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Sample records for polarised primary cilia

  1. Visualizing renal primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Verghese, Elizabeth; Martelotto, Luciano G; Cain, Jason E; Galtseva, Alya; Rosenblum, Norman D; Watkins, D Neil; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-03-01

    Renal primary cilia are microscopic sensory organelles found on the apical surface of epithelial cells of the nephron and collecting duct. They are based upon a microtubular cytoskeleton, bounded by a specialized membrane, and contain an array of proteins that facilitate their assembly, maintenance and function. Cilium-based signalling is important for the control of epithelial differentiation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various cystic kidney diseases and in renal repair. As such, visualizing renal primary cilia and understanding their composition has become an essential component of many studies of inherited kidney disease and mechanisms of epithelial regeneration. Primary cilia were initially identified in the kidney using electron microscopy and this remains a useful technique for the high resolution examination of these organelles. New reagents and techniques now also allow the structure and composition of primary cilia to be analysed in detail using fluorescence microscopy. Primary cilia can be imaged in situ in sections of kidney, and many renal-derived cell lines produce primary cilia in culture providing a simplified and accessible system in which to investigate these organelles. Here we outline microscopy-based techniques commonly used for studying renal primary cilia.

  2. Mechanical Properties of Primary Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battle, Christopher; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the primary cilium, long thought to be a vestigial cellular appendage with no function, is involved in a multitude of sensory functions. One example, interesting from both a biophysical and medical standpoint, is the primary cilium of kidney epithelial cells, which acts as a mechanosensitive flow sensor. Genetic defects in ciliary function can cause, e.g., polycystic kidney disease (PKD). The material properties of these non-motile, microtubule-based 9 +0 cilia, and the way they are anchored to the cell cytoskeleton, are important to know if one wants to understand the mechano-electrochemical response of these cells, which is mediated by their cilia. We have probed the mechanical properties, boundary conditions, and dynamics of the cilia of MDCK cells using optical traps and DIC/fluorescence microscopy. We found evidence for both elastic relaxation of the cilia themselves after bending and for compliance in the intracellular anchoring structures. Angular and positional fluctuations of the cilia reflect both thermal excitations and cellular driving forces.

  3. [Primary cilia and hedgehog signaling].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Katsunori

    2015-07-01

    The primary cilium is an immotile organelle protruding from the cell surface in almost all vertebrate cells. Many molecules inside the primary cilia coordinately play a pivotal role, so genetic defects of these components result in diverse congenital malformations of the brain, eye, liver, kidney, and skeleton. Hedgehog signaling is a highly conserved pathway regulating morphogenesis in early development and tumorigenesis postnatally. Recently, advanced molecular biology has revealed that components of hedgehog signaling such as PTCH1, SMO, and GLI specifically translocate within the primary cilium upon the ligand binding of the hedgehog protein, and transduce the biological growth signal from the cell surface to the nucleus. Haploinsufficiency of the components in the primary cilium would inhibit the hedgehog pathway, resulting in developmental anomalies like ventral neural tube defects. Since the hedgehog-dependent pathway is critical for vertebrate development, it is crucial to elucidate the functional roles of hedgehog-related proteins in the primary cilium. PMID:26353446

  4. Primary cilia signaling mediates intraocular pressure sensation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Na; Conwell, Michael D; Chen, Xingjuan; Kettenhofen, Christine Insinna; Westlake, Christopher J; Cantor, Louis B; Wells, Clark D; Weinreb, Robert N; Corson, Timothy W; Spandau, Dan F; Joos, Karen M; Iomini, Carlo; Obukhov, Alexander G; Sun, Yang

    2014-09-01

    Lowe syndrome is a rare X-linked congenital disease that presents with congenital cataracts and glaucoma, as well as renal and cerebral dysfunction. OCRL, an inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase, is mutated in Lowe syndrome. We previously showed that OCRL is involved in vesicular trafficking to the primary cilium. Primary cilia are sensory organelles on the surface of eukaryotic cells that mediate mechanotransduction in the kidney, brain, and bone. However, their potential role in the trabecular meshwork (TM) in the eye, which regulates intraocular pressure, is unknown. Here, we show that TM cells, which are defective in glaucoma, have primary cilia that are critical for response to pressure changes. Primary cilia in TM cells shorten in response to fluid flow and elevated hydrostatic pressure, and promote increased transcription of TNF-α, TGF-β, and GLI1 genes. Furthermore, OCRL is found to be required for primary cilia to respond to pressure stimulation. The interaction of OCRL with transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), a ciliary mechanosensory channel, suggests that OCRL may act through regulation of this channel. A novel disease-causing OCRL allele prevents TRPV4-mediated calcium signaling. In addition, TRPV4 agonist GSK 1016790A treatment reduced intraocular pressure in mice; TRPV4 knockout animals exhibited elevated intraocular pressure and shortened cilia. Thus, mechanotransduction by primary cilia in TM cells is implicated in how the eye senses pressure changes and highlights OCRL and TRPV4 as attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of glaucoma. Implications of OCRL and TRPV4 in primary cilia function may also shed light on mechanosensation in other organ systems.

  5. Primary cilia utilize glycoprotein-dependent adhesion mechanisms to stabilize long-lasting cilia-cilia contacts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The central tenet of cilia function is sensing and transmitting information. The capacity to directly contact extracellular surfaces would empower primary cilia to probe the environment for information about the nature and location of nearby surfaces. It has been well established that flagella and other motile cilia perform diverse cellular functions through adhesion. We hypothesized that mammalian primary cilia also interact with the extracellular environment through direct physical contact. Methods We identified cilia in rod photoreceptors and cholangiocytes in fixed mouse tissues and examined the structures that these cilia contact in vivo. We then utilized an MDCK cell culture model to characterize the nature of the contacts we observed. Results In retina and liver tissue, we observed that cilia from nearby cells touch one another. Using MDCK cells, we found compelling evidence that these contacts are stable adhesions that form bridges between two cells, or networks between many cells. We examined the nature and duration of the cilia-cilia contacts and discovered primary cilia movements that facilitate cilia-cilia encounters. Stable adhesions form as the area of contact expands from a single point to a stretch of tightly bound, adjacent cilia membranes. The cilia-cilia contacts persisted for hours and were resistant to several harsh treatments such as proteases and DTT. Unlike many other cell adhesion mechanisms, calcium was not required for the formation or maintenance of cilia adhesion. However, swainsonine, which blocks maturation of N-linked glycoproteins, reduced contact formation. We propose that cellular control of adhesion maintenance is active because cilia adhesion did not prevent cell division; rather, contacts dissolved during mitosis as cilia were resorbed. Conclusions The demonstration that mammalian primary cilia formed prolonged, direct, physical contacts supports a novel paradigm: that mammalian primary cilia detect features of the

  6. Non-motile primary cilia as fluid shear stress mechanosensors.

    PubMed

    Nauli, Surya M; Jin, Xingjian; AbouAlaiwi, Wissam A; El-Jouni, Wassim; Su, Xuefeng; Zhou, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that transmit extracellular signals into intracellular biochemical responses. Structural and functional defects in primary cilia are associated with a group of human diseases, known as ciliopathies, with phenotypes ranging from cystic kidney and obesity to blindness and mental retardation. Primary cilia mediate mechano- and chemosensation in many cell types. The mechanosensory function of the primary cilia requires the atypical G-protein-coupled receptor polycystin-1 and the calcium-permeable nonselective cation channel polycystin-2. Mechanical stimulations such as fluid-shear stress of the primary cilia initiate intracellular calcium rise, nitric oxide release, and protein modifications. In this review, we describe a set of protocols for cell culture to promote ciliation, mechanical stimulations of the primary cilia, and measurements of calcium rise and nitric oxide release induced by fluid shear stress. PMID:23522462

  7. Primary cilia in the developing and mature brain

    PubMed Central

    Guemez-Gamboa, Alicia; Coufal, Nicole G.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia were the largely neglected non-motile counterparts of their better-known cousin, the motile cilia. For years these non-motile cilia were considered evolutionary remnants of little consequence to cellular function. Fast-forward 10 years and we now recognize primary cilia as key integrators of extracellular ligand-based signaling and cellular polarity, which regulate neuronal cell fate, migration differentiation, as well as a host of adult behaviors. Important future questions will focus on structure-function relationships, their roles in signaling and disease, and as areas of target for treatments. PMID:24811376

  8. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J.; Rattner, Jerome B.; Hoorn, Frans A. van der

    2009-10-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3{beta} by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  9. CLEM Methods for Studying Primary Cilia.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Frank P; Perumal, Geoffrey S; Kolstrup, Johan; Satir, Peter

    2016-01-01

    CLEM (correlated light and electron microscope) imaging is a highly useful technique for examining primary cilia. With CLEM, it is possible to determine the distribution of tagged proteins along the ciliary membrane and axoneme with high precision. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) permits measurement of ciliary length and orientation in relation to nearby cellular structures in a 3D image; in optimal cases, this can be combined with superresolution microscopy of selected ciliary components as they enter or leave the cilium. This chapter discusses CLEM methods. In the method described in detail, samples are completely processed for sequential fluorescence and SEM observation. This method is ideal for robust antibody localization and minimizes image manipulation in correlating the fluorescent and SEM images. Alternative methods prepare samples for fluorescence imaging followed by processing for SEM then observation in the SEM. This method is ideal for optimal fluorescence imaging, particularly live cell imaging. PMID:27514923

  10. Loss of primary cilia occurs early in breast cancer development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that protrude from the cell surface. Primary cilia play a critical role in development and disease through regulation of signaling pathways including the Hedgehog pathway. Recent mouse models have also linked ciliary dysfunction to cancer. However, little is known about the role of primary cilia in breast cancer development. Primary cilia expression was characterized in cancer cells as well as their surrounding stromal cells from 86 breast cancer patients by counting cilia and measuring cilia length. In addition, we examined cilia expression in normal epithelial and stromal cells from reduction mammoplasties as well as histologically normal adjacent tissue for comparison. Results We observed a statistically significant decrease in the percentage of ciliated cells on both premalignant lesions as well as in invasive cancers. This loss of cilia does not correlate with increased proliferative index (Ki67-positive cells). However, we did detect rare ciliated cancer cells present in patients with invasive breast cancer and found that these express a marker of basaloid cancers that is associated with poor prognosis (Cytokeratin 5). Interestingly, the percentage of ciliated stromal cells associated with both premalignant and invasive cancers decreased when compared to stromal cells associated with normal tissue. To understand how cilia may be lost during cancer development we analyzed the expression of genes required for ciliogenesis and/or ciliary function and compared their expression in normal versus breast cancer samples. We found that expression of ciliary genes were frequently downregulated in human breast cancers. Conclusions These data suggest that primary cilia are lost early in breast cancer development on both the cancer cells and their surrounding stromal cells. PMID:24987519

  11. Electrical Signaling in Motile and Primary Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Kleene, Steven J.; Van Houten, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are highly conserved for their structure and also for their sensory functions. They serve as antennae for extracellular information. Whether the cilia are motile or not, they respond to environmental mechanical and chemical stimuli and send signals to the cell body. The information from extracellular stimuli is commonly converted to electrical signals through the repertoire of ion-conducting channels in the ciliary membrane, which results in changes in concentrations of ions, especially calcium ions, in the cilia. These changes, in turn, affect motility and the ability of the signaling pathways in the cilia and cell body to carry on the signal transduction. We review here the activities of ion channels in cilia in animals from protists to vertebrates. PMID:25892740

  12. Primary cilia are not calcium-responsive mechanosensors.

    PubMed

    Delling, M; Indzhykulian, A A; Liu, X; Li, Y; Xie, T; Corey, D P; Clapham, D E

    2016-03-31

    Primary cilia are solitary, generally non-motile, hair-like protrusions that extend from the surface of cells between cell divisions. Their antenna-like structure leads naturally to the assumption that they sense the surrounding environment, the most common hypothesis being sensation of mechanical force through calcium-permeable ion channels within the cilium. This Ca(2+)-responsive mechanosensor hypothesis for primary cilia has been invoked to explain a large range of biological responses, from control of left-right axis determination in embryonic development to adult progression of polycystic kidney disease and some cancers. Here we report the complete lack of mechanically induced calcium increases in primary cilia, in tissues upon which this hypothesis has been based. We developed a transgenic mouse, Arl13b-mCherry-GECO1.2, expressing a ratiometric genetically encoded calcium indicator in all primary cilia. We then measured responses to flow in primary cilia of cultured kidney epithelial cells, kidney thick ascending tubules, crown cells of the embryonic node, kinocilia of inner ear hair cells, and several cell lines. Cilia-specific Ca(2+) influxes were not observed in physiological or even highly supraphysiological levels of fluid flow. We conclude that mechanosensation, if it originates in primary cilia, is not via calcium signalling.

  13. Primary Cilia Are Not Calcium-Responsive Mechanosensors

    PubMed Central

    Delling, M.; Indzhykulian, A. A.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.; Xie, T.; Corey, D. P.; Clapham, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Primary cilia are solitary, generally non-motile, hair-like protrusions that extend from the surface of cells between cell divisions. Their antenna-like structure leads naturally to the assumption that they sense the surrounding environment, the most common hypothesis being sensation of mechanical force through calcium-permeable ion channels within the cilium1. This Ca2+- Responsive MechanoSensor (CaRMS) hypothesis for primary cilia has been invoked to explain a large range of biological responses, from control of left-right axis determination in embryonic development to adult progression of polycystic kidney disease and some cancers2,3. Here, we report the complete lack of mechanically induced calcium increases in primary cilia, in tissues upon which this hypothesis has been based. First, we developed a transgenic mouse, Arl13b-mCherry-GECO1.2, expressing a ratiometric genetically encoded calcium indicator (GECI) in all primary cilia. We then measured responses to flow in primary cilia of cultured kidney epithelial cells, kidney thick ascending tubules, crown cells of the embryonic node, kinocilia of inner ear hair cells, and several cell lines. Cilia-specific Ca2+ influxes were not observed in physiological or even highly supraphysiological levels of fluid flow. We conclude that mechanosensation, if it originates in primary cilia, is not via calcium signaling. PMID:27007841

  14. Primary cilia are not calcium-responsive mechanosensors.

    PubMed

    Delling, M; Indzhykulian, A A; Liu, X; Li, Y; Xie, T; Corey, D P; Clapham, D E

    2016-03-31

    Primary cilia are solitary, generally non-motile, hair-like protrusions that extend from the surface of cells between cell divisions. Their antenna-like structure leads naturally to the assumption that they sense the surrounding environment, the most common hypothesis being sensation of mechanical force through calcium-permeable ion channels within the cilium. This Ca(2+)-responsive mechanosensor hypothesis for primary cilia has been invoked to explain a large range of biological responses, from control of left-right axis determination in embryonic development to adult progression of polycystic kidney disease and some cancers. Here we report the complete lack of mechanically induced calcium increases in primary cilia, in tissues upon which this hypothesis has been based. We developed a transgenic mouse, Arl13b-mCherry-GECO1.2, expressing a ratiometric genetically encoded calcium indicator in all primary cilia. We then measured responses to flow in primary cilia of cultured kidney epithelial cells, kidney thick ascending tubules, crown cells of the embryonic node, kinocilia of inner ear hair cells, and several cell lines. Cilia-specific Ca(2+) influxes were not observed in physiological or even highly supraphysiological levels of fluid flow. We conclude that mechanosensation, if it originates in primary cilia, is not via calcium signalling. PMID:27007841

  15. STED and STORM Superresolution Imaging of Primary Cilia.

    PubMed

    Yang, T Tony; Chong, Weng Man; Liao, Jung-Chi

    2016-01-01

    The characteristic lengths of molecular arrangement in primary cilia are below the diffraction limit of light, challenging structural and functional studies of ciliary proteins. Superresolution microscopy can reach up to a 20 nm resolution, significantly improving the ability to map molecules in primary cilia. Here we describe detailed experimental procedure of STED microscopy imaging and dSTORM imaging, two of the most powerful superresolution imaging techniques. Specifically, we emphasize the use of these two methods on imaging proteins in primary cilia. PMID:27514922

  16. Primary Cilia and the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikova, Olga V.; Pugacheva, Elena N.; Golemis, Erica A.

    2009-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based structures that protrude from the cell surface, and function as sensors for mechanical and chemical environmental cues that regulate cellular differentiation or division. In metazoans, ciliary signaling is important both during organismal development and in the homeostasis controls of adult tissues, with receptors for the Hedgehog, PDGF, Wnt, and other signaling cascades arrayed and active along the ciliary membrane. In normal cells, cilia are dynamically regulated during cell cycle progression: present in G0 and G1 cells, and usually in S/G2 cells, but almost invariably resorbed before mitotic entry, to re-appear post-cytokinesis. This periodic resorption and reassembly of cilia, specified by interaction with the intrinsic cell cycle machinery, influences the susceptibility of cells to the influence of extrinsic signals with cilia-associated receptors. Pathogenic conditions of mammals associated with loss of or defects in ciliary integrity include a number of developmental disorders, cystic syndromes in adults, and some cancers. With the continuing expansion of the list of human diseases associated with ciliary abnormalities, the identification of the cellular mechanisms regulating ciliary growth and disassembly has become a topic of intense research interest. Although these mechanisms are far from being understood, a number of recent studies have begun to identify key regulatory factors that may begin to offer insight into disease pathogenesis and treatment. In this chapter we will discuss the current state of knowledge regarding cell cycle control of ciliary dynamics, and provide general methods that can be applied to investigate cell cycle-dependent ciliary growth and disassembly. PMID:20362089

  17. Lack of centrioles and primary cilia in STIL(-/-) mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    David, Ahuvit; Liu, Fengying; Tibelius, Alexandra; Vulprecht, Julia; Wald, Diana; Rothermel, Ulrike; Ohana, Reut; Seitel, Alexander; Metzger, Jasmin; Ashery-Padan, Ruth; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Izraeli, Shai; Krämer, Alwin

    2014-01-01

    Although most animal cells contain centrosomes, consisting of a pair of centrioles, their precise contribution to cell division and embryonic development is unclear. Genetic ablation of STIL, an essential component of the centriole replication machinery in mammalian cells, causes embryonic lethality in mice around mid gestation associated with defective Hedgehog signaling. Here, we describe, by focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, that STIL(-/-) mouse embryos do not contain centrioles or primary cilia, suggesting that these organelles are not essential for mammalian development until mid gestation. We further show that the lack of primary cilia explains the absence of Hedgehog signaling in STIL(-/-) cells. Exogenous re-expression of STIL or STIL microcephaly mutants compatible with human survival, induced non-templated, de novo generation of centrioles in STIL(-/-) cells. Thus, while the abscence of centrioles is compatible with mammalian gastrulation, lack of centrioles and primary cilia impairs Hedgehog signaling and further embryonic development. PMID:25486474

  18. Lack of centrioles and primary cilia in STIL(-/-) mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    David, Ahuvit; Liu, Fengying; Tibelius, Alexandra; Vulprecht, Julia; Wald, Diana; Rothermel, Ulrike; Ohana, Reut; Seitel, Alexander; Metzger, Jasmin; Ashery-Padan, Ruth; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Izraeli, Shai; Krämer, Alwin

    2014-01-01

    Although most animal cells contain centrosomes, consisting of a pair of centrioles, their precise contribution to cell division and embryonic development is unclear. Genetic ablation of STIL, an essential component of the centriole replication machinery in mammalian cells, causes embryonic lethality in mice around mid gestation associated with defective Hedgehog signaling. Here, we describe, by focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, that STIL(-/-) mouse embryos do not contain centrioles or primary cilia, suggesting that these organelles are not essential for mammalian development until mid gestation. We further show that the lack of primary cilia explains the absence of Hedgehog signaling in STIL(-/-) cells. Exogenous re-expression of STIL or STIL microcephaly mutants compatible with human survival, induced non-templated, de novo generation of centrioles in STIL(-/-) cells. Thus, while the abscence of centrioles is compatible with mammalian gastrulation, lack of centrioles and primary cilia impairs Hedgehog signaling and further embryonic development.

  19. Oscillatory fluid flow influences primary cilia and microtubule mechanics.

    PubMed

    Espinha, Lina C; Hoey, David A; Fernandes, Paulo R; Rodrigues, Hélder C; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Many tissues are sensitive to mechanical stimuli; however, the mechanotransduction mechanism used by cells remains unknown in many cases. The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile microtubule-based extension present on nearly every mammalian cell which extends from the basal body. The cilium is a mechanosensitive organelle and has been shown to transduce fluid flow-induced shear stress in tissues, such as the kidney and bone. The majority of microtubules assemble from the mother centriole (basal body), contributing significantly to the anchoring of the primary cilium. Several studies have attempted to quantify the number of microtubules emanating from the basal body and the results vary depending on the cell type. It has also been shown that cellular response to shear stress depends on microtubular integrity. This study hypothesizes that changing the microtubule attachment of primary cilia in response to a mechanical stimulus could change primary cilia mechanics and, possibly, mechanosensitivity. Oscillatory fluid flow was applied to two different cell types and the microtubule attachment to the ciliary base was quantified. For the first time, an increase in microtubules around primary cilia both with time and shear rate in response to oscillatory fluid flow stimulation was demonstrated. Moreover, it is presented that the primary cilium is required for this loading-induced cellular response. This study has demonstrated a new role for the cilium in regulating alterations in the cytoplasmic microtubule network in response to mechanical stimulation, and therefore provides a new insight into how cilia may regulate its mechanics and thus the cells mechanosensitivity.

  20. Primary Cilia and Dendritic Spines: Different but Similar Signaling Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Nechipurenko, Inna V.; Doroquez, David B.; Sengupta, Piali

    2013-01-01

    Primary non-motile cilia and dendritic spines are cellular compartments that are specialized to sense and transduce environmental cues and presynaptic signals, respectively. Despite their unique cellular roles, both compartments exhibit remarkable parallels in the general principles, as well as molecular mechanisms, by which their protein composition, membrane domain architecture, cellular interactions, and structural and functional plasticity are regulated. We compare and contrast the pathways required for the generation and function of cilia and dendritic spines, and suggest that insights from the study of one may inform investigations into the other of these critically important signaling structures. PMID:24048681

  1. Lithium chloride modulates chondrocyte primary cilia and inhibits Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Clare L; Wiles, Anna; Poole, C Anthony; Knight, Martin M

    2016-02-01

    Lithium chloride (LiCl) exhibits significant therapeutic potential as a treatment for osteoarthritis. Hedgehog signaling is activated in osteoarthritis, where it promotes chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage matrix catabolism. Hedgehog signaling requires the primary cilium such that maintenance of this compartment is essential for pathway activity. Here we report that LiCl (50 mM) inhibits Hedgehog signaling in bovine articular chondrocytes such that the induction of GLI1 and PTCH1 expression is reduced ​ by 71 and 55%, respectively. Pathway inhibition is associated with a 97% increase in primary cilia length from 2.09 ± 0.7 μm in untreated cells to 4.06 ± 0.9 μm in LiCl-treated cells. We show that cilia elongation disrupts trafficking within the axoneme with a 38% reduction in Arl13b ciliary localization at the distal region of the cilium, consistent with the role of Arl13b in modulating Hedgehog signaling. In addition, we demonstrate similar increases in cilia length in human chondrocytes in vitro and after administration of dietary lithium to Wistar rats in vivo. Our data provide new insights into the effects of LiCl on chondrocyte primary cilia and Hedgehog signaling and shows for the first time that pharmaceutical targeting of the primary cilium may have therapeutic benefits in the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:26499268

  2. Ins and outs of GPCR signaling in primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Schou, Kenneth Bødtker; Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are specialized microtubule-based signaling organelles that convey extracellular signals into a cellular response in most vertebrate cell types. The physiological significance of primary cilia is underscored by the fact that defects in assembly or function of these organelles lead to a range of severe diseases and developmental disorders. In most cell types of the human body, signaling by primary cilia involves different G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which transmit specific signals to the cell through G proteins to regulate diverse cellular and physiological events. Here, we provide an overview of GPCR signaling in primary cilia, with main focus on the rhodopsin-like (class A) and the smoothened/frizzled (class F) GPCRs. We describe how such receptors dynamically traffic into and out of the ciliary compartment and how they interact with other classes of ciliary GPCRs, such as class B receptors, to control ciliary function and various physiological and behavioral processes. Finally, we discuss future avenues for developing GPCR-targeted drug strategies for the treatment of ciliopathies. PMID:26297609

  3. Primary cilia and kidney injury: current research status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixuan

    2013-01-01

    Cilia, membrane-enclosed organelles protruding from the apical side of cells, can be divided into two classes: motile and primary cilia. During the past decades, motile cilia have been intensively studied. However, it was not until the 1990s that people began to realize the importance of primary cilia as cellular-specific sensors, particularly in kidney tubular epithelial cells. Furthermore, accumulating evidence indicates that primary cilia may be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and planar cell polarity. Many signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and mammalian target of rapamycin, have been located to the primary cilia. Thus primary cilia have been regarded as a hub that integrates signals from the extracellular environment. More importantly, dysfunction of this organelle may contribute to the pathogenesis of a large spectrum of human genetic diseases, named ciliopathies. The significance of primary cilia in acquired human diseases such as hypertension and diabetes has gradually drawn attention. Interestingly, recent reports disclosed that cilia length varies during kidney injury, and shortening of cilia enhances the sensitivity of epithelial cells to injury cues. This review briefly summarizes the current status of cilia research and explores the potential mechanisms of cilia-length changes during kidney injury as well as provides some thoughts to allure more insightful ideas and promotes the further study of primary cilia in the context of kidney injury. PMID:23904226

  4. Primary cilia and kidney injury: current research status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shixuan; Dong, Zheng

    2013-10-15

    Cilia, membrane-enclosed organelles protruding from the apical side of cells, can be divided into two classes: motile and primary cilia. During the past decades, motile cilia have been intensively studied. However, it was not until the 1990s that people began to realize the importance of primary cilia as cellular-specific sensors, particularly in kidney tubular epithelial cells. Furthermore, accumulating evidence indicates that primary cilia may be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and planar cell polarity. Many signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and mammalian target of rapamycin, have been located to the primary cilia. Thus primary cilia have been regarded as a hub that integrates signals from the extracellular environment. More importantly, dysfunction of this organelle may contribute to the pathogenesis of a large spectrum of human genetic diseases, named ciliopathies. The significance of primary cilia in acquired human diseases such as hypertension and diabetes has gradually drawn attention. Interestingly, recent reports disclosed that cilia length varies during kidney injury, and shortening of cilia enhances the sensitivity of epithelial cells to injury cues. This review briefly summarizes the current status of cilia research and explores the potential mechanisms of cilia-length changes during kidney injury as well as provides some thoughts to allure more insightful ideas and promotes the further study of primary cilia in the context of kidney injury.

  5. Intracellular and extracellular forces drive primary cilia movement

    PubMed Central

    Battle, Christopher; Ott, Carolyn M.; Burnette, Dylan T.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are ubiquitous, microtubule-based organelles that play diverse roles in sensory transduction in many eukaryotic cells. They interrogate the cellular environment through chemosensing, osmosensing, and mechanosensing using receptors and ion channels in the ciliary membrane. Little is known about the mechanical and structural properties of the cilium and how these properties contribute to ciliary perception. We probed the mechanical responses of primary cilia from kidney epithelial cells [Madin–Darby canine kidney-II (MDCK-II)], which sense fluid flow in renal ducts. We found that, on manipulation with an optical trap, cilia deflect by bending along their length and pivoting around an effective hinge located below the basal body. The calculated bending rigidity indicates weak microtubule doublet coupling. Primary cilia of MDCK cells lack interdoublet dynein motors. Nevertheless, we found that the organelles display active motility. 3D tracking showed correlated fluctuations of the cilium and basal body. These angular movements seemed random but were dependent on ATP and cytoplasmic myosin-II in the cell cortex. We conclude that force generation by the actin cytoskeleton surrounding the basal body results in active ciliary movement. We speculate that actin-driven ciliary movement might tune and calibrate ciliary sensory functions. PMID:25605896

  6. Characterization of cancer stem cells and primary cilia in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gate, David; Danielpour, Moise; Bannykh, Serguei; Town, Terrence

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma, a tumor of the cerebellum, is the most common pediatric central nervous system malignancy. These tumors are etiologically linked to mutations in the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway, which signals through the primary, non-motile cilium. The growth of these aggressive tumors relies on self-renewal of tumor-propagating cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). Previous reports have implicated CD133-expressing cells as CSCs in brain tumors, while those expressing CD15 have been shown to propagate medulloblastoma. Here, we demonstrate that CD133+ and CD15+ cells are distinct medulloblastoma populations. CD15+ cells comprise approximately 0.5-1% of total human medulloblastoma cells, display CSC properties in culture and are detected in the Smoothened A1 transgenic mouse model of medulloblastoma. Additionally, we report on a medulloblastoma patient with enriched CD15+ cells in recurrent vs primary medulloblastoma. We also demonstrate that human medulloblastoma cells critically rely on establishment of primary cilia to drive Shh-mediated cell division. Primary cilia are found in external granule cells of human fetal cerebellum and in 12/14 medulloblastoma samples. Yet, CD15+ medulloblastoma cells lack primary cilia, suggesting that this CSC population signals independently of Shh. These results are important when considering the effects of current and prospective treatment modalities on medulloblastoma CSC populations. PMID:25921740

  7. Primary Cilia Regulate Branching Morphogenesis During Mammary Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Kimberly M.; Liu, Bob Y.; Tlsty, Thea D.; Pazour, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary During mammary gland development an epithelial bud undergoes branching morphogenesis to expand into a continuous tree-like network of branched ducts [1]. The process involves multiple cell types that are coordinated by hormones and growth factors coupled with signaling events including Wnt and Hedgehog [2-5]. Primary cilia play key roles in the development of many organs by coordinating extracellular signaling (Wnt, Hedgehog) with cellular physiology [6-8]. During mammary development, we find cilia on luminal epithelial, myoepithelial and stromal cells during early branching morphogenesis when epithelial ducts extend into the fat pad and undergo branching morphogenesis. When branching is complete, cilia disappear from luminal epithelial cells but remain on myoepithelial and stromal cells. Ciliary dysfunction caused by intraflagellar transport (IFT) defects results in branching defects. These include decreased ductal extension and decreased secondary and tertiary branching along with reduced lobular-alveolar development during pregnancy and lactation. We find increased canonical Wnt and decreased Hedgehog signaling in the mutant glands, which is consistent with the role of cilia in regulating these pathways [6-11]. In mammary gland and other organs, increased canonical Wnt [12-14] and decreased Hedgehog [15, 16] signaling decreases branching morphogenesis suggesting that Wnt and Hedgehog signaling connect ciliary dysfunction to branching defects. PMID:20381354

  8. Primary cilia in energy balance signaling and metabolic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hankyu; Song, Jieun; Jung, Joo Hyun; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2015-01-01

    Energy homeostasis in our body system is maintained by balancing the intake and expenditure of energy. Excessive accumulation of fat by disrupting the balance system causes overweight and obesity, which are increasingly becoming global health concerns. Understanding the pathogenesis of obesity focused on studying the genes related to familial types of obesity. Recently, a rare human genetic disorder, ciliopathy, links the role for genes regulating structure and function of a cellular organelle, the primary cilium, to metabolic disorder, obesity and type II diabetes. Primary cilia are microtubule based hair-like membranous structures, lacking motility and functions such as sensing the environmental cues, and transducing extracellular signals within the cells. Interestingly, the subclass of ciliopathies, such as Bardet-Biedle and Alström syndrome, manifest obesity and type II diabetes in human and mouse model systems. Moreover, studies on genetic mouse model system indicate that more ciliary genes affect energy homeostasis through multiple regulatory steps such as central and peripheral actions of leptin and insulin. In this review, we discuss the latest findings in primary cilia and metabolic disorders, and propose the possible interaction between primary cilia and the leptin and insulin signal pathways which might enhance our understanding of the unambiguous link of a cell’s antenna to obesity and type II diabetes. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(12): 647-654] PMID:26538252

  9. Function and regulation of primary cilia and intraflagellar transport proteins in the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Serra, Rosa A.; Yang, Shuying

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from the cell surface to enable transduction of various developmental signaling pathways. The process of intraflagellar transport (IFT) is crucial for the building and maintenance of primary cilia. Ciliary dysfunction has been found in a range of disorders called ciliopathies, some of which display severe skeletal dysplasias. In recent years, interest has grown in uncovering the function of primary cilia/IFT proteins in bone development, mechanotransduction, and cellular regulation. We summarize recent advances in understanding the function of cilia and IFT proteins in the regulation of cell differentiation in osteoblasts, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We also discuss the mechanosensory function of cilia and IFT proteins in bone cells, cilia orientation, and other functions of cilia in chondrocytes. PMID:24961486

  10. Fluid mechanics of nodal flow due to embryonic primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Blake, J R; Gaffney, E A

    2008-05-01

    Breaking of left-right symmetry is crucial in vertebrate development. The role of cilia-driven flow has been the subject of many recent publications, but the underlying mechanisms remain controversial. At approximately 8 days post-fertilization, after the establishment of the dorsal-ventral and anterior-posterior axes, a depressed structure is found on the ventral side of mouse embryos, termed the ventral node. Within the node, 'whirling' primary cilia, tilted towards the posterior, drive a flow implicated in the initial left-right signalling asymmetry. However, the underlying fluid mechanics have not been fully and correctly explained until recently and accurate characterization is required in determining how the flow triggers the downstream signalling cascades. Using the approximation of resistive force theory, we show how the flow is produced and calculate the optimal configuration to cause maximum flow, showing excellent agreement with in vitro measurements and numerical simulation, and paralleling recent analogue experiments. By calculating numerical solutions of the slender body theory equations, we present time-dependent physically based fluid dynamics simulations of particle pathlines in flows generated by large arrays of beating cilia, showing the far-field radial streamlines predicted by the theory.

  11. Autophagy Regulates Formation of Primary Cilia in Mefloquine-Treated Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji Hyun; Bae, Dong-Jun; Kim, Eun Sung; Kim, Han Byeol; Park, So Jung; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Jo, Doo Sin; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia have critical roles in coordinating multiple cellular signaling pathways. Dysregulation of primary cilia is implicated in various ciliopathies. To identify specific regulators of autophagy, we screened chemical libraries and identified mefloquine, an anti-malaria medicine, as a potent regulator of primary cilia in human retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. Not only ciliated cells but also primary cilium length was increased in mefloquine-treated RPE cells. Treatment with mefloquine strongly induced the elongation of primary cilia by blocking disassembly of primary cilium. In addition, we found that autophagy was increased in mefloquine-treated cells by enhancing autophagic flux. Both chemical and genetic inhibition of autophagy suppressed ciliogenesis in mefloquine-treated RPE cells. Taken together, these results suggest that autophagy induced by mefloquine positively regulates the elongation of primary cilia in RPE cells. PMID:26157548

  12. Primary cilia of inv/inv mouse renal epithelial cells sense physiological fluid flow: bending of primary cilia and Ca2+ influx.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Dai; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Yokoyama, Takahiko

    2005-01-01

    Primary cilia are hypothesized to act as a mechanical sensor to detect renal tubular fluid flow. Anomalous structure of primary cilia and/or impairment of increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in response to fluid flow are thought to result in renal cyst formation in conditional kif3a knockout, Tg737 and pkd1/pkd2 mutant mice. The mutant inv/inv mouse develops multiple renal cysts like kif3a, Tg737 and pkd1/pkd2 mutants. Inv proteins have been shown to be localized in the renal primary cilia, but response of inv/inv cilia to fluid stress has not been examined. In the present study, we examined the mechanical response of primary cilia to physiological fluid flow using a video microscope, as well as intracellular Ca2+ increases in renal epithelial cells from normal and inv/inv mice in response to flow stress. Percentages of ciliated cells and the length of primary cilia were not significantly different between primary renal cell cultures from normal and inv/inv mutant mice. Localization of inv protein was restricted to the base of primary cilia even under flow stress. Inv/inv mutant cells had similar bending mechanics of primary cilia in response to physiological fluid flow compared to normal cells. Furthermore, no difference was found in intracellular Ca2+ increases in response to physiological fluid flow between normal and inv/inv mutant cells. Our present study suggests that the function of the inv protein is distinct from polaris (the Tg737 gene product), polycystins (pkd1 and pkd2 gene products). PMID:16474191

  13. Unilateral nephrectomy elongates primary cilia in the remaining kidney via reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Jun; Jang, Hee-Seong; Kim, Jee In; Lipschutz, Joshua H; Park, Kwon Moo

    2016-02-29

    The length of primary cilia is associated with normal cell and organ function. In the kidney, the change of functional cilia length/mass is associated with various diseases such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, polycystic kidney disease, and congenital solitary kidney. Here, we investigate whether renal mass reduction affects primary cilia length and function. To induce renal mass reduction, mice were subjected to unilateral nephrectomy (UNx). UNx increased kidney weight and superoxide formation in the remaining kidney. Primary cilia were elongated in proximal tubule cells, collecting duct cells and parietal cells of the remaining kidney. Mn(III) Tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin (MnTMPyP), an antioxidant, reduced superoxide formation in UNx-mice and prevented the elongation of primary cilia. UNx increased the expression of phosphorylated ERK, p21, and exocyst complex members Sec8 and Sec10, in the remaining kidney, and these increases were prevented by MnTMPyP. In MDCK, a kidney tubular epithelial cell line, cells, low concentrations of H2O2 treatment elongated primary cilia. This H2O2-induced elongation of primary cilia was also prevented by MnTMPyP treatment. Taken together, these data demonstrate that kidney compensation, induced by a reduction of renal mass, results in primary cilia elongation, and this elongation is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  14. Unilateral nephrectomy elongates primary cilia in the remaining kidney via reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang Jun; Jang, Hee-Seong; Kim, Jee In; Lipschutz, Joshua H.; Park, Kwon Moo

    2016-01-01

    The length of primary cilia is associated with normal cell and organ function. In the kidney, the change of functional cilia length/mass is associated with various diseases such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, polycystic kidney disease, and congenital solitary kidney. Here, we investigate whether renal mass reduction affects primary cilia length and function. To induce renal mass reduction, mice were subjected to unilateral nephrectomy (UNx). UNx increased kidney weight and superoxide formation in the remaining kidney. Primary cilia were elongated in proximal tubule cells, collecting duct cells and parietal cells of the remaining kidney. Mn(III) Tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin (MnTMPyP), an antioxidant, reduced superoxide formation in UNx-mice and prevented the elongation of primary cilia. UNx increased the expression of phosphorylated ERK, p21, and exocyst complex members Sec8 and Sec10, in the remaining kidney, and these increases were prevented by MnTMPyP. In MDCK, a kidney tubular epithelial cell line, cells, low concentrations of H2O2 treatment elongated primary cilia. This H2O2-induced elongation of primary cilia was also prevented by MnTMPyP treatment. Taken together, these data demonstrate that kidney compensation, induced by a reduction of renal mass, results in primary cilia elongation, and this elongation is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:26923764

  15. Surface topography regulates wnt signaling through control of primary cilia structure in mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurray, R. J.; Wann, A. K. T.; Thompson, C. L.; Connelly, J. T.; Knight, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The primary cilium regulates cellular signalling including influencing wnt sensitivity by sequestering β-catenin within the ciliary compartment. Topographic regulation of intracellular actin-myosin tension can control stem cell fate of which wnt is an important mediator. We hypothesized that topography influences mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) wnt signaling through the regulation of primary cilia structure and function. MSCs cultured on grooves expressed elongated primary cilia, through reduced actin organization. siRNA inhibition of anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT88) reduced cilia length and increased active nuclear β-catenin. Conversely, increased primary cilia assembly in MSCs cultured on the grooves was associated with decreased levels of nuclear active β-catenin, axin-2 induction and proliferation, in response to wnt3a. This negative regulation, on grooved topography, was reversed by siRNA to IFT88. This indicates that subtle regulation of IFT and associated cilia structure, tunes the wnt response controlling stem cell differentiation.

  16. Primary cilia enhance kisspeptin receptor signaling on gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koemeter-Cox, Andrew I.; Sherwood, Thomas W.; Green, Jill A.; Steiner, Robert A.; Berbari, Nicolas F.; Yoder, Bradley K.; Kauffman, Alexander S.; Monsma, Paula C.; Brown, Anthony; Askwith, Candice C.; Mykytyn, Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Most central neurons in the mammalian brain possess an appendage called a primary cilium that projects from the soma into the extracellular space. The importance of these organelles is highlighted by the fact that primary cilia dysfunction is associated with numerous neuropathologies, including hyperphagia-induced obesity, hypogonadism, and learning and memory deficits. Neuronal cilia are enriched for signaling molecules, including certain G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), suggesting that neuronal cilia sense and respond to neuromodulators in the extracellular space. However, the impact of cilia on signaling to central neurons has never been demonstrated. Here, we show that the kisspeptin receptor (Kiss1r), a GPCR that is activated by kisspeptin to regulate the onset of puberty and adult reproductive function, is enriched in cilia projecting from mouse gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. Interestingly, GnRH neurons in adult animals are multiciliated and the percentage of GnRH neurons possessing multiple Kiss1r-positive cilia increases during postnatal development in a progression that correlates with sexual maturation. Remarkably, disruption of cilia selectively on GnRH neurons leads to a significant reduction in kisspeptin-mediated GnRH neuronal activity. To our knowledge, this result is the first demonstration of cilia disruption affecting central neuronal activity and highlights the importance of cilia for proper GPCR signaling. PMID:24982149

  17. Primary cilia found on HeLa and other cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Tia J; Falk, Matthias M

    2015-11-01

    For many years now, researchers have known of a sensory appendage on the surface of most differentiated cell types called primary cilium. Primary cilia are both chemo- and mechano-sensory in function and have an obvious role in cell cycle control. Because of this, it has been thought that primary cilia are not found on rapidly proliferating cells, for example, cancer cells. Here we report using immunofluorescent staining for the ciliary protein Arl13b that primary cilia are frequently found on HeLa (human epithelial adenocarcinoma) and other cancer cell lines such as MG63 (human osteosarcoma) commonly used for cell culture studies and that the ciliated population is significantly higher (ave. 28.6% and 46.5%, respectively in starved and 15.7-18.6% in un-starved cells) than previously anticipated. Our finding impacts the current perception of primary cilia formed in highly proliferative cells.

  18. Primary cilia mechanics affects cell mechanosensation: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Khayyeri, Hanifeh; Barreto, Sara; Lacroix, Damien

    2015-08-21

    Primary cilia (PC) are mechanical cell structures linked to the cytoskeleton and are central to how cells sense biomechanical signals from their environment. However, it is unclear exactly how PC mechanics influences cell mechanosensation. In this study we investigate how the PC mechanical characteristics are involved in the mechanotransduction process whereby cilium deflection under fluid flow induces strains on the internal cell components that regulate the cell׳s mechanosensitive response. Our investigation employs a computational approach in which a finite element model of a cell consisting of a nucleus, cytoplasm, cortex, microtubules, actin bundles and a primary cilium was used together with a finite element representation of a flow chamber. Fluid-structure interaction analysis was performed by simulating perfusion flow of 1mm/s on the cell model. Simulations of cells with different PC mechanical characteristics, showed that the length and the stiffness of PC are responsible for the transmission of mechanical stimuli to the cytoskeleton. Fluid flow deflects the cilium, with the highest strains found at the base of the PC and in the cytoplasm. The PC deflection created further strains on the cell nucleus but did not influence microtubules and actin bundles significantly. Our results indicate that PC deflection under fluid flow stimulation transmits mechanical strain primarily to other essential organelles in the cytoplasm, such as the Golgi complex, that regulate cells' mechanoresponse. The simulations further suggest that cell mechanosensitivity can be altered by targeting PC length and rigidity.

  19. Direct recording and molecular identification of the calcium channel of primary cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaen, Paul G.; Delling, Markus; Vien, Thuy N.; Clapham, David E.

    2013-12-01

    A primary cilium is a solitary, slender, non-motile protuberance of structured microtubules (9+0) enclosed by plasma membrane. Housing components of the cell division apparatus between cell divisions, primary cilia also serve as specialized compartments for calcium signalling and hedgehog signalling pathways. Specialized sensory cilia such as retinal photoreceptors and olfactory cilia use diverse ion channels. An ion current has been measured from primary cilia of kidney cells, but the responsible genes have not been identified. The polycystin proteins (PC and PKD), identified in linkage studies of polycystic kidney disease, are candidate channels divided into two structural classes: 11-transmembrane proteins (PKD1, PKD1L1 and PKD1L2) remarkable for a large extracellular amino terminus of putative cell adhesion domains and a G-protein-coupled receptor proteolytic site, and the 6-transmembrane channel proteins (PKD2, PKD2L1 and PKD2L2; TRPPs). Evidence indicates that the PKD1 proteins associate with the PKD2 proteins via coiled-coil domains. Here we use a transgenic mouse in which only cilia express a fluorophore and use it to record directly from primary cilia, and demonstrate that PKD1L1 and PKD2L1 form ion channels at high densities in several cell types. In conjunction with an accompanying manuscript, we show that the PKD1L1-PKD2L1 heteromeric channel establishes the cilia as a unique calcium compartment within cells that modulates established hedgehog pathways.

  20. Direct recording and molecular identification of the calcium channel of primary cilia.

    PubMed

    DeCaen, Paul G; Delling, Markus; Vien, Thuy N; Clapham, David E

    2013-12-12

    A primary cilium is a solitary, slender, non-motile protuberance of structured microtubules (9+0) enclosed by plasma membrane. Housing components of the cell division apparatus between cell divisions, primary cilia also serve as specialized compartments for calcium signalling and hedgehog signalling pathways. Specialized sensory cilia such as retinal photoreceptors and olfactory cilia use diverse ion channels. An ion current has been measured from primary cilia of kidney cells, but the responsible genes have not been identified. The polycystin proteins (PC and PKD), identified in linkage studies of polycystic kidney disease, are candidate channels divided into two structural classes: 11-transmembrane proteins (PKD1, PKD1L1 and PKD1L2) remarkable for a large extracellular amino terminus of putative cell adhesion domains and a G-protein-coupled receptor proteolytic site, and the 6-transmembrane channel proteins (PKD2, PKD2L1 and PKD2L2; TRPPs). Evidence indicates that the PKD1 proteins associate with the PKD2 proteins via coiled-coil domains. Here we use a transgenic mouse in which only cilia express a fluorophore and use it to record directly from primary cilia, and demonstrate that PKD1L1 and PKD2L1 form ion channels at high densities in several cell types. In conjunction with an accompanying manuscript, we show that the PKD1L1-PKD2L1 heteromeric channel establishes the cilia as a unique calcium compartment within cells that modulates established hedgehog pathways. PMID:24336289

  1. Tubulin glycylases are required for primary cilia, control of cell proliferation and tumor development in colon

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Cecilia; Papon, Laura; Cacheux, Wulfran; Marques Sousa, Patricia; Lascano, Valeria; Tort, Olivia; Giordano, Tiziana; Vacher, Sophie; Lemmers, Benedicte; Mariani, Pascale; Meseure, Didier; Medema, Jan Paul; Bièche, Ivan; Hahne, Michael; Janke, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    TTLL3 and TTLL8 are tubulin glycine ligases catalyzing posttranslational glycylation of microtubules. We show here for the first time that these enzymes are required for robust formation of primary cilia. We further discover the existence of primary cilia in colon and demonstrate that TTLL3 is the only glycylase in this organ. As a consequence, colon epithelium shows a reduced number of primary cilia accompanied by an increased rate of cell division in TTLL3-knockout mice. Strikingly, higher proliferation is compensated by faster tissue turnover in normal colon. In a mouse model for tumorigenesis, lack of TTLL3 strongly promotes tumor development. We further demonstrate that decreased levels of TTLL3 expression are linked to the development of human colorectal carcinomas. Thus, we have uncovered a novel role for tubulin glycylation in primary cilia maintenance, which controls cell proliferation of colon epithelial cells and plays an essential role in colon cancer development. PMID:25180231

  2. Primary cilia integrate hedgehog and Wnt signaling during tooth development.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Chen, S; Cheng, D; Jing, W; Helms, J A

    2014-05-01

    Many ciliopathies have clinical features that include tooth malformations but how these defects come about is not clear. Here we show that genetic deletion of the motor protein Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in an arrest in odontogenesis. Incisors are completely missing, and molars are enlarged in Wnt1(Cre+)Kif3a(fl/fl) embryos. Although amelogenesis and dentinogenesis initiate in the molar tooth bud, both processes terminate prematurely. We demonstrate that loss of Kif3a in dental mesenchyme results in loss of Hedgehog signaling and gain of Wnt signaling in this same tissue. The defective dental mesenchyme then aberrantly signals to the dental epithelia, which prompts an up-regulation in the Hedgehog and Wnt responses in the epithelia and leads to multiple attempts at invagination and an expanded enamel organ. Thus, the primary cilium integrates Hedgehog and Wnt signaling between dental epithelia and mesenchyme, and this cilia-dependent integration is required for proper tooth development.

  3. Primary Cilia on Horizontal Basal Cells Regulate Regeneration of the Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Joiner, Ariell M.; Green, Warren W.; McIntyre, Jeremy C.; Allen, Benjamin L.; Schwob, James E.

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) is one of the few tissues to undergo constitutive neurogenesis throughout the mammalian lifespan. It is composed of multiple cell types including olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that are readily replaced by two populations of basal stem cells, frequently dividing globose basal cells and quiescent horizontal basal cells (HBCs). However, the precise mechanisms by which these cells mediate OE regeneration are unclear. Here, we show for the first time that the HBC subpopulation of basal stem cells uniquely possesses primary cilia that are aligned in an apical orientation in direct apposition to sustentacular cell end feet. The positioning of these cilia suggests that they function in the detection of growth signals and/or differentiation cues. To test this idea, we generated an inducible, cell type-specific Ift88 knock-out mouse line (K5rtTA;tetOCre;Ift88fl/fl) to disrupt cilia formation and maintenance specifically in HBCs. Surprisingly, the loss of HBC cilia did not affect the maintenance of the adult OE but dramatically impaired the regeneration of OSNs following lesion. Furthermore, the loss of cilia during development resulted in a region-specific decrease in neurogenesis, implicating HBCs in the establishment of the OE. Together, these results suggest a novel role for primary cilia in HBC activation, proliferation, and differentiation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show for the first time the presence of primary cilia on a quiescent population of basal stem cells, the horizontal basal cells (HBCs), in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Importantly, our data demonstrate that cilia on HBCs are necessary for regeneration of the OE following injury. Moreover, the disruption of HBC cilia alters neurogenesis during the development of the OE, providing evidence that HBCs participate in the establishment of this tissue. These data suggest that the mechanisms of penetrance for ciliopathies in the OE extend beyond that of defects in olfactory sensory

  4. Modulation of primary cilia length by melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Akie; Yamato, Shogo; Katoh, Yohei; Nakayama, Kazuhisa; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Kobayashi, Yuki; Saito, Yumiko

    2016-06-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) receptor 1 (MCHR1) is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The MCH-MCHR1 system has been implicated in the regulation of feeding, emotional processing, and sleep in rodents. Recent work revealed that MCHR1 is selectively expressed in neuronal primary cilia of the central nervous system. Cilia have various chemosensory functions in many types of cell, and ciliary dysfunction is associated with ciliopathies such as polycystic kidney disease and obesity. Although dynamic modulation of neuronal cilia length is observed in obese mice, the functional interaction of neuronal ciliary GPCR and its endogenous ligand has not yet been elucidated. We report here that MCH treatment significantly reduced cilia length in hTERT-RPE1 cells (hRPE1 cells) transfected with MCHR1. Quantitative analyses indicated that MCH-induced cilia shortening progressed in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 lower than 1nM when cells were treated for 6h. Although the assembly and disassembly of primary cilia are tightly coupled to the cell cycle, cell cycle reentry was not a determinant of MCH-induced cilia shortening. We confirmed that MCH elicited receptor internalization, Ca(2+) mobilization, ERK and Akt phosphorylation, and inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in MCHR1-expressing hRPE1 cells. Among these diverse pathways, we revealed that Gi/o-dependent Akt phosphorylation was an important component in the initial stage of MCH-induced cilia length shortening. Furthermore, induction of fewer cilia by Kif3A siRNA treatment significantly decreased the MCH-mediated phosphorylation of Akt, indicating the functional importance of the MCHR1-Akt pathway in primary cilia. Taken together, the present data suggest that the MCH-MCHR1 axis may modulate the sensitivity of cells to external environments by controlling the cilia length. Therefore, further characterization of MCHR1 as a ciliary GPCR will provide a potential molecular mechanism to link cilia length

  5. Complex interactions between genes controlling trafficking in primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Ocbina, Polloneal Jymmiel R; Eggenschwiler, Jonathan T; Moskowitz, Ivan; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2011-06-01

    Cilia-associated human genetic disorders are striking in the diversity of their abnormalities and their complex inheritance. Inactivation of the retrograde ciliary motor by mutations in DYNC2H1 causes skeletal dysplasias that have strongly variable expressivity. Here we define previously unknown genetic relationships between Dync2h1 and other genes required for ciliary trafficking. Mutations in mouse Dync2h1 disrupt cilia structure, block Sonic hedgehog signaling and cause midgestation lethality. Heterozygosity for Ift172, a gene required for anterograde ciliary trafficking, suppresses cilia phenotypes, Sonic hedgehog signaling defects and early lethality of Dync2h1 homozygotes. Ift122, like Dync2h1, is required for retrograde ciliary trafficking, but reduction of Ift122 gene dosage also suppresses the Dync2h1 phenotype. These genetic interactions illustrate the cell biology underlying ciliopathies and argue that mutations in intraflagellar transport genes cause their phenotypes because of their roles in cilia architecture rather than direct roles in signaling.

  6. Lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Ko; Kasahara, Kyosuke; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato

    2009-10-30

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of lithium, a first-line antimanic mood stabilizer, have not yet been fully elucidated. Treatment of the algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with lithium has been shown to induce elongation of their flagella, which are analogous structures to vertebrate cilia. In the mouse brain, adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3) and certain neuropeptide receptors colocalize to the primary cilium of neuronal cells, suggesting a chemosensory function for the primary cilium in the nervous system. Here we show that lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells. Brain sections from mice chronically fed with Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were subjected to immunofluorescence study. Primary cilia carrying both AC3 and the receptor for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were elongated in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens of lithium-fed mice, as compared to those of control animals. Moreover, lithium-treated NIH3T3 cells and cultured striatal neurons exhibited elongation of the primary cilia. The present results provide initial evidence that a psychotropic agent can affect ciliary length in the central nervous system, and furthermore suggest that lithium exerts its therapeutic effects via the upregulation of cilia-mediated MCH sensing. These findings thus contribute novel insights into the pathophysiology of bipolar mood disorder and other psychiatric diseases.

  7. The ciliary pocket: an endocytic membrane domain at the base of primary and motile cilia.

    PubMed

    Molla-Herman, Anahi; Ghossoub, Rania; Blisnick, Thierry; Meunier, Alice; Serres, Catherine; Silbermann, Flora; Emmerson, Chris; Romeo, Kelly; Bourdoncle, Pierre; Schmitt, Alain; Saunier, Sophie; Spassky, Nathalie; Bastin, Philippe; Benmerah, Alexandre

    2010-05-15

    Cilia and flagella are eukaryotic organelles involved in multiple cellular functions. The primary cilium is generally non motile and found in numerous vertebrate cell types where it controls key signalling pathways. Despite a common architecture, ultrastructural data suggest some differences in their organisation. Here, we report the first detailed characterisation of the ciliary pocket, a depression of the plasma membrane in which the primary cilium is rooted. This structure is found at low frequency in kidney epithelial cells (IMCD3) but is associated with virtually all primary cilia in retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE1). Transmission and scanning electron microscopy, immunofluorescence analysis and videomicroscopy revealed that the ciliary pocket establishes closed links with the actin-based cytoskeleton and that it is enriched in active and dynamic clathrin-coated pits. The existence of the ciliary pocket was confirmed in mouse tissues bearing primary cilia (cumulus), as well as motile cilia and flagella (ependymal cells and spermatids). The ciliary pocket shares striking morphological and functional similarities with the flagellar pocket of Trypanosomatids, a trafficking-specialised membrane domain at the base of the flagellum. Our data therefore highlight the conserved role of membrane trafficking in the vicinity of cilia. PMID:20427320

  8. Hippocampal and cortical primary cilia are required for aversive memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Berbari, Nicolas F; Malarkey, Erik B; Yazdi, S M Zaki R; McNair, Andrew D; Kippe, Jordyn M; Croyle, Mandy J; Kraft, Timothy W; Yoder, Bradley K

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for decades that neurons throughout the brain possess solitary, immotile, microtubule based appendages called primary cilia. Only recently have studies tried to address the functions of these cilia and our current understanding remains poor. To determine if neuronal cilia have a role in behavior we specifically disrupted ciliogenesis in the cortex and hippocampus of mice through conditional deletion of the Intraflagellar Transport 88 (Ift88) gene. The effects on learning and memory were analyzed using both Morris Water Maze and fear conditioning paradigms. In comparison to wild type controls, cilia mutants displayed deficits in aversive learning and memory and novel object recognition. Furthermore, hippocampal neurons from mutants displayed an altered paired-pulse response, suggesting that loss of IFT88 can alter synaptic properties. A variety of other behavioral tests showed no significant differences between conditional cilia mutants and controls. This type of conditional allele approach could be used to distinguish which behavioral features of ciliopathies arise due to defects in neural development and which result from altered cell physiology. Ultimately, this could lead to an improved understanding of the basis for the cognitive deficits associated with human cilia disorders such as Bardet-Biedl syndrome, and possibly more common ailments including depression and schizophrenia. PMID:25184295

  9. Primary cilia are critical for Sonic hedgehog-mediated dopaminergic neurogenesis in the embryonic midbrain.

    PubMed

    Gazea, Mary; Tasouri, Evangelia; Tolve, Marianna; Bosch, Viktoria; Kabanova, Anna; Gojak, Christian; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Novikov, Orna; Spatz, Joachim; Pereira, Gislene; Hübner, Wolfgang; Brodski, Claude; Tucker, Kerry L; Blaess, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons modulate various motor and cognitive functions, and their dysfunction or degeneration has been implicated in several psychiatric diseases. Both Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt signaling pathways have been shown to be essential for normal development of mDA neurons. Primary cilia are critical for the development of a number of structures in the brain by serving as a hub for essential developmental signaling cascades, but their role in the generation of mDA neurons has not been examined. We analyzed mutant mouse lines deficient in the intraflagellar transport protein IFT88, which is critical for primary cilia function. Conditional inactivation of Ift88 in the midbrain after E9.0 results in progressive loss of primary cilia, a decreased size of the mDA progenitor domain, and a reduction in mDA neurons. We identified Shh signaling as the primary cause of these defects, since conditional inactivation of the Shh signaling pathway after E9.0, through genetic ablation of Gli2 and Gli3 in the midbrain, results in a phenotype basically identical to the one seen in Ift88 conditional mutants. Moreover, the expansion of the mDA progenitor domain observed when Shh signaling is constitutively activated does not occur in absence of Ift88. In contrast, clusters of Shh-responding progenitors are maintained in the ventral midbrain of the hypomorphic Ift88 mouse mutant, cobblestone. Despite the residual Shh signaling, the integrity of the mDA progenitor domain is severely disturbed, and consequently very few mDA neurons are generated in cobblestone mutants. Our results identify for the first time a crucial role of primary cilia in the induction of mDA progenitors, define a narrow time window in which Shh-mediated signaling is dependent upon normal primary cilia function for this purpose, and suggest that later Wnt signaling-dependent events act independently of primary cilia.

  10. RC/BTB2 is essential for formation of primary cilia in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Li, Wei; Ni, Jin; Wu, Jinghua; Liu, Junping; Zhang, Zhengang; Zhang, Yong; Li, Hongfei; Shi, Yuqin; Teves, Maria E; Song, Shizheng; Strauss, Jerome F; Zhang, Zhibing

    2015-04-01

    RC/BTB2 is a binding partner of sperm associated antigen 16S (SPAG16S), which is a regulator of spermiogenesis in mice, a process during which sperm flagella are formed. The expression of Rc/btb2 is also regulated by multicilin, a protein that controls ciliogenesis. Given that mouse Rc/btb2 mRNA is not only expressed in tissues bearing motile cilia, but also in tissues without motile cilia, we investigated whether RC/BTB2 plays a role in the general process of ciliogenesis by studying two cell lines that have primary cilia, NIH3T3, and IMCD3. We discovered that the subcellular localization of RC/BTB2 in the NIH3T3 and IMCD3 cells encompasses the pathway for ciliogenesis. RC/BTB2 was found in the Golgi bodies and centrosomes, two key structures essential for normal ciliogenesis. Knockdown of Rc/btb2 gene expression in these cell lines disrupted ciliogenesis. The percentage of cells with primary cilia was significantly reduced in stable cell lines transduced with specific Rc/btb2 shRNA viruses as compared to the control cells. When cilia were formed in the knockdown cells, they were significantly shorter than those in the control cells. Knockdown of Rc/btb2 expression did not affect cell proliferation and the cell cycle. Exogenous expression of RC/BTB2 in these stable knockdown cells restored ciliogenesis. These findings suggest that RC/BTB2 is a necessary component of the process of formation of primary cilia in somatic cells, perhaps through the transportation of cargos from Golgi bodies to centrosomes for cilia assembling. PMID:25762510

  11. Role for primary cilia as flow detectors in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Van der Heiden, Kim; Egorova, Anastasia D; Poelmann, Robert E; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Hierck, Beerend P

    2011-01-01

    The cardiovascular system is exposed to biochemical and biomechanical signals. Various sensors for these signals have been described and they contribute to cardiovascular development, maintenance of vessel integrity during adult life, and to pathogenesis. In the past 10years, primary cilia, membrane-covered, rod-like cellular protrusions, were discovered on multiple cell types of the cardiovascular system. Primary cilia are sensory organelles involved in several key (developmental) signaling pathways and in chemo- and mechanosensing on a myriad of cell types. In the embryonic and adult cardiovascular system, they have been demonstrated to function as shear stress sensors on endothelial cells and could act as strain sensors on smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes and as chemosensors on fibroblasts. This review will cover their occurrence and elaborate on established and possible functions of primary cilia in the cardiovascular system.

  12. Rab10 associates with primary cilia and the exocyst complex in renal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Babbey, Clifford M.; Bacallao, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Rab10, a mammalian homolog of the yeast Sec4p protein, has previously been associated with endocytic recycling and biosynthetic membrane transport in cultured epithelia and with Glut4 translocation in adipocytes. Here, we report that Rab10 associates with primary cilia in renal epithelia in culture and in vivo. In addition, we find that Rab10 also colocalizes with exocyst proteins at the base of nascent cilia, and physically interacts with the exocyst complex, as detected with anti-Sec8 antibodies. These data suggest that membrane transport to the primary cilum may be mediated by interactions between Rab10 and an exocyst complex located at the cilium base. PMID:20576682

  13. Loss of primary cilia results in deregulated and unabated apical calcium entry in ARPKD collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Siroky, Brian J; Ferguson, William B; Fuson, Amanda L; Xie, Yi; Fintha, Attila; Komlosi, Peter; Yoder, Bradley K; Schwiebert, Erik M; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M; Bell, P Darwin

    2006-06-01

    Recent genetic analysis has identified a pivotal role of primary cilia in the pathogenesis of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). However, little is known regarding how cilia loss/dysfunction contributes to cyst development. In epithelial cells, changes in apical fluid flow induce cilia-mediated Ca2+ entry via polycystin-2 (PC2), a cation channel. The Oak Ridge Polycystic Kidney (orpk) mouse contains a mutated Tg737 gene that disrupts expression of polaris, a protein required for ciliogenesis. These studies examine the effect of cilia malformation on Ca2+ entry in orpk cilia(-) collecting duct principal cells, and in orpk cells in which wild-type Tg737 was reintroduced, orpk cilia(+). [Ca2+]i was monitored in confluent cell monolayers using fluorescence microscopy. Intrinsic apical Ca2+ entry was measured by Mn2+ quenching and Ca2+ depletion/readdition under flow conditions below the threshold for stimulation. We found that unstimulated apical Ca2+ entry was markedly increased in cilia(-) cells and was sensitive to Gd3+, an inhibitor of PC2. Electrophysiological measurements demonstrate increased abundance of an apical channel, consistent with PC2, in cilia(-) cells. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that PC2, normally expressed on and at the base of cilia in orpk cilia(+) cells, was observed throughout the apical membrane in cilia(-) cells. Furthermore, cilia(-) cells displayed elevated subapical Ca2+ levels measured with the near-membrane Ca2+ indicator FFP-18. We propose that cilia exert a tonic regulatory influence on apical Ca2+ entry, and absence of cilia results in loss of spatial organization of PC2, causing unregulated Ca2+ entry and elevations in subapical [Ca2+], a factor which may contribute to cyst formation. PMID:16396941

  14. An Essential Role for Dermal Primary Cilia in Hair Follicle Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Jonathan; Laag, Essam; Michaud, Edward J.; Yoder, Bradley K.

    2009-01-01

    The primary cilium is a microtubule-based organelle implicated as an essential component of a number of signaling pathways. It is present on cells throughout the mammalian body; however, its functions in most tissues remain largely unknown. Herein we demonstrate that primary cilia are present on cells in murine skin and hair follicles throughout morphogenesis and during hair follicle cycling in postnatal life. Using the Cre-lox system, we disrupted cilia assembly in the ventral dermis and evaluated the effects on hair follicle development. Mice with disrupted dermal cilia have severe hypotrichosis (lack of hair) in affected areas. Histological analyses reveal that most follicles in the mutants arrest at stage 2 of hair development and have small or absent dermal condensates. This phenotype is reminiscent of that seen in the skin of mice lacking Shh or Gli2. In situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicates that the hedgehog pathway is downregulated in the dermis of the cilia mutant hair follicles. Thus, these data establish cilia as a critical signaling component required for normal hair morphogenesis and suggest that this organelle is needed on cells in the dermis for reception of signals such as sonic hedgehog. PMID:18987668

  15. Primary cilia expression in bone marrow in response to mechanical stimulation in explant bioreactor culture.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, T R; Schiavi, J; Alyssa Varsanik, M; Voisin, M; Birmingham, E; Haugh, M G; McNamara, L M; Niebur, G L

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow contains a multitude of mechanically sensitive cells that may participate in mechanotransduction. Primary cilia are sensory organelles expressed on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), osteoblasts, osteocytes, and other cell types that sense fluid flow in monolayer culture. In marrow, cilia could similarly facilitate the sensation of relative motion between adjacent cells or interstitial fluid. The goal of this study was to determine the response of cilia to mechanical stimulation of the marrow. Bioreactors were used to supply trabecular bone explants with low magnitude mechanical stimulation (LMMS) of 0.3 ×g at 30 Hz for 1 h/d, 5 d/week, inducing shear stresses in the marrow. Four groups were studied: unstimulated (UNSTIM), stimulated (LMMS), and with and without chloral hydrate (UNSTIM+CH and LMMS+CH, respectively), which was used to disrupt cilia. After 19 days of culture, immunohistochemistry for acetylated α-tubulin revealed that more cells expressed cilia in culture compared to in vivo controls. Stimulation decreased the number of cells expressing cilia in untreated explants, but not in CH-treated explants. MSCs represented a greater fraction of marrow cells in the untreated explants than CH-treated explants. MSCs harvested from the stimulated groups were more proliferative than in the unstimulated explants, but this effect was absent from CH treated explants. In contrast to the marrow, neither LMMS nor CH treatment affected bone formation as measured by mineralising surface. Computational models indicated that LMMS does not induce bone strain, and the reported effects were thus attributed to shear stress in the marrow. From a clinical perspective, genetic or pharmaceutical alterations of cilia expression may affect marrow health and function. PMID:27434268

  16. Direct recording and molecular identification of the calcium channel of primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    DeCaen, Paul G.; Delling, Markus; Vien, Thuy N.; Clapham, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A primary cilium is a solitary slender non-motile protuberance of structured microtubules (9+0) enclosed by plasma membrane1. Housing components of the cell division apparatus between cell divisions, they also serve as specialized compartments for calcium signaling2 and Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathways3. Specialized sensory cilia such as retinal photoreceptors and olfactory cilia employ diverse ion channels4-7. An ion current has been measured from primary cilia of kidney cells8 but the responsible genes have not been identified. The polycystin proteins (PC, PKD), identified in linkage studies of polycystic kidney disease9, are candidate channels divided into two structural classes: 11-transmembrane (TM) proteins (PKD1, PKD1-L1 and PKD1-L2) remarkable for a large extracellular N-terminus of putative cell adhesion domains and a GPCR proteolytic site, and the 6-TM channel proteins (PKD2, PKD2-L1, PKD2-L2; TRPPs). Evidence suggests that the PKD1s associate with the PKD2s via coiled-coil domains10-12. Here, we employ a transgenic mouse in which only cilia express a fluorophore and employ it to directly record from primary cilia and demonstrate that PKD1-L1 and PKD2-L1 form ion channels at high densities in several cell types. In conjunction with the companion manuscript2, we show that the PKD1-L1/PKD2-L1 heteromeric channel establishes the cilia as a unique calcium compartment within cells that modulates established Hedgehog pathways. PMID:24336289

  17. Primary cilia regulate proliferation of amplifying progenitors in adult hippocampus: implications for learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Amador-Arjona, Alejandro; Elliott, Jimmy; Miller, Amber; Ginbey, Ashley; Pazour, Gregory J; Enikolopov, Grigori; Roberts, Amanda J; Terskikh, Alexey V

    2011-07-01

    Integration of new neurons into the adult hippocampus has been linked to specific types of learning. Primary cilia were found to be required for the formation of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus during development. However, the requirement of cilia in maintenance of adult NSCs is unknown. We developed a genetic mouse model in which fetal/perinatal brain development is unaffected, but adult hippocampal neurogenesis is constantly reduced by conditional ablation of primary cilia in adult GFAP(+) neural stem/progenitor cells. We found that this approach specifically reduces the number of hippocampal amplifying progenitors (also called type 2a cells) without affecting the number of radial NSCs (or type 1 cells). Constant reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis produced a delay rather than a permanent deficiency in spatial learning without affecting the retention of long-term memories. Decreased neurogenesis also altered spatial novelty recognition and hippocampus-independent cue conditioning. Here, we propose that adult hippocampal newborn neurons increase the efficiency of generating the new representations of spatial memories and that reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be biased toward cue-based strategies. This novel mouse model provides evidences that cognitive deficits associated with ciliary defects (ciliopathies) might be, in part, mediated by the deficiency of primary cilia in adult hippocampal stem/progenitor cells. PMID:21734285

  18. Primary cilia regulate proliferation of amplifying progenitors in adult hippocampus: implications for learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Amador-Arjona, Alejandro; Elliott, Jimmy; Miller, Amber; Ginbey, Ashley; Pazour, Gregory J; Enikolopov, Grigori; Roberts, Amanda J; Terskikh, Alexey V

    2011-07-01

    Integration of new neurons into the adult hippocampus has been linked to specific types of learning. Primary cilia were found to be required for the formation of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus during development. However, the requirement of cilia in maintenance of adult NSCs is unknown. We developed a genetic mouse model in which fetal/perinatal brain development is unaffected, but adult hippocampal neurogenesis is constantly reduced by conditional ablation of primary cilia in adult GFAP(+) neural stem/progenitor cells. We found that this approach specifically reduces the number of hippocampal amplifying progenitors (also called type 2a cells) without affecting the number of radial NSCs (or type 1 cells). Constant reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis produced a delay rather than a permanent deficiency in spatial learning without affecting the retention of long-term memories. Decreased neurogenesis also altered spatial novelty recognition and hippocampus-independent cue conditioning. Here, we propose that adult hippocampal newborn neurons increase the efficiency of generating the new representations of spatial memories and that reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be biased toward cue-based strategies. This novel mouse model provides evidences that cognitive deficits associated with ciliary defects (ciliopathies) might be, in part, mediated by the deficiency of primary cilia in adult hippocampal stem/progenitor cells.

  19. Protein composition and movements of membrane swellings associated with primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Mohieldin, Ashraf M.; Haymour, Hanan S.; Lo, Shao T.; AbouAlaiwi, Wissam A.; Atkinson, Kimberly F.; Ward, Christopher J.; Gao, Min; Wessely, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of many ciliary proteins has been linked to a list of diseases, from cystic kidney to obesity and from hypertension to mental retardation. We previously proposed that primary cilia are unique communication organelles that function as microsensory compartments that house mechanosensory molecules. Here we report that primary cilia exhibit membrane swellings or ciliary bulbs, which based on their unique ultrastructure and motility, could be mechanically regulated by fluid-shear stress. Together with the ultrastructure analysis of the swelling, which contains monosialodihexosylganglioside (GM3), our results show that ciliary bulb has a distinctive set of functional proteins, including GM3 synthase (GM3S), bicaudal-c1 (Bicc1), and polycystin-2 (PC2). In fact, results from our cilia isolation demonstrated for the first time that GM3S and Bicc1 are members of the primary cilia proteins. Although these proteins are not required for ciliary membrane swelling formation under static condition, fluid-shear stress induced swelling formation is partially modulated by GM3S. We therefore propose that the ciliary bulb exhibits a sensory function within the mechano-ciliary structure. Overall, our studies provided an important step towards understanding the ciliary bulb function and structure. PMID:25650235

  20. Current topics of functional links between primary cilia and cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Ichiro; Goto, Hidemasa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Inagaki, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia, microtubule-based sensory structures, orchestrate various critical signals during development and tissue homeostasis. In view of the rising interest into the reciprocal link between ciliogenesis and cell cycle, we discuss here several recent advances to understand the molecular link between the individual step of ciliogenesis and cell cycle control. At the onset of ciliogenesis (the transition from centrosome to basal body), distal appendage proteins have been established as components indispensable for the docking of vesicles at the mother centriole. In the initial step of axonemal extension, CP110, Ofd1, and trichoplein, key negative regulators of ciliogenesis, are found to be removed by a kinase-dependent mechanism, autophagy, and ubiquitin-proteasome system, respectively. Of note, their disposal functions as a restriction point to decide that the axonemal nucleation and extension begin. In the elongation step, Nde1, a negative regulator of ciliary length, is revealed to be ubiquitylated and degraded by CDK5-SCF(Fbw7) in a cell cycle-dependent manner. With regard to ciliary length control, it has been uncovered in flagellar shortening of Chlamydomonas that cilia itself transmit a ciliary length signal to cytoplasm. At the ciliary resorption step upon cell cycle re-entry, cilia are found to be disassembled not only by Aurora A-HDAC6 pathway but also by Nek2-Kif24 and Plk1-Kif2A pathways through their microtubule-depolymerizing activity. On the other hand, it is becoming evident that the presence of primary cilia itself functions as a structural checkpoint for cell cycle re-entry. These data suggest that ciliogenesis and cell cycle intimately link each other, and further elucidation of these mechanisms will contribute to understanding the pathology of cilia-related disease including cancer and discovering targets of therapeutic interventions. PMID:26719793

  1. Depletion of primary cilia from mature dentate granule cells impairs hippocampus-dependent contextual memory

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soyoung; Kirschen, Gregory W.; Gu, Yan; Ge, Shaoyu

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium, a sensory organelle, regulates cell proliferation and neuronal development of dentate granule cells in the hippocampus. However, its role in the function of mature dentate granule cells remains unknown. Here we specifically depleted and disrupted ciliary proteins IFT20 and Kif3A (respectively) in mature dentate granule cells and investigated hippocampus-dependent contextual memory and long-term plasticity at mossy fiber synapses. We found that depletion of IFT20 in these cells significantly impaired context-dependent fear-related memory. Furthermore, we tested synaptic plasticity of mossy fiber synapses in area CA3 and found increased long-term potentiation upon depletion of IFT20 or disruption of Kif3A. Our findings suggest a role of primary cilia in the memory function of mature dentate granule cells, which may result from abnormal mossy fiber synaptic plasticity. A direct link between the primary cilia of mature dentate granule cells and behavior will require further investigation using independent approaches to manipulate primary cilia. PMID:27678193

  2. Endocytic recycling protein EHD1 regulates primary cilia morphogenesis and SHH signaling during neural tube development

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Rainey, Mark A; Arya, Priyanka; Dutta, Samikshan; George, Manju; Storck, Matthew D.; McComb, Rodney D.; Muirhead, David; Todd, Gordon L.; Gould, Karen; Datta, Kaustubh; Waes, Janee Gelineau-van; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Members of the four-member C-terminal EPS15-Homology Domain-containing (EHD) protein family play crucial roles in endocytic recycling of cell surface receptors from endosomes to the plasma membrane. In this study, we show that Ehd1 gene knockout in mice on a predominantly B6 background is embryonic lethal. Ehd1-null embryos die at mid-gestation with a failure to complete key developmental processes including neural tube closure, axial turning and patterning of the neural tube. We found that Ehd1-null embryos display short and stubby cilia on the developing neuroepithelium at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5). Loss of EHD1 also deregulates the ciliary SHH signaling with Ehd1-null embryos displaying features indicative of increased SHH signaling, including a significant downregulation in the formation of the GLI3 repressor and increase in the ventral neuronal markers specified by SHH. Using Ehd1-null MEFS we found that EHD1 protein co-localizes with the SHH receptor Smoothened in the primary cilia upon ligand stimulation. Under the same conditions, EHD1 was shown to co-traffic with Smoothened into the developing primary cilia and we identify EHD1 as a direct binding partner of Smoothened. Overall, our studies identify the endocytic recycling regulator EHD1 as a novel regulator of the primary cilium-associated trafficking of Smoothened and Hedgehog signaling. PMID:26884322

  3. Pulsed electromagnetic fields promote osteoblast mineralization and maturation needing the existence of primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Yan, Juan-Li; Zhou, Jian; Ma, Hui-Ping; Ma, Xiao-Ni; Gao, Yu-Hai; Shi, Wen-Gui; Fang, Qing-Qing; Ren, Qian; Xian, Cory J; Chen, Ke-Ming

    2015-03-15

    Although pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) have been approved as a therapy for osteoporosis, action mechanisms and optimal parameters are elusive. To determine the optimal intensity, exposure effects of 50 Hz PEMFs of 0.6-3.6 mT (0.6 interval at 90 min/day) were investigated on proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of cultured calvarial osteoblasts. All intensity groups stimulated proliferation significantly with the highest effect at 0.6 mT. The 0.6 mT group also obtained the optimal osteogenic effect as demonstrated by the highest ALP activity, ALP(+) CFU-f colony formation, nodule mineralization, and expression of COL-1 and BMP-2. To verify our hypothesis that the primary cilia are the cellular sensors for PEMFs, osteoblasts were also transfected with IFT88 siRNA or scrambled control, and osteogenesis-promoting effects of 0.6 mT PEMFs were found abrogated when primary cilia were inhibited by IFT88 siRNA. Thus primary cilia of osteoblasts play an indispensable role in mediating PEMF osteogenic effect in vitro.

  4. Primary cilia regulate Shh activity in the control of molar tooth number.

    PubMed

    Ohazama, Atsushi; Haycraft, Courtney J; Seppala, Maisa; Blackburn, James; Ghafoor, Sarah; Cobourne, Martyn; Martinelli, David C; Fan, Chen-Ming; Peterkova, Renata; Lesot, Herve; Yoder, Bradley K; Sharpe, Paul T

    2009-03-01

    Primary cilia mediate Hh signalling and mutations in their protein components affect Hh activity. We show that in mice mutant for a cilia intraflagellar transport (IFT) protein, IFT88/polaris, Shh activity is increased in the toothless diastema mesenchyme of the embryonic jaw primordia. This results in the formation of ectopic teeth in the diastema, mesial to the first molars. This phenotype is specific to loss of polaris activity in the mesenchyme since loss of Polaris in the epithelium has no detrimental affect on tooth development. To further confirm that upregulation of Shh activity is responsible for the ectopic tooth formation, we analysed mice mutant for Gas1, a Shh protein antagonist in diastema mesenchyme. Gas1 mutants also had ectopic diastema teeth and accompanying increased Shh activity. In this context, therefore, primary cilia exert a specific negative regulatory effect on Shh activity that functions to repress tooth formation and thus determine tooth number. Strikingly, the ectopic teeth adopt a size and shape characteristic of premolars, a tooth type that was lost in mice around 50-100 million years ago. PMID:19211681

  5. A Smoothened-Evc2 complex transduces the Hedgehog signal at primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Karolin V; Hughes, Casey E; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2012-10-16

    Vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is initiated at primary cilia by the ligand-triggered accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) in the ciliary membrane. The underlying biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. We find that Hh agonists promote the association between Smo and Evc2, a ciliary protein that is defective in two human ciliopathies. The formation of the Smo-Evc2 complex is under strict spatial control, being restricted to a distinct ciliary compartment, the EvC zone. Mutant Evc2 proteins that localize in cilia but are displaced from the EvC zone are dominant inhibitors of Hh signaling. Disabling Evc2 function blocks Hh signaling at a specific step between Smo and the downstream regulators protein kinase A and Suppressor of Fused, preventing activation of the Gli transcription factors. Our data suggest that the Smo-Evc2 signaling complex at the EvC zone is required for Hh signal transmission and elucidate the molecular basis of two human ciliopathies.

  6. Active stochastic stress fluctuations in the cell cytoskeleton stir the cell and activate primary cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christoph F.; Fakhri, Nikta; Battle, Christopher; Ott, Carolyn M.; Wessel, Alok D.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Mackintosh, Frederick C.

    2015-03-01

    Cells are active systems with molecular force generation that drives complex dynamics at the supramolecular scale. Much of cellular dynamics is driven by myosin motors interacting with the actin cytoskeleton. We discovered active random ``stirring'' driven by cytoplasmic myosin as an intermediate mode of transport, different from both thermal diffusion and directed motor activity. We found a further manifestation of cytoskeletal dynamics in the active motion patterns of primary cilia generated by epithelial cells. These cilia were thought to be immotile due to the absence of dynein motors, but it turns out that their anchoring deeper inside the cell in combination with the strongly fluctuating cortex results in clearly measurable non-equilibrium fluctuations.

  7. Galectin-7 modulates the length of the primary cilia and wound repair in polarized kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rondanino, Christine; Poland, Paul A; Kinlough, Carol L; Li, Hui; Rbaibi, Youssef; Myerburg, Michael M; Al-bataineh, Mohammad M; Kashlan, Ossama B; Pastor-Soler, Nuria M; Hallows, Kenneth R; Weisz, Ora A; Apodaca, Gerard; Hughey, Rebecca P

    2011-09-01

    Galectins (Gal) are β-galactoside-binding proteins that function in epithelial development and homeostasis. An overlapping role for Gal-3 and Gal-7 in wound repair was reported in stratified epithelia. Although Gal-7 was thought absent in simple epithelia, it was reported in a proteomic analysis of cilia isolated from cultured human airway, and we recently identified Gal-7 transcripts in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells (Poland PA, Rondanino C, Kinlough CL, Heimburg-Molinaro J, Arthur CM, Stowell SR, Smith DF, Hughey RP. J Biol Chem 286: 6780-6790, 2011). We now report that Gal-7 is localized exclusively on the primary cilium of MDCK, LLC-PK(1) (pig kidney), and mpkCCD(c14) (mouse kidney) cells as well as on cilia in the rat renal proximal tubule. Gal-7 is also present on most cilia of multiciliated cells in human airway epithelia primary cultures. Interestingly, exogenous glutathione S-transferase (GST)-Gal-7 bound the MDCK apical plasma membrane as well as the cilium, while the lectin Ulex europeaus agglutinin, with glycan preferences similar to Gal-7, bound the basolateral plasma membrane as well as the cilium. In pull-down assays, β1-integrin isolated from either the basolateral or apical/cilia membranes of MDCK cells was similarly bound by GST-Gal-7. Selective localization of Gal-7 to cilia despite the presence of binding sites on all cell surfaces suggests that intracellular Gal-7 is specifically delivered to cilia rather than simply binding to surface glycoconjugates after generalized secretion. Moreover, depletion of Gal-7 using tetracycline-induced short-hairpin RNA in mpkCCD(c14) cells significantly reduced cilia length and slowed wound healing in a scratch assay. We conclude that Gal-7 is selectively targeted to cilia and plays a key role in surface stabilization of glycoconjugates responsible for integrating cilia function with epithelial repair. PMID:21677144

  8. Axonemal Positioning and Orientation in 3-D Space for Primary Cilia: What is Known, What is Assumed, and What Needs Clarification

    PubMed Central

    Farnum, Cornelia E.; Wilsman, Norman J.

    2012-01-01

    Two positional characteristics of the ciliary axoneme – its location on the plasma membrane as it emerges from the cell, and its orientation in three-dimensional space – are known to be critical for optimal function of actively motile cilia (including nodal cilia), as well as for modified cilia associated with special senses. However, these positional characteristics have not been analyzed to any significant extent for primary cilia. This review briefly summarizes the history of knowledge of these two positional characteristics across a wide spectrum of cilia, emphasizing their importance for proper function. Then the review focuses what is known about these same positional characteristics for primary cilia in all major tissue types where they have been reported. The review emphasizes major areas that would be productive for future research for understanding how positioning and 3-D orientation of primary cilia may be related to their hypothesized signaling roles within different cellular populations. PMID:22012592

  9. Cell context-specific expression of primary cilia in the human testis and ciliary coordination of Hedgehog signalling in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Marie Berg; Almstrup, Kristian; Lindbæk, Louise; Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Svingen, Terje

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that coordinate numerous cellular signalling pathways during development and adulthood. Defects in ciliary assembly or function lead to a series of developmental disorders and diseases commonly referred to as ciliopathies. Still, little is known about the formation and function of primary cilia in the mammalian testis. Here, we characterized primary cilia in adult human testis and report a constitutive expression of cilia in peritubular myoid cells and a dynamic expression of cilia in differentiating Leydig cells. Primary cilia are generally absent from cells of mature seminiferous epithelium, but present in Sertoli cell-only tubules in Klinefelter syndrome testis. Peritubular cells in atrophic testis produce overly long cilia. Furthermore cultures of growth-arrested immature mouse Leydig cells express primary cilia that are enriched in components of Hedgehog signalling, including Smoothened, Patched-1, and GLI2, which are involved in regulating Leydig cell differentiation. Stimulation of Hedgehog signalling increases the localization of Smoothened to the cilium, which is followed by transactivation of the Hedgehog target genes, Gli1 and Ptch1. Our findings provide new information on the spatiotemporal formation of primary cilia in the testis and show that primary cilia in immature Leydig cells mediate Hedgehog signalling. PMID:25992706

  10. Cell context-specific expression of primary cilia in the human testis and ciliary coordination of Hedgehog signalling in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Marie Berg; Almstrup, Kristian; Lindbæk, Louise; Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Svingen, Terje

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that coordinate numerous cellular signalling pathways during development and adulthood. Defects in ciliary assembly or function lead to a series of developmental disorders and diseases commonly referred to as ciliopathies. Still, little is known about the formation and function of primary cilia in the mammalian testis. Here, we characterized primary cilia in adult human testis and report a constitutive expression of cilia in peritubular myoid cells and a dynamic expression of cilia in differentiating Leydig cells. Primary cilia are generally absent from cells of mature seminiferous epithelium, but present in Sertoli cell-only tubules in Klinefelter syndrome testis. Peritubular cells in atrophic testis produce overly long cilia. Furthermore cultures of growth-arrested immature mouse Leydig cells express primary cilia that are enriched in components of Hedgehog signalling, including Smoothened, Patched-1, and GLI2, which are involved in regulating Leydig cell differentiation. Stimulation of Hedgehog signalling increases the localization of Smoothened to the cilium, which is followed by transactivation of the Hedgehog target genes, Gli1 and Ptch1. Our findings provide new information on the spatiotemporal formation of primary cilia in the testis and show that primary cilia in immature Leydig cells mediate Hedgehog signalling.

  11. Cartilage Abnormalities Associated with Defects of Chondrocytic Primary Cilia in Bardet-Biedl Syndrome Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Anjan P.; Martin, James A.; Zhang, Qihong; Sheffield, Val C.; Morcuende, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Primary cilia are found on nearly every mammalian cell, including osteocytes, fibroblasts, and chondrocytes. However, the functions of primary cilia have not been extensively studied in these cells, particularly chondrocytes. Interestingly, defects in the primary cilium result in skeletal defects such as polydactyly in Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS), a ciliary disorder that also results in obesity, retinopathy, and cognitive impairments (1–4). Wild-type mice and mutant mice of the ciliary proteins Bbs1, Bbs2, and Bbs6 were evaluated with respect to histological and biochemical differences in chondrocytes from articular cartilage and xiphoid processes. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, chondrocytic cilia were visualized from the load-bearing joints and non-load-bearing xiphoid processes. Significant differences in ciliary morphology were not identified between mutant and wild-type mice. However, after expanding chondrocytes in cell culture and implanting them in solid agarose matrix, it was seen that the fraction of ciliated cells in cultures from mutant mice was significantly lower than in the wild-type cultures (p<.05). In addition, in Safranin-O-stained whole joint sections, Bbs mutant mice had significantly lower articular joint thickness (p<.05) and lower proteoglycan content saturation (p<.05) than wild-type mice. Moreover, there were statistically significant differences of cell distribution between Bbs mutant and wild-type mice (p<.05), indicating that mutant articular cartilage had changes consistent with early signs of osteoarthritis. These data indicate that Bbs genes and their functions in the chondrocytic primary cilium are important for normal articular cartilage maintenance. PMID:19195025

  12. Neonatal seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol or kainic acid disrupt primary cilia growth on developing mouse cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alexander K; Le, Megan M; Smith, Tyler S; Hoang-Minh, Lan B; Atkinson, Eric W; Ugartemendia, George; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Coleman, Jason E; Sarkisian, Matthew R

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal or early-life seizures (ELS) are often associated with life-long neurophysiological, cognitive and behavioral deficits, but the underlying mechanisms contributing to these deficits remain poorly understood. Newborn, post-migratory cortical neurons sprout ciliary buds (procilia) that mature into primary cilia. Disruption of the growth or signaling capabilities of these cilia has been linked to atypical neurite outgrowth from neurons and abnormalities in neuronal circuitry. Here, we tested the hypothesis that generalized seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) or kainic acid (KA) during early postnatal development impair neuronal and/or glial ciliogenesis. Mice received PTZ (50 or 100mg/kg), KA (2mg/kg), or saline either once at birth (P0), or once daily from P0 to P4. Using immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, the cilia of neurons and glia were examined at P7, P14, and P42. A total of 83 regions were analyzed, representing 13 unique neocortical and hippocampal regions. Neuronal cilia were identified by co-expression of NeuN and type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII) or somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), while glial cilia were identified by co-expression of GFAP, Arl13b, and gamma-tubulin. We found that PTZ exposure at either P0 or from P0 to P4 induced convulsive behavior, followed by acute and lasting effects on neuronal cilia lengths that varied depending on the cortical region, PTZ dose, injection frequency, and time post-PTZ. Both increases and decreases in neuronal cilia length were observed. No changes in the length of glial cilia were observed under any of the test conditions. Lastly, we found that a single KA seizure at P0 led to similar abnormalities in neuronal cilia lengths. Our results suggest that seizure(s) occurring during early stages of cortical development induce persistent and widespread changes in neuronal cilia length. Given the impact neuronal cilia have on neuronal differentiation, ELS-induced changes in ciliogenesis may

  13. Phosphorylation-dependent Akt-Inversin interaction at the basal body of primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Suizu, Futoshi; Hirata, Noriyuki; Kimura, Kohki; Edamura, Tatsuma; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ishigaki, Satoko; Donia, Thoria; Noguchi, Hiroko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Noguchi, Masayuki

    2016-06-15

    A primary cilium is a microtubule-based sensory organelle that plays an important role in human development and disease. However, regulation of Akt in cilia and its role in ciliary development has not been demonstrated. Using yeast two-hybrid screening, we demonstrate that Inversin (INVS) interacts with Akt. Mutation in the INVS gene causes nephronophthisis type II (NPHP2), an autosomal recessive chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy. Co-immunoprecipitation assays show that Akt interacts with INVS via the C-terminus. In vitro kinase assays demonstrate that Akt phosphorylates INVS at amino acids 864-866 that are required not only for Akt interaction, but also for INVS dimerization. Co-localization of INVS and phosphorylated form of Akt at the basal body is augmented by PDGF-AA Akt-null MEF cells as well as siRNA-mediated inhibition of Akt attenuated ciliary growth, which was reversed by Akt reintroduction. Mutant phosphodead- or NPHP2-related truncated INVS, which lack Akt phosphorylation sites, suppress cell growth and exhibit distorted lumen formation and misalignment of spindle axis during cell division. Further studies will be required for elucidating functional interactions of Akt-INVS at the primary cilia for identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying NPHP2. PMID:27220846

  14. Adipogenic Differentiation of hMSCs is Mediated by Recruitment of IGF‐1r Onto the Primary Cilium Associated With Cilia Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Dalbay, Melis T.; Connelly, John T.; Chapple, J. Paul; Knight, Martin M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary cilia are single non‐motile organelles that provide a highly regulated compartment into which specific proteins are trafficked as a critical part of various signaling pathways. The absence of primary cilia has been shown to prevent differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Changes in primary cilia length are crucial for regulating signaling events; however it is not known how alterations in cilia structure relate to differentiation. This study tested the hypothesis that changes in primary cilia structure are required for stem cell differentiation. hMSCs expressed primary cilia that were labeled with acetylated alpha tubulin and visualized by confocal microscopy. Chemically induced differentiation resulted in lineage specific changes in cilia length and prevalence which were independent of cell cycle. In particular, adipogenic differentiation resulted in cilia elongation associated with the presence of dexamethasone, while insulin had an inhibitory effect on cilia length. Over a 7‐day time course, adipogenic differentiation media resulted in cilia elongation within 2 days followed by increased nuclear PPARγ levels; an early marker of adipogenesis. Cilia elongation was associated with increased trafficking of insulin‐like growth factor‐1 receptor β (IGF‐1Rβ) into the cilium. This was reversed on inhibition of elongation by IFT‐88 siRNA transfection, which also decreased nuclear PPARγ. This is the first study to show that adipogenic differentiation requires primary cilia elongation associated with the recruitment of IGF‐1Rβ onto the cilium. This study may lead to the development of cilia‐targeted therapies for controlling adipogenic differentiation and associated conditions such as obesity. Stem Cells 2015;33:1952–1961 PMID:25693948

  15. Primary cilia distribution and orientation during involution of the bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Biet, J; Poole, C A; Stelwagen, K; Margerison, J K; Singh, K

    2016-05-01

    The regulation of mammary gland involution occurs through multiple levels including environmental factors, hormones, and local intramammary signals. Primary cilia (PC) are signaling organelles that sense biochemical and biophysical extracellular stimuli and are vital for cellular and tissue function. The aim of this study was to examine the distribution, incidence, and orientation of PC. Furthermore, we determined changes in expression levels of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)6 at the onset of bovine mammary gland involution. Mammary tissue was collected from pasture-fed, primiparous, nonpregnant Friesian dairy cows at mid lactation (n=5 per group) killed 6-h after milking (lactating controls) and during involution after 7 and 28 d of nonmilking (NM). Fluorescent immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy of tissue sections showed that PC were present on luminal secretory epithelial cells (SEC), myoepithelial cells (MEC), and stromal fibroblast cells (SFC). Furthermore, in all 3 experimental groups, different PC positions or orientations relative to the cell surface were identified on SEC and MEC, which projected toward the lumen and were either straight, bent, or deflected against the apical cell surface, whereas PC in SFC were confined to the interalveolar space. However, by 28-d NM, fewer PC projected into the luminal space and most appeared deflected or projected toward the interalveolar space. Furthermore, by 28-d NM, with the increase in stromal connective tissue, more PC were detected within the interalveolar and interlobular stroma. At 28-d NM, we observed a decrease in luminal cilia relative to the total number of cilia. The number of ciliated cells in the total fraction (SEC, MEC, and SFC) was the same for all 3 groups, although in the luminal fraction (SEC and MEC), PC per nuclei increased by 28-d NM relative to lactation. At all 3 stages, we detected variations in shape and orientation of PC within the same alveolus, with

  16. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: evaluation using cilia beat frequency assessment via spectral analysis of digital microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Olm, Mary A K; Kögler, João E; Macchione, Mariangela; Shoemark, Amelia; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Rodrigues, Joaquim C

    2011-07-01

    Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) measurements provide valuable information for diagnosing of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). We developed a system for measuring CBF, used it in association with electron microscopy to diagnose PCD, and then analyzed characteristics of PCD patients. The CBF measurement system was based on power spectra measured through digital imaging. Twenty-four patients suspected of having PCD (age 1-19 yr) were selected from a group of 75 children and adolescents with pneumopathies of unknown causes. Ten healthy, nonsmoking volunteers (age ≥ 17 yr) served as a control group. Nasal brush samples were collected, and CBF and electron microscopy were performed. PCD was diagnosed in 12 patients: 5 had radial spoke defects, 3 showed absent central microtubule pairs with transposition, 2 had outer dynein arm defects, 1 had a shortened outer dynein arm, and 1 had a normal ultrastructure. Previous studies have reported that the most common cilia defects are in the dynein arm. As expected, the mean CBF was higher in the control group (P < 0.001) and patients with normal ultrastructure (P < 0.002), than in those diagnosed with cilia ultrastructural defects (i.e., PCD patients). An obstructive ventilatory pattern was observed in 70% of the PCD patients who underwent pulmonary function tests. All PCD patients presented bronchial wall thickening on chest computed tomography scans. The protocol and diagnostic techniques employed allowed us to diagnose PCD in 16% of patients in this study.

  17. RTTN Mutations Link Primary Cilia Function to Organization of the Human Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kheradmand Kia, Sima; Verbeek, Elly; Engelen, Erik; Schot, Rachel; Poot, Raymond A.; de Coo, Irenaeus F.M.; Lequin, Maarten H.; Poulton, Cathryn J.; Pourfarzad, Farzin; Grosveld, Frank G.; Brehm, António; de Wit, Marie Claire Y.; Oegema, Renske; Dobyns, William B.; Verheijen, Frans W.; Mancini, Grazia M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Polymicrogyria is a malformation of the developing cerebral cortex caused by abnormal organization and characterized by many small gyri and fusion of the outer molecular layer. We have identified autosomal-recessive mutations in RTTN, encoding Rotatin, in individuals with bilateral diffuse polymicrogyria from two separate families. Rotatin determines early embryonic axial rotation, as well as anteroposterior and dorsoventral patterning in the mouse. Human Rotatin has recently been identified as a centrosome-associated protein. The Drosophila melanogaster homolog of Rotatin, Ana3, is needed for structural integrity of centrioles and basal bodies and maintenance of sensory neurons. We show that Rotatin colocalizes with the basal bodies at the primary cilium. Cultured fibroblasts from affected individuals have structural abnormalities of the cilia and exhibit downregulation of BMP4, WNT5A, and WNT2B, which are key regulators of cortical patterning and are expressed at the cortical hem, the cortex-organizing center that gives rise to Cajal-Retzius (CR) neurons. Interestingly, we have shown that in mouse embryos, Rotatin colocalizes with CR neurons at the subpial marginal zone. Knockdown experiments in human fibroblasts and neural stem cells confirm a role for RTTN in cilia structure and function. RTTN mutations therefore link aberrant ciliary function to abnormal development and organization of the cortex in human individuals. PMID:22939636

  18. Characterization of primary cilia distribution and morphology during lactation, stasis, and involution in the bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Millier, Melanie J; Singh, Kuljeet; Poole, C Anthony

    2013-12-01

    Primary cilia are small, sensory organelles projecting from virtually all cells and are vital for cellular and tissue function. Their distribution in bovine mammary tissue has not previously been assessed, despite the potential for these organelles to provide specialized perceptive and regulatory functions to this acutely responsive and adaptive gland. The research objectives were to assess ciliary distribution and morphology during active lactation, milk stasis, and early involution using tissue samples obtained following the abrupt cessation of milk removal in nonpregnant, Friesian dairy cows at mid-lactation. Routinely processed tissue sections were obtained at intervals from 6 to 192 hr after the last milking (N = 3 animals per group) and assigned to active lactation (6-12 hr), milk stasis (18-36 hr), and early involution (72-192 hr). Primary cilia were observed in luminal secretory epithelial cells (SECs), myoepithelial cells, and stromal cells following fluorescent immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. In SECs, some primary cilia appeared deflected against the apical cell membrane. The proportion of those deflected was greater during milk stasis than active lactation. Data show that primary cilia were suitably placed in three important cell types to potentially coordinate various forms of signal transduction relying on both mechanosensation and chemosensation, according to the physical and physiological state of the gland. Their cell-type distribution and morphology provide new directions in the study of mammary regulation to enhance the understanding of how various mammary-specific cellular responses may be initiated by biochemical or local biophysical factors. PMID:24155176

  19. Single-molecule imaging of Hedgehog pathway protein Smoothened in primary cilia reveals binding events regulated by Patched1

    PubMed Central

    Milenkovic, Ljiljana; Weiss, Lucien E.; Yoon, Joshua; Roth, Theodore L.; Su, YouRong S.; Sahl, Steffen J.; Scott, Matthew P.; Moerner, W. E.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of the signaling protein Smoothened (Smo) in the membrane of primary cilia is an essential step in Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction, yet the molecular mechanisms of Smo movement and localization are poorly understood. Using ultrasensitive single-molecule tracking with high spatial/temporal precision (30 nm/10 ms), we discovered that binding events disrupt the primarily diffusive movement of Smo in cilia at an array of sites near the base. The affinity of Smo for these binding sites was modulated by the Hh pathway activation state. Activation, by either a ligand or genetic loss of the negatively acting Hh receptor Patched-1 (Ptch), reduced the affinity and frequency of Smo binding at the base. Our findings quantify activation-dependent changes in Smo dynamics in cilia and highlight a previously unknown step in Hh pathway activation. PMID:26100903

  20. Orpk mouse model of polycystic kidney disease reveals essential role of primary cilia in pancreatic tissue organization.

    PubMed

    Cano, David A; Murcia, Noel S; Pazour, Gregory J; Hebrok, Matthias

    2004-07-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) includes a group of disorders that are characterized by the presence of cysts in the kidney and other organs, including the pancreas. Here we show that in orpk mice, a model system for PKD that harbors a mutation in the gene that encodes the polaris protein, pancreatic defects start to occur at the end of gestation, with an initial expansion of the developing pancreatic ducts. Ductal dilation continues rapidly after birth and results in the formation of large, interconnected cysts. Expansion of pancreatic ducts is accompanied by apoptosis of neighboring acinar cells, whereas endocrine cell differentiation and islet formation appears to be unaffected. Polaris has been shown to co-localize with primary cilia, and these structures have been implicated in the formation of renal cysts. In the orpk pancreas, cilia numbers are reduced and cilia length is decreased. Expression of polycystin-2, a protein involved in PKD, is mislocalized in orpk mice. Furthermore, the cellular localization of beta-catenin, a protein involved in cell adhesion and Wnt signaling, is altered. Thus, polaris and primary cilia function are required for the maturation and maintenance of proper tissue organization in the pancreas. PMID:15226261

  1. Primary cilia act as mechanosensors during bone healing around an implant

    PubMed Central

    Leucht, P.; Monica, S.D.; Temiyasathit, S.; Lenton, K.; Manu, A.; Longaker, M.T.; Jacobs, C.R.; Spilker, R.L.; Guo, H.; Brunski, J.B.; Helms, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The primary cilium is an organelle that senses cues in a cell’s local environment. Some of these cues constitute molecular signals; here, we investigate the extent to which primary cilia can also sense mechanical stimuli. We used a conditional approach to delete Kif3a in pre-osteoblasts and then employed a motion device that generated a spatial distribution of strain around an intra-osseous implant positioned in the mouse tibia. We correlated interfacial strain fields with cell behaviors ranging from proliferation through all stages of osteogenic differentiation. We found that peri-implant cells in the Col1Cre;Kif3afl/fl mice were unable to proliferate in response to a mechanical stimulus, failed to deposit and then orient collagen fibers to the strain fields caused by implant displacement, and failed to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the lack of a functioning primary cilium blunts the normal response of a cell to a defined mechanical stimulus. The ability to manipulate the genetic background of peri-implant cells within the context of a whole, living tissue provides a rare opportunity to explore mechanotransduction from a multi-scale perspective. PMID:22784673

  2. Characterization of phenotype markers and neuronotoxic potential of polarised primary microglia in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chhor, Vibol; Le Charpentier, Tifenn; Lebon, Sophie; Oré, Marie-Virgine; Celador, Idoia Lara; Josserand, Julien; Degos, Vincent; Jacotot, Etienne; Hagberg, Henrik; Sävman, Karin; Mallard, Carina; Gressens, Pierre; Fleiss, Bobbi

    2013-01-01

    Microglia mediate multiple facets of neuroinflammation, including cytotoxicity, repair, regeneration, and immunosuppression due to their ability to acquire diverse activation states, or phenotypes. Modulation of microglial phenotype is an appealing neurotherapeutic strategy but a comprehensive study of classical and more novel microglial phenotypic markers in vitro is lacking. The aim of this study was to outline the temporal expression of a battery of phenotype markers from polarised microglia to generate an in vitro tool for screening the immunomodulatory potential of novel compounds. We characterised expression of thirty-one macrophage/microglial phenotype markers in primary microglia over time (4, 12, 36, and 72 h), using RT-qPCR or multiplex protein assay. Firstly, we selected Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as the strongest M1–M2 polarising stimuli, from six stimuli tested. At each time point, markers useful to identify that microglia were M1 included iNOS, Cox-2 and IL-6 and a loss of M2a markers. Markers useful for quantifying M2b-immunomodulatory microglia included, increased IL-1RA and SOCS3 and for M2a-repair and regeneration, included increased arginase-1, and a loss of the M1 and M2b markers were discriminatory. Additional markers were regulated at fewer time points, but are still likely important to monitor when assessing the immunomodulatory potential of novel therapies. Further, to facilitate identification of how novel immunomodulatory treatments alter the functional affects of microglia, we characterised how the soluble products from polarised microglia affected the type and rate of neuronal death; M1/2b induced increasing and M2a-induced decreasing neuronal loss. We also assessed any effects of prior activation state, to provide a way to identify how a novel compound may alter phenotype depending on the stage of injury/insult progression. We identified generally that a prior M1/2b reduced the ability of microglia to switch to

  3. Biological and Chemical Removal of Primary Cilia Affects Mechanical Activation of Chondrogenesis Markers in Chondroprogenitors and Hypertrophic Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Deren, Matthew E.; Yang, Xu; Guan, Yingjie; Chen, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Chondroprogenitors and hypertrophic chondrocytes, which are the first and last stages of the chondrocyte differentiation process, respectively, are sensitive to mechanical signals. We hypothesize that the mechanical sensitivity of these cells depends on the cell surface primary cilia. To test this hypothesis, we removed the primary cilia by biological means with transfection with intraflagellar transport protein 88 (IFT88) siRNA or by chemical means with chloral hydrate treatment. Transfection of IFT88 siRNA significantly reduced the percentage of ciliated cells in both chondroprogenitor ATDC5 cells as well as primary hypertrophic chondrocytes. Cyclic loading (1 Hz, 10% matrix deformation) of ATDC5 cells in three-dimensional (3D) culture stimulates the mRNA levels of chondrogenesis marker Type II collagen (Col II), hypertrophic chondrocyte marker Type X collagen (Col X), and a molecular regulator of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). The reduction of ciliated chondroprogenitors abolishes mechanical stimulation of Col II, Col X, and BMP-2. In contrast, cyclic loading stimulates Col X mRNA levels in hypertrophic chondrocytes, but not those of Col II and BMP-2. Both biological and chemical reduction of ciliated hypertrophic chondrocytes reduced but failed to abolish mechanical stimulation of Col X mRNA levels. Thus, primary cilia play a major role in mechanical stimulation of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy in chondroprogenitor cells and at least a partial role in hypertrophic chondrocytes. PMID:26861287

  4. Evaluating the Role of PTH in Promotion of Chondrosarcoma Cell Proliferation and Invasion by Inhibiting Primary Cilia Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Wei; Jiang, Ting; Guo, Fengjing; Xu, Tao; Gong, Chen; Cheng, Peng; Zhao, Libo; Cheng, Weiting; Xu, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is characterized by secretion of a cartilage-like matrix, with high proliferation ability and metastatic potential. Previous studies have shown that parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has a close relationship with various tumor types. The objectives of this study were to research the function played by PTHrP in human chondrosarcoma, especially targeting cell proliferation and invasion, and to search for the potential interaction between PTHrP and primary cilia in tumorigenesis. Surgical resection tissues and the human chondrosarcoma cell line SW1353 were used in the scientific research. Cells were stimulated with an optimum concentration of recombinant PTH (1-84), and siRNA was used to interfere with internal PTHrP. Cell proliferation and invasion assays were applied, including MTS-8 cell proliferation assay, Western blot, RT-PCR, Transwell invasion assay, and immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence assays. A high level of PTHrP expression was found in human chondrosarcoma tissues, and recombinant PTH exhibited positive promotion in tumor cell proliferation and invasion. In the meantime, PTHrP could inhibit the assembly of primary cilia and regulate downstream gene expression. These findings indicate that PTHrP can regulate tumor cell proliferation and invasion ability, possibly through suppression of primary cilia assembly. Thus, restricting PTHrP over-expression is a feasible potential therapeutic method for chondrosarcoma. PMID:25365173

  5. Epithelial to Stromal Re-Distribution of Primary Cilia during Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schimmack, Simon; Kneller, Sarah; Dadabaeva, Nigora; Bergmann, Frank; Taylor, Andrew; Hackert, Thilo; Werner, Jens; Strobel, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Background The Hedgehog (HH) pathway is a mediator in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Surprisingly, previous studies suggested that primary cilia (PC), the essential organelles for HH signal transduction, were lost in PDAC. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of PC in human normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis, and during carcinogenesis to PDAC with focus on both epithelia and stroma. Methods PC were analyzed in paraffin sections from normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis, intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasia, and PDAC, as well as in primary human pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) and pancreatic cancer cell lines by double immunofluorescence staining for acetylated α-tubuline and γ-tubuline. Co-staining for the HH receptors PTCH1, PTCH2 and SMO was also performed. Results PC are gradually lost during pancreatic carcinogenesis in the epithelium: the fraction of cells with PC gradually and significantly decreased from 32% in ducts of normal pancreas, to 21% in ducts of chronic pancreatitis, to 18% in PanIN1a, 6% in PanIN2, 3% in PanIN3 and to 1.2% in invasive PDAC. However, this loss of PC in the neoplastic epithelium is accompanied by a gain of PC in the surrounding stroma. The fraction of stromal cells with PC significantly increased from 13% around normal ducts to about 30% around PanIN and PDAC. HH-receptors were detected in tumor stroma but not in epithelial cells. PC are also present in PSC and pancreatic cancer cell lines. Conclusion PC are not lost during pancreatic carcinogenesis but re-distributed from the epithelium to the stroma. This redistribution may explain the re-direction of HH signaling towards the stroma during pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:27783689

  6. Functional aspects of primary cilia in signaling, cell cycle and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunctional cilia underlie a broad range of cellular and tissue phenotypes and can eventually result in the development of ciliopathies: pathologically diverse diseases that range from clinically mild to highly complex and severe multi-organ failure syndromes incompatible with neonatal life. Given that virtually all cells of the human body have the capacity to generate cilia, it is likely that clinical manifestations attributed to ciliary dysfunction will increase in the years to come. Disputed but nevertheless enigmatic is the notion that at least a subset of tumor phenotypes fit within the ciliopathy disease spectrum and that cilia loss may be required for tumor progression. Contending for the centrosome renders ciliation and cell division mutually exclusive; a regulated tipping of balance promotes either process. The mechanisms involved, however, are complex. If the hypothesis that tumorigenesis results from dysfunctional cilia is true, then why do the classic ciliopathies only show limited hyperplasia at best? Although disassembly of the cilium is a prerequisite for cell proliferation, it does not intrinsically drive tumorigenesis per se. Alternatively, we will explore the emerging evidence suggesting that some tumors depend on ciliary signaling. After reviewing the structure, genesis and signaling of cilia, the various ciliopathy syndromes and their genetics, we discuss the current debate of tumorigenesis as a ciliopathy spectrum defect, and describe recent advances in this fascinating field. PMID:23628112

  7. Primary cilia regulate mTORC1 activity and cell size through Lkb1.

    PubMed

    Boehlke, Christopher; Kotsis, Fruzsina; Patel, Vishal; Braeg, Simone; Voelker, Henriette; Bredt, Saskia; Beyer, Theresa; Janusch, Heike; Hamann, Christoph; Gödel, Markus; Müller, Klaus; Herbst, Martin; Hornung, Miriam; Doerken, Mara; Köttgen, Michael; Nitschke, Roland; Igarashi, Peter; Walz, Gerd; Kuehn, E Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    The mTOR pathway is the central regulator of cell size. External signals from growth factors and nutrients converge on the mTORC1 multi-protein complex to modulate downstream targets, but how the different inputs are integrated and translated into specific cellular responses is incompletely understood. Deregulation of the mTOR pathway occurs in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), where cilia (filiform sensory organelles) fail to sense urine flow because of inherited mutations in ciliary proteins. We therefore investigated if cilia have a role in mTOR regulation. Here, we show that ablation of cilia in transgenic mice results in enlarged cells when compared with control animals. In vitro analysis demonstrated that bending of the cilia by flow is required for mTOR downregulation and cell-size control. Surprisingly, regulation of cell size by cilia is independent of flow-induced calcium transients, or Akt. However, the tumour-suppressor protein Lkb1 localises in the cilium, and flow results in increased AMPK phosphorylation at the basal body. Conversely, knockdown of Lkb1 prevents normal cell-size regulation under flow conditions. Our results demonstrate that the cilium regulates mTOR signalling and cell size, and identify the cilium-basal body compartment as a spatially restricted activation site for Lkb1 signalling. PMID:20972424

  8. EFCAB7 and IQCE regulate Hedgehog signaling by tethering the EVC-EVC2 complex to the base of primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Pusapati, Ganesh V.; Hughes, Casey E; Dorn, Karolin V.; Zhang, Dapeng; Sugianto, Priscilla; Aravind, L.; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway depends on primary cilia in vertebrates, but the signaling machinery within cilia remains incompletely defined. We report the identification of a complex between two ciliary proteins, EFCAB7 and IQCE, which positively regulates the Hh pathway. The EFCAB7-IQCE module anchors the EVC-EVC2 complex in a signaling microdomain at the base of cilia. EVC and EVC2 genes are mutated in Ellis van Creveld and Weyers syndromes, characterized by impaired Hh signaling in skeletal, cardiac and orofacial tissues. EFCAB7 binds to a C-terminal disordered region in EVC2 that is deleted in Weyers patients. EFCAB7 depletion mimics the Weyers cellular phenotype— the mis-localization of EVC-EVC2 within cilia and impaired activation of the transcription factor GLI2. Evolutionary analysis suggests that emergence of these complexes might have been important for adaptation of an ancient organelle, the cilium, for an animal-specific signaling network. PMID:24582806

  9. Concise Review: Primary Cilia: Control Centers for Stem Cell Lineage Specification and Potential Targets for Cell-Based Therapies.

    PubMed

    Bodle, Josephine C; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2016-06-01

    Directing stem cell lineage commitment prevails as the holy grail of translational stem cell research, particularly to those interested in the application of mesenchymal stem cells and adipose-derived stem cells in tissue engineering. However, elucidating the mechanisms underlying their phenotypic specification persists as an active area of research. In recent studies, the primary cilium structure has been intimately associated with defining cell phenotype, maintaining stemness, as well as functioning in a chemo, electro, and mechanosensory capacity in progenitor and committed cell types. Many hypothesize that the primary cilium may indeed be another important player in defining and controlling cell phenotype, concomitant with lineage-dictated cytoskeletal dynamics. Many of the studies on the primary cilium have emerged from disparate areas of biological research, and crosstalk amongst these areas of research is just beginning. To date, there has not been a thorough review of how primary cilia fit into the current paradigm of stem cell differentiation and this review aims to summarize the current cilia work in this context. The goal of this review is to highlight the cilium's function and integrate this knowledge into the working knowledge of stem cell biologists and tissue engineers developing regenerative medicine technologies. Stem Cells 2016;34:1445-1454.

  10. Efficient live fluorescence imaging of intraflagellar transport in mammalian primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2016-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is a motile process critical for building most cilia, including those of mammalian cells. Defects in IFT lead to short or missing cilia, and in animals can cause defects in development, for example in hedgehog mediated signaling, as well as disease symptoms such as polycystic kidney disease or retinal degeneration. Understanding how IFT works is thus a high priority in ciliary biology. Imaging of living cells has played a key role in understanding the mechanism of IFT, and this is particularly the case in mammalian cells where biochemical analysis of IFT is extremely difficult, due to the difficulty of isolating cilia away from the rest of the cell. Imaging IFT in living mammalian cells requires solution to several problems: constructing cell lines that express fluorescent protein tagged IFT proteins, obtaining cell populations with a high degree of ciliation, confocal or TIRF imaging with sufficient time resolution and signal to noise ratio to observe the majority of IFT particles as they travel back and forth inside the cilium, and analyzing the image data to extract quantitative measurements of IFT. We describe optimized solutions to each of these technical challenges. Using the approaches described here, mammalian cultured cells become powerful platforms for quantitative analysis of IFT dynamics. PMID:25837392

  11. Planar cell polarity effector gene Intu regulates cell fate-specific differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Dai, D; Li, L; Huebner, A; Zeng, H; Guevara, E; Claypool, D J; Liu, A; Chen, J

    2013-01-01

    Genes involved in the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway are essential for a number of developmental processes in mammals, such as convergent extension and ciliogenesis. Tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway are believed to mediate PCP signals in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. However, how PCP signaling controls the morphogenesis of mammalian tissues remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of inturned (Intu), a tissue-specific PCP effector gene, during hair follicle formation in mice. Tissue-specific disruption of Intu in embryonic epidermis resulted in hair follicle morphogenesis arrest because of the failure of follicular keratinocyte to differentiate. Targeting Intu in the epidermis resulted in almost complete loss of primary cilia in epidermal and follicular keratinocytes, and a suppressed hedgehog signaling pathway. Surprisingly, the epidermal stratification and differentiation programs and barrier function were not affected. These results demonstrate that tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway control the differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia in a cell fate- and context-dependent manner, which may be critical in orchestrating the propagation and interpretation of polarity signals established by the core PCP components. PMID:22935613

  12. Mutations in CSPP1 Cause Primary Cilia Abnormalities and Joubert Syndrome with or without Jeune Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tuz, Karina; Bachmann-Gagescu, Ruxandra; O’Day, Diana R.; Hua, Kiet; Isabella, Christine R.; Phelps, Ian G.; Stolarski, Allan E.; O’Roak, Brian J.; Dempsey, Jennifer C.; Lourenco, Charles; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Medne, Livija; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Stark, Zornitza; Leventer, Richard J.; Topçu, Meral; Cansu, Ali; Jagadeesh, Sujatha; Done, Stephen; Ishak, Gisele E.; Glass, Ian A.; Shendure, Jay; Neuhauss, Stephan C.F.; Haldeman-Englert, Chad R.; Doherty, Dan; Ferland, Russell J.

    2014-01-01

    Joubert syndrome (JBTS) is a recessive ciliopathy in which a subset of affected individuals also have the skeletal dysplasia Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD). Here, we have identified biallelic truncating CSPP1 (centrosome and spindle pole associated protein 1) mutations in 19 JBTS-affected individuals, four of whom also have features of JATD. CSPP1 mutations explain ∼5% of JBTS in our cohort, and despite truncating mutations in all affected individuals, the range of phenotypic severity is broad. Morpholino knockdown of cspp1 in zebrafish caused phenotypes reported in other zebrafish models of JBTS (curved body shape, pronephric cysts, and cerebellar abnormalities) and reduced ciliary localization of Arl13b, further supporting loss of CSPP1 function as a cause of JBTS. Fibroblasts from affected individuals with CSPP1 mutations showed reduced numbers of primary cilia and/or short primary cilia, as well as reduced axonemal localization of ciliary proteins ARL13B and adenylyl cyclase III. In summary, CSPP1 mutations are a major cause of the Joubert-Jeune phenotype in humans; however, the mechanism by which these mutations lead to both JBTS and JATD remains unknown. PMID:24360808

  13. Planar cell polarity effector gene Intu regulates cell fate-specific differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Dai, D; Li, L; Huebner, A; Zeng, H; Guevara, E; Claypool, D J; Liu, A; Chen, J

    2013-01-01

    Genes involved in the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway are essential for a number of developmental processes in mammals, such as convergent extension and ciliogenesis. Tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway are believed to mediate PCP signals in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. However, how PCP signaling controls the morphogenesis of mammalian tissues remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of inturned (Intu), a tissue-specific PCP effector gene, during hair follicle formation in mice. Tissue-specific disruption of Intu in embryonic epidermis resulted in hair follicle morphogenesis arrest because of the failure of follicular keratinocyte to differentiate. Targeting Intu in the epidermis resulted in almost complete loss of primary cilia in epidermal and follicular keratinocytes, and a suppressed hedgehog signaling pathway. Surprisingly, the epidermal stratification and differentiation programs and barrier function were not affected. These results demonstrate that tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway control the differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia in a cell fate- and context-dependent manner, which may be critical in orchestrating the propagation and interpretation of polarity signals established by the core PCP components.

  14. Cilia Dysfunction in Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Ann E.; Walters, Matthew S.; Shaykhiev, Renat; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the human airway epithelium is the presence of ciliated cells bearing motile cilia, specialized cell surface projections containing axonemes comprised of microtubules and dynein arms, which provide ATP-driven motility. In the airways, cilia function in concert with airway mucus to mediate the critical function of mucociliary clearance, cleansing the airways of inhaled particles and pathogens. The prototypical disorder of respiratory cilia is primary ciliary dyskinesia, an inherited disorder that leads to impaired mucociliary clearance, repeated chest infections, and progressive destruction of lung architecture. Numerous acquired lung diseases are also marked by abnormalities in both cilia structure and function. In this review we summarize current knowledge regarding airway ciliated cells and cilia, how they function to maintain a healthy epithelium, and how disorders of cilia structure and function contribute to inherited and acquired lung disease. PMID:25386990

  15. PTEN regulates cilia through Dishevelled

    PubMed Central

    Shnitsar, Iryna; Bashkurov, Mikhail; Masson, Glenn R.; Ogunjimi, Abiodun A.; Mosessian, Sherly; Cabeza, Eduardo Aguiar; Hirsch, Calley L.; Trcka, Daniel; Gish, Gerald; Jiao, Jing; Wu, Hong; Winklbauer, Rudolf; Williams, Roger L.; Pelletier, Laurence; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Barrios-Rodiles, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are hair-like cellular protrusions important in many aspects of eukaryotic biology. For instance, motile cilia enable fluid movement over epithelial surfaces, while primary (sensory) cilia play roles in cellular signalling. The molecular events underlying cilia dynamics, and particularly their disassembly, are not well understood. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) is an extensively studied tumour suppressor, thought to primarily act by antagonizing PI3-kinase signalling. Here we demonstrate that PTEN plays an important role in multicilia formation and cilia disassembly by controlling the phosphorylation of Dishevelled (DVL), another ciliogenesis regulator. DVL is a central component of WNT signalling that plays a role during convergent extension movements, which we show here are also regulated by PTEN. Our studies identify a novel protein substrate for PTEN that couples PTEN to regulation of cilia dynamics and WNT signalling, thus advancing our understanding of potential underlying molecular etiologies of PTEN-related pathologies. PMID:26399523

  16. Over-expression of Plk4 induces centrosome amplification, loss of primary cilia and associated tissue hyperplasia in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paula A; Bury, Leah; Shahbazi, Marta N; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Tate, Peri H; Wormald, Sam; Hindley, Christopher J; Huch, Meritxell; Archer, Joy; Skarnes, William C; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Glover, David M

    2015-12-01

    To address the long-known relationship between supernumerary centrosomes and cancer, we have generated a transgenic mouse that permits inducible expression of the master regulator of centriole duplication, Polo-like-kinase-4 (Plk4). Over-expression of Plk4 from this transgene advances the onset of tumour formation that occurs in the absence of the tumour suppressor p53. Plk4 over-expression also leads to hyperproliferation of cells in the pancreas and skin that is enhanced in a p53 null background. Pancreatic islets become enlarged following Plk4 over-expression as a result of equal expansion of α- and β-cells, which exhibit centrosome amplification. Mice overexpressing Plk4 develop grey hair due to a loss of differentiated melanocytes and bald patches of skin associated with a thickening of the epidermis. This reflects an increase in proliferating cells expressing keratin 5 in the basal epidermal layer and the expansion of these cells into suprabasal layers. Such cells also express keratin 6, a marker for hyperplasia. This is paralleled by a decreased expression of later differentiation markers, involucrin, filaggrin and loricrin. Proliferating cells showed an increase in centrosome number and a loss of primary cilia, events that were mirrored in primary cultures of keratinocytes established from these animals. We discuss how repeated duplication of centrioles appears to prevent the formation of basal bodies leading to loss of primary cilia, disruption of signalling and thereby aberrant differentiation of cells within the epidermis. The absence of p53 permits cells with increased centrosomes to continue dividing, thus setting up a neoplastic state of error prone mitoses, a prerequisite for cancer development. PMID:26701933

  17. Over-expression of Plk4 induces centrosome amplification, loss of primary cilia and associated tissue hyperplasia in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Paula A.; Bury, Leah; Shahbazi, Marta N.; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Tate, Peri H.; Wormald, Sam; Hindley, Christopher J.; Huch, Meritxell; Archer, Joy; Skarnes, William C.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Glover, David M.

    2015-01-01

    To address the long-known relationship between supernumerary centrosomes and cancer, we have generated a transgenic mouse that permits inducible expression of the master regulator of centriole duplication, Polo-like-kinase-4 (Plk4). Over-expression of Plk4 from this transgene advances the onset of tumour formation that occurs in the absence of the tumour suppressor p53. Plk4 over-expression also leads to hyperproliferation of cells in the pancreas and skin that is enhanced in a p53 null background. Pancreatic islets become enlarged following Plk4 over-expression as a result of equal expansion of α- and β-cells, which exhibit centrosome amplification. Mice overexpressing Plk4 develop grey hair due to a loss of differentiated melanocytes and bald patches of skin associated with a thickening of the epidermis. This reflects an increase in proliferating cells expressing keratin 5 in the basal epidermal layer and the expansion of these cells into suprabasal layers. Such cells also express keratin 6, a marker for hyperplasia. This is paralleled by a decreased expression of later differentiation markers, involucrin, filaggrin and loricrin. Proliferating cells showed an increase in centrosome number and a loss of primary cilia, events that were mirrored in primary cultures of keratinocytes established from these animals. We discuss how repeated duplication of centrioles appears to prevent the formation of basal bodies leading to loss of primary cilia, disruption of signalling and thereby aberrant differentiation of cells within the epidermis. The absence of p53 permits cells with increased centrosomes to continue dividing, thus setting up a neoplastic state of error prone mitoses, a prerequisite for cancer development. PMID:26701933

  18. Electron microscopy of flagella, primary cilia, and intraflagellar transport in flat-embedded cells.

    PubMed

    Rogowski, Michaela; Scholz, Dirk; Geimer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is an evolutionarily highly conserved, microtubule-based, bidirectional transport system found in eukaryotic cilia/flagella and is indispensable for their assembly, maintenance, and sensory functions. Powered by two different motor complexes, linear arrays of protein particles, called IFT trains, are transported from the base to the tip of the cilium/flagellum and back, carrying axonemal precursors to the tip for assembly and turnover products back to the cell body for recycling. The dynamics of IFT can be visualized using various types of live-cell microscopy techniques, but for analyzing the ultrastructure of IFT trains, transmission electron microscopy is indispensable. The focus of this chapter is to describe the application of the flat embedding technique to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and monolayers of mammalian culture cells. Such flat embeddings are well suited for the analysis of the ultrastructure of the IFT system by standard electron microscopy and electron tomography.

  19. The role of primary cilia in corpus callosum formation is mediated by production of the Gli3 repressor.

    PubMed

    Laclef, Christine; Anselme, Isabelle; Besse, Laurianne; Catala, Martin; Palmyre, Aurélien; Baas, Dominique; Paschaki, Marie; Pedraza, Maria; Métin, Christine; Durand, Bénédicte; Schneider-Maunoury, Sylvie

    2015-09-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC) is a frequent brain disorder found in over 80 human congenital syndromes including ciliopathies. Here, we report a severe AgCC in Ftm/Rpgrip1l knockout mouse, which provides a valuable model for Meckel-Grüber syndrome. Rpgrip1l encodes a protein of the ciliary transition zone, which is essential for ciliogenesis in several cell types in mouse including neuroepithelial cells in the developing forebrain. We show that AgCC in Rpgrip1l(-/-) mouse is associated with a disturbed location of guidepost cells in the dorsomedial telencephalon. This mislocalization results from early patterning defects and abnormal cortico-septal boundary (CSB) formation in the medial telencephalon. We demonstrate that all these defects primarily result from altered GLI3 processing. Indeed, AgCC, together with patterning defects and mispositioning of guidepost cells, is rescued by overexpressing in Rpgrip1l(-/-) embryos, the short repressor form of the GLI3 transcription factor (GLI3R), provided by the Gli3(Δ699) allele. Furthermore, Gli3(Δ699) also rescues AgCC in Rfx3(-/-) embryos deficient for the ciliogenic RFX3 transcription factor that regulates the expression of several ciliary genes. These data demonstrate that GLI3 processing is a major outcome of primary cilia function in dorsal telencephalon morphogenesis. Rescuing CC formation in two independent ciliary mutants by GLI3(Δ699) highlights the crucial role of primary cilia in maintaining the proper level of GLI3R required for morphogenesis of the CC.

  20. Cilia and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jason M.; Witman, George B.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, cilia have moved from relative obscurity to a position of importance for understanding multiple complex human diseases. Now termed the ciliopathies, these diseases inflict devastating effects on millions of people worldwide. In this review, written primarily for teachers and students who may not yet be aware of the recent exciting developments in this field, we provide a general overview of our current understanding of cilia and human disease. We start with an introduction to cilia structure and assembly and indicate where they are found in the human body. We then discuss the clinical features of selected ciliopathies, with an emphasis on primary ciliary dyskinesia, polycystic kidney disease, and retinal degeneration. The history of ciliopathy research involves a fascinating interplay between basic and clinical sciences, highlighted in a timeline. Finally, we summarize the relative strengths of individual model organisms for ciliopathy research; many of these are suitable for classroom use. PMID:25960570

  1. Revealing the Molecular Structure and the Transport Mechanism at the Base of Primary Cilia Using Superresolution STED Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tung-Lin

    The primary cilium is an organelle that serves as a signaling center of the cell and is involved in the hedgehog signaling, cAMP pathway, Wnt pathways, etc. Ciliary function relies on the transportation of molecules between the primary cilium and the cell, which is facilitated by intraflagellar transport (IFT). IFT88, one of the important IFT proteins in complex B, is known to play a role in the formation and maintenance of cilia in various types of organisms. The ciliary transition zone (TZ), which is part of the gating apparatus at the ciliary base, is home to a large number of ciliopathy molecules. Recent studies have identified important regulating elements for TZ gating in cilia. However, the architecture of the TZ region and its arrangement relative to intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins remain largely unknown, hindering the mechanistic understanding of the regulation processes. One of the major challenges comes from the tiny volume at the ciliary base packed with numerous proteins, with the diameter of the TZ close to the diffraction limit of conventional microscopes. Using a series of stimulated emission depletion (STED) superresolution images mapped to electron microscopy images, we analyzed the structural organization of the ciliary base. Subdiffraction imaging of TZ components defines novel geometric distributions of RPGRIP1L, MKS1, CEP290, TCTN2 and TMEM67, shedding light on their roles in TZ structure, assembly, and function. We found TCTN2 at the outmost periphery of the TZ close to the ciliary membrane, with a 227+/-18 nm diameter. TMEM67 was adjacent to TCTN2, with a 205+/-20 nm diameter. RPGRIP1L was localized toward the axoneme at the same axial level as TCTN2 and TMEM67, with a 165+/-8 nm diameter. MKS1 was situated between TMEM67 and RPGRIP1L, with an 186+/-21 nm diameter. Surprisingly, CEP290 was localized at the proximal side of the TZ close to the distal end of the centrin-labeled basal body. The lateral width was unexpectedly close to

  2. Reduction of oxidative stress during recovery accelerates normalization of primary cilia length that is altered after ischemic injury in murine kidneys.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee In; Kim, Jinu; Jang, Hee-Seong; Noh, Mi Ra; Lipschutz, Joshua H; Park, Kwon Moo

    2013-05-15

    The primary cilium is a microtubule-based nonmotile organelle that extends from the surface of cells, including renal tubular cells. Here, we investigated the alteration of primary cilium length during epithelial cell injury and repair, following ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) insult, and the role of reactive oxygen species in this alteration. Thirty minutes of bilateral renal ischemia induced severe renal tubular cell damage and an increase of plasma creatinine (PCr) concentration. Between 8 and 16 days following the ischemia, the increased PCr returned to normal range, although without complete histological restoration. Compared with the primary cilium length in normal kidney tubule cells, the length was shortened 4 h and 1 day following ischemia, increased over normal 8 days after ischemia, and then returned to near normal 16 days following ischemia. In the urine of I/R-subjected mice, acetylated tubulin was detected. The cilium length of proliferating cells was shorter than that in nonproliferating cells. Mature cells had shorter cilia than differentiating cells. Treatment with Mn(III) tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin (MnTMPyP), an antioxidant, during the recovery of damaged kidneys accelerated normalization of cilia length concomitant with a decrease of oxidative stress and morphological recovery in the kidney. In the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, H(2)O(2) treatment caused released ciliary fragment into medium, and MnTMPyP inhibited the deciliation. The ERK inhibitor U0126 inhibited elongation of cilia in normal and MDCK cells recovering from H(2)O(2) stress. Taken together, our results suggest that primary cilia length reflects cell proliferation and the length of primary cilium is regulated, at least, in part, by reactive oxygen species through ERK.

  3. Sensory cilia in arthropods.

    PubMed

    Keil, Thomas A

    2012-11-01

    In arthropods, the modified primary cilium is a structure common to all peripheral sensory neurons other than photoreceptors. Since its first description in 1958, it has been investigated in great detail in numerous sense organs (sensilla) of many insect species by means of electron microscopy and electrophysiology. The perfection of molecular biological methods has led to an enormous advance in our knowledge about development and function of sensory cilia in the fruitfly since the end of the last century. The cilia show a wealth of adaptations according to their different physiological roles: chemoreception, mechanoreception, hygroreception, and thermoreception. Divergent types of receptors and channels have evolved fulfilling these tasks. The number of olfactory receptor genes can be close to 300 in ants, whereas in crickets slightest mechanical stimuli are detected by the interaction of extremely sophisticated biomechanical devices with mechanosensory cilia. Despite their enormous morphological and physiological divergence, sensilla and sensory cilia develop according to a stereotyped pattern. Intraflagellar transport genes have been found to be decisive for proper development and function.

  4. Morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus in human primary nasal ciliated epithelial cells occurs at surface membrane microdomains that are distinct from cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Jumat, Muhammad Raihan; Yan, Yan; Ravi, Laxmi Iyer; Wong, Puisan; Huong, Tra Nguyen; Li, Chunwei; Tan, Boon Huan; Wang, De Yun; Sugrue, Richard J.

    2015-10-15

    The distribution of cilia and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein, fusion (F) protein, attachment (G) protein, and M2-1 protein in human ciliated nasal epithelial cells was examined at between 1 and 5 days post-infection (dpi). All virus structural proteins were localized at cell surface projections that were distinct from cilia. The F protein was also trafficked into the cilia, and while its presence increased as the infection proceeded, the N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time of infection. The presence of the F protein in the cilia correlated with cellular changes in the cilia and reduced cilia function. At 5 dpi extensive cilia loss and further reduced cilia function was noted. These data suggested that although RSV morphogenesis occurs at non-cilia locations on ciliated nasal epithelial cells, RSV infection induces changes in the cilia body that leads to extensive cilia loss. - Highlights: • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects nasal ciliated epithelial cells. • Virus morphogenesis occurs within filamentous projections distinct from cilia. • The RSV N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time during infection. • Trafficking of the F protein into the cilia occurred early in infection. • Presence of the F protein in cilia correlated with impaired cilia function.

  5. The role of primary cilia in the development and disease of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Wheway, Gabrielle; Parry, David A; Johnson, Colin A

    2014-01-01

    The normal development and function of photoreceptors is essential for eye health and visual acuity in vertebrates. Mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in photoreceptor development and function are associated with a suite of inherited retinal dystrophies, often as part of complex multi-organ syndromic conditions. In this review, we focus on the role of the photoreceptor outer segment, a highly modified and specialized primary cilium, in retinal health and disease. We discuss the many defects in the structure and function of the photoreceptor primary cilium that can cause a class of inherited conditions known as ciliopathies, often characterized by retinal dystrophy and degeneration, and highlight the recent insights into disease mechanisms. PMID:24162842

  6. The role for HNF-1beta-targeted collectrin in maintenance of primary cilia and cell polarity in collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanling; Wada, Jun; Yasuhara, Akihiro; Iseda, Izumi; Eguchi, Jun; Fukui, Kenji; Yang, Qin; Yamagata, Kazuya; Hiesberger, Thomas; Igarashi, Peter; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Haiyan; Akagi, Shigeru; Kanwar, Yashpal S; Makino, Hirofumi

    2007-01-01

    Collectrin, a homologue of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), is a type I transmembrane protein, and we originally reported its localization to the cytoplasm and apical membrane of collecting duct cells. Recently, two independent studies of targeted disruption of collectrin in mice resulted in severe and general defects in renal amino acid uptake. Collectrin has been reported to be under the transcriptional regulation by HNF-1alpha, which is exclusively expressed in proximal tubules and localized at the luminal side of brush border membranes. The deficiency of collectrin was associated with reduction of multiple amino acid transporters on luminal membranes. In the current study, we describe that collectrin is a target of HNF-1beta and heavily expressed in the primary cilium of renal collecting duct cells. Collectrin is also localized in the vesicles near the peri-basal body region and binds to gamma-actin-myosin II-A, SNARE, and polycystin-2-polaris complexes, and all of these are involved in intracellular and ciliary movement of vesicles and membrane proteins. Treatment of mIMCD3 cells with collectrin siRNA resulted in defective cilium formation, increased cell proliferation and apoptosis, and disappearance of polycystin-2 in the primary cilium. Suppression of collectrin mRNA in metanephric culture resulted in the formation of multiple longitudinal cysts in ureteric bud branches. Taken together, the cystic change and formation of defective cilium with the interference in the collectrin functions would suggest that it is necessary for recycling of the primary cilia-specific membrane proteins, the maintenance of the primary cilia and cell polarity of collecting duct cells. The transcriptional hierarchy between HNF-1beta and PKD (polycystic kidney disease) genes expressed in the primary cilia of collecting duct cells has been suggested, and collectrin is one of such HNF-1beta regulated genes. PMID:17476336

  7. Multiple cilia suppress tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Primary cilia are cellular structures that have important functions in development and disease. The suppression of multiciliate differentiation of choroid plexus precursors, and maintenance of a single primary cilium by Notch1, is now shown to be involved in choroid plexus tumour formation. PMID:27027488

  8. Cilia and coordination of signaling networks during heart development

    PubMed Central

    Koefoed, Karen; Veland, Iben Rønn; Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Larsen, Lars Allan; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are unique sensory organelles that coordinate a wide variety of different signaling pathways to control cellular processes during development and in tissue homeostasis. Defects in function or assembly of these antenna-like structures are therefore associated with a broad range of developmental disorders and diseases called ciliopathies. Recent studies have indicated a major role of different populations of cilia, including nodal and cardiac primary cilia, in coordinating heart development, and defects in these cilia are associated with congenital heart disease. Here, we present an overview of the role of nodal and cardiac primary cilia in heart development. PMID:24345806

  9. Sensory roles of neuronal cilia: cilia development, morphogenesis, and function in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Kyung; Barr, Maureen M

    2008-01-01

    In the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, cilia are found on the dendritic endings of sensory neurons. C. elegans cilia are classified as 'primary' or 'sensory' according to the '9+0' axonemal ultrastructure (nine doublet outer microtubules with no central microtubule pair) and lack of motility, characteristics of '9+2' cilia. The C. elegans ciliated nervous system allows the animal to perceive environmental stimuli and make appropriate developmental, physiological, and behavioral decisions. In vertebrates, the biological significance of primary cilia had been largely neglected. Recent findings have placed primary/sensory cilia in the center of cellular signaling and developmental processes. Studies using genetic model organisms such as C. elegans identified the link between ciliary dysfunction and human ciliopathies. Future studies in the worm will address important basic questions regarding ciliary development, morphogenesis, specialization, and signaling functions. PMID:18508635

  10. Cilia organize ependymal planar polarity

    PubMed Central

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Han, Young-Goo; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Multi-ciliated epithelial cells, called ependymal cells, line the ventricles in the adult brain. Most ependymal cells are born prenatally and are derived from radial glia. Ependymal cells have a remarkable planar polarization that determines orientation of ciliary beating and propulsion of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Disruption of ependymal ciliary beating, by injury or disease, results in aberrant CSF circulation and hydrocephalus, a common disorder of the central nervous system. Very little is known about the mechanisms guiding ependymal planar polarity and whether this organization is acquired during ependymal cell development or is already present in radial glia. Here we show that basal bodies in ependymal cells in the lateral ventricle walls of adult mice are polarized in two ways: i) rotational; angle of individual basal bodies with respect to their long axis and ii) translational; the position of basal bodies on the apical surface of the cell. Conditional ablation of motile cilia disrupted rotational orientation, but translational polarity was largely preserved. In contrast, translational polarity was dramatically affected when radial glial primary cilia were ablated earlier in development. Remarkably, radial glia in the embryo have a translational polarity that predicts the orientation of mature ependymal cells. These results suggest that ependymal planar cell polarity is a multi-step process initially organized by primary cilia in radial glia and then refined by motile cilia in ependymal cells. PMID:20164345

  11. Myosin heavy chain 10 (MYH10) is required for centriole migration during the biogenesis of primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyowon; Kim, Jongshin; Kim, Joon

    2015-05-22

    The actin cytoskeleton has been implicated in the assembly of cilia, but roles of actin-dependent motor proteins in ciliogenesis remain unclear. Myosin heavy chain 10 (MYH10), one of the isoforms of non-muscle myosin II, is known to mediate centrosome reorientation during cell migration. Here we show that MYH10 is required for centriole migration to the apical plasma membrane, which occurs at the onset of ciliogenesis. Knockdown of MYH10 in RPE1 cells caused a reduction in the levels of cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) and its binding protein EZRIN. Moreover, both centriole migration and subsequent cilium assembly were defective in MYH10 depleted cells. We further found that MYH10 influences centrosomal recruitment of IFT88, which is required for the transport of building blocks to the ciliary tip. The role of MYH10 in IFT88 recruitment appears to be indirect in that there is a correlation between centriolar IFT88 levels and centriolar positions along the apical-basal axis during ciliogenesis. Our results indicate that MYH10 contributes to ciliogenesis in RPE1 cells by promoting cortical actin-dependent centriole migration.

  12. STUDIES ON CILIA

    PubMed Central

    Satir, Peter

    1963-01-01

    Upon excision into spring water, the lateral cilia of the gill of the freshwater mussel Elliptio complanatus (Solander) stop beating, but 0.04 M potassium ion can activate the gill so that these cilia again beat with metachronal rhythm. One per cent osmium tetroxide quickly pipetted onto a fully activated gill fixes the lateral cilia in a pattern that preserves the form and arrangement of the metachronal wave, and permits the cilia to be studied with the electron microscope in all stages of their beat cycle. Changes are seen in the fixed active preparation that are not present in the inactive control, i.e., in the packing of the cilia, the position of the axis of the ciliary cross-section, and the diameter of the ring of peripheral filaments. Analysis of these parameters may lead to new correlations between ciliary fine structure and function. PMID:14079494

  13. KIF3A binds to β-arrestin for suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signalling independently of primary cilia in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsuh; Suh, Young-Ah; Oh, Ju-Hee; Lee, Bo Ra; Kim, Joon; Jang, Se Jin

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signalling is implicated in the progression of several human cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, mutations in Wnt/β-catenin pathway components are uncommon in NSCLC, and their epigenetic control remains unclear. Here, we show that KIF3A, a member of the kinesin-2 family, plays a role in suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signalling in NSCLC cells. KIF3A knockdown increases both β-catenin levels and transcriptional activity with concomitant promotion of malignant potential, such as increased proliferation and migration and upregulation of stemness markers. Because KIF3A binds β-arrestin, KIF3A depletion allows β-arrestin to form a complex with DVL2 and axin, stabilizing β-catenin. Although primary cilia, whose biogenesis requires KIF3A, are thought to restrain the Wnt response, pharmacological inhibition of ciliogenesis failed to increase β-catenin activity in NSCLC cells. A correlation between KIF3A loss and a poorer NSCLC prognosis as well as β-catenin and cyclin D1 upregulation further suggests that KIF3A suppresses Wnt/β-catenin signalling and tumourigenesis in NSCLC. PMID:27596264

  14. KIF3A binds to β-arrestin for suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signalling independently of primary cilia in lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minsuh; Suh, Young-Ah; Oh, Ju-Hee; Lee, Bo Ra; Kim, Joon; Jang, Se Jin

    2016-09-01

    Aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signalling is implicated in the progression of several human cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, mutations in Wnt/β-catenin pathway components are uncommon in NSCLC, and their epigenetic control remains unclear. Here, we show that KIF3A, a member of the kinesin-2 family, plays a role in suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signalling in NSCLC cells. KIF3A knockdown increases both β-catenin levels and transcriptional activity with concomitant promotion of malignant potential, such as increased proliferation and migration and upregulation of stemness markers. Because KIF3A binds β-arrestin, KIF3A depletion allows β-arrestin to form a complex with DVL2 and axin, stabilizing β-catenin. Although primary cilia, whose biogenesis requires KIF3A, are thought to restrain the Wnt response, pharmacological inhibition of ciliogenesis failed to increase β-catenin activity in NSCLC cells. A correlation between KIF3A loss and a poorer NSCLC prognosis as well as β-catenin and cyclin D1 upregulation further suggests that KIF3A suppresses Wnt/β-catenin signalling and tumourigenesis in NSCLC.

  15. KIF3A binds to β-arrestin for suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signalling independently of primary cilia in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsuh; Suh, Young-Ah; Oh, Ju-Hee; Lee, Bo Ra; Kim, Joon; Jang, Se Jin

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signalling is implicated in the progression of several human cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, mutations in Wnt/β-catenin pathway components are uncommon in NSCLC, and their epigenetic control remains unclear. Here, we show that KIF3A, a member of the kinesin-2 family, plays a role in suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signalling in NSCLC cells. KIF3A knockdown increases both β-catenin levels and transcriptional activity with concomitant promotion of malignant potential, such as increased proliferation and migration and upregulation of stemness markers. Because KIF3A binds β-arrestin, KIF3A depletion allows β-arrestin to form a complex with DVL2 and axin, stabilizing β-catenin. Although primary cilia, whose biogenesis requires KIF3A, are thought to restrain the Wnt response, pharmacological inhibition of ciliogenesis failed to increase β-catenin activity in NSCLC cells. A correlation between KIF3A loss and a poorer NSCLC prognosis as well as β-catenin and cyclin D1 upregulation further suggests that KIF3A suppresses Wnt/β-catenin signalling and tumourigenesis in NSCLC. PMID:27596264

  16. Addressing polarisation in science.

    PubMed

    Earp, Brian D

    2015-09-01

    Ploug and Holm argue that polarisation in scientific communities can generate conflicts of interest for individual researchers. Their proposed solution to this problem is that authors should self-report whether they are polarised on conflict of interest disclosure forms. I argue that this is unlikely to work. This is because any author with the self-awareness and integrity to identify herself as polarised would be unlikely to conduct polarised research to begin with. Instead, I suggest that it is the role of (associate-level) editors of journals to detect and report on polarisation. One consequence of this view is that they need to be sufficiently familiar with the field of research they are evaluating to know whether polarisation is at stake.

  17. Mutations in CEP78 Cause Cone-Rod Dystrophy and Hearing Loss Associated with Primary-Cilia Defects.

    PubMed

    Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Farinelli, Pietro; Giangreco, Basilio; Tsika, Chrysanthi; Royer-Bertrand, Beryl; Mbefo, Martial K; Bedoni, Nicola; Kjellström, Ulrika; El Zaoui, Ikram; Di Gioia, Silvio Alessandro; Balzano, Sara; Cisarova, Katarina; Messina, Andrea; Decembrini, Sarah; Plainis, Sotiris; Blazaki, Styliani V; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Micheal, Shazia; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius; Moulin, Alexandre P; Cremers, Frans P M; Roepman, Ronald; Arsenijevic, Yvan; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K; Andréasson, Sten; Rivolta, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Cone-rod degeneration (CRD) belongs to the disease spectrum of retinal degenerations, a group of hereditary disorders characterized by an extreme clinical and genetic heterogeneity. It mainly differentiates from other retinal dystrophies, and in particular from the more frequent disease retinitis pigmentosa, because cone photoreceptors degenerate at a higher rate than rod photoreceptors, causing severe deficiency of central vision. After exome analysis of a cohort of individuals with CRD, we identified biallelic mutations in the orphan gene CEP78 in three subjects from two families: one from Greece and another from Sweden. The Greek subject, from the island of Crete, was homozygous for the c.499+1G>T (IVS3+1G>T) mutation in intron 3. The Swedish subjects, two siblings, were compound heterozygotes for the nearby mutation c.499+5G>A (IVS3+5G>A) and for the frameshift-causing variant c.633delC (p.Trp212Glyfs(∗)18). In addition to CRD, these three individuals had hearing loss or hearing deficit. Immunostaining highlighted the presence of CEP78 in the inner segments of retinal photoreceptors, predominantly of cones, and at the base of the primary cilium of fibroblasts. Interaction studies also showed that CEP78 binds to FAM161A, another ciliary protein associated with retinal degeneration. Finally, analysis of skin fibroblasts derived from affected individuals revealed abnormal ciliary morphology, as compared to that of control cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that mutations in CEP78 cause a previously undescribed clinical entity of a ciliary nature characterized by blindness and deafness but clearly distinct from Usher syndrome, a condition for which visual impairment is due to retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:27588451

  18. Making sense of cilia and flagella

    PubMed Central

    Sloboda, Roger D.; Rosenbaum, Joel L.

    2007-01-01

    Data reported at an international meeting on the sensory and motile functions of cilia, including the primary cilium found on most cells in the human body, have thrust this organelle to the forefront of studies on the cell biology of human disease. PMID:18025299

  19. Cilia and Polycystic Kidney Disease, Kith and Kin

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liwei; Lipschutz, Joshua H.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, cilia have been found to play important roles in renal cystogenesis. Many genes, such as PKD1 and PKD2 which, when mutated, cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), have been found to localize to primary cilia. The cilium functions as a sensor to transmit extracellular signals into the cell. Abnormal cilia structure and function are associated with the development of polyscystic kidney disease (PKD). Cilia assembly includes centriole migration to the apical surface of the cell, ciliary vesicle docking and fusion with the cell membrane at the intended site of cilium outgrowth, and microtubule growth from the basal body. This review summarizes the most recent advances in cilia and PKD research, with special emphasis on the mechanisms of cytoplasmic and intraciliary protein transport during ciliogenesis. PMID:24898006

  20. Cilia and polycystic kidney disease, kith and kin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liwei; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2014-06-01

    In the past decade, cilia have been found to play important roles in renal cystogenesis. Many genes, such as PKD1 and PKD2 which, when mutated, cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), have been found to localize to primary cilia. The cilium functions as a sensor to transmit extracellular signals into the cell. Abnormal cilia structure and function are associated with the development of polyscystic kidney disease (PKD). Cilia assembly includes centriole migration to the apical surface of the cell, ciliary vesicle docking and fusion with the cell membrane at the intended site of cilium outgrowth, and microtubule growth from the basal body. This review summarizes the most recent advances in cilia and PKD research, with special emphasis on the mechanisms of cytoplasmic and intraciliary protein transport during ciliogenesis.

  1. Cilia involvement in patterning and maintenance of the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Haycraft, Courtney J; Serra, Rosa

    2008-01-01

    Although the expression of cilia on chondrocytes was described over 40 years ago, the importance of this organelle in skeletal development and maintenance has only recently been recognized. Primary cilia are found on most mammalian cells and have been shown to play a role in chemosensation and mechanosensation. A growing number of human pleiotropic syndromes have been shown to be associated with ciliary or basal body dysfunction. Skeletal phenotypes, including alterations in limb patterning, endochondral bone formation, craniofacial development, and dentition, have been described in several of these syndromes. Additional insights into the potential roles and mechanisms of cilia action in the mammalian skeleton have been provided by research in model organisms including mouse and zebrafish. In this article we describe what is currently known about the localization of cilia in the skeleton as well as the roles and underlying molecular mechanisms of cilia in skeletal development. PMID:19147010

  2. Putative roles of cilia in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Winyard, Paul; Jenkins, Dagan

    2011-10-01

    The last 10 years has witnessed an explosion in research into roles of cilia in cystic renal disease. Cilia are membrane-enclosed finger-like projections from the cell, usually on the apical surface or facing into a lumen, duct or airway. Ten years ago, the major recognised functions related to classical "9+2" cilia in the respiratory and reproductive tracts, where co-ordinated beating clears secretions and assists fertilisation respectively. Primary cilia, which have a "9+0" arrangement lacking the central microtubules, were anatomical curiosities but several lines of evidence have implicated them in both true polycystic kidney disease and other cystic renal conditions: ranging from the homology between Caenorhabditis elegans proteins expressed on sensory cilia to mammalian polycystic kidney disease (PKD) 1 and 2 proteins, through the discovery that orpk cystic mice have structurally abnormal cilia to numerous recent studies wherein expression of nearly all cyst-associated proteins has been reported in the cilia or its basal body. Functional studies implicate primary cilia in mechanosensation, photoreception and chemosensation but it is the first of these which appears most important in polycystic kidney disease: in the simplest model, fluid flow across the apical surface of renal cells bends the cilia and induces calcium influx, and this is perturbed in polycystic kidney disease. Downstream effects include changes in cell differentiation and polarity. Pathways such as hedgehog and Wnt signalling may also be regulated by cilia. These data support important roles for cilia in the pathogenesis of cystic kidney diseases but one must not forget that the classic polycystic kidney disease proteins are expressed in several other locations where they may have equally important roles, such as in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, whilst it is not just aberrant cilia signalling that can lead to de-differentiation, loss of polarity and other characteristic features of

  3. Autophagy and regulation of cilia function and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Orhon, I; Dupont, N; Pampliega, O; Cuervo, A M; Codogno, P

    2015-01-01

    Motile and primary cilia (PC) are microtubule-based structures located at the cell surface of many cell types. Cilia govern cellular functions ranging from motility to integration of mechanical and chemical signaling from the environment. Recent studies highlight the interplay between cilia and autophagy, a conserved cellular process responsible for intracellular degradation. Signaling from the PC recruits the autophagic machinery to trigger autophagosome formation. Conversely, autophagy regulates ciliogenesis by controlling the levels of ciliary proteins. The cross talk between autophagy and ciliated structures is a novel aspect of cell biology with major implications in development, physiology and human pathologies related to defects in cilium function. PMID:25361082

  4. In vivo investigation of cilia structure and function using Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Eric R.; Wallingford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are key organelles in development and homeostasis. The ever-expanding complement of cilia associated proteins necessitates rapid and tractable models for in vivo functional investigation. Xenopus laevis provides an attractive model for such studies, having multiple ciliated populations, including primary and multiciliated tissues. The rapid external development of Xenopus and the large cells make it an especially excellent platform for imaging studies. Here we present embryological and cell-biological methods for the investigation of cilia structure and function in Xenopus laevis, with a focus on quantitative live and fixed imaging. PMID:25837389

  5. Cilia/Ift protein and motor-related bone diseases and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential cellular organelles projecting from the cell surface to sense and transduce developmental signaling. They are tiny but have complicated structures containing microtubule (MT)-based internal structures (the axoneme) and mother centriole formed basal body. Intraflagellar transport (Ift) operated by Ift proteins and motors are indispensable for cilia formation and function. Mutations in Ift proteins or Ift motors cause various human diseases, some of which have severe bone defects. Over the last few decades, major advances have occurred in understanding the roles of these proteins and cilia in bone development and remodeling by examining cilia/Ift protein-related human diseases and establishing mouse transgenic models. In this review, we describe current advances in the understanding of the cilia/Ift structure and function. We further summarize cilia/Ift-related human diseases and current mouse models with an emphasis on bone-related phenotypes, cilia morphology, and signaling pathways. PMID:25553465

  6. Cilia/Ift protein and motor -related bone diseases and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential cellular organelles projecting from the cell surface to sense and transduce developmental signaling. They are tiny but have complicated structures containing microtubule (MT)-based internal structures (the axoneme) and mother centriole formed basal body. Intraflagellar transport (Ift) operated by Ift proteins and motors are indispensable for cilia formation and function. Mutations in Ift proteins or Ift motors cause various human diseases, some of which have severe bone defects. Over the last few decades, major advances have occurred in understanding the roles of these proteins and cilia in bone development and remodeling by examining cilia/Ift protein-related human diseases and establishing mouse transgenic models. In this review, we describe current advances in the understanding of the cilia/Ift structure and function. We further summarize cilia/Ift-related human diseases and current mouse models with an emphasis on bone-related phenotypes, cilia morphology, and signaling pathways.

  7. Polarised light sheet tomography.

    PubMed

    Reidt, Sascha L; O'Brien, Daniel J; Wood, Kenneth; MacDonald, Michael P

    2016-05-16

    The various benefits of light sheet microscopy have made it a widely used modality for capturing three-dimensional images. It is mostly used for fluorescence imaging, but recently another technique called light sheet tomography solely relying on scattering was presented. The method was successfully applied to imaging of plant roots in transparent soil, but is limited when it comes to more turbid samples. This study presents a polarised light sheet tomography system and its advantages when imaging in highly scattering turbid media. The experimental configuration is guided by Monte Carlo radiation transfer methods, which model the propagation of a polarised light sheet in the sample. Images of both reflecting and absorbing phantoms in a complex collagenous matrix were acquired, and the results for different polarisation configurations are compared. Focus scanning methods were then used to reduce noise and produce three-dimensional reconstructions of absorbing targets.

  8. Polarised light sheet tomography.

    PubMed

    Reidt, Sascha L; O'Brien, Daniel J; Wood, Kenneth; MacDonald, Michael P

    2016-05-16

    The various benefits of light sheet microscopy have made it a widely used modality for capturing three-dimensional images. It is mostly used for fluorescence imaging, but recently another technique called light sheet tomography solely relying on scattering was presented. The method was successfully applied to imaging of plant roots in transparent soil, but is limited when it comes to more turbid samples. This study presents a polarised light sheet tomography system and its advantages when imaging in highly scattering turbid media. The experimental configuration is guided by Monte Carlo radiation transfer methods, which model the propagation of a polarised light sheet in the sample. Images of both reflecting and absorbing phantoms in a complex collagenous matrix were acquired, and the results for different polarisation configurations are compared. Focus scanning methods were then used to reduce noise and produce three-dimensional reconstructions of absorbing targets. PMID:27409945

  9. Reduction of the immunostainable length of the hippocampal dentate granule cells' primary cilia in 3xAD-transgenic mice producing human A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Gaudet, Chantal; Menard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Atkinson, Trevor; LaFerla, Frank M.; Ito, Shingo; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Pra, Ilaria; Whitfield, James

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} and tau-induced neurofibrillary tangles play a key role in Alzheimer's disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}{sub 1-42} and mutant tau protein together reduce the primary cilium length. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This shortening likely reduces cilium-dependent neurogenesis and memory function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This provides a model of an A{beta}/tau targeting of a neuronal signaling organelle. -- Abstract: The hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of the two sites of continuous neurogenesis in adult rodents and humans. Virtually all dentate granule cells have a single immobile cilium with a microtubule spine or axoneme covered with a specialized cell membrane loaded with receptors such as the somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}). The signals from these receptors have been reported to stimulate neuroprogenitor proliferation and the post-mitotic maturation of newborn granule cells into functioning granule cells. We have found that in 6-24-months-old triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice (3xTg-AD) producing both A{beta}{sub 1-42} and the mutant human tau protein tau{sub P301L,} the dentate granule cells still had immunostainable SSTR3- and p75{sup NTR}-bearing cilia but they were only half the length of the immunostained cilia in the corresponding wild-type mice. However, the immunostainable length of the granule cell cilia was not reduced either in 2xTg-AD mice accumulating large amounts of A{beta}{sub 1-42} or in mice accumulating only a mutant human tau protein. Thus it appears that a combination of A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau protein accumulation affects the levels of functionally important receptors in 3xTg-AD mice. These observations raise the important possibility that structural and functional changes in granule cell cilia might have a role in AD.

  10. Polarisation properties of pulsars at optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, Roberto; Marelli, Martino; Shearer, Andrew; Slowikowska, Agnieszka

    2016-07-01

    Polarisation measurements of pulsars offer unique insights into their highly-magnetised relativistic environments and represent a primary test for neutron star magnetosphere models and radiation emission mechanisms. Besides the radio band, optical observations have been, so far, best suited to these goals, with polarisation measurements in the X-rays becoming possible in the near future thanks to missions, such as XIPE and IXPE. In this talk, we review the status of the optical polarisation measurements of pulsars and we foresee possible synergies between X-ray polarimetry observations of selected pulsars with, e.g XIPE and IXPE, and optical observations with the next generation of extremely large telescope, such as the E-ELT.

  11. 1001 model organisms to study cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Vincensini, Laetitia; Blisnick, Thierry; Bastin, Philippe

    2011-03-01

    Most mammalian cell types have the potential to assemble at least one cilium. Immotile cilia participate in numerous sensing processes, while motile cilia are involved in cell motility and movement of extracellular fluid. The functional importance of cilia and flagella is highlighted by the growing list of diseases due to cilia defects. These ciliopathies are marked by an amazing diversity of clinical manifestations and an often complex genetic aetiology. To understand these pathologies, a precise comprehension of the biology of cilia and flagella is required. These organelles are remarkably well conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution. In this review, we describe the strengths of various model organisms to decipher diverse aspects of cilia and flagella biology: molecular composition, mode of assembly, sensing and motility mechanisms and functions. Pioneering studies carried out in the green alga Chlamydomonas established the link between cilia and several genetic diseases. Moreover, multicellular organisms such as mouse, zebrafish, Xenopus, Caenorhabditis elegans or Drosophila, and protists such as Paramecium, Tetrahymena and Trypanosoma or Leishmania each bring specific advantages to the study of cilium biology. For example, the function of genes involved in primary ciliary dyskinesia (due to defects in ciliary motility) can be efficiently assessed in trypanosomes.

  12. Undulipodia, flagella and cilia.

    PubMed

    Margulis, L

    1980-01-01

    The term flagella is ambiguous. It refers to bacterial structures composed of flagellin protein and to eukaryotic structures composed of microtubule proteins and ATPase (tubulin and dynein). The fact that cilia are nearly identical to eukaryotic flagella and have nothing in common with prokaryotic flagella is not apparent from the terminology. It is proposed that the 30-year old suggestion of Smagina and reiterated by Kuznicki and others, be adopted: that cilia and eukaryotic flagella be called "undulipodia." The term flagella ought to be restricted to prokaryotic organelles, bacterial flagella and spirochaete axial filaments: solid structures composed of flagellin which protrude through the plasma membrane and lack intrinsic motility throughout their length. Undulipodia are defined as intrinsically motile intracellular structures showing a 9-fold symmetry in the pattern of arrangement of 24 nm diameter microtubules. They are limited to eukaryotes, members of the protoctist, animal and plant kingdoms.

  13. What makes cilia beat?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangani, Ashok; Foster, Kenneth

    2014-11-01

    There have been numerous attempts at understanding the mechanism responsible for producing steady beat in cilia that propel eukaryotic cells. The core structure of a cilium, known as the axoneme, consists of nine microtubules doublet surrounding a central pair of microtubules. The dynein motors on the doublets generate active shear forces that are responsible for relative sliding and bending of the cilium. Several theories have been put forward over the last sixty years but none are supported through a careful analysis of the ciliary beating. We have combined the methods of slender body theory and multipole expansions - both developed by Professor Acrivos and his students - to analyze in detail the hydrodynamics of ciliary beating in ten different cases. The analysis is used to infer the internal dynamics of cilia and, in particular, the active forces generated by the dynein motors along the length of cilia. We find that the properties of the axoneme vary along the length of a cilium. In the central region, the active forces generated are primarily dependent on the rate of sliding of the microtubules. This region therefore appears to be optimized to propagate a wave down the length of the cilium. The proximal region near the cell body appears more complex and may be suitable for creating waves. These conclusions from the hydrodynamic analysis are consistent with a recent study that reports different structures of the axoneme in these two regions. The detailed comparison with various theories of axoneme dynamics/collective behavior of molecular motors show that none of the existing theories are adequate for predicting the correct active moments generated so that the mechanism for ciliary beating still remains unresolved.

  14. The ciliary Evc/Evc2 complex interacts with Smo and controls Hedgehog pathway activity in chondrocytes by regulating Sufu/Gli3 dissociation and Gli3 trafficking in primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Caparrós-Martín, Jose A; Valencia, María; Reytor, Edel; Pacheco, María; Fernandez, Margarita; Perez-Aytes, Antonio; Gean, Esther; Lapunzina, Pablo; Peters, Heiko; Goodship, Judith A; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is involved in patterning and morphogenesis of most organs in the developing mammalian embryo. Despite many advances in understanding core components of the pathway, little is known about how the activity of the Hh pathway is adjusted in organ- and tissue-specific developmental processes. Mutations in EVC or EVC2 disrupt Hh signaling in tooth and bone development. Using mouse models, we show here that Evc and Evc2 are mutually required for localizing to primary cilia and also for maintaining their normal protein levels. Consistent with Evc and Evc2 functioning as a complex, the skeletal phenotypes in either single or double homozygous mutant mice are virtually indistinguishable. Smo translocation to the cilium was normal in Evc2-deficient chondrocytes following Hh activation with the Smo-agonist SAG. However, Gli3 recruitment to cilia tips was reduced and Sufu/Gli3 dissociation was impaired. Interestingly, we found Smo to co-precipitate with Evc/Evc2, indicating that in some cells Hh signaling requires direct interaction of Smo with the Evc/Evc2 complex. Expression of a dominantly acting Evc2 mutation previously identified in Weyer's acrodental dysostosis (Evc2Δ43) caused mislocalization of Evc/Evc2Δ43 within the cilium and also reproduced the Gli3-related molecular defects observed in Evc2(-/-) chondrocytes. Moreover, Evc silencing in Sufu(-/-) cells attenuated the output of the Hh pathway, suggesting that Evc/Evc2 also promote Hh signaling in the absence of Sufu. Together our data reveal that the Hh pathway involves Evc/Evc2-dependent modulations that are necessary for normal endochondral bone formation.

  15. Self-eating to remove cilia roadblock.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zaiming; Zhu, Muyuan; Zhong, Qing

    2014-02-01

    Autophagy delivers many proteins and cellular components to the lysosome for degradation via selective or nonselective mechanisms. By controlling the stability of defined protein factors, autophagy might regulate cellular processes in a precise and finely-tuned manner. In this study, we demonstrated that autophagy positively regulates the biogenesis of the primary cilium, an antenna-like organelle that senses the environment and transduces signals. Defects in the function or structure of cilia cause a number of human diseases called "ciliopathies." We found that the autophagosome membrane anchored protein LC3 interacts with OFD1 (oral-facial-digital syndrome 1) and removes it from the centriolar satellite upon serum starvation to initiate primary cilium biogenesis. OFD1 regulation and primary cilium formation are defective in autophagy-deficient cells, and reducing OFD1 protein levels through RNA interference rescues primary cilium formation. More strikingly, knockdown of OFD1 induces primary cilium formation in unstressed cells as well as in a human breast cancer cell that was previously reported to have lost the ability to form primary cilia. These findings therefore suggest an unexpected link among autophagy, ciliogenesis, ciliopathy, and cancers. PMID:24343661

  16. Recruitment of β-Arrestin into Neuronal Cilia Modulates Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 3 Ciliary Localization

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jill A.; Schmid, Cullen L.; Bley, Elizabeth; Monsma, Paula C.; Brown, Anthony; Bohn, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential sensory and signaling organelles present on nearly every mammalian cell type. Defects in primary cilia underlie a class of human diseases collectively termed ciliopathies. Primary cilia are restricted subcellular compartments, and specialized mechanisms coordinate the localization of proteins to cilia. Moreover, trafficking of proteins into and out of cilia is required for proper ciliary function, and this process is disrupted in ciliopathies. The somatostatin receptor subtype 3 (Sstr3) is selectively targeted to primary cilia on neurons in the mammalian brain and is implicated in learning and memory. Here, we show that Sstr3 localization to cilia is dynamic and decreases in response to somatostatin treatment. We further show that somatostatin treatment stimulates β-arrestin recruitment into Sstr3-positive cilia and this recruitment can be blocked by mutations in Sstr3 that impact agonist binding or phosphorylation. Importantly, somatostatin treatment fails to decrease Sstr3 ciliary localization in neurons lacking β-arrestin 2. Together, our results implicate β-arrestin in the modulation of Sstr3 ciliary localization and further suggest a role for β-arrestin in the mediation of Sstr3 ciliary signaling. PMID:26503786

  17. Cyclic GMP and Cilia Motility

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia of the lungs respond to environmental challenges by increasing their ciliary beat frequency in order to enhance mucociliary clearance as a fundamental tenant of innate defense. One important second messenger in transducing the regulable nature of motile cilia is cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP). In this review, the history of cGMP action is presented and a survey of the existing data addressing cGMP action in ciliary motility is presented. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated regulation of cGMP in ciliated cells is presented in the context of alcohol-induced cilia function and dysfunction. PMID:26264028

  18. Antennas of organ morphogenesis: the roles of cilia in vertebrate kidney development.

    PubMed

    Marra, Amanda N; Li, Yue; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-09-01

    Cilia arose early during eukaryotic evolution, and their structural components are highly conserved from the simplest protists to complex metazoan species. In recent years, the role of cilia in the ontogeny of vertebrate organs has received increasing attention due to a staggering correlation between human disease and dysfunctional cilia. In particular, the presence of cilia in both the developing and mature kidney has become a deep area of research due to ciliopathies common to the kidney, such as polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Interestingly, mutations in genes encoding proteins that localize to the cilia cause similar cystic phenotypes in kidneys of various vertebrates, suggesting an essential role for cilia in kidney organogenesis and homeostasis as well. Importantly, the genes so far identified in kidney disease have conserved functions across species, whose kidneys include both primary and motile cilia. Here, we aim to provide a comprehensive description of cilia and their role in kidney development, as well as highlight the usefulness of the zebrafish embryonic kidney as a model to further understand the function of cilia in kidney health. PMID:27389733

  19. Antennas of organ morphogenesis: the roles of cilia in vertebrate kidney development

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Amanda N.; Li, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cilia arose early during eukaryotic evolution, and their structural components are highly conserved from the simplest protists to complex metazoan species. In recent years, the role of cilia in the ontogeny of vertebrate organs has received increasing attention due to a staggering correlation between human disease and dysfunctional cilia. In particular, the presence of cilia in both the developing and mature kidney has become a deep area of research due to ciliopathies common to the kidney, such as polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Interestingly, mutations in genes encoding proteins that localize to the cilia cause similar cystic phenotypes in kidneys of various vertebrates, suggesting an essential role for cilia in kidney organogenesis and homeostasis as well. Importantly, the genes so far identified in kidney disease have conserved functions across species, whose kidneys include both primary and motile cilia. Here, we aim to provide a comprehensive description of cilia and their role in kidney development, as well as highlight the usefulness of the zebrafish embryonic kidney as a model to further understand the function of cilia in kidney health. PMID:27389733

  20. Antennas of organ morphogenesis: the roles of cilia in vertebrate kidney development.

    PubMed

    Marra, Amanda N; Li, Yue; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2016-09-01

    Cilia arose early during eukaryotic evolution, and their structural components are highly conserved from the simplest protists to complex metazoan species. In recent years, the role of cilia in the ontogeny of vertebrate organs has received increasing attention due to a staggering correlation between human disease and dysfunctional cilia. In particular, the presence of cilia in both the developing and mature kidney has become a deep area of research due to ciliopathies common to the kidney, such as polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Interestingly, mutations in genes encoding proteins that localize to the cilia cause similar cystic phenotypes in kidneys of various vertebrates, suggesting an essential role for cilia in kidney organogenesis and homeostasis as well. Importantly, the genes so far identified in kidney disease have conserved functions across species, whose kidneys include both primary and motile cilia. Here, we aim to provide a comprehensive description of cilia and their role in kidney development, as well as highlight the usefulness of the zebrafish embryonic kidney as a model to further understand the function of cilia in kidney health.

  1. Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase and Somatostatin Receptor 3 Expression Persists in Aged Rat Neocortical and Hippocampal Neuronal Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Guadiana, Sarah M.; Parker, Alexander K.; Filho, Gileno F.; Sequeira, Ashton; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Shaw, Gerry; Mandel, Ronald J.; Foster, Thomas C.; Kumar, Ashok; Sarkisian, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilia of forebrain neurons assemble around birth and become enriched with neuromodulatory receptors. Our understanding of the permanence of these structures and their associated signaling pathways in the aging brain is poor, but they are worthy of investigation because disruptions in neuronal cilia signaling have been implicated in changes in learning and memory, depression-like symptoms, and sleep anomalies. Here, we asked whether neurons in aged forebrain retain primary cilia and whether the staining characteristics of aged cilia for type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and pericentrin resemble those of cilia in younger forebrain. To test this, we analyzed immunostained sections of forebrain tissues taken from young and aged male Fischer 344 (F344) and F344 × Brown Norway (F344 × BN) rats. Analyses of ACIII and SSTR3 in young and aged cortices of both strains of rats revealed that the staining patterns in the neocortex and hippocampus were comparable. Virtually every NeuN positive cell examined possessed an ACIII positive cilium. The lengths of ACIII positive cilia in neocortex were similar between young and aged for both strains, whereas in F344 × BN hippocampus, the cilia lengths increased with age in CA1 and CA3, but not in dentate gyrus (DG). Additionally, the percentages of ACIII positive cilia that were also SSTR3 positive did not differ between young and aged tissues in either strain. We also found that pericentrin, a protein that localizes to the basal bodies of neuronal cilia and functions in primary cilia assembly, persisted in aged cortical neurons of both rat strains. Collectively, our data show that neurons in aged rat forebrain possess primary cilia and that these cilia, like those present in younger brain, continue to localize ACIII, SSTR3, and pericentrin. Further studies will be required to determine if the function and signaling pathways regulated by cilia are similar in aged compared to young brain

  2. Hadron Contribution to Vacuum Polarisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davier, M.; Hoecker, A.; Malaescu, B.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-10-01

    Precision tests of the Standard Theory require theoretical predictions taking into account higher-order quantum corrections. Among these vacuum polarisation plays a predominant role. Vacuum polarisation originates from creation and annihilation of virtual particle-antiparticle states. Leptonic vacuum polarisation can be computed from quantum electrodynamics. Hadronic vacuum polarisation cannot because of the non-perturbative nature of QCD at low energy. The problem is remedied by establishing dispersion relations involving experimental data on the cross section for e+ e- annihilation into hadrons. This chapter sets the theoretical and experimental scene and reviews the progress achieved in the last decades thanks to more precise and complete data sets. Among the various applications of hadronic vacuum polarisation calculations, two are emphasised: the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the running of the fine structure constant α to the Z mass scale. They are fundamental ingredients to high precision tests of the Standard Theory.

  3. Evaluating efficiency and robustness in cilia design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanliang; Kanso, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Motile cilia are used by many eukaryotic cells to transport flow. Cilia-driven flows are important to many physiological functions, yet a deep understanding of the interplay between the mechanical structure of cilia and their physiological functions in healthy and diseased conditions remains elusive. To develop such an understanding, one needs a quantitative framework to assess cilia performance and robustness when subject to perturbations in the cilia apparatus. Here we link cilia design (beating patterns) to function (flow transport) in the context of experimentally and theoretically derived cilia models. We particularly examine the optimality and robustness of cilia design. Optimality refers to efficiency of flow transport, while robustness is defined as low sensitivity to variations in the design parameters. We find that suboptimal designs can be more robust than optimal ones. That is, designing for the most efficient cilium does not guarantee robustness. These findings have significant implications on the understanding of cilia design in artificial and biological systems.

  4. Evaluating efficiency and robustness in cilia design.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hanliang; Kanso, Eva

    2016-03-01

    Motile cilia are used by many eukaryotic cells to transport flow. Cilia-driven flows are important to many physiological functions, yet a deep understanding of the interplay between the mechanical structure of cilia and their physiological functions in healthy and diseased conditions remains elusive. To develop such an understanding, one needs a quantitative framework to assess cilia performance and robustness when subject to perturbations in the cilia apparatus. Here we link cilia design (beating patterns) to function (flow transport) in the context of experimentally and theoretically derived cilia models. We particularly examine the optimality and robustness of cilia design. Optimality refers to efficiency of flow transport, while robustness is defined as low sensitivity to variations in the design parameters. We find that suboptimal designs can be more robust than optimal ones. That is, designing for the most efficient cilium does not guarantee robustness. These findings have significant implications on the understanding of cilia design in artificial and biological systems. PMID:27078459

  5. Role of cilia in normal pancreas function and in diseased states.

    PubMed

    diIorio, Philip; Rittenhouse, Ann R; Bortell, Rita; Jurczyk, Agata

    2014-06-01

    Primary cilia play an essential role in modulating signaling cascades that shape cellular responses to environmental cues to maintain proper tissue development. Mutations in primary cilium proteins have been linked to several rare developmental disorders, collectively known as ciliopathies. Together with other disorders associated with dysfunctional cilia/centrosomes, affected individuals have increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome, neurologic disorders, and diabetes. In pancreatic tissues, cilia are found exclusively in islet and ductal cells where they play an essential role in pancreatic tissue organization. Their absence or disorganization leads to pancreatic duct abnormalities, acinar cell loss, polarity defects, and dysregulated insulin secretion. Cilia in pancreatic tissues are hubs for cellular signaling. Many signaling components, such as Hh, Notch, and Wnt, localize to pancreatic primary cilia and are necessary for proper development of pancreatic epithelium and β-cell morphogenesis. Receptors for neuroendocrine hormones, such as Somatostatin Receptor 3, also localize to the cilium and may play a more direct role in controlling insulin secretion due to somatostatin's inhibitory function. Finally, unique calcium signaling, which is at the heart of β-cell function, also occurs in primary cilia. Whereas voltage-gated calcium channels trigger insulin secretion and serve a variety of homeostatic functions in β-cells, transient receptor potential channels regulate calcium levels within the cilium that may serve as a feedback mechanism, regulating insulin secretion. This review article summarizes our current understanding of the role of primary cilia in normal pancreas function and in the diseased state. PMID:24861006

  6. Polarisation of Planets and Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Jeremy; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna; Bott, Kimberly; Cotton, Daniel V.

    2015-11-01

    We present observations of the linear polarisation of several hot Jupiter systems with our new high-precision polarimeter HIPPI (HIgh Precision Polarimetric Instrument). By looking at the combined light of the star and planet we aim to detect the polarised light reflected from the planet's atmosphere. This can provide information on the presence of, and nature of clouds in the atmosphere, and constrain the geometric albedo of the planet. The method is applicable to both transitting and non-transitting planets, and can also be used to determine the inclination of the system, and thus the true mass for radial velocity detected planets.To predict and interpret the polarisation from such observations, we have also developed an advanced polarimetric modelling capability, by incoroporating full polarised radiative transfer into our atmospheric modelling code VSTAR. This is done using the VLIDORT vector radiative transfer solver (Spurr, 2006). The resulting code allows us to predict disc-resolved, phase-resolved, and spectrally-resolved intensity and linear polarisation for any planet, exoplanet, brown dwarf or cool star atmosphere that can be modelled with VSTAR. We have tested the code by reproducing benchmark calculations in polarised radiative transfer, and by Solar System test cases, including reproducing the classic Hansen and Hovenier (1974) calculation of the polarisation phase curves of Venus.Hansen, J.E., & Hovenier, J.W., 1974, J. Atmos. Sci., 31, 1137Spurr, R., 2006, JQSRT, 102, 316.

  7. Self-assembled artificial cilia

    PubMed Central

    Vilfan, Mojca; Potočnik, Anton; Kavčič, Blaž; Osterman, Natan; Poberaj, Igor; Vilfan, Andrej; Babič, Dušan

    2010-01-01

    Due to their small dimensions, microfluidic devices operate in the low Reynolds number regime. In this case, the hydrodynamics is governed by the viscosity rather than inertia and special elements have to be introduced into the system for mixing and pumping of fluids. Here we report on the realization of an effective pumping device that mimics a ciliated surface and imitates its motion to generate fluid flow. The artificial biomimetic cilia are constructed as long chains of spherical superparamagnetic particles, which self-assemble in an external magnetic field. Magnetic field is also used to actuate the cilia in a simple nonreciprocal manner, resulting in a fluid flow. We prove the concept by measuring the velocity of a cilia-pumped fluid as a function of height above the ciliated surface and investigate the influence of the beating asymmetry on the pumping performance. A numerical simulation was carried out that successfully reproduced the experimentally obtained data. PMID:19934055

  8. Type 3 adenylyl cyclase: a key enzyme mediating the cAMP signaling in neuronal cilia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Liyan; LeBel, Robert P; Storm, Daniel R; Chen, Xuanmao

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are rigid, centriole-derived, microtubule-based organelles present in a majority of vertebrate cells including neurons. They are considered the cellular “antennae” attuned for detecting a range of extracellular signals including photons, odorants, morphogens, hormones and mechanical forces. The ciliary microenvironment is distinct from most actin-based subcellular structures such as microvilli or synapses. In the nervous system, there is no evidence that neuronal cilia process any synaptic structure. Apparently, the structural features of neuronal cilia do not allow them to harbor any synaptic connections. Nevertheless, a large number of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) including odorant receptors, rhodopsin, Smoothened, and type 6 serotonin receptor are found in cilia, suggesting that these tiny processes largely depend on metabotropic receptors and their tuned signals to impact neuronal functions. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3), widely known as a cilia marker, is highly and predominantly expressed in olfactory sensory cilia and primary cilia throughout the brain. We discovered that ablation of AC3 in mice leads to pleiotropic phenotypes including anosmia, failure to detect mechanical stimulation of airflow, cognitive deficit, obesity, and depression-like behaviors. Multiple lines of human genetic evidence also demonstrate that AC3 is associated with obesity, major depressive disorder (MDD), sarcoidosis, and infertility, underscoring its functional importance. Here we review recent progress on AC3, a key enzyme mediating the cAMP signaling in neuronal cilia. PMID:27785336

  9. Polarised neutron scattering from dynamic polarised targets in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knop, W.; Hirai, M.; Olah, G.; Meerwinck, W.; Schink, H.-J.; Stuhrman, H. B.; Wagner, R.; Wenkow-EsSouni, M.; Zhao, J.; Schärpf, O.; Crichton, R. R.; Krumpolc, M.; Nierhaus, K. H.; Niinikoski, T. O.; Rijllart, A.

    1991-10-01

    The contrast giving rise to neutron small-angle scattering can be enhanced considerably by polarisation of the hydrogen nuclei [J. des Coizeaux and G. Jannink, Les Polymères en Solution, Les Editions de Physique, F-91944 Les Ulis, France (1987)]. Using polarised neutrons the scattering from protonated labels in a deuterated matrix will increase by an order of magnitude. This is the basis of nuclear spin contrast variation, a method which is of particular interest for the in situ structure determination of macromolecular components. A new polarised target for neutron scattering has been designed by CERN and tested successfully at FRG-1 of the GKSS research centre. For the purpose of thermal-neutron scattering the frozen solutions of biomolecules are immersed in liquid helium 4, which is thermally coupled to the cooling mixture of helium 3/helium 4 of the dilution refrigerator. The nuclear spins are aligned with respect to the external magnetic field-parallel or antiparallel-by dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP). The gain in neutron scattering compared to earlier experiments using direct cooling of the sample by helium 3 is a factor of 30. Another factor of 30 arises from the installation of the cold source and the beryllium reflector in FRG-1 [W. Knop et al., J. Appl. Cryst. 22 (1989) 352]. Pure nuclear spin targets are produced from dynamic polarised targets by selective depolarisation. In biological material only the hydrogen isotopes contribute significantly to polarised neutron scattering. Thus, saturation of the proton NMR yields a deuteron target, provided the target material has been enriched by the latter isotope. A proton target is obtained from the dynamic polarised target by saturation of deuteron NMR. This leads to six additional scattering functions reflecting the proton and deuteron spin densities and the correlations between the polarised isotopes. Polarised neutron scattering from nuclear spin targets of apoferritin and various derivatives of the

  10. [The importance of model organisms to study cilia and flagella biology].

    PubMed

    Vincensini, Laetitia; Blisnick, Thierry; Bastin, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are ubiquitous organelles that protrude from the surfaces of many cells, and whose architecture is highly conserved from protists to humans. These complex organelles, composed of over 500 proteins, can be either immotile or motile. They are involved in a myriad of biological processes, including sensing (non-motile cilia) and/or cell motility or movement of extracellular fluids (motile cilia). The ever-expanding list of human diseases linked to defective cilia illustrates the functional importance of cilia and flagella. These ciliopathies are characterised by an impressive diversity of symptoms and an often complex genetic etiology. A precise knowledge of cilia and flagella biology is thus critical to better understand these pathologies. However, multi-ciliated cells are terminally differentiated and difficult to manipulate, and a primary cilium is assembled only when the cell exits from the cell cycle. In this context the use of model organisms, that relies on the high degree of structural but also of molecular conservation of these organelles across evolution, is instrumental to decipher the many facets of cilia and flagella biology. In this review, we highlight the specific strengths of the main model organisms to investigate the molecular composition, mode of assembly, sensing and motility mechanisms and functions of cilia and flagella. Pioneering studies carried out in the green alga Chlamydomonas established the link between cilia and several genetic diseases. Moreover, multicellular organisms such as mouse, zebrafish, Xenopus, C. elegans or Drosophila, and protists like Paramecium, Tetrahymena and Trypanosoma or Leishmania each bring specific advantages to the study of cilium biology. For example, the function of genes involved in primary ciliary dyskinesia (due to defects in ciliary motility) can be efficiently assessed in trypanosomes.

  11. On lower bounds for polarisability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, H. E.; Pupyshev, V. I.

    2013-09-01

    The response of molecular systems to external fields was one of the first areas studied after development of the new quantum mechanics. Early work by Kirkwood and Buckingham developed polarisability lower bounds that are still used today. This work uses an inequality proposed by Linderberg to develop a treatment of polarisability lower bounds that unifies the work of Kirkwood and Buckingham with Hylleraas' variational perturbation theory. In particular, the prehistory of the works of Kirkwood and Buckingham is described. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the convergence of approximate wavefunctions in the confined atom problem. The applicability of dimensional scaling and its utility in the analysis of confined systems are also discussed.

  12. Polarisation reflectometry of anisotropic optical fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinov, Yurii A; Kryukov, Igor' I; Pervadchuk, Vladimir P; Toroshin, Andrei Yu

    2009-11-30

    Anisotropic, polarisation-maintaining fibres have been studied using a reflectometer and integrated optic polariser. Linearly polarised pulses were launched into the fibre under test at different angles between their plane of polarisation and the main optical axis of the fibre. A special procedure for the correlation analysis of these reflectograms is developed to enhance the reliability of the information about the longitudinal optical uniformity of anisotropic fibres. (optical fibres and fibreoptic sensors)

  13. Reciprocal regulation of cilia and autophagy via the MTOR and proteasome pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shixuan; Livingston, Man J; Su, Yunchao; Dong, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Primary cilium is an organelle that plays significant roles in a number of cellular functions ranging from cell mechanosensation, proliferation, and differentiation to apoptosis. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular function in biology and indispensable for cellular homeostasis. Both cilia and autophagy have been linked to different types of genetic and acquired human diseases. Their interaction has been suggested very recently, but the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. We examined autophagy in cells with suppressed cilia and measured cilium length in autophagy-activated or -suppressed cells. It was found that autophagy was repressed in cells with short cilia. Further investigation showed that MTOR activation was enhanced in cilia-suppressed cells and the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin could largely reverse autophagy suppression. In human kidney proximal tubular cells (HK2), autophagy induction was associated with cilium elongation. Conversely, autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ) as well as bafilomycin A1 (Baf) led to short cilia. Cilia were also shorter in cultured atg5-knockout (KO) cells and in atg7-KO kidney proximal tubular cells in mice. MG132, an inhibitor of the proteasome, could significantly restore cilium length in atg5-KO cells, being concomitant with the proteasome activity. Together, the results suggest that cilia and autophagy regulate reciprocally through the MTOR signaling pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  14. Novel roles for the radial spoke head protein 9 in neural and neurosensory cilia

    PubMed Central

    Sedykh, Irina; TeSlaa, Jessica J.; Tatarsky, Rose L.; Keller, Abigail N.; Toops, Kimberly A.; Lakkaraju, Aparna; Nyholm, Molly K.; Wolman, Marc A.; Grinblat, Yevgenya

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are cell surface organelles with key roles in a range of cellular processes, including generation of fluid flow by motile cilia. The axonemes of motile cilia and immotile kinocilia contain 9 peripheral microtubule doublets, a central microtubule pair, and 9 connecting radial spokes. Aberrant radial spoke components RSPH1, 3, 4a and 9 have been linked with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), a disorder characterized by ciliary dysmotility; yet, radial spoke functions remain unclear. Here we show that zebrafish Rsph9 is expressed in cells bearing motile cilia and kinocilia, and localizes to both 9 + 2 and 9 + 0 ciliary axonemes. Using CRISPR mutagenesis, we show that rsph9 is required for motility of presumptive 9 + 2 olfactory cilia and, unexpectedly, 9 + 0 neural cilia. rsph9 is also required for the structural integrity of 9 + 2 and 9 + 0 ciliary axonemes. rsph9 mutant larvae exhibit reduced initiation of the acoustic startle response consistent with hearing impairment, suggesting a novel role for Rsph9 in the kinocilia of the inner ear and/or lateral line neuromasts. These data identify novel roles for Rsph9 in 9 + 0 motile cilia and in sensory kinocilia, and establish a useful zebrafish PCD model. PMID:27687975

  15. Particle manipulation using vibrating cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallapragada, Phanindra; Kelly, Scott

    2012-11-01

    The ability to manipulate small particles suspended in fluids has many practical applications, ranging from the mechanical testing of macromolecules like DNA to the controlled abrasion of brittle surfaces for precision polishing. A natural method is non-contact manipulation of particles through boundary excitations. Particle-manipulation via a vibrating cilia to establish controlled fluid flows with desired patterns of transport is one such bioinspired method. We show experimental results on the clustering and transport of finite-sized particles in the streaming flow set up by the oscillating cilia. We further show computations to explain the effects of hyperbolic structures in the four dimensional phase space of the dynamics of finite-sized particles.

  16. Selective particle capture by asynchronously beating cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Selective particle filtration is fundamental in many engineering and biological systems. For example, many aquatic microorganisms use filter feeding to capture food particles from the surrounding fluid, using motile cilia. One of the capture strategies is to use the same cilia to generate feeding currents and to intercept particles when the particles are on the downstream side of the cilia. Here, we develop a 3D computational model of ciliary bands interacting with flow suspended particles and calculate particle trajectories for a range of particle sizes. Consistent with experimental observations, we find optimal particle sizes that maximize capture rate. The optimal size depends nonlinearly on cilia spacing and cilia coordination, synchronous vs. asynchronous. These parameters affect the cilia-generated flow field, which in turn affects particle trajectories. The low capture rate of smaller particles is due to the particles' inability to cross the flow streamlines of neighboring cilia. Meanwhile, large particles have difficulty entering the sub-ciliary region once advected downstream, also resulting in low capture rates. The optimal range of particle sizes is enhanced when cilia beat asynchronously. These findings have potentially important implications on the design and use of biomimetic cilia in processes such as particle sorting in microfluidic devices.

  17. Mutation of Growth Arrest Specific 8 Reveals a Role in Motile Cilia Function and Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Wesley R; Malarkey, Erik B; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; Pasek, Raymond C; Porath, Jonathan D; Birket, Susan E; Saunier, Sophie; Antignac, Corinne; Knowles, Michael R; Leigh, Margaret W; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Challa, Anil K; Kesterson, Robert A; Rowe, Steven M; Drummond, Iain A; Parant, John M; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Porter, Mary E; Yoder, Bradley K; Berbari, Nicolas F

    2016-07-01

    Ciliopathies are genetic disorders arising from dysfunction of microtubule-based cellular appendages called cilia. Different cilia types possess distinct stereotypic microtubule doublet arrangements with non-motile or 'primary' cilia having a 9+0 and motile cilia have a 9+2 array of microtubule doublets. Primary cilia are critical sensory and signaling centers needed for normal mammalian development. Defects in their structure/function result in a spectrum of clinical and developmental pathologies including abnormal neural tube and limb patterning. Altered patterning phenotypes in the limb and neural tube are due to perturbations in the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. Motile cilia are important in fluid movement and defects in motility result in chronic respiratory infections, altered left-right asymmetry, and infertility. These features are the hallmarks of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, OMIM 244400). While mutations in several genes are associated with PCD in patients and animal models, the genetic lesion in many cases is unknown. We assessed the in vivo functions of Growth Arrest Specific 8 (GAS8). GAS8 shares strong sequence similarity with the Chlamydomonas Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex (NDRC) protein 4 (DRC4) where it is needed for proper flagella motility. In mammalian cells, the GAS8 protein localizes not only to the microtubule axoneme of motile cilia, but also to the base of non-motile cilia. Gas8 was recently implicated in the Hh signaling pathway as a regulator of Smoothened trafficking into the cilium. Here, we generate the first mouse with a Gas8 mutation and show that it causes severe PCD phenotypes; however, there were no overt Hh pathway phenotypes. In addition, we identified two human patients with missense variants in Gas8. Rescue experiments in Chlamydomonas revealed a subtle defect in swim velocity compared to controls. Further experiments using CRISPR/Cas9 homology driven repair (HDR) to generate one of these human missense variants in

  18. On polarisation of Jovian decametric radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecacheux, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Among known planetary non thermal radio emissions, mostly circularly polarised, the decametric (DAM) radiation from Jupiter is characterized by its strong elliptical polarisation. A campaign of extensive broadband measurements of the DAM polarisation was performed by using the Nançay Decameter Array. The measurements use unprecedented high time-frequency resolutions throughout wide time/frequency coverage. Thus the DAM polarisation ellipse could be described with a reasonable accuracy over long lasting DAM storms (several hours, i.e. a noticeable part of Jupiter's rotation) as well as at the shorter scales of the fine structures which appear on intensity spectrograms (arcs, modulation lanes, S-bursts, etc...). In most of the studied cases, and when only one sense of circular polarisation could be observed, the degree of polarisation was measured to reach 100%, and the polarisation ellipse was found to remain stable in shape and orientation over hours and within the whole observed bandwidth, in agreement with the polarisation from a steady single source. When both senses of circular polarisation were present, the two corresponding polarisation ellipses could be extracted from the data. Furthermore, the spectral structures at shorter time scales, - including the so called S-bursts -, did not show up any further specific polarisation signature. The significance of those observations is briefly discussed.

  19. Emergence of metachronal waves in cilia arrays

    PubMed Central

    Elgeti, Jens; Gompper, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Propulsion by cilia is a fascinating and universal mechanism in biological organisms to generate fluid motion on the cellular level. Cilia are hair-like organelles, which are found in many different tissues and many uni- and multicellular organisms. Assembled in large fields, cilia beat neither randomly nor completely synchronously—instead they display a striking self-organization in the form of metachronal waves (MCWs). It was speculated early on that hydrodynamic interactions provide the physical mechanism for the synchronization of cilia motion. Theory and simulations of physical model systems, ranging from arrays of highly simplified actuated particles to a few cilia or cilia chains, support this hypothesis. The main questions are how the individual cilia interact with the flow field generated by their neighbors and synchronize their beats for the metachronal wave to emerge and how the properties of the metachronal wave are determined by the geometrical arrangement of the cilia, like cilia spacing and beat direction. Here, we address these issues by large-scale computer simulations of a mesoscopic model of 2D cilia arrays in a 3D fluid medium. We show that hydrodynamic interactions are indeed sufficient to explain the self-organization of MCWs and study beat patterns, stability, energy expenditure, and transport properties. We find that the MCW can increase propulsion velocity more than 3-fold and efficiency almost 10-fold—compared with cilia all beating in phase. This can be a vital advantage for ciliated organisms and may be interesting to guide biological experiments as well as the design of efficient microfluidic devices and artificial microswimmers. PMID:23487771

  20. Emergence of metachronal waves in cilia arrays.

    PubMed

    Elgeti, Jens; Gompper, Gerhard

    2013-03-19

    Propulsion by cilia is a fascinating and universal mechanism in biological organisms to generate fluid motion on the cellular level. Cilia are hair-like organelles, which are found in many different tissues and many uni- and multicellular organisms. Assembled in large fields, cilia beat neither randomly nor completely synchronously--instead they display a striking self-organization in the form of metachronal waves (MCWs). It was speculated early on that hydrodynamic interactions provide the physical mechanism for the synchronization of cilia motion. Theory and simulations of physical model systems, ranging from arrays of highly simplified actuated particles to a few cilia or cilia chains, support this hypothesis. The main questions are how the individual cilia interact with the flow field generated by their neighbors and synchronize their beats for the metachronal wave to emerge and how the properties of the metachronal wave are determined by the geometrical arrangement of the cilia, like cilia spacing and beat direction. Here, we address these issues by large-scale computer simulations of a mesoscopic model of 2D cilia arrays in a 3D fluid medium. We show that hydrodynamic interactions are indeed sufficient to explain the self-organization of MCWs and study beat patterns, stability, energy expenditure, and transport properties. We find that the MCW can increase propulsion velocity more than 3-fold and efficiency almost 10-fold--compared with cilia all beating in phase. This can be a vital advantage for ciliated organisms and may be interesting to guide biological experiments as well as the design of efficient microfluidic devices and artificial microswimmers.

  1. Mutation of Growth Arrest Specific 8 Reveals a Role in Motile Cilia Function and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Wesley R.; Malarkey, Erik B.; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; Pasek, Raymond C.; Porath, Jonathan D.; Birket, Susan E.; Saunier, Sophie; Antignac, Corinne; Leigh, Margaret W.; Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Drummond, Iain A.; Parant, John M.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Yoder, Bradley K.

    2016-01-01

    Ciliopathies are genetic disorders arising from dysfunction of microtubule-based cellular appendages called cilia. Different cilia types possess distinct stereotypic microtubule doublet arrangements with non-motile or ‘primary’ cilia having a 9+0 and motile cilia have a 9+2 array of microtubule doublets. Primary cilia are critical sensory and signaling centers needed for normal mammalian development. Defects in their structure/function result in a spectrum of clinical and developmental pathologies including abnormal neural tube and limb patterning. Altered patterning phenotypes in the limb and neural tube are due to perturbations in the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. Motile cilia are important in fluid movement and defects in motility result in chronic respiratory infections, altered left-right asymmetry, and infertility. These features are the hallmarks of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, OMIM 244400). While mutations in several genes are associated with PCD in patients and animal models, the genetic lesion in many cases is unknown. We assessed the in vivo functions of Growth Arrest Specific 8 (GAS8). GAS8 shares strong sequence similarity with the Chlamydomonas Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex (NDRC) protein 4 (DRC4) where it is needed for proper flagella motility. In mammalian cells, the GAS8 protein localizes not only to the microtubule axoneme of motile cilia, but also to the base of non-motile cilia. Gas8 was recently implicated in the Hh signaling pathway as a regulator of Smoothened trafficking into the cilium. Here, we generate the first mouse with a Gas8 mutation and show that it causes severe PCD phenotypes; however, there were no overt Hh pathway phenotypes. In addition, we identified two human patients with missense variants in Gas8. Rescue experiments in Chlamydomonas revealed a subtle defect in swim velocity compared to controls. Further experiments using CRISPR/Cas9 homology driven repair (HDR) to generate one of these human missense variants

  2. Swimming like algae: biomimetic soft artificial cilia

    PubMed Central

    Sareh, Sina; Rossiter, Jonathan; Conn, Andrew; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are used effectively in a wide variety of biological systems from fluid transport to thrust generation. Here, we present the design and implementation of artificial cilia, based on a biomimetic planar actuator using soft-smart materials. This actuator is modelled on the cilia movement of the alga Volvox, and represents the cilium as a piecewise constant-curvature robotic actuator that enables the subsequent direct translation of natural articulation into a multi-segment ionic polymer metal composite actuator. It is demonstrated how the combination of optimal segmentation pattern and biologically derived per-segment driving signals reproduce natural ciliary motion. The amenability of the artificial cilia to scaling is also demonstrated through the comparison of the Reynolds number achieved with that of natural cilia. PMID:23097503

  3. Swimming like algae: biomimetic soft artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Sareh, Sina; Rossiter, Jonathan; Conn, Andrew; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are used effectively in a wide variety of biological systems from fluid transport to thrust generation. Here, we present the design and implementation of artificial cilia, based on a biomimetic planar actuator using soft-smart materials. This actuator is modelled on the cilia movement of the alga Volvox, and represents the cilium as a piecewise constant-curvature robotic actuator that enables the subsequent direct translation of natural articulation into a multi-segment ionic polymer metal composite actuator. It is demonstrated how the combination of optimal segmentation pattern and biologically derived per-segment driving signals reproduce natural ciliary motion. The amenability of the artificial cilia to scaling is also demonstrated through the comparison of the Reynolds number achieved with that of natural cilia. PMID:23097503

  4. Centrosomal protein CP110 controls maturation of the mother centriole during cilia biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sharda Prasad; Sharma, Neel Kamal; Liu, Chunqiao; Dong, Lijin; Li, Tiansen; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defects in cilia centrosomal genes cause pleiotropic clinical phenotypes, collectively called ciliopathies. Cilia biogenesis is initiated by the interaction of positive and negative regulators. Centriolar coiled coil protein 110 (CP110) caps the distal end of the mother centriole and is known to act as a suppressor to control the timing of ciliogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that CP110 promotes cilia formation in vivo, in contrast to findings in cultured cells. Cp110−/− mice die shortly after birth owing to organogenesis defects as in ciliopathies. Shh signaling is impaired in null embryos and primary cilia are reduced in multiple tissues. We show that CP110 is required for anchoring of basal bodies to the membrane during cilia formation. CP110 loss resulted in an abnormal distribution of core components of subdistal appendages (SDAs) and of recycling endosomes, which may be associated with premature extension of axonemal microtubules. Our data implicate CP110 in SDA assembly and ciliary vesicle docking, two requisite early steps in cilia formation. We suggest that CP110 has unique context-dependent functions, acting as both a suppressor and a promoter of ciliogenesis. PMID:26965371

  5. The Heterotaxy gene, GALNT11, glycosylates Notch to orchestrate cilia type and laterality

    PubMed Central

    Boskovski, Marko T.; Yuan, Shiaulou; Pedersen, Nis Borbye; Goth, Christoffer Knak; Makova, Svetlana; Clausen, Henrik; Brueckner, Martina; Khokha, Mustafa K.

    2013-01-01

    Heterotaxy (Htx) is a disorder of left-right (LR) body patterning, or laterality, that is associated with major congenital heart disease1. The etiology and mechanism underlying most human Htx is poorly understood. In vertebrates, laterality is initiated at the embryonic left-right organizer (LRO), where motile cilia generate leftward flow that is detected by immotile sensory cilia, which transduce flow into downstream asymmetric signals2–6. The mechanism that specifies these two cilia types remains unknown. We now show that the GalNAc-type O-glycosylation enzyme GALNT11 is crucial to such determination. We previously identified GALNT11 as a candidate disease gene in a patient with Htx7, and now demonstrate, in Xenopus, that galnt11 activates Notch signaling. GALNT11 O-glycosylates NOTCH1 peptides in vitro, thereby supporting a mechanism of Notch activation either by increasing ADAM17-mediated ectodomain shedding of the Notch receptor or by modification of specific EGF repeats. We further developed a quantitative live imaging technique for Xenopus LRO cilia and show that galnt11-mediated notch1 signaling modulates the spatial distribution and ratio of motile and immotile cilia at the LRO. galnt11 or notch1 depletion increases the ratio of motile cilia at the expense of immotile cilia and produces a laterality defect reminiscent of loss of the ciliary sensor Pkd2. In contrast, Notch overexpression decreases this ratio mimicking the ciliopathy, primary ciliary dyskinesia. Together, our data demonstrate that Galnt11 modifies Notch, establishing an essential balance between motile and immotile cilia at the LRO to determine laterality and identifies a novel mechanism for human Htx. PMID:24226769

  6. The heterotaxy gene GALNT11 glycosylates Notch to orchestrate cilia type and laterality.

    PubMed

    Boskovski, Marko T; Yuan, Shiaulou; Pedersen, Nis Borbye; Goth, Christoffer Knak; Makova, Svetlana; Clausen, Henrik; Brueckner, Martina; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2013-12-19

    Heterotaxy is a disorder of left-right body patterning, or laterality, that is associated with major congenital heart disease. The aetiology and mechanisms underlying most cases of human heterotaxy are poorly understood. In vertebrates, laterality is initiated at the embryonic left-right organizer, where motile cilia generate leftward flow that is detected by immotile sensory cilia, which transduce flow into downstream asymmetric signals. The mechanism that specifies these two cilia types remains unknown. Here we show that the N-acetylgalactosamine-type O-glycosylation enzyme GALNT11 is crucial to such determination. We previously identified GALNT11 as a candidate disease gene in a patient with heterotaxy, and now demonstrate, in Xenopus tropicalis, that galnt11 activates Notch signalling. GALNT11 O-glycosylates human NOTCH1 peptides in vitro, thereby supporting a mechanism of Notch activation either by increasing ADAM17-mediated ectodomain shedding of the Notch receptor or by modification of specific EGF repeats. We further developed a quantitative live imaging technique for Xenopus left-right organizer cilia and show that Galnt11-mediated Notch1 signalling modulates the spatial distribution and ratio of motile and immotile cilia at the left-right organizer. galnt11 or notch1 depletion increases the ratio of motile cilia at the expense of immotile cilia and produces a laterality defect reminiscent of loss of the ciliary sensor Pkd2. By contrast, Notch overexpression decreases this ratio, mimicking the ciliopathy primary ciliary dyskinesia. Together our data demonstrate that Galnt11 modifies Notch, establishing an essential balance between motile and immotile cilia at the left-right organizer to determine laterality, and reveal a novel mechanism for human heterotaxy. PMID:24226769

  7. Out of the cleanroom, self-assembled magnetic artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Gao, Yang; Wyss, Hans; Anderson, Patrick; den Toonder, Jaap

    2013-09-01

    Micro-sized hair-like structures, such as cilia, are abundant in nature and have various functionalities. Many efforts have been made to mimic the fluid pumping function of cilia, but most of the fabrication processes for these "artificial cilia" are tedious and expensive, hindering their practical application. In this paper a cost-effective in situ fabrication technique for artificial cilia is demonstrated. The cilia are constructed by self-assembly of micron sized magnetic beads and encapsulated with soft polymer coatings. Actuation of the cilia induces an effective fluid flow, and the cilia lengths and distribution can be adjusted by varying the magnetic bead concentration and fabrication parameters.

  8. Specialized Cilia in Mammalian Sensory Systems.

    PubMed

    Falk, Nathalie; Lösl, Marlene; Schröder, Nadja; Gießl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are highly conserved and important microtubule-based organelles that project from the surface of eukaryotic cells and act as antennae to sense extracellular signals. Moreover, cilia have emerged as key players in numerous physiological, developmental, and sensory processes such as hearing, olfaction, and photoreception. Genetic defects in ciliary proteins responsible for cilia formation, maintenance, or function underlie a wide array of human diseases like deafness, anosmia, and retinal degeneration in sensory systems. Impairment of more than one sensory organ results in numerous syndromic ciliary disorders like the autosomal recessive genetic diseases Bardet-Biedl and Usher syndrome. Here we describe the structure and distinct functional roles of cilia in sensory organs like the inner ear, the olfactory epithelium, and the retina of the mouse. The spectrum of ciliary function in fundamental cellular processes highlights the importance of elucidating ciliopathy-related proteins in order to find novel potential therapies. PMID:26378583

  9. Specialized Cilia in Mammalian Sensory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Nathalie; Lösl, Marlene; Schröder, Nadja; Gießl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are highly conserved and important microtubule-based organelles that project from the surface of eukaryotic cells and act as antennae to sense extracellular signals. Moreover, cilia have emerged as key players in numerous physiological, developmental, and sensory processes such as hearing, olfaction, and photoreception. Genetic defects in ciliary proteins responsible for cilia formation, maintenance, or function underlie a wide array of human diseases like deafness, anosmia, and retinal degeneration in sensory systems. Impairment of more than one sensory organ results in numerous syndromic ciliary disorders like the autosomal recessive genetic diseases Bardet-Biedl and Usher syndrome. Here we describe the structure and distinct functional roles of cilia in sensory organs like the inner ear, the olfactory epithelium, and the retina of the mouse. The spectrum of ciliary function in fundamental cellular processes highlights the importance of elucidating ciliopathy-related proteins in order to find novel potential therapies. PMID:26378583

  10. Polarisation of Social Studies Textbooks in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidi, Syed Manzar Abbas

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at the evolution of the social studies curricula in Pakistan, which are of critical importance in shaping the outlook of many young Pakistanis, who are affected by this polarised discourse. The author argues that this trend of polarisation springing from dynamics of education also effectively contributes to a widening social…

  11. A simple homemade polarised sunglasses test card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamdad, Farzad

    2016-05-01

    In this article construction of a simple and inexpensive test card which can be used to demonstrate the polarisation ability of sunglasses is described. The card was fabricated simply by using a piece of polariser sheet with one to three layers of cellophane tape fixed on it.

  12. A Simple Homemade Polarised Sunglasses Test Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamdad, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    In this article construction of a simple and inexpensive test card which can be used to demonstrate the polarisation ability of sunglasses is described. The card was fabricated simply by using a piece of polariser sheet with one to three layers of cellophane tape fixed on it.

  13. Cilia driven flow networks in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Faubel, Regina; Westendorf, Chrsitian; Eichele, Gregor; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    Neurons exchange soluble substances via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that fills the ventricular system. The walls of the ventricular cavities are covered with motile cilia that constantly beat and thereby induce a directional flow. We recently discovered that cilia in the third ventricle generate a complex flow pattern leading to partitioning of the ventricular volume and site-directed transport paths along the walls. Transient and daily recurrent alterations in the cilia beating direction lead to changes in the flow pattern. This has consequences for delivery of CSF components along the near wall flow. The contribution of this cilia-induced flow to overall CSF flow remains to be investigated. The state-of-art lattice Boltzmann method is adapted for studying the CFS flow. The 3D geometry of the third ventricle at high resolution was reconstructed. Simulation of CSF flow without cilia in this geometry confirmed that the previous idea about unidirectional flow does not explain how different components of CSF can be delivered to their various target sites. We study the contribution of the cilia-induced flow pattern to overall CSF flow and identify target areas for site-specific delivery of CSF-constituents with respect to the temporal changes.

  14. DNAH11 Localization in the Proximal Region of Respiratory Cilia Defines Distinct Outer Dynein Arm Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Gerard W; Loges, Niki T; Klinkenbusch, Judith A; Olbrich, Heike; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Raidt, Johanna; Wallmeier, Julia; Werner, Claudius; Westermann, Cordula; Ruckert, Christian; Mirra, Virginia; Hjeij, Rim; Memari, Yasin; Durbin, Richard; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Praveen, Kavita; Kashef, Mohammad A; Kashef, Sara; Eghtedari, Fardin; Häffner, Karsten; Valmari, Pekka; Baktai, György; Aviram, Micha; Bentur, Lea; Amirav, Israel; Davis, Erica E; Katsanis, Nicholas; Brueckner, Martina; Shaposhnykov, Artem; Pigino, Gaia; Dworniczak, Bernd; Omran, Heymut

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessively inherited disease that leads to chronic respiratory disorders owing to impaired mucociliary clearance. Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a diagnostic standard to identify ultrastructural defects in respiratory cilia but is not useful in approximately 30% of PCD cases, which have normal ciliary ultrastructure. DNAH11 mutations are a common cause of PCD with normal ciliary ultrastructure and hyperkinetic ciliary beating, but its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. We therefore characterized DNAH11 in human respiratory cilia by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) in the context of PCD. We used whole-exome and targeted next-generation sequence analysis as well as Sanger sequencing to identify and confirm eight novel loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. We designed and validated a monoclonal antibody specific to DNAH11 and performed high-resolution IFM of both control and PCD-affected human respiratory cells, as well as samples from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-left-right dynein mice, to determine the ciliary localization of DNAH11. IFM analysis demonstrated native DNAH11 localization in only the proximal region of wild-type human respiratory cilia and loss of DNAH11 in individuals with PCD with certain loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. GFP-left-right dynein mice confirmed proximal DNAH11 localization in tracheal cilia. DNAH11 retained proximal localization in respiratory cilia of individuals with PCD with distinct ultrastructural defects, such as the absence of outer dynein arms (ODAs). TEM tomography detected a partial reduction of ODAs in DNAH11-deficient cilia. DNAH11 mutations result in a subtle ODA defect in only the proximal region of respiratory cilia, which is detectable by IFM and TEM tomography.

  15. DNAH11 Localization in the Proximal Region of Respiratory Cilia Defines Distinct Outer Dynein Arm Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Gerard W; Loges, Niki T; Klinkenbusch, Judith A; Olbrich, Heike; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Raidt, Johanna; Wallmeier, Julia; Werner, Claudius; Westermann, Cordula; Ruckert, Christian; Mirra, Virginia; Hjeij, Rim; Memari, Yasin; Durbin, Richard; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Praveen, Kavita; Kashef, Mohammad A; Kashef, Sara; Eghtedari, Fardin; Häffner, Karsten; Valmari, Pekka; Baktai, György; Aviram, Micha; Bentur, Lea; Amirav, Israel; Davis, Erica E; Katsanis, Nicholas; Brueckner, Martina; Shaposhnykov, Artem; Pigino, Gaia; Dworniczak, Bernd; Omran, Heymut

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessively inherited disease that leads to chronic respiratory disorders owing to impaired mucociliary clearance. Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a diagnostic standard to identify ultrastructural defects in respiratory cilia but is not useful in approximately 30% of PCD cases, which have normal ciliary ultrastructure. DNAH11 mutations are a common cause of PCD with normal ciliary ultrastructure and hyperkinetic ciliary beating, but its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. We therefore characterized DNAH11 in human respiratory cilia by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) in the context of PCD. We used whole-exome and targeted next-generation sequence analysis as well as Sanger sequencing to identify and confirm eight novel loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. We designed and validated a monoclonal antibody specific to DNAH11 and performed high-resolution IFM of both control and PCD-affected human respiratory cells, as well as samples from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-left-right dynein mice, to determine the ciliary localization of DNAH11. IFM analysis demonstrated native DNAH11 localization in only the proximal region of wild-type human respiratory cilia and loss of DNAH11 in individuals with PCD with certain loss-of-function DNAH11 mutations. GFP-left-right dynein mice confirmed proximal DNAH11 localization in tracheal cilia. DNAH11 retained proximal localization in respiratory cilia of individuals with PCD with distinct ultrastructural defects, such as the absence of outer dynein arms (ODAs). TEM tomography detected a partial reduction of ODAs in DNAH11-deficient cilia. DNAH11 mutations result in a subtle ODA defect in only the proximal region of respiratory cilia, which is detectable by IFM and TEM tomography. PMID:26909801

  16. On the numbering of peripheral doublets in cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Afzelius, B A

    1988-01-01

    The nine microtubular doublets of cilia and flagella have distinctive features that make it possible to assign an index number to each of them. Such an indexing has been used for a long time for animal cilia and flagella, whereas other indexing systems have been proposed recently for plant cilia. It is shown here that the similarity between cilia from animals and cilia from plants and protists is so great that the same indexing system can be used for all cilia regardless of their derivation.

  17. Heterotrimeric kinesin-II is necessary and sufficient to promote different stepwise assembly of morphologically distinct bipartite cilia in Drosophila antenna

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Swadhin C.; Girotra, Mukul; Ray, Krishanu

    2011-01-01

    Structurally diverse sensory cilia have evolved from primary cilia, a microtubule-based cellular extension engaged in chemical and mechanical sensing and signal integration. The diversity is often associated with functional specialization. The olfactory receptor neurons in Drosophila, for example, express three distinct bipartite cilia displaying different sets of olfactory receptors on them. Molecular description underlying their assembly and diversification is still incomplete. Here, we show that the branched and the slender olfactory cilia develop in two distinct step-wise patterns through the pupal stages before the expression of olfactory receptor genes in olfactory neurons. The process initiates with a thin procilium growth from the dendrite apex, followed by volume increment in successive stages. Mutations in the kinesin-II subunit genes either eliminate or restrict the cilia growth as well as tubulin entry into the developing cilia. Together with previous results, our results here suggest that heterotrimeric kinesin-II is the primary motor engaged in all type-I sensory cilia assembly in Drosophila and that the cilia structure diversity is achieved through additional transports supported by the motor during development. PMID:21233284

  18. Heterotrimeric kinesin-II is necessary and sufficient to promote different stepwise assembly of morphologically distinct bipartite cilia in Drosophila antenna.

    PubMed

    Jana, Swadhin C; Girotra, Mukul; Ray, Krishanu

    2011-03-15

    Structurally diverse sensory cilia have evolved from primary cilia, a microtubule-based cellular extension engaged in chemical and mechanical sensing and signal integration. The diversity is often associated with functional specialization. The olfactory receptor neurons in Drosophila, for example, express three distinct bipartite cilia displaying different sets of olfactory receptors on them. Molecular description underlying their assembly and diversification is still incomplete. Here, we show that the branched and the slender olfactory cilia develop in two distinct step-wise patterns through the pupal stages before the expression of olfactory receptor genes in olfactory neurons. The process initiates with a thin procilium growth from the dendrite apex, followed by volume increment in successive stages. Mutations in the kinesin-II subunit genes either eliminate or restrict the cilia growth as well as tubulin entry into the developing cilia. Together with previous results, our results here suggest that heterotrimeric kinesin-II is the primary motor engaged in all type-I sensory cilia assembly in Drosophila and that the cilia structure diversity is achieved through additional transports supported by the motor during development.

  19. Reptin/Ruvbl2 is a Lrrc6/Seahorse interactor essential for cilia motility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Yuan, Shiaulou; Cao, Ying; Kallakuri, Sowjanya; Li, Yuanyuan; Kishimoto, Norihito; DiBella, Linda; Sun, Zhaoxia

    2013-07-30

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by defective cilia motility. The identified PCD genes account for about half of PCD incidences and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We demonstrate that Reptin/Ruvbl2, a protein known to be involved in epigenetic and transcriptional regulation, is essential for cilia motility in zebrafish. We further show that Reptin directly interacts with the PCD protein Lrrc6/Seahorse and this interaction is critical for the in vivo function of Lrrc6/Seahorse in zebrafish. Moreover, whereas the expression levels of multiple dynein arm components remain unchanged or become elevated, the density of axonemal dynein arms is reduced in reptin(hi2394) mutants. Furthermore, Reptin is highly enriched in the cytosol and colocalizes with Lrrc6/Seahorse. Combined, these results suggest that the Reptin-Lrrc6/Seahorse complex is involved in dynein arm formation. We also show that although the DNA damage response is induced in reptin(hi2394) mutants, it remains unchanged in cilia biogenesis mutants and lrrc6/seahorse mutants, suggesting that increased DNA damage response is not intrinsic to ciliary defects and that in vertebrate development, Reptin functions in multiple processes, both cilia specific and cilia independent.

  20. Sperm-Associated Antigen–17 Gene Is Essential for Motile Cilia Function and Neonatal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Maria Eugenia; Zhang, Zhibing; Costanzo, Richard M.; Henderson, Scott C.; Corwin, Frank D.; Zweit, Jamal; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Subler, Mark; Salloum, Fadi N.; Rubin, Bruce K.

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), resulting from defects in cilia assembly or motility, is caused by mutations in a number of genes encoding axonemal proteins. PCD phenotypes are variable, and include recurrent respiratory tract infections, bronchiectasis, hydrocephaly, situs inversus, and male infertility. We generated knockout mice for the sperm-associated antigen–17 (Spag17) gene, which encodes a central pair (CP) protein present in the axonemes of cells with “9 + 2” motile cilia or flagella. The targeting of Spag17 resulted in a severe phenotype characterized by immotile nasal and tracheal cilia, reduced clearance of nasal mucus, profound respiratory distress associated with lung fluid accumulation and disruption of the alveolar epithelium, cerebral ventricular expansion consistent with emerging hydrocephalus, failure to suckle, and neonatal demise within 12 hours of birth. Ultrastructural analysis revealed the loss of one CP microtubule in approximately one quarter of tracheal cilia axonemes, an absence of a C1 microtubule projection, and other less frequent CP structural abnormalities. SPAG6 and SPAG16 (CP proteins that interact with SPAG17) were increased in tracheal tissue from SPAG17-deficient mice. We conclude that Spag17 plays a critical role in the function and structure of motile cilia, and that neonatal lethality is likely explained by impaired airway mucociliary clearance. PMID:23418344

  1. Vector solitons with a uniform polarisation state induced by polarisation filtering in a fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Weicheng; Chen Guojie; Han Dingan; Xie Jianing

    2013-06-30

    A fibre laser with a SESAM as a passive mode-locker is constructed for obtaining a vector soliton with the Kelly sidebands. The analysis of the peculiarities of the sidebands shows that the polarisation states are nonuniform across the entire pulse spectral profile from the leading edge to the trailing edge. Polarisation filtering effect is proposed to obtain a vector soliton with a uniform polarisation state. It is shown that during the polarisation filtering by a polariser incorporated into the laser cavity, the spectral width of the vector solitons gradually broadens and the pulse power decreases. It is found that at a maximum spectral width and a minimum pulse power, vector solitons with a uniform polarisation state are generated. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  2. Dual intravitreal foreign body: Intravitreal cilia in penetrating injury.

    PubMed

    Azad, Shorya; Takkar, Brijesh; Azad, Rajvardhan; Bypareddy, Ravi; Rathi, Anubha

    2015-01-01

    Intraocular cilia, though a rare condition, has been previously reported in cases of open globe injury. We discuss a unique case of intravitreal cilia, found incidentally during vitrectomy for intravitreal foreign body removal.

  3. First Polarised Light with the NIKA Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritacco, A.; Adam, R.; Adane, A.; Ade, P.; André, P.; Beelen, A.; Belier, B.; Benoît, A.; Bideaud, A.; Billot, N.; Bourrion, O.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Coiffard, G.; Comis, B.; D'Addabbo, A.; Désert, F.-X.; Doyle, S.; Goupy, J.; Kramer, C.; Leclercq, S.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Martino, J.; Mauskopf, P.; Maury, A.; Mayet, F.; Monfardini, A.; Pajot, F.; Pascale, E.; Perotto, L.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Rebolo-Iglesias, M.; Revéret, V.; Rodriguez, L.; Savini, G.; Schuster, K.; Sievers, A.; Thum, C.; Triqueneaux, S.; Tucker, C.; Zylka, R.

    2016-08-01

    NIKA is a dual-band camera operating with 315 frequency multiplexed LEKIDs cooled at 100 mK. NIKA is designed to observe the sky in intensity and polarisation at 150 and 260 GHz from the IRAM 30-m telescope. It is a test-bench for the final NIKA2 camera. The incoming linear polarisation is modulated at four times the mechanical rotation frequency by a warm rotating multi-layer half- wave plate. Then, the signal is analyzed by a wire grid and finally absorbed by the lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs). The small time constant (<1 ms ) of the LEKIDs combined with the modulation of the HWP enables the quasi-simultaneous measurement of the three Stokes parameters I, Q, U, representing linear polarisation. In this paper, we present the results of recent observational campaigns demonstrating the good performance of NIKA in detecting polarisation at millimeter wavelength.

  4. An ultrafast carbon nanotube terahertz polarisation modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Docherty, Callum J.; Stranks, Samuel D.; Habisreutinger, Severin N.; Joyce, Hannah J.; Herz, Laura M.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Johnston, Michael B.

    2014-05-28

    We demonstrate ultrafast modulation of terahertz radiation by unaligned optically pumped single-walled carbon nanotubes. Photoexcitation by an ultrafast optical pump pulse induces transient terahertz absorption in nanowires aligned parallel to the optical pump. By controlling the polarisation of the optical pump, we show that terahertz polarisation and modulation can be tuned, allowing sub-picosecond modulation of terahertz radiation. Such speeds suggest potential for semiconductor nanowire devices in terahertz communication technologies.

  5. Entropy-based measures of in vivo cilia-driven microfluidic mixing derived from quantitative optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekera, Kenny; Jonas, Stephan; Bhattacharya, Dipankan; Khokha, Mustafa; Choma, Michael A.

    2012-02-01

    Motile cilia are cellular organelles that project from different epithelial surfaces including respiratory epithelium. They generate directional fluid flow that removes harmful pathogens and particulate matter from the respiratory system. While it has been known that primary ciliary dyskinesia increases the risk of recurrent pulmonary infections, there is now heightened interest in understanding the role that cilia play in a wide-variety of respiratory diseases. Different optical imaging technologies are being investigated to visualize cilia-driven fluid flow, and quantitative image analysis is used to generate measures of ciliary performance. Here, we demonstrate the quantification of in vivo cilia-driven microfluidic mixing using spatial and temporal measures of Shannon information entropy. Using videomicroscopy, we imaged in vivo cilia-driven fluid flow generated by the epidermis of the Xenopus tropicalis embryo. Flow was seeded with either dyes or microparticles. Both spatial and temporal measures of entropy show significant levels of mixing, with maximum entropy measures of ~6.5 (out of a possible range of 0 to 8). Spatial entropy measures showed localization of mixing "hot-spots" and "cold-spots" and temporal measures showed mixing throughout.In sum, entropy-based measures of microfluidic mixing can characterize in vivo cilia-driven fluid flow and hold the potential for better characterization of ciliary dysfunction.

  6. Regeneration of cilia in heavily irradiated sea urchin embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, R.C.

    1981-12-01

    Cilia were removed from blastulae, gastrulae, and plutei of the sea urchins Arbacia punctulata and Lytechinus variegatus by shaking the embryos in hypertonic media. Exposure to 50 krad (and in some experiments 100 krad) of ..gamma.. radiation either before or after deciliation had no effect on the time of appearance of regenerating cilia. There were no visually obvious differences in the rate of growth of the cilia in control and irradiated embryos. The cilia commenced beating at the same time, but the initial beating sometimes seemed less vigorous following irradiation. The data support the hypothesis that radiation has no major effect on the assembly from mature basal bodies of the microtubules of cilia.

  7. Fish and frogs: models for vertebrate cilia signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wessely, Oliver; Obara, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    The presence of cilia in many vertebrate cell types and its function has been ignored for many years. Only in the past few years has its importance been rediscovered. In part, this was triggered by the realization that many gene products mutated in polycystic kidney diseases are localized to cilia and dysfunctional cilia result in kidney disease. Another breakthrough was the observation that the establishment of the left-right body axis is dependent on cilia function. Since then, many other developmental paradigms have been shown to rely on cilia-dependent signaling. In addition to mouse and Chlamydomonas, lower vertebrate model systems such as zebrafish, medaka and Xenopus have provided important new insights into cilia signaling and its role during embryonic development. This review will summarize those studies. We will also illustrate how these lower vertebrates are promising model systems for future studies defining the physiological function of cilia during organogenesis and disease pathophysiology. PMID:17981674

  8. IFT46 plays an essential role in cilia development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Sun; Hwang, Kyu-Seok; Oh, Hyun-Woo; Ji-Ae, Kim; Kim, Hyun-Taek; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Ju; Yeong Ko, Je; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Jeong, Yun-Mi; You, Kwan-Hee; Kim, Joon; Park, Doo-Sang; Nam, Ki-Hoan; Aizawa, Shinichi; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Park, Jong-Hoon; Zhou, Weibin; Kim, Nam-Soon; Kim, Cheol-Hee

    2015-04-15

    Cilia are microtubule-based structures that project into the extracellular space. Ciliary defects are associated with several human diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, primary ciliary dyskinesia, left-right axis patterning, hydrocephalus and retinal degeneration. However, the genetic and cellular biological control of ciliogenesis remains poorly understood. The IFT46 is one of the highly conserved intraflagellar transport complex B proteins. In zebrafish, ift46 is expressed in various ciliated tissues such as Kupffer׳s vesicle, pronephric ducts, ears and spinal cord. We show that ift46 is localized to the basal body. Knockdown of ift46 gene results in multiple phenotypes associated with various ciliopathies including kidney cysts, pericardial edema and ventral axis curvature. In ift46 morphants, cilia in kidney and spinal canal are shortened and abnormal. Similar ciliary defects are observed in otic vesicles, lateral line hair cells, olfactory pits, but not in Kupffer׳s vesicle. To explore the functions of Ift46 during mouse development, we have generated Ift46 knock-out mice. The Ift46 mutants have developmental defects in brain, neural tube and heart. In particular Ift46(-/-) homozygotes displays randomization of the embryo heart looping, which is a hallmark of defective left-right (L/R) axis patterning. Taken together, our results demonstrated that IFT46 has an essential role in vertebrate ciliary development.

  9. Polarised Drell-Yan measurements at COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiosso, Michela

    2015-01-01

    Much of the information that exists today about Transverse Momentum Dependent Parton Distribution Functions (TMDs) comes from SIDIS measurements with unpolarised and polarised beams and targets where they appear convoluted with fragmentation functions (FFs). Drell-Yan (DY) measurements are complementary to those by SIDIS experiments, as they allow to measure convolutions of only Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) without involving FFs. Moreover, given the T-odd character of both Sivers and Boer-Mulders functions, the sign of these TMDs is expected to be reversed when observed from SIDIS or from DY. Measurements of SIDIS were performed by Compass in the period 2002 to 2007 and in 2010, using a naturally polarised µ+ beam and a solid state target polarised either longitudinally or transversely with respect to the beam direction. Now the COMPASS Experiment has the unique opportunity to access TMDs from single-polarised Drell-Yan processes as well, in the same kinematical domain of the SIDIS data and with the same experimental setup; it will allow to test the TMDs universality and the sign change prediction for the first time. We present here the upcoming polarised DY measurements at COMPASS.

  10. Magnetically-actuated artificial cilia for microfluidic propulsion.

    PubMed

    Khaderi, S N; Craus, C B; Hussong, J; Schorr, N; Belardi, J; Westerweel, J; Prucker, O; Rühe, J; den Toonder, J M J; Onck, P R

    2011-06-21

    In this paper we quantitatively analyse the performance of magnetically-driven artificial cilia for lab-on-a-chip applications. The artificial cilia are fabricated using thin polymer films with embedded magnetic nano-particles and their deformation is studied under different external magnetic fields and flows. A coupled magneto-mechanical solid-fluid model that accurately captures the interaction between the magnetic field, cilia and fluid is used to simulate the cilia motion. The elastic and magnetic properties of the cilia are obtained by fitting the results of the computational model to the experimental data. The performance of the artificial cilia with a non-uniform cross-section is characterised using the numerical model for two channel configurations that are of practical importance: an open-loop and a closed-loop channel. We predict that the flow and pressure head generated by the artificial cilia can be as high as 18 microlitres per minute and 3 mm of water, respectively. We also study the effect of metachronal waves on the flow generated and show that the fluid propelled increases drastically compared to synchronously beating cilia, and is unidirectional. This increase is significant even when the phase difference between adjacent cilia is small. The obtained results provide guidelines for the optimal design of magnetically-driven artificial cilia for microfluidic propulsion. PMID:21331419

  11. Bbof1 is required to maintain cilia orientation

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Yuan-Hung; Werner, Michael E.; Stubbs, Jennifer; Joens, Matt S.; Li, Julie; Chien, Shu; Fitzpatrick, James A. J.; Mitchell, Brian J.; Kintner, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Multiciliate cells (MCCs) are highly specialized epithelial cells that employ hundreds of motile cilia to produce a vigorous directed flow in a variety of organ systems. The production of this flow requires the establishment of planar cell polarity (PCP) whereby MCCs align hundreds of beating cilia along a common planar axis. The planar axis of cilia in MCCs is known to be established via the PCP pathway and hydrodynamic cues, but the downstream steps required for cilia orientation remain poorly defined. Here, we describe a new component of cilia orientation, based on the phenotypic analysis of an uncharacterized coiled-coil protein, called bbof1. We show that the expression of bbof1 is induced during the early phases of MCC differentiation by the master regulator foxj1. MCC differentiation and ciliogenesis occurs normally in embryos where bbof1 activity is reduced, but cilia orientation is severely disrupted. We show that cilia in bbof1 mutants can still respond to patterning and hydrodynamic cues, but lack the ability to maintain their precise orientation. Misexpression of bbof1 promotes cilia alignment, even in the absence of flow or in embryos where microtubules and actin filaments are disrupted. Bbof1 appears to mediate cilia alignment by localizing to a polar structure adjacent to the basal body. Together, these results suggest that bbof1 is a basal body component required in MCCs to align and maintain cilia orientation in response to flow. PMID:23900544

  12. Transport of the outer dynein arm complex to cilia requires a cytoplasmic protein Lrrc6.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Yasuko; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Botilde, Yanick; Nabeshima, Ryo; Takaoka, Katsuyoshi; Ajima, Rieko; Lamri, Lynda; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Saga, Yumiko; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Hamada, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Lrrc6 encodes a cytoplasmic protein that is expressed specifically in cells with motile cilia including the node, trachea and testes of the mice. A mutation of Lrrc6 has been identified in human patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Mutant mice lacking Lrrc6 show typical PCD defects such as hydrocephalus and laterality defects. We found that in the absence of Lrrc6, the morphology of motile cilia remained normal, but their motility was completely lost. The 9 + 2 arrangement of microtubules remained normal in Lrrc6(-/-) mice, but the outer dynein arms (ODAs), the structures essential for the ciliary beating, were absent from the cilia. In the absence of Lrrc6, ODA proteins such as DNAH5, DNAH9 and IC2, which are assembled in the cytoplasm and transported to the ciliary axoneme, remained in the cytoplasm and were not transported to the ciliary axoneme. The IC2-IC1 interaction, which is the first step of ODA assembly, was normal in Lrrc6(-/-) mice testes. Our results suggest that ODA proteins may be transported from the cytoplasm to the cilia by an Lrrc6-dependent mechanism.

  13. Transport of the outer dynein arm complex to cilia requires a cytoplasmic protein Lrrc6.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Yasuko; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Botilde, Yanick; Nabeshima, Ryo; Takaoka, Katsuyoshi; Ajima, Rieko; Lamri, Lynda; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Saga, Yumiko; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Hamada, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Lrrc6 encodes a cytoplasmic protein that is expressed specifically in cells with motile cilia including the node, trachea and testes of the mice. A mutation of Lrrc6 has been identified in human patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Mutant mice lacking Lrrc6 show typical PCD defects such as hydrocephalus and laterality defects. We found that in the absence of Lrrc6, the morphology of motile cilia remained normal, but their motility was completely lost. The 9 + 2 arrangement of microtubules remained normal in Lrrc6(-/-) mice, but the outer dynein arms (ODAs), the structures essential for the ciliary beating, were absent from the cilia. In the absence of Lrrc6, ODA proteins such as DNAH5, DNAH9 and IC2, which are assembled in the cytoplasm and transported to the ciliary axoneme, remained in the cytoplasm and were not transported to the ciliary axoneme. The IC2-IC1 interaction, which is the first step of ODA assembly, was normal in Lrrc6(-/-) mice testes. Our results suggest that ODA proteins may be transported from the cytoplasm to the cilia by an Lrrc6-dependent mechanism. PMID:27353389

  14. An Olfactory Cilia Pattern in the Mammalian Nose Ensures High Sensitivity to Odors.

    PubMed

    Challis, Rosemary C; Tian, Huikai; Wang, Jue; He, Jiwei; Jiang, Jianbo; Chen, Xuanmao; Yin, Wenbin; Connelly, Timothy; Ma, Limei; Yu, C Ron; Pluznick, Jennifer L; Storm, Daniel R; Huang, Liquan; Zhao, Kai; Ma, Minghong

    2015-10-01

    In many sensory organs, specialized receptors are strategically arranged to enhance detection sensitivity and acuity. It is unclear whether the olfactory system utilizes a similar organizational scheme to facilitate odor detection. Curiously, olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the mouse nose are differentially stimulated depending on the cell location. We therefore asked whether OSNs in different locations evolve unique structural and/or functional features to optimize odor detection and discrimination. Using immunohistochemistry, computational fluid dynamics modeling, and patch clamp recording, we discovered that OSNs situated in highly stimulated regions have much longer cilia and are more sensitive to odorants than those in weakly stimulated regions. Surprisingly, reduction in neuronal excitability or ablation of the olfactory G protein in OSNs does not alter the cilia length pattern, indicating that neither spontaneous nor odor-evoked activity is required for its establishment. Furthermore, the pattern is evident at birth, maintained into adulthood, and restored following pharmacologically induced degeneration of the olfactory epithelium, suggesting that it is intrinsically programmed. Intriguingly, type III adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), a key protein in olfactory signal transduction and ubiquitous marker for primary cilia, exhibits location-dependent gene expression levels, and genetic ablation of ACIII dramatically alters the cilia pattern. These findings reveal an intrinsically programmed configuration in the nose to ensure high sensitivity to odors.

  15. An Olfactory Cilia Pattern in the Mammalian Nose Ensures High Sensitivity to Odors.

    PubMed

    Challis, Rosemary C; Tian, Huikai; Wang, Jue; He, Jiwei; Jiang, Jianbo; Chen, Xuanmao; Yin, Wenbin; Connelly, Timothy; Ma, Limei; Yu, C Ron; Pluznick, Jennifer L; Storm, Daniel R; Huang, Liquan; Zhao, Kai; Ma, Minghong

    2015-10-01

    In many sensory organs, specialized receptors are strategically arranged to enhance detection sensitivity and acuity. It is unclear whether the olfactory system utilizes a similar organizational scheme to facilitate odor detection. Curiously, olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the mouse nose are differentially stimulated depending on the cell location. We therefore asked whether OSNs in different locations evolve unique structural and/or functional features to optimize odor detection and discrimination. Using immunohistochemistry, computational fluid dynamics modeling, and patch clamp recording, we discovered that OSNs situated in highly stimulated regions have much longer cilia and are more sensitive to odorants than those in weakly stimulated regions. Surprisingly, reduction in neuronal excitability or ablation of the olfactory G protein in OSNs does not alter the cilia length pattern, indicating that neither spontaneous nor odor-evoked activity is required for its establishment. Furthermore, the pattern is evident at birth, maintained into adulthood, and restored following pharmacologically induced degeneration of the olfactory epithelium, suggesting that it is intrinsically programmed. Intriguingly, type III adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), a key protein in olfactory signal transduction and ubiquitous marker for primary cilia, exhibits location-dependent gene expression levels, and genetic ablation of ACIII dramatically alters the cilia pattern. These findings reveal an intrinsically programmed configuration in the nose to ensure high sensitivity to odors. PMID:26365258

  16. Loss of cilia causes embryonic lung hypoplasia, liver fibrosis, and cholestasis in the talpid3 ciliopathy mutant

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Megan G; McTeir, Lynn; Barrie, Andrew M; Freem, Lucy J; Stephen, Louise A

    2014-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog plays an essential role in maintaining hepatoblasts in a proliferative non-differentiating state during embryogenesis. Transduction of the Hedgehog signaling pathway is dependent on the presence of functional primary cilia and hepatoblasts, therefore, must require primary cilia for normal function. In congenital syndromes in which cilia are absent or non-functional (ciliopathies) hepatorenal fibrocystic disease is common and primarily characterized by ductal plate malformations which underlie the formation of liver cysts, as well as less commonly, by hepatic fibrosis, although a role for abnormal Hedgehog signal transduction has not been implicated in these phenotypes. We have examined liver, lung and rib development in the talpid3 chicken mutant, a ciliopathy model in which abnormal Hedgehog signaling is well characterized. We find that the talpid3 phenotype closely models that of human short-rib polydactyly syndromes which are caused by the loss of cilia, and exhibit hypoplastic lungs and liver failure. Through an analysis of liver and lung development in the talpid3 chicken, we propose that cilia in the liver are essential for the transduction of Hedgehog signaling during hepatic development. The talpid3 chicken represents a useful resource in furthering our understanding of the pathology of ciliopathies beyond the treatment of thoracic insufficiency as well as generating insights into the role Hedgehog signaling in hepatic development. PMID:24743779

  17. Genesis of cilia and microvilli of rat nasal epithelia during prenatal development. III. Respiratory epithelium surface, including a comparison with the surface of the olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Menco, B P; Farbman, A I

    1987-01-01

    During prenatal development the respiratory epithelium surface of the rat's nasal septum underwent the following changes. At intra-uterine day E14 there was a transformation from State I, cells with primary cilia only, to cells which also had microvilli (Stage II). Anterior parts of the nasal septum retained microvilli throughout further development. Posteriorly, centriole multiplication (Stage III) and formation of shafts of secondary cilia (Stage IV) occurred from around E16 and E18 onwards, respectively. From E18 to E20 numbers of cells with cilia increased at an overall rate of about 6 X 10(6) cells/cm2/day. Respiratory cilia and microvilli grew, on average, by about 0.3 micron/day and 0.1 micron/day, respectively. At Stage V, beginning around E19, the cilia became aligned within cells and, at Stage VI, beginning around E21, became synchronised between cells. Respiratory ciliogenesis in the nose is most precocious near the olfactory epithelium. The formation of respiratory cilia starts after that of olfactory cilia. However, unlike olfactory epithelium surfaces those of ciliated respiratory epithelia resembled those of adults around birth. Images Figs. 1-4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 PMID:3654366

  18. Ciliae-based actuator with piezoelectric excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pott, Peter P.; Carrasco, Alvaro; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2012-06-01

    Small actuators based on the inverse piezoelectric effect are successfully deployed in commercial applications. Usually, ultrasonic motors are used. Based on resonance effects these motors provide a pronounced nonlinearity at low speeds and thus put high demands on the control algorithm. In contrast, piezoelectric stepping motors are mechanically complex and provide only low speeds. The contribution at hand describes a proposed design for a new piezoelectric motor based on cilia friction that can be manufactured at low costs. The cilia are made from uniaxial carbon-fibre reinforced plastics. The derived CFRP-brushes are pressed perpendicularly to the rotor surface to produce force or torque. First experiments prove the feasibility of the concept. A net pushing force of 500 mN is achieved.

  19. Microfabrication of IPMC cilia for bio-inspired flow sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hong; Li, Wen; Tan, Xiaobo

    2012-04-01

    As the primary flow sensing organ for fishes, the lateral line system plays a critical role in fish behavior. Analogous to its biological counterpart, an artificial lateral line system, consisting of arrays of micro flow sensors, is expected to be instrumental in the navigation and control of underwater robots. In this paper we investigate the microfabrication of ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) cilia for the purpose of flow sensing. While existing macro- and microfabrication methods for IPMCs have predominantly focused on planar structures, we propose a device where micro IPMC beams stand upright on a substrate to effectively interact with the flow. Challenges in the casting of 3D Nafion structure and selective formation of electrodes are discussed, and potential solutions for addressing these challenges are presented together with preliminary microfabrication results.

  20. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Is it only cilia dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Novas, Rossina; Cardenas-Rodriguez, Magdalena; Irigoín, Florencia; Badano, Jose L

    2015-11-14

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous, pleiotropic disorder, characterized by both congenital and late onset defects. From the analysis of the mutational burden in patients to the functional characterization of the BBS proteins, this syndrome has become a model for both understanding oligogenic patterns of inheritance and the biology of a particular cellular organelle: the primary cilium. Here we briefly review the genetics of BBS to then focus on the function of the BBS proteins, not only in the context of the cilium but also highlighting potential extra-ciliary roles that could be relevant to the etiology of the disorder. Finally, we provide an overview of how the study of this rare syndrome has contributed to the understanding of cilia biology and how this knowledge has informed on the cellular basis of different clinical manifestations that characterize BBS and the ciliopathies.

  1. Bardet-Biedl syndrome: Is it only cilia dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Novas, Rossina; Cardenas-Rodriguez, Magdalena; Irigoín, Florencia; Badano, Jose L

    2015-11-14

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous, pleiotropic disorder, characterized by both congenital and late onset defects. From the analysis of the mutational burden in patients to the functional characterization of the BBS proteins, this syndrome has become a model for both understanding oligogenic patterns of inheritance and the biology of a particular cellular organelle: the primary cilium. Here we briefly review the genetics of BBS to then focus on the function of the BBS proteins, not only in the context of the cilium but also highlighting potential extra-ciliary roles that could be relevant to the etiology of the disorder. Finally, we provide an overview of how the study of this rare syndrome has contributed to the understanding of cilia biology and how this knowledge has informed on the cellular basis of different clinical manifestations that characterize BBS and the ciliopathies. PMID:26231314

  2. Forces Applied by Cilia Measured on Explants from Mucociliary Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Teff, Zvi; Priel, Zvi; Gheber, Levi A.

    2007-01-01

    Forces applied by intact mucus-propelling cilia were measured for the first time that we know of using a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrooptic system. The AFM probe was dipped into a field of beating cilia and its time-dependent deflection was recorded as it was struck by the cilia while the electrooptic system simultaneously and colocally measured the frequency to ensure that no perturbation was induced by the AFM probe. Using cilia from frog esophagus, we measured forces of ∼0.21 nN per cilium during the effective stroke. This value, together with the known internal structure of these cilia, leads to the conclusion that most dynein arms along the length of the axoneme contribute to the effective stroke of these cilia. PMID:17142280

  3. Simulation of metachronal wave in a model of pulmonary cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitran, Sorin

    2006-03-01

    A simulation of the formation of metachronal waves in carpets of pulmonary cilia is presented. The cilia move in a two-layer fluid model. The fluid layer adjacent to the cilia base is purely viscous while the tips of the cilia move through a viscoelastic fluid. An overlapping fixed-moving grid formulation is employed to capture the effect of the cilia on the surrounding fluid. The 9+2 internal microtubule structure of an individual cilium is modeled using large-deflection, curved, finite-element beams. Realistic models of the forces exerted by dynein molecules are extracted from measurements of observed cilia shapes. The possibility of formation of metachronal waves under different assumptions of boundary conditions is investigated and shown to be dependent on the surrounding geometry.

  4. Assembly and dynamics of synthetic cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Tim

    2012-02-01

    From motility of simple protists to determining the handedness of complex vertebrates, highly conserved eukaryotic cilia and flagella are essential for the reproduction and survival of many biological organisms. Despite extensive studies, the exact mechanism by which individual components coordinate to produce ciliary beating patterns remains unknown. We describe a novel approach towards studying ciliary beating. Instead of deconstructing a fully functional organelle from the top-down, we describe a process by which synthetic cilia-like structures are assembled from the bottom-up. We find that simple mixtures of microtubules, kinesin clusters, and a bundling agent produce spontaneous oscillations in MT bundles, suggesting that self-organized beating may be a generic feature of internally driven bundles. Furthermore, bundles in close proximity spontaneously coordinate their beating to generate metachronal traveling waves, reminiscent of the waves seen in ciliary fields. These findings and future refinements of the system can potentially provide insights into general design principles required for engineering synthetic cilia as well as understanding the biological analogues.

  5. Optimal polarisation equations in FLRW universes

    SciTech Connect

    Tram, Thomas; Lesgourgues, Julien E-mail: Julien.Lesgourgues@cern.ch

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents the linearised Boltzmann equation for photons for scalar, vector and tensor perturbations in flat, open and closed FLRW cosmologies. We show that E- and B-mode polarisation for all types can be computed using only a single hierarchy. This was previously shown explicitly for tensor modes in flat cosmologies but not for vectors, and not for non-flat cosmologies.

  6. Polarisation modulation in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Adam; Maccarone, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    X-ray polarimetry promises to provide a powerful new lever arm for studying accretion onto black holes with the next generation of X-ray telescopes. I will discuss how polarisation can be used to help constrain the physical origin of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in the X-ray light curves of accreting black holes. QPOs may be signatures of the frame dragging effect: in General Relativity, a spinning black hole twists up the surrounding space-time, causing vertical precession of nearby orbits. In the truncated disc / precessing inner flow model, the entire inner accretion flow precesses as a solid body causing a modulation in the X-ray flux through solid angle and Doppler effects. This model also predicts the observed polarisation of the X-ray signal to vary quasi-periodically. I will summarise our work to model the polarisation signal from a precessing accretion flow, starting with simple assumptions about the emission mechanism but taking General Relativity fully into account. We find that it should be possible to measure the predicted modulation in polarisation degree for a reasonable region of parameter space with a polarimeter capable of detecting ~60 counts per second from a bright black hole binary. I will also show that sensitivity can be greatly improved by correlating the signal with a high count rate reference band signal.

  7. Methods for Studying Movement of Molecules Within Cilia.

    PubMed

    Lechtreck, Karl F

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of cilia and eukaryotic flagella (interchangeable terms) requires the import of numerous proteins from the cell body into the growing organelle. Proteins move into and inside cilia by diffusion and by motor-based intraflagellar transport (IFT). Many aspects of ciliary protein transport such as the distribution of unloading sites and the frequency of transport can be analyzed using direct in vivo imaging of fluorescently tagged proteins. Here, we will describe how to use total internal reflection fluorescence microcopy (TIRFM) to analyze protein transport in the flagella of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a widely used model for cilia and cilia-related disease.

  8. Sensory functions of motile cilia and implication for bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Raksha; Javidan-Nejad, Cylen; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer; Horani, Amjad; Cabellon, Michelle C.; Walter, Michael J.; Brody, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are specialized organelles that extend from the surface of cells into the local environment. Airway epithelial cell cilia are motile to provide mucociliary clearance for host defense. On other cells, solitary cilia are specialized to detect chemical or mechanosensory signals. Sensory proteins in motile cilia have recently been identified that detect shear stress, osmotic force, fluid flow, bitter taste and sex hormones. The relationship of sensory function in human motile cilia to disease is now being revealed. One example is polycystin-1 and polycystin-2. As a complex, these proteins function as a flow sensor in cilia and are mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The polycystins are also expressed in motile cilia of the airways, potentially operating as sensors in the lung. Computed tomography studies from patients with ADPKD revealed radiographic evidence for bronchiectasis, suggesting that polycystin-1 and -2 are important in lung function. The expression of this complex and sensory channel TRPV4, and bitter taste and sex hormones receptors in motile cilia indicate that the cell is wired to interpret environmental cues to regulate cilia beat frequency and other functions. Defective signaling of sensory proteins may result in a ciliopathy that includes lung disease. PMID:22202111

  9. Ion channels and calcium signaling in motile cilia

    PubMed Central

    Doerner, Julia F; Delling, Markus; Clapham, David E

    2015-01-01

    The beating of motile cilia generates fluid flow over epithelia in brain ventricles, airways, and Fallopian tubes. Here, we patch clamp single motile cilia of mammalian ependymal cells and examine their potential function as a calcium signaling compartment. Resting motile cilia calcium concentration ([Ca2+] ~170 nM) is only slightly elevated over cytoplasmic [Ca2+] (~100 nM) at steady state. Ca2+ changes that arise in the cytoplasm rapidly equilibrate in motile cilia. We measured CaV1 voltage-gated calcium channels in ependymal cells, but these channels are not specifically enriched in motile cilia. Membrane depolarization increases ciliary [Ca2+], but only marginally alters cilia beating and cilia-driven fluid velocity within short (~1 min) time frames. We conclude that beating of ependymal motile cilia is not tightly regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels, unlike that of well-studied motile cilia and flagella in protists, such as Paramecia and Chlamydomonas. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11066.001 PMID:26650848

  10. Using Xenopus skin to study cilia development and function.

    PubMed

    Werner, Michael E; Mitchell, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are prevalent biological structures that are important for cell signaling and for generating fluid flow (or motility). Cilia are found throughout biology from single-celled organisms to vertebrates, and many model systems have been employed for their analysis. Here, we describe the use of Xenopus larval skin as a system for the study of ciliogenesis and ciliary function. In particular, we describe basic molecular and embryological manipulations and imaging techniques that have proven particularly useful for understanding the polarized beating of cilia and the generation of directed fluid flow (Werner & Mitchell, 2012). However, these same tools have the potential to benefit a large number of cilia-related biological questions.

  11. Methods for Studying Movement of Molecules Within Cilia.

    PubMed

    Lechtreck, Karl F

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of cilia and eukaryotic flagella (interchangeable terms) requires the import of numerous proteins from the cell body into the growing organelle. Proteins move into and inside cilia by diffusion and by motor-based intraflagellar transport (IFT). Many aspects of ciliary protein transport such as the distribution of unloading sites and the frequency of transport can be analyzed using direct in vivo imaging of fluorescently tagged proteins. Here, we will describe how to use total internal reflection fluorescence microcopy (TIRFM) to analyze protein transport in the flagella of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a widely used model for cilia and cilia-related disease. PMID:27514917

  12. Polarisation of electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, James; Vryonidou, Eleni

    2013-05-01

    We present results for the polarisation of gauge bosons produced at the LHC. Polarisation effects for W bosons manifest themselves in the angular distributions of the lepton and in the distributions of lepton transverse momentum and missing transverse energy. The polarisation is discussed for a range of different processes producing W bosons such as W+jets and W from top production. The relative contributions of the different polarisation states vary from process to process, reflecting the dynamics of the underlying hardscattering process. We also calculate the polarisation of the Z boson produced in association with QCD jets at the LHC.

  13. The polycystic kidney disease proteins, polycystin-1, polycystin-2, polaris, and cystin, are co-localized in renal cilia.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Bradley K; Hou, Xiaoying; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M

    2002-10-01

    Recent evidence has suggested an association between structural and/or functional defects in the primary apical cilium of vertebrate epithelia and polycystic kidney disease (PKD). In Caenorhabditis elegans, the protein orthologues of the PKD-related proteins, polycystin-1 (LOV-1), polycystin-2 (PKD2), and polaris (OSM-5), co-localize in the cilia of male-specific sensory neurons, and defects in these proteins cause abnormalities of cilia structure and/or function. This study sought to determine whether the mammalian polycystins are expressed in primary cilia of renal epithelia and whether these proteins co-localize with polaris and cystin, the newly described, cilia-associated protein that is disrupted in the cpk mouse. To begin to address this issue, the expression of the protein products encoded by the PKD1, PKD2, Tg737, and cpk genes were examined in mouse cortical collecting duct (mCCD) cells using an immunofluorescence-based approach with a series of previously well-characterized antibodies. The mCCD cells were grown on cell culture inserts to optimize cell polarization and cilia formation. The data demonstrate co-localization in cilia of polycystin-1 and polycystin-2, which are the principal proteins involved in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, with polaris and cystin, which are proteins that are disrupted in the Tg737(orpk)and cpk mouse models of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, respectively. These data add to a growing body of evidence that suggests that primary cilium plays a key role in normal physiologic functions of renal epithelia and that defects in ciliary function contribute to the pathogenesis of PKD. PMID:12239239

  14. Foxj1 regulates floor plate cilia architecture and modifies the response of cells to sonic hedgehog signalling

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Catarina; Ribes, Vanessa; Kutejova, Eva; Cayuso, Jordi; Lawson, Victoria; Norris, Dominic; Stevens, Jonathan; Davey, Megan; Blight, Ken; Bangs, Fiona; Mynett, Anita; Hirst, Elizabeth; Chung, Rachel; Balaskas, Nikolaos; Brody, Steven L.; Marti, Elisa; Briscoe, James

    2010-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog signalling is essential for the embryonic development of many tissues including the central nervous system, where it controls the pattern of cellular differentiation. A genome-wide screen of neural progenitor cells to evaluate the Shh signalling-regulated transcriptome identified the forkhead transcription factor Foxj1. In both chick and mouse Foxj1 is expressed in the ventral midline of the neural tube in cells that make up the floor plate. Consistent with the role of Foxj1 in the formation of long motile cilia, floor plate cells produce cilia that are longer than the primary cilia found elsewhere in the neural tube, and forced expression of Foxj1 in neuroepithelial cells is sufficient to increase cilia length. In addition, the expression of Foxj1 in the neural tube and in an Shh-responsive cell line attenuates intracellular signalling by decreasing the activity of Gli proteins, the transcriptional mediators of Shh signalling. We show that this function of Foxj1 depends on cilia. Nevertheless, floor plate identity and ciliogenesis are unaffected in mouse embryos lacking Foxj1 and we provide evidence that additional transcription factors expressed in the floor plate share overlapping functions with Foxj1. Together, these findings identify a novel mechanism that modifies the cellular response to Shh signalling and reveal morphological and functional features of the amniote floor plate that distinguish these cells from the rest of the neuroepithelium. PMID:21098568

  15. ciliaFA: a research tool for automated, high-throughput measurement of ciliary beat frequency using freely available software

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Analysis of ciliary function for assessment of patients suspected of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and for research studies of respiratory and ependymal cilia requires assessment of both ciliary beat pattern and beat frequency. While direct measurement of beat frequency from high-speed video recordings is the most accurate and reproducible technique it is extremely time consuming. The aim of this study was to develop a freely available automated method of ciliary beat frequency analysis from digital video (AVI) files that runs on open-source software (ImageJ) coupled to Microsoft Excel, and to validate this by comparison to the direct measuring high-speed video recordings of respiratory and ependymal cilia. These models allowed comparison to cilia beating between 3 and 52 Hz. Methods Digital video files of motile ciliated ependymal (frequency range 34 to 52 Hz) and respiratory epithelial cells (frequency 3 to 18 Hz) were captured using a high-speed digital video recorder. To cover the range above between 18 and 37 Hz the frequency of ependymal cilia were slowed by the addition of the pneumococcal toxin pneumolysin. Measurements made directly by timing a given number of individual ciliary beat cycles were compared with those obtained using the automated ciliaFA system. Results The overall mean difference (± SD) between the ciliaFA and direct measurement high-speed digital imaging methods was −0.05 ± 1.25 Hz, the correlation coefficient was shown to be 0.991 and the Bland-Altman limits of agreement were from −1.99 to 1.49 Hz for respiratory and from −2.55 to 3.25 Hz for ependymal cilia. Conclusions A plugin for ImageJ was developed that extracts pixel intensities and performs fast Fourier transformation (FFT) using Microsoft Excel. The ciliaFA software allowed automated, high throughput measurement of respiratory and ependymal ciliary beat frequency (range 3 to 52 Hz) and avoids operator error due to selection bias. We have

  16. Cilia and Nuclear Pore Proteins: Pore No More?

    PubMed

    Obado, Samson O; Rout, Michael P

    2016-09-12

    Nuclear pore proteins at the base of cilia were thought to regulate transport into cilia. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Del Viso et al. (2016) challenge this view, showing instead that pore proteins localize to ciliary basal bodies and that their perturbation leads to congenital heart disease. PMID:27623377

  17. ATR promotes cilia signalling: links to developmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Stiff, Tom; Casar Tena, Teresa; O'Driscoll, Mark; Jeggo, Penny A; Philipp, Melanie

    2016-04-15

    Mutations in ATR(ataxia telangiectasia and RAD3-related) cause Seckel syndrome (ATR-SS), a microcephalic primordial dwarfism disorder. Hitherto, the clinical manifestation of ATR deficiency has been attributed to its canonical role in DNA damage response signalling following replication fork stalling/collapse. Here, we show that ATR regulates cilia-dependent signalling in a manner that can be uncoupled from its function during replication. ATR-depleted or patient-derived ATR-SS cells form cilia of slightly reduced length but are dramatically impaired in cilia-dependent signalling functions, including growth factor and Sonic hedgehog signalling. To better understand the developmental impact of ATR loss of function, we also used zebrafish as a model. Zebrafish embryos depleted of Atr resembled ATR-SS morphology, showed a modest but statistically significant reduction in cilia length and other morphological features indicative of cilia dysfunction. Additionally, they displayed defects in left-right asymmetry including ambiguous expression of southpaw, incorrectly looped hearts and randomized localization of internal organs including the pancreas, features typically conferred by cilia dysfunction. Our findings reveal a novel role for ATR in cilia signalling distinct from its canonical function during replication and strengthen emerging links between cilia function and development. PMID:26908596

  18. ATR promotes cilia signalling: links to developmental impacts

    PubMed Central

    Stiff, Tom; Casar Tena, Teresa; O'Driscoll, Mark; Jeggo, Penny A.; Philipp, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and RAD3-related) cause Seckel syndrome (ATR-SS), a microcephalic primordial dwarfism disorder. Hitherto, the clinical manifestation of ATR deficiency has been attributed to its canonical role in DNA damage response signalling following replication fork stalling/collapse. Here, we show that ATR regulates cilia-dependent signalling in a manner that can be uncoupled from its function during replication. ATR-depleted or patient-derived ATR-SS cells form cilia of slightly reduced length but are dramatically impaired in cilia-dependent signalling functions, including growth factor and Sonic hedgehog signalling. To better understand the developmental impact of ATR loss of function, we also used zebrafish as a model. Zebrafish embryos depleted of Atr resembled ATR-SS morphology, showed a modest but statistically significant reduction in cilia length and other morphological features indicative of cilia dysfunction. Additionally, they displayed defects in left-right asymmetry including ambiguous expression of southpaw, incorrectly looped hearts and randomized localization of internal organs including the pancreas, features typically conferred by cilia dysfunction. Our findings reveal a novel role for ATR in cilia signalling distinct from its canonical function during replication and strengthen emerging links between cilia function and development. PMID:26908596

  19. Left-right asymmetry: cilia and calcium revisited.

    PubMed

    Blum, Martin; Vick, Philipp

    2015-03-01

    Leftward flow generated by motile cilia is known to underlie left-right asymmetry in vertebrate embryos. A new study now links intraciliary calcium oscillations to cilia motility and the downstream nodal signaling cascade that drives left-sided development. PMID:25734272

  20. Modelling elliptically polarised free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, J. R.; Campbell, L. T.; Freund, H. P.; McNeil, B. W. J.

    2016-06-01

    A model of a free electron laser (FEL) operating with an elliptically polarised undulator is presented. The equations describing the FEL interaction, including resonant harmonic radiation fields, are averaged over an undulator period and generate a generalised Bessel function scaling factor, similar to that of planar undulator FEL theory. Comparison between simulations of the averaged model with those of an unaveraged model show very good agreement in the linear regime. Two unexpected results were found. Firstly, an increased coupling to harmonics for elliptical rather than planar polarisarised undulators. Secondly, and thought to be unrelated to the undulator polarisation, a significantly different evolution between the averaged and unaveraged simulations of the harmonic radiation evolution approaching FEL saturation.

  1. IFT-Cargo Interactions and Protein Transport in Cilia.

    PubMed

    Lechtreck, Karl F

    2015-12-01

    The motile and sensory functions of cilia and flagella are indispensable for human health. Cilia assembly requires a dedicated protein shuttle, intraflagellar transport (IFT), a bidirectional motility of multi-megadalton protein arrays along ciliary microtubules. IFT functions as a protein carrier delivering hundreds of distinct proteins into growing cilia. IFT-based protein import and export continue in fully grown cilia and are required for ciliary maintenance and sensing. Large ciliary building blocks might depend on IFT to move through the transition zone, which functions as a ciliary gate. Smaller, freely diffusing proteins, such as tubulin, depend on IFT to be concentrated or removed from cilia. As I discuss here, recent work provides insights into how IFT interacts with its cargoes and how the transport is regulated. PMID:26498262

  2. STUDIES ON CILIA. THE FIXATION OF THE METACHRONAL WAVE.

    PubMed

    SATIR, P

    1963-08-01

    Upon excision into spring water, the lateral cilia of the gill of the freshwater mussel Elliptio complanatus (Solander) stop beating, but 0.04 M potassium ion can activate the gill so that these cilia again beat with metachronal rhythm. One per cent osmium tetroxide quickly pipetted onto a fully activated gill fixes the lateral cilia in a pattern that preserves the form and arrangement of the metachronal wave, and permits the cilia to be studied with the electron microscope in all stages of their beat cycle. Changes are seen in the fixed active preparation that are not present in the inactive control, i.e., in the packing of the cilia, the position of the axis of the ciliary cross-section, and the diameter of the ring of peripheral filaments. Analysis of these parameters may lead to new correlations between ciliary fine structure and function.

  3. Development of actuation system for artificial cilia with magnetic elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumori, Fujio; Saijou, Akinori; Osada, Toshiko; Miura, Hideshi

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of magnetically actuated artificial cilia. Natural cilia are a highly efficient device that produces flow under a small-Reynolds-number state. There are two important characteristics of natural cilia; one is asymmetric movement, which is composed of effective and recovery strokes, and the other is the phase difference of a stroke in each cilium in an array that will produce a metachronal wave. In this paper, we propose an actuation system for artificial cilia composed of a silicone elastomer and multiparticle chains of a magnetic material. The applied magnetic field is controlled by rotation of a permanent magnet. This rotating magnetic field induced an asymmetric movement similar to that of a natural cilium. We also changed the orientation angle of multiparticle chains to control the phase difference of a stroke in each artificial cilium. This technique would help to realize metachronal waves of artificial cilia.

  4. Cilia-Associated Genes Play Differing Roles in Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Stawicki, Tamara M.; Hernandez, Liana; Esterberg, Robert; Linbo, Tor; Owens, Kelly N.; Shah, Arish N.; Thapa, Nihal; Roberts, Brock; Moens, Cecilia B.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Raible, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells possess a single primary cilium, called the kinocilium, early in development. While the kinocilium is lost in auditory hair cells of most species it is maintained in vestibular hair cells. It has generally been believed that the primary role of the kinocilium and cilia-associated genes in hair cells is in the establishment of the polarity of actin-based stereocilia, the hair cell mechanotransduction apparatus. Through genetic screening and testing of candidate genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) we have found that mutations in multiple cilia genes implicated in intraflagellar transport (dync2h1, wdr35, ift88, and traf3ip), and the ciliary transition zone (cc2d2a, mks1, and cep290) lead to resistance to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These genes appear to have differing roles in hair cells, as mutations in intraflagellar transport genes, but not transition zone genes, lead to defects in kinocilia formation and processes dependent upon hair cell mechanotransduction activity. These mutants highlight a novel role of cilia-associated genes in hair cells, and provide powerful tools for further study. PMID:27207957

  5. Cilia-Associated Genes Play Differing Roles in Aminoglycoside-Induced Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Hernandez, Liana; Esterberg, Robert; Linbo, Tor; Owens, Kelly N; Shah, Arish N; Thapa, Nihal; Roberts, Brock; Moens, Cecilia B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells possess a single primary cilium, called the kinocilium, early in development. While the kinocilium is lost in auditory hair cells of most species it is maintained in vestibular hair cells. It has generally been believed that the primary role of the kinocilium and cilia-associated genes in hair cells is in the establishment of the polarity of actin-based stereocilia, the hair cell mechanotransduction apparatus. Through genetic screening and testing of candidate genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) we have found that mutations in multiple cilia genes implicated in intraflagellar transport (dync2h1, wdr35, ift88, and traf3ip), and the ciliary transition zone (cc2d2a, mks1, and cep290) lead to resistance to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. These genes appear to have differing roles in hair cells, as mutations in intraflagellar transport genes, but not transition zone genes, lead to defects in kinocilia formation and processes dependent upon hair cell mechanotransduction activity. These mutants highlight a novel role of cilia-associated genes in hair cells, and provide powerful tools for further study.

  6. Computation of the internal forces in cilia: application to ciliary motion, the effects of viscosity, and cilia interactions.

    PubMed

    Gueron, S; Levit-Gurevich, K

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents a simple and reasonable method for generating a phenomenological model of the internal mechanism of cilia. The model uses a relatively small number of parameters whose values can be obtained by fitting to ciliary beat shapes. Here, we use beat patterns observed in Paramecium. The forces that generate these beats are computed and fit to a simple functional form called the "engine." This engine is incorporated into a recently developed hydrodynamic model that accounts for interactions between neighboring cilia and between the cilia and the surface from which they emerge. The model results are compared to data on ciliary beat patterns of Paramecium obtained under conditions where the beats are two-dimensional. Many essential features of the motion, including several properties that are not built in explicitly, are shown to be captured. In particular, the model displays a realistic change in beat pattern and frequency in response to increased viscosity and to the presence of neighboring cilia in configurations such as rows of cilia and two-dimensional arrays of cilia. We found that when two adjacent model cilia start beating at different phases they become synchronized within several beat periods, as observed in experiments where two flagella are brought into close proximity. Furthermore, examination of various multiciliary configurations shows that an approximately antiplectic wave pattern evolves autonomously. This modeling evidence supports earlier conjectures that metachronism may occur, at least partially, as a self-organized phenomenon due to hydrodynamic interactions between neighboring cilia. PMID:9545031

  7. Computation of the internal forces in cilia: application to ciliary motion, the effects of viscosity, and cilia interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Gueron, S; Levit-Gurevich, K

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a simple and reasonable method for generating a phenomenological model of the internal mechanism of cilia. The model uses a relatively small number of parameters whose values can be obtained by fitting to ciliary beat shapes. Here, we use beat patterns observed in Paramecium. The forces that generate these beats are computed and fit to a simple functional form called the "engine." This engine is incorporated into a recently developed hydrodynamic model that accounts for interactions between neighboring cilia and between the cilia and the surface from which they emerge. The model results are compared to data on ciliary beat patterns of Paramecium obtained under conditions where the beats are two-dimensional. Many essential features of the motion, including several properties that are not built in explicitly, are shown to be captured. In particular, the model displays a realistic change in beat pattern and frequency in response to increased viscosity and to the presence of neighboring cilia in configurations such as rows of cilia and two-dimensional arrays of cilia. We found that when two adjacent model cilia start beating at different phases they become synchronized within several beat periods, as observed in experiments where two flagella are brought into close proximity. Furthermore, examination of various multiciliary configurations shows that an approximately antiplectic wave pattern evolves autonomously. This modeling evidence supports earlier conjectures that metachronism may occur, at least partially, as a self-organized phenomenon due to hydrodynamic interactions between neighboring cilia. PMID:9545031

  8. How to polarise all neutrons in one beam: a high performance polariser and neutron transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, D. Martin; Bentley, P. M.; Pappas, C.

    2016-09-01

    Polarised neutron beams are used in disciplines as diverse as magnetism,soft matter or biology. However, most of these applications often suffer from low flux also because the existing neutron polarising methods imply the filtering of one of the spin states, with a transmission of 50% at maximum. With the purpose of using all neutrons that are usually discarded, we propose a system that splits them according to their polarisation, flips them to match the spin direction, and then focuses them at the sample. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations show that this is achievable over a wide wavelength range and with an outstanding performance at the price of a more divergent neutron beam at the sample position.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Hilfinger, Andreas; Chattopadhyay, Amit K; Jülicher, Frank

    2009-05-01

    Cilia and flagella are hairlike extensions of eukaryotic cells which generate oscillatory beat patterns that can propel micro-organisms and create fluid flows near cellular surfaces. The evolutionary highly conserved core of cilia and flagella consists of a cylindrical arrangement of nine microtubule doublets, called the axoneme. The axoneme is an actively bending structure whose motility results from the action of dynein motor proteins cross-linking microtubule doublets and generating stresses that induce bending deformations. The periodic beat patterns are the result of a mechanical feedback that leads to self-organized bending waves along the axoneme. Using a theoretical framework to describe planar beating motion, we derive a nonlinear wave equation that describes the fundamental Fourier mode of the axonemal beat. We study the role of nonlinearities and investigate how the amplitude of oscillations increases in the vicinity of an oscillatory instability. We furthermore present numerical solutions of the nonlinear wave equation for different boundary conditions. We find that the nonlinear waves are well approximated by the linearly unstable modes for amplitudes of beat patterns similar to those observed experimentally. PMID:19518491

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of cilia and flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfinger, Andreas; Chattopadhyay, Amit K.; Jülicher, Frank

    2009-05-01

    Cilia and flagella are hairlike extensions of eukaryotic cells which generate oscillatory beat patterns that can propel micro-organisms and create fluid flows near cellular surfaces. The evolutionary highly conserved core of cilia and flagella consists of a cylindrical arrangement of nine microtubule doublets, called the axoneme. The axoneme is an actively bending structure whose motility results from the action of dynein motor proteins cross-linking microtubule doublets and generating stresses that induce bending deformations. The periodic beat patterns are the result of a mechanical feedback that leads to self-organized bending waves along the axoneme. Using a theoretical framework to describe planar beating motion, we derive a nonlinear wave equation that describes the fundamental Fourier mode of the axonemal beat. We study the role of nonlinearities and investigate how the amplitude of oscillations increases in the vicinity of an oscillatory instability. We furthermore present numerical solutions of the nonlinear wave equation for different boundary conditions. We find that the nonlinear waves are well approximated by the linearly unstable modes for amplitudes of beat patterns similar to those observed experimentally.

  11. An age of enlightenment for cilia: The FASEB summer research conference on the "Biology of Cilia and Flagella".

    PubMed

    Tran, Pamela V; Lechtreck, Karl F

    2016-01-15

    From July 19-24, 2015, 169 clinicians and basic scientists gathered in the vertiginous heights of Snowmass, Colorado (2502 m) for the fourth FASEB summer research conference on the 'Biology of Cilia and Flagella'. Organizers Maureen Barr (Rutgers University), Iain Drummond (Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School), and Jagesh Shah (Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School) assembled a program filled with new data and forward-thinking ideas documenting the ongoing growth of the field. Sixty oral presentations and 77 posters covered novel aspects of cilia structure, ciliogenesis, cilia motility, cilia-mediated signaling, and cilia-related disease. In this report, we summarize the meeting, highlight exciting developments and discuss open questions.

  12. An age of enlightenment for cilia: The FASEB summer research conference on the "Biology of Cilia and Flagella".

    PubMed

    Tran, Pamela V; Lechtreck, Karl F

    2016-01-15

    From July 19-24, 2015, 169 clinicians and basic scientists gathered in the vertiginous heights of Snowmass, Colorado (2502 m) for the fourth FASEB summer research conference on the 'Biology of Cilia and Flagella'. Organizers Maureen Barr (Rutgers University), Iain Drummond (Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School), and Jagesh Shah (Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School) assembled a program filled with new data and forward-thinking ideas documenting the ongoing growth of the field. Sixty oral presentations and 77 posters covered novel aspects of cilia structure, ciliogenesis, cilia motility, cilia-mediated signaling, and cilia-related disease. In this report, we summarize the meeting, highlight exciting developments and discuss open questions. PMID:26597000

  13. Structural defects in cilia of the choroid plexus, subfornical organ and ventricular ependyma are associated with ventriculomegaly

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hydrocephalus is a heterogeneous disorder with multiple etiologies that are not yet fully understood. Animal models have implicated dysfunctional cilia of the ependyma and choroid plexus in the development of the disorder. In this report, we sought to determine the origin of the ventriculomegaly in four Bardet Biedl syndrome (BBS) mutant mouse strains as models of a ciliopathy. Methods Evans Blue dye was injected into the lateral ventricle of wild- type and BBS mutant mice to determine whether obstruction of intra- or extra-ventricular CSF flow contributed to ventriculomegaly. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine the ultrastructure of the choroid plexus, subfornical organ (SFO), subcommisural organ (SCO), and ventricular ependyma to evaluate their ultrastructure and the morphology of their primary and motile cilia. Results and discussion No obstruction of intra- or extra-ventricular CSF flow was observed, implying a communicating form of hydrocephalus in BBS mutant mice. TEM analyses of the mutants showed no evidence of choroidal papillomas or breakdown of the blood:CSF barrier. In contrast, structural defects were observed in a subpopulation of cilia lining the choroid plexus, SFO, and ventricular ependyma. These included disruptions of the microtubular structure of the axoneme and the presence of electron-dense vesicular-like material along the ciliary shaft and at the tips of cilia. Conclusions Abnormalities in cilia structure and function have the potential to influence ciliary intraflagellar transport (IFT), cilia maintenance, protein trafficking, and regulation of CSF production. Ciliary structural defects are the only consistent pathological features associated with CSF-related structures in BBS mutant mice. These defects are observed from an early age, and may contribute to the underlying pathophysiology of ventriculomegaly. PMID:23046663

  14. Measurement of polarisation in collisions at = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jezabek, M.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manzali, M.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spinella, F.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-05-01

    The polarisation of prompt mesons is measured by performing an angular analysis of decays using proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0, collected by the LHCb detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The polarisation is measured in bins of transverse momentum and rapidity in the kinematic region and , and is compared to theoretical models. No significant polarisation is observed.

  15. Chlamydomonas IFT88 and Its Mouse Homologue, Polycystic Kidney Disease Gene Tg737, Are Required for Assembly of Cilia and Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Pazour, Gregory J.; Dickert, Bethany L.; Vucica, Yvonne; Seeley, E. Scott; Rosenbaum, Joel L.; Witman, George B.; Cole, Douglas G.

    2000-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is a rapid movement of multi-subunit protein particles along flagellar microtubules and is required for assembly and maintenance of eukaryotic flagella. We cloned and sequenced a Chlamydomonas cDNA encoding the IFT88 subunit of the IFT particle and identified a Chlamydomonas insertional mutant that is missing this gene. The phenotype of this mutant is normal except for the complete absence of flagella. IFT88 is homologous to mouse and human genes called Tg737. Mice with defects in Tg737 die shortly after birth from polycystic kidney disease. We show that the primary cilia in the kidney of Tg737 mutant mice are shorter than normal. This indicates that IFT is important for primary cilia assembly in mammals. It is likely that primary cilia have an important function in the kidney and that defects in their assembly can lead to polycystic kidney disease. PMID:11062270

  16. Polarised Photon Beams for the BGO-OD Experiment at ELSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, T.; Bella, A.; Alef, S.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Becker, M.; Bielefeldt, P.; Boese, S.; Braghieri, A.; Brinkmann, K.; Cole, P.; Curciarello, F.; De Leo, V.; Di Salvo, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Fantini, A.; Freyermuth, O.; Friedrich, S.; Frommberger, F.; Ganenko, V.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Giardina, G.; Goertz, S.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, P.; Hillert, W.; Ignatov, A.; Jahn, R.; Joosten, R.; Jude, T. C.; Klein, F.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopatin, I. V.; Mandaglio, G.; Messi, F.; Messi, R.; Metag, V.; Moricciani, D.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Nanova, M.; Nedorezov, V.; Novinskiy, D.; Pedroni, P.; Reitz, B.; Romaniuk, M.; Rostomyan, T.; Rudnev, N.; Schaerf, C.; Scheluchin, G.; Schmieden, H.; Stugelev, A.; Sumachev, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Vegna, V.; Walther, D.; Watts, D.; Zaunick, H.

    The new BGO-OD experiment at the electron accelerator ELSA, of the University of Bonn, is designed to study the reaction dynamics of nucleon excitations in meson photoproduction. It consists of a central BGO calorimeter with a magnetic spectrometer in forward direction. The physics programme includes the measurement of polarisation observables using linearly and circularly polarised photon beams. Linear polarisation is obtained by coherent bremsstrahlung off a diamond crystal, and circular polarisation is obtained via bremsstrahlung from longitudinally polarised electrons. The degree of linear polarisation is determined from the bremsstrahlung spectrum itself. To determine the polarisation of the circularly polarised photon beam, the polarisation of the electron beam is measured by a Møller polarimeter. As a preliminary consistency check, the (linear) polarisation observable, Σ, was compared to world data for π0 and η photoproduction. To determine the degree of circular polarisation, a Møller polarimeter was setup and first measurements of the electron beam polarisation performed.

  17. Evolutionary implications of localization of the signaling scaffold protein parafusin to both cilia and the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satir, Birgit Hegner; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Liu, Li; Lethan, Mette; Satir, Peter; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2015-02-01

    Parafusin (PFUS), a 63 kDa protein first discovered in the eukaryote Paramecium and known for its role in apicomplexan exocytosis, provides a model for the common origin of cellular systems employing scaffold proteins for targeting and signaling. PFUS is closely related to eubacterial rather than archeal phosphoglucomutases (PGM) - as we proved by comparison of their 88 sequences - but has no PGM activity. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis with a PFUS-specific peptide antibody showed presence of this protein around the base region of primary cilia in a variety of mammalian cell types, including mouse embryonic (MEFs) and human foreskin fibroblasts (hFFs), human carcinoma stem cells (NT-2 cells), and human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Further, PFUS localized to the nucleus of fibroblasts, and prominently to nucleoli of MEFs. Localization studies were confirmed by Western blot analysis, showing that the PFUS antibody specifically recognizes a single protein of ca. 63 kDa in both cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Finally, immunofluorescence microscopy analysis showed that PFUS localized to nuclei and cilia in Paramecium. These results support the suggestion that PFUS plays a role in signaling between nucleus and cilia, and that the cilium and the nucleus both evolved around the time of eukaryotic emergence. We hypothesize that near the beginnings of eukaryotic cell evolution, scaffold proteins such as PFUS arose as peripheral membrane protein identifiers for cytoplasmic membrane trafficking and were employed similarly during the subsequent evolution of exocytic, nuclear transport, and ciliogenic mechanisms.

  18. Cilia-associated bacteria in fatal Bordetella bronchiseptica pneumonia of dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Taha-Abdelaziz, Khaled; Bassel, Laura L; Harness, Melanie L; Clark, Mary Ellen; Register, Karen B; Caswell, Jeff L

    2016-07-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica frequently causes nonfatal tracheobronchitis, but its role in fatal pneumonia is less recognized. Our study evaluated histologic identification of cilia-associated bacteria as a method for diagnosis of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia. Cases of fatal bronchopneumonia were studied retrospectively, excluding neonates and cases of aspiration pneumonia, minor lung lesions, or autolysis. The study population comprised 36 canine and 31 feline cases of bronchopneumonia. B. bronchiseptica was identified in 8 of 36 canine and 14 of 31 feline cases based on immunohistochemistry (IHC) using serum from a rabbit hyperimmunized with pertactin, PCR testing (Fla2/Fla12), and/or bacterial culture data when available. Of these, IHC was positive in 4 canine and 7 feline cases, PCR was positive in 8 canine and 14 feline cases, and B. bronchiseptica was isolated in 2 of 5 canine and 3 of 9 feline cases tested. Examination of histologic sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin revealed bronchial cilia-associated bacteria in 4 of 36 canine and 5 of 31 feline cases; these were all positive by IHC and PCR. The presence of cilia-associated bacteria had been noted in the pathology report for only 2 of these 9 cases. Thus, the presence of cilia-associated bacteria seems frequently overlooked by pathologists, but is a diagnostically significant feature of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia. A specific diagnosis of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia is important because it suggests primary or opportunistic bacterial pneumonia rather than aspiration pneumonia, and because of the risk of animal-to-animal transmission of B. bronchiseptica, the availability of vaccines for disease prevention, and the potential zoonotic risk to immunocompromised pet owners. PMID:27178716

  19. Cilia-associated bacteria in fatal Bordetella bronchiseptica pneumonia of dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Taha-Abdelaziz, Khaled; Bassel, Laura L; Harness, Melanie L; Clark, Mary Ellen; Register, Karen B; Caswell, Jeff L

    2016-07-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica frequently causes nonfatal tracheobronchitis, but its role in fatal pneumonia is less recognized. Our study evaluated histologic identification of cilia-associated bacteria as a method for diagnosis of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia. Cases of fatal bronchopneumonia were studied retrospectively, excluding neonates and cases of aspiration pneumonia, minor lung lesions, or autolysis. The study population comprised 36 canine and 31 feline cases of bronchopneumonia. B. bronchiseptica was identified in 8 of 36 canine and 14 of 31 feline cases based on immunohistochemistry (IHC) using serum from a rabbit hyperimmunized with pertactin, PCR testing (Fla2/Fla12), and/or bacterial culture data when available. Of these, IHC was positive in 4 canine and 7 feline cases, PCR was positive in 8 canine and 14 feline cases, and B. bronchiseptica was isolated in 2 of 5 canine and 3 of 9 feline cases tested. Examination of histologic sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin revealed bronchial cilia-associated bacteria in 4 of 36 canine and 5 of 31 feline cases; these were all positive by IHC and PCR. The presence of cilia-associated bacteria had been noted in the pathology report for only 2 of these 9 cases. Thus, the presence of cilia-associated bacteria seems frequently overlooked by pathologists, but is a diagnostically significant feature of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia. A specific diagnosis of B. bronchiseptica pneumonia is important because it suggests primary or opportunistic bacterial pneumonia rather than aspiration pneumonia, and because of the risk of animal-to-animal transmission of B. bronchiseptica, the availability of vaccines for disease prevention, and the potential zoonotic risk to immunocompromised pet owners.

  20. Polarisation-Insensitive Optical Fibre Phase Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreit, Darran; Youngquist, Robert C.; Giles, Ian P.

    1987-10-01

    An acoustic fibre phase modulator, operating up to a few MHz, is described which employs a piezoelectric plate in a squeezing action. A novel construction using two machined brass v-grooves results in a much reduced sensitivity to optical polarisation and the optimum groove angle is independent of the level of friction on the walls of each groove. A normalised birefringence of 0.04 was achieved at 1.5MHz, with a modulation efficiency of approximately 0.23 rad/Vrms., for a 2cm long device.

  1. Using Xenopus Skin to Study Cilia Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Michael E.; Mitchell, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are prevalent biological structures that are important for cell signaling and for generating fluid flow (or motility). Cilia are found throughout biology from single-celled organisms to vertebrates, and many model systems have been employed for their analysis. Here, we describe the use of Xenopus larval skin as a system for the study of ciliogenesis and ciliary function. In particular, we describe basic molecular and embryological manipulations and imaging techniques that have proven particularly useful for understanding the polarized beating of cilia and the generation of directed fluid flow (Werner & Mitchell, 2012). However, these same tools have the potential to benefit a large number of cilia-related biological questions. PMID:23522471

  2. Hydrodynamic interactions of cilia on a spherical body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasouri, Babak; Elfring, Gwynn J.

    2016-03-01

    Microorganisms develop coordinated beating patterns on surfaces lined with cilia known as metachronal waves. For a chain of cilia attached to a flat ciliate, it has been shown that hydrodynamic interactions alone can lead the system to synchronize. However, several microorganisms possess a curve-shaped ciliate body and so to understand the effect of this geometry on the formation of metachronal waves, we evaluate the hydrodynamic interactions of cilia near a large spherical body. Using a minimal model, we show that for a chain of cilia around the sphere, the natural periodicity in the geometry leads the system to synchronize. We also report an emergent wavelike behavior when an asymmetry is introduced to the system.

  3. Using Xenopus skin to study cilia development and function.

    PubMed

    Werner, Michael E; Mitchell, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are prevalent biological structures that are important for cell signaling and for generating fluid flow (or motility). Cilia are found throughout biology from single-celled organisms to vertebrates, and many model systems have been employed for their analysis. Here, we describe the use of Xenopus larval skin as a system for the study of ciliogenesis and ciliary function. In particular, we describe basic molecular and embryological manipulations and imaging techniques that have proven particularly useful for understanding the polarized beating of cilia and the generation of directed fluid flow (Werner & Mitchell, 2012). However, these same tools have the potential to benefit a large number of cilia-related biological questions. PMID:23522471

  4. Hydrodynamic interactions of cilia on a spherical body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasouri, Babak; Elfring, Gwynn J.

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of metachronal waves in ciliated microorganisms can arise solely from the hydrodynamic interactions between the cilia. For a chain of cilia attached to a flat ciliate, it was observed that fluid forces can lead the system to form a metachronal wave. However, several microorganisms such as paramecium and volvox possess a curved shaped ciliate body. To understand the effect of this geometry on the formation of metachronal waves, we evaluate the hydrodynamic interactions of cilia near a large spherical body. Using a minimal model, we show that for a chain of cilia around the sphere, the embedded periodicity in the geometry leads the system to synchronize. We also report an emergent wave-like behavior when an asymmetry is introduced to the system.

  5. Cilia propel the embryo in the right direction.

    PubMed

    Brueckner, M

    2001-07-15

    Cilia have long been suspected to play a role in the determination of left-right asymmetry. Humans with the dominantly inherited condition Kartagener syndrome have defective cilia and a 50% incidence of mirror-image positioning of their organs (situs inversus). Analysis of mouse mutations affecting ciliary biogenesis and motility has demonstrated that the molecular motors kinesin and dynein are required to establish normal handed organismal asymmetry. The cilia that propel formation of the embryonic left-right axis are not conventional cilia, but monocilia. They are found on the node, or organizer, of the gastrulation-stage mouse embryo where they drive net leftward movement of the fluid surrounding the node, and initiate left-right asymmetry.

  6. The significance of ultrastructural abnormalities of human cilia.

    PubMed

    Fox, B; Bull, T B; Makey, A R; Rawbone, R

    1981-12-01

    The electronmicroscopic structure of cilia was studied from the inferior turbinate of the nose in 22 adults, and in 84 biopsies from the bronchial tree of 40 adults. The incidence of compound cilia and abnormal microtubular structures was assessed. There were significant variations in the incidence of abnormalities in different parts of the airways and even within different areas of the same electronmicroscopic section. The focal nature of differences in structure of cilia indicate that abnormalities found in a single biopsy do not necessarily reflect a generalized change in the bronchial tree. Thus, such a finding should not be used as evidence that the abnormalities of cilia are the cause of decrease in mucociliary clearance or that they play a role in the pathogenesis of bronchiectasis and sinusitis.

  7. Circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence and electroluminescence of iridium complexes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tian-Yi; Jing, Yi-Ming; Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Lin; Tang, Zhiyong; Zheng, You-Xuan; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all the neutral iridium complexes widely used as dopants in PhOLEDs are racemic mixtures; however, this study observed that these complexes can be separated into stable optically active Λ and ∆ isomers and that their chirality is an intrinsic property. The circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence (CPPPL) signals of Λ/Δ isomers are perfect mirror images with opposite polarisation and equal intensity exhibiting a “handedness” for the polarisation. For the first time, we applied the Λ/Δ iridium isomers as emitters in OLEDs, and the circularly polarised phosphorescent electroluminescence (CPPEL) spectra reveal completely positive or negative broad peaks consistent with the CPPPL spectra. The results demonstrate that the Λ/Δ isomers have potential application for 3D OLEDs because they can exhibit high efficiency and luminance, and 3D display technology based on circularly polarised light is the most comfortable for the eyes. PMID:26446521

  8. Evolution: Tracing the origins of centrioles, cilia, and flagella.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Santos, Zita; Azimzadeh, Juliette; Pereira-Leal, José B; Bettencourt-Dias, Mónica

    2011-07-25

    Centrioles/basal bodies (CBBs) are microtubule-based cylindrical organelles that nucleate the formation of centrosomes, cilia, and flagella. CBBs, cilia, and flagella are ancestral structures; they are present in all major eukaryotic groups. Despite the conservation of their core structure, there is variability in their architecture, function, and biogenesis. Recent genomic and functional studies have provided insight into the evolution of the structure and function of these organelles. PMID:21788366

  9. Evolution: Tracing the origins of centrioles, cilia, and flagella.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Santos, Zita; Azimzadeh, Juliette; Pereira-Leal, José B; Bettencourt-Dias, Mónica

    2011-07-25

    Centrioles/basal bodies (CBBs) are microtubule-based cylindrical organelles that nucleate the formation of centrosomes, cilia, and flagella. CBBs, cilia, and flagella are ancestral structures; they are present in all major eukaryotic groups. Despite the conservation of their core structure, there is variability in their architecture, function, and biogenesis. Recent genomic and functional studies have provided insight into the evolution of the structure and function of these organelles.

  10. Microscale imaging of cilia-driven fluid flow

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Brendan K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Cilia-driven fluid flow is important for multiple processes in the body, including respiratory mucus clearance, gamete transport in the oviduct, right-left patterning in the embryonic node, and cerebrospinal fluid circulation. Multiple imaging techniques have been applied towards quantifying ciliary flow. Here we review common velocimetry methods of quantifying fluid flow. We then discuss four important optical modalities, including light microscopy, epifluorescence, confocal microscopy, and optical coherence tomography, that have been used to investigate cilia-driven flow. PMID:25417211

  11. A Numerical Study of Muco-Ciliary Transport under the condition of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayathilake, Pahala Gedara; Lee, Wan Lung; Le, Duc Vinh; Lee, Heow Pueh; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2012-11-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a disease due to the defects in motile cilia. A two-dimensional numerical model based on the immersed boundary method coupled with the projection method is used for a preliminary study of the flow physics of muco-ciliary transport of human respiratory tract under PCD conditions. The effects of the cilia beating amplitude, cilia beat pattern (CBP), cilia beat frequency (CBF), immotile cilia, and uncoordinated beating of cilia on mucus transport are investigated. As expected, the mucus velocity decreases as the beating amplitude and CBF decrease. The windscreen wiper motion and rigid rod motion, which are two abnormal CBPs owing to PCD, would greatly reduce the mucus transport. The mucus velocity decreases rather linearly if the number of uniformly distributed immotile cilia increases. The results further show that the mucus velocity would be slightly reduced when the uniformly distributed immotile cilia are rearranged as a cluster of immotile cilia. Furthermore, if the half of the cilia are immotile and uniformly distributed, the incoordination between motile cilia would not significantly affect the mucus velocity.

  12. Pneumatically-actuated artificial cilia array for biomimetic fluid propulsion.

    PubMed

    Gorissen, Benjamin; de Volder, Michaël; Reynaerts, Dominiek

    2015-11-21

    Arrays of beating cilia emerged in nature as one of the most efficient propulsion mechanisms at a small scale, and are omnipresent in microorganisms. Previous attempts at mimicking these systems have foundered against the complexity of fabricating small-scale cilia exhibiting complex beating motions. In this paper, we propose for the first time arrays of pneumatically-actuated artificial cilia that are able to address some of these issues. These artificial cilia arrays consist of six highly flexible silicone rubber actuators with a diameter of 1 mm and a length of 8 mm that can be actuated independently from each other. In an experimental setup, the effects of the driving frequency, phase difference and duty cycle on the net flow in a closed-loop channel have been studied. Net fluid speeds of up to 19 mm s(-1) have been measured. Further, it is possible to invert the flow direction by simply changing the driving frequency or by changing the duty cycle of the driving block pulse pressure wave without changing the bending direction of the cilia. Using PIV measurements, we corroborate for the first time existing mathematical models of cilia arrays to measurements on prototypes.

  13. Metachronal wave formation in a model of pulmonary cilia.

    PubMed

    Mitran, Sorin M

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional simulation of the formation of metachronal waves in rows of pulmonary cilia is presented. The cilia move in a two-layer fluid model. The fluid layer adjacent to the cilia bases is purely viscous while the tips of the cilia move through a viscoelastic fluid. An overlapping fixed-moving grid formulation is employed to capture the effect of the cilia on the surrounding fluid. In contrast with immersed boundary methods, this technique allows a natural enforcement of boundary conditions without the need for smoothing of singular force distributions. The fluid domains are discretized using a finite volume method. The 9 + 2 internal microtubule structure of an individual cilium is modeled using large-deflection, curved, finite-element beams. The microtubule skeleton is cross-linked to itself and to the cilium membrane through spring elements which model nexin links. The cilium membrane itself is considered to be elastic and subject to fluid stresses computed from the moving grid formulation as well as internal forces transmitted from the microtubule skeleton. A cilium is set into motion by the action of dynein molecules exerting forces between adjacent microtubules. Realistic models of the forces exerted by dynein molecules are extracted from measurements of observed cilia shapes.

  14. Metachronal wave formation in a model of pulmonary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Mitran, Sorin M.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional simulation of the formation of metachronal waves in rows of pulmonary cilia is presented. The cilia move in a two-layer fluid model. The fluid layer adjacent to the cilia bases is purely viscous while the tips of the cilia move through a viscoelastic fluid. An overlapping fixed-moving grid formulation is employed to capture the effect of the cilia on the surrounding fluid. In contrast with immersed boundary methods, this technique allows a natural enforcement of boundary conditions without the need for smoothing of singular force distributions. The fluid domains are discretized using a finite volume method. The 9 + 2 internal microtubule structure of an individual cilium is modeled using large-deflection, curved, finite-element beams. The microtubule skeleton is cross-linked to itself and to the cilium membrane through spring elements which model nexin links. The cilium membrane itself is considered to be elastic and subject to fluid stresses computed from the moving grid formulation as well as internal forces transmitted from the microtubule skeleton. A cilium is set into motion by the action of dynein molecules exerting forces between adjacent microtubules. Realistic models of the forces exerted by dynein molecules are extracted from measurements of observed cilia shapes. PMID:19169426

  15. Branchial cilia and sperm flagella recruit distinct axonemal components.

    PubMed

    Konno, Alu; Shiba, Kogiku; Cai, Chunhua; Inaba, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella have highly conserved 9 + 2 structures. They are functionally diverged to play cell-type-specific roles even in a multicellular organism. Although their structural components are therefore believed to be common, few studies have investigated the molecular diversity of the protein components of the cilia and flagella in a single organism. Here we carried out a proteomic analysis and compared protein components between branchial cilia and sperm flagella in a marine invertebrate chordate, Ciona intestinalis. Distinct feature of protein recruitment in branchial cilia and sperm flagella has been clarified; (1) Isoforms of α- and β-tubulins as well as those of actins are distinctly used in branchial cilia or sperm flagella. (2) Structural components, such as dynein docking complex, tektins and an outer dense fiber protein, are used differently by the cilia and flagella. (3) Sperm flagella are specialized for the cAMP- and Ca2+-dependent regulation of outer arm dynein and for energy metabolism by glycolytic enzymes. Our present study clearly demonstrates that flagellar or ciliary proteins are properly recruited according to their function and stability, despite their apparent structural resemblance and conservation.

  16. Pneumatically-actuated artificial cilia array for biomimetic fluid propulsion.

    PubMed

    Gorissen, Benjamin; de Volder, Michaël; Reynaerts, Dominiek

    2015-11-21

    Arrays of beating cilia emerged in nature as one of the most efficient propulsion mechanisms at a small scale, and are omnipresent in microorganisms. Previous attempts at mimicking these systems have foundered against the complexity of fabricating small-scale cilia exhibiting complex beating motions. In this paper, we propose for the first time arrays of pneumatically-actuated artificial cilia that are able to address some of these issues. These artificial cilia arrays consist of six highly flexible silicone rubber actuators with a diameter of 1 mm and a length of 8 mm that can be actuated independently from each other. In an experimental setup, the effects of the driving frequency, phase difference and duty cycle on the net flow in a closed-loop channel have been studied. Net fluid speeds of up to 19 mm s(-1) have been measured. Further, it is possible to invert the flow direction by simply changing the driving frequency or by changing the duty cycle of the driving block pulse pressure wave without changing the bending direction of the cilia. Using PIV measurements, we corroborate for the first time existing mathematical models of cilia arrays to measurements on prototypes. PMID:26439855

  17. Schmidtea mediterranea: a model system for analysis of motile cilia.

    PubMed

    Rompolas, Panteleimon; Patel-King, Ramila S; King, Stephen M

    2009-01-01

    Cilia are cellular organelles that appeared early in the evolution of eukaryotes. These structures and the pool of about 600genes involved in their assembly and function are highly conserved in organisms as distant as single-cell protists, like Chlamydomonas reinhardtti, and humans (Silflow and Lefebvre, 2001). A significant body of work on the biology of cilia has been produced over the years, with the help of powerful model organisms including C. reinhardtti, Caenorhabditis elegans, sea urchins, and mice. However, specific limitations of these systems, especially regarding the ability to efficiently study gene loss-of-function, warrant the search for a new model organism to study cilia and cilia-based motility. Schmidtea mediterranea is a species of planarian (Class: Tubellaria) with a well-defined monostratified ciliated epithelium, which contributes to the motility of the organism, in addition to other more specialized ciliary structures. The use of S. mediterranea as an experimental system to study stem cell biology and regeneration has led to a recently sequenced genome and to the development of a wide array of powerful tools including the ability to inhibit gene expression via RNA interference. In addition, we have developed and describe here a number of methods for analyzing motile cilia in S. mediterranea. Overall, S. mediterranea is a highly versatile, easy to maintain, and genetically tractable organism that provides a powerful alternative model system for the study of motile cilia.

  18. Endothelial Cilia Are Essential for Developmental Vascular Integrity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Sowjanya; Yu, Jianxin A.; Li, Jade; Li, Yuanyuan; Weinstein, Brant M.; Nicoli, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The cilium is a signaling platform of the vertebrate cell. It has a critical role in polycystic kidney disease and nephronophthisis. Cilia have been detected on endothelial cells, but the function of these organelles in the vasculature remains incompletely defined. In this study, using genetic and chemical genetic tools in the model organism zebrafish, we reveal an essential role of cilia in developmental vascular integrity. Embryos expressing mutant intraflagellar transport genes, which are essential and specific for cilia biogenesis, displayed increased risk of developmental intracranial hemorrhage, whereas the morphology of the vasculature remained normal. Moreover, cilia were present on endothelial cells in the developing zebrafish vasculature. We further show that the involvement of cilia in vascular integrity is endothelial autonomous, because endothelial-specific re-expression of intraflagellar transport genes in respective mutants rescued the intracranial hemorrhage phenotype. Finally, whereas inhibition of Hedgehog signaling increased the risk of intracranial hemorrhage in ciliary mutants, activation of the pathway rescued this phenotype. In contrast, embryos expressing an inactivating mutation in pkd2, one of two autosomal dominant cystic kidney disease genes, did not show increased risk of developmental intracranial hemorrhage. These results suggest that Hedgehog signaling is a major mechanism for this novel role of endothelial cilia in establishing vascular integrity. PMID:25214579

  19. Midbody remnant licenses primary cilia formation in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ott, Carolyn M

    2016-08-01

    Tethered midbody remnants dancing across apical microvilli, encountering the centrosome, and beckoning forth a cilium-who would have guessed this is how polarized epithelial cells coordinate the end of mitosis and the beginning of ciliogenesis? New evidence from Bernabé-Rubio et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201601020) supports this emerging model. PMID:27482049

  20. Anatomical and physiological evidence for polarisation vision in the nocturnal bee Megalopta genalis.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Birgit; Cronin, Thomas W; Ribi, Willi A; Wcislo, William T; Warrant, Eric J

    2007-06-01

    The presence of a specialised dorsal rim area with an ability to detect the e-vector orientation of polarised light is shown for the first time in a nocturnal hymenopteran. The dorsal rim area of the halictid bee Megalopta genalis features a number of characteristic anatomical specialisations including an increased rhabdom diameter and a lack of primary screening pigments. Optically, these specialisations result in wide spatial receptive fields (Deltarho = 14 degrees ), a common adaptation found in the dorsal rim areas of insects used to filter out interfering effects (i.e. clouds) from the sky. In this specialised eye region all nine photoreceptors contribute their microvilli to the entire length of the ommatidia. These orthogonally directed microvilli are anatomically arranged in an almost linear, anterior-posterior orientation. Intracellular recordings within the dorsal rim area show very high polarisation sensitivity and a sensitivity peak within the ultraviolet part of the spectrum.

  1. The coiled-coil domain containing protein CCDC151 is required for the function of IFT-dependent motile cilia in animals.

    PubMed

    Jerber, Julie; Baas, Dominique; Soulavie, Fabien; Chhin, Brigitte; Cortier, Elisabeth; Vesque, Christine; Thomas, Joëlle; Durand, Bénédicte

    2014-02-01

    Cilia are evolutionarily conserved organelles endowed with essential physiological and developmental functions. In humans, disruption of cilia motility or signaling leads to complex pleiotropic genetic disorders called ciliopathies. Cilia motility requires the assembly of multi-subunit motile components such as dynein arms, but mechanisms underlying their assembly pathway and transport into the axoneme are still largely unknown. We identified a previously uncharacterized coiled-coil domain containing protein CCDC151, which is evolutionarily conserved in motile ciliated species and shares ancient features with the outer dynein arm-docking complex 2 of Chlamydomonas. In Drosophila, we show that CG14127/CCDC151 is associated with motile intraflagellar transport (IFT)-dependent cilia and required for geotaxis behavior of adult flies. In zebrafish, Ccdc151 is expressed in tissues with motile cilia, and morpholino-induced depletion of Ccdc151 leads to left-right asymmetry defects and kidney cysts. We demonstrate that Ccdc151 is required for proper motile function of cilia in the Kupffer's vesicle and in the pronephros by controlling dynein arm assembly, showing that Ccdc151 is a novel player in the control of IFT-dependent dynein arm assembly in animals. However, we observed that CCDC151 is also implicated in other cellular functions in vertebrates. In zebrafish, ccdc151 is involved in proper orientation of cell divisions in the pronephros and genetically interacts with prickle1 in this process. Furthermore, knockdown experiments in mammalian cells demonstrate that CCDC151 is implicated in the regulation of primary cilium length. Hence, CCDC151 is required for motile cilia function in animals but has acquired additional non-motile functions in vertebrates.

  2. The Strange Quark Polarisation from COMPASS data

    SciTech Connect

    Kouznetsov, O.

    2009-12-17

    The strange quark helicity distribution {delta}s(x) was derived at LO from the inclusive asymmetry A{sub a,d} and the semi-inclusive asymmetries A{sub 1,d}{sup {pi}}{sup +}, A{sub 1,d}{sup {pi}}{sup -}, A{sub 1,d}{sup K+}, A{sub 1,d}{sup K-}, measured by COMPASS in polarised deep inelastic muon-deuteron scattering. The distribution of {delta}s(x) is compatible with zero in the whole measured range. The value of the first moment of {delta}s and its error are very sensitive to the assumed value of the ratio of the s-bar-quark to u-quark fragmentation functions into positive kaons {integral}D(K+/s)(z)dz/{integral}D{sub u}{sup K+}(z)dz.

  3. Null point of discrimination in crustacean polarisation vision.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Christy, John; Roberts, Nicholas W; Marshall, N Justin

    2014-07-15

    The polarisation of light is used by many species of cephalopods and crustaceans to discriminate objects or to communicate. Most visual systems with this ability, such as that of the fiddler crab, include receptors with photopigments that are oriented horizontally and vertically relative to the outside world. Photoreceptors in such an orthogonal array are maximally sensitive to polarised light with the same fixed e-vector orientation. Using opponent neural connections, this two-channel system may produce a single value of polarisation contrast and, consequently, it may suffer from null points of discrimination. Stomatopod crustaceans use a different system for polarisation vision, comprising at least four types of polarisation-sensitive photoreceptor arranged at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg relative to each other, in conjunction with extensive rotational eye movements. This anatomical arrangement should not suffer from equivalent null points of discrimination. To test whether these two systems were vulnerable to null points, we presented the fiddler crab Uca heteropleura and the stomatopod Haptosquilla trispinosa with polarised looming stimuli on a modified LCD monitor. The fiddler crab was less sensitive to differences in the degree of polarised light when the e-vector was at -45 deg than when the e-vector was horizontal. In comparison, stomatopods showed no difference in sensitivity between the two stimulus types. The results suggest that fiddler crabs suffer from a null point of sensitivity, while stomatopods do not.

  4. Null point of discrimination in crustacean polarisation vision.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Christy, John; Roberts, Nicholas W; Marshall, N Justin

    2014-07-15

    The polarisation of light is used by many species of cephalopods and crustaceans to discriminate objects or to communicate. Most visual systems with this ability, such as that of the fiddler crab, include receptors with photopigments that are oriented horizontally and vertically relative to the outside world. Photoreceptors in such an orthogonal array are maximally sensitive to polarised light with the same fixed e-vector orientation. Using opponent neural connections, this two-channel system may produce a single value of polarisation contrast and, consequently, it may suffer from null points of discrimination. Stomatopod crustaceans use a different system for polarisation vision, comprising at least four types of polarisation-sensitive photoreceptor arranged at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg relative to each other, in conjunction with extensive rotational eye movements. This anatomical arrangement should not suffer from equivalent null points of discrimination. To test whether these two systems were vulnerable to null points, we presented the fiddler crab Uca heteropleura and the stomatopod Haptosquilla trispinosa with polarised looming stimuli on a modified LCD monitor. The fiddler crab was less sensitive to differences in the degree of polarised light when the e-vector was at -45 deg than when the e-vector was horizontal. In comparison, stomatopods showed no difference in sensitivity between the two stimulus types. The results suggest that fiddler crabs suffer from a null point of sensitivity, while stomatopods do not. PMID:24737768

  5. Oscillations of Eukaryotic Cilia and Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Arvind; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan

    2006-11-01

    The undulating beat of eukaryotic flagella and cilia produces forces that move cells and cause locomotion. The timing mechanisms that generate these periodic undulations are still mysterious and the question of how these oscillations arise is still a subject of much research - both experimental and theoretical. Recent experimental results on paralyzed and reconstituted flagella offer new insight into the dynamical mechanisms that could result in sustained waveform generation. Motivated by these recent experimental results we propose a model that mimics the flagellar structure as motor driven elastic, inextensible filaments. We hypothesize that the oscillations arise due to motor (dynein) driven, constrained, relative sliding of parts of the flagella. The dynamical equations describing the evolution of the populations of attached and detached motors is actively coupled to the local configuration as well as local sliding velocities via strain and configuration dependent kinetic reaction rates. At the same time, the filament configuration is actively coupled to the motor densities via the dependence of the active internal torque densities on the motor populations as well as their internal state. Appropriate ensemble averaged force-velocity relationships for the motors completes the set of equations. Numerical solutions reveal onset of dynamical instabilities via Hopf-bifurcations with oscillatory waveforms emerging from a trivial base state corresponding to a straight, non-moving flagellum.

  6. Experimental investigation of the flow induced by artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Hussong, J; Schorr, N; Belardi, J; Prucker, O; Rühe, J; Westerweel, J

    2011-06-21

    The fluid transport produced by rectangular shaped, magnetically actuated artificial cilia of 70 μm length and 20 μm width was determined by means of phase-locked Micro Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) measurements in a closed microfluidic chamber. The phase-averaged flow produced by the artificial cilia reached up to 130 μm s(-1) with an actuation cycle frequency of 10 Hz. Analysis of the measured flow data indicate that the present system is capable of achieving volume flow rates of V[combining dot above](cilia) = 14 ± 4 μl min(-1) in a micro channel of 0.5 × 5 mm(2) cross-sectional area when no back pressure is built up. This corresponds to an effective pressure gradient of 6 ± 1 Pa m(-1), which equals a pressure difference of 0.6 ± 0.1 mPa over a distance of 100 μm between two rows of cilia. These results were derived analytically from the measured velocity profile by treating the cilia as a thin boundary layer. While the cilia produce phase-averaged velocities of the order of O(10(2)μm s(-1)), time-resolved measurements showed that the flow field reverses two times during one actuation cycle inducing instantaneous velocities of up to approximately 2 mm s(-1). This shows that the flow field is dominated by fluid oscillations and flow rates are expected to increase if the beating motion of the cilia is further improved. PMID:21614349

  7. Effect of viscosity on metachrony in mucus propelling cilia.

    PubMed

    Gheber, L; Korngreen, A; Priel, Z

    1998-01-01

    In the present work we report that increasing the viscosity of the medium caused not only a decrease in the ciliary beat frequency but also changes in the metachrony and correlation between cilia. The study was performed using double and triple simultaneous photoelectric measurements on cultured ciliary cells from the frog esophagus in the viscosity range of 1-2,000 cp. We observed that increasing the viscosity intensified the fluctuations in all the measured parameters. Ciliary beat frequency decreased moderately. Even at quite high viscosities (circa 2000 cp.), cilia were still active with beating frequencies of 3-5 Hz. In addition, the degree of correlation between cilia parallel to the effective stroke direction (ESD) decreased, while that perpendicular to the ESD at a low range of viscosities remained unchanged and even increased at high viscosities. Medium viscosities in the range of 30-1,500 cp. altered the metachronal wave properties of cultured frog esophagus. The metachronal wavelength increased by up to 50%, and the wave direction changed towards more orthoplectic type of coordination. According to our recently suggested model [Gheber and Priel, 1990: Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 16:167-181], these effects can be explained by a decrease in the temporal asymmetry of the ciliary beat. Since similar results were observed in water propelling cilia of Paramecium subjected to medium viscosity ranges of up to 40 cp. [Machemer, 1972: J. Exp. Biol. 57:239-259], we conclude that hydrodynamic interactions govern the metachronal wave properties of both mucus and water propelling cilia, though mucus propelling cilia, with their better adaptation to increased load, are affected at much higher viscosities than water propelling cilia.

  8. Fibreoptic methods of cross-polarisation optical coherence tomography for endoscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gelikonov, V M; Gelikonov, G V

    2008-07-31

    Two systems of cross-polarisation optical coherence tomography based on polarisation-maintaining and polarisation non-maintaining fibres intended for in vivo endoscopic studies of biological objects are described. The sensitivities of the systems detecting scattered light with the initial and orthogonal polarisations in media with local microscopic optical anisotropic inhomogeneities are compared. (biophotonics)

  9. The strange history of polarised neutrons in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, T. J.

    2016-04-01

    The history of polarised neutrons in Australia is unusual firstly because of the particular access that individuals in universities had to the facilities at the reactor site and because this resulted in the experiments being done almost all being with polarisation analysis. Two instruments were initially available. One was a conventional instrument albeit with a tilting counter. The other was a primitive polarisation analysis instrument purpose built for diffuse scattering. This latter instrument evolved over more than thirty years and produced results ranging from the separation of magnetic and nuclear diffuse scattering, for which it was conceived, to the isolation of magnetic features in inelastic spectra.

  10. Amniotic fluid fluorescence polarisation values for assessing fetal lung maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Legge, M; Potter, H C

    1981-01-01

    The fluorescence probe 1,6, diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene was used to determine the micro-viscosity of third trimester amniotic fluid samples utilising an Aminco Bowman spectrofluorometer fitted with a polariser prism. The results were related to the lecithin sphingomyelin (L:S) ratio. A fluorescence polarisation value of 0.360 corresponded to an L:S ratio of 2.0 in uncomplicated and diabetic pregnancies. Pregnancies complicated by Rhesus disease gave significantly different fluorescence polarisation values when compared with the uncomplicated pregnancies. PMID:7309891

  11. Ciliopathy-associated gene Cc2d2a promotes assembly of subdistal appendages on the mother centriole during cilia biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Veleri, Shobi; Manjunath, Souparnika H.; Fariss, Robert N.; May-Simera, Helen; Brooks, Matthew; Foskett, Trevor A.; Gao, Chun; Longo, Teresa A.; Liu, Pinghu; Nagashima, Kunio; Rachel, Rivka A.; Li, Tiansen; Dong, Lijin; Swaroop, Anand

    2014-01-01

    The primary cilium originates from the mother centriole and participates in critical functions during organogenesis. Defects in cilia biogenesis or function lead to pleiotropic phenotypes. Mutations in centrosome-cilia gene CC2D2A result in Meckel and Joubert syndromes. Here we generate a Cc2d2a-/- mouse that recapitulates features of Meckel syndrome including embryonic lethality and multi-organ defects. Cilia are absent in Cc2d2a-/- embryonic node and other somatic tissues; disruption of cilia-dependent Shh signaling appears to underlie exencephaly in mutant embryos. The Cc2d2a-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lack cilia though mother centriole and pericentriolar proteins are detected. Odf2, associated with subdistal appendages, is absent and ninein is reduced in mutant MEFs. In Cc2d2a-/- MEFs, subdistal appendages are lacking or abnormal by transmission-EM. Consistent with this, CC2D2A localizes to subdistal appendages by immuno-EM in wild type cells. We conclude that CC2D2A is essential for the assembly of subdistal appendages, which anchor cytoplasmic microtubules and prime the mother centriole for axoneme biogenesis. PMID:24947469

  12. Microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired and magnetically actuated artificial cilia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Ling-Ying; Hsu, Chun-Chieh; Mani, Karthick

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired artificial cilia provide a promising alternative for lab-on-a-chip applications. However, the ability of actuating artificial cilia to achieve a time-dependent local flow control with high accuracy together with the elegance of full integration into the biocompatible microfluidic platforms remains remote. Driven by this motive, the current work has constructed a series of artificial cilia inside a microchannel to facilitate the time-dependent flow propulsion through artificial cilia actuation with high-speed (>40 Hz) circular beating behavior. The generated flow was quantified using micro-particle image velocimetry and particle tracking with instantaneous net flow velocity of up to 101 μm/s. Induced flow patterns caused by the tilted conical motion of artificial cilia constitutes efficient fluid propulsion at microscale. This flow phenomenon was further measured and illustrated by examining the induced flow behavior across the depth of the microchannel to provide a global view of the underlying flow propulsion mechanism. The presented analytic paradigms and substantial flow evidence present novel insights into the area of flow manipulation at microscale. PMID:26045730

  13. Microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired and magnetically actuated artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Ling-Ying; Hsu, Chun-Chieh; Mani, Karthick

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired artificial cilia provide a promising alternative for lab-on-a-chip applications. However, the ability of actuating artificial cilia to achieve a time-dependent local flow control with high accuracy together with the elegance of full integration into the biocompatible microfluidic platforms remains remote. Driven by this motive, the current work has constructed a series of artificial cilia inside a microchannel to facilitate the time-dependent flow propulsion through artificial cilia actuation with high-speed (>40 Hz) circular beating behavior. The generated flow was quantified using micro-particle image velocimetry and particle tracking with instantaneous net flow velocity of up to 10(1 ) μm/s. Induced flow patterns caused by the tilted conical motion of artificial cilia constitutes efficient fluid propulsion at microscale. This flow phenomenon was further measured and illustrated by examining the induced flow behavior across the depth of the microchannel to provide a global view of the underlying flow propulsion mechanism. The presented analytic paradigms and substantial flow evidence present novel insights into the area of flow manipulation at microscale.

  14. Mechanism of spontaneous switching of polarisation in an ytterbium-doped fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, V G; Sya, Ya V; Nanii, Oleg E; Khlystov, V I

    2007-04-30

    The regime of polarisation switching in a double-clad ytterbium fibre laser is studied experimentally and explained theoretically. It is shown that polarisation switching appears in lasers with the long active medium (no less than 20 m) when the pump slightly exceeds the threshold. The experimentally observed properties of spontaneous polarisation switching in the ytterbium fibre laser are explained by the competition of modes with orthogonal polarisations taking into account the polarisation-dependent saturation of amplification and losses. (fibre lasers)

  15. Algebraic cancellation of polarisation noise in fibre interferometers.

    PubMed

    McRae, Terry G; Ngo, Silvie; Lam, Timothy T-Y; McClelland, David E; Chow, Jong H; Shaddock, Daniel A; Gray, Malcolm B

    2016-05-16

    This experiment uses digital interferometry to reduce polarisation noise from a fiber interferometer to the level of double Rayleigh backscatter making precision fiber metrology systems robust for remote field applications. This is achieved with a measurement of the Jones matrix with interferometric sensitivity in real time, limited only by fibre length and processing bandwidth. This new approach leads to potentially new metrology applications and the ability to do ellipsometry without polarisation elements in the output field. PMID:27409872

  16. Fluid flow due to collective non-reciprocal motion of symmetrically-beating artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Khaderi, S N; den Toonder, J M J; Onck, P R

    2012-03-01

    Using a magneto-mechanical solid-fluid numerical model for permanently magnetic artificial cilia, we show that the metachronal motion of symmetrically beating cilia establishes a net pressure gradient in the direction of the metachronal wave, which creates a unidirectional flow. The flow generated is characterised as a function of the cilia spacing, the length of the metachronal wave, and a dimensionless parameter that characterises the relative importance of the viscous forces over the elastic forces in the cilia.

  17. Fluid flow due to collective non-reciprocal motion of symmetrically-beating artificial cilia

    PubMed Central

    Khaderi, S. N.; den Toonder, J. M. J.; Onck, P. R.

    2012-01-01

    Using a magneto-mechanical solid-fluid numerical model for permanently magnetic artificial cilia, we show that the metachronal motion of symmetrically beating cilia establishes a net pressure gradient in the direction of the metachronal wave, which creates a unidirectional flow. The flow generated is characterised as a function of the cilia spacing, the length of the metachronal wave, and a dimensionless parameter that characterises the relative importance of the viscous forces over the elastic forces in the cilia. PMID:22662092

  18. nlz1 is required for cilia formation in zebrafish embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sunit; Sriskanda, Shahila; Boobalan, Elangovan; Alur, Ramakrishna P; Elkahloun, Abdel; Brooks, Brian P

    2015-10-15

    The formation of cilia is a fundamental developmental process affecting diverse functions such as cellular signaling, tissue morphogenesis and body patterning. However, the mechanisms of ciliogenesis during vertebrate development are not fully understood. In this report we describe a novel role of the Nlz1 protein in ciliogenesis. We demonstrate morpholino-mediated knockdown of nlz1 in zebrafish causes abnormal specification of the cells of Kupffer's vesicle (KV); a severe reduction of the number of cilia in KV, the pronephros, and the neural floorplate; and a spectrum of later phenotypes reminiscent of human ciliopathies. In vitro and in vivo data indicate that Nlz1 acts downstream of Foxj1a and Wnt8a/presumed canonical Wnt signaling. Furthermore, Nlz1 contributes to motile cilia formation by positively regulating Wnt11/presumed non-canonical Wnt signaling. Together, our data suggest a novel role of nlz1 in ciliogenesis and the morphogenesis of multiple tissues.

  19. Cilia-Like Beating of Active Microtubule Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Timothy; Welch, David; Nicastro, Daniela; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism that drives the regular beating of individual cilia and flagella, as well as dense ciliary fields, remains unclear. We describe a minimal model system, composed of microtubules and molecular motors, which self-assemble into active bundles exhibiting beating patterns reminiscent of those found in eukaryotic cilia and flagella. These observations suggest that hundreds of molecular motors, acting within an elastic microtubule bundle, spontaneously synchronize their activity to generate large-scale oscillations. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that densely packed, actively bending bundles spontaneously synchronize their beating patterns to produce collective behavior similar to metachronal waves observed in ciliary fields. The simple in vitro system described here could provide insights into beating of isolated eukaryotic cilia and flagella, as well as their synchronization in dense ciliary fields. PMID:21778400

  20. nlz1 is required for cilia formation in zebrafish embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sunit; Sriskanda, Shahila; Boobalan, Elangovan; Alur, Ramakrishna. P.; Elkahloun, Abdel

    2015-01-01

    The formation of cilia is a fundamental developmental process affecting diverse functions such as cellular signaling, tissue morphogenesis and body patterning. However, the mechanisms of ciliogenesis during vertebrate development are not fully understood. In this report we describe a novel role of the Nlz1 protein in ciliogenesis. We demonstrate morpholino-mediated knockdown of nlz1 in zebrafish causes abnormal specification of the cells of Kupffer’s vesicle (KV); a severe reduction of the number of cilia in KV, the pronephros, and the neural floorplate; and a spectrum of later phenotypes reminiscent of human ciliopathies. In vitro and in vivo data indicate that Nlz1 acts downstream of Foxj1a and Wnt8a/presumed canonical Wnt signaling. Furthermore, Nlz1 contributes to motile cilia formation by positively regulating Wnt11/presumed non-canonical Wnt signaling. Together, our data suggest a novel role of nlz1 in ciliogenesis and the morphogenesis of multiple tissues. PMID:26327644

  1. Polarisation dynamics of a Nd:YAG ceramic laser

    SciTech Connect

    Khandokhin, Pavel A; Ievlev, Ivan V; Lebedeva, Yu S; Mukhin, I B; Palashov, O V; Khazanov, Efim A

    2011-02-28

    We report an experimental study of the polarisation dynamics of a dual-polarisation microchip Nd:YAG ceramic laser. Our results demonstrate dual-polarisation operation of the polycrystalline Nd:YAG laser. The low-frequency dynamics in this regime involves three types of relaxation oscillations, two of which are responsible for antiphase dynamics of the intensities of orthogonally polarised modes. Linearly polarised pump light induces gain anisotropy in the Nd:YAG ceramic, as in Nd:YAG single-crystal lasers. We present a comparative analysis of the behaviour of orthogonally polarised modes in Nd:YAG single-crystal lasers and the Nd:YAG ceramic laser, with a random orientation of the crystallographic axes in each grain (microcrystal), describe a technique for evaluating the total cavity loss from the relaxation oscillation spectrum and compare single-crystal and ceramic active elements. Experimental evidence is presented for gain anisotropy, loss anisotropy and phase anisotropy in ceramic and single-crystal microchip lasers. (lasers)

  2. Optically induced dynamic nuclear spin polarisation in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, Jochen; Schwartz, Ilai; Chen, Qiong; Schulze-Sünninghausen, David; Carl, Patrick; Höfer, Peter; Retzker, Alexander; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Isoya, Junichi; Luy, Burkhard; Plenio, Martin B.; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depends strongly on nuclear spin polarisation and, motivated by this observation, dynamical nuclear spin polarisation has recently been applied to enhance MRI protocols (Kurhanewicz et al 2011 Neoplasia 13 81). Nuclear spins associated with the 13C carbon isotope (nuclear spin I = 1/2) in diamond possess uniquely long spin lattice relaxation times (Reynhardt and High 2011 Prog. Nucl. Magn. Reson. Spectrosc. 38 37). If they are present in diamond nanocrystals, especially when strongly polarised, they form a promising contrast agent for MRI. Current schemes for achieving nuclear polarisation, however, require cryogenic temperatures. Here we demonstrate an efficient scheme that realises optically induced 13C nuclear spin hyperpolarisation in diamond at room temperature and low ambient magnetic field. Optical pumping of a nitrogen-vacancy centre creates a continuously renewable electron spin polarisation which can be transferred to surrounding 13C nuclear spins. Importantly for future applications we also realise polarisation protocols that are robust against an unknown misalignment between magnetic field and crystal axis.

  3. Polarised nuclei for neutron science: recent applications and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glättli, Hans

    2004-08-01

    Neutron scattering on nuclei is spin dependent, particularly strongly for 1H. The means to achieve large nuclear polarisations and its use for structure analysis or as spin-handling device are reviewed. High resolution (diffraction) as well as low resolution (SANS) measurements can benefit from polarised nuclei by changing selectively the form factors of Bragg reflections or the contrasts (the scattering length density profiles) in SANS. The internal structure of ribosomes and the conformation of polymers in solution have been investigated by this method. A numerical simulation is presented to show the influence of steady-state polarisation of protons on the scattering from a protein-ARN model complex. In addition, a more recent technique, time-resolved SANS is described. It makes use of spatial polarisation gradients created around paramagnetic centres at the onset of nuclear polarisation. Such polarisation domains can enhance considerably the scattering amplitude of free radicals and thus contribute to determine their positions inside a complex protein. Examples of possible future experiments are proposed which combine simultaneously the selectivity of solid-state NMR techniques and neutron scattering.

  4. FOXJ1 Prevents Cilia Growth Inhibition by Cigarette Smoke in Human Airway Epithelium In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Brekman, Angelika; Walters, Matthew S.; Tilley, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Airway epithelium ciliated cells play a central role in clearing the lung of inhaled pathogens and xenobiotics, and cilia length and coordinated beating are important for airway clearance. Based on in vivo studies showing that the airway epithelium of healthy smokers has shorter cilia than that of healthy nonsmokers, we investigated the mechanisms involved in cigarette smoke–mediated inhibition of ciliogenesis by assessing normal human airway basal cell differentiation in air–liquid interface (ALI) cultures in the presence of nontoxic concentrations of cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Measurements of cilia length from Day 28 ALI cultures demonstrated that CSE exposure was associated with shorter cilia (P < 0.05), reproducing the effect of cigarette smoking on cilia length observed in vivo. This phenotype correlated with a broad CSE-mediated suppression of genes involved in cilia-related transcriptional regulation, intraflagellar transport, cilia motility, structural integrity, and basal body development but not of control genes or epithelial barrier integrity. The CSE-mediated inhibition of cilia growth could be prevented by lentivirus-mediated overexpression of FOXJ1, the major cilia-related transcription factor, which led to partial reversal of expression of cilia-related genes suppressed by CSE. Together, the data suggest that components of cigarette smoke are responsible for a broad suppression of genes involved in cilia growth, but, by stimulating ciliogenesis with the transcription factor FOXJ1, it may be possible to maintain close to normal cilia length despite the stress of cigarette smoking. PMID:24828273

  5. Laser-induced spreading arrest of Mytilus gill cilia

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Using a "slit camera" recording technique, we have examined the effects of local laser irradiation of cilia of the gill epithelium of Mytilus edulis. The laser produces a lesion which interrupts epithelial integrity. In artificial sea water that contains high K+ or is effectively Ca++ free, metachronism of the lateral cilia continues to either side of the lesion with only minor perturbations in frequency synchronization and wave velocity, such as would be expected if metachronal wave coordination is mechanical. However, in normal sea water and other appropriate ionic conditions (i.e., where Ca++ concentration is elevated), in addition to local damage, the laser induces distinct arrest responses of the lateral cilia. Arrest is not mechanically coordinated, since cilia stop in sequence depending on stroke position as well as distance from the lesion. The velocity of arrest under standard conditions is about 3 mm/s, several orders of magnitude faster than spreading velocities associated with diffusion of materials from the injured region. Two responses can be distinguished on the basis of the kinetics of recovery of the arrested regions. These are (a) a nondecremental response that resembles spontaneous ciliary stoppage in the gills, and (b) a decremental response, where arrest nearer the stimulus point is much longer lasting. The slower recovery is often periodic, with a step size approximating lateral cell length. Arrest responses with altered kinetics also occur in laterofrontal cilia. The responses of Mytilus lateral cilia resemble the spreading ciliary arrest seen in Elliptio and arrest induced by electrical and other stimuli, and the decremental response may depend upon electrotonic spread of potential change produced at the stimulus site. If this were coupled to transient changes in Ca++ permeability of the cell membrane, a local rise in Ca++ concentration might inhibit ciliary beat at a sensitive point in the stroke cycle to produce the observed arrest. PMID

  6. Laser-induced spreading arrest of Mytilus gill cilia.

    PubMed

    Motokawa, T; Satir, P

    1975-08-01

    Using a "slit camera" recording technique, we have examined the effects of local laser irradiation of cilia of the gill epithelium of Mytilus edulis. The laser produces a lesion which interrupts epithelial integrity. In artificial sea water that contains high K+ or is effectively Ca++ free, metachronism of the lateral cilia continues to either side of the lesion with only minor perturbations in frequency synchronization and wave velocity, such as would be expected if metachronal wave coordination is mechanical. However, in normal sea water and other appropriate ionic conditions (i.e., where Ca++ concentration is elevated), in addition to local damage, the laser induces distinct arrest responses of the lateral cilia. Arrest is not mechanically coordinated, since cilia stop in sequence depending on stroke position as well as distance from the lesion. The velocity of arrest under standard conditions is about 3 mm/s, several orders of magnitude faster than spreading velocities associated with diffusion of materials from the injured region. Two responses can be distinguished on the basis of the kinetics of recovery of the arrested regions. These are (a) a nondecremental response that resembles spontaneous ciliary stoppage in the gills, and (b) a decremental response, where arrest nearer the stimulus point is much longer lasting. The slower recovery is often periodic, with a step size approximating lateral cell length. Arrest responses with altered kinetics also occur in laterofrontal cilia. The responses of Mytilus lateral cilia resemble the spreading ciliary arrest seen in Elliptio and arrest induced by electrical and other stimuli, and the decremental response may depend upon electrotonic spread of potential change produced at the stimulus site. If this were coupled to transient changes in Ca++ permeability of the cell membrane, a local rise in Ca++ concentration might inhibit ciliary beat at a sensitive point in the stroke cycle to produce the observed arrest.

  7. Primary ciliary dyskinesia and associated sensory ciliopathies

    PubMed Central

    Horani, Amjad; Ferkol, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disease of motile cilia, which belongs to a group of disorders resulting from dysfunction of cilia, collectively known as ciliopathies. Insights into the genetics and phenotypes of PCD have grown over the last decade, in part propagated by the discovery of a number of novel cilia-related genes. These genes encode proteins that segregate into structural axonemal, regulatory, as well as cytoplasmic assembly proteins. Our understanding of primary (sensory) cilia has also expanded, and an ever-growing list of diverse conditions has been linked to defective function and signaling of the sensory cilium. Recent multicenter clinical and genetic studies have uncovered the heterogeneity of motile and sensory ciliopathies, and in some cases, the overlap between these conditions. In this review, we will describe the genetics and pathophysiology of ciliopathies in children, focusing on PCD, review emerging genotype-phenotype relationships, and diagnostic tools available for the clinician. PMID:26967669

  8. Metachronal Wave of Cilia Transport in a Curved Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, Sohail; Sadaf, Hina

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the mechanism of cilia-induced flow is discussed through a mathematical model. In this analysis two-dimensional flow of a viscous fluid is observed in a curved channel with ciliated walls. The features of ciliary structures are determined by the dominance of viscous effects over inertial effects using the long-wavelength approximation. The flow is modeled in both fixed and wave frame references. The exact solution is calculated for the velocity profile and the flow properties for the viscous fluid are determined as a function of the cilia and metachronal wave velocity. Results for the pressure rise, pressure gradient and stream function are constructed and analyzed graphically.

  9. Polarisation effects in gradient nano-optics

    SciTech Connect

    Erokhin, N S; Shvartsburg, A B; Zueva, Yu M

    2013-09-30

    The spectra of reflection of s- and p-polarised waves from gradient nanocoatings at arbitrary angles of incidence are found within the framework of two exactly solvable models of such coatings. To use the detected spectra in the visible and IR ranges, for different frequencies and coating thicknesses we present the wave reflection coefficients as functions of dimensionless frequencies related to the refractive index gradient of the coating material. It is shown that reflection from the gradient coatings in question is an order of magnitude weaker than reflection from uniform coatings, other parameters of radiation and the reflection system being equal. We report a new exactly solvable model illustrating the specific effect of gradient film optics – the possibility of non-reflective propagation of an s-wave through such a film (an analogue of the Brewster effect). The prospects are shown for the use of gradient nanostructures with different refractive index profiles to fabricate broadband non-reflective coatings. (nanogradient dielectric coatings and metamaterials)

  10. Polarised black holes in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Miguel S.; Greenspan, Lauren; Oliveira, Miguel; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-06-01

    We consider solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a negative cosmological constant that asymptote to global AdS 4 with conformal boundary {S}2× {{{R}}}t. At the sphere at infinity we turn on a space-dependent electrostatic potential, which does not destroy the asymptotic AdS behaviour. For simplicity we focus on the case of a dipolar electrostatic potential. We find two new geometries: (i) an AdS soliton that includes the full backreaction of the electric field on the AdS geometry; (ii) a polarised neutral black hole that is deformed by the electric field, accumulating opposite charges in each hemisphere. For both geometries we study boundary data such as the charge density and the stress tensor. For the black hole we also study the horizon charge density and area, and further verify a Smarr formula. Then we consider this system at finite temperature and compute the Gibbs free energy for both AdS soliton and black hole phases. The corresponding phase diagram generalizes the Hawking-Page phase transition. The AdS soliton dominates the low temperature phase and the black hole the high temperature phase, with a critical temperature that decreases as the external electric field increases. Finally, we consider the simple case of a free charged scalar field on {S}2× {{{R}}}t with conformal coupling. For a field in the SU(N ) adjoint representation we compare the phase diagram with the above gravitational system.

  11. Novel Insights into the Development and Function of Cilia Using the Advantages of the Paramecium Cell and Its Many Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Junji; Valentine, Megan S.; Van Houten, Judith L.

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium species, especially P. tetraurelia and caudatum, are model organisms for modern research into the form and function of cilia. In this review, we focus on the ciliary ion channels and other transmembrane proteins that control the beat frequency and wave form of the cilium by controlling the signaling within the cilium. We put these discussions in the context of the advantages that Paramecium brings to the understanding of ciliary motility: mutants for genetic dissections of swimming behavior, electrophysiology, structural analysis, abundant cilia for biochemistry and modern proteomics, genomics and molecular biology. We review the connection between behavior and physiology, which allows the cells to broadcast the function of their ciliary channels in real time. We build a case for the important insights and advantages that this model organism continues to bring to the study of cilia. PMID:26230712

  12. Novel Insights into the Development and Function of Cilia Using the Advantages of the Paramecium Cell and Its Many Cilia.

    PubMed

    Yano, Junji; Valentine, Megan S; Van Houten, Judith L

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium species, especially P. tetraurelia and caudatum, are model organisms for modern research into the form and function of cilia. In this review, we focus on the ciliary ion channels and other transmembrane proteins that control the beat frequency and wave form of the cilium by controlling the signaling within the cilium. We put these discussions in the context of the advantages that Paramecium brings to the understanding of ciliary motility: mutants for genetic dissections of swimming behavior, electrophysiology, structural analysis, abundant cilia for biochemistry and modern proteomics, genomics and molecular biology. We review the connection between behavior and physiology, which allows the cells to broadcast the function of their ciliary channels in real time. We build a case for the important insights and advantages that this model organism continues to bring to the study of cilia. PMID:26230712

  13. Realizing the Physics of Motile Cilia Synchronization with Driven Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruot, Nicolas; Cicuta, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    Cilia and flagella in biological systems often show large scale cooperative behaviors such as the synchronization of their beats in "metachronal waves." These are beautiful examples of emergent dynamics in biology, and are essential for life, allowing diverse processes from the motility of eukaryotic microorganisms, to nutrient transport and clearance of pathogens from mammalian airways. How these collective states arise is not fully understood, but it is clear that individual cilia interact mechanically, and that a strong and long-ranged component of the coupling is mediated by the viscous fluid. We review here the work by ourselves and others aimed at understanding the behavior of hydrodynamically coupled systems, and particularly a set of results that have been obtained both experimentally and theoretically by studying actively driven colloidal systems. In these controlled scenarios, it is possible to selectively test aspects of living motile cilia, such as the geometrical arrangement, the effects of the driving profile and the distance to no-slip boundaries. We outline and give examples of how it is possible to link model systems to observations on living systems, which can be made on microorganisms, on cell cultures or on tissue sections. This area of research has clear clinical application in the long term, as severe pathologies are associated with compromised cilia function in humans.

  14. The metachronal wave of lateral cilia of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Aiello, E; Sleigh, M A

    1972-09-01

    The form of beat of cilia and the structure of the metachronal wave on the lateral gill epithelium of Mytulus edulis have been studied on living material by interference-contrast microscopy and stroboscopic illumination, and compared with the same features in rapid-fixed preparations studied by light microscopy and with the scanning electron microscope. The most striking finding is that the beat of the cilia is not planar, as previously assumed, but involves a sideways movement in the recovery stroke Previous reports on nonplanar ciliary beating from protozoan examples describe a planar effective stroke and a counterclockwise rotation in the recovery stroke; in this molluscan example there is a clockwise rotation in the recovery stroke The lateral inclination of the cilia in the recovery stroke is in the same direction as the propagation of the waves, and the orientation of cilia in the recovery stroke is thought to determine whether the waves move to the left or right of the direction of the effective stroke

  15. Force Generation and Dynamics of Individual Cilia under External Loading

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David B.; Swaminathan, Vinay; Estes, Ashley; Cribb, Jeremy; O'Brien, E. Timothy; Davis, C. William; Superfine, R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Motile cilia are unique multimotor systems that display coordination and periodicity while imparting forces to biological fluids. They play important roles in normal physiology, and ciliopathies are implicated in a growing number of human diseases. In this work we measure the response of individual human airway cilia to calibrated forces transmitted via spot-labeled magnetic microbeads. Cilia respond to applied forces by 1), a reduction in beat amplitude (up to an 85% reduction by 160–170 pN of force); 2), a decreased tip velocity proportionate to applied force; and 3), no significant change in beat frequency. Tip velocity reduction occurred in each beat direction, independently of the direction of applied force, indicating that the cilium is “driven” in both directions at all times. By applying a quasistatic force model, we deduce that axoneme stiffness is dominated by the rigidity of the microtubules, and that cilia can exert 62 ± 18 pN of force at the tip via the generation of 5.6 ± 1.6 pN/dynein head. PMID:20085719

  16. Optimization of bio-inspired multi-segment IPMC cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareh, S.; Conn, A. T.; Rossiter, J. M.; Ieropoulos, I.; Walters, P.

    2010-04-01

    In nature, unidirectional fluid flows are often induced at micro-scales by cilia and related organelles. A controllable unidirectional flow is beneficial at these scales for a range of novel robotic and medical applications, whether the flow is used for propulsion (e.g. swimming robots) or mass transfer (e.g. prosthetic trachea). Ionic Polymer Metal Composites (IPMCs) are innovative smart materials that can be used directly as active propulsive surfaces rather than a traditional motor and propeller. IPMC actuators with two segmented electrodes that attempt to mimic the motion of cilia-like organelles have been realized. In this paper the optimization of these actuators towards producing unidirectional flows is described. A parametric study of the kinematic and hydrodynamic effect of modulating the drive signal has been conducted. As with eukaryotic cilia and flagella found in mammals, the segmented IPMC actuator can generate both flexural (asymmetric) and undulatory (symmetric) motions from the same physical structure. The motion is controlled by applying profiles of driving frequencies and phase differences. Kinematic analysis using a camera and laser displacement sensor has been used to measure and classify different motion types. The hydrodynamic forces produced by each motion type have been estimated using particle-tracking flow visualization. This allows drive signal profiles to be ranked in terms of fluid flow momentum transfer and directionality. Using the results of the parametric study, the IPMC motion is optimized towards producing unidirectional flow via repeatable cilia-inspired motion.

  17. Symmetry Breaking in a Model for Nodal Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brokaw, Charles J.

    2005-03-01

    Nodal cilia are very short cilia found in the embryonic node on the ventral surface of early mammalian embryos. They create a right to left fluid flow that is responsible for determining the normal asymmetry of the internal organs of the mammalian body. To do this, the distal end of the cilium must circle in a counterclockwise sense. Computer simulations with 3-dimensional models of flagella allow examination of 3-dimensional movements such as those of nodal cilia. 3-dimensional circling motions of short cilia can be achieved with velocity controlled models, in which dynein activity is regulated by sliding velocity. If dyneins on one outer doublet are controlled by the sliding velocity experienced by that doublet, the system is symmetric, and the 3-dimensional models can show either clockwise or counterclockwise circling. My computer simulations have examined two possible symmetry breaking mechanisms: 1) dyneins on doublet N are regulated by a mixture of the sliding velocities experienced by doublets N and N+1 (numbered in a clockwise direction, looking from the base). or 2) symmetry is broken by an off-axis force that produces a right-handed twist of the axoneme, consistent with observations that some dyneins can rotate their substrate microtubules in a clockwise direction.

  18. Analysis of properties of cilia using Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Vidyalakshmi; Corpuz, Elizabeth O; Hubenschmidt, Mark J; Townsend, Caroline R; Asai, David J; Wilkes, David E

    2009-01-01

    Cilia and eukaryotic flagella are important structures required for the motility of cells, the movement of medium across the surfaces of cells, and the connections between the receptor and synthetic portions of sensory cells. The axoneme forms the cytoskeleton of the cilium comprising several hundreds of proteins that assemble into the 9 + 2 arrangement of outer doublet and central pair microtubules, the inner and outer rows of dynein arms, and many other structures. Tetrahymena thermophila is an excellent model organism for the study of cilia and ciliogenesis. The cell is covered by about 1,000 cilia which are essential for survival. Additionally, the Tetrahymena genome is available and targeted genetic manipulations are straightforward. In this chapter, we describe five protocols that examine properties of cilia: (a) measuring mRNA levels to see the effect of deciliation on gene expression; (b) swimming velocity and linearity; (c) ciliary length and density; (d) phagocytosis that occurs through the ciliated oral apparatus; and (e) depolarization-induced ciliary reversal.

  19. Chronic effects of nitrogen dioxide on cilia in hamster bronchioles.

    PubMed

    Heller, R F; Gordon, R E

    1986-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide has been shown to have a deleterious effect on the structure and function of respiratory cilia. This study focuses on both the alterations of cilia morphology, and the ciliated cell response induced by nitrogen dioxide, in order to determine the mechanism(s) leading to ciliary dysfunction. Ciliated cells of the respiratory airways of hamsters, exposed to 30 ppm nitrogen dioxide for 5 months, 7 days/week, 22 hours/day, were examined ultrastructurally using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of thin sections, freeze-fracture replicas, and thin sections of tissues treated with cationized ferritin. SEM and TEM preparations appeared to show a generalized reduction in number and length of cilia. It was common to see basal bodies with no ciliary shaft and many cilia at different stages of growth. It was also apparent that the cilia were most fragile just below the ciliary necklaces. After breakage, the plasma membranes of the remaining ciliary stubs covered the exposed basal bodies. During the early stages of ciliary regeneration, freeze fracture replicas showed the emergence of membrane particles which appeared to correlate with cationized ferritin binding sites. As the cilia increased in length, the particles assembled into a necklace-like arrangement, varying in ring number and particle distribution as compared to the 5 to 7 well organized rings observed in controls. In corresponding thin sections, cationized ferritin appeared bound to sites in the region of the ciliary necklace particles. As the cilia developed further, the cationic ferritin binding at these sites diminished. This data suggests that nitrogen dioxide had an affect on the plasma membranes of ciliated cells. One of the major sites affected by the nitrogen dioxide was the ciliary necklace region. Exposure to nitrogen dioxide appeared to lead to increased ciliary fragility, stunted ciliary growth, and loss of ciliary motility. The rings of ciliary

  20. Fabrication of Magnetically Actuated Polymeric Nanorod Arrays to Mimic Biological Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, A. R.; Evans, B. A.; Carroll, R. L.; Superfine, R.

    2006-11-01

    We report on successful fabrication of free-standing polymer nanorod arrays capable of actuation via externally applied magnetic fields. Our primary motivation is to mimic the ability of epithelial lung cilia to promote microscale fluid transport. Additionally, nanoscale actuator arrays of this nature have a wide variety of possible applications including microfluidics, sensing, and photonics. To fabricate these structures we utilize porous polycarbonate track-etched membranes as templates for a dispersion of a magnetic nanoparticle ferrofluid in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Crosslinking of the polymer followed by subsequent dissolution of the membrane releases the rod array. With this method we have successfully fabricated rods with diameters down to 200 nanometers and lengths of 10-25 microns. Rods of various sizes have been successfully actuated with permanent magnets as well as an integrated magnetic force microscope that was developed in-house. We have demonstrated that actuation induces local fluid flow and are currently developing increased control over the array's actuation pattern to more closely resemble that of biological cilia.

  1. Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Blocks Nitric Oxide-Mediated Alcohol-Stimulated Cilia Beating

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, T. A.; Wells, S. M.; Alsaidi, Z. A.; DeVasure, J. M.; Klein, E. B.; Bailey, K. L.; Sisson, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    The airway epithelium is exposed to alcohol during drinking through direct exhalation of volatized ethanol from the bronchial circulation. Alcohol exposure leads to a rapid increase in the cilia beat frequency (CBF) of bronchial epithelial cells followed by a chronic desensitization of cilia stimulatory responses. This effect is governed in part by the nitric oxide regulation of cyclic guanosine and adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinases (PKG and PKA) and is not fully understood. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, is implicated in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary disorders. We hypothesized that the inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by ADMA blocks alcohol-stimulated increases in CBF. To test this hypothesis, ciliated primary bovine bronchial epithelial cells (BBEC) were preincubated with ADMA (100 µM) and stimulated with 100 mM ethanol. CBF was measured and PKA assayed. By 1 hr, ethanol activated PKA, resulting in elevated CBF. Both alcohol-induced PKA activation and CBF were inhibited in the presence of ADMA. ADMA alone had no effect on PKA activity or CBF. Using a mouse model overexpressing the ADMA-degrading enzyme, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH), we examined PKA and CBF in precision-cut mouse lung slices. Alcohol-stimulated increases in lung slice PKA and CBF were temporally enhanced in the DDAH mice versus control mice. PMID:24307761

  2. A novel biosensor to study cAMP dynamics in cilia and flagella

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shatanik; Jansen, Vera; Jikeli, Jan F; Hamzeh, Hussein; Alvarez, Luis; Dombrowski, Marco; Balbach, Melanie; Strünker, Timo; Seifert, Reinhard; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Wachten, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The cellular messenger cAMP regulates multiple cellular functions, including signaling in cilia and flagella. The cAMP dynamics in these subcellular compartments are ill-defined. We introduce a novel FRET-based cAMP biosensor with nanomolar sensitivity that is out of reach for other sensors. To measure cAMP dynamics in the sperm flagellum, we generated transgenic mice and reveal that the hitherto methods determining total cAMP levels do not reflect changes in free cAMP levels. Moreover, cAMP dynamics in the midpiece and principal piece of the flagellum are distinctively different. The sole cAMP source in the flagellum is the soluble adenylate cyclase (SACY). Although bicarbonate-dependent SACY activity requires Ca2+, basal SACY activity is suppressed by Ca2+. Finally, we also applied the sensor to primary cilia. Our new cAMP biosensor features unique characteristics that allow gaining new insights into cAMP signaling and unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying ciliary function in vitro and in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14052.001 PMID:27003291

  3. Computer-assisted image analysis of human cilia and Chlamydomonas flagella reveals both similarities and differences in axoneme structure.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Eileen T; Giddings, Thomas H; Porter, Mary E; Ostrowski, Lawrence E

    2012-08-01

    In the past decade, investigations from several different fields have revealed the critical role of cilia in human health and disease. Because of the highly conserved nature of the basic axonemal structure, many different model systems have proven useful for the study of ciliopathies, especially the unicellular, biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Although the basic axonemal structure of cilia and flagella is highly conserved, these organelles often perform specialized functions unique to the cell or tissue in which they are found. These differences in function are likely reflected in differences in structural organization. In this work, we directly compare the structure of isolated axonemes from human cilia and Chlamydomonas flagella to identify similarities and differences that potentially play key roles in determining their functionality. Using transmission electron microscopy and 2D image averaging techniques, our analysis has confirmed the overall structural similarity between these two species, but also revealed clear differences in the structure of the outer dynein arms, the central pair projections, and the radial spokes. We also show how the application of 2D image averaging can clarify the underlying structural defects associated with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Overall, our results document the remarkable similarity between these two structures separated evolutionarily by over a billion years, while highlighting several significant differences, and demonstrate the potential of 2D image averaging to improve the diagnosis and understanding of PCD.

  4. A Initio Studies of Polarisabilities of Ions in Crystals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tole, Philip

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis is concerned with the ab initio calculation of polarisabilities of ions in crystals. For a binary salt the Clausius-Mossotti equation relates the refractive index to the in-crystal polarisability of the ion-pair. However, there is no experimental means of separating the sum into anion and cation components. Theoretical models which use isolated ion polarisabilities to do this are physically unrealistic and have met with little success. A much better model has been developed using ab initio all-electron CHF calculations. The in-crystal environment is represented by a 'molecular' cluster embedded in a point-charge lattice. The physical features important to the success of the model are the nearest-neighbour overlap compression and the isotropic part of the electrostatic potential arising from the point -charge lattice. Calculations on simple first row alkali halides show the cation to be independent of these forces whereas the anion becomes, smaller, more bound and less polarisable in the crystal. When corrections for correlation are added the agreement with Clausius-Mossotti polarisabilities is at the 5% level or better. This implies a reduction in polarisability by factors of up to 2 with respect to the free ion. The polarisabilities for the anions in LiF, NaF, KF, LiCl, NaCl, KCl, LiBr, NaBr, KBr, CaF _2, BeO, MgO, CaO, Li_2O, Na_2O, K_2O, BeS, CaS, Li_2S, Na_2 S and K_2S were calculated. Anion polarisability is found to vary with lattice parameter but hardly at all with coordination number. Calculations on Be_2C show that in-crystal compression is sufficient to stabilise even C^{4 -}, which has a polarisability of over 20 au. Anions at the surface of LiF and MgO were also modelled. Because anisotropic overlap and electrostatic factors tend to cancel, the ion in 5-, 4- and 3-coordinate surface sites has a polarisability only a few per cent greater than in the bulk solid. Implications for

  5. Polarisation Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, David Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E99-114 comprised a series of measurements to explore proton Compton scattering at high momentum transfer. For the first time, the polarisation transfer observables in the p ($\\vec{γ}$, γ' \\vec{p}$) reaction were measured in the GeV energy range, where it is believed that quark-gluon degrees of freedom begin to dominate. The experiment utilised a circularly polarised photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target, with the scattered photon and recoil proton detected in a lead-glass calorimeter and a magnetic spectrometer, respectively.

  6. OPTICAL FIBRES AND FIBREOPTIC SENSORS: Polarisation reflectometry of anisotropic optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinov, Yurii A.; Kryukov, Igor'I.; Pervadchuk, Vladimir P.; Toroshin, Andrei Yu

    2009-11-01

    Anisotropic, polarisation-maintaining fibres have been studied using a reflectometer and integrated optic polariser. Linearly polarised pulses were launched into the fibre under test at different angles between their plane of polarisation and the main optical axis of the fibre. A special procedure for the correlation analysis of these reflectograms is developed to enhance the reliability of the information about the longitudinal optical uniformity ofanisotropic fibres.

  7. Polarised HIGH-Q2 Deep Inelastic Scattering at Hera-Ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, K.

    2005-04-01

    The cross sections for neutral and charged-current deep inelastic scattering with longitudinally polarised e+p collisions were first measured at a luminosity-averaged positive polarisation of about 30% and at a negative polarisation of about -40%. The parity-violating nature of the weak charged-current interaction was clearly observed, which is the first direct measurement at large energies.

  8. IFT88 plays a cilia- and PCP-independent role in controlling oriented cell divisions during vertebrate embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Borovina, Antonia; Ciruna, Brian

    2013-10-17

    The role for cilia in establishing planar cell polarity (PCP) is contentious. Although knockdown of genes known to function in ciliogenesis has been reported to cause PCP-related morphogenesis defects in zebrafish, genetic mutations affecting intraflagellar transport (IFT) do not show PCP phenotypes despite the requirement for IFT in cilia formation. This discrepancy has been attributed to off-target effects of antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) injection, confounding maternal effects in zygotic mutant embryos, or an inability to distinguish between cilia-dependent versus cilia-independent protein functions. To determine the role of cilia in PCP, we generated maternal + zygotic IFT88 (MZift88) mutant zebrafish embryos, which never form cilia. We clearly demonstrate that cilia are not required to establish PCP. Rather, IFT88 plays a cilia-independent role in controlling oriented cell divisions at gastrulation and neurulation. Our results have important implications for the interpretation of cilia gene function in normal development and in disease.

  9. Cilia-based flow network in the brain ventricles.

    PubMed

    Faubel, Regina; Westendorf, Christian; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Eichele, Gregor

    2016-07-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid conveys many physiologically important signaling factors through the ventricular cavities of the brain. We investigated the transport of cerebrospinal fluid in the third ventricle of the mouse brain and discovered a highly organized pattern of cilia modules, which collectively give rise to a network of fluid flows that allows for precise transport within this ventricle. We also discovered a cilia-based switch that reliably and periodically alters the flow pattern so as to create a dynamic subdivision that may control substance distribution in the third ventricle. Complex flow patterns were also present in the third ventricles of rats and pigs. Our work suggests that ciliated epithelia can generate and maintain complex, spatiotemporally regulated flow networks. PMID:27387952

  10. [The rebirth of the ultrastructure of cilia and flagella].

    PubMed

    Fisch, Cathy; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    The sensory and motility functions of eukaryotic cilia and flagella are essential for cell survival in protozoans and for cell differentiation and homoeostasis in metazoans. Ciliary biology has benefited early on from the input of electron microscopy. Over the last decade, the visualization of cellular structures has greatly progressed, thus it becomes timely to review the ultrastructure of cilia and flagella. Briefly touching upon the typical features of a 9+2 axoneme, we dwell extensively on the transition zone, the singlet zone, the ciliary necklace, cap and crown. The relation of the singlet zone to sensory and/or motile function, the link of the ciliary cap to microtubule dynamics and to ciliary beat, the involvement of the ciliary crown in ovocyte and mucosal propulsion, and the role of the transition zone/the ciliary necklace in axonemal stabilization, autotomy and as a diffusion barrier will all be discussed.

  11. Structural and functional hierarchy of eukaryotic cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Omoto, C K

    1995-01-01

    There are now a variety of methods to investigate the morphofunctional aspects of eukaryotic cilia and cilia. These methods are useful for investigating the basic mechanism of eukaryotic axonemal mechanochemical function and understanding the function and interaction of its components. It is clear that the complex structure of eukaryotic axoneme requires the combination of all these techniques to unravel its mystery. The compositionally simple in vitro microtubule assays are crucial in investigating the functions of different dyneins within an axoneme. However, because such assays do not include other components of the axoneme and the important mechanical feedback present in a beating axoneme, reactivation of the entire structure will continue to play a basic role in the morphofunctional study of eukaryotic axonemes.

  12. Spontaneous Creation of Macroscopic Flow and Metachronal Waves in an Array of Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirao, B.; Joanny, J.

    2007-03-01

    Cells or bacteria carrying cilia on their surface show many striking features : alignment of cilia in an array, two-phase asymmetric beating for each cilium, coordination between cilia and existence of metachronal waves with a constant phase difference between two adjacent cilia. We give simple theoretical arguments based on hydrodynamic coupling and an internal mechanism of the cilium derived from the behavior of a collection of molecular motors, to account qualitatively for these cooperative features. Hydrodynamic interactions can lead to the alignment of an array of cilia. We study the effect of a transverse external flow and obtain a two-phase asymmetrical beating, faster along the flow and slower against the flow, proceeding around an average curved position. We show that an aligned array of cilia is able to spontaneously break the left-right symmetry and to create a global average flow. Metachronism arises as a local minimum of the beating threshold and leads to a rather constant flow.

  13. Atypical cilia in the tracheal epithelium of healthy water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Bruno, F; Dallai, R; Galati, P; Pazzanese, P; Roperto, F

    1999-07-01

    Samples of tracheal mucosa were obtained from 10 healthy adult water buffaloes and 50 000 cilia were examined ultrastructurally. Ciliary abnormalities were found in all 10 subjects. Atypical cilia occurred as compound cilia (up to 1.5%), intracytoplasmic cilia (0.07%) and swollen cilia (0.05%). The microtubular pattern was determined in 5000 cross-sectioned cilia, with about 7% showing axonemal abnormalities in which peripheral defects prevailed. Some electron-dense plugs appeared inside the cylinder lumen of 2.5% of basal bodies. Freeze-fracture studies revealed a ciliary necklace composed of up to eight rows of intramembranous particles. This fine detail appeared to differ from that of other small and large ruminants.

  14. The commensurate spin excitation in chromium: A polarised neutron investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R. ); Stirling, W.G. . Dept. of Physics); Severing, A. )

    1991-01-01

    A polarised neutron experiment with neutron energy analysis has been performed with a single-Q sample of chromium in a large magnetic field. The 4-meV commensurate'' mode is found to involve spin fluctuations parallel to the ordered chromium moments. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Spin-SILC: CMB polarisation component separation with spin wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Keir K.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Leistedt, Boris; McEwen, Jason D.; Pontzen, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    We present Spin-SILC, a new foreground component separation method that accurately extracts the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarisation E and B modes from raw multifrequency Stokes Q and U measurements of the microwave sky. Spin-SILC is an internal linear combination method that uses spin wavelets to analyse the spin-2 polarisation signal P = Q + iU. The wavelets are additionally directional (non-axisymmetric). This allows different morphologies of signals to be separated and therefore the cleaning algorithm is localised using an additional domain of information. The advantage of spin wavelets over standard scalar wavelets is to simultaneously and self-consistently probe scales and directions in the polarisation signal P = Q + iU and in the underlying E and B modes, therefore providing the ability to perform component separation and E-B decomposition concurrently for the first time. We test Spin-SILC on full-mission Planck simulations and data and show the capacity to correctly recover the underlying cosmological E and B modes. We also demonstrate a strong consistency of our CMB maps with those derived from existing component separation methods. Spin-SILC can be combined with the pseudo- and pure E-B spin wavelet estimators presented in a companion paper to reliably extract the cosmological signal in the presence of complicated sky cuts and noise. Therefore, it will provide a computationally-efficient method to accurately extract the CMB E and B modes for future polarisation experiments.

  16. Dynamic nuclear polarisation NMR of nanosized zirconium phosphate polymer fillers.

    PubMed

    Ziarelli, Fabio; Casciola, Mario; Pica, Monica; Donnadio, Anna; Aussenac, Fabien; Sauvée, Claire; Capitani, Donatella; Viel, Stéphane

    2014-09-11

    Surface functionalisation with organic modifiers of multi-layered zirconium phosphate (ZrP) nanoparticles used as polymer fillers can be directly probed by dynamic nuclear polarisation NMR, which provides unambiguous evidence of the presence of P-O-C chemical bonds at the surface of the ZrP layers, thereby confirming successful functionalisation.

  17. IFT46 plays crucial roles in craniofacial and cilia development.

    PubMed

    Park, Inji; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Chowon; Ismail, Tayaba; Kim, Yoo-Kyung; Park, Jeen-Woo; Kwon, Oh-Shin; Kang, Beom Sik; Lee, Dong-Seok; Park, Tae-Joo; Park, Mae-Ja; Choi, Sun-Cheol; Lee, Hyun-Shik

    2016-08-26

    The intraflagellar transport (IFT) system is essential for bidirectional movement of ciliary components from the basal body to the tip beneath the ciliary sheath and is conserved for cilia and flagella formation in most vertebrates. IFT complex A is involved in anterograde trafficking, whereas complex B is involved in retrograde trafficking. IFT46 is well known as a crucial component of IFT complex B, however, its developmental functions are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the novel functions of IFT46 during vertebrate development, especially, ciliogenesis and neurogenesis, because IFT46 is strongly expressed in both multiciliated cells of epithelial and neural tissues. Knockdown of IFT46 using morpholino microinjections caused shortening of the body axis as well as the formation of fewer and shorter cilia. Furthermore, loss of IFT46 down-regulated the expression of the neural plate and neural tube markers, thus may influence Wnt/planar cell polarity and the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway during neurogenesis. In addition, loss of IFT46 caused craniofacial defects by interfering with cartilage formation. In conclusion, our results depict that IFT46 plays important roles in cilia as well as in neural and craniofacial development. PMID:27320864

  18. Nature-inspired micro-fluidic manipulation using artificial cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Toonder, Jaap; de Goede, Judith; Khatavkar, Vinayak; Anderson, Patrick

    2006-11-01

    One particular micro-fluidics manipulation mechanism ``designed'' by nature is that due to a covering of beating cilia over the external surface of micro-organisms (e.g. Paramecium). A cilium can be viewed as a small hair or flexible rod (in protozoa: typical length 10 μm and diameter 0.1 μm) which is attached to the surface. We have developed polymer micro-actuators, made with standard micro-technology processing, which respond to an applied electrical or magnetic field by changing their shape. The shape and size of the polymer actuators mimics that of cilia occurring in nature. We have shown experimentally that, indeed, our artificial cilia can induce significant flow velocities of at least 75 μm/s in a fluid with a viscosity of 10 mPas. In this paper we will give an overview of our activities in developing the polymer actuators and the corresponding technology, show experimental and numerical fluid flow results, and finally assess the feasibility of applying this new and attractive micro-fluidic actuation method in functional biosensors.

  19. Intraflagellar Transport Gene Expression Associated with Short Cilia in Smoking and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Hessel, Justina; Heldrich, Jonna; Fuller, Jennifer; Staudt, Michelle R.; Radisch, Sharon; Hollmann, Charleen; Harvey, Ben-Gary; Kaner, Robert J.; Salit, Jacqueline; Yee-Levin, Jenny; Sridhar, Sriram; Pillai, Sreekumar; Hilton, Holly; Wolff, Gerhard; Bitter, Hans; Visvanathan, Sudha; Fine, Jay; Stevenson, Christopher S.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Tilley, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Smoking and COPD are associated with decreased mucociliary clearance, and healthy smokers have shorter cilia in the large airway than nonsmokers. We hypothesized that changes in cilia length are consistent throughout the airway, and we further hypothesized that smokers with COPD have shorter cilia than healthy smokers. Because intraflagellar transport (IFT) is the process by which cilia of normal length are produced and maintained, and alterations in IFT lead to short cilia in model organisms, we also hypothesized that smoking induces changes in the expression of IFT-related genes in the airway epithelium of smokers and smokers with COPD. To assess these hypotheses, airway epithelium was obtained via bronchoscopic brushing. Cilia length was assessed by measuring 100 cilia (10 cilia on each of 10 cells) per subject and Affymetrix microarrays were used to evaluate IFT gene expression in nonsmokers and healthy smokers in 2 independent data sets from large and small airway as well as in COPD smokers in a data set from the small airway. In the large and small airway epithelium, cilia were significantly shorter in healthy smokers than nonsmokers, and significantly shorter in COPD smokers than in both healthy smokers and nonsmokers. The gene expression data confirmed that a set of 8 IFT genes were down-regulated in smokers in both data sets; however, no differences were seen in COPD smokers compared to healthy smokers. These results support the concept that loss of cilia length contributes to defective mucociliary clearance in COPD, and that smoking-induced changes in expression of IFT genes may be one mechanism of abnormally short cilia in smokers. Strategies to normalize cilia length may be an important avenue for novel COPD therapies. PMID:24465567

  20. A role for Tctex-1 (DYNLT1) in controlling primary cilium length.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Krysten J; MacCarthy-Morrogh, Lucy; Smyllie, Nicola; Stephens, David J

    2011-10-01

    The microtubule motor complex cytoplasmic dynein is known to be involved in multiple processes including endomembrane organization and trafficking, mitosis, and microtubule organization. The majority of studies of cytoplasmic dynein have focused on the form of the motor that is built around the dynein-1 heavy chain. A second isoform, dynein heavy chain-2, and its specifically associated light intermediate chain, LIC3 (D2LIC), are known to be involved in the formation and function of primary cilia. We have used RNAi in human epithelial cells to define the cytoplasmic dynein subunits that function with dynein heavy chain 2 in primary cilia. We identify the dynein light chain Tctex-1 as a key modulator of cilia length control; depletion of Tctex-1 results in longer cilia as defined by both acetylated tubulin labeling of the axoneme and Rab8a labeling of the cilia membrane. Suppression of dynein heavy chain-2 causes concomitant loss of Tctex-1 and this correlates with an increase in cilia length. Compared to individual depletions, double siRNA depletion of DHC2 and Tctex-1 causes an even greater increase in cilia length. Our data show that Tctex-1 is a key regulator of cilia length and most likely functions as part of dynein-2.

  1. Polarisation properties of Milky-Way-like galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. H.; Reich, W.

    2012-07-01

    Aims: We study the polarisation properties, magnetic field strength, and synchrotron emission scale-height of Milky-Way-like galaxies in comparison with other spiral galaxies. Methods: We used our 3D-emission model of the Milky Way Galaxy for viewing the Milky Way from outside at various inclinations in the way that spiral galaxies are observed. We analysed these Milky Way maps with techniques used to obtain the strength of magnetic fields, rotation measures (RMs), and scale-heights of synchrotron emission from observations of resolved galaxies and compared the results with the Milky Way model parameter. We also simulated a large sample of unresolved Milky-Way-like galaxies to study their statistical polarisation properties. Results: When seen edge-on, the synchrotron emission from the Milky Way has an exponential scale-height of about 0.74 kpc, which is much lower than the values obtained from previous models. We find that current analysis methods overestimate the scale-height of synchrotron emission of galaxies by about 10% at an inclination of 80° and about 40% at an inclination of 70° because of contamination from the disk. The observed RMs for face-on galaxies derived from high-frequency polarisation measurements approximate to the Faraday depths (FDs) when scaled by a factor of two. For edge-on galaxies, the observed RMs are indicative of the orientation of the large-scale magnetic field, but are not closely related with the FDs. Assuming energy equipartition between the magnetic field and particles for the Milky Way results in an average magnetic-field strength that is about twice as high as the intrinsic value for a K factor of 100. The number distribution of the integrated polarisation percentages of a large sample of unresolved Milky-Way-like galaxies peaks at about 4.2% at 4.8 GHz and at about 0.8% at 1.4 GHz. Integrated polarisation angles rotated by 90° align very well with the position angles of the major axes, implying that unresolved galaxies do

  2. Polarised radio sources : a study of luminosity, redshift and flux density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Julie Kristen

    2011-05-01

    Results of deep polarisation imaging at 1.4 GHz with the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory as part of the DRAO Planck Deep Fields project are presented. This deep extragalactic field covers 15.16 deg2 centred at a2000 = 16h14m and d2000 = 54560, has an angular resolution of 4200-6200 at the field centre, and reaches a sensitivity of 55 mJy beam-1 in Stokes I and 45 mJy beam-1 in Stokes Q and U. There are 958 radio sources in Stokes I of which 136 are detected in polarisation. The Euclidean-normalized polarised differential source counts are determined down to 400 mJy. These counts indicate that sources have a higher percentage polarisation at fainter Stokes I flux density levels than for brighter sources. The majority of the polarised sources are steep-spectrum objects with a mean spectral index of -0.77, and there is no correlation between fractional polarisation and spectral index. Of the polarised sources, 77% show structure at the arc-second scale whereas only 38% of the sources with no detectable polarisation show such structure. This indicates that polarised sources tend to have structure at arcsecond scales and that the polarised emission is most likely not beamed. This confirms that the polarised radio sources tend to be lobe-dominated radio galaxies. The median percentage polarisation for resolved sources is 6.8%, while it is 4.4% for compact objects. Radio sources in the DRAO deep field have been matched with the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic survey of the European Large Area ISO Survey North 1 field. In the redshift range of 0.04 < z < 3.2, there are 429 radio sources with redshifts of which 69 are polarised. Infrared colour analysis of the radio sample shows that the majority of polarised sources are elliptical galaxies with an embedded active galactic nucleus. High resolution imaging shows that FRIs are more highly polarised than FRIIs, which are seen to populate the polarized source counts at fainter flux density levels. There is no

  3. 3D reconstruction of concave surfaces using polarisation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohaib, A.; Farooq, A. R.; Ahmed, J.; Smith, L. N.; Smith, M. L.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for improved shape recovery using polarisation-based photometric stereo. The majority of previous research using photometric stereo involves 3D reconstruction using both the diffuse and specular components of light; however, this paper suggests the use of the specular component only as it is the only form of light that comes directly off the surface without subsurface scattering or interreflections. Experiments were carried out on both real and synthetic surfaces. Real images were obtained using a polarisation-based photometric stereo device while synthetic images were generated using PovRay® software. The results clearly demonstrate that the proposed method can extract three-dimensional (3D) surface information effectively even for concave surfaces with complex texture and surface reflectance.

  4. Verification of polarising optics for the LISA optical bench.

    PubMed

    Dehne, Marina; Tröbs, Michael; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten

    2012-12-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a space-based interferometric gravitational wave detector. In the current baseline design for the optical bench, the use of polarising optics is foreseen to separate optical beams. Therefore it is important to investigate the influence of polarising components on the interferometer sensitivity and validate that the required picometre stability in the low-frequency band (1 mHz - 1 Hz) is achievable. This paper discusses the design of the experiment and the implemented stabilisation loops. A displacement readout fulfilling the requirement in the whole frequency band is presented. Alternatively, we demonstrate improvement of the noise performance by implementing various algorithms in data post-processing, which leads to an additional robustness for the LISA mission.

  5. Pulsar polarisation below 200 MHz: Average profiles and propagation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noutsos, A.; Sobey, C.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Weltevrede, P.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Karastergiou, A.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Alexov, A.; Breton, R. P.; Bilous, A. V.; Cooper, S.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Hassall, T. E.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Keane, E. F.; Osłowski, S.; Pilia, M.; Serylak, M.; Stappers, B. W.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zagkouris, K.; Anderson, K.; Bähren, L.; Bell, M.; Broderick, J.; Carbone, D.; Cendes, Y.; Coenen, T.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fender, R.; Garsden, H.; Jonker, P.; Law, C.; Markoff, S.; Masters, J.; Miller-Jones, J.; Molenaar, G.; Osten, R.; Pietka, M.; Rol, E.; Rowlinson, A.; Scheers, B.; Spreeuw, H.; Staley, T.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J.; Wijers, R.; Wijnands, R.; Wise, M.; Zarka, P.; van der Horst, A.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: We present the highest-quality polarisation profiles to date of 16 non-recycled pulsars and four millisecond pulsars, observed below 200 MHz with the LOFAR high-band antennas. Based on the observed profiles, we perform an initial investigation of expected observational effects resulting from the propagation of polarised emission in the pulsar magnetosphere and the interstellar medium. Methods: The polarisation data presented in this paper have been calibrated for the geometric-projection and beam-shape effects that distort the polarised information as detected with the LOFAR antennas. We have used RM Synthesis to determine the amount of Faraday rotation in the data at the time of the observations. The ionospheric contribution to the measured Faraday rotation was estimated using a model of the ionosphere. To study the propagation effects, we have compared our low-frequency polarisation observations with archival data at 240, 400, 600, and 1400 MHz. Results: The predictions of magnetospheric birefringence in pulsars have been tested using spectra of the pulse width and fractional polarisation from multifrequency data. The derived spectra offer only partial support for the expected effects of birefringence on the polarisation properties, with only about half of our sample being consistent with the model's predictions. It is noted that for some pulsars these measurements are contaminated by the effects of interstellar scattering. For a number of pulsars in our sample, we have observed significant variations in the amount of Faraday rotation as a function of pulse phase, which is possibly an artefact of scattering. These variations are typically two orders of magnitude smaller than that observed at 1400 MHz by Noutsos et al. (2009), for a different sample of southern pulsars. In this paper we present a possible explanation for the difference in magnitude of this effect between the two frequencies, based on scattering. Finally, we have estimated the magnetospheric

  6. Polarisation and Mode Combinations for Ship Detection Using RADARSAT-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannevik, Tonje Nanette; Olsen, Richard B.

    2010-12-01

    RADARSAT-2 provides new opportunities for spaceborne monitoring of vessel traffic and fishing activities. A series of RADARSAT-2 data has been collected and analysed over Norwegian waters. ScanSAR and standard quad-pol images have been used in the analyses. The Norne field is used as a test site, because it is possible to image the same vessel under different conditions. The different polarisations and polarization combinations are analysed.

  7. Ultrafast polarisation spectroscopy of photoinduced charges in a conjugated polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Bakulin, A A; Loosdrecht, P van; Pshenichnikov, M S; Parashchuk, D Yu

    2009-07-31

    Tunable optical parametric generators and amplifiers (OPA), proposed and developed by Akhmanov and his colleagues, have become the working horses in exploration of dynamical processes in physics, chemistry, and biology. In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility of using ultrafast polarisation-sensitive two-colour spectroscopy, performed with a set of two OPAs, to study charge photogeneration and transport in conjugated polymers and their donor-acceptor blends. (special issue devoted to the 80th birthday of S.A. Akhmanov)

  8. PoGOLite measurement of Crab polarisation and future plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Mark

    2016-07-01

    (For the PoGOLite Collaboration) The PoGOLite Pathfinder is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter designed for the observation of bright, ~1 Crab, sources. Polarisation is determined by measuring the azimuthal Compton scattering angle of incident X-rays in an array of plastic scintillators housed in an BGO anticoincidence well. The PoGOLite Pathfinder was launched from the SSC Esrange Space Centre in July 2013 resulting in a near-circumpolar flight of two weeks duration. The linear polarisation of hard X-ray emissions from the Crab was measured in a previously unexplored energy interval, 20-120 keV. The polarimetric response was characterised prior to flight using both polarised and unpolarised calibration sources. Systematic effects were addressed through observations of a background field. An upgraded polarimeter, PoGO+, is scheduled to fly in summer 2016 from Esrange. Results from the 2013 Pathfinder flight and prospects for the 2016 flight will be discussed.

  9. Diagnostic of stellar magnetic fields with cumulative circular polarisation profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochukhov, O.

    2015-08-01

    Information about stellar magnetic field topologies is obtained primarily from high-resolution circular polarisation (Stokes V) observations. Because of their generally complex morphologies, the stellar Stokes V profiles are usually interpreted with elaborate inversion techniques such as Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI). Here we further develop a new method for interpreting circular polarisation signatures in spectral lines using cumulative Stokes V profiles (anti-derivative of Stokes V). This method is complimentary to ZDI and can be applied to validate the inversion results or when the available observational data are insufficient for an inversion. Based on the rigorous treatment of polarised line formation in the weak-field regime, we show that, for rapidly rotating stars, the cumulative Stokes V profiles contain information about the spatially resolved longitudinal magnetic field density. Rotational modulation of these profiles can be employed for a simple, qualitative characterisation of the stellar magnetic field topologies. We apply this diagnostic method to the archival observations of the weak-line T Tauri star V410 Tau and Bp He-strong star HD 37776. We show that the magnetic field in V410 Tau is dominated by an azimuthal component, in agreement with the ZDI map that we recover from the same data set. For HD 37776 the cumulative Stokes V profile variation indicates the presence of multiple regions of positive and negative field polarity. This behaviour agrees with the ZDI results, but contradicts the popular hypothesis that the magnetic field of this star is dominated by an axisymmetric quadrupolar component.

  10. Majorana fermion fingerprints in spin-polarised scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotetes, Panagiotis; Mendler, Daniel; Heimes, Andreas; Schön, Gerd

    2015-11-01

    We calculate the spatially resolved tunnelling conductance of topological superconductors (TSCs) based on ferromagnetic chains, measured by means of spin-polarised scanning tunnelling microscopy (SPSTM). Our analysis reveals novel signatures of MFs arising from the interplay of their strongly anisotropic spin-polarisation and the magnetisation content of the tip. We focus on the deep Yu-Shiba-Rusinov (YSR) limit where only YSR bound states localised in the vicinity of the adatoms govern the low-energy as also the topological properties of the system. Under these conditions, we investigate the occurrence of zero/finite bias peaks (ZBPs/FBPs) for a single or two coupled TSC chains forming a Josephson junction. Each TSC can host up to two Majorana fermions (MFs) per edge if chiral symmetry is preserved. Here we retrieve the conductance for all the accessible configurations of the MF number of each chain. Our results illustrate innovative spin-polarisation-sensitive experimental routes for arresting the MFs by either restoring or splitting the ZBP in a predictable fashion via: (i) weakly breaking chiral symmetry, e.g. by the SPSTM tip itself or by an external Zeeman field and (ii) tuning the superconducting phase difference of the TSCs, which is encoded in the 4π-Josephson coupling of neighbouring MFs.

  11. Polarised Drell-Yan measurements at COMPASS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaresma, M.

    2014-01-01

    The spin structure of the nucleon and its Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) are important topics studied by the COMPASS experiment at CERN. So far, the transverse momentum dependent PDFs (TMD PDFs) of the proton and deuteron have been studied in Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS). The Drell-Yan (DY) process is a complementary way to access the TMD PDFs, using a transversely polarised target. Studying the angular distributions of dimuons from the DY events produced in the collisions of a π- beam with 190 GeV/ c momentum off a transversely polarised proton target (NH3) we are able to extract the azimuthal spin asymmetries, which are generated by 4 out of the 8 TMD PDFs needed to describe the nucleon structure at leading order QCD. The expected sign change in Sivers and Boer-Mulders functions when accessed from DY and SIDIS will be checked [1]. The opportunity to study, in the same experiment, the TMD PDFs from both SIDIS and DY processes is unique at COMPASS. The COMPASS II Proposal [2] was approved by CERN including one year for polarised DY measurements; the beginning of the DY data taking is scheduled for 2014. The feasibility of the measurement was proven by several beam tests performed so far.

  12. Evc is a positive mediator of Ihh-regulated bone growth that localises at the base of chondrocyte cilia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Blair, Helen J; Rodriguez-Andres, M Elena; Blanco, Maria Jose; Wilson, Amy; Liu, Yu-Ning; Miles, Colin; Peters, Heiko; Goodship, Judith A

    2007-08-01

    EVC is a novel protein mutated in the human chondroectodermal dysplasia Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC; OMIM: 225500). We have inactivated Evc in the mouse and show that Evc(-/-) mice develop an EvC-like syndrome, including short ribs, short limbs and dental abnormalities. lacZ driven by the Evc promoter revealed that Evc is expressed in the developing bones and the orofacial region. Antibodies developed against Evc locate the protein at the base of the primary cilium. The growth plate of Evc(-/-) mice shows delayed bone collar formation and advanced maturation of chondrocytes. Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is expressed normally in the growth plates of Evc(-/-) mice, but expression of the Ihh downstream genes Ptch1 and Gli1 was markedly decreased. Recent studies have shown that Smo localises to primary cilia and that Gli3 processing is defective in intraflagellar transport mutants. In vitro studies using Evc(-/-) cells demonstrate that the defect lies downstream of Smo. Chondrocyte cilia are present in Evc(-/-) mice and Gli3 processing appears normal by western blot analysis. We conclude that Evc is an intracellular component of the hedgehog signal transduction pathway that is required for normal transcriptional activation of Ihh target genes.

  13. Left-right organizer flow dynamics: how much cilia activity reliably yields laterality?

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Pedro; Ferreira, Rita R; Guerrero, Adán; Pintado, Petra; Tavares, Bárbara; Amaro, Joana; Smith, Andrew A; Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas; Smith, David J; Lopes, Susana S

    2014-06-23

    Internal organs are asymmetrically positioned inside the body. Embryonic motile cilia play an essential role in this process by generating a directional fluid flow inside the vertebrate left-right organizer. Detailed characterization of how fluid flow dynamics modulates laterality is lacking. We used zebrafish genetics to experimentally generate a range of flow dynamics. By following the development of each embryo, we show that fluid flow in the left-right organizer is asymmetric and provides a good predictor of organ laterality. This was tested in mosaic organizers composed of motile and immotile cilia generated by dnah7 knockdowns. In parallel, we used simulations of fluid dynamics to analyze our experimental data. These revealed that fluid flow generated by 30 or more cilia predicts 90% situs solitus, similar to experimental observations. We conclude that cilia number, dorsal anterior motile cilia clustering, and left flow are critical to situs solitus via robust asymmetric charon expression. PMID:24930722

  14. Polaris, a protein involved in left-right axis patterning, localizes to basal bodies and cilia.

    PubMed

    Taulman, P D; Haycraft, C J; Balkovetz, D F; Yoder, B K

    2001-03-01

    Mutations in Tg737 cause a wide spectrum of phenotypes, including random left-right axis specification, polycystic kidney disease, liver and pancreatic defects, hydrocephalus, and skeletal patterning abnormalities. To further assess the biological function of Tg737 and its role in the mutant pathology, we identified the cell population expressing Tg737 and determined the subcellular localization of its protein product called Polaris. Tg737 expression is associated with cells possessing either motile or immotile cilia and sperm. Similarly, Polaris concentrated just below the apical membrane in the region of the basal bodies and within the cilia or flagellar axoneme. The data suggest that Polaris functions in a ciliogenic pathway or in cilia maintenance, a role supported by the loss of cilia on the ependymal cell layer in ventricles of Tg737(orpk) brains and by the lack of node cilia in Tg737(Delta2-3betaGal) mutants. PMID:11251073

  15. c21orf59/kurly Controls Both Cilia Motility and Polarization.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Kimberly M; Grimes, Daniel T; Schottenfeld-Roames, Jodi; Werner, Michael E; Ku, Tse-Shuen J; Kim, Sun K; Pelliccia, Jose L; Morante, Nicholas F C; Mitchell, Brian J; Burdine, Rebecca D

    2016-03-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based projections that function in the movement of extracellular fluid. This requires cilia to be: (1) motile and driven by dynein complexes and (2) correctly polarized on the surface of cells, which requires planar cell polarity (PCP). Few factors that regulate both processes have been discovered. We reveal that C21orf59/Kurly (Kur), a cytoplasmic protein with some enrichment at the base of cilia, is needed for motility; zebrafish mutants exhibit characteristic developmental abnormalities and dynein arm defects. kur was also required for proper cilia polarization in the zebrafish kidney and the larval skin of Xenopus laevis. CRISPR/Cas9 coupled with homologous recombination to disrupt the endogenous kur locus in Xenopus resulted in the asymmetric localization of the PCP protein Prickle2 being lost in mutant multiciliated cells. Kur also makes interactions with other PCP components, including Disheveled. This supports a model wherein Kur plays a dual role in cilia motility and polarization.

  16. Destabilization of the IFT-B cilia core complex due to mutations in IFT81 causes a Spectrum of Short-Rib Polydactyly Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Ivan; Taylor, S. Paige; Zhang, Wenjuan; Martin, Jorge; Forlenza, Kimberly N.; Spiro, Rhonda P.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael; Cohn, Daniel H.; Krakow, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Short-rib polydactyly syndromes (SRPS) and Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD) or Jeune Syndrome are recessively inherited skeletal ciliopathies characterized by profound skeletal abnormalities and are frequently associated with polydactyly and multiorgan system involvement. SRPS are produced by mutations in genes that participate in the formation and function of primary cilia and usually result from disruption of retrograde intraflagellar (IFT) transport of the cilium. Herein we describe a new spectrum of SRPS caused by mutations in the gene IFT81, a key component of the IFT-B complex essential for anterograde transport. In mutant chondrocytes, the mutations led to low levels of IFT81 and mutant cells produced elongated cilia, had altered hedgehog signaling, had increased post-translation modification of tubulin, and showed evidence of destabilization of additional anterograde transport complex components. These findings demonstrate the importance of IFT81 in the skeleton, its role in the anterograde transport complex, and expand the number of loci associated with SRPS. PMID:27666822

  17. Soluble mediators, not cilia, determine airway surface liquid volume in normal and cystic fibrosis superficial airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert; Trout, Laura; Donaldson, Scott H; Boucher, Richard C

    2006-05-01

    A key aspect of the lung's innate defense system is the ability of the superficial epithelium to regulate airway surface liquid (ASL) volume to maintain a 7-mum periciliary liquid layer (PCL), which is required for cilia to beat and produce mucus flow. The mechanisms whereby airway epithelia regulate ASL height to >or=7 microm are poorly understood. Using bumetanide as an inhibitor of Cl- secretion, and nystatin as an activator of Na+ absorption, we found that a coordinated "blending" of both Cl- secretion and Na+ absorption must occur to effect ASL volume homeostasis. We then investigated how ASL volume status is regulated by the underlying epithelia. Cilia were not critical to this process as (a) ASL volume was normal in cultures from patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia with immotile cilia, and (b) in normal cultures that had not yet undergone ciliogenesis. However, we found that maneuvers that mimic deposition of excess ASL onto the proximal airways, which occurs during mucociliary clearance and after glandular secretion, acutely stimulated Na+ absorption, suggesting that volume regulation was sensitive to changes in concentrations of soluble mediators in the ASL rather than alterations in ciliary beating. To investigate this hypothesis further, we added potential "soluble mediators" to the ASL. ASL volume regulation was sensitive to a channel-activating protein (CAP; trypsin) and a CAP inhibitor (aprotinin), which regulated Na+ absorption via changes in epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) activity in both normal and cystic fibrosis cultures. ATP was also found to acutely regulate ASL volume by inducing secretion in normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) cultures, while its metabolite adenosine (ADO) evoked secretion in normal cultures but stimulated absorption in CF cultures. Interestingly, the amount of ASL/Cl- secretion elicited by ATP/ADO was influenced by the level of CAP-induced Na+ absorption, suggesting that there are important interactions between the soluble

  18. About the effects of polarising optics on lidar signals and the Δ90 calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenthaler, Volker

    2016-08-01

    This paper provides a model for assessing the effects of polarising optics on the signals of typical lidar systems, which is based on the description of the individual optical elements of the lidar and of the state of polarisation of the light by means of the Müller-Stokes formalism. General analytical equations are derived for the dependence of the lidar signals on polarisation parameters, for the linear depolarisation ratio, and for the signals of different polarisation calibration setups. The equations can also be used for the calculation of systematic errors caused by nonideal optical elements, their rotational misalignment, and by non-ideal laser polarisation. We present the description of the lidar signals including the polarisation calibration in a closed form, which can be applied for a large variety of lidar systems.

  19. Regulation of cilia assembly, disassembly, and length by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Muqing; Li, Guihua; Pan, Junmin

    2009-01-01

    The exact mechanism by which cells are able to assemble, regulate, and disassemble cilia or flagella is not yet completely understood. Recent studies in several model systems, including Chlamydomonas, Tetrahymena, Leishmania, Caenorhabditis elegans, and mammals, provide increasing biochemical and genetic evidence that phosphorylation of multiple protein kinases plays a key role in cilia assembly, disassembly, and length regulation. Members of several protein kinase families--including aurora kinases, never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related protein kinases, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, and a novel cyclin-dependent protein kinase--are involved in the ciliary regulation process. Among the newly identified protein kinase substrates are Chlamydomonas kinesin-13 (CrKinesin13), a microtubule depolymerizer, and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), a microtubule deacetylase. Chlamydomonas aurora/Ipl1p-like protein kinase (CALK) and CrKinesin13 are two proteins that undergo phosphorylation changes correlated with flagellar assembly or disassembly. CALK becomes phosphorylated when flagella are lost, whereas CrKinesin13 is phosphorylated when new flagella are assembled. Conversely, suppressing CrKinesin13 expression results in cells with shorter flagella. PMID:20362099

  20. Ultrastructure of cilia and flagella - back to the future!

    PubMed

    Fisch, Cathy; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale

    2011-06-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella perform motility and sensory functions which are essential for cell survival in protozoans, and to organism development and homoeostasis in metazoans. Their ultrastructure has been studied from the early beginnings of electron microscopy, and these studies continue to contribute to much of our understanding about ciliary biology. In the light of the progress made in the visualization of cellular structures over the last decade, we revisit the ultrastructure of cilia and flagella. We briefly describe the typical features of a 9+2 axoneme before focusing extensively on the transition zone, the ciliary necklace, the singlet zone, the ciliary cap and the ciliary crown. We discuss how the singlet zone is linked to sensory and/or motile function, the contribution of the ciliary crown to ovocyte and mucosal propulsion, and the relationship between the ciliary cap and microtubule growth and shortening, and its relation to ciliary beat. We further examine the involvement of the transition zone/the ciliary necklace in axonemal stabilization, autotomy and as a diffusion barrier.

  1. Calculation of the optimal polarisation anisotropy of interference mirrors of a ring laser resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Vol'pyan, O D; Kuryatov, V N; Sokolov, A L

    2009-10-31

    The influence of the amplitude-phase polarisation anisotropy of the interference mirrors on the polarisation characteristics of a ring laser (ellipticity, frequency shifts, and losses) is analysed. The combination of the mirror parameters, at which the maximum sensitivity of the polarisation characteristics of radiation to the nonplanar deformation of the axial contour is observed, is determined. It is shown that there exists a range of optimal phase anisotropies of the mirrors. (resonators)

  2. UV circular polarisation in star formation regions: the origin of homochirality?

    PubMed

    Lucas, P W; Hough, J H; Bailey, Jeremy; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Gledhill, T M; McCall, Alan

    2005-02-01

    Ultraviolet circularly polarised light has been suggested as the initial cause of the homochirality of organic molecules in terrestrial organisms, via enantiomeric selection of prebiotic molecules by asymmetric photolysis. We present a theoretical investigation of mechanisms by which ultraviolet circular polarisation may be produced in star formation regions. In the scenarios considered here, light scattering produces only a small percentage of net circular polarisation at any point in space, due to the forward throwing nature of the phase function in the ultraviolet. By contrast, dichroic extinction can produce a fairly high percentage of net circular polarisation ( approximately 10%) and may therefore play a key role in producing an enantiomeric excess.

  3. Cilia internal mechanism and metachronal coordination as the result of hydrodynamical coupling

    PubMed Central

    Gueron, Shay; Levit-Gurevich, Konstantin; Liron, Nadav; Blum, Jacob J.

    1997-01-01

    We present a simple but realistic model for the internal bend-generating mechanism of cilia, using parameters obtained from the analysis of data of the beat of a single cilium, and incorporate it into a recently developed dynamical model. Comparing the results to experimental data for two-dimensional beats, we demonstrate that the model captures the essential features of the motion, including many properties that are not built in explicitly. The beat pattern and frequency change in response to increased viscosity and the presence of neighboring cilia in a realistic fashion. Using the model, we are able to investigate multicilia configurations such as rows of cilia and two-dimensional arrays of cilia. When two adjacent model cilia start beating at different phase, they synchronize within two cycles, as observed in experiments in which two flagella beating out of phase are brought close together. Examination of various multicilia configurations shows that metachronal patterns (i.e., beats with a constant phase difference between neighboring cilia) evolve autonomously. This provides modeling evidence in support of the conjecture that metachronism may occur as a self-organized phenomenon due to hydrodynamical interactions between the cilia. PMID:9177158

  4. Spontaneous Creation of Macroscopic Flow and Metachronal Waves in an Array of Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Guirao, Boris; Joanny, Jean-François

    2007-01-01

    Cells carrying cilia on their surface show many striking features: alignment of cilia in an array, two-phase asymmetric beating for each cilium, and existence of metachronal coordination with a constant phase difference between two adjacent cilia. We give simple theoretical arguments based on hydrodynamic coupling and an internal mechanism of the cilium derived from the behavior of a collection of molecular motors to account qualitatively for these cooperative features. Hydrodynamic interactions can lead to the alignment of an array of cilia. We study the effect of a transverse external flow and obtain a two-phase asymmetrical beating, faster along the flow and slower against the flow, proceeding around an average curved position. We show that an aligned array of cilia is able to spontaneously break the left-right symmetry and to create a global average flow. Metachronal coordination arises as a consequence of the internal mechanism of the cilia and their hydrodynamic couplings, with a wavelength comparable to that found in experiments. It allows the cilia to start beating at a lower adenosine-triphosphate threshold and at a higher frequency than for a single cilium. It also leads to a rather stationary flow, which might be its major advantage. PMID:17189311

  5. Kinesin-13 regulates the quantity and quality of tubulin inside cilia

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Krishna Kumar; Jiang, Yu-Yang; Lechtreck, Karl F.; Kushida, Yasuharu; Alford, Lea M.; Sale, Winfield S.; Hennessey, Todd; Gaertig, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Kinesin-13, an end depolymerizer of cytoplasmic and spindle microtubules, also affects the length of cilia. However, in different models, depletion of kinesin-13 either lengthens or shortens cilia, and therefore the exact function of kinesin-13 in cilia remains unclear. We generated null mutations of all kinesin-13 paralogues in the ciliate Tetrahymena. One of the paralogues, Kin13Ap, localizes to the nuclei and is essential for nuclear divisions. The remaining two paralogues, Kin13Bp and Kin13Cp, localize to the cell body and inside assembling cilia. Loss of both Kin13Bp and Kin13Cp resulted in slow cell multiplication and motility, overgrowth of cell body microtubules, shortening of cilia, and synthetic lethality with either paclitaxel or a deletion of MEC-17/ATAT1, the α-tubulin acetyltransferase. The mutant cilia assembled slowly and contained abnormal tubulin, characterized by altered posttranslational modifications and hypersensitivity to paclitaxel. The mutant cilia beat slowly and axonemes showed reduced velocity of microtubule sliding. Thus kinesin-13 positively regulates the axoneme length, influences the properties of ciliary tubulin, and likely indirectly, through its effects on the axonemal microtubules, affects the ciliary dynein-dependent motility. PMID:25501369

  6. RPGR, a prenylated retinal ciliopathy protein, is targeted to cilia in a prenylation- and PDE6D-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Nirmal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RPGR (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator) is a ciliary protein associated with several forms of inherited retinal degenerative diseases. PDE6D is a ubiquitously expressed prenyl-binding protein and involved in ciliary targeting of prenylated proteins. The current working model for the RPGR function depicts that RPGR acts as a scaffold protein to recruit cargo-loaded PDE6D to primary cilia. Here, we present evidence demonstrating an alternative relationship between RPGR and PDE6D, in which RPGR is a cargo of PDE6D for ciliary targeting. We found that the constitutive isoform of RPGR, which is prenylated, requires prenylation for its ciliary localization. We also found that there are at least two independent ciliary targeting signals in RPGR: one within the N-terminal region that contains the RCC1-like domain and the other near the prenylation site at the C-terminus. Ablation of PDE6D blocked ciliary targeting of RPGR. Our study indicates that prenylated RPGR is one of the cargos of PDE6D for ciliary trafficking and provides insight into the mechanisms by which RPGR is targeted to cilia. PMID:27493202

  7. RPGR, a prenylated retinal ciliopathy protein, is targeted to cilia in a prenylation- and PDE6D-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Nirmal; Seo, Seongjin

    2016-09-15

    RPGR (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator) is a ciliary protein associated with several forms of inherited retinal degenerative diseases. PDE6D is a ubiquitously expressed prenyl-binding protein and involved in ciliary targeting of prenylated proteins. The current working model for the RPGR function depicts that RPGR acts as a scaffold protein to recruit cargo-loaded PDE6D to primary cilia. Here, we present evidence demonstrating an alternative relationship between RPGR and PDE6D, in which RPGR is a cargo of PDE6D for ciliary targeting. We found that the constitutive isoform of RPGR, which is prenylated, requires prenylation for its ciliary localization. We also found that there are at least two independent ciliary targeting signals in RPGR: one within the N-terminal region that contains the RCC1-like domain and the other near the prenylation site at the C-terminus. Ablation of PDE6D blocked ciliary targeting of RPGR. Our study indicates that prenylated RPGR is one of the cargos of PDE6D for ciliary trafficking and provides insight into the mechanisms by which RPGR is targeted to cilia.

  8. RPGR, a prenylated retinal ciliopathy protein, is targeted to cilia in a prenylation- and PDE6D-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Nirmal; Seo, Seongjin

    2016-01-01

    RPGR (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator) is a ciliary protein associated with several forms of inherited retinal degenerative diseases. PDE6D is a ubiquitously expressed prenyl-binding protein and involved in ciliary targeting of prenylated proteins. The current working model for the RPGR function depicts that RPGR acts as a scaffold protein to recruit cargo-loaded PDE6D to primary cilia. Here, we present evidence demonstrating an alternative relationship between RPGR and PDE6D, in which RPGR is a cargo of PDE6D for ciliary targeting. We found that the constitutive isoform of RPGR, which is prenylated, requires prenylation for its ciliary localization. We also found that there are at least two independent ciliary targeting signals in RPGR: one within the N-terminal region that contains the RCC1-like domain and the other near the prenylation site at the C-terminus. Ablation of PDE6D blocked ciliary targeting of RPGR. Our study indicates that prenylated RPGR is one of the cargos of PDE6D for ciliary trafficking and provides insight into the mechanisms by which RPGR is targeted to cilia. PMID:27493202

  9. The impact of surface chemistry modification on macrophage polarisation.

    PubMed

    Rostam, Hassan M; Singh, Sonali; Salazar, Fabian; Magennis, Peter; Hook, Andrew; Singh, Taranjit; Vrana, Nihal E; Alexander, Morgan R; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M

    2016-11-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that have a central role in combating infection and maintaining tissue homeostasis. They exhibit remarkable plasticity in response to environmental cues. At either end of a broad activation spectrum are pro-inflammatory (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages with distinct functional and phenotypical characteristics. Macrophages also play a crucial role in orchestrating immune responses to biomaterials used in the fabrication of implantable devices and drug delivery systems. To assess the impact of different surface chemistries on macrophage polarisation, human monocytes were cultured for 6 days on untreated hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) and hydrophilic O2 plasma-etched polystyrene (O2-PS40) surfaces. Our data clearly show that monocytes cultured on the hydrophilic O2-PS40 surface are polarised towards an M1-like phenotype, as evidenced by significantly higher expression of the pro-inflammatory transcription factors STAT1 and IRF5. By comparison, monocytes cultured on the hydrophobic PS surface exhibited an M2-like phenotype with high expression of mannose receptor (MR) and production of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and CCL18. While the molecular basis of such different patterns of cell differentiation is yet to be fully elucidated, we hypothesise that it is due to the adsorption of different biomolecules on these surface chemistries. Indeed our surface characterisation data show quantitative and qualitative differences between the protein layers on the O2-PS40 surface compared to PS surface which could be responsible for the observed differential macrophage polarisation on each surface.

  10. Surface Parameter Estimation using Interferometric Coherences between Different Polarisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajnsek, I.; Alvarez-Perez, J.-L.; Papathanassiou, K. P.; Moreira, A.; Cloude, S. R.

    2003-04-01

    In this work the potential of using the interferometric coherence at different polarisations over surface scat- terers in order to extract information about surface parameters is investigated. For the first time the sensitivity of the indi- vidual coherence contributions to surface roughness and moisture conditions is discussed and simulated using a novel hy- brid polarimetric surface scattering model. The model itself consists of two components, a coherent part obtained from the extended Bragg model and an incoherent part obtained from the integral equation model. Finally, experimental airborne SAR data are used to validate the modeled elements of the Pauli scattering vector.

  11. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: cytological and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Greenstone, M; Rutman, A; Dewar, A; Mackay, I; Cole, P J

    1988-05-01

    Thirty patients with functional and/or morphological abnormalities of respiratory tract cilia were identified. The diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia was based on observed abnormalities of ciliary ultrastructure or beating in vitro (beat pattern, beat frequency or percentage of motile cilia). Beat frequency and motility indices approached the normal range in some cases and suggests that the term 'immotile cilia syndrome' is not appropriate. Morphological abnormalities were most commonly due to deficiency of dynein arms, affecting the outer arms (n = 7), inner arms (n = 3) or both (n = 10). Examples of radial spoke and microtubular defects were also identified but in seven subjects ciliary ultrastructure was normal. In six patients paired samples of nasal and bronchial cilia were obtained and showed consistent abnormalities of motility and ultrastructure. Adenosine triphosphate and adenosine triphosphatase did not restore in vitro motility when added to dynein deficient cilia. The clinical picture was of life-long sinusitis and recurrent bronchial infection but the spectrum was broader than that encompassed by Kartagener's triad (dextrocardia, sinusitis and bronchiectasis). Fourteen patients had normal cardiac situs and definite or highly suggestive evidence of bronchiectasis was present in only 17 patients. Radiological evidence of sinusitis was common but absence of frontal sinuses was not universal. Chronic serous otitis media was a frequent finding but deafness was rarely profound. Fertility problems were common but were not universal in female subjects. Lung function testing revealed evidence of airflow obstruction but this was mild in most cases. PMID:2975807

  12. The polarisation correction for space-borne grating spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fa-cai; Sun, Quan-she; Chen, Kun-feng; Zhu, Xing-bang; Wang, Shao-shui; Wang, Guo-quan; Zheng, Xiang-liang; Han, Zhong

    2014-02-01

    Satellite measurements of backscattered sunlight contain essential information about the global distribution of atmospheric constituents. Light reflected from the Earth's atmosphere is linearly or partially linearly polarized because of scattering of unpolarized sunlight by air molecules and aerosols. In the ultraviolet and visible part of the spectrum, measurements of space-borne grating spectrometers are in general sensitive to the state of polarization of the observed light. The interaction of polarized light with polarization-sensitive optical devices yields a different radiance that is measured by the detectors than the radiance that enters the instrument. In the OMI and the SBUV/2 instruments the problem of instrument polarization sensitivity is avoided because the polarized backscattered sunlight is depolarized before it interacts with the polarization-sensitive optical components. For GOME, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2 it is intended to eliminate the polarization response of the instrument from the polarization-sensitive measurement. This paper discusses the basic concept of the polarisation correction of the space-borne grating spectrometers by using Mueller matrix calculus. A model was developed using the Mueller Matrices formulation to evaluate the polarization sensitivity of the space-borne grating spectrometers. The optical components are treated as general diattenuators with phase retardance. The correction for this polarization sensitivity is based on broadband polarization measurements. Accurate preflight polarisation calibration of space-borne grating spectrometers is essential for the observational objectives of the instrument, and a special facility has been developed in order to allow the instrument to be calibrated.

  13. Compact prisms for polarisation splitting of fibre laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, B L; Yagodkin, D I

    2005-11-30

    Simple compact monoprisms for spatial splitting of polarised laser beams with relatively small diameters (no more than 1 mm) are considered. Prisms can be made of optically inactive CaCO{sub 3}, {alpha}-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} ({alpha}-BBO), LiIO{sub 3}, LiNbO{sub 3}, YVO{sub 4}, and TiO{sub 2} crystals known in polarisation optics. The exact solution of the Snell equation for the extraordinary wave reflected from a surface arbitrarily tilted to its wave vector is obtained. The analysis of variants of the solution allows the fabrication of prisms with any deviation angles of the extraordinary wave by preserving the propagation direction of the ordinary wave. Three variants of prisms are considered: with minimised dimensions, with the Brewster output of the extraordinary beam, and with the deviation of the extraordinary wave by 90{sup 0}. Calcite prisms with the deviation angles for the extraordinary beam {approx}19{sup 0} and 90{sup 0} are tested experimentally. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  14. Shot and Patronin polarise microtubules to direct membrane traffic and biogenesis of microvilli in epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, Ichha; Elbediwy, Ahmed; Diaz de la Loza, Maria del Carmen; Fletcher, Georgina C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In epithelial tissues, polarisation of microtubules and actin microvilli occurs along the apical-basal axis of each cell, yet how these cytoskeletal polarisation events are coordinated remains unclear. Here, we examine the hierarchy of events during cytoskeletal polarisation in Drosophila melanogaster epithelia. Core apical-basal polarity determinants polarise the spectrin cytoskeleton to recruit the microtubule-binding proteins Patronin (CAMSAP1, CAMSAP2 and CAMPSAP3 in humans) and Shortstop [Shot; MACF1 and BPAG1 (also known as DST) in humans] to the apical membrane domain. Patronin and Shot then act to polarise microtubules along the apical-basal axis to enable apical transport of Rab11 endosomes by the Nuf–Dynein microtubule motor complex. Finally, Rab11 endosomes are transferred to the MyoV (also known as Didum in Drosophila) actin motor to deliver the key microvillar determinant Cadherin 99C to the apical membrane to organise the biogenesis of actin microvilli. PMID:27231092

  15. Variable and Polarised Near-infrared Emission from the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzamanian, B.; Eckart, A.; Valencia-S., M.; Witzel, G.; Zamaninasab, M.; Zajaček, M.; Sabha, N.; García-Marín, M.; Karas, V.; Peissker, F.; Karssen, G. D.; Parsa, M.; Grosso, N.; Mossoux, E.; Porquet, D.; Jalali, B.; Horrobin, M.; Buchholz, R.; Dovčiak, M.; Kunneriath, D.; Bursa, M.; Zensus, A.; Schödel, R.; Moultaka, J.; Straubmeier, C.

    2015-03-01

    Infrared observations of the Galactic Centre (GC) provide a unique opportunity to study stellar and bow-shock polarisation effects in a dusty environment. For the infrared counterpart of the supermassive black hole Sgr A* these observations reveal new insights into the physical processes at work. The observations were carried out with NACO in the Ks-band (2.2 µm) from 2004 to 2012 and several linearly polarised flares were observed during these years. We find that the distribution of polarised flux density is closely related to the single-state power-law distribution of the total flux densities. A typical polarisation degree of the order of 10-20% and a preferred polarisation angle of 13° ± 15° are derived, likely linked to the intrinsic orientation of the Sgr A* system. We discuss different scenarios for the accretion process for the Sgr A* system based on our findings.

  16. Polarisation Dynamics of Vector Soliton Molecules in Mode Locked Fibre Laser

    PubMed Central

    Tsatourian, Veronika; Sergeyev, Sergey V.; Mou, Chengbo; Rozhin, Alex; Mikhailov, Vitaly; Rabin, Bryan; Westbrook, Paul S.; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2013-01-01

    Two fundamental laser physics phenomena - dissipative soliton and polarisation of light are recently merged to the concept of vector dissipative soliton (VDS), viz. train of short pulses with specific state of polarisation (SOP) and shape defined by an interplay between anisotropy, gain/loss, dispersion, and nonlinearity. Emergence of VDSs is both of the fundamental scientific interest and is also a promising technique for control of dynamic SOPs important for numerous applications from nano-optics to high capacity fibre optic communications. Using specially designed and developed fast polarimeter, we present here the first experimental results on SOP evolution of vector soliton molecules with periodic polarisation switching between two and three SOPs and superposition of polarisation switching with SOP precessing. The underlying physics presents an interplay between linear and circular birefringence of a laser cavity along with light induced anisotropy caused by polarisation hole burning. PMID:24193374

  17. A role for central spindle proteins in cilia structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katherine R.; Kieserman, Esther K.; Wang, Peggy I.; Basten, Sander G.; Giles, Rachel H.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Wallingford, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokinesis and ciliogenesis are fundamental cellular processes that require strict coordination of microtubule organization and directed membrane trafficking. These processes have been intensely studied, but there has been little indication that regulatory machinery might be extensively shared between them. Here, we show that several central spindle/midbody proteins (PRC1, MKLP-1, INCENP, centriolin) also localize in specific patterns at the basal body complex in vertebrate ciliated epithelial cells. Moreover, bioinformatic comparisons of midbody and cilia proteomes reveal a highly significant degree of overlap. Finally, we used temperature-sensitive alleles of PRC1/spd-1 and MKLP-1/zen-4 in C. elegans to assess ciliary functions while bypassing these proteins' early role in cell division. These mutants displayed defects in both cilia function and cilia morphology. Together, these data suggest the conserved re-use of a surprisingly large number of proteins in the cytokinetic apparatus and in cilia. PMID:21246755

  18. Metachronal wave of artificial cilia array actuated by applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumori, Fujio; Marume, Ryuma; Saijou, Akinori; Kudo, Kentaro; Osada, Toshiko; Miura, Hideshi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a biomimetic microstructure related to cilia, which are effective fluidic and conveying systems in nature, is described. Authors have already reported that a magnetic elastomer pillar actuated by a rotating magnetic field can work like a natural cilium. In the present work, we show examples of a cilia array with a metachronal wave as the next step. A metachronal wave is a sequential action of a number of cilia. It is theoretically known that a metachronal wave gives a higher fluidic efficiency; however, there has been no report on a metachronal wave by artificial cilia. We prepared magnetic elastomer pillars that contain chainlike clusters of magnetic particles. The orientation of chains was set to be different in each pillar so that each pillar will deform with a different phase.

  19. Design of Dual Circularly Polarised 2-15 GHz Feed and the Polarisation Degree Measurement for CSRH-II Antenna System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha; Yan, Yi Hua; Chen, Zhi Jun; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Fu Shun

    2015-04-01

    The Chinese Spectral Radioheliograph is an aperture-synthesis telescope observing the Sun in ultra wide bandwidth on the ground. It contains two arrays Chinese Spectral Radioheliograph-I and Chinese Spectral Radioheliograph-II from 0.4 to 15 GHz. In order to obtain ultra wide-band performance, the cascaded folded dipoles are used in this feed. At the same time, in order to get circularly polarised signals coming from the Sun, a wide-band 90° hybrid is added in the output ports of the feed. This feed has characteristics of about 10 dBi gain, less than 1.5 voltage standing wave ratio. It also has characteristics with low axial ratio, fixed phase centre location, and constant beam width in operating frequencies. Through cross-correlating all combinations of two orthogonal polarisations at each antenna, the polarisation state of the waves is measured and give a differential instrumental delay between two data channels. The relationship between the own polarisation degree of the Sun and the observed polarisation degree is also measured for cross-polarised delay in observing the Sun in this paper.

  20. Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to study renal development and disease: sexy cilia.

    PubMed

    Barr, Maureen M

    2005-02-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has no kidney per se, yet "the worm" has proved to be an excellent model to study renal-related issues, including tubulogenesis of the excretory canal, membrane transport and ion channel function, and human genetic diseases including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The goal of this review is to explain how C. elegans has provided insight into cilia development, cilia function, and human cystic kidney diseases.

  1. Mutations in DYNC2LI1 disrupt cilia function and cause short rib polydactyly syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, S. Paige; Dantas, Tiago J.; Duran, Ivan; Wu, Sulin; Lachman, Ralph S.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Vallee, Richard B.; Krakow, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The short rib polydactyly syndromes (SRPS) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive, perinatal-lethal skeletal disorders characterized primarily by short, horizontal ribs, short limbs, and poly-dactyly. Mutations in several genes affecting intraflagellar transport (IFT) cause SRPS but they do not account for all cases. Here we identify additional SRPS genes and further unravel the functional basis for IFT. We perform whole exome sequencing and identify mutations in a new disease-producing gene, cytoplasmic dynein-2 light intermediate chain 1, DYNC2LI1, segregating with disease in three families. Using primary fibroblasts, we show that DYNC2LI1 is essential for dynein-2 complex stability and that mutations in DYNC2LI1 result in variable-length, including hyperelongated, cilia, Hedgehog pathway impairment, and ciliary IFT accumulations. The findings in this study expand our understanding of SRPS locus heterogeneity and demonstrate the importance of DYNC2LI1 in dynein-2 complex stability, cilium function, Hedgehog regulation, and skeletogenesis. PMID:26077881

  2. Beyond 9+0: noncanonical axoneme structures characterize sensory cilia from protists to humans.

    PubMed

    Gluenz, Eva; Höög, Johanna L; Smith, Amy E; Dawe, Helen R; Shaw, Michael K; Gull, Keith

    2010-09-01

    The intracellular amastigote stages of parasites such as Leishmania are often referred to as aflagellate. They do, however, possess a short axoneme of cryptic function. Here, our examination of the structure of this axoneme leads to a testable hypothesis of its role in the cell biology of pathogenicity. We show a striking similarity between the microtubule axoneme structure of the Leishmania mexicana parasite infecting a macrophage and vertebrate primary cilia. In both, the 9-fold microtubule doublet symmetry is broken by the incursion of one or more microtubule doublets into the axoneme core, giving rise to an architecture that we term here the 9v (variable) axoneme. Three-dimensional reconstructions revealed that no particular doublet initiated the symmetry break, and moreover it often involved 2 doublets. The tip of the L. mexicana flagellum was frequently intimately associated with the macrophage vacuole membrane. We propose that the main function of the amastigote flagellum is to act as a sensory organelle with important functions in host-parasite interactions and signaling in the intracellular stage of the L. mexicana life cycle.

  3. Directed Fluid Flow Produced by Arrays of Magnetically Actuated Core-Shell Biomimetic Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiser, B. L.; Shields, A. R.; Evans, B. A.; Superfine, R.

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a novel core-shell microstructure that we use to fabricate arrays of flexible, magnetically actuated biomimetic cilia. Our biomimetic cilia mimic the size and beat shape of biological cilia in order to replicate the transport of fluid driven by cilia in many biological systems including the determination of left-right asymmetry in the vertebrate embryonic nodal plate and mucociliary clearance in the lung. Our core-shell structures consist of a flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) core surrounded by a shell of nickel approximately forty nanometers thick; by using a core-shell structure, we can tune the mechanical and magnetic properties independently. We present the fabrication process and the long-range transport that occurs above the beating biomimetic cilia tips and will report on progress toward biomimetic cilia induced flow in viscoelastic fluids similar to mucus in the human airway. These flows may have applications in photonics and microfluidics, and our structures may be further useful as sensors or actuators in microelectromechanical systems.

  4. Centrin 2 Is Required for Mouse Olfactory Ciliary Trafficking and Development of Ependymal Cilia Planar Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Prachee; Irwin, Mavis; Gerstner, Cecilia D.; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Lucero, Mary T.

    2014-01-01

    Centrins are ancient calmodulin-related Ca2+-binding proteins associated with basal bodies. In lower eukaryotes, Centrin2 (CETN2) is required for basal body replication and positioning, although its function in mammals is undefined. We generated a germline CETN2 knock-out (KO) mouse presenting with syndromic ciliopathy including dysosmia and hydrocephalus. Absence of CETN2 leads to olfactory cilia loss, impaired ciliary trafficking of olfactory signaling proteins, adenylate cyclase III (ACIII), and cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel, as well as disrupted basal body apical migration in postnatal olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). In mutant OSNs, cilia base-anchoring of intraflagellar transport components IFT88, the kinesin-II subunit KIF3A, and cytoplasmic dynein 2 appeared compromised. Although the densities of mutant ependymal and respiratory cilia were largely normal, the planar polarity of mutant ependymal cilia was disrupted, resulting in uncoordinated flow of CSF. Transgenic expression of GFP-CETN2 rescued the Cetn2-deficiency phenotype. These results indicate that mammalian basal body replication and ciliogenesis occur independently of CETN2; however, mouse CETN2 regulates protein trafficking of olfactory cilia and participates in specifying planar polarity of ependymal cilia. PMID:24790208

  5. Spatial organization of cilia tufts governs airways mucus transport: Application to severe asthma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelloufi, Mustapha Kamel; Gras, Delphine; Chanez, Pascal; Viallat, Annie

    2014-11-01

    We study the coupling between both density and spatial repartition of beating cilia tufts, and the coordinated transport of mucus in an in-vitro epithelial model. We use a fully differentiated model epithelium in air liquid interface (ALI) obtained from endo-bronchial biopsies from healthy subjects and patients with asthma. The asthma phenotype is known to persist in the model. Mucus transport is characterized by the trajectories and velocities of microscopic beads incorporated in the mucus layer. When the beating cilia tufts density is higher than dc = 11/100 × 100 μm2 a spherical spiral coordinated mucus transport is observed over the whole ALI chamber (radius = 6 mm). Below dc, local mucus coordinated transport is observed on small circular domains on the epithelium surface. We reveal that the radii of these domains scale with the beating cilia tufts density with a power 3.7. Surprisingly, this power law is independent on cilia beat frequency, concentration and rheological properties of mucus for healthy subject and patient with asthma. The rotating or linear mucus transport is related to dispersion of the cilia tufts on the epithelium surface. We show that impaired mucus transport observed in severe asthma model epithelia is due to a drastic lack and dysfunction of cilia tufts. The author acknowledges the support of the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under reference ANR-13-BSV5-0015-01.

  6. Quantitative description of fluid flows produced by left-right cilia in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fox, Craig; Manning, M Lisa; Amack, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia generate directional flows that move mucus through airways, cerebrospinal fluid through brain ventricles, and oocytes through fallopian tubes. In addition, specialized monocilia beat in a rotational pattern to create asymmetric flows that are involved in establishing the left-right (LR) body axis during embryogenesis. These monocilia, which we refer to as "left-right cilia," produce a leftward flow of extraembryonic fluid in a transient "organ of asymmetry" that directs asymmetric signaling and development of LR asymmetries in the cardiovascular system and gastrointestinal tract. The asymmetric flows are thought to establish a chemical gradient and/or activate mechanosensitive cilia to initiate calcium ion signals and a conserved Nodal (TGFβ) pathway on the left side of the embryo, but the mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear. The zebrafish organ of asymmetry, called Kupffer's vesicle, provides a useful model system for investigating LR cilia and cilia-powered fluid flows. Here, we describe methods to visualize flows in Kupffer's vesicle using fluorescent microspheres and introduce a new and freely available MATLAB particle tracking code to quantitatively describe these flows. Analysis of normal and aberrant flows indicates this approach is useful for characterizing flow properties that impact LR asymmetry and may be more broadly applicable for quantifying other cilia flows. PMID:25837391

  7. The mechanism of self-organized beating of cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyadharan, Jyothish Sulochana

    The internal structure and physical properties of cilia are well known. The relevant hydrodynamics is also well known. But the mechanism behind the coordinated activity of the dynein molecular motors is not known. Based on experimental observations, it has been concluded that this mechanism cannot be due to control from the cell body. The possible mechanism has to be self-organized and the trigger for motor activation/deactivation has to be something related to the geometry of the ciliary axoneme. This thesis critically evaluates the most widely currently cited models and suggests an alternative model for how cilia beat. From the literature we obtained wave forms of ciliary beating at different instants in the beat cycle. These instants were digitized and interpolated. From this data, we were able to calculate the hydrodynamic force distribution (external force distribution) on the cilia and the translational and rotational velocities of the cell body. Once the hydrodynamic force distribution was obtained, we calculated the internal force distribution in the cilium using an equation we derived. Once this was known, we were able to calculate parameters of the ciliary axoneme such as the dynamic stiffness. The stiffness is the ratio of the first Fourier modes of the internal force distribution and the relative sliding between the doublet microtubules that form the axoneme. We found that the first mode was the dominant one and is the one we used for calculations. We were also able to calculate the energy involved in formation and propagation of the wave that produces the ciliary beating. We discovered that the dynamic stiffness varies along the length of a cilium. We determined that in the central region of the cilium, the stiffness is almost purely imaginary which means that the sliding velocity follows the internal force generation in that region rather than sliding. We also found that in Fourier space, the flexural rigidity (kappa=EI where E is Young's modulus and

  8. Automatic and accurate measurements of P-wave and S-wave polarisation properties with a weighted multi-station complex polarisation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Meersman, K.; van der Baan, M.; Kendall, J.-M.; Jones, R. H.

    2003-04-01

    We present a weighted multi-station complex polarisation analysis to determine P-wave and S-wave polarisation properties of three-component seismic array data. Complex polarisation analysis of particle motion on seismic data was first introduced by Vidale (1986). In its original form, the method is an interpretation of the eigenvalue decomposition of a 3 by 3, complex data-covariance matrix. We have extended the definition of the data-covariance matrix (C) to C=X^HW-1 X, where C now is a 3n by 3n symmetric complex covariance matrix, with n the number of included three-component (3C) stations. X is the data matrix, the columns of which are the analytic signals of the Northern, Eastern and vertical components of the subsequent 3C stations. X^H is the transpose of the complex conjugate of X and W is a diagonal weighting matrix containing the pre-arrival noise levels of all components and all stations. The signals used in the data-matrix are corrected for arrival time differences. The eigenvectors and eigenvalues of C now describe the polarisation properties within the selected analysis window for all included stations. The main advantages of this approach are a better separation of signal and noise in the covariance matrix and the measurement of signal polarisation properties that are not influenced by the presence of polarised white noise. The technique was incorporated in an automated routine to measure the P-wave and S-wave polarisation properties of a microseismic data-set. The data were recorded in the Valhall oilfield in 1998 with a six level 3C vertical linear array with geophones at 20 m intervals between depths of 2100 m and 2200 m. In total 303 microseismic events were analysed and the results compared with manual interpretations. This comparison showed the advantage and high accuracy of the method.

  9. Measurement of CP asymmetries and polarisation fractions in decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-07-01

    An angular analysis of the decay is performed using pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 .0 fb-1 collected by the LHCb experiment at a centre-of-mass energy TeV. A combined angular and mass analysis separates six helicity amplitudes and allows the measurement of the longitudinal polarisation fraction f L = 0 .201 ± 0 .057 (stat .) ± 0 .040 (syst .) for the decay. A large scalar contribution from the K {0/∗}(1430) and K {0/∗}(800) resonances is found, allowing the determination of additional CP asymmetries. Triple product and direct CP asymmetries are determined to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations. The branching fraction is measured to be (10 .8 ± 2 .1 (stat .) ± 1 .4 (syst .) ± 0 .6 ( f d /f s )) × 10-6. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Dust polarisation and magnetic field geometry in Proto Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, L.; Zhang, Q.; Zijlstra, A.; Patel, N. A.; Vázquez, R.; Zauderer, B. A.; Contreras, M. E.; Guillén, P. F.

    2014-04-01

    The role of magnetic fields in late type stars and their nebulae, such as proto-planetary (PPNe) and planetary nebulae (PNe), is poorly known from an observational point of view. We therefore present new submillimeter observations realised with the Sub-Millimeter Array (SMA) which unveil the dust continuum polarisation in two well known PPNe: CRL 618 and OH 231.8+4.2. Assuming the current grain alignment theory, we also trace the geometry of the magnetic field in these two objects. The combination of this study with previous submillimeter observations, done with SCUBA at JCMT, will then pave the way for a better understanding of the evolution of magnetic fields in the envelopes of PPNe and PNe.

  11. Phase delay of polarisation modes in elastically twisted spun fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Morshnev, Sergey K; Chamorovsky, Yury K; Vorob'ev, Igor' L

    2011-05-31

    The evolution of the phase delay between linearly polarised orthogonal modes in a spun fibre elastically twisted around its axis has been studied experimentally and theoretically using a model for a helical structure of the built-in linear birefringence axes. The phase delay is a sinusoidal function of elastic twist angle, with an amplitude and period dependent on fibre parameters: spin pitch and built-in linear birefringence beat length. It is shown that, at a known spin pitch, phase delay versus elastic twist angle data can be used to determine the beat length of built-in linear birefringence in the range 0.01 to 100 mm. The theoretical analysis results are supported by experimental data for conventional and microstructured spun fibres. (fibre optics)

  12. Denoising time-domain induced polarisation data using wavelet techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deo, Ravin N.; Cull, James P.

    2016-05-01

    Time-domain induced polarisation (TDIP) methods are routinely used for near-surface evaluations in quasi-urban environments harbouring networks of buried civil infrastructure. A conventional technique for improving signal to noise ratio in such environments is by using analogue or digital low-pass filtering followed by stacking and rectification. However, this induces large distortions in the processed data. In this study, we have conducted the first application of wavelet based denoising techniques for processing raw TDIP data. Our investigation included laboratory and field measurements to better understand the advantages and limitations of this technique. It was found that distortions arising from conventional filtering can be significantly avoided with the use of wavelet based denoising techniques. With recent advances in full-waveform acquisition and analysis, incorporation of wavelet denoising techniques can further enhance surveying capabilities. In this work, we present the rationale for utilising wavelet denoising methods and discuss some important implications, which can positively influence TDIP methods.

  13. Non-polarisable dry electrode based on NASICON ceramic.

    PubMed

    Gondran, C; Siebert, E; Fabry, P; Novakov, E; Gumery, P Y

    1995-05-01

    A NASICON-type ceramic (high sodium ion conductor) is proposed to record bioelectric signals. The electrode does not need gel before its application. The principle of the measurements is based on a sodium ion exchange between the skin and the material. Electrical measurements performed in saline solutions show that the electrode is slightly polarisable. The skin-electrode impedance was investigated. The impedance decreases as a function of the time of application. The resistive component is the major source of the impedance change. This can be explained by the perspiration process which occurs immediately with time after the application of the NASICON-based electrode on the skin. The skin condition is also an important parameter. NaCl saline solution or abrasion causes the resistance to decrease markedly.

  14. T helper cell polarisation as a measure of the maturation of the immune response.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Scott B; Stolte, Ellen H; Chow, Anthony W; Savelkoul, Huub F J

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: T helper cell polarisation is important under chronic immune stimulatory conditions and drives the type of the evolving immune response. Mice treated with superantigens in vivo display strong effects on Th subset differentiation. The aim of the study was to detect the intrinsic capacity of T cells to polarise under various ex vivo conditions. METHODS: Purified CD4+ T cells obtained from super-antigen-treated mice were cultured under Th polarising conditions in vitro. By combining intracellular cytokine staining and subsequent flow cytometric analysis with quantitative cytokine measurements in culture supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the differential Th polarising capacity of the treatment can be detected in a qualitative and quantitative manner. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: BALB/c mice were shown to be biased to develop strong Th2 polarised immune responses using Th0 stimulation of purified CD4+ T cells from phosphate-buffered saline-treated mice. Nevertheless, our analysis methodology convincingly showed that even in these mice, Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 treatment in vivo resulted in a significantly stronger Th1 polarising effect than control treatment. Our results indicate that populations of Th cells can be assessed individually for their differential Th1 or Th2 maturation capacity in vivo by analysing robust in vitro polarisation cultures combined with intracellular cytokine staining and ELISA. PMID:14760935

  15. Identification of Cilia Genes That Affect Cell-Cycle Progression Using Whole-Genome Transcriptome Analysis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtti

    PubMed Central

    Albee, Alison J.; Kwan, Alan L.; Lin, Huawen; Granas, David; Stormo, Gary D.; Dutcher, Susan K.

    2013-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule based organelles that project from cells. Cilia are found on almost every cell type of the human body and numerous diseases, collectively termed ciliopathies, are associated with defects in cilia, including respiratory infections, male infertility, situs inversus, polycystic kidney disease, retinal degeneration, and Bardet-Biedl Syndrome. Here we show that Illumina-based whole-genome transcriptome analysis in the biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii identifies 1850 genes up-regulated during ciliogenesis, 4392 genes down-regulated, and 4548 genes with no change in expression during ciliogenesis. We examined four genes up-regulated and not previously known to be involved with cilia (ZMYND10, NXN, GLOD4, SPATA4) by knockdown of the human orthologs in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (hTERT-RPE1) cells to ask whether they are involved in cilia-related processes that include cilia assembly, cilia length control, basal body/centriole numbers, and the distance between basal bodies/centrioles. All of the genes have cilia-related phenotypes and, surprisingly, our data show that knockdown of GLOD4 and SPATA4 also affects the cell cycle. These results demonstrate that whole-genome transcriptome analysis during ciliogenesis is a powerful tool to gain insight into the molecular mechanism by which centrosomes and cilia are assembled. PMID:23604077

  16. Changes of lymphocyte membrane fluidity in rheumatoid arthritis: a fluorescence polarisation study.

    PubMed Central

    Beccerica, E; Piergiacomi, G; Curatola, G; Ferretti, G

    1988-01-01

    Fluorescence polarisation of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene was used to study the lymphocyte membrane in rheumatoid arthritis. The increase of polarisation value in the patients (n = 27) compared with healthy controls (n = 32) suggests a decrease of membrane fluidity. Moreover, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and plasma fibrinogen concentrations were positively correlated with lymphocyte fluorescence polarisation values (r = 0.66 and r = 0.76 respectively). The results suggest that the changes in lymphocyte membrane fluidity could be involved in the pathogenetic mechanism of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:3382266

  17. Birefringence in anisotropic optical fibres studied by polarised light Brillouin reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A S; Burdin, V V; Konstantinov, Yu A; Petukhov, A S; Drozdov, I R; Kuz'minykh, Ya S; Besprozvannykh, V G

    2015-01-31

    Modal birefringence (the difference between the effective refractive indices of orthogonal polarisation modes) is one of the key parameters of anisotropic single-mode fibres, characterising their ability to preserve a linearly polarised state of input light. This parameter is commonly measured using short pieces of fibre, but such procedures are destructive and allow the birefringence to be determined only at the ends of long fibres. In this study, polarised light Brillouin reflectometry is used to assess birefringence uniformity throughout the length of an anisotropic fibre. (optical fibres)

  18. Polarisation effects in twin-core fibre: Application for mode locking in a fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lobach, I A; Kablukov, S I; Podivilov, Evgenii V; Babin, Sergei A; Apolonski, A A

    2012-09-30

    We report the first measurements of the longitudinal power distribution in a twin-core optical fibre at different input light polarisations. Experimental evidence is presented that, because of the difference in birefringence between the cores, the power in them depends on which core the beam is launched into. Experimental data are interpreted in terms of a modified polarisation model for mode coupling in twin-core fibres which takes into account the birefringence of the cores. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time the use of the polarisation properties of a twincore fibre for mode locking in a fibre laser. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

  19. Capillary compressor of femtosecond laser pulses with nonlinear rotation of polarisation ellipse

    SciTech Connect

    Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V; Kostryukov, P V; Losev, Leonid L; Tenyakov, S Yu

    2012-03-31

    The process of nonlinear rotation of the polarisation ellipse of laser radiation, occurring simultaneously with the broadening of the pulse spectrum due to nonlinear self-phase modulation in a gas-filled capillary, is studied. It is shown that the maximal rotation of the polarisation ellipse is experienced by the spectral components, shifted towards the short-wavelength side with respect to the central wavelength of the initial laser pulse. Using the effect of polarisation ellipse rotation, an eightfold increase in the energy contrast ratio of a 28-fs light pulse, obtained by compression of the radiation pulse from an ytterbium laser with the duration 290 fs, is implemented.

  20. Polarisation and compression of {sup 3}He for Magnetic Resonance Imaging purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Geurts, D. G.; Brand, J. F. J. van den; Bulten, H. J.; Poolman, H. R.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Nicolay, K.

    1998-01-20

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is often used in medical science as a diagnostic tool for the human body. Conventional MRI uses the NMR signal from the protons of water molecules in tissue to image the interior of the patient's body. However, for certain areas such as the lungs and airways, the usage of a highly polarised gas yields better results. We are currently constructing an apparatus that uses polarised {sup 3}He gas to produce detailed images of those signal-deficient moyeties. We also plan to study possible uptake of polarised {sup 3}He gas by the circulatory system to image other organs.

  1. Target molecules of calmodulin on microtubules of Tetrahymena cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano-Ohnishi, Junko; Watanabe, Yoshio )

    1988-09-01

    In the course of an attempt to isolate the calmodulin-binding proteins (CaMBPs) from cilia of Tetrahymena, it was found that some CaMBPs tend to interact with axonemal microtubules. The present study demonstrates this interaction by cosedimentation experiments using in vitro polymerized Tetrahymena axonemal microtubules and Tetrahymena CaMBPs purified from axonemes by calmodulin affinity column chromatography. Analysis by the ({sup 125}I)calmodulin overlay method showed that at least three CaMBPs (M{sub r} 69, 45, and 37 kDa) cosediment with microtubules. Furthermore, without any addition of exogenous CaMBPs, microtubules purified after three cycles of temperature-dependent polymerization and depolymerization included the above CaMBPs and additional CaMBPs which could not cosediment with microtubules. From the results, the authors have classified these microtubule-associated CaMBPs into two groups: (i) CaMBPs which interact with microtubules only during polymerization, and (ii) CaMBPs which interact not only with microtubules during polymerization, but also with polymerized microtubules. These results suggest that the microtubule-associated CaMBPs, especially those of the latter group, are located on the surface of ciliary microtubules, and may become the target molecules of calmodulin at Ca{sup 2+}-triggered ciliary reversal.

  2. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Michael R; Zariwala, Maimoona; Leigh, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessive genetically heterogeneous disorder of motile cilia with chronic otosinopulmonary disease and organ laterality defects in ∼50% of cases. The prevalence of PCD is difficult to determine. Recent diagnostic advances through measurement of nasal nitric oxide and genetic testing has allowed rigorous diagnoses and determination of a robust clinical phenotype, which includes neonatal respiratory distress, daily nasal congestion, and wet cough starting early in life, along with organ laterality defects. There is early onset of lung disease in PCD with abnormal airflow mechanics and radiographic abnormalities detected in infancy and early childhood. PMID:27514592

  3. Cell cycle deregulation and mosaic loss of Ext1 drive peripheral chondrosarcomagenesis in the mouse and reveal an intrinsic cilia deficiency.

    PubMed

    de Andrea, Carlos E; Zhu, Ju-Fen; Jin, Huifeng; Bovée, Judith V M G; Jones, Kevin B

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral chondrosarcoma (PCS) develops as malignant transformation of an osteochondroma, a benign cartilaginous outgrowth at the bone surface. Its invasive, lobular growth despite low-grade histology suggests a loss of chondrocyte polarity. The known genetics of osteochondromagenesis include mosaic loss of EXT1 or EXT2 in both hereditary and non-hereditary cases. The most frequent genetic aberrations in human PCS also include disruptions of CDKN2A or TP53. In order to test the sufficiency of either of these to drive progression of an osteochondroma to PCS, we added conditional loss of Trp53 or Ink4a/Arf in an Ext1-driven mouse model of osteochondromagenesis. Each additional tumour suppressor silencing efficiently drove the development of growths that mimic human PCS. As in humans, lobules developed from both Ext1-null and Ext1-functional clones within osteochondromas. Assessment of their orientation revealed an absence of primary cilia in the majority of mouse PCS chondrocytes, which was corroborated in human PCSs. Loss of primary cilia may be responsible for the lost polarity phenotype ascribed to PCS. Cilia deficiency blocks proliferation in physeal chondrocytes, but cell cycle deregulation is sufficient to rescue chondrocyte proliferation following deciliation. This provides a basis of selective pressure for the frequent cell-cycle regulator silencing observed in peripheral chondrosarcomagenesis. Mosaic loss of Ext1 combined with loss of cell cycle regulators promotes peripheral chondrosarcomagenesis in the mouse and reveals deficient ciliogenesis in both the model and the human disease, explaining biological behaviour including lobular and invasive growth.

  4. “Mating Behavior, Male Sensory Cilia, and Polycystins in C. elegans” Chapter

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Maureen M.

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of C. elegans males and the male-specific sensory neurons required for mating behaviors has provided insight into the molecular function of polycystins and mechanisms that are needed for polycystin ciliary localization. In humans, polycystin 1 and polycystin 2 are needed for kidney function; loss of polycystin function leads to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Polycystins localize to cilia in C. elegans and mammals, a finding that has guided research into ADPKD. The discovery that the polycystins form ciliary receptors in male-specific neurons needed for mating behaviors has also helped to unlock insights into two additional exciting new areas: the secretion of extracellular vesicles; and mechanisms of ciliary specialization. First, we will summarize the studies done in C. elegans regarding the expression, localization, and function of the polycystin 1 and 2 homologs, LOV-1 and PKD-2, and discuss insights gained from this basic research. Molecules that are co-expressed with the polycystins in the male-specific neurons may identify evolutionarily conserved molecular mechanisms for polycystin function and localization. We will discuss the finding that polycystins are secreted in extracellular vesicles that evoke behavioral change in males, suggesting that such vesicles provide a novel form of communication to conspecifics in the environment. In humans, polycystin-containing extracellular vesicles are secreted in urine and can be taken up by cilia, and quickly internalized. Therefore, communication by polycystin-containing extracellular vesicles may also use mechanisms that are evolutionarily conserved from nematode to human. Lastly, different cilia display structural and functional differences that specialize them for particular tasks, despite the fact that virtually all cilia are built by a conserved Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) mechanism and share some basic structural features. Comparative analysis of the male

  5. Dynamics of self-oscillating cilia designed from active polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Pratyush; Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2012-02-01

    Using theory and simulations, we design active synthetic surfaces which are capable of replicating functionalities of biological cilia. In order to design such exquisite biomimetic systems we harness unique properties of polymer gels that undergo photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. Powered by internalized BZ reaction these polymer gels swell and de-swell autonomously by chemo-mechanical transduction and therefore are ideal materials for designing our system. In order to simulate the dynamics of the BZ cilia in surrounding fluid we have developed a nonlinear hybrid 3D model which captures elasto-dynamics of polymer gel and diffusive exchange of BZ reagents between the gel and the fluid. Here we show that the geometrical arrangement of cilia and the distribution of BZ activator in the fluid determine the dynamic response of the cilia. We further show that using light as an external stimulus we can sequentially modulate height of individual cilium and thereby create the ``piano effect''. Finally, we demonstrate that synchronized oscillations in the cilia result from the distribution of BZ-activator in the surrounding fluid. Our findings can be used to design active surfaces which can be remotely tuned depending upon the magnitude of external stimuli.

  6. Simulation by using the lattice Boltzmann method of microscopic particle motion induced by artificial cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alapati, Suresh; Che, Woo Seong; Mannoor, Madhusoodanan; Suh, Yong Kweon

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present the results obtained from the simulation of particle motion induced by the fluid flow driven by an array of beating artificial cilia inside a micro-channel. A worm-like-chain model is used to simulate the elastic cilia, and the lattice Boltzmann equation is used to compute the fluid flow. We employ a harmonic force at the extreme tip of each cilium to actuate it. Our simulation methods are first validated by applying them to the motion of a single cilium and a freely falling sphere. After validation, we simulate the fluid flow generated by an array of beating cilia and find that a maximum flow rate is achieved at an optimum sperm number. Next, we simulate the motion of a neutrally buoyant spherical particle at this optimum sperm number by tracking the particle motion with a smoothed profile method. We address the effect of the following parameters on the particle velocity: the gap between cilia and particle, the particle size, the cilia density, and the presence of an array of intermediate particles.

  7. CCTα and CCTδ Chaperonin Subunits Are Essential and Required for Cilia Assembly and Maintenance in Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    Seixas, Cecilia; Cruto, Teresa; Tavares, Alexandra; Gaertig, Jacek; Soares, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Background The eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin CCT is a hetero-oligomeric complex formed by two rings connected back-to-back, each composed of eight distinct subunits (CCTα to CCTζ). CCT complex mediates the folding, of a wide range of newly synthesised proteins including tubulin (α, β and γ) and actin, as quantitatively major substrates. Methodology/Principal Findings We disrupted the genes encoding CCTα and CCTδ subunits in the ciliate Tetrahymena. Cells lacking the zygotic expression of either CCTα or CCTδ showed a loss of cell body microtubules, failed to assemble new cilia and died within 2 cell cycles. We also show that loss of CCT subunit activity leads to axoneme shortening and splaying of tips of axonemal microtubules. An epitope-tagged CCTα rescued the gene knockout phenotype and localized primarily to the tips of cilia. A mutation in CCTα, G346E, at a residue also present in the related protein implicated in the Bardet Biedel Syndrome, BBS6, also caused defects in cilia and impaired CCTα localization in cilia. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that the CCT subunits are essential and required for ciliary assembly and maintenance of axoneme structure, especially at the tips of cilia. PMID:20502701

  8. Characterization of Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Containing Proteins Critical for Cilia Formation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanan; Cao, Jingli; Huang, Shan; Feng, Di; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Xueliang; Yan, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    Cilia formation and function require a special set of trafficking machinery termed intraflagellar transport (IFT), consisting mainly of protein complexes IFT-A, IFT-B, BBSome, and microtubule-dependent molecular motors. Tetratricopeptide repeat-containing (TTC) proteins are widely involved in protein complex formation. Nine of them are known to serve as components of the IFT or BBSome complexes. How many TTC proteins are cilia-related and how they function, however, remain unclear. Here we show that twenty TTC genes were upregulated by at least 2-fold during the differentiation of cultured mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTECs) into multiciliated cells. Our systematic screen in zebrafish identified four novel TTC genes, ttc4, -9c, -36, and -39c, that are critical for cilia formation and motility. Accordingly, their zebrafish morphants displayed typical ciliopathy-related phenotypes, including curved body, abnormal otolith, hydrocephalus, and defective left-right patterning. The morphants of ttc4 and ttc25, a known cilia-related gene, additionally showed pronephric cyst formation. Immunoprecipitation indicated associations of TTC4, -9c, -25, -36, and -39c with components or entire complexes of IFT-A, IFT-B, or BBSome, implying their participations in IFT or IFT-related activities. Our results provide a global view for the relationship between TTC proteins and cilia. PMID:25860617

  9. Study of clathrate hydrates via equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation employing polarisable and non-polarisable, rigid and flexible water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, Christian J.; English, Niall J.

    2016-04-01

    Equilibrium molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on metastable sI and sII polymorphs of empty hydrate lattices, in addition to liquid water and ice Ih. The non-polarisable TIP4P-2005, simple point charge model (SPC), and polarisable Thole-type models (TTM): TTM2, TTM3, and TTM4 water models were used in order to survey the differences between models and to see what differences can be expected when polarisability is incorporated. Rigid and flexible variants were used of each model to gauge the effects of flexibility. Power spectra are calculated and compared to density-of-states spectra inferred from inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements. Thermodynamic properties were also calculated, as well as molecular-dipole distributions. It was concluded that TTM models offer optimal fidelity vis-à-vis INS spectra, together with thermodynamic properties, with the flexible TTM2 model offering optimal placement of vibrational modes.

  10. Study of clathrate hydrates via equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation employing polarisable and non-polarisable, rigid and flexible water models.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Christian J; English, Niall J

    2016-04-28

    Equilibrium molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on metastable sI and sII polymorphs of empty hydrate lattices, in addition to liquid water and ice Ih. The non-polarisable TIP4P-2005, simple point charge model (SPC), and polarisable Thole-type models (TTM): TTM2, TTM3, and TTM4 water models were used in order to survey the differences between models and to see what differences can be expected when polarisability is incorporated. Rigid and flexible variants were used of each model to gauge the effects of flexibility. Power spectra are calculated and compared to density-of-states spectra inferred from inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements. Thermodynamic properties were also calculated, as well as molecular-dipole distributions. It was concluded that TTM models offer optimal fidelity vis-à-vis INS spectra, together with thermodynamic properties, with the flexible TTM2 model offering optimal placement of vibrational modes. PMID:27131553

  11. Compton scattering and nucleon polarisabilities in chiral EFT: Status and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießhammer, Harald W.; McGovern, Judith A.; Phillips, Daniel R.

    2016-05-01

    We review theoretical progress and prospects for determining the nucleon's static dipole polarisabilities from Compton scattering on few-nucleon targets, including new values; see Refs. [1-5] for details and a more thorough bibliography.

  12. Imaging of small birefringent objects by polarised light conventional and confocal microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Török, P.

    2000-07-01

    In this work a theory for describing small birefringent objects imaged in polarised light conventional and confocal microscopes is developed. Due to the polarisation dependent nature of the problem a full electromagnetic theory is used. The solution permits the analysis of a polarised light optical microscope imaging small birefringent objects of arbitrary type, including form birefringence, as long as it can be characterised by a third-rank dielectric tensor. The optical microscope is equipped with two Babinet-Soleil compensators on the illumination side that can be freely adjusted to set the polarisation state of the illumination from linear through elliptical to circular. Numerical examples are presented for the most important practical cases of images of small birefringent objects.

  13. Spin echo small angle neutron scattering using a continuously pumped {sup 3}He neutron polarisation analyser

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, S. R.; Li, K.; Yan, H.; Stonaha, P.; Li, F.; Wang, T.; Baxter, D. V.; Snow, W. M.; Washington, A. L.; Walsh, A.; Chen, W. C.; Parnell, A. J.; Fairclough, J. P. A.; Pynn, R.

    2015-02-15

    We present a new instrument for spin echo small angle neutron scattering (SESANS) developed at the Low Energy Neutron Source at Indiana University. A description of the various instrument components is given along with the performance of these components. At the heart of the instrument are a series of resistive coils to encode the neutron trajectory into the neutron polarisation. These are shown to work well over a broad range of neutron wavelengths. Neutron polarisation analysis is accomplished using a continuously operating neutron spin filter polarised by Rb spin-exchange optical pumping of {sup 3}He. We describe the performance of the analyser along with a study of the {sup 3}He polarisation stability and its implications for SESANS measurements. Scattering from silica Stöber particles is investigated and agrees with samples run on similar instruments.

  14. Semi-inclusive polarised lepton-nucleon scattering and the anomalous gluon contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güllenstern, St.; Veltri, M.; Górnicki, P.; Mankiewicz, L.; Schäfer, A.

    1993-08-01

    We discuss a new observable for semi-inclusive pion production in polarised lepton-nucleon collisions. This observable is sensitive to the polarised and unpolarised strange quark distribution and the anomalous gluon contribution, provided that their fragmentation functions into pions differ substantially from that of light quarks. From Monte Carlo data generated with our PEPSI code we conclude that HERMES might be able to decide whether the polarized strange quark and gluon distributions are large.

  15. Application of the vector Monte-Carlo method in polarisation optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Churmakov, D Yu; Kuz'min, V L; Meglinskii, I V

    2006-11-30

    The vector Monte-Carlo method is developed and applied to polarisation optical coherence tomography. The basic principles of simulation of the propagation of polarised electromagnetic radiation with a small coherence length are considered under conditions of multiple scattering. The results of numerical simulations for Rayleigh scattering well agree with the Milne solution generalised to the case of an electromagnetic field and with theoretical calculations in the diffusion approximation. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  16. High resolution VLBI polarisation imaging of AGN with the Maximum Entropy Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlan, Colm P.; Gabuzda, Denise C.

    2016-08-01

    Radio polarisation images of the jets of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) can provide a deep insight into the launching and collimation mechanisms of relativistic jets. However, even at VLBI scales, resolution is often a limiting factor in the conclusions that can be drawn from observations. The Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) is a deconvolution algorithm that can outperform the more common CLEAN algorithm in many cases, particularly when investigating structures present on scales comparable to or smaller than the nominal beam size with "super-resolution". A new implementation of the MEM suitable for single- or multiple-wavelength VLBI polarisation observations has been developed and is described here. Monte Carlo simulations comparing the performances of CLEAN and MEM at reconstructing the properties of model images are presented; these demonstrate the enhanced reliability of MEM over CLEAN when images of the fractional polarisation and polarisation angle are constructed using convolving beams that are appreciably smaller than the full CLEAN beam. The results of using this new MEM software to image VLBA observations of the AGN 0716+714 at six different wavelengths are presented, and compared to corresponding maps obtained with CLEAN. MEM and CLEAN maps of Stokes I, the polarised flux, the fractional polarisation and the polarisation angle are compared for convolving beams ranging from the full CLEAN beam down to a beam one-third of this size. MEM's ability to provide more trustworthy polarisation imaging than a standard CLEAN-based deconvolution when convolving beams appreciably smaller than the full CLEAN beam are used is discussed.

  17. Behavioural investigation of polarisation sensitivity in the Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) and the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Verity J; Smith, Emma L; Church, Stuart C; Partridge, Julian C

    2003-09-01

    Many animals have sensitivity to the e-vector of linearly polarised light, which may assist in visually mediated behaviours such as navigation, signalling and foraging. However, it is still controversial as to whether birds possess polarisation sensitivity. Several studies have found that altering the polarisation patterns of the broad visual field surrounding birds alters their intended migratory orientation. However, electrophysiological tests have failed to elicit evidence for polarisation sensitivity in birds, and the mechanism by which birds might perceive polarised light is unknown. In this experiment, we trained Japanese quail and European starlings to discriminate stimuli differing in their polarisation pattern. Although both quail and starlings were able to discriminate stimuli in which the stimulus sub-components either differed or had the same radiant intensity (the control task), they were unable to discriminate stimuli in which the e-vector orientations of the stimulus sub-components either differed by 90 degrees or had the same angle of polarisation. The birds' successful performance on the control task, but failure to complete the polarisation task, demonstrated that they had all the necessary cognitive abilities to make the discrimination except sensitivity to angle of polarisation. We conclude that quail and starlings are unable to use polarisation cues in this foraging task. PMID:12909701

  18. Adaptable radiative transfer innovations for submillimetre telescopes (ARTIST). Dust polarisation module (DustPol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, M.; Brinch, C.; Girart, J. M.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Frau, P.; Hennebelle, P.; Kuiper, R.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Bertoldi, F.; Hogerheijde, M.; Juhasz, A.; Schaaf, R.

    2012-07-01

    We present a new publicly available tool (DustPol) aimed to model the polarised thermal dust emission. The module DustPol, which is publicly available, is part of the ARTIST (Adaptable Radiative Transfer Innovations for Submillimetre Telescopes) package, which also offers tools for modelling the polarisation of line emission together with a model library and a Python-based user interface. DustPol can easily manage analytical as well as pre-gridded models to generate synthetic maps of the Stokes I, Q, and U parameters. These maps are stored in FITS format which is straightforwardly read by the data reduction software used, e.g., by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). This turns DustPol into a powerful engine for the prediction of the expected polarisation features of a source observed with ALMA or the Planck satellite as well as for the interpretation of existing submillimetre observations obtained with other telescopes. DustPol allows the parameterisation of the maximum degree of polarisation and we find that, in a prestellar core, if there is depolarisation, this effect should happen at densities of 106 cm-3 or larger. We compare a model generated by DustPol with the observational polarisation data of the low-mass Class 0 object NGC 1333 IRAS 4A, finding that the total and the polarised emission are consistent.

  19. Polarisation response of delay dependent absorption modulation in strong field dressed helium atoms probed near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, E. R.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, A.; Austin, D. R.; Diveki, Z.; Hutchinson, S. E. E.; Siegel, T.; Ruberti, M.; Averbukh, V.; Miseikis, L.; Strüber, C. S.; Chipperfield, L.; Marangos, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the vectorial response of strongly dressed helium atoms probed by an attosecond pulse train (APT) polarised either parallel or perpendicular to the dressing field polarisation. The transient absorption is probed as a function of delay between the APT and the linearly polarised 800 nm field of peak intensity 1.3× {10}14 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. The APT spans the photon energy range 16-42 eV, covering the first ionisation energy of helium (24.59 eV). With parallel polarised dressing and probing fields, we observe modulations with periods of one half and one quarter of the dressing field period. When the polarisation of the dressing field is altered from parallel to perpendicular with respect to the APT polarisation we observe a large suppression in the modulation depth of the above ionisation threshold absorption. In addition to this we present the intensity dependence of the harmonic modulation depth as a function of delay between the dressing and probe fields, with dressing field peak intensities ranging from 2 × 1012 to 2 × 1014 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. We compare our experimental results with a full-dimensional solution of the single-atom time-dependent (TD) Schrödinger equation obtained using the recently developed abinitio TD B-spline ADC method and find good qualitative agreement for the above threshold harmonics.

  20. Polarisation response of delay dependent absorption modulation in strong field dressed helium atoms probed near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, E. R.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, A.; Austin, D. R.; Diveki, Z.; Hutchinson, S. E. E.; Siegel, T.; Ruberti, M.; Averbukh, V.; Miseikis, L.; Strüber, C. S.; Chipperfield, L.; Marangos, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the vectorial response of strongly dressed helium atoms probed by an attosecond pulse train (APT) polarised either parallel or perpendicular to the dressing field polarisation. The transient absorption is probed as a function of delay between the APT and the linearly polarised 800 nm field of peak intensity 1.3× {10}14 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. The APT spans the photon energy range 16–42 eV, covering the first ionisation energy of helium (24.59 eV). With parallel polarised dressing and probing fields, we observe modulations with periods of one half and one quarter of the dressing field period. When the polarisation of the dressing field is altered from parallel to perpendicular with respect to the APT polarisation we observe a large suppression in the modulation depth of the above ionisation threshold absorption. In addition to this we present the intensity dependence of the harmonic modulation depth as a function of delay between the dressing and probe fields, with dressing field peak intensities ranging from 2 × 1012 to 2 × 1014 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. We compare our experimental results with a full-dimensional solution of the single-atom time-dependent (TD) Schrödinger equation obtained using the recently developed abinitio TD B-spline ADC method and find good qualitative agreement for the above threshold harmonics.

  1. Structural and energetic effects of the use of polarisable water to solvate proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Stephan J.; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    2015-09-01

    Using a non-polarisable model (simple-point-charge (SPC)) for liquid water and two polarisable water models (COS/G2, COS/D), the effect of introducing molecular polarisability into the solvent upon protein structure and energetics is investigated for eight proteins, hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL), major cold shock protein (CspA), protein G (GP), chorismate mutase (CM), the C-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L7/L12 (RB), the amino terminal domain of phage 434 repressor (GRP), a 12-residue β-hairpin (DNV) and the GCN trigger peptide (GTP), using MD simulation, one 50 ns simulation and four additional 20 ns simulations for each protein and each water model. The differences in overall structural and energetic properties of the proteins induced by the three different water models are small, except for the amino-terminal domain of phage 434 repressor (GRP). The polarisable COS/G2 water model induces a slightly stronger interaction with the proteins modelled using the GROMOS 54A7 force field than the non-polarisable SPC water model, while for the polarisable COS/D water model the opposite effect is observed.

  2. Comparative structural analysis of eukaryotic flagella and cilia from Chlamydomonas, Tetrahymena, and sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Pigino, Gaia; Maheshwari, Aditi; Bui, Khanh Huy; Shingyoji, Chikako; Kamimura, Shinji; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    Although eukaryotic flagella and cilia all share the basic 9+2 microtubule-organization of their internal axonemes, and are capable of generating bending-motion, the waveforms, amplitudes, and velocities of the bending-motions are quite diverse. To explore the structural basis of this functional diversity of flagella and cilia, we here compare the axonemal structure of three different organisms with widely divergent bending-motions by electron cryo-tomography. We reconstruct the 3D structure of the axoneme of Tetrahymena cilia, and compare it with the axoneme of the flagellum of sea urchin sperm, as well as with the axoneme of Chlamydomonas flagella, which we analyzed previously. This comparative structural analysis defines the diversity of molecular architectures in these organisms, and forms the basis for future correlation with their different bending-motions. PMID:22406282

  3. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Flagella/cilia are motile organelles with more than 400 proteins. To understand the mechanism of such complex systems, we need methods to describe molecular arrange-ments and conformations three-dimensionally in vivo. Cryo-electron tomography enabled us such a 3D structural analysis. Our group has been working on 3D structure of flagella/cilia using this method and revealed highly ordered and beautifully organized molecular arrangement. 3D structure gave us insights into the mechanism to gener-ate bending motion with well defined waveforms. In this review, I summarize our recent structural studies on fla-gella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography, mainly focusing on dynein microtubule-based ATPase motor proteins and the radial spoke, a regulatory protein complex. PMID:27493552

  4. Ex vivo Method for High Resolution Imaging of Cilia Motility in Rodent Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Richard; Lo, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    An ex vivo technique for imaging mouse airway epithelia for quantitative analysis of motile cilia function important for insight into mucociliary clearance function has been established. Freshly harvested mouse trachea is cut longitudinally through the trachealis muscle and mounted in a shallow walled chamber on a glass-bottomed dish. The trachea sample is positioned along its long axis to take advantage of the trachealis muscle to curl longitudinally. This allows imaging of ciliary motion in the profile view along the entire tracheal length. Videos at 200 frames/sec are obtained using differential interference contrast microscopy and a high speed digital camera to allow quantitative analysis of cilia beat frequency and ciliary waveform. With the addition of fluorescent beads during imaging, cilia generated fluid flow also can be determined. The protocol time spans approximately 30 min, with 5 min for chamber preparation, 5-10 min for sample mounting, and 10-15 min for videomicroscopy. PMID:23963287

  5. Characterization of metachronal wave of beating cilia on frog's palate epithelium in tissue culture.

    PubMed Central

    Eshel, D; Priel, Z

    1987-01-01

    1. A method is suggested to measure phase versus distance between beating cilia by means of a photoelectric device. A statistical method interpreting the results thus obtained is discussed. 2. It was found that: (a) an average phase exists between beating cilia, (b) despite strong fluctuations in phase on a short time scale, the average phase was kept constant over periods of 8 h, (c) the ciliary frequency and the length of the metachronal wave can be measured simultaneously. 3. The average phase differences are linearly dependent on distance. 4. The effective range of synchronization between cilia is of the order of 10 micron indicating that it occurs within one cell. 5. During the cycle of ciliary beating there are periods where coupling is stronger. PMID:3656188

  6. Characterization of metachronal wave of beating cilia on frog's palate epithelium in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Eshel, D; Priel, Z

    1987-07-01

    1. A method is suggested to measure phase versus distance between beating cilia by means of a photoelectric device. A statistical method interpreting the results thus obtained is discussed. 2. It was found that: (a) an average phase exists between beating cilia, (b) despite strong fluctuations in phase on a short time scale, the average phase was kept constant over periods of 8 h, (c) the ciliary frequency and the length of the metachronal wave can be measured simultaneously. 3. The average phase differences are linearly dependent on distance. 4. The effective range of synchronization between cilia is of the order of 10 micron indicating that it occurs within one cell. 5. During the cycle of ciliary beating there are periods where coupling is stronger.

  7. Ex vivo method for high resolution imaging of cilia motility in rodent airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Francis, Richard; Lo, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    An ex vivo technique for imaging mouse airway epithelia for quantitative analysis of motile cilia function important for insight into mucociliary clearance function has been established. Freshly harvested mouse trachea is cut longitudinally through the trachealis muscle and mounted in a shallow walled chamber on a glass-bottomed dish. The trachea sample is positioned along its long axis to take advantage of the trachealis muscle to curl longitudinally. This allows imaging of ciliary motion in the profile view along the entire tracheal length. Videos at 200 frames/sec are obtained using differential interference contrast microscopy and a high speed digital camera to allow quantitative analysis of cilia beat frequency and ciliary waveform. With the addition of fluorescent beads during imaging, cilia generated fluid flow also can be determined. The protocol time spans approximately 30 min, with 5 min for chamber preparation, 5-10 min for sample mounting, and 10-15 min for videomicroscopy. PMID:23963287

  8. New insights into an old organelle: meeting report on biology of cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Piali; Barr, Maureen M

    2014-06-01

    The rising interest of the scientific community in cilia biology was evident from the fact that registration for the third FASEB conference on 'The Biology of Cilia and Flagella' closed out before the early bird deadline. Cilia and flagella are organelles of profound medical importance; defects in their structure or function result in a plethora of human diseases called ciliopathies. 240 clinicians and basic scientists from around the world gathered from 23 June 2013 to 28 June 2013 at Sheraton at the Falls, Niagara Falls, NY to present and discuss their research on this intensely studied subcellular structure. The meeting was organized by Gregory Pazour (University of Massachusetts Medical School), Bradley Yoder (University of Alabama-Birmingham), and Maureen Barr (Rutgers University) and was sponsored by the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB). Here, we report highlights, points of discussion, and emerging themes from this exciting meeting. PMID:24612344

  9. A Group of ent-Kaurane Diterpenoids Inhibit Hedgehog Signaling and Induce Cilia Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shiyou; Du, Jiacheng; Kong, Qinghua; Li, Chaocui; Li, Yan; Sun, Handong; Pu, Jianxin; Mao, Bingyu

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays important roles in the tumorigenesis of multiple cancers and is a key target for drug discovery. In a screen of natural products extracted from Chinese herbs, we identified eight ent-Kaurane diterpenoids and two triterpene dilactones as novel Hh pathway antagonists. Epistatic analyses suggest that these compounds likely act at the level or downstream of Smoothened (Smo) and upstream of Suppressor of Fused (Sufu). The ent-Kauranoid-treated cells showed elongated cilia, suppressed Smo trafficking to cilia, and mitotic defects, while the triterpene dilactones had no effect on the cilia and ciliary Smo. These ent-Kaurane diterpenoids provide new prototypes of Hh inhibitors, and are valuable probes for deciphering the mechanisms of Smo ciliary transport and ciliogenesis. PMID:26439749

  10. Microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins in the regulation of assembly, disassembly, and length of cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhangfeng; Liang, Yinwen; Meng, Dan; Wang, Liang; Pan, Junmin

    2015-01-01

    Defects in ciliary assembly, maintenance, and signaling are associated with various human diseases and developmental disorders, termed ciliopathies. Eukaryotic flagella and cilia (interchangeable terms) are microtubule-based organelles. Thus, microtubule dynamics and microtubule-dependent transport are predicted to affect the structural integrity and functionality of cilia profoundly. Kinesin-2 is well known for its role in intraflagellar transport to transport ciliary precursors and signaling molecules. Recently, microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins found in kinesin-8, -13, and -14A families have emerged as regulators of cilia. We first discuss ciliary kinesins identified in the flagellar or ciliary proteome, and then focus on the function and regulation of microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins. Lastly, we review the recent advances of microtubule-depolymerizing kinesins in controlling ciliary assembly, disassembly, and length.

  11. Comparative structural analysis of eukaryotic flagella and cilia from Chlamydomonas, Tetrahymena, and sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Pigino, Gaia; Maheshwari, Aditi; Bui, Khanh Huy; Shingyoji, Chikako; Kamimura, Shinji; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    Although eukaryotic flagella and cilia all share the basic 9+2 microtubule-organization of their internal axonemes, and are capable of generating bending-motion, the waveforms, amplitudes, and velocities of the bending-motions are quite diverse. To explore the structural basis of this functional diversity of flagella and cilia, we here compare the axonemal structure of three different organisms with widely divergent bending-motions by electron cryo-tomography. We reconstruct the 3D structure of the axoneme of Tetrahymena cilia, and compare it with the axoneme of the flagellum of sea urchin sperm, as well as with the axoneme of Chlamydomonas flagella, which we analyzed previously. This comparative structural analysis defines the diversity of molecular architectures in these organisms, and forms the basis for future correlation with their different bending-motions.

  12. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Flagella/cilia are motile organelles with more than 400 proteins. To understand the mechanism of such complex systems, we need methods to describe molecular arrange-ments and conformations three-dimensionally in vivo. Cryo-electron tomography enabled us such a 3D structural analysis. Our group has been working on 3D structure of flagella/cilia using this method and revealed highly ordered and beautifully organized molecular arrangement. 3D structure gave us insights into the mechanism to gener-ate bending motion with well defined waveforms. In this review, I summarize our recent structural studies on fla-gella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography, mainly focusing on dynein microtubule-based ATPase motor proteins and the radial spoke, a regulatory protein complex.

  13. A missense mutation in DCDC2 causes human recessive deafness DFNB66, likely by interfering with sensory hair cell and supporting cell cilia length regulation

    PubMed Central

    Grati, M'hamed; Chakchouk, Imen; Ma, Qi; Bensaid, Mariem; Desmidt, Alexandra; Turki, Nouha; Yan, Denise; Baanannou, Aissette; Mittal, Rahul; Driss, Nabil; Blanton, Susan; Farooq, Amjad; Lu, Zhongmin; Liu, Xue Zhong; Masmoudi, Saber

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans. We show that a point mutation in DCDC2 (DCDC2a), a member of doublecortin domain-containing protein superfamily, causes non-syndromic recessive deafness DFNB66 in a Tunisian family. Using immunofluorescence on rat inner ear neuroepithelia, DCDC2a was found to localize to the kinocilia of sensory hair cells and the primary cilia of nonsensory supporting cells. DCDC2a fluorescence is distributed along the length of the kinocilium with increased density toward the tip. DCDC2a-GFP overexpression in non-polarized COS7 cells induces the formation of long microtubule-based cytosolic cables suggesting a role in microtubule formation and stabilization. Deafness mutant DCDC2a expression in hair cells and supporting cells causes cilium structural defects, such as cilium branching, and up to a 3-fold increase in length ratios. In zebrafish, the ortholog dcdc2b was found to be essential for hair cell development, survival and function. Our results reveal DCDC2a to be a deafness gene and a player in hair cell kinocilia and supporting cell primary cilia length regulation likely via its role in microtubule formation and stabilization. PMID:25601850

  14. A missense mutation in DCDC2 causes human recessive deafness DFNB66, likely by interfering with sensory hair cell and supporting cell cilia length regulation.

    PubMed

    Grati, M'hamed; Chakchouk, Imen; Ma, Qi; Bensaid, Mariem; Desmidt, Alexandra; Turki, Nouha; Yan, Denise; Baanannou, Aissette; Mittal, Rahul; Driss, Nabil; Blanton, Susan; Farooq, Amjad; Lu, Zhongmin; Liu, Xue Zhong; Masmoudi, Saber

    2015-05-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans. We show that a point mutation in DCDC2 (DCDC2a), a member of doublecortin domain-containing protein superfamily, causes non-syndromic recessive deafness DFNB66 in a Tunisian family. Using immunofluorescence on rat inner ear neuroepithelia, DCDC2a was found to localize to the kinocilia of sensory hair cells and the primary cilia of nonsensory supporting cells. DCDC2a fluorescence is distributed along the length of the kinocilium with increased density toward the tip. DCDC2a-GFP overexpression in non-polarized COS7 cells induces the formation of long microtubule-based cytosolic cables suggesting a role in microtubule formation and stabilization. Deafness mutant DCDC2a expression in hair cells and supporting cells causes cilium structural defects, such as cilium branching, and up to a 3-fold increase in length ratios. In zebrafish, the ortholog dcdc2b was found to be essential for hair cell development, survival and function. Our results reveal DCDC2a to be a deafness gene and a player in hair cell kinocilia and supporting cell primary cilia length regulation likely via its role in microtubule formation and stabilization.

  15. Polarised skylight and the landmark panorama provide night-active bull ants with compass information during route following.

    PubMed

    Reid, Samuel F; Narendra, Ajay; Hemmi, Jan M; Zeil, Jochen

    2011-02-01

    Navigating animals are known to use a number of celestial and terrestrial compass cues that allow them to determine and control their direction of travel. Which of the cues dominate appears to depend on their salience. Here we show that night-active bull ants attend to both the pattern of polarised skylight and the landmark panorama in their familiar habitat. When the two directional cues are in conflict, ants choose a compromise direction. However, landmark guidance appears to be the primary mechanism of navigation used by forager ants, with those cues in the direction of heading having the greatest influence on navigation. Different colonies respond to the removal of these cues to different degrees, depending on the directional information provided by the local landmark panorama. Interestingly, other parts of the surrounding panorama also influence foraging speed and accuracy, suggesting that they too play a role in navigation.

  16. Interactive computer-assisted approach for evaluation of ultrastructural cilia abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Christoph; Siegmund, Heiko; Semmelmann, Matthias; Grafe, Claudia; Evert, Matthias; Schroeder, Josef A.

    2016-03-01

    Introduction - Diagnosis of abnormal cilia function is based on ultrastructural analysis of axoneme defects, especialy the features of inner and outer dynein arms which are the motors of ciliar motility. Sub-optimal biopsy material, methodical, and intrinsic electron microscopy factors pose difficulty in ciliary defects evaluation. We present a computer-assisted approach based on state-of-the-art image analysis and object recognition methods yielding a time-saving and efficient diagnosis of cilia dysfunction. Method - The presented approach is based on a pipeline of basal image processing methods like smoothing, thresholding and ellipse fitting. However, integration of application specific knowledge results in robust segmentations even in cases of image artifacts. The method is build hierarchically starting with the detection of cilia within the image, followed by the detection of nine doublets within each analyzable cilium, and ending with the detection of dynein arms of each doublet. The process is concluded by a rough classification of the dynein arms as basis for a computer-assisted diagnosis. Additionally, the interaction possibilities are designed in a way, that the results are still reproducible given the completion report. Results - A qualitative evaluation showed reasonable detection results for cilia, doublets and dynein arms. However, since a ground truth is missing, the variation of the computer-assisted diagnosis should be within the subjective bias of human diagnosticians. The results of a first quantitative evaluation with five human experts and six images with 12 analyzable cilia showed, that with default parameterization 91.6% of the cilia and 98% of the doublets were found. The computer-assisted approach rated 66% of those inner and outer dynein arms correct, where all human experts agree. However, especially the quality of the dynein arm classification may be improved in future work.

  17. Mammalian cilia function is independent of the polymeric state of tubulin glycylation.

    PubMed

    Dossou, Starlette J Y; Bré, Marie-Hélène; Hallworth, Richard

    2007-11-01

    Polyglycylation is a polymeric post-translational modification of tubulin that is ubiquitous and widely present in cilia and flagella. It consists of the addition of highly variable numbers of glycyl residues as side chains onto the gamma carboxyl group of specific glutamyl residues at the C-termini of alpha- and beta-tubulin. The function of polyglycylation is poorly understood, however, studies in Tetrahymena have shown that the mutation of polyglycylation sites in beta-tubulin resulted in axonemal abnormality or lethality. This suggests that polyglycylation is functionally essential in protists. We hypothesize that polyglycylation is also essential in mammalian cilia and that the extent of polyglycylation has functional significance. In this study, we examined polyglycylation states in ciliated tissues and in mouse tracheal epithelial cell cultures. We utilized two antibodies, TAP 952 and AXO 49, which recognize glutamyl sites possessing monomeric glycylation sites and glutamyl sites possessing polymeric glycylation sites, respectively. Monomeric glycylation sites were observed in cilia of all the ciliated tissues examined but were invariably excluded from the distal tips. In contrast, polymeric glycylation sites were rare, but when observed, they were localized at the bases of cilia. During ciliogenesis, in epithelial cell cultures, monomeric glycylation sites were observed, but the extent of polymeric glycylation sites were variable and were only observed during the early stages of the cultures. Our observations suggest that while monomeric glycylation sites are universal and likely essential in mammalian cilia, polymeric glycylation sites are not required for ciliary beating. Rather, our observations suggest that the number of added glycyl residues increases progressively from the tips of cilia toward their bases.

  18. Zebrafish ift57, ift88, and ift172 intraflagellar transport mutants disrupt cilia but do not affect hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Lunt, Shannon C; Haynes, Tony; Perkins, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Cilia formation requires intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins. Recent studies indicate that mammalian Hedgehog (Hh) signaling requires cilia. It is unclear, however, if the requirement for cilia and IFT proteins in Hh signaling represents a general rule for all vertebrates. Here we examine zebrafish ift57, ift88, and ift172 mutants and morphants for defects in Hh signaling. Although ift57 and ift88 mutants and morphants contained residual maternal protein, the cilia were disrupted. In contrast to previous genetic studies in mouse, mutations in zebrafish IFT genes did not affect the expression of Hh target genes in the neural tube and forebrain and had no quantitative effect on Hh target gene expression. Zebrafish IFT mutants also exhibited no dramatic changes in the craniofacial skeleton, somite formation, or motor neuron patterning. Thus, our data indicate the requirement for cilia in the Hh signal transduction pathway may not represent a universal mechanism in vertebrates.

  19. Insight on the surface polarisation for non-blocking electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrade, T.; Alexe-Ionescu, A. L.; Saracco, G.; Barbero, G.

    2016-03-01

    A complete phenomenological description of the electrode polarisation and of the non-blocking character of electrodes is theoretically discussed. To do this, the role of the ions on the electrical response of an electrolytic cell submitted to an external field of small amplitude is investigated. We assume that the conduction current across the electrodes is limited by energy barriers which determine the activation energy of the corresponding electrochemical reactions responsible for the processes of charge transfer between the solution containing ions and the external circuit. This assumption implies that the boundary conditions for the conduction current on the electrodes contain two terms: one proportional to the surface electric field, as in the Ohmic model, and the other proportional to the surface variation of the bulk concentration of ions, as in the Chang-Jaffe model. We deduce, in the one-mobile ion approximation, the expression for the electric impedance of the cell, in the shape of a slab, for mixed boundary conditions. Our expression contains, as particular cases, the Ohmic and Chang-Jaffe models. The equivalence between the general case considered in our analysis and previous models is discussed.

  20. Polarised clathrin-mediated endocytosis of EGFR during chemotactic invasion.

    PubMed

    Mutch, Laura Jane; Howden, Jake Davey; Jenner, Emma Poppy Louise; Poulter, Natalie Sarah; Rappoport, Joshua Zachary

    2014-06-01

    Directed cell migration is critical for numerous physiological processes including development and wound healing. However chemotaxis is also exploited during cancer progression. Recent reports have suggested links between vesicle trafficking pathways and directed cell migration. Very little is known about the potential roles of endocytosis pathways during metastasis. Therefore we performed a series of studies employing a previously characterised model for chemotactic invasion of cancer cells to assess specific hypotheses potentially linking endocytosis to directed cell migration. Our results demonstrate that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is indispensable for epidermal growth factor (EGF) directed chemotactic invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. Conversely, caveolar endocytosis is not required in this mode of migration. We further found that chemoattractant receptor (EGFR) trafficking occurs by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is polarised towards the front of migrating cells. However, we found no role for clathrin-mediated endocytosis in focal adhesion disassembly in this migration model. Thus, this study has characterised the role of endocytosis during chemotactic invasion and has identified functions mechanistically linking clathrin-mediated endocytosis to directed cell motility.

  1. Metachronal beating of cilia under the influence of Casson fluid and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Khan, Zafar Hayat

    2015-03-01

    Metachronal beating of cilia under the influence of Casson fluid and magnetic field is considered. The model for cilia literature is modelled for the first time. The governing coupled equations are constructed under long wavelength and low Reynold's number approximation. Exact solutions are evaluated for stream function and pressure gradient. The important results in this study are the variation of the Hartmann number M, Casson fluid parameter ζ. The velocity field increases due to the increase in Hartmann number M near the channel walls while velocity field decreases at the center of the channel. Comparative study is also made for Casson fluid with Newtonian fluid.

  2. Metachronal beating of cilia under influence of Hartmann layer and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sher Akbar, Noreen; Khan, Z. H.; Nadeem, S.

    2014-08-01

    The propulsion system of cilia motion is investigated considering a viscous fluid model. The problem of the two-dimensional fluid motion in a symmetric channel with ciliated walls is considered. The features of ciliary structures are resolved by the supremacy of viscosity effects over inertial control by the long-wavelength and low-Reynolds-number approximation. Exact solutions for the longitudinal pressure gradient, temperature and velocities are obtained. The pressure gradient and volume flow rate for different values of the flow parameters are also predicted. The flow possessions for the viscous fluid are solved as a function of the cilia and metachronal wave velocity.

  3. Genetics and Biology of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Horani, Amjad; Ferkol, Thomas W; Dutcher, Susan K.; Brody, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ciliopathies are a growing class of disorders caused by abnormal ciliary axonemal structure and function. Our understanding of the complex genetic and functional phenotypes of these conditions has rapidly progressed. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) remains the sole genetic disorder of motile cilia dysfunction. However, unlike many Mendelian genetic disorders, PCD is not caused by mutations in a single gene or locus, but rather, autosomal recessive mutation in one of many genes that lead to a similar phenotype. The first reported PCD mutations, more than a decade ago, identified genes encoding known structural components of the ciliary axoneme. In recent years, mutations in genes encoding novel cytoplasmic and regulatory proteins have been discovered. These findings have provided new insights into the functions of the motile cilia, and a better understanding of motile cilia disease. Advances in genetic tools will soon allow more precise genetic testing, mandating that clinicians must understand the genetic basis of PCD. Here, we review genetic mutations, their biological impact on cilia structure and function, and the implication of emerging genetic diagnostic tools. PMID:26476603

  4. Diffuse radio foregrounds: all-sky polarisation and anomalous microwave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Navarro, M. A.

    2014-07-01

    In this Thesis, we present work on the diffuse Galactic emission in the 23-43 GHz frequency range. We studied the polarised emission, which is dominated by synchrotron radiation at these frequencies. We also present work on the anomalous microwave emission (AME), both in total intensity and polarisation. These observations are useful to quantify the CMB foreground contribution and give us information about the ISM of our Galaxy. Polarisation observations are affected by a positive bias, particularly important in regions with low signal-to-noise ratio. We present a method to correct the bias in the case where the uncertainties in the Q, U Stokes parameters are not symmetric. We show that this method successfully corrects the polarisation maps, with a residual bias smaller than the random uncertainties on the maps, outperforming the methods that are previously described in the literature. We use the de-biasing method to set upper limits for the polarisation of AME in the ρ Ophiuchi and Perseus molecular clouds. In both clouds the AME polarisation fraction is found to be less than 2% at 23 GHz and33 GHz.We use data from the WMAP satellite at 23, 33 and 41 GHz to study the diffuse polarised emission over the entire sky. This emission is due to synchrotron radiation and it originates mostly from filamentary structures with well-ordered magnetic fields.We identify new filaments and studied their observational properties, such as polarisation spectral indices, polarisation fraction and Faraday rotation. We explore the link between the large scale filaments and the local ISM, using the model of an expanding shell in the vicinity of the Sun. We also quantify the level of contamination added by the diffuse filaments to the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra.The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) observed the polarised sky at 43 and 95 GHz, in order to measure the CMB spectra. We describe the instrument, the observations and data processing, focusing on two regions of the Galactic

  5. Innervation of Gill Lateral Cells in the Bivalve Mollusc Crassostrea virginica Affects Cellular Membrane Potential and Cilia Activity

    PubMed Central

    Catapane, Edward J; Nelson, Michael; Adams, Trevon; Carroll, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Gill lateral cells of Crassostrea virginica are innervated by the branchial nerve, which contains serotonergic and dopaminergic fibers that regulate cilia beating rate. Terminal release of serotonin or dopamine results in an increase or decrease, respectively, of cilia beating rate in lateral gill cells. In this study we used the voltage sensitive fluorescent probe DiBAC4(3) to quantify changes in gill lateral cell membrane potential in response to electrical stimulation of the branchial nerve or to applications of serotonin and dopamine, and correlate these changes to cilia beating rates. Application of serotonin to gill lateral cells caused prolonged membrane depolarization, similar to plateau potentials, while increasing cilia beating rate. Application of dopamine hyperpolarized the resting membrane while decreasing cilia beating rate. Low frequency (5 Hz) electrical stimulations of the branchial nerve, which cause terminal release of endogenous serotonin, or high frequency (20 Hz) stimulations, which cause terminal release of endogenous dopamine, had the same effects on gill lateral cell membrane potentials and cilia beating rate as the respective applications of serotonin or dopamine. The study shows that innervation of gill lateral cells by the branchial nerve affects membrane potential as well as cilia beating rate, and demonstrates a strong correlation between changes in membrane potential and regulation of cilia beating rate. The study furthers the understanding of serotonin and dopamine signaling in the innervation and regulation of gill cilia in bivalves. The study also shows that voltage sensitive fluorescent probes like DiBAC 4(3) can be successfully used as an alternative to microelectrodes to measure changes in membrane potential of ciliated gill cells and other small cells with fast moving cilia. PMID:27489887

  6. Intestinal cell kinase, a protein associated with endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome, is a key regulator of cilia length and Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Moon, Heejung; Song, Jieun; Shin, Jeong-Oh; Lee, Hankyu; Kim, Hong-Kyung; Eggenschwiller, Jonathan T; Bok, Jinwoong; Ko, Hyuk Wan

    2014-06-10

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome is a recessive genetic disorder associated with multiple congenital defects in endocrine, cerebral, and skeletal systems that is caused by a missense mutation in the mitogen-activated protein kinase-like intestinal cell kinase (ICK) gene. In algae and invertebrates, ICK homologs are involved in flagellar formation and ciliogenesis, respectively. However, it is not clear whether this role of ICK is conserved in mammals and how a lack of functional ICK results in the characteristic phenotypes of human ECO syndrome. Here, we generated Ick knockout mice to elucidate the precise role of ICK in mammalian development and to examine the pathological mechanisms of ECO syndrome. Ick null mouse embryos displayed cleft palate, hydrocephalus, polydactyly, and delayed skeletal development, closely resembling ECO syndrome phenotypes. In cultured cells, down-regulation of Ick or overexpression of kinase-dead or ECO syndrome mutant ICK resulted in an elongation of primary cilia and abnormal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Wild-type ICK proteins were generally localized in the proximal region of cilia near the basal bodies, whereas kinase-dead ICK mutant proteins accumulated in the distal part of bulged ciliary tips. Consistent with these observations in cultured cells, Ick knockout mouse embryos displayed elongated cilia and reduced Shh signaling during limb digit patterning. Taken together, these results indicate that ICK plays a crucial role in controlling ciliary length and that ciliary defects caused by a lack of functional ICK leads to abnormal Shh signaling, resulting in congenital disorders such as ECO syndrome.

  7. Endocytic Control of Cellular Signaling at the Primary Cilium.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Lotte B; Mogensen, Johanne B; Christensen, Søren T

    2016-09-01

    Primary cilia are dynamic signaling organelles that project from the cell surface to sense diverse chemical, physical and morphogenetic cues. Ciliary defects therefore cause diseases (ciliopathies) that affect multiple organs in developing and adult organisms. Cilia-mediated signaling involves the orchestrated movement of signaling proteins in and out of the ciliary compartment, including movement of receptors such as the Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) receptor Patched 1 (PTCH1), Smoothened (SMO), and various other G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as well as transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptors I and II (TGF-β-RI/II). We provide here a current understanding of trafficking events associated with cilia-mediated signaling, with emphasis on the involvement of clathrin-dependent receptor-mediated endocytosis in regulating ciliary Shh and TGF-β signaling. PMID:27364476

  8. Macrophage polarisation by fatty acids is PPARgamma-dependent.

    PubMed

    Pararasa, Chatyan; Bailey, Clifford; Griffiths, Helen

    2014-10-01

    Elevated plasma free fatty acids (FAs) are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effects of the saturated FA palmitate and unsaturated FA oleate on monocyte phenotype and function. Palmitate increased cell surface expression of integrin CD11b and scavenger receptor CD36 in a concentration-dependent manner with some decrease in mitochondrial reducing capacity at high concentration (300µM). Monocytes incubated with palmitate, but not oleate, showed increased uptake of oxidized LDL and increased adhesion to rat aortic endothelium, particularly at bifurcations. The palmitate-induced increase in CD11b and CD36 expression was associated with increased cellular C16 ceramide and sphingomyelin, loss of reduced glutathione, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increased monocyte surface CD11b and CD36 was inhibited by fumonisin B1, an inhibitor of de novo ceramide synthesis, but not by the superoxide dismutase mimetic MnTBap. In contrast, MnTBap prevented the mitochondrial ROS increase and metabolic inhibition due to 300µM palmitate. This study demonstrates that in viable monocytes, palmitate but not oleate increases expression of surface CD11b and CD36. Palmitate increases monocyte adhesion to the aortic wall and promotes uptake of oxidized LDL and this involves de novo ceramide synthesis. We have also explored whether specific dietary fatty acids drive monocyte to macrophage polarisation via metabolic pathways. Here we show that monocytes pre-incubated with the saturated fatty acid palmitate increase production of inflammatory cytokines such as TNFa and IL-6 in response to a phorbol myristate differentiation trigger. This increases mitochondrial superoxide production, reduces dependency on oxidative phosphorylation through ceramide-dependent inhibition of PPARgamma activity and increases TNFa production, again via a mechanism that requires ceramide production. PMID:26461339

  9. Hyperglycemia in the absence of cilia accelerates cystogenesis and induces renal damage

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hong; Fitzgibbon, Wayne R.; Baicu, Catalin F.; Zile, Michael R.; Steele, Stacy L.; Amria, May; Saigusa, Takamitsu; Funk, Jason; Bunni, Marlene A.; Siegal, Gene P.; Siroky, Brian J.; Bissler, John J.; Bell, P. Darwin

    2015-01-01

    In polycystic kidney disease (PKD), the rate of cyst formation and disease progression is highly variable. The lack of predictability in disease progression may be due to additional environmental factors or pathophysiological processes called “third hits.” Diabetes is a growing epidemic, and recent studies suggest that PKD patients may be at an increased risk for this disease. We sought to determine if hyperglycemia enhances the initiation and rate of cystogenesis. Tamoxifen was administered to adult Ift88 conditional floxed allele mice to induce cilia loss in the presence of Cre. Subsequent administration of streptozotocin resulted in equivalent hyperglycemia in cilia+ and cilia− mice. Hyperglycemia with loss of cilia increased the rate of cyst formation and cell proliferation. Structural and functional alterations in the kidney, including focal glomerular foot process effacement, interstitial inflammation, formation of primitive renal tubules, polyuria, and increased proteinuria, were also observed in hyperglycemic cilia− mice. Gene array analysis indicated enhanced Wnt and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition signaling in the kidney of hyperglycemic cilia− mice. These data show that hyperglycemia, in the absence of cilia, results in renal structural and functional damage and accelerates cystogenesis, suggesting that diabetes is a risk factor in the progression of PKD. PMID:25904703

  10. Exact solution of cilia induced flow of a Jeffrey fluid in an inclined tube.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, K; Shaheen, S; Mann, A B

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the cilia induced flow of MHD Jeffrey fluid through an inclined tube. This study is carried out under the assumptions of long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. Exact solutions for the velocity profile, pressure rise, pressure gradient, volume flow rate and stream function are obtained. Effects of pertinent physical parameters on the computational results are presented graphically. PMID:27610298

  11. The planarian Schmidtea mediterranea as a model for studying motile cilia and multiciliated cells.

    PubMed

    Basquin, Cyril; Orfila, Anne-Marie; Azimzadeh, Juliette

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea has emerged as a powerful model system to study the assembly and function of cilia. S. mediterranea is a free-living flatworm that uses the beating of cilia on its ventral epidermis for locomotion. The ventral epidermis is composed of a single layer of multiciliated cells highly similar to the multiciliated cells that line the airway, the brain ventricles, and the oviducts in humans. The genome of S. mediterranea has been sequenced and efficient methods for targeting gene expression by RNA interference (RNAi) are available. Locomotion defects induced by perturbing the expression of ciliary genes can be often detected by simple visual screening, and more subtle defects can be detected by measuring locomotion speed. Cilia are present in large numbers and are directly accessible, which facilitates analyses by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Here we describe a set of methods for maintaining planarians in the lab. These include gene knockout by RNAi, cilia visualization by immunofluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, and live imaging.

  12. A Cilia Independent Role of Ift88/Polaris during Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Boehlke, Christopher; Janusch, Heike; Hamann, Christoph; Powelske, Christian; Mergen, Miriam; Herbst, Henriette; Kotsis, Fruzsina; Nitschke, Roland; Kuehn, E Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Ift88 is a central component of the intraflagellar transport (Ift) complex B, essential for the building of cilia and flagella from single cell organisms to mammals. Loss of Ift88 results in the absence of cilia and causes left-right asymmetry defects, disordered Hedgehog signaling, and polycystic kidney disease, all of which are explained by aberrant ciliary function. In addition, a number of extraciliary functions of Ift88 have been described that affect the cell-cycle, mitosis, and targeting of the T-cell receptor to the immunological synapse. Similarly, another essential ciliary molecule, the kinesin-2 subunit Kif3a, which transports Ift-B in the cilium, affects microtubule (MT) dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells independently of cilia. We now show that loss of Ift88 impairs cell migration irrespective of cilia. Ift88 is required for the polarization of migrating MDCK cells, and Ift88 depleted cells have fewer MTs at the leading edge. Neither MT dynamics nor MT nucleation are dependent on Ift88. Our findings dissociate the function of Ift88 from Kif3a outside the cilium and suggest a novel extraciliary function for Ift88. Future studies need to address what unifying mechanism underlies the different extraciliary functions of Ift88. PMID:26465598

  13. Heat transfer analysis of Rabinowitsch fluid flow due to metachronal wave of cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Butt, Adil Wahid

    The present investigation concerns with the mechanical properties of a Rabinowitsch fluid model and the effects of thermal conductivity over it. Flow is considered to be occurring due to metachronal wave produced as a result of constant beating of cilia at the walls of a horizontal circular tube. The expressions for flow characteristics have been derived results are analyzed graphically and discussed briefly.

  14. Loss of Dishevelleds disrupts planar polarity in ependymal motile cilia and results in hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Shinya; Nakatani, Jin; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Cheng, JrGang; Belinson, Haim; Inubushi, Toshiro; Snider, William D; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-08-01

    Defects in ependymal (E) cells, which line the ventricle and generate cerebrospinal fluid flow through ciliary beating, can cause hydrocephalus. Dishevelled genes (Dvls) are essential for Wnt signaling, and Dvl2 has been shown to localize to the rootlet of motile cilia. Using the hGFAP-Cre;Dvl1(-/-);2(flox/flox);3(+/-) mouse, we show that compound genetic ablation of Dvls causes hydrocephalus. In hGFAP-Cre;Dvl1(-/-);2(flox/flox);3(+/-) mutants, E cells differentiated normally, but the intracellular and intercellular rotational alignments of ependymal motile cilia were disrupted. As a consequence, the fluid flow generated by the hGFAP-Cre;Dvl1(-/-);2(flox/flox);3(+/-) E cells was significantly slower than that observed in control mice. Dvls were also required for the proper positioning of motile cilia on the apical surface. Tamoxifen-induced conditional removal of Dvls in adult mice also resulted in defects in intracellular rotational alignment and positioning of ependymal motile cilia. These results suggest that Dvls are continuously required for E cell planar polarity and may prevent hydrocephalus. PMID:25043421

  15. Distinctive features of cilia in metazoans and their significance for systematics.

    PubMed

    Tyler, S

    1979-01-01

    A comparative study of epidermal cilia in the Turbellaria and Nemertea has revealed features in these organelles that are specific to certain taxonomic groups. Turbellarians of the order Acoela, in particular, have a characteristic pattern of axonemal filament termination in the distal tips of their cilia and a characteristic ciliary rootlet system that is not seen in other turbellarian orders nor in other metazoans. Each epidermal cilium in acoels has a typical 9 + 2 axonemal pattern through the main part of its length, but near its distal tip there is an abrupt shelf-life narrowing at which filaments 4-7 terminate; filaments 1, 2, 8 and 9 continue into the thinner distal-most part of the shaft along with singlet microtubules from the axonemal center. The rootlet system in acoel cilia involves an interconnecting pattern with lateral connectives. The unique structure of these cilia has systematic and phylogenetic significance for the Acoela, and it is argued that ultrastructural characters in general, including characters of organelles, can be validly applied to the phylogeny and systematics of the Metazoa.

  16. General and cell-type specific mechanisms target TRPP2/PKD-2 to cilia.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Kyung; Qin, Hongmin; Knobel, Karla M; Hu, Jinghua; Rosenbaum, Joel L; Barr, Maureen M

    2006-10-01

    Ciliary localization of the transient receptor potential polycystin 2 channel (TRPP2/PKD-2) is evolutionarily conserved, but how TRPP2 is targeted to cilia is not known. In this study, we characterize the motility and localization of PKD-2, a TRPP2 homolog, in C. elegans sensory neurons. We demonstrate that GFP-tagged PKD-2 moves bidirectionally in the dendritic compartment. Furthermore, we show a requirement for different molecules in regulating the ciliary localization of PKD-2. PKD-2 is directed to moving dendritic particles by the UNC-101/adaptor protein 1 (AP-1) complex. When expressed in non-native neurons, PKD-2 remains in cell bodies and is not observed in dendrites or cilia, indicating that cell-type specific factors are required for directing PKD-2 to the dendrite. PKD-2 stabilization in cilia and cell bodies requires LOV-1, a functional partner and a TRPP1 homolog. In lov-1 mutants, PKD-2 is greatly reduced in cilia and forms abnormal aggregates in neuronal cell bodies. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is not essential for PKD-2 dendritic motility or access to the cilium, but may regulate PKD-2 ciliary abundance. We propose that both general and cell-type-specific factors govern TRPP2/PKD-2 subcellular distribution by forming at least two steps involving somatodendritic and ciliary sorting decisions. PMID:16943275

  17. Dynamics of Individual cilia to external loading- A simple one dimensional picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Vinay; Hill, David; Superfine, R.

    2008-10-01

    From being called the cellular janitors to swinging debauchers, cilia have captured the fascinations of researchers for over 200 years. In cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease where the cilia loses it's function, the protective mucus layer in the lung thickens and mucociliary clearance breaks down, leading to inflammation along the airways and an increased rate of infection. The mechanistic understanding of mucus clearance depends on a quantitative assessment of the axoneme dynamics and the maximum force the cilia are capable of generating and imparting to the mucus layer. Similar to the situation in molecular motors, detailed quantitative measurements of dynamics under applied load conditions are expected to be essential in developing predictive models. Based on our measurements of the dynamics of individual ciliary motion in the human bronchial epithelial cell under the application of an applied load, we present a simple one dimensional model for the axoneme dynamics and quantify the axoneme stiffness, the internal force generated by the axoneme, the stall force and show how the dynamics sheds insight on the time dependence of the internal force generation. The internal force generated by the axoneme is related to the ability of cilia to propel fluids and to their potential role in force sensing.

  18. A Cilia Independent Role of Ift88/Polaris during Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Christoph; Powelske, Christian; Mergen, Miriam; Herbst, Henriette; Kotsis, Fruzsina; Nitschke, Roland; Kuehn, E. Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Ift88 is a central component of the intraflagellar transport (Ift) complex B, essential for the building of cilia and flagella from single cell organisms to mammals. Loss of Ift88 results in the absence of cilia and causes left-right asymmetry defects, disordered Hedgehog signaling, and polycystic kidney disease, all of which are explained by aberrant ciliary function. In addition, a number of extraciliary functions of Ift88 have been described that affect the cell-cycle, mitosis, and targeting of the T-cell receptor to the immunological synapse. Similarly, another essential ciliary molecule, the kinesin-2 subunit Kif3a, which transports Ift-B in the cilium, affects microtubule (MT) dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells independently of cilia. We now show that loss of Ift88 impairs cell migration irrespective of cilia. Ift88 is required for the polarization of migrating MDCK cells, and Ift88 depleted cells have fewer MTs at the leading edge. Neither MT dynamics nor MT nucleation are dependent on Ift88. Our findings dissociate the function of Ift88 from Kif3a outside the cilium and suggest a novel extraciliary function for Ift88. Future studies need to address what unifying mechanism underlies the different extraciliary functions of Ift88. PMID:26465598

  19. Prickle3 synergizes with Wtip to regulate basal body organization and cilia growth

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chih-Wen; Ossipova, Olga; Ioannou, Andriani; Sokol, Sergei Y.

    2016-01-01

    PCP proteins maintain planar polarity in many epithelial tissues and have been implicated in cilia development in vertebrate embryos. In this study we examine Prickle3 (Pk3), a vertebrate homologue of Drosophila Prickle, in Xenopus gastrocoel roof plate (GRP). GRP is a tissue equivalent to the mouse node, in which cilia-generated flow promotes left-right patterning. We show that Pk3 is enriched at the basal body of GRP cells but is recruited by Vangl2 to anterior cell borders. Interference with Pk3 function disrupted the anterior polarization of endogenous Vangl2 and the posterior localization of cilia in GRP cells, demonstrating its role in PCP. Strikingly, in cells with reduced Pk3 activity, cilia growth was inhibited and γ-tubulin and Nedd1 no longer associated with the basal body, suggesting that Pk3 has a novel function in basal body organization. Mechanistically, this function of Pk3 may involve Wilms tumor protein 1-interacting protein (Wtip), which physically associates with and cooperates with Pk3 to regulate ciliogenesis. We propose that, in addition to cell polarity, PCP components control basal body organization and function. PMID:27062996

  20. An Outer Arm Dynein Conformational Switch Is Required for Metachronal Synchrony of Motile Cilia in Planaria

    PubMed Central

    Rompolas, Panteleimon; Patel-King, Ramila S.

    2010-01-01

    Motile cilia mediate the flow of mucus and other fluids across the surface of specialized epithelia in metazoans. Efficient clearance of peri-ciliary fluids depends on the precise coordination of ciliary beating to produce metachronal waves. The role of individual dynein motors and the mechanical feedback mechanisms required for this process are not well understood. Here we used the ciliated epithelium of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea to dissect the role of outer arm dynein motors in the metachronal synchrony of motile cilia. We demonstrate that animals that completely lack outer dynein arms display a significant decline in beat frequency and an inability of cilia to coordinate their oscillations and form metachronal waves. Furthermore, lack of a key mechanosensitive regulatory component (LC1) yields a similar phenotype even though outer arms still assemble in the axoneme. The lack of metachrony was not due simply to a decrease in ciliary beat frequency, as reducing this parameter by altering medium viscosity did not affect ciliary coordination. In addition, we did not observe a significant temporal variability in the beat cycle of impaired cilia. We propose that this conformational switch provides a mechanical feedback system within outer arm dynein that is necessary to entrain metachronal synchrony. PMID:20844081

  1. Qilin Is Essential for Cilia Assembly and Normal Kidney Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jade; Sun, Zhaoxia

    2011-01-01

    Defects in the cilium, a once thought vestigial organelle, have recently been implicated in many human diseases, including a number of cystic kidney diseases such as polycystic kidney disease (PKD), Bardet Bieldl Syndrome, and Meckel-Gruber Syndrome. In a forward genetic screen, qilin was identified as a novel gene important in the pathogenesis of kidney cysts in zebrafish. In this paper we characterized qilinhi3959A mutant's phenotypes in detail, investigated cilia formation in this mutant and performed structural and functional analysis of the Qilin protein. Results reveal Qilin's essential role in cilia assembly and maintenance in multiple organs, including the kidney, the lateral line organ, and the outer segment of the photoreceptor cell. In addition, rescue experiments suggest that defective pronephric cilia correlate with the formation of kidney cysts in qilinhi3959A mutants. Further, genetic analysis suggests that qilin interacts with multiple intraflagellar transport (IFT) complex B genes, which is supported by the striking phenotypic similarities between qilinhi3959A and IFT complex B mutants. Finally, through deletion analysis we provide evidence that the well-conserved N-terminus and the coiled-coil domain of Qilin are both essential and sufficient for its function. Taken all the observations together, we propose that Qilin acts in a similar role as IFT complex B proteins in cilia assembly, maintenance and kidney development in zebrafish. PMID:22102889

  2. Loss of Dishevelleds disrupts planar polarity in ependymal motile cilia and results in hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Ohata, Shinya; Nakatani, Jin; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Cheng, JrGang; Belinson, Haim; Inubushi, Toshiro; Snider, William D.; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Álvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Defects in ependymal (E) cells, which line the ventricle and generate cerebrospinal fluid flow through ciliary beating, can cause hydrocephalus. Dishevelled genes (Dvls) are essential for Wnt signaling and Dvl2 has been shown to localize to the rootlet of motile cilia. Using the hGFAP-Cre;Dvl1−/−;2flox/flox;3+/− mouse, we show that compound genetic ablation of Dvls causes hydrocephalus. In hGFAP-Cre;Dvl1−/−;2flox/flox;3+/− mutants, E cells differentiated normally, but the intracellular and intercellular rotational alignments of ependymal motile cilia were disrupted. As a consequence, the fluid flow generated by the hGFAP-Cre;Dvl1−/−;2flox/flox;3+/− E cells was significantly slower than that observed in control mice. Dvls were also required for the proper positioning of motile cilia on the apical surface. Tamoxifen-induced conditional removal of Dvls in adult mice also resulted in defects in intracellular rotational alignment and positioning of ependymal motile cilia. These results suggest that Dvls are continuously required for E cell planar polarity and may prevent hydrocephalus. PMID:25043421

  3. Sperm-Associated Antigen 6 (SPAG6) Deficiency and Defects in Ciliogenesis and Cilia Function: Polarity, Density, and Beat

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Maria E.; Sears, Patrick R.; Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhengang; Tang, Waixing; van Reesema, Lauren; Costanzo, Richard M.; Davis, C. William; Knowles, Michael R.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Zhang, Zhibing

    2014-01-01

    SPAG6, an axoneme central apparatus protein, is essential for function of ependymal cell cilia and sperm flagella. A significant number of Spag6-deficient mice die with hydrocephalus, and surviving males are sterile because of sperm motility defects. In further exploring the ciliary dysfunction in Spag6-null mice, we discovered that cilia beat frequency was significantly reduced in tracheal epithelial cells, and that the beat was not synchronized. There was also a significant reduction in cilia density in both brain ependymal and trachea epithelial cells, and cilia arrays were disorganized. The orientation of basal feet, which determines the direction of axoneme orientation, was apparently random in Spag6-deficient mice, and there were reduced numbers of basal feet, consistent with reduced cilia density. The polarized epithelial cell morphology and distribution of intracellular mucin, α-tubulin, and the planar cell polarity protein, Vangl2, were lost in Spag6-deficient tracheal epithelial cells. Polarized epithelial cell morphology and polarized distribution of α-tubulin in tracheal epithelial cells was observed in one-week old wild-type mice, but not in the Spag6-deficient mice of the same age. Thus, the cilia and polarity defects appear prior to 7 days post-partum. These findings suggest that SPAG6 not only regulates cilia/flagellar motility, but that in its absence, ciliogenesis, axoneme orientation, and tracheal epithelial cell polarity are altered. PMID:25333478

  4. Mapping gravitational-wave backgrounds of arbitrary polarisation using pulsar timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gair, Jonathan R.; Romano, Joseph D.; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2015-11-01

    We extend our previous work on mapping gravitational-wave backgrounds using techniques borrowed from the analysis of cosmic microwave background data to backgrounds which have non-general-relativity (non-GR) polarisations. Our analysis and results are presented in the context of pulsar timing array observations, but the overarching methods are general, and can be easily applied to LIGO or eLISA observations using appropriately modified response functions. Analytic expressions for the pulsar timing response to gravitational waves with non-GR polarisation are given for each mode of a spin-weighted spherical-harmonic decomposition of the background, which permit the signal to be mapped across the sky to any desired resolution. We also derive the pulsar timing overlap reduction functions for the various non-GR polarisations, finding analytic forms for anisotropic backgrounds with scalar-transverse ("breathing") and vector-longitudinal polarisations, and a semianalytic form for scalar-longitudinal backgrounds. Our results indicate that pulsar timing observations will be completely insensitive to scalar-transverse mode anisotropies in the polarisation amplitude beyond dipole, and anisotropies in the power beyond quadrupole. Analogous to our previous findings that pulsar timing observations lack sensitivity to tensor-curl modes for a transverse-traceless tensor background, we also find insensitivity to vector-curl modes for a vector-longitudinal background.

  5. A public code for general relativistic, polarised radiative transfer around spinning black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason

    2016-10-01

    Ray tracing radiative transfer is a powerful method for comparing theoretical models of black hole accretion flows and jets with observations. We present a public code, GRTRANS, for carrying out such calculations in the Kerr metric, including the full treatment of polarised radiative transfer and parallel transport along geodesics. The code is written in FORTRAN 90 and efficiently parallelises with OPENMP, and the full code and several components have PYTHON interfaces. We describe several tests which are used for verifiying the code, and we compare the results for polarised thin accretion disc and semi-analytic jet problems with those from the literature as examples of its use. Along the way, we provide accurate fitting functions for polarised synchrotron emission and transfer coefficients from thermal and power-law distribution functions, and compare results from numerical integration and quadrature solutions of the polarised radiative transfer equations. We also show that all transfer coefficients can play an important role in predicted images and polarisation maps of the Galactic centre black hole, Sgr A*, at submillimetre wavelengths.

  6. Nucleon polarisabilities from Compton scattering off the one- and few-nucleon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießhammer, Harald W.

    2005-07-01

    These proceedings sketch how combining recent theoretical advances with data from the new generation of high-precision Compton scattering experiments on both the proton and few-nucleon systems offers fresh, detailed insight into the Physics of the nucleon polarisabilities. A multipole-analysis is presented to simplify their interpretation. Predictions from Chiral Effective Field Theory with special emphasis on the spin-polarisabilities can serve as a guideline for doubly-polarised experiments below 300 MeV. The strong energy-dependence of the scalar magnetic dipole-polarisability β turns out to be crucial to understanding the proton and deuteron data. Finally, a high-accuracy determination of the proton and neutron polarisabilities shows that they are identical within error-bars. For details and a better list of references, consult Refs. [H.W. Grießhammer, T.R. Hemmert, Phys. Rev. C 65 (2002) 045207, nucl-th/0110006; R.P. Hildebrandt, H.W. Grießhammer, T.R. Hemmert, B. Pasquini, Eur. Phys. J. A 20 (2004) 293, nucl-th/0307070; R.P. Hildebrandt, H.W. Grießhammer, T.R. Hemmert, Eur. Phys. J. A 20 (2004) 329, nucl-th/0308054; R.P. Hildebrandt, H.W. Grießhammer, T.R. Hemmert, D.R. Phillips, Eur. Phys. J. A, nucl-th/0405077 (in press)].

  7. Formation of a Polarised Primitive Endoderm Layer in Embryoid Bodies Requires Fgfr/Erk Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Doughton, Gail; Wei, Jun; Tapon, Nicolas; Welham, Melanie J.; Chalmers, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    The primitive endoderm arises from the inner cell mass during mammalian pre-implantation development. It faces the blastocoel cavity and later gives rise to the extraembryonic parietal and visceral endoderm. Here, we investigate a key step in primitive endoderm development, the acquisition of apico-basolateral polarity and epithelial characteristics by the non-epithelial inner cell mass cells. Embryoid bodies, formed from mouse embryonic stem cells, were used as a model to study this transition. The outer cells of these embryoid bodies were found to gradually acquire the hallmarks of polarised epithelial cells and express markers of primitive endoderm cell fate. Fgf receptor/Erk signalling is known to be required for specification of the primitive endoderm, but its role in polarisation of this tissue is less well understood. To investigate the function of this pathway in the primitive endoderm, embryoid bodies were cultured in the presence of a small molecule inhibitor of Mek. This inhibitor caused a loss of expression of markers of primitive endoderm cell fate and maintenance of the pluripotency marker Nanog. In addition, a mislocalisation of apico-basolateral markers and disruption of the epithelial barrier, which normally blocks free diffusion across the epithelial cell layer, occurred. Two inhibitors of the Fgf receptor elicited similar phenotypes, suggesting that Fgf receptor signalling promotes Erk-mediated polarisation. This data shows that primitive endoderm cells of the outer layer of embryoid bodies gradually polarise, and formation of a polarised primitive endoderm layer requires the Fgf receptor/Erk signalling pathway. PMID:24752320

  8. Live Imaging of the Ependymal Cilia in the Lateral Ventricles of the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Al Omran, Alzahra J; Saternos, Hannah C; Liu, Tongyu; Nauli, Surya M; AbouAlaiwi, Wissam A

    2015-01-01

    Multiciliated ependymal cells line the ventricles in the adult brain. Abnormal function or structure of ependymal cilia is associated with various neurological deficits. The current ex vivo live imaging of motile ependymal cilia technique allows for a detailed study of ciliary dynamics following several steps. These steps include: mice euthanasia with carbon dioxide according to protocols of The University of Toledo's Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); craniectomy followed by brain removal and sagittal brain dissection with a vibratome or sharp blade to obtain very thin sections through the brain lateral ventricles, where the ependymal cilia can be visualized. Incubation of the brain's slices in a customized glass-bottom plate containing Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM)/High-Glucose at 37 °C in the presence of 95%/5% O2/CO2 mixture is essential to keep the tissue alive during the experiment. A video of the cilia beating is then recorded using a high-resolution differential interference contrast microscope. The video is then analyzed frame by frame to calculate the ciliary beating frequency. This allows distinct classification of the ependymal cells into three categories or types based on their ciliary beating frequency and angle. Furthermore, this technique allows the use of high-speed fluorescence imaging analysis to characterize the unique intracellular calcium oscillation properties of ependymal cells as well as the effect of pharmacological agents on the calcium oscillations and the ciliary beating frequency. In addition, this technique is suitable for immunofluorescence imaging for ciliary structure and ciliary protein localization studies. This is particularly important in disease diagnosis and phenotype studies. The main limitation of the technique is attributed to the decrease in live motile cilia movement as the brain tissue starts to die. PMID:26067390

  9. Mechanisms of cilia-driven transport in the airways in the absence of mucus.

    PubMed

    Bermbach, Saskia; Weinhold, Karina; Roeder, Thomas; Petersen, Frank; Kugler, Christian; Goldmann, Torsten; Rupp, Jan; König, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Airway mucus is thought to be required for the clearance of inhaled particles by mucociliary transport, but this view has recently been challenged. To test if mucus is necessary for cilia-driven particle transport, we removed mucus from murine and human ex vivo airway preparations by thorough rinsing with buffer with or without additional dithiothreitol washing. The transport of particles with diameters of 4.5 μm, 200 nm, and 40 nm and of bacteria was analyzed by video microscopy. Complete removal of mucus was verified by wheat germ agglutinin staining and by scanning electron microscopy. In the absence of mucus, we observed efficient transport of particles and bacteria by direct cilia-mediated propulsion or via fluid flow generated by ciliary beating. Virus-sized particles had the tendency to attach to cilia. Because direct contact of particles with ciliated cells occurs in the absence of mucus, we examined if this direct interaction changes epithelial function. Neither bacteria- nor LPS-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in ciliated cells occurred, indicating that mere contact between ciliated cells and bacteria during transport does not activate the epithelium. Attachment of virus-sized particles to cilia could induce mucus release and/or increase the ciliary beat frequency. Our results indicate that cilia-driven transport of particles with various sizes is possible in murine and human airways without the presence of mucus. If mucus-free transport fails, the epithelium can react by releasing mucus or increasing the ciliary beat frequency to maintain particle transport.

  10. Msd1/SSX2IP-dependent microtubule anchorage ensures spindle orientation and primary cilia formation.

    PubMed

    Hori, Akiko; Ikebe, Chiho; Tada, Masazumi; Toda, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    Anchoring microtubules to the centrosome is critical for cell geometry and polarity, yet the molecular mechanism remains unknown. Here we show that the conserved human Msd1/SSX2IP is required for microtubule anchoring. hMsd1/SSX2IP is delivered to the centrosome in a centriolar satellite-dependent manner and binds the microtubule-nucleator γ-tubulin complex. hMsd1/SSX2IP depletion leads to disorganised interphase microtubules and misoriented mitotic spindles with reduced length and intensity. Furthermore, hMsd1/SSX2IP is essential for ciliogenesis, and during zebrafish embryogenesis, knockdown of its orthologue results in ciliary defects and disturbs left-right asymmetry. We propose that the Msd1 family comprises conserved microtubule-anchoring proteins.

  11. Analysis of the H + D2 reaction mechanism through consideration of the intrinsic reactant polarisation.

    PubMed

    Aldegunde, J; Alvariño, J M; Kendrick, B K; Sáez Rábanos, V; de Miranda, M P; Aoiz, F J

    2006-11-14

    The effect of reactant polarisation on the dynamics of the title reaction at collision energies up to 1.6 eV is analysed in depth. The analysis takes advantage of two novel theoretical concepts: intrinsic reaction properties and stereodynamical portraits. Exact quantum methods are used to determine the polarisation moments that quantify the intrinsic reactant polarisation at various levels of detail, including or not product state and/or scattering angle resolution. The data is then examined with the aid of stereodynamical portraits, which facilitate the rationalisation of the stereochemical effects that are relevant for the reaction dynamics. This allows for detailed characterisations of the so-called direct and delayed reaction mechanisms.

  12. Fabrication-tolerant integrated polarisation splitter based on cascaded Mach–Zehnder interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A Yu; Gol'tsov, A Yu

    2013-12-31

    We report a fabrication-tolerant polarisation splitter based on cascaded Mach – Zehnder interferometers. This configuration enables a factor of 2 – 3 increase (at the 20 dB level) in the tolerance to the phase difference in comparison with a single interferometer. As an example, we present numerical simulation of a splitter with a centre wavelength of 650 nm, based on a planar waveguide from Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The permissible channel waveguide width deviation from calculation results (20-dB extinction coefficient bandwidth) is ∼8% (∼30 nm) for the TE polarisation and ∼30% (100 nm) for the TM polarisation. (fiber and integrated optics)

  13. Structure of hydrogenous liquids: separation of coherent and incoherent cross sections using polarised neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stunault, A.; Vial, S.; Pusztai, L.; Cuello, G. J.; Temleitner, L.

    2016-04-01

    The determination of the coherent structure factor of hydrogenous liquids is very difficult: while X-rays are barely sensitive to hydrogen, neutrons results still lack accuracy due to the contamination of the scattering intensities by a huge spin-incoherent signal from the 1H atoms. Using polarised neutrons with polarisation analysis, one can experimentally separate the coherent and incoherent contributions to the scattered intensity. We present the upgrade of the D3 polarised hot neutron diffractometer at ILL to study hydrogenated liquids. We show first data obtained from a test sample of water and detail the data reduction leading to an unprecedented accuracy in the extraction of the coherent signal, representative of the structure.

  14. Modelling the circular polarisation of Earth-like exoplanets: constraints on detecting homochirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogenboom, Michael; Stam, Daphne; Rossi, Loic; Snik, Frans

    2016-04-01

    The circular polarisation of light is a property of electromagnetic radiation from which extensive information can be extracted. It is oft-neglected due to its small signal relative to linear polarisation and the need for advanced instrumentation in measuring it. Additionally, numerical modelling is complex as the full Stokes vector must always be computed. Circular polarisation is commonly induced through the multiple scattering of light by aerosols te{hansen} and multiple reflections of light by rough surfaces te{circplanets}. Most interestingly, distinctive spectral circular polarimetric behaviour is exhibited by light reflected by organisms due to the homochiral molecular structure of all known organisms te{chiralbailey}. Especially fascinating is the unique circular polarimetric behaviour of light reflected by photosynthesising organisms at the absorption wavelength of the chlorophyll pigment te{circpolchar}. This presents the previously unexplored possibility of circular polarimetry as a method for identifying and characterising the presence of organisms, a method which could be applied in the hunt for extraterrestrial life. To date, few telescopes exist that measure circular polarisation and none that have been deployed in space. Observations of the circular polarisation reflected by other planets in the solar system have been made with ground-based telescopes, with significant results te{circplanets}. However, none of these observations have been made at the phase angles at which exoplanets will be observed. Also, none have been made of the Earth, which is the logical starting point for the study of biologically induced circular polarisation signals. This introduces the need for numerical modelling to determine the extent to which circular polarisation is present in light reflected by exoplanets or the Earth. In this study, we model the multiple scattering and reflection of light using the doubling-adding method te{dehaan}. We will present circular

  15. Modelling the circular polarisation of Earth-like exoplanets: constraints on detecting homochirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogenboom, Michael; Stam, Daphne; Rossi, Loic; Snik, Frans

    2016-04-01

    The circular polarisation of light is a property of electromagnetic radiation from which extensive information can be extracted. It is oft-neglected due to its small signal relative to linear polarisation and the need for advanced instrumentation in measuring it. Additionally, numerical modelling is complex as the full Stokes vector must always be computed. Circular polarisation is commonly induced through the multiple scattering of light by aerosols te{hansen} and multiple reflections of light by rough surfaces te{circplanets}. Most interestingly, distinctive spectral circular polarimetric behaviour is exhibited by light reflected by organisms due to the homochiral molecular structure of all known organisms te{chiralbailey}. Especially fascinating is the unique circular polarimetric behaviour of light reflected by photosynthesising organisms at the absorption wavelength of the chlorophyll pigment te{circpolchar}. This presents the previously unexplored possibility of circular polarimetry as a method for identifying and characterising the presence of organisms, a method which could be applied in the hunt for extraterrestrial life. To date, few telescopes exist that measure circular polarisation and none that have been deployed in space. Observations of the circular polarisation reflected by other planets in the solar system have been made with ground-based telescopes, with significant results te{circplanets}. However, none of these observations have been made at the phase angles at which exoplanets will be observed. Also, none have been made of the Earth, which is the logical starting point for the study of biologically induced circular polarisation signals. This introduces the need for numerical modelling to determine the extent to which circular polarisation is present in light reflected by exoplanets or the Earth. In this study, we model the multiple scattering and reflection of light using the doubling-adding method te{dehaan}. We will present circular

  16. Polarisation of the auroral red line in the Earth's upper atmosphere: a review (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, H.; Barthelemy, M.; Lilensten, J.; Bommier, V.; Simon Wedlund, C.

    2013-12-01

    Polarisation of light is a key observable to provide information about asymmetry or anisotropy within a radiative source. Polarimetry of auroral emission lines in the Earth's upper atmosphere has been overlooked for decades. However, the bright red auroral line (6300Å) produced by collisional impact with electrons precipitating along magnetic field lines is a good candidate to search for polarisation. This problem was investigated recently with observations obtained by Lilensten et al (2008), Barthélemy et al (2011) and Lilensten et al (2013) with a photopolarimeter. Analysis of the data indicates that the red auroral emission line is polarised at a level of a few percent. The results are compared to theoretical predictions of Bommier et al (2011) that were obtained for a collimated beam. The comparison suggests the existence of depolarization processes whose origin will be discussed. A new dedicated spectropolarimeter currently under development will also be presented. This instrument will cover the optical spectrum from approximately 400 to 700 nm providing simultaneously the polarisation of the red line and of other interesting auroral emission lines such as N2+ 1NG (4278Å), other N2 bands, etc... The importance of these polarisation measurements in the context of upper atmosphere modelling and geomagnetic activity will be discussed. Lilensten, J. et al, Polarization in aurorae: A new dimension for space environments studies, Geophys. Res. Lett., 26, 269, 2008 Barthélemy M. et al, Polarisation in the auroral red line during coordinated EISCAT Svalbard Radar/optical experiments, Annales Geophysicae, Volume 29, Issue 6, 2011, 1101-1112, 2011. Bommier V. et al, The Theoretical Impact Polarization of the O I 6300 Å Red Line of Earth Auroræ, Annales Geophysicae, Volume 29, Issue 1, 2011, 71-79, 2011 Lilensten, J. et al, The thermospheric auroral red line polarization: confirmation of detection and first quantitative analysis, Journal of Space Weather and Space

  17. Instrumental polarisation at the Nasmyth focus of the E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Juan Ovelar, M.; Snik, F.; Keller, C. U.; Venema, L.

    2014-02-01

    The ~39-m European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) will be the largest telescope ever built. This makes it particularly suitable for sensitive polarimetric observations, as polarimetry is a photon-starved technique. However, the telescope mirrors may severely limit the polarimetric accuracy of instruments on the Nasmyth platforms by creating instrumental polarisation and/or modifying the polarisation signal of the object. In this paper we characterise the polarisation effects of the two currently considered designs for the E-ELT Nasmyth ports as well as the effect of ageing of the mirrors. By means of the Mueller matrix formalism, we compute the response matrices of each mirror arrangement for a range of zenith angles and wavelengths. We then present two techniques to correct for these effects that require the addition of a modulating device at the "polarisation-free" intermediate focus that acts either as a switch or as a part of a two-stage modulator. We find that the values of instrumental polarisation, Stokes transmission reduction and cross-talk vary significantly with wavelength, and with pointing, for the lateral Nasmyth case, often exceeding the accuracy requirements for proposed polarimetric instruments. Realistic ageing effects of the mirrors after perfect calibration of these effects may cause polarimetric errors beyond the requirements. We show that the modulation approach with a polarimetric element located in the intermediate focus reduces the instrumental polarisation effects down to tolerable values, or even removes them altogether. The E-ELT will be suitable for sensitive and accurate polarimetry, provided frequent calibrations are carried out, or a dedicated polarimetric element is installed at the intermediate focus.

  18. A model for distortions of polarisation-angle curves in radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyks, J.; Serylak, M.; Osłowski, S.; Saha, L.; Guillemot, L.; Cognard, I.; Rudak, B.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Some radio pulsar profiles (in particular those of millisecond pulsars) contain wide emission structures which cover large intervals of pulse phase. Local distortions of an average curve of polarisation angle (PA) can be identified in such profiles, and they are often found to be associated with absorption features or narrow emission components. Aims: The features may be interpreted as a convolution of a lateral profile of an emitter with a microscopic radiation pattern of a non-negligible angular extent. Methods: We study a model which assumes that such an extended microbeam of the X-mode curvature radiation is spreading the radiation polarised at a fixed position angle within an interval of pulse phase. Results: The model is capable of interpreting the strongly dissimilar polarisation of double notches in PSR B1821-24A (for which we present new polarisation data from the Nançay Radio Telescope) and PSR J0437-4715. It also explains a step-like change in PA observed at the bifurcated trailing component in the profile of J0437-4715. A generic form of the modelled PA distortion is a zigzag-shaped wiggle, which in the presence of the second polarisation mode (O-mode) can be magnified or transformed into a W- or U-shaped deflection of a total net PA. Conclusions: The model's efficiency in interpreting dissimilar polarisation effects provides further credence to the stream-based (fan-beam) geometry of pulsar emission. It also suggests that the microbeam width may not always be assumed negligible in comparison with the angular scale of emissivity gradients in the emission region.

  19. Polarised infrared and Raman studies of YCa 4O(BO 3) 3 a non-linear optical single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnakumar, V.; Nagalakshmi, R.

    2004-10-01

    YCa 4O(BO 3) 3-(YCOB) is a non-linear optical (NLO) material grown by Czochralski technique. Polarised IR, ATR-IR, polarised Raman and optical transmission spectral measurements were made. A series of absorption bands have been observed with intensities depending on the functional groups of the crystals. The observed bands were assigned and discussed.

  20. Active polarisation control of a quantum cascade laser using tuneable birefringence in waveguides.

    PubMed

    Dhirhe, D; Slight, T J; Holmes, B M; Ironside, C N

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the design, modelling, fabrication and characterisation of an integrated tuneable birefringent waveguide for quantum cascade lasers. We have fabricated quantum cascade lasers operating at wavelengths around 4450 nm that include polarisation mode converters and a differential phase shift section. We employed below laser threshold electroluminescence to investigate the single pass operation of the integrated device. We use a theory based on the electro-optic properties of birefringence in quantum cascade laser waveguides combined with a Jones matrix based description to gain an understanding of the electroluminescence results. With the quantum cascade lasers operating above threshold we demonstrated polarisation control of the output.

  1. Polarisation splitting of laser beams by large angles with minimal reflection losses

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, B L

    2006-05-31

    New crystal anisotropic prisms for splitting orthogonally polarised components of laser radiation by large angles with minimal reflection losses caused by the Brewster refraction and total internal reflection of polarised waves from the crystal-air interface are considered and the method for their calculation is described. It is shown that, by assembling glue-free combinations of two or three prisms, thermally stable beamsplitters can be fabricated, which are free from the beam astigmatism and the wave dispersion of the output angles of the beams. The parameters and properties of new beamsplitters are presented in a convenient form in figures and tables. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Magneto-optical trap formed by elliptically polarised light waves for Mg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, O. N.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Goncharov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a magneto-optical trap (MOT) formed by elliptically polarised waves for 24Mg atoms on a closed optical 3P2 → 3D3 (λ = 383.8 nm) transition in the ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration of the field. Compared with a known MOT formed by circularly polarised waves (σ+ - σ- configuration), the suggested configuration of the trap formed by fields of ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration allows deeper sub-Doppler cooling of trapped 24Mg atoms, which cannot be implemented in a conventional trap formed by fields of σ+ - σ- configuration.

  3. Paramecium BBS genes are key to presence of channels in Cilia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Changes in genes coding for ciliary proteins contribute to complex human syndromes called ciliopathies, such as Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS). We used the model organism Paramecium to focus on ciliary ion channels that affect the beat form and sensory function of motile cilia and evaluate the effects of perturbing BBS proteins on these channels. Methods We used immunoprecipitations and mass spectrometry to explore whether Paramecium proteins interact as in mammalian cells. We used RNA interference (RNAi) and swimming behavior assays to examine the effects of BBS depletion on ciliary ion channels that control ciliary beating. Combining RNA interference and epitope tagging, we examined the effects of BBS depletion of BBS 7, 8 and 9 on the location of three channels and a chemoreceptor in cilia. Results We found 10 orthologs of 8 BBS genes in P. tetraurelia. BBS1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 9 co-immunoprecipitate. While RNAi reduction of BBS 7 and 9 gene products caused loss and shortening of cilia, RNAi for all BBS genes except BBS2 affected patterns of ciliary motility that are governed by ciliary ion channels. Swimming behavior assays pointed to loss of ciliary K+ channel function. Combining RNAi and epitope tagged ciliary proteins we demonstrated that a calcium activated K+ channel was no longer located in the cilia upon depletion of BBS 7, 8 or 9, consistent with the cells’ swimming behavior. The TRPP channel PKD2 was also lost from the cilia. In contrast, the ciliary voltage gated calcium channel was unaffected by BBS depletion, consistent with behavioral assays. The ciliary location of a chemoreceptor for folate was similarly unperturbed by the depletion of BBS 7, 8 or 9. Conclusions The co-immunoprecipitation of BBS 1,2,4,5,7,8, and 9 suggests a complex of BBS proteins. RNAi for BBS 7, 8 or 9 gene products causes the selective loss of K+ and PKD2 channels from the cilia while the critical voltage gated calcium channel and a peripheral receptor protein remain

  4. Computational models of the primary cilium and endothelial mechanotransmission.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yi Chung; Cooling, Michael T; Long, David S

    2015-06-01

    In endothelial cells (ECs), the mechanotransduction of fluid shear stress is partially dependent on the transmission of force from the fluid into the cell (mechanotransmission). The role of the primary cilium in EC mechanotransmission is not yet known. To motivate a framework towards quantifying cilia contribution to EC mechanotransmission, we have reviewed mechanical models of both (1) the primary cilium (three-dimensional and lower-dimensional) and (2) whole ECs (finite element, non-finite element, and tensegrity). Both the primary cilia and whole EC models typically incorporate fluid-induced wall shear stress and spatial geometry based on experimentally acquired images of cells. This paper presents future modelling directions as well as the major goals towards integrating primary cilium models into a multi-component EC mechanical model. Finally, we outline how an integrated cilium-EC model can be used to better understand mechanotransduction in the endothelium. PMID:25366114

  5. The Primary Cilium as a Novel Extracellular Sensor in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Hoey, David A.; Chen, Julia C.; Jacobs, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanically induced adaptation of bone is required to maintain a healthy skeleton and defects in this process can lead to dramatic changes in bone mass, resulting in bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Therefore, understanding how this process occurs could yield novel therapeutics to treat diseases of excessive bone loss or formation. Over the past decade the primary cilium has emerged as a novel extracellular sensor in bone, being required to transduce changes in the extracellular mechanical environment into biochemical responses regulating bone adaptation. In this review, we introduce the primary cilium as a novel extracellular sensor in bone; discuss the in vitro and in vivo findings of primary cilia based sensing in bone; explore the role of the primary cilium in regulating stem cell osteogenic fate commitment and finish with future directions of research and possible development of cilia targeting therapeutics to treat bone diseases. PMID:22707948

  6. A continuous roll-pulling approach for the fabrication of magnetic artificial cilia with microfluidic pumping capability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; den Toonder, Jaap; Cardinaels, Ruth; Anderson, Patrick

    2016-06-21

    Magnetic artificial cilia are micro-hairs covering a surface that can be actuated using a time-dependent magnetic field to pump or mix fluids in microfluidic devices. This paper presents a novel fabrication method to realize magnetic artificial cilia using a roll-pulling process, in which a cylinder decorated with micro-pillars rolls over a liquid precursor film that contains magnetic particles at a speed up to 1 m s(-1), while a magnetic field is applied. Due to the interaction between the pillars and the liquid film, micro-hairs are pulled out of the film. In this way, surfaces with slender cone-shaped magnetic artificial cilia were produced. When integrated in a closed-loop channel, the artificial cilia were shown to be capable of generating substantial microfluidic pumping using external magnetic actuation. The spatial arrangement of the cilia can be varied by altering the layout of the micro-pillars on the roll surface. In addition, the final geometry of the individual cilia depends on the rheological properties of the precursor material in combination with the processing parameters of the roll-pulling process. A rheological study and fabrication tests were carried out for a range of precursor material compositions to obtain insight into the relation between precursor rheology and processing conditions on the one hand, and cilia geometry on the other hand. The development of this cleanroom-free, high speed and potentially large area method of production of artificial cilia is another step towards their implementation in real-life applications. PMID:27210071

  7. A continuous roll-pulling approach for the fabrication of magnetic artificial cilia with microfluidic pumping capability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; den Toonder, Jaap; Cardinaels, Ruth; Anderson, Patrick

    2016-06-21

    Magnetic artificial cilia are micro-hairs covering a surface that can be actuated using a time-dependent magnetic field to pump or mix fluids in microfluidic devices. This paper presents a novel fabrication method to realize magnetic artificial cilia using a roll-pulling process, in which a cylinder decorated with micro-pillars rolls over a liquid precursor film that contains magnetic particles at a speed up to 1 m s(-1), while a magnetic field is applied. Due to the interaction between the pillars and the liquid film, micro-hairs are pulled out of the film. In this way, surfaces with slender cone-shaped magnetic artificial cilia were produced. When integrated in a closed-loop channel, the artificial cilia were shown to be capable of generating substantial microfluidic pumping using external magnetic actuation. The spatial arrangement of the cilia can be varied by altering the layout of the micro-pillars on the roll surface. In addition, the final geometry of the individual cilia depends on the rheological properties of the precursor material in combination with the processing parameters of the roll-pulling process. A rheological study and fabrication tests were carried out for a range of precursor material compositions to obtain insight into the relation between precursor rheology and processing conditions on the one hand, and cilia geometry on the other hand. The development of this cleanroom-free, high speed and potentially large area method of production of artificial cilia is another step towards their implementation in real-life applications.

  8. Chemical-Free Technique to Study the Ultrastructure of Primary Cilium

    PubMed Central

    Mohieldin, Ashraf M.; AbouAlaiwi, Wissam A.; Gao, Min; Nauli, Surya M.

    2015-01-01

    A primary cilium is a hair-like structure with a width of approximately 200 nm. Over the past few decades, the main challenge in the study of the ultrastructure of cilia has been the high sensitivity of cilia to chemical fixation, which is required for many imaging techniques. In this report, we demonstrate a combined high-pressure freezing (HPF) and freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FFTEM) technique to examine the ultrastructure of a cilium. Our objective is to develop an optimal high-resolution imaging approach that preserves cilia structures in their best natural form without alteration of cilia morphology by chemical fixation interference. Our results showed that a cilium has a swelling-like structure (termed bulb), which was previously considered a fixation artifact. The intramembrane particles observed via HPF/FFTEM indicated the presence of integral membrane proteins and soluble matrix proteins along the ciliary bulb, which is part of an integral structure within the ciliary membrane. We propose that HPF/FFTEM is an important and more suitable chemical-free method to study the ultrastructure of primary cilia. PMID:26521680

  9. CCDC103 mutations cause primary ciliary dyskinesia by disrupting assembly of ciliary dynein arms

    PubMed Central

    Panizzi, Jennifer R.; Becker-Heck, Anita; Castleman, Victoria H.; Al-Mutairi, Dalal; Liu, Yan; Loges, Niki T.; Pathak, Narendra; Austin-Tse, Christina; Sheridan, Eamonn; Schmidts, Miriam; Olbrich, Heike; Werner, Claudius; Häffner, Karsten; Hellman, Nathan; Chodhari, Rahul; Gupta, Amar; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht; Olale, Felix; Burdine, Rebecca D.; Schier, Alexander F.; O’Callaghan, Christopher; Chung, Eddie MK; Reinhardt, Richard; Mitchison, Hannah M.; King, Stephen M.; Omran, Heymut; Drummond, Iain A.

    2012-01-01

    Cilia are essential for fertilization, respiratory clearance, cerebrospinal fluid circulation, and to establish laterality1. Cilia motility defects cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, MIM 242650), a disorder affecting 1:15-30,000 births. Cilia motility requires the assembly of multisubunit dynein arms that drive cilia bending2. Despite progress in understanding the genetic basis of PCD, mutations remain to be identified for several PCD linked loci3. Here we show that the zebrafish cilia paralysis mutant schmalhanstn222 (smh) mutant encodes the coiled-coil domain containing 103 protein (Ccdc103), a foxj1a regulated gene. Screening 146 unrelated PCD families identified patients in six families with reduced outer dynein arms, carrying mutations in CCDC103. Dynein arm assembly in smh mutant zebrafish was rescued by wild-type but not mutant human CCDC103. Chlamydomonas Ccdc103 functions as a tightly bound, axoneme-associated protein. The results identify Ccdc103 as a novel dynein arm attachment factor that when mutated causes Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. PMID:22581229

  10. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrodental dysostosis are caused by cilia-mediated diminished response to hedgehog ligands.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Goodship, Judith A

    2009-11-15

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC; OMIM 225500) is a recessive disorder comprising chondrodysplasia, polydactyly, nail dysplasia, orofacial abnormalities and, in a proportion of patients, cardiovascular malformations. Weyers acrodental dysostosis (Weyers; OMIM 193530) is an allelic dominant disorder comprising polydactyly, nail dysplasia, and orofacial abnormalities. EvC results from loss-of-function mutations in EVC or EVC2, the phenotype associated with the mutations in these two genes being indistinguishable. Three convincing causative mutations have been identified in patients with Weyers acrodental dysostosis, which are clustered in the last coding exon of EVC2 and lead to production of a truncated protein lacking the final 43 amino acids. Localization and function of EVC and EVC2 are inferred from studying the murine orthologs. Both Evc and Evc2 proteins localize to the basal bodies of primary cilia and analysis of an Ellis-van Creveld mouse model, which includes the limb shortening and tooth abnormalities of EvC patients, has demonstrated Hedgehog signaling defects in the absence of Evc. The loss of Evc2 has not been studied directly, but Hedgehog signaling is impaired when a mutant murine Evc2 Weyer variant is expressed in vitro. We conclude that the phenotypic abnormalities in EvC and Weyers syndrome result from tissue specific disruption of the response to Hh ligands.

  11. The sense of smell, its signalling pathways, and the dichotomy of cilia and microvilli in olfactory sensory cells

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Smell is often regarded as an ancillary perception in primates, who seem so dominated by their sense of vision. In this paper, we will portray some aspects of the significance of olfaction to human life and speculate on what evolutionary factors contribute to keeping it alive. We then outline the functional architecture of olfactory sensory neurons and their signal transduction pathways, which are the primary detectors that render olfactory perception possible. Throughout the phylogenetic tree, olfactory neurons, at their apical tip, are either decorated with cilia or with microvilli. The significance of this dichotomy is unknown. It is generally assumed that mammalian olfactory neurons are of the ciliary type only. The existance of so-called olfactory microvillar cells in mammals, however, is well documented, but their nature remains unclear and their function orphaned. This paper discusses the possibility, that in the main olfactory epithelium of mammals ciliated and microvillar sensory cells exist concurrently. We review evidence related to this hypothesis and ask, what function olfactory microvillar cells might have and what signalling mechanisms they use. PMID:17903277

  12. Collective motion of motile cilia: from human airways to model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuta, Pietro; Feriani, Luigi; Chioccioli, Maurizio; Kotar, Jurij

    Mammalian airways are a fantastic playground of nonlinear phenomena, from the function of individual active filaments, to the emerging collective behaviour, to the rheology of the mucus solution surrounding cilia. We have been investigating the fundamental physics of this system through a variety of model system approaches, both experimental and computational. In the last year we have started measurements on living human cells, observing cilia shape during beating, and measuring speed and coherence of the collective dynamics. We report on significant differences in the collective motion in ciliated cell carpets from a variety of diseases, and we attempt to reconcile the collective dynamical phenotypes to the properties of individual filaments and the mechanics of the environment.

  13. A molecular ruler determines the repeat length in eukaryotic cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Oda, Toshiyuki; Yanagisawa, Haruaki; Kamiya, Ritsu; Kikkawa, Masahide

    2014-11-14

    Existence of cellular structures with specific size raises a fundamental question in biology: How do cells measure length? One conceptual answer to this question is by a molecular ruler, but examples of such rulers in eukaryotes are lacking. In this work, we identified a molecular ruler in eukaryotic cilia and flagella. Using cryo-electron tomography, we found that FAP59 and FAP172 form a 96-nanometer (nm)-long complex in Chlamydomonas flagella and that the absence of the complex disrupted 96-nm repeats of axonemes. Furthermore, lengthening of the FAP59/172 complex by domain duplication resulted in extension of the repeats up to 128 nm, as well as duplication of specific axonemal components. Thus, the FAP59/172 complex is the molecular ruler that determines the 96-nm repeat length and arrangements of components in cilia and flagella.

  14. Katanin p80 Regulates Human Cortical Development by Limiting Centriole and Cilia Number

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wen F.; Pomp, Oz; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Kodani, Andrew; Henke, Katrin; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H.; Yu, Timothy W.; Woodworth, Mollie B.; Bonnard, Carine; Raj, Grace Selva; Tan, Thong Teck; Hamamy, Hanan; Masri, Amira; Shboul, Mohammad; Al Saffar, Muna; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Al-Dosari, Mohammed; Alazami, Anas; Alowain, Mohammed; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Reiter, Jeremy F.; Harris, Matthew P.; Reversade, Bruno; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Katanin is a microtubule-severing complex whose catalytic activities are well characterized, but whose in vivo functions are incompletely understood. Human mutations in KATNB1, which encodes the noncatalytic regulatory p80 subunit of katanin, cause severe microlissencephaly. Loss of Katnb1 in mice confirms essential roles in neurogenesis and cell survival, while loss of zebrafish katnb1 reveals specific roles for katnin p80 in early and late developmental stages. Surprisingly, Katnb1 null mutant mouse embryos display hallmarks of aberrant Sonic hedgehog signaling, including holoprosencephaly. KATNB1-deficient human cells show defective proliferation and spindle structure, while Katnb1 null fibroblasts also demonstrate a remarkable excess of centrioles, with supernumerary cilia but deficient Hedgehog signaling. Our results reveal unexpected functions for KATNB1 in regulating overall centriole, mother centriole, and cilia number, and as an essential gene for normal Hedgehog signaling during neocortical development. PMID:25521379

  15. Katanin p80 regulates human cortical development by limiting centriole and cilia number.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen F; Pomp, Oz; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Kodani, Andrew; Henke, Katrin; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H; Yu, Timothy W; Woodworth, Mollie B; Bonnard, Carine; Raj, Grace Selva; Tan, Thong Teck; Hamamy, Hanan; Masri, Amira; Shboul, Mohammad; Al Saffar, Muna; Partlow, Jennifer N; Al-Dosari, Mohammed; Alazami, Anas; Alowain, Mohammed; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Reiter, Jeremy F; Harris, Matthew P; Reversade, Bruno; Walsh, Christopher A

    2014-12-17

    Katanin is a microtubule-severing complex whose catalytic activities are well characterized, but whose in vivo functions are incompletely understood. Human mutations in KATNB1, which encodes the noncatalytic regulatory p80 subunit of katanin, cause severe microlissencephaly. Loss of Katnb1 in mice confirms essential roles in neurogenesis and cell survival, while loss of zebrafish katnb1 reveals specific roles for katnin p80 in early and late developmental stages. Surprisingly, Katnb1 null mutant mouse embryos display hallmarks of aberrant Sonic hedgehog signaling, including holoprosencephaly. KATNB1-deficient human cells show defective proliferation and spindle structure, while Katnb1 null fibroblasts also demonstrate a remarkable excess of centrioles, with supernumerary cilia but deficient Hedgehog signaling. Our results reveal unexpected functions for KATNB1 in regulating overall centriole, mother centriole, and cilia number, and as an essential gene for normal Hedgehog signaling during neocortical development.

  16. Polarisation Analysis Neutron Spectrometer, POLANO, at J-PARC - Concept and Magnetic Field Optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohoyama, K.; Yokoo, T.; Itoh, S.; Nanbu, M.; Iwasa, K.; Ohkawara, M.; Kaneko, N.; Ino, T.; Hayashida, H.; Oku, T.; Kira, H.; Tasaki, S.; Takeda, M.; Kimura, H.; Sato, T. J.

    2016-04-01

    The status of the polarised neutron spectrometer constructed at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex through a collaboration between Tohoku University and KEK will be reported. In particular, the optimisation of magnetic fields to minimise neutron- beam depolarisation using the finite element method will be discussed on the basis of several simulations using the finite element method.

  17. Intra-well relaxation process in magnetic fluids subjected to strong polarising fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, C. N.; Fannin, P. C.; Mălăescu, I.; Barvinschi, P.; Ercuţa, A.

    2012-02-01

    We report on the frequency and field dependent complex magnetic susceptibility measurements of a kerosene-based magnetic fluid with iron oxide nanoparticles, stabilized with oleic acid, in the frequency range 0.1-6 GHz and over the polarising field range of 0-168.4 kA/m. By increasing polarising field, H, a subsidiary loss-peak clearly occurs in the vicinity of the ferromagnetic resonance peak, from which it remains distinct even in strong polarising fields of 168.4 kA/m. This is in contrast to other reported cases in which the intra-well relaxation process is manifested only as a shoulder of the resonance peak, which vanishes in polarising fields larger than that of 100 kA/m. The results of the XRD analysis connected to the anisotropy field results confirm that the investigated sample contains particles of magnetite and of the tetragonal phase of maghemite. Taking into account the characteristics of our sample, the theoretical analysis revealed that the intra-well relaxation process of the small particles of the tetragonal phase of maghemite may be responsible for the subsidiary loss peak of the investigated magnetic fluid.

  18. The history of polarisation measurements: their role in studies of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, R.

    2015-03-01

    Radio astronomy gave us new methods to study magnetic fields. Synchrotron radiation, the main cause of comic radio waves, is highly linearly polarised with the `E' vector normal to the magnetic field. The Faraday Effect rotates the `E' vector in thermal regions by the magnetic field in the line of sight. Also the radio Zeeman Effect has been observed.

  19. The intrinsic B-mode polarisation of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    SciTech Connect

    Fidler, Christian; Pettinari, Guido W.; Crittenden, Robert; Koyama, Kazuya; Wands, David; Beneke, Martin E-mail: Guido.Pettinari@sussex.ac.uk E-mail: Kazuya.Koyama@port.ac.uk

    2014-07-01

    We estimate the B-polarisation induced in the Cosmic Microwave Background by the non-linear evolution of density perturbations. Using the second-order Boltzmann code SONG, our analysis incorporates, for the first time, all physical effects at recombination. We also include novel contributions from the redshift part of the Boltzmann equation and from the bolometric definition of the temperature in the presence of polarisation. The remaining line-of-sight terms (lensing and time-delay) have previously been studied and must be calculated non-perturbatively. The intrinsic B-mode polarisation is present independent of the initial conditions and might contaminate the signal from primordial gravitational waves. We find this contamination to be comparable to a primordial tensor-to-scalar ratio of r ≅ 10{sup −7} at the angular scale ℓ ≅ 100, where the primordial signal peaks, and r ≅ 5 × 10{sup −5} at ℓ ≅ 700, where the intrinsic signal peaks. Therefore, we conclude that the intrinsic B-polarisation from second-order effects is not likely to contaminate future searches of primordial gravitational waves.

  20. Discrimination of water, ice and aerosols by light polarisation in the CLOUD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichman, L.; Fuchs, C.; Järvinen, E.; Ignatius, K.; Höppel, N. F.; Dias, A.; Heinritzi, M.; Simon, M.; Tröstl, J.; Wagner, A. C.; Wagner, R.; Williamson, C.; Yan, C.; Bianchi, F.; Connolly, P. J.; Dorsey, J. R.; Duplissy, J.; Ehrhart, S.; Frege, C.; Gordon, H.; Hoyle, C. R.; Kristensen, T. B.; Steiner, G.; Donahue, N. M.; Flagan, R.; Gallagher, M. W.; Kirkby, J.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Stratmann, F.; Tomé, A.

    2015-11-01

    Cloud microphysical processes involving the ice phase in tropospheric clouds are among the major uncertainties in cloud formation, weather and General Circulation Models (GCMs). The simultaneous detection of aerosol particles, liquid droplets, and ice crystals, especially in the small cloud-particle size range below 50 μm, remains challenging in mixed phase, often unstable ice-water phase environments. The Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarisation (CASPOL) is an airborne instrument that has the ability to detect such small cloud particles and measure their effects on the backscatter polarisation state. Here we operate the versatile Cosmics-Leaving-OUtdoor-Droplets (CLOUD) chamber facility at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) to produce controlled mixed phase and other clouds by adiabatic expansions in an ultraclean environment, and use the CASPOL to discriminate between different aerosols, water and ice particles. In this paper, optical property measurements of mixed phase clouds and viscous Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) are presented. We report observations of significant liquid - viscous SOA particle polarisation transitions under dry conditions using CASPOL. Cluster analysis techniques were subsequently used to classify different types of particles according to their polarisation ratios during phase transition. A classification map is presented for water droplets, organic aerosol (e.g., SOA and oxalic acid), crystalline substances such as ammonium sulphate, and volcanic ash. Finally, we discuss the benefits and limitations of this classification approach for atmospherically relevant concentration and mixtures with respect to the CLOUD 8-9 campaigns and its potential contribution to Tropical Troposphere Layer (TTL) analysis.

  1. Reconstruction of the primordial power spectrum using temperature and polarisation data from multiple experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, Gavin; Contaldi, Carlo R. E-mail: c.contaldi@imperial.ac.uk

    2009-07-01

    We develop a method to reconstruct the primordial power spectrum, P(k), using both temperature and polarisation data from the joint analysis of a number of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) observations. The method is an extension of the Richardson-Lucy algorithm, first applied in this context by Shafieloo and Souradeep [1]. We show how the inclusion of polarisation measurements can decrease the uncertainty in the reconstructed power spectrum. In particular, the polarisation data can constrain oscillations in the spectrum more effectively than total intensity only measurements. We apply the estimator to a compilation of current CMB results. The reconstructed spectrum is consistent with the best-fit power spectrum although we find evidence for a 'dip' in the power on scales k ≈ 0.002 Mpc{sup −1}. This feature appears to be associated with the WMAP power in the region 18 ≤ l ≤ 26 which is consistently below best-fit models. We also forecast the reconstruction for a simulated, Planck-like [2] survey including sample variance limited polarisation data.

  2. Occurrence of autoantibodies to cilia in lambs with a 'coughing syndrome'.

    PubMed

    Niang, M; Rosenbusch, R F; Andrews, J J; Lopez-Virella, J; Kaeberle, M L

    1998-07-31

    A respiratory disease of lambs that has been termed the 'coughing syndrome' has been observed in the mid-western region of the United States of America. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) and Mycoplasma arginini (M. arginini) were routinely isolated from the respiratory tract of lambs with this disease. A high level of antibodies reactive with ovine cilia of the upper respiratory tract was detected in the sera from many of the lambs in affected flocks but not in sera of lambs from unaffected flocks. The reactivity of these antibodies with cilia was demonstrated by ELISA and confirmed by indirect immunofluorescent staining and western immunoblotting. These antibodies were predominantly of the IgG isotype. They were distinct from cold or warm agglutinins and could be absorbed from the sera with cilia but not with antigens of common bacterial pathogens of the sheep respiratory tract including M. ovipneumoniae, M. arginini, Pasteurella haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida or Neisseria ovis. In addition, their occurrence appeared to be independent of the specific antibodies to M. ovipneumoniae and M. arginini. Western immunoblotting indicated that the antibodies were directed primarily against an antigen with apparent molecular weight of 50 kDa. In one flock from which serial serum samples were collected from the same lambs over a 10-month period, antibodies to ovine cilia developed before the onset of the clinical disease and persisted for a period of several months until most of the lambs had apparently recovered. However, colonization of the respiratory tract of the lambs by M. ovipneumoniae preceded the production of these antibodies. Sequential serum samples taken from another flock, with no known history of this coughing, showed no such antibodies throughout the sampling period. It is suggested that an immunopathologic mechanism involving production of autoantibodies directed against a ciliary antigen of the lambs could be a contributing factor to the

  3. An electro-optic monitor of the behavior of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cilia.

    PubMed

    Josef, Keith; Saranak, Jureepan; Foster, Kenneth W

    2005-06-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii steers through water with a pair of cilia (eukaryotic flagella). Long-term observation of the beating of its cilia with controlled stimulation is improving our understanding of how a cell responds to sensory inputs. Here we describe how to record ciliary motion continuously for long periods. We also report experiments on the network of intracellular signaling that connects the environment inputs with response outputs. Local spatial changes in ciliary response on the time scale of the underlying biochemical dynamics are observed. Near-infrared light monitors the cells held by a micropipette. This condition is tolerated well for hours, not interfering with ciliary beating or sensory transduction. A computer integrates the light stimulation of the eye of Chlamydomonas with the ciliary motion making possible long-term correlations. Measures of ciliary responses include the beating frequency, stroke velocity, and stroke duration of each cilium, and the relative phase of the cis and trans cilia. The stationarity and dependence of the system on light intensity was investigated. About 150,000,000 total beat cycles and up to 8 h on one cell have been recorded. Each beat cycle is resolved so that each asynchronous beat is detected. Responses extend only a few hundred milliseconds, but there is a persistence of momentary changes that last much longer. Interestingly, we see a response that is linear with absolute light intensity as well as different kinds of response that are clearly nonlinear, implying two signaling pathways from the cell body to the cilia.

  4. Global genetic analysis in mice unveils central role for cilia in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Li, You; Klena, Nikolai T; Gabriel, George C; Liu, Xiaoqin; Kim, Andrew J; Lemke, Kristi; Chen, Yu; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Devine, William; Damerla, Rama Rao; Chang, Chienfu; Yagi, Hisato; San Agustin, Jovenal T; Thahir, Mohamed; Anderton, Shane; Lawhead, Caroline; Vescovi, Anita; Pratt, Herbert; Morgan, Judy; Haynes, Leslie; Smith, Cynthia L; Eppig, Janan T; Reinholdt, Laura; Francis, Richard; Leatherbury, Linda; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K; Tobita, Kimimasa; Pazour, Gregory J; Lo, Cecilia W

    2015-05-28

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent birth defect, affecting nearly 1% of live births; the incidence of CHD is up to tenfold higher in human fetuses. A genetic contribution is strongly suggested by the association of CHD with chromosome abnormalities and high recurrence risk. Here we report findings from a recessive forward genetic screen in fetal mice, showing that cilia and cilia-transduced cell signalling have important roles in the pathogenesis of CHD. The cilium is an evolutionarily conserved organelle projecting from the cell surface with essential roles in diverse cellular processes. Using echocardiography, we ultrasound scanned 87,355 chemically mutagenized C57BL/6J fetal mice and recovered 218 CHD mouse models. Whole-exome sequencing identified 91 recessive CHD mutations in 61 genes. This included 34 cilia-related genes, 16 genes involved in cilia-transduced cell signalling, and 10 genes regulating vesicular trafficking, a pathway important for ciliogenesis and cell signalling. Surprisingly, many CHD genes encoded interacting proteins, suggesting that an interactome protein network may provide a larger genomic context for CHD pathogenesis. These findings provide novel insights into the potential Mendelian genetic contribution to CHD in the fetal population, a segment of the human population not well studied. We note that the pathways identified show overlap with CHD candidate genes recovered in CHD patients, suggesting that they may have relevance to the more complex genetics of CHD overall. These CHD mouse models and >8,000 incidental mutations have been sperm archived, creating a rich public resource for human disease modelling. PMID:25807483

  5. An electro-optic monitor of the behavior of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cilia.

    PubMed

    Josef, Keith; Saranak, Jureepan; Foster, Kenneth W

    2005-06-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii steers through water with a pair of cilia (eukaryotic flagella). Long-term observation of the beating of its cilia with controlled stimulation is improving our understanding of how a cell responds to sensory inputs. Here we describe how to record ciliary motion continuously for long periods. We also report experiments on the network of intracellular signaling that connects the environment inputs with response outputs. Local spatial changes in ciliary response on the time scale of the underlying biochemical dynamics are observed. Near-infrared light monitors the cells held by a micropipette. This condition is tolerated well for hours, not interfering with ciliary beating or sensory transduction. A computer integrates the light stimulation of the eye of Chlamydomonas with the ciliary motion making possible long-term correlations. Measures of ciliary responses include the beating frequency, stroke velocity, and stroke duration of each cilium, and the relative phase of the cis and trans cilia. The stationarity and dependence of the system on light intensity was investigated. About 150,000,000 total beat cycles and up to 8 h on one cell have been recorded. Each beat cycle is resolved so that each asynchronous beat is detected. Responses extend only a few hundred milliseconds, but there is a persistence of momentary changes that last much longer. Interestingly, we see a response that is linear with absolute light intensity as well as different kinds of response that are clearly nonlinear, implying two signaling pathways from the cell body to the cilia. PMID:15838839

  6. Global genetic analysis in mice unveils central role for cilia in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Li, You; Klena, Nikolai T; Gabriel, George C; Liu, Xiaoqin; Kim, Andrew J; Lemke, Kristi; Chen, Yu; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Devine, William; Damerla, Rama Rao; Chang, Chienfu; Yagi, Hisato; San Agustin, Jovenal T; Thahir, Mohamed; Anderton, Shane; Lawhead, Caroline; Vescovi, Anita; Pratt, Herbert; Morgan, Judy; Haynes, Leslie; Smith, Cynthia L; Eppig, Janan T; Reinholdt, Laura; Francis, Richard; Leatherbury, Linda; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K; Tobita, Kimimasa; Pazour, Gregory J; Lo, Cecilia W

    2015-05-28

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent birth defect, affecting nearly 1% of live births; the incidence of CHD is up to tenfold higher in human fetuses. A genetic contribution is strongly suggested by the association of CHD with chromosome abnormalities and high recurrence risk. Here we report findings from a recessive forward genetic screen in fetal mice, showing that cilia and cilia-transduced cell signalling have important roles in the pathogenesis of CHD. The cilium is an evolutionarily conserved organelle projecting from the cell surface with essential roles in diverse cellular processes. Using echocardiography, we ultrasound scanned 87,355 chemically mutagenized C57BL/6J fetal mice and recovered 218 CHD mouse models. Whole-exome sequencing identified 91 recessive CHD mutations in 61 genes. This included 34 cilia-related genes, 16 genes involved in cilia-transduced cell signalling, and 10 genes regulating vesicular trafficking, a pathway important for ciliogenesis and cell signalling. Surprisingly, many CHD genes encoded interacting proteins, suggesting that an interactome protein network may provide a larger genomic context for CHD pathogenesis. These findings provide novel insights into the potential Mendelian genetic contribution to CHD in the fetal population, a segment of the human population not well studied. We note that the pathways identified show overlap with CHD candidate genes recovered in CHD patients, suggesting that they may have relevance to the more complex genetics of CHD overall. These CHD mouse models and >8,000 incidental mutations have been sperm archived, creating a rich public resource for human disease modelling.

  7. Congenital Heart Disease Genetics Uncovers Context-Dependent Organization and Function of Nucleoporins at Cilia.

    PubMed

    Del Viso, Florencia; Huang, Fang; Myers, Jordan; Chalfant, Madeleine; Zhang, Yongdeng; Reza, Nooreen; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Lusk, C Patrick; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2016-09-12

    Human genomics is identifying candidate genes for congenital heart disease (CHD), but discovering the underlying mechanisms remains challenging. In a patient with CHD and heterotaxy (Htx), a disorder of left-right patterning, we previously identified a duplication in Nup188. However, a mechanism to explain how a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) could cause Htx/CHD was undefined. Here, we show that knockdown of Nup188 or its binding partner Nup93 leads to a loss of cilia during embryonic development while leaving NPC function largely intact. Many data, including the localization of endogenous Nup188/93 at cilia bases, support their direct role at cilia. Super-resolution imaging of Nup188 shows two barrel-like structures with dimensions and organization incompatible with an NPC-like ring, arguing against a proposed "ciliary pore complex." We suggest that the nanoscale organization and function of nucleoporins are context dependent in a way that is required for the structure of the heart. PMID:27593162

  8. The intraflagellar transport protein IFT80 is required for cilia formation and osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuying; Wang, Changdong

    2012-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins are essential for the assembly and maintenance of cilia, which play important roles in development and homeostasis. IFT80 is a newly defined IFT protein. Partial mutation of IFT80 in humans causes diseases such as Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) and short rib polydactyly (SRP) type III with abnormal skeletal development. However, the role and mechanism of IFT80 in osteogenesis is unknown. Here, we first detected IFT80 expression pattern and found that IFT80 was highly expressed in mouse long bone, skull, and during osteoblast differentiation. By using lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) technology to silence IFT80 in murine mesenchymal progenitor cell line-C3H10T1/2 and bone marrow derived stromal cells, we found that silencing IFT80 led to either shortening or loss of cilia and the decrease of Arl13b expression - a small GTPase that is localized in cilia. Additionally, silencing IFT80 blocked the expression of osteoblast markers and significantly inhibited ALP activity and cell mineralization. We further found that IFT80 silencing inhibited the expression of Gli2, a critical transcriptional factor in the hedgehog signaling pathway. Overexpression of Gli2 rescued the deficiency of osteoblast differentiation from IFT80-silenced cells, and dramatically promoted osteoblast differentiation. Moreover, introduction of Smo agonist (SAG) promotes osteoblast differentiation, which was partially inhibited by IFT80 silencing. Thus, these results suggested that IFT80 plays an important role in osteogenesis through regulating Hedgehog/Gli signal pathways. PMID:22771375

  9. WD60/FAP163 is a dynein intermediate chain required for retrograde intraflagellar transport in cilia.

    PubMed

    Patel-King, Ramila S; Gilberti, Renée M; Hom, Erik F Y; King, Stephen M

    2013-09-01

    Retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for assembly of cilia. We identify a Chlamydomonas flagellar protein (flagellar-associated protein 163 [FAP163]) as being closely related to the D1bIC(FAP133) intermediate chain (IC) of the dynein that powers this movement. Biochemical analysis revealed that FAP163 is present in the flagellar matrix and is actively trafficked by IFT. Furthermore, FAP163 copurified with D1bIC(FAP133) and the LC8 dynein light chain, indicating that it is an integral component of the retrograde IFT dynein. To assess the functional role of FAP163, we generated an RNA interference knockdown of the orthologous protein (WD60) in planaria. The Smed-wd60(RNAi) animals had a severe ciliary assembly defect that dramatically compromised whole-organism motility. Most cilia were present as short stubs that had accumulated large quantities of IFT particle-like material between the doublet microtubules and the membrane. The few remaining approximately full-length cilia had a chaotic beat with a frequency reduced from 24 to ∼10 Hz. Thus WD60/FAP163 is a dynein IC that is absolutely required for retrograde IFT and ciliary assembly.

  10. WD60/FAP163 is a dynein intermediate chain required for retrograde intraflagellar transport in cilia

    PubMed Central

    Patel-King, Ramila S.; Gilberti, Renée M.; Hom, Erik F. Y.; King, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for assembly of cilia. We identify a Chlamydomonas flagellar protein (flagellar-associated protein 163 [FAP163]) as being closely related to the D1bIC(FAP133) intermediate chain (IC) of the dynein that powers this movement. Biochemical analysis revealed that FAP163 is present in the flagellar matrix and is actively trafficked by IFT. Furthermore, FAP163 copurified with D1bIC(FAP133) and the LC8 dynein light chain, indicating that it is an integral component of the retrograde IFT dynein. To assess the functional role of FAP163, we generated an RNA interference knockdown of the orthologous protein (WD60) in planaria. The Smed-wd60(RNAi) animals had a severe ciliary assembly defect that dramatically compromised whole-organism motility. Most cilia were present as short stubs that had accumulated large quantities of IFT particle–like material between the doublet microtubules and the membrane. The few remaining approximately full-length cilia had a chaotic beat with a frequency reduced from 24 to ∼10 Hz. Thus WD60/FAP163 is a dynein IC that is absolutely required for retrograde IFT and ciliary assembly. PMID:23864713

  11. A Computational Model of Dynein Activation Patterns that Can Explain Nodal Cilia Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duanduan; Zhong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Normal left-right patterning in vertebrates depends on the rotational movement of nodal cilia. In order to produce this ciliary motion, the activity of axonemal dyneins must be tightly regulated in a temporal and spatial manner; the specific activation pattern of the dynein motors in the nodal cilia has not been reported. Contemporary imaging techniques cannot directly assess dynein activity in a living cilium. In this study, we establish a three-dimensional model to mimic the ciliary ultrastructure and assume that the activation of dynein proteins is related to the interdoublet distance. By employing finite-element analysis and grid deformation techniques, we simulate the mechanical function of dyneins by pairs of point loads, investigate the time-variant interdoublet distance, and simulate the dynein-triggered ciliary motion. The computational results indicate that, to produce the rotational movement of nodal cilia, the dynein activity is transferred clockwise (looking from the tip) between the nine doublet microtubules, and along each microtubule, the dynein activation should occur faster at the basal region and slower when it is close to the ciliary tip. Moreover, the time cost by all the dyneins along one microtubule to be activated can be used to deduce the dynein activation pattern; it implies that, as an alternative method, measuring this time can indirectly reveal the dynein activity. The proposed protein-structure model can simulate the ciliary motion triggered by various dynein activation patterns explicitly and may contribute to furthering the studies on axonemal dynein activity. PMID:26153700

  12. Congenital Heart Disease Genetics Uncovers Context-Dependent Organization and Function of Nucleoporins at Cilia.

    PubMed

    Del Viso, Florencia; Huang, Fang; Myers, Jordan; Chalfant, Madeleine; Zhang, Yongdeng; Reza, Nooreen; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Lusk, C Patrick; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2016-09-12

    Human genomics is identifying candidate genes for congenital heart disease (CHD), but discovering the underlying mechanisms remains challenging. In a patient with CHD and heterotaxy (Htx), a disorder of left-right patterning, we previously identified a duplication in Nup188. However, a mechanism to explain how a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) could cause Htx/CHD was undefined. Here, we show that knockdown of Nup188 or its binding partner Nup93 leads to a loss of cilia during embryonic development while leaving NPC function largely intact. Many data, including the localization of endogenous Nup188/93 at cilia bases, support their direct role at cilia. Super-resolution imaging of Nup188 shows two barrel-like structures with dimensions and organization incompatible with an NPC-like ring, arguing against a proposed "ciliary pore complex." We suggest that the nanoscale organization and function of nucleoporins are context dependent in a way that is required for the structure of the heart.

  13. A computational model of dynein activation patterns that can explain nodal cilia rotation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duanduan; Zhong, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Normal left-right patterning in vertebrates depends on the rotational movement of nodal cilia. In order to produce this ciliary motion, the activity of axonemal dyneins must be tightly regulated in a temporal and spatial manner; the specific activation pattern of the dynein motors in the nodal cilia has not been reported. Contemporary imaging techniques cannot directly assess dynein activity in a living cilium. In this study, we establish a three-dimensional model to mimic the ciliary ultrastructure and assume that the activation of dynein proteins is related to the interdoublet distance. By employing finite-element analysis and grid deformation techniques, we simulate the mechanical function of dyneins by pairs of point loads, investigate the time-variant interdoublet distance, and simulate the dynein-triggered ciliary motion. The computational results indicate that, to produce the rotational movement of nodal cilia, the dynein activity is transferred clockwise (looking from the tip) between the nine doublet microtubules, and along each microtubule, the dynein activation should occur faster at the basal region and slower when it is close to the ciliary tip. Moreover, the time cost by all the dyneins along one microtubule to be activated can be used to deduce the dynein activation pattern; it implies that, as an alternative method, measuring this time can indirectly reveal the dynein activity. The proposed protein-structure model can simulate the ciliary motion triggered by various dynein activation patterns explicitly and may contribute to furthering the studies on axonemal dynein activity.

  14. DNAH6 and Its Interactions with PCD Genes in Heterotaxy and Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Onuoha, Ezenwa Obi; Damerla, Rama Rao; Francis, Richard; Furutani, Yoshiyuki; Tariq, Muhammad; King, Stephen M.; Hendricks, Gregory; Cui, Cheng; Saydmohammed, Manush; Lee, Dong Min; Zahid, Maliha; Sami, Iman; Leatherbury, Linda; Pazour, Gregory J.; Ware, Stephanie M.; Nakanishi, Toshio; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Tsang, Michael; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2016-01-01

    Heterotaxy, a birth defect involving left-right patterning defects, and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), a sinopulmonary disease with dyskinetic/immotile cilia in the airway are seemingly disparate diseases. However, they have an overlapping genetic etiology involving mutations in cilia genes, a reflection of the common requirement for motile cilia in left-right patterning and airway clearance. While PCD is a monogenic recessive disorder, heterotaxy has a more complex, largely non-monogenic etiology. In this study, we show mutations in the novel dynein gene DNAH6 can cause heterotaxy and ciliary dysfunction similar to PCD. We provide the first evidence that trans-heterozygous interactions between DNAH6 and other PCD genes potentially can cause heterotaxy. DNAH6 was initially identified as a candidate heterotaxy/PCD gene by filtering exome-sequencing data from 25 heterotaxy patients stratified by whether they have airway motile cilia defects. dnah6 morpholino knockdown in zebrafish disrupted motile cilia in Kupffer’s vesicle required for left-right patterning and caused heterotaxy with abnormal cardiac/gut looping. Similarly DNAH6 shRNA knockdown disrupted motile cilia in human and mouse respiratory epithelia. Notably a heterotaxy patient harboring heterozygous DNAH6 mutation was identified to also carry a rare heterozygous PCD-causing DNAI1 mutation, suggesting a DNAH6/DNAI1 trans-heterozygous interaction. Furthermore, sequencing of 149 additional heterotaxy patients showed 5 of 6 patients with heterozygous DNAH6 mutations also had heterozygous mutations in DNAH5 or other PCD genes. We functionally assayed for DNAH6/DNAH5 and DNAH6/DNAI1 trans-heterozygous interactions using subthreshold double-morpholino knockdown in zebrafish and showed this caused heterotaxy. Similarly, subthreshold siRNA knockdown of Dnah6 in heterozygous Dnah5 or Dnai1 mutant mouse respiratory epithelia disrupted motile cilia function. Together, these findings support an oligogenic disease

  15. DNAH6 and Its Interactions with PCD Genes in Heterotaxy and Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Li, You; Yagi, Hisato; Onuoha, Ezenwa Obi; Damerla, Rama Rao; Francis, Richard; Furutani, Yoshiyuki; Tariq, Muhammad; King, Stephen M; Hendricks, Gregory; Cui, Cheng; Saydmohammed, Manush; Lee, Dong Min; Zahid, Maliha; Sami, Iman; Leatherbury, Linda; Pazour, Gregory J; Ware, Stephanie M; Nakanishi, Toshio; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Tsang, Michael; Lo, Cecilia W

    2016-02-01

    Heterotaxy, a birth defect involving left-right patterning defects, and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), a sinopulmonary disease with dyskinetic/immotile cilia in the airway are seemingly disparate diseases. However, they have an overlapping genetic etiology involving mutations in cilia genes, a reflection of the common requirement for motile cilia in left-right patterning and airway clearance. While PCD is a monogenic recessive disorder, heterotaxy has a more complex, largely non-monogenic etiology. In this study, we show mutations in the novel dynein gene DNAH6 can cause heterotaxy and ciliary dysfunction similar to PCD. We provide the first evidence that trans-heterozygous interactions between DNAH6 and other PCD genes potentially can cause heterotaxy. DNAH6 was initially identified as a candidate heterotaxy/PCD gene by filtering exome-sequencing data from 25 heterotaxy patients stratified by whether they have airway motile cilia defects. dnah6 morpholino knockdown in zebrafish disrupted motile cilia in Kupffer's vesicle required for left-right patterning and caused heterotaxy with abnormal cardiac/gut looping. Similarly DNAH6 shRNA knockdown disrupted motile cilia in human and mouse respiratory epithelia. Notably a heterotaxy patient harboring heterozygous DNAH6 mutation was identified to also carry a rare heterozygous PCD-causing DNAI1 mutation, suggesting a DNAH6/DNAI1 trans-heterozygous interaction. Furthermore, sequencing of 149 additional heterotaxy patients showed 5 of 6 patients with heterozygous DNAH6 mutations also had heterozygous mutations in DNAH5 or other PCD genes. We functionally assayed for DNAH6/DNAH5 and DNAH6/DNAI1 trans-heterozygous interactions using subthreshold double-morpholino knockdown in zebrafish and showed this caused heterotaxy. Similarly, subthreshold siRNA knockdown of Dnah6 in heterozygous Dnah5 or Dnai1 mutant mouse respiratory epithelia disrupted motile cilia function. Together, these findings support an oligogenic disease

  16. Dual-Polarised Doppler X-band Radar Observations of Mixed Phased Clouds from the UK's Ice in Clouds Experiment-Dust (ICE-D)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, R. R., III; Blyth, A. M.; Bennett, L.; Dufton, D.; Cui, Z.; Huang,