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Sample records for polarised primary cilia

  1. Secreted frizzled-related protein disrupts PCP in eye lens fiber cells that have polarised primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Yuki; Stump, Richard J. W.; Nguyen, Anke; Wen, Li; Chen, Yongjuan; Wang, Yanshu; Murdoch, Jennifer N.; Lovicu, Frank J.; McAvoy, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling polarises cells along tissue axes. Although pathways involved are becoming better understood, outstanding issues include; (i) existence/identity of cues that orchestrate global polarisation in tissues, and (ii) the generality of the link between polarisation of primary cilia and asymmetric localisation of PCP proteins. Mammalian lenses are mainly comprised of epithelial-derived fiber cells. Concentrically arranged fibers are precisely aligned as they elongate along the anterior-posterior axis and orientate towards lens poles where they meet fibers from other segments to form characteristic sutures. We show that lens exhibits PCP, with each fiber cell having a apically situated cilium and in most cases this is polarised towards the anterior pole. Frizzled and other PCP proteins are also asymmetrically localised along the equatorial-anterior axis. Mutations in core PCP genes Van Gogh-like 2 and Celsr1 perturb oriented fiber alignment and suture formation. Suppression of the PCP pathway by overexpressing Sfrp2, shows that whilst local groups of fibers are often similarly oriented, they lack global orientation; consequently when local groups of fibers with different orientations meet they form multiple, small, ectopic suture-like configurations. This indicates that this extracellular inhibitor disrupts a global polarising signal that utilises a PCP-mediated mechanism to coordinate the global alignment and orientation of fibers to lens poles. PMID:19968984

  2. Visualizing renal primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Verghese, Elizabeth; Martelotto, Luciano G; Cain, Jason E; Galtseva, Alya; Rosenblum, Norman D; Watkins, D Neil; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-03-01

    Renal primary cilia are microscopic sensory organelles found on the apical surface of epithelial cells of the nephron and collecting duct. They are based upon a microtubular cytoskeleton, bounded by a specialized membrane, and contain an array of proteins that facilitate their assembly, maintenance and function. Cilium-based signalling is important for the control of epithelial differentiation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various cystic kidney diseases and in renal repair. As such, visualizing renal primary cilia and understanding their composition has become an essential component of many studies of inherited kidney disease and mechanisms of epithelial regeneration. Primary cilia were initially identified in the kidney using electron microscopy and this remains a useful technique for the high resolution examination of these organelles. New reagents and techniques now also allow the structure and composition of primary cilia to be analysed in detail using fluorescence microscopy. Primary cilia can be imaged in situ in sections of kidney, and many renal-derived cell lines produce primary cilia in culture providing a simplified and accessible system in which to investigate these organelles. Here we outline microscopy-based techniques commonly used for studying renal primary cilia.

  3. HIF Stabilization Weakens Primary Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Although solitary or sensory cilia are present in most cells of the body and their existence has been known since the sixties, very little is known about their functions. One suspected function is fluid flow sensing- physical bending of cilia produces an influx of Ca++, which can then result in a variety of activated signaling pathways. Defective cilia and ciliary-associated proteins have been shown to result in cystic diseases. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is a progressive disease, typically appearing in the 5th decade of life and is one of the most common monogenetic inherited human diseases, affecting approximately 600,000 people in the United States. Because the mechanical properties of cilia impact their response to applied flow, we asked how the stiffness of cilia can be controlled pharmacologically. We performed an experiment subjecting cilia to Taxol (a microtubule stabilizer) and CoCl2 (a HIF stabilizer to model hypoxia). Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells were selected as our model system. After incubation with a selected pharmacological agent, cilia were optically trapped and the bending modulus measured. We found that HIF stabilization significantly weakens cilia. These results illustrate a method to alter the mechanical properties of primary cilia and potentially alter the flow sensing properties of cilia. PMID:27812213

  4. HIF Stabilization Weakens Primary Cilia.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Although solitary or sensory cilia are present in most cells of the body and their existence has been known since the sixties, very little is known about their functions. One suspected function is fluid flow sensing- physical bending of cilia produces an influx of Ca++, which can then result in a variety of activated signaling pathways. Defective cilia and ciliary-associated proteins have been shown to result in cystic diseases. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is a progressive disease, typically appearing in the 5th decade of life and is one of the most common monogenetic inherited human diseases, affecting approximately 600,000 people in the United States. Because the mechanical properties of cilia impact their response to applied flow, we asked how the stiffness of cilia can be controlled pharmacologically. We performed an experiment subjecting cilia to Taxol (a microtubule stabilizer) and CoCl2 (a HIF stabilizer to model hypoxia). Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells were selected as our model system. After incubation with a selected pharmacological agent, cilia were optically trapped and the bending modulus measured. We found that HIF stabilization significantly weakens cilia. These results illustrate a method to alter the mechanical properties of primary cilia and potentially alter the flow sensing properties of cilia.

  5. Mechanical Properties of Primary Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battle, Christopher; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the primary cilium, long thought to be a vestigial cellular appendage with no function, is involved in a multitude of sensory functions. One example, interesting from both a biophysical and medical standpoint, is the primary cilium of kidney epithelial cells, which acts as a mechanosensitive flow sensor. Genetic defects in ciliary function can cause, e.g., polycystic kidney disease (PKD). The material properties of these non-motile, microtubule-based 9 +0 cilia, and the way they are anchored to the cell cytoskeleton, are important to know if one wants to understand the mechano-electrochemical response of these cells, which is mediated by their cilia. We have probed the mechanical properties, boundary conditions, and dynamics of the cilia of MDCK cells using optical traps and DIC/fluorescence microscopy. We found evidence for both elastic relaxation of the cilia themselves after bending and for compliance in the intracellular anchoring structures. Angular and positional fluctuations of the cilia reflect both thermal excitations and cellular driving forces.

  6. Primary cilia in neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Enza Maria; Rosti, Rasim O.; Gibbs, Elizabeth; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are generally solitary organelles that emanate from the surface of almost all vertebrate cell types. Until recently, details regarding the function of these structures were lacking; however, extensive evidence now suggests that primary cilia have critical roles in sensing the extracellular environment, and in coordinating developmental and homeostatic signalling pathways. Furthermore, disruption of these functions seems to underlie a diverse spectrum of disorders, known as primary ciliopathies. These disorders are characterized by wide-ranging clinical and genetic heterogeneity, but with substantial overlap among distinct conditions. Indeed, ciliopathies are associated with a large variety of manifestations that often include distinctive neurological findings. Herein, we review neurological features associated with primary ciliopathies, highlight genotype–phenotype correlations, and discuss potential mechanisms underlying these findings. PMID:24296655

  7. Primary cilia and graded Sonic Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Sasai, Noriaki; Briscoe, James

    2012-01-01

    Cilia are evolutionary-conserved microtubule-containing organelles protruding from the surface of cells. They are classified into two types--primary and motile cilia. Primary cilia are nearly ubiquitous, at least in vertebrate cells, and it has become apparent that they play an essential role in the intracellular transduction of a range of stimuli. Most notable among these is Sonic Hedgehog. In this article we briefly summarize the structure and biogenesis of primary cilia. We discuss the evidence implicating cilia in the transduction of extrinsic signals. We focus on the involvement and molecular mechanism of cilia in signaling by Sonic Hedgehog in embryonic tissues, specifically the neural tube, and we discuss how cilia play an active role in the interpretation of gradients of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling.

  8. Role of Primary Cilia in Odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hampl, M; Cela, P; Szabo-Rogers, H L; Bosakova, M Kunova; Dosedelova, H; Krejci, P; Buchtova, M

    2017-08-01

    Primary cilium is a solitary organelle that emanates from the surface of most postmitotic mammalian cells and serves as a sensory organelle, transmitting the mechanical and chemical cues to the cell. Primary cilia are key coordinators of various signaling pathways during development and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The emerging evidence implicates primary cilia function in tooth development. Primary cilia are located in the dental epithelium and mesenchyme at early stages of tooth development and later during cell differentiation and production of hard tissues. The cilia are present when interactions between both the epithelium and mesenchyme are required for normal morphogenesis. As the primary cilium coordinates several signaling pathways essential for odontogenesis, ciliary defects can interrupt the latter process. Genetic or experimental alterations of cilia function lead to various developmental defects, including supernumerary or missing teeth, enamel and dentin hypoplasia, or teeth crowding. Moreover, dental phenotypes are observed in ciliopathies, including Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, Weyers acrofacial dysostosis, cranioectodermal dysplasia, and oral-facial-digital syndrome, altogether demonstrating that primary cilia play a critical role in regulation of both the early odontogenesis and later differentiation of hard tissue-producing cells. Here, we summarize the current evidence for the localization of primary cilia in dental tissues and the impact of disrupted cilia signaling on tooth development in ciliopathies.

  9. Proteomics of Primary Cilia by Proximity Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Mick, David U.; Rodrigues, Rachel B.; Leib, Ryan D.; Adams, Christopher M.; Chien, Allis S.; Gygi, Steven P.; Nachury, Maxence V.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY While cilia are recognized as important signaling organelles, the extent of ciliary functions remains unknown because of difficulties in cataloguing proteins from mammalian primary cilia. We present a method that readily captures rapid snapshots of the ciliary proteome by selectively biotinylating ciliary proteins using a cilia-targeted proximity labeling enzyme (cilia-APEX). Besides identifying known ciliary proteins, cilia-APEX uncovered several ciliary signaling molecules. The kinases PKA, AMPK and LKB1 were validated as bona fide ciliary proteins and PKA was found to regulate Hedgehog signaling in primary cilia. Furthermore, proteomics profiling of Ift27/Bbs19 mutant cilia correctly detected BBSome accumulation inside Ift27−/− cilia and revealed that β-arrestin 2 and the viral receptor CAR are candidate cargoes of the BBSome. This work demonstrates that proximity labeling can be applied to proteomics of non-membrane-enclosed organelles and suggests that proteomics profiling of cilia will enable a rapid and powerful characterization of ciliopathies. PMID:26585297

  10. Primary Cilia in Pancreatic Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lodh, Sukanya; O’Hare, Elizabeth A.; Zaghloul, Norann A.

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia and their anchoring basal bodies are important regulators of a growing list of signaling pathways. Consequently, dysfunction in proteins associated with these structures results in perturbation of the development and function of a spectrum of tissue and cell types. Here, we review the role of cilia in mediating the development and function of the pancreas. We focus on ciliary regulation of major pathways involved in pancreatic development, including Shh, Wnt, TGF-β, Notch, and fibroblast growth factor. We also discuss pancreatic phenotypes associated with ciliary dysfunction, including pancreatic cysts and defects in glucose homeostasis, and explore the potential role of cilia in such defects. PMID:24864023

  11. Primary cilia signaling mediates intraocular pressure sensation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Na; Conwell, Michael D; Chen, Xingjuan; Kettenhofen, Christine Insinna; Westlake, Christopher J; Cantor, Louis B; Wells, Clark D; Weinreb, Robert N; Corson, Timothy W; Spandau, Dan F; Joos, Karen M; Iomini, Carlo; Obukhov, Alexander G; Sun, Yang

    2014-09-02

    Lowe syndrome is a rare X-linked congenital disease that presents with congenital cataracts and glaucoma, as well as renal and cerebral dysfunction. OCRL, an inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase, is mutated in Lowe syndrome. We previously showed that OCRL is involved in vesicular trafficking to the primary cilium. Primary cilia are sensory organelles on the surface of eukaryotic cells that mediate mechanotransduction in the kidney, brain, and bone. However, their potential role in the trabecular meshwork (TM) in the eye, which regulates intraocular pressure, is unknown. Here, we show that TM cells, which are defective in glaucoma, have primary cilia that are critical for response to pressure changes. Primary cilia in TM cells shorten in response to fluid flow and elevated hydrostatic pressure, and promote increased transcription of TNF-α, TGF-β, and GLI1 genes. Furthermore, OCRL is found to be required for primary cilia to respond to pressure stimulation. The interaction of OCRL with transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), a ciliary mechanosensory channel, suggests that OCRL may act through regulation of this channel. A novel disease-causing OCRL allele prevents TRPV4-mediated calcium signaling. In addition, TRPV4 agonist GSK 1016790A treatment reduced intraocular pressure in mice; TRPV4 knockout animals exhibited elevated intraocular pressure and shortened cilia. Thus, mechanotransduction by primary cilia in TM cells is implicated in how the eye senses pressure changes and highlights OCRL and TRPV4 as attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of glaucoma. Implications of OCRL and TRPV4 in primary cilia function may also shed light on mechanosensation in other organ systems.

  12. Primary cilia signaling mediates intraocular pressure sensation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Na; Conwell, Michael D.; Chen, Xingjuan; Kettenhofen, Christine Insinna; Westlake, Christopher J.; Cantor, Louis B.; Wells, Clark D.; Weinreb, Robert N.; Corson, Timothy W.; Spandau, Dan F.; Joos, Karen M.; Iomini, Carlo; Obukhov, Alexander G.; Sun, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Lowe syndrome is a rare X-linked congenital disease that presents with congenital cataracts and glaucoma, as well as renal and cerebral dysfunction. OCRL, an inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase, is mutated in Lowe syndrome. We previously showed that OCRL is involved in vesicular trafficking to the primary cilium. Primary cilia are sensory organelles on the surface of eukaryotic cells that mediate mechanotransduction in the kidney, brain, and bone. However, their potential role in the trabecular meshwork (TM) in the eye, which regulates intraocular pressure, is unknown. Here, we show that TM cells, which are defective in glaucoma, have primary cilia that are critical for response to pressure changes. Primary cilia in TM cells shorten in response to fluid flow and elevated hydrostatic pressure, and promote increased transcription of TNF-α, TGF-β, and GLI1 genes. Furthermore, OCRL is found to be required for primary cilia to respond to pressure stimulation. The interaction of OCRL with transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), a ciliary mechanosensory channel, suggests that OCRL may act through regulation of this channel. A novel disease-causing OCRL allele prevents TRPV4-mediated calcium signaling. In addition, TRPV4 agonist GSK 1016790A treatment reduced intraocular pressure in mice; TRPV4 knockout animals exhibited elevated intraocular pressure and shortened cilia. Thus, mechanotransduction by primary cilia in TM cells is implicated in how the eye senses pressure changes and highlights OCRL and TRPV4 as attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of glaucoma. Implications of OCRL and TRPV4 in primary cilia function may also shed light on mechanosensation in other organ systems. PMID:25143588

  13. Primary Cilia and Intraflagellar Transport Proteins in Bone and Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Yuan, X; Yang, S

    2016-11-01

    Primary cilia, present on most mammalian cells, function as a sensor to sense the environment change and transduce signaling. Loss of primary cilia causes a group of human pleiotropic syndromes called Ciliopathies. Some of the ciliopathies display skeletal dysplasias, implying the important role of primary cilia in skeletal development and homeostasis. Emerging evidence has shown that loss or malfunction of primary cilia or ciliary proteins in bone and cartilage is associated with developmental and function defects. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins are essential for cilia formation and/or function. In this review, we discuss the role of primary cilia and IFT proteins in the development of bone and cartilage, as well as the differentiation and mechanotransduction of mesenchymal stem cells, osteoblasts, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. We also include the role of primary cilia in tooth development and highlight the current advance of primary cilia and IFT proteins in the pathogenesis of cartilage diseases, including osteoarthritis, osteosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma.

  14. The Roles of Primary cilia in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kathem, Sarmed H.; Mohieldin, Ashraf M.; Nauli, Surya M.

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited genetic disorder that results in progressive renal cyst formation with ultimate loss of renal function and other systemic disorders. These systemic disorders include abnormalities in cardiovascular, portal, pancreatic and gastrointestinal systems. ADPKD is considered to be among the ciliopathy diseases due to the association with abnormal primary cilia function. In order to understand the full course of primary cilia and its association with ADPKD, the structure, functions and role of primary cilia have been meticulously investigated. As a result, the focus on primary cilia has emerged to support the vital roles of primary cilia in ADPKD. The primary cilia have been shown to have not only a mechanosensory function but also a chemosensory function. Both structural and functional defects in primary cilia result in cystic kidney disease and vascular hypertension. Thus, the mechanosenory and chemosensory functions will be analyzed in regards to ADPKD. PMID:25599087

  15. Autophagy and primary cilia: dual interplay

    PubMed Central

    Pampliega, Olatz; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles for sensing of the extracellular milieu and transducing this information into the cell through a variety of molecular signaling pathways. Functioning of the primary cilium has been recently connected to autophagy, a pathway for degradation of cellular components in lysosomes. Autophagy regulates the length of the cilia by removing proteins required for ciliogenesis, a phenomenon that is molecularly different if performed by basal autophagy or when autophagy is induced in response to various stressors. Here we review the current knowledge about the dual interaction between autophagy and ciliogenesis, and discuss the potential role that deregulated ciliary autophagy could have in pathologies with alterations in autophagy and ciliogenesis. PMID:26826446

  16. The emerging face of primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Zaghloul, Norann A.; Brugmann, Samantha A.

    2011-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that serve as hubs for the transduction of various developmental signaling pathways including Hedgehog, Wnt, FGF and PDGF. Ciliary dysfunction contributes to a range of disorders, collectively known as the ciliopathies. Recently, interest has grown in these syndromes, particularly among craniofacial biologists, as many known and putative ciliopathies have severe craniofacial defects. Herein we discuss the current understanding of ciliary biology and craniofacial development in an attempt to gain insight into the molecular etiology for craniofacial ciliopathies, and uncover a characteristic ciliopathic craniofacial gestalt. PMID:21305689

  17. Primary Cilia Are Lost in Preinvasive and Invasive Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hassounah, Nadia B.; Nagle, Ray; Saboda, Kathylynn; Roe, Denise J.; Dalkin, Bruce L.; McDermott, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Little is known about the role of primary cilia in preinvasive and invasive prostate cancer. However, reduced cilia expression has been observed in human cancers including pancreatic cancer, renal cell carcinoma, breast cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, and melanoma. The aim of this study was to characterize primary cilia expression in preinvasive and invasive human prostate cancer, and to investigate the correlation between primary cilia and the Wnt signaling pathway. Human prostate tissues representative of stages of prostate cancer formation (normal prostate, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and invasive prostate cancer (including perineural invasion)) were stained for ciliary proteins. The frequency of primary cilia was determined. A decrease in the percentage of ciliated cells in PIN, invasive cancer and perineural invasion lesions was observed when compared to normal. Cilia lengths were also measured to indirectly test functionality. Cilia were shorter in PIN, cancer, and perineural invasion lesions, suggesting dysfunction. Primary cilia have been shown to suppress the Wnt pathway. Increased Wnt signaling has been implicated in prostate cancer. Therefore, we investigated a correlation between loss of primary cilia and increased Wnt signaling in normal prostate and in preinvasive and invasive prostate cancer. To investigate Wnt signaling in our cohort, serial tissue sections were stained for β-catenin as a measure of Wnt signaling. Nuclear β-catenin was analyzed and Wnt signaling was found to be higher in un-ciliated cells in the normal prostate, PIN, a subset of invasive cancers, and perineural invasion. Our results suggest that cilia normally function to suppress the Wnt signaling pathway in epithelial cells and that cilia loss may play a role in increased Wnt signaling in some prostate cancers. These results suggest that cilia are dysfunctional in human prostate cancer, and

  18. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J.; Rattner, Jerome B.; Hoorn, Frans A. van der

    2009-10-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3{beta} by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  19. CLEM Methods for Studying Primary Cilia.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Frank P; Perumal, Geoffrey S; Kolstrup, Johan; Satir, Peter

    2016-01-01

    CLEM (correlated light and electron microscope) imaging is a highly useful technique for examining primary cilia. With CLEM, it is possible to determine the distribution of tagged proteins along the ciliary membrane and axoneme with high precision. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) permits measurement of ciliary length and orientation in relation to nearby cellular structures in a 3D image; in optimal cases, this can be combined with superresolution microscopy of selected ciliary components as they enter or leave the cilium. This chapter discusses CLEM methods. In the method described in detail, samples are completely processed for sequential fluorescence and SEM observation. This method is ideal for robust antibody localization and minimizes image manipulation in correlating the fluorescent and SEM images. Alternative methods prepare samples for fluorescence imaging followed by processing for SEM then observation in the SEM. This method is ideal for optimal fluorescence imaging, particularly live cell imaging.

  20. Sensing a Sensor: Identifying the Mechanosensory Function of Primary Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rahul M.; Jin, Xingjian; Nauli, Surya M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, primary cilia have emerged as the premier means by which cells sense and transduce mechanical stimuli. Primary cilia are sensory organelles that have been shown to be vitally involved in the mechanosensation of urine in the renal nephron, bile in the hepatic biliary system, digestive fluid in the pancreatic duct, dentin in dental pulp, lacunocanalicular fluid in bone and cartilage, and blood in vasculature. The prevalence of primary cilia among mammalian cell types is matched by the tremendously varied disease states caused by both structural and functional defects in cilia. In the process of delineating the mechanisms behind these disease states, calcium fluorimetry has been widely utilized as a means of quantifying ciliary function to both fluid flow and pharmacological agents. In this review, we will discuss the approaches used in associating calcium levels to cilia function. PMID:24839551

  1. Primary cilia disappear in rat podocytes during glomerular development.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Koichiro; Kurihara, Hidetake; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2010-07-01

    Most tubular epithelial cell types express primary cilia, and mutations of primary-cilium-associated proteins are well known to cause several kinds of cystic renal disease. However, until now, it has been unclear whether mammalian podocytes express primary cilia in vivo. In this study, we determined whether primary cilia are present in the podocytes of rat immature and mature glomeruli by means of transmission electron microscopy of serial ultrathin sections. In immature glomeruli of fetal rats, podocytes express the primary cilia with high percentages at the S-shaped body (88 +/- 5%, n = 3), capillary loop (95 +/- 4%, n = 4), and maturing glomerulus (76 +/- 13%, n = 5) stages. The percentage of ciliated podocytes was significantly lower at the maturing glomerulus stage than at the former two stages. In mature glomeruli of adult rats, ciliated podocytes were not found at all (0 +/- 0%, n = 11). These findings indicate that the primary cilia gradually disappear in rat podocytes during glomerular development. Since glomerular filtration rate increases during development, the primary cilia on the podocytes are subjected to a stronger bending force. Thus, the disappearance of the primary cilia presumably prevents the entry of excessive calcium-ions via the cilium-associated polycystin complexes and the disturbance of intracellular signaling cascades in mature podocytes.

  2. Emerging roles for renal primary cilia in epithelial repair.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2012-01-01

    Primary cilia are microscopic sensory antennae that cells in many vertebrate tissues use to gather information about their environment. In the kidney, primary cilia sense urine flow and are essential for the maintenance of epithelial architecture. Defects of this organelle cause the cystic kidney disease characterized by epithelial abnormalities. These findings link primary cilia to the regulation of epithelial differentiation and proliferation, processes that must be precisely controlled during epithelial repair in the kidney. Here, we consider likely roles for primary cilium-based signaling during responses to renal injury and ensuing epithelial repair processes.

  3. Primary cilia and coordination of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Søren T; Clement, Christian A; Satir, Peter; Pedersen, Lotte B

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based sensory organelles that coordinate signalling pathways in cell-cycle control, migration, differentiation and other cellular processes critical during development and for tissue homeostasis. Accordingly, defects in assembly or function of primary cilia lead to a plethora of developmental disorders and pathological conditions now known as ciliopathies. In this review, we summarize the current status of the role of primary cilia in coordinating receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling pathways. Further, we present potential mechanisms of signalling crosstalk and networking in the primary cilium and discuss how defects in ciliary RTK signalling are linked to human diseases and disorders. PMID:21956154

  4. Electrical Signaling in Motile and Primary Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Kleene, Steven J.; Van Houten, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are highly conserved for their structure and also for their sensory functions. They serve as antennae for extracellular information. Whether the cilia are motile or not, they respond to environmental mechanical and chemical stimuli and send signals to the cell body. The information from extracellular stimuli is commonly converted to electrical signals through the repertoire of ion-conducting channels in the ciliary membrane, which results in changes in concentrations of ions, especially calcium ions, in the cilia. These changes, in turn, affect motility and the ability of the signaling pathways in the cilia and cell body to carry on the signal transduction. We review here the activities of ion channels in cilia in animals from protists to vertebrates. PMID:25892740

  5. Primary Cilia Are Not Calcium-Responsive Mechanosensors

    PubMed Central

    Delling, M.; Indzhykulian, A. A.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.; Xie, T.; Corey, D. P.; Clapham, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Primary cilia are solitary, generally non-motile, hair-like protrusions that extend from the surface of cells between cell divisions. Their antenna-like structure leads naturally to the assumption that they sense the surrounding environment, the most common hypothesis being sensation of mechanical force through calcium-permeable ion channels within the cilium1. This Ca2+- Responsive MechanoSensor (CaRMS) hypothesis for primary cilia has been invoked to explain a large range of biological responses, from control of left-right axis determination in embryonic development to adult progression of polycystic kidney disease and some cancers2,3. Here, we report the complete lack of mechanically induced calcium increases in primary cilia, in tissues upon which this hypothesis has been based. First, we developed a transgenic mouse, Arl13b-mCherry-GECO1.2, expressing a ratiometric genetically encoded calcium indicator (GECI) in all primary cilia. We then measured responses to flow in primary cilia of cultured kidney epithelial cells, kidney thick ascending tubules, crown cells of the embryonic node, kinocilia of inner ear hair cells, and several cell lines. Cilia-specific Ca2+ influxes were not observed in physiological or even highly supraphysiological levels of fluid flow. We conclude that mechanosensation, if it originates in primary cilia, is not via calcium signaling. PMID:27007841

  6. Primary cilia regulate hippocampal neurogenesis by mediating sonic hedgehog signaling

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, Joshua J.; Sarkisian, Matthew R.; Arellano, Jon I.; Morozov, Yury M.; Ayoub, Albert E.; Sojitra, Sonal; Wang, Baolin; Flavell, Richard A.; Rakic, Pasko; Town, Terrence

    2008-01-01

    Primary cilia are present on mammalian neurons and glia, but their function is largely unknown. We generated conditional homozygous mutant mice for a gene we termed Stumpy. Mutants lack cilia and have conspicuous abnormalities in postnatally developing brain regions, including a hypoplasic hippocampus characterized by a primary deficiency in neural stem cells known as astrocyte-like neural precursors (ALNPs). Previous studies suggested that primary cilia mediate sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Here, we find that loss of ALNP cilia leads to abrogated Shh activity, increased cell cycle exit, and morphological abnormalities in ALNPs. Processing of Gli3, a mediator of Shh signaling, is also altered in the absence of cilia. Further, key mediators of the Shh pathway localize to ALNP cilia. Thus, selective targeting of Shh machinery to primary cilia confers to ALNPs the ability to differentially respond to Shh mitogenic signals compared to neighboring cells. Our data suggest these organelles are cellular “antennae” critically required to modulate ALNP behavior. PMID:18728187

  7. Primary Cilia in Breast Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    mechanical signals (Satir and Christensen, 2007). The process of Intraflagellar Transport ( IFT ) is responsible for building and maintaining the...Zhang, Q., Song, B., Jackson, W.S., Detloff, P.J., Serra, R., and Yoder, B.K. (2007). Intraflagellar transport is essential for endochondral bone...structure and function of cilia. The absence of Ift88/Tg737/Polaris, a core molecular component of the IFT machinery, results in the loss of cilia

  8. Primary cilia and autophagic dysfunction in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaliszewski, M; Knott, A B; Bossy-Wetzel, E

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited, neurodegenerative disorder caused by a single-gene mutation: a CAG expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene that results in production of a mutated protein, mutant HTT, with a polyglutamine tail (polyQ-HTT). Although the molecular pathways of polyQ-HTT toxicity are not fully understood, because protein misfolding and aggregation are central features of HD, it has long been suspected that cellular housekeeping processes such as autophagy might be important to disease pathology. Indeed, multiple lines of research have identified abnormal autophagy in HD, characterized generally by increased autophagic induction and inefficient clearance of substrates. To date, the origin of autophagic dysfunction in HD remains unclear and the search for actors involved continues. To that end, recent studies have suggested a bidirectional relationship between autophagy and primary cilia, signaling organelles of most mammalian cells. Interestingly, primary cilia structure is defective in HD, suggesting a potential link between autophagic dysfunction, primary cilia and HD pathogenesis. In addition, because polyQ-HTT also accumulates in primary cilia, the possibility exists that primary cilia might play additional roles in HD: perhaps by disrupting signaling pathways or acting as a reservoir for secretion and propagation of toxic, misfolded polyQ-HTT fragments. Here, we review recent research suggesting potential links between autophagy, primary cilia and HD and speculate on possible pathogenic mechanisms and future directions for the field. PMID:26160070

  9. Primary cilia disappear in rat podocytes during glomerular development

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Hidetake; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2010-01-01

    Most tubular epithelial cell types express primary cilia, and mutations of primary-cilium-associated proteins are well known to cause several kinds of cystic renal disease. However, until now, it has been unclear whether mammalian podocytes express primary cilia in vivo. In this study, we determined whether primary cilia are present in the podocytes of rat immature and mature glomeruli by means of transmission electron microscopy of serial ultrathin sections. In immature glomeruli of fetal rats, podocytes express the primary cilia with high percentages at the S-shaped body (88 ± 5%, n = 3), capillary loop (95 ± 4%, n =  4), and maturing glomerulus (76 ± 13%, n = 5) stages. The percentage of ciliated podocytes was significantly lower at the maturing glomerulus stage than at the former two stages. In mature glomeruli of adult rats, ciliated podocytes were not found at all (0 ± 0%, n = 11). These findings indicate that the primary cilia gradually disappear in rat podocytes during glomerular development. Since glomerular filtration rate increases during development, the primary cilia on the podocytes are subjected to a stronger bending force. Thus, the disappearance of the primary cilia presumably prevents the entry of excessive calcium-ions via the cilium-associated polycystin complexes and the disturbance of intracellular signaling cascades in mature podocytes. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00441-010-0983-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20495826

  10. Analysis of primary cilia in directional cell migration in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Søren T; Veland, Iben R; Schwab, Albrecht; Cammer, Michael; Satir, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Early studies of migrating fibroblasts showed that primary cilia orient in front of the nucleus and point toward the leading edge. Recent work has shown that primary cilia coordinate a series of signaling pathways critical to fibroblast cell migration during development and in wound healing. In particular, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα) is compartmentalized to the primary cilium to activate signaling pathways that regulate reorganization of the cytoskeleton required for lamellipodium formation and directional migration in the presence of a specific ligand gradient. We summarize selected methods in analyzing ciliary function in directional cell migration, including immunofluorescence microscopy, scratch assay, and chemotaxis assay by micropipette addition of PDGFRα ligands to cultures of fibroblasts. These methods should be useful not only in studying cell migration but also more generally in delineating response pathways in cells with primary cilia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Primary cilia and coordination of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Søren T; Clement, Christian A; Satir, Peter; Pedersen, Lotte B

    2012-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based sensory organelles that coordinate signalling pathways in cell-cycle control, migration, differentiation and other cellular processes critical during development and for tissue homeostasis. Accordingly, defects in assembly or function of primary cilia lead to a plethora of developmental disorders and pathological conditions now known as ciliopathies. In this review, we summarize the current status of the role of primary cilia in coordinating receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signalling pathways. Further, we present potential mechanisms of signalling crosstalk and networking in the primary cilium and discuss how defects in ciliary RTK signalling are linked to human diseases and disorders. Copyright © 2011 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. A TRPM4-dependent current in murine renal primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Richard J.; Kleene, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in primary cilia lead to a variety of human diseases. One of these, polycystic kidney disease, can be caused by defects in a Ca2+-gated ion channel (TRPP2) found on the cilium. Other ciliary functions also contribute to cystogenesis, and defects in apical Ca2+ homeostasis have been implicated. By recording directly from the native cilia of mIMCD-3 cells, a murine cell line of renal epithelial origin, we have identified a second Ca2+-gated channel in the ciliary membrane: the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 4 (TRPM4). In excised primary cilia, TRPM4 was found to have a low sensitivity to Ca2+, with an EC50 of 646 μM at +100 mV. It was inhibited by MgATP and by 9-phenanthrol. The channel was not permeable to Ca2+ or Cl− and had a permeability ratio PK/PNa of 1.42. Reducing the expression of Trpm4 mRNA with short hairpin (sh) RNA reduced the TRPM4 current by 87% and shortened primary cilia by 43%. When phospholipase C was inhibited, the sensitivity to cytoplasmic Ca2+ greatly increased (EC50 = 26 μM at +100 mV), which is consistent with previous reports that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) modulates the channel. MgATP did not restore the channel to a preinactivation state, suggesting that the enzyme or substrate necessary for making PIP2 is not abundant in primary cilia of mIMCD-3 cells. The function of TRPM4 in renal primary cilia is not yet known, but it is likely to influence the apical Ca2+ dynamics of the cell, perhaps in tandem with TRPP2. PMID:26290373

  13. Oscillatory fluid flow influences primary cilia and microtubule mechanics.

    PubMed

    Espinha, Lina C; Hoey, David A; Fernandes, Paulo R; Rodrigues, Hélder C; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Many tissues are sensitive to mechanical stimuli; however, the mechanotransduction mechanism used by cells remains unknown in many cases. The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile microtubule-based extension present on nearly every mammalian cell which extends from the basal body. The cilium is a mechanosensitive organelle and has been shown to transduce fluid flow-induced shear stress in tissues, such as the kidney and bone. The majority of microtubules assemble from the mother centriole (basal body), contributing significantly to the anchoring of the primary cilium. Several studies have attempted to quantify the number of microtubules emanating from the basal body and the results vary depending on the cell type. It has also been shown that cellular response to shear stress depends on microtubular integrity. This study hypothesizes that changing the microtubule attachment of primary cilia in response to a mechanical stimulus could change primary cilia mechanics and, possibly, mechanosensitivity. Oscillatory fluid flow was applied to two different cell types and the microtubule attachment to the ciliary base was quantified. For the first time, an increase in microtubules around primary cilia both with time and shear rate in response to oscillatory fluid flow stimulation was demonstrated. Moreover, it is presented that the primary cilium is required for this loading-induced cellular response. This study has demonstrated a new role for the cilium in regulating alterations in the cytoplasmic microtubule network in response to mechanical stimulation, and therefore provides a new insight into how cilia may regulate its mechanics and thus the cells mechanosensitivity.

  14. DISC1 Regulates Primary Cilia That Display Specific Dopamine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Marley, Aaron; von Zastrow, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in the DISC1 gene are strongly associated with major psychiatric syndromes such as schizophrenia. DISC1 encodes a cytoplasmic protein with many potential interaction partners, but its cellular functions remain poorly understood. We identified a role of DISC1 in the cell biology of primary cilia that display disease-relevant dopamine receptors. Methodology/Principal Findings A GFP-tagged DISC1 construct expressed in NIH3T3 cells and rat striatal neurons localized near the base of primary cilia. RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous DISC1 resulted in a marked reduction in the number of cells expressing a primary cilium. FLAG-tagged versions of the cloned human D1, D2 and D5 dopamine receptors concentrated highly on the ciliary surface, and this reflects a specific targeting mechanism specific because D3 and D4 receptors localized to the plasma membrane but were not concentrated on cilia. Conclusions/Significance These results identify a role of DISC1 in regulating the formation and/or maintenance of primary cilia, and establish subtype-specific targeting of dopamine receptors to the ciliary surface. Our findings provide new insight to receptor cell biology and suggest a relationship between DISC1 and neural dopamine signaling. PMID:20531939

  15. Ins and outs of GPCR signaling in primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Schou, Kenneth Bødtker; Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are specialized microtubule-based signaling organelles that convey extracellular signals into a cellular response in most vertebrate cell types. The physiological significance of primary cilia is underscored by the fact that defects in assembly or function of these organelles lead to a range of severe diseases and developmental disorders. In most cell types of the human body, signaling by primary cilia involves different G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which transmit specific signals to the cell through G proteins to regulate diverse cellular and physiological events. Here, we provide an overview of GPCR signaling in primary cilia, with main focus on the rhodopsin-like (class A) and the smoothened/frizzled (class F) GPCRs. We describe how such receptors dynamically traffic into and out of the ciliary compartment and how they interact with other classes of ciliary GPCRs, such as class B receptors, to control ciliary function and various physiological and behavioral processes. Finally, we discuss future avenues for developing GPCR-targeted drug strategies for the treatment of ciliopathies. PMID:26297609

  16. Primary cilia: a link between hormone signalling and endocrine-related cancers?

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Samuel M; Chapple, J Paul

    2016-10-15

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that play a role as signalling hubs. Disruption of primary cilia structure and function is increasingly recognised in a range of cancers, with a growing body of evidence suggesting that ciliary disruption contributes to tumourigenesis. This review considers the role of primary cilia in the pathogenesis of endocrine-related cancers.

  17. Inversin, Wnt signaling and primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Lienkamp, Soeren; Ganner, Athina; Walz, Gerd

    2012-02-01

    Mutations of the ankyrin-repeat protein Inversin, a member of a diverse family of more than 12 proteins, cause nephronophthisis (NPH), an autosomal recessive cystic kidney disease associated with extra-renal manifestations such as retinitis pigmentosa, cerebellar aplasia and situs inversus. Most NPH gene products (NPHPs) localize to the cilium, and appear to control the transport of cargo protein to the cilium by forming functional networks. Inversin interacts with NPHP1 and NPHP3, and shares with NPHP4 the ability to antagonize Dishevelled-stimulated canonical Wnt signaling, potentially through recruitment of the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC/C). However, Dishevelled antagonism may be confined towards the basal body, thereby polarizing motile cilia on the cells of the ventral node and respiratory tract. Inversin is essential for recruiting Dishevelled to the plasma membrane in response to activated Frizzled, a crucial step in planar cell polarity signaling. During vertebrate pronephros development, the Inversin-mediated translocation of Dishevelled appears to orchestrate the migration of cells and differentiation of segments that correspond to the mammalian loop of Henle. Thus, defective tubule migration and elongation may contribute to concentration defects and cause cyst formation in patients with NPH. Copyright © 2011 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Renal Primary Cilia Lengthen after Acute Tubular Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Elizabeth; Ricardo, Sharon D.; Weidenfeld, Raphael; Zhuang, Junli; Hill, Prudence A.; Langham, Robyn G.

    2009-01-01

    Renal primary cilia are sensory antennas required for the maintenance of normal epithelial differentiation and proliferation in the kidney, but they also have a potential role in epithelial differentiation during renal injury and repair. In mice, tubular damage causes an increase in the length of renal cilia, which may modify their sensory sensitivity during repair. Here, we investigated whether the alteration of renal cilium length during renal injury is clinically relevant. Using biopsies of human renal transplants that suffered acute tubular necrosis during transplantation, we compared the length of renal primary cilia with renal function. Serial biopsies showed that acute tubular necrosis resulted in more than a doubling of cilium length throughout the nephron and collecting duct approximately 1 wk after injury. Allografts displayed a trend toward normalization of cilium length in later biopsies, and this correlated with functional recovery. A mouse model of renal ischemia-reperfusion confirmed the increase and subsequent regression of cilium length during renal repair, displaying complete normalization of cilium length within 6 wk of injury. These findings demonstrate that the length of renal cilia is a clinically relevant indicator of renal injury and repair. PMID:19608704

  19. Characterization of cancer stem cells and primary cilia in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gate, David; Danielpour, Moise; Bannykh, Serguei; Town, Terrence

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma, a tumor of the cerebellum, is the most common pediatric central nervous system malignancy. These tumors are etiologically linked to mutations in the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway, which signals through the primary, non-motile cilium. The growth of these aggressive tumors relies on self-renewal of tumor-propagating cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). Previous reports have implicated CD133-expressing cells as CSCs in brain tumors, while those expressing CD15 have been shown to propagate medulloblastoma. Here, we demonstrate that CD133+ and CD15+ cells are distinct medulloblastoma populations. CD15+ cells comprise approximately 0.5-1% of total human medulloblastoma cells, display CSC properties in culture and are detected in the Smoothened A1 transgenic mouse model of medulloblastoma. Additionally, we report on a medulloblastoma patient with enriched CD15+ cells in recurrent vs primary medulloblastoma. We also demonstrate that human medulloblastoma cells critically rely on establishment of primary cilia to drive Shh-mediated cell division. Primary cilia are found in external granule cells of human fetal cerebellum and in 12/14 medulloblastoma samples. Yet, CD15+ medulloblastoma cells lack primary cilia, suggesting that this CSC population signals independently of Shh. These results are important when considering the effects of current and prospective treatment modalities on medulloblastoma CSC populations.

  20. Oscillatory Fluid Flow Influences Primary Cilia and Microtubule Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Espinha, Lina C.; Hoey, David A.; Fernandes, Paulo R.; Rodrigues, Hélder C.; Jacobs, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    Many tissues are sensitive to mechanical stimuli; however, the mechanotransduction mechanism used by cells remains unknown in many cases. The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile microtubule-based extension present on nearly every mammalian cell which extends from the basal body. The cilium is a mechanosensitive organelle and has been shown to transduce fluid flow-induced shear stress in tissues such as the kidney and bone. The majority of microtubules assemble from the mother centriole (basal body), contributing significantly to the anchoring of the primary cilium. Several studies have attempted to quantify the number of microtubules emanating from the basal body and the results vary depending on the cell type. It has also been shown that cellular response to shear stress depends on microtubular integrity. This study hypothesizes that changing the microtubule attachment of primary cilia in response to a mechanical stimulus could change primary cilia mechanics and, possibly, mechanosensitivity. Oscillatory fluid flow was applied to two different cell types and the microtubule attachment to the ciliary base was quantified. For the first time, an increase in microtubules around primary cilia both with time and shear rate in response to oscillatory fluid flow stimulation was demonstrated. Moreover, it is presented that the primary cilium is required for this loading-induced cellular response. This study has demonstrated a new role for the cilium in regulating alterations in the cytoplasmic microtubule network in response to mechanical stimulation, and therefore provides a new insight into how cilia may regulate its mechanics and thus the cells mechanosensitivity. PMID:25044764

  1. Primary cilia in energy balance signaling and metabolic disorder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hankyu; Song, Jieun; Jung, Joo Hyun; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2015-12-01

    Energy homeostasis in our body system is maintained by balancing the intake and expenditure of energy. Excessive accumulation of fat by disrupting the balance system causes overweight and obesity, which are increasingly becoming global health concerns. Understanding the pathogenesis of obesity focused on studying the genes related to familial types of obesity. Recently, a rare human genetic disorder, ciliopathy, links the role for genes regulating structure and function of a cellular organelle, the primary cilium, to metabolic disorder, obesity and type II diabetes. Primary cilia are microtubule based hair-like membranous structures, lacking motility and functions such as sensing the environmental cues, and transducing extracellular signals within the cells. Interestingly, the subclass of ciliopathies, such as Bardet-Biedle and Alström syndrome, manifest obesity and type II diabetes in human and mouse model systems. Moreover, studies on genetic mouse model system indicate that more ciliary genes affect energy homeostasis through multiple regulatory steps such as central and peripheral actions of leptin and insulin. In this review, we discuss the latest findings in primary cilia and metabolic disorders, and propose the possible interaction between primary cilia and the leptin and insulin signal pathways which might enhance our understanding of the unambiguous link of a cell's antenna to obesity and type II diabetes.

  2. Primary cilia in energy balance signaling and metabolic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hankyu; Song, Jieun; Jung, Joo Hyun; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2015-01-01

    Energy homeostasis in our body system is maintained by balancing the intake and expenditure of energy. Excessive accumulation of fat by disrupting the balance system causes overweight and obesity, which are increasingly becoming global health concerns. Understanding the pathogenesis of obesity focused on studying the genes related to familial types of obesity. Recently, a rare human genetic disorder, ciliopathy, links the role for genes regulating structure and function of a cellular organelle, the primary cilium, to metabolic disorder, obesity and type II diabetes. Primary cilia are microtubule based hair-like membranous structures, lacking motility and functions such as sensing the environmental cues, and transducing extracellular signals within the cells. Interestingly, the subclass of ciliopathies, such as Bardet-Biedle and Alström syndrome, manifest obesity and type II diabetes in human and mouse model systems. Moreover, studies on genetic mouse model system indicate that more ciliary genes affect energy homeostasis through multiple regulatory steps such as central and peripheral actions of leptin and insulin. In this review, we discuss the latest findings in primary cilia and metabolic disorders, and propose the possible interaction between primary cilia and the leptin and insulin signal pathways which might enhance our understanding of the unambiguous link of a cell’s antenna to obesity and type II diabetes. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(12): 647-654] PMID:26538252

  3. Function and regulation of primary cilia and intraflagellar transport proteins in the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Serra, Rosa A.; Yang, Shuying

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from the cell surface to enable transduction of various developmental signaling pathways. The process of intraflagellar transport (IFT) is crucial for the building and maintenance of primary cilia. Ciliary dysfunction has been found in a range of disorders called ciliopathies, some of which display severe skeletal dysplasias. In recent years, interest has grown in uncovering the function of primary cilia/IFT proteins in bone development, mechanotransduction, and cellular regulation. We summarize recent advances in understanding the function of cilia and IFT proteins in the regulation of cell differentiation in osteoblasts, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We also discuss the mechanosensory function of cilia and IFT proteins in bone cells, cilia orientation, and other functions of cilia in chondrocytes. PMID:24961486

  4. Function and regulation of primary cilia and intraflagellar transport proteins in the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Serra, Rosa A; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from the cell surface to enable transduction of various developmental signaling pathways. The process of intraflagellar transport (IFT) is crucial for the building and maintenance of primary cilia. Ciliary dysfunction has been found in a range of disorders called ciliopathies, some of which display severe skeletal dysplasias. In recent years, interest has grown in uncovering the function of primary cilia/IFT proteins in bone development, mechanotransduction, and cellular regulation. We summarize recent advances in understanding the function of cilia and IFT proteins in the regulation of cell differentiation in osteoblasts, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We also discuss the mechanosensory function of cilia and IFT proteins in bone cells, cilia orientation, and other functions of cilia in chondrocytes.

  5. [Establishment of osteoblast primary cilia model removed by chloral hyrate].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-ni; Shi, Wen-gui; Xie, Yan-fang; Ma, Hui-ping; Ge, Bao-feng; Zhen, Ping; Chen, Ke-ming

    2015-06-01

    To establish osteoblast model, primary cilla model was removed by chloral hyrate, observe effects of osteoblast primary cilla moved on enhancing ALP staining and calcified nodules staining in electromagnetic field. Three 3-day-old male SD rats weighed between 6 and 9 g were killed, cranial osteoblast was drawed and adherencing cultured respectively. Cells were subcultured and randomly divided into 4 groups until reach to fusion states. The four groups included chloral hydrate non-involved group (control group), 2 mM, 4 mM and 8 mM chloral hydrate group, and cultured in 37 °C, 5% CO2 incubator for 72 h. Morphology of primary cilla was observed by laser confocal scanning microscope, and incidence of osteoblast primary cilia was analyzed by Image-Pro Plus 6.0 software. Cells in the correct concentration group which can removed cillia most effectively were selected and divided into 3 groups, including control group (C), Electromagnetic fields group (EMFs), and EMFs with 4 mM chloral hydrate group. DMEM nutrient solution contained 10%FBS were added into three groups and cultured for 9 days and formation of ALP were observed by histochemical staining of alkaline phosphatase. After 12 days' cultivation, formation of mineralization nodes was observed by alizarin red staining. Compared with control group and 2mM chloral hydrate group,4 mM chloral hydrate group could effectively remove osteoblast primary cilla (P<0.01). Removal of osteoblast primary cilla could weaken the formation of ALP and mineralization nodes in osteoblast in EMFS. Compared with EMFs group, the area of ALP and mineralization nodes in EMFs with 4 mM chloral hydrate group were decreased obviously (P<0.01). 4mM chloral hydrate could effectively remove osteoblast primary cilia. Primary cilla participate in EMFs promoting formation of ALP and mineralization nodes in osteoblast and provide new ideas for exploring mechanism of EMFs promoting osteoblast maturation and mineralization.

  6. Molecular complexes that direct rhodopsin transport to primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Deretic, Dusanka

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin is a key molecular constituent of photoreceptor cells, yet understanding of how it regulates photoreceptor membrane trafficking and biogenesis of light-sensing organelles, the rod outer segments (ROS) is only beginning to emerge. Recently identified sequence of well-orchestrated molecular interactions of rhodopsin with the functional networks of Arf and Rab GTPases at multiple stages of intracellular targeting fits well into the complex framework of the biogenesis and maintenance of primary cilia, of which the ROS is one example. This review will discuss the latest progress in dissecting the molecular complexes that coordinate rhodopsin incorporation into ciliary-targeted carriers with the recruitment and activation of membrane tethering complexes and regulators of fusion with the periciliary plasma membrane. In addition to revealing the fundamental principals of ciliary membrane renewal, recent advances also provide molecular insight into the ways by which disruptions of the exquisitely orchestrated interactions lead to cilia dysfunction and result in human retinal dystrophies and syndromic diseases that affect multiple organs, including the eyes. PMID:24135424

  7. Primary cilia are present on human blood and bone marrow cells and mediate Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mohan; Chaudhry, Parvesh; Merchant, Akil A

    2016-12-01

    Primary cilia are nonmotile, microtubule-based organelles that are present on the cellular membrane of all eukaryotic cells. Functional cilia are required for the response to developmental signaling pathways such as Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt/β-catenin. Although the Hh pathway has been shown to be active in leukemia and other blood cancers, there have been no reports describing the presence of primary cilia in human blood or leukemia cells. In the present study, we show that nearly all human blood and bone marrow cells have primary cilia (97-99%). In contrast, primary cilia on AML cell lines (KG1, KG1a, and K562) were less frequent (10-36% of cells) and were often shorter and dysmorphic, with less well-defined basal bodies. Finally, we show that treatment of blood cells with the Hh pathway ligand Sonic Hedgehog (SHh) causes translocation of Smoothened (SMO) to the primary cilia and activation of Hh target genes, demonstrating that primary cilia in blood cells are functional and participate in Hh signaling. Loss of primary cilia on leukemia cells may have important implications for aberrant pathway activation and response to SMO inhibitors currently in clinical development. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Unilateral nephrectomy elongates primary cilia in the remaining kidney via reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang Jun; Jang, Hee-Seong; Kim, Jee In; Lipschutz, Joshua H.; Park, Kwon Moo

    2016-01-01

    The length of primary cilia is associated with normal cell and organ function. In the kidney, the change of functional cilia length/mass is associated with various diseases such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, polycystic kidney disease, and congenital solitary kidney. Here, we investigate whether renal mass reduction affects primary cilia length and function. To induce renal mass reduction, mice were subjected to unilateral nephrectomy (UNx). UNx increased kidney weight and superoxide formation in the remaining kidney. Primary cilia were elongated in proximal tubule cells, collecting duct cells and parietal cells of the remaining kidney. Mn(III) Tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin (MnTMPyP), an antioxidant, reduced superoxide formation in UNx-mice and prevented the elongation of primary cilia. UNx increased the expression of phosphorylated ERK, p21, and exocyst complex members Sec8 and Sec10, in the remaining kidney, and these increases were prevented by MnTMPyP. In MDCK, a kidney tubular epithelial cell line, cells, low concentrations of H2O2 treatment elongated primary cilia. This H2O2-induced elongation of primary cilia was also prevented by MnTMPyP treatment. Taken together, these data demonstrate that kidney compensation, induced by a reduction of renal mass, results in primary cilia elongation, and this elongation is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:26923764

  9. Unilateral nephrectomy elongates primary cilia in the remaining kidney via reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Jun; Jang, Hee-Seong; Kim, Jee In; Lipschutz, Joshua H; Park, Kwon Moo

    2016-02-29

    The length of primary cilia is associated with normal cell and organ function. In the kidney, the change of functional cilia length/mass is associated with various diseases such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, polycystic kidney disease, and congenital solitary kidney. Here, we investigate whether renal mass reduction affects primary cilia length and function. To induce renal mass reduction, mice were subjected to unilateral nephrectomy (UNx). UNx increased kidney weight and superoxide formation in the remaining kidney. Primary cilia were elongated in proximal tubule cells, collecting duct cells and parietal cells of the remaining kidney. Mn(III) Tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin (MnTMPyP), an antioxidant, reduced superoxide formation in UNx-mice and prevented the elongation of primary cilia. UNx increased the expression of phosphorylated ERK, p21, and exocyst complex members Sec8 and Sec10, in the remaining kidney, and these increases were prevented by MnTMPyP. In MDCK, a kidney tubular epithelial cell line, cells, low concentrations of H2O2 treatment elongated primary cilia. This H2O2-induced elongation of primary cilia was also prevented by MnTMPyP treatment. Taken together, these data demonstrate that kidney compensation, induced by a reduction of renal mass, results in primary cilia elongation, and this elongation is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  10. Dynamic Remodeling of Membrane Composition Drives Cell Cycle through Primary Cilia Excision.

    PubMed

    Phua, Siew Cheng; Chiba, Shuhei; Suzuki, Masako; Su, Emily; Roberson, Elle C; Pusapati, Ganesh V; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Rohatgi, Rajat; Reiter, Jeremy F; Ikegami, Koji; Inoue, Takanari

    2017-01-12

    The life cycle of a primary cilium begins in quiescence and ends prior to mitosis. In quiescent cells, the primary cilium insulates itself from contiguous dynamic membrane processes on the cell surface to function as a stable signaling apparatus. Here, we demonstrate that basal restriction of ciliary structure dynamics is established by the cilia-enriched phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase, Inpp5e. Growth induction displaces ciliary Inpp5e and accumulates phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in distal cilia. This change triggers otherwise-forbidden actin polymerization in primary cilia, which excises cilia tips in a process we call cilia decapitation. While cilia disassembly is traditionally thought to occur solely through resorption, we show that an acute loss of IFT-B through cilia decapitation precedes resorption. Finally, we propose that cilia decapitation induces mitogenic signaling and constitutes a molecular link between the cilia life cycle and cell-division cycle. This newly defined ciliary mechanism may find significance in cell proliferation control during normal development and cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Surface topography regulates wnt signaling through control of primary cilia structure in mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurray, R. J.; Wann, A. K. T.; Thompson, C. L.; Connelly, J. T.; Knight, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The primary cilium regulates cellular signalling including influencing wnt sensitivity by sequestering β-catenin within the ciliary compartment. Topographic regulation of intracellular actin-myosin tension can control stem cell fate of which wnt is an important mediator. We hypothesized that topography influences mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) wnt signaling through the regulation of primary cilia structure and function. MSCs cultured on grooves expressed elongated primary cilia, through reduced actin organization. siRNA inhibition of anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT88) reduced cilia length and increased active nuclear β-catenin. Conversely, increased primary cilia assembly in MSCs cultured on the grooves was associated with decreased levels of nuclear active β-catenin, axin-2 induction and proliferation, in response to wnt3a. This negative regulation, on grooved topography, was reversed by siRNA to IFT88. This indicates that subtle regulation of IFT and associated cilia structure, tunes the wnt response controlling stem cell differentiation.

  12. Surface topography regulates wnt signaling through control of primary cilia structure in mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    McMurray, R J; Wann, A K T; Thompson, C L; Connelly, J T; Knight, M M

    2013-12-18

    The primary cilium regulates cellular signalling including influencing wnt sensitivity by sequestering β-catenin within the ciliary compartment. Topographic regulation of intracellular actin-myosin tension can control stem cell fate of which wnt is an important mediator. We hypothesized that topography influences mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) wnt signaling through the regulation of primary cilia structure and function. MSCs cultured on grooves expressed elongated primary cilia, through reduced actin organization. siRNA inhibition of anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT88) reduced cilia length and increased active nuclear β-catenin. Conversely, increased primary cilia assembly in MSCs cultured on the grooves was associated with decreased levels of nuclear active β-catenin, axin-2 induction and proliferation, in response to wnt3a. This negative regulation, on grooved topography, was reversed by siRNA to IFT88. This indicates that subtle regulation of IFT and associated cilia structure, tunes the wnt response controlling stem cell differentiation.

  13. Surface topography regulates wnt signaling through control of primary cilia structure in mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, R. J.; Wann, A. K. T.; Thompson, C. L.; Connelly, J. T.; Knight, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The primary cilium regulates cellular signalling including influencing wnt sensitivity by sequestering β-catenin within the ciliary compartment. Topographic regulation of intracellular actin-myosin tension can control stem cell fate of which wnt is an important mediator. We hypothesized that topography influences mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) wnt signaling through the regulation of primary cilia structure and function. MSCs cultured on grooves expressed elongated primary cilia, through reduced actin organization. siRNA inhibition of anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT88) reduced cilia length and increased active nuclear β-catenin. Conversely, increased primary cilia assembly in MSCs cultured on the grooves was associated with decreased levels of nuclear active β-catenin, axin-2 induction and proliferation, in response to wnt3a. This negative regulation, on grooved topography, was reversed by siRNA to IFT88. This indicates that subtle regulation of IFT and associated cilia structure, tunes the wnt response controlling stem cell differentiation. PMID:24346024

  14. G-protein-coupled receptors, Hedgehog signaling and primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2014-09-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway has become an important model to study the cell biology of primary cilia, and reciprocally, the study of ciliary processes provides an opportunity to solve longstanding mysteries in the mechanism of vertebrate Hh signal transduction. The cilium is emerging as an unique compartment for G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in many systems. Two members of the GPCR family, Smoothened and Gpr161, play important roles in the Hh pathway. We review the current understanding of how these proteins may function to regulate Hh signaling and also highlight some of the critical unanswered questions being tackled by the field. Uncovering GPCR-regulated mechanisms important in Hh signaling may provide therapeutic strategies against the Hh pathway that plays important roles in development, regeneration and cancer.

  15. A high-fat diet regulates gastrin and acid secretion through primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Saqui-Salces, Milena; Dowdle, William E; Reiter, Jeremy F; Merchant, Juanita L

    2012-08-01

    The role of primary cilia in the gastrointestinal tract has not been examined. Here we report the presence of primary cilia on gastric endocrine cells producing gastrin, ghrelin, and somatostatin (Sst), hormones regulated by food intake. During eating, cilia in the gastric antrum decreased, whereas gastric acid and circulating gastrin increased. Mice fed high-fat chow showed a delayed decrease in antral cilia, increased plasma gastrin, and gastric acidity. Mice fed high-fat chow for 3 wk showed lower cilia numbers and acid but higher gastrin levels than mice fed a standard diet, suggesting that fat affects gastric physiology. Ex vivo experiments showed that cilia in the corpus responded to acid and distension, whereas cilia in the antrum responded to food. To analyze the role of gastric cilia, we conditionally deleted the intraflagellar transport protein Ift88 (Ift88(-/fl)). In fed Ift88(-/fl) mice, gastrin levels were higher, and gastric acidity was lower. Moreover, gastrin and Sst gene expression did not change in response to food as in controls. At 8 mo, Ift88(-/fl) mice developed foveolar hyperplasia, hypergastrinemia, and hypochlorhydria associated with endocrine dysfunction. Our results show that components of food (fat) are sensed by antral cilia on endocrine cells, which modulates gastrin secretion and gastric acidity.

  16. Primary cilia enhance kisspeptin receptor signaling on gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koemeter-Cox, Andrew I.; Sherwood, Thomas W.; Green, Jill A.; Steiner, Robert A.; Berbari, Nicolas F.; Yoder, Bradley K.; Kauffman, Alexander S.; Monsma, Paula C.; Brown, Anthony; Askwith, Candice C.; Mykytyn, Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Most central neurons in the mammalian brain possess an appendage called a primary cilium that projects from the soma into the extracellular space. The importance of these organelles is highlighted by the fact that primary cilia dysfunction is associated with numerous neuropathologies, including hyperphagia-induced obesity, hypogonadism, and learning and memory deficits. Neuronal cilia are enriched for signaling molecules, including certain G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), suggesting that neuronal cilia sense and respond to neuromodulators in the extracellular space. However, the impact of cilia on signaling to central neurons has never been demonstrated. Here, we show that the kisspeptin receptor (Kiss1r), a GPCR that is activated by kisspeptin to regulate the onset of puberty and adult reproductive function, is enriched in cilia projecting from mouse gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. Interestingly, GnRH neurons in adult animals are multiciliated and the percentage of GnRH neurons possessing multiple Kiss1r-positive cilia increases during postnatal development in a progression that correlates with sexual maturation. Remarkably, disruption of cilia selectively on GnRH neurons leads to a significant reduction in kisspeptin-mediated GnRH neuronal activity. To our knowledge, this result is the first demonstration of cilia disruption affecting central neuronal activity and highlights the importance of cilia for proper GPCR signaling. PMID:24982149

  17. 5-HT6 receptor blockade regulates primary cilia morphology in striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Matthew; Lesiak, Adam J; Croicu, Alex; Cohenca, Nathalie; Sullivan, Jane M; Neumaier, John F

    2017-04-01

    The 5-HT6 receptor has been implicated in a variety of cognitive processes including habitual behaviors, learning, and memory. It is found almost exclusively in the brain, is expressed abundantly in striatum, and localizes to neuronal primary cilia. Primary cilia are antenna-like, sensory organelles found on most neurons that receive both chemical and mechanical signals from other cells and the surrounding environment; however, the effect of 5-HT6 receptor function on cellular morphology has not been examined. We confirmed that 5-HT6 receptors were localized to primary cilia in wild-type (WT) but not 5-HT6 knockout (5-HT6KO) in both native mouse brain tissue and primary cultured striatal neurons then used primary neurons cultured from WT or 5-HT6KO mice to study the function of these receptors. Selective 5-HT6 antagonists reduced cilia length in neurons cultured from wild-type mice in a concentration and time-dependent manner without altering dendrites, but had no effect on cilia length in 5-HT6KO cultured neurons. Varying the expression levels of heterologously expressed 5-HT6 receptors affected the fidelity of ciliary localization in both WT and 5-HT6KO neurons; overexpression lead to increasing amounts of 5-HT6 localization outside of the cilia but did not alter cilia morphology. Introducing discrete mutations into the third cytoplasmic loop of the 5-HT6 receptor greatly reduced, but did not entirely eliminate, trafficking of the 5-HT6 receptor to primary cilia. These data suggest that blocking 5-HT6 receptor activity reduces the length of primary cilia and that mechanisms that regulate trafficking of 5-HT6 receptors to cilia are more complex than previously thought. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Trichoplein and Aurora A block aberrant primary cilia assembly in proliferating cells.

    PubMed

    Inoko, Akihito; Matsuyama, Makoto; Goto, Hidemasa; Ohmuro-Matsuyama, Yuki; Hayashi, Yuko; Enomoto, Masato; Ibi, Miho; Urano, Takeshi; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Kiyono, Tohru; Izawa, Ichiro; Inagaki, Masaki

    2012-04-30

    The primary cilium is an antenna-like organelle that modulates differentiation, sensory functions, and signal transduction. After cilia are disassembled at the G0/G1 transition, formation of cilia is strictly inhibited in proliferating cells. However, the mechanisms of this inhibition are unknown. In this paper, we show that trichoplein disappeared from the basal body in quiescent cells, whereas it localized to mother and daughter centrioles in proliferating cells. Exogenous expression of trichoplein inhibited primary cilia assembly in serum-starved cells, whereas ribonucleic acid interference-mediated depletion induced primary cilia assembly upon cultivation with serum. Trichoplein controlled Aurora A (AurA) activation at the centrioles predominantly in G1 phase. In vitro analyses confirmed that trichoplein bound and activated AurA directly. Using trichoplein mutants, we demonstrate that the suppression of primary cilia assembly by trichoplein required its ability not only to localize to centrioles but also to bind and activate AurA. Trichoplein or AurA knockdown also induced G0/G1 arrest, but this phenotype was reversed when cilia formation was prevented by simultaneous knockdown of IFT-20. These data suggest that the trichoplein-AurA pathway is required for G1 progression through a key role in the continuous suppression of primary cilia assembly.

  19. Primary cilia mechanics affects cell mechanosensation: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Khayyeri, Hanifeh; Barreto, Sara; Lacroix, Damien

    2015-08-21

    Primary cilia (PC) are mechanical cell structures linked to the cytoskeleton and are central to how cells sense biomechanical signals from their environment. However, it is unclear exactly how PC mechanics influences cell mechanosensation. In this study we investigate how the PC mechanical characteristics are involved in the mechanotransduction process whereby cilium deflection under fluid flow induces strains on the internal cell components that regulate the cell׳s mechanosensitive response. Our investigation employs a computational approach in which a finite element model of a cell consisting of a nucleus, cytoplasm, cortex, microtubules, actin bundles and a primary cilium was used together with a finite element representation of a flow chamber. Fluid-structure interaction analysis was performed by simulating perfusion flow of 1mm/s on the cell model. Simulations of cells with different PC mechanical characteristics, showed that the length and the stiffness of PC are responsible for the transmission of mechanical stimuli to the cytoskeleton. Fluid flow deflects the cilium, with the highest strains found at the base of the PC and in the cytoplasm. The PC deflection created further strains on the cell nucleus but did not influence microtubules and actin bundles significantly. Our results indicate that PC deflection under fluid flow stimulation transmits mechanical strain primarily to other essential organelles in the cytoplasm, such as the Golgi complex, that regulate cells' mechanoresponse. The simulations further suggest that cell mechanosensitivity can be altered by targeting PC length and rigidity.

  20. Direct recording and molecular identification of the calcium channel of primary cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaen, Paul G.; Delling, Markus; Vien, Thuy N.; Clapham, David E.

    2013-12-01

    A primary cilium is a solitary, slender, non-motile protuberance of structured microtubules (9+0) enclosed by plasma membrane. Housing components of the cell division apparatus between cell divisions, primary cilia also serve as specialized compartments for calcium signalling and hedgehog signalling pathways. Specialized sensory cilia such as retinal photoreceptors and olfactory cilia use diverse ion channels. An ion current has been measured from primary cilia of kidney cells, but the responsible genes have not been identified. The polycystin proteins (PC and PKD), identified in linkage studies of polycystic kidney disease, are candidate channels divided into two structural classes: 11-transmembrane proteins (PKD1, PKD1L1 and PKD1L2) remarkable for a large extracellular amino terminus of putative cell adhesion domains and a G-protein-coupled receptor proteolytic site, and the 6-transmembrane channel proteins (PKD2, PKD2L1 and PKD2L2; TRPPs). Evidence indicates that the PKD1 proteins associate with the PKD2 proteins via coiled-coil domains. Here we use a transgenic mouse in which only cilia express a fluorophore and use it to record directly from primary cilia, and demonstrate that PKD1L1 and PKD2L1 form ion channels at high densities in several cell types. In conjunction with an accompanying manuscript, we show that the PKD1L1-PKD2L1 heteromeric channel establishes the cilia as a unique calcium compartment within cells that modulates established hedgehog pathways.

  1. Tubulin glycylases are required for primary cilia, control of cell proliferation and tumor development in colon

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Cecilia; Papon, Laura; Cacheux, Wulfran; Marques Sousa, Patricia; Lascano, Valeria; Tort, Olivia; Giordano, Tiziana; Vacher, Sophie; Lemmers, Benedicte; Mariani, Pascale; Meseure, Didier; Medema, Jan Paul; Bièche, Ivan; Hahne, Michael; Janke, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    TTLL3 and TTLL8 are tubulin glycine ligases catalyzing posttranslational glycylation of microtubules. We show here for the first time that these enzymes are required for robust formation of primary cilia. We further discover the existence of primary cilia in colon and demonstrate that TTLL3 is the only glycylase in this organ. As a consequence, colon epithelium shows a reduced number of primary cilia accompanied by an increased rate of cell division in TTLL3-knockout mice. Strikingly, higher proliferation is compensated by faster tissue turnover in normal colon. In a mouse model for tumorigenesis, lack of TTLL3 strongly promotes tumor development. We further demonstrate that decreased levels of TTLL3 expression are linked to the development of human colorectal carcinomas. Thus, we have uncovered a novel role for tubulin glycylation in primary cilia maintenance, which controls cell proliferation of colon epithelial cells and plays an essential role in colon cancer development. PMID:25180231

  2. An Experimental and Computational Analysis of Primary Cilia Deflection Under Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Matthew E.; Nguyen, An M.; Herzog, Florian A.; Hoey, David A.; Jacobs, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we have developed a novel model of the deflection of primary cilia experiencing fluid flow accounting for phenomena not previously considered. Specifically, we developed a large rotation formulation that accounts for rotation at the base of the cilium, the initial shape of the cilium and fluid drag at high deflection angles. We utilized this model to analyze full three dimensional datasets of primary cilia deflecting under fluid flow acquired with high-speed confocal microscopy. We found a wide variety of previously unreported bending shapes and behaviors. We also analyzed post-flow relaxation patterns. Results from our combined experimental and theoretical approach suggest that the average flexural rigidity of primary cilia might be higher than previously reported (Schwartz et al. 1997). In addition our findings indicate the mechanics of primary cilia are richly varied and mechanisms may exist to alter their mechanical behavior. PMID:22452422

  3. Roles for primary cilia in gonadotrophin-releasing hormone neurones in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Shin, J; Prescott, M; Mair, J; Campbell, R E

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development, gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones make an extraordinary migration out of the nose and into the brain where, in adulthood, they drive the pituitary regulation of gonadal function and fertility. Primary cilia are antennae-like, immotile organelles that project from the surface of nearly all cells, including GnRH neurones. Links between defects in primary cilia and a variety of human pathologies have been discovered that suggest a role for primary cilia in embryogenesis and reproductive function. The present study aimed to investigate whether GnRH neurone primary cilia are critical for their embryonic migration and the adult control of fertility. To achieve this, we used a Cre-loxP strategy to selectively disrupt primary cilia by deleting Kif3a, an intraflagellar transport protein family member essential for primary cilia assembly and function, specifically in GnRH neurones. Confocal analysis revealed that, in Kif3a(fl/fl) (WT-Kif3a) controls, all GnRH neurones possessed primary cilia, whereas, in GnRH-Cre(+/-) ;Kif3a(fl/fl) (GnRH-Kif3aKO) mice, 60% of GnRH neurones lacked any evidence of primary cilia and the remaining 40% possessed only stunted primary cilia (< 2 μm). Despite abolishing normal primary cilia assembly in GnRH neurones from embryogenesis, adult GnRH neurone distribution and reproductive function was remarkably normal. The total number of GnRH neurones was the same in GnRH-Kif3aKO and WT-Kif3a controls; however, a significant increase (25%) was identified in the number of GnRH neurones sampled through the midpoint of the rostral pre-optic area in GnRH-Kif3aKO mice (P < 0.05). The time to vaginal opening was not different in GnRH-Kif3aKO mice, although they displayed significantly advanced first oestrus (P < 0.05), and oestrous cycle length was increased (P < 0.05). However, females displayed normal basal levels of luteinising hormone, responded normally to oestrogen-induced negative- and positive

  4. Primary Cilia Integrate Hedgehog and Wnt Signaling during Tooth Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, B.; Chen, S.; Cheng, D.; Jing, W.; Helms, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Many ciliopathies have clinical features that include tooth malformations but how these defects come about is not clear. Here we show that genetic deletion of the motor protein Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in an arrest in odontogenesis. Incisors are completely missing, and molars are enlarged in Wnt1Cre+Kif3afl/fl embryos. Although amelogenesis and dentinogenesis initiate in the molar tooth bud, both processes terminate prematurely. We demonstrate that loss of Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in loss of Hedgehog signaling and gain of Wnt signaling in this same tissue. The defective dental mesenchyme then aberrantly signals to the dental epithelia, which prompts an up-regulation in the Hedgehog and Wnt responses in the epithelia and leads to multiple attempts at invagination and an expanded enamel organ. Thus, the primary cilium integrates Hedgehog and Wnt signaling between dental epithelia and mesenchyme, and this cilia-dependent integration is required for proper tooth development. PMID:24659776

  5. Primary cilia integrate hedgehog and Wnt signaling during tooth development.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Chen, S; Cheng, D; Jing, W; Helms, J A

    2014-05-01

    Many ciliopathies have clinical features that include tooth malformations but how these defects come about is not clear. Here we show that genetic deletion of the motor protein Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in an arrest in odontogenesis. Incisors are completely missing, and molars are enlarged in Wnt1(Cre+)Kif3a(fl/fl) embryos. Although amelogenesis and dentinogenesis initiate in the molar tooth bud, both processes terminate prematurely. We demonstrate that loss of Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in loss of Hedgehog signaling and gain of Wnt signaling in this same tissue. The defective dental mesenchyme then aberrantly signals to the dental epithelia, which prompts an up-regulation in the Hedgehog and Wnt responses in the epithelia and leads to multiple attempts at invagination and an expanded enamel organ. Thus, the primary cilium integrates Hedgehog and Wnt signaling between dental epithelia and mesenchyme, and this cilia-dependent integration is required for proper tooth development.

  6. Biophysics and biofluid dynamics of primary cilia: evidence for and against the flow-sensing function.

    PubMed

    Nag, Subhra; Resnick, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Primary cilia have been called "the forgotten organelle" for over 20 yr. As cilia now have their own journal and several books devoted to their study, perhaps it is time to reconsider the moniker "forgotten organelle." In fact, during the drafting of this review, 12 relevant publications have been issued; we therefore apologize in advance for any relevant work we inadvertently omitted. What purpose is yet another ciliary review? The primary goal of this review is to specifically examine the evidence for and against the hypothesized flow-sensing function of primary cilia expressed by differentiated epithelia within a kidney tubule, bringing together differing disciplines and their respective conceptual and experimental approaches. We will show that understanding the biophysics/biomechanics of primary cilia provides essential information for understanding any potential role of ciliary function in disease. We will summarize experimental and mathematical models used to characterize renal fluid flow and incident force on primary cilia and to characterize the mechanical response of cilia to an externally applied force and discuss possible ciliary-mediated cell signaling pathways triggered by flow. Throughout, we stress the importance of separating the effects of fluid shear and stretch from the action of hydrodynamic drag. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Human embryonic stem cells in culture possess primary cilia with hedgehog signaling machinery

    PubMed Central

    Kiprilov, Enko N.; Awan, Aashir; Desprat, Romain; Velho, Michelle; Clement, Christian A.; Byskov, Anne Grete; Andersen, Claus Y.; Satir, Peter; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Christensen, Søren T.; Hirsch, Rhoda Elison

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are potential therapeutic tools and models of human development. With a growing interest in primary cilia in signal transduction pathways that are crucial for embryological development and tissue differentiation and interest in mechanisms regulating human hESC differentiation, demonstrating the existence of primary cilia and the localization of signaling components in undifferentiated hESCs establishes a mechanistic basis for the regulation of hESC differentiation. Using electron microscopy (EM), immunofluorescence, and confocal microscopies, we show that primary cilia are present in three undifferentiated hESC lines. EM reveals the characteristic 9 + 0 axoneme. The number and length of cilia increase after serum starvation. Important components of the hedgehog (Hh) pathway, including smoothened, patched 1 (Ptc1), and Gli1 and 2, are present in the cilia. Stimulation of the pathway results in the concerted movement of Ptc1 out of, and smoothened into, the primary cilium as well as up-regulation of GLI1 and PTC1. These findings show that hESCs contain primary cilia associated with working Hh machinery. PMID:18332216

  8. Human embryonic stem cells in culture possess primary cilia with hedgehog signaling machinery.

    PubMed

    Kiprilov, Enko N; Awan, Aashir; Desprat, Romain; Velho, Michelle; Clement, Christian A; Byskov, Anne Grete; Andersen, Claus Y; Satir, Peter; Bouhassira, Eric E; Christensen, Søren T; Hirsch, Rhoda Elison

    2008-03-10

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are potential therapeutic tools and models of human development. With a growing interest in primary cilia in signal transduction pathways that are crucial for embryological development and tissue differentiation and interest in mechanisms regulating human hESC differentiation, demonstrating the existence of primary cilia and the localization of signaling components in undifferentiated hESCs establishes a mechanistic basis for the regulation of hESC differentiation. Using electron microscopy (EM), immunofluorescence, and confocal microscopies, we show that primary cilia are present in three undifferentiated hESC lines. EM reveals the characteristic 9 + 0 axoneme. The number and length of cilia increase after serum starvation. Important components of the hedgehog (Hh) pathway, including smoothened, patched 1 (Ptc1), and Gli1 and 2, are present in the cilia. Stimulation of the pathway results in the concerted movement of Ptc1 out of, and smoothened into, the primary cilium as well as up-regulation of GLI1 and PTC1. These findings show that hESCs contain primary cilia associated with working Hh machinery.

  9. A role for primary cilia in aortic valve development and disease.

    PubMed

    Toomer, Katelynn A; Fulmer, Diana; Guo, Lilong; Drohan, Alex; Peterson, Neal; Swanson, Paige; Brooks, Brittany; Mukherjee, Rupak; Body, Simon; Lipschutz, Joshua H; Wessels, Andy; Norris, Russell A

    2017-08-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease is the most common congenital heart defect, affecting 0.5-1.2% of the population and causing significant morbidity and mortality. Only a few genes have been identified in pedigrees, and no single gene model explains BAV inheritance, thus supporting a complex genetic network of interacting genes. However, patients with rare syndromic diseases that stem from alterations in the structure and function of primary cilia ("ciliopathies") exhibit BAV as a frequent cardiovascular finding, suggesting primary cilia may factor broadly in disease etiology. Our data are the first to demonstrate that primary cilia are expressed on aortic valve mesenchymal cells during embryonic development and are lost as these cells differentiate into collagen-secreting fibroblastic-like cells. The function of primary cilia was tested by genetically ablating the critical ciliogenic gene Ift88. Loss of Ift88 resulted in abrogation of primary cilia and increased fibrogenic extracellular matrix (ECM) production. Consequentially, stratification of ECM boundaries normally present in the aortic valve were lost and a highly penetrant BAV phenotype was evident at birth. Our data support cilia as a novel cellular mechanism for restraining ECM production during aortic valve development and broadly implicate these structures in the etiology of BAV disease in humans. Developmental Dynamics 246:625-634, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Zonal variation in primary cilia elongation correlates with localized biomechanical degradation in stress deprived tendon

    PubMed Central

    Rowson, Daniel; Screen, Hazel R.C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tenocytes express primary cilia, which elongate when tendon is maintained in the absence of biomechanical load. Previous work indicates differences in the morphology and metabolism of the tenocytes in the tendon fascicular matrix (FM) and the inter‐fascicular matrix (IFM). This study tests the hypothesis that primary cilia in these two regions respond differently to stress deprivation and that this is associated with differences in the biomechanical degradation of the extracellular matrix. Rat tail tendon fascicles were examined over a 7‐day period of either stress deprivation or static load. Seven days of stress deprivation induced cilia elongation in both regions. However, elongation was greater in the IFM compared to the FM. Stress deprivation also induced a loss of biomechanical integrity, primarily in the IFM. Static loading reduced both the biomechanical degradation and cilia elongation. The different responses to stress deprivation in the two tendon regions are likely to be important for the aetiology of tendinopathy. Furthermore, these data suggest that primary cilia elongate in response to biomechanical degradation rather than simply the removal of load. This response to degradation is likely to have important consequences for cilia signalling in tendon and as well as in other connective tissues. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 34:2146–2153, 2016. PMID:26969839

  11. Zonal variation in primary cilia elongation correlates with localized biomechanical degradation in stress deprived tendon.

    PubMed

    Rowson, Daniel; Knight, Martin M; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-12-01

    Tenocytes express primary cilia, which elongate when tendon is maintained in the absence of biomechanical load. Previous work indicates differences in the morphology and metabolism of the tenocytes in the tendon fascicular matrix (FM) and the inter-fascicular matrix (IFM). This study tests the hypothesis that primary cilia in these two regions respond differently to stress deprivation and that this is associated with differences in the biomechanical degradation of the extracellular matrix. Rat tail tendon fascicles were examined over a 7-day period of either stress deprivation or static load. Seven days of stress deprivation induced cilia elongation in both regions. However, elongation was greater in the IFM compared to the FM. Stress deprivation also induced a loss of biomechanical integrity, primarily in the IFM. Static loading reduced both the biomechanical degradation and cilia elongation. The different responses to stress deprivation in the two tendon regions are likely to be important for the aetiology of tendinopathy. Furthermore, these data suggest that primary cilia elongate in response to biomechanical degradation rather than simply the removal of load. This response to degradation is likely to have important consequences for cilia signalling in tendon and as well as in other connective tissues. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 34:2146-2153, 2016.

  12. The presence of primary cilia in cancer cells does not predict responsiveness to modulation of smoothened activity.

    PubMed

    Spann, Ashley L; Yuan, Kun; Goliwas, Kayla F; Steg, Adam D; Kaushik, Devanshu D; Kwon, Yeon-Jin; Frost, Andra R

    2015-07-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that regulate smoothened-dependent activation of the GLI transcription factors in canonical hedgehog signaling. In many cancers, primary cilia are markedly decreased or absent. The lack of primary cilia may inhibit or alter canonical hedgehog signaling and, thereby, interfere in the cellular responsiveness to modulators of smoothened activity. Clinical trials of smoothened antagonists for cancer treatment have shown the best response in basal cell carcinomas, with limited response in other solid tumors. To determine whether the presence or absence of primary cilia in cancer cells will predict their responsiveness to modulation of smoothened activity, we compared the ability of an agonist and/or inhibitor of smoothened (SAG and SANT1, respectively) to modulate GLI-mediated transcription, as measured by GLI1 mRNA level or GLI-luciferase reporter activity, in non-cancer cells with primary cilia (ovarian surface epithelial cells and breast fibroblasts), in cancer cells that cannot assemble primary cilia (MCF7, MDA-MB-231 cell lines), and in cancer cells with primary cilia (SKOV3, PANC1 cell lines). As expected, SAG and SANT1 resulted in appropriate modulation of GLI transcriptional activity in ciliated non-cancer cells, and failed to modulate GLI transcriptional activity in cancer cells without primary cilia. However, there was also no modulation of GLI transcriptional activity in either ciliated cancer cell line. SAG treatment of SKOV3 induced localization of smoothened to primary cilia, as assessed by immunofluorescence, even though there was no increase in GLI transcriptional activity, suggesting a defect in activation of SMO in the primary cilia or in steps later in the hedgehog pathway. In contrast to SKOV3, SAG treatment of PANC1 did not cause the localization of smoothened to primary cilia. Our data demonstrate that the presence of primary cilia in the cancer epithelial cells lines tested does not indicate their

  13. Primary Cilia Modulate IHH Signal Transduction in Response to Hydrostatic Loading of Growth Plate Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Y, Yvonne Y.; Wang, Lai; Welter, J, Jean F.; Ballock, R. Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Indian Hedgehog (Ihh) is a key component of the regulatory apparatus governing chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation in the growth plate. Recent studies have demonstrated that the primary cilium is the site of Ihh signaling within the cell, and that primary cilia are essential for bone and cartilage formation. Primary cilia are also postulated to act as mechanosensory organelles that transduce mechanical forces acting on the cell into biological signals. In this study, we used a hydrostatic compression system to examine Ihh signal transduction under the influence of mechanical load. Our results demonstrate that hydrostatic compression increased both Ihh gene expression and Ihh-responsive Gli-luciferase activity. These increases were aborted by disrupting the primary cilia structure with chloral hydrate. These results suggest that growth plate chondrocytes respond to hydrostatic loading by increasing Ihh signaling, and that the primary cilium is required for this mechano-biological signal transduction to occur. PMID:21930256

  14. Uromodulin is expressed in renal primary cilia and UMOD mutations result in decreased ciliary uromodulin expression

    PubMed Central

    Zaucke, Frank; Boehnlein, Joana M.; Steffens, Sarah; Polishchuk, Roman S.; Rampoldi, Luca; Fischer, Andreas; Pasch, Andreas; Boehm, Christoph W. A.; Baasner, Anne; Attanasio, Massimo; Hoppe, Bernd; Hopfer, Helmut; Beck, Bodo B.; Sayer, John A.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Wolf, Matthias T. F.

    2010-01-01

    Uromodulin (UMOD) mutations are responsible for three autosomal dominant tubulo-interstitial nephropathies including medullary cystic kidney disease type 2 (MCKD2), familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy and glomerulocystic kidney disease. Symptoms include renal salt wasting, hyperuricemia, gout, hypertension and end-stage renal disease. MCKD is part of the ‘nephronophthisis–MCKD complex’, a group of cystic kidney diseases. Both disorders have an indistinguishable histology and renal cysts are observed in either. For most genes mutated in cystic kidney disease, their proteins are expressed in the primary cilia/basal body complex. We identified seven novel UMOD mutations and were interested if UMOD protein was expressed in the primary renal cilia of human renal biopsies and if mutant UMOD would show a different expression pattern compared with that seen in control individuals. We demonstrate that UMOD is expressed in the primary cilia of renal tubules, using immunofluorescent studies in human kidney biopsy samples. The number of UMOD-positive primary cilia in UMOD patients is significantly decreased when compared with control samples. Additional immunofluorescence studies confirm ciliary expression of UMOD in cell culture. Ciliary expression of UMOD is also confirmed by electron microscopy. UMOD localization at the mitotic spindle poles and colocalization with other ciliary proteins such as nephrocystin-1 and kinesin family member 3A is demonstrated. Our data add UMOD to the group of proteins expressed in primary cilia, where mutations of the gene lead to cystic kidney disease. PMID:20172860

  15. Lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Ko; Kasahara, Kyosuke; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato

    2009-10-30

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of lithium, a first-line antimanic mood stabilizer, have not yet been fully elucidated. Treatment of the algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with lithium has been shown to induce elongation of their flagella, which are analogous structures to vertebrate cilia. In the mouse brain, adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3) and certain neuropeptide receptors colocalize to the primary cilium of neuronal cells, suggesting a chemosensory function for the primary cilium in the nervous system. Here we show that lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells. Brain sections from mice chronically fed with Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were subjected to immunofluorescence study. Primary cilia carrying both AC3 and the receptor for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were elongated in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens of lithium-fed mice, as compared to those of control animals. Moreover, lithium-treated NIH3T3 cells and cultured striatal neurons exhibited elongation of the primary cilia. The present results provide initial evidence that a psychotropic agent can affect ciliary length in the central nervous system, and furthermore suggest that lithium exerts its therapeutic effects via the upregulation of cilia-mediated MCH sensing. These findings thus contribute novel insights into the pathophysiology of bipolar mood disorder and other psychiatric diseases.

  16. Topography of calcium phosphate ceramics regulates primary cilia length and TGF receptor recruitment associated with osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwei; Dalbay, Melis T; Luo, Xiaoman; Vrij, Erik; Barbieri, Davide; Moroni, Lorenzo; de Bruijn, Joost D; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Chapple, J Paul; Knight, Martin M; Yuan, Huipin

    2017-07-15

    The surface topography of synthetic biomaterials is known to play a role in material-driven osteogenesis. Recent studies show that TGFβ signalling also initiates osteogenic differentiation. TGFβ signalling requires the recruitment of TGFβ receptors (TGFβR) to the primary cilia. In this study, we hypothesize that the surface topography of calcium phosphate ceramics regulates stem cell morphology, primary cilia structure and TGFβR recruitment to the cilium associated with osteogenic differentiation. We developed a 2D system using two types of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramic discs with identical chemistry. One sample had a surface topography at micron-scale (TCP-B, with a bigger surface structure dimension) whilst the other had a surface topography at submicron scale (TCP-S, with a smaller surface structure dimension). In the absence of osteogenic differentiation factors, human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) were more spread on TCP-S than on TCP-B with alterations in actin organization and increased primary cilia prevalence and length. The cilia elongation on TCP-S was similar to that observed on glass in the presence of osteogenic media and was followed by recruitment of transforming growth factor-β RII (p-TGFβ RII) to the cilia axoneme. This was associated with enhanced osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs on TCP-S, as shown by alkaline phosphatase activity and gene expression for key osteogenic markers in the absence of additional osteogenic growth factors. Similarly, in vivo after a 12-week intramuscular implantation in dogs, TCP-S induced bone formation while TCP-B did not. It is most likely that the surface topography of calcium phosphate ceramics regulates primary cilia length and ciliary recruitment of p-TGFβ RII associated with osteogenesis and bone formation. This bioengineering control of osteogenesis via primary cilia modulation may represent a new type of biomaterial-based ciliotherapy for orthopedic, dental and maxillofacial surgery

  17. Hippocampal and Cortical Primary Cilia Are Required for Aversive Memory in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, S. M. Zaki R.; McNair, Andrew D.; Kippe, Jordyn M.; Croyle, Mandy J.; Kraft, Timothy W.; Yoder, Bradley K.

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for decades that neurons throughout the brain possess solitary, immotile, microtubule based appendages called primary cilia. Only recently have studies tried to address the functions of these cilia and our current understanding remains poor. To determine if neuronal cilia have a role in behavior we specifically disrupted ciliogenesis in the cortex and hippocampus of mice through conditional deletion of the Intraflagellar Transport 88 (Ift88) gene. The effects on learning and memory were analyzed using both Morris Water Maze and fear conditioning paradigms. In comparison to wild type controls, cilia mutants displayed deficits in aversive learning and memory and novel object recognition. Furthermore, hippocampal neurons from mutants displayed an altered paired-pulse response, suggesting that loss of IFT88 can alter synaptic properties. A variety of other behavioral tests showed no significant differences between conditional cilia mutants and controls. This type of conditional allele approach could be used to distinguish which behavioral features of ciliopathies arise due to defects in neural development and which result from altered cell physiology. Ultimately, this could lead to an improved understanding of the basis for the cognitive deficits associated with human cilia disorders such as Bardet-Biedl syndrome, and possibly more common ailments including depression and schizophrenia. PMID:25184295

  18. Behavior of Primary Cilia and Tricellular Tight Junction Proteins during Differentiation in Temperature-Sensitive Mouse Cochlear Precursor Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Kakuki, Takuya; Kaneko, Yakuto; Takano, Kenichi; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Kohno, Takayuki; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    In the sensory hair cells of the mammalian cochlea, the primary cilia in the planar cell polarity as well as the tight junctions in the epithelial cell polarity and the barrier are important to maintain normal hearing. Temperature-sensitive mouse cochlear precursor hair cells were used to investigate the behavior of primary cilia and tricellular tight junction proteins during the differentiation of sensory hair cells. In undifferentiated cells (incubated at 33°C), many acetylated tubulin-positive primary cilia were observed, and each was accompanied with an x03B3;-tubulin-positive basal body. The primary cilia had a '9 + 0' architecture with nine outer microtubule doublets but lacking a central pair of microtubules. In differentiated cells (incubated at 39°C), acetylated tubulin-positive primary cilia as well as acetylated tubulin-positive cilia-like structures were partially observed on the cell surface. In differentiated cells, the number of primary cilia was markedly reduced compared with undifferentiated cells, and innumerable cilia-like structures with no ciliary pockets were partially observed on the cell surface. In undifferentiated cells, few tricellulin molecules and lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptors (LSRs) were observed in the cytoplasm. In differentiated cells, many tricellulin molecules and LSRs were observed on the membranes and within the cytoplasm. Conditional immortalized mouse cochlear precursor hair cells may be useful to investigate the roles of primary cilia and tricellular tight junctions during cellular differentiation and degeneration such as apoptosis.

  19. Primary cilia regulate the osmotic stress response of renal epithelial cells through TRPM3.

    PubMed

    Siroky, Brian J; Kleene, Nancy K; Kleene, Steven J; Varnell, Charles D; Comer, Raven G; Liu, Jialiu; Lu, Lu; Pachciarz, Nolan W; Bissler, John J; Dixon, Bradley P

    2017-04-01

    Primary cilia sense environmental conditions, including osmolality, but whether cilia participate in the osmotic response in renal epithelial cells is not known. The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels TRPV4 and TRPM3 are osmoresponsive. TRPV4 localizes to cilia in certain cell types, while renal subcellular localization of TRPM3 is not known. We hypothesized that primary cilia are required for maximal activation of the osmotic response of renal epithelial cells and that ciliary TRPM3 and TRPV4 mediate that response. Ciliated [murine epithelial cells from the renal inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD-3) and 176-5] and nonciliated (176-5Δ) renal cells expressed Trpv4 and Trpm3 Ciliary expression of TRPM3 was observed in mIMCD-3 and 176-5 cells and in wild-type mouse kidney tissue. TRPV4 was identified in cilia and apical membrane of mIMCD-3 cells by electrophysiology and in the cell body by immunofluorescence. Hyperosmolal stress at 500 mOsm/kg (via NaCl addition) induced the osmotic response genes betaine/GABA transporter (Bgt1) and aldose reductase (Akr1b3) in all ciliated cell lines. This induction was attenuated in nonciliated cells. A TRPV4 agonist abrogated Bgt1 and Akr1b3 induction in ciliated and nonciliated cells. A TRPM3 agonist attenuated Bgt1 and Akr1b3 induction in ciliated cells only. TRPM3 knockout attenuated Akr1b3 induction. Viability under osmotic stress was greater in ciliated than nonciliated cells. Akr1b3 induction was also less in nonciliated than ciliated cells when mannitol was used to induce hyperosmolal stress. These findings suggest that primary cilia are required for the maximal osmotic response in renal epithelial cells and that TRPM3 is involved in this mechanism. TRPV4 appears to modulate the osmotic response independent of cilia.

  20. Role for primary cilia as flow detectors in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Van der Heiden, Kim; Egorova, Anastasia D; Poelmann, Robert E; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Hierck, Beerend P

    2011-01-01

    The cardiovascular system is exposed to biochemical and biomechanical signals. Various sensors for these signals have been described and they contribute to cardiovascular development, maintenance of vessel integrity during adult life, and to pathogenesis. In the past 10years, primary cilia, membrane-covered, rod-like cellular protrusions, were discovered on multiple cell types of the cardiovascular system. Primary cilia are sensory organelles involved in several key (developmental) signaling pathways and in chemo- and mechanosensing on a myriad of cell types. In the embryonic and adult cardiovascular system, they have been demonstrated to function as shear stress sensors on endothelial cells and could act as strain sensors on smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes and as chemosensors on fibroblasts. This review will cover their occurrence and elaborate on established and possible functions of primary cilia in the cardiovascular system.

  1. Ultrastructural characterization of primary cilia in pathologically characterized human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors.

    PubMed

    Moser, Joanna J; Fritzler, Marvin J; Rattner, Jerome B

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are non-motile sensory cytoplasmic organelles that are involved in cell cycle progression. Ultrastructurally, the primary cilium region is complex, with normal ciliogenesis progressing through five distinct morphological stages in human astrocytes. Defects in early stages of ciliogenesis are key features of astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines and provided the impetus for the current study which describes the morphology of primary cilia in molecularly characterized human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors. Seven surgically resected human GBM tissue samples were molecularly characterized according to IDH1/2 mutation status, EGFR amplification status and MGMT promoter methylation status and were examined for primary cilia expression and structure using indirect immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. We report for the first time that primary cilia are disrupted in the early stages of ciliogenesis in human GBM tumors. We confirm that immature primary cilia and basal bodies/centrioles have aberrant ciliogenesis characteristics including absent paired vesicles, misshaped/swollen vesicular hats, abnormal configuration of distal appendages, and discontinuity of centriole microtubular blades. Additionally, the transition zone plate is able to form in the absence of paired vesicles on the distal end of the basal body and when a cilium progresses beyond the early stages of ciliogenesis, it has electron dense material clumped along the transition zone and a darkening of the microtubules at the proximal end of the cilium. Primary cilia play a role in a variety of human cancers. Previously primary cilia structure was perturbed in cultured cell lines derived from astrocytomas/glioblastomas; however there was always some question as to whether these findings were a cell culture phenomena. In this study we confirm that disruptions in ciliogenesis at early stages do occur in GBM tumors and that these ultrastructural findings bear resemblance to those previously

  2. Cystogenesis and elongated primary cilia in Tsc1-deficient distal convoluted tubules.

    PubMed

    Armour, Eric A; Carson, Robert P; Ess, Kevin C

    2012-08-15

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multiorgan hamartomatous disease caused by loss of function mutations of either the TSC1 or TSC2 genes. Neurological symptoms of TSC predominate in younger patients, but renal pathologies are a serious aspect of the disease in older children and adults. To study TSC pathogenesis in the kidney, we inactivated the mouse Tsc1 gene in the distal convoluted tubules (DCT). At young ages, Tsc1 conditional knockout (CKO) mice have enlarged kidneys and mild cystogenesis with increased mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC)1 but decreased mTORC2 signaling. Treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin reduces kidney size and cystogenesis. Rapamycin withdrawal led to massive cystogenesis involving both distal as well as proximal tubules. To assess the contribution of decreased mTORC2 signaling in kidney pathogenesis, we also generated Rictor CKO mice. These animals did not have any detectable kidney pathology. Finally, we examined primary cilia in the DCT. Cilia were longer in Tsc1 CKO mice, and rapamycin treatment returned cilia length to normal. Rictor CKO mice had normal cilia in the DCT. Overall, our findings suggest that loss of the Tsc1 gene in the DCT is sufficient for renal cystogenesis. This cytogenesis appears to be mTORC1 but not mTORC2 dependent. Intriguingly, the mechanism may be cell autonomous as well as non-cell autonomous and possibly involves the length and function of primary cilia.

  3. An Essential Role for Dermal Primary Cilia in Hair Follicle Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Jonathan; Laag, Essam; Michaud, Edward J.; Yoder, Bradley K.

    2009-01-01

    The primary cilium is a microtubule-based organelle implicated as an essential component of a number of signaling pathways. It is present on cells throughout the mammalian body; however, its functions in most tissues remain largely unknown. Herein we demonstrate that primary cilia are present on cells in murine skin and hair follicles throughout morphogenesis and during hair follicle cycling in postnatal life. Using the Cre-lox system, we disrupted cilia assembly in the ventral dermis and evaluated the effects on hair follicle development. Mice with disrupted dermal cilia have severe hypotrichosis (lack of hair) in affected areas. Histological analyses reveal that most follicles in the mutants arrest at stage 2 of hair development and have small or absent dermal condensates. This phenotype is reminiscent of that seen in the skin of mice lacking Shh or Gli2. In situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicates that the hedgehog pathway is downregulated in the dermis of the cilia mutant hair follicles. Thus, these data establish cilia as a critical signaling component required for normal hair morphogenesis and suggest that this organelle is needed on cells in the dermis for reception of signals such as sonic hedgehog. PMID:18987668

  4. Primary Cilia on Horizontal Basal Cells Regulate Regeneration of the Olfactory Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Joiner, Ariell M; Green, Warren W; McIntyre, Jeremy C; Allen, Benjamin L; Schwob, James E; Martens, Jeffrey R

    2015-10-07

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) is one of the few tissues to undergo constitutive neurogenesis throughout the mammalian lifespan. It is composed of multiple cell types including olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that are readily replaced by two populations of basal stem cells, frequently dividing globose basal cells and quiescent horizontal basal cells (HBCs). However, the precise mechanisms by which these cells mediate OE regeneration are unclear. Here, we show for the first time that the HBC subpopulation of basal stem cells uniquely possesses primary cilia that are aligned in an apical orientation in direct apposition to sustentacular cell end feet. The positioning of these cilia suggests that they function in the detection of growth signals and/or differentiation cues. To test this idea, we generated an inducible, cell type-specific Ift88 knock-out mouse line (K5rtTA;tetOCre;Ift88(fl/fl)) to disrupt cilia formation and maintenance specifically in HBCs. Surprisingly, the loss of HBC cilia did not affect the maintenance of the adult OE but dramatically impaired the regeneration of OSNs following lesion. Furthermore, the loss of cilia during development resulted in a region-specific decrease in neurogenesis, implicating HBCs in the establishment of the OE. Together, these results suggest a novel role for primary cilia in HBC activation, proliferation, and differentiation. We show for the first time the presence of primary cilia on a quiescent population of basal stem cells, the horizontal basal cells (HBCs), in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Importantly, our data demonstrate that cilia on HBCs are necessary for regeneration of the OE following injury. Moreover, the disruption of HBC cilia alters neurogenesis during the development of the OE, providing evidence that HBCs participate in the establishment of this tissue. These data suggest that the mechanisms of penetrance for ciliopathies in the OE extend beyond that of defects in olfactory sensory neurons and may

  5. Loss of Primary Cilia Upregulates Renal Hypertrophic Signaling and Promotes Cystogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgibbon, Wayne; Sas, Kelli; Stenbit, Antine E.; Amria, May; Houston, Amber; Reichert, Ryan; Gilley, Sandra; Siegal, Gene P.; Bissler, John; Bilgen, Mehmet; Chou, Peter Cheng-te; Guay-Woodford, Lisa; Yoder, Brad; Haycraft, Courtney J.; Siroky, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Primary cilia dysfunction alters renal tubular cell proliferation and differentiation and associates with accelerated cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease. However, the mechanism leading from primary ciliary dysfunction to renal cyst formation is unknown. We hypothesize that primary cilia prevent renal cyst formation by suppressing pathologic tubular cell hypertrophy and proliferation. Unilateral nephrectomy initiates tubular cell hypertrophy and proliferation in the contralateral kidney and provides a tool to examine primary cilia regulation of renal hypertrophy. Conditional knockout of the primary cilia ift88 gene leads to delayed, adult-onset renal cystic disease, which provides a window of opportunity to conduct unilateral nephrectomy and examine downstream kinetics of renal hypertrophy and cyst formation. In wild-type animals, unilateral nephrectomy activated the mTOR pathway and produced appropriate structural and functional hypertrophy without renal cyst formation. However, in ift88 conditional knockout animals, unilateral nephrectomy triggered increased renal hypertrophy and accelerated renal cyst formation, leading to renal dysfunction. mTOR signaling also increased compared with wild-type animals, suggesting a mechanistic cascade starting with primary ciliary dysfunction, leading to excessive mTOR signaling and renal hypertrophic signaling and culminating in cyst formation. These data suggest that events initiating hypertrophic signaling, such as structural or functional loss of renal mass, may accelerate progression of adult polycystic kidney disease toward end-stage renal disease. PMID:21493775

  6. Primary cilia expression in bone marrow in response to mechanical stimulation in explant bioreactor culture.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, T R; Schiavi, J; Alyssa Varsanik, M; Voisin, M; Birmingham, E; Haugh, M G; McNamara, L M; Niebur, G L

    2016-07-19

    Bone marrow contains a multitude of mechanically sensitive cells that may participate in mechanotransduction. Primary cilia are sensory organelles expressed on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), osteoblasts, osteocytes, and other cell types that sense fluid flow in monolayer culture. In marrow, cilia could similarly facilitate the sensation of relative motion between adjacent cells or interstitial fluid. The goal of this study was to determine the response of cilia to mechanical stimulation of the marrow. Bioreactors were used to supply trabecular bone explants with low magnitude mechanical stimulation (LMMS) of 0.3 ×g at 30 Hz for 1 h/d, 5 d/week, inducing shear stresses in the marrow. Four groups were studied: unstimulated (UNSTIM), stimulated (LMMS), and with and without chloral hydrate (UNSTIM+CH and LMMS+CH, respectively), which was used to disrupt cilia. After 19 days of culture, immunohistochemistry for acetylated α-tubulin revealed that more cells expressed cilia in culture compared to in vivo controls. Stimulation decreased the number of cells expressing cilia in untreated explants, but not in CH-treated explants. MSCs represented a greater fraction of marrow cells in the untreated explants than CH-treated explants. MSCs harvested from the stimulated groups were more proliferative than in the unstimulated explants, but this effect was absent from CH treated explants. In contrast to the marrow, neither LMMS nor CH treatment affected bone formation as measured by mineralising surface. Computational models indicated that LMMS does not induce bone strain, and the reported effects were thus attributed to shear stress in the marrow. From a clinical perspective, genetic or pharmaceutical alterations of cilia expression may affect marrow health and function.

  7. The primary cilia, a 'Rab-id' transit system for hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Oro, Anthony E

    2007-12-01

    Intense focus has been centered around how the primary cilia transduces the hedgehog (Hh) signal from smoothened (Smo) to the Gli transcription factors. New data indicate that ligand and signaling lipids help regulate small GTPase-dependent accumulation and activity of signaling components.

  8. Analysis of Soluble Protein Entry into Primary Cilia Using Semi-Permeabilized Cells

    PubMed Central

    Breslow, David K.; Nachury, Maxence V.

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium is a protrusion from the cell surface that serves as a specialized compartment for signal transduction. Many signaling factors are known to be dynamically concentrated within cilia and to require cilia for their function. Yet protein entry into primary cilia remains poorly understood. To enable a mechanistic analysis of soluble protein entry into cilia, we developed a method for semi-permeabilization of mammalian cells in which the plasma membrane is permeabilized while the ciliary membrane remains intact. Using semi-permeabilized cells as the basis for an in vitro diffusion-to-capture assay, we uncovered a size-dependent diffusion barrier that restricts soluble protein exchange between the cytosol and the cilium. The manipulability of this in vitro system enabled an extensive characterization of the ciliary diffusion barrier and led us to show that the barrier is mechanistically distinct from those at the axon initial segment and the nuclear pore complex. Because semi-permeabilized cells enable a range of experimental perturbations that would not be easily feasible in intact cells, we believe this methodology will provide a unique resource for investigating primary cilium function in development and disease. PMID:25837393

  9. INTU is essential for oncogenic Hh signaling through regulating primary cilia formation in basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, N; Leung, E L-H; Liu, C; Li, L; Eguether, T; Jun Yao, X-J; Jones, E C; Norris, D A; Liu, A; Clark, R A; Roop, D R; Pazour, G J; Shroyer, K R; Chen, J

    2017-08-31

    Inturned (INTU), a cilia and planar polarity effector, performs prominent ciliogenic functions during morphogenesis, such as in the skin. INTU is expressed in adult tissues but its role in tissue maintenance is unknown. Here, we report that the expression of the INTU gene is aberrantly elevated in human basal cell carcinoma (BCC), coinciding with increased primary cilia formation and activated hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Disrupting Intu in an oncogenic mutant Smo (SmoM2)-driven BCC mouse model prevented the formation of BCC through suppressing primary cilia formation and Hh signaling, suggesting that Intu performs a permissive role during BCC formation. INTU is essential for intraflagellar transport A complex assembly during ciliogenesis. To further determine whether Intu is directly involved in the activation of Hh signaling downstream of ciliogenesis, we examined the Hh signaling pathway in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, which readily responds to the Hh pathway activation. Depleting Intu blocked Smo agonist-induced Hh pathway activation, whereas the expression of Gli2ΔN, a constitutively active Gli2, restored Hh pathway activation in Intu-deficient cells, suggesting that INTU functions upstream of Gli2 activation. In contrast, overexpressing Intu did not promote ciliogenesis or Hh signaling. Taken together, data obtained from this study suggest that INTU is indispensable during BCC tumorigenesis and that its aberrant upregulation is likely a prerequisite for primary cilia formation during Hh-dependent tumorigenesis.

  10. Primary cilia are critical for Sonic hedgehog-mediated dopaminergic neurogenesis in the embryonic midbrain.

    PubMed

    Gazea, Mary; Tasouri, Evangelia; Tolve, Marianna; Bosch, Viktoria; Kabanova, Anna; Gojak, Christian; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Novikov, Orna; Spatz, Joachim; Pereira, Gislene; Hübner, Wolfgang; Brodski, Claude; Tucker, Kerry L; Blaess, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons modulate various motor and cognitive functions, and their dysfunction or degeneration has been implicated in several psychiatric diseases. Both Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt signaling pathways have been shown to be essential for normal development of mDA neurons. Primary cilia are critical for the development of a number of structures in the brain by serving as a hub for essential developmental signaling cascades, but their role in the generation of mDA neurons has not been examined. We analyzed mutant mouse lines deficient in the intraflagellar transport protein IFT88, which is critical for primary cilia function. Conditional inactivation of Ift88 in the midbrain after E9.0 results in progressive loss of primary cilia, a decreased size of the mDA progenitor domain, and a reduction in mDA neurons. We identified Shh signaling as the primary cause of these defects, since conditional inactivation of the Shh signaling pathway after E9.0, through genetic ablation of Gli2 and Gli3 in the midbrain, results in a phenotype basically identical to the one seen in Ift88 conditional mutants. Moreover, the expansion of the mDA progenitor domain observed when Shh signaling is constitutively activated does not occur in absence of Ift88. In contrast, clusters of Shh-responding progenitors are maintained in the ventral midbrain of the hypomorphic Ift88 mouse mutant, cobblestone. Despite the residual Shh signaling, the integrity of the mDA progenitor domain is severely disturbed, and consequently very few mDA neurons are generated in cobblestone mutants. Our results identify for the first time a crucial role of primary cilia in the induction of mDA progenitors, define a narrow time window in which Shh-mediated signaling is dependent upon normal primary cilia function for this purpose, and suggest that later Wnt signaling-dependent events act independently of primary cilia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Primary cilia and signaling pathways in mammalian development, health and disease

    PubMed Central

    VELAND, IBEN R.; AWAN, AASHIR; PEDERSEN, LOTTE B.; YODER, BRADLEY K.; CHRISTENSEN, SØREN T.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Although first described 1898 and long considered a vestigial organelle of little functional importance, the primary cilium has become one of the hottest research topics in modern cell biology and physiology. Primary cilia are non-motile sensory organelles present in a single copy on the surface of most growth-arrested or differentiated mammalian cells, and defects in their assembly or function are tightly coupled to many developmental defects, diseases and disorders. In normal tissues the primary cilium coordinates a series of signal transduction pathways, including Hedgehog, Wnt, PDGFRα and integrin signaling. In the kidney the primary cilium may function as a mechano-, chemo- and osmosensing unit that probes the extracellular environment and transmits signals to the cell via e.g. polycystins, which depend on ciliary localization for appropriate function. Indeed, hypomorphic mutations in the mouse ift88 (previously called Tg737) gene, which encodes a ciliogenic intraflagellar transport (IFT) protein, result in malformation of primary cilia, and in the collecting ducts of kidney tubules this is accompanied by development of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (PKD; (1)). While PKD was one of the first diseases to be linked to dysfunctional primary cilia, defects in this organelle have subsequently been associated with many other phenotypes, including cancer, obesity, diabetes as well as a number of developmental defects. Collectively, these disorders of the cilium are now referred to as the ciliopathies. In this review we provide a brief overview of the structure and function of primary cilia and some of their roles in coordinating signal transduction pathways in mammalian development, health and disease. This review was written in conjunction with the Takis Anagnostopoulos Symposium on Renal and Epithelial Physiology and Physiopathology at Faculté de Médecine Necker in Paris, June 26-27, 2008. PMID:19276629

  12. Current topics of functional links between primary cilia and cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Ichiro; Goto, Hidemasa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Inagaki, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia, microtubule-based sensory structures, orchestrate various critical signals during development and tissue homeostasis. In view of the rising interest into the reciprocal link between ciliogenesis and cell cycle, we discuss here several recent advances to understand the molecular link between the individual step of ciliogenesis and cell cycle control. At the onset of ciliogenesis (the transition from centrosome to basal body), distal appendage proteins have been established as components indispensable for the docking of vesicles at the mother centriole. In the initial step of axonemal extension, CP110, Ofd1, and trichoplein, key negative regulators of ciliogenesis, are found to be removed by a kinase-dependent mechanism, autophagy, and ubiquitin-proteasome system, respectively. Of note, their disposal functions as a restriction point to decide that the axonemal nucleation and extension begin. In the elongation step, Nde1, a negative regulator of ciliary length, is revealed to be ubiquitylated and degraded by CDK5-SCF(Fbw7) in a cell cycle-dependent manner. With regard to ciliary length control, it has been uncovered in flagellar shortening of Chlamydomonas that cilia itself transmit a ciliary length signal to cytoplasm. At the ciliary resorption step upon cell cycle re-entry, cilia are found to be disassembled not only by Aurora A-HDAC6 pathway but also by Nek2-Kif24 and Plk1-Kif2A pathways through their microtubule-depolymerizing activity. On the other hand, it is becoming evident that the presence of primary cilia itself functions as a structural checkpoint for cell cycle re-entry. These data suggest that ciliogenesis and cell cycle intimately link each other, and further elucidation of these mechanisms will contribute to understanding the pathology of cilia-related disease including cancer and discovering targets of therapeutic interventions.

  13. Pericentrin forms a complex with intraflagellar transport proteins and polycystin-2 and is required for primary cilia assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jurczyk, Agata; Gromley, Adam; Redick, Sambra; Agustin, Jovenal San; Witman, George; Pazour, Gregory J.; Peters, Dorien J.M.; Doxsey, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Primary cilia are nonmotile microtubule structures that assemble from basal bodies by a process called intraflagellar transport (IFT) and are associated with several human diseases. Here, we show that the centrosome protein pericentrin (Pcnt) colocalizes with IFT proteins to the base of primary and motile cilia. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrates that Pcnt is on or near basal bodies at the base of cilia. Pcnt depletion by RNA interference disrupts basal body localization of IFT proteins and the cation channel polycystin-2 (PC2), and inhibits primary cilia assembly in human epithelial cells. Conversely, silencing of IFT20 mislocalizes Pcnt from basal bodies and inhibits primary cilia assembly. Pcnt is found in spermatocyte IFT fractions, and IFT proteins are found in isolated centrosome fractions. Pcnt antibodies coimmunoprecipitate IFT proteins and PC2 from several cell lines and tissues. We conclude that Pcnt, IFTs, and PC2 form a complex in vertebrate cells that is required for assembly of primary cilia and possibly motile cilia and flagella. PMID:15337773

  14. Adenylate Cyclase Type III Is Not a Ubiquitous Marker for All Primary Cilia during Development

    PubMed Central

    Antal, Maria Cristina; Bénardais, Karelle; Samama, Brigitte; Auger, Cyril; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Ghandour, Said; Boehm, Nelly

    2017-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase type III (AC3) is localized in plasma membrane of neuronal primary cilium and can be used as a marker of this cilium. AC3 has also been detected in some other primary cilia such as those of fibroblasts, synoviocytes or astrocytes. Despite the presence of a cilium in almost all cell types, we show that AC3 is not a common marker of all primary cilia of different human and mouse tissues during development. In peripheral organs, AC3 is present mainly in primary cilia in cells of the mesenchymal lineage (fibroblasts, chondroblasts, osteoblasts-osteocytes, odontoblasts, muscle cells and endothelial cells). In epithelia, the apical cilium of renal and pancreatic tubules and of ductal plate in liver is AC3-negative whereas the cilium of basal cells of stratified epithelia is AC3-positive. Using fibroblasts cell culture, we show that AC3 appears at the plasma membrane of the primary cilium as soon as this organelle develops. The functional significance of AC3 localization at the cilium membrane in some cells but not others has to be investigated in relationship with cell physiology and expression at the cilium plasma membrane of specific upstream receptors. PMID:28122017

  15. Adenylate Cyclase Type III Is Not a Ubiquitous Marker for All Primary Cilia during Development.

    PubMed

    Antal, Maria Cristina; Bénardais, Karelle; Samama, Brigitte; Auger, Cyril; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Ghandour, Said; Boehm, Nelly

    2017-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase type III (AC3) is localized in plasma membrane of neuronal primary cilium and can be used as a marker of this cilium. AC3 has also been detected in some other primary cilia such as those of fibroblasts, synoviocytes or astrocytes. Despite the presence of a cilium in almost all cell types, we show that AC3 is not a common marker of all primary cilia of different human and mouse tissues during development. In peripheral organs, AC3 is present mainly in primary cilia in cells of the mesenchymal lineage (fibroblasts, chondroblasts, osteoblasts-osteocytes, odontoblasts, muscle cells and endothelial cells). In epithelia, the apical cilium of renal and pancreatic tubules and of ductal plate in liver is AC3-negative whereas the cilium of basal cells of stratified epithelia is AC3-positive. Using fibroblasts cell culture, we show that AC3 appears at the plasma membrane of the primary cilium as soon as this organelle develops. The functional significance of AC3 localization at the cilium membrane in some cells but not others has to be investigated in relationship with cell physiology and expression at the cilium plasma membrane of specific upstream receptors.

  16. CILIA: before and after.

    PubMed

    Satir, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This is a history of cilia research before and after the discovery of intraflagellar transport (IFT) and the link between primary cilia ciliogenesis and polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Before IFT, ca. the beginning of the new millennium, although sensory and primary cilia were well described, research was largely focused on motile cilia, their structure, movement, and biogenesis. After IFT and the link to PKD, although work on motile cilia has continued to progress, research on primary cilia has exploded, leading to new insights into the role of cilia in cell signaling and development. Genomics, proteomics, and new imaging techniques have unified the field and pointed out the critical role of cilia as a restricted cell organellar compartment, functionally integrated with other cell organelles including the autophagosome and the nucleus.

  17. Depletion of primary cilia from mature dentate granule cells impairs hippocampus-dependent contextual memory

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soyoung; Kirschen, Gregory W.; Gu, Yan; Ge, Shaoyu

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium, a sensory organelle, regulates cell proliferation and neuronal development of dentate granule cells in the hippocampus. However, its role in the function of mature dentate granule cells remains unknown. Here we specifically depleted and disrupted ciliary proteins IFT20 and Kif3A (respectively) in mature dentate granule cells and investigated hippocampus-dependent contextual memory and long-term plasticity at mossy fiber synapses. We found that depletion of IFT20 in these cells significantly impaired context-dependent fear-related memory. Furthermore, we tested synaptic plasticity of mossy fiber synapses in area CA3 and found increased long-term potentiation upon depletion of IFT20 or disruption of Kif3A. Our findings suggest a role of primary cilia in the memory function of mature dentate granule cells, which may result from abnormal mossy fiber synaptic plasticity. A direct link between the primary cilia of mature dentate granule cells and behavior will require further investigation using independent approaches to manipulate primary cilia. PMID:27678193

  18. Identification of Elongated Primary Cilia with Impaired Mechanotransduction in Idiopathic Scoliosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Oliazadeh, Niaz; Gorman, Kristen F.; Eveleigh, Robert; Bourque, Guillaume; Moreau, Alain

    2017-01-01

    The primary cilium is an outward projecting antenna-like organelle with an important role in bone mechanotransduction. The capacity to sense mechanical stimuli can affect important cellular and molecular aspects of bone tissue. Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is a complex pediatric disease of unknown cause, defined by abnormal spinal curvatures. We demonstrate significant elongation of primary cilia in IS patient bone cells. In response to mechanical stimulation, these IS cells differentially express osteogenic factors, mechanosensitive genes, and signaling genes. Considering that numerous ciliary genes are associated with a scoliosis phenotype, among ciliopathies and knockout animal models, we expected IS patients to have an accumulation of rare variants in ciliary genes. Instead, our SKAT-O analysis of whole exomes showed an enrichment among IS patients for rare variants in genes with a role in cellular mechanotransduction. Our data indicates defective cilia in IS bone cells, which may be linked to heterogeneous gene variants pertaining to cellular mechanotransduction. PMID:28290481

  19. Primary cilia on porcine testicular somatic cells and their role in hedgehog signaling and tubular morphogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dores, Camila; Alpaugh, Whitney; Su, Lin; Biernaskie, Jeff; Dobrinski, Ina

    2017-04-01

    The primary cilium is a microtubule-based sensory organelle found on nearly all eukaryotic cells but little is understood about its function in the testis. We investigate the role of primary cilia on testis cells in vitro by inhibiting formation of the primary cilium with Ciliobrevin D, a cell-permeable, reversible chemical inhibitor of ATPase motor cytoplasmic dynein. We analyzed cultured cells for the presence of primary cilia and their involvement in hedgehog signaling. Primary cilia were present on 89.3 ± 2.3 % of untreated testicular somatic cells compared to 3.1 ± 2.5 % cells with primary cilia for Ciliobrevin D-treated cells. Protein levels of Gli-2 and Smoothened were lower on Western blots after suppression of cilia with Ciliobrevin D. The inhibitor did not affect centrosome localization or cell proliferation, indicating that changes were due to ablation of the primary cilium. Testicular somatic cells have the ability to form three-dimensional tubules in vitro. In vitro-formed tubules were significantly longer and wider in the control group than in the Ciliobrevin D-treated group (9.91 ± 0.35 vs. 5.540 ± 1.08 mm and 339.8 ± 55.78 vs. 127.2 ± 11.9 μm, respectively) indicating that primary cilia play a role in tubule formation. Our results establish that the inhibition of ATPase motor cytoplasmic dynein perturbs formation of primary cilia in testicular somatic cells, affects the hedgehog signaling pathway and impairs tubule formation in vitro. These findings provide evidence for a role of cilia in the testis in cell signaling and tubular morphogenesis in vitro.

  20. The Lowe syndrome protein OCRL1 is involved in primary cilia assembly.

    PubMed

    Coon, Brian G; Hernandez, Victor; Madhivanan, Kayalvizhi; Mukherjee, Debarati; Hanna, Claudia B; Barinaga-Rementeria Ramirez, Irene; Lowe, Martin; Beales, Philip L; Aguilar, R Claudio

    2012-04-15

    Lowe syndrome (LS) is a devastating, X-linked genetic disease characterized by the presence of congenital cataracts, profound learning disabilities and renal dysfunction. Unfortunately, children affected with LS often die early of health complications including renal failure. Although this syndrome was first described in the early 1950s and the affected gene, OCRL1, was identified more than 17 years ago, the mechanism by which Ocrl1 defects lead to LS's symptoms remains unknown. Here we show that LS display characteristics of a ciliopathy. Specifically, we found that patients' cells have defects in the assembly of primary cilia and this phenotype was reproduced in cell lines by knock-down of Ocrl1. Importantly, this defect could be rescued by re-introduction of WT Ocrl1 in both patient and Ocrl1 knock-down cells. In addition, a zebrafish animal model of LS exhibited cilia defects and multiple morphological and anatomical abnormalities typically seen in ciliopathies. Mechanistically, we show that Ocrl1 is involved in protein trafficking to the primary cilia in an Rab8-and IPIP27/Ses-dependent manner. Taking into consideration the relevance of the signaling pathways hosted by the primary cilium, our results suggest hitherto unrecognized mechanisms by which Ocrl1 deficiency may contribute to the phenotypic characteristics of LS. This conceptual change in our understanding of the disease etiology may provide an alternative avenue for the development of therapies.

  1. Endocytic recycling protein EHD1 regulates primary cilia morphogenesis and SHH signaling during neural tube development.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Rainey, Mark A; Arya, Priyanka; Dutta, Samikshan; George, Manju; Storck, Matthew D; McComb, Rodney D; Muirhead, David; Todd, Gordon L; Gould, Karen; Datta, Kaustubh; Gelineau-van Waes, Janee; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2016-02-17

    Members of the four-member C-terminal EPS15-Homology Domain-containing (EHD) protein family play crucial roles in endocytic recycling of cell surface receptors from endosomes to the plasma membrane. In this study, we show that Ehd1 gene knockout in mice on a predominantly B6 background is embryonic lethal. Ehd1-null embryos die at mid-gestation with a failure to complete key developmental processes including neural tube closure, axial turning and patterning of the neural tube. We found that Ehd1-null embryos display short and stubby cilia on the developing neuroepithelium at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5). Loss of EHD1 also deregulates the ciliary SHH signaling with Ehd1-null embryos displaying features indicative of increased SHH signaling, including a significant downregulation in the formation of the GLI3 repressor and increase in the ventral neuronal markers specified by SHH. Using Ehd1-null MEFS we found that EHD1 protein co-localizes with the SHH receptor Smoothened in the primary cilia upon ligand stimulation. Under the same conditions, EHD1 was shown to co-traffic with Smoothened into the developing primary cilia and we identify EHD1 as a direct binding partner of Smoothened. Overall, our studies identify the endocytic recycling regulator EHD1 as a novel regulator of the primary cilium-associated trafficking of Smoothened and Hedgehog signaling.

  2. Endocytic recycling protein EHD1 regulates primary cilia morphogenesis and SHH signaling during neural tube development

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Rainey, Mark A; Arya, Priyanka; Dutta, Samikshan; George, Manju; Storck, Matthew D.; McComb, Rodney D.; Muirhead, David; Todd, Gordon L.; Gould, Karen; Datta, Kaustubh; Waes, Janee Gelineau-van; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Members of the four-member C-terminal EPS15-Homology Domain-containing (EHD) protein family play crucial roles in endocytic recycling of cell surface receptors from endosomes to the plasma membrane. In this study, we show that Ehd1 gene knockout in mice on a predominantly B6 background is embryonic lethal. Ehd1-null embryos die at mid-gestation with a failure to complete key developmental processes including neural tube closure, axial turning and patterning of the neural tube. We found that Ehd1-null embryos display short and stubby cilia on the developing neuroepithelium at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5). Loss of EHD1 also deregulates the ciliary SHH signaling with Ehd1-null embryos displaying features indicative of increased SHH signaling, including a significant downregulation in the formation of the GLI3 repressor and increase in the ventral neuronal markers specified by SHH. Using Ehd1-null MEFS we found that EHD1 protein co-localizes with the SHH receptor Smoothened in the primary cilia upon ligand stimulation. Under the same conditions, EHD1 was shown to co-traffic with Smoothened into the developing primary cilia and we identify EHD1 as a direct binding partner of Smoothened. Overall, our studies identify the endocytic recycling regulator EHD1 as a novel regulator of the primary cilium-associated trafficking of Smoothened and Hedgehog signaling. PMID:26884322

  3. Primary cilia in the basal cells of equine epididymis: a serendipitous finding.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Silvana

    2013-04-01

    Occurrence of a solitary cilium was an unexpected discovery while studying the ultrastructure of epididymal epithelium in equidae. Primary cilia were detected in epididymal basal cells of all individuals of the equines studied - horses, donkey and mules - independently from age and tract of the duct, emerging from the basal cell surface and insinuating into the intercellular spaces. More rarely solitary cilia occurred also at the luminal surface of the principal cells. The ciliary apparatus was constituted by a structurally typical basal body continuous with the finger-like ciliary shaft extending from the cell surface, and an adjacent centriole oriented at right angles to the basal body. The cilium was structured as the typical primary, non-motile cilia found in many mammalian cells, having a 9+0 microtubular pattern. The basal diplosome was randomly associated with other cellular organelles including the Golgi complex, the endoplasmic reticulum, the microfilament network, the plasma membrane, vesicles and pits. Primary ciliogenesis is a new and unexpected finding in the epididymal epithelium. A monitoring role of luminal factors and extracellular liquids might be attributed to this organelle, likely acting as chemical receptor of the luminal environment, thus modulating the epithelial function by a cell-to-cell crosstalk involving the entire epithelium.

  4. A Simple Cell-Based Assay Reveals That Diverse Neuropsychiatric Risk Genes Converge on Primary Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Marley, Aaron; von Zastrow, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Human genetic studies are beginning to identify a large number of genes linked to neuropsychiatric disorders. It is increasingly evident that different genes contribute to risk for similar syndromes and, conversely, the same genes or even the same alleles cross over traditional diagnostic categories. A current challenge is to understand the cellular biology of identified risk genes. However, most genes associated with complex neuropsychiatric phenotypes are not related through a known biochemical pathway, and many have an entirely unknown cellular function. One possibility is that diverse disease-linked genes converge at a higher-level cellular structure. The synapse is already known to be one such convergence, and emerging evidence suggests the primary cilium as another. Because many genes associated with neuropsychiatric illness are expressed also outside the nervous system, as are cilia, we tested the hypothesis that such genes affect conserved features of the primary cilium. Using RNA interference to test 41 broadly expressed candidate genes associated with schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability, we found 20 candidates that reduce ciliation in NIH3T3 cells when knocked down, and three whose manipulation increases cilia length. Three of the candidate genes were previously implicated in cilia formation and, altogether, approximately half of the candidates tested produced a ciliary phenotype. Our results support the hypothesis that primary cilia indeed represent a conserved cellular structure at which the effects of diverse neuropsychiatric risk genes converge. More broadly, they suggest a relatively simple cell-based approach that may be useful for exploring the complex biological underpinnings of neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:23056384

  5. A Smoothened-Evc2 complex transduces the Hedgehog signal at primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Karolin V; Hughes, Casey E; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2012-10-16

    Vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is initiated at primary cilia by the ligand-triggered accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) in the ciliary membrane. The underlying biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. We find that Hh agonists promote the association between Smo and Evc2, a ciliary protein that is defective in two human ciliopathies. The formation of the Smo-Evc2 complex is under strict spatial control, being restricted to a distinct ciliary compartment, the EvC zone. Mutant Evc2 proteins that localize in cilia but are displaced from the EvC zone are dominant inhibitors of Hh signaling. Disabling Evc2 function blocks Hh signaling at a specific step between Smo and the downstream regulators protein kinase A and Suppressor of Fused, preventing activation of the Gli transcription factors. Our data suggest that the Smo-Evc2 signaling complex at the EvC zone is required for Hh signal transmission and elucidate the molecular basis of two human ciliopathies.

  6. Emerging role of primary cilia as mechanosensors in osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, An M; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2013-06-01

    The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile microtubule-based extension present on nearly every mammalian cell. This organelle has established mechanosensory roles in several contexts including kidney, liver, and the embryonic node. Mechanical load deflects the cilium, triggering biochemical responses. Defects in cilium function have been associated with numerous human diseases. Recent research has implicated the primary cilium as a mechanosensor in bone. In this review, we discuss the cilium, the growing evidence for its mechanosensory role in bone, and areas of future study.

  7. The Role of Primary Cilia in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation: A Pivotal Switch in Guiding Lineage Commitment

    PubMed Central

    Tummala, Padmaja; Arnsdorf, Emily J.; Jacobs, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that have been shown to play a critical role in lineage commitment. It was our hypothesis that the primary cilium is necessary for chemically induced differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). To investigate this, polaris siRNA was used to inhibit the primary cilia and the mRNA levels of transcription factors Runx2, PPARγ were measured by RT PCR as markers of osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation, respectively. MSCs with inhibited primary cilia had significantly decreased basal mRNA expression levels of all three lineages specific transcription factors indicating that primary cilia are critical in multiple differentiation pathways. Furthermore, to determine if primary cilia play a role in the differentiation potential of MSCs, progenitor cells transfected with either scrambled or polaris siRNA were cultured in osteo-inductive, chondro-inductive, or adipo-inductive media and lineage commitment was ascertained. Interestingly, within 24 h of culture, cells transfected with polaris siRNA in both osteogenic and adipogenic media lost adhesion and released from the slides; however MSCs in chondrogenic media as well as cells transfected with scrambled siRNA did not. These results suggest that the primary cilium is necessary for the normal progression of chemically induced osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. As a control, the experiment was repeated with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and none of the effects of inhibited primary cilia were observed indicating that the loss of adhesion may be specific to MSCs. Furthermore after biochemically inducing the cells to differentiate, polaris knockdown resulted in abrogation of both Runx2 and PPARγ mRNA while SOX9 mRNA expression was significantly lower. These results suggest that primary cilia play an essential role not only in the initiation of both osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation, but also in maintaining the phenotype of differentiated cells. Interestingly

  8. An ovine hepatorenal fibrocystic model of a Meckel-like syndrome associated with dysmorphic primary cilia and TMEM67 mutations.

    PubMed

    Stayner, C; Poole, C A; McGlashan, S R; Pilanthananond, M; Brauning, R; Markie, D; Lett, B; Slobbe, L; Chae, A; Johnstone, A C; Jensen, C G; McEwan, J C; Dittmer, K; Parker, K; Wiles, A; Blackburne, W; Leichter, A; Leask, M; Pinnapureddy, A; Jennings, M; Horsfield, J A; Walker, R J; Eccles, M R

    2017-05-09

    Meckel syndrome (MKS) is an inherited autosomal recessive hepatorenal fibrocystic syndrome, caused by mutations in TMEM67, characterized by occipital encephalocoele, renal cysts, hepatic fibrosis, and polydactyly. Here we describe an ovine model of MKS, with kidney and liver abnormalities, without polydactyly or occipital encephalocoele. Homozygous missense p.(Ile681Asn; Ile687Ser) mutations identified in ovine TMEM67 were pathogenic in zebrafish phenotype rescue assays. Meckelin protein was expressed in affected and unaffected kidney epithelial cells by immunoblotting, and in primary cilia of lamb kidney cyst epithelial cells by immunofluorescence. In contrast to primary cilia of relatively consistent length and morphology in unaffected kidney cells, those of affected cyst-lining cells displayed a range of short and extremely long cilia, as well as abnormal morphologies, such as bulbous regions along the axoneme. Putative cilia fragments were also consistently located within the cyst luminal contents. The abnormal ciliary phenotype was further confirmed in cultured interstitial fibroblasts from affected kidneys. These primary cilia dysmorphologies and length control defects were significantly greater in affected cells compared to unaffected controls. In conclusion, we describe abnormalities involving primary cilia length and morphology in the first reported example of a large animal model of MKS, in which we have identified TMEM67 mutations.

  9. Axonemal Positioning and Orientation in 3-D Space for Primary Cilia: What is Known, What is Assumed, and What Needs Clarification

    PubMed Central

    Farnum, Cornelia E.; Wilsman, Norman J.

    2012-01-01

    Two positional characteristics of the ciliary axoneme – its location on the plasma membrane as it emerges from the cell, and its orientation in three-dimensional space – are known to be critical for optimal function of actively motile cilia (including nodal cilia), as well as for modified cilia associated with special senses. However, these positional characteristics have not been analyzed to any significant extent for primary cilia. This review briefly summarizes the history of knowledge of these two positional characteristics across a wide spectrum of cilia, emphasizing their importance for proper function. Then the review focuses what is known about these same positional characteristics for primary cilia in all major tissue types where they have been reported. The review emphasizes major areas that would be productive for future research for understanding how positioning and 3-D orientation of primary cilia may be related to their hypothesized signaling roles within different cellular populations. PMID:22012592

  10. G-protein—coupled receptors, hedgehog signaling and primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway has become an important model to study diverse aspects of cell biology of the primary cilium, and reciprocally, the study of ciliary processes provides an opportunity to solve longstanding mysteries in the mechanism of vertebrate Hh signal transduction. The cilium is emerging as an unique compartment for G-protein—coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in many systems. Two members of the GPCR family, Smoothened and Gpr161, play important roles in the Hh pathway. We review the current understanding of how these proteins may function to regulate Hh signaling and also highlight some of the critical unanswered questions being tackled by the field. Uncovering GPCR-regulated mechanisms important in Hh signaling may provide therapeutic strategies against the Hh pathway that plays important roles in development, regeneration and cancer. PMID:24845016

  11. Arl13b in primary cilia regulates the migration and placement of interneurons in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Holden; Eom, Tae-Yeon; Mariani, Laura E; Bachleda, Amelia; Hirt, Joshua; Gukassyan, Vladimir; Cusack, Corey L; Lai, Cary; Caspary, Tamara; Anton, E S

    2012-11-13

    Coordinated migration and placement of interneurons and projection neurons lead to functional connectivity in the cerebral cortex; defective neuronal migration and the resultant connectivity changes underlie the cognitive defects in a spectrum of neurological disorders. Here we show that primary cilia play a guiding role in the migration and placement of postmitotic interneurons in the developing cerebral cortex and that this process requires the ciliary protein, Arl13b. Through live imaging of interneuronal cilia, we show that migrating interneurons display highly dynamic primary cilia and we correlate cilia dynamics with the interneuron's migratory state. We demonstrate that the guidance cue receptors essential for interneuronal migration localize to interneuronal primary cilia, but their concentration and dynamics are altered in the absence of Arl13b. Expression of Arl13b variants known to cause Joubert syndrome induce defective interneuronal migration, suggesting that defects in cilia-dependent interneuron migration may in part underlie the neurological defects in Joubert syndrome patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The contrasting roles of primary cilia and cytonemes in Hh signaling.

    PubMed

    Kornberg, Thomas B

    2014-10-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) is a paracrine signaling protein with major roles in development and disease. In vertebrates and invertebrates, Hh signal transduction is carried out almost entirely by evolutionarily conserved components, and in both, intercellular movement of Hh is mediated by cytonemes - specialized filopodia that serve as bridges that bring distant cells into contact. A significant difference is the role of the primary cilium, a slender, tubulin-based protuberance of many vertebrate cells. Although the primary cilium is essential for Hh signaling in cells that have one, most Drosophila cells lack a primary cilium. This perspective addresses the roles of primary cilia and cytonemes, and proposes that for Hh signaling, the role of primary cilia is to provide a specialized hydrophobic environment that hosts lipid-modified Hh and other components of Hh signal transduction after Hh has traveled from elsewhere in the cell. Implicit in this model is the idea that initial binding and uptake of Hh is independent of and segregated from the processes of signal transduction and activation.

  13. Primary Cilia Negatively Regulate Melanogenesis in Melanocytes and Pigmentation in a Human Skin Model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyunjung; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun Sung; Park, So Jung; Bae, Il-Hong; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Jeong, In Young; Kim, Hyoung-June; Lee, Youngjin; Park, Hea Chul; Jeon, Hong Bae; Kim, Ki Woo; Lee, Tae Ryong; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium is an organelle protruding from the cell body that senses external stimuli including chemical, mechanical, light, osmotic, fluid flow, and gravitational signals. Skin is always exposed to the external environment and responds to external stimuli. Therefore, it is possible that primary cilia have an important role in skin. Ciliogenesis was reported to be involved in developmental processes in skin, such as keratinocyte differentiation and hair formation. However, the relation between skin pigmentation and primary cilia is largely unknown. Here, we observed that increased melanogenesis in melanocytes treated with a melanogenic inducer was inhibited by a ciliogenesis inducer, cytochalasin D, and serum-free culture. However, these inhibitory effects disappeared in GLI2 knockdown cells. In addition, activation of sonic hedgehog (SHH)-smoothened (Smo) signaling pathway by a Smo agonist, SAG inhibited melanin synthesis in melanocytes and pigmentation in a human skin model. On the contrary, an inhibitor of primary cilium formation, ciliobrevin A1, activated melanogenesis in melanocytes. These results suggest that skin pigmentation may be regulated partly by the induction of ciliogenesis through Smo-GLI2 signaling.

  14. Primary Cilia Negatively Regulate Melanogenesis in Melanocytes and Pigmentation in a Human Skin Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Sung; Park, So Jung; Bae, Il-Hong; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Jeong, In Young; Kim, Hyoung-June; Lee, Youngjin; Park, Hea Chul; Jeon, Hong Bae; Kim, Ki Woo; Lee, Tae Ryong; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium is an organelle protruding from the cell body that senses external stimuli including chemical, mechanical, light, osmotic, fluid flow, and gravitational signals. Skin is always exposed to the external environment and responds to external stimuli. Therefore, it is possible that primary cilia have an important role in skin. Ciliogenesis was reported to be involved in developmental processes in skin, such as keratinocyte differentiation and hair formation. However, the relation between skin pigmentation and primary cilia is largely unknown. Here, we observed that increased melanogenesis in melanocytes treated with a melanogenic inducer was inhibited by a ciliogenesis inducer, cytochalasin D, and serum-free culture. However, these inhibitory effects disappeared in GLI2 knockdown cells. In addition, activation of sonic hedgehog (SHH)-smoothened (Smo) signaling pathway by a Smo agonist, SAG inhibited melanin synthesis in melanocytes and pigmentation in a human skin model. On the contrary, an inhibitor of primary cilium formation, ciliobrevin A1, activated melanogenesis in melanocytes. These results suggest that skin pigmentation may be regulated partly by the induction of ciliogenesis through Smo-GLI2 signaling. PMID:27941997

  15. Adipogenic Differentiation of hMSCs is Mediated by Recruitment of IGF-1r Onto the Primary Cilium Associated With Cilia Elongation.

    PubMed

    Dalbay, Melis T; Thorpe, Stephen D; Connelly, John T; Chapple, J Paul; Knight, Martin M

    2015-06-01

    Primary cilia are single non-motile organelles that provide a highly regulated compartment into which specific proteins are trafficked as a critical part of various signaling pathways. The absence of primary cilia has been shown to prevent differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Changes in primary cilia length are crucial for regulating signaling events; however it is not known how alterations in cilia structure relate to differentiation. This study tested the hypothesis that changes in primary cilia structure are required for stem cell differentiation. hMSCs expressed primary cilia that were labeled with acetylated alpha tubulin and visualized by confocal microscopy. Chemically induced differentiation resulted in lineage specific changes in cilia length and prevalence which were independent of cell cycle. In particular, adipogenic differentiation resulted in cilia elongation associated with the presence of dexamethasone, while insulin had an inhibitory effect on cilia length. Over a 7-day time course, adipogenic differentiation media resulted in cilia elongation within 2 days followed by increased nuclear PPARγ levels; an early marker of adipogenesis. Cilia elongation was associated with increased trafficking of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor β (IGF-1Rβ) into the cilium. This was reversed on inhibition of elongation by IFT-88 siRNA transfection, which also decreased nuclear PPARγ. This is the first study to show that adipogenic differentiation requires primary cilia elongation associated with the recruitment of IGF-1Rβ onto the cilium. This study may lead to the development of cilia-targeted therapies for controlling adipogenic differentiation and associated conditions such as obesity.

  16. Development of a method for the measurement of primary cilia length in 3D

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary cilia length is an important measure of cell and tissue function. While accurate length measurements can be calculated from cells in 2D culture, measurements in tissue or 3D culture are inherently difficult due to optical distortions. This study uses a novel combination of image processing techniques to rectify optical distortions and accurately measure cilia length from 3D images. Methods Point spread functions and experimental resolutions were calculated from subresolution microspheres embedded in 3D agarose gels for both wide-field fluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopes. The degree of axial smearing and spherical aberration was calculated from xy:xz diameter ratios of 3D image data sets of 4 μm microspheres that had undergone deconvolution and/or Gaussian blurring. Custom-made 18 and 50 μm fluorescent microfibers were also used as calibration objects to test the suitability of processed image sets for 3D skeletonization. Microfiber length in 2D was first measured to establish an original population mean. Fibers were then embedded in 3D agarose gels to act as ciliary models. 3D image sets of microfibers underwent deconvolution and Gaussian blurring. Length measurements within 1 standard deviation of the original 2D population mean were deemed accurate. Finally, the combined method of deconvolution, Gaussian blurring and skeletonization was compared to previously published methods using images of immunofluorescently labeled renal and chondrocyte primary cilia. Results Deconvolution significantly improved contrast and resolution but did not restore the xy:xz diameter ratio (0.80). Only the additional step of Gaussian blurring equalized xy and xz resolutions and yielded a diameter ratio of 1.02. Following image processing, skeletonization successfully estimated microfiber boundaries and allowed reliable and repeatable measurement of fiber lengths in 3D. We also found that the previously published method of calculating length from 2

  17. CEP90 is required for the assembly and centrosomal accumulation of centriolar satellites, which is essential for primary cilia formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeongmi; Lee, Kwanwoo; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2012-01-01

    Centriolar satellites are PCM-1-positive granules surrounding centrosomes. Proposed functions of the centriolar satellites include protein targeting to the centrosome, as well as communication between the centrosome and surrounding cytoplasm. CEP90 is a centriolar satellite protein that is critical for spindle pole integrity in mitotic cells. In this study, we examined the biological functions of CEP90 in interphase cells. CEP90 physically interacts with PCM-1 at centriolar satellites, and this interaction is essential for centrosomal accumulation of the centriolar satellites and eventually for primary cilia formation. CEP90 is also required for BBS4 loading on centriolar satellites and its localization in primary cilia. Our results imply that the assembly and transport of centriolar satellites are critical steps for primary cilia formation and ciliary protein recruitment.

  18. Primary cilia function regulates the length of the embryonic trunk axis and urogenital field in mice.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Elanor N; Svingen, Terje; Ng, Ee Ting; Wicking, Carol; Koopman, Peter

    2014-11-15

    The issues of whether and how some organs coordinate their size and shape with the blueprint of the embryo axis, while others appear to regulate their morphogenesis autonomously, remain poorly understood. Mutations in Ift144, encoding a component of the trafficking machinery of primary cilia assembly, result in a range of embryo patterning defects, affecting the limbs, skeleton and neural system. Here, we show that embryos of the mouse mutant Ift144(twt) develop gonads that are larger than wild-type. Investigation of the early patterning of the urogenital ridge revealed that the anterior-posterior domain of the gonad/mesonephros was extended at 10.5 dpc, with no change in the length of the metanephros. In XY embryos, this extension resulted in an increase in testis cord number. Moreover, we observed a concomitant extension of the trunk axis in both sexes, with no change in the length of the tail domain or somite number. Our findings support a model in which: (1) primary cilia regulate embryonic trunk elongation; (2) the length of the trunk axis determines the size of the urogenital ridges; and (3) the gonad domain is partitioned into a number of testis cords that depends on the available space, rather than being divided a predetermined number of times to generate a specific number of cords. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Silibinin negatively contributes to primary cilia length via autophagy regulated by histone deacetylase 6 in confluent mouse embryo fibroblast 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Liu, Wei; Liu, Xiaoling; Liu, Weiwei; Wang, Hongju; Yao, Guodong; Zang, Linghe; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Tashiro, Shin-Ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Primary cilium is a cellular antenna, signalling as a sensory organelle. Numerous pathological manifestation is associated with change of its length. Although the interaction between autophagy and primary cilia has been suggested, the role of autophagy in primary cilia length is largely unknown. In this study the primary cilia were immunostained and observed by using confocal fluorescence microscopy, and we found that silibinin, a natural flavonoid, shortened the length of primary cilia, meanwhile it also induced autophagy in 3T3-L1 cells. This study was designed to investigate the significance of silibinin-induced autophagy in primary ciliary structure in confluent mouse embryo fibroblast 3T3-L1 cells. Either blocking the autophagic flux with pre-treatment with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), or transfection of siRNA targeting LC3 inhibited the reduction of cilia length caused by silibinin exposure. Autophagy induced by silibinin decreased expressions of the cilia-associated proteins, such as IFT88, KIF3a and Ac-tubulin, while 3-MA restored it, indicating that autophagy induced by silibinin led to a reduction of primary cilia length. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), which was suggested as a mediator of autophagy, was up-regulated by silibinin in a time-dependent manner. In addition, 3T3-L1 cells treated with siRNA against HDAC6 had a reduced autophagic level and were protected from silibinin-induced cilia shortening. Taken together, we conclude that the HDAC6-mediated autophagy negatively regulates primary cilia length during silibinin treatment and has the potential to serve as a therapeutic target for primary cilia-associated ciliopathies. These findings thus provide new information about the potential link between autophagy and primary cilia.

  20. Meckel-Gruber syndrome and the role of primary cilia in kidney, skeleton, and central nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Barker, Amy R; Thomas, Rhys; Dawe, Helen R

    2014-01-01

    The ciliopathies are a group of related inherited diseases characterized by malformations in organ development. The diseases affect multiple organ systems, with kidney, skeleton, and brain malformations frequently observed. Research over the last decade has revealed that these diseases are due to defects in primary cilia, essential sensory organelles found on most cells in the human body. Here we discuss the genetic and cell biological basis of one of the most severe ciliopathies, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, and explain how primary cilia contribute to the development of the affected organ systems.

  1. Meckel-Gruber syndrome and the role of primary cilia in kidney, skeleton, and central nervous system development

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Amy R; Thomas, Rhys; Dawe, Helen R

    2014-01-01

    The ciliopathies are a group of related inherited diseases characterized by malformations in organ development. The diseases affect multiple organ systems, with kidney, skeleton, and brain malformations frequently observed. Research over the last decade has revealed that these diseases are due to defects in primary cilia, essential sensory organelles found on most cells in the human body. Here we discuss the genetic and cell biological basis of one of the most severe ciliopathies, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, and explain how primary cilia contribute to the development of the affected organ systems. PMID:24322779

  2. Type I collagen promotes primary cilia growth through down-regulating HDAC6-mediated autophagy in confluent mouse embryo fibroblast 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Liu, Weiwei; Liu, Xiaoling; Otkur, Wuxiyar; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Yamato, Masayuki; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji; Tashiro, Shin-Ichi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2017-08-12

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that extend from nearly all vertebrate cells. Abnormal ciliogenesis and cilia length are suggested to be associated with hypertension and obesity as well as diseases such as Meckel-Gruber syndrome. Extracellular matrix (ECM), comprising cellular microenvironment, influences cell shape and proliferation. However, influence of ECM on cilia biogenesis has not been well studied. In this study we examined the effects of type I collagen (col I), the major component of ECM, on primary cilia growth. When cultured on collagen-coated dishes, confluent 3T3-L1 cells were found to exhibit fibroblast-like morphology, which was different from the cobblestone-like shape on non-coated dishes. The level of autophagy in the cells cultured on col I-coated dishes was attenuated compared with the cells cultured on non-coated dishes. The cilia of the cells cultured on col I-coated dishes became longer, accompanying increased expression of essential proteins for cilia assembly. Transfection of the siRNA targeting microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) further enhanced the length of primary cilia, suggesting that col I positively regulated cilia growth through inhibition of autophagy. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), which was suggested as a mediator of autophagy in our previous study on primary cilia, was down-regulated with col I. 3T3-L1 cells treated with the siRNA against HDAC6 reduced the autophagy level and enhanced collagen-induced cilia elongation, implying that HDAC6 was involved in mediating autophagy. In conclusion, col I promotes cilia growth through repressing the HDAC-autophagy pathway that can be involved in the interaction between primary cilia and col I. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Smoothened-Evc2 Complex Transduces the Hedgehog Signal at Primary Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Karolin V.; Hughes, Casey E.; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is initiated at primary cilia by the ligand-triggered accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) in the ciliary membrane. The underlying biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. We find that Hh agonists promote the association between Smo and Evc2, a ciliary protein that is defective in two human ciliopathies. The formation of the Smo-Evc2 complex is under strict spatial control, being restricted to a distinct ciliary compartment, the EvC zone. Mutant Evc2 proteins that localize in cilia but are displaced from the EvC zone are dominant inhibitors of Hh signaling. Disabling Evc2 function blocks Hh signaling at a specific step between Smo and the downstream regulators protein kinase A and Suppressor of Fused, preventing activation of the Gli transcription factors. Our data suggest that the Smo-Evc2 signaling complex at the EvC zone is required for Hh signal transmission and elucidate the molecular basis of two human ciliopathies. PMID:22981989

  4. Cilia biology: stop overeating now!

    PubMed

    Satir, Peter

    2007-11-20

    Knocking out primary cilia of adult mouse tissues or a specific subset of cilia from POMC-expressing neurons in the brain initiates uncontrolled eating. This behavior leads to obesity and kidney disease.

  5. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase is required for novel object learning and extinction of contextual memory: role of cAMP signaling in primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenshan; Phan, Trongha; Storm, Daniel R

    2011-04-13

    Although primary cilia are found on neurons throughout the brain, their physiological function remains elusive. Human ciliopathies are associated with cognition defects, and transgenic mice lacking proteins expressed in primary cilia exhibit defects in learning and memory. Recently, it was reported that mice lacking the G-protein-coupling receptor somatostatin receptor-3 (SSTR3), a protein expressed predominately in the primary cilia of neurons, have defective memory for novel object recognition and lower cAMP levels in the brain. Since SSTR3 is coupled to regulation of adenylyl cyclase, this suggests that adenylyl cyclase activity in primary cilia of CNS neurons may be critical for some forms of learning and memory. Because the type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3) is expressed in primary cilia of hippocampal neurons, we examined AC3(-/-) mice for several forms of learning and memory. Here, we report that AC3(-/-) mice show no short-term memory for novel objects and fail to exhibit extinction of contextual fear conditioning. They also show impaired learning and memory for temporally dissociative passive avoidance. Since AC3 is exclusively expressed in primary cilia, we conclude that cAMP signals generated within primary cilia contribute to some forms of learning and memory, including extinction of contextual fear conditioning.

  6. The Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase is Required for Novel Object Learning and Extinction of Contextual Memory: Role of cAMP Signaling in Primary Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenshan; Phan, Trongha; Storm, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Although primary cilia are found on neurons throughout the brain, their physiological function remains elusive. Human ciliopathies are associated with cognition defects and transgenic mice lacking proteins expressed in primary cilia exhibit defects in learning and memory. Recently, it was reported that mice lacking the G-protein coupling receptor somatostatin receptor-3 (SSTR3), a protein expressed predominately in the primary cilia of neurons, have defective memory for novel object recognition and lower cAMP levels in the brain. Since SSTR3 is coupled to regulation of adenylyl cyclase this suggests that adenylyl cyclase activity in primary cilia of CNS neurons may be critical for some forms of learning and memory. Because the type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3) is expressed in primary cilia of hippocampal neurons, we examined AC3−/− mice for several forms of learning and memory. Here, we report that AC3−/− mice show no short-term memory for novel objects and fail to exhibit extinction of contextual fear conditioning. They also show impaired learning and memory for temporally dissociated passive avoidance (TDPA). Since AC3 is exclusively expressed in primary cilia we conclude that cAMP signals generated within primary cilia contribute to some forms of learning and memory including extinction of contextual fear conditioning. PMID:21490195

  7. Hypoxia inhibits primary cilia formation and reduces cell-mediated contraction in stress-deprived rat tail tendon fascicles

    PubMed Central

    Lavagnino, Michael; Oslapas, Anna N.; Gardner, Keri L.; Arnoczky, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Hypoxia, which is associated with chronic tendinopathy, has recently been shown to decrease the mechanosensitivity of some cells. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of hypoxia on the formation of elongated primary cilia (a mechanosensing organelle of tendon cells) in vitro and to determine the effect of hypoxia on cell-mediated contraction of stress-deprived rat tail tendon fascicles (RTTfs). Methods Tendon cells isolated from RTTfs were cultured under normoxic (21% O2) or hypoxic (1% O2) conditions for 24 hours. The cells were then stained for tubulin and the number of cells with elongated cilia counted. RTTfs from 1-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were also cultured under hypoxic and normoxic conditions for three days and tendon length measured daily. Results A significant (p=0.002) decrease in the percent of elongated cilia was found in cells maintained in hypoxic conditions (54.1%±12.2) when compared in normoxic conditions (71.7%±6.32). RTTfs in hypoxia showed a significant decrease in the amount of contraction compared to RTTfs in normoxia after two (p=0.007) and three (p=0.001) days. Conclusion The decreased incidence of elongated primary cilia in a hypoxic environment, as well as the decreased mechanoresponsiveness of tendon cells under these conditions may relate to the inability of some cases of chronic tendinopathy to respond to strain-based rehabilitation modalities (i.e. eccentric loading). PMID:27900292

  8. Primary cilia act as mechanosensors during bone healing around an implant

    PubMed Central

    Leucht, P.; Monica, S.D.; Temiyasathit, S.; Lenton, K.; Manu, A.; Longaker, M.T.; Jacobs, C.R.; Spilker, R.L.; Guo, H.; Brunski, J.B.; Helms, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The primary cilium is an organelle that senses cues in a cell’s local environment. Some of these cues constitute molecular signals; here, we investigate the extent to which primary cilia can also sense mechanical stimuli. We used a conditional approach to delete Kif3a in pre-osteoblasts and then employed a motion device that generated a spatial distribution of strain around an intra-osseous implant positioned in the mouse tibia. We correlated interfacial strain fields with cell behaviors ranging from proliferation through all stages of osteogenic differentiation. We found that peri-implant cells in the Col1Cre;Kif3afl/fl mice were unable to proliferate in response to a mechanical stimulus, failed to deposit and then orient collagen fibers to the strain fields caused by implant displacement, and failed to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the lack of a functioning primary cilium blunts the normal response of a cell to a defined mechanical stimulus. The ability to manipulate the genetic background of peri-implant cells within the context of a whole, living tissue provides a rare opportunity to explore mechanotransduction from a multi-scale perspective. PMID:22784673

  9. The Talpid3 gene (KIAA0586) encodes a centrosomal protein that is essential for primary cilia formation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yili; Bangs, Fiona; Paton, I Robert; Prescott, Alan; James, John; Davey, Megan G; Whitley, Paul; Genikhovich, Grigory; Technau, Ulrich; Burt, David W; Tickle, Cheryll

    2009-02-01

    The chicken talpid(3) mutant, with polydactyly and defects in other embryonic regions that depend on hedgehog (Hh) signalling (e.g. the neural tube), has a mutation in KIAA0568. Similar phenotypes are seen in mice and in human syndromes with mutations in genes that encode centrosomal or intraflagella transport proteins. Such mutations lead to defects in primary cilia, sites where Hh signalling occurs. Here, we show that cells of talpid(3) mutant embryos lack primary cilia and that primary cilia can be rescued with constructs encoding Talpid3. talpid(3) mutant embryos also develop polycystic kidneys, consistent with widespread failure of ciliogenesis. Ultrastructural studies of talpid(3) mutant neural tube show that basal bodies mature but fail to dock with the apical cell membrane, are misorientated and almost completely lack ciliary axonemes. We also detected marked changes in actin organisation in talpid(3) mutant cells, which may explain misorientation of basal bodies. KIAA0586 was identified in the human centrosomal proteome and, using an antibody against chicken Talpid3, we detected Talpid3 in the centrosome of wild-type chicken cells but not in mutant cells. Cloning and bioinformatic analysis of the Talpid3 homolog from the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis identified a highly conserved region in the Talpid3 protein, including a predicted coiled-coil domain. We show that this region is required to rescue primary cilia formation and neural tube patterning in talpid(3) mutant embryos, and is sufficient for centrosomal localisation. Thus, Talpid3 is one of a growing number of centrosomal proteins that affect both ciliogenesis and Hh signalling.

  10. Evaluating the Role of PTH in Promotion of Chondrosarcoma Cell Proliferation and Invasion by Inhibiting Primary Cilia Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Wei; Jiang, Ting; Guo, Fengjing; Xu, Tao; Gong, Chen; Cheng, Peng; Zhao, Libo; Cheng, Weiting; Xu, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is characterized by secretion of a cartilage-like matrix, with high proliferation ability and metastatic potential. Previous studies have shown that parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has a close relationship with various tumor types. The objectives of this study were to research the function played by PTHrP in human chondrosarcoma, especially targeting cell proliferation and invasion, and to search for the potential interaction between PTHrP and primary cilia in tumorigenesis. Surgical resection tissues and the human chondrosarcoma cell line SW1353 were used in the scientific research. Cells were stimulated with an optimum concentration of recombinant PTH (1-84), and siRNA was used to interfere with internal PTHrP. Cell proliferation and invasion assays were applied, including MTS-8 cell proliferation assay, Western blot, RT-PCR, Transwell invasion assay, and immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence assays. A high level of PTHrP expression was found in human chondrosarcoma tissues, and recombinant PTH exhibited positive promotion in tumor cell proliferation and invasion. In the meantime, PTHrP could inhibit the assembly of primary cilia and regulate downstream gene expression. These findings indicate that PTHrP can regulate tumor cell proliferation and invasion ability, possibly through suppression of primary cilia assembly. Thus, restricting PTHrP over-expression is a feasible potential therapeutic method for chondrosarcoma. PMID:25365173

  11. Evaluating the role of PTH in promotion of chondrosarcoma cell proliferation and invasion by inhibiting primary cilia expression.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wei; Jiang, Ting; Guo, Fengjing; Xu, Tao; Gong, Chen; Cheng, Peng; Zhao, Libo; Cheng, Weiting; Xu, Kai

    2014-10-31

    Chondrosarcoma is characterized by secretion of a cartilage-like matrix, with high proliferation ability and metastatic potential. Previous studies have shown that parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has a close relationship with various tumor types. The objectives of this study were to research the function played by PTHrP in human chondrosarcoma, especially targeting cell proliferation and invasion, and to search for the potential interaction between PTHrP and primary cilia in tumorigenesis. Surgical resection tissues and the human chondrosarcoma cell line SW1353 were used in the scientific research. Cells were stimulated with an optimum concentration of recombinant PTH (1-84), and siRNA was used to interfere with internal PTHrP. Cell proliferation and invasion assays were applied, including MTS-8 cell proliferation assay, Western blot, RT-PCR, Transwell invasion assay, and immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence assays. A high level of PTHrP expression was found in human chondrosarcoma tissues, and recombinant PTH exhibited positive promotion in tumor cell proliferation and invasion. In the meantime, PTHrP could inhibit the assembly of primary cilia and regulate downstream gene expression. These findings indicate that PTHrP can regulate tumor cell proliferation and invasion ability, possibly through suppression of primary cilia assembly. Thus, restricting PTHrP over-expression is a feasible potential therapeutic method for chondrosarcoma.

  12. Epithelial to Stromal Re-Distribution of Primary Cilia during Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schimmack, Simon; Kneller, Sarah; Dadabaeva, Nigora; Bergmann, Frank; Taylor, Andrew; Hackert, Thilo; Werner, Jens; Strobel, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Background The Hedgehog (HH) pathway is a mediator in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Surprisingly, previous studies suggested that primary cilia (PC), the essential organelles for HH signal transduction, were lost in PDAC. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of PC in human normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis, and during carcinogenesis to PDAC with focus on both epithelia and stroma. Methods PC were analyzed in paraffin sections from normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis, intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasia, and PDAC, as well as in primary human pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) and pancreatic cancer cell lines by double immunofluorescence staining for acetylated α-tubuline and γ-tubuline. Co-staining for the HH receptors PTCH1, PTCH2 and SMO was also performed. Results PC are gradually lost during pancreatic carcinogenesis in the epithelium: the fraction of cells with PC gradually and significantly decreased from 32% in ducts of normal pancreas, to 21% in ducts of chronic pancreatitis, to 18% in PanIN1a, 6% in PanIN2, 3% in PanIN3 and to 1.2% in invasive PDAC. However, this loss of PC in the neoplastic epithelium is accompanied by a gain of PC in the surrounding stroma. The fraction of stromal cells with PC significantly increased from 13% around normal ducts to about 30% around PanIN and PDAC. HH-receptors were detected in tumor stroma but not in epithelial cells. PC are also present in PSC and pancreatic cancer cell lines. Conclusion PC are not lost during pancreatic carcinogenesis but re-distributed from the epithelium to the stroma. This redistribution may explain the re-direction of HH signaling towards the stroma during pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:27783689

  13. Functional aspects of primary cilia in signaling, cell cycle and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunctional cilia underlie a broad range of cellular and tissue phenotypes and can eventually result in the development of ciliopathies: pathologically diverse diseases that range from clinically mild to highly complex and severe multi-organ failure syndromes incompatible with neonatal life. Given that virtually all cells of the human body have the capacity to generate cilia, it is likely that clinical manifestations attributed to ciliary dysfunction will increase in the years to come. Disputed but nevertheless enigmatic is the notion that at least a subset of tumor phenotypes fit within the ciliopathy disease spectrum and that cilia loss may be required for tumor progression. Contending for the centrosome renders ciliation and cell division mutually exclusive; a regulated tipping of balance promotes either process. The mechanisms involved, however, are complex. If the hypothesis that tumorigenesis results from dysfunctional cilia is true, then why do the classic ciliopathies only show limited hyperplasia at best? Although disassembly of the cilium is a prerequisite for cell proliferation, it does not intrinsically drive tumorigenesis per se. Alternatively, we will explore the emerging evidence suggesting that some tumors depend on ciliary signaling. After reviewing the structure, genesis and signaling of cilia, the various ciliopathy syndromes and their genetics, we discuss the current debate of tumorigenesis as a ciliopathy spectrum defect, and describe recent advances in this fascinating field. PMID:23628112

  14. Characterization of phenotype markers and neuronotoxic potential of polarised primary microglia in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chhor, Vibol; Le Charpentier, Tifenn; Lebon, Sophie; Oré, Marie-Virgine; Celador, Idoia Lara; Josserand, Julien; Degos, Vincent; Jacotot, Etienne; Hagberg, Henrik; Sävman, Karin; Mallard, Carina; Gressens, Pierre; Fleiss, Bobbi

    2013-01-01

    Microglia mediate multiple facets of neuroinflammation, including cytotoxicity, repair, regeneration, and immunosuppression due to their ability to acquire diverse activation states, or phenotypes. Modulation of microglial phenotype is an appealing neurotherapeutic strategy but a comprehensive study of classical and more novel microglial phenotypic markers in vitro is lacking. The aim of this study was to outline the temporal expression of a battery of phenotype markers from polarised microglia to generate an in vitro tool for screening the immunomodulatory potential of novel compounds. We characterised expression of thirty-one macrophage/microglial phenotype markers in primary microglia over time (4, 12, 36, and 72 h), using RT-qPCR or multiplex protein assay. Firstly, we selected Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as the strongest M1–M2 polarising stimuli, from six stimuli tested. At each time point, markers useful to identify that microglia were M1 included iNOS, Cox-2 and IL-6 and a loss of M2a markers. Markers useful for quantifying M2b-immunomodulatory microglia included, increased IL-1RA and SOCS3 and for M2a-repair and regeneration, included increased arginase-1, and a loss of the M1 and M2b markers were discriminatory. Additional markers were regulated at fewer time points, but are still likely important to monitor when assessing the immunomodulatory potential of novel therapies. Further, to facilitate identification of how novel immunomodulatory treatments alter the functional affects of microglia, we characterised how the soluble products from polarised microglia affected the type and rate of neuronal death; M1/2b induced increasing and M2a-induced decreasing neuronal loss. We also assessed any effects of prior activation state, to provide a way to identify how a novel compound may alter phenotype depending on the stage of injury/insult progression. We identified generally that a prior M1/2b reduced the ability of microglia to switch to

  15. Primary Cilia as a Possible Link between Left-Right Asymmetry and Neurodevelopmental Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Trulioff, Andrey; Ermakov, Alexander; Malashichev, Yegor

    2017-01-01

    Cilia have multiple functions in the development of the entire organism, and participate in the development and functioning of the central nervous system. In the last decade, studies have shown that they are implicated in the development of the visceral left-right asymmetry in different vertebrates. At the same time, some neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, autism, bipolar disorder, and dyslexia, are known to be associated with lateralization failure. In this review, we consider possible links in the mechanisms of determination of visceral asymmetry and brain lateralization, through cilia. We review the functions of seven genes associated with both cilia, and with neurodevelopmental diseases, keeping in mind their possible role in the establishment of the left-right brain asymmetry. PMID:28125008

  16. EFCAB7 and IQCE regulate Hedgehog signaling by tethering the EVC-EVC2 complex to the base of primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Pusapati, Ganesh V.; Hughes, Casey E; Dorn, Karolin V.; Zhang, Dapeng; Sugianto, Priscilla; Aravind, L.; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway depends on primary cilia in vertebrates, but the signaling machinery within cilia remains incompletely defined. We report the identification of a complex between two ciliary proteins, EFCAB7 and IQCE, which positively regulates the Hh pathway. The EFCAB7-IQCE module anchors the EVC-EVC2 complex in a signaling microdomain at the base of cilia. EVC and EVC2 genes are mutated in Ellis van Creveld and Weyers syndromes, characterized by impaired Hh signaling in skeletal, cardiac and orofacial tissues. EFCAB7 binds to a C-terminal disordered region in EVC2 that is deleted in Weyers patients. EFCAB7 depletion mimics the Weyers cellular phenotype— the mis-localization of EVC-EVC2 within cilia and impaired activation of the transcription factor GLI2. Evolutionary analysis suggests that emergence of these complexes might have been important for adaptation of an ancient organelle, the cilium, for an animal-specific signaling network. PMID:24582806

  17. Small GTPases and cilia.

    PubMed

    Li, Yujie; Hu, Jinghua

    2011-01-01

    Small GTPases are key molecular switches that bind and hydrolyze GTP in diverse membrane- and cytoskeleton-related cellular processes. Recently, mounting evidences have highlighted the role of various small GTPases, including the members in Arf/Arl, Rab, and Ran subfamilies, in cilia formation and function. Once overlooked as an evolutionary vestige, the primary cilium has attracted more and more attention in last decade because of its role in sensing various extracellular signals and the association between cilia dysfunction and a wide spectrum of human diseases, now called ciliopathies. Here we review recent advances about the function of small GTPases in the context of cilia, and the correlation between the functional impairment of small GTPases and ciliopathies. Understanding of these cellular processes is of fundamental importance for broadening our view of cilia development and function in normal and pathological states and for providing valuable insights into the role of various small GTPases in disease processes, and their potential as therapeutic targets.

  18. Shear stress blunts tubuloglomerular feedback partially mediated by primary cilia and nitric oxide at the macula densa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Shen, Chunyu; Liu, Haifeng; Wang, Shaohui; Chen, Xinshan; Roman, Richard J; Juncos, Luis A; Lu, Yan; Wei, Jin; Zhang, Jie; Yip, Kay-Pong; Liu, Ruisheng

    2015-10-01

    The present study tested whether primary cilia on macula densa serve as a flow sensor to enhance nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) activity and inhibit tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF). Isolated perfused macula densa was loaded with calcein red and 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate to monitor cell volume and nitric oxide (NO) generation. An increase in tubular flow rate from 0 to 40 nl/min enhanced NO production by 40.0 ± 1.2%. The flow-induced NO generation was blocked by an inhibitor of NOS1 but not by inhibition of the Na/K/2Cl cotransporter or the removal of electrolytes from the perfusate. NO generation increased from 174.8 ± 21 to 276.1 ± 24 units/min in cultured MMDD1 cells when shear stress was increased from 0.5 to 5.0 dynes/cm(2). The shear stress-induced NO generation was abolished in MMDD1 cells in which the cilia were disrupted using a siRNA to ift88. Increasing the NaCl concentration of the tubular perfusate from 10 to 80 mM NaCl in the isolated perfused juxtaglomerular preparation reduced the diameter of the afferent arteriole by 3.8 ± 0.1 μm. This response was significantly blunted to 2.5 ± 0.2 μm when dextran was added to the perfusate to increase the viscosity and shear stress. Inhibition of NOS1 blocked the effect of dextran on TGF response. In vitro, the effects of raising perfusate viscosity with dextran on tubular hydraulic pressure were minimized by reducing the outflow resistance to avoid stretching of tubular cells. These results suggest that shear stress stimulates primary cilia on the macula densa to enhance NO generation and inhibit TGF responsiveness.

  19. Cilia Dysfunction in Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Ann E.; Walters, Matthew S.; Shaykhiev, Renat; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the human airway epithelium is the presence of ciliated cells bearing motile cilia, specialized cell surface projections containing axonemes comprised of microtubules and dynein arms, which provide ATP-driven motility. In the airways, cilia function in concert with airway mucus to mediate the critical function of mucociliary clearance, cleansing the airways of inhaled particles and pathogens. The prototypical disorder of respiratory cilia is primary ciliary dyskinesia, an inherited disorder that leads to impaired mucociliary clearance, repeated chest infections, and progressive destruction of lung architecture. Numerous acquired lung diseases are also marked by abnormalities in both cilia structure and function. In this review we summarize current knowledge regarding airway ciliated cells and cilia, how they function to maintain a healthy epithelium, and how disorders of cilia structure and function contribute to inherited and acquired lung disease. PMID:25386990

  20. PTEN regulates cilia through Dishevelled

    PubMed Central

    Shnitsar, Iryna; Bashkurov, Mikhail; Masson, Glenn R.; Ogunjimi, Abiodun A.; Mosessian, Sherly; Cabeza, Eduardo Aguiar; Hirsch, Calley L.; Trcka, Daniel; Gish, Gerald; Jiao, Jing; Wu, Hong; Winklbauer, Rudolf; Williams, Roger L.; Pelletier, Laurence; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Barrios-Rodiles, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are hair-like cellular protrusions important in many aspects of eukaryotic biology. For instance, motile cilia enable fluid movement over epithelial surfaces, while primary (sensory) cilia play roles in cellular signalling. The molecular events underlying cilia dynamics, and particularly their disassembly, are not well understood. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) is an extensively studied tumour suppressor, thought to primarily act by antagonizing PI3-kinase signalling. Here we demonstrate that PTEN plays an important role in multicilia formation and cilia disassembly by controlling the phosphorylation of Dishevelled (DVL), another ciliogenesis regulator. DVL is a central component of WNT signalling that plays a role during convergent extension movements, which we show here are also regulated by PTEN. Our studies identify a novel protein substrate for PTEN that couples PTEN to regulation of cilia dynamics and WNT signalling, thus advancing our understanding of potential underlying molecular etiologies of PTEN-related pathologies. PMID:26399523

  1. Planar cell polarity effector gene Intu regulates cell fate-specific differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Dai, D; Li, L; Huebner, A; Zeng, H; Guevara, E; Claypool, D J; Liu, A; Chen, J

    2013-01-01

    Genes involved in the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway are essential for a number of developmental processes in mammals, such as convergent extension and ciliogenesis. Tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway are believed to mediate PCP signals in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. However, how PCP signaling controls the morphogenesis of mammalian tissues remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of inturned (Intu), a tissue-specific PCP effector gene, during hair follicle formation in mice. Tissue-specific disruption of Intu in embryonic epidermis resulted in hair follicle morphogenesis arrest because of the failure of follicular keratinocyte to differentiate. Targeting Intu in the epidermis resulted in almost complete loss of primary cilia in epidermal and follicular keratinocytes, and a suppressed hedgehog signaling pathway. Surprisingly, the epidermal stratification and differentiation programs and barrier function were not affected. These results demonstrate that tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway control the differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia in a cell fate- and context-dependent manner, which may be critical in orchestrating the propagation and interpretation of polarity signals established by the core PCP components.

  2. Over-expression of Plk4 induces centrosome amplification, loss of primary cilia and associated tissue hyperplasia in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Paula A.; Bury, Leah; Shahbazi, Marta N.; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Tate, Peri H.; Wormald, Sam; Hindley, Christopher J.; Huch, Meritxell; Archer, Joy; Skarnes, William C.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Glover, David M.

    2015-01-01

    To address the long-known relationship between supernumerary centrosomes and cancer, we have generated a transgenic mouse that permits inducible expression of the master regulator of centriole duplication, Polo-like-kinase-4 (Plk4). Over-expression of Plk4 from this transgene advances the onset of tumour formation that occurs in the absence of the tumour suppressor p53. Plk4 over-expression also leads to hyperproliferation of cells in the pancreas and skin that is enhanced in a p53 null background. Pancreatic islets become enlarged following Plk4 over-expression as a result of equal expansion of α- and β-cells, which exhibit centrosome amplification. Mice overexpressing Plk4 develop grey hair due to a loss of differentiated melanocytes and bald patches of skin associated with a thickening of the epidermis. This reflects an increase in proliferating cells expressing keratin 5 in the basal epidermal layer and the expansion of these cells into suprabasal layers. Such cells also express keratin 6, a marker for hyperplasia. This is paralleled by a decreased expression of later differentiation markers, involucrin, filaggrin and loricrin. Proliferating cells showed an increase in centrosome number and a loss of primary cilia, events that were mirrored in primary cultures of keratinocytes established from these animals. We discuss how repeated duplication of centrioles appears to prevent the formation of basal bodies leading to loss of primary cilia, disruption of signalling and thereby aberrant differentiation of cells within the epidermis. The absence of p53 permits cells with increased centrosomes to continue dividing, thus setting up a neoplastic state of error prone mitoses, a prerequisite for cancer development. PMID:26701933

  3. Cilia and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jason M.; Witman, George B.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, cilia have moved from relative obscurity to a position of importance for understanding multiple complex human diseases. Now termed the ciliopathies, these diseases inflict devastating effects on millions of people worldwide. In this review, written primarily for teachers and students who may not yet be aware of the recent exciting developments in this field, we provide a general overview of our current understanding of cilia and human disease. We start with an introduction to cilia structure and assembly and indicate where they are found in the human body. We then discuss the clinical features of selected ciliopathies, with an emphasis on primary ciliary dyskinesia, polycystic kidney disease, and retinal degeneration. The history of ciliopathy research involves a fascinating interplay between basic and clinical sciences, highlighted in a timeline. Finally, we summarize the relative strengths of individual model organisms for ciliopathy research; many of these are suitable for classroom use. PMID:25960570

  4. The role of primary cilia in corpus callosum formation is mediated by production of the Gli3 repressor.

    PubMed

    Laclef, Christine; Anselme, Isabelle; Besse, Laurianne; Catala, Martin; Palmyre, Aurélien; Baas, Dominique; Paschaki, Marie; Pedraza, Maria; Métin, Christine; Durand, Bénédicte; Schneider-Maunoury, Sylvie

    2015-09-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC) is a frequent brain disorder found in over 80 human congenital syndromes including ciliopathies. Here, we report a severe AgCC in Ftm/Rpgrip1l knockout mouse, which provides a valuable model for Meckel-Grüber syndrome. Rpgrip1l encodes a protein of the ciliary transition zone, which is essential for ciliogenesis in several cell types in mouse including neuroepithelial cells in the developing forebrain. We show that AgCC in Rpgrip1l(-/-) mouse is associated with a disturbed location of guidepost cells in the dorsomedial telencephalon. This mislocalization results from early patterning defects and abnormal cortico-septal boundary (CSB) formation in the medial telencephalon. We demonstrate that all these defects primarily result from altered GLI3 processing. Indeed, AgCC, together with patterning defects and mispositioning of guidepost cells, is rescued by overexpressing in Rpgrip1l(-/-) embryos, the short repressor form of the GLI3 transcription factor (GLI3R), provided by the Gli3(Δ699) allele. Furthermore, Gli3(Δ699) also rescues AgCC in Rfx3(-/-) embryos deficient for the ciliogenic RFX3 transcription factor that regulates the expression of several ciliary genes. These data demonstrate that GLI3 processing is a major outcome of primary cilia function in dorsal telencephalon morphogenesis. Rescuing CC formation in two independent ciliary mutants by GLI3(Δ699) highlights the crucial role of primary cilia in maintaining the proper level of GLI3R required for morphogenesis of the CC.

  5. Glis3 is associated with primary cilia and Wwtr1/TAZ and implicated in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hong Soon; Beak, Ju Youn; Kim, Yong-Sik; Herbert, Ronald; Jetten, Anton M

    2009-05-01

    In this study, we describe the generation and partial characterization of Krüppel-like zinc finger protein Glis3 mutant (Glis3(zf/zf)) mice. These mice display abnormalities very similar to those of patients with neonatal diabetes and hypothyroidism syndrome, including the development of diabetes and polycystic kidney disease. We demonstrate that Glis3 localizes to the primary cilium, suggesting that Glis3 is part of a cilium-associated signaling pathway. Although Glis3(zf/zf) mice form normal primary cilia, renal cysts contain relatively fewer cells with a primary cilium. We further show that Glis3 interacts with the transcriptional modulator Wwtr1/TAZ, which itself has been implicated in glomerulocystic kidney disease. Wwtr1 recognizes a P/LPXY motif in the C terminus of Glis3 and enhances Glis3-mediated transcriptional activation, indicating that Wwtr1 functions as a coactivator of Glis3. Mutations in the P/LPXY motif abrogate the interaction with Wwtr1 and the transcriptional activity of Glis3, indicating that this motif is part of the transcription activation domain of Glis3. Our study demonstrates that dysfunction of Glis3 leads to the development of cystic renal disease, suggesting that Glis3 plays a critical role in maintaining normal renal functions. We propose that localization to the primary cilium and interaction with Wwtr1 are key elements of the Glis3 signaling pathway.

  6. Glis3 Is Associated with Primary Cilia and Wwtr1/TAZ and Implicated in Polycystic Kidney Disease ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hong Soon; Beak, Ju Youn; Kim, Yong-Sik; Herbert, Ronald; Jetten, Anton M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we describe the generation and partial characterization of Krüppel-like zinc finger protein Glis3 mutant (Glis3zf/zf) mice. These mice display abnormalities very similar to those of patients with neonatal diabetes and hypothyroidism syndrome, including the development of diabetes and polycystic kidney disease. We demonstrate that Glis3 localizes to the primary cilium, suggesting that Glis3 is part of a cilium-associated signaling pathway. Although Glis3zf/zf mice form normal primary cilia, renal cysts contain relatively fewer cells with a primary cilium. We further show that Glis3 interacts with the transcriptional modulator Wwtr1/TAZ, which itself has been implicated in glomerulocystic kidney disease. Wwtr1 recognizes a P/LPXY motif in the C terminus of Glis3 and enhances Glis3-mediated transcriptional activation, indicating that Wwtr1 functions as a coactivator of Glis3. Mutations in the P/LPXY motif abrogate the interaction with Wwtr1 and the transcriptional activity of Glis3, indicating that this motif is part of the transcription activation domain of Glis3. Our study demonstrates that dysfunction of Glis3 leads to the development of cystic renal disease, suggesting that Glis3 plays a critical role in maintaining normal renal functions. We propose that localization to the primary cilium and interaction with Wwtr1 are key elements of the Glis3 signaling pathway. PMID:19273592

  7. EFCAB7 and IQCE regulate hedgehog signaling by tethering the EVC-EVC2 complex to the base of primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Pusapati, Ganesh V; Hughes, Casey E; Dorn, Karolin V; Zhang, Dapeng; Sugianto, Priscilla; Aravind, L; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2014-03-10

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway depends on primary cilia in vertebrates, but the signaling machinery within cilia remains incompletely defined. We report the identification of a complex between two ciliary proteins, EFCAB7 and IQCE, which positively regulates the Hh pathway. The EFCAB7-IQCE module anchors the EVC-EVC2 complex in a signaling microdomain at the base of cilia. EVC and EVC2 genes are mutated in Ellis van Creveld and Weyers syndromes, characterized by impaired Hh signaling in skeletal, cardiac, and orofacial tissues. EFCAB7 binds to a C-terminal disordered region in EVC2 that is deleted in Weyers patients. EFCAB7 depletion mimics the Weyers cellular phenotype-the mislocalization of EVC-EVC2 within cilia and impaired activation of the transcription factor GLI2. Evolutionary analysis suggests that emergence of these complexes might have been important for adaptation of an ancient organelle, the cilium, for an animal-specific signaling network. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. TULP3 bridges the IFT-A complex and membrane phosphoinositides to promote trafficking of G protein-coupled receptors into primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Wen, Xiaohui; Chih, Ben; Nelson, Christopher D; Lane, William S; Scales, Suzie J; Jackson, Peter K

    2010-10-01

    Primary cilia function as a sensory signaling compartment in processes ranging from mammalian Hedgehog signaling to neuronal control of obesity. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is an ancient, conserved mechanism required to assemble cilia and for trafficking within cilia. The link between IFT, sensory signaling, and obesity is not clearly defined, but some novel monogenic obesity disorders may be linked to ciliary defects. The tubby mouse, which presents with adult-onset obesity, arises from mutation in the Tub gene. The tubby-like proteins comprise a related family of poorly understood proteins with roles in neural development and function. We find that specific Tubby family proteins, notably Tubby-like protein 3 (TULP3), bind to the IFT-A complex. IFT-A is linked to retrograde ciliary transport, but, surprisingly, we find that the IFT-A complex has a second role directing ciliary entry of TULP3. TULP3 and IFT-A, in turn, promote trafficking of a subset of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), but not Smoothened, to cilia. Both IFT-A and membrane phosphoinositide-binding properties of TULP3 are required for ciliary GPCR localization. TULP3 and IFT-A proteins both negatively regulate Hedgehog signaling in the mouse embryo, and the TULP3-IFT-A interaction suggests how these proteins cooperate during neural tube patterning.

  9. Revealing the Molecular Structure and the Transport Mechanism at the Base of Primary Cilia Using Superresolution STED Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tung-Lin

    The primary cilium is an organelle that serves as a signaling center of the cell and is involved in the hedgehog signaling, cAMP pathway, Wnt pathways, etc. Ciliary function relies on the transportation of molecules between the primary cilium and the cell, which is facilitated by intraflagellar transport (IFT). IFT88, one of the important IFT proteins in complex B, is known to play a role in the formation and maintenance of cilia in various types of organisms. The ciliary transition zone (TZ), which is part of the gating apparatus at the ciliary base, is home to a large number of ciliopathy molecules. Recent studies have identified important regulating elements for TZ gating in cilia. However, the architecture of the TZ region and its arrangement relative to intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins remain largely unknown, hindering the mechanistic understanding of the regulation processes. One of the major challenges comes from the tiny volume at the ciliary base packed with numerous proteins, with the diameter of the TZ close to the diffraction limit of conventional microscopes. Using a series of stimulated emission depletion (STED) superresolution images mapped to electron microscopy images, we analyzed the structural organization of the ciliary base. Subdiffraction imaging of TZ components defines novel geometric distributions of RPGRIP1L, MKS1, CEP290, TCTN2 and TMEM67, shedding light on their roles in TZ structure, assembly, and function. We found TCTN2 at the outmost periphery of the TZ close to the ciliary membrane, with a 227+/-18 nm diameter. TMEM67 was adjacent to TCTN2, with a 205+/-20 nm diameter. RPGRIP1L was localized toward the axoneme at the same axial level as TCTN2 and TMEM67, with a 165+/-8 nm diameter. MKS1 was situated between TMEM67 and RPGRIP1L, with an 186+/-21 nm diameter. Surprisingly, CEP290 was localized at the proximal side of the TZ close to the distal end of the centrin-labeled basal body. The lateral width was unexpectedly close to

  10. Morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus in human primary nasal ciliated epithelial cells occurs at surface membrane microdomains that are distinct from cilia.

    PubMed

    Jumat, Muhammad Raihan; Yan, Yan; Ravi, Laxmi Iyer; Wong, Puisan; Huong, Tra Nguyen; Li, Chunwei; Tan, Boon Huan; Wang, De Yun; Sugrue, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of cilia and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein, fusion (F) protein, attachment (G) protein, and M2-1 protein in human ciliated nasal epithelial cells was examined at between 1 and 5 days post-infection (dpi). All virus structural proteins were localized at cell surface projections that were distinct from cilia. The F protein was also trafficked into the cilia, and while its presence increased as the infection proceeded, the N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time of infection. The presence of the F protein in the cilia correlated with cellular changes in the cilia and reduced cilia function. At 5dpi extensive cilia loss and further reduced cilia function was noted. These data suggested that although RSV morphogenesis occurs at non-cilia locations on ciliated nasal epithelial cells, RSV infection induces changes in the cilia body that leads to extensive cilia loss.

  11. Reduction of oxidative stress during recovery accelerates normalization of primary cilia length that is altered after ischemic injury in murine kidneys.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee In; Kim, Jinu; Jang, Hee-Seong; Noh, Mi Ra; Lipschutz, Joshua H; Park, Kwon Moo

    2013-05-15

    The primary cilium is a microtubule-based nonmotile organelle that extends from the surface of cells, including renal tubular cells. Here, we investigated the alteration of primary cilium length during epithelial cell injury and repair, following ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) insult, and the role of reactive oxygen species in this alteration. Thirty minutes of bilateral renal ischemia induced severe renal tubular cell damage and an increase of plasma creatinine (PCr) concentration. Between 8 and 16 days following the ischemia, the increased PCr returned to normal range, although without complete histological restoration. Compared with the primary cilium length in normal kidney tubule cells, the length was shortened 4 h and 1 day following ischemia, increased over normal 8 days after ischemia, and then returned to near normal 16 days following ischemia. In the urine of I/R-subjected mice, acetylated tubulin was detected. The cilium length of proliferating cells was shorter than that in nonproliferating cells. Mature cells had shorter cilia than differentiating cells. Treatment with Mn(III) tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin (MnTMPyP), an antioxidant, during the recovery of damaged kidneys accelerated normalization of cilia length concomitant with a decrease of oxidative stress and morphological recovery in the kidney. In the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, H(2)O(2) treatment caused released ciliary fragment into medium, and MnTMPyP inhibited the deciliation. The ERK inhibitor U0126 inhibited elongation of cilia in normal and MDCK cells recovering from H(2)O(2) stress. Taken together, our results suggest that primary cilia length reflects cell proliferation and the length of primary cilium is regulated, at least, in part, by reactive oxygen species through ERK.

  12. Axoneme Structure from Motile Cilia.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2017-01-03

    The axoneme is the main extracellular part of cilia and flagella in eukaryotes. It consists of a microtubule cytoskeleton, which normally comprises nine doublets. In motile cilia, dynein ATPase motor proteins generate sliding motions between adjacent microtubules, which are integrated into a well-orchestrated beating or rotational motion. In primary cilia, there are a number of sensory proteins functioning on membranes surrounding the axoneme. In both cases, as the study of proteomics has elucidated, hundreds of proteins exist in this compartmentalized biomolecular system. In this article, we review the recent progress of structural studies of the axoneme and its components using electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, mainly focusing on motile cilia. Structural biology presents snapshots (but not live imaging) of dynamic structural change and gives insights into the force generation mechanism of dynein, ciliary bending mechanism, ciliogenesis, and evolution of the axoneme.

  13. Morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus in human primary nasal ciliated epithelial cells occurs at surface membrane microdomains that are distinct from cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Jumat, Muhammad Raihan; Yan, Yan; Ravi, Laxmi Iyer; Wong, Puisan; Huong, Tra Nguyen; Li, Chunwei; Tan, Boon Huan; Wang, De Yun; Sugrue, Richard J.

    2015-10-15

    The distribution of cilia and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein, fusion (F) protein, attachment (G) protein, and M2-1 protein in human ciliated nasal epithelial cells was examined at between 1 and 5 days post-infection (dpi). All virus structural proteins were localized at cell surface projections that were distinct from cilia. The F protein was also trafficked into the cilia, and while its presence increased as the infection proceeded, the N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time of infection. The presence of the F protein in the cilia correlated with cellular changes in the cilia and reduced cilia function. At 5 dpi extensive cilia loss and further reduced cilia function was noted. These data suggested that although RSV morphogenesis occurs at non-cilia locations on ciliated nasal epithelial cells, RSV infection induces changes in the cilia body that leads to extensive cilia loss. - Highlights: • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects nasal ciliated epithelial cells. • Virus morphogenesis occurs within filamentous projections distinct from cilia. • The RSV N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time during infection. • Trafficking of the F protein into the cilia occurred early in infection. • Presence of the F protein in cilia correlated with impaired cilia function.

  14. Structure and function of mammalian cilia.

    PubMed

    Satir, Peter; Christensen, Søren T

    2008-06-01

    In the past half century, beginning with electron microscopic studies of 9 + 2 motile and 9 + 0 primary cilia, novel insights have been obtained regarding the structure and function of mammalian cilia. All cilia can now be viewed as sensory cellular antennae that coordinate a large number of cellular signaling pathways, sometimes coupling the signaling to ciliary motility or alternatively to cell division and differentiation. This view has had unanticipated consequences for our understanding of developmental processes and human disease.

  15. [Primary ciliary dyskinesia, immotile cilia syndrome, and Kartagener syndrome: diagnostic criteria].

    PubMed

    Dombi, V H; Walt, H

    1996-03-16

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia is the generic term for a heterogeneous group of inherited diseases in which ciliary ultrastructure is defective and as a consequence ciliary motility is disturbed. An international consensus on the diagnostic criteria has not yet been reached. This paper reviews some recent findings which are useful in the diagnosis of the disease and attempts to establish the best diagnostic criteria. The marker symptoms are chronic bronchitis, otitis, and sinusitis since childhood. Additionally, one or more of the following criteria must be present: Kartagener syndrome, a dextrocardia situation, markedly reduced frequency in ciliary motility, or an essential ultrastructure deviation in more than 20% of the square cuts (e.g. reduced number of dynein arms). Biopsy of the ciliated mucosa is usually required for the above criteria and is studied by vital microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Primary and secondary ciliary dyskinesia can be distinguished by these methods and the rare case of PCD without ultrastructure deficiency ruled out. In special cases a cell culture is recommended for the diagnosis. Practical aspects of the sampling methods and diagnostic pitfalls are reviewed.

  16. Dopamine receptors reveal an essential role of IFT-B, KIF17, and Rab23 in delivering specific receptors to primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Leaf, Alison; Von Zastrow, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate physiological signaling by primary cilia depends on the specific targeting of particular receptors to the ciliary membrane, but how this occurs remains poorly understood. In this study, we show that D1-type dopaminergic receptors are delivered to cilia from the extra-ciliary plasma membrane by a mechanism requiring the receptor cytoplasmic tail, the intraflagellar transport complex-B (IFT-B), and ciliary kinesin KIF17. This targeting mechanism critically depends on Rab23, a small guanine nucleotide binding protein that has important effects on physiological signaling from cilia but was not known previously to be essential for ciliary delivery of any cargo. Depleting Rab23 prevents dopamine receptors from accessing the ciliary membrane. Conversely, fusion of Rab23 to a non-ciliary receptor is sufficient to drive robust, nucleotide-dependent mis-localization to the ciliary membrane. Dopamine receptors thus reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism of ciliary receptor targeting and functional role of Rab23 in promoting this process. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06996.001 PMID:26182404

  17. Dopamine receptors reveal an essential role of IFT-B, KIF17, and Rab23 in delivering specific receptors to primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Leaf, Alison; Von Zastrow, Mark

    2015-07-16

    Appropriate physiological signaling by primary cilia depends on the specific targeting of particular receptors to the ciliary membrane, but how this occurs remains poorly understood. In this study, we show that D1-type dopaminergic receptors are delivered to cilia from the extra-ciliary plasma membrane by a mechanism requiring the receptor cytoplasmic tail, the intraflagellar transport complex-B (IFT-B), and ciliary kinesin KIF17. This targeting mechanism critically depends on Rab23, a small guanine nucleotide binding protein that has important effects on physiological signaling from cilia but was not known previously to be essential for ciliary delivery of any cargo. Depleting Rab23 prevents dopamine receptors from accessing the ciliary membrane. Conversely, fusion of Rab23 to a non-ciliary receptor is sufficient to drive robust, nucleotide-dependent mis-localization to the ciliary membrane. Dopamine receptors thus reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism of ciliary receptor targeting and functional role of Rab23 in promoting this process.

  18. The Role for HNF-1β-Targeted Collectrin in Maintenance of Primary Cilia and Cell Polarity in Collecting Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanling; Wada, Jun; Yasuhara, Akihiro; Iseda, Izumi; Eguchi, Jun; Fukui, Kenji; Yang, Qin; Yamagata, Kazuya; Hiesberger, Thomas; Igarashi, Peter; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Haiyan; Akagi, Shigeru; Kanwar, Yashpal S.; Makino, Hirofumi

    2007-01-01

    Collectrin, a homologue of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), is a type I transmembrane protein, and we originally reported its localization to the cytoplasm and apical membrane of collecting duct cells. Recently, two independent studies of targeted disruption of collectrin in mice resulted in severe and general defects in renal amino acid uptake. Collectrin has been reported to be under the transcriptional regulation by HNF-1α, which is exclusively expressed in proximal tubules and localized at the luminal side of brush border membranes. The deficiency of collectrin was associated with reduction of multiple amino acid transporters on luminal membranes. In the current study, we describe that collectrin is a target of HNF-1β and heavily expressed in the primary cilium of renal collecting duct cells. Collectrin is also localized in the vesicles near the peri-basal body region and binds to γ-actin-myosin II-A, SNARE, and polycystin-2-polaris complexes, and all of these are involved in intracellular and ciliary movement of vesicles and membrane proteins. Treatment of mIMCD3 cells with collectrin siRNA resulted in defective cilium formation, increased cell proliferation and apoptosis, and disappearance of polycystin-2 in the primary cilium. Suppression of collectrin mRNA in metanephric culture resulted in the formation of multiple longitudinal cysts in ureteric bud branches. Taken together, the cystic change and formation of defective cilium with the interference in the collectrin functions would suggest that it is necessary for recycling of the primary cilia-specific membrane proteins, the maintenance of the primary cilia and cell polarity of collecting duct cells. The transcriptional hierarchy between HNF-1β and PKD (polycystic kidney disease) genes expressed in the primary cilia of collecting duct cells has been suggested, and collectrin is one of such HNF-1β regulated genes. PMID:17476336

  19. Cilia and coordination of signaling networks during heart development

    PubMed Central

    Koefoed, Karen; Veland, Iben Rønn; Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Larsen, Lars Allan; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are unique sensory organelles that coordinate a wide variety of different signaling pathways to control cellular processes during development and in tissue homeostasis. Defects in function or assembly of these antenna-like structures are therefore associated with a broad range of developmental disorders and diseases called ciliopathies. Recent studies have indicated a major role of different populations of cilia, including nodal and cardiac primary cilia, in coordinating heart development, and defects in these cilia are associated with congenital heart disease. Here, we present an overview of the role of nodal and cardiac primary cilia in heart development. PMID:24345806

  20. Intraflagellar Transport Protein 172 is essential for primary cilia formation and plays a vital role in patterning the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Gorivodsky, Marat; Mukhopadhyay, Mahua; Wilsch-Braeuninger, Michaela; Phillips, Matthew; Teufel, Andreas; Kim, Changmee; Malik, Nasir; Huttner, Wieland; Westphal, Heiner

    2008-01-01

    IFT172, also known as Selective Lim-domain Binding protein (SLB), is a component of the Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) complex. In order to evaluate the biological role of the Ift172 gene, we generated a loss-of-function mutation in the mouse. The resulting Slb mutant embryos die between E12.5–13.0, and exhibit severe cranio-facial malformations, failure to close the cranial neural tube, holoprosencephaly, heart edema and extensive hemorrhages. Cilia outgrowth in cells of the neuroepithelium is initiated but the axonemes are severely truncated and do not contain visible microtubules. Morphological and molecular analyses revealed a global brain-patterning defect along the dorsal-ventral (DV) and anterior-posterior (AP) axes. We demonstrate that Ift172 gene function is required for early regulation of Fgf8 at the midbrain-hindbrain boundary and maintenance of the isthmic organizer. In addition, Ift172 is required for proper function of the embryonic node, the early embryonic organizer and for formation of the head organizing center (the anterior mesendoderm, or AME). We propose a model suggesting that forebrain and mid-hindbrain growth and AP patterning depends on the early function of Ift172 at gastrulation. Our data suggest that the formation and function of the node and AME in the mouse embryo relies on an indispensable role of Ift172 in cilia morphogenesis and cilia-mediated signaling. PMID:18930042

  1. Cilia ultrastructure in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    McLean, Laurie; MacCormick, Johnna; Robb, Ian; Carpenter, Blair; Pothos, Mary

    2003-12-01

    Chronic sinusitis, otitis media with effusion, and upper respiratory tract infections are commonly found in patients with Down syndrome. These diseases are generally felt to be secondary to depressed immune function and altered craniofacial dimensions. Recently, a cilia ultrastructure abnormality was found in a child with Down syndrome. This study is the first to be carried out to determine if cilia ultrastructure abnormalities are prevalent in the population with Down syndrome. Four of 10 patients had documented cilia abnormalities, but these were present in the background of normal cilia, suggesting that they were the result rather than the cause of chronic sinusitis. Similarly, nasal epithelium metaplasia was detected in 50% of the patients. Chronic sinusitis, otitis media with effusion, and recurrent upper respiratory tract infections in children with Down syndrome cannot generally be attributed to primary cilia ultrastructure abnormalities.

  2. Cilia organize ependymal planar polarity.

    PubMed

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Han, Young-Goo; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2010-02-17

    Multiciliated epithelial cells, called ependymal cells, line the ventricles in the adult brain. Most ependymal cells are born prenatally and are derived from radial glia. Ependymal cells have a remarkable planar polarization that determines orientation of ciliary beating and propulsion of CSF. Disruption of ependymal ciliary beating, by injury or disease, results in aberrant CSF circulation and hydrocephalus, a common disorder of the CNS. Very little is known about the mechanisms guiding ependymal planar polarity and whether this organization is acquired during ependymal cell development or is already present in radial glia. Here we show that basal bodies in ependymal cells in the lateral ventricle walls of adult mice are polarized in two ways: (1) rotational; angle of individual basal bodies with respect to their long axis and (2) translational; the position of basal bodies on the apical surface of the cell. Conditional ablation of motile cilia disrupted rotational orientation, but translational polarity was largely preserved. In contrast, translational polarity was dramatically affected when radial glial primary cilia were ablated earlier in development. Remarkably, radial glia in the embryo have a translational polarity that predicts the orientation of mature ependymal cells. These results suggest that ependymal planar cell polarity is a multistep process initially organized by primary cilia in radial glia and then refined by motile cilia in ependymal cells.

  3. Cilia organize ependymal planar polarity

    PubMed Central

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Han, Young-Goo; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Multi-ciliated epithelial cells, called ependymal cells, line the ventricles in the adult brain. Most ependymal cells are born prenatally and are derived from radial glia. Ependymal cells have a remarkable planar polarization that determines orientation of ciliary beating and propulsion of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Disruption of ependymal ciliary beating, by injury or disease, results in aberrant CSF circulation and hydrocephalus, a common disorder of the central nervous system. Very little is known about the mechanisms guiding ependymal planar polarity and whether this organization is acquired during ependymal cell development or is already present in radial glia. Here we show that basal bodies in ependymal cells in the lateral ventricle walls of adult mice are polarized in two ways: i) rotational; angle of individual basal bodies with respect to their long axis and ii) translational; the position of basal bodies on the apical surface of the cell. Conditional ablation of motile cilia disrupted rotational orientation, but translational polarity was largely preserved. In contrast, translational polarity was dramatically affected when radial glial primary cilia were ablated earlier in development. Remarkably, radial glia in the embryo have a translational polarity that predicts the orientation of mature ependymal cells. These results suggest that ependymal planar cell polarity is a multi-step process initially organized by primary cilia in radial glia and then refined by motile cilia in ependymal cells. PMID:20164345

  4. Cilia in the nervous system: linking cilia function and neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji E.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Ciliopathies are genetic disorders caused by defects of primary ciliary structure and/or function and are characterized by pleiotropic clinical features. The ciliopathies include several partially overlapping syndromes such as Joubert syndrome, Bardet–Biedl syndrome and Meckel–Gruber syndrome, all of which have pronounced neurodevelopmental features. Here we focus on potential roles of cilia in central nervous system function, to explore how impairments may cause brain malformation and neurodevelopmental disease. Recent findings Cilia have long been considered as ‘sensory cellular antennae’, responding as chemo-sensors, mechano-sensors and thermo-sensors, although their roles in development were not well understood until recently. The surprising finding that disparate syndromes are all due to defects of the primary cilia, along with the recent advances in genetics, has helped elucidate further roles of primary cilia beyond sensory functions. Several molecules that are associated with key signaling pathways have been discovered in primary cilia. These include sonic hedgehog, wingless, planar cell polarity and fibroblast growth factor, which are essential for many cellular processes. Additionally, mutations in ‘ciliome’ genes have largely shown developmental defects such as abnormal body axis and brain malformation, implying disrupted cilia-related signaling pathways. Accordingly, the emerging theme is that primary cilia may play roles as modulators of signal transduction to help shape cellular responses within the environmental context during both development and homeostasis. Summary The link between cilia and signal pathways has become a framework for understanding the pathogenesis of ciliopathies. Despite recent progress in ciliary biology, fundamental questions remain about how cilia regulate neuronal function in the central nervous system. Therefore, investigation of ciliary function in the nervous system may reveal cilia

  5. Cilia in the nervous system: linking cilia function and neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji E; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2011-04-01

    Ciliopathies are genetic disorders caused by defects of primary ciliary structure and/or function and are characterized by pleiotropic clinical features. The ciliopathies include several partially overlapping syndromes such as Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome and Meckel-Gruber syndrome, all of which have pronounced neurodevelopmental features. Here we focus on potential roles of cilia in central nervous system function, to explore how impairments may cause brain malformation and neurodevelopmental disease. Cilia have long been considered as 'sensory cellular antennae', responding as chemo-sensors, mechano-sensors and thermo-sensors, although their roles in development were not well understood until recently. The surprising finding that disparate syndromes are all due to defects of the primary cilia, along with the recent advances in genetics, has helped elucidate further roles of primary cilia beyond sensory functions. Several molecules that are associated with key signaling pathways have been discovered in primary cilia. These include sonic hedgehog, wingless, planar cell polarity and fibroblast growth factor, which are essential for many cellular processes. Additionally, mutations in 'ciliome' genes have largely shown developmental defects such as abnormal body axis and brain malformation, implying disrupted cilia-related signaling pathways. Accordingly, the emerging theme is that primary cilia may play roles as modulators of signal transduction to help shape cellular responses within the environmental context during both development and homeostasis. The link between cilia and signal pathways has become a framework for understanding the pathogenesis of ciliopathies. Despite recent progress in ciliary biology, fundamental questions remain about how cilia regulate neuronal function in the central nervous system. Therefore, investigation of ciliary function in the nervous system may reveal cilia-modulating mechanisms in neurodevelopmental processes, as well

  6. Development and Distribution of Neuronal Cilia in Mouse Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, Jon I.; Guadiana, Sarah M.; Breunig, Joshua J.; Rakic, Pasko; Sarkisian, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal primary cilia are not generally recognized, but they are considered to extend from most, if not all, neurons in the neocortex. However, when and how cilia develop in neurons are not known. This study used immunohistochemistry for adenylyl cyclase III (ACIII), a marker of primary cilia, and electron microscopic analysis to describe the development and maturation of cilia in mouse neocortical neurons. Our results indicate that ciliogenesis is initiated in late fetal stages after neuroblast migration, when the mother centriole docks with the plasma membrane, becomes a basal body, and grows a cilia bud that we call a procilium. This procilium consists of a membranous protrusion extending from the basal body but lacking axonemal structure and remains undifferentiated until development of the axoneme and cilia elongation starts at about postnatal day 4. Neuronal cilia elongation and final cilia length depend on layer position, and the process extends for a long time, lasting 8–12 weeks. We show that, in addition to pyramidal neurons, inhibitory interneurons also grow cilia of comparable length, suggesting that cilia are indeed present in all neocortical neuron subtypes. Furthermore, the study of mice with defective ciliogenesis suggested that failed elongation of cilia is not essential for proper neuronal migration and laminar organization or establishment of neuronal polarity. Thus, the function of this organelle in neocortical neurons remains elusive. PMID:22020803

  7. Structure and function of mammalian cilia

    PubMed Central

    Satir, Peter

    2008-01-01

    In the past half century, beginning with electron microscopic studies of 9 + 2 motile and 9 + 0 primary cilia, novel insights have been obtained regarding the structure and function of mammalian cilia. All cilia can now be viewed as sensory cellular antennae that coordinate a large number of cellular signaling pathways, sometimes coupling the signaling to ciliary motility or alternatively to cell division and differentiation. This view has had unanticipated consequences for our understanding of developmental processes and human disease. PMID:18365235

  8. Microscopic study of dental hard tissues in primary teeth with Dentinogenesis Imperfecta Type II: Correlation of 3D imaging using X-ray microtomography and polarising microscopy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Graham R; Fearne, Janice M; Sabel, Nina; Norén, Jörgen G

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the histological appearance of dental hard tissues in primary teeth from children with DI using conventional polarised light microscopy and correlate that with 3D imaging using X-ray microtomograpy (XMT) to gain a further understanding of the dentine structure of teeth diagnosed with dentinogenesis imperfecta. Undecalcified sections of primary teeth from patients diagnosed with Dentinogenesis Imperfecta Type II were examined using polarised light microscopy. XMT was employed for 3D-imaging and analysis of the dentine. The polarised light microscopy and XMT revealed tubular structures in the dentine seen as vacuoles coinciding with the path of normal dentinal tubules but not continuous tubules. The size of the tubules was close to that of capillaries. The largest tubular structures had a direction corresponding to where the pulp tissue would have been located during primary dentine formation. The dysfunctional mineralisation of the dentine and obliteration of the pulp evidently leaves blood vessels in the dentine which have in the main been tied off and, in the undecalcified sections, appear as vacuoles. Although from radiographs, the pulp in teeth affected by Dentinogenesis Imperfect type II appears to be completely obliterated, a network of interconnected vessels may remain. The presence of large dentinal tubules and blood vessels, or the remnants of blood vessels, could provide a pathway for bacteria from the oral cavity. This might account for why some of these teeth develop periapical abscesses in spite of apparently having no pulp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. STUDIES ON CILIA

    PubMed Central

    Satir, Peter

    1963-01-01

    Upon excision into spring water, the lateral cilia of the gill of the freshwater mussel Elliptio complanatus (Solander) stop beating, but 0.04 M potassium ion can activate the gill so that these cilia again beat with metachronal rhythm. One per cent osmium tetroxide quickly pipetted onto a fully activated gill fixes the lateral cilia in a pattern that preserves the form and arrangement of the metachronal wave, and permits the cilia to be studied with the electron microscope in all stages of their beat cycle. Changes are seen in the fixed active preparation that are not present in the inactive control, i.e., in the packing of the cilia, the position of the axis of the ciliary cross-section, and the diameter of the ring of peripheral filaments. Analysis of these parameters may lead to new correlations between ciliary fine structure and function. PMID:14079494

  10. Polarisation vision: beetles see circularly polarised light.

    PubMed

    Warrant, Eric J

    2010-07-27

    It has long been known that the iridescent cuticle of many scarab beetles reflects circularly polarised light. It now turns out that scarabs can also see this light, potentially using it as a covert visual signal.

  11. Cilia in the CNS: the Quiet Organelle Claims Center Stage

    PubMed Central

    Louvi, Angeliki; Grove, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The primary cilium is a cellular organelle that is almost ubiquitous in eukaryotes, yet its functions in vertebrates have been slow to emerge. The last fifteen years have been marked by accelerating insight into the biology of primary cilia, arising from the synergy of three major lines of research. These research programs describe a specialized mode of protein trafficking in cilia, reveal that genetic disruptions of primary cilia cause complex human disease syndromes, and establish that Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction requires the primary cilium. New lines of research have branched off to investigate the role of primary cilia in neuronal signaling, adult neurogenesis, and brain tumor formation. We review a fast expanding literature to determine what we now know about the primary cilium in the developing and adult CNS, and what new directions should lead to further clarity. PMID:21435552

  12. High expression of the taurine transporter TauT in primary cilia of NIH3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Søren T; Voss, Jesper W; Teilmann, Stefan C; Lambert, Ian H

    2005-05-01

    Taurine, present in high concentrations in various mammalian cells, is essential for regulation of cell volume, cellular oxidative status as well as the cellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Cellular taurine content is a balance between active uptake through the saturable, Na(+)-dependent taurine transporter TauT, and passive release via a volume-sensitive leak pathway. Here we demonstrate that: (i) TauT localizes to the primary cilium of growth-arrested NIH3T3 fibroblasts, (ii) long-term exposure to TNF(alpha) or hypertonic sucrose medium, i.e., growth medium supplemented with 100 mM sucrose, increases ciliary TauT expression and (iii) long-term exposure to hypertonic taurine medium, i.e., growth medium supplemented with 100 mM taurine, reduces ciliary TauT expression. These results point to an important role of taurine in the regulation of physiological processes located to the primary cilium.

  13. Chemically inducible diffusion trap at cilia reveals molecular sieve-like barrier.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Chun; Niewiadomski, Pawel; Lin, Benjamin; Nakamura, Hideki; Phua, Siew Cheng; Jiao, John; Levchenko, Andre; Inoue, Takafumi; Rohatgi, Rajat; Inoue, Takanari

    2013-07-01

    Primary cilia function as specialized compartments for signal transduction. The stereotyped structure and signaling function of cilia inextricably depend on the selective segregation of molecules in cilia. However, the fundamental principles governing the access of soluble proteins to primary cilia remain unresolved. We developed a methodology termed 'chemically inducible diffusion trap at cilia' to visualize the diffusion process of a series of fluorescent proteins ranging in size from 3.2 nm to 7.9 nm into primary cilia. We found that the interior of the cilium was accessible to proteins as large as 7.9 nm. The kinetics of ciliary accumulation of this panel of proteins was exponentially limited by their Stokes radii. Quantitative modeling suggests that the diffusion barrier operates as a molecular sieve at the base of cilia. Our study presents a set of powerful, generally applicable tools for the quantitative monitoring of ciliary protein diffusion under both physiological and pathological conditions.

  14. Gli2a protein localization reveals a role for Iguana/DZIP1 in primary ciliogenesis and a dependence of Hedgehog signal transduction on primary cilia in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In mammalian cells, the integrity of the primary cilium is critical for proper regulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction pathway. Whether or not this dependence on the primary cilium is a universal feature of vertebrate Hedgehog signalling has remained contentious due, in part, to the apparent divergence of the intracellular transduction pathway between mammals and teleost fish. Results Here, using a functional Gli2-GFP fusion protein, we show that, as in mammals, the Gli2 transcription factor localizes to the primary cilia of cells in the zebrafish embryo and that this localization is modulated by the activity of the Hh pathway. Moreover, we show that the Igu/DZIP1protein, previously implicated in the modulation of Gli activity in zebrafish, also localizes to the primary cilium and is required for its proper formation. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate a conserved role of the primary cilium in mediating Hedgehog signalling activity across the vertebrate phylum and validate the use of the zebrafish as a representative model for the in vivo analysis of vertebrate Hedgehog signalling. PMID:20487519

  15. Cilia and polycystic kidney disease, kith and kin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liwei; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2014-06-01

    In the past decade, cilia have been found to play important roles in renal cystogenesis. Many genes, such as PKD1 and PKD2 which, when mutated, cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), have been found to localize to primary cilia. The cilium functions as a sensor to transmit extracellular signals into the cell. Abnormal cilia structure and function are associated with the development of polyscystic kidney disease (PKD). Cilia assembly includes centriole migration to the apical surface of the cell, ciliary vesicle docking and fusion with the cell membrane at the intended site of cilium outgrowth, and microtubule growth from the basal body. This review summarizes the most recent advances in cilia and PKD research, with special emphasis on the mechanisms of cytoplasmic and intraciliary protein transport during ciliogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cilia and Polycystic Kidney Disease, Kith and Kin

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liwei; Lipschutz, Joshua H.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, cilia have been found to play important roles in renal cystogenesis. Many genes, such as PKD1 and PKD2 which, when mutated, cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), have been found to localize to primary cilia. The cilium functions as a sensor to transmit extracellular signals into the cell. Abnormal cilia structure and function are associated with the development of polyscystic kidney disease (PKD). Cilia assembly includes centriole migration to the apical surface of the cell, ciliary vesicle docking and fusion with the cell membrane at the intended site of cilium outgrowth, and microtubule growth from the basal body. This review summarizes the most recent advances in cilia and PKD research, with special emphasis on the mechanisms of cytoplasmic and intraciliary protein transport during ciliogenesis. PMID:24898006

  17. The Role of Cilia in the Pathogenesis of Cystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dell, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Primary (immotile) cilia are specialized organelles present on most cell types. Almost all of proteins associated with a broad spectrum of human cystic kidney diseases have been localized to the region in or around the cilia. Abnormal cilia structure and/or function have been reported in animal models and human cystic kidneys. The goal of this review is to discuss current understanding of the mechanisms by which abnormal genes/proteins and cilia interact to potentially influence renal cystogenesis. Recent findings Novel direct recording of cilia calcium levels/channel activity suggest that cilia form a calcium-mediated signaling microenvironment separate from the cytoplasm, which could provide a mechanism for cilia-specific downstream signaling. Genetic-based studies confirm that cilia are not required for cystogenesis but modulate cystic kidney disease severity through a novel, undefined mechanism. Mechanisms by which both cilia-associated and non-cilia associated proteins can alter cilia structure/function have also been identified. Summary Considerable progress has been made in defining the mechanisms by which abnormal genes and proteins affect cilia structure and function. However, the exact mechanisms by which these interactions cause renal cyst formation and progression of cystic kidney disease are still unknown. PMID:25575298

  18. Cilia/Ift protein and motor -related bone diseases and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential cellular organelles projecting from the cell surface to sense and transduce developmental signaling. They are tiny but have complicated structures containing microtubule (MT)-based internal structures (the axoneme) and mother centriole formed basal body. Intraflagellar transport (Ift) operated by Ift proteins and motors are indispensable for cilia formation and function. Mutations in Ift proteins or Ift motors cause various human diseases, some of which have severe bone defects. Over the last few decades, major advances have occurred in understanding the roles of these proteins and cilia in bone development and remodeling by examining cilia/Ift protein-related human diseases and establishing mouse transgenic models. In this review, we describe current advances in the understanding of the cilia/Ift structure and function. We further summarize cilia/Ift-related human diseases and current mouse models with an emphasis on bone-related phenotypes, cilia morphology, and signaling pathways.

  19. The Kinesin-4 Protein KIF7 Regulates Mammalian Hedgehog Signaling by Organizing the Cilia Tip Compartment

    PubMed Central

    He, Mu; Subramanian, Radhika; Bangs, Fiona; Omelchenko, Tatiana; Liem, Karel F.; Kapoor, Tarun M.; Anderson, Kathryn V.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction requires the primary cilium, a microtubule-based organelle, and the Gli/Sufu complexes that mediate Hh signaling are enriched at cilia tips. KIF7, a kinesin-4 family protein, is a conserved regulator of the Hh signaling pathway and a human ciliopathy protein. Here we show that KIF7 localizes to cilia tips, the site of microtubule plus-ends, where it limits cilia length and controls cilia structure. Purified recombinant KIF7 binds the plus-ends of growing microtubules in vitro, where it reduces the rate of microtubule growth and increases the frequency of microtubule catastrophe. KIF7 is not required for normal intraflagellar transport or for trafficking of Hh pathway proteins into cilia. Instead, a central function of KIF7 in the mammalian Hh pathway is to control cilia architecture and to create a single cilia tip compartment where Gli/Sufu activation can be correctly regulated. PMID:24952464

  20. Cilia/Ift protein and motor-related bone diseases and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential cellular organelles projecting from the cell surface to sense and transduce developmental signaling. They are tiny but have complicated structures containing microtubule (MT)-based internal structures (the axoneme) and mother centriole formed basal body. Intraflagellar transport (Ift) operated by Ift proteins and motors are indispensable for cilia formation and function. Mutations in Ift proteins or Ift motors cause various human diseases, some of which have severe bone defects. Over the last few decades, major advances have occurred in understanding the roles of these proteins and cilia in bone development and remodeling by examining cilia/Ift protein-related human diseases and establishing mouse transgenic models. In this review, we describe current advances in the understanding of the cilia/Ift structure and function. We further summarize cilia/Ift-related human diseases and current mouse models with an emphasis on bone-related phenotypes, cilia morphology, and signaling pathways. PMID:25553465

  1. The role of cilia in the pathogenesis of cystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Dell, Katherine M

    2015-04-01

    Primary (immotile) cilia are specialized organelles present on most cell types. Almost all of proteins associated with a broad spectrum of human cystic kidney diseases have been localized to the region in or around the cilia. Abnormal cilia structure and function have both been reported in animal models and human cystic kidneys. The goal of this review is to discuss current understanding of the mechanisms by which abnormal genes/proteins and cilia interact to potentially influence renal cystogenesis. Novel direct recording of cilia calcium levels/channel activity suggests that cilia form a calcium-mediated signaling microenvironment separate from the cytoplasm, which could provide a mechanism for cilia-specific downstream signaling. Genetic-based studies confirm that cilia are not required for cystogenesis, but modulate cystic kidney disease severity through a novel, undefined mechanism. Mechanisms by which both cilia-associated and noncilia-associated proteins can alter cilia structure/function have also been identified. Considerable progress has been made in defining the mechanisms by which abnormal genes and proteins affect cilia structure and function. However, the exact mechanisms by which these interactions cause renal cyst formation and progression of cystic kidney disease are still unknown.

  2. Reduction of the immunostainable length of the hippocampal dentate granule cells' primary cilia in 3xAD-transgenic mice producing human A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Gaudet, Chantal; Menard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Atkinson, Trevor; LaFerla, Frank M.; Ito, Shingo; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Pra, Ilaria; Whitfield, James

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} and tau-induced neurofibrillary tangles play a key role in Alzheimer's disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}{sub 1-42} and mutant tau protein together reduce the primary cilium length. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This shortening likely reduces cilium-dependent neurogenesis and memory function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This provides a model of an A{beta}/tau targeting of a neuronal signaling organelle. -- Abstract: The hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of the two sites of continuous neurogenesis in adult rodents and humans. Virtually all dentate granule cells have a single immobile cilium with a microtubule spine or axoneme covered with a specialized cell membrane loaded with receptors such as the somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}). The signals from these receptors have been reported to stimulate neuroprogenitor proliferation and the post-mitotic maturation of newborn granule cells into functioning granule cells. We have found that in 6-24-months-old triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice (3xTg-AD) producing both A{beta}{sub 1-42} and the mutant human tau protein tau{sub P301L,} the dentate granule cells still had immunostainable SSTR3- and p75{sup NTR}-bearing cilia but they were only half the length of the immunostained cilia in the corresponding wild-type mice. However, the immunostainable length of the granule cell cilia was not reduced either in 2xTg-AD mice accumulating large amounts of A{beta}{sub 1-42} or in mice accumulating only a mutant human tau protein. Thus it appears that a combination of A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau protein accumulation affects the levels of functionally important receptors in 3xTg-AD mice. These observations raise the important possibility that structural and functional changes in granule cell cilia might have a role in AD.

  3. STUDIES ON CILIA

    PubMed Central

    Satir, Peter

    1968-01-01

    This study confirms and extends previous work on the lateral cilia of the fresh-water mussel, Elliptio complanatus, in support of a "sliding filament" mechanism of ciliary motility wherein peripheral filaments (microtubules) do not change length during beat (see Satir, 1967). Short sequences of serial sections of tips are examined in control (nonbeating) and activated (metachronal wave) preparations. Several different tip types, functional rather than morphogenetic variants, are demonstrated, but similarly bent cilia have similar tips. The peripheral filaments are composed of two subfibers: a and b. The bent regions of cilia are in the form of circular arcs, and apparent differences in subfiber-b length at the tip are those predicted solely by geometry of the stroke without the necessity of assuming filament contraction. Various subfibers b apparently move with respect to one another during beat, since small systematic variations in relative position can be detected from cilium to cilium. While subfiber-b lengths are uniform throughout, subfiber-a lengths are morphologically different for each filament: 8 and 3 are about 0.8 µ longer than 1, 4 and 5, but each unique length is independent of stroke position or tip type. Subfiber-a does not contract, nor does it move, e.g. slide, with respect to subfiber-b of the same doublet. The central pair of filaments extends to the tip of the cilium where its members fuse. Subunit assembly in ciliary microtubules is evidently precise. This may be of importance in establishing the relationships needed for mechanochemical interactions that produce sliding and beat. PMID:5678451

  4. Overview of structure and function of mammalian cilia.

    PubMed

    Satir, Peter; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2007-01-01

    Cilia are membrane-bounded, centriole-derived projections from the cell surface that contain a microtubule cytoskeleton, the ciliary axoneme, surrounded by a ciliary membrane. Axonemes in multiciliated cells of mammalian epithelia are 9 + 2, possess dynein arms, and are motile. In contrast, single nonmotile 9 + 0 primary cilia are found on epithelial cells, such as those of the kidney tubule, but also on nonepithelial cells, such as chondrocytes, fibroblasts, and neurons. The ciliary membranes of all cilia contain specific receptors and ion channel proteins that initiate signaling pathways controlling motility and/or linking mechanical or chemical stimuli, including sonic hedgehog and growth factors, to intracellular transduction cascades regulating differentiation, migration, and cell growth during development and in adulthood. Unique motile 9 + 0 cilia, found during development at the embryonic node, determine left-right asymmetry of the body.

  5. Tau polarisation at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemany, Ricard

    1999-04-01

    The measurements of the tau polarisation at LEP I are reviewed. Special emphasis is given to the new preliminary results presented at this conference. The ALEPH collaboration has studied the polarisation as a function of the polar angle using a new method based on the tau direction reconstruction and fully exploiting the angular correlations. A second traditional approach, based on the single tau decays has been also developed. The DELPHI collaboration has also studied the full data sample using an individual tau decay method and an inclusive hadronic selection. The results from the four experiments are presented with discussion of the compatibility among the methods and experiments.

  6. Polarisation properties of pulsars at optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, Roberto; Marelli, Martino; Shearer, Andrew; Slowikowska, Agnieszka

    2016-07-01

    Polarisation measurements of pulsars offer unique insights into their highly-magnetised relativistic environments and represent a primary test for neutron star magnetosphere models and radiation emission mechanisms. Besides the radio band, optical observations have been, so far, best suited to these goals, with polarisation measurements in the X-rays becoming possible in the near future thanks to missions, such as XIPE and IXPE. In this talk, we review the status of the optical polarisation measurements of pulsars and we foresee possible synergies between X-ray polarimetry observations of selected pulsars with, e.g XIPE and IXPE, and optical observations with the next generation of extremely large telescope, such as the E-ELT.

  7. STUDIES ON CILIA

    PubMed Central

    Satir, Peter

    1965-01-01

    Termination of peripheral filaments of the axoneme of gill cilia of fresh-water mussels (Elliptio or Anodonta) occurs in characteristic fashion: (a) subfiber b of certain doublets ends leaving a single simplified tubular unit; (b) the wall of the unit becomes thick and may even obliterate the interior; and (c) the filament drops out of the 9 + 2 pattern. The order in which doublets begin simplifying is also characteristic. This may be determined by numbering the filaments, those with the bridge being 5–6, with the direction of numbering determined by the apparent enantiomorphic configuration (I to IV) of the cross-section. Shorter filaments can be identified in simplifying tips with mixed double and single peripheral units. In this material, laterofrontal cirri show a morphological specialization in the region where individual cilia simplify. The cilia studied run frontally from the body of the cirrus and point in the direction of effective stroke. The longest filaments (Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7) appear as the doublets at the bottom of the cross-section, nearest the surface of the cell of origin. Above them, and above the central pair, a dark band (a section of a dense rod) runs through the matrix. The remaining filaments are the single units. Effective-pointing frontal and lateral ciliary tips end in a fashion similar to laterofrontal tips, although no dense band is present. For all effective-pointing tips studied, the order in which the peripheral filaments end appears to be Nos. (9, 1), 8, 2, 7, 6, 3, 4, 5. However, recovery-pointing lateral tips show a different order: Nos. 7, 6, 8, 5, 9, 4, 1 (3, 2), although the longer filaments are still at the bottom of the cross-section. In simple models of ciliary movement involving contraction of the peripheral filaments, filaments at the top of the cross-section should be longer, if any are. Such models are not supported by the evidence here. These results can be interpreted as supporting sliding-filament models of movement

  8. Hydrodynamic Phase Locking in Mouse Node Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Ishikawa, Takuji; Hamada, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    Rotational movement of mouse node cilia generates leftward fluid flow in the node cavity, playing an important role in left-right determination in the embryo. Although rotation of numerous cilia was believed necessary to trigger the determination, recent reports indicate the action of two cilia to be sufficient. We examine cooperative cilia movement via hydrodynamic interaction. Results show cilia to be cooperative, having phases locked in a certain relation; a system with a pair of nonidentical cilia can achieve phase-locked states more easily than one with a pair of identical cilia.

  9. The ciliary Evc/Evc2 complex interacts with Smo and controls Hedgehog pathway activity in chondrocytes by regulating Sufu/Gli3 dissociation and Gli3 trafficking in primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Caparrós-Martín, Jose A; Valencia, María; Reytor, Edel; Pacheco, María; Fernandez, Margarita; Perez-Aytes, Antonio; Gean, Esther; Lapunzina, Pablo; Peters, Heiko; Goodship, Judith A; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is involved in patterning and morphogenesis of most organs in the developing mammalian embryo. Despite many advances in understanding core components of the pathway, little is known about how the activity of the Hh pathway is adjusted in organ- and tissue-specific developmental processes. Mutations in EVC or EVC2 disrupt Hh signaling in tooth and bone development. Using mouse models, we show here that Evc and Evc2 are mutually required for localizing to primary cilia and also for maintaining their normal protein levels. Consistent with Evc and Evc2 functioning as a complex, the skeletal phenotypes in either single or double homozygous mutant mice are virtually indistinguishable. Smo translocation to the cilium was normal in Evc2-deficient chondrocytes following Hh activation with the Smo-agonist SAG. However, Gli3 recruitment to cilia tips was reduced and Sufu/Gli3 dissociation was impaired. Interestingly, we found Smo to co-precipitate with Evc/Evc2, indicating that in some cells Hh signaling requires direct interaction of Smo with the Evc/Evc2 complex. Expression of a dominantly acting Evc2 mutation previously identified in Weyer's acrodental dysostosis (Evc2Δ43) caused mislocalization of Evc/Evc2Δ43 within the cilium and also reproduced the Gli3-related molecular defects observed in Evc2(-/-) chondrocytes. Moreover, Evc silencing in Sufu(-/-) cells attenuated the output of the Hh pathway, suggesting that Evc/Evc2 also promote Hh signaling in the absence of Sufu. Together our data reveal that the Hh pathway involves Evc/Evc2-dependent modulations that are necessary for normal endochondral bone formation.

  10. Evaluating efficiency and robustness in cilia design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanliang; Kanso, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Motile cilia are used by many eukaryotic cells to transport flow. Cilia-driven flows are important to many physiological functions, yet a deep understanding of the interplay between the mechanical structure of cilia and their physiological functions in healthy and diseased conditions remains elusive. To develop such an understanding, one needs a quantitative framework to assess cilia performance and robustness when subject to perturbations in the cilia apparatus. Here we link cilia design (beating patterns) to function (flow transport) in the context of experimentally and theoretically derived cilia models. We particularly examine the optimality and robustness of cilia design. Optimality refers to efficiency of flow transport, while robustness is defined as low sensitivity to variations in the design parameters. We find that suboptimal designs can be more robust than optimal ones. That is, designing for the most efficient cilium does not guarantee robustness. These findings have significant implications on the understanding of cilia design in artificial and biological systems.

  11. Antennas of organ morphogenesis: the roles of cilia in vertebrate kidney development

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Amanda N.; Li, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cilia arose early during eukaryotic evolution, and their structural components are highly conserved from the simplest protists to complex metazoan species. In recent years, the role of cilia in the ontogeny of vertebrate organs has received increasing attention due to a staggering correlation between human disease and dysfunctional cilia. In particular, the presence of cilia in both the developing and mature kidney has become a deep area of research due to ciliopathies common to the kidney, such as polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Interestingly, mutations in genes encoding proteins that localize to the cilia cause similar cystic phenotypes in kidneys of various vertebrates, suggesting an essential role for cilia in kidney organogenesis and homeostasis as well. Importantly, the genes so far identified in kidney disease have conserved functions across species, whose kidneys include both primary and motile cilia. Here, we aim to provide a comprehensive description of cilia and their role in kidney development, as well as highlight the usefulness of the zebrafish embryonic kidney as a model to further understand the function of cilia in kidney health. PMID:27389733

  12. Double Polarisation Observables at Pax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekipelov, M.

    2009-04-01

    A polarised antiproton beam at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, proposed by the PAX collaboration, will provide new physics possibilities, uniquely accessible at the planned High Energy Storage Ring at FAIR. Our proposal to realise an asymmetric collider, in which polarised antiprotons with momenta of about 3.5 GeV/c collide with polarised protons with momenta up to 15 GeV/c, is well suited to perform a direct measurement of the transversity distribution function h1.

  13. Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase and Somatostatin Receptor 3 Expression Persists in Aged Rat Neocortical and Hippocampal Neuronal Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Guadiana, Sarah M.; Parker, Alexander K.; Filho, Gileno F.; Sequeira, Ashton; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Shaw, Gerry; Mandel, Ronald J.; Foster, Thomas C.; Kumar, Ashok; Sarkisian, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilia of forebrain neurons assemble around birth and become enriched with neuromodulatory receptors. Our understanding of the permanence of these structures and their associated signaling pathways in the aging brain is poor, but they are worthy of investigation because disruptions in neuronal cilia signaling have been implicated in changes in learning and memory, depression-like symptoms, and sleep anomalies. Here, we asked whether neurons in aged forebrain retain primary cilia and whether the staining characteristics of aged cilia for type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and pericentrin resemble those of cilia in younger forebrain. To test this, we analyzed immunostained sections of forebrain tissues taken from young and aged male Fischer 344 (F344) and F344 × Brown Norway (F344 × BN) rats. Analyses of ACIII and SSTR3 in young and aged cortices of both strains of rats revealed that the staining patterns in the neocortex and hippocampus were comparable. Virtually every NeuN positive cell examined possessed an ACIII positive cilium. The lengths of ACIII positive cilia in neocortex were similar between young and aged for both strains, whereas in F344 × BN hippocampus, the cilia lengths increased with age in CA1 and CA3, but not in dentate gyrus (DG). Additionally, the percentages of ACIII positive cilia that were also SSTR3 positive did not differ between young and aged tissues in either strain. We also found that pericentrin, a protein that localizes to the basal bodies of neuronal cilia and functions in primary cilia assembly, persisted in aged cortical neurons of both rat strains. Collectively, our data show that neurons in aged rat forebrain possess primary cilia and that these cilia, like those present in younger brain, continue to localize ACIII, SSTR3, and pericentrin. Further studies will be required to determine if the function and signaling pathways regulated by cilia are similar in aged compared to young brain

  14. Fluid pumping using magnetic cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasoge, Srinivas; Ballard, Matt; Alexeev, Alexander; Hesketh, Peter; Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering Team

    2016-11-01

    Using experiments and computer simulations, we examine fluid pumping by artificial magnetic cilia fabricated using surface micromachining techniques. An asymmetry in forward and recovery strokes of the elastic cilia causes the net pumping in a creeping flow regime. We show this asymmetry in the ciliary strokes is due to the change in magnetization of the elastic cilia combined with viscous force due to the fluid. Specifically, the time scale for forward stroke is mostly governed by the magnetic forces, whereas the time scale for the recovery stroke is determined by the elastic and viscous forces. These different time scales result in different cilia deformation during forward and backward strokes which in turn lead to the asymmetry in the ciliary motion. To disclose the physics of magnetic cilia pumping we use a hybrid lattice Boltzmann and lattice spring method. We validate our model by comparing the simulation results with the experimental data. The results of our study will be useful to design microfluidic systems for fluid mixing and particle manipulation including different biological particles. USDA and NSF.

  15. Role of cilia in normal pancreas function and in diseased states.

    PubMed

    diIorio, Philip; Rittenhouse, Ann R; Bortell, Rita; Jurczyk, Agata

    2014-06-01

    Primary cilia play an essential role in modulating signaling cascades that shape cellular responses to environmental cues to maintain proper tissue development. Mutations in primary cilium proteins have been linked to several rare developmental disorders, collectively known as ciliopathies. Together with other disorders associated with dysfunctional cilia/centrosomes, affected individuals have increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome, neurologic disorders, and diabetes. In pancreatic tissues, cilia are found exclusively in islet and ductal cells where they play an essential role in pancreatic tissue organization. Their absence or disorganization leads to pancreatic duct abnormalities, acinar cell loss, polarity defects, and dysregulated insulin secretion. Cilia in pancreatic tissues are hubs for cellular signaling. Many signaling components, such as Hh, Notch, and Wnt, localize to pancreatic primary cilia and are necessary for proper development of pancreatic epithelium and β-cell morphogenesis. Receptors for neuroendocrine hormones, such as Somatostatin Receptor 3, also localize to the cilium and may play a more direct role in controlling insulin secretion due to somatostatin's inhibitory function. Finally, unique calcium signaling, which is at the heart of β-cell function, also occurs in primary cilia. Whereas voltage-gated calcium channels trigger insulin secretion and serve a variety of homeostatic functions in β-cells, transient receptor potential channels regulate calcium levels within the cilium that may serve as a feedback mechanism, regulating insulin secretion. This review article summarizes our current understanding of the role of primary cilia in normal pancreas function and in the diseased state.

  16. Polarisation, key to good localisation.

    PubMed

    van Beest, Moniek; Robben, Joris H; Savelkoul, Paul J M; Hendriks, Giel; Devonald, Mark A J; Konings, Irene B M; Lagendijk, Anne K; Karet, Fiona; Deen, Peter M T

    2006-08-01

    Polarisation of cells is crucial for vectorial transport of ions and solutes. In literature, however, proteins specifically targeted to the apical or basolateral membrane are often studied in non-polarised cells. To investigate whether these data can be extrapolated to expression in polarised cells, we studied several membrane-specific proteins. In polarised MDCK cells, the Aquaporin-2 water channel resides in intracellular vesicles and apical membrane, while the vasopressin-type 2 receptor, anion-exchanger 1 (AE1) protein and E-Cadherin mainly localise to the basolateral membrane. In non-polarised MDCK cells, however, Aquaporin-2 localises, besides plasma membrane, mainly in the Golgi complex, while the others show a dispersed staining throughout the cell. Moreover, while AQP2 mutants in dominant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus are missorted to different organelles in polarised cells, they all predominantly localise to the Golgi complex in non-polarised MDCK cells. Additionally, the maturation of V2R, and likely its missorting, is affected in transiently-transfected compared to stably-transfected cells. In conclusion, we show that the use of stably-transfected polarised cells is crucial in interpreting the processing and the localisation of membrane targeted proteins.

  17. Hadron Contribution to Vacuum Polarisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davier, M.; Hoecker, A.; Malaescu, B.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-10-01

    Precision tests of the Standard Theory require theoretical predictions taking into account higher-order quantum corrections. Among these vacuum polarisation plays a predominant role. Vacuum polarisation originates from creation and annihilation of virtual particle-antiparticle states. Leptonic vacuum polarisation can be computed from quantum electrodynamics. Hadronic vacuum polarisation cannot because of the non-perturbative nature of QCD at low energy. The problem is remedied by establishing dispersion relations involving experimental data on the cross section for e+ e- annihilation into hadrons. This chapter sets the theoretical and experimental scene and reviews the progress achieved in the last decades thanks to more precise and complete data sets. Among the various applications of hadronic vacuum polarisation calculations, two are emphasised: the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the running of the fine structure constant α to the Z mass scale. They are fundamental ingredients to high precision tests of the Standard Theory.

  18. Type 3 adenylyl cyclase: a key enzyme mediating the cAMP signaling in neuronal cilia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Liyan; LeBel, Robert P; Storm, Daniel R; Chen, Xuanmao

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are rigid, centriole-derived, microtubule-based organelles present in a majority of vertebrate cells including neurons. They are considered the cellular “antennae” attuned for detecting a range of extracellular signals including photons, odorants, morphogens, hormones and mechanical forces. The ciliary microenvironment is distinct from most actin-based subcellular structures such as microvilli or synapses. In the nervous system, there is no evidence that neuronal cilia process any synaptic structure. Apparently, the structural features of neuronal cilia do not allow them to harbor any synaptic connections. Nevertheless, a large number of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) including odorant receptors, rhodopsin, Smoothened, and type 6 serotonin receptor are found in cilia, suggesting that these tiny processes largely depend on metabotropic receptors and their tuned signals to impact neuronal functions. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3), widely known as a cilia marker, is highly and predominantly expressed in olfactory sensory cilia and primary cilia throughout the brain. We discovered that ablation of AC3 in mice leads to pleiotropic phenotypes including anosmia, failure to detect mechanical stimulation of airflow, cognitive deficit, obesity, and depression-like behaviors. Multiple lines of human genetic evidence also demonstrate that AC3 is associated with obesity, major depressive disorder (MDD), sarcoidosis, and infertility, underscoring its functional importance. Here we review recent progress on AC3, a key enzyme mediating the cAMP signaling in neuronal cilia. PMID:27785336

  19. Polarisation of Planets and Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Jeremy; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna; Bott, Kimberly; Cotton, Daniel V.

    2015-11-01

    We present observations of the linear polarisation of several hot Jupiter systems with our new high-precision polarimeter HIPPI (HIgh Precision Polarimetric Instrument). By looking at the combined light of the star and planet we aim to detect the polarised light reflected from the planet's atmosphere. This can provide information on the presence of, and nature of clouds in the atmosphere, and constrain the geometric albedo of the planet. The method is applicable to both transitting and non-transitting planets, and can also be used to determine the inclination of the system, and thus the true mass for radial velocity detected planets.To predict and interpret the polarisation from such observations, we have also developed an advanced polarimetric modelling capability, by incoroporating full polarised radiative transfer into our atmospheric modelling code VSTAR. This is done using the VLIDORT vector radiative transfer solver (Spurr, 2006). The resulting code allows us to predict disc-resolved, phase-resolved, and spectrally-resolved intensity and linear polarisation for any planet, exoplanet, brown dwarf or cool star atmosphere that can be modelled with VSTAR. We have tested the code by reproducing benchmark calculations in polarised radiative transfer, and by Solar System test cases, including reproducing the classic Hansen and Hovenier (1974) calculation of the polarisation phase curves of Venus.Hansen, J.E., & Hovenier, J.W., 1974, J. Atmos. Sci., 31, 1137Spurr, R., 2006, JQSRT, 102, 316.

  20. Cholangiocyte cilia express TRPV4 and detect changes in luminal tonicity inducing bicarbonate secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gradilone, Sergio A.; Masyuk, Anatoliy I.; Splinter, Patrick L.; Banales, Jesus M.; Huang, Bing Q.; Tietz, Pamela S.; Masyuk, Tatyana V.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.

    2007-01-01

    Cholangiocytes, epithelial cells lining the biliary tree, have primary cilia extending from their apical membrane into the ductal lumen. Although important in disease, cilia also play a vital role in normal cellular functions. We reported that cholangiocyte cilia are sensory organelles responding to mechanical stimuli (i.e., luminal fluid flow) by alterations in intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP. Because cholangiocyte cilia are also ideally positioned to detect changes in composition and tonicity of bile, we hypothesized that cilia also function as osmosensors. TRPV4, a Ca2+-permeable ion channel, has been implicated in signal transduction of osmotic stimuli. Using purified rat cholangiocytes and perfused intrahepatic bile duct units (IBDUs), we found that TRPV4 is expressed on cholangiocyte cilia, and that hypotonicity induces an increase in intracellular Ca2+ in a TRPV4-, ciliary-, and extracellular calcium-dependent manner. The osmosensation of luminal tonicity by ciliary TRPV4 induces bicarbonate secretion, the main determinant of ductal bile formation, by a mechanism involving apical ATP release. Furthermore, the activation of TRPV4 in vivo, by its specific agonist, 4αPDD, induces an increase in bile flow as well as ATP release and bicarbonate secretion. Our results suggest that cholangiocyte primary cilia play an important role in ductal bile formation by acting as osmosensors. PMID:18024594

  1. Cholangiocyte cilia express TRPV4 and detect changes in luminal tonicity inducing bicarbonate secretion.

    PubMed

    Gradilone, Sergio A; Masyuk, Anatoliy I; Splinter, Patrick L; Banales, Jesus M; Huang, Bing Q; Tietz, Pamela S; Masyuk, Tatyana V; Larusso, Nicholas F

    2007-11-27

    Cholangiocytes, epithelial cells lining the biliary tree, have primary cilia extending from their apical membrane into the ductal lumen. Although important in disease, cilia also play a vital role in normal cellular functions. We reported that cholangiocyte cilia are sensory organelles responding to mechanical stimuli (i.e., luminal fluid flow) by alterations in intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP. Because cholangiocyte cilia are also ideally positioned to detect changes in composition and tonicity of bile, we hypothesized that cilia also function as osmosensors. TRPV4, a Ca(2+)-permeable ion channel, has been implicated in signal transduction of osmotic stimuli. Using purified rat cholangiocytes and perfused intrahepatic bile duct units (IBDUs), we found that TRPV4 is expressed on cholangiocyte cilia, and that hypotonicity induces an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) in a TRPV4-, ciliary-, and extracellular calcium-dependent manner. The osmosensation of luminal tonicity by ciliary TRPV4 induces bicarbonate secretion, the main determinant of ductal bile formation, by a mechanism involving apical ATP release. Furthermore, the activation of TRPV4 in vivo, by its specific agonist, 4alphaPDD, induces an increase in bile flow as well as ATP release and bicarbonate secretion. Our results suggest that cholangiocyte primary cilia play an important role in ductal bile formation by acting as osmosensors.

  2. Polarised neutron scattering from dynamic polarised targets in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knop, W.; Hirai, M.; Olah, G.; Meerwinck, W.; Schink, H.-J.; Stuhrman, H. B.; Wagner, R.; Wenkow-EsSouni, M.; Zhao, J.; Schärpf, O.; Crichton, R. R.; Krumpolc, M.; Nierhaus, K. H.; Niinikoski, T. O.; Rijllart, A.

    1991-10-01

    The contrast giving rise to neutron small-angle scattering can be enhanced considerably by polarisation of the hydrogen nuclei [J. des Coizeaux and G. Jannink, Les Polymères en Solution, Les Editions de Physique, F-91944 Les Ulis, France (1987)]. Using polarised neutrons the scattering from protonated labels in a deuterated matrix will increase by an order of magnitude. This is the basis of nuclear spin contrast variation, a method which is of particular interest for the in situ structure determination of macromolecular components. A new polarised target for neutron scattering has been designed by CERN and tested successfully at FRG-1 of the GKSS research centre. For the purpose of thermal-neutron scattering the frozen solutions of biomolecules are immersed in liquid helium 4, which is thermally coupled to the cooling mixture of helium 3/helium 4 of the dilution refrigerator. The nuclear spins are aligned with respect to the external magnetic field-parallel or antiparallel-by dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP). The gain in neutron scattering compared to earlier experiments using direct cooling of the sample by helium 3 is a factor of 30. Another factor of 30 arises from the installation of the cold source and the beryllium reflector in FRG-1 [W. Knop et al., J. Appl. Cryst. 22 (1989) 352]. Pure nuclear spin targets are produced from dynamic polarised targets by selective depolarisation. In biological material only the hydrogen isotopes contribute significantly to polarised neutron scattering. Thus, saturation of the proton NMR yields a deuteron target, provided the target material has been enriched by the latter isotope. A proton target is obtained from the dynamic polarised target by saturation of deuteron NMR. This leads to six additional scattering functions reflecting the proton and deuteron spin densities and the correlations between the polarised isotopes. Polarised neutron scattering from nuclear spin targets of apoferritin and various derivatives of the

  3. Planar polarity of ependymal cilia.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Norihito; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2012-02-01

    Ependymal cells, epithelial cells that line the cerebral ventricles of the adult brain in various animals, extend multiple motile cilia from their apical surface into the ventricles. These cilia move rapidly, beating in a direction determined by the ependymal planar cell polarity (PCP). Ciliary dysfunction interferes with cerebrospinal fluid circulation and alters neuronal migration. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying two distinct types of ependymal PCP. Ciliary beating in the direction of fluid flow is established by a combination of hydrodynamic forces and intracellular planar polarity signaling. The ciliary basal bodies' anterior position on the apical surface of the cell is determined in the embryonic radial glial cells, inherited by ependymal cells, and established by non-muscle myosin II in early postnatal development.

  4. [The importance of model organisms to study cilia and flagella biology].

    PubMed

    Vincensini, Laetitia; Blisnick, Thierry; Bastin, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are ubiquitous organelles that protrude from the surfaces of many cells, and whose architecture is highly conserved from protists to humans. These complex organelles, composed of over 500 proteins, can be either immotile or motile. They are involved in a myriad of biological processes, including sensing (non-motile cilia) and/or cell motility or movement of extracellular fluids (motile cilia). The ever-expanding list of human diseases linked to defective cilia illustrates the functional importance of cilia and flagella. These ciliopathies are characterised by an impressive diversity of symptoms and an often complex genetic etiology. A precise knowledge of cilia and flagella biology is thus critical to better understand these pathologies. However, multi-ciliated cells are terminally differentiated and difficult to manipulate, and a primary cilium is assembled only when the cell exits from the cell cycle. In this context the use of model organisms, that relies on the high degree of structural but also of molecular conservation of these organelles across evolution, is instrumental to decipher the many facets of cilia and flagella biology. In this review, we highlight the specific strengths of the main model organisms to investigate the molecular composition, mode of assembly, sensing and motility mechanisms and functions of cilia and flagella. Pioneering studies carried out in the green alga Chlamydomonas established the link between cilia and several genetic diseases. Moreover, multicellular organisms such as mouse, zebrafish, Xenopus, C. elegans or Drosophila, and protists like Paramecium, Tetrahymena and Trypanosoma or Leishmania each bring specific advantages to the study of cilium biology. For example, the function of genes involved in primary ciliary dyskinesia (due to defects in ciliary motility) can be efficiently assessed in trypanosomes. © Société de Biologie, 2011.

  5. Novel roles for the radial spoke head protein 9 in neural and neurosensory cilia

    PubMed Central

    Sedykh, Irina; TeSlaa, Jessica J.; Tatarsky, Rose L.; Keller, Abigail N.; Toops, Kimberly A.; Lakkaraju, Aparna; Nyholm, Molly K.; Wolman, Marc A.; Grinblat, Yevgenya

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are cell surface organelles with key roles in a range of cellular processes, including generation of fluid flow by motile cilia. The axonemes of motile cilia and immotile kinocilia contain 9 peripheral microtubule doublets, a central microtubule pair, and 9 connecting radial spokes. Aberrant radial spoke components RSPH1, 3, 4a and 9 have been linked with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), a disorder characterized by ciliary dysmotility; yet, radial spoke functions remain unclear. Here we show that zebrafish Rsph9 is expressed in cells bearing motile cilia and kinocilia, and localizes to both 9 + 2 and 9 + 0 ciliary axonemes. Using CRISPR mutagenesis, we show that rsph9 is required for motility of presumptive 9 + 2 olfactory cilia and, unexpectedly, 9 + 0 neural cilia. rsph9 is also required for the structural integrity of 9 + 2 and 9 + 0 ciliary axonemes. rsph9 mutant larvae exhibit reduced initiation of the acoustic startle response consistent with hearing impairment, suggesting a novel role for Rsph9 in the kinocilia of the inner ear and/or lateral line neuromasts. These data identify novel roles for Rsph9 in 9 + 0 motile cilia and in sensory kinocilia, and establish a useful zebrafish PCD model. PMID:27687975

  6. Selective particle capture by asynchronously beating cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Selective particle filtration is fundamental in many engineering and biological systems. For example, many aquatic microorganisms use filter feeding to capture food particles from the surrounding fluid, using motile cilia. One of the capture strategies is to use the same cilia to generate feeding currents and to intercept particles when the particles are on the downstream side of the cilia. Here, we develop a 3D computational model of ciliary bands interacting with flow suspended particles and calculate particle trajectories for a range of particle sizes. Consistent with experimental observations, we find optimal particle sizes that maximize capture rate. The optimal size depends nonlinearly on cilia spacing and cilia coordination, synchronous vs. asynchronous. These parameters affect the cilia-generated flow field, which in turn affects particle trajectories. The low capture rate of smaller particles is due to the particles' inability to cross the flow streamlines of neighboring cilia. Meanwhile, large particles have difficulty entering the sub-ciliary region once advected downstream, also resulting in low capture rates. The optimal range of particle sizes is enhanced when cilia beat asynchronously. These findings have potentially important implications on the design and use of biomimetic cilia in processes such as particle sorting in microfluidic devices.

  7. Motile cilia harbor serum response factor as a mechanism of environment sensing and injury response in the airway.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Tara M; Wyatt, Todd A; Sweeter, Jenea; Bailey, Kristina L; Poole, Jill A; Heires, Art J; Sisson, Joseph H; Romberger, Debra J

    2014-05-01

    Nonmotile primary cilia are recognized as important sensory organelles during development and normal biological functioning. For example, recent work demonstrates that transcriptional regulators of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway localize to primary cilia and participate in sensing and transducing signals regarding the cellular environment. In contrast, motile cilia are traditionally viewed as mechanical machinery, vital for the movement of solutes and clearance of bacteria and debris, but not participants in cellular sensing and signaling mechanisms. Recently, motile cilia were found to harbor receptors responsible for sensing and responding to environmental stimuli. However, no transcription factors are known to be regulated by cilia localization as a sensing mechanism in vertebrates. Using a mouse model of organic dust-induced airway inflammation, we found that the transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) localizes to motile cilia of airway epithelial cells and alters its localization in response to inflammatory stimuli. Furthermore, inhibition of SRF signaling using the small molecule CCG-1423 reduces organic dust-induced IL-8 release from bronchial epithelial cells and stimulates cilia beat frequency in ciliated mouse tracheal epithelial cells. Immunohistochemical analyses reveal that SRF localizes to the cilia of mouse brain ependymal and ovarian epithelial cells as well. These data reveal a novel mechanism by which a transcription factor localizes to motile cilia and modulates cell activities including cilia motility and inflammation response. These data challenge current dogma regarding motile cilia functioning and may lead to significant contributions in understanding motile ciliary signaling dynamics, as well as mechanisms involving SRF-mediated responses to inflammation and injury.

  8. Emergence of metachronal waves in cilia arrays

    PubMed Central

    Elgeti, Jens; Gompper, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Propulsion by cilia is a fascinating and universal mechanism in biological organisms to generate fluid motion on the cellular level. Cilia are hair-like organelles, which are found in many different tissues and many uni- and multicellular organisms. Assembled in large fields, cilia beat neither randomly nor completely synchronously—instead they display a striking self-organization in the form of metachronal waves (MCWs). It was speculated early on that hydrodynamic interactions provide the physical mechanism for the synchronization of cilia motion. Theory and simulations of physical model systems, ranging from arrays of highly simplified actuated particles to a few cilia or cilia chains, support this hypothesis. The main questions are how the individual cilia interact with the flow field generated by their neighbors and synchronize their beats for the metachronal wave to emerge and how the properties of the metachronal wave are determined by the geometrical arrangement of the cilia, like cilia spacing and beat direction. Here, we address these issues by large-scale computer simulations of a mesoscopic model of 2D cilia arrays in a 3D fluid medium. We show that hydrodynamic interactions are indeed sufficient to explain the self-organization of MCWs and study beat patterns, stability, energy expenditure, and transport properties. We find that the MCW can increase propulsion velocity more than 3-fold and efficiency almost 10-fold—compared with cilia all beating in phase. This can be a vital advantage for ciliated organisms and may be interesting to guide biological experiments as well as the design of efficient microfluidic devices and artificial microswimmers. PMID:23487771

  9. Emergence of metachronal waves in cilia arrays.

    PubMed

    Elgeti, Jens; Gompper, Gerhard

    2013-03-19

    Propulsion by cilia is a fascinating and universal mechanism in biological organisms to generate fluid motion on the cellular level. Cilia are hair-like organelles, which are found in many different tissues and many uni- and multicellular organisms. Assembled in large fields, cilia beat neither randomly nor completely synchronously--instead they display a striking self-organization in the form of metachronal waves (MCWs). It was speculated early on that hydrodynamic interactions provide the physical mechanism for the synchronization of cilia motion. Theory and simulations of physical model systems, ranging from arrays of highly simplified actuated particles to a few cilia or cilia chains, support this hypothesis. The main questions are how the individual cilia interact with the flow field generated by their neighbors and synchronize their beats for the metachronal wave to emerge and how the properties of the metachronal wave are determined by the geometrical arrangement of the cilia, like cilia spacing and beat direction. Here, we address these issues by large-scale computer simulations of a mesoscopic model of 2D cilia arrays in a 3D fluid medium. We show that hydrodynamic interactions are indeed sufficient to explain the self-organization of MCWs and study beat patterns, stability, energy expenditure, and transport properties. We find that the MCW can increase propulsion velocity more than 3-fold and efficiency almost 10-fold--compared with cilia all beating in phase. This can be a vital advantage for ciliated organisms and may be interesting to guide biological experiments as well as the design of efficient microfluidic devices and artificial microswimmers.

  10. Sensory signaling-dependent remodeling of olfactory cilia architecture in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai; Sengupta, Piali

    2008-05-01

    Nonmotile primary cilia are sensory organelles composed of a microtubular axoneme and a surrounding membrane sheath that houses signaling molecules. Optimal cellular function requires the precise regulation of axoneme assembly, membrane biogenesis, and signaling protein targeting and localization via as yet poorly understood mechanisms. Here, we show that sensory signaling is required to maintain the architecture of the specialized AWB olfactory neuron cilia in C. elegans. Decreased sensory signaling results in alteration of axoneme length and expansion of a membraneous structure, thereby altering the topological distribution of a subset of ciliary transmembrane signaling molecules. Signaling-regulated alteration of ciliary structures can be bypassed by modulation of intracellular cGMP or calcium levels and requires kinesin-II-driven intraflagellar transport (IFT), as well as BBS- and RAB8-related proteins. Our results suggest that compensatory mechanisms in response to altered levels of sensory activity modulate AWB cilia architecture, revealing remarkable plasticity in the regulation of cilia structure.

  11. Magnetically Actuated Cilia for Microfluidic Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasoge, Srinivas; Owen, Drew; Ballard, Matt; Hesketh, Peter J.; Alexeev, Alexander; Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering Collaboration; Petit InstituteBioengineering; Biosciences Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate magnetic micro-cilia based microfluidic mixing and capture techniques. For this, we use a simple and easy to fabricate high aspect ratio cilia, which are actuated magnetically. These micro-features are fabricated by evaporating NiFe alloy at room temperature, on to patterned photoresist. The evaporated alloy curls upwards when the seed layer is removed to release the cilia, thus making a free standing `C' shaped magnetic microstructure. This is actuated using an external electromagnet or a rotating magnet. The artificial cilia can be actuated upto 20Hz. We demonstrate the active mixing these cilia can produce in the microchannel. Also, we demonstrate the capture of target species in a sample using these fast oscillating cilia. The surface of the cilia is functionalized by streptavidin which binds to biotin labelled fluorescent microspheres and mimic the capture of bacteria. We show very high capture efficiencies by using these methods. These simple to fabricate micro cilia can easily be incorporated into many microfluidic systems which require high mixing and capture efficiencies.

  12. Microfluidic manipulation with artificial/bioinspired cilia.

    PubMed

    den Toonder, Jaap M J; Onck, Patrick R

    2013-02-01

    A recent development, inspired by nature, is the use of 'artificial cilia' to create pumping and/or mixing in microfluidic devices. Cilia are small hairs that can be found in biology and are used for (fluid) actuation and sensing. Microscopic actuators resembling cilia, actuated to move under the influence of various stimuli such as electrostatic field, magnetic field, and even light, have been developed by a number of groups and shown to be capable of generating flow and mixing in microfluidic environments. The research on artificial cilia started about a decade ago and is rapidly expanding. In addition to being relevant for potential application in lab-on-a-chip devices, the work on artificial cilia forms a beautiful example of how a biological system can form the successful basis for both scientific research and technological applications. In this review, we will give an overview of the most important approaches in this exciting field. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Swimming like algae: biomimetic soft artificial cilia

    PubMed Central

    Sareh, Sina; Rossiter, Jonathan; Conn, Andrew; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are used effectively in a wide variety of biological systems from fluid transport to thrust generation. Here, we present the design and implementation of artificial cilia, based on a biomimetic planar actuator using soft-smart materials. This actuator is modelled on the cilia movement of the alga Volvox, and represents the cilium as a piecewise constant-curvature robotic actuator that enables the subsequent direct translation of natural articulation into a multi-segment ionic polymer metal composite actuator. It is demonstrated how the combination of optimal segmentation pattern and biologically derived per-segment driving signals reproduce natural ciliary motion. The amenability of the artificial cilia to scaling is also demonstrated through the comparison of the Reynolds number achieved with that of natural cilia. PMID:23097503

  14. Swimming like algae: biomimetic soft artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Sareh, Sina; Rossiter, Jonathan; Conn, Andrew; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond

    2013-01-06

    Cilia are used effectively in a wide variety of biological systems from fluid transport to thrust generation. Here, we present the design and implementation of artificial cilia, based on a biomimetic planar actuator using soft-smart materials. This actuator is modelled on the cilia movement of the alga Volvox, and represents the cilium as a piecewise constant-curvature robotic actuator that enables the subsequent direct translation of natural articulation into a multi-segment ionic polymer metal composite actuator. It is demonstrated how the combination of optimal segmentation pattern and biologically derived per-segment driving signals reproduce natural ciliary motion. The amenability of the artificial cilia to scaling is also demonstrated through the comparison of the Reynolds number achieved with that of natural cilia.

  15. Measuring techniques in induced polarisation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlin, Torleif; Leroux, Virginie; Nissen, Johan

    2002-06-01

    Multi-electrode geoelectrical imaging has become very popular and is used for many different purposes. For some of these, the inclusion of IP data would be desirable as it would allow the interpreter to distinguish between, e.g. sand formations with saltwater infiltration and clay formations or help delineate landfills. However, present-day IP measuring techniques require the use of nonpolarisable potential electrodes and special wire layout and are thus cumbersome and expensive. In this paper, we suggest making IP measurements with multi-electrode cables and just one set of steel electrodes. The polarisation potentials on the potential electrodes are corrected for by subtracting the polarisation potential measured when no primary current and no IP signal are present. Test measurements indicate that the polarisation potentials vary slowly and that the correction procedure is feasible. At two sites in southern Sweden, we have compared measurements with only stainless steel electrodes and measurements with both stainless steel and Pb-PbCl nonpolarisable electrodes using one or two sets of multicore cables, respectively. Almost no difference between the two data sets was observed. At one site, the charge-up effect on the potential electrodes was not important, while at the other site, the correction procedure was crucial. Though only two sites have been studied so far, it seems that time-domain IP imaging measurements can be taken with only steel electrodes and ordinary multicore cables. Coupling in the multicore cables has not presented any problems at the investigated sites where grounding resistances were moderate, making the coupling effect small. High grounding resistance sites have not yet been investigated.

  16. Mutation of Growth Arrest Specific 8 Reveals a Role in Motile Cilia Function and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Wesley R.; Malarkey, Erik B.; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; Pasek, Raymond C.; Porath, Jonathan D.; Birket, Susan E.; Saunier, Sophie; Antignac, Corinne; Leigh, Margaret W.; Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Drummond, Iain A.; Parant, John M.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Yoder, Bradley K.

    2016-01-01

    Ciliopathies are genetic disorders arising from dysfunction of microtubule-based cellular appendages called cilia. Different cilia types possess distinct stereotypic microtubule doublet arrangements with non-motile or ‘primary’ cilia having a 9+0 and motile cilia have a 9+2 array of microtubule doublets. Primary cilia are critical sensory and signaling centers needed for normal mammalian development. Defects in their structure/function result in a spectrum of clinical and developmental pathologies including abnormal neural tube and limb patterning. Altered patterning phenotypes in the limb and neural tube are due to perturbations in the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. Motile cilia are important in fluid movement and defects in motility result in chronic respiratory infections, altered left-right asymmetry, and infertility. These features are the hallmarks of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, OMIM 244400). While mutations in several genes are associated with PCD in patients and animal models, the genetic lesion in many cases is unknown. We assessed the in vivo functions of Growth Arrest Specific 8 (GAS8). GAS8 shares strong sequence similarity with the Chlamydomonas Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex (NDRC) protein 4 (DRC4) where it is needed for proper flagella motility. In mammalian cells, the GAS8 protein localizes not only to the microtubule axoneme of motile cilia, but also to the base of non-motile cilia. Gas8 was recently implicated in the Hh signaling pathway as a regulator of Smoothened trafficking into the cilium. Here, we generate the first mouse with a Gas8 mutation and show that it causes severe PCD phenotypes; however, there were no overt Hh pathway phenotypes. In addition, we identified two human patients with missense variants in Gas8. Rescue experiments in Chlamydomonas revealed a subtle defect in swim velocity compared to controls. Further experiments using CRISPR/Cas9 homology driven repair (HDR) to generate one of these human missense variants

  17. On polarisation of Jovian decametric radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecacheux, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Among known planetary non thermal radio emissions, mostly circularly polarised, the decametric (DAM) radiation from Jupiter is characterized by its strong elliptical polarisation. A campaign of extensive broadband measurements of the DAM polarisation was performed by using the Nançay Decameter Array. The measurements use unprecedented high time-frequency resolutions throughout wide time/frequency coverage. Thus the DAM polarisation ellipse could be described with a reasonable accuracy over long lasting DAM storms (several hours, i.e. a noticeable part of Jupiter's rotation) as well as at the shorter scales of the fine structures which appear on intensity spectrograms (arcs, modulation lanes, S-bursts, etc...). In most of the studied cases, and when only one sense of circular polarisation could be observed, the degree of polarisation was measured to reach 100%, and the polarisation ellipse was found to remain stable in shape and orientation over hours and within the whole observed bandwidth, in agreement with the polarisation from a steady single source. When both senses of circular polarisation were present, the two corresponding polarisation ellipses could be extracted from the data. Furthermore, the spectral structures at shorter time scales, - including the so called S-bursts -, did not show up any further specific polarisation signature. The significance of those observations is briefly discussed.

  18. Centrosomal protein CP110 controls maturation of the mother centriole during cilia biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sharda Prasad; Sharma, Neel Kamal; Liu, Chunqiao; Dong, Lijin; Li, Tiansen; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defects in cilia centrosomal genes cause pleiotropic clinical phenotypes, collectively called ciliopathies. Cilia biogenesis is initiated by the interaction of positive and negative regulators. Centriolar coiled coil protein 110 (CP110) caps the distal end of the mother centriole and is known to act as a suppressor to control the timing of ciliogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that CP110 promotes cilia formation in vivo, in contrast to findings in cultured cells. Cp110−/− mice die shortly after birth owing to organogenesis defects as in ciliopathies. Shh signaling is impaired in null embryos and primary cilia are reduced in multiple tissues. We show that CP110 is required for anchoring of basal bodies to the membrane during cilia formation. CP110 loss resulted in an abnormal distribution of core components of subdistal appendages (SDAs) and of recycling endosomes, which may be associated with premature extension of axonemal microtubules. Our data implicate CP110 in SDA assembly and ciliary vesicle docking, two requisite early steps in cilia formation. We suggest that CP110 has unique context-dependent functions, acting as both a suppressor and a promoter of ciliogenesis. PMID:26965371

  19. Out of the cleanroom, self-assembled magnetic artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Gao, Yang; Wyss, Hans; Anderson, Patrick; den Toonder, Jaap

    2013-09-07

    Micro-sized hair-like structures, such as cilia, are abundant in nature and have various functionalities. Many efforts have been made to mimic the fluid pumping function of cilia, but most of the fabrication processes for these "artificial cilia" are tedious and expensive, hindering their practical application. In this paper a cost-effective in situ fabrication technique for artificial cilia is demonstrated. The cilia are constructed by self-assembly of micron sized magnetic beads and encapsulated with soft polymer coatings. Actuation of the cilia induces an effective fluid flow, and the cilia lengths and distribution can be adjusted by varying the magnetic bead concentration and fabrication parameters.

  20. CB-08KIF3A IS ESSENTIAL FOR CILIOGENESIS, CILIA FUNCTION AND PROMOTES GLIOBLASTOMA PROGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Hoang-Minh, Lan; Deleyrolle, Loic; Ugartemendia, George; Breunig, Joshua; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Reynolds, Brent; Sarkisian, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent findings that cilia transduce diverse signaling pathways affecting cell proliferation, migration and survival, little is known about the influence of cilia or cilia-associated proteins in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We recently showed that primary cilia project from subsets of cells in GBM patient biopsies and derived cell lines. To determine if cilia contribute to GBM growth, we blocked ciliogenesis using a lentivirus expressing a dominant negative form of KIF3A, an essential ciliogenesis protein. We generated stable GBM cell lines (L0 and S3; representing different molecular subclasses) whereby dnKIF3A+ cells exhibited virtual complete loss of cilia compared to controls (confirmed by immunostaining and EM). Canonically, secreted Sonic hedgehog (SHH) ligand binds and activates receptor signaling cascades (e.g., smoothened (SMO)) within cilia to promote normal cell proliferation and tumor cell growth in specific developmental and pathological contexts, respectively. To examine the role of SHH in GBM proliferation, we exposed control and dnKIF3A+ L0 and S3 cells to saline or recombinant SHH. We found the number of L0 control cells significantly increased after SHH compared to saline, an effect blocked by pretreatment with cyclopamine (SMO inhibitor). However, SHH did not increase the number of L0 dnKIF3A+ cells. Interestingly, SHH exposure had no effect on S3 control cell numbers, despite observations that SHH signaling components (SMO and Gli3) were recruited to their cilia in response to SHH. This suggests GBM cilia are SHH-responsive but the downstream consequences of ciliary signaling may differ between cell lines. Notably, mice intracranially xenografted with L0 cells expressing dnKIF3A survived significantly longer than mice receiving control cells, and retained the loss of cilia phenotype in the tumors. Collectively, these data suggest KIF3A promotes GBM tumor progression, but the extent to which the effects are mediated by cilia and the

  1. The sensory cilia of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Peter N; Ou, Guangshuo; Leroux, Michel R; Scholey, Jonathan M

    2007-03-08

    The non-motile cilium, once believed to be a vestigial cellular structure, is now increasingly associated with the ability of a wide variety of cells and organisms to sense their chemical and physical environments. With its limited number of sensory cilia and diverse behavioral repertoire, C. elegans has emerged as a powerful experimental system for studying how cilia are formed, function, and ultimately modulate complex behaviors. Here, we discuss the biogenesis, distribution, structures, composition and general functions of C. elegans cilia. We also briefly highlight how C. elegans is being used to provide molecular insights into various human ciliopathies, including Polycystic Kidney Disease and Bardet-Biedl Syndrome.

  2. Inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases; new players in the regulation of cilia and ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Conduit, Sarah E; Dyson, Jennifer M; Mitchell, Christina A

    2012-08-31

    Phosphoinositides regulate numerous cellular events via the recruitment and activation of multiple lipid-binding effector proteins. The precise temporal and spatial regulation of phosphoinositide signals by the co-ordinated activities of phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases is essential for homeostasis and development. Mutations in two inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases, INPP5E and OCRL, cause the cerebrorenal syndromes of Joubert and Lowe's, respectively. INPP5E and OCRL exhibit overlapping phosphoinositide substrate specificity and subcellular localisation, including an association with the primary cilia. Here, we review recent studies that identify a new role for these enzymes in the regulation of primary cilia function. Joubert syndrome has been extensively linked to primary cilia defects, and Lowe's may represent a new class of 'ciliopathy associated' syndromes.

  3. Lack of cilia and differentiation defects in the liver of human foetuses with the Meckel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Clotman, Frédéric; Libbrecht, Louis; Killingsworth, Murray C; Loo, Christine C K; Roskams, Tania; Lemaigre, Frédéric P

    2008-03-01

    Meckel syndrome is an autosomal-recessive disease characterized by a combination of renal cysts, anomalies of the central nervous system, polydactyly and ductal plate malformations (DPM), which are hepatic anomalies consisting of excessive and abnormal foetal biliary structures. Among the genomic loci associated with Meckel syndrome, mutations in four genes were recently identified. These genes code for proteins associated with primary cilia and are possibly involved in cell differentiation. The aim of the present work was to investigate the formation of the primary cilia and the differentiation of the hepatic cells in foetuses with Meckel syndrome. Sections of livers from human foetuses with Meckel syndrome were analysed by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. The primary cilia of the biliary cells were absent in some Meckel foetuses, but were present in others. In addition, defects in hepatic differentiation were observed in Meckel livers, as evidenced by the presence of hybrid cells co-expressing hepatocytic and biliary markers. Defects in cilia formation occur in some Meckel livers, and most cases show DPM associated with abnormal hepatic cell differentiation. Because differentiation precedes the formation of the cilia during liver development, we propose that defective differentiation may constitute the initial defect in the liver of Meckel syndrome foetuses.

  4. Switching on cilia: transcriptional networks regulating ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Choksi, Semil P; Lauter, Gilbert; Swoboda, Peter; Roy, Sudipto

    2014-04-01

    Cilia play many essential roles in fluid transport and cellular locomotion, and as sensory hubs for a variety of signal transduction pathways. Despite having a conserved basic morphology, cilia vary extensively in their shapes and sizes, ultrastructural details, numbers per cell, motility patterns and sensory capabilities. Emerging evidence indicates that this diversity, which is intimately linked to the different functions that cilia perform, is in large part programmed at the transcriptional level. Here, we review our understanding of the transcriptional control of ciliary biogenesis, highlighting the activities of FOXJ1 and the RFX family of transcriptional regulators. In addition, we examine how a number of signaling pathways, and lineage and cell fate determinants can induce and modulate ciliogenic programs to bring about the differentiation of distinct cilia types.

  5. Cilia in vertebrate left-right patterning.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Agnik; Amack, Jeffrey D

    2016-12-19

    Understanding how left-right (LR) asymmetry is generated in vertebrate embryos is an important problem in developmental biology. In humans, a failure to align the left and right sides of cardiovascular and/or gastrointestinal systems often results in birth defects. Evidence from patients and animal models has implicated cilia in the process of left-right patterning. Here, we review the proposed functions for cilia in establishing LR asymmetry, which include creating transient leftward fluid flows in an embryonic 'left-right organizer'. These flows direct asymmetric activation of a conserved Nodal (TGFβ) signalling pathway that guides asymmetric morphogenesis of developing organs. We discuss the leading hypotheses for how cilia-generated asymmetric fluid flows are translated into asymmetric molecular signals. We also discuss emerging mechanisms that control the subcellular positioning of cilia and the cellular architecture of the left-right organizer, both of which are critical for effective cilia function during left-right patterning. Finally, using mosaic cell-labelling and time-lapse imaging in the zebrafish embryo, we provide new evidence that precursor cells maintain their relative positions as they give rise to the ciliated left-right organizer. This suggests the possibility that these cells acquire left-right positional information prior to the appearance of cilia.This article is part of the themed issue 'Provocative questions in left-right asymmetry'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Role of cilia in structural birth defects: insights from ciliopathy mutant mouse models.

    PubMed

    Rao Damerla, Rama; Gabriel, George C; Li, You; Klena, Nikolai T; Liu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Yu; Cui, Cheng; Pazour, Gregory J; Lo, Cecilia W

    2014-06-01

    Structural birth defect (SBD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the newborn period. Although the etiology of SBD is diverse, a wide spectrum of SBD associated with ciliopathies points to the cilium as having a central role in the pathogenesis of SBDs. Ciliopathies are human diseases arising from disruption of cilia structure and/or function. They are associated with developmental anomalies in one or more organ systems and can involve defects in motile cilia, such as those in the airway epithelia or from defects in nonmotile (primary cilia) that have sensory and cell signaling function. Availability of low cost next generation sequencing has allowed for explosion of new knowledge in genetic etiology of ciliopathies. This has led to the appreciation that many genes are shared in common between otherwise clinically distinct ciliopathies. Further insights into the relevance of the cilium in SBD has come from recovery of pathogenic mutations in cilia-related genes from many large-scale mouse forward genetic screens with differing developmental phenotyping focus. Our mouse mutagenesis screen for congenital heart disease (CHD) using noninvasive fetal echocardiography has yielded a marked enrichment for pathogenic mutations in genes required for motile or primary cilia function. These novel mutant mouse models will be invaluable for modeling human ciliopathies and further interrogating the role of the cilium in the pathogenesis of SBD and CHD. Overall, these findings suggest a central role for the cilium in the pathogenesis of a wide spectrum of developmental anomalies associated with CHD and SBDs.

  7. Specific α- and β-Tubulin Isotypes Optimize the Functions of Sensory Cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Daryl D.; Miller, Renee M.; Núñez, Lizbeth; Portman, Douglas S.

    2010-01-01

    Primary cilia have essential roles in transducing signals in eukaryotes. At their core is the ciliary axoneme, a microtubule-based structure that defines cilium morphology and provides a substrate for intraflagellar transport. However, the extent to which axonemal microtubules are specialized for sensory cilium function is unknown. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, primary cilia are present at the dendritic ends of most sensory neurons, where they provide a specialized environment for the transduction of particular stimuli. Here, we find that three tubulin isotypes—the α-tubulins TBA-6 and TBA-9 and the β-tubulin TBB-4—are specifically expressed in overlapping sets of C. elegans sensory neurons and localize to the sensory cilia of these cells. Although cilia still form in mutants lacking tba-6, tba-9, and tbb-4, ciliary function is often compromised: these mutants exhibit a variety of sensory deficits as well as the mislocalization of signaling components. In at least one case, that of the CEM cephalic sensory neurons, cilium architecture is disrupted in mutants lacking specific ciliary tubulins. While there is likely to be some functional redundancy among C. elegans tubulin genes, our results indicate that specific tubulins optimize the functional properties of C. elegans sensory cilia. PMID:20421600

  8. The IFT-A complex regulates Shh signaling through cilia structure and membrane protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Liem, Karel F.; Ashe, Alyson; He, Mu; Satir, Peter; Moran, Jennifer; Beier, David; Wicking, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Two intraflagellar transport (IFT) complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B, build and maintain primary cilia and are required for activity of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. A weak allele of the IFT-A gene, Ift144, caused subtle defects in cilia structure and ectopic activation of the Shh pathway. In contrast, strong loss of IFT-A, caused by either absence of Ift144 or mutations in two IFT-A genes, blocked normal ciliogenesis and decreased Shh signaling. In strong IFT-A mutants, the Shh pathway proteins Gli2, Sufu, and Kif7 localized correctly to cilia tips, suggesting that these pathway components were trafficked by IFT-B. In contrast, the membrane proteins Arl13b, ACIII, and Smo failed to localize to primary cilia in the absence of IFT-A. We propose that the increased Shh activity seen in partial loss-of-function IFT-A mutants may be a result of decreased ciliary ACIII and that the loss of Shh activity in the absence of IFT-A is a result of severe disruptions of cilia structure and membrane protein trafficking. PMID:22689656

  9. The IFT-A complex regulates Shh signaling through cilia structure and membrane protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Liem, Karel F; Ashe, Alyson; He, Mu; Satir, Peter; Moran, Jennifer; Beier, David; Wicking, Carol; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2012-06-11

    Two intraflagellar transport (IFT) complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B, build and maintain primary cilia and are required for activity of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. A weak allele of the IFT-A gene, Ift144, caused subtle defects in cilia structure and ectopic activation of the Shh pathway. In contrast, strong loss of IFT-A, caused by either absence of Ift144 or mutations in two IFT-A genes, blocked normal ciliogenesis and decreased Shh signaling. In strong IFT-A mutants, the Shh pathway proteins Gli2, Sufu, and Kif7 localized correctly to cilia tips, suggesting that these pathway components were trafficked by IFT-B. In contrast, the membrane proteins Arl13b, ACIII, and Smo failed to localize to primary cilia in the absence of IFT-A. We propose that the increased Shh activity seen in partial loss-of-function IFT-A mutants may be a result of decreased ciliary ACIII and that the loss of Shh activity in the absence of IFT-A is a result of severe disruptions of cilia structure and membrane protein trafficking.

  10. Pericentrin, a centrosomal protein related to microcephalic primordial dwarfism, is required for olfactory cilia assembly in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Ko; Kasahara, Kyosuke; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Shimizu, Shoko; Taniguchi, Manabu; Matsuzaki, Shinsuke; Tohyama, Masaya; Asanuma, Masato

    2009-10-01

    The Drosophila pericentrin-like protein has been shown to be essential for the formation of the sensory cilia of chemosensory and mechanosensory neurons by mutant analysis in flies, while the in vivo function of pericentrin, a well-studied mammalian centrosomal protein related to microcephalic primordial dwarfism, has been unclear. To determine whether pericentrin is required for ciliogenesis in mammals, we generated and analyzed mice with a hypomorphic mutation of Pcnt encoding the mouse pericentrin. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that olfactory cilia of chemosensory neurons in the nasal olfactory epithelium were malformed in the homozygous mutant mice. On the other hand, the assembly of motile and primary cilia of non-neuronal epithelial cells and the formation of sperm flagella were not affected in the Pcnt-mutant mice. The defective assembly of olfactory cilia in the mutant was apparent from birth. The mutant animals displayed reduced olfactory performance in agreement with the compromised assembly of olfactory cilia. Our findings suggest that pericentrin is essential for the assembly of chemosensory cilia of olfactory receptor neurons, but it is not globally required for cilia formation in mammals.

  11. DNAH11 Localization in the Proximal Region of Respiratory Cilia Defines Distinct Outer Dynein Arm Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Gerard W; Loges, Niki T; Klinkenbusch, Judith A; Olbrich, Heike; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Raidt, Johanna; Wallmeier, Julia; Werner, Claudius; Westermann, Cordula; Ruckert, Christian; Mirra, Virginia; Hjeij, Rim; Memari, Yasin; Durbin, Richard; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Praveen, Kavita; Kashef, Mohammad A; Kashef, Sara; Eghtedari, Fardin; Häffner, Karsten; Valmari, Pekka; Baktai, György; Aviram, Micha; Bentur, Lea; Amirav, Israel; Davis, Erica E; Katsanis, Nicholas; Brueckner, Martina; Shaposhnykov, Artem; Pigino, Gaia; Dworniczak, Bernd; Omran, Heymut

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessively inherited disease that leads to chronic respiratory disorders owing to impaired mucociliary clearance. Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a diagnostic standard to identify ultrastructural defects in respiratory cilia but is not useful in approximately 30% of PCD cases, which have normal ciliary ultrastructure. DNAH11 mutations are a common cause of PCD with normal ciliary ultrastructure and hyperkinetic ciliary beating, but its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. We therefore characterized DNAH11 in human respiratory cilia by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) in the context of PCD. We used whole-exome and targeted next-generation sequence analysis as well as Sanger sequencing to identify and confirm eight novel loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. We designed and validated a monoclonal antibody specific to DNAH11 and performed high-resolution IFM of both control and PCD-affected human respiratory cells, as well as samples from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-left-right dynein mice, to determine the ciliary localization of DNAH11. IFM analysis demonstrated native DNAH11 localization in only the proximal region of wild-type human respiratory cilia and loss of DNAH11 in individuals with PCD with certain loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. GFP-left-right dynein mice confirmed proximal DNAH11 localization in tracheal cilia. DNAH11 retained proximal localization in respiratory cilia of individuals with PCD with distinct ultrastructural defects, such as the absence of outer dynein arms (ODAs). TEM tomography detected a partial reduction of ODAs in DNAH11-deficient cilia. DNAH11 mutations result in a subtle ODA defect in only the proximal region of respiratory cilia, which is detectable by IFM and TEM tomography.

  12. DNAH11 Localization in the Proximal Region of Respiratory Cilia Defines Distinct Outer Dynein Arm Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Gerard W.; Loges, Niki T.; Klinkenbusch, Judith A.; Olbrich, Heike; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Raidt, Johanna; Wallmeier, Julia; Werner, Claudius; Westermann, Cordula; Ruckert, Christian; Mirra, Virginia; Hjeij, Rim; Memari, Yasin; Durbin, Richard; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Praveen, Kavita; Kashef, Mohammad A.; Kashef, Sara; Eghtedari, Fardin; Häffner, Karsten; Valmari, Pekka; Baktai, György; Aviram, Micha; Bentur, Lea; Amirav, Israel; Davis, Erica E.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Brueckner, Martina; Shaposhnykov, Artem; Pigino, Gaia; Dworniczak, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessively inherited disease that leads to chronic respiratory disorders owing to impaired mucociliary clearance. Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a diagnostic standard to identify ultrastructural defects in respiratory cilia but is not useful in approximately 30% of PCD cases, which have normal ciliary ultrastructure. DNAH11 mutations are a common cause of PCD with normal ciliary ultrastructure and hyperkinetic ciliary beating, but its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. We therefore characterized DNAH11 in human respiratory cilia by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) in the context of PCD. We used whole-exome and targeted next-generation sequence analysis as well as Sanger sequencing to identify and confirm eight novel loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. We designed and validated a monoclonal antibody specific to DNAH11 and performed high-resolution IFM of both control and PCD-affected human respiratory cells, as well as samples from green fluorescent protein (GFP)–left–right dynein mice, to determine the ciliary localization of DNAH11. IFM analysis demonstrated native DNAH11 localization in only the proximal region of wild-type human respiratory cilia and loss of DNAH11 in individuals with PCD with certain loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. GFP–left–right dynein mice confirmed proximal DNAH11 localization in tracheal cilia. DNAH11 retained proximal localization in respiratory cilia of individuals with PCD with distinct ultrastructural defects, such as the absence of outer dynein arms (ODAs). TEM tomography detected a partial reduction of ODAs in DNAH11-deficient cilia. DNAH11 mutations result in a subtle ODA defect in only the proximal region of respiratory cilia, which is detectable by IFM and TEM tomography. PMID:26909801

  13. Polarisation of Social Studies Textbooks in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidi, Syed Manzar Abbas

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at the evolution of the social studies curricula in Pakistan, which are of critical importance in shaping the outlook of many young Pakistanis, who are affected by this polarised discourse. The author argues that this trend of polarisation springing from dynamics of education also effectively contributes to a widening social…

  14. A Simple Homemade Polarised Sunglasses Test Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamdad, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    In this article construction of a simple and inexpensive test card which can be used to demonstrate the polarisation ability of sunglasses is described. The card was fabricated simply by using a piece of polariser sheet with one to three layers of cellophane tape fixed on it.

  15. Polarisation of Social Studies Textbooks in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidi, Syed Manzar Abbas

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at the evolution of the social studies curricula in Pakistan, which are of critical importance in shaping the outlook of many young Pakistanis, who are affected by this polarised discourse. The author argues that this trend of polarisation springing from dynamics of education also effectively contributes to a widening social…

  16. Heterotrimeric kinesin-II is necessary and sufficient to promote different stepwise assembly of morphologically distinct bipartite cilia in Drosophila antenna

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Swadhin C.; Girotra, Mukul; Ray, Krishanu

    2011-01-01

    Structurally diverse sensory cilia have evolved from primary cilia, a microtubule-based cellular extension engaged in chemical and mechanical sensing and signal integration. The diversity is often associated with functional specialization. The olfactory receptor neurons in Drosophila, for example, express three distinct bipartite cilia displaying different sets of olfactory receptors on them. Molecular description underlying their assembly and diversification is still incomplete. Here, we show that the branched and the slender olfactory cilia develop in two distinct step-wise patterns through the pupal stages before the expression of olfactory receptor genes in olfactory neurons. The process initiates with a thin procilium growth from the dendrite apex, followed by volume increment in successive stages. Mutations in the kinesin-II subunit genes either eliminate or restrict the cilia growth as well as tubulin entry into the developing cilia. Together with previous results, our results here suggest that heterotrimeric kinesin-II is the primary motor engaged in all type-I sensory cilia assembly in Drosophila and that the cilia structure diversity is achieved through additional transports supported by the motor during development. PMID:21233284

  17. Nonorthogonal polarisation eigenstates in anisotropic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Mamaev, Yu A; Khandokhin, Pavel A

    2011-06-30

    The Jones matrix method is used to analyse the polarisation eigenmodes of a solid-state laser with an anisotropic Fabry - Perot cavity containing amplitude and phase anisotropic elements. The results demonstrate that, when the axes of these elements do not coincide, the eigenpolarisations become elliptical and nonorthogonal. The ellipticities and azimuths of the polarisation modes and the magnitude and phase of the nonorthogonality parameter are determined as functions of polariser angle at different relationships between the amplitude and phase anisotropies, and the effect is shown to be strongest at a polariser angle of 45{sup 0}. There is critical phase anisotropy, dependent on amplitude anisotropy, at which the magnitude of the nonorthogonality parameter and ellipticity of the polarisation modes approach unity. (resonators)

  18. Cilia distribution and polarity in the epithelial lining of the mouse middle ear cavity

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenwei; Yi, Hong; Taylor, Jeannette; Li, Jian-dong; Chi, Fanglu; Todd, N. Wendell; Lin, Xi; Ren, Dongdong; Chen, Ping

    2017-01-01

    The middle ear conducts sound to the cochlea for hearing. Otitis media (OM) is the most common illness in childhood. Moreover, chronic OM with effusion (COME) is the leading cause of conductive hearing loss. Clinically, COME is highly associated with Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia, implicating significant contributions of cilia dysfunction to COME. The understanding of middle ear cilia properties that are critical to OM susceptibility, however, is limited. Here, we confirmed the presence of a ciliated region near the Eustachian tube orifice at the ventral region of the middle ear cavity, consisting mostly of a lumen layer of multi-ciliated and a layer of Keratin-5-positive basal cells. We also found that the motile cilia are polarized coordinately and display a planar cell polarity. Surprisingly, we also found a region of multi-ciliated cells that line the posterior dorsal pole of the middle ear cavity which was previously thought to contain only non-ciliated cells. Our study provided a more complete understanding of cilia distribution and revealed for the first time coordinated polarity of cilia in the epithelium of the mammalian middle ear, thus illustrating novel structural features that are likely critical for middle ear functions and related to OM susceptibility. PMID:28358397

  19. Sperm-Associated Antigen–17 Gene Is Essential for Motile Cilia Function and Neonatal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Maria Eugenia; Zhang, Zhibing; Costanzo, Richard M.; Henderson, Scott C.; Corwin, Frank D.; Zweit, Jamal; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Subler, Mark; Salloum, Fadi N.; Rubin, Bruce K.

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), resulting from defects in cilia assembly or motility, is caused by mutations in a number of genes encoding axonemal proteins. PCD phenotypes are variable, and include recurrent respiratory tract infections, bronchiectasis, hydrocephaly, situs inversus, and male infertility. We generated knockout mice for the sperm-associated antigen–17 (Spag17) gene, which encodes a central pair (CP) protein present in the axonemes of cells with “9 + 2” motile cilia or flagella. The targeting of Spag17 resulted in a severe phenotype characterized by immotile nasal and tracheal cilia, reduced clearance of nasal mucus, profound respiratory distress associated with lung fluid accumulation and disruption of the alveolar epithelium, cerebral ventricular expansion consistent with emerging hydrocephalus, failure to suckle, and neonatal demise within 12 hours of birth. Ultrastructural analysis revealed the loss of one CP microtubule in approximately one quarter of tracheal cilia axonemes, an absence of a C1 microtubule projection, and other less frequent CP structural abnormalities. SPAG6 and SPAG16 (CP proteins that interact with SPAG17) were increased in tracheal tissue from SPAG17-deficient mice. We conclude that Spag17 plays a critical role in the function and structure of motile cilia, and that neonatal lethality is likely explained by impaired airway mucociliary clearance. PMID:23418344

  20. Reptin/Ruvbl2 is a Lrrc6/Seahorse interactor essential for cilia motility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Yuan, Shiaulou; Cao, Ying; Kallakuri, Sowjanya; Li, Yuanyuan; Kishimoto, Norihito; DiBella, Linda; Sun, Zhaoxia

    2013-07-30

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by defective cilia motility. The identified PCD genes account for about half of PCD incidences and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We demonstrate that Reptin/Ruvbl2, a protein known to be involved in epigenetic and transcriptional regulation, is essential for cilia motility in zebrafish. We further show that Reptin directly interacts with the PCD protein Lrrc6/Seahorse and this interaction is critical for the in vivo function of Lrrc6/Seahorse in zebrafish. Moreover, whereas the expression levels of multiple dynein arm components remain unchanged or become elevated, the density of axonemal dynein arms is reduced in reptin(hi2394) mutants. Furthermore, Reptin is highly enriched in the cytosol and colocalizes with Lrrc6/Seahorse. Combined, these results suggest that the Reptin-Lrrc6/Seahorse complex is involved in dynein arm formation. We also show that although the DNA damage response is induced in reptin(hi2394) mutants, it remains unchanged in cilia biogenesis mutants and lrrc6/seahorse mutants, suggesting that increased DNA damage response is not intrinsic to ciliary defects and that in vertebrate development, Reptin functions in multiple processes, both cilia specific and cilia independent.

  1. Reptin/Ruvbl2 is a Lrrc6/Seahorse interactor essential for cilia motility

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lu; Yuan, Shiaulou; Cao, Ying; Kallakuri, Sowjanya; Li, Yuanyuan; Kishimoto, Norihito; DiBella, Linda; Sun, Zhaoxia

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by defective cilia motility. The identified PCD genes account for about half of PCD incidences and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We demonstrate that Reptin/Ruvbl2, a protein known to be involved in epigenetic and transcriptional regulation, is essential for cilia motility in zebrafish. We further show that Reptin directly interacts with the PCD protein Lrrc6/Seahorse and this interaction is critical for the in vivo function of Lrrc6/Seahorse in zebrafish. Moreover, whereas the expression levels of multiple dynein arm components remain unchanged or become elevated, the density of axonemal dynein arms is reduced in reptinhi2394 mutants. Furthermore, Reptin is highly enriched in the cytosol and colocalizes with Lrrc6/Seahorse. Combined, these results suggest that the Reptin-Lrrc6/Seahorse complex is involved in dynein arm formation. We also show that although the DNA damage response is induced in reptinhi2394 mutants, it remains unchanged in cilia biogenesis mutants and lrrc6/seahorse mutants, suggesting that increased DNA damage response is not intrinsic to ciliary defects and that in vertebrate development, Reptin functions in multiple processes, both cilia specific and cilia independent. PMID:23858445

  2. The essential roles of transition fibers in the context of cilia.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing; Ling, Kun; Hu, Jinghua

    2015-08-01

    Once thought of as a vestigial organelle, the primary cilium is now recognized as a signaling hub for key cellular pathways in vertebrate development. The recent renaissance in cilia studies significantly improved our understanding of how cilia form and function, but little is known about how ciliogenesis is initiated and how ciliary proteins enter cilia. These important ciliary events require transition fibers (TFs) that are positioned at the ciliary base as symmetric nine-bladed propeller fibrous structures. Up until recently, TFs have been the most underappreciated ciliary structures due to limited knowledge about their molecular composition and function. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of TF composition and the indispensable roles of TFs in regulating the initiation of ciliogenesis and the selective import of ciliary proteins.

  3. Regeneration of cilia in heavily irradiated sea urchin embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, R.C.

    1981-12-01

    Cilia were removed from blastulae, gastrulae, and plutei of the sea urchins Arbacia punctulata and Lytechinus variegatus by shaking the embryos in hypertonic media. Exposure to 50 krad (and in some experiments 100 krad) of ..gamma.. radiation either before or after deciliation had no effect on the time of appearance of regenerating cilia. There were no visually obvious differences in the rate of growth of the cilia in control and irradiated embryos. The cilia commenced beating at the same time, but the initial beating sometimes seemed less vigorous following irradiation. The data support the hypothesis that radiation has no major effect on the assembly from mature basal bodies of the microtubules of cilia.

  4. Cildb: a knowledgebase for centrosomes and cilia.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz, Olivier; Malinowska, Agata; Klotz, Catherine; Sperling, Linda; Dadlez, Michal; Koll, France; Cohen, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Ciliopathies, pleiotropic diseases provoked by defects in the structure or function of cilia or flagella, reflect the multiple roles of cilia during development, in stem cells, in somatic organs and germ cells. High throughput studies have revealed several hundred proteins that are involved in the composition, function or biogenesis of cilia. The corresponding genes are potential candidates for orphan ciliopathies. To study ciliary genes, model organisms are used in which particular questions on motility, sensory or developmental functions can be approached by genetics. In the course of high throughput studies of cilia in Paramecium tetraurelia, we were confronted with the problem of comparing our results with those obtained in other model organisms. We therefore developed a novel knowledgebase, Cildb, that integrates ciliary data from heterogeneous sources. Cildb links orthology relationships among 18 species to high throughput ciliary studies, and to OMIM data on human hereditary diseases. The web interface of Cildb comprises three tools, BioMart for complex queries, BLAST for sequence homology searches and GBrowse for browsing the human genome in relation to OMIM information for human diseases. Cildb can be used for interspecies comparisons, building candidate ciliary proteomes in any species, or identifying candidate ciliopathy genes.Database URL:http://cildb.cgm.cnrs-gif.fr.

  5. Cilia gene mutations cause atrioventricular septal defects by multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Steimle, Jeffrey D.; Huang, Wenhui; Felker, Lindsay; Kamp, Anna; Kweon, Junghun; Peterson, Michael; Reeves, Roger H.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Gruber, Peter J.; Yang, Xinan H.; Shendure, Jay; Moskowitz, Ivan P.

    2016-01-01

    Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs) are a common severe form of congenital heart disease (CHD). In this study we identified deleterious non-synonymous mutations in two cilia genes, Dnah11 and Mks1, in independent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mouse mutant lines with heritable recessive AVSDs by whole-exome sequencing. Cilia are required for left/right body axis determination and second heart field (SHF) Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, and we find that cilia mutations affect these requirements differentially. Dnah11avc4 did not disrupt SHF Hh signaling and caused AVSDs only concurrently with heterotaxy, a left/right axis abnormality. In contrast, Mks1avc6 disrupted SHF Hh signaling and caused AVSDs without heterotaxy. We performed unbiased whole-genome SHF transcriptional profiling and found that cilia motility genes were not expressed in the SHF whereas cilia structural and signaling genes were highly expressed. SHF cilia gene expression predicted the phenotypic concordance between AVSDs and heterotaxy in mice and humans with cilia gene mutations. A two-step model of cilia action accurately predicted the AVSD/heterotaxyu phenotypic expression pattern caused by cilia gene mutations. We speculate that cilia gene mutations contribute to both syndromic and non-syndromic AVSDs in humans and provide a model that predicts the phenotypic consequences of specific cilia gene mutations. PMID:27340223

  6. Entropy-based measures of in vivo cilia-driven microfluidic mixing derived from quantitative optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekera, Kenny; Jonas, Stephan; Bhattacharya, Dipankan; Khokha, Mustafa; Choma, Michael A.

    2012-02-01

    Motile cilia are cellular organelles that project from different epithelial surfaces including respiratory epithelium. They generate directional fluid flow that removes harmful pathogens and particulate matter from the respiratory system. While it has been known that primary ciliary dyskinesia increases the risk of recurrent pulmonary infections, there is now heightened interest in understanding the role that cilia play in a wide-variety of respiratory diseases. Different optical imaging technologies are being investigated to visualize cilia-driven fluid flow, and quantitative image analysis is used to generate measures of ciliary performance. Here, we demonstrate the quantification of in vivo cilia-driven microfluidic mixing using spatial and temporal measures of Shannon information entropy. Using videomicroscopy, we imaged in vivo cilia-driven fluid flow generated by the epidermis of the Xenopus tropicalis embryo. Flow was seeded with either dyes or microparticles. Both spatial and temporal measures of entropy show significant levels of mixing, with maximum entropy measures of ~6.5 (out of a possible range of 0 to 8). Spatial entropy measures showed localization of mixing "hot-spots" and "cold-spots" and temporal measures showed mixing throughout.In sum, entropy-based measures of microfluidic mixing can characterize in vivo cilia-driven fluid flow and hold the potential for better characterization of ciliary dysfunction.

  7. Nucleon spin-polarisabilities from polarisation observables in low-energy deuteron Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießhammer, H. W.; Shukla, D.

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the dependence of polarisation observables in elastic deuteron Compton scattering below the pion production threshold on the spin-independent and spin-dependent iso-scalar dipole polarisabilities of the nucleon. The calculation uses Chiral Effective Field Theory ( χ EFT) with dynamical Δ(1232) degrees of freedom in the Small Scale Expansion (SSE) at next-to-leading order. Resummation of the NN intermediate rescattering states and including the Δ induces sizeable effects. The analysis considers cross-sections and the analysing power of linearly polarised photons on an unpolarised target, and cross-section differences and asymmetries of linearly and circularly polarised beams on a vector-polarised deuteron. An intuitive argument helps one to identify kinematics in which one or several polarisabilities do not contribute. Some double-polarised observables are only sensitive to linear combinations of two of the spin-polarisabilities, simplifying a multipole analysis of the data. Spin-polarisabilities can be extracted at photon energies ≳ 100 MeV, after measurements at lower energies of lesssim 70 MeV provide high-accuracy determinations of the spin-independent ones. An interactive Mathematica 7.0 notebook of our findings is available from hgrie@gwu.edu.

  8. Concentration Polarisation in the Electrodialysis Process and the Polarisation Characteristics of Ion-selective Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balavadze, Elyusbar M.; Bobreshova, O. V.; Kulintsov, P. I.

    1988-06-01

    Complications in the electrodialysis process, due to the occurrence of concentration polarisation, are analysed. It is shown that most present-day methods for measuring the electrochemical characteristics of ion-selective membranes are not suitable for monitoring the behaviour of these membranes over a wide range of polarising current densities. An analysis of the polarisation characteristics of electromembrane systems shows the advantages of a system with a rotating membrane disc. It is shown that in the polarisation process there is a significant deterioration of the electrochemical properties of heterogeneous membranes whereas the properties of homogeneous perfluorinated sulpho-cation-exchange membranes remain almost unchanged. The bibliography includes 43 references.

  9. Polarised Drell-Yan at COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Riccardo

    2017-03-01

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN took the polarised Drell-Yan data in 2015. The muon pairs originating from 190 GeV/c pion collisions with polarised protons provide a way of accessing the transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions of the nucleon. The study of the azimuthal spin asymmetries in Drell-Yan complements a wealth of results already obtained from transversely polarised semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering at COMPASS. The first results from the polarised Drell-Yan measurements will be shown in the context of the previously obtained SIDIS results. The expected impact of these data will be discussed, as well as prospects for future Drell-Yan related studies.

  10. Polarisability and dispersion properties of SF 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, P. W.; Kelly, H. M.; Steiner, E.

    1993-02-01

    Electric properties of the SF 6 molecule are surveyed. Coupled Hartree—Fock calculations of the dipole, dipole—octopole and quadrupole polarisabilities of SF 6 in a polarised basis given values of α = 27, E = 107, C = 229 and Δ C = 113 (all in au). Allowing for the large vibrational contribution to the experimental static polarisability, agreement is good, with CHF theory underestimating α by about 10%. The calculated hexadecapole moment of -25.7 e a40 is within the range of experimental estimates, but the calculated dipole—octopole polarisability E is smaller than previous model and estimated experimental values by an order of magnitude. A large vibrational contribution to E is predicted. Dispersion coefficients C6, C8 and Δ C8 are calculated for SF 6 paired with itself and rare gas atoms, and comparison is made with the sparse experimental data.

  11. First Polarised Light with the NIKA Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritacco, A.; Adam, R.; Adane, A.; Ade, P.; André, P.; Beelen, A.; Belier, B.; Benoît, A.; Bideaud, A.; Billot, N.; Bourrion, O.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Coiffard, G.; Comis, B.; D'Addabbo, A.; Désert, F.-X.; Doyle, S.; Goupy, J.; Kramer, C.; Leclercq, S.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Martino, J.; Mauskopf, P.; Maury, A.; Mayet, F.; Monfardini, A.; Pajot, F.; Pascale, E.; Perotto, L.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Rebolo-Iglesias, M.; Revéret, V.; Rodriguez, L.; Savini, G.; Schuster, K.; Sievers, A.; Thum, C.; Triqueneaux, S.; Tucker, C.; Zylka, R.

    2016-08-01

    NIKA is a dual-band camera operating with 315 frequency multiplexed LEKIDs cooled at 100 mK. NIKA is designed to observe the sky in intensity and polarisation at 150 and 260 GHz from the IRAM 30-m telescope. It is a test-bench for the final NIKA2 camera. The incoming linear polarisation is modulated at four times the mechanical rotation frequency by a warm rotating multi-layer half- wave plate. Then, the signal is analyzed by a wire grid and finally absorbed by the lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs). The small time constant (<1 ms ) of the LEKIDs combined with the modulation of the HWP enables the quasi-simultaneous measurement of the three Stokes parameters I, Q, U, representing linear polarisation. In this paper, we present the results of recent observational campaigns demonstrating the good performance of NIKA in detecting polarisation at millimeter wavelength.

  12. The secret world of shrimps: polarisation vision at its best.

    PubMed

    Kleinlogel, Sonja; White, Andrew G

    2008-05-14

    Animal vision spans a great range of complexity, with systems evolving to detect variations in light intensity, distribution, colour, and polarisation. Polarisation vision systems studied to date detect one to four channels of linear polarisation, combining them in opponent pairs to provide intensity-independent operation. Circular polarisation vision has never been seen, and is widely believed to play no part in animal vision. Polarisation is fully measured via Stokes' parameters--obtained by combined linear and circular polarisation measurements. Optimal polarisation vision is the ability to see Stokes' parameters: here we show that the crustacean Gonodactylus smithii measures the exact components required. This vision provides optimal contrast-enhancement and precise determination of polarisation with no confusion states or neutral points--significant advantages. Linear and circular polarisation each give partial information about the polarisation of light--but the combination of the two, as we will show here, results in optimal polarisation vision. We suggest that linear and circular polarisation vision not be regarded as different modalities, since both are necessary for optimal polarisation vision; their combination renders polarisation vision independent of strongly linearly or circularly polarised features in the animal's environment.

  13. The Secret World of Shrimps: Polarisation Vision at Its Best

    PubMed Central

    Kleinlogel, Sonja; White, Andrew G.

    2008-01-01

    Background Animal vision spans a great range of complexity, with systems evolving to detect variations in light intensity, distribution, colour, and polarisation. Polarisation vision systems studied to date detect one to four channels of linear polarisation, combining them in opponent pairs to provide intensity-independent operation. Circular polarisation vision has never been seen, and is widely believed to play no part in animal vision. Methodology/Principal Findings Polarisation is fully measured via Stokes' parameters—obtained by combined linear and circular polarisation measurements. Optimal polarisation vision is the ability to see Stokes' parameters: here we show that the crustacean Gonodactylus smithii measures the exact components required. Conclusions/Significance This vision provides optimal contrast-enhancement and precise determination of polarisation with no confusion states or neutral points—significant advantages. Linear and circular polarisation each give partial information about the polarisation of light—but the combination of the two, as we will show here, results in optimal polarisation vision. We suggest that linear and circular polarisation vision not be regarded as different modalities, since both are necessary for optimal polarisation vision; their combination renders polarisation vision independent of strongly linearly or circularly polarised features in the animal's environment. PMID:18478095

  14. An ultrafast carbon nanotube terahertz polarisation modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Docherty, Callum J.; Stranks, Samuel D.; Habisreutinger, Severin N.; Joyce, Hannah J.; Herz, Laura M.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Johnston, Michael B.

    2014-05-28

    We demonstrate ultrafast modulation of terahertz radiation by unaligned optically pumped single-walled carbon nanotubes. Photoexcitation by an ultrafast optical pump pulse induces transient terahertz absorption in nanowires aligned parallel to the optical pump. By controlling the polarisation of the optical pump, we show that terahertz polarisation and modulation can be tuned, allowing sub-picosecond modulation of terahertz radiation. Such speeds suggest potential for semiconductor nanowire devices in terahertz communication technologies.

  15. Impact of Diverse Polarisations on Clutter Statistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-29

    Statistical inference ’ (Dover Publications Inc., Mineola, New York, 2003) 12 Dudewicz, E.J., and Mishra, S.N.: ‘Modern mathematical statistics ’ (John Wiley...Impact of diverse polarisations on clutter statistics M. Rangaswamy Abstract: The author addresses the impact of diverse polarisations on clutter... statistics in the context of waveform diversity for multi-functional operation from a specific platform as well as for multiple sensing from multiple

  16. Inactivation of Chibby affects function of motile airway cilia

    PubMed Central

    Voronina, Vera A.; Treuting, Piper; Love, Damon; Grubb, Barbara R.; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Adams, Allison; Li, Feng-Qian; Moon, Randall T.

    2009-01-01

    Chibby (Cby) is a conserved component of the Wnt–β-catenin pathway. Cby physically interacts with β-catenin to repress its activation of transcription. To elucidate the function of Cby in vertebrates, we generated Cby−/− mice and found that after 2–3 d of weight loss, the majority of mice die before or around weaning. All Cby−/− mice develop rhinitis and sinusitis. When challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, Cby−/− mice are unable to clear the bacteria from the nasal cavity. Notably, Cby−/− mice exhibit a complete absence of mucociliary transport caused by a marked paucity of motile cilia in the nasal epithelium. Moreover, ultrastructural experiments reveal impaired basal body docking to the apical surface of multiciliated cells. In support of these phenotypes, endogenous Cby protein is localized at the base of cilia. As the phenotypes of Cby−/− mice bear striking similarities to primary ciliary dyskinesia, Cby−/− mice may prove to be a useful model for this condition. PMID:19364920

  17. IFT46 plays an essential role in cilia development

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Sun; Hwang, Kyu-Seok; Oh, Hyun-Woo; Ji-Ae, Kim; Kim, Hyun-Taek; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Ju; Ko, Je Yeong; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Jeong, Yun-Mi; You, Kwan-Hee; Kim, Joon; Park, Doo-Sang; Nam, Ki-Hoan; Aizawa, Shinichi; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Park, Jong-Hoon; Zhou, Weibin; Kim, Nam-Soon; Kim, Cheol-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based structures that project into the extracellular space. Ciliary defects are associated with several human diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, primary ciliary dyskinesia, left-right axis patterning, hydrocephalus and retinal degeneration. However, the genetic and cellular biological control of ciliogenesis remains poorly understood. The IFT46 is one of the highly conserved intraflagellar transport complex B proteins. In zebrafish, ift46 is expressed in various ciliated tissues such as Kupffer’s vesicle, pronephric ducts, ears and spinal cord. We show that ift46 is localized to the basal body. Knockdown of ift46 gene results in multiple phenotypes associated with various ciliopathies including kidney cysts, pericardial edema and ventral axis curvature. In ift46 morphants, cilia in kidney and spinal canal are shortened and abnormal. Similar ciliary defects are observed in otic vesicles, lateral line hair cells, olfactory pits, but not in Kupffer’s vesicle. To explore the functions of Ift46 during mouse development, we have generated Ift46 knock-out mice. The Ift46 mutants have developmental defects in brain, neural tube and heart. In particular Ift46(−/−) homozygotes displays randomization of the embryo heart looping, which is a hallmark of defective left-right (L/R) axis patterning. Taken together, our results demonstrated that IFT46 has an essential role in vertebrate ciliary development. PMID:25722189

  18. Polarised black holes in ABJM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Miguel S.; Greenspan, Lauren; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E.

    2017-06-01

    We numerically construct asymptotically AdS 4 solutions to Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. These have a dipolar electrostatic potential turned on at the conformal boundary {S}^2× {\\mathbb{R}}_t . We find two classes of geometries: AdS soliton solutions that encode the full backreaction of the electric field on the AdS geometry without a horizon, and neutral black holes that are "polarised" by the dipolar potential. For a certain range of the electric field \\mathcal{E} , we find two distinct branches of the AdS soliton that exist for the same value of \\mathcal{E} . For the black hole, we find either two or four branches depending on the value of the electric field and horizon temperature. These branches meet at critical values of the electric field and impose a maximum value of \\mathcal{E} that should be reflected in the dual field theory. For both the soliton and black hole geometries, we study boundary data such as the stress tensor. For the black hole, we also consider horizon observables such as the entropy. At finite temperature, we consider the Gibbs free energy for both phases and determine the phase transition between them. We find that the AdS soliton dominates at low temperature for an electric field up to the maximum value. Using the gauge/gravity duality, we propose that these solutions are dual to deformed ABJM theory and compute the corresponding weak coupling phase diagram.

  19. Bbof1 is required to maintain cilia orientation

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Yuan-Hung; Werner, Michael E.; Stubbs, Jennifer; Joens, Matt S.; Li, Julie; Chien, Shu; Fitzpatrick, James A. J.; Mitchell, Brian J.; Kintner, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Multiciliate cells (MCCs) are highly specialized epithelial cells that employ hundreds of motile cilia to produce a vigorous directed flow in a variety of organ systems. The production of this flow requires the establishment of planar cell polarity (PCP) whereby MCCs align hundreds of beating cilia along a common planar axis. The planar axis of cilia in MCCs is known to be established via the PCP pathway and hydrodynamic cues, but the downstream steps required for cilia orientation remain poorly defined. Here, we describe a new component of cilia orientation, based on the phenotypic analysis of an uncharacterized coiled-coil protein, called bbof1. We show that the expression of bbof1 is induced during the early phases of MCC differentiation by the master regulator foxj1. MCC differentiation and ciliogenesis occurs normally in embryos where bbof1 activity is reduced, but cilia orientation is severely disrupted. We show that cilia in bbof1 mutants can still respond to patterning and hydrodynamic cues, but lack the ability to maintain their precise orientation. Misexpression of bbof1 promotes cilia alignment, even in the absence of flow or in embryos where microtubules and actin filaments are disrupted. Bbof1 appears to mediate cilia alignment by localizing to a polar structure adjacent to the basal body. Together, these results suggest that bbof1 is a basal body component required in MCCs to align and maintain cilia orientation in response to flow. PMID:23900544

  20. Magnetically-actuated artificial cilia for microfluidic propulsion.

    PubMed

    Khaderi, S N; Craus, C B; Hussong, J; Schorr, N; Belardi, J; Westerweel, J; Prucker, O; Rühe, J; den Toonder, J M J; Onck, P R

    2011-06-21

    In this paper we quantitatively analyse the performance of magnetically-driven artificial cilia for lab-on-a-chip applications. The artificial cilia are fabricated using thin polymer films with embedded magnetic nano-particles and their deformation is studied under different external magnetic fields and flows. A coupled magneto-mechanical solid-fluid model that accurately captures the interaction between the magnetic field, cilia and fluid is used to simulate the cilia motion. The elastic and magnetic properties of the cilia are obtained by fitting the results of the computational model to the experimental data. The performance of the artificial cilia with a non-uniform cross-section is characterised using the numerical model for two channel configurations that are of practical importance: an open-loop and a closed-loop channel. We predict that the flow and pressure head generated by the artificial cilia can be as high as 18 microlitres per minute and 3 mm of water, respectively. We also study the effect of metachronal waves on the flow generated and show that the fluid propelled increases drastically compared to synchronously beating cilia, and is unidirectional. This increase is significant even when the phase difference between adjacent cilia is small. The obtained results provide guidelines for the optimal design of magnetically-driven artificial cilia for microfluidic propulsion.

  1. Ciliae-based actuator with piezoelectric excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pott, Peter P.; Carrasco, Alvaro; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2012-06-01

    Small actuators based on the inverse piezoelectric effect are successfully deployed in commercial applications. Usually, ultrasonic motors are used. Based on resonance effects these motors provide a pronounced nonlinearity at low speeds and thus put high demands on the control algorithm. In contrast, piezoelectric stepping motors are mechanically complex and provide only low speeds. The contribution at hand describes a proposed design for a new piezoelectric motor based on cilia friction that can be manufactured at low costs. The cilia are made from uniaxial carbon-fibre reinforced plastics. The derived CFRP-brushes are pressed perpendicularly to the rotor surface to produce force or torque. First experiments prove the feasibility of the concept. A net pushing force of 500 mN is achieved.

  2. Forces applied by cilia measured on explants from mucociliary tissue.

    PubMed

    Teff, Zvi; Priel, Zvi; Gheber, Levi A

    2007-03-01

    Forces applied by intact mucus-propelling cilia were measured for the first time that we know of using a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrooptic system. The AFM probe was dipped into a field of beating cilia and its time-dependent deflection was recorded as it was struck by the cilia while the electrooptic system simultaneously and colocally measured the frequency to ensure that no perturbation was induced by the AFM probe. Using cilia from frog esophagus, we measured forces of approximately 0.21 nN per cilium during the effective stroke. This value, together with the known internal structure of these cilia, leads to the conclusion that most dynein arms along the length of the axoneme contribute to the effective stroke of these cilia.

  3. IPMC cilia system for artificial muscle applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Taeseon; Palmre, Viljar; Stalbaum, Tyler P.; Shen, Qi; Trabia, Sarah; Kim, Kwang Jin

    2016-04-01

    Artificial muscle (AM) technology is an excellent candidate for creating cilia-based structures for bio-inspired locomotion, maneuvering, and acoustic systems. We developed an AM based cilia fiber which are soft, flexible, easily shaped and low power consumption. The developed cilium has a diameter of around 200 µm and prepared through polymer injection technique. Nafion was used for base polymer for cilia and fabricated IPMCs via platinum electroless plating process. The prepared cilia were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis. The 2 point probe was conducted to measure electrode surface resistance of prepared IPMCs. We further characterized the cross-sectional morphology and studied the electromechanical performances (displacement and blocking force) of the prepared IPMC actuators. Also we created prototype mm-sized AM fiber cilia array (3x20) and tested the actuation of AM cilia fiber under external electric field.

  4. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Is it only cilia dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Novas, Rossina; Cardenas-Rodriguez, Magdalena; Irigoín, Florencia; Badano, Jose L

    2015-11-14

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous, pleiotropic disorder, characterized by both congenital and late onset defects. From the analysis of the mutational burden in patients to the functional characterization of the BBS proteins, this syndrome has become a model for both understanding oligogenic patterns of inheritance and the biology of a particular cellular organelle: the primary cilium. Here we briefly review the genetics of BBS to then focus on the function of the BBS proteins, not only in the context of the cilium but also highlighting potential extra-ciliary roles that could be relevant to the etiology of the disorder. Finally, we provide an overview of how the study of this rare syndrome has contributed to the understanding of cilia biology and how this knowledge has informed on the cellular basis of different clinical manifestations that characterize BBS and the ciliopathies.

  5. Microfabrication of IPMC cilia for bio-inspired flow sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hong; Li, Wen; Tan, Xiaobo

    2012-04-01

    As the primary flow sensing organ for fishes, the lateral line system plays a critical role in fish behavior. Analogous to its biological counterpart, an artificial lateral line system, consisting of arrays of micro flow sensors, is expected to be instrumental in the navigation and control of underwater robots. In this paper we investigate the microfabrication of ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) cilia for the purpose of flow sensing. While existing macro- and microfabrication methods for IPMCs have predominantly focused on planar structures, we propose a device where micro IPMC beams stand upright on a substrate to effectively interact with the flow. Challenges in the casting of 3D Nafion structure and selective formation of electrodes are discussed, and potential solutions for addressing these challenges are presented together with preliminary microfabrication results.

  6. Ion channels and calcium signaling in motile cilia

    PubMed Central

    Doerner, Julia F; Delling, Markus; Clapham, David E

    2015-01-01

    The beating of motile cilia generates fluid flow over epithelia in brain ventricles, airways, and Fallopian tubes. Here, we patch clamp single motile cilia of mammalian ependymal cells and examine their potential function as a calcium signaling compartment. Resting motile cilia calcium concentration ([Ca2+] ~170 nM) is only slightly elevated over cytoplasmic [Ca2+] (~100 nM) at steady state. Ca2+ changes that arise in the cytoplasm rapidly equilibrate in motile cilia. We measured CaV1 voltage-gated calcium channels in ependymal cells, but these channels are not specifically enriched in motile cilia. Membrane depolarization increases ciliary [Ca2+], but only marginally alters cilia beating and cilia-driven fluid velocity within short (~1 min) time frames. We conclude that beating of ependymal motile cilia is not tightly regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels, unlike that of well-studied motile cilia and flagella in protists, such as Paramecia and Chlamydomonas. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11066.001 PMID:26650848

  7. Linearly polarised photon beams at ELSA and measurement of the beam asymmetry in π0_{} photoproduction off the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, D.; Bantes, B.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D. E.; Beck, R.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Castelijns, R.; Crede, V.; Ehmanns, A.; Essig, K.; Ewald, R.; Fabry, I.; Frommberger, F.; Fornet-Ponse, K.; Fuchs, M.; Funke, C.; Gridnev, A. B.; Gutz, E.; Hillert, W.; Höffgen, S.; Hoffmeister, P.; Horn, I.; Jaegle, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E.; Konrad, M.; Kotulla, M.; Krusche, B.; Löhner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Lotz, J.; Lugert, S.; Menze, D.; Mertens, T.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Metag, V.; Morales, C.; Nanova, M.; Novinski, D. V.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L. M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Schmidt, C.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S.; Süle, A.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Trnka, D.; Walther, D.; Weinheimer, C.; Wendel, C.

    2009-03-01

    At the electron accelerator ELSA a linearly polarised tagged photon beam is produced by coherent bremsstrahlung off a diamond crystal. Orientation and energy range of the linear polarisation can be deliberately chosen by accurate positioning of the crystal with a goniometer. The degree of polarisation is determined by the form of the scattered electron spectrum. Good agreement between experiment and expectations on the basis of the experimental conditions is obtained. Polarisation degrees of ensuremath P_{γ}=40 % are typically achieved at half of the primary electron energy. The determination of ensuremath P_{γ} is confirmed by measuring the beam asymmetry, Σ , in π0_{} photoproduction and by a comparison of the results to independent measurements using laser backscattering.

  8. Evidence of a role of inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase INPP5E in cilia formation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Luo, Na; Lu, Jingping; Sun, Yang

    2012-12-15

    Inositol phosphatases are important regulators of cell signaling and membrane trafficking. Mutations in inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase, INPP5E, have been identified in Joubert syndrome, a rare congenital disorder characterized by midbrain malformation, retinitis pigmentosa, renal cysts, and polydactyly. Previous studies have implicated primary cilia abnormalities in Joubert syndrome, yet the role of INPP5E in cilia formation is not well understood. In this study, we examined the function of INPP5E in cilia development in zebrafish. Using specific antisense morpholino oligonucleotides to knockdown Inpp5e expression, we observed phenotypes of microphthalmia, pronephros cysts, pericardial effusion, and left-right body axis asymmetry. The Inpp5e morphant zebrafish exhibited shortened and decreased cilia formation in the Kupffer's vesicle and pronephric ducts as compared to controls. Epinephrine-stimulated melanosome trafficking was delayed in the Inpp5e zebrafish morphants. Expression of human INPP5E expression rescued the phenotypic defects in the Inpp5e morphants. Taken together, we showed that INPP5E is critical for the cilia development in zebrafish.

  9. ATR promotes cilia signalling: links to developmental impacts

    PubMed Central

    Stiff, Tom; Casar Tena, Teresa; O'Driscoll, Mark; Jeggo, Penny A.; Philipp, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and RAD3-related) cause Seckel syndrome (ATR-SS), a microcephalic primordial dwarfism disorder. Hitherto, the clinical manifestation of ATR deficiency has been attributed to its canonical role in DNA damage response signalling following replication fork stalling/collapse. Here, we show that ATR regulates cilia-dependent signalling in a manner that can be uncoupled from its function during replication. ATR-depleted or patient-derived ATR-SS cells form cilia of slightly reduced length but are dramatically impaired in cilia-dependent signalling functions, including growth factor and Sonic hedgehog signalling. To better understand the developmental impact of ATR loss of function, we also used zebrafish as a model. Zebrafish embryos depleted of Atr resembled ATR-SS morphology, showed a modest but statistically significant reduction in cilia length and other morphological features indicative of cilia dysfunction. Additionally, they displayed defects in left-right asymmetry including ambiguous expression of southpaw, incorrectly looped hearts and randomized localization of internal organs including the pancreas, features typically conferred by cilia dysfunction. Our findings reveal a novel role for ATR in cilia signalling distinct from its canonical function during replication and strengthen emerging links between cilia function and development. PMID:26908596

  10. Polarisation modulation in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Adam; Maccarone, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    X-ray polarimetry promises to provide a powerful new lever arm for studying accretion onto black holes with the next generation of X-ray telescopes. I will discuss how polarisation can be used to help constrain the physical origin of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in the X-ray light curves of accreting black holes. QPOs may be signatures of the frame dragging effect: in General Relativity, a spinning black hole twists up the surrounding space-time, causing vertical precession of nearby orbits. In the truncated disc / precessing inner flow model, the entire inner accretion flow precesses as a solid body causing a modulation in the X-ray flux through solid angle and Doppler effects. This model also predicts the observed polarisation of the X-ray signal to vary quasi-periodically. I will summarise our work to model the polarisation signal from a precessing accretion flow, starting with simple assumptions about the emission mechanism but taking General Relativity fully into account. We find that it should be possible to measure the predicted modulation in polarisation degree for a reasonable region of parameter space with a polarimeter capable of detecting ~60 counts per second from a bright black hole binary. I will also show that sensitivity can be greatly improved by correlating the signal with a high count rate reference band signal.

  11. ciliaFA: a research tool for automated, high-throughput measurement of ciliary beat frequency using freely available software.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire M; Djakow, Jana; Free, Robert C; Djakow, Petr; Lonnen, Rana; Williams, Gwyneth; Pohunek, Petr; Hirst, Robert A; Easton, Andrew J; Andrew, Peter W; O'Callaghan, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of ciliary function for assessment of patients suspected of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and for research studies of respiratory and ependymal cilia requires assessment of both ciliary beat pattern and beat frequency. While direct measurement of beat frequency from high-speed video recordings is the most accurate and reproducible technique it is extremely time consuming. The aim of this study was to develop a freely available automated method of ciliary beat frequency analysis from digital video (AVI) files that runs on open-source software (ImageJ) coupled to Microsoft Excel, and to validate this by comparison to the direct measuring high-speed video recordings of respiratory and ependymal cilia. These models allowed comparison to cilia beating between 3 and 52 Hz. Digital video files of motile ciliated ependymal (frequency range 34 to 52 Hz) and respiratory epithelial cells (frequency 3 to 18 Hz) were captured using a high-speed digital video recorder. To cover the range above between 18 and 37 Hz the frequency of ependymal cilia were slowed by the addition of the pneumococcal toxin pneumolysin. Measurements made directly by timing a given number of individual ciliary beat cycles were compared with those obtained using the automated ciliaFA system. The overall mean difference (± SD) between the ciliaFA and direct measurement high-speed digital imaging methods was -0.05 ± 1.25 Hz, the correlation coefficient was shown to be 0.991 and the Bland-Altman limits of agreement were from -1.99 to 1.49 Hz for respiratory and from -2.55 to 3.25 Hz for ependymal cilia. A plugin for ImageJ was developed that extracts pixel intensities and performs fast Fourier transformation (FFT) using Microsoft Excel. The ciliaFA software allowed automated, high throughput measurement of respiratory and ependymal ciliary beat frequency (range 3 to 52 Hz) and avoids operator error due to selection bias. We have included free access to the ciliaFA plugin and

  12. Planetary polarisation measurements with small telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masding, Philip; Rossi, Loic; Miles, Phil

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a method for measuring the linear polarisation of planets which is accessible to experienced amateur astronomers. The method requires a telescope with an aperture of about 20cm or more together with a linear polarising filter and a planetary imaging camera. Many suitable cameras are available and they can record uncompressed video at frame rates of 10 to 60 per second. Typically this rate will depend on the brightness of the source and size of the telescope. An ideal camera will be monochrome and is used with separate colour filters and a polarising filter. The method is to attach the colour and polarising filters to the camera and record a series of video clips. After recording each video clip the camera and filters are rotated by about 20 degrees until the total rotation is over 180 degrees. Each video clip is then stacked to produce a single low noise image. Most stacking software can sort the video frames according to quality, so the stack is based on a selected percentage of the best frames. There are several freeware stacking programs available which are primarily used for planetary imaging in general but are very suitable for polarisation. Original videos are mostly 8 bit but noise allows the combined stack to have a higher effective resolution and it is saved in 16 bit format. The stacked images are currently processed in Matlab, although the algorithms are being incorporated in Winjupos which is freeware. Results so far have been primarily for Jupiter, but we also have some data for Venus. The Matlab code is used to register the stacked frames (removing any camera rotation) and in the case of Jupiter, compensate for rotation of the planet during the video capture process. Accurate image registration is crucial for this method. A disk function is also applied to allow for the changing illumination angle as the planet rotates. A least squares function calculates the best fit cos squared curve for the variation of light at each point in the

  13. IFT-Cargo Interactions and Protein Transport in Cilia.

    PubMed

    Lechtreck, Karl F

    2015-12-01

    The motile and sensory functions of cilia and flagella are indispensable for human health. Cilia assembly requires a dedicated protein shuttle, intraflagellar transport (IFT), a bidirectional motility of multi-megadalton protein arrays along ciliary microtubules. IFT functions as a protein carrier delivering hundreds of distinct proteins into growing cilia. IFT-based protein import and export continue in fully grown cilia and are required for ciliary maintenance and sensing. Large ciliary building blocks might depend on IFT to move through the transition zone, which functions as a ciliary gate. Smaller, freely diffusing proteins, such as tubulin, depend on IFT to be concentrated or removed from cilia. As I discuss here, recent work provides insights into how IFT interacts with its cargoes and how the transport is regulated.

  14. An age of enlightenment for cilia: The FASEB Summer Research Conference on the “Biology of Cilia and Flagella”

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Pamela V.; Lechtreck, Karl F.

    2015-01-01

    From July 19–24, 2015, 169 clinicians and basic scientists gathered in the vertiginous heights of Snowmass, Colorado (2,502 m) for the fourth FASEB summer research conference on the ‘Biology of Cilia and Flagella’. Organizers Maureen Barr (Rutgers University), Iain Drummond (Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School), and Jagesh Shah (Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School) assembled a program filled with new data and forward-thinking ideas documenting the ongoing growth of the field. Sixty oral presentations and 77 posters covered novel aspects of cilia structure, ciliogenesis, cilia motility, cilia-mediated signaling, and cilia-related disease. In this report, we summarize the meeting, highlight exciting developments and discuss open questions. PMID:26597000

  15. An age of enlightenment for cilia: The FASEB summer research conference on the "Biology of Cilia and Flagella".

    PubMed

    Tran, Pamela V; Lechtreck, Karl F

    2016-01-15

    From July 19-24, 2015, 169 clinicians and basic scientists gathered in the vertiginous heights of Snowmass, Colorado (2502 m) for the fourth FASEB summer research conference on the 'Biology of Cilia and Flagella'. Organizers Maureen Barr (Rutgers University), Iain Drummond (Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School), and Jagesh Shah (Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School) assembled a program filled with new data and forward-thinking ideas documenting the ongoing growth of the field. Sixty oral presentations and 77 posters covered novel aspects of cilia structure, ciliogenesis, cilia motility, cilia-mediated signaling, and cilia-related disease. In this report, we summarize the meeting, highlight exciting developments and discuss open questions.

  16. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETER: Dependence of polarisation of radiation of a linear Nd:YAG laser on the pump radiation polarisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Nikolai V.; Lariontsev, E. G.; Naumkin, Nikolai I.

    2004-09-01

    The dependence of polarisation characteristics of radiation of a linear Nd:YAG laser on polarisation of radiation of a pump diode laser is studied experimentally and theoretically. It is shown that, in the case of polarisation isotropy of the optical resonator, the polarisation of radiation of the Nd:YAG laser is completely determined by the polarisation of pump radiation. Based on the vector model of this laser pumped by polarised radiation, an analytic solution describing stationary lasing is obtained.

  17. Emergence of multiple synchronization modes in hydrodynamically-coupled cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanliang; Kanso, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Motile cilia and flagella exhibit different phase coordinations. For example, closely swimming spermatozoa are observed to synchronize together; bi-flagellates Chlamydomonas regulate the flagella in a "breast-stroke" fashion; cilia on the surface of Paramecium beat in a fixed phase lag in an orchestrated wave like fashion. Experimental evidence suggests that phase coordinations can be achieved solely via hydrodynamical interactions. However, the exact mechanisms behind it remain illusive. Here, adapting a "geometric switch" model, we observe different synchronization modes in pairs of hydrodynamically-coupled cilia by changing physical parameters such as the strength of the cilia internal motor and the separation distance between cilia. Interestingly, we find regions in the parameter space where the coupled cilia reach stable phase coordinations and regions where the phase coordinations are sensitive to perturbations. We also find that leaning into the fluid reduces the sensitivity to perturbations, and produces stable phase coordination that is neither in-phase nor anti-phase, which could explain the origin of metachronal waves in large cilia populations.

  18. Dynamics of cilia length in left–right development

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Reduction in the length of motile cilia in the zebrafish left–right organizer (LRO), also known as Kupffer's vesicle, has a large impact on left–right development. Here we demonstrate through genetic overexpression in zebrafish embryos and mathematical modelling that the impact of increased motile cilia length in embryonic LRO fluid flow is milder than that of short cilia. Through Arl13b overexpression, which increases cilia length without impacting cilia beat frequency, we show that the increase in cilium length is associated with a decrease in beat amplitude, resulting in similar flow strengths for Arl13b overexpression and wild-type (WT) embryos, which were not predicted by current theory. Longer cilia exhibit pronounced helical beat patterns and, consequently, lower beat amplitudes relative to WT, a result of an elastohydrodynamic shape transition. For long helical cilia, fluid dynamics modelling predicts a mild (approx. 12%) reduction in the torque exerted on the fluid relative to the WT, resulting in a proportional reduction in flow generation. This mild reduction is corroborated by experiments, providing a mechanism for the mild impact on organ situs. PMID:28405397

  19. Biochemical Studies of Olfaction: Role of Cilia in Odorant Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Rhein, L. D.

    1983-01-01

    Chemoreception in vertebrates is beginning to be understood. Numerous anatomical, behavioral, and physiological studies are now available. Current research efforts are examining the molecular basis of chemoreception. Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) have a functional olfactory system and are a suitable vertebrate model for studying odorant interactions with receptors. Using a biochemical approach, initial events of olfactory recognition were examined; the aim was to determine the location and specificity of odor receptors. Cilia occupy the distal region of the receptor neuron on the trout olfactory epithelium, and their membranes are the postulated locus of odorant receptor sites. A cilia preparation was isolated from the olfactory rosette. The preparation was characterized by quantifying biochemical markers for cilia, along with electron microscopy, all of which substantiated enrichment of cilia. Functional activity was assessed by quantifying binding of several radioactively labeled odorant amino acids. The odorants bound to the cilia in a manner similar to the sedimentable preparation previously isolated from t h e olfactory rosette of the same animal, thus verifying the presence of odor receptors in the cilia preparation. Evidence also confirmed a site TSA which binds L-threonine, L-serine, and L-alanine and a site L which binds L-lysine (and L-arginine). Binding of L-serine and D-alanine showed evidence for a single affinity site while the others showed two affinity sites. Separation of membrane fractions from the cilia preparation revealed that binding activity is associated with a very low density membrane fraction B. PMID:19295786

  20. Fetus Sound Stimulation: Cilia Memristor Effect of Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Jankovic-Raznatovic, Svetlana; Dragojevic-Dikic, Svetlana; Rakic, Snezana; Nikolic, Branka; Plesinac, Snezana; Tasic, Lidija; Perisic, Zivko; Sovilj, Mirjana; Adamovic, Tatjana; Koruga, Djuro

    2014-01-01

    Background. This experimental study evaluates fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA) circulation after the defined prenatal acoustical stimulation (PAS) and the role of cilia in hearing and memory and could explain signal transduction and memory according to cilia optical-acoustical properties. Methods. PAS was performed twice on 119 no-risk term pregnancies. We analyzed fetal MCA circulation before, after first and second PAS. Results. Analysis of the Pulsatility index basic (PIB) and before PAS and Pulsatility index reactive after the first PAS (PIR 1) shows high statistical difference, representing high influence on the brain circulation. Analysis of PIB and Pulsatility index reactive after the second PAS (PIR 2) shows no statistical difference. Cilia as nanoscale structure possess magnetic flux linkage that depends on the amount of charge that has passed between two-terminal variable resistors of cilia. Microtubule resistance, as a function of the current through and voltage across the structure, leads to appearance of cilia memory with the “memristor” property. Conclusion. Acoustical and optical cilia properties play crucial role in hearing and memory processes. We suggest that fetuses are getting used to sound, developing a kind of memory patterns, considering acoustical and electromagnetically waves and involving cilia and microtubules and try to explain signal transduction. PMID:24719851

  1. Fetus sound stimulation: cilia memristor effect of signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Jankovic-Raznatovic, Svetlana; Dragojevic-Dikic, Svetlana; Rakic, Snezana; Nikolic, Branka; Plesinac, Snezana; Tasic, Lidija; Perisic, Zivko; Sovilj, Mirjana; Adamovic, Tatjana; Koruga, Djuro

    2014-01-01

    This experimental study evaluates fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA) circulation after the defined prenatal acoustical stimulation (PAS) and the role of cilia in hearing and memory and could explain signal transduction and memory according to cilia optical-acoustical properties. PAS was performed twice on 119 no-risk term pregnancies. We analyzed fetal MCA circulation before, after first and second PAS. Analysis of the Pulsatility index basic (PIB) and before PAS and Pulsatility index reactive after the first PAS (PIR 1) shows high statistical difference, representing high influence on the brain circulation. Analysis of PIB and Pulsatility index reactive after the second PAS (PIR 2) shows no statistical difference. Cilia as nanoscale structure possess magnetic flux linkage that depends on the amount of charge that has passed between two-terminal variable resistors of cilia. Microtubule resistance, as a function of the current through and voltage across the structure, leads to appearance of cilia memory with the "memristor" property. Acoustical and optical cilia properties play crucial role in hearing and memory processes. We suggest that fetuses are getting used to sound, developing a kind of memory patterns, considering acoustical and electromagnetically waves and involving cilia and microtubules and try to explain signal transduction.

  2. Micro-fluidic actuation using magnetic artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Fahrni, Francis; Prins, Menno W J; van Ijzendoorn, Leo J

    2009-12-07

    We demonstrate advanced fluid manipulations using magnetic polymeric artificial cilia on the walls of a microfluidic channel. In nature, cilia are little hairs covering the surface of micro-organisms which enable them to manipulate a fluid on the micro-scale. The asymmetric movement of natural cilia is crucial to obtain a net fluid flow. We have developed a ferromagnetic polymer made from iron nanoparticles and polydimethylsiloxane, and describe a process that can structure the material into high aspect ratio lying artificial cilia with a length of 300 microm. These artificial cilia were actuated with a homogeneous rotating magnetic field (micro(0)H < 50 mT) generated with a compact external electromagnet. An asymmetric movement involving torsion could be created when the cilia were provided with a remanent magnetisation perpendicular to the plane of rotation of the magnetic field vector. The artificial cilia could be actuated in fluid up to a frequency of approximately 50 Hz. In an aqueous solution in a microfluidic chamber we were able to generate rotational as well as translational fluid movements with fluid velocities up to approximately 0.5 mm s(-1).

  3. Double polarisation experiments in meson photoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Jan

    2016-11-01

    One of the remaining challenges within the standard model is to gain a good understanding of QCD in the non-perturbative regime. A key step towards this aim is baryon spectroscopy, investigating the spectrum and the properties of baryon resonances. To gain access to resonances with small πN partial width, photoproduction experiments provide essential information. Partial wave analyses need to be performed to extract the contributing resonances. Here, a complete experiment is required to unambiguously determine the contributing amplitudes. This involves the measurement of carefully chosen single and double polarisation observables. In a joint endeavour by MAMI, ELSA, and Jefferson Laboratory, a new generation of experiments with polarised beams, polarised proton and neutron targets, and 4π particle detectors have been performed in recent years. Many results of unprecedented quality were recently published by all three experiments, and included by the various partial wave analysis groups in their analyses, leading to substantial improvements, e.g. a more precise determination of resonance parameters. An overview of recent results is given, with an emphasis on results from the CBELSA/TAPS experiment, and their impact on our understanding of the nucleon excitation spectrum is discussed.

  4. Evolutionary implications of localization of the signaling scaffold protein parafusin to both cilia and the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satir, Birgit Hegner; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Liu, Li; Lethan, Mette; Satir, Peter; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2015-02-01

    Parafusin (PFUS), a 63 kDa protein first discovered in the eukaryote Paramecium and known for its role in apicomplexan exocytosis, provides a model for the common origin of cellular systems employing scaffold proteins for targeting and signaling. PFUS is closely related to eubacterial rather than archeal phosphoglucomutases (PGM) - as we proved by comparison of their 88 sequences - but has no PGM activity. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis with a PFUS-specific peptide antibody showed presence of this protein around the base region of primary cilia in a variety of mammalian cell types, including mouse embryonic (MEFs) and human foreskin fibroblasts (hFFs), human carcinoma stem cells (NT-2 cells), and human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Further, PFUS localized to the nucleus of fibroblasts, and prominently to nucleoli of MEFs. Localization studies were confirmed by Western blot analysis, showing that the PFUS antibody specifically recognizes a single protein of ca. 63 kDa in both cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Finally, immunofluorescence microscopy analysis showed that PFUS localized to nuclei and cilia in Paramecium. These results support the suggestion that PFUS plays a role in signaling between nucleus and cilia, and that the cilium and the nucleus both evolved around the time of eukaryotic emergence. We hypothesize that near the beginnings of eukaryotic cell evolution, scaffold proteins such as PFUS arose as peripheral membrane protein identifiers for cytoplasmic membrane trafficking and were employed similarly during the subsequent evolution of exocytic, nuclear transport, and ciliogenic mechanisms. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  5. How to polarise all neutrons in one beam: a high performance polariser and neutron transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, D. Martin; Bentley, P. M.; Pappas, C.

    2016-09-01

    Polarised neutron beams are used in disciplines as diverse as magnetism,soft matter or biology. However, most of these applications often suffer from low flux also because the existing neutron polarising methods imply the filtering of one of the spin states, with a transmission of 50% at maximum. With the purpose of using all neutrons that are usually discarded, we propose a system that splits them according to their polarisation, flips them to match the spin direction, and then focuses them at the sample. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations show that this is achievable over a wide wavelength range and with an outstanding performance at the price of a more divergent neutron beam at the sample position.

  6. Hydrodynamic interactions of cilia on a spherical body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasouri, Babak; Elfring, Gwynn J.

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of metachronal waves in ciliated microorganisms can arise solely from the hydrodynamic interactions between the cilia. For a chain of cilia attached to a flat ciliate, it was observed that fluid forces can lead the system to form a metachronal wave. However, several microorganisms such as paramecium and volvox possess a curved shaped ciliate body. To understand the effect of this geometry on the formation of metachronal waves, we evaluate the hydrodynamic interactions of cilia near a large spherical body. Using a minimal model, we show that for a chain of cilia around the sphere, the embedded periodicity in the geometry leads the system to synchronize. We also report an emergent wave-like behavior when an asymmetry is introduced to the system.

  7. Hydrodynamic interactions of cilia on a spherical body.

    PubMed

    Nasouri, Babak; Elfring, Gwynn J

    2016-03-01

    Microorganisms develop coordinated beating patterns on surfaces lined with cilia known as metachronal waves. For a chain of cilia attached to a flat ciliate, it has been shown that hydrodynamic interactions alone can lead the system to synchronize. However, several microorganisms possess a curve-shaped ciliate body and so to understand the effect of this geometry on the formation of metachronal waves, we evaluate the hydrodynamic interactions of cilia near a large spherical body. Using a minimal model, we show that for a chain of cilia around the sphere, the natural periodicity in the geometry leads the system to synchronize. We also report an emergent wavelike behavior when an asymmetry is introduced to the system.

  8. Microscale imaging of cilia-driven fluid flow

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Brendan K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cilia-driven fluid flow is important for multiple processes in the body, including respiratory mucus clearance, gamete transport in the oviduct, right-left patterning in the embryonic node, and cerebrospinal fluid circulation. Multiple imaging techniques have been applied towards quantifying ciliary flow. Here we review common velocimetry methods of quantifying fluid flow. We then discuss four important optical modalities, including light microscopy, epifluorescence, confocal microscopy, and optical coherence tomography, that have been used to investigate cilia-driven flow. PMID:25417211

  9. Tracing the origins of centrioles, cilia, and flagella

    PubMed Central

    Azimzadeh, Juliette; Pereira-Leal, José. B.

    2011-01-01

    Centrioles/basal bodies (CBBs) are microtubule-based cylindrical organelles that nucleate the formation of centrosomes, cilia, and flagella. CBBs, cilia, and flagella are ancestral structures; they are present in all major eukaryotic groups. Despite the conservation of their core structure, there is variability in their architecture, function, and biogenesis. Recent genomic and functional studies have provided insight into the evolution of the structure and function of these organelles. PMID:21788366

  10. Branchial Cilia and Sperm Flagella Recruit Distinct Axonemal Components

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Alu; Shiba, Kogiku; Cai, Chunhua; Inaba, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella have highly conserved 9 + 2 structures. They are functionally diverged to play cell-type-specific roles even in a multicellular organism. Although their structural components are therefore believed to be common, few studies have investigated the molecular diversity of the protein components of the cilia and flagella in a single organism. Here we carried out a proteomic analysis and compared protein components between branchial cilia and sperm flagella in a marine invertebrate chordate, Ciona intestinalis. Distinct feature of protein recruitment in branchial cilia and sperm flagella has been clarified; (1) Isoforms of α- and β-tubulins as well as those of actins are distinctly used in branchial cilia or sperm flagella. (2) Structural components, such as dynein docking complex, tektins and an outer dense fiber protein, are used differently by the cilia and flagella. (3) Sperm flagella are specialized for the cAMP- and Ca2+-dependent regulation of outer arm dynein and for energy metabolism by glycolytic enzymes. Our present study clearly demonstrates that flagellar or ciliary proteins are properly recruited according to their function and stability, despite their apparent structural resemblance and conservation. PMID:25962172

  11. The retinitis pigmentosa protein RP2 interacts with polycystin 2 and regulates cilia-mediated vertebrate development

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Toby; Zhou, Weibin; Jenkins, Paul; Liu, Chia-Jen; Swaroop, Anand; Khanna, Hemant; Martens, Jeffrey; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Margolis, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Ciliopathies represent a growing group of human genetic diseases whose etiology lies in defects in ciliogenesis or ciliary function. Given the established entity of renal–retinal ciliopathies, we have been examining the role of cilia-localized proteins mutated in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in regulating renal ciliogenesis or cilia-dependent signaling cascades. Specifically, this study examines the role of the RP2 gene product with an emphasis on renal and vertebrate development. We demonstrate that in renal epithelia, RP2 localizes to the primary cilium through dual acylation of the amino-terminus. We also show that RP2 forms a calcium-sensitive complex with the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease protein polycystin 2. Ablation of RP2 by shRNA promotes swelling of the cilia tip that may be a result of aberrant trafficking of polycystin 2 and other ciliary proteins. Morpholino-mediated repression of RP2 expression in zebrafish results in multiple developmental defects that have been previously associated with ciliary dysfunction, such as hydrocephalus, kidney cysts and situs inversus. Finally, we demonstrate that, in addition to our observed physical interaction between RP2 and polycystin 2, dual morpholino-mediated knockdown of polycystin 2 and RP2 results in enhanced situs inversus, indicating that these two genes also regulate a common developmental process. This work suggests that RP2 may be an important regulator of ciliary function through its association with polycystin 2 and provides evidence of a further link between retinal and renal cilia function. PMID:20729296

  12. Polarised Photon Beams for the BGO-OD Experiment at ELSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, T.; Bella, A.; Alef, S.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Becker, M.; Bielefeldt, P.; Boese, S.; Braghieri, A.; Brinkmann, K.; Cole, P.; Curciarello, F.; De Leo, V.; Di Salvo, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Fantini, A.; Freyermuth, O.; Friedrich, S.; Frommberger, F.; Ganenko, V.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Giardina, G.; Goertz, S.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, P.; Hillert, W.; Ignatov, A.; Jahn, R.; Joosten, R.; Jude, T. C.; Klein, F.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopatin, I. V.; Mandaglio, G.; Messi, F.; Messi, R.; Metag, V.; Moricciani, D.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Nanova, M.; Nedorezov, V.; Novinskiy, D.; Pedroni, P.; Reitz, B.; Romaniuk, M.; Rostomyan, T.; Rudnev, N.; Schaerf, C.; Scheluchin, G.; Schmieden, H.; Stugelev, A.; Sumachev, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Vegna, V.; Walther, D.; Watts, D.; Zaunick, H.

    The new BGO-OD experiment at the electron accelerator ELSA, of the University of Bonn, is designed to study the reaction dynamics of nucleon excitations in meson photoproduction. It consists of a central BGO calorimeter with a magnetic spectrometer in forward direction. The physics programme includes the measurement of polarisation observables using linearly and circularly polarised photon beams. Linear polarisation is obtained by coherent bremsstrahlung off a diamond crystal, and circular polarisation is obtained via bremsstrahlung from longitudinally polarised electrons. The degree of linear polarisation is determined from the bremsstrahlung spectrum itself. To determine the polarisation of the circularly polarised photon beam, the polarisation of the electron beam is measured by a Møller polarimeter. As a preliminary consistency check, the (linear) polarisation observable, Σ, was compared to world data for π0 and η photoproduction. To determine the degree of circular polarisation, a Møller polarimeter was setup and first measurements of the electron beam polarisation performed.

  13. The compact polarised emission of AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabuzda, Denise

    To impose some kind of order on a broad review of various recent observational VLBI polarisation results, these results will be considered in the framework of the hypothesis that many Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) jets have helical magnetic (B) fields. The results of the MOJAVE project, in which 133 radio-bright AGN are regularly monitored at 15 GHz with polarisation sensitivity with the VLBA, represents an extremely useful resource that is now available to the astronomical community. There are a growing number of AGN whose jets show clear evidence for the presence of helical B fields: extended regions in the VLBI jets where the predominant B field is orthogonal to the jet direction, stretches of VLBI jets where the inferred B field remains nearly orthogonal to the jet direction in the presence of substantial bending of the jet, the common occurrence of "spine+sheath" jet polarisation structures and the presence of Faraday-rotation gradients across the VLBI jets. This compels us to take very seriously the idea that some, possibly many, AGN jets have helical B fields. In fact, such fields can come about very naturally as a consequence of the joint action of rotation of the central black hole+accretion disc and the jet outflow. As a whole, the recent observational results considered here suggest that we must look at AGN jets as fundamentally electromagnetic, current-carrying structures if we wish to fully understand their nature. Possible observational tests to distinguish between alternative interpretations for some of the observed phenomena are also discussed.

  14. Linking the Primary Cilium to Cell Migration in Tissue Repair and Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Veland, Iben Rønn; Lindbæk, Louise; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are unique sensory organelles that coordinate cellular signaling networks in vertebrates. Inevitably, defects in the formation or function of primary cilia lead to imbalanced regulation of cellular processes that causes multisystemic disorders and diseases, commonly known as ciliopathies. Mounting evidence has demonstrated that primary cilia coordinate multiple activities that are required for cell migration, which, when they are aberrantly regulated, lead to defects in organogenesis and tissue repair, as well as metastasis of tumors. Here, we present an overview on how primary cilia may contribute to the regulation of the cellular signaling pathways that control cyclic processes in directional cell migration. PMID:26955067

  15. Experimental investigation of the flow induced by artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Hussong, J; Schorr, N; Belardi, J; Prucker, O; Rühe, J; Westerweel, J

    2011-06-21

    The fluid transport produced by rectangular shaped, magnetically actuated artificial cilia of 70 μm length and 20 μm width was determined by means of phase-locked Micro Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) measurements in a closed microfluidic chamber. The phase-averaged flow produced by the artificial cilia reached up to 130 μm s(-1) with an actuation cycle frequency of 10 Hz. Analysis of the measured flow data indicate that the present system is capable of achieving volume flow rates of V[combining dot above](cilia) = 14 ± 4 μl min(-1) in a micro channel of 0.5 × 5 mm(2) cross-sectional area when no back pressure is built up. This corresponds to an effective pressure gradient of 6 ± 1 Pa m(-1), which equals a pressure difference of 0.6 ± 0.1 mPa over a distance of 100 μm between two rows of cilia. These results were derived analytically from the measured velocity profile by treating the cilia as a thin boundary layer. While the cilia produce phase-averaged velocities of the order of O(10(2)μm s(-1)), time-resolved measurements showed that the flow field reverses two times during one actuation cycle inducing instantaneous velocities of up to approximately 2 mm s(-1). This shows that the flow field is dominated by fluid oscillations and flow rates are expected to increase if the beating motion of the cilia is further improved.

  16. Conservation of ciliary proteins in plants with no cilia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic cilia are complex, highly conserved microtubule-based organelles with a broad phylogenetic distribution. Cilia were present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and many proteins involved in cilia function have been conserved through eukaryotic diversification. However, cilia have also been lost multiple times in different lineages, with at least two losses occurring within the land plants. Whereas all non-seed plants produce cilia for motility of male gametes, some gymnosperms and all angiosperms lack cilia. During these evolutionary losses, proteins with ancestral ciliary functions may be lost or co-opted into different functions. Results Here we identify a core set of proteins with an inferred ciliary function that are conserved in ciliated eukaryotic species. We interrogate this genomic dataset to identify proteins with a predicted ancestral ciliary role that have been maintained in non-ciliated land plants. In support of our prediction, we demonstrate that several of these proteins have a flagellar localisation in protozoan trypanosomes. The phylogenetic distribution of these genes within the land plants indicates evolutionary scenarios of either sub- or neo-functionalisation and expression data analysis shows that these genes are highly expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana pollen cells. Conclusions A large number of proteins possess a phylogenetic ciliary profile indicative of ciliary function. Remarkably, many genes with an ancestral ciliary role are maintained in non-ciliated land plants. These proteins have been co-opted to perform novel functions, most likely before the loss of cilia, some of which appear related to the formation of the male gametes. PMID:22208660

  17. Effect of viscosity on metachrony in mucus propelling cilia.

    PubMed

    Gheber, L; Korngreen, A; Priel, Z

    1998-01-01

    In the present work we report that increasing the viscosity of the medium caused not only a decrease in the ciliary beat frequency but also changes in the metachrony and correlation between cilia. The study was performed using double and triple simultaneous photoelectric measurements on cultured ciliary cells from the frog esophagus in the viscosity range of 1-2,000 cp. We observed that increasing the viscosity intensified the fluctuations in all the measured parameters. Ciliary beat frequency decreased moderately. Even at quite high viscosities (circa 2000 cp.), cilia were still active with beating frequencies of 3-5 Hz. In addition, the degree of correlation between cilia parallel to the effective stroke direction (ESD) decreased, while that perpendicular to the ESD at a low range of viscosities remained unchanged and even increased at high viscosities. Medium viscosities in the range of 30-1,500 cp. altered the metachronal wave properties of cultured frog esophagus. The metachronal wavelength increased by up to 50%, and the wave direction changed towards more orthoplectic type of coordination. According to our recently suggested model [Gheber and Priel, 1990: Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 16:167-181], these effects can be explained by a decrease in the temporal asymmetry of the ciliary beat. Since similar results were observed in water propelling cilia of Paramecium subjected to medium viscosity ranges of up to 40 cp. [Machemer, 1972: J. Exp. Biol. 57:239-259], we conclude that hydrodynamic interactions govern the metachronal wave properties of both mucus and water propelling cilia, though mucus propelling cilia, with their better adaptation to increased load, are affected at much higher viscosities than water propelling cilia.

  18. The coiled-coil domain containing protein CCDC151 is required for the function of IFT-dependent motile cilia in animals.

    PubMed

    Jerber, Julie; Baas, Dominique; Soulavie, Fabien; Chhin, Brigitte; Cortier, Elisabeth; Vesque, Christine; Thomas, Joëlle; Durand, Bénédicte

    2014-02-01

    Cilia are evolutionarily conserved organelles endowed with essential physiological and developmental functions. In humans, disruption of cilia motility or signaling leads to complex pleiotropic genetic disorders called ciliopathies. Cilia motility requires the assembly of multi-subunit motile components such as dynein arms, but mechanisms underlying their assembly pathway and transport into the axoneme are still largely unknown. We identified a previously uncharacterized coiled-coil domain containing protein CCDC151, which is evolutionarily conserved in motile ciliated species and shares ancient features with the outer dynein arm-docking complex 2 of Chlamydomonas. In Drosophila, we show that CG14127/CCDC151 is associated with motile intraflagellar transport (IFT)-dependent cilia and required for geotaxis behavior of adult flies. In zebrafish, Ccdc151 is expressed in tissues with motile cilia, and morpholino-induced depletion of Ccdc151 leads to left-right asymmetry defects and kidney cysts. We demonstrate that Ccdc151 is required for proper motile function of cilia in the Kupffer's vesicle and in the pronephros by controlling dynein arm assembly, showing that Ccdc151 is a novel player in the control of IFT-dependent dynein arm assembly in animals. However, we observed that CCDC151 is also implicated in other cellular functions in vertebrates. In zebrafish, ccdc151 is involved in proper orientation of cell divisions in the pronephros and genetically interacts with prickle1 in this process. Furthermore, knockdown experiments in mammalian cells demonstrate that CCDC151 is implicated in the regulation of primary cilium length. Hence, CCDC151 is required for motile cilia function in animals but has acquired additional non-motile functions in vertebrates.

  19. Dynamic nuclear polarisation via the integrated solid effect I: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henstra, A.; Wenckebach, W. Th.

    2014-07-01

    In the hyperpolarisation method known as dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP), a small amount of unpaired electron spins is added to the sample containing the nuclear spins and the polarisation of these unpaired electron spins is transferred to the nuclear spins by means of a microwave field. Traditional DNP uses weak continuous wave (CW) microwave fields, so perturbation methods can be used to calculate the polarisation transfer. A much faster transfer of the electron spin polarisation is obtained with the integrated solid effect (ISE) which uses strong pulsed microwave fields. As in nuclear orientation via electron spin locking, the polarisation transfer is coherent, similar to the coherence transfer between nuclear spins. This paper presents a theoretical approach to calculate this polarisation transfer. ISE is successfully used for a fast polarisation transfer from short-lived photo-excited triplet states to the surrounding nuclear spins in molecular crystals. These triplet states are strongly aligned in the photo-excitation process and do not require the low temperatures and strong magnetic fields needed to polarise the electron spins in traditional DNP. In the following paper, the theory is applied to the system naphthalene-h8 doped with pentacene-d14 which provides the photo-excited triplet states, and compared with experimental results.

  20. The polarised internal target for the PAX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciullo, G.; Barion, L.; Barschel, C.; Grigoriev, K.; Lenisa, P.; Nass, A.; Sarkadi, J.; Statera, M.; Steffens, E.; Tagliente, G.

    2011-05-01

    The PAX (Polarized Antiproton eXperiment) collaboration aims to polarise antiproton beams stored in ring by means of spin-filtering. The experimental setup is based on a polarised internal gas target, surrounded by a detection system for the measurement of spin observables. In this report, we present results from the commission of the PAX target (atomic beam source, openable cell, and polarimeter).

  1. Application of laboratory and digital techniques for visual enhancement during the ultrastructural assessment of cilia.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Josef A

    2017-09-11

    Routine diagnostic electron microscopy of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is based on the findings of ultrastructural defects of axonemal components. Assessment of the typical abnormalities can be enhanced by improving the sample preservation status using tannic acid (TA) as additive in the biopsy fixation or processing steps. Another option is the implementation of computer-assisted image analysis tools. Advancements in high-resolution 3D visualization of the axonemal structure have been noted, with great potential for the future diagnosis of inherited cilia disorders.

  2. Circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence and electroluminescence of iridium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tian-Yi; Jing, Yi-Ming; Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Lin; Tang, Zhiyong; Zheng, You-Xuan; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2015-10-01

    Nearly all the neutral iridium complexes widely used as dopants in PhOLEDs are racemic mixtures; however, this study observed that these complexes can be separated into stable optically active Λ and ∆ isomers and that their chirality is an intrinsic property. The circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence (CPPPL) signals of Λ/Δ isomers are perfect mirror images with opposite polarisation and equal intensity exhibiting a “handedness” for the polarisation. For the first time, we applied the Λ/Δ iridium isomers as emitters in OLEDs, and the circularly polarised phosphorescent electroluminescence (CPPEL) spectra reveal completely positive or negative broad peaks consistent with the CPPPL spectra. The results demonstrate that the Λ/Δ isomers have potential application for 3D OLEDs because they can exhibit high efficiency and luminance, and 3D display technology based on circularly polarised light is the most comfortable for the eyes.

  3. The Roles of Primary Cilia in Cardiovascular System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    catenin- dependent Wnt signalling through dual ciliary and non -ciliary mechanisms. Nat Cell Biol 10:70–76. Gerdes JM, Liu Y, Zaghloul NA, Leitch CC...constrains beta-catenin- dependent Wnt signalling through dual ciliary and non -ciliary mechanisms. Nat Cell Biol 10:70–76. Gerdes JM, Liu Y, Zaghloul NA...involvement of centrosome and basal body dysfunction in the pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes . Diabetes 2005; 54(5

  4. The Roles of Primary Cilia in Cardiovascular System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension and aneurysm are a prevalent problem in our society. Because the risk of these vascular diseases is too important to ignore, our studies...are designed to provide exciting and original concepts to examine the etiologies of hypertension and aneurysm with regard to mechanosensory... Problems ...….……………………………………………… 8 6. Products…………………………………….……….….……………. 9 7. Participants & Other Collaborating Organizations……….……… 9 8. Special

  5. Microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired and magnetically actuated artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Ling-Ying; Hsu, Chun-Chieh; Mani, Karthick

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired artificial cilia provide a promising alternative for lab-on-a-chip applications. However, the ability of actuating artificial cilia to achieve a time-dependent local flow control with high accuracy together with the elegance of full integration into the biocompatible microfluidic platforms remains remote. Driven by this motive, the current work has constructed a series of artificial cilia inside a microchannel to facilitate the time-dependent flow propulsion through artificial cilia actuation with high-speed (>40 Hz) circular beating behavior. The generated flow was quantified using micro-particle image velocimetry and particle tracking with instantaneous net flow velocity of up to 10(1 ) μm/s. Induced flow patterns caused by the tilted conical motion of artificial cilia constitutes efficient fluid propulsion at microscale. This flow phenomenon was further measured and illustrated by examining the induced flow behavior across the depth of the microchannel to provide a global view of the underlying flow propulsion mechanism. The presented analytic paradigms and substantial flow evidence present novel insights into the area of flow manipulation at microscale.

  6. Cryo-electron tomography of motile cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography has been a valuable tool in the analysis of 3D structures of cilia at molecular and cellular levels. It opened a way to reconstruct 3D conformations of proteins in cilia at 3-nm resolution, revealed networks of a number of component proteins in cilia, and has even allowed the study of component dynamics. In particular, we have identified the locations and conformations of all the regular inner and outer dyneins, as well as various regulators such as radial spokes. Since the mid 2000s, cryo-electron tomography has provided us with new knowledge, concepts, and questions in the area of cilia research. Now, after nearly 10 years of application of this technique, we are turning a corner and are at the stage to discuss the next steps. We expect further development of this technique for specimen preparation, data acquisition, and analysis. While combining this tool with other methodologies has already made cryo-electron tomography more biologically significant, we need to continue this cooperation using recently developed biotechnology and cell biology approaches. In this review, we will provide an up-to-date overview of the biological insights obtained by cryo-electron tomography and will discuss future possibilities of this technique in the context of cilia research.

  7. Peroxiredoxin 1 is involved in disassembly of flagella and cilia.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fanghua; Liu, Hongtao; Li, Jie; Xue, Lexun; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2014-02-14

    Cilia/flagella are evolutionarily conserved cellular organelles. In this study, we demonstrated that Dunaliella salina Peroxiredoxin 1 (DsPrdx1) localized to the flagella and basal bodies, and was involved in flagellar disassembly. The link between DsPrdx1 and flagella of Dunaliella salina (D. salina) encouraged us to explore the function of its human homologue, Homo sapiens Peroxiredoxin 1 (HsPrdx1) in development and physiology. Our results showed that HsPrdx1 was overexpressed, and cilia were lost in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells compared with the non-cancerous esophageal epithelial cells Het-1A. Furthermore, when HsPrdx1 was knocked down by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentivirus in ESCC cells, the phenotype of cilia lost can be reversed, and the expression levels of tumor suppressor genes LKB1 and p-AMPK were increased, and the activity of the oncogene Aurora A was inhibited compared with those in cells transfected with scrambe-shRNA lentivirus. These findings firstly showed that Prdx1 is involved in disassembly of flagella and cilia, and suggested that the abnormal expression of the cilia-related gene including Prdx1 may affect both ciliogenesis and cancernogenesis.

  8. Airway Epithelial Cell Cilia and Obstructive Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yaghi, Asma; Dolovich, Myrna B.

    2016-01-01

    Airway epithelium is the first line of defense against exposure of the airway and lung to various inflammatory stimuli. Ciliary beating of airway epithelial cells constitutes an important part of the mucociliary transport apparatus. To be effective in transporting secretions out of the lung, the mucociliary transport apparatus must exhibit a cohesive beating of all ciliated epithelial cells that line the upper and lower respiratory tract. Cilia function can be modulated by exposures to endogenous and exogenous factors and by the viscosity of the mucus lining the epithelium. Cilia function is impaired in lung diseases such as COPD and asthma, and pharmacologic agents can modulate cilia function and mucus viscosity. Cilia beating is reduced in COPD, however, more research is needed to determine the structural-functional regulation of ciliary beating via all signaling pathways and how this might relate to the initiation or progression of obstructive lung diseases. Additionally, genotypes and how these can influence phenotypes and epithelial cell cilia function and structure should be taken into consideration in future investigations. PMID:27845721

  9. Microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired and magnetically actuated artificial cilia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Ling-Ying; Hsu, Chun-Chieh; Mani, Karthick

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired artificial cilia provide a promising alternative for lab-on-a-chip applications. However, the ability of actuating artificial cilia to achieve a time-dependent local flow control with high accuracy together with the elegance of full integration into the biocompatible microfluidic platforms remains remote. Driven by this motive, the current work has constructed a series of artificial cilia inside a microchannel to facilitate the time-dependent flow propulsion through artificial cilia actuation with high-speed (>40 Hz) circular beating behavior. The generated flow was quantified using micro-particle image velocimetry and particle tracking with instantaneous net flow velocity of up to 101 μm/s. Induced flow patterns caused by the tilted conical motion of artificial cilia constitutes efficient fluid propulsion at microscale. This flow phenomenon was further measured and illustrated by examining the induced flow behavior across the depth of the microchannel to provide a global view of the underlying flow propulsion mechanism. The presented analytic paradigms and substantial flow evidence present novel insights into the area of flow manipulation at microscale. PMID:26045730

  10. The C-terminal tails of heterotrimeric kinesin-2 motor subunits directly bind to α-tubulin1: Possible implications for cilia-specific tubulin entry.

    PubMed

    Girotra, Mukul; Srivastava, Shalini; Kulkarni, Anuttama; Barbora, Ayan; Bobra, Kratika; Ghosal, Debnath; Devan, Pavithra; Aher, Amol; Jain, Akanksha; Panda, Dulal; Ray, Krishanu

    2017-02-01

    The assembly of microtubule-based cytoskeleton propels the cilia and flagella growth. Previous studies have indicated that the kinesin-2 family motors transport tubulin into the cilia through intraflagellar transport. Here, we report a direct interaction between the C-terminal tail fragments of heterotrimeric kinesin-2 and α-tubulin1 isoforms in vitro. Blot overlay screen, affinity purification from tissue extracts, cosedimentation with subtilisin-treated microtubule and LC-ESI-MS/MS characterization of the tail-fragment-associated tubulin identified an association between the tail domains and α-tubulin1A/D isotype. The interaction was confirmed by Forster's resonance energy transfer assay in tissue-cultured cells. The overexpression of the recombinant tails in NIH3T3 cells affected the primary cilia growth, which was rescued by coexpression of a α-tubulin1 transgene. Furthermore, fluorescent recovery after photobleach analysis in the olfactory cilia of Drosophila indicated that tubulin is transported in a non-particulate form requiring kinesin-2. These results provide additional new insight into the mechanisms underlying selective tubulin isoform enrichment in the cilia.

  11. Ciliopathy-associated gene Cc2d2a promotes assembly of subdistal appendages on the mother centriole during cilia biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Veleri, Shobi; Manjunath, Souparnika H; Fariss, Robert N; May-Simera, Helen; Brooks, Matthew; Foskett, Trevor A; Gao, Chun; Longo, Teresa A; Liu, Pinghu; Nagashima, Kunio; Rachel, Rivka A; Li, Tiansen; Dong, Lijin; Swaroop, Anand

    2014-06-20

    The primary cilium originates from the mother centriole and participates in critical functions during organogenesis. Defects in cilia biogenesis or function lead to pleiotropic phenotypes. Mutations in centrosome-cilia gene CC2D2A result in Meckel and Joubert syndromes. Here we generate a Cc2d2a(-/-) mouse that recapitulates features of Meckel syndrome including embryonic lethality and multiorgan defects. Cilia are absent in Cc2d2a(-/-) embryonic node and other somatic tissues; disruption of cilia-dependent Shh signalling appears to underlie exencephaly in mutant embryos. The Cc2d2a(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lack cilia, although mother centrioles and pericentriolar proteins are detected. Odf2, associated with subdistal appendages, is absent and ninein is reduced in mutant MEFs. In Cc2d2a(-/-) MEFs, subdistal appendages are lacking or abnormal by transmission electron microscopy. Consistent with this, CC2D2A localizes to subdistal appendages by immuno-EM in wild-type cells. We conclude that CC2D2A is essential for the assembly of subdistal appendages, which anchor cytoplasmic microtubules and prime the mother centriole for axoneme biogenesis.

  12. Chirped elliptically polarised cnoidal waves and polarisation 'chaos' in an isotropic medium with spatial dispersion of cubic nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Vladimir A; Petnikova, V M; Potravkin, N N; Shuvalov, Vladimir V

    2012-12-31

    It is found that chirped elliptically polarised cnoidal waves can propagate and aperiodic regimes, resembling polarisation chaos, can emerge in an isotropic medium with local and nonlocal components of cubic nonlinearity and second-order frequency dispersion. In the particular case of the formation of the waveguides of the same profile for two circularly polarised components of the light field relevant analytical solutions are derived and the frequencies of chirped components are shown to vary in concord with periodic changes of their intensities. In this case, the nature of the changes in the polarisation state during the light wave propagation depends on the values of nonlinear phase shifts of circularly polarised components of the field during the period and is sensitive to changes in the initial conditions. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  13. Anatomical and physiological evidence for polarisation vision in the nocturnal bee Megalopta genalis.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Birgit; Cronin, Thomas W; Ribi, Willi A; Wcislo, William T; Warrant, Eric J

    2007-06-01

    The presence of a specialised dorsal rim area with an ability to detect the e-vector orientation of polarised light is shown for the first time in a nocturnal hymenopteran. The dorsal rim area of the halictid bee Megalopta genalis features a number of characteristic anatomical specialisations including an increased rhabdom diameter and a lack of primary screening pigments. Optically, these specialisations result in wide spatial receptive fields (Deltarho = 14 degrees ), a common adaptation found in the dorsal rim areas of insects used to filter out interfering effects (i.e. clouds) from the sky. In this specialised eye region all nine photoreceptors contribute their microvilli to the entire length of the ommatidia. These orthogonally directed microvilli are anatomically arranged in an almost linear, anterior-posterior orientation. Intracellular recordings within the dorsal rim area show very high polarisation sensitivity and a sensitivity peak within the ultraviolet part of the spectrum.

  14. Centriole distal appendages promote membrane docking, leading to cilia initiation

    PubMed Central

    Tanos, Barbara E.; Yang, Hui-Ju; Soni, Rajesh; Wang, Won-Jing; Macaluso, Frank P.; Asara, John M.; Tsou, Meng-Fu Bryan

    2013-01-01

    The distal appendages (DAPs) of centrioles have been proposed to anchor cilia to the plasma membrane, but their molecular composition, assembly, and exact function in ciliogenesis remain poorly understood. Using quantitative centrosome proteomics and superresolution microscopy, we identified five DAP components, including one previously described (CEP164), one partially characterized (CEP89 [ccdc123]), and three novel (CEP83 [ccdc41], SCLT1, and FBF1) DAP proteins. Analyses of DAP assembly revealed a hierarchy. CEP83 recruits both SCLT1 and CEP89 to centrioles. Subsequent recruitment of FBF1 and CEP164 is independent of CEP89 but mediated by SCLT1. All five DAP components are essential for ciliogenesis; loss of CEP83 specifically blocks centriole-to-membrane docking. Undocked centrioles fail to recruit TTBK2 or release CP110, the two earliest modifications found on centrioles prior to cilia assembly, revealing centriole-to-membrane docking as a temporal and spatial cue promoting cilia initiation. PMID:23348840

  15. Fluid flow due to collective non-reciprocal motion of symmetrically-beating artificial cilia

    PubMed Central

    Khaderi, S. N.; den Toonder, J. M. J.; Onck, P. R.

    2012-01-01

    Using a magneto-mechanical solid-fluid numerical model for permanently magnetic artificial cilia, we show that the metachronal motion of symmetrically beating cilia establishes a net pressure gradient in the direction of the metachronal wave, which creates a unidirectional flow. The flow generated is characterised as a function of the cilia spacing, the length of the metachronal wave, and a dimensionless parameter that characterises the relative importance of the viscous forces over the elastic forces in the cilia. PMID:22662092

  16. A Numerical Study of Muco-Ciliary Transport under the condition of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayathilake, Pahala Gedara; Lee, Wan Lung; Le, Duc Vinh; Lee, Heow Pueh; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2012-11-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a disease due to the defects in motile cilia. A two-dimensional numerical model based on the immersed boundary method coupled with the projection method is used for a preliminary study of the flow physics of muco-ciliary transport of human respiratory tract under PCD conditions. The effects of the cilia beating amplitude, cilia beat pattern (CBP), cilia beat frequency (CBF), immotile cilia, and uncoordinated beating of cilia on mucus transport are investigated. As expected, the mucus velocity decreases as the beating amplitude and CBF decrease. The windscreen wiper motion and rigid rod motion, which are two abnormal CBPs owing to PCD, would greatly reduce the mucus transport. The mucus velocity decreases rather linearly if the number of uniformly distributed immotile cilia increases. The results further show that the mucus velocity would be slightly reduced when the uniformly distributed immotile cilia are rearranged as a cluster of immotile cilia. Furthermore, if the half of the cilia are immotile and uniformly distributed, the incoordination between motile cilia would not significantly affect the mucus velocity.

  17. The Strange Quark Polarisation from COMPASS data

    SciTech Connect

    Kouznetsov, O.

    2009-12-17

    The strange quark helicity distribution {delta}s(x) was derived at LO from the inclusive asymmetry A{sub a,d} and the semi-inclusive asymmetries A{sub 1,d}{sup {pi}}{sup +}, A{sub 1,d}{sup {pi}}{sup -}, A{sub 1,d}{sup K+}, A{sub 1,d}{sup K-}, measured by COMPASS in polarised deep inelastic muon-deuteron scattering. The distribution of {delta}s(x) is compatible with zero in the whole measured range. The value of the first moment of {delta}s and its error are very sensitive to the assumed value of the ratio of the s-bar-quark to u-quark fragmentation functions into positive kaons {integral}D(K+/s)(z)dz/{integral}D{sub u}{sup K+}(z)dz.

  18. Null point of discrimination in crustacean polarisation vision.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Christy, John; Roberts, Nicholas W; Marshall, N Justin

    2014-07-15

    The polarisation of light is used by many species of cephalopods and crustaceans to discriminate objects or to communicate. Most visual systems with this ability, such as that of the fiddler crab, include receptors with photopigments that are oriented horizontally and vertically relative to the outside world. Photoreceptors in such an orthogonal array are maximally sensitive to polarised light with the same fixed e-vector orientation. Using opponent neural connections, this two-channel system may produce a single value of polarisation contrast and, consequently, it may suffer from null points of discrimination. Stomatopod crustaceans use a different system for polarisation vision, comprising at least four types of polarisation-sensitive photoreceptor arranged at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg relative to each other, in conjunction with extensive rotational eye movements. This anatomical arrangement should not suffer from equivalent null points of discrimination. To test whether these two systems were vulnerable to null points, we presented the fiddler crab Uca heteropleura and the stomatopod Haptosquilla trispinosa with polarised looming stimuli on a modified LCD monitor. The fiddler crab was less sensitive to differences in the degree of polarised light when the e-vector was at -45 deg than when the e-vector was horizontal. In comparison, stomatopods showed no difference in sensitivity between the two stimulus types. The results suggest that fiddler crabs suffer from a null point of sensitivity, while stomatopods do not. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Polarisation analysis on the LET time-of-flight spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, G. J.; Košata, J.; Devonport, M.; Galsworthy, P.; Bewley, R. I.; Voneshen, D. J.; Dalgliesh, R.; Stewart, J. R.

    2017-06-01

    We present a design for implementing uniaxial polarisation analysis on the LET cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer, installed on the second target station at ISIS. The polarised neutron beam is to be produced by a transmission-based supermirror polariser with the polarising mirrors arranged in a “double-V” formation. This will be followed by a Mezei-type precession coil spin flipper, selected for its small spatial requirements, as well as a permanent magnet guide field to transport the beam polarisation to the sample position. The sample area will contain a set of holding field coils, whose purpose is to produce a highly homogenous magnetic field for the wide-angle 3He analyser cell. To facilitate fast cell changes and reduce the risk of cell failure, we intend to separate the cell and cryostat from the vacuum of the sample tank by installing both in a vessel at atmospheric pressure. When the instrument upgrade is complete, the performance of LET is expected to be commensurate with existing and planned polarised cold neutron spectrometers at other sources. Finally, we discuss the implications of performing uniaxial polarisation analysis only, and identify quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) on ionic conducting materials as an interesting area to apply the technique.

  20. FOXJ1 prevents cilia growth inhibition by cigarette smoke in human airway epithelium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brekman, Angelika; Walters, Matthew S; Tilley, Ann E; Crystal, Ronald G

    2014-11-01

    Airway epithelium ciliated cells play a central role in clearing the lung of inhaled pathogens and xenobiotics, and cilia length and coordinated beating are important for airway clearance. Based on in vivo studies showing that the airway epithelium of healthy smokers has shorter cilia than that of healthy nonsmokers, we investigated the mechanisms involved in cigarette smoke-mediated inhibition of ciliogenesis by assessing normal human airway basal cell differentiation in air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures in the presence of nontoxic concentrations of cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Measurements of cilia length from Day 28 ALI cultures demonstrated that CSE exposure was associated with shorter cilia (P < 0.05), reproducing the effect of cigarette smoking on cilia length observed in vivo. This phenotype correlated with a broad CSE-mediated suppression of genes involved in cilia-related transcriptional regulation, intraflagellar transport, cilia motility, structural integrity, and basal body development but not of control genes or epithelial barrier integrity. The CSE-mediated inhibition of cilia growth could be prevented by lentivirus-mediated overexpression of FOXJ1, the major cilia-related transcription factor, which led to partial reversal of expression of cilia-related genes suppressed by CSE. Together, the data suggest that components of cigarette smoke are responsible for a broad suppression of genes involved in cilia growth, but, by stimulating ciliogenesis with the transcription factor FOXJ1, it may be possible to maintain close to normal cilia length despite the stress of cigarette smoking.

  1. Deficiency in Origin Licensing Proteins Impairs Cilia Formation: Implications for the Aetiology of Meier-Gorlin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alcantara, Diana; Outwin, Emily; Brunner, Han G.; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.; O'Driscoll, Mark; Jeggo, Penny A.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6, which encode proteins required for DNA replication origin licensing, cause Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS), a disorder conferring microcephaly, primordial dwarfism, underdeveloped ears, and skeletal abnormalities. Mutations in ATR, which also functions during replication, can cause Seckel syndrome, a clinically related disorder. These findings suggest that impaired DNA replication could underlie the developmental defects characteristic of these disorders. Here, we show that although origin licensing capacity is impaired in all patient cells with mutations in origin licensing component proteins, this does not correlate with the rate of progression through S phase. Thus, the replicative capacity in MGS patient cells does not correlate with clinical manifestation. However, ORC1-deficient cells from MGS patients and siRNA–mediated depletion of origin licensing proteins also have impaired centrosome and centriole copy number. As a novel and unexpected finding, we show that they also display a striking defect in the rate of formation of primary cilia. We demonstrate that this impacts sonic hedgehog signalling in ORC1-deficient primary fibroblasts. Additionally, reduced growth factor-dependent signaling via primary cilia affects the kinetics of cell cycle progression following cell cycle exit and re-entry, highlighting an unexpected mechanism whereby origin licensing components can influence cell cycle progression. Finally, using a cell-based model, we show that defects in cilia function impair chondroinduction. Our findings raise the possibility that a reduced efficiency in forming cilia could contribute to the clinical features of MGS, particularly the bone development abnormalities, and could provide a new dimension for considering developmental impacts of licensing deficiency. PMID:23516378

  2. Novel Insights into the Development and Function of Cilia Using the Advantages of the Paramecium Cell and Its Many Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Junji; Valentine, Megan S.; Van Houten, Judith L.

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium species, especially P. tetraurelia and caudatum, are model organisms for modern research into the form and function of cilia. In this review, we focus on the ciliary ion channels and other transmembrane proteins that control the beat frequency and wave form of the cilium by controlling the signaling within the cilium. We put these discussions in the context of the advantages that Paramecium brings to the understanding of ciliary motility: mutants for genetic dissections of swimming behavior, electrophysiology, structural analysis, abundant cilia for biochemistry and modern proteomics, genomics and molecular biology. We review the connection between behavior and physiology, which allows the cells to broadcast the function of their ciliary channels in real time. We build a case for the important insights and advantages that this model organism continues to bring to the study of cilia. PMID:26230712

  3. Wettability and surface free energy of polarised ceramic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Miho; Hori, Naoko; Namba, Saki; Toyama, Takeshi; Nishimiya, Nobuyuki; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2015-01-13

    The surface modification of ceramic biomaterials used for medical devices is expected to improve osteoconductivity through control of the interfaces between the materials and living tissues. Polarisation treatment induced surface charges on hydroxyapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate, carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite and yttria-stabilized zirconia regardless of the differences in the carrier ions participating in the polarisation. Characterization of the surfaces revealed that the wettability of the polarised ceramic biomaterials was improved through the increase in the surface free energies compared with conventional ceramic surfaces.

  4. Conflict of interest disclosure and the polarisation of scientific communities.

    PubMed

    Ploug, Thomas; Holm, Søren

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we introduce and define the notion of polarised scientific communities. We show how polarisation may generate genuine conflicts of interest that require specific efforts to be identified and reported, and suggest a simple heuristic for the identification and reporting of the polarisation of research. We use examples from the debates about breast cancer screening and the prescription of statins to people at low risk of heart disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Mutations in MAPKBP1 Cause Juvenile or Late-Onset Cilia-Independent Nephronophthisis.

    PubMed

    Macia, Maxence S; Halbritter, Jan; Delous, Marion; Bredrup, Cecilie; Gutter, Arthur; Filhol, Emilie; Mellgren, Anne E C; Leh, Sabine; Bizet, Albane; Braun, Daniela A; Gee, Heon Y; Silbermann, Flora; Henry, Charline; Krug, Pauline; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nitschké, Patrick; Joly, Dominique; Nicoud, Philippe; Paget, André; Haugland, Heidi; Brackmann, Damien; Ahmet, Nayir; Sandford, Richard; Cengiz, Nurcan; Knappskog, Per M; Boman, Helge; Linghu, Bolan; Yang, Fan; Oakeley, Edward J; Saint Mézard, Pierre; Sailer, Andreas W; Johansson, Stefan; Rødahl, Eyvind; Saunier, Sophie; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Benmerah, Alexandre

    2017-02-02

    Nephronophthisis (NPH), an autosomal-recessive tubulointerstitial nephritis, is the most common cause of hereditary end-stage renal disease in the first three decades of life. Since most NPH gene products (NPHP) function at the primary cilium, NPH is classified as a ciliopathy. We identified mutations in a candidate gene in eight individuals from five families presenting late-onset NPH with massive renal fibrosis. This gene encodes MAPKBP1, a poorly characterized scaffolding protein for JNK signaling. Immunofluorescence analyses showed that MAPKBP1 is not present at the primary cilium and that fibroblasts from affected individuals did not display ciliogenesis defects, indicating that MAPKBP1 may represent a new family of NPHP not involved in cilia-associated functions. Instead, MAPKBP1 is recruited to mitotic spindle poles (MSPs) during the early phases of mitosis where it colocalizes with its paralog WDR62, which plays a key role at MSP. Detected mutations compromise recruitment of MAPKBP1 to the MSP and/or its interaction with JNK2 or WDR62. Additionally, we show increased DNA damage response signaling in fibroblasts from affected individuals and upon knockdown of Mapkbp1 in murine cell lines, a phenotype previously associated with NPH. In conclusion, we identified mutations in MAPKBP1 as a genetic cause of juvenile or late-onset and cilia-independent NPH.

  6. Sensory cilia and integration of signal transduction in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Søren T; Pedersen, Lotte B; Schneider, Linda; Satir, Peter

    2007-02-01

    The primary cilium is a hallmark of mammalian tissue cells. Recent research has shown that these organelles display unique sets of selected signal transduction modules including receptors, ion channels, effector proteins and transcription factors that relay chemical and physical stimuli from the extracellular environment in order to control basic cellular processes during embryonic and postnatal development, as well as in tissue homeostasis in adulthood. Consequently, defects in building of the cilium or in transport or function of ciliary signal proteins are associated with a series of pathologies, including developmental disorders and cancer. In this review, we highlight recent examples of the mechanisms by which signal components are selectively targeted and transported to the ciliary membrane and we present an overview of the signal transduction pathways associated with primary and motile cilia in vertebrate cells, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha (PDGFRalpha), hedgehog and Wnt signaling pathways. Finally, we discuss the functions of these cilia-associated signal transduction pathways and their role in human health and development.

  7. Optimization of bio-inspired multi-segment IPMC cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareh, S.; Conn, A. T.; Rossiter, J. M.; Ieropoulos, I.; Walters, P.

    2010-04-01

    In nature, unidirectional fluid flows are often induced at micro-scales by cilia and related organelles. A controllable unidirectional flow is beneficial at these scales for a range of novel robotic and medical applications, whether the flow is used for propulsion (e.g. swimming robots) or mass transfer (e.g. prosthetic trachea). Ionic Polymer Metal Composites (IPMCs) are innovative smart materials that can be used directly as active propulsive surfaces rather than a traditional motor and propeller. IPMC actuators with two segmented electrodes that attempt to mimic the motion of cilia-like organelles have been realized. In this paper the optimization of these actuators towards producing unidirectional flows is described. A parametric study of the kinematic and hydrodynamic effect of modulating the drive signal has been conducted. As with eukaryotic cilia and flagella found in mammals, the segmented IPMC actuator can generate both flexural (asymmetric) and undulatory (symmetric) motions from the same physical structure. The motion is controlled by applying profiles of driving frequencies and phase differences. Kinematic analysis using a camera and laser displacement sensor has been used to measure and classify different motion types. The hydrodynamic forces produced by each motion type have been estimated using particle-tracking flow visualization. This allows drive signal profiles to be ranked in terms of fluid flow momentum transfer and directionality. Using the results of the parametric study, the IPMC motion is optimized towards producing unidirectional flow via repeatable cilia-inspired motion.

  8. Symmetry Breaking in a Model for Nodal Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brokaw, Charles J.

    2005-03-01

    Nodal cilia are very short cilia found in the embryonic node on the ventral surface of early mammalian embryos. They create a right to left fluid flow that is responsible for determining the normal asymmetry of the internal organs of the mammalian body. To do this, the distal end of the cilium must circle in a counterclockwise sense. Computer simulations with 3-dimensional models of flagella allow examination of 3-dimensional movements such as those of nodal cilia. 3-dimensional circling motions of short cilia can be achieved with velocity controlled models, in which dynein activity is regulated by sliding velocity. If dyneins on one outer doublet are controlled by the sliding velocity experienced by that doublet, the system is symmetric, and the 3-dimensional models can show either clockwise or counterclockwise circling. My computer simulations have examined two possible symmetry breaking mechanisms: 1) dyneins on doublet N are regulated by a mixture of the sliding velocities experienced by doublets N and N+1 (numbered in a clockwise direction, looking from the base). or 2) symmetry is broken by an off-axis force that produces a right-handed twist of the axoneme, consistent with observations that some dyneins can rotate their substrate microtubules in a clockwise direction.

  9. Model Cilia - Experiments with Biomimetic Actuable Structures and Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd Carroll, R.

    2005-03-01

    The use of cilia to drive fluid flow is a common motif in living organisms, and in the tissues of higher organisms. By understanding the ways that cilia function (or do not function), potential therapies to treat human diseases (such as cystic fibrosis) may be devised. The complex hydrodynamics of flow in beating ciliary tissues (such as lung epithelial tissues) are challenging to study in cultured tissues, suggesting the need for model systems that will mimic the morphology and beat patterns of living systems. To reach this goal, we have fabricated high aspect ratio cilia-like structures with dimensions similar to those of a lung epithelial cilium (0.2 to 2.0 μm diameter by ˜6 to 10 μm long). The structures and surfaces are composed of a magneto-elastomeric nanocomposite, allowing the actuation of artificial cilia by magnetic fields. We have studied the flexibility of the materials under conditions of flow (in microfluidics channels), and will present theoretical and experimental data from various efforts at actuation. We will discuss details of the fabrication of the ciliated structures and present results of mechanical characterization. The impact of this work on the understanding of fluid flow above ciliated cells and tissues and potential applications of such model systems will also be described.

  10. Realizing the Physics of Motile Cilia Synchronization with Driven Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruot, Nicolas; Cicuta, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    Cilia and flagella in biological systems often show large scale cooperative behaviors such as the synchronization of their beats in "metachronal waves." These are beautiful examples of emergent dynamics in biology, and are essential for life, allowing diverse processes from the motility of eukaryotic microorganisms, to nutrient transport and clearance of pathogens from mammalian airways. How these collective states arise is not fully understood, but it is clear that individual cilia interact mechanically, and that a strong and long-ranged component of the coupling is mediated by the viscous fluid. We review here the work by ourselves and others aimed at understanding the behavior of hydrodynamically coupled systems, and particularly a set of results that have been obtained both experimentally and theoretically by studying actively driven colloidal systems. In these controlled scenarios, it is possible to selectively test aspects of living motile cilia, such as the geometrical arrangement, the effects of the driving profile and the distance to no-slip boundaries. We outline and give examples of how it is possible to link model systems to observations on living systems, which can be made on microorganisms, on cell cultures or on tissue sections. This area of research has clear clinical application in the long term, as severe pathologies are associated with compromised cilia function in humans.

  11. Force Generation and Dynamics of Individual Cilia under External Loading

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David B.; Swaminathan, Vinay; Estes, Ashley; Cribb, Jeremy; O'Brien, E. Timothy; Davis, C. William; Superfine, R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Motile cilia are unique multimotor systems that display coordination and periodicity while imparting forces to biological fluids. They play important roles in normal physiology, and ciliopathies are implicated in a growing number of human diseases. In this work we measure the response of individual human airway cilia to calibrated forces transmitted via spot-labeled magnetic microbeads. Cilia respond to applied forces by 1), a reduction in beat amplitude (up to an 85% reduction by 160–170 pN of force); 2), a decreased tip velocity proportionate to applied force; and 3), no significant change in beat frequency. Tip velocity reduction occurred in each beat direction, independently of the direction of applied force, indicating that the cilium is “driven” in both directions at all times. By applying a quasistatic force model, we deduce that axoneme stiffness is dominated by the rigidity of the microtubules, and that cilia can exert 62 ± 18 pN of force at the tip via the generation of 5.6 ± 1.6 pN/dynein head. PMID:20085719

  12. Analysis of properties of cilia using Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Vidyalakshmi; Corpuz, Elizabeth O; Hubenschmidt, Mark J; Townsend, Caroline R; Asai, David J; Wilkes, David E

    2009-01-01

    Cilia and eukaryotic flagella are important structures required for the motility of cells, the movement of medium across the surfaces of cells, and the connections between the receptor and synthetic portions of sensory cells. The axoneme forms the cytoskeleton of the cilium comprising several hundreds of proteins that assemble into the 9 + 2 arrangement of outer doublet and central pair microtubules, the inner and outer rows of dynein arms, and many other structures. Tetrahymena thermophila is an excellent model organism for the study of cilia and ciliogenesis. The cell is covered by about 1,000 cilia which are essential for survival. Additionally, the Tetrahymena genome is available and targeted genetic manipulations are straightforward. In this chapter, we describe five protocols that examine properties of cilia: (a) measuring mRNA levels to see the effect of deciliation on gene expression; (b) swimming velocity and linearity; (c) ciliary length and density; (d) phagocytosis that occurs through the ciliated oral apparatus; and (e) depolarization-induced ciliary reversal.

  13. Magnetically actuated artificial cilia for optimum mixing performance in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Chia-Yun; Lin, Cheng-Yi; Hu, Ya-Ting

    2013-07-21

    Contemporary lab-chip devices require efficient, high-performance mixing capability. A series of artificial cilia with embedded magnetic particles was fabricated to achieve precise flow manipulation through magnetically driven control. These fabricated structures were actuated in a homogeneous magnetic field generated by a built-in magnetic coil system for various beating cycles inside a microchannel. Three representative trajectories, namely, circular motion, back-and-forth oscillation, and a figure-of-eight pattern, of artificial cilia were designed and generated to mimic the motion of actual cilia. Homogeneous mixing of two highly viscous (>25 centipoise) dyed solutions by using the figure-of-eight trajectory achieved a mixing efficiency of approximately 86%. The underlying relationship between ciliated structures and the induced flow fields was further elucidated by performing a hydrodynamic analysis with micro-particle image velocimetry. In addition, a numerical modeling method which used a fluid structure interaction module was applied to provide quantitative 3D illustrations of induced flow patterns, including vortical structures and vortex core locations. The results reveal that both the magnitude and distribution of induced vortices primarily affect the mixing performance of two viscous flow streams. By using magnetically controlled artificial cilia along with the presented analytical paradigms, a new active flow mixing strategy was suggested to efficiently transport/agitate flows for microfluidics and biomedical applications.

  14. A coating of passively oscillating flexible cilia to reduce drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revell, Alistair; Harwood, Adrian; O'Connor, Joseph; Sanchez, Jonathan; Favier, Julien

    2016-11-01

    We present results related to the reduction of wake drag by the coordinated action of a layer of passively oscillating flexible cilia. Inspired by the pop-up of bird feathers, this configuration is shown to self-adapt to the surrounding flow, leading to a stabilization of the wake, a reduction of the mean drag and of lift oscillations. The study is performed using Lattice Boltzmann method, coupled to a recent version of the immersed boundary method. We will present the physical analysis of the coupling between multiple beating cilia and an incoming fluid flow. The modal behaviour of the cilia dynamics will be discussed, as well as their effect on an archetype of unsteady separated boundary layer (first the oscillating channel flow and then the circular cylinder). In the latter case results demonstrate an optimal drag occurs for a particular stiffness, compared to the control case where the same cilia are fixed. It appears that the optimal results are due to a reconfiguration of the elastic coating according to the local vorticity of the flow, and a frequency lock-in, which leads to more stable wake and reduced drag. The structural parameters of the layer will be varied. Results from the PEL-SKIN project: funded by EU Grant #334954.

  15. Topology of phase and polarisation singularities in focal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrejic, Petar; Lekner, John

    2017-10-01

    The focal region of a beam contains circles of zeros of the beam wavefunction, on which surfaces of different phase meet. The existence of these zeros is topological in origin, and appears to be universal. Two examples of generalised Bessel beams are examined. One of these has zeros only in the focal plane. The other has focal plane zeros but also movement of the zeros away from the focal plane at certain values of a parameter which determines the tightness of the focus, as analysed by Berry in 1998. As tightness of focus increases these two families of beams coalesce into a common most-focused beam. The polarisation properties of both families and of their common limiting form are considered and correlated with the zeros (dislocations) of the beam wavefunctions. We find regions of circular polarisation in beams which are nominally linearly polarised, and rapid variation of the polarisation pattern as the tightness of focus passes through critical values.

  16. Measurement of the tau lepton polarisation at LEP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Dedovich, D.; Ricca, G. Della; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Santo, M. C. Espirito; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Nulty, R. Mc; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.; Delphi Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    A first measurement of the average polarisation Pτ of tau leptons produced in e+e- annihilation at energies significantly above the Z resonance is presented. The polarisation is determined from the kinematic spectra of tau hadronic decays. The measured value Pτ = - 0.164 ± 0.125 is consistent with the Standard Model prediction for the mean LEP energy of 197 GeV.

  17. Measurement of the tau lepton polarisation at LEP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DELPHI Collaboration; Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Dedovich, D.; Ricca, G. Della; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Santo, M. C. Espirito; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Nulty, R. Mc; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2008-01-01

    A first measurement of the average polarisation P of tau leptons produced in e+e- annihilation at energies significantly above the Z resonance is presented. The polarisation is determined from the kinematic spectra of tau hadronic decays. The measured value P=-0.164±0.125 is consistent with the Standard Model prediction for the mean LEP energy of 197 GeV.

  18. Polarised nuclei for neutron science: recent applications and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glättli, Hans

    2004-08-01

    Neutron scattering on nuclei is spin dependent, particularly strongly for 1H. The means to achieve large nuclear polarisations and its use for structure analysis or as spin-handling device are reviewed. High resolution (diffraction) as well as low resolution (SANS) measurements can benefit from polarised nuclei by changing selectively the form factors of Bragg reflections or the contrasts (the scattering length density profiles) in SANS. The internal structure of ribosomes and the conformation of polymers in solution have been investigated by this method. A numerical simulation is presented to show the influence of steady-state polarisation of protons on the scattering from a protein-ARN model complex. In addition, a more recent technique, time-resolved SANS is described. It makes use of spatial polarisation gradients created around paramagnetic centres at the onset of nuclear polarisation. Such polarisation domains can enhance considerably the scattering amplitude of free radicals and thus contribute to determine their positions inside a complex protein. Examples of possible future experiments are proposed which combine simultaneously the selectivity of solid-state NMR techniques and neutron scattering.

  19. Polarisers in the focal domain: Theoretical model and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Herrero, Rosario; Maluenda, David; Juvells, Ignasi; Carnicer, Artur

    2017-02-01

    Polarisers are one of the most widely used devices in optical set-ups. They are commonly used with paraxial beams that propagate in the normal direction of the polariser plane. Nevertheless, the conventional projection character of these devices may change when the beam impinges a polariser with a certain angle of incidence. This effect is more noticeable if polarisers are used in optical systems with a high numerical aperture, because multiple angles of incidence have to be taken into account. Moreover, the non-transverse character of highly focused beams makes the problem more complex and strictly speaking, the Malus’ law does not apply. In this paper we develop a theoretical framework to explain how ideal polarisers affect the behavior of highly focused fields. In this model, the polarisers are considered as birefringent plates, and the vector behaviour of focused fields is described using the plane-wave angular spectrum approach. Experiments involving focused fields were conducted to verify the theoretical model and a satisfactory agreement between theoretical and experimental results was found.

  20. Polarisation dynamics of a Nd:YAG ceramic laser

    SciTech Connect

    Khandokhin, Pavel A; Ievlev, Ivan V; Lebedeva, Yu S; Mukhin, I B; Palashov, O V; Khazanov, Efim A

    2011-02-28

    We report an experimental study of the polarisation dynamics of a dual-polarisation microchip Nd:YAG ceramic laser. Our results demonstrate dual-polarisation operation of the polycrystalline Nd:YAG laser. The low-frequency dynamics in this regime involves three types of relaxation oscillations, two of which are responsible for antiphase dynamics of the intensities of orthogonally polarised modes. Linearly polarised pump light induces gain anisotropy in the Nd:YAG ceramic, as in Nd:YAG single-crystal lasers. We present a comparative analysis of the behaviour of orthogonally polarised modes in Nd:YAG single-crystal lasers and the Nd:YAG ceramic laser, with a random orientation of the crystallographic axes in each grain (microcrystal), describe a technique for evaluating the total cavity loss from the relaxation oscillation spectrum and compare single-crystal and ceramic active elements. Experimental evidence is presented for gain anisotropy, loss anisotropy and phase anisotropy in ceramic and single-crystal microchip lasers. (lasers)

  1. Optically induced dynamic nuclear spin polarisation in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, Jochen; Schwartz, Ilai; Chen, Qiong; Schulze-Sünninghausen, David; Carl, Patrick; Höfer, Peter; Retzker, Alexander; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Isoya, Junichi; Luy, Burkhard; Plenio, Martin B.; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depends strongly on nuclear spin polarisation and, motivated by this observation, dynamical nuclear spin polarisation has recently been applied to enhance MRI protocols (Kurhanewicz et al 2011 Neoplasia 13 81). Nuclear spins associated with the 13C carbon isotope (nuclear spin I = 1/2) in diamond possess uniquely long spin lattice relaxation times (Reynhardt and High 2011 Prog. Nucl. Magn. Reson. Spectrosc. 38 37). If they are present in diamond nanocrystals, especially when strongly polarised, they form a promising contrast agent for MRI. Current schemes for achieving nuclear polarisation, however, require cryogenic temperatures. Here we demonstrate an efficient scheme that realises optically induced 13C nuclear spin hyperpolarisation in diamond at room temperature and low ambient magnetic field. Optical pumping of a nitrogen-vacancy centre creates a continuously renewable electron spin polarisation which can be transferred to surrounding 13C nuclear spins. Importantly for future applications we also realise polarisation protocols that are robust against an unknown misalignment between magnetic field and crystal axis.

  2. Polarisers in the focal domain: Theoretical model and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Herrero, Rosario; Maluenda, David; Juvells, Ignasi; Carnicer, Artur

    2017-02-13

    Polarisers are one of the most widely used devices in optical set-ups. They are commonly used with paraxial beams that propagate in the normal direction of the polariser plane. Nevertheless, the conventional projection character of these devices may change when the beam impinges a polariser with a certain angle of incidence. This effect is more noticeable if polarisers are used in optical systems with a high numerical aperture, because multiple angles of incidence have to be taken into account. Moreover, the non-transverse character of highly focused beams makes the problem more complex and strictly speaking, the Malus' law does not apply. In this paper we develop a theoretical framework to explain how ideal polarisers affect the behavior of highly focused fields. In this model, the polarisers are considered as birefringent plates, and the vector behaviour of focused fields is described using the plane-wave angular spectrum approach. Experiments involving focused fields were conducted to verify the theoretical model and a satisfactory agreement between theoretical and experimental results was found.

  3. Polarisers in the focal domain: Theoretical model and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Herrero, Rosario; Maluenda, David; Juvells, Ignasi; Carnicer, Artur

    2017-01-01

    Polarisers are one of the most widely used devices in optical set-ups. They are commonly used with paraxial beams that propagate in the normal direction of the polariser plane. Nevertheless, the conventional projection character of these devices may change when the beam impinges a polariser with a certain angle of incidence. This effect is more noticeable if polarisers are used in optical systems with a high numerical aperture, because multiple angles of incidence have to be taken into account. Moreover, the non-transverse character of highly focused beams makes the problem more complex and strictly speaking, the Malus’ law does not apply. In this paper we develop a theoretical framework to explain how ideal polarisers affect the behavior of highly focused fields. In this model, the polarisers are considered as birefringent plates, and the vector behaviour of focused fields is described using the plane-wave angular spectrum approach. Experiments involving focused fields were conducted to verify the theoretical model and a satisfactory agreement between theoretical and experimental results was found. PMID:28191817

  4. A novel biosensor to study cAMP dynamics in cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shatanik; Jansen, Vera; Jikeli, Jan F; Hamzeh, Hussein; Alvarez, Luis; Dombrowski, Marco; Balbach, Melanie; Strünker, Timo; Seifert, Reinhard; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Wachten, Dagmar

    2016-03-22

    The cellular messenger cAMP regulates multiple cellular functions, including signaling in cilia and flagella. The cAMP dynamics in these subcellular compartments are ill-defined. We introduce a novel FRET-based cAMP biosensor with nanomolar sensitivity that is out of reach for other sensors. To measure cAMP dynamics in the sperm flagellum, we generated transgenic mice and reveal that the hitherto methods determining total cAMP levels do not reflect changes in free cAMP levels. Moreover, cAMP dynamics in the midpiece and principal piece of the flagellum are distinctively different. The sole cAMP source in the flagellum is the soluble adenylate cyclase (SACY). Although bicarbonate-dependent SACY activity requires Ca(2+), basal SACY activity is suppressed by Ca(2+). Finally, we also applied the sensor to primary cilia. Our new cAMP biosensor features unique characteristics that allow gaining new insights into cAMP signaling and unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying ciliary function in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Asymmetric dimethylarginine blocks nitric oxide-mediated alcohol-stimulated cilia beating.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, T A; Wells, S M; Alsaidi, Z A; DeVasure, J M; Klein, E B; Bailey, K L; Sisson, J H

    2013-01-01

    The airway epithelium is exposed to alcohol during drinking through direct exhalation of volatized ethanol from the bronchial circulation. Alcohol exposure leads to a rapid increase in the cilia beat frequency (CBF) of bronchial epithelial cells followed by a chronic desensitization of cilia stimulatory responses. This effect is governed in part by the nitric oxide regulation of cyclic guanosine and adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinases (PKG and PKA) and is not fully understood. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, is implicated in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary disorders. We hypothesized that the inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by ADMA blocks alcohol-stimulated increases in CBF. To test this hypothesis, ciliated primary bovine bronchial epithelial cells (BBEC) were preincubated with ADMA (100  µM) and stimulated with 100 mM ethanol. CBF was measured and PKA assayed. By 1 hr, ethanol activated PKA, resulting in elevated CBF. Both alcohol-induced PKA activation and CBF were inhibited in the presence of ADMA. ADMA alone had no effect on PKA activity or CBF. Using a mouse model overexpressing the ADMA-degrading enzyme, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH), we examined PKA and CBF in precision-cut mouse lung slices. Alcohol-stimulated increases in lung slice PKA and CBF were temporally enhanced in the DDAH mice versus control mice.

  6. A novel biosensor to study cAMP dynamics in cilia and flagella

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shatanik; Jansen, Vera; Jikeli, Jan F; Hamzeh, Hussein; Alvarez, Luis; Dombrowski, Marco; Balbach, Melanie; Strünker, Timo; Seifert, Reinhard; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Wachten, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The cellular messenger cAMP regulates multiple cellular functions, including signaling in cilia and flagella. The cAMP dynamics in these subcellular compartments are ill-defined. We introduce a novel FRET-based cAMP biosensor with nanomolar sensitivity that is out of reach for other sensors. To measure cAMP dynamics in the sperm flagellum, we generated transgenic mice and reveal that the hitherto methods determining total cAMP levels do not reflect changes in free cAMP levels. Moreover, cAMP dynamics in the midpiece and principal piece of the flagellum are distinctively different. The sole cAMP source in the flagellum is the soluble adenylate cyclase (SACY). Although bicarbonate-dependent SACY activity requires Ca2+, basal SACY activity is suppressed by Ca2+. Finally, we also applied the sensor to primary cilia. Our new cAMP biosensor features unique characteristics that allow gaining new insights into cAMP signaling and unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying ciliary function in vitro and in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14052.001 PMID:27003291

  7. Arl13b-regulated cilia activities are essential for polarized radial glial scaffold formation.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Holden; Guo, Jiami; Yokota, Yukako; Umberger, Nicole L; Su, Chen-Ying; Li, Jingjun; Verma, Nisha; Hirt, Joshua; Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Caspary, Tamara; Anton, E S

    2013-08-01

    The construction of cerebral cortex begins with the formation of radial glia. Once formed, polarized radial glial cells divide either symmetrically or asymmetrically to balance appropriate production of progenitor cells and neurons. Following birth, neurons use the processes of radial glia as scaffolding for oriented migration. Radial glia therefore provide an instructive structural matrix to coordinate the generation and placement of distinct groups of cortical neurons in the developing cerebral cortex. We found that Arl13b, a cilia-enriched small GTPase that is mutated in Joubert syndrome, was critical for the initial formation of the polarized radial progenitor scaffold. Using developmental stage-specific deletion of Arl13b in mouse cortical progenitors, we found that early neuroepithelial deletion of ciliary Arl13b led to a reversal of the apical-basal polarity of radial progenitors and aberrant neuronal placement. Arl13b modulated ciliary signaling necessary for radial glial polarity. Our findings indicate that Arl13b signaling in primary cilia is crucial for the initial formation of a polarized radial glial scaffold and suggest that disruption of this process may contribute to aberrant neurodevelopment and brain abnormalities in Joubert syndrome-related ciliopathies.

  8. Polarisation effects in gradient nano-optics

    SciTech Connect

    Erokhin, N S; Shvartsburg, A B; Zueva, Yu M

    2013-09-30

    The spectra of reflection of s- and p-polarised waves from gradient nanocoatings at arbitrary angles of incidence are found within the framework of two exactly solvable models of such coatings. To use the detected spectra in the visible and IR ranges, for different frequencies and coating thicknesses we present the wave reflection coefficients as functions of dimensionless frequencies related to the refractive index gradient of the coating material. It is shown that reflection from the gradient coatings in question is an order of magnitude weaker than reflection from uniform coatings, other parameters of radiation and the reflection system being equal. We report a new exactly solvable model illustrating the specific effect of gradient film optics – the possibility of non-reflective propagation of an s-wave through such a film (an analogue of the Brewster effect). The prospects are shown for the use of gradient nanostructures with different refractive index profiles to fabricate broadband non-reflective coatings. (nanogradient dielectric coatings and metamaterials)

  9. Explaining opinion polarisation with opinion copulas

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    An empirically founded and widely established driving force in opinion dynamics is homophily i.e. the tendency of “birds of a feather” to “flock together”. The closer our opinions are the more likely it is that we will interact and converge. Models using these assumptions are called bounded confidence models (BCM) as they assume a tolerance threshold after which interaction is unlikely. They are known to produce one or more clusters, depending on the size of the bound, with more than one cluster being possible only in the deterministic case. Introducing noise, as is likely to happen in a stochastic world, causes BCM to produce consensus which leaves us with the open problem of explaining the emergence and sustainance of opinion clusters and polarisation. We investigate the role of heterogeneous priors in opinion formation, introduce the concept of opinion copulas, argue that it is well supported by findings in Social Psychology and use it to show that the stochastic BCM does indeed produce opinion clustering without the need for extra assumptions. PMID:28829802

  10. Planck pre-launch status: Expected LFI polarisation capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, J. P.; Bersanelli, M.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Ganga, K.; Leach, S. M.; Moss, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Poutanen, T.; Sandri, M.; Scott, D.; Tauber, J.; Valenziano, L.; Villa, F.; Wilkinson, A.; Zonca, A.; Baccigalupi, C.; Borrill, J.; Butler, R. C.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; Frailis, M.; Francheschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Gregorio, A.; Leonardi, R.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Meinhold, P.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Morgante, G.; Prezeau, G.; Rocha, G.; Stringhetti, L.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.

    2010-09-01

    We present a system-level description of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) considered as a differencing polarimeter, and evaluate its expected performance. The LFI is one of the two instruments on board the ESA Planck mission to study the cosmic microwave background. It consists of a set of 22 radiometers sensitive to linear polarisation, arranged in orthogonally-oriented pairs connected to 11 feed horns operating at 30, 44 and 70 GHz. In our analysis, the generic Jones and Mueller-matrix formulations for polarimetry are adapted to the special case of the LFI. Laboratory measurements of flight components are combined with optical simulations of the telescope to investigate the values and uncertainties in the system parameters affecting polarisation response. Methods of correcting residual systematic errors are also briefly discussed. The LFI has beam-integrated polarisation efficiency >99% for all detectors, with uncertainties below 0.1%. Indirect assessment of polarisation position angles suggests that uncertainties are generally less than 0.5°, and this will be checked in flight using observations of the Crab nebula. Leakage of total intensity into the polarisation signal is generally well below the thermal noise level except for bright Galactic emission, where the dominant effect is likely to be spectral-dependent terms due to bandpass mismatch between the two detectors behind each feed, contributing typically 1-3% leakage of foreground total intensity. Comparable leakage from compact features occurs due to beam mismatch, but this averages to < 5 × 10-4 for large-scale emission. An inevitable feature of the LFI design is that the two components of the linear polarisation are recovered from elliptical beams which differ substantially in orientation. This distorts the recovered polarisation and its angular power spectrum, and several methods are being developed to correct the effect, both in the power spectrum and in the sky maps. The LFI will return a high

  11. Elliptic polarisation of the polar motion excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizouard, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Because of its geophysical interpretation, Earth's polar motion excitation is generally decomposed into prograde (counter-clockwise) and retrograde (clockwise) circular terms at fixed frequency. Yet, these later are commonly considered as specific to the frequency and to the underlying geophysical process, and no study has raised the possibility that they could share features independent from frequency. Complex Fourier Transform permits to determine retrograde and prograde circular terms of the observed excitation and of its atmospheric, oceanic and hydrological counterparts. The total prograde and retrograde parts of these excitations are reconstructed in time domain. Then, complex linear correlation between retrograde and conjugate prograde parts is observed for both the geodetic excitation and the matter term of the hydro-atmospheric excitation. In frequency domain, the ratio of the retrograde circular terms with their corresponding conjugate prograde terms favours specific values: the amplitude ratio follows a probabilistic gamma distribution centred around 1.5 (maximum for 1), and the argument ratio obeys a distribution close to a normal law centred around 2 α = 160°. These frequency and time domain characteristics mean an elliptical polarisation towards α ={˜ } 80° East with an ellipticity of 0.8, mostly resulting from the matter term of the hydro-atmospheric excitation. Whatsoever the frequency band above 0.4 cpd, the hydro-atmospheric matter term tends to be maximal in the geographic areas surrounding the great meridian circle of longitude {˜ }80° or {˜ } 260° East. The favoured retrograde/prograde amplitude ratio around 1.5 or equivalently the ellipticity of 0.8 can result from the amplification of pressure waves propagating towards the west by the normal atmospheric mode Ψ _3^1 around 10 days.

  12. CILIA FORMATION IN THE ADULT CAT BRAIN AFTER PARGYLINE TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Milhaud, Monique; Pappas, George D.

    1968-01-01

    The brains of four adult cats treated with pargyline (a nonhydrazide monoaminoxidase inhibitor) were examined at both the light and electron microscopic levels. Formation of typical mature cilia with the 9 + 2 pattern was observed in neural cells in the following areas: habenula nuclei, interpeduncular nuclei, hippocampus, mammillary bodies, thalamus, and caudate nucleus. The most marked ciliation occurs in the habenula nuclei. In general, glial cells greatly predominate in the formation of cilia. It is not clear whether ciliation in the central nervous system is the direct result of pargyline or if it occurs indirectly as a result of inhibition of monoaminoxidase. These findings are compared with the serotonin effect on ciliation in the embryogenesis of lower forms. It is suggested that pharmacological stimulation of centriolar reproduction without subsequent mitosis may lead to ciliary formation. PMID:11905194

  13. Polarisation singularities in the electric field at a sum-frequency generated by two collinear elliptically polarised Gaussian beams in the bulk of a nonlinear gyrotropic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Vladimir A; Perezhogin, I A; Potravkin, N N

    2011-02-28

    Polarisation singularities in the electric field at a sum-frequency generated in the bulk of an isotropic gyrotropic medium with a quadratic nonlinearity are predicted to appear in the case of the collinear interaction of two uniformly elliptically polarised Gaussian beams. The parameters of the fundamental waves are found, corresponding to the formation of lines with circular and linear polarisations (C- and L-lines) in the cross section of the beam at the sum-frequency as well as to the appearance of the regions in the signal beam where the polarisation state varies smoothly from the left-hand circularly polarised state to the right-hand circularly polarised. In this case, the ellipticity degree of the polarisation ellipse takes all possible values, while its orientation remains unchanged. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  14. Cilia-dependent GLI processing in neural crest cells is required for tongue development.

    PubMed

    Millington, Grethel; Elliott, Kelsey H; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chang, Ching-Fang; Dlugosz, Andrzej; Brugmann, Samantha A

    2017-04-15

    Ciliopathies are a class of diseases caused by the loss of a ubiquitous, microtubule-based organelle called a primary cilium. Ciliopathies commonly result in defective development of the craniofacial complex, causing midfacial defects, craniosynostosis, micrognathia and aglossia. Herein, we explored how the conditional loss of primary cilia on neural crest cells (Kif3a(f/f);Wnt1-Cre) generated aglossia. On a cellular level, our data revealed that aglossia in Kif3a(f/f);Wnt1-Cre embryos was due to a loss of mesoderm-derived muscle precursors migrating into and surviving in the tongue anlage. To determine the molecular basis for this phenotype, we performed RNA-seq, in situ hybridization, qPCR and Western blot analyses. We found that transduction of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway, rather than other pathways previously implicated in tongue development, was aberrant in Kif3a(f/f);Wnt1-Cre embryos. Despite increased production of full-length GLI2 and GLI3 isoforms, previously identified GLI targets important for mandibular and glossal development (Foxf1, Foxf2, Foxd1 and Foxd2) were transcriptionally downregulated in Kif3a(f/f);Wnt1-Cre embryos. Genetic removal of GLI activator (GLIA) isoforms in neural crest cells recapitulated the aglossia phenotype and downregulated Fox gene expression. Genetic addition of GLIA isoforms in neural crest cells partially rescued the aglossia phenotype and Fox gene expression in Kif3a(f/f);Wnt1-Cre embryos. Together, our data suggested that glossal development requires primary cilia-dependent GLIA activity in neural crest cells. Furthermore, these data, in conjunction with our previous work, suggested prominence specific roles for GLI isoforms; with development of the frontonasal prominence relying heavily on the repressor isoform and the development of the mandibular prominence/tongue relying heavily on the activator isoform. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Distributed molecular polarisabilities and asymptotic intermolecular interaction energies†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rob, Fazle; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2013-07-01

    Strategies for obtaining distributed molecular polarisabilities and using them in calculations of interaction energies have been examined. A mathematically rigorous strategy applying constrained density fitting that practically removes the so-called charge-flow terms has been proposed. The resulting polarisabilities give asymptotic dispersion energies without the artefacts plaguing the previously used methods. In particular, since the charge-flow polarisabilities are extremely small in our approach, the terms in the distributed expansion of the dispersion energy which decay slower than the sixth inverse power of the intermonomer separation are negligible. Furthermore, we show that the usual practice of approximately locating or neglecting two-centre (nonlocal) distributed polarisabilities in calculations of these energies can now be abandoned since in the algorithm developed by us the inclusion of the nonlocal polarisabilities increases the computational requirements only by one power of the number of atoms and the summations can be restricted to within a small cutoff radius. Our method gives dispersion energies that are practically identical to the values computed from exact (unexpanded) formulas for all separations where charge-overlap effects are small, i.e. this approach gives the best possible asymptotic representation of dispersion energies. Thus, it should be possible to replace the current empirical dispersion functions by ab initio computed dispersion energies in a range of applications.

  16. Voltage-gated calcium channels of Paramecium cilia.

    PubMed

    Lodh, Sukanya; Yano, Junji; Valentine, Megan S; Van Houten, Judith L

    2016-10-01

    Paramecium cells swim by beating their cilia, and make turns by transiently reversing their power stroke. Reversal is caused by Ca(2+) entering the cilium through voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV) channels that are found exclusively in the cilia. As ciliary Ca(2+) levels return to normal, the cell pivots and swims forward in a new direction. Thus, the activation of the CaV channels causes cells to make a turn in their swimming paths. For 45 years, the physiological characteristics of the Paramecium ciliary CaV channels have been known, but the proteins were not identified until recently, when the P. tetraurelia ciliary membrane proteome was determined. Three CaVα1 subunits that were identified among the proteins were cloned and confirmed to be expressed in the cilia. We demonstrate using RNA interference that these channels function as the ciliary CaV channels that are responsible for the reversal of ciliary beating. Furthermore, we show that Pawn (pw) mutants of Paramecium that cannot swim backward for lack of CaV channel activity do not express any of the three CaV1 channels in their ciliary membrane, until they are rescued from the mutant phenotype by expression of the wild-type PW gene. These results reinforce the correlation of the three CaV channels with backward swimming through ciliary reversal. The PwB protein, found in endoplasmic reticulum fractions, co-immunoprecipitates with the CaV1c channel and perhaps functions in trafficking. The PwA protein does not appear to have an interaction with the channel proteins but affects their appearance in the cilia. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Voltage-gated calcium channels of Paramecium cilia

    PubMed Central

    Lodh, Sukanya; Valentine, Megan S.; Van Houten, Judith L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramecium cells swim by beating their cilia, and make turns by transiently reversing their power stroke. Reversal is caused by Ca2+ entering the cilium through voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels that are found exclusively in the cilia. As ciliary Ca2+ levels return to normal, the cell pivots and swims forward in a new direction. Thus, the activation of the CaV channels causes cells to make a turn in their swimming paths. For 45 years, the physiological characteristics of the Paramecium ciliary CaV channels have been known, but the proteins were not identified until recently, when the P. tetraurelia ciliary membrane proteome was determined. Three CaVα1 subunits that were identified among the proteins were cloned and confirmed to be expressed in the cilia. We demonstrate using RNA interference that these channels function as the ciliary CaV channels that are responsible for the reversal of ciliary beating. Furthermore, we show that Pawn (pw) mutants of Paramecium that cannot swim backward for lack of CaV channel activity do not express any of the three CaV1 channels in their ciliary membrane, until they are rescued from the mutant phenotype by expression of the wild-type PW gene. These results reinforce the correlation of the three CaV channels with backward swimming through ciliary reversal. The PwB protein, found in endoplasmic reticulum fractions, co-immunoprecipitates with the CaV1c channel and perhaps functions in trafficking. The PwA protein does not appear to have an interaction with the channel proteins but affects their appearance in the cilia. PMID:27707864

  18. Artificial Muscle (AM) Cilia Array for Underwater Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-15

    Composite (IPMC) 4 P.R. Bandyopadhyay and J.C. Hansen, ’’Breakup and then makeup: a predictive model of how cilia self-regulate hardness for posture...groups in the core layers of the composite which have not been metalized. Table 2 describes the initial cleaning process. The Nation was abraded with...This causes platinum to be deposited on the surface of the Nafion. Following this the resulting composite was removed and the resistances across the

  19. Artificial Muscle (AM) Cilia Array for Underwater Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-15

    Metal Composite (IPMC) 4 P. R. Bandyopadhyay and J. C. Hansen, "Breakup and then makeup: a pred ictive model of how cilia self-regulate hardness for...sulfonyl end groups in the core layers of the composite which have not been metalized. Table 2 describes the initial cleaning process. The Nation was...Nation. Following this the resulting composite was removed and the resistances across the metalized surfaces were checked. For good conductivity

  20. Evc2 is a positive modulator of Hedgehog signalling that interacts with Evc at the cilia membrane and is also found in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Blair, Helen J; Tompson, Stuart; Liu, Yu-Ning; Campbell, Jennifer; MacArthur, Katie; Ponting, Chris P; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Goodship, Judith A

    2011-02-28

    Evc is essential for Indian Hedgehog (Hh) signalling in the cartilage growth plate. The gene encoding Evc2 is in close proximity in divergent orientation to Evc and mutations in both human genes lead to the chondrodysplasia Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that the Evc and Evc2 genes arose through a duplication event early in metazoan evolution and were subsequently lost in arthropods and nematodes. Here we demonstrate that Evc2 is essential for Hh pathway activation in response to the Smo agonist purmorphamine. A yeast two-hybrid screen using Evc as bait identified Evc2 as an Evc binding partner and we confirmed the interaction by immunoprecipitation. We developed anti-Evc2 antibodies and show that Evc2 and Evc co-localize at the basal body and also on primary cilia. In transfected cells, basal body and cilia localization is observed when Evc and Evc2 constructs are co-transfected but not when either construct is transfected individually. We show that Evc and Evc2 are cilia transmembrane proteins, the C-terminus for both being intracellular and Evc2, but not Evc, having an extracellular portion. Furthermore, Evc is absent at the basal body in Evc2 null cells. Using Western blots of cytoplasmic and nuclear protein, we also demonstrate that full length Evc2 but not Evc, is located in the nucleus. We demonstrate for the first time that Evc2 is a positive regulator of the Hh signalling pathway and that it is located at the basal body of primary cilia. We show that the presence of Evc and Evc2 at the basal body and cilia membrane is co-dependent. In addition, Evc2, but not Evc, is present in the cell nucleus suggesting movement of Evc2 between the cilium and nucleus.

  1. Evc2 is a positive modulator of Hedgehog signalling that interacts with Evc at the cilia membrane and is also found in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evc is essential for Indian Hedgehog (Hh) signalling in the cartilage growth plate. The gene encoding Evc2 is in close proximity in divergent orientation to Evc and mutations in both human genes lead to the chondrodysplasia Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Results Bioinformatic analysis reveals that the Evc and Evc2 genes arose through a duplication event early in metazoan evolution and were subsequently lost in arthropods and nematodes. Here we demonstrate that Evc2 is essential for Hh pathway activation in response to the Smo agonist purmorphamine. A yeast two-hybrid screen using Evc as bait identified Evc2 as an Evc binding partner and we confirmed the interaction by immunoprecipitation. We developed anti-Evc2 antibodies and show that Evc2 and Evc co-localize at the basal body and also on primary cilia. In transfected cells, basal body and cilia localization is observed when Evc and Evc2 constructs are co-transfected but not when either construct is transfected individually. We show that Evc and Evc2 are cilia transmembrane proteins, the C-terminus for both being intracellular and Evc2, but not Evc, having an extracellular portion. Furthermore, Evc is absent at the basal body in Evc2 null cells. Using Western blots of cytoplasmic and nuclear protein, we also demonstrate that full length Evc2 but not Evc, is located in the nucleus. Conclusions We demonstrate for the first time that Evc2 is a positive regulator of the Hh signalling pathway and that it is located at the basal body of primary cilia. We show that the presence of Evc and Evc2 at the basal body and cilia membrane is co-dependent. In addition, Evc2, but not Evc, is present in the cell nucleus suggesting movement of Evc2 between the cilium and nucleus. PMID:21356043

  2. Primary ciliary dyskinesia and associated sensory ciliopathies

    PubMed Central

    Horani, Amjad; Ferkol, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disease of motile cilia, which belongs to a group of disorders resulting from dysfunction of cilia, collectively known as ciliopathies. Insights into the genetics and phenotypes of PCD have grown over the last decade, in part propagated by the discovery of a number of novel cilia-related genes. These genes encode proteins that segregate into structural axonemal, regulatory, as well as cytoplasmic assembly proteins. Our understanding of primary (sensory) cilia has also expanded, and an ever-growing list of diverse conditions has been linked to defective function and signaling of the sensory cilium. Recent multicenter clinical and genetic studies have uncovered the heterogeneity of motile and sensory ciliopathies, and in some cases, the overlap between these conditions. In this review, we will describe the genetics and pathophysiology of ciliopathies in children, focusing on PCD, review emerging genotype-phenotype relationships, and diagnostic tools available for the clinician. PMID:26967669

  3. Nature-inspired micro-fluidic manipulation using artificial cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Toonder, Jaap; de Goede, Judith; Khatavkar, Vinayak; Anderson, Patrick

    2006-11-01

    One particular micro-fluidics manipulation mechanism ``designed'' by nature is that due to a covering of beating cilia over the external surface of micro-organisms (e.g. Paramecium). A cilium can be viewed as a small hair or flexible rod (in protozoa: typical length 10 μm and diameter 0.1 μm) which is attached to the surface. We have developed polymer micro-actuators, made with standard micro-technology processing, which respond to an applied electrical or magnetic field by changing their shape. The shape and size of the polymer actuators mimics that of cilia occurring in nature. We have shown experimentally that, indeed, our artificial cilia can induce significant flow velocities of at least 75 μm/s in a fluid with a viscosity of 10 mPas. In this paper we will give an overview of our activities in developing the polymer actuators and the corresponding technology, show experimental and numerical fluid flow results, and finally assess the feasibility of applying this new and attractive micro-fluidic actuation method in functional biosensors.

  4. Nanoscale Fluidics: Using magnetic nanorods as model cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jing; Ben, Wilde; Jeremy, Cribb; Chris, Dwyer; Jay, Fisher; Kalpit, Desai; Leandra, Vicci; Russell, M. Taylor, II; Richard, Superfine

    2003-11-01

    The beating of cilia and flagella, slender cylinders 250 nanometers in diameter with lengths from 7 to 50 microns, is ubiquitous in biology. The fluid dynamics produced by the cilia or flagella motion is responsible for organism feeding, propulsion, for bacterial clearance in the lungs and for the right-left asymmetry in vertebrates. We are developing a model system for cilia beating through the use of magnetic nanorods. Using anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes as templates, magnetic rods of permalloy with a diameter of 100 and 200 nm have been fabricated. We will describe the details of fabrication and characterization, and discuss methods used to study the hydrodynamic behavior of these nanorods in aqueous solutions under applied magnetic fields. Movies of these nanorods in oscillating 3-D magnetic fields generated by our 3-dimensional force microscopy (3DFM) clearly show bead motion in vortices around the nanorod. Deliberately transporting beads near the rods by laser trap, we can reproducibly study the hydrodynamic behavior around the nanorods and the influence of local rheological properties.

  5. A facile template-free approach to magnetodriven, multifunctional artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Timonen, Jaakko V I; Johans, Christoffer; Kontturi, Kyösti; Walther, Andreas; Ikkala, Olli; Ras, Robin H A

    2010-08-01

    Flexible and magnetic artificial cilia were grown on various substrates by a facile bottom-up approach based on template-free magnetic assembly. The magnetic cilia formed spontaneously from a suspension of micrometer-sized ferromagnetic particles and elastomeric polymer in a liquid solvent when dried in an external magnetic field. The cilia mimics were mechanically stable even in the absence of an external magnetic field and a solvent due to the polymer, which acted as "glue" holding the particles together and connecting the cilia to the substrate. The length of the magnetic cilia was in the millimeter range, that is, two to three orders of magnitude times the length of typical biological cilia. The aspect ratio reached values over 100 and was tunable with the magnetic field gradient and the size of the ferromagnetic particles. The cilia mimics responded to an external magnetic field by reversibly bending along the field. The bending actuation was sufficiently powerful to allow two functions: to translate macroscopic nonmagnetic objects placed over the cilia mimics and to mix liquids of even high viscosity. The mechanical properties of the magnetic cilia could be easily tuned by changing the impregnating polymer. The particularly simple template-free construction and fixation on various surfaces suggest applications as an externally controllable surface.

  6. Pion-Mass Dependence of the Nucleon Polarisabilities: A Reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Daniel R.; Griesshammer, Harald W.; McGovern, Judith A.

    2014-09-01

    The static electric and magnetic scalar dipole polarisabilities and the four spin polarisabilities parametrise the nucleon's two-photon response. At next-to-next-to-leading order in Chiral Effective Field Theory (χEFT) with dynamical Δ (1232) s, they have recently been extracted from Compton scattering data; ongoing experiments at HI γS, MAMI and MAXlab test proton-neutron differences and chiral symmetry breaking. Comparing lattice QCD simulations at pion masses mπ > 220 MeV to data and χEFT predictions requires a reliable extrapolation to the physical point. Since χEFT provides a systematically improvable, model-independent parametrisation of the polarisabilities, it is well-suited for that task. The relative theoretical uncertainties increase with increasing mπ: the magnitudes of the polarisabilities decrease; the χEFT expansion parameter itself increases; and the Δ (1232) becomes more important, leading to a re-ordering of contributions. After a review of χEFT, this presentation offers a method to quantitatively assess error-bands for chiral lattice extrapolations which can also be applied to other cases. Published errors appear to be underestimated. The static electric and magnetic scalar dipole polarisabilities and the four spin polarisabilities parametrise the nucleon's two-photon response. At next-to-next-to-leading order in Chiral Effective Field Theory (χEFT) with dynamical Δ (1232) s, they have recently been extracted from Compton scattering data; ongoing experiments at HI γS, MAMI and MAXlab test proton-neutron differences and chiral symmetry breaking. Comparing lattice QCD simulations at pion masses mπ > 220 MeV to data and χEFT predictions requires a reliable extrapolation to the physical point. Since χEFT provides a systematically improvable, model-independent parametrisation of the polarisabilities, it is well-suited for that task. The relative theoretical uncertainties increase with increasing mπ: the magnitudes of the

  7. Polarisation Spectral Synthesis For Type Ia Supernova Explosion Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulla, Mattia

    2017-02-01

    Despite their relevance across a broad range of astrophysical research topics, Type Ia supernova explosions are still poorly understood and answers to the questions of when, why and how these events are triggered remain unclear. In this respect, polarisation offers a unique opportunity to discriminate between the variety of possible scenarios. The observational evidence that Type Ia supernovae are associated with rather low polarisation signals (smaller than a few per cent) places strong constraints for models and calls for modest asphericities in the progenitor system and/or explosion mechanism.The goal of this thesis is to assess the validity of contemporary Type Ia supernova explosion models by testing whether their predicted polarisation signatures can account for the small signals usually observed. To this end, we have implemented and tested an innovative Monte Carlo scheme in the radiative transfer code artis. Compared to previous Monte Carlo approaches, this technique produces synthetic observables (light curves, flux and polarisation spectra) with a substantial reduction in the Monte Carlo noise and therefore in the required computing time. This improvement is particularly crucial for our study as we aim to extract very weak polarisation signals, comparable to those detected in Type Ia supernovae. We have also demonstrated the applicability of this method to other classes of supernovae via a preliminary study of the first spectropolarimetry observations of superluminous supernovae.Using this scheme, we have calculated synthetic spectropolarimetry for three multi-dimensional explosion models recently proposed as promising candidates to explain Type Ia supernovae. Our findings highlight the power of spectropolarimetry in testing and discriminating between different scenarios. While all the three models predict light curves and flux spectra that are similar to each others and reproduce those observed in Type Ia supernovae comparably well, polarisation does

  8. Polarisation Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, David Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E99-114 comprised a series of measurements to explore proton Compton scattering at high momentum transfer. For the first time, the polarisation transfer observables in the p ($\\vec{γ}$, γ' \\vec{p}$) reaction were measured in the GeV energy range, where it is believed that quark-gluon degrees of freedom begin to dominate. The experiment utilised a circularly polarised photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target, with the scattered photon and recoil proton detected in a lead-glass calorimeter and a magnetic spectrometer, respectively.

  9. On the dipole polarisability and dipole sum rules of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalugina, Yulia N.; Thakkar, Ajit J.

    2015-10-01

    Ab initio calculations of the dipole polarisability and other Cauchy moments of the dipole oscillator strength distribution (DOSD) of ozone are reported to help resolve discrepancies between theory and experiment. A number of coupled-cluster methods based on a Hartree-Fock reference function, multiconfiguration-reference configuration interaction methods, and perturbatively corrected, complete-active-space self-consistent field methods are used. The C DOSD of Kumar and Thakkar is probably preferable to their B1 distribution. Our best estimate of the mean polarisability is ? atomic units.

  10. Full analytical solution of Adapted Polarisation State Contrast Imaging.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Debajyoti; Mondal, Sugata; Lacot, Eric; Orlik, Xavier

    2011-12-05

    We have earlier proposed a 2-channel imaging technique: Adapted Polarisation State Contrast Imaging (APSCI), which noticeably enhances the polarimetric contrast between an object and its background using fully polarised incident state adapted to the scene, such that the polarimetric responses of those regions are located as far as possible on the Poincaré sphere. We address here the full analytical and graphical analysis of the ensemble of solutions of specific incident states, by introducing 3-Distance Eigen Space and explain the underlying physical structure of APSCI and the effect of noise over the measurements.

  11. A technique for detecting and locating polarisation nonuniformities in an anisotropic optical fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Burdin, V V; Konstantinov, Yurii A; Pervadchuk, Vladimir P; Smirnov, A S

    2013-06-30

    One of the most important requirements for optical fibres as waveguiding media is uniformity. Polarisation-maintaining anisotropic fibres contain a special type of nonuniformity, which leads to polarisation cross-talk: optical power is transferred from one polarisation mode to the orthogonal mode. In this paper, we report a technique for detecting and locating such nonuniformities in a PANDA anisotropic single-mode fibre using polarised reflectometry. (fiber optics)

  12. Polarisation, Radicalisation and Social Policy: Evaluating the Theories of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lub, Vasco

    2013-01-01

    This article evaluates the validity of "theories of change" of anti-polarisation and anti-radicalisation interventions. Assumptions of four dominant social policies are confronted with the literature. In addition, epistemological issues are discussed. Notions of "what works and why", do not equate to straightforward…

  13. A tunable diode laser emitting orthogonally polarised radiation modes

    SciTech Connect

    Fadyushin, A B; Velichansky, Vladimir L; Senkov, N V; Lukin, M D; Scully, M O; Fleischauer, M

    2002-07-31

    A new scheme of the external cavity of a diode laser is described. The scheme provides emission of two closely spaced ({Delta}{lambda} < 10{sup -3} nm) orthogonally polarised modes, which can be tuned within the gain line, with the mode interval continuously changed. (lasers)

  14. Effect of Cilia Beat Frequency on Muco-ciliary Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Sedaghat, M.H.; Shahmardan, M.M.; Norouzi, M.; Heydari, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The airway surface liquid (ASL), which is a fluid layer coating the interior epithelial surface of the bronchi and bronchiolesis, plays an important defensive role against foreign particles and chemicals entering lungs. Objective: Numerical investigation has been employed to solve two-layer model consisting of mucus layer as a viscoelastic fluid and periciliary liquid layer as a Newtonian fluid to study the effects of cilia beat frequency (CBF) at various amounts of mucus properties on muco-ciliary transport problem. Methods: Hybrid finite difference-lattice Boltzmann-method (FB-LBM) has been used to solve the momentum equations and to simulate cilia forces, and also the PCL-mucus interface more accurately, immersed boundary method (IBM) has been employed. The main contribution of the current study is to use an Oldroyd-B model as the constitutive equation of mucus. Results: Our results show that increasing CBF and decreasing mucus viscosity ratio have great effects on mucus flow, but the effect of viscosity ratio is more significant. The results also illustrate that the relation between cilia beat frequency and mean mucus velocity is almost linear and it has similar behavior at different values of viscosity ratio. Conclusion: Numerical investigation based on hybrid IB-FD-LBM has been used to study the effect of CBF at various mounts of mucus viscosity ratio on the muco-ciliary clearance. The results showed that the effect of viscosity ratio on the muco-ciliary transport process is more significant compared with CBF. PMID:28144596

  15. Mechanism of olfactory masking in the sensory cilia

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Hirohiko; Hikichi, Satoshi; Kurahashi, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Olfactory masking has been used to erase the unpleasant sensation in human cultures for a long period of history. Here, we show a positive correlation between the human masking and the odorant suppression of the transduction current through the cyclic nucleotide–gated (CNG) and Ca2+-activated Cl− (Cl(Ca)) channels. Channels in the olfactory cilia were activated with the cytoplasmic photolysis of caged compounds, and their sensitiveness to odorant suppression was measured with the whole cell patch clamp. When 16 different types of chemicals were applied to cells, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-induced responses (a mixture of CNG and Cl(Ca) currents) were suppressed widely with these substances, but with different sensitivities. Using the same chemicals, in parallel, we measured human olfactory masking with 6-rate scoring tests and saw a correlation coefficient of 0.81 with the channel block. Ringer's solution that was just preexposed to the odorant-containing air affected the cAMP-induced current of the single cell, suggesting that odorant suppression occurs after the evaporation and air/water partition of the odorant chemicals at the olfactory mucus. To investigate the contribution of Cl(Ca), the current was exclusively activated by using the ultraviolet photolysis of caged Ca, DM-nitrophen. With chemical stimuli, it was confirmed that Cl(Ca) channels were less sensitive to the odorant suppression. It is interpreted, however, that in the natural odorant response the Cl(Ca) is affected by the reduction of Ca2+ influx through the CNG channels as a secondary effect. Because the signal transmission between CNG and Cl(Ca) channels includes nonlinear signal-boosting process, CNG channel blockage leads to an amplified reduction in the net current. In addition, we mapped the distribution of the Cl(Ca) channel in living olfactory single cilium using a submicron local [Ca2+]i elevation with the laser photolysis. Cl(Ca) channels are expressed broadly along the cilia. We conclude that

  16. Sychronization of flagella and cilia due to viscous interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, David; Qian, Bian; Jiang, Hongyuan; Powers, Thomas; Breuer, Kenneth

    2009-11-01

    Motivated by the observed coordination of nearby beating cilia and rotating bacterial flagella, we use a scaled model experiment to show that hydrodynamic interactions can cause synchronization between rotating paddles driven at constant torque in a very viscous fluid. Systems with two and three paddles are explored, and interactions between symmetric and asymmetric paddles are tested. For two-paddle systems, synchronization is only observed when the shafts supporting the paddles have some flexibility, and the phase difference in the synchronized state depends on the symmetry of the paddles. Calculations using the method of regularized stokeslets and simple analytic theory match the experimental observations well.

  17. Localization of retinitis pigmentosa 2 to cilia is regulated by Importin β2

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Toby W.; Fan, Shuling; Margolis, Ben L.

    2011-01-01

    Ciliopathies represent a newly emerging group of human diseases that share a common etiology resulting from dysfunction of the cilium or centrosome. The gene encoding the retinitis pigmentosa 2 protein (RP2) is mutated in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. RP2 localizes to the ciliary base and this requires the dual acylation of the N-terminus, but the precise mechanism by which RP2 is trafficked to the cilia is unknown. Here we have characterized an interaction between RP2 and Importin β2 (transportin-1), a member of the Importin-β family that regulates nuclear–cytoplasmic shuttling. We demonstrate that Importin β2 is necessary for localization of RP2 to the primary cilium because ablation of Importin β2 by shRNA blocks entry both of endogenous and exogenous RP2 to the cilium. Furthermore, we identify two distinct binding sites of RP2, which interact independently with Importin β2. One binding site is a nuclear localization signal (NLS)-like sequence that is located at the N-terminus of RP2 and the other is an M9-like sequence within the tubulin folding cofactor C (TBCC) domain. Mutation of the NLS-like consensus sequence did not abolish localization of RP2 to cilia, suggesting that the sequence is not essential for RP2 ciliary targeting. Interestingly, we found that several missense mutations that cause human disease fall within the M9-like sequence of RP2 and these mutations block entry of RP2 into the cilium, as well as its interaction with Importin β2. Together, this work further highlights a role of Importin β2 in regulation of the entry of RP2 and other proteins into the ciliary compartment. PMID:21285245

  18. Polarised IR and Raman spectra of monoglycine nitrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Jan A.; Drozd, Marek A.; Ratajczak, Henryk

    2010-07-01

    Polarised Raman spectra of the monoglycine (monoglycinium) nitrate (hereafter MGN) single crystal are reported. Additionally, the polarised specular reflection spectra for the (1 0 0) single crystal sample (E|| Y( b) and E|| Z( c)) were measured in the region 3600-80 cm -1. The spectra of the imaginary parts of the refractive indices are computed by the Kramers-Kronig transformation (Opus). The polarised spectra are discussed with respect to the diffraction crystal structure and recent literature data on normal co-ordinate analysis for the glycinium cation ( +NH 3CH 2COOH). The stretching vibrations of the NH3+ groups are explained by considering their hydrogen bonds. The intensity of the Raman bands arising from the stretching vibrations of the CH 2 group are explained assuming that each C sbnd H bond stretches independently. This finding is unusual and suggests that the C(2) sbnd H(5) bond is involved in the hydrogen bonding (improper hydrogen bond). The deformation vibrations of the CH 2 group are explained assuming scissoring, twisting, wagging and rocking type of vibrations. The band at 871 cm -1 exhibits the CC stretching character of the CCN skeleton, whereas the band at ca. 1050 cm -1 shows the νaCCN character. The stretching νOH vibrations of the C sbnd O sbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond gives rise to a band at ca. 3087 cm -1, clearly seen in the Y( xx) Z Raman spectrum. Its γOH mode appears at 896 cm -1. The δOH vibration is coupled to other vibrations, although the IR band at ca. 1375 (E|| Y) likely arises from this mode. It was impossible to define a character of the glycinium cations deformation vibrations giving rise to the bands observed in between 680 and 490 cm -1, on the basis of their polarisation properties. The polarisation properties of the internal modes of the nitrate ions are discussed.

  19. Functional characterization of putative cilia genes by high-content analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Cary K.; Gupta, Nidhi; Wen, Xiaohui; Rangell, Linda; Chih, Ben; Peterson, Andrew S.; Bazan, J. Fernando; Li, Li; Scales, Suzie J.

    2011-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based protrusions from the cell surface that are involved in a number of essential signaling pathways, yet little is known about many of the proteins that regulate their structure and function. A number of putative cilia genes have been identified by proteomics and comparative sequence analyses, but functional data are lacking for the vast majority. We therefore monitored the effects in three cell lines of small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of 40 of these genes by high-content analysis. We assayed cilia number, length, and transport of two different cargoes (membranous serotonin receptor 6-green fluorescent protein [HTR6-GFP] and the endogenous Hedgehog [Hh] pathway transcription factor Gli3) by immunofluorescence microscopy; and cilia function using a Gli-luciferase Hh signaling assay. Hh signaling was most sensitive to perturbations, with or without visible structural cilia defects. Validated hits include Ssa2 and mC21orf2 with ciliation defects; Ift46 with short cilia; Ptpdc1 and Iqub with elongated cilia; and Arl3, Nme7, and Ssna1 with distinct ciliary transport but not length defects. Our data confirm various ciliary roles for several ciliome proteins and show it is possible to uncouple ciliary cargo transport from cilia formation in vertebrates. PMID:21289087

  20. Biomimetic cilia arrays - fabrication, magnetic actuation, and driven fluid transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Adam

    The cilium is one of biology's most basic functional nanostructures, present on nearly every cell and increasingly realized as vital to many aspects of human health. A fundamental reason for the ubiquity of cilia is their ability to effectively interact with fluids at the microscale, where the Reynolds number is low and thus inertia is irrelevant. This ability makes cilia an attractive and popular candidate for an engineered biomimic with potential applications in microfluidics and sensing. In addition, biological ciliated systems are difficult to study for many reasons, and so I demonstrate how a functional biomimetic system can also serve as a model platform for highly controlled studies of biologically relevant, cilia-driven hydrodynamics. Using the template-based microfabrication of a magnetic nanoparticle/polymer composite, I fabricate arrays of magnetically actuated biomimetic cilia at the scale of their biological analogues. I will discuss this fabrication technique and the magnetic actuation of these arrays to mimic the beat of biological cilia. I also report on the nature of the fluid flows driven by the cilia beat, and demonstrate how these cilia arrays can simultaneously generate long-range fluid transport and mixing in distinct fluid flow regimes. Finally, I present these results within the context of canonical hydrodynamics problems and discuss the implications for biological systems, such as the motile cilia recently discovered in the embryonic node.

  1. Loss of cilia suppresses cyst growth in genetic models of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ming; Tian, Xin; Igarashi, Peter; Pazour, Gregory J.; Somlo, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Kidney cysts occur following inactivation of polycystins in otherwise intact cilia or following complete removal of cilia by inactivation of intraflagellar transport-related proteins. We investigated the mechanisms of cyst formation in these two distinct processes by combining conditional inactivation of polycystins with concomitant ablation of cilia in developing and adult kidney and liver. We found that loss of intact cilia suppresses cyst growth following inactivation of polycystins and that the severity of cystic disease was directly related to the length of time between the initial loss of the polycystin proteins and the subsequent involution of cilia. This cilia-dependent cyst growth was not explained by activation of the MAPK/ERK, mTOR or cAMP pathways and is likely to be distinct from the mechanism of cyst growth following complete loss of cilia. The data establish the existence of a novel pathway defined by polycystin-dependent inhibition and cilia-dependent activation that promotes rapid cyst growth. PMID:23892607

  2. Cilia are required for asymmetric nodal induction in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Tisler, Matthias; Wetzel, Franziska; Mantino, Sabrina; Kremnyov, Stanislav; Thumberger, Thomas; Schweickert, Axel; Blum, Martin; Vick, Philipp

    2016-08-23

    Left-right (LR) organ asymmetries are a common feature of metazoan animals. In many cases, laterality is established by a conserved asymmetric Nodal signaling cascade during embryogenesis. In most vertebrates, asymmetric nodal induction results from a cilia-driven leftward fluid flow at the left-right organizer (LRO), a ciliated epithelium present during gastrula/neurula stages. Conservation of LRO and flow beyond the vertebrates has not been reported yet. Here we study sea urchin embryos, which use nodal to establish larval LR asymmetry as well. Cilia were found in the archenteron of embryos undergoing gastrulation. Expression of foxj1 and dnah9 suggested that archenteron cilia were motile. Cilia were polarized to the posterior pole of cells, a prerequisite of directed flow. High-speed videography revealed rotating cilia in the archenteron slightly before asymmetric nodal induction. Removal of cilia through brief high salt treatments resulted in aberrant patterns of nodal expression. Our data demonstrate that cilia - like in vertebrates - are required for asymmetric nodal induction in sea urchin embryos. Based on these results we argue that the anterior archenteron represents a bona fide LRO and propose that cilia-based symmetry breakage is a synapomorphy of the deuterostomes.

  3. Structural and Functional Recovery of Sensory Cilia in C. elegans IFT Mutants upon Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Julie; Brear, Andrea G.; Prahlad, Veena; Blacque, Oliver E.; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cilia are formed and maintained by the highly conserved process of intraflagellar transport (IFT). Mutations in IFT genes lead to ciliary structural defects and systemic disorders termed ciliopathies. Here we show that the severely truncated sensory cilia of hypomorphic IFT mutants in C. elegans transiently elongate during a discrete period of adult aging leading to markedly improved sensory behaviors. Age-dependent restoration of cilia morphology occurs in structurally diverse cilia types and requires IFT. We demonstrate that while DAF-16/FOXO is dispensable, the age-dependent suppression of cilia phenotypes in IFT mutants requires cell-autonomous functions of the HSF1 heat shock factor and the Hsp90 chaperone. Our results describe an unexpected role of early aging and protein quality control mechanisms in suppressing ciliary phenotypes of IFT mutants, and suggest possible strategies for targeting subsets of ciliopathies. PMID:27906968

  4. Left-right organizer flow dynamics: how much cilia activity reliably yields laterality?

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Pedro; Ferreira, Rita R; Guerrero, Adán; Pintado, Petra; Tavares, Bárbara; Amaro, Joana; Smith, Andrew A; Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas; Smith, David J; Lopes, Susana S

    2014-06-23

    Internal organs are asymmetrically positioned inside the body. Embryonic motile cilia play an essential role in this process by generating a directional fluid flow inside the vertebrate left-right organizer. Detailed characterization of how fluid flow dynamics modulates laterality is lacking. We used zebrafish genetics to experimentally generate a range of flow dynamics. By following the development of each embryo, we show that fluid flow in the left-right organizer is asymmetric and provides a good predictor of organ laterality. This was tested in mosaic organizers composed of motile and immotile cilia generated by dnah7 knockdowns. In parallel, we used simulations of fluid dynamics to analyze our experimental data. These revealed that fluid flow generated by 30 or more cilia predicts 90% situs solitus, similar to experimental observations. We conclude that cilia number, dorsal anterior motile cilia clustering, and left flow are critical to situs solitus via robust asymmetric charon expression.

  5. Structural and Functional Recovery of Sensory Cilia in C. elegans IFT Mutants upon Aging.

    PubMed

    Cornils, Astrid; Maurya, Ashish K; Tereshko, Lauren; Kennedy, Julie; Brear, Andrea G; Prahlad, Veena; Blacque, Oliver E; Sengupta, Piali

    2016-12-01

    The majority of cilia are formed and maintained by the highly conserved process of intraflagellar transport (IFT). Mutations in IFT genes lead to ciliary structural defects and systemic disorders termed ciliopathies. Here we show that the severely truncated sensory cilia of hypomorphic IFT mutants in C. elegans transiently elongate during a discrete period of adult aging leading to markedly improved sensory behaviors. Age-dependent restoration of cilia morphology occurs in structurally diverse cilia types and requires IFT. We demonstrate that while DAF-16/FOXO is dispensable, the age-dependent suppression of cilia phenotypes in IFT mutants requires cell-autonomous functions of the HSF1 heat shock factor and the Hsp90 chaperone. Our results describe an unexpected role of early aging and protein quality control mechanisms in suppressing ciliary phenotypes of IFT mutants, and suggest possible strategies for targeting subsets of ciliopathies.

  6. The BBSome controls IFT assembly and turnaround in cilia.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing; Zhang, Yuxia; Li, Yujie; Zhang, Qing; Ling, Kun; Hu, Jinghua

    2012-09-01

    The bidirectional movement of intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles, which are composed of motors, IFT-A and IFT-B subcomplexes, and cargoes, is required for the biogenesis and signalling of cilia(1,2). A successful IFT cycle depends on the proper assembly of the massive IFT particle at the ciliary base and its turnaround from anterograde to retrograde transport at the ciliary tip. However, how IFT assembly and turnaround are regulated in vivo remains elusive. From a whole-genome mutagenesis screen in Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified two hypomorphic mutations in dyf-2 and bbs-1 as the only mutants showing normal anterograde IFT transport but defective IFT turnaround at the ciliary tip. Further analyses revealed that the BBSome (refs 3, 4), a group of conserved proteins affected in human Bardet-Biedl syndrome(5) (BBS), assembles IFT complexes at the ciliary base, then binds to the anterograde IFT particle in a DYF-2- (an orthologue of human WDR19) and BBS-1-dependent manner, and lastly reaches the ciliary tip to regulate proper IFT recycling. Our results identify the BBSome as the key player regulating IFT assembly and turnaround in cilia.

  7. Evc is a positive mediator of Ihh-regulated bone growth that localises at the base of chondrocyte cilia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Blair, Helen J; Rodriguez-Andres, M Elena; Blanco, Maria Jose; Wilson, Amy; Liu, Yu-Ning; Miles, Colin; Peters, Heiko; Goodship, Judith A

    2007-08-01

    EVC is a novel protein mutated in the human chondroectodermal dysplasia Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC; OMIM: 225500). We have inactivated Evc in the mouse and show that Evc(-/-) mice develop an EvC-like syndrome, including short ribs, short limbs and dental abnormalities. lacZ driven by the Evc promoter revealed that Evc is expressed in the developing bones and the orofacial region. Antibodies developed against Evc locate the protein at the base of the primary cilium. The growth plate of Evc(-/-) mice shows delayed bone collar formation and advanced maturation of chondrocytes. Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is expressed normally in the growth plates of Evc(-/-) mice, but expression of the Ihh downstream genes Ptch1 and Gli1 was markedly decreased. Recent studies have shown that Smo localises to primary cilia and that Gli3 processing is defective in intraflagellar transport mutants. In vitro studies using Evc(-/-) cells demonstrate that the defect lies downstream of Smo. Chondrocyte cilia are present in Evc(-/-) mice and Gli3 processing appears normal by western blot analysis. We conclude that Evc is an intracellular component of the hedgehog signal transduction pathway that is required for normal transcriptional activation of Ihh target genes.

  8. Destabilization of the IFT-B cilia core complex due to mutations in IFT81 causes a Spectrum of Short-Rib Polydactyly Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Ivan; Taylor, S. Paige; Zhang, Wenjuan; Martin, Jorge; Forlenza, Kimberly N.; Spiro, Rhonda P.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael; Cohn, Daniel H.; Krakow, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Short-rib polydactyly syndromes (SRPS) and Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD) or Jeune Syndrome are recessively inherited skeletal ciliopathies characterized by profound skeletal abnormalities and are frequently associated with polydactyly and multiorgan system involvement. SRPS are produced by mutations in genes that participate in the formation and function of primary cilia and usually result from disruption of retrograde intraflagellar (IFT) transport of the cilium. Herein we describe a new spectrum of SRPS caused by mutations in the gene IFT81, a key component of the IFT-B complex essential for anterograde transport. In mutant chondrocytes, the mutations led to low levels of IFT81 and mutant cells produced elongated cilia, had altered hedgehog signaling, had increased post-translation modification of tubulin, and showed evidence of destabilization of additional anterograde transport complex components. These findings demonstrate the importance of IFT81 in the skeleton, its role in the anterograde transport complex, and expand the number of loci associated with SRPS. PMID:27666822

  9. Destabilization of the IFT-B cilia core complex due to mutations in IFT81 causes a Spectrum of Short-Rib Polydactyly Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duran, Ivan; Taylor, S Paige; Zhang, Wenjuan; Martin, Jorge; Forlenza, Kimberly N; Spiro, Rhonda P; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael; Cohn, Daniel H; Krakow, Deborah

    2016-09-26

    Short-rib polydactyly syndromes (SRPS) and Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD) or Jeune Syndrome are recessively inherited skeletal ciliopathies characterized by profound skeletal abnormalities and are frequently associated with polydactyly and multiorgan system involvement. SRPS are produced by mutations in genes that participate in the formation and function of primary cilia and usually result from disruption of retrograde intraflagellar (IFT) transport of the cilium. Herein we describe a new spectrum of SRPS caused by mutations in the gene IFT81, a key component of the IFT-B complex essential for anterograde transport. In mutant chondrocytes, the mutations led to low levels of IFT81 and mutant cells produced elongated cilia, had altered hedgehog signaling, had increased post-translation modification of tubulin, and showed evidence of destabilization of additional anterograde transport complex components. These findings demonstrate the importance of IFT81 in the skeleton, its role in the anterograde transport complex, and expand the number of loci associated with SRPS.

  10. Threshold π0 Photoproduction on Transverse Polarised Protons at MAMI

    DOE PAGES

    Schumann, S.

    2015-09-14

    Polarisation-dependent differential cross sections σT associated with the target asymmetry T have been measured for the reaction γ p-→ p π0 with transverse target polarisation from π0 threshold up to photon energies of 190 MeV. Additionally, the data were obtained using a frozen-spin butanol target with the Crystal Ball / TAPS detector set-up and the Glasgow photon tagging system at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. Our results for σT have been used in combination with our previous measurements of the unpolarised cross section σ0 and the beam asymmetry Σ for a model-independent determination of S and P wave multipoles in themore » π0 threshold region, which includes for the first time a direct determination of the imaginary part of the E0+ multipole.« less

  11. Measurement of double polarisation asymmetries in ω-photoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, H.; Jude, T. C.; Schmieden, H.; Anisovich, A. V.; Bantes, B.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Beloglazov, Yu.; Bichow, M.; Böse, S.; Brinkmann, K.-Th.; Challand, Th.; Crede, V.; Diez, F.; Drexler, P.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Fornet-Ponse, K.; Friedrich, St.; Frommberger, F.; Funke, Ch.; Gottschall, M.; Gridnev, A.; Grüner, M.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, Ch.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, J.; Hillert, W.; Hoffmeister, Ph.; Honisch, Ch.; Jaegle, I.; Kaiser, D.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kalischewski, F.; Kammer, S.; Keshelashvili, I.; Kleber, V.; Klein, F.; Klempt, E.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Kube, M.; Lang, M.; Lopatin, I.; Maghrbi, Y.; Makonyi, K.; Metag, V.; Meyer, W.; Müller, J.; Nanova, M.; Nikonov, V.; Novotny, R.; Piontek, D.; Reeve, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rostomyan, T.; Runkel, S.; Sarantsev, A.; Schaepe, St.; Schmidt, Ch.; Schmitz, R.; Seifen, T.; Sokhoyan, V.; Sumachev, V.; Thiel, A.; Thoma, U.; Urban, M.; van Pee, H.; Walther, D.; Wendel, Ch.; Wiedner, U.; Wilson, A.; Winnebeck, A.

    2015-11-01

    The first measurements of the beam-target-helicity-asymmetries E and G in the photoproduction of ω-mesons off protons at the CBELSA/TAPS experiment are reported. E (G) was measured using circularly (linearly) polarised photons and a longitudinally polarised target. E was measured over the photon energy range from close to threshold (Eγ = 1108 MeV) to Eγ = 2300 MeV and G at a single energy interval of 1108

  12. Verification of polarising optics for the LISA optical bench.

    PubMed

    Dehne, Marina; Tröbs, Michael; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten

    2012-12-03

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a space-based interferometric gravitational wave detector. In the current baseline design for the optical bench, the use of polarising optics is foreseen to separate optical beams. Therefore it is important to investigate the influence of polarising components on the interferometer sensitivity and validate that the required picometre stability in the low-frequency band (1 mHz - 1 Hz) is achievable. This paper discusses the design of the experiment and the implemented stabilisation loops. A displacement readout fulfilling the requirement in the whole frequency band is presented. Alternatively, we demonstrate improvement of the noise performance by implementing various algorithms in data post-processing, which leads to an additional robustness for the LISA mission.

  13. Constraining new resonant physics with top spin polarisation information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Christoph; Ferrando, James; Nordström, Karl

    2017-06-01

    We provide a comprehensive analysis of the power of including top quark-polarisation information to kinematically challenging top pair resonance searches, for which ATLAS and CMS start losing sensitivity. Following the general modelling and analysis strategies pursued by the experiments, we analyse the semi-leptonic and the di-lepton channels and show that including polarisation information can lead to large improvements in the limit setting procedures with large data sets. This will allow us to set stronger limits for parameter choices where sensitivity from the invariant mass of the top pair is not sufficient. This highlights the importance of spin observables as part of a more comprehensive set of observables to gain sensitivity to BSM resonance searches.

  14. Polarisation of microwave emission from reconnecting twisted coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordovskyy, M.; Browning, P. K.; Kontar, E. P.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration due to the kink instability in twisted coronal loops can be a viable scenario for confined solar flares. Detailed investigation of this phenomenon requires reliable methods for observational detection of magnetic twist in solar flares, which may not be possible solely through extreme UV and soft X-ray thermal emission. Polarisation of microwave emission in flaring loops can be used as one of the detection criteria. Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of magnetic twist in flaring coronal loops on the polarisation of gyro-synchrotron microwave (GSMW) emission, and determine whether it could provide a means for magnetic twist detection. Methods: We consider time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic and test-particle models developed using the LARE3D and GCA codes to investigate twisted coronal loops that relax after kink instability. Synthetic GSMW emission maps (I and V Stokes components) are calculated using GX simulator. Results: It is found that flaring twisted coronal loops produce GSMW radiation with a gradient of circular polarisation across the loop. However, these patterns may be visible only for a relatively short period of time owing to fast magnetic reconfiguration after the instability. Their visibility also depends on the orientation and position of the loop on the solar disk. Typically, it would be difficult to see these characteristic polarisation patterns in a twisted loop seen from the top (i.e. close to the centre of the solar disk), but easier in a twisted loop seen from the side (i.e. observed very close to the limb).

  15. Ultrafast polarisation spectroscopy of photoinduced charges in a conjugated polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Bakulin, A A; Loosdrecht, P van; Pshenichnikov, M S; Parashchuk, D Yu

    2009-07-31

    Tunable optical parametric generators and amplifiers (OPA), proposed and developed by Akhmanov and his colleagues, have become the working horses in exploration of dynamical processes in physics, chemistry, and biology. In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility of using ultrafast polarisation-sensitive two-colour spectroscopy, performed with a set of two OPAs, to study charge photogeneration and transport in conjugated polymers and their donor-acceptor blends. (special issue devoted to the 80th birthday of S.A. Akhmanov)

  16. Semi-Classical Dirac Vacuum Polarisation in a Scalar Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampart, Jonas; Lewin, Mathieu

    2016-08-01

    We study vacuum polarisation effects of a Dirac field coupled to an external scalar field and derive a semi-classical expansion of the regu-larised vacuum energy. The leading order of this expansion is given by a classical formula due to Chin, Lee-Wick and Walecka, for which our result provides the first rigorous proof. We then discuss applications to the non-relativistic large-coupling limit of an interacting system, and to the stability of homogeneous systems.

  17. Prospects for studying vacuum polarisation using dipole and synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias

    2016-04-01

    > The measurement of vacuum polarisation effects, in particular vacuum birefringence, using combined optical and X-ray laser pulses are now actively pursued. Here we briefly examine the feasibility of two alternative set-ups. The first utilises an alternative target, namely a converging dipole pulse, and the second uses an alternative probe, namely the synchrotron-like emission from highly energetic particles, themselves interacting with a laser pulse. The latter set-up has been proposed for experiments at ELI-NP.

  18. Cilia Internal Mechanism and Metachronal Coordination as the Result of Hydrodynamical Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueron, Shay; Levit-Gurevich, Konstantin; Liron, Nadav; Blum, Jacob J.

    1997-06-01

    We present a simple but realistic model for the internal bend-generating mechanism of cilia, using parameters obtained from the analysis of data of the beat of a single cilium, and incorporate it into a recently developed dynamical model. Comparing the results to experimental data for two-dimensional beats, we demonstrate that the model captures the essential features of the motion, including many properties that are not built in explicitly. The beat pattern and frequency change in response to increased viscosity and the presence of neighboring cilia in a realistic fashion. Using the model, we are able to investigate multicilia configurations such as rows of cilia and two-dimensional arrays of cilia. When two adjacent model cilia start beating at different phase, they synchronize within two cycles, as observed in experiments in which two flagella beating out of phase are brought close together. Examination of various multicilia configurations shows that metachronal patterns (i.e., beats with a constant phase difference between neighboring cilia) evolve autonomously. This provides modeling evidence in support of the conjecture that metachronism may occur as a self-organized phenomenon due to hydrodynamical interactions between the cilia.

  19. The Par-PrkC Polarity Complex Is Required for Cilia Growth in Zebrafish Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Krock, Bryan L.; Perkins, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Specification and development of the apical membrane in epithelial cells requires the function of polarity proteins, including Pard3 and an atypical protein kinase C (PrkC). Many epithelial cells possess microtubule-based organelles, known as cilia, that project from their apical surface and the membrane surrounding the cilium is contiguous with the apical cell membrane. Although cilia formation in cultured cells required Pard3, the in vivo requirement for Pard3 in cilia development remains unknown. The vertebrate photoreceptor outer segment represents a highly specialized cilia structure in which to identify factors necessary for apical and ciliary membrane formation. Pard3 and PrkC localized to distinct domains within vertebrate photoreceptors. Using partial morpholino knockdown, photo-morpholinos, and pharmacological approaches, the function of Pard3 and PrkC were found to be required for the formation of both the apical and ciliary membrane of vertebrate photoreceptors. Inhibition of Pard3 or PrkC activity significantly reduced the size of photoreceptor outer segments and resulted in mislocalization of rhodopsin. Suppression of Pard3 or PrkC also led to a reduction in cilia size and cilia number in Kupffer’s Vesicle, which resulted in left-right asymmetry defects. Thus, the Par-PrkC complex functions in cilia formation in vivo and this likely reflects a general role in specifying non-ciliary and ciliary compartments of the apical domain. PMID:25144710

  20. INPP5E regulates phosphoinositide-dependent cilia transition zone function.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Jennifer M; Conduit, Sarah E; Feeney, Sandra J; Hakim, Sandra; DiTommaso, Tia; Fulcher, Alex J; Sriratana, Absorn; Ramm, Georg; Horan, Kristy A; Gurung, Rajendra; Wicking, Carol; Smyth, Ian; Mitchell, Christina A

    2017-01-02

    Human ciliopathies, including Joubert syndrome (JBTS), arise from cilia dysfunction. The inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase INPP5E localizes to cilia and is mutated in JBTS. Murine Inpp5e ablation is embryonically lethal and recapitulates JBTS, including neural tube defects and polydactyly; however, the underlying defects in cilia signaling and the function of INPP5E at cilia are still emerging. We report Inpp5e(-/-) embryos exhibit aberrant Hedgehog-dependent patterning with reduced Hedgehog signaling. Using mouse genetics, we show increasing Hedgehog signaling via Smoothened M2 expression rescues some Inpp5e(-/-) ciliopathy phenotypes and "normalizes" Hedgehog signaling. INPP5E's phosphoinositide substrates PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 accumulated at the transition zone (TZ) in Hedgehog-stimulated Inpp5e(-/-) cells, which was associated with reduced recruitment of TZ scaffolding proteins and reduced Smoothened levels at cilia. Expression of wild-type, but not 5-phosphatase-dead, INPP5E restored TZ molecular organization and Smoothened accumulation at cilia. Therefore, we identify INPP5E as an essential point of convergence between Hedgehog and phosphoinositide signaling at cilia that maintains TZ function and Hedgehog-dependent embryonic development.

  1. Histone deacetylase 6–mediated selective autophagy regulates COPD-associated cilia dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Hilaire C.; Cloonan, Suzanne M.; Bhashyam, Abhiram R.; Haspel, Jeffery A.; Singh, Anju; Sathirapongsasuti, J. Fah; Cervo, Morgan; Yao, Hongwei; Chung, Anna L.; Mizumura, Kenji; An, Chang Hyeok; Shan, Bin; Franks, Jonathan M.; Haley, Kathleen J.; Owen, Caroline A.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Washko, George R.; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K.; Rahman, Irfan; Kim, Hong Pyo; Mahmood, Ashfaq; Biswal, Shyam S.; Ryter, Stefan W.; Choi, Augustine M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) involves aberrant airway inflammatory responses to cigarette smoke (CS) that are associated with epithelial cell dysfunction, cilia shortening, and mucociliary clearance disruption. Exposure to CS reduced cilia length and induced autophagy in vivo and in differentiated mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTECs). Autophagy-impaired (Becn1+/– or Map1lc3B–/–) mice and MTECs resisted CS-induced cilia shortening. Furthermore, CS increased the autophagic turnover of ciliary proteins, indicating that autophagy may regulate cilia homeostasis. We identified cytosolic deacetylase HDAC6 as a critical regulator of autophagy-mediated cilia shortening during CS exposure. Mice bearing an X chromosome deletion of Hdac6 (Hdac6–/Y) and MTECs from these mice had reduced autophagy and were protected from CS-induced cilia shortening. Autophagy-impaired Becn1–/–, Map1lc3B–/–, and Hdac6–/Y mice or mice injected with an HDAC6 inhibitor were protected from CS-induced mucociliary clearance (MCC) disruption. MCC was preserved in mice given the chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid, but was disrupted in mice lacking the transcription factor NRF2, suggesting that oxidative stress and altered proteostasis contribute to the disruption of MCC. Analysis of human COPD specimens revealed epigenetic deregulation of HDAC6 by hypomethylation and increased protein expression in the airways. We conclude that an autophagy-dependent pathway regulates cilia length during CS exposure and has potential as a therapeutic target for COPD. PMID:24200693

  2. Be together, not the same: Spatiotemporal organization of different cilia types generates distinct transport functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawroth, Janna; Guo, Hanliang; Ruby, Edward; Dabiri, John; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Kanso, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Motile cilia are microscopic, hair-like structures on the cell surface that can sense and propel the extracellular fluid environment. Cilia are often thought to be limited to stereotypic morphologies, beat kinematics and non-discriminatory clearance functions, but we find that the spatiotemporal organization of different cilia types and beat behaviors can generate complex flow patterns and transport functions. Here, we present a case study in the Hawaiian bobtail squid where collective ciliary activity and resulting flow fields help recruit symbiont bacteria to the animal host. In particular, we demonstrate empirically and computationally how the squid's internal cilia act like a microfluidic device that actively filters the water for potential bacterial candidates and also provides a sheltered zone allowing for accumulation of mucus and bacteria into a biofilm. Moreover, in this sheltered zone, different cilia-driven flows enhance diffusion of biochemical signals, which could accelerate specific bacteria-host recognition. These results suggest that studying cilia activity on the population level might reveal a diverse range of biological transport and sensing functions. Moreover, understanding cilia as functional building blocks could inspire the design of ciliated robots and devices.

  3. Specific localization of scallop gill epithelial calmodulin in cilia.

    PubMed

    Stommel, E W; Stephens, R E; Masure, H R; Head, J F

    1982-03-01

    Calmodulin has been isolated and characterized from the gill of the bay scallop aequipecten irradians. Quantitative electrophoretic analysis of epithelial cell fractions show most of the calmodulin to be localized in the cilia, specifically in the detergent- solubilized membrane-matrix fraction. Calmodulin represents 2.2 +/- 0.3 percent of the membrane-matrix protein or 0.41 +/- 0.5 percent of the total ciliary protein. Its concentration is at least 10(-4) M if distributed uniformly within the matrix. Extraction in the presence of calcium suggests that the calmodulin is not bound to the axoneme proper. The ciliary protein is identified as a calmodulin on the basis of its calcium- dependent binding to a fluphenazine-sepharose affinity column and its comigration with bovine brain calmodulin on alkaline-urea and SDS polyacrylamide gels in both the presence and absence of calcium. Scallop ciliary calmodulin activates bovine brain phosphodiesterase to the same extent as bovine brain and chicken gizzard calmodulins. Containing trimethyllysine and lacking cysteine and tryptophan, the amino acid composition of gill calmodulin is typical of known calmodulins, except that it is relatively high in serine and low in methionine. Its composition is less acidic than other calmodulins, in agreement with an observed isoelectric point approximately 0.2 units higher than that of bovine brain. Comparative tryptic peptide mapping of scallop gill ciliary and bovine brain calmodulins indicates coincidence of over 75 percent of the major peptides, but at least two major peptides in each show no near-equivalency. Preliminary results using ATP-reactivated gill cell models show no effect of calcium at micromolar levels on ciliary beat or directionality of the lateral cilia, the cilia which constitute the vast majority of those isolated. However, ciliary arrest will occur at calcium levels more than 150 muM. Because calmodulin usually functions in the micromolar range, its role in this system

  4. PoGOLite measurement of Crab polarisation and future plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Mark

    2016-07-01

    (For the PoGOLite Collaboration) The PoGOLite Pathfinder is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter designed for the observation of bright, ~1 Crab, sources. Polarisation is determined by measuring the azimuthal Compton scattering angle of incident X-rays in an array of plastic scintillators housed in an BGO anticoincidence well. The PoGOLite Pathfinder was launched from the SSC Esrange Space Centre in July 2013 resulting in a near-circumpolar flight of two weeks duration. The linear polarisation of hard X-ray emissions from the Crab was measured in a previously unexplored energy interval, 20-120 keV. The polarimetric response was characterised prior to flight using both polarised and unpolarised calibration sources. Systematic effects were addressed through observations of a background field. An upgraded polarimeter, PoGO+, is scheduled to fly in summer 2016 from Esrange. Results from the 2013 Pathfinder flight and prospects for the 2016 flight will be discussed.

  5. Doubly-polarised pion photoproduction on the nucleon at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    The A2 Collaboration at MAMI (Mainz) carried out new measurements of the helicity dependence of the total inclusive photo-absorption cross section and of the partial cross sections for several reaction channels on the proton and on the neutron in the photon energy region 200 < Eγ < 1500 MeV. The experiments were performed at the tagged photon beam facility of the MAMI accelerator in Mainz, using circularly and linearly polarised photons on longitudinally polarised proton, deuteron and 3He targets. Hadronic reaction products were detected by the large acceptance Crystal Ball-TAPS spectrometer, complemented by plastic scintillators and vertex detectors for charged particle tracking and identification. These new, high-quality doubly-polarised pion-photoproduction data sets provide a valuable input to the study of the nucleon structure and excitation spectrum by significantly constraining the electromagnetic multipole evaluation performed by the different available partial wave analysis models. Furthermore, the helicity dependent observables provide the main ingredient for the verification of the well-known Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule, which relates the helicity-dependent photoasborption process to the main static nucleon properties (mass, charge, spin).

  6. The fine structure of the cilia from ctenophore swimming-plates.

    PubMed

    AFZELIUS, B A

    1961-02-01

    The ctenophore swimming-plate has been examined with the electron microscope. It has been recognized as an association of long cilia in tight hexagonal packing. One of the directions of the hexagonal packing is parallel to the long edge of the swimming-plate and is perpendicular to the direction of the ciliary beat. All the cilia in the swimming-plate are identically oriented. The effective beat in the movement of the swimming-plate is directed towards the aboral pole of the animal, and this is also the side of the unpaired peripheral filament in all the cilia. The direction of the ciliary beat is fixed in relation to the position of the filaments of the cilia. The swimming-plate cilium differs from other types of cilia and flagella in having a filament arrangement that can be described as 9 + 3 as opposed to the conventional 9 + 2 pattern. The central filaments appear in a group of two "tubular" filaments and an associated compact filament. The compact filament might have a supporting function. It has been called "midfilament." Two of the peripheral nine filaments (Fig. 1, Nos. 3 and 8) are joined to the ciliary membrane by means of slender lamellae, which divide the cilium into two unequal compartments. These lamellae have been called "compartmenting lamellae." Some observations of the arrangement of the compartmenting lamelae indicate that they function by cementing the cilia together in lateral rows. The cilia of the rows meet at a short distance from each other, leaving a gap of 30 A only. The meeting points are close to the termini of the compartmenting ridges. An electron-dense substance is sometimes seen bridging the gap. Some irregularities are noted with regard to the arrangement of the compartmenting lamellae particularly at the peripheral rows of cilia. In many cilia in these rows there are small vesicles beneath the ciliary membrane.

  7. About the effects of polarising optics on lidar signals and the Δ90 calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenthaler, Volker

    2016-08-01

    This paper provides a model for assessing the effects of polarising optics on the signals of typical lidar systems, which is based on the description of the individual optical elements of the lidar and of the state of polarisation of the light by means of the Müller-Stokes formalism. General analytical equations are derived for the dependence of the lidar signals on polarisation parameters, for the linear depolarisation ratio, and for the signals of different polarisation calibration setups. The equations can also be used for the calculation of systematic errors caused by nonideal optical elements, their rotational misalignment, and by non-ideal laser polarisation. We present the description of the lidar signals including the polarisation calibration in a closed form, which can be applied for a large variety of lidar systems.

  8. Elliptically polarised soft x-rays produced using a local bump in MAX II - Characterisation of the degree of polarisation

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J. Hunter; LeBlanc, G.; Andersson, A.; Lindgren, L.-J.; Hahlin, A.; Karis, O.; Arvanitis, D.

    2004-05-12

    MAX-lab has introduced a local perturbation to the electron orbit of the MAX II storage ring, providing users at the SX700 monochromator beam line, D1011, with elliptically polarised soft x-rays. This is achieved by using corrector magnets to send the electron orbit on an ascending or descending trajectory through the dipole magnet source. This simple 'bump' approach has many advantages over and above insertion device based solutions. To illustrate the potential of the approach, the degree of circular polarisation, Pc, has both been calculated and measured. The calculation was made by applying the Stokes formalism to the intensities given by the standard dipole emission formula. Experimentally Pc was characterised using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements. In such experiments magnetic contrast scales directly proportional to Pc. Using a 25 atomic layer bcc Fe film deposited on the Cu(100) surface as a calibration standard the spin moment, ms, was determined. By comparing the values of ms obtained here with those reported earlier, the degree of circular polarisation could be estimated. At {approx} 715 eV the calculated and measured values of Pc are 0.93 and 0.85, respectively.

  9. High Grazing Angle and High Resolution Sea Clutter: Correlation and Polarisation Analyses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    corner reflector , are shown in Figure 34. (a) co-polarisation response (b) cross -polarisation response Figure 34: Polarisation signatures of the...even-bounce scattering mechanism, such as a large conducting dihedral corner reflector . Structures of large conducting left- and right-handed helixes...double bounce scattering from a dihedral - corner - reflector like mechanism has a phase difference of about 180o whereas a odd bounce scattering from

  10. UV circular polarisation in star formation regions: the origin of homochirality?

    PubMed

    Lucas, P W; Hough, J H; Bailey, Jeremy; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Gledhill, T M; McCall, Alan

    2005-02-01

    Ultraviolet circularly polarised light has been suggested as the initial cause of the homochirality of organic molecules in terrestrial organisms, via enantiomeric selection of prebiotic molecules by asymmetric photolysis. We present a theoretical investigation of mechanisms by which ultraviolet circular polarisation may be produced in star formation regions. In the scenarios considered here, light scattering produces only a small percentage of net circular polarisation at any point in space, due to the forward throwing nature of the phase function in the ultraviolet. By contrast, dichroic extinction can produce a fairly high percentage of net circular polarisation ( approximately 10%) and may therefore play a key role in producing an enantiomeric excess.

  11. Filamentation of femtosecond Gaussian pulses with close-to-linear or -circular elliptical polarisation

    SciTech Connect

    Panov, N A; Kosyreva, O G; Savel'ev-Trofimov, Andrei B; Uryupina, D S; Perezhogin, I A; Makarov, Vladimir A

    2011-02-28

    A numerical investigation was made of the formation and development of filaments in the propagation of high-power femtosecond Gaussian laser pulses in argon, whose polarisation is close to the linear or circular one. Filaments produced by close-to-circularly polarised pulses were found to be more uniform, greater in diameter, and higher in intensity than the filaments produced by close-to-linearly polarised pulses. For incident pulses with a close-to-linear (circular) polarisation, the degree of ellipticity of the radiation on the axis of the resultant filament becomes equal to zero (unity) at the instant of the peak of the local intensity. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  12. High e-vector acuity in the polarisation vision system of the fiddler crab Uca vomeris.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Pignatelli, Vincenzo; Temple, Shelby E; Marshall, N Justin; Hemmi, Jan M

    2012-06-15

    Polarisation vision is used by a variety of species in many important tasks, including navigation and orientation (e.g. desert ant), communication and signalling (e.g. stomatopod crustaceans), and as a possible substitute for colour vision (e.g. cephalopod molluscs). Fiddler crabs are thought to possess the anatomical structures necessary to detect polarised light, and occupy environments rich in polarisation cues. Yet little is known about the capabilities of their polarisation sense. A modified polarisation-only liquid crystal display and a spherical rotating treadmill were combined to test the responses of fiddler crabs to moving polarisation stimuli. The species Uca vomeris was found to be highly sensitive to polarised light and detected stimuli differing in e-vector angle by as little as 3.2 deg. This represents the most acute behavioural sensitivity to polarised light yet measured for a crustacean. The occurrence of null points in their discrimination curve indicates that this species employs an orthogonal (horizontal/vertical) receptor array for the detection of polarised light.

  13. The Possibility of Polarisation in the LHeC Ring-Ring Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, D.P.; Wienands, H.U.; Fitterer, M.; Burkhardt, H.; /CERN

    2012-05-08

    A proposal to add 60-GeV electron and positron beams to the LHC at CERN (LHeC) is currently being prepared. The provision of electron and positron longitudinal polarisation is an important component of the proposal and we are examining the feasibility of Sokolov-Ternov self-polarisation at energies up to 60 GeV in a storage ring in the LHC tunnel. But at this energy the attainable polarisation can be very strongly limited by depolarising effects. This paper summarises first calculations of the attainable polarisation including estimates of the efficacy of Siberian Snakes for weakening synchrotron sideband resonances.

  14. LASER BEAMS AND RESONATORS: Formation of an inhomogeneously polarised light beam at the sum frequency by two collinear elliptically polarised Gaussian beams focused into a chiral medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, S. N.; Makarov, Vladimir A.; Perezhogin, I. A.

    2006-09-01

    The distribution of polarisation of a light field in the cross section of a beam at the sum frequency is investigated upon the collinear interaction of two elliptically polarised Gaussian beams in a nonlinear isotropic gyrotropic medium. It is shown that the ellipticity, the angle of rotation of the principal axis of the polarisation ellipse, and the rotation direction of the electric field vector of radiation at the sum frequency in the beam cross section strongly depend on the angle in the polar coordinate system. The ranges of parameters of elliptically polarised fundamental Gaussian beams are found where the cross section of the sum-frequency beam is divided into sectors with different rotation directions of the electric field vector. The equations of the straight lines determining the boundaries of these sectors contain parameters specifying the shape and orientation of polarisation ellipses of the fundamental waves and the ratio of their wave vectors. In the case of opposite circular polarisations of these waves, the ellipticity of the sum-frequency beam does not change in the beam cross section and the principal axes of polarisation ellipses of the light field are oriented perpendicular to the radius in polar coordinates.

  15. A role for central spindle proteins in cilia structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katherine R.; Kieserman, Esther K.; Wang, Peggy I.; Basten, Sander G.; Giles, Rachel H.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Wallingford, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokinesis and ciliogenesis are fundamental cellular processes that require strict coordination of microtubule organization and directed membrane trafficking. These processes have been intensely studied, but there has been little indication that regulatory machinery might be extensively shared between them. Here, we show that several central spindle/midbody proteins (PRC1, MKLP-1, INCENP, centriolin) also localize in specific patterns at the basal body complex in vertebrate ciliated epithelial cells. Moreover, bioinformatic comparisons of midbody and cilia proteomes reveal a highly significant degree of overlap. Finally, we used temperature-sensitive alleles of PRC1/spd-1 and MKLP-1/zen-4 in C. elegans to assess ciliary functions while bypassing these proteins' early role in cell division. These mutants displayed defects in both cilia function and cilia morphology. Together, these data suggest the conserved re-use of a surprisingly large number of proteins in the cytokinetic apparatus and in cilia. PMID:21246755

  16. Synchronization and Collective Dynamics of Flagella and Cilia as Hydrodynamically Coupled Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Nariya; Golestanian, Ramin; Bennett, Rachel R.

    2017-10-01

    Cooperative motion of flagella and cilia faciliates swimming of microorganisms and material transport in the body of multicellular organisms. Using minimal models, we address the roles of hydrodynamic interaction in synchronization and collective dynamics of flagella and cilia. Collective synchronization of bacterial flagella is studied with a model of bacterial carpets. Cilia and eukaryotic flagella are characterized by periodic modulation of their driving forces, which produces various patterns of two-body synchronization and metachronal waves. Long-range nature of the interaction introduces novel features in the dynamics of these model systems. The flagella of a swimmer synchronize also by a viscous drag force mediated through the swimmer's body. Recent advance in experimental studies of the collective dynamics of flagella, cilia and related artificial systems are summarized.

  17. Cilia assembly: a role for F-actin in IFT recruitment.

    PubMed

    Quarmby, Lynne

    2014-09-08

    Ciliary growth rates are limited by the availability of precursors at the growing tip. A new paper reveals that the early rapid growth of nascent cilia is supported by F-actin-facilitated delivery of IFT proteins to basal bodies.

  18. Deletion of airway cilia results in noninflammatory bronchiectasis and hyperreactive airways

    PubMed Central

    Gilley, Sandra K.; Stenbit, Antine E.; Pasek, Raymond C.; Sas, Kelli M.; Steele, Stacy L.; Amria, May; Bunni, Marlene A.; Estell, Kimberly P.; Schwiebert, Lisa M.; Flume, Patrick; Gooz, Monika; Haycraft, Courtney J.; Yoder, Bradley K.; Miller, Caroline; Pavlik, Jacqueline A.; Turner, Grant A.; Sisson, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms for the development of bronchiectasis and airway hyperreactivity have not been fully elucidated. Although genetic, acquired diseases and environmental influences may play a role, it is also possible that motile cilia can influence this disease process. We hypothesized that deletion of a key intraflagellar transport molecule, IFT88, in mature mice causes loss of cilia, resulting in airway remodeling. Airway cilia were deleted by knockout of IFT88, and airway remodeling and pulmonary function were evaluated. In IFT88− mice there was a substantial loss of airway cilia on respiratory epithelium. Three months after the deletion of cilia, there was clear evidence for bronchial remodeling that was not associated with inflammation or apparent defects in mucus clearance. There was evidence for airway epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. IFT88− mice exhibited increased airway reactivity to a methacholine challenge and decreased ciliary beat frequency in the few remaining cells that possessed cilia. With deletion of respiratory cilia there was a marked increase in the number of club cells as seen by scanning electron microscopy. We suggest that airway remodeling may be exacerbated by the presence of club cells, since these cells are involved in airway repair. Club cells may be prevented from differentiating into respiratory epithelial cells because of a lack of IFT88 protein that is necessary to form a single nonmotile cilium. This monocilium is a prerequisite for these progenitor cells to transition into respiratory epithelial cells. In conclusion, motile cilia may play an important role in controlling airway structure and function. PMID:24213915

  19. Piracy of adhesins: attachment of superinfecting pathogens to respiratory cilia by secreted adhesins of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Tuomanen, E

    1986-12-01

    Two proteins secreted by Bordetella pertussis are known to mediate adherence of these bacteria to mammalian respiratory cilia. When either ciliated cells or other pathogenic bacteria were pretreated with these adhesins, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus acquired the ability to adhere to cilia in vitro and in vivo. Such piracy of adhesins may contribute to superinfection in mucosal diseases such as whooping cough.

  20. Centrin 2 is required for mouse olfactory ciliary trafficking and development of ependymal cilia planar polarity.

    PubMed

    Ying, Guoxin; Avasthi, Prachee; Irwin, Mavis; Gerstner, Cecilia D; Frederick, Jeanne M; Lucero, Mary T; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2014-04-30

    Centrins are ancient calmodulin-related Ca(2+)-binding proteins associated with basal bodies. In lower eukaryotes, Centrin2 (CETN2) is required for basal body replication and positioning, although its function in mammals is undefined. We generated a germline CETN2 knock-out (KO) mouse presenting with syndromic ciliopathy including dysosmia and hydrocephalus. Absence of CETN2 leads to olfactory cilia loss, impaired ciliary trafficking of olfactory signaling proteins, adenylate cyclase III (ACIII), and cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel, as well as disrupted basal body apical migration in postnatal olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). In mutant OSNs, cilia base-anchoring of intraflagellar transport components IFT88, the kinesin-II subunit KIF3A, and cytoplasmic dynein 2 appeared compromised. Although the densities of mutant ependymal and respiratory cilia were largely normal, the planar polarity of mutant ependymal cilia was disrupted, resulting in uncoordinated flow of CSF. Transgenic expression of GFP-CETN2 rescued the Cetn2-deficiency phenotype. These results indicate that mammalian basal body replication and ciliogenesis occur independently of CETN2; however, mouse CETN2 regulates protein trafficking of olfactory cilia and participates in specifying planar polarity of ependymal cilia.

  1. Directed Fluid Flow Produced by Arrays of Magnetically Actuated Core-Shell Biomimetic Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiser, B. L.; Shields, A. R.; Evans, B. A.; Superfine, R.

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a novel core-shell microstructure that we use to fabricate arrays of flexible, magnetically actuated biomimetic cilia. Our biomimetic cilia mimic the size and beat shape of biological cilia in order to replicate the transport of fluid driven by cilia in many biological systems including the determination of left-right asymmetry in the vertebrate embryonic nodal plate and mucociliary clearance in the lung. Our core-shell structures consist of a flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) core surrounded by a shell of nickel approximately forty nanometers thick; by using a core-shell structure, we can tune the mechanical and magnetic properties independently. We present the fabrication process and the long-range transport that occurs above the beating biomimetic cilia tips and will report on progress toward biomimetic cilia induced flow in viscoelastic fluids similar to mucus in the human airway. These flows may have applications in photonics and microfluidics, and our structures may be further useful as sensors or actuators in microelectromechanical systems.

  2. Effect of Fluid Viscosity on the Cilia-Generated Flow on a Mouse Tracheal Lumen.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Haga, Tomofumi; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Ueno, Hironori; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2017-04-01

    Mucous flow in a tracheal lumen is generated by the beat motion of ciliated cells to provide a clearance function by discharging harmful dust particles and viruses. Due to its physiological importance, the cilia-generated flow and the rheological properties of mucus have been investigated intensively. The effects of viscosity on the cilia-generated flow, however, have not been fully clarified. In this study, we measured bulk background velocity of ciliary flow using a micro particle tracking velocimetry method under various viscosity conditions in mice. The results showed that the flow velocity decreased as the increase with viscosity of ambient fluid. Moreover, no previous study has clarified the pump power generated by cilia, which provides important information with regard to understanding the molecular motor properties of cilia. Measurements of both the ciliary flow and the ciliary motion were conducted to determine the cilia pump power. Our results indicated that the cilia pump during the effective stroke did not drive the ciliary flow efficiently under high viscosity conditions; these findings are necessary to resolve the clearance function.

  3. The C. elegans mRNA decapping enzyme shapes morphology of cilia.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Takeshi; Nagahama, Keigo; Izumi, Susumu

    2017-09-05

    Cilia and flagella are evolutionarily conserved organelles that protrude from cell surfaces. Most cilia and flagella are single rod-shaped but some cilia show a variety of shapes. For example, human airway epithelial cells are multiciliated, flagella of crayfish spermatozoon are star-like shaped, and fruit fly spermatozoon extends long flagella. In Caenorhabditis elegans, cilia display morphological diversity of shapes (single, dual rod-type and wing-like and highly-branched shapes). Here we show that DCAP-1 and DCAP-2, which are the homologues of mammalian DCP1 and DCP2 mRNA decapping enzymes, respectively, are involved in formation of dual rod-type and wing-like shaped cilia in C. elegans. mRNA decapping enzyme catalyzes hydrolysis of 5' cap structure of mRNA, which leads to degradation of mRNA. Rescue experiments showed that DCAP-2 acts not in glial cells surrounding cilia but in neurons. This is the first evidence to demonstrate that mRNA decapping is involved in ciliary shape formation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Phosphorylation by casein kinase 2 induces PACS-1 binding of nephrocystin and targeting to cilia

    PubMed Central

    Schermer, Bernhard; Höpker, Katja; Omran, Heymut; Ghenoiu, Cristina; Fliegauf, Manfred; Fekete, Andrea; Horvath, Judit; Köttgen, Michael; Hackl, Matthias; Zschiedrich, Stefan; Huber, Tobias B; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Blaukat, Andree; Walz, Gerd; Benzing, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in proteins localized to cilia and basal bodies have been implicated in a growing number of human diseases. Access of these proteins to the ciliary compartment requires targeting to the base of the cilia. However, the mechanisms involved in transport of cilia proteins to this transitional zone are elusive. Here we show that nephrocystin, a ciliary protein mutated in the most prevalent form of cystic kidney disease in childhood, is expressed in respiratory epithelial cells and accumulates at the base of cilia, overlapping with markers of the basal body area and the transition zone. Nephrocystin interacts with the phosphofurin acidic cluster sorting protein (PACS)-1. Casein kinase 2 (CK2)-mediated phosphorylation of three critical serine residues within a cluster of acidic amino acids in nephrocystin mediates PACS-1 binding, and is essential for colocalization of nephrocystin with PACS-1 at the base of cilia. Inhibition of CK2 activity abrogates this interaction and results in the loss of correct nephrocystin targeting. These data suggest that CK2-dependent transport processes represent a novel pathway of targeting proteins to the cilia. PMID:16308564

  5. Centrin 2 Is Required for Mouse Olfactory Ciliary Trafficking and Development of Ependymal Cilia Planar Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Prachee; Irwin, Mavis; Gerstner, Cecilia D.; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Lucero, Mary T.

    2014-01-01

    Centrins are ancient calmodulin-related Ca2+-binding proteins associated with basal bodies. In lower eukaryotes, Centrin2 (CETN2) is required for basal body replication and positioning, although its function in mammals is undefined. We generated a germline CETN2 knock-out (KO) mouse presenting with syndromic ciliopathy including dysosmia and hydrocephalus. Absence of CETN2 leads to olfactory cilia loss, impaired ciliary trafficking of olfactory signaling proteins, adenylate cyclase III (ACIII), and cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel, as well as disrupted basal body apical migration in postnatal olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). In mutant OSNs, cilia base-anchoring of intraflagellar transport components IFT88, the kinesin-II subunit KIF3A, and cytoplasmic dynein 2 appeared compromised. Although the densities of mutant ependymal and respiratory cilia were largely normal, the planar polarity of mutant ependymal cilia was disrupted, resulting in uncoordinated flow of CSF. Transgenic expression of GFP-CETN2 rescued the Cetn2-deficiency phenotype. These results indicate that mammalian basal body replication and ciliogenesis occur independently of CETN2; however, mouse CETN2 regulates protein trafficking of olfactory cilia and participates in specifying planar polarity of ependymal cilia. PMID:24790208

  6. Spatial organization of cilia tufts governs airways mucus transport: Application to severe asthma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelloufi, Mustapha Kamel; Gras, Delphine; Chanez, Pascal; Viallat, Annie

    2014-11-01

    We study the coupling between both density and spatial repartition of beating cilia tufts, and the coordinated transport of mucus in an in-vitro epithelial model. We use a fully differentiated model epithelium in air liquid interface (ALI) obtained from endo-bronchial biopsies from healthy subjects and patients with asthma. The asthma phenotype is known to persist in the model. Mucus transport is characterized by the trajectories and velocities of microscopic beads incorporated in the mucus layer. When the beating cilia tufts density is higher than dc = 11/100 × 100 μm2 a spherical spiral coordinated mucus transport is observed over the whole ALI chamber (radius = 6 mm). Below dc, local mucus coordinated transport is observed on small circular domains on the epithelium surface. We reveal that the radii of these domains scale with the beating cilia tufts density with a power 3.7. Surprisingly, this power law is independent on cilia beat frequency, concentration and rheological properties of mucus for healthy subject and patient with asthma. The rotating or linear mucus transport is related to dispersion of the cilia tufts on the epithelium surface. We show that impaired mucus transport observed in severe asthma model epithelia is due to a drastic lack and dysfunction of cilia tufts. The author acknowledges the support of the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under reference ANR-13-BSV5-0015-01.

  7. Quantitative description of fluid flows produced by left-right cilia in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fox, Craig; Manning, M Lisa; Amack, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia generate directional flows that move mucus through airways, cerebrospinal fluid through brain ventricles, and oocytes through fallopian tubes. In addition, specialized monocilia beat in a rotational pattern to create asymmetric flows that are involved in establishing the left-right (LR) body axis during embryogenesis. These monocilia, which we refer to as "left-right cilia," produce a leftward flow of extraembryonic fluid in a transient "organ of asymmetry" that directs asymmetric signaling and development of LR asymmetries in the cardiovascular system and gastrointestinal tract. The asymmetric flows are thought to establish a chemical gradient and/or activate mechanosensitive cilia to initiate calcium ion signals and a conserved Nodal (TGFβ) pathway on the left side of the embryo, but the mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear. The zebrafish organ of asymmetry, called Kupffer's vesicle, provides a useful model system for investigating LR cilia and cilia-powered fluid flows. Here, we describe methods to visualize flows in Kupffer's vesicle using fluorescent microspheres and introduce a new and freely available MATLAB particle tracking code to quantitatively describe these flows. Analysis of normal and aberrant flows indicates this approach is useful for characterizing flow properties that impact LR asymmetry and may be more broadly applicable for quantifying other cilia flows.

  8. The impact of surface chemistry modification on macrophage polarisation.

    PubMed

    Rostam, Hassan M; Singh, Sonali; Salazar, Fabian; Magennis, Peter; Hook, Andrew; Singh, Taranjit; Vrana, Nihal E; Alexander, Morgan R; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M

    2016-11-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that have a central role in combating infection and maintaining tissue homeostasis. They exhibit remarkable plasticity in response to environmental cues. At either end of a broad activation spectrum are pro-inflammatory (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages with distinct functional and phenotypical characteristics. Macrophages also play a crucial role in orchestrating immune responses to biomaterials used in the fabrication of implantable devices and drug delivery systems. To assess the impact of different surface chemistries on macrophage polarisation, human monocytes were cultured for 6 days on untreated hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) and hydrophilic O2 plasma-etched polystyrene (O2-PS40) surfaces. Our data clearly show that monocytes cultured on the hydrophilic O2-PS40 surface are polarised towards an M1-like phenotype, as evidenced by significantly higher expression of the pro-inflammatory transcription factors STAT1 and IRF5. By comparison, monocytes cultured on the hydrophobic PS surface exhibited an M2-like phenotype with high expression of mannose receptor (MR) and production of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and CCL18. While the molecular basis of such different patterns of cell differentiation is yet to be fully elucidated, we hypothesise that it is due to the adsorption of different biomolecules on these surface chemistries. Indeed our surface characterisation data show quantitative and qualitative differences between the protein layers on the O2-PS40 surface compared to PS surface which could be responsible for the observed differential macrophage polarisation on each surface.

  9. The mechanism of self-organized beating of cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyadharan, Jyothish Sulochana

    The internal structure and physical properties of cilia are well known. The relevant hydrodynamics is also well known. But the mechanism behind the coordinated activity of the dynein molecular motors is not known. Based on experimental observations, it has been concluded that this mechanism cannot be due to control from the cell body. The possible mechanism has to be self-organized and the trigger for motor activation/deactivation has to be something related to the geometry of the ciliary axoneme. This thesis critically evaluates the most widely currently cited models and suggests an alternative model for how cilia beat. From the literature we obtained wave forms of ciliary beating at different instants in the beat cycle. These instants were digitized and interpolated. From this data, we were able to calculate the hydrodynamic force distribution (external force distribution) on the cilia and the translational and rotational velocities of the cell body. Once the hydrodynamic force distribution was obtained, we calculated the internal force distribution in the cilium using an equation we derived. Once this was known, we were able to calculate parameters of the ciliary axoneme such as the dynamic stiffness. The stiffness is the ratio of the first Fourier modes of the internal force distribution and the relative sliding between the doublet microtubules that form the axoneme. We found that the first mode was the dominant one and is the one we used for calculations. We were also able to calculate the energy involved in formation and propagation of the wave that produces the ciliary beating. We discovered that the dynamic stiffness varies along the length of a cilium. We determined that in the central region of the cilium, the stiffness is almost purely imaginary which means that the sliding velocity follows the internal force generation in that region rather than sliding. We also found that in Fourier space, the flexural rigidity (kappa=EI where E is Young's modulus and

  10. Singularities of the second-harmonic light field polarisation arising upon reflection of normally incident elliptically polarised Gaussian beam from the surface of an isotropic chiral medium

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, K S; Makarov, Vladimir A; Perezhogin, I A; Potravkin, N N

    2011-11-30

    We have analysed the conditions for the appearance of polarisation singularities in the second-harmonic beam cross section arising in the case of reflection of a uniformly elliptically polarised Gaussian beam at the fundamental frequency from the surface of an isotropic gyrotropic medium. It is shown that there are elliptical polarisation states of the incident light at which the cross section of the second-harmonic reflected beam contains either one or two C lines and either two, or one, or none L lines [the loci of the points where the propagating radiation is circularly (C) or linearly (L) polarised].The formulas determining the conditions for the occurrence of L and C lines and specifying their orientation in the plane of the cross-section of the second-harmonic beam are obtained.

  11. Elliptically polarised cnoidal waves in a medium with spatial dispersion of cubic nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Vladimir A; Perezhogin, I A; Petnikova, V M; Potravkin, N N; Shuvalov, Vladimir V

    2012-02-28

    We present new specific analytic solutions of a system of nonlinear Schroedinger equations, corresponding to elliptically polarised cnoidal waves in an isotropic gyrotropic medium with spatial dispersion of cubic nonlinearity and second-order frequency dispersion under the conditions of formation of the waveguides of the same type for each of the circularly polarised components of the light field.

  12. Time-resolved proton polarisation (TPP) images tyrosyl radical sites in bovine liver catalase.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Oliver; Jouve, Hélène M.; Stuhrmann, Heinrich B.

    2017-05-01

    A differentiation between dynamic polarised protons close to tyrosyl radical sites in catalase and those of the bulk is achieved by time-resolved polarised neutron scattering. Three radical sites, all of them being close to the molecular centre and the heme, appear to be equally possible. Among these is tyr-369 the radial site of which had previously been proven by EPR.

  13. High Extinction Ratio In-Fibre Polarisers by Exploiting Tilted Fibre Bragg Grating Structures for Single-Polarisation High-Power Fibre Lasers and Amplifiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    maintaining (PM) fibre, utilising polarisation hole-burning ( PHB ) effect to reduce homogeneous linewidth of the EDFL. In our work, we demonstrate a stable...loss filter which will induce some loss to the cavity around its paired attenuation band region, thus imposing PHB effect to the gain medium. The...polarisation-hole-burning ( PHB ) effect to realise multi-wavelength switchable function in proposed fibre ring laser system. In the proposed fibre ring laser

  14. Target molecules of calmodulin on microtubules of Tetrahymena cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano-Ohnishi, Junko; Watanabe, Yoshio )

    1988-09-01

    In the course of an attempt to isolate the calmodulin-binding proteins (CaMBPs) from cilia of Tetrahymena, it was found that some CaMBPs tend to interact with axonemal microtubules. The present study demonstrates this interaction by cosedimentation experiments using in vitro polymerized Tetrahymena axonemal microtubules and Tetrahymena CaMBPs purified from axonemes by calmodulin affinity column chromatography. Analysis by the ({sup 125}I)calmodulin overlay method showed that at least three CaMBPs (M{sub r} 69, 45, and 37 kDa) cosediment with microtubules. Furthermore, without any addition of exogenous CaMBPs, microtubules purified after three cycles of temperature-dependent polymerization and depolymerization included the above CaMBPs and additional CaMBPs which could not cosediment with microtubules. From the results, the authors have classified these microtubule-associated CaMBPs into two groups: (i) CaMBPs which interact with microtubules only during polymerization, and (ii) CaMBPs which interact not only with microtubules during polymerization, but also with polymerized microtubules. These results suggest that the microtubule-associated CaMBPs, especially those of the latter group, are located on the surface of ciliary microtubules, and may become the target molecules of calmodulin at Ca{sup 2+}-triggered ciliary reversal.

  15. Compact prisms for polarisation splitting of fibre laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, B L; Yagodkin, D I

    2005-11-30

    Simple compact monoprisms for spatial splitting of polarised laser beams with relatively small diameters (no more than 1 mm) are considered. Prisms can be made of optically inactive CaCO{sub 3}, {alpha}-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} ({alpha}-BBO), LiIO{sub 3}, LiNbO{sub 3}, YVO{sub 4}, and TiO{sub 2} crystals known in polarisation optics. The exact solution of the Snell equation for the extraordinary wave reflected from a surface arbitrarily tilted to its wave vector is obtained. The analysis of variants of the solution allows the fabrication of prisms with any deviation angles of the extraordinary wave by preserving the propagation direction of the ordinary wave. Three variants of prisms are considered: with minimised dimensions, with the Brewster output of the extraordinary beam, and with the deviation of the extraordinary wave by 90{sup 0}. Calcite prisms with the deviation angles for the extraordinary beam {approx}19{sup 0} and 90{sup 0} are tested experimentally. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  16. IFT88 plays a cilia- and PCP-independent role in controlling oriented cell divisions during vertebrate embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Borovina, Antonia; Ciruna, Brian

    2013-10-17

    The role for cilia in establishing planar cell polarity (PCP) is contentious. Although knockdown of genes known to function in ciliogenesis has been reported to cause PCP-related morphogenesis defects in zebrafish, genetic mutations affecting intraflagellar transport (IFT) do not show PCP phenotypes despite the requirement for IFT in cilia formation. This discrepancy has been attributed to off-target effects of antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) injection, confounding maternal effects in zygotic mutant embryos, or an inability to distinguish between cilia-dependent versus cilia-independent protein functions. To determine the role of cilia in PCP, we generated maternal + zygotic IFT88 (MZift88) mutant zebrafish embryos, which never form cilia. We clearly demonstrate that cilia are not required to establish PCP. Rather, IFT88 plays a cilia-independent role in controlling oriented cell divisions at gastrulation and neurulation. Our results have important implications for the interpretation of cilia gene function in normal development and in disease. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Polarisation Dynamics of Vector Soliton Molecules in Mode Locked Fibre Laser

    PubMed Central

    Tsatourian, Veronika; Sergeyev, Sergey V.; Mou, Chengbo; Rozhin, Alex; Mikhailov, Vitaly; Rabin, Bryan; Westbrook, Paul S.; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2013-01-01

    Two fundamental laser physics phenomena - dissipative soliton and polarisation of light are recently merged to the concept of vector dissipative soliton (VDS), viz. train of short pulses with specific state of polarisation (SOP) and shape defined by an interplay between anisotropy, gain/loss, dispersion, and nonlinearity. Emergence of VDSs is both of the fundamental scientific interest and is also a promising technique for control of dynamic SOPs important for numerous applications from nano-optics to high capacity fibre optic communications. Using specially designed and developed fast polarimeter, we present here the first experimental results on SOP evolution of vector soliton molecules with periodic polarisation switching between two and three SOPs and superposition of polarisation switching with SOP precessing. The underlying physics presents an interplay between linear and circular birefringence of a laser cavity along with light induced anisotropy caused by polarisation hole burning. PMID:24193374

  18. Geometrically-controlled polarisation processing in femtosecond-laser-written photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Pitsios, Ioannis; Samara, Farid; Corrielli, Giacomo; Crespi, Andrea; Osellame, Roberto

    2017-09-12

    Polarisation of light is a powerful and widely used degree of freedom to encode information, both in classical and quantum applications. In particular, quantum information technologies based on photons are being revolutionised by the use of integrated photonic circuits. It is therefore very important to be able to manipulate the polarisation of photons in such circuits. We experimentally demonstrate the fabrication by femtosecond laser micromachining of components such as polarisation insensitive and polarising directional couplers, operating at 1550 nm wavelength, where the two opposite behaviours are achieved just by controlling the geometric layout of the photonic circuits, being the waveguides fabricated with the same irradiation recipe. We expect to employ this approach in complex integrated photonic devices, capable of a full control of the photons polarisation for quantum cryptography, quantum computation and quantum teleportation experiments.

  19. Amplification of a radially polarised beam in an Yb:YAG thin-slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. R.; Beecher, S. J.; Mackenzie, J. I.; Clarkson, W. A.

    2017-08-01

    The use of an Yb:YAG thin-slab architecture for amplification of a radially polarised beam at 1030 nm is investigated and shown to be a promising route for power scaling. The detrimental impact of the Gouy phase shift on radial polarisation purity is considered and a simple scheme for effective phase shift management to restore polarisation purity is presented. Preliminary experiments based on a double-pass amplifier configuration yielded an output beam with a high radial polarisation extinction ratio of 15 dB and no degradation in polarisation purity despite the non- axial symmetry of amplifier gain medium. At 50 W of launched pump power a small-signal gain of 7.5 dB was obtained for a 25 mW input, whilst 4.4 dB gain was obtained for a 1.45 W input. The prospects for further power scaling are discussed.

  20. Shot and Patronin polarise microtubules to direct membrane traffic and biogenesis of microvilli in epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, Ichha; Elbediwy, Ahmed; Diaz de la Loza, Maria del Carmen; Fletcher, Georgina C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In epithelial tissues, polarisation of microtubules and actin microvilli occurs along the apical-basal axis of each cell, yet how these cytoskeletal polarisation events are coordinated remains unclear. Here, we examine the hierarchy of events during cytoskeletal polarisation in Drosophila melanogaster epithelia. Core apical-basal polarity determinants polarise the spectrin cytoskeleton to recruit the microtubule-binding proteins Patronin (CAMSAP1, CAMSAP2 and CAMPSAP3 in humans) and Shortstop [Shot; MACF1 and BPAG1 (also known as DST) in humans] to the apical membrane domain. Patronin and Shot then act to polarise microtubules along the apical-basal axis to enable apical transport of Rab11 endosomes by the Nuf–Dynein microtubule motor complex. Finally, Rab11 endosomes are transferred to the MyoV (also known as Didum in Drosophila) actin motor to deliver the key microvillar determinant Cadherin 99C to the apical membrane to organise the biogenesis of actin microvilli. PMID:27231092

  1. A morphological study of the sulfurisation of digenite to covellite using reflected polarised light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rask Møller Frøkiær, Heidi; Warner, Terence E.

    2017-08-01

    A series of copper rods were reacted with sulfur vapour in evacuated glass ampoules at ∼445 °C. Product materials were characterised by powder X-ray diffraction and reflected polarised light microscopy. Copper sulfurised rapidly to digenite, γ-Cu2-xS, under these conditions, whereas the subsequent sulfurisation to covellite, CuS, was notably slower, yielding texturally distinguishable inner (secondary) and outer (primary) CuS regions. A two-stage partial sulfurisation of γ-Cu1.8S resulted in the external growth of two successive layers of primary CuS, which demonstrates decisively that covellite - besides being a p-type metal - is ionically conducting at 445 °C, although considerably less so than digenite. We infer that the growth of platy covellite crystals and their radial alignment in the primary CuS layer are a consequence of copper ion mobility being restricted to the basal plane of the covellite structure. Sulfurising a coil of copper wire at ∼445 °C is an effective method for synthesising covellite.

  2. Ectopic cilia associated with an orbital dermoid cyst and sinus tract: case report.

    PubMed

    Krahulík, David; Karhanová, Marta; Vaverka, Miroslav; Brychtová, Světlana; Pospíšilová, Dagmar

    2015-08-01

    Ectopic cilia are extremely rare congenital anomalies in which eyelash follicles appear in an abnormal place on the eyelid, most typically on the lateral quadrant of the anterior surface of the upper eyelid. In the majority of cases, simple surgical excision of ectopic cilia is indicated because of its cosmetic aspect. There is usually no associated medical co-morbidity with this anomaly. The authors report an unusual case of ectopic cilia associated with an orbital dermoid cyst and sinus tract. A 3-year-old boy was initially diagnosed with ectopic cilia on the left upper eyelid. There was no history of inflammation or swelling of the eyelid. An ophthalmological examination revealed only 1 mm of ptosis; no proptosis, inferior displacement, or palpable orbital mass was present. During surgical excision of the ectopic cilia, a thin sinus tract was identified, leading posteriorly to the orbit. Magnetic resonance imaging performed after the excision showed a supraorbital extraconal mass just below the roof of the left orbit. A supraorbital 2-piece craniotomy was performed with total extirpation of the dermoid cyst. The cyst was removed en bloc without damage to the extraocular muscles, but the sinus tract could no longer be identified. Follow-up MRI was performed 6 months after surgery and showed no evidence of recurrence. A follow-up ophthalmological examination showed no signs of inferior displacement or proptosis. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this case is the first reported instance of ectopic cilia associated with a dermoid cyst and sinus tract in which no typical clinical signs and symptoms of possible orbital pathology were present. This case highlights the value of radiological examination in all cases of ectopic cilia prior to surgical excision.

  3. The perennial organelle: assembly and disassembly of the primary cilium

    PubMed Central

    Seeley, E. Scott; Nachury, Maxence V.

    2010-01-01

    Primary cilia contain signaling receptors of diverse classes, and ciliary dysfunction results in a variety of developmental defects. Thus, primary cilia are thought to have an important role in sensing and transducing cellular signals. Although there is clear evidence demonstrating that these organelles are assembled and disassembled dynamically as cells progress through the cell cycle, the mechanisms by which the cell cycle controls the assembly and disassembly of the primary cilium remain poorly understood. In this Commentary, we review the basic cellular mechanisms that underlie the early stages of cilium assembly and discuss how the cell cycle communicates with the ciliation program. A commonly held view is that ciliation occurs exclusively in cells that have exited the cell cycle and entered quiescence or differentiation. However, this concept is at odds with the finding that, during development, many actively proliferating cells require cilia-mediated signaling pathways to instruct their developmental fate. Here, we reassess the quiescence-centric view of ciliation by reviewing historic and current literature. We discuss ample evidence that cilia are in fact present on many proliferating cells, and that a transient peak of ciliation before the G1-S transition might be tightly coupled to entry into the DNA replication phase. Finally, we touch on the relationship between the ciliation and cell-division cycles and the tissue distribution of primary cilia in order to highlight potential roles for the primary cilium in restraining cells from the hyperproliferative state that contributes to cancer. PMID:20144999

  4. Phosphatase inhibitor 2 promotes acetylation of tubulin in the primary cilium of human retinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiping; Brautigan, David L

    2008-01-01

    Background Primary cilia are flagella-like projections from the centriole of mammalian cells that have a key role in cell signaling. Human diseases are linked to defects in primary cilia. Microtubules make up the axoneme of cilia and are selectively acetylated and this is thought to contribute to the stability of the structure. However, mechanisms to regulate tubulin acetylation in cilia are poorly understood. Results Endogenous phosphatase inhibitor-2 (I-2) was found concentrated in cilia of human epithelial cells, and was localized to cilia early in the process of formation, prior to the full acetylation of microtubules. Knockdown of I-2 by siRNA significantly reduced the acetylation of microtubules in cilia, without a net decrease in whole cell tubulin acetylation. There was a reduction in the percentage of I-2 knockdown cells with a primary cilium, but no apparent alteration in the cilium length, suggesting no change in microtubule-based transport processes. Inhibition of either histone deacetylases with trichostatin A, or protein phosphatase-1 with calyculin A in I-2 knockdown cells partially rescued the acetylation of microtubules in cilia and the percentage of cells with a primary cilium. Conclusion The regulatory protein I-2 localizes to the primary cilium where it affects both Ser/Thr phosphorylation and is required for full tubulin acetylation. Rescue of tubulin acetylation in I-2 knockdown cells by different chemical inhibitors shows that deacetylases and phosphatases are functionally interconnected to regulate microtubules. As a multifunctional protein, I-2 may link cell cycle progression to structure and stability of the primary cilium. PMID:19036150

  5. “Mating Behavior, Male Sensory Cilia, and Polycystins in C. elegans” Chapter

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Maureen M.

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of C. elegans males and the male-specific sensory neurons required for mating behaviors has provided insight into the molecular function of polycystins and mechanisms that are needed for polycystin ciliary localization. In humans, polycystin 1 and polycystin 2 are needed for kidney function; loss of polycystin function leads to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Polycystins localize to cilia in C. elegans and mammals, a finding that has guided research into ADPKD. The discovery that the polycystins form ciliary receptors in male-specific neurons needed for mating behaviors has also helped to unlock insights into two additional exciting new areas: the secretion of extracellular vesicles; and mechanisms of ciliary specialization. First, we will summarize the studies done in C. elegans regarding the expression, localization, and function of the polycystin 1 and 2 homologs, LOV-1 and PKD-2, and discuss insights gained from this basic research. Molecules that are co-expressed with the polycystins in the male-specific neurons may identify evolutionarily conserved molecular mechanisms for polycystin function and localization. We will discuss the finding that polycystins are secreted in extracellular vesicles that evoke behavioral change in males, suggesting that such vesicles provide a novel form of communication to conspecifics in the environment. In humans, polycystin-containing extracellular vesicles are secreted in urine and can be taken up by cilia, and quickly internalized. Therefore, communication by polycystin-containing extracellular vesicles may also use mechanisms that are evolutionarily conserved from nematode to human. Lastly, different cilia display structural and functional differences that specialize them for particular tasks, despite the fact that virtually all cilia are built by a conserved Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) mechanism and share some basic structural features. Comparative analysis of the male

  6. Dynamics of self-oscillating cilia designed from active polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Pratyush; Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2012-02-01

    Using theory and simulations, we design active synthetic surfaces which are capable of replicating functionalities of biological cilia. In order to design such exquisite biomimetic systems we harness unique properties of polymer gels that undergo photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. Powered by internalized BZ reaction these polymer gels swell and de-swell autonomously by chemo-mechanical transduction and therefore are ideal materials for designing our system. In order to simulate the dynamics of the BZ cilia in surrounding fluid we have developed a nonlinear hybrid 3D model which captures elasto-dynamics of polymer gel and diffusive exchange of BZ reagents between the gel and the fluid. Here we show that the geometrical arrangement of cilia and the distribution of BZ activator in the fluid determine the dynamic response of the cilia. We further show that using light as an external stimulus we can sequentially modulate height of individual cilium and thereby create the ``piano effect''. Finally, we demonstrate that synchronized oscillations in the cilia result from the distribution of BZ-activator in the surrounding fluid. Our findings can be used to design active surfaces which can be remotely tuned depending upon the magnitude of external stimuli.

  7. Simulation by using the lattice Boltzmann method of microscopic particle motion induced by artificial cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alapati, Suresh; Che, Woo Seong; Mannoor, Madhusoodanan; Suh, Yong Kweon

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present the results obtained from the simulation of particle motion induced by the fluid flow driven by an array of beating artificial cilia inside a micro-channel. A worm-like-chain model is used to simulate the elastic cilia, and the lattice Boltzmann equation is used to compute the fluid flow. We employ a harmonic force at the extreme tip of each cilium to actuate it. Our simulation methods are first validated by applying them to the motion of a single cilium and a freely falling sphere. After validation, we simulate the fluid flow generated by an array of beating cilia and find that a maximum flow rate is achieved at an optimum sperm number. Next, we simulate the motion of a neutrally buoyant spherical particle at this optimum sperm number by tracking the particle motion with a smoothed profile method. We address the effect of the following parameters on the particle velocity: the gap between cilia and particle, the particle size, the cilia density, and the presence of an array of intermediate particles.

  8. Flow induced by ependymal cilia dominates near-wall cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the lateral ventricles.

    PubMed

    Siyahhan, Bercan; Knobloch, Verena; de Zélicourt, Diane; Asgari, Mahdi; Schmid Daners, Marianne; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-05-06

    While there is growing experimental evidence that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow induced by the beating of ependymal cilia is an important factor for neuronal guidance, the respective contribution of vascular pulsation-driven macroscale oscillatory CSF flow remains unclear. This work uses computational fluid dynamics to elucidate the interplay between macroscale and cilia-induced CSF flows and their relative impact on near-wall dynamics. Physiological macroscale CSF dynamics are simulated in the ventricular space using subject-specific anatomy, wall motion and choroid plexus pulsations derived from magnetic resonance imaging. Near-wall flow is quantified in two subdomains selected from the right lateral ventricle, for which dynamic boundary conditions are extracted from the macroscale simulations. When cilia are neglected, CSF pulsation leads to periodic flow reversals along the ventricular surface, resulting in close to zero time-averaged force on the ventricle wall. The cilia promote more aligned wall shear stresses that are on average two orders of magnitude larger compared with those produced by macroscopic pulsatile flow. These findings indicate that CSF flow-mediated neuronal guidance is likely to be dominated by the action of the ependymal cilia in the lateral ventricles, whereas CSF dynamics in the centre regions of the ventricles is driven predominantly by wall motion and choroid plexus pulsation.

  9. Flow induced by ependymal cilia dominates near-wall cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the lateral ventricles

    PubMed Central

    Siyahhan, Bercan; Knobloch, Verena; de Zélicourt, Diane; Asgari, Mahdi; Schmid Daners, Marianne; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-01-01

    While there is growing experimental evidence that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow induced by the beating of ependymal cilia is an important factor for neuronal guidance, the respective contribution of vascular pulsation-driven macroscale oscillatory CSF flow remains unclear. This work uses computational fluid dynamics to elucidate the interplay between macroscale and cilia-induced CSF flows and their relative impact on near-wall dynamics. Physiological macroscale CSF dynamics are simulated in the ventricular space using subject-specific anatomy, wall motion and choroid plexus pulsations derived from magnetic resonance imaging. Near-wall flow is quantified in two subdomains selected from the right lateral ventricle, for which dynamic boundary conditions are extracted from the macroscale simulations. When cilia are neglected, CSF pulsation leads to periodic flow reversals along the ventricular surface, resulting in close to zero time-averaged force on the ventricle wall. The cilia promote more aligned wall shear stresses that are on average two orders of magnitude larger compared with those produced by macroscopic pulsatile flow. These findings indicate that CSF flow-mediated neuronal guidance is likely to be dominated by the action of the ependymal cilia in the lateral ventricles, whereas CSF dynamics in the centre regions of the ventricles is driven predominantly by wall motion and choroid plexus pulsation. PMID:24621815

  10. Cell cycle deregulation and mosaic loss of Ext1 drive peripheral chondrosarcomagenesis in the mouse and reveal an intrinsic cilia deficiency

    PubMed Central

    de Andrea, Carlos E.; Zhu, Ju-Fen; Jin, Huifeng; Bovée, Judith V.M.G.; Jones, Kevin B.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral chondrosarcoma (PCS) develops as malignant transformation of an osteochondroma, a benign cartilaginous outgrowth at the bone surface. Its invasive, lobular growth despite low-grade histology suggests a loss of chondrocyte polarity. The known genetics of osteochondromagenesis include mosaic loss of EXT1 or EXT2 in both hereditary and non-hereditary cases. The most frequent genetic aberrations in human PCS also include disruptions of CDKN2A or TP53. In order to test the sufficiency of either of these to drive progression of an osteochondroma to PCS, we added conditional loss of Trp53 or Ink4a/Arf in an Ext1-driven mouse model of osteochondromagenesis. Each additional tumour suppressor silencing efficiently drove the development of growths that mimic human PCS. As in humans, lobules developed from both Ext1-null and Ext1-functional clones within osteochondromas. Assessment of their orientation revealed an absence of primary cilia in the majority of mouse PCS chondrocytes, which was corroborated in human PCSs. Loss of primary cilia may be responsible for the lost polarity phenotype ascribed to PCS. Cilia deficiency blocks proliferation in physeal chondrocytes, but cell cycle deregulation is sufficient to rescue chondrocyte proliferation following deciliation. This provides a basis of selective pressure for the frequent cell cycle regulator silencing observed in peripheral chondrosarcomagenesis. Mosaic loss of Ext1 combined with loss of cell cycle regulators promotes peripheral chondrosarcomagenesis in the mouse and reveals deficient ciliagenesis in both the model and the human disease, explaining biological behaviour including lobular and invasive growth. PMID:25644707

  11. Measurement of CP asymmetries and polarisation fractions in decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.

    2015-07-01

    An angular analysis of the decay is performed using pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 .0 fb-1 collected by the LHCb experiment at a centre-of-mass energy TeV. A combined angular and mass analysis separates six helicity amplitudes and allows the measurement of the longitudinal polarisation fraction f L = 0 .201 ± 0 .057 (stat .) ± 0 .040 (syst .) for the decay. A large scalar contribution from the K {0/∗}(1430) and K {0/∗}(800) resonances is found, allowing the determination of additional CP asymmetries. Triple product and direct CP asymmetries are determined to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations. The branching fraction is measured to be (10 .8 ± 2 .1 (stat .) ± 1 .4 (syst .) ± 0 .6 ( f d /f s )) × 10-6. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Conformational analysis of proteins with a dual polarisation silicon microring.

    PubMed

    Hoste, J-W; Werquin, S; Claes, T; Bienstman, P

    2014-02-10

    Optical microresonator biosensors have proven to be a valid tool to perform affinity analysis of a biological binding event. However, when these microresonators are excited with a single optical mode they can not distinguish between a thin dense layer of biomolecules or a thick sparse layer. This means the sensor is "blind" to changes in shape of bound biomolecules. We succeeded in exciting a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) microring with TE and TM polarisations simultaneously by using an asymmetrical directional coupler and as such were able to separately determine the thickness and the density (or refractive index) of a bound biolayer. A proof-of-concept is given by determining both parameters of deposited dielectric layers and by analysing the conformational changes of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) proteins due to a change in pH of the buffer.

  13. Exclusive ω meson muoproduction on transversely polarised protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Aghasyan, M.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N. V.; Anosov, V.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E. R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Chang, W.-C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S.-U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; von Harrach, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Joosten, R.; Jörg, P.; Kabuß, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O. M.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y.-S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G. V.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Montuenga, P.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pešek, M.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Roskot, M.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salac, R.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smolik, J.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wallner, S.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Zaremba, K.; Zavada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2017-02-01

    Exclusive production of ω mesons was studied at the COMPASS experiment by scattering 160 GeV / c muons off transversely polarised protons. Five single-spin and three double-spin azimuthal asymmetries were measured in the range of photon virtuality 1 (GeV / c) 2

  14. T helper cell polarisation as a measure of the maturation of the immune response.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Scott B; Stolte, Ellen H; Chow, Anthony W; Savelkoul, Huub F J

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: T helper cell polarisation is important under chronic immune stimulatory conditions and drives the type of the evolving immune response. Mice treated with superantigens in vivo display strong effects on Th subset differentiation. The aim of the study was to detect the intrinsic capacity of T cells to polarise under various ex vivo conditions. METHODS: Purified CD4+ T cells obtained from super-antigen-treated mice were cultured under Th polarising conditions in vitro. By combining intracellular cytokine staining and subsequent flow cytometric analysis with quantitative cytokine measurements in culture supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the differential Th polarising capacity of the treatment can be detected in a qualitative and quantitative manner. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: BALB/c mice were shown to be biased to develop strong Th2 polarised immune responses using Th0 stimulation of purified CD4+ T cells from phosphate-buffered saline-treated mice. Nevertheless, our analysis methodology convincingly showed that even in these mice, Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 treatment in vivo resulted in a significantly stronger Th1 polarising effect than control treatment. Our results indicate that populations of Th cells can be assessed individually for their differential Th1 or Th2 maturation capacity in vivo by analysing robust in vitro polarisation cultures combined with intracellular cytokine staining and ELISA. PMID:14760935

  15. Spin Polarisabilities and Compton Scattering from χEFT: Bridging QCD and Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesshammer, Harald W.; McGovern, Judith A.; Phillips, Daniel R.

    2017-01-01

    Compton scattering from protons and neutrons probes their two-photon response in electric and magnetic fields of real photons, exploring the symmetries and interaction strengths of the internal degrees of freedom. With the scalar polarisabilities αE 1 and βM 1 now reasonably understood, the focus turns to the so-far poorly explored spin-polarisabilities. They parametrise the stiffness of the nucleon spin in external electro-magnetic fields, analogous to rotations of the polarisation of light by optically active media (bi-refringence/Faraday effect) and are particularly sensitive to the directional dependence of the πNγ interactions dictated by chiral symmetry and its breaking. This contribution addresses the potential of Chiral Effective Field Theory to relate between lattice QCD and ongoing or approved efforts at MAX-lab, HI γS and MAMI. We discuss high-intensity experiments with polarised targets and polarised beams which will allow the extraction of the spin-polarisabilities; χEFT predictions which indicate which observables for polarised protons, deuterons and 3 He are particularly sensitive; convergence, residual theoretical uncertainties and possibilities for improvement; and chiral extrapolations in mπ for lattice computations. Supported in part by UK STFC, US DOE and George Washington University.

  16. An efficient stable optical polariser module for calibration of the S4UVN earth observation satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolt, Stephen; Calcines, Ariadna; Lomanowski, Bartosz; Bramall, David; Shaw, Benjamin

    2016-07-01

    We describe here an optical polariser module intended to deliver well characterised polarised light to an imaging spectrometer instrument. The instrument in question is the Sentinel-4/UVN Earth observation imaging spectrometer due to be deployed in 2019 in a geostationary orbit. The polariser module described here will be used in the ground based calibration campaign for this instrument. One critical task of the calibration campaign will be the highly accurate characterisation of the polarisation sensitivity of instrument. The polariser module provides a constant, uniform source of linearly polarised light whose direction can be adjusted without changing the output level or uniformity of the illumination. A critical requirement of the polariser module is that the illumination is uniform across the exit pupil. Unfortunately, a conventional Glan-Taylor arrangement cannot provide this uniformity due to the strong variation in transmission at a refractive surface for angles close to the critical angle. Therefore a modified prism arrangement is proposed and this is described in detail. Detailed tolerance modelling and straylight modelling is also reported here.

  17. Unified approach to multipolar polarisation and charge transfer for ions: microhydrated Na+.

    PubMed

    Mills, Matthew J L; Hawe, Glenn I; Handley, Christopher M; Popelier, Paul L A

    2013-11-07

    Electrostatic effects play a large part in determining the properties of chemical systems. In addition, a treatment of the polarisation of the electron distribution is important for many systems, including solutions of monatomic ions. Typically employed methods for describing polarisable electrostatics use a number of approximations, including atom-centred point charges and polarisation methods that require iterative calculation on the fly. We present a method that treats charge transfer and polarisation on an equal footing. Atom-centred multipole moments describe the charge distribution of a chemical system. The variation of these multipole moments with the geometry of the surrounding atoms is captured by the machine learning method kriging. The interatomic electrostatic interaction can be computed using the resulting predicted multipole moments. This allows the treatment of both intra- and interatomic polarisation with the same method. The proposed method does not return explicit polarisabilities but instead, predicts the result of the polarisation process. An application of this new method to the sodium cation in a water environment is described. The performance of the method is assessed by comparison of its predictions of atomic multipole moments and atom-atom electrostatic interaction energies to exact results. The kriging models are able to predict the electrostatic interaction energy between the ion and all water atoms within 4 kJ mol(-1) for any of the external test set Na(+)(H2O)6 configurations.

  18. Resolving dispersion and induction components for polarisable molecular simulations of ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pádua, Agílio A. H.

    2017-05-01

    One important development in interaction potential models, or atomistic force fields, for molecular simulation is the inclusion of explicit polarisation, which represents the induction effects of charged or polar molecules on polarisable electron clouds. Polarisation can be included through fluctuating charges, induced multipoles, or Drude dipoles. This work uses Drude dipoles and is focused on room-temperature ionic liquids, for which fixed-charge models predict too slow dynamics. The aim of this study is to devise a strategy to adapt existing non-polarisable force fields upon addition of polarisation, because induction was already contained to an extent, implicitly, due to parametrisation against empirical data. Therefore, a fraction of the van der Waals interaction energy should be subtracted so that the Lennard-Jones terms only account for dispersion and the Drude dipoles for induction. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory is used to resolve the dispersion and induction terms in dimers and to calculate scaling factors to reduce the Lennard-Jones terms from the non-polarisable model. Simply adding Drude dipoles to an existing fixed-charge model already improves the prediction of transport properties, increasing diffusion coefficients, and lowering the viscosity. Scaling down the Lennard-Jones terms leads to still faster dynamics and densities that match experiment extremely well. The concept developed here improves the overall prediction of density and transport properties and can be adapted to other models and systems. In terms of microscopic structure of the ionic liquids, the inclusion of polarisation and the down-scaling of Lennard-Jones terms affect only slightly the ordering of the first shell of counterions, leading to small decreases in coordination numbers. Remarkably, the effect of polarisation is major beyond first neighbours, significantly weakening spatial correlations, a structural effect that is certainly related to the faster dynamics of

  19. Resolving dispersion and induction components for polarisable molecular simulations of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Pádua, Agílio A H

    2017-05-28

    One important development in interaction potential models, or atomistic force fields, for molecular simulation is the inclusion of explicit polarisation, which represents the induction effects of charged or polar molecules on polarisable electron clouds. Polarisation can be included through fluctuating charges, induced multipoles, or Drude dipoles. This work uses Drude dipoles and is focused on room-temperature ionic liquids, for which fixed-charge models predict too slow dynamics. The aim of this study is to devise a strategy to adapt existing non-polarisable force fields upon addition of polarisation, because induction was already contained to an extent, implicitly, due to parametrisation against empirical data. Therefore, a fraction of the van der Waals interaction energy should be subtracted so that the Lennard-Jones terms only account for dispersion and the Drude dipoles for induction. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory is used to resolve the dispersion and induction terms in dimers and to calculate scaling factors to reduce the Lennard-Jones terms from the non-polarisable model. Simply adding Drude dipoles to an existing fixed-charge model already improves the prediction of transport properties, increasing diffusion coefficients, and lowering the viscosity. Scaling down the Lennard-Jones terms leads to still faster dynamics and densities that match experiment extremely well. The concept developed here improves the overall prediction of density and transport properties and can be adapted to other models and systems. In terms of microscopic structure of the ionic liquids, the inclusion of polarisation and the down-scaling of Lennard-Jones terms affect only slightly the ordering of the first shell of counterions, leading to small decreases in coordination numbers. Remarkably, the effect of polarisation is major beyond first neighbours, significantly weakening spatial correlations, a structural effect that is certainly related to the faster dynamics of

  20. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Flagella/cilia are motile organelles with more than 400 proteins. To understand the mechanism of such complex systems, we need methods to describe molecular arrange-ments and conformations three-dimensionally in vivo. Cryo-electron tomography enabled us such a 3D structural analysis. Our group has been working on 3D structure of flagella/cilia using this method and revealed highly ordered and beautifully organized molecular arrangement. 3D structure gave us insights into the mechanism to gener-ate bending motion with well defined waveforms. In this review, I summarize our recent structural studies on fla-gella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography, mainly focusing on dynein microtubule-based ATPase motor proteins and the radial spoke, a regulatory protein complex.

  1. New insights into an old organelle: meeting report on biology of cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Piali; Barr, Maureen M

    2014-06-01

    The rising interest of the scientific community in cilia biology was evident from the fact that registration for the third FASEB conference on 'The Biology of Cilia and Flagella' closed out before the early bird deadline. Cilia and flagella are organelles of profound medical importance; defects in their structure or function result in a plethora of human diseases called ciliopathies. 240 clinicians and basic scientists from around the world gathered from 23 June 2013 to 28 June 2013 at Sheraton at the Falls, Niagara Falls, NY to present and discuss their research on this intensely studied subcellular structure. The meeting was organized by Gregory Pazour (University of Massachusetts Medical School), Bradley Yoder (University of Alabama-Birmingham), and Maureen Barr (Rutgers University) and was sponsored by the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). Here, we report highlights, points of discussion, and emerging themes from this exciting meeting.

  2. Microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins in the regulation of assembly, disassembly, and length of cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhangfeng; Liang, Yinwen; Meng, Dan; Wang, Liang; Pan, Junmin

    2015-01-01

    Defects in ciliary assembly, maintenance, and signaling are associated with various human diseases and developmental disorders, termed ciliopathies. Eukaryotic flagella and cilia (interchangeable terms) are microtubule-based organelles. Thus, microtubule dynamics and microtubule-dependent transport are predicted to affect the structural integrity and functionality of cilia profoundly. Kinesin-2 is well known for its role in intraflagellar transport to transport ciliary precursors and signaling molecules. Recently, microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins found in kinesin-8, -13, and -14A families have emerged as regulators of cilia. We first discuss ciliary kinesins identified in the flagellar or ciliary proteome, and then focus on the function and regulation of microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins. Lastly, we review the recent advances of microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins in controlling ciliary assembly, disassembly, and length.

  3. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Polarisation properties of radiation of high-power industrial multitubular CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galushkin, M. G.; Zabelin, A. M.; Zelenov, E. V.; Korotchenko, A. V.; Chernous, V. N.

    2003-12-01

    The polarisation of radiation of high-power industrial multitubular, diffusion-cooled CO2 lasers is studied. The conditions of the appearance of linear and elliptic polarisation and of polarisation instability are determined. The relation between the laser parameters and its polarisation characteristics is established.

  4. Polarisation effects in twin-core fibre: Application for mode locking in a fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobach, I. A.; Kablukov, S. I.; Podivilov, Evgenii V.; Babin, Sergei A.; Apolonski, A. A.

    2012-09-01

    We report the first measurements of the longitudinal power distribution in a twin-core optical fibre at different input light polarisations. Experimental evidence is presented that, because of the difference in birefringence between the cores, the power in them depends on which core the beam is launched into. Experimental data are interpreted in terms of a modified polarisation model for mode coupling in twin-core fibres which takes into account the birefringence of the cores. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time the use of the polarisation properties of a twincore fibre for mode locking in a fibre laser.

  5. Polarisation and compression of {sup 3}He for Magnetic Resonance Imaging purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Geurts, D. G.; Brand, J. F. J. van den; Bulten, H. J.; Poolman, H. R.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Nicolay, K.

    1998-01-20

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is often used in medical science as a diagnostic tool for the human body. Conventional MRI uses the NMR signal from the protons of water molecules in tissue to image the interior of the patient's body. However, for certain areas such as the lungs and airways, the usage of a highly polarised gas yields better results. We are currently constructing an apparatus that uses polarised {sup 3}He gas to produce detailed images of those signal-deficient moyeties. We also plan to study possible uptake of polarised {sup 3}He gas by the circulatory system to image other organs.

  6. Capillary compressor of femtosecond laser pulses with nonlinear rotation of polarisation ellipse

    SciTech Connect

    Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V; Kostryukov, P V; Losev, Leonid L; Tenyakov, S Yu

    2012-03-31

    The process of nonlinear rotation of the polarisation ellipse of laser radiation, occurring simultaneously with the broadening of the pulse spectrum due to nonlinear self-phase modulation in a gas-filled capillary, is studied. It is shown that the maximal rotation of the polarisation ellipse is experienced by the spectral components, shifted towards the short-wavelength side with respect to the central wavelength of the initial laser pulse. Using the effect of polarisation ellipse rotation, an eightfold increase in the energy contrast ratio of a 28-fs light pulse, obtained by compression of the radiation pulse from an ytterbium laser with the duration 290 fs, is implemented.

  7. Interactive computer-assisted approach for evaluation of ultrastructural cilia abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Christoph; Siegmund, Heiko; Semmelmann, Matthias; Grafe, Claudia; Evert, Matthias; Schroeder, Josef A.

    2016-03-01

    Introduction - Diagnosis of abnormal cilia function is based on ultrastructural analysis of axoneme defects, especialy the features of inner and outer dynein arms which are the motors of ciliar motility. Sub-optimal biopsy material, methodical, and intrinsic electron microscopy factors pose difficulty in ciliary defects evaluation. We present a computer-assisted approach based on state-of-the-art image analysis and object recognition methods yielding a time-saving and efficient diagnosis of cilia dysfunction. Method - The presented approach is based on a pipeline of basal image processing methods like smoothing, thresholding and ellipse fitting. However, integration of application specific knowledge results in robust segmentations even in cases of image artifacts. The method is build hierarchically starting with the detection of cilia within the image, followed by the detection of nine doublets within each analyzable cilium, and ending with the detection of dynein arms of each doublet. The process is concluded by a rough classification of the dynein arms as basis for a computer-assisted diagnosis. Additionally, the interaction possibilities are designed in a way, that the results are still reproducible given the completion report. Results - A qualitative evaluation showed reasonable detection results for cilia, doublets and dynein arms. However, since a ground truth is missing, the variation of the computer-assisted diagnosis should be within the subjective bias of human diagnosticians. The results of a first quantitative evaluation with five human experts and six images with 12 analyzable cilia showed, that with default parameterization 91.6% of the cilia and 98% of the doublets were found. The computer-assisted approach rated 66% of those inner and outer dynein arms correct, where all human experts agree. However, especially the quality of the dynein arm classification may be improved in future work.

  8. A bio-inspired inner-motile photocatalyst film: a magnetically actuated artificial cilia photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dunpu; Wang, Wei; Peng, Fengping; Kou, Jiahui; Ni, Yaru; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi

    2014-04-01

    A new type of inner-motile photocatalyst film is explored to enhance photocatalytic performance using magnetically actuated artificial cilia. The inner-motile photocatalyst film is capable of generating flow and mixing on the microscale because it produces a motion similar to that of natural cilia when it is subjected to a rotational magnetic field. Compared with traditional photocatalyst films, the inner-motile photocatalyst film exhibits the unique ability of microfluidic manipulation. It uses an impactful and self-contained design to accelerate interior mass transfer and desorption of degradation species. Moreover, the special cilia-like structures increase the surface area and light absorption. Consequently, the photocatalytic activity of the inner-motile photocatalyst film is dramatically improved to approximately 3.0 times that of the traditional planar film. The inner-motile photocatalyst film also exhibits high photocatalytic durability and can be reused several times with ease. Furthermore, this feasible yet versatile platform can be extended to other photocatalyst systems, such as TiO2, P25, ZnO, and Co3O4 systems, to improve their photocatalytic performance.A new type of inner-motile photocatalyst film is explored to enhance photocatalytic performance using magnetically actuated artificial cilia. The inner-motile photocatalyst film is capable of generating flow and mixing on the microscale because it produces a motion similar to that of natural cilia when it is subjected to a rotational magnetic field. Compared with traditional photocatalyst films, the inner-motile photocatalyst film exhibits the unique ability of microfluidic manipulation. It uses an impactful and self-contained design to accelerate interior mass transfer and desorption of degradation species. Moreover, the special cilia-like structures increase the surface area and light absorption. Consequently, the photocatalytic activity of the inner-motile photocatalyst film is dramatically