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Sample records for polar stratospheric clouds

  1. Optical studies of polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enell, Carl-Fredrik; Gustavsson, Bjorn; Steen, Ake; Brandstrom, Urban; Rydesater, Peter; Johansson, P.; Wagner, T.; Friess, U.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Platt, Ulrich

    1999-12-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC) appear in the polar zones of the Earth in the winter. These clouds are known to cause enhanced chemical ozone destruction. Methods for optical remote-sensing of PSC in use or under development at the Swedish Institute of Space Physics are discussed with respect to their advantages and limitations. Especially multistatic imaging may become a valuable additional tool for PSC studies.

  2. Polar stratospheric clouds inferred from satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, J.; Jones, R. L.; Remsberg, E. E.; Tuck, A. F.

    1986-11-01

    Anomalously high radiances from the ozone channel of the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) sounding instrument have been observed in the Northern Hemisphere winter lower stratosphere. Such events, thought to be due to polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), are examined further by computing relative humidities using Stratospheric Sounding Unit temperatures and water vapor measurements from the LIMS Map Archive Tape analyses. Regions identified as PSCs are found to correspond closely to regions of high humidity. While instances of saturation were found, the average humidity at the centers of 39 PSCs was calculated to be 58 percent. Possible reasons for this apparent discrepancy are discussed. Applying a similar approach to the Southern Hemisphere, in 1979, virtually no PSCs are found in the vortex after September 10 at 20 km. This result has important implications for a number of proposed explanations for the Antarctic ozone hole.

  3. Polar stratospheric clouds inferred from satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-11-01

    Anomalously high radiances from the ozone channel of the Limb Infra-red Monitor of the Statosphere (LIMS) sounding instrument have been observed in the Northern Hemisphere winter lower stratosphere. Such events, thought to be due to polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are examined further by computing relative humidities using Stratospheric Sounding Unit (SSU) temperatures and water vapor measurements from the LIMS Map Archive Tape (MAT) analyses. Regions identified as PSCs are found to correspond closely to regions of high humidity. While instances of saturation were found, the average humidity at the centers of 39 PSCs was calculated to be 58%. Possible reasons for this apparent discrepancy are discussed. Applying a similar approach to the Southern Hemisphere, in 1979, virtually no PSCs are found in the vortex after 10 September at 20 km. This result has important implications for a number of proposed explanations for the Antarctic ozone hole.

  4. Formation of model polar stratospheric cloud films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middlebrook, Ann M.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Mcneill, Laurie S.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1992-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to examine the competitive growth of films representative of polar stratospheric clouds. These experiments show that either crystalline nitric acid trihydrate (beta-NAT) or amorphous films with H2O:HNO3 ratios close to 3:1 formed at temperatures 3-7 K warmer than the ice frost point under stratospheric pressure conditions. In addition, with higher HNO3 pressure, we observed nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) formation at temperatures warmer than ice formation. However, our experiments also show that NAD surfaces converted to beta-NAT upon exposure to stratospheric water pressures. Finally, we determined that the net uptake coefficient for HNO3 on beta-NAT is close to unity, whereas the net uptake coefficient for H2O is much less.

  5. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  6. How do Polar Stratospheric Clouds Form?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, Katja; Gandrud, Bruce; Baumgardner, Darrel; Herman, Robert; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    SOLVE measurements have been compared with results from a microphysical model to understand the composition and formation of the polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) observed during SOLVE. Evidence that the majority of the particles remain liquid throughout the winter will be presented. However, a small fraction of the particles do freeze, and the presence of these frozen particles can not be explained by current theories, in which the only freezing mechanism is homogeneous freezing to ice below the ice frost point. Alternative formation mechanisms, in particular homogeneous freezing above the ice frost point and heterogeneous freezing, have been explored using the microphysical model. Both nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) have been considered as possible compositions for the solid-phase nitric acid aerosols. Comparisons between the model results and the SOLVE measurements will be used to constrain the possible formation mechanisms. Other effects of these frozen particles will also be discussed, in particular denitrification.

  7. Chemistry and microphysics of polar stratospheric clouds and cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Zondlo, M A; Hudson, P K; Prenni, A J; Tolbert, M A

    2000-01-01

    Ice particles found within polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and upper tropospheric cirrus clouds can dramatically impact the chemistry and climate of the Earth's atmosphere. The formation of PSCs and the subsequent chemical reactions that occur on their surfaces are key components of the massive ozone hole observed each spring over Antarctica. Cirrus clouds also provide surfaces for heterogeneous reactions and significantly modify the Earth's climate by changing the visible and infrared radiation fluxes. Although the role of ice particles in climate and chemistry is well recognized, the exact mechanisms of cloud formation are still unknown, and thus it is difficult to predict how anthropogenic activities will change cloud abundances in the future. This article focuses on the nucleation, chemistry, and microphysical properties of ice particles composing PSCs and cirrus clouds. A general overview of the current state of research is presented along with some unresolved issues facing scientists in the future.

  8. Optical backscatter characteristics of Arctic polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Schaffner, S. K.; Poole, L. R.; Mccormick, M. P.; Hunt, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Airborne lidar measurements have been made of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition in January-February 1989. These show the existence of a systematic relationship between the backscatter depolarization ratio and the (aerosol + molecular)/molecular backscatter ratio. The data are consistent with a two population PSC particle model.

  9. Composition of Polar Stratospheric Clouds from Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, M. A.; Anthony, S. E.; Disselkamp, R.; Toon, O. B.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) have recently been implicated in Arctic and Antarctic ozone destruction. Although the chemistry is well documented, the composition of the clouds remains uncertain. The most common PSCs (type I) are thought to be composed of HNO3/H2O mixtures. Although the exact process is not clear, type I PSCs are believed to nucleate on preexisting stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs) composed of sulfuric acid and water. We are using infrared spectroscopy to study the composition and formation mechanism of type I PSCs. In the laboratory, we have used FTIR spectroscopy to probe the composition and phase of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O aerosols under winter polar stratospheric conditions. We have also used recently measured infrared optical constants for HNO3/H2O mixtures to analyze solar infrared extinction measurements of type I PSCs obtained in September 1987 over Antarctica. The results of these studies will be discussed in the context of current theories for polar stratospheric clouds formation.

  10. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, S.T.; Bailey, P.L.; Gille, J.C.; Lee, E.C.; Mergenthaler, J.L.; Roche, A.E.; Kumer, J.B.; Fishbein, E.F.; Waters, J.W.; Lahoz, W.A.

    1994-10-15

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605 cm{sup {minus}1} (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 {mu}m) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheroidal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculation and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles. 47 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.; Bailey, P. L.; Gille, J. C.; Lee, E. C.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Roche, A. E.; Kumer, J. B.; Fishbein, E. F.; Waters, J. W.; Lahoz, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605/cm (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 micrometers) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheriodal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculations and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles.

  12. The polar stratospheric cloud event of January 24. II - Photochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. L.; Mckenna, D. S.; Solomon, S.; Poole, L. R.; Brune, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    During the 1988/89 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE), observations of the chemical composition, aerosol characteristics and atmospheric state were obtained from two aircraft, a NASA ER-2 and a DC-8. This paper presents a diagnosis of observations obtained using the ER-2 on January 24, 1989, using a Lagrangian coupled microphysical-photochemical model. The high chlorine monoxide mixing ratios observed from the ER-2 on the afternoon of January 24, 1989 are interpreted as a result of in situ heterogeneous release of reactive chlorine from the reservoirs HCl and CIONO2 on type-1 polar stratospheric cloud particles observed to be present at that time. This essential element in theories of polar ozone depletion has never before been observed directly in the stratosphere.

  13. Monstrous Ice Cloud System in Titan's Present South Polar Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Carrie; Samuelson, Robert; McLain, Jason; Achterberg, Richard; Flasar, F. Michael; Milam, Stefanie

    2015-11-01

    During southern autumn when sunlight was still available, Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem discovered a cloud around 300 km near Titan's south pole (West, R. A. et al., AAS/DPS Abstracts, 45, #305.03, 2013); the cloud was later determined by Cassini's Visible and InfraRed Mapping Spectrometer to contain HCN ice (de Kok et al., Nature, 514, pp 65-67, 2014). This cloud has proven to be only the tip of an extensive ice cloud system contained in Titan's south polar stratosphere, as seen through the night-vision goggles of Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS). As the sun sets and the gloom of southern winter approaches, evidence is beginning to accumulate from CIRS far-IR spectra that a massive system of nitrile ice clouds is developing in Titan's south polar stratosphere. Even during the depths of northern winter, nothing like the strength of this southern system was evident in corresponding north polar regions.From the long slant paths that are available from limb-viewing CIRS far-IR spectra, we have the first definitive detection of the ν6 band of cyanoacetylene (HC3N) ice in Titan’s south polar stratosphere. In addition, we also see a strong blend of nitrile ice lattice vibration features around 160 cm-1. From these data we are able to derive ice abundances. The most prominent (and still chemically unidentified) ice emission feature, the Haystack, (at 220 cm-1) is also observed. We establish the vertical distributions of the ice cloud systems associated with both the 160 cm-1 feature and the Haystack. The ultimate aim is to refine the physical and possibly the chemical relationships between the two. Transmittance thin film spectra of nitrile ice mixtures obtained in our Spectroscopy for Planetary ICes Environments (SPICE) laboratory are used to support these analyses.

  14. Polar stratospheric cloud sightings by SAM II. [Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement onboard Nimbus 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Steele, H. M.; Hamill, P.; Swissler, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    The functions and data gained regarding stratospheric cloud sightings by the stratospheric aerosol measurement (SAM) II experiment on board the Numbus 7 spacecraft are reported. SAM II comprises a single channel sun photometer centered at 1.0 micron wavelength for measuring the solar intensity when the sun descends below an apparent 300 km altitude until the sun is occulted by clouds or the horizon. Readings are also made during sunrise in an opposite fashion. Transmission profiles are developed from the data and used to construct profiles of aerosol extinction with a 1 km resolution. Polar stratospheric clouds have been observed in more than 90% of the cases when the minimum temperature is 185 K or less, and 45% of the time when the temperature is 193 K or less. The clouds were more prevalent in the Antarctic winter than during the Arctic winter, and cloud height was lower than indicated by previous data.

  15. The Discovery of Polar Stratospheric Clouds by SAM II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, L. R.; McCormick, M. P.

    2005-12-01

    Until the advent of spaceborne observations, clouds were thought to occur very rarely in the extremely dry stratosphere. This view changed dramatically following the launch of the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II instrument on the Nimbus 7 spacecraft in October 1978. SAM II was a single channel solar photometer designed to measure stratospheric aerosol extinction profiles at a wavelength of 1.0 micron at latitudes from 64-80 degrees in both hemispheres. An analysis of SAM II data from the Arctic for January 1979 revealed a number of profiles in which the extinction was 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than expected. Careful study showed that these large extinction values were not artifacts, but were indeed due to dramatic reductions in the amount of solar radiance reaching the instrument. Further analyses showed that these so-called polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were observed only when the local stratospheric temperature was very low (185-200 K). The interest in PSCs was primarily academic until the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985, which was quickly followed by studies associating this ozone depletion with the release of active chlorine through heterogeneous chemical reactions catalyzed by PSC particles. A large body of research over the ensuing two decades has firmly established this link. In this paper, we will recount the serendipitous discovery of PSCs in SAM II data more than 25 years ago and highlight other advances in our understanding of PSCs that have stemmed from spaceborne observations.

  16. Cirrus and Polar Stratospheric Cloud Studies using CLAES Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mergenthaler, John L.; Douglass, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We've concluded a 3 year (Period of Performance- January 21, 1998 to February 28, 2001) study of cirrus and polar stratospheric clouds using CLAES (Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer) data. We have described the progress of this study in monthly reports, UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) science team meetings, American Geophysical Society Meetings, refereed publications and collaborative publications. Work undertaken includes the establishment of CLAES cloud detection criteria, the refinement of CLAES temperature retrieval techniques, compare the findings of CLAES with those of other instruments, and present findings to the larger community. This report describes the progress made in these areas.

  17. The formation of polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, H. M.; Hamill, P.; Swissler, T. J.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of the stratospheric aerosol by SAM II during the northern and southern winters of 1979 showed a pronounced increase in extinction on occasions when the temperature fell to a low value (below 200 K). The correlation between extinction and temperature is evaluated on the basis of thermodynamic considerations. As the temperature falls, the hygroscopic aerosols absorb water vapor from the atmosphere, growing as they do so. The effect of the temperature on the size distribution and composition of the aerosol is determined, and the optical extinction at 1 micron wavelength is calculated using Mie scattering theory. The theoretical predictions of the change in extinction with temperature and humidity are compared with the SAM II results at 100 mb, and the water vapor mixing ratio and aerosol number density are inferred from these results. A best fit of the theoretical curves to the SAM II data gives a water vapor content of 5-6 ppmv, and a total particle number density of 6-7 particles/cu cm.

  18. Seasonal and Interannual Variability of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Optical Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Thomason, L. W.; Damadeo, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    In addition to their important role in ozone depletion, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) may also impact stratospheric radiation and dynamics. Earlier studies indicated that PSCs could significantly affect radiative heating rates, but the magnitude and even the sign of the effect varied greatly from study to study, depending on many factors, e.g. PSC optical depth and underlying tropospheric cloud cover. A more recent study, which assumed nominal PSC conditions of 100% cloud fraction and visible optical depth of 0.01 for non-ice PSCs and 0.04 for ice PSCs, suggested that PSCs could produce significant perturbations to the radiative heating rates in the Antarctic stratosphere. A comprehensive evaluation of the radiative effects of PSCs requires more accurate knowledge of PSC characteristics over the entire polar region and throughout complete seasons. With the advent of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission in 2006, a more complete picture of PSC composition and occurrence is now emerging. The polarization-sensitive CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar system onboard the CALIPSO spacecraft is acquiring, on average, over 300,000 backscatter profiles per day at latitudes poleward of 55° (including the polar night region up to 82°), providing a unique opportunity to examine the distribution of PSC optical depth on vortex-wide scales and over entire PSC seasons. In this paper, we describe an approach to calculate PSC optical depth from the CALIOP 532-nm attenuated backscatter measurements. We retrieve the PSC extinction profile downward from cloud top using a composition-dependent extinction-to-backscatter ratio and then integrate the extinction profile to derive PSC optical depth. We then examine this multi-year PSC optical depth record to determine the spatial and seasonal variability for the Arctic and Antarctic, respectively. Multi-year composites provide insight to the interannual

  19. Formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloyan, Artash; Yermakov, Alex; Arutyunyan, Vardan; Larin, Igor

    2014-05-01

    A new mathematical model of the global transport of gaseous species and aerosols in the atmosphere and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in both hemispheres was constructed. PSCs play a significant role in ozone chemistry since heterogeneous reactions proceed on their particle surfaces and in the bulk, affecting the gas composition of the atmosphere, specifically, the content of chlorine and nitrogen compounds, which are actively involved in the destruction of ozone. Stratospheric clouds are generated by co-condensation of water vapor and nitric acid on sulfate particles and in some cases during the freezing of supercooled water as well as when nitric acid vapors are dissolved in sulfate aerosol particles [1]. These clouds differ in their chemical composition and microphysics [2]. In this study, we propose new kinetic equations describing the variability of species in the gas and condensed phases to simulate the formation of PSCs. Most models for the formation of PSCs use constant background values of sulfate aerosols in the lower stratosphere. This approach is too simplistic since sulfate aerosols in the stratosphere are characterized by considerably nonuniform spatial and temporal variations. Two PSC types are considered: Type 1 refers to the formation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and Type 2 refers to the formation of particles composed of different proportions of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O. Their formation is coupled with the spatial problem of sulfate aerosol generation in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere incorporating the chemical and kinetic transformation processes (photochemistry, nucleation, condensation/evaporation, and coagulation) and using a non-equilibrium particle-size distribution [3]. In this formulation, the system of equations is closed and allows an adequate description of the PSC dynamics in the stratosphere. Using the model developed, numerical experiments were performed to reproduce the spatial and temporal variability of

  20. Evolution of polar stratospheric clouds during the Antarctic winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaswamy, V.

    1988-01-01

    The occurrence of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs), initially inferred from satellite measurements of solar extinction, have now also been noted by the recent scientific expeditions in the Antarctic. The presence of such clouds in the Antarctic has been postulated to play a significant role in the depletion of ozone during the transition from winter to spring. The mechanisms suggested involve both dynamical and chemical processes which, explicity or implicitly, are associated with the ice particles constituting the PSCs. It is, thus, both timely and necessary to investigate the evolution of these clouds and ascertain the nature and magnitude of their influences on the state of the Antarctic stratosphere. To achieve these objectives, a detailed microphysical model of the processes governing the growth and sublimation of ice particles in the polar stratosphere was developed, based on the investigations of Ramaswamy and Detwiler. The present studies focus on the physical processes that occur at temperatures below those required for the onset of ice deposition from the vapor phase. Once these low temperatures are attained, the deposition of water vapor onto nucleation particles becomes extremely significant. First, the factors governing the magnitude of growth and the growth rate of ice particles at various altitudes are examined. Second, the ice phase mechanisms are examined in the context of a column model with altitudes ranging from 100 to 5 mb pressure levels. The column microphysical model was used to perform simulations of the cloud evolution, using the observed daily temperatures. The effect due to the growth of the particles on the radiation fields are also investigated using a one dimensional radiative transfer model. Specifically, the perturbations in the longwave cooling and that in the shortwave heating for the late winter/early spring time period are analyzed.

  1. On the temperature dependence of polar stratospheric clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Fiocco, G.; Cacciani, M.; Di Girolamo, P. ); Fua, D. CNR De Luisi, J. )

    1991-03-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds were frequently observed by lidar at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station during May-October 1988. The dependence of the backscattering cross section on the temperature can be referred to transitions of the HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O system: it appears possible to distinguish the pure trihydrate from the mixed ice-trihydrate phase in the composition of the aerosol and, in some cases, to bracket the HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O content of the ambient gas, and to provide indications on the size of the particles.

  2. Arctic polar stratospheric cloud observations by airborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Poole, L. R.; Kent, G. S.; Hunt, W. H.; Osborn, M. T.

    1990-01-01

    Lidar observations obtained from January 24 to February 2, 1989, during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric expedition (AASE) mission further support the existence of two distinct classes (Types 1 and 2) of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Most of the Type 1 PSCs observed were formed by rapid adiabatic cooling and exhibited very low depolarization ratios and low-to-intermediate scattering ratios. Type 2 PSCs were observed in regions of lowest temperature and showed much larger depolarization and scattering ratios, as would be expected from larger ice crystals. PSCs with low scattering ratios but moderate depolarization ratios were observed near the center of the vortex on one flight. These may have been either sparse Type 2 PSCs or Type 1 PSCs formed by less rapid cooling.

  3. Proceedings of a Workshop on Polar Stratospheric Clouds: Their Role in Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, P. (Editor); Mcmaster, L. R. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The potential role of polar stratospheric clouds in atmospheric processes was assessed. The observations of polar stratospheric clouds with the Nimbus 7 SAM II satellite experiment were reviewed and a preliminary analysis of their formation, impact on other remote sensing experiments, and potential impact on climate were presented. The potential effect of polar stratospheric clouds on climate, radiation balance, atmospheric dynamics, stratospheric chemistry and water vapor budget, and cloud microphysics was assessed. Conclusions and recommendations, a synopsis of materials and complementary material to support those conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  4. Airborne lidar observations in the wintertime Arctic stratosphere - Polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Carter, A. F.; Higdon, N. S.; Butler, C. F.; Robinette, P. A.; Toon, O. B.; Schoeberl, M. R.

    1990-01-01

    Polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) distributions in the wintertime Arctic stratosphere and their optical characteristics were measured with a multiwavelength airborne lidar system as part of the 1989 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition. PSCs were observed on 10 flights between January 6 and February 2, 1989, into the polar vortex. The PSCs were found in the 14-27 km altitude range in regions where the temperatures were less than 195 K. Two types of aerosols with different optical characteristics (Types 1a and 1b) were observed in PSCs thought to be composed of nitric acid trihydrate. Water ice PSCs (Type 2) were observed to have high scattering ratios (greater than 10) and high aerosol depolarizations (greater than 10 percent) at temperatures less than 190 K.

  5. Homogenous Surface Nucleation of Solid Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Hamill, P.; Salcedo, D.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A general surface nucleation rate theory is presented for the homogeneous freezing of crystalline germs on the surfaces of aqueous particles. While nucleation rates in a standard classical homogeneous freezing rate theory scale with volume, the rates in a surface-based theory scale with surface area. The theory is used to convert volume-based information on laboratory freezing rates (in units of cu cm, seconds) of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) aerosols into surface-based values (in units of sq cm, seconds). We show that a surface-based model is capable of reproducing measured nucleation rates of NAT and NAD aerosols from concentrated aqueous HNO3 solutions in the temperature range of 165 to 205 K. Laboratory measured nucleation rates are used to derive free energies for NAT and NAD germ formation in the stratosphere. NAD germ free energies range from about 23 to 26 kcal mole, allowing for fast and efficient homogeneous NAD particle production in the stratosphere. However, NAT germ formation energies are large (greater than 26 kcal mole) enough to prevent efficient NAT particle production in the stratosphere. We show that the atmospheric NAD particle production rates based on the surface rate theory are roughly 2 orders of magnitude larger than those obtained from a standard volume-based rate theory. Atmospheric volume and surface production of NAD particles will nearly cease in the stratosphere when denitrification in the air exceeds 40 and 78%, respectively. We show that a surface-based (volume-based) homogeneous freezing rate theory gives particle production rates, which are (not) consistent with both laboratory and atmospheric data on the nucleation of solid polar stratospheric cloud particles.

  6. Reactions on sulphuric acid aerosol and on polar stratospheric clouds in the Antarctic stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, E.W.; Mulvaney, R.

    1991-06-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry producing active chlorine has been identified as crucial to Antarctic ozone depletion. Most attention has focused on reactions on solid polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles, although there is still no satisfactory understanding of the microchemical incorporation of HCl in PSCs. The alternative mechanism involving sulphuric acid aerosol as the reaction surface has been considered at lower latitudes, but its role in the special conditions of the polar stratosphere has been largely ignored. Recent data from the Antarctic stratosphere have suggested the HCl is present in sulphuric acid aerosol that remains liquid even at the lowest stratospheric temperatures. The available laboratory data show that cold, relatively dilute, sulphuric acid is particularly able to take up HCl that is available for reaction provided the aerosol remains liquid. Fast heterogeneous reaction rates compared to those at mid-latitudes will produce active chlorine rapidly. Since the aerosol is present with significant surface area throughout the lower stratosphere, it should be very effective for heterogeneous reaction once temperatures drop. These surfaces, rather than PSCs, could host the initial conversion of Cl to its active form over the Antarctic.

  7. Nitric acid in polar stratospheric clouds - Similar temperature of nitric acid condensation and cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Snetsinger, Kenneth G.; Hamill, Patrick; Goodman, Jindra K.; Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1990-01-01

    As shown independently by two different techniques, nitric acid aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) both form below similar threshold temperatures. This supports the idea that the PSC particles involved in chlorine activation and ozone depletion in the winter polar stratosphere are composed of nitric acid. One technique used to show this is the inertial impaction of nitric acid aerosols using an Er-2 aircraft; the other method is remote sensing of PSCs by the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM II) satellite borne optical sensor. Both procedures were in operation during the Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition in 1989, and the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment in 1987. Analysis of Arctic particles gathered in situ indicates the presence of nitric acid below a 'first appearance' temperature Tfa = 202 K. This is the same highest temperature at which PSCs are seen by the SAM II satellite. In comparison, a 'first appearance' temperature Tfa = 198 K as found for the Antarctic samples.

  8. Spectroscopic Evidence Against Nitric Acid Trihydrate in Polar Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) play a key role in the photochemical mechanism thought to be responsible for ozone depletion in the Antarctic and Arctic. Reactions of PSC particles activate chlorine to forms that are capable of photochemical ozone destruction, and sequester nitrogen oxides (NOx) that would otherwise deactivate the chlorine. Although the heterogeneous chemistry is now well established, the composition of the clouds themselves is uncertain. It is commonly thought that they are composed of nitric acid trihydrate, although observations have left this question unresolved. Here we reanalyse infrared spectra of type 1 PSCs obtained in Antarctica in September 1987, using recently measured optical constants of the various compounds that might be present in PSCs. We find these PSCs were not composed of nitric acid trihydrate but instead had a more complex compositon, perhaps that of a ternary solution. Because cloud formation is sensitive to their composition, this finding will alter our understanding of the locations and conditions in which PSCs form. In addition, the extent of ozone loss depends on the ability of the PSCs to remove NOx permanently through sedimentation, The sedimentation rates depend on PSC particle size which in turn is controlled by the composition and formation mechanism.

  9. Spectroscopic Evidence Against Nitric Acid Trihydrate in Polar Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) play a key role in the photochemical mechanisms thought to be responsible for ozone depletion in the Antarctic and the Arctic. Reactions on PSC particles activate chlorine to forms that are capable of photochemical ozone destruction, and sequester nitrogen oxides (NOx) that would otherwise deactivate the chlorine. Although the heterogeneous chemistry is now well established, the composition of the clouds themselves is uncertain. It is commonly thought that they are composed of nitric acid trihydrate, although observations have left this question unresolved. Here we reanalyse infrared spectra of type I PCS's obtained in Antarctica in September 1987, using recently measured optical constraints of the various compounds that might be present in PSC's. We find that these PSC's were not composed of nitric acid trihydrate but instead had a more complex composition perhaps that of a ternary solution. Because cloud formation is sensitive to their composition, this finding will alter our understanding of the locations and conditions in which PSCs form. In addition, the extent of ozone loss depends on the ability of the PSC's to remove NOx permanently through sedimentation. The sedimentation rates depend on PSC particle size which in turn is controlled by the composition and formation mechanism.

  10. Mixed-phased particles in polar stratospheric ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Anatoli; Molina, Mario J.; Loerting, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Keywords: polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), ozone depletion, differential scanning calorimeter. The rate of chlorine activation reactions, which lead to ozone depletion in the winter/spring polar stratosphere (Molina, 1994), depends on the phase state of the surface of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) ice crystals (McNeil et al., 2006). PSCs are thought to consist of solid ice and NAT (nitric acid trihydrate, HNO3× 3H2O) particles and supercooled HNO3/H2SO4/H2O droplets. The corresponding PSCs are called Type II, Ia, and Ib PSCs, respectively (Zondlo et al., 1998). Type II PSCs are formed in the Antarctic region below the ice frost point of 189 K by homogeneous freezing of HNO3/H2SO4/H2O droplets (Chang et al., 1999) with the excess of HNO3. The PSC ice crystals are thought to be solid. However, the fate of H+, NO3-, SO42- ions during freezing was not investigated. Our differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies of freezing emulsified HNO3/H2SO4/H2O droplets of sizes and compositions representative of the polar stratosphere demonstrate that during the freezing of the droplets, H+, NO3-, SO42- are expelled from the ice lattice. The expelled ions form a residual solution around the formed ice crystals. The residual solution does not freeze but transforms to glassy state at ~150 K (Bogdan et al., 2010). By contrast to glass-formation in these nitric-acid rich ternary mixtures the residual solution freezes in the case of sulphuric-acid rich ternary mixtures (Bogdan and Molina, 2009). For example, we can consider the phase separation into ice and a residual solution during the freezing of 23/3 wt% HNO3/H2SO4/H2O droplets. On cooling, ice is formed at ~189 K. This is inferred from the fact that the corresponding melting peak at ~248 K exactly matches the melting point of ice in the phase diagram of HNO3/H2SO4/H2O containing 3 wt % H2SO4. After the ice has formed, the glass transition occurs at Tg ≈ 150 K. The appearance of the glass transition indicates that the

  11. More rapid polar ozone depletion through the reaction of HOCl with HCl on polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The direct reaction of HOCl with HCl is shown here to play a critical part in polar ozone loss. Observations of high levels of OClO and ClO in the springtime Antarctic stratosphere confirm that most of the available chlorine is in the form of ClO(x). But current photochemical models have difficulty converting HCl to ClO(x) rapidly enough in early spring to account fully for the observations. Here, a chemical model is used to show that the direct reaction of HOCl with HCl provides the missing mechanism. As alternative sources of nitrogen-containing oxidants have been converted in the late autumn to inactive HNO3 by known reactions on the sulfate layer aerosols, the reaction of HOCl with HCl on polar stratospheric clouds becomes the most important pathway for releasing that stratospheric chlorine which goes into polar night as HCl.

  12. Polar stratospheric clouds: A high latitude warming mechanism in an ancient greenhouse world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, L. Cirbus; Pollard, D.

    The presence of water vapor clouds in the stratosphere produces warming in excess of tropospheric greenhouse warming, via radiative warming in the lower stratosphere. The stratospheric clouds form only in regions of very low temperature and so the warming produced by the clouds is concentrated in polar winter regions. Results from a paleoclimate modeling study that includes idealized, prescribed polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) show that the clouds cause up to 20°C of warming at high latitude surfaces of the winter hemisphere, with greatest impact in oceanic regions where sea ice is reduced. The modeled temperature response suggests that PSCs may have been a significant climate forcing factor for past time intervals associated with high concentrations of atmospheric methane. The clouds and associated warming may help to explain long-standing discrepancies between model-produced paleotemperatures and geologic proxy temperature interpretations at high latitudes, a persistent problem in studies of ancient greenhouse climates.

  13. Modelling Liquid Particle Composition In Polar Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, D.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) are thought to be composed of solid ni- tric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles, water ice particles, or supercooled liquid HNO3/H2SO4/H2O particles under different conditions and depending on the ther- mal history of the air mass. The solid particles are believed to form by the freezing of the liquid particles, the rate of which depends on the composition and size of the liquid particles. Lagrangian-in-radius-space numerical schemes have been used be- fore to study particle composition across the PSC size spectrum, in simple box model runs and in domain-filling Lagrangian studies. However these models were not de- signed to be compatible with global chemistry and transport models (CTMs), which currently model PSCs by assuming equilibrium with the atmosphere.We report here on an adaptation of a continuous (Eulerian-in-radius) distribution scheme, modelling the evolution of liquid PSC particles in non-equilibrium conditions. It uses an effi- cient numerical scheme, designed to be compatible with CTMs. Results from the new scheme have been validated against analytical solutions, and corroborate the compo- sition gradients across the size distribution under rapid cooling conditions that were reported in earlier studies.

  14. Spectroscopic studies of model polar stratospheric cloud films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Middlebrook, Ann M.

    1993-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to study nitric-acid/ice films representative of type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). These studies reveal that in addition to amorphous nitric acid/ice mixtures, there are three stable stoichiometric hydrates of nitric acid: nitric-acid monohydrate (NAM), dihydrate (NAD), and trihydrate (NAT). We also observe two distinct crystalline forms of the trihydrate, which we denote alpha- and beta-NAT. These two forms appear to differ in their concentration of crystalline defects, but not in their chemical composition. In addition to probing the composition of type I PSCs, we have also used FTIR spectroscopy to study the interaction of HCl with model PSC films. In this work we find that for HCl pressures in the range 10 exp -5 to 10 exp -7 Torr, HCl is taken up by ice at 155 K to form a thin layer of HCl.6H2O. At 193 K, the uptake of HCl by ice was consistent with less than or equal to monolayer coverage. Uptake of HCl by alpha and beta-NAT at 175 K was also consistent with less than or equal to monolayer coverage.

  15. Nonorographic generation of Arctic polar stratospheric clouds during December 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchman, Matthew H.; Buker, Marcus L.; Tripoli, Gregory J.; Browell, Edward V.; Grant, William B.; McGee, Thomas J.; Burris, John F.

    2003-03-01

    During December 1999, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were observed in the absence of conditions conducive to generation by topographic gravity waves. The possibility is explored that PSCs can be generated by inertia gravity waves (IGW) radiating from breaking synoptic-scale Rossby waves on the polar front jet. The aerosol features on 7 and 12 December are selected for comparison with theory and with simulations using the University of Wisconsin Nonhydrostatic Modeling System (UWNMS). Consistent with Rossby adjustment theory, a common feature in the UWNMS simulations is radiation of IGW from the tropopause polar front jet, especially from sectors which are evolving rapidly in the Rossby wave breaking process. Packets of gravity wave energy radiate upward and poleward into the cold pool, while individual wave crests propagate poleward and downward, causing mesoscale variations in vertical motion and temperature. On 12 December the eastbound DC-8 lidar observations exhibited a fairly uniform field of six waves in aerosol enhancement in the 14-20 km layer, consistent with vertical displacement by a field of IGW propagating antiparallel to the flow, with characteristic horizontal and vertical wavelengths of ˜300 and ˜10 km. UWNMS simulations show emanation of a field of IGW upward and southwestward from a northward incursion of the polar front jet. The orientation and evolution of the aerosol features on 7 December are consistent with a single PSC induced by an IGW packet propagating from a breaking Rossby wave over western Russia toward the northeast into the coldest part of the base of the polar vortex, with characteristic period ˜9 hours, vertical wavelength ˜12 km, and horizontal wavelength ˜1000 km. Linear theory shows that for both of these cases, IGW energy propagates upward at ˜1 km/hour and horizontally at ˜100 km/hour, with characteristic trace speed ˜30 m/s. The spatial orientation of the PSC along IGW phase lines is contrasted with the nearly

  16. Dual-polarization airborne lidar observations of polar stratospheric cloud evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Mccormick, M. P.; Kent, G. S.; Hunt, W. H.; Osborn, M. T.

    1990-01-01

    Dual-polarization 0.532 micron lidar data show systematic polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) evolution along a portion of the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition DC-8 flight of January 31, 1989. This flight leg was roughly aligned with air parcel motion on isentropic surfaces from 400-500 K, where the local adiabatic cooling rate was about 20 K/day. Type 1 PSCs show low depolarization ratios and scattering ratios which approach intermediate limiting values as ambient temperature decreases. These data suggest that Type 1 particles formed by rapid cooling may be nearly spherical and are restricted in size by partitioning of a limited HNO3 vapor supply among many competing growth sites. Type 2 PSCs appear at temperatures below estimated local frost points with increases in depolarization and scattering typical of larger ice crystals.

  17. Radiative effects of polar stratospheric clouds during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, Joan E.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of a study of the radiative effects of polar stratospheric clouds during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) in which daily 3D Type I nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and Type II water ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were generated in the polar regions during AAOE and the AASE aircraft missions. Mission data on particular composition and size, together with NMC-analyzed temperatures, are used. For AAOE, both Type I and Type II clouds were formed for the time period August 23 to September 17, after which only Type I clouds formed. During AASE, while Type I clouds were formed for each day between January 3 and February 10, Type II clouds formed on only two days, January 24 and 31. Mie theory and a radiative transfer model are used to compute the radiative heating rates during the mission periods, for clear and cloudy lower sky cases. Only the Type II water ice clouds have a significant radiative effect, with the Type I NATO PSCs generating a net heating or cooling of 0.1 K/d or less.

  18. Stratospheric water vapour and temperature variability and their effect on polar stratospheric cloud formation and existence in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosrawi, Farahnaz; Urban, Joachim; Lossow, Stefan; Stiller, Gabriele; Weigel, Katja; Braesicke, Peter; Pitts, Michael C.; Murtagh, Donal

    2015-04-01

    Based on more than 10-years of satellite measurements from UARS/HALOE, Envisat/MIPAS, Odin/SMR, Aura/MLS and SciSat/ACE-FTS we investigate water vapour (H2O) variability in the northern hemisphere polar regions. We find from the observations a connection between cold winters and enhanced water vapour mixing ratios in the lower polar stratosphere (475 to 525 K). We perform a sensitivity study along air parcel trajectories to test how an increase of stratospheric water vapour of 1 ppmv or a temperature decrease of 1 K affects the time period during which polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) can be formed and exist. Air parcel trajectories were calculated 6-days backward in time. The trajectories were started at the time and locations where PSCs were observed by CALIPSO (Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder satellite observations) during the Arctic winter 2010/2011. We test the sensitivity of PSCs formation and existence to changes in H2O and temperature based on PSC observations during this winter since it was one of the coldest Arctic winters in the last decade. The polar vortex persisted over a period of four months, thus leading to extensive PSC formation. During this winter PSCs were detected by CALIPSO on 42 days. In total, 738 trajectories were calculated and analysed. The resulting statistic derived from the air parcel trajectories shows a clear prolongation of the time period where PSCs can be formed and exist when the temperature in the stratosphere is decreased by 1 K and H2O is increased by 1 ppmv. We derive an increase in time where the stratospheric air is exposed to temperatures below Tice and TNAT, respectively, by ~6000 h. Thus, changes in stratospheric water vapour and temperature can prolong PSC formation and existence and thus have a significant influence on the chemistry of the polar stratosphere.

  19. Arctic polar stratospheric cloud measurements by means of a four wavelength depolarization lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanutti, L.; Castagnoli, F.; Delguasta, M.; Flesia, C.; Godin, S.; Kolenda, J.; Kneipp, H.; Kyro, Esko; Matthey, R.; Morandi, M.

    1994-01-01

    A four wavelength depolarization backscattering lidar has been operated during the European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE) in Sodankyl, in the Finnish Arctic. The lidar performed measurements during the months of December 1991, January, February and March 1992. The Finnish Meteorological Institute during the same period launched regularly three Radiosondes per day, and three Ozone sondes per week. Both Mt. Pinatubo aerosols and Polar Stratospheric Clouds were measured. The use of four wavelengths, respectively at 355 nm, 532 nm , 750 nm, and 850 nm permits an inversion of the lidar data to determine aerosol particle size. The depolarization technique permits the identification of Polar Stratospheric Clouds. Frequent correlation between Ozone minima and peaks in the Mt. Pinatubo aerosol maxima were detected. Measurements were carried out both within and outside the Polar Vortex.

  20. Heterogeneous conversion of COF2 to HF in polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wofsy, Steven C.; Yatteau, John H.; Salawitch, Ross J.; Mcelroy, Michael B.; Toon, Geoffrey C.

    1990-01-01

    It is argued that the reaction COF2 + H2O - 2HF + CO2 should proceed on surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds, based on laboratory evidence for this reaction in condensed phase and on analysis of column observations of HF during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition. If the hypothesis is confirmed, observations of COF2 and HF could provide unambiguous indication of heterogeneous processing of polar air, and could help elucidate the influence of heterogeneous chemistry on concentrations of HCl, ClNO3, and chlorine oxide radicals.

  1. Vapor pressures of solid hydrates of nitric acid - Implications for polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worsnop, Douglas R.; Fox, Lewis E.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    1993-01-01

    Thermodynamic data are presented for hydrates of nitric acid: HNO3.H2O, HNO3.2H2O, HNO3.3H2O, and a higher hydrate. Laboratory data indicate that nucleation and persistence of metastable HNO3.2H2O may be favored in polar stratospheric clouds over the slightly more stable HNO3.3H2O. Atmospheric observations indicate that some polar stratospheric clouds may be composed of HNO3.2H2O and HNO3.3H2O. Vapor transfer from HNO3.2H2O to HNO3.3H2O could be a key step in the sedimentation of HNO3, which plays an important role in the depletion of polar ozone.

  2. Freezing of polar stratospheric clouds in orographically induced strong warming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsias, A.; Prenni, A. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Onasch, T. P.; Luo, B. P.; Tolbert, M. A.; Peter, Th.

    1997-09-01

    Results from laboratory experiments and microphysical modeling are presented that suggest a potential freezing nucleation mechanism for polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles above the water ice frost point (Tice). The mechanism requires very high HNO3 concentrations of about 58 wt% in the droplets, and leads to the freezing of nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) in a highly selective manner in the smallest droplets of an ensemble. In the stratosphere such liquid compositions are predicted to occur in aerosol droplets which are warmed adiabatically with rates of about +150 K/h from below 190 K to 194 K. Such rapid temperature changes have been observed in mountain leewaves that occur frequently in the stratosphere, clearly demonstrating the need for a stratospheric gravity wave climatology.

  3. Chemical analysis of refractory stratospheric aerosol particles collected within the arctic vortex and inside polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Martin; Weigel, Ralf; Kandler, Konrad; Günther, Gebhard; Molleker, Sergej; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Vogel, Bärbel; Weinbruch, Stephan; Borrmann, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    Stratospheric aerosol particles with diameters larger than about 10 nm were collected within the arctic vortex during two polar flight campaigns: RECONCILE in winter 2010 and ESSenCe in winter 2011. Impactors were installed on board the aircraft M-55 Geophysica, which was operated from Kiruna, Sweden. Flights were performed at a height of up to 21 km and some of the particle samples were taken within distinct polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). The chemical composition, size and morphology of refractory particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. During ESSenCe no refractory particles with diameters above 500 nm were sampled. In total 116 small silicate, Fe-rich, Pb-rich and aluminum oxide spheres were found. In contrast to ESSenCe in early winter, during the late-winter RECONCILE mission the air masses were subsiding inside the Arctic winter vortex from the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, thus initializing a transport of refractory aerosol particles into the lower stratosphere. During RECONCILE, 759 refractory particles with diameters above 500 nm were found consisting of silicates, silicate / carbon mixtures, Fe-rich particles, Ca-rich particles and complex metal mixtures. In the size range below 500 nm the presence of soot was also proven. While the data base is still sparse, the general tendency of a lower abundance of refractory particles during PSC events compared to non-PSC situations was observed. The detection of large refractory particles in the stratosphere, as well as the experimental finding that these particles were not observed in the particle samples (upper size limit ˜ 5 µm) taken during PSC events, strengthens the hypothesis that such particles are present in the lower polar stratosphere in late winter and have provided a surface for heterogeneous nucleation during PSC formation.

  4. Satellite Observations of Arctic and Antarctic Polar Stratospheric Clouds and Atmospheric Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, A.; Santee, M. L.; Wu, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    We present an overview of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and atmospheric composition during the 2008-2012 Arctic and Antarctic seasons using A-Train measurements of lidar backscatter and gas phase concentrations of HNO3, H2O, HCl and ClO. The processes of denitrification, dehydration and chlorine activation are investigated. PSC types are classified using the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite which measures vertical profiles of aerosol and cloud backscatter at 532 nm (total and perpendicular polarization) and 1064 nm. Ambient temperature/pressure profiles and constituent gases are obtained from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). Since April 2008 these two instruments have flown in close formation in the A-Train, maintaining colocation across track to less than 10 km and with temporal sampling differences less than 30 seconds.

  5. Observations of Antarctic Polar Stratospheric Clouds by Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Fromm, Michael; Spinhirne, James

    2005-01-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) frequently occur in the polar regions during winter and are important because they play a role in the destruction of stratospheric ozone. During late September and early October 2003, GLAS frequently observed PSCs over western Antarctica. At the peak of this activity on September 29 and 30 we investigate the vertical structure and extent, horizontal coverage and backscatter characteristics of the PSCs using the GLAS data. The PSCs were found to cover an area approximately 10 to 15 % of the size of Antarctica in a region where enhanced PSC frequency has been noted by previous PSC climatology studies. The area of PSC formation was found to coincide with the coldest temperatures in the lower stratosphere. In addition, extensive cloudiness was seen within the troposphere below the PSCs indicating that tropospheric disturbances might have played a role in their formation.

  6. Influence of polar stratospheric clouds on the depletion of Antarctic ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, Ross J.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Mcelroy, Michael B.

    1988-01-01

    Precipitation of nitrate in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) can provide a significant sink for Antarctic stratospheric odd nitrogen. It is argued that the depth of the Ozone Hole is sensitive to the occurrence of temperatures below about 196 K. An increase in the prevalence of temperatures below 196 K would enhance ozone loss by increasing the spatial extent and persistence of PSCs, and by decreasing the level of HNO3 that remains following PSC evaporation. Concentrations of halogen gases in the 1960s and earlier were insufficient to support major ozone loss, even if thermal conditions were favorable.

  7. Characteristics of polar stratospheric clouds as observed by SAM II, SAGE, and lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Hamill, P.; Farrukh, U. O.

    1985-01-01

    Satellite and lidar data sets developed over several years of observations are analyzed to detail the macroscopic and microphysical characteristics of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Mappings were made of the sizes, locations, probabilities of occurrence and temperature dependence of the PSCs, and indicated that PSCs are correlated with an extended stratospheric cloud bank in the cold polar vortex region. The bank is bounded by a 188 K isotherm, and the probability of occurrence drops to 50 percent at the 193 K isotherm. Values of 6.3 particles/cu cm and radii averaging 0.0725 micron/particle are calculated, along with an estimated downward velocity of 0.01 m/sec.

  8. Polar stratospheric clouds at the South Pole in 1990: Lidar observations and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, R.L.; Bowman, K.P.; Gardner, C.S. )

    1993-01-20

    In December 1989 a Rayleigh/sodium lidar (589 nm) was installed at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station, and was used to measure stratospheric aerosol, temperature, and mesospheric sodium profiles through October 1990. Observations of stratospheric aerosol and temperature are presented in this paper. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were first observed in late May at about 20 km. As the lower stratosphere cooled further, PSCs were observed throughout the 12-27 km altitude region, and remained there from mid-June until late August. Observations in early September detected no PSCs above 21 km. An isolated cloud was observed in mid-October. Throughout the winter the clouds had small backscatter ratios (< 10). Observations made at two wavelengths in July show that the clouds are predominately composed of nitric acid trihydrate with associated Angstrom coefficients between 0.2 and 3.7. Comparison of the lidar data and balloon borne frost point measurements in late August indicate that the nitric acid mixing ratio was less than 1.5 ppbv. Observations over periods of several hours show downward motions in the cloud layers similar to the phase progressions of upwardly-propagating gravity waves. The vertical phase velocities of these features ([approx] 4 cm/s) are significantly faster than the expected settling velocities of the cloud particles. Both the backscatter ratio profiles and the radiosonde horizontal wind profiles show 1-4 km vertical structures. This suggests that the kilometer-scale vertical structure of the PSCs is maintained by low frequency gravity waves propagating through the cloud layers. 24 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Particle size distributions in Arctic polar stratospheric clouds, growth and freezing of sulfuric acid droplets, and implications for cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, James E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Kelly, K. K.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.; Gary, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper uses particle size and volume measurements obtained with the forward scattering spectrometer probe model 300 during January and February 1989 in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment to investigate processes important in the formation and growth of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. It is suggested on the basis of comparisons of the observations with expected sulfuric acid droplet deliquescence that in the Arctic a major fraction of the sulfuric acid droplets remain liquid until temperatures at least as low as 193 K. It is proposed that homogeneous freezing of the sulfuric acid droplets might occur near 190 K and might play a role in the formation of PSCs.

  10. Effects of a polar stratosphere cloud parameterization on ozone depletion due to stratospheric aircraft in a two-dimensional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Considine, David B.; Douglass, Anne R.; Jackman, Charles H.

    1994-01-01

    A parameterization of Type 1 and 2 polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation is presented which is appropriate for use in two-dimensional (2-D) photochemical models of the stratosphere. The calculations of PSC frequency of occurrence and surface area density uses climatological temperature probability distributions obtained from National Meteorological Center data to avoid using zonal mean temperatures, which are not good predictors of PSC behavior. The parameterization does not attempt to model the microphysics of PSCs. The parameterization predicts changes in PSC formation and heterogeneous processing due to perturbations of stratospheric trace constituents. It is therefore useful in assessing the potential effects of a fleet of stratospheric aircraft (high speed civil transports, or HSCTs) on stratospheric composition. the model calculated frequency of PSC occurrence agrees well with a climatology based on stratospheric aerosol measurement (SAM) 2 observations. PSCs are predicted to occur in the tropics. Their vertical range is narrow, however, and their impact on model O3 fields is small. When PSC and sulfate aerosol heterogeneous processes are included in the model calculations, the O3 change for 1980 - 1990 is in substantially better agreement with the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS)-derived O3 trend than otherwise. The overall changes in model O3 response to standard HSCT perturbation scenarios produced by the parameterization are small and tend to decrease the model sensitivity to the HSCT perturbation. However, in the southern hemisphere spring a significant increase in O3 sensitivity to HSCT perturbations is found. At this location and time, increased PSC formation leads to increased levels of active chlorine, which produce the O3 decreases.

  11. Extreme stratospheric springs and their consequences for the onset of polar mesospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siskind, David E.; Allen, Douglas R.; Randall, Cora E.; Harvey, V. Lynn; Hervig, Mark E.; Lumpe, Jerry; Thurairajah, Brentha; Bailey, Scott M.; Russell, James M.

    2015-09-01

    We use data from the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) explorer and from the NASA Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) stratospheric analysis to explore the variability in the onset of the Northern Hemisphere (NH) Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) season. Consistent with recently published results, we show that the early onset of the NH PMC season in 2013 was accompanied by a warm springtime stratosphere; conversely, we show that the late onset in 2008 coincides with a very cold springtime stratosphere. Similar stratospheric temperature anomalies for 1997 and 2011 also are connected either directly, through observed temperatures, or indirectly, through an early PMC onset, to conditions near the mesopause. These 4 years, 2008, 1997, 2011, and 2013 represent the extremes of stratospheric springtime temperatures seen in the MERRA analysis and correspond to analogous extrema in planetary wave activity. The three years with enhanced planetary wave activity (1997, 2011 and 2013) are shown to coincide with the recently identified stratospheric Frozen In Anticyclone (FrIAC) phenomenon. FrIACs in 1997 and 2013 are associated with early PMC onsets; however, the dramatic FrIAC of 2011 is not. This may be because the 2011 FrIAC occurred too early in the spring. The link between NH PMC onset and stratospheric FrIAC occurrences represents a new mode of coupling between the stratosphere and mesosphere. Since FrIACs appear to be more frequent in recent years, we speculate that as a result, PMCs may occur earlier as well. Finally we compare the zonal mean zonal winds and observed gravity wave activity for the FrIACs of 2011 and 2013. We find no evidence that gravity wave activity was favored in 2013 relative to 2011, thus suggesting that direct forcing by planetary waves was the key mechanism in accelerating the cooling and moistening of the NH mesopause region in May of 2013.

  12. A Laboratory Study on the Phase Transition for Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teets, Edward H., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of different phases of simulated polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles were investigated in the laboratory. Solutions and mixtures of solutions at concentrations 1 to 5 m (molality) of ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, sodium chloride, sulfuric acid, and nitric acid were supercooled to prescribed temperatures below their equilibrium melting point. These solutions were contained in small diameter glass tubing of volumes ranging from 2.6 to 0.04 ml. Samples were nucleated by insertion of an ice crystal, or in some cases by a liquid nitrogen cooled wire. Crystallization velocities were determined by timing the crystal growth front passages along the glass tubing. Solution mixtures containing aircraft exhaust (soot) were also examined. Crystallization rates increased as deltaT2, where deltaT is the supercooling for weak solutions (2 m or less). The higher concentrated solutions (greater than 3 m) showed rates significantly less than deltaT2. This reduced rate suggested an onset of a glass phase. Results were applied to the nucleation of highly concentrated solutions at various stages of polar stratospheric cloud development within the polar stratosphere.

  13. Continuous Lidar Monitoring of Polar Stratospheric Clouds at the South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D

    2009-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) play a primary role in the formation of annual ozone holes over Antarctica during the austral sunrise. Meridional temperature gradients in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere, caused by strong radiative cooling, induce a broad dynamic vortex centered near the South Pole that decouples and insulates the winter polar airmass. PSC nucleate and grow as vortex temperatures gradually fall below equilibrium saturation and frost points for ambient sulfate, nitrate, and water vapor concentrations (generally below 197 K). Cloud surfaces promote heterogeneous reactions that convert stable chlorine and bromine-based molecules into photochemically active ones. As spring nears, and the sun reappears and rises, photolysis decomposes these partitioned compounds into individual halogen atoms that react with and catalytically destroy thousands of ozone molecules before they are stochastically neutralized. Despite a generic understanding of the ozone hole paradigm, many key components of the system, such as cloud occurrence, phase, and composition; particle growth mechanisms; and denitrification of the lower stratosphere have yet to be fully resolved. Satellite-based observations have dramatically improved the ability to detect PSC and quantify seasonal polar chemical partitioning. However, coverage directly over the Antarctic plateau is limited by polar-orbiting tracks that rarely exceed 80 degrees S. In December 1999, a NASA Micropulse Lidar Network instrument (MPLNET) was first deployed to the NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory (ESRL) Atmospheric Research Observatory at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station for continuous cloud and aerosol profiling. MPLNET instruments are eye-safe, capable of full-time autonomous operation, and suitably rugged and compact to withstand long-term remote deployment. With only brief interruptions during the winters of 2001 and 2002, a nearly continuous data archive exists to the present.

  14. Laboratory measurements of polar stratospheric cloud rate parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, Rex D.; Plumb, Ian C.; Ryan, Keith R.

    1994-01-01

    It is now clear that heterogeneous reactions play an important role in controlling the concentration of ozone in the stratosphere. In this work, the loss of N2O5 on ice substrates has been studied in a flow reactor in an attempt to gain a more fundamental understanding of these reactions. The apparent reaction probability in this system was found to decrease as the substrate was exposed to N2O5. A model which corrected for the loss of surface sites was developed and although it appears to fit the data for a given experiment quite well, it is concluded that the loss of reactive sites is not the full explanation. In addition, the results of an experimental and modeling study suggest that reaction on the internal surface of the ice substrates is not a major loss mechanism for N2O5 in the current work.

  15. Lidar measurements of polar stratospheric clouds during the 1989 airborne Arctic stratospheric expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.

    1991-01-01

    The Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) was conducted during January to February 1989 from the Sola Air Station, Norway. As part of this expedition, the NASA Langley Research Center's multiwavelength airborne lidar system was flown on the NASA Ames Research Center's DC-8 aircraft to measure ozone (O3) and aerosol profiles in the region of the polar vortex. The lidar system simultaneously transmitted laser beams at 1064, 603, 311, and 301.5 nm to measure atmospheric scattering, polarization and O3 profiles. Long range flights were made between Stavanger, Norway, and the North Pole, and between 40 deg W and 20 deg E meridians. Eleven flights were made, each flight lasting an average of 10 hours covering about 8000 km. Atmospheric scattering ratios, aerosol polarizations, and aerosol scattering ratio wavelength dependences were derived from the lidar measurements to altitudes above 27 km. The details of the aerosol scattering properties of lidar observations in the IR, VIS, and UV regions are presented along with correlations with the national meteorological Center's temperature profiles.

  16. An analysis of lidar observations of polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Kinne, S.; Browell, E. V.; Jordan, J.

    1990-01-01

    Lidar observations by Browell et al. (1990) are interpreted using single scattering calculations for nonspherical particles and aerosol microphysical calculations. Many of the lidar observations are consistent with particles containing 10 ppbv of condensed nitric acid vapor and an equivalent mass of water. The lidar observations of these Type 1 clouds identify two subtypes, whose properties are deduced. Type 1b particles are spherical, or nearly spherical, and typically have radii near 0.5 micron; Type 1a particles are not spherical, and have a spherical volume equivalent radius exceeding 1.0 micron. Several factors may cause variations in the size of the particles. The most significant factors are the cooling rate and the degree to which the air parcels cool below the condensation point. Specific examples in which cooling rate and cooling point may have led to variations in particle size are found in the Browell et al. (1990) data set. Condensation of 1 ppmm of water or less is quantitatively sufficient to account for the magnitude of the lidar backscatter observed from water ice clouds. The ice particles are not spherical in shape. The sizes of particles in water ice clouds cannot be determined because they are much larger than the wavelength of the lidar.

  17. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-09-01

    Satellite-based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid-December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled a thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  18. Heterogeneous Formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds- Part 1: Nucleation of Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooss, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid-December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled a thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  19. First temperature measurements within Polar Stratospheric Clouds with the Esrange lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtert, Peggy; Khaplanov, Mikhail; Khosrawi, Farahnaz; Gumbel, Jörg

    2013-04-01

    In the winter stratosphere polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) provide the surface for heterogeneous reactions which transform stable chlorine and bromine species into their highly reactive ozone-destroying states. PSCs are classified into three types (PSC Ia: nitric acid di- or trihydrate crystals, NAD or NAT; PSC Ib: supercooled liquid ternary solutions, STS; PSC II: ice) according to their particle composition and to their physical phase. The formation of PSCs depends strongly on temperature. For a comprehensive understanding of such temperature-dependent processes in the lower stratosphere, lidar measurements using the rotational-Raman technique are most suitable. The rotational-Raman technique allows for temperature measurements without a priori assumptions of the state of the atmosphere. The technique is feasible in aerosol layers and clouds, such as PSCs. A rotational-Raman channel for temperature measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere was added to the Esrange lidar in late 2010. The Esrange lidar operates at Esrange (68°N, 21°E) near the Swedish city of Kiruna. By combining rotational-Raman measurements (4-35 km height) and the integration technique (30-80 km height), the Esrange lidar is now capable of measuring atmospheric temperature profiles from the upper troposphere up to the mesosphere. Such measurements could be used to validate current lidar-based PSC classification schemes and the current understanding of PSC formation. The new capability of the instrument furthermore enables the studies of other clouds layers, temperature variations and exchange processes in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. These studies will take advantage of the geographical location of Esrange where mountain wave activity in the lee of the Scandinavian mountain range gives rise to a wide range of PSC growth conditions. Although several lidars are operated at polar latitudes, there are few instruments that are capable of measuring temperature

  20. On the size and composition of particles in polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinne, Stefan; Toon, Owen B.; Toon, Goeff C.; Farmer, Crofton B.; Browell, Edward V.

    1988-01-01

    Attenuation measurements of the solar radiation between 1.5 and 15 micron wavelengths were performed with the airborne (DC-8) JPL MARK 4 interferometer during the 1987 Antarctic Expedition. The opacities not only provide information about the abundance of stratospheric gases but also about the optical depths of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) at wavelengths of negligible gas absorption (windows). The optical depth of PSCs can be determined for each window once the background attenuation, due to air-molecules and aerosol has been filtered out with a simple extinction law. The ratio of optical thicknesses at different wavelengths reveals information about particle size and particle composition. Among the almost 700 measured spectra only a few PSC cases exist. PSC events are identified by sudden reductions in the spectrally integrated intensity value and are also verified with backscattering data from an upward directed lidar instrument, that was mounted on the DC-8. For the selected case on September 21st at 14.40 GMT, lidar data indicate an optically thin cloud at 18k and later an additional optically thick cloud at 15 km altitude. All results still suffer from: (1) often arbitrary definitions of a clear case, that often already may have contained PSC particles and (2) noise problems that restrict the calculations of optical depths to values larger than 0.001. Once these problems are handled, this instrument may become a valuable tool towards a better understanding of the role PSCs play in the Antarctic stratosphere.

  1. Balloon borne Antarctic frost point measurements and their impact on polar stratospheric cloud theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, James M.; Hofmann, D. J.; Carpenter, J. R.; Harder, J. W.; Oltmans, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    The first balloon-borne frost point measurements over Antarctica were made during September and October, 1987 as part of the NOZE 2 effort at McMurdo. The results indicate water vapor mixing ratios on the order of 2 ppmv in the 15 to 20 km region which is somewhat smaller than the typical values currently being used significantly smaller than the typical values currently being used in polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) theories. The observed water vapor mixing ratio would correspond to saturated conditions for what is thought to be the lowest stratospheric temperatures encountered over the Antarctic. Through the use of available lidar observations there appears to be significant evidence that some PSCs form at temperatures higher than the local frost point (with respect to water) in the 10 to 20 km region thus supporting the nitric acid theory of PSC composition. Clouds near 15 km and below appear to form in regions saturated with respect to water and thus are probably mostly ice water clouds although they could contain relatively small amounts of other constituents. Photographic evidence suggests that the clouds forming above the frost point probably have an appearance quite different from the lower altitude iridescent, colored nacreous clouds.

  2. Measurements of size and composition of particles in polar stratospheric clouds from infrared solar absorption spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinne, S.; Toon, O. B.; Toon, G. C.; Farmer, C. B.; Browell, E. V.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) observations, based on IR measurements of solar extinction, made by the airborne JPL Mark IV interferometer during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Expedition in 1987, together with the instrumentation and the theoretical aspects of data analysis. Thirty-three PSC cases were analyzed and categorized into two types, I and II, which were found to occur at different altitudes during September. Type I clouds, seen at altitudes above 15 km, contained particles with radii of about 0.5 micarons and nitric acid concentrations greater than 40 percent, while type II clouds, found usually below 15 km, contained particles with radii of 6 microns and larger, composed of water ice. In addition, particles of larger than the 15-micron-size detection limit were encounterd.

  3. Sensitivity of polar stratospheric cloud formation to changes in water vapour and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosrawi, F.; Urban, J.; Lossow, S.; Stiller, G.; Weigel, K.; Braesicke, P.; Pitts, M. C.; Rozanov, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Murtagh, D.

    2016-01-01

    More than a decade ago it was suggested that a cooling of stratospheric temperatures by 1 K or an increase of 1 ppmv of stratospheric water vapour could promote denitrification, the permanent removal of nitrogen species from the stratosphere by solid polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. In fact, during the two Arctic winters 2009/10 and 2010/11 the strongest denitrification in the recent decade was observed. Sensitivity studies along air parcel trajectories are performed to test how a future stratospheric water vapour (H2O) increase of 1 ppmv or a temperature decrease of 1 K would affect PSC formation. We perform our study based on measurements made during the Arctic winter 2010/11. Air parcel trajectories were calculated 6 days backward in time based on PSCs detected by CALIPSO (Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder satellite observations). The sensitivity study was performed on single trajectories as well as on a trajectory ensemble. The sensitivity study shows a clear prolongation of the potential for PSC formation and PSC existence when the temperature in the stratosphere is decreased by 1 K and water vapour is increased by 1 ppmv. Based on 15 years of satellite measurements (2000-2014) from UARS/HALOE, Envisat/MIPAS, Odin/SMR, Aura/MLS, Envisat/SCIAMACHY and SCISAT/ACE-FTS it is further investigated if there is a decrease in temperature and/or increase of water vapour (H2O) observed in the polar regions similar to that observed at midlatitudes and in the tropics. Performing linear regression analyses we derive from the Envisat/MIPAS (2002-2012) and Aura/MLS (2004-2014) observations predominantly positive changes in the potential temperature range 350 to 1000 K. The linear changes in water vapour derived from Envisat/MIPAS observations are largely insignificant, while those from Aura/MLS are mostly significant. For the temperature neither of the two instruments indicate any significant changes. Given the strong inter-annual variation observed in

  4. Lidar observations of polar stratospheric clouds at McMurdo, Antarctica, during NOZE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morley, Bruce M.

    1988-01-01

    SRI International operated a dual wavelength (1.064 micrometer and .532 micrometer) aerosol lidar at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, as part of the National Ozone Expedition-2 (NOZE-2). The objective of the project was to map the vertical distributions of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), which are believed to play an important role in the destruction of ozone in the Antarctic spring. Altitude, thickness, homogeneity, and duration of PSC events as well as information on particle shape, size or number density will be very useful in determining the exact role of PSCs in ozone destructions, and when combined with measurements of other investigators, additional properties of PSCs can be estimated. The results are currently being analyzed in terms of PSC properties which are useful for modeling the stratospheric ozone depletion mechanism.

  5. Application of physical adsorption thermodynamics to heterogeneous chemistry on polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Scott; Turco, Richard P.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory isotherms for the binding of several nonheterogeneously active atmospheric gases and for HCl to water ice are translated into adsorptive equilibrium constants and surface enthalpies. Extrapolation to polar conditions through the Clausius Clapeyron relation yields coverage estimates below the percent level for N2, Ar, CO2, and CO, suggesting that the crystal faces of type II stratospheric cloud particles may be regarded as clean with respect to these species. For HCl, and perhaps HF and HNO3, estimates rise to several percent, and the adsorbed layer may offer acid or proton sources alternate to the bulk solid for heterogeneous reactions with stratospheric nitrates. Measurements are lacking for many key atmospheric molecules on water ice, and almost entirely for nitric acid trihydrate as substrate. Adsorptive equilibria enter into gas to particle mass flux descriptions, and the binding energy determines rates for desorption of, and encounter between, potential surface reactants.

  6. A case of type I polar stratospheric cloud formation by heterogeneous nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Ferry, G. V.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Goodman, J.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA ER-2 aircraft flew on January 24, 1989, from Stavanger to Spitsbergen, Norway, at the 430-440 K potential temperature surface (19.2-19.8 km pressure altitude). Aerosols were sampled continuously by an optical particle counter (PMS-FSSP300) for concentration and size analyses, and during five 10-min intervals by four wire and one replicator impactor for concentration, size, composition, and phase analysis. During sampling, the air saturation of H2O with respect to ice changed from 20 to 100 percent, and of HNO3 with respect to nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) from subsaturation to supersaturation. Data from both instruments indicate a condensation of hydrochloric acid and, later, nitric acid on the background aerosol particles as the ambient temperature decreases along the flight track. This heterogeneous nucleation mechanism generates type I polar stratospheric cloud particles of 10-fold enhanced optical depth, which could play a role in stratospheric ozone depletion.

  7. Estimation of polar stratospheric cloud infrared extinction climatology using visible satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Michael C.; Thomason, Larry W.

    1995-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) provide surfaces for heterogeneous processes which can dramatically alter the normal partitioning of odd nitrogen and chlorine families in the winter polar stratospheres, setting up conditions for significant ozone depletion as manifested in the springtime Antarctic ozone hole. The spatial and temporal distribution of PSC's is important for parameterizing PSC occurrence in multidimensional photochemical models whose use is essential for fully understanding observed Antarctic ozone losses as well as for accessing the possibility of a similar phemonenon occurring in the future in the Arctic. The Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) 2 sensor, a single-channel (1mu m) photometer launched into a Sun-synchronous orbit aboard the Nimbus 7 satellite in October 1978, provided a unique database to establish the climatology of PSC's. Poole and Pitts (1994) used the record of high-latitude aerosol extinction obtained by SAM II from 1979-1989 to establish the climatology of PSC occurrences in the Arctic and Antarctic. Unfortunately, little information about PSC composition or type was detectable from the single-wavelength SAM II data.

  8. Investigating Type I Polar Stratospheric Cloud Formation Mechanisms with POAM Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Drdla, K.; Fromm, M.; Hoppel, K.; Browell, E.; Hamill, P.; Dempsey, D.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Type Ia PSCs are believed to be composed of nitric acid hydrate particles. Recent results from the SOLVE/THESEO 2000 campaign showed evidence that this type of PSC was composed of a small number of very large particles capable of sedimentary denitrification of regions of the stratosphere. It is unknown whether homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation is responsible for the formation of these PSCs. Arctic winters are tending to be colder in response to global tropospheric warming. The degree to which this influences ozone depletion will depend on the freezing mechanism of nitric acid hydrate particles. If nucleation is homogeneous it implies that the freezing process is an inherent property of the particle, while heterogeneous freezing means that the extent of PSCs will depend in part on the number of nuclei available. The Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM)II and III satellites have been making observations of stratospheric aerosols and Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) since 1994. Recently, we have developed a technique that can discriminate between Type Ia and Ib PSCs using these observations. A statistical approach is employed to demonstrate the robustness of this approach and results are compared with lidar measurements. The technique is used to analyze observations from POAM II and II during Northern Hemisphere winters where significant PSC formation occurred with the objective of exploring Type I PSC formation mechanisms. The different PSCs identified using this method exhibit different growth curve as expressed as extinction versus temperature.

  9. Condensed Acids In Antartic Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Toon, O. B.; Ferry, G. V.; Starr, W. L.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Chan, K. R.; Goodman, J. K.; Livingston, J. M.; Verma, S.; Fong, W.

    1992-01-01

    Report dicusses nitrate, sulfate, and chloride contents of stratospheric aerosols during 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. Emphasizes growth of HNO3*3H2O particles in polar stratospheric clouds. Important in testing theories concerning Antarctic "ozone hole".

  10. An experimental study of growth and phase change of polar stratospheric cloud particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, John; Teets, Edward

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the progress made on understanding phase changes related to solutions which may comprise Polar Stratospheric Clouds. In particular, it is concerned with techniques for investigating specific classes of metastability and phase change which may be important not only in Polar Stratospheric Clouds but in all atmospheric aerosols in general. While the lower level atmospheric aerosol consists of mixtures of (NH4)(SO4)2, NH4HSO4, NaCl among others, there is evidence that aerosol at PSC levels is composed of acid aerosol, either injected from volcanic events (such as Pinatubo) or having diffused upward from the lower atmosphere. In particular, sulfuric acid and nitric acid are known to occur at PSC levels, and are suspected of catalyzing ozone destruction reactions by adsorption on surfaces of crystallized particles. The present study has centered on two approaches: (1) the extent of supercooling (with respect to ice) and supersaturation (with respect to hydrate) and the nature of crystal growth in acid solutions of specific molality; and (2) the nature of growth from the vapor of HNO3 - H2O crystals both on a substrate and on a pre-existing aerosol.

  11. Freezing temperatures of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O mixtures: Implications for polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Naihui

    1994-01-01

    The freezing temperatures of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O mixtures were systematically documented. Nitric acid was found to affect freezing significantly. Measurements show that nitric acid can cause substantial supercooling over a broad composition range. However, some ternary compositions, like to those in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), have high freezing temperatures. The freezing of PSC particles could be controlled by the temperature and vapor pressure of both nitric acid and water in a non-linear way. Formation of polar stratospheric clouds may be forecasted on the basic of conditions of temperature and vapor contents of water and nitric acid.

  12. A decadal satellite record of gravity wave activity in the lower stratosphere to study polar stratospheric cloud formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Lars; Spang, Reinhold; Orr, Andrew; Alexander, M. Joan; Holt, Laura A.; Stein, Olaf

    2017-02-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves yield substantial small-scale temperature fluctuations that can trigger the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). This paper introduces a new satellite record of gravity wave activity in the polar lower stratosphere to investigate this process. The record is comprised of observations of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite from January 2003 to December 2012. Gravity wave activity is measured in terms of detrended and noise-corrected 15 µm brightness temperature variances, which are calculated from AIRS channels that are the most sensitive to temperature fluctuations at about 17-32 km of altitude. The analysis of temporal patterns in the data set revealed a strong seasonal cycle in wave activity with wintertime maxima at mid- and high latitudes. The analysis of spatial patterns indicated that orography as well as jet and storm sources are the main causes of the observed waves. Wave activity is closely correlated with 30 hPa zonal winds, which is attributed to the AIRS observational filter. We used the new data set to evaluate explicitly resolved temperature fluctuations due to gravity waves in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational analysis. It was found that the analysis reproduces orographic and non-orographic wave patterns in the right places, but that wave amplitudes are typically underestimated by a factor of 2-3. Furthermore, in a first survey of joint AIRS and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) satellite observations, nearly 50 gravity-wave-induced PSC formation events were identified. The survey shows that the new AIRS data set can help to better identify such events and more generally highlights the importance of the process for polar ozone chemistry.

  13. A Climatology of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Types by MIPAS-Envisat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spang, Reinhold; Hoffmann, Lars; Griessbach, Sabine; Orr, Andrew; Höpfner, Michael; Müller, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    For Chemistry Climate Models (CCM) it is still a challenging task to properly represent the evolution of the polar vortices over the entire winter season. The models usually do not include comprehensive microphysical modules to evolve the formation of different types of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) over the winter. Consequently, predictions on the development and recovery of the future ozone hole have relatively large uncertainties. A climatological record of hemispheric measurement of PSC types could help to better validate and improve the PSC schemes in CCMs. The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) instrument onboard the ESA Envisat satellite operated from July 2002 to April 2012. The infra-red limb emission measurements compile a unique dataset of day and night measurements of polar stratospheric clouds up to the poles. From the spectral measurements in the 4.15-14.6 microns range it is possible to select a number of atmospheric window regions and spectral signatures to classify PSC cloud types like nitric acid hydrates, sulfuric ternary solution droplets, and ice particles. The cloud detection sensitivity is similar to space borne lidars, but MIPAS adds complementary information due to its different measurement technique (limb instead of nadir) and wavelength region. Here we will describe a new classification method for PSCs based on the combination of multiple brightness temperature differences (BTD) and colour ratios. Probability density functions (PDF) of the MIPAS measurements in conjunction with a database of radiative transfer model calculations of realistic PSC particle size distributions enable the definition of regions attributed to specific or mixed types clouds. Applying a naive bias classifier for independent criteria to all defined classes in four 2D PDF distributions, it is possible to assign the most likely PSC type to any measured cloud spectrum. Statistical Monte Carlo test have been applied to quantify

  14. Denitrification and polar stratospheric cloud formation during the Arctic winter 2009/2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosrawi, F.; Urban, J.; Pitts, M. C.; Voelger, P.; Achtert, P.; Kaphlanov, M.; Murtagh, D.; Fricke, K.-H.

    2011-04-01

    The sedimentation of HNO3 containing Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) particles leads to a permanent removal of HNO3 and thus to a denitrification of the stratosphere, an effect which plays an important role in stratospheric ozone depletion. The polar vortex in the Arctic winter 2009/2010 was very cold and stable between end of December and end of January. Strong denitrification was observed in the Arctic in mid of January by the Odin Sub Millimetre Radiometer (Odin/SMR) which was the strongest denitrification that had been observed in the entire Odin/SMR measuring period (2001-2010). Lidar measurements of PSCs were performed in the area of Kiruna, Northern Sweden with the IRF (Institutet för Rymdfysik) lidar and with the Esrange lidar in January 2010. The measurements show that PSCs were present over the area of Kiruna during the entire period of observations. The formation of PSCs during the Arctic winter 2009/2010 is investigated using a microphysical box model. Box model simulations are performed along air parcel trajectories calculated six days backward according to the PSC measurements with the ground-based lidar in the Kiruna area. From the temperature history of the trajectories and the box model simulations we find two PSC regions, one over Kiruna according to the measurements made in Kiruna and one north of Scandinavia which is much colder, reaching also temperatures below Tice. Using the box model simulations along backward trajectories together with the observations of Odin/SMR, CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) and the ground-based lidar we investigate how and by which type of PSC particles the denitrification that was observed during the Arctic winter 2009/2010 was caused. From our analysis we find that due to an unusually strong synoptic cooling event in mid January, ice particle formation on NAT may be a possible mechanism that caused denitrification during the Arctic winter 2009/2010.

  15. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds-nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-05-01

    Satellite based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current theory, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring on the surface of dust or meteoritic particles. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along tens of thousands of trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT PSCs with these observations enables the thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory and is simple to implement in models. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed PSCs very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories.

  16. Characterization of Polar Stratospheric Clouds With Spaceborne Lidar: CALIPSO and the 2006 Antarctic Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Michael C.; Thomason, L. W.; Poole, Lamont R.; Winker, David M.

    2007-01-01

    The role of polar stratospheric clouds in polar ozone loss has been well documented. The CALIPSO satellite mission offers a new opportunity to characterize PSCs on spatial and temporal scales previously unavailable. A PSC detection algorithm based on a single wavelength threshold approach has been developed for CALIPSO. The method appears to accurately detect PSCs of all opacities, including tenuous clouds, with a very low rate of false positives and few missed clouds. We applied the algorithm to CALIPSO data acquired during the 2006 Antarctic winter season from 13 June through 31 October. The spatial and temporal distribution of CALIPSO PSC observations is illustrated with weekly maps of PSC occurrence. The evolution of the 2006 PSC season is depicted by time series of daily PSC frequency as a function of altitude. Comparisons with virtual solar occultation data indicate that CALIPSO provides a different view of the PSC season than attained with previous solar occultation satellites. Measurement-based time series of PSC areal coverage and vertically-integrated PSC volume are computed from the CALIPSO data. The observed area covered with PSCs is significantly smaller than would be inferred from a temperature-based proxy such as TNAT but is similar in magnitude to that inferred from TSTS. The potential of CALIPSO measurements for investigating PSC microphysics is illustrated using combinations of lidar backscatter coefficient and volume depolarization to infer composition for two CALIPSO PSC scenes.

  17. Detection of Ice Polar Stratospheric Clouds from Assimilation of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Benson, Craig; Liu, Hui-Chun; Pawson, Steven; Chang, Ping; Riishojgaard, Lars Peter

    2006-01-01

    A novel technique is presented for detection of ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) that form at extremely low temperatures in the lower polar stratosphere during winter. Temperature is a major factor in determining abundance of PSCs, which in turn provide surfaces for heterogeneous chemical reactions leading to ozone loss and radiative cooling. The technique infers the presence of ice PSCs using radiances from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) in the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) data assimilation system. Brightness temperatures are computed from short-term GEOS-5 forecasts for several hundred AIRS channels, using a radiation transfer module. The differences between collocated AIRS observations and these computed values are the observed-minus-forecast (O-F) residuals in the assimilation system. Because the radiation model assumes clear-sky conditions, we hypothesize that these O-F residuals contain quantitative information about PSCs. This is confirmed using sparse data from the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III occultation instrument. The analysis focuses on 0-F residuals for the 6.79pm AIRS moisture channel. At coincident locations, when POAM III detects ice clouds, the AIRS O-F residuals for this channel are lower than -2K. When no ice PSCs are evident in POAM III data, the AIRS 0-F residuals are larger. Given this relationship, the high spatial density of AIRS data is used to construct maps of regions where 0-F residuals are lower than -2K, as a proxy for ice PSCs. The spatial scales and spatio-temporal variations of these PSCs in the Antarctic and Arctic are discussed on the basis of these maps.

  18. Optical effects of polar stratospheric clouds on the retrieval of TOMS total ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Ahmad, Z.; Herman, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Small areas of sharply reduced ozone density appear frequently in the maps produced from polar region total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) data. These mini-holes are of the order of 1000 km in extent with a lifetime of a few days. On the basis of measurements from ground-based instruments, balloon-borne ozonesondes, and simultaneous measurements of aerosol and ozone concentrations during aircraft flights in the Arctic and Antarctic regions, the appearance of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are frequently associated with false reductions in ozone derived from the TOMS albedo data. By combining radiative transfer calculations with the observed PSC and ozone data, it is shown that PSCs located near or above the ozone density maximum (with optical thickness greater than 0.1) can explain most of the differences between TOMS ozone data and ground or in situ ozone measurements. Several examples of real and false TOMS mini-hole phenomenon are investigated using data from the 1989 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) and from balloon flights over Norway and Sweden.

  19. Fourier transform infrared studies of the interaction of HCl with model polar stratospheric cloud films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, Birgit G.; Mcneill, Laurie S.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1993-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions involving hydrochloric acid adsorbed on the surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are postulated to contribute to polar ozone loss. Using FTIR spectroscopy to probe the condensed phase, we have examined the interaction of HCl with ice and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) films representative of types II and I PSCs, respectively. For HCl pressures in the range of 10 exp -7 to 10 exp -5 Torr, our FTIR studies show that a small amount of crystalline HCl-6H2O formed on or in ice at 155 K. However, for higher HCl pressures, we observed that the entire film of ice rapidly converted into an amorphous 4:1 H2O:HCl mixture. From HCl-uptake experiments with P(HCl) = 8 x 10 exp -7 Torr, we estimate roughly that the diffusion coefficient of HCl in ice is around 2 x 10 exp -12 sq cm/s at 158 K. For higher temperatures more closely approximating those found in the stratosphere, we were unable to detect bulk HCl uptake by ice. Indirect evidence suggests that HCl adsorption onto the surface of model PSC films inhibited the evaporation of both ice and NAT by 3-5 K.

  20. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 2: Nucleation of ice on synoptic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Hoyle, C. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Dörnbrack, A.; Peter, T.

    2013-04-01

    This paper provides unprecedented evidence for the importance of heterogeneous nucleation, likely on solid particles of meteoritic origin, and of small-scale temperature fluctuations, for the formation of ice particles in the Arctic stratosphere. During January 2010, ice PSCs (Polar Stratospheric Clouds) were shown by CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) to have occurred on a synoptic scale (~ 1000 km dimension). CALIPSO observations also showed widespread PSCs containing nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles in December 2009, prior to the occurrence of synoptic-scale regions of ice PSCs during mid-January 2010. We demonstrate by means of detailed microphysical modeling along air parcel trajectories that the formation of these PSCs is not readily reconciled with expectations from the conventional understanding of PSC nucleation mechanisms. The measurements are at odds with the previous laboratory-based understanding of PSC formation, which deemed direct heterogeneous nucleation of NAT and ice on preexisting solid particles unlikely. While a companion paper (Part 1) addresses the heterogeneous nucleation of NAT during December 2009, before the existence of ice PSCs, this paper shows that also the large-scale occurrence of stratospheric ice in January 2010 cannot be explained merely by homogeneous ice nucleation but requires the heterogeneous nucleation of ice, e.g. on meteoritic dust or preexisting NAT particles. The required efficiency of the ice nuclei is surprisingly high, namely comparable to that of known tropospheric ice nuclei such as mineral dust particles. To gain model agreement with the ice number densities inferred from observations, the presence of small-scale temperature fluctuations, with wavelengths unresolved by the numerical weather prediction models, is required. With the derived rate parameterization for heterogeneous ice nucleation we are able to explain and reproduce CALIPSO observations throughout the

  1. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 2: Nucleation of ice on synoptic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Hoyle, C. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Dörnbrack, A.; Peter, T.

    2013-11-01

    This paper provides compelling evidence for the importance of heterogeneous nucleation, likely on solid particles of meteoritic origin, and of small-scale temperature fluctuations, for the formation of ice particles in the Arctic stratosphere. During January 2010, ice PSCs (polar stratospheric clouds) were shown by CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) to have occurred on a synoptic scale (~1000 km dimension). CALIPSO observations also showed widespread PSCs containing NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) particles in December 2009, prior to the occurrence of synoptic-scale regions of ice PSCs during mid-January 2010. We demonstrate by means of detailed microphysical modeling along air parcel trajectories that the formation of these PSCs is not readily reconciled with expectations from the conventional understanding of PSC nucleation mechanisms. The measurements are at odds with the previous laboratory-based understanding of PSC formation, which deemed direct heterogeneous nucleation of NAT and ice on preexisting solid particles unlikely. While a companion paper (Part 1) addresses the heterogeneous nucleation of NAT during December 2009, before the existence of ice PSCs, this paper shows that also the large-scale occurrence of stratospheric ice in January 2010 cannot be explained merely by homogeneous ice nucleation but requires the heterogeneous nucleation of ice, e.g. on meteoritic dust or preexisting NAT particles. The required efficiency of the ice nuclei is surprisingly high, namely comparable to that of known tropospheric ice nuclei such as mineral dust particles. To gain model agreement with the ice number densities inferred from observations, the presence of small-scale temperature fluctuations, with wavelengths unresolved by the numerical weather prediction models, is required. With the derived rate parameterization for heterogeneous ice nucleation we are able to explain and reproduce CALIPSO observations throughout the

  2. Freezing of sulfuric and nitric acid solutions: Implications for polar stratospheric cloud formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo Gonzalez, Dara

    2000-12-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) play an important role in ozone chemistry during the polar winter. The magnitude of their effect depends on their phase, composition and formation mechanism, which are not fully understood yet. In order to understand how liquid PSCs freeze, two apparatus were designed to study the freezing behavior of small drops using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer and an optical microscope. Sulfuric acid aqueous drops with composition of 10 to 50 wt % were studied with the FTIR apparatus. The surface on which the drops stand caused heterogeneous nucleation of ice, but not of the sulfuric acid hydrates. The more concentrated solutions (>40 wt %) supercooled to 130 K without freezing. Below 150 K these solutions formed an amorphous solid, which liquefied upon warming. Drops with composition of 40 to 64 wt % HNO3 were prepared and their phase transitions were detected with the optical microscope apparatus. Freezing temperatures of the drops were determined and homogeneous nucleation rates of nitric acid dihydrate (JNAD) and nitric acid trihydrate (JNAT) between 170 and 190 K were calculated. JNAT and JNAD depend predominantly on the saturation of the solid in the liquid solution: higher saturation ratios correspond to higher nucleation rates. Classical nucleation theory was used to parameterize this relation. Since the saturation ratios of NAD and NAT vary with temperature and composition in different ways, NAT or NAD can form preferentially under different conditions. Evidence was found that NAD catalyzes the nucleation of NAT below ~183 K. Mullite, cristobalite and alumina were tested as possible heterogeneous nuclei of volcanic origin for PSCs. They catalyze freezing of NAD and NAT at temperatures below 179 K, which are too low to be stratospherically important. The results suggest that the largest drops in a PSC will freeze homogeneously if the stratospheric temperature remains below the NAT condensation temperature for more

  3. Long-term measurements of Polar Stratospheric Clouds with the Esrange lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtert, Peggy; Tesche, Matthias; Blum, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) play a key role for ozone depletion in the polar stratosphere whose magnitude depends on the type of PSC and its lifetime and extent. PSCs are classified into three types (PSC Ia: nitric acid di- or trihydrate crystals, NAD or NAT; PSC Ib: supercooled liquid ternary solutions, STS; PSC II: ice) according to their particle composition and to their physical phase. This study presents long-term statistics of PSC occurrence from measurements with the lidar system at the Esrange Space Centre (68°N, 21°E), northern Sweden. The study gives an overview of the occurrence frequency of different PSC types in connection to the prevailing meteorological conditions for the northern hemispheric winters from 1996/97 to 2013/14. During these 18 years, most of the measurements were conducted in January. The geographical location of Esrange in the lee of the Scandinavian mountain range allows for the observation of a wide range of PSC growth conditions due to mountain-wave activity. The Esrange lidar data set contains hourly mean values of the parallel and perpendicularly polarized backscatter ratio and the linear particle depolarization ratio - all measured at 532 nm. These parameters are used for PSC classification. The lowest occurrence frequency is found for PSCs of type II (6% for the entire period). This low occurrence rate is reasonable since PSCs of type II are formed at temperatures below the ice-frost point. Such temperatures are rarely reached in the Arctic polar vortex. Most of the observations between 1997 and 2014 showed low particle depolarization ratios and low backscatter ratios according to which observed PSCs were classified as type Ib (47%) or mixtures (33%). The remaining 13% of the observation were classified as type Ia PSCs (NAT particles).

  4. Chlorine chemistry on polar stratospheric cloud particles in the Arctic winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Toohey, D. W.; Avallone, L. M.; Anderson, J. G.; Newman, P.; Lait, L.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Elkins, J. W.; Chan, K. R.

    1993-01-01

    Simultaneous in situ measurements of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and chlorine monoxide (ClO) in the Arctic winter vortex showed large HCl losses of up to 1 ppbv, which were correlated with high ClO levels of up to 1.4 ppbv. Air parcel trajectory analysis identified that this conversion of inorganic chlorine occurred at air temperatures of less than 196 -/+ 4 kelvin. High ClO was always accompanied by loss of HCl mixing ratios equal to 1/2(ClO+ 2Cl2O2). These data indicate that the heterogeneous reaction HCl + ClONO2 - Cl2 + HNO3 on particles of polar stratospheric clouds establishes the chlorine partitioning, which, contrary to earlier notions, begins with an excess of ClONO2, not HCl.

  5. Formation of mixed-phase particles during the freezing of polar stratospheric ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Anatoli; Molina, Mario J; Tenhu, Heikki; Mayer, Erwin; Loerting, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are extremely efficient at catalysing the transformation of photostable chlorine reservoirs into photolabile species, which are actively involved in springtime ozone-depletion events. Why PSCs are such efficient catalysts, however, is not well understood. Here, we investigate the freezing behaviour of ternary HNO₃-H₂SO₄-H₂O droplets of micrometric size, which form type II PSC ice particles. We show that on freezing, a phase separation into pure ice and a residual solution coating occurs; this coating does not freeze but transforms into glass below ∼150 K. We find that the coating, which is thicker around young ice crystals, can still be approximately 30 nm around older ice crystals of diameter about 10 µm. These results affect our understanding of PSC microphysics and chemistry and suggest that chlorine-activation reactions are better studied on supercooled HNO₃-H₂SO₄-H₂O solutions rather than on a pure ice surface.

  6. Denitrification and polar stratospheric cloud formation during the Arctic winter 2009/2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosrawi, F.; Urban, J.; Pitts, M. C.; Voelger, P.; Achtert, P.; Kaphlanov, M.; Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.; Murtagh, D.; Fricke, K.-H.

    2011-08-01

    The sedimentation of HNO3 containing Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) particles leads to a permanent removal of HNO3 and thus to a denitrification of the stratosphere, an effect which plays an important role in stratospheric ozone depletion. The polar vortex in the Arctic winter 2009/2010 was very cold and stable between end of December and end of January. Strong denitrification between 475 to 525 K was observed in the Arctic in mid of January by the Odin Sub Millimetre Radiometer (Odin/SMR). This was the strongest denitrification that had been observed in the entire Odin/SMR measuring period (2001-2010). Lidar measurements of PSCs were performed in the area of Kiruna, Northern Sweden with the IRF (Institutet för Rymdfysik) lidar and with the Esrange lidar in January 2010. The measurements show that PSCs were present over the area of Kiruna during the entire period of observations. The formation of PSCs during the Arctic winter 2009/2010 is investigated using a microphysical box model. Box model simulations are performed along air parcel trajectories calculated six days backward according to the PSC measurements with the ground-based lidar in the Kiruna area. From the temperature history of the backward trajectories and the box model simulations we find two PSC regions, one over Kiruna according to the measurements made in Kiruna and one north of Scandinavia which is much colder, reaching also temperatures below Tice. Using the box model simulations along backward trajectories together with the observations of Odin/SMR, Aura/MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder), CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) and the ground-based lidar we investigate how and by which type of PSC particles the denitrification that was observed during the Arctic winter 2009/2010 was caused. From our analysis we find that due to an unusually strong synoptic cooling event in mid January, ice particle formation on NAT may be a possible formation mechanism during

  7. Polar stratospheric cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modeled by ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Wohltmann, Ingo; Wegner, Tobias; Takeda, Masanori; Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.; Lehmann, Ralph; Santee, Michelle L.; Rex, Markus

    2016-03-01

    We examined observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) by CALIPSO, and of HCl and ClO by MLS along air mass trajectories, to investigate the dependence of the inferred PSC composition on the temperature history of the air parcels and the dependence of the level of chlorine activation on PSC composition. Several case studies based on individual trajectories from the Arctic winter 2009/2010 were conducted, with the trajectories chosen such that the first processing of the air mass by PSCs in this winter occurred on the trajectory. Transitions of PSC composition classes were observed to be highly dependent on the temperature history. In cases of a gradual temperature decrease, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and super-cooled ternary solution (STS) mixture clouds were observed. In cases of rapid temperature decrease, STS clouds were first observed, followed by NAT/STS mixture clouds. When temperatures dropped below the frost point, ice clouds formed and then transformed into NAT/STS mixture clouds when temperature increased above the frost point. The threshold temperature for rapid chlorine activation on PSCs is approximately 4 K below the NAT existence temperature, TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an air mass encountered PSCs. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  8. A multi-wavelength classification method for polar stratospheric cloud types using infrared limb spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spang, Reinhold; Hoffmann, Lars; Höpfner, Michael; Griessbach, Sabine; Müller, Rolf; Pitts, Michael C.; Orr, Andrew M. W.; Riese, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) instrument on board the ESA Envisat satellite operated from July 2002 until April 2012. The infrared limb emission measurements represent a unique dataset of daytime and night-time observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) up to both poles. Cloud detection sensitivity is comparable to space-borne lidars, and it is possible to classify different cloud types from the spectral measurements in different atmospheric windows regions. Here we present a new infrared PSC classification scheme based on the combination of a well-established two-colour ratio method and multiple 2-D brightness temperature difference probability density functions. The method is a simple probabilistic classifier based on Bayes' theorem with a strong independence assumption. The method has been tested in conjunction with a database of radiative transfer model calculations of realistic PSC particle size distributions, geometries, and composition. The Bayesian classifier distinguishes between solid particles of ice and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), as well as liquid droplets of super-cooled ternary solution (STS). The classification results are compared to coincident measurements from the space-borne lidar Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument over the temporal overlap of both satellite missions (June 2006-March 2012). Both datasets show a good agreement for the specific PSC classes, although the viewing geometries and the vertical and horizontal resolution are quite different. Discrepancies are observed between the CALIOP and the MIPAS ice class. The Bayesian classifier for MIPAS identifies substantially more ice clouds in the Southern Hemisphere polar vortex than CALIOP. This disagreement is attributed in part to the difference in the sensitivity on mixed-type clouds. Ice seems to dominate the spectral behaviour in the limb infrared spectra and may cause an overestimation in ice occurrence

  9. A synopsis of CALIPSO Polar Stratospheric Cloud Observations from 2006-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.

    2014-10-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are known to play key roles in the springtime chemical depletion of ozone at high latitudes. PSC particles provide sites for heterogeneous chemical reactions that transform stable chlorine and bromine reservoir species into highly reactive ozone-destructive forms. Furthermore, large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) PSC particles can irreversibly redistribute odd nitrogen through gravitational sedimentation, which prolongs the ozone depletion process by slowing the reformation of the stable chlorine reservoirs. Spaceborne observations from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar on the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite are providing a rich new dataset for studying PSCs. CALIOP began data collection in mid-June 2006 and has since acquired, on average, over 300,000 backscatter profiles daily at latitudes between 55° and 82° in both hemispheres. PSCs are detected in the CALIOP backscatter profiles as enhancements above the background aerosol in either 532-nm scattering ratio (the ratio of total-to-molecular backscatter) or 532-nm perpendicular-polarized backscatter. CALIOP PSCs are separated into composition classes based on the ensemble 532- nm scattering ratio and 532-nm particulate depolarization ratio (which is sensitive to the presence of non-spherical, i.e. NAT and ice particles). In this paper, we provide an overview of the CALIOP PSC measurements and then examine the vertical and spatial distribution of PSCs in the Arctic and Antarctic on vortex-wide scales for entire PSC seasons over the more than eight-year data record.

  10. Microphysical Modelling of Polar Stratospheric Clouds During the 1999-2000 Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, Katja; Schoeberl, Mark; Rosenfield, Joan; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of the 1999-2000 Arctic winter has been examined using a microphysical/photochemical model run along diabatic trajectories. A large number of trajectories have been generated, filling the vortex throughout the region of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation, and extending from November until the vortex breakup, in order to provide representative sampling of the evolution of PSCs and their effect on stratospheric chemistry. The 1999-2000 winter was particularly cold, allowing extensive PSC formation. Many trajectories have ten-day periods continuously below the Type I PSC threshold; significant periods of Type II PSCs are also indicated. The model has been used to test the extent and severity of denitrification and dehydration predicted using a range of different microphysical schemes. Scenarios in which freezing only occurs below the ice frost point (causing explicit coupling of denitrification and dehydration) have been tested, as well as scenarios with partial freezing at warmer temperatures (in which denitrification can occur independently of dehydration). The sensitivity to parameters such as aerosol freezing rates and heterogeneous freezing have been explored. Several scenarios cause sufficient denitrification to affect chlorine partitioning, and in turn, model-predicted ozone depletion, demonstrating that an improved understanding of the microphysics responsible for denitrification is necessary for understanding ozone loss rates.

  11. Retrieval of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Microphysical Properties from Lidar Measurements: Dependence on Particle Shape Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Yang, P.; McGee, T. J.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A retrieval algorithm has been developed for the microphysical analysis of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) optical data obtained using lidar instrumentation. The parameterization scheme of the PSC microphysical properties allows for coexistence of up to three different particle types with size-dependent shapes. The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method has been used to calculate optical properties of particles with maximum dimensions equal to or less than 2 mu m and with shapes that can be considered more representative of PSCs on the scale of individual crystals than the commonly assumed spheroids. Specifically. these are irregular and hexagonal crystals. Selection of the optical parameters that are input to the inversion algorithm is based on a potential data set such as that gathered by two of the lidars on board the NASA DC-8 during the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 0 p (SAGE) Ozone Loss Validation experiment (SOLVE) campaign in winter 1999/2000: the Airborne Raman Ozone and Temperature Lidar (AROTEL) and the NASA Langley Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). The 0 microphysical retrieval algorithm has been applied to study how particle shape assumptions affect the inversion of lidar data measured in leewave PSCs. The model simulations show that under the assumption of spheroidal particle shapes, PSC surface and volume density are systematically smaller than the FDTD-based values by, respectively, approximately 10-30% and approximately 5-23%.

  12. Analysis of the physical state of one Arctic polar stratospheric cloud based on observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, K.; Tabazadeh, A.; Turco, R. P.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Dye, J. E.; Twohy, C.; Baumgardner, D.

    1994-01-01

    During the Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) simultaneous measurements of aerosol size distribution and NO(y)(HN03 + NO + NO2 + 2(N205)) were made along ER-2 flight paths. The flow characteristics of the NO(y) instrument allow us to derive the condensed NO(y) amount (assumed to be HN03) present during polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) events. Analysis of the January 24th flight indicates that this condensed HN03 amount does not agree well with the aerosol volume if the observed PSCs are composed of solid nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), as is generally assumed. However, the composition agrees well with that predicted for liquid H2S04/HN03/H20 solution droplets using a new Aerosol Physical Chemistry Model (APCM). The agreement corresponds in detail to variations in temperature and humidity. The weight percentages of H2SO4, HN03, and H2O derived from the measurements all correspond to those predicted for ternary, liquid solutions.

  13. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-03-01

    Satellite based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled the thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed PSCs very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  14. Effects of Polar Stratospheric Clouds in the Nimbus 7 LIMS Version 6 Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, Ellis; Harvey, V. Lynn

    2016-01-01

    The historic Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) measurements of 1978-1979 from the Nimbus 7 satellite were re-processed with Version 6 (V6) algorithms and archived in 2002. The V6 data set employs updated radiance registration methods, improved spectroscopic line parameters, and a common vertical resolution for all retrieved parameters. Retrieved profiles are spaced about every 1.6 of latitude along orbits and include the additional parameter of geopotential height. Profiles of O3 are sensitive to perturbations from emissions of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). This work presents results of implementing a first-order screening for effects of PSCs using simple algorithms based on vertical gradients of the O3 mixing ratio. Their occurrences are compared with the co-located, retrieved temperatures and related to the temperature thresholds needed for saturation of H2O and/or HNO3 vapor onto PSC particles. Observed daily locations where the major PSC screening criteria are satisfied are validated against PSCs observed with the Stratospheric Aerosol Monitor (SAM) II experiment also on Nimbus 7. Remnants of emissions from PSCs are characterized for O3 and HNO3 following the screening. PSCs may also impart a warm bias in the co-located LIMS temperatures, but by no more than 1-2K at the altitudes of where effects of PSCs are a maximum in the ozone; thus, no PSC screening was applied to the V6 temperatures. Minimum temperatures vary between 187 and 194K and often occur 1 to 2 km above where PSC effects are first identified in the ozone (most often between about 21 and 28 hPa). Those temperature-pressure values are consistent with conditions for the existence of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) mixtures and to a lesser extent of super-cooled ternary solution (STS) droplets. A local, temporary uptake of HNO3 vapor of order 1-3 ppbv is indicated during mid-January for the 550K surface. Seven-month time series of the distributions of LIMS O3 and HNO3 are shown based

  15. Effects of polar stratospheric clouds in the Nimbus 7 LIMS Version 6 data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remsberg, Ellis; Harvey, V. Lynn

    2016-07-01

    The historic Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) measurements of 1978-1979 from the Nimbus 7 satellite were re-processed with Version 6 (V6) algorithms and archived in 2002. The V6 data set employs updated radiance registration methods, improved spectroscopic line parameters, and a common vertical resolution for all retrieved parameters. Retrieved profiles are spaced about every 1.6° of latitude along orbits and include the additional parameter of geopotential height. Profiles of O3 are sensitive to perturbations from emissions of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). This work presents results of implementing a first-order screening for effects of PSCs using simple algorithms based on vertical gradients of the O3 mixing ratio. Their occurrences are compared with the co-located, retrieved temperatures and related to the temperature thresholds needed for saturation of H2O and/or HNO3 vapor onto PSC particles. Observed daily locations where the major PSC screening criteria are satisfied are validated against PSCs observed with the Stratospheric Aerosol Monitor (SAM) II experiment also on Nimbus 7. Remnants of emissions from PSCs are characterized for O3 and HNO3 following the screening. PSCs may also impart a warm bias in the co-located LIMS temperatures, but by no more than 1-2 K at the altitudes of where effects of PSCs are a maximum in the ozone; thus, no PSC screening was applied to the V6 temperatures. Minimum temperatures vary between 187 and 194 K and often occur 1 to 2 km above where PSC effects are first identified in the ozone (most often between about 21 and 28 hPa). Those temperature-pressure values are consistent with conditions for the existence of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) mixtures and to a lesser extent of super-cooled ternary solution (STS) droplets. A local, temporary uptake of HNO3 vapor of order 1-3 ppbv is indicated during mid-January for the 550 K surface. Seven-month time series of the distributions of LIMS O3 and HNO3 are shown

  16. Heterogeneous chemistry on Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds - A microphysical estimate of the extent of chemical processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, K.; Turco, R. P.; Elliott, S.

    1993-01-01

    A detailed model of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), which includes nucleation, condensational growth. and sedimentation processes, has been applied to the study of heterogeneous chemical reactions. For the first time, the extent of chemical processing during a polar winter has been estimated for an idealized air parcel in the Antarctic vortex by calculating in detail the rates of heterogeneous reactions on PSC particles. The resulting active chlorine and NO(x) concentrations at first sunrise are analyzed with respect to their influence upon the Antarctic ozone hole using a photochemical model. It is found that the species present at sunrise are primarily influenced by the relative values of the heterogeneous reaction rate constants and the initial gas concentrations. However, the extent of chlorine activation is also influenced by whether N2O5 is removed by reaction with HCl or H2O. The reaction of N2O5 with HCl, which occurs rapidly on type 1 PSCs, activates the chlorine contained in the reservoir species HCl. Hence the presence and surface area of type 1 PSCs early in the winter are crucial in determining ozone depletion.

  17. Gravity Waves in the Polar Stratosphere and Mesosphere and Their Relations with Ice Cloud Observed Sofie/AIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Yue, J.; Xu, J.; Wang, L.; Yuan, W.; Russell, J. M., III; Hervig, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    A six-years (2007-2013) temperature dataset from the Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE) onboard the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite is used to extract gravity waves (GWs) in the polar stratosphere and mesosphere of both hemispheres. These data are continuous in the polar regions. The monthly mean GW potential energy (PE) increases exponentially with a scale height of ~13 km in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere. GWs are stronger in the winter than in the summer and exhibit strong annual variation. GWs are stronger in the southern polar region (SPR) than in the northern polar region (NPR) except in the summer months. This is likely because there are stronger and longer-lasting zonal wind jets in the SPR stratosphere, as revealed from Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) wind data. The longitudinal variations of PE in the winter polar stratosphere are consistent with the elevated regions. In the mesosphere, the longitudinal variations of PE do not vary with height significantly. The correlations between GW PE and the column ice water content (IWC, an indicator of the polar mesosphere cloud) exhibit longitudinal and annual variations.

  18. Microphysical Simulations of Polar Stratospheric Clouds Compared with Calipso and MLS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y.; Toon, O. B.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lambert, A.; Brakebusch, M.

    2014-12-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) form in the lower stratosphere during the polar night due to the cold temperature inside the polar vortex. PSCs are important to understand because they are responsible for the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole and the ozone depletion over the Arctic. In this work, we explore the formation and evolution of STS particles (Super-cooled Ternary Solution) and NAT (Nitric-acid Trihydrate) particles using the SD-WACCM/CARMA model. SD-WACCM/CARMA couples the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model using Specific Dynamics with the microphysics model (CARMA). The 2010-2011 Arctic winter has been simulated because the Arctic vortex remained cold enough for PSCs from December until the end of March (Manney et al., 2011). The unusual length of this cold period and the presence of PSCs caused strong ozone depletion. This model simulates the growth and evaporation of the STS particles instead of considering them as being in equilibrium as other models do (Carslaw et al., 1995). This work also explores the homogeneous nucleation of NAT particles and derives a scheme for NAT formation based on the observed denitrification during the winter 2010-2011. The simulated microphysical features (particle volumes, size distributions, etc.) of both STS (Supercooled Ternary Solutions) and NAT particles show a consistent comparison with historical observations. The modeled evolution of PSCs and gas phase ozone related chemicals inside the vortex such as HCl and ClONO2 are compared with the observations from MLS, MIPAS and CALIPSO over this winter. The denitrification history indicate the surface nucleation rate from Tabazadeh et al. (2002) removes too much HNO3 over the winter. With a small modification of the free energy term of the equation, the denitification and the PSC backscattering features are much closer to the observations. H2O, HCl, O3 and ClONO2 are very close to MLS and MIPAS observations inside the vortex. The model underestimates ozone

  19. Polar stratospheric clouds over Finland in the 2012/2013 Arctic winter measured by two Raman lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Anne; Giannakaki, Eleni; Kivi, Rigel; Schrems, Otto; Immler, Franz; Komppula, Mika

    2013-04-01

    Already in December 2012, the Arctic stratospheric vortex reached temperatures sufficiently low for polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation over wide areas of Northern Europe and whole Finland. Within Finland, stratospheric aerosol lidar measurements have been and are performed with two Raman lidar systems, the PollyXT, owned by the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) and situated well below the Arctic circle close to Kuopio (63 N, 27 E) and the MARL lidar owned by the Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), and situated at the FMI Arctic Research Centre in Sodankylä (67 N, 26 E). The PollyXT has been designed as an autonomous tropospheric lidar system, but it has proven to be able to detect aerosol backscatter and depolarization at least as high up as 25 km. Measurements are ongoing as far as low clouds allow for stratospheric analysis with both lidars until the end of PSC season in February. For the winter 2012/2013, PSC occurrence frequency, types and characteristics will be determined. Comparative analysis with Calipso lidar profiles covering Finland will be performed. Preliminary results from December 17-24 show PSCs detected in Kuopio during seven days with the PollyXT lidar. The altitude of the clouds varied in the range of 17-25 km. In Sodankylä the measurements were running on one day during the period and PSCs were observed between altitudes 17-25 km. For the same time period (December 17-24, 2012) CALIPSO has observed stratospheric layers at all overpasses over Finland (9 tracks on five days). The clouds were observed between 18.5 and 26 km, with varying geometric and optical thickness.

  20. Effects of the El Chichon volcanic cloud in the stratosphere on the polarization of light from the sky.

    PubMed

    Coulson, K L

    1983-04-01

    A dense volcanic cloud from the El Chichon volcanic eruption has been observed in the stratosphere over Hawaii since it was first discovered at the Mauna Loa Observatory 9 Apr. 1982. Lidar observations have shown the cloud to have been dense and highly layered in its early stages, but as the cloud matured it became more homogeneous and the top portion underwent considerable enhancement. Measurements of the degree of polarization of skylight at the zenith and across the sky in the sun's vertical show that the polarization field is strongly modified by the effects of the cloud and that the modifications are of a different nature from those produced by high turbidity in the lower layers of the atmosphere. The degree of polarization at the zenith during twilight shows a secondary maximum at a solar depression D = 4.8-5 degrees, a secondary minimum at D = 4 degrees, a primary maximum at D = 1-2 degrees, and a rapid decrease to values generally <10% in the immediate sunrise period. The positions of the neutral points are strongly affected by the cloud, the Arago point being shifted from its normal position by as much as 15-20 degrees and the Babinet point being shifted even farther. Multiple Babinet points were observed on some occasions. The measurements indicate the polarization field to be modified more by the El Chichon cloud than it was by the clouds from previous eruptions which have occurred during this century.

  1. Retrieval of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Microphysical Properties From Lidar Measurements: Dependence on Particle Shape Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, Susanne; Reichardt, Jens; Yang, Ping; McGee, Thomas J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of particle sizes and number densities of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) is highly important, because they are critical parameters for the modeling of the ozone chemistry of the stratosphere. In situ measurements of PSC particles are rare. the main instrument for the accumulation of PSC data are lidar systems. Therefore the derivation of some microphysical properties of PSCS from the optical parameters measured by lidars would be highly beneficial for ozone research. Inversion of lidar data obtained in the presence of PSCs formed from crystalline particles type 11 and the various nitric acid tri Ydrrate (NAT) types cannot be easily accomplished, because a suitable scattering theory for small faceted crystals has not been readily available tip to now. As a consequence, the T-matrix method is commonly used for the interpretation of these PSC lidar data. Here the assumption is made that the optical properties of an ensemble of spheroids resemble those of crystalline PSCs, and microphysical properties of the PSC are inferred from the optical signatures of the PSC at two or more wavelengths. The problem with the T-matrix approach is that the assumption of spheroidal instead of faceted particles can lead to dramatically wrong results: Usually cloud particle properties are deduced from analysis of lidar profiles of backscatter ratio and depolarization ratio. The particle contribution to the backscatter ratio is given by the product of the particle number density and the backscattering cross section. The latter is proportional to the value of the particle's scattering phase function at 180 degrees scattering angle. At 180 degrees however, the phase functions of rough, faceted crystals and of spheroids with same maximum dimension differ by a factor of 6. From this it follows that for a PSC consisting of faceted crystals, the particle number density is underestimated by roughly the same factor if spheroidal particles are unrealistically assumed. We are currently

  2. Physical chemistry of the H2SO4/HNO3/H2O system - Implications for polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, M. J.; Zhang, R.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Mcmahon, J. R.; Kim, J. E.; Chang, H. Y.; Beyer, K. D.

    1993-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play a key role in stratospheric ozone depletion. Surface-catalyzed reactions on PSC particles generate chlorine compounds that photolyze readily to yield chlorine radicals, which in turn destroy ozone very efficiently. The most prevalent PSCs form at temperatures several degrees above the ice frost point and are believed to consist of HNO3 hydrates; however, their formation mechanism is unclear. Results of laboratory experiments are presented which indicate that the background stratospheric H2SO4/H2O aerosols provide an essential link in this mechanism: These liquid aerosols absorb significant amounts of HNO3 vapor, leading most likely to the crystallization of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT). The frozen particles then grow to form PSCs by condensation of additional amounts of HNO3 and H2O vapor. Furthermore, reaction probability measurements reveal that the chlorine radical precursors are formed readily at polar stratospheric temperatures not just on NAT and ice crystals, but also on liquid H2SO4 solutions and on solid H2SO4 hydrates. These results imply that the chlorine activation efficiency of the aerosol particles increases rapidly as the temperature approaches the ice frost point regardless of the phase or composition of the particles.

  3. A Unified Satellite-Observation Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) Database for Long-Term Climate-Change Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromm, Michael; Pitts, Michael; Alfred, Jerome

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the project team's activity and accomplishments during the period 12 February, 1999 - 12 February, 2000. The primary objective of this project was to create and test a generic algorithm for detecting polar stratospheric clouds (PSC), an algorithm that would permit creation of a unified, long term PSC database from a variety of solar occultation instruments that measure aerosol extinction near 1000 nm The second objective was to make a database of PSC observations and certain relevant related datasets. In this report we describe the algorithm, the data we are making available, and user access options. The remainder of this document provides the details of the algorithm and the database offering.

  4. 21st Century Trends in Antarctic Temperature and Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) Area in the GEOS Chemistry-Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Newman, P. A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines trends in Antarctic temperature and APSC, a temperature proxy for the area of polar stratospheric clouds, in an ensemble of Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations of the 21st century. A selection of greenhouse gas, ozone-depleting substance, and sea surface temperature scenarios is used to test the trend sensitivity to these parameters. One scenario is used to compare temperature trends in two versions of the GEOS CCM. An extended austral winter season is examined in detail. In May, June, and July, the expected future increase in CO2-related radiative cooling drives temperature trends in the Antarctic lower stratosphere. At 50 hPa, a 1.3 K cooling is expected between 2000 and 2100. Ozone levels increase, despite this robust cooling signal and the consequent increase in APSC, suggesting the enhancement of stratospheric transport in future. In the lower stratosphere, the choice of climate change scenarios does not affect the magnitude of the early winter cooling. Midwinter temperature trends are generally small. In October, APSC trends have the same sign as the prescribed halogen trends. That is, there are negative APSC trends in "grealistic future" simulations, where halogen loading decreases in accordance with the Montreal Protocol and CO2 continues to increase. In these simulations, the speed of ozone recovery is not influenced by either the choice of sea surface temperature and greenhouse gas scenarios or by the model version.

  5. The Sensitivity of Arctic Ozone Loss to Polar Stratospheric Cloud Volume and Chlorine and Bromine Loading in a Chemistry and Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A. R.; Stolarski, R. S.; Strahan, S. E.; Polansky, B. C.

    2006-01-01

    The sensitivity of Arctic ozone loss to polar stratospheric cloud volume (V(sub PSC)) and chlorine and bromine loading is explored using chemistry and transport models (CTMs). A simulation using multi-decadal output from a general circulation model (GCM) in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) CTM complements one recycling a single year s GCM output in the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) CTM. Winter polar ozone loss in the GSFC CTM depends on equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC) and polar vortex characteristics (temperatures, descent, isolation, polar stratospheric cloud amount). Polar ozone loss in the GMI CTM depends only on changes in EESC as the dynamics repeat annually. The GSFC CTM simulation reproduces a linear relationship between ozone loss and Vpsc derived from observations for 1992 - 2003 which holds for EESC within approx.85% of its maximum (approx.1990 - 2020). The GMI simulation shows that ozone loss varies linearly with EESC for constant, high V(sub PSC).

  6. Investigation of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Solid Particle Formation Mechanisms Using ILAS and AVHRR Observations in the Arctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irie, H.; Pagan, K. L.; Tabazadeh, A.; Legg, M. J.; Sugita, T.

    2004-01-01

    Satellite observations of denitrification and ice clouds in the Arctic lower stratosphere in February 1997 are used with Lagrangian microphysical box model calculations to evaluate nucleation mechanisms of solid polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. The occurrences of ice clouds are not correlated in time and space with the locations of back trajectories of denitrified air masses, indicating that ice particle surfaces are not always a prerequisite for the formation of solid PSCs that lead to denitrification. In contrast, the model calculations incorporating a pseudoheterogeneous freezing process occurring at the vapor-liquid interface can quantitatively explain most of the observed denitrification when the nucleation activation free energy for nitric acid dihydrate formation is raised by only approx.10% relative to the current published values. Once nucleated, the conversion of nitric acid dihydrate to the stable trihydrate phase brings the computed levels of denitrification closer to the measurements. INDEX TERMS: 0305 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801); 0320 Atmospheric Composition and SblctureC: loud physics and chemistry; 0340 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Middle atmosphere-composition and chemistry

  7. Determination of polar stratospheric cloud particle refractive indices by use of in situ optical measurements and T-matrix calculations.

    PubMed

    Scarchilli, Claudio; Adriani, Alberto; Cairo, Francesco; Di Donfrancesco, Guido; Buontempo, Carlo; Snels, Marcel; Moriconi, Maria Luisa; Deshler, Terry; Larsen, Niels; Luo, Beiping; Mauersberger, Konrad; Ovarlez, Joelle; Rosen, Jim; Schreiner, Jochen

    2005-06-01

    A new algorithm to infer structural parameters such as refractive index and asphericity of cloud particles has been developed by use of in situ observations taken by a laser backscattersonde and an optical particle counter during balloon stratospheric flights. All three main particles, liquid, ice, and a no-ice solid (NAT, nitric acid trihydrate) of polar stratospheric clouds, were observed during two winter flights performed from Kiruna, Sweden. The technique is based on use of the T-matrix code developed for aspherical particles to calculate the backscattering coefficient and particle depolarizing properties on the basis of size distribution and concentration measurements. The results of the calculations are compared with observations to estimated refractive indices and particle asphericity. The method has also been used in cases when the liquid and solid phases coexist with comparable influence on the optical behavior of the cloud to estimate refractive indices. The main results prove that the index of refraction for NAT particles is in the range of 1.37-1.45 at 532 nm. Such particles would be slightly prolate spheroids. The calculated refractive indices for liquid and ice particles are 1.51-1.55 and 1.31-1.33, respectively. The results for solid particles confirm previous measurements taken in Antarctica during 1992 and obtained by a comparison of lidar and optical particle counter data.

  8. Determination of polar stratospheric cloud particle refractive indices by use of in situ optical measurements and T-matrix calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarchilli, Claudio; Adriani, Alberto; Cairo, Francesco; di Donfrancesco, Guido; Buontempo, Carlo; Snels, Marcel; Moriconi, Maria Luisa; Deshler, Terry; Larsen, Niels; Luo, Beiping; Mauersberger, Konrad; Ovarlez, Joelle; Rosen, Jim; Schreiner, Jochen

    2005-06-01

    A new algorithm to infer structural parameters such as refractive index and asphericity of cloud particles has been developed by use of in situ observations taken by a laser backscattersonde and an optical particle counter during balloon stratospheric flights. All three main particles, liquid, ice, and a no-ice solid (NAT, nitric acid trihydrate) of polar stratospheric clouds, were observed during two winter flights performed from Kiruna, Sweden. The technique is based on use of the T-matrix code developed for aspherical particles to calculate the backscattering coefficient and particle depolarizing properties on the basis of size distribution and concentration measurements. The results of the calculations are compared with observations to estimated refractive indices and particle asphericity. The method has also been used in cases when the liquid and solid phases coexist with comparable influence on the optical behavior of the cloud to estimate refractive indices. The main results prove that the index of refraction for NAT particles is in the range of 1.37-1.45 at 532 nm. Such particles would be slightly prolate spheroids. The calculated refractive indices for liquid and ice particles are 1.51-1.55 and 1.31-1.33, respectively. The results for solid particles confirm previous measurements taken in Antarctica during 1992 and obtained by a comparison of lidar and optical particle counter data.

  9. Polar Stratospheric Cloud formation and denitrification during the Arctic winter 2009/2010 and 2010/2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosrawi, Farahnaz; Urban, Joachim; Pitts, Michael C.; Kirner, Oliver; Braesicke, Peter; Santee, Michelle L.; Manney, Gloria L.; Murtagh, Donal

    2015-04-01

    The sedimentation of HNO3 containing polar stratospheric cloud particles leads to a permanent removal of HNO3 from the stratosphere. The so-called denitrification is an effect that plays an important role in stratospheric ozone depletion. The Arctic winter 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 were both quite unique. The Arctic winter 2010/2011 was one of the coldest winters on record leading to the strongest depletion of ozone measured in the Arctic. Though the Arctic winter 2009/2010 was rather warm in the climatological sense it was distinguished by an exceptionally cold stratosphere from mid December 2009 to mid January 2010 leading to prolonged PSC formation and significant denitrification. Model simulations and space-borne observations are used to investigate PSC formation and denitrification during these two winters. Model simulations were performed with the atmospheric chemistry-climate model ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) and compared to observations by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations Satellite (CALIPSO) and the Odin Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (Odin/SMR) as well as with observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder on Aura (Aura/MLS). While PSCs were present during the Arctic winter 2010/2011 over nearly four months, from mid December to end of March, they were not as persistent as the ones that occurred during the shorter (one month) cold period during the Arctic winter 2009/2010. Although the PSC season during the Arctic winter 2009/2010 was much shorter than in 2010/2011, denitrification during the Arctic winter 2009/2010 was similar in magnitude than during 2010/2011.

  10. Detection of global tropospheric clouds and polar stratospheric clouds over Antarctica using thermal infrared spectral data observed by TANSO-FTS/GOSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Someya, Yu; Imasu, Ryoichi; Ota, Yoshifumi; Saitoh, Naoko

    2014-05-01

    Global tropospheric cloud distribution was derived from thermal infrared band data observed by Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation - Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) onboard Greenhouse gases Observation SATellite (GOSAT). It is expected that this band has ability to detect optically thin clouds compared with Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI) which is the other sensor on GOSAT. In addition, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) which can be harder to detect than the tropospheric clouds because of high reflectivity or low temperature of the surface and their low optical thickness were also detected. We have modified CO2 slicing method which was developed as one of the cirrus cloud detection techniques using thermal infrared band data to detect thin clouds more stably. The pseudo spectral channels were defined as sets of several actual spectral channels between 700cm-1 and 750cm-1 which have weighting function peak height in a same height range for each 0.5km. These pseudo channels were optimized with simulation studies using a multi-scattering radiative transfer code, Polarized radiance System for Transfer of Atmospheric Radiation (Pstar) 3 for several temperature profile patterns prepared based on latitudes and temperature at 500hPa. GOSAT data was analyzed with the combination of these pseudo channels determined for each of observation points from these simulations and the results were compared with the observational results from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) / Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO). The comparisons about global cloud are based on the coincident observations in 2010. Monthly occurrences of Antarctic PSCs were compared for each grid area from June to September in 2010. As a result, the correlation coefficients in each month are 0.76, 0.71, 0.75, and 0.61 relatively. Though that is low value in September, it can be explained by decrease of occurrences.

  11. Influence of Mountain Waves and NAT Nucleation Mechanisms on Polar Stratospheric Cloud Formation at Local and Synoptic Scales during the 1999-2000 Arctic Winter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-07

    B., Dörnbrack, A., Leut - becher, M., Volkert, H., Renger, W., Bacmeister, J., and Peter, T.: Particle microphysics and chemistry in remotely...observed moun- tain polar stratospheric clouds, J. Geophys. Res., 103, 5785– 5796, 1998a. Carslaw, K. S., Wirth, M., Tsias, A., Luo, B., Dörnbrack, A., Leut

  12. Fourier transform infrared studies of model polar stratospheric cloud surfaces - Growth and evaporation of ice and nitric acid/ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Middlebrook, Ann M.

    1990-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared surface studies are used to probe the microphysical properties of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and ice films representative of type I and II polar stratospheric clouds (PSC). Experiments indicate that, on initial exposure to 1.8 microtorr of HNO3, a layer of ice is quantitatively converted to NAT. However, conversion of ice to NAT does not proceed indefinitely, but rather the system reaches saturation. For longer exposures or higher HNO3 pressures, NAM becomes the dominant nitric acid containing species on the surface. Evaporation studies were performed to test the feasibility of a recent denitrification mechanism. The results indicate that ice coated with 0.20 micron of NAT evaporates at a temperature of about 4 C higher than uncoated ice.

  13. Lidar observations of Arctic polar stratospheric clouds, 1988 - Signature of small, solid particles above the frost point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Osborn, M. T.; Hunt, W. H.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents recent (January 1988) Arctic airborne lidar data which suggest that Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are composed of small solid particles with radii on the order of 0.5 micron. PSCs were observed remotely in the 21-24 km altitude range north of Greenland during a round-trip flight from Andenes, Norway on January 29, 1988, aboard the NASA Wallops Flight Facility P-3 Orion aircraft. Synoptic analyses at the 30-mb level show local temperatures of 191-193 K, which are well above the estimated frost point temperature of 185 K; this suggests that the PSCs were probably of the binary HNO3-H2O (Type I) class.

  14. Interannual variations of early winter Antarctic polar stratospheric cloud formation and nitric acid observed by CALIOP and MLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Alyn; Santee, Michelle L.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.

    2016-12-01

    We use satellite-borne measurements collected over the last decade (2006-2015) from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) to investigate the nitric acid distribution and the properties of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the early winter Antarctic vortex. Frequently, at the very start of the winter, we find that synoptic-scale depletion of HNO3 can be detected in the inner vortex before the first lidar detection of geophysically associated PSCs. The generation of "sub-visible" PSCs can be explained as arising from the development of a solid particle population with low number densities and large particle sizes. Assumed to be composed of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), the sub-visible PSCs form at ambient temperatures well above the ice frost point, but also above the temperature at which supercooled ternary solution (STS) grows out of the background supercooled binary solution (SBS) distribution. The temperature regime of their formation, inferred from the simultaneous uptake of ambient HNO3 into NAT and their Lagrangian temperature histories, is at a depression of a few kelvin with respect to the NAT existence threshold, TNAT. Therefore, their nucleation requires a considerable supersaturation of HNO3 over NAT, and is consistent with a recently described heterogeneous nucleation process on solid foreign nuclei immersed in liquid aerosol. We make a detailed investigation of the comparative limits of detection of PSCs and the resulting sequestration of HNO3 imposed by lidar, mid-infrared, and microwave techniques. We find that the temperature history of air parcels, in addition to the local ambient temperature, is an important factor in the relative frequency of formation of liquid/solid PSCs. We conclude that the initiation of NAT nucleation and the subsequent development of large NAT particles capable of sedimentation and denitrification in the early winter do not emanate from an ice

  15. The potential for ozone depletion in the Arctic polar stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, W. H.; Anderson, J. G.; Toohey, D. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Poole, L. R.

    1991-01-01

    The nature of the Arctic polar stratosphere is observed to be similar in many respects to that of the Antarctic polar stratosphere, where an ozone hole has been identified. Most of the available chlorine (CHl and ClONO2) was converted by reactions on polar stratospheric clouds to reactive ClO and Cl2O2 thoroughout the Arctic polar vortex before midwinter. Reactive nitrogen was converted to HNO3, and some, with spatial inhomogeneity, fell out of the stratosphere. These chemical changes ensured characteristic ozone losses of 10 to 15 percent at altitudes inside the polar vortex where polar stratospheric clouds had occurred. These local losses can translate into 5 to 8 percent losses in the vertical column abundance of ozone. As the amount of stratospheric chlorine inevitably increases by 50 percent over the next two decades, ozone losses recognizable as an ozone hole may well appear.

  16. The potential for ozone depletion in the arctic polar stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Brune, W H; Anderson, J G; Toohey, D W; Fahey, D W; Kawa, S R; Jones, R L; McKenna, D S; Poole, L R

    1991-05-31

    The nature of the Arctic polar stratosphere is observed to be similar in many respects to that of the Antarctic polar stratosphere, where an ozone hole has been identified. Most of the available chlorine (HCl and ClONO(2)) was converted by reactions on polar stratospheric clouds to reactive ClO and Cl(2)O(2) throughout the Arctic polar vortex before midwinter. Reactive nitrogen was converted to HNO(3), and some, with spatial inhomogeneity, fell out of the stratosphere. These chemical changes ensured characteristic ozone losses of 10 to 15% at altitudes inside the polar vortex where polar stratospheric clouds had occurred. These local losses can translate into 5 to 8% losses in the vertical column abundance of ozone. As the amount of stratospheric chlorine inevitably increases by 50% over the next two decades, ozone losses recognizable as an ozone hole may well appear.

  17. Type I polar stratospheric cloud particles - Concentration, shape, size, light extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Ferry, G. V.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Goodman, J.; Hamill, P.; Livingston, J. M.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1990-01-01

    Results from the flight on January 24, 1989 of the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment during which the ER-2 aircraft transitioned from unsaturated to ice saturated air at 20 km altitude are presented. Aerosol particles were sampled by wire impactors and examined for number density as a function of particle size by taking photomicrographs in a scanning electron microscope and visually sizing and counting the particles. Differences in the chemical, physical and optical properties of stratospheric aerosol between ice-saturated and nonsaturated air are described.

  18. Large-scale variations in ozone and polar stratospheric clouds measured with airborne lidar during formation of the 1987 ozone hole over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Poole, Lamont R.; Mccormick, M. Patrick; Ismail, Syed; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.; Szedlmayer, Margaret M.; Jones, Rod; Krueger, Arlin J.; Tuck, Adrian

    1988-01-01

    A joint field experiment between NASA and NOAA was conducted during August to September 1987 to obtain in situ and remote measurements of key gases and aerosols from aircraft platforms during the formation of the ozone (O3) hole over Antarctica. The ER-2 (advanced U-2) and DC-8 aircraft from the NASA Ames Research Center were used in this field experiment. The NASA Langley Research Center's airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system was operated from the DC-8 to obtain profiles of O3 and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere during long-range flights over Antarctica from August 28 to September 29, 1987. The airborne DIAL system was configured to transmit simultaneously four laser wavelengths (301, 311, 622, and 1064 nm) above the DC-8 for DIAL measurements of O3 profiles between 11 to 20 km ASL (geometric altitude above sea level) and multiple wavelength aerosol backscatter measurements between 11 to 24 km ASL. A total of 13 DC-8 flights were made over Antarctica with 2 flights reaching the South Pole. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) were detected in multiple thin layers in the 11 to 21 km ASL altitude range with each layer having a typical thickness of less than 1 km. Two types of PSC's were found based on aerosol backscattering ratios: predominantly water ice clouds (type 2) and clouds with scattering characteristics consistent with binary solid nitric acid/water clouds (type 1). Large-scale cross sections of O3 distributions were obtained. The data provides additional information about a potentially important transport mechanism that may influence the O3 budget inside the vortex. There is also some evidence that strong low pressure systems in the troposphere are associated with regions of lower stratospheric O3. This paper discusses the spatial and temporal variations of O3 inside and outside the polar vortex region during the development of the O3 hole and relates these data to other measurements obtained during this field experiment.

  19. Changes in the character of Polar stratospheric clouds over Antarctica in 1992 due to the Pinatubo volcanic aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Deshler, T.; Johnson, B.J.; Rozier, W.R. )

    1994-02-15

    Vertical profiles of aerosol concentration were measured on 8 occasions from McMurdo Station, Antarctica (78[degrees]S), between late August and early October 1992. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were observed on 6 of these soundings. The characteristics of PSCs, and ozone, were quite different above and below about 16 km. Above 16 km PSCs were variable in time, with particles > 1.0 [mu]m radius contributing significantly to the surface area, generally < 8 [mu]m[sup 2] cm[sup [minus]3]. Below 16 km PSCs were much more stable and were dominated by high concentrations of smaller particles, < 1.0 [mu]m, with surface areas of 20-30 [mu]m[sup 2] cm[sup [minus]3]. This lower layer coincided with the altitude of the primary Pinatubo volcanic aerosol as measured in mid September and October, and with the 4 km region of the atmosphere where ozone was virtually completed destroyed over Antarctica in 1992. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Balloon borne Antarctic frost point measurements and their impact on polar stratospheric cloud theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, James M.; Hofmann, D. J.; Carpenter, J. R.; Harder, J. W.; Oltsmans, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    Balloon-borne frost point measurements were performed over Antarctica during September-October 1987 as part of the NOZE II effort at McMurdo. The results show water mixing ratios on the order of 2 ppmv in the 20 km region, suggesting that models of the springtime Antarctic stratosphere should be based on approximately 2 ppmv water vapor. Evidence indicating that some PSCs form at temperatures higher than the frost point in the 15 to 20 km region is discussed. This supports the binary HNO3-H2O theory of PSC composition.

  1. The vapor pressures of supercooled NHO3/H2O solutions. [in polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, David R.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure utilizing the Gibbs-Duhem relation is used to extrapolate vapor pressures of supercooled HNO3 mixtures to 190 K. Values of A and B from the equation logP = A - B/T are presented for solutions between 0.20 and 0.25 mole fraction HNO3. In the stratosphere, if sufficient HNO3 vapor is present because it has not come into equilibrium with the nitric acid trihydrate, supercooled nitric acid solutions could condense at temperatures up to 1.5 + or - 0.8 K above the ice point.

  2. POST: Polar Stratospheric Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bely, Pierre Y.; Ford, Holland C.; Burg, Richard; Petro, Larry; White, Rick; Bally, John

    1995-10-01

    The tropopause, typically at 16 to 18 km altitude at the lower latitudes, dips to 8 km in the polar regions. This makes the cold, dry and nonturbulent lower stratosphere accessible to tethered aerostats. Tethered aerostats can fly as high as 12 km and are extremely reliable, lasting for many years. In contrast to free-flying balloons, they can stay on station for weeks at a time, and payloads can be safely recovered for maintenance and adjustment and relaunched in a matter of hours. We propose to use such a platform, located first in the Arctic (near Fairbanks, Alaska) and, potentially, later in the Antarctic, to operate a new technology 6-meter, diluted aperture telescope with diffraction-limited performance in the near infrared. Thanks to the low ambient temperature (220 K), thermal emission from the optics is of the same order as that of the zodiacal light in the 2 to 3 micron band. Since this wavelength interval is the darkest part of the zodiacal light spectrum from optical wavelengths to 100 microns, the combination of high resolution images and a very dark sky make it the spectral region of choice for observing the redshifted light from galaxies and clusters of galaxies at moderate to high redshifts.

  3. Real refractive indices of infrared-characterized nitric-acid/ice films: Implications for optical measurements of polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middlebrook, Ann M.; Berland, Brian S.; George, Steven M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Toon, Owen B.

    1994-01-01

    The infrared spectra of nitric-acid/ice films representative of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were collected with simultaneous optical interference measurements to determine the real refractive indices at lambda = 632 nm. Ice and amphorous nitric-acid/ice films were prepared by condensation of water and nitric acid vapors onto a wedged Al2O3 substrate. The real refractive indices of these films were determined from the optical interference of a reflected helium-neon laser during film growth. The indices of the amphorous films varied smoothly from n = 1.30 for ice to n = 1.49 for nitric acid, similar to observations in previous work. We were unable to obtain the refractive index of crystlline films during adsorption because of optical scattering caused by surface roughness. Therefore crystlline nitric acid hydrate films were prepared by annealing amphorous nitric-acid/ice films. Further heating caused desorption of the crystalline hydrate films. During desorption, the refractive indices for ice, NAM (nitric acid monohydrate), alpha- and beta-NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) films were measured using the optical interference technique. In agreement with earlier data, the real refractive indices for ice and NAM determined in desorption were n = 1.30 +/- 0.01 and n = 1.53 +/- 0.03, respectively. The real refractive indices for alpha- and beta-NAT were found to be n = 1.51 +/- 0.01 and n greater than or equal to 1.46, respectively. Our measurements also suggest that the shape of crystalline nitric acid particles may depend on whether they nucleate from the liquid or by vapor deposition. If confirmed by future studies, this observation may provide a means of distinguishing the nucleation mechanism of crystalline PSCs.

  4. Nucleation and growth of crystals under cirrus and polar stratospheric cloud conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, John; Queen, Brian; Teets, Edward; Fahey, James

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory studies examine phase changes of hygroscopic substances which occur as aerosol in stratosphere and troposphere (sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, nitric acid, sulfuric acid), under controlled conditions, in samples volume 1 to 10(exp -4) ml. Crystallization of salts from supersaturated solutions is examined by slowly evaporating a solution drop on a substrate, under controlled relative humidity, until self nucleation occurs; controlled nucleation of ice in a mm capillary U-tube gives a measured ice crystallization velocity at known supercooling. Two states of crystallization occur for regions where hydrates exist. It is inferred that all of the materials readily exist as supersaturated/supercooled solutions; the degree of metastability appears to be slightly enhanced by inclusion of aircraft produced soot. The crystallization velocity is taken as a measure of viscosity. Results suggest an approach to a glass transition at high molality, supersaturation and/or supercooling within the range of atmospheric interest. It is hypothesized that surface reactions occur more readily on solidified particles - either crystalline or glass, whereas volume reactions are more important on droplets with sufficiently low viscosity and volume diffusivity. Implications are examined for optical properties of such particles in the atmosphere. In a separate experiment, crystal growth was examined in a modified thermal vapor diffusion chamber over the range of cirrus temperature (-30 to -70 C) and under controlled supersaturation and air pressure. The crystals grew at a velocity of 1-2 microns/s, thickness 60-70 micron, in the form of thin column crystals. Design criteria are given for a system to investigate particle growth down to -100 C, (PSC temperatures) where nitric acid particles can be grown under similar control and in the form of hydrate crystals.

  5. The January 30, 1989 Arctic polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) event - Evidence for a mechanism of dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandrud, B. W.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Ferry, G. V.; Loewenstein, M.; Chan, K. R.; Sanford, L.; Gary, B.

    1990-01-01

    In-situ particle measurements made aboard the NASA ER-2 in the Arctic on 890130 (YYMMDD) show Type 1 PSC particles over much of the flight, with instances of embedded Type 2 PSCs. The Type 2 particles were observed at temperatures warmer than the local frost-point temperature of water; extended up to the upper size cutoff of the instrument (about 24-micron diameter); and are shown to contain too large a volume to be primarily NAT. Based on measured vertical temperature profiles, it is concluded that the Type 2 particles observed on this day were formed above the aircraft in a region where saturation with respect to ice was achieved and were sufficiently large to have fallen into the path of the ER-2. Although the amount of material in the particles, expressed as water, is small by comparison to the total (vapor + aerosol) water concentration, the flux of water from the falling particles is of sufficient magnitude, if sustained, to lead to dehydration of the source region. These observations verify the mechanism for dehydration of polar vortex air masses by precipitation of ice particles.

  6. The January 30, 1989 Arctic polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) event - Evidence for a mechanism of dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandrud, B. W.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Ferry, G. V.; Loewenstein, M.; Chan, K. R.; Sanford, L.; Gary, B.

    1990-03-01

    In-situ particle measurements made aboard the NASA ER-2 in the Arctic on 890130 (YYMMDD) show Type 1 PSC particles over much of the flight, with instances of embedded Type 2 PSCs. The Type 2 particles were observed at temperatures warmer than the local frost-point temperature of water; extended up to the upper size cutoff of the instrument (about 24-micron diameter); and are shown to contain too large a volume to be primarily NAT. Based on measured vertical temperature profiles, it is concluded that the Type 2 particles observed on this day were formed above the aircraft in a region where saturation with respect to ice was achieved and were sufficiently large to have fallen into the path of the ER-2. Although the amount of material in the particles, expressed as water, is small by comparison to the total (vapor + aerosol) water concentration, the flux of water from the falling particles is of sufficient magnitude, if sustained, to lead to dehydration of the source region. These observations verify the mechanism for dehydration of polar vortex air masses by precipitation of ice particles.

  7. POST: a polar stratospheric telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Holland C.; Bely, Pierre Y.; Bally, John; Crocker, James H.; Dopita, Mike; Tilley, James N.; Allen, Ronald; Bartko, Frank; White, Richard L.; Burg, Richard; Burrows, Christopher J.; Clampin, Mark; Harper, Doyal A.; Illingworth, Garth; McCray, Richard; Meyer, Stephan; Mould, Jeremy; Norman, Colin

    1994-06-01

    The lower stratosphere in the polar regions offers conditions for observation in the near-infrared comparable to those obtained from space. We describe a concept for a 6-meter, diluted aperture, near-infrared telescope carried by a tethered aerostat flying at 12 km altitude, to serve as a testbed for future space astronomical observatories while producing frontier science.

  8. Polar stratospheric cloud microphysical properties measured by the microRADIBAL instrument on 25 January 2000 above Esrange and modeling interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogniez, C.; Huret, N.; Eckermann, S.; RivièRe, E. D.; Pirre, M.; Herman, M.; Balois, J.-Y.; Verwaerde, C.; Larsen, N.; Knudsen, B.

    2003-03-01

    The balloonborne microRADIBAL instrument is a radiometer that measures the radiance and polarization of the sunlight scattered by the atmosphere, gas, and aerosols in a horizontal plane in the near-infrared range. It was launched from Esrange, Sweden, on 25 January 2000 in the framework of the Third European Stratospheric Experiment on Ozone (THESEO) 2000 campaign, and performed measurements in the vicinity of a large polar stratospheric cloud (PSC). The measurements provide diagrams of the radiance versus scattering angle at several altitudes. The aerosol signature, derived from the radiance measurements, has been modeled via Mie theory and the T-Matrix code. Three different size distributions of aerosols have been tested: monomodal and bimodal size distributions of spherical particles, and bimodal size distributions including a mode of spherical and a mode of nonspherical particles. The best agreement between the measured and modeled signatures is obtained considering a bimodal size distribution composed by a mode of medium spherical particles (median radius about 0.15 μm) and a second mode of larger nonspherical particles (median radius about 1.1 μm, aspect ratio about 0.6). Concentrations and surface densities of the PSC particles have been estimated. The existence of such particles has been tentatively explained using the Lagrangian Microphysical and Photochemical Lagrangian Stratospheric Model of Ozone (MiPLaSMO) model. On 25 January 2000 the polar stratospheric cloud detected by microRADIBAL is associated with a lee-wave event. Temperature perturbations due to lee-wave events were calculated using the National Research Laboratory Mountain Wave Forecast Model (MWFM) and have been included along trajectories. They are localized in a large region between the Norwegian mountains and Esrange. Their amplitude varies from 3 to 7 K. Detailed comparisons between measured and modeled surfaces and dimensional distributions of PSCs' particles are achieved. The two

  9. Observational Evidence Against Mountain-Wave Generation of Ice Nuclei as a Prerequisite for the Formation of Three Solid Nitric Acid Polar Stratospheric Clouds Observed in the Arctic in Early December 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, Kathy L.; Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Drdla, Katja; Hervig, Mark E.; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Browell, Edward V.; Legg, Marion J.; Foschi, Patricia G.

    2004-01-01

    A number of recently published papers suggest that mountain-wave activity in the stratosphere, producing ice particles when temperatures drop below the ice frost point, may be the primary source of large NAT particles. In this paper we use measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments on board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar-orbiting satellites to map out regions of ice clouds produced by stratospheric mountain-wave activity inside the Arctic vortex. Lidar observations from three DC-8 flights in early December 1999 show the presence of solid nitric acid (Type Ia or NAT) polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). By using back trajectories and superimposing the position maps on the AVHRR cloud imagery products, we show that these observed NAT clouds could not have originated at locations of high-amplitude mountain-wave activity. We also show that mountain-wave PSC climatology data and Mountain Wave Forecast Model 2.0 (MWFM-2) raw hemispheric ray and grid box averaged hemispheric wave temperature amplitude hindcast data from the same time period are in agreement with the AVHRR data. Our results show that ice cloud formation in mountain waves cannot explain how at least three large scale NAT clouds were formed in the stratosphere in early December 1999.

  10. Titan's south polar stratospheric vortex evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teanby, Nicholas A.; Vinatier, Sandrine; Sylvestre, Melody; de Kok, Remco; Nixon, Conor; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Titan experienced northern spring equinox in August 2009 when the south polar region was plunged into perpetual darkness. Following equinox, the south pole experienced the most extreme changes in stratospheric behaviour ever observed: the global stratospheric circulation cell reversed direction (Teanby et al 2012), HCN ice clouds (de Kok et al 2014) and other exotic condensates appeared over the south pole (Jennings et al 2015, West et al 2016), and significant composition and temperature changes occurred (Vinatier et al 2015, Teanby et al 2015, Coustenis et al 2016). Here we use Cassini CIRS limb and nadir observations from 2004-2016 to investigate the evolution of south polar stratospheric temperature and composition in the post-equinox period. Reversal following equinox was extremely rapid, taking less than 6 months (1/60th of a Titan year), which resulted in an initial adiabatic polar hot spot and increased trace gas abundances (Teanby et al 2012). However, rather than develop this trend further as winter progressed, Titan's polar hot spot subsequently disappeared, with the formation of a polar cold spot. Recently in late 2015 / early 2016 a more subdued hotspot began to return with associated extreme trace gas abundances. This talk will reveal the rapid and significant changes observed so far and discuss implications for possible polar feedback mechanisms and Titan's atmospheric dynamics.Coustenis et al (2016), Icarus, 270, 409-420.de Kok et al (2014), Nature, 514, 65-67.Jennings et al (2015), ApJL, 804, L34.Teanby et al (2012), Nature, 491, 732-735.Teanby et al (2015), DPS47, National Harbor, 205.02.Vinatier et al (2015), Icarus, 250, 95-115.West et al (2016), Icarus, 270, 399-408.

  11. The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss on Southern Hemisphere stratospheric circulation and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeble, J.; Braesicke, P.; Abraham, N. L.; Roscoe, H. K.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss resulting from chlorine activation on polar stratospheric clouds is examined using a pair of model integrations run with the fully coupled chemistry climate model UM-UKCA. Suppressing chlorine activation through heterogeneous reactions is found to produce modelled ozone differences consistent with observed ozone differences between the present and pre-ozone hole period. Statistically significant high-latitude Southern Hemisphere (SH) ozone loss begins in August and peaks in October-November, with > 75% of ozone destroyed at 50 hPa. Associated with this ozone destruction is a > 12 K decrease of the lower polar stratospheric temperatures and an increase of > 6 K in the upper stratosphere. The heating components of this temperature change are diagnosed and it is found that the temperature dipole is the result of decreased short-wave heating in the lower stratosphere and increased dynamical heating in the upper stratosphere. The cooling of the polar lower stratosphere leads, through thermal wind balance, to an acceleration of the polar vortex and delays its breakdown by ~ 2 weeks. A link between lower stratospheric zonal wind speed, the vertical component of the Eliassen-Palm (EP) flux, Fz and the residual mean vertical circulation, w*, is identified. In November and December, increased westerly winds and a delay in the breakup of the polar vortex lead to increases in Fz, indicating increased wave activity entering the stratosphere and propagating to higher altitudes. The resulting increase in wave breaking, diagnosed by decreases to the EP flux divergence, drives enhanced downwelling over the polar cap. Many of the stratospheric signals modelled in this study propagate down to the troposphere, and lead to significant surface changes in December.

  12. The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss on Southern Hemisphere stratospheric circulation and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeble, J.; Braesicke, P.; Abraham, N. L.; Roscoe, H. K.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss resulting from chlorine activation on polar stratospheric clouds is examined using a pair of model integrations run with the fully coupled chemistry climate model UM-UKCA. Suppressing chlorine activation through heterogeneous reactions is found to produce modelled ozone differences consistent with observed ozone differences between the present and pre-ozone hole period. Statistically significant high latitude Southern Hemisphere (SH) ozone loss begins in August and peaks in October-November, with >75% of ozone destroyed at 50 hPa. Associated with this ozone destruction is a >12 K decrease of the lower polar stratospheric temperatures and an increase of >6 K in the upper stratosphere. The heating components of this temperature change are diagnosed and it is found that the temperature dipole is the result of decreased shortwave heating in the lower stratosphere and increased dynamical heating in the upper stratosphere. The cooling of the polar lower stratosphere leads, through thermal wind balance, to an acceleration of the polar vortex and delays its breakdown by ~2 weeks. A link between lower stratospheric zonal wind speed, the vertical component of the EP flux, Fz, and the residual mean vertical circulation, w*, is identified. In December and January, increased westerly winds lead to increases in Fz, associated with an increase in tropopause height. The resulting increase in wavebreaking leads to enhanced downwelling/reduced upwelling over the polar cap. Many of the stratospheric signals modelled in this study propagate down to the troposphere, and lead to significant surface changes in December.

  13. Mountain Wave-Induced Polar Stratospheric Cloud Forecasts for Aircraft Science Flights during SOLVE/THESEO 2000

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-08

    by the mountain wave models several days in advance, permitting coordinated quasi- Lagrangian flights that measured their composition and structure in...wave PSC forecasting campaigns, such as use of anelastic rather than Boussinesq linearized gridpoint models and a need to forecast stratospheric...prediction (NWP) models . NWP fields, once available, were postprocessed into specialized AAOE mission products, such as isentropic potential vorticity maps

  14. Monitoring of the Polar Stratospheric Clouds formation and evolution in Antarctica in August 2007 during IPY with the MATCH method applied to lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoux, Nadege; David, Christine; Klekociuk, Andrew; Pitts, Michael; di Liberto, Luca; Snels, Marcel; Jumelet, Julien; Bekki, Slimane; Larsen, Niels

    2010-05-01

    The project ORACLE-O3 ("Ozone layer and UV RAdiation in a changing CLimate Evaluated during IPY") is one of the coordinated international proposals selected for the International Polar Year (IPY). As part of this global project, LOLITA-PSC ("Lagrangian Observations with Lidar Investigations and Trajectories in Antarctica and Arctic, of PSC") is devoted to Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC) studies. Indeed, understanding the formation and evolution of PSC is an important issue to quantify the impact of climate changes on their frequency of formation and, further, on chlorine activation and subsequent ozone depletion. In this framework, three lidar stations performed PSC observations in Antarctica during the 2006, 2007, and 2008 winters: Davis (68.58°S, 77.97°E), McMurdo (77.86°S, 166.48°E) and Dumont D'Urville (66.67°S, 140.01°E). The data are completed with the lidar data from CALIOP ("Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization") onboard the CALIPSO ("Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation") satellite. Lagrangian trajectory calculations are used to identify air masses with PSCs sounded by several ground-based lidar stations with the same method, called MATCH, applied for the first time in Arctic to study the ozone depletion with radiosoundings. The evolution of the optical properties of the PSCs and thus the type of PSCs formed (supercooled ternary solution, nitric acid trihydrate particles or ice particles) could thus be linked to the thermodynamical evolution of the air mass deduced from the trajectories. A modeling with the microphysical model of the Danish Meteorological Institute allows assessing our ability to predict PSCs for various environmental conditions. Indeed, from pressure and temperature evolution, the model allows retrieving the types of particles formed as well as their mean radii, their concentrations and could also simulate the lidar signals. In a first step, a case in August 2007 around 17-18 km, involving

  15. Seasonal variations of stratospheric gravity waves in Antarctica and correlations to polar mesospheric cloud brightness in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, C.; Chu, X.; Huang, W.; Nott, G. J.; Espy, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) play an important role in the dynamics of global middle and upper atmosphere. However, quantitative characterization of GWs in the upper stratosphere is still rare in Antarctica. Here we present a study of stratospheric GW parameters and seasonal variations using the data obtained with the University of Illinois Fe Boltzmann/Rayleigh lidar at the South Pole (90°S) from December 1999 to January 2001 and at Rothera (67.5°S, 68.0°W) from December 2002 to March 2005. Through analyzing the Rayleigh lidar density data in 30-60 km, GW parameters are derived for the South Pole and Rothera, and the results are comparable. The annual mean GW vertical wavelength is 4.3 +/- 1.5 km, vertical phase speed is 0.33 +/- 0.15 m/s, and the period is 245 +/- 110 min. We characterize the stratospheric GW strength with the root- mean-square (RMS) relative density perturbation. The seasonal variation of GW strength is clear at Rothera, with the maximum in winter and the minimum in summer. No significant seasonal variations are observed at the South Pole. The data also show that the GW period is shorter in summer than in winter at Rothera. In addition, the stratospheric GW strength is negatively correlated with PMC brightness at Rothera but no significant correlation at the South Pole. Two important factors, i.e., the wind filtering effect and topographical GW source difference, are investigated in order to explain the GW seasonal variations. We then apply a GW ray-tracing model to analyze the GW source and propagation. The correlation between GW strength and PMC brightness also provides a clue of GW propagation from the stratosphere to the mesosphere.

  16. Phase Equilibria of H2SO4, HNO3, and HCl Hydrates and the Composition of Polar Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooldridge, Paul J.; Zhang, Renyi; Molina, Mario J.

    1995-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria behavior for the hydrates and coexisting pairs of hydrates of common acids which exist in the stratosphere are assembled from new laboratory measurements and standard literature data. The analysis focuses upon solid-vapor and solid-solid-vapor equilibria at temperatures around 200 K and includes new calorimetric and vapor pressure data. Calculated partial pressures versus 1/T slopes for the hydrates and coexisting hydrates agree well with experimental data where available.

  17. Phase equilibria of H2SO4, HNO3, and HCl hydrates and the composition of polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooldridge, Paul J.; Zhang, Renyi; Molina, Mario J.

    1995-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria behavior for the hydrates and coexisting pairs of hydrates of common acids which exist in the stratosphere are assembled from new laboratory measurements and standard literature data. The analysis focuses upon solid-vapor and solid-solid-vapor equilibria at temperatures around 200 K and includes new calorimetric and vapor pressure data. Calculated partial pressures versus 1/T slopes for the hydrates and coexisting hydrates agree well with experimental data where available.

  18. Polarization of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloub, Philippe; Herman, Maurice; Parol, Frederic

    1995-12-01

    This paper reports the main results concerning polarization by clouds derived from POLDER (polarization and directionality of earth's reflectances) airborne version. These results tend to confirm the high information content in the polarization (phase, altimetry). The preliminary results of EUCREX'94 (European Cloud Radiation Experiment) evidenced the drastically different polarized signatures for ice crystals and water droplets. Here we report systematic and statistically significative observations over the whole EUCREX data set. The results show that the cirrus exhibit their own signature. Preliminary observations performed during CLEOPATRA'91 (Cloud Experiment Ober Pfaffenhofen And Transport) and EUCREX'94 campaigns have shown the feasibility of cloud altimetry using spectral information (443 nm and 865 nm) of the polarized light over liquid water droplets clouds. Altimetry technique has been generalized on ASTEX-SOFIA'92 and EUCREX'94 data sets. All these results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  19. The stratospheric polar vortex: evolving perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, R. A.

    2005-12-01

    The discovery of dramatic Antarctic ozone depletion occurred at a time of rapid change in our understanding of stratospheric dynamics. The existence of the polar vortex, encircled by the polar night jet, had been well known for some time, as had the planetary scale Rossby waves that so dominate stratospheric meteorology. But, 25 years ago, the concepts of Rossby wave breaking, and of the "surf zone" and the sharpness of its boundaries at the vortex edge and in the subtropics, were relatively new, and the role of these waves in the driving of the mean diabatic circulation was not fully appreciated. While the local importance of gravity wave drag in the mesosphere was recognized by that time, its impact in the stratosphere was by no means clear. For a time, it was thought by many that the "ozone hole" was produced by anomalous polar upwelling, whose existence seemed to be demanded by observations of widespread, anomalously low temperatures in high southern latitudes in spring, which (at first) did not appear to be a consequence of depleted ozone. In the event, of course, chemical observations provided overwhelming support for the chemical depletion theory, while tracer observations, as well as revised radiative calculations, undermined the case for polar upwelling. The demands of stratospheric chemistry have always required that dynamical understanding of the stratosphere should extend beyond traditional meteorology to include questions of the transport of chemical species. Stratospheric transport has many facets, of which one - the impermeability of the vortex edge - was brought into focus by the appearance of the ozone hole and the need to understand the degree to which vortex air is isolated from its environment. The issue was controversial for a time, but analyses of tracer observations have confirmed expectations based on dynamical theory and on modeling studies that the isolation is strong, except during major vortex disturbances. Interest in polar vortex

  20. Solubility and equilibrium vapor pressures of HC1 dissolved in polar stratospheric cloud materials - Ice and the trihydrate of nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, David; Mauersberger, Konrad

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the pressure-solubility behavior of HC1 in water ice and in the nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) crystal at 200 K are reported. It was found that HC1 is about 20 times more soluble in NAT than in ice for stratospheric conditions. A relation between HC1 pressure and substrate composition based on the Gibbs-Duhem equation is developed. This relation, along with other thermodynamic data, can be used to obtain the HC1 pressure-solubility behavior at different temperatures. Implications of these results for the south polar ozone hole are discussed.

  1. Arctic stratospheric sulphur injections: radiative forcings and cloud responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, U.; Gasparini, B.; Miriam, K.; Kravitz, B.; Rasch, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Observations and climate projections show a high sensitivity of the Arctic climate to the increase in greenhouse gas emissions, known as the polar amplification. This study evaluates the options of counteracting the rising polar temperatures by stratospheric sulphur injections in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes.10 Mt of sulphur dioxide are emitted in a point emission source setup centred at the 100 hPa pressure level over Svalbard island (80°N,15°E). We perform simulations with the general circulation models ECHAM5, ECHAM6, and GISS ModelE. We study pulsed emission simulations that differ among themselves by the injection starting date (March-September), injection length (1, 30, or 90 day emission period), and the vertical resolution of the model (for ECHAM6). We find injections in April to be the most efficient in terms of the shortwave radiative forcing at the top-of-the atmosphere over the Arctic region. The distribution of sulphate aerosol spreads out beyond the injection region, with a significant share reaching the Southern Hemisphere. Results from ModelE show high latitude injections could counteract the spring and summer temperature increase due to higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Preliminary results with a more realistic description of clouds in ECHAM-HAM reveal a complex pattern of responses, most notably: a decrease in Northern Hemisphere cirrus clouds strengthening the effect of stratospheric aerosols in ECHAM5 a decrease in low-level clouds over the Arctic increasing the incoming solar radiation and causing a net positive radiative balance cirrus clouds are resilient to stratospheric sulphur injections in the absence of sulphate warming

  2. Cloud Condensation in Titan's Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Paul N.; Anderson, Carrie M.

    2011-01-01

    A 1-D condensation model is developed for the purpose of reproducing ice clouds in Titan's lower stratosphere observed by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) onboard Cassini. Hydrogen cyanide (HCN), cyanoacetylene (HC3N), and ethane (C2H6) vapors are treated as chemically inert gas species that flow from an upper boundary at 500 km to a condensation sink near Titan's tropopause (-45 km). Gas vertical profiles are determined from eddy mixing and a downward flux at the upper boundary. The condensation sink is based upon diffusive growth of the cloud particles and is proportional to the degree of supersaturation in the cloud formation regIOn. Observations of the vapor phase abundances above the condensation levels and the locations and properties of the ice clouds provide constraints on the free parameters in the model. Vapor phase abundances are determined from CIRS mid-IR observations, whereas cloud particle sizes, altitudes, and latitudinal distributions are derived from analyses of CIRS far-IR observations of Titan. Specific cloud constraints include: I) mean particle radii of2-3 J.lm inferred from the V6 506 cm- band of HC3N, 2) latitudinal abundance distributions of condensed nitriles, inferred from a composite emission feature that peaks at 160/cm , and 3) a possible hydrocarbon cloud layer at high latitudes, located near an altitude of 60 km, which peaks between 60 and 80 cm l . Nitrile abundances appear to diminish substantially at high northern latitudes over the time period 2005 to 2010 (northern mid winter to early spring). Use of multiple gas species provides a consistency check on the eddy mixing coefficient profile. The flux at the upper boundary is the net column chemical production from the upper atmosphere and provides a constraint on chemical pathways leading to the production of these compounds. Comparison of the differing lifetimes, vapor phase transport, vapor phase loss rate, and particle sedimentation, sheds light on temporal stability

  3. Polar stratospheric optical depth observed between 1978 and 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Trepte, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    Observations of the stratospheric optical depth at 1.0 micron obtained for high latitudes are presented for a 7-year period. Weekly averaged data determined from measurements made by the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement experiment from October 1978-1985 show that the overall yearly values in both polar regions are controlled by volcanic perturbations, with most volcanic effects being experienced in Arctic latitudes. Conservatively, peak values found in the Antarctic region were approximately 0.02 and in the Arctic region about 0.55. Probable values for these regions are estimated to be 0.26 and 0.11, respectively. The weekly averaged data also show the seasonal fluctuations due to microphysical and dynamical processes. Comparison of the optical depth record with a weekly averaged 50-mbar temperature record indicates that polar stratospheric clouds are present in the southern high latitudes each year near this level from early June to early September. A depression observed in the optical depth record each austral spring season is believed to be the result of the downward displacement of particles caused by subsidence and sedimentation during the course of winter. Following the breakup of the vortex, optical depth values increase as aerosol is transported poleward. These features are noted to be present in the Arctic region as well, but on a smaller scale because of the satellite sampling methodology and the averaging scheme employed.

  4. Stratospheric Polar Freezing Belt Causes Denitrification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Jensen, E. J.; Toon, O. B.; Drdla, K.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Trajectory cloud model calculations are presented to show that homogeneous freezing of nitric acid hydrates can produce a polar freezing belt in both hemispheres that can cause denitrification. While hydrate cloud microphysical properties are similar over both poles, the shorter persistence of clouds in the Arctic prevents the depth of the denitrified layers from growing beyond a few kilometers. The 1999-2000 Arctic winter is unique in showing a distinct denitrification profile with a depth of approx. 4.5 km that is nearly half as deep as that computed for a typical Antarctic winter.

  5. Persistence of the Lower Stratospheric Polar Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugh, Darryn W.; Randel, William J.; Pawson, Steven; Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.

    1999-01-01

    The persistence of the Arctic and Antarctic lower stratospheric vortices is examined over the period 1958 to 1998. Three different vortex-following diagnostics (two using potential vorticity and one based solely on the zonal winds) are compared, and shown to give very similar results for the break up date. The variability in the timing of the breakup of each vortex is qualitatively the same: there are large interannual variations together with smaller decadal-scale variations and there is a significant increase in the persistence since the mid-1980s (all variations are larger for the Arctic vortex). Also, in both hemispheres there is a high correlation between the persistence and the strength and coldness of the spring vortex, with all quantities having the same interannual and decadal variability. However, there is no such correlation between the persistence and the characteristics of the mid-winter vortex. In the northern hemisphere there is also a high correlation between the vortex persistence and the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric eddy heat flux averaged over the two months prior to the breakup. This indicates that the variability in the wave activity entering the stratosphere over late-winter to early-spring plays a key role in the variability of the vortex persistence (and spring polar temperatures) on both interannual and decadal time scales. However, the decadal variation in the Arctic vortex coldness and persistence for the 1990's falls outside the range of natural variability, while this is not the case for the eddy heat flux. This suggests that the recent increase in vortex persistence is not due solely to changes in the wave activity entering the stratosphere.

  6. Laser radar observation of the polar stratospheric aerosol layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaka, Y.; Hirasawa, T.; Fukunishi, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Fujii, R.; Miyaoka, H.

    1985-01-01

    The polar stratosphere has been speculated to be an active sink region of various stratospheric materials; ozone, water vapor, NOX, aerosol particles and so on, but this process is not theoretically and/or observationally made clear. The observation of the polar stratospheric aerosol layer using laser radar certainly contributes to the study of the global transport of these stratospheric minor constituents. In addition to this, from the viewpoint of aerosol science, there may be many interesting phenomena which cannot be found in the stratosphere at mid and low latitudes; the effect of precipitation of high energy molecules and atoms, of very cold winter stratosphere, of very cold mesopause in summer. Laser radar observation is one of the main activities of the Antarctic Middle Atmosphere (AMA) project at Syowa Station (69.00 deg S, 39.35 deg E), Antarctica since May 1983. Laser radar measurement at Syowa Station is discussed in detail.

  7. Evaluation of Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds data obtained by ground based lidars (at Dome C, McMurdo and Dumont D'Urville) and the satellite based CALIOP lidar system versus a subset of CCMVAL-2 chemistry-climate models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snels, Marcel; Fierli, Federico; de Muro, Mauro; Cagnazzo, Chiara; Cairo, Francesco; Di Liberto, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds play an important role in the ozone depletion process in polar regions and are thus strongly linked to climate changes. Long term observations are needed to monitor the presence of PSCs and to compare to climate models. The last decades PSCs in Antarctica have been observed by using the CALIOP lidar system on the CALIPSO satellite and by ground based lidars at Dumont D'Urville, McMurdo, Casey, and since 2014 at Dome C. We evaluate the Antarctic PSC observational databases of CALIPSO and the ground-based lidars of NDACC (Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) located in McMurdo and Dumont D'Urville and Dome C stations and provide a process-oriented evaluation of PSC in a subset of CCMVAL-2 chemistry-climate models. Lidar observatories have a decadal coverage, albeit with discontinuities, spanning from 1992 to today hence offering a unique database. A clear issue is the representativeness of ground-based long-term data series of the Antarctic stratosphere conditions that may limit their value in climatological studies and model evaluation. The comparison with the CALIPSO observations with a global coverage is, hence, a key issue. In turn, models can have a biased representation of the stratospheric conditions and of the PSC microphysics leading to large discrepancies in PSC occurrence and composition. Point-to-point comparison is difficult due to sparseness of the database and to intrinsic differences in spatial distribution between models and observations. However, a statistical analysis of PSC observations shows a satisfactory agreement between ground-based and satellite borne-lidar. The differences may be attributed to averaging processes for data with a bad signal to noise ratio, which tends to smear out the values of the optical parameters. Data from some Chemistry Climate models (CCMs) having provided PSC surface areas on daily basis have been evaluated using the same diagnostic type that may be derived CALIPSO (i

  8. Stratospheric tropical warming event and its impact on the polar and tropical troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodera, Kunihiko; Eguchi, Nawo; Mukougawa, Hitoshi; Nasuno, Tomoe; Hirooka, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Stratosphere-troposphere coupling is investigated in relation to middle atmospheric subtropical jet (MASTJ) variations in boreal winter. An exceptional strengthening of the MASTJ occurred in association with a sudden equatorward shift of the stratospheric polar night jet (PNJ) in early December 2011. This abrupt transformation of the MASTJ and PNJ had no apparent relation to the upward propagation of planetary waves from the troposphere. The impact of this stratospheric event penetrated into the troposphere in two regions: in the northern polar region and the tropics. Due to the strong MASTJ, planetary waves at higher latitudes were deflected and trapped in the northern polar region. Trapping of the planetary waves resulted in amplification of zonal wave number 1 component, which appeared in the troposphere as the development of a trough over the Atlantic sector and a ridge over the Eurasian sector. A strong MASTJ also suppressed the equatorward propagation of planetary waves, which resulted in weaker tropical stratospheric upwelling and produced anomalous warming in the tropical stratosphere. In the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), however, sublimation of ice clouds kept the temperature change minor. In the troposphere, an abrupt termination of a Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) event occurred following the static stability increase in the TTL. This termination suggests that the stratospheric event affected the convective episode in the troposphere.

  9. Polar Stratospheric Research Platforms -Ballooning in the Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterzen, Steven; Masi, Silvia; Debernardis, Paolo

    Tracing the history of ballooning in the Antarctic and Arctic, we can look at Nobile/Amundsen in the Arctic as well as Scott in Antarctica making use of balloons. Technological advances over the past few decades have lead to the development of relatively secure stratospheric research platforms that can not only lift 4 tons of instrumentation to over 38 kilometers into "near space", but can last at float altitudes for well over 30 days at float. This kind of performance comes at a relatively low cost compared to rocket propelled research. For the past 7 years the Italian Space Agency (ASI) has funded the development of the most northern launch facility for Long Duration Balloons from Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway. In 2009, the launch of the SORA experiment from Svalbard, suspended below an 800,000 m3 balloon proved concept of the feasibility of scientific heavy lift balloon launches from 79 deg N. From deep space observations to near space investigation, aerosols and Earth observations, polar stratospheric balloons offer the scientific investigators a stable platform to perform a wide range of research. This paper will discuss research opportunities, future scientific payloads scheduled for launching from Svalbard, and the development of Ultra Light Long Duration Balloon and the telemetry systems.

  10. Stratosphere aerosol and cloud measurements at McMurdo Station Antarctica during the spring of 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, D. J.; Rosen, J. M.; Harder, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of stratospheric aerosols with balloonborne optical particle counters on 6 occasions at McMurdo Station (78 deg S) in the spring of 1986 indicated subsidence of the stratospheric sulfate layer during the time that the ozone hole was forming (Hofmann et al., 1988). Since dynamic models of ozone depletion involving upwelling in the spring polar vortex would suggest the opposite, we repeated the measurements with an increased frequency (about one sounding per week) in 1987. During 3 of the aerosol soundings in 1986, temperatures in the 15 to 20 km range were low enough (less than 80 C) for HNO3 to co-condense with water according to several theories of polar stratospheric cloud formation. However, particles were not observed with the characteristic size suggested by theory (approx. 0.5 microns). For this reason, it was proposed that polar stratospheric clouds may predominantly consist of large (approx. 5 to 50 microns) ice crystals at very low (approx. 10 sup 4- 10 sup 3 cm cubed) concentrations (Rosen et al., 1988). The particle counter employed would be relatively insensitive to these low concentrations. With the increased frequency of soundings in 1987, and adding additional size discrimination in the 1 to 2 micron region, this hypothesis could be verified if suitably low temperatures were encountered.

  11. Tropical stratospheric gravity wave activity and relationships to clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. Joan; Beres, Jadwiga H.; Pfister, Leonhard

    2000-09-01

    Wind measurements from NASA's ER-2 aircraft in the stratosphere are used to obtain information on the momentum flux carried by gravity waves with horizontal wavelengths between 5 and 150 km. Tropical data are compared with the cloud brightness temperature below the aircraft as an indicator of deep convective activity. A striking correlation between cold, high clouds and large gravity wave momentum flux is seen in data from the Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange Project (STEP) tropical campaign during the monsoon season over northern Australia and Indonesia. There is an enhancement in the flux carried by waves propagating against the background wind in these observations. The same analysis was performed with data from more recent ER-2 flights over the tropical Pacific Ocean during the Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment/Measurements for Assessing the Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (ASHOE/MAESA), Stratospheric Tracers of Atmospheric Transport (STRAT), and Photochemistry of Ozone Loss in the Arctic Region in Summer (POLARIS) campaigns which took place in 1994, 1995-1996, and 1997, respectively. These data also show a correlation between gravity wave momentum flux and deep convective clouds, but the relationship is much weaker, and the magnitudes of the momentum flux over the deepest clouds are about 7 times smaller than those seen in the STEP data. The reasons for these differences remain uncertain, but possibilities include both real geophysical differences and differences associated with the flight paths during the 1987 versus later campaigns.

  12. Downward-Propagating Temperature Anomalies in the Preconditioned Polar Stratosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuntai; Miller, Alvin J.; Wang, Julian; Angell, James K.

    2002-04-01

    Dynamical links of the Northern Hemisphere stratosphere and troposphere are studied, with an emphasis on whether stratospheric changes have a direct effect on tropospheric weather and climate. In particular, downward propagation of stratospheric anomalies of polar temperature in the winter-spring season is examined based upon 22 years of NCEP-NCAR reanalysis data. It is found that the polar stratosphere is sometimes preconditioned, which allows a warm anomaly to propagate from the upper stratosphere to the troposphere, and sometimes it prohibits downward propagation. The Arctic Oscillation (AO) is more clearly seen in the former case. To understand what dynamical conditions dictate the stratospheric property of downward propagation, the upper-stratospheric warming episodes with very large anomalies (such as stratospheric sudden warming) are selected and divided into two categories according to their downward-propagating features. Eliassen-Palm (E-P) diagnostics and wave propagation theories are used to examine the characteristics of wave-mean flow interactions in the two different categories. It is found that in the propagating case the initial wave forcing is very large and the polar westerly wind is reversed. As a result, dynamically induced anomalies propagate down as the critical line descends. A positive feedback is that the dramatic change in zonal wind alters the refractive index in a way favorable for continuous poleward transport of wave energy. The second pulse of wave flux conducts polar warm anomalies farther down. Consequently, the upper-tropospheric circulations are changed, in particular, the subtropical North Atlantic jet stream shifts to the south by 5 degrees of latitude, and the alignment of the jet stream becomes more zonal, which is similar to the negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO).

  13. How does downward planetary wave coupling affect polar stratospheric ozone in the Arctic winter stratosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubis, Sandro W.; Silverman, Vered; Matthes, Katja; Harnik, Nili; Omrani, Nour-Eddine; Wahl, Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    It is well established that variable wintertime planetary wave forcing in the stratosphere controls the variability of Arctic stratospheric ozone through changes in the strength of the polar vortex and the residual circulation. While previous studies focused on the variations in upward wave flux entering the lower stratosphere, here the impact of downward planetary wave reflection on ozone is investigated for the first time. Utilizing the MERRA2 reanalysis and a fully coupled chemistry-climate simulation with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1(WACCM)) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), we find two downward wave reflection effects on ozone: (1) the direct effect in which the residual circulation is weakened during winter, reducing the typical increase of ozone due to upward planetary wave events and (2) the indirect effect in which the modification of polar temperature during winter affects the amount of ozone destruction in spring. Winter seasons dominated by downward wave reflection events (i.e., reflective winters) are characterized by lower Arctic ozone concentration, while seasons dominated by increased upward wave events (i.e., absorptive winters) are characterized by relatively higher ozone concentration. This behavior is consistent with the cumulative effects of downward and upward planetary wave events on polar stratospheric ozone via the residual circulation and the polar temperature in winter. The results establish a new perspective on dynamical processes controlling stratospheric ozone variability in the Arctic by highlighting the key role of wave reflection.

  14. The tropospheric-stratospheric polar vortex breakdown of January 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    An extraordinary warming of the stratosphere in December-January 1976-77 was followed by tropospheric warming in the polar region and cooling in middle latitudes. During January 10-20, the associated polar anticyclone extended from the surface to 10 mb. Antecedents of the polar vortex breakdown are reviewed with the aid of results of zonal-harmonic analyses of planetary waves, for heights of the pressure surfaces (700-10 mb), temperature, and mean stratospheric temperature (the latter determined from satellite radiation measurements). Wave 1 in height and temperature played a dominant role in the stratosphere, attaining amplitudes of 1600 gpm and 25 C, respectively, at 10 mb. On the other hand, superposition of retrogressing wave 1 and quasi-stationary wave 2 in the height of the 300-mb surface, with individual amplitudes exceeding 300 gpm, is judged to have been an important factor in the overall development.

  15. On the motion of air through the stratospheric polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Zurek, R. W.; O'Neill, A.; Swinbank, R.

    1994-01-01

    Trajectory calculations using horizontal winds from the U.K. Meteorological Office data assimilation system and vertical velocities from a radiation calculation are used to simulate the three-dimensional motion of air through the stratospheric polar vortex for Northern Hemisphere (NH) and Southern Hemisphere (SH) winters since the launch of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Throughout the winter, air from the upper stratosphere moves poleward and descends into the middle stratosphere. In the SH lower to middle stratosphere, strongest descent occurs near the edge of the polar vortex, with that edge defined by mixing characteristics. The NH shows a similar pattern in late winter, but in early winter strongest descent is near the center of the vortex, except when wave activity is particularly strong. Strong barriers to latitudinal mixing exist above about 420 K throughout the winter. Below this, the polar night jet is weak in early winter, so air descending below that level mixes between polar and middle latitudes. In late winter, parcels descend less and the polar night jet moves downward, so there is less latitudinal mixing. The degree of mixing in the lower stratosphere thus depends strongly on the position and evolution of the polar night jet and on the amount of descent experienced by the air parcels; these characteristics show considerable interannual variability in both hemispheres. The computed trajectories provide a three-dimensional picture of air motion during the final warming. Large tongues of air are drawn off the vortex and stretched into increasingly long and narrow tongues extending into low latitudes. This vortex erosion process proceeds more rapidly in the NH than in he SH. In the lower stratosphere, the majority of air parcels remain confined within a lingering region of strong potential vorticity gradients into December in the SH and April in the NH, well after the vortex breaks up in the midstratosphere.

  16. On the Motion of Air through the Stratospheric Polar Vortex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manney, G. L.; Zurek, R. W.; O'Neill, A.; Swinbank, R.

    1994-10-01

    Trajectory calculations using horizontal winds from the U.K. Meteorological Office data assimilation system and vertical velocities from a radiation calculation are used to simulate the three-dimensional motion of air through the stratospheric polar vortex for Northern Hemisphere (NH) and Southern Hemisphere (SH) winters since the launch of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. Throughout the winter, air from the upper stratosphere moves poleward and descends into the middle stratosphere. In the SH lower to middle stratosphere, strongest descent occurs near the edge of the polar vortex, with that edge defined by mixing characteristics. The NH shows a similar pattern in late winter, but in early winter strongest descent is near the center of the vortex, except when wave activity is particularly strong. Strong barriers to latitudinal mixing exist above about 420 K throughout the winter. Below this, the polar night jet is weak in early winter, so air descending below that level mixes between polar and middle latitudes. In late winter, parcels descend less and the polar night jet moves downward, so there is less latitudinal mixing. The degree of mixing in the lower stratosphere thus depends strongly on the position and evolution of the polar night jet and on the amount of descent experienced by the air parcels; these characteristics show considerable interannual variability in both hemispheres.The computed trajectories provide a three-dimensional picture of air motion during the final warming. Large tongues of air are drawn off the vortex and stretched into increasingly long and narrow tongues extending into low latitudes. This vortex erosion process proceeds more rapidly in the NH than in the SH. In the lower stratosphere, the majority of air parcels remain confined within a lingering region of strong potential vorticity gradients into December in the SH and April in the NH, well after the vortex breaks up in the midstratosphere.

  17. Wintertime Polar Ozone Evolution during Stratospheric Vortex Break-Down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tweedy, O.; Limpasuvan, V.; Smith, A. K.; Richter, J. H.; Orsolini, Y.; Stordal, F.; Kvissel, O.

    2011-12-01

    Stratospheric Sudden Warming (SSW) is characterized by the rapid warming of the winter polar stratosphere and the weakening of the circumpolar flow. During the onset of a major SSW (when the circumpolar flow reverses direction), the warm stratopause layer (SL) descends from its climatological position to the mid-stratosphere level. As the vortex recovers from SSW, a "new" SL forms in the mid-mesosphere region before returning to its typical level. This SL discontinuity appears in conjunction with enhanced downward intrusion of chemical species from the lower thermosphere/upper mesosphere to the stratosphere. The descended species can potentially impact polar ozone. In this study, the NCAR's Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) is used to investigate the behavior of polar ozone related to major SSWs. Specifically, dynamical evolution and chemistry of NOx, CO, and O3 are examined during three realistic major SSWs and compared with a non-SSW winter season. The simulated (zonal-mean) polar ozone distribution exhibits a "primary" maximum near 40 km, a "secondary" maximum between 90-105 km, and a "tertiary" maximum near 70 km. The concentration of the secondary maximum reduces by ~1.5 parts per million by volume (ppmv) as the vortex recovers and the upper mesospheric polar easterlies return. Enhanced downwelling above the newly formed SL extends up to just above this secondary maximum (~110 km). With an averaged concentration of 2 ppmv, the tertiary ozone maximum layer displaces upward with enhanced upwelling during SSW in conjunction with the lower mesospheric cooling. The downward propagation of the stratospheric wind reversal is accompanied by CO intrusion toward the lowermost stratosphere and anomalous behavior in the primary ozone maximum. Overall, the major SSW, SL, and polar ozone evolution mimic recently reported satellite observations.

  18. SAM 2 measurements of the polar stratospheric aerosol. Volume 9: October 1982-April 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Mcmaster, L.R.; Powell, K.A.

    1991-02-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II sensor aboard Nimbus 7 is providing 1.0 micron extinction measurements of Antarctic and Arctic stratospheric aerosols with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Representative examples and weekly averages including corresponding temperature profiles provided by NOAA for the time and place of each SAM II measurement are presented. Contours of aerosol extinction as a function of altitude and longitude or time are plotted, and aerosol optical depths are calculated for each week. Typical values of aerosol extinction and stratospheric optical depth in the Arctic are unusually large due to the presence of material from the El Chichon volcano eruption in the Spring of 1982. For example, the optical depth peaked at 0.068, more than 50 times background values. Typical values of aerosol extinction and stratospheric optical depth in the Antarctic varied considerably during this period due to the transport and arrival of the material from the El Chichon eruption. For example, the stratospheric optical depth varied from 0.002 in October 1982, to 0.021 in January 1983. Polar stratospheric clouds were observed during the Arctic winter, as expected. A representative sample is provided of the ninth 6-month period of data to be used in atmospheric and climatic studies.

  19. Researchers Focus on Fire Clouds That Reach to the Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-08-01

    Volcanic eruptions are not the only violent events that can inject smoke-colored and cauliflower-textured clouds into the stratosphere. Pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCB) storms can, too. These recently discovered phenomena are storms caused or aided by fire; they have many characteristics similar to thunderstorms, including lightning, hail, and extreme vertical height through the troposphere and into the lower stratosphere. Common wisdom had held that “the only event that can explosively pollute the stratosphere is a volcanic eruption,” Michael Fromm, a meteorologist with the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D. C., said at a 9 August press briefing at the 2010 Meeting of the Americas in Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil. “Now we know that pyroCBs can do a version of this, thanks to the heat from fire.”

  20. SAM 2 Measurements of the Polar Stratospheric Aerosol, volume 2. April 1979 to October 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Steele, H. M.; Hamill, P.

    1982-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II sensor is abroad the Earth orbiting Nimbus 7 spacecraft proving extinction measurements of the Antarctic and Arctic stratospheric aerosol with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Representative examples and weekly averages of aerosol data and corresponding temperature profiles for the time and place of each SAM II measurement (April 29, 1979, to October 27, 1979) is presented. Contours of aerosol extinction as a function of altitude and longitude or time were plotted and weekly aerosol optical depths were calculated. Seasonal variations and variations in space (altitude and longitude) for both polar regions are easily seen. Typical values of aerosol extinction at the SAM II wavelength of 1.0 micron for the time priod were 1 to 3 x 10 to the -4th power km -1 in the main stratospheric aerosol layer. Optical depths for the stratosphere were about 0.002. Polar stratospheric clouds at altitudes between the tropopause and 20 km were observed during the Antarctic winter at various times and locations. A ready-to-use format containing a representative sample of the second 6 months of data to be used in atmospheric and climatic studies is presented.

  1. Interhemispheric differences in polar stratospheric HNO3, H2O, ClO, and O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santee, M. L.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.; Froidevaux, L.; Manney, G. L.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Harwood, R. S.; Peckham, G. E.

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous global measurements of nitric acid (HNO3), water (H2O), chlorine monoxide (ClO), and ozone (O3) in the stratosphere have been obtained over complete annual cycles in both hemispheres by the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. A sizeable decrease in gas-phase HNO3 was evident in the lower stratospheric vortex over Antarctica by early June 1992, followed by a significant reduction in gas-phase H2O after mid-July. By mid-August, near the time of peak ClO, abundances of gas-phase HNO3 and H2O were extremely low. The concentrations of HNO3 and H2O over Antarctica remained depressed into November, well after temperatures in the lower stratosphere had risen above the evaporation threshold for polar stratospheric clouds, implying that denitrification and dehydration had occurred. No large decreases in either gas-phase HNO3 or H2O were observed in the 1992-1993 Arctic winter vortex. Although ClO was enhanced over the Arctic as it was over the Antarctic, Arctic O3 depletion was substantially smaller than that over Antarctica. A major factor currently limiting the formation of an Arctic ozone 'hole' is the lack of denitrification in the northern polar vortex, but future cooling of the lower stratosphere could lead to more intense denitrification and consequently larger losses of Arctic ozone.

  2. Pattern recognition analysis of polar clouds during summer and winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebert, Elizabeth E.

    1992-01-01

    A pattern recognition algorithm is demonstrated which classifies eighteen surface and cloud types in high-latitude AVHRR imagery based on several spectral and textural features, then estimates the cloud properties (fractional coverage, albedo, and brightness temperature) using a hybrid histogram and spatial coherence technique. The summertime version of the algorithm uses both visible and infrared data (AVHRR channels 1-4), while the wintertime version uses only infrared data (AVHRR channels 3-5). Three days of low-resolution AVHRR imagery from the Arctic and Antarctic during January and July 1984 were analyzed for cloud type and fractional coverage. The analysis showed significant amounts of high cloudiness in the Arctic during one day in winter. The Antarctic summer scene was characterized by heavy cloud cover in the southern ocean and relatively clear conditions in the continental interior. A large region of extremely low brightness temperatures in East Antarctica during winter suggests the presence of polar stratospheric cloud.

  3. HCl dissolved in solid mixtures of nitric acid and ice - Implications for the polar stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, James; Mauersberger, Konrad; Hanson, David

    1991-01-01

    The solubility of HCl in polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles plays an important role in the heterogeneous chemistry of the lower polar stratosphere. New laboratory studies are reported showing a strong dependence of the HCl solubility on the HNO3 content in ice particles. At 200 K and a partial HCl pressure of 10 exp -6 torr, the HCl content in NAT is 0.35 mol pct, decreasing about a factor of 3 for every ten-fold decrease in the substrate's HNO3 content. At an HCl pressure of 10 exp -7 torr, the content is about 40 percent of that at 10 exp -6 torr. HCL dissolved in pure water ice at these partial pressures is less than 0.002 mol pct. The surface coverage of HCl on small ice samples was estimated to be about 0.1 monolayer at 10 exp -6 torr exposure.

  4. Antarctic polar stratospheric aerosols: The roles of nitrates, chlorides and sulfates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Goodman, J. K.; Ferry, G. V.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Verma, S.; Fong, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nitric and hydrochloric acids have been postulated to condense in the winter polar stratosphere to become an important component of polar stratospheric clouds. One implication is that the removal of NO(y) from the gas phase by this mechanism allows high Cl(x) concentrations to react with O3, because the formation of ClNO3 is inhibited. Contributions of NO3 and Cl to the stratospheric aerosol were determined during the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment by testing for the presence of nitrates and chlorides in the condensed phase. Aerosol particles were collected on four 500 micron diameter gold wires, each pretreated differently to give results that were specific to certain physical and chemical aerosol properties. One wire was carbon-coated for concentration and size analyses by scanning electron microscopy; X-ray energy dispersive analyses permitted the detection of S and Cl in individual particles. Three more wires were coated with Nitron, barium chloride and silver nitrate, respectively, to detect nitrate, sulfate and chloride in aerosol particles. All three ions, viz., sulfates, nitrates and chlorides were detected in the Antarctic stratospheric aerosol. In terms of number concentrations, the aerosol was dominated by sulfates, followed by chlorides and nitrates. An inverse linear regression can be established between nitrate concentrations and ozone mixing ratio, and between temperature and nitrates.

  5. Interhemispheric comparison of the development of the stratospheric polar vortex during fall - A 3-dimensional perspective for 1991-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, Gloria L.; Zurek, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    The development of the stratospheric polar vortex during fall and early winter in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) during 1991-1992, and the Southern Hemisphere (SH) during 1992 is examined using National Meteorological Center data. Compared to the NH, the polar vortex in the SH developed with less variability on short time scales, deepened more rapidly and continued to expand well into winter. Daily minimum temperatures in the lower stratosphere were lowest at equivalent seasonal dates in both hemispheres, but values below the condensation temperatures of polar stratospheric clouds occurred earlier, persisted much longer, and occupied a larger volume of air in the SH. These interhemispheric meteorological differences can account for some of the key features of the chlorine monoxide distributions observed by the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite.

  6. Theoretical Investigations of Clouds and Aerosols in the Stratosphere and Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.

    2005-01-01

    support of the Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Data Analysis Program. We investigated a wide variety of issues involving ambient stratospheric aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds or heterogeneous chemistry, analysis of laboratory data, and particles in the upper troposphere. The papers resulting from these studies are listed below. In addition, I participated in the 1999-2000 SOLVE mission as one of the project scientists and in the 2002 CRYSTAL field mission as one of the project scientists. Several CU graduate students and research associates also participated in these mission, under support from the ACMAP program, and worked to interpret data. During the past few years my group has completed a number of projects under the

  7. Aircraft deployment, and airborne arctic stratospheric expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Estelle; Tuck, Adrian; Hipskind, Steve; Toon, Brian; Wegener, Steve

    1990-01-01

    The Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition had two primary objectives: to study the production and loss mechanisms of ozone in the north polar stratosphere and to study the effect on ozone distribution of the Arctic Polar Vortex and of the cold temperatures associated with the formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds. Two specially instrumented NASA aircraft were flown over the Arctic region. Each aircraft flew to acquire data on the meteorological, chemical and cloud physical phenomena that occur in the polar stratosphere during winter. The chemical processes which occur in the polar stratosphere during winter were also observed and studied. The data acquired are being analyzed.

  8. Clouds, hazes, and the stratospheric methane abundance in Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Hammel, Heidi B.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of high-spatial-resolution (approximately 0.8 arcsec) methane band and continuum imagery of Neptune's relatively homogeneous Equatorial Region yields significant constraints on (1) the stratospheric gaseous methane mixing ratio (f(sub CH4, S)), (2) the column abundances and optical properties of stratospheric and tropospheric hydrocarbon hazes, and (3) the wavelength-dependent single-scattering albedo of the 3-bar opaque cloud. From the center-to-limb behavior of the 7270-A and 8900-A CH4 bands, the stratospheric methane mixing ratios is limited to f(sub CH4, S) less than 1.7 x 10(exp -3), with a nominal value of f(sub CH4, S) = 3.5 x 10(exp -4), one to two orders of magnitude less than pre-Voyager estimates, but in agreement with a number of recent ultraviolet and thermal infrared measurements, and largely in agreement with the tropopause mixing ratio implied by Voyager temperature measurements. Upper limits to the stratospheric haze mass column abundance and 6190-A and 8900-A haze opacities are 0.61 micrograms/sq cm and 0.075 and 0.042, respectively, with nominal values of 0.20 micrograms/sq cm and 0.025 and 0.014 for the 0.2 micrometers radius particles preferred by the recent Voyager PPS analysis of Pryor et al. (1992). The tropospheric CH4 haze opacities are comparable to that found in the stratosphere, i.e., upper limits of 0.104 and 0.065 at 6190 A and 8900 A, respectively, with nominal values of 0.085 and 0.058. This indicates a column abundance less than 11.0 micrograms/sq cm, corresponding to the methane gas content within a well-mixed 3% methane tropospheric layer only 0.1 cm thick near the 1.5-bar CH4 condensation level. Conservative scattering is ruled out for the opaque cloud near 3 bars marking the bottom of the visible atmosphere. Specifically, we find cloud single-scattering albedos of 0.915 +/- 0.006 at 6340 A, 0.775 +/- 0.012 at 7490 A, and 0.803 +/- 0.010 at 8260 A. Global models utilizing a complete global spectrum confirm the red

  9. Interannual Variability of the North Polar Vortex in the Lower Stratosphere During the UARS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurek, R. W.; Manney, G. L.; Miller, A. J.; Gelman, M. E.; Nagatani, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    Northern winters since the 1991 launch of UARS are compared to earlier years (1978 -1991) with respect to the potential for formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds and for isolation of the north polar vortex. Daily NMC temperature minima at 465 K late in the winter of 1993-94 and again in December 1994 were the lowest values experienced during these times of the year (since 1978). Northern PV gradients were unusually strong in 1991-92 prior to late January and throughout the winter in both 1992-93 and 1994-95. Of all northern winters since 1978, 1994-95 with its early extended cold spell and persistently strong PV gradients most resembled the Antarctic winter lower stratosphere. Even so, temperatures was never as low, nor was the polar vortex as large, as during a typical southern winter. Judged by daily temperature minima and PV gradients at 465 K, meteorological conditions in the Arctic winter lower stratosphere during the UARS period were more conducive to vortex ozone loss by heterogeneous chemistry than in most previous winters since 1978-79.

  10. Laboratory studies of the nitric acid trihydrate - Implications for the south polar stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, David; Mauersberger, Konrad

    1988-01-01

    Vapor pressures of HNO3 and H2O have been measured over the trihydrate crystal, formed by vapor deposit on a glass surface. In the temperature range 190 to 205 K the two phase-equilibrium trihydrate/vapor was studied by adding and removing H2O. Coexistence equilibria vapor pressures of trihydrate/solid solutions of HNO3 in ice and of mono-/trihydrate were also measured. Results show that for typical mixing ratios of H2O and HNO3 found in the lower stratosphere (3 ppm H2O, 5 ppb HNO3) the trihydrate would start to form at temperatures about 7 K higher than the ice point. The pressure of atmospheric HNO3 would rapidly decrease as the atmosphere cools without large changes in partial pressures of H2O. These laboratory results provide information on the formation of polar stratospheric clouds containing H2O and HNO3.

  11. SAM II measurements of the polar stratospheric aerosol. Volume 6: April to October 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Brandl, D.

    1985-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II sensor is aboard the Earth-orbiting Nimbus 7 spacecraft providing extinction measurements of the Antarctic and Arctic stratospheric aerosols with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Representative examples and weekly averages of these aerosol data and corresponding temperature profiles (Apr. 1981 to Oct. 1981) are presented. Contours of aerosol extinction as a function of altitude and longitude or time are plotted and weekly aerosol optical depths are calculated. Stratospheric optical depths are 0.002 to 0.003 for the Antarctic region and 0.006 to 0.007 at the beginning to 0.003 to 0.004 at the end of the time period for the Arctic region. Polar stratospheric clouds at altitudes between the tropopause and 20 km were observed during the Antarctic winter. A ready-to-use format containing a representative sample of the sixth 6 months of data to be used in atmospheric and climatic studies is reported.

  12. Solid-state photochemistry as a formation mechanism for Titan's stratospheric C4N2 ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. M.; Samuelson, R. E.; Yung, Y. L.; McLain, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    We propose that C4N2 ice clouds observed in Titan's springtime polar stratosphere arise due to solid-state photochemistry occurring within extant ice cloud particles of HCN-HC3N mixtures. This formation process resembles the halogen-induced ice particle surface chemistry that leads to condensed nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles and ozone depletion in Earth's polar stratosphere. As our analysis of the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer 478 cm-1 ice emission feature demonstrates, this solid-state photochemistry mechanism eliminates the need for the relatively high C4N2 saturation vapor pressures required (even though they are not observed) when the ice is produced through the usual procedure of direct condensation from the vapor.

  13. Solid-State Photochemistry as a Formation Mechanism for Titan's Stratospheric C4N2 Ice Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, C. M.; Samuelson, R. E.; Yung, Y. L.; McLain, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    We propose that C4N2 ice clouds observed in Titan's springtime polar stratosphere arise due to solid-state photochemistry occurring within extant ice cloud particles of HCN-HC3N mixtures. This formation process resembles the halogen-induced ice particle surface chemistry that leads to condensed nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles and ozone depletion in Earth's polar stratosphere. As our analysis of the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer 478 per centimeter ice emission feature demonstrates, this solid-state photochemistry mechanism eliminates the need for the relatively high C4N2 saturation vapor pressures required (even though they are not observed) when the ice is produced through the usual procedure of direct condensation from the vapor.

  14. Origin of Condensation Nuclei in the Springtime Polar Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Jingxia; Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1995-01-01

    An enhanced sulfate aerosol layer has been observed near 25 km accompanying springtime ozone depletion in the Antarctic stratosphere. We use a one-dimensional aerosol model that includes photochemistry, particle nucleation, condensational growth, coagulation, and sedimentation to study the origin of the layer. Annual cycles of sunlight, temperature, and ozone are incorporated into the model. Our results indicate that binary homogeneous nucleation leads to the formation of very small droplets of sulfuric acid and water under conditions of low temperature and production of H2SO4 following polar sunrise. Photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) alone, however, cannot provide sufficient SO2 to create the observed condensation nuclei (CN) layer. When subsidence of SO2 from very high altitudes in the polar night vortex is incorporated into the model, the CN layer is reasonably reproduced. The model predictions, based on the subsidence in polar vortex, agree with in situ measurements of particle concentration, vertical distribution, and persistence during polar spring.

  15. Origin of condensation nuclei in the springtime polar stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Jingxia; Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1995-01-01

    An enhanced sulfate aerosol layer has been observed near 25 km accompanying springtime ozone depletion in the Antarctic stratosphere. We use a one-dimensional aerosol model that includes photochemistry, particle nucleation, condensational growth, coagulation, and sedimentation to study the origin of the layer. Annual cycles of sunlight, temperature, and ozone are incorporated into the model. Our results indicate that binary homogeneous nucleation leads to the formation of very small droplets of sulfuric acid and water under conditions of low temperature and production of H2SO4 following polar sunrise. Photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) alone, however, cannot provide sufficient SO2 to create the observed condensation nuclei (CN) layer. When subsidence of SO2 from very high altitudes in the polar night vortex is incorporated into the model, the CN layer is reasonably reproduced. The model predictions, based on the subsidence in polar vortex, agree with in situ measurements of particle concentration, vertical distribution, and persistence during polar spring.

  16. Deep optically thin cirrus clouds in the polar regions. I - Infrared extinction characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Yoo, Jung-Moon; Dalu, Giuseppe; Fraser, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    The spectral data obtained by the infrared interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS) flown on Nimbus 4 satellite in 1970 indicated the existence of optically thin ice clouds in the upper troposphere that probably extended into lower stratosphere, in the polar regions, during winter and early spring. The spectral features of these clouds differ somewhat from that of the optically thin cirrus clouds in the tropics. From theoretical simulation of the infrared spectra in the 8-25 micron region, it is inferred that these polar clouds have a vertical stratification in particle size, with larger particles (about 12 microns) in the bottom of the cloud and smaller ones (less than 1 micron) aloft. Radiative transfer calculations also suggest that the equivalent ice-water content of these polar clouds is of the order of 1 mg/sq cm.

  17. The impact of gravity waves and cloud nucleation threshold on stratospheric water and tropical tropospheric cloud fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, Mark; Dessler, Andrew; Ye, Hao; Wang, Tao; Avery, Melody; Jensen, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Using the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and MERRA-2 reanalysis winds, temperatures, and anvil cloud ice, we explore the impact of varying the cloud nucleation threshold relative humidity (RH) and high-frequency gravity waves on stratospheric water vapor (H2O) and upper tropical tropopause cloud fraction (TCF). Our model results are compared to 2008/2009 winter TCF derived from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization and H2O observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The RH threshold affects both model H2O and TCF, while high-frequency gravity waves mostly impact TCF. Adjusting the nucleation RH and the amplitude of high-frequency gravity waves allows us to tune the model to observations. Reasonable observational agreement is obtained with a nucleation threshold between 130% and 150% RH consistent with airborne observations. For the MERRA reanalysis, we lower the tropopause temperature by 0.5 K roughly consistent with GPS radio occultation measurements and include ~0.1 K high-frequency gravity wave temperature oscillations in order to match TCF and H2O observations. For MERRA-2 we do not need to adjust the tropopause temperature nor add gravity waves, because there are sufficient high-frequency temperature oscillations already present in the MERRA-2 reanalysis to reproduce the observed TCF.

  18. Aerosol chamber study of optical constants and N2O5 uptake on supercooled H2SO4/H2O/HNO3 solution droplets at polar stratospheric cloud temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Naumann, Karl-Heinz; Mangold, Alexander; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schurath, Ulrich

    2005-09-15

    The mechanism of the formation of supercooled ternary H(2)SO(4)/H(2)O/HNO(3) solution (STS) droplets in the polar winter stratosphere, i.e., the uptake of nitric acid and water onto background sulfate aerosols at T < 195 K, was successfully mimicked during a simulation experiment at the large coolable aerosol chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. Supercooled sulfuric acid droplets, acting as background aerosol, were added to the cooled AIDA vessel at T = 193.6 K, followed by the addition of ozone and nitrogen dioxide. N(2)O(5), the product of the gas phase reaction between O(3) and NO(2), was then hydrolyzed in the liquid phase with an uptake coefficient gamma(N(2)O(5)). From this experiment, a series of FTIR extinction spectra of STS droplets was obtained, covering a broad range of different STS compositions. This infrared spectra sequence was used for a quantitative test of the accuracy of published infrared optical constants for STS aerosols, needed, for example, as input in remote sensing applications. The present findings indicate that the implementation of a mixing rule approach, i.e., calculating the refractive indices of ternary H(2)SO(4)/H(2)O/HNO(3) solution droplets based on accurate reference data sets for the two binary H(2)SO(4)/H(2)O and HNO(3)/H(2)O systems, is justified. Additional model calculations revealed that the uptake coefficient gamma(N(2)O(5)) on STS aerosols strongly decreases with increasing nitrate concentration in the particles, demonstrating that this so-called nitrate effect, already well-established from uptake experiments conducted at room temperature, is also dominant at stratospheric temperatures.

  19. Possible effect of extreme solar energetic particle event of 20 January 2005 on polar stratospheric aerosols: direct observational evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova, I. A.; Usoskin, I. G.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Petelina, S. V.

    2012-01-01

    Energetic cosmic rays are the main source of ionization of the low-middle atmosphere, leading to associated changes in atmospheric properties. Via the hypothetical influence of ionization on aerosol growth and facilitated formation of clouds, this may be an important indirect link relating solar variability to climate. This effect is highly debated, however, since the proposed theoretical mechanisms still remain illusive and qualitative, and observational evidence is inconclusive and controversial. Therefore, important questions regarding the existence and magnitude of the effect, and particularly the fraction of aerosol particles that can form and grow, are still open. Here we present empirical evidence of the possible effect caused by cosmic rays upon polar stratospheric aerosols, based on a case study of an extreme solar energetic particle (SEP) event of 20 January 2005. Using aerosol data obtained over polar regions from different satellites with optical instruments that were operating during January 2005, such as the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III), and Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS), we found a significant simultaneous change in aerosol properties in both the Southern and Northern Polar regions in temporal association with the SEP event. We speculate that ionization of the atmosphere, which was abnormally high in the lower stratosphere during the extreme SEP event, might have led to formation of new particles and/or growth of preexisting ultrafine particles in the polar stratospheric region. However, a detailed interpretation of the effect is left for subsequent studies. This is the first time high vertical resolution measurements have been used to discuss possible production of stratospheric aerosols under the influence of cosmic ray induced ionization. The observed effect is marginally detectable for the analyzed severe SEP event and can be undetectable for the majority of weak-moderate events. The present

  20. Martian north polar water ice clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamppari, L. K.; Bass, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Viking Orbiter determined that the surface of Mars' northern residual cap consists of water ice. An examination of north polar water-ice clouds could lend insight into the fate of the water vapor during this time period.

  1. Likely seeding of cirrus clouds by stratospheric Kasatochi volcanic aerosol particles near a mid-latitude tropopause fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, James R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Yang, Kai; Stewart, Sebastian A.; Fromm, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Following the explosive 7-8 August 2008 Mt. Kasatochi volcanic eruption in southwestern Alaska, a segment of the dispersing stratospheric aerosol layer was profiled beginning 16 August in continuous ground-based lidar measurements over the Mid-Atlantic coast of the eastern United States. On 17-18 August, the layer was displaced downward into the upper troposphere through turbulent mixing near a tropopause fold. Cirrus clouds and ice crystal fallstreaks were subsequently observed, having formed within the entrained layer. The likely seeding of these clouds by Kasatochi aerosol particles is discussed. Cloud formation is hypothesized as resulting from either preferential homogenous freezing of relatively large sulfate-based solution droplets deliquesced after mixing into the moist upper troposphere or through heterogeneous droplet activation by volcanic ash. Satellite-borne spectrometer measurements illustrate the evolution of elevated Kasatochi SO 2 mass concentrations regionally and the spatial extent of the cirrus cloud band induced by likely particle seeding. Satellite-borne polarization lidar observations confirm ice crystal presence within the clouds. Geostationary satellite-based water vapor channel imagery depicts strong regional subsidence, symptomatic of tropopause folding, along a deepening trough in the sub-tropical westerlies. Regional radiosonde profiling confirms both the position of the fold and depth of upper-tropospheric subsidence. These data represent the first unambiguous observations of likely cloud seeding by stratospheric volcanic aerosol particles after mixing back into the upper troposphere.

  2. Comment on the polarity of magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, W. D.; Lee, L.-C.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1990-01-01

    The initial description of magnetic clouds by Klein and Burlaga (1982) and the models that have been developed for their representation (e.g., by Goldstein, 1983) are examined. The results show that a definition of the cloud's polarity only in terms of the Bz component of the IMF is not always correct. It is suggested that, for the description polarities of quasi-transverse and quasi-parallel clouds, a combination of directions in the Bz and By components of the IMF should be used.

  3. Measurements of condensation nuclei in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition - Observations of particle production in the polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Stolzenburg, M. R.; Clark, W. E.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.

    1990-01-01

    The ER-2 Condensation Nucleus Counter (ER-2 CNC) was operated in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) in January and February 1989. The ER-2 CNC measures the mixing ratio of particles, CN, with diameters from approximately 0.02 to approximately 1 micron. The spatial distribution of CN in the Arctic polar vortex was found to resemble that measured in the Antarctic in the Spring of 1987. The vertical profile of CN in the vortex was lowered by subsidence. At altitudes above the minimum in the CN mixing ratio profile, CN mixing ratios correlated negatively with that of N2O, demonstrating new particle production. CN serve as nuclei in the formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) and the concentration of CN can affect PSC properties.

  4. Visualization of stratospheric ozone depletion and the polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treinish, Lloyd A.

    1995-01-01

    Direct analysis of spacecraft observations of stratospheric ozone yields information about the morphology of annual austral depletion. Visual correlation of ozone with other atmospheric data illustrates the diurnal dynamics of the polar vortex and contributions from the upper troposphere, including the formation and breakup of the depletion region each spring. These data require care in their presentation to minimize the introduction of visualization artifacts that are erroneously interpreted as data features. Non geographically registered data of differing mesh structures can be visually correlated via cartographic warping of base geometries without interpolation. Because this approach is independent of the realization technique, it provides a framework for experimenting with many visualization strategies. This methodology preserves the fidelity of the original data sets in a coordinate system suitable for three-dimensional, dynamic examination of atmospheric phenomena.

  5. A consistent definition of the Arctic polar vortex breakup in both the lower and upper stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, W.; Seo, J.

    2014-12-01

    Breakup of the polar vortex is a dominant feature of the seasonal transition from winter to summer in the stratosphere, which significantly affects stratospheric O3 concentration and tropospheric weather. Previously several criteria for the vortex breakup have been suggested based on the potential vorticity (PV) and wind speed, however, those mainly have focused on the lower stratospheric vortex of which spatiotemporal evolution and decay are more continuous than those of the upper stratospheric vortex. To find a consistent criterion for the vortex breakup in both the lower and upper stratosphere, the present study defined a polar vortex breakup day as when PV gradient at the polar vortex edge becomes lower than that at the subtropical edge on the area equivalent latitude based on PV. With applying the new definition to the UK Met Office reanalysis data, the breakup days of the Arctic polar vortices on 18 isentropic levels from 450 K to 1300 K were calculated for the period of 1993-2005. In comparison with CH4, N2O and O3 measured by the ILAS and POAM II/III satellite instruments, the breakup days are well consistent with changes in the distribution of such tracers as well as their zonal standard deviations associated with the vortex structure breaking and irreversible mixing. The vortex breakup in the upper stratosphere occurs more or less a month prior to that in the middle and lower stratosphere while the stratospheric final warming events occurs simultaneously in the upper and lower stratosphere.

  6. The change of depolarization of backscattering light from the polar stratospheric aerosol layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaka, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The change of polarization properties of scattered light strongly depends on the non-spherisity of target particles. It should be helpful information for the study of stratospheric aerosols to know the non-spherisity of stratospheric aerosol particles. The change of the total backscatter depolarization ratio of the stratospheric aerosol layer measured at Syowa Station (69.00 deg S, 39.35 deg E), Antarctica is described.

  7. Lower Stratospheric Temperature Differences In Meteorological Analyses and Their Impact On Polar Processing Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manney, G.; Sabutis, J.; Pawson, S.; Santee, M.; Naujokat, B.; Swinbank, R.; Gelman, M.; Ebisuzaki, W.

    Models - chemical transport models (CTMs), trajectory and Eulerian transport mod- els, microphysical models - used in polar processing studies typically rely on winds and/or temperatures from one of several meteorological analyses to drive the transport and control processes such as polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and chemical reaction rates. Using different analyzed data sets to obtain temperatures and temper- ature histories can have significant consequences. A quantitative comparison of six meteorological analyses (UK Met Office, National Centers for Environmental Pre- diction/Climate Prediction Center (NCEP), NCEP/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis (REAN), Freie Universität Berlin, European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO)) is pre- sented for the cold 1999-2000 and 1995-1996 Arctic winters, showing substantial dif- ferences in diagnostics related to polar processing between the different analyses. Bi- ases between analyses vary from year to year. Temperature history case studies show substantial differences using Met Office, NCEP, REAN, ECMWF, and DAO analyses. Different meteorological conditions in the comparably cold winters of 1995-1996 and 1999-2000 had a large impact on both expectations for PSC formation and on the ef- fects of discrepancies between different meteorological analyses. Met Office, NCEP, REAN, ECMWF, and DAO analyses are commonly used in modeling polar processes; the choice of analysis can strongly influence the results of such studies.

  8. Climatology of the stratospheric polar vortex and planetary wave breaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Mark P.; Holton, James R.

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of Ertel's potential vorticity (PV) on the 850 K isentropic surface is used to establish a climatology for the transient evolution of the planetary scale circulation in the Northern Hemisphere winter midstratosphere. PV distributions are computed from gridded NMC daily temperature and height maps for the 10 and 30 mb levels, and show that a very good approximation for 850 K PV can be derived from 10 mb heights and temperatures alone. It is assumed that reversals of the latitudinal gradient of PV, localized in longitude and latitude may be regarded as signatures of planetary wave breaking. Wave breaking identified by such signatures tends to occur mainly in the vicinity of the Aleutian anticyclone, with a secondary maximum over Europe. The area of the polar vortex, defined as the area enclosed by PV contours greater than a certain critical value, is strongly influenced by wave breaking. Erosion of the polar vortex due to transport and mixing of PV leads to a preconditioned state, when defined in terms of vortex area, that always occurs prior to major stratospheric warmings. During winters with little PV transport or mixing, the vortex area evolves rather uniformly in response to radiative forcing. During winters with major sudden warmings, the wave breaking signature as defined here first appears at low values of PV, then rapidly moves toward higher values as the vortex area is reduced and the 'surf-zone' structure becomes well defined.

  9. Measurements of Chlorine Partitioning in the Winter Arctic Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stachnik, R.; Salawitch, R.; Engel, A.; Schmidt, U.

    1999-01-01

    Under the extremely cold conditions in the polar winter stratosphere, heterogeneous reactions involving HCl and CIONO(sub 2) on the surfaces of polar stratospheric cloud particles can release large amounts of reactive chlorine from these reservoirs leading to rapid chemical loss of ozone in the Arctic lower stratosphere during late winter and early spring.

  10. Five-day Waves in Polar Stratosphere and Mesosphere Temperature and Mesospheric Ice Water Measured by SOFIE/AIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, J.; Liu, X.

    2015-12-01

    The temperature and column ice water content (IWC) of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) have been simultaneously measured by the Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE) onboard NASA's Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite since April 2007. The 8-year (2007-2014) data of the temperature and IWC are used to extract the 5-day planetary waves (PWs) with zonal wavenumbers ranging from -1 to -3 (eastward propagating mode, E1-E3), 0 (stationary mode, W0), and 1 to 3 (westward propagating mode, W1-W3) in the polar stratosphere and mesosphere. The 5-day PWs in temperature are stronger in the polar winter stratosphere and mesosphere and exhibit substantial inter-hemispheric asymmetry. The date-height distributions of the 5-day waves coincide with those of the eastward jet in each hemisphere. This indicates that the 5-day PWs might be generated from barotropic/baroclinic instability in the polar stratosphere. The relative strengths of 5-day PWs decrease with increasing wavenumbers. The E1 (W1) 5-day PW is stronger than any other mode in the winter stratosphere and lower mesosphere (summer upper mesosphere). SOFIE temperature and IWC data are derived from simultaneous measurements in the same air column and thus provide a good opportunity to study the phase relationship between the 5-day PWs in temperature and IWC. Our analyses show that the phase shifts of W1 5-day PW in temperature relative to that in IWC have a mean of -2.0 h (0.3 h) with a standard deviation of 3.8 h (4.2 h) in the northern (southern) polar region. This indicates that the formation of the W1 5-day PW in PMCs is controlled mainly by the W1 5-day PW in temperature and influenced by other factors and is consistent with previous studies.

  11. Five-day waves in polar stratosphere and mesosphere temperature and mesospheric ice water measured by SOFIE/AIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Yue, Jia; Xu, Jiyao; Yuan, Wei; Russell, James M., III; Hervig, Mark E.

    2015-05-01

    The temperature and column ice water content (IWC) of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) have been simultaneously measured by the Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE) on board NASA's Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere satellite since April 2007. The 8 year (2007-2014) data of the temperature and IWC are used to extract the 5 day planetary waves (PWs) with zonal wave numbers ranging from -1 to -3 (eastward propagating mode, E1-E3), 0 (stationary mode, W0), and 1 to 3 (westward propagating mode, W1-W3) in the polar stratosphere and mesosphere. The 5 day PWs in temperature are stronger in the polar winter stratosphere and mesosphere and exhibit substantial interhemispheric asymmetry. The date-height distributions of the 5 day waves coincide with those of the eastward jet in each hemisphere. This indicates that the 5 day PWs might be generated from barotropic/baroclinic instability in the polar stratosphere. The relative strengths of 5 day PWs decrease with increasing wave numbers. The E1 (W1) 5 day PW is stronger than any other mode in the winter stratosphere and lower mesosphere (summer upper mesosphere). SOFIE temperature and IWC data are derived from simultaneous measurements in the same air column and thus provide a good opportunity to study the phase relationship between the 5 day PWs in temperature and IWC. Our analyses show that the phase shifts of W1 5 day PW in temperature relative to that in IWC have a mean of -2.0 h (0.3 h) with a standard deviation of 3.8 h (4.2 h) in the northern (southern) polar region. This indicates that the formation of the W1 5 day PW in PMCs is controlled mainly by the W1 5 day PW in temperature and influenced by other factors and is consistent with previous studies.

  12. A Twilight and Moonlight Model for Polar Stratospheric Telescope (POST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, L.; Bely, P.; White, R.

    1994-05-01

    We have modeled the run of brightness of the sky during twilight in order to estimate the yearly amount of nightime available for visual and infrared observations (0.55 - 8.0 microns ) with the Polar Stratospheric Telescope (POST). We have also applied the model to the estimation of the brightness of scattered moonlight. Our calculations were motivated by the sensitive dependence on solar depression angle of the duration of twilight for ground-based observers in the polar regions. The twilight model represents singly and doubly Rayleigh scattered sunlight and the full three-dimensional geometry of the earth's atmosphere and shadow. The onset of nightime was determined using an additional model of the brightness of the night sky which incorporates the thermal emission of the atmosphere, scattered and thermal emissivity of the zodiacal light, and the thermal emission of POST. We find at 0.55 microns for an observer at an altitude of 13 km that ZA_⊙ is 0.7 deg less than for a sea-level observer to attain the same twilight sky brightness. The difference decreases to zero at 6 - 8 microns . In itself this will have little effect on the available nightime for POST. However, the predicted brightness of the 2.5 microns sky as observed with POST is three orders of magnitude fainter than for a ground-based observer, and as a consequence the sensible twilight is prolonged to ZA_⊙=110 deg . In contrast, the great brightness of the sky (although less than for a ground-based observer) in the range 3.5 - 8.0 microns reduces the sensible duration of twilight. At the end of twilight ZA_⊙=101 deg at 3.5 microns , ZA_⊙=97 deg at 6.0 microns , and ZA_⊙=95 deg at 8.0 microns . The number of hours of darkness per year for an arctic site (latitude = 65 deg ) is 2000 at 0.55 microns , 1850 at 2.5 microns , 2700 at 3.5 microns , 3300 at 6.0 microns , and 3600 at 8.0 microns . Finally, we find the brightness of atmospherically scattered moonlight is six times less for a POST

  13. The Polar Stratosphere in a Changing Climate (POLSTRACC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelhaf, Hermann; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Woiwode, Wolfgang; Rapp, Markus; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Engel, Andreas; Boenisch, Harald

    2015-04-01

    The POLSTRACC mission aims at providing new scientific knowledge on the Arctic lowermost stratosphere (LMS) and upper troposphere under the present load of halogens and state of climate variables. POLSTRACC is the only HALO (High Altitude and LOng Range Research Aircraft, German Research Community) mission dedicated to study the UTLS at high latitudes several years after the last intensive Arctic campaigns. The scientific scope of POLSTRACC will be broadened by its combination with the SALSA (Seasonality of Air mass transport and origin in the Lowermost Stratosphere using the HALO Aircraft) and GW-LCYCLE (Gravity Wave Life Cycle Experiment, a BMBF/ROMIC project) missions, which address complementary scientific goals sharing the same HALO payload. POLSTRACC, SALSA and GW-LCYCLE will offer the unique opportunity to study the bottom of the polar vortex and the high-latitude UTLS along with their impact on lower latitudes throughout an entire winter/spring cycle. The POLSTRACC consortium includes national (KIT, Forschungszentrum Jülich, DLR, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Universities of Frankfurt, Heidelberg, Mainz and Wuppertal) and international partners (e.g. NASA). The payload for the combined POLSTRACC, SALSA and GW-LCYCLE campaigns comprises an innovative combination of remote sensing techniques providing 2- and 3-D distributions of temperature and a large number of substances, and precise in-situ instruments measuring T, O3, H2O, tracers of different lifetimes and chemically active species at the aircraft level with high time-resolution. Drop sondes will add information about temperature, humidity and wind in the atmosphere underneath the aircraft. The field campaign will be divided into three phases for addressing (i) the early polar vortex and its wide-scale vicinity in December 2015 (from Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany), (ii) the mid-winter vortex from January to March 2016 (from Kiruna, Sweden), and (iii) the late dissipating vortex and its wide

  14. Determining the Polar Cosmic Ray Effect on Cloud Microphysics and the Earth's Ozone Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckie, Charlene Radons

    Earth’s changing climate is an important topic where atmospheric ozone plays a critical role. Ozone has a direct influence on the amount and type of solar radiation received by the Earth. This study addresses how cosmic rays may influence the ozone layer by ionizing Earth’s atmosphere and enhancing the growth of cloud condensation nuclei and rate of chemical reactions on polar ice cloud surfaces. This theory was largely based on the lifetime work by Lu [2010]. The region of interest was centered over the Thule, Greenland neutron monitor station. Using cosmic ray, satellite-based ISCCP and ICARE project cloud data along with TOMS-OMI-SBUV and TEMIS total column ozone data, data comparisons were done. Plots of cosmic rays versus Antarctic atmospheric ozone from Lu [2009] were reproduced using regional Arctic data and extended to include years from 1983 to 2011. Comparisons to the research by Harris et al. [2010] were made by substituting ice cloud optical thickness for the cloud parameter and seasonal total column ozone for winter stratospheric ozone loss. The results of these data evaluations showed that the regional Arctic view matched very closely to Lu’s work from the Antarctic. The ozone 3-point moving average case demonstrated a statistically significant correlation of -0.508. Extending the data duration exposed a cosmic ray data peak that was 14 percent larger than the two previous 11-year cycles. Ice cloud tau / ozone data comparisons did not produce the strong correlations from Harris et al. [2010]. Five years of low stratospheric temperatures and increased volumes of polar stratospheric clouds, identified by Rex et al. [2006], matched significant years of total column ozone minimums. Polar atmospheric CO2 trended along with ice cloud tau and oppositely to total column ozone, suggesting that lower stratospheric temperatures are instrumental in ozone reduction. Future work would involve using more extensive datasets, focusing on parameters such as ice

  15. Attenuation by clouds of UV radiation for low stratospheric ozone conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orte, Facundo; Wolfram, Elian; Salvador, Jacobo; D'Elia, Raúl; Quiroga, Jonathan; Quel, Eduardo; Mizuno, Akira

    2017-02-01

    Stratospheric poor ozone air masses related to the polar ozone hole overpass subpolar regions in the Southern Hemisphere during spring and summer seasons, resulting in increases of surface Ultraviolet Index (UVI). The impact of these abnormal increases in the ultraviolet radiation could be overestimated if clouds are not taking into account. The aim of this work is to determine the percentage of cases in which cloudiness attenuates the high UV radiation that would reach the surface in low total ozone column situations and in clear sky hypothetical condition for Río Gallegos, Argentina. For this purpose, we analysed UVI data obtained from a multiband filter radiometer GUV-541 (Biospherical Inc.) installed in the Observatorio Atmosférico de la Patagonia Austral (OAPA-UNIDEF (MINDEF - CONICET)) (51 ° 33' S, 69 ° 19' W), Río Gallegos, since 2005. The database used covers the period 2005-2012 for spring seasons. Measured UVI values are compared with UVI calculated using a parametric UV model proposed by Madronich (2007), which is an approximation for the UVI for clear sky, unpolluted atmosphere and low surface albedo condition, using the total ozone column amount, obtained from the OMI database for our case, and the solar zenith angle. It is observed that ˜76% of the total low ozone amount cases, which would result in high and very high UVI categories for a hypothetical (modeled) clear sky condition, are attenuated by clouds, while 91% of hypothetical extremely high UVI category are also attenuated.

  16. Strong modification of stratospheric ozone forcing by cloud and sea-ice adjustments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yan; Hu, Yongyun; Huang, Yi

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the climatic impact of stratospheric ozone recovery (SOR), with a focus on the surface temperature change in atmosphere-slab ocean coupled climate simulations. We find that although SOR would cause significant surface warming (global mean: 0.2 K) in a climate free of clouds and sea ice, it causes surface cooling (-0.06 K) in the real climate. The results here are especially interesting in that the stratosphere-adjusted radiative forcing is positive in both cases. Radiation diagnosis shows that the surface cooling is mainly due to a strong radiative effect resulting from significant reduction of global high clouds and, to a lesser extent, from an increase in high-latitude sea ice. Our simulation experiments suggest that clouds and sea ice are sensitive to stratospheric ozone perturbation, which constitutes a significant radiative adjustment that influences the sign and magnitude of the global surface temperature change.

  17. POST: A polar stratospheric telescope for the Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, M. A.; Ford, H. C.; Bally, J.; Bely, P.

    1996-01-01

    The tropopause, typically at 16 to 18 km altitude at the lower latitudes, dips down to only 8 km in the polar regions, allowing access to the cold, dry and nonturbulent lower stratosphere by tethered aerostats. These can float as high as 12 km, have long operating lifetimes, and are extremely reliable. In contrast to free-flying balloons, they can stay on station for weeks at a time, and payloads can be safely recovered for maintenance and adjustment and relaunched in a matter of hours. We propose to use such a platform, located first near Fairbanks, Alaska, and later in the Antarctic, to operate a new-technology 4 m telescope with diffraction-limited performance in the near infrared. Thanks to the low ambient temperature (about 200 K), thermal emission from the optics is of the same order as that of the zodiacal light in the 2-3 micron band. Since this wavelength interval is the darkest part of the zodiacal light spectrum from optical wavelengths to 100 micron, the combination of high-resolution images and a very dark sky make it the spectral region of choice for observing galaxies, QSOs and clusters of galaxies at the formation epoch of galaxies.

  18. Generation of waves by jet-stream instabilities in winter polar stratosphere/mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpynev, B. G.; Churilov, S. M.; Chernigovskaya, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the paper we investigate the manifestation of large-scale and middle-scale atmospheric irregularities observed on stratosphere/mesosphere heights. We consider typical patterns of circulation in stratosphere and lower mesosphere which are formed due to a difference of air potential energy between equatorial and polar latitudes, especially in polar night conditions. On the base of ECMWF Era Interim reanalysis data we consider the dynamics of midlatitude winter jet-streams which transfer heat from low latitudes to polar region and which develop due to equator/pole baroclinic instabilities. We consider typical patterns of general circulation in stratosphere/lower mesosphere and reasons for creation of flaky structure of polar stratosphere. Also we analyze conditions that are favorable for splitting of winter circumpolar vortex during sudden stratosphere warming events and role of phase difference tides in this process. The analysis of vertical structure of the stratosphere wind shows the presence of regions with significant shear of horizontal velocity which favors for inducing of shear-layer instability that appears as gravity wave on boundary surface. During powerful sudden stratosphere warming events the main jet-stream can amplify these gravity waves to very high amplitudes that causes wave overturning and releasing of wave energy into the heat due to the cascade breakdown and turbulence. For the dynamics observed in reanalysis data we consider physical mechanisms responsible for observed phenomena.

  19. Chlorine Deactivation in the Lower Stratospheric Polar Regions during late Winter: Results from UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santee, M. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Manney, G. L.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Roche, A. E.; Kumer, J. B.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Russell, J. M., III

    1996-01-01

    Recovery from enhanced chlorine conditions in the lower stratospheric polar regions of both hemispheres is investigated using data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements of ClO within the polar vortices are used to infer ClO(sub x) (ClO + 2Cl202) abundances that are then correlated with simultaneous Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) measurements of ClON02 and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) measurements of HCl obtained starting within 5 days of the end of the MLS and CLAES high-latitude observing periods in each hemisphere. Time series of vortex-averaged mixing ratios are calculated on two potential temperature surfaces (585 K and 465 K) in the lower stratosphere for approximately month-long intervals during late winter: August 17 - September 17, 1992, in the southern hemisphere and February 12 - March 16, 1993, in the northern hemisphere. The observed mixing ratios are adjusted for the effects of vertical transport using diabatic vertical velocities estimated from CLAES tracer data. In the northern hemisphere, the decrease in ClO, is balanced on both surfaces by an increase in ClON02- In the southern hemisphere, continuing polar stratospheric cloud activity prevents ClO from undergoing sustained decline until about September 3. In contrast to the northern hemisphere, there is no significant chemical change in vortex-averaged ClON02 at 465 K, and there is an apparent decrease in ClON02 at 585 K, even after the enhanced ClO abundances have started to recede. Results from the SLIMCAT chemical transport model initialized with UARS data and run with OH + ClO yields HCl + 02 as an 8% channel suggest that the primary recovery product in the south during this time period is not ClON02, but HCl. HALOE HCl mixing ratios are extrapolated back to the time of the MLS and CLAES data. At 585 K, the chlorine budget can be made to balance by extrapolating HCl back to a value of 0.6 parts per billion by

  20. The Impact of Polar Stratospheric Ozone Loss on Southern Hemisphere Climate and Stratosheric Circulation - A Chemistry Climate Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeble, James; Braesicke, Peter; Roscoe, Howard; Pyle, John

    2013-04-01

    It is now well established that the large spring time stratospheric ozone loss which occurs in the Southern Hemisphere is the result of the liberation of chlorine from the reservoir species HCl and ClONO2 through heterogeneous reactions occurring on Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) particles. Here we investigate the impact this ozone loss has on Southern Hemisphere climate and the Brewer Dobson Circulation (BDC) using a fully coupled chemistry climate model, UM-UKCA. Two, 20 year time slice integrations were run, the first a reference year 2000 integration, and the second an identical integration in which heterogeneous chemistry on PSCs is suppressed. In the model, chlorine activation through reactions occurring on PSC particles results in a 70% decrease of vortex averaged ozone from October to November at 20km. This ozone loss leads to a large cooling of the lower stratosphere from mid September to late February, with a maximum cooling of 12K from November to December. Associated with the cooling is a decrease in geopotential height of greater than 500m over the polar cap, and a strengthening and poleward shift of the polar jet. The temperature, geopotential height and zonal wind changes are significant at the 95% confidence level, and all three propagate down to the surface in December. The surface temperature response is highly asymmetric; while much of the polar cap cools by more than 1K, the Antarctic Peninsula warms by approximately 0.5K. The change in the strength and position of the polar jet alters the propagation and breaking of planetary and gravity waves. This results in changes to the BDC, particularly increased downwelling over the polar cap during Southern Hemisphere spring and summer, measured using changes to the residual mean vertical velocity. Increased downwelling causes the middle and upper polar stratosphere to warm due to dynamical heating and increases ozone concentrations between 25 and 30km in DJF. Changes in the amplitude and phase of

  1. Polarized View of Supercooled Liquid Water Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Platnick, Steven E.; Arnold, G. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Supercooled liquid water (SLW) clouds, where liquid droplets exist at temperatures below 0 C present a well known aviation hazard through aircraft icing, in which SLW accretes on the airframe. SLW clouds are common over the Southern Ocean, and climate-induced changes in their occurrence is thought to constitute a strong cloud feedback on global climate. The two recent NASA field campaigns POlarimeter Definition EXperiment (PODEX, based in Palmdale, California, January-February 2013) and Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, based in Houston, Texas in August- September 2013) provided a unique opportunity to observe SLW clouds from the high-altitude airborne platform of NASA's ER-2 aircraft. We present an analysis of measurements made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) during these experiments accompanied by correlative retrievals from other sensors. The RSP measures both polarized and total reflectance in 9 spectral channels with wavelengths ranging from 410 to 2250 nm. It is a scanning sensor taking samples at 0.8deg intervals within 60deg from nadir in both forward and backward directions. This unique angular resolution allows for characterization of liquid water droplet size using the rainbow structure observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg. Simple parametric fitting algorithms applied to the polarized reflectance provide retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT),which allows retrieval of the droplet size distribution without assuming a size distribution shape. We present an overview of the RSP campaign datasets available from the NASA GISS website, as well as two detailed examples of the retrievals. In these case studies we focus on cloud fields with spatial features

  2. Possible effect of extreme solar energetic particle event of 20 January 2005 on polar stratospheric aerosols: direct observational evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova, I. A.; Usoskin, I. G.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Petelina, S. V.

    2011-05-01

    Energetic cosmic rays are the main source of ionization of the low-middle atmosphere, leading to associated changes in atmospheric properties. Via the hypothetical influence of ionization on aerosol growth and facilitated formation of cloud condensation nuclei, this may be an important indirect link relating solar variability to climate. This effect is highly debated, however, since the proposed theoretical mechanisms still remain illusive and qualitative, and observational evidence is inconclusive and controversial. Therefore, important questions regarding the existence and magnitude of the effect, and particularly the fraction of aerosol particles that can be formed and grow large enough to influence cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), are still open. Here we present empirical evidence of the possible effect caused by cosmic rays upon polar stratospheric aerosols, based on a case study of an extreme solar energetic particle (SEP) event of 20 January 2005. Using aerosol data obtained over polar regions from different satellites with optical instruments that were operating during January 2005, such as the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III), and Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS), we found a significant simultaneous change in aerosol properties in both the southern and northern polar regions in temporal association with the SEP event. We speculate that ionization of the atmosphere, which was abnormally high during this extreme SEP event, might have led to formation of new particles and/or growth of preexisting ultrafine particles up to the size of CCN. However, a detailed interpretation of the effect is left for subsequent studies. This is the first time high vertical resolution measurements have been used to provide evidence for the probable production of stratospheric CCN from cosmic ray induced ionization.

  3. The 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens - Physical and chemical processes in the stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Whitten, R. C.; Hamill, P.; Keesee, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    The large and diverse set of observational data collected in the high-altitude plumes of the May 18, May 25, and June 13, 1980 eruptions is organized and analyzed with a view to discerning the processes at work. The data serve to guide and constrain detailed model simulations of the volcanic clouds. For this purpose, use is made of a comprehensive one-dimensional model of stratospheric sulfate aerosols, sulfur precursor gases, and volcanic ash and dust. The model takes into account gas-phase and condensed-phase (heterogeneous) chemistry in the clouds, aerosol nucleation and growth, and cloud expansion. Computational results are presented for the time histories of the gaseous species concentrations, aerosol size distributions, and ash burdens of the eruption clouds. Also investigated are the long-term buildup of stratospheric aerosols in the Northern Hemisphere and the persistent effects of injected chlorine and water vapor on stratospheric ozone. It is concluded that SO2, water vapor, and ash were probably the most important substances injected into the stratosphere by the Mount St. Helens volcano, both with respect to their widespread effects on composition and their effect on climate.

  4. Stratospheric polar vortex splits and displacements in the high-top CMIP5 climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seviour, William J. M.; Gray, Lesley J.; Mitchell, Daniel M.

    2016-02-01

    Sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events can occur as either a split or a displacement of the stratospheric polar vortex. Recent observational studies have come to different conclusions about the relative impacts of these two types of SSW upon surface climate. A clearer understanding of their tropospheric impact would be beneficial for medium-range weather forecasts and could improve understanding of the physical mechanism for stratosphere-troposphere coupling. Here we perform the first multimodel comparison of stratospheric polar vortex splits and displacements, analyzing 13 stratosphere-resolving models from the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) ensemble. We find a wide range of biases among models in both the mean state of the vortex and the frequency of vortex splits and displacements, although these biases are closely related. Consistent with observational results, almost all models show vortex splits to occur barotropically throughout the depth of the stratosphere, while vortex displacements are more baroclinic. Vortex splits show a slightly stronger North Atlantic surface signal in the month following onset. However, the most significant difference in the surface response is that vortex displacements show stronger negative pressure anomalies over Siberia. This region is shown to be colocated with differences in tropopause height, suggestive of a localized response to lower stratospheric potential vorticity anomalies.

  5. Titan's Tropopause Temperatures from CIRS: Implications for Stratospheric Methane Cloud Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. M.; Samuelson, R.; Achterberg, R. K.; Barnes, J. W.; Flasar, F. M.

    2012-12-01

    Analysis of Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) far-IR spectra enable the construction of Titan's temperature profile in the altitude region containing the tropopause. Whereas the methane ν4 band at 1306 cm-1 (7.7 μm) is the primary opacity source for deducing thermal structure between 100 km and 500 km, N2-N2 collision-induced absorption between 70 and 140 cm-1 (143 μm and 71 μm) is utilized to determine temperatures at Titan's tropopause. Additional opacity due to aerosol and nitrile ices must also be taken into account in this part of the far-IR spectral region. The spectral characteristics of these particulate opacities have been deduced from CIRS limb data at 58°S, 15°S, 15°N, and 85°N. Empirically, the spectral shapes of these opacities appear to be independent of both latitude and altitude below 300 km (Anderson and Samuelson, 2011, Icarus 212, 762-778), justifying the extension of these spectral properties to all latitudes. We find that Titan's tropopause temperature is cooler than the HASI value of 70.5K by ~6K. This leads to the possibility that subsidence at high northern latitudes can cause methane condensation in the winter polar stratosphere. A search for methane clouds in this region is in progress.

  6. Titan's Tropopause Temperatures from CIRS: Implications for Stratospheric Methane Cloud Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, C. M.; Samuelson, R. E.; Achterberg, R. K.; Barnes, J. W.; Flasar, F. M.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) far-IR spectra enable the construction of Titan's temperature profile in the altitude region containing the tropopause. Whereas the methane V4 band at 1306/cm (7.7 microns) is the primary opacity source for deducing thermal structure between 100 km and 500 km, N2-N2 collision-induced absorption between 70 and 140/cm (143 microns and 71 microns) is utilized to determine temperatures at Titan's tropopause. Additional opacity due to aerosol and nitrile ices must also be taken into account in this part of the far-IR spectral region. The spectral characteristics of these particulate opacities have been deduced from CIRS limb data at 58degS, 15degS, 15degN, and 85degN. Empirically, the spectral shapes of these opacities appear to be independent of both latitude and altitude below 300 km (Anderson and Samuelson, 2011, Icarus 212, 762-778), justifying the extension of these spectral properties to all latitudes. We find that Titan's tropopause temperature is cooler than the HAS! value of 70.5K by approx. 6K. This leads to the possibility that subsidence at high northern latitudes can cause methane condensation in the winter polar stratosphere. A search for methane clouds in this region is in progress.

  7. The Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition - Prologue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard; Plumb, Alan; Condon, Estelle

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an introduction to the initial scientific results of the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE), as well as data from other atmospheric experiments and analyses carried out during the Arctic polar winter of 1989. Mission objectives of the AASE were to study the mechanisms of ozone depletion and redistribution in the northern polar stratosphere, including the influences of Arctic meteorology, and polar stratospheric clouds formed at low temperatures. Some major aspects of the AASE are described including: logistics and operations, meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, trace composition and chemistry, and ozone depletion. It is concluded that the Arctic-89 experiments have provided the scientific community with a wealth of new information that will contribute to a better understanding of the polar winter stratosphere and the critical problem of global ozone depletion.

  8. The sensitivity to polarization in stratospheric aerosol retrievals from limb scattered sunlight measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elash, B. J.; Bourassa, A. E.; Rieger, L. A.; Dueck, S. R.; Zawada, D. J.; Degenstein, D. A.

    2017-03-01

    Satellite measurements of limb scattered sunlight at visible and near infrared wavelengths have been used successfully for several years to retrieve the vertical profile of stratospheric aerosol extinction coefficient. The existing satellite measurements are of the total radiance, with very little knowledge or impact of the polarization state of the limb radiance. Recently proposed instrument concepts for stratospheric aerosol profiling have been designed to measure the linearly polarized radiance. Yet, to date, the impact of the polarized measurement on the retrievals has not been systematically studied. Here we use a fully spherical, multiple scattering radiative transfer model to perform a sensitivity study on the effects of the polarized measurement on stratospheric aerosol extinction retrievals through specific investigations of the aerosol signal fraction in polarized measurements, potential retrieval bias, and achievable precision. In this study,we simulate both total and linearly polarized measurements, for a wide range of limb viewing geometries that are encountered in typical low earth orbits and for various aerosol loading scenarios. The orientation of the linear polarization with respect to the horizon is also studied. Taking into account instrument signal to noise levels it is found that in general, the linear polarization can be used as effectively as the total radiance measurement, with consideration of instrument signal to noise capabilities; however the horizontal polarization is more promising in terms of signal magnitude.

  9. Airborne brightness temperature measurements of the polar winter troposphere as part of the Airborne Arctic Stratosphere Experiment 2 and the effect of brightness temperature variations on the diabatic heating in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.; Platnick, Steven; Kinne, Stefan; Pilewskie, Peter; Bucholtz, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we report radiometric measurements of tropospheric brightness temperatures obtained during the AASE 2 experiment. These measurements represent the first attempt to characterize effective radiative temperatures as seen from above the troposphere during the Arctic winter. The reported measurements include brightness temperatures at 6.7 and 10.5 microns as seen from the NASA DC-8 aircraft flying at about 11 km altitude. We also present radiative transfer calculations to estimate the effect of tropospheric brightness temperature on the lower stratospheric heating rates. Because of the recent massive eruption of the Pinatubo volcano, we also discuss the effects of a volcanic aerosol layer. It is concluded that small particles like the volcanic aerosol or polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) type 1 do not affect stratospheric heating rates by much; on the other hand, larger particles, PSCs types 2 and 3, may have significant effects on heating rates and consequently on dynamics of the lower stratosphere. The dynamical effects of local stratospheric temperature variations are briefly discussed.

  10. Stratospheric meteorological conditions in the Arctic polar vortex, 1991 to 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P.; Lait, L. R.; Schoeberl, M.; Nash, E. R.; Kelly, K.; Fahey, D. W.; Nagatani, R.; Toohey, D.; Avallone, L.; Anderson, J.

    1993-01-01

    Stratospheric meteorological conditions during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition II (AASE II) presented excellent observational opportunities from Bangor, Maine, because the polar vortex was located over southeastern Canada for significant periods during the 1991-1992 winter. Temperature analyses showed that nitric acid trihydrates (NAT temperatures below 195 K) should have formed over small regions in early December. The temperatures in the polar vortex warmed beyond NAT temperatures by late January (earlier than normal). Perturbed chemistry was found to be associated with these cold temperatures.

  11. Polar mesosphere and lower thermosphere dynamics: 2. Response to sudden stratospheric warmings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdy, Andrew J.; Vincent, Robert A.; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Igarashi, Kiyoshi; Murayama, Yasuhiro; Singer, Werner; Murphy, Damian J.; Riggin, D. M.

    2007-09-01

    The dynamical response of the polar mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) to sudden stratospheric warmings is investigated using MF radars at Davis (69°S, 78°E), Syowa (69°S, 40°E) and Rothera (68°S, 68°W) in the Antarctic and Poker Flat (65°N, 147°W) and Andenes (69°N, 16°E) in the Arctic. Mean winds, gravity waves and planetary waves are investigated during sudden stratospheric warmings, and comparisons are made with climatological means. The available MF radar data set includes six major sudden stratospheric warmings in the Northern Hemisphere and the unprecedented 2002 Southern Hemisphere major stratospheric warming. Three of the six northern events are relatively weak and could almost be classed as minor warmings, while the larger three have similar characteristics to the event in the Southern Hemisphere. Zonal wind reversals associated with the major warmings in both hemispheres are generally weaker and earlier by several days in the mesosphere than in the stratosphere. There are, however, significant differences between locations in their response to stratospheric warmings. The zonal winds are remarkably weaker than average during both winter and spring around the time of the southern major warming of 2002, but these effects are not observed for the Northern Hemisphere events. Gravity wave activity is found to vary significantly between individual stratospheric warming events and also between individual locations.

  12. Radiatively driven stratosphere-troposphere interactions near the tops of tropical cloud clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churchill, Dean D.; Houze, Robert A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of two numerical simulations of the mechanism involved in the dehydration of air, using the model of Churchill (1988) and Churchill and Houze (1990) which combines the water and ice physics parameterizations and IR and solar-radiation parameterization with a convective adjustment scheme in a kinematic nondynamic framework. One simulation, a cirrus cloud simulation, was to test the Danielsen (1982) hypothesis of a dehydration mechanism for the stratosphere; the other was to simulate the mesoscale updraft in order to test an alternative mechanism for 'freeze-drying' the air. The results show that the physical processes simulated in the mesoscale updraft differ from those in the thin-cirrus simulation. While in the thin-cirrus case, eddy fluxes occur in response to IR radiative destabilization, and, hence, no net transfer occurs between troposphere and stratosphere, the mesosphere updraft case has net upward mass transport into the lower stratosphere.

  13. QBO Influence on Polar Stratospheric Variability in the GEOS Chemistry-Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Oman, L. D.; Li, F.; Slong, I.-S.; Newman, P. A.; Nielsen, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation modulates the strength of both the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheric vortices. Model and observational studies have found that the phase and characteristics of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) contribute to the high degree of variability in the Arctic stratosphere in winter. While the Antarctic stratosphere is less variable, recent work has shown that Southern Hemisphere planetary wave driving increases in response to "warm pool" El Nino events that are coincident with the easterly phase of the QBO. These events hasten the breakup of the Antarctic polar vortex. The Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) chemistry-climate model (CCM) is now capable of generating a realistic QBO, due a new parameterization of gravity wave drag. In this presentation, we will use this new model capability to assess the influence of the QBO on polar stratospheric variability. Using simulations of the recent past, we will compare the modeled relationship between QBO phase and mid-winter vortex strength with the observed Holton-Tan relation, in both hemispheres. We will use simulations of the 21 St century to estimate future trends in the relationship between QBO phase and vortex strength. In addition, we will evaluate the combined influence of the QBO and El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on the timing of the breakup of the polar stratospheric vortices in the GEOS CCM. We will compare the influence of these two natural phenomena with trends in the vortex breakup associated with ozone recovery and increasing greenhouse gas concentrations.

  14. Toward a Better Quantitative Understanding of Polar Stratospheric Ozone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieler, K.; Rex, M.; Salawitch, R. J.; Canty, T.; Streibel, M.; Stimpfle, R. M.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Dorf, M.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Godin-Beekmann, S.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that observed large O3 loss rates in cold Arctic Januaries cannot be explained with current understanding of the loss processes, recommended reaction kinetics, and standard assumptions about total stratospheric chlorine and bromine. Studies based on data collected during recent field campaigns suggest faster rates of photolysis and thermal decomposition of ClOOCl and higher stratospheric bromine concentrations than previously assumed. We show that a model accounting for these kinetic changes and higher levels of BrO can largely resolve the January Arctic O3 loss problem and closely reproduces observed Arctic O3 loss while being consistent with observed levels of ClO and ClOOCl. The model also suggests that bromine catalyzed O3 loss is more important relative to chlorine catalyzed loss than previously thought.

  15. Rocket- and aircraft-borne trace gas measurements in the winter polar stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, F.; Moehler, O.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Ziereis, H.

    1988-01-01

    In January and February 1987 stratospheric rocket- and aircraft-borne trace gas measurements were done in the North Polar region using ACIMS (Active Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry) and PACIMS (PAssive Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry) instruments. The rocket was launched at ESRANGE (European Sounding Rocket Launching Range) (68 N, 21 E, Northern Sweden) and the twin-jet research aircraft operated by the DFVLR (Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchs-anstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt), and equipped with a mass spectrometer laboratory was stationed at Kiruna airport. Various stratospheric trace gases were measured including nitric acid, sulfuric acid, non-methane hydrocarbons (acetone, hydrogen cyanide, acetonitrile, methanol etc.), and ambient cluster ions. The experimental data is presented and possible implications for polar stratospheric ozone discussed.

  16. Exploring the Effects of Cloud Vertical Structure on Cloud Microphysical Retrievals based on Polarized Reflectances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. J.; Zhang, Z.; Platnick, S. E.; Ackerman, A. S.; Cornet, C.; Baum, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    A polarized cloud reflectance simulator was developed by coupling an LES cloud model with a polarized radiative transfer model to assess the capabilities of polarimetric cloud retrievals. With future remote sensing campaigns like NASA's Aerosols/Clouds/Ecosystems (ACE) planning to feature advanced polarimetric instruments it is important for the cloud remote sensing community to understand the retrievable information available and the related systematic/methodical limitations. The cloud retrieval simulator we have developed allows us to probe these important questions in a realistically relevant test bed. Our simulator utilizes a polarized adding-doubling radiative transfer model and an LES cloud field from a DHARMA simulation (Ackerman et al. 2004) with cloud properties based on the stratocumulus clouds observed during the DYCOMS-II field campaign. In this study we will focus on how the vertical structure of cloud microphysics can influence polarized cloud effective radius retrievals. Numerous previous studies have explored how retrievals based on total reflectance are affected by cloud vertical structure (Platnick 2000, Chang and Li 2002) but no such studies about the effects of vertical structure on polarized retrievals exist. Unlike the total cloud reflectance, which is predominantly multiply scattered light, the polarized reflectance is primarily the result of singly scattered photons. Thus the polarized reflectance is sensitive to only the uppermost region of the cloud (tau~<1) where photons can scatter once and still escape before being scattered again. This means that retrievals based on polarized reflectance have the potential to reveal behaviors specific to the cloud top. For example cloud top entrainment of dry air, a major influencer on the microphysical development of cloud droplets, can be potentially studied with polarimetric retrievals.

  17. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei in the stratosphere around the plume of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.F.; Hudson, J.G.; Kocmond, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei were made from small samples of stratospheric air taken from a U-2 aircraft at altitudes ranging from 13 to 19 kilometers. The measured concentrations of nuclei both in and outside the plume from the May and June 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens were higher than expected, ranging from about 100 to about 1000 per cubic centimeter active at 1 percent supersaturation.

  18. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei in the stratosphere around the plume of mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Rogers, C F; Hudson, J G; Kocmond, W C

    1981-02-20

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei were made from small samples of stratospheric air taken from a U-2 aircraft at altitudes ranging from 13 to 19 kilometers. The measured concentrations of nuclei both in and outside the plume from the May and June 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens were higher than expected, ranging from about 100 to about 1000 per cubic centimeter active at 1 percent supersaturation.

  19. Weakening of the Stratospheric Polar Vortex by Arctic Sea-Ice Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Baek-Min; Son, Seok-Woo; Min, Seung-Ki; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Joong; Zhang, Xiangdong; Shim, Taehyoun; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-09-02

    Successive cold winters of severely low temperatures in recent years have had critical social and economic impacts on the mid-latitude continents in the Northern Hemisphere. Although these cold winters are thought to be partly driven by dramatic losses of Arctic sea ice, the mechanism that links sea ice loss to cold winters remains a subject of debate. Here, by conducting observational analyses and model experiments, we show how Arctic sea ice loss and cold winters in extra-polar regions are dynamically connected through the polar stratosphere. We find that decreased sea ice cover during early winter months (November-December), especially over the Barents-Kara seas, enhance the upward propagation of planetary-scale waves with wavenumbers of 1 and 2, subsequently weakening the stratospheric polar vortex in mid-winter (January- February). The weakened polar vortex preferentially induces a negative phase of Arctic Oscillation at the surface, resulting in low temperatures in mid-latitudes.

  20. Dehydration of the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere by Subvisible Cirrus Clouds Near the Tropical Tropopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry B.

    1996-01-01

    The extreme dryness of the lower stratosphere is believed to be caused by freeze-drying of air as it enters the stratosphere through the cold tropical tropopause. Previous investigations have been focused on dehydration occurring at the tops of deep convective cloud systems, However, recent observations of a ubiquitous stratiform cirrus cloud layer near the tropical tropopause suggest the possibility of dehydration as air is slowly lifted by large-scale motions, In this study, we have evaluated this possibility using a detailed ice cloud model. Simulations of ice cloud formation in the temperature minima of gravity waves (wave periods of 1 - 2 hours) indicate that large numbers of ice crystals will likely form due to the low temperatures and rapid cooling. As a result, the crystals do not grow larger than about 10 microns, fallspeeds are no greater than a few cm/s, and little or no precipitation or dehydration occurs. However, ice cloud's formed by large-scale vertical motions (with lifetimes of a day or more) should have,fever crystals and more time for crystal sedimentation to occur, resulting in water vapor depletions as large as 1 ppmv near the tropopause. We suggest that gradual lifting near the tropical tropopause, accompanied by formation of thin cirrus, may account for the dehydration.

  1. What Controls the Arctic Lower Stratosphere Temperature?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The temperature of the Arctic lower stratosphere is critical for understanding polar ozone levels. As temperatures drop below about 195 K, polar stratospheric clouds form, which then convert HCl and ClONO2 into reactive forms that are catalysts for ozone loss reactions. Hence, the lower stratospheric temperature during the March period is a key parameter for understanding polar ozone losses. The temperature is basically understood to be a result of planetary waves which drive the polar temperature away from a cold "radiative equilibrium" state. This is demonstrated using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis calculations of the heat flux and the mean polar temperature. The temperature during the March period is fundamentally driven by the integrated impact of large scale waves moving from the troposphere to the stratosphere during the January through February period. We will further show that the recent cold years in the northern polar vortex are a result of this weakened wave driving of the stratosphere.

  2. Cloud cover determination in polar regions from satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, R. G.; Key, J. R.; Maslanik, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The principal objectives of this project are: (1) to develop suitable validation data sets to evaluate the effectiveness of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) operational algorithm for cloud retrieval in polar regions and to validate model simulations of polar cloud cover; (2) to identify limitations of current procedures for varying atmospheric surface conditions, and to explore potential means to remedy them using textural classifiers; and (3) to compare synoptic cloud data from a control run experiment of the GISS climate model II with typical observed synoptic cloud patterns.

  3. Increased polar stratospheric ozone losses and delayed eventual recovery owing to increasing greenhouse-gas concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindell, Drew T.; Rind, David; Lonergan, Patrick

    1998-04-01

    The chemical reactions responsible for stratospheric ozone depletion are extremely sensitive to temperature. Greenhouse gases warm the Earth's surface but cool the stratosphere radiatively and therefore affect ozone depletion. Here we investigate the interplay between projected future emissions of greenhouse gases and levels of ozone-depleting halogen species using a global climate model that incorporates simplified ozone-depletion chemistry. Temperature and wind changes induced by the increasing greenhouse-gas concentrations alter planetary-wave propagation in our model, reducing the frequency of sudden stratospheric warmings in the Northern Hemisphere. This results in a more stable Arctic polar vortex, with significantly colder temperatures in the lower stratosphere and concomitantly increased ozone depletion. Increased concentrations of greenhouse gases might therefore be at least partly responsible for the very large Arctic ozone losses observed in recent winters. Arctic losses reach a maximum in the decade 2010 to 2019 in our model, roughly a decade after the maximum in stratospheric chlorine abundance. The mean losses are about the same as those over the Antarctic during the early 1990s, with geographically localized losses of up to two-thirds of the Arctic ozone column in the worst years. The severity and the duration of the Antarctic ozone hole are also predicted to increase because of greenhouse-gas-induced stratospheric cooling over the coming decades.

  4. Microphysical and radiative changes in cirrus clouds by geoengineering the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirisan, A.; Spichtinger, P.; Luo, B. P.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Wernli, H.; Lohmann, U.; Peter, T.

    2013-05-01

    In the absence of tangible progress in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the implementation of solar radiation management has been suggested as measure to stop global warming. Here we investigate the impacts on northern midlatitude cirrus from continuous SO2emissions of 2-10 Mt/a in the tropical stratosphere. Transport of geoengineering aerosols into the troposphere was calculated along trajectories based on ERA Interim reanalyses using ozone concentrations to quantify the degree of mixing of stratospheric and tropospheric air termed "troposphericity". Modeled size distributions of the geoengineered H2SO4-H2O droplets have been fed into a cirrus box model with spectral microphysics. The geoengineering is predicted to cause changes in ice number density by up to 50%, depending on troposphericity and cooling rate. We estimate the resulting cloud radiative effects from a radiation transfer model. Complex interplay between the few large stratospheric and many small tropospheric H2SO4-H2O droplets gives rise to partly counteracting radiative effects: local increases in cloud radiative forcing up to +2 W/m2for low troposphericities and slow cooling rates, and decreases up to -7.5 W/m2for high troposphericities and fast cooling rates. The resulting mean impact on the northern midlatitudes by changes in cirrus is predicted to be low, namely <1% of the intended radiative forcing by the stratospheric aerosols. This suggests that stratospheric sulphate geoengineering is unlikely to have large microphysical effects on the mean cirrus radiative forcing. However, this study disregards feedbacks, such as temperature and humidity changes in the upper troposphere, which must be examined separately.

  5. Observations of denitrification and dehydration in the winter polar stratospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Kawa, S. R.; Tuck, A. F.; Loewenstein, M.

    1990-01-01

    It is argued that denitrification of the Arctic stratosphere can be explained by the selective growth and sedimentation of aerosol particles rich in nitric acid. Because reactive nitrogen species moderate the destruction of ozone by chlorine-catalyzed reactions by sequestering chlorine in reservoir species such as ClONO2, the possibility of the removal of reactive nitrogen without dehydration should be allowed for in attempts to model ozone depletion in the Arctic. Indeed, denitrification along with elevated concentrations of reactive chlorine observed in 1989 indicate that the Arctic was chemically primed for ozone destruction without an extended period of temperatures below the frost point, as is characteristic of the Antarctic.

  6. Denitrification mechanism of the polar winter stratosphere by major volcanic eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Bekki, S.

    1994-09-20

    The author presents results from a one dimensional model simulation of the absorption of HNO{sub 3} on sulfuric acid aerosol particles resulting from volcanic eruptions. Uptake of HNO{sub 3} on such droplets, followed by sedimentation of the aerosols may result in a net transfer of HNO{sub 3} to lower altitudes in the polar stratospheric winter. The effectiveness of this process is found to be strongly dependent upon the ambient temperature, and density of aerosol in the stratosphere. 25 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Troposphere-Stratosphere Dynamic Coupling Under Strong and Weak Polar Vortex Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, Judith; Graf, Hans-F.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropospheric and stratospheric wave-like anomalies of spherical zonal wave number (ZWN) 1 is studied by applying Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA). A lag-correlation technique is used with 10-day lowpass filtered daily time series of 50- and 500-hPa geopotential heights. Generally stratospheric circulation is determined by ultralong tropospheric planetary waves. During winter seasons characterized either by any anomalously strong or weak polar winter vortex different propagation characteristics for waves of ZWN 1 are observed. The non-linear perspective of the results have implications for medium range weather forecast and climate sensitivity experiments.

  8. In-Situ Measurements of Changes in Stratospheric Aerosol and the N2O - Aerosol Relationship inside and outside of the Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borrmann, S.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Wilson, J. C.; Jonsson, H. H.; Brock, C. A.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Ferry, G. V.; Barr, K. S.

    1993-01-01

    Two optical particle counters on the ER-2, together covering a particle size diameter range from 0.1 micrometers to 23 micrometers, were used to measure the aerosol bulk quantities integral number, aerosol surface and volume, as well as detailed size distributions inside and outside of the polar vortex in the lower stratosphere. While AASE I (Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition, (Dec. 1988 - Feb. 1989) was conducted in a period of relative volcanic quiescence, enhancements in aerosol number, surface and volume of factors around 10, 25 and 100 were observed during AASE II (Aug. 1991 - Mar. 1992) due to the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The changes in these bulk quantities as well as in the size distributions measured both outside and inside the the polar vortex are presented and compared with those obtained in polar stratospheric cloud events (AASE I). Except for a shift towards larger aerosol mixing ratios the general shape of correlograms between the measured N2O and particle mixing ratios remain similar before and after the eruption. Similar correlograms are used to interpret data from vertical profiles inside and outside of the polar vortex.

  9. In-situ measurements of changes in stratospheric aerosol and the N2O-aerosol relationship inside and outside of the polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borrmann, S.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Wilson, J. C.; Jonsson, H. H.; Brock, C. A.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Ferry, G. V.; Barr, K. S.

    1993-01-01

    Two optical particle counters on the ER-2, together covering a particle size diameter range from 0.1 microns to 23 microns, were used to measure the aerosol bulk quantities integral number, aerosol surface and volume, as well as detailed size distributions inside and outside of the polar vortex in the lower stratosphere. While AAES I (Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition, (Dec. 88 - Feb. 89) was conducted in a period of relative volcanic quiescence, enhancements in aerosol number, surface and volume of factors around 10, 25 and 100 were observed during AASE 2 (Aug. 91 - Mar. 92) due to the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The changes in these bulk quantities as well as in the size distributions measured both outside and inside the polar vortex are presented and compared with those obtained in polar stratospheric cloud events (AASE I). Except for a shift towards larger aerosol mixing ratios the general shape of correlograms between the measured N2O and particle mixing ratios remain similar before and after the eruption. Similar correlograms are used to interpret data from vertical profiles inside and outside of the polar vortex.

  10. Asymmetries in ozone depressions between the polar stratospheres following a solar proton event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.; Heath, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    Ozone depletions in the polar stratosphere during the energetic solar proton event on 4 August 1972 were observed by the backscattered ultraviolet (BUV) experiments on the Nimbus 4 satellite. The observed ozone contents, the ozone depressions and their temporal variations above the 4 mb level exhibited distinct asymmetries between the northern and southern hemispheres. Since the ozone destroying solar particles precipitate rather symmetrically into the two polar atmospheres, due to the geomagnetic dipole field, it is suggested that these asymmetries may be explained in terms of the differences in dynamics between the summer and the winter polar atmospheres. In the summer (northern) hemisphere, the stratospheric and mesospheric ozone depletion and recovery are smooth functions of time due to the preponderance of undistributed orderly flow in this region. On the other hand, the temporal variation of the upper stratospheric ozone in the winter polar atmosphere (southern hemisphere) exhibits large amplitude irregularities. These characteristic differences between the two polar atmospheres are also evident in the vertical distributions of temperatures and winds observed by balloons and rocket soundings.

  11. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  12. Stochastic Radiative Transfer in Polar Mixed Phase Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, J.; Veron, D. E.

    2004-12-01

    According to recent research, mixed phase clouds comprise one third of the overall annual cloud cover in the Arctic region. These clouds contain distinct regions of liquid water and ice, which have a different impact on radiation than single-phase clouds. Despite the prevalence of mixed phase clouds in the polar regions, many modern atmospheric general circulation models use single-phase clouds in their radiation routines. A stochastic approach to representating the transfer of shortwave radiation through a cloud layer where the distribution of the ice and liquid is governed by observed statistics is being assessed. Data from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) program and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's North Slopes of Alaska Cloud and Radiation Testbed site will be used to determine the characteristic features of the cloud field and to evaluate the performance of this statistical model.

  13. Detecting Super-Thin Clouds With Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Wenbo; Videen, Gorden; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel method for detecting cloud particles in the atmosphere. Solar radiation backscattered from clouds is studied with both satellite data and a radiative transfer model. A distinct feature is found in the angle of linear polarization of solar radiation that is backscattered from clouds. The dominant backscattered electric field from the clear-sky Earth-atmosphere system is nearly parallel to the Earth surface. However, when clouds are present, this electric field can rotate significantly away from the parallel direction. Model results demonstrate that this polarization feature can be used to detect super-thin cirrus clouds having an optical depth of only 0.06 and super-thin liquid water clouds having an optical depth of only 0.01. Such clouds are too thin to be sensed using any current passive satellite instruments.

  14. Detecting Super-Thin Clouds with Polarized Sunlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Wenbo; Videen, Gorden; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel method for detecting cloud particles in the atmosphere. Solar radiation backscattered from clouds is studied with both satellite data and a radiative transfer model. A distinct feature is found in the angle of linear polarization of solar radiation that is backscattered from clouds. The dominant backscattered electric field from the clear-sky Earth-atmosphere system is nearly parallel to the Earth surface. However, when clouds are present, this electric field can rotate significantly away from the parallel direction. Model results demonstrate that this polarization feature can be used to detect super-thin cirrus clouds having an optical depth of only 0.06 and super-thin liquid water clouds having an optical depth of only 0.01. Such clouds are too thin to be sensed using any current passive satellite instruments.

  15. Early evolution of a stratospheric volcanic eruption cloud as observed with TOMS and AVHRR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, D.J.; Rose, William I.; Coke, L.R.; Bluth, G.J.S.; Sprod, I.E.; Krueger, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is a detailed study of remote sensing data from the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) and the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) satellite detectors, of the 1982 eruption of El Chichón, Mexico. The volcanic cloud/atmosphere interactions in the first four days of this eruption were investigated by combining ultraviolet retrievals to estimate the mass of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic cloud [Krueger et al., 1995] with thermal infrared retrievals of the size, optical depth, and mass of fine-grained (1–10 μm radius) volcanic ash [Wen and Rose, 1994]. Our study provides the first direct evidence of gravitational separation of ash from a stratospheric, gas-rich, plinian eruption column and documents the marked differences in residence times of volcanic ash and sulfur dioxide in volcanic clouds. The eruption column reached as high as 32 km [Carey and Sigurdsson, 1986] and was injected into an atmosphere with a strong wind shear, which allowed for an observation of the separation of sulfur dioxide and volcanic ash. The upper, more sulfur dioxide-rich part of the cloud was transported to the west in the stratosphere, while the fine-grained ash traveled to the south in the troposphere. The mass of sulfur dioxide released was estimated at 7.1 × 109 kg with the mass decreasing by approximately 4% 1 day after the peak. The mass of fine-grained volcanic ash detected was estimated at 6.5 × 109 kg, amounting to about 0.7% of the estimated mass of the ash which fell out in the mapped ash blanket close to the volcano. Over the following days, 98% of this remaining fine ash was removed from the volcanic cloud, and the effective radius of ash in the volcanic cloud decreased from about 8 μm to about 4 μm.

  16. Cloud cover determination in polar regions from satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, R. G.; Key, J. R.; Maslanik, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The principal objectives of this project are: to develop suitable validation data sets to evaluate the effectiveness of the ISCCP operational algorithm for cloud retrieval in polar regions and to validate model simulations of polar cloud cover; to identify limitations of current procedures for varying atmospheric surface conditions, and to explore potential means to remedy them using textural classifiers: and to compare synoptic cloud data from a control run experiment of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model 2 with typical observed synoptic cloud patterns. Current investigations underway are listed and the progress made to date is summarized.

  17. Replicator for characterization of cirrus and polar stratospheric cloud particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, John; Purcell, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    A formvar replicator for installation in an aircraft pod has been designed, built, and flight tested on the NASA DC-8. The system incorporates a deicing capability (which can be pressure activated) to enable climb out through icing situations prior to deployment. The system can be operated at preselected speeds such that data can be recorded over a period of one to ten hours on 200 ft of 16mm film. A x2 speed control can be used during flight. Capability exists for detection of chemical constituents by appropriate doping of the formvar solution. An article entitled 'Measurements of ice particles in tropical cirrus anvils: importance in radiation balance' is attached as appendix A.

  18. Replicator for characterization of cirrus and polar stratospheric cloud particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, John; Purcell, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    A formvar replicator for installation in an aircraft pod has been designed, built, and flight tested on the NASA DC-8. The system incorporates a deicing capability (which can be pressure activated) to enable climb out through icing situations prior to deployment. The system can be operated at preselected speeds such that data can be recorded over a period of 1 to ten hours on 200 ft of 16mm film. A x2 speed control can be used during flight. Capability exists for detection of chemical constituents by appropriate doping of formvar solution.

  19. Evidence for a polar ethane cloud on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, C.A.; Penteado, P.; Rannou, P.; Brown, R.; Boudon, V.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.; Drossart, P.; Buratti, B.; Nicholson, P.; McKay, C.P.; Coustenis, A.; Negrao, A.; Jaumann, R.

    2006-01-01

    Spectra from Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer reveal the presence of a vast tropospheric cloud on Titan at latitudes 51?? to 68?? north and all longitudes observed (10?? to 190?? west). The derived characteristics indicate that this cloud is composed of ethane and forms as a result of stratospheric subsidence and the particularly cool conditions near the moon's north pole. Preferential condensation of ethane, perhaps as ice, at Titan's poles during the winters may partially explain the lack of liquid ethane oceans on Titan's surface at middle and lower latitudes.

  20. Tropical tropopause water isotopes in a GCM: Sensitivity to cloud processes and stratosphere-troposphere exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, G. A.; Hoffmann, G.; Hu, Y.

    2004-05-01

    Water isotopes ratios (δ 18O, δ D) are very sensitive tracers of the history of the water in the atmosphere. For example, depletion of heavy isotopes in convective plumes can be extreme and thus isotope ratios can be used to discriminate between upwelled and in-situ condensation. We present results with state-of-the-art GCMs that include water isotopes in every aspect of the modelled water cycle, including the relatively sophisticated prognostic cloud water scheme. These models also have reasonable representations of the stratospheric circulation and so can be used to look at the processes involved in stratosphere-troposphere exchange. We demonstrate that the models show a similar range of variability near the tropical tropopause to that seen in recent data, and that the zonal mean values are less depleted than a simple Rayleigh distillation column would suggest. Importantly, we show that the isotopes can be sensitive to uncertain details of the cloud parameterizations and thus may help in improving and validating cloud schemes in models.

  1. Lidar observations of the El Chichon cloud in the stratosphere over Fukuoka

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujiwara, M.; Shibata, T.; Hirono, M.

    1985-01-01

    A volcanic cloud in the stratosphere, originating from the March to April 1982 eruptions of El Chichon, has been observed for about 2.5 years at Fukuoka (33.5 degrees N, 130.4 degrees E) with two wavelengths of Nd-YAG lidar, 1.06 and 0.53 microns. Time and height variabilities of the cloud are described, using the 1.06 microns data, and some results of the two-wavelength measurements are presented. A sudden enormous increase in the total aerosol backscattering from the stratosphere (backscattering coefficient for 1.06 microns integrated over 13.5 to 28.5 km range) was followed by a decrease from late spring to summer with large fluctuations. The cloud initially appeared stratified into two layers: the upper one with fine structure and sharp edges in the easterly wind region and the lower dumpy one in the westerly wind region. Most of the aerosols were contained in the upper layer. The two layers merged into a broad, single-peaked layer as the easterly prevailed in the whole region in fall, when the total aerosol backscattering began to increase. The layer then decreased its peak height as it broadened. The difference in shape of both layers and the increase of total backscattering from fall can be interpreted by the difference in velocity of material transport in the easterly and the westerly wind region.

  2. On connections between the stratospheric polar vortex and sea ice in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukovich, J. V.; Barber, D. G.

    2009-12-01

    The unprecedented decline in sea ice extent and thickness in the Arctic in the early part of the 21st century establishes conditions conducive to increased communication between oceanic, sea-ice and atmospheric phenomena. In this study we explore the correspondence between stratospheric dynamic variability in winter and changes in sea ice in the Arctic. Investigated in particular are anomalies and trends in Eliassen-Palm flux components in the northern hemisphere to determine changes in upward wave propagation in response to an accelerated decline in Arctic ice cover in the early part of the 21st century. Connections between the strength and position of the polar vortex and changes in sea ice extent, concentration, and motion are examined in the context of sudden stratospheric warmings and vortex splitting and displacement events. Relative vorticity is used to study the permeability of the polar vortex in response to storm activity in the Arctic with reduced ice cover. Initial results from this analysis suggest a decline in upward wave propagation in winter and an increase in upward wave propagation in fall in recent decades. Spatial coincidence is observed between composites of surface winds for years associated with vortex displacement events and record lows in ice extent. The implications of a poleward increase in cyclonic activity from 70 °N - 80 °N during spring and summer for seasonal variations in the stratospheric polar vortex are also examined.

  3. Polar Processes in a 50-year Simulation of Stratospheric Chemistry and Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S.R.; Douglass, A. R.; Patrick, L. C.; Allen, D. R.; Randall, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    The unique chemical, dynamical, and microphysical processes that occur in the winter polar lower stratosphere are expected to interact strongly with changing climate and trace gas abundances. Significant changes in ozone have been observed and prediction of future ozone and climate interactions depends on modeling these processes successfully. We have conducted an off-line model simulation of the stratosphere for trace gas conditions representative of 1975-2025 using meteorology from the NASA finite-volume general circulation model. The objective of this simulation is to examine the sensitivity of stratospheric ozone and chemical change to varying meteorology and trace gas inputs. This presentation will examine the dependence of ozone and related processes in polar regions on the climatological and trace gas changes in the model. The model past performance is base-lined against available observations, and a future ozone recovery scenario is forecast. Overall the model ozone simulation is quite realistic, but initial analysis of the detailed evolution of some observable processes suggests systematic shortcomings in our description of the polar chemical rates and/or mechanisms. Model sensitivities, strengths, and weaknesses will be discussed with implications for uncertainty and confidence in coupled climate chemistry predictions.

  4. A case study of formation and maintenance of a lower stratospheric cirrus cloud over the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhya, M.; Sridharan, S.; Indira Devi, M.; Niranjan, K.; Jayaraman, A.

    2015-05-01

    A rare occurrence of stratospheric cirrus at 18.6 km height persisting for about 5 days during 3-7 March 2014 is inferred from the ground-based Mie lidar observations over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E) and spaceborne observations. Due to the vertical transport by large updrafts on 3 March in the troposphere, triggered by a potential vorticity intrusion, the water vapour mixing ratio shows an increase around the height of 18.6 km. Relative humidity with respect to ice is ~ 150%, indicating that the cirrus cloud may be formed though homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid. The cirrus cloud persists due to the cold anomaly associated with the presence of a 4-day wave.

  5. Retrievals of Aerosol and Cloud Particle Microphysics Using Polarization and Depolarization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The recent availability of theoretical techniques for computing single and multiple scattering of light by realistic polydispersions of spherical and nonspherical particles and the strong dependence of the Stokes scattering matrix on particle size, shape, and refractive index make polarization and depolarization measurements a powerful particle characterization tool. In this presentation I will describe recent applications of photopolarimetric and lidar depolarization measurements to remote sensing characterization of tropospheric aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), and contrails. The talk will include (1) a short theoretical overview of the effects of particle microphysics on particle single-scattering characteristics; (2) the use of multi-angle multi-spectral photopolarimetry to retrieve the optical thickness, size distribution, refractive index, and number concentration of tropospheric aerosols over the ocean surface; and (3) the application of the T-matrix method to constraining the PSC and contrail particle microphysics using multi-spectral measurements of lidar backscatter and depolarization.

  6. Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) Observed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on Aura

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Shettle, Eric P.; Levelt, Pieternel F.; Kowalewski, Matthew G.

    2010-01-01

    Backscattered ultraviolet (BUV) instruments designed for measuring stratospheric ozone profiles have proven to be robust tools for observing polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs). These measurements are available for more than 30 years, and have been used to demonstrate the existence of long-term variations in PMC occurrence frequency and brightness. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the EOS Aura satellite provides new and improved capabilities for PMC characterization. OMI uses smaller pixels than previous BUV instruments, which increases its ability to identify PMCs and discern more spatial structure, and its wide cross-track viewing swath provides full polar coverage up to 90 latitude every day in both hemispheres. This cross-track coverage allows the evolution of PMC regions to be followed over several consecutive orbits. Localized PMC variations determined from OMI measurements are consistent with coincident SBUV/2 measurements. Nine seasons of PMC observations from OMI are now available, and clearly demonstrate the advantages of these measurements for PMC analysis.

  7. On the age of stratospheric air and ozone depletion potentials in polar regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, W. H.; Heidt, L. E.; Lueb, R. A.; Vedder, J. F.; Mills, M. J.; Solomon, S.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the nearly inert, man-made chlorofluorocarbon CFC-115 obtained during January 1989 are used to infer the age of air in the lower stratosphere. These observations together with estimated release rates suggest an average age of high-latitude air at pressure altitudes near 17-21 km of about 3 to 5 yr. This information is used together with direct measurements of HCFC-22, HCFC-142b, CH3Br, H-1301, H-1211, and H-2402 to examine the fractional dissociation of these species within the Arctic polar lower stratosphere compared to that of CFC-11 and hence to estimate their local ozone depletion potentials in this region. It is shown that these HCFCs are much less efficiently dissociated within the stratosphere than CFC-11, lowering their ozone depletion potentials to only about 30-40 percent of their chlorine loading potentials. In contrast, the observations of CH3Br and the Halons considered confirm that they are rapidly dissociated within the stratosphere, with important implications for their ozone depletion potentials.

  8. Intra-seasonal variability of extreme boreal stratospheric polar vortex events and their precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Durán, Adelaida; Serrano, Encarna; Ayarzagüena, Blanca; Abalos, Marta; de la Cámara, Alvaro

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical variability of the boreal stratospheric polar vortex has been usually analysed considering the extended winter as a whole or only focusing on December, January and February. Yet recent studies have found intra-seasonal differences in the boreal stratospheric dynamics. In this study, the intra-seasonal variability of anomalous wave activity preceding polar vortex extremes in the Northern Hemisphere is examined using ERA-Interim reanalysis data. Weak (WPV) and strong (SPV) polar vortex events are grouped into early, mid- or late winter sub-periods depending on the onset date. Overall, the strongest (weakest) wave-activity anomalies preceding polar vortex extremes are found in mid- (early) winter. Most of WPV (SPV) events in early winter occur under the influence of east (west) phase of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) and an enhancement (inhibition) of wavenumber-1 wave activity (WN1). Mid- and late winter WPV events are preceded by a strong vortex and an enhancement of WN1 and WN2, but the spatial structure of the anomalous wave activity and the phase of the QBO are different. Prior to mid-winter WPVs the enhancement of WN2 is related to the predominance of La Niña and linked to blockings over Siberia. Mid-winter SPV events show a negative phase of the Pacific-North America pattern that inhibits WN1 injected into the stratosphere. This study suggests that dynamical features preceding extreme polar vortex events in mid-winter should not be generalized to other winter sub-periods.

  9. A two micron polarization survey toward dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamura, M.; Sato, S.; Gatley, I.; Hough, J. H.

    1989-01-01

    A near infrared (2.2 micron) polarization survey of about 190 sources was conducted toward nearby dark clouds. The sample includes both background field stars and embedded young stellar objects. The aim is to determine the magnetic field structure in the densest regions of the dark clouds and study the role of magnetic fields in various phases of star formation processes, and to study the grain alignment efficiency in the dark cloud cores. From the polarization of background field stars and intrinsically unpolarized embedded sources, the magnetic field structure was determined in these clouds. From the intrinsic polarization of young stellar objects, the spatial distribution was determined of circumstellar dust around young stars. Combining the perpendicularity between the disks and magnetic fields with perpendicularity between the cloud elongation and magnetic fields, it is concluded that the magnetic fields might have dominated nearly all aspects of cloud dynamics, from the initial collapse of the clouds right through to the formation of disks/tori around young stars in these low to intermediate mass star forming clouds of the Taurus, Ophiuchus, and Perseus.

  10. Laboratory studies of stratospheric aerosol chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    1996-01-01

    In this report we summarize the results of the two sets of projects funded by the NASA grant NAG2-632, namely investigations of various thermodynamic and nucleation properties of the aqueous acid system which makes up stratospheric aerosols, and measurements of reaction probabilities directly on ice aerosols with sizes corresponding to those of polar stratospheric cloud particles. The results of these investigations are of importance for the assessment of the potential stratospheric effects of future fleets of supersonic aircraft. In particular, the results permit to better estimate the effects of increased amounts of water vapor and nitric acid (which forms from nitrogen oxides) on polar stratospheric clouds and on the chemistry induced by these clouds.

  11. Cloud cover determination in polar regions from satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, R. G.; Key, J.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives are to develop a suitable validation data set for evaluating the effectiveness of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) algorithm for cloud retrieval in polar regions, to identify limitations of current procedures and to explore potential means to remedy them using textural classifiers, and to compare synoptic cloud data from model runs with observations. Toward the first goal, a polar data set consisting of visible, thermal, and passive microwave data was developed. The AVHRR and SMMR data were digitally merged to a polar stereographic projection with an effective pixel size of 5 sq km. With this data set, two unconventional methods of classifying the imagery for the analysis of polar clouds and surfaces were examined: one based on fuzzy sets theory and another based on a trained neural network. An algorithm for cloud detection was developed from an early test version of the ISCCP algorithm. This algorithm includes the identification of surface types with passive microwave, then temporal tests at each pixel location in the cloud detection phase. Cloud maps and clear sky radiance composites for 5 day periods are produced. Algorithm testing and validation was done with both actural AVHRR/SMMR data, and simulated imagery. From this point in the algorithm, groups of cloud pixels are examined for their spectral and textural characteristics, and a procedure is developed for the analysis of cloud patterns utilizing albedo, IR temperature, and texture. In a completion of earlier work, empirical analyses of arctic cloud cover were explored through manual interpretations of DMSP imagery and compared to U.S. Air Force 3D-nephanalysis. Comparisons of observed cloudiness from existing climatologies to patterns computed by the GISS climate model were also made.

  12. Weakening of the stratospheric polar vortex by Arctic sea-ice loss.

    PubMed

    Kim, Baek-Min; Son, Seok-Woo; Min, Seung-Ki; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Joong; Zhang, Xiangdong; Shim, Taehyoun; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-09-02

    Successive cold winters of severely low temperatures in recent years have had critical social and economic impacts on the mid-latitude continents in the Northern Hemisphere. Although these cold winters are thought to be partly driven by dramatic losses of Arctic sea-ice, the mechanism that links sea-ice loss to cold winters remains a subject of debate. Here, by conducting observational analyses and model experiments, we show how Arctic sea-ice loss and cold winters in extra-polar regions are dynamically connected through the polar stratosphere. We find that decreased sea-ice cover during early winter months (November-December), especially over the Barents-Kara seas, enhances the upward propagation of planetary-scale waves with wavenumbers of 1 and 2, subsequently weakening the stratospheric polar vortex in mid-winter (January-February). The weakened polar vortex preferentially induces a negative phase of Arctic Oscillation at the surface, resulting in low temperatures in mid-latitudes.

  13. What Controls the Arctic Lower Stratosphere Temperature?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The temperature of the Arctic lower stratosphere is critical for understanding polar ozone levels. As temperatures drop below about 195 K, polar stratospheric clouds form, which then convert HCl and ClONO2 into reactive forms that are catalysts for ozone loss reactions. Hence, the lower stratospheric temperature during the March period is a key parameter for understanding polar ozone losses. The temperature is basically understood to be a result of planetary waves which drive the polar temperature away from a cold "radiative equilibrium" state. This is demonstrated using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis calculations of the heat flux and the mean polar temperature. The temperature during the March period is fundamentally driven by the integrated impact of large scale waves moving from the troposphere to the stratosphere during the January through February period.

  14. The Three-Dimensional Structure of Breaking Rossby Waves in the Polar Wintertime Stratosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polvani, L. M.; Saravanan, R.

    2000-11-01

    The three-dimensional nature of breaking Rossby waves in the polar wintertime stratosphere is studied using an idealized global primitive equation model. The model is initialized with a well-formed polar vortex, characterized by a latitudinal band of steep potential vorticity (PV) gradients. Planetary-scale Rossby waves are generated by varying the topography of the bottom boundary, corresponding to undulations of the tropopause. Such topographically forced Rossby waves then propagate up the edge of the vortex, and their amplification with height leads to irreversible wave breaking.These numerical experiments highlight several nonlinear aspects of stratospheric dynamics that are beyond the reach of both isentropic two-dimensional models and fully realistic GCM simulations. They also show that the polar vortex is contorted by the breaking Rossby waves in a surprisingly wide range of shapes.With zonal wavenumber-1 forcing, wave breaking usually initiates as a deep helical tongue of PV that is extruded from the polar vortex. This tongue is often observed to roll up into deep isolated columns, which, in turn, may be stretched and tilted by horizontal and vertical shears. The wave amplitude directly controls the depth of the wave breaking region and the amount of vortex erosion. At large forcing amplitudes, the wave breaking in the middle/lower portions of the vortex destroys the PV gradients essential for vertical propagation, thus shielding the top of the vortex from further wave breaking.The initial vertical structure of the polar vortex is shown to play an important role in determining the characteristics of the wave breaking. Perhaps surprisingly, initially steeper PV gradients allow for stronger vertical wave propagation and thus lead to stronger erosion. Vertical wind shear has the notable effect of tilting and stretching PV structures, and thus dramatically accelerating the downscale stirring. An initial decrease in vortex area with increasing height (i.e., a

  15. Lower stratospheric temperature differences between meteorological analyses in two cold Arctic winters and their impact on polar processing studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manney, Gloria L.; Sabutis, Joseph L.; Pawson, Steven; Santee, Michelle L.; Naujokat, Barbara; Swinbank, Richard; Gelman, Melvyn E.; Ebisuzaki, Wesley

    2003-03-01

    A quantitative comparison of six meteorological analyses is presented for the cold 1999/2000 and 1995/1996 Arctic winters. Using different analyzed data sets to obtain temperatures and temperature histories can have significant consequences. The area with temperatures below a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation threshold commonly varies by ˜25% between the analyses, with some differences over 50%. Biases between analyses vary from year to year; in January 2000, Met Office analyses were coldest and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) analyses were warmest, while NCEP analyses were usually coldest in 1995/1996 and NCEP/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis (REAN) were usually warmest. Freie Universität Berlin analyses are often colder than others at T ≲ 205 K. European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) temperatures agreed better with other analyses in 1999/2000, after improvements in the assimilation system, than in 1995/1996. Temperature history case studies show substantial differences using Met Office, NCEP, REAN, ECMWF, and NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO) analyses. In January 2000 (when a large cold region was centered in the polar vortex), all analyses gave qualitatively similar results. However, in February 2000 (a much warmer period) and in January and February 1996 (comparably cold to January 2000 but with the cold region near the polar vortex edge), distributions of "potential PSC lifetimes" and total time spent below a PSC formation threshold varied significantly between the analyses. Largest peaks in "PSC lifetime" distributions in January 2000 were at 4-6 and 11-14 days, while in 1996 they were at 1-3 days. Different meteorological conditions in comparably cold winters have a large impact on expectations for PSC formation and on the effects of discrepancies between different meteorological analyses. Met Office, NCEP, REAN, ECMWF, and DAO analyses are commonly used in modeling polar processes

  16. CLOUD AND HAZE IN THE WINTER POLAR REGION OF TITAN OBSERVED WITH VISUAL AND INFRARED MAPPING SPECTROMETER ON BOARD CASSINI

    SciTech Connect

    Rannou, P.; Le Mouelic, S.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R. H.

    2012-03-20

    A large cloud in the north polar region of Titan was first observed by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) in 2005 and then in 2006. This cloud, confined beyond the latitude 62 Degree-Sign N, is surrounded by a mixture of aerosol and mist probably lying in the low stratosphere and troposphere. Subsequent images of this region of Titan show a gradual vanishing of this cloud which was reported previously. In this paper, we characterize the physical properties of this cloud, haze, and mist as well as their time evolutions. We note several details on the images such as a secondary cloud above the main cloud and latitudes beyond 70 Degree-Sign N. We also show that the cloud disappearance leaves the polar region poorly loaded in aerosols, yielding an annular zone of aerosols between 50 Degree-Sign N and 65 Degree-Sign N. Our analysis suggests that this structure observed by VIMS in the near-IR is an annular structure observed by ISS on board Voyager one Titan year ago in 1980.

  17. Effects of stratospheric aerosols and thin cirrus clouds on the atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery: simulations.

    PubMed

    Gordon, H R; Zhang, T; He, F; Ding, K

    1997-01-20

    Using simulations, we determine the influence of stratospheric aerosol and thin cirrus clouds on the performance of the proposed atmospheric correction algorithm for the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data over the oceans. Further, we investigate the possibility of using the radiance exiting the top of the atmosphere in the 1.38-microm water vapor absorption band to remove their effects prior to application of the algorithm. The computations suggest that for moderate optical thicknesses in the stratosphere, i.e., tau(s) < or approximately 0.15, the stratospheric aerosol-cirrus cloud contamination does not seriously degrade the MODIS except for the combination of large (approximately 60 degrees) solar zenith angles and large (approximately 45 degrees) viewing angles, for which multiple-scattering effects can be expected to be particularly severe. The performance of a hierarchy of stratospheric aerosol/cirrus cloud removal procedures for employing the 1.38-microm water vapor absorption band to correct for stratospheric aerosol/cirrus clouds, ranging from simply subtracting the reflectance at 1.38 microm from that in the visible bands, to assuming that their optical properties are known and carrying out multiple-scattering computations of their effect by the use of the 1.38-microm reflectance-derived concentration, are studied for stratospheric aerosol optical thicknesses at 865 nm as large as 0.15 and for cirrus cloud optical thicknesses at 865 nm as large as 1.0. Typically, those procedures requiring the most knowledge concerning the aerosol optical properties (and also the most complex) performed the best; however, for tau(s) < or approximately 0.15, their performance is usually not significantly better than that found by applying the simplest correction procedure. A semiempirical algorithm is presented that permits accurate correction for thin cirrus clouds with tau(s) as large as unity when an accurate estimate of the cirrus cloud

  18. Lessened response of boreal winter stratospheric polar vortex to El Niño in recent decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinggao; Li, Tim; Xu, Haiming; Yang, Shuangyan

    2016-09-01

    The decadal change of El Niño teleconnection and the corresponding response of the boreal winter stratospheric polar vortex are investigated through the composite analysis of El Niño events during the two periods 1958-78 and 1979-2015. It is found that, during the period 1958-78, El Niño generates an anomalous Aleutian low in the mid troposphere extending from northeastern Eurasia to the northeastern Pacific with the most significant center in the northwestern Pacific. The anomalous Aleutian low results in a marked increase in planetary wavenumber 1 but a weak decrease in wavenumber 2 from the upper troposphere to lower stratosphere. The Eliassen-Palm (EP) flux of planetary waves converges at the high latitudes in the stratosphere and brings about a significantly weakened polar vortex. In contrast, during the period 1979-2015, the wintertime El Niño-related Aleutian low shifts eastward into the northeastern Pacific. This variation in tropospheric El Niño teleconnection leads to a dramatic decrease in planetary wavenumber 2 but a relatively weak increase in wavenumber 1. Furthermore, the magnitude of the decrease of wavenumber-2 EP flux is comparable to the increase of wavenumber-1 EP flux in the stratosphere. Consequently, the stratospheric response lessens dramatically, showing a less disturbed and slightly enhanced polar vortex. The lessened stratospheric response is quite obvious in the stratosphere below 10 hPa regardless of the long-term trend being removed or not, indicating a dominant role of El Niño in the wintertime variability of lower polar stratosphere.

  19. Dissipation of Titans north polar cloud at northern spring equinox

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Le, Mouelic S.; Rannou, P.; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, C.; Griffith, C.A.; Le, Corre L.; Barnes, J.W.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.; Tobie, G.

    2012-01-01

    Saturns Moon Titan has a thick atmosphere with a meteorological cycle. We report on the evolution of the giant cloud system covering its north pole using observations acquired by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft. A radiative transfer model in spherical geometry shows that the clouds are found at an altitude between 30 and 65 km. We also show that the polar cloud system vanished progressively as Titan approached equinox in August 2009, revealing at optical wavelengths the underlying sea known as Kraken Mare. This decrease of activity suggests that the north-polar downwelling has begun to shut off. Such a scenario is compared with the Titan global circulation model of Rannou et al. (2006), which predicts a decrease of cloud coverage in northern latitudes at the same period of time. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sensitivity of Polar Stratospheric Ozone Loss to Uncertainties in Chemical Reaction Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. Randolph; Stolarksi, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Several recent observational and laboratory studies of processes involved in polar stratospheric ozone loss have prompted a reexamination of aspects of our understanding for this key indicator of global change. To a large extent, our confidence in understanding and projecting changes in polar and global ozone is based on our ability to simulate these processes in numerical models of chemistry and transport. The fidelity of the models is assessed in comparison with a wide range of observations. These models depend on laboratory-measured kinetic reaction rates and photolysis cross sections to simulate molecular interactions. A typical stratospheric chemistry mechanism has on the order of 50- 100 species undergoing over a hundred intermolecular reactions and several tens of photolysis reactions. The rates of all of these reactions are subject to uncertainty, some substantial. Given the complexity of the models, however, it is difficult to quantify uncertainties in many aspects of system. In this study we use a simple box-model scenario for Antarctic ozone to estimate the uncertainty in loss attributable to known reaction kinetic uncertainties. Following the method of earlier work, rates and uncertainties from the latest laboratory evaluations are applied in random combinations. We determine the key reactions and rates contributing the largest potential errors and compare the results to observations to evaluate which combinations are consistent with atmospheric data. Implications for our theoretical and practical understanding of polar ozone loss will be assessed.

  1. Occurrence of ozone laminae near the boundary of the stratospheric polar vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, S.J.; Vaughan, G. ); Kyro, E. )

    1993-05-20

    The authors report on observations of laminae in ozone distributions observed at high northern latitudes near the polar vortex. Regions of enhanced and depleted ozone density are observed. Data from ozonesonde collections and lidar measurements during the Airborne Arctic Stratosphere Expedition (AASE) are analyzed, and compared with earlier work. The ozonesonde archives of the World Meteorological Organization are also examined in this analysis. The laminae are observed to distribute differently as a function of season, and with the potential temperature. Transport of ozone equatorward is also found with a class of these laminae.

  2. Optical imaging of cloud-to-stratosphere/mesosphere lightning over the Amazon Basin (CS/LAB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, Davis D.; Wescott, Eugene M.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the CS/LAB project was to obtain images of cloud to stratosphere lightning discharges from aboard NASA's DC-8 Airborne Laboratory while flying in the vicinity of thunderstorms over the Amazon Basin. We devised a low light level imaging package as an add-on experiment to an airborne Laboratory deployment to South America during May-June, 1993. We were not successful in obtaining the desired images during the South American deployment. However, in a follow up flight over the American Midwest during the night of July 8-9, 1993 we recorded nineteen examples of the events over intense thunderstorms. From the observations were estimated absolute brightness, terminal altitudes, flash duration, horizontal extents, emission volumes, and frequencies relative to negative and positive ground strokes.

  3. Magnetic Field Structure in Molecular Clouds by Polarization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. P.; Su, B. H.; Eswaraiah, C.; Pandey, A. K.; Wang, C. W.; Lai, S. P.; Tamura, M.; Sato, S.

    2015-03-01

    We report on a program to delineate magnetic field structure inside molecular clouds by optical and infrared polarization observations. An ordered magnetic field inside a dense cloud may efficiently align the spinning dust grains to cause a detectable level of optical and near-infrared polarization of otherwise unpolarized background starlight due to dichroic extinction. The near-infrared polarization data were taken by SIRPOL mounted on IRSF in SAAO. Here we present the SIRPOL results in RCW 57, for which the magnetic field is oriented along the cloud filaments, and in Carina Nebula, for which no intrinsic polarization is detected in the turbulent environment. We further describe TRIPOL, a compact and efficient polarimer to acquire polarized images simultaneously at g', r', and i' bands, which is recently developed at Nagoya University for adaption to small-aperture telescopes. We show how optical observations probe the translucent outer parts of a cloud, and when combining with infrared observations probing the dense parts, and with millimeter and submillimeter observations to sutdy the central embedded protostar, if there is one, would yield the magnetic field structure on different length scales in the star-formation process.

  4. Atmospheric Polarization Imaging with Variable Aerosols and Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-10

    to a cloud;  Measurements made at the Mauna Loa Observatory (a mountaintop observatory in Hawaii) confirmed previous studies by Coulson and...on work supported by this grant: 1. Mr. Andrew Dahlberg – All-sky polarization imager deployment at Mauna Loa Observatory , Hawaii – M.S. Thesis...the Mauna Loa Observatory on the island of Hawaii (Dahlberg et al. 2009). The Atmospheric Polarization Imager (API) System The API instrument

  5. On the connection between stratospheric water vapour changes and widespread severe denitrification in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosrawi, Farahnaz; Urban, Jo; Lossow, Stefan; Stiller, Gabi; Murtagh, Donal

    2013-04-01

    Water vapour is one of the most important greenhouse gases and plays a key role in the chemistry of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). Any changes in atmospheric water vapour bring important implications for the global climate. Long-term ground-based and satellite measurements indicate an increase of stratospheric water vapour abundance by an average of 1 ppmv during the last 30 years (1980-2010). Increases in stratospheric water vapour cool the stratosphere but warm the troposphere. Both the cooling of the stratosphere and the increase in water vapour enhance the potential for the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. More than a decade ago it already was suggested that a cooling of stratospheric temperatures by 1 K or an increase of 1 ppmv of stratospheric water vapor could promote denitrification, the permanent removal of nitrogen species from the stratosphere by solid polar stratospheric cloud particles. In fact, during the two recent Arctic winter 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 the strongest denitrification in the recent decade was measured by Odin/SMR. In the latter winter denitrification lead also to severe ozone depletion with similar extensions as the Antarctic "ozone hole". In this study, the correlation between observed water vapour trends and the recent temperature evolution in the Arctic together with trace gas measurements and PSC observations are considered to investigate a possible connection between the increase in stratospheric water vapour and polar stratospheric cloud formation/denitrification.

  6. Theoretical Studies of Polar Stratospheric Clouds and the Background Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the work done with funding from NASA Grant NAGW 3525 during 1995. The grant was initiated in March, 1992 and has a planned duration of three years. This report covers the time period March 1995 to Present. In this report I present a short description of the projects carried out and documentation of the work done in terms of papers presented, etc.

  7. Toward autonomous surface-based infrared remote sensing of polar clouds: cloud-height retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Penny M.; Cox, Christopher J.; Walden, Von P.

    2016-08-01

    Polar regions are characterized by their remoteness, making measurements challenging, but an improved knowledge of clouds and radiation is necessary to understand polar climate change. Infrared radiance spectrometers can operate continuously from the surface and have low power requirements relative to active sensors. Here we explore the feasibility of retrieving cloud height with an infrared spectrometer that would be designed for use in remote polar locations. Using a wide variety of simulated spectra of mixed-phase polar clouds at varying instrument resolutions, retrieval accuracy is explored using the CO2 slicing/sorting and the minimum local emissivity variance (MLEV) methods. In the absence of imposed errors and for clouds with optical depths greater than ˜ 0.3, cloud-height retrievals from simulated spectra using CO2 slicing/sorting and MLEV are found to have roughly equivalent high accuracies: at an instrument resolution of 0.5 cm-1, mean biases are found to be ˜ 0.2 km for clouds with bases below 2 and -0.2 km for higher clouds. Accuracy is found to decrease with coarsening resolution and become worse overall for MLEV than for CO2 slicing/sorting; however, the two methods have differing sensitivity to different sources of error, suggesting an approach that combines them. For expected errors in the atmospheric state as well as both instrument noise and bias of 0.2 mW/(m2 sr cm-1), at a resolution of 4 cm-1, average retrieval errors are found to be less than ˜ 0.5 km for cloud bases within 1 km of the surface, increasing to ˜ 1.5 km at 4 km. This sensitivity indicates that a portable, surface-based infrared radiance spectrometer could provide an important complement in remote locations to satellite-based measurements, for which retrievals of low-level cloud are challenging.

  8. Polar Ozone Workshop. Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the proceedings of the Polar Ozone Workshop held in Snowmass, CO, on May 9 to 13, 1988 are given. Topics covered include ozone depletion, ozonometry, polar meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, remote sensing of trace gases, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical simulations.

  9. Seasonal transitions and possible polar mesospheric cloud regions calculated by a zonally averaged model of the middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memmesheimer, M.; Gaertner, V.; Blum, P. W.

    1986-12-01

    A global, zonally averaged dynamical model of the middle atmosphere is used to calculate the seasonal variations of winds and temperature from 10 to 110 km. The main purpose of the study is to search for the existence of regions where noctilucent or polar mesospheric clouds (NLC/PMC) may be formed. For this purpose the difference between the actual temperature and the frost point is calculated based on a fixed water vapor mixing ratio. A value of 10 ppmV is chosen, which is in the upper range of the data obtained by different measurement techniques. Possible cloud existence regions (PCR) are defined by the condition that the actual temperature is below the frost point inside the PCR. It is found that this is the case for the summer polar mesopause during May-August (in the northern hemisphere) and November-February (in the southern hemisphere). The PCR extends from the pole to approximately 60° latitude at a height of about 85 km. In addition, in the lower stratosphere during winter the temperature also falls below the frost point, approximately at an altitude where stratospheric clouds are observed. The time-dependent behaviour of the PCR is investigated and compared with the data of the ultraviolet spectrometer on board the SME satellite and with ground-based observations of noctilucent clouds. It can be shown that the time of the NLC/PMC season is in good agreement with the time span covered by the estimated possible cloud region. The fast changes in atmospheric circulation and temperatures at mesospheric heights during late spring/early summer and late summer/beginning of autumn are an interesting fact. This may be responsible for the sudden start/end of the cloud season. The study shows that two dimensional modeling may be a good approach to get more insight into the development of large-scale atmospheric background conditions necessary for PMC/NLC formation.

  10. Polarization of far-infrared radiation from molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, G.; Gonatas, D. P.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Platt, S. R.; Dragovan, M.

    1989-01-01

    The paper reports measurements of the polarization of far-infrared emission from dust in nine molecular clouds. Detections were obtained in Mon R2, in the Kleinmann-Low (KL) nebula in Orion, and in Sgr A. Upper limits were set for six other clouds. A comparison of the 100 micron polarization of KL with that previously measured at 270 microns provides new evidence that the polarization is due to emission from magnetically aligned dust grains. Comparing the results for Orion with measurements at optical wavelengths, it is inferred that the magnetic field direction in the outer parts of the Orion cloud is the same as that in the dense core. This direction is nearly perpendicular to the ridge of molecular emission and is parallel to both the molecular outflow in KL and the axis of rotation of the cloud core. In Mon R2, the field direction which the measurements imply does not agree withthat derived from 0.9-2.2 micron polarimetry. The discrepancy is attributed to scattering in the near-infrared. In Orion and Sgr A, where comparisons are possible, the measurements are in good agreement with 10 micron polarization measurements.

  11. Polarization Lidar Liquid Cloud Detection Algorithm for Winter Mountain Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie

    1992-01-01

    We have collected an extensive polarization lidar dataset from elevated sites in the Tushar Mountains of Utah in support of winter storm cloud seeding research and experiments. Our truck-mounted ruby lidar collected zenith, dual-polarization lidar data through a roof window equipped with a wiper system to prevent snowfall accumulation. Lidar returns were collected at a rate of one shot every 1 to 5 min during declared storm periods over the 1985 and 1987 mid-Jan. to mid-Mar. Field seasons. The mid-barrier remote sensor field site was located at 2.57 km MSL. Of chief interest to weather modification efforts are the heights of supercooled liquid water (SLW) clouds, which must be known to assess their 'seedability' (i.e., temperature and height suitability for artificially increasing snowfall). We are currently re-examining out entire dataset to determine the climatological properties of SLW clouds in winter storms using an autonomous computer algorithm.

  12. On the growth of nitric and sulfuric acid aerosol particles under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.

    1988-01-01

    A theory for the formation of frozen aerosol particles in the Antarctic stratosphere was developed and applied to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The theory suggests that the condensed ice particles are composed primarily of nitric acid and water, with small admixtures of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in solid solution. The proposed particle formation mechanism is in agreement with the magnitude and seasonal behavior of the optical extinction observed in the winter polar stratosphere.

  13. The impact of volcanic aerosol on the Northern Hemisphere stratospheric polar vortex: mechanisms and sensitivity to forcing structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, M.; Krüger, K.; Bittner, M.; Timmreck, C.; Schmidt, H.

    2014-06-01

    Observations and simple theoretical arguments suggest that the Northern Hemisphere (NH) stratospheric polar vortex is stronger in winters following major volcanic eruptions. However, recent studies show that climate models forced by prescribed volcanic aerosol fields fail to reproduce this effect. We investigate the impact of volcanic aerosol forcing on stratospheric dynamics, including the strength of the NH polar vortex, in ensemble simulations with the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model. The model is forced by four different prescribed forcing sets representing the radiative properties of stratospheric aerosol following the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo: two forcing sets are based on observations, and are commonly used in climate model simulations, and two forcing sets are constructed based on coupled aerosol-climate model simulations. For all forcings, we find that temperature and zonal wind anomalies in the NH high latitudes are not directly impacted by anomalous volcanic aerosol heating. Instead, high latitude effects result from robust enhancements in stratospheric residual circulation, which in turn result, at least in part, from enhanced stratospheric wave activity. High latitude effects are therefore much less robust than would be expected if they were the direct result of aerosol heating. While there is significant ensemble variability in the high latitude response to each aerosol forcing set, the mean response is sensitive to the forcing set used. Significant differences, for example, are found in the NH polar stratosphere temperature and zonal wind response to two different forcing data sets constructed from different versions of SAGE II aerosol observations. Significant strengthening of the polar vortex, in rough agreement with the expected response, is achieved only using aerosol forcing extracted from prior coupled aerosol-climate model simulations. Differences in the dynamical response to the different forcing sets used imply that reproducing

  14. Cloud cover determination in polar regions from satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, R. G.; Maslanik, J. A.; Key, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    A definition is undertaken of the spectral and spatial characteristics of clouds and surface conditions in the polar regions, and to the creation of calibrated, geometrically correct data sets suitable for quantitative analysis. Ways are explored in which this information can be applied to cloud classifications as new methods or as extensions to existing classification schemes. A methodology is developed that uses automated techniques to merge Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) data, and to apply first-order calibration and zenith angle corrections to the AVHRR imagery. Cloud cover and surface types are manually interpreted, and manual methods are used to define relatively pure training areas to describe the textural and multispectral characteristics of clouds over several surface conditions. The effects of viewing angle and bidirectional reflectance differences are studied for several classes, and the effectiveness of some key components of existing classification schemes is tested.

  15. Cloud Coverage and Height Distribution from the GLAS Polar Orbiting Lidar: Comparison to Passive Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhime, J. D.; Palm, S. P.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Mahesh, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) began full on orbit operations in September 2003. A main application of the two-wavelength GLAS lidar is highly accurate detection and profiling of global cloud cover. Initial analysis indicates that cloud and aerosol layers are consistently detected on a global basis to cross-sections down to 10(exp -6) per meter. Images of the lidar data dramatically and accurately show the vertical structure of cloud and aerosol to the limit of signal attenuation. The GLAS lidar has made the most accurate measurement of global cloud coverage and height to date. In addition to the calibrated lidar signal, GLAS data products include multi level boundaries and optical depth of all transmissive layers. Processing includes a multi-variable separation of cloud and aerosol layers. An initial application of the data results is to compare monthly cloud means from several months of GLAS observations in 2003 to existing cloud climatologies from other satellite measurement. In some cases direct comparison to passive cloud retrievals is possible. A limitation of the lidar measurements is nadir only sampling. However monthly means exhibit reasonably good global statistics and coverage results, at other than polar regions, compare well with other measurements but show significant differences in height distribution. For polar regions where passive cloud retrievals are problematic and where orbit track density is greatest, the GLAS results are particularly an advance in cloud cover information. Direct comparison to MODIS retrievals show a better than 90% agreement in cloud detection for daytime, but less than 60% at night. Height retrievals are in much less agreement. GLAS is a part of the NASA EOS project and data products are thus openly available to the science community (see http://glo.gsfc.nasa.gov).

  16. Composite analysis of the temporal development of waves in the polar MLT region during stratospheric warmings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthias, Vivien; Hoffmann, Peter; Rapp, Markus; Baumgarten, Gerd

    2012-12-01

    During winter the wind field in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) at middle and polar latitudes is characterized by a strong variability due to enhanced planetary wave activity and related stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) events. Such events are considered as distinct vertical coupling processes influencing the atmosphere below and above the stratosphere. In the last 12 years, an enhanced number of SSW, compared to the period from 1989 to 1998, has been observed in the northern hemisphere. Every SSW is connected with different effects in the MLT (strength and temporal development of wind reversals, temperature changes, wave activity, longitudinal dependence). To characterize the average behavior of the mesospheric response to strong SSWs, we combine high-resolution wind measurements from MF- and meteor radar at Andenes (69°N, 16°E) with global temperature observations from MLS aboard the Aura satellite for SSW events with a return to the middle atmosphere normal winter condition afterwards. Our aim is to identify characteristic wave patterns which are common to the majority of these events and to define the average characteristics of the SSW-related wave activity in the MLT. These will be compared to the relatively quiet winter 2011 with only a short minor warming without a wind reversal and to the wave activity in 2009 and 2010. The results show clear signatures of enhanced mesospheric planetary wave activity before and during the SSW and an earlier onset of the short term wind reversal in the mesosphere compared to wind and temperature changes in the stratosphere. The strong eastward winds at altitudes below 80 km after SSW are connected with an enhanced gravity wave activity caused by changed filter conditions. This provides evidence for a strong modulation of semidiurnal tidal amplitudes before and during SSW by planetary waves. However, no clear relation has been found in the temporal development of tides relative to the onset of the selected SSW

  17. Stratospheric denitrification due to polar aerosol formation: Implications for a future atmosphere with increased CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitari, Giovanni; Ricciardulli, Lucrezia

    The amount of stratospheric denitrification produced by NAT aerosol formation is studied with a photochemical two-dimensional model which includes the effects of zonal asymmetries of the temperature field. The model photochemistry is coupled with a microphysical code for aerosol formation and growth, so that the permanent loss of stratospheric nitric acid and water vapor may be taken into account. The model results for nitric acid relative to the atmospheric chemical composition of 1980 are compared with LIMS data. We show that the level of denitrification may rise substantially if the polar vortex cools down, as it could be the case in a future atmosphere richer in carbon dioxide. A three-dimensional model is used to calculate the temperature perturbation due to an increase of CO2 from 335 ppmv of 1980 (baseline) up to 500 ppmv (predicted for 2050). The photochemical model adopting these new temperatures predicts an average 20% HNO3 column decrease poleward of 45N with respect to baseline. One consequence is that the relative weight of the NOx catalytic cycle for O3 destruction decreases with respect to the present atmosphere.

  18. Exploring ISEE-3 magnetic cloud polarities with electron heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Crooker, N. U.; Gosling, J. T.

    1999-06-01

    We have used solar wind electron heat fluxes to determine the magnetic polarities of the interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF) during the ISEE-3 observations in 1978-1982. That period included 14 magnetic clouds (MCs) identified by Zhang and Burlaga. The MCs have been modeled as single magnetic flux ropes, and it is generally assumed that they are magnetically closed structures with each end of the flux rope connected to the Sun. The flux rope model is valid only if the magnetic polarity of each MC does not change during the passage of ISEE-3 through the MC. We test this model with the heat flux data, using the dominant heat flux in bidirectional electron heat fluxes to determine the MC polarities. The polarity changes within at least 2, and possibly 6, of the 14 MCs, meaning that those MCs can not fit the model of a single flux rope.

  19. A comparison of Arctic lower stratospheric winter temperatures for 1988-89 with temperatures since 1964

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagatani, Ronald M.; Miller, Alvin J.; Gelman, Melvyn E.; Newman, Paul A.

    1990-01-01

    Lower stratospheric temperatures during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition are compared with temperatures available since January, 1964. January, 1989, was the coldest averaged January in the last 26 years at high latitude, lower stratospheric levels. There have been other months with temperatures almost as low as the level of January, 1989, and localized temperatures (e.g., minimum polar vortex temperatures) have been lower than that encountered in January 1989. February, 1989, was warmer than average and March, 1989, had some of the highest polar vortex temperatures in the last 26 years. Conditions were therefore not very favorable for Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) formation into early spring.

  20. Sensitivity of Polar Stratospheric Ozone Loss to Uncertainties in Chemical Reaction Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. Randolph; Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Several recent observational and laboratory studies of processes involved in polar stratospheric ozone loss have prompted a reexamination of aspect of out understanding for this key indicator of global change. To a large extent, our confidence in understanding and projecting changes in polar and global ozone is based on our ability to to simulate these process in numerical models of chemistry and transport. These models depend on laboratory-measured kinetic reaction rates and photlysis cross section to simulate molecular interactions. In this study we use a simple box-model scenario for Antarctic ozone to estimate the uncertainty in loss attributable to known reaction kinetic uncertainties. Following the method of earlier work, rates and uncertainties from the latest laboratory evaluation are applied in random combinations. We determine the key reaction and rates contributing the largest potential errors and compare the results to observations to evaluate which combinations are consistent with atmospheric data. Implications for our theoretical and practical understanding of polar ozone loss will be assessed.

  1. Titan's Stratospheric Aerosols and Condensate Clouds as Observed with Cassini CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kok, Remco; Irwin, P. G.; Teanby, N. A.; Samuelson, R. E.; Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Fletcher, L.; Howett, C.; Calcutt, S. B.; Bowles, N. E.; Flasar, F. M.; Taylor, F. W.; Cassini/CIRS Team

    2006-09-01

    Four broad spectral features were identified in far-infrared limb spectra from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). The features are broader than the spectral resolution, which suggests that they are caused by particulates in Titan's stratosphere. We derive here the spectral properties and variations with altitude and latitude for these four features. Titan's main aerosol is called Haze 0 here. It is present at all wavenumbers in the far-infrared and is found to have a fractional scale height between 1.6-1.7 with a small increase in opacity in the north. A second feature around 140 cm-1 (Haze A) has similar spatial properties to Haze 0, but has a smaller fractional scale height of 1.2-1.3. Both Haze 0 and Haze A show an increase in abundance below 100 km, perhaps indicative of a scattering cloud. Two other features (Haze B around 220 cm-1 and Haze C around 190 cm-1) have a large maximum in their density profiles at 140 km and 90 km respectively. Haze B is much more abundant in the northern hemisphere compared to the southern hemisphere. Haze C also shows a large increase towards the north, but then disappears at 85oN. This work is supported by the Prins Bernhard Cultuurfond and Pieter Beijer Fonds.

  2. The impact of volcanic aerosol on the Northern Hemisphere stratospheric polar vortex: mechanisms and sensitivity to forcing structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, M.; Krüger, K.; Bittner, M.; Timmreck, C.; Schmidt, H.

    2014-12-01

    Observations and simple theoretical arguments suggest that the Northern Hemisphere (NH) stratospheric polar vortex is stronger in winters following major volcanic eruptions. However, recent studies show that climate models forced by prescribed volcanic aerosol fields fail to reproduce this effect. We investigate the impact of volcanic aerosol forcing on stratospheric dynamics, including the strength of the NH polar vortex, in ensemble simulations with the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model. The model is forced by four different prescribed forcing sets representing the radiative properties of stratospheric aerosol following the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo: two forcing sets are based on observations, and are commonly used in climate model simulations, and two forcing sets are constructed based on coupled aerosol-climate model simulations. For all forcings, we find that simulated temperature and zonal wind anomalies in the NH high latitudes are not directly impacted by anomalous volcanic aerosol heating. Instead, high-latitude effects result from enhancements in stratospheric residual circulation, which in turn result, at least in part, from enhanced stratospheric wave activity. High-latitude effects are therefore much less robust than would be expected if they were the direct result of aerosol heating. Both observation-based forcing sets result in insignificant changes in vortex strength. For the model-based forcing sets, the vortex response is found to be sensitive to the structure of the forcing, with one forcing set leading to significant strengthening of the polar vortex in rough agreement with observation-based expectations. Differences in the dynamical response to the forcing sets imply that reproducing the polar vortex responses to past eruptions, or predicting the response to future eruptions, depends on accurate representation of the space-time structure of the volcanic aerosol forcing.

  3. Variability of water vapour in the Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thölix, L.; Backman, L.; Kivi, R.; Karpechko, A.

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluates the stratospheric water vapour distribution and variability in the Arctic. A FinROSE chemistry climate model simulation covering years 1990-2013 is compared to observations (satellite and frostpoint hygrometer soundings) and the sources of stratospheric water vapour are studied. According to observations and the simulations the water vapour concentration in the Arctic stratosphere started to increase after year 2006, but around 2011 the concentration started to decrease. Model calculations suggest that the increase in water vapour during 2006-2011 (at 56 hPa) is mostly explained by transport related processes, while the photochemically produced water vapour plays a relatively smaller role. The water vapour trend in the stratosphere may have contributed to increased ICE PSC occurrence. The increase of water vapour in the precense of the low winter temperatures in the Arctic stratosphere led to more frequent occurrence of ICE PSCs in the Arctic vortex. The polar vortex was unusually cold in early 2010 and allowed large scale formation of the polar stratospheric clouds. The cold pool in the stratosphere over the Northern polar latitudes was large and stable and a large scale persistent dehydration was observed. Polar stratospheric ice clouds and dehydration were observed at Sodankylä with accurate water vapour soundings in January and February 2010 during the LAPBIAT atmospheric sounding campaign. The observed changes in water vapour were reproduced by the model. Both the observed and simulated decrease of the water vapour in the dehydration layer was up to 1.5 ppm.

  4. A Lidar and Backscatter Sonde Aerosol Measurement Campaign at Table Mountain During February-March 1997: Observations of Stratospheric Background Aerosols and Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyerle, G.; Gross, M.; Haner, D.; Kjome, N.; McDermid, I.; McGee, T.; Rosen, J.; Schafer, H. J.; Schrems, O.

    1999-01-01

    Altitude profiles of backscater ratio of the stratospheric background aerosol layer at altitudes between 15 and 25 km and high-altitude cirrus clouds at altitudes below 13 km are analyzed and discussed. Cirrus clouds were present on 16 of the 26 campaign nights.

  5. Observational constraints on the tropospheric and near-surface winter signature of the Northern Hemisphere stratospheric polar vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Hans-F.; Zanchettin, Davide; Timmreck, Claudia; Bittner, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    A composite analysis of Northern Hemisphere's mid-winter tropospheric anomalies under the conditions of strong and weak stratospheric polar vortex was performed on NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data from 1948 to 2013 considering, as additional grouping criteria, the coincidental states of major seasonally relevant climate phenomena, such as El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Quasi Biennial Oscillation and strong volcanic eruptions. The analysis reveals that samples of strong polar vortex nearly exclusively occur during cold ENSO states, while a weak polar vortex is observed for both cold and warm ENSO. The strongest tropospheric and near-surface anomalies are found for warm ENSO and weak polar vortex conditions, suggesting that internal tropospheric circulation anomalies related to warm ENSO constructively superpose on dynamical effects from the stratosphere. Additionally, substantial differences are found between the continental winter warming patterns under strong polar vortex conditions in volcanically-disturbed and volcanically-undisturbed winters. However, the small-size samples obtained from the multi-compositing prevent conclusive statements about typical patterns, dominating effects and mechanisms of stratosphere-troposphere interaction on the seasonal time scale based on observational/reanalysis data alone. Hence, our analysis demonstrates that patterns derived from observational/reanalysis time series need to be taken with caution as they not always provide sufficiently robust constraints to the inferred mechanisms implicated with stratospheric polar vortex variability and its tropospheric and near-surface signature. Notwithstanding this argument, we propose a limited set of mechanisms that together may explain a relevant part of observed climate variability. These may serve to define future numerical model experiments minimizing the sample biases and, thus, improving process understanding.

  6. Analysis of isentropic potential vorticities for the relationship between stratospheric polar vortex and the cooling process in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.

    2015-12-01

    We analyze the relationships between stratospheric polar vortex anomalies and cooling events in eastern China using isentropic reanalysis data from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Daily mean data from 2000 to 2011 are used to explore the effective stratospheric signals. First, diagnoses of the 2009/2010 winter show that after the stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) of the Atlantic-East Asian (AEA) pattern, the stratospheric high isentropic potential vorticity(IPV) center derived from the split polar vortex will move to the northeast of the Eurasian continent. The air mass, accompanied by some southward and eastward movements and characterized by high IPV values, will be stretched vertically, leading to apparent reinforcements of the positive vorticity and the development of a cold vortex system in the troposphere. The northerly wind on the western side of the cold vortex can transport cold air southward and downward, resulting in this distinct cooling process in eastern China. Secondly, the Empirical Orthogonal Function analyses of IPV anomalies on the 430 K isentropic surface during 2000-2011 winters indicate that the IPV distribution and time series of the first mode are able to represent the polar vortex variation features, which significantly influence cold-air activity in eastern China, especially in the AEA-type SSW winter. When the time series increases significantly, the polar vortex will be split and the high-IPV center will move to the northeast of the Eurasian continent with downward and southward developments, inducing obvious cooling in eastern China. Moreover, all the four times SSW events of AEA pattern from 2000 to 2011 are reflected in the first time series, and after the strong polar vortex disturbances, cooling processes of different intensities are observed in eastern China. The cooling can sustain at least one week. For this reason the first time series can be used as an available index of polar vortex oscillation and has

  7. Lower Stratospheric Temperature Differences Between Meteorological Analyses in two cold Arctic Winters and their Impact on Polar Processing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, Gloria L.; Sabutis, Joseph L.; Pawson, Steven; Santee, Michelle L.; Naujokat, Barbara; Swinbank, Richard; Gelman, Melvyn E.; Ebisuzaki, Wesley; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A quantitative intercomparison of six meteorological analyses is presented for the cold 1999-2000 and 1995-1996 Arctic winters. The impacts of using different analyzed temperatures in calculations of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation potential, and of different winds in idealized trajectory-based temperature histories, are substantial. The area with temperatures below a PSC formation threshold commonly varies by approximately 25% among the analyses, with differences of over 50% at some times/locations. Freie University at Berlin analyses are often colder than others at T is less than or approximately 205 K. Biases between analyses vary from year to year; in January 2000. U.K. Met Office analyses were coldest and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) analyses warmest. while NCEP analyses were usually coldest in 1995-1996 and Met Office or NCEP[National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis (REAN) warmest. European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) temperatures agreed better with other analyses in 1999-2000, after improvements in the assimilation model. than in 1995-1996. Case-studies of temperature histories show substantial differences using Met Office, NCEP, REAN and NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO) analyses. In January 2000 (when a large cold region was centered in the polar vortex), qualitatively similar results were obtained for all analyses. However, in February 2000 (a much warmer period) and in January and February 1996 (comparably cold to January 2000 but with large cold regions near the polar vortex edge), distributions of "potential PSC lifetimes" and total time spent below a PSC formation threshold varied significantly among the analyses. Largest peaks in "PSC lifetime" distributions in January 2000 were at 4-6 and 11-14 days. while in the 1996 periods, they were at 1-3 days. Thus different meteorological conditions in comparably cold winters had a large impact on expectations for PSC formation and on the

  8. Spring polar ozone behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding of the springtime behavior of polar stratospheric ozone as of mid 1990 is summarized. Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds as hypothesis for ozone loss are considered and a simplified description of the behavior of Antarctic ozone in winter and spring is given. Evidence that the situation is more complicated than described by the theory is produced. Many unresolved scientific issues remain and some of the most important problems are identified. Ozone changes each spring since 1979 have clearly established for the first time that man made chlorine compounds influence stratospheric ozone. Long before important advances in satellite and in situ investigations, it was Dobson's decision to place a total ozone measuring spectrometer at Halley Bay in Antarctica during the International Geophysical Year and subsequent continuous monitoring which led to the discovery that ozone was being destroyed each spring by chlorine processed by polar stratospheric clouds.

  9. Stratospheric Cooling and Arctic Ozone Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriquez, Jose M.

    1998-01-01

    We present sensitivity studies using the AER( box model for an idealized parcel in the lower stratosphere at 70 N during winter/spring with different assumed stratospheric coolings and chlorine loadings. Our calculations show that stratospheric cooling could further deplete ozone via increased polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and retard its expected recovery even with the projected chlorine loading decrease. We introduce the concept of chlorine-cooling equivalent and show that a 1 K cooling could provide the same local ozone depletion as an increase of chlorine by 0.4-0.7 ppbv for the scenarios considered. Thus, sustained stratospheric cooling could further reduce Arctic ozone content and delay the anticipated ozone recovery in the Northern Hemisphere even with the realization of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments.

  10. Stratospheric Cooling and Arctic Ozone Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriquez, Jose M.

    1998-01-01

    We present sensitivity studies using the AER box model for an idealized parcel in the lower stratosphere at 70 deg N during winter/spring with different assumed stratospheric cooling and chlorine loadings. Our calculations show that stratospheric cooling could further deplete ozone via increased polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and retard its expected recovery even with the projected chlorine loading decrease. We introduce the concept of chlorine-cooling equivalent and show that a 1 K Cooling could provide the same local ozone depletion as an increase of chlorine by 0.4-0.7 ppbv for the scenarios considered. Thus, sustained stratospheric cooling could further reduce Arctic ozone content and delay the anticipated ozone recovery in the Northern Hemisphere even with the realization of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments.

  11. Wave Driven Disturbances of the Thermal Structure in the Polar Winter Upper Stratosphere and Lower Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Katelynn R.

    The polar winter middle atmosphere is a dynamically active region that is driven primarily by wave activity. Planetary waves intermittently disturbed the region at different levels and the most spectacular type of disturbance is a major Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW). However, other types of extreme disturbances occur on a more frequent, intraseasonal basis. One such disturbance is a synoptic-scale "weather event" observed in lidar and rocket soundings, soundings from the TIMED/SABER instrument and UK Meteorological Office (MetO) assimilated data. These disturbances are most easily identified near 42 km where temperatures are elevated over baseline conditions by a remarkable 50 K and an associated cooling is observed near 75 km. As these disturbances have a coupled vertical structure extending into the lower mesosphere, they are termed Upper Stratospheric/Lower Mesospheric (USLM) disturbances. This research begins with description of the phenomenology of USLM events in observations and the assimilated data set MetO, develops a description of the dynamics responsible for their development and places them in the context of the family of polar winter middle atmospheric disturbances. Climatologies indicates that USLM disturbances are commonly occurring polar wintertime disturbances of the middle atmosphere, have a remarkably repeating thermal structure, are located on the East side of the polar low and are related planetary wave activity. Using the same methodology for identifying USLM events and building climatologies of these events, the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model WACCM version 4 is established to spontaneously and internally generate USLM disturbances. Planetary waves are seen to break at a level just above the stratopause and convergence of the EP-flux vector is occurring in this region, decelerating the eastward zonal-mean wind and inducing ageostrophic vertical motion to maintain mass continuity. The descending air increases the horizontal

  12. Nucleation and growth of HNO3-3H2O particles in the polar stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wofsy, Steven C.; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Salawitch, Ross J.; Mcelroy, Michael B.

    1990-01-01

    Growth of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles on background stratospheric aerosols is examined for an isolated air parcel cooled at a uniform rate. During the process of nucleation, the saturation ratio of HNO3 vapor reaches a maximum value between 2 and 15, corresponding to supercooling by 1-4 K. If cooling rates exceed 0.5-1 K/day, small particles of NAT are produced. A major fraction of the available condensation nuclei is activated and removal of HNO3 by gravitational settling is slow. If cooling rates are less than 0.5-1 K/day, the number of aerosols that nucleate is reduced, leading to differential growth of large NAT particles. Observations of 5 micron radius particles in clouds at temperatures above the water frost point may reflect condensation of NAT on ice particles that fall through a column of air as it is cooled. Rapid condensation of HNO3 on ice particles is promoted by the high supersaturation attained during nucleation and maintained during subsequent cooling. This process provides a mechanism for irreversible removal of HNO3.

  13. Uranus’ Hemispheric Asymmetries in Polar Cloud and Circulation Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammel, Heidi B.; Sromovsky, Lawrence; Fry, Pat; de Pater, Imke

    2015-11-01

    We report on the north polar region of Uranus in the post-equinoctial era. Near-IR imaging with Keck 2 using NIRC2 in 2012-2014 revealed numerous small bright features, as well as small dark features, between 50 degrees N and the north pole. Tracking of these features yielded circulation patterns, with the remarkable result that the region from 60 degrees to at least 83 degrees rotates about the northern pole as a solid body, with a drift rate of 4.1 degrees/hour westward relative to the interior (Sromovsky et al. 2015, Icarus 258, 192-223). For the south pole, the same latitude region had dramatically different characteristics, as judged by 1986 Voyager and 2003 Keck observations. The southern region showed no discrete near-IR features; detailed circulation measurements in that region were based solely on low-contrast features in re-analyzed Voyager images (Karkoschka, 2015, Icarus 250, 294-307). They revealed a large gradient in drift rates, with values reaching twice that seen in the corresponding northern region.The north-south asymmetry in circulation and cloud structure/morphology is surprising because the distribution of upper tropospheric methane is relatively symmetric: roughly constant over a region from 30 S to 30 N, and then declining at higher latitudes in both hemispheres. The methane distribution suggests symmetric down-welling motion in both polar regions, which would inhibit formation of condensation clouds there, in contrast to the observed dichotomy. Some asymmetry may be an effect of seasonal forcing, since the north versus south polar measurements were made during different seasons. If so, then major changes can be expected in the north polar region as Uranus proceeds toward its 2030 northern summer solstice. Hubble STIS observations expected in October of 2015 will further examine the vertical distribution and stability of the polar methane abundances. Future high-resolution imaging with Earth-based facilities will be able to track circulation

  14. A Long Data Record (1979-2003) of Stratospheric Ozone Derived from TOMS Cloud Slicing: Comparison with SAGE and Implications for Ozone Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, Jerry R.; Chandra, Sushil; Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2004-01-01

    It is generally recognized that Stratospheric Aerosols and Gas Experiment (SAGE) stratospheric ozone data have become a standard long-record reference field for comparison with other stratospheric ozone measurements. This study demonstrates that stratospheric column ozone (SCO) derived from total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) Cloud Slicing may be used to supplement SAGE data as a stand-alone long- record reference field in the tropics extending to middle and high latitudes over the Pacific. Comparisons of SAGE I1 version 6.2 SCO and TOMS version 8 Cloud Slicing SCO for 1984-2003 exhibit remarkable agreement in monthly ensemble means to within 1-3 DU (1 - 1.5% of SCO) despite being independently-calibrated measurements. An important component of our study is to incorporate these column ozone measurements to investigate long-term trends for the period 1979-2003. Our study includes Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBW) version 8 measurements of upper stratospheric column ozone (i.e., zero to 32 hPa column ozone) to characterize seasonal cycles and seasonal trends in this region, as well as the lower stratosphere and troposphere when combined with TOMS SCO and total column ozone. The trend analyses suggest that most ozone reduction in the atmosphere since 1979 in mid-to-high latitudes has occurred in the Lower stratosphere below approx. 25 km. The delineation of upper and lower stratospheric column ozone indicate that trends in the upper stratosphere during the latter half of the 1979-2003 period have reduced to near zero globally, while trends in the lower stratosphere have become larger by approx. 5 DU decade%om the tropics extending to mid-latitudes in both hemispheres. For TCO, the trend analyses suggest moderate increases over the 25-year time record in the extra-tropics of both hemispheres of around 4-6 DU (Northern Hemisphere) and 6-8 DU (Southern Hemisphere).

  15. The Polar Stratosphere in a Changing Climate (POLSTRACC): Mission overview and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelhaf, Hermann; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Woiwode, Wolfgang; Rapp, Markus; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Engel, Andreas; Bönisch, Harald

    2016-04-01

    The POLSTRACC mission aims at providing new scientific knowledge on the Arctic lowermost stratosphere and upper troposphere under the present load of halogens and state of climate variables. POLSTRACC employs the German High Altitude and LOng Range Research Aircraft (HALO) and is the only HALO mission dedicated to study the UTLS at high latitudes several years after the last intensive Arctic campaigns. The scientific scope of POLSTRACC is broadened by its combination with the SALSA (Seasonality of Air mass transport and origin in the Lowermost Stratosphere using the HALO Aircraft) and GW-LCYCLE (Gravity Wave Life Cycle Experiment, a BMBF/ROMIC project) missions, which address complementary scientific goals sharing the same HALO payload. POLSTRACC, SALSA and GW-LCYCLE offer the unique opportunity to study the bottom of the polar vortex and the high-latitude UTLS along with their impact on lower latitudes throughout an entire winter/spring cycle. The payload for the combined POLSTRACC, SALSA and GW-LCYCLE campaigns comprises an innovative combination of remote sensing techniques providing 2- and 3-D distributions of temperature and a large number of substances, and precise in-situ instruments measuring T, O3, H2O, tracers of different lifetimes and chemically active species at the aircraft level with high time-resolution. Drop sondes will add information about temperature, humidity and wind in the atmosphere underneath the aircraft. The POLSTRACC consortium includes national (KIT, Forschungszentrum Jülich, DLR, Universities of Frankfurt, Heidelberg, Mainz and Wuppertal; PTB) and international partners (e.g. NASA). The field campaign is divided into three phases for addressing (i) the early polar vortex and its wide-scale vicinity in December 2015 (from Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany), (ii) the mid-winter vortex from January to March 2016 (from Kiruna, Sweden), and (iii) the late dissipating vortex and its wide-scale vicinity in March 2016 (from Kiruna and

  16. Jupiter Stratospheric Haze Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    These two views of Jupiter obtained by the imaging system aboard the Galileo spacecraft show evidence of strikingly different stratospheric hazes between the polar regions and low or mid latitudes. The Great Red Spot shows in one mosaic, centered at about 20 degrees South latitude and taken on June 26, 1996 at a range of 1.46 million kilometers. The other mosaic is centered near 50 degrees North latitude, and was taken on November 4, 1996 at a range of 1.60 million kilometers.

    North is at the top in both images. In the Red Spot image, the edge of the planet (limb) runs in a single arc from lower left to upper right, with dark space at lower right. In the polar image, the limb runs in two segments across the top right corner, with dark space at top right. Both images are mosaics; the offset of the individual frames of the mosaic produces the jagged border and the break in the polar limb.

    These are false color images, constructed specifically to reveal cloud elevation differences. Three color channels are used. The red channel is an image taken at a near infrared wavelength where methane in Jupiter's atmosphere is strongly absorbing, and therefore gives no information about deep clouds but reveals high clouds. The green channel is a weaker methane band, and the blue channel is assigned to a wavelength where Jupiter's atmosphere is transparent. Thus red features indicate high hazes. A view near the edge of the planet accentuates the high hazes because of the slanting path of the line of sight.

    The pronounced reddening near the edge of the planet in polar regions indicates a high stratospheric haze. Comparison with the Great Red Spot shows that such a high haze is absent at that latitude. Detailed analysis shows that a stratospheric haze exists at both latitudes but is approximately 50 km higher near the poles. It is likely that the high polar haze is produced by magnetospheric particles, which travel along magnetic field lines and bombard the upper atmosphere

  17. The polarization lidar technique for cloud research - A review and current assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    The development of the polarization lidar technique is reviewed, and the current capabilities and limitations of the technique for the cloud research are discussed. At present, polarization lidar is a key component of climate-research programs designed to characterize the properties of cirrus clouds and is an integral part of multiple remote-sensor studies of mixed-phase cloud systems such as winter mountain storms, making it possible to discriminate between cloud phases and to identify some particle types and orientations. Recent theoretical approaches involving ice crystal ray-tracing and cloud microphysical-model simulations are expected to increase the utility of the polarization lidar technique.

  18. Magmatic gas source for the stratospheric SO[sub 2] cloud from the June 15, 1991, eruption of Mount Pinatubo

    SciTech Connect

    Westrich, H.R. ); Gerlach, T.M. )

    1992-10-01

    A water-rich magmatic gas phase escaped explosively from Mount Pinatubo on June 15, 1991, taking with it a load of crystalline and molten material sufficient to form pumice and tephra deposits with an estimated total dense-rock-equivalent volume of 3-5 km[sup 3], and carrying in it enough sulfur to form a 20 Mt SO[sub 2] cloud in the stratosphere. Application of the petrologic method for estimating sulfur degassing during the climatic event from the sulfur content of trapped glass inclusions and matrix glasses in the pumice deposits requires an unacceptably large volume of erupted magma to account for SO[sub 2] in the stratospheric cloud. The ubiquitous presence of primary vapor bubbles in glass inclusions and unaltered anhydrite phenocrysts in the pumice suggest that sulfur was present in a separate H[sub 2]O-rich gas phase of the Pinatubo magma before eruption. Thus, for this eruption, and perhaps others, the petrologic method for estimating sulfur degassing is prone to substantial underestimation of sulfur release and the potential climatic impact of past explosive eruptions.

  19. Quantifying the response strength of the southern stratospheric polar vortex to Indian Ocean warming in austral summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuanglin; Chen, Xiaoting

    2014-03-01

    A previous multiple-AGCM study suggested that Indian Ocean Warming (IOW) tends to warm and weaken the southern polar vortex. Such an impact is robust because of a qualitative consistency among the five AGCMs used. However, a significant difference exists in the modeled strengths, particularly in the stratosphere, with those in three of the AGCMs (CCM3, CAM3, and GFS) being four to five times as strong as those in the two other models (GFDL AM2, ECHAM5). As to which case reflects reality is an important issue not only for quantifying the role of tropical ocean warming in the recent modest recovery of the ozone hole over the Antarctic, but also for projecting its future trend. This issue is addressed in the present study through comparing the models' climatological mean states and intrinsic variability, particularly those influencing tropospheric signals to propagate upward and reach the stratosphere. The results suggest that differences in intrinsic variability of model atmospheres provide implications for the difference. Based on a comparison with observations, it is speculated that the impact in the real world may be closer to the modest one simulated by GFDL AM2 and ECHAM5, rather than the strong one simulated by the three other models (CCM3, CAM3 and GFS). In particular, IOW during the past 50 years may have dynamically induced a 1.0°C warming in the polar lower stratosphere (˜ 100 hPa), which canceled a fraction of radiative cooling due to ozone depletion.

  20. Studies of stratospheric and mesospheric chemistry in polar regions with the Berlin Climate Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM CHEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenfell, J. L.; Mieth, P.; Kruger, K.; Langematz, U.; Labitzke, K.; Steil, B.

    2001-12-01

    The Berlin Climate Middle Atmosphere model (CMAM) with resolution T21 and lid at 84km (Langematz and Pawson, 1997) has been interactively coupled with the chemistry module of Steil et al., (1998). Chemical tracer fields from a test run which used the Palmer gravity wave drag (GWD) scheme have been found to compare well both with observations and other models (e.g. MA-ECHAM4-CHEM). However, in this run the model pole has a warm bias and dynamical variability is not well reproduced. Therefore we are currently testing a suite of orographic and non-orographic GWD schemes in the model. Preliminary results from these latter runs are presented here and focus on stratospheric and mesospheric chemical processes during polar winter, particularly those affecting ozone. The contrast between hemispheres, the springtime 'recovery' of polar stratospheric ozone and relevant chemical diurnal cycles are explored. Bibliography U. Langematz, and Pawson S., The Berlin troposphere-stratosphere-mesosphere GCM: Climatology and forcing mechanisms, Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc., 123, 1075-1096, 1997 B. Steil, Dameris M., Brühl C., Crutzen P. J., Grewe V., Ponater M., and Sausen R., Development of a chemistry module for GCMs: first results of a multiannual integration, Ann. Geophys., 16, 205-228, 1998

  1. The Martian polar cap - Radiative effects of ozone, clouds, and airborne dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1990-01-01

    The solar and thermal flux striking the polar cap of Mars is computed for various ozone, dust, and cloud abundances and for three solar zenith angles. Ozone does not significantly affect the total energy budget of the polar cap. Hence the observed hemispherical asymmetry in ozone abundance causes only an insignificant hemispherical asymmetry in the polar caps. Vertical optical depths of dust and cloud ranging from zero to 1 cause little change in the total flux absorbed by the polar cap near its edge but increase the absorbed flux significantly as one travels poleward. Hemispherical asymmetries in dust abundance, cloud cover, and surface pressure combine to cause a significant hemispherical asymmetry in the total flux absorbed by the residual polar caps, which helps to explain the dichotomy in the residual polar caps on Mars. Other processes which affect the energy budget of the polar cap are proposed and reviewed, particularly with respect to their interaction with the radiative effects of clouds and dust.

  2. What Controls the Temperature of the Arctic Stratosphere during the Spring?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Rosenfield, Joan E.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control the temperature of the polar lower stratosphere during spring is key to understanding ozone loss in the Arctic polar vortex. Spring ozone loss rates are directly tied to polar stratospheric temperatures by the formation of polar stratospheric clouds, and the conversion of chlorine species to reactive forms on these cloud particle surfaces. In this paper, we study those factors that control temperatures in the polar lower stratosphere. We use the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/NCAR reanalysis data covering the last two decades to investigate how planetary wave driving of the stratosphere is connected to polar temperatures. In particular, we show that planetary waves forced in the troposphere in mid- to late winter (January-February) are principally responsible for the mean polar temperature during the March period. These planetary waves are forced by both thermal and orographic processes in the troposphere, and propagate into the stratosphere in the mid and high latitudes. Strong mid-winter planetary wave forcing leads to a warmer Arctic lower stratosphere in early spring, while weak mid-winter forcing leads to cooler Arctic temperatures.

  3. Simulation of the climate effects of a geoengineered stratospheric sulfate cloud with the NASA GEOSCCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oman, L.; Aquila, V.; Colarco, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Suggested solar radiation management (SRM) methods to mitigate global warming include the injection of sulfur dioxide (SO2 ) in the stratosphere. We present the results from SRM simulation ensemble performed with the NASA GEOS-5 Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM). We focus on the response of the stratosphere to a stratospheric SO2 injection. In particular, we investigate the changes of the stratospheric dynamics and composition, and the impact of an increased aerosol layer on ozone recovery. As prescribed for experiment G4 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP), we inject 5 Tg/year of SO2 from 2020 to 2070. The location of the injection is the equator at 0° longitude between 16 km and 25 km altitude. After 2070, we interrupt the SO2 injection and simulate the readjustment until 2090. The emissions scenario is RCP4.5, which predicts a radiative forcing of about 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. This is considered a "medium-low" scenario in terms of radiative forcing. GEOSCCM does not include an interactive ocean model, therefore we use the sea surface temperatures forecasted by the Community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4) for RCP4.5.

  4. Stratospheric Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf, F.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols affect the atmospheric energy balance by scattering and absorbing solar and terrestrial radiation. They also can alter stratospheric chemical cycles by catalyzing heterogeneous reactions which markedly perturb odd nitrogen, chlorine and ozone levels. Aerosol measurements by satellites began in NASA in 1975 with the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) program, to be followed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) starting in 1979. Both programs employ the solar occultation, or Earth limb extinction, techniques. Major results of these activities include the discovery of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in both hemispheres in winter, illustrations of the impacts of major (El Chichon 1982 and Pinatubo 1991) eruptions, and detection of a negative global trend in lower stratospheric/upper tropospheric aerosol extinction. This latter result can be considered a triumph of successful worldwide sulfur emission controls. The SAGE record will be continued and improved by SAGE III, currently scheduled for multiple launches beginning in 2000 as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS). The satellite program has been supplemented by in situ measurements aboard the ER-2 (20 km ceiling) since 1974, and from the DC-8 (13 km ceiling) aircraft beginning in 1989. Collection by wire impactors and subsequent electron microscopic and X-ray energy-dispersive analyses, and optical particle spectrometry have been the principle techniques. Major findings are: (1) The stratospheric background aerosol consists of dilute sulfuric acid droplets of around 0.1 micrometer modal diameter at concentration of tens to hundreds of monograms per cubic meter; (2) Soot from aircraft amounts to a fraction of one percent of the background total aerosol; (3) Volcanic eruptions perturb the sulfuric acid, but not the soot, aerosol abundance by several orders of magnitude; (4) PSCs contain nitric acid at temperatures below 195K, supporting chemical hypotheses

  5. Measurements of stratospheric ozone and aerosols above Spitsbergen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuber, Roland; Beyerle, Georg; Schrems, Otto; Fabian, Rolf; Vondergathen, Peter; Krueger, Bernd C.

    1994-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone and aerosol data recorded at Spitsbergen (79 deg N, 12 deg E) from 1988 to 1992 are presented. Strong dynamical influences like seasonal variations and annual cycles in the ozone concentrations are described. Polar Stratospheric Clouds were detected above Spitsbergen in January 1989 and 1990, but not in the next two years. Volcanic aerosols, attributed to the Mt. Pinatubo eruption, appeared as early as August 1991 above Spitsbergen and were a constant feature of the lower Arctic stratosphere in winter 1991/92.

  6. The anomalous Arctic lower stratospheric polar vortex of 1992-1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Zurek, R. W.; Gelman, M. E.; Miller, A. J.; Nagatani, R.

    1994-01-01

    Potential vorticity (PV) gradients defining the lower stratospheric vortex during the 1992-1993 winter were anomalously strong and persistent compared to those during the last 16 Arctic winters. For approximately equal to 3 months PV gradients were closer to typical Antarctic values than to most Arctic values. Air motion diagnostics computed for 3-dimensional air parcels confirm that the 1992-1993 Arctic lower stratospheric vortex was substantially more isolated than is typical. Such isolation will delay and reduce the export of the higher ozone typical of the winter lower stratospheric vortex to mid-latitudes. This may have contributed to the record-low total ozone amounts observed in northern mid-latitudes in 1993.

  7. Phase transition observations and discrimination of small cloud particles by light polarization in expansion chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichman, Leonid; Fuchs, Claudia; Järvinen, Emma; Ignatius, Karoliina; Florian Höppel, Niko; Dias, Antonio; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Andrea Christine; Wagner, Robert; Williamson, Christina; Yan, Chao; Connolly, Paul James; Dorsey, James Robert; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Hoyle, Christopher Robert; Bjerring Kristensen, Thomas; Steiner, Gerhard; McPherson Donahue, Neil; Flagan, Richard; Gallagher, Martin William; Kirkby, Jasper; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, António

    2016-03-01

    Cloud microphysical processes involving the ice phase in tropospheric clouds are among the major uncertainties in cloud formation, weather, and general circulation models. The detection of aerosol particles, liquid droplets, and ice crystals, especially in the small cloud particle-size range below 50 μm, remains challenging in mixed phase, often unstable environments. The Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarization (CASPOL) is an airborne instrument that has the ability to detect such small cloud particles and measure the variability in polarization state of their backscattered light. Here we operate the versatile Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber facility at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) to produce controlled mixed phase and other clouds by adiabatic expansions in an ultraclean environment, and use the CASPOL to discriminate between different aerosols, water, and ice particles. In this paper, optical property measurements of mixed-phase clouds and viscous secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are presented. We report observations of significant liquid-viscous SOA particle polarization transitions under dry conditions using CASPOL. Cluster analysis techniques were subsequently used to classify different types of particles according to their polarization ratios during phase transition. A classification map is presented for water droplets, organic aerosol (e.g., SOA and oxalic acid), crystalline substances such as ammonium sulfate, and volcanic ash. Finally, we discuss the benefits and limitations of this classification approach for atmospherically relevant concentrations and mixtures with respect to the CLOUD 8-9 campaigns and its potential contribution to tropical troposphere layer analysis.

  8. Laboratory analyses of meteoric debris in the upper stratosphere from settling bolide dust clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Della Corte, V.; Ferrari, M.; Rotundi, A.; Brunetto, R.

    2016-03-01

    Bolide and fireball fragmentation produce vast amounts of dust that will slowly fall through the stratosphere. DUSTER (Dust in the Upper Stratosphere Tracking Experiment and Retrieval) was designed to intercept the nanometer to micrometer meteoric dust from these events for laboratory analyses while it is still in the upper stratosphere. This effort required extraordinary precautions to avoid particle contamination during collection and in the laboratory. Here we report dust from the upper stratosphere that was collected during two campaigns one in 2008 and another in 2011. We collected and characterized forty five uncontaminated meteoric dust particles. The collected particles are alumina, aluminosilica, plagioclase, fassaite, silica, CaCO3, CaO, extreme F-rich Csbnd Osbnd Ca particles, and oxocarbon particles. These particles are found in friable CI and CM carbonaceous chondrite, and unequilibrated ordinary chondrite meteoroids that are the most common source of bolides and fireballs. The oxocarbons have no meteorite counterparts. Some F-bearing CaCO3 particles changed shape when they interacted with the ambient laboratory atmosphere which might indicate their highly unequilibrated state as a result of fragmentation. Equilibrium considerations constrain the thermal regime experienced by the collected particles between ∼2000 °C and ∼1000 °C, as high as 3700 °C and as low as ∼650 °C after 9 s, followed by rapid quenching (μs) to below 1600 °C, but equilibrium conditions during these events is most unlikely. So far the observed thermal conditions in these events put the temperatures between ∼4300 °C and ∼430 °C for 5 s and high cooling rates. Such conditions are present in the immediate wake of meteors and fireballs.

  9. Towards improved understanding of cloud influence on polar surface energy budgets using CloudSat and CALIPSO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, J. E.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; McIlhattan, E.; Chepfer, H.; Morrison, A.

    2015-12-01

    The spaceborne radar CloudSat and the spaceborne lidar platform Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) have provided nearly a decade of groundbreaking observations of polar cloud and precipitation processes. Specifically relevant to this AGU session, the CloudSat 2B-FLXHR-LIDAR product (hereafter, 2BFLX) is an observationally constrained radiative flux and heating rate calculation that leverages constraints from A-train observations, including CloudSat+CALIPSO. The surface radiative fluxes calculated within 2BFLX represent an important advance because unlike top-of-atmosphere (TOA) fluxes, surface radiative fluxes cannot be directly measured by satellite, yet directly impact surface heating, sea ice melt, and ice sheet mass balance. In this presentation, we will highlight the influence of supercooled liquid on polar surface radiation budgets constrained within 2BFLX data. We will also use 2BFLX data in concert with the fully attenuated signal and cloud phase information from CALIPSO as an observational constraint on polar cloud-climate feedbacks in the Community Earth System Model (CESM).

  10. Law of mass action in the Arctic lower stratospheric polar vortex January-March 2000: ClO scaling and the calculation of ozone loss rates in a turbulent fractal medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuck, Adrian F.; Hovde, Susan J.; Gao, Ru-Shan; Richard, Erik C.

    2003-08-01

    We consider the effects of power law scaling in the 1999-2000 Arctic lower stratospheric vortex from the point of view of the law of mass action and its application to the chemical kinetics of ozone loss embedded in a turbulent, macroscopic, fractal medium. The ER-2 observations of ClO obey power law scaling; the exponent varies with time in a manner shown to be consistent with the scaling of NOy and O3, via the influences of polar stratospheric clouds and actinic solar radiation. While the microscopic rate coefficient for ClO three-body recombination to the dimer applies as measured to three-dimensional volumes in which the sole transport mechanism is molecular diffusion, this cannot be true in the 2.56-dimensional space in which macroscopically fluctuating ClO reacts in the lower stratosphere. We show that the rate of loss of ozone via the ClO dimer mechanism is proportional to [ClO]2.20 in late January/early February and to [ClO]2.55 in March. Chemical ozone loss had already occurred by the date of the first flight, 20000120.

  11. Interhemispheric Differences in Dentifrication and Related Processes Affecting Polar Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santee, M. L.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.; Froidevaux, L.; Manney, G. L.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Harwood, R. S.; Peckham, G. E.

    1994-01-01

    The severe depletion of stratospheric ozone over Antarctica in late winter and early spring is caused by enhanced CLO abundances arising from heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). CLO abundances comparable to those over Antarctica have also been observed throughout the Arctic Vortex, but the accompanying loss of Arctic ozone has been much less severe.

  12. Simulation of the transport of halogen species from the equatorial and mid-latitude stratosphere to the polar stratosphere in a two-dimensional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yung, Yuk L.; Shia, R. L.; Allen, M.; Zurek, R. W.; Crisp, D.; Wen, J. S.

    1988-01-01

    The bulk of O sub 3 destruction in the Antarctic stratosphere takes place in the lower stratosphere between 15 and 25 km. Both O sub 3 and the halogen reservoir species have their origins in the higher altitude region (20 to 30 km) in the equatorial and mid-latitude stratosphere. Using the Caltech-JPL two-dimensional residual circulation model, researchers investigate the growth of stratospheric halogen due to the increase of CFCl sub 3 and CF sub 2 Cl sub 2.

  13. Polar stratospheric ozone: interactions with climate change, results from the EU project RECONCILE, and the 2010/11 Arctic ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hobe, Marc

    2013-04-01

    One of the most profound and well known examples of human impacts on atmospheric chemistry is the so called ozone hole. During the second half of the 20th century, anthropogenic emissions of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) led to a significant increase in stratospheric chlorine levels and hence the rate of ozone removal by catalytic cycles involving chlorine. While CFCs were essentially banned by the 1987 Montreal Protocol and its subsequent amendments, and stratospheric chlorine levels have recently started to decline again, another anthropogenic influence may at least delay the recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer: climate change, with little doubt a result of human emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, has led to changes in stratospheric temperature and circulation. The large ozone losses that typically occur in polar regions in spring are particularly affected by these changes. Here, we give an overview of the ozone-climate interactions affecting polar stratospheric ozone loss, and present latest results from the international research project RECONCILE funded by the European Commission. Remaining open questions will be discussed including the possible impacts of recently suggested geoengineering concepts to artificially enhance the stratospheric aerosol loading. A special focus will also be put on the 2010/11 Arctic winter that saw the first Arctic Ozone hole, including an impact study on surface UV radiation in the densely populated northern mid-latitudes.

  14. Stratospheric Cooling and Arctic Ozone Recovery. Appendix L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriguez, Jose M.; Tabazadeh, Azadeh

    1998-01-01

    We present sensitivity studies using the AER box model for an idealized parcel in the lower stratosphere at 70 deg N during winter/spring with different assumed stratospheric cooling and chlorine loadings. Our calculations show that stratospheric cooling could further deplete ozone via increased polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and retard its expected recovery even with the projected chlorine loading decrease. We introduce the concept of chlorine-cooling equivalent and show that a 1 K cooling could provide the same local ozone depletion as an increase of chlorine by 0.4 - 0.7 ppbv for the scenarios considered. Thus, sustained stratospheric cooling could further reduce Arctic ozone content and delay the anticipated ozone recovery in the Northern Hemisphere even with the realization of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendments.

  15. Stratospheric Tracers of Atmospheric Transport (STRAT) Campaign: ER-2 Participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James G.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Stratospheric Tracers of Atmospheric Transport (STRAT) mission was initiated to advance knowledge of the major transport mechanisms of the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere. This is the region of the atmosphere within which exchange processes take place that critically determine the response of the climate system and ozone distribution to changing conditions triggered by the release of chemicals at the surface. The mission series that extended from October 1995 to November 1997 was extremely successful. The scientific advances that emerged from that mission include analyses of- troposphere-to-stratosphere transport in the lowermost stratosphere from measurements of H2O, CO2, N2O, and O3; the effects of tropical cirrus clouds on the abundance of lower stratospheric ozone; the role of HO, in super- and subsonic aircraft exhaust plumes; and dehydration and denitrification in the arctic polar vortex during the 1995-96 winter.

  16. Polarization Catastrophe Contributing to Rotation and Tornadic Motion in Cumulo-Nimbus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handel, P. H.

    2007-05-01

    When the concentration of sub-micron ice particles in a cloud exceeds 2.5E21 per cubic cm, divided by the squared average number of water molecules per crystallite, the polarization catastrophe occurs. Then all ice crystallites nucleated on aerosol dust particles align their dipole moments in the same direction, and a large polarization vector field is generated in the cloud. Often this vector field has a radial component directed away from the vertical axis of the cloud. It is induced by the pre-existing electric field caused by the charged screening layers at the cloud surface, the screening shell of the cloud. The presence of a vertical component of the magnetic field of the earth creates a density of linear momentum G=DxB in the azimuthal direction, where D=eE+P is the electric displacement vector and e is the vacuum permittivity. This linear momentum density yields an angular momentum density vector directed upward in the nordic hemisphere, if the polarization vector points away from the vertical axis of the cloud. When the cloud becomes colloidally unstable, the crystallites grow beyond the size limit at which they still could carry a large ferroelectric saturation dipole moment, and the polarization vector quickly disappears. Then the cloud begins to rotate with an angular momentum that has the same direction. Due to the large average number of water molecules in a crystallite, the polarization catastrophe (PC) is present in practically all clouds, and is compensated by masking charges. In cumulo-nimbus (thunder-) clouds the collapse of the PC is rapid, and the masking charges lead to lightning, and in the upper atmosphere also to sprites, elves, and blue jets. In stratus clouds, however, the collapse is slow, and only leads to reverse polarity in dissipating clouds (minus on the bottom), as compared with growing clouds (plus on the bottom, because of the excess polarization charge). References: P.H. Handel: "Polarization Catastrophe Theory of Cloud

  17. Aircraft observations of biomass burning emissions in the lower stratosphere during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D.; Campos, T. L.; Flocke, F. M.; Stechman, D.; Farris, C.; Rooney, M.; Pan, L.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Riemer, D. D.; Chen, D.; Huey, L. G.; Brock, C. A.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.; Murphy, D. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Dibb, J. E.; Scheuer, E. M.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Gao, R.; Langridge, J. M.; Hair, J. W.; Butler, C. F.; Fenn, M. A.; Fromm, M. D.; Lindsey, D.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    During test flights for the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment conducted in May and June of 2012, clear indications of biomass burning (BB) were observed in the Lower Stratosphere (LS). Enhancements in CO, aerosols, and CH3CN substantiate the impact of BB effluents on the studied air mass. A large complex of fires southwest of Lake Baikal in Russia had been observed to flare up significantly on May 7, 2012, leading to a strong Aerosol Index signature. The aerosol plume was tracked using AURA Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Cloud-Aerosol LIDAR and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) curtains from the Baikal area, over Northern Siberia, the Aleutian Islands, South Western Canada and ultimately to the DC3 flight study area on May 14, 2012. BB tracers were sampled from the NASA DC8 and the NSF GV aircraft over a lateral range of 600km and an altitude of approximately 11.7 km which is approximately 0.5 km to 1.0 km above the local cold point tropopause.

  18. Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition 2: Air Parcel Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    An overview of Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition 2 is given. Effects of Pinatubo aerosol on stratospheric ozone at mid-latitudes, in situ measurements of ClO and ClO/HCl ratio, balloon-borne measurements of ClO, NO, and O3 in a volcanic cloud, and new observations of the NO(y)/N2O correlation in the lower stratosphere are discussed. Among other topics addressed are the following: in situ tracer correlations of methane, nitrous oxide, and ozone as observed aboard the DC-8, in situ measurements of changes in stratospheric aerosol and the N2O-aerosol relationship inside and outside of the polar vortex, measurements of halogenated organic compounds near the tropical tropopause, and airborne brightness measurements of the polar winter troposphere.

  19. Laboratory simulations of NAT formation approaching stratospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, James; Mauersberger, Konrad

    1994-01-01

    Previous laboratory studies have established the stability conditions of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), of which type 1 polar stratospheric cloud (PSC 1) particles are thought to be composed. However, NAT samples in lab studies were almost always formed under conditions very different from those of the stratosphere. In order to better understand the in situ growth of PSC 1 particle populations, samples of water and nitric acid were deposited under conditions of temperature and pressure which more closely approximate the polar stratosphere. The compositions of the solids, measured shortly after deposition, depended on the H2O:HNO3 ratio in the vapor from which the solids were condensed. Solids formed from vapor mixtures that approached stratospheric contained significantly less HNO3 than the 25 mol percent expected of NAT.

  20. Composition and freezing of aqueous H2SO4/HNO3 solutions under polar stratospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, K. D.; Seago, S. W.; Chang, H. Y.; Molina, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    The results of laboratory investigations of the freezing behavior of aqueous acid solutions indicate that in the stratosphere H2SO/H2O aerosol droplets would not freeze at temperatures above the ice frost point in the absence of HNO3; however, in the presence of typical levels of HNO3 liquid sulfuric acid aerosols take up significant amounts of HNO3 and H2O vapors and freeze much more readily. This is a consequence of the very rapid change in composition of the liquid droplets as the temperature drops to within two to three degrees of the equilibrium temperature at which HNO3 and H2O vapors would co-condense to form a liquid solution. In the high latitude stratosphere this HNO3/H2O 'dew point' is typically around 192-194 K at 100 mbar.

  1. Stratospheric minor species vertical distributions during polar winter by balloon borne UV-Vis spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pommereau, J. P.; Piquard, J.

    1994-01-01

    A light, relatively cheap and easy to operate balloonborne UV-visible spectrometer was designed for investigating ozone photochemistry in the Arctic winter. The instrument was flown 11 times during the European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE) in winter 1991-92 in Northern Scandinavia. The first simultaneous measurements of vertical distributions of aerosols, PSC's, O3, NO2 and OClO inside the vortex during flight no. 6 on 16 January, in cold conditions are reported, which show that nitrogen oxides were almost absent (lower than 100 ppt) in the stratosphere below 22 km, while a layer of relatively large OClO concentration (15 ppt) was present at the altitude of the minimum temperature.

  2. Persistent polar depletion of stratospheric ozone and emergent mechanisms of ultraviolet radiation-mediated health dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Dugo, Mark A; Han, Fengxiang; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    Year 2011 noted the first definable ozone "hole" in the Arctic region, serving as an indicator to the continued threat of dangerous ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure caused by the deterioration of stratospheric ozone in the northern hemisphere. Despite mandates of the Montreal Protocol to phase out the production of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs), the relative stability of ODCs validates popular notions of persistent stratospheric ozone for several decades. Moreover, increased UVR exposure through stratospheric ozone depletion is occurring within a larger context of physiologic stress and climate change across the biosphere. In this review, we provide commentaries on stratospheric ozone depletion with relative comparisons between the well-known Antarctic ozone hole and the newly defined ozone hole in the Arctic. Compared with the Antarctic region, the increased UVR exposure in the Northern Hemisphere poses a threat to denser human populations across North America, Europe, and Asia. In this context, we discuss emerging targets of UVR exposure that can potentially offset normal biologic rhythms in terms of taxonomically conserved photoperiod-dependent seasonal signaling and entrainment of circadian clocks. Consequences of seasonal shifts during critical life history stages can alter fitness and condition, whereas circadian disruption is increasingly becoming associated as a causal link to increased carcinogenesis. We further review the significance of genomic alterations via UVR-induced modulations of phase I and II transcription factors located in skin cells, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2), with emphasis on mechanism that can lead to metabolic shifts and cancer. Although concern for adverse health consequences due to increased UVR exposure are longstanding, recent advances in biochemical research suggest that AhR and Nrf2 transcriptional regulators are likely targets for UVR

  3. Experience of direct impactor measurements of the structure and composition of stratospheric aerosols in polar latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratyev, K. Y.; Ivlev, Leo S.; Ivanov, V. A.; Zhukov, V. M.

    1993-11-01

    The data obtained in 1989 during the launchings to the stratosphere of a two-cascade impactor from the test ground in Apatity have been discussed. The aerosol samples have been analyzed using an electronic microscope to have information on the structure and size distribution of aerosol particles. The chemical and elemental analyses have been made using the methods of mass-spectrometry, IR spectroscopy, neutron activation, and x-ray fluorescence.

  4. Use of operational analyses to study the dynamics of troposphere-stratosphere interactions in polar regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salstein, David A.; Rosen, Richard D.; Miller, Alvin J.

    1988-01-01

    Operational analyses produced by large weather centers have been used in the past to monitor various aspects of the general circulation as well as address dynamical questions. For a number years researchers have been monitoring National Meteorological Center (NMC) analyses at 100 millibars because it is the level from which stratospheric analyses are built. In particular, they closely examined the pressure-work term at that level which is an important parameter related to the forcing of the stratosphere by the troposphere. Rapid fluctuations typically seen in this quanity during the months of July-November, and similarly noted by Randel et al., (1987) may raise some concern about the quality of the analyses. Researchers investigated the behavior of the term mainly responsible for these variations, namely the eddy flux of heat, and furthermore have corroborated the presence of these variations in contemporaneous analyses produced by the European Centre for Medium Range Forecasts (ECMWF). Researchers demonstrated that fluctuations in standing eddy heat fluxes, related to the forcing of the stratosphere by the troposphere, agree in two largely independent meteorological analyses. Researchers believe, that these fluctuations are mostly real.

  5. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  6. Polar Cirrus Cloud Properties Through Long-Term Lidar and Radiometer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James; Campbell, James; Mahesh, Ashwin; Welton, Judd; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In comparison to mid latitude cloud cover, knowledge of polar cirrus and other cloud cover is limited. The interpretations of satellite-based cloud imaging and retrievals in polar regions have major problems due to factors such as darkness and extreme low temperatures. Beginning in 2002 a NASA orbiting lidar instrument, GLAS, (Geoscience Laser Altimeter System) will unambiguously define cloud type and fraction with good coverage of polar regions. Active laser sensing gives the spatial and temporal distribution of clouds and diamond dust. In preparation for, and supplementing the GLAS measurements are ground based MP (micro pulse) lidar experiments providing continuous profiling. MP lidar installations have been operating at the South Pole since December 1999 and at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program arctic site since 1996. Both at the ARM Barrow, Alaska site and at the South Pole station, Fourier-transform interferometers also observe clouds in the wavelength intervals between approximately 5 and 18 microns. Spectral instruments can yield cloud microphysical properties with additional information from lidar about the vertical extent of clouds being modeled. We examine the simultaneous lidar and spectral data from both Barrow and South Pole, to obtain cloud properties (optical depth, particle size) by the use of both instruments. The results have applications to interpretation of current satellite data, and GLAS measurements when available.

  7. Heterogeneous physicochemistry of the polar ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard P.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Processes occurring in the polar winter stratosphere, which involve polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), are investigated using observations from the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. In particular, data on the properties of PSCs and their physical chemistry, the microphysical processes and time constants for cloud processes, the heterogeneous chemical processes and their time constants, and nonlinearities in the long-term ozone trend associated with physical and chemical processes are examined. The chemical reactions leading to the depletion of the inert chlorine reservoir in a presence of type I PSCs are established, and it is shown that type II PSCs contribute to chemical processing that sustains the chemical imbalance of the polar stratosphere. It is shown that, using a simple model, the decadal evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole may be understood through nonlinearities in the heterogeneous chemistry, with possible contributing effects of variations in stratospheric temperatures and water vapor concentrations.

  8. Effects of the El Chichon volcanic cloud in the stratosphere on the intensity of light from the sky.

    PubMed

    Coulson, K L

    1983-08-01

    This is the second of two papers dealing with the effects of volcanic debris from the eruption of El Chichon on light from the sunlit sky. The polarization of skylight was considered in the first of the two, whereas this one is devoted to skylight intensity. It is shown here that the magnitude of the skylight intensity is modified very significantly from its clear sky value by the volcanic cloud, as is its change with solar depression angle during twilight and its distribution over the sky during the day. Emphasis is on measurements at a wavelength of 0.07 microm. Generally the volcanic cloud produces a diminution of zenith intensity during twilight with a considerable enhancement of intensity over the sky throughout the main part of the day. The solar aureole is not as sharp as it is in normally clear conditions, but the volcanic cloud causes a very diffuse type of aureole which covers a large portion of the sky. The preferential scattering of the longer wavelengths of sunlight, which is made evident by brilliant red and yellow colors in the sunrise period, causes a pronounced change of longwave/shortwave color ratios during twilight from their values in clear atmospheric conditions. The combination of intensity data shown here with polarization data in the previous paper should give a relatively complete picture of the effects of volcanic debris on solar radiation in the atmosphere and be useful in the verification of radiative transfer models of atmospheric turbidity.

  9. A study of the effect of overshooting deep convection on the water content of the TTL and lower stratosphere from Cloud Resolving Model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosvenor, D. P.; Choularton, T. W.; Coe, H.; Held, G.

    2007-09-01

    Simulations of overshooting, tropical deep convection using a Cloud Resolving Model with bulk microphysics are presented in order to examine the effect on the water content of the TTL (Tropical Tropopause Layer) and lower stratosphere. This case study is a subproject of the HIBISCUS (Impact of tropical convection on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere at global scale) campaign, which took place in Bauru, Brazil (22° S, 49° W), from the end of January to early March 2004. Comparisons between 2-D and 3-D simulations suggest that the use of 3-D dynamics is vital in order to capture the mixing between the overshoot and the stratospheric air, which caused evaporation of ice and resulted in an overall moistening of the lower stratosphere. In contrast, a dehydrating effect was predicted by the 2-D simulation due to the extra time, allowed by the lack of mixing, for the ice transported to the region to precipitate out of the overshoot air. Three different strengths of convection are simulated in 3-D by applying successively lower heating rates (used to initiate the convection) in the boundary layer. Moistening is produced in all cases, indicating that convective vigour is not a factor in whether moistening or dehydration is produced by clouds that penetrate the tropopause, since the weakest case only just did so. An estimate of the moistening effect of these clouds on an air parcel traversing a convective region is made based on the domain mean simulated moistening and the frequency of convective events observed by the IPMet (Instituto de Pesquisas Meteorológicas, Universidade Estadual Paulista) radar (S-band type at 2.8 Ghz) to have the same 10 dBZ echo top height as those simulated. These suggest a fairly significant mean moistening of 0.26, 0.13 and 0.05 ppmv in the strongest, medium and weakest cases, respectively, for heights between 16 and 17 km. Since the cold point and WMO (World Meteorological Organization) tropopause in this region lies at ~15.9 km

  10. Freezing of stratospheric aerosol droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas; Crutzen, Paul

    Theoretical calculations are presented for homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing of sulfuric acid droplets under stratospheric conditions, based on classical nucleation theory. In contrast to previous results it is shown that a prominent candidate for freezing, sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT ≡ H2SO4·4H2O), does not freeze homogeneously. The theoretical results limit the homogeneous freezing rate at 200 K to much less than 1 cm-3s-1, a value that may be estimated from bulk phase laboratory experiments. This suggests that the experimental value is likely to be a measure of heterogeneous, not homogeneous nucleation. Thus, under statospheric conditions, freezing of SAT can only occur in the presence of suitable nuclei; however, even for heterogeneous nucleation experimental results impose strong constraints. Since a nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) embryo probably needs a solid body for nucleation, these results put an important constraint on the theory of NAT formation in polar stratospheric clouds.

  11. Comparing Submillimeter Polarized Emission with Near-infrared Polarization of Background Stars for the Vela C Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Fabio P.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Ashton, Peter; Benton, Steven J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Martin, Peter G.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Diego Soler, Juan; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2017-03-01

    We present a large-scale combination of near-infrared (near-IR) interstellar polarization data from background starlight with polarized emission data at submillimeter wavelengths for the Vela C molecular cloud. The near-IR data consist of more than 6700 detections probing a range of visual extinctions between 2 and 20 {mag} in and around the cloud. The submillimeter data were collected in Antarctica by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry. This is the first direct combination of near-IR and submillimeter polarization data for a molecular cloud aimed at measuring the “polarization efficiency ratio” ({R}{eff}), a quantity that is expected to depend only on grain-intrinsic physical properties. It is defined as {p}500/({p}I/{τ }V), where p 500 and p I are polarization fractions at 500 μ {{m}} and the I band, respectively, and {τ }V is the optical depth. To ensure that the same column density of material is producing both polarization from emission and from extinction, we conducted a careful selection of near-background stars using 2MASS, Herschel, and Planck data. This selection excludes objects contaminated by the Galactic diffuse background material as well as objects located in the foreground. Accounting for statistical and systematic uncertainties, we estimate an average {R}{eff} value of 2.4 ± 0.8, which can be used to test the predictions of dust grain models designed for molecular clouds when such predictions become available. The ratio {R}{eff} appears to be relatively flat as a function of the cloud depth for the range of visual extinctions probed.

  12. Polarization studies of the Earth stratospheric layer by means of picosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbrutskyi, O. V.; Saryboha, H. V.; Nevodovskyi, P. V.; Vidmachenko, A. P.; Ivakhiv, O. V.

    2016-10-01

    Changes of aerosol optical thickness in the upper layers of Earth's atmosphere is one of the reasons that lead to climate change on Earth. Stratospheric ozone layer completely absorbs solar radiation. So polarimetric measurements of aerosol in the ultraviolet (UV) part of the spectrum to effectively carry out research into the causes of these changes. This problem can be solved by means of remote sensing of the ozone layer from the board of space satellite with the use of ultraviolet polarimeter. On the development of such devices actively working researchers of different countries.

  13. A Polar Specific 20-year Data Set of Cloud Fraction and Height Derived from Satellite Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Jennifer; Schweiger, Axel

    2004-01-01

    This is a final report to fulfill reporting requirements on NASA grant NASA NAG5-11800. Jennifer Francis, PI at Rutgers University is currently continuing work on this project under a no-cost extension. Work at the University of Washington portion of the project is completed and reported here. Major accomplishments and results from this portion of the project include: 1) Extension and reprocessing of TOVS Polar Pathfinder (Path-P) data set; 2) Analysis of Arctic cloud variability; 3) Validation of Southern Hemisphere ocean cloud retrievals; 4) Intercompared cloud height information from AVHRR retrievals and surface-based cloud radar information.

  14. Water vapour variability and trends in the Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thölix, Laura; Kivi, Rigel; Backman, Leif; Karpechko, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    Water vapour in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere (UTLS) is a radiatively and chemically important trace gas. Stratospheric water vapour also affects ozone chemistry through odd-hydrogen chemistry and formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC). Both transport and chemistry contribute to the extratropical lower stratospheric water vapour distribution and trends. The main sources of stratospheric water vapour are intrusion through the tropical tropopause and production from oxidation of methane. Accurate observations of UTLS water vapour are difficult to obtain due to the strong gradient in the water vapour profile over the tropopause. However, modelling the stratospheric water vapour distribution is challenging and accurate measurements are needed for model validation. Trends in Arctic water vapour will be analysed and explained in terms of contribution from different processes (transport and chemistry), using observations and chemistry transport model (CTM) simulations. Accurate water vapour soundings from Sodankylä will be used to study water vapour within the Arctic polar vortex, including process studies on formation of PSCs and dehydration. Water vapour profiles measured during the LAPBIAT atmospheric sounding campaign in Sodankylä in January 2010 indicated formation of ice clouds and dehydration. Effects on ozone chemistry will also be studied. Global middle atmospheric simulations have been performed with the FinROSE-ctm using ERA-Interim winds and temperatures. The FinROSE-ctm is a global middle atmosphere model that produces the distribution of 30 long-lived species and tracers and 14 short-lived species. The chemistry describes around 110 gas phase reactions, 37 photodissociation processes and the main heterogeneous reactions related to aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds.

  15. A strong phase reversal of the Arctic Oscillation in midwinter 2015/2016: Role of the stratospheric polar vortex and tropospheric blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Hoffman H. N.; Zhou, Wen; Leung, Marco Y. T.; Shun, C. M.; Lee, S. M.; Tong, H. W.

    2016-11-01

    In January 2016, Asia and North America experienced unusual cold temperatures, although the global average of surface air temperature broke the warmest record during a strong El Niño event. This was closely related to the remarkable phase transition of the Arctic Oscillation (AO), which can be explained by stratosphere-troposphere interactions. First, the quasi-biennial oscillation changed to its westerly phase in summer 2015 and the stratospheric polar vortex was stronger in early to midwinter 2015/2016. As blocking did not occur in December, the associated downward propagation signal resulted in a strongly positive AO in late December 2015. Second, after late December, the positive phase of Pacific-North America pattern became apparent in El Niño event, which strengthened the Aleutian anticyclone in the stratosphere. In addition, an equivalent barotropic ("blocking") anticyclone was established in the troposphere over Asia. The coexistence of blocking over Asia and North America characterized the negative AO and a strong zonal wave number 2 pattern. Due to stronger zonal wave number 2 signals from the troposphere, the stronger stratospheric polar vortex was elongated, with two cyclonic centers over Asia and the North Atlantic in January. The resultant southward displacement of polar vortices was followed by rare snowfall in the subtropical region of East Asia and a heavy snowstorm on the East Coast of the United States.

  16. Microwave Polarized Signatures Generated within Cloud Systems: SSM/I Observations Interpreted with Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prigent, Catherine; Pardo, Juan R.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rossow, Willaim B.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Special Sensor Microwave /Imager (SSM/I) observations in cloud systems are studied over the tropics. Over optically thick cloud systems, presence of polarized signatures at 37 and 85 GHz is evidenced and analyzed with the help of cloud top temperature and optical thickness extracted from visible and IR satellite observations. Scattering signatures at 85 GHz (TbV(85) less than or = 250 K) are associated with polarization differences greater than or = 6 K, approx. 50%, of the time over ocean and approx. 40% over land. In addition. over thick clouds the polarization difference at 37 GHz is rarely negligible. The polarization differences at 37 and 85 GHz do not stem from the surface but are generated in regions of relatively homogeneous clouds having high liquid water content. To interpret the observations, a radiative transfer model that includes the scattering by non-spherical particles is developed. based on the T-matrix approach and using the doubling and adding method. In addition to handling randomly and perfectly oriented particles, this model can also simulate the effect of partial orientation of the hydrometeors. Microwave brightness temperatures are simulated at SSM/I frequencies and are compared with the observations. Polarization differences of approx. 2 K can be simulated at 37 GHz over a rain layer, even using spherical drops. The polarization difference is larger for oriented non-spherical particles. The 85 GHz simulations are very sensitive to the ice phase of the cloud. Simulations with spherical particles or with randomly oriented non-spherical ice particles cannot replicate the observed polarization differences. However, with partially oriented non-spherical particles, the observed polarized signatures at 85 GHz are explained, and the sensitivity of the scattering characteristics to the particle size, asphericity, and orientation is analyzed. Implications on rain and ice retrievals are discussed.

  17. The Polarization Lidar Technique for Cloud Research: A Review and Current Assessment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, Kenneth

    1991-12-01

    The development of the polarization lidar field over the past two decades is reviewed, and the current cloud-research capabilities and limitations are evaluated. Relying on fundamental scattering principles governing the interaction of polarized laser light with distinctly shaped hydrometers, this remote-sensing technique has contributed to our knowledge of the composition and structure of a variety of cloud types. For example, polarization lidar is a key component of current climate-research programs to characterize the properties of cirrus clouds, and is an integral part of multiple remote-sensor studies of mixed-phase cloud systems, such as winter mountain storms. Although unambiguous cloud-phase discrimination and the identification of some ice particle types and orientations are demonstrated capabilities, recent theoretical approaches involving ice crystal ray-tracing and cloud microphysical model simulations are, promising to increase the utility of the technique. New results simulating the single and multiple scattering properties of precipitating mixed-phase clouds are given for illustration of such methods.

  18. Comparing submillimeter polarized emission with near-infrared polarization of background stars for the Vela C molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Fabio P.; Ade, Peter; Angilè, Francesco E.; Ashton, Peter; Benton, Steven J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gandilo, Natalie; Klein, Jeffrey; Li, Zhi-Yun; Korotkov, Andrei; Martin, Peter G.; Matthews, Tristan; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; nakamura, fumitaka; Barth Netterfield, Calvin; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil; Soler, Juan D.; Thomas, Nicholas; tucker, carole; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek; BLASTPOL

    2016-06-01

    We present a large-scale combination of near-infrared (near-IR) interstellar polarization data from background starlight, with polarized emission data at sub-millimetric (sub-mm) bands for the Vela C molecular cloud. The sub-mm data were obtained by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) during the 2012 flight in Antartica. The near-IR data consist of more than 6700 detections in the I-band, covering a wide area around the cloud, mostly in the range of visual extinctions between 2 and 16 mag. The main goal was to determine the polarization efficiency ratio Reff , defined as p500/(pI/τV), where p500 is the polarization fraction at 500 μm and optical depths τV are estimated from cataloged near-IR photometry. To ensure that the same column density of material is producing both polarization from emission and extinction, we introduce a new method to select stars that are located in the near-background, the Gaussian-logistic (GL) technique. The polarization efficiency ratio is critically affected by stellar objects with background contamination from the diffuse Galactic material, emphasizing the need for a careful selection. Accounting for the statistical and systematic uncertainties from the GL method, we estimate an average Reff value of 2.4 ± 0.8, which can be used to test dust grain models designed specifically for molecular clouds. Reff appears to be relatively flat as a function of the cloud depth, suggesting that significant grain modification might occur only at higher densities.

  19. How well can we monitor cloud properties over polar regions in winter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, S. A.; Holz, R.; Frey, R.; Heidinger, A.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding the impact of clouds on the Earth's radiation balance and detecting changes in the amount and distribution of global cloud cover requires accurate global cloud climatologies with well-characterized uncertainties. To meet this challenge, significant effort has been given to generating climate quality long-term cloud data sets using over 30 years of polar-orbiting satellite measurements [Rossow and Schiffer, 1999; Jacobowitz et al, 2003; Wylie and Menzel, 1999] with plans to continue the cloud record using the next generation of polar orbiting sensors [e.g. Ackerman, et al., 1998]. A "Climate Quality" climatology requires that both the uncertainties and the physical sensitivities are quantified and are smaller than the expected climate signature. Clouds play a critical role in the Arctic climate system, through interacting with other important climate processes, including snow/ice albedo feedback. Clouds modulate the surface radiative fluxes (Wang and Key, 2003) that influence the growth and melting of sea ice. Increasing cloud cover, which keeps the shortwave irradiances at the top-of-atmosphere unchanged, possibly compensates the reduced sea ice extent (Kato et al., 2006). However, assessing changes in polar conditions during winter has been a challenge. Holz et al (2008) presented a global two-month comparison between the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud properties. Both CALIOP and MODIS are part of the NASA A-Train constellation of satellites and provide continuous near-coincident measurements that result in over 28 million cloud detection comparisons in a month. Globally (includes polar regions), it was found that the MODIS 1-km cloud mask and the CALIOP 1-km averaged layer product agreement is 88% for cloudy conditions in both August 2006 and February 2007. For clear-sky conditions the agreement is 84 (85) % for August (February). The best agreement is

  20. Investigation of East Asian clouds with polarization light detection and ranging.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Sergei N; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V; Cheong, Hai Du; Kim, Dukhyeon

    2015-04-10

    In this paper we present results of investigation of the main optical properties of East Asian clouds with a ground-based polarization lidar placed in Daejeon, Republic of Korea. Asian dust is located in elevated layers of the atmosphere in spring, travels long distances, and causes significant damage to ecology. We present backscattering matrices of clouds obtained from polarimetric remote measurements which comprise information on the scattering and absorption properties of cloud particles, their morphology, and spatial orientation. Theory of our applied lidar polarization experiment is presented in terms of the instrumental vectors of a transmitter and a receiver. Methods of solving linear and nonlinear systems of equations comprising echo signals are considered. Some numerical and measurement results are presented to illustrate the efficiency and versatility of the method of estimating the cloud parameters.

  1. Polarization properties of lidar scattering from clouds at 347 nm and 694 nm.

    PubMed

    Pal, S R; Carswell, A I

    1978-08-01

    The polarization characteristics of lidar scattering from cumulus and low-lying shower clouds have been measured with a system operating at 694 nm (red) and 347 nm (blue). The backscatter profiles of the polarization components as well as of the total intensity of the return are presented and discussed for the two wavelengths. The linear depolarization ratio delta, which can be used as a measure of the unpolarized multiple scattering, has been obtained at both wavelengths. This quantity has a very low value at cloud base for both wavelengths and increases with pulse penetration. The blue registers generally higher values of a within the cloud. The measured total intensity backscatter functions for both wavelengths are presented and discussed in relation to theoretical calculations of cloud models.

  2. Surface areas and porosities of ices used to simulate stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, Leon F.; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1993-01-01

    Surface areas, bulk densities, and porosities of ices formed at 85 or 200 K are measured to study the morphology of the vapor-deposited ices that have been used to simulate ice clouds in the laboratory. Surface areas are measured from the Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) analysis of absorption isotherms obtained at 72.2 K. Bulk densities and porosities are determined photogrammetrically. Results show that water ice and HNO3-H2O ice films deposited from the vapor at temperatures below 200 K exhibit large BET surface areas and are highly porous. For the ices annealed at temperatures above 200 K, external surface areas calculated from the observed particle sizes agree reasonably well with the BET areas, which indicates that the annealed ices are composed of nonporous particles and that the porosity of these ices is due to interstices among the particles.

  3. Natural and anthropogenic perturbations of the stratospheric ozone layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reviews potential causes for reduction in the ozone abundance. The response of stratospheric ozone to solar activity is discussed. Ozone changes are simulated in relation with the potential development of a fleet of high-speed stratospheric aircraft and the release in the atmosphere of chlorofluorocarbons. The calculations are performed by a two-dimensional chemical-radiative-dynamical model. The importance of heterogeneous chemistry in polar stratospheric clouds and in the Junge layer (sulfate aerosol) is emphasized. The recently reported ozone trend over the last decade is shown to have been largely caused by the simultaneous effects of increasing concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons and heterogeneous chemistry. The possibility for a reduction in stratospheric ozone following a large volcanic eruption such as that of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 is discussed.

  4. A Match-based approach to the estimation of polar stratospheric ozone loss using Aura Microwave Limb Sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livesey, N. J.; Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.

    2015-04-01

    The well-established "Match" approach to quantifying chemical destruction of ozone in the polar lower stratosphere is applied to ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on NASA's Aura spacecraft. Quantification of ozone loss requires distinguishing transport- and chemically induced changes in ozone abundance. This is accomplished in the Match approach by examining cases where trajectories indicate that the same airmass has been observed on multiple occasions. The method was pioneered using ozone sonde observations, for which hundreds of matched ozone observations per winter are typically available. The dense coverage of the MLS measurements, particularly at polar latitudes, allows matches to be made to thousands of observations each day. This study is enabled by recently developed MLS Lagrangian Trajectory Diagnostic (LTD) support products. Sensitivity studies indicate that the largest influence on the ozone loss estimates are the value of potential vorticity (PV) used to define the edge of the polar vortex (within which matched observations must lie) and the degree to which the PV of an airmass is allowed to vary between matched observations. Applying Match calculations to MLS observations of nitrous oxide, a long-lived tracer whose expected rate of change on these timescales is negligible, enables quantification of the impact of transport errors on the Match-based ozone loss estimates. Our loss estimates are generally in agreement with previous estimates for selected Arctic winters, though indicating smaller losses than many other studies. Arctic ozone losses are greatest during the 2010/11 winter, as seen in prior studies, with 2.0 ppmv (parts per million by volume) loss estimated at 450 K potential temperature. As expected, Antarctic winter ozone losses are consistently greater than those for the Arctic, with less interannual variability (e.g., ranging between 2.3 and 3.0 ppmv at 450 K). This study exemplifies the insights into atmospheric

  5. Subtropical and Polar Cirrus Clouds Characterized by Ground-Based Lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Lopes, Fabio J. S.; Landulfo, Eduardo; Ochoa, Héctor; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus clouds are product of weather processes, and then their occurrence and macrophysical/optical properties can vary significantly over different regions of the world. Lidars can provide height-resolved measurements with a relatively good both vertical and temporal resolutions, making them the most suitable instrumentation for high-cloud observations. The aim of this work is to show the potential of lidar observations on Cirrus clouds detection in combination with a recently proposed methodology to retrieve the Cirrus clouds macrophysical and optical features. In this sense, a few case studies of cirrus clouds observed at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements are carried out in two stations: the Metropolitan city of Sao Paulo (MSP, Brazil, 23.3°S 46.4°W), located at subtropical latitudes, and the Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina, 78ºS 35ºW) in the Antarctic continent. Optical (COD-cloud optical depth and LR-Lidar Ratio) and macrophysical (top/base heights and thickness) properties of both the subtropical and polar cirrus clouds are reported. In general, subtropical Cirrus clouds present lower LR values and are found at higher altitudes than those detected at polar latitudes. In general, Cirrus clouds are detected at similar altitudes by CALIOP. However, a poor agreement is achieved in the LR retrieved between ground-based lidars and space-borne CALIOP measurements, likely due to the use of a fixed (or low-variable) LR value in CALIOP inversion procedures.

  6. A Search for the Polarization of Spinning Dust in the Dark Cloud LDN 1622

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B.; Robishaw, T.; Finkbeiner, D.

    2008-08-01

    Numerous observations have shown that the dark cloud LDN 1622 possesses an anomalous, dust-correlated spectrum of microwave emission. The microwave spectrum is consistent with anomalous spectra observed in other, more diffuse, clouds in the Galaxy and could be caused by electric-dipole emission from small, spinning dust grains. Other mechanisms that have been proposed are magnetic-dipole emission from larger, ferrous grains and hard synchrotron, both of which (unlike electric-dipole emission) would could evince significantly higher levels of polarization. We describe results from an ongoing campaign to measure the polarization of LDN 1622 with the Green Bank Telescope at 8 GHz.

  7. Studies of Polar Mesospheric Clouds from Observations by the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Scott M.

    2005-01-01

    The Geospace Sciences SR&T award NAG5-12648 "Studies of polar mesospheric clouds from observations by the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer" has been completed. The project was very successful in completing the proposed objectives and brought forth unexpected results in the study of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs). This work has provided key results to the community, provided valuable experience to two students, and inspired new research and collaborations with other research groups. Here we briefly summarize the progress and the scientific results.

  8. Spectral Cloud-Filtering of AIRS Data: Non-Polar Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Gregorich, David; Barron, Diana

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating array spectrometer which covers the thermal infrared spectral range between 640 and 1700/cm. In order to retain the maximum radiometric accuracy of the AIRS data, the effects of cloud contamination have to be minimized. We discuss cloud filtering which uses the high spectral resolution of AIRS to identify about 100,000 of 500,000 non-polar ocean spectra per day as relatively "cloud-free". Based on the comparison of surface channels with the NCEP provided global real time sst (rtg.sst), AIRS surface sensitive channels have a cold bias ranging from O.5K during the day to 0.8K during the night. Day and night spatial coherence tests show that the cold bias is due to cloud contamination. During the day the cloud contamination is due to a 2-3% broken cloud cover at the 1-2 km altitude, characteristic of low stratus clouds. The cloud-contamination effects surface sensitive channels only. Cloud contamination can be reduced to 0.2K by combining the spectral filter with a spatial coherence threshold, but the yield drops to 16,000 spectra per day. AIRS was launched in May 2002 on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua satellite. Since September 2002 it has returned 4 million spectra of the globe each day.

  9. Weather from the Stratosphere?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Mark P.; Thompson, David W. J.; Shuckburgh, Emily F.; Norton, Warwick A.; Gillett, Nathan P.

    2006-01-01

    Is the stratosphere, the atmospheric layer between about 10 and 50 km, important for predicting changes in weather and climate? The traditional view is that the stratosphere is a passive recipient of energy and waves from weather systems in the underlying troposphere, but recent evidence suggests otherwise. At a workshop in Whistler, British Columbia (1), scientists met to discuss how the stratosphere responds to forcing from below, initiating feedback processes that in turn alter weather patterns in the troposphere. The lowest layer of the atmosphere, the troposphere, is highly dynamic and rich in water vapor, clouds, and weather. The stratosphere above it is less dense and less turbulent (see the figure). Variability in the stratosphere is dominated by hemispheric-scale changes in airflow on time scales of a week to several months. Occasionally, however, stratospheric air flow changes dramatically within just a day or two, with large-scale jumps in temperature of 20 K or more. The troposphere influences the stratosphere mainly through atmospheric waves that propagate upward. Recent evidence shows that the stratosphere organizes this chaotic wave forcing from below to create long-lived changes in the stratospheric circulation. These stratospheric changes can feed back to affect weather and climate in the troposphere.

  10. The structure and phase of cloud tops as observed by polarization lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, J. D.; Hansen, M. Z.; Simpson, J.

    1983-01-01

    High-resolution observations of the structure of cloud tops have been obtained with polarization lidar operated from a high altitude aircraft. Case studies of measurements acquired from cumuliform cloud systems are presented, two from September 1979 observations in the area of Florida and adjacent waters and a third during the May 1981 CCOPE experiment in southeast Montana. Accurate cloud top height structure and relative density of hydrometers are obtained from the lidar return signal intensity. Correlation between the signal return intensity and active updrafts was noted. Thin cirrus overlying developing turrets was observed in some cases. Typical values of the observed backscatter cross section were 0.1-5 (km/sr) for cumulonimbus tops. The depolarization ratio of the lidar signals was a function of the thermodynamic phase of cloud top areas. An increase of the cloud top depolarization with decreasing temperature was found for temperatures above and below -40 C.

  11. Atmospheric Polarization Imaging with Variable Aerosols and Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-10

    made at the Mauna Loa Observatory (a mountaintop observatory in Hawaii) confirmed previous studies by Coulson and extended them to partly cloudy...grant: 1. Mr. Andrew Dahlberg – All-sky polarization imager deployment at Mauna Loa Observatory , Hawaii – M.S. Thesis, May 2010 (http...surface albedo appear to explain a morning-to-afternoon asymmetry in the observed polarization pattern in the sky above the Mauna Loa Observatory on the

  12. A cold pool reference frame for analyzing polar stratospheric clouds and tropospheric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    The dominance of synoptic scale tropospheric forcing as a driver for Arctic PSC existence has been established for a single season [Teitelbaum et al., 2001, J. Geophys. Res.] and over the entire SAM II, POAM II, POAM III era [Fromm et al. 2003, J. Geophys. Res.]. These results suggest that a meteorological context for PSC occurrence and composition, based on synoptic-scale dynamics, is appropriate and useful for unified PSC studies. Here we analyze satellite PSC observations in a new geospatial context: the cold pool reference frame (CPRF). We present a CPRF using the canonical nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) saturation isotherm as the boundary, with isotherms for liquid ternary aerosol condensation and the water-ice frost point for inner PSC-composition "latitudes." The temperature minimum and the longitude of the temperature minimum mark the pole and axis of the CPRF, respectively. The CPRF also incorporates the air flow through the cold pool with the Montgomery stream function. With such information, we relate SAGE and POAM occurrence of PSCs with respect to the cold pool axis and the upwind/downwind PSC-composition latitude belts. The CPRF model, and a justification based on monthly average December 2002 meteorological analyses, is presented. To illustrate, we show the case of 19 December 2002 as well as monthly PSC results. We also apply the CPRF to PSC observations from the Arctic winter of 2010/2011.

  13. Continuous Lidar Monitoring of Polar Stratospheric Clouds at the South Pole

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    orbiting tracks that rarely exceed 80°S. Ground-based measurements of PSC can supple- ment gaps in satellite coverage. Such data are funda- mental...2.85 km MSL, with the dotted line representing 220 DU, or the colloquial threshold for "ozone hole" conditions. 1999 to the NOAA Earth Systems Research...ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. The MPLNET project Is funded through the NASA Earth Observing System and the NASA Atmospheric Radiation Sciences program. The authors

  14. Heterogeneous reactions of chlorine nitrate and hydrogen chloride on type I polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun; Moore, Steven B.; Keyser, Leon F.

    1991-01-01

    A fast-flow reactor coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to study the heterogeneous reactions ClONO2 + HCl yields Cl2 + HNO3 (1) and ClONO2 + H2O yields HOCl + HNO3 (2) on vapor-deposited HNO3-H2O ice substrates. It was found that the sticking coefficient of HCl on these substrates was a strong function of the substrate composition, ranging from about 2 x 10 exp -5 at nitric acid trihydrate composition to 6 x 10 exp -3 at 45 wt pct HNO3. The HNO3-H2O ice substrates were found to have large internal surface areas, and corrections for gas-phase diffusion within the porous ices were applied to observed loss rates.

  15. Cloud and aerosol optics by polarized micro pulse Lidar and ground based measurements of zenith radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgadillo, Rodrigo

    Clouds impact Earth's climate through cloud transmission and reflection properties. Clouds reflect approximately 15 percent of the incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. A key cloud radiative variable is cloud optical depth, which gives information about how much light is transmitted through a cloud. Historically, remote measurements of cloud optical depth have been limited to uniform overcast conditions and had low temporal and spatial resolution. We present a novel method to measure cloud optical depth for coastal regions from spectral zenith radiance measurements for optically thin clouds, which removes some of these limitations. Our measurement site is part of South Florida's Cloud-Aerosol-Rain Observatory (CAROb), located on Virginia Key, FL (6 km from Miami). This work is based on Marshak et al.'s method for finding cloud optical depth from vegetative sites that provide a strong spectral contrast between red and near infrared surface albedo. However, given the unique nature of our site, which contains water, vegetation, beach, and urban surface types, we found no such spectral contrast at those wavelength pairs. We measured albedo, with hyperspectral resolution, for different surface types around our measurement site to estimate the effective spectral albedo for the area centered on the site with a 5km radius. From this analysis, we found the best possible albedo contrast (573.9 and 673.1 nm) for our site. We tested the derived cloud optical depth from zenith radiance at these two wavelengths against a concurrently running polarized micro pulse LIDAR (MPL) and found good agreement.

  16. The analysis of polar clouds from AVHRR satellite data using pattern recognition techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William L.; Ebert, Elizabeth

    1990-01-01

    The cloud cover in a set of summertime and wintertime AVHRR data from the Arctic and Antarctic regions was analyzed using a pattern recognition algorithm. The data were collected by the NOAA-7 satellite on 6 to 13 Jan. and 1 to 7 Jul. 1984 between 60 deg and 90 deg north and south latitude in 5 spectral channels, at the Global Area Coverage (GAC) resolution of approximately 4 km. This data embodied a Polar Cloud Pilot Data Set which was analyzed by a number of research groups as part of a polar cloud algorithm intercomparison study. This study was intended to determine whether the additional information contained in the AVHRR channels (beyond the standard visible and infrared bands on geostationary satellites) could be effectively utilized in cloud algorithms to resolve some of the cloud detection problems caused by low visible and thermal contrasts in the polar regions. The analysis described makes use of a pattern recognition algorithm which estimates the surface and cloud classification, cloud fraction, and surface and cloudy visible (channel 1) albedo and infrared (channel 4) brightness temperatures on a 2.5 x 2.5 deg latitude-longitude grid. In each grid box several spectral and textural features were computed from the calibrated pixel values in the multispectral imagery, then used to classify the region into one of eighteen surface and/or cloud types using the maximum likelihood decision rule. A slightly different version of the algorithm was used for each season and hemisphere because of differences in categories and because of the lack of visible imagery during winter. The classification of the scene is used to specify the optimal AVHRR channel for separating clear and cloudy pixels using a hybrid histogram-spatial coherence method. This method estimates values for cloud fraction, clear and cloudy albedos and brightness temperatures in each grid box. The choice of a class-dependent AVHRR channel allows for better separation of clear and cloudy pixels than

  17. NEAR-INFRARED POLARIZATION SOURCE CATALOG OF THE NORTHEASTERN REGIONS OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaeyeong; Pak, Soojong; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Park, Won-Kee; Tamura, Motohide E-mail: jeongws@kasi.re.kr

    2016-01-15

    We present a near-infrared band-merged photometric and polarimetric catalog for the 39′ × 69′ fields in the northeastern part of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), which were observed using SIRPOL, an imaging polarimeter of the InfraRed Survey Facility. This catalog lists 1858 sources brighter than 14 mag in the H band with a polarization signal-to-noise ratio greater than three in the J, H, or K{sub s} bands. Based on the relationship between the extinction and the polarization degree, we argue that the polarization mostly arises from dichroic extinctions caused by local interstellar dust in the LMC. This catalog allows us to map polarization structures to examine the global geometry of the local magnetic field, and to show a statistical analysis of the polarization of each field to understand its polarization properties. In the selected fields with coherent polarization position angles, we estimate magnetic field strengths in the range of 3−25 μG using the Chandrasekhar–Fermi method. This implies the presence of large-scale magnetic fields on a scale of around 100 parsecs. When comparing mid- and far-infrared dust emission maps, we confirmed that the polarization patterns are well aligned with molecular clouds around the star-forming regions.

  18. Arctic "ozone hole" in a cold volcanic stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Tabazadeh, A; Drdla, K; Schoeberl, M R; Hamill, P; Toon, O B

    2002-03-05

    Optical depth records indicate that volcanic aerosols from major eruptions often produce clouds that have greater surface area than typical Arctic polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). A trajectory cloud-chemistry model is used to study how volcanic aerosols could affect springtime Arctic ozone loss processes, such as chlorine activation and denitrification, in a cold winter within the current range of natural variability. Several studies indicate that severe denitrification can increase Arctic ozone loss by up to 30%. We show large PSC particles that cause denitrification in a nonvolcanic stratosphere cannot efficiently form in a volcanic environment. However, volcanic aerosols, when present at low altitudes, where Arctic PSCs cannot form, can extend the vertical range of chemical ozone loss in the lower stratosphere. Chemical processing on volcanic aerosols over a 10-km altitude range could increase the current levels of springtime column ozone loss by up to 70% independent of denitrification. Climate models predict that the lower stratosphere is cooling as a result of greenhouse gas built-up in the troposphere. The magnitude of column ozone loss calculated here for the 1999--2000 Arctic winter, in an assumed volcanic state, is similar to that projected for a colder future nonvolcanic stratosphere in the 2010 decade.

  19. Overview of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II water vapor observations - Method, validation, and data characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Chiou, E.-W.; Chu, W.; Oltmans, S.; Lerner, J.; Larsen, J.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of water vapor observations in the troposphere and stratosphere performed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II solar occultation instrument, and the analysis procedure, the instrument errors, and data characteristics are discussed. The results are compared with correlative in situ measurements and other satellite data. The features of the data set collected between 1985 and 1989 include an increase in middle- and upper-tropospheric water vapor during northern hemisphere summer and autumn; minimum water vapor values of 2.5-3 ppmv in the tropical lower stratosphere; slowly increasing water vapor values with altitude in the stratosphere, reaching 5-6 ppmv or greater near the stratopause; extratropical values with minimum profile amounts occurring above the conventionally defined tropopause; and higher extratropical than tropical water vapor values throughout the stratosphere except in locations of possible polar stratospheric clouds.

  20. Accuracy Assessments of Cloud Droplet Size Retrievals from Polarized Reflectance Measurements by the Research Scanning Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail Dmitrievic; Cairns, Brian; Emde, Claudia; Ackerman, Andrew S.; vanDiedenhove, Bastiaan

    2012-01-01

    We present an algorithm for the retrieval of cloud droplet size distribution parameters (effective radius and variance) from the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) measurements. The RSP is an airborne prototype for the Aerosol Polarimetery Sensor (APS), which was on-board of the NASA Glory satellite. This instrument measures both polarized and total reflectance in 9 spectral channels with central wavelengths ranging from 410 to 2260 nm. The cloud droplet size retrievals use the polarized reflectance in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg, where they exhibit the sharply defined structure known as the rain- or cloud-bow. The shape of the rainbow is determined mainly by the single scattering properties of cloud particles. This significantly simplifies both forward modeling and inversions, while also substantially reducing uncertainties caused by the aerosol loading and possible presence of undetected clouds nearby. In this study we present the accuracy evaluation of our algorithm based on the results of sensitivity tests performed using realistic simulated cloud radiation fields.

  1. Lifetime Extension of Cirrus Cloud Ice Particles upon Contamination with HCl and HNO3 under conditions of the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Michel J.; Delval, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Ice particles in the Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere (UT/LS) are the seat of heterogeneous chemical processes that are important in polar ozone chemistry. Estimated evaporative lifetimes of typical pure ice particles of a few micrometers radius in Cirrus clouds are on the order of a minute or so at 80% relative humidity, too short to allow significant heterogeneous processing. We took this as a motivation to systematically measure absolute rates of evaporation and condensation of H2O in 1 to 2 micrometer thick ice films taken as proxies for small atmospheric ice particles under controlled conditions of HCl and HNO3 trace gas contamination. We have used a multidiagnostic reaction vessel equipped with residual gas mass spectrometry (MS), FTIR absorption spectroscopy in transmission and a quartz crystal microbalance (QCMB) in order to simultaneously observe both the gas and condensed phases under relevant atmospheric conditions. The rates (Rev(H2O)) or fluxes of evaporation (Jev(H2O)) of H2O from thin ice films contaminated by a measured amount of HCl in the range of 10% of a formal monolayer to 20 formal monolayers decreased by factors of between 2 and 50 depending on parameters such as temperature of deposition (Tdep), rate (RHCl) and dose (NHCl) of contaminant doping. Experiments with HCl fell into two categories as far as the decrease of Jev with the average mole fraction of contaminant (χHCl) in the remaining ice slab was concerned: one group where Jev(H2O) decreased gradually after pure ice evaporated, and another group where Jev(H2O) abruptly changes with χHCl after evaporation of excess ice. FTIR spectroscopy revealed an unknown, yet crystalline form of HCl hydrate upon HCl doping that does not correspond to a known crystalline hydrate. Of importance is the observation, that the equilibrium vapor pressure of these contaminated ices correspond to that of pure ice even after evaporation of excess ice at the characteristic rate of pure ice evaporation

  2. Depolarization of polarized light caused by high altitude clouds. 1: Depolarization of lidar induced by cirrus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y Y; Li, Z P; Bösenberg, J

    1989-09-01

    A scattering model is described for the investigation of depolarization of polarized light caused by ice clouds. The scattering by a single particle is described by refraction, reflection, and diffraction. The ice cloud is assumed to be a random mixture of hexagonal columns and plates of random orientation and size. Multiple scattering effects are included by means of a Monte Carlo method, where single photon histories are constructed from random samples of the distributions governing the basic scattering parameters. The dependence of depolarization on cloud extinction coefficient, receiver field of view, and mixing ratio of columns to plates are studied. Lidar measurements of depolarization by a high altitude cirrus cloud are presented and discussed within the frame of the present model. Good agreement can be obtained assuming a variation of crystal shape distribution with height.

  3. A Match-based approach to the estimation of polar stratospheric ozone loss using Aura Microwave Limb Sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livesey, N. J.; Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.

    2015-09-01

    The well-established "Match" approach to quantifying chemical destruction of ozone in the polar lower stratosphere is applied to ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on NASA's Aura spacecraft. Quantification of ozone loss requires distinguishing transport- and chemically induced changes in ozone abundance. This is accomplished in the Match approach by examining cases where trajectories indicate that the same air mass has been observed on multiple occasions. The method was pioneered using ozonesonde observations, for which hundreds of matched ozone observations per winter are typically available. The dense coverage of the MLS measurements, particularly at polar latitudes, allows matches to be made to thousands of observations each day. This study is enabled by recently developed MLS Lagrangian trajectory diagnostic (LTD) support products. Sensitivity studies indicate that the largest influence on the ozone loss estimates are the value of potential vorticity (PV) used to define the edge of the polar vortex (within which matched observations must lie) and the degree to which the PV of an air mass is allowed to vary between matched observations. Applying Match calculations to MLS observations of nitrous oxide, a long-lived tracer whose expected rate of change is negligible on the weekly to monthly timescales considered here, enables quantification of the impact of transport errors on the Match-based ozone loss estimates. Our loss estimates are generally in agreement with previous estimates for selected Arctic winters, though indicating smaller losses than many other studies. Arctic ozone losses are greatest during the 2010/11 winter, as seen in prior studies, with 2.0 ppmv (parts per million by volume) loss estimated at 450 K potential temperature (~ 18 km altitude). As expected, Antarctic winter ozone losses are consistently greater than those for the Arctic, with less interannual variability (e.g., ranging between 2.3 and 3.0 ppmv at 450 K). This

  4. Atmospheric Polarization Imaging with Variable Aerosols, Clouds, and Surface Albedo

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    which are comparable to or larger than the optical wavelength, alter the pure Rayleigh background through scattering processes that do not follow the...removes the uncertainty of film processing inherent in systems described by North and Duggin (1997) and Horvath et al. (2002). Our use of electronically...polarization. We used satellite imagery to determine the effective surface reflectance for the area surrounding the MLO, and processed clear-sky

  5. Effect of stratospheric aerosol layers on the TOMS/SBUV ozone retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Ahmad, Zia; Pan, L.; Herman, J. R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Mcpeters, R.

    1994-01-01

    An evaluation of the optical effects of stratospheric aerosol layers on total ozone retrieval from space by the TOMS/SBUV type instruments is presented here. Using the Dave radiative transfer model we estimate the magnitude of the errors in the retrieved ozone when polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) or volcanic aerosol layers interfere with the measurements. The largest errors are produced by optically thick water ice PSC's. Results of simulation experiments on the effect of the Pinatubo aerosol cloud on the Nimbus-7 and Meteor-3 TOMS products are presented.

  6. Corona-producing cirrus cloud properties derived from polarization lidar and photographic analyses.

    PubMed

    Sassen, K

    1991-08-20

    Polarization lidar data are used to demonstrate that clouds composed of hexagonal ice crystals can generate multiple-ringed colored coronas. Although relatively uncommon in our mid-latitude cirrus sample (derived from Project FIRE extended time observations), the coronas are associated with unusual cloud conditions that appear to be effective in generating the displays. Invariably, the cirrus cloud tops are located at or slightly above elevated tropopauses (12.7-km MSL average height) at temperatures between -60 degrees and -70 degrees C. The cloud top region also generates relatively strong laser backscattering and unusually high 0.5-0.7 linear depolarization ratios. Color photograph analysis of corona ring angles indicates crystals with mean diameters of from 12 to 30 microm. The cirrus cloud types were mainly subvisual to thin (i.e., bluish-colored) cirrostratus, but also included fibrous cirrus. Estimated cloud optical thicknesses at the 0.694-microm laser wavelength ranged from 0.001 to 0.2, where the upper limit reflects the effects of multiple scattering and/or unfavorable changes in particle characteristics in deep cirrus clouds.

  7. Tomographic and spectral views on the lifecycle of polar mesospheric clouds from Odin/OSIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultgren, Kristoffer; Gumbel, Jörg

    2014-12-01

    Vertical and horizontal structures of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC) have been recovered by tomographic retrieval from the OSIRIS instrument aboard the Odin satellite. The tomographic algorithm has been used to return local scattering coefficients at seven wavelengths in the ultraviolet. This spectral information is used to retrieve PMC particle sizes, number density, and ice mass density. While substantial horizontal variations are found, local vertical structures are overall consistent with the idea of a growth-sedimentation process leading to a visible cloud. Large numbers of small particles are present near the top of the observed cloud layer. Toward lower altitudes, particle sizes increase while particle number densities decrease. A close relationship is found between the distribution of local PMC scattering coefficient and ice mass density. The bottom of the cloud often features large particles with mode radii exceeding 70 nm that rain out of the cloud before sublimating. The number density of these large particles is small, and they do not contribute significantly to the overall cloud brightness. As a consequence, the presence of these large particles can be difficult to identify for remote sensing techniques that integrate over the entire cloud column. When it comes to deriving absolute values of particle mode radius and number density, there is a strong sensitivity to assumptions on the mathematical form of the particle size distribution. We see a continued strong need to resolve this issue by co-analysis of various remote sensing techniques and observation geometries.

  8. X-ray polarization fluctuations induced by cloud eclipses in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, F.; Dovčiak, M.

    2015-01-01

    Context. A fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show dramatic X-ray spectral changes on the day-to-week time scales associated with variation in the line of sight of the cold absorber. Aims: We intend to model the polarization fluctuations arising from an obscuration event, thereby offering a method of determining whether flux variations are due to occultation or extreme intrinsic emission variability. Methods: Undertaking 1-100 keV polarimetric simulations with the Monte Carlo code Stokes, we simulated the journey of a variety of cold gas clouds in front of an extended primary source. We varied the hydrogen column density nH and size of the absorber, as well as the initial polarization state of the emitting source, to cover a wide range of scenarios. Results: Simulations indicate that different results are expected according to the initial polarization of the extended continuum source. For unpolarized primary fluxes, large (~50°) variations of the polarization position angle ψ are expected before and after an occultation event, which is associated with very low residual polarization degrees (P ≪ 1%). In the case of an emitting disk with intrinsic, position-independent polarization, and for a given range of parameters, X-ray eclipses significantly alter the observed polarization spectra, with most of the variations seen in ψ. Finally, non-uniformly polarized emitting regions produce very distinctive polarization variations due to the successive covering and uncovering of different portions of the disk. Plotted against time, variations in P and ψ form detectable P Cygni type profiles that are distinctive signatures of non-axisymmetric emission. Conclusions: We find that X-ray polarimetry is particularly adapted to probing X-ray eclipses due to Compton-thin and Compton-thick gas clouds. Polarization measurements would distinguish between intrinsic intensity fluctuations and external eclipsing events, constrain the geometry of the covering medium, and test

  9. Representations of the Stratospheric Polar Vortices in Versions 1 and 2 of the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOS CCM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, S.; Stolarski, R.S.; Nielsen, J.E.; Perlwitz, J.; Oman, L.; Waugh, D.

    2009-01-01

    This study will document the behavior of the polar vortices in two versions of the GEOS CCM. Both versions of the model include the same stratospheric chemistry, They differ in the underlying circulation model. Version 1 of the GEOS CCM is based on the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 4, general circulation model which includes the finite-volume (Lin-Rood) dynamical core and physical parameterizations from Community Climate Model, Version 3. GEOS CCM Version 2 is based on the GEOS-5 GCM that includes a different tropospheric physics package. Baseline simulations of both models, performed at two-degree spatial resolution, show some improvements in Version 2, but also some degradation, In the Antarctic, both models show an over-persistent stratospheric polar vortex with late breakdown, but the year-to-year variations that are overestimated in Version I are more realistic in Version 2. The implications of this for the interactions with tropospheric climate, the Southern Annular Mode, will be discussed. In the Arctic both model versions show a dominant dynamically forced variabi;ity, but Version 2 has a persistent warm bias in the low stratosphere and there are seasonal differences in the simulations. These differences will be quantified in terms of climate change and ozone loss. Impacts of model resolution, using simulations at one-degree and half-degree, and changes in physical parameterizations (especially the gravity wave drag) will be discussed.

  10. Trajectory retrieval and component investigations of the southern polar stratosphere based on high-resolution spectroscopy of the totally eclipsed moon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolnikov, Oleg S.; Punanova, Anna F.; Krushinsky, Vadim V.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present the high-resolution spectral observations of the fragment of lunar surface during the total lunar eclipse of December 10, 2011. The observations were carried out with the fiber-fed echelle spectrograph at the 1.2-m telescope in Kourovka Astronomical observatory (Ural mountains, central Russia). The observed radiation is transmitted by tangent trajectory through the southern polar stratosphere before the reflection from the Moon and the spectra contain a number of absorption bands of atmospheric gases (O2, O3, O4, NO2, H2O). High-resolution analysis of three O2 bands and O4 absorption effects is used to trace the effective trajectory of solar emission through the stratosphere and to detect the contribution of scattered light. Bands of other gases allow us to measure their abundances along the trajectory.

  11. Numerical modeling of polarization properties of the return signals in ground-based LIDAR cloud sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablukova, E. G.; Kargin, B. A.; Lisenko, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents results of numerical statistical simulations of experiments of ground-based sensing of cloud layers by terahertz linearly polarized radiation for certain wavelengths from the atmospheric transparency windows. Summarized results of many years' field measurements of liquid droplet size distributions in temperate latitudes of the Earth and the distributions obtained by aircraft experiments off Great Britain's coast are used in the scattering layer models. The models of the scattering medium take into account the vertical stratification of water vapor concentration in the atmosphere and the differences in cloud layer microstructure at the top and the base.

  12. Cloud classification from satellite data using a fuzzy sets algorithm: A polar example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, J. R.; Maslanik, J. A.; Barry, R. G.

    1988-01-01

    Where spatial boundaries between phenomena are diffuse, classification methods which construct mutually exclusive clusters seem inappropriate. The Fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm assigns each observation to all clusters, with membership values as a function of distance to the cluster center. The FCM algorithm is applied to AVHRR data for the purpose of classifying polar clouds and surfaces. Careful analysis of the fuzzy sets can provide information on which spectral channels are best suited to the classification of particular features, and can help determine likely areas of misclassification. General agreement in the resulting classes and cloud fraction was found between the FCM algorithm, a manual classification, and an unsupervised maximum likelihood classifier.

  13. Cloud classification from satellite data using a fuzzy sets algorithm - A polar example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, J. R.; Maslanik, J. A.; Barry, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    Where spatial boundaries between phenomena are diffuse, classification methods which construct mutually exclusive clusters seem inappropriate. The Fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm assigns each observation to all clusters, with membership values as a function of distance to the cluster center. The FCM algorithm is applied to AVHRR data for the purpose of classifying polar clouds and surfaces. Careful analysis of the fuzzy sets can provide information on which spectral channels are best suited to the classification of particular features, and can help determine like areas of misclassification. General agreement in the resulting classes and cloud fraction was found between the FCM algorithm, a manual classification, and an unsupervised maximum likelihood classifier.

  14. Systematic stratospheric observations on the Antarctic continent at Dumont d'Urville

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godin, S.; Sarkissian, A.; David, C.; Megie, G.; Pommereau, J. P.; Goutail, F.; Aimedieu, P.; Piquard, J.; Lebouar, E.; Stefanutti, L.

    1994-01-01

    Results of different routine measurements performed in Dumont d'Urville (66 deg S, 140 deg E) since 1988 are presented. They include the seasonal variation of total ozone and NO2 as measured by a SAOZ UV-Visible spectrometer, Polar Stratospheric Cloud observations by a backscatter lidar and more recently, vertical ozone profiles by ECC sondes and ozone and aerosols stratospheric profiles by a DIAL lidar. The particular results of 1991 in relation with the volcanic events of Mount Pinatubo and Mount Hudson, and the position of the polar vortex over Dumont d'Urville are discussed.

  15. Trajectory analysis of Polar Patrol Balloon (PPB) flights in the stratosphere over Antarctica in summer and spring: A preliminary result

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanzawa, Hiroshi; Fujii, Ryoichi; Yamazaki, Koji; Yamanaka, Manabu D.

    1994-01-01

    Actual trajectories of two PPB's which flew in the Antarctic stratosphere in austral summer and spring are compared with those calculated based on objective analysis data of Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). The differences between the actual and calculated trajectories are discussed to check reliability of the JMA objective analysis data for the stratosphere, and to detect subsynoptic scale variability due to gravity waves and others.

  16. A 2D Microphysical Analysis of Aerosol Nucleation in the Polar Winter Stratosphere: Implications for H2SO4 Photolysis and Nucleation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Michael J.; Toon, Owen B.; Mills, Michael J.; Solomon, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Each spring a layer of small particles forms between 20 and 30 km in the polar regions. Results are presented from a 2D microphysical model of sulfate aerosol, which provide the first self-consistent explanation of the observed "CN layer." Photochemical conversion of sulfuric acid to SO2 in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere is necessary for this layer to form. Recent laboratory measurements of H2SO4 and SO3 photolysis rates are consistent with such conversion, though an additional source of SO2 may be required. Nucleation throughout the polar winter extends the top of the aerosol layer to higher altitudes, despite strong downward transport of ambient air. This finding may be important to heterogeneous chemistry at the top of the aerosol layer in polar winter and spring.

  17. Interannual variability of the 4-day wave and isentropic mixing inside the polar vortex in midwinter of the Southern Hemisphere upper stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuta, Ryo; Yoden, Shigeo

    2002-12-01

    Interannual variations of the flow field and large-scale horizontal transport and mixing inside the wintertime polar vortex of the Southern Hemisphere upper stratosphere are investigated using isentropic winds obtained from the U.K. Met Office assimilated data for nine years of 1992-2000. We focused on the midwinter, July, when the polar vortex is not much distorted, although an eastward propagating wave called the 4-day wave is observed in some years in the polar region. Finite-time Lyapunov exponents are computed, and contour advections are done to examine stirring and mixing in the polar region. When the 4-day wave has a large amplitude, effective mixing through a stretching and folding process is seen inside the polar vortex. Finite-time Lyapunov exponents are sometimes as large as the midlatitudes, and the material contours of small areas grow exponentially in time on the poleward side of 70°S. Such mixing properties are not uniform inside the vortex. When the wave is not clearly seen, on the other hand, wind fields are close to a solid body rotation around the pole, and mixing is very small; Lyapunov exponents are small, and the material contours grow linearly in time by the stretching due to the meridional shear of the polar night jet. Such interannual variability of the strength of the mixing is correlated with the variability of the perturbation amplitude of potential vorticity in the polar region.

  18. Retrieval of Venus' clouds parameters with polarization using SPICAV-IR onboard Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Loïc; Marcq, Emmanuel; Montmessin, Franck; Fedorova, Anna; Stam, Daphne; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Korablev, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the structure and dynamics of Venus' clouds is essential as they have a strong impact on the radiative balance and atmospheric chemistry of the planet. Polarimetry has greatly contributed to our knwoledge about the properties of the cloud layers located between 48 and ~ 70 km. Hansen and Hovenier (1974), using ground-based observations, found the cloud particles to be ~ 1μm spherical droplets, with a refractive index corresponding to a concentrated sulfuric acid-water solution. Later, Kawabata et al. (1980), using polarimetric data from OCPP onboard Pioneer Venus retrieved the properties of the haze: effective radius of ~ 0.25μm, refractive indices consistent with a sulfuric acid-water solution, variance of the particle size distribution. We introduce here new measurements obtained with the SPICAV-IR spectrometer onboard ESA's Venus Express. Observing Venus in the visible and IR from 650 nm to 1625 nm with a good spatial and temporal converage, SPICAV's sensitivity to the degree of linear polarization gives us an opportunity to put better constraints on haze and cloud particles at Venus cloud top, as well as their spatial and temporal variability. These observations reveal a particular feature called glory, observed by SPICAV-IR and VMC (Markiewicz et al. 2014). Using a radiative transfer code taking into account polarization (de Haan et al. 1987, de Rooij et al. 1984, Stam et al. 1999), we model the cloud layers and the glory allowing us to retrieve the real part of the refractive index, the effective radius and variance of the particle size distribution from the main cloud layer. Our results confirm that the particles are spherical, with a narrow size distribution and with refractive indices that are compatible with H2SO4-H2O solutions (Rossi et al. 2014). Using the large latitudinal coverage of the data, we can also retrieve the variation of the overlying haze layer optical thickness. We find that τh is increasing with increasing latitude, in

  19. Interaction between the low altitude atmosphere and clouds by high-precision polarization lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiina, Tatsuo; Noguchi, Kazuo; Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    2012-11-01

    Lidar is a powerful remote sensing tool to monitor the weather changes and the environmental issues. This technique should not been restricted in those fields. In this study, the authors aim to be apply it to the prediction of weather disaster. The heavy rain and the lightning strike are our targets. The inline typed MPL (micro pulse lidar) has been accomplished to grasp the interaction between the low altitude cloud and the atmosphere and to predict the heavy rain, while it was hard to catch the sign of lightning strike. The authors introduced a new algorism to catch the direct sign of the lightning strike. Faraday effect is caused by lightning discharge in the ionized atmosphere. This effect interacts with the polarization of the propagating beam, that is, the polarization plane is rotated by the effect. In this study, high precision polarization lidar was developed to grasp the small rotation angle of the polarization of the propagating beam. In this report, the interaction between the low altitude cloud and the atmosphere was monitored by the high precision polarization lidar. And the observation result of the lightning discharge were analyzed.

  20. Development of a multiple-field-of-view multiple-scattering polarization lidar: comparison with cloud radar.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hajime; Sato, Kaori; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Makino, Toshiyuki; Jin, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Atsushi; Takano, Toshiaki; Fujikawa, Masahiro

    2016-12-26

    We developed a multiple-field-of-view multiple-scattering polarization lidar (MFMSPL) to study the microphysics of optically thick clouds. Designed to measure enhanced backscattering and depolarization ratio comparable to space-borne lidar, the system consists of four sets of parallel and perpendicular channels mounted with different zenith angles. Depolarization ratios from water clouds were large as observed by MFMSPL compared to those observed by conventional lidar. Cloud top heights and depolarization ratios tended to be larger for outer MFMSPL channels than for vertically pointing channels. Co-located 95 GHz cloud radar and MFMSPL observations showed reasonable agreement at the observed cloud top height.

  1. Statistical numerical simulation of polarized terahertz radiation propagation in a cloud layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablukova, E. G.; Kargin, B. A.; Lisenko, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    The results of numerical simulation of polarization characteristics of terahertz signals from a ground-based remote sensing system in stratus clouds for various models of liquid-droplet clouds are compared. Models of the scattering medium take into account the vertical stratification of the water vapor concentration in the atmosphere. The model of droplet size distribution includes droplets larger than 20 μm in radius. They are referred to as large droplets, while droplets with radius 1cloud layer was developed with allowance for a difference in the vertical stratification of the mean radii of the small and large droplets.

  2. Development of multiple scattering polarization lidar to observe depolarization ratio of optically thick low level clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Hajime; Sato, Kaori; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Jin, Yoshitaka

    2017-02-01

    We have examined the characteristic of backscattering coefficient and depolarization ratio that are affected by multiple scattering in optically thick water clouds. We used observations obtained by the Multiple Field of view Multiple Scattering Polarization Lidar (MFMSPL) system. The MFMSPL was the first ground-based lidar that can detect depolarization ratio of optically thick clouds and it has 8 channels, i.e., 4 for parallel channels and another 4 for perpendicular ones and achieved total FOV of 70mrad. The MFMSPL offers a unique opportunity to simulate and study space-borne lidar signals including depolarization ratio such as from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar. It was shown that the attenuated backscattering coefficient and depolarization ratio constructed by using 8 channel observations by MFMSPL were comparable to the values obtained by CALIPSO lidar.

  3. Analysis of polarization radar returns from ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, A.; Sturniolo, O.; Prodi, F.

    Using a modified T-matrix code, some polarimetric single-scattering radar parameters ( Zh,v, LDR h,v, ρhv, ZDR and δhv) from populations of ice crystals in ice phase at 94 GHz, modeled with axisymmetric prolate and oblate spheroidal shapes for a Γ-size distribution with different α parameter ( α=0, 1, 2) and characteristic dimension Lm varying from 0.1 to 1.8 mm, have been computed. Some of the results for different radar elevation angles and different orientation distribution for fixed water content are shown. Deeper analysis has been carried out for pure extensive radar polarimetric variables; all of them are strongly dependent on the shapes (characterised by the aspect ratio), the canting angle and the radar elevation angle. Quantities like ZDR or δhv at side incidence or LDR h and ρhv at vertical incidence can be used to investigate the preferred orientation of the particles and, in some cases, their habits. We analyze scatterplots using couples of pure extensive variables. The scatterplots with the most evident clustering properties for the different habits seem to be those in the ( ZDR [ χ=0°], δhv [ χ=0°]), in the ( ZDR [ χ=0°], LDR h [ χ=90°]) and in the ( ZDR [ χ=0°], ρhv [ χ=90°]) plane. Among these, the most appealing one seems to be that involving ZDR and ρhv variables. To avoid the problem of having simultaneous measurements with a side and a vertical-looking radar, we believe that measurements of these two extensive variables using a radar with an elevation angle around 45° can be an effective instrument to identify different habits. In particular, this general idea can be useful for future space-borne polarimetric radars involved in the studies of high ice clouds. It is also believed that these results can be used in next challenge of developing probabilistic and expert methods for identifying hydrometeor types by W-band radars.

  4. Is the zodiacal light intensity steady. [cloud surface brightness and polarization from OSO-5 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, G. B.; Sparrow, J. G.; Ney, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    It is pointed out that conclusions reported by Sparrow and Ney (1972, 1973) could be confirmed in an investigation involving the refinement of OSO-5 data on zodiacal light. It had been found by Sparrow and Ney that the absolute value of both the surface brightness and polarization of the zodiacal cloud varied by less than 10% over the 4-yr period from January 1969 to January 1973.

  5. Velocity profiles inside volcanic clouds from three-dimensional scanning microwave dual-polarization Doppler radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario

    2016-07-01

    In this work, velocity profiles within a volcanic tephra cloud obtained by dual-polarization Doppler radar acquisitions with three-dimensional (3-D) mechanical scanning capability are analyzed. A method for segmenting the radar volumes into three velocity regimes: vertical updraft, vertical fallout, and horizontal wind advection within a volcanic tephra cloud using dual-polarization Doppler radar moments is proposed. The horizontal and vertical velocity components within the regimes are retrieved using a novel procedure that makes assumptions concerning the characteristics of the winds inside these regimes. The vertical velocities retrieved are combined with 1-D simulations to derive additional parameters including particle fallout, mass flux, and particle sizes. The explosive event occurred on 23 November 2013 at the Mount Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy), is considered a demonstrative case in which to analyze the radar Doppler signal inside the tephra column. The X-band radar (3 cm wavelength) in the Catania, Italy, airport observed the 3-D scenes of the Etna tephra cloud ~32 km from the volcano vent every 10 min. From the radar-derived vertical velocity profiles of updraft, particle fallout, and horizontal transportation, an exit velocity of 150 m/s, mass flux rate of 1.37 • 107 kg/s, particle fallout velocity of 18 m/s, and diameters of precipitating tephra particles equal to 0.8 cm are estimated on average. These numbers are shown to be consistent with theoretical 1-D simulations of plume dynamics and local reports at the ground, respectively. A thickness of 3 ± 0.36 km for the downwind ash cloud is also inferred by differentiating the radar-derived cloud top and the height of transition between the convective and buoyancy regions, the latter being inferred by the estimated vertical updraft velocity profile. The unique nature of the case study as well as the novelty of the segmentation and retrieval methods presented potentially give new insights into the

  6. Monte Carlo Calculations of Polarized Microwave Radiation Emerging from Cloud Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Roberti, Laura

    1998-01-01

    The last decade has seen tremendous growth in cloud dynamical and microphysical models that are able to simulate storms and storm systems with very high spatial resolution, typically of the order of a few kilometers. The fairly realistic distributions of cloud and hydrometeor properties that these models generate has in turn led to a renewed interest in the three-dimensional microwave radiative transfer modeling needed to understand the effect of cloud and rainfall inhomogeneities upon microwave observations. Monte Carlo methods, and particularly backwards Monte Carlo methods have shown themselves to be very desirable due to the quick convergence of the solutions. Unfortunately, backwards Monte Carlo methods are not well suited to treat polarized radiation. This study reviews the existing Monte Carlo methods and presents a new polarized Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The code is based on a forward scheme but uses aliasing techniques to keep the computational requirements equivalent to the backwards solution. Radiative transfer computations have been performed using a microphysical-dynamical cloud model and the results are presented together with the algorithm description.

  7. The First Observation of the Submillimeter Polarization Spectrum in a Low-AV Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell Ashton, Peter; Ade, Peter; Angilè, Francesco E.; Benton, Steven J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gandilo, Natalie; Klein, Jeffrey; Li, Zhi-Yun; Korotkov, Andrei; Martin, Peter G.; Matthews, Tristan; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; nakamura, fumitaka; Barth Netterfield, Calvin; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Santos, Fabio P.; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil; Soler, Juan D.; Thomas, Nicholas; tucker, carole; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek; BLASTPol

    2017-01-01

    Polarized emission from aligned interstellar dust is both a crucial tool for studies of magnetism in the interstellar medium and a troublesome contaminant in studies of the polarized cosmic microwave background. In each case, an understanding of the significance of the dust polarization signal requires well-calibrated models that accurately describe dust grains’ physical properties and interactions with their environment. Despite decades of progress in both theory and observation, polarized dust emission models remain largely underconstrained. During its 2012 flight, BLASTPol (the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry) obtained simultaneous broad-band polarimetric maps at 250, 350, and 500 μm of a several degree-scale region containing several low-AV molecular clouds. Combining these data with polarimetric observations from the Planck 850 μm band, we have produced a submillimeter polarization spectrum for one of these objects for the first time. We find the polarization degree to be largely constant across the four submillimeter bands. This result introduces a new observable with the potential to place strong empirical constraints on polarized dust models of the ISM in a density regime that has not been accessible to previous experiments. Comparing with the work of Draine & Fraisse (2009), our result is inconsistent with two of their four models. In particular, the two models for which all polarization arises from the aligned silicate component yield submillimeter polarization spectra that rise steeply with wavelength, in disagreement with our observations. This line of investigation will continue in the near future, as new experiments like The Next-Generation BLAST Polarimeter (BLAST-TNG) use their enhanced sensitivities to characterize polarized dust emission in even more diffuse environments.

  8. Effects of marine cloud brightening on polar regions and the meridional heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, B.; Gadian, A.; Latham, J.

    2011-12-01

    Marine cloud brightening is one of several proposed solar radiation management geoengineering schemes designed to avert some of the undesirable effects of climate change (Latham et al. 2008). Such changes include ice loss, desertification and increased sea levels. Polar sea ice fraction has been recorded by satellite data for the last 40 years. This data shows a general long term reduction in sea ice thickness and area and this reduction has been attributed to climate change. Changes in climate have been argued to be disproportionately larger in polar regions. The HadGEM1 (UK Met Office Climate Model, V6.1) is a fully coupled climate model. It is used to project changes in polar ice cover and temperatures as a result of increasing carbon dioxide and geoengineering using marine cloud brightening scenario. The meridional heat flux is the mechanism for moving energy from the tropics to the polar regions. The results show that for a comparison between a control (~ 2020 Carbon Dioxide concentrations) and a double pre-industrial Carbon Dioxide simulation, the maximum meridional heat flux is found to increase from 5.8PW to 6.1PW. With three-region seeding of marine Stratocumulus, this is reduced to 5.7PW. The annual North Polar sea ice cover, initially 11.5M sq km, is reduced by 3.6M sq km as a result of the increased Carbon Dioxide. Application of a three region seeding scenario, results in an increase in sea ice cover of 0.20M sq km above the initial (2020) values. Reference: Latham J. et al.. (2008) Global temperature stabilization via controlled albedo enhancement of low-level maritime clouds. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A doi:10.1098/rsta.2008.0137.

  9. Effects of marine cloud brightening on polar regions and the meridional heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, B.; Gadain, A.; Latham, J.

    2012-04-01

    Marine cloud brightening is one of several proposed solar radiation management geoengineering schemes designed to avert some of the undesirable effects of climate change (Latham et al. 2008). Such changes include ice loss, desertification and increased sea levels. Polar sea ice fraction has been recorded by satellite data for the last 40 years. This data shows a general long term reduction in sea ice thickness and area and this reduction has been attributed to climate change. Changes in climate have been argued to be disproportionately larger in polar regions. The HadGEM1 (UK Met Office Climate Model, V6.1) is a fully coupled climate model. It is used to project changes in polar ice cover and temperatures as a result of increasing carbon dioxide and geoengineering using marine cloud brightening scenario. The meridional heat flux is the mechanism for moving energy from the tropics to the polar regions. The results show that for a comparison between a control (~ 2020 carbon dioxide concentrations) and a double pre-industrial carbon dioxide simulation, the maximum meridional heat flux is found to change from 5.8 PW to 6.1 PW. With three region seeding of marine stratocumulus, this is reduced to 5.7 PW. The annual North Polar sea ice cover, initially 11.5 x106 sq km, is reduced by 3.6 x106 sq km as a result of the increased carbon dioxide. Application of a three region seeding scenario, results an increase in sea ice cover of 0.20 x106 sq km above the initial values. Reference: Latham J. et al.. (2008) Global temperature stabilization via controlled albedo enhancement of low-level maritime clouds. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A doi:10.1098/rsta.2008.0137.

  10. Mixtures of stratospheric and overshooting air measured using A-Train sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, S.; Shibata, T.; Okamoto, H.; Ishimoto, H.; Kubota, H.

    2012-06-01

    Synergetic spaceborne observations of overshooting air, defined as cloud intrusion through the level of neutral buoyancy above deep convection, are analyzed using various thresholds introduced in previous studies to detect overshooting. The brightness temperature of the overshooting air measured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is generally 2 K higher than that retrieved by the radiative transfer model, in which the size distribution of ice cloud particles is estimated from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and CloudSat data and the vertical temperature profile of cloud is assumed to follow that of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). The lapse rate of overshooting whose cloud top is higher than the level of the cold-point temperature (CPT) is lower than that of an adiabatic expansion. These observations can be rationalized as being due to the overshooting air being locally warmed by a mixture of warmer stratospheric air. Analysis of CALIOP and CloudSat data by using a radar-lidar algorithm shows that the mode of averaged ice water content of the overshoot above the CPT height is 6.3-10 mg/m3. Therefore, if 5% or more of ice particles in the overshoot are sublimated and mixed into the lower stratosphere, the lower stratospheric air will be hydrated. The difference between the brightness temperatures of 6.7 and 11 μm channels observed with MODIS demonstrates that the overshoot enhances stratospheric water vapor. These results indicate that the warm stratospheric air moves downward at and around the overshoot and mixes with the overshooting air and that the overshooting hydrates the lower stratosphere.

  11. International Workshop on Stratospheric Aerosols: Measurements, Properties, and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Following a mandate by the International Aerosol Climatology Program under the auspices of International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics International Radiation Commission, 45 scientists from five nations convened to discuss relevant issues associated with the measurement, properties, and effects of stratospheric aerosols. A summary is presented of the discussions on formation and evolution, transport and fate, effects on climate, role in heterogeneous chemistry, and validation of lidar and satellite remote sensing of stratospheric aerosols. Measurements are recommended of the natural (background) and the volcanically enhanced aerosol (sulfuric acid and silica particles), the exhaust of shuttle, civil aviation and supersonic aircraft operations (alumina, soot, and ice particles), and polar stratospheric clouds (ice, condensed nitric and hydrochloric acids).

  12. Variability of water vapour in the Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thölix, Laura; Backman, Leif; Kivi, Rigel; Karpechko, Alexey Yu.

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluates the stratospheric water vapour distribution and variability in the Arctic. A FinROSE chemistry transport model simulation covering the years 1990-2014 is compared to observations (satellite and frost point hygrometer soundings), and the sources of stratospheric water vapour are studied. In the simulations, the Arctic water vapour shows decadal variability with a magnitude of 0.8 ppm. Both observations and the simulations show an increase in the water vapour concentration in the Arctic stratosphere after the year 2006, but around 2012 the concentration started to decrease. Model calculations suggest that this increase in water vapour is mostly explained by transport-related processes, while the photochemically produced water vapour plays a relatively smaller role. The increase in water vapour in the presence of the low winter temperatures in the Arctic stratosphere led to more frequent occurrence of ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the Arctic vortex. We perform a case study of ice PSC formation focusing on January 2010 when the polar vortex was unusually cold and allowed large-scale formation of PSCs. At the same time a large-scale persistent dehydration was observed. Ice PSCs and dehydration observed at Sodankylä with accurate water vapour soundings in January and February 2010 during the LAPBIAT (Lapland Atmosphere-Biosphere facility) atmospheric measurement campaign were well reproduced by the model. In particular, both the observed and simulated decrease in water vapour in the dehydration layer was up to 1.5 ppm.

  13. Impacts of stratospheric ozone depletion and recovery on wave propagation in the boreal winter stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dingzhu; Tian, Wenshou; Xie, Fei; Wang, Chunxiao; Zhang, Jiankai

    2015-08-01

    This paper uses a state-of-the-art general circulation model to study the impacts of the stratospheric ozone depletion from 1980 to 2000 and the expected partial ozone recovery from 2000 to 2020 on the propagation of planetary waves in December, January, and February. In the Southern Hemisphere (SH), the stratospheric ozone depletion leads to a cooler and stronger Antarctic stratosphere, while the stratospheric ozone recovery has the opposite effects. In the Northern Hemisphere (NH), the impacts of the stratospheric ozone depletion on polar stratospheric temperature are not opposite to that of the stratospheric ozone recovery; i.e., the stratospheric ozone depletion causes a weak cooling and the stratospheric ozone recovery causes a statistically significant cooling. The stratospheric ozone depletion leads to a weakening of the Arctic polar vortex, while the stratospheric ozone recovery leads to a strengthening of the Arctic polar vortex. The cooling of the Arctic polar vortex is found to be dynamically induced via modulating the planetary wave activity by stratospheric ozone increases. Particularly interesting is that stratospheric ozone changes have opposite effects on the stationary and transient wave fluxes in the NH stratosphere. The analysis of the wave refractive index and Eliassen-Palm flux in the NH indicates (1) that the wave refraction in the stratosphere cannot fully explain wave flux changes in the Arctic stratosphere and (2) that stratospheric ozone changes can cause changes in wave propagation in the northern midlatitude troposphere which in turn affect wave fluxes in the NH stratosphere. In the SH, the radiative cooling (warming) caused by stratospheric ozone depletion (recovery) produces a larger (smaller) meridional temperature gradient in the midlatitude upper troposphere, accompanied by larger (smaller) zonal wind vertical shear and larger (smaller) vertical gradients of buoyancy frequency. Hence, there are more (fewer) transient waves

  14. Cloud Masking and Surface Temperature Distribution in the Polar Regions Using AVHRR and other Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Joey C.

    1995-01-01

    Surface temperature is one of the key variables associated with weather and climate. Accurate measurements of surface air temperatures are routinely made in meteorological stations around the world. Also, satellite data have been used to produce synoptic global temperature distributions. However, not much attention has been paid on temperature distributions in the polar regions. In the polar regions, the number of stations is very sparse. Because of adverse weather conditions and general inaccessibility, surface field measurements are also limited. Furthermore, accurate retrievals from satellite data in the region have been difficult to make because of persistent cloudiness and ambiguities in the discrimination of clouds from snow or ice. Surface temperature observations are required in the polar regions for air-sea-ice interaction studies, especially in the calculation of heat, salinity, and humidity fluxes. They are also useful in identifying areas of melt or meltponding within the sea ice pack and the ice sheets and in the calculation of emissivities of these surfaces. Moreover, the polar regions are unique in that they are the sites of temperature extremes, the location of which is difficult to identify without a global monitoring system. Furthermore, the regions may provide an early signal to a potential climate change because such signal is expected to be amplified in the region due to feedback effects. In cloud free areas, the thermal channels from infrared systems provide surface temperatures at relatively good accuracies. Previous capabilities include the use of the Temperature Humidity Infrared Radiometer (THIR) onboard the Nimbus-7 satellite which was launched in 1978. Current capabilities include the use of the Advance Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aboard NOAA satellites. Together, these two systems cover a span of 16 years of thermal infrared data. Techniques for retrieving surface temperatures with these sensors in the polar regions have

  15. Modeling total and polarized reflectances of ice clouds: evaluation by means of POLDER and ATSR-2 measurements.

    PubMed

    Knap, Wouter H; Labonnote, Laurent C; Brogniez, Gérard; Stammes, Piet

    2005-07-01

    Four ice-crystal models are tested by use of ice-cloud reflectances derived from Along Track Scanning Radiometer-2 (ATSR-2) and Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances (POLDER) radiance measurements. The analysis is based on dual-view ATSR-2 total reflectances of tropical cirrus and POLDER global-scale total and polarized reflectances of ice clouds at as many as 14 viewing directions. Adequate simulations of ATSR-2 total reflectances at 0.865 microm are obtained with model clouds consisting of moderately distorted imperfect hexagonal monocrystals (IMPs). The optically thickest clouds (tau > approximately 16) in the selected case tend to be better simulated by use of pure hexagonal monocrystals (PHMs). POLDER total reflectances at 0.670 microm are best simulated with columnar or platelike IMPs or columnar inhomogeneous hexagonal monocrystals (IHMs). Less-favorable simulations are obtained for platelike IHMs and polycrystals (POLYs). Inadequate simulations of POLDER total and polarized reflectances are obtained for model clouds consisting of PHMs. Better simulations of the POLDER polarized reflectances at 0.865 microm are obtained with IMPs, IHMs, or POLYs, although POLYs produce polarized reflectances that are systematically lower than most of the measurements. The best simulations of the polarized reflectance for the ice-crystal models assumed in this study are obtained for model clouds consisting of columnar IMPs or IHMs.

  16. Measurement of polar stratospheric NO2 from the 23rd and 24th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) balloon experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibasaki, K.; Iwagami, N.; Ogawa, T.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of the Japanese activities of MAP in the Antarctica, balloon-borne measurements of the stratospheric NO2 profile were planned and carried out by the JARE 23rd and 24th wintering parties. Few results have been reported so far as the stratospheric NO2 profile at high latitude. There were no reported balloon measurements carried out in the Southern Hemisphere. Profiles are presented for the first balloon-borne measurement of the stratospheric NO2 in the Antarctica. Three balloons named JA21, JA25 and JA26 were launched from Syowa Station (69 deg S, 35.6 deg E) using 5000 cu. cm plastic balloons. JA21 balloon was launched on November 24, 1982, and JA25 and JA26 balloons on November 12 and 20, 1983, respectively.

  17. The Influence of Arctic Sea Ice Extent on Polar Cloud Fraction and Vertical Structure and Implications for Regional Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Strey, Sara T.; Spinhirne, James; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Recent satellite lidar measurements of cloud properties spanning a period of five years are used to examine a possible connection between Arctic sea ice amount and polar cloud fraction and vertical distribution. We find an anti-correlation between sea ice extent and cloud fraction with maximum cloudiness occurring over areas with little or no sea ice. We also find that over ice free regions, there is greater low cloud frequency and average optical depth. Most of the optical depth increase is due to the presence of geometrically thicker clouds over water. In addition, our analysis indicates that over the last 5 years, October and March average polar cloud fraction has increased by about 7 and 10 percent, respectively, as year average sea ice extent has decreased by 5 to 7 percent. The observed cloud changes are likely due to a number of effects including, but not limited to, the observed decrease in sea ice extent and thickness. Increasing cloud amount and changes in vertical distribution and optical properties have the potential to affect the radiative balance of the Arctic region by decreasing both the upwelling terrestrial longwave radiation and the downward shortwave solar radiation. Since longwave radiation dominates in the long polar winter, the overall effect of increasing low cloud cover is likely a warming of the Arctic and thus a positive climate feedback, possibly accelerating the melting of Arctic sea ice.

  18. Influence of Arctic Sea Ice Extent on Polar Cloud Fraction and Vertical Structure and Implications for Regional Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Strey, Sara T.; Spinhirne, James; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Recent satellite lidar measurements of cloud properties spanning a period of 5 years are used to examine a possible connection between Arctic sea ice amount and polar cloud fraction and vertical distribution. We find an anticorrelation between sea ice extent and cloud fraction with maximum cloudiness occurring over areas with little or no sea ice. We also find that over ice!free regions, there is greater low cloud frequency and average optical depth. Most of the optical depth increase is due to the presence of geometrically thicker clouds over water. In addition, our analysis indicates that over the last 5 years, October and March average polar cloud fraction has increased by about 7% and 10%, respectively, as year average sea ice extent has decreased by 5% 7%. The observed cloud changes are likely due to a number of effects including, but not limited to, the observed decrease in sea ice extent and thickness. Increasing cloud amount and changes in vertical distribution and optical properties have the potential to affect the radiative balance of the Arctic region by decreasing both the upwelling terrestrial longwave radiation and the downward shortwave solar radiation. Because longwave radiation dominates in the long polar winter, the overall effect of increasing low cloud cover is likely a warming of the Arctic and thus a positive climate feedback, possibly accelerating the melting of Arctic sea ice.

  19. Polarization of Directly Imaged Young Giant Planets as a Probe of Mass, Rotation, and Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark Scott; Sengupta, Sujan

    2012-01-01

    Young, hot gas giant planets at large separations from their primaries have been directly imaged around several nearby stars. More such planets will likely be detected by ongoing and new imaging surveys with instruments such as the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). Efforts continue to model the spectra of these planets in order to constrain their masses, effective temperatures, composition, and cloud structure. One potential tool for analyzing these objects, which has received relatively less attention, is polarization. Linear polarization of gas giant exoplanets can arise from the combined influences of light scattering by atmospheric dust and a rotationally distorted shape. The oblateness of gas giant planet increases of course with rotation rate and for fixed rotation also rises with decreasing gravity. Thus young, lower mass gas giant planets with youthful inflated radii could easily have oblateness greater than that of Saturn s 10%. We find that polarizations of over 1% may easily be produced in the near-infrared in such cases. This magnitude of polarization may be measurable by GPI and other instruments. Thus if detected, polarization of a young Jupiter places constraints on the combination of its gravity, rotation rate, and degree of cloudiness. We will present results of our multiple scattering analysis coupled with a self-consistent dusty atmospheric models to demonstrate the range of polarizations that might be expected from resolved exoplanets and the range of parameter space that such observations may inform.

  20. Title:- Effects of Marine Cloud Brightening on Polar Regions and Meridional Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadian, A.; Parkes, B.; Latham, J.; Blyth, A.

    2012-12-01

    Marine cloud brightening (MCB) is one of several proposed solar radiation management geoengineering schemes designed to enhance the albedo of marine stratocumulus clouds, with concomitant overall cooling, and the intention of averting some of the undesirable effects of climate change (Latham et al. 2008, 2012). Such changes include ice loss, desertification and increased sea levels. Polar sea ice fraction has been recorded by satellite data for the last 40 years. This data shows a general long term reduction in sea ice thickness and area and this reduction has been attributed to climate change. Changes in climate have been reported to be disproportionately larger in polar regions. The HadGEM1 (UK Met Office Climate Model, V6.1) is a fully coupled climate model. It is used to project changes in polar ice cover and temperatures as a result of increasing carbon dioxide and the deployment of MCB geoengineering. The meridional heat flux is the mechanism for moving energy from the tropics to the polar regions. The results show that for a comparison between a control (~ 2020 carbon dioxide concentrations) and a double pre-industrial carbon dioxide simulation, the maximum meridional heat flux is found to change from 5.8 PW to 6.1 PW. With three-region MCB seeding of marine stratocumulus, this is reduced to 5.7 PW. Application of a three region seeding scenario, results an increase insea ice cover to 0.20 million sq km above the initial values. ( Parkes et al. 2012 ) Latham J. et al (2008) Global temperature stabilization. Phil Trans Roy Soc A. doi 10.1098/rsta.2008.0137 Latham J et al (2012) Marine Cloud Brighetening. Phil Trans Ro Soc A. In press rsta 1012.0086

  1. Polar cloud observatory at Ny-Ålesund in GRENE Arctic Climate Change Research Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanouchi, Takashi; Takano, Toshiaki; Shiobara, Masataka; Okamoto, Hajime; Koike, Makoto; Ukita, Jinro

    2016-04-01

    Cloud is one of the main processes in the climate system and especially a large feed back agent for Arctic warming amplification (Yoshimori et al., 2014). From this reason, observation of polar cloud has been emphasized and 95 GHz cloud profiling radar in high precision was established at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in 2013 as one of the basic infrastructure in the GRENE (Green Network of Excellence Program) Arctic Climate Change Research Project. The radar, "FALCON-A", is a FM-CW (frequency modulated continuous wave) Doppler radar, developed for Arctic use by Chiba University (PI: T. Takano) in 2012, following its prototype, "FALCON-1" which was developed in 2006 (Takano et al., 2010). The specifications of the radar are, central frequency: 94.84 GHz; antenna power: 1 W; observation height: up to 15 km; range resolution: 48 m; beam width: 0.2 degree (15 m at 5 km); Doppler width: 3.2 m/s; time interval: 10 sec, and capable of archiving high sensitivity and high spatial and time resolution. An FM-CW type radar realizes similar sensitivity with much smaller parabolic antennas separated 1.4 m from each other used for transmitting and receiving the wave. Polarized Micro-Pulse Lidar (PMPL, Sigma Space MPL-4B-IDS), which is capable to measure the backscatter and depolarization ratio, has also been deployed to Ny-Ålesund in March 2012, and now operated to perform collocated measurements with FALCON-A. Simultaneous measurement data from collocated PMPL and FALCON-A are available for synergetic analyses of cloud microphysics. Cloud mycrophysics, such as effective radius of ice particles and ice water content, are obtained from the analysis based on algorithm, which is modified for ground-based measurements from Okamoto's retrieval algorithm for satellite based cloud profiling radar and lidar (CloudSat and CALIPSO; Okamoto et al., 2010). Results of two years will be shown in the presentation. Calibration is a point to derive radar reflectivity (dBZ) from original intensity data

  2. A Review of Recent Lidar Studies of the Diurnal and Seasonal Variations of Polar Mesospheric Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Chu, X.

    2001-05-01

    Lidar observations during the past decade have contributed enormously to our understanding of the structure of polar mesospheric clouds. Multi-wavelength observations have provided key insights into the size distribution and concentration of the PMC particles while 24 hour measurements have revealed the strong influence of tidal perturbations on the height and volume backscatter properties of the cloud layers. We summarize pioneering observations in the Northern Hemisphere at Andoya, Norway and Sondrestromfjord, Greenland. We also discuss seasonal trends emerging from the first lidar measurments of PMCs in the Southern Hemisphere. These data, obtained at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, provide new insights into possible hemispherical differences in mesopause region dynamics and temperature structure.

  3. Mobile Multiwavelength Polarization Raman Lidar for Water Vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Song, Xiaoquan; Liu, Bingyi; Dai, Guangyao; Zhang, Kailin; Qin, Shengguang; Gao, Fei; Hua, Dengxin

    2016-06-01

    Aiming at the detection of water vapor mixing ratio, particle linear depolarization ratio, extinction coefficient and cloud information, the Water vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WVCAL) was developed by the lidar group at Ocean University of China. The Lidar consists of transmitting subsystem, receiving subsystem, data acquisition and controlling subsystem and auxiliary subsystem. These parts were presented and described in this paper. For the measurement of various physical properties, three channels including Raman channel, polarization channel and infrared channel are integrated in this Lidar system. In this paper, the integration and working principle of these channels is introduced in details. Finally, a measurement example which was operated in coastal area-Qingdao, Shandong province, during 2014 is provided.

  4. Rotational excitation of simple polar molecules by H2 and electrons in diffuse clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liszt, H. S.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Emission from strongly-polar molecules could be a probe of physical conditions in diffuse molecular gas. Aims: We wish to provide basic information needed to interpret emission from molecules having higher dipole moments than CO, originating in diffuse clouds where the density is relatively low and the temperature and electron fraction are relatively high compared to dark clouds. Methods: Parameter studies in LVG models are used to show how the low-lying rotational transitions of common polar molecules HCO+, HCN and CS vary with number density, column density and electron fraction; with molecular properties such as the charge state and permanent dipole moment; and with observational details such as the transition that is observed. Physically-based models are used to check the parameter studies and provide a basis for relating the few extant observations. Results: Parameter studies of LVG radiative transfer models show that lines of polar molecules are uniformly brighter for ions, for lower J-values and for higher dipole moments. Excitation by electrons is more important for J = 1-0 lines and contributes rather less to the brightness of CS J = 2-1 lines. If abundances are like those seen in absorption, the HCO+J = 1-0 line will be the brightest line after CO, followed by HCN (1-0) and CS (2-1). Because of the very weak rotational excitation in diffuse clouds, emission brightnesses and molecular column densities retain a nearly-linear proportionality under fixed physical conditions, even when transitions are quite optically thick; this implies that changes in relative intensities among different species can be used to infer changes in their relative abundances.

  5. Dust in the small Magellanic cloud. 1: Interstellar polarization and extinction data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magalhaes, A. M.; Rodrigues, C. V.; Coyne, C. V.; Piirola, V.

    1996-01-01

    The typical extinction curve for the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), in contrast to that for the Galaxy, has no bump at 2175 A and has a steeper rise into the far ultraviolet. For the Galaxy the interpretation of the extinction and, therefore, the dust content of the interstellar medium has been greatly assisted by measurements of the wavelength dependence of the polarization. For the SMC no such measurements existed. Therefore, to further elucidate the dust properties in the SMC we have for the first time measured linear polarization with five colors in the optical region of the spectrum for a sample of reddened stars. For two of these stars, for which there were no existing UV spectrophotometric measurements, but for which we measured a relatively large polarization, we have also obtained data from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) in order to study the extinction. We also attempt to correlate the SMC extinction and polarization data. The main results are: the wavelength of maximum polarization, lambda(sub max), in the SMC is typically smaller than that in the Galaxy; however, AZC 456, which shows the UV extinction bump, has a lambda(sub max) typical of that in the Galaxy, but its polarization curve is narrower and its bump is shifted to shorter wavelengths as compared to the Galaxy; and from an analysis of both the extinction and polarization data it appears that the SMC has typically smaller grains than those in the Galaxy. The absence of the extinction bump in the SMC has generally been thought to imply a lower carbon abundance in the SMC compared to the Galaxy. We interpret our results to mean that te size distribution of the interstellar grains, and not only the carbon abundance, is different in the SMC as compared to the Galaxy. In Paper 2 we present dust model fits to these observations.

  6. In situ evidence of rapid, vertical, irreversible transport of lower tropospheric air into the lower tropical stratosphere by convective cloud turrets and by larger-scale upwelling in tropical cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Danielsen, E.F. )

    1993-05-20

    The author describes evidence from three different cloud types observed in the Australian monsoon, continental-maritime convective, maritime convective, and tropical cyclones, which contribute to transport of tropospheric air masses into the lower stratosphere. Measurements were made from ER-2 aircraft flying out of Darwin, Australia, equipped to measure an array of different parameters, including water vapor, temperatures, pressures, radon, etc. Maritime environmental conditions do not produce as much bouyancy for ascending air masses near Darwin, as do continental-maritime conditions when intense solar heating over the arid continental center of Australia heat and drys air masses which flow over the moist surface marine layers and have bouyancy to allow deep penetration into the lower stratosphere. For the tropical cyclones, their large scale, slower ascending air seems to mix into the stratosphere by gravity wave generation, which produces turbulence enough to drive air mass mixing across the inversions which cap these features.

  7. Depletion of stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic and Arctic: responses of plants of polar terrestrial ecosystems to enhanced UV-B, an overview.

    PubMed

    Rozema, Jelte; Boelen, Peter; Blokker, Peter

    2005-10-01

    Depletion of stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic has been re-occurring yearly since 1974, leading to enhanced UV-B radiation. Arctic ozone depletion has been observed since 1990. Ozone recovery has been predicted by 2050, but no signs of recovery occur. Here we review responses of polar plants to experimentally varied UV-B through supplementation or exclusion. In supplementation studies comparing ambient and above ambient UV-B, no effect on growth occurred. UV-B-induced DNA damage, as measured in polar bryophytes, is repaired overnight by photoreactivation. With UV exclusion, growth at near ambient may be less than at below ambient UV-B levels, which relates to the UV response curve of polar plants. UV-B screening foils also alter PAR, humidity, and temperature and interactions of UV with environmental factors may occur. Plant phenolics induced by solar UV-B, as in pollen, spores and lignin, may serve as a climate proxy for past UV. Since the Antarctic and Arctic terrestrial ecosystems differ essentially, (e.g. higher species diversity and more trophic interactions in the Arctic), generalization of polar plant responses to UV-B needs caution.

  8. Multistatic Imaging and Optical Modelling of Nacreous Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enell, C.-F.; Gustavsson, B.; Steen, A.; Brändström, U.; Rydesäter, P.

    The presence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) has important implications for stratospheric chemistry. Thus it is important to understand the development of such clouds. In this report the feasibility of using multi-static imaging for studies of PSC physics is discussed. In particular, a method to solve for particle sizes using bistatic multi-wavelength observations is described. It has not yet been possible to apply the proposed method to PSC images. However, a numerical simulation for the ideal case of single scattering by spherical particles works with reasonable accuracy, even when random noise is added.

  9. Spectra of polarized thermal radiation in a cloudy atmosphere: Line-by-Line and Monte Carlo model for passive remote sensing of cirrus and polar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Boris; Falaleeva, Victoria

    2016-07-01

    A polarized high-resolution 1-D model has been presented for TIR (Thermal Infrared) remote sensing application. It is based on the original versions of MC (Monte Carlo) and LbL (Line-by-Line) algorithms, which have shown their effectiveness when modelling the thermal radiation atmospheric transfer, taking into account, the semi-transparent Ci-type and polar clouds scattering, as well as the direct consideration of the spectra of molecular absorption. This model may be useful in the planning of satellite experiments and in the validation of similar models, which use the "k-distribution" or other approximations, to account for gaseous absorption. The example simulations demonstrate that, the selective gas absorption does not only significantly affect the absorption and emission of radiation, but also, its polarization in the Ci-type clouds. As a result, the spectra of polarized radiation contain important information about the clouds, and a high-resolution polarized limb sounding in the TIR, seems to be a useful tool in obtaining information on cloud types and their vertical structures.

  10. Temporal and spectral cloud screening of polar winter aerosol optical depth (AOD): impact of homogeneous and inhomogeneous clouds and crystal layers on climatological-scale AODs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Norman T.; Baibakov, Konstantin; Hesaraki, Sareh; Ivanescu, Liviu; Martin, Randall V.; Perro, Chris; Chaubey, Jai P.; Herber, Andreas; Duck, Thomas J.

    2016-10-01

    We compared star-photometry-derived, polar winter aerosol optical depths (AODs), acquired at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada, and Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, with GEOS-Chem (GC) simulations as well as ground-based lidar and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) retrievals over a sampling period of two polar winters. The results indicate significant cloud and/or low-altitude ice crystal (LIC) contamination which is only partially corrected using temporal cloud screening. Spatially homogeneous clouds and LICs that remain after temporal cloud screening represent an inevitable systematic error in the estimation of AOD: this error was estimated to vary from 78 to 210 % at Eureka and from 2 to 157 % at Ny-Ålesund. Lidar analysis indicated that LICs appeared to have a disproportionately large influence on the homogeneous coarse-mode optical depths that escape temporal cloud screening. In principle, spectral cloud screening (to yield fine-mode or submicron AODs) reduces pre-cloud-screened AODs to the aerosol contribution if one assumes that coarse-mode (super-micron) aerosols are a minor part of the AOD. Large, low-frequency differences between these retrieved values and their GC analogue appeared to be often linked to strong, spatially extensive planetary boundary layer events whose presence at either site was inferred from CALIOP profiles. These events were either not captured or significantly underestimated by the GC simulations. High-frequency AOD variations of GC fine-mode aerosols at Ny-Ålesund were attributed to sea salt, while low-frequency GC variations at Eureka and Ny-Ålesund were attributable to sulfates. CALIOP profiles and AODs were invaluable as spatial and temporal redundancy support (or, alternatively, as insightful points of contention) for star photometry retrievals and GC estimates of AOD.

  11. A two-channel, tunable diode laser-based hygrometer for measurement of water vapor and cirrus cloud ice water content in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A. W.; Gao, R. S.; Watts, L. A.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Fahey, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The recently developed NOAA Water instrument is a two-channel, closed-path, tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer designed for the measurement of upper troposphere/lower stratosphere water vapor and enhanced total water (vapor + inertially enhanced condensed phase) from the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) or other high-altitude research aircraft. The instrument utilizes wavelength-modulated spectroscopy with second harmonic detection near 2694 nm to achieve high precision with a 79 cm double-pass optical path. The detection cells are operated under constant temperature, pressure, and flow conditions to maintain a constant sensitivity to H2O independent of the ambient sampling environment. An onboard calibration system is used to perform periodic in situ calibrations to verify the stability of the instrument sensitivity during flight. For the water vapor channel, ambient air is sampled perpendicular to the flow past the aircraft in order to reject cloud particles, while the total water channel uses a heated, forward-facing inlet to sample both water vapor and cloud particles. The total water inlet operates subisokinetically, thereby inertially enhancing cloud particle number in the sample flow and affording increased cloud water content sensitivity. The NOAA Water instrument was flown for the first time during the second deployment of the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) in February-March 2013 on the NASA Global Hawk UAS. The instrument demonstrated a typical in-flight precision (1 s, 1σ) of better than 0.17 parts per million (ppm, 10-6 mol mol-1), with an overall H2O vapor measurement uncertainty of 5% ± 0.23 ppm. The inertial enhancement for cirrus cloud particle sampling under ATTREX flight conditions ranged from 33 to 48 for ice particles larger than 8 μm in diameter, depending primarily on aircraft altitude. The resulting ice water content detection limit (2σ) was 0.023-0.013 ppm, corresponding to approximately 2 μg m

  12. Dust in the small Magellanic Cloud. 2: Dust models from interstellar polarization and extinction data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, C. V.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Coyne, G. V.

    1995-01-01

    We study the dust in the Small Magellanic Cloud using our polarization and extinction data (Paper 1) and existing dust models. The data suggest that the monotonic SMC extinction curve is related to values of lambda(sub max), the wavelength of maximum polarization, which are on the average smaller than the mean for the Galaxy. On the other hand, AZV 456, a star with an extinction similar to that for the Galaxy, shows a value of lambda(sub max) similar to the mean for the Galaxy. We discuss simultaneous dust model fits to extinction and polarization. Fits to the wavelength dependent polarization data are possible for stars with small lambda(sub max). In general, they imply dust size distributions which are narrower and have smaller mean sizes compared to typical size distributions for the Galaxy. However, stars with lambda(sub max) close to the Galactic norm, which also have a narrower polarization curve, cannot be fit adequately. This holds true for all of the dust models considered. The best fits to the extinction curves are obtained with a power law size distribution by assuming that the cylindrical and spherical silicate grains have a volume distribution which is continuous from the smaller spheres to the larger cylinders. The size distribution for the cylinders is taken from the fit to the polarization. The 'typical', monotonic SMC extinction curve can be fit well with graphite and silicate grains if a small fraction of the SMC carbon is locked up in the grain. However, amorphous carbon and silicate grains also fit the data well. AZV456, which has an extinction curve similar to that for the Galaxy, has a UV bump which is too blue to be fit by spherical graphite grains.

  13. PolCat: Modelling submillimetre polarization of molecular cloud cores using successive parametrized coordinate transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzmann, E. L.; Fiege, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a software package called PolCat for modelling magnetized molecular cloud cores using submillimetre linear polarization and continuum intensity maps from thermal dust emission. Our PolCat modelling software builds a three-dimensional triaxial core model via the use of consecutive parametrized coordinate transformations, and produces simulated polarization maps to fit to observational datasets. We utilize a multi-objective evolutionary optimizer to search the parameter space to simultaneously minimize χ2 for the intensity and polarization position angle maps. The aim of this paper is to test PolCat by applying it to several artificial data sets, characterizing the capabilities and performance of the code using approximately 400 test runs. We find that PolCat is able to distinguish between polarization maps of twisted and non-twisted field geometries and identify the symmetry of the twist when one exists in the data. PolCat generally obtains the correct shapes of cores when fit to models with the correct field geometry. We characterized the degeneracy of our models due to orientation, finding that there are at least eight degenerate core orientations that produce identical polarization maps for the case of triaxial cores. The degeneracy increases with core symmetry. We expect PolCat to be a useful tool for modelling observational polarization data sets. Our tests demonstrate that the code can often eliminate incorrect field configurations, while finding a range or potential models that can explain the data. Physical considerations can often further reduce the set of allowed models, resulting in reasonable constraints on field geometry.

  14. Stratospheric Tracers of Atmospheric Transport (STRAT) Campaign: ER-2 Participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James G.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Stratospheric Tracers of Atmospheric Transport (STRAT) mission was initiated to advance knowledge of the major transport mechanisms of the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere. This is the region of the atmosphere within which exchange processes take place that critically determine the response of the climate system and ozone distribution to changing conditions triggered by the release of chemicals at the surface. The mission series that extended from October 1995 to November 1997 was extremely successful. The scientific advances that emerged from that mission include analyses of: (1) troposphere-to-stratosphere transport in the lowermost stratosphere from measurements of H2O, CO2, N2O, and O3; (2) the effects of tropical cirrus clouds on the abundance of lower stratospheric ozone; (3) the role of HO(sub x) in super- and subsonic aircraft exhaust plumes; and (4) dehydration and denitrification in the arctic polar vortex during the 1995-96 winter. The abstracts from published papers are included.

  15. Quasi-Liquid Layer Formation on Ice under Stratospheric Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeill, V. Faye; Loerting, Thomas; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Molina, Luisa T.; Molina, Mario J.

    2004-01-01

    Characterization of the interaction of hydrogen chloride (HCl) with ice is essential to understanding at a molecular level the processes responsible for ozone depletion involving polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. To explain the catalytic role PSC particle surfaces play during chlorine activation, we proposed previously that HCl induces the formation of a disordered region on the ice surface, a quasi-liquid layer (QLL), at stratospheric conditions. The QLL is known to exist in pure ice crystals at temperatures near the melting point, but its existence at stratospheric temperatures (-85 C to -70 C) had not been reported yet. We studied the interaction of HCl with ice under stratospheric conditions using the complementary approach of a) ellipsometry to directly monitor the ice surface, using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) to monitor the gas phase species present in the ellipsometry experiments, and b) flow-tube experiments with CIMS detection. Here we show that trace amounts of HCl induce QLL formation at stratospheric temperatures, and that the QLL enhances the chlorine-activation reaction of HCl with chlorine nitrate (ClONO2), and also enhances acetic acid (CH3COOH) adsorption.

  16. Three-satellite comparison of polar mesospheric clouds: Evidence for long-term change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shettle, E. P.; Thomas, G. E.; Olivero, J. J.; Evans, W. F. J.; Debrestian, D. J.; Chardon, L.

    2002-06-01

    Measurements of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) from three different satellite instruments are compared. These instruments are the Solar Mesospheric Explorer (SME), the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII), and the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM II). These measurements have been put on a common basis, correcting for differences in the wavelengths and measurement techniques used. This common basis is the probability distribution of the excess extinction ratio (EER) at a standard wavelength of 265 nm, where the EER is the ratio of the PMC extinction coefficient to the background molecular Rayleigh scattering coefficient. The results indicate that the POAM and WINDII measurements in the Southern Hemisphere had a higher probability of observing bright PMCs during the 1993-1996 time period than SME did a decade earlier in 1983-1986. Local time variations identified in WINDII data are interpreted in terms of a diurnal and semidiurnal component of average EER. These results are qualitatively similar to those found from lidar soundings of noctilucent cloud at sites in Norway and at the South Pole. Differences in interannual variability, local time of the measurements, assumed particle size distributions, and solar cycle effects are ruled out as possible explanations of the differences.

  17. Bright polar mesospheric clouds formed by main engine exhaust from the space shuttle's final launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Lossow, Stefan; Fiedler, Jens; Baumgarten, Gerd; Lübken, Franz-Josef; Hallgren, Kristofer; Hartogh, Paul; Randall, Cora E.; Lumpe, Jerry; Bailey, Scott M.; Niciejewski, R.; Meier, R. R.; Plane, John M. C.; Kochenash, Andrew J.; Murtagh, Donal P.; Englert, Christoph R.

    2012-10-01

    The space shuttle launched for the last time on 8 July 2011. As with most shuttle launches, the three main engines injected about 350 t of water vapor between 100 and 115 km off the east coast of the United States during its ascent to orbit. We follow the motion of this exhaust with a variety of satellite and ground-based data sets and find that (1) the shuttle water vapor plume spread out horizontally in all directions over a distance of 3000 to 4000 km in 18 h, (2) a portion of the plume reached northern Europe in 21 h to form polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) that are brighter than over 99% of all PMCs observed in that region, and (3) the observed altitude dependence of the particle size is reversed with larger particles above smaller particles. We use a one-dimensional cloud formation model initialized with predictions of a plume diffusion model to simulate the unusually bright PMCs. We find that eddy mixing can move the plume water vapor down to the mesopause near 90 km where ice particles can form. If the eddy diffusion coefficient is 400 to 1000 m2/s, the predicted integrated cloud brightness is in agreement with both satellite and ground-based observations of the shuttle PMCs. The propellant mass of the shuttle is about 20% of that from all vehicles launched during the northern 2011 PMC season. We suggest that the brightest PMC population near 70°N is formed by space traffic exhaust.

  18. AN IMPRINT OF MOLECULAR CLOUD MAGNETIZATION IN THE MORPHOLOGY OF THE DUST POLARIZED EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, J. D.; Netterfield, C. B.; Fissel, L. M.; Hennebelle, P.; Martin, P. G.; Miville-Deschenes, M.-A.

    2013-09-10

    We describe a morphological imprint of magnetization found when considering the relative orientation of the magnetic field direction with respect to the density structures in simulated turbulent molecular clouds. This imprint was found using the Histogram of Relative Orientations (HRO), a new technique that utilizes the gradient to characterize the directionality of density and column density structures on multiple scales. We present results of the HRO analysis in three models of molecular clouds in which the initial magnetic field strength is varied, but an identical initial turbulent velocity field is introduced, which subsequently decays. The HRO analysis was applied to the simulated data cubes and mock-observations of the simulations produced by integrating the data cube along particular lines of sight. In the three-dimensional analysis we describe the relative orientation of the magnetic field B with respect to the density structures, showing that: (1) the magnetic field shows a preferential orientation parallel to most of the density structures in the three simulated cubes, (2) the relative orientation changes from parallel to perpendicular in regions with density over a critical density n{sub T} in the highest magnetization case, and (3) the change of relative orientation is largest for the highest magnetization and decreases in lower magnetization cases. This change in the relative orientation is also present in the projected maps. In conjunction with simulations, HROs can be used to establish a link between the observed morphology in polarization maps and the physics included in simulations of molecular clouds.

  19. Mobile multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar for water vapor, cloud and aerosol measurement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songhua; Song, Xiaoquan; Liu, Bingyi; Dai, Guangyao; Liu, Jintao; Zhang, Kailin; Qin, Shengguang; Hua, Dengxin; Gao, Fei; Liu, Liping

    2015-12-28

    Aiming at the detection of atmospheric water vapor mixing ratio, depolarization ratio, backscatter coefficient, extinction coefficient and cloud information, the Water vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WACAL) is developed by the lidar group at Ocean University of China. The lidar consists of transmitter, receiver, data acquisition and auxiliary system. For the measurement of various atmospheric physical properties, three channels including Raman channel, polarization channel and infrared channel are integrated in WACAL. The integration and working principle of these channels are introduced in details. The optical setup, the housekeeping of the system and the data retrieval routines are also presented. After the completion of the construction of the lidar, the WACAL system was installed in Ocean University of China (36.165°N, 120.5°E), Qingdao for the measurement of atmosphere during 2013 and 2014. The measurement principles and some case studies corresponding to various atmospheric physical properties are provided. Finally, the result of one continuous measurement example operated on 13 June 2014 is presented. The WACAL can measure the aerosol and cloud optical properties as well as the water vapor mixing ratio. It is useful for studying the direct and indirect effects of the aerosol on the climate change.

  20. The Climatology of Polar Mesospheric Clouds From the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S. M.; Thomas, G. E.; Merkel, A. W.

    2001-05-01

    Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) are a high latitude phenomenon known to occur at altitudes near 83 km at times near the summer solstice, and are related to the phenomenon of Noctilucent Clouds (NLCs). The first recorded siting of an NLC occurred in 1885 and there is evidence that the frequency of occurrence of NLCs is increasing, suggesting long term change in the mesosphere. The first climatology of PMCs was derived from observations by the Solar Mesospheric Explorer (SME) made during 1981 through 1986. SME observations showed seasonal variations with a typical PMC season lasting from approximately 90 days beginning 21 days before summer solstice. The Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE), like SME, observes the Earth's UV limb radiance and thus also observes PMCs. The instrumentation on SNOE and SME are nearly identical making the observations comparable. SNOE was launched on February 27, 1998; thus, the combination of SNOE and SME measurements cover a span of nearly two decades. To date, SNOE has observed three northern and three southern PMC seasons. In this talk we will present the algorithms for determining PMC scattering properties from the background limb radiance. We will present the derived rates of occurrence of PMCs from the SNOE measurements, and we will show how the variation of cloud brightness and latitudinal extent vary through the season. These results will be compared to those from SME.

  1. Reaction of chlorine nitrate with hydrogen chloride and water at Antarctic stratospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Rossi, Michel J.; Malhotra, Ripudaman; Golden, David M.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies of heterogeneous reactions important for ozone depletion over Antarctica are reported. The reaction of chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) with H2O and HCl on surfacers that simulate polar stratospheric clouds are studied at temperatures relevant to the Antarctic stratosphere. The gaseous products of the resulting reactions, HOCl, Cl2O, and Cl2, could readily photolyze in the Antarctic spring to produce active chlorine for ozone depletion. Furthermore, the additional formation of condensed-phase HNO3 could serve as a sink for odd nitrogen species that would otherwise scavenge the active chlorine.

  2. Multiwavelength lidar measurements of stratospheric aerosols above Spitsbergen during winter 1992/93

    SciTech Connect

    Beyerle, G.; Neuber, R.; Schrems, O. ); Wittrock, F. ); Knudsen, B. )

    1994-01-01

    Using a multiwavelength lidar the authors measured aerosols from the tropopause to altitudes of 30 km in the period December 1992 to March 1993. They analyzed backscatter and depolarization measurements to infer information on aerosol size and phase. During most of this period they saw evidence of a liquid drop aerosol layer in the lower stratosphere which was of a volcanic origin. In January they observed polar stratospheric clouds on numerous occasions, and particle size was found to depend strongly on the cooling rate.

  3. Local time dependence of polar mesospheric clouds and model validation with satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Francie; Berger, Uwe; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2016-04-01

    Polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs), also known as noctilucent clouds (NLCs), consist of water-ice cystals. They occur at high latitudes in the summer mesopause region at very low temperatures below 150 K. In this case PMCs are highly sensitive to atmospheric conditions. Therefore, PMCs are thought to be sensitive indicators of climate changes in the middle atmosphere. The ice clouds show spatial and temporal variations. We present a model that can help to understand the variability of mesospheric clouds. The model is called Mesospheric Ice Microphysics And tranSport model (MIMAS) and is a threedimensional Lagrangian transport model, which can be used on multiple dynamic fields. MIMAS is a good instrument to check observations and also to fill some gaps that are included in satellite observations, e.g., the local time dependence of PMCs. The ice model is used to study local time dependencies of the PMC occurrence frequency, brightness and ice water content. At the station ALOMAR in Northern Norway (69°N, 16°E) we have the most ice water content with a total mean of around 90 g/km² (July 2008) in the morning hours. In the afternoons the ice water content decreases to 10 g/km² and increases again in the evening hours to 50 g/km². Tidal variability will impact results of long-term PMC observations which do not cover the full diurnal cycle. To investigate the local time dependence of PMCs in its entirety, ground-based remote sensing instruments, e.g., lidars are usefull. Variations in PMCs relating to occurrence frequency and brightness as function of local time had been already observed with the ALOMAR Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar. But lidar measurements offer only observations at a single local station. Models give the opportunity of a global perspective on a possible local time dependence of PMCs. In this context we will present latitudinal variations regarding to local time dependence. The combination of further observations and modeling studies can help to understand

  4. A simulation of the Cerro Hudson SO2 cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Doiron, Scott D.; Lait, Leslie R.; Newman, Paul A.; Krueger, Arlin J.

    1993-01-01

    An isentropic trajectory model is used to simulate the evolution of the southern hemisphere SO2 cloud associated with the eruption of Cerro Hudson. By matching the parcel trajectories with total ozone mapping spectrometer SO2 retrievals, the principal stratospheric injection region is determined to be between 11 and 16 km in altitude. This region is characterized by weak wind shears and is located just poleward of the subtropical jet in the outer fringe of the stratospheric polar vortex. The lack of wind shear in the injection region explains the slow zonal dispersal of the SO2 cloud which was still clearly observed 19 days after the eruption. The trajectory model simulation of the SO2 cloud shows good agreement with observations for 7 days after the eruption. Using the potential vorticity and potential temperature estimates of the initial eruption cloud, the cloud position relative to the polar night jet is shown to be nearly fixed up to September 2, 1991, which was as long as the cloud was observed. This result suggests that the lower stratospheric polar and midlatitude regions are nearly isolated from each other during the late August period.

  5. Laboratory studies of chemical and photochemical processes relevant to stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahniser, Mark S.; Nelson, David D.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kolb, Charles E.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to reduce the uncertainty in several key gas-phase kinetic processes which impact our understanding of stratospheric ozone. The main emphasis of this work is on measuring rate coefficients and product channels for reactions of HO(sub x) and NO(sub x) species in the temperature range 200 K to 240 K relevant to the lower stratosphere. Other areas of study have included infrared spectroscopic studies of the HO2 radical, measurements of OH radical reactions with alternative fluorocarbons, and determination of the vapor pressures of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions. The results of these studies will improve models of stratospheric ozone chemistry and predictions of perturbations due to human influences. In this annual report, we focus on our recent accomplishments in the quantitative spectroscopy of the HO2 radical. This report details the measurements of the broadening coefficients for the v(sub 2) vibrational band. Further measurements of the vapor pressures of nitric acid hydrates relevant to the polar stratospheric cloud formation indicate the importance of metastable crystalline phases of H2SO4, HNO3, and H2O. Large particles produced from these metastable phases may provide a removal mechanism for HNO3 in the polar stratosphere.

  6. Proof-of-Concept Study for Ground-based Millimetre-wave Observations of Horizontal Winds in the Polar Stratosphere and Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newnham, D.; Ford, G. P.; Moffat-Griffin, T.; Pumphrey, H. C.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed observations of horizontal winds in the Polar Regions are essential to understand chemical transport, atmospheric dynamics, waves and tides, and improve knowledge of polar and global climate systems. New measurement techniques for the altitude range 20-70 km are needed to address the current sparse wind observations for the upper stratosphere and mesosphere that limits our understanding of vertical wave propagation and its impact on planetary-scale circulation. We demonstrate the feasibility of remote sensing stratospheric and mesospheric zonal and meridional winds using ground-based passive millimetre wave spectroradiometry. Vertical profiles of horizontal winds are retrieved from simulations of line-of-sight Doppler-shifted atmospheric emission lines above Halley station (75°37'S, 26°14'W), Antarctica. Using the 231.28 GHz ozone line, or the pair of ozone lines at 249.79 GHz and 249.96 GHz, and a radiometer system temperature of 1400 K we estimate that daily mean wind profiles over the altitude range 25-75 km could be observed with a measurement uncertainty of 4-8 ms-1 and vertical resolution of 10-15 km. Under optimal observing conditions at Halley the temporal resolution is predicted to improve to 1-3 hrs, allowing studies of planetary and large-scale gravity waves. Combining observations of the 231.28 GHz ozone line and the 230.54 GHz carbon monoxide line extends the altitude coverage to ~95 km. The effects of clear-sky seasonal mean winter/summer conditions, zenith angle of the received atmospheric emission, and spectrometer frequency resolution on the altitude coverage, measurement uncertainty, and height and time resolution of the retrieved wind profiles have been determined.

  7. Martian North Polar Water-Ice Clouds During the Viking Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamppari, L. K.; Bass, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The Viking Orbiters determined that the surface of Mars' northern residual cap consists of water ice. Observed atmospheric water vapor abundances in the equatorial regions have been related to seasonal exchange between reservoirs such as the polar caps, the regolith and between different phases in the atmosphere. Kahn modeled the physical characteristics of ice hazes seen in Viking Orbiter imaging limb data, hypothesizing that ice hazes provide a method for scavenging water vapor from the atmosphere and accumulating it into ice particles. Given that Jakosky found that these particles had sizes such that fallout times were of order one Martian sol, these water-ice hazes provided a method for returning more water to the regolith than that provided by adsorption alone. These hazes could also explain the rapid hemispheric decrease in atmospheric water in late northern summer as well as the increase during the following early spring. A similar comparison of water vapor abundance versus polar cap brightness has been done for the north polar region. They have shown that water vapor decreases steadily between L(sub s) = 100-150 deg while polar cap albedo increases during the same time frame. As a result, they suggested that late summer water-ice deposition onto the ice cap may be the cause of the cap brightening. This deposition could be due to adsorption directly onto the cap surface or to snowfall. Thus, an examination of north polar waterice clouds could lend insight into the fate of the water vapor during this time period. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. A New Stratospheric Aerosol Product from CALIPSO Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, J.; Vaughan, M.; Trepte, C. R.; Winker, D. M.; Vernier, J. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Young, S. A.; Liu, Z.; Lucker, P.; Tackett, J. L.; Omar, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Stratospheric aerosols are derived from precursor SO2 and OCS gases transported from the lower troposphere. Volcanic injections can also enhance aerosol loadings far above background levels. The latter can exert a significant influence on the Earth's radiation budget for major and even minor eruptions. Careful measurements are needed, therefore, to monitor the distribution and evolution of stratospheric aerosols for climate related studies. The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission has been acquiring profile measurements of clouds and aerosols since 2006, leading to major advances in our understanding of tropospheric aerosol and cloud properties and the processes that control them. The CALIPSO products have also enabled new insights into polar stratospheric clouds and stratospheric aerosols. Vernier et al (2009,JGR,114,D00H10) reported on the construction of a modified CALIPSO lidar product that corrected minor artifacts with the original lidar calibration that affected stratospheric aerosol investigations. A significantly improved CALIPSO Lidar Version 4 Level 1 product has been recently released addressing these calibration issues and has resulted in enhanced signal levels and a highly stable record over the span of the mission. Based on this product, a new 3D gridded stratospheric CALIPSO data product is under development and being targeted for release in 2015. A key emphasis of this new product is to bridge the measurement gap between the SAGE II and SAGE III data record (1984-2005) and the start of measurements from the new SAGE III instrument to be deployed on the International Space Station in 2016. The primary parameters delivered in the CALIPSO stratospheric data products will be attenuated scattering ratio and aerosol extinction profiles, both averaged over one month intervals and binned into an equal angle grid of constant latitude and longitude with a vertical resolution of 900m. We will present the overall

  9. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols: Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1988-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystallization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  10. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols - Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1989-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystalization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  11. JUPITER AS AN EXOPLANET: UV TO NIR TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM REVEALS HAZES, A Na LAYER, AND POSSIBLY STRATOSPHERIC H{sub 2}O-ICE CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Montañés-Rodríguez, Pilar; González-Merino, B.; Pallé, E.

    2015-03-01

    Currently, the analysis of transmission spectra is the most successful technique to probe the chemical composition of exoplanet atmospheres. However, the accuracy of these measurements is constrained by observational limitations and the diversity of possible atmospheric compositions. Here, we show the UV–VIS–IR transmission spectrum of Jupiter as if it were a transiting exoplanet, obtained by observing one of its satellites, Ganymede, while passing through Jupiter’s shadow, i.e., during a solar eclipse from Ganymede. The spectrum shows strong extinction due to the presence of clouds (aerosols) and haze in the atmosphere and strong absorption features from CH{sub 4}. More interestingly, the comparison with radiative transfer models reveals a spectral signature, which we attribute here to a Jupiter stratospheric layer of crystalline H{sub 2}O ice. The atomic transitions of Na are also present. These results are relevant for the modeling and interpretation of giant transiting exoplanets. They also open a new technique to explore the atmospheric composition of the upper layers of Jupiter’s atmosphere.

  12. The Remarkable 2003--2004 Winter and Other Recent Warm Winters in the Arctic Stratosphere Since the Late 1990s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, Gloria L.; Kruger, Kirstin; Sabutis, Joseph L.; Sena, Sara Amina; Pawson, Steven

    2005-01-01

    The 2003-2004 Arctic winter was remarkable in the approximately 50-year record of meteorological analyses. A major warming beginning in early January 2004 led to nearly 2 months of vortex disruption with high-latitude easterlies in the middle to lower stratosphere. The upper stratospheric vortex broke up in late December, but began to recover by early January, and in February and March was the strongest since regular observations began in 1979. The lower stratospheric vortex broke up in late January. Comparison with 2 previous years, 1984-1985 and 1986-1987, with prolonged midwinter warming periods shows unique characteristics of the 2003-2004 warming period: The length of the vortex disruption, the strong and rapid recovery in the upper stratosphere, and the slow progression of the warming from upper to lower stratosphere. January 2004 zonal mean winds in the middle and lower stratosphere were over 2 standard deviations below average. Examination of past variability shows that the recent frequency of major stratospheric warmings (7 in the past 6 years) is unprecedented. Lower stratospheric temperatures were unusually high during 6 of the past 7 years, with 5 having much lower than usual potential for polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation and ozone loss (nearly none in 1998-1999, 2001-2002, and 2003-2004, and very little in 1997-1998 and 2000-2001). Middle and upper stratospheric temperatures, however, were unusually low during and after February. The pattern of 5 of the last 7 years with very low PSC potential would be expected to occur randomly once every 850 years. This cluster of warm winters, immediately following a period of unusually cold winters, may have important implications for possible changes in interannual variability and for determination and attribution of trends in stratospheric temperatures and ozone.

  13. Optical and physical properties of stratospheric aerosols from balloon measurements in the visible and near-infrared domains. II. Comparison of extinction, reflectance, polarization, and counting measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenaël; Robert, Claude; Chartier, Michel; Pirre, Michel; Brogniez, Colette; Herman, Maurice; Verwaerde, Christian; Balois, Jean-Yves; Ovarlez, Joëlle; Ovarlez, Henri; Crespin, Jacques; Deshler, Terry

    2002-12-01

    The physical properties of stratospheric aerosols can be retrieved from optical measurements involving extinction, radiance, polarization, and counting. We present here the results of measurements from the balloonborne instruments AMON, SALOMON, and RADIBAL, and from the French Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique and the University of Wyoming balloonborne particle counters. A cross comparison of the measurements was made for observations of background aerosols conducted during the polar winters of February 1997 and January-February 2000 for various altitudes from 13 to 19 km. On the one hand, the effective radius and the total amount of background aerosols derived from the various sets of data are similar and are in agreement with pre-Pinatubo values. On the other hand, strong discrepancies occur in the shapes of the bimodal size distributions obtained from analysis of the raw measurements of the various instruments. It seems then that the log-normal assumption cannot fully reproduce the size distribution of background aerosols. The effect of the presence of particular aerosols on the measurements is discussed, and a new strategy for observations is proposed.

  14. The importance of ice particle shape on UV measurements of polar mesospheric clouds: SBUV/2 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarten, Gerd; Thomas, Gary E.

    2006-01-01

    We present calculations of scattering of solar UV radiation from polar mesospheric clouds (PMC) for the wavelengths and scattering angles appropriate to the SBUV/2 series of satellite experiments. Our model includes for the first time the effects of non-sphericity of ice particles whose evidence has been recently gained from lidar depolarization experiments. Our results apply to the scattering cross section averaged over a particle size ensemble which spans the mean size and size ranges expected for PMC. We demonstrate that for the size range 20 100 nm (effective spherical particle radius), the wavelength range 252 292 nm, and the scattering angle range 100 140, non-spherical particles cause only moderate (<35%) deviations from conventional Mie theory, which assumes spherical shapes. The total UV scattering efficiency of PMC particles per unit mass of water vapor is not significantly affected by shape effects, in the range of parameters studied. On the other hand, our study suggests that shape effects need to be considered in the analysis of UV spectra of PMC, such as those of Carbary et al. [2004. Evidence for bimodal particle distribution from the spectra of polar mesospheric clouds. Geophysical Research Letters 31 (13), 3108] and DeLand et al. [2005. Spectral measurements of PMCs from SBUV/2 instruments. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, to appear, doi: 10.1016/j.astp.2005.08.006]. In particular, attention must also be paid to the scattering angle dependence of the measurements, and the range of scattering angles involved in compiling average spectra of PMC.

  15. Gravity waves in polar mesospheric clouds measured by Odin/OSIRIS since 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petelina, S. V.

    2009-05-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System instrument (OSIRIS) on the limb-viewing Odin satellite observes Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) in both hemispheres since November, 2001. The orbit period of Odin is 96 minutes and the maximum latitudinal coverage in the orbit plane is between 82.2 N and 82.2 S. In this work, the longitudinal distribution of Odin/OSIRIS PMC brightness in each hemisphere during a 4-week period around the summer solstice from 2002 until 2009 is analyzed. It is found that in the southern hemisphere, the cloud brightness was consistently up to 30% lower around 250-300°E (70-120°W) - above the Antarctic peninsular. In the northern hemisphere, the PMC brightness was systematically 20-30% lower around 50-130°E - above Ural Mountains. Similar results have been obtained for the PMC 2007-08 season in Antarctica and PMC-2007 Arctic season by one of the instruments on a recently launched Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite. We attribute this effect to the influence of gravity waves generated by the Earth's terrain.

  16. Simulation of particle size distributions in Polar Mesospheric Clouds from Microphysical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, G. E.; Merkel, A.; Bardeen, C.; Rusch, D. W.; Lumpe, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    The size distribution of ice particles is perhaps the most important observable aspect of microphysical processes in Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) formation and evolution. A conventional technique to derive such information is from optical observation of scattering, either passive solar scattering from photometric or spectrometric techniques, or active backscattering by lidar. We present simulated size distributions from two state-of-the-art models using CARMA sectional microphysics: WACCM/CARMA, in which CARMA is interactively coupled with WACCM3 (Bardeen et al, 2009), and stand-alone CARMA forced by WACCM3 meteorology (Merkel et al, this meeting). Both models provide well-resolved size distributions of ice particles as a function of height, location and time for realistic high-latitude summertime conditions. In this paper we present calculations of the UV scattered brightness at multiple scattering angles as viewed by the AIM Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) satellite experiment. These simulations are then considered discretely-sampled “data” for the scattering phase function, which are inverted using a technique (Lumpe et al, this meeting) to retrieve particle size information. We employ a T-matrix scattering code which applies to a wide range of non-sphericity of the ice particles, using the conventional idealized prolate/oblate spheroidal shape. This end-to-end test of the relatively new scattering phase function technique provides insight into both the retrieval accuracy and the information content in passive remote sensing of PMC.

  17. Possible methane-induced polar warming in the early Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, L. C.; Walker, James C. G.; Moore, T. C., Jr.; Rea, David K.; Zachos, James C.

    1992-05-01

    Estimates of Eocene wetland areas are considered and it is suggested that the flux of methane may have been substantially greater during the Eocene than at present. Elevated methane concentrations would have enhanced early Eocene global warming and also might have prevented severe winter cooling of polar regions because of the potential of atmospheric methane to promote the formation of optically thick polar stratospheric ice clouds.

  18. Martian dust aerosols and clouds in the North Polar summer: size and sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmon, M. T.; Mason, E.

    2013-12-01

    Martian dust aerosols control an important part of the energy transport in the Martian atmosphere. Ice aerosols, especially in the North Polar summer, play an important role in energy transport, scavenge the atmosphere of dust, and play a role in the vertical and horizontal transport of water away from the sublimating polar cap. Their physical properties, such as size and shape, have not been directly measured, and are only measureable through remote sensing. We report two novel measurements of dust and ice aerosol physical properties with data from the Phoenix Lander's Surface Stereo Imager. First, the scoop on the Phoenix Robotic Arm was used as an occultation instrument, blocking the Sun and allowing images of the near-Sun sky without contamination from the much-brighter direct sunlight. This allows the use of diffraction scattering to measure the dust size distribution. The general technique has been used frequently, but the shading of the Sun allows much more precise and accurate probing, especially of the larger end of the size distribution. Second, direct solar images on many occasions show scattered sky light significantly above the instrument background during cloudy times. These measurements, corrected for the dust background, show light diffracted by cloud particles. Statistics of the magnitude and width of the diffraction peak demonstrate the common presence of 30-micron scale ice crystals above the Phoenix site, consistent with estimates made from the observation of fall streaks by the Lidar.

  19. Martian dust aerosols and clouds in the North Polar summer: size and sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmon, Mark T.; Mason, E.

    2013-10-01

    Martian dust aerosols control an important part of the energy transport in the Martian atmosphere. Ice aerosols, especially in the North Polar summer, play an important role in energy transport, scavenge the atmosphere of dust, and play a role in the vertical and horizontal transport of water away from the sublimating polar cap. Their physical properties, such as size and shape, have not been directly measured, and are only measureable through remote sensing. We report two novel measurements of dust and ice aerosol physical properties with data from the Phoenix Lander’s Surface Stereo Imager. First, the scoop on the Phoenix Robotic Arm was used as an occultation instrument, blocking the Sun and allowing images of the near-Sun sky without contamination from the much-brighter direct sunlight. This allows the use of diffraction scattering to measure the dust size distribution. The general technique has been used frequently, but the shading of the Sun allows much more precise and accurate probing, especially of the larger end of the size distribution. Second, direct solar images on many occasions show scattered sky light significantly above the instrument background during cloudy times. These measurements, corrected for the dust background, show light diffracted by cloud particles. Statistics of the magnitude and width of the diffraction peak demonstrate the common presence of 30-micron scale ice crystals above the Phoenix site, consistent with estimates made from the observation of fall streaks by the Lidar.

  20. Effect of Gravity Waves Generated in the Monsoon Region on Polar Mesospheric Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurairajah, B.; Bailey, S. M.; Carstens, J. N.; Siskind, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Gravity Waves (GWs) play an important role in both the formation and destruction of polar mesospheric clouds. In summer, while vertically propagating GWs induce a residual circulation that cools the summer mesosphere and therefore supports the formation of PMCs, observation and modeling studies have also shown that short period GWs can additionally destroy PMCs. In this study we analyze the effect of non-vertical propagation of GWs on PMCs using temperature data from the SABER instrument on TIMED satellite and PMC occurrence frequency from the CIPS instrument on the AIM satellite. During the 2007 PMC season, time series of GWs over the monsoon region at 50 km and PMCs over the polar region at 84 km have a correlation coefficient of 0.9. SABER GW amplitude and momentum flux over the monsoon region show a poleward tilt with altitude. This slanted structure suggests a poleward, but non-vertical, propagation of GWs facilitated by the easterly winds associated with the monsoon circulation, thus indicating a possible source of high latitude middle atmospheric GWs.

  1. Balloon-Borne Submillimeter Polarimetry of the Vela C Molecular Cloud: Systematic Dependence of Polarization Fraction on Column Density and Local Polarization-Angle Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fissel, Laura M.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Ashton, Peter; Benton, Steven J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Martin, Peter G.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Santos, Fabio P.; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Diego Soler, Juan; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2016-06-01

    We present results for Vela C obtained during the 2012 flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry. We mapped polarized intensity across almost the entire extent of this giant molecular cloud, in bands centered at 250, 350, and 500 μm. In this initial paper, we show our 500 μm data smoothed to a resolution of 2.‧5 (approximately 0.5 pc). We show that the mean level of the fractional polarization p and most of its spatial variations can be accounted for using an empirical three-parameter power-law fit, p \\propto {{\\boldsymbol{N}}}-0.45 {{\\boldsymbol{S}}}-0.60, where N is the hydrogen column density and S is the polarization-angle dispersion on 0.5 pc scales. The decrease of p with increasing S is expected because changes in the magnetic field direction within the cloud volume sampled by each measurement will lead to cancellation of polarization signals. The decrease of p with increasing N might be caused by the same effect, if magnetic field disorder increases for high column density sightlines. Alternatively, the intrinsic polarization efficiency of the dust grain population might be lower for material along higher density sightlines. We find no significant correlation between N and S. Comparison of observed submillimeter polarization maps with synthetic polarization maps derived from numerical simulations provides a promising method for testing star formation theories. Realistic simulations should allow for the possibility of variable intrinsic polarization efficiency. The measured levels of correlation among p, N, and S provide points of comparison between observations and simulations.

  2. Zernike moments as a useful tool for ACE imager aerological data retrieval (stratospheric temperature and cloud product)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodion, Jan; Fussen, Didier; Filip, Vanhellemont; Mateshvili, Nina; Christine, Bingen; Maxime, Stapelle; Dekemper, Emmanuel; Gilbert, Kathy; Walker, Kaley; Bernath, Peter

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) was launched in August 2003 aboard the Canadian satellite SCISAT-I, and is at present fully operational. ACE circles the Earth at an altitude of 650 km with an orbital inclination of 74° . Solar occultation is the primary observation technique used by the on board instruments, which consist of a high resolution Fourier Transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS), a dual optical spectrophotometer (MAESTRO) and two filtered imagers, subject of this presentation. While the Sun is setting below or rising from behind the Earth's horizon, at every timestamp, the imagers capture a snapshot of the Sun as seen through the atmosphere. On these pictures, the apparent Sun width is about 25 km at the tangent point and the apparent Sun height varies from almost 0.7 km in the optically thick, lower troposphere where the Sun image is highly flattened by the refraction to its maximum (about 25 km at the tangent point) where refractive effects are negligible. Used in image processing, image moments are certain particular weighted averages (moments) of the image pixel's intensities, or functions of those moments, usually chosen to have some attractive property on interpretation. Zernike moments were first introduced by Teague (1980) based on the complex, orthogonal functions called Zernike polynomials. Though computationally very complex compared to geometric and Legendre moments, Zernike moments have proved to be superior in terms of their feature representation capability and low noise sensitivity. Also, the construction of different moment invariants makes them well suited for our research. A detailed image analysis of ACE imager data using Zernike moments provides us the necessary information for the retrieval of temperature profiles from a series of distorted images of an object of known shape such as the Sun. These temperature profiles are validated with ACE-FTS data. Besides, a preliminary cloud product could be derived and, in addition, a

  3. Observations of Stratospheric Aerosols over Sondrestrom, Greenland Injected by Russia's Sarychev Peak Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, R. R.; Thayer, J. P.; Hayman, M.; Barnes, J. E.; O'Neill, M.

    2009-12-01

    Volcanic stratospheric aerosols affect global climate by influencing the radiative budget and chemistry of the lower stratosphere. Presently the stratospheric aerosol levels are in a background state. This provides the opportunity for studies of stratospheric injections by small volcanic eruptions. A thin stratospheric aerosol layer was identified during the month of July, 2009 using the Arctic Lidar Technology (ARCLITE) System operated at Sondrestrom. Trajectory analysis points to the source of the aerosols being the Sarychev Peak volcano in the Russian Kuril Islands. Latitudinal observations of the layer were made by the NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory/Global Monitoring Division’s (GMD) stratospheric lidar network (Boulder,CO; Mauna Loa, HI; and Pago Pago, American Samoa). These observations show a significant increase in aerosol backscatter levels compared to the low background levels observed prior the eruption. Profiles derived from the from the ARCLITE observations include depolarization, backscatter and temperature which allow for a characterization of the layer on a daily basis. The ARCLITE observations also provide a time series of measurements showing the evolution of the aerosol layer over the month after the injection within the context of the less frequent profiles provided by the global GMD network. From the optical qualities observed, the exact nature of the aerosols and their role in the radiative budget and stratospheric chemistry are elucidated. These types of observations are unique to ground based lidar systems like ARCLITE due to the optically thin qualities of the layer which prevent detection in the visible band by nadir looking satellites. The long-term effect of this injection of sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere may influence the formation of type 1b polar stratospheric clouds during the coming winter.

  4. Do NAD and NAT form in liquid stratospheric aerosols by pseudoheterogeneous nucleation?

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A

    2006-05-04

    Laboratory data of the freezing of nitric acid hydrates (NAD, NAT) from HNO(3)/H(2)O and HNO(3)/H(2)SO(4)/H(2)O solution droplets have been evaluated with respect to a "pseudoheterogeneous" (surface-induced) nucleation mechanism of NAD and NAT, which has been argued to possibly lead to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). In addition, a parametrization of pseudoheterogeneous nucleation of NAD and NAT suggested recently (Tabazadeh et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2002, 106, 10238-10246) has been analyzed, showing that this parametrization should not be used in stratospheric modeling studies. The analysis of several laboratory data sets yields an upper limit of the pseudoheterogeneous nucleation rate coefficient of NAD of 2.2 x 10(-5) cm(-2) s(-1). In contrast, the upper limit of the pseudoheterogeneous nucleation rate coefficient of NAT could not be constrained satisfactorily, since formation of NAT has not been observed at stratospheric conditions in laboratory experiments applying small droplets. Maximum NAD production rates of 9.6 x 10(-9) cm(-3) (air) h(-1) in the stratosphere have been estimated assuming a pseudoheterogeneous nucleation mechanism that is constrained by the experimental observations. If maximum NAD supersaturation persisted for 4 weeks in the polar stratosphere the corresponding NAD particle number densities are estimated to be about 6 x 10(-6) cm(-3). These particle number densities are 3 orders of magnitude lower than particle number densities recently observed in the stratosphere. In conclusion, on the basis of laboratory data it is found that a pseudoheterogeneous nucleation mechanism is not sufficient to explain recent observations of large nitric acid containing particles in the polar stratosphere.

  5. Stabilization of Global Temperature and Polar Sea-ice cover via seeding of Maritime Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Latham, John; Launder, Brian; Neukermans, Armand; Rasch, Phil; Salter, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    The marine cloud albedo enhancement (cloud whitening) geoengineering technique (Latham1990, 2002, Bower et al. 2006, Latham et al. 2008, Salter et al. 2008, Rasch et al. 2009) involves seeding maritime stratocumulus clouds with seawater droplets of size (at creation) around 1 micrometer, causing the droplet number concentration to increase within the clouds, thereby enhancing their albedo and possibly longevity. GCM modeling indicates that (subject to satisfactory resolution of specified scientific and technological problems) the technique could produce a globally averaged negative forcing of up to about -4W/m2, adequate to hold the Earth's average temperature constant as the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration increases to twice the current value. This idea is being examined using GCM modeling, LES cloud modeling, technological development (practical and theoretical), and analysis of data from the recent, extensive VOCALS field study of marine stratocumulus clouds. We are also formulating plans for a possible limited-area field test of the technique. Recent general circulation model computations using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model indicate that increasing cloud reflectivity by seeding maritime boundary layer clouds may compensate for some effects on climate of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. The chosen seeding strategy (one of many possible scenarios), when employed in an atmosphere where the CO2 concentration is doubled, can restore global averages of temperature, precipitation and polar sea-ice to present day values, but not simultaneously. The response varies nonlinearly with the extent of seeding, and geoengineering generates local changes to important climatic features. Our computations suggest that for the specimen cases examined there is no appreciable reduction of rainfall over land, as a consequence of seeding. This result is in agreement with one separate study but not another. Much further work is required to explain these

  6. A model for studying the composition and chemical effects of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Turco, Richard P.; Jacobson, Mark Z.

    1994-01-01

    We developed polynomial expressions for the temperature dependence of the mean binary and water activity coefficients for H2SO4 and HNO3 solutions. These activities were used in an equilibrium model to predict the composition of stratospheric aerosols under a wide range of environmental conditions. For typical concentrations of H2O, H2SO4, HNO3, HCl, HBr, HF, and HOCl in the lower stratosphere, the aerosol composition is estimated as a function of the local temperature and the ambient relative humidity. For temperatures below 200 K, our results indicate that (1) HNO3 contributes a significant mass fraction to stratospheric aerosols, and (2) HCl solubility is considerably affected by HNO3 dissolution into sulfate aerosols. We also show that, in volcanically disturbed periods, changes in stratospheric aerosol composition can significantly alter the microphysics that leads to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The effects caused by HNO3 dissolution on the physical and chemical properties of stratospheric aerosols are discussed.

  7. Sensitivity of Stratospheric Geoengineering with Black Carbon to Aerosol Size and Altitude of Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kravitz, Ben; Robock, Alan; Shindell, Drew T.; Miller, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon (BC) aerosols using a general circulation model with fixed sea surface temperatures show that the climate effects strongly depend on aerosol size and altitude of injection. 1 Tg BC/a injected into the lower stratosphere would cause little surface cooling for large radii but a large amount of surface cooling for small radii and stratospheric warming of over 60 C. With the exception of small particles, increasing the altitude of injection increases surface cooling and stratospheric warming. Stratospheric warming causes global ozone loss by up to 50% in the small radius case. The Antarctic shows less ozone loss due to reduction of polar stratospheric clouds, but strong circumpolar winds would enhance the Arctic ozone hole. Using diesel fuel to produce the aerosols is likely prohibitively expensive and infeasible. Although studying an absorbing aerosol is a useful counterpart to previous studies involving sulfate aerosols, black carbon geoengineering likely carries too many risks to make it a viable option for deployment.

  8. Stratospheric Impact on the Onset of the Mesospheric Ice Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, J.; Baumgarten, G.; Berger, U.; Gabriel, A.; Latteck, R.; Luebken, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mesospheric ice layers, observed as noctilucent clouds (NLC) from ground, are the visible manifestation of extreme conditions in the polar summer mesopause region. Temperatures fall very low so that water vapor can freeze condence, which at 69°N usually occurs beginning of June. However, in 2013 the ALOMAR RMR lidar observed the first NLC on 21 May and the clouds reoccured during the following days. These were the earliest detections since 20 years and indicated an about 10 days earlier onset of the mesospheric ice season. This is supported by the colocated MAARSY radar which showed the occurrence rates of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) increasing faster than usual.The exceptional case was accompanied by ˜6 K lower temperatures and higher water vapor mixing ratios at NLC altitudes above ALOMAR from end of April until beginning of June as measured by the MLS instrument onboard the AURA satellite. Using MERRA reanalysis data we will show that the zonal mean temperature as well as the dynamic conditions in the Arctic middle atmosphere deviated in spring 2013 significantly from the mean conditions of the last 20 years. The planetary wave activity in the high latitude stratosphere was enhanced from 20 April to beginning of May. The colder and wetter upper mesosphere in May 2013 is attributed to this unusual late planetary wave activity in the stratosphere, introducing a strong upwelling in the mesosphere, lower temperatures and an upward transport of water vapor, which finally resulted into earlier existence conditions for mesospheric ice particles. For the southern hemisphere a high correlation between winter/summer transition in the stratosphere and onset of mesospheric ice is known as intra-hemispheric coupling. We regard the processes in the Arctic middle atmosphere in spring 2013 as a first evidence for intra-hemispheric coupling in the northern hemisphere, extending from the stratosphere into the mesopause region.

  9. The major stratospheric final warming in 2016: dispersal of vortex air and termination of Arctic chemical ozone loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manney, Gloria L.; Lawrence, Zachary D.

    2016-12-01

    The 2015/16 Northern Hemisphere winter stratosphere appeared to have the greatest potential yet seen for record Arctic ozone loss. Temperatures in the Arctic lower stratosphere were at record lows from December 2015 through early February 2016, with an unprecedented period of temperatures below ice polar stratospheric cloud thresholds. Trace gas measurements from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) show that exceptional denitrification and dehydration, as well as extensive chlorine activation, occurred throughout the polar vortex. Ozone decreases in 2015/16 began earlier and proceeded more rapidly than those in 2010/11, a winter that saw unprecedented Arctic ozone loss. However, on 5-6 March 2016 a major final sudden stratospheric warming ("major final warming", MFW) began. By mid-March, the mid-stratospheric vortex split after being displaced far off the pole. The resulting offspring vortices decayed rapidly preceding the full breakdown of the vortex by early April. In the lower stratosphere, the period of temperatures low enough for chlorine activation ended nearly a month earlier than that in 2011 because of the MFW. Ozone loss rates were thus kept in check because there was less sunlight during the cold period. Although the winter mean volume of air in which chemical ozone loss could occur was as large as that in 2010/11, observed ozone values did not drop to the persistently low values reached in 2011.We use MLS trace gas measurements, as well as mixing and polar vortex diagnostics based on meteorological fields, to show how the timing and intensity of the MFW and its impact on transport and mixing halted chemical ozone loss. Our detailed characterization of the polar vortex breakdown includes investigations of individual offspring vortices and the origins and fate of air within them. Comparisons of mixing diagnostics with lower-stratospheric N2O and middle-stratospheric CO from MLS (long-lived tracers) show rapid vortex erosion and extensive mixing during

  10. The Seasonal Response of Titan's Troposphere and Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. M.; Schinder, P. J.; Achterberg, R. K.; Marouf, E. A.; French, R. G.; Kliore, A. J.; Rappaport, N. J.

    2009-01-01

    The radiative response of Titan's atmosphere varies by several orders of magnitude with altitude. This presents an interesting situation in which most of the stratosphere----at least that part above 100km is characterized by radiative relaxation times that are short compared to the length of a Titan season, and the troposphere and tropopause region by times that are larger than seasonal timescales. Consistent with this, Cassini CIRS spectra indicate stratospheric temperatures at 100-170 kin that are 20-30 K cooler at high northern latitudes in winter than those at equatorial and southern latitudes. Given the expectation that the situation will largely reverse in southern winter, the observed large meridional contrast is likely indicative of the expected seasonal variation at polar latitudes in both hemispheres. CIRS spectra do not as easily yield temperatures below 100 km in the lower stratosphere and tropopause region, because of the contribution of heterogeneously distributed aerosols and condensates to the infrared opacity. However, Cassini radio occultations probe both the stratosphere and troposphere, and below 80 km they show the thermal contrast with latitude to be muted, e.g,, approx.5 K near the tropopause at 40-50 km and approx.3 K just above the surface. This is consistent with the large radiative relaxation times at these altitudes and with efficient meridional heat transport. What is curious is the manner in which temperatures in the north winter polar atmosphere make the transition between the troposphere and lower stratosphere, where seasonal variations are relatively small, and higher altitudes, where they are large. Temperatures at all latitudes sounded by the radio occultations exhibit similar behavior in the lower stratosphere, increasing with altitude. Between 80 and 100 kin, however, the temperatures at high northern latitudes exhibit a sudden drop with increasing altitude, producing the meridional contrast in the upper stratosphere described

  11. Lidar measurements of ozone and aerosol distributions during the 1992 airborne Arctic stratospheric expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Fenn, Marta A.; Grant, William B.; Ismail, Syed; Carter, Arlen F.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Langley airborne differential absorption lidar system was operated from the NASA Ames DC-8 aircraft during the 1992 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition to investigate the distribution of stratospheric aerosols and ozone (O3) across the Arctic vortex from January to March 1992. Aerosols from the Mt. Pinatubo eruption were found outside and inside the Arctic vortex with distinctly different scattering characteristics and spatial distributions in the two regions. The aerosol and O3 distributions clearly identified the edge of the vortex and provided additional information on vortex dynamics and transport processes. Few polar stratospheric clouds were observed during the AASE-2; however, those that were found had enhanced scattering and depolarization over the background Pinatubo aerosols. The distribution of aerosols inside the vortex exhibited relatively minor changes during the AASE-2. Ozone depletion inside the vortex as limited to less than or equal to 20 percent in the altitude region from 15-20 km.

  12. Ozone and aerosol changes during the 1991-1992 airborne Arctic stratospheric expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Buller, Carolyn F.; Fenn, Marta A.; Grant, William B.; Ismail, Syed; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Toon, Owen B.; Loewenstein, Max; Podolske, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone and aerosol distributions were measured across the wintertime Arctic vortex from January to March 1992 with an airborne lidar system as part of the 1992 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE II). Aerosols from the Mount Pinatubo eruption were found outside and inside the vortex with distinctly different distributions that clearly identified the dynamics of the vortex. Changes in aerosols inside the vortex indicated advection of air from outside to inside the vortex below 16 kilometers. No polar stratospheric clouds were observed and no evidence was found for frozen volcanic aerosols inside the vortex. Between January and March, ozone depletion was observed inside the vortex from 14 to 20 kilometers with a maximum average loss of about 23 percent near 18 kilometers.

  13. Ozone and aerosol changes during the 1991-1992 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    SciTech Connect

    Browell, E.V.; Grant, W.B.; Ismail, S. ); Butler, C.F.; Fenn, M.A. ); Schoeberl, M.R. ); Toon, O.B.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J.R. )

    1993-08-27

    Stratospheric ozone and aerosol distributions were measured across the wintertime Arctic vortex from January to March 1992 with an airborne lidar system as part of the 1992 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE II). Aerosols from the Mount Pinatubo eruption were found outside and inside the vortex with distinctly different distributions that clearly identified the dynamics of the vortex. Changes in aerosols inside the vortex indicated advection of air from outside to inside the vortex below 16 kilometers. No polar stratospheric clouds were observed and no evidence was found for frozen volcanic aerosols inside the vortex. Between January and March, ozone depletion was observed inside the vortex from 14 to 20 kilometers with a maximum average loss of about 23 percent near 18 kilometers.

  14. Persistent longitudinal variations in 8 years of CIPS/AIM polar mesospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Yue, Jia; Xu, Jiyao; Yuan, Wei; Russell, James M.; Hervig, M. E.; Nakamura, Takuji

    2016-07-01

    The Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument on the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite provides an opportunity to study the longitudinal variation in polar mesospheric cloud (PMC). We examined the longitudinal variation in PMC albedo using 8 years (2007-2014) of observations from the CIPS instrument. The results show that the PMC albedo in the Southern Hemisphere (SH), especially in the latitude band of 80°S-85°S, is persistently low ( 65% relative to the rest of the hemisphere) within 60°W to 150°W longitude. In the Northern Hemisphere (NH), however, PMC albedo is found to be relatively zonally asymmetry. Harmonic analyses show that the persistent longitudinal variation in the SH PMC albedo is due to zonal wave numbers 1 through 4 (WN1-WN4) processes with minima in the longitude range of 60°W-150°W. The influence of temperature and H2O on the longitudinal variation of the PMC albedo is discussed based on results obtained using a simple 0-D PMC model and temperature from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Sounding of the Atmosphere with Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) and H2O from MLS. The modeled region of low ice mass in the SH is generally consistent with that of low PMC albedo seen in CIPS. Tidal analyses using the SABER temperatures indicate that the nonmigrating semidiurnal tides with modes of S0, W1, and E1 might be the main drivers of the persistent longitudinal variations of PMC albedo in the SH. Nonmigrating tides are much weaker in the NH and consistent with the observed lack of longitudinal variability in PMC albedo.

  15. Tomographic retrieval of water vapour and temperature around polar mesospheric clouds using Odin-SMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, O. M.; Eriksson, P.; Urban, J.; Murtagh, D.; Hultgren, K.; Gumbel, J.

    2015-05-01

    A special observation mode of the Odin satellite provides the first simultaneous measurements of water vapour, temperature and polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) brightness over a large geographical area while still resolving both horizontal and vertical structures in the clouds and background atmosphere. The observation mode was activated during June, July and August of 2010 and 2011, and for latitudes between 50 and 82° N. This paper focuses on the water vapour and temperature measurements carried out with Odin's sub-millimetre radiometer (SMR). The tomographic retrieval approach used provides water vapour and temperature between 75 and 90 km with a vertical resolution of about 2.5 km and a horizontal resolution of about 200 km. The precision of the measurements is estimated to 0.2 ppmv for water vapour and 2 K for temperature. Due to limited information about the pressure at the measured altitudes, the results have large uncertainties (> 3 ppmv) in the retrieved water vapour. These errors, however, influence mainly the mean atmosphere retrieved for each orbit, and variations around this mean are still reliably captured by the measurements. SMR measurements are performed using two different mixer chains, denoted as frequency mode 19 and 13. Systematic differences between the two frontends have been noted. A first comparison with the Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment instrument (SOFIE) on-board the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite and the Fourier Transform Spectrometer of the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE-FTS) on-board SCISAT indicates that the measurements using the frequency mode 19 have a significant low bias in both temperature (> 15 K) and water vapour (> 0.5 ppmv), while the measurements using frequency mode 13 agree with the other instruments considering estimated errors. PMC brightness data is provided by OSIRIS, Odin's other sensor. Combined SMR and OSIRIS data for some example orbits is considered. For these orbits, effects of

  16. Estimation of Jones matrix, birefringence and entropy using Cloude-Pottier decomposition in polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yamanari, Masahiro; Tsuda, Satoru; Kokubun, Taiki; Shiga, Yukihiro; Omodaka, Kazuko; Aizawa, Naoko; Yokoyama, Yu; Himori, Noriko; Kunimatsu-Sanuki, Shiho; Maruyama, Kazuichi; Kunikata, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of polarimetric parameters has been a fundamental issue to assess biological tissues that have form birefringence or polarization scrambling in polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). We present a mathematical framework to provide a maximum likelihood estimation of the target covariance matrix and its incoherent target decomposition to estimate a Jones matrix of a dominant scattering mechanism, called Cloude-Pottier decomposition, thereby deriving the phase retardation and the optic axis of the sample. In addition, we introduce entropy that shows the randomness of the polarization property. Underestimation of the entropy at a low sampling number is mitigated by asymptotic quasi maximum likelihood estimator. A bias of the entropy from random noises is corrected to show only the polarization property inherent in the sample. The theory is validated with experimental measurements of a glass plate and waveplates, and applied to the imaging of a healthy human eye anterior segment as an image filter. PMID:27699120

  17. Estimation of Jones matrix, birefringence and entropy using Cloude-Pottier decomposition in polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yamanari, Masahiro; Tsuda, Satoru; Kokubun, Taiki; Shiga, Yukihiro; Omodaka, Kazuko; Aizawa, Naoko; Yokoyama, Yu; Himori, Noriko; Kunimatsu-Sanuki, Shiho; Maruyama, Kazuichi; Kunikata, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Toru

    2016-09-01

    Estimation of polarimetric parameters has been a fundamental issue to assess biological tissues that have form birefringence or polarization scrambling in polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). We present a mathematical framework to provide a maximum likelihood estimation of the target covariance matrix and its incoherent target decomposition to estimate a Jones matrix of a dominant scattering mechanism, called Cloude-Pottier decomposition, thereby deriving the phase retardation and the optic axis of the sample. In addition, we introduce entropy that shows the randomness of the polarization property. Underestimation of the entropy at a low sampling number is mitigated by asymptotic quasi maximum likelihood estimator. A bias of the entropy from random noises is corrected to show only the polarization property inherent in the sample. The theory is validated with experimental measurements of a glass plate and waveplates, and applied to the imaging of a healthy human eye anterior segment as an image filter.

  18. The Met Office HadGEM3-ES chemistry-climate model: evaluation of stratospheric dynamics and its impact on ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardiman, Steven C.; Butchart, Neal; O'Connor, Fiona M.; Rumbold, Steven T.

    2017-03-01

    Free-running and nudged versions of a Met Office chemistry-climate model are evaluated and used to investigate the impact of dynamics versus transport and chemistry within the model on the simulated evolution of stratospheric ozone. Metrics of the dynamical processes relevant for simulating stratospheric ozone are calculated, and the free-running model is found to outperform the previous model version in 10 of the 14 metrics. In particular, large biases in stratospheric transport and tropical tropopause temperature, which existed in the previous model version, are substantially reduced, making the current model more suitable for the simulation of stratospheric ozone. The spatial structure of the ozone hole, the area of polar stratospheric clouds, and the increased ozone concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere winter stratosphere following sudden stratospheric warmings, were all found to be sensitive to the accuracy of the dynamics and were better simulated in the nudged model than in the free-running model. Whilst nudging can, in general, provide a useful tool for removing the influence of dynamical biases from the evolution of chemical fields, this study shows that issues can remain in the climatology of nudged models. Significant biases in stratospheric vertical velocities, age of air, water vapour, and total column ozone still exist in the Met Office nudged model. Further, these can lead to biases in the downward flux of ozone into the troposphere.

  19. Cloud identification in the Canadian High Arctic using the UV-visible colour index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoyi; Adams, Cristen; Strong, Kimberly; Duck, Thomas; Perro, Chris; Hudak, David; Rodriguez, Peter

    2014-05-01

    In UV-visible spectroscopy, Rayleigh and Mie scattering contribute to the broadband extinction seen in spectra of scattered sunlight. The relative intensity of these two components of scattering is highly dependent on the cloud condition of the sky. The colour index, defined as the ratio of light intensities at different wavelengths, typically 350 nm and 550 nm, provides a means of determining the cloud conditions. A UV-visible triple-grating spectrometer, the UT-GBS (University of Toronto Ground-Based Spectrometer), was installed at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL), at Eureka in the Canadian High Arctic (86.4°W, 80.1°N) in 1999. Since then, the instrument has made daily measurements during spring from 1999-2009, and year-round, with the exception of polar night, from 2010-2013. The UT-GBS measures vertical column densities of ozone, NO2, and BrO, as well as slant column densities of enhanced OClO, by using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. We use the colour index data from the UT-GBS to distinguish polar stratospheric clouds and tropospheric clouds. The UV-visible measurements are supplemented by vertically resolved lidar and radar cloud data products. The CANDAC (Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change) Rayleigh-Mie-Raman Lidar (CRL) and the Millimetre Cloud Radar (MMCR) are located at the Zero Altitude PEARL Auxiliary Laboratory (0PAL), which is about 15 km away from PEARL. The CRL uses ultra-short pulses of light from two lasers, operating at ultraviolet (355 nm) and visible (532 nm) wavelengths. The CRL measures the vertical distribution of aerosols, temperature, and water vapour in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The zenith-pointing MMCR measures equivalent radar reflectivity, Doppler velocity, spectral width, and Doppler spectra, from which information about cloud heights, thicknesses, internal structure and vertical motions can be determined. Polar stratospheric cloud

  20. Double-layer structure in polar mesospheric clouds observed from SOFIE/AIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Haiyang; Shepherd, Gordon G.; Tang, Yuanhe; Bu, Lingbing; Wang, Zhen

    2017-02-01

    Double-layer structures in polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) are observed by using Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE) data between 2007 and 2014. We find 816 and 301 events of double-layer structure with percentages of 10.32 and 7.25 % compared to total PMC events, and the mean distances between two peaks are 3.06 and 2.73 km for the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and Southern Hemisphere (SH) respectively. Double-layer PMCs almost always have less mean ice water content (IWC) than daily IWC during the core of the season, but they are close to each other at the beginning and the end. The result by averaging over all events shows that the particle concentration has obvious double peaks, while the particle radius exhibits an unexpected monotonic increase with decreasing altitude. By further analysis of the background temperature and water vapour residual profiles, we conclude that the lower layer is a reproduced one formed at the bottom of the upper layer. 56.00 and 47.51 % of all double-layer events for the NH and SH respectively have temperature enhancements larger than 2 K locating between their double peaks. The longitudinal anti-correlation between the gravity waves' (GWs') potential energies and occurrence frequencies of double-layer PMCs suggests that the double-layer PMCs tend to form in an environment where the GWs have weaker intensities.

  1. Highly Polar Organic Compounds in Summer Cloud Water from Whiteface Mountain, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagona, J. A.; Dukett, J. E.; Mazurek, M.

    2010-12-01

    Highly polar organic compounds (HPOC) containing multiple oxygen atoms are of interest due to the aerosol direct and indirect effects and uncertainty they may contribute to climate forcing. Atmospheric HPOC exist as particulate or dissolved chemical species depending on relative humidity. HPOC solid mixtures are thought to scatter and absorb light due to particle size and color (white to yellow). Understanding the chemical composition of HPOC in cloud water (CW) is important for modeling and predicting the direct and indirect influences of this organic aerosol component on the climate system. In this initial study we present a detailed molecular examination of 10 CW samples. CW samples were collected in September 2009 using an automated CW collector at Whiteface Mountain (elevation 1483 m) in the Adirondack Mountains in upstate NY. We performed QA/QC experiments for the CW samples and analyzed the HPOC mixtures by ultratrace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Diacids such as oxalic acid and succinic acid were major components of the CW HPOC with concentrations on the order of 15 ng/mL. Substituted diacids, monoacids, and sugars also were present. We discuss the possible sources of these compounds in light of back-trajectory analysis.

  2. Impact of the January 2012 solar proton event on polar mesospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardeen, C. G.; Marsh, D. R.; Jackman, C. H.; Hervig, M. E.; Randall, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    We use data from the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere mission and simulations using the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model to determine the impact of the 23-30 January 2012 solar proton event (SPE) on polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) and mesospheric water vapor. We see a small heating and loss of ice mass on 26 January that is consistent with prior results but is not statistically significant. We also find a previously unreported but statistically significant ~10% increase in ice mass and in water vapor in the sublimation area in the model that occurs in the 7 to 14 days following the start of the event. The magnitude of the response to the January 2012 SPE is small compared to other sources of variability like gravity waves and planetary waves; however, sensitivity tests suggest that with larger SPEs this delayed increase in ice mass will increase, while there is little change in the loss of ice mass early in the event. The PMC response to SPEs in models is dependent on the gravity wave parameterization, and temperature anomalies from SPEs may be useful in evaluating and tuning gravity wave parameterizations.

  3. Stratospheric Heterogeneous Chemistry and Microphysics: Model Development, Validation and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard P.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to: define the chemical and physical processes leading to stratospheric ozone change that involve polar stratospheric clouds (PSCS) and the reactions occurring on the surfaces of PSC particles; study the formation processes, and the physical and chemical properties of PSCS, that are relevant to atmospheric chemistry and to the interpretation of field measurements taken during polar stratosphere missions; develop quantitative models describing PSC microphysics and heterogeneous chemical processes; assimilate laboratory and field data into these models; and calculate the extent of chemical processing on PSCs and the impact of specific microphysical processes on polar composition and ozone depletion. During the course of the project, a new coupled microphysics/physical-chemistry/ photochemistry model for stratospheric sulfate aerosols and nitric acid and ice PSCs was developed and applied to analyze data collected during NASA's Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition-II (AASE-II) and other missions. In this model, detailed treatments of multicomponent sulfate aerosol physical chemistry, sulfate aerosol microphysics, polar stratospheric cloud microphysics, PSC ice surface chemistry, as well as homogeneous gas-phase chemistry were included for the first time. In recent studies focusing on AASE measurements, the PSC model was used to analyze specific measurements from an aircraft deployment of an aerosol impactor, FSSP, and NO(y) detector. The calculated results are in excellent agreement with observations for particle volumes as well as NO(y) concentrations, thus confirming the importance of supercooled sulfate/nitrate droplets in PSC formation. The same model has been applied to perform a statistical study of PSC properties in the Northern Hemisphere using several hundred high-latitude air parcel trajectories obtained from Goddard. The rates of ozone depletion along trajectories with different meteorological histories are presently

  4. Cloud retrieval algorithm for the imaging spectro-polarimeter on board EUMETSAT Polar System - Second Generation (EPS-SG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Munro, Rose

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric remote sensing benefits a lot from the use of spectro - polarimetric imagers on board satellite platforms. Due to the movement of the spacecraft, any given scene can be observed from many directions by an imaging polarimeter. This concept has been proven with the measurements of POLDER - 1, 2, and 3 on board ADEOS and PARASOL platforms. POLDER has performed measurements of the Stokes vector (first three components) of reflected light in 16 directions at several wavelengths in the visible and near - infrared. The 3MI (Multi-viewing, Multi-channel, Multi-polarization Imaging) on board of a future (2021) EPS-SG mission is very similar to POLDER. However, the measurements are performed at more spectral channels as compared to POLDER and also at a better spatial resolution (4*4km). In particular, the measurements of the Stokes vector components (I, Q, U) of the reflected solar light are performed at the wavelengths 410, 443, 490, 555, 670, 865, 1650, and 2130nm. In addition, the intensity of reflected light is measured at 763, 765, 910, and 1370nm. The FWHM of the channel at 763nm is 10nm and it is 20 nm at other channels (except at 765nm, 865nm, 1650nm, and 2130nm, where FWHM is equal to 40nm). The imaging spectro-polarimeter enables enhanced retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties using spaceborne observations. In particular, the following parameters of clouds can be retrieved: cloud top altitude, liquid water path, the average size of particles in the clouds, and the cloud thermodynamic state. The cloud albedo, cloud optical thickness, single scattering albedo and other optical parameters of clouds can be derived as well. In this presentation we describe the cloud retrieval algorithm CROP developed at EUMETSAT for the retrievals of cloud microphysical, geometrical, and optical characteristics using 3MI observations. The retrievals are performed only for completely cloudy pixels. The measurements at channels 763 and 765nm are used to get cloud top

  5. Layers of quasi-horizontally oriented ice crystals in cirrus clouds observed by a two-wavelength polarization lidar.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Balin, Yurii; Kokhanenko, Grigorii; Penner, Iogannes; Konoshonkin, Alexander; Kustova, Natalia

    2014-10-06

    Layers of quasi-horizontally oriented ice crystals in cirrus clouds are observed by a two-wavelength polarization lidar. These layers of thickness of several hundred meters are identified by three attributes: the backscatter reveals a sharp ridge while the depolarization ratio and color ratio become deep minima. These attributes have been justified by theoretical calculations of these quantities within the framework of the physical-optics approximation.

  6. The Contribution of Water Ice Clouds to the Water Cycle in the North Polar Region of Mars: Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, D. S.; Tamppari, L. K.

    2000-01-01

    While it has long been known that Mars' north residual polar cap and the Martian regolith are significant sources of atmospheric water vapor, the amount of water vapor observed in the northern spring season by the Viking Mars Atmospheric Water Detector instrument (MAWD) cannot be attributed to cap and regolith sources alone. Kahn suggested that ice hazes may be the mechanism by which additional water is supplied to the Martian atmosphere. Additionally, a significant decrease in atmospheric water vapor was observed in the late northern summer that could not be correlated with the return of the cold seasonal C02 ice. While the detection of water ice clouds on Mars indicate that water exists in Mars' atmosphere in several different phases, the extent to which water ice clouds play a role in moving water through the Martian atmosphere remains uncertain. Work by Bass et. al. suggested that the time dependence of water ice cap seasonal variability and the increase in atmospheric water vapor depended on the polar cap center reaching 200K, the night time saturation temperature. Additionally, they demonstrated that a decrease in atmospheric water vapor may be attributed to deposition of water ice onto the sur