Science.gov

Sample records for polarization resolved measurements

  1. Depth-resolved measurements with elliptically polarized reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Maria J.; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    The ability of elliptical polarized reflectance spectroscopy (EPRS) to detect spectroscopic alterations in tissue mimicking phantoms and in biological tissue in situ is demonstrated. It is shown that there is a linear relationship between light penetration depth and ellipticity. This dependence is used to demonstrate the feasibility of a depth-resolved spectroscopic imaging using EPRS. The advantages and drawbacks of EPRS in evaluation of biological tissue are analyzed and discussed. PMID:27446712

  2. An imaging spectro-polarimeter for measuring hemispherical spectrally resolved down-welling sky polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenault, David B.; Pezzaniti, J. L.; Roche, Michael; Hyatt, Brian

    2016-05-01

    A full sky imaging spectro-polarimeter has been developed that measures spectrally resolved (~2.5 nm resolution) radiance and polarization (𝑠0, 𝑠1, 𝑠2 Stokes Elements) of natural sky down-welling over approximately 2π sr between 400nm and 1000nm. The sensor is based on a scanning push broom hyperspectral imager configured with a continuously rotating polarizer (sequential measurement in time polarimeter). Sensor control and processing software (based on Polaris Sensor Technologies Grave' camera control software) has a straight-forward and intuitive user interface that provides real-time updated sky down-welling spectral radiance/polarization maps and statistical analysis tools.

  3. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity.

    PubMed

    Levitt, James A; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ϵ , is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25<ϵ<40 in other lipid-rich regions. Our spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  4. Wavelength resolved polarized elastic scatter measurements from micron-sized single particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Czege, Jozsef; Eversole, Jay D.

    2013-05-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate correlations of polarimetric angular scattering patterns from individual aerosol particles with the particles' physical structure and composition. Such signature patterns may be able to provide particle classification capability, such as, for example, discrimination between man-made and naturally occurring aerosols. If successful, this effort could improve current detection methods for biological warfare (BW) agent aerosols. So far, we have demonstrated an experimental arrangement to measure polarization-state resolved, multi-angle, scattering intensities from single aerosol particles on-the-fly. Our novel approach is a radical departure from conventional polarimetric measurement methods, and a key factor is the use of a multiple-order retarder to prepare different polarization states, depending on the wavelength of the incident light. This novel experimental technique uses a supercontinuum light source, an array of optical fibers, an imaging spectrometer and an EMCCD camera to simultaneously acquire wavelength and angle dependent particle light scattering data as a two-dimensional snapshot. Mueller matrix elements were initially measured from individual particles held in an optical trap (at 405 nm). Since particles can be stably trapped for long periods (hours), we were able to change the optical configuration to acquire multiple Mueller matrix element measurements on a single particle. We have computationally modeled these measurements at specific angles, and the comparison with experimental measurements shows good agreement. Similar measurements have also been made on slowly falling particles, and our current efforts are focused on improving experimental technique sufficiently to make such measurements on flowing particles.

  5. Measuring the biphoton temporal wave function with polarization-dependent and time-resolved two-photon interference.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Shu, Chi; Guo, Xianxin; Loy, M M T; Du, Shengwang

    2015-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate an approach to measuring the biphoton temporal wave function with polarization-dependent and time-resolved two-photon interference. Through six sets of two-photon interference measurements projected onto different polarization subspaces, we can reconstruct the amplitude and phase functions of the biphoton temporal waveform. For the first time, we apply this technique to experimentally determine the temporal quantum states of the narrow-band biphotons generated from the spontaneous four-wave mixing in cold atoms.

  6. Theoretical, numerical and experimental study of geometrical parameters that affect anisotropy measurements in polarization-resolved SHG microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teulon, Claire; Gusachenko, Ivan; Latour, Gaël; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2015-04-01

    Polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (P-SHG) microscopy is an efficient imaging modality for in situ observation of biopolymers structure in tissues, providing information about their mean in-plane orientation and their molecular structure and 3D distribution. Nevertheless, P-SHG signal build-up in a strongly focused regime is not throroughly understood yet, preventing reliable and reproducible measurements. In this study, theoretical analysis, vectorial numerical simulations and experiments are performed to understand how geometrical parameters, such as excitation and collection numerical apertures and detection direction, affect P-SHG imaging in homogeneous collagen tissues. A good agreement is obtained in tendon and cornea, showing that detection geometry significantly affects the SHG anisotropy measurements, but not the measurements of collagen in-plane orientation. PMID:25968762

  7. Invivo depth-resolved birefringence measurements of the human retinal nerve fiber layer by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Cense, Barry; Chen, Teresa C; Park, B Hyle; Pierce, Mark C; de Boer, Johannes F

    2002-09-15

    To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of in vivo depth-resolved birefringence measurements of the human retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) by use of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). Because glaucoma causes nerve fiber layer damage, which may cause loss of retinal birefringence, PS-OCT is a potentially useful technique for the early detection of glaucoma. We built a fiber-based PS-OCT setup that produces quasi-real-time images of the human retina in vivo . Preliminary measurements of a healthy volunteer showed that the double-pass phase retardation per unit depth of the RNFL near the optic nerve head is 39+/-6( degrees )/100microm . PMID:18026517

  8. Structural changes in bacteriorhodopsin during the photocycle measured by time-resolved polarized Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, L; Ormos, P

    2001-12-01

    The structural changes in bacteriorhodopsin during the photocycle are investigated. Time resolved polarized infrared spectroscopy in combination with photoselection is used to determine the orientation and motion of certain structural units of the molecule: Asp-85, Asp-96, Asp-115, the Schiff base, and several amide I vibrations. The results are compared with recently published x-ray diffraction data with atomic resolution about conformational motions during the photocycle. The orientation of the measured vibrations are also calculated from the structure data, and based on the comparison of the values from the two techniques new information is obtained: several amide I bands in the infrared spectrum are assigned, and we can also identify the position of the proton in the protonated Asp residues.

  9. Polarization resolved angular optical scattering of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, B.; Pan, Y.; Wang, C.; Videen, G.; Cao, Hui

    2014-05-01

    Real-time detection and identification of bio-aerosol particles are crucial for the protection against chemical and biological agents. The strong elastic light scattering properties of airborne particles provides a natural means for rapid, non-invasive aerosol characterization. Recent theoretical predictions suggested that variations in the polarization dependent angular scattering cross section could provide an efficient means of classifying different airborne particles. In particular, the polarization dependent scattering cross section of aggregate particles is expected to depend on the shape of the primary particles. In order to experimentally validate this prediction, we built a high throughput, sampling system, capable of measuring the polarization resolved angular scattering cross section of individual aerosol particles flowing through an interrogating volume with a single shot of laser pulse. We calibrated the system by comparing the polarization dependent scattering cross section of individual polystyrene spheres with that predicted by Mie theory. We then used the system to study different particles types: Polystyrene aggregates composed 500 nm spheres and Bacillus subtilis (BG, Anthrax simulant) spores composed of elongated 500 nm × 1000 nm cylinder-line particles. We found that the polarization resolved scattering cross section depends on the shape of the constituent elements of the aggregates. This work indicates that the polarization resolved scattering cross section could be used for rapid discrimination between different bio-aerosol particles.

  10. Development of a polarization resolved spectroscopic diagnostic for measurements of the magnetic field in the Caltech coaxial magnetized plasma jet experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikama, Taiichi; Bellan, Paul M.

    2011-11-01

    Measurements of the magnetic field strength in current-carrying magnetically confined plasmas are necessary for understanding the underlying physics governing the dynamical behavior. Such a measurement would be particularly useful in the Caltech coaxial magnetized plasma gun, an experiment used for fundamental studies relevant to spheromak formation, astrophysical jet formation/propagation, solar coronal physics, and the general behavior of twisted magnetic flux tubes that intercept a boundary. In order to measure the field strength in the Caltech experiment, a non-perturbing spectroscopic method is being implemented to observe the Zeeman splitting in the emission spectra. The method is based on polarization-resolving spectroscopy of the Zeeman-split σ components, a technique previously used in both solar and laboratory plasmas. We have designed and constructed an optical system that can simultaneously detect left- and right-circularly polarized emission with both high throughput and small extinction ratio. The system will be used on the 489.5 nm NII line, chosen because of its simple Zeeman structure and minimal Stark broadening.

  11. Detection of a poorly resolved airplane using SWIR polarization imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Laura M.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Chenault, David B.

    2016-05-01

    Polarization can be used to detect manmade objects on the ground and in the air, as it provides additional information beyond intensity and color. Skylight can be strongly polarized, so the detection of airplanes in flight requires careful consideration of the skylight degree and angle of polarization (DoLP, AoP). In this study, we detect poorly resolved airplanes (>= 4 pixels on target) in flight during daytime partly cloudy and smoky conditions in Bozeman, Montana. We used a Polaris Sensor Technologies SWIR-MWIR rotating imaging polarimeter to measure the polarization signatures of airplanes and the surrounding skylight from 1.5 to 1.8 μm in the short-wave infrared (SWIR). An airplane flying in a clear region of partly cloudy sky was found to be 69% polarized at an elevation angle of 13° with respect to the horizon and the surrounding skylight was 4-8% polarized (maximum skylight DoLP was found to be 7-14% at an elevation angle of 50°). As the airplane increased in altitude, the DoLP for both airplane and surrounding sky pixels increased as the airplane neared the band of maximum sky polarization. We also observed that an airplane can be less polarized than its surrounding skylight when there is heavy smoke present. In such a case, the airplane was 30-38% polarized at an elevation angle of 17°, while the surrounding skylight was approximately 40% polarized (maximum skylight DoLP was 40-55% at an elevation angle of 34°). In both situations the airplane was most consistently observed in DoLP images rather than S0 or AoP images. In this paper, we describe the results in detail and discuss how this phenomenology could detect barely resolved aircrafts.

  12. Polarization-resolved imaging of an ensemble of waveguide modes.

    PubMed

    Schimpf, D N; Ramachandran, S

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate polarization-sensitive measurement of the modal content of waveguides by generalizing the classic rotating wave-plate-based polarimeter to wide-field optical low-coherence interferometry. The spatial phases of the modes are retrieved with principal component analysis. By applying this polarization-sensitive cross-correlation (C2) imaging technique to the characterization of a few-mode fiber, we reveal that different modes experience distinct bend-induced birefringence in optical fibers. This polarization-resolved C2 imaging is well suited for analyzing the impact of polarization on wave propagation in high-power fiber lasers as well as in mode-division-multiplexed communications systems. PMID:22859088

  13. Resolving polarized stellar features thanks to polarimetric interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousselet-Perraut, Karine; Chesneau, Olivier; Vakili, Farrokh; Mourard, Denis; Janel, Sebastien; Lavaud, Laurent; Crocherie, Axel

    2003-02-01

    Polarimetry is a powerful means for detecting and constraining various physical phenomena, such as scattering processes or magnetic fields, occuring in a large panel of stellar objects: extended atmospheres of hot stars, CP stars, Young Stellar Objects, Active Galaxy Nuclei, ... However, the lack of angular resolution is generally a strong handicap to drastically constrain the physical parameters and the geometry of the polarizing phenomena because of the cancelling of the polarized signal. In fact, even if stellar features are strongly polarized, the (spectro-)polarimetric signal integrated over the stellar surface rarely exceeds few percents. Coupling polarimetric and interferometric devices allows to resolve these local polarized structures and thus to constrain complex patchy stellar surfaces and/or environments such as disk topology in T Tauri stars, hot stars radiative winds or oscillations in Be star envelopes. In this article, we explain how interfero-polarimetric observables, basically the contrast and the position of the interference fringe patterns versus polarization (and even versus wavelength) are powerful to address the above scientific drivers and we emphasize on the key point of instrumental and data calibrations: since interferometric measurements are differential ones between 2 or more beams, this strongly relaxes the calibration requirements for the fringe phase observable. Prospects induced by the operation of the optical aperture synthesis arrays are also discussed.

  14. Time-resolved backscattering of circularly and linearly polarized light in a turbid medium.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiaohui; Alfano, R R

    2004-12-01

    Time-resolved backscattering profiles of circularly and linearly polarized light were measured from a turbid medium composed of small and large polystyrene sphere particles in water. It is shown that, based on the measurements of the time-resolved backscattered copolarized and cross-polarized components of the incident polarized light, either linearly or circularly polarized light can be used to effectively image an object that is deep inside a turbid medium composed of small particles, depending on the depolarization properties of the object itself. For large particles such as in tissue, fog, and clouds, the experimentally observed polarization memory effect on the backscattering temporal profiles suggests that a significant improvement in the image contrast can be achieved by use of circularly polarized light.

  15. Phase Resolved Cyclotron Spectroscopy of Polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dealaman, Shannon J.

    2010-01-01

    This research was conducted through the REU program at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory in La Serena, Chile. For this research we reduced and modeled phase-resolved cyclotron spectroscopy of four AM Her stars: MN Hya, HU Aqu, VV Pup, and QS Tel. Two of the four spectra show good cyclotron harmonics while the other two were taken during a high state with too much noise in the spectra. Using a Constant-Lambda code (Schwope et al., 1990) we modeled the two good spectra and further modeled the harmonic motion of HU Aqr. The models produced for MN Hya gave parameters with a magnetic field strength between 44 MG and 43.4 MG, a plasma temperature between 4.1 keV and 5.6 keV, a log Λ of 4.2 ± 0.3, and a viewing angle set between 83.0 degrees and 70.0 degrees and HU Aqr a magnetic field between 36.0 MG and 37.6 MG, a plasma temperature between 15.0 keV and 15.5 keV, a log Λ of 4.0 ± 0.3, and a viewing angle between 89.5 degrees and 70.5 degrees. This was the first attempt to model MN Hya with a constant lambda code and the first harmonic motion model of HU Aqr.

  16. Spin-Resolved Fermi Surface of the Localized Ferromagnetic Heusler Compound Cu₂MnAl Measured with Spin-Polarized Positron Annihilation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Josef A; Bauer, Andreas; Böni, Peter; Ceeh, Hubert; Dugdale, Stephen B; Ernsting, David; Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang; Leitner, Michael; Pfleiderer, Christian; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2015-11-13

    We determined the bulk electronic structure of the prototypical Heusler compound Cu(2)MnAl by measuring the angular correlation of annihilation radiation using spin-polarized positrons. To this end, a new algorithm for reconstructing 3D densities from projections is introduced that allows us to corroborate the excellent agreement between our electronic structure calculations and the experimental data. The contribution of each individual Fermi surface sheet to the magnetization was identified, and summed to a total spin magnetic moment of 3.6±0.5 μ(B)/f.u..

  17. Forward versus backward polarization-resolved SHG imaging of collagen structure in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teulon, Claire; Gusachenko, Ivan; Latour, Gaël.; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-03-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) is a powerful technique to observe fibrillar collagen without any staining and with a good contrast. More information about the molecular structure of collagen fibrils in tissues and their 3D distribution can be gained with polarization-resolved SHG imaging. Nevertheless, strong focusing is required for effective imaging and light propagation in tissues is complex and not thoroughly understood yet, preventing accurate and reproducible measurements. Theoretical analysis, vectorial numerical simulations and experiments were implemented to understand how the SHG signal builds up and how geometrical parameters affect polarization-resolved measurements in homogeneous collagen-rich tissues.

  18. Information Content Analysis for the Multi-Viewing, Multi-Channel, Multi-Polarization Imaging (3MI) Instrument : Toward Retrieval of Vertically Resolved Cloud Properties from Passive Only Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedi, J.; Merlin, G.; Labonnote, L.; Cornet, C.; Ferlay, N.; Desmons, M.; Dubuisson, P.; Parol, F.; Davis, A. B.; Marbach, T.

    2014-12-01

    efforts to obtain vertically resolved information on cloud properties from 3MI passive measurements only. In particular the synergy of multiangle polarization measurements at 443 and 865 nm with Oxygen A-band differential absorption information to retrieve cloud geometrical thickness will be discussed.

  19. Sensitivity of VIIRS Polarization Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    The design of an optical system typically involves a sensitivity analysis where the various lens parameters, such as lens spacing and curvatures, to name two parameters, are (slightly) varied to see what, if any, effect this has on the performance and to establish manufacturing tolerances. A sinular analysis was performed for the VIIRS instruments polarization measurements to see how real world departures from perfectly linearly polarized light entering VIIRS effects the polarization measurement. The methodology and a few of the results of this polarization sensitivity analysis are presented and applied to the construction of a single polarizer which will cover the VIIRS VIS/NIR spectral range. Keywords: VIIRS, polarization, ray, trace; polarizers, Bolder Vision, MOXTEK

  20. Nonselective and polarization effects in time-resolved optogalvanic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhechev, D.; Steflekova, V.

    2016-02-01

    Three interfering effects in optogalvanic (OG) spectroscopy are identified in a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) - OG detector. The laser beam is found to generate two nonselective processes, namely photoelectron emission (PE) from the cathode surface with a sub-breakdown bias applied, and nonresonant space ionization. The convolution of these galvanic contributions was determined experimentally as an instrumental function and a deconvolution procedure to determine the actual OG signal was developed. Specific plasma conductance is detected dependent on the polarization of the laser beam irradiating. Linearly/circularly polarized light beam is found to induce OG signals differ in amplitude (and their shape parameters in the time-resolved OG signals (TROGS)). The phenomena coherence and specific conductance are found to be in causal relationship. The additional conductance due to coherent states of atoms manifests itself as an intrinsic instrumental property of OG detector.

  1. In vivo multiphoton imaging of the cornea: polarization-resolved second harmonic generation from stromal collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latour, G.; Gusachenko, I.; Kowalczuk, L.; Lamarre, I.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy provides specific and contrasted images of unstained collagenous tissues such as tendons or corneas. Polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements have been implemented in a laserscanning multiphoton microscope. Distortion of the polarimetric response due to birefringence and diattenuation during propagation of the laser excitation has been shown in rat-tail tendons. A model has been developed to account for these effects and correct polarization-resolved SHG images in thick tissues. This new modality is then used in unstained human corneas to access two quantitative parameters: the fibrils orientation within the collagen lamellae and the ratio of the main second-order nonlinear tensorial components. Orientation maps obtained from polarization resolution of the trans-detected SHG images are in good agreement with the striated features observed in the raw images. Most importantly, polarization analysis of the epi-detected SHG images also enables to map the fibrils orientation within the collagen lamellae while epi-detected SHG images of corneal stroma are spatially homogenous and do not enable direct visualization of the fibrils orientation. Depth profiles of the polarimetric SHG response are also measured and compared to models accounting for orientation changes of the collagen lamellae within the focal volume. Finally, in vivo polarization-resolved SHG is performed in rat corneas and structural organization of corneal stroma is determined using epi-detected signals.

  2. Polar plot representation of time-resolved fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Eichorst, John Paul; Wen Teng, Kai; Clegg, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Measuring changes in a molecule's fluorescence emission is a common technique to study complex biological systems such as cells and tissues. Although the steady-state fluorescence intensity is frequently used, measuring the average amount of time that a molecule spends in the excited state (the fluorescence lifetime) reveals more detailed information about its local environment. The lifetime is measured in the time domain by detecting directly the decay of fluorescence following excitation by short pulse of light. The lifetime can also be measured in the frequency domain by recording the phase and amplitude of oscillation in the emitted fluorescence of the sample in response to repetitively modulated excitation light. In either the time or frequency domain, the analysis of data to extract lifetimes can be computationally intensive. For example, a variety of iterative fitting algorithms already exist to determine lifetimes from samples that contain multiple fluorescing species. However, recently a method of analysis referred to as the polar plot (or phasor plot) is a graphical tool that projects the time-dependent features of the sample's fluorescence in either the time or frequency domain into the Cartesian plane to characterize the sample's lifetime. The coordinate transformations of the polar plot require only the raw data, and hence, there are no uncertainties from extensive corrections or time-consuming fitting in this analysis. In this chapter, the history and mathematical background of the polar plot will be presented along with examples that highlight how it can be used in both cuvette-based and imaging applications.

  3. Linear Polarization Measurements of Chromospheric Emission Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Keller, C. U.

    2003-01-01

    We have used the Zurich Imaging Stokes Polarimeter (ZIMPOL I) with the McMath-Pierce 1.5 m main telescope on Kitt Peak to obtain linear polarization measurements of the off-limb chromosphere with a sensitivity better than 1 x 10(exp -5). We found that the off-disk observations require a combination of good seeing (to show the emission lines) and a clean heliostat (to avoid contamination by scattered light from the Sun's disk). When these conditions were met, we obtained the following principal results: 1. Sometimes self-reversed emission lines of neutral and singly ionized metals showed linear polarization caused by the transverse Zeeman effect or by instrumental cross talk from the longitudinal Zeeman effect in chromospheric magnetic fields. Otherwise, these lines tended to depolarize the scattered continuum radiation by amounts that ranged up to 0.2%. 2. Lines previously known to show scattering polarization just inside the limb (such as the Na I lambda5889 D2 and the He I lambda5876 D3 lines) showed even more polarization above the Sun's limb, with values approaching 0.7%. 3. The O I triplet at lambda7772, lambda7774, and lambda7775 showed a range of polarizations. The lambda7775 line, whose maximum intrinsic polarizability, P(sub max), is less than 1%, revealed mainly Zeeman contributions from chromospheric magnetic fields. However, the more sensitive lambda7772 (P(sub max) = 19%) and lambda7774 (P(sub max) = 29%) lines had relatively strong scattering polarizations of approximately 0.3% in addition to their Zeeman polarizations. At times of good seeing, the polarization spectra resolve into fine structures that seem to be chromospheric spicules.

  4. Numerical simulation of polarization-resolved second-harmonic microscopy in birefringent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusachenko, Ivan; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2013-11-01

    Polarization-resolved second-harmonic microscopy has recently emerged as a valuable technique for in situ imaging of collagen structure in tissues. Nevertheless, collagen-rich tissues such as tendon, ligament, skin dermis, bone, cornea, or artery exhibit a heterogeneous and anisotropic architecture that results in complex optical properties. While experimental evidence of polarization distortions has been reported in various tissues, the physics of second-harmonic imaging within such tissues is not fully understood yet. In this work, we performed numerical simulations of polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation in a strongly focused regime within a birefringent tissue. We show that vectorial components due to strong focusing have a rather small effect on the measurement of the second-harmonic tensorial response, while birefringence and optical dispersion may affect these measurements dramatically. We show indeed that a difference in the focal field distribution for ordinary and extraordinary waves results in different phase-matching conditions, which strongly affects the relative efficacy of second-harmonic generation for different polarizations. These results are of great interest for extracting reliable quantitative parameters from second-harmonic images.

  5. Analysis of cloud polarization measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J. E.; Coffeen, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The polarization of sunlight reflected by various cloud types was measured in the near-infrared with a polarimeter flown aboard the NASA Convair 990. The data reduction has been completed and detailed comparisons have been made between the observations and theoretical computations. The analysis presented shows that the polarization in the near-infrared can be used on a routine basis to reliably yield the cloud particle phase (water or ice) and the average particle size in the top part of water clouds (usually within + or - 25%). In some cases the polarization also yields the cloud optical thickness (or a lower limit) and a measure of the width of the particle size distribution in the top of the water clouds.

  6. Spatially resolved measurement of rock core porosity.

    PubMed

    Marica, F; Chen, Q; Hamilton, A; Hall, C; Al, T; Balcom, B J

    2006-01-01

    Density weighted, centric scan, Conical SPRITE MRI techniques are applied in the current work for local porosity measurements in fluid saturated porous media. The methodology is tested on a series of sandstone core samples. These samples vary in both porosity and degree of local heterogeneity due to bedding plane structure. The MRI porosity measurement is in good agreement with traditional gravimetric measurements of porosity. Spatially resolved porosity measurements reveal significant porosity variation in some samples. This novel MRI technique should have applications to the characterization of local porosity in a wide variety of porous media. PMID:16216540

  7. Spatially resolved measurement of rock core porosity.

    PubMed

    Marica, F; Chen, Q; Hamilton, A; Hall, C; Al, T; Balcom, B J

    2006-01-01

    Density weighted, centric scan, Conical SPRITE MRI techniques are applied in the current work for local porosity measurements in fluid saturated porous media. The methodology is tested on a series of sandstone core samples. These samples vary in both porosity and degree of local heterogeneity due to bedding plane structure. The MRI porosity measurement is in good agreement with traditional gravimetric measurements of porosity. Spatially resolved porosity measurements reveal significant porosity variation in some samples. This novel MRI technique should have applications to the characterization of local porosity in a wide variety of porous media.

  8. Synchrotron beam coherence: a spatially resolved measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, C. Q.; Peele, A. G.; Roberts, A.; Nugent, K. A.; Paterson, D.; McNulty, I.

    2005-01-01

    We report a precise and spatially resolved measurement of the complex degree of coherence of a one-dimensional 1.5-keV beam produced by a third-generation synchrotron source. The method of phase-space tomography is used, which requires only measurements of the x-ray intensity. We find that the field is statistically stationary to within experimental error, the correlations are very well approximated by a Gaussian distribution, and the measured coherence length is in excellent agreement with expectations.

  9. Measuring Gravitation Using Polarization Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    A proposed method of measuring gravitational acceleration would involve the application of polarization spectroscopy to an ultracold, vertically moving cloud of atoms (an atomic fountain). A related proposed method involving measurements of absorption of light pulses like those used in conventional atomic interferometry would yield an estimate of the number of atoms participating in the interferometric interaction. The basis of the first-mentioned proposed method is that the rotation of polarization of light is affected by the acceleration of atoms along the path of propagation of the light. The rotation of polarization is associated with a phase shift: When an atom moving in a laboratory reference interacts with an electromagnetic wave, the energy levels of the atom are Doppler-shifted, relative to where they would be if the atom were stationary. The Doppler shift gives rise to changes in the detuning of the light from the corresponding atomic transitions. This detuning, in turn, causes the electromagnetic wave to undergo a phase shift that can be measured by conventional means. One would infer the gravitational acceleration and/or the gradient of the gravitational acceleration from the phase measurements.

  10. Time-resolved fluorescence polarization spectroscopy of visible and near infrared dyes in picosecond dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) dyes absorb and emit light within the range from 700 to 900 nm have several benefits in biological studies for one- and/or two-photon excitation for deeper penetration of tissues. These molecules undergo vibrational and rotational motion in the relaxation of the excited electronic states, Due to the less than ideal anisotropy behavior of NIR dyes stemming from the fluorophores elongated structures and short fluorescence lifetime in picosecond range, no significant efforts have been made to recognize the theory of these dyes in time-resolved polarization dynamics. In this study, the depolarization of the fluorescence due to emission from rotational deactivation in solution will be measured with the excitation of a linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulse and a streak camera. The theory, experiment and application of the ultrafast fluorescence polarization dynamics and anisotropy are illustrated with examples of two of the most important medical based dyes. One is NIR dye, namely Indocyanine Green (ICG) and is compared with Fluorescein which is in visible range with much longer lifetime. A set of first-order linear differential equations was developed to model fluorescence polarization dynamics of NIR dye in picosecond range. Using this model, the important parameters of ultrafast polarization spectroscopy were identified: risetime, initial time, fluorescence lifetime, and rotation times.

  11. Design and parallel fabrication of wire-grid polarization arrays for polarization-resolved imaging at 1.55 microm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yaling; Klotzkin, David J

    2008-07-10

    Polarization-resolved imaging can provide information about the composition and topography of the environment that is invisible to the eye. We demonstrate a practical method to fabricate arrays of small, orthogonal wire-grid polarizers (WGPs) that can be matched to individual detector pixels, and we present design curves that relate the structure to the polarization extinction ratio obtained. The photonic area lithographically mapped (PALM) method uses multiple-exposure conventional and holographic lithography to create subwavelength patterns easily aligned to conventional mask features. WGPs with polarization extinction ratios of approximately 10 at a 1.55 microm wavelength were fabricated, and square centimeter areas of square micrometer size WGP arrays suitable for polarization-resolved imaging on glass were realized.

  12. Time Resolved Deposition Measurements in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; H. Kugel; A.L. Roquemore; J. Hogan; W.R. Wampler; the NSTX team

    2004-08-03

    Time-resolved measurements of deposition in current tokamaks are crucial to gain a predictive understanding of deposition with a view to mitigating tritium retention and deposition on diagnostic mirrors expected in next-step devices. Two quartz crystal microbalances have been installed on NSTX at a location 0.77m outside the last closed flux surface. This configuration mimics a typical diagnostic window or mirror. The deposits were analyzed ex-situ and found to be dominantly carbon, oxygen, and deuterium. A rear facing quartz crystal recorded deposition of lower sticking probability molecules at 10% of the rate of the front facing one. Time resolved measurements over a 4-week period with 497 discharges, recorded 29.2 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of deposition, however surprisingly, 15.9 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} of material loss occurred at 7 discharges. The net deposited mass of 13.3 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} matched the mass of 13.5 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} measured independently by ion beam analysis. Monte Carlo modeling suggests that transient processes are likely to dominate the deposition.

  13. Polar Dunes Resolved by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter Gridded Topography and Pulse Widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) polar data have been refined to the extent that many features poorly imaged by Viking Orbiters are now resolved in densely gridded altimetry. Individual linear polar dunes with spacings of 0.5 km or more can be seen as well as sparsely distributed and partially mantled dunes. The refined altimetry will enable measurements of the extent and possibly volume of the north polar ergs. MOLA pulse widths have been recalibrated using inflight data, and a robust algorithm applied to solve for the surface optical impulse response. It shows the surface root-mean-square (RMS) roughness at the 75-m-diameter MOLA footprint scale, together with a geological map. While the roughness is of vital interest for landing site safety studies, a variety of geomorphological studies may also be performed. Pulse widths corrected for regional slope clearly delineate the extent of the polar dunes. The MOLA PEDR profile data have now been re-released in their entirety (Version L). The final Mission Experiment Gridded Data Records (MEGDR's) are now provided at up to 128 pixels per degree globally. Densities as high as 512 pixels per degree are available in a polar stereographic projection. A large computational effort has been expended in improving the accuracy of the MOLA altimetry themselves, both in improved orbital modeling and in after-the-fact adjustment of tracks to improve their registration at crossovers. The current release adopts the IAU2000 rotation model and cartographic frame recommended by the Mars Cartography Working Group. Adoption of the current standard will allow registration of images and profiles globally with an uncertainty of less than 100 m. The MOLA detector is still operational and is currently collecting radiometric data at 1064 nm. Seasonal images of the reflectivity of the polar caps can be generated with a resolution of about 300 m per pixel.

  14. Time-resolved scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frömter, Robert; Kloodt, Fabian; Rößler, Stefan; Frauen, Axel; Staeck, Philipp; Cavicchia, Demetrio R.; Bocklage, Lars; Röbisch, Volker; Quandt, Eckhard; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of investigating periodically driven magnetization dynamics in a scanning electron microscope with polarization analysis based on spin-polarized low-energy electron diffraction. With the present setup, analyzing the time structure of the scattering events, we obtain a temporal resolution of 700 ps, which is demonstrated by means of imaging the field-driven 100 MHz gyration of the vortex in a soft-magnetic FeCoSiB square. Owing to the efficient intrinsic timing scheme, high-quality movies, giving two components of the magnetization simultaneously, can be recorded on the time scale of hours.

  15. Conversion of sunflower multiband radiometer polarization measurements to polarization parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biehl, Larry L.

    1995-01-01

    The data processing analysis and conversion of polarization measurements to polarization parameters from the Sunflower multiband radiometer is presented in this final report. Included is: (1) the actual data analysis; (2) the comparison of the averaging techniques and the percent polarization derived from the original and averaged I, Q, U parameters; (3) the polarizer angles used in conversion; (4) the Matlab files; (5) the relative ground size, field of view location, and view zenith angles, and (6) the summary of all the sky data for all dates.

  16. RESOLVE for Lunar Polar Ice/Volatile Characterization Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, G. B.; Larson, W. E.; Quinn, J. W.; Colaprete, A.; Picard, M.; Boucher, D.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since data from the neutron spectrometer instrument on the Lunar Prospector mission indicated the possibility of significant concentrations of hydrogen at the lunar poles, speculation on the form and concentration of the hydrogen has been debated. The recent impact of the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) along with thermal, topographic, neutron spectrometry, and radar frequency data obtained from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) have provided more information suggesting significant amounts of water/ice and other volatiles may be available in the top 1 to 2 meters of regolith at the lunar poles. The next step in understanding what resources are available at the lunar poles is to perform a mission to obtain ground truth. data. To meet this need, the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) along with the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) have been working on a prototype payload known as the Regolith & Environment Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction experiment, or RESOLVE.

  17. Real-time inversion of polarization gate frequency-resolved optical gating spectrograms.

    PubMed

    Kane, Daniel J; Weston, Jeremy; Chu, Kai-Chien J

    2003-02-20

    Frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) is a technique used to measure the intensity and phase of ultrashort laser pulses through the optical construction of a spectrogram of the pulse. To obtain quantitative information about the pulse from its spectrogram, an iterative two-dimensional phase retrieval algorithm must be used. Current algorithms are quite robust but retrieval of all the pulse information can be slow. Previous real-time FROG trace inversion work focused on second-harmonic-generation FROG, which has an ambiguity in the direction of time, and required digital signal processors (DSPs). We develop a simplified real-time FROG device based on a single-shot geometry that no longer requires DSPs. We use it and apply the principal component generalized projections algorithm to invert polarization gate FROG traces at rates as high as 20 Hz.

  18. TIME-RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF THE POLAR EU CANCRI IN THE OPEN CLUSTER MESSIER 67

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Kurtis A.; Howell, Steve B.; Bellini, Andrea; Rubin, Kate H. R.; Bolte, Michael E-mail: steve.b.howell@nasa.gov E-mail: psmith@as.arizona.edu E-mail: rubin@mpia.de

    2013-05-15

    We present time-resolved spectroscopic and polarimetric observations of the AM Her system EU Cnc. EU Cnc is located near the core of the old open cluster Messier 67; new proper motion measurements indicate that EU Cnc is indeed a member of the star cluster, and this system therefore is useful to constrain the formation and evolution of magnetic cataclysmic variables. The spectra exhibit two-component emission features with independent radial velocity variations as well as time-variable cyclotron emission indicating a magnetic field strength of 41 MG. The period of the radial velocity and cyclotron hump variations are consistent with the previously known photometric period, and the spectroscopic flux variations are consistent in amplitude with previous photometric amplitude measurements. The secondary star is also detected in the spectrum. We also present polarimetric imaging measurements of EU Cnc that show a clear detection of polarization, and the degree of polarization drops below our detection threshold at phases when the cyclotron emission features are fading or not evident. The combined data are all consistent with the interpretation that EU Cnc is a low-state polar in the cluster Messier 67. The mass function of the system gives an estimate of the accretor mass of M{sub WD} {>=} 0.68 M{sub Sun} with M{sub WD} Almost-Equal-To 0.83 M{sub Sun} for an average inclination. We are thus able to place a lower limit on the progenitor mass of the accreting white dwarf of {>=}1.43 M{sub Sun }.

  19. Prospecting for Polar Volatiles: Results from the Resolve Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, Richard C.; Colarprete, Anthony; Deans, Matthew C.; Heldman, Jennifer; Sanders, Gerald B.; Larson, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Both the Moon and Mercury evidently host ice and other volatile compounds in cold traps at the planets poles. Determining the form, spatial distribution, and abundance of these volatiles at the lunar poles can help us understand how and when they were delivered and emplaced. This bears directly on the delivery of water and prebiotic compounds to the inner planets over the solar system s history, and also informs plans for utilizing the volatiles as resources for sustained human exploration as well as the commercial development of space. Temperature models and orbital data suggest near-surface volatile concentrations may exist at polar locations not strictly in permanent shadow. Remote operation of a robotic lunar rover mission for the 7-10 days of available sunlight would permit key questions to be answered. But such a short, quick-tempo mission has unique challenges and requires a new concept of operations. Both science and rover operations decisionmaking must be done in real time, requiring immediate situational awareness, data analysis, and decision support tools.

  20. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of High Field Polars (FUSE 00)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The following work has been accomplished: 1) The emission lines of O VI1 and He II were used to produce Doppler tomograms of the plasma emission. 2) An improved interstellar absorption model is being developed for the CIAO spectral fitting program, Sherpa. Use of the earlier version of this model showed it to be inadequate for its purpose. Once this model is working, we intend to complete our analysis of V884 Her and those of other FUSE programs. In addition to the above work, this grant has helped support the following related work: 1) The publication of the paper "Periodicities in the X-ray intensity variations of TV Columbae: an Intermediate Polar" by Rana, V. R., Singh, K. P., Schlegel, E. M., & Barrett, P. 2004, AJ, 126,489, and 2) FUSE data of a possible nova-like variable Ret 1 has been analyzed and shown to contain a hot (37000 deg) white dwarf (WD 0334-6400). The FUV spectrum shows strong absorption lines of C III.

  1. First-order reversal curve probing of spatially resolved polarization switching dynamics in ferroelectric nanocapacitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunseok; Kumar, Amit; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Jesse, Stephen; Han, Hee; Pantel, Daniel; Vrejoiu, Ionela; Lee, Woo; Hesse, Dietrich; Alexe, Marin; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2012-01-24

    Spatially resolved polarization switching in ferroelectric nanocapacitors was studied on the sub-25 nm scale using the first-order reversal curve (FORC) method. The chosen capacitor geometry allows both high-veracity observation of the domain structure and mapping of polarization switching in a uniform field, synergistically combining microstructural observations and probing of uniform-field polarization responses as relevant to device operation. A classical Kolmogorov-Avrami-Ishibashi model has been adapted to the voltage domain, and the individual switching dynamics of the FORC response curves are well approximated by the adapted model. The comparison with microstructures suggests a strong spatial variability of the switching dynamics inside the nanocapacitors.

  2. Angle resolved scatter measurement of bulk scattering in transparent ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Saurabh; Miller, J. Keith; Shori, Ramesh K.; Goorsky, Mark S.

    2015-02-01

    Bulk scattering in polycrystalline laser materials (PLM), due to non-uniform refractive index across the bulk, is regarded as the primary loss mechanism leading to degradation of laser performance with higher threshold and lower output power. The need for characterization techniques towards identifying bulk scatter and assessing the quality. Assessment of optical quality and the identification of bulk scatter have been by simple visual inspection of thin samples of PLMs, thus making the measurements highly subjective and inaccurate. Angle Resolved Scatter (ARS) measurement allows for the spatial mapping of scattered light at all possible angles about a sample, mapping the intensity for both forward scatter and back-scatter regions. The cumulative scattered light intensity, in the forward scatter direction, away from the specular beam is used for the comparison of bulk scattering between samples. This technique employ the detection of scattered light at all angles away from the specular beam directions and represented as a 2-D polar map. The high sensitivity of the ARS technique allows us to compare bulk scattering in different PLM samples which otherwise had similar transmitted beam wavefront distortions.

  3. Superficial microcirculation flow measurement using polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiwei; Morgan, S. P.; Xiao, Yunshi

    2008-12-01

    Depth discrimination of polarized light is used in investigating laser Doppler measurement of the superficial microcirculation in tissue. Using polarization Monte Carlo simulation, temporal point spread function and power spectral distribution of backscattered polarization remaining light firstly are used to prove polarized light to be valid in measuring moving blood cell perfusion and mean flow velocity. Then simulation of layered medium model demonstrate that relationships between blood flow perfusion and mean frequency shift are linear to medium flowing velocity, and the Doppler shift information in polarization remaining light mainly comes from lower layer medium up to about 14 times of mean free path (MFP) of medium investigated and can be considered that Doppler effects come only from lower layer of the medium. Simulations in three-layer tissue model show that moving blood cell perfusion and mean blood cell moving velocity calculated from polarization remaining are much more sensitive to lower layer flow velocity variation, and more irrelevant to deeper layer flow rate fluctuations, that further confirms Doppler measurement from polarization remaining light to be effective for superficial microcirculation in tissue. Factors affecting Laser Doppler measurement like medium absorption, percentage of moving particles in blood detector size are discussed.

  4. Stokes vector based polarization resolved second harmonic microscopy of starch granules

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Nirmal; Qiu, Jianjun; Foreman, Matthew R.; Romero, Carlos Macías; Török, Peter; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2013-01-01

    We report on the measurement and analysis of the polarization state of second harmonic signals generated by starch granules, using a four-channel photon counting based Stokes-polarimeter. Various polarization parameters, such as the degree of polarization (DOP), the degree of linear polarization (DOLP), the degree of circular polarization (DOCP), and anisotropy are extracted from the 2D second harmonic Stokes images of starch granules. The concentric shell structure of a starch granule forms a natural photonic crystal structure. By integration over all the solid angle, it will allow very similar SHG quantum efficiency regardless of the angle or the states of incident polarization. Given type I phase matching and the concentric shell structure of a starch granule, one can easily infer the polarization states of the input beam from the resulting SH micrograph. PMID:23577289

  5. Polarization Measurements on SUMI's TVLS Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, K.; West, E. A.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of toroidal variable-line-space (TVLS) gratings for the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI), currently being developed at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC). SUMI is a spectro-polarimeter designed to measure magnetic fields in the solar chromosphere by observing two UV emission lines sensitive to magnetic fields, the CIY line at 155nm and the MgII line at 280nm. The instrument uses a pair of TVLS gratings, to observe both linear polarizations simultaneously. Efficiency measurements were done on bare aluminum gratings and aluminum/MgF2 coated gratings, at both linear polarizations.

  6. Histology validation of mapping depth-resolved cardiac fiber orientation in fresh mouse heart using optical polarization tractography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, K.; Wasala, N. B.; Yao, X.; Duan, D.; Yao, G.

    2014-01-01

    Myofiber organization in cardiac muscle plays an important role in achieving normal mechanical and electrical heart functions. An imaging tool that can reveal microstructural details of myofiber organization is valuable for both basic research and clinical applications. A high-resolution optical polarization tractography (OPT) was recently developed based on Jones matrix optical coherence tomography (JMOCT). In this study, we validated the accuracy of using OPT for measuring depth-resolved fiber orientation in fresh heart samples by comparing directly with histology images. Systematic image processing algorithms were developed to register OPT with histology images. The pixel-wise differences between the two tractographic results were analyzed in details. The results indicate that OPT can accurately image depth-resolved fiber orientation in fresh heart tissues and reveal microstructural details at the histological level. PMID:25136507

  7. Precision of polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy limited by photon noise for samples with cylindrical symmetry.

    PubMed

    Wasik, Valentine; Réfrégier, Philippe; Roche, Muriel; Brasselet, Sophie

    2015-08-01

    The estimation of parameters in polarization-resolved two-photon microscopy response perturbed by photon noise is analyzed in the context of second harmonic generation for the distribution of molecules presenting cylindrical symmetry. The estimation task is investigated using the Cramer-Rao lower bound for Poisson photon noise. It is shown that a noniterative technique can lead to estimation results that have good efficiencies for most of the physical possible values of the sample parameters for sufficiently high photon levels. The trade-off, between the number of incident polarization states and the total number of measured photons, that can be obtained with the Cramer-Rao lower bound is also discussed.

  8. Polarization measurement of laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, Natascha; Engels, Ralf; Engin, Ilhan; Greven, Patrick; Holler, Astrid; Lehrach, Andreas; Maier, Rudolf; Büscher, Markus; Cerchez, Mirela; Swantusch, Marco; Toncian, Monika; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald; Gibbon, Paul; Karmakar, Anupam

    2014-02-15

    We report on the successful use of a laser-driven few-MeV proton source to measure the differential cross section of a hadronic scattering reaction as well as on the measurement and simulation study of polarization observables of the laser-accelerated charged particle beams. These investigations were carried out with thin foil targets, illuminated by 100 TW laser pulses at the Arcturus laser facility; the polarization measurement is based on the spin dependence of hadronic proton scattering off nuclei in a Silicon target. We find proton beam polarizations consistent with zero magnitude which indicates that for these particular laser-target parameters the particle spins are not aligned by the strong magnetic fields inside the laser-generated plasmas.

  9. Polarization measurement analysis. III. Analysis of the polarization angle dispersion function with high precision polarization data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alina, D.; Montier, L.; Ristorcelli, I.; Bernard, J.-P.; Levrier, F.; Abdikamalov, E.

    2016-10-01

    High precision polarization measurements, such as those from the Planck satellite, open new opportunities for the study of the magnetic field structure as traced by polarimetric measurements of the interstellar dust emission. The polarization parameters suffer from bias in the presence of measurement noise. It is critical to take into account all the information available in the data in order to accurately derive these parameters. In our previous work, we studied the bias on polarization fraction and angle, various estimators of these quantities, and their associated uncertainties. The goal of this paper is to characterize the bias on the polarization angle dispersion function that is used to study the spatial coherence of the polarization angle. We characterize for the first time the bias on the conventional estimator of the polarization angle dispersion function and show that it can be positive or negative depending on the true value. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to explore the impact of the noise properties of the polarization data, as well as the impact of the distribution of the true polarization angles on the bias. We show that in the case where the ellipticity of the noise in (Q,U) varies by less than 10%, one can use simplified, diagonal approximation of the noise covariance matrix. In other cases, the shape of the noise covariance matrix should be taken into account in the estimation of the polarization angle dispersion function. We also study new estimators such as the dichotomic and the polynomial estimators. Though the dichotomic estimator cannot be directly used to estimate the polarization angle dispersion function, we show that, on the one hand, it can serve as an indicator of the accuracy of the conventional estimator and, on the other hand, it can be used for deriving the polynomial estimator. We propose a method for determining the upper limit of the bias on the conventional estimator of the polarization angle dispersion function. The

  10. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement.

    PubMed

    Bentefour, El H; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-21

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams 'proton imaging field' are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons. PMID:27435446

  11. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentefour, El H.; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams ‘proton imaging field’ are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons.

  12. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of two-color XUV–NIR ionization with polarization control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düsterer, S.; Hartmann, G.; Babies, F.; Beckmann, A.; Brenner, G.; Buck, J.; Costello, J.; Dammann, L.; De Fanis, A.; Geßler, P.; Glaser, L.; Ilchen, M.; Johnsson, P.; Kazansky, A. K.; Kelly, T. J.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Nosik, V. L.; Sazhina, I. P.; Scholz, F.; Seltmann, J.; Sotoudi, H.; Viefhaus, J.; Kabachnik, N. M.

    2016-08-01

    Electron emission caused by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation in the presence of a strong near infrared (NIR) field leads to multiphoton interactions that depend on several parameters. Here, a comprehensive study of the influence of the angle between the polarization directions of the NIR and XUV fields on the two-color angle-resolved photoelectron spectra of He and Ne is presented. The resulting photoelectron angular distribution strongly depends on the orientation of the NIR polarization plane with respect to that of the XUV field. The prevailing influence of the intense NIR field over the angular emission characteristics for He(1s) and Ne(2p) ionization lines is shown. The underlying processes are modeled in the frame of the strong field approximation (SFA) which shows very consistent agreement with the experiment reaffirming the power of the SFA for multicolor-multiphoton ionization in this regime.

  13. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of two-color XUV-NIR ionization with polarization control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düsterer, S.; Hartmann, G.; Babies, F.; Beckmann, A.; Brenner, G.; Buck, J.; Costello, J.; Dammann, L.; De Fanis, A.; Geßler, P.; Glaser, L.; Ilchen, M.; Johnsson, P.; Kazansky, A. K.; Kelly, T. J.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Nosik, V. L.; Sazhina, I. P.; Scholz, F.; Seltmann, J.; Sotoudi, H.; Viefhaus, J.; Kabachnik, N. M.

    2016-08-01

    Electron emission caused by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation in the presence of a strong near infrared (NIR) field leads to multiphoton interactions that depend on several parameters. Here, a comprehensive study of the influence of the angle between the polarization directions of the NIR and XUV fields on the two-color angle-resolved photoelectron spectra of He and Ne is presented. The resulting photoelectron angular distribution strongly depends on the orientation of the NIR polarization plane with respect to that of the XUV field. The prevailing influence of the intense NIR field over the angular emission characteristics for He(1s) and Ne(2p) ionization lines is shown. The underlying processes are modeled in the frame of the strong field approximation (SFA) which shows very consistent agreement with the experiment reaffirming the power of the SFA for multicolor-multiphoton ionization in this regime.

  14. Polarization measurement analysis. I. Impact of the full covariance matrix on polarization fraction and angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montier, L.; Plaszczynski, S.; Levrier, F.; Tristram, M.; Alina, D.; Ristorcelli, I.; Bernard, J.-P.

    2015-02-01

    With the forthcoming release of high precision polarization measurements, such as from the Planck satellite, the metrology of polarization needs to be improved. In particular, it is important to have full knowledge of the noise properties when estimating polarization fraction and polarization angle, which suffer from well-known biases. While strong simplifying assumptions have usually been made in polarization analysis, we present a method for including the full covariance matrix of the Stokes parameters in estimates of the distributions of the polarization fraction and angle. We thereby quantified the impact of the noise properties on the biases in the observational quantities and derived analytical expressions for the probability density functions of these quantities that take the full complexity of the covariance matrix into account, including the Stokes I intensity components. We performed Monte Carlo simulations to explore the impact of the noise properties on the statistical variance and bias of the polarization fraction and angle. We show that for low variations (< 10%) of the effective ellipticity between the Q and U components around the symmetrical case the covariance matrix may be simplified as is usually done, with a negligible impact on the bias. For S/Ns with intensity lower than 10, the uncertainty on the total intensity is shown to drastically increase the uncertainty of the polarization fraction but not the relative bias of the polarization fraction, while a 10% correlation between the intensity and the polarized components does not significantly affect the bias of the polarization fraction. We compare estimates of the uncertainties that affect polarization measurements, addressing limitations of the estimates of the S/N, and we show how to build conservative confidence intervals for polarization fraction and angle simultaneously. This study, which is the first in a set of papers dedicated to analysing polarization measurements, focuses on the

  15. Data Analysis And Polarization Measurements With GEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohmayer, Tod

    2011-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX (GEMS) mission was selected by NASA for flight in 2014. GEMS will make the first sensitive survey of X-ray polarization across a wide range of source classes including black hole and neutron star binaries, AGN of different types, rotation and accretion-powered pulsars, magnetars, shell supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. GEMS employs grazing-incidence foil mirrors and novel time-projection chamber (TPC) polarimeters leveraging the photoelectric effect. The GEMS detectors image the charge tracks of photoelectrons produced by 2 - 10 keV X-rays. The initial direction of the photoelectron is determined by the linear polarization of the photon. We present an overview of the data analysis challenges and methods for GEMS, including procedures for producing optimally filtered images of the charge tracks and estimating their initial directions. We illustrate our methods using laboratory measurements of polarized and unpolarized X-rays with flight-like detectors as well as from simulated tracks. We also present detailed simulations exploring the statistics of polarization measurements appropriate for GEMS, and make comparisons with previous work.

  16. GRB Polarization Measurements with CGRO/COMPTEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Mark L.; Collmar, Werner

    2016-04-01

    We have embarked on a program to analyze CGRO/COMPTEL data in search for evidence of polarization in both transient sources and in brighter steady sources. We are pursuing this work because of the heightened interest in high energy polarimetry, the recognition that some high energy sources may be highly polarized (thus improving our chances of a making useful measurements), and the ready availability of modern computing resources that provide the ability to carry out more comprehensive simulations in support of the analysis. The only significant work done to date with regards to COMPTEL polarimetry was published almost 20 years ago and used a simplified mass model of COMPTEL for simulating the instrument response. Estimates of the minimum detectable polarization (MDP) near 1 MeV included 30% for a two-week observation of the Crab, as low as 10% for bright GRBs, and as low as 10% for bright solar flares. The data analysis performed at the time led to inconclusive results and suggested some unknown systematic error. We contend that a self-consistent analysis will be feasible with high fidelity simulations, simulations that were not easily generated 20 years ago. Our analysis utilizes the latest GEANT4 simulation tools in conjunction with a high-fidelity mass model of the COMPTEL instrument, and incorporate updated analysis tools originally developed by the COMPTEL collaboration. Given the nine years of COMPTEL data, we expect that this work will likely add to our understanding of the polarization properties of transient sources, such as GRBs and solar flares, as well as brighter steady sources, such as the Crab and Cyg X-1. Here we present results from simulations of the COMPTEL polarization response and examine prospects for studying GRB polarization.

  17. Probing magnetar magnetosphere through X-ray polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taverna, R.; Muleri, F.; Turolla, R.; Soffitta, P.; Fabiani, S.; Nobili, L.

    2014-02-01

    The study of magnetars is of particular relevance since these objects are the only laboratories where the physics in ultra-strong magnetic fields can be directly tested. Until now, spectroscopic and timing measurements at X-ray energies in soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) have been the main source of information about the physical properties of a magnetar and of its magnetosphere. Spectral fitting in the ˜0.5-10 keV range allowed us to validate the `twisted magnetosphere' model, probing the structure of the external field and estimating the density and velocity of the magnetospheric currents. Spectroscopy alone, however, may fail in disambiguating the two key parameters governing magnetospheric scattering (the charge velocity and the twist angle) and is quite insensitive to the source geometry. X-ray polarimetry, on the other hand, can provide a quantum leap in the field by adding two extra observables, the linear polarization degree and the polarization angle. Using the bright AXP 1RXS J170849.0-400910 as a template, we show that phase-resolved polarimetric measurements can unambiguously determine the model parameters, even with a small X-ray polarimetry mission carrying modern photoelectric detectors and existing X-ray optics. We also show that polarimetric measurements can pinpoint vacuum polarization effects and thus provide indirect evidence for ultra-strong magnetic fields.

  18. Error-compensation measurements on polarization qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhibo; Zhu, Huangjun; Xiang, Guo-Yong; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-06-01

    Systematic errors are inevitable in most measurements performed in real life because of imperfect measurement devices. Reducing systematic errors is crucial to ensuring the accuracy and reliability of measurement results. To this end, delicate error-compensation design is often necessary in addition to device calibration to reduce the dependence of the systematic error on the imperfection of the devices. The art of error-compensation design is well appreciated in nuclear magnetic resonance system by using composite pulses. In contrast, there are few works on reducing systematic errors in quantum optical systems. Here we propose an error-compensation design to reduce the systematic error in projective measurements on a polarization qubit. It can reduce the systematic error to the second order of the phase errors of both the half-wave plate (HWP) and the quarter-wave plate (QWP) as well as the angle error of the HWP. This technique is then applied to experiments on quantum state tomography on polarization qubits, leading to a 20-fold reduction in the systematic error. Our study may find applications in high-precision tasks in polarization optics and quantum optics.

  19. Two-Dimensional Subpicosecond Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy: Optical Kerr-Gating with a Dynamic Polarization Excitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Takashige; Romano, Natalie C.; Modarelli, David A.; Lim, Edward C.

    2013-06-01

    With an advent of ultrafast lasers, a number of applications are widely adopted to probe photophysical and photochemical properties of a molecule that occurs in an ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond) time scale. Intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) or proton transfer in photoexcited electron donor-acceptor (EDA) molecules, for instance, has been a topic of very extensive time-resolved studies for several decades. Time-evolution of an anisotropic property can track dipole orientations or conformational changes in their photoexcited molecular systems, which is of extreme importance to examine its structure and excited-state dynamics rather than probing an isotropic "population change".With this respect, we recently developed a subpicosecond time-resolved 2-D fluorescence anisotropy (TRFA) in which method implements a dynamic alternation of laser polarizations to excite a sample using a photoelastic modulator (PEM). In the combination of an ultrafast optical shutter (Kerr-gating) and a spectrograph that is coupled with a CCD, two signal phases so-obtained dynamically, I_{∥}( t, λ) and I_{⊥}( t, λ), provide a 2-D mapped information on both a wide range for spectra and time-resolved kinetics of photoexcited molecules of interest. From the definition of an anisotropy 2-D TRFA, r (t, λ), is given instantly and even more reliably at a single measurement. In this paper we will present benchmark tests of some target samples to establish performance of TRFA.

  20. Optical diagnosis and characterization of dental caries with polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Hsu, Stephen Chin-Ying; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-04-01

    We report the utility of a rapid polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging technique developed for optical diagnosis and characterization of dental caries in the tooth. Hyperspectral SRS images (512 × 512 pixels) of the tooth covering both the fingerprint (800-1800 cm(-1)) and high-wavenumber (2800-3600 cm(-1)) regions can be acquired within 15 minutes, which is at least 10(3) faster in imaging speed than confocal Raman mapping. Hyperspectral SRS imaging uncovers the biochemical distributions and variations across the carious enamel in the tooth. SRS imaging shows that compared to the sound enamel, the mineral content in the body of lesion decreases by 55%; while increasing up to 110% in the surface zone, indicating the formation of a hyper-mineralized layer due to the remineralization process. Further polarized SRS imaging shows that the depolarization ratios of hydroxyapatite crystals (ν 1-PO4 (3-) of SRS at 959 cm(-1)) of the tooth in the sound enamel, translucent zone, body of lesion and the surface zone are 0.035 ± 0.01, 0.052 ± 0.02, 0.314 ± 0.1, 0.038 ± 0.02, respectively, providing a new diagnostic criterion for discriminating carious lesions from sound enamel in the teeth. This work demonstrates for the first time that the polarization-resolved hyperspectral SRS imaging technique can be used for quantitatively determining tooth mineralization levels and discriminating carious lesions from sound enamel in a rapid fashion, proving its promising potential of early detection and diagnosis of dental caries without labeling. PMID:27446654

  1. Optical diagnosis and characterization of dental caries with polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Hsu, Stephen Chin-Ying; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    We report the utility of a rapid polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging technique developed for optical diagnosis and characterization of dental caries in the tooth. Hyperspectral SRS images (512 × 512 pixels) of the tooth covering both the fingerprint (800-1800 cm−1) and high-wavenumber (2800-3600 cm−1) regions can be acquired within 15 minutes, which is at least 103 faster in imaging speed than confocal Raman mapping. Hyperspectral SRS imaging uncovers the biochemical distributions and variations across the carious enamel in the tooth. SRS imaging shows that compared to the sound enamel, the mineral content in the body of lesion decreases by 55%; while increasing up to 110% in the surface zone, indicating the formation of a hyper-mineralized layer due to the remineralization process. Further polarized SRS imaging shows that the depolarization ratios of hydroxyapatite crystals (ν1-PO43- of SRS at 959 cm−1) of the tooth in the sound enamel, translucent zone, body of lesion and the surface zone are 0.035 ± 0.01, 0.052 ± 0.02, 0.314 ± 0.1, 0.038 ± 0.02, respectively, providing a new diagnostic criterion for discriminating carious lesions from sound enamel in the teeth. This work demonstrates for the first time that the polarization-resolved hyperspectral SRS imaging technique can be used for quantitatively determining tooth mineralization levels and discriminating carious lesions from sound enamel in a rapid fashion, proving its promising potential of early detection and diagnosis of dental caries without labeling. PMID:27446654

  2. Spatially resolved scatter measurement of diffractive micromirror arrays.

    PubMed

    Sicker, Cornelius; Heber, Jörg; Berndt, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Spatial light modulators (SLMs) support flexible system concepts in modern optics and especially phase-only SLMs such as micromirror arrays (MMAs) appear attractive for many applications. In order to achieve a precise phase modulation, which is crucial for optical performance, careful characterization and calibration of SLM devices is required. We examine an intensity-based measurement concept, which promises distinct advantages by means of a spatially resolved scatter measurement that is combined with the MMA's diffractive principle. Measurements yield quantitative results, which are consistent with measurements of micromirror roughness components, by white-light interferometry. They reveal relative scatter as low as 10-4, which corresponds to contrast ratios up to 10,000. The potential of the technique to resolve phase changes in the subnanometer range is experimentally demonstrated. PMID:27411205

  3. Cosmological CPT violation and CMB polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun-Qing

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the possibility of testing Charge-Parity-Time Reversal (CPT) symmetry with cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. We consider two kinds of Chern-Simons (CS) term, electromagnetic CS term and gravitational CS term, and study their effects on the CMB polarization power spectra in detail. By combining current CMB polarization measurements, the seven-year WMAP, BOOMERanG 2003 and BICEP observations, we obtain a tight constraint on the rotation angle Δα = -2.28±1.02 deg (1 σ), indicating a 2.2 σ detection of the CPT violation. Here, we particularly take the systematic errors of CMB measurements into account. After adding the QUaD polarization data, the constraint becomes -1.34 < Δα < 0.82 deg at 95% confidence level. When comparing with the effect of electromagnetic CS term, the gravitational CS term could only generate TB and EB power spectra with much smaller amplitude. Therefore, the induced parameter epsilon can not be constrained from the current polarization data. Furthermore, we study the capabilities of future CMB measurements, Planck and CMBPol, on the constraints of Δα and epsilon. We find that the constraint of Δα can be significantly improved by a factor of 15. Therefore, if this rotation angle effect can not be taken into account properly, the constraints of cosmological parameters will be biased obviously. For the gravitational CS term, the future Planck data still can not constrain epsilon very well, if the primordial tensor perturbations are small, r < 0.1. We need the more accurate CMBPol experiment to give better constraint on epsilon.

  4. Polarization bispectrum for measuring primordial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2013-11-01

    We examine the potential of polarization bispectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) to constrain primordial magnetic fields (PMFs). We compute all possible bispectra between temperature and polarization anisotropies sourced by PMFs and show that they are weakly correlated with well-known local-type and secondary ISW-lensing bispectra. From a Fisher analysis it is found that, owing to E-mode bispectra, in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment the expected uncertainty in the amplitude of magnetized bispectra is 80% improved in comparison with an analysis in terms of temperature auto-bispectrum alone. In the Planck or the proposed PRISM experiment cases, we will be able to measure PMFs with strength 2.6 or 2.2 nG. PMFs also generate bispectra involving B-mode polarization, due to tensor-mode dependence. We also find that the B-mode bispectrum can reduce the uncertainty more drastically and hence PMFs comparable to or less than 1 nG may be measured in a PRISM-like experiment.

  5. Motion-artifact-robust, polarization-resolved second-harmonic-generation microscopy based on rapid polarization switching with electro-optic Pockells cell and its application to in vivo visualization of collagen fiber orientation in human facial skin.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuji; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shuichiro; Ogura, Yuki; Yamashita, Toyonobu; Hirao, Tetsuji; Araki, Tsutomu; Yasui, Takeshi

    2014-04-01

    Polarization-resolved second-harmonic-generation (PR-SHG) microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating collagen fiber orientation quantitatively with low invasiveness. However, the waiting time for the mechanical polarization rotation makes it too sensitive to motion artifacts and hence has hampered its use in various applications in vivo. In the work described in this article, we constructed a motion-artifact-robust, PR-SHG microscope based on rapid polarization switching at every pixel with an electro-optic Pockells cell (PC) in synchronization with step-wise raster scanning of the focus spot and alternate data acquisition of a vertical-polarization-resolved SHG signal and a horizontal-polarization-resolved one. The constructed PC-based PR-SHG microscope enabled us to visualize orientation mapping of dermal collagen fiber in human facial skin in vivo without the influence of motion artifacts. Furthermore, it implied the location and/or age dependence of the collagen fiber orientation in human facial skin. The robustness to motion artifacts in the collagen orientation measurement will expand the application scope of SHG microscopy in dermatology and collagen-related fields.

  6. A Cloud Resolving Simulation of a Polar Low Over the Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K.; Maesaka, T.; Liu, A.; Tsuboki, K.; Renfrew, I.

    2005-05-01

    Polar lows, high latitude mesoscale marine cyclones, remain one of the most enigmatic of meteorological phenomena. They can be often observed on satellite imagery as spiral cloud systems whose striking organization belies the significant threat they represent to maritime activity as a result of the hurricane force associated with them. Their small horizontal scale, often less than 500km, short life time, typically less than 24 hours, and their tendency to form in data sparse regions make them a challenge to forecast. Polar lows are often associated with significant fluxes of heat and moisture between the atmosphere and ocean that act to modify both fluids. In the atmosphere, the fluxes act to warm and moisten the boundary layer resulting in the formation of 2D roll and 3D cellular convection. In the ocean, fluxes act to densify the surface waters and may contribute to the preconditioning phase of deep ocean convection. The presence of sea ice often introduces a spatial heterogeneity into the air-sea flux fields, In this talk, we will present a numerical simulation of a polar low that formed over the Labrador Sea on February 8 1997 during the Labrador Sea Deep Ocean Convection Experiment. A flight on that date with an instrumented aircraft collected data on the cloud-scale structure of the polar low and its associated air-sea interaction. The simulation was performed with a cloud resolving mesoscale forecast model in a domain with a horizontal scale of 500 km by 400 km at a horizontal resolution of 500m. The high spatial resolution and large domain allowed for an explicit representation of both the cloud-scale and larger-scale circulations associated with the polar low. In addition, the model included an explicit representation of the heterogeneity associated with the Labrador Sea's marginal ice zone. A comparison with satellite and in-situ observations indicate that the simulation is able to capture many of the cloud-scale and large-scale features of this polar low

  7. Time-Resolved Rayleigh Scattering Measurements in Hot Gas Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2008-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded gas flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultipler tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. Mean and rms velocity and temperature fluctuation measurements in both an electrically-heated jet facility with a 10-mm diameter nozzle and also in a hydrogen-combustor heated jet facility with a 50.8-mm diameter nozzle at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented.

  8. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, Chiranjit; Steinkamp, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated cw laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes.

  9. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOEpatents

    Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

  10. Polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation imaging for liver fibrosis assessment without labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Pan, Shiying; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-10-01

    We apply the polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation (PR-SHG) microscopy to investigate the changes of collagen typings (type I vs type III) and collagen fibril orientations of liver tissue in bile-duct-ligation (BDL) rat models. The PR-SHG results show that the second-order susceptibility tensor ratios (χ31/χ15 and χ33/χ15) of collagen fibers increase with liver fibrotic progression after BDL surgery, reflecting an increase of the type III collagen component with the severity of liver fibrosis; and the square root of the collagen type III to type I ratio linearly correlates (R2 = 0.98) with histopathological scores. Furthermore, the collagen fibril orientations become more random with liver fibrosis transformation as compared to normal liver tissue. This work demonstrates that PR-SHG microscopy has the potential for label-free diagnosis and characterization of liver fibrosis based on quantitative analysis of collagen typings and fibril orientations.

  11. Polarization-resolved spectroscopy imaging of grain boundaries and optical excitations in crystalline organic thin films

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Z.; Rawat, N.; Cour, I.; Manning, L.; Headrick, R. L.; Furis, M.

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of optical properties of organic crystalline semiconductors thin films is challenging due to submicron grain sizes and the presence of numerous structural defects, disorder and grain boundaries. Here we report on the results of combined linear dichroism (LD)/ polarization-resolved photoluminescence (PL) scanning microscopy experiments that simultaneously probe the excitonic radiative recombination and the molecular ordering in solution-processed metal-free phthalocyanine crystalline thin films with macroscopic grain sizes. LD/PL images reveal the relative orientation of the singlet exciton transition dipoles at the grain boundaries and the presence of a localized electronic state that acts like a barrier for exciton diffusion across the grain boundary. We also show how this energy barrier can be entirely eliminated through the optimization of deposition parameters that results in films with large grain sizes and small-angle boundaries. These studies open an avenue for exploring the influence of long-range order on exciton diffusion and carrier transport. PMID:26365682

  12. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melendy, Robert F.

    2015-12-01

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis.

  13. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    SciTech Connect

    Melendy, Robert F.

    2015-12-28

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis.

  14. Resolving and measuring diffusion in complex interfaces: Exploring new capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd M.

    2015-09-01

    This exploratory LDRD targeted the use of a new high resolution spectroscopic diffusion capabilities developed at Sandia to resolve transport processes at interfaces in heterogeneous polymer materials. In particular, the combination of high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion experiments were used to directly explore interface diffusion within heterogeneous polymer composites, including measuring diffusion for individual chemical species in multi-component mixtures. Several different types of heterogeneous polymer systems were studied using these HRMAS NMR diffusion capabilities to probe the resolution limitations, determine the spatial length scales involved, and explore the general applicability to specific heterogeneous systems. The investigations pursued included a) the direct measurement of the diffusion for poly(dimethyl siloxane) polymer (PDMS) on nano-porous materials, b) measurement of penetrant diffusion in additive manufactures (3D printed) processed PDMS composites, and c) the measurement of diffusion in swollen polymers/penetrant mixtures within nano-confined aluminum oxide membranes. The NMR diffusion results obtained were encouraging and allowed for an improved understanding of diffusion and transport processes at the molecular level, while at the same time demonstrating that the spatial heterogeneity that can be resolved using HRMAS NMR PFG diffusion experiment must be larger than ~μm length scales, expect for polymer transport within nanoporous carbons where additional chemical resolution improves the resolvable heterogeneous length scale to hundreds of nm.

  15. Moisture-insensitive optical fingerprint scanner based on polarization resolved in-finger scattered light.

    PubMed

    Back, Seon-Woo; Lee, Yong-Geon; Lee, Sang-Shin; Son, Geun-Sik

    2016-08-22

    A moisture-insensitive optical fingerprint scanner (FPS) that is based on polarization resolved in-finger light is proposed and realized. Incident visible light, which is selectively fed to a fingerprint sample via a polarization beam splitter (PBS), is deemed to be partially scattered backward by tissues associated with the skin of the finger. The backscattered light is mostly index-guided in the ridge comprising the fingerprint, which has a higher refractive index, and is drastically dispersed in the valley, which is typically filled with water or air and so has a lower index. However, when light reflects directly off the surface of the finger skin, it fundamentally prevents the scanned image from being determined. The proposed FPS produces bright and dark intensity patterns that are alternately created on the surface of the PBS and correspond to the ridges and valleys, respectively. Thus, this method can especially distinguish between a fake synthetic fingerprint and a genuine fingerprint due to its use of in-finger scattered light. The scanner has been rigorously designed by carrying out ray-optic simulations depending on the wavelength, with tissue-induced scattering taken into account. The device was constructed by incorporating a wire-grid type PBS in conjunction with visible LED sources, including blue, green and red. The scanner adopting a blue LED, which exhibits the strongest light scattering, resulted in the best fingerprint image, enabling enhanced fidelity under the wet and dry situations. Finally, a fake synthetic fingerprint could be successfully discriminated. PMID:27557199

  16. Moisture-insensitive optical fingerprint scanner based on polarization resolved in-finger scattered light.

    PubMed

    Back, Seon-Woo; Lee, Yong-Geon; Lee, Sang-Shin; Son, Geun-Sik

    2016-08-22

    A moisture-insensitive optical fingerprint scanner (FPS) that is based on polarization resolved in-finger light is proposed and realized. Incident visible light, which is selectively fed to a fingerprint sample via a polarization beam splitter (PBS), is deemed to be partially scattered backward by tissues associated with the skin of the finger. The backscattered light is mostly index-guided in the ridge comprising the fingerprint, which has a higher refractive index, and is drastically dispersed in the valley, which is typically filled with water or air and so has a lower index. However, when light reflects directly off the surface of the finger skin, it fundamentally prevents the scanned image from being determined. The proposed FPS produces bright and dark intensity patterns that are alternately created on the surface of the PBS and correspond to the ridges and valleys, respectively. Thus, this method can especially distinguish between a fake synthetic fingerprint and a genuine fingerprint due to its use of in-finger scattered light. The scanner has been rigorously designed by carrying out ray-optic simulations depending on the wavelength, with tissue-induced scattering taken into account. The device was constructed by incorporating a wire-grid type PBS in conjunction with visible LED sources, including blue, green and red. The scanner adopting a blue LED, which exhibits the strongest light scattering, resulted in the best fingerprint image, enabling enhanced fidelity under the wet and dry situations. Finally, a fake synthetic fingerprint could be successfully discriminated.

  17. Performance of Orbital Neutron Instruments for Spatially Resolved Hydrogen Measurements of Airless Planetary Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Elphic, Richard C.; Feldman, William C.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Orbital neutron spectroscopy has become a standard technique for measuring planetary surface compositions from orbit. While this technique has led to important discoveries, such as the deposits of hydrogen at the Moon and Mars, a limitation is its poor spatial resolution. For omni-directional neutron sensors, spatial resolutions are 1–1.5 times the spacecraft's altitude above the planetary surface (or 40–600 km for typical orbital altitudes). Neutron sensors with enhanced spatial resolution have been proposed, and one with a collimated field of view is scheduled to fly on a mission to measure lunar polar hydrogen. No quantitative studies or analyses have been published that evaluate in detail the detection and sensitivity limits of spatially resolved neutron measurements. Here, we describe two complementary techniques for evaluating the hydrogen sensitivity of spatially resolved neutron sensors: an analytic, closed-form expression that has been validated with Lunar Prospector neutron data, and a three-dimensional modeling technique. The analytic technique, called the Spatially resolved Neutron Analytic Sensitivity Approximation (SNASA), provides a straightforward method to evaluate spatially resolved neutron data from existing instruments as well as to plan for future mission scenarios. We conclude that the existing detector—the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND)—scheduled to launch on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter will have hydrogen sensitivities that are over an order of magnitude poorer than previously estimated. We further conclude that a sensor with a geometric factor of ∼ 100 cm2 Sr (compared to the LEND geometric factor of ∼ 10.9 cm2 Sr) could make substantially improved measurements of the lunar polar hydrogen spatial distribution. Key Words: Planetary instrumentation—Planetary science—Moon—Spacecraft experiments—Hydrogen. Astrobiology 10, 183–200. PMID:20298147

  18. Performance of orbital neutron instruments for spatially resolved hydrogen measurements of airless planetary bodies.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David J; Elphic, Richard C; Feldman, William C; Funsten, Herbert O; Prettyman, Thomas H

    2010-03-01

    Orbital neutron spectroscopy has become a standard technique for measuring planetary surface compositions from orbit. While this technique has led to important discoveries, such as the deposits of hydrogen at the Moon and Mars, a limitation is its poor spatial resolution. For omni-directional neutron sensors, spatial resolutions are 1-1.5 times the spacecraft's altitude above the planetary surface (or 40-600 km for typical orbital altitudes). Neutron sensors with enhanced spatial resolution have been proposed, and one with a collimated field of view is scheduled to fly on a mission to measure lunar polar hydrogen. No quantitative studies or analyses have been published that evaluate in detail the detection and sensitivity limits of spatially resolved neutron measurements. Here, we describe two complementary techniques for evaluating the hydrogen sensitivity of spatially resolved neutron sensors: an analytic, closed-form expression that has been validated with Lunar Prospector neutron data, and a three-dimensional modeling technique. The analytic technique, called the Spatially resolved Neutron Analytic Sensitivity Approximation (SNASA), provides a straightforward method to evaluate spatially resolved neutron data from existing instruments as well as to plan for future mission scenarios. We conclude that the existing detector--the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND)--scheduled to launch on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter will have hydrogen sensitivities that are over an order of magnitude poorer than previously estimated. We further conclude that a sensor with a geometric factor of approximately 100 cm(2) Sr (compared to the LEND geometric factor of approximately 10.9 cm(2) Sr) could make substantially improved measurements of the lunar polar hydrogen spatial distribution.

  19. Performance of orbital neutron instruments for spatially resolved hydrogen measurements of airless planetary bodies.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David J; Elphic, Richard C; Feldman, William C; Funsten, Herbert O; Prettyman, Thomas H

    2010-03-01

    Orbital neutron spectroscopy has become a standard technique for measuring planetary surface compositions from orbit. While this technique has led to important discoveries, such as the deposits of hydrogen at the Moon and Mars, a limitation is its poor spatial resolution. For omni-directional neutron sensors, spatial resolutions are 1-1.5 times the spacecraft's altitude above the planetary surface (or 40-600 km for typical orbital altitudes). Neutron sensors with enhanced spatial resolution have been proposed, and one with a collimated field of view is scheduled to fly on a mission to measure lunar polar hydrogen. No quantitative studies or analyses have been published that evaluate in detail the detection and sensitivity limits of spatially resolved neutron measurements. Here, we describe two complementary techniques for evaluating the hydrogen sensitivity of spatially resolved neutron sensors: an analytic, closed-form expression that has been validated with Lunar Prospector neutron data, and a three-dimensional modeling technique. The analytic technique, called the Spatially resolved Neutron Analytic Sensitivity Approximation (SNASA), provides a straightforward method to evaluate spatially resolved neutron data from existing instruments as well as to plan for future mission scenarios. We conclude that the existing detector--the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND)--scheduled to launch on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter will have hydrogen sensitivities that are over an order of magnitude poorer than previously estimated. We further conclude that a sensor with a geometric factor of approximately 100 cm(2) Sr (compared to the LEND geometric factor of approximately 10.9 cm(2) Sr) could make substantially improved measurements of the lunar polar hydrogen spatial distribution. PMID:20298147

  20. Measuring receptor recycling in polarized MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Luciana; Apodaca, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of proteins such as channels, pumps, and receptors is critical for epithelial cell function. In this chapter we present a method to measure receptor recycling in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells using an iodinated ligand. We describe a technique to iodinate transferrin (Tf), we discuss how (125)I-Tf can be used to label a cohort of endocytosed Tf receptor, and then we provide methods to measure the rate of recycling of the (125)I-Tf-receptor complex. We also show how this approach, which is easily adaptable to other proteins, can be used to simultaneously measure the normally small amount of (125)I-Tf transcytosis and degradation.

  1. Improving Earthquake Stress Drop Measurements - What can we Really Resolve?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abercrombie, R. E.; Bannister, S. C.; Fry, B.; Ruhl, C. J.; Kozlowska, M.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake stress drop is fundamental to understanding the physics of the rupture process. Although it is superficially simple to calculate an estimate of stress drop from the corner frequency of the radiated spectrum, it is much harder to be certain that measurements are reliable and accurate. The same is true of other measurements of stress drop and radiated energy. The large number of studies of earthquake stress drop, the high variability in results (~0.1-100 MPa), the large uncertainties, and the ongoing scaling controversy are evidence for this. We investigate the resolution and uncertainties of stress drops calculated using an empirical Green's function (EGF) approach. Earthquakes in 3 sequences at Parkfield, California are recorded by multiple borehole stations and have abundant smaller earthquakes to use as EGFs (Abercrombie, 2014). The earthquakes in the largest magnitude cluster (M~2.1) exhibit clear temporal variation of stress drop. Independent studies obtained a similar pattern implying that it is resolvable for these well-recorded, simple sources. The borehole data reveal a similar temporal pattern for another sequence, not resolvable in an earlier study using surface recordings. The earthquakes in the third sequence have complex sources; corner frequency measurements for this sequence are highly variable and poorly resolved. We use the earthquakes in the first cluster to quantify the uncertainties likely to arise in less optimal settings. The limited signal bandwidth and the quality of the EGF assumption are major sources of error. Averaging across multiple stations improves the resolution, as does using multiple good EGFs (Abercrombie, 2015). We adapt the approach to apply to larger data sets. We focus on New Zealand, with the aim of resolving stress drop variability in a variety of tectonic settings. We investigate stacking over stations and multiple EGFs, and compare earthquakes (M~3-6) from both the overlying and the subducting plates.

  2. Spatially resolved concentration measurements based on backscatter absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze; Sanders, Scott T.; Robinson, Michael A.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of spatially resolved measurements of gas properties using direct absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with backscattered signals. We report a 1-D distribution of H2O mole fraction with a spatial resolution of 5 mm. The peak and average discrepancy between the measured and expected mole fraction are 21.1 and 8.0 %, respectively. The demonstration experiment is related to a diesel aftertreatment system; a selective catalytic reduction brick made of cordierite is used. The brick causes volume scattering interference; advanced baseline fitting based on a genetic algorithm is used to reduce the effects of this interference by a factor of 2.3.

  3. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenbiao; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Pu

    2016-05-01

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research. PMID:27250457

  4. Orientational Ordering of Carotenoids in Myelin Membranes Resolved by Polarized Raman Microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kutuzov, Nikolay P.; Brazhe, Alexey R.; Maksimov, Georgy V.; Dracheva, Olga E.; Lyaskovskiy, Vladimir L.; Bulygin, Fedor V.; Rubin, Andrey B.

    2014-01-01

    We study orientational ordering of membrane compounds in the myelinated nerve fiber by means of polarized Raman microspectroscopy. The theory of orientational distribution functions was adapted to live-cell measurements. The obtained orientational distribution functions of carotenoids and lipid acyl chain clearly indicated a predominantly radial-like orientation in membranes of the myelin. Two-dimensional Raman images, made under optimal polarization of incident laser beam, corroborated the proposed carotenoid orientation within the bilayer. Experimental data suggested the tilted orientation of both carotenoid polyenic and lipid acyl chains. The values of maximum tilt angles were similar, with possible implication of carotenoid-induced ordering effect on lipid acyl chains, and hence change of myelin membrane properties. This study stages carotenoids of the nerve as possible mediators of excitation and leverages underlying activity-dependent membrane reordering. PMID:25140424

  5. Electrooptic sampling measures MMICS with polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, D. M.; Weingarten, K. J.; Rodwell, M. J. W.

    1987-08-01

    An experimental system is described which tests high-speed ICs without traditional measurement limitation. The methods takes advantage of GaAs's electrooptic properties. Electric fields associated with conductor voltages within a GaAs circuit induce small anisotropic changes in the optical index of refraction of the substrate. A polarized probing beam is passed through a circuit's substrate near a conductor, and the intensity of the probe beam is modulated in proportion to the conductor's potential. Improved time resolution is achieved by using a pulsed, optical probe beam with pulse durations on the order of 1 ps, permitting instrument bandwidths greater than 100 GHz. The elimination of external electroopic elements removes invasive properties, permitting probing with no electrical contact, no loading of the test point with low-impedance transmission lines, and no parasitic probe impedance.

  6. Minimum resolvable temperature difference measurements on undersampled imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driggers, Ronald G.; Hodgkin, Van A.; Vollmerhausen, Richard H.; O'Shea, Patrick

    2003-08-01

    Minimum Resolvable Temperature Difference (MRTD) is the primary measurement of performance for infrared imaging systems. Where Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) is a measurement of resolution and three-dimensional noise (or noise equivalent temperature difference) is a measurement of sensitivity, MRTD combines both measurements into a test of observer visual acuity through the imager. MRTD has been incorrectly applied to undersampled thermal imagers as a means for assessing the overall performance of the imager. The incorrect application of the MRTD (or just MRT) test to undersampled imagers includes testing to the half-sample (or Nyquist rate) of the sensor and calling the MRT unresolvable beyond this frequency. This approach is known to give poor predictions in overall system performance. Also, measurements at frequencies below the half-sample rate are strongly dependent on the phase between the sampling geometry and the four-bar target. The result is that very little information in the MRT measurement of an undersampled thermal imager is useful. There are a number of alternatives including Dynamic MRT (DMRT), Minimum Temperature Difference Perceived (MTDP), Triangle Orientation Discrimination (TOD), and objective MRT tests. The NVESD approach is to measure the MTF and system noise and to use these measurements in the MRT calculation to give good sensor performance predictions. This paper describes the problems with MRT for undersampled imagers, describes the alternative measurements, and presents the NVESD approach to MRT measurements.

  7. Time-Resolved Polar X-Ray Images of Capsule Implosions on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, Steven; Izumi, Nobuhiko; Kyrala, George; Bradley, David; Town, Richard; Milovich, Jose; Weber, Steve; Benedetti, Robin; NIF Team

    2011-10-01

    Key experiments leading to ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) involve measuring the symmetry of imploding capsules using images recorded by x-ray framing cameras. Recent polar x-ray images display a wide variety of interesting features including four-fold azimuthal symmetry. We describe techniques that have been developed to quantify the azimuthal shape and explain the physical phenomena associated with features observed in the images. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Measuring the continuum polarization with ESPaDOnS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, A.; Rodrigues, C. V.; Martioli, E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Our goal is to test the feasibility of obtaining accurate measurements of the continuum polarization from high-resolution spectra using the spectropolarimetric mode of ESPaDOnS. Methods: We used the new pipeline OPERA to reduce recent and archived ESPaDOnS data. Several polarization standard stars and science objects were tested for the linear mode. In addition, the circular mode was tested using several objects from the archive with expected null polarization. Synthetic broad-band polarization was computed from the ESPaDOnS continuum polarization spectra and compared with published values (when available) to quantify the accuracy of the instrument. Results: The continuum linear polarization measured by ESPaDOnS is consistent with broad-band polarimetry measurements available in the literature. The accuracy in the degree of linear polarization is around 0.2-0.3% considering the full sample. The accuracy in polarization position angle using the most polarized objects is better than 5°. Consistent with this, the instrumental polarization computed for the circular continuum polarization is also between 0.2-0.3%. Our results suggest that measurements of the continuum polarization using ESPaDOnS are viable and can be used to study many astrophysical objects. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  9. Seasonal and solar-cycle variations of DP-type polar magnetic fields resolved via EOF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Robert; Freeman, Mervyn; Wild, James; Dorrian, Gareth; Gjerloev, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    We describe our application of the Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) method to characterise and separate contributions to the variability of the Earth's external magnetic field (EMF) in the northern polar region, using ground magnetometer measurements. The EOF method analyses the spatio-temporal co-variance of the data to decompose it into dynamically distinct modes (each mode is a pair of spatial and temporal basis vectors). Briefly, the benefits of this analysis method are firstly that a small number of the modes can cumulatively represent most of the variance of the original data, and secondly that the basis vectors are defined by the data. Hence, the structure of the EMF is resolved compactly without a priori assumptions, in contrast to other decomposition methods such as Fourier and spherical harmonic expansions. We present the modes from 11 years (1997 - 2008) of magnetic vector data at 5 minutes resolution, recently collated by the SuperMAG archive of observatory and variometer data. Despite the sparse and irregular station distribution, a complete spatial morphology of the EMF is achieved using a self-consistent iterative infill method. Using a comparison of the temporal behaviour of the modes alongside independent measures of solar-terrestrial coupling, we demonstrate that the leading three modes describe the well-known Disturbance-Polar currents types 2 and 1 (DP2, DP1) and the system of cusp currents (DPY). These three modes account for the majority of the variance of the data - other modes describe the spatial motions of these current systems. The variation in the DP2, DP1 and DPY currents throughout the last solar cycle is presented, and the utility of this database of magnetic perturbations (to which further analysis methods can be applied) is highlighted.

  10. Polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for label-free biomolecular imaging of the tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    We report the development and implementation of a rapid polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy technique for label-free biomolecular imaging of the tooth. The hyperspectral SRS imaging technique developed covers both fingerprint (800-1800 cm-1) and high-wavenumber (2800-3600 cm-1) regions for tooth Raman imaging without fluorescence background interference with an imaging speed of <0.3 s per frame of 512 × 512 pixels (˜1 μs per pixel), that is, >106 faster than confocal Raman imaging. Significant differences of hyperspectral SRS spectra among different tooth locations (e.g., dentin, enamel, and dentin-enamel junction) are observed, revealing the biochemical distribution differences across the tooth. Further polarization-resolved SRS imaging shows different polarization dependences related to the molecular orientation differences of various tooth locations. This work demonstrates the potential of polarization-resolved hyperspectral SRS imaging technique developed in rapidly characterizing biochemical structures and compositions as well as biomolecule organizations/orientations of the tooth without labeling.

  11. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  12. Generation of an axially super-resolved quasi-spherical focal spot using an amplitude-modulated radially polarized beam.

    PubMed

    Lin, Han; Jia, Baohua; Gu, Min

    2011-07-01

    An axially super-resolved quasi-spherical focal spot can be generated by focusing an amplitude-modulated radially polarized beam through a high numerical aperture objective. A method based on the unique depolarization properties of a circular focus is proposed to design the amplitude modulation. The generated focal spot shows a ratio of x:y:z=1:1:1.48 for the normalized FWHM in three dimensions, compared to that of x:y:z=1:0.74:1.72 under linear polarization (in the x direction) illumination. Moreover, the focusable light efficiency of the designed amplitude-modulated beam is 65%, which is more than 3 times higher than the optimized case under linear polarization and thus make the amplitude-modulated radial polarization beam more suitable for a wide range of applications.

  13. Measurements of Hygroscopicity- and Size-Resolved Sea Spray Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B.; Dawson, K. W.; Royalty, T. M.; Reed, R. E.; Petters, M.; Meskhidze, N.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a central role in many environmental processes by influencing the Earth's radiative balance, tropospheric chemistry, clouds, biogeochemical cycles, and visibility as well as adversely impacting human health. Based on their origin, atmospheric aerosols can be defined as anthropogenic or natural. Recent studies have shown that a large fraction of uncertainty in the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosols is related to uncertainty in natural—background—aerosols. Marine aerosols are of particular interest due to the abundance of oceans covering the Earth's surface. Despite their importance, limited information is currently available for size- and composition-resolved marine aerosol emission fluxes. Our group has designed and built an instrument for measuring the size- and hygroscopicity-resolved sea spray aerosol fluxes. The instrument was first deployed during spring 2015 at the end of the 560 m pier of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Field Research Facility in Duck, NC. Measurements include 200 nm-sized diameter growth factor (hygroscopicity) distributions, sea spray particle flux measurements, and total sub-micron sized aerosol concentration. Ancillary ocean data includes salinity, pH, sea surface temperature, dissolved oxygen content, and relative fluorescence (proxy for [Chl-a]). Hygroscopicity distribution measurements show two broad peaks, one indicative of organics and sulfates and another suggestive of sea salt. The fraction of 200 nm-sized salt particles having hygroscopicity similar to that of sea-spray aerosol contributes up to ~24% of the distribution on days with high-speed onshore winds and up to ~3% on calm days with winds blowing from the continent. However, the total concentration of sea-spray-like particles originating from offshore versus onshore winds was relatively similar. Changes in the relative contribution of sea-salt to number concentration were caused by a concomitant changes in total aerosol concentration

  14. Time-resolved biofilm deformation measurements using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Blauert, Florian; Horn, Harald; Wagner, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of shear stress with the biofilm leads to a dynamic deformation, which is related to the structural and material characteristics of biofilms. We show how optical coherence tomography can be used as an imaging technique to investigate the time-resolved deformation on the biofilm mesoscale as well as to estimate mechanical properties of the biofilm. For the first time time-resolved deformation from cross-sectional views of the inner biofilm structure could be shown. Changes in the biofilm structure and rheological properties were calculated from cross sections in real-time and time-lapsed measurements. Heterotrophic biofilms were grown in a flow cell set-up at low shear stress of τw  = 0.01 Pa. By applying higher shear stress elastic and viscoelastic behavior of biofilms were quantified. Deformation led to a change in biofilm conformation and allowed to estimate rheological properties. Assuming an ideal wall shear stress calculation, the shear modulus G = 29.7 ± 1.7 Pa and the Young's modulus E = 36.0 ± 2.6 Pa were estimated.

  15. In-vivo depth-resolved birefringence measurements of the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cense, Barry; Chen, Teresa; Park, Boris H.; Pierce, Mark C.; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2002-06-01

    Glaucoma causes irreversible damage to nerves in the retinal nerve fiber layer. A technique that could measure both the condition and thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) would be very useful for the early detection and treatment of glaucoma. Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) is a modality that measures the depth resolved optical birefringence of biological tissue. Since damage to the nerve fiber layer could decrease its birefringence, PS-OCT has the potential to enhance specificity in determining RNFL thickness and integrity in OCT images. In order to measure the RNFL birefringence on humans in vivo, a fiber-based PS-OCT set-up was built with which quasi real time images of the human retina were made. Preliminary measurements on a healthy retina show that the birefringence of the RNFL around the optic nerve head was equal to 34+/- 3 degree(s)/100 micrometers . In conclusion, to our knowledge, we present the first depth resolved birefringence measurements of the human RNFL in vivo.

  16. Highly polarized emission in spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of alpha-Fe(001)/GaAs(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, James; Yu, Sung Woo; Morton, Simon; Waddill, George; Thompson, Jamie; Neal, James; Spangenberg, Matthais; Shen, T.H.

    2009-05-19

    Highly spin-polarized sources of electrons, Integrated into device design, remain of great interest to the spintronic and magneto-electronic device community Here, the growth of Fe upon GaAs(001) has been studied with photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), including Spin Resolved PES. Despite evidence of atomic level disorder such as intermixing, an over-layer with the spectroscopic signature of alpha-Fe(001), with a bcc real space ordering, Is obtained The results will be discussed in light of the possibility of using such films as a spin-polarized source in device applications.

  17. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  18. Time resolved PIV measurement of fluid dynamics in agitated vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasikova, D.; Kotek, M.; Kopecky, V.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the results obtained by TR PIV measurements focused on detailed flow analysis in the selected region. The investigated area was placed 3mm above the blades axis and 5mm far from the blade edge. The captured images were firstly analysed on the mean velocity distribution and the intensity of turbulence {UV} statistics. Here we used the time resolved technique for the experimental study of the flow field in the agitated vessel. The results of the application POD and ODP algorithm on the captured datasets uncovered the existence of unsteady structures in the area that was assumed to be stable. The existence of these structures is bringing a novel view on the mixing process.

  19. Spatially and temporally resolved temperature measurement in laser media.

    PubMed

    Körner, Jörg; Yue, Fangxin; Hein, Joachim; Kaluza, Malte C

    2016-06-01

    A technique to measure the spatially resolved temperature distribution in a laser medium is presented. It is based on the temperature dependence of the absorption cross section close to the zero-phonon line of the active medium. Since other materials in the beam path exhibit a high (and constant) transmission at this wavelength, the method can easily be applied in realistic amplifier setups. The method was successfully tested on three different samples, which were pumped by a pulsed laser diode with up to 150 W average power: side-cooled Yb:YAG and Yb:fluoride-phosphate glass at room temperature and face-cooled Yb:CaF2 at 120 K.

  20. An Absolute Measurement of Resonance-Resolved Electron Impact Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisenfeld, Daniel Brett

    1998-11-01

    An experiment to measure electron-impact excitation (EIE) of multiply-charged ions is described. An absolute measurement has been carried out of the cross section for EIE of Si2+(3s2/ 1S/to3s3p/ 1P) from energies below threshold to 11 eV above. A beams modulation technique with inclined electron and ion beams was used. Radiation at 120.7 nm from the excited ions was detected using an absolutely calibrated optical system. The analysis of the experimental data requires a determination of the population fraction of the Si2+ (3s3p/ 3Po) metastable state in the incident ion beam, which was measured to be 0.210 ± 0.018. The data have been corrected for contributions to the signal from radiative decay following excitation from the metastable state to 3s3p1P and 3p2/ 3P, and excitation of the ground state to levels above 3s3p/ 1P. The experimental 0.56 ± 0.08 eV energy spread has allowed us to resolve complex resonance structure throughout the studied energy range. At the reported ±14% uncertainty level (90% confidence limit), the measured structure and absolute scale of the cross section are in good agreement with 12-state close-coupling R-matrix calculations.

  1. Circularly polarized near-field optical mapping of spin-resolved quantum Hall chiral edge states.

    PubMed

    Mamyouda, Syuhei; Ito, Hironori; Shibata, Yusuke; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masumi; Akazaki, Tatsushi; Tamura, Hiroyuki; Ootuka, Youiti; Nomura, Shintaro

    2015-04-01

    We have successfully developed a circularly polarized near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) that enables us to irradiate circularly polarized light with spatial resolution below the diffraction limit. As a demonstration, we perform real-space mapping of the quantum Hall chiral edge states near the edge of a Hall-bar structure by injecting spin polarized electrons optically at low temperature. The obtained real-space mappings show that spin-polarized electrons are injected optically to the two-dimensional electron layer. Our general method to locally inject spins using a circularly polarized NSOM should be broadly applicable to characterize a variety of nanomaterials and nanostructures.

  2. Space-time resolved measurements of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarczyk, T.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Dudzak, R.; Chodukowski, T.; Dostal, J.; Demchenko, N. N.; Korneev, Ph.; Kalinowska, Z.; Kalal, M.; Renner, O.; Smid, M.; Borodziuk, S.; Krousky, E.; Ullschmied, J.; Hrebicek, J.; Medrik, T.; Golasowski, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Skala, J.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2015-10-01

    The first space-time resolved spontaneous magnetic field (SMF) measurements realized on Prague Asterix Laser System are presented. The SMF was generated as a result of single laser beam (1.315 μm) interaction with massive planar targets made of materials with various atomic numbers (plastic and Cu). Measured SMF confirmed azimuthal geometry and their maximum amplitude reached the value of 10 MG at the laser energy of 250 J for both target materials. It was demonstrated that spatial distributions of these fields are associated with the character of the ablative plasma expansion which clearly depends on the target material. To measure the SMF, the Faraday effect was employed causing rotation of the vector of polarization of the linearly polarized diagnostic beam. The rotation angle was determined together with the phase shift using a novel design of a two-channel polaro-interferometer. To obtain sufficiently high temporal resolution, the polaro-interferometer was irradiated by Ti:Sa laser pulse with the wavelength of 808 nm and the pulse duration of 40 fs. The results of measurements were compared with theoretical analysis.

  3. Space-time resolved measurements of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Borodziuk, S.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Dudzak, R.; Dostal, J.; Krousky, E.; Ullschmied, J.; Hrebicek, J.; Medrik, T.; Golasowski, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Skala, J.; Demchenko, N. N.; Korneev, Ph.; Kalal, M.; Renner, O.; Smid, M.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2015-10-15

    The first space-time resolved spontaneous magnetic field (SMF) measurements realized on Prague Asterix Laser System are presented. The SMF was generated as a result of single laser beam (1.315 μm) interaction with massive planar targets made of materials with various atomic numbers (plastic and Cu). Measured SMF confirmed azimuthal geometry and their maximum amplitude reached the value of 10 MG at the laser energy of 250 J for both target materials. It was demonstrated that spatial distributions of these fields are associated with the character of the ablative plasma expansion which clearly depends on the target material. To measure the SMF, the Faraday effect was employed causing rotation of the vector of polarization of the linearly polarized diagnostic beam. The rotation angle was determined together with the phase shift using a novel design of a two-channel polaro-interferometer. To obtain sufficiently high temporal resolution, the polaro-interferometer was irradiated by Ti:Sa laser pulse with the wavelength of 808 nm and the pulse duration of 40 fs. The results of measurements were compared with theoretical analysis.

  4. RESOLVED MEASUREMENTS OF X{sub CO} IN NGC 6946

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan Meyer, Jennifer; Koda, Jin; Mooney, Thomas; Towers, Sarah; Momose, Rieko; Fukuhara, Masayuki; Egusa, Fumi; Kennicutt, Robert; Kuno, Nario; Carty, Misty; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Scoville, Nick

    2012-01-01

    We present the largest sample to date of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in a substantial spiral galaxy other than the Milky Way. We map the distribution of molecular gas with high resolution and image fidelity within the central 5 kpc of the spiral galaxy NGC 6946 in the {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0) transition. By combining observations from the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m single dish telescope and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy interferometer, we are able to obtain high image fidelity and accurate measurements of L{sub CO} compared with previous purely interferometric studies. We resolve individual GMCs, measure their luminosities and virial masses, and derive X{sub CO}-the conversion factor from CO measurements to H{sub 2} masses-within individual clouds. On average, we find that X{sub CO} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} (K km s{sup -1}){sup -1}, which is consistent within our uncertainties with previously derived Galactic values as well as the value we derive for Galactic GMCs above our mass sensitivity limit. The properties of our GMCs are largely consistent with the trends observed for molecular clouds detected in the Milky Way disk, with the exception of six clouds detected within {approx}400 pc of the center of NGC 6946, which exhibit larger velocity dispersions for a given size and luminosity, as has also been observed at the Galactic center.

  5. Effect of 3D Polarization profiles on polarization measurements and colliding beam experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Bazilevsky, A.

    2011-08-18

    The development of polarization profiles are the primary reason for the loss of average polarization. Polarization profiles have been parametrized with a Gaussian distribution. We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the figure of merit in single and double spin experiments. Examples from RHIC are provided. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only collider of spin polarized protons. During beam acceleration and storage profiles of the polarization P develop, which affect the polarization measured in a polarimeter, and the polarization and figure of merit (FOM) in colliding beam experiments. We calculate these for profiles in all dimensions, and give examples for RHIC. Like in RHIC we call the two colliding beams Blue and Yellow. We use the overbar to designate intensity-weighted averages in polarimeters (e.g. {bar P}), and angle brackets to designate luminosity-weighted averages in colliding beam experiments (e.g.

    ).

  6. Measurement of polarization of 3He with mobile polarized 3He neutron spin filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ino, T.; Kim, G. N.; Lee, M. W.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, S. W.; Skoy, V. R.

    2014-03-01

    A mobile polarized 3He neutron spin filter was developed for both optical pumping and transportation, and the polarization of 3He was measured with cold neutrons of HANARO in KAERI. The progress of polarization build-up during the optical pumping of the 3He cell was observed by adiabatic fast-passage NMR system. The 3He cell was made of an alumino-silicate glass GE-180 with a cylindrical shape of 40 mm in diameter and 60 mm in length from KEK. A cell contained 5.74 barṡcm of 3He gas. The whole installation after 8 h pumping was transported to the general-purpose test station of the HANARO research reactor and the polarization of 3He was measured with cold neutrons. The measured polarization of 3He was 0.18 ± 0.01 by measuring the neutron transmission through the 3He cell.

  7. Measurement of complex ultrashort laser pulses using frequency-resolved optical gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lina

    This thesis contains three components of research: a detailed study of the performance of Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) for measuring complex ultrashort laser pulses, a new method for measuring the arbitrary polarization state of an ultrashort laser pulse using Tomographic Ultrafast Retrieval of Transverse Light E-fields (TURTLE) technique, and new approach for measuring two complex pulses simultaneously using PG blind FROG. In recent decades, many techniques for measuring the full intensity and phase of ultrashort laser pulses have been proposed. These techniques include: Spectral Interferometry (SI)[1], Temporal Analysis by Dispersing a Pair of Light E-Field (TADPOLE)[2], Spectral Phase Interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction (SPIDER)[3], and Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG)[4]. Each technique is actually a class of techniques that includes different variations on the original idea, such as SEA-SPIDER[5], ZAP SPIDER[6] are two variations of SPIDER. But most of these techniques for measuring ultrashort laser pulses either do not yield the complete time-dependent intensity and phase (e.g., autocorrelation), can at best only measure simple pulses (e.g., SPIDER), or need well characterized reference pulse. In this thesis, we compare the performance of three versions of FROG: second-harmonic-generation (SHG) FROG, polarization-gate (PG) FROG, and cross-correlation FROG (XFROG), the last of which requires a well-characterized reference pulse. We found that the XFROG algorithm converged in all cases and required only one initial guess. The PG FROG algorithm converged for 99% of the moderately complex pulses that we tried, and for over 95% of the most complex pulses (TBP ˜ 100). And the SHG FROG algorithm converged for 95% of the pulses that we tried and for over 80% of the most complex pulses. After some analysis, we found that noise filtering and adding more sampling points to the FROG trace solved the non-converging problems and we

  8. Time- and polarization-resolved cellular autofluorescence towards quantitative biochemistry on living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfveby, John; TImerman, Randi; Soto Velasquez, Monica P.; Wickramasinghe, Dhanushka W. P. M.; Bartusek, Jillian; Heikal, Ahmed A.

    2014-09-01

    Native coenzymes such as the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide play pivotal roles in energy metabolism and a myriad of biochemical reactions in living cells/tissues. These coenzymes are naturally fluorescent and, therefore, have the potential to serve as intrinsic biomarkers for mitochondrial activities, programmed cell death (apoptosis), oxidative stress, aging, and neurodegenerative disease. In this contribution, we employ two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and time-resolved anisotropy imaging of intracellular NADH for quantitative, non-invasive biochemistry on living cells in response to hydrogenperoxide- induced oxidative stress. In contrast with steady-state one-photon, UV-excited autofluorescence, two-photon FLIM is sensitive to both molecular conformation and stimuli-induced changes in the local environment in living cells with minimum photodamage and inherently enhanced spatial resolution. On the other hand, time-resolved, two-photon anisotropy imaging of cellular autofluorescence allows for quantitative assessment of binding state and environmental restrictions on the tumbling mobility of intrinsic NADH. Our measurements reveal that free and enzyme-bound NADH exist at equilibrium, with a dominant autofluorescence contribution of the bound fraction in living cells. Parallel studies on NADH-enzyme binding in controlled environments serve as a point of reference in analyzing autofluorescence in living cells. These autofluorescence-based approaches complement the conventional analytical biochemistry methods that require the destruction of cells/tissues, while serving as an important step towards establishing intracellular NADH as a natural biomarker for monitoring changes in energy metabolism and redox state of living cells in response to environmental hazards.

  9. Response Surface Methods For Spatially-Resolved Optical Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Dorrington, A. A.; Cutler, A. D.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    Response surface methods (or methodology), RSM, have been applied to improve data quality for two vastly different spatially-resolved optical measurement techniques. In the first application, modern design of experiments (MDOE) methods, including RSM, are employed to map the temperature field in a direct-connect supersonic combustion test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser-based measurement technique known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure temperature at various locations in the combustor. RSM is then used to develop temperature maps of the flow. Even though the temperature fluctuations at a single point in the flowfield have a standard deviation on the order of 300 K, RSM provides analytic fits to the data having 95% confidence interval half width uncertainties in the fit as low as +/- 30 K. Methods of optimizing future CARS experiments are explored. The second application of RSM is to quantify the shape of a 5-meter diameter, ultra-lightweight, inflatable space antenna at NASA Langley Research Center. Photogrammetry is used to simultaneously measure the shape of the antenna at approximately 500 discrete spatial locations. RSM allows an analytic model to be developed that describes the shape of the majority of the antenna with an uncertainty of 0.4 mm, with 95% confidence. This model would allow a quantitative comparison between the actual shape of the antenna and the original design shape. Accurately determining this shape also allows confident interpolation between the measured points. Such a model could, for example, be used for ray tracing of radio-frequency waves up to 95 GHz. to predict the performance of the antenna.

  10. Cell growth characteristics from angle- and polarization-resolved light scattering: Prospects for two-dimensional correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herran Cuspinera, Roxana M.; Hore, Dennis K.

    2016-11-01

    We highlight the potential of generalized two-dimensional correlation analysis for the fingerprinting of cell growth in solution monitored by light scattering, where the synchronous and asynchronous responses serve as a sensitive marker for the effect of growth conditions on the distribution of cell morphologies. The polarization of the scattered light varies according to the cell size distribution, and so the changes in the polarization over time are an excellent indicator of the dynamic growth conditions. However, direct comparison of the polarization-, time-, and angle-resolved signals between different experiments is hindered by the subtle changes in the data, and the inability to easily adapt models to account for these differences. Using Mie scattering simulations of different growth conditions, and some preliminary experimental data for a single set of conditions, we illustrate that correlation analysis provides rapid and sensitive qualitative markers of growth characteristics.

  11. Spatially resolved contrast measurement of diffractive micromirror arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicker, Cornelius; Heber, Jörg; Berndt, Dirk; Rückerl, Florian; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Shorte, Spencer; Wagner, Michael; Schenk, Harald

    2015-02-01

    Diffractive micromirror arrays (MMA) are a special class of optical MEMS, serving as spatial light modulators (SLM) that control the phase of reflected light. Since the surface profile is the determining factor for an accurate phase modulation, high-precision topographic characterization techniques are essential to reach highest optical performance. While optical profiling techniques such as white-light interferometry are still considered to be most suitable to this task, the practical limits of interferometric techniques start to become apparent with the current state of optical MEMS technology. Light scatter from structured surfaces carries information about their topography, making scatter techniques a promising alternative. Therefore, a spatially resolved scatter measurement technique, which takes advantage of the MMA's diffractive principle, has been implemented experimentally. Spectral measurements show very high contrast ratios (up to 10 000 in selected samples), which are consistent with calculations from micromirror roughness parameters obtained by white-light interferometry, and demonstrate a high sensitivity to changes in the surface topography. The technique thus seems promising for the fast and highly sensitive characterization of diffractive MMAs.

  12. Proton Form Factor Measurements Using Polarization Method: Beyond Born Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Pentchev, Lubomir

    2008-10-13

    Significant theoretical and experimental efforts have been made over the past 7 years aiming to explain the discrepancy between the proton form factor ratio data obtained at JLab using the polarization method and the previous Rosenbluth measurements. Preliminary results from the first high precision polarization experiment dedicated to study effects beyond Born approximation will be presented. The ratio of the transferred polarization components and, separately, the longitudinal polarization in ep elastic scattering have been measured at a fixed Q{sup 2} of 2.5 GeV{sup 2} over a wide kinematic range. The two quantities impose constraints on the real part of the ep elastic amplitudes.

  13. Measurement of ocular counterrolling /OCR/ by polarized light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, R. V.; Lichtenberg, B. K.

    1982-01-01

    The assessment of the activation of the otolith gravitoinertial sensors in the vestibular system of the inner ear may be accomplished by observing the occular counterrolling (OCR) movements which rotate the eyes about the line of sight. A method is presented for the continuous measurement of OCR by means of polarized light, a system of polarizers, and a contact lens. A polarized hard contact lens is placed between two soft lenses before application to the eye, and the measured phase difference between the incident rotating polarized light and the reflected light from this lens provides readings uncontaminated by other eye movement modes.

  14. POLARIZED HYDROGEN JET TARGET FOR MEASUREMENT OF RHIC PROTON BEAM POLARIZATION.

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; WISE,T.; CHAPMAN,M.; GRAHAM,D.; KPONOU,A.; MAHLER,G.; MENG,W.; NASS,A.; RITTER,J.

    2005-01-28

    The performance and unique features of the RHIC polarized jet target and our solutions to the important design constraints imposed on the jet by the RHIC environment are described. The target polarization and thickness were measured to be 0.924 {+-} 2% and 1.3 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 12} atoms/cm{sup 2} respectively.

  15. Temporally and spatially resolved photoluminescence investigation of (112{sup ¯}2) semi-polar InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells grown on nanorod templates

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Smith, R.; Athanasiou, M.; Yu, X.; Bai, J.; Wang, T.

    2014-12-29

    By means of time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) and confocal PL measurements, temporally and spatially resolved optical properties have been investigated on a number of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN multiple-quantum-well (MQW) structures with a wide range of indium content alloys from 13% to 35% on (112{sup ¯}2) semi-polar GaN with high crystal quality, obtained through overgrowth on nanorod templates. With increasing indium content, the radiative recombination lifetime initially increases as expected, but decreases if the indium content further increases to 35%, corresponding to emission in the green spectral region. The reduced radiative recombination lifetime leads to enhanced optical performance for the high indium content MQWs as a result of strong exciton localization, which is different from the behaviour of c-plane InGaN/GaN MQWs, where quantum confined Stark effect plays a dominating role in emission process.

  16. [Research on New Type of Spectral Modulation Polarization Measurement Technology].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Zhou, Feng; Li, Huan; Zhao, Hai-bo

    2015-10-01

    Spectral Modulation Polarization Measurement technology (SMPM) is a new type of polarization modulation technology, with an achromatic /4 retarder, a multiple-order retarder and a polarizer the polarization information of incident light can be encoded into the spectral dimension, sinusoidal which amplitude scales with the degree of the linear polarization and phase scales with the angle of the linear polarization can be acquired directly. With a dedicated algorithm for the modulated spectrum, we can get degree and angle of the linear polarization, spectral information and radiation information of the target. This paper expounds the basic principle of SMPM and concrete implementation scheme is proposed. Demodulation algorithm is designed before experimental platform are set up. Experiment which verified the correctness on the SMPM has carried on. The experimental results show the correctness and feasibility of SMPM. Compared with traditional polarization modulate techniques no moving parts and electronic components are including in this scheme. It's also has the advantages of compact and low mass. We can get all the polarization information through one single measurement rather than get Stokes parameters for further calculations. This study provides a new kind of technological approaches for the development of new space polarization detecting sensor.

  17. Design of a Device for Sky Light Polarization Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yujie; Hu, Xiaoping; Lian, Junxiang; Zhang, Lilian; Xian, Zhiwen; Ma, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Sky polarization patterns can be used both as indicators of atmospheric turbidity and as a sun compass for navigation. The objective of this study is to improve the precision of sky light polarization measurements by optimal design of the device used. The central part of the system is composed of a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera; a fish-eye lens and a linear polarizer. Algorithms for estimating parameters of the polarized light based on three images are derived and the optimal alignments of the polarizer are analyzed. The least-squares estimation is introduced for sky light polarization pattern measurement. The polarization patterns of sky light are obtained using the designed system and they follow almost the same patterns of the single-scattering Rayleigh model. Deviations of polarization angles between observation and the theory are analyzed. The largest deviations occur near the sun and anti-sun directions. Ninety percent of the deviations are less than 5° and 40% percent of them are less than 1°. The deviations decrease evidently as the degree of polarization increases. It also shows that the polarization pattern of the cloudy sky is almost identical as in the blue sky. PMID:25196003

  18. [Research on New Type of Spectral Modulation Polarization Measurement Technology].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Zhou, Feng; Li, Huan; Zhao, Hai-bo

    2015-10-01

    Spectral Modulation Polarization Measurement technology (SMPM) is a new type of polarization modulation technology, with an achromatic /4 retarder, a multiple-order retarder and a polarizer the polarization information of incident light can be encoded into the spectral dimension, sinusoidal which amplitude scales with the degree of the linear polarization and phase scales with the angle of the linear polarization can be acquired directly. With a dedicated algorithm for the modulated spectrum, we can get degree and angle of the linear polarization, spectral information and radiation information of the target. This paper expounds the basic principle of SMPM and concrete implementation scheme is proposed. Demodulation algorithm is designed before experimental platform are set up. Experiment which verified the correctness on the SMPM has carried on. The experimental results show the correctness and feasibility of SMPM. Compared with traditional polarization modulate techniques no moving parts and electronic components are including in this scheme. It's also has the advantages of compact and low mass. We can get all the polarization information through one single measurement rather than get Stokes parameters for further calculations. This study provides a new kind of technological approaches for the development of new space polarization detecting sensor. PMID:26904842

  19. Design of a device for sky light polarization measurements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Hu, Xiaoping; Lian, Junxiang; Zhang, Lilian; Xian, Zhiwen; Ma, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Sky polarization patterns can be used both as indicators of atmospheric turbidity and as a sun compass for navigation. The objective of this study is to improve the precision of sky light polarization measurements by optimal design of the device used. The central part of the system is composed of a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera; a fish-eye lens and a linear polarizer. Algorithms for estimating parameters of the polarized light based on three images are derived and the optimal alignments of the polarizer are analyzed. The least-squares estimation is introduced for sky light polarization pattern measurement. The polarization patterns of sky light are obtained using the designed system and they follow almost the same patterns of the single-scattering Rayleigh model. Deviations of polarization angles between observation and the theory are analyzed. The largest deviations occur near the sun and anti-sun directions. Ninety percent of the deviations are less than 5° and 40% percent of them are less than 1°. The deviations decrease evidently as the degree of polarization increases. It also shows that the polarization pattern of the cloudy sky is almost identical as in the blue sky. PMID:25196003

  20. Polarization Measurements in Photoproduction with CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    E. Pasyuk

    2010-05-01

    A significant part of the experimental program in Hall-B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to the studies of the structure of baryons. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), availability of circularly and linearly polarized photon beams and recent addition of polarized targets provides remarkable opportunity for single, double and in some cases triple polarization measurements in photoproduction. An overview of the experiments will be presented.

  1. Improved degree of polarization-based differential group delay measurements.

    PubMed

    Pye, Jason; Yevick, David

    2014-06-01

    The time-averaged Stokes vectors obtained after polarization-scrambled light containing multiple, independently polarized frequency components traverses an optical fiber collectively form a surface in Stokes space. The geometry of this surface can be directly related to the polarization mode dispersion of the fiber. This paper examines both numerically and experimentally an improved method for performing such measurements. Additionally, it quantifies the surfaces associated with input pulses containing an arbitrary set of equally spaced frequencies.

  2. SAMRAI: A novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission beamline in the VUV region at UVSOR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shin-Ichi; Ito, Takahiro; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro; Sakai, Masahiro; Nakamura, Eiken; Kondo, Naonori; Horigome, Toshio; Hayashi, Kenji; Goto, Tomohiro; Ejima, Takeo; Soda, Kazuo

    2010-05-15

    A novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy beamline in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region has been installed at the UVSOR-II 750 MeV synchrotron light source. The beamline is equipped with a 3 m long APPLE-II type undulator with horizontally/vertically linear and right/left circular polarizations, a 10 m Wadsworth type monochromator covering a photon energy range of 6-43 eV, and a 200 mm radius hemispherical photoelectron analyzer with an electron lens of a {+-}18 deg. acceptance angle. Due to the low emittance of the UVSOR-II storage ring, the light source is regarded as an entrance slit, and the undulator light is directly led to a grating by two plane mirrors in the monochromator while maintaining a balance between high-energy resolution and high photon flux. The energy resolving power (h{nu}/{Delta}h{nu}) and photon flux of the monochromator are typically 1x10{sup 4} and 10{sup 12} photons/s, respectively, with a 100 {mu}m exit slit. The beamline is used for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with an energy resolution of a few meV covering the UV-to-VUV energy range.

  3. Polar Wind Measurements with TIDE/PSI and HYDRA on the Polar Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Y. J.; Horwitz, J. L.; Moore, Thomas E.; Giles, Barbara L.; Chandler, Michael O.; Craven, Paul D.; Chang, S.-W.; Scudder, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) on the POLAR spacecraft has allowed sampling of the three-dimensional ion distributions with excellent energy, angular, and mass resolution. The companion Plasma Source Instrument, when operated, allows sufficient diminution of the electric potential to observe the polar wind at very high altitudes. In this presentation, we will describe the results of polar wind characteristics H+, He+, and 0+ as observed by TIDE at 5000 km and 8 RE altitudes. The relationship of the polar wind parameters with the solar zenith angle and with the day-night distance in the Solar Magnetic coordinate system will also be presented. We will compare these measurements with recent simulations of the photoelectron-driven polar wind using a couple fluid-semikinetic model. In addition, we will compare these polar wind observations with low-energy electrons sampled by the HYDRA experiment on POLAR to examine possible effects of the polar rain and photoelectrons and hopefully explain the large ion outflow velocity variations at POLAR apogee.

  4. Polarization-ratio reflectance measurements in the extreme ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Brimhall, N; Heilmann, N; Ware, M; Peatross, J

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate a technique for determining optical constants of materials in the extreme UV from the ratio of p-polarized to s-polarized reflectance. The measurements are based on laser-generated high-order harmonics, which have easily rotatable linear polarization but that are prone to brightness fluctuations and systematic drifts during measurement. Rather than measure the absolute reflectance, we extract the optical constants of a material from the ratio of p-polarized to s-polarized reflectance at multiple incident angles. This has the advantage of dividing out long-term fluctuations and possible systematic errors. We show that the reflectance ratio is as sensitive as the absolute reflectance to material optical properties.

  5. A method for measuring thermoreflectance using polarization modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.S.; Norris, P.M.

    1996-12-31

    A novel thermoreflectance technique is presented for noncontact temperature measurements at large angles of incidence on solid materials and devices. The method involves measuring the differential reflectance from a polarization modulated laser beam. The polarization differential reflectance technique is demonstrated on undoped single-crystal Si wafers over a temperature range of 20 C to 60 C. The method is shown to be an extremely sensitive temperature probe for near grazing angle measurements.

  6. Genomic Evidence for Island Population Conversion Resolves Conflicting Theories of Polar Bear Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, James A.; Green, Richard E.; Fulton, Tara L.; Stiller, Mathias; Jay, Flora; Ovsyanikov, Nikita; Salamzade, Rauf; St. John, John; Stirling, Ian; Slatkin, Montgomery; Shapiro, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis, the evolutionary relationship between polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and brown bears (U. arctos) remains unclear. The two most recent comprehensive reports indicate a recent divergence with little subsequent admixture or a much more ancient divergence followed by extensive admixture. At the center of this controversy are the Alaskan ABC Islands brown bears that show evidence of shared ancestry with polar bears. We present an analysis of genome-wide sequence data for seven polar bears, one ABC Islands brown bear, one mainland Alaskan brown bear, and a black bear (U. americanus), plus recently published datasets from other bears. Surprisingly, we find clear evidence for gene flow from polar bears into ABC Islands brown bears but no evidence of gene flow from brown bears into polar bears. Importantly, while polar bears contributed <1% of the autosomal genome of the ABC Islands brown bear, they contributed 6.5% of the X chromosome. The magnitude of sex-biased polar bear ancestry and the clear direction of gene flow suggest a model wherein the enigmatic ABC Island brown bears are the descendants of a polar bear population that was gradually converted into brown bears via male-dominated brown bear admixture. We present a model that reconciles heretofore conflicting genetic observations. We posit that the enigmatic ABC Islands brown bears derive from a population of polar bears likely stranded by the receding ice at the end of the last glacial period. Since then, male brown bear migration onto the island has gradually converted these bears into an admixed population whose phenotype and genotype are principally brown bear, except at mtDNA and X-linked loci. This process of genome erosion and conversion may be a common outcome when climate change or other forces cause a population to become isolated and then overrun by species with which it can hybridize. PMID:23516372

  7. Genomic evidence for island population conversion resolves conflicting theories of polar bear evolution.

    PubMed

    Cahill, James A; Green, Richard E; Fulton, Tara L; Stiller, Mathias; Jay, Flora; Ovsyanikov, Nikita; Salamzade, Rauf; St John, John; Stirling, Ian; Slatkin, Montgomery; Shapiro, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis, the evolutionary relationship between polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and brown bears (U. arctos) remains unclear. The two most recent comprehensive reports indicate a recent divergence with little subsequent admixture or a much more ancient divergence followed by extensive admixture. At the center of this controversy are the Alaskan ABC Islands brown bears that show evidence of shared ancestry with polar bears. We present an analysis of genome-wide sequence data for seven polar bears, one ABC Islands brown bear, one mainland Alaskan brown bear, and a black bear (U. americanus), plus recently published datasets from other bears. Surprisingly, we find clear evidence for gene flow from polar bears into ABC Islands brown bears but no evidence of gene flow from brown bears into polar bears. Importantly, while polar bears contributed <1% of the autosomal genome of the ABC Islands brown bear, they contributed 6.5% of the X chromosome. The magnitude of sex-biased polar bear ancestry and the clear direction of gene flow suggest a model wherein the enigmatic ABC Island brown bears are the descendants of a polar bear population that was gradually converted into brown bears via male-dominated brown bear admixture. We present a model that reconciles heretofore conflicting genetic observations. We posit that the enigmatic ABC Islands brown bears derive from a population of polar bears likely stranded by the receding ice at the end of the last glacial period. Since then, male brown bear migration onto the island has gradually converted these bears into an admixed population whose phenotype and genotype are principally brown bear, except at mtDNA and X-linked loci. This process of genome erosion and conversion may be a common outcome when climate change or other forces cause a population to become isolated and then overrun by species with which it can hybridize.

  8. Measurements of optical polarization properties in dental tissues and biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Pecho, Oscar E.; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María M.

    2011-05-01

    Since biological tissues can have the intrinsic property of altering the polarization of incident light, optical polarization studies are important for a complete characterization. We have measured the polarized light scattered off of different dental tissues and biomaterials for a comparative study of their optical polarization property. The experimental setup was composed by a He-Ne laser, two linear polarizers and a detection system based on a photodiode. The laser beam was passed through one linear polarizer placed in front of the sample, beyond which the second linear polarizer (analyzer) and the photodiode detector were placed. First, the maximum laser-light intensity (reference condition) was attained without the sample in the laser path. Then, the sample was placed between the two polarizers and the polarization shift of the scattered laser light was determined by rotating the analyzer until the reference condition was reached. Two dental-resin composites (nanocomposite and hybrid) and two human dental tissues (enamel and dentine) were analyzed under repeatability conditions at three different locations on the sample: 20 measurements of the shift were taken and the average value and the uncertainty associated were calculated. For the human dentine the average value of the polarization shift found was 7 degrees, with an associated uncertainty of 2 degrees. For the human enamel and both dental-resin composites the average shift values were found to be similar to their corresponding uncertainties (2 degrees). The results suggest that although human dentine has notable polarization properties, dental-resin composites and human enamel do not show significant polarization shifts.

  9. NASA's Lunar Polar Ice Prospector, RESOLVE: Mission Rehearsal in Apollo Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Picard, Martin; Quinn, Jacqueline; Sanders, Gerald B.; Colaprete, Anthony; Elphic, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    After the completion of the Apollo Program, space agencies didn't visit the moon for many years. But then in the 90's, the Clementine and Lunar Prospector missions returned and showed evidence of water ice at the poles. Then in 2009 the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite indisputably showed that the Cabeus crater contained water ice and other useful volatiles. Furthermore, instruments aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) show evidence that the water ice may also be present in areas that receive several days of continuous sunlight each month. However, before we can factor this resource into our mission designs, we must understand the distribution and quantity of ice or other volatiles at the poles and whether it can be reasonably harvested for use as propellant or mission consumables. NASA, in partnership with the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), has been developing a payload to answer these questions. The payload is named RESOLVE. RESOLVE is on a development path that will deliver a tested flight design by the end of 2014. The team has developed a Design Reference Mission using LRO data that has RESOLVE landing near Cabeus Crater in May of2016. One of the toughest obstacles for RESOLVE's solar powered mission is its tight timeline. RESOLVE must be able to complete its objectives in the 5-7 days of available sunlight. The RESOLVE team must be able to work around obstacles to the mission timeline in real time. They can't afford to take a day off to replan as other planetary missions have done. To insure that this mission can be executed as planned, a prototype version of RESOLVE was developed this year and tested at a lunar analog site on Hawaii, known as Apollo Valley, which was once used to train the Apollo astronauts. The RESOLVE team planned the mission with the same type of orbital imagery that would be available from LRO. The simulation team prepositioned a Lander in Apollo Valley with RESOLVE on top mounted on its CSA rover. Then the mission

  10. Fluorescence polarization competition assay: the range of resolvable inhibitor potency is limited by the affinity of the fluorescent ligand.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinyi

    2003-02-01

    For the development of fluorescence polarization (FP) competition assays, there is a widespread belief that tight-binding fluorescent ligands should be avoided to identify inhibitors of low or intermediate potency in the screening of small-molecule compound libraries. It is demonstrated herein that this statement is a misconception; in fact, the higher the affinity of the fluorescent ligand, the wider the range of inhibitor potency that can be resolved. An approximate estimate for the low end of inhibitor K(i) values that can be resolved is the K(d) value of the fluorescent ligand. Because FP competition assays are typically conducted under nonstoichiometric titration conditions, it is suggested that a fluorescent ligand of highest affinity that also has an adequate quantum yield to satisfy such conditions be selected.

  11. ATOMIC BEAM POLARIZATION MEASUREMENT OF THE RHIC POLARIZED H-JET TARGET.

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; NASS,A.; GRAHAM,D.; KPONOU,A.; MAHLER,G.; MENG,W.; RITTER,J.; ET AL.

    2005-01-28

    The RHIC polarized H-Jet measures the polarization of the RHIC proton beam via elastic scattering off a nuclear polarized atomic hydrogen beam. The atomic beam is produced by a dissociator, a beam forming system and sextupole magnets. Nuclear polarization is achieved by exchanging occupation numbers of hyperfine states using high frequency transitions. The polarization was measured using a modified form of a Breit-Rabi polarimeter including focusing magnets and another set of high frequency transitions. The sampling of a large part of the beam and low noise electronics made it possible to measure the polarization to a high degree of accuracy in a very short time period (1 min). Using this system, we measured no depolarization of the atomic beam due to the RF fields of the bunched proton beam. Time-of-Flight measurements were done using a fast chopper and a QMA at the position of the RHIC interaction point to determine the areal density of the atomic beam seen by the RHIC beam.

  12. Four-component polarization measurement of lidar atmospheric scattering.

    PubMed

    Houston, J D; Carswell, A I

    1978-02-15

    Measurements of the backscattering from the lower atmosphere of linearly polarized ruby lidar pulses at 694 nm are described. A four-channel receiver provides simultaneous measurements of the four components of the Stokes vector of the scattered radiation. These data are used to obtain information on the polarization state of the scattering and its dependence on atmospheric conditions. Results are presented and discussed for clear air, hazes, and several cloud types. In water droplet clouds some rotation of the plane of polarization and changes in ellipticity are noted in the backscattered wave. Linear polarization of the penetrating lidar beam is strongly preserved even in quite dense clouds. In view of the increased complexity of the four-component measurement technique it would appear that in such cases two-channel measurements of delta would be the most efficient lidar approach.

  13. Measuring polarization of light quarks at ATLAS and CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, Yevgeny

    2015-10-01

    Polarization of strange quarks is preserved to a high degree when they hadronize into Λ baryons, as observed in Z decays at LEP. This opens up the possibility for ATLAS and CMS to use strange-quark polarization measurements as a characterization tool for new physics scenarios that produce such quarks. Measurements in t t ¯ samples would be useful for obtaining additional information about the polarization transfer from the strange quark to the Λ baryon. Already with 100 fb-1 in run 2, t t ¯ samples in ATLAS and CMS become competitive in sensitivity with the Z samples of the LEP experiments. Moreover, while the LEP measurements were done inclusively over all quark flavors, which makes their interpretation dependent on various modeling assumptions, t t ¯ events at the LHC offer multiple handles for disentangling the different contributions experimentally. We also discuss the possibility of measuring polarizations of up and down quarks.

  14. Measurement of Lamb wave polarization using a one-dimensional scanning laser vibrometer (L).

    PubMed

    Ayers, James; Apetre, Nicole; Ruzzene, Massimo; Sabra, Karim

    2011-02-01

    A single head scanning laser Doppler vibrometer is used for the estimation of the polarization of the first symmetric (S(0)) and antisymmetric (A(0)) Lamb wave modes. The measurements at two known incidence angles are performed in order to resolve the two components of motion. Filtering in the frequency/wavenumber domain of the response recorded along a scan line separates the contributions from each mode and allows the evaluation of the corresponding elliptical trajectories of particle motion. Comparison between measured and analytically estimated trajectories validates the measurement technique and suggests its application for the development of material characterization and diagnostics tools. PMID:21361415

  15. Measurement of Lamb wave polarization using a one-dimensional scanning laser vibrometer (L).

    PubMed

    Ayers, James; Apetre, Nicole; Ruzzene, Massimo; Sabra, Karim

    2011-02-01

    A single head scanning laser Doppler vibrometer is used for the estimation of the polarization of the first symmetric (S(0)) and antisymmetric (A(0)) Lamb wave modes. The measurements at two known incidence angles are performed in order to resolve the two components of motion. Filtering in the frequency/wavenumber domain of the response recorded along a scan line separates the contributions from each mode and allows the evaluation of the corresponding elliptical trajectories of particle motion. Comparison between measured and analytically estimated trajectories validates the measurement technique and suggests its application for the development of material characterization and diagnostics tools.

  16. Resolving Emissions Dynamics via Mass Spectrometry: Time Resolved Measurements of Emission Transients by Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Partridge, William P.

    2000-08-20

    Transient emissions occur throughout normal engine operation and can significantly contribute to overall system emissions. Such transient emissions may originate from various sources including cold start, varying load and exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR) rates; all of which are dynamic processes in the majority of engine operation applications (1). Alternatively, there are systems which are inherently dynamic even at steady-state engine-operation conditions. Such systems include catalytic exhaust-emissions treatment devices with self-initiated and sustained oscillations (2) and NOX adsorber systems (3,4,5). High-speed diagnostics, capable of temporally resolving such emissions transients, are required to characterize the process, verify calculated system inputs, and optimize the system.

  17. Comparison of skylight polarization measurements and MODTRAN-P calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pust, Nathan J.; Shaw, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Increased use of polarization in optical remote sensing provides motivation for a study of instruments and methods that can be used to test and validate polarized atmospheric radiative transfer codes and simulation tools. An example comparison of measured skylight polarization and calculations from a preliminary version of the polarized MODTRAN radiative transfer code (MODTRAN-P) for cloud-free conditions is presented. The study combines data from an all-sky polarization imager at 452, 491, 532, 632, and 701 nm, a solar radiometer, a zenith-viewing aerosol and cloud lidar, a weather station, and radiosonde profiles of atmospheric temperature and pressure to compare measurements and model calculations of the maximum degree of linear polarization for cloud-free atmospheres. Comparisons for conditions ranging from extremely clear to thick forest fire smoke indicate that the additional data most needed for constraining calculations are aerosol size distributions. Nevertheless, comparisons made with standard aerosol models in version 2.1-alpha of MODTRAN-P with an unpolarized multiple-scattering algorithm illustrate the methodology and provide quantitative information about the range of conditions for which a single-scattering radiative transfer code is useful for predicting skylight polarization. This approach is also warranted because many users simulate atmospheres with the MODTRAN standard aerosol models. The agreement of model calculations with measurements is high for low aerosol optical depth and degrades with increasing optical depth. Agreement between measurements and model results is best for the longer wavelengths.

  18. Polarization lidar measurements of honeybees for locating buried landmines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Joseph A.; Seldomridge, Nathan L.; Dunkle, Dustin L.; Nugent, Paul W.; Spangler, Lee H.; Churnside, James H.; Wilson, James W.; Bromenshenk, Jerry J.; Henderson, Colin B.

    2005-08-01

    A polarization-sensitive lidar was used to detect honeybees trained to locate buried landmines by smell. Lidar measurements of bee location agree reasonably well with maps of chemical plume strength and bee density determined by visual and video counts, indicating that the bees are preferentially located near the explosives and that the lidar identifies the locations of higher bee concentration. The co-polarized lidar backscatter signal is more effective than the cross-polarized signal for bee detection. Laboratory measurements show that the depolarization ratio of scattered light is near zero for bee wings and up to approximately thirty percent for bee bodies.

  19. Polarization measurement and vertical aperture optimization for obtaining circularly polarized bend-magnet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.; Hussain, Z.

    1997-04-01

    Growing interest in utilizing circular polarization prompted the design of bend-magnet beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, covering the 30-1500 eV spectral region, to include vertical aperturing capabilities for optimizing the collection of circular polarization above and below the orbit plane. After commissioning and early use of the beamline, a multilayer polarimeter was used to characterize the polarization state of the beam as a function of vertical aperture position. This report partially summarizes the polarimetry measurements and compares results with theoretical calculations intended to simulate experimental conditions.

  20. Study of optical clearing in polarization measurements by Monte Carlo simulations with anisotropic tissue-mimicking models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongsheng; Zeng, Nan; Wang, Yunfei; He, Honghui; Tuchin, Valery V; Ma, Hui

    2016-08-01

    We conducted Monte Carlo simulations based on anisotropic sclera-mimicking models to examine the polarization features in Mueller matrix polar decomposition (MMPD) parameters during the refractive index matching process, which is one of the major mechanisms of optical clearing. In a preliminary attempt, by changing the parameters of the models, wavelengths, and detection geometries, we demonstrate how the depolarization coefficient and retardance vary during the refractive index matching process and explain the polarization features using the average value and standard deviation of scattering numbers of the detected photons. We also study the depth-resolved polarization features during the gradual progression of the refractive index matching process. The results above indicate that the refractive index matching process increases the depth of polarization measurements and may lead to higher contrast between tissues of different anisotropies in deeper layers. MMPD-derived polarization parameters can characterize the refractive index matching process qualitatively. PMID:27240298

  1. Field-resolved measurement of reaction-induced spectral densities by polarizability response spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Andrew M.; Nome, Rene A.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2007-11-14

    The experimental design and theoretical description of a novel five-pulse laser spectroscopy is presented with an application to a pyridinium charge transfer complex in acetonitrile and methanol. In field-resolved polarizability response spectroscopy (PORS), an electronically resonant laser pulse first excites a solvated chromophore (reactant) and off-resonant Raman spectra of the resulting nuclear motions are measured as a function of the reaction time. The present apparatus differs from our earlier design by performing the Raman probe measurement (with fixed pulse delays) in the frequency domain. In addition, the full electric fields of the signals are measured by spectral interferometry to separate nonresonant and Raman responses. Our theoretical model shows how the PORS signal arises from nuclear motions that are displaced/driven by the photoinduced reaction. The field-resolved off-resonant (of the solute's electronic transitions) probing favors detection of solvent (as opposed to solute) dynamics coupled to the reaction. The sign of the signal represents the relative strengths of polarization responses associated with the ground and photoexcited solutions. Signatures of nonresonant and PORS signal contributions to the experimental results are analyzed with numerical calculations based on a theoretical model we have developed for reaction-induced PORS. Our model identifies two mechanisms of PORS signal generation: (i) structural relaxation induced resonance; (ii) dephasing induced resonance. In the charge transfer reaction investigated, the solvent-dependent and time-evolving (solvent) polarizability spectral density (PSD) is readily obtained. The general trend of an initial broadband inertial nuclear response followed by a decrease in the linewidth of the PSD establishes that the measured PSD is inconsistent with the approximation of a linear response. Furthermore, the explicit time evolution of the PSD is important for properly describing solvent control of

  2. Field-resolved measurement of reaction-induced spectral densities by polarizability response spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Andrew M.; Nome, Rene A.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2007-11-01

    The experimental design and theoretical description of a novel five-pulse laser spectroscopy is presented with an application to a pyridinium charge transfer complex in acetonitrile and methanol. In field-resolved polarizability response spectroscopy (PORS), an electronically resonant laser pulse first excites a solvated chromophore (reactant) and off-resonant Raman spectra of the resulting nuclear motions are measured as a function of the reaction time. The present apparatus differs from our earlier design by performing the Raman probe measurement (with fixed pulse delays) in the frequency domain. In addition, the full electric fields of the signals are measured by spectral interferometry to separate nonresonant and Raman responses. Our theoretical model shows how the PORS signal arises from nuclear motions that are displaced/driven by the photoinduced reaction. The field-resolved off-resonant (of the solute's electronic transitions) probing favors detection of solvent (as opposed to solute) dynamics coupled to the reaction. The sign of the signal represents the relative strengths of polarization responses associated with the ground and photoexcited solutions. Signatures of nonresonant and PORS signal contributions to the experimental results are analyzed with numerical calculations based on a theoretical model we have developed for reaction-induced PORS. Our model identifies two mechanisms of PORS signal generation: (i) structural relaxation induced resonance; (ii) dephasing induced resonance. In the charge transfer reaction investigated, the solvent-dependent and time-evolving (solvent) polarizability spectral density (PSD) is readily obtained. The general trend of an initial broadband inertial nuclear response followed by a decrease in the linewidth of the PSD establishes that the measured PSD is inconsistent with the approximation of a linear response. Furthermore, the explicit time evolution of the PSD is important for properly describing solvent control of

  3. Water leaving polarization signal measured from space. Is it possible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskozub, Jacek; Freda, Wlodzimierz

    2016-04-01

    Improvements in optical techniques for measuring linear polarization have renewed interest in using them to study ocean waters. However, some questions needed answering. Is there any useful information about ocean water optical properties in the polarization signal? Is it possible to discern it from polarization caused by atmospheric Rayleigh scattering polarization reflected by the sea surface and by the reflection itself? Will the signal be still detectable from the top of the atmosphere? We have recently answered affirmatively to the first question, showing that useful information about in-water single scattering albedo can be derived from the degree of polarization of water leaving radiation [1]. This information, can be combined with reflectance measurements to calculate for example the backscattering ratio of sea water components. Thus, at least in theory, optical remote sensing could be used to get information about the angular distribution of scattering. To answer the second and third questions, we have performed experiments [2] and used Monte Carlo modelling to study the water leaving polarization through a realistic (Cox-Munk distribution) sea surface. The results are promising, at least in some directions (mostly 90 degrees of azimuth angle from the sun blink). We also performed Monte Carlo calculations with a realistic atmosphere with both Rayleigh and aerosol scattering. The (new and unpublished) results show the polarization signal of water leaving can be also discerned from the top of the atmosphere making satellite remote sensing of ocean leaving polarization a realistic possibility. [1] Piskozub J. and Freda W, 2013, Signal of single scattering albedo in water leaving polarization, J. Europ. Opt. Soc.-Rapid, 8, 13055, http://dx.doi.org/10.2971/jeos.2013.13055 [2] Freda W., J. Piskozub, H. Toczek, 2015, Polarization imaging over sea surface - a method for measurements of Stokes components angular distribution, J. Eur. Opt. Soc.-Rapid, 10, 15060

  4. Polarized Reflectance Measurement of Burned Skin Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pedro, Hector Michael; Chang, Chuan-I.; Zarnani, Faranak; Glosser, Robert; Maas, D.; Idris, A.

    2011-10-01

    In the US, there are over 400,000 burn victims with 3,500 deaths in 2010. Recent evidence suggests that early removal of burn tissues can significantly increase the success of their recovery, since burns continue to spread and damage surrounding tissues after hours of injury. The rationale behind this procedure is that burns trigger the body's immune system to overreact, causing additional damage. Therefore, it is important to distinguish burn areas so that it can be removed. The problem with this is that it is difficult to recognize the margins of the burn area. In our project, we use polarized reflectance as a tool to identify the burned tissues from unburned ones.

  5. Characterizing the kinetics of suspended cylindrical particles by polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ran; Ou, Xueheng; Ma, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Polarization has promising potential to retrieve the information of the steady samples, such as tissues. However, for the fast changing sample such as the suspended algae in the water, the kinetics of the particles also influence the scattered polarization. The present paper will show our recent results to extract the information about the kinetics of the suspended cylindrical particles by polarization measurements. The sample is the aqueous suspension of the glass fibers stirred by a magnetic stirrer. We measure the scattered polarization of the fibers by use of a simultaneous polarization measurement system and obtain the time series of two orthogonal polarization components. By use of correlation analysis, we obtain the time parameters from the auto-correlation functions of the polarization components, and observe the changes with the stirring speeds. Results show that these time parameters indicate the immigration of the fibers. After discussion, we find that they may further characterize the kinetics, including the translation and rotation, of the glass fibers in the fluid field.

  6. Polarization measurement and vertical aperture optimization for obtaining circularly polarized bend-magnet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.; Hussain, Z.

    1995-10-01

    Using multilayer linear polarizers, we have studied the polarization state of radiation from bend magnet beamline 9.3.2 at Advanced Light Source as function of vertical oping angle at photon energies 367 and 722 eV. Both a fine slit and a coarse semi-aperture were stepped across the beam to accept different parts of the vertical radiation fan. Polarimetry yields the degree of linear polarization directly and the degree of circular polarization indirectly assuming an immeasurably small amount of unpolarized radiation based on close agreement of theory and experiment for linear polarization. Results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations, with departures from theory owing to uncertainty in effective aperture of the measured beam. The narrow 0.037 mrad aperture on the orbit plane transmits a beam whose degree of linear polarization exceeds 0.99 at these energies. The wide semi-aperture blocking the beam from above and below transmits a beam with a max figure of merit, given by the square root of flux times degree of circular polarization, when the aperture edge is on the orbit plane thus blocking only half of the total available flux.

  7. Intrinsic spin polarized electronic structure of CrO{sub 2} epitaxial film revealed by bulk-sensitive spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Hirokazu; Sunagawa, Masanori; Kittaka, Tomoko; Terashima, Kensei; Wakita, Takanori; Muraoka, Yuji; Yokoya, Takayoshi

    2015-05-18

    We have performed bulk-sensitive spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy in order to clarify the intrinsic spin-resolved electronic states of half-metallic ferromagnet CrO{sub 2}. We used CrO{sub 2} epitaxial films on TiO{sub 2}(100), which shows a peak at 1 eV with a clear Fermi edge, consistent with the bulk-sensitive PES spectrum for CrO{sub 2}. In spin-resolved spectra at 40 K, while the Fermi edge was observed in the spin up (majority spin) state, no states at the Fermi level (E{sub F}) with an energy gap of 0.5 eV below E{sub F} were observed in the spin down (minority spin) state. At 300 K, the gap in the spin down state closes. These results are consistent with resistivity measurements and magnetic hysteresis curves of the fabricated CrO{sub 2} film, constituting spectroscopic evidence for the half-metallicity of CrO{sub 2} at low temperature and reducing the spin polarization at room temperature. We also discuss the electron correlation effects of Cr 3d.

  8. Radiation measurements from polar and geosynchronous satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1973-01-01

    During the 1960's, radiation budget measurements from satellites have allowed quantitative study of the global energetics of our atmosphere-ocean system. A continuing program is planned, including independent measurement of the solar constant. Thus far, the measurements returned from two basically different types of satellite experiments are in agreement on the long term global scales where they are most comparable. This fact, together with independent estimates of the accuracy of measurement from each system, shows that the energy exchange between earth and space is now measured better than it can be calculated. Examples of application of the radiation budget data were shown. They can be related to the age-old problem of climate change, to the basic question of the thermal forcing of our circulation systems, and to the contemporary problems of local area energetics and computer modeling of the atmosphere.

  9. Bias-free procedure for the measurement of the minimum resolvable temperature difference and minimum resolvable contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijl, Piet; Valeton, J. Mathieu

    1999-10-01

    The characterization of electro-optical system performance by means of the standard minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRTD) or the minimum resolvable contrast (MRC) has a number of serious disadvantages. One of the problems is that they depend on the subjective decision criterion of the observer. We present an improved measurement procedure in which the results are free from observer bias. In an adaptive two-alternative forced-choice procedure, both the standard four-bar pattern and a five-bar reference pattern of the same size and contrast are presented consecutively in random order. The observer decides which of the two presentations contains the four-bar pattern. Misjudgments are made if the bars cannot be resolved or are distorted by sampling. The procedure converges to the contrast at which 75% of the observer responses are correct. The reliability of the responses is tested statistically. Curves cut off near the Nyquist frequency, so that it is not necessary to artificially set a frequency limit for sampling array cameras. The procedure enables better and easier measurement, yields more stable results than the standard procedure, and avoids disputes between different measuring teams. The presented procedure is a `quick fix' solution for some of the problems with the MRTD and MRC, and is recommended as long as bar patterns are used as the stimulus. A new and fundamentally better method to characterize electro-optical system performance, called the triangle orientation discrimination threshold was recently proposed by Bijl and Valeton (1998).

  10. POLVSM (Polarized Volume Scattering Meter) instrument: an innovative device to measure the directional and polarized scattering properties of hydrosols.

    PubMed

    Chami, Malik; Thirouard, Alexandre; Harmel, Tristan

    2014-10-20

    An innovative instrument dedicated to the multispectral measurements of the directional and polarized scattering properties of the hydrosols, so-called POLVSM, is described. The instrument could be used onboard a ship, as a benchtop instrument, or at laboratory. The originality of the POLVSM concept relies on the use of a double periscopic optical system whose role is (i) to separate the plane containing the light source from the scattering plane containing the sample and the receiver and (ii) to prevent from any specularly reflected light within the sample chamber. As a result, a wide range of scattering angle, namely from 1° to 179°, is covered by the detector. Another originality of the instrument is to measure the Mueller scattering matrix elements, including the degree of polarization. A relevant calibration procedure, which could be of great interest as well for other instruments, is proposed to convert the raw data into physical units. The relative uncertainty in POLVSM data was determined at ± 4.3%. The analysis of measurements of the volume scattering function and degree of polarization performed under controlled conditions for samples dominated either by inorganic hydrosols or phytoplankton monospecific species showed a good consistency with literature, thus confirming the good performance of the POLVSM device. Comparisons of POLVSM data with theoretical calculations showed that Mie theory could reproduce efficiently the measurements of the VSF and degree of polarization for the case of inorganic hydrosols sample, despite the likely non sphericity of these particles as revealed by one of the element of the Mueller matrix. Our results suggested as well that a sophisticated modeling of the heterogeneous internal structure of living cells, or at least, the use of layered sphere models, is needed to correctly predict the directional and polarized effects of phytoplankton on the oceanic radiation. The relevance of performing angularly resolved measurements

  11. POLVSM (Polarized Volume Scattering Meter) instrument: an innovative device to measure the directional and polarized scattering properties of hydrosols.

    PubMed

    Chami, Malik; Thirouard, Alexandre; Harmel, Tristan

    2014-10-20

    An innovative instrument dedicated to the multispectral measurements of the directional and polarized scattering properties of the hydrosols, so-called POLVSM, is described. The instrument could be used onboard a ship, as a benchtop instrument, or at laboratory. The originality of the POLVSM concept relies on the use of a double periscopic optical system whose role is (i) to separate the plane containing the light source from the scattering plane containing the sample and the receiver and (ii) to prevent from any specularly reflected light within the sample chamber. As a result, a wide range of scattering angle, namely from 1° to 179°, is covered by the detector. Another originality of the instrument is to measure the Mueller scattering matrix elements, including the degree of polarization. A relevant calibration procedure, which could be of great interest as well for other instruments, is proposed to convert the raw data into physical units. The relative uncertainty in POLVSM data was determined at ± 4.3%. The analysis of measurements of the volume scattering function and degree of polarization performed under controlled conditions for samples dominated either by inorganic hydrosols or phytoplankton monospecific species showed a good consistency with literature, thus confirming the good performance of the POLVSM device. Comparisons of POLVSM data with theoretical calculations showed that Mie theory could reproduce efficiently the measurements of the VSF and degree of polarization for the case of inorganic hydrosols sample, despite the likely non sphericity of these particles as revealed by one of the element of the Mueller matrix. Our results suggested as well that a sophisticated modeling of the heterogeneous internal structure of living cells, or at least, the use of layered sphere models, is needed to correctly predict the directional and polarized effects of phytoplankton on the oceanic radiation. The relevance of performing angularly resolved measurements

  12. Measuring the polarization of a rapidly precessing deuteron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagdasarian, Z.; Bertelli, S.; Chiladze, D.; Ciullo, G.; Dietrich, J.; Dymov, S.; Eversmann, D.; Fanourakis, G.; Gaisser, M.; Gebel, R.; Gou, B.; Guidoboni, G.; Hejny, V.; Kacharava, A.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Lehrach, A.; Lenisa, P.; Lorentz, B.; Magallanes, L.; Maier, R.; Mchedlishvili, D.; Morse, W. M.; Nass, A.; Oellers, D.; Pesce, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Pretz, J.; Rathmann, F.; Shmakova, V.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stockhorst, H.; Ströher, H.; Talman, R.; Thörngren Engblom, P.; Valdau, Yu.; Weidemann, C.; Wüstner, P.

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes a time-marking system that enables a measurement of the in-plane (horizontal) polarization of a 0.97-GeV/c deuteron beam circulating in the Cooler Synchrotron (COSY) at the Forschungszentrum Jülich. The clock time of each polarimeter event is used to unfold the 120-kHz spin precession and assign events to bins according to the direction of the horizontal polarization. After accumulation for one or more seconds, the down-up scattering asymmetry can be calculated for each direction and matched to a sinusoidal function whose magnitude is proportional to the horizontal polarization. This requires prior knowledge of the spin tune or polarization precession rate. An initial estimate is refined by resorting the events as the spin tune is adjusted across a narrow range and searching for the maximum polarization magnitude. The result is biased toward polarization values that are too large, in part because of statistical fluctuations but also because sinusoidal fits to even random data will produce sizable magnitudes when the phase is left free to vary. An analysis procedure is described that matches the time dependence of the horizontal polarization to templates based on emittance-driven polarization loss while correcting for the positive bias. This information will be used to study ways to extend the horizontal polarization lifetime by correcting spin tune spread using ring sextupole fields and thereby to support the feasibility of searching for an intrinsic electric dipole moment using polarized beams in a storage ring. This paper is a combined effort of the Storage Ring EDM collaboration and the JEDI collaboration.

  13. Radiation measurements from polar and geosynchronous satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.; Kidder, S. Q.; Hillger, D. W.; Ellis, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: (1) cloud effects in climate determination; (2) annual variation in the global heat balance of the earth; (3) the accuracy of precipitation estimates made from passive microwave measurements from satellites; (4) seasonal oceanic precipitation frequencies; (5) determination of mesoscale temperature and moisture fields over land from satellite radiance measurements; and (6) Nimbus 6 scanning microwave spectrometer data evaluation for surface wind and pressure components in tropical storms.

  14. Multiple-view spectrally resolved x-ray imaging observations of polar-direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, R. C.; Johns, H. M.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Nagayama, T.; Hsu, S. C.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Cobble, J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Bradley, P. A.; Hakel, P.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Tregillis, I. L.; Wysocki, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    We present spatially, temporally, and spectrally resolved narrow- and broad-band x-ray images of polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on OMEGA. These self-emission images were obtained during the deceleration phase and bang time using several multiple monochromatic x-ray imaging instruments fielded along two or three quasi-orthogonal lines-of-sight, including equatorial and polar views. The instruments recorded images based on K-shell lines from a titanium tracer located in the shell as well as continuum emission. These observations constitute the first such data obtained for PDD implosions. The image data show features attributed to laser imprinting and zero-order hydrodynamics. Equatorial-view images show a "double bun" structure that is consistent with synthetic images obtained from post-processing 2D and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment. Polar-view images show a pentagonal, petal pattern that correlates with the PDD laser illumination used on OMEGA, thus revealing a 3D aspect of PDD OMEGA implosions not previously observed. Differences are noted with respect to a PDD experiment performed at National Ignition Facility.

  15. Multiple-view spectrally resolved x-ray imaging observations of polar-direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, R. C.; Johns, H. M.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Nagayama, T.; Hsu, S. C.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Cobble, J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Bradley, P. A.; Hakel, P.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Tregillis, I. L.; Wysocki, F. J.

    2014-12-15

    We present spatially, temporally, and spectrally resolved narrow- and broad-band x-ray images of polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on OMEGA. These self-emission images were obtained during the deceleration phase and bang time using several multiple monochromatic x-ray imaging instruments fielded along two or three quasi-orthogonal lines-of-sight, including equatorial and polar views. The instruments recorded images based on K-shell lines from a titanium tracer located in the shell as well as continuum emission. These observations constitute the first such data obtained for PDD implosions. The image data show features attributed to laser imprinting and zero-order hydrodynamics. Equatorial-view images show a “double bun” structure that is consistent with synthetic images obtained from post-processing 2D and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment. Polar-view images show a pentagonal, petal pattern that correlates with the PDD laser illumination used on OMEGA, thus revealing a 3D aspect of PDD OMEGA implosions not previously observed. Differences are noted with respect to a PDD experiment performed at National Ignition Facility.

  16. Apparatus and method for measuring electrostatic polarization

    DOEpatents

    Hahn, Erwin L.; Clarke, John; Sloater, Tycho; Hilbert, Claude; Heaney, Michael B.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the electric properties of solid matter which provides data for determining the polarizability of the electron distributions contained therein is disclosed. A sample of the solid to be studied is placed between the plates of a capacitor where it acts as a dielectric. The sample is excited by the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with an atomic species contained in the sample. The voltage induced across the capacitor is then measured as a function of time with the aid of a high Q circuit tuned to a frequency related to the frequency of the applied electromagnetic energy.

  17. SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF CIRCULAR DICHROISM AND FLUORESCENCE POLARIZATION ANISOTROPY.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND,J.C.

    2002-01-19

    Circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy are important tools for characterizing biomolecular systems. Both are used extensively in kinetic experiments involving stopped- or continuous flow systems as well as titrations and steady-state spectroscopy. This paper presents the theory for determining circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy simultaneously, thus insuring the two parameters are recorded under exactly the same conditions and at exactly the same time in kinetic experiments. The approach to measuring circular dichroism is that used in almost all conventional dichrographs. Two arrangements for measuring fluorescence polarization anisotropy are described. One uses a single fluorescence detector and signal processing with a lock-in amplifier that is similar to the measurement of circular dichroism. The second approach uses classic ''T'' format detection optics, and thus can be used with conventional photon-counting detection electronics. Simple extensions permit the simultaneous measurement of the absorption and excitation intensity corrected fluorescence intensity.

  18. Process and apparatus for measuring degree of polarization and angle of major axis of polarized beam of light

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Derek E.; Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process are disclosed for calibrating measurements of the phase of the polarization of a polarized beam and the angle of the polarized optical beam's major axis of polarization at a diagnostic point with measurements of the same parameters at a point of interest along the polarized beam path prior to the diagnostic point. The process is carried out by measuring the phase angle of the polarization of the beam and angle of the major axis at the point of interest, using a rotatable polarizer and a detector, and then measuring these parameters again at a diagnostic point where a compensation apparatus, including a partial polarizer, which may comprise a stack of glass plates, is disposed normal to the beam path between a rotatable polarizer and a detector. The partial polarizer is then rotated both normal to the beam path and around the axis of the beam path until the detected phase of the beam polarization equals the phase measured at the point of interest. The rotatable polarizer at the diagnostic point may then be rotated manually to determine the angle of the major axis of the beam and this is compared with the measured angle of the major axis of the beam at the point of interest during calibration. Thereafter, changes in the polarization phase, and in the angle of the major axis, at the point of interest can be monitored by measuring the changes in these same parameters at the diagnostic point.

  19. Measurement of Small Optical Polarization Rotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    When data with and without an optically active sample are acquired simultaneously while one manually rotates the analyser, the graph of the first signal versus the second one is an ellipse whose shape shows the phase shift between the two signals; this shift is twice the optical rotation. There is no need to measure the rotation of the analyser or…

  20. Traceability study of optical fiber degree of polarization (DOP) measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Li, Jian; Zhang, Zhixin

    2013-09-01

    Degree of polarization (DOP) is an important physical quantity for describing the optical polarization effect and is widely applied in optical fiber communication, optical fiber gyro and the related technologies. Currently, the optical polarization degree tester for the purpose of communication uses mainly two kinds of measurement methods: Stokes vector method and extremum method. At present, there isn't a standard to measure the accuracy and consistency of DOP parameter measurement by the devices listed above, affecting seriously the application of DOP parameter measurement in the fields of optical fiber gyro and optical fiber communication. So, it is urgent to table the accurate guarantees to trace the source of quantitative values of the DOP measuring devices and testers. In this paper, the polarization beam combination method is raised to research and manufacture the standard optical fiber light source device with the variable DOP, and an indicated error measurement has been conducted for a DOP meter. A kind of standard optical fiber light source device that uses a single light source to realize the variable DOP is put forward. It is used to provide the accurate and variable optical fiber polarization degree light with a scope of 0~100%. It is used to calibrate the DOP meters and widely applied in the field of national defense and optical communication fields. By using the standard optical power meter, DOP value by which the optical power meter calculates the optical signal can be measured, which will be used ultimately for calibration of the DOP meter. A measurement uncertainty of 0.5% is obtained using the polarization beam combination method.

  1. Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS Polarization Measurements of OMC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Burton, Michael G.; Schultz, A. S. B.

    2006-01-01

    We present 2 micrometer polarization measurements of positions in the BN region of the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1) made with NICMOS Camera 2 (0.2" resolution) on Hubble Space Telescope. Our goals are to seek the sources of heating for IRc2, 3, 4, and 7, identify possible young stellar objects (YSOs), and characterize the grain alignment in the dust clouds along the lines-of-sight to the stars. Our results are as follows: BN is approximately 29% polarized by dichroic absorption and appears to be the illuminating source for most of the nebulosity to its north and up to approximately 5" to its south. Although the stars are probably all polarized by dichroic absorption, there are a number of compact, but non-point-source, objects that could be polarized by a combination of both dichroic absorption and local scattering of star light. We identify several candidate YSOs, including an approximately edge-on bipolar YSO 8.7" east of BN, and a deeply-embedded IRc7, all of which are obviously self-luminous at mid-infrared wavelengths and may be YSOs. None of these is a reflection nebula illuminated by a star located near radio source I, as was previously suggested. Other IRc sources are clearly reflection nebulae: IRc3 appears to be illuminated by IRc2-B or a combination of the IRc2 sources, and IRc4 and IRc5 appear to be illuminated by an unseen star in the vicinity of radio source I, or by Star n or IRc2-A. Trends in the magnetic field direction are inferred from the polarization of the 26 stars that are bright enough to be seen as NICMOS point sources. Their polarization ranges from N less than or equal to 1% (all stars with this low polarization are optically visible) to greater than 40%. The most polarized star has a polarization position angle different from its neighbors by approximately 40 degrees, but in agreement with the grain alignment inferred from millimeter polarization measurements of the cold dust cloud in the southern part of OMC-1. The polarization

  2. Flow cytometry using Brillouin imaging and sensing via time-resolved optical (BISTRO) measurements.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-11-01

    A novel concept of Brillouin imaging and sensing via time-resolved optical (BISTRO) measurements is introduced for flow cytometry applications. The system affords robust, maintenance-free and high-speed elasticity-sensitive measurements. PMID:26347908

  3. Effect of noise on Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D.N.; DeLong, K.W.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    We study the effects of noise in Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses. We quantify the measurement accuracy in the presence of additive, muliplicative, and quantization noise, and discuss filtering and pre-processing of the data.

  4. Automation of Mode Locking in a Nonlinear Polarization Rotation Fiber Laser through Output Polarization Measurements.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Michel; Gagnon, Marc-Daniel; Habel, Joé

    2016-01-01

    When a laser is mode-locked, it emits a train of ultra-short pulses at a repetition rate determined by the laser cavity length. This article outlines a new and inexpensive procedure to force mode locking in a pre-adjusted nonlinear polarization rotation fiber laser. This procedure is based on the detection of a sudden change in the output polarization state when mode locking occurs. This change is used to command the alignment of the intra-cavity polarization controller in order to find mode-locking conditions. More specifically, the value of the first Stokes parameter varies when the angle of the polarization controller is swept and, moreover, it undergoes an abrupt variation when the laser enters the mode-locked state. Monitoring this abrupt variation provides a practical easy-to-detect signal that can be used to command the alignment of the polarization controller and drive the laser towards mode locking. This monitoring is achieved by feeding a small portion of the signal to a polarization analyzer measuring the first Stokes parameter. A sudden change in the read out of this parameter from the analyzer will occur when the laser enters the mode-locked state. At this moment, the required angle of the polarization controller is kept fixed. The alignment is completed. This procedure provides an alternate way to existing automating procedures that use equipment such as an optical spectrum analyzer, an RF spectrum analyzer, a photodiode connected to an electronic pulse-counter or a nonlinear detecting scheme based on two-photon absorption or second harmonic generation. It is suitable for lasers mode locked by nonlinear polarization rotation. It is relatively easy to implement, it requires inexpensive means, especially at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and it lowers the production and operation costs incurred in comparison to the above-mentioned techniques. PMID:26967924

  5. Polari, a Fortran IV Program for Measures of Attitudinal Polarization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vegelius, Jan; Edvardsson, Bo

    1976-01-01

    The theoretical background underlying the mathematical development of different measures of the degree of attitudinal polarization applicable to bipolar questions and a Fortran IV computer program that provides a rapid means for calculation of four of those measures are presented. (Author/JKS)

  6. Spectroscopic ellipsometer based on direct measurement of polarization ellipticity

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Lionel R.

    2011-06-20

    A polarizer-sample-Wollaston prism analyzer ellipsometer is described in which the ellipsometric angles {psi} and {Delta} are determined by direct measurement of the elliptically polarized light reflected from the sample. With the Wollaston prism initially set to transmit p- and s-polarized light, the azimuthal angle P of the polarizer is adjusted until the two beams have equal intensity. This condition yields {psi}={+-}P and ensures that the reflected elliptically polarized light has an azimuthal angle of {+-}45 deg. and maximum ellipticity. Rotating the Wollaston prism through 45 deg. and adjusting the analyzer azimuth until the two beams again have equal intensity yields the ellipticity that allows {Delta} to be determined via a simple linear relationship. The errors produced by nonideal components are analyzed. We show that the polarizer dominates these errors but that for most practical purposes, the error in {psi} is negligible and the error in {Delta} may be corrected exactly. A native oxide layer on a silicon substrate was measured at a single wavelength and multiple angles of incidence and spectroscopically at a single angle of incidence. The best fit film thicknesses obtained were in excellent agreement with those determined using a traditional null ellipsometer.

  7. Measuring political polarization: Twitter shows the two sides of Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, A. J.; Borondo, J.; Losada, J. C.; Benito, R. M.

    2015-03-01

    We say that a population is perfectly polarized when divided in two groups of the same size and opposite opinions. In this paper, we propose a methodology to study and measure the emergence of polarization from social interactions. We begin by proposing a model to estimate opinions in which a minority of influential individuals propagate their opinions through a social network. The result of the model is an opinion probability density function. Next, we propose an index to quantify the extent to which the resulting distribution is polarized. Finally, we apply the proposed methodology to a Twitter conversation about the late Venezuelan president, Hugo Chávez, finding a good agreement between our results and offline data. Hence, we show that our methodology can detect different degrees of polarization, depending on the structure of the network.

  8. Angular resolved light scattering for discriminating among marine picoplankton: modeling and experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Bing; Jaffe, Jules S.; Chachisvilis, Mirianas; Esener, Sadik C.

    2006-12-01

    In order to assess the capability to optically identify small marine microbes, both simulations and experiments of angular resolved light scattering (ARLS) were performed. After calibration with 30-nm vesicles characterized by a nearly constant scattering distribution for vertically polarized light (azimuthal angle=90°), ARLS from suspensions of three types of marine picoplankton (two prokaryotes and one eukaryote) in seawater was measured with a scattering device that consisted of an elliptical mirror, a rotating aperture, and a PMT. Scattered light was recorded with adequate signal-to-noise in the 40-140°. Simulations modeled the cells as prolate spheroids with independently measured dimensions. For the prokaryotes, approximated as homogeneous spheroids, simulations were performed using the RM (Rayleigh-Mie) - I method, a hybrid of the Rayleigh-Debye approximation and the generalized Lorentz-Mie theory. For the picoeukaryote, an extended RM - I method was developed for a coated spheroid with different shell thickness distributions. The picoeukaryote was then modeled as a coated sphere with a spherical core. Good overall agreements were obtained between simulations and experiments. The distinctive scattering patterns of the different species hold promise for an identification system based on ARLS.

  9. Polarized Structure Functions: Proton/Deuteron Measurements in Hall C

    SciTech Connect

    Oscar A. Rondon

    2005-02-01

    The study of the nucleon polarized structure functions has matured beyond the inclusive measurements of the past to the investigation of all eight quark distribution functions in the nucleon. Jefferson Lab's Hall C program of polarized structure functions studies started with a measurement of the proton and deuteron spin structure in the resonances at Q2 {approx} 1.3 [GeV/c]2. This work will be extended for the proton to more than 5 [GeV/c]2 for both DIS and the resonances in the upcoming SANE experiment. SANE will use a novel non-magnetic very large solid angle detector, BETA. Semi-inclusive asymmetries will be measured to determine the flavor composition of the nucleon spin in the recently approved Semi-SANE experiment. The 11 GeV energy upgrade will open new opportunities to study other functions, such as the transversity, Collins and Sievers functions, using vertical polarized targets.

  10. Measurement of polarization with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Leitch, E M; Kovac, J M; Pryke, C; Carlstrom, J E; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Dragovan, M; Reddall, B; Sandberg, E S

    Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation can reveal with remarkable precision the conditions of the Universe when it was approximately 400,000 years old. The three most fundamental properties of the CMB are its frequency spectrum (which determines the temperature), and the fluctuations in both the temperature and polarization across a range of angular scales. The frequency spectrum has been well determined, and considerable progress has been made in measuring the power spectrum of the temperature fluctuations. But despite many efforts to measure the polarization, detection of this property of the CMB has hitherto been beyond the reach of even the most sensitive observations. Here we describe the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI), an array of radio telescopes, which for the past two years has conducted polarization-sensitive observations of the CMB from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole research station.

  11. Measurement of polarization with the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Leitch, E M; Kovac, J M; Pryke, C; Carlstrom, J E; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Dragovan, M; Reddall, B; Sandberg, E S

    Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation can reveal with remarkable precision the conditions of the Universe when it was approximately 400,000 years old. The three most fundamental properties of the CMB are its frequency spectrum (which determines the temperature), and the fluctuations in both the temperature and polarization across a range of angular scales. The frequency spectrum has been well determined, and considerable progress has been made in measuring the power spectrum of the temperature fluctuations. But despite many efforts to measure the polarization, detection of this property of the CMB has hitherto been beyond the reach of even the most sensitive observations. Here we describe the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI), an array of radio telescopes, which for the past two years has conducted polarization-sensitive observations of the CMB from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole research station. PMID:12490940

  12. Measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor from inclusive quasielastic scattering of polarized electrons from polarized [sup 3]He

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.; Arrington, J.; Beise, E.J.; Bray, B.; Carr, R.W.; Filippone, B.W.; Lung, A.; McKeown, R.D.; Mueller, B.; Pitt, M.L. ); Jones, C.E. ); DeSchepper, D.; Dodson, G.; Dow, K.; Ent, R.; Farkhondeh, M.; Hansen, J.; Korsch, W.; Kramer, L.H.; Lee, K.; Makins, N.; Milner, R.G.; Tieger, D.R.; Welch, T.P. ); Candell, E.; Napolitano, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B.; Tripp, C. ); Lorenzon, W. )

    1994-08-01

    We report a measurement of the asymmetry in spin-dependent quasielastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from a polarized [sup 3]He target. The neutron magnetic form factor [ital G][sup [ital n

  13. Microsphere-based cantilevers for polarization-resolved and femtosecond SNOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Mora, C. A.; Hartelt, M.; Bayer, D.; Aeschlimann, M.; Ilin, E. A.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2016-04-01

    We present a cantilever-based near-field probe with integrated Mie scattering dielectric SiO2 microsphere (MSDM) for near-field optical imaging as well as femtosecond spectroscopy applications. In contrast to the state-of-the-art transmissive near-field probes, the MSDM reveals a transmission of almost unity known from far-field microscopy configuration. For proper handling, the microsphere is integrated at the apex of a conventional pyramidal aperture tip carried by an atomic force microscopy cantilever. It proved to be mechanically robust during the scanning process even if operating it in the contact mode. The spherical symmetry provides on the one hand a well-defined mechanical contact point with the sample irrespective of its inclination angle to the sample surface. On the other hand, the symmetry of the device preserves the polarization of light proving to be useful for the investigation of the polarization dependent behavior of plasmonic nanostructures. The high transmission combined with low dispersion renders spectroscopic investigations on the femtosecond timescale with a moderate lateral resolution. Second order autocorrelation experiments on a BBO crystal reveals a time resolution well below 100 {fs at } 191 {nm} spatial resolution.

  14. Polarization-resolved simulations of multiple-order rainbows using realistic raindrop shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haußmann, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents selected results of a simulation study of the first five (primary-quinary) rainbow orders based on a realistic, size-dependent shape model for falling raindrops, taking into account that the drops' bottom part is flattened to higher degree than the dome-like top part. Moreover, broad drop size distributions are included in the simulations, as it is one goal of this paper to analyze, whether the predicted amplification and attenuation patterns for higher-order rainbows, as derived from previous simulations with monodisperse drop sizes, will still be pronounced under the conditions of natural rainfall. Secondly, deviations of the multiple rainbow orders' polarization state from the reference case of spherical drops are discussed. It is shown that each rainbow order may contain a small amount of circularly polarized light due to total internal reflections. Thirdly, it is investigated, how the conditions that generate twinned primary rainbows will affect the higher orders. For the simulations, geometric-optic ray tracing of the full Stokes vector as well as an approximate approach using appropriately shifted Debye series data is applied.

  15. Probing the 3D structure of cornea-like collagen liquid crystals with polarization-resolved SHG microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teulon, Claire; Tidu, Aurélien; Portier, François; Mosser, Gervaise; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-07-11

    This work aims at characterizing the three-dimensional organization of liquid crystals composed of collagen, in order to determine the physico-chemical conditions leading to highly organized structures found in biological tissues such as cornea. To that end, we use second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, since aligned collagen structures have been shown to exhibit intrinsic SHG signals. We combine polarization-resolved SHG experiments (P-SHG) with the theoretical derivation of the SHG signal of collagen molecules tilted with respect to the focal plane. Our P-SHG images exhibit striated patterns with variable contrast, as expected from our analytical and numerical calculations for plywood-like nematic structures similar to the ones found in the cornea. This study demonstrates the benefits of P-SHG microscopy for in situ characterization of highly organized biopolymers at micrometer scale, and the unique sensitivity of this nonlinear optical technique to the orientation of collagen molecules. PMID:27410876

  16. Information On Tropospheric Ozone From Space Borne Polarization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasekamp, O. P.; Landgraf, J.

    Tropospheric ozone retrieval from reflectance spectra is an important issue for many current and future satellite instruments.However, it is difficult to distinguish between stratospheric and tropospheric ozone on the basis of reflectance spectra only, because the reflectance is a quantity that is more sensitive to stratospheric ozone than to tro- pospheric ozone. In this paper we show that satellite measurements of the state of polarization of backscattered light contain valuable additional information on tropo- spheric ozone. The reason for this is the high sensitivity of the state of polarization to tropospheric ozone. This is because the state of polarization is most sensitive to ozone at that altitude where most scattering takes place, which is in the troposphere for wavelengths >300 nm. Retrievals performed on synthetic GOME-2 data show that the vertical resolution of the tropospheric ozone profile is significantly improved if a polarization measurement is used in addition to the reflectance spectrum. Prob- lems that are currently encountered in tropospheric ozone retrieval from reflectance spectra may be solved by using additional polarization measurements.

  17. Monochromatic Measurements of the JPSS-1 VIIRS Polarization Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McIntire, Jeff; Moyer, David; Brown, Steven W.; Lykke, Keith R.; Waluschka, Eugene; Oudrari, Hassan; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2016-01-01

    Polarization sensitivity is a critical property that must be characterized for spaceborne remote sensing instruments designed to measure reflected solar radiation. Broadband testing of the first Joint Polar-orbiting Satellite System (JPSS-1) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) showed unexpectedly large polarization sensitivities for the bluest bands on VIIRS (centered between 400 and 600 nm). Subsequent ray trace modeling indicated that large diattenuation on the edges of the bandpass for these spectral bands was the driver behind these large sensitivities. Additional testing using the National Institute of Standards and Technologies Traveling Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Responsivity Calibrations Using Uniform Sources was added to the test program to verify and enhance the model. The testing was limited in scope to two spectral bands at two scan angles; nonetheless, this additional testing provided valuable insight into the polarization sensitivity. Analysis has shown that the derived diattenuation agreed with the broadband measurements to within an absolute difference of about0.4 and that the ray trace model reproduced the general features of the measured data. Additionally, by deriving the spectral responsivity, the linear diattenuation is shown to be explicitly dependent on the changes in bandwidth with polarization state.

  18. Analysis of Polder Polarization Measurements During Astex and Eucrex Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Hui; Han, Qingyuan; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1997-01-01

    Polarization is more sensitive than intensity to cloud microstructure such as the particle size and shape, and multiple scattering does not wash out features in polarization as effectively as it does in the intensity. Polarization measurements, particularly in the near IR, are potentially a valuable tool for cloud identification and for studies of the microphysics of clouds. The POLDER instrument is designed to provide wide field of view bidirectional images in polarized light. During the ASTEX-SOFIA campaign on June 12th, 1992, over the Atlantic Ocean (near the Azores Islands), images of homogeneous thick stratocumulus cloud fields were acquired. During the EUCREX'94 (April, 1994) campaign, the POLDER instrument was flying over the region of Brittany (France), taking observations of cirrus clouds. This study involves model studies and data analysis of POLDER observations. Both models and data analysis show that POLDER can be used to detect cloud thermodynamic phases. Model results show that polarized reflection in the Lamda =0.86 micron band is sensitive to cloud droplet sizes but not to cloud optical thickness. Comparison between model and data analysis reveals that cloud droplet sizes during ASTEX are about 5 microns, which agrees very well with the results of in situ measurements (4-5 microns). Knowing the retrieved cloud droplet sizes, the total reflected intensity of the POLDER measurements then can be used to retrieve cloud optical thickness. The close agreement between data analysis and model results during ASTEX also suggests the homogeneity of the cloud layer during that campaign.

  19. Monochromatic measurements of the JPSS-1 VIIRS polarization sensitivity.

    PubMed

    McIntire, Jeff; Moyer, David; Brown, Steven W; Lykke, Keith R; Waluschka, Eugene; Oudrari, Hassan; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2016-09-20

    Polarization sensitivity is a critical property that must be characterized for spaceborne remote sensing instruments designed to measure reflected solar radiation. Broadband testing of the first Joint Polar-orbiting Satellite System (JPSS-1) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) showed unexpectedly large polarization sensitivities for the bluest bands on VIIRS (centered between 400 and 600 nm). Subsequent ray trace modeling indicated that large diattenuation on the edges of the bandpass for these spectral bands was the driver behind these large sensitivities. Additional testing using the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Traveling Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Responsivity Calibrations Using Uniform Sources was added to the test program to verify and enhance the model. The testing was limited in scope to two spectral bands at two scan angles; nonetheless, this additional testing provided valuable insight into the polarization sensitivity. Analysis has shown that the derived diattenuation agreed with the broadband measurements to within an absolute difference of about 0.4% and that the ray trace model reproduced the general features of the measured data. Additionally, by deriving the spectral responsivity, the linear diattenuation is shown to be explicitly dependent on the changes in bandwidth with polarization state. PMID:27661568

  20. A high accuracy broadband measurement system for time resolved complex bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, S; Malhotra, A; Ardelt, G; Ryschka, M

    2014-06-01

    Bioimpedance measurements are useful tools in biomedical engineering and life science. Bioimpedance is the electrical impedance of living tissue and can be used in the analysis of various physiological parameters. Bioimpedance is commonly measured by injecting a small well known alternating current via surface electrodes into an object under test and measuring the resultant surface voltages. It is non-invasive, painless and has no known hazards. This work presents a field programmable gate array based high accuracy broadband bioimpedance measurement system for time resolved bioimpedance measurements. The system is able to measure magnitude and phase of complex impedances under test in a frequency range of about 10-500 kHz with excitation currents from 10 µA to 5 mA. The overall measurement uncertainties stay below 1% for the impedance magnitude and below 0.5° for the phase in most measurement ranges. Furthermore, the described system has a sample rate of up to 3840 impedance spectra per second. The performance of the bioimpedance measurement system is demonstrated with a resistor based system calibration and with measurements on biological samples.

  1. First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Maxime; Gillon, Béatrice; Claiser, Nicolas; Gillet, Jean-Michel; Lecomte, Claude; Souhassou, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1980s it has been possible to probe crystallized matter, thanks to X-ray or neutron scattering techniques, to obtain an accurate charge density or spin distribution at the atomic scale. Despite the description of the same physical quantity (electron density) and tremendous development of sources, detectors, data treatment software etc., these different techniques evolved separately with one model per experiment. However, a breakthrough was recently made by the development of a common model in order to combine information coming from all these different experiments. Here we report the first experimental determination of spin-resolved electron density obtained by a combined treatment of X-ray, neutron and polarized neutron diffraction data. These experimental spin up and spin down densities compare very well with density functional theory (DFT) calculations and also confirm a theoretical prediction made in 1985 which claims that majority spin electrons should have a more contracted distribution around the nucleus than minority spin electrons. Topological analysis of the resulting experimental spin-resolved electron density is also briefly discussed. PMID:25075338

  2. Dual polarized receiving steering antenna array for measurement of ultrawideband pulse polarization structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzovsky, E. V.; Buyanov, Yu. I.; Koshelev, V. I.; Nekrasov, E. S.

    2016-03-01

    To measure simultaneously two orthogonal components of the electromagnetic field of nano- and subnano-second duration, an antenna array has been developed. The antenna elements of the array are the crossed dipoles of dimension 5 × 5 cm. The arms of the dipoles are connected to the active four-pole devices to compensate the frequency response variations of a short dipole in the frequency band ranging from 0.4 to 4 GHz. The dipoles have superimposed phase centers allowing measuring the polarization structure of the field in different directions. The developed antenna array is the linear one containing four elements. The pattern maximum position is controlled by means of the switched ultrawideband true time delay lines. Discrete steering in seven directions in the range from -40° to +40° has been realized. The error at setting the pattern maximum position is less than 4°. The isolation of the polarization exceeds 29 dB in the direction orthogonal to the array axis and in the whole steering range it exceeds 23 dB. Measurement results of the polarization structure of radiated and scattered pulses with different polarization are presented as well.

  3. Measurement of CMB Polarization with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, Emily; ACTPol Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) is a polarization-sensitive receiver for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope designed to make sensitive, high-resolution measurements of the polarization anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) with the goal of investigating the properties of inflation, dark energy, dark matter, and neutrinos in the early Universe. The ACTPol receiver employs three kilo-pixel arrays of transition edge sensor (TES) bolometer detectors. The first and second of these arrays, which were deployed in 2013 and 2014, respectively, and observed at 146 GHz, are among the most sensitive millimeter-wave polarimeters currently fielded and demonstrate the significant polarization measurement capabilities of the ACTPol instrument. I will present an overview of the first two seasons of observations, discussing the optimization of the detector arrays, the on-sky instrument performance, the observation and data-reduction strategies, and the science results.

  4. Single-shot dual-polarization holography: measurement of the polarization state of a magnetic sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodadad, Davood; Amer, Eynas; Gren, Per; Melander, Emil; Hällstig, Emil; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2015-08-01

    In this paper a single-shot digital holographic set-up with two orthogonally polarized reference beams is proposed to achieve rapid acquisition of Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect images. Principles of the method and the background theory for dynamic state of polarization measurement by use of digital holography are presented. This system has no mechanically moving elements or active elements for polarization control and modulation. An object beam is combined with two reference beams at different off-axis angles and is guided to a detector. Then two complex fields (interference terms) representing two orthogonal polarizations are recorded in a single frame simultaneously. Thereafter the complex fields are numerically reconstructed and carrier frequency calibration is done to remove aberrations introduced in multiplexed digital holographic recordings. From the numerical values of amplitude and phase, a real time quantitative analysis of the polarization state is possible by use of Jones vectors. The technique is demonstrated on a magnetic sample that is a lithographically patterned magnetic microstructure consisting of thin permalloy parallel stripes.

  5. Magnetoelectroluminescence of organic heterostructures: Analytical theory and spectrally resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Feilong; Kelley, Megan R.; Crooker, Scott A.; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Ruden, P. Paul; Smith, Darryl L.

    2014-12-22

    The effect of a magnetic field on the electroluminescence of organic light emitting devices originates from the hyperfine interaction between the electron/hole polarons and the hydrogen nuclei of the host molecules. In this paper, we present an analytical theory of magnetoelectroluminescence for organic semiconductors. To be specific, we focus on bilayer heterostructure devices. In the case we are considering, light generation at the interface of the donor and acceptor layers results from the formation and recombination of exciplexes. The spin physics is described by a stochastic Liouville equation for the electron/hole spin density matrix. By finding the steady-state analytical solution using Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory, we explore how the singlet/triplet exciplex ratio is affected by the hyperfine interaction strength and by the external magnetic field. In order to validate the theory, spectrally resolved electroluminescence experiments on BPhen/m-MTDATA devices are analyzed. With increasing emission wavelength, the width of the magnetic field modulation curve of the electroluminescence increases while its depth decreases. Furthermore, these observations are consistent with the model.

  6. Magnetoelectroluminescence of organic heterostructures: Analytical theory and spectrally resolved measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Feilong; Kelley, Megan R.; Crooker, Scott A.; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Ruden, P. Paul; Los Alamos National Lab.; Smith, Darryl L.; Los Alamos National Lab.

    2014-12-22

    The effect of a magnetic field on the electroluminescence of organic light emitting devices originates from the hyperfine interaction between the electron/hole polarons and the hydrogen nuclei of the host molecules. In this paper, we present an analytical theory of magnetoelectroluminescence for organic semiconductors. To be specific, we focus on bilayer heterostructure devices. In the case we are considering, light generation at the interface of the donor and acceptor layers results from the formation and recombination of exciplexes. The spin physics is described by a stochastic Liouville equation for the electron/hole spin density matrix. By finding the steady-state analytical solutionmore » using Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory, we explore how the singlet/triplet exciplex ratio is affected by the hyperfine interaction strength and by the external magnetic field. In order to validate the theory, spectrally resolved electroluminescence experiments on BPhen/m-MTDATA devices are analyzed. With increasing emission wavelength, the width of the magnetic field modulation curve of the electroluminescence increases while its depth decreases. Furthermore, these observations are consistent with the model.« less

  7. Measuring the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization with SPT-POL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crites, Abigail; SPT-POL Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    A new polarization-sensitive camera, SPT-POL, designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), was deployed on the 10 meter South Pole Telescope in January 2012. The goal of the project is to exploit the high resolution of the telescope (1 arcminute beam) and the high sensitivity afforded by the 1536 detector camera to characterize the B-mode polarization induced by the gravitational lensing of the primordial E-mode CMB polarization, as well as to detect or set an upper limit on the level of the B-mode polarization from inflationary gravitational waves. The lensing B-modes will be used to constrain the sum of the neutrino masses by measuring large scale structure, while the inflationary B-modes are sensitive to the energy scale of inflation. I will discuss the development of the SPT-POL camera including the cryogenic design and the transition edge sensor (TES) detectors as well as the science goals and status of the ongoing of the SPT-POL program.

  8. Polarized radio emission from extensive air showers measured with LOFAR

    SciTech Connect

    Schellart, P.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J.E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J.R.; Krause, M.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J.P.; Veen, S. ter; Thoudam, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present LOFAR measurements of radio emission from extensive air showers. We find that this emission is strongly polarized, with a median degree of polarization of nearly 99%, and that the angle between the polarization direction of the electric field and the Lorentz force acting on the particles, depends on the observer location in the shower plane. This can be understood as a superposition of the radially polarized charge-excess emission mechanism, first proposed by Askaryan and the geomagnetic emission mechanism proposed by Kahn and Lerche. We calculate the relative strengths of both contributions, as quantified by the charge-excess fraction, for 163 individual air showers. We find that the measured charge-excess fraction is higher for air showers arriving from closer to the zenith. Furthermore, the measured charge-excess fraction also increases with increasing observer distance from the air shower symmetry axis. The measured values range from (3.3± 1.0)% for very inclined air showers at 25 m to (20.3± 1.3)% for almost vertical showers at 225 m. Both dependencies are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions.

  9. Polarized and spatially resolved Raman scattering from composition-graded wurtzite InGaAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Rho, H.; Lee, E. H.; Song, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    We report Raman scattering from wurtzite single-crystalline InGaAs nanowires (NWs) to probe optical phonon behaviors associated with spatial grading in alloy composition along the NW length. Polarized Raman spectra revealed several optical phonons and their scattering symmetries: (i) InAs-like A 1(LO) and A 1(TO) phonons and (ii) GaAs-like A 1(LO), A 1(TO), and E 2(high) phonons. In addition, strong anisotropic behavior was observed in the Raman tensor elements of the A 1(TO) phonon mode. Interestingly, a spatial mapping of the GaAs-like A 1(TO) phonon along the NW length direction showed a systematic increase in energy from the NW top (~255 cm‑1) to the midpoint (~263 cm‑1), indicating an increase in the Ga mole fraction from about 0.5 to about 0.8. Further toward the NW bottom, the GaAs-like A 1(TO) phonon energy saturated to the peak value at about 264 cm‑1. In the upper half of the NW, the phonon linewidths broadened significantly due to the spatial grading in In/Ga composition along the NW length. When the composition grading was negligible in the bottom half of the NW, the spectral widths were considerably narrowed. The GaAs-like E 2(high) phonon showed similar variations in both energy and spectral width along the NW length.

  10. Interpretation of measurements of the polarization percentage for plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincon, J. L.; Marouan, Y.; Lefeuvre, F.

    1992-02-01

    The conditions of the application of the pure-state concept to the analysis of a plasma wave in a magnetoplasma are studied. Estimations of the Samson percentage of polarization are discussed. The best results are obtained with the minimum prediction error estimator. Simple physical interpretation is possible when the estimator is derived from the three magnetic-wave-field components only. There is an exception for electrostatic waves. Propagation modes and the region of the Clemmow-Mullaly-Allis diagram exist for which the percentage of polarization may be considered as a measure of the dispersion in k vectors.

  11. Measuring the cosmic microwave background polarization with POLARBEAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Darcy; Polarbear Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    POLARBEAR is a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment located in the Atacama desert in Chile. POLARBEAR-1 started observations in 2012, and in 2014, the POLARBEAR team published results from its first season of observations on a small fraction of the sky. These results include the first measurement of a non-zero B-mode polarization angular power spectrum, measured at sub-degree scales where the dominant signal is gravitational lensing of the CMB. We also published a measurement of the large-scale gravitational structure deflection power spectrum derived from CMB polarization alone, which demonstrates a powerful technique that can be used to measure nearly all of the gravitational structure in the universe. Improving these measurements requires precision characterization of the CMB polarization signal over large fractions of the sky, at multiple frequencies. To achieve these goals, POLARBEAR has begun expanding to include an additional two 3.5 meter telescopes with multi-chroic receivers, known as the Simons Array. Phased upgrades to receiver technology will improve sensitivity and capabilities, while continuing a deep survey of 80% of the sky. POLARBEAR-2 is the next receiver that will be installed in 2015 on a new telescope, with a larger area focal plane with dichroic pixels, with bands at 95 GHz and 150 GHz, and a total of 7,588 polarization sensitive antenna-coupled transition edge sensor bolometers. The focal plane is cooled to 250 milliKelvin, and the bolometers will be read-out by SQUID amplifiers with 40x frequency domain multiplexing. The array is designed to have a noise equivalent temperature of 5.7 μK√s.

  12. VLT/NACO disk-resolved observations of Titan: the trailing hemisphere and a polar feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, A.; Gendron, E.; Drossart, P.; Combes, M.; Hirtzig, M.; Lacombe, F.; Rouan, D.; Collin, C.; Pau, S.; Lagrange, A. M.; Rannou, P.; Negrão, A.

    2003-05-01

    Titan was observed in the near-infrared during an exploratory observing campaign in November 2002 with the new Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NACO) at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope (ESO/VLT) 8-m UT4 unit in Chile. Our data were taken with NACO's spectro-imager, called CONICA. CONICA is equipped with a 1024x1024 pixel InSb array detector sensitive from 1 to 5 micron. The nominal pixel size is 0.013 arcsec. The images were acquired in several narrow-band filters (1.04, 1.08, 1.09, 1.24, 1.28, 1.64, 1.75, 2.12, 2.17 micron) and they cover three different phases of Titan at 80, 190 and 212 of SEP longitudes (November 20, 25 and 26 respectively). The reduced data are of excellent quality and in most cases of unparalleled resolution and contrast. They exhibit atmospheric phenomena and surface features seen in great detail. Indeed, we have obtained contrasts of 100 1.28 surface images of Titan's trailing hemisphere thus recovering an excellent cartography there. We have also observed a bright (by 70 darker areas) atmospheric feature at Titan's South Pole with a fast movement around the pole. This feature is visible at 2.12 micron but disappears at 2.17 micron. This could be indicative of the presence of a polar cloud tracer (or "vortex") on Titan at precise altitudes in the atmosphere. We will present the first results of our analysis of the data (Gendron et al., 2003) and describe the phenomena observed. References: Gendron, E., Coustenis, A., P. Drossart, M. Combes, M. Hirtzig, F. Lacombe, D. Rouan, C. Collin, S. Pau, A.-M. Lagrange 2003. VLT/NACO adaptive optics imaging of Titan. Astron. Astroph., in press.

  13. Scatter polarization measurements with a mueller matrix imaging polarimeter.

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, Russell A.; DeBoo, Brian

    2004-08-01

    A Mueller matrix imaging polarimeter is used to acquire polarization-sensitive images of seven different manmade samples in multiple scattering geometries. Successive Mueller matrix images of a sample with changing incidence and scatter angles are used to develop a Mueller matrix bidirectional reflectance distribution function for the sample in one plane of measurement. The Mueller matrix bidirectional reflectance distribution functions are compared, and patterns are noted. The most significant data for the scattering samples measured occurs along the diagonal of the respective Mueller matrices, indicating significant depolarization effects. Reduced depolarization data in the form of the average degree of polarization (of exiting light) for each sample is examined as a function of changing scattering geometry. Five of seven manmade samples exhibit an inverted Gaussian profile of depolarization with changing scattering geometry, the shape of which may prove useful for measuring sample properties (e.g. roughness) and for classifying or categorizing samples in a remote sensing scheme. Depolarization differences for each sample in response to changing incident polarization states are also examined, and a new metric, the degree of polarization surface, has been developed to visualize all such data simultaneously.

  14. Roll angle measurement using a polarization scanning reference source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Rastegar, Jahangir; Kankipati, Varun

    2014-06-01

    On board measurement of attitude position, for example roll angle, of autonomous vehicles is critical to the execution of a successful mission. This paper describes a real-time technique, which combines a polarization scanning reference source and a priori knowledge of the scanning pattern. Measurements in an anechoic chamber, as well as, field tests in a busy parking lot, verify the efficacy of the technique, for both line of sight and non-line of sight capability.

  15. A One Billion Year Martian Climate Model: The Importance of Seasonally Resolved Polar Caps and the Role of Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. C.; Leovy, C. B.; Quinn, T. R.; Haberle, R. M.; Schaeffer, J.

    2003-01-01

    Wind deflation and deposition are powerful agents of surface change in the present Mars climate regime. Recent studies indicate that, while the distribution of regions of potential deflation (or erosion) and deposition is remarkably insensitive to changes in orbital parameters (obliquity, timing of perihelion passage, etc.), rates of aeolian surface modification may be highly sensitive to these parameters even if the atmospheric mass remains constant. But previous work suggested the atmospheric mass is likely to be sensitive to obliquity, especially if a significant mass of carbon dioxide can be stored in the regolith or deposited in the form of massive polar caps. Deflation and erosion are highly sensitive to surface pressure, so feedback between orbit variations and surface pressure can greatly enhance the sensitivity of aeolian modification rates to orbital parameters. We used statistics derived from a 1 Gyr orbital integration of the spin axis of Mars, coupled with 3D general circulation models (GCMs) at a variety of orbital conditions and pressures, to explore this feedback. We also employed a seasonally resolved 1D energy balance model to illuminate the gross characteristics of the longterm atmospheric evolution, wind erosion and deposition over one billion years. We find that seasonal polar cycles have a critical influence on the ability for the regolith to release CO2 at high obliquities, and find that the atmospheric CO2 actually decreases at high obliquities due to the cooling effect of polar deposits at latitudes where seasonal caps form. At low obliquity, the formation of massive, permanent polar caps depends critically on the values of the frost albedo, A(sub frost), and frost emissivity, E(sub frost). Using our 1D model with values of A(sub frost) = 0.67 and E(sub frost) = 0.55, matched to the NASA Ames GCM results, we find that permanent caps only form at low obliquities (< 10 degrees). Thus, contrary to expectations, the Martian atmospheric pressure

  16. On the Statistical Analysis of X-ray Polarization Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, T. E.; Kallman, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    In many polarimetry applications, including observations in the X-ray band, the measurement of a polarization signal can be reduced to the detection and quantification of a deviation from uniformity of a distribution of measured angles of the form alpha plus beta cosine (exp 2)(phi - phi(sub 0) (0 (is) less than phi is less than pi). We explore the statistics of such polarization measurements using both Monte Carlo simulations as well as analytic calculations based on the appropriate probability distributions. We derive relations for the number of counts required to reach a given detection level (parameterized by beta the "number of sigma's" of the measurement) appropriate for measuring the modulation amplitude alpha by itself (single interesting parameter case) or jointly with the position angle phi (two interesting parameters case). We show that for the former case when the intrinsic amplitude is equal to the well known minimum detectable polarization (MDP) it is, on average, detected at the 3sigma level. For the latter case, when one requires a joint measurement at the same confidence level, then more counts are needed, by a factor of approximately equal to 2.2, than that required to achieve the MDP level. We find that the position angle uncertainty at 1sigma confidence is well described by the relation sigma(sub pi) equals 28.5(degrees) divided by beta.

  17. Measuring ultrashort pulses using frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Trebino, R.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this program is the development of techniques for the measurement of ultrafast events important in gas-phase combustion chemistry. Specifically, goals of this program include the development of fundamental concepts and spectroscopic techniques that will augment the information currently available with ultrafast laser techniques. Of equal importance is the development of technology for ultrafast spectroscopy. For example, methods for the production and measurement of ultrashort pulses at wavelengths important for these studies is an important goal. Because the specific vibrational motion excited in a molecule depends sensitively on the intensity, I(t), and the phase, {psi}(t), of the ultrashort pulse used to excite the motion, it is critical to measure both of these quantities for an individual pulse. Unfortunately, this has remained an unsolved problem for many years. Fortunately, this year, the authors present a technique that achieves this goal.

  18. Asymmetric polarization and hysteresis behaviour in ferroelectric P(VDF-TrFE) (76 : 24) copolymer thin films spatially resolved via LIMM.

    PubMed

    Putzeys, T; Wübbenhorst, M

    2015-03-28

    The concept of charge-polarization coupling in the ferroelectric copolymer PVDF-TrFE (poly[vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene]) has been revisited by employing high resolution (<50 nm) pyroelectric depth profiling (LIMM). By virtue of probing the pyroelectric activity over the film thickness in the presence of a variable, external electrical field, the local ferroelectric response and spatially resolved hysteresis could be obtained. A large asymmetry was found between the positive and negative electrode-polymer interface. Differences in amplitude of polarization, contribution of interface charges and length scale of the polarization-free zone near the electrodes suggest a higher availability of compensation charges at the negative electrode that finally stabilize the local polarization. The resulting asymmetries in the polarization distribution are hence attributed to excess charges as a result of electron injection as a specific charge generation mechanism at the negative electrode. PMID:25714004

  19. In vivo time-resolved autofluorescence measurements on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katika, Kamal M.; Pilon, Laurent; Dipple, Katrina; Levin, Seymour; Blackwell, Jennifer; Berberoglu, Halil

    2006-02-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results obtained from fluorescence lifetime measurements on human skin using time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) techniques. Human skin was exposed to light from a pulsed LED of 700 ps pulse width at a wavelength of 375 nm and fluorescence decays were recorded at four different emission wavelengths (442, 460, 478 and 496 nm) using a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a monochromator. Measurements were carried out on the left and right palms of subjects recruited for the study after obtaining consent using a UCLA IRB approved consent form. The subjects recruited consisted of 18 males and 17 females with different skin complexions and ages ranging from 10 to 70 years. In addition, a set of experiments were also performed on various locations including the palm, the arm and the cheek of a Caucasian subject. The fluorescence decays thus obtained were fit to a three-exponential decay model in all cases and were approximately 0.4, 2.7 and 9.4 ns, respectively. The variations in these lifetimes with location, gender, skin complexion and age are studied. It is speculated that the shorter lifetimes correspond to free and bound NADH while the longer lifetime is due to AGE crosslinks.

  20. Effects of spin diffusion on electron spin relaxation time measured with a time-resolved microscopic photoluminescence technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2015-02-07

    We performed measurements at room temperature for a GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well grown on GaAs(110) using a time-resolved microscopic photoluminescence (micro-PL) technique to find what effects spin diffusion had on the measured electron spin relaxation time, τ{sub s}, and developed a method of estimating the spin diffusion coefficient, D{sub s}, using the measured data and the coupled drift-diffusion equations for spin polarized electrons. The spatial nonuniformities of τ{sub s} and the initial degree of electron spin polarization caused by the pump intensity distribution inside the focal spot were taken into account to explain the dependence of τ{sub s} on the measured spot size, i.e., a longer τ{sub s} for a smaller spot size. We estimated D{sub s} as ∼100 cm{sup 2}/s, which is similar to a value reported in the literature. We also provided a qualitative understanding on how spin diffusion lengthens τ{sub s} in micro-PL measurements.

  1. [A method for time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurement].

    PubMed

    Pan, Cong-Yuan; Han, Zhen-Yu; Li, Chao-Yang; Yu, Yun-Si; Wang, Sheng-Bo; Wang, Qiu-Ping

    2014-04-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is strongly time related. Time-resolved LIBS measurement is an important technique for the research on laser induced plasma evolution and self-absorption of the emission lines. Concerning the temporal characteristics of LIBS spectrum, a method is proposed in the present paper which can achieve micros-scale time-resolved LIBS measurement by using general ms-scale detector. By setting different integration delay time of the ms-scale spectrum detector, a series of spectrum are recorded. And the integration delay time interval should be longer than the worst temporal precision. After baseline correction and spectrum fitting, the intensity of the character line was obtained. Calculating this intensity with differential method at a certain time interval and then the difference value is the time-resolved line intensity. Setting the plasma duration time as X-axis and the time-resolved line intensity as Y-axis, the evolution curve of the character line intensity can be plotted. Character line with overlap-free and smooth background should be a priority to be chosen for analysis. Using spectrometer with ms-scale integration time and a control system with temporal accuracy is 0.021 micros, experiments carried out. The results validate that this method can be used to characterize the evolution of LIBS characteristic lines and can reduce the cost of the time-resolved LIBS measurement system. This method makes high time-resolved LIBS spectrum measurement possible with cheaper system.

  2. Time-resolved heat transfer and skin friction measurements in unsteady flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diller, T. E.; Telionis, D. P.

    A review of heat transfer and skin friction measurement methods is presented with particular emphasis on techniques that yield details of time-resolved properties. A description of the calibration methods necessary to insure accurate measurements is included. Examples of recent unsteady heat transfer and skin friction measurements with interpretations of the meaning and importance of the results are given.

  3. Generalized Mueller matrix method for polarization mode dispersion measurement in a system with polarization-dependent loss or gain.

    PubMed

    Dong, H; Shum, P; Yan, M; Zhou, J Q; Ning, G X; Gong, Y D; Wu, C Q

    2006-06-12

    A generalized Mueller matrix method (GMMM) is proposed to measure the polarization mode dispersion (PMD) in an optical fiber system with polarization-dependent loss or gain (PDL/G). This algorithm is based on the polar decomposition of a 4X4 matrix which corresponds to a Lorentz transformation. Compared to the generalized Poincaré sphere method, the GMMM can measure PMD accurately with a relatively larger frequency step, and the obtained PMD data has very low noise level. PMID:19516669

  4. Time Resolved Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. This presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 µm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as "viable aerosols" or "fluorescent bioparticles" (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. Data from the UVAPS were averaged over 5 minute time intervals. The presence of bioparticles in the observed size range has been

  5. Transmission grating based extreme ultraviolet imaging spectrometer for time and space resolved impurity measurements.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Stutman, Dan; Tritz, Kevin; Finkenthal, Michael; Tarrio, Charles; Grantham, Steven

    2010-10-01

    A free standing transmission grating based imaging spectrometer in the extreme ultraviolet range has been developed for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The spectrometer operates in a survey mode covering the approximate spectral range from 30 to 700 Å and has a resolving capability of δλ/λ on the order of 3%. Initial results from space resolved impurity measurements from NSTX are described in this paper.

  6. Time-resolved pressure measurements in chemically reacting powder mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, E. ); Graham, R.A.; Holman, G.T.; Anderson, M.U. ); Thadhani, N.N. )

    1994-07-10

    PVDF piezoelectric polymer stress-rate gauges have been used to detect and record stress pulses input to and propagated through powder mixtures of 5Ti+3Si at densities of 53%. Data are obtained for the porous solid crush-up'' and in the chemically reacting state. Wave speed is determined to an accuracy of 0.1% and serves as a sensitive and overt indication of chemical reactions. Compressed-gas gun and high explosive loading experiments show a crush strength of about 1 GPa. Strong exothermic chemical transformation is indicated by large increases in wave speed to expanded volume states. The degree of reaction is approximately 50%. The pressure measurements are supplemented by studies of shock treated powder mixtures preserved for post-shock analysis which determine the effect of particle size and morphology on reaction threshold and degree of reaction. The materials response is consistent with Graham's CONMAH conceptual model of shock-induced solid state chemistry reaction. [copyright]American Institute of Physics

  7. Muon polarization in the MEG experiment: predictions and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, A. M.; Bao, Y.; Baracchini, E.; Bemporad, C.; Berg, F.; Biasotti, M.; Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavoto, G.; Cei, F.; Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Bari, A. De; Gerone, M. De; D'Onofrio, A.; Dussoni, S.; Fujii, Y.; Galli, L.; Gatti, F.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grassi, M.; Graziosi, A.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Haruyama, T.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hodge, Z.; Ieki, K.; Ignatov, F.; Iwamoto, T.; Kaneko, D.; Kang, T. I.; Kettle, P.-R.; Khazin, B. I.; Khomutov, N.; Korenchenko, A.; Kravchuk, N.; Lim, G. M. A.; Mihara, S.; Molzon, W.; Mori, Toshinori; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Nakaura, S.; Nicolò, D.; Nishiguchi, H.; Nishimura, M.; Ogawa, S.; Ootani, W.; Panareo, M.; Papa, A.; Pepino, A.; Piredda, G.; Pizzigoni, G.; Popov, A.; Renga, F.; Ripiccini, E.; Ritt, S.; Rossella, M.; Rutar, G.; Sawada, R.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G.; Tassielli, G. F.; Tenchini, F.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venturini, M.; Voena, C.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, K.; You, Z.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2016-04-01

    The MEG experiment makes use of one of the world's most intense low energy muon beams, in order to search for the lepton flavour violating process μ + → e+ γ . We determined the residual beam polarization at the thin stopping target, by measuring the asymmetry of the angular distribution of Michel decay positrons as a function of energy. The initial muon beam polarization at the production is predicted to be P_{μ } = -1 by the Standard Model (SM) with massless neutrinos. We estimated our residual muon polarization to be P_{μ } = -0.86 ± 0.02 (stat) { }^{+ 0.05}_{-0.06} (syst) at the stopping target, which is consistent with the SM predictions when the depolarizing effects occurring during the muon production, propagation and moderation in the target are taken into account. The knowledge of beam polarization is of fundamental importance in order to model the background of our {μ ^+ → e^+ γ } search induced by the muon radiative decay: μ + → e+ bar{ν }_{μ } ν _e γ.

  8. High time resolved electron temperature measurements by using the multi-pass Thomson scattering system in GAMMA 10/PDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Yasuhara, Ryo; Ohta, Koichi; Chikatsu, Masayuki; Shima, Yoriko; Kohagura, Junko; Sakamoto, Mizuki; Nakashima, Yousuke; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Ichimura, Makoto; Yamada, Ichihiro; Funaba, Hisamichi; Minami, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    High time resolved electron temperature measurements are useful for fluctuation study. A multi-pass Thomson scattering (MPTS) system is proposed for the improvement of both increasing the TS signal intensity and time resolution. The MPTS system in GAMMA 10/PDX has been constructed for enhancing the Thomson scattered signals for the improvement of measurement accuracy. The MPTS system has a polarization-based configuration with an image relaying system. We optimized the image relaying optics for improving the multi-pass laser confinement and obtaining the stable MPTS signals over ten passing TS signals. The integrated MPTS signals increased about five times larger than that in the single pass system. Finally, time dependent electron temperatures were obtained in MHz sampling.

  9. Determination of biogeochemical properties of marine particles using above water measurements of the degree of polarization at the Brewster angle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chami, Malik; McKee, David

    2007-07-01

    Retrieval of biogeochemical parameters from remotely sensed data in optically complex waters such as those found in coastal zones is a challenging task due to the effects of various water constituents (biogenic, nonalgal and inorganic particles, dissolved matter) on the radiation exiting the ocean. Since scattering by molecules, aerosols, hydrosols and reflection at the sea surface introduce and modify the polarization state of light, the polarized upward radiation contains embedded information about the intrinsic nature of aerosols and suspended matter in the ocean. In this study, shipborne above water angularly resolved visible/near infrared multiband measurements of the degree of polarization are analysed against their corresponding in-situ biogeochemically characterized water samples for the first time. Water samples and radiometric data were collected in the English Channel along an inshore-offshore transect. Angular variations in the degree of polarization P are found to be consistent with theory. Maximum values of P are observed near the Brewster viewing angle in the specular direction. Variations in the degree of polarization at the Brewster angle (PB) with water content revealed that the suspended particulate matter, which is mainly composed of inorganic particles during the experiment, contributes to depolarise the skylight reflection, thus reducing PB. An empirical polarization-based approach is proposed to determine biogeochemical properties of the particles. The concentration of inorganic particles can be estimated using PB to within ±13% based on the dataset used. Larger sets of polarized measurements are recommended to corroborate the tendency observed in this study.

  10. Wavelength encoded polarization measurements for simultaneous spectral and polarimetric characterization in near field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, H. S.; Swami, M. K.; Kushwaha, P. K.; Uppal, A.; Gupta, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    We report a scheme for polarization sensitive near field imaging of nanostructured samples by making use of broadband polarized near field illumination and detection of polarization states of scattered light by a spectrally encoded analyzer. The analyzer comprising a combination of polarizer, a multi-order waveplate and a broadband quarter waveplate allows analysis of the spectrally encoded polarization states of scattered light for characterization of the polarization properties of nano structures from a single image scan. The scheme was validated by measuring the near field polarization parameters of silver nanowires. The approach allows simultaneous measurement of polarization characteristics as well as spectral features of the nano materials.

  11. Hydrogen bond stabilities in membrane-reconstituted alamethicin from amide-resolved hydrogen-exchange measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, C E; Handcock, L J

    1996-01-01

    Amide-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange-rate constants were measured for backbone amides of alamethicin reconstituted in dioleoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles by an exchange-trapping method combined with high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In vesicles containing alamethicin at molar ratios between 1:20 and 1:100 relative to lipid, the exchange-rate constants increased with increasing volume of the D20 buffer in which the vesicles were suspended, indicating that exchange under these conditions is dominated by partitioning of the peptide into the aqueous phase. This was supported by observation of a linear relationship between the exchange-rate constants for amides in membrane-reconstituted alamethicin and those for amides in alamethicin dissolved directly into D2O buffer. Significant protection of amides from exchange with D2O buffer in membrane-reconstituted alamethicin is interpreted in terms of stabilization by helical hydrogen bonding. Under conditions in which amide exchange occurred by partitioning of the peptide into solution, only lower limits for hydrogen-bond stabilities in the membrane were determined; all the potentially hydrogen-bonded amides of alamethicin are at least 1000-fold exchange protected in the membrane-bound state. When partitioning of alamethicin into the aqueous phase was suppressed by hydration of reconstituted vesicles in a limiting volume of water [D2O:dioleoylphosphatidylcholine:alamethicin; 220:1:0.05; (M:M:M)], the exchange-protection factors exhibited helical periodicity with highly exchange-protected, and less well-protected, amides on the nonpolar and polar helix faces, respectively. The exchange data indicate that, under the conditions studied, alamethicin adopts a stable helical structure in DOPC bilayers in which all the potentially hydrogen-bonded amides are stabilized by helical hydrogen bonds. The protection factors define the orientation of the peptide helix with respect to an aqueous phase, which is

  12. Cluster mass fraction and size distribution determined by fs-time-resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaoming; Shim, Bonggu; Arefiev, Alexey; Tushentsov, Mikhail; Breizman, Boris; Downer, Mike

    2009-11-01

    Characterization of supersonic gas jets is important for accurate interpretation and control of laser-cluster experiments. While average size and total atomic density can be found by standard Rayleigh scatter and interferometry, cluster mass fraction and size distribution are usually difficult to measure. Here we determine the cluster fraction and the size distribution with fs-time-resolved refractive index and absorption measurements in cluster gas jets after ionization and heating by an intense pump pulse. The fs-time-resolved refractive index measured with frequency domain interferometer (FDI) shows different contributions from monomer plasma and cluster plasma in the time domain, enabling us to determine the cluster fraction. The fs-time-resolved absorption measured by a delayed probe shows the contribution from clusters of various sizes, allowing us to find the size distribution.

  13. The BESS-Polar Proton & Helium flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hams, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Mitchell, J.W.; Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Itazaki, A.; Kim, K.C.; Kumazawal, T.; Lee, M.H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Moiseev, A.A.; Meyers, Z.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J.F.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E.S.; Shikaze, Y.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Suzuki, J.; Takasugi, Y.; Takeuchi, K.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.; Yamagami, T.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshimura, K.

    The Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS) instrument pro-vides precise measurements of the elemental and isotopic composition of the light Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) component. The ability to determine the charge sign of incident par-ticles enables the instrument to search for GCR antimatter, which is a major objective of the BESS program. Since 1993, the US-Japan BESS collaboration has conducted 11 successful balloon flights, nine northern-latitude flights of 1-day duration and most recently two long-duration balloon flights (8.5 days in 2004 & 24.5 days in 2007/2008), with the BESS-Polar instrument. The BESS-Polar instrument is the current effort of BESS program specifically designed for long-duration, low-geomagnetic cutoff Antarctic flights with significantly increased transparency for incident CR particle allowing to study anti/proton down to 100 MeV and a faster data acquisition enables processing of all CR events without event selection. The first BESS-Polar flight was launched on Dec 13, 2004 from Williams Field, near McMurdo Station in Antarctica. The instrument recorded data for 8.5 days, limited by the cryogenic life time of the superconducting magnet. During this flight the BESS-Polar instrument recorded 0.9 x 109 CR events. In this paper, we present the absolute proton and helium flux for the first BESS-Polar flight as well as the time variation of the fluxes due to solar activity.

  14. Time-resolved measurements of the density fluctuations in ion phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, Ahmed; Skiff, Frederick

    2006-05-15

    A two-point correlation function measurement of the ion density fluctuations is presented. Using two laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection systems, the density fluctuation is resolved in time, ion parallel velocity, and space (along the magnetic field). The measurements reveal two components of the density fluctuations, one of which is explained by fluid theory. The other component is ion-velocity-dependent and is newly identified. In addition to the density fluctuation measurements, a velocity-resolved estimate of the fluctuation-induced transport flux using correlations between a Langmuir probe and LIF is reported.

  15. The polar ozone and aerosol measurement experiment (POAM II)

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilacqua, R.M.; Shettle, E.P.; Hornstein, J.S.

    1994-12-31

    The Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement experiment (POAM II), was launched on the SPOT 3 satellite on 25 September, 1993. POAM II is designed to measure the vertical profiles of the polar ozone, aerosols, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide, atmospheric density and temperature in the stratosphere and upper troposphere. It makes solar occultation measurements in nine channels defined by narrow-band filters. The field of view is 0.01 by 1.2 degrees, with an instantaneous vertical resolution of 0.6 km at the tangent point in the earth`s atmosphere. The SPOT 3 satellite is in a 98.7-degree inclined sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 833 km. From the measured transmissions, it is possible to determine the density profiles of aerosols, O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O, and NO{sub 2}. Using the assumption of uniformly mixed oxygen, the authors are also able to determine the temperature. The authors present details of the POAM II instrument design, including the optical configuration, electronics and measurement accuracy. The authors also present preliminary results from the occultation measurements made to date.

  16. Ultrashort-pulse measurement using noninstantaneous nonlinearities: Raman effects in frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.; Kohler, B.; Wilson, K.R.

    1995-03-01

    Ultrashort-pulse-characterization techniques generally require instantaneously responding media. We show that this is not the case for frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG). We include, as an example, the noninstantaneous Raman response of fused silica, which can cause errors in the retrieved pulse width of as much as 8% for a 25-fs pulse in polarization-gate FROG. We present a modified pulse-retrieval algorithm that deconvolves such slow effects and use it to retrieve pulses of any width. In experiments with 45-fs pulses this algorithm achieved better convergence and yielded a shorter pulse than previous FROG algorithms.

  17. Polarization measurements through space-to-ground atmospheric propagation paths by using a highly polarized laser source in space.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Morio; Takenaka, Hideki; Shoji, Yozo; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Koyama, Yoshisada; Kunimori, Hiroo

    2009-12-01

    The polarization characteristics of an artificial laser source in space were measured through space-to-ground atmospheric transmission paths. An existing Japanese laser communication satellite and optical ground station were used to measure Stokes parameters and the degree of polarization of the laser beam transmitted from the satellite. As a result, the polarization was preserved within an rms error of 1.6 degrees, and the degree of polarization was 99.4+/-4.4% through the space-to-ground atmosphere. These results contribute to the link estimation for quantum key distribution via space and provide the potential for enhancements in quantum cryptography worldwide in the future. PMID:20052156

  18. Polarization measurements through space-to-ground atmospheric propagation paths by using a highly polarized laser source in space.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Morio; Takenaka, Hideki; Shoji, Yozo; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Koyama, Yoshisada; Kunimori, Hiroo

    2009-12-01

    The polarization characteristics of an artificial laser source in space were measured through space-to-ground atmospheric transmission paths. An existing Japanese laser communication satellite and optical ground station were used to measure Stokes parameters and the degree of polarization of the laser beam transmitted from the satellite. As a result, the polarization was preserved within an rms error of 1.6 degrees, and the degree of polarization was 99.4+/-4.4% through the space-to-ground atmosphere. These results contribute to the link estimation for quantum key distribution via space and provide the potential for enhancements in quantum cryptography worldwide in the future.

  19. Measurement of J/ ψ polarization in pp collisions at

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Baesso, C.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chen, P.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dogaru, M.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicheur, A.; Hicks, E.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Marconi, U.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Martynov, A.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Maurice, E.; Mazurov, A.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Morello, M. J.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrick, G. N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D. L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, M.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Urner, D.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2013-11-01

    An angular analysis of the decay J/ ψ→ μ + μ - is performed to measure the polarization of prompt J/ ψ mesons produced in pp collisions at . The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 0.37 fb-1 collected with the LHCb detector. The measurement is presented as a function of transverse momentum, p T, and rapidity, y, of the J/ ψ meson, in the kinematic region 2< p T<15 GeV/ c and 2.0< y<4.5.

  20. Superthermal electron distribution measurements from polarized electron cyclotron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1988-06-01

    Measurements of the superthermal electron distribution can be made by observing the polarized electron cyclotron emission. The emission is viewed along a constant magnetic field surface. This simplifies the resonance condition and gives a direct correlation between emission frequency and kinetic energy of the emitting electron. A transformation technique is formulated which determines the anisotropy of the distribution and number density of superthermals at each energy measured. The steady-state distribution during lower hybrid current drive and examples of the superthermal dynamics as the runaway conditions is varied are presented for discharges in the PLT tokamak. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Measuring CMB polarization from ISS: the SPOrt experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SPORT Collaboration

    2004-09-01

    The SPOrt (Sky Polarization Observatory) experiment aims to measure CMBP (cosmic microwave background polarization) on about 80% of the sky from space. Selected by ESA to fly on board the ISS in 2006, it is funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). As shown also by the recent WMAP release, CMBP data, besides of removing various degeneracies among cosmological parameters, provided new and important information on the cosmic opacity τ and, therefore, on very early cosmic objects which reionized the world at z ˜ 15. Most such information is obtained from low-l spectral components, that SPOrt, with its HPBW resolution of 7∘ will explore with a high level of sensitivity. The 4 polarimeters of SPOrt work at 22, 32 and (2x) 90 GHz. At lower frequencies they will provide a (nearly) all-sky survey of Galactic synchrotron polarized emission, while data at the higher frequency will measure the CMBP signal. Correlating SPOrt with anisotropy data, by other experiments, shall therefore provide significant cosmological information. We performed a number of simulations of SPOrt performance, aimed to determine how far τ and/or other parameter(s) concerning reionization are constrained by the expected data. We also considered a possible interplay between reionization histories and Dark Energy nature. Besides of information on technological developments for systematics reduction, long term stability and observing time efficiency, we report here recent outputs on the expected SPOrt performance in constraining cosmological models.

  2. Generation of polarization-resolved wideband unpredictability-enhanced chaotic signals based on vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers subject to chaotic optical injection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Jun; Wu, Zheng-Mao; Tang, Xi; Deng, Tao; Fan, Li; Zhong, Zhu-Qiang; Xia, Guang-Qiong

    2015-03-23

    A system framework is proposed and analyzed for generating polarization-resolved wideband unpredictability-enhanced chaotic signals based on a slave vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (S-VCSEL) driven by an injected optical chaos signal from a master VCSEL (M-VCSEL) under optical feedback. After calculating the time series outputs from the M-VCSEL under optical feedback and the S-VCSEL under chaotic optical injection by using the spin-flip model (SFM), the unpredictability degree (UD) is evaluated by permutation entropy (PE), and the bandwidth of the polarization-resolved outputs from the M-VCSEL and S-VCSEL are numerically investigated. The results show that, under suitable parameters, both the bandwidth and UD of two polarization components (PCs) outputs from the S-VCSEL can be enhanced significantly compared with that of the driving chaotic signals output from the M-VCSEL. By simulating the influences of the feedback and injection parameters on the bandwidth and UD of the polarization-resolved outputs from S-VCSEL, related operating parameters can be optimized.

  3. Nondipole Effects in Chiral Systems Measured with Linearly Polarized Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, K. P.; Hemmers, O.; Guillemin, R.; Stolte, W. C.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Lindle, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    With the advent of third-generation synchrotron light sources, it has been demonstrated that higher-order corrections to the dipole approximation are necessary for the description of light-matter interactions in the soft x-ray range. These effects, known as 'nondipole effects', present themselves as asymmetries in the angular distributions of photoelectrons. Chiral molecules, known to have asymmetries in photoelectron angular distributions when exposed to circularly polarized light, have been proposed to demonstrate a chiral-specific nondipole effect when exposed to linearly polarized light. We present the first-ever measurement of nondipole chiral angular distributions for the case of each enantiomer of camphor in the photon energy range 296-343eV.

  4. USGS Polar Temperature Logging System, Description and Measurement Uncertainties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an updated technical description of the USGS Polar Temperature Logging System (PTLS) and a complete assessment of the measurement uncertainties. This measurement system is used to acquire subsurface temperature data for climate-change detection in the polar regions and for reconstructing past climate changes using the 'borehole paleothermometry' inverse method. Specifically designed for polar conditions, the PTLS can measure temperatures as low as -60 degrees Celsius with a sensitivity ranging from 0.02 to 0.19 millikelvin (mK). A modular design allows the PTLS to reach depths as great as 4.5 kilometers with a skid-mounted winch unit or 650 meters with a small helicopter-transportable unit. The standard uncertainty (uT) of the ITS-90 temperature measurements obtained with the current PTLS range from 3.0 mK at -60 degrees Celsius to 3.3 mK at 0 degrees Celsius. Relative temperature measurements used for borehole paleothermometry have a standard uncertainty (urT) whose upper limit ranges from 1.6 mK at -60 degrees Celsius to 2.0 mK at 0 degrees Celsius. The uncertainty of a temperature sensor's depth during a log depends on specific borehole conditions and the temperature near the winch and thus must be treated on a case-by-case basis. However, recent experience indicates that when logging conditions are favorable, the 4.5-kilometer system is capable of producing depths with a standard uncertainty (uZ) on the order of 200-250 parts per million.

  5. FIRST DIRECT MEASUREMENTS OF TRANSVERSE WAVES IN SOLAR POLAR PLUMES USING SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Thurgood, J. O.; Morton, R. J.; McLaughlin, J. A.

    2014-07-20

    There is intense interest in determining the precise contribution of Alfvénic waves propagating along solar structures to the problems of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Since the launch of SDO/AIA, it has been possible to resolve transverse oscillations in off-limb solar polar plumes and recently McIntosh et al. concluded that such waves are energetic enough to play a role in heating the corona and accelerating the fast solar wind. However, this result is based on comparisons to Monte Carlo simulations and confirmation via direct measurements is still outstanding. Thus, this Letter reports on the first direct measurements of transverse wave motions in solar polar plumes. Over a four hour period, we measure the transverse displacements, periods, and velocity amplitudes of 596 distinct oscillations observed in the 171 Å channel of SDO/AIA. We find a broad range of non-uniformly distributed parameter values which are well described by log-normal distributions with peaks at 234 km, 121 s, and 8 km s{sup –1}, and mean and standard deviations of 407 ± 297 km, 173 ± 118 s, and 14 ± 10 km s{sup –1}. Within standard deviations, our direct measurements are broadly consistent with previous results. However, accounting for the whole of our observed non-uniform parameter distribution we calculate an energy flux of 9-24 W m{sup –2}, which is 4-10 times below the energy requirement for solar wind acceleration. Hence, our results indicate that transverse magnetohydrodynamic waves as resolved by SDO/AIA cannot be the dominant energy source for fast solar wind acceleration in the open-field corona.

  6. Direct measurement of the dielectric polarization properties of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Cuervo, Ana; Dans, Pablo D.; Carrascosa, José L.; Orozco, Modesto; Gomila, Gabriel; Fumagalli, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The electric polarizability of DNA, represented by the dielectric constant, is a key intrinsic property that modulates DNA interaction with effector proteins. Surprisingly, it has so far remained unknown owing to the lack of experimental tools able to access it. Here, we experimentally resolved it by detecting the ultraweak polarization forces of DNA inside single T7 bacteriophages particles using electrostatic force microscopy. In contrast to the common assumption of low-polarizable behavior like proteins (εr ∼ 2–4), we found that the DNA dielectric constant is ∼8, considerably higher than the value of ∼3 found for capsid proteins. State-of-the-art molecular dynamic simulations confirm the experimental findings, which result in sensibly decreased DNA interaction free energy than normally predicted by Poisson–Boltzmann methods. Our findings reveal a property at the basis of DNA structure and functions that is needed for realistic theoretical descriptions, and illustrate the synergetic power of scanning probe microscopy and theoretical computation techniques. PMID:25136104

  7. Direct Measurement of the Resolving Power of X-ray CT System in SPring-8

    SciTech Connect

    Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio; Takano, Hidekazu; Yagi, Naoto

    2004-05-12

    Resolving power of high spatial resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) system was evaluated by taking CT images of artificial test patterns at BL47XU in SPring-8 (SP-{mu}CT BL47XU). The system consists of an in-vacuum type undulator, a double crystal monochromator cooled with liquid nitrogen, a high precision sample stages and a high spatial resolution X-ray detector. For the precise measurement of the resolving power, the artificial test patterns of Cu/Al concentric multilayer were fabricated by DC sputtering deposition at AIST Kansai. 7 or 5 layers of Cu/Al are deposited by period of 2 {mu}m and 1 {mu}m. Therefore the resolving power could be measured at 4 {mu}m and 2 {mu}m with each test pattern. It was confirmed that the system had a resolving power of 2 {mu}m at 15keV from the CT images of test patterns. The resolution is not independent on the used energy. At 30keV, the resolving power was slightly poorer than 2 {mu}m. The result was consistent with the point spread functions of the high resolution detector measured by focused micro-beam.

  8. Measurements of the polarization observables IS and Ic for γp→pπ+π- using the clas spectr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanretty, Charles; CLAS Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    Constituent Quark Models predict an excited baryon spectrum much richer in resonances than that which has been observed experimentally, the so-called missing resonance problem. Evidence for the production of these short-lived states may come about through measurements of quantities called polarization observables. These observables occur when the constraint of polarization is imposed on the reactions and are highly sensitive to resonance production. The expected sequential decay of these N* resonances via πΔ and NΔ intermediate states makes the double pion final state an attractive final state to study to reveal these missing resonances. In recent years, both single-and double-polarization experiments have been carried out as part of the N* program at Jefferson Lab in Newport News, Virginia with the goal of resolving this missing resonance problem. One such polarized photoproduction experiment used linearly polarized photons incident on an unpolarized LH2 target. The analysis of γp→pπ+π- reactions found in these polarized photoproduction data using the power of a kinematic fitter results in highly accurate measurements of these observables. The analysis of this pπ+π- final state and the extraction of two such observables, IS and Ic, will be discussed.

  9. A technique for measuring vertically and horizontally polarized microwave brightness temperatures using electronic polarization-basis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, Albin J.

    1992-01-01

    This technique for electronically rotating the polarization basis of an orthogonal-linear polarization radiometer is based on the measurement of the first three feedhorn Stokes parameters, along with the subsequent transformation of this measured Stokes vector into a rotated coordinate frame. The technique requires an accurate measurement of the cross-correlation between the two orthogonal feedhorn modes, for which an innovative polarized calibration load was developed. The experimental portion of this investigation consisted of a proof of concept demonstration of the technique of electronic polarization basis rotation (EPBR) using a ground based 90-GHz dual orthogonal-linear polarization radiometer. Practical calibration algorithms for ground-, aircraft-, and space-based instruments were identified and tested. The theoretical effort consisted of radiative transfer modeling using the planar-stratified numerical model described in Gasiewski and Staelin (1990).

  10. Measurement of W Boson Polarization in Top Quark Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Vickey, Trevor Neil

    2004-01-01

    A measurement of the polarization of the W boson from top quark decay is an excellent test of the V-A form of the charged-current weak interaction in the standard model. Since the longitudinal W boson is intimately related to the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism, and the standard model gives a specific prediction for the fraction of longitudinal W bosons from top decays, it is of particular interest for study. This thesis presents a measurement of W boson polarization in top quark decays through an analysis of the cosθ* distribution in the lepton-plus-jets channel of t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. This measurement uses an integrated luminosity of ~ 162 pb-1 of data collected with the CDF Run II detector, resulting in 31 t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events with at least one identified b jet. Using a binned likelihood fit to the cosθ* distribution from the t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events found in this sample, the fraction of W bosons with longitudinal polarization is determined to be F0 = 0.99$+0.29\\atop{-0.35}$stat.) ± 0.19(syst.), F0 > 0.33 @ 95% CL. This result is consistent with the standard model prediction, given a top quark mass of 174.3 GeV/c2, of F0 = 0.701 ± 0.012.

  11. A novel polarization interferometer for measuring upper atmospheric winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Ting-Kui; Zhang, Chun-Min

    2010-06-01

    A static polarization interferometer for measuring upper atmospheric winds is presented, based on two Savart plates with their optical axes perpendicular to each other. The principle and characteristics of the interferometer are described. The interferometer with a wide field of view can offer a stable benchmark optical path difference over a specified spectral region of 0.55-0.63 μm because there are no quarter wave plates. Since the instrument employs a straight line common-path configuration but without moving parts and slits, it is very compact, simple, inherently robust and has high throughput. The paper is limited to a theoretical analysis.

  12. Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) Polarization Measurements on CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, T.; Jones, B.; Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P. C.; Hosea, J. C.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2001-10-01

    Mode-converted (MC) EBWs offer an attractive path for electron temperature measurement, heating, and current drive in overdense plasmas (ω_pe>>Ω_ce). A quad-ridged antenna was installed in CDX-U with a movable limiter, which shortens electron density scale length at the MC layer and hence optimizes MC efficiency. Electrostatic EBWs are expected to MC to X-mode electromagnetic waves. Measurements were made with both the X- and O-mode aligned antennas, and the X/O ratio was calculated. An X/O ratio >2 was observed with the antenna near the MC layer, in contrast to a ratio of 1.2 measured previously with an antenna outside the vessel. A ratio of ~1 was seen with the antenna far from the MC layer, possibly due to reflections between the plasma and vessel wall causing polarization scrambling. Reduction of the X/O ratio was observed when the limiter was extended, likely due to polarization mixing caused by reflection or refraction at the limiter surface in front of the antenna.

  13. Using Polar Coronal Hole Area Measurements to Determine the Solar Polar Magnetic Field Reversal in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karna, N.; Webber, S.A. Hess; Pesnell, W.D.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of solar polar coronal hole (PCH) areas since the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows how the polar regions have evolved during Solar Cycle 24. We present PCH areas from mid-2010 through 2013 using data from the Atmospheric Imager Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instruments onboard SDO. Our analysis shows that both the northern and southern PCH areas have decreased significantly in size since 2010. Linear fits to the areas derived from the magnetic-field properties indicate that, although the northern hemisphere went through polar-field reversal and reached solar-maximum conditions in mid-2012, the southern hemisphere had not reached solar-maximum conditions in the polar regions by the end of 2013. Our results show that solar-maximum conditions in each hemisphere, as measured by the area of the polar coronal holes and polar magnetic field, will be offset in time.

  14. Parameterization of size-resolved dust emission and validation with measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Y.; Ishizuka, M.; Mikami, M.; Leys, J. F.

    2011-04-01

    A critical problem in dust research is to estimate size-resolved dust emission rates. Several dust schemes have been proposed but are yet to be rigorously tested against observed data. In the recent Japan-Australia Dust Experiment (JADE), size-resolved dust fluxes were measured. In this study, the JADE data are used to test a size-resolved dust scheme. Our aim is to examine whether the scheme has the capability to predict size-resolved dust fluxes, what the ranges of the scheme parameters are, and whether the scheme is sensitive to the parameters. The JADE data show that dust emission depends linearly on saltation flux and thus confirm the basic assumption of the scheme. The magnitudes of the scheme parameters are found to be consistent with those reported in earlier studies. The estimated size-resolved dust fluxes are in satisfactory agreement with the measurements, although considerable discrepancies remain and are difficult to rectify without speculative tuning of the scheme input parameters. The discrepancies have been traced back to the uncertainties in the parent soil particle size analyses and in the dust flux observations. Ensemble tests showed both model physics uncertainties and parameter uncertainties. It is proposed that the dust scheme under consideration is not as sensitive as previously suspected and is likely to perform well if the parameters are specified within a reasonably correct range.

  15. Multiple interferometer interaction free measurement using polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Pitt, Kevin; Milgie, Michael

    2016-02-01

    This paper experimentally and theoretically investigates improving interaction free measurement (IFM) efficiency using a chain of multiple interferometers with transmissive beam splitters of reflectivity less than 50%. The object measured with IFM is present or absent from one of the interferometer paths depending on the polarization of the incident light. The ability to effectively move an object in and out of the system without physically moving it makes implementing a multiple chain interferometer more practical. It also allows verifying the desired interferometer phase while simultaneously making the IFM measurement. A recursive phase model of a chain of interferometers is presented which accounts for both losses and arbitrary phase differences between each pair of arms in the chain. The recursive model predicts the photodiode power and is experimentally validated for a chain of interferometers of lengths one and two.

  16. Coordinated Energetic Particle Measurements Using Chandra, Cluster, and Polar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Mellin, R.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D.

    2003-12-01

    It is not well known in the magnetospheric physics community that the Chandra spacecraft carries a multi-element energetic particle telescope called EPHIN (Electron Proton Helium Instrument) fielded by the University of Kiel. For present purposes we are interested in electrons that are measured from greater than 30 keV to greater than 10 MeV. Chandra is in a highly elliptical orbit with a perigee of 16000 km, and apogee of 133,000 km and an inclination of 28 degrees. Fortuitously the line of apsides is relatively close to that of the Cluster constellation. A first use of the Chandra data has been a further examination of a substorm onset that occurred = 0408 UT on 27 August 2001, discussed in a publication by Baker et al. (2002). At that time the s/c coordinates in GSM were Chandra (-6.64, 16.15, 12.82); Cluster 3 (-19.15, -1.40, 1.54); Polar (-7.71, -4.50, 3.32). It can be seen that whereas Cluster and Polar were a bit post midnight and roughly radially aligned, Chandra was well pre-midnight at around 20 hrs. Yet the onset time of energetic electrons at Chandra was very close to that observed at Cluster and Polar. Furthermore, some pre-substorm bursts were also seen to be closely time coincident at Chandra and the other spacecraft. These observations give additional evidence about the scale size of the phenomena and will be discussed in detail along with other coordinated measurements. Baker et al. GRL 29, no. 24, 2190, 2002

  17. Angular and spectrally resolved investigations of yeast cells by light scattering microscopy and goniometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Julian; Müller, Dennis; Nothelfer, Steffen; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-07-01

    Spectrally and angular resolved light scattering from yeast cells was studied with a scattering microscope and a goniometer. Different cell models were investigated with help of analytical solutions of Maxwell's equations. It was found that extraction of precise morphological and optical cellular properties from the measured scattering patterns and phase functions requires more sophisticated cell models than standard Mie theory.

  18. Spatially-resolved spectroscopic technique for measuring optical properties of food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantification of optical properties is important to understand light interaction with biological materials, and to develop effective optical sensing techniques for property characterization and quality measurement of food products. This chapter reviews spatially-resolved method, with the focus on f...

  19. Resolving the 180-degree ambiguity in vector magnetic field measurements: The 'minimum' energy solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    I present a robust algorithm that resolves the 180-deg ambiguity in measurements of the solar vector magnetic field. The technique simultaneously minimizes both the divergence of the magnetic field and the electric current density using a simulated annealing algorithm. This results in the field orientation with approximately minimum free energy. The technique is well-founded physically and is simple to implement.

  20. Measuring A{sub b} with polarized beams at SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Junk, T.R.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    We present the first direct measurement of the left-right asymmetry of b-quarks from the decay of Z{sup 0} bosons produced in the annihilation of longitudinally polarized electrons and unpolarized positrons in the SLD at the SLC. Two complementary techniques are presented: (1) Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} decays are tagged using track impact parameters measured with a CCD-based vertex detector with b {minus} {bar b} discrimination provided by momentum-weighted track charge; (2) Semileptonic b-decays are tagged using high (P, P{sub T}) muons and electrons with b {minus} {bar b} discrimination provided by the lepton charge. In our 1993 sample of {approximately}50,000 Z{sup 0} decays having a luminosity-weighted average e{sup {minus}} polarization of (62.6{plus_minus}1.2)%, we find the following preliminary results: A{sub b}(track charge) = 1.01{plus_minus}0.12(stat) {plus_minus}0.14(sys), A{sub b}(muons) = 0.94{plus_minus}0.25(stat){plus_minus}0.11(sys), and A{sub b}(electrons) 0.99{plus_minus}0.27(stat){plus_minus} 0.19(sys).

  1. Single shot, time-resolved measurement of the coherence properties of OCT swept source lasers.

    PubMed

    Butler, T; Slepneva, S; O'Shaughnessy, B; Kelleher, B; Goulding, D; Hegarty, S P; Lyu, H-C; Karnowski, K; Wojtkowski, M; Huyet, G

    2015-05-15

    A novel, time-resolved interferometric technique is presented that allows the reconstruction of the complex electric field output of a swept source laser in a single-shot measurement. The power of the technique is demonstrated by examining a short cavity swept source designed for optical coherence tomography (OCT) applications with a spectral width of over 100 nm. The novel analysis allows a time-resolved real-time characterization of the roll-off, optical spectrum, linewidth, and coherence properties of a dynamic, rapidly swept laser source.

  2. Polarization aberrations in the solar activity measurements experiments (SAMEX) solar vector magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1989-01-01

    An optical design and polarization analysis of the Air Force/NASA Solar Activity Measurements Experiments solar vector magnetograph optical system is performed. Polarization aberration theory demonstrates that conventional telescope coating designs introduce unacceptably high levels of polarization aberrations into the optical system. Several ultralow polarization mirror and lens coatings designs for this instrument are discussed. Balancing of polarization aberrations at different surfaces is demonstrated.

  3. Exploratory study on a statistical method to analyse time resolved data obtained during nanomaterial exposure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, F.; Njiki-Menga, G.-H.; Witschger, O.

    2013-04-01

    Most of the measurement strategies that are suggested at the international level to assess workplace exposure to nanomaterials rely on devices measuring, in real time, airborne particles concentrations (according different metrics). Since none of the instruments to measure aerosols can distinguish a particle of interest to the background aerosol, the statistical analysis of time resolved data requires special attention. So far, very few approaches have been used for statistical analysis in the literature. This ranges from simple qualitative analysis of graphs to the implementation of more complex statistical models. To date, there is still no consensus on a particular approach and the current period is always looking for an appropriate and robust method. In this context, this exploratory study investigates a statistical method to analyse time resolved data based on a Bayesian probabilistic approach. To investigate and illustrate the use of the this statistical method, particle number concentration data from a workplace study that investigated the potential for exposure via inhalation from cleanout operations by sandpapering of a reactor producing nanocomposite thin films have been used. In this workplace study, the background issue has been addressed through the near-field and far-field approaches and several size integrated and time resolved devices have been used. The analysis of the results presented here focuses only on data obtained with two handheld condensation particle counters. While one was measuring at the source of the released particles, the other one was measuring in parallel far-field. The Bayesian probabilistic approach allows a probabilistic modelling of data series, and the observed task is modelled in the form of probability distributions. The probability distributions issuing from time resolved data obtained at the source can be compared with the probability distributions issuing from the time resolved data obtained far-field, leading in a

  4. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystalsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugh, M. J.; Wu, M.; Jacoby, K. D.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-11-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  5. Measuring the X-ray Resolving Power of Bent Potassium Acid Phthalate Diffraction Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J.; Wu, M.; Jacoby, K. D.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-11-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a dual goniometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  6. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J. Jacoby, K. D.; Wu, M.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-11-15

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  7. Polar nephelometer for light-scattering measurements of ice crystals.

    PubMed

    Barkey, B; Liou, K N

    2001-02-15

    We report on a small, lightweight polar nephelometer for the measurement of the light-scattering properties of cloud particles, specifically designed for use on a balloonborne platform in cirrus cloud conditions. The instrument consists of 33 fiber-optic light guides positioned in a two-dimensional plane from 5 degrees to 175 degrees that direct the scattered light to photodiode detectors-amplifier units. The system uses an onboard computer and data acquisition card to collect and store the measured signals. The instrument's calibration is tested by measurement of light scattered into a two-dimensional plane from small water droplets generated by an ultrasonic humidifier. Excellent comparisons between the measured water-droplet scattering properties and expectations generated by Mie calculation are shown. The measured scattering properties of ice crystals generated in a cold chamber also compare reasonably well with the theoretical results based on calculations from a unified theory of light scattering by ice crystals that use the particle size distribution measured in the chamber. PMID:18033557

  8. Experimental investigation of saturated polarization spectroscopy for quantitative concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, T A; Giancola, W C; Lucht, R P

    2000-04-20

    Polarization-spectroscopy (PS) line shapes and signal intensities are measured in well-characterized hydrogen-air flames operated over a wide range of equivalence ratios. We use both low (perturbative) and high (saturating) pump beam intensities in the counterpropagating pump-probe geometry. The effects of saturation on the line-center signal intensity and the resonance linewidth are investigated. The PS signal intensities are used to measure relative OH number densities in a series of near-adiabatic flames at equivalence ratios (phi) ranging from 0.5 to 1.5. The use of saturating pump intensities minimizes the effect of pump beam absorption, providing more accurate number density measurements. When calibrated to the calculated OH concentration in the phi = 0.6 flame, the saturated PS number density measurements probing the P(1)(2) transition are in excellent agreement with OH absorption measurements, equilibrium calculations of OH number density, and previous saturated degenerate four-wave mixing OH number density measurements. PMID:18345100

  9. Experimental investigation of saturated polarization spectroscopy for quantatative concentration measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Giancola, William C.; Lucht, Robert P.

    2000-04-20

    Polarization-spectroscopy (PS) line shapes and signal intensities are measured in well-characterized hydrogen-air flames operated over a wide range of equivalence ratios. We use both low (perturbative) and high (saturating) pump beam intensities in the counterpropagating pump-probe geometry. The effects of saturation on the line-center signal intensity and the resonance linewidth are investigated. The PS signal intensities are used to measure relative OH number densities in a series of near-adiabatic flames at equivalence ratios ({phi}) ranging from 0.5 to 1.5. The use of saturating pump intensities minimizes the effect of pump beam absorption, providing more accurate number density measurements. When calibrated to the calculated OH concentration in the {phi}=0.6 flame, the saturated PS number density measurements probing the P{sub 1}(2) transition are in excellent agreement with OH absorption measurements, equilibrium calculations of OH number density, and previous saturated degenerate four-wave mixing OH number density measurements. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  10. Polar nephelometer for light-scattering measurements of ice crystals.

    PubMed

    Barkey, B; Liou, K N

    2001-02-15

    We report on a small, lightweight polar nephelometer for the measurement of the light-scattering properties of cloud particles, specifically designed for use on a balloonborne platform in cirrus cloud conditions. The instrument consists of 33 fiber-optic light guides positioned in a two-dimensional plane from 5 degrees to 175 degrees that direct the scattered light to photodiode detectors-amplifier units. The system uses an onboard computer and data acquisition card to collect and store the measured signals. The instrument's calibration is tested by measurement of light scattered into a two-dimensional plane from small water droplets generated by an ultrasonic humidifier. Excellent comparisons between the measured water-droplet scattering properties and expectations generated by Mie calculation are shown. The measured scattering properties of ice crystals generated in a cold chamber also compare reasonably well with the theoretical results based on calculations from a unified theory of light scattering by ice crystals that use the particle size distribution measured in the chamber.

  11. Simultaneous resonant x-ray diffraction measurement of polarization inversion and lattice strain in polycrystalline ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorfman, S.; Simons, H.; Iamsasri, T.; Prasertpalichat, S.; Cann, D. P.; Choe, H.; Pietsch, U.; Watier, Y.; Jones, J. L.

    2016-02-01

    Structure-property relationships in ferroelectrics extend over several length scales from the individual unit cell to the macroscopic device, and with dynamics spanning a broad temporal domain. Characterizing the multi-scale structural origin of electric field-induced polarization reversal and strain in ferroelectrics is an ongoing challenge that so far has obscured its fundamental behaviour. By utilizing small intensity differences between Friedel pairs due to resonant scattering, we demonstrate a time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique for directly and simultaneously measuring both lattice strain and, for the first time, polarization reversal during in-situ electrical perturbation. This technique is demonstrated for BaTiO3-BiZn0.5Ti0.5O3 (BT-BZT) polycrystalline ferroelectrics, a prototypical lead-free piezoelectric with an ambiguous switching mechanism. This combines the benefits of spectroscopic and diffraction-based measurements into a single and robust technique with time resolution down to the ns scale, opening a new door to in-situ structure-property characterization that probes the full extent of the ferroelectric behaviour.

  12. Simultaneous resonant x-ray diffraction measurement of polarization inversion and lattice strain in polycrystalline ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Gorfman, S; Simons, H; Iamsasri, T; Prasertpalichat, S; Cann, D P; Choe, H; Pietsch, U; Watier, Y; Jones, J L

    2016-01-01

    Structure-property relationships in ferroelectrics extend over several length scales from the individual unit cell to the macroscopic device, and with dynamics spanning a broad temporal domain. Characterizing the multi-scale structural origin of electric field-induced polarization reversal and strain in ferroelectrics is an ongoing challenge that so far has obscured its fundamental behaviour. By utilizing small intensity differences between Friedel pairs due to resonant scattering, we demonstrate a time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique for directly and simultaneously measuring both lattice strain and, for the first time, polarization reversal during in-situ electrical perturbation. This technique is demonstrated for BaTiO3-BiZn0.5Ti0.5O3 (BT-BZT) polycrystalline ferroelectrics, a prototypical lead-free piezoelectric with an ambiguous switching mechanism. This combines the benefits of spectroscopic and diffraction-based measurements into a single and robust technique with time resolution down to the ns scale, opening a new door to in-situ structure-property characterization that probes the full extent of the ferroelectric behaviour.

  13. Simultaneous resonant x-ray diffraction measurement of polarization inversion and lattice strain in polycrystalline ferroelectrics

    PubMed Central

    Gorfman, S.; Simons, H.; Iamsasri, T.; Prasertpalichat, S.; Cann, D. P.; Choe, H.; Pietsch, U.; Watier, Y.; Jones, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Structure-property relationships in ferroelectrics extend over several length scales from the individual unit cell to the macroscopic device, and with dynamics spanning a broad temporal domain. Characterizing the multi-scale structural origin of electric field-induced polarization reversal and strain in ferroelectrics is an ongoing challenge that so far has obscured its fundamental behaviour. By utilizing small intensity differences between Friedel pairs due to resonant scattering, we demonstrate a time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique for directly and simultaneously measuring both lattice strain and, for the first time, polarization reversal during in-situ electrical perturbation. This technique is demonstrated for BaTiO3-BiZn0.5Ti0.5O3 (BT-BZT) polycrystalline ferroelectrics, a prototypical lead-free piezoelectric with an ambiguous switching mechanism. This combines the benefits of spectroscopic and diffraction-based measurements into a single and robust technique with time resolution down to the ns scale, opening a new door to in-situ structure-property characterization that probes the full extent of the ferroelectric behaviour. PMID:26864859

  14. Frequency-resolved noise figure measurements of phase (in)sensitive fiber optical parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Malik, R; Kumpera, A; Lorences-Riesgo, A; Andrekson, P A; Karlsson, M

    2014-11-17

    We measure the frequency-resolved noise figure of fiber optical parametric amplifiers both in phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive modes in the frequency range from 0.03 to 3 GHz. We also measure the variation in noise figure due to the degradation in pump optical signal to noise ratio and also as a function of the input signal powers. Noise figure degradation due to stimulated Brillouin scattering is observed.

  15. Measurement of thermal transport using time-resolved thermal wave microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2011-10-01

    A theoretical and experimental analysis of time-resolved thermal wave microscopy (TRTWM) technique used for thermal wave imaging is presented. TRTWM combines the elements of both frequency and time domain laser based thermoreflectance approaches widely used for thermal wave imaging and measurement of thermal transport. An analytical thermal wave model used for analysis is described and compared to experimental results. Implementation of TRTWM to measure thermal conductivities of materials of interest is demonstrated.

  16. Direct measurement of sub-wavelength interference using thermal light and photon-number-resolved detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Yanhua E-mail: jfan@nist.gov; Fan, Jingyun E-mail: jfan@nist.gov; Migdall, Alan; Becerra, Francisco E.

    2014-09-08

    We examine thermal light diffracted through a double slit using photon-number-resolved detection to directly measure high-order spatial correlations, and we see sinusoidal modulations of those correlations. The fringe width can, in principal, be made arbitrarily small, and we have experimentally obtained fringe widths as small as 30 nm with 800 nm wavelength light. This extreme sub-wavelength resolution, along with this direct detection technique, offers potential for high precision measurement applications.

  17. Direct measurement of sub-wavelength interference using thermal light and photon-number-resolved detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yanhua; Becerra, Francisco E.; Fan, Jingyun; Migdall, Alan

    2014-09-01

    We examine thermal light diffracted through a double slit using photon-number-resolved detection to directly measure high-order spatial correlations, and we see sinusoidal modulations of those correlations. The fringe width can, in principal, be made arbitrarily small, and we have experimentally obtained fringe widths as small as 30 nm with 800 nm wavelength light. This extreme sub-wavelength resolution, along with this direct detection technique, offers potential for high precision measurement applications.

  18. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy imaging.

    PubMed

    Suhling, Klaus; Levitt, James; Chung, Pei-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence can be characterized by its intensity, position, wavelength, lifetime, and polarization. The more of these features are acquired in a single measurement, the more can be learned about the sample, i.e., the microenvironment of the fluorescence probe. Polarization-resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging-time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy imaging, TR-FAIM-allows mapping of viscosity or binding or of homo-FRET which can indicate dimerization or generally oligomerization.

  19. Deconvolution improves the accuracy and depth sensitivity of time-resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diop, Mamadou; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2013-03-01

    Time-resolved (TR) techniques have the potential to distinguish early- from late-arriving photons. Since light travelling through superficial tissue is detected earlier than photons that penetrate the deeper layers, time-windowing can in principle be used to improve the depth sensitivity of TR measurements. However, TR measurements also contain instrument contributions - referred to as the instrument-response-function (IRF) - which cause temporal broadening of the measured temporal-point-spread-function (TPSF). In this report, we investigate the influence of the IRF on pathlength-resolved absorption changes (Δμa) retrieved from TR measurements using the microscopic Beer-Lambert law (MBLL). TPSFs were acquired on homogeneous and two-layer tissue-mimicking phantoms with varying optical properties. The measured IRF and TPSFs were deconvolved to recover the distribution of time-of-flights (DTOFs) of the detected photons. The microscopic Beer-Lambert law was applied to early and late time-windows of the TPSFs and DTOFs to access the effects of the IRF on pathlength-resolved Δμa. The analysis showed that the late part of the TPSFs contains substantial contributions from early-arriving photons, due to the smearing effects of the IRF, which reduced its sensitivity to absorption changes occurring in deep layers. We also demonstrated that the effects of the IRF can be efficiently eliminated by applying a robust deconvolution technique, thereby improving the accuracy and sensitivity of TR measurements to deep-tissue absorption changes.

  20. Phase-resolved surface pressure and heat-transfer measurements on the blade of a two-stage turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, M.G.; Haldeman, C.W. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    Phase-resolved surface pressure, and unsteady pressure measurements are reported for the first-stage blade row of the Space Shuttle Main Engine two-stage fuel-side turbine. Measurements were made at 10, 50, and 90 percent span on both the pressure and suction surfaces of the blade. Phase-resolved and unsteady heat-flux measurements are also reported.

  1. Electroweak coupling measurements from polarized Bhabha scattering at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, K.T.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    The cross section for Bhabah scattering (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) with polarized electrons at the center of mass energy of the Z{sup 0} resonance has been measured with the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) during the 1992--1993 runs. The first measurement of the left-right asymmetry in Bhabah scattering (A{sub LR}{sup e+}e{sup {minus}} ({theta})) is presented. From A{sub LR}{sup e+}{sup {minus}} ({Theta}) the effective weak mixing angle is measured to be sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2245{plus_minus}0.0010. When combined with the measurement of A{sub LR}, the effective electron couplings are measured to be v{sub e} = {minus}0.0414{plus_minus}0.0020 and a{sub e} = {minus}0.4977{plus_minus}0.0045.

  2. Angular Scattering Reflectance and Polarization Measurements of Candidate Regolith Materials Measured in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert M.; Boryta, Mark D.; Hapke, Bruce W.; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Vandervoort, Kurt; Vides, Christina L.

    2016-10-01

    The reflectance and polarization of light reflected from a solar system object indicates the chemical and textural state of the regolith. Remote sensing data are compared to laboratory angular scattering measurements and surface properties are determined.We use a Goniometric Photopolarimeter (GPP) to make angular reflectance and polarization measurements of particulate materials that simulate planetary regoliths. The GPP employs the Helmholtz Reciprocity Principle ( 2, 1) – the incident light is linearly polarized - the intensity of the reflected component is measured. The light encounters fewer optical surfaces improving signal to noise. The lab data are physically equivalent to the astronomical data.Our reflectance and polarization phase curves of highly reflective, fine grained, media simulate the regolith of Jupiter's satellite Europa. Our lab data exhibit polarization phase curves that are very similar to reports by experienced astronomers (4). Our previous reflectance phase curve data of the same materials agree with the same astronomical observers (5). We find these materials exhibit an increase in circular polarization ratio with decreasing phase angle (3). This suggests coherent backscattering (CB) of photons in the regolith (3). Shkuratov et al.(3) report that the polarization properties of these particulate media are also consistent with the CB enhancement process (5). Our results replicate the astronomical data indicating Europa's regolith is fine-grained, high porous with void space exceeding 90%.1. Hapke, B. W. (2012). ISBN 978-0-521-88349-82. Minnaert, M. (1941).Asrophys. J., 93, 403-410.3. Nelson, R. M. et al. (1998). Icarus, 131, 223-230.4. Rosenbush, V. et al. (2015). ISBN 978-1-107-04390-9, pp 340-359.5. Shkuratov, Yu. et al. (2002) Icarus 159, 396–416.

  3. Studies of 3He polarization losses during NMR and EPR measurment and Polarized 3He target cell lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Peibo

    2014-09-01

    The 3He target cell polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping(SEOP) is used as a neutron substitute to study the inner structure of the neutron. In our lab, nuclear-magnetic-resonance(NMR) is used to measure the relative polarization and electron-paramagnetic-resonance(EPR) is used to measure the spin exchange EPR frequency shift parameter of potassium and rubidium in our target cell presented in magnetic fields. The alkali in the cell is used to facilitate the polarization of 3He. The first part of my work presents the study of the polarization losses of the cell during both NMR and EPR. With the help of improved RF coils, we keep the background noise received by pickup coils reasonably low, but three other kinds of losses are inevitable: losses during Adiabatic Fast Passage (AFP) sweep, losses due to flux change caused by different cell orientation with respect to RF fields and physical losses. Fortunately there is only flux change in NMR measurements. The second part of my work presents the study of cell lifetime improvement. The polarization decreases in a process called relaxation exponentially. The lifetime of a cell is how long it can keep its polarization. The typical lifetime of cells produced in our lab is about 22 hours. With a newly designed vacuum system. The 3He target cell polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping(SEOP) is used as a neutron substitute to study the inner structure of the neutron. In our lab, nuclear-magnetic-resonance(NMR) is used to measure the relative polarization and electron-paramagnetic-resonance(EPR) is used to measure the spin exchange EPR frequency shift parameter of potassium and rubidium in our target cell presented in magnetic fields. The alkali in the cell is used to facilitate the polarization of 3He. The first part of my work presents the study of the polarization losses of the cell during both NMR and EPR. With the help of improved RF coils, we keep the background noise received by pickup coils reasonably low, but

  4. Microlensed dual-fiber probe for depth-resolved fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hae Young; Ryu, Seon Young; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Geon Hee; Park, Seong Jun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Chang, Ki Soo

    2011-07-01

    We propose and demonstrate a compact microlensed dual-fiber probe that has a good collection efficiency and a high depth-resolution ability for fluorescence measurements. The probe is formed with a conventional fusion splicer creating a common focusing lens on two fibers placed side by side. The collection efficiency of the fabricated probe was evaluated by measuring the fluorescence signal of a fresh ginkgo leaf. It was shown experimentally that the proposed probe could effectively collect the fluorescence signal with a six-fold increase compared to that of a general flat-tipped probe. The beam propagation method was used to design a probe with an optimized working distance and an improved resolving depth. It was found that the working distance depends mainly on the radius of curvature of the lens, whereas the resolving depth is determined by the core diameters of the illumination and collection fibers. The depth-resolved ability of probes with working distances of ~100 μm and 300 μm was validated by using a two-layer tissue phantom. The experimental results demonstrate that the microlensed dual-fiber probe has the potential to facilitate depth-resolved fluorescence detection of epithelial tissue.

  5. Range-resolved frequency-agile CO2 lidar measurements of smokestack vapor effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Francis M.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.; Warren, Russell E.

    1999-11-01

    Range-resolved lidar measurements of chemical vapor output from a smokestack were conducted using a moderate-power (100 millijoules per pulse) frequency-agile CO2 differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system. A 70-foot non-industrial smokestack, erected for the purpose of studying effluent emissions, was used in the experiment. These measurements were conducted for the purpose of obtaining real data to support development of advanced chemical and biological (CB) range- resolved vapor detection algorithms. Plume transmission measurements were made using natural atmospheric backscatter from points at the mouth of the stack and several positions downwind. Controlled releases of triethyl-phosphate (TEP), dimethyl-methylphosphonate (DMMP), and sulfur-hexaflouride (SF6) were performed. Test methodology and experimental results are presented. Effective application of ground-based lidar to the monitoring of smokestack effluents, without the use of fixed targets, is discussed.

  6. Towards Measurement of the Time-resolved Heat Release of Protein Conformation Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puchalla, Jason; Adamek, Daniel; Austin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    We present a way to observe time-resolved heat release using a laminar flow diffusional mixer coupled with a highly sensitive infrared camera which measures the temperature change of the solvent. There are significant benefits to the use of laminar flow mixers for time-resolved calorimetry: (1) The thermal signal can be made position and time- stationary to allow for signal integration; (2) Extremely small volumes (nl/s) of sample are required for a measurement; (3) The same mixing environment can be observed spectroscopically to obtain state occupation information; (4) The mixer allows one to do out of equilibrium dynamic studies. The hope is that these measurements will allow us probe the non-equilibrium thermodynamics as a protein moves along a free energy trajectory from one state to another.

  7. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Scott, H. A.; Biener, M. M.; Fein, J. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer obtained spatially resolved measurements of Ti K-α emission. Density profiles were measured from K-α intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-α spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This work shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.

  8. Probing the radio emission from air showers with polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bardenet, R.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Foerster, N.; Fox, B. D.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PeÂķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Preda, T.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Straub, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcǎu, O.; Thao, N. T.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    The emission of radio waves from air showers has been attributed to the so-called geomagnetic emission process. At frequencies around 50 MHz this process leads to coherent radiation which can be observed with rather simple setups. The direction of the electric field induced by this emission process depends only on the local magnetic field vector and on the incoming direction of the air shower. We report on measurements of the electric field vector where, in addition to this geomagnetic component, another component has been observed that cannot be described by the geomagnetic emission process. The data provide strong evidence that the other electric field component is polarized radially with respect to the shower axis, in agreement with predictions made by Askaryan who described radio emission from particle showers due to a negative charge excess in the front of the shower. Our results are compared to calculations which include the radiation mechanism induced by this charge-excess process.

  9. Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev,V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2007-08-02

    The system created in non-central relativisticnucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Dueto spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could becomeglobally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. Wepresent the results of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperon global polarizationmeasurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN=62.4 GeV and 200 GeVperformed with the STAR detector at RHIC. The observed globalpolarization of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperons in the STAR acceptance isconsistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. Theobtained upper limit, lbar P Lambda, anti-Lambda rbar<= 0.02, iscompared to the theoretical values discussed recently in theliterature.

  10. Polar Nephelometer Measurements of Aerosol Phase Functions: Calibration and Field Measurements in Hawaii and the UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, J. N.

    2005-12-01

    A custom polar nephelometer was built to make open air aerosol phase function measurements. The system is calibrated using filtered air as well as known aerosols. Measurements of aerosol phase functions were made in Hawaii and the United Arab Emirates. Using Mie and Pollack and Cuzzi code, aerosol size distributions are inverted. Time permiting these results will be compared with aerosol size distribution measurements obtained by other techniques.

  11. Characterization of Polar Mesospheric Clouds Using Infrared Measurements From HALOE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervig, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) revealed the infrared signature of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs), for the first time, HALOE PMC observations at eight wavelengths (2.45 - 10 microns) show remarkable agreement with model PMC spectra based on ice particle extinction, and thus provide the first confirmation that water ice is the primary component of PMCs. Because PMCs respond to changes in temperature and water vapor, they are considered an indicator of global climate change. We propose to further the understanding of PMCs using a decade of infrared measurements form HALOE. This effort will characterize PMC spectral properties, extinction profiles, and size distributions. Using this information, HALOE measurements will be used to make simultaneous retrievals of H2O, O3, and temperature, in the presence of PMCs. The simultaneous retrievals of particle properties, H2O, O3, and temperature will be used with HALOE NO data to provide a significant step forward in the knowledge of PMC characteristics and formation conditions. We will challenge fundamental theories of PMC formation, and investigate changes in PMC properties and related conditions over the length of the HALOE measurement record. HALOE has been operating without flaw since it was launched on October 11, 1991. Consequently, ten southern and ten northern PMC seasons have been observed thus far, providing a wealth of data for the study of PMCs and related parameters.

  12. Characterization of Polar Mesospheric Clouds Using Infrared Measurements from HALOE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervig, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) revealed the infrared signature of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs), for the first time, HALOE PMC observations at eight wavelengths (2.45 - 10 microns) show remarkable agreement with model PMC spectra based on ice particle extinction, and thus provide the first confirmation that water ice is the primary component of PMCs. Because PMCs respond to changes in temperature and water vapor, they are considered an indicator of global climate change. We propose to further the understanding of PMCs using a decade of infrared measurements form HALOE. This effort will characterize PMC spectral properties, extinction profiles, and size distributions. Using this information, HALOE measurements will be used to make simultaneous retrievals of H2O3, and temperature, in the presence of PMCs. The simultaneous retrievals of particle properties, H2O3, and temperature will be used with HALOE NO data to provide a significant step forward in the knowledge of PMC characteristics and formation conditions. We will challenge fundamental theories of PMC formation, and investigate changes in PMC properties and related conditions over the length of the HALOE measurement record. HALOE has been operating without flaw since it was launched on October 11, 1991. Consequently, ten southern and ten northern PMC seasons have been observed thus far, providing a wealth of data for the study of PMC and related parameters.

  13. Time-Resolved Optical Measurements of Fuel-Air Mixedness in Windowless High Speed Research Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    1998-01-01

    Fuel distribution measurements in gas turbine combustors are needed from both pollution and fuel-efficiency standpoints. In addition to providing valuable data for performance testing and engine development, measurements of fuel distributions uniquely complement predictive numerical simulations. Although equally important as spatial distribution, the temporal distribution of the fuel is an often overlooked aspect of combustor design and development. This is due partly to the difficulties in applying time-resolved diagnostic techniques to the high-pressure, high-temperature environments inside gas turbine engines. Time-resolved measurements of the fuel-to-air ratio (F/A) can give researchers critical insights into combustor dynamics and acoustics. Beginning in early 1998, a windowless technique that uses fiber-optic, line-of-sight, infrared laser light absorption to measure the time-resolved fluctuations of the F/A (refs. 1 and 2) will be used within the premixer section of a lean-premixed, prevaporized (LPP) combustor in NASA Lewis Research Center's CE-5 facility. The fiber-optic F/A sensor will permit optical access while eliminating the need for film-cooled windows, which perturb the flow. More importantly, the real-time data from the fiber-optic F/A sensor will provide unique information for the active feedback control of combustor dynamics. This will be a prototype for an airborne sensor control system.

  14. High-accuracy time- and space-resolved Stark shift measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.E.; Adams, R.; Carlson, A.L.; Ching, C.H.; Filuk, A.B.; Lake, P.

    1996-07-01

    Stark-shift measurements using emission spectroscopy are a powerful tool for advancing understanding in many plasma physics experiments. The authors use simultaneous 2-D-spatial and time-resolved spectra to study the electric field evolution in the 20 TW Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II ion diode acceleration gap. Fiber optic arrays transport light from the gap to remote streaked spectrographs operated in a multiplexed mode that enables recording time-resolved spectra from eight spatial locations on a single instrument. Design optimization and characterization measurements of the multiplexed spectrograph properties include the astigmatism, resolution, dispersion variation, and sensitivity. A semi-automated line-fitting procedure determines the Stark shift and the related uncertainties. Fields up to 10 MV/cm are measured with an accuracy {+-}2--4%. Detailed tests of the fitting procedure confirm that the wavelength shift uncertainties are accurate to better than {+-}20%. Development of an active spectroscopy probe technique that uses laser-induced fluorescence from an injected atomic beam to obtain 3-D space- and time-resolved measurements of the electric and magnetic fields is in progress.

  15. Time and Space Resolved Heat Transfer Measurements Under Nucleate Bubbles with Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Jerry G.; Hussey, Sam W.; Yee, Glenda F.; Kim, Jungho

    2003-01-01

    Investigations into single bubble pool boiling phenomena are often complicated by the difficulties in obtaining time and space resolved information in the bubble region. This usually occurs because the heaters and diagnostics used to measure heat transfer data are often on the order of, or larger than, the bubble characteristic length or region of influence. This has contributed to the development of many different and sometimes contradictory models of pool boiling phenomena and dominant heat transfer mechanisms. Recent investigations by Yaddanapyddi and Kim and Demiray and Kim have obtained time and space resolved heat transfer information at the bubble/heater interface under constant temperature conditions using a novel micro-heater array (10x10 array, each heater 100 microns on a side) that is semi-transparent and doubles as a measurement sensor. By using active feedback to maintain a state of constant temperature at the heater surface, they showed that the area of influence of bubbles generated in FC-72 was much smaller than predicted by standard models and that micro-conduction/micro-convection due to re-wetting dominated heat transfer effects. This study seeks to expand on the previous work by making time and space resolved measurements under bubbles nucleating on a micro-heater array operated under constant heat flux conditions. In the planned investigation, wall temperature measurements made under a single bubble nucleation site will be synchronized with high-speed video to allow analysis of the bubble energy removal from the wall.

  16. Diagnostics of the efficiency of surface plasmon-polariton excitation by quantum dots via polarization measurements of the output radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kukushkin, V. A.; Baidus, N. V.; Zdoroveishchev, A. V.

    2015-06-15

    It is demonstrated that the efficiency of surface plasmon-polariton excitation at a metal-semiconductor interface by active quantum dots can be determined from measurements of the polarization characteristics of the output radiation. Experimentally, the proposed diagnostic method is based on finding the ratio of the intensities of the output radiation with polarizations orthogonal and parallel to the nanoheterostructure plane for two different distances between the quantum-dot layer and the metal-semiconductor interface. These data are then used to obtain the unknown parameters in the proposed mathematical model which makes it possible to calculate the rate of surface plasmon-polariton excitation by active quantum dots. As a result, this rate can be determined without complicated expensive equipment for fast time-resolved measurements.

  17. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Steven. A.; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-09-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10-8 for a distance of 50 m.

  18. Angularly resolved x-ray scattering measurements of shock and ramp compressed polycrysaalline diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, M. J.; Fletcher, L. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Gauthier, M.; Lee, H. J.; Galtier, E.; Ravasio, A.; Gleason, A.; Hamel, S.; Vorberger, J.; Gericke, D. O.; Chen, Z.; Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Funk, S.; Hastings, J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; HED Science Collaboration Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Direct measurements of the crystal structure of materials under shock and ramp compression can be obtained using 2D angularly resolved x-ray scattering at the MEC end station of the LCLS facility. Diamond has been proposed as an ablator material for inertial confinement fusion targets, requiring a better understanding how the crystal structure responds to dynamic compression. In this experiment we used the two 527 nm optical lasers to compress 25 and 50 μm diamond foils. Each beam provided 6 J in 3 ns focused to an intensity of 4 ×1014 W/cm2 with different pulse shapes to provide shock and ramp compression. Compression and lattice deformation measurements were made directly from angularly resolved x-ray scattering and compared to DFT simulations.

  19. Mode-resolved frequency comb interferometry for high-accuracy long distance measurement

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Steven. A.; van Eldik, Sjoerd; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    Optical frequency combs have developed into powerful tools for distance metrology. In this paper we demonstrate absolute long distance measurement using a single femtosecond frequency comb laser as a multi-wavelength source. By applying a high-resolution spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array, the frequency comb modes are resolved spectrally to the level of an individual mode. Having the frequency comb stabilized against an atomic clock, thousands of accurately known wavelengths are available for interferometry. From the spectrally resolved output of a Michelson interferometer a distance is derived. The presented measurement method combines spectral interferometry, white light interferometry and multi-wavelength interferometry in a single scheme. Comparison with a fringe counting laser interferometer shows an agreement within <10−8 for a distance of 50 m. PMID:26419282

  20. The time resolved measurement of ultrashort terahertz-band electric fields without an ultrashort probe

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D. A. Snedden, E. W.; Jamison, S. P.

    2015-05-04

    The time-resolved detection of ultrashort pulsed THz-band electric field temporal profiles without an ultrashort laser probe is demonstrated. A non-linear interaction between a narrow-bandwidth optical probe and the THz pulse transposes the THz spectral intensity and phase information to the optical region, thereby generating an optical pulse whose temporal electric field envelope replicates the temporal profile of the real THz electric field. This optical envelope is characterised via an autocorrelation based FROG (frequency resolved optical gating) measurement, hence revealing the THz temporal profile. The combination of a narrow-bandwidth, long duration, optical probe, and self-referenced FROG makes the technique inherently immune to timing jitter between the optical probe and THz pulse and may find particular application where the THz field is not initially generated via ultrashort laser methods, such as the measurement of longitudinal electron bunch profiles in particle accelerators.

  1. The time resolved measurement of ultrashort terahertz-band electric fields without an ultrashort probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, D. A.; Snedden, E. W.; Jamison, S. P.

    2015-05-01

    The time-resolved detection of ultrashort pulsed THz-band electric field temporal profiles without an ultrashort laser probe is demonstrated. A non-linear interaction between a narrow-bandwidth optical probe and the THz pulse transposes the THz spectral intensity and phase information to the optical region, thereby generating an optical pulse whose temporal electric field envelope replicates the temporal profile of the real THz electric field. This optical envelope is characterised via an autocorrelation based FROG (frequency resolved optical gating) measurement, hence revealing the THz temporal profile. The combination of a narrow-bandwidth, long duration, optical probe, and self-referenced FROG makes the technique inherently immune to timing jitter between the optical probe and THz pulse and may find particular application where the THz field is not initially generated via ultrashort laser methods, such as the measurement of longitudinal electron bunch profiles in particle accelerators.

  2. Super-resolving angular rotation measurement using binary-outcome homodyne detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Qiao, Tianyuan; Ma, Kun; Zhang, Jiandong; Cen, Longzhu; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-08-01

    There has been much recent interest in high precision angular rotation measurement using photon orbital angular momentum to realize super-resolving angular rotation measurement. It is well known that quantum detection strategies can obtain a quantum-enhanced performance. Here, we prove that binary-outcome homodyne detection method can obtain a narrower signal peak, showing better resolution compared with the existing data processing method. Since the photon loss is unavoidable in the actual non-ideal optical system, this paper further discusses the impact of photon loss on the resolution and sensitivity of angular rotation measurement with binary-outcome homodyne detection method. PMID:27505811

  3. Dichroic spectrally-resolved interferometry to overcome the measuring range limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Ki-Nam

    2015-09-01

    In this investigation, a simple method to eliminate the dead zone without the minimum measurable distance and extend the measurable range of spectrally resolved interferometry (SRI) twice based on the bandwidth separation by a dichroic beam splitter (DBS) is proposed. The main advantage of this dichroic SRI is that it can be simply implemented with a dichroic beam splitter and another reference mirror from the typical SRI. Feasibility experiments were performed to verify the principle of the dichroic SRI and the result confirmed the effectiveness of this method as the extended measuring range. Some practical error sources are considered and the alternative solutions are also discussed.

  4. Time-resolved measurements of Cooper-pair radiative recombination in InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, S. S.; Nakajima, H.; Kumano, H.; Suemune, I.; Irie, H.; Asano, Y.; Akahane, K.; Sasaki, M.; Murayama, A.

    2015-08-21

    We studied InAs quantum dots (QDs) where electron Cooper pairs penetrate from an adjacent niobium (Nb) superconductor with the proximity effect. With time-resolved luminescence measurements at the wavelength around 1550 nm, we observed luminescence enhancement and reduction of luminescence decay time constants at temperature below the superconducting critical temperature (T{sub C}) of Nb. On the basis of these measurements, we propose a method to determine the contribution of Cooper-pair recombination in InAs QDs. We show that the luminescence enhancement measured below T{sub C} is well explained with our theory including Cooper-pair recombination.

  5. Monochromated, spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopic measurements of gold nanoparticles in the plasmon range.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, B; Riegler, K; Kothleitner, G; Grogger, W; Hofer, F

    2009-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles show optical properties different from bulk material due to resonance phenomena which depend on local structure and geometry. Electron energy-loss spectrometry (EELS) in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows the spatially resolved measurement of these properties at a resolution of few nanometers. In this work, the first monochromated measurements of gold nanoparticles (spheres, rods and triangles) are presented. Due to the improved energy resolution of about 0.2 eV, surface plasmon excitations at energies below 1 eV could be accurately measured from raw experimental data. PMID:18722779

  6. Frequency-resolved optical-gating measurements of ultrashort pulses using surface third-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Krumbuegel, M.A.; DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Trebino, R.

    1996-09-01

    We demonstrate what is to our knowledge the first frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) technique to measure ultrashort pulses from an unamplified Ti:sapphire laser oscillator without direction-of-time ambiguity. This technique utilizes surface third-harmonic generation as the nonlinear-optical effect and, surprisingly, is the most sensitive third-order FROG geometry yet. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  7. Exciton diffusion lengths of organic semiconductor thin films measured by spectrally resolved photoluminescence quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, Richard R.; Giebink, Noel C.; Belak, Anna A.; Benziger, Jay B.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate spectrally resolved photoluminescence quenching as a means to determine the exciton diffusion length of several archetype organic semiconductors used in thin film devices. We show that aggregation and crystal orientation influence the anisotropy of the diffusion length for vacuum-deposited polycrystalline films. The measurement of the singlet diffusion lengths is found to be in agreement with diffusion by Förster transfer, whereas triplet diffusion occurs primarily via Dexter transfer.

  8. Determination of biogeochemical properties of marine particles using above water measurements of the degree of polarization at the Brewster angle.

    PubMed

    Chami, Malik; McKee, David

    2007-07-23

    Retrieval of biogeochemical parameters from remotely sensed data in optically complex waters such as those found in coastal zones is a challenging task due to the effects of various water constituents (biogenic, nonalgal and inorganic particles, dissolved matter) on the radiation exiting the ocean. Since scattering by molecules, aerosols, hydrosols and reflection at the sea surface introduce and modify the polarization state of light, the polarized upward radiation contains embedded information about the intrinsic nature of aerosols and suspended matter in the ocean. In this study, shipborne above water angularly resolved visible/near infrared multiband measurements of the degree of polarization are analysed against their corresponding in-situ biogeochemically characterized water samples for the first time. Water samples and radiometric data were collected in the English Channel along an inshore-offshore transect. Angular variations in the degree of polarization P are found to be consistent with theory. Maximum values of P are observed near the Brewster viewing angle in the specular direction. Variations in the degree of polarization at the Brewster angle (P(B)) with water content revealed that the suspended particulate matter, which is mainly composed of inorganic particles during the experiment, contributes to depolarise the skylight reflection, thus reducing P(B). An empirical polarization-based approach is proposed to determine biogeochemical properties of the particles. The concentration of inorganic particles can be estimated using P(B) to within +/-13% based on the dataset used. Larger sets of polarized measurements are recommended to corroborate the tendency observed in this study.

  9. ICESat's Laser Measurements of Polar Ice, Atmosphere, Ocean, and Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. J.; Schutz, B.; Abdalati, W.; Abshire, J.; Bentley, C.; Brenner, A.; Bufton, J.; Dezio, J.; Hancock, D.; Harding, D.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) mission will measure changes in elevation of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets as part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) of satellites. Time-series of elevation changes will enable determination of the present-day mass balance of the ice sheets, study of associations between observed ice changes and polar climate, and estimation of the present and future contributions of the ice sheets to global sea level rise. Other scientific objectives of ICESat include: global measurements of cloud heights and the vertical structure of clouds and aerosols; precise measurements of land topography and vegetation canopy heights; and measurements of sea ice roughness, sea ice thickness, ocean surface elevations, and surface reflectivity. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on ICESat has a 1064 nm laser channel for surface altimetry and dense cloud heights and a 532 nm lidar channel for the vertical distribution of clouds and aerosols. The accuracy of surface ranging is 10 cm, averaged over 60 m diameter laser footprints spaced at 172 m along-track. The orbital altitude will be around 600 km at an inclination of 94 deg with a 183-day repeat pattern. The onboard GPS receiver will enable radial orbit determinations to better than 5 cm, and star-trackers will enable footprints to be located to 6 m horizontally. The spacecraft attitude will be controlled to point the laser beam to within +/- 35 m of reference surface tracks at high latitudes. ICESat is designed to operate for 3 to 5 years and should be followed by successive missions to measure ice changes for at least 15 years.

  10. Method for using polarization gating to measure a scattering sample

    DOEpatents

    Baba, Justin S.

    2015-08-04

    Described herein are systems, devices, and methods facilitating optical characterization of scattering samples. A polarized optical beam can be directed to pass through a sample to be tested. The optical beam exiting the sample can then be analyzed to determine its degree of polarization, from which other properties of the sample can be determined. In some cases, an apparatus can include a source of an optical beam, an input polarizer, a sample, an output polarizer, and a photodetector. In some cases, a signal from a photodetector can be processed through attenuation, variable offset, and variable gain.

  11. Measuring X-Ray Polarization in the Presence of Systematic Effects: Known Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, Ronald F.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2012-01-01

    The prospects for accomplishing x-ray polarization measurements of astronomical sources have grown in recent years, after a hiatus of more than 37 years. Unfortunately, accompanying this long hiatus has been some confusion over the statistical uncertainties associated with x-ray polarization measurements of these sources. We have initiated a program to perform the detailed calculations that will offer insights into the uncertainties associated with x-ray polarization measurements. Here we describe a mathematical formalism for determining the 1- and 2-parameter errors in the magnitude and position angle of x-ray (linear) polarization in the presence of a (polarized or unpolarized) background. We further review relevant statistics including clearly distinguishing between the Minimum Detectable Polarization (MDP) and the accuracy of a polarization measurement.

  12. Velocity and Temperature Measurement in Supersonic Free Jets Using Spectrally Resolved Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Seasholtz, R. G.

    2004-01-01

    The flow fields of unheated, supersonic free jets from convergent and convergent-divergent nozzles operating at M = 0.99, 1.4, and 1.6 were measured using spectrally resolved Rayleigh scattering technique. The axial component of velocity and temperature data as well as density data obtained from a previous experiment are presented in a systematic way with the goal of producing a database useful for validating computational fluid dynamics codes. The Rayleigh scattering process from air molecules provides a fundamental means of measuring flow properties in a non-intrusive, particle free manner. In the spectrally resolved application, laser light scattered by the air molecules is collected and analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). The difference between the incident laser frequency and the peak of the Rayleigh spectrum provides a measure of gas velocity. The temperature is measured from the spectral broadening caused by the random thermal motion and density is measured from the total light intensity. The present point measurement technique uses a CW laser, a scanning FPI and photon counting electronics. The 1 mm long probe volume is moved from point to point to survey the flow fields. Additional arrangements were made to remove particles from the main as well as the entrained flow and to isolate FPI from the high sound and vibration levels produced by the supersonic jets. In general, velocity is measured within +/- 10 m/s accuracy and temperature within +/- 10 K accuracy.

  13. Measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor from inclusive quasielastic scattering of polarized electrons from polarized {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.; Arrington, J.; Beise, E.J.; Bray, B.; Carr, R.W.; Filippone, B.W.; Lung, A.; McKeown, R.D.; Mueller, B.; Pitt, M.L.; Jones, C.E.; DeSchepper, D.; Dodson, G.; Dow, K.; Ent, R.; Farkhondeh, M.; Hansen, J.; Korsch, W.; Kramer, L.H.; Lee, K.; Makins, N.; Milner, R.G.; Tieger, D.R.; Welch, T.P.; Candell, E.; Napolitano, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B.; Tripp, C.; Lorenzon, W.

    1995-07-10

    We report a measurement of the asymmetry in spin-dependent quasielastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from a polarized {sup 3}He target. The neutron magnetic form factor {ital G}{sup {ital n}}{sub {ital M}} has been extracted from the measured asymmetry based on recent PWIA calculations using spin-dependent spectral functions. This experiment represents the first measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor using spin-dependent electron scattering. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  14. Measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor from inclusive quasielastic scattering of polarized electrons from polarized {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.; Arrington, J.; Beise, E.J.; Bray, B.; Carr, R.W.; Filippone, B.W.; Lung, A.; McKeown, R.D.; Mueller, B.; Pitt, M.L.; Jones, C.E.; DeSchepper, D.; Dodson, G.; Dow, K.; Ent, R.; Farkhondeh, M.; Hansen, J.; Korsch, W.; Kramer, L.H.; Lee, K.; Makins, N.; Milner, R.G.; Tieger, D.R.; Welch, T.P.; Candell, E.; Napolitano, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B.; Tripp, C.; Lorenzon, W.

    1995-05-10

    We report a measurement of the asymmetry in spin-dependent quasielastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from a polarized {sup 3}He target. The neutron magnetic form factor {ital G}{sup {ital n}}{sub {ital M}} has been extracted from the measured asymmetry based on recent PWIA calculations using spin-dependent spectral functions. This work represents the first measurement of {ital G}{sup {ital n}}{sub {ital M}} using spin-dependent electron scattering. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  15. Toward precision D coefficient measurement in polarized neutron decay and the development of A helium-3 neutron polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Shenq-Rong

    1998-12-01

    I describe the search for possible time reversal symmetry violation by measurement of the coefficient D in polarized neutron decay. This relates to the triple product among the neutron polarization vector, electron momentum, and proton momentum in the neutron decay rate (w~[-]/σnċ(/vec pe×/vec pp)). With the improvements in neutron polarization (97%), an optimal octagonal detector geometry, and neutron spin transport system, about 15×106 decay events were selected from data acquired at the Cold Neutron Research Facility at NIST, Gaithersburg. I have developed techniques for extracting D from the positive and negative triple product decay rates. My preliminary result is D=(12.1/pm13.4)×10-4 where the uncertainty is statistical only. The false D resulting from the instrumental factor (σκ) and neutron polarization uncertainty (σP) are negligible. I also estimate the false D of the asymmetric transverse polarization (ATP) effect with an upper limit 5×10-4 for the preliminary analysis of the initial data. I also describe development of an optical pumping/spin exchange neutron spin filter and obtained 40% neutron polarization for 2 A neutrons with a 10 amagat-cm 35 cm3 polarized 3He cell.

  16. Apparatus for time-resolved and energy-resolved measurement of internal conversion electron emission induced by nuclear resonant excitation with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawauchi, Taizo; Matsumoto, Masuaki; Fukutani, Katsuyuki; Okano, Tatsuo; Kishimoto, Shunji; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yoda, Yoshitaka

    2007-01-15

    A high-energy and large-object-spot type cylindrical mirror analyzer (CMA) was constructed with the aid of electron trajectory simulations. By adopting a particular shape for the outer cylinder, an energy resolution of 7% was achieved without guide rings as used in conventional CMAs. Combined with an avalanche photodiode as an electron detector, the K-shell internal conversion electrons were successfully measured under irradiation of synchrotron radiation at 14.4 keV in an energy-resolved and time-resolved manner.

  17. Accurate metrology of polarization curves measured at the speckle size of visible light scattering.

    PubMed

    Ghabbach, A; Zerrad, M; Soriano, G; Amra, C

    2014-06-16

    An optical procedure is presented to measure at the speckle size and with high accuracy, the polarization degree of patterns scattered by disordered media. Whole mappings of polarization ratio, polarimetric phase and polarization degree are pointed out. Scattered clouds are emphasized on the Poincaré sphere, and are completed by probability density functions of the polarization degree. A special care is attributed to the accuracy of data. The set-up provides additional signatures of scattering media.

  18. The RHIC p-Carbon CNI Polarimeter Upgrade For The Beam Polarization And Intensity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski, A.; Bazilevski, A.; Bunce, G.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Morozov, B.; Nemesure, S.; Russo, T.; Steski, D.; Sivertz, M.

    2009-08-04

    Proton polarization measurements in the AGS and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at the beam energies 24-250 GeV) are based on proton-carbon and proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region. Polarimeter operation in the scanning mode also gives polarization profile and beam intensity profile (beam emittance) measurements. Bunch by bunch emittance measurement is a very powerful tool for machine setup. Presently, the polarization and beam intensity profile measurements (in both vertical and horizontal planes) are restricted by the long target switching time and possible target destruction during this complicated motion. The RHIC polarimeters were operated near the limit of the counting rate for present silicon strip detectors. The ongoing polarimeter upgrade for the 2009 run will address all these problems. The upgrade should allow significant reduction of the polarization measurement errors by making feasible the complete polarization measurements, which includes polarization profiles in both the horizontal and vertical planes.

  19. Resolving three-dimensional surface displacements from InSAR measurements: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Li, Z. W.; Ding, X. L.; Zhu, J. J.; Zhang, L.; Sun, Q.

    2014-06-01

    One-dimensional measurement along the Line-Of-Sight (LOS) direction has greatly limited the capability of InSAR technique in the investigation of surface displacements and their dynamics. In recent years, great efforts have been made to resolve complete three-dimensional (3-D) displacements from InSAR measurements. This contribution is intended to provide a systematic review of the progress achieved in this field. Based on an analysis of the InSAR LOS measurements, we first cover two commonly used techniques, i.e., Offset-Tracking and multi-aperture InSAR (MAI), with which the surface displacement in the azimuth direction can be measured together with the LOS displacement. Several methods for mapping 3-D displacements using InSAR measurements are subsequently presented and categorized into three groups: (i) combination of multi-pass LOS and azimuth measurements; (ii) integration of InSAR and GPS data; and (iii) prior information assisted approaches. The strengths and weaknesses of each method are analyzed to show the applicability of each method to specific 3-D displacement mapping cases, in hope to provide a useful guidance in choosing a suitable approach accordingly. Finally, suggestions for resolving the challenging issues and outlook of future research are given.

  20. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurement of NAPL contaminated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, N.; Huisman, J. A.; Furman, A.

    2010-12-01

    The potential applicability of spectral induce polarization (SIP) as a tool to map NAPLs (non aqueous phase liquids) contaminants at the subsurface lead researchers to investigate the electric signature of those contaminant on the spectral response. However, and despite the cumulative efforts, the effect of NAPL on the electrical properties of soil, and the mechanisms that control this effect are largely unknown. In this work a novel experiment is designed to further examine the effect of NAPL on the electrical properties of partially saturated soil. The measurement system that used is the ZEL-SIP04 impedance meter developed at the Forschungszentrum Julich, Germany. The system accurately (nominal phase precision of 0.1 mrad below 1 kHz) measures the phase and the amplitude of a material possessing a very low polarization (such as soil). The sample holder has a dimension of 60 cm long and 4.6 cm in diameter. Current and potential electrodes were made of brass, and while the current electrodes were inserted in full into the soil, the contact between the potential electrode and the soil was made through an Agarose bridge. Two types of soils were used: clean quartz sand, and a mixture of sand with clean Bentonite. Each soil (sandy or clayey) was mixed with water to get saturation degree of 30%. Following the mixture with water, NAPL was added and the composite were mixed again. Packing was done by adding and compressing small portions of the soil to the column. A triplicate of each mixture was made with a good reproducible bulk density. Both for the sandy and clayey soils, the results indicate that additions of NAPL decrease the real part of the complex resistivity. Additionally, for the sandy soil this process is time depended, and that a further decrease in resistivity develops over time. The results are analyzed considering geometrical factors: while the NAPL is electrically insulator, addition of NAPL to the soil is expected to increase the connectivity of the

  1. Number-resolved master equation approach to quantum measurement and quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Qi

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the well-known Landauer-Büttiker scattering theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function technique for mesoscopic transports, an alternative (and very useful) scheme is quantum master equation approach. In this article, we review the particle-number ( n)-resolved master equation ( n-ME) approach and its systematic applications in quantum measurement and quantum transport problems. The n-ME contains rich dynamical information, allowing efficient study of topics such as shot noise and full counting statistics analysis. Moreover, we also review a newly developed master equation approach (and its n-resolved version) under self-consistent Born approximation. The application potential of this new approach is critically examined via its ability to recover the exact results for noninteracting systems under arbitrary voltage and in presence of strong quantum interference, and the challenging non-equilibrium Kondo effect.

  2. Time-Resolved High-Spatial-Resolution Measurements of Underwater Laser Ionization and Filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. G.; Kaganovich, D.; Helle, M. H.; Penano, J.; Ting, A.; Gordon, D.

    2013-10-01

    Laser triggering and guiding of underwater electrical discharges are being investigated and developed at NRL for applications including advanced micromachining and low-frequency laser acoustic generation. As part of this development we recently made several high-spatial-resolution, time-resolved measurements of underwater optical filamentation and laser ionization. Using 2-laser pump-probe backlit imaging techniques, we were able to achieve time resolution as short as 35 fs and spatial resolution down to 1 micron. Shadowgraph images show few-micron diameter gas bubbles forming throughout the pump beam path in ps timescales. Microbubble numbers and density increased with pulse energy and time during the pump pulse. We also obtained time-resolved spectra of ns-laser-ionized water, revealing black-body radiation lasting more than 100 ns after the ionizing pulse. Results from ongoing underwater laser ionization, filamentation, and discharge-guiding experiments will be presented. This work is supported by NRL Base Funds.

  3. Time-resolved wave profile measurements in copper to Megabar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L C; Asay, J R

    1981-01-01

    Many time-resolved techniques have been developed which have greatly aided in the understanding of dynamic material behavior such as the high pressure-dynamic strength of materials. In the paper, time-resolved measurements of copper (at shock-induced high pressures and temperatures) are used to illustrate the capability of using such techniques to investigate high pressure strength. Continuous shock loading and release wave profiles have been made in copper to 93 GPa using velocity interferometric techniques. Fine structure in the release wave profiles from the shocked state indicates an increase in shear strength of copper to 1.5 GPa at 93 GPa from its ambient value of 0.08 GPa.

  4. Mathematical Relationships Between Two Sets of Laser Anemometer Measurements for Resolving the Total Velocity Vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Albert K.

    1993-01-01

    The mathematical relations between the measured velocity fields for the same compressor rotor flow field resolved by two fringe type laser anemometers at different observational locations are developed in this report. The relations allow the two sets of velocity measurements to be combined to produce a total velocity vector field for the compressor rotor. This report presents the derivation of the mathematical relations, beginning with the specification of the coordinate systems and the velocity projections in those coordinate systems. The vector projections are then transformed into a common coordinate system. The transformed vector coordinates are then combined to determine the total velocity vector. A numerical example showing the solution procedure is included.

  5. The 7BM beamline at the APS: a facility for time-resolved fluid dynamics measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kastengren, Alan; Powell, Christopher F.; Arms, Dohn; Dufresne, Eric M.; Gibson, Harold; Wang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, X-ray radiography has been used to probe the internal structure of dense sprays with microsecond time resolution and a spatial resolution of 15 µm even in high-pressure environments. Recently, the 7BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been commissioned to focus on the needs of X-ray spray radiography measurements. The spatial resolution and X-ray intensity at this beamline represent a significant improvement over previous time-resolved X-ray radiography measurements at the APS. PMID:22713903

  6. Laser-based spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy for rapid, high-resolution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotlieb, Kenneth; Bostwick, Aaron; Hussain, Zahid; Lanzara, Alessandra; Jozwiak, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    A unique spin-and angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer (spin-ARPES) is coupled with a 6 eV laser to achieve unprecedented measurements of near-EF physics in topological insulators and Rashba systems. The pairing of the spin-ARPES system with the laser allows for energy and angular resolutions never before seen in a spin-ARPES experiment. Most importantly, the high efficiency of the system and high photon flux of the laser make measurements very rapid, permitting exploration of a large experimental phase space.

  7. On the limitations of geomagnetic measures of interplanetary magnetic polarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Rosenberg, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The maximum attainable accuracy in inferring the interplanetary magnetic polarity from polar cap magnetograms is about 88%. This is achieved in practice, when high-latitude polar cap stations are used during local summer months, and the signature in the ground records is strong. An attempt by Svalgaard (1972) to use this effect to infer an index of interplanetary magnetic polarity back to 1926 has not been so successful. Furthermore, some of the properties of the index have changed with time. Prior to 1963, the inferred polarities are strongly dependent on geomagnetic activity, while after this time they are not. Thus, this index should not be used to separate solar-magnetic from solar-activity effects prior to 1963.

  8. Time-resolved beam symmetry measurement for VMAT commissioning and quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael P; Greer, Peter B

    2016-03-08

    In volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment delivery perfect beam symmetry is assumed by the planning system. This study aims to test this assumption and present a method of measuring time-resolved beam symmetry measurement during a VMAT delivery that includes extreme variations of dose rate and gantry speed. The Sun Nuclear IC Profiler in gantry mount was used to measure time-resolved in-plane and cross-plane profiles during plan delivery from which symmetry could be determined. Time-resolved symmetry measurements were performed throughout static field exposures at cardinal gantry angles, conformal arcs with constant dose rate and gantry speed, and during a VMAT test plan with gantry speed and dose rate modulation. Measurements were performed for both clockwise and counterclockwise gantry rotation and across four Varian 21iX lin-acs. The symmetry was found to be generally constant throughout the static field exposures to within 0.3% with an exception on one linac of up to 0.7%. Agreement in symmetry between cardinal angles was always within 1.0% and typically within 0.6%. During conformal arcs the results for clockwise and counterclockwise rotation were in agreement to within 0.3%. Both clockwise and counterclockwise tended to vary in similar manner by up to 0.5% during arc consistent with the cardinal gantry angle static field results. During the VMAT test plan the symmetry generally was in agreement with the conformal arc results. Greater variation in symmetry was observed in the low-dose-rate regions by up to 1.75%. All results were within clinically acceptable levels using the tolerances of NCS Report 24 (2015).

  9. Time-resolved beam symmetry measurement for VMAT commissioning and quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael P; Greer, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    In volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment delivery perfect beam symmetry is assumed by the planning system. This study aims to test this assumption and present a method of measuring time-resolved beam symmetry measurement during a VMAT delivery that includes extreme variations of dose rate and gantry speed. The Sun Nuclear IC Profiler in gantry mount was used to measure time-resolved in-plane and cross-plane profiles during plan delivery from which symmetry could be determined. Time-resolved symmetry measurements were performed throughout static field exposures at cardinal gantry angles, conformal arcs with constant dose rate and gantry speed, and during a VMAT test plan with gantry speed and dose rate modulation. Measurements were performed for both clockwise and counterclockwise gantry rotation and across four Varian 21iX lin-acs. The symmetry was found to be generally constant throughout the static field exposures to within 0.3% with an exception on one linac of up to 0.7%. Agreement in symmetry between cardinal angles was always within 1.0% and typically within 0.6%. During conformal arcs the results for clockwise and counterclockwise rotation were in agreement to within 0.3%. Both clockwise and counterclockwise tended to vary in similar manner by up to 0.5% during arc consistent with the cardinal gantry angle static field results. During the VMAT test plan the symmetry generally was in agreement with the conformal arc results. Greater variation in symmetry was observed in the low-dose-rate regions by up to 1.75%. All results were within clinically acceptable levels using the tolerances of NCS Report 24 (2015). PMID:27074485

  10. Instrument for spatially resolved simultaneous measurements of forces and currents in particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Spethmann, A. Trottenberg, T. Kersten, H.

    2015-01-15

    The article presents a device for spatially resolved and simultaneous measurements of forces and currents in particle beams, especially in beams composed of ions and neutral atoms. The forces are exerted by the impinging beam particles on a plane circular conductive target plate of 20 mm diameter mounted on a pendulum with electromagnetic force compensation. The force measurement in the micronewton range is achieved by electromagnetic compensation by means of static Helmholtz coils and permanent magnets attached to the pendulum. Exemplary measurements are performed in the 1.2 keV beam of a broad beam ion source. The simultaneous measurements of forces and currents onto the same target are compared with each other and with Faraday cup measurements.

  11. Boundary-Layer Resolved Measurements of a Three-Dimensional Disturbance Using Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naguib, Ahmed; Wassermann, Florian; Freudenhammer, Daniel; Grundmann, Sven

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV) is a modern flow diagnostic technique with unique advantages including the ability to efficiently capture volumetric measurements of velocity fields in complex geometry without the need for optical access. In comparison to Particle Image Velocimetry, MRV is substantially underutilized, and hence MRV's strengths and limitations to address a variety of flow configurations is yet to be demonstrated. Investigated in the present work is the viability of MRV to provide boundary-layer-resolved measurements of a 3D disturbance created by a circular cylindrical element protruding from the wall. These measurements are challenging because of the high spatial resolution requirement over a relatively large measurement volume (100 x 100 x 250 mm3) , the weak cross-stream disturbance velocities (less than 0.1% of the freesteam velocity), and the difficulties associated with the presence of a wall. Data are acquired using a portable water-flow loop with an acrylic test section placed on the bed of an MRI machine. The cylindrical element is mounted through the test-section's side wall where the boundary layer Reynolds number (Re) is 162 based on displacement thickness. Several element heights are investigated, ranging from a fraction of, to a full boundary layer thickness. The results provide an assessment of the ability of MRV to perform boundary-layer-resolved measurements of weak disturbances.

  12. A comparison of magnetic resonance methods for spatially resolved T2 distribution measurements in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashaee, S.; Marica, F.; Newling, B.; Balcom, B. J.

    2015-05-01

    Naturally occurring porous media are usually characterized by a distribution of pore sizes. If the material is fluid saturated, the 1H magnetic resonance (MR) signal depends on the pore size, the surface relaxivity and the fluid itself. Measurement of the transverse relaxation time T2 is a well-established technique to characterize material samples by means of MR. T2 distribution measurements, including T2 distribution mapping, are widely employed in clinical applications and in petroleum engineering. T2 distribution measurements are the most basic measurement employed to determine the fluid-matrix properties in MR core analysis. Three methods for T2 distribution mapping, namely spin-echo single point imaging (SE-SPI), DANTE-Z Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) and adiabatic inversion CPMG are compared in terms of spatial resolution, minimum observable T2 and sensitivity. Bulk CPMG measurement is considered to be the gold standard for T2 determination. Bulk measurement of uniform samples is compared to the three spatially resolved measurements. SE-SPI is an imaging method, which measures spatially resolved T2s in samples of interest. A variant is introduced in this work that employs pre-equalized magnetic field gradient waveforms and is therefore able to measure shorter T2s than previously reported. DANTE-Z CPMG and adiabatic inversion CPMG are faster, non-imaging, local T2 distribution measurements. The DANTE-Z pulse train and adiabatic inversion pulse are compared in terms of T1 or T2 relaxation time effects during the RF pulse application, minimum pulse duration, requisite RF pulse power, and inversion profile quality. In addition to experimental comparisons, simulation results are presented.

  13. Depth-resolved photothermal optical coherence tomography by local optical path length change measurement (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Shuichi; Hong, Young-Joo; Li, En; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-03-01

    Photothermal OCT has been emerged to contrast absorbers in biological tissues. The tissues response to photothermal excitation as change of thermal strain and refractive index. To resolve the depth of absorption agents, the measurements of the local thermal strain change and local refractive index change due to photothermal effect is required. In this study, we developed photothermal OCT for depth-resolved absorption contrast imaging. The phase-resolved OCT can measure the axial strain change and local refractive index change as local optical path length change. A swept-source OCT system is used with a wavelength swept laser at 1310 nm with a scanning rate of 50 kHz. The sensitivity of 110 dB is achieved. At the sample arm, the excitation beam from a fiber-coupled laser diode of 406 nm wavelength is combined with the OCT probe beam co-linearly. The slowly modulated excitation beam around 300 Hz illuminate biological tissues. M-mode scan is applied during one-period modulation duration. The local optical path length change is measured by temporal and axial phase difference. The theoretical prediction of the photothermal response is derived and in good agreement with experimental results. In the case of slow modulation, the delay of photothermal response can be neglected. The local path length changes are averaged over the half period of the excitation modulation, and then demodulated. This method exhibits 3-dB gain in the sensitivity of the local optical path length change measurement over the direct Fourier transform method. In vivo human skin imaging of endogenous absorption agent will be demonstrated.

  14. Two-color-absorption sensor for time-resolved measurements of gasoline concentration and temperature.

    PubMed

    Pyun, Sung Hyun; Porter, Jason M; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K; Montoya, Juan C; Allen, Mark G; Sholes, Kevin R

    2009-11-20

    A midinfrared absorption sensor for crank-angle-resolved in-cylinder measurements of gasoline concentration and gas temperature for spark-ignition internal-combustion engines is reported, and design considerations and validation testing in the controlled environments of a heated cell and shock-heated gases are discussed. Mid-IR laser light was tuned to transitions in the strong absorption bands associated with C-H stretching vibration near 3.4 microm, and time-resolved fuel vapor concentration and gas temperature were determined simultaneously from the absorption at two different wavelengths. These two infrared laser wavelengths were simultaneously produced by difference-frequency generation, which combines a near-IR signal laser with two near-IR pump lasers in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal. Injection current modulation of the pump lasers produced intensity modulation of the mid-IR, which allowed the transmitted signals from the two laser wavelengths to be detected on a single detector and separated by frequency demultiplexing. Injection current modulation produced a wavelength modulation synchronous with the intensity modulation for each of the laser wavelengths, and accurate measurement of the gasoline absorption signal required the effects of wavelength modulation to be considered. Validation experiments were conducted for a single-component hydrocarbon fuel (2,2,4-trimethyl-pentane, commonly known as iso-octane) and a gasoline blend in a heated static cell (300 < or = T < or = 600 K) and behind planar shock waves (600 < T < 1100 K) in a shock tube. With a bandwidth of 10 kHz, the measured fuel concentrations agreed within 5% RMS and the measured temperature agreed within 3% RMS to the known values. The 10 kHz bandwidth is sufficient to resolve 1 crank-angle degree at 1600 RPM. PMID:19935971

  15. Hybrid plasmonic gap modes in metal film-coupled dimers and their physical origins revealed by polarization resolved dark field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Can; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Lei, Dang Yuan

    2016-03-01

    Plasmonic gap modes sustained by metal film-coupled nanostructures have recently attracted extensive research attention due to flexible control over their spectral response and significantly enhanced field intensities at the particle-film junction. In this work, by adopting an improved dark field spectroscopy methodology - polarization resolved spectral decomposition and colour decoding - we are able to ``visualize'' and distinguish unambiguously the spectral and far field radiation properties of the complex plasmonic gap modes in metal film-coupled nanosphere monomers and dimers. Together with full-wave numerical simulation results, it is found that while the monomer-film system supports two hybridized dipole-like plasmon modes having different oscillating orientations and resonance strengths, the scattering spectrum of the dimer-film system features two additional peaks, one strong yet narrow resonant mode corresponding to a bonding dipolar moment and one hybridized higher order resonant mode, both polarized along the dimer axis. In particular, we demonstrate that the polarization dependent scattering radiation of the film-coupled nanosphere dimer can be used to optically distinguish from monomers and concurrently determine the spatial orientation of the dimer with significantly improved accuracy at the single-particle level, illustrating a simple yet highly sensitive plasmon resonance based nanometrology method.Plasmonic gap modes sustained by metal film-coupled nanostructures have recently attracted extensive research attention due to flexible control over their spectral response and significantly enhanced field intensities at the particle-film junction. In this work, by adopting an improved dark field spectroscopy methodology - polarization resolved spectral decomposition and colour decoding - we are able to ``visualize'' and distinguish unambiguously the spectral and far field radiation properties of the complex plasmonic gap modes in metal film

  16. Time Integrated and Time Resolved Neutron Measurements in a Plasma Focus Device

    SciTech Connect

    Milanese, M.; Moroso, R.; Castillo, F.; Herrera, J. J. E.; Golzarri, J. I.; Espinosa, G.

    2006-12-04

    This work reports some experimental results on neutron emission from the pinch phase of the plasma focus device PACO (2 kJ, 31 kV). An evaluation of the building structure influence on neutron yield measurements was made. Special devices supporting CR-39 detectors were designed, constructed and used for this purpose. Scintillator-photomultiplier systems were used to made time-resolved neutron detection. Angular dependence of neutron pulses was observed doing simultaneous measurements at three different angular positions of the time-resolved detectors. Time-of-flight neutron measurements were also done to estimate the scattering influence. This work shows that the scattering effect is not relevant in our experiment, at least for r {<=} 2 m. So that in this limit it is not necessary do any correction by the scattering. The average forward to radial neutron yield anisotropy is found to be 1.59 {+-}0.12. The neutron energy anisotropy measurements by time-of-flight don't offer relevant results about the neutron production mechanism.

  17. Polarized Imaging Nephelometer for Field and Aircraft Measurements of Aerosol Phase Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgos, G.; Martins, J.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols have a significant impact on the radiative balance and water cycle of our planet through influencing atmospheric radiation. Remote sensing of aerosols relies on scattering phase matrix information to retrieve aerosol properties with frequent global coverage. At the Laboratory for Aerosols, Clouds and Optics (LACO) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County we developed a new technique to directly measure the aerosol phase function and the degree of linear polarization of the scattered light (two elements of the phase matrix). We designed and built a portable instrument called the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph). The PI-Neph successfully participated in dozens of flights of the NASA Development and Evaluation of satellite ValidatiOn Tools by Experimenters (DEVOTE) project and the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) project. The ambient aerosol enters the PI-Neph through an inlet and the sample is illuminated by laser light (wavelength of 532 nm); the scattered light is imaged by a stationary wide field of view camera in the scattering angle range of 2° to 178°. (In some cases stray light limited the scattering angle range to 3° to 176°). The PI-Neph measurement of phase function and the AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) retrievals have already been compared in some cases when the aircraft spiraled over AERONET sites, for example at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, on October 18 2011, as shown in Figure 1. The differences between the PI-Neph and the AERONET retrievals can be attributed to differences between the ambient size distribution and the one sampled inside the aircraft. The data that is resolved with respect to scattering angle is used to compute the volume scattering coefficient. The above mentioned October 18 flight data showed good agreement between the PI-Neph measurements of volume scattering coefficient and the parallel TSI integrating nephelometer measurements. On average the TSI measurements were 1.02 times the PI

  18. Time-resolved chirp measurement for 100GBaud test systems using an ideal frequency discriminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Regan T.; Shi, Kai; Barry, Liam P.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper we present multi-channel chirp measurements of wide-band sources, using a programmable Fourier-domain optical processor (FDOP) as a near-perfect linear frequency discriminator element followed by a fast photodiode and electrical sampling oscilloscope. The electric field of a 10.7 Gbit/s phase-encoded data source and a directly modulated laser diode are simultaneously interrogated with this measurement system. The constellation diagram of the phase-encoded data source is demonstrated, and a comparison with another phase-sensitive measurement technique is performed. Additionally, an extension to this technique is demonstrated in which the time-resolved chirp of a picosecond-duration mode-locked laser diode with a 260 GHz spectral bandwidth is characterised using the FDOP and a high-bandwidth optical sampling oscilloscope. This measurement ensemble has sufficient temporal resolution to characterise random or repetitive data signals up to 100GBaud.

  19. Monochromatic heterodyne fiber-optic profile sensor for spatially resolved velocity measurements with frequency division multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Pfister, Thorsten; Buettner, Lars; Shirai, Katsuaki; Czarske, Juergen

    2005-05-01

    Investigating shear flows is important in technical applications as well as in fundamental research. Velocity measurements with high spatial resolution are necessary. Laser Doppler anemometry allows nonintrusive precise measurements, but the spatial resolution is limited by the size of the measurement volume to {approx}50 {mu}m. A new laser Doppler profile sensor is proposed, enabling determination of the velocity profile inside the measurement volume. Two fringe systems with contrary fringe spacing gradients are generated to determine the position as well as the velocity of passing tracer particles. Physically discriminating between the two measuring channels is done by a frequency-division-multiplexing technique with acousto-optic modulators. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and a fiber-optic measuring head were employed, resulting in a portable and flexible sensor. In the center of the measurement volume of {approx}1-mm length, a spatial resolution of {approx}5 {mu}m was obtained. Spatially resolved measurements of the Blasius velocity profile are presented. Small velocities as low as 3 cm/s are measured. The sensor is applied in a wind tunnel to determine the wall shear stress of a boundary layer flow. All measurement results show good agreement with the theoretical prediction.

  20. Polarization and Color Filtering Applied to Enhance Photogrammetric Measurements of Reflective Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Jeffrey M.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Techniques for enhancing photogrammetric measurement of reflective surfaces by reducing noise were developed utilizing principles of light polarization. Signal selectivity with polarized light was also compared to signal selectivity using chromatic filters. Combining principles of linear cross polarization and color selectivity enhanced signal-to-noise ratios by as much as 800 fold. More typical improvements with combining polarization and color selectivity were about 100 fold. We review polarization-based techniques and present experimental results comparing the performance of traditional retroreflective targeting materials, cornercube targets returning depolarized light, and color selectivity.

  1. Time-resolved energy spectrum measurement of a linear induction accelerator with the magnetic analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Yang, Guo-Jun; Chen, Si-Fu; Zhang, Zhuo; Wei, Tao; Li, Jin

    2015-01-01

    We recently set up a time-resolved optical beam diagnostic system. Using this system, we measured the high current electron beam energy in the accelerator under construction. This paper introduces the principle of the diagnostic system, describes the setup, and shows the results. A bending beam line was designed using an existing magnetic analyzer with a 300 mm-bending radius and a 60° bending angle at hard-edge approximation. Calculations show that the magnitude of the beam energy is about 18 MeV, and the energy spread is within 2%. Our results agree well with the initial estimates deduced from the diode voltage approach.

  2. A Lidar for Making Range Resolved CO2 Measurements within the Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John; Riris, Haris; Andrews, Arlyn; Krainak, Mike; Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, Jim; Colarco, Amelia; Heaps, William

    2006-01-01

    A ground based differential absorption lidar is under development at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center to make range resolved measurements of CO2 within the planetary boundary layer. This is a direct detection lidar designed for both photon counting and analog use. Technology being developed for this instrument will be discussed including efforts in fiber lasers, optical parametric amplifiers and both InGaAs and HgCdTe solid-state detectors. The capabilities of this system are investigated and preliminary results presented.

  3. Range-resolved bistatic imaging lidar for the measurement of the lower atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Meki, K; Yamaguchi, K; Li, X; Saito, Y; Kawahara, T D; Nomura, A

    1996-09-01

    A bistatic imaging lidar system using a cooled CCD camera as a detector has been developed for the observation of aerosols, fog, and clouds in the lower atmosphere, especially within several hundred meters of the Earth's surface. Theoretical discussion showed that the received signal does not depend on the measured range. The potential of the bistatic imaging lidar was confirmed through results of nighttime observations of atmospheric phenomena up to 300 m. A range-resolved profile was obtained without scanning and with a very short time resolution, within 1 min.

  4. Microscopic Study of Glass Transition: Time-Resolved Fluorescence Measurements of Doped Dye Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, H.; Ye, J. Y.; Hattori, T.; Maruyama, Y.; Ishikawa, M.

    The microscopic dynamics of several monomeric and polymeric glass formers has been investigated by the time-resolved fluorescence measurement of doped malachite green molecules in a wide temperature range. For monomers and a polymer without side chains, beside a kink around the calorimetric glass transition temperature Tg, another crossover at Tc about 30 - 50 K above Tg has been clearly observed, which is in agreement with the prediction of the mode-coupling theory. On the other hand, for the complex polymers with side chains, although we could not distinguish any singularities above Tg, we observed another kink below Tg, which can be attributed to the side-chain motions.

  5. Molecular diffusivity measurement through an alumina membrane using time-resolved fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennard, Raymond; DeSisto, William J.; Mason, Michael D.

    2010-11-01

    We present a simple fluorescence imaging method for measuring the time-resolved concentration of a fluorescent molecule diffusing through an anodic alumina membrane with a pore diameter of 20 nm. From the concentration breakthrough curve, the molecular diffusivity of the fluorophore was extracted. The experimentally determined diffusivity was three orders of magnitude lower than reported bulk values. Due to the relative simplicity and ease of use, this method can be applied to provide fundamental information for biomolecular separations applications. One feature of this method is the high sensitivity at intercellular volumes broadening its application to drug delivery and controlled cell growth.

  6. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; et al

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  7. The Dosepix detector—an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector for spectrometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, A.; Anton, G.; Ballabriga, R.; Bisello, F.; Campbell, M.; Celi, J. C.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Jensch, M.; Kochanski, N.; Llopart, X.; Michel, N.; Mollenhauer, U.; Ritter, I.; Tennert, F.; Wölfel, S.; Wong, W.; Michel, T.

    2015-04-01

    The Dosepix detector is a hybrid photon-counting pixel detector based on ideas of the Medipix and Timepix detector family. 1 mm thick cadmium telluride and 300 μm thick silicon were used as sensor material. The pixel matrix of the Dosepix consists of 16 x 16 square pixels with 12 rows of (200 μm)2 and 4 rows of (55 μm)2 sensitive area for the silicon sensor layer and 16 rows of pixels with 220 μm pixel pitch for CdTe. Besides digital energy integration and photon-counting mode, a novel concept of energy binning is included in the pixel electronics, allowing energy-resolved measurements in 16 energy bins within one acquisition. The possibilities of this detector concept range from applications in personal dosimetry and energy-resolved imaging to quality assurance of medical X-ray sources by analysis of the emitted photon spectrum. In this contribution the Dosepix detector, its response to X-rays as well as spectrum measurements with Si and CdTe sensor layer are presented. Furthermore, a first evaluation was carried out to use the Dosepix detector as a kVp-meter, that means to determine the applied acceleration voltage from measured X-ray tubes spectra.

  8. Spatially-resolved x-ray scattering measurements of a planar blast wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa, E. J.; Montgomery, D. S.; Benage, J. F.; Falk, K.; Kuranz, C. C.; Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.

    2012-10-01

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal is typically measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. An experiment is described in which we used the IXTS to measure the spatial temperature profile of a novel system. A low-density carbon foam was irradiated with intensities on the order of 10^15 W/cm^2, launching a planar blast wave. After a delay of several nanoseconds, x-rays created from irradiation of a nickel foil, scattered at 90 and were recorded by the IXTS. The resulting spatially resolved scattering spectra were analyzed to extract the temperature profile across the blast wave.

  9. Range Resolved CO2 Atmospheric Backscattering Measurements Using Fiber Lasers and RZPN Code Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John

    2011-01-01

    We report the use of a return-to- zero (RZPN) pseudo noise modulation technique for making range resolved measurements of CO2 within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) using commercial, off-the-shelf, components. Conventional, range resolved, DIAL measurements require laser pulse widths that are significantly shorter than the desired spatial resolution and necessitate using pulses whose temporal spacing is such that scattered returns from only a single pulse are observed by the receiver at any one time (for the PBL pulse separations must be greater than approximately 20 microseconds). This imposes significant operational limitations when using currently available fiber lasers because of the resulting low duty cycle (less than approximately 0.0005) and consequent low average laser output power. The RZPN modulation technique enables a fiber laser to operate at much higher duty cycles (approaching 0.04) thereby more effectively utilizing the amplifier's output. This increases the counts received by approximately two orders of magnitude. Our approach involves employing two distributed feedback lasers (DFB), each modulated by a different RPZN code, whose outputs are then amplified by a CW fiber amplifier. One laser is tuned to a CO2 absorption line; the other operates offline thereby permitting the simultaneous acquisition of both on and offline signals using independent RZPN codes. This minimizes the impact of atmospheric turbulence on the measurement. The on and offline signals are retrieved by deconvolving the return signal using the appropriate kernels.

  10. Inferring the time resolved core electron temperature from x-ray emission measured by a streak camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shahab; Patel, Pravesh; Izumi, Nobuhiko; Macphee, Andrew G.; Ma, Tammy; Cerjan, Charlie; Bradley, David K.

    2015-11-01

    The electron temperature (Te) of the hot spot within the core of imploded inertial confinement fusion capsules is an effective indicator of implosion performance. A temporally resolved measurement of Te helps elucidate the mechanisms for hot spot heating and cooling such as alpha-heating and mix. Additionally, comparison with simulations will aid in tuning models to effectively predict implosion performance. The Streaked Polar Instrumentation for Diagnosing Energetic Radiation (SPIDER) is an x-ray streak camera designed to record the x-ray burn history during the stagnation phase. SPIDER accurately reports bang time and burn duration of implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The addition of several filters of specific materials and thicknesses spread across the spatial axis of the streak camera imager allows for a least square fit of the signal through these filters to a bremsstrahlung hot spot model. The fitted parameters of the model are the Te, opacity, and X-ray yield which is valuable for ablator mix estimates. The details of this calculation and results from several shots on NIF are presented.

  11. Cellular organization and substructure measured using angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry.

    PubMed Central

    Wax, Adam; Yang, Changhuei; Backman, Vadim; Badizadegan, Kamran; Boone, Charles W; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2002-01-01

    We measure the organization and substructure of HT29 epithelial cells in a monolayer using angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry. This new technique probes cellular structure by measuring scattered light, as in flow cytometry, but offers an advantage in that the structure can be examined in situ, avoiding the need to disrupt the cell monolayer. We determine the size distribution of the cell nuclei by fitting measured light-scattering spectra to the predictions of Mie theory. In addition, we obtain information about the cellular organization and substructure by examining the spatial correlations within the monolayer. A remarkable finding is that the spatial correlations over small length scales take the form of an inverse power law, indicating the fractal nature of the packing of the subcellular structures. We also identify spatial correlations on a scale large compared with the size of a cell, indicating an overlying order within the monolayer. PMID:11916880

  12. Protein analysis by time-resolved measurements with an electro-switchable DNA chip

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Andreas; Hampel, Paul A.; Kaiser, Wolfgang; Knezevic, Jelena; Welte, Thomas; Villa, Valentina; Maruyama, Makiko; Svejda, Matej; Jähner, Simone; Fischer, Frank; Strasser, Ralf; Rant, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Measurements in stationary or mobile phases are fundamental principles in protein analysis. Although the immobilization of molecules on solid supports allows for the parallel analysis of interactions, properties like size or shape are usually inferred from the molecular mobility under the influence of external forces. However, as these principles are mutually exclusive, a comprehensive characterization of proteins usually involves a multi-step workflow. Here we show how these measurement modalities can be reconciled by tethering proteins to a surface via dynamically actuated nanolevers. Short DNA strands, which are switched by alternating electric fields, are employed as capture probes to bind target proteins. By swaying the proteins over nanometre amplitudes and comparing their motional dynamics to a theoretical model, the protein diameter can be quantified with Angström accuracy. Alterations in the tertiary protein structure (folding) and conformational changes are readily detected, and even post-translational modifications are revealed by time-resolved molecular dynamics measurements. PMID:23839273

  13. Velocity Field Measurements of Human Coughing Using Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, T.; Marr, D. R.; Higuchi, H.; Glauser, M. N.

    2003-11-01

    Quantitative fluid mechanics analysis of human coughing has been carried out using new Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TRPIV). The study involves measurement of velocity vector time-histories and velocity profiles. It is focused on the average normal human coughing. Some work in the past on cough mechanics has involved measurement of flow rates, tidal volumes and sub-glottis pressure. However, data of unsteady velocity vector field of the exiting highly time-dependent jets is not available. In this study, human cough waveform data are first acquired in vivo using conventional respiratory instrumentation for various volunteers of different gender/age groups. The representative waveform is then reproduced with a coughing/breathing simulator (with or without a manikin) for TRPIV measurements and analysis. The results of this study would be useful not only for designing of indoor air quality and heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, but also for devising means of protection against infectious diseases.

  14. Time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters by means of triple probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qayyum, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, S.; Deeba, Farah; Ali, Rafaqat; Hussain, S.

    2013-12-01

    Triple Langmuir probe (TLP) diagnostic system with its necessary driving circuit is developed and successfully applies for time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters in the negative glow region of pulsating-dc discharge. This technique allows the instantaneous measurement of electron temperature [T-], electron number density [n-] as well as plasma fluctuations without any voltage or frequency sweep. In TLP configuration two probes are differentially biased and serve as a floating symmetric double probe whereas the third probe is simply floating into plasma to measure floating potential as a function of time and thus incorporates the effect of plasma fluctuations. As an example of the application to time-dependent plasmas, basic plasma parameters such as floating potential, electron temperature, and electron number density in low pressure air discharge are determined as a function of time for different fill pressure. The results demonstrate temporal evolution of plasma parameters and thus plasma generation progression for different fill pressures.

  15. Measurement of electron density with the phase-resolved cut-off probe method

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, J. H.; Kim, D. W.; Na, B. K.; You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Shin, Y. H.

    2011-07-15

    The phase resolved cut-off probe method, a precise measurement method for the electron density, was recently proposed [J. H. Kwon et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 081502 (2010)]. This paper presents the measurements of electron density using the method under various experimental conditions (different pressures, powers, chamber volumes, and discharge sources). The result shows that the method is not only in good agreement with the previous method using wave transmittance under various experimental conditions but it is also able to find the cut-off point clearly even under difficult conditions such as high pressure ({approx} 1 Torr), high discharge power, and small plasma volume. The details of the experimental setup, the operating mechanism of the probe method, and the data processing procedure (algorithm) are also addressed. Furthermore, the reliability of the measurement method is investigated by using an electromagnetic field simulation with cold plasma model (CST-Drude model, Computer Simulation Technology).

  16. Time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters by means of triple probe.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, A; Ahmad, N; Ahmad, S; Deeba, Farah; Ali, Rafaqat; Hussain, S

    2013-12-01

    Triple Langmuir probe (TLP) diagnostic system with its necessary driving circuit is developed and successfully applies for time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters in the negative glow region of pulsating-dc discharge. This technique allows the instantaneous measurement of electron temperature [T_], electron number density [n_] as well as plasma fluctuations without any voltage or frequency sweep. In TLP configuration two probes are differentially biased and serve as a floating symmetric double probe whereas the third probe is simply floating into plasma to measure floating potential as a function of time and thus incorporates the effect of plasma fluctuations. As an example of the application to time-dependent plasmas, basic plasma parameters such as floating potential, electron temperature, and electron number density in low pressure air discharge are determined as a function of time for different fill pressure. The results demonstrate temporal evolution of plasma parameters and thus plasma generation progression for different fill pressures.

  17. Executive Summary of the Workshop on Polarization and Beam Energy Measurements at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Aurand, B.; Bailey, I.; Bartels, C.; Blair, G.; Brachmann, A.; Clarke, J.; Deacon, L.; Duginov, V.; Ghalumyan, A.; Hartin, A.; Hauptman, J.; Helebrant, C.; Hesselbach, S.; Kafer, D.; List, J.; Lorenzon, W.; Lyapin, A.; Marchesini, I.; Melikian, R.; Monig, K.; Moeit, K.C.; /Bonn U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Royal Holloway, U. of London /SLAC /Daresbury /Dubna, JINR /Yerevan Phys. Inst /Oxford U., JAI /Iowa State U. /Durham U., IPPP /Michigan U. /University Coll. London /Novosibirsk, IYF /Minsk, Inst. Phys. /Oregon U.

    2008-07-25

    This note summarizes the results of the 'Workshop on Polarization and Beam Energy Measurements at the ILC', held at DESY (Zeuthen) April 9-11 2008. The topics for the workshop included (1) physics requirements, (2) polarized sources and low energy polarimetry, (3) BDS polarimeters, (4) BDS energy spectrometers, and (5) physics-based measurements of beam polarization and beam energy from collider data. Discussions focused on the current ILC baseline program as described in the Reference Design Report (RDR), which includes physics runs at beam energies between 100 and 250 GeV, as well as calibration runs on the Z-pole. Electron polarization of P{sub e{sup -}} {approx}> 80% and positron polarization of P{sub e{sup +}} {approx}> 30% are part of the baseline configuration of the machine. Energy and polarization measurements for ILC options beyond the baseline, including Z-pole running and the 1 TeV energy upgrade, were also discussed.

  18. High precision measurement of undulator polarization in the regime of hard x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, B.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Kämpfer, T.; Wehrhan, O.; Förster, E.; Paulus, G. G.; Wille, H. C.; Schlage, K.; Röhlsberger, R.; Weckert, E.; Stöhlker, T.

    2014-07-14

    We have measured the polarization purity of undulator radiation at 12.9 keV, with hitherto unachievable precision. We could measure a polarization purity of 1.8 × 10{sup −4} by using a silicon channel-cut crystal with six Bragg reflections at 45° as analyzer.

  19. The effect of airborne dust on astronomical polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Jeremy; Ulanowski, Z.; Lucas, P. W.; Hough, J. H.; Hirst, E.; Tamura, M.

    2008-05-01

    In the past, it has generally been assumed that polarization observations made with ground-based telescopes are unaffected by the passage of light through the Earth's atmosphere. Here, we report observations with a new high-sensitivity astronomical polarimeter (PlanetPol) made during a Saharan dust event over the La Palma observatory in 2005 May that show excess linear polarization in the horizontal direction due to the passage of the starlight through the dust. The polarization reached a maximum value of 4.8 × 10-5 at 56° zenith distance and varied over five nights in proportion to the change in dust optical depth. Polarization of transmitted light (dichroism) does not occur for spherical or randomly oriented non-spherical particles. Thus, these results imply that some fraction of the dust grain population aligns with a preferred orientation. We use T-matrix models to demonstrate that the observed polarization direction implies a vertical orientation for the long axis of the particles. We suggest a possible mechanism for vertical orientation resulting from the electric field in the atmosphere. These results will need to be taken into account in the design and use of future instruments for high-sensitivity astronomical polarimetry. The results also indicate possible new approaches to studying aerosol particles and their effects on the Earth's atmosphere.

  20. Polarized Imaging Nephelometer Scattering Measurements from the Winter of 2013 Discover-AQ Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, R.; Martins, J.; Dolgos, G.; Dubovik, O.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    After greenhouse gases, aerosols are thought to have the largest contribution to the total radiative forcing of the atmosphere, but they are frequently cited as the single largest source of uncertainty among all anthropogenic radiative forcing components. Remote sensing allows global measurements of aerosol properties, however validation of these measurements are crucial, and their retrieval algorithms require climatological assumptions that must be first measured in situ. In situ instruments are also needed to supplement remote sensing measurements, which frequently have a relatively low spatial resolution, particularly when assessing surface air quality. The Laboratory for Aerosols, Clouds and Optics (LACO) at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) has developed an instrument called the Polarized Imaging NEPHelometer (PI-Neph) to significantly aid in situ particle optical scattering measurements. The PI-Neph is based on a novel polar nephelometer design that uses a high-powered laser and wide field of view optical detection system (CCD camera) to measure the intensity of scattered laser light as a function of scattering angle. This allows for the measurement of scattering coefficient, phase function and polarized phase function over an angular range of 2 to 178 degrees with an angular resolution of less than half of a degree. This simple layout also permits the construction of an instrument that is compact enough to be flown on a variety of airborne platforms. PI-Neph measurements have been validated by a variety of methods since its completion in the fall of 2011. Measurements of mono-disperse polystyrene spheres have yielded results that are in close agreement with Mie theory, while scattering coefficient measurements made in parallel with commercially available integrating nephelometers from TSI have agreed to within 5%. The PI-Neph has successfully participated in several field experiments, most recently completing the January/February portion of

  1. Comparison of vertical resolved leaf area index measurements in an open canopy savannah-type forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piayda, Arndt; Cuntz, Matthias; Dubbert, Maren; Werner, Christiane; Pereira, Joao S.

    2013-04-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is a very important vegetation parameter in soil-vegetation-atmosphere exchange modeling. To represent the structure of ecosystems in vertically distributed modeling, vertical resolved LAI distributions as well as vertically and angular gap fraction (Pgap) distributions are needed, but rarely available. Additionally, former studies neglect woody plant components when using light interception or digital photography based methods for LAI or Pgap observations. This can lead to significantly biased results, particularly in semi-arid savannah-type ecosystems with low LAI values. The objective of this study is to compare three non-destructive LAI measurement techniques in a sparse savannah-type cork oak canopy in central Portugal in order to derive vertically resolved LAI as well as vertically and angular resolved Pgap. Since established canopy analyzers, such as the LAI-2000, rely on diffuse light conditions, which are rarely realized in semi-arid regions, we also employed fast, digital cover photography (DCP) working independently from diffuse light conditions. We used vertical and angular distributed DCP and applied object-based image analysis techniques to exclude woody plant components from Pgap estimation and LAI determination. We compared the results with vertically distributed LAI-2000 measurements, and additionally with vertical estimates based on easily measurable forest canopy parameters. We employed bootstrap resampling methods to determine the accuracy of all measurements depending on sample size. Leaf inclination measurements indicate planophile leaf orientation. Thus LAI was calculated with Pgap and the leaf inclination information. This led to a spatial averaged LAI of 0.52 +- 0.06 for DCP while LAI-2000 measurements resulted in 0.67 +- 0.07. Uncertainty bounds of LAI converge much faster with increasing sample size for the DCP than for the LAI-2000. This allows a more efficient sampling design, which is of great importance in

  2. Characterization of organic contaminants in porous media using nuclear magnetic resonance and spectral induced polarization measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupert, Y. K.

    2015-12-01

    The remediation and monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts. This laboratory research focuses on combining two innovative geophysical methods: nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and spectral induced polarization (SIP) to assess their suitability to characterize and quantify organic contaminants in porous media. Toluene, a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL), and ethoxy-nonafluorobutane, an engineered dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL), have been selected as representative organic contaminants. Low-field NMR relaxation time (T2) measurements and diffusion-relaxation (D-T2) correlation measurements, as well as low frequency SIP measurements (<10 kHz) are performed to quantify the amount of these two organic compounds in the presence of water in three types of porous media (sands, clay, and various sand-clay mixtures). The T2, D-T2, and SIP measurements are made on water, toluene, and the synthetic DNAPL in each porous media to understand the effect of different porous media on the NMR and SIP responses in each fluid. We then plan to make measurements on water-organic mixtures with varied concentrations of organic compounds in each porous medium to resolve the NMR and SIP response of the organic contaminants from that of water and to quantify the amount of organic contaminants. Building a relationship between SIP and NMR signatures from organic contaminants not only provides a fundamental yet important petrophysical relationship, but also builds a framework for continued investigation into how these two methods synergize. This will also provide spatially dense information about organic contaminated natural sediments at scales that will improve the quantitative characterization and remediation of contaminated sites.The remediation and monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts

  3. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography measurements with different phase modulation amplitude when using continuous polarization modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the phase retardance and relative optic-axis orientation of a sample can be calculated without prior knowledge of the actual value of the phase modulation amplitude when using a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system based on continuous polarization modulation (CPM-PS-OCT). We also demonstrate that the sample Jones matrix can be calculated at any values of the phase modulation amplitude in a reasonable range depending on the system effective signal-to-noise ratio. This has fundamental importance for the development of clinical systems by simplifying the polarization modulator drive instrumentation and eliminating its calibration procedure. This was validated on measurements of a three-quarter waveplate and an equine tendon sample by a fiber-based swept-source CPM-PS-OCT system.

  4. The complex ion structure of warm dense carbon measured by spectrally resolved x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W.; Vorberger, J.; Helfrich, J.; Frydrych, S.; Ortner, A.; Otten, A.; Roth, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Siegenthaler, K.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Wünsch, K.; Bachmann, B.; Döppner, T.; Bagnoud, V.; Blažević, A.; and others

    2015-05-15

    We present measurements of the complex ion structure of warm dense carbon close to the melting line at pressures around 100 GPa. High-pressure samples were created by laser-driven shock compression of graphite and probed by intense laser-generated x-ray sources with photon energies of 4.75 keV and 4.95 keV. High-efficiency crystal spectrometers allow for spectrally resolving the scattered radiation. Comparing the ratio of elastically and inelastically scattered radiation, we find evidence for a complex bonded liquid that is predicted by ab-initio quantum simulations showing the influence of chemical bonds under these conditions. Using graphite samples of different initial densities we demonstrate the capability of spectrally resolved x-ray scattering to monitor the carbon solid-liquid transition at relatively constant pressure of 150 GPa. Showing first single-pulse scattering spectra from cold graphite of unprecedented quality recorded at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we demonstrate the outstanding possibilities for future high-precision measurements at 4th Generation Light Sources.

  5. Time resolved measurements of rigid fiber dispersion in near homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabban, Lilach; Cohen, Asaf; van Hout, Rene; Empfl Environmental Multi-Phase Flow Laboratory Team

    2013-11-01

    Time resolved, planar particle image velocimetry (PIV, 3kHz) and two-orthogonal view, digital holographic cinematography (2kHz) was used to measure 3D fiber trajectories/orientation dynamics in near homogeneous isotropic air turbulence (HIT) with dilute suspended fibers. The PIV covered a field of view of 6 × 12 mm2 and the holography a volume of interest of 173 mm3, positioned at the center of the chamber. HIT (Reλ = 144) was generated in the center of a 403 cm3 cube by eight woofers mounted on each of its corners. Three different nylon fibers having a length of 0.5 mm and diameter of 10, 14 and 19 μm were released from the top of the chamber. Fibers had Stokes numbers of order one and are expected to accumulate in regions of low vorticity and settle along a path of local minimal drag. Fiber 3D trajectories/orientations have been obtained from the holography measurements and orientational/translational dispersion coefficients will be presented. In addition the flow field in the vicinity of tracked fibers has been resolved by the PIV, and results on fluid and fiber accelerations and position correlation with in-plane strain rate and out-of-plane vorticity will be presented.

  6. Time-resolved measurement technique for pulsed electron beam envelope basing on framing and streaking principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Wang, Yuan; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Huang; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The time-resolved electron beam envelope parameters, including cross sectional distribution and beam centroid position, are very important for the study of beam transmission characteristics in a magnetic field and for verifying the rationality of the magnetic field parameters employed. One kind of high time-resolved beam envelope measurement system has recently been developed, constituted of a high-speed framing camera and a streak camera. It can obtain three panoramic images of the beam and time continuous information along the given beam profile simultaneously. Recently obtained data has proved that several fast vibrations of the beam envelope along the diameter direction occur during the front and the tail parts of the electron beam. The vibration period is several nanoseconds. The effect of magnetic field on the electron beam is also observed and verified. Beam debugging experiments have proved that the existing beam transmission design is reasonable and viable. This beam envelope measurement system will establish a good foundation for beam physics research. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (10675104, 11375162)

  7. Optical characterisation of gold films for time-resolved reflectance thermometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Music, Jasmina; White, Thomas G.; Chapman, David J.; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of temperature represents a long-standing challenge within the field of high-pressure science. Recently, a promising time-resolved reflectance thermometry technique employing embedded gold films has been demonstrated. As an active diagnostic, reflectance thermometry is well suited for dynamic experiments generating temperatures below 1000K, where passive diagnostics such as pyrometry become infeasible due to the transient states created. A critical component of the reflectance thermometry technique is a robust optical characterisation of the gold films, decoupling the thermal and pressure contributions. Additionally, the optical properties of gold vary with both sample preparation and thermal history. With a view towards the development of a spatially-resolved reflectance thermometry technique for temperature measurement, we report the optical characterisation of a range of commercially available or deposited thin film gold samples. Reflectance spectroscopy was performed on the gold films as a function of temperature from ambient conditions to 400K, and as a function of pressure using a diamond anvil cell. The experimental data are fitted to a simple phenomenological Drude model paving the way for the calibrated films to be used during future dynamic experiments.

  8. Comparisons of wind speed retrieval methods on C-band multi-polarization SAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lin; Yang, Jingsong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Juan; Wang, Difeng

    2014-10-01

    This paper compares the wind speed retrieval methods on C-band multi-polarization SAR measurements to find out the most appropriate one for each polarization data. The RADARSAT-2 SAR quad-polarization (VV+HH+VH+HV) data and NDBC buoy wind data were collocated. For VVpolarization, the retrieved wind speed are compared among four geophysical model function (GMF). For HH polarization, the retrieved wind speed are compared among four polarization ratio model (PR) based on CMOD5 GMF. For VH polarization, the retrieved wind speed are compared between two linear models. Comparisons show all of three polarimetric SAR data have the ability of retrieving wind speed. Based on the error analysis, the commendatory methods are proposed for each polarization.

  9. Polarization measurement of free electron laser pulses in the VUV generated by the variable polarization source FERMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finetti, P.; Allaria, E.; Diviacco, B.; Callegari, C.; Mahieu, B.; Viefhaus, J.; Zangrando, M.; De Ninno, G.; Lambert, G.; Ferrari, E.; Buck, J.; Ilchen, M.; Vodungbo, B.; Mahne, N.; Svetina, C.; Spezzani, C.; Di Mitri, S.; Penco, G.; Trovò, M.; Fawley, W. M.; Rebernik, P.; Gauthier, D.; Grazioli, C.; Coreno, M.; Ressel, B.; Kivimäki, A.; Mazza, T.; Glaser, L.; Scholz, F.; Seltmann, J.; Gessler, P.; Grünert, J.; De Fanis, A.; Meyer, M.; Knie, A.; Moeller, S. P.; Raimondi, L.; Capotondi, F.; Pedersoli, E.; Plekan, O.; Danailov, M.; Demidovich, A.; Nikolov, I.; Abrami, A.; Gautier, J.; Lüning, J.; Zeitoun, P.; Giannessi, L.

    2014-09-01

    FERMI, based at Elettra (Trieste, Italy) is the first free electron laser (FEL) facility operated for user experiments in seeded mode. Another unique property of FERMI, among other FEL sources, is to allow control of the polarization state of the radiation. Polarization dependence in the study of the interaction of coherent, high field, short-pulse ionizing radiation with matter, is a new frontier with potential in a wide range of research areas. The first measurement of the polarization-state of VUV light from a single-pass FEL was performed at FERMI FEL-1 operated in the 52 nm-26 nm range. Three different experimental techniques were used. The experiments were carried out at the end-station of two different beamlines to assess the impact of transport optics and provide polarization data for the end user. In this paper we summarize the results obtained from different setups. The results are consistent with each other and allow a general discussion about the viability of permanent diagnostics aimed at monitoring the polarization of FEL pulses.

  10. Stretch-rate relationships for turbulent premixed combustion LES subgrid models measured using temporally resolved diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Adam M.; Driscoll, James F.

    2010-07-15

    Temporally resolved measurements of turbulence-flame interaction were used to experimentally determine relationships for the strain-rate and curvature stretch-rate exerted on a premixed flame surface. These relationships include a series of transfer functions that are analogous to, but not equal to, stretch-efficiency functions. The measurements were obtained by applying high-repetition-rate particle image velocimetry in a turbulent slot Bunsen flame and were able to resolve the range of turbulent scales that cause flame surface straining and wrinkling. Fluid control masses were tracked in a Lagrangian manner as they interacted with the flame surface. From each interaction, the spatially and temporally filtered subgrid strain-rate and curvature stretch-rate were measured. By analyzing the statistics of thousands of turbulence-flame interactions, relationships for the strain-rate and curvature stretch-rate were determined that are appropriate for Large Eddy Simulation. It was found that the strain-rate exerted on the flame during these interactions was better correlated with the strength of the subgrid fluid-dynamic strain-rate field than with previously used characteristic strain-rates. Furthermore, stretch-efficiency functions developed from simplified vortex-flame interactions significantly over-predict the measurements. Hence, the proposed relationship relates the strain-rate on the flame to the filtered subgrid fluid-dynamic strain-rate field during real turbulence-flame interactions using an empirically determined Strain-Rate Transfer function. It was found that the curvature stretch-rate did not locally balance the strain-rate as has been proposed in previous models. A geometric relationship was found to exist between the subgrid flame surface wrinkling factor and subgrid curvature stretch-rate, which could be expressed using an empirically determined wrinkling factor transfer function. Curve fits to the measured relationships are provided that could be

  11. Status of the Upsilon Polarization Measurement at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, Niharika; /Purdue U.

    2011-10-01

    The angular distributions of {Upsilon}(1S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays are analyzed using a sample of {Upsilon}(1S) mesons in 2.9 fb{sup -1} of data collected at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The results of the one-dimensional angular analysis suggest that {Upsilon}(1S) may be longitudinal polarized at high transverse momentum. This observation is largely inconsistent with NRQCD prediction that predicts transverse polarization at high p{sub T}.

  12. Measurement of the nuclear polarization of hydrogen and deuterium molecules using a Lamb-shift polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Ralf Gorski, Robert; Grigoryev, Kiril; Mikirtychyants, Maxim; Rathmann, Frank; Seyfarth, Hellmut; Ströher, Hans; Weiss, Philipp; Kochenda, Leonid; Kravtsov, Peter; Trofimov, Viktor; Tschernov, Nikolay; Vasilyev, Alexander; Vznuzdaev, Marat; Schieck, Hans Paetz gen.

    2014-10-15

    Lamb-shift polarimeters are used to measure the nuclear polarization of protons and deuterons at energies of a few keV. In combination with an ionizer, the polarization of hydrogen and deuterium atoms was determined after taking into account the loss of polarization during the ionization process. The present work shows that the nuclear polarization of hydrogen or deuterium molecules can be measured as well, by ionizing the molecules and injecting the H{sub 2}{sup +} (or D{sub 2}{sup +}) ions into the Lamb-shift polarimeter.

  13. Measuring kinetic isotope effects in enzyme reactions using time-resolved electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liuni, Peter; Olkhov-Mitsel, Ekaterina; Orellana, Arturo; Wilson, Derek J

    2013-04-01

    Kinetic isotope effect (KIE) measurements are a powerful tool for studying enzyme mechanisms; they can provide insights into microscopic catalytic processes and even structural constraints for transition states. However, KIEs have not come into widespread use in enzymology, due in large part to the requirement for prohibitively cumbersome experimental procedures and daunting analytical frameworks. In this work, we introduce time-resolved electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (TRESI-MS) as a straightforward, precise, and inexpensive method for measuring KIEs. Neither radioisotopes nor large amounts of material are needed and kinetic measurements for isotopically "labeled" and "unlabeled" species are acquired simultaneously in a single "competitive" assay. The approach is demonstrated first using a relatively large isotope effect associated with yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) catalyzed oxidation of ethanol. The measured macroscopic KIE of 2.19 ± 0.05 is consistent with comparable measurements in the literature but cannot be interpreted in a way that provides insights into isotope effects in individual microscopic steps. To demonstrate the ability of TRESI-MS to directly measure intrinsic KIEs and to characterize the precision of the technique, we measure a much smaller (12)C/(13)C KIE associated specifically with presteady state acylation of chymotrypsin during hydrolysis of an ester substrate.

  14. THE Q/U IMAGING EXPERIMENT: POLARIZATION MEASUREMENTS OF RADIO SOURCES AT 43 AND 95 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Huffenberger, K. M.; Araujo, D.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Bischoff, C.; Buder, I.; Chinone, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Cleary, K.; Monsalve, R.; Næss, S. K.; Newburgh, L. B.; Reeves, R.; Ruud, T. M.; Eriksen, H. K.; Wehus, I. K.; Gaier, T.; Dickinson, C.; Gundersen, J. O.; Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

    2015-06-10

    We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the cosmic microwave background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, >40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are ∼480 such sources within QUIET’s four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30–40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At signal-to-noise ratio > 3 significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only 1.3 ± 1.1 detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization measurements of the same sources from the literature. For the four sources with WMAP and Planck intensity measurements >1 Jy, the polarization fractions are above 1% in both QUIET bands. At high significance, we compute polarization fractions as much as 10%–20% for some sources, but the effects of source variability may cut that level in half for contemporaneous comparisons. Our results indicate that simple models—ones that scale a fixed polarization fraction with frequency—are inadequate to model the behavior of these sources and their contributions to polarization maps.

  15. The Q/U Imaging Experiment: Polarization Measurements of Radio Sources at 43 and 95 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffenberger, K. M.; Araujo, D.; Bischoff, C.; Buder, I.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Kusaka, A.; Monsalve, R.; Næss, S. K.; Newburgh, L. B.; Reeves, R.; Ruud, T. M.; Wehus, I. K.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Dickinson, C.; Eriksen, H. K.; Gaier, T.; Gundersen, J. O.; Hasegawa, M.; Hazumi, M.; Miller, A. D.; Radford, S. J. E.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Staggs, S. T.; Tajima, O.; Thompson, K. L.; QUIET Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We present polarization measurements of extragalactic radio sources observed during the cosmic microwave background polarization survey of the Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET), operating at 43 GHz (Q-band) and 95 GHz (W-band). We examine sources selected at 20 GHz from the public, >40 mJy catalog of the Australia Telescope (AT20G) survey. There are ˜480 such sources within QUIET’s four low-foreground survey patches, including the nearby radio galaxies Centaurus A and Pictor A. The median error on our polarized flux density measurements is 30-40 mJy per Stokes parameter. At signal-to-noise ratio > 3 significance, we detect linear polarization for seven sources in Q-band and six in W-band; only 1.3 ± 1.1 detections per frequency band are expected by chance. For sources without a detection of polarized emission, we find that half of the sources have polarization amplitudes below 90 mJy (Q-band) and 106 mJy (W-band), at 95% confidence. Finally, we compare our polarization measurements to intensity and polarization measurements of the same sources from the literature. For the four sources with WMAP and Planck intensity measurements >1 Jy, the polarization fractions are above 1% in both QUIET bands. At high significance, we compute polarization fractions as much as 10%-20% for some sources, but the effects of source variability may cut that level in half for contemporaneous comparisons. Our results indicate that simple models—ones that scale a fixed polarization fraction with frequency—are inadequate to model the behavior of these sources and their contributions to polarization maps.

  16. Stimulated Raman scattering in micrometer-sized droplets: time-resolved measurements.

    PubMed

    Pinnick, R G; Biswas, A; Chyălek, P; Armstrong, R L; Latifi, H; Creegan, E; Srivastava, V; Jarzembski, M; Fernández, G

    1988-06-01

    Time-resolved measurements of elastic scattering and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in micrometer-sized water and carbon tetrachloride droplets irradiated with a pulsed, frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (pulse width 8 nsec, lambda = 532 nm, peak intensity ~1 GW cm(-2)) are reported. Elastic scattering of light is instantaneous within our measurement error, estimated to be <+/-3 nsec. On the other hand, the first Stokes shift in water and multiple-order (through ninth-order) Stokes shifts in carbon tetrachloride are delayed from the elastically scattered light by 5-7 nsec. The delay in SRS is apparently a consequence of structure resonances within the droplet, which acts as an optical cavity with relatively high Q. Quasi-periodic peaks in SRS spectra of water droplets are shown to be associated with elastic-scattering structure resonances having the same mode order.

  17. Depth-resolved whole-field displacement measurement using wavelength scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo D.; Zhou, Yanzhou; Huntley, Jonathan M.; Wildman, Ricky D.

    2004-07-01

    We describe a technique for measuring depth-resolved displacement fields within a three-dimensional (3D) scattering medium based on wavelength scanning interferometry. Sequences of two-dimensional interferograms are recorded whilst the wavelength of the laser is tuned at a constant rate. Fourier transformation of the resulting 3D intensity distribution along the time axis reconstructs the scattering potential within the medium, and changes in the 3D phase distribution measured between two separate scans provide one component of the 3D displacement field. The technique is illustrated with a proof-of-principle experiment involving two independently controlled reflecting surfaces. Advantages over the corresponding method based on low-coherence interferometry include a depth range unlimited by mechanical scanning devices, and immunity from fringe contrast reduction when imaging through dispersive media.

  18. Depth-resolved whole-field displacement measurement by wavelength-scanning electronic speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo D.; Huntley, Jonathan M.; Wildman, Ricky D.

    2005-07-01

    We show, for the first time to our knowledge, how wavelength-scanning interferometry can be used to measure depth-resolved displacement fields through semitransparent scattering surfaces. Temporal sequences of speckle interferograms are recorded while the wavelength of the laser is tuned at a constant rate. Fourier transformation of the resultant three-dimensional (3-D) intensity distribution along the time axis reconstructs the scattering potential within the medium, and changes in the 3-D phase distribution measured between two separate scans provide the out-of-plane component of the 3-D displacement field. The principle of the technique is explained in detail and illustrated with a proof-of-principle experiment involving two independently tilted semitransparent scattering surfaces. Results are validated by standard two-beam electronic speckle pattern interferometry.

  19. Spatially resolved excitation temperature measurements in a hypersonic flow using the hook method.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, R J; Ebrahim, N A

    1977-05-01

    The extension of the hook method to include spatial resolution of nonuniformities in the test plane as suggested by Huber (1971) and Sandeman (1971) is demonstrated experimentally by measurements of the variation of the integrated line density of ground state sodium in a flame. Experiments are also described in which the variations in the flow of CO(2) in a hypersonic shock tunnel are spatially resolved along the spectrometer slit. The variations in the hook separations of the 425.4-nm Cr1 resonance and the 434.4-nm CrI 1-eV lower state line are simultaneously measured. The chromium exists as an impurity in the hypersonic flow of CO(2) over a cylinder in a shock tunnel. The populations of the levels so obtained have enabled the comparison of the excitation temperature of the Cr 1-eV level with the calculated gas temperature.

  20. Spectrally-resolved measurement of concentrated light distributions for Fresnel lens concentrators.

    PubMed

    Besson, P; White, P McVey; Dominguez, C; Voarino, P; Garcia-Linares, P; Lemiti, M; Schriemer, H; Hinzer, K; Baudrit, M

    2016-01-25

    A test method that measures spectrally resolved irradiance distribution for a concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) optical system is presented. In conjunction with electrical I-V curves, it is a means to visualize and characterize the effects of chromatic aberration and nonuniform flux profiles under controllable testing conditions. The indoor characterization test bench, METHOD (Measurement of Electrical, Thermal and Optical Devices), decouples the temperatures of the primary optical element (POE) and the cell allowing their respective effects on optical and electrical performance to be analysed. In varying the temperature of the POE, the effects on electrical efficiency, focal distance, spectral sensitivity, acceptance angle and multi-junction current matching profiles can be quantified. This work presents the calibration procedures to accurately image the spectral irradiance distribution of a CPV system and a study of system behavior over lens temperature. PMID:26832591

  1. Spatially-resolved X-ray scattering measurements of a planar blast wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa, E. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.; Falk, K.; Montgomery, D. S.; Benage, J. F.

    2014-06-01

    We present X-ray scattering measurements characterizing the spatial temperature and ionization profile of a blast wave driven in a near-solid density foam. Several-keV X-rays scattered from a laser-driven blast wave in a carbon foam. We resolved the scattering in high resolution in space and wavelength to extract the plasma conditions along the propagation direction of the blast wave. We infer temperatures of 20-40 eV and ionizations of 2-4 in the shock and rarefaction regions of the blast wave. This range of measured ionization states allows for a detailed comparison between different models for the bound-free scattering. FLYCHK simulations of the temperature-ionization balance generally agree with the experimental values in the shocked region while consistently underestimating the ionization in the rarefaction.

  2. Divertor electron temperature and impurity diffusion measurements with a spectrally resolved imaging radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, D. J.; Kumar, D.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Tritz, K.; Jaworski, M. A.

    2012-10-15

    A divertor imaging radiometer (DIR) diagnostic is being studied to measure spatially and spectrally resolved radiated power P{sub rad}({lambda}) in the tokamak divertor. A dual transmission grating design, with extreme ultraviolet ({approx}20-200 A) and vacuum ultraviolet ({approx}200-2000 A) gratings placed side-by-side, can produce coarse spectral resolution over a broad wavelength range covering emission from impurities over a wide temperature range. The DIR can thus be used to evaluate the separate P{sub rad} contributions from different ion species and charge states. Additionally, synthetic spectra from divertor simulations can be fit to P{sub rad}({lambda}) measurements, providing a powerful code validation tool that can also be used to estimate electron divertor temperature and impurity transport.

  3. Spatially resolved, in situ potential measurements through porous electrodes as applied to fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Hess, Katherine C; Epting, William K; Litster, Shawn

    2011-12-15

    We report the development and use of a microstructured electrode scaffold (MES) to make spatially resolved, in situ, electrolyte potential measurements through the thickness of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) electrode. This new approach uses a microfabricated apparatus to analyze the coupled transport and electrochemical phenomena in porous electrodes at the microscale. In this study, the MES allows the fuel cell to run under near-standard operating conditions, while providing electrolyte potential measurements at discrete distances through the electrode's thickness. Here we use spatial distributions of electrolyte potential to evaluate the effects of Ohmic and mass transport resistances on the through-plane reaction distribution for various operating conditions. Additionally, we use the potential distributions to estimate the ionic conductivity of the electrode. Our results indicate the in situ conductivity is higher than typically estimated for PEFC electrodes based on bulk polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) conductivity.

  4. Site-resolved measurement of the spin-correlation function in the Fermi-Hubbard model.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Maxwell F; Mazurenko, Anton; Chiu, Christie S; Ji, Geoffrey; Greif, Daniel; Greiner, Markus

    2016-09-16

    Exotic phases of matter can emerge from strong correlations in quantum many-body systems. Quantum gas microscopy affords the opportunity to study these correlations with unprecedented detail. Here, we report site-resolved observations of antiferromagnetic correlations in a two-dimensional, Hubbard-regime optical lattice and demonstrate the ability to measure the spin-correlation function over any distance. We measure the in situ distributions of the particle density and magnetic correlations, extract thermodynamic quantities from comparisons to theory, and observe statistically significant correlations over three lattice sites. The temperatures that we reach approach the limits of available numerical simulations. The direct access to many-body physics at the single-particle level demonstrated by our results will further our understanding of how the interplay of motion and magnetism gives rise to new states of matter. PMID:27634527

  5. Design and validation of an angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry fiber probe for in vivo clinical measurements of depth-resolved nuclear morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yizheng; Terry, Neil G.; Woosley, John T.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a /LCI) fiber probe designed for in vivo clinical application in gastrointestinal endoscopy. The a/LCI technique measures the depth-resolved angular scattering distribution to determine the size distribution and optical density of cell nuclei for assessing the health of epithelial tissues. Clinical application is enabled by an endoscopic fiber-optic probe that employs a 2.3-m-long coherent fiber bundle and is compatible with the standard 2.8-mm-diam biopsy channel of a gastroscope. The probe allows for real-time data acquisition by collecting the scattering from multiple angles in parallel, enabled by the Fourier domain approach. The performance of the probe is characterized through measurement of critical parameters. The depth-resolved sizing capability of the system is demonstrated using single- and double-layer microsphere phantoms with subwavelength sizing precision and accuracy achieved. Initial results from a clinical feasibility test are also presented to show in vivo application in the human esophagus.

  6. Design and validation of an angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry fiber probe for in vivo clinical measurements of depth-resolved nuclear morphology

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yizheng; Terry, Neil G.; Woosley, John T.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a ∕LCI) fiber probe designed for in vivo clinical application in gastrointestinal endoscopy. The a∕LCI technique measures the depth-resolved angular scattering distribution to determine the size distribution and optical density of cell nuclei for assessing the health of epithelial tissues. Clinical application is enabled by an endoscopic fiber-optic probe that employs a 2.3-m-long coherent fiber bundle and is compatible with the standard 2.8-mm-diam biopsy channel of a gastroscope. The probe allows for real-time data acquisition by collecting the scattering from multiple angles in parallel, enabled by the Fourier domain approach. The performance of the probe is characterized through measurement of critical parameters. The depth-resolved sizing capability of the system is demonstrated using single- and double-layer microsphere phantoms with subwavelength sizing precision and accuracy achieved. Initial results from a clinical feasibility test are also presented to show in vivo application in the human esophagus. PMID:21280890

  7. Study on the measurement system of the target polarization characteristics and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Zhu, Yong; Zhang, Su; Duan, Jin; Yang, Di; Zhan, Juntong; Wang, Xiaoman; Jiang, Hui-Lin

    2015-10-01

    The polarization imaging detection technology increased the polarization information on the basis of the intensity imaging, which is extensive application in the military and civil and other fields, the research on the polarization characteristics of target is particularly important. The research of the polarization reflection model was introduced in this paper, which describes the scattering vector light energy distribution in reflecting hemisphere polarization characteristics, the target polarization characteristics test system solutions was put forward, by the irradiation light source, measuring turntable and camera, etc, which illuminate light source shall direct light source, with laser light sources and xenon lamp light source, light source can be replaced according to the test need; Hemispherical structure is used in measuring circumarotate placed near its base material sample, equipped with azimuth and pitching rotation mechanism, the manual in order to adjust the azimuth Angle and high Angle observation; Measuring camera pump works, through the different in the way of motor control polaroid polarization test, to ensure the accuracy of measurement and imaging resolution. The test platform has set up by existing laboratory equipment, the laser is 532 nm, line polaroid camera, at the same time also set the sending and receiving optical system. According to the different materials such as wood, metal, plastic, azimuth Angle and zenith Angle in different observation conditions, measurement of target in the polarization scattering properties of different exposure conditions, implementation of hemisphere space pBRDF measurement.

  8. Development of neutron polarization measurement system for studying the medium effect on NN interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jumpei

    2014-09-01

    Modification of nucleon and meson properties in nuclear medium is one of the most interesting topics in nuclear physics. To investigate the medium effect on NN interaction, quasi-elastic reaction is one of the most powerful tool. Especially, the spin observables are very useful since it is insensitive to distortion effect. For the proton-proton interaction, the analyzing power and polarization transfer have been measured for exclusive (p,2p) reaction. On the other hand, for the proton-neutron interaction, the polarization transfer have been measured only for inclusive (p,n) reaction. Therefore, we plan to measure the polarization transfer for exclusive (p,np) reaction. To achieve the measurement, we developed the neutron polarization measurement system for (p,np) reaction, which has following two component; (1) neutron polarization measurement; (2) exclusive measurement. For the neutron polarization measurement, we have reconstructed the neutron polarimeter NPOL3. We have calibrated the new NPOL3 by using the polarized neutron from 2H(p,n) reaction and obtained the effective analyzing power Ayeff = 0 . 127 . For the exclusive measurement, we used the LAS spectrometer for recoil proton detection and achieved the energy resolution of 6 MeV.

  9. Spatially resolved measurements of mean spin-spin relaxation time constants.

    PubMed

    Nechifor, Ruben Emanuel; Romanenko, Konstantin; Marica, Florea; Balcom, Bruce J

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic Resonance measurements of the T2 distribution have become very common and they are a powerful way to probe microporous fluid bearing solids. While the structure of the T2 distribution, and changes in the structure, are often very informative, it is common to reduce the T2 distribution to a mean numeric quantity in order to provide a quantitative interpretation of the distribution. Magnetic Resonance Imaging measurements of the T2 distribution have recently been introduced, but they are time consuming, especially for 2 and 3 spatial dimensions. In this paper we explore a direct MRI measurement of the arithmetic mean of 1/T2, characterizing the distribution by using the initial slope of the spatially resolved T2 decay in a CPMG prepared Centric Scan SPRITE experiment. The methodology is explored with a test phantom sample and realistic petroleum reservoir core plug samples. The arithmetic mean of 1/T2 is related to the harmonic mean of T2. The mean obtained from the early decay is explored through measurements of uniform saturated core plug samples and by comparison to other means determined from the complete T2 distribution. Complementary data were obtained using SE-SPI T2 distribution MRI measurements. The utility of the arithmetic mean 1/T2 is explored through measurements of centrifuged core plug samples where the T2 distribution varies spatially. The harmonic mean T2 obtained from the early decay was employed to estimate the irreducible water saturation for core plug samples. PMID:24361482

  10. Spatially resolved measurements of mean spin-spin relaxation time constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechifor, Ruben Emanuel; Romanenko, Konstantin; Marica, Florea; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic Resonance measurements of the T2 distribution have become very common and they are a powerful way to probe microporous fluid bearing solids. While the structure of the T2 distribution, and changes in the structure, are often very informative, it is common to reduce the T2 distribution to a mean numeric quantity in order to provide a quantitative interpretation of the distribution. Magnetic Resonance Imaging measurements of the T2 distribution have recently been introduced, but they are time consuming, especially for 2 and 3 spatial dimensions. In this paper we explore a direct MRI measurement of the arithmetic mean of 1/T2, characterizing the distribution by using the initial slope of the spatially resolved T2 decay in a CPMG prepared Centric Scan SPRITE experiment. The methodology is explored with a test phantom sample and realistic petroleum reservoir core plug samples. The arithmetic mean of 1/T2 is related to the harmonic mean of T2. The mean obtained from the early decay is explored through measurements of uniform saturated core plug samples and by comparison to other means determined from the complete T2 distribution. Complementary data were obtained using SE-SPI T2 distribution MRI measurements. The utility of the arithmetic mean 1/T2 is explored through measurements of centrifuged core plug samples where the T2 distribution varies spatially. The harmonic mean T2 obtained from the early decay was employed to estimate the irreducible water saturation for core plug samples.

  11. Reactor for in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Horn, R; Korup, O; Geske, M; Zavyalova, U; Oprea, I; Schlögl, R

    2010-06-01

    The present work describes a reactor that allows in situ measurements of spatially resolved kinetic data in heterogeneous catalysis. The reactor design allows measurements up to temperatures of 1300 degrees C and 45 bar pressure, i.e., conditions of industrial relevance. The reactor involves reactants flowing through a solid catalyst bed containing a sampling capillary with a side sampling orifice through which a small fraction of the reacting fluid (gas or liquid) is transferred into an analytical device (e.g., mass spectrometer, gas chromatograph, high pressure liquid chromatograph) for quantitative analysis. The sampling capillary can be moved with microm resolution in or against flow direction to measure species profiles through the catalyst bed. Rotation of the sampling capillary allows averaging over several scan lines. The position of the sampling orifice is such that the capillary channel through the catalyst bed remains always occupied by the capillary preventing flow disturbance and fluid bypassing. The second function of the sampling capillary is to provide a well which can accommodate temperature probes such as a thermocouple or a pyrometer fiber. If a thermocouple is inserted in the sampling capillary and aligned with the sampling orifice fluid temperature profiles can be measured. A pyrometer fiber can be used to measure the temperature profile of the solid catalyst bed. Spatial profile measurements are demonstrated for methane oxidation on Pt and methane oxidative coupling on Li/MgO, both catalysts supported on reticulated alpha-Al(2)O(3) foam supports. PMID:20590252

  12. MgII Linear Polarization Measurements Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayahsi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen; Adams, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph (SUMI) sounding rocket program, with emphasis on the polarization characteristics of the VUV optics and their spectral, spatial and polarization resolution. SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria and this paper will describe the data that was acquired with emphasis on the MgII linear polarization measurements.

  13. Measurement of the linear polarization of channeling radiation in silicon and diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Rzepka, M.; Buschhorn, G.; Diedrich, E.; Kotthaus, R.; Kufner, W.; Roessl, W.; Schmidt, K.H.; Hoffmann-Stascheck, P.; Genz, H.; Nething, U.; Richter, A.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    1995-07-01

    Utilizing 90{degree} Compton scattering the linear polarization of channeling radiation produced at the superconducting accelerator S-DALINAC with 62 MeV electrons in silicon and diamond has been measured in the energy range between 50 and 400 keV. Planar channeling radiation due to transitions involving transversal bound as well as unbound states is completely linearly polarized perpendicular to the channeling plane. Axial channeling radiation does not show linear polarization.

  14. On the Incorporation of Metallicity Data into Measurements of Star Formation History from Resolved Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2016-07-01

    The combination of spectroscopic stellar metallicities and resolved star color–magnitude diagrams (CMDs) has the potential to constrain the entire star formation history (SFH) of a galaxy better than fitting CMDs alone (as is most common in SFH studies using resolved stellar populations). In this paper, two approaches to incorporating external metallicity information into CMD-fitting techniques are presented. Overall, the joint fitting of metallicity and CMD information can increase the precision of measured age–metallicity relationships (AMRs) and star formation rates by 10% over CMD fitting alone. However, systematics in stellar isochrones and mismatches between spectroscopic and photometric determinations of metallicity can reduce the accuracy of the recovered SFHs. I present a simple mitigation of these systematics that can reduce their amplitude to the level obtained from CMD fitting alone, while ensuring that the AMR is consistent with spectroscopic metallicities. As is the case in CMD-fitting analysis, improved stellar models and calibrations between spectroscopic and photometric metallicities are currently the primary impediment to gains in SFH precision from jointly fitting stellar metallicities and CMDs.

  15. Measurement of dynamic variations of polarized light in processed meat due to aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubaker, Hamed M.; Tománek, Pavel; Grmela, Lubomír

    2011-05-01

    The propagation of laser light in biological tissues is of growing importance in many medical and food applications. This problem is seriously studied in live science. The biological tissues consist of cells which dimensions are bigger than wavelength of visible light and display large compositional variations, inhomogeneities, and anisotropic structures. Therefore a Mie scattering of transmitted or backscattered light occurs and different polarization states arise. The changes of polarization state due to the multiple scattering of light in the biological cellular tissues also allow measure the freshness of processed victuals. The transmitted and backscattered laser light exhibits multiple scattering on the thin slice of sample. The phenomenon is different if the cellular tissues are living or dead. In the case of meat, there are temporal and dynamic changes not only as a result of chemical process, but also geometric deformations due to the water evaporation from intracellular and extracellular sites. The polarization measurement shows the changes in polarization orientation due to the muscle orientation and meat aging. Two types of measurements were provided: a) Measurement of polarized light reflected and twice transmitted forward and backward through the biological tissue samples - meat slice attached on sample holder mirror. b) Measurement of polarized light transmitted through the biological tissue sample. The relationship between polarization changes and meat freshness, and a dynamic temporal behavior of polarization states in the aged meat is reported.

  16. New Instrument for Measuring Size-resolved Submicron Sea Spray Particle Production From Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskhidze, N.; Petters, M. D.; Reed, R. E.; Dawson, K. W.; Phillips, B.; Royalty, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Marine aerosols play an important role in controlling the Earth's radiation balance, cloud formation and microphysical properties, and the chemistry of the marine atmosphere. As aerosol effects on climate are estimated from the difference between model simulations with present-day and with preindustrial aerosol and precursor emissions, accurate knowledge of size- and composition-dependent production flux of sea spray particles is important for correct assessment of the role of anthropogenic aerosols in climate change. One particular knowledge gap in sea spray particle emissions resides in yet uncharacterized contributions of sea spray to the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) budget over the marine boundary layer. The chemical composition of 50 to 200 nm sized sea spray particles, most critical to modeling CCN concentration from size distribution data is often simplified as purely organic, purely sea-salt or mixture of both. The lack of accurate information of the size-dependent production flux of sub-micron sea spray particles prevents the modeling community from resolving discrepancies between model-predicted and measured CCN number concentration in the marine boundary layer. We designed a new system for size-selected sea spray aerosol flux measurement that is composed of a 3D sonic anemometer, two thermodenuders, three differential mobility analyzers, two condensation particle counters, and a CCN counter. The system is designed to operate in both Eddy Covariance (EC) and Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) modes. The system is based on the volatility/humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer technique and is therefore designed to measure the size-resolved turbulent fluxes of sub-micron sized sea-salt particles for a wide range of meteorological, hydrological and ocean chemical/biological conditions. The method and the setup will be presented along with some results from a recent field-deployment of the instrument at the North Carolina coast. This presentation

  17. Development of a Mid-Infrared Laser for Range-Resolved Methane DIAL Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, S.; Hannun, R. A.; Smith, J. B.; Dykema, J. A.; Witinski, M. F.; Anderson, J. G.

    2013-12-01

    Obtaining a global, homogenous observational record of atmospheric methane mixing ratio as a function of altitude constitutes a challenging experimental problem. The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) as well as several climate satellites such as SCIAMACHY provide global data of ground-level concentrations and atmospheric column averages, mapping the global methane content as part of the carbon cycle. However, recent data from the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations mission (HIPPO) reveals highly variable spatial structure within the vertical profile, that is not captured by satellite or ground-based in situ data. This underscores the need for new approaches for range-resolved methane detection. Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) has proven to be a viable technique for range-resolved greenhouse gas measurements from both ground-based and airborne platforms. In order to achieve the necessary vertical resolution for long-range methane measurements, a high-power, pulsed laser system in the mid-IR has been developed. The optical set-up includes a single-frequency Nd:YAG laser, which pumps a non-linear crystal to generate broadly tunable, mid-IR pulses via Optical Parametric Generation (OPG). A detailed sensitivity analysis, including computational estimates of the requirements for laser linewidth, spectral purity, and frequency stability and an examination of different spectral regions in the mid-IR, will be presented. Depending on the deployment location of such a ground-based DIAL observing system, these measurements would make substantial contributions to a range of carbon cycle science questions, including monitoring of national emissions inventories and quantifying potential increases in methane emissions from natural reservoirs due to changing climate.

  18. Spectrally resolved measurement of small optical losses by cavity enhanced spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeuner, T.; Paa, W.; Schmidl, G.; Mühlig, Ch.

    2011-05-01

    In general losses of optical of less than 1 % cannot be measured precisely with the best-established techniques (e.q. two-beam spectroscopy). However, it is possible to measure losses in the 0.0001 - 0.5 % range with high accuracy using cavity enhanced spectroscopy (CES) methods. Such low losses can be measured with CES, due to an increased interaction path way with the object. The Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) technique takes advantage of the CES method and transforms the optical loss information into the time domain. Two types of CRD setups for spectrally resolved loss measurement of laser mirrors will be presented. The first setup uses a tunable laser system for serial detection of the reflectivity spectra. The second method determines the spectral losses using a super continuum source. Here, simultaneous excitation and a spectrometer based camera system for separate detection of several wavelengths is used. Results will be shown and compared with direct absorption measurements of the same sample.

  19. Circular dichroism measurements at an x-ray free-electron laser with polarization control.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, G; Lindahl, A O; Knie, A; Hartmann, N; Lutman, A A; MacArthur, J P; Shevchuk, I; Buck, J; Galler, A; Glownia, J M; Helml, W; Huang, Z; Kabachnik, N M; Kazansky, A K; Liu, J; Marinelli, A; Mazza, T; Nuhn, H-D; Walter, P; Viefhaus, J; Meyer, M; Moeller, S; Coffee, R N; Ilchen, M

    2016-08-01

    A non-destructive diagnostic method for the characterization of circularly polarized, ultraintense, short wavelength free-electron laser (FEL) light is presented. The recently installed Delta undulator at the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (USA) was used as showcase for this diagnostic scheme. By applying a combined two-color, multi-photon experiment with polarization control, the degree of circular polarization of the Delta undulator has been determined. Towards this goal, an oriented electronic state in the continuum was created by non-resonant ionization of the O2 1s core shell with circularly polarized FEL pulses at hν ≃ 700 eV. An also circularly polarized, highly intense UV laser pulse with hν ≃ 3.1 eV was temporally and spatially overlapped, causing the photoelectrons to redistribute into so-called sidebands that are energetically separated by the photon energy of the UV laser. By determining the circular dichroism of these redistributed electrons using angle resolving electron spectroscopy and modeling the results with the strong-field approximation, this scheme allows to unambiguously determine the absolute degree of circular polarization of any pulsed, ultraintense XUV or X-ray laser source. PMID:27587106

  20. Circular dichroism measurements at an x-ray free-electron laser with polarization control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, G.; Lindahl, A. O.; Knie, A.; Hartmann, N.; Lutman, A. A.; MacArthur, J. P.; Shevchuk, I.; Buck, J.; Galler, A.; Glownia, J. M.; Helml, W.; Huang, Z.; Kabachnik, N. M.; Kazansky, A. K.; Liu, J.; Marinelli, A.; Mazza, T.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Walter, P.; Viefhaus, J.; Meyer, M.; Moeller, S.; Coffee, R. N.; Ilchen, M.

    2016-08-01

    A non-destructive diagnostic method for the characterization of circularly polarized, ultraintense, short wavelength free-electron laser (FEL) light is presented. The recently installed Delta undulator at the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (USA) was used as showcase for this diagnostic scheme. By applying a combined two-color, multi-photon experiment with polarization control, the degree of circular polarization of the Delta undulator has been determined. Towards this goal, an oriented electronic state in the continuum was created by non-resonant ionization of the O2 1s core shell with circularly polarized FEL pulses at hν ≃ 700 eV. An also circularly polarized, highly intense UV laser pulse with hν ≃ 3.1 eV was temporally and spatially overlapped, causing the photoelectrons to redistribute into so-called sidebands that are energetically separated by the photon energy of the UV laser. By determining the circular dichroism of these redistributed electrons using angle resolving electron spectroscopy and modeling the results with the strong-field approximation, this scheme allows to unambiguously determine the absolute degree of circular polarization of any pulsed, ultraintense XUV or X-ray laser source.

  1. Polarized digital shearography for simultaneous dual shearing directions measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin; Lee, Cheok Peng; Li, Junrui; Zhang, Boyang; Yang, Lianxiang

    2016-08-01

    The selection of the direction of sensitivity for digital shearography is determined by its shearing direction. As a result, directionally shaped defects could be missed in non-destructive testing using a digital shearography system with only one shearing direction. This paper reports a polarized digital shearography system based on two Mach-Zehnder interferometers, which can create two orthogonal shearing directions and record shearograms in the two orthogonal directions simultaneously. The two shearograms are separated from each other by proper polarization design so that no cross interference occurs. The phase maps of the shearograms are generated by spatial phase shift methods through the introduction of different carrier frequencies in the two orthogonal shearograms and use of the Fourier transform method. This enabled simultaneous dual directional non-destructive testing during continuous loading. Theory derivation, spectrum analysis, and non-destructive testing application results are shown in detail.

  2. Polarized digital shearography for simultaneous dual shearing directions measurements.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xin; Lee, Cheok Peng; Li, Junrui; Zhang, Boyang; Yang, Lianxiang

    2016-08-01

    The selection of the direction of sensitivity for digital shearography is determined by its shearing direction. As a result, directionally shaped defects could be missed in non-destructive testing using a digital shearography system with only one shearing direction. This paper reports a polarized digital shearography system based on two Mach-Zehnder interferometers, which can create two orthogonal shearing directions and record shearograms in the two orthogonal directions simultaneously. The two shearograms are separated from each other by proper polarization design so that no cross interference occurs. The phase maps of the shearograms are generated by spatial phase shift methods through the introduction of different carrier frequencies in the two orthogonal shearograms and use of the Fourier transform method. This enabled simultaneous dual directional non-destructive testing during continuous loading. Theory derivation, spectrum analysis, and non-destructive testing application results are shown in detail. PMID:27587103

  3. Precision measurement of the nuclear polarization in laser-cooled, optically pumped 37K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenker, B.; Behr, J. A.; Melconian, D.; Anderson, R. M. A.; Anholm, M.; Ashery, D.; Behling, R. S.; Cohen, I.; Craiciu, I.; Donohue, J. M.; Farfan, C.; Friesen, D.; Gorelov, A.; McNeil, J.; Mehlman, M.; Norton, H.; Olchanski, K.; Smale, S.; Thériault, O.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Warner, C. L.

    2016-07-01

    We report a measurement of the nuclear polarization of laser-cooled, optically pumped 37K atoms which will allow us to precisely measure angular correlation parameters in the {β }+-decay of the same atoms. These results will be used to test the V - A framework of the weak interaction at high precision. At the Triumf neutral atom trap (Trinat), a magneto-optical trap confines and cools neutral 37K atoms and optical pumping spin-polarizes them. We monitor the nuclear polarization of the same atoms that are decaying in situ by photoionizing a small fraction of the partially polarized atoms and then use the standard optical Bloch equations to model their population distribution. We obtain an average nuclear polarization of \\bar{P}=0.9913+/- 0.0009, which is significantly more precise than previous measurements with this technique. Since our current measurement of the β-asymmetry has 0.2 % statistical uncertainty, the polarization measurement reported here will not limit its overall uncertainty. This result also demonstrates the capability to measure the polarization to \\lt 0.1 % , allowing for a measurement of angular correlation parameters to this level of precision, which would be competitive in searches for new physics.

  4. Systematic errors in cosmic microwave background polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dea, Daniel; Challinor, Anthony; Johnson, Bradley R.

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the impact of instrumental systematic errors on the potential of cosmic microwave background polarization experiments targeting primordial B-modes. To do so, we introduce spin-weighted Müller matrix-valued fields describing the linear response of the imperfect optical system and receiver, and give a careful discussion of the behaviour of the induced systematic effects under rotation of the instrument. We give the correspondence between the matrix components and known optical and receiver imperfections, and compare the likely performance of pseudo-correlation receivers and those that modulate the polarization with a half-wave plate. The latter is shown to have the significant advantage of not coupling the total intensity into polarization for perfect optics, but potential effects like optical distortions that may be introduced by the quasi-optical wave plate warrant further investigation. A fast method for tolerancing time-invariant systematic effects is presented, which propagates errors through to power spectra and cosmological parameters. The method extends previous studies to an arbitrary scan strategy, and eliminates the need for time-consuming Monte Carlo simulations in the early phases of instrument and survey design. We illustrate the method with both simple parametrized forms for the systematics and with beams based on physical-optics simulations. Example results are given in the context of next-generation experiments targeting tensor-to-scalar ratios r ~ 0.01.

  5. A Measurement of the Recoil Polarization of Electroproduced {Lambda}(1116)

    SciTech Connect

    Simeon McAleer

    2002-01-01

    The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory was used to study the reaction e + p {yields} e{prime} + K{sup +} + {Lambda}(1116) for events where {Lambda}(1116) subsequently decayed via the channel {Lambda}(1116) {yields} p + {pi}{sup -}. Data were taken at incident electron beam energies of 2.5, 4.0, and 4.2 GeV during the 1999 E1C run period. They hyperon production spectra span the Q{sup 2} range from 0.5 to 2.8 GeV{sup 2} and nearly the entire range in the center of mass angles. The proton angular distribution in the {Lambda}(1116) rest frame is used to deduce the recoil polarization of the hyperon, and the W and cos {theta}{sub cm}{sup K+} dependence of the recoil polarization will be presented. The data show sizeable negative polarizations for the {Lambda}(1116) as a function of both cos {theta}{sub cm}{sup K+} and W.

  6. Study of the mesosphere using wide-field twilight polarization measurements: Early results beyond the polar circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolnikov, O. S.; Kozelov, B. V.

    2016-07-01

    This paper discusses the results of early measurements of temperature and dust in the mesosphere on the basis of wide-field twilight sky polarimetry, which began in 2015 in Apatity (North of Russia, 67.6° N, 33.4° E) using the original entire-sky camera. These measurements have been performed for the first time beyond the Polar Circle in the winter and early spring period. The general polarization properties of the twilight sky and the procedure for identifying single scattering are described. The key results of the study include the Boltzmann temperature values at altitudes higher than 70 km and the conclusion on a weak effect of dust on scattering properties of the mesosphere during this period.

  7. Dielectric properties measurement method in the microwave frequencies range for non-polar/polar liquid mixtures characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, E.; Neamtu, C.; Ienciu, M.; Surducan, V.; Limare, A.; Fourel, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present a method based on dielectric properties measurements over a large spectrum of frequencies, in the microwave (MW) domain, in order to characterize a liquid mixture. The liquid mixtures consist of non-polar fluids (silicone oil, diesel fuel) and polar additives, in order to increase the specific MW absorption of the mixture for further MW power processing. We have measured the MW specific absorptions for mixtures of silicone oil with 20% and 30% (w/w) isopropanol. In both cases, the mixtures are sufficiently stable over time to allow further studies of thermal convection dynamics initiated by MW heating. For a mixture of diesel fuel with 10% (w/w) alkyl polyglycoside, the main observation was that its MW specific absorption varies over time after the mechanical mixing process.

  8. Measurements of VLF polarization and wave normal direction on OGO-F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helliwell, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    A major achievement of the F-24 experiment on OGO 6 was a verification of the theory of the polarization of proton whistlers. As predicted, the electron whistler was found to be right-hand polarized and the proton whistler left hand polarized. The transition from right- to left-hand polarization was found to occur very rapidly. Thus it appears that the experimental technique may allow great accuracy in the measurement of the cross-over frequency, a frequency that provides information on the ionic composition of the ionosphere.

  9. Time- and spectrally resolved measurements of laser-driven hohlraum radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hessling, T.; Blazevic, A.; Stoehlker, T.; Frank, A.; Kraus, D.; Roth, M.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    2011-07-15

    At the GSI Helmholtz center for heavy-ion research combined experiments with heavy ions and laser-produced plasmas are investigated. As a preparation to utilize indirectly heated targets, where a converter hohlraum provides thermal radiation to create a more homogeneous plasma, this converter target has to be characterized. In this paper the latest results of these measurements are presented. Small spherical cavities with diameters between 600 and 750 {mu}m were heated with laser energies up to 30 J at 532-nm wavelength. Radiation temperatures could be determined by time-resolved as well as time-integrated diagnostics, and maximum values of up to 35 eV were achieved.

  10. A new approach for highly resolved air temperature measurements in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttstädt, M.; Sachsen, T.; Ketzler, G.; Merbitz, H.; Schneider, C.

    2011-02-01

    In different fields of applied local climate investigation, highly resolved data of air temperature are of great importance. As a part of the research programme entitled City2020+, which deals with future climate conditions in agglomerations, this study focuses on increasing the quantity of urban air temperature data intended for the analysis of their spatial distribution. A new measurement approach using local transport buses as "riding thermometers" is presented. By this means, temperature data with a very high temporal and spatial resolution could be collected during scheduled bus rides. The data obtained provide the basis for the identification of thermally affected areas and for the investigation of factors in urban structure which influence the thermal conditions. Initial results from the ongoing study, which show the temperature distribution along different traverses through the city of Aachen, are presented.

  11. Space- and time-resolved resistive measurements of liquid metal wall thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhoseini, S. M. H.; Volpe, F. A.

    2016-11-01

    In a fusion reactor internally coated with liquid metal, it will be important to diagnose the thickness of the liquid at various locations in the vessel, as a function of time, and possibly respond to counteract undesired bulging or depletion. The electrical conductance between electrodes immersed in the liquid metal can be used as a simple proxy for the local thickness. Here a matrix of electrodes is shown to provide spatially and temporally resolved measurements of liquid metal thickness in the absence of plasma. First a theory is developed for m × n electrodes, and then it is experimentally demonstrated for 3 × 1 electrodes, as the liquid stands still or is agitated by means of a shaker. The experiments were carried out with Galinstan, but are easily extended to lithium or other liquid metals.

  12. Experimental estimation of the photons visiting probability profiles in time-resolved diffuse reflectance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawosz, P.; Kacprzak, M.; Weigl, W.; Borowska-Solonynko, A.; Krajewski, P.; Zolek, N.; Ciszek, B.; Maniewski, R.; Liebert, A.

    2012-12-01

    A time-gated intensified CCD camera was applied for time-resolved imaging of light penetrating in an optically turbid medium. Spatial distributions of light penetration probability in the plane perpendicular to the axes of the source and the detector were determined at different source positions. Furthermore, visiting probability profiles of diffuse reflectance measurement were obtained by the convolution of the light penetration distributions recorded at different source positions. Experiments were carried out on homogeneous phantoms, more realistic two-layered tissue phantoms based on the human skull filled with Intralipid-ink solution and on cadavers. It was noted that the photons visiting probability profiles depend strongly on the source-detector separation, the delay between the laser pulse and the photons collection window and the complex tissue composition of the human head.

  13. Time-Resolved High-Spatial-Resolution Measurements of Underwater Laser Ionization and Filamentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ted; Helle, Mike; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Ting, Antonio; Penano, Joe; Hafizi, Bahman; Chen, Yu-Hsin

    2014-10-01

    Intense underwater laser propagation, filamentation, and ionization are being investigated at NRL for applications including laser-guided discharges, advanced micromachining, and low-frequency laser acoustic generation. Time-resolved spectroscopy of intense underwater propagation and filamentation reveal strong Stimulated molecular Raman Scattering with ps temporal structure and frequency chirp. In addition, fs-time-resolution perpendicular shadowgraph images of ns underwater laser ionization reveal gas microbubble generation throughout the pump beam path. These microbubbles form in ps timescales with remarkably uniform initial diameters of a few-microns. Simulations using the HELCAP 4D nonlinear laser propagation code accurately predict measured filament fluence profiles and propagation, but also indicate complex, time-dependent and axially non-uniform plasma behavior. Results from recent experiments and simulations will be presented. This work is supported by NRL Base Funds.

  14. New method for measuring time-resolved spectra of lanthanide emission using square-wave excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Cai, Wei; Duan, Qianqian; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-11-15

    A method using modulated continuous wave (CW) visible laser to measure time-resolved fluorescence spectra of trivalent rare-earth ions has been developed. Electro-optic modulator was used to modulate the CW pumping laser with a rise time of 2 μs. CW Nd{sup 3+} lasers were used as examples to present the method. Upconversion dynamic process of Ho{sup 3+} was studied utilizing a 532 nm CW laser. Quantum cutting dynamic process from Tb{sup 3+} to Yb{sup 3+} was analyzed by a 473 nm CW laser. This method can be applied to any CW laser such as He-Ne laser, Ar{sup +} laser, Kr{sup +} laser, Ti:sapphire laser, etc.

  15. Time-resolved temperature measurement and numerical simulation of millisecond laser irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zewen; Zhang Hongchao; Shen Zhonghua; Ni Xiaowu

    2013-07-21

    Thermal process of 1064 nm millisecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiated silicon was time-resolved temperature measured by an infrared radiation pyrometer, temperature evolutions of the spot center for wide range of laser energy densities were presented. The waveforms of temperature evolution curves contained much information about phase change, melting, solidification and vaporization. An axisymmetric numerical model was established for millisecond laser heating silicon. The transient temperature fields were obtained by using the finite element method. The numerical results of temperature evolutions of the spot center are in good agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, the axial temperature distributions of the numerical results give a better understanding of the waveforms in the experimental results. The melting threshold, vaporizing threshold, melting duration, and melting depth were better identified by analyzing two kinds of results.

  16. Turbulent Statistics from Time-Resolved PIV Measurements of a Jet Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition is an adaptive signal processing method that when applied to a broadband signal, such as that generated by turbulence, acts as a set of band-pass filters. This process was applied to data from time-resolved, particle image velocimetry measurements of subsonic jets prior to computing the second-order, two-point, space-time correlations from which turbulent phase velocities and length and time scales could be determined. The application of this method to large sets of simultaneous time histories is new. In this initial study, the results are relevant to acoustic analogy source models for jet noise prediction. The high frequency portion of the results could provide the turbulent values for subgrid scale models for noise that is missed in large-eddy simulations. The results are also used to infer that the cross-correlations between different components of the decomposed signals at two points in space, neglected in this initial study, are important.

  17. Turbulent Statistics From Time-Resolved PIV Measurements of a Jet Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2013-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition is an adaptive signal processing method that when applied to a broadband signal, such as that generated by turbulence, acts as a set of band-pass filters. This process was applied to data from time-resolved, particle image velocimetry measurements of subsonic jets prior to computing the second-order, two-point, space-time correlations from which turbulent phase velocities and length and time scales could be determined. The application of this method to large sets of simultaneous time histories is new. In this initial study, the results are relevant to acoustic analogy source models for jet noise prediction. The high frequency portion of the results could provide the turbulent values for subgrid scale models for noise that is missed in large-eddy simulations. The results are also used to infer that the cross-correlations between different components of the decomposed signals at two points in space, neglected in this initial study, are important.

  18. Time-Resolved Microdialysis for In Vivo Neurochemical Measurements and Other Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Kristin N.; Kennedy, Robert T.

    2008-07-01

    Monitoring changes in chemical concentrations over time in complex environments is typically performed using sensors and spectroscopic techniques. Another approach is to couple sampling methods, such as microdialysis, with chromatographic, electrophoretic, or enzymatic assays. Recent advances of such coupling have enabled improvements in temporal resolution, multianalyte capability, and automation. In a sampling and analysis method, the temporal resolution is set by the mass sensitivity of the analytical method, analysis time, and zone dispersion during sampling. Coupling methods with high speed and mass sensitivity to microdialysis sampling help to reduce some of these contributions to yield methods with temporal resolution of seconds. These advances have been primarily used in monitoring neurotransmitters in vivo. This review covers the problems associated with chemical monitoring in the brain, recent advances in using microdialysis for time-resolved in vivo measurements, sample applications, and other potential applications of the technology such as determining reaction kinetics and process monitoring.

  19. Resolving subjects and measuring observer/subject distances with a thermal tactile imager.

    PubMed

    Do, David H; Riehle, Timothy H; Solinsky, Ryan; Assadi-Lamouki, Pouyan; Hillesheim, Christopher T; Vu, An N; Velie, Troy; Seifert, Gregory J

    2008-01-01

    Visually-impaired people have difficulty detecting objects beyond the reach of a cane. We functionally coupled a far-infrared camera to a linear array of tactile elements to create a thermal tactile viewer that enhances environmental awareness. Users may scan such a device across a scene to spatially locate people. We observed in a series of acuity-measuring tasks, at twenty feet of observer/subject separation, observers could resolve two people standing four inches apart (a separation angle of 1 degrees ) and locate the angular position of people within a room with 78% accuracy. Additionally, when employing a technique involving two sweeps from two observation points separated by approximately an arm span, subjects correctly reported observer/subject separation distance with 60% accuracy. These observations suggest the technique of information transfer provided by a thermal tactile viewing device provides the fundamental acuity required for an assistive locating device. PMID:19163664

  20. Time-Resolved AMR measurements of current induced magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guittienne, Ph.; Wegrowe, J.-E.; Kelly, D.; Ansermet, J.-Ph.

    2001-03-01

    Time-resolved detection of the magnetization switching in static magnetic fields was achieved by pulsing current densities of about 107 A/cm2 in single isolated Nickel nanowires (80nm in diameter, 6000 nm in length, electrodeposited in porous membranes), using a Weathstone bridge of a 1GHz bandwidth. This irreversible transition is found to occur in a time of about 10 ns. The time of switching within the pulse, tsw, is measured as a function of applied field and current. The temperature rise due to Joule heating is deduced from the change in resistance. The entire set of data tsw(H,T) are fitted with a simple activation law, with the energy barrier height as the unique fitting parameter. The results show a strong departure from pure thermal activation indicating a current-induced magnetization reversal.

  1. A proposed diagnostic for time-resolved 14 MeV neutron measurements on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, L.P.; Nazikian, R.; Prorvitch, V.

    1990-06-01

    A novel method for time resolved measurements of the 14 MeV neutron flux in an intense 2.5 MeV neutron and {gamma}-ray background has been developed. Discrimination against the background 2.5 MeV neutron and {gamma}-ray flux is achieved by the use of polyethylene and lead shielding. A high detection efficiency of DT neutrons is obtained by the use of large volume plastic scintillators and photomultiplier tube designed for operating in high magnetic field environments. Design computations for a such a detector system on TFTR show that an absolute detection efficiency of {approximately}10{sup {minus}8} counts per DT neutron may be obtained. A source strength of 10{sup 13} DT n/s may readily be detected by this method using both count mode and current mode operation with a resolution of {approximately}10 ms within a statistical accuracy of {approximately}5%. 12 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Few-femtosecond time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Behrens, C; Decker, F-J; Ding, Y; Dolgashev, V A; Frisch, J; Huang, Z; Krejcik, P; Loos, H; Lutman, A; Maxwell, T J; Turner, J; Wang, J; Wang, M-H; Welch, J; Wu, J

    2014-04-30

    X-ray free-electron lasers, with pulse durations ranging from a few to several hundred femtoseconds, are uniquely suited for studying atomic, molecular, chemical and biological systems. Characterizing the temporal profiles of these femtosecond X-ray pulses that vary from shot to shot is not only challenging but also important for data interpretation. Here we report the time-resolved measurements of X-ray free-electron lasers by using an X-band radiofrequency transverse deflector at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We demonstrate this method to be a simple, non-invasive technique with a large dynamic range for single-shot electron and X-ray temporal characterization. A resolution of less than 1 fs root mean square has been achieved for soft X-ray pulses. The lasing evolution along the undulator has been studied with the electron trapping being observed as the X-ray peak power approaches 100 GW.

  3. New method for measuring time-resolved spectra of lanthanide emission using square-wave excitation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Duan, Qianqian; Cai, Wei; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-11-01

    A method using modulated continuous wave (CW) visible laser to measure time-resolved fluorescence spectra of trivalent rare-earth ions has been developed. Electro-optic modulator was used to modulate the CW pumping laser with a rise time of 2 μs. CW Nd(3+) lasers were used as examples to present the method. Upconversion dynamic process of Ho(3+) was studied utilizing a 532 nm CW laser. Quantum cutting dynamic process from Tb(3+) to Yb(3+) was analyzed by a 473 nm CW laser. This method can be applied to any CW laser such as He-Ne laser, Ar(+) laser, Kr(+) laser, Ti:sapphire laser, etc.

  4. In situ time-resolved measurements of carbon nanotube and nanohorn growth

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, David B; Puretzky, Alexander A; Styers-Barnett, David J; Hu, Hui; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Hongtao; Rouleau, Christopher M; Eres, Gyula; Jackson, Jeremy Joseph; Wood, Richard F; Pannala, Sreekanth; Wells, Jack C

    2007-01-01

    Growth mechanisms of carbon nanotubes are investigated and compared for both high- and low-temperature synthesis methods through experiments utilizing time-resolved, in situ imaging and spectros-copy. High-speed videography and pyrometry measured the timeframes for growth for single-wall car-bon nanotubes (SWNTs) and nanohorns (SWNHs) by laser vaporization (LV) at 1150 C, revealing that C can self-assemble at high temperatures preferentially into SWNH structures without catalyst assistance at rates comparable to catalyst-assisted SWNT growth by either laser vaporization or chemical vapor depo-sition (CVD). Laser interferometry and videography reveal the coordinated growth of vertically-aligned nanotube arrays (VANTAs) by CVD at 550-900 C.

  5. Time-resolved lattice measurements of shock-induced phase transitions in polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milathianaki, Despina

    The response of materials under extreme temperature and pressure conditions is a topic of great significance because of its relevance in astrophysics, geophysics, and inertial confinement fusion. In recent years, environments exceeding several hundred gigapascals in pressure have been produced in the laboratory via laser-based dynamic loading techniques. Shock-loading is of particular interest as the shock provides a fiducial for measuring time-dependent processes in the lattice such as phase transitions. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction is the only technique that offers an insight into these shock-induced processes at the relevant spatial (atomic) and temporal scales. In this study, nanosecond resolution x-ray diffraction techniques were developed and implemented towards the study of shock-induced phase transitions in polycrystalline materials. More specifically, the capability of a focusing x-ray diffraction geometry in high-resolution in situ lattice measurements was demonstrated by probing shock-compressed Cu and amorphous metallic glass samples. In addition, simultaneous lattice and free surface velocity measurements of shock-compressed Mg in the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) and shock-induced body centered cubic (bcc) phases between 12 and 45 GPa were performed. These measurements revealed x-ray diffraction signals consistent with a compressed bcc lattice above a shock pressure of 26.2+/-1.3 GPa, thus capturing for the first time direct lattice evidence of a shock-induced hcp to bcc phase transition in Mg. Our measurement of the hcp-bcc phase boundary in Mg was found to be consistent with the calculated boundary from generalized pseudopotential theory in the pressure and temperature region intersected by the principal shock Hugoniot. Furthermore, the subnanosecond timescale of the phase transition implied by the shock-loading conditions was in agreement with the kinetics of a martensitic transformation. In conclusion, we report on the progress and

  6. [Analysis of Polarization Characteristics of Wheat and Maize Crops Using Land-Based Remote Sensing Measurements].

    PubMed

    Sid'ko, A F; Botvich, I Yu; Pisman, T I; Shevyrnogov, A P

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents analysis of a study of the polarized component of the reflectance factor (Rq) and the degree of polarization (P) of wheat and maize crops depending on the wavelength. Registration of polarization characteristics was carried out in the field from the elevated work platform at heights of 10 to 18 m in June and July. Measurements were performed using a double-beam spectrophotometer with a polarized light filter attachment, within the spectral range from 400 to 820-nm. The viewing angle was no greater than 20 degree with respect to the nadir. The reflection spectra of wheat and maize crops obtained using a polarizer adjusted to transmit the maximum and minimum amounts of light (R(max) and R(min)) were studied. Based on these reflection spectra polarization characteristics, which. differ in the visible and infrared spectral region, were determined and analyzed.

  7. Practical issues in ultrashort-laser-pulse measurement using frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Trebino, R.

    1996-07-01

    The authors explore several practical experimental issues in measuring ultrashort laser pulses using the technique of frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG). They present a simple method for checking the consistency of experimentally measured FROG data with the independently measured spectrum and autocorrelation of the pulse. This method is a powerful way of discovering systematic errors in FROG experiments. They show how to determine the optimum sampling rate for FROG and show that this satisfies the Nyquist criterion for the laser pulse. They explore the low- and high-power limits to FROG and determine that femtojoule operation should be possible, while the effects of self-phase modulation limit the highest signal efficiency in FROG to 1%. They also show quantitatively that the temporal blurring due to a finite-thickness medium in single-shot geometries does not strongly limit the FROG technique. They explore the limiting time-bandwidth values that can be represented on a FROG trace of a given size. Finally, they report on a new measure of the FROG error that improves convergence in the presence of noise.

  8. Measurement of Electron Beam Polarization from Unstrained Bulk GaAs via Two Photon Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    J L McCarter, T J Gay, J Hansknecht, M Poelker, M L Stutzman

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes measurements of the beam polarization and quantum efficiency for photoemission using two-photon excitation from unstrained bulk GaAs illuminated with pulsed, high intensity 1560nm laser light. Quantum efficiency is linearly proportional to 1560nm peak laser intensity, which was varied in three independent ways, indicating that the emitted electrons are promoted from the valence to the conduction band via two-photon absorption. Beam polarization was measured using a microMott polarimeter, with a value of 16.8(4)% polarization at 1560nm, which is roughly half the measured value of 33.4(8)% using 778 nm light.

  9. Instrumentation for time-resolved dynamic and static dichroic measurements of polymers with a near-IR acoustooptic tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweat, Joseph Allen

    1999-11-01

    The optical measurement of the orientational response of chemical functional groups of a polymer as it is subjected to conventional dynamic mechanical analysis can give insight into the rheological behavior of the polymer while under repetitive strain based on the chemical structure. Instrumentation used in the mid infrared has included the use of grating monochromators and interferometers. The use of a multiply modulated optical signal has decreased the level of noise to observe the small amplitude changes (typically >10-3 absorbance units) associated with the repetitive oscillatory strain. The use of digital signal processing to replace phase sensitive detection for demodulation of the optical signal has greatly reduced the spectral collection time. In addition, multiplexing gained with the use of step-scan interferometry in making time resolved measurements has aided in making the procedure more practical. However, instrumental complexity and expense are drawbacks. By incorporating the high throughput, polarized tuned beam, and rapid wavelength switching capability of an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF), a dynamic instrument with integrated centralized control by a single microprocessor has been built. it operates in the near infrared with a rapid dynamic data collection time and requires the use of only a single modulation in the form of the sample oscillatory strain. The near infrared permits thicker samples to reduce sample preparation tune or allows polymers to be tested without pretreatment. The use of Fourier based digital filtering improves the signal to noise ratio of the dynamic differential spectra. The instrument is cost effective and rugged in comparison to step-scan interferometers yet has a rapid data collection rate allowing use in a routine industrial setting. Information from these measurements can aid in determining the rheological properties necessary for the end use functionality of a polymer. Additionally, AOTF instrumentation can be used

  10. Broad spectral range measurement of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers using spectral interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlubina, P.; Ciprian, D.; Martynkien, T.; Mergo, P.; Urbańczyk, W.

    2011-05-01

    Chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers is measured over a broad spectral range (e.g. 500-1600 nm) using two white-light spectral interferometric techniques. First, a technique employing an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fiber in the test arm is used to measure the wavelength dependence of the differential group effective index, or equivalently the chromatic dispersion of one polarization mode supported by the fiber. Second, a technique employing a tandem configuration of a Michelson interferometer and the optical fiber under test is used to measure the group modal birefringence in the fiber. From these measurements, the chromatic dispersion of the other polarization mode supported by the fiber is retrieved. We measured by these techniques the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in four air-silica holey fibers and revealed the dependence of zero-dispersion wavelength on the geometry of the holey fiber.

  11. Phase-resolved X-ray spectroscopy and spectral energy distribution of the X-ray soft polar RS Caeli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traulsen, I.; Reinsch, K.; Schwope, A. D.; Schwarz, R.; Walter, F. M.; Burwitz, V.

    2014-02-01

    Context. RS Cae is the third target in our series of XMM-Newton observations of soft X-ray-dominated polars. Aims: Our observational campaign aims to better understand and describe the multiwavelength data, the physical properties of the system components, and the short- and long-term behavior of the component fluxes in RS Cae. Methods: We employ stellar atmosphere, stratified accretion-column, and widely used X-ray spectral models. We fit the XMM-Newton spectra, model the multiband light curves, and opt for a mostly consistent description of the spectral energy distribution. Results: Our XMM-Newton data of RS Cae are clearly dominated by soft X-ray emission. The X-ray light curves are shaped by emission from the main accretion region, which is visible over the whole orbital cycle, interrupted only by a stream eclipse. The optical light curves are formed by cyclotron and stream emission. The XMM-Newton X-ray spectra comprise a black-body-like and a plasma component at mean temperatures of 36 eV and 7 keV. The spectral fits give evidence of a partially absorbing and a reflection component. Multitemperature models, covering a broader temperature range in the X-ray emitting accretion regions, reproduce the spectra appropriately well. Including archival data, we describe the spectral energy distribution with a combination of models based on a consistent set of parameters and derive a lower limit estimate of the distance d ≳ 750 pc. Conclusions: The high bolometric soft-to-hard flux ratios and short-term variability of the (X-ray) light curves are characteristic of inhomogeneous accretion. RS Cae clearly belongs in the group of polars that show a very strong soft X-ray flux compared to their hard X-ray flux. The different black-body fluxes and similar hard X-ray and optical fluxes during the XMM-Newton and ROSAT observations show that soft and hard X-ray emission are not directly correlated. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with

  12. Spatially resolved scattering polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Kohlgraf-Owens, Thomas; Dogariu, Aristide

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate a compact, spatially resolved polarimeter based on a coherent optical fiber bundle coupled with a thin layer of scattering centers. The use of scattering for polarization encoding allows the polarimeter to work across broad angular and spectral domains. Optical fiber bundles provide high spatial resolution of the incident field. Because neighboring elements of the bundle interact with the incident field differently, only a single interaction of the fiber bundle with the unknown field is needed to perform the measurement. Experimental results are shown to demonstrate the capability to perform imaging polarimetry. PMID:19412259

  13. Versatile attosecond beamline in a two-foci configuration for simultaneous time-resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Locher, R.; Lucchini, M. Herrmann, J.; Sabbar, M.; Weger, M.; Ludwig, A.; Gallmann, L.; Keller, U.; Castiglioni, L.; Greif, M.; Hengsberger, M.

    2014-01-15

    We present our attoline which is a versatile attosecond beamline at the Ultrafast Laser Physics Group at ETH Zurich for attosecond spectroscopy in a variety of targets. High-harmonic generation (HHG) in noble gases with an infrared (IR) driving field is employed to generate pulses in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral regime for XUV-IR cross-correlation measurements. The IR pulse driving the HHG and the pulse involved in the measurements are used in a non-collinear set-up that gives independent access to the different beams. Single attosecond pulses are generated with the polarization gating technique and temporally characterized with attosecond streaking. This attoline contains two target chambers that can be operated simultaneously. A toroidal mirror relay-images the focus from the first chamber into the second one. In the first interaction region a dedicated double-target allows for a simple change between photoelectron/photoion measurements with a time-of-flight spectrometer and transient absorption experiments. Any end station can occupy the second interaction chamber. A surface analysis chamber containing a hemispherical electron analyzer was employed to demonstrate successful operation. Simultaneous RABBITT measurements in two argon jets were recorded for this purpose.

  14. Multiplexed measurements by time resolved spectroscopy using colloidal CdSe/ZnS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, U.; Jimenez de Aberasturi, D.; Malinowski, R.; Amin, F.; Parak, W. J.; Heimbrodt, W.

    2014-01-27

    Multiplexed measurements of analytes in parallel is a topical demand in bioanalysis and bioimaging. An interesting alternative to commonly performed spectral multiplexing is lifetime multiplexing. In this Letter, we present a proof of principle of single-color lifetime multiplexing by coupling the same fluorophore to different nanoparticles. The effective lifetime of the fluorophores can be tuned by more than one order of magnitude due to resonance energy transfer from donor states. Measurements have been done on a model systems consisting of ATTO-590 dye molecules linked to either gold particles or to CdSe/ZnS core shell quantum dots. Both systems show the same luminescence spectrum of ATTO-590 dye emission in continuous wave excitation, but can be distinguished by means of time resolved measurements. The dye molecules bound to gold particles exhibit a mono-exponential decay with a lifetime of 4.5 ns, whereas the dye molecules bound to CdSe/ZnS dots show a nonexponential decay with a slow component of about 135 ns due to the energy transfer from the quantum dots. We demonstrate the fundamental possibility to determine the mixing ratio for dyes with equal luminescence spectra but very different transients. This opens up a pathway independent of the standard optical multiplexing with many different fluorophores emitting from the near ultraviolet to the near infrared spectral region.

  15. Spectrally resolved cavity ring down measurement of high reflectivity mirrors using a supercontinuum laser source.

    PubMed

    Schmidl, Gabriele; Paa, Wolfgang; Triebel, Wolfgang; Schippel, Stefan; Heyer, Hartmut

    2009-12-10

    We investigate a cavity ring down setup that offers the possibility to measure the spectrally resolved reflectivities of high reflectivity mirrors. The setup consists of a resonator (ring down cavity) and an intensified CCD camera system combined with a spectrograph for spectral resolution. A commercial supercontinuum laser (350-1750 nm) is applied as a compact excitation source. It is based on a photonic crystal fiber that is pumped by a q-switched microchip laser (1.6 ns pulse duration, 25 kHz repetition rate). This combination allows simultaneously recording the transmittance of the cavity over a wide wavelength range determined by the excitation source and the spectral sensitivity of the detector. The photon lifetimes inside the cavity (ring down times) are measured with high spectral resolution by means of an intensified camera system. Subsequently shifting the "gate" of the image intensifier from short to long delay times after the excitation pulse allows calculation of the reflectivity spectrum of the mirrors. Comparison of these results with measurements using a conventional setup (laser diode 675 nm and photomultiplier tube) clearly shows the high potential of the method due to the multichannel excitation and the detection scheme. PMID:20011015

  16. A microreactor array for spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity for high-throughput catalysis science

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratyuk, Petro; Gumuslu, Gamze; Shukla, Shantanu; Miller, James B; Morreale, Bryan D; Gellman, Andrew J

    2013-04-01

    We describe a 100 channel microreactor array capable of spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity across the surface of a flat substrate. When used in conjunction with a composition spread alloy film (CSAF, e.g. Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y}) across which component concentrations vary smoothly, such measurements permit high-throughput analysis of catalytic activity and selectivity as a function of catalyst composition. In the reported implementation, the system achieves spatial resolution of 1 mm{sup 2} over a 10×10 mm{sup 2} area. During operation, the reactant gases are delivered at constant flow rate to 100 points of differing composition on the CSAF surface by means of a 100-channel microfluidic device. After coming into contact with the CSAF catalyst surface, the product gas mixture from each of the 100 points is withdrawn separately through a set of 100 isolated channels for analysis using a mass spectrometer. We demonstrate the operation of the device on a Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} CSAF catalyzing the H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange reaction at 333 K. In essentially a single experiment, we measured the catalytic activity over a broad swathe of concentrations from the ternary composition space of the Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} alloy.

  17. Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance measurements in fluorescence yield

    SciTech Connect

    Marcham, M. K.; Keatley, P. S.; Neudert, A.; Hicken, R. J.; Cavill, S. A.; Shelford, L. R.; van der Laan, G.; Telling, N. D.; Childress, J. R.; Katine, J. A.; Shafer, P.; Arenholz, E.

    2010-10-14

    Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance (XFMR) has been measured in fluorescence yield, extending the application of XFMR to opaque samples on opaque substrates. Magnetization dynamics were excited in a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5) bilayer by means of a continuous wave microwave excitation, while x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra were measured stroboscopically at different points in the precession cycle. By tuning the x-ray energy to the L{sub 3} edges of Ni and Fe, the dependence of the real and imaginary components of the element specific magnetic susceptibility on the strength of an externally applied static bias field was determined. First results from measurements on a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5)/Dy(1) sample confirm that enhanced damping results from the addition of the Dy cap.

  18. Highly resolved measurements of defect evolution under heated-and-shocked conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lanier, N. E.; Workman, J.; Holmes, R. L.; Graham, P.; Moore, A.

    2007-05-15

    One of the principal advantages of a double-shell capsule design is the potential for ignition without requiring cryogenic implosions. These designs compress deuterium fuel by transferring kinetic energy from a laser-ablated outer shell to an inner shell by means of a nearly elastic symmetric collision. However, prior to this collision the inner shell experiences varying levels of preheat such that any nonuniformities can evolve significantly. It is the condition of these perturbations at the time the collision-induced shock compresses the inner shell that ultimately dictates capsule performance. With this in mind, a series of experiments have been performed on the OMEGA laser facility [R. T. Boehly et al., Opt. Comm. 133, 495 (1997)] that produce highly resolved measurements of defect evolution under heated-and-shocked conditions. Tin L-shell radiation is used to heat a layered package of epoxy and foam. The epoxy can be engineered with a variety of surface perturbations or defects. As the system evolves, a strong shock can be introduced with the subsequent hydrodynamic behavior imaged on calibrated film via x-ray radiography. This technique allows density variations of the evolving system to be quantitatively measured. This paper summarizes the hydrodynamic behavior of rectangular gaps under heated conditions with detailed experimental measurements of their residual density perturbations. Moreover, the impact of these residual density perturbations on shock deformation and material flow is discussed.

  19. Multiplexed measurements by time resolved spectroscopy using colloidal CdSe/ZnS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, U.; Jimenez de Aberasturi, D.; Malinowski, R.; Amin, F.; Parak, W. J.; Heimbrodt, W.

    2014-01-01

    Multiplexed measurements of analytes in parallel is a topical demand in bioanalysis and bioimaging. An interesting alternative to commonly performed spectral multiplexing is lifetime multiplexing. In this Letter, we present a proof of principle of single-color lifetime multiplexing by coupling the same fluorophore to different nanoparticles. The effective lifetime of the fluorophores can be tuned by more than one order of magnitude due to resonance energy transfer from donor states. Measurements have been done on a model systems consisting of ATTO-590 dye molecules linked to either gold particles or to CdSe/ZnS core shell quantum dots. Both systems show the same luminescence spectrum of ATTO-590 dye emission in continuous wave excitation, but can be distinguished by means of time resolved measurements. The dye molecules bound to gold particles exhibit a mono-exponential decay with a lifetime of 4.5 ns, whereas the dye molecules bound to CdSe/ZnS dots show a nonexponential decay with a slow component of about 135 ns due to the energy transfer from the quantum dots. We demonstrate the fundamental possibility to determine the mixing ratio for dyes with equal luminescence spectra but very different transients. This opens up a pathway independent of the standard optical multiplexing with many different fluorophores emitting from the near ultraviolet to the near infrared spectral region.

  20. Time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters by means of triple probe

    SciTech Connect

    Qayyum, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, S.; Deeba, Farah; Ali, Rafaqat; Hussain, S.

    2013-12-15

    Triple Langmuir probe (TLP) diagnostic system with its necessary driving circuit is developed and successfully applies for time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters in the negative glow region of pulsating-dc discharge. This technique allows the instantaneous measurement of electron temperature [T{sub −}], electron number density [n{sub −}] as well as plasma fluctuations without any voltage or frequency sweep. In TLP configuration two probes are differentially biased and serve as a floating symmetric double probe whereas the third probe is simply floating into plasma to measure floating potential as a function of time and thus incorporates the effect of plasma fluctuations. As an example of the application to time-dependent plasmas, basic plasma parameters such as floating potential, electron temperature, and electron number density in low pressure air discharge are determined as a function of time for different fill pressure. The results demonstrate temporal evolution of plasma parameters and thus plasma generation progression for different fill pressures.

  1. Measurements of skylight polarization: a case study in urban region with high-loading aerosol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lianghai; Gao, Jun; Fan, Zhiguo; Zhang, Jun

    2015-02-01

    We investigate skylight polarization patterns in an urban region using our developed full-Stokes imaging polarimeter. A detailed description of our imaging polarimeter and its calibration are given, then, we measure skylight polarization patterns at wavelength λ=488  nm and at solar elevation between -05°10' and +35°42' in the city of Hefei, China. We show that in an urban region with high-loading aerosols: (1) the measured degree of linear polarization reaches the maximum near sunset, and large areas of unpolarized sky exist in the forward sunlight direction close to the Sun; (2) the position of neural points shifts from the local meridian plane and, if compared with a clear sky, alters the symmetrical characteristics of celestial polarization pattern; and (3) the observed circular polarization component is negligible. PMID:25967834

  2. Polarization Effects in Optical Coherence Tomography of Various Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Johannes F.; Srinivas, Shyam M.; Park, B. Hyle; Pham, Tuan H.; Chen, Zhongping; Milner, Thomas E.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) was used to obtain spatially resolved ex vivo images of polarization changes in skeletal muscle, bone, skin and brain. Through coherent detection of two orthogonal polarization states of the signal formed by interference of light reflected from the biological sample and a mirror in the reference arm of a Michelson interferometer, the depth resolved change in polarization was measured. Inasmuch as any fibrous structure will influence the polarization of light, PS-OCT is a potentially powerful technique investigating tissue structural properties. In addition, the effects of single polarization state detection on OCT image formation is demonstrated. PMID:25774083

  3. Measurements of the Polarization Properties of Foam Materials Useful for mm-wave Polarimeters Windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, G.; Marchetti, T.; de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.

    2016-08-01

    We have measured in the W-band, using a custom setup, the absorption and polarization properties in transmission of foam materials (elyfoamⓇ, styrodurⓇ, plastazoteⓇ, and propozoteⓇ) useful for windows of mm-wave photometers and polarimeters. The levels of the induced polarization degree and of the absorption are very small, and difficult to measure accurately. We find induced polarization degrees lower than 0.6 %, and transmissions higher than 97 % for few centimeter thicknesses of our samples. We describe the instrumental setup, the measurements, and the impact of our findings in the design of precision polarimeters for Cosmic Microwave Background measurements. All these materials, with the exception of black plastazoteⓇ, feature transmissions higher than 99 %, and induced polarizations lower than ˜1 % for sample thicknesses around 2-3 cm.

  4. Development of Neutron Polarization Measurement System for Studying NN interaction in Nuclear Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, J.; Wakasa, T.; Dozono, M.; Fukunaga, T.; Gotanda, S.; Hatanaka, K.; Kanaya, Y.; Maeda, Y.; Maeda, Y.; Miki, K.; Nishio, Y.; Noro, T.; Ohnaka, K.; Sakaguchi, S.; Sakemi, Y.; Sekiguchi, K.; Tamii, A.; Taguchi, T.; Wada, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We have developed the neutron polarization measurement system to perform the first polarization-transfer measurement for the exclusive (p,np) reaction. For the neutron polarization measurement, we have reconstructed the neutron polarimeter NPOL3. The NPOL3 system has been calibrated by using the polarized neutron from the 2H(p→,n→) reaction, and the resulting effective analyzing power is Ay:eff = 0.127. For the exclusive measurement, the Large Acceptance Spectrometer (LAS) has been used for the recoil proton detection. The energy resolution of 6 MeV is achieved for separation energy, which is sufficient to separate the 1s and 1p orbits for light nuclei.

  5. An update on polar aerosol optical properties using POLAR-AOD and other measurements performed during the International Polar Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasi, Claudio; Lupi, Angelo; Mazzola, Mauro; Stone, Robert S.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; Herber, Andreas; Radionov, Vladimir F.; Holben, Brent N.; Sorokin, Mikhail G.; Sakerin, Sergey M.; Terpugova, Svetlana A.; Sobolewski, Piotr S.; Lanconelli, Christian; Petkov, Boyan H.; Busetto, Maurizio; Vitale, Vito

    2012-06-01

    An updated set of time series of derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström's exponent α from a number of Arctic and Antarctic stations was analyzed to determine the long-term variations of these two parameters. The Arctic measurements were performed at Ny-Ålesund (1991-2010), Barrow (1977-2010) and some Siberian sites (1981-1991). The data were integrated with Level 2.0 AERONET sun-photometer measurements recorded at Hornsund, Svalbard, and Barrow for recent years, and at Tiksi for the summer 2010. The Antarctic data-set comprises sun-photometer measurements performed at Mirny (1982-2009), Neumayer (1991-2004), and Terra Nova Bay (1987-2005), and at South Pole (1977-2010). Analyses of daily mean AOD were made in the Arctic by (i) adjusting values to eliminate volcanic effects due to the El Chichón, Pinatubo, Kasatochi and Sarychev eruptions, and (ii) selecting the summer background aerosol data from those affected by forest fire smoke. Nearly null values of the long-term variation of summer background AOD were obtained at Ny-Ålesund (1991-2010) and at Barrow (1977-2010). No evidence of important variations in AOD was found when comparing the monthly mean values of AOD measured at Tiksi in summer 2010 with those derived from multi-filter actinometer measurements performed in the late 1980s at some Siberian sites. The long-term variations of seasonal mean AOD for Arctic Haze (AH) conditions and AH episode seasonal frequency were also evaluated, finding that these parameters underwent large fluctuations over the 35-year period at Ny-Ålesund and Barrow, without presenting well-defined long-term variations. A characterization of chemical composition, complex refractive index and single scattering albedo of ground-level aerosol polydispersions in summer and winter-spring is also presented, based on results mainly found in the literature. The long-term variation in Antarctic AOD was estimated to be stable, within ±0.10% per year, at the three coastal sites

  6. Structure of collagen adsorbed on a model implant surface resolved by polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Izabella; Habecker, Florian; Ahlers, Michael; Klüner, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    The polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectra of collagen adsorbed on a titania surface and quantum chemical calculations are used to describe components of the amide I mode to the protein structure at a sub-molecular level. In this study, imino acid rich and poor fragments, representing the entire collagen molecule, are taken into account. The amide I mode of the collagen triple helix is composed of three absorption bands which involve: (i) (∼1690 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching modes at unhydrated groups, (ii) (1655-1673 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching at carbonyl groups at imino acids and glycine forming intramolecular hydrogen bonds with H atoms at both NH2 and, unusual for proteins, CH2 groups at glycine at a neighbouring chain and (iii) (∼1640 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching at carbonyl groups forming hydrogen bonds between two, often charged, amino acids as well as hydrogen bonds to water along the entire helix. The IR spectrum of films prepared from diluted solutions (c < 50 μg ml-1) corresponds to solution spectra indicating that native collagen molecules interact with water adsorbed on the titania surface. In films prepared from solutions (c ⩾ 50 μg ml-1) collagen multilayers are formed. The amide I mode is blue-shifted by 18 cm-1, indicating that intramolecular hydrogen bonds at imino acid rich fragments are weakened. Simultaneous red-shift of the amide A mode implies that the strength of hydrogen bonds at the imino acid poor fragments increases. Theoretically predicted distortion of the collagen structure upon adsorption on the titania surface is experimentally confirmed.

  7. Use of Dual Polarization Radar in Validation of Satellite Precipitation Measurements: Rationale and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekar, V.; Hou, Arthur; Smith, Eric; Bringi, V. N.; Rutledge, S. A.; Gorgucci, E.; Petersen, W. A.; SkofronickJackson, Gail

    2008-01-01

    Dual-polarization weather radars have evolved significantly in the last three decades culminating in the operational deployment by the National Weather Service. In addition to operational applications in the weather service, dual-polarization radars have shown significant potential in contributing to the research fields of ground based remote sensing of rainfall microphysics, study of precipitation evolution and hydrometeor classification. Furthermore the dual-polarization radars have also raised the awareness of radar system aspects such as calibration. Microphysical characterization of precipitation and quantitative precipitation estimation are important applications that are critical in the validation of satellite borne precipitation measurements and also serves as a valuable tool in algorithm development. This paper presents the important role played by dual-polarization radar in validating space borne precipitation measurements. Starting from a historical evolution, the various configurations of dual-polarization radar are presented. Examples of raindrop size distribution retrievals and hydrometeor type classification are discussed. The quantitative precipitation estimation is a product of direct relevance to space borne observations. During the TRMM program substantial advancement was made with ground based polarization radars specially collecting unique observations in the tropics which are noted. The scientific accomplishments of relevance to space borne measurements of precipitation are summarized. The potential of dual-polarization radars and opportunities in the era of global precipitation measurement mission is also discussed.

  8. Measures of health sciences journal use: a comparison of vendor, link-resolver, and local citation statistics*

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Sandra L.; Blecic, Deborah D.; Martin, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Libraries require efficient and reliable methods to assess journal use. Vendors provide complete counts of articles retrieved from their platforms. However, if a journal is available on multiple platforms, several sets of statistics must be merged. Link-resolver reports merge data from all platforms into one report but only record partial use because users can access library subscriptions from other paths. Citation data are limited to publication use. Vendor, link-resolver, and local citation data were examined to determine correlation. Because link-resolver statistics are easy to obtain, the study library especially wanted to know if they correlate highly with the other measures. Methods: Vendor, link-resolver, and local citation statistics for the study institution were gathered for health sciences journals. Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients were calculated. Results: There was a high positive correlation between all three data sets, with vendor data commonly showing the highest use. However, a small percentage of titles showed anomalous results. Discussion and Conclusions: Link-resolver data correlate well with vendor and citation data, but due to anomalies, low link-resolver data would best be used to suggest titles for further evaluation using vendor data. Citation data may not be needed as it correlates highly with other measures. PMID:23646026

  9. Measurement of the transport spin polarization of FeV using point-contact Andreev reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, William; Osofsky, Mike; Bussman, Konrad; Parker, David S; Cheng, L

    2013-01-01

    The Fe1 xVx alloy system exhibits the lowest known Gilbert relaxation rate of any ferromagnetic metal or binary alloy with G1 435MHz at x1 427% V. Low relaxation rates are of particular interest in modern spin electronic applications involving spin torque. The transport spin polarization of a series of sputtered epitaxial Fe1 xVx samples was measured using point contact Andreev reflection. Values of the transport spin polarization agree well with those measured for pure Fe and are independent of composition. The results indicate that the substitution of up to 50% of V for Fe does not reduce the spin polarization in the alloy.

  10. Spatially resolved two-color diffusion measurements in human skin applied to transdermal liposome penetration.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Jonathan; Bloksgaard, Maria; Kubiak, Jakub; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2013-05-01

    A multiphoton excitation-based fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy method, Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), was used to measure the local diffusion coefficients of distinct model fluorescent substances in excised human skin. In combination with structural information obtained by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy imaging, the acquired diffusion information was processed to construct spatially resolved diffusion maps at different depths of the stratum corneum (SC). Experiments using amphiphilic and hydrophilic fluorescently labeled molecules show that their diffusion in SC is very heterogeneous on a microscopic scale. This diffusion-based strategy was further exploited to investigate the integrity of liposomes during transdermal penetration. Specifically, the diffusion of dual-color fluorescently labeled liposomes--containing an amphiphilic fluorophore in the lipid bilayer and a hydrophilic fluorophore encapsulated in the liposome lumen--was measured using cross-correlation RICS. This type of experiment allows discrimination between separate (uncorrelated) and joint (correlated) diffusion of the two different fluorescent probes, giving information about liposome integrity. Independent of the liposome composition (phospholipids or transfersomes), our results show a clear lack of cross-correlation below the skin surface, indicating that the penetration of intact liposomes is highly compromised by the skin barrier. PMID:23223136

  11. Velocity measurements in a thermoacoustic refrigerator using Time-Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Poignand, Gaelle; Berson, Arganthael; Jondeau, Emmanuel

    2011-11-01

    A standing-wave thermoacoustic refrigerator consists of a stack of plates placed in an acoustic resonator with two heat exchangers located at each end of the stack. The full understanding of the heat transfer between the stack and the heat exchangers of thermoacoustic systems is a key issue to improve the global efficiency of such devices. The aim of this work is to investigate the generation of vortices near the ends of the stack, which affects heat transfer. The aerodynamic field in the gap between the stack and the heat exchanger is characterized using a time-resolved particle image velocimetry technique. Measurements are performed in a standing-wave refrigerator operating at a frequency of 200 Hz. Instantaneous velocity fields are recorded at a frequency of 3125 Hz (i.e. 15 velocity fields per acoustic period). Measurements show that vortex shedding occurs at high pressure levels, when the nonlinear acoustic regime prevails and they validate previous experiments [Berson & Blanc-Benon, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 2007, 122(4), EL122-127]. The increased viscous dissipation generates additional heating and a loss of efficiency.

  12. Spatially resolved two-color diffusion measurements in human skin applied to transdermal liposome penetration.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Jonathan; Bloksgaard, Maria; Kubiak, Jakub; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2013-05-01

    A multiphoton excitation-based fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy method, Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), was used to measure the local diffusion coefficients of distinct model fluorescent substances in excised human skin. In combination with structural information obtained by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy imaging, the acquired diffusion information was processed to construct spatially resolved diffusion maps at different depths of the stratum corneum (SC). Experiments using amphiphilic and hydrophilic fluorescently labeled molecules show that their diffusion in SC is very heterogeneous on a microscopic scale. This diffusion-based strategy was further exploited to investigate the integrity of liposomes during transdermal penetration. Specifically, the diffusion of dual-color fluorescently labeled liposomes--containing an amphiphilic fluorophore in the lipid bilayer and a hydrophilic fluorophore encapsulated in the liposome lumen--was measured using cross-correlation RICS. This type of experiment allows discrimination between separate (uncorrelated) and joint (correlated) diffusion of the two different fluorescent probes, giving information about liposome integrity. Independent of the liposome composition (phospholipids or transfersomes), our results show a clear lack of cross-correlation below the skin surface, indicating that the penetration of intact liposomes is highly compromised by the skin barrier.

  13. Time-resolved double-slit interference pattern measurement with entangled photons

    PubMed Central

    Kolenderski, Piotr; Scarcella, Carmelo; Johnsen, Kelsey D.; Hamel, Deny R.; Holloway, Catherine; Shalm, Lynden K.; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Resch, Kevin J.; Jennewein, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The double-slit experiment strikingly demonstrates the wave-particle duality of quantum objects. In this famous experiment, particles pass one-by-one through a pair of slits and are detected on a distant screen. A distinct wave-like pattern emerges after many discrete particle impacts as if each particle is passing through both slits and interfering with itself. Here we present a temporally- and spatially-resolved measurement of the double-slit interference pattern using single photons. We send single photons through a birefringent double-slit apparatus and use a linear array of single-photon detectors to observe the developing interference pattern. The analysis of the buildup allows us to compare quantum mechanics and the corpuscular model, which aims to explain the mystery of single-particle interference. Finally, we send one photon from an entangled pair through our double-slit setup and show the dependence of the resulting interference pattern on the twin photon's measured state. Our results provide new insight into the dynamics of the buildup process in the double-slit experiment, and can be used as a valuable resource in quantum information applications. PMID:24770360

  14. Time-resolved double-slit interference pattern measurement with entangled photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolenderski, Piotr; Scarcella, Carmelo; Johnsen, Kelsey D.; Hamel, Deny R.; Holloway, Catherine; Shalm, Lynden K.; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Resch, Kevin J.; Jennewein, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The double-slit experiment strikingly demonstrates the wave-particle duality of quantum objects. In this famous experiment, particles pass one-by-one through a pair of slits and are detected on a distant screen. A distinct wave-like pattern emerges after many discrete particle impacts as if each particle is passing through both slits and interfering with itself. Here we present a temporally- and spatially-resolved measurement of the double-slit interference pattern using single photons. We send single photons through a birefringent double-slit apparatus and use a linear array of single-photon detectors to observe the developing interference pattern. The analysis of the buildup allows us to compare quantum mechanics and the corpuscular model, which aims to explain the mystery of single-particle interference. Finally, we send one photon from an entangled pair through our double-slit setup and show the dependence of the resulting interference pattern on the twin photon's measured state. Our results provide new insight into the dynamics of the buildup process in the double-slit experiment, and can be used as a valuable resource in quantum information applications.

  15. Time-resolved double-slit interference pattern measurement with entangled photons.

    PubMed

    Kolenderski, Piotr; Scarcella, Carmelo; Johnsen, Kelsey D; Hamel, Deny R; Holloway, Catherine; Shalm, Lynden K; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Resch, Kevin J; Jennewein, Thomas

    2014-04-28

    The double-slit experiment strikingly demonstrates the wave-particle duality of quantum objects. In this famous experiment, particles pass one-by-one through a pair of slits and are detected on a distant screen. A distinct wave-like pattern emerges after many discrete particle impacts as if each particle is passing through both slits and interfering with itself. Here we present a temporally- and spatially-resolved measurement of the double-slit interference pattern using single photons. We send single photons through a birefringent double-slit apparatus and use a linear array of single-photon detectors to observe the developing interference pattern. The analysis of the buildup allows us to compare quantum mechanics and the corpuscular model, which aims to explain the mystery of single-particle interference. Finally, we send one photon from an entangled pair through our double-slit setup and show the dependence of the resulting interference pattern on the twin photon's measured state. Our results provide new insight into the dynamics of the buildup process in the double-slit experiment, and can be used as a valuable resource in quantum information applications.

  16. Measurement of the optical properties of rat brain tissue using contact spatially resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gysbrechts, Barbara; Nguyen Do Trong, Nghia; Wang, Ling; Cabral, Henrique; Navratilova, Zaneta; Battaglia, Francesco P.; Saeys, Wouter; Bartic, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, biophotonics is widely used in neuroscience. The effectiveness of biophotonic techniques, such as fluorescence imaging and optogenetics, is affected by the optical properties of the examined tissue. Therefore, knowledge of these properties is essential to carefully plan experiments. Mice and rats are widely used in neuroscience studies. However, reports about optical properties of their brains are very rare. We measured optical absorption μa and reduced scattering μ's coefficients of native rat brain in the visible and near-infrared wavelength region, using contact spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS). In this study, we estimate μa and μ's for the rat cortex and discuss their stability in time. Additionally, variations in optical properties within and between samples were characterized. The results extend the range of known optical properties for the rat cortex, especially in the visible range, relevant to optogenetics. μa and μ's are stable within a time span of four hours, and show low variation in and between brain samples. This indicates that a suitable protocol was used to estimate optical properties of rodent brain tissue. Since contact SRS is a non-destructive method, this technique could be used also to measure μa and μ's in living animals. Moreover, the probe has small dimensions, allowing the characterization of optical properties in different structures of the brain.

  17. Chemically-Resolved Volatility Measurements of Organic Aerosol from Different Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Docherty, K. S.; Mohr, C.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Ziemann, P. J.; Onasch, T. B.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2009-04-01

    A newly modified fast temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD) was coupled to a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) for rapid quantification of chemically-resolved volatility of organic aerosols (OA) emitted from individual sources. The TD-AMS system was used to characterize primary OA (POA) from biomass burning, trash burning surrogates (paper and plastic), and meat cooking as well as chamber-generated secondary OA (SOA) from a-pinene and gasoline vapor. Almost all atmospheric models represent POA as non-volatile, with no allowance for evaporation upon heating or dilution, or condensation upon cooling. Our results indicate that all OAs observed show semi-volatile behavior and that most POAs are at least as volatile as SOA measured in urban environments. Biomass-burning OA (BBOA) exhibited a wide range of volatilities, but more often showed volatility similar to urban OA. Paper-burning resembles BBOA because of its high volatility and intermediate atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratio, while meat-cooking OAs (MCOA) have consistently lower volatility than ambient OA. Chamber-generated SOA was significantly more volatile than urban SOA, challenging extrapolation of traditional laboratory volatility measurements to the atmosphere. Most OAs sampled show increasing O/C ratio and decreasing H/C (hydrogen-to-carbon) ratio with temperature, further indicating that more oxygenated OA components are less volatile.

  18. Time resolved laser induced fluorescence measurements: Considerations when using Nd:YAG based system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabasovic, Maja S.; Sevic, Dragutin; Terzic, Mira; Marinkovic, Bratislav P.

    2012-05-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) and the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) have been shown to be methods which are fast and sensitive to provide information about the constituents in analyzed samples. TR-LIF and LIBS have similar hardware requirements. In this paper, we analyze some characteristics of TR-LIF/LIBS system implemented in our laboratory, considering the fact that the excitation part of the system is based on Nd:YAG laser and Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO). The laser is more than powerful enough (365 mJ at 1064 nm, variable OPO output >5 mJ) for LIBS, but somehow slow (the length of fundamental laser harmonic output pulse is about 5 ns) for fluorescence measurements in our present area of interest, namely plants and food products. Fortunately, the pulse length of tunable OPO output (320-475 nm) is less then 1 ns, so by means of a correct deconvolution procedure it is possible to measure the fluorescence lifetimes in the range as small as a few nanoseconds. The fluorescence detection part of our system is based on picosecond streak camera. Using the fluorescent dyes (Rhodamine B and Fluorescein) ethanol solutions we verified the analyzing capabilities of our TR-LIF system.

  19. Highly resolved measurements of atmospheric turbulence with the new 2d-Atmospheric Laser Cantilever Anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeromin, A.; Schaffarczyk, A. P.; Puczylowski, J.; Peinke, J.; Hölling, M.

    2014-12-01

    For the investigation of atmospheric turbulent flows on small scales a new anemometer was developed, the so-called 2d-Atmospheric Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-ALCA). It performs highly resolved measurements with a spatial resolution in millimeter range and temporal resolution in kHz range, thus detecting very small turbulent structures. The anemometer is a redesign of the successfully operating 2d-LCA for laboratory application. The new device was designed to withstand hostile operating environments (rain and saline, humid air). In February 2012, the 2d-ALCA was used for the first time in a test field. The device was mounted in about 53 m above ground level on a lattice tower near the German North Sea coast. Wind speed was measured by the 2d-ALCA at 10 kHz sampling rate and by cup anemometers at 1 Hz. The instantaneous wind speed ranged from 8 m/s to 19 m/s at an average turbulence level of about 7 %. Wind field characteristics were analyzed based on cup anemometer as well as 2d-ALCA. The combination of both devices allowed the study of atmospheric turbulence over several magnitudes in turbulent scales.

  20. Soft x-ray resonant magneto-optical kerr effect as a depth-sensitive probe of magnetic heterogeneity: its application to resolve helical spin structures using linear p polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ki-Suk; Kim, Sang-Koog; Kortright, J.B.

    2004-06-01

    We have calculated the soft x-ray resonant Kerr intensities as a function of the incident grazing angle of linearly p-polarized waves from the model spin structures, where the chirality (handedness) of the spin spirals (twist in depth) in a magnetic layer and the periodicity of a unit spiral are designed to vary. Variations in the chirality and the periodicity lead to noticeable changes in the Kerr intensity versus the grazing angle, which is due not only to a large sensitivity of the Kerr intensity of the linear p polarization to both the magnitude and direction of the transverse components of magnetizations, but also to a large dependence of the depth sensitivity on the grazing angle at the resonance regions. The measurement and analysis of the specular Kerr intensity are relatively straightforward in determining the inhomogeneous spin structures in depth, compared to those of the Kerr rotation and ellipticity. This is proven to be a convenient and useful probe to determine the handedness of spin spiral structures, as well as to resolve the detailed magnetic heterostructures in depth in ultrathin-layered films.

  1. Supercontinuum based absorption spectrometer for cycle-resolved multiparameter measurements in a rapid compression machine.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Kleindienst, Stefan; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2016-06-10

    A broadband supercontinuum (SC) based absorption spectrometer capable of cycle-resolved multiparameter measurements at internal combustion (IC) engine conditions is presented. Three parameters, temperature, pressure and water mole fraction, were extracted from broadband near-infrared H2O absorption spectra, spanning the wavelength-range from 1340 to 1405.5 nm, which exhibits a large number of specific H2O transitions. The spectrometer is based on spatial domain detection and features a near-infrared line scan camera as a detector. Measurements were performed during a compression cycle of a rapid compression machine comprising a pressure and temperature range from 2.5 to 65 bar and 300 to 900 K, respectively. With the new spectrometer, we are for the first time, based on the authors' knowledge, able to perform measurements based on SC radiation over a complete compression and expansion stroke at measurement rates up to 50 kHz. A detailed overview is provided about the best match algorithm between theory and experiments, including parameters from two different spectral databases, namely the Barber-Tennyson database (BT2) and HITRAN2012. The results indicate that spectral broadening effects are not properly described by theory, especially at pressure levels exceeding 20 bar, which culminates in a clear underestimation of the derived pressure data by SC absorption spectroscopy. Nevertheless, temperature can be determined accurately by performing a three-parameter fit based on water mole fraction, temperature, and pressure. In contrast, making use of pressure transducer data as look-up values and varying only temperature and H2O mole fraction to find the best match leads to a clear overestimation of temperature at elevated pressures. PMID:27409013

  2. Supercontinuum based absorption spectrometer for cycle-resolved multiparameter measurements in a rapid compression machine.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Kleindienst, Stefan; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2016-06-10

    A broadband supercontinuum (SC) based absorption spectrometer capable of cycle-resolved multiparameter measurements at internal combustion (IC) engine conditions is presented. Three parameters, temperature, pressure and water mole fraction, were extracted from broadband near-infrared H2O absorption spectra, spanning the wavelength-range from 1340 to 1405.5 nm, which exhibits a large number of specific H2O transitions. The spectrometer is based on spatial domain detection and features a near-infrared line scan camera as a detector. Measurements were performed during a compression cycle of a rapid compression machine comprising a pressure and temperature range from 2.5 to 65 bar and 300 to 900 K, respectively. With the new spectrometer, we are for the first time, based on the authors' knowledge, able to perform measurements based on SC radiation over a complete compression and expansion stroke at measurement rates up to 50 kHz. A detailed overview is provided about the best match algorithm between theory and experiments, including parameters from two different spectral databases, namely the Barber-Tennyson database (BT2) and HITRAN2012. The results indicate that spectral broadening effects are not properly described by theory, especially at pressure levels exceeding 20 bar, which culminates in a clear underestimation of the derived pressure data by SC absorption spectroscopy. Nevertheless, temperature can be determined accurately by performing a three-parameter fit based on water mole fraction, temperature, and pressure. In contrast, making use of pressure transducer data as look-up values and varying only temperature and H2O mole fraction to find the best match leads to a clear overestimation of temperature at elevated pressures.

  3. Time-resolved autofluorescence measurements for the differentiation of lung tissue states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Lutz; Schmalzigaug, K.; Paul, Rene; Lichey, J.; Kemnitz, Klaus; Fink, Frank

    1995-12-01

    The fluorescence properties of fluorophores relevant in tissue metabolism (NADH, flavines, etc.) are characteristic of the clinical states of tissues. Especially the differentiation of healthy, cancerous, and necrotic tissue states is of large interest in lung-tumor diagnostics, e.g. to ensure that biopsies are taken from non-necrotic areas. In contrast to the common fluorescence detection our approach provides both a combination of spectral and time information from autofluorescence and the simultaneous detection of two fluorophores in order to improve differentiation between various tissues. The basis of analysis of autofluorescence is knowledge of the photophysical parameters of the fluorophores. Aqueous solutions of NADH, flavines and their mixtures have been investigated using the method of time-correlated single photon counting. The fluorescence was recorded with a new 'delay-line' microchannel-plate photomultiplier tube, that enables time- and wavelength-resolved measurements simultaneously. Nicotine-adenine-dinucleotide (NADH) and flavine-adenin-dinucleotide (FAD) display their characteristic temporal behavior (NADH: (tau) 1 equals 250 ps, (tau) 2 equals 660 ps; FAD: (tau) 1 equals 160 ps, (tau) 2 equals 2.25 ns, (tau) 3 equals 4.6 ns) in aqueous solution. In a mixture of NADH and FAD both components could be isolated by using global analytical methods. Time-gated fluorescence measurements on lung-tissue samples of 12 patients immediately after surgical resection have been performed with a fiber- based fluorescence detector. It could be demonstrated that NADH measurements are suitable for differentiating tumorous and necrotic tissue while flavine measurements are suitable for differentiating healthy and non-healthy tissue types. Applications of optical fibers facilitate simple combinations of the detection method with common surgical instruments (e.g. biopsy needles).

  4. Development and application of an instrument for spatially resolved Seebeck coefficient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakutayev, Andriy; Luciano, Frank J.; Bollinger, Vincent P.; Sigdel, Ajaya K.; Ndione, Paul F.; Perkins, John D.; Berry, Joseph J.; Parilla, Philip A.; Ginley, David S.

    2013-05-01

    The Seebeck coefficient is a key indicator of the majority carrier type (electrons or holes) in a material. The recent trend toward the development of combinatorial materials research methods has necessitated the development of a new high-throughput approach to measuring the Seebeck coefficient at spatially distinct points across any sample. The overall strategy of the high-throughput experiments is to quickly identify the region of interest on the sample at some expense of accuracy, and then study this region by more conventional techniques. The instrument for spatially resolved Seebeck coefficient measurements reported here relies on establishing a temperature difference across the entire compositionally graded thin-film and consecutive mapping of the resulting voltage as a function of position, which facilitates the temperature-dependent measurements up to 400 °C. The results of the designed instrument are verified at ambient temperature to be repeatable over 10 identical samples and accurate to within 10% versus conventional Seebeck coefficient measurements over the -100 to +150 μV/K range using both n-type and p-type conductive oxides as test cases. The developed instrument was used to determine the sign of electrical carriers of compositionally graded Zn-Co-O and Ni-Co-O libraries prepared by combinatorial sputtering. As a result of this study, both cobalt-based materials were determined to have p-type conduction over a broad single-phase region of chemical compositions and small variation of the Seebeck coefficient over the entire investigated range of compositions and temperature.

  5. Linear polarization measurements of Comet C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy) from STEREO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, W. T.

    2015-11-01

    The spectacular Kreutz sungrazing comet C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy) was well observed by the coronagraphs aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the twin Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft during both the inbound and outbound passages about perihelion on 16 December 2011. The combination of the two STEREO viewpoints covers a large range of phase angles for which the polarization dependence can be measured. Extremely large polarization levels were measured for Comet Lovejoy, ranging from -15 ± 3% in the negative branch at low phase angles, to as much as 58% or more in the positive branch. To the best of our knowledge, these high polarization levels are completely unprecedented. The negative branch extends to larger phase angles than usual, with the highest negative polarization occurring around 35°, and the transition from negative to positive polarization occurring around 45-50°. Stratification along the tail was also detected, with the degree of polarization increasing with greater distance from the nucleus. Although cometary dust grains are typically modeled as aggregates, we speculate based on results available in the literature that these observations can be best explained by nearly spherical or somewhat aspherical magnesium-rich silicate particles stratified by size, with size distributions characterized by effective size parameters ranging from xeff = 2-3 near the nucleus to xeff < 1 farther back in the tail. However, additional modeling would be needed to better understand the implications of these unusual polarization measurements.

  6. Ultrashort coherence times in partially polarized stationary optical beams measured by two-photon absorption.

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, Andriy; Roussey, Matthieu; Friberg, Ari T; Setälä, Tero

    2015-11-30

    We measure the recently introduced electromagnetic temporal degree of coherence of a stationary, partially polarized, classical optical beam. Instead of recording the visibility of intensity fringes, the spectrum, or the polarization characteristics, we introduce a novel technique based on two-photon absorption. Using a Michelson interferometer equipped with polarizers and a specific GaAs photocount tube, we obtain the two fundamental quantities pertaining to the fluctuations of light: the degree of coherence and the degree of polarization. We also show that the electromagnetic intensity-correlation measurements with two-photon absorption require that the polarization dynamics, i.e., the time evolution of the instantaneous polarization state, is properly taken into account. We apply the technique to unpolarized and polarized sources of amplified spontaneous emission (Gaussian statistics) and to a superposition of two independent, narrow-band laser beams of different mid frequencies (non-Gaussian statistics). For these two sources femtosecond-range coherence times are found that are in good agreement with the traditional spectral measurements. Although previously employed for laser pulses, two-photon absorption provides a new physical principle to study electromagnetic coherence phenomena in classical and quantum continuous-wave light at extremely short time scales.

  7. Ultrashort coherence times in partially polarized stationary optical beams measured by two-photon absorption.

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, Andriy; Roussey, Matthieu; Friberg, Ari T; Setälä, Tero

    2015-11-30

    We measure the recently introduced electromagnetic temporal degree of coherence of a stationary, partially polarized, classical optical beam. Instead of recording the visibility of intensity fringes, the spectrum, or the polarization characteristics, we introduce a novel technique based on two-photon absorption. Using a Michelson interferometer equipped with polarizers and a specific GaAs photocount tube, we obtain the two fundamental quantities pertaining to the fluctuations of light: the degree of coherence and the degree of polarization. We also show that the electromagnetic intensity-correlation measurements with two-photon absorption require that the polarization dynamics, i.e., the time evolution of the instantaneous polarization state, is properly taken into account. We apply the technique to unpolarized and polarized sources of amplified spontaneous emission (Gaussian statistics) and to a superposition of two independent, narrow-band laser beams of different mid frequencies (non-Gaussian statistics). For these two sources femtosecond-range coherence times are found that are in good agreement with the traditional spectral measurements. Although previously employed for laser pulses, two-photon absorption provides a new physical principle to study electromagnetic coherence phenomena in classical and quantum continuous-wave light at extremely short time scales. PMID:26698754

  8. High-accuracy linear and circular polarization measurements at 21 cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pater, I.; Weiler, K. W.

    1982-01-01

    New high-accuracy linear and circular polarization measurements have been obtained for 27 small-diameter radio sources, using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope at 21 cm (1415 MHz). From these and other observed properties of the sources, estimates of the average internal magnetic field strengths in the sources are made by applying the uniform synchrotron emission model to the measured circular polarization and by using equipartition arguments. These two values are compared and found to be in agreement to within an order of magnitude, as was previously found by Weiler and de Pater (1980). Also, the magnetic fields estimated from circular polarization measurements at two different wavelengths (49 and 21 cm) are compared and found to be in rough agreement, but with indications of differences between variable and nonvariable sources. A comparison of the magnitudes of linear and circular polarization in sources shows no correlations.

  9. ABSOLUTE MEASUREMENT OF THE POLARIZATION OF HIGH ENERGY PROTON BEAMS AT RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    MAKDISI,Y.; BRAVAR, A. BUNCE, G. GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The spin physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) requires knowledge of the beam polarization to better than 5%. Such a goal is made the more difficult by the lack of knowledge of the analyzing power of high energy nuclear physics processes. To overcome this, a polarized hydrogen jet target was constructed and installed at one intersection region in RHIC where it intersects both beams and utilizes the precise knowledge of the jet atomic hydrogen beam polarization to measure the analyzing power in proton-proton elastic scattering in the Nuclear Coulomb Interference (CNI) region at the prescribed RHIC proton beam energy. The reverse reaction is used to assess the absolute beam polarization. Simultaneous measurements taken with fast high statistics polarimeters that measure the p-Carbon elastic scattering process also in the CNI region use the jet results to calibrate the latter.

  10. First Measurement of the Linear Polarization of Radiative Electron Capture Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Tashenov, S.; Stoehlker, Th.; Gumberidze, A.; Hagmann, S.; Spillmann, U.; Banas, D.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Beyer, H. F.; Bosch, F.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Fritzsche, S.; Surzhykov, A.; Krings, T.; Protic, D.; Sierpowski, D.

    2006-12-01

    For radiative electron capture into the K shell of bare uranium ions, a study of the polarization properties has been performed. For this purpose a position sensitive germanium detector has been used as an efficient Compton polarimeter. This enabled us to measure the degree of linear polarization by analyzing Compton scattering inside the detector and to determine the orientation of the polarization plane. Depending on the observation angle and the beam energy used, the radiation is found to be linearly polarized by up to 80%. In all cases studied, the plane of polarization coincides with the collision plane. The results will be discussed in the context of rigorous relativistic calculations, showing that relativistic effects tend to lead to a depolarization of the radiation emitted.

  11. Measurements and simulations of polarization states of underwater light in clear oceanic waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yu; Tonizzo, Alberto; Gilerson, Alexander A.; Cummings, Molly E.; Brady, Parrish; Sullivan, James M.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Dierssen, Heidi M.; Ahmed, Samir A.; Kattawar, George W.

    2011-08-01

    Polarization states of the underwater light field were measured by a hyperspectral and multiangular polarimeter and a video polarimeter under various atmospheric, surface, and water conditions, as well as solar and viewing geometries, in clear oceanic waters near Port Aransas, Texas. Some of the first comprehensive comparisons were made between the measured polarized light, including the degree and angle of linear polarization and linear Stokes parameters (Q and U), and those from Monte Carlo simulations that used concurrently measured water inherent optical properties and particle volume scattering functions as input. For selected wavelengths in the visible spectrum, measured and model-simulated polarization characteristics were found to be consistent in most cases. Measured degree and angle of linear polarization are found to be largely determined by an in-water single-scattering model. Model simulations suggest that the degree of linear polarization (DoLP) at horizontal viewing directions is highly dependent on the viewing azimuth angle for a low solar elevation. This implies that animals can use the DoLP signal for orientation.

  12. Prospect of polarization measurements from black hole binaries in their thermal state with a scattering polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Chandreyee; Paul, Biswajit

    2011-07-01

    X-ray polarization measurement is a unique tool which may provide crucial information regarding the emission mechanism and the geometry of various astrophysical sources, such as neutron stars, accreting black holes, pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants etc., and can help us to probe matter under extreme magnetic fields and extreme gravitational fields. Although the three other domains of X-ray astronomy, i.e. timing, spectral and imaging are well developed, there has been very little progress in X-ray polarimetry with only one definitive polarization measurement and a few upper limits available so far. Radiation from accreting black holes in their thermal-dominated (high soft) state is expected to be polarized due to scattering in the plane-parallel atmosphere of the disc. Furthermore, special and general relativistic effects in the innermost parts of the disc predict energy-dependent rotation in the plane of polarization and some distinct signatures which can be used as a probe for measuring the parameters of the black hole, like its spin, emissivity profile and the angle of inclination of the system. We present the results from an analysis of expected minimum detectable polarization from some of the galactic black hole binaries, GRO J1655-40, GX 339-4, H1743-322, Cygnus X-1 and XTE J1817-330, in their thermal-dominated state with a proposed Thomson X-ray polarimeter. A proposal for a scattering polarimeter has been submitted to the Indian Space Research Organization for a dedicated small satellite mission and a laboratory unit has been built. Along with the measurement of the degree of polarization, the polarization angle measurement is also important, hence the error in the polarization angle measurement for a range of detection significance is also obtained.

  13. Time-resolved temperature and O atom measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in combustible mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanier, Suzanne; Bowman, Sherrie; Burnette, David; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents results of time-resolved rotational temperature measurements, by pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and absolute O atom number density measurements, by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence. The experiments were conducted in nanosecond pulse discharges in H2-O2-Ar and C2H4-O2-Ar mixtures, initially at room temperature, operated at a high pulse repetition rate of 40 kHz, in a plane-to-plane double dielectric barrier geometry at a pressure of 40 Torr. Intensified charge-coupled device images show that O2-Ar and H2-O2-Ar plasmas remain diffuse and volume-filling during the entire burst. Images taken in C2H4-O2-Ar plasma demonstrate significant discharge filamentation and constriction along the center plane and in the corners of the test section. The experimental results demonstrate high accuracy of pure rotational psec CARS for thermometry measurements at low partial pressures of oxygen in nonequilibrium plasmas. The results are compared with kinetic modeling calculations, using two different H2-O2 chemistry and C2H4-O2 chemistry mechanisms. In H2-O2-Ar mixtures, the kinetic modeling predictions are in fairly good agreement with the data, predicting temperature rise and O atom accumulation in long discharge bursts, up to 450 pulses. The results show that adding hydrogen to the mixture results in an additional temperature rise, due to its partial oxidation by radicals generated in the plasma, essentially without chain branching. In C2H4-O2-Ar mixtures, the model consistently underpredicts both temperature and O atom number density. The most likely reason for the difference between the experimental data and model predictions is discharge filamentation developing when ethylene is added to the O2-Ar mixture, at fairly low temperatures.

  14. Measurement of vascular water transport in human subjects using time-resolved pulsed arterial spin labelling.

    PubMed

    Bibic, Adnan; Knutsson, Linda; Schmidt, Anders; Henningsson, Erik; Månsson, Sven; Abul-Kasim, Kasim; Åkeson, Jonas; Gunther, Matthias; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Wirestam, Ronnie

    2015-08-01

    Most approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) data analysis aim to provide a quantitative measure of the cerebral blood flow (CBF). This study, however, focuses on the measurement of the transfer time of blood water through the capillaries to the parenchyma (referred to as the capillary transfer time, CTT) as an alternative parameter to characterise the haemodynamics of the system. The method employed is based on a non-compartmental model, and no measurements need to be added to a common time-resolved ASL experiment. Brownian motion of labelled spins in a potential was described by a one-dimensional general Langevin equation as the starting point, and as a Fokker-Planck differential equation for the averaged distribution of labelled spins at the end point, which takes into account the effects of flow and dispersion of labelled water by the pseudorandom nature of the microvasculature and the transcapillary permeability. Multi-inversion time (multi-TI) ASL data were acquired in 14 healthy subjects on two occasions in a test-retest design, using a pulsed ASL sequence and three-dimensional gradient and spin echo (3D-GRASE) readout. Based on an error analysis to predict the size of a region of interest (ROI) required to obtain reasonably precise parameter estimates, data were analysed in two relatively large ROIs, i.e. the occipital lobe (OC) and the insular cortex (IC). The average values of CTT in OC were 260 ± 60 ms in the first experiment and 270 ± 60 ms in the second experiment. The corresponding IC values were 460 ± 130 ms and 420 ± 139 ms, respectively. Information related to the water transfer time may be important for diagnostics and follow-up of cerebral conditions or diseases characterised by a disrupted blood-brain barrier or disturbed capillary blood flow.

  15. Noise sensitivity in frequency-resolved optical-gating measurements of ultrashort pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D.N.; DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R.; Ladera, C.L.

    1995-10-01

    Frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), a technique for measuring ultrashort laser pulses, involves producing a spectrogram of the pulse and then retrieving the pulse intensity and phase with an iterative algorithm. We study how several types of noise---multiplicative, additive, and quantization---affect pulse retrieval. We define a convergence criterion and find that the algorithm converges to a reasonable pulse field, even in the presence of 10% noise. Specifically, with appropriate filtering, 1% rms retrieval error is achieved for 10% multiplicative noise, 10% additive noise, and as few as 8 bits of resolution. For additive and multiplicative noise the retrieval errors decrease roughly as the square root of the amount of noise. In addition, the background induced in the wings of the pulse by additive noise is equal to the amount of additive noise on the trace. Thus the dynamic range of the measured intensity and phase is limited by a noise floor equal to the amount of additive noise on the trace. We also find that, for best results, a region of zero intensity should surround the nonzero region of the trace. Consequently, in the presence of additive noise, baseline subtraction is important. We also find that Fourier low-pass filtering improves pulse retrieval without introducing significant distortion, especially in high-noise cases. We show that the field errors in the temporal and the spectral domains are equal. Overall, the algorithm performs well because the measured trace contains {ital N}{sup 2} data points for a pulse that has only 2{ital N} degrees of freedom; FROG has built in redundancy. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital Optical} {ital Society} {ital of} {ital America}.

  16. Straining and wrinkling processes during turbulence-premixed flame interaction measured using temporally-resolved diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Adam M.; Driscoll, James F.

    2009-12-15

    The dynamical processes of flame surface straining and wrinkling that occur as turbulence interacts with a premixed flame were measured using cinema-stereoscopic PIV (CS-PIV) and orthogonal-plane cinema-stereoscopic PIV (OPCS-PIV). These diagnostics provided temporally resolved measurements of turbulence-flame interaction at frame rates of up to 3 kHz and spatial resolutions as small as 280{mu} m. Previous descriptions of flame straining and wrinkling have typically been derived based on a canonical interaction between a pair of counter-rotating vortices and a planar flame surface. However, it was found that this configuration did not properly represent real turbulence-flame interaction. Interactions resembling the canonical configuration were observed in less than 10% of the recorded frames. Instead, straining and wrinkling were generally caused more geometrically complex turbulence, consisting of large groups of structures that could be multiply curved and intertwined. The effect of the interaction was highly dependent on the interaction geometry. Furthermore, even when the turbulence did exist in the canonical geometry, the straining and wrinkling of the flame surface were not well characterized by the vortical structures. A new mechanistic description of the turbulence-flame interaction was therefore identified and confirmed by the measurements. In this description, flame surface straining is caused by coherent structures of fluid-dynamic strain-rate (strain-rate structures). The role of vortical structures is to curve existing flame surface, creating wrinkles. By simultaneously considering both forms of turbulent structure, turbulence-flame interactions in both the canonical configuration and more complex geometries could be understood. (author)

  17. Measurement of complicated temperature-dependent polarization of multiferroic RMn2O5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukunaga, Mamoru; Noda, Yukio

    2011-09-01

    We have measured the temperature-dependent electric polarization P(T) of multiferroic rare-earth (R) manganese oxides RMn2O5 using both typical pyroelectric measurements and hysteresis loops with the double-wave method (DWM), and revealed the complicated behavior of the P(T). RMn2O5 single crystal samples often exhibit a tendency to macroscopically polarize without applying an external electric field. We have found that the tendency appeared in P(T) by the pyroelectric measurement can be measured by the DWM loops. The tendency to polarize is equivalent to asymmetric non-hystersis loops obtained by the DWM. We clarify the relationship between P(T) by pyroelectric measurement and that by the DWM loops, which can warrant the measured P(T).

  18. Passive remote sensing of aerosol layer height using near-UV multiangle polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lianghai; Hasekamp, Otto; Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Cairns, Brian; Yorks, John E.; Chowdhary, Jacek

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that multiangle polarization measurements in the near-UV and blue part of the spectrum are very well suited for passive remote sensing of aerosol layer height. For this purpose we use simulated measurements with different setups (different wavelength ranges, with and without polarization, different polarimetric accuracies) as well as airborne measurements from the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) obtained over the continental USA. We find good agreement of the retrieved aerosol layer height from RSP with measurements from the Cloud Physics Lidar showing a mean absolute difference of less than 1 km. Furthermore, we found that the information on aerosol layer height is provided for large part by the multiangle polarization measurements with high accuracy rather than the multiangle intensity measurements. The information on aerosol layer height is significantly decreased when the shortest RSP wavelength (410 nm) is excluded from the retrieval and is virtually absent when 550 nm is used as shortest wavelength.

  19. Analysis of polarization characteristics of plant canopies using ground-based remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sid'ko, A. F.; Botvich, I. Yu.; Pisman, T. I.; Shevyrnogov, A. P.

    2014-09-01

    The paper presents results and analysis of a study on polarized characteristics of the reflectance factor of different plant canopies under field conditions, using optical remote sensing techniques. Polarization characteristics were recorded from the elevated work platform at heights of 10-18 m in June and July. Measurements were performed using a double-beam spectrophotometer with a polarized light filter attachment, within the spectral range from 400 to 820 nm. The viewing zenith angle was below 20 degree. Birch (Betila pubescens), pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), wheat (Triticum acstivum) [L.] crops, corn (Zea mays L. ssp. mays) crops, and various grass canopies were used in this study. The following polarization characteristics were studied: the reflectance factor of the canopy with the polarizer adjusted to transmit the maximum and minimum amounts of light (Rmax and Rmin), polarized component of the reflectance factor (Rq), and the degree of polarization (Р). Wheat, corn, and grass canopies have higher Rmax and Rmin values than forest plants. The Rq and P values are higher for the birch than for the pine within the wavelength range between 430 and 740 nm. The study shows that polarization characteristics of plant canopies may be used as an effective means of decoding remote sensing data.

  20. Frequency-resolved optical gating measurement of ultrashort pulses by using single nanowire.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiaxin; Liao, Feng; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    The use of ultrashort pulses for fundamental studies and applications has been increasing rapidly in the past decades. Along with the development of ultrashort lasers, exploring new pulse diagnositic approaches with higher signal-to-noise ratio have attracted great scientific and technological interests. In this work, we demonstrate a simple technique of ultrashort pulses characterization with a single semiconductor nanowire. By performing a frequency-resolved optical gating method with a ZnO nanowire coupled to tapered optical microfibers, the phase and amplitude of a pulse series are extracted. The generated signals from the transverse frequency conversion process can be spatially distinguished from the input, so the signal-to-noise ratio is improved and permits lower energy pulses to be identified. Besides, since the nanometer scale of the nonlinear medium provides relaxed phase-matching constraints, a measurement of 300-nm-wide supercontinuum pulses is achieved. This system is highly compatible with standard optical fiber systems, and shows a great potential for applications such as on-chip optical communication. PMID:27609521

  1. The role of delay times in subcycle-resolved probe retardation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reislöhner, Jan; Pfeiffer, Adrian N.

    2016-02-01

    The delay in the nonlinear response of matter to intense laser pulses has been studied since a long time regarding its nuclear contribution. In contrast, the electronic part of the nonlinear response in wide-band-gap dielectrics, which is usually dominant, is not well explored regarding its delay, and previous studies have revealed that the timescale is below 1 fs. Here, the influence of delay times on the recently introduced method of subcycle-resolved probe retardation measurements is investigated using a simulation. In the model assumed, the electronic nonlinearity is divided into the third order Kerr effect and the plasma contribution due to conduction band population in the strong laser field. In the regime of close-to-collinear pump-probe geometries, the probe retardation shows both π- and 2π-oscillations in the pump-probe delay. Sub-femtosecond delay times influence the phase of the oscillations significantly, but it remains difficult to distinguish the influence of the Kerr response from the plasma contribution.

  2. Reprint of: The role of delay times in subcycle-resolved probe retardation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reislöhner, Jan; Pfeiffer, Adrian N.

    2016-08-01

    The delay in the nonlinear response of matter to intense laser pulses has been studied since a long time regarding its nuclear contribution. In contrast, the electronic part of the nonlinear response in wide-band-gap dielectrics, which is usually dominant, is not well explored regarding its delay, and previous studies have revealed that the timescale is below 1 fs. Here, the influence of delay times on the recently introduced method of subcycle-resolved probe retardation measurements is investigated using a simulation. In the model assumed, the electronic nonlinearity is divided into the third order Kerr effect and the plasma contribution due to conduction band population in the strong laser field. In the regime of close-to-collinear pump-probe geometries, the probe retardation shows both π- and 2π-oscillations in the pump-probe delay. Sub-femtosecond delay times influence the phase of the oscillations significantly, but it remains difficult to distinguish the influence of the Kerr response from the plasma contribution.

  3. Resolving meso-scale seabed variability using reflection measurements from an autonomous underwater vehicle.

    PubMed

    Holland, Charles W; Nielsen, Peter L; Dettmer, Jan; Dosso, Stan

    2012-02-01

    Seabed geoacoustic variability is driven by geological processes that occur over a wide spectrum of space-time scales. While the acoustics community has some understanding of horizontal fine-scale geoacoustic variability, less than O(10(0)) m, and large-scale variability, greater than O(10(3)) m, there is a paucity of data resolving the geoacoustic meso-scale O(10(0)-10(3)) m. Measurements of the meso-scale along an ostensibly "benign" portion of the outer shelf reveal three classes of variability. The first class was expected and is due to horizontal variability of layer thicknesses: this was the only class that could be directly tied to seismic reflection data. The second class is due to rapid changes in layer properties and/or boundaries, occurring over scales of meters to hundreds of meters. The third class was observed as rapid variations of the angle/frequency dependent reflection coefficient within a single observation and is suggestive of variability at scales of meter or less. Though generally assumed to be negligible in acoustic modeling, the second and third classes are indicative of strong horizontal geoacoustic variability within a given layer. The observations give early insight into possible effects of horizontal geoacoustic variability on long-range acoustic propagation and reverberation. PMID:22352482

  4. Resolving meso-scale seabed variability using reflection measurements from an autonomous underwater vehicle.

    PubMed

    Holland, Charles W; Nielsen, Peter L; Dettmer, Jan; Dosso, Stan

    2012-02-01

    Seabed geoacoustic variability is driven by geological processes that occur over a wide spectrum of space-time scales. While the acoustics community has some understanding of horizontal fine-scale geoacoustic variability, less than O(10(0)) m, and large-scale variability, greater than O(10(3)) m, there is a paucity of data resolving the geoacoustic meso-scale O(10(0)-10(3)) m. Measurements of the meso-scale along an ostensibly "benign" portion of the outer shelf reveal three classes of variability. The first class was expected and is due to horizontal variability of layer thicknesses: this was the only class that could be directly tied to seismic reflection data. The second class is due to rapid changes in layer properties and/or boundaries, occurring over scales of meters to hundreds of meters. The third class was observed as rapid variations of the angle/frequency dependent reflection coefficient within a single observation and is suggestive of variability at scales of meter or less. Though generally assumed to be negligible in acoustic modeling, the second and third classes are indicative of strong horizontal geoacoustic variability within a given layer. The observations give early insight into possible effects of horizontal geoacoustic variability on long-range acoustic propagation and reverberation.

  5. Frequency-resolved Raman for transient thermal probing and thermal diffusivity measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyu; Xu, Shen; Hurley, David H; Yue, Yanan; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-01-01

    A new transient Raman thermal probing technique, frequency-resolved Raman (FR-Raman), is developed for probing the transient thermal response of materials and measuring their thermal diffusivity. The FR-Raman uses an amplitude-modulated square-wave laser for simultaneous material heating and Raman excitation. The evolution profile of Raman properties: intensity, Raman wavenumber, and emission, against frequency are reconstructed and used for fitting to determine the thermal diffusivity. A microscale silicon (Si) cantilever is used to investigate the capacity of this new technique. The thermal diffusivity is determined as 9.57×10-5  m2/s, 11.00×10-5  m2/s, and 9.02×10-5  m2/s via fitting Raman intensity, wavenumber, and total Raman emission, respectively. The results agree well with literature data. The FR-Raman provides a novel way for transient thermal probing with very high temporal resolution and micrometer-scale spatial resolution.

  6. Spectroscopy and optically stimulated luminescence of Al2O3:C using time-resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukihara, E. G.; McKeever, S. W. S.

    2006-10-01

    This paper reports the observation of ultraviolet (UV) emission at 335nm in the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of carbon-doped aluminum oxide (Al2O3:C) and presents results on the investigation of the OSL properties of this band, including its dose response, time dependence after irradiation, and dependence of the OSL signal on the type of radiation. Time-resolved OSL measurements were used to separate the UV emission band from the dominant OSL emission band of Al2O3:C, namely, the F-center luminescence at 420nm. A comparison of the OSL properties of the UV and F-center emission bands is important for various dosimetric applications because the relative contribution of the UV and F-center emissions to the OSL signal varies with readout technique and optical filters used in the readout equipment. The UV emission band is found to show an ionization density dependence that is different from the dependence observed for the F-center emission, and an increase in intensity with time elapsed after beta irradiation. These results are relevant for OSL dosimetry of radiation fields containing heavy charged particles, such as the space radiation field and the secondary fields created by interactions of matter with energetic neutrons, as well as for understanding of the basic OSL mechanism in Al2O3:C.

  7. Time-resolved inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurements with individual, monodisperse drop sample introduction.

    PubMed

    Dziewatkoski, M P; Daniels, L B; Olesik, J W

    1996-04-01

    Individual ion clouds, each produced in the ICP from a single drop of sample, were monitored using time-resolved mass spectrometry and optical emission spectrometry simultaneously. The widths of the ion clouds in the plasma as a function of distance from the point of initial desolvated particle vaporization in the ICP were estimated. The Li(+) cloud width (full width at halfmaximum) varied from 85 to 272 μs at 3 and 10 mm from the apparent vaporization point, respectively. The Sr(+) cloud width varied from 97 to 142 μs at 5 and 10 mm from the apparent vaporization point, respectively. The delays between optical and mass spectrometry signals were used to measure gas velocities in the ICP. The velocity data could then be used to convert ion cloud peak widths in time to cloud sizes in the ICP. Li(+) clouds varied from 2.1 to 6.6 mm (full width at half-maximum) and Sr(+) clouds varied from 2.4 to 3.5 mm at the locations specified above. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from experimental data to be 88, 44, and 24 cm(2)/s for Li(+), Mg(+), and Sr(+), respectively. The flight time of ions from the sampling orifice of the mass spectrometer to the detector were mass dependent and varied from 13 to 21 μs for Mg(+) to 93 to 115 μs for Pb(+).

  8. High-Speed Hopping: Time-Resolved Tomographic PIV Measurements of Water Flea Swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D. W.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2012-11-01

    Daphniids, also known as water fleas, are small, freshwater crustaceans that live in a low-to-intermediate Reynolds number regime. These plankters are equipped with a pair of branched, setae-bearing antennae that they beat to impulsively propel themselves, or ``hop,'' through the water. A typical hop carries the daphniid one body length forward and is followed by a period of sinking. We present time-resolved tomographic PIV measurements of swimming by Daphnia magna. The body kinematics and flow physics of the daphniid hop are quantified. It is shown that the flow generated by each stroking antenna resembles an asymmetric viscous vortex ring. It is proposed that the flow produced by the daphniid hop can be modeled as a double Stokeslet consisting of two impulsively applied point forces separated by the animal width. The flow physics are discussed in the context of other species operating in the same Reynolds number range of 10 to 100: sea butterfly swimming and flight by the smallest flying insects.

  9. Measuring the Properties of Void Galaxies in Environmental COntext (ECO) using RESOLVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez, Jonathan; Berlind, Andreas A.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Gonzalez, Roberto; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila; Resolve

    2015-01-01

    We measure the environmental dependence of multiple galaxy properties inside the Environmental COntext survey focusing primarily on void galaxies for this project. We define void galaxies to be ~5% of galaxies having the lowest local density, where density is determined using the Nth nearest neighbor method. We examine the stellar mass, color, fractional stellar mass growth rate (FSMGR), fractional gas mass determined from a photometric gas fraction relation calibrated with the RESOLVE survey, and morphology distributions of the void galaxy population and compare them to those of galaxies in other large-scale structures (such as filaments or clusters). First, we show that our void galaxies typically have lower stellar masses than galaxies in denser environments, and they display the properties expected of a lower stellar mass population: they have late-types, are bluer, have higher FSMGR, and are more gas rich. Since color, star-formation, gas content, and morphology all correlate with stellar mass, we therefore move on to control for stellar mass and investigate the extent to which void galaxies are different at fixed mass. We show that void galaxies are indeed bluer and slightly more star forming at fixed stellar mass than galaxies in other environments. We also show that the ratio of blue early types to red early types is higher inside voids than in any other environment.

  10. Time-resolved stereo PIV measurements of shock-boundary layer interaction on a supercritical airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Axel; Klaas, Michael; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2012-03-01

    Time-resolved stereo particle-image velocimetry (TR-SPIV) and unsteady pressure measurements are used to analyze the unsteady flow over a supercritical DRA-2303 airfoil in transonic flow. The dynamic shock wave-boundary layer interaction is one of the most essential features of this unsteady flow causing a distinct oscillation of the flow field. Results from wind-tunnel experiments with a variation of the freestream Mach number at Reynolds numbers ranging from 2.55 to 2.79 × 106 are analyzed regarding the origin and nature of the unsteady shock-boundary layer interaction. Therefore, the TR-SPIV results are analyzed for three buffet flows. One flow exhibits a sinusoidal streamwise oscillation of the shock wave only due to an acoustic feedback loop formed by the shock wave and the trailing-edge noise. The other two buffet flows have been intentionally influenced by an artificial acoustic source installed downstream of the test section to investigate the behavior of the interaction to upstream-propagating disturbances generated by a defined source of noise. The results show that such upstream-propagating disturbances could be identified to be responsible for the upstream displacement of the shock wave and that the feedback loop is formed by a pulsating separation of the boundary layer dependent on the shock position and the sound pressure level at the shock position. Thereby, the pulsation of the separation could be determined to be a reaction to the shock motion and not vice versa.

  11. Spatially resolved measurements of electron cyclotron resonance ion source beam profile characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2011-03-15

    Simulations predict that the concentric rings and the triangular structures in the profiles of strongly focused ion beams that are found in different experiments should be dominated by ion species with the same or at least similar m/q-ratio. To verify these theoretical predictions we have tuned our ECR ion source to deliver a beam consisting of multiple ion species whose particular m/q-depending focusing ranges from weakly focused to overfocused. We then recorded spatially resolved charge-state distributions of the beam profile at characteristic positions in the plane perpendicular to the beam line. The results validate theoretical predictions and are summarized in this paper. To achieve the required beam profile characteristics we moved the extraction along the beam line to achieve stronger focusing than by only changing the extraction voltage. To fit the regions of interest of the beam profile into the transmission area of the sector magnet, we steered the beam by moving the extraction in the plane perpendicular to the beam axis. The results of both investigations, beam focusing and beam steering by using a 3D-movable extraction, are also reported in this paper. A brief overview of the new beam monitor extensively used during these measurements, the Faraday cup array, is also given.

  12. Frequency-resolved optical gating measurement of ultrashort pulses by using single nanowire.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiaxin; Liao, Feng; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    The use of ultrashort pulses for fundamental studies and applications has been increasing rapidly in the past decades. Along with the development of ultrashort lasers, exploring new pulse diagnositic approaches with higher signal-to-noise ratio have attracted great scientific and technological interests. In this work, we demonstrate a simple technique of ultrashort pulses characterization with a single semiconductor nanowire. By performing a frequency-resolved optical gating method with a ZnO nanowire coupled to tapered optical microfibers, the phase and amplitude of a pulse series are extracted. The generated signals from the transverse frequency conversion process can be spatially distinguished from the input, so the signal-to-noise ratio is improved and permits lower energy pulses to be identified. Besides, since the nanometer scale of the nonlinear medium provides relaxed phase-matching constraints, a measurement of 300-nm-wide supercontinuum pulses is achieved. This system is highly compatible with standard optical fiber systems, and shows a great potential for applications such as on-chip optical communication.

  13. Frequency-resolved optical gating measurement of ultrashort pulses by using single nanowire

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jiaxin; Liao, Feng; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    The use of ultrashort pulses for fundamental studies and applications has been increasing rapidly in the past decades. Along with the development of ultrashort lasers, exploring new pulse diagnositic approaches with higher signal-to-noise ratio have attracted great scientific and technological interests. In this work, we demonstrate a simple technique of ultrashort pulses characterization with a single semiconductor nanowire. By performing a frequency-resolved optical gating method with a ZnO nanowire coupled to tapered optical microfibers, the phase and amplitude of a pulse series are extracted. The generated signals from the transverse frequency conversion process can be spatially distinguished from the input, so the signal-to-noise ratio is improved and permits lower energy pulses to be identified. Besides, since the nanometer scale of the nonlinear medium provides relaxed phase-matching constraints, a measurement of 300-nm-wide supercontinuum pulses is achieved. This system is highly compatible with standard optical fiber systems, and shows a great potential for applications such as on-chip optical communication. PMID:27609521

  14. Frequency-resolved optical gating measurement of ultrashort pulses by using single nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiaxin; Liao, Feng; Gu, Fuxing; Zeng, Heping

    2016-09-01

    The use of ultrashort pulses for fundamental studies and applications has been increasing rapidly in the past decades. Along with the development of ultrashort lasers, exploring new pulse diagnositic approaches with higher signal-to-noise ratio have attracted great scientific and technological interests. In this work, we demonstrate a simple technique of ultrashort pulses characterization with a single semiconductor nanowire. By performing a frequency-resolved optical gating method with a ZnO nanowire coupled to tapered optical microfibers, the phase and amplitude of a pulse series are extracted. The generated signals from the transverse frequency conversion process can be spatially distinguished from the input, so the signal-to-noise ratio is improved and permits lower energy pulses to be identified. Besides, since the nanometer scale of the nonlinear medium provides relaxed phase-matching constraints, a measurement of 300-nm-wide supercontinuum pulses is achieved. This system is highly compatible with standard optical fiber systems, and shows a great potential for applications such as on-chip optical communication.

  15. Time-Resolved Aluminum Monoxide Emission Measurements in Laser-Induced Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, David; Parigger, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Laser-induced plasmas are useful for diagnostic applications in a wide variety of fields. One application is the creation of laser-induced plasmas on the surface of an aluminum sample to simulate an aluminized flame. In this study, aluminum monoxide emissions are measured to characterize the temperature along the laser-induced plasma as a function of time delay following laser-induced optical breakdown. The breakdown event is achieved by focusing 1064 nanometer laser radiation from an Nd:YAG laser onto the surface of an aluminum sample. Light from the plasma is dispersed with the use of a Czerny-Turner spectrograph, and time resolved emission spectra are recorded with an intensified, gated detector. Temperatures are inferred from the diatomic molecular emissions by fitting the experimentally collected to theoretically calculated spectra using a Nelder-Mead algorithm. For computation of synthetic spectra we utilize accurate line strengths for selected AlO molecular bands. Atomic emissions from aluminum are also investigated in our study of laser-induced plasma.

  16. Calculation of smoke plume mass from passive UV satellite measurements by GOME-2 polarization measurement devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M. J. M.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Wagner, T.; Fromm, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Wallow wildfire of 2011 was one of the most devastating fires ever in Arizona, burning over 2,000 km2 in the states of Arizona and New Mexico. The fire originated in the Bear Wallow Wilderness area in June, 2011, and raged for more than a month. The intense heat of the fire caused the formation of a pyro-convective cloud. The resulting smoke plume, partially located above low-lying clouds, was detected by several satellite instruments, including GOME-2 on June 2. The UV Aerosol Index, indicative of aerosol absorption, reached a maximum of 12 on that day, pointing to an elevated plume with moderately absorbing aerosols. We have performed extensive model calculations assuming different aerosol optical properties to determine the total aerosol optical depth of the plume. The plume altitude, needed to constrain the aerosol optical depth, was obtained from independent satellite measurements. The model results were compared with UV Aerosol Index and UV reflectances measured by the GOME-2 polarization measurement devices, which have a spatial resolution of roughly 10x40 km2. Although neither the exact aerosol optical properties nor optical depth can be obtained with this method, the range in aerosol optical depth values that we calculate, combined with the assumed specific extinction mass factor of 5 m2/kg lead us to a rough estimate of the smoke plume mass that cannot, at present, be assessed in another way.

  17. Limits on the size of aerosols from measurements of linear polarization in Titan’s atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasko, M. G.; Doose, L. R.; Dafoe, L. E.; See, C.

    2009-11-01

    The Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) instrument on the Huygens probe into the atmosphere of Titan yielded information on the size, shape, optical properties, and vertical distribution of haze aerosols in the atmosphere of Titan [Tomasko, M.G., Doose, L., Engel, S., Dafoe, L.E., West, R., Lemmon, M., Karkoschka, E., 2008. Planet. Space Sci. 56, 669-707] from photometric and spectroscopic measurements of sunlight in Titan's atmosphere. This instrument also made measurements of the degree of linear polarization of sunlight in two spectral bands centered at 491 and 934 nm. Here we present the calibration and reduction of the polarization measurements and compare the polarization observations to models using fractal aggregate particles which have different sizes for the small dimension (monomer size) of which the aggregates are composed. We find that the Titan aerosols produce very large polarizations perpendicular to the scattering plane for scattering near 90° scattering angle. The size of the monomers is tightly constrained by the measurements to a radius of 0.04 ± 0.01 μm at altitudes from 150 km to the surface. The decrease in polarization with decreasing altitude observed in red and blue light is as expected by increasing dilution due to multiple scattering at decreasing altitudes. There is no indication of particles that produce small amounts of linear polarization at low altitudes.

  18. Measurement of proton polarization in the d({gamma},p)n reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.F.; Jackson, H.E.; Jones, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    A proposal was approved by CEBAF PAC7 to measure angular distributions of the proton polarization for the d({gamma},p)n reaction in the GeV region. This proposed measurement will test the validity of extensions of conventional nuclear-physics theories to the higher energy regime. The results of the experiment will further constrain the evidence from SLAC experiments NE8 and NE17 that asymptotic scaling was observed above a photon energy of 1.3 GeV. Photoproton polarization measurements at lower energy indicate that the magnitude of the polarization increases with energy. This is consistent with the observation that polarizations are large in high-energy processes, e.g. A{sub nn} in pp {yields} pp scattering or A{sub y} in pp {yields} {pi}{sup 0}X. However, the polarizations in hadron-hadron scattering are believed to arise from Landshoff mechanisms. The higher energy photoproton experiment will permit the first measurements of polarization for a reaction, {gamma}d {yields} pn, where there are no Landshoff terms. The experiment would make use of a polarimeter installed in either the High Resolution Spectrometer in Hall A or the Short Orbit Spectrometer in Hall C at CEBAF.

  19. Measurement of inhomogeneous absorptive organic media with polarization interferometric confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Kohei; Egami, Chikara

    2015-06-01

    Polarization interferometric confocal microscope has been developed for high-precision measurement, especially for inhomogeneous organic media doped with nonlinear chromophores. The microscope has a novel contrast-enhancing technique: suppressing the background electric field with polarization interferometer. With this technique, the microscope has allowed optical anisotropy detection in a submicron area (400 nm × 400 nm), even with a low-cost and low-power continuous-wave (CW) laser light source. In particular, the microscope clearly distinguishes between isotropic and anisotropic regions. According to polarization interferometric ellipsometry, the microscope produces inspection images showing planer distribution of the optical parameter directly.

  20. Time-resolved measurements of aerosol elemental concentrations in indoor working environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žitnik, M.; Kastelic, A.; Rupnik, Z.; Pelicon, P.; Vaupetič, P.; Bučar, K.; Novak, S.; Samardžija, Z.; Matsuyama, S.; Catella, G.; Ishii, K.

    2010-12-01

    We have measured the elemental concentrations in aerosols with a 2-h time resolution in two different types of working environment: a chemistry laboratory dealing with the processing of advanced nanoparticulate materials and a medium-sized machine workshop. Non-stop 10-day and 12-day samplings were performed at each location in order to determine the concentration trends during the non-working/working and weekday/weekend periods. Supplementary measurements of PM10 aerosols with a 2-day sample collection time were performed with a standard Gent PM10 sampler to compare the elemental concentrations with the time-averaged concentrations detected by the 2D step-sampler. The concentrations were determined a posteriori by analyzing the x-ray spectra of aerosol samples emitted after 3-MeV proton bombardment. The PM10 samples collected in the chemistry laboratory were additionally inspected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to determine the chemical compositions of the individual particles. In the workshop, a total PM10 mass sampling was performed simultaneously with a minute resolution to compare the signal with typical outdoor PM10 concentration levels. A factor analysis of the time-resolved dataset points to six and eight factors in the chemistry laboratory and the machine workshop, respectively. These factors describe most of the data variance, and their composition in terms of different elements can be related to specific indoor activities and conditions. We were able to demonstrate that the elemental concentration sampling with hourly resolution is an excellent tool for studying the indoor air pollution. While sampling the total PM10 mass concentration with a minute resolution may lack the potential to identify the emission sources in a "noisy" environment, the time averaging on a day time scale is too coarse to cope with the working dynamics, even if elemental sensitivity is an option.

  1. Rotational diffusion of receptors for epidermal growth factor measured by time-resolved phosphorescence depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zidovetzki, Raphael; Johnson, David A.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Jovin, Thomas M.

    1991-06-01

    The cell surface receptor for epidermal growth factor (EGFR) is one of the most studied integral membrane proteins. The receptor is widely distributed in cells and tissues of mammalian and avian tissues and plays an important role in growth control. Binding of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) to EGFR initiates a complex biological response, which includes self-phosphorylation of the receptor due to an intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, phosphorylation of other membrane proteins, increased intake of metabolites, and increased proliferation. Complete amino acid sequence of EGFR revealed a high degree of homology with viral oncogenes and allowed tentative identification of an external hormone binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic domain that includes tyrosine kinase activity. EGF binding induces rapid aggregation of EGFR, a process which was also observed on other receptor systems. These and other observations led to a hypothesis that microaggregation of EGFR is a necessary prerequisite for the biological response of EGF. A direct approach to study the processes of oligomerization of cell membrane proteins is to measure their mobility under various conditions. The lateral mobility of the EGFR was studied on mouse 3T3 fibroblasts and on A431 cells. However, an examination of the equations for the lateral and rotational diffusion in membranes shows that only rotational diffusion is strongly dependent on the size of the diffusing entity. A method of measuring protein rotational diffusion by time-resolved phosphorescence has proved to be very useful in the analysis of both in vivo and in vitro systems. The authors apply this method to study the mobility of EGFR on living A431 cells and membrane preparations.

  2. A SCR Model Calibration Approach with Spatially Resolved Measurements and NH3 Storage Distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Xiaobo; Parker, Gordon G.; Johnson, John H.; Naber, Jeffrey D.; Pihl, Josh A.

    2014-11-27

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a technology used for reducing NO x emissions in the heavy-duty diesel (HDD) engine exhaust. In this study, the spatially resolved capillary inlet infrared spectroscopy (Spaci-IR) technique was used to study the gas concentration and NH3 storage distributions in a SCR catalyst, and to provide data for developing a SCR model to analyze the axial gaseous concentration and axial distributions of NH3 storage. A two-site SCR model is described for simulating the reaction mechanisms. The model equations and a calculation method was developed using the Spaci-IR measurements to determine the NH3 storage capacity andmore » the relationships between certain kinetic parameters of the model. Moreover, a calibration approach was then applied for tuning the kinetic parameters using the spatial gaseous measurements and calculated NH3 storage as a function of axial position instead of inlet and outlet gaseous concentrations of NO, NO2, and NH3. The equations and the approach for determining the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst and a method of dividing the NH3 storage capacity between the two storage sites are presented. It was determined that the kinetic parameters of the adsorption and desorption reactions have to follow certain relationships for the model to simulate the experimental data. Finally, the modeling results served as a basis for developing full model calibrations to SCR lab reactor and engine data and state estimator development as described in the references (Song et al. 2013a, b; Surenahalli et al. 2013).« less

  3. Polarization properties and Earth-based radar measurements of Venus in the post-Magellan era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    Studies of the polarization properties of reflected radar signals provide information about wavelength-scale surface and subsurface irregularities and can place constraints on the scattering models used to explain anomalously high backscatter cross sections, such as those measured for the surfaces of the icy Galilean satellites. The JPL aircraft-mounted synthetic aperture radars (SAR) provide cross-section and polarization information for terrestrial terrain types. Comparison of these measurements with results from the Magellan mission is helping to relate volcanic flow types on Venus to terrestrial equivalents. Unfortunately, the Magellan SAR transmits and receives a single linear polarization so that information concerning the polarization properties is dependent on past and future observations from the Earth, primarily with the 12.6-cm wavelength (the same as Magellan) radar system on the Arecibo telescope.

  4. Polarization lidar operation for measuring backscatter phase matrices of oriented scatterers.

    PubMed

    Hayman, Matthew; Spuler, Scott; Morley, Bruce; VanAndel, Joseph

    2012-12-31

    We describe implementation and demonstration of a polarization technique adapted for lidar to measure all unique elements of the volume backscatter phase matrix. This capability allows for detection of preferential orientation within a scattering volume, and may improve scattering inversions on oriented ice crystals. The technique is enabled using a Mueller formalism commonly employed in polarimetry, which does not require the lidar instrument be polarization preserving. Instead, the accuracy of the polarization measurements are limited by the accuracy of the instrument characterization. A high spectral resolution lidar at the National Center for Atmospheric Research was modified to demonstrate this polarization technique. Two observations where the instrument is tilted off zenith are presented. In the first case, the lidar detects flattened large raindrops oriented along the same direction due to drag forces from falling. The second case is an ice cloud approximately 5 km above lidar base that contains preferentially oriented ice crystals in a narrow altitude band.

  5. Xi0 and anti-Xi0 Polarization Measurements at 800-GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Abouzaid, E.; Alavi-Harati, A.; Alexopoulos, T.; Arenton, M.; Barker, A.R.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Blucher, E.; Bock, G.J.; Bright, S.; Cheu, E.; /Arizona U. /UCLA /Campinas State U. /Chicago U., EFI /Colorado U. /Elmhurst Coll. /Fermilab /Osaka U. /Rice U. /Sao Paulo U. /Virginia U.

    2006-08-01

    The polarization of {Xi}{sup 0} and {bar {Xi}}{sup 0} hyperons produced by 800 GeV/c protons on a BeO target at a fixed targeting angle of 4.8 mrad is measured by the KTeV experiment at Fermilab. The result of 9.7% for {Xi}{sup 0} polarization shows no significant energy dependence when compared to a result obtained at 400 GeV/c production energy and at twice the targeting angle. The polarization of the {Xi}{sup 0} is measured for the first time and found to be consistent with zero. They also examine the dependence of polarization on production p{sub t}.

  6. Measuring the self-healing of the spatially inhomogeneous states of polarization of vector Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milione, Giovanni; Dudley, Angela; Nguyen, Thien An; Chakraborty, Ougni; Karimi, Ebrahim; Forbes, Andrew; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    We experimentally measured the self-healing of the spatially inhomogeneous states of polarization of vector Bessel beams. Radially and azimuthally polarized vector Bessel beams were experimentally generated via a digital version of Durnin's method, using a spatial light modulator in concert with a liquid crystal q-plate. As a proof of principle, their intensities and spatially inhomogeneous states of polarization were experimentally measured using Stokes polarimetry as they propagated through two disparate obstructions. It was found, similar to their intensities, that their spatially inhomogeneous states of polarization self-healed. The self-healing can be understood via geometric optics, i.e., the interference of the unobstructed conical rays in the shadow region of the obstruction, and may have applications in, for example, optical trapping.

  7. Measurements in polar stratospheric clouds over Antarctica in September 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshler, Terry

    1991-01-01

    The results of six balloon flights at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, under varying temperature conditions, are used in a study of polar stratospheric clouds during Sept. 1989. A particle counter, with size resolution in the 0.5 micron radius region, indicates that cloud size distributions are always bimodal. Mode radii ranging from 0.05 to 0.10 microns were observed for the small particle mode, representing the sulfate layer or condensational growth enhancements of it. The data are not inconsistent with the expected increase in size with decreasing temperature of the small particle mode in the sulfate layer owing to deliquescence although this phenomenon is often masked by nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) condensation when temperatures are sufficiently low. Mode radii generally ranged from 1.5 to 3.5 micron for the large particle mode at concentrations 3 to 4 orders of magnitude lower than the small particle mode. The large particle mode, which normally comprises most of the mass, is presumably caused by NAT condensation on larger particles of the sulfate layer and indicates HNO3 mixing ratios of 1 to 5 ppbv for most of the cloud layers observed, suggesting substantial denitrification. On several occasions, distributions were observed with mode radii as high as 7 microns, and correspondingly large inferred mass, indicating water ice clouds in the 12 to 15 km region. On other occasions, absence of such clouds at very low temperatures indicated water vapor mixing ratios of less than 3 ppmv suggesting dehydration. Generally, the inferred HNO3 mixing ratios were higher in the lower stratosphere, suggesting redistribution through particle sedimentation.

  8. Spectrally resolving single-shot polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Knitter, Sebastian; Hellwig, Tim; Kues, Michael; Fallnich, Carsten

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrate a spectrally resolving single-shot polarimeter. The system consists of a commercial imaging spectrograph, modified by a birefringent wedge and a segmented polarizer. The physical operating principle and limitations of the apparatus as well as preliminary polarimetric measurements on the emission of random lasers are reported. PMID:21847155

  9. [A New Strategy of Spectrum and Polarization Measuring based on LCVR and AOTF].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao-li; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Zhi-bin; Wen, Ting-dun; Li, Ke-wu

    2015-08-01

    In view of the existing relatively cumbersome polarization measurement method of using liquid crystal phase variable retarder (LCVR) and acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF), a new strategy of spectrum and polarization measurement is put forward. This method removed mechanical movement and reduced the amount of phase delay from four groups to two groups. This method realizes the spectrum and polarization measurements by measuring the plus and minus 1 level diffraction light of the system with two LCVR, one AOTF and two same version detectors. For the polarization measurement of a particular wavelength, the computer controlled LCVR driving voltage to achieve the required phase delay in accordance with the requirements of the wavelength, it also controlled the driving frequency to implement the required wavelength selection of AOTF. Because of the different driving frequencies of AOTF corresponding to the different wavelengths, so it can get the spectral information by scanning the whole frequency bands, In this paper detailed principles are deduced and the polarization model of AOTF is analyzed, it also deduced the measurement formula of I, Q, U in the corresponding Stokes parameter through the theoretical calculation Muller matrix of the LCVR and AOTF. Finally it analyzed and simulated the measurement error of the whole system which was caused by the tiny deviation of phase delay, the simulation results show that relative error <3% when the phase delay amount within the range of ±π/100. This experiment proved the feasibility and accuracy of the measurement system, the results show that the error of the measuring system overall <6%. This study provides a new method of polarization measurement which is simple, feasible and precise, it has important application value. PMID:26672326

  10. Uncertainty minimization in NMR measurements of dynamic nuclear polarization of a proton target for nuclear physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Dustin M.

    2013-11-01

    A comprehensive investigation into the measurement uncertainty in polarization produced by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization is outlined. The polarization data taken during Jefferson Lab experiment E08-007 is used to obtain error estimates and to develop an algorithm to minimize uncertainty of the measurement of polarization in irradiated View the ^14NH_3 targets, which is readily applied to other materials. The target polarization and corresponding uncertainties for E08-007 are reported. The resulting relative uncertainty found in the target polarization is determined to be less than or equal to 3.9%.

  11. Measurements of Spin Observables in Pseudoscalar-Meson Photoproduction Using Polarized Neutrons in Solid HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageya, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Psuedo-scalar meson photo production measurements have been carried out with longitudinally-polarized neutrons using the circularly and linearly polarized photon beams and the CLAS at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jlab). The experiment aims to obtain a complete set of spin observables on an efficient neutron target. Preliminary E asymmetries for the exclusive reaction, γ + n(p) → π- + p(p), selecting quasi free neutron kinematics are discussed.

  12. Measurement of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in optical fibres using white-light spectral interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlubina, P.; Ciprian, D.; Kadulová, M.

    2010-04-01

    We report on a white-light interferometric technique for a broad spectral range measurement (e.g. 500-1600 nm) of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in short-length optical fibres. The technique utilizes an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fibre under test of known length inserted in one of the interferometer arms and the other arm with adjustable path length. We record a series of spectral interferograms by VIS-NIR and NIR fibre-optic spectrometers to measure the equalization wavelength as a function of the path length difference, or equivalently the differential group index dispersion of one polarization mode. The differential group dispersion of the other polarization mode is obtained from measurement of the group modal birefringence dispersion. We verify the applicability of the method by measuring the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in a birefringent holey fibre. We apply a five-term power series fit to the measured data and confirm by its differentiation that the chromatic dispersion agrees well with that specified by the manufacturer. We also measure by this technique the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in an elliptical-core fibre.

  13. Retinal nerve fiber layer retardation measurements using a polarization-sensitive fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Yasufumi; Okazaki, Yoshio; Shioiri, Takashi; Iida, Yukio; Kikuta, Hisao; Shirakashi, Motohiro; Yaoeda, Kiyoshi; Abe, Haruki; Ohnuma, Kazuhiko

    2011-07-01

    To measure the retardation distribution of the optic retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) from a single image, we have developed a new polarization analysis system that is able to detect the Stokes vector using a fundus camera. The polarization analysis system is constructed with a CCD area image sensor, a linear polarizing plate, a microphase plate array, and a circularly polarized light illumination unit. In this system, the Stokes vector expressing the whole state of polarization is detected, and the influence of the background scattering in the retina and of the retardation caused by the cornea are numerically eliminated. The measurement method is based on the hypothesis that the retardation process of the eye optics can be quantified by a numerical equation that consists of a retardation matrix of all the polarization components. We show the method and the measurement results for normal eyes. Our results indicate that the present method may provide a useful means for the evaluation of retardation distribution of the RNFL.

  14. Direct Photon Production and Gluon Polarization Measurements in Proton-Proton Collisions at PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feege, Nils; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Direct photons probe the hard scattering process in proton-proton collisions. The channel that dominates their production in these collisions is ``the inverse QCD Compton effect,'' g + q --> γ + q . Calculating this process requires no photon fragmentation function, which facilitates comparisons between theories and experiments. In polarized p+p collisions, direct photons help determine the proton spin structure. At leading order, the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry ALL is directly proportional to the product of quark and gluon polarizations. The polarized quark distributions are known from polarized lepton-proton scattering experiments. Using them together with ALL measurements allows to access both the magnitude and sign of the polarized gluon distribution. The PHENIX experiment has collected data from polarized p+p collisions at RHIC at center of mass energies of 200 GeV and 500 GeV. This talk presents the status of direct photon cross section measurements and ALL measurements at midrapidity (| η | < 0 . 35) using these data.

  15. CIV Polarization Measurements using a Vacuum Ultraviolet Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Gary, G. Allen; Cirtain, Jonathan; David, John; Kobayashi, Ken; Pietraszewski, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) is developing a Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Fabry-P rot Interferometer that will be launched on a sounding rocket for high throughput, high-cadence, extended field of view CIV (155nm) measurements. These measurements will provide (i) Dopplergrams for studies of waves, oscillations, explosive events, and mass motions through the transition region, and, (ii), polarization measurements to study the magnetic field in the transition region. This paper will describe the scientific goals of the instrument, a brief description of the optics and the polarization characteristics of the VUV Fabry P rot.

  16. Polar stratospheric cloud measurements by means of depolarization lidar in the Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanutti, L.

    1991-02-01

    POLE (Polar Ozone Lidar Experiment) is a cooperative project between the French and Italian services. It was started with the implementation of a first depolarization backscattering lidar for measurements both of background stratospheric aerosols and Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). A complex Ozone lidar was also installed which will replace the backscattering system and extend its measurements to tropospheric and stratospheric Ozone and to stratospheric and mesospheric temperatures. This new system allows also the measurement of the backscattered and depolarized signal produced by PSCs and background aerosols. The depolarization technique seemed to be quite efficient in the detection of different types of PSCs.

  17. Polar stratospheric cloud measurements by means of depolarization lidar in the Antarctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanutti, L.

    1991-01-01

    POLE (Polar Ozone Lidar Experiment) is a cooperative project between the French and Italian services. It was started with the implementation of a first depolarization backscattering lidar for measurements both of background stratospheric aerosols and Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). A complex Ozone lidar was also installed which will replace the backscattering system and extend its measurements to tropospheric and stratospheric Ozone and to stratospheric and mesospheric temperatures. This new system allows also the measurement of the backscattered and depolarized signal produced by PSCs and background aerosols. The depolarization technique seemed to be quite efficient in the detection of different types of PSCs.

  18. Measurement of displacement and distance with a polarization phase shifting folded Twyman Green interferometer.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sanjib; Kumar, Y Pavan

    2015-11-20

    A Sagnac interferometer (SI), consisting of a polarization beam splitter (PBS), along with two equally spaced plane mirrors that are inclined at 45° to each other, is transformed into a folded Twyman Green interferometer (TGI) by placing a mirrored parallel plate (MPP) into the hypotenuse arm of the SI. The converging input beam produced by a telescope objective (TO) is split into reflected (s-polarized) and transmitted (p-polarized) components by the PBS. The p- and s-polarized focal spots are made to fall on the mirrored end surfaces of the parallel plate (PP). The retroreflected p- and s-polarized beams become collimated after passing through the TO. A linear shift of the PP in either (longitudinal) direction alters the positions of the p- and s-polarized focal spots and results in a set of converging and diverging spherical wavefronts that interfere to form concentric circular fringes. We applied polarization phase-shifting interferometry to obtain the optical path difference (OPD) variation of the interference field. The displacement is calculated from the OPD variation. A validation experiment has been carried out by introducing known shifts to the PP. The setup can be used for displacement as well as distance measurement. PMID:26836546

  19. Measurement of electron beam polarization produced by photoemission from bulk GaAs using twisted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayburn, Nathan; Dreiling, Joan; McCarter, James; Ryan, Dominic; Poelker, Matt; Gay, Timothy

    2012-06-01

    GaAs photocathodes produce spin polarized electron beams when illuminated with circularly polarized light with photon energy approximately equal to the bandgap energy [1, 2]. A typical polarization value obtained with bulk GaAs and conventional circularly polarized light is 35%. This study investigated the spin polarization of electron beams emitted from GaAs illuminated with ``twisted light,'' an expression that describes a beam of light having orbital angular momentum (OAM). In the experiment, 790nm laser light was focused to a near diffraction-limited spot size on the surface of the GaAs photocathode to determine if OAM might couple to valence band electron spin mediated by the GaAs lattice. Our polarization measurements using a compact retarding-field micro-Mott polarimeter [3] have established an upper bound on the polarization of the emitted electron beam of 2.5%. [4pt] [1] D.T. Pierce, F. Meier, P. Zurcher, Appl. Phys. Lett. 26 670 (1975).[0pt] [2] C.K. Sinclair, et al., PRSTAB 10 023501 (2007).[0pt] [3] J.L. McCarter, M.L. Stutzman, K.W. Trantham, T.G. Anderson, A.M. Cook, and T.J. Gay Nucl. Instrum. and Meth. A (2010).

  20. Retrieving hurricane wind speeds using cross-polarization C-band measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zadelhoff, G.-J.; Stoffelen, A.; Vachon, P. W.; Wolfe, J.; Horstmann, J.; Belmonte Rivas, M.

    2014-02-01

    Hurricane-force wind speeds can have a large societal impact and in this paper microwave C-band cross-polarized (VH) signals are investigated to assess if they can be used to derive extreme wind-speed conditions. European satellite scatterometers have excellent hurricane penetration capability at C-band, but the vertically (VV) polarized signals become insensitive above 25 m s-1. VV and VH polarized backscatter signals from RADARSAT-2 SAR imagery acquired during severe hurricane events were compared to collocated SFMR wind measurements acquired by NOAA's hurricane-hunter aircraft. From this data set a geophysical model function (GMF) at strong-to-extreme/severe wind speeds (i.e., 20 m s-1 < U10 < 45 m s-1) is derived. Within this wind speed regime, cross-polarized data showed no distinguishable loss of sensitivity and as such, cross-polarized data can be considered a good candidate for the retrieval of strong-to-severe wind speeds from satellite instruments. The upper limit of 45 m s-1 is defined by the currently available collocated data. The validity of the derived relationship between wind speed and VH backscatter has been evaluated by comparing the cross-polarized signals to two independent wind-speed data sets (i.e., short-range ECMWF numerical weather prediction (NWP) model forecast winds and the NOAA best estimate 1-minute maximum sustained winds). Analysis of the three comparison data sets confirm that cross-polarized signals from satellites will enable the retrieval of strong-to-severe wind speeds where VV or horizontal (HH) polarization data has saturated. The VH backscatter increases exponentially with respect to wind speed (linear against VH [dB]) and a near-real-time assessment of maximum sustained wind speed is possible using VH measurements. VH measurements thus would be an extremely valuable complement on next-generation scatterometers for hurricane forecast warnings and hurricane model initialization.