couples are now available. Here, we review the experimental framework to measure ER redox changes using ER-targeted fluorescent biosensors. Advantages and drawbacks of plate-reader and microscopy-based measurements are discussed, and the power of these techniques demonstrated in the context of selected cell culture models for ER stress. PMID:23781233

  9. Direct and progressive differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into the chondrogenic lineage.

    PubMed

    Gong, Guochun; Ferrari, Deborah; Dealy, Caroline N; Kosher, Robert A

    2010-09-01

    Treatment of common and debilitating degenerative cartilage diseases particularly osteoarthritis is a clinical challenge because of the limited capacity of the tissue for self-repair. Because of their unlimited capacity for self-renewal and ability to differentiate into multiple lineages, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are a potentially powerful tool for repair of cartilage defects. The primary objective of the present study was to develop culture systems and conditions that enable hESCs to directly and uniformly differentiate into the chondrogenic lineage without prior embryoid body (EB) formation, since the inherent cellular heterogeneity of EBs hinders obtaining homogeneous populations of chondrogenic cells that can be used for cartilage repair. To this end, we have subjected undifferentiated pluripotent hESCs to the high density micromass culture conditions we have extensively used to direct the differentiation of embryonic limb bud mesenchymal cells into chondrocytes. We report that micromass cultures of pluripotent hESCs undergo direct, rapid, progressive, and substantially uniform chondrogenic differentiation in the presence of BMP2 or a combination of BMP2 and TGF-beta1, signaling molecules that act in concert to regulate chondrogenesis in the developing limb. The gene expression profiles of hESC-derived cultures harvested at various times during the progression of their differentiation has enabled us to identify cultures comprising cells in different phases of the chondrogenic lineage ranging from cultures just entering the lineage to well differentiated chondrocytes. Thus, we are poised to compare the abilities of hESC-derived progenitors in different phases of the chondrogenic lineage for cartilage repair.

  10. Procurement of information systems effectively (POISE): using the new UK guidelines to purchase an integrated clinical laboratory system.

    PubMed

    Feltham, R K

    1995-01-01

    Open tendering for medical informatics systems in the UK has traditionally been lengthy and, therefore, expensive on resources for vendor and purchaser alike. Events in the United Kingdom (UK) and European Community (EC) have led to new Government guidance being published on procuring information systems for the public sector: Procurement of Information Systems Effectively (POISE). This innovative procurement process, launched in 1993, has the support of the Computing Services Association (CSA) and the Federation of the Electronics Industry (FEI). This paper gives an overview of these new UK guidelines on healthcare information system purchasing in the context of a recent procurement project with an NHS Trust Hospital. The aim of the project was to replace three aging, separate, and different laboratory computer systems with a new, integrated turnkey system offering all department modules, an Open modern computer environment, and on-line electronic links to key departmental systems, both within and external to the Trust by the end of 1994. The new system had to complement the Trust's strategy for providing a modern clinical laboratory service to the local population and meet a tight budget.

  11. Super resolution microscopy is poised to reveal new insights into the formation and maturation of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Cristina M.; Patel, Mikin R.; Webb, Donna J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines and synapses are critical for neuronal communication, and they are perturbed in many neurological disorders; however, the study of these structures in living cells has been hindered by their small size. Super resolution microscopy, unlike conventional light microscopy, is diffraction unlimited and thus is well suited for imaging small structures, such as dendritic spines and synapses. Super resolution microscopy has already revealed important new information about spine and synapse morphology, actin remodeling, and nanodomain composition in both healthy cells and diseased states. In this review, we highlight the advancements in probes that make super resolution more amenable to live-cell imaging of spines and synapses. We also discuss recent data obtained by super resolution microscopy that has advanced our knowledge of dendritic spine and synapse structure, organization, and dynamics in both healthy and diseased contexts. Finally, we propose a series of critical questions for understanding spine and synapse formation and maturation that super resolution microscopy is poised to answer. PMID:27408691

  12. Phylogenetic lineages in the Botryosphaeriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Crous, Pedro W.; Slippers, Bernard; Wingfield, Michael J.; Rheeder, John; Marasas, Walter F.O.; Philips, Alan J.L.; Alves, Artur; Burgess, Treena; Barber, Paul; Groenewald, Johannes Z.

    2006-01-01

    Botryosphaeria is a species-rich genus with a cosmopolitan distribution, commonly associated with dieback and cankers of woody plants. As many as 18 anamorph genera have been associated with Botryosphaeria, most of which have been reduced to synonymy under Diplodia (conidia mostly ovoid, pigmented, thick-walled), or Fusicoccum (conidia mostly fusoid, hyaline, thin-walled). However, there are numerous conidial anamorphs having morphological characteristics intermediate between Diplodia and Fusicoccum, and there are several records of species outside the Botryosphaeriaceae that have anamorphs apparently typical of Botryosphaeria s.str. Recent studies have also linked Botryosphaeria to species with pigmented, septate ascospores, and Dothiorella anamorphs, or Fusicoccum anamorphs with Dichomera synanamorphs. The aim of this study was to employ DNA sequence data of the 28S rDNA to resolve apparent lineages within the Botryosphaeriaceae. From these data, 12 clades are recognised. Two of these lineages clustered outside the Botryosphaeriaceae, namely Diplodia-like anamorphs occurring on maize, which are best accommodated in Stenocarpella (Diaporthales), as well as an unresolved clade including species of Camarosporium/Microdiplodia. We recognise 10 lineages within the Botryosphaeriaceae, including an unresolved clade (Diplodia/Lasiodiplodia/Tiarosporella), Botryosphaeria s.str. (Fusicoccum anamorphs), Macrophomina, Neoscytalidium gen. nov., Dothidotthia (Dothiorella anamorphs), Neofusicoccum gen. nov. (Botryosphaeria-like teleomorphs, Dichomera-like synanamorphs), Pseudofusicoccum gen. nov., Saccharata (Fusicoccum- and Diplodia-like synanamorphs), “Botryosphaeria” quercuum (Diplodia-like anamorph), and Guignardia (Phyllosticta anamorphs). Separate teleomorph and anamorph names are not provided for newly introduced genera, even where both morphs are known. The taxonomy of some clades and isolates (e.g. B. mamane) remains unresolved due to the absence of ex

  13. Dual roles of lineage restricted transcription factors: the case of MITF in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Levy, Carmit; Fisher, David E

    2011-01-01

    Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor, MITF, is a master regulator of melanocyte development, differentiation, migration, and survival.(1) A broad collection of studies have indicated that MITF directly regulates the transcription of genes involved in pigmentation, which are selective to the melanocyte lineage. In addition, MITF controls expression of genes which are expressed in multiple cell lineages, and may also play differential roles in activating vs. maintaining gene expression patterns. In this Point of View article, we discuss lineage restricted transcription factor activation of both tissue-specific and ubiquitously expressed genes using melanocytes and MITF as a model system that may eventually provide insights into such processes in multiple cell lineages.

  14. Identification and isolation of a dermal lineage with intrinsic fibrogenic potential

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Aaron M.; Drukker, Micha; Januszyk, Michael; Krampitz, Geoffrey W.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.; Lorenz, H. Peter; Weissman, Irving L.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts represent a heterogeneous population of cells with diverse features that remain largely undefined. We reveal the presence of at least two fibroblast lineages in murine dorsal skin. Lineage tracing and transplantation assays demonstrate that a single fibroblast lineage is responsible for the bulk of connective tissue deposition during embryonic development, cutaneous wound healing, radiation fibrosis, and cancer stroma formation. Lineage-specific cell ablation leads to diminished connective tissue deposition in wounds and reduces melanoma growth. Using flow cytometry, we identify CD26/DPP4 as a surface marker that allows isolation of this lineage. Small molecule–based inhibition of CD26/DPP4 enzymatic activity during wound healing results in diminished cutaneous scarring. Identification and isolation of these lineages hold promise for translational medicine aimed at in vivo modulation of fibrogenic behavior. PMID:25883361

  15. Lineage-associated tracts defining the anatomy of the Drosophila first instar larval brain

    PubMed Central

    Hartenstein, Volker; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Lovick, Jennifer; Kong, Angel; Omoto, Jaison; Ngo, Kathy; Viktorin, Gudrun

    2015-01-01

    Fixed lineages derived from unique, genetically specified neuroblasts form the anatomical building blocks of the Drosophila brain. Neurons belonging to the same lineage project their axons in a common tract, which is labeled by neuronal markers. In this paper, we present a detailed atlas of the lineage-associated tracts forming the brain of the early Drosophila larva, based on the use of global markers (anti-Neuroglian, anti-Neurotactin, Inscuteable-Gal4>UAS-chRFP-Tub) and lineage-specific reporters. We describe 68 discrete fiber bundles that contain axons of one lineage or pairs/small sets of adjacent lineages. Bundles enter the neuropil at invariant locations, the lineage tract entry portals. Within the neuropil, these fiber bundles form larger fascicles that can be classified, by their main orientation, into longitudinal, transverse, and vertical (ascending/descending) fascicles. We present 3D digital models of lineage tract entry portals and neuropil fascicles, set into relationship to commonly used, easily recognizable reference structures such as the mushroom body, the antennal lobe, the optic lobe, and the Fasciclin II-positive fiber bundles that connect the brain and ventral nerve cord. Correspondences and differences between early larval tract anatomy and the previously described late larval and adult lineage patterns are highlighted. Our L1 neuro-anatomical atlas of lineages constitutes an essential step towards following morphologically defined lineages to the neuroblasts of the early embryo, which will ultimately make it possible to link the structure and connectivity of a lineage to the expression of genes in the particular neuroblast that gives rise to that lineage. Furthermore, the L1 atlas will be important for a host of ongoing work that attempts to reconstruct neuronal connectivity at the level of resolution of single neurons and their synapses. PMID:26141956

  16. Lineage-associated tracts defining the anatomy of the Drosophila first instar larval brain.

    PubMed

    Hartenstein, Volker; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Lovick, Jennifer K; Kong, Angel; Omoto, Jaison J; Ngo, Kathy T; Viktorin, Gudrun

    2015-10-01

    Fixed lineages derived from unique, genetically specified neuroblasts form the anatomical building blocks of the Drosophila brain. Neurons belonging to the same lineage project their axons in a common tract, which is labeled by neuronal markers. In this paper, we present a detailed atlas of the lineage-associated tracts forming the brain of the early Drosophila larva, based on the use of global markers (anti-Neuroglian, anti-Neurotactin, inscuteable-Gal4>UAS-chRFP-Tub) and lineage-specific reporters. We describe 68 discrete fiber bundles that contain axons of one lineage or pairs/small sets of adjacent lineages. Bundles enter the neuropil at invariant locations, the lineage tract entry portals. Within the neuropil, these fiber bundles form larger fascicles that can be classified, by their main orientation, into longitudinal, transverse, and vertical (ascending/descending) fascicles. We present 3D digital models of lineage tract entry portals and neuropil fascicles, set into relationship to commonly used, easily recognizable reference structures such as the mushroom body, the antennal lobe, the optic lobe, and the Fasciclin II-positive fiber bundles that connect the brain and ventral nerve cord. Correspondences and differences between early larval tract anatomy and the previously described late larval and adult lineage patterns are highlighted. Our L1 neuro-anatomical atlas of lineages constitutes an essential step towards following morphologically defined lineages to the neuroblasts of the early embryo, which will ultimately make it possible to link the structure and connectivity of a lineage to the expression of genes in the particular neuroblast that gives rise to that lineage. Furthermore, the L1 atlas will be important for a host of ongoing work that attempts to reconstruct neuronal connectivity at the level of resolution of single neurons and their synapses.

  17. Genome Diversity, Recombination, and Virulence across the Major Lineages of Paracoccidioides

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, José F.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Gallo, Juan E.; Sykes, Sean; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Misas, Elizabeth; Whiston, Emily A.; Bagagli, Eduardo; Soares, Celia M. A.; Teixeira, Marcus de M.; Taylor, John W.; Clay, Oliver K.; McEwen, Juan G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Paracoccidioides genus includes two species of thermally dimorphic fungi that cause paracoccidioidomycosis, a neglected health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. To examine the genome evolution and the diversity of Paracoccidioides spp., we conducted whole-genome sequencing of 31 isolates representing the phylogenetic, geographic, and ecological breadth of the genus. These samples included clinical, environmental and laboratory reference strains of the S1, PS2, PS3, and PS4 lineages of P. brasiliensis and also isolates of Paracoccidioides lutzii species. We completed the first annotated genome assemblies for the PS3 and PS4 lineages and found that gene order was highly conserved across the major lineages, with only a few chromosomal rearrangements. Comparing whole-genome assemblies of the major lineages with single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) predicted from the remaining 26 isolates, we identified a deep split of the S1 lineage into two clades we named S1a and S1b. We found evidence for greater genetic exchange between the S1b lineage and all other lineages; this may reflect the broad geographic range of S1b, which is often sympatric with the remaining, largely geographically isolated lineages. In addition, we found evidence of positive selection for the GP43 and PGA1 antigen genes and genes coding for other secreted proteins and proteases and lineage-specific loss-of-function mutations in cell wall and protease genes; these together may contribute to virulence and host immune response variation among natural isolates of Paracoccidioides spp. These insights into the recent evolutionary events highlight important differences between the lineages that could impact the distribution, pathogenicity, and ecology of Paracoccidioides. IMPORTANCE Characterization of genetic differences between lineages of the dimorphic human-pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides can identify changes linked to important phenotypes and guide the

  18. The Drosophila cyst stem cell lineage

    PubMed Central

    Zoller, Richard; Schulz, Cordula

    2012-01-01

    In all animals, germline cells differentiate in intimate contact with somatic cells and interactions between germline and soma are particularly important for germline development and function. In the male gonad of Drosophila melanogaster, the developing germline cells are enclosed by somatic cyst cells. The cyst cells are derived from cyst stem cells (CySCs) of somatic origin and codifferentiate with the germline cells. The fast generation cycle and the genetic tractability of Drosophila has made the Drosophila testis an excellent model for studying both the roles of somatic cells in guiding germline development and the interdependence of two separate stem cell lineages. This review focuses on our current understanding of CySC specification, CySC self-renewing divisions, cyst cell differentiation, and soma-germline interactions. Many of the mechanisms guiding these processes in Drosophila testes are similarly essential for the development and function of tissues in other organisms, most importantly for gametogenesis in mammals. PMID:23087834

  19. The melanocyte lineage in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Mort, Richard L.; Jackson, Ian J.; Patton, E. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Melanocyte development provides an excellent model for studying more complex developmental processes. Melanocytes have an apparently simple aetiology, differentiating from the neural crest and migrating through the developing embryo to specific locations within the skin and hair follicles, and to other sites in the body. The study of pigmentation mutations in the mouse provided the initial key to identifying the genes and proteins involved in melanocyte development. In addition, work on chicken has provided important embryological and molecular insights, whereas studies in zebrafish have allowed live imaging as well as genetic and transgenic approaches. This cross-species approach is powerful and, as we review here, has resulted in a detailed understanding of melanocyte development and differentiation, melanocyte stem cells and the role of the melanocyte lineage in diseases such as melanoma. PMID:25670789

  20. Use of transgenic mice to map cis-acting elements in the intestinal fatty acid binding protein gene (Fabpi) that control its cell lineage- specific and regional patterns of expression along the duodenal-colonic and crypt-villus axes of the gut epithelium

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The mouse intestinal epithelium is able to establish and maintain complex lineage-specific, spatial, and temporal patterns of gene expression despite its rapid and continuous renewal. A multipotent stem cell located near the base of each intestinal crypt gives rise to progeny which undergo amplification and allocation to either enterocytic, Paneth cell, goblet cell, or enteroendocrine cell lineages. Differentiation of these four lineages occurs during their geographically ordered migration along the crypt-villus axis. Gut stem cells appear to have a "positional address" which is manifested by differences in the differentiation programs of their lineal descendants along the duodenal-colonic (cephalocaudal) axis. We have used the intestinal fatty acid binding protein gene (Fabpi) as a model to identify cis-acting elements which regulate cell- and region-specific patterns of gene expression in the gut. Nucleotides -1178 to +28 of rat Fabpi direct a pattern of expression of a reporter (human growth hormone [hGH]) which mimics that of mouse Fabpi (a) steady-state levels of hGH mRNA are highest in the distal jejunum of adult transgenic mice and fall progressively toward both the duodenum and the mid-colon; and (b) hGH is confined to the enterocytic lineage and first appears as postmitotic, differentiating cells exit the crypt and migrate to the base of small intestinal villi or their colonic homologs, the surface epithelial cuffs. Nucleotides -103 to +28, which are highly conserved in rat, mouse and human Fabpi, are able to correctly initiate transgene expression in late fetal life, restrict hGH to the enterocytic lineage, and establish an appropriate cephalocaudal gradient of reporter expression. This cephalocaudal gradient is also influenced by cis- acting elements located between nucleotides -1178 and -278, and -277 and -185 that enhance and suppress (respectively) expression in the ileum and colon and by element(s) located upstream of nucleotide -277 that are needed

  1. A set of genes critical to development is epigenetically poised in mouse germ cells from fetal stages through completion of meiosis.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Bluma J; Dokshin, Gregoriy A; Young, Richard A; McCarrey, John R; Page, David C

    2013-10-01

    In multicellular organisms, germ cells carry the hereditary material from one generation to the next. Developing germ cells are unipotent gamete precursors, and mature gametes are highly differentiated, specialized cells. However, upon gamete union at fertilization, their genomes drive a totipotent program, giving rise to a complete embryo as well as extraembryonic tissues. The biochemical basis for the ability to transition from differentiated cell to totipotent zygote is unknown. Here we report that a set of developmentally critical genes is maintained in an epigenetically poised (bivalent) state from embryonic stages through the end of meiosis. We performed ChIP-seq and RNA-seq analysis on flow-sorted male and female germ cells during embryogenesis at three time points surrounding sexual differentiation and female meiotic initiation, and then extended our analysis to meiotic and postmeiotic male germ cells. We identified a set of genes that is highly enriched for regulators of differentiation and retains a poised state (high H3K4me3, high H3K27me3, and lack of expression) across sexes and across developmental stages, including in haploid postmeiotic cells. The existence of such a state in embryonic stem cells has been well described. We now demonstrate that a subset of genes is maintained in a poised state in the germ line from the initiation of sexual differentiation during fetal development and into postmeiotic stages. We propose that the epigenetically poised condition of these developmental genes is a fundamental property of the mammalian germ-line nucleus, allowing differentiated gametes to unleash a totipotent program following fertilization.

  2. Theory and Practice of Lineage Tracing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    Lineage tracing is a method that delineates all progeny produced by a single cell or a group of cells. The possibility of performing lineage tracing initiated the field of Developmental Biology and continues to revolutionize Stem Cell Biology. Here, I introduce the principles behind a successful lineage-tracing experiment. In addition, I summarize and compare different methods for conducting lineage tracing and provide examples of how these strategies can be implemented to answer fundamental questions in development and regeneration. The advantages and limitations of each method are also discussed.

  3. The Theory and Practice of Lineage Tracing

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ya-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Lineage tracing is a method that delineates all progeny produced by a single cell or a group of cells. The possibility of performing lineage tracing initiated the field of Developmental Biology, and continues to revolutionize Stem Cell Biology. Here, I introduce the principles behind a successful lineage-tracing experiment. In addition, I summarize and compare different methods for conducting lineage tracing and provide examples of how these strategies can be implemented to answer fundamental questions in development and regeneration. The advantages and limitations of each method are also discussed. PMID:26284340

  4. A new way to build cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuwei

    2017-01-01

    A combination of single-cell techniques and computational analysis enables the simultaneous discovery of cell states, lineage relationships and the genes that control developmental decisions. PMID:28332977

  5. Evolutionary dynamics of influenza A nucleoprotein (NP) lineages revealed by large-scale sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianpeng; Christman, Mary C; Donis, Ruben O; Lu, Guoqing

    2011-12-01

    Influenza A viral nucleoprotein (NP) plays a critical role in virus replication and host adaptation, however, the underlying molecular evolutionary dynamics of NP lineages are less well-understood. In this study, large-scale analyses of 5094 NP nucleotide sequences revealed eight distinct evolutionary lineages, including three host-specific lineages (human, classical swine and equine), two cross-host lineages (Eurasian avian-like swine and swine-origin human pandemic H1N1 2009) and three geographically isolated avian lineages (Eurasian, North American and Oceanian). The average nucleotide substitution rate of the NP lineages was estimated to be 2.4 × 10(-3) substitutions per site per year, with the highest value observed in pandemic H1N1 2009 (3.4 × 10(-3)) and the lowest in equine (0.9 × 10(-3)). The estimated time of most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) for each lineage demonstrated that the earliest human lineage was derived around 1906, and the latest pandemic H1N1 2009 lineage dated back to December 17, 2008. A marked time gap was found between the times when the viruses emerged and were first sampled, suggesting the crucial role for long-term surveillance of newly emerging viruses. The selection analyses showed that human lineage had six positive selection sites, whereas pandemic H1N1 2009, classical swine, Eurasian avian and Eurasian swine had only one or two sites. Protein structure analyses revealed several positive selection sites located in epitope regions or host adaptation regions, indicating strong adaptation to host immune system pressures in influenza viruses. Along with previous studies, this study provides new insights into the evolutionary dynamics of influenza A NP lineages. Further lineage analyses of other gene segments will allow better understanding of influenza A virus evolution and assist in the improvement of global influenza surveillance.

  6. The complete genome sequencing of Prevotella intermedia strain OMA14 and a subsequent fine-scale, intra-species genomic comparison reveal an unusual amplification of conjugative and mobile transposons and identify a novel Prevotella-lineage-specific repeat.

    PubMed

    Naito, Mariko; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Itoh, Takehiko; Shoji, Mikio; Okamoto, Masaaki; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Nakayama, Koji

    2016-02-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a pathogenic bacterium involved in periodontal diseases. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a clinical strain, OMA14, of this bacterium along with the results of comparative genome analysis with strain 17 of the same species whose genome has also been sequenced, but not fully analysed yet. The genomes of both strains consist of two circular chromosomes: the larger chromosomes are similar in size and exhibit a high overall linearity of gene organizations, whereas the smaller chromosomes show a significant size variation and have undergone remarkable genome rearrangements. Unique features of the Pre. intermedia genomes are the presence of a remarkable number of essential genes on the second chromosomes and the abundance of conjugative and mobilizable transposons (CTns and MTns). The CTns/MTns are particularly abundant in the second chromosomes, involved in its extensive genome rearrangement, and have introduced a number of strain-specific genes into each strain. We also found a novel 188-bp repeat sequence that has been highly amplified in Pre. intermedia and are specifically distributed among the Pre. intermedia-related species. These findings expand our understanding of the genetic features of Pre. intermedia and the roles of CTns and MTns in the evolution of bacteria.

  7. Transcriptional Regulators of the Trophoblast Lineage in Mammals with Hemochorial Placentation

    PubMed Central

    Knott, Jason G.; Paul, Soumen

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian reproduction is critically dependent on the trophoblast cell lineage, which assures proper establishment of maternal-fetal interactions during pregnancy. Specification of trophoblast cell lineage begins with the development of the trophectoderm (TE) in preimplantation embryos. Subsequently, other trophoblast cell types arise with progression of pregnancy. Studies with transgenic animal models as well as trophoblast stem/progenitor cells have implicated distinct transcriptional and epigenetic regulators in trophoblast lineage development. This review focuses on our current understanding of transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms regulating specification, determination, maintenance and differentiation of trophoblast cells. PMID:25190503

  8. Developmental lineage priming in Dictyostelium by heterogeneous Ras activation.

    PubMed

    Chattwood, Alex; Nagayama, Koki; Bolourani, Parvin; Harkin, Lauren; Kamjoo, Marzieh; Weeks, Gerald; Thompson, Christopher R L

    2013-11-26

    In cell culture, genetically identical cells often exhibit heterogeneous behavior, with only 'lineage primed' cells responding to differentiation inducing signals. It has recently been proposed that such heterogeneity exists during normal embryonic development to allow position independent patterning based on 'salt and pepper' differentiation and sorting out. However, the molecular basis of lineage priming and how it leads to reproducible cell type proportioning are poorly understood. To address this, we employed a novel forward genetic approach in the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum. These studies reveal that the Ras-GTPase regulator gefE is required for normal lineage priming and salt and pepper differentiation. This is because Ras-GTPase activity sets the intrinsic response threshold to lineage specific differentiation signals. Importantly, we show that although gefE expression is uniform, transcription of its target, rasD, is both heterogeneous and dynamic, thus providing a novel mechanism for heterogeneity generation and position-independent differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01067.001.

  9. Developmental lineage priming in Dictyostelium by heterogeneous Ras activation

    PubMed Central

    Chattwood, Alex; Nagayama, Koki; Bolourani, Parvin; Harkin, Lauren; Kamjoo, Marzieh; Weeks, Gerald; Thompson, Christopher RL

    2013-01-01

    In cell culture, genetically identical cells often exhibit heterogeneous behavior, with only ‘lineage primed’ cells responding to differentiation inducing signals. It has recently been proposed that such heterogeneity exists during normal embryonic development to allow position independent patterning based on ‘salt and pepper’ differentiation and sorting out. However, the molecular basis of lineage priming and how it leads to reproducible cell type proportioning are poorly understood. To address this, we employed a novel forward genetic approach in the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum. These studies reveal that the Ras-GTPase regulator gefE is required for normal lineage priming and salt and pepper differentiation. This is because Ras-GTPase activity sets the intrinsic response threshold to lineage specific differentiation signals. Importantly, we show that although gefE expression is uniform, transcription of its target, rasD, is both heterogeneous and dynamic, thus providing a novel mechanism for heterogeneity generation and position-independent differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01067.001 PMID:24282234

  10. Lineage sorting accounting for the disassociation between chloroplast and mitochondrial lineages in oaks of southern France.

    PubMed

    Chiang, T Y

    2000-12-01

    Dumolin-Lapégue et al. (Mol. Biol. Evol. 15: 1321-1331. 1998) suggested that recurrent inversions of a 4-bp sequence of the mtDNA nad4-1/2 locus due to intramolecular recombination were responsible for the disassociation of chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes of French oaks. Based on their PCR-RFLP (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism) data obtained from three noncoding spacers, a minimum spanning network representing the phylogeny of the cpDNA was reconstructed. The mapping of alleles b and c of the mtDNA nad4-1/2 locus on the cpDNA network revealed a nonrandom distribution, which contradicted the expected patterns when repeated, and ongoing inversions had been occurring. The fact that polymorphisms (a mixed c + d type) were mostly restricted to the interior nodes of the network, which represented ancient haplotypes and geographically coincided with probable glacial refugia in southern Europe, agreed with a migrant-pool model. Evidence of a widespread pattern of polymorphism distribution indicated that mtDNA haplotypes were likely to be more ancient than the cpDNA haplotypes. Lineage sorting, due to relative age of cpDNA vs. mtDNA, plus the specific migratory mode, which recruited colonists from a random sample of resource populations during glacial expansion (thereby extending the lineage sorting period, LSP), may have resulted in the disassociation of chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes in oaks.

  11. Genetic and molecular analysis of region 88E9;88F2 in Drosophila melanogaster, including the ear gene related to human factors involved in lineage-specific leukemias.

    PubMed Central

    Zraly, Claudia B; Feng, Yun; Dingwall, Andrew K

    2002-01-01

    We identified and characterized the Drosophila gene ear (ENL/AF9-related), which is closely related to mammalian genes that have been implicated in the onset of acute lymphoblastic and myelogenous leukemias when their products are fused as chimeras with those of human HRX, a homolog of Drosophila trithorax. The ear gene product is present in all early embryonic cells, but becomes restricted to specific tissues in late embryogenesis. We mapped the ear gene to cytological region 88E11-13, near easter, and showed that it is deleted by Df(3R)ea(5022rx1), a small, cytologically invisible deletion. Annotation of the completed Drosophila genome sequence suggests that this region might contain as many as 26 genes, most of which, including ear, are not represented by mutant alleles. We carried out a large-scale noncomplementation screen using Df(3R)ea(5022rx1) and chemical (EMS) mutagenesis from which we identified seven novel multi-allele recessive lethal complementation groups in this region. An overlapping deficiency, Df(3R)Po(4), allowed us to map several of these groups to either the proximal or the distal regions of Df(3R)ea(5022rx1). One of these complementation groups likely corresponds to the ear gene as judged by map location, terminal phenotype, and reduction of EAR protein levels. PMID:11901121

  12. Patterns of growth, axonal extension and axonal arborization of neuronal lineages in the developing Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Camilla; Shy, Diana; Spindler, Shana R.; Fung, Siaumin; Pereanu, Wayne; Younossi -Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila central brain is composed of approximately 100 paired lineages, with most lineages comprising 100–150 neurons. Most lineages have a number of important characteristics in common. Typically, neurons of a lineage stay together as a coherent cluster and project their axons into a coherent bundle visible from late embryo to adult. Neurons born during the embryonic period form the primary axon tracts (PATs) that follow stereotyped pathways in the neuropile. Apoptotic cell death removes an average of 30–40% of primary neurons around the time of hatching. Secondary neurons generated during the larval period form secondary axon tracts (SATs) that typically fasciculate with their corresponding primary axon tract. SATs develop into the long fascicles that interconnect the different compartments of the adult brain. Structurally, we distinguish between three types of lineages: PD lineages, characterized by distinct, spatially separate proximal and distal arborizations; C lineages with arborizations distributed continuously along the entire length of their tract; D lineages that lack proximal arborizations. Arborizations of many lineages, in particular those of the PD type, are restricted to distinct neuropile compartments. We propose that compartments are ‘scaffolded” by individual lineages, or small groups thereof. Thereby, the relatively small number of primary neurons of each primary lineage set up the compartment map in the late embryo. Compartments grow during the larval period simply by an increase in arbor volume of primary neurons. Arbors of secondary neurons form within or adjacent to the larval compartments, resulting in smaller compartment subdivisions and additional, adult specific compartments. PMID:19538956

  13. Asynchronous fate decisions by single cells collectively ensure consistent lineage composition in the mouse blastocyst

    PubMed Central

    Saiz, Néstor; Williams, Kiah M.; Seshan, Venkatraman E.; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular communication is essential to coordinate the behaviour of individual cells during organismal development. The preimplantation mammalian embryo is a paradigm of tissue self-organization and regulative development; however, the cellular basis of these regulative abilities has not been established. Here we use a quantitative image analysis pipeline to undertake a high-resolution, single-cell level analysis of lineage specification in the inner cell mass (ICM) of the mouse blastocyst. We show that a consistent ratio of epiblast and primitive endoderm lineages is achieved through incremental allocation of cells from a common progenitor pool, and that the lineage composition of the ICM is conserved regardless of its size. Furthermore, timed modulation of the FGF-MAPK pathway shows that individual progenitors commit to either fate asynchronously during blastocyst development. These data indicate that such incremental lineage allocation provides the basis for a tissue size control mechanism that ensures the generation of lineages of appropriate size. PMID:27857135

  14. Poised Regeneration of Zebrafish Melanocytes Involves Direct Differentiation and Concurrent Replenishment of Tissue-Resident Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Sharanya; Kasheta, Melissa; Ceol, Craig J

    2015-06-22

    Efficient regeneration following injury is critical for maintaining tissue function and enabling organismal survival. Cells reconstituting damaged tissue are often generated from resident stem or progenitor cells or from cells that have dedifferentiated and become proliferative. While lineage-tracing studies have defined cellular sources of regeneration in many tissues, the process by which these cells execute the regenerative process is largely obscure. Here, we have identified tissue-resident progenitor cells that mediate regeneration of zebrafish stripe melanocytes and defined how these cells reconstitute pigmentation. Nearly all regeneration melanocytes arise through direct differentiation of progenitor cells. Wnt signaling is activated prior to differentiation, and inhibition of Wnt signaling impairs regeneration. Additional progenitors divide symmetrically to sustain the pool of progenitor cells. Combining direct differentiation with symmetric progenitor divisions may serve as a means to rapidly repair injured tissue while preserving the capacity to regenerate.

  15. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Moraxella catarrhalis Serosensitive and Seroresistant Lineages Demonstrate Their Independent Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Joshua P.; de Vries, Stefan P.W.; Ahmed, Azad; Powell, Evan; Schultz, Matthew P.; Hermans, Peter W.M.; Hill, Darryl J.; Zhou, Zhemin; Constantinidou, Crystala I.; Hu, Fen Z.; Bootsma, Hester J.; Ehrlich, Garth D.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial species Moraxella catarrhalis has been hypothesized as being composed of two distinct lineages (referred to as the seroresistant [SR] and serosensitive [SS]) with separate evolutionary histories based on several molecular typing methods, whereas 16S ribotyping has suggested an additional split within the SS lineage. Previously, we characterized whole-genome sequences of 12 SR-lineage isolates, which revealed a relatively small supragenome when compared with other opportunistic nasopharyngeal pathogens, suggestive of a relatively short evolutionary history. Here, we performed whole-genome sequencing on 18 strains from both ribotypes of the SS lineage, an additional SR strain, as well as four previously identified highly divergent strains based on multilocus sequence typing analyses. All 35 strains were subjected to a battery of comparative genomic analyses which clearly show that there are three lineages—the SR, SS, and the divergent. The SR and SS lineages are closely related, but distinct from each other based on three different methods of comparison: Allelic differences observed among core genes; possession of lineage-specific sets of core and distributed genes; and by an alignment of concatenated core sequences irrespective of gene annotation. All these methods show that the SS lineage has much longer interstrain branches than the SR lineage indicating that this lineage has likely been evolving either longer or faster than the SR lineage. There is evidence of extensive horizontal gene transfer (HGT) within both of these lineages, and to a lesser degree between them. In particular, we identified very high rates of HGT between these two lineages for ß-lactamase genes. The four divergent strains are sui generis, being much more distantly related to both the SR and SS groups than these other two groups are to each other. Based on average nucleotide identities, gene content, GC content, and genome size, this group could be considered as a separate

  16. Saami mitochondrial DNA reveals deep maternal lineage clusters.

    PubMed

    Delghandi, M; Utsi, E; Krauss, S

    1998-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA of 62 Saami from the north of Norway was analyzed in the D loop hypervariable region I and II and sequences were compared to other gene pools. Two major (lineage 1 and 2) and two minor (lineage 3 and 4) maternal lineage clusters were found. Lineage 1 (56.9% of all hitherto analyzed Saami samples) contains a substantial number of branching haplotypes which are unknown in European gene pools. Lineage 2 (31.5%) and lineage 4 (3.6%) have few branching points and are present at a low rate throughout European gene pools. Lineage 3 (4.7%) has polymorphisms characteristic of circumpolar lineages.

  17. Lineage-specific Virulence Determinants of Haemophilus influenzae Biogroup aegyptius

    PubMed Central

    Strouts, Fiona R.; Power, Peter; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Corton, Nicola; van Tonder, Andries; Quail, Michael A.; Langford, Paul R.; Hudson, Michael J.; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    An emergent clone of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius (Hae) is responsible for outbreaks of Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF). First recorded in Brazil in 1984, the so-called BPF clone of Hae caused a fulminant disease that started with conjunctivitis but developed into septicemic shock; mortality rates were as high as 70%. To identify virulence determinants, we conducted a pan-genomic analysis. Sequencing of the genomes of the BPF clone strain F3031 and a noninvasive conjunctivitis strain, F3047, and comparison of these sequences with 5 other complete H. influenzae genomes showed that >77% of the F3031 genome is shared among all H. influenzae strains. Delineation of the Hae accessory genome enabled characterization of 163 predicted protein-coding genes; identified differences in established autotransporter adhesins; and revealed a suite of novel adhesins unique to Hae, including novel trimeric autotransporter adhesins and 4 new fimbrial operons. These novel adhesins might play a critical role in host–pathogen interactions. PMID:22377449

  18. Lineage specification in the fly nervous system and evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Cattenoz, Pierre B; Giangrande, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decades, it has become clear that glia are multifunctional and plastic cells endowed with key regulatory roles. They control the response to developmental and/or pathological signals, thereby affecting neural proliferation, remodeling, survival, and regeneration. It is, therefore, important to understand the biology of these cells and the molecular mechanisms controlling their development/activity. The fly community has made major breakthroughs by characterizing the bases of gliogenesis and function. Here we describe the regulation and the role of the fly glial determinant. Then, we discuss the impact of the determinant in cell plasticity and differentiation. Finally, we address the conservation of this pathway across evolution. PMID:23966161

  19. Adipose lineage specification of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Majka, Susan M.; Miller, Heidi L.; Sullivan, Timothy; Erickson, Paul F.; Kong, Raymond; Weiser-Evans, Mary; Nemenoff, Raphael; Moldovan, Radu; Morandi, Shelley A.; Davis, James A.; Klemm, Dwight J.

    2012-01-01

    We have reported the production of white adipocytes in adipose tissue from hematopoietic progenitors arising from bone marrow. However, technical challenges have hindered detection of this adipocyte population by certain other laboratories. These disparate results highlight the need for sensitive and definitive techniques to identify bone marrow progenitor (BMP)-derived adipocytes. In these studies we exploited new models and methods to enhance detection of this adipocyte population. Here we showed that confocal microscopy with spectrum acquisition could effectively identify green fluorescent protein (GFP) positive BMP-derived adipocytes by matching their fluorescence spectrum to that of native GFP. Likewise, imaging flow cytometry made it possible to visualize intact unilocular and multilocular GFP-positive BMP-derived adipocytes and distinguished them from non-fluorescent adipocytes and cell debris in the cytometer flow stream. We also devised a strategy to detect marker genes in flow-enriched adipocytes from which stromal cells were excluded. This technique also proved to be an efficient means for detecting genetically labeled adipocytes and should be applicable to models in which marker gene expression is low or absent. Finally, in vivo imaging of mice transplanted with BM from adipocyte-targeted luciferase donors showed a time-dependent increase in luciferase activity, with the bulk of luciferase activity confined to adipocytes rather than stromal cells. These results confirmed and extended our previous reports and provided proof-of-principle for sensitive techniques and models for detection and study of these unique cells. PMID:23700536

  20. Blood cells of Drosophila: cell lineages and role in host defence.

    PubMed

    Meister, Marie

    2004-02-01

    Drosophila haemopoiesis gives rise to three independent cell lineages: plasmatocytes, crystal cells and lamellocytes. The regulation of Drosophila stem cell proliferation and lineage specification involves transactivators and signalling pathways, many of which have mammalian counterparts that control haemopoietic processes. Drosophila plasmatocytes are professional phagocytes that resemble the monocyte/macrophage lineage, crystal cells play a critical role in defence-related melanisation, and lamellocytes encapsulate large invaders. Crystal cells and lamellocytes have no clear mammalian homologues. Research into the molecular mechanisms that underlie the various immune functions of Drosophila blood cells, such as non-self recognition, is now taking wing.

  1. Building a lineage from single cells: genetic techniques for cell lineage tracking.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, Mollie B; Girskis, Kelly M; Walsh, Christopher A

    2017-04-01

    Resolving lineage relationships between cells in an organism is a fundamental interest of developmental biology. Furthermore, investigating lineage can drive understanding of pathological states, including cancer, as well as understanding of developmental pathways that are amenable to manipulation by directed differentiation. Although lineage tracking through the injection of retroviral libraries has long been the state of the art, a recent explosion of methodological advances in exogenous labelling and single-cell sequencing have enabled lineage tracking at larger scales, in more detail, and in a wider range of species than was previously considered possible. In this Review, we discuss these techniques for cell lineage tracking, with attention both to those that trace lineage forwards from experimental labelling, and those that trace backwards across the life history of an organism.

  2. Deciphering the transcriptional network of the dendritic cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jennifer C; Brown, Brian D; Shay, Tal; Gautier, Emmanuel L; Jojic, Vladimir; Cohain, Ariella; Pandey, Gaurav; Leboeuf, Marylene; Elpek, Kutlu G; Helft, Julie; Hashimoto, Daigo; Chow, Andrew; Price, Jeremy; Greter, Melanie; Bogunovic, Milena; Bellemare-Pelletier, Angelique; Frenette, Paul S; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Turley, Shannon J; Merad, Miriam

    2012-09-01

    Although much progress has been made in the understanding of the ontogeny and function of dendritic cells (DCs), the transcriptional regulation of the lineage commitment and functional specialization of DCs in vivo remains poorly understood. We made a comprehensive comparative analysis of CD8(+), CD103(+), CD11b(+) and plasmacytoid DC subsets, as well as macrophage DC precursors and common DC precursors, across the entire immune system. Here we characterized candidate transcriptional activators involved in the commitment of myeloid progenitor cells to the DC lineage and predicted regulators of DC functional diversity in tissues. We identified a molecular signature that distinguished tissue DCs from macrophages. We also identified a transcriptional program expressed specifically during the steady-state migration of tissue DCs to the draining lymph nodes that may control tolerance to self tissue antigens.

  3. Runx3 specifies lineage commitment of innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Takashi; Song, Christina; Ryu, Stacy H; Plougastel-Douglas, Beatrice; Yang, Liping; Levanon, Ditsa; Groner, Yoram; Bern, Michael D; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Colonna, Marco; Egawa, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2015-11-01

    Subsets of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) reside in the mucosa and regulate immune responses to external pathogens. While ILCs can be phenotypically classified into ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 subsets, the transcriptional control of commitment to each ILC lineage is incompletely understood. Here we report that the transcription factor Runx3 was essential for the normal development of ILC1 and ILC3 cells but not of ILC2 cells. Runx3 controlled the survival of ILC1 cells but not of ILC3 cells. Runx3 was required for expression of the transcription factor RORγt and its downstream target, the transcription factor AHR, in ILC3 cells. The absence of Runx3 in ILCs exacerbated infection with Citrobacter rodentium. Therefore, our data establish Runx3 as a key transcription factor in the lineage-specific differentiation of ILC1 and ILC3 cells.

  4. Pox neuro control of cell lineages that give rise to larval poly-innervated external sensory organs in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanrui; Boll, Werner; Noll, Markus

    2015-01-15

    The Pox neuro (Poxn) gene of Drosophila plays a crucial role in the development of poly-innervated external sensory (p-es) organs. However, how Poxn exerts this role has remained elusive. In this study, we have analyzed the cell lineages of all larval p-es organs, namely of the kölbchen, papilla 6, and hair 3. Surprisingly, these lineages are distinct from any previously reported cell lineages of sensory organs. Unlike the well-established lineage of mono-innervated external sensory (m-es) organs and a previously proposed model of the p-es lineage, we demonstrate that all wild-type p-es lineages exhibit the following features: the secondary precursor, pIIa, gives rise to all three support cells-socket, shaft, and sheath, whereas the other secondary precursor, pIIb, is neuronal and gives rise to all neurons. We further show that in one of the p-es lineages, that of papilla 6, one cell undergoes apoptosis. By contrast in Poxn null mutants, all p-es lineages have a reduced number of cells and their pattern of cell divisions is changed to that of an m-es organ, with the exception of a lineage in a minority of mutant kölbchen that retains a second bipolar neuron. Indeed, the role of Poxn in p-es lineages is consistent with the specification of the developmental potential of secondary precursors and the regulation of cell division but not apoptosis.

  5. An Hdac1/Rpd3-Poised Circuit Balances Continual Self-Renewal and Rapid Restriction of Developmental Potential during Asymmetric Stem Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Derek H; Hamm, Danielle C; Anhezini, Lucas; Xiao, Qi; Siller, Karsten H; Siegrist, Sarah E; Harrison, Melissa M; Lee, Cheng-Yu

    2017-02-27

    How the developmental potential of differentiating stem cell progeny becomes rapidly and stably restricted following asymmetric stem cell division is unclear. In the fly larval brain, earmuff (erm) uniquely functions to restrict the developmental potential of intermediate neural progenitors (INPs) generated by asymmetrically dividing neural stem cells (neuroblasts). Here we demonstrate that the histone deacetylase Hdac1/Rpd3 functions together with self-renewal transcriptional repressors to maintain the erm immature INP enhancer in an inactive but poised state in neuroblasts. Within 2 hr of immature INP birth, downregulation of repressor activities alleviates Rpd3-mediated repression on the erm enhancer, enabling acetylation of multiple histone proteins and activating Erm expression. Erm restricts the developmental potential in immature INPs by repressing genes encoding neuroblast transcriptional activators. We propose that poising the fast-activating enhancers of master regulators of differentiation through continual histone deacetylation in stem cells enables self-renewal and rapid restriction of developmental potential following asymmetric division.

  6. Whole genome sequencing identifies circulating Beijing-lineage Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in Guatemala and an associated urban outbreak.

    PubMed

    Saelens, Joseph W; Lau-Bonilla, Dalia; Moller, Anneliese; Medina, Narda; Guzmán, Brenda; Calderón, Maylena; Herrera, Raúl; Sisk, Dana M; Xet-Mull, Ana M; Stout, Jason E; Arathoon, Eduardo; Samayoa, Blanca; Tobin, David M

    2015-12-01

    Limited data are available regarding the molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strains circulating in Guatemala. Beijing-lineage Mtb strains have gained prevalence worldwide and are associated with increased virulence and drug resistance, but there have been only a few cases reported in Central America. Here we report the first whole genome sequencing of Central American Beijing-lineage strains of Mtb. We find that multiple Beijing-lineage strains, derived from independent founding events, are currently circulating in Guatemala, but overall still represent a relatively small proportion of disease burden. Finally, we identify a specific Beijing-lineage outbreak centered on a poor neighborhood in Guatemala City.

  7. IL12B expression is sustained by a heterogenous population of myeloid lineages during tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Reeme, Allison E.; Miller, Halli E.; Robinson, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary IL12B is required for resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, promoting the initiation and maintenance of Mtb-specific effector responses. While this makes the IL12-pathway an attractive target for experimental tuberculosis (TB) therapies, data regarding what lineages express IL12B after infection is established are limited. This is not obvious in the lung, an organ in which both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic lineages produce IL12p40 upon pathogen encounter. Here, we use radiation bone marrow chimeras and Yet40 reporter mice to determine what lineages produce IL12p40 during experimental TB. We observed that hematopoietic IL12p40-production was sufficient to control Mtb, with no contribution by non-hematopoietic lineages. Furthermore, rather than being produced by a single subset, IL12p40 was produced by cells that were heterogenous in their size, granularity, autofluorescence and expression of CD11c, CD11b and CD8α. While depending on the timepoint and tissue examined, the surface phenotype of IL12p40-producers most closely resembled macrophages based on previous surveys of lung myeloid lineages. Importantly, depletion of CDllchi cells during infection had no affect on lung IL12p40-concentrations. Collectively, our data demonstrate that IL12p40 production is sustained by a heterogenous population of myeloid lineages during experimental TB, and that redundant mechanisms of IL12p40-production exist when CD11chi lineages are absent. PMID:23491716

  8. IL12B expression is sustained by a heterogenous population of myeloid lineages during tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Reeme, Allison E; Miller, Halli E; Robinson, Richard T

    2013-05-01

    IL12B is required for resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, promoting the initiation and maintenance of Mtb-specific effector responses. While this makes the IL12-pathway an attractive target for experimental tuberculosis (TB) therapies, data regarding what lineages express IL12B after infection is established are limited. This is not obvious in the lung, an organ in which both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic lineages produce IL12p40 upon pathogen encounter. Here, we use radiation bone marrow chimeras and Yet40 reporter mice to determine what lineages produce IL12p40 during experimental TB. We observed that hematopoietic IL12p40-production was sufficient to control Mtb, with no contribution by non-hematopoietic lineages. Furthermore, rather than being produced by a single subset, IL12p40 was produced by cells that were heterogenous in their size, granularity, autofluorescence and expression of CD11c, CD11b and CD8α. While depending on the timepoint and tissue examined, the surface phenotype of IL12p40-producers most closely resembled macrophages based on previous surveys of lung myeloid lineages. Importantly, depletion of CD11c(hi) cells during infection had no affect on lung IL12p40-concentrations. Collectively, our data demonstrate that IL12p40 production is sustained by a heterogenous population of myeloid lineages during experimental TB, and that redundant mechanisms of IL12p40-production exist when CD11c(hi) lineages are absent.

  9. Brg1 modulates enhancer activation in mesoderm lineage commitment

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Jeffrey M.; Hota, Swetansu K.; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Ho, Lena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Bruneau, B. G.

    2015-03-26

    The interplay between different levels of gene regulation in modulating developmental transcriptional programs, such as histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, is not well understood. Here, we show that the chromatin remodeling factor Brg1 is required for enhancer activation in mesoderm induction. In an embryonic stem cell-based directed differentiation assay, the absence of Brg1 results in a failure of cardiomyocyte differentiation and broad deregulation of lineage-specific gene expression during mesoderm induction. We find that Brg1 co-localizes with H3K27ac at distal enhancers and is required for robust H3K27 acetylation at distal enhancers that are activated during mesoderm induction. Brg1 is also required to maintain Polycomb-mediated repression of non-mesodermal developmental regulators, suggesting cooperativity between Brg1 and Polycomb complexes. Thus, Brg1 is essential for modulating active and repressive chromatin states during mesoderm lineage commitment, in particular the activation of developmentally important enhancers. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate interplay between chromatin remodeling complexes and histone modifications that, together, ensure robust and broad gene regulation during crucial lineage commitment decisions.

  10. Brg1 modulates enhancer activation in mesoderm lineage commitment

    DOE PAGES

    Alexander, Jeffrey M.; Hota, Swetansu K.; He, Daniel; ...

    2015-03-26

    The interplay between different levels of gene regulation in modulating developmental transcriptional programs, such as histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, is not well understood. Here, we show that the chromatin remodeling factor Brg1 is required for enhancer activation in mesoderm induction. In an embryonic stem cell-based directed differentiation assay, the absence of Brg1 results in a failure of cardiomyocyte differentiation and broad deregulation of lineage-specific gene expression during mesoderm induction. We find that Brg1 co-localizes with H3K27ac at distal enhancers and is required for robust H3K27 acetylation at distal enhancers that are activated during mesoderm induction. Brg1 is also requiredmore » to maintain Polycomb-mediated repression of non-mesodermal developmental regulators, suggesting cooperativity between Brg1 and Polycomb complexes. Thus, Brg1 is essential for modulating active and repressive chromatin states during mesoderm lineage commitment, in particular the activation of developmentally important enhancers. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate interplay between chromatin remodeling complexes and histone modifications that, together, ensure robust and broad gene regulation during crucial lineage commitment decisions.« less

  11. Hematopoietic stem cell-independent B-1a lineage.

    PubMed

    Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Yang, Yang

    2015-12-01

    The accepted dogma has been that a single long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LT-HSC) can reconstitute all components of the immune system. However, our single-cell transfer studies have shown that highly purified LT-HSCs selectively fail to reconstitute B-1a cells in otherwise fully reconstituted hosts (i.e., LT-HSCs fully reconstitute follicular, marginal zone, and B-1b B cells, but not B-1a cells). These results suggest that B-1a cells are a separate B cell lineage that develops independently of classical LT-HSCs. We provide an evolutionary two-pathway development model (HSC independent versus HSC dependent), and suggest that this lineage separation is employed not only by B cells but by all hematopoietic lineages. Collectively, these findings challenge the current notion that LT-HSCs can reconstitute all components of the immune system and raise key questions about human HSC transplantation. We discuss the implications of these findings in light of our recent studies demonstrating the ability of B-1a cells to elicit antigen-specific responses that differ markedly from those mounted by follicular B cells. These findings have implications for vaccine development, in particular vaccines that may elicit the B-1a repertoire.

  12. Archaeal Lineages within the Human Microbiome: Absent, Rare or Elusive?

    PubMed Central

    Horz, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Archaea are well-recognized components of the human microbiome. However, they appear to be drastically underrepresented compared to the high diversity of bacterial taxa which can be found on various human anatomic sites, such as the gastrointestinal environment, the oral cavity and the skin. As our “microbial” view of the human body, including the methodological concepts used to describe them, has been traditionally biased towards bacteria, the question arises whether our current knowledge reflects the actual ratio of archaea versus bacteria or whether we have failed so far to unravel the full diversity of human-associated archaea. This review article hypothesizes that distinct archaeal lineages within humans exist, which still await our detection. First, previously unrecognized taxa might be quite common but they have eluded conventional detection methods. Two recent prime examples are described that demonstrate that this might be the case for specific archaeal lineages. Second, some archaeal taxa might be overlooked because they are rare and/or in low abundance. Evidence for this exists for a broad range of phylogenetic lineages, however we currently do not know whether these sporadically appearing organisms are mere transients or important members of the so called “rare biosphere” with probably basic ecosystem functions. Lastly, evidence exists that different human populations harbor different archaeal taxa and/or the abundance and activity of shared archaeal taxa may differ and thus their impact on the overall microbiome. This research line is rather unexplored and warrants further investigation. While not recapitulating exhaustively all studies on archaeal diversity in humans, this review highlights pertinent recent findings that show that the choice of appropriate methodological approaches and the consideration of different human populations may lead to the detection of archaeal lineages previously not associated with humans. This in turn will help

  13. Quantifying Selective Pressures Driving Bacterial Evolution Using Lineage Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Guillaume; Kussell, Edo

    2015-01-01

    Organisms use a variety of strategies to adapt to their environments and maximize long-term growth potential, but quantitative characterization of the benefits conferred by the use of such strategies, as well as their impact on the whole population's rate of growth, remains challenging. Here, we use a path-integral framework that describes how selection acts on lineages—i.e., the life histories of individuals and their ancestors—to demonstrate that lineage-based measurements can be used to quantify the selective pressures acting on a population. We apply this analysis to Escherichia coli bacteria exposed to cyclical treatments of carbenicillin, an antibiotic that interferes with cell-wall synthesis and affects cells in an age-dependent manner. While the extensive characterization of the life history of thousands of cells is necessary to accurately extract the age-dependent selective pressures caused by carbenicillin, the same measurement can be recapitulated using lineage-based statistics of a single surviving cell. Population-wide evolutionary pressures can be extracted from the properties of the surviving lineages within a population, providing an alternative and efficient procedure to quantify the evolutionary forces acting on a population. Importantly, this approach is not limited to age-dependent selection, and the framework can be generalized to detect signatures of other trait-specific selection using lineage-based measurements. Our results establish a powerful way to study the evolutionary dynamics of life under selection and may be broadly useful in elucidating selective pressures driving the emergence of antibiotic resistance and the evolution of survival strategies in biological systems.

  14. Targeting the Monocyte–Macrophage Lineage in Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    van den Bosch, Thierry P. P.; Kannegieter, Nynke M.; Hesselink, Dennis A.; Baan, Carla C.; Rowshani, Ajda T.

    2017-01-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for immunotherapeutic strategies that specifically target the active immune cells participating in the process of rejection after solid organ transplantation. The monocyte–macrophage cell lineage is increasingly recognized as a major player in acute and chronic allograft immunopathology. The dominant presence of cells of this lineage in rejecting allograft tissue is associated with worse graft function and survival. Monocytes and macrophages contribute to alloimmunity via diverse pathways: antigen processing and presentation, costimulation, pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and tissue repair. Cross talk with other recipient immune competent cells and donor endothelial cells leads to amplification of inflammation and a cytolytic response in the graft. Surprisingly, little is known about therapeutic manipulation of the function of cells of the monocyte–macrophage lineage in transplantation by immunosuppressive agents. Although not primarily designed to target monocyte–macrophage lineage cells, multiple categories of currently prescribed immunosuppressive drugs, such as mycophenolate mofetil, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and calcineurin inhibitors, do have limited inhibitory effects. These effects include diminishing the degree of cytokine production, thereby blocking costimulation and inhibiting the migration of monocytes to the site of rejection. Outside the field of transplantation, some clinical studies have shown that the monoclonal antibodies canakinumab, tocilizumab, and infliximab are effective in inhibiting monocyte functions. Indirect effects have also been shown for simvastatin, a lipid lowering drug, and bromodomain and extra-terminal motif inhibitors that reduce the cytokine production by monocytes–macrophages in patients with diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis. To date, detailed knowledge concerning the origin, the developmental requirements, and functions of diverse specialized monocyte

  15. Lineage-tracing methods and the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Benjamin D; DiRocco, Derek P

    2014-01-01

    The kidney is a complex organ with over 30 different cell types, and understanding the lineage relationships between these cells is challenging. During nephrogenesis, a central question is how the coordinated morphogenesis, growth, and differentiation of distinct cell types leads to development of a functional organ. In mature kidney, understanding cell division and fate during injury, regeneration and aging are critical topics for understanding disease. Genetic lineage tracing offers a powerful tool to decipher cellular hierarchies in both development and disease because it allows the progeny of a single cell, or group of cells, to be tracked unambiguously. Recent advances in this field include the use of inducible recombinases, multicolor reporters, and mosaic analysis. In this review, we discuss lineage-tracing methods focusing on the mouse model system and consider the impact of these methods on our understanding of kidney biology and prospects for future application. PMID:24088959

  16. Global reorganisation of cis-regulatory units upon lineage commitment of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Freire-Pritchett, Paula; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Várnai, Csilla; Wingett, Steven W; Cairns, Jonathan; Collier, Amanda J; García-Vílchez, Raquel; Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Osborne, Cameron S; Fraser, Peter J; Rugg-Gunn, Peter J; Spivakov, Mikhail

    2017-03-23

    Long-range cis-regulatory elements such as enhancers coordinate cell-specific transcriptional programmes by engaging in DNA looping interactions with target promoters. Deciphering the interplay between the promoter connectivity and activity of cis-regulatory elements during lineage commitment is crucial for understanding developmental transcriptional control. Here, we use Promoter Capture Hi-C to generate a high-resolution atlas of chromosomal interactions involving ~22,000 gene promoters in human pluripotent and lineage-committed cells, identifying putative target genes for known and predicted enhancer elements. We reveal extensive dynamics of cis-regulatory contacts upon lineage commitment, including the acquisition and loss of promoter interactions. This spatial rewiring occurs preferentially with predicted changes in the activity of cis-regulatory elements, and is associated with changes in target gene expression. Our results provide a global and integrated view of promoter interactome dynamics during lineage commitment of human pluripotent cells.

  17. Notch and hippo converge on Cdx2 to specify the trophectoderm lineage in the mouse blastocyst.

    PubMed

    Rayon, Teresa; Menchero, Sergio; Nieto, Andres; Xenopoulos, Panagiotis; Crespo, Miguel; Cockburn, Katie; Cañon, Susana; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; de la Pompa, Jose Luis; Rossant, Janet; Manzanares, Miguel

    2014-08-25

    The first lineage choice in mammalian embryogenesis is that between the trophectoderm, which gives rise to the trophoblast of the placenta, and the inner cell mass, from which is derived the embryo proper and the yolk sac. The establishment of these lineages is preceded by the inside-versus-outside positioning of cells in the early embryo and stochastic expression of key transcription factors, which is then resolved into lineage-restricted expression. The regulatory inputs that drive this restriction and how they relate to cell position are largely unknown. Here, we show an unsuspected role of Notch signaling in regulating trophectoderm-specific expression of Cdx2 in cooperation with TEAD4. Notch activity is restricted to outer cells and is able to influence positional allocation of blastomeres, mediating preferential localization to the trophectoderm. Our results show that multiple signaling inputs at preimplantation stages specify the first embryonic lineages.

  18. Single-Cell RNA-Seq Reveals Lineage and X Chromosome Dynamics in Human Preimplantation Embryos.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Sophie; Edsgärd, Daniel; Reinius, Björn; Deng, Qiaolin; Panula, Sarita Pauliina; Codeluppi, Simone; Plaza Reyes, Alvaro; Linnarsson, Sten; Sandberg, Rickard; Lanner, Fredrik

    2016-05-05

    Mouse studies have been instrumental in forming our current understanding of early cell-lineage decisions; however, similar insights into the early human development are severely limited. Here, we present a comprehensive transcriptional map of human embryo development, including the sequenced transcriptomes of 1,529 individual cells from 88 human preimplantation embryos. These data show that cells undergo an intermediate state of co-expression of lineage-specific genes, followed by a concurrent establishment of the trophectoderm, epiblast, and primitive endoderm lineages, which coincide with blastocyst formation. Female cells of all three lineages achieve dosage compensation of X chromosome RNA levels prior to implantation. However, in contrast to the mouse, XIST is transcribed from both alleles throughout the progression of this expression dampening, and X chromosome genes maintain biallelic expression while dosage compensation proceeds. We envision broad utility of this transcriptional atlas in future studies on human development as well as in stem cell research.

  19. Co-localization of Cell Lineage Markers and the Tomato Signal.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yan; Hinton, Robert J; Chan, Kevin S; Feng, Jian Q

    2016-12-28

    The cell lineage tracing system has been used predominantly in developmental biology studies. The use of Cre recombinase allows for the activation of the reporter in a specific cell line and all progeny. Here, we used the cell lineage tracing technique to demonstrate that chondrocytes directly transform into osteoblasts and osteocytes during long bone and mandibular condyle development using two kinds of Cre, Col10a1-Cre and Aggrecan-Cre(ERT2) (Agg-Cre(ERT2)), crossed with Rosa26(tdTomato). Both Col10 and aggrecan are well-recognized markers for chondrocytes. On this basis, we developed a new method-cell lineage tracing in conjunction with fluorescent immunohistochemistry-to define cell fate by analyzing the expression of specific cell markers. Runx2 (a marker for early-stage osteogenic cells) and Dentin matrix protein1 (DMP1; a marker for late-stage osteogenic cells) were used to identify chondrocyte-derived bone cells and their differentiation status. This combination not only broadens the application of cell lineage tracing, but also simplifies the generation of compound mice. More importantly, the number, location, and differentiation statuses of parent cell progeny are displayed simultaneously, providing more information than cell lineage tracing alone. In conclusion, the co-application of cell lineage tracing techniques and immunofluorescence is a powerful tool for investigating cell biology in vivo.

  20. Local adaptation and divergence in colour signal conspicuousness between monomorphic and polymorphic lineages in a lizard.

    PubMed

    McLean, C A; Moussalli, A; Stuart-Fox, D

    2014-12-01

    Population differences in visual environment can lead to divergence in multiple components of animal coloration including signalling traits and colour patterns important for camouflage. Divergence may reflect selection imposed by different receivers (conspecifics, predators), which depends in turn on the location of the colour patch. We tested for local adaptation of two genetically and phenotypically divergent lineages of a rock-inhabiting lizard, Ctenophorus decresii, by comparing the visual contrast of colour patches to different receivers in native and non-native environments. The lineages differ most notably in male throat coloration, which is polymorphic in the northern lineage and monomorphic in the southern lineage, but also differ in dorsal and lateral coloration, which is visible to both conspecifics and potential predators. Using models of animal colour vision, we assessed whether lineage-specific throat, dorsal and lateral coloration enhanced conspicuousness to conspecifics, increased crypsis to birds or both, respectively, when viewed against the predominant backgrounds from each lineage. Throat colours were no more conspicuous against native than non-native rock but contrasted more strongly with native lichen, which occurs patchily on rocks inhabited by C. decresii. Conversely, neck coloration (lateral) more closely matched native lichen. Furthermore, although dorsal coloration of southern males was consistently more conspicuous to birds than that of northern males, both lineages had similar absolute conspicuousness against their native backgrounds. Combined, our results are consistent with local adaptation of multiple colour traits in relation to multiple receivers, suggesting that geographic variation in background colour has influenced the evolution of lineage-specific coloration in C. decresii.

  1. Multiple roles of NF1 in the melanocyte lineage.

    PubMed

    Larribère, Lionel; Utikal, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    NF1 is a tumour suppressor gene, germline mutations of which lead to neurofibromatosis type 1 syndrome. Patients develop benign tumours from several types of cells including neural crest-derived cells. NF1 somatic mutations also occur in 15% of sporadic melanoma, a cancer originating from melanocytes. Evidence now suggests the involvement of NF1 mutations in melanoma resistance to targeted therapies. Although NF1 is ubiquitously expressed, genetic links between NF1 and genes involved in melanocyte biology have been described, implying the lineage-specific mechanisms. In this review, we summarize and discuss the latest advances related to the roles of NF1 in melanocyte biology and in cutaneous melanoma.

  2. Divergent functions of hematopoietic transcription factors in lineage priming and differentiation during erythro-megakaryopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Pimkin, Maxim; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Mishra, Tejaswini; Morrissey, Christapher S; Wu, Weisheng; Keller, Cheryl A; Blobel, Gerd A; Lee, Dongwon; Beer, Michael A; Hardison, Ross C; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2014-12-01

    Combinatorial actions of relatively few transcription factors control hematopoietic differentiation. To investigate this process in erythro-megakaryopoiesis, we correlated the genome-wide chromatin occupancy signatures of four master hematopoietic transcription factors (GATA1, GATA2, TAL1, and FLI1) and three diagnostic histone modification marks with the gene expression changes that occur during development of primary cultured megakaryocytes (MEG) and primary erythroblasts (ERY) from murine fetal liver hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We identified a robust, genome-wide mechanism of MEG-specific lineage priming by a previously described stem/progenitor cell-expressed transcription factor heptad (GATA2, LYL1, TAL1, FLI1, ERG, RUNX1, LMO2) binding to MEG-associated cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in multipotential progenitors. This is followed by genome-wide GATA factor switching that mediates further induction of MEG-specific genes following lineage commitment. Interaction between GATA and ETS factors appears to be a key determinant of these processes. In contrast, ERY-specific lineage priming is biased toward GATA2-independent mechanisms. In addition to its role in MEG lineage priming, GATA2 plays an extensive role in late megakaryopoiesis as a transcriptional repressor at loci defined by a specific DNA signature. Our findings reveal important new insights into how ERY and MEG lineages arise from a common bipotential progenitor via overlapping and divergent functions of shared hematopoietic transcription factors.

  3. Divergent functions of hematopoietic transcription factors in lineage priming and differentiation during erythro-megakaryopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Pimkin, Maxim; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Mishra, Tejaswini; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Wu, Weisheng; Keller, Cheryl A.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Lee, Dongwon; Beer, Michael A.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial actions of relatively few transcription factors control hematopoietic differentiation. To investigate this process in erythro-megakaryopoiesis, we correlated the genome-wide chromatin occupancy signatures of four master hematopoietic transcription factors (GATA1, GATA2, TAL1, and FLI1) and three diagnostic histone modification marks with the gene expression changes that occur during development of primary cultured megakaryocytes (MEG) and primary erythroblasts (ERY) from murine fetal liver hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We identified a robust, genome-wide mechanism of MEG-specific lineage priming by a previously described stem/progenitor cell-expressed transcription factor heptad (GATA2, LYL1, TAL1, FLI1, ERG, RUNX1, LMO2) binding to MEG-associated cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in multipotential progenitors. This is followed by genome-wide GATA factor switching that mediates further induction of MEG-specific genes following lineage commitment. Interaction between GATA and ETS factors appears to be a key determinant of these processes. In contrast, ERY-specific lineage priming is biased toward GATA2-independent mechanisms. In addition to its role in MEG lineage priming, GATA2 plays an extensive role in late megakaryopoiesis as a transcriptional repressor at loci defined by a specific DNA signature. Our findings reveal important new insights into how ERY and MEG lineages arise from a common bipotential progenitor via overlapping and divergent functions of shared hematopoietic transcription factors. PMID:25319996

  4. Are Law Schools Poised for Innovation? Three Case Studies of Law Professors Teaching Online in American J.D. Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaworowski, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study is to describe the characteristics of three law professors teaching online courses to determine what type of adopter they were. This study used the Rogers diffusion of innovation theory, and specifically analyzed the participants on whether they were innovators or early adopters. These analyses are…

  5. Lineage Analysis in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    SMA with some globular domains, predominantly colocalizing with GFP endothelial lineage-marked cells in the neointima (Figure 4F). Figure 4. VE...whether the neointima arises from a small population of apoptosis- resistant pulmonary artery endothelial cells that proliferate after injury to produce

  6. A novel molecular test for influenza B virus detection and lineage differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chloe KS; Tsang, Gary CH; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Li, Olive TW; Peiris, Malik; Poon, Leo LM

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary influenza B viruses are classified into two groups known as Yamagata and Victoria lineages. The co-circulation of two viral lineages in recent years urges for a robust and simple diagnostic test for detecting influenza B viruses and for lineage differentiation. In this study, a SYBR green-based asymmetric PCR assay has been developed for influenza B virus detection. Apart from identifying influenza B virus, the assay contains sequence-specific probes for lineage differentiation. This allows identifying influenza B virus and detecting influenza B viral lineage in a single reaction. The test has been evaluated by a panel of respiratory specimens. Of 108 Influenza B virus-positive specimens, 105 (97%) were positive in this assay. None of the negative control respiratory specimens were positive in the test (N=60). Viral lineages of all samples that are positive in the assay (N=105) can also be classified correctly. These results suggest that this assay has a potential for routine influenza B virus surveillance. PMID:24760697

  7. Phylogenetic correlates of extinction risk in mammals: species in older lineages are not at greater risk.

    PubMed

    Verde Arregoitia, Luis Darcy; Blomberg, Simon P; Fisher, Diana O

    2013-08-22

    Phylogenetic information is becoming a recognized basis for evaluating conservation priorities, but associations between extinction risk and properties of a phylogeny such as diversification rates and phylogenetic lineage ages remain unclear. Limited taxon-specific analyses suggest that species in older lineages are at greater risk. We calculate quantitative properties of the mammalian phylogeny and model extinction risk as an ordinal index based on International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List categories. We test for associations between lineage age, clade size, evolutionary distinctiveness and extinction risk for 3308 species of terrestrial mammals. We show no significant global or regional associations, and three significant relationships within taxonomic groups. Extinction risk increases for evolutionarily distinctive primates and decreases with lineage age when lemurs are excluded. Lagomorph species (rabbits, hares and pikas) that have more close relatives are less threatened. We examine the relationship between net diversification rates and extinction risk for 173 genera and find no pattern. We conclude that despite being under-represented in the frequency distribution of lineage ages, species in older, slower evolving and distinct lineages are not more threatened or extinction-prone. Their extinction, however, would represent a disproportionate loss of unique evolutionary history.

  8. Mesenchymal progenitor cells for the osteogenic lineage.

    PubMed

    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal progenitors of the osteogenic lineage provide the flexibility for bone to grow, maintain its function and homeostasis. Traditionally, colony-forming-unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) have been regarded as surrogates for mesenchymal progenitors; however, this definition cannot address the function of these progenitors in their native setting. Transgenic murine models including lineage-tracing technologies based on the cre-lox system have proven to be useful in delineating mesenchymal progenitors in their native environment. Although heterogeneity of cell populations of interest marked by a promoter-based approach complicates overall interpretation, an emerging complexity of mesenchymal progenitors has been revealed. Current literatures suggest two distinct types of bone progenitor cells; growth-associated mesenchymal progenitors contribute to explosive growth of bone in early life, whereas bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors contribute to the much slower remodeling process and response to injury that occurs mainly in adulthood. More detailed relationships of these progenitors need to be studied through further experimentation.

  9. EGFR and Notch signaling respectively regulate proliferative activity and multiple cell lineage differentiation of Drosophila gastric stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Guo, Xingting; Xi, Rongwen

    2014-05-01

    Quiescent, multipotent gastric stem cells (GSSCs) in the copper cell region of adult Drosophila midgut can produce all epithelial cell lineages found in the region, including acid-secreting copper cells, interstitial cells and enteroendocrine cells, but mechanisms controlling their quiescence and the ternary lineage differentiation are unknown. By using cell ablation or damage-induced regeneration assays combined with cell lineage tracing and genetic analysis, here we demonstrate that Delta (Dl)-expressing cells in the copper cell region are the authentic GSSCs that can self-renew and continuously regenerate the gastric epithelium after a sustained damage. Lineage tracing analysis reveals that the committed GSSC daughter with activated Notch will invariably differentiate into either a copper cell or an interstitial cell, but not the enteroendocrine cell lineage, and loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies revealed that Notch signaling is both necessary and sufficient for copper cell/interstitial cell differentiation. We also demonstrate that elevated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, which is achieved by the activation of ligand Vein from the surrounding muscle cells and ligand Spitz from progenitor cells, mediates the regenerative proliferation of GSSCs following damage. Taken together, we demonstrate that Dl is a specific marker for Drosophila GSSCs, whose cell cycle status is dependent on the levels of EGFR signaling activity, and the Notch signaling has a central role in controlling cell lineage differentiation from GSSCs by separating copper/interstitial cell lineage from enteroendocrine cell lineage.

  10. Environmental biology of the marine Roseobacter lineage.

    PubMed

    Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Biebl, Hanno

    2006-01-01

    The Roseobacter lineage is a phylogenetically coherent, physiologically heterogeneous group of alpha-Proteobacteria comprising up to 25% of marine microbial communities, especially in coastal and polar oceans, and it is the only lineage in which cultivated bacteria are closely related to environmental clones. Currently 41 subclusters are described, covering all major marine ecological niches (seawater, algal blooms, microbial mats, sediments, sea ice, marine invertebrates). Members of the Roseobacter lineage play an important role for the global carbon and sulfur cycle and the climate, since they have the trait of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis, oxidize the greenhouse gas carbon monoxide, and produce the climate-relevant gas dimethylsulfide through the degradation of algal osmolytes. Production of bioactive metabolites and quorum-sensing-regulated control of gene expression mediate their success in complex communities. Studies of representative isolates in culture, whole-genome sequencing, e.g., of Silicibacter pomeroyi, and the analysis of marine metagenome libraries have started to reveal the environmental biology of this important marine group.

  11. Bivalent histone modifications in stem cells poise miRNA loci for CpG island hypermethylation in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Iliou, Maria S; Lujambio, Amaia; Portela, Anna; Brüstle, Oliver; Koch, Philipp; Andersson-Vincent, Per Henrik; Sundström, Erik; Hovatta, Outi; Esteller, Manel

    2011-11-01

    It has been proposed that the existence of stem cell epigenetic patterns confer a greater likelihood of CpG island hypermethylation on tumor suppressor-coding genes in cancer. The suggested mechanism is based on the Polycomb-mediated methylation of K27 of histone H3 and the recruitment of DNA methyltransferases on the promoters of tumor suppressor genes in cancer cells, when those genes are preferentially pre-marked in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) with bivalent chromatin domains. On the other hand, miRNAs appear to be dysregulated in cancer, with many studies reporting silencing of miRNA genes due to aberrant hypermethylation of their promoter regions. We wondered whether a pre-existing histone modification profile in stem cells might also contribute to the DNA methylation-associated silencing of miRNA genes in cancer. To address this, we examined a group of tumor suppressor miRNA genes previously reported to become hypermethylated and inactivated specifically in cancer cells. We analyzed the epigenetic events that take place along their promoters in human embryonic stem cells and in transformed cells. Our results suggest that there is a positive correlation between the existence of bivalent chromatin domains on miRNA promoters in ESCs and the hypermethylation of those genes in cancer, leading us to conclude that this epigenetic mark could be a mechanism that prepares miRNA promoters for further DNA hypermethylation in human tumors.

  12. Phylogenomics of the Zygomycete lineages: Exploring phylogeny and genome evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Zygomycete lineages mark the major transition from zoosporic life histories of the common ancestors of Fungi and the earliest diverging chytrid lineages (Chytridiomycota and Blastocladiomycota). Genome comparisons from these lineages may reveal gene content changes that reflect the transition to...

  13. Genome sequesnce of lineage III Listeria monocytogenes strain HCC23

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 98% of reported human listeriosis cases are caused by Listeria monocytogenes serotypes within lineages I and II. Serotypes within lineage III (4a and 4c) are commonly isolated from environmental and food specimens. We report the first complete genome sequence of a lineage III isolate, HCC2...

  14. Anterior dental evolution in the Australopithecus anamensis-afarensis lineage.

    PubMed

    Ward, Carol V; Plavcan, J Michael; Manthi, Fredrick K

    2010-10-27

    Australopithecus anamensis is the earliest known species of the Australopithecus-human clade and is the likely ancestor of Australopithecus afarensis. Investigating possible selective pressures underlying these changes is key to understanding the patterns of selection shaping the origins and early evolution of the Australopithecus-human clade. During the course of the Au. anamensis-afarensis lineage, significant changes appear to occur particularly in the anterior dentition, but also in jaw structure and molar form, suggesting selection for altered diet and/or food processing. Specifically, canine tooth crown height does not change, but maxillary canines and P(3)s become shorter mesiodistally, canine tooth crowns become more symmetrical in profile and P(3)s less unicuspid. Canine roots diminish in size and dimorphism, especially relative to the size of the postcanine teeth. Molar crowns become higher. Tooth rows become more divergent and symphyseal form changes. Dietary change involving anterior dental use is also suggested by less intense anterior tooth wear in Au. afarensis. These dental changes signal selection for altered dietary behaviour and explain some differences in craniofacial form between these taxa. These data identify Au. anamensis not just as a more primitive version of Au. afarensis, but as a dynamic member of an evolving lineage leading to Au. afarensis, and raise intriguing questions about what other evolutionary changes occurred during the early evolution of the Australopithecus-human clade, and what characterized the origins of the group.

  15. Spectral sensitivity of cone photoreceptors and opsin expression in two colour-divergent lineages of the lizard Ctenophorus decresii.

    PubMed

    Yewers, Madeleine S; McLean, Claire A; Moussalli, Adnan; Stuart-Fox, Devi; Bennett, Andrew T D; Knott, Ben

    2015-05-15

    Intraspecific differences in sensory perception are rarely reported but may occur when a species range extends across varying sensory environments, or there is coevolution between the sensory system and a varying signal. Examples in colour vision and colour signals are rare in terrestrial systems. The tawny dragon lizard Ctenophorus decresii is a promising candidate for such intraspecific variation, because the species comprises two geographically and genetically distinct lineages in which throat colour (a social signal used in intra- and inter-specific interactions) is locally adapted to the habitat and differs between lineages. Male lizards from the southern lineage have UV-blue throats, whereas males from the northern lineage are polymorphic with four discrete throat colours that all show minimal UV reflectance. Here, we determine the cone photoreceptor spectral sensitivities and opsin expression of the two lineages, to test whether they differ, particularly in the UV wavelengths. Using microspectrophotometry on retinal cone photoreceptors, we identified a long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) visual pigment, a 'short' and 'long' medium-wavelength-sensitive (MWS) pigment and a short-wavelength-sensitive (SWS) pigment, all of which did not differ in λmax between lineages. Through transcriptome analysis of opsin genes we found that both lineages express four cone opsin genes, including the SWS1 opsin with peak sensitivity in the UV range, and that amino acid sequences did not differ between lineages with the exception of a single leucine to valine substitution in the RH2 opsin. Counts of yellow and transparent oil droplets associated with LWS+MWS and SWS+UVS cones, respectively, showed no difference in relative cone proportions between lineages. Therefore, contrary to predictions, we find no evidence of differences between lineages in single cone photoreceptor spectral sensitivity or opsin expression. However, we confirm the presence of four single cone classes

  16. Water relations traits of C4 grasses depend on phylogenetic lineage, photosynthetic pathway, and habitat water availability

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Osborne, Colin P.

    2015-01-01

    The repeated evolution of C4 photosynthesis in independent lineages has resulted in distinct biogeographical distributions in different phylogenetic lineages and the variants of C4 photosynthesis. However, most previous studies have only considered C3/C4 differences without considering phylogeny, C4 subtype, or habitat characteristics. We hypothesized that independent lineages of C4 grasses have structural and physiological traits that adapt them to environments with differing water availability. We measured 40 traits of 33 species from two major C4 grass lineages in a common glasshouse environment. Chloridoideae species were shorter, with narrower and longer leaves, smaller but denser stomata, and faster curling leaves than Panicoideae species, but overall differences in leaf hydraulic and gas exchange traits between the two lineages were weak. Chloridoideae species had two different ways to reach higher drought resistance potential than Panicoideae; NAD-ME species used water saving, whereas PCK species used osmotic adjustment. These patterns could be explained by the interactions of lineage×C4 subtype and lineage×habitat water availability in affected traits. Specifically, phylogeny tended to have a stronger influence on structural traits, and C4 subtype had more important effects on physiological traits. Although hydraulic traits did not differ consistently between lineages, they showed strong covariation and relationships with leaf structure. Thus, phylogenetic lineage, photosynthetic pathway, and adaptation to habitat water availability act together to influence the leaf water relations traits of C4 grasses. This work expands our understanding of ecophysiology in major C4 grass lineages, with implications for explaining their regional and global distributions in relation to climate. PMID:25504656

  17. Water relations traits of C4 grasses depend on phylogenetic lineage, photosynthetic pathway, and habitat water availability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Osborne, Colin P

    2015-02-01

    The repeated evolution of C4 photosynthesis in independent lineages has resulted in distinct biogeographical distributions in different phylogenetic lineages and the variants of C4 photosynthesis. However, most previous studies have only considered C3/C4 differences without considering phylogeny, C4 subtype, or habitat characteristics. We hypothesized that independent lineages of C4 grasses have structural and physiological traits that adapt them to environments with differing water availability. We measured 40 traits of 33 species from two major C4 grass lineages in a common glasshouse environment. Chloridoideae species were shorter, with narrower and longer leaves, smaller but denser stomata, and faster curling leaves than Panicoideae species, but overall differences in leaf hydraulic and gas exchange traits between the two lineages were weak. Chloridoideae species had two different ways to reach higher drought resistance potential than Panicoideae; NAD-ME species used water saving, whereas PCK species used osmotic adjustment. These patterns could be explained by the interactions of lineage×C4 subtype and lineage×habitat water availability in affected traits. Specifically, phylogeny tended to have a stronger influence on structural traits, and C4 subtype had more important effects on physiological traits. Although hydraulic traits did not differ consistently between lineages, they showed strong covariation and relationships with leaf structure. Thus, phylogenetic lineage, photosynthetic pathway, and adaptation to habitat water availability act together to influence the leaf water relations traits of C4 grasses. This work expands our understanding of ecophysiology in major C4 grass lineages, with implications for explaining their regional and global distributions in relation to climate.

  18. Salt Stress Phenotypes in Listeria monocytogenes Vary by Genetic Lineage and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    den Bakker, Henk C.; Fortes, Esther D.; Boor, Kathryn J.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Listeria monocytogenes can survive and grow under wide-ranging environmental stress conditions encountered both in foods and in the host. The ability of certain L. monocytogenes subtypes to thrive under stress conditions present in specific niches was hypothesized to reflect genetic characteristics and phenotypic capabilities conserved among strains within a subtype. To quantify variations in salt stress phenotypes among 40 strains selected to represent the diversity of the three major L. monocytogenes genetic lineages and to determine if salt stress phenotypes were associated with genetic relatedness, we measured growth under salt stress at both 7°C and 37°C. At 7°C, in brain–heart infusion with 6% NaCl, average growth rates among the lineages were similar. A comparison of doubling times after exposure to salt stress at 7°C or 37°C indicated that growth at 7°C provided crossprotection to subsequent salt stress for strains in lineages I and II. At 37°C, in brain–heart infusion with 6% NaCl, lineage I and III strains grew significantly faster (p < 0.0001) than lineage II strains. Under salt stress at 37°C, differences in growth parameters were significantly (p < 0.005) associated with genetic relatedness of the strains. Compatible solute uptake is part of the L. monocytogenes salt stress response, but growth differences between the lineages were not related to differences in transcript levels of osmolyte transporter-encoding genes betL, gbuA, oppA, and opuCA. The combination of phylogenetic and phenotypic data suggests that L. monocytogenes lineage I and III strains, which are most commonly associated with human and animal disease, may be better adapted to osmotic stress at 37°C, conditions that are present in the host gastrointestinal tract. PMID:20707723

  19. Recovering mitochondrial DNA lineages of extinct Amerindian nations in extant homopatric Brazilian populations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Brazilian Amerindians have experienced a drastic population decrease in the past 500 years. Indeed, many native groups from eastern Brazil have vanished. However, their mitochondrial mtDNA haplotypes, still persist in Brazilians, at least 50 million of whom carry Amerindian mitochondrial lineages. Our objective was to test whether, by analyzing extant rural populations from regions anciently occupied by specific Amerindian groups, we could identify potentially authentic mitochondrial lineages, a strategy we have named 'homopatric targeting'. Results We studied 173 individuals from Queixadinha, a small village located in a territory previously occupied by the now extinct Botocudo Amerindian nation. Pedigree analysis revealed 74 unrelated matrilineages, which were screened for Amerindian mtDNA lineages by restriction fragment length polymorphism. A cosmopolitan control group was composed of 100 individuals from surrounding cities. All Amerindian lineages identified had their hypervariable segment HVSI sequenced, yielding 13 Amerindian haplotypes in Queixadinha, nine of which were not present in available databanks or in the literature. Among these haplotypes, there was a significant excess of haplogroup C (70%) and absence of haplogroup A lineages, which were the most common in the control group. The novelty of the haplotypes and the excess of the C haplogroup suggested that we might indeed have identified Botocudo lineages. To validate our strategy, we studied teeth extracted from 14 ancient skulls of Botocudo Amerindians from the collection of the National Museum of Rio de Janeiro. We recovered mtDNA sequences from all the teeth, identifying only six different haplotypes (a low haplotypic diversity of 0.8352 ± 0.0617), one of which was present among the lineages observed in the extant individuals studied. Conclusions These findings validate the technique of homopatric targeting as a useful new strategy to study the peopling and colonization of the New

  20. Genome Evolution and Innovation across the Four Major Lineages of Cryptococcus gattii

    PubMed Central

    Farrer, Rhys A.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Gujja, Sharvari; Saif, Sakina; Zeng, Qiandong; Chen, Yuan; Voelz, Kerstin; Heitman, Joseph; May, Robin C.; Fisher, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus gattii is a fungal pathogen of humans, causing pulmonary infections in otherwise healthy hosts. To characterize genomic variation among the four major lineages of C. gattii (VGI, -II, -III, and -IV), we generated, annotated, and compared 16 de novo genome assemblies, including the first for the rarely isolated lineages VGIII and VGIV. By identifying syntenic regions across assemblies, we found 15 structural rearrangements, which were almost exclusive to the VGI-III-IV lineages. Using synteny to inform orthology prediction, we identified a core set of 87% of C. gattii genes present as single copies in all four lineages. Remarkably, 737 genes are variably inherited across lineages and are overrepresented for response to oxidative stress, mitochondrial import, and metal binding and transport. Specifically, VGI has an expanded set of iron-binding genes thought to be important to the virulence of Cryptococcus, while VGII has expansions in the stress-related heat shock proteins relative to the other lineages. We also characterized genes uniquely absent in each lineage, including a copper transporter absent from VGIV, which influences Cryptococcus survival during pulmonary infection and the onset of meningoencephalitis. Through inclusion of population-level data for an additional 37 isolates, we identified a new transcontinental clonal group that we name VGIIx, mitochondrial recombination between VGII and VGIII, and positive selection of multidrug transporters and the iron-sulfur protein aconitase along multiple branches of the phylogenetic tree. Our results suggest that gene expansion or contraction and positive selection have introduced substantial variation with links to mechanisms of pathogenicity across this species complex. PMID:26330512

  1. Human leukocyte antigen-G allele polymorphisms have evolved following three different evolutionary lineages based on intron sequences.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Isabel; Herraiz, Miguel Angel; Peñaloza, Jorge; Barbolla, Maria Luz; Jurado, Maria Luisa; Macedo, Jacqueline; Vidart, José Antonio; Martinez-Laso, Jorge

    2010-11-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G alleles follow a different pattern of polymorphism generation from those of the HLA classical I alleles. These polymorphisms have been defined as a result of random permitted point mutations in exons. However, this polymorphism maintenance could have an evolutionary specific pathways based on noncoding regions as introns, 14-bp deletion/insertion (exon 8), or promoter regions. Therefore a systematic sequencing study of HLA-G alleles was done obtaining the complete genomic sequence of 16 different HLA-G alleles: nine alleles were intron and exon confirmatory sequences, four were exon confirmatory and new intron described sequences, and three were new alleles. A 14-bp deletion/insertion polymorphism was also sequenced in these alleles. These sequences, together with those previously published, were compared, and phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analyses were performed. Results showed the presence of three major specific evolutionary patterns, tentatively named lineages, and the other four as minor lineages (only one allele). The relative age of the major lineages could also be established based on the number of lineage-specific positions and the number of alleles of each lineage. Two main mechanisms are clearly defined in the generation of the lineages (introns), gene conversion, and/or convergent evolution following specific patterns.

  2. Proliferative cell types in embryonic lineages of the central complex of the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Boyan, George; Williams, Leslie; Legl, Andrea; Herbert, Zsofia

    2010-08-01

    The central complex of the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria develops to completion during embryogenesis. A major cellular contribution to the central complex is from the w, x, y, z lineages of the pars intercerebralis, each of which comprises over 100 cells, making them by far the largest in the embryonic protocerebrum. Our focus has been to find a cellular mechanism that allows such a large number of cell progeny to be generated within a restricted period of time. Immunohistochemical visualization of the chromosomes of mitotically active cells has revealed an almost identical linear array of proliferative cells present simultaneously in each w, x, y, z lineage at 50% of embryogenesis. This array is maintained relatively unchanged until almost 70% of embryogenesis, after which mitotic activity declines and then ceases. The array is absent from smaller lineages of the protocerebrum not associated with the central complex. The proliferative cells are located apically to the zone of ganglion mother cells and amongst the progeny of the neuroblast. Comparisons of cell morphology, immunoreactivity (horseradish peroxidase, repo, Prospero), location in lineages and spindle orientation have allowed us to distinguish the proliferative cells in an array from neuroblasts, ganglion mother cells, neuronal progeny and glia. Our data are consistent with the proliferative cells being secondary (amplifying) progenitors and originating from a specific subtype of ganglion mother cell. We propose a model of the way that neuroblasts, ganglion mother cells and secondary progenitors together produce the large cell numbers found in central complex lineages.

  3. A microfluidic platform enabling single-cell RNA-seq of multigenerational lineages.

    PubMed

    Kimmerling, Robert J; Lee Szeto, Gregory; Li, Jennifer W; Genshaft, Alex S; Kazer, Samuel W; Payer, Kristofor R; de Riba Borrajo, Jacob; Blainey, Paul C; Irvine, Darrell J; Shalek, Alex K; Manalis, Scott R

    2016-01-06

    We introduce a microfluidic platform that enables off-chip single-cell RNA-seq after multi-generational lineage tracking under controlled culture conditions. We use this platform to generate whole-transcriptome profiles of primary, activated murine CD8+ T-cell and lymphocytic leukemia cell line lineages. Here we report that both cell types have greater intra- than inter-lineage transcriptional similarity. For CD8+ T-cells, genes with functional annotation relating to lymphocyte differentiation and function--including Granzyme B--are enriched among the genes that demonstrate greater intra-lineage expression level similarity. Analysis of gene expression covariance with matched measurements of time since division reveals cell type-specific transcriptional signatures that correspond with cell cycle progression. We believe that the ability to directly measure the effects of lineage and cell cycle-dependent transcriptional profiles of single cells will be broadly useful to fields where heterogeneous populations of cells display distinct clonal trajectories, including immunology, cancer, and developmental biology.

  4. Heterogeneous lineage marker expression in naive embryonic stem cells is mostly due to spontaneous differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Gautham; Abranches, Elsa; Guedes, Ana M. V.; Henrique, Domingos; Raj, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    Populations of cultured mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) exhibit a subfraction of cells expressing uncharacteristically low levels of pluripotency markers such as Nanog. Yet, the extent to which individual Nanog-negative cells are differentiated, both from ESCs and from each other, remains unclear. Here, we show the transcriptome of Nanog-negative cells exhibits expression of classes of genes associated with differentiation that are not yet active in cells exposed to differentiation conditions for one day. Long non-coding RNAs, however, exhibit more changes in expression in the one-day-differentiated cells than in Nanog-negative cells. These results are consistent with the concept that Nanog-negative cells may contain subpopulations of both lineage-primed and differentiated cells. Single cell analysis showed that Nanog-negative cells display substantial and coherent heterogeneity in lineage marker expression in progressively nested subsets of cells exhibiting low levels of Nanog, then low levels of Oct4, and then a set of lineage markers, which express intensely in a small subset of these more differentiated cells. Our results suggest that the observed enrichment of lineage-specific marker gene expression in Nanog-negative cells is associated with spontaneous differentiation of a subset of these cells rather than the more random expression that may be associated with reversible lineage priming. PMID:26292941

  5. Combinatorial decoding of the invariant C. elegans embryonic lineage in space and time

    PubMed Central

    Zacharias, Amanda L.; Murray, John Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how a single cell, the zygote, can divide and differentiate to produce the diverse animal cell types is a central goal of developmental biology research. The model organism Caenorhabditis elegans provides a system that enables a truly comprehensive understanding of this process across all cells. Its invariant cell lineage makes it possible to identify all of the cells in each individual and compare them across organisms. Recently developed methods automate the process of cell identification, allowing high-throughput gene expression characterization and phenotyping at single cell resolution. In this Review, we summarize the sequences of events that pattern the lineage including establishment of founder cell identity, the signaling pathways that diversify embryonic fate, and the regulators involved in patterning within these founder lineages before cells adopt their terminal fates. We focus on insights that have emerged from automated approaches to lineage tracking, including insights into mechanisms of robustness, context-specific regulation of gene expression, and temporal coordination of differentiation. We suggest a model by which lineage history produces a combinatorial code of transcription factors that act, often redundantly, to ensure terminal fate. PMID:26915329

  6. A nonclassical MHC class I U lineage locus in zebrafish with a null haplotypic variant

    PubMed Central

    Dirscherl, Hayley; Yoder, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Three sequence lineages of MHC class I genes have been described in zebrafish (Danio rerio): U, Z, and L. The U lineage genes encoded on zebrafish chromosome 19 are predicted to provide the classical function of antigen presentation. This MHC class I locus displays significant haplotypic variation and is the only MHC class I locus in zebrafish that shares conserved synteny with the core mammalian MHC. Here we describe two MHC class I U lineage genes, mhc1ula and mhc1uma, that map to chromosome 22. Unlike the U lineage proteins encoded on chromosome 19, Ula and Uma likely play a nonclassical role as they lack conservation of key peptide binding residues, display limited polymorphic variation, and exhibit tissue-specific expression. We also describe a null haplotype at this chromosome 22 locus in which the mhc1ula and mhc1uma genes are absent due to a ∼30 kb deletion with no other MHC class I sequences present. Functional and non-functional transcripts of mhc1ula and mhc1uma were identified; however, mhc1uma transcripts were often not amplified or amplified at low levels from individuals possessing an apparently bona fide gene. These distinct U lineage genes may be restricted to the superorder Ostariophysi as similar sequences only could be identified from the blind cavefish (Astyanyx mexicanus), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), goldfish (Carassius auratus), and grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus). PMID:26254596

  7. Ixodes persulcatus Ticks as Vectors for the Babesia microti U.S. Lineage in Japan.

    PubMed

    Zamoto-Niikura, Aya; Morikawa, Shigeru; Hanaki, Ken-Ichi; Holman, Patricia J; Ishihara, Chiaki

    2016-11-15

    The U.S. lineage, one of the major clades in the Babesia microti group, is known as a causal agent of human babesiosis mostly in the northeastern and upper midwestern United States. This lineage, however, also is distributed throughout the temperate zone of Eurasia with several reported human cases, although convincing evidence of the identity of the specific vector(s) in this area is lacking. Here, the goal was to demonstrate the presence of infectious parasites directly in salivary glands of Ixodes persulcatus, from which U.S. lineage genetic sequences have been detected in Asia, and to molecularly characterize the isolates. Five PCR-positive specimens were individually inoculated into hamsters, resulting in infections in four; consequently, four strains were newly established. Molecular characterization, including 18S rRNA, β-tubulin, and CCT7 gene sequences, as well as Western blot analysis and indirect fluorescent antibody assay, revealed that all four strains were identical to each other and to the U.S. lineage strains isolated from rodents captured in Japan. The 18S rRNA gene sequence from the isolates was identical to those from I. persulcatus in Russia and China, but the genetic and antigenic profiles of the Japanese parasites differ from those in the United States and Europe. Together with previous epidemiological and transmission studies, we conclude that I. persulcatus is likely the principal vector for the B. microti U.S. lineage in Japan and presumably in northeastern Eurasia.

  8. Lineage stability and phenotypic plasticity of Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Hori, Shohei

    2014-05-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells expressing the transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) constitute a unique T-cell lineage committed to suppressive functions. While their differentiation state is remarkably stable in the face of various perturbations from the extracellular environment, they are able to adapt to diverse and fluctuating tissue environments by changing their phenotype. The lineage stability and phenotypic plasticity of Treg cells thus ensure the robustness of self-tolerance and tissue homeostasis. Recent studies have suggested, however, that Treg cells may retain lineage plasticity, the ability to switch their cell fate to various effector T-cell types under certain circumstances such as inflammation, a notion that remains highly contentious. While accumulating evidence indicates that some Treg cells can downregulate Foxp3 expression and/or acquire effector T-helper cell-like phenotypes, results from my laboratory have shown that Treg cells retain epigenetic memory of, and thus remain committed to, Foxp3 expression and suppressive functions despite such phenotypic plasticity. It has also become evident that Foxp3 can be promiscuously and transiently expressed in activated T cells. Here, I argue that the current controversy stems partly from the lack of the lineage specificity of Foxp3 expression and also from the confusion between phenotypic plasticity and lineage plasticity, and discuss implications of our findings in Treg cell fate determination and maintenance.

  9. Bioinformatics Reveal Five Lineages of Oleosins and the Mechanism of Lineage Evolution Related to Structure/Function from Green Algae to Seed Plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Der; Huang, Anthony H C

    2015-09-01

    Plant cells contain subcellular lipid droplets with a triacylglycerol matrix enclosed by a layer of phospholipids and the small structural protein oleosin. Oleosins possess a conserved central hydrophobic hairpin of approximately 72 residues penetrating into the lipid droplet matrix and amphipathic amino- and carboxyl (C)-terminal peptides lying on the phospholipid surface. Bioinformatics of 1,000 oleosins of green algae and all plants emphasizing biological implications reveal five oleosin lineages: primitive (in green algae, mosses, and ferns), universal (U; all land plants), and three in specific organs or phylogenetic groups, termed seed low-molecular-weight (SL; seed plants), seed high-molecular-weight (SH; angiosperms), and tapetum (T; Brassicaceae) oleosins. Transition from one lineage to the next is depicted from lineage intermediates at junctions of phylogeny and organ distributions. Within a species, each lineage, except the T oleosin lineage, has one to four genes per haploid genome, only approximately two of which are active. Primitive oleosins already possess all the general characteristics of oleosins. U oleosins have C-terminal sequences as highly conserved as the hairpin sequences; thus, U oleosins including their C-terminal peptide exert indispensable, unknown functions. SL and SH oleosin transcripts in seeds are in an approximately 1:1 ratio, which suggests the occurrence of SL-SH oleosin dimers/multimers. T oleosins in Brassicaceae are encoded by rapidly evolved multitandem genes for alkane storage and transfer. Overall, oleosins have evolved to retain conserved hairpin structures but diversified for unique structures and functions in specific cells and plant families. Also, our studies reveal oleosin in avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp and no acyltransferase/lipase motifs in most oleosins.

  10. Bioinformatics Reveal Five Lineages of Oleosins and the Mechanism of Lineage Evolution Related to Structure/Function from Green Algae to Seed Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Der; Huang, Anthony H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells contain subcellular lipid droplets with a triacylglycerol matrix enclosed by a layer of phospholipids and the small structural protein oleosin. Oleosins possess a conserved central hydrophobic hairpin of approximately 72 residues penetrating into the lipid droplet matrix and amphipathic amino- and carboxyl (C)-terminal peptides lying on the phospholipid surface. Bioinformatics of 1,000 oleosins of green algae and all plants emphasizing biological implications reveal five oleosin lineages: primitive (in green algae, mosses, and ferns), universal (U; all land plants), and three in specific organs or phylogenetic groups, termed seed low-molecular-weight (SL; seed plants), seed high-molecular-weight (SH; angiosperms), and tapetum (T; Brassicaceae) oleosins. Transition from one lineage to the next is depicted from lineage intermediates at junctions of phylogeny and organ distributions. Within a species, each lineage, except the T oleosin lineage, has one to four genes per haploid genome, only approximately two of which are active. Primitive oleosins already possess all the general characteristics of oleosins. U oleosins have C-terminal sequences as highly conserved as the hairpin sequences; thus, U oleosins including their C-terminal peptide exert indispensable, unknown functions. SL and SH oleosin transcripts in seeds are in an approximately 1:1 ratio, which suggests the occurrence of SL-SH oleosin dimers/multimers. T oleosins in Brassicaceae are encoded by rapidly evolved multitandem genes for alkane storage and transfer. Overall, oleosins have evolved to retain conserved hairpin structures but diversified for unique structures and functions in specific cells and plant families. Also, our studies reveal oleosin in avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp and no acyltransferase/lipase motifs in most oleosins. PMID:26232488

  11. A novel transgenic mouse model to study the osteoblast lineage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Maes, Christa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2007-11-01

    Over the past few decades, osteoblast differentiation has been studied extensively in a variety of culture systems and findings from these experiments have shaped our understanding of the bone-forming cell lineage. However, in vitro assays are bound by intrinsic limitations and are unable to effectively mirror many aspects related to osteoblasts in vivo, including their origin, destiny, and life span. Therefore, these fundamental questions strongly advocate the need for novel models to characterize the osteoblast lineage in vivo. Here, we developed a transgenic mouse system to study stage-specific subsets of osteoblast lineage cells. We believe that this system will prove to be a helpful tool in deciphering multiple aspects of osteoblast biology in vivo.

  12. Adaptive radiation of venomous marine snail lineages and the accelerated evolution of venom peptide genes

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Baldomero M.; Watkins, Maren; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip; Imperial, Julita S.; de la Cotera, Edgar P. Heimer; Aguilar, Manuel B.; Vera, Estuardo López; Concepcion, Gisela P.; Lluisma, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    An impressive biodiversity (>10,000 species) of marine snails (suborder Toxoglossa or superfamily Conoidea) have complex venoms, containing ca. 100 biologically active, disulfide-rich peptides. In the genus Conus, the most intensively investigated toxoglossan lineage (~500 species), a small set of venom gene superfamilies undergo rapid sequence hyperdiversification within their mature toxin regions. Each major lineage of Toxoglossa has its own distinct set of venom gene superfamilies. Two recently identified venom gene superfamilies are expressed in the large Turridae clade, but not in Conus. Thus, as major venomous molluscan clades expand, a small set of lineage specific venom gene superfamilies undergo accelerated evolution. The juxtaposition of extremely conserved signal sequences with hypervariable mature peptide regions is unprecedented and raises the possibility that in these gene superfamilies, the signal sequences are conserved as a result of an essential role they play in enabling rapid sequence evolution of the region of the gene that encodes the active toxin. PMID:22954218

  13. Hematopoietic organs of Manduca sexta and hemocyte lineages.

    PubMed

    Nardi, James B; Pilas, Barbara; Ujhelyi, Elizabeth; Garsha, Karl; Kanost, Michael R

    2003-10-01

    Cells of the moth immune system are derived from organs that loosely envelop the four wing imaginal discs. The immune response in these insects is believed to depend on the activities of two main classes of hemocytes: plasmatocytes and granular cells. The fates of cells that arise from these hematopoietic organs have been followed by immunolabeling with plasmatocyte-specific and granular-cell-specific antibodies. Cells within each hematopoietic organ differ in their coherence and in their expression of two plasmatocyte-specific surface proteins, integrin and neuroglian. Within an organ there is no overlap in the expression of these two surface proteins; neuroglian is found on the surfaces of the coherent cells while integrin is expressed on cells that are losing coherence, rounding up, and dispersing. A granular-cell-specific marker for the protein lacunin labels the basal lamina that delimits each organ but only a small number of granular cells that lie on or near the periphery of the hematopoietic organ. When organs are cultured in the absence of hemolymph, all cells derived from hematopoietic organs turn out to immunolabel with the plasmatocyte-specific antibody MS13. The circulating plasmatocytes derived from hematopoietic organs have higher ploidy levels than the granular cells and represent a separate lineage of hemocytes.

  14. VP8*P[8] lineages of group A rotaviruses circulating over 20 years in Brazil: proposal of six different sub-lineages for P[8]-3 clade.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcelle Figueira Marques; Gómez, Mariela Martínez; Rose, Tatiana Lundgren; Volotão, Eduardo de Mello; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe Anibal; Bello, Gonzalo; Leite, Jose Paulo Gagliardi

    2013-06-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) is the most important cause of severe gastroenteritis among children worldwide. Vaccination is considered the best alternative among public health measures to reduce and prevent the global burden caused by RVA infections. Rotarix™, a monovalent vaccine based on a human strain with a G1P[8]-1 specificity, was introduced in the National Brazilian Immunization Programs (NIP) in March, 2006. RVA P[8] is the most prevalent P genotype worldwide and four distinct phylogenetic lineages: P[8]-1, -2, -3, and -4 have been described. In the current study phylogenetic analysis of the VP8(*) gene of 135 RVA P[8] Brazilian strains, in combination with G1, G3, G5 or G9 VP7 genotype, collected from 1986 to 2011 were carried out for a better understanding of the evolution of this viral genotype in Brazil. Lineages P[8]-1, P[8]-2, and P[8]-3 were observed circulating in Brazil. In 2001 these three P[8] lineages co-circulated simultaneously and this is the first report in South America to date. Considering the P[8] lineage and the G genotype, all G3 strains were related to lineage P[8]-3, whereas the G9 strains were related to P[8]-2 and P[8]-3 and G1 and G5 were related to P[8]-1, P[8]-2, and P[8]-3. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis based on estimate of genetic distances between P[8]-3 strains and the definition of a 1.5% cutoff value (with relevant statistical support) it was possible to propose a new classification for the P[8]-3 lineage into six different sub-lineages: P[8]-3.1 to P[8]-3.6. These findings reinforce the notion of the existence of constraints within specific RVA strains populations. The results obtained in this study reinforce the importance of a continuous RVA surveillance of circulating strains in order to predict the possible variants that will circulate in a country, assess the effects of vaccination on RVA circulating strains, and ultimately help in the design, challenges, and prospects of RVA vaccines.

  15. Evolution of two prototypic T cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sabyasachi; Li, Jianxu; Hirano, Masayuki; Sutoh, Yoichi; Herrin, Brantley R.; Cooper, Max D.

    2015-01-01

    Jawless vertebrates, which occupy a unique position in chordate phylogeny, employ leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-based variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR) for antigen recognition. During the assembly of the VLR genes (VLRA, VLRB and VLRC), donor LRR-encoding sequences are copied in a step-wise manner into the incomplete germ-line genes. The assembled VLR genes are differentially expressed by discrete lymphocyte lineages: VLRA- and VLRC-producing cells are T-cell like, whereas VLRB-producing cells are B-cell like. VLRA+ and VLRC+ lymphocytes resemble the two principal T-cell lineages of jawed vertebrates that express the αβ or γδ T-cell receptors (TCR). Reminiscent of the interspersed nature of the TCRα/TCRδ locus in jawed vertebrates, the close proximity of the VLRA and VLRC loci facilitates sharing of donor LRR sequences during VLRA and VLRC assembly. Here we discuss the insight these findings provide into vertebrate T- and B-cell evolution, and the alternative types of anticipatory receptors they use for adaptive immunity. PMID:25958271

  16. Origin of strigolactones in the green lineage.

    PubMed

    Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Xie, Xiaonan; Timme, Ruth E; Puech-Pages, Virginie; Dunand, Christophe; Lecompte, Emilie; Delwiche, Charles F; Yoneyama, Koichi; Bécard, Guillaume; Séjalon-Delmas, Nathalie

    2012-09-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the appearance of strigolactones in the green lineage and to determine the primitive function of these molecules. We measured the strigolactone content of several isolated liverworts, mosses, charophyte and chlorophyte green algae using a sensitive biological assay and LC-MS/MS analyses. In parallel, sequence comparison of strigolactone-related genes and phylogenetic analyses were performed using available genomic data and newly sequenced expressed sequence tags. The primitive function of strigolactones was determined by exogenous application of the synthetic strigolactone analog, GR24, and by mutant phenotyping. Liverworts, the most basal Embryophytes and Charales, one of the closest green algal relatives to Embryophytes, produce strigolactones, whereas several other species of green algae do not. We showed that GR24 stimulates rhizoid elongation of Charales, liverworts and mosses, and rescues the phenotype of the strigolactone-deficient Ppccd8 mutant of Physcomitrella patens. These findings demonstrate that the first function of strigolactones was not to promote arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Rather, they suggest that the strigolactones appeared earlier in the streptophyte lineage to control rhizoid elongation. They may have been conserved in basal Embryophytes for this role and then recruited for the stimulation of colonization by glomeromycotan fungi.

  17. Parallel emergence of negative epistasis across experimental lineages.

    PubMed

    Zee, Peter C; Velicer, Gregory J

    2017-01-27

    Epistatic interactions can greatly impact evolutionary phenomena, particularly the process of adaptation. Here, we leverage four parallel experimentally evolved lineages to study the emergence and trajectories of epistatic interactions in the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. A social gene (pilA) necessary for effective group swarming on soft agar had been deleted from the common ancestor of these lineages. During selection for competitiveness at the leading edge of growing colonies, two lineages evolved qualitatively novel mechanisms for greatly increased swarming on soft agar, whereas the other two lineages evolved relatively small increases in swarming. By reintroducing pilA into different genetic backgrounds along the four lineages, we tested whether parallel lineages showed similar patterns of epistasis. In particular, we tested whether a pattern of negative epistasis between accumulating mutations and pilA previously found in the fastest lineage would be found only in the two evolved lineages with the fastest and most striking swarming phenotypes, or rather was due to common epistatic structure across all lineages arising from the generic fixation of adaptive mutations. Our analysis reveals the emergence of negative epistasis across all four independent lineages. Further, we present results showing that the observed negative epistasis is not due exclusively to evolving populations approaching a maximum phenotypic value that inherently limits positive effects of pilA reintroduction, but rather involves direct antagonistic interactions between accumulating mutations and the reintroduced social gene.

  18. Contrasting microsatellite diversity in the evolutionary lineages of Phytophthora lateralis.

    PubMed

    Vettraino, AnnaMaria; Brasier, Clive M; Webber, Joan F; Hansen, Everett M; Green, Sarah; Robin, Cecile; Tomassini, Alessia; Bruni, Natalia; Vannini, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    Following recent discovery of Phytophthora lateralis on native Chamaecyparis obtusa in Taiwan, four phenotypically distinct lineages were discriminated: the Taiwan J (TWJ) and Taiwan K (TWK) in Taiwan, the Pacific Northwest (PNW) in North America and Europe and the UK in west Scotland. Across the four lineages, we analysed 88 isolates from multiple sites for microsatellite diversity. Twenty-one multilocus genotypes (MLGs) were resolved with high levels of diversity of the TWK and PNW lineages. No alleles were shared between the PNW and the Taiwanese lineages. TWK was heterozygous at three loci, whereas TWJ isolates were homozygous apart from one isolate, which exhibited a unique allele also present in the TWK lineage. PNW lineage was heterozygous at three loci. The evidence suggests its origin may be a yet unknown Asian source. North American and European PNW isolates shared all their alleles and also a dominant MLG, consistent with a previous proposal that this lineage is a recent introduction into Europe from North America. The UK lineage was monomorphic and homozygous at all loci. It shared its alleles with the PNW and the TWJ and TWK lineages, hence a possible origin in a recent hybridisation event between a Taiwan lineage and PNW cannot be ruled out.

  19. Biguanide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction yields increased lactate production and cytotoxicity of aerobically-poised HepG2 cells and human hepatocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Dykens, James A. Jamieson, Joseph; Marroquin, Lisa; Nadanaciva, Sashi; Billis, Puja A.; Will, Yvonne

    2008-12-01

    As a class, the biguanides induce lactic acidosis, a hallmark of mitochondrial impairment. To assess potential mitochondrial impairment, we evaluated the effects of metformin, buformin and phenformin on: 1) viability of HepG2 cells grown in galactose, 2) respiration by isolated mitochondria, 3) metabolic poise of HepG2 and primary human hepatocytes, 4) activities of immunocaptured respiratory complexes, and 5) mitochondrial membrane potential and redox status in primary human hepatocytes. Phenformin was the most cytotoxic of the three with buformin showing moderate toxicity, and metformin toxicity only at mM concentrations. Importantly, HepG2 cells grown in galactose are markedly more susceptible to biguanide toxicity compared to cells grown in glucose, indicating mitochondrial toxicity as a primary mode of action. The same rank order of potency was observed for isolated mitochondrial respiration where preincubation (40 min) exacerbated respiratory impairment, and was required to reveal inhibition by metformin, suggesting intramitochondrial bio-accumulation. Metabolic profiling of intact cells corroborated respiratory inhibition, but also revealed compensatory increases in lactate production from accelerated glycolysis. High (mM) concentrations of the drugs were needed to inhibit immunocaptured respiratory complexes, supporting the contention that bioaccumulation is involved. The same rank order was found when monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS production, and glutathione levels in primary human hepatocytes. In toto, these data indicate that biguanide-induced lactic acidosis can be attributed to acceleration of glycolysis in response to mitochondrial impairment. Indeed, the desired clinical outcome, viz., decreased blood glucose, could be due to increased glucose uptake and glycolytic flux in response to drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

  20. Astrocytes in Oligodendrocyte Lineage Development and White Matter Pathology.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiasi; Zhang, Lei; Chu, Yongxin; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Benqiang; Kong, Jiming; Bi, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    White matter is primarily composed of myelin and myelinated axons. Structural and functional completeness of myelin is critical for the reliable and efficient transmission of information. White matter injury has been associated with the development of many demyelinating diseases. Despite a variety of scientific advances aimed at promoting re-myelination, their benefit has proven at best to be marginal. Research suggests that the failure of the re-myelination process may be the result of an unfavorable microenvironment. Astrocytes, are the most ample and diverse type of glial cells in central nervous system (CNS) which display multiple functions for the cells of the oligodendrocytes lineage. As such, much attention has recently been drawn to astrocyte function in terms of white matter myelin repair. They are different in white matter from those in gray matter in specific regards to development, morphology, location, protein expression and other supportive functions. During the process of demyelination and re-myelination, the functions of astrocytes are dynamic in that they are able to change functions in accordance to different time points, triggers or reactive pathways resulting in vastly different biologic effects. They have pivotal effects on oligodendrocytes and other cell types in the oligodendrocyte lineage by serving as an energy supplier, a participant of immunological and inflammatory functions, a source of trophic factors and iron and a sustainer of homeostasis. Astrocytic impairment has been shown to be directly linked to the development of neuromyelities optica (NMO). In addition, astroctyes have also been implicated in other white matter conditions such as psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Inhibiting specifically detrimental signaling pathways in astrocytes while preserving their beneficial functions may be a promising approach for

  1. Genetic structure of the paternal lineage of the Roma people.

    PubMed

    Pamjav, Horolma; Zalán, Andrea; Béres, Judit; Nagy, Melinda; Chang, Yuet Meng

    2011-05-01

    According to written sources, Roma (Romanies, Gypsies) arrived in the Balkans around 1,000 years ago from India and have subsequently spread through several parts of Europe. Genetic data, particularly from the Y chromosome, have supported this model, and can potentially refine it. We now provide an analysis of Y-chromosomal markers from five Roma and two non-Roma populations (N = 787) in order to investigate the genetic relatedness of the Roma population groups to one another, and to gain further understanding of their likely Indian origins, the genetic contribution of non-Roma males to the Roma populations, and the early history of their splits and migrations in Europe. The two main sources of the Roma paternal gene pool were identified as South Asian and European. The reduced diversity and expansion of H1a-M82 lineages in all Roma groups imply shared descent from a single paternal ancestor in the Indian subcontinent. The Roma paternal gene pool also contains a specific subset of E1b1b1a-M78 and J2a2-M67 lineages, implying admixture during early settlement in the Balkans and the subsequent influx into the Carpathian Basin. Additional admixture, evident in the low and moderate frequencies of typical European haplogroups I1-M253, I2a-P37.2, I2b-M223, R1b1-P25, and R1a1-M198, has occurred in a more population-specific manner.

  2. Astrocytes in Oligodendrocyte Lineage Development and White Matter Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiasi; Zhang, Lei; Chu, Yongxin; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Benqiang; Kong, Jiming; Bi, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    White matter is primarily composed of myelin and myelinated axons. Structural and functional completeness of myelin is critical for the reliable and efficient transmission of information. White matter injury has been associated with the development of many demyelinating diseases. Despite a variety of scientific advances aimed at promoting re-myelination, their benefit has proven at best to be marginal. Research suggests that the failure of the re-myelination process may be the result of an unfavorable microenvironment. Astrocytes, are the most ample and diverse type of glial cells in central nervous system (CNS) which display multiple functions for the cells of the oligodendrocytes lineage. As such, much attention has recently been drawn to astrocyte function in terms of white matter myelin repair. They are different in white matter from those in gray matter in specific regards to development, morphology, location, protein expression and other supportive functions. During the process of demyelination and re-myelination, the functions of astrocytes are dynamic in that they are able to change functions in accordance to different time points, triggers or reactive pathways resulting in vastly different biologic effects. They have pivotal effects on oligodendrocytes and other cell types in the oligodendrocyte lineage by serving as an energy supplier, a participant of immunological and inflammatory functions, a source of trophic factors and iron and a sustainer of homeostasis. Astrocytic impairment has been shown to be directly linked to the development of neuromyelities optica (NMO). In addition, astroctyes have also been implicated in other white matter conditions such as psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Inhibiting specifically detrimental signaling pathways in astrocytes while preserving their beneficial functions may be a promising approach for

  3. Single-cell analysis of mixed-lineage states leading to a binary cell fate choice.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Andre; Venkatasubramanian, Meenakshi; Chaudhri, Viren K; Aronow, Bruce J; Salomonis, Nathan; Singh, Harinder; Grimes, H Leighton

    2016-09-29

    Delineating hierarchical cellular states, including rare intermediates and the networks of regulatory genes that orchestrate cell-type specification, are continuing challenges for developmental biology. Single-cell RNA sequencing is greatly accelerating such research, given its power to provide comprehensive descriptions of genomic states and their presumptive regulators. Haematopoietic multipotential progenitor cells, as well as bipotential intermediates, manifest mixed-lineage patterns of gene expression at a single-cell level. Such mixed-lineage states may reflect the molecular priming of different developmental potentials by co-expressed alternative-lineage determinants, namely transcription factors. Although a bistable gene regulatory network has been proposed to regulate the specification of either neutrophils or macrophages, the nature of the transition states manifested in vivo, and the underlying dynamics of the cell-fate determinants, have remained elusive. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing coupled with a new analytic tool, iterative clustering and guide-gene selection, and clonogenic assays to delineate hierarchical genomic and regulatory states that culminate in neutrophil or macrophage specification in mice. We show that this analysis captured prevalent mixed-lineage intermediates that manifested concurrent expression of haematopoietic stem cell/progenitor and myeloid progenitor cell genes. It also revealed rare metastable intermediates that had collapsed the haematopoietic stem cell/progenitor gene expression programme, instead expressing low levels of the myeloid determinants, Irf8 and Gfi1 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13). Genetic perturbations and chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing revealed Irf8 and Gfi1 as key components of counteracting myeloid-gene-regulatory networks. Combined loss of these two determinants 'trapped' the metastable intermediate. We propose that mixed-lineage states are obligatory during cell-fate specification

  4. Whole organism lineage tracing by combinatorial and cumulative genome editing

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Aaron; Findlay, Gregory M.; Gagnon, James A.; Horwitz, Marshall S.; Schier, Alexander F.; Shendure, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular systems develop from single cells through distinct lineages. However, current lineage tracing approaches scale poorly to whole, complex organisms. Here we use genome editing to progressively introduce and accumulate diverse mutations in a DNA barcode over multiple rounds of cell division. The barcode, an array of CRISPR/Cas9 target sites, marks cells and enables the elucidation of lineage relationships via the patterns of mutations shared between cells. In cell culture and zebrafish, we show that rates and patterns of editing are tunable, and that thousands of lineage-informative barcode alleles can be generated. By sampling hundreds of thousands of cells from individual zebrafish, we find that most cells in adult organs derive from relatively few embryonic progenitors. In future analyses, genome editing of synthetic target arrays for lineage tracing (GESTALT) can be used to generate large-scale maps of cell lineage in multicellular systems for normal development and disease. PMID:27229144

  5. Global Phylogenomic Analysis of Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae Reveals a Deep-Branching Classic Lineage That Is Distinct from Multiple Sporadic Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Hilty, Markus; Wüthrich, Daniel; Salter, Susannah J.; Engel, Hansjürg; Campbell, Samuel; Sá-Leão, Raquel; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Hermans, Peter; Sadowy, Ewa; Turner, Paul; Chewapreecha, Claire; Diggle, Mathew; Pluschke, Gerd; McGee, Lesley; Köseoğlu Eser, Özgen; Low, Donald E.; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi; Endimiani, Andrea; Küffer, Marianne; Dupasquier, Mélanie; Beaudoing, Emmanuel; Weber, Johann; Bruggmann, Rémy; Hanage, William P.; Parkhill, Julian; Hathaway, Lucy J.; Mühlemann, Kathrin; Bentley, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    The surrounding capsule of Streptococcus pneumoniae has been identified as a major virulence factor and is targeted by pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). However, nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae (non-Ec-Sp) have also been isolated globally, mainly in carriage studies. It is unknown if non-Ec-Sp evolve sporadically, if they have high antibiotic nonsusceptiblity rates and a unique, specific gene content. Here, whole-genome sequencing of 131 non-Ec-Sp isolates sourced from 17 different locations around the world was performed. Results revealed a deep-branching classic lineage that is distinct from multiple sporadic lineages. The sporadic lineages clustered with a previously sequenced, global collection of encapsulated S. pneumoniae (Ec-Sp) isolates while the classic lineage is comprised mainly of the frequently identified multilocus sequences types (STs) ST344 (n = 39) and ST448 (n = 40). All ST344 and nine ST448 isolates had high nonsusceptiblity rates to β-lactams and other antimicrobials. Analysis of the accessory genome reveals that the classic non-Ec-Sp contained an increased number of mobile elements, than Ec-Sp and sporadic non-Ec-Sp. Performing adherence assays to human epithelial cells for selected classic and sporadic non-Ec-Sp revealed that the presence of a integrative conjugative element (ICE) results in increased adherence to human epithelial cells (P = 0.005). In contrast, sporadic non-Ec-Sp lacking the ICE had greater growth in vitro possibly resulting in improved fitness. In conclusion, non-Ec-Sp isolates from the classic lineage have evolved separately. They have spread globally, are well adapted to nasopharyngeal carriage and are able to coexist with Ec-Sp. Due to continued use of PCV, non-Ec-Sp may become more prevalent. PMID:25480686

  6. Lineage shift in Indian strains of Dengue virus serotype-3 (Genotype III), evidenced by detection of lineage IV strains in clinical cases from Kerala

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Local epidemiology of Dengue is defined by the genetic diversity of the circulating Dengue virus (DENV) strains. This important information is not available for the virus strains from most parts of the Indian subcontinent. The present study focused on the genetic diversity of the serotype 3 DENV strains (DENV-3) from India. Results A total of 22 DENV-3 strains identified by reverse-transcription PCR analysis of serum samples from 709 patients were studied. These samples were collected over a period of 4 years (2008–2011) from dengue fever suspected patients from Kerala, a dengue endemic state in South India. Comparison of a 1740bp nucleotide sequence of the viral Capsid-Pre-membrane-Envelope coding region of our strains and previously reported DENV-3 strains from India, South Asia and South America revealed non-synonymous substitutions that were genotype III-specific as well as sporadic. Evidence of positive selection was detected in the I81 amino acid residue of the envelope protein. Out of the 22 samples, three had I81A and 18 had I81V substitutions. In the phylogenetic analysis by maximum likelihood method the strains from Kerala clustered in two different lineages (lineage III and IV) within genotype III clade of DENV-3 strains. The ten strains that belonged to lineage IV had a signature amino acid substitution T219A in the envelope protein. Interestingly, all these strains were found to be closely related to a Singapore strain GU370053 isolated in 2007. Conclusions Our study identifies for the first time the presence of lineage IV strains in the Indian subcontinent. Results indicate the possibility of a recent exotic introduction and also a shift from the existing lineage III strains to lineage IV. Lineage shifts in DENV-3 strains have been attributed to dramatic increase in disease severity in many parts of the world. Hence the present observation could be significant in terms of the clinical severity of future dengue cases in the region. PMID

  7. Prospective identification of hematopoietic lineage choice by deep learning.

    PubMed

    Buggenthin, Felix; Buettner, Florian; Hoppe, Philipp S; Endele, Max; Kroiss, Manuel; Strasser, Michael; Schwarzfischer, Michael; Loeffler, Dirk; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Hilsenbeck, Oliver; Schroeder, Timm; Theis, Fabian J; Marr, Carsten

    2017-02-20

    Differentiation alters molecular properties of stem and progenitor cells, leading to changes in their shape and movement characteristics. We present a deep neural network that prospectively predicts lineage choice in differentiating primary hematopoietic progenitors using image patches from brightfield microscopy and cellular movement. Surprisingly, lineage choice can be detected up to three generations before conventional molecular markers are observable. Our approach allows identification of cells with differentially expressed lineage-specifying genes without molecular labeling.

  8. Feedback, Lineages and Self-Organizing Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Calof, Anne L.; Lowengrub, John S.; Lander, Arthur D.

    2016-01-01

    Feedback regulation of cell lineage progression plays an important role in tissue size homeostasis, but whether such feedback also plays an important role in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. Here we use mathematical modeling to show that a particular feedback architecture in which both positive and negative diffusible signals act on stem and/or progenitor cells leads to the appearance of bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors, ultrasensitivity to external growth cues, local growth-driven budding, self-sustaining elongation, and the triggering of self-organization in the form of lamellar fingers. Such behaviors arise not through regulation of cell cycle speeds, but through the control of stem or progenitor self-renewal. Even though the spatial patterns that arise in this setting are the result of interactions between diffusible factors with antagonistic effects, morphogenesis is not the consequence of Turing-type instabilities. PMID:26989903

  9. The monosaccharide transporter gene family in land plants is ancient and shows differential subfamily expression and expansion across lineages

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Deborah A; Hill, Jeffrey P; Thomas, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Background In plants, tandem, segmental and whole-genome duplications are prevalent, resulting in large numbers of duplicate loci. Recent studies suggest that duplicate genes diverge predominantly through the partitioning of expression and that breadth of gene expression is related to the rate of gene duplication and protein sequence evolution. Here, we utilize expressed sequence tag (EST) data to study gene duplication and expression patterns in the monosaccharide transporter (MST) gene family across the land plants. In Arabidopsis, there are 53 MST genes that form seven distinct subfamilies. We created profile hidden Markov models of each subfamily and searched EST databases representing diverse land plant lineages to address the following questions: 1) Are homologs of each Arabidopsis subfamily present in the earliest land plants? 2) Do expression patterns among subfamilies and individual genes within subfamilies differ across lineages? 3) Has gene duplication within each lineage resulted in lineage-specific expansion patterns? We also looked for correlations between relative EST database representation in Arabidopsis and similarity to orthologs in early lineages. Results Homologs of all seven MST subfamilies were present in land plants at least 400 million years ago. Subfamily expression levels vary across lineages with greater relative expression of the STP, ERD6-like, INT and PLT subfamilies in the vascular plants. In the large EST databases of the moss, gymnosperm, monocot and eudicot lineages, EST contig construction reveals that MST subfamilies have experienced lineage-specific expansions. Large subfamily expansions appear to be due to multiple gene duplications arising from single ancestral genes. In Arabidopsis, one or a few genes within most subfamilies have much higher EST database representation than others. Most highly represented (broadly expressed) genes in Arabidopsis have best match orthologs in early divergent lineages. Conclusion The seven

  10. Systematic Review of Pharmacological Properties of the Oligodendrocyte Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, Carla; Bertalot, Thomas; Zusso, Morena; Skaper, Stephen D.; Giusti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrogenesis and oligodendrocyte precursor maturation are essential processes during the course of central nervous system development, and lead to the myelination of axons. Cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage are generated in the germinal zone from migratory bipolar oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), and acquire cell surface markers as they mature and respond specifically to factors which regulate proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival. Loss of myelin underlies a wide range of neurological disorders, some of an autoimmune nature—multiple sclerosis probably being the most prominent. Current therapies are based on the use of immunomodulatory agents which are likely to promote myelin repair (remyelination) indirectly by subverting the inflammatory response, aspects of which impair the differentiation of OPCs. Cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage express and are capable of responding to a diverse array of ligand-receptor pairs, including neurotransmitters and nuclear receptors such as γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, adenosine triphosphate, serotonin, acetylcholine, nitric oxide, opioids, prostaglandins, prolactin, and cannabinoids. The intent of this review is to provide the reader with a synopsis of our present state of knowledge concerning the pharmacological properties of the oligodendrocyte lineage, with particular attention to these receptor-ligand (i.e., neurotransmitters and nuclear receptor) interactions that can influence oligodendrocyte migration, proliferation, differentiation, and myelination, and an appraisal of their therapeutic potential. For example, many promising mediators work through Ca2+ signaling, and the balance between Ca2+ influx and efflux can determine the temporal and spatial properties of oligodendrocytes (OLs). Moreover, Ca2+ signaling in OPCs can influence not only differentiation and myelination, but also process extension and migration, as well as cell death in mature mouse OLs. There is also evidence

  11. Lineage mapper: A versatile cell and particle tracker

    PubMed Central

    Chalfoun, Joe; Majurski, Michael; Dima, Alden; Halter, Michael; Bhadriraju, Kiran; Brady, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The ability to accurately track cells and particles from images is critical to many biomedical problems. To address this, we developed Lineage Mapper, an open-source tracker for time-lapse images of biological cells, colonies, and particles. Lineage Mapper tracks objects independently of the segmentation method, detects mitosis in confluence, separates cell clumps mistakenly segmented as a single cell, provides accuracy and scalability even on terabyte-sized datasets, and creates division and/or fusion lineages. Lineage Mapper has been tested and validated on multiple biological and simulated problems. The software is available in ImageJ and Matlab at isg.nist.gov. PMID:27853188

  12. Lineage mapper: A versatile cell and particle tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalfoun, Joe; Majurski, Michael; Dima, Alden; Halter, Michael; Bhadriraju, Kiran; Brady, Mary

    2016-11-01

    The ability to accurately track cells and particles from images is critical to many biomedical problems. To address this, we developed Lineage Mapper, an open-source tracker for time-lapse images of biological cells, colonies, and particles. Lineage Mapper tracks objects independently of the segmentation method, detects mitosis in confluence, separates cell clumps mistakenly segmented as a single cell, provides accuracy and scalability even on terabyte-sized datasets, and creates division and/or fusion lineages. Lineage Mapper has been tested and validated on multiple biological and simulated problems. The software is available in ImageJ and Matlab at isg.nist.gov.

  13. Sensitivity to dietary phosphorus limitation in native vs. invasive lineages of a New Zealand freshwater snail.

    PubMed

    Neiman, Maurine; Krist, Amy

    2016-10-01

    Why some species and lineages are more likely to be invasive than others is one of the most important unanswered questions in basic and applied biology. In particular, the relative contributions to the invasion process of factors like pre-adaptation to invasiveness in the native range, evolution post-colonization, and random vs. non-random sampling of colonist lineages remain unclear. We use a powerful common garden approach to address the potential for a role for sensitivity to nutrient limitation in determining the invasiveness of particular lineages of Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a New Zealand freshwater snail that has become globally invasive. We quantified specific growth rate (SGR), an important fitness-related trait in this species, under high phosphorus (P) vs. low-P conditions for a diverse set of native and invasive P. antipodarum. This experiment revealed that native-range P. antipodarum experience a more severe decline in SGR in low-P conditions relative to SGR in high-P conditions than their invasive range counterparts. Although these results suggest resilience to P limitation in invasive lineages, the absence of significant absolute differences in SGR between native and invasive lineages indicates that a straightforward connection between response to P limitation and invasiveness in P. antipodarum is unlikely. Regardless, our data demonstrate that invasive vs. native lineages of P. antipodarum exhibit consistently different responses to an important environmental variable that is rarely studied in the context of invasion success. Further studies directed at exploring and disentangling the roles of sampling effects, selection on preexisting variation, and evolution after colonization will be required to provide a comprehensive picture of the role (or lack thereof) of nutrient limitation in the global invasion of P. antipodarum, as well for as other invasive taxa.

  14. Distinct lineages of Ebola virus in Guinea during the 2014 West African epidemic.

    PubMed

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Faye, Ousmane; Faye, Oumar; Koivogui, Lamine; Magassouba, Nfaly; Keita, Sakoba; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Diancourt, Laure; Bouchier, Christiane; Vandenbogaert, Matthias; Caro, Valérie; Fall, Gamou; Buchmann, Jan P; Matranga, Christan B; Sabeti, Pardis C; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Holmes, Edward C; Sall, Amadou A

    2015-08-06

    An epidemic of Ebola virus disease of unprecedented scale has been ongoing for more than a year in West Africa. As of 29 April 2015, there have been 26,277 reported total cases (of which 14,895 have been laboratory confirmed) resulting in 10,899 deaths. The source of the outbreak was traced to the prefecture of Guéckédou in the forested region of southeastern Guinea. The virus later spread to the capital, Conakry, and to the neighbouring countries of Sierra Leone, Liberia, Nigeria, Senegal and Mali. In March 2014, when the first cases were detected in Conakry, the Institut Pasteur of Dakar, Senegal, deployed a mobile laboratory in Donka hospital to provide diagnostic services to the greater Conakry urban area and other regions of Guinea. Through this process we sampled 85 Ebola viruses (EBOV) from patients infected from July to November 2014, and report their full genome sequences here. Phylogenetic analysis reveals the sustained transmission of three distinct viral lineages co-circulating in Guinea, including the urban setting of Conakry and its surroundings. One lineage is unique to Guinea and closely related to the earliest sampled viruses of the epidemic. A second lineage contains viruses probably reintroduced from neighbouring Sierra Leone on multiple occasions, while a third lineage later spread from Guinea to Mali. Each lineage is defined by multiple mutations, including non-synonymous changes in the virion protein 35 (VP35), glycoprotein (GP) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L) proteins. The viral GP is characterized by a glycosylation site modification and mutations in the mucin-like domain that could modify the outer shape of the virion. These data illustrate the ongoing ability of EBOV to develop lineage-specific and potentially phenotypically important variation.

  15. Reconstructing lineage hierarchies of the distal lung epithelium using single-cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Treutlein, Barbara; Brownfield, Doug G; Wu, Angela R; Neff, Norma F; Mantalas, Gary L; Espinoza, F Hernan; Desai, Tushar J; Krasnow, Mark A; Quake, Stephen R

    2014-05-15

    The mammalian lung is a highly branched network in which the distal regions of the bronchial tree transform during development into a densely packed honeycomb of alveolar air sacs that mediate gas exchange. Although this transformation has been studied by marker expression analysis and fate-mapping, the mechanisms that control the progression of lung progenitors along distinct lineages into mature alveolar cell types are still incompletely known, in part because of the limited number of lineage markers and the effects of ensemble averaging in conventional transcriptome analysis experiments on cell populations. Here we show that single-cell transcriptome analysis circumvents these problems and enables direct measurement of the various cell types and hierarchies in the developing lung. We used microfluidic single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) on 198 individual cells at four different stages encompassing alveolar differentiation to measure the transcriptional states which define the developmental and cellular hierarchy of the distal mouse lung epithelium. We empirically classified cells into distinct groups by using an unbiased genome-wide approach that did not require a priori knowledge of the underlying cell types or the previous purification of cell populations. The results confirmed the basic outlines of the classical model of epithelial cell-type diversity in the distal lung and led to the discovery of many previously unknown cell-type markers, including transcriptional regulators that discriminate between the different populations. We reconstructed the molecular steps during maturation of bipotential progenitors along both alveolar lineages and elucidated the full life cycle of the alveolar type 2 cell lineage. This single-cell genomics approach is applicable to any developing or mature tissue to robustly delineate molecularly distinct cell types, define progenitors and lineage hierarchies, and identify lineage-specific regulatory factors.

  16. Conversion of embryonic stem cells into extraembryonic lineages by CRISPR-mediated activators

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shu; Zou, Qingjian; Lai, Sisi; Zhang, Quanjun; Li, Li; Yan, Quanmei; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Zhong, Huilin; Lai, Liangxue

    2016-01-01

    The recently emerged CRISPR/Cas9 technique has opened a new perspective on readily editing specific genes. When combined with transcription activators, it can precisely manipulate endogenous gene expression. Here, we enhanced the expression of endogenous Cdx2 and Gata6 genes by CRISPR-mediated activators, thus mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were directly converted into two extraembryonic lineages, i.e., typical trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) and extraembryonic endoderm cells (XENCs), which exhibited characters of TSC or XENC derived from the blastocyst extraembryonic lineages such as cell morphology, specific gene expression, and differentiation ability in vitro and in vivo. This study demonstrates that the cell fate can be effectively manipulated by directly activating of specific endogenous gene expression with CRISPR-mediated activator. PMID:26782778

  17. A limited number of Y chromosome lineages is present in North American Holsteins.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiang-Peng; Dechow, Chad; Liu, Wan-Sheng

    2015-04-01

    Holsteins are the most numerous dairy cattle breed in North America and the breed has undergone intensive selection for improving milk production and conformation. Theoretically, this intensive selection could lead to a reduction of the effective population size and reduced genetic diversity. The objective of this study was to investigate the effective population size of the Holstein Y chromosome and the effects of limited Y chromosome lineages on male reproduction and the future of the breed. Paternal pedigree information of 62,897 Holstein bulls born between 1950 and 2013 in North America and 220,872 bulls evaluated by multiple-trait across-country genetic evaluations of Interbull (Uppsala, Sweden) were collected and analyzed. The results indicated that the number of Y chromosome lineages in Holsteins has undergone a dramatic decrease during the past 50 years because of artificial selection and the application of artificial insemination (AI) technology. All current Holstein AI bulls in North America are the descendants of only 2 ancestors (Hulleman and Neptune H) born in 1880. These 2 ancestral Y-lineages are continued through 3 dominant pedigrees from the 1960s; namely, Pawnee Farm Arlinda Chief, Round Oak Rag Apple Elevation, and Penstate Ivanhoe Star, with a contribution of 48.78, 51.06, and 0.16% to the Holstein bull population in the 2010s, respectively. The Y-lineage of Penstate Ivanhoe Star is almost eliminated from the breed. The genetic variations in the 2 ancestral Y-lineages were evaluated among 257 bulls by determining the copy number variations (CNV) of 3 Y-linked gene families: PRAMEY, HSFY, and ZNF280BY, which are spread along the majority (95%) of the bovine Y chromosome male-specific region (MSY). No significant difference was found between the 2 ancestral Y-lineages, although large CNV were observed within each lineage. This study suggests minimal genetic diversity on the Y chromosome in Holsteins and provides a starting point for investigating

  18. Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Genotypic Lineage Distribution in Chile and Neighboring Countries

    PubMed Central

    Lagos, Jaime; Couvin, David; Arata, Loredana; Tognarelli, Javier; Aguayo, Carolina; Leiva, Tamara; Arias, Fabiola; Hormazabal, Juan Carlos; Rastogi, Nalin; Fernández, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    . Finally, we also observed exclusive emergence of patterns SIT4014/X1 and SIT4015 (unknown lineage signature) that have hitherto been found exclusively in Chile, indicating that conditions specific to Chile, along with the unique genetic makeup of the Chilean population, might have allowed for a possible co-evolution leading to the success of these emerging genotypes. PMID:27518286

  19. Phenotypic differences among three clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are three major clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum present in North America and Europe named NA1, NA2, and EU1. Twenty-three isolates representing all three lineages were evaluated for phenotype including (i) aggressiveness on detached Rhododendron leaves and (ii) growth rate at minimum, ...

  20. Basin-scale distribution patterns of picocyanobacterial lineages in the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Zwirglmaier, Katrin; Heywood, Jane L; Chamberlain, Katie; Woodward, E Malcolm S; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Scanlan, Dave J

    2007-05-01

    Marine picocyanobacteria of the genera Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus are major contributors to oceanic primary production. The genera are genetically diverse, comprising several known ecotypes or lineages. However, little is known of the distribution of these lineages over large geographic areas. Here, we analysed the relative abundance of Prochlorococcus ecotypes and Synechococcus lineages at the ocean basin scale along an Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT) using dot blot hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques. The transect covered several contrasting oceanic provinces (gyres, upwelling, temperate regions) as well as environmentally 'equivalent' regions in the northern and southern hemisphere (northern and southern gyres and temperate regions). Flow cytometric data revealed a discrete separation in abundance of major picocyanobacterial genera. Prochlorococcus reached highest abundance in oligotrophic regions, while more mesotrophic waters were dominated by Synechococcus. Individual genetic lineages of both Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus showed highly similar distributions in corresponding regions in the northern and southern hemisphere. In addition, Prochlorococcus showed a distinctive depth distribution, with HLI and HLII ecotypes near the surface and co-occurring LL ecotypes further down in the water column. Conversely, Synechococcus generally revealed no obvious depth preference, but did show highly specific distribution at the horizontal scale, with clades I and IV particularly dominating temperate, mesotrophic waters in both the northern and southern hemispheres. The data clearly reveal that specific picocyanobacterial lineages proliferate in similar oceanic provinces separated by large spatial scales. Furthermore, comparison with an earlier AMT dataset suggests that basin scale distribution patterns for Prochlorococcus ecotypes are remarkably reproducible from year to year.

  1. Luminal progenitors restrict their lineage potential during mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Rodilla, Veronica; Dasti, Alessandro; Huyghe, Mathilde; Lafkas, Daniel; Laurent, Cécile; Reyal, Fabien; Fre, Silvia

    2015-02-01

    The hierarchical relationships between stem cells and progenitors that guide mammary gland morphogenesis are still poorly defined. While multipotent basal stem cells have been found within the myoepithelial compartment, the in vivo lineage potential of luminal progenitors is unclear. Here we used the expression of the Notch1 receptor, previously implicated in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis, to elucidate the hierarchical organization of mammary stem/progenitor cells by lineage tracing. We found that Notch1 expression identifies multipotent stem cells in the embryonic mammary bud, which progressively restrict their lineage potential during mammary ductal morphogenesis to exclusively generate an ERαneg luminal lineage postnatally. Importantly, our results show that Notch1-labelled cells represent the alveolar progenitors that expand during pregnancy and survive multiple successive involutions. This study reveals that postnatal luminal epithelial cells derive from distinct self-sustained lineages that may represent the cells of origin of different breast cancer subtypes.

  2. Luminal Progenitors Restrict Their Lineage Potential during Mammary Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    Rodilla, Veronica; Dasti, Alessandro; Huyghe, Mathilde; Lafkas, Daniel; Laurent, Cécile; Reyal, Fabien; Fre, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchical relationships between stem cells and progenitors that guide mammary gland morphogenesis are still poorly defined. While multipotent basal stem cells have been found within the myoepithelial compartment, the in vivo lineage potential of luminal progenitors is unclear. Here we used the expression of the Notch1 receptor, previously implicated in mammary gland development and tumorigenesis, to elucidate the hierarchical organization of mammary stem/progenitor cells by lineage tracing. We found that Notch1 expression identifies multipotent stem cells in the embryonic mammary bud, which progressively restrict their lineage potential during mammary ductal morphogenesis to exclusively generate an ERαneg luminal lineage postnatally. Importantly, our results show that Notch1-labelled cells represent the alveolar progenitors that expand during pregnancy and survive multiple successive involutions. This study reveals that postnatal luminal epithelial cells derive from distinct self-sustained lineages that may represent the cells of origin of different breast cancer subtypes. PMID:25688859

  3. Micromere lineages in the glossiphoniid leech Helobdella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Francoise Z.; Kang, Dongmin; Ramirez-Weber, Felipe-Andres; Bissen, Shirley T.; Weisblat, David A.

    2002-01-01

    In leech embryos, segmental mesoderm and ectoderm arise from teloblasts by lineages that are already relatively well characterized. Here, we present data concerning the early divisions and the definitive fate maps of the micromeres, a group of 25 small cells that arise during the modified spiral cleavage in leech (Helobdella robusta) and contribute to most of the nonsegmental tissues of the adult. Three noteworthy results of this work are as follows. (1) The c"' and dm' clones (3d and 3c in traditional nomenclature) give rise to a hitherto undescribed network of fibers that run from one end of the embryo to the other. (2) The clones of micromeres b" and b"' (2b and 3b in traditional nomenclature) die in normal development; the b" clone can be rescued to assume the normal c" fate if micromere c" or its clone are ablated in early development. (3) Two qualitative differences in micromere fates are seen between H. robusta (Sacramento) and another Helobdella sp. (Galt). First, in Helobdella sp. (Galt), the clone of micromere b" does not normally die, and contributes a subset of the cells arising exclusively from c" in H. robusta (Sacramento). Second, in Helobdella sp. (Galt), micromere c"' makes no definitive contribution, whereas micromere dm' gives rise to cells equivalent to those arising from c"' and dm' in H. robusta (Sacramento).

  4. Lineage management for on-demand data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, J. A.; Brodzik, M.; Billingsley, B. W.

    2009-12-01

    Most data consumers would agree that data should be easily available, and welcome the ability to subset, reformat, and reproject archived data before they retrieve the data for local use. Although these features in a data delivery system potentially enhance the interdisciplinary or collaborative use of the data, they also raise concerns for the archive providing those data. The Searchlight project at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) has successfully dealt with many of the technical issues surrounding the dynamic delivery of user-defined data subsets. These data manipulation accomplishments only solve part of the dynamic data delivery problem: We now need to associate accurate provenance and processing information with the customized data product. The user needs the provenance and history in order to make accurate judgements regarding the appropriate use of the data. Our User Support team may need that provenance and history in order to provide a level of service similar to that available for our documented, archived data sets. This presentation will examine the Searchlight team's response to the emerging issue of handling lineage information associated with dynamically generated data products.

  5. Lineage-dependent ecological coherence in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Koeppel, Alexander F; Wu, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Bacteria comprise an essential element of all ecosystems, including those present on and within the human body. Understanding bacterial diversity therefore offers enormous scientific and medical benefit, but significant questions remain regarding how best to characterize that diversity and organize it into biologically meaningful units. Bacterial communities are routinely characterized based on the relative abundances of taxa at the genus or even the phylum level, but the ecological coherence of these high-level taxonomic units is uncertain. Using human microbiota from the skin and gut as our model systems, we tested the ecological coherence of bacteria by investigating the habitat associations of bacteria at all levels of the taxonomic hierarchy. We observed four distinct taxonomic patterns of habitat association, reflecting different levels of ecological coherence among taxa. Our results support the hypothesis that deep-branch bacterial clades could be ecologically coherent and suggest that the phylogenetic depth of ecological coherence varies among the bacterial lineages and is an important factor to consider in studies of human microbiome associations.

  6. Genealogical analysis of maternal and paternal lineages in the Quebec population.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marc; Vézina, Hélène

    2010-04-01

    The Quebec population is one of the rare populations of its size for which genealogical information is available for an uninterrupted period of almost four centuries. This allows for in-depth studies on the formation and evolution of a young founder population. Using data from two major population registers, in this study we focus on the maternal and paternal lineages (i.e., strictly female or male genealogical lines) that can be traced back within the Quebec genealogies. Through the analysis of these lineages it is possible to characterize the founders who transmitted to the contemporary population their mitochondrial (for females) and Y-chromosome (for males) DNA. The basic material consists of 2,221 ascending genealogies of subjects who married in the Quebec population between 1945 and 1965. On average, more than nine generations of ancestors were identified among the lineages. Analyses of maternal and paternal lineages show that the number of paternal founders is higher and their origins and genetic contributions are more variable than that of maternal founders, leading to a larger effective population size and greater diversity of Y chromosomes than of mtDNA. This is explained for the most part by differential migratory patterns among male and female founders of the Quebec population. Comparisons of sex-specific genetic contributions with total genetic contribution showed a strong correlation between the two values, with some discrepancies related to sex ratio differences among the founders' first descendants.

  7. Fine Dissection of Human Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup HV Lineages Reveals Paleolithic Signatures from European Glacial Refugia

    PubMed Central

    Sarno, Stefania; Sevini, Federica; Vianello, Dario; Tamm, Erika; Metspalu, Ene; van Oven, Mannis; Hübner, Alexander; Sazzini, Marco; Franceschi, Claudio; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata

    2015-01-01

    Genetic signatures from the Paleolithic inhabitants of Eurasia can be traced from the early divergent mitochondrial DNA lineages still present in contemporary human populations. Previous studies already suggested a pre-Neolithic diffusion of mitochondrial haplogroup HV*(xH,V) lineages, a relatively rare class of mtDNA types that includes parallel branches mainly distributed across Europe and West Asia with a certain degree of structure. Up till now, variation within haplogroup HV was addressed mainly by analyzing sequence data from the mtDNA control region, except for specific sub-branches, such as HV4 or the widely distributed haplogroups H and V. In this study, we present a revised HV topology based on full mtDNA genome data, and we include a comprehensive dataset consisting of 316 complete mtDNA sequences including 60 new samples from the Italian peninsula, a previously underrepresented geographic area. We highlight points of instability in the particular topology of this haplogroup, reconstructed with BEAST-generated trees and networks. We also confirm a major lineage expansion that probably followed the Late Glacial Maximum and preceded Neolithic population movements. We finally observe that Italy harbors a reservoir of mtDNA diversity, with deep-rooting HV lineages often related to sequences present in the Caucasus and the Middle East. The resulting hypothesis of a glacial refugium in Southern Italy has implications for the understanding of late Paleolithic population movements and is discussed within the archaeological cultural shifts occurred over the entire continent. PMID:26640946

  8. Heritable Gene Regulation in the CD4:CD8 T Cell Lineage Choice

    PubMed Central

    Issuree, Priya D. A.; Ng, Charles P.; Littman, Dan R.

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive immune system is dependent on functionally distinct lineages of T cell antigen receptor αβ-expressing T cells that differentiate from a common progenitor in the thymus. CD4+CD8+ progenitor thymocytes undergo selection following interaction with MHC class I and class II molecules bearing peptide self-antigens, giving rise to CD8+ cytotoxic and CD4+ helper or regulatory T cell lineages, respectively. The strict correspondence of CD4 and CD8 expression with distinct cellular phenotypes has made their genes useful surrogates for investigating molecular mechanisms of lineage commitment. Studies of Cd4 and Cd8 transcriptional regulation have uncovered cis-regulatory elements that are critical for mediating epigenetic modifications at distinct stages of development to establish heritable transcriptional programs. In this review, we examine the epigenetic mechanisms involved in Cd4 and Cd8 gene regulation during T cell lineage specification and highlight the features that make this an attractive system for uncovering molecular mechanisms of heritability. PMID:28382035

  9. Modeling lineage and phenotypic diversification in the New World monkey (Platyrrhini, Primates) radiation.

    PubMed

    Aristide, Leandro; Rosenberger, Alfred L; Tejedor, Marcelo F; Perez, S Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive radiations that have taken place in the distant past can now be more thoroughly studied with the availability of large molecular phylogenies and comparative data drawn from extant and fossil species. Platyrrhines are a good example of a major mammalian evolutionary radiation confined to a single continent, involving a relatively large temporal scale and documented by a relatively small but informative fossil record. Here, we present comparative evidence using data on extant and fossil species to explore alternative evolutionary models in an effort to better understand the process of platyrrhine lineage and phenotypic diversification. Specifically, we compare the likelihood of null models of lineage and phenotypic diversification versus various models of adaptive evolution. Moreover, we statistically explore the main ecological dimension behind the platyrrhine diversification. Contrary to the previous proposals, our study did not find evidence of a rapid lineage accumulation in the phylogenetic tree of extant platyrrhine species. However, the fossil-based diversity curve seems to show a slowdown in diversification rates toward present times. This also suggests an early high rate of extinction among lineages within crown Platyrrhini. Finally, our analyses support the hypothesis that the platyrrhine phenotypic diversification appears to be characterized by an early and profound differentiation in body size related to a multidimensional niche model, followed by little subsequent change (i.e., stasis).

  10. Despite phylogenetic effects, C3-C4 lineages bridge the ecological gap to C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Marjorie R; Christin, Pascal-Antoine

    2017-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis is a physiological innovation involving several anatomical and biochemical components that emerged recurrently in flowering plants. This complex trait evolved via a series of physiological intermediates, broadly termed 'C3-C4', which have been widely studied to understand C4 origins. While this research program has focused on biochemistry, physiology, and anatomy, the ecology of these intermediates remains largely unexplored. Here, we use global occurrence data and local habitat descriptions to characterize the niches of multiple C3-C4 lineages, as well as their close C3 and C4 relatives. While C3-C4 taxa tend to occur in warm climates, their abiotic niches are spread along other dimensions, making it impossible to define a universal C3-C4 niche. Phylogeny-based comparisons suggest that, despite shifts associated with photosynthetic types, the precipitation component of the C3-C4 niche is particularly lineage specific, being highly correlated with that of closely related C3 and C4 taxa. Our large-scale analyses suggest that C3-C4 lineages converged toward warm habitats, which may have facilitated the transition to C4 photosynthesis, effectively bridging the ecological gap between C3 and C4 plants. The intermediates retained some precipitation aspects of their C3 ancestors' habitat, and likely transmitted them to their C4 descendants, contributing to the diversity among C4 lineages seen today.

  11. Identifying the lineages of individual cells in cocultures by multivariate analysis of Raman spectra.

    PubMed

    Ilin, Yelena; Kraft, Mary L

    2014-05-07

    The cellular and matrix cues that induce stem cell differentiation into distinct cell lineages must be identified to permit the ex vivo expansion of desired cell populations for clinical applications. Combinatorial biomaterials enable screening multiple different microenvironments while using small numbers of rare stem cells. New methods to identify the phenotypes of individual cells in cocultures with location specificity would increase the efficiency and throughput of these screening platforms. Here, we demonstrate that partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models of calibration Raman spectra from cells in pure cultures can be used to identify the lineages of individual cells in more complex culture environments. The calibration Raman spectra were collected from individual cells of four different lineages, and a PLS-DA model that captured the Raman spectral profiles characteristic of each cell line was created. The application of these models to Raman spectra from test sets of cells indicated individual, fixed and living cells in separate monocultures, as well as those in more complex culture environments, such as cocultures, could be identified with low error. Cells from populations with very similar biochemistries could also be identified with high accuracy. We show that these identifications are based on reproducible cell-related spectral features, and not spectral contributions from the culture environment. This work demonstrates that PLS-DA of Raman spectra acquired from pure monocultures provides an objective, noninvasive, and label-free approach for accurately identifying the lineages of individual, living cells in more complex coculture environments.

  12. Spatiotemporal analyses of neural lineages after embryonic and postnatal progenitor targeting combining different reporters

    PubMed Central

    Figueres-Oñate, Maria; García-Marqués, Jorge; Pedraza, Maria; De Carlos, Juan Andrés; López-Mascaraque, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Genetic lineage tracing with electroporation is one of the most powerful techniques to target neural progenitor cells and their progeny. However, the spatiotemporal relationship between neural progenitors and their final phenotype remain poorly understood. One critical factor to analyze the cell fate of progeny is reporter integration into the genome of transfected cells. To address this issue, we performed postnatal and in utero co-electroporations of different fluorescent reporters to label, in both cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb, the progeny of subventricular zone neural progenitors. By comparing fluorescent reporter expression in the adult cell progeny, we show a differential expression pattern within the same cell lineage, depending on electroporation stage and cell identity. Further, while neuronal lineages arise from many progenitors in proliferative zones after few divisions, glial lineages come from fewer progenitors that accomplish many cell divisions. Together, these data provide a useful guide to select a strategy to track the cell fate of a specific cell population and to address whether a different proliferative origin might be correlated with functional heterogeneity. PMID:25852461

  13. Cre-mediated recombination in cell lineages that express the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Soyal, Selma M; Mukherjee, Atish; Lee, Kevin Y-S; Li, Jie; Li, Huaiguang; DeMayo, Francesco J; Lydon, John P

    2005-02-01

    Using gene-targeting methods, a progesterone receptor Cre knockin (PR-Cre) mouse was generated in which Cre recombinase was inserted into exon 1 of the PR gene. The insertion positions the Cre gene downstream (and under the specific control) of the endogenous PR promoter. As for heterozygotes for the progesterone receptor knockout (PRKO) mutation, mice heterozygous for the Cre knockin insertion are phenotypically indistinguishable from wildtype. Crossing the PR-Cre with the ROSA26R reporter revealed that Cre excision activity is restricted to cells that express PR in progesterone-responsive tissues such as the uterus, ovary, oviduct, pituitary gland, and mammary gland. Initial characterization of the PR-Cre mouse underscores the utility of this model to precisely ablate floxed target genes specifically in cell lineages that express the PR. In the wider context of female reproductive tissue ontology, this model will be indispensable in tracing the developmental fate of cell lineages that descend from PR positive progenitors.

  14. Lineage fusion in Galápagos giant tortoises.

    PubMed

    Garrick, Ryan C; Benavides, Edgar; Russello, Michael A; Hyseni, Chaz; Edwards, Danielle L; Gibbs, James P; Tapia, Washington; Ciofi, Claudio; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2014-11-01

    Although many classic radiations on islands are thought to be the result of repeated lineage splitting, the role of past fusion is rarely known because during these events, purebreds are rapidly replaced by a swarm of admixed individuals. Here, we capture lineage fusion in action in a Galápagos giant tortoise species, Chelonoidis becki, from Wolf Volcano (Isabela Island). The long generation time of Galápagos tortoises and dense sampling (841 individuals) of genetic and demographic data were integral in detecting and characterizing this phenomenon. In C. becki, we identified two genetically distinct, morphologically cryptic lineages. Historical reconstructions show that they colonized Wolf Volcano from Santiago Island in two temporally separated events, the first estimated to have occurred ~199 000 years ago. Following arrival of the second wave of colonists, both lineages coexisted for approximately ~53 000 years. Within that time, they began fusing back together, as microsatellite data reveal widespread introgressive hybridization. Interestingly, greater mate selectivity seems to be exhibited by purebred females of one of the lineages. Forward-in-time simulations predict rapid extinction of the early arriving lineage. This study provides a rare example of reticulate evolution in action and underscores the power of population genetics for understanding the past, present and future consequences of evolutionary phenomena associated with lineage fusion.

  15. Surface topography enhances differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells towards osteogenic and adipogenic lineages.

    PubMed

    Abagnale, Giulio; Steger, Michael; Nguyen, Vu Hoa; Hersch, Nils; Sechi, Antonio; Joussen, Sylvia; Denecke, Bernd; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Dreser, Alice; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Gillner, Arnold; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    Surface topography impacts on cell growth and differentiation, but it is not trivial to generate defined surface structures and to assess the relevance of specific topographic parameters. In this study, we have systematically compared in vitro differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on a variety of groove/ridge structures. Micro- and nano-patterns were generated in polyimide using reactive ion etching or multi beam laser interference, respectively. These structures affected cell spreading and orientation of human MSCs, which was also reflected in focal adhesions morphology and size. Time-lapse demonstrated directed migration parallel to the nano-patterns. Overall, surface patterns clearly enhanced differentiation of MSCs towards specific lineages: 15 μm ridges increased adipogenic differentiation whereas 2 μm ridges enhanced osteogenic differentiation. Notably, nano-patterns with a periodicity of 650 nm increased differentiation towards both osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. However, in absence of differentiation media surface structures did neither induce differentiation, nor lineage-specific gene expression changes. Furthermore, nanostructures did not affect the YAP/TAZ complex, which is activated by substrate stiffness. Our results provide further insight into how structuring of tailored biomaterials and implant interfaces - e.g. by multi beam laser interference in sub-micrometer scale - do not induce differentiation of MSCs per se, but support their directed differentiation.

  16. Implementation of erythroid lineage analysis by flow cytometry in diagnostic models for myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Eline M.P.; Westers, Theresia M.; Alhan, Canan; Cali, Claudia; Visser-Wisselaar, Heleen A.; Chitu, Dana A.; van der Velden, Vincent H.J.; te Marvelde, Jeroen G.; Klein, Saskia K.; Muus, Petra; Vellenga, Edo; de Greef, Georgina E.; Legdeur, Marie-Cecile C.J.C.; Wijermans, Pierre W.; Stevens-Kroef, Marian J.P.L.; da Silva-Coelho, Pedro; Jansen, Joop H.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2017-01-01

    Flow cytometric analysis is a recommended tool in the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes. Current flow cytometric approaches evaluate the (im)mature myelo-/monocytic lineage with a median sensitivity and specificity of ~71% and ~93%, respectively. We hypothesized that the addition of erythroid lineage analysis could increase the sensitivity of flow cytometry. Hereto, we validated the analysis of erythroid lineage parameters recommended by the International/European LeukemiaNet Working Group for Flow Cytometry in Myelodysplastic Syndromes, and incorporated this evaluation in currently applied flow cytometric models. One hundred and sixty-seven bone marrow aspirates were analyzed; 106 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, and 61 cytopenic controls. There was a strong correlation between presence of erythroid aberrancies assessed by flow cytometry and the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes when validating the previously described erythroid evaluation. Furthermore, addition of erythroid aberrancies to two different flow cytometric models led to an increased sensitivity in detecting myelodysplastic syndromes: from 74% to 86% for the addition to the diagnostic score designed by Ogata and colleagues, and from 69% to 80% for the addition to the integrated flow cytometric score for myelodysplastic syndromes, designed by our group. In both models the specificity was unaffected. The high sensitivity and specificity of flow cytometry in the detection of myelodysplastic syndromes illustrates the important value of flow cytometry in a standardized diagnostic approach. The trial is registered at www.trialregister.nl as NTR1825; EudraCT n.: 2008-002195-10 PMID:27658438

  17. Commitment to the CD4 lineage mediated by extracellular signal-related kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase and lck signaling.

    PubMed

    Sharp, L L; Hedrick, S M

    1999-12-15

    The development of T cells results in a concordance between the specificity of the TCR for MHC class I and class II molecules and the expression of CD8 and CD4 coreceptors. Based on analogy to simple metazoan models of organ development and lineage commitment, we sought to determine whether extracellular signal-related kinase (Erk) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway signaling acts as an inductive signal for the CD4 lineage. Here, we show that, by altering the intracellular signaling involving the Erk/MAP kinase pathway, T cells with specificity for MHC class I can be diverted to express CD4, and, conversely, T cells with specificity for MHC class II can be diverted to express CD8. Furthermore, we find that activation of the src-family tyrosine kinase, p56lck is an upstream mediator of lineage commitment. These results suggest a simple mechanism for lineage commitment in T cell development.

  18. Meta-Boolean models of asymmetric division patterns in the C. elegans intestinal lineage

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, Sofia; Forchheimer, Robert; Larsson, Jan-Åke

    2013-01-01

    The intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans is derived from 20 cells that are organized into nine intestinal rings. During embryogenesis, three of the rings rotate approximately 90 degrees in a process known as intestinal twist. The underlying mechanisms for this morphological event are not fully known, but it has been demonstrated that both left-right and anterior-posterior asymmetry is required for intestinal twist to occur. We have recently presented a rule-based meta-Boolean tree model intended to describe complex lineages. In this report we apply this model to the E lineage of C. elegans, specifically targeting the asymmetric anterior-posterior division patterns within the lineage. The resulting model indicates that cells with the same factor concentration are located next to each other in the intestine regardless of lineage origin. In addition, the shift in factor concentrations coincides with the boundary for intestinal twist. When modeling lit-1 mutant data according to the same principle, the factor distributions in each cell are altered, yet the concurrence between the shift in concentration and intestinal twist remains. This pattern suggests that intestinal twist is controlled by a threshold mechanism. In the current paper we present the factor concentrations for all possible combinations of symmetric and asymmetric divisions in the E lineage and relate these to the potential threshold by studying existing data for wild-type and mutant embryos. Finally, we discuss how the resulting models can serve as a basis for experimental design in order to reveal the underlying mechanisms of intestinal twist. PMID:24058861

  19. Cross-Species Transmission and Differential Fate of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Three Mammal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Xiaoyu; Feschotte, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) arise from retroviruses chromosomally integrated in the host germline. ERVs are common in vertebrate genomes and provide a valuable fossil record of past retroviral infections to investigate the biology and evolution of retroviruses over a deep time scale, including cross-species transmission events. Here we took advantage of a catalog of ERVs we recently produced for the bat Myotis lucifugus to seek evidence for infiltration of these retroviruses in other mammalian species (>100) currently represented in the genome sequence database. We provide multiple lines of evidence for the cross-ordinal transmission of a gammaretrovirus endogenized independently in the lineages of vespertilionid bats, felid cats and pangolin ~13–25 million years ago. Following its initial introduction, the ERV amplified extensively in parallel in both bat and cat lineages, generating hundreds of species-specific insertions throughout evolution. However, despite being derived from the same viral species, phylogenetic and selection analyses suggest that the ERV experienced different amplification dynamics in the two mammalian lineages. In the cat lineage, the ERV appears to have expanded primarily by retrotransposition of a single proviral progenitor that lost infectious capacity shortly after endogenization. In the bat lineage, the ERV followed a more complex path of germline invasion characterized by both retrotransposition and multiple infection events. The results also suggest that some of the bat ERVs have maintained infectious capacity for extended period of time and may be still infectious today. This study provides one of the most rigorously documented cases of cross-ordinal transmission of a mammalian retrovirus. It also illustrates how the same retrovirus species has transitioned multiple times from an infectious pathogen to a genomic parasite (i.e. retrotransposon), yet experiencing different invasion dynamics in different mammalian hosts. PMID

  20. Cross-Species Transmission and Differential Fate of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Three Mammal Lineages.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Xiaoyu; Feschotte, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) arise from retroviruses chromosomally integrated in the host germline. ERVs are common in vertebrate genomes and provide a valuable fossil record of past retroviral infections to investigate the biology and evolution of retroviruses over a deep time scale, including cross-species transmission events. Here we took advantage of a catalog of ERVs we recently produced for the bat Myotis lucifugus to seek evidence for infiltration of these retroviruses in other mammalian species (>100) currently represented in the genome sequence database. We provide multiple lines of evidence for the cross-ordinal transmission of a gammaretrovirus endogenized independently in the lineages of vespertilionid bats, felid cats and pangolin ~13-25 million years ago. Following its initial introduction, the ERV amplified extensively in parallel in both bat and cat lineages, generating hundreds of species-specific insertions throughout evolution. However, despite being derived from the same viral species, phylogenetic and selection analyses suggest that the ERV experienced different amplification dynamics in the two mammalian lineages. In the cat lineage, the ERV appears to have expanded primarily by retrotransposition of a single proviral progenitor that lost infectious capacity shortly after endogenization. In the bat lineage, the ERV followed a more complex path of germline invasion characterized by both retrotransposition and multiple infection events. The results also suggest that some of the bat ERVs have maintained infectious capacity for extended period of time and may be still infectious today. This study provides one of the most rigorously documented cases of cross-ordinal transmission of a mammalian retrovirus. It also illustrates how the same retrovirus species has transitioned multiple times from an infectious pathogen to a genomic parasite (i.e. retrotransposon), yet experiencing different invasion dynamics in different mammalian hosts.

  1. Single-cell analysis delineates a trajectory toward the human early otic lineage

    PubMed Central

    Ealy, Megan; Ellwanger, Daniel C.; Kosaric, Nina; Stapper, Andres P.; Heller, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Efficient pluripotent stem cell guidance protocols for the production of human posterior cranial placodes such as the otic placode that gives rise to the inner ear do not exist. Here we use a systematic approach including defined monolayer culture, signaling modulation, and single-cell gene expression analysis to delineate a developmental trajectory for human otic lineage specification in vitro. We found that modulation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and WNT signaling combined with FGF and retinoic acid treatments over the course of 18 days generates cell populations that develop chronological expression of marker genes of non-neural ectoderm, preplacodal ectoderm, and early otic lineage. Gene expression along this differentiation path is distinct from other lineages such as endoderm, mesendoderm, and neural ectoderm. Single-cell analysis exposed the heterogeneity of differentiating cells and allowed discrimination of non-neural ectoderm and otic lineage cells from off-target populations. Pseudotemporal ordering of human embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived single-cell gene expression profiles revealed an initially synchronous guidance toward non-neural ectoderm, followed by comparatively asynchronous occurrences of preplacodal and otic marker genes. Positive correlation of marker gene expression between both cell lines and resemblance to mouse embryonic day 10.5 otocyst cells implied reasonable robustness of the guidance protocol. Single-cell trajectory analysis further revealed that otic progenitor cell types are induced in monolayer cultures, but further development appears impeded, likely because of lack of a lineage-stabilizing microenvironment. Our results provide a framework for future exploration of stabilizing microenvironments for efficient differentiation of stem cell-generated human otic cell types. PMID:27402757

  2. Expanding the Entamoeba Universe: New Hosts Yield Novel Ribosomal Lineages.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Alison S; Busby, Eloise J; Levy, Abigail D; Komm, Natasha; Clark, C Graham

    2016-01-01

    Removing the requirement for cell culture has led to a substantial increase in the number of lineages of Entamoeba recognized as distinct. Surveying the range of potential host species for this parasite genus has barely been started and it is clear that additional sampling of the same host in different locations often identifies additional diversity. In this study, using small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, we identify four new lineages of Entamoeba, including the first report of Entamoeba from an elephant, and extend the host range of some previously described lineages. In addition, examination of microbiome data from a number of host animals suggests that substantial Entamoeba diversity remains to be uncovered.

  3. New haptophyte lineages and multiple independent colonizations of freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Simon, Marianne; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David; Jardillier, Ludwig

    2013-04-01

    The diversity and ecological relevance of small haptophytes in marine systems is increasingly recognized. Similar investigations in freshwater remain scarce, despite some recent studies showing the existence of divergent haptophyte lineages and indicating that these microalgae can occur at high abundance in lakes. We studied the diversity of haptophytes in a wide variety of marine, salty continental and, most particularly, freshwater environments by amplifying, cloning and sequencing 18S rRNA genes. For this purpose, we designed two sets of primers specific for the two recognized haptophyte classes, Prymnesiophyceae and Pavlovophyceae. We detected pavlovophyte sequences only in freshwater systems as well as several novel prymnesiophyte phylotypes in both freshwater and marine environments. In addition, we retrieved a cluster of sequences (HAP-3) from the Marmara Sea branching deeply in the haptophyte tree with no clear affiliation to either of the two recognized classes. Five of the freshwater prymnesiophyte phylotypes detected formed a divergent monophyletic group (EV) without close described representatives that branched within the Isochrysidales, a group of generally marine and most often calcifying coccolithophorids. The presence of several sequences of freshwater haptophytes scattered among marine taxa in phylogenetic trees confirms the occurrence of several independent haptophyte transitions between marine and freshwater environments.

  4. Ebf1-Dependent Control of the Osteoblast and Adipocyte Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Hesslein, David G. T.; Fretz, Jackie A.; Xi, Yougen; Nelson, Tracy; Zhou, Shoaming; Lorenzo, Joseph A.; Schatz, David G.; Horowitz, Mark C.

    2008-01-01

    Ebf1 is a transcription factor essential for B cell fate specification and function and important for the development of olfactory sensory neurons. We show here that Ebf1 also plays an important role in regulating osteoblast and adipocyte development in vivo. Ebf1 mRNA and protein is expressed in MSCs, in OBs at most stages of differentiation, and in adipocytes. Tibiae and femora from Ebf1−/− mice had a striking increase in all bone formation parameters examined including the number of OBs, osteoid volume, and bone formation rate. Serum osteocalcin, a marker of bone formation, was significantly elevated in mutant mice. The numbers of osteoclasts in bone were normal in younger (4 week-old) Ebf1−/− mice but increased in older (12 week-old) Ebf1−/− mice. This correlated well with in vitro osteoclast development from bone marrow cells. In addition to the increased osteoblastogenesis, there was a dramatic increase in adipocyte numbers in the bone marrow of Ebf1−/− mice. Increased adiposity was also seen histologically in the liver but not in the spleen of these mice, and accompanied by decreased deposition of adipose to subcutaneous sites. Thus Ebf1-deficient mice appear to be a new model of lipodystrophy. Ebf1 is a rare example of a transcription factor that regulates both the osteoblast and adipocyte lineages similarly. PMID:19130908

  5. A late-lineage murine neutrophil precursor population exhibits dynamic changes during demand-adapted granulopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Hyeok; Yang, Dongchan; Kim, Mirang; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Dongsup; Kang, Suk-Jo

    2017-01-01

    Homeostasis of neutrophils—the blood cells that respond first to infection and tissue injury—is critical for the regulation of immune responses and regulated through granulopoiesis, a multi-stage process by which neutrophils differentiate from hematopoietic stem cells. Granulopoiesis is a highly dynamic process and altered in certain clinical conditions, such as pathologic and iatrogenic neutropenia, described as demand-adapted granulopoiesis. The regulation of granulopoiesis under stress is not completely understood because studies of granulopoiesis dynamics have been hampered by technical limitations in defining neutrophil precursors. Here, we define a population of neutrophil precursor cells in the bone marrow with unprecedented purity, characterized by the lineage−CD11b+Ly6GloLy6BintCD115−, which we call NeuPs (Neutrophil Precursors). We demonstrated that NeuPs differentiate into mature and functional neutrophils both in vitro and in vivo. By analyzing the gene expression profiles of NeuPs, we also identified NeuP stage-specific genes and characterized patterns of gene regulation throughout granulopoiesis. Importantly, we found that NeuPs have the potential to proliferate, but the proliferation decreased in multiple different hematopoietic stress settings, indicating that proliferating NeuPs are poised at a critical step to regulate granulopoiesis. Our findings will facilitate understanding how the hematopoietic system maintains homeostasis and copes with the demands of granulopoiesis. PMID:28059162

  6. Sympatric speciation: perfume preferences of orchid bee lineages.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Duncan E

    2008-12-09

    Female attraction to an environmentally derived mating signal released by male orchid bees may be tightly linked to shared olfactory preferences of both sexes. A change in perfume preference may have led to divergence of two morphologically distinct lineages.

  7. Tools and Techniques for Wt1-Based Lineage Tracing.

    PubMed

    Wilm, Bettina; Muñoz-Chapuli, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal expression pattern of Wt1 has been extensively studied in a number of animal models to establish its function and the developmental fate of the cells expressing this gene. In this chapter, we review the available animal models for Wt1-expressing cell lineage analysis, including direct Wt1 expression reporters and systems for permanent Wt1 lineage tracing. We describe the presently used constitutive or inducible genetic lineage tracing approaches based on the Cre/loxP system utilizing Cre recombinase expression under control of a Wt1 promoter.To make these systems accessible, we provide laboratory protocols that include dissection and processing of the tissues for immunofluorescence and histopathological analysis of the lineage-labeled Wt1-derived cells within the embryo/tissue context.

  8. Parthenogenesis: birth of a new lineage or reproductive accident?

    PubMed

    van der Kooi, Casper J; Schwander, Tanja

    2015-08-03

    Parthenogenesis - the ability to produce offspring from unfertilized eggs - is widespread among invertebrates and now increasingly found in normally sexual vertebrates. Are these cases reproductive errors or could they be a first step in the emergence of new parthenogenetic lineages?

  9. LCGbase: A Comprehensive Database for Lineage-Based Co-regulated Genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng; Zhang, Yubin; Fan, Zhonghua; Liu, Guiming; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    ontology (GO) annotation, promoter identification, gene expression (co-expression), and evolutionary analysis. This database not only provides a way to define lineage-specific and species-specific gene clusters but also facilitates future studies on gene co-regulation, epigenetic control of gene expression (DNA methylation and histone marks), and chromosomal structures in a context of gene clusters and species evolution. LCGbase is freely available at http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/LCGbase.

  10. Genetic Lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in Isfahan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Riyahi Zaniani, Fatemeh; Moghim, Sharareh; Mirhendi, Hossein; Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh; Fazeli, Hossein; Salehi, Mahshid; Nasr Esfahani, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to identify the genetic lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Isfahan via the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable number tandem repeat typing method based on 15 loci. Forty-nine M. tuberculosis isolates were collected between 2013 and 2015 from Tuberculosis patients in Mollahadi Sabzevari Tuberculosis Center in Isfahan. All isolates were typed by 15-locus MIRU-VNTR typing. The highest percentage of isolates, 44.89 % (22/49), belonged to the Euro-American lineage, while the frequencies of the East-African-Indian, East-Asian, and Indo-Oceanic lineages were 28.57 % (14/49), 24.4 % (12/49), and 2.04 % (1/49), respectively. Among the 22 isolates of the Euro-American lineage, those belonging to the NEW-1 sub-lineage were most prevalent (24.4 %). Approximately, the same proportion of isolates belonging to the Delhi/CAS, Beijing, and NEW-1 sub-lineages were identified in Iranian and Afghan immigrant patients. The Delhi/CAS and Beijing sub-lineage isolates were prevalent among patients who had been previously treated for TB. Results showed that all of the 49 MIRU-VNTR patterns were unique and the clustering rate of the 15-locus MIRU-VNTR was 0.0 (minimum recent transmission). The results of this study show that the lineages of M. tuberculosis isolates in Isfahan are similar to those reported in the Eastern Mediterranean region (indicative of the epidemiological relationship between the countries in the region). The low clustering rate in our results reveals that transmission of tuberculosis in Isfahan is, in most cases, a reactivation of previous tuberculosis infection and the role of recently transmitted disease is minor.

  11. Histone demethylase KDM2B regulates lineage commitment in normal and malignant hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Andricovich, Jaclyn; Kai, Yan; Peng, Weiqun; Foudi, Adlen; Tzatsos, Alexandros

    2016-01-01

    The development of the hematopoietic system is a dynamic process that is controlled by the interplay between transcriptional and epigenetic networks to determine cellular identity. These networks are critical for lineage specification and are frequently dysregulated in leukemias. Here, we identified histone demethylase KDM2B as a critical regulator of definitive hematopoiesis and lineage commitment of murine hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). RNA sequencing of Kdm2b-null HSPCs and genome-wide ChIP studies in human leukemias revealed that KDM2B cooperates with polycomb and trithorax complexes to regulate differentiation, lineage choice, cytokine signaling, and cell cycle. Furthermore, we demonstrated that KDM2B exhibits a dichotomous role in hematopoietic malignancies. Specifically, we determined that KDM2B maintains lymphoid leukemias, but restrains RAS-driven myeloid transformation. Our study reveals that KDM2B is an important mediator of hematopoietic cell development and has opposing roles in tumor progression that are dependent on cellular context. PMID:26808549

  12. Lineage mapping identifies molecular and architectural similarities between the larval and adult Drosophila central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Lacin, Haluk; Truman, James W

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis in Drosophila occurs in two phases, embryonic and post-embryonic, in which the same set of neuroblasts give rise to the distinct larval and adult nervous systems, respectively. Here, we identified the embryonic neuroblast origin of the adult neuronal lineages in the ventral nervous system via lineage-specific GAL4 lines and molecular markers. Our lineage mapping revealed that neurons born late in the embryonic phase show axonal morphology and transcription factor profiles that are similar to the neurons born post-embryonically from the same neuroblast. Moreover, we identified three thorax-specific neuroblasts not previously characterized and show that HOX genes confine them to the thoracic segments. Two of these, NB2-3 and NB3-4, generate leg motor neurons. The other neuroblast is novel and appears to have arisen recently during insect evolution. Our findings provide a comprehensive view of neurogenesis and show how proliferation of individual neuroblasts is dictated by temporal and spatial cues. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13399.001 PMID:26975248

  13. Stem cells and lineage development in the mammalian blastocyst.

    PubMed

    Rossant, Janet

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian blastocyst is the source of the most pluripotent stem cells known: embryonic stem (ES) cells. However, ES cells are not totipotent; in mouse chimeras, they do not contribute to extra-embryonic cell types of the trophectoderm (TE) and primitive endoderm (PrE) lineages. Understanding the genetic pathways that control pluripotency v. extra-embryonic lineage restriction is key to understanding not only normal embryonic development, but also how to reprogramme adult cells to pluripotency. The trophectoderm and primitive endoderm lineages also provide the first signals that drive patterned differentiation of the pluripotent epiblast cells of the embryo. My laboratory has produced permanent mouse cell lines from both the TE and the PrE, termed trophoblast stem (TS) and eXtra-embryonic ENdoderm (XEN) cells. We have used these cells to explore the genetic and molecular hierarchy of lineage restriction and identify the key factors that distinguish the ES cell v. the TS or XEN cell fate. The major molecular pathways of lineage commitment defined in mouse embryos and stem cells are probably conserved across mammalian species, but more comparative studies of lineage development in embryos of non-rodent mammals will likely yield interesting differences in terms of timing and details.

  14. Evolutionary origin of a streamlined marine bacterioplankton lineage.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haiwei

    2015-06-01

    Planktonic bacterial lineages with streamlined genomes are prevalent in the ocean. The base composition of their DNA is often highly biased towards low G+C content, a possible source of systematic error in phylogenetic reconstruction. A total of 228 orthologous protein families were sampled that are shared among major lineages of Alphaproteobacteria, including the marine free-living SAR11 clade and the obligate endosymbiotic Rickettsiales. These two ecologically distinct lineages share genome sizes of <1.5 Mbp and genomic G+C content of <30%. Statistical analyses showed that only 28 protein families are composition-homogeneous, whereas the other 200 families significantly violate the composition-homogeneous assumption included in most phylogenetic methods. RAxML analysis based on the concatenation of 24 ribosomal proteins that fall into the heterogeneous protein category clustered the SAR11 and Rickettsiales lineages at the base of the Alphaproteobacteria tree, whereas that based on the concatenation of 28 homogeneous proteins (including 19 ribosomal proteins) disassociated the lineages and placed SAR11 at the base of the non-endosymbiotic lineages. When the two data sets were concatenated, only a model that accounted for compositional bias yielded a tree identical to the tree built with composition-homogeneous proteins. Ancestral genome analysis suggests that the first evolved SAR11 cell had a small genome streamlined from its ancestor by a factor of two and coinciding with an ecological transition, followed by further gradual streamlining towards the extant SAR11 populations.

  15. Correlated evolution of nucleotide substitution rates and allelic variation in Mhc-DRB lineages of primates

    PubMed Central

    Garamszegi, László Z; de Groot, Natasja G; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2009-01-01

    Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a key model of genetic polymorphism. Selection pressure by pathogens or other microevolutionary forces may result in a high rate of non-synonymous substitutions at the codons specifying the contact residues of the antigen binding sites (ABS), and the maintenance of extreme MHC allelic variation at the population/species level. Therefore, selection forces favouring MHC variability for any reason should cause a correlated evolution between substitution rates and allelic polymorphism. To investigate this prediction, we characterised nucleotide substitution rates and allelic polymorphism (i.e. the number of alleles detected in relation to the number of animals screened) of several Mhc class II DRB lineages in 46 primate species, and tested for a correlation between them. Results First, we demonstrate that species-specific and lineage-specific evolutionary constraints favour species- and lineage-dependent substitution rate at the codons specifying the ABS contact residues (i.e. certain species and lineages can be characterised by high substitution rate, while others have low rate). Second, we show that although the degree of the non-synonymous substitution rate at the ABS contact residues was systematically higher than the degree of the synonymous substitution rate, these estimates were strongly correlated when we controlled for species-specific and lineage-specific effects, and also for the fact that different studies relied on different sample size. Such relationships between substitution rates of different types could even be extended to the non-contact residues of the molecule. Third, we provide statistical evidence that increased substitution rate along a MHC gene may lead to allelic variation, as a high substitution rate can be observed in those lineages in which many alleles are maintained. Fourth, we show that the detected patterns were independent of phylogenetic constraints. When we used phylogenetic

  16. A case of cellular alchemy: lineage reprogramming and its potential in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Asuelime, Grace E; Shi, Yanhong

    2012-08-01

    The field of regenerative medicine is rapidly gaining momentum as an increasing number of reports emerge concerning the induced conversions observed in cellular fate reprogramming. While in recent years, much attention has been focused on the conversion of fate-committed somatic cells to an embryonic-like or pluripotent state, there are still many limitations associated with the applications of induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming, including relatively low reprogramming efficiency, the times required for the reprogramming event to take place, the epigenetic instability, and the tumorigenicity associated with the pluripotent state. On the other hand, lineage reprogramming involves the conversion from one mature cell type to another without undergoing conversion to an unstable intermediate. It provides an alternative approach in regenerative medicine that has a relatively lower risk of tumorigenesis and increased efficiency within specific cellular contexts. While lineage reprogramming provides exciting potential, there is still much to be assessed before this technology is ready to be applied in a clinical setting.

  17. Differential alu mobilization and polymorphism among the human and chimpanzee lineages.

    PubMed

    Hedges, Dale J; Callinan, Pauline A; Cordaux, Richard; Xing, Jinchuan; Barnes, Erin; Batzer, Mark A

    2004-06-01

    Alu elements are primate-specific members of the SINE (short interspersed element) retroposon family, which comprise approximately 10% of the human genome. Here we report the first chromosomal-level comparison examining the Alu retroposition dynamics following the divergence of humans and chimpanzees. We find a twofold increase in Alu insertions in humans in comparison to the common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes). The genomic diversity (polymorphism for presence or absence of the Alu insertion) associated with these inserts indicates that, analogous to recent nucleotide diversity studies, the level of chimpanzee Alu diversity is approximately 1.7 times higher than that of humans. Evolutionarily recent Alu subfamily structure differs markedly between the human and chimpanzee lineages, with the major human subfamilies remaining largely inactive in the chimpanzee lineage. We propose a population-based model to account for the observed fluctuation in Alu retroposition rates across primate taxa.

  18. Major bacterial lineages are essentially devoid of CRISPR-Cas viral defence systems

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, David; Sun, Christine L.; Brown, Christopher T.; Sharon, Itai; Anantharaman, Karthik; Probst, Alexander J.; Thomas, Brian C.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2016-01-01

    Current understanding of microorganism–virus interactions, which shape the evolution and functioning of Earth's ecosystems, is based primarily on cultivated organisms. Here we investigate thousands of viral and microbial genomes recovered using a cultivation-independent approach to study the frequency, variety and taxonomic distribution of viral defence mechanisms. CRISPR-Cas systems that confer microorganisms with immunity to viruses are present in only 10% of 1,724 sampled microorganisms, compared with previous reports of 40% occurrence in bacteria and 81% in archaea. We attribute this large difference to the lack of CRISPR-Cas systems across major bacterial lineages that have no cultivated representatives. We correlate absence of CRISPR-Cas with lack of nucleotide biosynthesis capacity and a symbiotic lifestyle. Restriction systems are well represented in these lineages and might provide both non-specific viral defence and access to nucleotides. PMID:26837824

  19. Major bacterial lineages are essentially devoid of CRISPR-Cas viral defence systems

    DOE PAGES

    Burstein, David; Sun, Christine L.; Brown, Christopher T.; ...

    2016-02-03

    Here, current understanding of microorganism–virus interactions, which shape the evolution and functioning of Earth’s ecosystems, is based primarily on cultivated organisms. Here we investigate thousands of viral and microbial genomes recovered using a cultivation independent approach to study the frequency, variety and taxonomic distribution of viral defence mechanisms. CRISPR-Cas systems that confer microorganisms with immunity to viruses are present in only 10% of 1,724 sampled microorganisms, compared with previous reports of 40% occurrence in bacteria and 81% in archaea. We attribute this large difference to the lack of CRISPR-Cas systems across major bacterial lineages that have no cultivated representatives. Wemore » correlate absence of CRISPR-Cas with lack of nucleotide biosynthesis capacity and a symbiotic lifestyle. Restriction systems are well represented in these lineages and might provide both non-specific viral defence and access to nucleotides.« less

  20. Major bacterial lineages are essentially devoid of CRISPR-Cas viral defence systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burstein, David; Sun, Christine L.; Brown, Christopher T.; Sharon, Itai; Anantharaman, Karthik; Probst, Alexander J.; Thomas, Brian C.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2016-02-03

    Here, current understanding of microorganism–virus interactions, which shape the evolution and functioning of Earth’s ecosystems, is based primarily on cultivated organisms. Here we investigate thousands of viral and microbial genomes recovered using a cultivation independent approach to study the frequency, variety and taxonomic distribution of viral defence mechanisms. CRISPR-Cas systems that confer microorganisms with immunity to viruses are present in only 10% of 1,724 sampled microorganisms, compared with previous reports of 40% occurrence in bacteria and 81% in archaea. We attribute this large difference to the lack of CRISPR-Cas systems across major bacterial lineages that have no cultivated representatives. We correlate absence of CRISPR-Cas with lack of nucleotide biosynthesis capacity and a symbiotic lifestyle. Restriction systems are well represented in these lineages and might provide both non-specific viral defence and access to nucleotides.

  1. Exploring Massive Incomplete Lineage Sorting in Arctoids (Laurasiatheria, Carnivora).

    PubMed

    Doronina, Liliya; Churakov, Gennady; Shi, Jingjing; Brosius, Jürgen; Baertsch, Robert; Clawson, Hiram; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Freed from the competition of large raptors, Paleocene carnivores could expand their newly acquired habitats in search of prey. Such changing conditions might have led to their successful distribution and rapid radiation. Today, molecular evolutionary biologists are faced, however, with the consequences of such accelerated adaptive radiations, because they led to sequential speciation more rapidly than phylogenetic markers could be fixed. The repercussions being that current genealogies based on such markers are incongruent with species trees.Our aim was to explore such conflicting phylogenetic zones of evolution during the early arctoid radiation, especially to distinguish diagnostic from misleading phylogenetic signals, and to examine other carnivore-related speciation events. We applied a combination of high-throughput computational strategies to screen carnivore and related genomes in silico for randomly inserted retroposed elements that we then used to identify inconsistent phylogenetic patterns in the Arctoidea group, which is well known for phylogenetic discordances.Our combined retrophylogenomic and in vitro wet lab approach detected hundreds of carnivore-specific insertions, many of them confirming well-established splits or identifying and solving conflicting species distributions. Our systematic genome-wide screens for Long INterspersed Elements detected homoplasy-free markers with insertion-specific truncation points that we used to distinguish phylogenetically informative markers from conflicting signals. The results were independently confirmed by phylogenetic diagnostic Short INterspersed Elements. As statistical analysis ruled out ancestral hybridization, these doubly verified but still conflicting patterns were statistically determined to be genomic remnants from a time of ancestral incomplete lineage sorting that especially accompanied large parts of Arctoidea evolution.

  2. Generation of Human Corneal Endothelial Cells via In Vitro Ocular Lineage Restriction of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiagang J.; Afshari, Natalie A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We generate a renewable supply of corneal endothelial cells (CEC) from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) under defined culture conditions. Methods Corneal endothelial cell induction was driven by small molecules in a stepwise fashion of lineage specification. During the initial phase, PSC fate was restricted to the eye field-like state and became eye field stem cells (EFSCs). In the second phase, PSC-derived EFSCs were further directed toward either neural crest lineage or retinal lineage. The CECs were directly induced from ocular neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) by suppressing TGF-β and ROCK signaling. Results Under chemically defined conditions, PSCs were massively converted into EFSCs and subsequently NCSCs. Eye field cell identity was characterized by the expression of key fate restriction factors for early eye field cells, such as PAX6, LHX2, and VSX2. The induction of ocular NCSCs was initiated by promoting WNT signaling in EFSCs. Within 2 weeks of induction, the majority of cells expressed the typical neural crest markers p75NTR and HNK-1. Eye field stem cell-derived NCSCs can be propagated and cryopreserved. Subsequently, a CEC monolayer was induced from adherent NCSCs in the presence of small molecular inhibitors to suppress TGF-β and ROCK signaling. The polygon-shaped CEC-like cells became visible after a week in culture. The NCSC-derived CECs expressed typical CEC markers, such as N-Cadherin and Na+/K+-ATPase. Conclusions A novel small molecule-based approach was developed to derive human CECs from PSCs via ocular lineage specification. Moreover, EFSC-derived NCSCs could serve as an immediate source cell for rapid CEC induction in vitro. PMID:28002562

  3. A novel lineage of myoviruses infecting cyanobacteria is widespread in the oceans.

    PubMed

    Sabehi, Gazalah; Shaulov, Lihi; Silver, David H; Yanai, Itai; Harel, Amnon; Lindell, Debbie

    2012-02-07

    Viruses infecting bacteria (phages) are thought to greatly impact microbial population dynamics as well as the genome diversity and evolution of their hosts. Here we report on the discovery of a novel lineage of tailed dsDNA phages belonging to the family Myoviridae and describe its first representative, S-TIM5, that infects the ubiquitous marine cyanobacterium, Synechococcus. The genome of this phage encodes an entirely unique set of structural proteins not found in any currently known phage, indicating that it uses lineage-specific genes for virion morphogenesis and represents a previously unknown lineage of myoviruses. Furthermore, among its distinctive collection of replication and DNA metabolism genes, it carries a mitochondrial-like DNA polymerase gene, providing strong evidence for the bacteriophage origin of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase. S-TIM5 also encodes an array of bacterial-like metabolism genes commonly found in phages infecting cyanobacteria including photosynthesis, carbon metabolism and phosphorus acquisition genes. This suggests a common gene pool and gene swapping of cyanophage-specific genes among different phage lineages despite distinct sets of structural and replication genes. All cytosines following purine nucleotides are methylated in the S-TIM5 genome, constituting a unique methylation pattern that likely protects the genome from nuclease degradation. This phage is abundant in the Red Sea and S-TIM5 gene homologs are widespread in the oceans. This unusual phage type is thus likely to be an important player in the oceans, impacting the population dynamics and evolution of their primary producing cyanobacterial hosts.

  4. De Novo Genes Arise at a Slow but Steady Rate along the Primate Lineage and Have Been Subject to Incomplete Lineage Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Guerzoni, Daniele; McLysaght, Aoife

    2016-01-01

    De novo protein-coding gene origination is increasingly recognized as an important evolutionary mechanism. However, there remains a large amount of uncertainty regarding the frequency of these events and the mechanisms and speed of gene establishment. Here, we describe a rigorous search for cases of de novo gene origination in the great apes. We analyzed annotated proteomes as well as full genomic DNA and transcriptional and translational evidence. It is notable that results vary between database updates due to the fluctuating annotation of these genes. Nonetheless we identified 35 de novo genes: 16 human-specific; 5 human and chimpanzee specific; and 14 that originated prior to the divergence of human, chimpanzee, and gorilla and are found in all three genomes. The taxonomically restricted distribution of these genes cannot be explained by loss in other lineages. Each gene is supported by an open reading frame-creating mutation that occurred within the primate lineage, and which is not polymorphic in any species. Similarly to previous studies we find that the de novo genes identified are short and frequently located near pre-existing genes. Also, they may be associated with Alu elements and prior transcription and RNA-splicing at the locus. Additionally, we report the first case of apparent independent lineage sorting of a de novo gene. The gene is present in human and gorilla, whereas chimpanzee has the ancestral noncoding sequence. This indicates a long period of polymorphism prior to fixation and thus supports a model where de novo genes may, at least initially, have a neutral effect on fitness. PMID:27056411

  5. Ring1B and Suv39h1 delineate distinct chromatin states at bivalent genes during early mouse lineage commitment.

    PubMed

    Alder, Olivia; Lavial, Fabrice; Helness, Anne; Brookes, Emily; Pinho, Sandra; Chandrashekran, Anil; Arnaud, Philippe; Pombo, Ana; O'Neill, Laura; Azuara, Véronique

    2010-08-01

    Pluripotent cells develop within the inner cell mass of blastocysts, a mosaic of cells surrounded by an extra-embryonic layer, the trophectoderm. We show that a set of somatic lineage regulators (including Hox, Gata and Sox factors) that carry bivalent chromatin enriched in H3K27me3 and H3K4me2 are selectively targeted by Suv39h1-mediated H3K9me3 and de novo DNA methylation in extra-embryonic versus embryonic (pluripotent) lineages, as assessed both in blastocyst-derived stem cells and in vivo. This stably repressed state is linked with a loss of gene priming for transcription through the exclusion of PRC1 (Ring1B) and RNA polymerase II complexes at bivalent, lineage-inappropriate genes upon trophoblast lineage commitment. Collectively, our results suggest a mutually exclusive role for Ring1B and Suv39h1 in regulating distinct chromatin states at key developmental genes and propose a novel mechanism by which lineage specification can be reinforced during early development.

  6. The Fates of Mutant Lineages and the Distribution of Fitness Effects of Beneficial Mutations in Laboratory Budding Yeast Populations

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Evgeni M.; Good, Benjamin H.; Desai, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    The outcomes of evolution are determined by which mutations occur and fix. In rapidly adapting microbial populations, this process is particularly hard to predict because lineages with different beneficial mutations often spread simultaneously and interfere with one another’s fixation. Hence to predict the fate of any individual variant, we must know the rate at which new mutations create competing lineages of higher fitness. Here, we directly measured the effect of this interference on the fates of specific adaptive variants in laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations and used these measurements to infer the distribution of fitness effects of new beneficial mutations. To do so, we seeded marked lineages with different fitness advantages into replicate populations and tracked their subsequent frequencies for hundreds of generations. Our results illustrate the transition between strongly advantageous lineages that decisively sweep to fixation and more moderately advantageous lineages that are often outcompeted by new mutations arising during the course of the experiment. We developed an approximate likelihood framework to compare our data to simulations and found that the effects of these competing beneficial mutations were best approximated by an exponential distribution, rather than one with a single effect size. We then used this inferred distribution of fitness effects to predict the rate of adaptation in a set of independent control populations. Finally, we discuss how our experimental design can serve as a screen for rare, large-effect beneficial mutations. PMID:24514901

  7. Global divergence of the human follicle mite Demodex folliculorum: Persistent associations between host ancestry and mite lineages

    PubMed Central

    Palopoli, Michael F.; Fergus, Daniel J.; Minot, Samuel; Pei, Dorothy T.; Simison, W. Brian; Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Thoemmes, Megan S.; Dunn, Robert R.; Trautwein, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic mites of the genus Demodex live within the hair follicles of mammals and are ubiquitous symbionts of humans, but little molecular work has been done to understand their genetic diversity or transmission. Here we sampled mite DNA from 70 human hosts of diverse geographic ancestries and analyzed 241 sequences from the mitochondrial genome of the species Demodex folliculorum. Phylogenetic analyses recovered multiple deep lineages including a globally distributed lineage common among hosts of European ancestry and three lineages that primarily include hosts of Asian, African, and Latin American ancestry. To a great extent, the ancestral geography of hosts predicted the lineages of mites found on them; 27% of the total molecular variance segregated according to the regional ancestries of hosts. We found that D. folliculorum populations are stable on an individual over the course of years and that some Asian and African American hosts maintain specific mite lineages over the course of years or generations outside their geographic region of birth or ancestry. D. folliculorum haplotypes were much more likely to be shared within families and between spouses than between unrelated individuals, indicating that transmission requires close contact. Dating analyses indicated that D. folliculorum origins may predate modern humans. Overall, D. folliculorum evolution reflects ancient human population divergences, is consistent with an out-of-Africa dispersal hypothesis, and presents an excellent model system for further understanding the history of human movement. PMID:26668374

  8. Global divergence of the human follicle mite Demodex folliculorum: Persistent associations between host ancestry and mite lineages.

    PubMed

    Palopoli, Michael F; Fergus, Daniel J; Minot, Samuel; Pei, Dorothy T; Simison, W Brian; Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Thoemmes, Megan S; Dunn, Robert R; Trautwein, Michelle

    2015-12-29

    Microscopic mites of the genus Demodex live within the hair follicles of mammals and are ubiquitous symbionts of humans, but little molecular work has been done to understand their genetic diversity or transmission. Here we sampled mite DNA from 70 human hosts of diverse geographic ancestries and analyzed 241 sequences from the mitochondrial genome of the species Demodex folliculorum. Phylogenetic analyses recovered multiple deep lineages including a globally distributed lineage common among hosts of European ancestry and three lineages that primarily include hosts of Asian, African, and Latin American ancestry. To a great extent, the ancestral geography of hosts predicted the lineages of mites found on them; 27% of the total molecular variance segregated according to the regional ancestries of hosts. We found that D. folliculorum populations are stable on an individual over the course of years and that some Asian and African American hosts maintain specific mite lineages over the course of years or generations outside their geographic region of birth or ancestry. D. folliculorum haplotypes were much more likely to be shared within families and between spouses than between unrelated individuals, indicating that transmission requires close contact. Dating analyses indicated that D. folliculorum origins may predate modern humans. Overall, D. folliculorum evolution reflects ancient human population divergences, is consistent with an out-of-Africa dispersal hypothesis, and presents an excellent model system for further understanding the history of human movement.

  9. The fates of mutant lineages and the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations in laboratory budding yeast populations.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Evgeni M; Good, Benjamin H; Desai, Michael M

    2014-04-01

    The outcomes of evolution are determined by which mutations occur and fix. In rapidly adapting microbial populations, this process is particularly hard to predict because lineages with different beneficial mutations often spread simultaneously and interfere with one another's fixation. Hence to predict the fate of any individual variant, we must know the rate at which new mutations create competing lineages of higher fitness. Here, we directly measured the effect of this interference on the fates of specific adaptive variants in laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations and used these measurements to infer the distribution of fitness effects of new beneficial mutations. To do so, we seeded marked lineages with different fitness advantages into replicate populations and tracked their subsequent frequencies for hundreds of generations. Our results illustrate the transition between strongly advantageous lineages that decisively sweep to fixation and more moderately advantageous lineages that are often outcompeted by new mutations arising during the course of the experiment. We developed an approximate likelihood framework to compare our data to simulations and found that the effects of these competing beneficial mutations were best approximated by an exponential distribution, rather than one with a single effect size. We then used this inferred distribution of fitness effects to predict the rate of adaptation in a set of independent control populations. Finally, we discuss how our experimental design can serve as a screen for rare, large-effect beneficial mutations.

  10. Hematopoietic expression of oncogenic BRAF promotes aberrant growth of monocyte-lineage cells resistant to PLX4720

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, Tamihiro; Dankort, David; Kang, Jing; Giblett, Susan; Pritchard, Catrin A.; McMahon, Martin; Leavitt, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Mutational activation of BRAF leading to expression of the BRAFV600E oncoprotein was recently identified in a high percentage of specific hematopoietic neoplasms in monocyte/histiocyte and mature B-cell lineages. Although BRAFV600E is a driver oncoprotein and pharmacological target in solid tumors such as melanoma, lung and thyroid cancer, it remains unknown whether BRAFV600E is an appropriate therapeutic target in hematopoietic neoplasms. To address this critical question, we generated a mouse model expressing inducible BRAFV600E in the hematopoietic system, and evaluated the efficacy of pathway-targeted therapeutics against primary hematopoietic cells. In this model, BRAFV600E expression conferred cytokine-independent growth to monocyte/macrophage-lineage progenitors leading to aberrant in vivo and in vitro monocyte/macrophage expansion. Furthermore, transplantation of BRAFV600E-expressing bone marrow cells promoted an in vivo pathology most notable for monocytosis in hematopoietic tissues and visceral organs. In vitro analysis revealed that MEK inhibition, but not RAF inhibition, effectively suppressed cytokine-independent clonal growth of monocyte/macrophage-lineage progenitors. However, combined RAF and PI3K inhibition effectively inhibited cytokine-independent colony formation, suggesting autocrine PI3K pathway activation. Taken together, these results provide evidence that constitutively activated BRAFV600E drives aberrant proliferation of monocyte-lineage cells. This study supports the development of pathway-targeted therapeutics in the treatment of BRAFV600E-expressing hematopoietic neoplasms in the monocyte/histiocyte lineage. PMID:24152792

  11. Pancreatic cell tracing, lineage tagging and targeted genetic manipulations in multiple cell types using pancreatic ductal infusion of adeno-associated viral vectors and/or cell-tagging dyes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Guo, Ping; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Peirish, Lauren; Fischbach, Shane; Song, Zewen; Gaffar, Iljana; Wiersch, John; El-Gohary, Yousef; Husain, Sohail Z; Gittes, George K

    2014-12-01

    Genetic manipulations, with or without lineage tracing for specific pancreatic cell types, are very powerful tools for studying diabetes, pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Nevertheless, the use of Cre/loxP systems to conditionally activate or inactivate the expression of genes in a cell type- and/or temporal-specific manner is not applicable to cell tracing and/or gene manipulations in more than one lineage at a time. Here we report a technique that allows efficient delivery of dyes for cell tagging into the mouse pancreas through the duct system, and that also delivers viruses carrying transgenes or siRNA under a specific promoter. When this technique is applied in genetically modified mice, it enables the investigator to perform either double lineage tracing or cell lineage tracing combined with gene manipulation in a second lineage. The technique requires <40 min.

  12. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  13. Lineage divergence in Odorrana graminea complex (Anura: Ranidae: Odorrana).

    PubMed

    Xiong, Rongchuan; Li, Cheng; Jiang, Jianping

    2015-05-26

    The confusing and unstable taxonomy of Odorrana livida (Rana livida) since its first record has made it a focal frog complex for systematics. In China, four species, Odorrana nebulosa, O. graminea, O. sinica, O. leporipes, were described to closely resemble O. livida or O. chloronota based on their morphological similarities, accompanied by much taxonomic confusion because of ambiguities in the wide distribution and morphological variations. Currently O. graminea is being used as the name of a provisional monotypic species group to include all the populations in China that closely resemble O. livida or O. chloronota. Here, we conducted a range-wide molecular phylogeographic analysis of the large green odorous frog (Odorrana graminea) complex across the majority of its range in China, based on 2780 bp DNA sequences of three mitochondrial genes (12S, 16S, ND2) in 107 samples from 20 sites. Our data recognized three distinct phylogeographic lineages of the Odorrana graminea (lato sensu) complex in China, and they together with a Thailand lineage formed a monophyletic group. Among the four lineages within O. graminea complex, the average genetic distances based on the concatenated sequences of 12S, 16S and ND2 were 7.5-8.8% and those based on 16S rRNA alone were 4.2-5.5%. Furthermore, canonical discriminant functions in morphometric analyses showed significant separations of all the paired lineage comparisons in China. The aforementioned genetic divergence and mismatched phenotypes among the lineages within the Odorrana graminea complex, in addition to their non-overlapping geographic distributions, imply extensive lineage diversification. However, precise taxonomic status of these lineages needs more studies based on adequate type information and more thorough species delimitation based on analysis of differentiation in bioacoustic and nuclear genetic characters especially regarding gene flow and admixture in geographical contact zones.

  14. Sphaerospora sensu stricto: taxonomy, diversity and evolution of a unique lineage of myxosporeans (Myxozoa).

    PubMed

    Bartošová, Pavla; Fiala, Ivan; Jirků, Miloslav; Cinková, Martina; Caffara, Monica; Fioravanti, Maria Letizia; Atkinson, Stephen Douglas; Bartholomew, Jerri Lee; Holzer, Astrid Sibylle

    2013-07-01

    Myxosporeans (Myxozoa) are eukaryotic parasites, primarily of fish, whose classification is in a state of flux as taxonomists attempt to synthesize the traditional morphology-based system with emerging DNA sequence-based phylogenies. The genus Sphaerospora Thélohan, 1892, which includes pathogenic species that cause significant impacts on fisheries and aquaculture, is one of the most polyphyletic taxa and exemplifies the current challenges facing myxozoan taxonomists. The type species, S. elegans, clusters within the Sphaerospora sensu stricto clade, members of which share similar tissue tropism and long insertions in their variable rRNA gene regions. However, other morphologically similar sphaerosporids lie in different branches of myxozoan phylogenetic trees. Herein, we significantly extend taxonomic sampling of sphaerosporids with SSU+LSU rDNA and EF-2 sequence data for 12 taxa including three representatives of the morphologically similar genus Polysporoplasma Sitjà-Bobadilla et Álvarez-Pellitero, 1995. These taxa were sampled from different vertebrate host groups, biogeographic realms and environments. Our phylogenetic analyses and statistical tests of single and concatenated datasets revealed Sphaerospora s. s. as a strongly supported monophyletic lineage, that clustered sister to the whole myxosporean clade (freshwater+marine lineages). Generally, Sphaerospora s. s. rDNA sequences (up to 3.7 kb) are the longest of all myxozoans and indeed metazoans. The sphaerosporid clade has two lineages, which have specific morphological, biological and sequence traits. Lineage A taxa (marine Sphaerospora spp.) have a single binucleate sporoplasm and shorter AT-rich rDNA inserts. Lineage B taxa (freshwater/brackish Sphaerospora spp.+marine/brackish Polysporoplasma spp.) have 2-12 uninucleate sporoplasms and longer GC-rich rDNA inserts. Lineage B has four subclades that correlate with host group and habitat; all Polysporoplasma species, including the type species

  15. Visualisation of chicken macrophages using transgenic reporter genes: insights into the development of the avian macrophage lineage.

    PubMed

    Balic, Adam; Garcia-Morales, Carla; Vervelde, Lonneke; Gilhooley, Hazel; Sherman, Adrian; Garceau, Valerie; Gutowska, Maria W; Burt, David W; Kaiser, Pete; Hume, David A; Sang, Helen M

    2014-08-01

    We have generated the first transgenic chickens in which reporter genes are expressed in a specific immune cell lineage, based upon control elements of the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) locus. The Fms intronic regulatory element (FIRE) within CSF1R is shown to be highly conserved in amniotes and absolutely required for myeloid-restricted expression of fluorescent reporter genes. As in mammals, CSF1R-reporter genes were specifically expressed at high levels in cells of the macrophage lineage and at a much lower level in granulocytes. The cell lineage specificity of reporter gene expression was confirmed by demonstration of coincident expression with the endogenous CSF1R protein. In transgenic birds, expression of the reporter gene provided a defined marker for macrophage-lineage cells, identifying the earliest stages in the yolk sac, throughout embryonic development and in all adult tissues. The reporter genes permit detailed and dynamic visualisation of embryonic chicken macrophages. Chicken embryonic macrophages are not recruited to incisional wounds, but are able to recognise and phagocytose microbial antigens.

  16. Visualisation of chicken macrophages using transgenic reporter genes: insights into the development of the avian macrophage lineage

    PubMed Central

    Balic, Adam; Garcia-Morales, Carla; Vervelde, Lonneke; Gilhooley, Hazel; Sherman, Adrian; Garceau, Valerie; Gutowska, Maria W.; Burt, David W.; Kaiser, Pete; Hume, David A.; Sang, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    We have generated the first transgenic chickens in which reporter genes are expressed in a specific immune cell lineage, based upon control elements of the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) locus. The Fms intronic regulatory element (FIRE) within CSF1R is shown to be highly conserved in amniotes and absolutely required for myeloid-restricted expression of fluorescent reporter genes. As in mammals, CSF1R-reporter genes were specifically expressed at high levels in cells of the macrophage lineage and at a much lower level in granulocytes. The cell lineage specificity of reporter gene expression was confirmed by demonstration of coincident expression with the endogenous CSF1R protein. In transgenic birds, expression of the reporter gene provided a defined marker for macrophage-lineage cells, identifying the earliest stages in the yolk sac, throughout embryonic development and in all adult tissues. The reporter genes permit detailed and dynamic visualisation of embryonic chicken macrophages. Chicken embryonic macrophages are not recruited to incisional wounds, but are able to recognise and phagocytose microbial antigens. PMID:25063453

  17. Interaction of CCR4–NOT with EBF1 regulates gene-specific transcription and mRNA stability in B lymphopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng-Yuan; Ramamoorthy, Senthilkumar; Boller, Sören; Rosenbaum, Marc; Rodriguez Gil, Alfonso; Mittler, Gerhard; Imai, Yumiko; Kuba, Keiji; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor EBF1 (early B-cell factor 1) regulates early B-cell differentiation by poising or activating lineage-specific genes and repressing genes associated with alternative cell fates. To identify proteins that regulate the diverse functions of EBF1, we used SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture)-based mass spectrometry of proteins associated with endogenous EBF1 in pro-B cells. This analysis identified most components of the multifunctional CCR4–NOT complex, which regulates transcription and mRNA degradation. CNOT3 interacts with EBF1, and we identified histidine 240 in EBF1 as a critical residue for this interaction. Complementation of Ebf1−/− progenitors with EBF1H240A revealed a partial block of pro-B-cell differentiation and altered expression of specific EBF1 target genes that show either reduced transcription or increased mRNA stability. Most deregulated EBF1 target genes show normal occupancy by EBF1H240A, but we also detected genes with altered occupancy, suggesting that the CCR4–NOT complex affects multiple activities of EBF1. Mice with conditional Cnot3 inactivation recapitulate the block of early B-cell differentiation, which we found to be associated with an impaired autoregulation of Ebf1 and reduced expression of pre-B-cell receptor components. Thus, the interaction of the CCR4–NOT complex with EBF1 diversifies the function of EBF1 in a context-dependent manner and may coordinate transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation. PMID:27807034

  18. Interaction of CCR4-NOT with EBF1 regulates gene-specific transcription and mRNA stability in B lymphopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Yuan; Ramamoorthy, Senthilkumar; Boller, Sören; Rosenbaum, Marc; Rodriguez Gil, Alfonso; Mittler, Gerhard; Imai, Yumiko; Kuba, Keiji; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2016-10-15

    Transcription factor EBF1 (early B-cell factor 1) regulates early B-cell differentiation by poising or activating lineage-specific genes and repressing genes associated with alternative cell fates. To identify proteins that regulate the diverse functions of EBF1, we used SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture)-based mass spectrometry of proteins associated with endogenous EBF1 in pro-B cells. This analysis identified most components of the multifunctional CCR4-NOT complex, which regulates transcription and mRNA degradation. CNOT3 interacts with EBF1, and we identified histidine 240 in EBF1 as a critical residue for this interaction. Complementation of Ebf1(-/-) progenitors with EBF1H240A revealed a partial block of pro-B-cell differentiation and altered expression of specific EBF1 target genes that show either reduced transcription or increased mRNA stability. Most deregulated EBF1 target genes show normal occupancy by EBF1H240A, but we also detected genes with altered occupancy, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex affects multiple activities of EBF1. Mice with conditional Cnot3 inactivation recapitulate the block of early B-cell differentiation, which we found to be associated with an impaired autoregulation of Ebf1 and reduced expression of pre-B-cell receptor components. Thus, the interaction of the CCR4-NOT complex with EBF1 diversifies the function of EBF1 in a context-dependent manner and may coordinate transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation.

  19. A statistical approach for distinguishing hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting.

    PubMed

    Joly, Simon; McLenachan, Patricia A; Lockhart, Peter J

    2009-08-01

    The extent and evolutionary significance of hybridization is difficult to evaluate because of the difficulty in distinguishing hybridization from incomplete lineage sorting. Here we present a novel parametric approach for statistically distinguishing hybridization from incomplete lineage sorting based on minimum genetic distances of a nonrecombining locus. It is based on the idea that the expected minimum genetic distance between sequences from two species is smaller for some hybridization events than for incomplete lineage sorting scenarios. When applied to empirical data sets, distributions can be generated for the minimum interspecies distances expected under incomplete lineage sorting using coalescent simulations. If the observed distance between sequences from two species is smaller than its predicted distribution, incomplete lineage sorting can be rejected and hybridization inferred. We demonstrate the power of the method using simulations and illustrate its application on New Zealand alpine buttercups (Ranunculus). The method is robust and complements existing approaches. Thus it should allow biologists to assess with greater accuracy the importance of hybridization in evolution.

  20. Early and multiple origins of metastatic lineages within primary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zi-Ming; Zhao, Bixiao; Bai, Yalai; Iamarino, Atila; Gaffney, Stephen G.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lifton, Richard P.; Rimm, David L.; Townsend, Jeffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of the evolutionary process of tumorigenesis that are fundamental to cancer biology and targeted treatment have been challenging to reveal, such as the divergence times and genetic clonality of metastatic lineages. To address these challenges, we performed tumor phylogenetics using molecular evolutionary models, reconstructed ancestral states of somatic mutations, and inferred cancer chronograms to yield three conclusions. First, in contrast to a linear model of cancer progression, metastases can originate from divergent lineages within primary tumors. Evolved genetic changes in cancer lineages likely affect only the proclivity toward metastasis. Single genetic changes are unlikely to be necessary or sufficient for metastasis. Second, metastatic lineages can arise early in tumor development, sometimes long before diagnosis. The early genetic divergence of some metastatic lineages directs attention toward research on driver genes that are mutated early in cancer evolution. Last, the temporal order of occurrence of driver mutations can be inferred from phylogenetic analysis of cancer chronograms, guiding development of targeted therapeutics effective against primary tumors and metastases. PMID:26858460