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Sample records for polarized parton distributions

  1. Extractions of polarized and unpolarized parton distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    An overview of our ongoing extractions of parton distribution functions of the nucleon is given. First JAM results on the determination of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from world data on polarized deep-inelastic scattering are presented first, and followed by a short report on the status of the JR unpolarized parton distributions. Different aspects of PDF analysis are briefly discussed, including effects of the nuclear structure of targets, target-mass corrections and higher twist contributions to the structure functions.

  2. Unbiased determination of polarized parton distributions and their uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Forte, Stefano; Guffanti, Alberto; Nocera, Emanuele R.; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Rojo, Juan

    2013-09-01

    We present a determination of a set of polarized parton distributions (PDFs) of the nucleon, at next-to-leading order, from a global set of longitudinally polarized deep-inelastic scattering data: NNPDFpol1.0. The determination is based on the NNPDF methodology: a Monte Carlo approach, with neural networks used as unbiased interpolants, previously applied to the determination of unpolarized parton distributions, and designed to provide a faithful and statistically sound representation of PDF uncertainties. We present our dataset, its statistical features, and its Monte Carlo representation. We summarize the technique used to solve the polarized evolution equations and its benchmarking, and the method used to compute physical observables. We review the NNPDF methodology for parametrization and fitting of neural networks, the algorithm used to determine the optimal fit, and its adaptation to the polarized case. We finally present our set of polarized parton distributions. We discuss its statistical properties, test for its stability upon various modifications of the fitting procedure, and compare it to other recent polarized parton sets, and in particular obtain predictions for polarized first moments of PDFs based on it. We find that the uncertainties on the gluon, and to a lesser extent the strange PDF, were substantially underestimated in previous determinations.

  3. First JAM results on the determination of polarized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    The Jefferson Lab Angular Momentum (JAM) collaboration is a new initiative aimed to the study of the angular-momentum-dependent structure of the nucleon. First results on the determination of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from world data on polarized deep-inelastic scattering will be presented and compared with previous determinations from other groups. Different aspects of global QCD analysis will be discussed, including effects due to nuclear structure, higher twist, and target-mass corrections, as well as the impact of different data selections.

  4. First JAM results on the determination of polarized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Accardi, Alberto; Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2014-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab Angular Momentum (JAM) Collaboration is a new initiative to study the angular momentum dependent structure of the nucleon. First results on the determination of spin-dependent parton distribution functions at intermediate and large x from world data on polarized deep-inelastic scattering are presented. Different aspects of global QCD analysis are discussed, including the effects of nuclear structure of deuterium and {sup 3}He targets, target mass corrections and higher twist contributions to the g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} structure functions.

  5. How large is the gluon polarization in the statistical parton distributions approach?

    SciTech Connect

    Soffer, Jacques; Bourrely, Claude; Buccella, Franco

    2015-04-10

    We review the theoretical foundations of the quantum statistical approach to parton distributions and we show that by using some recent experimental results from Deep Inelastic Scattering, we are able to improve the description of the data by means of a new determination of the parton distributions. We will see that a large gluon polarization emerges, giving a significant contribution to the proton spin.

  6. The parton distributions in nuclei and in polarized nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    The emerging information was reviewed on the way quark and anti-quark, and gluon distributions are modified in nuclei relative to free nucleons. Some implications of the recent data on polarized leptoproduction are discussed. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Parton Distributions Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    de Barbaro, L.; Keller, S. A.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schellman, H.; Tung, W.-K.

    2000-07-20

    This report summarizes the activities of the Parton Distributions Working Group of the QCD and Weak Boson Physics workshop held in preparation for Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. The main focus of this working group was to investigate the different issues associated with the development of quantitative tools to estimate parton distribution functions uncertainties. In the conclusion, the authors introduce a Manifesto that describes an optimal method for reporting data.

  8. Partonic Transverse Momentum Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2010-08-04

    In recent years parton distributions have been generalized to account also for transverse degrees of freedom and new sets of more general distributions, Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) parton distributions and fragmentation functions were introduced. Different experiments worldwide (HERMES, COMPASS, CLAS, JLab-Hall A) have measurements of TMDs in semi-inclusive DIS processes as one of their main focuses of research. TMD studies are also an important part of the present and future Drell-Yan experiments at RICH and JPARC and GSI, respectively, Studies of TMDs are also one of the main driving forces of the Jefferson Lab (JLab) 12 GeV upgrade project. Progress in phenomenology and theory is flourishing as well. In this talk an overview of the latest developments in studies of TMDs will be given and newly released results, ongoing activities, as well as planned near term and future measurements will be discussed.

  9. Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Schienbein, I.; Yu, J.-Y.; Keppel, Cynthia; Morfin, Jorge; Olness, F.; Owens, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    We study nuclear effects of charged current deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering in the framework of a chi^2 analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). We extract a set of iron PDFs which are used to compute x_Bj-dependent and Q^2-dependent nuclear correction factors for iron structure functions which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs. We compare our results with nuclear correction factors from neutrino-nucleus scattering models and correction factors for charged-lepton--iron scattering. We find that, except for very high x_Bj, our correction factors differ in both shape and magnitude from the correction factors of the models and charged-lepton scattering.

  10. Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    I. Schienbein, J.Y. Yu, C. Keppel, J.G. Morfin, F. Olness, J.F. Owens

    2009-06-01

    We study nuclear effects of charged current deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering in the framework of a {chi}{sup 2} analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). We extract a set of iron PDFs which are used to compute x{sub Bj}-dependent and Q{sup 2}-dependent nuclear correction factors for iron structure functions which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs. We compare our results with nuclear correction factors from neutrino-nucleus scattering models and correction factors for charged-lepton--iron scattering. We find that, except for very high x{sub Bj}, our correction factors differ in both shape and magnitude from the correction factors of the models and charged-lepton scattering.

  11. Unintegrated double parton distributions - A summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golec-Biernat, Krzysztof; Staśto, Anna

    2017-03-01

    We present main elements of the construction of unintegrated double parton distribution functions which depend on transverse momenta of partons. We follow the method proposed by Kimber, Martin and Ryskin for a construction of unintegrated single parton distributions from the standard parton distribution functions.

  12. Medium Effects in Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Huey-Wen Lin

    2011-12-01

    A defining experiment of high-energy physics in the 1980s was that of the EMC collaboration where it was first observed that parton distributions in nuclei are non-trivially related to those in the proton. This result implies that the presence of the nuclear medium plays an important role and an understanding of this from QCD has been an important goal ever since Here we investigate analogous, but technically simpler, effects in QCD and examine how the lowest moment of the pion parton distribution is modified by the presence of a Bose-condensed gas of pions or kaons.

  13. Structure functions and parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.D.; Stirling, W.J.; Roberts, R.G.

    1995-07-01

    The MRS parton distribution analysis is described. The latest sets are shown to give an excellent description of a wide range of deep-inelastic and other hard scattering data. Two important theoretical issues-the behavior of the distributions at small x and the flavor structure of the quark sea-are discussed in detail. A comparison with the new structure function data from HERA is made, and the outlook for the future is discussed.

  14. Generalized parton distributions in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey

    2009-12-01

    Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of nuclei describe the distribution of quarks and gluons in nuclei probed in hard exclusive reactions, such as e.g. deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS). Nuclear GPDs and nuclear DVCS allow us to study new aspects of many traditional nuclear effects (nuclear shadowing, EMC effect, medium modifications of the bound nucleons) as well as to access novel nuclear effects. In my talk, I review recent theoretical progress in the area of nuclear GPDs.

  15. Momentum transfer dependence of generalized parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Neetika

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the model for parametrization of the momentum dependence of nucleon generalized parton distributions in the light of recent MRST measurements of parton distribution functions (A.D. Martin et al., Eur. Phys. J. C 63, 189 (2009)). Our parametrization method with a minimum set of free parameters give a sufficiently good description of data for Dirac and Pauli electromagnetic form factors of proton and neutron at small and intermediate values of momentum transfer. We also calculate the GPDs for up- and down-quarks by decomposing the electromagnetic form factors for the nucleon using the charge and isospin symmetry and also study the evolution of GPDs to a higher scale. We further investigate the transverse charge densities for both the unpolarized and transversely polarized nucleon and compare our results with Kelly's distribution.

  16. CTEQ5 parton distributions and ongoing studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlmann, S.

    1999-09-21

    The CTEQ5 parton distributions are described, with emphasis on the changes since CTEQ4. The most significant change is in the quark flavor dependence of the parton distributions. Ongoing studies of large-x parton distributions are discussed. Luminosity estimates are given for HERA in order to improve the present uncertainties of the quark distributions. A discussion of how to improve the gluon uncertainty in the future is presented.

  17. The CJ12 parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Accardi, Alberto; Owens, Jeff F.

    2013-07-01

    Three new sets of next-to-leading order parton distribution functions (PDFs) are presented, determined by global fits to a wide variety of data for hard scattering processes. The analysis includes target mass and higher twist corrections needed for the description of deep-inelastic scattering data at large x and low Q^2, and nuclear corrections for deuterium targets. The PDF sets correspond to three different models for the nuclear effects, and provide a more realistic uncertainty range for the d quark PDF compared with previous fits. Applications to weak boson production at colliders are also discussed.

  18. Probing the leading-twist transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution function h1T⊥ via the polarized proton-antiproton Drell-Yan process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiacai; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2010-12-01

    We show that the polarized proton-antiproton Drell-Yan process is ideal to probe the pretzelosity distribution (h1T⊥), which is one of the new transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions of the nucleon. We present predictions of the cos⁡(2ϕ+ϕa-ϕb) asymmetry in the transversely polarized proton-antiproton Drell-Yan process at PAX kinematics and find that the results are significantly larger compared with those of the sin⁡(3ϕh-ϕS) asymmetry in the semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering process at HERMES, COMPASS, and JLab kinematics. We conclude that the cos⁡(2ϕ+ϕa-ϕb) asymmetry in the PAX experiment can probe the new physical quantity of the pretzelosity distribution.

  19. Jet correlations from unintegrated parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Hautmann, F.; Jung, H.

    2008-10-13

    Transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions can be introduced gauge-invariantly in QCD from high-energy factorization. We discuss Monte Carlo applications of these distributions to parton showers and jet physics, with a view to the implications for the Monte Carlo description of complex hadronic final states with multiple hard scales at the LHC.

  20. Parton distributions with LHC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Bertone, Valerio; Carrazza, Stefano; Deans, Christopher S.; Del Debbio, Luigi; Forte, Stefano; Guffanti, Alberto; Hartland, Nathan P.; Latorre, José I.; Rojo, Juan; Ubiali, Maria; Nnpdf Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    We present the first determination of parton distributions of the nucleon at NLO and NNLO based on a global data set which includes LHC data: NNPDF2.3. Our data set includes, besides the deep inelastic, Drell-Yan, gauge boson production and jet data already used in previous global PDF determinations, all the relevant LHC data for which experimental systematic uncertainties are currently available: ATLAS and LHCb W and Z rapidity distributions from the 2010 run, CMS W electron asymmetry data from the 2011 run, and ATLAS inclusive jet cross-sections from the 2010 run. We introduce an improved implementation of the FastKernel method which allows us to fit to this extended data set, and also to adopt a more effective minimization methodology. We present the NNPDF2.3 PDF sets, and compare them to the NNPDF2.1 sets to assess the impact of the LHC data. We find that all the LHC data are broadly consistent with each other and with all the older data sets included in the fit. We present predictions for various standard candle cross-sections, and compare them to those obtained previously using NNPDF2.1, and specifically discuss the impact of ATLAS electroweak data on the determination of the strangeness fraction of the proton. We also present collider PDF sets, constructed using only data from HERA, the Tevatron and the LHC, but find that this data set is neither precise nor complete enough for a competitive PDF determination.

  1. Unraveling hadron structure with generalized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Belitsky; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2004-10-01

    The recently introduced generalized parton distributions have emerged as a universal tool to describe hadrons in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. They combine the features of form factors, parton densities and distribution amplitudes - the functions used for a long time in studies of hadronic structure. Generalized parton distributions are analogous to the phase-space Wigner quasi-probability function of non-relativistic quantum mechanics which encodes full information on a quantum-mechanical system. We give an extensive review of main achievements in the development of this formalism. We discuss physical interpretation and basic properties of generalized parton distributions, their modeling and QCD evolution in the leading and next-to-leading orders. We describe how these functions enter a wide class of exclusive reactions, such as electro- and photo-production of photons, lepton pairs, or mesons.

  2. Generalized Valon Model for Double Parton Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broniowski, Wojciech; Ruiz Arriola, Enrique; Golec-Biernat, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    We show how the double parton distributions may be obtained consistently from the many-body light-cone wave functions. We illustrate the method on the example of the pion with two Fock components. The procedure, by construction, satisfies the Gaunt-Stirling sum rules. The resulting single parton distributions of valence quarks and gluons are consistent with a phenomenological parametrization at a low scale.

  3. Deeply exclusive processes and generalized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Vanderhaegen

    2005-02-01

    We discuss how generalized parton distributions (GPDs) enter into hard exclusive processes, and focuses on the links between GPDs and elastic nucleon form factors. These links, in the form of sum rules, represent powerful constraints on parameterizations of GPDs. A Regge parameterization for the GPDs at small momentum transfer -t is extended to the large-t region and it is found to catch the basic features of proton and neutron electromagnetic form factor data. This parameterization allows to estimate the quark contribution to the nucleon spin. It is furthermore discussed how these GPDs at large-t enter into two-photon exchange processes and resolve the discrepancy between Rosenbluth and polarization experiments of elastic electron nucleon scattering.

  4. NUCLEAR MODIFICATION TO PARTON DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS AND PARTON SATURATION.

    SciTech Connect

    QIU, J.-W.

    2006-11-14

    We introduce a generalized definition of parton distribution functions (PDFs) for a more consistent all-order treatment of power corrections. We present a new set of modified DGLAP evolution equations for nuclear PDFs, and show that the resummed {alpha}{sub s}A{sup 1/3}/Q{sup 2}-type of leading nuclear size enhanced power corrections significantly slow down the growth of gluon density at small-x. We discuss the relation between the calculated power corrections and the saturation phenomena.

  5. Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2011-10-24

    Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) provide three-dimensional images of the partonic structure of the nucleon in momentum space. We made impressive progress in understanding TMDs, both from the theoretical and experimental point of view. This brief overview on TMDs is divided in two parts: in the first, an essential list of achievements is presented. In the second, a selection of open questions is discussed.

  6. Constraints on parton distribution from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Bodek, A.; CDF Collaboration

    1995-10-01

    The asymmetry in W{sup -} - W{sup +} production in p{bar p} collisions and Drell-Yan data place tight constraints on parton distributions functions. The W asymmetry data constrain the slope of the quark distribution ratio d(x)/u(x) in the x range 0.007-0.27. The published W asymmetry results from the CDF 1992.3 data ({approx} 20 pb{sup -1}) greatly reduce the systematic error originating from the choice of PDF`s in the W mass measurement at CDF. These published results have also been included in the CTEQ3, MRSA, and GRV94 parton distribution fits. These modern parton distribution functions axe still in good agreement with the new 1993-94 CDF data({approx} 108 pb{sup -1} combined). Preliminary results from CDF for the Drell-Yan cross section in the mass range 11-350 GeV/c{sup 2} are discussed.

  7. The parton distribution function library

    SciTech Connect

    Plothow-Besch, H.

    1995-07-01

    This article describes an integrated package of Parton Density Functions called PDFLIB which has been added to the CERN Program Library Pool W999 and is labelled as W5051. In this package all the different sets of parton density functions of the Nucleon, Pion and the Photon which are available today have been put together. All these sets have been combined in a consistent way such that they all have similar calling sequences and no external data files have to be read in anymore. A default set has been prepared, although those preferring their own set or wanting to test a new one may do so within the package. The package also offers a program to calculate the strong coupling constant {alpha}, to first or second order. The correct {Lambda}{sub QCD} associated to the selected set of structure functions and the number of allowed flavours with respect to the given Q{sup 2} is automatically used in the calculation. The selection of sets, the program parameters as well as the possibilities to modify the defaults and to control errors occurred during execution are described.

  8. Generalized parton distributions in the deuteron.

    PubMed

    Berger, E R; Cano, F; Diehl, M; Pire, B

    2001-10-01

    We introduce generalized quark and gluon distributions in the deuteron, which can be measured in exclusive processes like deeply virtual Compton scattering and meson electroproduction. We discuss the basic properties of these distributions and point out how they probe the interplay of nucleon and parton degrees of freedom in the deuteron wave function.

  9. Progress in the dynamical parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro

    2012-06-01

    The present status of the (JR) dynamical parton distribution functions is reported. Different theoretical improvements, including the determination of the strange sea input distribution, the treatment of correlated errors and the inclusion of alternative data sets, are discussed. Highlights in the ongoing developments as well as (very) preliminary results in the determination of the strong coupling constant are presented.

  10. Higher twist parton distributions from light-cone wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, V. M.; Lautenschlager, T.; Pirnay, B.; Manashov, A. N.

    2011-05-01

    We explore the possibility to construct higher-twist parton distributions in a nucleon at some low reference scale from convolution integrals of the light-cone wave functions (WFs). To this end we introduce simple models for the four-particle nucleon WFs involving three valence quarks and a gluon with total orbital momentum zero, and estimate their normalization (WF at the origin) using QCD sum rules. We demonstrate that these WFs provide one with a reasonable description of both polarized and unpolarized parton densities at large values of the Bjorken variable x{>=}0.5. Twist-three parton distributions are then constructed as convolution integrals of qqqg and the usual three-quark WFs. The cases of the polarized structure function g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) and single transverse spin asymmetries are considered in detail. We find that the so-called gluon pole contribution to twist-three distributions relevant for single spin asymmetry vanishes in this model, but is generated perturbatively at higher scales by the evolution, in the spirit of Glueck-Reya-Vogt parton distributions.

  11. Generalized Parton Distributions: Visions, Basics, and Realities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, D.

    2014-06-01

    An introductory to generalized parton distributions (GDPs) is given which emphasizes their spectral property and its uses as well as the equivalence of various GDP representations. Furthermore, the status of the theory and phenomenology of hard exclusive processes is shortly reviewed.

  12. Nonperturbative evolution of parton quasi-distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radyushkin, A. V.

    2017-04-01

    Using the formalism of parton virtuality distribution functions (VDFs) we establish a connection between the transverse momentum dependent distributions (TMDs) F (x , k⊥2) and quasi-distributions (PQDs) Q (y ,p3) introduced recently by X. Ji for lattice QCD extraction of parton distributions f (x). We build models for PQDs from the VDF-based models for soft TMDs, and analyze the p3 dependence of the resulting PQDs. We observe a strong nonperturbative evolution of PQDs for small and moderately large values of p3 reflecting the transverse momentum dependence of TMDs. Thus, the study of PQDs on the lattice in the domain of strong nonperturbative effects opens a new perspective for investigation of the 3-dimensional hadron structure.

  13. Generalized parton distributions and exclusive processes

    SciTech Connect

    Guzey, Vadim

    2013-10-01

    In last fifteen years, GPDs have emerged as a powerful tool to reveal such aspects of the QCD structure of the nucleon as: - 3D parton correlations and distributions; - spin content of the nucleon. Further advances in the field of GPDs and hard exclusive processes rely on: - developments in theory and new methods in phenomenology such as new flexible parameterizations, neural networks, global QCD fits - new high-precision data covering unexplored kinematics: JLab at 6 and 12 GeV, Hermes with recoil detector, Compass, EIC. This slide-show presents: Nucleon structure in QCD, particularly hard processes, factorization and parton distributions; and a brief overview of GPD phenomenology, including basic properties of GPDs, GPDs and QCD structure of the nucleon, and constraining GPDs from experiments.

  14. Parton distribution benchmarking with LHC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Carrazza, Stefano; Del Debbio, Luigi; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Hartland, Nathan; Huston, Joey; Nadolsky, Pavel; Rojo, Juan; Stump, Daniel; Thorne, Robert S.; Yuan, C.-P.

    2013-04-01

    We present a detailed comparison of the most recent sets of NNLO PDFs from the ABM, CT, HERAPDF, MSTW and NNPDF collaborations. We compare parton distributions at low and high scales and parton luminosities relevant for LHC phenomenology. We study the PDF dependence of LHC benchmark inclusive cross sections and differential distributions for electroweak boson and jet production in the cases in which the experimental covariance matrix is available. We quantify the agreement between data and theory by computing the χ 2 for each data set with all the various PDFs. PDF comparisons are performed consistently for common values of the strong coupling. We also present a benchmark comparison of jet production at the LHC, comparing the results from various available codes and scale settings. Finally, we discuss the implications of the updated NNLO PDF sets for the combined PDF+ α s uncertainty in the gluon fusion Higgs production cross section.

  15. Access to generalized parton distributions at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Wolf-Dieter

    2015-04-10

    A brief experimentalist's introduction to Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) is given. Recent COMPASS results are shown on transverse target-spin asymmetries in hard exclusive ρ{sup 0} production and their interpretation in terms of a phenomenological model as indication for chiral-odd, transverse GPDs is discussed. For deeply virtual Compton scattering, it is briefly outlined how to access GPDs and projections are shown for future COMPASS measurements.

  16. Generalized parton distributions and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on proton at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    R. De Masi

    2007-12-01

    Two measurements of target and beam spin asymmetries for the reaction ep→epγ were performed with CLAS at Jefferson Laboratory. Polarized 5.7 GeV electrons were impinging on a longitudinally polarized ammonia and liquid hydrogen target respectively. These measurements are sensitive to Generalized Parton Distributions. Sizable sin phi azimuthal angular dependences were observed in both experiments, indicating the dominance of leading twist terms and the possibility of extracting combinations of Generalized Parton Distributions on the nucleon.

  17. Updated lattice results for parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Cichy, Krzysztof; Constantinou, Martha; Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos; Jansen, Karl; Steffens, Fernanda; Wiese, Christian

    2017-07-01

    We provide an analysis of the x dependence of the bare unpolarized, helicity, and transversity isovector parton distribution functions (PDFs) from lattice calculations employing (maximally) twisted mass fermions. The x dependence of the calculated PDFs resembles the one of the phenomenological parameterizations, a feature that makes this approach very promising. Furthermore, we apply momentum smearing for the relevant matrix elements to compute the lattice PDFs and find a large improvement factor when compared to conventional Gaussian smearing. This allows us to extend the lattice computation of the distributions to higher values of the nucleon momentum, which is essential for the prospects of a reliable extraction of the PDFs in the future.

  18. First moments of nucleon generalized parton distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, P.; Thomas, A. W.

    2010-06-01

    We extrapolate the first moments of the generalized parton distributions using heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. The calculation is based on the one loop level with the finite range regularization. The description of the lattice data is satisfactory, and the extrapolated moments at physical pion mass are consistent with the results obtained with dimensional regularization, although the extrapolation in the momentum transfer to t=0 does show sensitivity to form factor effects, which lie outside the realm of chiral perturbation theory. We discuss the significance of the results in the light of modern experiments as well as QCD inspired models.

  19. First moments of nucleon generalized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; Thomas, A. W.

    2010-06-01

    We extrapolate the first moments of the generalized parton distributions using heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. The calculation is based on the one loop level with the finite range regularization. The description of the lattice data is satisfactory, and the extrapolated moments at physical pion mass are consistent with the results obtained with dimensional regularization, although the extrapolation in the momentum transfer to t=0 does show sensitivity to form factor effects, which lie outside the realm of chiral perturbation theory. We discuss the significance of the results in the light of modern experiments as well as QCD inspired models.

  20. Parton and valon distributions in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Hwa, R.C.; Sajjad Zahir, M.

    1981-06-01

    Structure functions of the nucleon are analyzed in the valon model in which a nucleon is assumed to be a bound state of three valence quark clusters (valons). At high Q/sup 2/ the structure of the valons is described by leading-order results in the perturbative quantum chromodynamics. From the experimental data on deep-inelastic scattering off protons and neutrons, the flavor-dependent valon distributions in the nucleon are determined. Predictions for the parton distributions are then made for high Q/sup 2/ without guesses concerning the quark and gluon distributions at low Q/sup 2/. The sea-quark and gluon distributions are found to have a sharp peak at very small x. Convenient parametrization is provided which interpolates between different numbers of flavors.

  1. Self-Organizing Maps and Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    K. Holcomb, Simonetta Liuti, D. Z. Perry

    2011-05-01

    We present a new method to extract parton distribution functions from high energy experimental data based on a specific type of neural networks, the Self-Organizing Maps. We illustrate the features of our new procedure that are particularly useful for an anaysis directed at extracting generalized parton distributions from data. We show quantitative results of our initial analysis of the parton distribution functions from inclusive deep inelastic scattering.

  2. Polarized 3 parton production in inclusive DIS at small x

    DOE PAGES

    Ayala, Alejandro; Hentschinski, Martin; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; ...

    2016-08-18

    Azimuthal angular correlations between produced hadrons/jets in high energy collisions are a sensitive probe of the dynamics of QCD at small x. Here we derive the triple differential cross section for inclusive production of 3 polarized partons in DIS at small x using the spinor helicity formalism. The target proton or nucleus is described using the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) formalism. The resulting expressions are used to study azimuthal angular correlations between produced partons in order to probe the gluon structure of the target hadron or nucleus. Finally, our analytic expressions can also be used to calculate the real partmore » of the Next to Leading Order (NLO) corrections to di-hadron production in DIS by integrating out one of the three final state partons.« less

  3. Quasi-parton distribution functions, momentum distributions, and pseudo-parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radyushkin, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    We show that quasi-parton distribution functions (quasi-PDFs) may be treated as hybrids of PDFs and primordial rest-frame momentum distributions of partons. This results in a complicated convolution nature of quasi-PDFs that necessitates using large p3≳3 GeV momenta to get reasonably close to the PDF limit. As an alternative approach, we propose using pseudo-PDFs P (x ,z32) that generalize the light-front PDFs onto spacelike intervals and are related to Ioffe-time distributions M (ν ,z32), the functions of the Ioffe time ν =p3z3 and the distance parameter z32 with respect to which it displays perturbative evolution for small z3. In this form, one may divide out the z32 dependence coming from the primordial rest-frame distribution and from the problematic factor due to lattice renormalization of the gauge link. The ν dependence remains intact and determines the shape of PDFs.

  4. Parton distributions in nuclei: Quagma or quagmire

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    The emerging information on the way quark, antiquark, and gluon distributions are modified in nuclei relative to free nucleons is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on Drell-Yan and /psi/ production on nuclei and caution against premature use of these as signals for quagma in heavy-ion collisions. If we are to identify the formation of quark-gluon plasma in heavy-ion collisions by changes in the production rates for /psi/ relative to Drell-Yan lepton pairs, then it is important that we first understand the ''intrinsic'' changes in parton distributions in nuclei relative to free nucleons. So, emerging knowledge on how quark, antiquark, and gluon distributions are modified in nuclei relative to free nucleons is reviewed, and the emerging theoretical concensus is briefly summarized.

  5. Generalized parton distributions from deep virtual compton scattering at CLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Guidal, M.

    2010-04-24

    Here, we have analyzed the beam spin asymmetry and the longitudinally polarized target spin asymmetry of the Deep Virtual Compton Scattering process, recently measured by the Jefferson Lab CLAS collaboration. Our aim is to extract information about the Generalized Parton Distributions of the proton. By fitting these data, in a largely model-independent procedure, we are able to extract numerical values for the two Compton Form Factorsmore » $$H_{Im}$$ and $$\\tilde{H}_{Im}$$ with uncertainties, in average, of the order of 30%.« less

  6. Relation between transverse momentum dependent distribution functions and parton distribution functions in the covariant parton model approach

    SciTech Connect

    A.V. Efremov, P. Schweitzer, O.V. Teryaev, P. Zavada

    2011-03-01

    We derive relations between transverse momentum dependent distribution functions (TMDs) and the usual parton distribution functions (PDFs) in the 3D covariant parton model, which follow from Lorentz invariance and the assumption of a rotationally symmetric distribution of parton momenta in the nucleon rest frame. Using the known PDFs f_1(x) and g_1(x) as input we predict the x- and pT-dependence of all twist-2 T-even TMDs.

  7. Delineating the polarized and unpolarized partonic structure of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro

    2015-03-01

    Our latest results on the extraction of parton distribution functions of the nucleon are reported. First an overview of the recent JR14 upgrade of our unpolarized PDFs, including NNLO determinations of the strong coupling constant and a discussion of the role of the input scale in parton distribution analysis. In the second part of the talk recent results on the determination of spin-dependent PDFs from the JAM collaboration are given, including a careful treatment of hadronic and nuclear corrections, as well as results on the impact of present and future data in our understanding of the spin of the nucleon.

  8. Delineating the polarized and unpolarized partonic structure of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro

    2015-03-01

    Reports on our latest extractions of parton distribution functions of the nucleon are given. First an overview of the recent JR14 upgrade of our unpolarized PDFs, including NNLO determinations of the strong coupling constant and a discussion of the role of the input scale in parton distribution analysis. In the second part of the talk recent results on the determination of spin-dependent PDFs from the JAM collaboration are reported, including a careful treatment of hadronic and nuclear corrections, as well as reports on the impact of present and future data in our understanding of the spin of the nucleon.

  9. Nuclear modifications of Parton Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeluyi, Adeola Adeleke

    This dissertation addresses a central question of modern nuclear physics: how does the behavior of fundamental degrees of freedom (quarks and gluons) change in the nuclear environment? This is an important aspect of experimental studies at current facilities such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLAB). It is also highly relevant to planned experimental efforts at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the future Electron Ion Collider (EIC). All these facilities probe matter via collisions involving nuclei; thus complications arise due to the presence of the attendant nuclear medium. Theoretical efforts to understand and interpret experimental results from such collisions are therefore largely dependent on the resolution of this question. The development of nuclear physics demonstrates that theoretical description is most efficient in terms of the effective degrees of freedom relevant to the scale (energy) being probed. Thus at low energies, nuclei are described as bound states of protons and neutrons (nucleons). At higher energies, the nucleons are no longer elementary, but are revealed to possess an underlying substructure: they are made up of quarks and gluons, collectively termed partons. The mometum distributions of these partons in the nucleon are referred to as Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). Parton distributions can be determined from experimental measurements of structure functions. The ratio of nuclear structure functions to nucleon structure functions (generically referred to as nuclear ratio) is a measure of the nuclear modifications of the free nucleon PDFs. Thus a study of the nuclear ratio suffices to gain an understanding of nuclear modifications. In this dissertation we aim to describe theoretically nuclear modifications in a restricted region where the nuclear ratio is less than unity, the so

  10. New model for nucleon generalized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new type of models for nucleon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) H and E. They are heavily based on the fact nucleon GPDs require to use two forms of double distribution (DD) representations. The outcome of the new treatment is that the usual DD+D-term construction should be amended by an extra term, {xi} E{sub +}{sup 1} (x,{xi}) which has the DD structure {alpha}/{beta} e({beta},{alpha}, with e({beta},{alpha}) being the DD that generates GPD E(x,{xi}). We found that this function, unlike the D-term, has support in the whole -1 <= x <= 1 region. Furthermore, it does not vanish at the border points |x|={xi}.

  11. Nucleon Generalized Parton Distributions from Full Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards; Philipp Haegler; David Richards; John Negele; Konstantinos Orginos; Wolfram Schroers; Jonathan Bratt; Andrew Pochinsky; Michael Engelhardt; George Fleming; Bernhard Musch; Dru Renner

    2007-07-03

    We present a comprehensive study of the lowest moments of nucleon generalized parton distributions in N_f=2+1 lattice QCD using domain wall valence quarks and improved staggered sea quarks. Our investigation includes helicity dependent and independent generalized parton distributions for pion masses as low as 350 MeV and volumes as large as (3.5 fm)^3.

  12. Generalized parton distributions: Status and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Christian

    2009-01-01

    We summarize recent developments in understanding the concept of generalized parton distributions (GPDs), its relation to nucleon structure, and its application to high-Q^2 electroproduction processes. Following a brief review of QCD factorization and transverse nucleon structure, we discuss (a) new theoretical methods for the analysis of deeply-virtual Compton scattering (t-channel-based GPD parametrizations, dispersion relations); (b) the phenomenology of hard exclusive meson production (experimental tests of dominance of small-size configurations, model-independent comparative studies); (c) the role of GPDs in small-x physics and pp scattering (QCD dipole model, central exclusive diffraction). We emphasize the usefulness of the transverse spatial (or impact parameter) representation for both understanding the reaction mechanism in hard exclusive processes and visualizing the physical content of the GPDs.

  13. Quasi parton distributions and the gradient flow

    DOE PAGES

    Monahan, Christopher; Orginos, Kostas

    2017-03-22

    We propose a new approach to determining quasi parton distribution functions (PDFs) from lattice quantum chromodynamics. By incorporating the gradient flow, this method guarantees that the lattice quasi PDFs are finite in the continuum limit and evades the thorny, and as yet unresolved, issue of the renormalization of quasi PDFs on the lattice. In the limit that the flow time is much smaller than the length scale set by the nucleon momentum, the moments of the smeared quasi PDF are proportional to those of the lightfront PDF. Finally, we use this relation to derive evolution equations for the matching kernelmore » that relates the smeared quasi PDF and the light-front PDF.« less

  14. Improved quasi parton distribution through Wilson line renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Ji, Xiangdong; Zhang, Jian-Hui

    2017-02-01

    Recent developments showed that hadron light-cone parton distributions could be directly extracted from spacelike correlators, known as quasi parton distributions, in the large hadron momentum limit. Unlike the normal light-cone parton distribution, a quasi parton distribution contains ultraviolet (UV) power divergence associated with the Wilson line self energy. We show that to all orders in the coupling expansion, the power divergence can be removed by a "mass" counterterm in the auxiliary z-field formalism, in the same way as the renormalization of power divergence for an open Wilson line. After adding this counterterm, the quasi quark distribution is improved such that it contains at most logarithmic divergences. Based on a simple version of discretized gauge action, we present the one-loop matching kernel between the improved non-singlet quasi quark distribution with a lattice regulator and the corresponding quark distribution in dimensional regularization.

  15. Quasi-parton distribution functions, momentum distributions, and pseudo-parton distribution functions

    DOE PAGES

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2017-08-28

    Here, we show that quasi-PDFs may be treated as hybrids of PDFs and primordial rest-frame momentum distributions of partons. This results in a complicated convolution nature of quasi-PDFs that necessitates using large p3≳ 3 GeV momenta to get reasonably close to the PDF limit. Furthemore, as an alternative approach, we propose to use pseudo-PDFs P(x, zmore » $$2\\atop{3}$$) that generalize the light-front PDFs onto spacelike intervals and are related to Ioffe-time distributions M (v, z$$2\\atop{3}$$), the functions of the Ioffe time v = p3 z3 and the distance parameter z$$2\\atop{3}$$ with respect to which it displays perturbative evolution for small z3. In this form, one may divide out the z$$2\\atop{3}$$ dependence coming from the primordial rest-frame distribution and from the problematic factor due to lattice renormalization of the gauge link. The v-dependence remains intact and determines the shape of PDFs.« less

  16. Prospects For Measurements Of Generalized Parton Distributions At COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Neyret, Damien

    2007-06-13

    The concept of Generalized Parton Distributions extends classical parton distributions by giving a '3-dimensional' view of the nucleons, allowing to study correlations between the parton longitudinal momentum and its transverse position in the nucleon. Measurements of such generalized distributions can be done with the COMPASS experiment, in particular using Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering events. They require to modify the set-up of COMPASS by introducing a recoil proton detector, an additional electromagnetic calorimeter and a new liquid hydrogen target. These upgrades are presently under study, and the first data taking could take place in 2010.

  17. Evolution of the helicity and transversity Transverse-Momentum-Dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexey; Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and transversity parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on transverse momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized transverse momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.

  18. Evolution of the helicity and transversity Transverse-Momentum-Dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei; Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2013-07-01

    We examine the QCD evolution of the helicity and transversity parton distribution functions when including also their dependence on transverse momentum. Using an appropriate definition of these polarized transverse momentum distributions (TMDs), we describe their dependence on the factorization scale and rapidity cutoff, which is essential for phenomenological applications.

  19. Standard Model parton distributions at very high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Christian W.; Ferland, Nicolas; Webber, Bryan R.

    2017-08-01

    We compute the leading-order evolution of parton distribution functions for all the Standard Model fermions and bosons up to energy scales far above the electroweak scale, where electroweak symmetry is restored. Our results include the 52 PDFs of the unpolarized proton, evolving according to the SU(3), SU(2), U(1), mixed SU(2)×U(1) and Yukawa interactions. We illustrate the numerical effects on parton distributions at large energies, and show that this can lead to important corrections to parton luminosities at a future 100 TeV collider.

  20. Nuclear parton distributions and the Drell-Yan process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulagin, S. A.; Petti, R.

    2014-10-01

    We study the nuclear parton distribution functions on the basis of our recently developed semimicroscopic model, which takes into account a number of nuclear effects including nuclear shadowing, Fermi motion and nuclear binding, nuclear meson-exchange currents, and off-shell corrections to bound nucleon distributions. We discuss in detail the dependencies of nuclear effects on the type of parton distribution (nuclear sea vs valence), as well as on the parton flavor (isospin). We apply the resulting nuclear parton distributions to calculate ratios of cross sections for proton-induced Drell-Yan production off different nuclear targets. We obtain a good agreement on the magnitude, target and projectile x, and the dimuon mass dependence of proton-nucleus Drell-Yan process data from the E772 and E866 experiments at Fermilab. We also provide nuclear corrections for the Drell-Yan data from the E605 experiment.

  1. Nucleon parton distributions in a light-front quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    Continuing our analysis of parton distributions in the nucleon, we extend our light-front quark model in order to obtain both the helicity-independent and the helicity-dependent parton distributions, analytically matching the results of global fits at the initial scale μ ˜ 1 GeV; they also contain the correct Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution. We also calculate the transverse parton, Wigner and Husimi distributions from a unified point of view, using our light-front wave functions and expressing them in terms of the parton distributions q_v(x) and δ q_v(x). Our results are very relevant for the current and future program of the COMPASS experiment at SPS (CERN).

  2. Nonperturbative parton distributions and the proton spin problem

    SciTech Connect

    Simonov, Yu. A.

    2016-05-15

    The Lorentz contracted form of the static wave functions is used to calculate the valence parton distributions for mesons and baryons, boosting the rest frame solutions of the path integral Hamiltonian. It is argued that nonperturbative parton densities are due to excitedmultigluon baryon states. A simplemodel is proposed for these states ensuring realistic behavior of valence and sea quarks and gluon parton densities at Q{sup 2} = 10 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Applying the same model to the proton spin problem one obtains Σ{sub 3} = 0.18 for the same Q{sup 2}.

  3. Deeply Virtual Exclusive Processes and Generalized Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2011-06-01

    The goal of the comprehensive program in Deeply Virtual Exclusive Scattering at Jefferson Laboratory is to create transverse spatial images of quarks and gluons as a function of their longitudinal momentum fraction in the proton, the neutron, and in nuclei. These functions are the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) of the target nucleus. Cross section measurements of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) reaction ep {yields} ep{gamma} in Hall A support the QCD factorization of the scattering amplitude for Q^2 {>=} 2 GeV^2. Quasi-free neutron-DVCS measurements on the Deuteron indicate sensitivity to the quark angular momentum sum rule. Fully exclusive H(e, e'p{gamma} ) measurements have been made in a wide kinematic range in CLAS with polarized beam, and with both unpolarized and longitudinally polarized targets. Existing models are qualitatively consistent with the JLab data, but there is a clear need for less constrained models. Deeply virtual vector meson production is studied in CLAS. The 12 GeV upgrade will be essential for for these channels. The {rho} and {omega} channels reactions offer the prospect of flavor sensitivity to the quark GPDs, while the {phi}-production channel is dominated by the gluon distribution.

  4. Deeply Virtual Exclusive Processes and Generalized Parton Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Charles E.; Guidal, Michel; Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2011-05-01

    The goal of the comprehensive program in deeply virtual exclusive scattering at Jefferson Lab is to create transverse spatial images of quarks and gluons as a function of their longitudinal momentum fraction in the proton, the neutron, and in nuclei. These functions are the generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of the target nucleus. Cross section measurements of the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) reaction ep → epγ in Hall A support the QCD factorization of the scattering amplitude for Q2 >= 2 GeV2. Quasi-free neutron-DVCS measurements on the deuteron indicate sensitivity to the quark angular momentum sum rule. Fully exclusive H(e,e'pγ) measurements have been made in a wide kinematic range in CLAS with polarized beam, and with both unpolarized and longitudinally polarized targets. Existing models are qualitatively consistent with the Jefferson Lab data, but there is a clear need for less constrained models. Deeply virtual vector meson production is studied in CLAS. The 12 GeV upgrade will be essential for for these channels. The ρ and ω channels reactions offer the prospect of flavor sensitivity to the quark GPDs, while the ϕ-production channel is dominated by the gluon distribution.

  5. Reconstruction of Monte Carlo replicas from Hessian parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Tie-Jiun; Gao, Jun; Huston, Joey; Nadolsky, Pavel; Schmidt, Carl; Stump, Daniel; Wang, Bo-Ting; Xie, Ke Ping; Dulat, Sayipjamal; Pumplin, Jon; Yuan, C. P.

    2017-03-01

    We explore connections between two common methods for quantifying the uncertainty in parton distribution functions (PDFs), based on the Hessian error matrix and Monte-Carlo sampling. CT14 parton distributions in the Hessian representation are converted into Monte-Carlo replicas by a numerical method that reproduces important properties of CT14 Hessian PDFs: the asymmetry of CT14 uncertainties and positivity of individual parton distributions. The ensembles of CT14 Monte-Carlo replicas constructed this way at NNLO and NLO are suitable for various collider applications, such as cross section reweighting. Master formulas for computation of asymmetric standard deviations in the Monte-Carlo representation are derived. A correction is proposed to address a bias in asymmetric uncertainties introduced by the Taylor series approximation. A numerical program is made available for conversion of Hessian PDFs into Monte-Carlo replicas according to normal, log-normal, and Watt-Thorne sampling procedures.

  6. The role of the input scale in parton distribution analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Pedro Jimenez-Delgado

    2012-08-01

    A first systematic study of the effects of the choice of the input scale in global determinations of parton distributions and QCD parameters is presented. It is shown that, although in principle the results should not depend on these choices, in practice a relevant dependence develops as a consequence of what is called procedural bias. This uncertainty should be considered in addition to other theoretical and experimental errors, and a practical procedure for its estimation is proposed. Possible sources of mistakes in the determination of QCD parameter from parton distribution analysis are pointed out.

  7. Concurrent approaches to Generalized Parton Distribution modeling: the pion's case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouika, N.; Mezrag, C.; Moutarde, H.; Rodríguez-Quintero, J.

    2017-03-01

    The concept of Generalized Parton Distributions promises an understanding of the generation of the charge, spin, and energy-momentum structure of hadrons by quarks and gluons. Forthcoming measurements with unprecedented accuracy at Jefferson Lab and at CERN will challenge our quantitative description of the three-dimensional structure of hadrons. To fully exploit these future measurements, new tools and models are currently being developed. We explain the difficulties of Generalized Parton Distribution modeling, and present some recent progresses. In particular we describe the symmetry-preserving Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter framework. We also discuss various equivalent parameterizations and sketch how to combine them to obtain models satisfying a priori all required theoretical constraints. At last we explain why these developments naturally fit in a versatile software framework, named PARTONS, dedicated to the theory and phenomenology of GPDs.

  8. Impact of hadronic and nuclear corrections on global analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro; Accardi, Alberto; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2014-02-01

    We present the first results of a new global next-to-leading order analysis of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from the most recent world data on inclusive polarized deep-inelastic scattering, focusing in particular on the large-x and low-Q^2 regions. By directly fitting polarization asymmetries we eliminate biases introduced by using polarized structure function data extracted under nonuniform assumptions for the unpolarized structure functions. For analysis of the large-x data we implement nuclear smearing corrections for deuterium and 3He nuclei, and systematically include target mass and higher twist corrections to the g_1 and g_2 structure functions at low Q^2. We also explore the effects of Q^2 and W^2 cuts in the data sets, and the potential impact of future data on the behavior of the spin-dependent parton distributions at large x.

  9. Transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions: Status and prospects*

    DOE PAGES

    Angeles-Martinez, R.; Bacchetta, A.; Balitsky, Ian I.; ...

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we review transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions, their application to topical issues in high-energy physics phenomenology, and their theoretical connections with QCD resummation, evolution and factorization theorems. We illustrate the use of TMDs via examples of multi-scale problems in hadronic collisions. These include transverse momentum qT spectra of Higgs and vector bosons for low qT, and azimuthal correlations in the production of multiple jets associated with heavy bosons at large jet masses. We discuss computational tools for TMDs, and present the application of a new tool, TMDLIB, to parton density fits and parameterizations.

  10. Parton distribution functions in Monte Carlo factorisation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadach, S.; Płaczek, W.; Sapeta, S.; Siódmok, A.; Skrzypek, M.

    2016-12-01

    A next step in development of the KrkNLO method of including complete NLO QCD corrections to hard processes in a LO parton-shower Monte Carlo is presented. It consists of a generalisation of the method, previously used for the Drell-Yan process, to Higgs-boson production. This extension is accompanied with the complete description of parton distribution functions in a dedicated, Monte Carlo factorisation scheme, applicable to any process of production of one or more colour-neutral particles in hadron-hadron collisions.

  11. Dynamical parton distributions from DGLAP equations with nonlinear corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rong; Chen, Xu-Rong

    2017-05-01

    Determination of proton parton distribution functions is presented under the dynamical parton model assumption by applying DGLAP equations with GLR-MQ-ZRS corrections. We provide two data sets, referred to as IMParton16, which are from two different nonperturbative inputs. One is the naive input of three valence quarks and the other is the input of three valence quarks with flavor-asymmetric sea components. Basically, both data sets are compatible with the experimental measurements at high scale (Q 2 > 2 GeV2). Furthermore, our analysis shows that the input with flavor-asymmetric sea components better reproduces the structure functions at high Q 2. Generally, the parton distribution functions obtained, especially the gluon distribution function, are good options for inputs to simulations of high energy scattering processes. The analysis is performed under the fixed-flavor number scheme for n f = 3, 4, 5. Both data sets start from very low scales, around 0.07 GeV2, where the nonperturbative input is directly connected to the simple picture of the quark model. These results may shed some lights on the origin of the parton distributions observed at high Q 2. Supported by National Basic Research Program (973 Program 2014CB845406) and Century Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Y101020BR0)

  12. Recent progress in the statistical approach of parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Soffer, Jacques

    2011-07-15

    We recall the physical features of the parton distributions in the quantum statistical approach of the nucleon. Some predictions from a next-to-leading order QCD analysis are compared to recent experimental results. We also consider their extension to include their transverse momentum dependence.

  13. Illuminating the 1/x Moment of Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.; /Indiana U.

    2007-10-15

    The Weisberger relation, an exact statement of the parton model, elegantly relates a high-energy physics observable, the 1/x moment of parton distribution functions, to a nonperturbative low-energy observable: the dependence of the nucleon mass on the value of the quark mass or its corresponding quark condensate. We show that contemporary fits to nucleon structure functions fail to determine this 1/x moment; however, deeply virtual Compton scattering can be described in terms of a novel F1/x(t) form factor which illuminates this physics. An analysis of exclusive photon-induced processes in terms of the parton-nucleon scattering amplitude with Regge behavior reveals a failure of the high Q2 factorization of exclusive processes at low t in terms of the Generalized Parton-Distribution Functions which has been widely believed to hold in the past. We emphasize the need for more data for the DVCS process at large t in future or upgraded facilities.

  14. Parton Distributions in the pion from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    W. Detmold; Wally Melnitchouk; Anthony Thomas

    2003-03-01

    We analyze the moments of parton distribution functions in the pion calculated in lattice QCD, paying particular attention to their chiral extrapolation. Using the lowest three non-trivial moments calculated on the lattice, we assess the accuracy with which the x-dependence of both the valence and sea quark distributions in the pion can be extracted. The resulting valence quark distributions at the physical pion mass are in fair agreement with existing Drell-Yan data, but the statistical errors are such that one cannot yet confirm (or rule out) the large-x behavior expected from hadron helicity conservation in perturbative QCD. One can expect, however, that the next generation of calculations in lattice QCD will allow one to extract parton distributions with a level of accuracy comparable with current experiments.

  15. Violation of positivity bounds in models of generalized parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiburzi, Brian C.; Verma, Gaurav

    2017-08-01

    As with parton distributions, flexible phenomenological parametrizations of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) are essential for their extraction from data. The large number of constraints imposed on GPDs make simple Lorentz covariant models viable; but, such models are often incomplete in that they employ the impulse approximation. Using the GPD of the pion as a test case, we show that the impulse approximation can lead to violation of the positivity bound required of GPDs. We focus on a particular model of the pion bound-state vertex that was recently proposed and demonstrate that satisfying the bound is not guaranteed by Lorentz covariance. Violation of the positivity bound is tied to a problematic mismatch between the behavior of the quark distribution at the end point and the crossover value of the GPD.

  16. Charge symmetry breaking in parton distribution functions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Horsley, R.; Zanotti, J. M.; Nakamura, Y.; Pleiter, D.; Rakow, P. E. L.; Schierholz, G.; Stueben, H.; Thomas, A. W.; Young, R. D.; Winter, F.

    2011-03-01

    By determining the quark momentum fractions of the octet baryons from N{sub f}=2+1 lattice simulations, we are able to predict the degree of charge symmetry violation in the parton distribution functions of the nucleon. This is of importance, not only as a probe of our understanding of the nonperturbative structure of the proton, but also because such a violation constrains the accuracy of global fits to parton distribution functions and hence the accuracy with which, for example, cross sections at the LHC can be predicted. A violation of charge symmetry may also be critical in cases where symmetries are used to guide the search for physics beyond the standard model.

  17. Deeply Pseudoscalar Meson Electroproduction with CLAS and Generalized Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Guidal, Michel; Kubarovsky, Valery P.

    2015-06-01

    We discuss the recent data of exclusive $\\pi^0$ (and $\\pi^+$) electroproduction on the proton obtained by the CLAS collaboration at Jefferson Lab. It is observed that the cross sections, which have been decomposed in $\\sigma_T+\\epsilon\\sigma_L$, $\\sigma_{TT}$ and $\\sigma_{LT}$ structure functions, are dominated by transverse amplitude contributions. The data can be interpreted in the Generalized Parton Distribution formalism provided that one includes helicity-flip transversity GPDs.

  18. Nuclear Parton Distributions with the LHeC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Max

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear parton distributions are far from being known today because of an infant experimental base. Based on design studies of the LHeC and using new simulations, of the inclusive neutral and charged current cross section measurements and of the strange, charm and beauty densities in nuclei, it is demonstrated how that energy frontier electron-ion collider would unfold the complete set of nuclear PDFs in a hugely extended kinematic range of deep inelastic scattering, extending in Bjorken x down to values near to 10-6 in the perturbative domain. Together with a very precise and complete set of proton PDFs, the LHeC nPDFs will thoroughly change the theoretical understanding of parton dynamics and structure inside hadrons.

  19. Transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions: Status and prospects*

    SciTech Connect

    Angeles-Martinez, R.; Bacchetta, A.; Balitsky, Ian I.; Boer, D.; Boglione, M.; Boussarie, R.; Ceccopieri, F. A.; Cherednikov, I. O.; Connor, P.; Echevarria, M. G.; Ferrera, G.; Grados Luyando, J.; Hautmann, F.; Jung, H.; Kasemets, T.; Kutak, K.; Lansberg, J. P.; Lykasov, G.; Madrigal Martinez, J. D.; Mulders, P. J.; Nocera, E. R.; Petreska, E.; Pisano, C.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Radici, M.; Schnell, G.; Signori, A.; Szymanowski, L.; Taheri Monfared, S.; Van der Veken, F. F.; van Haevermaet, H. J.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vladimirov, A. A.; Wallon, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we review transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions, their application to topical issues in high-energy physics phenomenology, and their theoretical connections with QCD resummation, evolution and factorization theorems. We illustrate the use of TMDs via examples of multi-scale problems in hadronic collisions. These include transverse momentum qT spectra of Higgs and vector bosons for low qT, and azimuthal correlations in the production of multiple jets associated with heavy bosons at large jet masses. We discuss computational tools for TMDs, and present the application of a new tool, TMDLIB, to parton density fits and parameterizations.

  20. Study of Generalized Parton Distributions at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Andrey

    2017-07-01

    The quark-gluon dynamics manifests itself in a set of non-perturbative functions describing all possible spin-spin and spin-orbit correlations. The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) carry information not only on the longitudinal momentum but also on the transverse position of partons, providing rich and direct information on the orbital motion of quarks. The hard exclusive production of photons and pions provide a variety of spin and azimuthal angle dependent observables, sensitive to the dynamics of quark-gluon interactions. The study of the GPDs is one of the main goals of Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. In this talk, we present an overview of the current status and some future measurements of hard exclusive processes and extraction of underlying GPDs at Jefferson Lab.

  1. Generalized Parton Distributions, Analyticity and Formfactors

    SciTech Connect

    Teryaev, O. V

    2008-10-13

    The QCD factorization for hard exclusive amplitudes is compared with their crossing and analytic properties. The crucial role is played by their mathematical structure described by Radon and Abel transforms, leading to 'holographic' property of GPDs at LO. These transforms are very different in the even- and odd-dimensional spaces, the latter case related to 'creation' GPDs describing, say, the deuteron breakup. The bounds implied by crossing and analyticity for the angular distributions in two-photon processes are obtained. The contributions of different types of QCD factorization and duality between them are considered. The relations of GPDs to (gravitational) formfactors, equivalence principle (EP) and its extension (EEP) are analyzed. EEP is also considered for the case of vector mesons, showing the possible link with AdS/QCD correspondence.

  2. Pion and kaon valence-quark parton distribution functions.

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.; Bashir, A.; Roberts, C. D.; Tandy, P. C.

    2011-06-16

    A rainbow-ladder truncation of QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations, constrained by existing applications to hadron physics, is employed to compute the valence-quark parton distribution functions of the pion and kaon. Comparison is made to {pi}-N Drell-Yan data for the pion's u-quark distribution and to Drell-Yan data for the ratio u{sub K}(x)/u{sub {pi}}(x): the environmental influence of this quantity is a parameter-free prediction, which agrees well with existing data. Our analysis unifies the computation of distribution functions with that of numerous other properties of pseudoscalar mesons.

  3. Pion and kaon valence-quark parton distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Trang; Bashir, Adnan; Roberts, Craig D.; Tandy, Peter C.

    2011-06-15

    A rainbow-ladder truncation of QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations, constrained by existing applications to hadron physics, is employed to compute the valence-quark parton distribution functions of the pion and kaon. Comparison is made to {pi}-N Drell-Yan data for the pion's u-quark distribution and to Drell-Yan data for the ratio u{sub K}(x)/u{sub {pi}}(x): the environmental influence of this quantity is a parameter-free prediction, which agrees well with existing data. Our analysis unifies the computation of distribution functions with that of numerous other properties of pseudoscalar mesons.

  4. Parton distributions in the LHC era: MMHT 2014 PDFs.

    PubMed

    Harland-Lang, L A; Martin, A D; Motylinski, P; Thorne, R S

    We present LO, NLO and NNLO sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton determined from global analyses of the available hard scattering data. These MMHT2014 PDFs supersede the 'MSTW2008' parton sets, but they are obtained within the same basic framework. We include a variety of new data sets, from the LHC, updated Tevatron data and the HERA combined H1 and ZEUS data on the total and charm structure functions. We also improve the theoretical framework of the previous analysis. These new PDFs are compared to the 'MSTW2008' parton sets. In most cases the PDFs, and the predictions, are within one standard deviation of those of MSTW2008. The major changes are the [Formula: see text] valence quark difference at small [Formula: see text] due to an improved parameterisation and, to a lesser extent, the strange quark PDF due to the effect of certain LHC data and a better treatment of the [Formula: see text] branching ratio. We compare our MMHT PDF sets with those of other collaborations; in particular with the NNPDF3.0 sets, which are contemporary with the present analysis.

  5. Parton distributions in the LHC era: MMHT 2014 PDFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harland-Lang, L. A.; Martin, A. D.; Motylinski, P.; Thorne, R. S.

    2015-05-01

    We present LO, NLO and NNLO sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton determined from global analyses of the available hard scattering data. These MMHT2014 PDFs supersede the `MSTW2008' parton sets, but they are obtained within the same basic framework. We include a variety of new data sets, from the LHC, updated Tevatron data and the HERA combined H1 and ZEUS data on the total and charm structure functions. We also improve the theoretical framework of the previous analysis. These new PDFs are compared to the `MSTW2008' parton sets. In most cases the PDFs, and the predictions, are within one standard deviation of those of MSTW2008. The major changes are the valence quark difference at small due to an improved parameterisation and, to a lesser extent, the strange quark PDF due to the effect of certain LHC data and a better treatment of the branching ratio. We compare our MMHT PDF sets with those of other collaborations; in particular with the NNPDF3.0 sets, which are contemporary with the present analysis.

  6. Transverse momentum dependent parton distributions at small-x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yuan, Feng; Zhou, Jian

    2017-08-01

    We study the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distributions at small-x in a consistent framework that takes into account the TMD evolution and small-x evolution simultaneously. The small-x evolution effects are included by computing the TMDs at appropriate scales in terms of the dipole scattering amplitudes, which obey the relevant Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. Meanwhile, the TMD evolution is obtained by resumming the Collins-Soper type large logarithms emerged from the calculations in small-x formalism into Sudakov factors.

  7. Micro-review of structure functions and parton distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Morfin, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    There has recently been a great deal of discussion concerning the surprising differences in the measurements of the nucleon structure function F/sub 2/(x,Q/sup 2/), off of a hydrogen target, by the high statistics muoproduction experiments EMC and BCDMS. In this short review I will attempt to summarize the status of the experimental measurements of the structure functions and highlight any significant disagreements. At the conclusion I will comment on the status of the extraction of the parton distribution functions from these measurements. 17 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Transverse Momentum-Dependent Parton Distributions From Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Engelhardt, Bernhard Musch, Philipp Haegler, Andreas Schaefer

    2012-12-01

    Starting from a definition of transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and the Drell-Yan process, given in terms of matrix elements of a quark bilocal operator containing a staple-shaped Wilson connection, a scheme to determine such observables in lattice QCD is developed and explored. Parametrizing the aforementioned matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes permits a simple transformation of the problem to a Lorentz frame suited for the lattice calculation. Results for the Sivers and Boer-Mulders transverse momentum shifts are presented, focusing in particular on their dependence on the staple extent and the Collins-Soper evolution parameter.

  9. Iterative Monte Carlo analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, Wally; Kuhn, Sebastian E.; Ethier, Jacob J.; Accardi, Alberto

    2016-04-05

    We present a comprehensive new global QCD analysis of polarized inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, including the latest high-precision data on longitudinal and transverse polarization asymmetries from Jefferson Lab and elsewhere. The analysis is performed using a new iterative Monte Carlo fitting technique which generates stable fits to polarized parton distribution functions (PDFs) with statistically rigorous uncertainties. Inclusion of the Jefferson Lab data leads to a reduction in the PDF errors for the valence and sea quarks, as well as in the gluon polarization uncertainty at x ≳ 0.1. Furthermore, the study also provides the first determination of the flavor-separated twist-3 PDFs and the d2 moment of the nucleon within a global PDF analysis.

  10. Iterative Monte Carlo analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Sato, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, Wally; Kuhn, Sebastian E.; ...

    2016-04-05

    We present a comprehensive new global QCD analysis of polarized inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, including the latest high-precision data on longitudinal and transverse polarization asymmetries from Jefferson Lab and elsewhere. The analysis is performed using a new iterative Monte Carlo fitting technique which generates stable fits to polarized parton distribution functions (PDFs) with statistically rigorous uncertainties. Inclusion of the Jefferson Lab data leads to a reduction in the PDF errors for the valence and sea quarks, as well as in the gluon polarization uncertainty at x ≳ 0.1. Furthermore, the study also provides the first determination of the flavor-separated twist-3 PDFsmore » and the d2 moment of the nucleon within a global PDF analysis.« less

  11. Global NLO Analysis of Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, M.; Kumano, S.; Nagai, T.-H.

    2008-02-21

    Nuclear parton distribution functions (NPDFs) are determined by a global analysis of experimental measurements on structure-function ratios F{sub 2}{sup A}/F{sub 2}{sup A{sup '}} and Drell-Yan cross section ratios {sigma}{sub DY}{sup A}/{sigma}{sub DY}{sup A{sup '}}, and their uncertainties are estimated by the Hessian method. The NPDFs are obtained in both leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) of {alpha}{sub s}. As a result, valence-quark distributions are relatively well determined, whereas antiquark distributions at x>0.2 and gluon distributions in the whole x region have large uncertainties. The NLO uncertainties are slightly smaller than the LO ones; however, such a NLO improvement is not as significant as the nucleonic case.

  12. Studies of transverse momentum dependent parton distributions and Bessel weighting

    SciTech Connect

    Aghasyan, M.; Avakian, H.; De Sanctis, E.; Gamberg, L.; Mirazita, M.; Musch, B.; Prokudin, A.; Rossi, P.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a new technique for analysis of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions, based on the Bessel weighting formalism. The procedure is applied to studies of the double longitudinal spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering using a new dedicated Monte Carlo generator which includes quark intrinsic transverse momentum within the generalized parton model. Using a fully differential cross section for the process, the effect of four momentum conservation is analyzed using various input models for transverse momentum distributions and fragmentation functions. We observe a few percent systematic offset of the Bessel-weighted asymmetry obtained from Monte Carlo extraction compared to input model calculations, which is due to the limitations imposed by the energy and momentum conservation at the given energy/Q2. We find that the Bessel weighting technique provides a powerful and reliable tool to study the Fourier transform of TMDs with controlled systematics due to experimental acceptances and resolutions with different TMD model inputs.

  13. Studies of transverse momentum dependent parton distributions and Bessel weighting

    DOE PAGES

    Aghasyan, M.; Avakian, H.; De Sanctis, E.; ...

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a new technique for analysis of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions, based on the Bessel weighting formalism. The procedure is applied to studies of the double longitudinal spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering using a new dedicated Monte Carlo generator which includes quark intrinsic transverse momentum within the generalized parton model. Using a fully differential cross section for the process, the effect of four momentum conservation is analyzed using various input models for transverse momentum distributions and fragmentation functions. We observe a few percent systematic offset of the Bessel-weighted asymmetry obtained from Montemore » Carlo extraction compared to input model calculations, which is due to the limitations imposed by the energy and momentum conservation at the given energy/Q2. We find that the Bessel weighting technique provides a powerful and reliable tool to study the Fourier transform of TMDs with controlled systematics due to experimental acceptances and resolutions with different TMD model inputs.« less

  14. Proton structure and parton distribution functions from HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekelian, Vladimir

    2016-11-01

    The H1 and ZEUS collaborations at the electron-proton collider HERA collected e± p scattering data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb-1. The data were taken at proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV and an electron beam energy of 27.5 GeV, with different electric charges and longitudinal polarisation of the electron beam. Using these data inclusive neutral and charged current deep inelastic cross sections were measured over six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q2, and Bjorken x. A combination of all inclusive cross sections, published by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations at HERA, was performed. Using these combined HERA data and the individual H1 and ZEUS data taken using the polarised electron beams, the proton structure functions F2, FγZ2, xFγZ3 and FL were obtained, and scaling violations, electroweak unification, and polarisation effects in the charged current process were demonstrated. The combined cross sections were used as a sole input to QCD analyses at leading, next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading orders, providing a new set of parton distribution functions, denoted as HERAPDF2.0. An extension of the analysis by including HERA data on charm and jet production allowed a simultaneous determination of parton distributions and the strong coupling.

  15. Transverse momentum-dependent parton distribution functions in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhardt, Michael G.; Musch, Bernhard U.; Haegler, Philipp G.; Negele, John W.; Schaefer, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    A fundamental structural property of the nucleon is the distribution of quark momenta, both parallel as well as perpendicular to its propagation. Experimentally, this information is accessible via selected processes such as semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and the Drell-Yan process (DY), which can be parametrized in terms of transversemomentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs). On the other hand, these distribution functions can be extracted from nucleon matrix elements of a certain class of bilocal quark operators in which the quarks are connected by a staple-shaped Wilson line serving to incorporate initial state (DY) or final state (SIDIS) interactions. A scheme for evaluating such matrix elements within lattice QCD is developed. This requires casting the calculation in a particular Lorentz frame, which is facilitated by a parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes. Exploratory results are presented for the time-reversal odd Sivers and Boer-Mulders transverse momentum shifts.

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED "GLOBAL ANALYSIS OF POLARIZED PARTON DESTRIBUTIONS IN THE RHIC ERA" (VOLUME 86).

    SciTech Connect

    DESHPANDE,A.; VOGELSANG, W.

    2007-10-08

    The determination of the polarized gluon distribution is a central goal of the RHIC spin program. Recent achievements in polarization and luminosity of the proton beams in RHIC, has enabled the RHIC experiments to acquire substantial amounts of high quality data with polarized proton beams at 200 and 62.4 GeV center of mass energy, allowing a first glimpse of the polarized gluon distribution at RHIC. Short test operation at 500 GeV center of mass energy has also been successful, indicating absence of any fundamental roadblocks for measurements of polarized quark and anti-quark distributions planned at that energy in a couple of years. With this background, it has now become high time to consider how all these data sets may be employed most effectively to determine the polarized parton distributions in the nucleon, in general, and the polarized gluon distribution, in particular. A global analysis of the polarized DIS data from the past and present fixed target experiments jointly with the present and anticipated RHIC Spin data is needed.

  17. Sketching the Pion's Valence-Quark Generalised Parton Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Mezrag, C.; Chang, L.; Moutarde, H.; Roberts, C. D.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.; Sabatie, F.; Schmidt, S. M.

    2015-02-04

    In order to learn effectively from measurements of generalised parton distributions (GPDs), it is desirable to compute them using a framework that can potentially connect empirical information with basic features of the Standard Model. We sketch an approach to such computations, based upon a rainbow-ladder (RL) truncation of QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations and exemplified via the pion's valence dressed-quark GPD, H-pi(V)(chi, xi, t). Our analysis focuses primarily on xi = 0, although we also capitalise on the symmetry-preserving nature of the RL truncation by connecting H-pi(V)(chi, xi = +/- 1, t) with the pion's valence-quark parton distribution amplitude. We explain that the impulse-approximation used hitherto to define the pion's valence dressed-quark GPD is generally invalid owing to omission of contributions from the gluons which bind dressed-quarks into the pion. A simple correction enables us to identify a practicable improvement to the approximation for H(pi)(V)p(chi, 0, t), expressed as the Radon transform of a single amplitude. Therewith we obtain results for H pi V(chi, 0, t) and the associated impact-parameter dependent distribution, q(pi)(V)(chi, vertical bar(b) over right arrow (perpendicular to)vertical bar), which provide a qualitatively sound picture of the pion's dressed-quark structure at a hadronic scale. We evolve the distributions to a scale zeta = 2 GeV, so as to facilitate comparisons in future with results from experiment or other nonperturbative methods. (C) 2014 Published by Elsevier B. V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

  18. First Simultaneous Extraction of Spin-Dependent Parton Distributions and Fragmentation Functions from a Global QCD Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Ethier, Jacob J.; Sato Gonzalez, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2017-09-01

    We perform the first global QCD analysis of polarized inclusive and semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering and single-inclusive $e^+e^-$ annihilation data, fitting simultaneously the parton distribution and fragmentation functions using the iterative Monte Carlo method. Without imposing SU(3) symmetry relations, we find the strange polarization to be very small, consistent with zero for both inclusive and semi-inclusive data, which provides a resolution to the strange quark polarization puzzle. The combined analysis also allows the direct extraction from data of the isovector and octet axial charges, and is consistent with a small SU(2) flavor asymmetry of the polarized sea.

  19. Longitudinal and Transverse Parton Momentum Distributions for Hadrons within Relativistic Constituent Quark Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frederico, T.; Pace, E.; Pasquini, B.; Salme, G.

    2010-08-05

    Longitudinal and transverse parton distributions for pion and nucleon are calculated from hadron vertexes obtained by a study of form factors within relativistic quark models. The relevance of the one-gluon-exchange dominance at short range for the behavior of the form factors at large momentum transfer and of the parton distributions at the end points is stressed.

  20. ManeParse : A Mathematica reader for Parton Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. B.; Godat, E.; Olness, F. I.

    2017-07-01

    Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) are essential non-perturbative inputs for calculation of any observable with hadronic initial states. These PDFs are released by individual groups as discrete grids as a function of the Bjorken- x and energy scale Q. The LHAPDF project maintains a repository of PDFs from various groups in a new standardized LHAPDF6 format, additionally older formats such as the CTEQ PDS grid format are still in use. ManeParse is a package that provides access to PDFs within Mathematica to facilitate calculation and plotting. The program is self-contained so there are no external links to any FORTRAN, C or C++ programs. The package includes the option to use the built-in Mathematica interpolation or a custom cubic Lagrange interpolation routine which allows for flexibility in the extrapolation (particularly at small x-values). ManeParse is fast enough to enable simple calculations (involving even one or two integrations) in the Mathematica framework.

  1. From Bethe-Salpeter Wave functions to Generalised Parton Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezrag, C.; Moutarde, H.; Rodríguez-Quintero, J.

    2016-09-01

    We review recent works on the modelling of generalised parton distributions within the Dyson-Schwinger formalism. We highlight how covariant computations, using the impulse approximation, allows one to fulfil most of the theoretical constraints of the GPDs. Specific attention is brought to chiral properties and especially the so-called soft pion theorem, and its link with the Axial-Vector Ward-Takahashi identity. The limitation of the impulse approximation are also explained. Beyond impulse approximation computations are reviewed in the forward case. Finally, we stress the advantages of the overlap of lightcone wave functions, and possible ways to construct covariant GPD models within this framework, in a two-body approximation.

  2. From Bethe-Salpeter Wave Functions to Generalised Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Mezrag, C.; Moutarde, H.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2016-06-06

    We review recent works on the modelling of Generalised Parton Distributions within the Dyson-Schwinger formalism. We highlight how covariant computations, using the impulse approximation, allows one to fulfil most of the theoretical constraints of the GPDs. A specific attention is brought to chiral properties and especially the so-called soft pion theorem, and its link with the Axial-Vector Ward-Takahashi identity. The limitation of the impulse approximation are also explained. Beyond impulse approximation computations are reviewed in the forward case. Finally, we stress the advantages of the overlap of lightcone wave functions, and possible ways to construct covariant GPD models within this framework, in a two-body approximation

  3. Transverse momentum-dependent parton distribution functions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Engelhardt, Philipp Haegler, Bernhard Musch, John Negele, Andreas Schaefer

    2012-12-01

    Transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) relevant for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and the Drell-Yan process can be defined in terms of matrix elements of a quark bilocal operator containing a staple-shaped Wilson connection. Starting from such a definition, a scheme to determine TMDs in lattice QCD is developed and explored. Parametrizing the aforementioned matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes permits a simple transformation of the problem to a Lorentz frame suited for the lattice calculation. Results for the Sivers and Boer-Mulders transverse momentum shifts are obtained using ensembles at the pion masses 369MeV and 518MeV, focusing in particular on the dependence of these shifts on the staple extent and a Collins-Soper-type evolution parameter quantifying proximity of the staples to the light cone.

  4. Towards a model of pion generalized parton distributions from Dyson-Schwinger equations

    SciTech Connect

    Moutarde, H.

    2015-04-10

    We compute the pion quark Generalized Parton Distribution H{sup q} and Double Distributions F{sup q} and G{sup q} in a coupled Bethe-Salpeter and Dyson-Schwinger approach. We use simple algebraic expressions inspired by the numerical resolution of Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations. We explicitly check the support and polynomiality properties, and the behavior under charge conjugation or time invariance of our model. We derive analytic expressions for the pion Double Distributions and Generalized Parton Distribution at vanishing pion momentum transfer at a low scale. Our model compares very well to experimental pion form factor or parton distribution function data.

  5. Cross Sections for the Exclusive Photon Electroproduction on the Proton and Generalized Parton Distributions.

    PubMed

    Jo, H S; Girod, F X; Avakian, H; Burkert, V D; Garçon, M; Guidal, M; Kubarovsky, V; Niccolai, S; Stoler, P; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Amaryan, M J; Anderson, M D; Anefalos Pereira, S; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Compton, N; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Dupre, R; Alaoui, A El; Fassi, L El; Elouadrhiri, L; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Filippi, A; Fleming, J A; Garillon, B; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guegan, B; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Hirlinger Saylor, N; Ho, D; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Joosten, S; Keller, D; Khachatryan, G; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Lenisa, P; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; McKinnon, B; Meziani, Z E; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R A; Moutarde, H; Movsisyan, A; Munevar, E; Munoz Camacho, C; Nadel-Turonski, P; Net, L A; Niculescu, G; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Phillips, J J; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Puckett, A J R; Raue, B A; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Roy, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Simonyan, A; Skorodumina, Iu; Smith, G D; Sokhan, D; Sparveris, N; Stepanyan, S; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W; Zonta, I

    2015-11-20

    Unpolarized and beam-polarized fourfold cross sections (d^{4}σ/dQ^{2}dx_{B}dtdϕ) for the ep→e^{'}p^{'}γ reaction were measured using the CLAS detector and the 5.75-GeV polarized electron beam of the Jefferson Lab accelerator, for 110 (Q^{2},x_{B},t) bins over the widest phase space ever explored in the valence-quark region. Several models of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) describe the data well at most of our kinematics. This increases our confidence that we understand the GPD H, expected to be the dominant contributor to these observables. Through a leading-twist extraction of Compton form factors, these results support the model predictions of a larger nucleon size at lower quark-momentum fraction x_{B}.

  6. Cross Sections for the Exclusive Photon Electroproduction on the Proton and Generalized Parton Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, H. S.; Girod, F. X.; Avakian, H.; Burkert, V. D.; Garçon, M.; Guidal, M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Niccolai, S.; Stoler, P.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Garillon, B.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Hirlinger Saylor, N.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; McKinnon, B.; Meziani, Z. E.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Unpolarized and beam-polarized fourfold cross sections (d4σ /d Q2d xBd t d ϕ ) for the e p →e'p'γ reaction were measured using the CLAS detector and the 5.75-GeV polarized electron beam of the Jefferson Lab accelerator, for 110 (Q2,xB,t ) bins over the widest phase space ever explored in the valence-quark region. Several models of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) describe the data well at most of our kinematics. This increases our confidence that we understand the GPD H , expected to be the dominant contributor to these observables. Through a leading-twist extraction of Compton form factors, these results support the model predictions of a larger nucleon size at lower quark-momentum fraction xB.

  7. Cross sections for the exclusive photon electroproduction on the proton and Generalized Parton Distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Jo, Hyon -Suk

    2015-11-17

    Unpolarized and beam-polarized four-fold cross sectionsmore » $$\\frac{d^4 \\sigma}{dQ^2 dx_B dt d\\phi}$$ for the $$ep\\to e^\\prime p^\\prime \\gamma$$ reaction were measured using the CLAS detector and the 5.75-GeV polarized electron beam of the Jefferson Lab accelerator, for 110 ($$Q^2,x_B,t$$) bins over the widest phase space ever explored in the valence-quark region. Several models of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) describe the data well at most of our kinematics. This increases our confidence that we understand the GPD $H$, expected to be the dominant contributor to these observables. Thus, through a leading-twist extraction of Compton Form Factors, these results reveal a tomographic image of the nucleon.« less

  8. Cross sections for the exclusive photon electroproduction on the proton and Generalized Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Hyon -Suk

    2015-11-17

    Unpolarized and beam-polarized four-fold cross sections $\\frac{d^4 \\sigma}{dQ^2 dx_B dt d\\phi}$ for the $ep\\to e^\\prime p^\\prime \\gamma$ reaction were measured using the CLAS detector and the 5.75-GeV polarized electron beam of the Jefferson Lab accelerator, for 110 ($Q^2,x_B,t$) bins over the widest phase space ever explored in the valence-quark region. Several models of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) describe the data well at most of our kinematics. This increases our confidence that we understand the GPD $H$, expected to be the dominant contributor to these observables. Thus, through a leading-twist extraction of Compton Form Factors, these results reveal a tomographic image of the nucleon.

  9. Dual parametrization of generalized parton distributions in two equivalent representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, D.; Polyakov, M. V.; Semenov-Tian-Shansky, K. M.

    2015-03-01

    The dual parametrization and the Mellin-Barnes integral approach represent two frameworks for handling the double partial wave expansion of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in the conformal partial waves and in the t-channel SO(3) partial waves. Within the dual parametrization framework, GPDs are represented as integral convolutions of forward-like functions whose Mellin moments generate the conformal moments of GPDs. The Mellin-Barnes integral approach is based on the analytic continuation of the GPD conformal moments to the complex values of the conformal spin. GPDs are then represented as the Mellin-Barnes-type integrals in the complex conformal spin plane. In this paper we explicitly show the equivalence of these two independently developed GPD representations. Furthermore, we clarify the notions of the J = 0 fixed pole and the D-form factor. We also provide some insight into GPD modeling and map the phenomenologically successful Kumerički-Müller GPD model to the dual parametrization framework by presenting the set of the corresponding forward-like functions. We also build up the reparametrization procedure allowing to recast the double distribution representation of GPDs in the Mellin-Barnes integral framework and present the explicit formula for mapping double distributions into the space of double partial wave amplitudes with complex conformal spin.

  10. Chiral-Odd Generalized Parton Distributions, Transversity and Double Transverse-Spin Asymmetry in Drell-Yan Dilepton Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincetti, M.; Pasquini, B.; Boffi, S.

    2007-04-01

    Within the framework of light-cone quantization we derive the overlap representation of generalized parton distributions for transversely polarized quarks using the Fock-state decomposition in the transverse-spin basis. We apply this formalism to the case of light-cone wave functions in a constituent quark model giving numerical results for the four chiral-odd generalized parton distributions in a region where they describe the emission and reabsorption of a quark by the nucleon. With the transversity distribution obtained in the forward limit of the generalized distribution, we provide some predictions for the double transverse-spin asymmetry in Drell-Yan dilepton production in the kinematics of the \\cal {PAX} experiment.

  11. EPPS16: nuclear parton distributions with LHC data.

    PubMed

    Eskola, Kari J; Paakkinen, Petja; Paukkunen, Hannu; Salgado, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a global analysis of collinearly factorized nuclear parton distribution functions (PDFs) including, for the first time, data constraints from LHC proton-lead collisions. In comparison to our previous analysis, EPS09, where data only from charged-lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering (DIS), Drell-Yan (DY) dilepton production in proton-nucleus collisions and inclusive pion production in deuteron-nucleus collisions were the input, we now increase the variety of data constraints to cover also neutrino-nucleus DIS and low-mass DY production in pion-nucleus collisions. The new LHC data significantly extend the kinematic reach of the data constraints. We now allow much more freedom for the flavor dependence of nuclear effects than in other currently available analyses. As a result, especially the uncertainty estimates are more objective flavor by flavor. The neutrino DIS plays a pivotal role in obtaining a mutually consistent behavior for both up and down valence quarks, and the LHC dijet data clearly constrain gluons at large momentum fraction. Mainly for insufficient statistics, the pion-nucleus DY and heavy-gauge-boson production in proton-lead collisions impose less visible constraints. The outcome - a new set of next-to-leading order nuclear PDFs called EPPS16 - is made available for applications in high-energy nuclear collisions.

  12. The ABM parton distributions tuned to LHC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhin, S.; Blümlein, J.; Moch, S.

    2014-03-01

    We present a global fit of parton distributions at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD. The fit is based on the world data for deep-inelastic scattering, fixed-target data for the Drell-Yan process and includes, for the first time, data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for the Drell-Yan process and the hadroproduction of top-quark pairs. The analysis applies the fixed-flavor number scheme for nf=3, 4, 5, uses the MS¯ scheme for the strong coupling αs and the heavy-quark masses and keeps full account of the correlations among all nonperturbative parameters. At NNLO this returns the values of αs(MZ)=0.1132±0.0011 and mt(pole)=171.2±2.4 GeV for the top-quark pole mass. The fit results are used to compute benchmark cross sections for the Higgs production at the LHC to NNLO accuracy. We compare our results to those obtained by other groups and show that differences can be linked to different theoretical descriptions of the underlying physical processes.

  13. EPPS16: nuclear parton distributions with LHC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskola, Kari J.; Paakkinen, Petja; Paukkunen, Hannu; Salgado, Carlos A.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a global analysis of collinearly factorized nuclear parton distribution functions (PDFs) including, for the first time, data constraints from LHC proton-lead collisions. In comparison to our previous analysis, EPS09, where data only from charged-lepton-nucleus deep inelastic scattering (DIS), Drell-Yan (DY) dilepton production in proton-nucleus collisions and inclusive pion production in deuteron-nucleus collisions were the input, we now increase the variety of data constraints to cover also neutrino-nucleus DIS and low-mass DY production in pion-nucleus collisions. The new LHC data significantly extend the kinematic reach of the data constraints. We now allow much more freedom for the flavor dependence of nuclear effects than in other currently available analyses. As a result, especially the uncertainty estimates are more objective flavor by flavor. The neutrino DIS plays a pivotal role in obtaining a mutually consistent behavior for both up and down valence quarks, and the LHC dijet data clearly constrain gluons at large momentum fraction. Mainly for insufficient statistics, the pion-nucleus DY and heavy-gauge-boson production in proton-lead collisions impose less visible constraints. The outcome - a new set of next-to-leading order nuclear PDFs called EPPS16 - is made available for applications in high-energy nuclear collisions.

  14. Q2-DEPENDENCE of the Statistical Parton Distributions in the Valon Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohaily, S.; Yazdanpanah, M. M.; Mirjalili, A.

    2012-06-01

    We employ the statistical approach to obtain the nucleon parton distributions. Statistical distributions are considered as well for partons in the valon model in which a nucleon is assumed to be a state of three valence quark clusters (valon). Analytic expressions of the x-dependent of parton distribution functions (PDFs) in the valon model are obtained statistically in the whole x region [0, 1] in terms of the statistical parameters such as temperature, chemical potential and accessible volume. Since PDFs are obtained by taking the required sum rules including Gottfried sum rule at different energy scales, the Q2-dependence of these parameters can be obtained. Therefore the parton distributions as a function of Q2 will be resulted. To make the calculations more precise, we extend our results to contain three flavors rather than two light u and d quarks.

  15. Working Group I: Parton distributions: Summary report for the HERA LHC Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmar, M.; Forte, S.; Glazov, A.; Moch, S.; Alekhin, S.; Altarelli, G.; Andersen, Jeppe R.; Ball, R.D.; Blumlein, J.; Bottcher, H.; Carli, T.; Ciafaloni, M.; Colferai, D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Corcella, G.; Del Debbio, L.; Dissertori, G.; Feltesse, J.; Guffanti, A.; Gwenlan, C.; Huston, J.; /Zurich, ETH /DESY, Zeuthen /Serpukhov, IHEP /CERN /Rome III U. /INFN, Rome3 /Cambridge U. /Edinburgh U. /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Oxford U. /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /Michigan State U. /Uppsala U. /Barcelona U., ECM /Podgorica U. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Harish-Chandra Res. Inst. /Fermilab /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II

    2005-11-01

    We provide an assessment of the impact of parton distributions on the determination of LHC processes, and of the accuracy with which parton distributions (PDFs) can be extracted from data, in particular from current and forthcoming HERA experiments. We give an overview of reference LHC processes and their associated PDF uncertainties, and study in detail W and Z production at the LHC.We discuss the precision which may be obtained from the analysis of existing HERA data, tests of consistency of HERA data from different experiments, and the combination of these data. We determine further improvements on PDFs which may be obtained from future HERA data (including measurements of F{sub L}), and from combining present and future HERA data with present and future hadron collider data. We review the current status of knowledge of higher (NNLO) QCD corrections to perturbative evolution and deep-inelastic scattering, and provide reference results for their impact on parton evolution, and we briefly examine non-perturbative models for parton distributions. We discuss the state-of-the art in global parton fits, we assess the impact on them of various kinds of data and of theoretical corrections, by providing benchmarks of Alekhin and MRST parton distributions and a CTEQ analysis of parton fit stability, and we briefly presents proposals for alternative approaches to parton fitting. We summarize the status of large and small x resummation, by providing estimates of the impact of large x resummation on parton fits, and a comparison of different approaches to small x resummation, for which we also discuss numerical techniques.

  16. Flavour symmetry breaking in the kaon parton distribution amplitude

    DOE PAGES

    none,

    2014-11-01

    We compute the kaon's valence-quark (twist-two parton) distribution amplitude (PDA) by projecting its Poincaré-covariant Bethe–Salpeter wave-function onto the light-front. At a scale ζ = 2 GeV, the PDA is a broad, concave and asymmetric function, whose peak is shifted 12–16% away from its position in QCD's conformal limit. These features are a clear expression of SU(3)-flavour-symmetry breaking. They show that the heavier quark in the kaon carries more of the bound-state's momentum than the lighter quark and also that emergent phenomena in QCD modulate the magnitude of flavour-symmetry breaking: it is markedly smaller than one might expect based on themore » difference between light-quark current masses. Our results add to a body of evidence which indicates that at any energy scale accessible with existing or foreseeable facilities, a reliable guide to the interpretation of experiment requires the use of such nonperturbatively broadened PDAs in leading-order, leading-twist formulae for hard exclusive processes instead of the asymptotic PDA associated with QCD's conformal limit. We illustrate this via the ratio of kaon and pion electromagnetic form factors: using our nonperturbative PDAs in the appropriate formulae, FK/Fπ=1.23 at spacelike-Q2=17 GeV2, which compares satisfactorily with the value of 0.92(5) inferred in e+e- annihilation at s=17 GeV2.« less

  17. Impact of CLAS and COMPASS data on polarized parton densities and higher twist

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, Elliot; Sidorov, Aleksander V.; Stamenov, Dimiter B.

    2007-04-01

    We have reanalyzed the world data on inclusive polarized deep inelastic scattering (DIS) including the very precise CLAS proton and deuteron data, as well as the latest COMPASS data on the asymmetry A{sub 1}{sup d}, and have studied the impact of these data on polarized parton densities and higher twist effects. We demonstrate that the low Q{sup 2} CLAS data improve essentially our knowledge of higher twist corrections to the spin structure function g{sub 1}, while the large Q{sup 2} COMPASS data influence mainly the strange quark density. In our new analysis we find that a negative polarized gluon density, or one that changes sign as a function of x, cannot be ruled out on the basis of the present DIS data.

  18. Integral equation for spin dependent unintegrated parton distributions incorporating double ln2(1/x) effects at low x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwieciński, Jan; Maul, Martin

    2003-02-01

    In this paper we derive an integral equation for the evolution of unintegrated (longitudinally) polarized quark and gluon parton distributions. The conventional Catani-Ciafaloni-Fiorani-Marchesini (CCFM) framework is modified at small x in order to incorporate the QCD expectations concerning the double ln2(1/x) resummation at low x for the integrated distributions. Complete Altarelli-Parisi splitting functions are included that makes the formalism compatible with the leading order Altarelli-Parisi evolution at large and moderately small values of x. The obtained modified polarized CCFM equation is shown to be partially diagonalized by the Fourier-Bessel transformation. Results of the numerical solution for this modifed polarized CCFM equation for the nonsinglet quark distributions are presented.

  19. Evolution equations for connected and disconnected sea parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keh-Fei

    2017-08-01

    It has been revealed from the path-integral formulation of the hadronic tensor that there are connected sea and disconnected sea partons. The former is responsible for the Gottfried sum rule violation primarily and evolves the same way as the valence. Therefore, the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equations can be extended to accommodate them separately. We discuss its consequences and implications vis-á-vis lattice calculations.

  20. Transverse Momentum Dependent Parton Distribution/Fragmentation Functions at an Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    M. Anselmino, H. Avakian, D. Boer, F. Bradamante, M. Burkardt, J.P. Chen, E. Cisbani, M. Contalbrigo, D. Crabb, D. Dutta, L. Gamberg, H. Gao, D. Hasch, J. Huang, M. Huang, Z. Kang, C. Keppel, G. Laskaris, Z-T. Liang, M.X. Liu, N. Makins, R.D. Mckeown, A. Metz, Z-E. Meziani, B. Musch, J-C. Peng, A. Prokudin, X. Qian, Y. Qiang, J.W. Qiu, P. Rossi, P. Schweitzer, J. Soffer, V. Sulkosky, Y. Wang, B. Xiao, Q. Ye, Q-J. Ye, F. Yuan, X. Zhan, Y. Zhang, W. Zheng, J. Zhou

    2011-03-01

    We present a summary of a recent workshop held at Duke University on Partonic Transverse Momentum in Hadrons: Quark Spin-Orbit Correlations and Quark-Gluon Interactions. The transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs), parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, and multi-parton correlation functions, were discussed extensively at the Duke workshop. In this paper, we summarize first the theoretical issues concerning the study of partonic structure of hadrons at a future electron-ion collider (EIC) with emphasis on the TMDs. We then present simulation results on experimental studies of TMDs through measurements of single spin asymmetries (SSA) from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) processes with an EIC, and discuss the requirement of the detector for SIDIS measurements. The dynamics of parton correlations in the nucleon is further explored via a study of SSA in D (`D) production at large transverse momenta with the aim of accessing the unexplored tri-gluon correlation functions. The workshop participants identified the SSA measurements in SIDIS as a golden program to study TMDs in both the sea and valence quark regions and to study the role of gluons, with the Sivers asymmetry measurements as examples. Such measurements will lead to major advancement in our understanding of TMDs in the valence quark region, and more importantly also allow for the investigation of TMDs in the sea quark region along with a study of their evolution.

  1. TMDlib and TMDplotter: library and plotting tools for transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions.

    PubMed

    Hautmann, F; Jung, H; Krämer, M; Mulders, P J; Nocera, E R; Rogers, T C; Signori, A

    Transverse-momentum-dependent distributions (TMDs) are extensions of collinear parton distributions and are important in high-energy physics from both theoretical and phenomenological points of view. In this manual we introduce the library [Formula: see text], a tool to collect transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution functions (TMD PDFs) and fragmentation functions (TMD FFs) together with an online plotting tool, TMDplotter. We provide a description of the program components and of the different physical frameworks the user can access via the available parameterisations.

  2. Structure functions in the polarized Drell-Yan processes with spin-1/2 and spin-1 hadrons. II. Parton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, S.; Kumano, S.

    1999-09-01

    We analyze the polarized Drell-Yan processes with spin-1/2 and spin-1 hadrons in a parton model. Quark and antiquark correlation functions are expressed in terms of possible combinations of Lorentz vectors and pseudovectors with the constrains of Hermiticity, parity conservation, and time-reversal invariance. Then, we find tensor-polarized distributions for a spin-1 hadron. The naive parton model predicts that there exist 19 structure functions. However, there are only four or five nonvanishing structure functions, depending on whether the cross section is integrated over the virtual-photon transverse momentum Q-->T or the limit QT-->0 is taken. One of the finite structure functions is related to the tensor-polarized distribution b1, and it does not exist in the proton-proton reactions. The vanishing structure functions should be associated with higher-twist physics. The tensor distributions can be measured by the quadrupole polarization measurements. The Drell-Yan process has an advantage over the lepton reaction in the sense that the antiquark tensor polarization could be extracted rather easily.

  3. nCTEQ15 - Global analysis of nuclear parton distributions with uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Kusina, A.; Kovarik, K.; Jezo, T.; Clark, D. B.; Keppel, C.; Lyonnet, F.; Morfin, J. G.; Olness, F. I.; Owens, J. F.; Schienbein, I.; Yu, J. Y.

    2015-09-04

    We present the first official release of the nCTEQ nuclear parton distribution functions with errors. The main addition to the previous nCTEQ PDFs is the introduction of PDF uncertainties based on the Hessian method. Another important addition is the inclusion of pion production data from RHIC that give us a handle on constraining the gluon PDF. This contribution summarizes our results from arXiv:1509.00792, and concentrates on the comparison with other groups providing nuclear parton distributions.

  4. Evolution equations for the double parton distributions. Initial conditions and transverse momentum dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staśto, Anna M.; Golec-Biernat, Krzysztof

    2017-04-01

    In the first part of this contribution we discuss the problem of the initial conditions for the evolution of double parton distribution functions (PDFs). We show that one can construct a framework based on the expansion in terms of the Dirichlet functions in which both single and double PDFs satisfy momentum sum rules. In the second part, we propose how to include the transverse momentum dependence for the double parton distribution functions using the extension of the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin framework previously applied to the single PDFs.

  5. Bayesian extraction of the parton distribution amplitude from the Bethe-Salpeter wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Chang, Lei; Liu, Yu-xin

    2017-07-01

    We propose a new numerical method to compute the parton distribution amplitude (PDA) from the Euclidean Bethe-Salpeter wave function. The essential step is to extract the weight function in the Nakanishi representation of the Bethe-Salpeter wave function in Euclidean space, which is an ill-posed inversion problem, via the maximum entropy method (MEM). The Nakanishi weight function as well as the corresponding light-front parton distribution amplitude (PDA) can be well determined. We confirm prior work on PDA computations, which was based on different methods.

  6. nCTEQ15 - Global analysis of nuclear parton distributions with uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Kusina, A.; Jezo, T.; Clark, D. B.; Keppel, Cynthia; Lyonnet, F.; Morfin, Jorge; Olness, F. I.; Owens, Jeff; Schienbein, I.

    2015-09-01

    We present the first official release of the nCTEQ nuclear parton distribution functions with errors. The main addition to the previous nCTEQ PDFs is the introduction of PDF uncertainties based on the Hessian method. Another important addition is the inclusion of pion production data from RHIC that give us a handle on constraining the gluon PDF. This contribution summarizes our results from arXiv:1509.00792 and concentrates on the comparison with other groups providing nuclear parton distributions.

  7. Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions in a spectator diquark model

    SciTech Connect

    F Conti, A Bacchetta, M Radici

    2009-09-01

    Within the framework of a spectator diquark model of the nucleon, involving both scalar and axial-vector diquarks, we calculate all the leading-twist transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs). Naive Time-odd densities are generated through a one-gluon-loop rescattering mechanism, simulating the final state interactions required for these functions to exist. Analytic results are obtained for all the TMDs, and a connection with the light-cone wave functions formalism is also established. The model parameters are fixed by reproducing the phenomenological parametrizations of unpolarized and helicity parton distributions at the lowest available scale. Predictions for the other parton densities are given and, whenever possible, compared with available parametrizations.

  8. Heavy quarkonium production at collider energies: Partonic cross section and polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Jian -Wei; Kang, Zhong -Bo; Ma, Yan -Qing; Sterman, George

    2015-01-27

    We calculate the O(α³s) short-distance, QCD collinear-factorized coefficient functions for all partonic channels that include the production of a heavy quark pair at short distances. Thus, this provides the first power correction to the collinear-factorized inclusive hadronic production of heavy quarkonia at large transverse momentum, pT, including the full leading-order perturbative contributions to the production of heavy quark pairs in all color and spin states employed in NRQCD treatments of this process. We discuss the role of the first power correction in the production rates and the polarizations of heavy quarkonia in high-energy hadronic collisions. The consistency of QCD collinear factorization and nonrelativistic QCD factorization applied to heavy quarkonium production is also discussed.

  9. Heavy quarkonium production at collider energies: Partonic cross section and polarization

    DOE PAGES

    Qiu, Jian -Wei; Kang, Zhong -Bo; Ma, Yan -Qing; ...

    2015-01-27

    We calculate the O(α³s) short-distance, QCD collinear-factorized coefficient functions for all partonic channels that include the production of a heavy quark pair at short distances. Thus, this provides the first power correction to the collinear-factorized inclusive hadronic production of heavy quarkonia at large transverse momentum, pT, including the full leading-order perturbative contributions to the production of heavy quark pairs in all color and spin states employed in NRQCD treatments of this process. We discuss the role of the first power correction in the production rates and the polarizations of heavy quarkonia in high-energy hadronic collisions. The consistency of QCD collinearmore » factorization and nonrelativistic QCD factorization applied to heavy quarkonium production is also discussed.« less

  10. Constraints on spin-dependent parton distributions at large x from global QCD analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Avakian, H.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2014-09-28

    This study investigate the behavior of spin-dependent parton distribution functions (PDFs) at large parton momentum fractions x in the context of global QCD analysis. We explore the constraints from existing deep-inelastic scattering data, and from theoretical expectations for the leading x → 1 behavior based on hard gluon exchange in perturbative QCD. Systematic uncertainties from the dependence of the PDFs on the choice of parametrization are studied by considering functional forms motivated by orbital angular momentum arguments. Finally, we quantify the reduction in the PDF uncertainties that may be expected from future high-x data from Jefferson Lab at 12 GeV.

  11. Note on lattice regularization and equal-time correlators for parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, G. C.; Testa, M.

    2017-07-01

    We show that a recent interesting idea to circumvent the difficulties with the continuation of parton distribution functions to the Euclidean region, which consists in looking at equal time correlators between proton states of infinite momentum, encounters some problems related to the power divergent mixing pattern of deep inelastic scattering operators, when implemented within the lattice regularization.

  12. Correlations in double parton distributions: perturbative and non-perturbative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, Matteo; Scopetta, Sergio; Traini, Marco; Vento, Vicente

    2016-10-01

    The correct description of Double Parton Scattering (DPS), which represents a background in several channels for the search of new Physics at the LHC, requires the knowledge of double parton distribution functions (dPDFs). These quantities represent also a novel tool for the study of the three-dimensional nucleon structure, complementary to the possibilities offered by electromagnetic probes. In this paper we analyze dPDFs using Poincaré covariant predictions obtained by using a Light-Front constituent quark model proposed in a recent paper, and QCD evolution. We study to what extent factorized expressions for dPDFs, which neglect, at least in part, two-parton correlations, can be used. We show that they fail in reproducing the calculated dPDFs, in particular in the valence region. Actually measurable processes at existing facilities occur at low longitudinal momenta of the interacting partons; to have contact with these processes we have analyzed correlations between pairs of partons of different kind, finding that, in some cases, they are strongly suppressed at low longitudinal momenta, while for other distributions they can be sizeable. For example, the effect of gluon-gluon correlations can be as large as 20 %. We have shown that these behaviors can be understood in terms of a delicate interference of non-perturbative correlations, generated by the dynamics of the model, and perturbative ones, generated by the model independent evolution procedure. Our analysis shows that at LHC kinematics two-parton correlations can be relevant in DPS, and therefore we address the possibility to study them experimentally.

  13. New parton distributions from large-x and low-Q2 data

    SciTech Connect

    Alberto Accardi; Christy, M. Eric; Keppel, Cynthia E.; Melnitchouk, Wally; Monaghan, Peter A.; Morfin, Jorge G.; Owens, Joseph F.

    2010-02-11

    We report results of a new global next-to-leading order fit of parton distribution functions in which cuts on W and Q are relaxed, thereby including more data at high values of x. Effects of target mass corrections (TMCs), higher twist contributions, and nuclear corrections for deuterium data are significant in the large-x region. The leading twist parton distributions are found to be stable to TMC model variations as long as higher twist contributions are also included. Furthermore, the behavior of the d quark as x → 1 is particularly sensitive to the deuterium corrections, and using realistic nuclear smearing models the d-quark distribution at large x is found to be softer than in previous fits performed with more restrictive cuts.

  14. New parton distributions from large-x and low-Q2 data

    DOE PAGES

    Alberto Accardi; Christy, M. Eric; Keppel, Cynthia E.; ...

    2010-02-11

    We report results of a new global next-to-leading order fit of parton distribution functions in which cuts on W and Q are relaxed, thereby including more data at high values of x. Effects of target mass corrections (TMCs), higher twist contributions, and nuclear corrections for deuterium data are significant in the large-x region. The leading twist parton distributions are found to be stable to TMC model variations as long as higher twist contributions are also included. Furthermore, the behavior of the d quark as x → 1 is particularly sensitive to the deuterium corrections, and using realistic nuclear smearing modelsmore » the d-quark distribution at large x is found to be softer than in previous fits performed with more restrictive cuts.« less

  15. The Generalized Parton Distribution program after the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Franck Sabatie

    2009-12-01

    The Generalized Parton Distribution framework was introduced in the late 90's and describes the nucleon in a revolutionary way, correlating the information from both momentum and transverse position space into experimentally accessible functions. After a brief introduction, this article reviews the Jefferson Lab 6 GeV measurements of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering in Halls A and B, which give a unique access to Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD). The second half of this article reviews the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade in general terms, and then focuses on the GPD program in Halls A and B. This second generation of experiments will yield more accurate, more complete data in a wider kinematical range than any experiment ever before, using the full capability of a higher beam energy, higher luminosities, upgraded detectors and refined extraction techniques.

  16. Leading twist nuclear shadowing, nuclear generalized parton distributions and nuclear DVCS at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Guzey, Vadim; Goeke, Klaus; Siddikov, Marat

    2009-01-01

    We generalize the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing and calculate quark and gluon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of spinless nuclei. We predict very large nuclear shadowing for nuclear GPDs. In the limit of the purely transverse momentum transfer, our nuclear GPDs become impact parameter dependent nuclear parton distributions (PDFs). Nuclear shadowing induces non-trivial correlations between the impact parameter $b$ and the light-cone fraction $x$. We make predictions for the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) amplitude and the DVCS cross section on $^{208}$Pb at high energies. We calculate the cross section of the Bethe-Heitler (BH) process and address the issue of the extraction of the DVCS signal from the $e A \\to e \\gamma A$ cross section. We find that the $e A \\to e \\gamma A$ differential cross section is dominated by DVCS at the momentum transfer $t$ near the minima of the nuclear form factor. We also find that nuclear shadowing leads

  17. Strange quark parton distribution functions and implications for Drell-Yan boson production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusina, A.; Stavreva, T.; Berge, S.; Olness, F. I.; Schienbein, I.; Kovařík, K.; Ježo, T.; Yu, J. Y.; Park, K.

    2012-05-01

    Global analyses of parton distribution functions (PDFs) have provided incisive constraints on the up and down quark components of the proton, but constraining the other flavor degrees of freedom is more challenging. Higher-order theory predictions and new data sets have contributed to recent improvements. Despite these efforts, the strange quark parton distribution function has a sizable uncertainty, particularly in the small x region. We examine the constraints from experiment and theory, and investigate the impact of this uncertainty on LHC observables. In particular, we study W/Z production to see how the s quark uncertainty propagates to these observables, and examine the extent to which precise measurements at the LHC can provide additional information on the proton flavor structure.

  18. Spin-dependent parton distributions in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    I.C. Cloet; W. Bentz; A.W. Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Spin-dependent quark light-cone momentum distributions are calculated for a nucleon in the nuclear medium. We utilize a modified NJL model where the nucleon is described as a composite quark-diquark state. Scalar and vector mean fields are incorporated in the nuclear medium and these fields couple to the confined quarks in the nucleon. The effect of these fields on the spin-dependent distributions and consequently the axial charges is investigated. Our results for the ''spin-dependent EMC effect'' are also discussed.

  19. Transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions generated in the modified DGLAP formalism based on the valence-like distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinkhani, H.; Modarres, M.; Olanj, N.

    2017-07-01

    Transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distributions, also referred to as unintegrated parton distribution functions (UPDFs), are produced via the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin (KMR) prescription. The GJR08 set of parton distribution functions (PDFs) which are based on the valence-like distributions is used, at the leading order (LO) and the next-to-leading order (NLO) approximations, as inputs of the KMR formalism. The general and the relative behaviors of the generated TMD PDFs at LO and NLO and their ratios in a wide range of the transverse momentum values, i.e. kt2 = 10, 102, 104 and 108GeV2 are investigated. It is shown that the properties of the parent valence-like PDFs are imprinted on the daughter TMD PDFs. Imposing the angular ordering constraint (AOC) leads to the dynamical variable limits on the integrals which in turn increase the contributions from the lower scales at lower kt2. The results are compared with our previous studies based on the MSTW2008 input PDFs and it is shown that the present calculation gives flatter TMD PDFs. Finally, a comparison of longitudinal structure function (FL) is made by using the produced TMD PDFs and those that were generated through the MSTW2008-LO PDF from our previous work and the corresponding data from H1 and ZEUS collaborations and a reasonable agreement is found.

  20. Hadron production in deuteron-gold collisions and nuclear parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Adeluyi, Adeola; Fai, George

    2007-11-15

    We calculate nuclear modification factors R{sub dAu}, central-to-peripheral ratios, R{sub CP}, and pseudorapidity asymmetries Y{sub Asym} in deuteron-gold collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV in the framework of leading-order (LO) perturbative quantum chromodynamics. We use the Eskola-Kolhinen-Salgado (EKS), the Frankfurt-Guzey-Strikman (FGS), and the Hirai-Kumano-Nagai (HKN) nuclear parton distribution functions and the Albino-Kramer-Kniehl (AKK) fragmentation functions in our calculations. Results are compared to experimental data from the BRAHMS and STAR collaborations.

  1. Hadron production in deuteron-gold collisions and nuclear parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeluyi, Adeola; Fai, George

    2007-11-01

    We calculate nuclear modification factors RdAu, central-to-peripheral ratios, RCP, and pseudorapidity asymmetries YAsym in deuteron-gold collisions at s=200 GeV in the framework of leading-order (LO) perturbative quantum chromodynamics. We use the Eskola-Kolhinen-Salgado (EKS), the Frankfurt-Guzey-Strikman (FGS), and the Hirai-Kumano-Nagai (HKN) nuclear parton distribution functions and the Albino-Kramer-Kniehl (AKK) fragmentation functions in our calculations. Results are compared to experimental data from the BRAHMS and STAR collaborations.

  2. The Generalized Parton Distribution program in Hall A at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, C. Munoz

    2008-10-13

    Recent results on the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) program at Jefferson Lab (JLab) will be presented. The emphasis will be in the Hall A program aiming at measuring Q{sup 2}--dependences of different terms of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) cross section. This is a fundamental step before one can extract GPD information from JLab DVCS data. Neutral pion production will also be discussed and results from the CLAS collaboration will be shown. Finally, the upcoming program in Hall A, using both a 6 GeV beam ({approx_equal}2010) and a 11 GeV beam ({approx_equal}2015) will be described.

  3. APFEL Web: a web-based application for the graphical visualization of parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrazza, Stefano; Ferrara, Alfio; Palazzo, Daniele; Rojo, Juan

    2015-05-01

    We present APFEL Web, a Web-based application designed to provide a flexible user-friendly tool for the graphical visualization of parton distribution functions. In this note we describe the technical design of the APFEL Web application, motivating the choices and the framework used for the development of this project. We document the basic usage of APFEL Web and show how it can be used to provide useful input for a variety of collider phenomenological studies. Finally we provide some examples showing the output generated by the application.

  4. The asymptotic behaviour of parton distributions at small and large x.

    PubMed

    Ball, Richard D; Nocera, Emanuele R; Rojo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued from the earliest days of quantum chromodynamics that at asymptotically small values of x the parton distribution functions (PDFs) of the proton behave as [Formula: see text], where the values of [Formula: see text] can be deduced from Regge theory, while at asymptotically large values of x the PDFs behave as [Formula: see text], where the values of [Formula: see text] can be deduced from the Brodsky-Farrar quark counting rules. We critically examine these claims by extracting the exponents [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] from various global fits of parton distributions, analysing their scale dependence, and comparing their values to the naive expectations. We find that for valence distributions both Regge theory and counting rules are confirmed, at least within uncertainties, while for sea quarks and gluons the results are less conclusive. We also compare results from various PDF fits for the structure function ratio [Formula: see text] at large x, and caution against unrealistic uncertainty estimates due to overconstrained parametrisations.

  5. The impact of CMS inclusive jet data on parton distribution functions and their uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleedaneshvar, A.; Khorramian, A.

    2017-08-01

    It is well known that the jet production data at LHC provide important constraints on the medium and large-x gluon parton distribution function (PDF), as well as on the large-x sea quarks. In this work, we study the impact of recent CMS measurements for the inclusive jet production at center-of-mass energy of s=13 TeV on the PDFs and their uncertainties. To this aim, with use of the FASTNLO and xFitter framework, we apply the parton distribution re-weighting procedure to study the impact of CMS data on two NLO modern CT14 and MMHT PDF sets. As a result, we found that the fit quality obtained using both of these PDF sets is very good. Moreover, the CMS data can impact both the central values and uncertainties of some PDFs especially at low and large x regions. Overall, it is indicated that the CT14 PDFs compared with the MMHT ones are more affected. We emphasis that the inclusion of these data in a new global analysis of PDFs can improve the determination of the gluon and quark PDFs at both low and large x regions.

  6. Generalized parton distributions and rapidity gap survival in exclusive diffractive pp scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, L.; Hyde, C. E.; Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2007-03-01

    We study rapidity gap survival (RGS) in the production of high-mass systems (H=dijet, heavy quarkonium, Higgs boson) in double-gap exclusive diffractive pp scattering, pp{yields}p+(gap)+H+(gap)+p. Our approach is based on the idea that hard and soft interactions are approximately independent because they proceed over widely different time and distance scales. We implement this idea in a partonic description of proton structure, which allows for a model-independent treatment of the interplay of hard and soft interactions. The high-mass system is produced in a hard scattering process with exchange of two gluons between the protons, whose amplitude is calculable in terms of the gluon generalized parton distribution (GPD), measured in exclusive ep scattering. The hard scattering process is modified by soft spectator interactions, which we calculate neglecting correlations between hard and soft interactions (independent interaction approximation). We obtain an analytic expression for the RGS probability in terms of the phenomenological pp elastic scattering amplitude, without reference to the eikonal approximation. Contributions from inelastic intermediate states are suppressed. The onset of the black-disk limit in pp scattering at TeV energies strongly suppresses diffraction at small impact parameters and is the main factor in determining the RGS probability. Correlations between hard and soft interactions (e.g. due to scattering from the long-range pion field of the proton or due to possible short-range transverse correlations between partons) further decrease the RGS probability. We also investigate the dependence of the diffractive cross section on the transverse momenta of the final-state protons ('diffraction pattern'). By measuring this dependence one can perform detailed tests of the interplay of hard and soft interactions and even extract information about the gluon GPD in the proton. Such studies appear to be feasible with the planned forward detectors at the

  7. New parton distribution functions from a global analysis of quantum chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulat, Sayipjamal; Hou, Tie-Jiun; Gao, Jun; Guzzi, Marco; Huston, Joey; Nadolsky, Pavel; Pumplin, Jon; Schmidt, Carl; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C.-P.

    2016-02-01

    We present new parton distribution functions (PDFs) at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) from the CTEQ-TEA global analysis of quantum chromodynamics. These differ from previous CT PDFs in several respects, including the use of data from LHC experiments and the new D0 charged-lepton rapidity asymmetry data, as well as the use of a more flexible parametrization of PDFs that, in particular, allows a better fit to different combinations of quark flavors. Predictions for important LHC processes, especially Higgs boson production at 13 TeV, are presented. These CT14 PDFs include a central set and error sets in the Hessian representation. For completeness, we also present the CT14 PDFs determined at the LO and the NLO in QCD. Besides these general-purpose PDF sets, we provide a series of (N)NLO sets with various αs values and additional sets in general-mass variable flavor number schemes, to deal with heavy partons, with up to three, four, and six active flavors.

  8. New parton distribution functions from a global analysis of quantum chromodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Dulat, Sayipjamal; Hou, Tie -Jiun; Gao, Jun; ...

    2016-02-16

    Here, we present new parton distribution functions (PDFs) up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) from the CTEQ-TEA global analysis of quantum chromodynamics. These differ from previous CT PDFs in several respects, including the use of data from LHC experiments and the new D0 charged lepton rapidity asymmetry data, as well as the use of more flexible parametrization of PDFs that, in particular, allows a better fit to different combinations of quark flavors. Predictions for important LHC processes, especially Higgs boson production at 13 TeV, are presented. These CT14 PDFs include a central set and error sets in the Hessian representation. Formore » completeness, we also present the CT14 PDFs determined at the leading order (LO) and the next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. Besides these general-purpose PDF sets, we provide a series of (N)NLO sets with various αs values and additional sets in general-mass variable flavor number (GM-VFN) schemes, to deal with heavy partons, with up to 3, 4, and 6 active flavors.« less

  9. New parton distribution functions from a global analysis of quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dulat, Sayipjamal; Hou, Tie -Jiun; Gao, Jun; Guzzi, Marco; Nadolsky, Pavel; Pumplin, Jon; Schmidt, Carl; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C. -P.; Huston, Joey

    2016-02-16

    Here, we present new parton distribution functions (PDFs) up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) from the CTEQ-TEA global analysis of quantum chromodynamics. These differ from previous CT PDFs in several respects, including the use of data from LHC experiments and the new D0 charged lepton rapidity asymmetry data, as well as the use of more flexible parametrization of PDFs that, in particular, allows a better fit to different combinations of quark flavors. Predictions for important LHC processes, especially Higgs boson production at 13 TeV, are presented. These CT14 PDFs include a central set and error sets in the Hessian representation. For completeness, we also present the CT14 PDFs determined at the leading order (LO) and the next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. Besides these general-purpose PDF sets, we provide a series of (N)NLO sets with various αs values and additional sets in general-mass variable flavor number (GM-VFN) schemes, to deal with heavy partons, with up to 3, 4, and 6 active flavors.

  10. Parton distribution in pseudoscalar mesons with a light-front constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, J. P. B. C.; Ahmed, Isthiaq; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    We compute the distribution amplitudes of the pion and kaon in the light-front constituent quark model with the symmetric quark-bound state vertex function [1, 2, 3]. In the calculation we explicitly include the flavor-SU(3) symmetry breaking effect in terms of the constituent quark masses of the up (down) and strange quarks. To calculate the kaon parton distribution functions (PDFs), we use both the conditions in the light-cone wave function, i.e., when s ¯ quark is on-shell, and when u quark is on-shell, and make a comparison between them. The kaon PDFs calculated in the two different conditions clearly show asymmetric behaviour due to the flavor SU(3)-symmetry breaking implemented by the quark masses [4, 5].

  11. CT10 NLO and NNLO Parton Distribution Functions from the Coordinated Theoretical-Experimental Project on QCD

    DOE Data Explorer

    Huston, Joey [Co-Spokesperson; Ownes, Joseph [Co-Spokesperson

    The Coordinated Theoretical-Experimental Project on QCD is a multi-institutional collaboration devoted to a broad program of research projects and cooperative enterprises in high-energy physics centered on Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and its implications in all areas of the Standard Model and beyond. The Collaboration consists of theorists and experimentalists at 18 universities and 5 national laboratories. More than 65 sets of Parton Distribution Functions are available for public access. Links to many online software tools, information about Parton Distribution Functions, papers, and other resources are also available.

  12. Collinear parton distributions and the structure of the nucleon sea in a light-front meson-cloud model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofler, Stefan; Pasquini, Barbara

    2017-05-01

    The unpolarized, helicity and transversity parton distribution functions of the nucleon are studied within a convolution model where the bare nucleon is dressed by its virtual meson cloud. Using light-front time-ordered perturbation theory, the Fock states of the physical nucleon are expanded in a series involving a bare nucleon and two-particle (meson-baryon) states. The bare baryons and mesons are described with light-front wave functions (LFWFs) for the corresponding valence-parton components. Using a representation in terms of overlap of LFWFs, the role of the nonperturbative antiquark degrees of freedom and the valence-quark contribution at the input scale of the model is discussed for the leading-twist collinear parton distributions. After introducing perturbative QCD effects through evolution to experimental scales, the results are compared with available data and phenomenological extractions. Predictions for the nucleon tensor charge are also presented, finding a very good agreement with recent phenomenological extractions.

  13. Exclusive η electroproduction at W>2 GeV with CLAS and transversity generalized parton distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Bedlinskiy, I.; Kubarovsky, V.; Stoler, P.; ...

    2017-03-10

    The cross section of the exclusive η electroproduction reaction ep → e'p'η was measured at Jefferson Laboratory with a 5.75 GeV electron beam and the CLAS detector. Differential cross sections d4σ/dtdQ2dxBdΦη and structure functions σU = σT + εσL, σTT, and σLT, as functions of t, were obtained over a wide range of Q2 and xB. The η structure functions are compared with those previously measured for π0 at the same kinematics. At low t, both π0 and η are described reasonably well by generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in which chiral-odd transversity GPDs are dominant. As a result, the π0more » and η data, when taken together, can facilitate the flavor decomposition of the transversity GPDs.« less

  14. Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques applied to parton distribution functions determination: Proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gbedo, Yémalin Gabin; Mangin-Brinet, Mariane

    2017-07-01

    We present a new procedure to determine parton distribution functions (PDFs), based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. The aim of this paper is to show that we can replace the standard χ2 minimization by procedures grounded on statistical methods, and on Bayesian inference in particular, thus offering additional insight into the rich field of PDFs determination. After a basic introduction to these techniques, we introduce the algorithm we have chosen to implement—namely Hybrid (or Hamiltonian) Monte Carlo. This algorithm, initially developed for Lattice QCD, turns out to be very interesting when applied to PDFs determination by global analyses; we show that it allows us to circumvent the difficulties due to the high dimensionality of the problem, in particular concerning the acceptance. A first feasibility study is performed and presented, which indicates that Markov chain Monte Carlo can successfully be applied to the extraction of PDFs and of their uncertainties.

  15. New Angle on the Parton Distribution Functions: Self-Organizing Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Honkanen, H.; Liuti, S.

    2009-08-04

    Neural network (NN) algorithms have been recently applied to construct Parton Distribution Function (PDF) parametrizations, providing an alternative to standard global fitting procedures. Here we explore a novel technique using Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs). SOMs are a class of clustering algorithms based on competitive learning among spatially-ordered neurons. We train our SOMs with stochastically generated PDF samples. On every optimization iteration the PDFs are clustered on the SOM according to a user-defined feature and the most promising candidates are used as a seed for the subsequent iteration using the topology of the map to guide the PDF generating process. Our goal is a fitting procedure that, at variance with the standard neural network approaches, will allow for an increased control of the systematic bias by enabling user interaction in the various stages of the process.

  16. New avenue to the parton distribution functions: Self-organizing maps

    SciTech Connect

    Honkanen, H.; Liuti, S.; Carnahan, J.; Loitiere, Y.; Reynolds, P. R.

    2009-02-01

    Neural network algorithms have been recently applied to construct parton distribution function (PDF) parametrizations which provide an alternative to standard global fitting procedures. In this exploratory study we propose a technique using self-organizing maps (SOMs). SOMs are a class of clustering algorithms based on competitive learning among spatially ordered neurons. Our SOMs are trained on selections of stochastically generated PDF samples. The selection criterion for every optimization iteration is based on the features of the clustered PDFs. Our goal is a fitting procedure that, at variance with the standard neural network approaches, will allow for an increased control of the systematic bias by enabling user interaction in the various stages of the process.

  17. Agreement of neutrino deep inelastic scattering data with global fits of parton distributions.

    PubMed

    Paukkunen, Hannu; Salgado, Carlos A

    2013-05-24

    The compatibility of neutrino-nucleus deep inelastic scattering data within the universal, factorizable nuclear parton distribution functions has been studied independently by several groups in the past few years. The conclusions are contradictory, ranging from a violation of the universality up to a good agreement, most of the controversy originating from the use of the neutrino-nucleus data from the NuTeV Collaboration. Here, we pay attention to non-negligible differences in the absolute normalization between different neutrino data sets. We find that such variations are large enough to prevent a tensionless fit to all data simultaneously and could therefore misleadingly point towards nonuniversal nuclear effects. We propose a concrete method to deal with the absolute normalization and show that an agreement between independent neutrino data sets is established.

  18. nCTEQ15 - Global analysis of nuclear parton distributions with uncertainties in the CTEQ framework

    SciTech Connect

    Kovarik, K.; Kusina, A.; Clark, D. B.; Keppel, C.; Lyonnet, F.; Morfin, J. G.; Olness, F. I.; Owens, J. F.; Schienbein, I.

    2016-04-28

    We present the new nCTEQ15 set of nuclear parton distribution functions with uncertainties. This fit extends the CTEQ proton PDFs to include the nuclear dependence using data on nuclei all the way up to 208Pb. The uncertainties are determined using the Hessian method with an optimal rescaling of the eigenvectors to accurately represent the uncertainties for the chosen tolerance criteria. In addition to the Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and Drell-Yan (DY) processes, we also include inclusive pion production data from RHIC to help constrain the nuclear gluon PDF. Here, we investigate the correlation of the data sets with specific nPDF flavor components, and asses the impact of individual experiments. We also provide comparisons of the nCTEQ15 set with recent fits from other groups.

  19. Exclusive η electroproduction at W >2 GeV with CLAS and transversity generalized parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedlinskiy, I.; Kubarovsky, V.; Stoler, P.; Adhikari, K. P.; Akbar, Z.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khachatryan, M.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; McKinnon, B.; Meziani, Z. E.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Yurov, M.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    The cross section of the exclusive η electroproduction reaction e p →e'p'η was measured at Jefferson Laboratory with a 5.75 GeV electron beam and the CLAS detector. Differential cross sections d4σ /d t d Q2d xBd ϕη and structure functions σU=σT+ɛ σL,σT T , and σL T, as functions of t , were obtained over a wide range of Q2 and xB. The η structure functions are compared with those previously measured for π0 at the same kinematics. At low t , both π0 and η are described reasonably well by generalized parton distributions (GPDs) in which chiral-odd transversity GPDs are dominant. The π0 and η data, when taken together, can facilitate the flavor decomposition of the transversity GPDs.

  20. nCTEQ15 - Global analysis of nuclear parton distributions with uncertainties in the CTEQ framework

    DOE PAGES

    Kovarik, K.; Kusina, A.; Jezo, T.; ...

    2016-04-28

    We present the new nCTEQ15 set of nuclear parton distribution functions with uncertainties. This fit extends the CTEQ proton PDFs to include the nuclear dependence using data on nuclei all the way up to 208Pb. The uncertainties are determined using the Hessian method with an optimal rescaling of the eigenvectors to accurately represent the uncertainties for the chosen tolerance criteria. In addition to the Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and Drell-Yan (DY) processes, we also include inclusive pion production data from RHIC to help constrain the nuclear gluon PDF. Here, we investigate the correlation of the data sets with specific nPDFmore » flavor components, and asses the impact of individual experiments. We also provide comparisons of the nCTEQ15 set with recent fits from other groups.« less

  1. nCTEQ15 - Global analysis of nuclear parton distributions with uncertainties in the CTEQ framework

    SciTech Connect

    Kovarik, K.; Kusina, A.; Clark, D. B.; Keppel, C.; Lyonnet, F.; Morfin, J. G.; Olness, F. I.; Owens, J. F.; Schienbein, I.

    2016-04-28

    We present the new nCTEQ15 set of nuclear parton distribution functions with uncertainties. This fit extends the CTEQ proton PDFs to include the nuclear dependence using data on nuclei all the way up to 208Pb. The uncertainties are determined using the Hessian method with an optimal rescaling of the eigenvectors to accurately represent the uncertainties for the chosen tolerance criteria. In addition to the Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and Drell-Yan (DY) processes, we also include inclusive pion production data from RHIC to help constrain the nuclear gluon PDF. Here, we investigate the correlation of the data sets with specific nPDF flavor components, and asses the impact of individual experiments. We also provide comparisons of the nCTEQ15 set with recent fits from other groups.

  2. New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Hobbs, T. J.; Londergan, J. T.; ...

    2015-02-27

    We present a new global QCD analysis of parton distribution functions, allowing for possible intrinsic charm (IC) contributions in the nucleon inspired by light-front models. The analysis makes use of the full range of available high-energy scattering data for Q2 ≥ 1 GeV2 and W2 ≥ 3.5 GeV2, including fixed-target proton and deuteron deep cross sections at lower energies that were excluded in previously global analyses. The expanded data set places more stringent constraints on the momentum carried by IC, with (x)IC at most 0.5% (corresponding to an IC normalization of ~1%) at the 4σ level for ΔX2 = 1.more » We also assess the impact of older EMC measurements of Fc2c at large x, which favor a nonzero IC, but with very large X2 values.« less

  3. Determination of nuclear parton distribution functions and their uncertainties at next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, M.; Kumano, S.; Nagai, T.-H.

    2007-12-15

    Nuclear parton distribution functions (NPDFs) are determined by global analyses of experimental data on structure-function ratios F{sub 2}{sup A}/F{sub 2}{sup A'} and Drell-Yan cross-section ratios {sigma}{sub DY}{sup A}/{sigma}{sub DY}{sup A'}. The analyses are done in the leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) of running coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}. Uncertainties of the NPDFs are estimated in both LO and NLO for finding possible NLO improvement. Valence-quark distributions are well determined, and antiquark distributions are also determined at x<0.1. However, the antiquark distributions have large uncertainties at x>0.2. Gluon modifications cannot be fixed at this stage. Although the advantage of the NLO analysis, in comparison with the LO one, is generally the sensitivity to the gluon distributions, gluon uncertainties are almost the same in the LO and NLO. It is because current scaling-violation data are not accurate enough to determine precise nuclear gluon distributions. Modifications of the PDFs in the deuteron are also discussed by including data on the proton-deuteron ratio F{sub 2}{sup D}/F{sub 2}{sup p} in the analysis. A code is provided for calculating the NPDFs and their uncertainties at given x and Q{sup 2} in the LO and NLO.

  4. How Bright is the Proton? A Precise Determination of the Photon Parton Distribution Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, Aneesh; Nason, Paolo; Salam, Gavin P.; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-12-01

    It has become apparent in recent years that it is important, notably for a range of physics studies at the Large Hadron Collider, to have accurate knowledge on the distribution of photons in the proton. We show how the photon parton distribution function (PDF) can be determined in a model-independent manner, using electron-proton (e p ) scattering data, in effect viewing the e p →e +X process as an electron scattering off the photon field of the proton. To this end, we consider an imaginary, beyond the Standard Model process with a flavor changing photon-lepton vertex. We write its cross section in two ways: one in terms of proton structure functions, the other in terms of a photon distribution. Requiring their equivalence yields the photon distribution as an integral over proton structure functions. As a result of the good precision of e p data, we constrain the photon PDF at the level of 1%-2% over a wide range of momentum fractions.

  5. Prompt neutrino fluxes in the atmosphere with PROSA parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzelli, M. V.; Moch, S.; Zenaiev, O.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; Placakyte, R.; Sigl, G.

    2017-05-01

    Effects on atmospheric prompt neutrino fluxes of present uncertainties affecting the nucleon composition are studied by using the PROSA fit to parton distribution functions (PDFs). The PROSA fit extends the precision of the PDFs to low x, which is the kinematic region of relevance for high-energy neutrino production, by taking into account LHCb data on charm and bottom hadroproduction collected at the center-of-mass energy of √{s}=7 TeV. In the range of neutrino energies explored by present Very Large Volume Neutrino Telescopes, it is found that PDF uncertainties are far smaller with respect to those due to renormalization and factorization scale variation and to assumptions on the cosmic ray composition, which at present dominate and limit our knowledge of prompt neutrino fluxes. A discussion is presented on how these uncertainties affect the expected number of atmospheric prompt neutrino events in the analysis of high-energy events characterized by interaction vertices fully contained within the instrumented volume of the detector, performed by the IceCube collaboration. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Hobbs, T. J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2015-02-27

    We present a new global QCD analysis of parton distribution functions, allowing for possible intrinsic charm (IC) contributions in the nucleon inspired by light-front models. The analysis makes use of the full range of available high-energy scattering data for Q2 ≥ 1 GeV2 and W2 ≥ 3.5 GeV2, including fixed-target proton and deuteron deep cross sections at lower energies that were excluded in previously global analyses. The expanded data set places more stringent constraints on the momentum carried by IC, with (x)IC at most 0.5% (corresponding to an IC normalization of ~1%) at the 4σ level for ΔX2 = 1. We also assess the impact of older EMC measurements of Fc2c at large x, which favor a nonzero IC, but with very large X2 values.

  7. CTEQ-TEA parton distribution functions and HERA Run I and II combined data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Tie-Jiun; Dulat, Sayipjamal; Gao, Jun; Guzzi, Marco; Huston, Joey; Nadolsky, Pavel; Pumplin, Jon; Schmidt, Carl; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C.-P.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the impact of the recent HERA Run I +II combination of inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross-section data on the CT14 global analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). New PDFs at next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order, called CT14 HERA 2 , are obtained by a refit of the CT14 data ensembles, in which the HERA Run I combined measurements are replaced by the new HERA Run I +II combination. The CT14 functional parametrization of PDFs is flexible enough to allow good descriptions of different flavor combinations, so we use the same parametrization for CT14 HERA 2 but with an additional shape parameter for describing the strange quark PDF. We find that the HERA I +II data can be fit reasonably well, and both CT14 and CT14 HERA 2 PDFs can describe equally well the non-HERA data included in our global analysis. Because the CT14 and CT14 HERA 2 PDFs agree well within the PDF errors, we continue to recommend CT14 PDFs for the analysis of LHC Run 2 experiments.

  8. Moments of Nucleon's Parton Distribution for the Sea and Valence Quarks from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Mridupawan; Streuer, Thomas; Doi, Takumi; Dong, Shao-Jing; Draper, Terrence; Liu, Keh-Fei; Mathur, Nilmani; Thomas, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    We extend the study of lowest moments, $$ and $$, of the parton distribution function of the nucleon to include those of the sea quarks; this entails a disconnected insertion calculation in lattice QCD. This is carried out on a $16^3 \\times 24$ quenched lattice with Wilson fermion. The quark loops are calculated with $Z_2$ noise vectors and unbiased subtractions, and multiple nucleon sources are employed to reduce the statistical errors. We obtain 5$\\sigma$ signals for $$ for the $u,d,$ and $s$ quarks, but $$ is consistent with zero within errors. We provide results for both the connected and disconnected insertions. The perturbatively renormalized $$ for the strange quark at $\\mu = 2$ GeV is $_{s+\\bar{s}} = 0.027 \\pm 0.006$ which is consistent with the experimental result. The ratio of $$ for $s$ vs. $u/d$ in the disconnected insertion with quark loops is calculated to be $0.88 \\pm 0.07$. This is about twice as large as the phenomenologically fitted $\\displays

  9. A new phenomenological investigation of KMR and MRW unintegrated parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, M.; Hosseinkhani, H.; Olanj, N.; Masouminia, M. R.

    2015-11-01

    We address the longitudinal proton structure function, F_L(x,Q^2), from the k_t-factorization formalism by using the unintegrated parton distribution functions (UPDF) which are generated through the KMR and MRW procedures. The LO UPDF of the KMR prescription is extracted, by taking into account the PDF of Martin et al, i.e., MSTW2008-LO and MRST99-NLO, and next the NLO UPDF of the MRW scheme is generated through the set of MSTW2008-NLO PDF as the input. The different aspects of F_L(x,Q^2) in the two approaches, as well as its perturbative and non-perturbative parts, are calculated. Then the comparison of F_L(x,Q^2) is made with the data given by the ZEUS and H1 collaborations. It is demonstrated that the extracted F_L(x,Q^2), based on the UPDF of two schemes, are consistent with the experimental data, and to a good approximation they are independent of the input PDF. But the one developed from the KMR prescription has better agreement with the data with respect to that of MRW. As has been suggested, by lowering the factorization scale or the Bjorken variable in the related experiments it may be possible to analyze the present theoretical approaches more accurately.

  10. Parton distribution functions, αs, and heavy-quark masses for LHC Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhin, S.; Blümlein, J.; Moch, S.; PlačakytÄ--, R.

    2017-07-01

    We determine a new set of parton distribution functions (ABMP16), the strong coupling constant αs and the quark masses mc, mb and mt in a global fit to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD. The analysis uses the MS ¯ scheme for αs and all quark masses and is performed in the fixed-flavor number scheme for nf=3 , 4, 5. Essential new elements of the fit are the combined data from HERA for inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), data from the fixed-target experiments NOMAD and CHORUS for neutrino-induced DIS, data from Tevatron and the LHC for the Drell-Yan process and the hadro-production of single-top and top-quark pairs. The theory predictions include new improved approximations at NNLO for the production of heavy quarks in DIS and for the hadro-production of single-top quarks. The description of higher twist effects relevant beyond the leading twist collinear factorization approximation is refined. At NNLO, we obtain the value αs(nf=5 )(MZ)=0.1147 ±0.0008 .

  11. Parameterization of Parton Distributions Functions Based on Self-Organizing Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loitiere, Y.; Honkanen, H.; Liuti, S.

    2006-11-01

    Neural network algorithms have been recently applied to construct Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) parametrizations which provide an alternative to standard global fitting procedures [1]. In this contribution we propose a different technique, namely an interactive neural network algorithm using Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) [2]. SOMs generate a nonuniform projection from a high dimensional data space onto a low dimensional one (usually 1 or 2 dimensions) by clustering similar PDF representations together. Our SOMs are trained on progressively narrower selections of data samples. The selection criterion is that of convergence towards a neighborhood of the experimental data. Our procedure utilizes all available data on deep inelastic scattering in the kinematical region of 0.001 <=x <= 0.75, and 1 <=Q^2 <= 100 GeV^2, with a cut on the final state invariant mass, W^2 >= 10 GeV^2. Our main goal is to provide a fitting procedure that, at variance with standard neural network approaches, allows for an increased control of the systematic bias. SOMs, in fact, enable the user to directly control the data selection procedure at various stages of the process. [1] L. Del Debbio, S. Forte, J. I. Latorre, A. Piccione and J. Rojo, [NNPDF Collaboration], JHEP 0503, 080 (2005). [2] T. Kohonen, ``Self Organizing Maps,'' Springer-Verlag, 1997.

  12. Measurement of Exclusive π0 Electroproduction Structure Functions and their Relationship to Transverse Generalized Parton Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedlinskiy, I.; Kubarovsky, V.; Niccolai, S.; Stoler, P.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Avakian, H.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Fradi, A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Markov, N.; Martinez, D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Phelps, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Saylor, N.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2012-09-01

    Exclusive π0 electroproduction at a beam energy of 5.75 GeV has been measured with the Jefferson Lab CLAS spectrometer. Differential cross sections were measured at more than 1800 kinematic values in Q2, xB, t, and ϕπ, in the Q2 range from 1.0 to 4.6GeV2, -t up to 2GeV2, and xB from 0.1 to 0.58. Structure functions σT+ɛσL, σTT, and σLT were extracted as functions of t for each of 17 combinations of Q2 and xB. The data were compared directly with two handbag-based calculations including both longitudinal and transversity generalized parton distributions (GPDs). Inclusion of only longitudinal GPDs very strongly underestimates σT+ɛσL and fails to account for σTT and σLT, while inclusion of transversity GPDs brings the calculations into substantially better agreement with the data. There is very strong sensitivity to the relative contributions of nucleon helicity-flip and helicity nonflip processes. The results confirm that exclusive π0 electroproduction offers direct experimental access to the transversity GPDs.

  13. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    SciTech Connect

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; Blumlein, J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Garzelli, M. -V.; Guzzi, M.; Kuprash, O.; Moch, S. -O.; Nadolsky, P.; Placakyte, R.; Rabbertz, K.; Schienbein, I.; Starovoitov, P.

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by other experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.

  14. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    DOE PAGES

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; ...

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by othermore » experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.« less

  15. Transverse parton distribution functions at next-to-next-to-leading order: the quark-to-quark case.

    PubMed

    Gehrmann, Thomas; Lübbert, Thomas; Yang, Li Lin

    2012-12-14

    We present a calculation of the perturbative quark-to-quark transverse parton distribution function at next-to-next-to-leading order based on a gauge invariant operator definition. We demonstrate for the first time that such a definition works beyond the first nontrivial order. We extract from our calculation the coefficient functions relevant for a next-to-next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic Q(T) resummation in a large class of processes at hadron colliders.

  16. Reply to comment on ''New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distribution''

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro; Hobbs, Timothy J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2016-01-05

    We reply to the Comment of Brodsky and Gardner on our paper "New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distributions" [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 082002 (2015)]. We address a number of incorrect claims made about our fitting methodology, and elaborate how global QCD analysis of all available high-energy data provides no evidence for a large intrinsic charm component of the nucleon.

  17. Constraints on large-x parton distributions from new weak boson production and deep-inelastic scattering data

    DOE PAGES

    Accardi, A.; Brady, L. T.; Melnitchouk, W.; ...

    2016-06-20

    A new set of leading twist parton distribution functions, referred to as "CJ15", is presented, which take advantage of developments in the theoretical treatment of nuclear corrections as well as new data. The analysis includes for the first time data on the free neutron structure function from Jefferson Lab, and new high-precision charged lepton and W-boson asymmetry data from Fermilab, which significantly reduce the uncertainty on the d/u ratio at large values of x.

  18. CT14QED parton distribution functions from isolated photon production in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Carl; Pumplin, Jon; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C.-P.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the implementation of quantum electrodynamic (QED) evolution at leading order (LO) along with quantum chromodynamic (QCD) evolution at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the CTEQ-TEA global analysis package. The inelastic contribution to the photon parton distribution function (PDF) is described by a two-parameter ansatz, coming from radiation off the valence quarks, and based on the CT14 NLO PDFs. Setting the two parameters to be equal allows us to completely specify the inelastic photon PDF in terms of the inelastic momentum fraction carried by the photon, p0γ, at the initial scale Q0=1.295 GeV . We obtain constraints on the photon PDF by comparing with ZEUS data [S. Chekanov et al. (ZEUS Collaboration), Phys. Lett. B 687, 16 (2010)] on the production of isolated photons in deep inelastic scattering, e p →e γ +X . For this comparison we present a new perturbative calculation of the process that consistently combines the photon-initiated contribution with the quark-initiated contribution. Comparison with the data allows us to put a constraint at the 90% confidence level of p0γ≲0.14 % for the inelastic photon PDF at the initial scale of Q0=1.295 GeV in the one-parameter radiative ansatz. The resulting inelastic CT14QED PDFs will be made available to the public. In addition, we also provide CT14QEDinc PDFs, in which the inclusive photon PDF at the scale Q0 is defined by the sum of the inelastic photon PDF and the elastic photon distribution obtained from the equivalent photon approximation.

  19. The proton FL dipole approximation in the KMR and the MRW unintegrated parton distribution functions frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, M.; Masouminia, M. R.; Hosseinkhani, H.; Olanj, N.

    2016-01-01

    In the spirit of performing a complete phenomenological investigation of the merits of Kimber-Martin-Ryskin (KMR) and Martin-Ryskin-Watt (MRW) unintegrated parton distribution functions (UPDF), we have computed the longitudinal structure function of the proton, FL (x ,Q2), from the so-called dipole approximation, using the LO and the NLO-UPDF, prepared in the respective frameworks. The preparation process utilizes the PDF of Martin et al., MSTW2008-LO and MSTW2008-NLO, as the inputs. Afterwards, the numerical results are undergone a series of comparisons against the exact kt-factorization and the kt-approximate results, derived from the work of Golec-Biernat and Stasto, against each other and the experimental data from ZEUS and H1 Collaborations at HERA. Interestingly, our results show a much better agreement with the exact kt-factorization, compared to the kt-approximate outcome. In addition, our results are completely consistent with those prepared from embedding the KMR and MRW UPDF directly into the kt-factorization framework. One may point out that the FL, prepared from the KMR UPDF shows a better agreement with the exact kt-factorization. This is despite the fact that the MRW formalism employs a better theoretical description of the DGLAP evolution equation and has an NLO expansion. Such unexpected consequence appears, due to the different implementation of the angular ordering constraint in the KMR approach, which automatically includes the resummation of ln ⁡ (1 / x), BFKL logarithms, in the LO-DGLAP evolution equation.

  20. Multiple parton scattering in nuclei: Parton energy loss

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Guo, Xiao-feng

    2001-02-17

    Multiple parton scattering and induced parton energy loss are studied in deeply inelastic scattering (DIS) off nuclei. The effect of multiple scattering of a highly off-shell quark and the induced parton energy loss is expressed in terms of the modification to the quark fragmentation functions. The authors derive such modified quark fragmentation functions and their QCD evolution equations in DIS using the generalized factorization of higher twist parton distributions. They consider double-hard and hard-soft parton scattering as well as their interferences in the same framework. The final result, which depends on both the diagonal and off-diagonal twist-four parton distributions in nuclei, demonstrates clearly the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal interference features and predicts a unique nuclear modification of the quark fragmentation functions.

  1. Investigating strangeness in the proton by studying the effects of Light Cone parton distributions in the Meson Cloud Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuppan, Sam; Budnik, Garrett; Fox, Jordan

    2014-09-01

    The Meson Cloud Model (MCM) has proven to be a natural explanation for strangeness in the proton because of meson-baryon splitting into kaon-hyperon pairs. Total strangeness is predicted by integrated splitting functions, which represent the probability that the proton will fluctuate into a given meson-baryon pair. However, the momentum distributions s (x) and s (x) in the proton are determined from convolution integrals that depend on the parton distribution functions (PDFs) used for the mesons and baryons in the MCM. Theoretical calculations of these momentum distributions use many different forms for these PDFs. In our investigation, we calculate PDFs for K, K*, Λ, and Σ from two-body wave functions in a Light Cone Model (LCM) of the hadrons. We use these PDFs in conjunction with the MCM to create a hybrid model and compare our results to other theoretical calculations, experimental data from NuTeV, HERMES, ATLAS, and global parton distribution analyses. The Meson Cloud Model (MCM) has proven to be a natural explanation for strangeness in the proton because of meson-baryon splitting into kaon-hyperon pairs. Total strangeness is predicted by integrated splitting functions, which represent the probability that the proton will fluctuate into a given meson-baryon pair. However, the momentum distributions s (x) and s (x) in the proton are determined from convolution integrals that depend on the parton distribution functions (PDFs) used for the mesons and baryons in the MCM. Theoretical calculations of these momentum distributions use many different forms for these PDFs. In our investigation, we calculate PDFs for K, K*, Λ, and Σ from two-body wave functions in a Light Cone Model (LCM) of the hadrons. We use these PDFs in conjunction with the MCM to create a hybrid model and compare our results to other theoretical calculations, experimental data from NuTeV, HERMES, ATLAS, and global parton distribution analyses. This research has been supported in part by the

  2. Variable flavor number parton distributions and weak gauge and Higgs boson production at hadron colliders at next-to-next-to-leading order of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Reya, E.

    2009-12-01

    Based on our recent next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) dynamical parton distributions as obtained in the 'fixed flavor number scheme', we generate radiatively parton distributions in the 'variable flavor number scheme' where the heavy-quark flavors (c,b,t) also become massless partons within the nucleon. Only within this latter factorization scheme are NNLO calculations feasible at present, since the required partonic subprocesses are only available in the approximation of massless initial-state partons. The NNLO predictions for gauge boson production are typically larger (by more than 1{sigma}) than the next-to-leading order (NLO) ones, and rates at LHC energies can be predicted with an accuracy of about 5%, whereas at Tevatron they are more than 2{sigma} above the NLO ones. The NNLO predictions for standard model Higgs-boson production via the dominant gluon fusion process have a total (parton distribution function and scale) uncertainty of about 10% at LHC which almost doubles at the lower Tevatron energies; they are typically about 20% larger than the ones at NLO but the total uncertainty bands overlap.

  3. Charge symmetry at the partonic level

    SciTech Connect

    Londergan, J. T.; Peng, J. C.; Thomas, A. W.

    2010-07-01

    This review article discusses the experimental and theoretical status of partonic charge symmetry. It is shown how the partonic content of various structure functions gets redefined when the assumption of charge symmetry is relaxed. We review various theoretical and phenomenological models for charge symmetry violation in parton distribution functions. We summarize the current experimental upper limits on charge symmetry violation in parton distributions. A series of experiments are presented, which might reveal partonic charge symmetry violation, or alternatively might lower the current upper limits on parton charge symmetry violation.

  4. Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall fermion calculations at 297 MeV pion mass

    DOE PAGES

    Engelhardt, M.; Musch, B.; Bhattacharya, T.; ...

    2014-06-23

    Here, lattice QCD calculations of transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) in a nucleon are performed based on a definition of TMDs via hadronic matrix elements of quark bilocal operators containing staple-shaped gauge connections. A parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes serves to cast them in the Lorentz frame preferred for the lattice calculation. Using a RBC/UKQCD domain wall fermion ensemble corresponding to a pion mass of 297 MeV, on a lattice with spacing 0.084 fm, selected TMD observables are accessed and compared to previous exploration at heavier pion masses on coarser lattices.

  5. Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall fermion calculations at 297 MeV pion mass

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhardt, Michael; Musch, Bernhard; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Gupta, Rajan; Hagler, Phillip; Negele, John; Pochinsky, Andrew; Shafer, Andreas; Syritsyn, Sergey; Yoon, Boram

    2014-12-01

    Lattice QCD calculations of transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) in a nucleon are performed based on a definition of TMDs via hadronic matrix elements of quark bilocal operators containing staple-shaped gauge connections. A parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes serves to cast them in the Lorentz frame preferred for the lattice calculation. Using a RBC/UKQCD domain wall fermion ensemble corresponding to a pion mass of 297MeV, on a lattice with spacing 0.084fm, selected TMD observables are accessed and compared to previous explorations at heavier pion masses on coarser lattices.

  6. Nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions from domain wall fermion calculations at 297 MeV pion mass

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhardt, M.; Musch, B.; Bhattacharya, T.; Gupta, R.; Hagler, P.; Negele, J.; Pochinsky, A.; Schafer, A.; Syritsyn, S.; Yoon, B.

    2014-06-23

    Here, lattice QCD calculations of transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) in a nucleon are performed based on a definition of TMDs via hadronic matrix elements of quark bilocal operators containing staple-shaped gauge connections. A parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes serves to cast them in the Lorentz frame preferred for the lattice calculation. Using a RBC/UKQCD domain wall fermion ensemble corresponding to a pion mass of 297 MeV, on a lattice with spacing 0.084 fm, selected TMD observables are accessed and compared to previous exploration at heavier pion masses on coarser lattices.

  7. Laser-polarization-dependent photoelectron angular distributions from polar molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Qingbin; Hong, Weiyi; Lu, Peixiang; Xu, Zhizhan

    2011-11-21

    Photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) of oriented polar molecules in response to different polarized lasers are systematically investigated. It is found that the PADs of polar CO molecules show three distinct styles excited by linearly, elliptically and circularly polarized lasers respectively. In the case of elliptical polarization, a deep suppression is observed along the major axis and the distribution concentrates approximately along the minor axis. Additionally, it is also found that the concentrated distributions rotate clockwise as the ellipticity increases. Our investigation presents a method to manipulate the motion and angular distribution of photoelectrons by varying the polarization of the exciting pulses, and also implies the possibility to control the processes in laser-molecule interactions in future work.

  8. Accessing proton generalized parton distributions and pion distribution amplitudes with the exclusive pion-induced Drell-Yan process at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Takahiro; Chang, Wen-Chen; Kumano, Shunzo; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Sawada, Shinya; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) encoding multidimensional information of hadron partonic structure appear as the building blocks in a factorized description of hard exclusive reactions. The nucleon GPDs have been accessed by deeply virtual Compton scattering and deeply virtual meson production with lepton beam. A complementary probe with hadron beam is the exclusive pion-induced Drell-Yan process. In this paper, we discuss recent theoretical advances on describing this process in terms of nucleon GPDs and pion distribution amplitudes. Furthermore, we address the feasibility of measuring the exclusive pion-induced Drell-Yan process π-p →μ+μ-n via a spectrometer at the High Momentum Beamline being constructed at J-PARC in Japan. Realization of such measurement at J-PARC will provide a new test of perturbative QCD descriptions of a novel class of hard exclusive reactions. It will also offer the possibility of experimentally accessing nucleon GPDs at large timelike virtuality.

  9. NLO+NLL squark and gluino production cross sections with threshold-improved parton distributions.

    PubMed

    Beenakker, Wim; Borschensky, Christoph; Krämer, Michael; Kulesza, Anna; Laenen, Eric; Marzani, Simone; Rojo, Juan

    We present updated predictions for the cross sections for pair production of squarks and gluinos at the LHC Run II. First of all, we update the calculations based on NLO+NLL partonic cross sections by using the NNPDF3.0NLO global analysis. This study includes a full characterization of theoretical uncertainties from higher orders, PDFs and the strong coupling. Then we explore the implications for this calculation of the recent NNPDF3.0 PDFs with NLO+NLL threshold resummation. We find that the shift in the results induced by the threshold-improved PDFs is within the total theory uncertainty band of the calculation based on NLO PDFs. However, we also observe that the central values of the NLO+NLL cross sections are modified both in a qualitative and a quantitative way, illustrating the relevance and impact of using threshold-improved PDFs together with resummed partonic cross sections. The updated NLO+NLL cross sections based on NNPDF3.0NLO are publicly available in the NLL-fast format, and should be an important ingredient for the interpretation of the searches for supersymmetric particles at Run II.

  10. Dynamical next-to-next-to-leading order parton distributions and the perturbative stability of F{sub L}(x,Q{sup 2})

    SciTech Connect

    Glueck, M.; Reya, E.; Pisano, C.

    2008-04-01

    Recent measurements for F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) have been analyzed in terms of the 'dynamical' and 'standard' parton model approach at next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) of perturbative QCD. Having fixed the relevant NLO and NNLO parton distributions, we present the implications and predictions for the longitudinal structure function F{sub L}(x,Q{sup 2}). It is shown that the previously noted extreme perturbative NNLO/NLO instability of F{sub L}(x,Q{sup 2}) is an artifact of the commonly utilized 'standard' gluon distributions. In particular it is demonstrated that using the appropriate--dynamically generated--parton distributions at NLO and NNLO, F{sub L}(x,Q{sup 2}) turns out to be perturbatively rather stable already for Q{sup 2}{>=}O(2-3 GeV{sup 2})

  11. Summing threshold logs in a parton shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Zoltán; Soper, Davison E.

    2016-10-01

    When parton distributions are falling steeply as the momentum fractions of the partons increases, there are effects that occur at each order in α s that combine to affect hard scattering cross sections and need to be summed. We show how to accomplish this in a leading approximation in the context of a parton shower Monte Carlo event generator.

  12. Lattice QCD calculations of nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions using clover and domain wall fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Boram; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Gupta, Rajan; Engelhardt, Michael; Green, Jeremy; Haegler, Philipp; Musch, Bernhard; Negele, John; Pochinsky, Andrew; Syritsyn, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a lattice QCD calculation of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) of protons using staple-shaped Wilson lines. For time-reversal odd observables, we calculate the generalized Sivers and Boer-Mulders transverse momentum shifts in SIDIS and DY cases, and for T-even observables we calculate the transversity related to the tensor charge and the generalized worm-gear shift. The calculation is done on two different nf = 2+1 ensembles: domain-wall fermion (DWF) with lattice spacing 0:084fm and pion mass of 297 MeV, and clover fermion with lattice spacing 0:114 fm and pion mass of 317 MeV. The results from those two different discretizations are consistent with each other.

  13. Lattice QCD calculations of nucleon transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions using clover and domain wall fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Boram; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Gupta, Rajan; ...

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a lattice QCD calculation of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) of protons using staple-shaped Wilson lines. For time-reversal odd observables, we calculate the generalized Sivers and Boer-Mulders transverse momentum shifts in SIDIS and DY cases, and for T-even observables we calculate the transversity related to the tensor charge and the generalized worm-gear shift. The calculation is done on two different nf = 2+1 ensembles: domain-wall fermion (DWF) with lattice spacing 0:084fm and pion mass of 297 MeV, and clover fermion with lattice spacing 0:114 fm and pion mass of 317 MeV. The results from thosemore » two different discretizations are consistent with each other.« less

  14. Modeling of exclusive parton distributions and long-range rapidity correlations in proton-proton collisions at the LHC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, V. N.

    2013-10-01

    The soft part of proton-proton interaction is considered within a phenomenological model that involves the formation of color strings. Under the assumption that an elementary collision is associated with the interaction of two color dipoles, the total inelastic cross section and the multiplicity of charged particles are estimated in order to fix model parameters. Particular attention is given to modeling of exclusive parton distributions with allowance for the energy-conservation law and for fixing the center of mass, which are necessary for describing correlations. An algorithm that describes the fusion of strings in the transverse plane and which takes into account their finite rapidity width is developed. The influence of string-fusion effects on long-range correlations is found within this mechanism.

  15. Applicability of pion-nucleus Drell-Yan data in global analysis of nuclear parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paakkinen, Petja; Eskola, Kari J.; Paukkunen, Hannu

    2017-05-01

    Despite the success of modern nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs) in describing nuclear hard-process data, they still suffer from large uncertainties. One of the poorly constrained features is the possible asymmetry in nuclear modifications of valence u and d quarks. We study the possibility of using pion-nucleus Drell-Yan dilepton data as a new constraint in the global analysis of nPDFs. We find that the nuclear cross-section ratios from the NA3, NA10 and E615 experiments can be used without imposing significant new theoretical uncertainties and, in particular, that these datasets may have some constraining power on the u/d-asymmetry in nuclei.

  16. Parton Distribution Function Reweighting and Associated Uncertainties in a Search for Dark Matter with the ATLAS Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Annette; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Investigating the properties of a proton involved in a proton-proton collision at the Large Hadron Collider furthers our understanding of resulting processes from the collision. In the search for dark matter produced alongside a new heavy resonance, Z', or a W/Z boson, a process characterized by large missing transverse momentum from the undetected dark matter particles, parton distribution functions (PDFs) of protons were utilized to improve the Monte Carlo simulation of proton-proton collisions at &sqrt;s = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector. The PDF set NNPDF30 leading order was used to generate events with applied cuts: missing transverse momentum greater than 250 GeV, pseudorapidity of | η | < 2 . 5 , and groomed jets with R = 1 . 0 . An algorithm was developed to do PDF reweighting from NNPDF30 leading order to the following PDF sets: NNPDF30 next-to-leading order, MMHT2014, HERAPDF20, CT14, and MSTW2008. Distributions of the transverse momentum, mass, azimuthal angle, rapidity, and pseudorapidity for the leading and subleading jets, as well as the missing transverse momentum, were produced with the PDF reweighting algorithm. The uncertainty associated with the choice of a particular PDF in creating these distributions was calculated.

  17. Quantum Key Distribution with Blind Polarization Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kye, Won-Ho; Kim, Chil-Min; Kim, M. S.; Park, Young-Jai

    2005-07-01

    We propose a new quantum key distribution scheme that uses the blind polarization basis. In our scheme the sender and the receiver share key information by exchanging qubits with arbitrary polarization angles without basis reconciliation. As only random polarizations are transmitted, our protocol is secure even when a key is embedded in a not-so-weak coherent-state pulse. We show its security against the photon-number splitting attack and the impersonation attack.

  18. Spin-flavor structure of chiral-odd generalized parton distributions in the large-Nc limit

    DOE PAGES

    Schweitzer, P.; Weiss, C.

    2016-10-05

    We study the spin-flavor structure of the nucleon's chiral-odd generalized parton distributions (transversity GPDs) in the large-Nc limit of QCD. In contrast to the chiral-even case, only three combinations of the four chiral-odd GPDs are nonzero in the leading order of the 1/Nc expansion: E-barT = ET+2H-tildeT, HT, and E-tildeT. The degeneracy is explained by the absence of spin-orbit interactions correlating the transverse momentum transfer with the transverse quark spin. It can also be deduced from the natural Nc scaling of the quark-nucleon helicity amplitudes associated with the GPDs. In the GPD E-barT the flavor-singlet component u+d is leading inmore » the 1/Nc expansion, while in HT and E-tildeT it is the flavor-nonsinglet components u–d. Furthermore, the large-Nc relations are consistent with the spin-flavor structure extracted from hard exclusive π0 and η electroproduction data, if it is assumed that the processes are mediated by twist-3 amplitudes involving the chiral-odd GPDs and the chiral-odd pseudoscalar meson distribution amplitudes.« less

  19. Strongly interacting parton matter equilibration

    SciTech Connect

    Ozvenchuk, V.; Linnyk, O.; Bratkovskaya, E.; Gorenstein, M.; Cassing, W.

    2012-07-15

    We study the kinetic and chemical equilibration in 'infinite' parton matter within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics transport approach. The 'infinite' matter is simulated within a cubic box with periodic boundary conditions initialized at different energy densities. Particle abundances, kinetic energy distributions, and the detailed balance of the off-shell quarks and gluons in the strongly-interacting quarkgluon plasma are addressed and discussed.

  20. Connected-Sea Partons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keh-Fei; Chang, Wen-Chen; Cheng, Hai-Yang; Peng, Jen-Chieh

    2012-12-01

    According to the path-integral formalism of the hadronic tensor, the nucleon sea contains two distinct components called the connected sea (CS) and the disconnected sea (DS). We discuss how the CS and DS are accessed in the lattice QCD calculation of the moments of the parton distributions. We show that the CS and DS components of u¯(x)+d¯(x) can be extracted by using recent data on the strangeness parton distribution, the CT10 global fit, and the lattice result of the ratio of the strange to u(d) moments in the disconnected insertion. The extracted CS and DS for u¯(x)+d¯(x) have a distinct Bjorken x dependence in qualitative agreement with expectation. The analysis also shows that the momentum fraction of u¯(x)+d¯(x) is about equally divided between the CS and DS at Q2=2.5GeV2. Implications for the future global analysis of parton distributions are presented.

  1. Wigner Distributions of Quarks for Different Polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Jai; Mukherjee, Asmita; Nair, Sreeraj

    2017-03-01

    We calculate quark Wigner distributions using the light-front wave functions in a dressed quark model. In this model, a proton target is replaced by a simplified spin-1/2 state, namely a quark dressed with a gluon. We calculate the Wigner distributions for different polarization configuration of quark and the target state in this model.

  2. Constraints on large-x parton distributions from new weak boson production and deep-inelastic scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Accardi, A.; Brady, L. T.; Melnitchouk, W.; Owens, J. F.; Sato, N.

    2016-06-20

    A new set of leading twist parton distribution functions, referred to as "CJ15", is presented, which take advantage of developments in the theoretical treatment of nuclear corrections as well as new data. The analysis includes for the first time data on the free neutron structure function from Jefferson Lab, and new high-precision charged lepton and W-boson asymmetry data from Fermilab, which significantly reduce the uncertainty on the d/u ratio at large values of x.

  3. Constraints on large-x parton distributions from new weak boson production and deep-inelastic scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Accardi, A.; Brady, L. T.; Melnitchouk, W.; Owens, J. F.; Sato, N.

    2016-06-20

    A new set of leading twist parton distribution functions, referred to as "CJ15", is presented, which take advantage of developments in the theoretical treatment of nuclear corrections as well as new data. The analysis includes for the first time data on the free neutron structure function from Jefferson Lab, and new high-precision charged lepton and W-boson asymmetry data from Fermilab, which significantly reduce the uncertainty on the d/u ratio at large values of x.

  4. Partonic calculation of the two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering at large momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Y. C. Chen; A. Afanasev; S. J. Brodsky; C. E. Carlson; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2004-03-01

    We estimate the two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering at large momentum transfer through the scattering off a parton in the proton. We relate the process on the nucleon to the generalized parton distributions which also enter in other wide angle scattering processes. We find that when taking the polarization transfer determinations of the form factors as input, adding in the 2 photon correction, does reproduce the Rosenbluth data.

  5. The neural network approach to parton fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Rojo, Joan; Latorre, Jose I.; Del Debbio, Luigi; Forte, Stefano; Piccione, Andrea

    2005-10-06

    We introduce the neural network approach to global fits of parton distribution functions. First we review previous work on unbiased parametrizations of deep-inelastic structure functions with faithful estimation of their uncertainties, and then we summarize the current status of neural network parton distribution fits.

  6. Comment on "Reevaluation of the parton distribution of strange quarks in the nucleon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarski, M.

    2015-11-01

    The HERMES collaboration in Phys. Rev. D 89, 097101 (2014) extracted information about the strange quark density in the nucleon. One of the main results is an observation that the shape of the extracted density is very different from the shapes of the strange quark density from global QCD fits and also from that of the light antiquarks. In this paper systematic studies on the HERMES published multiplicity of pion and kaon data are presented. It is shown that the conclusions concerning the strange quark distribution in the nucleon reached in Phys. Rev. D 89, 097101 (2014) are at the moment premature.

  7. POLRADS: polarization radiance distribution measurement system.

    PubMed

    Voss, Kenneth J; Souaidia, Nordine

    2010-09-13

    While the upwelling radiance distribution in the ocean can be highly polarized, there are few measurements of this parameter in the open ocean. To obtain the polarized in-water upwelling spectral radiance distribution data we have developed the POLRADS instrument. This instrument is based on the NuRADS radiance distribution camera systems in which linear polarizer's have been installed. By combining simultaneous images from three NuRADS instruments, three Stokes parameters (I, Q, U) for the water leaving radiance can be obtained for all upwelling angles simultaneously. This system measures the Stokes parameters Q/I and U/I with a 0.05-0.06 uncertainty and I with a 7-10% uncertainty.

  8. Flavor dependence of the pion and kaon form factors and parton distribution functions

    DOE PAGES

    Hutauruk, Parada T. P.; Cloët, Ian C.; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2016-09-01

    The separate quark flavor contributions to the pion and kaon valence quark distribution functions are studied, along with the corresponding electromagnetic form factors in the space-like region. The calculations are made using the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the model of Nambu and Jona-Lasinio with proper-time regularization. Both the pion and kaon form factors and the valence quark distribution functions reproduce many features of the available empirical data. The larger mass of the strange quark naturally explains the empirical fact that the ratio u(K) + (x)/u(pi) + (x) drops below unity at large x, with a value of approximately Mmore » $$2\\atop{u}$$/Ms$$2\\atop{s}$$ as x → 1. With regard to the elastic form factors we report a large flavor dependence, with the u-quark contribution to the kaon form factor being an order of magnitude smaller than that of the s-quark at large Q2, which may be a sensitive measure of confinement effects in QCD. Surprisingly though, the total K+ and π+ form factors differ by only 10%. Lastly, in general we find that flavor breaking effects are typically around 20%.« less

  9. Flavor dependence of the pion and kaon form factors and parton distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Hutauruk, Parada T. P.; Cloët, Ian C.; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2016-09-01

    The separate quark flavor contributions to the pion and kaon valence quark distribution functions are studied, along with the corresponding electromagnetic form factors in the space-like region. The calculations are made using the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the model of Nambu and Jona-Lasinio with proper-time regularization. Both the pion and kaon form factors and the valence quark distribution functions reproduce many features of the available empirical data. The larger mass of the strange quark naturally explains the empirical fact that the ratio u(K) + (x)/u(pi) + (x) drops below unity at large x, with a value of approximately M$2\\atop{u}$/Ms$2\\atop{s}$ as x → 1. With regard to the elastic form factors we report a large flavor dependence, with the u-quark contribution to the kaon form factor being an order of magnitude smaller than that of the s-quark at large Q2, which may be a sensitive measure of confinement effects in QCD. Surprisingly though, the total K+ and π+ form factors differ by only 10%. Lastly, in general we find that flavor breaking effects are typically around 20%.

  10. Determination of Polarised Parton Distributions in the Nucleon --- Next to Leading Order QCD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatur, Stanislaw; Bartelski, Jan; Kurzela, Miroslaw

    2000-03-01

    We have made next to leading order QCD fit to the deep inelastic spin asymmetries on nucleons and we have determined polarised quark and gluon densities. The functional form for such distributions was inspired by the Martin, Roberts and Stirling fit for unpolarised case. In addition to usually used data points (averaged over x and Q2) we have also considered the sample containing points with similar x and different Q2. It seems that splitting of quark densities into valence and sea contribution is strongly model dependent and only their sum (i.e. , Δ u and Δ d) can be precisely determined from the data. Integrated polarised gluon contribution, contrary to some expectations, is relatively small and the sign of it depends on the fact which sample of data points is used.

  11. Generalized parton correlation functions for a spin-0 hadron

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, Stephan; Metz, Andreas; Schlegel, Marc; Goeke, Klaus

    2008-08-01

    The fully unintegrated, off-diagonal quark-quark correlator for a spin-0 hadron is parameterized in terms of so-called generalized parton correlation functions. Such objects are of relevance for the phenomenology of certain hard exclusive reactions. In particular, they can be considered as mother distributions of generalized parton distributions on the one hand and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions on the other. Therefore, our study provides new, model-independent insights into the recently proposed nontrivial relations between generalized and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. As a by-product we obtain the first complete classification of generalized parton distributions beyond leading twist.

  12. Mechanisms of Polarized Organelle Distribution in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Britt, Dylan J.; Farías, Ginny G.; Guardia, Carlos M.; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells exhibiting axonal and somatodendritic domains with distinct complements of cytoplasmic organelles. Although some organelles are widely distributed throughout the neuronal cytoplasm, others are segregated to either the axonal or somatodendritic domains. Recent findings show that organelle segregation is largely established at a pre-axonal exclusion zone (PAEZ) within the axon hillock. Polarized sorting of cytoplasmic organelles at the PAEZ is proposed to depend mainly on their selective association with different microtubule motors and, in turn, with distinct microtubule arrays. Somatodendritic organelles that escape sorting at the PAEZ can be subsequently retrieved at the axon initial segment (AIS) by a microtubule- and/or actin-based mechanism. Dynamic sorting along the PAEZ-AIS continuum can thus explain the polarized distribution of cytoplasmic organelles between the axonal and somatodendritic domains. PMID:27065809

  13. Mechanisms of Polarized Organelle Distribution in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Britt, Dylan J; Farías, Ginny G; Guardia, Carlos M; Bonifacino, Juan S

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells exhibiting axonal and somatodendritic domains with distinct complements of cytoplasmic organelles. Although some organelles are widely distributed throughout the neuronal cytoplasm, others are segregated to either the axonal or somatodendritic domains. Recent findings show that organelle segregation is largely established at a pre-axonal exclusion zone (PAEZ) within the axon hillock. Polarized sorting of cytoplasmic organelles at the PAEZ is proposed to depend mainly on their selective association with different microtubule motors and, in turn, with distinct microtubule arrays. Somatodendritic organelles that escape sorting at the PAEZ can be subsequently retrieved at the axon initial segment (AIS) by a microtubule- and/or actin-based mechanism. Dynamic sorting along the PAEZ-AIS continuum can thus explain the polarized distribution of cytoplasmic organelles between the axonal and somatodendritic domains.

  14. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION, AUGUST 3, 2000 AT BNL, OCTOBER 14, 2000 AT KYOTO UNIVERSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    BUNCE, G.; VIGDOR, S.

    2001-03-15

    International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce.

  15. Pion transverse momentum dependent parton distributions in a light-front constituent approach, and the Boer-Mulders effect in the pion-induced Drell-Yan process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquini, B.; Schweitzer, P.

    2014-07-01

    At leading twist the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions of the pion consist of two functions, the unpolarized f1,π(x,k⊥2) and the Boer-Mulders function h1,π⊥(x ,k⊥2). We study both functions within a light-front constituent model of the pion, comparing the results with different pion models and the corresponding nucleon distributions from a light-front constituent model. After evolution from the model scale to the relevant experimental scales, the results for the collinear pion valence parton distribution function f1,π(x) are in very good agreement with available parametrizations. Using the light-front constituent model results for the Boer-Mulders functions of the pion and nucleon, we calculate the coefficient ν in the angular distribution of Drell-Yan dileptons produced in pion-nucleus scattering, which is responsible for the violation of the Lam-Tung relation. We find a good agreement with the data, and carefully discuss the range of applicability of our approach.

  16. Extraction of partonic transverse momentum distributions from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan and Z-boson production

    DOE PAGES

    Bacchetta, Alessandro; Delcarro, Filippo; Pisano, Cristian; ...

    2017-06-15

    We present an extraction of unpolarized partonic transverse momentum distributions (TMDs) from a simultaneous fit of available data measured in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan and Z boson production. To connect data at different scales, we use TMD evolution at next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The analysis is restricted to the low-transverse-momentum region, with no matching to fixed-order calculations at high transverse momentum. We introduce specific choices to deal with TMD evolution at low scales, of the order of 1 GeV2. Furthermore, this could be considered as a first attempt at a global fit of TMDs.

  17. Study of Generalized Parton Distributions and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on the nucleon with the CLAS and CLAS12 detectors at the Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Guegan, Baptiste

    2012-11-01

    The exclusive leptoproduction of a real photon is considered to be the "cleanest" way to access the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD). This process is called Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) lN {yields} lN{gamma} , and is sensitive to all the four GPDs. Measuring the DVCS cross section is one of the main goals of this thesis. In this thesis, we present the work performed to extract on a wide phase-space the DVCS cross-section from the JLab data at a beam energy of 6 GeV.

  18. Extraction of partonic transverse momentum distributions from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan and Z-boson production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchetta, Alessandro; Delcarro, Filippo; Pisano, Cristian; Radici, Marco; Signori, Andrea

    2017-06-01

    We present an extraction of unpolarized partonic transverse momentum distributions (TMDs) from a simultaneous fit of available data measured in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan and Z boson production. To connect data at different scales, we use TMD evolution at next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The analysis is restricted to the low-transverse-momentum region, with no matching to fixed-order calculations at high transverse momentum. We introduce specific choices to deal with TMD evolution at low scales, of the order of 1 GeV2. This could be considered as a first attempt at a global fit of TMDs.

  19. Perturbative QCD correlations in multi-parton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blok, B.; Dokshitzer, Yu.; Frankfurt, L.; Strikman, M.

    2014-06-01

    We examine the role played in double-parton interactions (DPI) by the parton-parton correlations originating from perturbative QCD parton splittings. Also presented are the results of the numerical analysis of the integrated DPI cross sections at Tevatron and LHC energies. To obtain the numerical results the knowledge of the single-parton GPDs gained by the HERA experiments was used to construct the non-perturbative input for generalized double-parton distributions. The perturbative two-parton correlations induced by three-parton interactions contribute significantly to a resolution of the longstanding puzzle of an excess of multi-jet production events in the back-to-back kinematics observed at the Tevatron.

  20. LHC production of forward-center and forward-forward di-jets in the kt-factorization and transverse dependent unintegrated parton distribution frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, M.; Masouminia, M. R.; Aminzadeh Nik, R.; Hosseinkhani, H.; Olanj, N.

    2017-09-01

    The present work is devoted to study the high-energy QCD events, such as the di-jet productions from proton-proton inelastic collisions at the LHC in the forward-center and the forward-forward configurations. This provides us with much valuable case study, since such phenomena can provide a direct glimpse into the partonic behavior of a hadron in a dominant gluonic region. We use the unintegrated parton distribution functions (UPDF) in the kt-factorization framework. The UPDF of Kimber et al. (KMR) and Martin et al. (MRW) are generated in the leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO), using the Harland-Lang et al. (MMHT2014) PDF libraries. While working in the forward-center and the forward-forward rapidity sectors, one can probe the parton densities at very low longitudinal momentum fractions (x). Such a model computation can provide simpler analytic description of data with respect to existing formalisms such as perturbative QCD. The differential cross-section calculations are performed at the center of mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to CMS collaboration measurement. It is shown that the gluonic jet productions are dominant and a good description of data as well as other theoretical attempts (i.e. KS-linear, KS-nonlinear and rcBK) is obtained. The uncertainty of the calculations is derived by manipulating the hard scale of the processes by a factor of two. This conclusion is achieved, due to the particular visualization of the angular ordering constraint (AOC), that is incorporated in the definition of these UPDF.

  1. TRANSVERSE POLARIZATION DISTRIBUTION AND FRAGMENTATION FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    BOER,D.

    2000-04-11

    The authors discuss transverse polarization distribution and fragmentation functions, in particular, T-odd functions with transverse momentum dependence, which might be relevant for the description of single transverse spin asymmetries. The role of intrinsic transverse momentum in the expansion in inverse powers of the hard scale is elaborated upon. The sin {phi} single spin asymmetry in the process e {rvec p} {r_arrow} e{prime} {pi}{sup +} X as recently reported by the HERMES Collaboration is investigated, in particular, by using the bag model.

  2. Probe initial parton density and formation time via jet quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2002-09-20

    Medium modification of jet fragmentation function due to multiple scattering and induced gluon radiation leads directly to jet quenching or suppression of leading particle distribution from jet fragmentation. One can extract an effective total parton energy loss which can be related to the total transverse momentum broadening. For an expanding medium, both are shown to be sensitive to the initial parton density and formation time. Therefore, one can extract the initial parton density and formation time from simultaneous measurements of parton energy loss and transverse momentum broadening. Implication of the recent experimental data on effects of detailed balance in parton energy loss is also discussed.

  3. Transverse nucleon structure and diagnostics of hard parton-parton processes at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    L. Frankfurt, M. Strikman, C. Weiss

    2011-03-01

    We propose a new method to determine at what transverse momenta particle production in high-energy pp collisions is governed by hard parton-parton processes. Using information on the transverse spatial distribution of partons obtained from hard exclusive processes in ep/\\gamma p scattering, we evaluate the impact parameter distribution of pp collisions with a hard parton-parton process as a function of p_T of the produced parton (jet). We find that the average pp impact parameters in such events depend very weakly on p_T in the range 2 < p_T < few 100 GeV, while they are much smaller than those in minimum-bias inelastic collisions. The impact parameters in turn govern the observable transverse multiplicity in such events (in the direction perpendicular to the trigger particle or jet). Measuring the transverse multiplicity as a function of p_T thus provides an effective tool for determining the minimum p_T for which a given trigger particle originates from a hard parton-parton process.

  4. The midpoint between dipole and parton showers

    SciTech Connect

    Höche, Stefan; Prestel, Stefan

    2015-09-28

    We present a new parton-shower algorithm. Borrowing from the basic ideas of dipole cascades, the evolution variable is judiciously chosen as the transverse momentum in the soft limit. This leads to a very simple analytic structure of the evolution. A weighting algorithm is implemented that allows one to consistently treat potentially negative values of the splitting functions and the parton distributions. Thus, we provide two independent, publicly available implementations for the two event generators PYTHIA and SHERPA.

  5. Constraining the Polarized Gluon Distribution Through Di-jet Measurements at √{ s} = 510 GeV at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olvitt, Daniel, Jr.; STAR Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The production of jets from polarized p+p collisions at STAR is dominated by quark-gluon and gluon-gluon scattering. The di-jet double spin asymmetry (ALL) is sensitive to the polarized gluon distribution (ΔG). Di-jets are also advantageous because the parton momentum fraction, x, of initial partons may be reconstructed to first order from the final state measurements. Both jet and di-jet ALL measurements at √{ s} = 200 GeV have helped to constrain ΔG to values of x 0.05. In 2012, data were collected at √{ s} = 510 GeV in order to probe lower values of x. Jet and di-jet preliminary ALL results have been released and will soon be incorporated into theoretical fits. In 2013, data were also collected at √{ s} = 510 GeV. An update on the di-jet ALL measurement using polarized p+p data collected at STAR during 2013, with an estimated 250 pb-1 of integrated luminosity will be presented.

  6. Measurement of double-differential cross sections for top quark pair production in pp collisions at √{s} = 8 {TeV} and impact on parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Dvornikov, O.; Makarenko, V.; Mossolov, V.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Zykunov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Alderweireldt, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Skovpen, K.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Vannerom, D.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Khvastunov, I.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Komm, M.; Krintiras, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Chagas, E. Belchior Batista Das; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Guativa, L. M. Huertas; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, T.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Ruan, M.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, J.; Ban, Y.; Chen, G.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Sculac, T.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Mesic, B.; Susa, T.; Ather, M. W.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Järvinen, T.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Stahl Leiton, A. G.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Zghiche, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Bihan, A.-C. Le; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Finco, L.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Khvedelidze, A.; Lomidze, D.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Preuten, M.; Schomakers, C.; Schulz, J.; Verlage, T.; Albert, A.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hamer, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Flügge, G.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Müller, T.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Arndt, T.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bin Anuar, A. A.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Connor, P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Eren, E.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grados Luyando, J. M.; Grohsjean, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Keaveney, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Lenz, T.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Zenaiev, O.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Dreyer, T.; Garutti, E.; Gonzalez, D.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kurz, S.; Lapsien, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Sonneveld, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Stöver, M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baur, S.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Butz, E.; Caspart, R.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Freund, B.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Kassel, F.; Katkov, I.; Kudella, S.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Shvetsov, I.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Kousouris, K.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Filipovic, N.; Pasztor, G.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Makovec, A.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Bahinipati, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Kumari, P.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutt, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Thakur, S.; Behera, P. K.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Dugad, S.; Kole, G.; Mahakud, B.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Banerjee, S.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Jain, Sa.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Sarkar, T.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Hegde, V.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Pandey, S.; Rane, A.; Sharma, S.; Chenarani, S.; Eskandari Tadavani, E.; Etesami, S. M.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Albergo, S.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Russo, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Strom, D.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Brivio, F.; Ciriolo, V.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malberti, M.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Fienga, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Antunes De Oliveira, A. Carvalho; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Rossin, R.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Ventura, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Braghieri, A.; Fallavollita, F.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Ressegotti, M.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Mantovani, G.; Mariani, V.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Cipriani, M.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Marzocchi, B.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Monteno, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Shchelina, K.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Zanetti, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Oh, Y. D.; Sekmen, S.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Lee, A.; Kim, H.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, T. J.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Ha, S.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Almond, J.; Kim, J.; Lee, H.; Oh, S. B.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Seo, S. H.; Yang, U. K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yu, G. B.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Hwang, C.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Carpinteyro, S.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Saddique, A.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Pyskir, A.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Calpas, B.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Voytishin, N.; Zarubin, A.; Chtchipounov, L.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Sulimov, V.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Toms, M.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Aushev, T.; Bylinkin, A.; Danilov, M.; Popova, E.; Rusinov, V.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Terkulov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Korneeva, N.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Savrin, V.; Volkov, P.; Blinov, V.; Skovpen, Y.; Shtol, D.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Elumakhov, D.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Dordevic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Barrio Luna, M.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Erice, C.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; González Fernández, J. R.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Sanchez Cruz, S.; Suárez Andrés, I.; Vischia, P.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Curras, E.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Botta, C.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; Chen, Y.; Cimmino, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Roeck, A.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Everaerts, P.; Fartoukh, S.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Gulhan, D.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kornmayer, A.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Krammer, M.; Lange, C.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Meijers, F.; Merlin, J. A.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Milenovic, P.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Sauvan, J. B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Tosi, M.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Verweij, M.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Wiederkehr, S. A.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; De Cosa, A.; Donato, S.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Seitz, C.; Yang, Y.; Zucchetta, A.; Candelise, V.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Tsai, J. F.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Boran, F.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. 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I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; West, C.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Cutts, D.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Hogan, J. M.; Jesus, O.; Kwok, K. H. M.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Spencer, E.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Shalhout, S.; Shi, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tos, K.; Tripathi, M.; Bachtis, M.; Bravo, C.; Cousins, R.; Dasgupta, A.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Mccoll, N.; Saltzberg, D.; Schnaible, C.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Bouvier, E.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Ghiasi Shirazi, S. M. A.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Si, W.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Amin, N.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Franco Sevilla, M.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Mullin, S. D.; Ovcharova, A.; Qu, H.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Duarte, J.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Weinberg, M.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Leontsinis, S.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mcdermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Zientek, M.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cremonesi, M.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, M.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strait, J.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Wu, Y.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Low, J. F.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Shchutska, L.; Sperka, D.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Kolberg, T.; Perry, T.; Prosper, H.; Santra, A.; Yohay, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Cavanaugh, R.; Chen, X.; Evdokimov, O.; Gerber, C. E.; Hangal, D. A.; Hofman, D. J.; Jung, K.; Kamin, J.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Trauger, H.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Boren, S.; Bowen, J.; Castle, J.; Forthomme, L.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kunkle, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Apyan, A.; Azzolini, V.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; D'Alfonso, M.; Demiragli, Z.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Maier, B.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Tatar, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Kravchenko, I.; Malta Rodrigues, A.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Charaf, O.; Hahn, K. A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Rupprecht, N.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Lange, D.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mei, K.; Ojalvo, I.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Tully, C.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Khatiwada, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Schulte, J. F.; Shi, X.; Sun, J.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. T.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Agapitos, A.; Chou, J. P.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Montalvo, R.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Delannoy, A. G.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Juska, E.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Sturdy, J.; Zaleski, S.; Belknap, D. A.; Buchanan, J.; Caillol, C.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Hussain, U.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2017-07-01

    Normalized double-differential cross sections for top quark pair (t\\overline{t}) production are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 {TeV} with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The analyzed data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 {fb}^{-1}. The measurement is performed in the dilepton e^{± }μ ^{∓ } final state. The t\\overline{t} cross section is determined as a function of various pairs of observables characterizing the kinematics of the top quark and t\\overline{t} system. The data are compared to calculations using perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading and approximate next-to-next-to-leading orders. They are also compared to predictions of Monte Carlo event generators that complement fixed-order computations with parton showers, hadronization, and multiple-parton interactions. Overall agreement is observed with the predictions, which is improved when the latest global sets of proton parton distribution functions are used. The inclusion of the measured t\\overline{t} cross sections in a fit of parametrized parton distribution functions is shown to have significant impact on the gluon distribution.

  7. Measurement of double-differential cross sections for top quark pair production in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 8$$ TeV and impact on parton distribution functions

    DOE PAGES

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; ...

    2017-07-11

    Normalized double-differential cross sections for top quark pair (more » $$\\mathrm{t}\\overline{\\mathrm{t}}$$ ) production are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 $$\\,\\text {TeV}$$ with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The analyzed data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 $$\\,\\text {fb}^{-1}$$ . The measurement is performed in the dilepton $$\\mathrm {e}^{\\pm }\\mu ^{\\mp }$$ final state. The $$\\mathrm{t}\\overline{\\mathrm{t}}$$ cross section is determined as a function of various pairs of observables characterizing the kinematics of the top quark and $$\\mathrm{t}\\overline{\\mathrm{t}}$$ system. The data are compared to calculations using perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading and approximate next-to-next-to-leading orders. They are also compared to predictions of Monte Carlo event generators that complement fixed-order computations with parton showers, hadronization, and multiple-parton interactions. Overall agreement is observed with the predictions, which is improved when the latest global sets of proton parton distribution functions are used. Lastly, the inclusion of the measured $$\\mathrm{t}\\overline{\\mathrm{t}}$$ cross sections in a fit of parametrized parton distribution functions is shown to have significant impact on the gluon distribution.« less

  8. Measurement of double-differential cross sections for top quark pair production in pp collisions at [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] and impact on parton distribution functions.

    PubMed

    Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Flechl, M; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; König, A; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rad, N; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Strauss, J; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Dvornikov, O; Makarenko, V; Mossolov, V; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Zykunov, V; Shumeiko, N; Alderweireldt, S; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Lauwers, J; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Lowette, S; Moortgat, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Skovpen, K; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Parijs, I; Brun, H; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Delannoy, H; Fasanella, G; Favart, L; Goldouzian, R; Grebenyuk, A; Karapostoli, G; Lenzi, T; Léonard, A; Luetic, J; Maerschalk, T; Marinov, A; Randle-Conde, A; 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Aggleton, R; Ball, F; Beck, L; Brooke, J J; Burns, D; Clement, E; Cussans, D; Flacher, H; Goldstein, J; Grimes, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Jacob, J; Kreczko, L; Lucas, C; Newbold, D M; Paramesvaran, S; Poll, A; Sakuma, T; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S; Smith, D; Smith, V J; Bell, K W; Belyaev, A; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Calligaris, L; Cieri, D; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Harder, K; Harper, S; Olaiya, E; Petyt, D; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Thea, A; Tomalin, I R; Williams, T; Baber, M; Bainbridge, R; Buchmuller, O; Bundock, A; Casasso, S; Citron, M; Colling, D; Corpe, L; Dauncey, P; Davies, G; De Wit, A; Della Negra, M; Di Maria, R; Dunne, P; Elwood, A; Futyan, D; Haddad, Y; Hall, G; Iles, G; James, T; Lane, R; Laner, C; Lyons, L; Magnan, A-M; Malik, S; Mastrolorenzo, L; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Pela, J; Penning, B; Pesaresi, M; Raymond, D M; Richards, A; Rose, A; Scott, E; Seez, C; Summers, S; Tapper, A; Uchida, K; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wright, J; Zenz, S C; Cole, J E; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Reid, I D; Symonds, P; Teodorescu, L; Turner, M; Borzou, A; Call, K; Dittmann, J; Hatakeyama, K; Liu, H; Pastika, N; Bartek, R; Dominguez, A; Buccilli, A; Cooper, S I; Henderson, C; Rumerio, P; West, C; Arcaro, D; Avetisyan, A; Bose, T; Gastler, D; Rankin, D; Richardson, C; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Zou, D; Benelli, G; Cutts, D; Garabedian, A; Hakala, J; Heintz, U; Hogan, J M; Jesus, O; Kwok, K H M; Laird, E; Landsberg, G; Mao, Z; Narain, M; Piperov, S; Sagir, S; Spencer, E; Syarif, R; Breedon, R; Burns, D; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Chauhan, S; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Conway, R; Cox, P T; Erbacher, R; Flores, C; Funk, G; Gardner, M; Ko, W; Lander, R; Mclean, C; Mulhearn, M; Pellett, D; Pilot, J; Shalhout, S; Shi, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stolp, D; Tos, K; Tripathi, M; Bachtis, M; Bravo, C; Cousins, R; Dasgupta, A; Florent, A; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Mccoll, N; Saltzberg, D; Schnaible, C; Valuev, V; Weber, M; Bouvier, E; Burt, K; Clare, R; Ellison, J; Gary, J W; Ghiasi Shirazi, S M A; Hanson, G; Heilman, J; Jandir, P; Kennedy, E; Lacroix, F; Long, O R; Olmedo Negrete, M; Paneva, M I; Shrinivas, A; Si, W; Wei, H; Wimpenny, S; Yates, B R; Branson, J G; Cerati, G B; Cittolin, S; Derdzinski, M; Gerosa, R; Holzner, A; Klein, D; Krutelyov, V; Letts, J; Macneill, I; Olivito, D; Padhi, S; Pieri, M; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Tadel, M; Vartak, A; Wasserbaech, S; Welke, C; Wood, J; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Zevi Della Porta, G; Amin, N; Bhandari, R; Bradmiller-Feld, J; Campagnari, C; Dishaw, A; Dutta, V; Franco Sevilla, M; George, C; Golf, F; Gouskos, L; Gran, J; Heller, R; Incandela, J; Mullin, S D; Ovcharova, A; Qu, H; Richman, J; Stuart, D; Suarez, I; Yoo, J; Anderson, D; Bendavid, J; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Duarte, J; Lawhorn, J M; Mott, A; Newman, H B; Pena, C; Spiropulu, M; Vlimant, J R; Xie, S; Zhu, R Y; Andrews, M B; Ferguson, T; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Sun, M; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Weinberg, M; Cumalat, J P; Ford, W T; Jensen, F; Johnson, A; Krohn, M; Leontsinis, S; Mulholland, T; Stenson, K; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chaves, J; Chu, J; Dittmer, S; Mcdermott, K; Mirman, N; Patterson, J R; Rinkevicius, A; Ryd, A; Skinnari, L; Soffi, L; Tan, S M; Tao, Z; Thom, J; Tucker, J; Wittich, P; Zientek, M; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Banerjee, S; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Bolla, G; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Cremonesi, M; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Grünendahl, S; Gutsche, O; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hasegawa, S; Hirschauer, J; Hu, Z; Jayatilaka, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Klima, B; Kreis, B; Lammel, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Liu, M; Liu, T; Lopes De Sá, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Magini, N; Marraffino, J M; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Merkel, P; Mrenna, S; Nahn, S; O'Dell, V; Pedro, K; Prokofyev, O; Rakness, G; Ristori, L; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Stoynev, S; Strait, J; Strobbe, N; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vernieri, C; Verzocchi, M; Vidal, R; Wang, M; Weber, H A; Whitbeck, A; Wu, Y; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bortignon, P; Bourilkov, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Carnes, A; Carver, M; Curry, D; Das, S; Field, R D; Furic, I K; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Low, J F; Ma, P; Matchev, K; Mei, H; Mitselmakher, G; Rank, D; Shchutska, L; Sperka, D; Thomas, L; Wang, J; Wang, S; Yelton, J; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Ackert, A; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bein, S; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Kolberg, T; Perry, T; Prosper, H; Santra, A; Yohay, R; Baarmand, M M; Bhopatkar, V; Colafranceschi, S; Hohlmann, M; Noonan, D; Roy, T; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Berry, D; Betts, R R; Cavanaugh, R; Chen, X; Evdokimov, O; Gerber, C E; Hangal, D A; Hofman, D J; Jung, K; Kamin, J; Sandoval Gonzalez, I D; Trauger, H; Varelas, N; Wang, H; Wu, Z; Zhang, J; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Durgut, S; Gandrajula, R P; Haytmyradov, M; Khristenko, V; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Snyder, C; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yi, K; Blumenfeld, B; Cocoros, A; Eminizer, N; Fehling, D; Feng, L; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Roskes, J; Sarica, U; Swartz, M; Xiao, M; You, C; Al-Bataineh, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Boren, S; Bowen, J; Castle, J; Forthomme, L; Khalil, S; Kropivnitskaya, A; Majumder, D; Mcbrayer, W; Murray, M; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Tapia Takaki, J D; Wang, Q; Ivanov, A; Kaadze, K; Maravin, Y; Mohammadi, A; Saini, L K; Skhirtladze, N; Toda, S; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Anelli, C; Baden, A; Baron, O; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Ferraioli, C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Jabeen, S; Jeng, G Y; Kellogg, R G; Kunkle, J; Mignerey, A C; Ricci-Tam, F; Shin, Y H; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Abercrombie, D; Allen, B; Apyan, A; Azzolini, V; Barbieri, R; Baty, A; Bi, R; Bierwagen, K; Brandt, S; Busza, W; Cali, I A; D'Alfonso, M; Demiragli, Z; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Hsu, D; Iiyama, Y; Innocenti, G M; Klute, M; Kovalskyi, D; Krajczar, K; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Maier, B; Marini, A C; Mcginn, C; Mironov, C; Narayanan, S; Niu, X; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Stephans, G S F; Tatar, K; Velicanu, D; Wang, J; Wang, T W; Wyslouch, B; Benvenuti, A C; Chatterjee, R M; Evans, A; Hansen, P; Kalafut, S; Kao, S C; Kubota, Y; Lesko, Z; Mans, J; Nourbakhsh, S; Ruckstuhl, N; Rusack, R; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Claes, D R; Fangmeier, C; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kamalieddin, R; Kravchenko, I; Malta Rodrigues, A; Monroy, J; Siado, J E; Snow, G R; Stieger, B; Alyari, M; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Harrington, C; Iashvili, I; Kaisen, J; Nguyen, D; Parker, A; Rappoccio, S; Roozbahani, B; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Hortiangtham, A; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Teixeira De Lima, R; Trocino, D; Wang, R-J; Wood, D; Bhattacharya, S; Charaf, O; Hahn, K A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Schmitt, M H; Sung, K; Trovato, M; Velasco, M; Dev, N; Hildreth, M; Hurtado Anampa, K; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Marinelli, N; Meng, F; Mueller, C; Musienko, Y; Planer, M; Reinsvold, A; Ruchti, R; Rupprecht, N; Smith, G; Taroni, S; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Alimena, J; Antonelli, L; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Francis, B; Hart, A; Hill, C; Ji, W; Liu, B; Luo, W; Puigh, D; Winer, B L; Wulsin, H W; Cooperstein, S; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Lange, D; Luo, J; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mei, K; Ojalvo, I; Olsen, J; Palmer, C; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Tully, C; Malik, S; Barker, A; Barnes, V E; Folgueras, S; Gutay, L; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, A W; Khatiwada, A; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Schulte, J F; Shi, X; Sun, J; Wang, F; Xie, W; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Chen, Z; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Guilbaud, M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Northup, M; Padley, B P; Roberts, J; Rorie, J; Tu, Z; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Duh, Y T; Ferbel, T; Galanti, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Han, J; Hindrichs, O; Khukhunaishvili, A; Lo, K H; Tan, P; Verzetti, M; Agapitos, A; Chou, J P; Gershtein, Y; Gómez Espinosa, T A; Halkiadakis, E; Heindl, M; Hughes, E; Kaplan, S; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R; Kyriacou, S; Lath, A; Montalvo, R; Nash, K; Osherson, M; Saka, H; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Sheffield, D; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Delannoy, A G; Foerster, M; Heideman, J; Riley, G; Rose, K; Spanier, S; Thapa, K; Bouhali, O; Celik, A; Dalchenko, M; De Mattia, M; Delgado, A; Dildick, S; Eusebi, R; Gilmore, J; Huang, T; Juska, E; Kamon, T; Mueller, R; Pakhotin, Y; Patel, R; Perloff, A; Perniè, L; Rathjens, D; Safonov, A; Tatarinov, A; Ulmer, K A; Akchurin, N; Damgov, J; De Guio, F; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Gurpinar, E; Kunori, S; Lamichhane, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Peltola, T; Undleeb, S; Volobouev, I; Wang, Z; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Janjam, R; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Ni, H; Sheldon, P; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Xu, Q; Arenton, M W; Barria, P; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Neu, C; Sinthuprasith, T; Sun, X; Wang, Y; Wolfe, E; Xia, F; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Sturdy, J; Zaleski, S; Belknap, D A; Buchanan, J; Caillol, C; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Gomber, B; Grothe, M; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Hussain, U; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ruggles, T; Savin, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Woods, N

    2017-01-01

    Normalized double-differential cross sections for top quark pair ([Formula: see text]) production are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8[Formula: see text] with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The analyzed data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7[Formula: see text]. The measurement is performed in the dilepton [Formula: see text] final state. The [Formula: see text] cross section is determined as a function of various pairs of observables characterizing the kinematics of the top quark and [Formula: see text] system. The data are compared to calculations using perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading and approximate next-to-next-to-leading orders. They are also compared to predictions of Monte Carlo event generators that complement fixed-order computations with parton showers, hadronization, and multiple-parton interactions. Overall agreement is observed with the predictions, which is improved when the latest global sets of proton parton distribution functions are used. The inclusion of the measured [Formula: see text] cross sections in a fit of parametrized parton distribution functions is shown to have significant impact on the gluon distribution.

  9. QCD evolution of (un)polarized gluon TMDPDFs and the Higgs q T -distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarria, Miguel G.; Kasemets, Tomas; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian

    2015-07-01

    We provide the proper definition of all the leading-twist (un)polarized gluon transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDPDFs), by considering the Higgs boson transverse momentum distribution in hadron-hadron collisions and deriving the factorization theorem in terms of them. We show that the evolution of all the (un)polarized gluon TMDPDFs is driven by a universal evolution kernel, which can be resummed up to next-to-next-to-leading-logarithmic accuracy. Considering the proper definition of gluon TMDPDFs, we perform an explicit next-to-leading-order calculation of the unpolarized ( f {1/ g }), linearly polarized ( h {1/⊥ g }) and helicity ( g {1/L g }) gluon TMDPDFs, and show that, as expected, they are free from rapidity divergences. As a byproduct, we obtain the Wilson coefficients of the refactorization of these TMDPDFs at large transverse momentum. In particular, the coefficient of g {1/L g }, which has never been calculated before, constitutes a new and necessary ingredient for a reliable phenomenological extraction of this quantity, for instance at RHIC or the future AFTER@LHC or Electron-Ion Collider. The coefficients of f {1/ g } and h {1/⊥ g } have never been calculated in the present formalism, although they could be obtained by carefully collecting and recasting previous results in the new TMD formalism. We apply these results to analyze the contribution of linearly polarized gluons at different scales, relevant, for instance, for the inclusive production of the Higgs boson and the C-even pseudoscalar bottomonium state η b . Applying our resummation scheme we finally provide predictions for the Higgs boson q T -distribution at the LHC.

  10. Experimental demonstration of negative-valued polarization quasiprobability distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasibko, K. Yu.; Chekhova, M. V.; Khalili, F. Ya.

    2017-08-01

    Polarization quasiprobability distribution defined in the Stokes space shares many important properties with the Wigner function for position and momentum. Most notably, they both give correct one-dimensional marginal probability distributions and therefore represent the natural choice for the probability distributions in classical hidden-variable models. In this context, negativity of the Wigner function is considered as proof of nonclassicality for a quantum state. On the contrary, the polarization quasiprobability distribution demonstrates negativity for all quantum states. This feature comes from the discrete nature of Stokes variables; however, it was not observed in previous experiments, because they were performed with photon-number averaging detectors. Here we reconstruct the polarization quasiprobability distribution of a coherent state with photon-number resolving detectors, which allows us to directly observe for the first time its negativity. Furthermore we derive a theoretical polarization quasiprobability distribution for any linearly polarized quantum state.

  11. Phenomenological determination of polarized quark distributions in the nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelski, Jan; Tatur, Stanisław

    1996-03-01

    We present a fit to spin asymmetries which gives polarized quark distributions. These functions are closely related to the ones given by the Martin, Roberts and Stirling fit for unpolarized structure functions. The integrals of polarized distributions are discussed and compared with the corresponding quantities obtained from neutron and hyperon β-decay data. We use the combination of proton, neutron and deuteron spin asymmetries in order to determine the coefficients of our polarized quark distributions. Our fit shows that phenomenologically there is no need for taking polarized gluons into account.

  12. Spin-flavor structure of chiral-odd generalized parton distributions in the large-Nc limit

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, P.; Weiss, C.

    2016-10-05

    We study the spin-flavor structure of the nucleon's chiral-odd generalized parton distributions (transversity GPDs) in the large-Nc limit of QCD. In contrast to the chiral-even case, only three combinations of the four chiral-odd GPDs are nonzero in the leading order of the 1/Nc expansion: E-barT = ET+2H-tildeT, HT, and E-tildeT. The degeneracy is explained by the absence of spin-orbit interactions correlating the transverse momentum transfer with the transverse quark spin. It can also be deduced from the natural Nc scaling of the quark-nucleon helicity amplitudes associated with the GPDs. In the GPD E-barT the flavor-singlet component u+d is leading in the 1/Nc expansion, while in HT and E-tildeT it is the flavor-nonsinglet components u–d. Furthermore, the large-Nc relations are consistent with the spin-flavor structure extracted from hard exclusive π0 and η electroproduction data, if it is assumed that the processes are mediated by twist-3 amplitudes involving the chiral-odd GPDs and the chiral-odd pseudoscalar meson distribution amplitudes.

  13. Adaptive algorithms for two-channel polarization sensing under various polarization statistics with nonuniform distributions.

    PubMed

    Yemelyanov, Konstantin M; Lin, Shih-Schön; Pugh, Edward N; Engheta, Nader

    2006-08-01

    The polarization of light carries much useful information about the environment. Biological studies have shown that some animal species use polarization information for navigation and other purposes. It has been previously shown that a bioinspired polarization-difference imaging (PDI) technique can facilitate detection and feature extraction of targets in scattering media. It has also been established [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 15, 359 (1998)] that polarization sum and polarization difference are the optimum pair of linear combinations of images taken through two orthogonally oriented linear polarizers of a scene having a uniform distribution of polarization directions. However, in many real environments the scene has a nonuniform distribution of polarization directions. Using principal component analysis of the polarization statistics of the scene, we develop a method to determine the two optimum information channels with unequal weighting coefficients that can be formed as linear combinations of the images of a scene taken through a pair of linear polarizers not constrained to the horizontal and vertical directions of the scene. We determine the optimal orientations of linear polarization filters that enhance separation of a target from the background, where the target is defined as an area with distinct polarization characteristics as compared to the background. Experimental results confirm that in most situations adaptive PDI outperforms conventional PDI with fixed channels.

  14. Constructing Parton Convolution in Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Ji, Xiangdong

    2001-10-08

    Parton convolution models have been used extensively in describing the sea quarks in the nucleon and explaining quark distributions in nuclei (the EMC effect). From the effective field theory point of view, we construct the parton convolution formalism which has been the underlying conception of all convolution models. We explain the significance of scheme and scale dependence of the auxiliary quantities such as the pion distributions in a nucleon. As an application, we calculate the complete leading nonanalytic chiral contribution to the isovector component of the nucleon sea.

  15. Nucleon Parton Structure from Continuum QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednar, Kyle; Cloet, Ian; Tandy, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The parton structure of the nucleon is investigated using QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations (DSEs). This formalism builds in numerous essential features of QCD, for example, the dressing of parton propagators and dynamical formation of non-pointlike di-quark correlations. All needed elements of the approach, including the nucleon wave function solution from a Poincaré covariant Faddeev equation, are encoded in spectral-type representations in the Nakanishi style. This facilitates calculations and the necessary connections between Euclidean and Minkowski metrics. As a first step results for the nucleon quark distribution functions will be presented. The extension to the transverse momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) also be discussed. Supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1516138.

  16. Depth-fused three-dimensional display using polarization distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soon-gi; Min, Sung-Wook

    2010-11-01

    We propose novel depth-fused three-dimensional (DFD) method using polarization distribution, which is one kind of multifocal plane display that provides autostereoscopic image with small visual fatigue. The DFD method is based on the characteristic of human depth perception when the luminance-modulated two-dimensional (2D) images are overlapped. The perceived depth position is decided by the luminance ratio of each plane. The proposed system includes the polarization selective scattering films and the polarization modulating device. The polarization selective scattering film has the characteristics of partial scattering according to the polarization state and transmits the rest light from the scattering. When the films are stacked with the scattering axis rotated, each layer of film provides different scattering ratio according to the incident polarization. Consequently, the appropriate modulation of polarization can provide DFD image through the system. The depth map provides depth information of each pixel as a gray scale image. Thus, when a depth map is displayed on a polarization modulating device, it is converted into a polarization distributed depth map. The conventional twisted nematic liquid crystal display can be used as a polarization modulating device without complicated modification. We demonstrate the proposed system with simple experiment, and compare the characteristic of the system with simulated result.

  17. Hydrogen Distribution in the Lunar Polar Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanin, A. B.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Bakhtin, B. N.; Bodnarik, J. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Harshmann, K.; Fedosov, F.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present a method of conversion of the lunar neutron counting rate measured by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) instrument collimated neutron detectors, to water equivalent hydrogen (WEH) in the top approximately 1 m layer of lunar regolith. Polar maps of the Moon’s inferred hydrogen abundance are presented and discussed.

  18. Hydrogen distribution in the lunar polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanin, A. B.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Bakhtin, B. N.; Bodnarik, J. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Harshman, K.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Livengood, T. A.; Malakhov, A. V.; McClanahan, T. P.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Starr, R. D.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Tret'yakov, V. I.; Vostrukhin, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    We present a method of conversion of the lunar neutron counting rate measured by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) instrument collimated neutron detectors, to water equivalent hydrogen (WEH) in the top ∼1 m layer of lunar regolith. Polar maps of the Moon's inferred hydrogen abundance are presented and discussed.

  19. Ozone vertical distribution in Mars polar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komitov, B.

    On the basis of an ultraviolet spectrum obtained over the north polar region of Mars by Mariner-9, the vertical profile of the ozone density is calculated. A density maximum is found at about 25 km height over the surface of the planet. Its value is about 1×1010molecules cm-3. The obtained result is compared to the results obtained by other authors.

  20. Polarization-multiplexed plasmonic phase generation with distributed nanoslits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Kyuho; Lee, Gun-Yeal; Lee, Byoungho

    2015-06-15

    Methods for multiplexing surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) have been attracting much attention due to their potentials for plasmonic integrated systems, plasmonic holography, and optical tweezing. Here, using closely-distanced distributed nanoslits, we propose a method for generating polarization-multiplexed SPP phase profiles which can be applied for implementing general SPP phase distributions. Two independent types of SPP phase generation mechanisms - polarization-independent and polarization-reversible ones - are combined to generate fully arbitrary phase profiles for each optical handedness. As a simple verification of the proposed scheme, we experimentally demonstrate that the location of plasmonic focus can be arbitrary designed, and switched by the change of optical handedness.

  1. Parton Charge Symmetry Violation: Electromagnetic Effects and W Production Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Londergan; D.P. Murdock; A.W. Thomas

    2006-04-14

    Recent phenomenological work has examined two different ways of including charge symmetry violation in parton distribution functions. First, a global phenomenological fit to high energy data has included charge symmetry breaking terms, leading to limits on the magnitude of parton charge symmetry breaking. In a second approach, two groups have included the coupling of partons to photons in the QCD evolution equations. One possible experiment that could search for isospin violation in parton distributions is a measurement of the asymmetry in W production at a collider. In this work we include both of the postulated sources of parton charge symmetry violation. We show that, given charge symmetry violation of a magnitude consistent with existing high energy data, the expected W production asymmetries would be quite small, generally less than one percent.

  2. Improved modelling of independent parton hadronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddulph, Phillip; Thompson, Graham

    1989-04-01

    A modification is proposed to current versions of the Field-Feynman ansatz for the hadronization of a quark in Monte Carlo models of QCD interactions. This faster-running algorithm has no more parameters and imposes a better degree of energy conservation. It results in naturally introducing a limitation of the transverse momentum distribution, similar to the experimentally observed "seagull" effect. There is now a much improved conservation of quantum numbers between the original parton and resultant hadrons, and the momentum of the emitted parton is better preserved in the summed momentum vectors of the final state particles.

  3. Longitudinal polarization of hyperons in the forward region in polarized pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Wei; Zhou Shanshan; Xu Qinghua

    2010-03-01

    We study the longitudinal polarization of hyperons and antihyperons at forward pseudorapidity, 2.5<{eta}<4, in singly polarized pp collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energies by using different parametrizations of the polarized parton densities and different models for the polarized fragmentation functions. The results show that the {Sigma}{sup +} polarization is able to distinguish different pictures on spin transfer in high energy fragmentation processes; and the polarization of {Lambda} and {Lambda} hyperons can provide sensitivity to the helicity distribution of strange sea quarks. The influence from beam remnant to hyperon polarization in the forward region is also discussed.

  4. Random distributed feedback Raman fiber laser with polarized pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Wang, Z. N.; Churkin, D. V.; Vatnik, I. D.; Fan, M. Q.; Rao, Y. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, the polarization properties of a random fiber laser operating via Raman gain and random distributed feedback owing to Rayleigh scattering are investigated for the first time. Using polarized pump, the partially polarized generation is obtained with a generation spectrum exhibiting discrete narrow spectral features contrary to the smooth spectrum observed for the depolarized pump. The threshold, output power, degree of polarization and the state of polarization (SOP) of the lasing can be significantly influenced by the SOP of the pump. Fine narrow spectral components are also sensitive to the SOP of the pump wave. Furthermore, we found that random lasing’s longitudinal power distributions are different in the case of polarized and depolarized pumping that results in considerable reduction of the generation slope efficiency for the polarized radiation. Our results indicate that polarization effects play an important role on the performance of the random fiber laser. This work improves the understanding of the physics of random lasing in fibers and makes a step forward towards the establishment of the vector model of random fiber lasers.

  5. Phenomenological study of unintegrated parton distribution functions in the frameworks of the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin and Martin-Ryskin-Watt approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, M.; Hosseinkhani, H.; Olanj, N.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the phenomenological behavior of unitegrated parton distribution functions (UPDF) by using the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin (KMR) and Martin-Ryskin-Watt (MRW) formalisms. In the first method, the leading order (LO) UPDF of the KMR prescription is extracted, by taking into account the PDF of Martin et al., i.e., MSTW2008-LO and MRST99-NLO and. While in the second scheme, the next-to-leading order (NLO) UPDF of the (MRW) procedure is generated through the set of MSTW2008-NLO PDFas the inputs. The different aspects of the UPDF in the two approaches, as well as the input PDF are discussed. Then, the deep inelastic proton structure functions, F2(x,Q2), are calculated from the above UPDF in the two schemes, and compared with the data, which are extracted from the ZEUS, NMC, and H1+ZEUS experimental measurements. In general, it is shown that the calculated structure functions based on the UPDF of two schemes, are consistent to the experimental data, and by a good approximation, they are independent to the input PDF. But the proton structure functions, which are extracted from the KMR prescription, have better agreement to the data with respect to that of MRW. Although the MRW formalism is in more compliance with the Dokshitzer-Bribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) evolution equation requisites, but it seems in the KMR case, the angular ordering constraint spreads the UPDF to the whole transverse momentum region, and makes the results to sum up the leading DGLAP and Balitski-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov (BFKL) Logarithms. This point is under study by the authors.

  6. 3-, 4-, and 5-flavor next-to-next-to-leading order parton distribution functions from deep-inelastic-scattering data and at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhin, S.; Blümlein, J.; Klein, S.; Moch, S.

    2010-01-01

    We determine the parton distribution functions (PDFs) in a next-to-next-to-leading order QCD analysis of the inclusive neutral-current deep-inelastic-scattering (DIS) world data combined with the neutrino-nucleon DIS di-muon data and the fixed-target Drell-Yan data. The PDF evolution is performed in the Nf=3 fixed-flavor scheme and supplementary sets of PDFs in the 4- and 5-flavor schemes are derived from the results in the 3-flavor scheme using matching conditions. The charm-quark DIS contribution is calculated in a general-mass variable-flavor-number (GMVFN) scheme interpolating between the zero-mass 4-flavor scheme at asymptotically large values of momentum transfer Q2 and the 3-flavor scheme prescription of Buza-Matiounine-Smith-van Neerven (BMSN) at the value of Q2=mc2. The results in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme are compared with those of the fixed-flavor scheme and other prescriptions used in global fits of PDFs. The strong coupling constant is measured at an accuracy of ≈1.5%. We obtain at next-to-next-to-leading order αs(MZ2)=0.1135±0.0014 in the fixed-flavor scheme and αs(MZ2)=0.1129±0.0014 applying the Buza-Matiounine-Smith-van Neerven prescription. The implications for important standard candle and hard scattering processes at hadron colliders are illustrated. Predictions for cross sections of W±- and Z-boson, the top-quark pair, and Higgs-boson production at the Tevatron and the LHC based on the 5-flavor PDFs of the present analysis are provided.

  7. Linearly polarized gluons and the Higgs transverse momentum distribution.

    PubMed

    Boer, Daniël; den Dunnen, Wilco J; Pisano, Cristian; Schlegel, Marc; Vogelsang, Werner

    2012-01-20

    We study how gluons carrying linear polarization inside an unpolarized hadron contribute to the transverse momentum distribution of Higgs bosons produced in hadronic collisions. They modify the distribution produced by unpolarized gluons in a characteristic way that could be used to determine whether the Higgs boson is a scalar or a pseudoscalar particle.

  8. Electron distribution in polar heterojunctions within a realistic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Nguyen Thanh; Thao, Dinh Nhu; Thao, Pham Thi Bich; Quang, Doan Nhat

    2015-12-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electron distribution, i.e., two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in polar heterojunctions (HJs) within a realistic model. The 2DEG is confined along the growth direction by a triangular quantum well with a finite potential barrier and a bent band figured by all confinement sources. Therein, interface polarization charges take a double role: they induce a confining potential and, furthermore, they can make some change in other confinements, e.g., in the Hartree potential from ionized impurities and 2DEG. Confinement by positive interface polarization charges is necessary for the ground state of 2DEG existing at a high sheet density. The 2DEG bulk density is found to be increased in the barrier, so that the scattering occurring in this layer (from interface polarization charges and alloy disorder) becomes paramount in a polar modulation-doped HJ.

  9. Are partons confined tachyons?

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.

    1996-03-01

    The author notes that if hadrons are gravitationally stabilized ``black holes``, as discrete physics suggests, it is possible that partons, and in particular quarks, could be modeled as tachyons, i.e. particles having v{sup 2} > c{sup 2}, without conflict with the observational fact that neither quarks nor tachyons have appeared as ``free particles``. Some consequences of this model are explored.

  10. Parton physics from large-momentum effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, XiangDong

    2014-07-01

    Parton physics, when formulated as light-front correlations, are difficult to study non-perturbatively, despite the promise of light-front quantization. Recently an alternative approach to partons have been proposed by re-visiting original Feynman picture of a hadron moving at asymptotically large momentum. Here I formulate the approach in the language of an effective field theory for a large hadron momentum P in lattice QCD, LaMET for short. I show that using this new effective theory, parton properties, including light-front parton wave functions, can be extracted from lattice observables in a systematic expansion of 1/ P, much like that the parton distributions can be extracted from the hard scattering data at momentum scales of a few GeV.

  11. Accessing the Distribution of Linearly Polarized Gluons in Unpolarized Hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, Daniel; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian; /Cagliari U. /INFN, Cagliari

    2011-08-19

    Gluons inside unpolarized hadrons can be linearly polarized provided they have a nonzero transverse momentum. The simplest and theoretically safest way to probe this distribution of linearly polarized gluons is through cos2{phi} asymmetries in heavy quark pair or dijet production in electron-hadron collisions. Future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) or Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) experiments are ideally suited for this purpose. Here we estimate the maximum asymmetries for EIC kinematics.

  12. Polarization of photons scattered by electrons in any spectral distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan; Jiang, Yunguo

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of the quantum electrodynamics, we present a generic formalism of the polarization for beamed monochromatic photons scattered by electrons in any spectral distribution. The formulae reduce to the components of the Fano matrix when electrons are at rest. We mainly investigate the polarization in three scenarios, i.e., electrons at rest, isotropic electrons with a power-law spectrum, and thermal electrons. If the incident beam is polarized, the polarization is reduced significantly by isotropic electrons at large viewing angles; the degree of polarization caused by thermal electrons is about half of that caused by power-law electrons. If the incident bean is unpolarized, soft γ-rays can lead to about 15% polarization at viewing angles around π/4. For isotropic electrons, one remarkable feature is that the polarization as a function of the incident photon energy always peaks roughly at 1 MeV; this is valid for both the thermal and power-law cases. This feature can be used to distinguish the model of the inverse Compton scattering from that of the synchrotron radiation.

  13. Partonic collectivity at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shusu

    2009-10-01

    The measurement of event anisotropy, often called v2, provides a powerful tool for studying the properties of hot and dense medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions. The important discoveries of partonic collectivity and the brand-new process for hadronization - quark coalescence were obtained through a systematic analysis of the v2 for 200 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC [1]. However, early dynamic information might be masked by later hadronic rescatterings. Multistrange hadrons (φ, ξ and φ) with their large mass and presumably small hadronic cross sections should be less sensitive to hadronic rescattering in the later stage of the collisions and therefore a good probe of the early stage of the collision. We will present the measurement of v2 of π, p, KS^0, λ, ξ, φ and φ in heavy ion collisions. In minimum-bias Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV, a significant amount of elliptic flow, almost identical to other mesons and baryons, is observed for φ and φ. Experimental observations of pT dependence of v2 of identified particles at RHIC support partonic collectivity. [4pt] [1] B. I. Abelev et al., (STAR Collaboration), Phys. Rev. C 77, 054901 (2008).

  14. Resolution and polarization distribution in cryogenic DNP/MAS experiments

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Corzilius, Björn; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Andreas, Loren B.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Matsuki, Yoh; Belenky, Marina L.; Lugtenburg, Johan; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    This contribution addresses four potential misconceptions associated with high-resolution dynamic nuclear polarization/magic angle spinning (DNP/MAS) experiments. First, spectral resolution is not generally compromised at the cryogenic temperatures at which DNP experiments are performed. As we demonstrate at a modest field of 9 T (380 MHz 1H), 1 ppm linewidths are observed in DNP/MAS spectra of a membrane protein in its native lipid bilayer, and <0.4 ppm linewidths are reported in a crystalline peptide at 85 K. Second, we address the concerns about paramagnetic broadening in DNP/MAS spectra of proteins by demonstrating that the exogenous radical polarizing agents utilized for DNP are distributed in the sample in such a manner as to avoid paramagnetic broadening and thus maintain full spectral resolution. Third, the enhanced polarization is not localized around the polarizing agent, but rather is effectively and uniformly dispersed throughout the sample, even in the case of membrane proteins. Fourth, the distribution of polarization from the electron spins mediated via spin diffusion between 1H–1H strongly dipolar coupled spins is so rapid that shorter magnetization recovery periods between signal averaging transients can be utilized in DNP/MAS experiments than in typical experiments performed at ambient temperature. PMID:20454732

  15. Superthermal electron distribution measurements from polarized electron cyclotron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1988-06-01

    Measurements of the superthermal electron distribution can be made by observing the polarized electron cyclotron emission. The emission is viewed along a constant magnetic field surface. This simplifies the resonance condition and gives a direct correlation between emission frequency and kinetic energy of the emitting electron. A transformation technique is formulated which determines the anisotropy of the distribution and number density of superthermals at each energy measured. The steady-state distribution during lower hybrid current drive and examples of the superthermal dynamics as the runaway conditions is varied are presented for discharges in the PLT tokamak. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Inclusive parton cross sections in photoproduction and photon structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, T.; Aid, S.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Baehr, J.; Bán, J.; Ban, Y.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Barth, M.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Beyer, R.; Biddulph, P.; Bispham, P.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Botterweck, F.; Boudry, V.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Brune, C.; Buchholz, R.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Burton, M.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Charlet, M.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Clerbaux, B.; Colombo, M.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormack, C.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cussans, D. G.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E. A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Droutskoi, A.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Gonzalez-Pineiro, B.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herynek, I.; Hess, M. F.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hiller, K. H.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Horisberger, R.; Hudgson, V. L.; Huet, Ph.; Hütte, M.; Hufnagel, H.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Janoth, J.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Katzy, J.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kazarian, S.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Köhne, J. H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krämerkämper, T.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Krüner-Marquis, U.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J.-F.; Lebedev, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Link, J.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; List, B.; Lobo, G.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lomas, J.; Lopez, G. C.; Lubimov, V.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Maraček, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, T.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Migliori, A.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Moreau, F.; Morris, J. V.; Mroczko, E.; Müller, G.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Nicholls, T. C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Niedzballa, Ch.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg-Werther, M.; Oakden, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Panaro, E.; Panitch, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pieuchot, A.; Pitzl, D.; Pope, G.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rabbertz, K.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Rick, H.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, H. E.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rouse, F.; Royon, C.; Rüter, K.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Rylko, R.; Sahlmann, N.; Salesch, S. G.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Schacht, P.; Schiek, S.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, G.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schuhmann, E.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Sefkow, F.; Seidel, M.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Solochenko, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Spiekermann, J.; Spielman, S.; Spitzer, H.; Starosta, R.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stiewe, J.; Stösslein, U.; Stolze, K.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Uelkes, P.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Esch, P.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Verrecchia, P.; Villet, G.; Wacker, K.; Wagener, A.; Wagener, M.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wittek, C.; Wright, A. E.; Wünsch, E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zarbock, D.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.; Zuber, K.; H1 Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Photoproduction of 2-jet events is studied with the H1 detector at HERA. Parton cross sections are extracted from the data by an unfolding method using leading order parton-jet correlations of a QCD generator. The gluon distribution in the photon is derived in the fractional momentum range 0.04 ⩽ xγ ⩽ 1 at the average factorization scale 75 GeV 2.

  17. Spatial Distribution of Pair Production Over the Pulsar Polar Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Parfrey, Kyle

    2016-10-01

    Using an analytic, axisymmetric approach that includes general relativity, coupled to a condition for pair production deduced from simulations, we derive general results about the spatial distribution of pair-producing field lines over the pulsar polar cap. In particular, we show that pair production on magnetic field lines operates over only a fraction of the polar cap for an aligned rotator for general magnetic field configurations, assuming the magnetic field varies spatially on a scale that is larger than the size of the polar cap. We compare our result to force-free simulations of a pulsar with a dipole surface field and find excellent agreement. Our work has implications for first-principles simulations of pulsar magnetospheres and for explaining observations of pulsed radio and high-energy emission.

  18. Wee partons in large nuclei: From virtual dream to hard reality

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopalan, R.

    1995-06-01

    We construct a weak coupling, many body theory to compute parton distributions in large nuclei for x {much_lt} A{sup {minus} 1/3}. The wee partons are highly coherent, non-Abelian Weizsaecker-Williams fields. Radiative corrections to the classical results axe discussed. The parton distributions for a single nucleus provide the initial conditions for the dynamical evolution of matter formed in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions.

  19. Distributed vibration fiber sensing system based on Polarization Diversity Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junan; Jiang, Peng; Hu, Zhengliang; Hu, Yongming

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a distributed vibration fiber sensing system based on Polarization Diversity Receiver(PDR). We use Acoustic Optical Modulator(AOM) to generate pulse light and an unbalanced M-Z interferometer to generate two pulse light with a certain time delay in the same period. As the pulse lights propagating in fibers, the Backward Rayleigh scattering lights will interfere with each other. The vibration on the fiber will change the length and refractive index of fiber which results in the change of the phase of the interference signal. Hence, one arm of the M-Z interferometer is modulated by a sinusoidal phase-generated carrier(PGC) signal, and PGC demodulation algorithm has been used to acquire phase information from the Backward Rayleigh scattering lights. In order to overcome the influence of polarization-induced fading and enhance Signal Noise Ratio(SNR), we set a PDR before the photo detector. The Polarization Diversity Receiver segregates the interfere light into two lights with orthogonal states of polarization. Hence, there is always one channel has a better interfere light signal. The experiments are presented to verify the effectiveness of the distributed vibration fiber sensing system proposed.

  20. Multi-user distribution of polarization entangled photon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapateau, J.; Ghalbouni, J.; Orieux, A.; Diamanti, E.; Zaquine, I.

    2015-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate multi-user distribution of polarization entanglement using commercial telecom wavelength division demultiplexers. The entangled photon pairs are generated from a broadband source based on spontaneous parametric down conversion in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal using a double path setup employing a Michelson interferometer and active phase stabilisation. We test and compare demultiplexers based on various technologies and analyze the effect of their characteristics, such as losses and polarization dependence, on the quality of the distributed entanglement for three channel pairs of each demultiplexer. In all cases, we obtain a Bell inequality violation, whose value depends on the demultiplexer features. This demonstrates that entanglement can be distributed to at least three user pairs of a network from a single source. Additionally, we verify for the best demultiplexer that the violation is maintained when the pairs are distributed over a total channel attenuation corresponding to 20 km of optical fiber. These techniques are therefore suitable for resource-efficient practical implementations of entanglement-based quantum key distribution and other quantum communication network applications.

  1. Multi-user distribution of polarization entangled photon pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Trapateau, J.; Orieux, A.; Diamanti, E.; Zaquine, I.; Ghalbouni, J.

    2015-10-14

    We experimentally demonstrate multi-user distribution of polarization entanglement using commercial telecom wavelength division demultiplexers. The entangled photon pairs are generated from a broadband source based on spontaneous parametric down conversion in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal using a double path setup employing a Michelson interferometer and active phase stabilisation. We test and compare demultiplexers based on various technologies and analyze the effect of their characteristics, such as losses and polarization dependence, on the quality of the distributed entanglement for three channel pairs of each demultiplexer. In all cases, we obtain a Bell inequality violation, whose value depends on the demultiplexer features. This demonstrates that entanglement can be distributed to at least three user pairs of a network from a single source. Additionally, we verify for the best demultiplexer that the violation is maintained when the pairs are distributed over a total channel attenuation corresponding to 20 km of optical fiber. These techniques are therefore suitable for resource-efficient practical implementations of entanglement-based quantum key distribution and other quantum communication network applications.

  2. Processing TOVS Polar Pathfinder data using the distributed batch controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, James; Salem, Kenneth M.; Schweiger, Axel; Livny, Miron

    1997-09-01

    The distributed batch controller (DBC) supports scientific batch data processing. Batch jobs are distributed by the DBC over a collection of computing resources. Since these resources may be widely scattered the DBC is well suited for collaborative research efforts whose resources may not be centrally located. The DBC provides its users with centralized monitoring and control of distributed batch jobs. Version 1 of the DBC is currently being used by the TOVS Polar Pathfinder project to generate Arctic atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles. Profile generating jobs are distributed and executed by the DBC on workstation clusters located at several sites across the US. This paper describes the data processing requirements of the TOVS Polar Pathfinder project, and how the DBC is being used to meet them. It also describes Version 2 of the DBC. DBC V2 is implemented in Java, and utilizes a number of advanced Java features such as threads and remote method invocation. It incorporates a number of functional enhancements. These include a flexible mechanism supporting interoperation of the DBC with a wider variety of execution resources and an improved user interface.

  3. NLO production of W± and Z0 vector bosons via hadron collisions in the frameworks of Kimber-Martin-Ryskin and Martin-Ryskin-Watt unintegrated parton distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, M.; Masouminia, M. R.; Aminzadeh Nik, R.; Hosseinkhani, H.; Olanj, N.

    2016-10-01

    In a series of papers, we have investigated the compatibility of the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin (KMR) and Martin-Ryskin-Watt (MRW) unintegrated parton distribution functions (UPDFs) as well as the description of the experimental data on the proton structure functions. The present work is a sequel to that survey, via calculation of the transverse-momentum distribution of the electroweak gauge vector bosons in the kt-factorization scheme, by the means of the KMR, the leading-order (LO) MRW, and the next-to-leading-order (NLO) MRW UPDF, in the NLO. To this end, we have calculated and aggregated the invariant amplitudes of the corresponding involved diagrams in the NLO and counted the individual contributions in different frameworks. The preparation process for the UPDF utilizes the parton distribution functions of Martin et al., MSTW2008-LO, MSTW2008-NLO, MMHT2014-LO, and MMHT2014-NLO, as the inputs. Afterward, the results have been analyzed against each other as well as the existing experimental data, i.e., D0, CDF, ATLAS, and CMS collaborations. Our calculations show excellent agreement with the experiment data. It is, however, interesting to point out that the calculation using the KMR framework illustrates a stronger agreement with the experimental data, despite the fact that the LO MRW and the NLO MRW formalisms employ a better theoretical description of the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equation. This is of course due to the use of the different implementation of the angular ordering constraint in the KMR approach, which automatically includes the resummation of ln (1 /x ) , Balitski-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov logarithms, in the LO Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equation.

  4. Generalized parton correlation functions for a spin-1/2 hadron

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan Meissner, Andreas Metz, Marc Schlegel

    2009-08-01

    The fully unintegrated, off-diagonal quark-quark correlator for a spin-1/2 hadron is parameterized in terms of so-called generalized parton correlation functions. Such objects, in particular, can be considered as mother distributions of generalized parton distributions on the one hand and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions on the other. Therefore, our study provides new, model-independent insights into the recently proposed nontrivial relations between generalized and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. We find that none of these relations can be promoted to a model-independent status. As a by-product we obtain the first complete classification of generalized parton distributions beyond leading twist. The present paper is a natural extension of our previous corresponding analysis for spin-0 hadrons.

  5. Distributed measurement of birefringence dispersion in polarization-maintaining fibers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng; Wang, Xiang-Zhao; Zhang, Yimo; Jing, Wencai

    2006-12-01

    A new method to measure the birefringence dispersion in high-birefringence polarization-maintaining fibers is presented using white-light interferometry. By analyzing broadening of low-coherence interferograms obtained in a scanning Michelson interferometer, the birefringence dispersion and its variation along different fiber sections are acquired with high sensitivity and accuracy. Birefringence dispersions of two PANDA fibers at their operation wavelength are measured to be 0.011 ps/(km nm) and 0.018 ps/(km nm), respectively. Distributed measurement capability of the method is also verified experimentally.

  6. THE EFFECT OF THE DUST SIZE DISTRIBUTION ON ASTEROID POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Masiero, Joseph; Hartzell, Christine; Scheeres, Daniel J. E-mail: christine.hartzell@colorado.edu

    2009-12-15

    We have developed a theoretical description of how of an asteroid's polarization-phase curve will be affected by the removal of the dust from the surface due to a size-dependent phenomenon such as radiation pressure-driven escape of levitated particles. We test our calculations against new observations of four small (D {approx} 1 km) near-Earth asteroids (NEAs; (85236), (142348), (162900), and 2006 SZ{sub 217}) obtained with the Dual Beam Imaging Polarimeter on the University of Hawaii's 2.2 m telescope, as well as previous observations of (25143) Itokawa and (433) Eros. We find that the polarization of the light reflected from an asteroid is controlled by the mineralogical and chemical composition of the surface and is independent of dust particle. The relation between the slope of the polarization-phase curve beyond the inversion angle and the albedo of an asteroid is thus independent of the surface regolith size distribution and is valid for both Main Belt and NEAs.

  7. Implications of current constraints on parton charge symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    J. T. Londergan; A. W. Thomas

    2005-11-01

    For the first time, charge symmetry breaking terms in parton distribution functions have been included in a global fit to high energy data. We review the results obtained for both valence and sea quark charge symmetry violation and compare these results with the most stringent experimental upper limits on charge symmetry violation for parton distribution functions, as well as with theoretical estimates of charge symmetry violation. The limits allowed in the global fit would tolerate a rather large violation of charge symmetry. We discuss the implications of this for various observables, including extraction of the Weinberg angle in neutrino DIS and the Gottfried and Adler sum rules.

  8. [The polarization characteristics distribution and correction method of the polarization coupling error in ocean remote sensing system].

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Wang, Shu-Peng; Gu, Xing-Fa; Yu, Tao; Fang, Li

    2012-06-01

    With the development of the quantitative researches using ocean color remote sensing data sets, study on reducing the uncertainty of the response of the ocean color remote sensors to the polarization characteristics of the target has been attracting more and more attention recently. Taking MODIS as an example, the polarization distribution in the whole field of view was analyzed. For the atmosphere path radiance and the apparent radiance considering the coupling between ocean surface and atmosphere, the polarization distribution has a strong relation with the imaging geometry. Compared to the contribution of the polarization from the rough sea surface, the contribution from the atmosphere is dominated. Based on the polarization characteristics in the field of view, the influence of the polarization coupling error on the quality of the satellite data was studied with the assumption of different polarization sensitivities. It was found that errors due to polarization sensitivity in the field of view are lower than water leaving radiance only when the polarization sensitivity is less than 2%. And in this case it can meet the need of the retrieval of water leaving radiative products. The method of the compensation for the polarization coupling error due to the atmosphere is proposed, which proved to be effective to improve the utilization of satellite data and the accuracy of measured radiance by remote sensor.

  9. Parton fragmentation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, A.; Vossen, A.

    2016-11-01

    The field of fragmentation functions of light quarks and gluons is reviewed. In addition to integrated fragmentation functions, attention is paid to the dependence of fragmentation functions on transverse momenta and on polarization degrees of freedom. Higher-twist and di-hadron fragmentation functions are considered as well. Moreover, the review covers both theoretical and experimental developments in hadron production in electron-positron annihilation, deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and proton-proton collisions.

  10. Fourier analysis of polar cap electric field and current distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical study of high-latitude electric fields and currents, using analytic Fourier analysis methods, is conducted. A two-dimensional planar model of the ionosphere with an enhanced conductivity auroral belt and field-aligned currents at the edges is employed. Two separate topics are treated. A field-aligned current element near the cusp region of the polar cap is included to investigate the modifications to the convection pattern by the east-west component of the interplanetary magnetic field. It is shown that a sizable one-cell structure is induced near the cusp which diverts equipotential contours to the dawnside or duskside, depending on the sign of the cusp current. This produces characteristic dawn-dusk asymmetries to the electric field that have been previously observed over the polar cap. The second topic is concerned with the electric field configuration obtained in the limit of perfect shielding, where the field is totally excluded equatorward of the auroral oval. When realistic field-aligned current distributions are used, the result is to produce severely distorted, crescent-shaped equipotential contours over the cap. Exact, analytic formulae applicable to this case are also provided.

  11. Unbiased polarized PDFs upgraded with new inclusive DIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocera, Emanuele R.

    2016-02-01

    I present a determination of longitudinally-polarized parton distribution functions of the proton from inclusive deep-inelastic scattering data: NNPDFpol1.0+. This determination, based on the NNPDF methodology, upgrades a previous analysis, NNPDFpol1.0, in two respects: first, it includes all new data sets which have recently become available from the COMPASS experiment at CERN and from the E93-009, EG1-DVCS and E06-014 experiments at JLAB; second, it uses the state-of-the-art unpolarized parton set NNPDF3.0 as a baseline for the reconstruction of fitted observables and for the determination of positivity constraints. I discuss the impact of both these new inputs on the uncertainty of parton distribution functions.

  12. Parton interpretation of the nucleon spin-dependent structure functions

    SciTech Connect

    Mankiewicz, L. ); Ryzak, Z. )

    1991-02-01

    We discuss the interpretation of the nucleon's polarized structure function {ital g}{sub 2}({ital x}). If the target state is represented by its Fock decomposition on the light cone, the operator-product expansion allows us to demonstrate that moments of {ital g}{sub 2}({ital x}) are related to overlap integrals between wave functions of opposite longitudinal polarizations. In the light-cone formalism such wave functions are related by the kinematical operator {ital scrY}, or light-cone parity. As a consequence, it can be shown that moments of {ital g}{sub 2} give information about the same parton wave function, or probability amplitude to find a certain parton configuration in the target which defines {ital g}{sub 1}({ital x}) or {ital F}{sub 2}({ital x}). Specific formulas are given, and possible applications to the phenomenology of the nucleon structure in QCD are discussed.

  13. Biodiversity and distribution of polar freshwater DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre de Cárcer, Daniel; López-Bueno, Alberto; Pearce, David A.; Alcamí, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Viruses constitute the most abundant biological entities and a large reservoir of genetic diversity on Earth. Despite the recent surge in their study, our knowledge on their actual biodiversity and distribution remains sparse. We report the first metagenomic analysis of Arctic freshwater viral DNA communities and a comparative analysis with other freshwater environments. Arctic viromes are dominated by unknown and single-stranded DNA viruses with no close relatives in the database. These unique viral DNA communities mostly relate to each other and present some minor genetic overlap with other environments studied, including an Arctic Ocean virome. Despite common environmental conditions in polar ecosystems, the Arctic and Antarctic DNA viromes differ at the fine-grain genetic level while sharing a similar taxonomic composition. The study uncovers some viral lineages with a bipolar distribution, suggesting a global dispersal capacity for viruses, and seemingly indicates that viruses do not follow the latitudinal diversity gradient known for macroorganisms. Our study sheds light into the global biogeography and connectivity of viral communities. PMID:26601189

  14. Polarized reflectance and transmittance distribution functions of the ocean surface.

    PubMed

    Hieronymi, Martin

    2016-07-11

    Two aspects of ocean modelling are treated: representation of ocean waves considering all size-classes of waves and tracing of light-interactions at the wavy sea surface. Nonlinear wave profiles are realized accounting for a wide range of climatologically relevant sea states and wind speeds. Polarized ray tracing is used to investigate air-incident and whitecap-free reflectance and transmittance distributions with high angular resolution subject to sea-characterizing parameters, such as significant wave height, peak wave period, wind speed, and surface roughness. Wave-shadowing effects of incident and multiple reflected rays are fully considered. Their influence mostly starts with incidence angles greater than 60°, i.e., when the sun is near the horizon, and is especially pronounced for steep sea states. The net effect of multiple reflections is a redistribution of reflectance and transmittance fractions in their respective hemispheres and a slight increase of the net transmission of light into the sea. Revised reflectance and transmittance distribution functions, RDF and TDF, are provided depending on surface roughness in terms of the mean-square slope; reference is made to other sea state parameters. In comparison with the slope statistics approach, uncertainties related to sun near the horizon are reduced and on average this study yields somewhat higher reflectance values with some variability related to the sea state. By means of provided data, irradiance and radiance reflectances can be computed using desired sky radiance distributions, e.g., clear sky, overcast or partly cloudy sky, as well as wind or sea state information including wave propagation direction.

  15. Emergent phenomena and partonic structure in hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Craig D.; Mezrag, Cédric

    2017-03-01

    Modern facilities are poised to tackle fundamental questions within the Standard Model, aiming to reveal the nature of confinement, its relationship to dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB) - the origin of visible mass - and the connection between these two, key emergent phenomena. There is strong evidence to suggest that they are intimately connected with the appearance of momentum-dependent masses for gluons and quarks in QCD, which are large in the infrared: mg 500MeV and Mq 350MeV. DCSB, expressed in the dynamical generation of a dressed-quark mass, has an enormous variety of verifiable consequences, including an enigmatic result that the properties of the (almost) massless pion are the cleanest expression of the mechanism which is responsible for almost all the visible mass in the Universe. This contribution explains that these emergent phenomena are expressed with particular force in the partonic structure of hadrons, e.g. in valence-quark parton distribution amplitudes and functions, and, consequently, in numerous hadronic observables, so that we are now in a position to exhibit the consequences of confinement and DCSB in a wide range of hadron observables, opening the way to empirical verification of their expression in the Standard Model.

  16. Threshold photoneutron angular distribution and polarization studies of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    The photoneutron method was applied to the study of: (1) deuteron photodisintegration; (2) giant magnetic dipole resonances in heavy nuclei; (3) mechanism of radiative capture in light nuclei; and (4) isospin splitting of the giant dipole resonance in /sup 60/Ni. These studies were performed with the pulsed bremsstrahlung beam and high-resolution spectrometer available at the Argonne high-current electron linac. A threshold photoneutron polarization method was developed in order to search for the giant M1 resonance in heavy nuclei. A surprisingly small amount of M1 strength was found in /sup 208/Pb. Furthermore, the M1 strength for the 5.08-MeV excitation in /sup 17/O, the best example of a single-particle M1 resonance in nuclei, was found to be strongly quenched. In addition, the /sup 17/O(..gamma..,n/sub 0/)/sup 16/O reaction was found to provide an ideal example of the Lane-Lynn theory of radiative capture. The interplay among the three components of the theory, internal, channel and potential capture, were evident from the data. An electron beam transport system was developed which allows the bremsstrahlung to impinge on the photoneutron target on an axis perpendicular to the usual reaction plane. This system provides an accurate method for the measurement of relative angular distributions in (..gamma..,n) reactions. This system was applied to a high-accuracy measurement of the relative angular distribution for the D(..gamma..,n)H reaction. The question of isospin-splitting of the giant dipole resonance in /sup 60/Ni was studied by using the unique pico-pulse from the accelerator and the newly installed 25-m, neutron flight paths. The results provide clear evidence for the effect of isospin splitting.

  17. POLAR ICE: Integrating, Distributing and Visualising Ice Information Products for Operators in Polar Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Nick; Fleming, Andrew; Cziferszky, Andreas; Toudal Pedersen, Leif; Rasmussen, Till; Makynen, Marko; Berglund, Robin; Seitsonen, Lauri; Rudjord, Oystein; Solberg, Rune; Tangen, Helge; Axell, Lars; Saldo, Roberto; Melsheimer, Christian; Larsen, Hans Eilif; Puestow, Thomas; Arhturs, David; Flach, Dominie

    2016-08-01

    The POLAR ICE project has developed a system for integrating and delivering satellite derived ice information products to operators working in the economically and environmentally important Arctic and Antarctic regions. POLAR ICE has been supported by the European Commission's FP7 programme and undertaken by European and Canadian companies and institutes, who are all partners in the Polar View Earth Observation Limited (PVEO) company. It is the aim of PVEO to commercialise the service that has been developed and demonstrated as a part of POLAR ICE.Access to sea ice information derived from satellite earth observation data is critical to support the increasing numbers of Arctic and Antarctic shipping and off-shore operations and to protect the rapidly changing polar environment.To-date the development of sea ice information capabilities has addressed separate elements of complete service chains. In contrast POLAR ICE has linked these separate elements together, filled in known gaps and built a robust integrated service chain.

  18. Constraints on parton distribution functions and extraction of the strong coupling constant from the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 7$$ $$\\,\\text {TeV}$$

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-26

    The inclusive jet cross section for proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeVwas measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1. The measurement covers a phase space up to 2TeV in jet transverse momentum and 2.5 in absolute jet rapidity. The statistical precision of these data leads to stringent constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton. The data provide important input for the gluon density at high fractions of the proton momentum and for the strong coupling constant at large energy scales. Using predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamicsmore » at next-to-leading order, complemented with electroweak corrections, the constraining power of these data is investigated and the strong coupling constant at the Z boson mass MZ is determined to be αS(MZ)=0.1185±0.0019(exp)+0.0060-0.0037(theo), which is in agreement with the world average.« less

  19. Constraints on parton distribution functions and extraction of the strong coupling constant from the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ $\\,\\text {TeV}$

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-26

    The inclusive jet cross section for proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7TeVwas measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1. The measurement covers a phase space up to 2TeV in jet transverse momentum and 2.5 in absolute jet rapidity. The statistical precision of these data leads to stringent constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton. The data provide important input for the gluon density at high fractions of the proton momentum and for the strong coupling constant at large energy scales. Using predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order, complemented with electroweak corrections, the constraining power of these data is investigated and the strong coupling constant at the Z boson mass MZ is determined to be αS(MZ)=0.1185±0.0019(exp)+0.0060-0.0037(theo), which is in agreement with the world average.

  20. Constraints on parton distribution functions and extraction of the strong coupling constant from the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at [Formula: see text][Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dobur, D; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Grebenyuk, A; Léonard, A; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Zenoni, F; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Crucy, S; Dildick, S; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Salva Diblen, S; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jafari, A; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Júnior, W L Aldá; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Martins, T Dos Reis; Mora Herrera, C; Pol, M E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santaolalla, J; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Dogra, S; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Aleksandrov, A; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Marinov, A; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Plestina, R; Romeo, F; Tao, J; Wang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Li, Q; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Zou, W; Avila, C; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Ellithi Kamel, A; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Talvitie, J; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Filipovic, N; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Mastrolorenzo, L; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sauvan, J B; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Boudoul, G; Bouvier, E; Brochet, S; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fan, J; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sabes, D; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Xiao, H; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Bontenackels, M; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Hindrichs, O; Klein, K; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Brodski, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Knutzen, S; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Millet, P; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Weber, M; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Heister, A; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Künsken, A; Lingemann, J; Nowack, A; Nugent, I M; Perchalla, L; 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Russ, J; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Krohn, M; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chatterjee, A; Chaves, J; Chu, J; Dittmer, S; Eggert, N; Mirman, N; Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Ryd, A; Salvati, E; Skinnari, L; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Thompson, J; Tucker, J; Weng, Y; Winstrom, L; Wittich, P; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Anderson, J; Apollinari, G; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Bolla, G; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gao, Y; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Grünendahl, S; Gutsche, O; Hanlon, J; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hirschauer, J; Hooberman, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Kaadze, K; Klima, B; Kreis, B; Kwan, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Liu, T; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Martinez Outschoorn, V I; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Merkel, P; Mishra, K; Mrenna, S; Musienko, Y; Nahn, S; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sharma, S; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitbeck, A; Whitmore, J; Yang, F; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bortignon, P; Bourilkov, D; Carver, M; Cheng, T; Curry, D; Das, S; De Gruttola, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Field, R D; Fisher, M; Furic, I K; Hugon, J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kypreos, T; Low, J F; Matchev, K; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Muniz, L; Rinkevicius, A; Shchutska, L; Snowball, M; Sperka, D; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Hewamanage, S; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Diamond, B; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Veeraraghavan, V; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Berry, D; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Kurt, P; Moon, D H; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Duru, F; Haytmyradov, M; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Rahmat, R; Sen, S; Tan, P; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Martin, C; Swartz, M; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Bruner, C; Kenny, R P; Malek, M; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Sekaric, J; Stringer, R; Wang, Q; Wood, J S; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Saini, L K; Shrestha, S; Skhirtladze, N; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Baden, A; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Barbieri, R; Bauer, G; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Di Matteo, L; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gulhan, D; Klute, M; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; Gude, A; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Keller, J; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Meier, F; Snow, G R; Zvada, M; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wang, R J; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Sung, K; Velasco, M; Won, S; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Drozdetskiy, A; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Antonelli, L; Brinson, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hart, A; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Smith, G; Winer, B L; Wolfe, H; Wulsin, H W; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Hunt, A; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Gutay, L; Hu, Z; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, K; Kress, M; Leonardo, N; Lopes Pegna, D; Maroussov, V; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shi, X; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Khukhunaishvili, A; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Kaplan, S; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; York, A; Bouhali, O; Castaneda Hernandez, A; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Krutelyov, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kovitanggoon, K; Kunori, S; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Friis, E; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Levine, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Verwilligen, P; Vuosalo, C; Woods, N

    The inclusive jet cross section for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7[Formula: see text] was measured by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0[Formula: see text]. The measurement covers a phase space up to 2[Formula: see text] in jet transverse momentum and 2.5 in absolute jet rapidity. The statistical precision of these data leads to stringent constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton. The data provide important input for the gluon density at high fractions of the proton momentum and for the strong coupling constant at large energy scales. Using predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics at next-to-leading order, complemented with electroweak corrections, the constraining power of these data is investigated and the strong coupling constant at the Z boson mass [Formula: see text] is determined to be [Formula: see text], which is in agreement with the world average.

  1. Recent Results on Polarized Quark and Gluon Distributions at Compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, I.; Jinr; Dubna

    2005-04-01

    The latest results of deep inelastic scattering (DIS) studies of 160 GeV muons on the deuterated polarized target are reported. They include estimations of virtual photon-deuteron asymmetries, gluon contributions to the nucleon spin and Collins asymmetries in hadron production on the transversely polarized target.

  2. Polarized gluon distributions from high-pT pair hadron productions in polarized deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanishi, Teruya; Yu-Bing, Dong; Morii, Toshiyuki

    2001-06-01

    To study the polarized gluon density Δg(x) in the nucleon, we propose the high-pT pair charmed hadron production process in polarized lp scattering. The double spin asymmetry ALL for this process is a good observable for testing the models of Δg(x). .

  3. Movements and distribution of polar bears in the Beaufort sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Durner, G.M.; Stirling, I.; Lunn, N.J.; Messier, F.

    2000-01-01

    We fitted 173 satellite radio collars (platform transmitter terminals) to 121 adult female polar bears in the Beaufort Sea and relocated the bears 44 736 times between 1985 and 1995. We regularly resighted many instrumented bears so that we could ascertain whether changes in movements or distribution were related to reproductive status. Mean short-term movement rates were less than 2 km/h for all classes of bears. Maximum movement rates occurred in winter and early summer. In the southern Beaufort Sea (SBS), net geographic movements from the beginning to the end of each month were smaller for females with cubs of the year than for solitary females, and larger in November than in April, May, or July. In May, June, July, and August, radio-collared bears in the SBS moved north. They moved south in October. In the northern Beaufort Sea (NBS), bears moved north in June and south in March and September. Total annual movements ranged from 1406 to 6203 km. Mean total distances moved each month ranged from 79 to 420 km. Total monthly movements by SBS bears were largest in early winter and smallest in early spring. In the NBS, movements were largest in summer and smallest in winter. In the SBS, females with cubs moved less each month than other females. Annual activity areas ranged from 7264 to 596 800 km2. Monthly activity areas ranged from 88 to 9760 km2. Seasonal fidelity to activity areas of bears captured in all parts of the Beaufort Sea was strongest in summer and weakest in spring.

  4. Effects of laser polarization on photoelectron angular distribution through laser-induced continuum structure

    SciTech Connect

    Buica, Gabriela; Nakajima, Takashi

    2005-11-15

    We theoretically investigate the effects of laser polarization on the photoelectron angular distribution through laser-induced continuum structure. We focus on a polarization geometry where the probe and dressing lasers are both linearly polarized and change the relative polarization angle between them. We find that the total ionization yield and the branching ratio into different ionization channels change as a function of the relative polarization angle, and accordingly the photoelectron angular distribution is altered. We present specific results for the 4p{sub 1/2}-6p{sub 1/2} and 4p{sub 3/2}-6p{sub 3/2} systems of the K atom and show that the change of the polarization angle leads to a significant modification of the photoelectron angular distribution.

  5. Measurement of parity-violating spin asymmetries in W± production at midrapidity in longitudinally polarized p +p collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Voas, B.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present midrapidity measurements from the PHENIX experiment of large parity-violating single-spin asymmetries of high transverse momentum electrons and positrons from W±/Z decays, produced in longitudinally polarized p +p collisions at center of mass energies of √{s }=500 and 510 GeV. These asymmetries allow direct access to the antiquark polarized parton distribution functions due to the parity-violating nature of the W -boson coupling to quarks and antiquarks. The results presented are based on data collected in 2011, 2012, and 2013 with an integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1 , which exceeds previous PHENIX published results by a factor of more than 27. These high Q2 data probe the parton structure of the proton at W mass scale and provide an important addition to our understanding of the antiquark parton helicity distribution functions at an intermediate Bjorken x value of roughly MW/√{s }=0.16 .

  6. Spectral and polarization characteristics of the nonspherically decaying radiation generated by polarization currents with superluminally rotating distribution patterns.

    PubMed

    Ardavan, Houshang; Ardavan, Arzhang; Singleton, John

    2004-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the emission from a superluminal polarization current whose distribution pattern rotates (with an angular frequency omega) and oscillates (with a frequency Omega) at the same time and that comprises both poloidal and toroidal components. This type of polarization current is found in recent practical machines designed to investigate superluminal emission. We find that the superluminal motion of the distribution pattern of the emitting current generates localized electromagnetic waves that do not decay spherically, i.e., that do not have an intensity diminishing as RP(-2) with the distance RP from their source. The nonspherical decay of the focused wave packets that are emitted by the polarization currents does not contravene conservation of energy: The constructive interference of the constituent waves of such propagating caustics takes place within different solid angles on spheres of different radii (RP) centered on the source. For a polarization current whose longitudinal distribution (over an azimuthal interval of length 2pi) consists of m cycles of a sinusoidal wave train, the nonspherically decaying part of the emitted radiation contains the frequencies Omega +/- momega; i.e., it contains only the frequencies involved in the creation and implementation of the source. This is in contrast to recent studies of the spherically decaying emission, which was shown to contain much higher frequencies. The polarization of the emitted radiation is found to be linear for most configurations of the source.

  7. Parton shower evolution in a 3D hydrodynamical medium

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Thorsten

    2008-09-15

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation of the perturbative quantum chromodynamics shower developing after a hard process embedded in a heavy-ion collision. The main assumption is that the cascade of branching partons traverses a medium that (consistent with standard radiative energy loss pictures) is characterized by a local transport coefficient q-circumflex that measures the virtuality per unit length transferred to a parton that propagates in this medium. This increase in parton virtuality alters the development of the shower and in essence leads to extra induced radiation and hence a softening of the momentum distribution in the shower. After hadronization, this leads to the concept of a medium-modified fragmentation function. On the level of observables, this is manifest as the suppression of high-transverse-momentum (P{sub T}) hadron spectra. We simulate the soft medium created in heavy-ion collisions by a 3D hydrodynamical evolution and average the medium-modified fragmentation function over this evolution to compare with data on single inclusive hadron suppression and extract the q-circumflex that characterizes the medium. Finally, we discuss possible uncertainties of the model formulation and argue that the data in a soft momentum show evidence of qualitatively different physics that presumably cannot be described by a medium-modified parton shower.

  8. An analytical model for the celestial distribution of polarized light, accounting for polarization singularities, wavelength and atmospheric turbidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Gao, Jun; Fan, Zhiguo; Roberts, Nicholas W.

    2016-06-01

    We present a computationally inexpensive analytical model for simulating celestial polarization patterns in variable conditions. We combine both the singularity theory of Berry et al (2004 New J. Phys. 6 162) and the intensity model of Perez et al (1993 Sol. Energy 50 235-245) such that our single model describes three key sets of data: (1) the overhead distribution of the degree of polarization as well as the existence of neutral points in the sky; (2) the change in sky polarization as a function of the turbidity of the atmosphere; and (3) sky polarization patterns as a function of wavelength, calculated in this work from the ultra-violet to the near infra-red. To verify the performance of our model we generate accurate reference data using a numerical radiative transfer model and statistical comparisons between these two methods demonstrate no significant difference in almost all situations. The development of our analytical model provides a novel method for efficiently calculating the overhead skylight polarization pattern. This provides a new tool of particular relevance for our understanding of animals that use the celestial polarization pattern as a source of visual information.

  9. Activation-dependent plasticity of polarized GPCR distribution on the neuronal surface.

    PubMed

    Simon, Anne C; Loverdo, Claude; Gaffuri, Anne-Lise; Urbanski, Michel; Ladarre, Delphine; Carrel, Damien; Rivals, Isabelle; Leterrier, Christophe; Benichou, Olivier; Dournaud, Pascal; Szabo, Bela; Voituriez, Raphael; Lenkei, Zsolt

    2013-08-01

    Directionality of information flow through neuronal networks is sustained at cellular level by polarized neurons. However, specific targeting or anchoring motifs responsible for polarized distribution on the neuronal surface have only been identified for a few neuronal G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, through mutational and pharmacological modifications of the conformational state of two model GPCRs, the axonal CB1R cannabinoid and the somatodendritic SSTR2 somatostatin receptors, we show important conformation-dependent variations in polarized distribution. The underlying mechanisms include lower efficiency of conformation-dependent GPCR endocytosis in axons, compared with dendrites, particularly at moderate activation levels, as well as endocytosis-dependent transcytotic delivery of GPCRs from the somatodendritic domain to distal axonal portions, shown by using compartmentalized microfluidic devices. Kinetic modeling predicted that GPCR distribution polarity is highly regulated by steady-state endocytosis, which is conformation dependent and is able to regulate the relative amount of GPCRs targeted to axons and that axonally polarized distribution is an intermediary phenotype that appears at moderate basal activation levels. Indeed, we experimentally show that gradual changes in basal activation-dependent endocytosis lead to highly correlated shifts of polarized GPCR distribution on the neuronal surface, which can even result in a fully reversed polarized distribution of naturally somatodendritic or axonal GPCRs. In conclusion, polarized distribution of neuronal GPCRs may have a pharmacologically controllable component, which, in the absence of dominant targeting motifs, could even represent the principal regulator of sub-neuronal distribution. Consequently, chronic modifications of basal GPCR activation by therapeutic or abused drugs may lead to previously unanticipated changes in brain function through perturbation of polarized GPCR distribution on

  10. Proton Polarization Angular Distribution in Deuteron Photo-Disintegration

    SciTech Connect

    Sarty, Adam; Fox, Brendan; Meekins, David; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Kinney, Edward; Garibaldi, Franco; Gao, Juncai; Aniol, Konrad; Epstein, Martin; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Markowitz, Pete; Bosted, Peter; Roche, Rikki; Gilman, Ronald; Frullani, Salvatore; Churchwell, Steve

    1999-12-01

    The apparent scaling in 90 cm deuteron photodisintegration, first observed several years ago at SLAC, has lead to several related experiments and a number ot theoretical calculations.We have in the past year measured in Hall A, with up to 2.5-GeV photons, cross sections at large angles and the proton polarization at 90cm.Verypreliminary online analysis of the induced polarizations yields the very surprising result that theinduced polarizations apparently vanish starting at about the same energy at whichthe existing cross section data start to scale, to follow the constituent countingrules.Given this result, we propose further measurements to see if this observationholds at other angles.

  11. Semiclassical model for the distribution of final polar angles and m‧ states in rotationally inelastic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, T. J.; Towne, A. C.; Talbi, D.; Hickman, A. P.

    2016-02-01

    Using the venerable vector model, we develop an expression for the change in the polar angle of the angular momentum of a rotator caused by collisions in a cell-type experiment. For an initial j precessing with polar angle θ, and a given distribution of 'tipping angles', we derive the distribution of final polar angles θ‧. Final m‧ levels are also determined. The results agree well with exact quantum calculations for thermal collisions of He or Ar with NaK. We also identify a special case where the distribution of θ‧ has a simple Lorentzian form.

  12. Intrinsic transverse momentum and parton correlations from dynamical chiral symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Schweitzer, Mark Strikman, Christian Weiss

    2013-01-01

    The dynamical breaking of chiral symmetry in QCD is caused by nonperturbative interactions on a distance scale rho ~ 0.3 fm, much smaller than the typical hadronic size R ~ 1 fm. These short-distance interactions influence the intrinsic transverse momentum distributions of partons and their correlations at a low normalization point. We study this phenomenon in an effective description of the low-energy dynamics in terms of chiral constituent quark degrees of freedom, which refers to the large-N_c limit of QCD. The nucleon is obtained as a system of constituent quarks and antiquarks moving in a self-consistent classical chiral field (relativistic mean-field approximation, or chiral quark-soliton model). The calculated transverse momentum distributions of constituent quarks and antiquarks are matched with QCD quarks, antiquarks and gluons at the chiral symmetry--breaking scale rho^{-2}. We find that the transverse momentum distribution of valence quarks is localized at p_T^2 ~ R^{-2} and roughly of Gaussian shape. The distribution of unpolarized sea quarks exhibits a would-be power-like tail ~1/p_T^2 extending up to the chiral symmetry-breaking scale. Similar behavior is observed in the flavor-nonsinglet polarized sea. The high-momentum tails are the result of short-range correlations between sea quarks in the nucleon's light-cone wave function, which are analogous to short-range NN correlations in nuclei. We show that the nucleon's light-cone wave function contains correlated pairs of transverse size rho << R with scalar-isoscalar (Sigma) and pseudoscalar-isovector (Pi) quantum numbers, whose internal wave functions have a distinctive spin structure and become identical at p_T^2 ~ rho^{-2} (restoration of chiral symmetry). These features are model-independent and represent an effect of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking on the nucleon's partonic structure. Our results have numerous implications for the transverse momentum distributions of particles produced in hard

  13. Polarization recovery and auto-compensation in quantum key distribution network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lijun; Xu, Hai; Tang, Xiao

    2006-08-01

    A Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) network can allow multi-user communication via secure key. Moreover, by actively switching communication nodes, one can achieve high key transmission rate for the selected nodes. However, the polarization properties of different fiber path are different and these properties also randomly drift over time. Therefore, polarization recovery after the switching and auto-compensation during key transmission are critical for the QKD network. In this work, we use programmable polarization controllers to implement polarization recovery and auto-compensation in the QKD network. We will also discuss its time limitation and future improvement.

  14. Silicon photonic transceiver circuit for high-speed polarization-based discrete variable quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Hong; Long, Christopher M.; DeRose, Christopher T.; Boynton, Nicholas; Urayama, Junji; Camacho, Ryan; Pomerene, Andrew; Starbuck, Andrew L.; Trotter, Douglas C.; Davids, Paul S.; Lentine, Anthony L.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a silicon photonic transceiver circuit for high-speed discrete variable quantum key distribution that employs a common structure for transmit and receive functions. The device is intended for use in polarization-based quantum cryptographic protocols, such as BB84. Our characterization indicates that the circuit can generate the four BB84 states (TE/TM/45°/135° linear polarizations) with >30 dB polarization extinction ratios and gigabit per second modulation speed, and is capable of decoding any polarization bases differing by 90° with high extinction ratios.

  15. Above-threshold ionization of noble gases in elliptically polarized fields: Effects of atomic polarization on photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, YanLan; Yu, ShaoGang; Lai, XuanYang; Liu, XiaoJun; Chen, Jing

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically investigate the atomic polarization effect on photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) in above-threshold ionization of noble gases with elliptically polarized laser fields at wavelength of 800 nm, ellipticity of 0.25, and intensity of 1.5 ×1014W/cm2 . Simulations based on a semiclassical model that includes both the ionic Coulomb potential and the atomic polarization effect show surprisingly little difference between PADs for Ar, Kr, and Xe, which is in good agreement with recent experimental observations. Our calculations reveal that the atomic polarization effect increases the distance of the tunnel exit point of the photoelectron to the parent ion and weakens the strength of the interaction between the parent ion and the photoelectron on its subsequent classical propagation. As a result, the forward-scattering electrons which contribute to the main lobes in PADs are substantially suppressed. Our results indicate that the insensitivity of PADs for Ar, Kr, and Xe may be closely related to the influence of the atomic polarization effect on the photoelectron dynamics in the strong laser field.

  16. Solid-phase polarization matrixes for dynamic nuclear polarization from homogeneously distributed radicals in mesostructured hybrid silica materials.

    PubMed

    Gajan, David; Schwarzwälder, Martin; Conley, Matthew P; Grüning, Wolfram R; Rossini, Aaron J; Zagdoun, Alexandre; Lelli, Moreno; Yulikov, Maxim; Jeschke, Gunnar; Sauvée, Claire; Ouari, Olivier; Tordo, Paul; Veyre, Laurent; Lesage, Anne; Thieuleux, Chloé; Emsley, Lyndon; Copéret, Christophe

    2013-10-16

    Mesoporous hybrid silica-organic materials containing homogeneously distributed stable mono- or dinitroxide radicals covalently bound to the silica surface were developed as polarization matrixes for solid-state dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR experiments. For TEMPO-containing materials impregnated with water or 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, enhancement factors of up to 36 were obtained at ∼100 K and 9.4 T without the need for a glass-forming additive. We show that the homogeneous radical distribution and the subtle balance between the concentration of radical in the material and the fraction of radicals at a sufficient inter-radical distance to promote the cross-effect are the main determinants for the DNP enhancements we obtain. The material, as well as an analogue containing the poorly soluble biradical bTUrea, is used as a polarizing matrix for DNP NMR experiments of solutions containing alanine and pyruvic acid. The analyte is separated from the polarization matrix by simple filtration.

  17. DETAILED COMPARISON BETWEEN PARTON CASCADE AND HADRONIC CASCADE AT SPS AND RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    NARA,Y.

    1998-10-23

    The authors study the importance of the partonic phase produced in relativistic heavy ion collision by comparing the parton cascade model and the hadronic cascade model. Hadron yield, baryon stopping and transverse momentum distribution are calculated with JAM and discussions are given comparing with VNI. Both of these models give good description of experimental data. They also discuss the strangeness production mechanism and the directed transverse flow.

  18. Prompt photon photoproduction at HERA with non-collinear parton dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatov, A. V.; Zotov, N. P.

    2011-07-15

    We investigate the prompt photon photoproduction at HERA within the framework of the k{sub T}-factorization approach to QCD. Our consideration is based on the off-shell matrix elements for the underlying partonic subprocesses and the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin (KMR) unintegrated parton densities in the proton. We also use the Ciafaloni-Catani-Fiorani-Marchesini (CCFM) unintegrated gluon as well as valence and sea quark distributions.

  19. Gpr125 modulates Dishevelled distribution and planar cell polarity signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Roszko, Isabelle; Sepich, Diane S; Ni, Mingwei; Hamm, Heidi E; Marlow, Florence L; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2013-07-01

    During vertebrate gastrulation, Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling orchestrates polarized cell behaviors underlying convergence and extension (C&E) movements to narrow embryonic tissues mediolaterally and lengthen them anteroposteriorly. Here, we have identified Gpr125, an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor, as a novel modulator of the Wnt/PCP signaling system. Excess Gpr125 impaired C&E movements and the underlying cell and molecular polarities. Reduced Gpr125 function exacerbated the C&E and facial branchiomotor neuron (FBMN) migration defects of embryos with reduced Wnt/PCP signaling. At the molecular level, Gpr125 recruited Dishevelled to the cell membrane, a prerequisite for Wnt/PCP activation. Moreover, Gpr125 and Dvl mutually clustered one another to form discrete membrane subdomains, and the Gpr125 intracellular domain directly interacted with Dvl in pull-down assays. Intriguingly, Dvl and Gpr125 were able to recruit a subset of PCP components into membrane subdomains, suggesting that Gpr125 may modulate the composition of Wnt/PCP membrane complexes. Our study reveals a role for Gpr125 in PCP-mediated processes and provides mechanistic insight into Wnt/PCP signaling.

  20. Gpr125 modulates Dishevelled distribution and planar cell polarity signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Roszko, Isabelle; Sepich, Diane S.; Ni, Mingwei; Hamm, Heidi E.; Marlow, Florence L.; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2013-01-01

    During vertebrate gastrulation, Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling orchestrates polarized cell behaviors underlying convergence and extension (C&E) movements to narrow embryonic tissues mediolaterally and lengthen them anteroposteriorly. Here, we have identified Gpr125, an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor, as a novel modulator of the Wnt/PCP signaling system. Excess Gpr125 impaired C&E movements and the underlying cell and molecular polarities. Reduced Gpr125 function exacerbated the C&E and facial branchiomotor neuron (FBMN) migration defects of embryos with reduced Wnt/PCP signaling. At the molecular level, Gpr125 recruited Dishevelled to the cell membrane, a prerequisite for Wnt/PCP activation. Moreover, Gpr125 and Dvl mutually clustered one another to form discrete membrane subdomains, and the Gpr125 intracellular domain directly interacted with Dvl in pull-down assays. Intriguingly, Dvl and Gpr125 were able to recruit a subset of PCP components into membrane subdomains, suggesting that Gpr125 may modulate the composition of Wnt/PCP membrane complexes. Our study reveals a role for Gpr125 in PCP-mediated processes and provides mechanistic insight into Wnt/PCP signaling. PMID:23821037

  1. APACIC++ 2.0. A PArton Cascade In C++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, F.; Schälicke, A.; Soff, G.

    2006-06-01

    The new version of the parton shower module APACIC++ for the SHERPA event generator framework is presented. It incorporates some features, that are specific for the consistent merging with multi-particle matrix elements at tree-level. This publication also includes some example results and a short description of the upgraded class structure of APACIC++, version 2.0. Program summaryTitle of program:APACIC++, version 2.0 Catalogue identifier:ADNE_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADNE_v2_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADNE Authors of previous version: R. Kuhn, F. Krauss, B. Iványi, G. Soff Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Commun. 134 (2001) 223 Licensing provisions: none Operating system under which the program has been tested: Linux, Unix, Darwin Programming language: C++ No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 78 352 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 561 276 External routines/libraries used: The makeinstall requires the autotools package Distribution format: tar gzip file Nature of the physical problem: Modern collider-based experiments in particle physics are characterized by increasing energies that are released and, thus, by a growing number of particles that are produced. The large numbers of involved particles renders it impossible to derive fully analytical predictions for a detailed description of the final state. In addition, the transformation of the partons of perturbative quantum field theory into the experimentally observable hadrons is until now not understood on a quantitative level. These obstacles prevent a direct comparison of analytical predictions with experimental data, and simulation tools need to be employed to bridge this gap. Method of solution: The event generator SHERPA with a new version of the parton shower module APACIC++ is able to

  2. Multiparticle production in a two-component dual parton model

    SciTech Connect

    Aurenche, P. ); Bopp, F.W. ); Capella, A. ); Kwiecinski, J. ); Maire, M. ); Ranft, J.; Tran Thanh Van, J. )

    1992-01-01

    The dual parton model (DPM) describes soft and semihard multiparticle production. The version of the DPM presented in this paper includes soft and hard mechanisms as well as diffractive processes. The model is formulated as a Monte Carlo event generator. We calculate in this model, in the energy range of the hadron colliders, rapidity distributions and the rise of the rapidity plateau with the collision energy, transverse-momentum distributions and the rise of average transverse momenta with the collision energy, multiplicity distributions in different pseudorapidity regions, and transverse-energy distributions. For most of these quantities we find a reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  3. Experimental Evidence for Partonic Orbital Angular Momentum at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Douglas E.

    2011-12-14

    Although one might naively anticipate that the proton, being the lowest baryonic energy state, would be in a L = 0 state, the current theoretical understanding is that it must carry orbital angular momentum in order, for example, to have a non-zero anomalous magnetic moment. I will review the experimental evidence linked theoretically to orbital angular momentum of the proton's constituents from the RHIC experiments and summarize by presenting a challenge to the theory community--to develop a consistent framework which can explain the spin polarization asymmetries seen at RHIC and elsewhere, and give insight to the partonic wave-functions including orbital angular momentum.

  4. HARD PARTON PHYSICS IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 17

    SciTech Connect

    CARROLL,J.

    1999-09-10

    The RIKEN-BNL center workshop on ''Hard parton physics in high energy nuclear collisions'' was held at BNL from March 1st-5th! 1999. The focus of the workshop was on hard probes of nucleus-nucleus collisions that will be measured at RHIC with the PHENIX and STAR detectors. There were about 45 speakers and over 70 registered participants at the workshop, with roughly a quarter of the speakers from overseas. About 60% of the talks were theory talks. A nice overview of theory for RHIC was provided by George Sterman. The theoretical talks were on a wide range of topics in QCD which can be classified under the following: (a) energy loss and the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect; (b) minijet production and equilibration; (c) small x physics and initial conditions; (d) nuclear parton distributions and shadowing; (e) spin physics; (f) photon, di-lepton, and charm production; and (g) hadronization, and simulations of high pt physics in event generators. Several of the experimental talks discussed the capabilities of the PHENIX and STAR detectors at RHIC in measuring high pt particles in heavy ion collisions. In general, these talks were included in the relevant theory sessions. A session was set aside to discuss the spin program at RHIC with polarized proton beams. In addition, there were speakers from 08, HERA, the fixed target experiments at Fermilab, and the CERN fixed target Pb+Pb program, who provided additional perspective on a range of issues of relevance to RHIC; from jets at the Tevatron, to saturation of parton distributions at HERA, and recent puzzling data on direct photon production in fixed target experiments, among others.

  5. The size distribution of interstellar dust particles as determined from polarization: Infinite cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Hee; Martin, P. G.

    1994-08-01

    To extract the size distribution of polarizing dust grains from the wavelength dependence of interstellar linear polarization as objectively as possible, we have used the maximum-entropy method (MEM), as in an earlier study of size distributions based on extinction (Kim, Martin, & Hendry). There are additional complications using polarization data since polarization depends on shape and alignment. In this first investigation, we adopted infinite cylinders with perfect spinning alignment. To constrain a wide range of sizes it is necessary to use data from the infrared to the far-ultraviolet. Much of our analysis is based on bare silicate grains. The modified Serkowski law represents interstellar polarization quite well for the wavelength range 0.3 to 2 micrometers using one parameter, lambdamax, the wavelength at which the polarization is maximum. Recent ultraviolet polarimetric observations of eight stars of differing lambdamax indicate that extrapolation of the modified Serkowski curve into the ultraviolet produces a reasonable approximation for larger lambdamax (greater than or approximately 0.55 micrometer), but for smaller lambdamax there is an excess of polarization observed. Therefore, we have investigated how the size distribution of the polarizing grains changes with lambdamax simply by fitting the modified Serkowski curve evaluated for lambdamax = 0.55, 0.615, and 0.68 micrometers. But for HD 25443 (lambdamax = 0.49 micrometer) which shows super-Serkowski behavi or, and for HD 197770 (lambdamax = 0.51 micrometers) which might exhibit a 2175 A polarization bump, we combined the modified Serkowski curve in the infrared and optical with the actual far-ultraviolet data. The size distributions found for silicates bear little resemblance to a power law. Instead, when expressed as contributions to the total mass, they peak roughly at 0.14 micrometer and are skewed, with the relative rate of decrease to larger and smaller sizes depending on lambdamax. For the

  6. Interstellar polarization at high galactic latitudes from distant stars. III. Distribution of the polarization vectors - evidence for distinct zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugin, A.; Teerikorpi, P.; Haikala, L.

    2000-06-01

    We make a map of interstellar polarization direction around the North Galactic Pole and study the distribution of the revealed magnetic field lines. We study in detail Markkanen's (\\cite{markkanen79}) cloud and other local features apparent in the polarization map, and compare them with the IRAS 100 micron map. The elongated Markkanen's cloud (at a distance of 100-200 pc) and its magnetic field lines coincide with IRAS filaments. The cloud throws a shadow in soft (0.25 keV ROSAT) X-rays, as expected from its close distance. Another interesting feature is the polarization alignment around l ~ 190degr , b ~ 75degr -83degr , with the direction about perpendicular to that of Markkanen's cloud, hence also perpendicular to the Local Spiral spur. This feature is shown only by stars more distant than 300 pc, and in the IRAS map it is located in a region of enhanced brightness. The differing polarization directions partially overlap in the sky, suggesting the existence of two kinds of clouds with different magnetic field directions. The IRAS 100 micron map is faint towards the sector 40degr < l < 135degr . Only in this region with little nearby diffuse matter is there some signature of the global magnetic field (parallel with l ~ 78degr ).

  7. Squark production and decay matched with parton showers at NLO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavin, R.; Hangst, C.; Krämer, M.; Mühlleitner, M.; Pellen, M.; Popenda, E.; Spira, M.

    2015-01-01

    Extending previous work on the predictions for the production of supersymmetric (SUSY) particles at the LHC, we present the fully differential calculation of the next-to-leading order (NLO) SUSY-QCD corrections to the production of squark and squark-antisquark pairs of the first two generations. The NLO cross sections are combined with the subsequent decay of the final state (anti)squarks into the lightest neutralino and (anti)quark at NLO SUSY-QCD. No assumptions on the squark masses are made, and the various subchannels are taken into account independently. In order to obtain realistic predictions for differential distributions the fixed-order calculations have to be combined with parton showers. Making use of the Powheg method we have implemented our results in the Powheg-Box framework and interfaced the NLO calculation with the parton shower Monte Carlo programs Pythia6 and Herwig++. The code is publicly available and can be downloaded from the Powheg-Box webpage. The impact of the NLO corrections on the differential distributions is studied and parton shower effects are investigated for different benchmark scenarios.

  8. Sensor for real-time determining the polarization state distribution in the object images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilosanidze, Barbara; Kakauridze, George; Kvernadze, Teimuraz; Kurkhuli, Georgi

    2015-10-01

    An innovative real-time polarimetric method is presented based on the integral polarization-holographic diffraction element developed by us. This element is suggested to be used for real time analysis of the polarization state of light, to help highlight military equipment in a scene. In the process of diffraction, the element decomposes light incoming on them onto orthogonal circular and linear basis. The simultaneous measurement of the intensities of four diffracted beams by means of photodetectors and the appropriate software enable the polarization state of an analyzable light (all the four Stokes parameters) and its change to be obtained in real time. The element with photodetectors and software is a sensor of the polarization state. Such a sensor allows the point-by-point distribution of the polarization state in the images of objects to be determined. The spectral working range of such an element is 530 - 1600 nm. This sensor is compact, lightweight and relatively cheap, and it can be easily installed on any space and airborne platforms. It has no mechanically moving or electronically controlled elements. The speed of its operation is limited only by computer processing. Such a sensor is proposed to be use for the determination of the characteristics of the surface of objects at optical remote sensing by means of the determination of the distribution of the polarization state of light in the image of recognizable object and the dispersion of this distribution, which provides additional information while identifying an object. The possibility of detection of a useful signal of the predetermined polarization on a background of statistically random noise of an underlying surface is also possible. The application of the sensor is also considered for the nondestructive determination of the distribution of stressed state in different constructions based on the determination of the distribution of the polarization state of light reflected from the object under

  9. Chiral dynamics and partonic structure at large transverse distances

    SciTech Connect

    Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2009-12-30

    In this paper, we study large-distance contributions to the nucleon’s parton densities in the transverse coordinate (impact parameter) representation based on generalized parton distributions (GPDs). Chiral dynamics generates a distinct component of the partonic structure, located at momentum fractions x≲Mπ/MN and transverse distances b~1/Mπ. We calculate this component using phenomenological pion exchange with a physical lower limit in b (the transverse “core” radius estimated from the nucleon’s axial form factor, Rcore=0.55 fm) and demonstrate its universal character. This formulation preserves the basic picture of the “pion cloud” model of the nucleon’s sea quark distributions, while restricting its application to the region actually governed by chiral dynamics. It is found that (a) the large-distance component accounts for only ~1/3 of the measured antiquark flavor asymmetry d¯-u¯ at x~0.1; (b) the strange sea quarks s and s¯ are significantly more localized than the light antiquark sea; (c) the nucleon’s singlet quark size for x<0.1 is larger than its gluonic size, (b2)q+q¯>(b2)g, as suggested by the t-slopes of deeply-virtual Compton scattering and exclusive J/ψ production measured at HERA and FNAL. We show that our approach reproduces the general Nc-scaling of parton densities in QCD, thanks to the degeneracy of N and Δ intermediate states in the large-Nc limit. Finally, we also comment on the role of pionic configurations at large longitudinal distances and the limits of their applicability at small x.

  10. QCD constraints on the shape of polarized quark and gluon distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Burkardt, Matthias; Schmidt, Ivan

    1995-02-01

    We develop simple analytic representations of the polarized quark and gluon distributions in the nucleon at low Q2 which incorporate general constraints obtained from the requirements of color coherence of gluon couplings at x ˜ 0 and the helicity retention properties of perturbative QCD couplings at x ˜ 1. The unpolarized predictions are similar to the Do' distributions given by Martin, Roberts, and Stirling. The predictions for the quark helicity distributions are compared with polarized structure functions measured by the E142 experiment at SLAC and the SMC experiment at CERN.

  11. SNR radio spectral index distribution and its correlation with polarization. a case study: the Lupus Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borka Jovanović, V.; Jovanović, P.; Borka, D.

    2017-04-01

    We use radio-continuum all-sky surveys at 1420 and 408 MHz with the aim to investigate properties of the Galactic radio source Lupus Loop. The survey data at 1435 MHz, with the linear polarization of the southern sky, are also used. We calculate properties of this supernova remnant: the brightness temperature, surface brightness and radio spectral index. To determine its borders and to calculate its properties, we use the method we have developed. The non-thermal nature of its radiation is confirmed. The distribution of spectral index over its area is also given. A significant correlation between the radio spectral index distribution and the corresponding polarized intensity distribution inside the loop borders is found, indicating that the polarization maps could provide us information about the distribution of the interstellar medium, and thus could represent one additional way to search for new Galactic loops.

  12. Measurement of relative phase distribution of onion epidermal cells by using the polarization microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, In Hee; Lee, Ji Yong; Lee, Seungrag; Lee, Dong Ju; Kim, Dug Young

    2007-02-01

    Bio-cells and tissues have intrinsic polarization characteristics, which are changed by external stimulus and internal metamorphosis in cells and tissues and some of the bio-cells and tissues have intrinsic birefringence characteristics, which are also changed by external stimulus and internal metamorphosis in cells and tissues. In this paper, we have developed the polarization microscope for measurement of relative phase which results from birefringence characteristics of materials with improved linear polarizing method and have measured relative phase distribution of onion epidermal cells. From the measurement of the relative phase distribution of onion epidermal cells, decrease of relative phase distribution of onion epidermal cells was investigated as the elapse of time. In decrease of relative phase distribution, relative phase of cell membrane in onion epidermal cells decreased radically as compared with that of cytoplasm because decline of function in cell membrane that takes charge of matter transfer in onion epidermal cells has occurred.

  13. Pre-equilibrium parton dynamics: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    1993-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: parton production and evolution; QCD transport theory; interference in the medium; QCD and phase transition; and future heavy ion experiments. This papers have been indexed separately elsewhere on the data base.

  14. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  15. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-10-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  16. General Helicity Formalism for Polarized Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmino, M; Boglione, M; D’Alesio, U; Melis, S; Murgia, F; Nocera, E R; Prokudin, A

    2011-06-01

    We study polarized Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) processes, within the QCD parton model and a factorization scheme, taking into account all transverse motions, of partons inside the initial proton and of hadrons inside the fragmenting partons. We use the helicity formalism. The elementary interactions are computed at LO with non collinear exact kinematics, which introduces phases in the expressions of their helicity amplitudes. Several Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) distribution and fragmentation functions appear and contribute to the cross sections and to spin asymmetries. Our results agree with those obtained with different formalisms, showing the consistency of our approach. The full expression for single and double spin asymmetries is derived. Simplified, explicit analytical expressions, convenient for phenomenological studies, are obtained assuming a factorized Gaussian dependence on intrinsic momenta for the TMDs.

  17. Double parton scattering in the color glass condensate: Hanbury-Brown-Twiss correlations in double inclusive photon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovner, Alex; Rezaeian, Amir H.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a technique to study double parton scattering (DPS) in the color-glass-condensate (CGC) approach. We show that the cross section of the DPS in the CGC approach is calculable in terms of new nonperturbative objects, generalized double transverse momentum-dependent parton distribution (2GTMD) functions. We investigate the production of pairs of prompt photons from two partons in the projectile hadron in high-energy proton-nucleus collisions. We show that even for independent partons in the projectile, the prompt photon correlation function exhibits Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) correlations. The width of the HBT peak is controlled by the transverse distance between the partons of the pair, which is of the order of the proton size. Thus, the HBT measurements in two-particle production such as prompt photon pairs provide useful information about the nonperturbative 2GTMDs.

  18. Asymmetry distributions and mass effects in dijet events at a polarized HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maul, M.; Schäfer, A.; Mirkes, E.; Rädel, G.

    1998-09-01

    The asymmetry distributions for several kinematic variables are considered for finding a systematic way to maximize the signal for the extraction of the polarized gluon density. The relevance of mass effects for the corresponding dijet cross section is discussed and the different approximations for including mass effects are compared. We also compare via the programs Pepsi and Mepjet two different Monte Carlo (MC) approaches for simulating the expected signal in the dijet asymmetry at a polarized HERA.

  19. Studies of partonic transverse momentum and spin structure of the nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contalbrigo, M.

    2014-06-01

    The investigation of the partonic degrees of freedom beyond collinear approximation (3D description) has been gained increasing interest in the last decade. The Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, after the CEBAF upgrade to 12 GeV, will become the most complete facility for the investigation of the hadron structure in the valence region by scattering of polarized electron off various polarized nucleon targets. A compendium of the planned experiments is here presented.

  20. Quantitative predictions on auxin-induced polar distribution of PIN proteins during vein formation in leaves.

    PubMed

    Alim, K; Frey, E

    2010-10-01

    The dynamic patterning of the plant hormone auxin and its efflux facilitator the PIN protein are the key regulators for the spatial and temporal organization of plant development. In particular auxin induces the polar localization of its own efflux facilitator. Due to this positive feedback, auxin flow is directed and patterns of auxin and PIN arise. During the earliest stage of vein initiation in leaves auxin accumulates in a single cell in a rim of epidermal cells from which it flows into the ground meristem tissue of the leaf blade. There the localized auxin supply yields the successive polarization of PIN distribution along a strand of cells. We model the auxin and PIN dynamics within cells with a minimal canalization model. Solving the model analytically we uncover an excitable polarization front that triggers a polar distribution of PIN proteins in cells. As polarization fronts may extend to opposing directions from their initiation site, we suggest a possible resolution to the puzzling occurrence of bipolar cells, thus we offer an explanation for the development of closed, looped veins. Employing non-linear analysis, we identify the role of the contributing microscopic processes during polarization. Furthermore, we deduce quantitative predictions on polarization fronts establishing a route to determine the up to now largely unknown kinetic rates of auxin and PIN dynamics.

  1. Demonstration of distributed fiber-optic temperature sensing with PM fiber using polarization crosstalk analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hongxin; Zhao, Ziwei; Feng, Ting; Ding, Dongliang; Li, Zhihong; Yao, X. Steve

    2016-11-01

    Polarization crosstalk is a phenomenon that the powers of two orthogonal polarization modes propagating in a polarization maintaining (PM) fiber couple into each other. Because there is certain mathematical relationship between the polarization crosstalk signals and external perturbations such as stress and temperature variations, stress and temperature sensing in PM fiber can be simultaneously achieved by measuring the strengths and locations of polarization crosstalk signals. In this paper, we report what we believe the first distributed temperature sensing demonstration using polarization crosstalk analysis in PM fibers. Firstly, by measuring the spacing changes between two crosstalk peaks at different fiber length locations, we obtained the temperature sensing coefficient (TSC) of approximately -0.73 μm/(°C•m), which means that the spacing between two crosstalk peaks induced at two locations changes by 0.73 μm when the temperature changes by 1 °C over a fiber length of 1 meter. Secondly, in order to bring different temperature values at different axial locations along a PM fiber to verify the distributed temperature sensing, four heating-strips are used to heat different fiber sections of the PM fiber under test, and the temperatures measured by the proposed fiber sensing method according to the obtained TSC are almost consistent with those of heating-strips measured by a thermoelectric thermometer. As a new type of distributed fiber temperature sensing technique, we believe that our method will find broad applications in the near future.

  2. Relationship of F-actin distribution to development of polar shape in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Polymerization of actin has been associated with development of polar shape in human neutrophils (PMN). To examine the relation of filamentous actin (F-actin) distribution to shape change in PMN, we developed a method using computerized video image analysis and fluorescence microscopy to quantify distribution of F-actin in single cells. PMN were labeled with fluorescent probe NBD-phallicidin to measure filamentous actin and Texas red to assess cell thickness. We show that Texas red fluorescence is a reasonable measure of cell thickness and that correction of the NBD-phallicidin image for cell thickness using the Texas red image permits assessment of focal F-actin content. Parameters were derived that quantify total F-actin content, movement of F-actin away from the center of the cell, asymmetry of F- actin distribution, and change from round to polar shape. The sequence of change in F-actin distribution and its relation to development of polar shape in PMN was determined using these parameters. After stimulation with chemotactic peptide at 25 degrees C, F-actin polymerized first at the rim of the PMN. This was followed by development of asymmetry of F-actin distribution and change to polar shape. The dominant pseudopod developed first in the region of lower F- actin concentration followed later by polymerization of actin in the end of the developed pseudopod. Asymmetric F-actin distribution was detected in round PMN before development of polar shape. Based upon these data, asymmetric distribution of F-actin is coincident with and probably precedes development of polar shape in PMN stimulated in suspension by chemotactic peptide. PMID:1577856

  3. Radon Transform and Light-Cone Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teryaev, O. V.

    2016-08-01

    The relevance of Radon transform for generalized and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions is discussed. The new application for conditional (fracture) parton distributions and dihadron fragmentation functions is suggested.

  4. Multiple parton interaction studies at DØ

    DOE PAGES

    Lincoln, D.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present the results of studies of multiparton interactions done by the DØ collaboration using the Fermilab Tevatron at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. We also present three analyses, involving three distinct final signatures: (a) a photon with at least 3 jets ( γ + 3jets), (b) a photon with a bottom or charm quark tagged jet and at least 2 other jets ( γ + b/c + 2jets), and (c) two J/ ψ mesons. The fraction of photon + jet events initiated by double parton scattering is about 20%, while the fraction for events inmore » which two J/ ψ mesons were produced is 30 ± 10. While the two measurements are statistically compatible, the difference might indicate differences in the quark and gluon distribution within a nucleon. Finally, this speculation originates from the fact that photon + jet events are created by collisions with quarks in the initial states, while J/ ψ events are produced preferentially by a gluonic initial state.« less

  5. Multiple parton interaction studies at DØ

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, D.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present the results of studies of multiparton interactions done by the DØ collaboration using the Fermilab Tevatron at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. We also present three analyses, involving three distinct final signatures: (a) a photon with at least 3 jets ( γ + 3jets), (b) a photon with a bottom or charm quark tagged jet and at least 2 other jets ( γ + b/c + 2jets), and (c) two J/ ψ mesons. The fraction of photon + jet events initiated by double parton scattering is about 20%, while the fraction for events in which two J/ ψ mesons were produced is 30 ± 10. While the two measurements are statistically compatible, the difference might indicate differences in the quark and gluon distribution within a nucleon. Finally, this speculation originates from the fact that photon + jet events are created by collisions with quarks in the initial states, while J/ ψ events are produced preferentially by a gluonic initial state.

  6. Angular distributions of the polarized photons and electron in the decays of the state of charmonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Alex W. K.; Wong, Cheuk-Ping; Sit, Wai-Yu

    2014-02-01

    We calculate the combined angular-distribution functions of the polarized photons ( and ) and electron () produced in the cascade process , when the colliding and are unpolarized. Our results are independent of any dynamical models and are expressed in terms of the spherical harmonics whose coefficients are functions of the angular-momentum helicity amplitudes of the individual processes. Once the joint angular distribution of (, ) and that of (, ) with the polarization of either one of the two particles are measured, our results will enable one to determine the relative magnitudes as well as the relative phases of all the angular-momentum helicity amplitudes in the radiative decay processes and.

  7. Spectrum, angular distribution and polarization of auroral hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosa, P. N.; Rausaria, R. R.; Moza, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Elastic and inelastic scattering cross section angular variations are computed, and used as the basis of Monte Carlo calculations of electron energy evolution and angular distributions at different heights in the ionosphere. Monoenergic, power law and exponential electron spectra with isotropic and monodirectional incidence, starting at 300 km altitude, have been used to obtain the angular and energy distributions at various height intervals. It is found that isotropic distribution incident at the top of the ionosphere becomes anisotropic, due to collisions at lower heights. The Sauter (1934) bremsstrahlung cross section, and the calculated electron flux, are used to compute the spectrum, angular distribution, and polarization of bremsstrahlung X-rays at different heights. Angular distribution and polarization studies can yield data about the nature of precipitating electron flux, and hence about the acceleration mechanism operating during electron precipitation.

  8. Parton shower Monte Carlo event generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Bryan

    2011-12-01

    A parton shower Monte Carlo event generator is a computer program designed to simulate the final states of high-energy collisions in full detail down to the level of individual stable particles. The aim is to generate a large number of simulated collision events, each consisting of a list of final-state particles and their momenta, such that the probability to produce an event with a given list is proportional (approximately) to the probability that the corresponding actual event is produced in the real world. The Monte Carlo method makes use of pseudorandom numbers to simulate the event-to-event fluctuations intrinsic to quantum processes. The simulation normally begins with a hard subprocess, shown as a black blob in Figure 1, in which constituents of the colliding particles interact at a high momentum scale to produce a few outgoing fundamental objects: Standard Model quarks, leptons and/or gauge or Higgs bosons, or hypothetical particles of some new theory. The partons (quarks and gluons) involved, as well as any new particles with colour, radiate virtual gluons, which can themselves emit further gluons or produce quark-antiquark pairs, leading to the formation of parton showers (brown). During parton showering the interaction scale falls and the strong interaction coupling rises, eventually triggering the process of hadronization (yellow), in which the partons are bound into colourless hadrons. On the same scale, the initial-state partons in hadronic collisions are confined in the incoming hadrons. In hadron-hadron collisions, the other constituent partons of the incoming hadrons undergo multiple interactions which produce the underlying event (green). Many of the produced hadrons are unstable, so the final stage of event generation is the simulation of the hadron decays.

  9. Transverse force on transversely polarized quarks in longitudinally polarized nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Manal; Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    We study the semiclassical interpretation of the x3 and x4 moments of twist-3 parton distribution functions (PDFs). While no semiclassical interpretation for the higher moments of gT(x ) and e (x ) was found, the x3 moment of the chirally odd spin-dependent twist-3 PDF hL3(x ) can be related to the longitudinal gradient of the transverse force on transversely polarized quarks in longitudinally polarized nucleons in a deep-inelastic scattering experiment. We discuss how this result relates to the torque acting on a quark in the same experiment. This has further implications for comparisons between the Jaffe-Manohar and the Ji decompositions of the nucleon spin.

  10. Transverse circular-polarized Bessel beam generation by inward cylindrical aperture distribution.

    PubMed

    Pavone, S C; Ettorre, M; Casaletti, M; Albani, M

    2016-05-16

    In this paper the focusing capability of a radiating aperture implementing an inward cylindrical traveling wave tangential electric field distribution directed along a fixed polarization unit vector is investigated. In particular, it is shown that such an aperture distribution generates a non-diffractive Bessel beam whose transverse component (with respect to the normal of the radiating aperture) of the electric field takes the form of a zero-th order Bessel function. As a practical implementation of the theoretical analysis, a circular-polarized Bessel beam launcher, made by a radial parallel plate waveguide loaded with several slot pairs, arranged on a spiral pattern, is designed and optimized. The proposed launcher performance agrees with the theoretical model and exhibits an excellent polarization purity.

  11. Angular distributions in the radiative decays of the state of charmonium originating from polarized collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Cheuk-Ping; Mok, Alex W. K.; Sit, Wai-Yu

    2015-03-01

    Using the helicity formalism, we calculate the combined angular distribution function of the two gamma photons ( and ) and the electron () in the triple cascade process , when and are arbitrarily polarized. We also derive six different partially integrated angular distribution functions which give the angular distributions of one or two particles in the final state. Our results show that by measuring the two-particle angular distribution of and and that of and , one can determine the relative magnitudes as well as the relative phases of all the helicity amplitudes in the two charmonium radiative transitions and.

  12. A linear optical protocol of random quantum key distribution by using polarization entangled photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wen-Zhen; Wu, Yan-Hua; Jiang, Hui-Juan; Li, Chong

    2010-02-01

    Utilized polarization entangled photons, a linear optical protocol for generating random quantum key distribution (QKD) is proposed, which is made up of EPR-source, linear optical elements, and conventional photon detectors. It is shown that total efficiency of QKD η=100% in theory.

  13. Electron-beam-deposited distributed polarization rotator for high-power laser applications.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J B; Kessler, T J; Smith, C; Taylor, B; Gruschow, V; Hettrick, J; Charles, B

    2014-10-06

    Electron-beam deposition of silica and alumina is used to fabricate distributed polarization rotators suitable for smoothing the intensity of large-aperture, high-peak-power lasers. Low-modulation, low-loss transmittance with a high 351-nm laser-damage threshold is achieved.

  14. Design and Simulation of a Polarized Pure Photon Source for Compton Scattering from Solid Polarized Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Zhang, Jixie

    2016-09-01

    Wide angle compton scattering from polarized protons holds great promise: access to the generalized parton distribution functions H and E with different weighting and moments than in other hard exclusive processes, emphasizing the u-quarks and the valence region. Previously, experiments were proposed using bremsstrahlung from polarized electrons striking a radiator. Unfortunately the mixed electron- γ beam limits the polarized target performance due to radiation damage and restricted luminosity owing to the heat load. We have designed a pure photon beam line by placing a dipole magnet after the radiator which deflects the electrons away from the target and into a beam dump. This approach has many benefits which include an order of magnitude increase in the photon luminosity and unrestricted use of transversely polarized targets while preserving robust target performance. We will discuss the physics motivation, the design (of two different options) as well as the G4beamline simulation results of the source.

  15. Predicting 21st-century polar bear habitat distribution from global climate models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durner, G.M.; Douglas, D.C.; Nielson, R.M.; Amstrup, Steven C.; McDonald, T.L.; Stirling, I.; Mauritzen, Mette; Born, E.W.; Wiig, O.; Deweaver, E.; Serreze, M.C.; Belikov, Stanislav; Holland, M.M.; Maslanik, J.; Aars, Jon; Bailey, D.A.; Derocher, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    Projections of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) sea ice habitat distribution in the polar basin during the 21st century were developed to understand the consequences of anticipated sea ice reductions on polar bear populations. We used location data from satellitecollared polar bears and environmental data (e.g., bathymetry, distance to coastlines, and sea ice) collected from 1985 to 1995 to build resource selection functions (RSFs). RSFs described habitats that polar bears preferred in summer, autumn, winter, and spring. When applied to independent data from 1996 to 2006, the RSFs consistently identified habitats most frequently used by polar bears. We applied the RSFs to monthly maps of 21st-century sea ice concentration projected by 10 general circulation models (GCMs) used in the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report, under the A1B greenhouse gas forcing scenario. Despite variation in their projections, all GCMs indicated habitat losses in the polar basin during the 21st century. Losses in the highest-valued RSF habitat (optimal habitat) were greatest in the southern seas of the polar basin, especially the Chukchi and Barents seas, and least along the Arctic Ocean shores of Banks Island to northern Greenland. Mean loss of optimal polar bear habitat was greatest during summer; from an observed 1.0 million km2 in 1985-1995 (baseline) to a projected multi-model mean of 0.32 million km2 in 2090-2099 (-68% change). Projected winter losses of polar bear habitat were less: from 1.7 million km2 in 1985-1995 to 1.4 million km2 in 2090-2099 (-17% change). Habitat losses based on GCM multi-model means may be conservative; simulated rates of habitat loss during 1985-2006 from many GCMs were less than the actual observed rates of loss. Although a reduction in the total amount of optimal habitat will likely reduce polar bear populations, exact relationships between habitat losses and population demographics remain unknown. Density and energetic

  16. Relaxation Time Distribution (RTD) of Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) data from environmental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Ustra, A.; Slater, L. D.; Zhang, C.; Mendonça, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present an alternative formulation of the Debye Decomposition (DD) of complex conductivity spectra, with a new set of parameters that are directly related to the continuous Debye relaxation model. The procedure determines the relaxation time distribution (RTD) and two frequency-independent parameters that modulate the induced polarization spectra. The distribution of relaxation times quantifies the contribution of each distinct relaxation process, which can in turn be associated with specific polarization processes and characterized in terms of electrochemical and interfacial parameters as derived from mechanistic models. Synthetic tests show that the procedure can successfully fit spectral induced polarization (SIP) data and accurately recover the RTD. The procedure was applied to different data sets, focusing on environmental applications. We focus on data of sand-clay mixtures artificially contaminated with toluene, and crude oil-contaminated sands experiencing biodegradation. The results identify characteristic relaxation times that can be associated with distinct polarization processes resulting from either the contaminant itself or transformations associated with biodegradation. The inversion results provide information regarding the relative strength and dominant relaxation time of these polarization processes.

  17. Observations of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere from the Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegrini, Frederic; Valek, Phil; Bagenal, Fran; Bolton, Scott; Clark, George; Connerney, Jack; Ebert, Rob; Gladstone, Randy; Kim, Thomas; Kurth, William; Levin, Steve; Louarn, Philippe; Loeffler, Chad; Mauk, Barry; McComas, David; Pollock, Craig; Ranquist, Drake; Reno, Michelle; Szalay, Jamey; Thomsen, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    The Juno mission employs a suite of instruments to perform the first-ever in situ measurements of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. Observations of the plasma environment are performed by the Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE). JADE measures the plasma using two nearly identical electron sensors and an ion sensor. The electron sensors (JADE-E) measure electron distributions in the range of 100 eV to 100 keV. The un-deflected field-of-view (FOV) of each electron sensor is in the spin plane of the spacecraft; approximately the plane which includes the spacecraft velocity direction and the local magnetic field. Around perijove, the JADE-E sensors use electrostatic deflection to track the local magnetic field in order to measure pitch angle distributions at 1 s time resolution. The JADE ion sensor (JADE-I) measures the energy per charge and time of flight (TOF) of incident ions (mass/q < 64 amu/e) to produce composition separated ion distributions in the range of 10 eV/e to 50 keV/e. Using the spacecraft spin to sweep its FOV, JADE-I measures a full 4Pi sr ion distribution function every 30 s. The first two opportunities to observe the plasma in Jupiter's polar magnetosphere by JADE occurred on 27 August and 11 December 2016. During both of these passes, JADE crossed field lines connected to the northern and southern auroral ovals and measured polar and sub-auroral plasmas. JADE observed ions of ionospheric and Iogenic origin and a range of electron distributions, including narrow beams and distributions with emptied loss cones. We present here in situ plasma observations of the Jovian polar magnetosphere made by the JADE instrument.

  18. APFELgrid : A high performance tool for parton density determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertone, Valerio; Carrazza, Stefano; Hartland, Nathan P.

    2017-03-01

    We present a new software package designed to reduce the computational burden of hadron collider measurements in Parton Distribution Function (PDF) fits. The APFELgrid package converts interpolated weight tables provided by APPLgrid files into a more efficient format for PDF fitting by the combination with PDF and αs evolution factors provided by APFEL. This combination significantly reduces the number of operations required to perform the calculation of hadronic observables in PDF fits and simplifies the structure of the calculation into a readily optimised scalar product. We demonstrate that our technique can lead to a substantial speed improvement when compared to existing methods without any reduction in numerical accuracy.

  19. Measurement of Proton Structure and Parton Density Functions from HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Raicevic, Natasa

    2010-01-21

    A preliminary result is reported of the charged current and neutral current inclusive cross sections from e{sup +}p and e{sup -}p scattering obtained from a combination of published measurements from H1 and ZEUS. Taking into account the systematic error correlations in a coherent approach, a reduction of experimental uncertainties for combined results is achieved compared to the separate results of the H1 and ZEUS experiments. The combined results are used as input for a next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD parton distribution determination.

  20. The distribution of polarized radio sources >15 μJy IN GOODS-N

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnick, L.; Owen, F. N.

    2014-04-10

    We present deep Very Large Array observations of the polarization of radio sources in the GOODS-N field at 1.4 GHz at resolutions of 1.''6 and 10''. At 1.''6, we find that the peak flux cumulative number count distribution is N(> p) ∼ 45*(p/30 μJy){sup –0.6} per square degree above a detection threshold of 14.5 μJy. This represents a break from the steeper slopes at higher flux densities, resulting in fewer sources predicted for future surveys with the Square Kilometer Array and its precursors. It provides a significant challenge for using background rotation measures (RMs) to study clusters of galaxies or individual galaxies. Most of the polarized sources are well above our detection limit, and they are also radio galaxies that are well-resolved even at 10'', with redshifts from ∼0.2-1.9. We determined a total polarized flux for each source by integrating the 10'' polarized intensity maps, as will be done by upcoming surveys such as POSSUM. These total polarized fluxes are a factor of two higher, on average, than the peak polarized flux at 1.''6; this would increase the number counts by ∼50% at a fixed flux level. The detected sources have RMs with a characteristic rms scatter of ∼11 rad m{sup –2} around the local Galactic value, after eliminating likely outliers. The median fractional polarization from all total intensity sources does not continue the trend of increasing at lower flux densities, as seen for stronger sources. The changes in the polarization characteristics seen at these low fluxes likely represent the increasing dominance of star-forming galaxies.

  1. Parton Propagation and Fragmentation in QCD Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alberto Accardi, Francois Arleo, William Brooks, David D'Enterria, Valeria Muccifora

    2009-12-01

    We review recent progress in the study of parton propagation, interaction and fragmentation in both cold and hot strongly interacting matter. Experimental highlights on high-energy hadron production in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering, proton-nucleus and heavy-ion collisions, as well as Drell-Yan processes in hadron-nucleus collisions are presented. The existing theoretical frameworks for describing the in-medium interaction of energetic partons and the space-time evolution of their fragmentation into hadrons are discussed and confronted to experimental data. We conclude with a list of theoretical and experimental open issues, and a brief description of future relevant experiments and facilities.

  2. Evolution of parton fragmentation functions at finitetemperature

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, Jonathan; Wang, Enke; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2002-06-12

    The first order correction to the parton fragmentation functions in a thermal medium is derived in the leading logarithmic approximation in the framework of thermal field theory. The medium-modified evolution equations of the parton fragmentation functions are also derived. It is shown that all infrared divergences, both linear and logarithmic, in the real processes are canceled among themselves and by corresponding virtual corrections. The evolution of the quark number and the energy loss (or gain) induced by the thermal medium are investigated.

  3. Angular distribution and polarization properties of radiation scattering in the classical framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, Madalina

    2017-06-01

    We study the scattering of intense electromagnetic radiation on free relativistic electrons in the classical formalism. Starting from the well known property that in the relativistic regime the radiation is emitted by an accelerated charged particle along its instantaneous velocity direction we discuss the effects of the radiation reaction on the shape of the angular distribution in Thomson effect for the case of linear and circular polarization of the incident light and for different collision geometries. We also study the polarization properties of the emitted radiation for several low intensity cases.

  4. Polarized fluorescence depletion reports orientation distribution and rotational dynamics of muscle cross-bridges.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Marcus G; Dale, Robert E; van der Heide, Uulke A; Goldman, Yale E

    2002-01-01

    The method of polarized fluorescence depletion (PFD) has been applied to enhance the resolution of orientational distributions and dynamics obtained from fluorescence polarization (FP) experiments on ordered systems, particularly in muscle fibers. Previous FP data from single fluorescent probes were limited to the 2(nd)- and 4(th)-rank order parameters, and , of the probe angular distribution (beta) relative to the fiber axis and , a coefficient describing the extent of rapid probe motions. We applied intense 12-micros polarized photoselection pulses to transiently populate the triplet state of rhodamine probes and measured the polarization of the ground-state depletion using a weak interrogation beam. PFD provides dynamic information describing the extent of motions on the time scale between the fluorescence lifetime (e.g., 4 ns) and the duration of the photoselection pulse and it potentially supplies information about the probe angular distribution corresponding to order parameters above rank 4. Gizzard myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) was labeled with the 6-isomer of iodoacetamidotetramethylrhodamine and exchanged into rabbit psoas muscle fibers. In active contraction, dynamic motions of the RLC on the PFD time scale were intermediate between those observed in relaxation and rigor. The results indicate that previously observed disorder of the light chain region in contraction can be ascribed principally to dynamic motions on the microsecond time scale. PMID:12124286

  5. Optimal distribution of integration time for intensity measurements in degree of linear polarization polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Hu, Haofeng; Liu, Tiegen; Huang, Bingjing; Song, Zhanjie

    2016-04-04

    We consider the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) polarimetry system, which performs two intensity measurements at orthogonal polarization states to estimate DOLP. We show that if the total integration time of intensity measurements is fixed, the variance of the DOLP estimator depends on the distribution of integration time for two intensity measurements. Therefore, by optimizing the distribution of integration time, the variance of the DOLP estimator can be decreased. In this paper, we obtain the closed-form solution of the optimal distribution of integration time in an approximate way by employing Delta method and Lagrange multiplier method. According to the theoretical analyses and real-world experiments, it is shown that the variance of the DOLP estimator can be decreased for any value of DOLP. The method proposed in this paper can effectively decrease the measurement variance and thus statistically improve the measurement accuracy of the polarimetry system.

  6. Chimera distribution amplitudes for the pion and the longitudinally polarized ρ-meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanis, N. G.; Pimikov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Using QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates, we show that the distribution amplitude of the longitudinally polarized ρ-meson may have a shorttailed platykurtic profile in close analogy to our recently proposed platykurtic distribution amplitude for the pion. Such a chimera distribution de facto amalgamates the broad unimodal profile of the distribution amplitude, obtained with a Dyson-Schwinger equations-based computational scheme, with the suppressed tails characterizing the bimodal distribution amplitudes derived from QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates. We argue that pattern formation, emerging from the collective synchronization of coupled oscillators, can provide a single theoretical scaffolding to study unimodal and bimodal distribution amplitudes of light mesons without recourse to particular computational schemes and the reasons for them.

  7. Constraints on parton density functions from D0

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, Jonathan M.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2008-04-01

    Five recent results from D0 which either impact or have the potential to impact on uncertainties in parton density functions are presented. Many analyses at D0 are sensitive to the modeling of the partonic structure of the proton. When theoretical and experimental uncertainties are well controlled there exists the possibility for additional constraints on parton density functions (PDF). Five measurements are presented which either have already been included in global parton fits or have the potential to contribute in the future.

  8. Polarization-basis tracking scheme for quantum key distribution using revealed sifted key bits.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu-Yang; Chen, Wei; Chen, Hua; Wang, Chao; Li, Ya-Ping; Wang, Shuang; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2017-03-15

    The calibration of the polarization basis between the transmitter and receiver is an important task in quantum key distribution. A continuously working polarization-basis tracking scheme (PBTS) will effectively promote the efficiency of the system and reduce the potential security risk when switching between the transmission and calibration modes. Here, we proposed a single-photon level continuously working PBTS using only sifted key bits revealed during an error correction procedure, without introducing additional reference light or interrupting the transmission of quantum signals. We applied the scheme to a polarization-encoding BB84 QKD system in a 50 km fiber channel, and obtained an average quantum bit error rate (QBER) of 2.32% and a standard derivation of 0.87% during 24 h of continuous operation. The stable and relatively low QBER validates the effectiveness of the scheme.

  9. Planar polarity of hair cells in the chick inner ear is correlated with polarized distribution of c-flamingo-1 protein.

    PubMed

    Davies, Alexander; Formstone, Caroline; Mason, Ivor; Lewis, Julian

    2005-07-01

    Hair cells of the vertebrate inner ear are directional mechanosensors: they have a polarity, defined by a vector in the plane of the sensory epithelium. It has been suggested that this polarity might be controlled by genes homologous to those that control planar cell polarity (PCP) in Drosophila, and vertebrate homologues of the Drosophila PCP genes Van Gogh/strabismus and flamingo/starry night are indeed essential for normal hair cell PCP. The underlying molecular mechanism is unclear, however. Although the PCP protein Flamingo shows a polarized intracellular distribution in the fly, it is unknown whether this is necessary for its function. Here, we describe the expression pattern of a flamingo homologue, c-flamingo-1 (c-fmi-1), in the developing chick ear and show that its protein product, like that of flamingo in the fly, has a polarized distribution in each hair cell, defining an axis that corresponds to the structural PCP axis. This conservation between fly and vertebrate suggests that the polarized protein localization is functionally important. In the basilar papilla, the same localization is seen in supporting cells also, suggesting that supporting cells are cryptically polarized, despite having no overt structural polarity; they may thus participate in PCP signal transmission across the sensory patch.

  10. Leads Detection Using Mixture Statistical Distribution Based CRF Algorithm from Sentinel-1 Dual Polarization SAR Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Fei; Zhang, Shengkai; Zhu, Tingting

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is significantly important for polar remote sensing since it can provide continuous observations in all days and all weather. SAR can be used for extracting the surface roughness information characterized by the variance of dielectric properties and different polarization channels, which make it possible to observe different ice types and surface structure for deformation analysis. In November, 2016, Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE) 33rd cruise has set sails in sea ice zone in Antarctic. Accurate leads spatial distribution in sea ice zone for routine planning of ship navigation is essential. In this study, the semantic relationship between leads and sea ice categories has been described by the Conditional Random Fields (CRF) model, and leads characteristics have been modeled by statistical distributions in SAR imagery. In the proposed algorithm, a mixture statistical distribution based CRF is developed by considering the contexture information and the statistical characteristics of sea ice for improving leads detection in Sentinel-1A dual polarization SAR imagery. The unary potential and pairwise potential in CRF model is constructed by integrating the posteriori probability estimated from statistical distributions. For mixture statistical distribution parameter estimation, Method of Logarithmic Cumulants (MoLC) is exploited for single statistical distribution parameters estimation. The iteration based Expectation Maximal (EM) algorithm is investigated to calculate the parameters in mixture statistical distribution based CRF model. In the posteriori probability inference, graph-cut energy minimization method is adopted in the initial leads detection. The post-processing procedures including aspect ratio constrain and spatial smoothing approaches are utilized to improve the visual result. The proposed method is validated on Sentinel-1A SAR C-band Extra Wide Swath (EW) Ground Range Detected (GRD) imagery with a

  11. Haze and cloud distribution in Uranus' atmosphere based on high-contrast spatially resolved polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostogryz, Nadiia; Berdyugina, Svetlana; Gisler, Daniel; Berkefeld, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    In planetary atmospheres, main sources of opacity are molecular absorption and scattering on molecules, hazes and aerosols. Hence, light reflected from a planetary atmosphere can be linearly polarized. Polarization study of inner solar system planets and exoplanets is a powerful method to characterize their atmospheres, because of a wide range of observable phase angles. For outer solar system planets, observable phase angles are very limited. For instance, Uranus can only be observed up to 3.2 degrees away from conjunctions, and its disk-integrated polarization is close to zero due to the back-scattering geometry. However, resolving the disk of Uranus and measuring the center-to-limb polarization can help constraining the vertical atmospheric structure and the nature of scattering aerosols and particles. In October 2016, we carried out polarization measurements of Uranus in narrow-band filters centered at methane bands and the adjacent continuum using the GREGOR Planet Polarimeter (GPP). The GPP is a high-precision polarimeter and is mounted at the 1.5-m GREGOR solar telescope, which is suitable for observing at night. In order to reach a high spatial resolution, the instrument uses an adaptive-optics system of the telescope. To interpret our measurements, we solve the polarized radiative transfer problem taking into account different scattering and absorption opacities. We calculate the center-to-limb variation of polarization of Uranus' disk in the continuum spectrum and in methane bands. By varying the vertical distribution of haze and cloud layers, we derive the vertical structure of the best-fit Uranus atmosphere.

  12. QCD parton model at collider energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.K.

    1984-09-01

    Using the example of vector boson production, the application of the QCD improved parton model at collider energies is reviewed. The reliability of the extrapolation to SSC energies is assessed. Predictions at ..sqrt..S = 0.54 TeV are compared with data. 21 references.

  13. Systematic Improvement of QCD Parton Showers

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Jan; Hoeche, Stefan; Hoeth, Hendrik; Krauss, Frank; Schonherr, Marek; Zapp, Korinna; Schumann, Steffen; Siegert, Frank; /Freiburg U.

    2012-05-17

    In this contribution, we will give a brief overview of the progress that has been achieved in the field of combining matrix elements and parton showers. We exemplify this by focusing on the case of electron-positron collisions and by reporting on recent developments as accomplished within the SHERPA event generation framework.

  14. Fragmentation of parton jets at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, R.

    1985-08-01

    The parton fragmentation function is calculated in the region of small x in the doubly logarithmic approximation of QCD. For this, the method of separating the softest particle, which has hitherto been applied only in the Regge kinematic region, is developed. Simple arguments based on unitarity and gauge invariance are used to derive the well known condition of ordering of the emission angles.

  15. Testing methods for using high-resolution satellite imagery to monitor polar bear abundance and distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaRue, Michelle A.; Stapleton, Seth P.; Porter, Claire; Atkinson, Stephen N.; Atwood, Todd C.; Dyck, Markus; Lecomte, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution satellite imagery is a promising tool for providing coarse information about polar species abundance and distribution, but current applications are limited. With polar bears (Ursus maritimus), the technique has only proven effective on landscapes with little topographic relief that are devoid of snow and ice, and time-consuming manual review of imagery is required to identify bears. Here, we evaluated mechanisms to further develop methods for satellite imagery by examining data from Rowley Island, Canada. We attempted to automate and expedite detection via a supervised spectral classification and image differencing to expedite image review. We also assessed what proportion of a region should be sampled to obtain reliable estimates of density and abundance. Although the spectral signature of polar bears differed from nontarget objects, these differences were insufficient to yield useful results via a supervised classification process. Conversely, automated image differencing—or subtracting one image from another—correctly identified nearly 90% of polar bear locations. This technique, however, also yielded false positives, suggesting that manual review will still be required to confirm polar bear locations. On Rowley Island, bear distribution approximated a Poisson distribution across a range of plot sizes, and resampling suggests that sampling >50% of the site facilitates reliable estimation of density (CV <15%). Satellite imagery may be an effective monitoring tool in certain areas, but large-scale applications remain limited because of the challenges in automation and the limited environments in which the method can be effectively applied. Improvements in resolution may expand opportunities for its future uses.

  16. Spin correlations in the Drell–Yan process, parton entanglement, and other unconventional QCD effects

    SciTech Connect

    Nachtmann, O.

    2014-11-15

    We review ideas on the structure of the QCD vacuum which had served as motivation for the discussion of various non-standard QCD effects in high-energy reactions in articles from 1984 to 1995. These effects include, in particular, transverse-momentum and spin correlations in the Drell–Yan process and soft photon production in hadron–hadron collisions. We discuss the relation of the approach introduced in the above-mentioned articles to the approach, developed later, using transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TDMs). The latter approach is a special case of our more general one which allows for parton entanglement in high-energy reactions. We discuss signatures of parton entanglement in the Drell–Yan reaction. Also for Higgs-boson production in pp collisions via gluon–gluon annihilation effects of entanglement of the two gluons are discussed and are found to be potentially important. These effects can be looked for in the current LHC experiments. In our opinion studying parton-entanglement effects in high-energy reactions is, on the one hand, very worthwhile by itself and, on the other hand, it allows to perform quantitative tests of standard factorisation assumptions. Clearly, the experimental observation of parton-entanglement effects in the Drell–Yan reaction and/or in Higgs-boson production would have a great impact on our understanding how QCD works in high-energy collisions.

  17. Investigating GPDs in the framework of the double distribution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, F.; Mirjalili, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we construct the generalized parton distribution (GPD) in terms of the kinematical variables x, ξ, t, using the double distribution model. By employing these functions, we could extract some quantities which makes it possible to gain a three-dimensional insight into the nucleon structure function at the parton level. The main objective of GPDs is to combine and generalize the concepts of ordinary parton distributions and form factors. They also provide an exclusive framework to describe the nucleons in terms of quarks and gluons. Here, we first calculate, in the Double Distribution model, the GPD based on the usual parton distributions arising from the GRV and CTEQ phenomenological models. Obtaining quarks and gluons angular momenta from the GPD, we would be able to calculate the scattering observables which are related to spin asymmetries of the produced quarkonium. These quantities are represented by AN and ALS. We also calculate the Pauli and Dirac form factors in deeply virtual Compton scattering. Finally, in order to compare our results with the existing experimental data, we use the difference of the polarized cross-section for an initial longitudinal leptonic beam and unpolarized target particles (ΔσLU). In all cases, our obtained results are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  18. Control of antiferromagnetic domain distribution via polarization-dependent optical annealing

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Takuya; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The absence of net magnetization inside antiferromagnetic domains has made the control of their spatial distribution quite challenging. Here we experimentally demonstrate an optical method for controlling antiferromagnetic domain distributions in MnF2. Reduced crystalline symmetry can couple an order parameter with non-conjugate external stimuli. In the case of MnF2, time-reversal symmetry is macroscopically broken reflecting the different orientations of the two magnetic sublattices. Thus, it exhibits different absorption coefficients between two orthogonal linear polarizations below its antiferromagnetic transition temperature under an external magnetic field. Illumination with linearly polarized laser light under this condition selectively destructs the formation of a particular antiferromagnetic order via heating. As a result, the other antiferromagnetic order is favoured inside the laser spot, achieving spatially localized selection of an antiferromagnetic order. Applications to control of interface states at antiferromagnetic domain boundaries, exchange bias and control of spin currents are expected. PMID:26911337

  19. Control of antiferromagnetic domain distribution via polarization-dependent optical annealing.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takuya; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2016-02-25

    The absence of net magnetization inside antiferromagnetic domains has made the control of their spatial distribution quite challenging. Here we experimentally demonstrate an optical method for controlling antiferromagnetic domain distributions in MnF2. Reduced crystalline symmetry can couple an order parameter with non-conjugate external stimuli. In the case of MnF2, time-reversal symmetry is macroscopically broken reflecting the different orientations of the two magnetic sublattices. Thus, it exhibits different absorption coefficients between two orthogonal linear polarizations below its antiferromagnetic transition temperature under an external magnetic field. Illumination with linearly polarized laser light under this condition selectively destructs the formation of a particular antiferromagnetic order via heating. As a result, the other antiferromagnetic order is favoured inside the laser spot, achieving spatially localized selection of an antiferromagnetic order. Applications to control of interface states at antiferromagnetic domain boundaries, exchange bias and control of spin currents are expected.

  20. Control of antiferromagnetic domain distribution via polarization-dependent optical annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Takuya; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2016-02-01

    The absence of net magnetization inside antiferromagnetic domains has made the control of their spatial distribution quite challenging. Here we experimentally demonstrate an optical method for controlling antiferromagnetic domain distributions in MnF2. Reduced crystalline symmetry can couple an order parameter with non-conjugate external stimuli. In the case of MnF2, time-reversal symmetry is macroscopically broken reflecting the different orientations of the two magnetic sublattices. Thus, it exhibits different absorption coefficients between two orthogonal linear polarizations below its antiferromagnetic transition temperature under an external magnetic field. Illumination with linearly polarized laser light under this condition selectively destructs the formation of a particular antiferromagnetic order via heating. As a result, the other antiferromagnetic order is favoured inside the laser spot, achieving spatially localized selection of an antiferromagnetic order. Applications to control of interface states at antiferromagnetic domain boundaries, exchange bias and control of spin currents are expected.

  1. An O([alpha][sub s]) Monte Carlo for W production with parton showering

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    We construct an event generator for p[bar p][yields]W[sup +]X[yields]e[sup +][nu]X including complete O([alpha][sub s]) corrections, and interface with initial and final state parton showers. Problems with negative weights and with double counting higher order parton radiation are averted. We present results for W+n-jet production, and compare with results from complete tree-level calculations, and shower calculations off of the lowest order 2[yields]2 sub-process. We also compute the [sub qT](W) distribution, and compare with data.

  2. An O({alpha}{sub s}) Monte Carlo for W production with parton showering

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.A.

    1991-12-31

    We construct an event generator for p{bar p}{yields}W{sup +}X{yields}e{sup +}{nu}X including complete O({alpha}{sub s}) corrections, and interface with initial and final state parton showers. Problems with negative weights and with double counting higher order parton radiation are averted. We present results for W+n-jet production, and compare with results from complete tree-level calculations, and shower calculations off of the lowest order 2{yields}2 sub-process. We also compute the {sub qT}(W) distribution, and compare with data.

  3. Non-dipolar Wilson Links for Parton Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hsiang-nan

    We propose a new definition of a transverse-momentum-dependent wave function with simpler soft subtraction. The unsubtracted wave function involves two pieces of non-light-like Wilson links oriented in different directions, so that the rapidity singularity appearing in usual kT factorization is regularized, and the pinched singularity from Wilson-link self-energy corrections is alleviated to a logarithmic one. We show explicitly at one-loop level that the simpler definition with the non-dipolar Wilson links exhibits the same infrared behavior as the one with the dipolar Wilson links. The non-dipolar Wilson links are also introduced to the quasi-parton distribution function (QPDF) with an equal-time correlator in the large momentum limit, which can remove the involved linear divergence, and allow perturbative matching to the standard light-cone parton distribution function. The latter can then be extracted reliably from Euclidean lattice data for the QPDF with the non-dipolar Wilson links.

  4. Intensity and polarization of light scattered by size distributions of randomly oriented nonspherical particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, M. I.; Travis, L. D.

    1993-01-01

    Calculations of light scattering by small particles are important in many diverse fields of science and engineering. In many cases of practical interest, scattering particles are nonspherical and are distributed over sizes and orientations. However, accurate light scattering computations for ensembles of nonspherical particles are difficult and time-consuming, and the literature in which such calculations are reported is rather scarce. In this paper, the T-matrix approach, as extended recently to randomly oriented particles, is used to calculate rigorously light scattering by size distributions of randomly oriented axially symmetric particles. To model the variation of particle sizes in real ensembles, we use a power law distribution typical of some terrestrial aerosols. Contour plots of intensity and degree of linear polarization for polydisperse prolate and oblate spheroids of different aspect ratios and effective equivalent-sphere size parameters from 0 to 10 are calculated and compared with calculations for equivalent spheres. The angular scattering behavior of nonspherical polydispersions is found to be greatly different from that of spheres, while the scattering properties of oblate and prolate spheroids of the same aspect ratio are similar. With increasing particle size, both intensity and polarization become more shape-dependent. In general, nonspherical particles are stronger side scatterers and weaker backscatterers than equivalent spheres. With increasing aspect ratio of nonspherical particles polarization tends to be predominantly positive. Possible effects of particle nonsphericity on optical remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols are discussed.

  5. Effects produced by multi-parton interactions and color reconnection in small systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuautle, Eleazar; Ortiz, Antonio; Paić, Guy

    2016-12-01

    Multi-parton interactions and color reconnection can produce QGP-like effects in small systems, specifically, radial flow-like patterns. For pp collisions simulated with Pythia 8.212, in this work we investigate their effects on different observables like event multiplicity, event shapes and transverse momentum distributions.

  6. Investigation of parton fragmentation with the TPC detector at PEP: recent results

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, W.

    1985-08-01

    Long-range correlations are discussed as a new tool to test the parton model and jet universality and are used to determine general properties of quark fragmentation functions. Proton-antiproton correlatiosns and proton rapidity distribution yield information about details of the confinement process, excluding e.g. the decay of heavy mesonic clusters as the dominant source of baryons.

  7. First observations of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere from the Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valek, P. W.; Allegrini, F.; Bagenal, F.; Bolton, S. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Ebert, R. W.; Gladstone, R.; Kurth, W. S.; Levin, S.; Louarn, P.; Loeffler, C.; Mauk, B.; McComas, D. J.; Pollock, C.; Reno, M. L.; Szalay, J.; Weidner, S.; Wilson, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Juno mission employs a suite of instruments to perform the first in situ measurements of the Jovian polar magnetosphere. Observations of the plasma environment are performed by the Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE). JADE measures the plasma using two nearly identical electrons sensors and an ion sensor. The electron sensors (JADE-E) measure the electron distribution in the range of 100 eV to 100 keV. The un-deflected Field-of-View (FOV) of the electron sensor is the spin plane of the spacecraft; approximately the plane which includes the spacecraft velocity direction and the local magnetic field. However, around closest approach the JADE-E sensors use electrostatic deflection to track the local magnetic field direction in order to measure the pitch angle distribution with nearly 1 second time resolution. The JADE ion sensor (JADE-I) measures the energy per charge and time of flight (TOF) of incident ions to observe the composition separated ion distributions. The JADE-I sensor measures the energy per charge in the range of 10 eV / q to 50 keV / q for ions with masses < 64 amu / q. Using the spacecraft spin to sweep its FOV, JADE-I measures a full 4Pi ion distribution function every 30 seconds. Juno made its first perijove observations on August 27, crossing through both the northern and southern auroral ovals. We present here the first in situ plasma observations of the Jovian polar magnetosphere made by the JADE instrument.

  8. 'Downward control' of the mean meridional circulation and temperature distribution of the polar winter stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Rolando R.; Boville, Byron A.

    1994-01-01

    According to the 'downward control' principle, the extratropical mean vertical velocity on a given pressure level is approximately proportional to the meridional gradient of the vertically integrated zonal force per unit mass exerted by waves above that level. In this paper, a simple numerical model that includes parameterizations of both planetary and gravity wave breaking is used to explore the influence of gravity wave breaking in the mesosphere on the mean meridional circulation and temperature distribution at lower levels in the polar winter stratosphere. The results of these calculations suggest that gravity wave drag in the mesosphere can affect the state of the polar winter stratosphere down to altitudes below 30 km. The effect is most important when planetary wave driving is relatively weak: that is, during southern winter and in early northern winter. In southern winter, downwelling weakens by a factor of 2 near the stratospause and by 20% at 30 km when gravity wave drag is not included in the calculations. As a consequence, temperatures decrease considerably throughout the polar winter stratosphere (over 20 K above 40 km and as much as 8 K at 30 km, where the effect is enhanced by the long radiative relaxation timescale). The polar winter states obtained when gravity wave drag is omitted in this simple model resemble the results of simulations with some general circulation models and suggest that some of the shortcomings of the latter may be due to a deficit in mesospheric momentum deposition by small-scale gravity waves.

  9. Ozone And Humidity Distribution Inside The Polar Jet: Identification Of Transport Across The Tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kley, D.; Smit, H. G. J.; Duhnke, K.

    The region of the polar jet stream plays an important role in exchange processes be- tween stratosphere and troposphere. In a statistical study ozone and water vapor mea- surements obtained from the MOZAIC (=Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In Service Aircraft) project were used to investigate atmospheric dynamics in the region of the polar jet over the North-Atlantic. From a one year record of more than 1000 transatlantic MOZAIC-flights cross- sectional distributions of ozone and relative humidity inside the polar jet stream are composed and analyzed. A synoptical approach is employed, using daily weather anal- ysis maps of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast, to develop a coordinate transformation method which enables to position MOZAIC water vapor and ozone data relative to the jet-axis. Inside the jet the cross sections of ozone and humidity show a local circulation pattern across the tropopause with an indication of a net downward flux which is most pro- nounced in spring and has a minimum in autumn. The paper will discuss the observed circulation pattern inside the polar jet in terms of transport across the tropopause and its implications on the budget of ozone and water vapor in the UT/LS-region.

  10. Observation of Significant Quantum Efficiency Enhancement from a Polarized Photocathode with Distributed Bragg Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shukui; Poelker, Matthew; Stutzman, Marcy L.; Chen, Yiqiao; Moy, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    Polarized photocathodes with higher Quantum efficiency (QE) would help to reduce the technological challenge associated with producing polarized beams at milliampere levels, because less laser light would be required, which simplifies photocathode cooling requirements. And for a given amount of available laser power, higher QE would extend the photogun operating lifetime. The distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) concept was proposed to enhance the QE of strained-superlattice photocathodes by increasing the absorption of the incident photons using a Fabry-Perot cavity formed between the front surface of the photocathode and the substrate that includes a DBR, without compromising electron polarization. Here we present recent results showing QE enhancement of a GaAs/GaAsP strained-superlattice photocathode made with a DBR structure. Typically, a GaAs/GaAsP strained-superlattice photocathode without DBR provides a QE of 1%, at a laser wavelength corresponding to peak polarization. In comparison, the GaAs/GaAsP strained-superlattice photocathodes with DBR exhibited an enhancement of over 2 when the incident laser wavelength was tuned to meet the resonant condition for the Fabry-Perot resonator.

  11. Retrieval of Droplet size Density Distribution from Multiple field of view Cross polarized Lidar Signals: Theory and Experimental Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-02

    Retrieval of droplet-size density distribution from multiple- field -of-view cross-polarized lidar signals: theory and experimental validation...Gilles Roy, Luc Bissonnette, Christian Bastille, and Gilles Vallee Multiple- field -of-view (MFOV) secondary-polarization lidar signals are used to...use secondary polarization. A mathematical relation among the PSD, the lidar fields of view, the scattering angles, and the angular depolarization

  12. Differential distributions of CSE1L/CAS and E-cadherin in the polarized and non-polarized epithelial glands of neoplastic colorectal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Uen, Wu-Ching; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Tsao, Tang-Yi; Deng, Win-Ping; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Hsu, Chung-Huei; Hsieh, Cheng-I; Liao, Ching-Fong; Jiang, Ming-Chung

    2010-10-01

    Colorectal glands are important functional organs in colorectal tissue and are also the origin of colorectal carcinomas. Epithelial cell polarization of colorectal glands is related to structural integrity and physiological functions of colorectal glands as well as colorectal carcinoma formation. The cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CSE1L/CAS) protein has been shown to induce polarity formation of human colorectal cells in cell culture. E-cadherin expression in epithelial cells is crucial for the establishment and maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. In this study we examined the distributions of CSE1L and E-cadherin in the epithelial glands of normal and neoplastic colorectal epithelium and correlated these to polarity formation in the colorectal glands. Our results showed that CSE1L was differentially stained in the epithelial glands of neoplastic colorectal epithelium, and the staining was related to gland epithelial cell polarization and E-cadherin distribution. CSE1L was associated E-cadherin in GST pull-down experiments and immunoprecipitation assays. Basolateral staining of CSE1L and E-cadherin were seen in the polarized glands of normal and neoplastic colorectal epithelium. Absence of basolateral CSE1L staining in neoplastic epithelium glands was associated with loss of gland epithelial cell polarity, and this was parallel with E-cadherin staining. The non-polarized areas in epithelium glands showed a patchy staining for CSE1L and E-cadherin. These results indicate that examination of CSE1L and E-cadherin distribution in colorectal epithelium glands may be valuable for evaluating the malignance of colorectal disease.

  13. Reconstruction of the polarization distribution of the Rice-Mele model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahyavi, M.; Hetényi, B.

    2017-06-01

    We calculate the gauge-invariant cumulants (and moments) associated with the Zak phase in the Rice-Mele model. We reconstruct the underlying probability distribution by maximizing the information entropy and applying the moments as constraints. When the Wannier functions are localized within one unit cell, the probability distribution so obtained corresponds to that of the Wannier function. We show that in the fully dimerized limit the magnitudes of the moments are all equal. In this limit, if the on-site interaction is decreased towards zero, the distribution shifts towards the midpoint of the unit cell, but the overall shape of the distribution remains the same. Away from this limit, if alternate hoppings are finite and the on-site interaction is decreased, the distribution also shifts towards the midpoint of the unit cell, but it does this by changing shape, by becoming asymmetric around the maximum, and by shifting. We also follow the probability distribution of the polarization in cycles around the topologically nontrivial point of the model. The distribution moves across to the next unit cell, its shape distorting considerably in the process. If the radius of the cycle is large, the shift of the distribution is accompanied by large variations in the maximum.

  14. Single and double polarization asymmetries from deeply virtual π0 production with a longitudinally polarized proton target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Andrey; CLAS Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    Deeply virtual exclusive reactions such as π0 meson production with large γ virtuality Q2 offer an opportunity to explore the nucleon structure and access information about quark position and angular momentum distributionsin nucleon, as described in terms of the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). Cross-section measurements of π0 production recently have been carried out at Jefferson Lab in the DIS regime. Measurements of polarization observables provide additional information of the production mechanism due to interference effects. Preliminary results will be discussed on single and double polarization asymmetries from data recently obtained using the highly polarized CEBAF electron beam, a longitudinally polarized NH3 target, and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) equipped with a high granularity electromagnetic calorimeter. The asymmetries are highly sensitive to the different kinematics covered in the measurement. Preliminary results for different Q2, xB and t ranges will be presented.

  15. Experimental Demonstration of Polarization Encoding Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhiyuan; Liao, Zhongfa; Xu, Feihu; Qi, Bing; Qian, Li; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate the first implementation of polarization encoding measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), which is immune to all detector side-channel attacks. Active phase randomization of each individual pulse is implemented to protect against attacks on imperfect sources. By optimizing the parameters in the decoy state protocol, we show that it is feasible to implement polarization encoding MDI-QKD with commercial off-the-shelf devices. A rigorous finite key analysis is applied to estimate the secure key rate. Our work paves the way for the realization of a MDI-QKD network, in which the users only need compact and low-cost state-preparation devices and can share complicated and expensive detectors provided by an untrusted network server.

  16. The Polarized Distribution of Na+,K+-ATPase: Role of the Interaction between β Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Benavides, Teresita; Roldán, María L.; Larre, Isabel; Flores-Benitez, David; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolas; Contreras, Ruben G.; Cereijido, Marcelino

    2010-01-01

    The very existence of higher metazoans depends on the vectorial transport of substances across epithelia. A crucial element of this transport is the membrane enzyme Na+,K+-ATPase. Not only is this enzyme distributed in a polarized manner in a restricted domain of the plasma membrane but also it creates the ionic gradients that drive the net movement of glucose, amino acids, and ions across the entire epithelium. In a previous work, we have shown that Na+,K+-ATPase polarity depends on interactions between the β subunits of Na+,K+-ATPases located on neighboring cells and that these interactions anchor the entire enzyme at the borders of the intercellular space. In the present study, we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer and coprecipitation methods to demonstrate that these β subunits have sufficient proximity and affinity to permit a direct interaction, without requiring any additional extracellular molecules to span the distance. PMID:20444976

  17. Robust spatial-polarization hyperentanglement distribution of two-photon systems against collective noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Cheng-Yan; Wang, Guan-Yu; Alzahrani, Faris; Hobiny, Aatef; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2017-03-01

    Hyperentanglement is a significant resource for high-capacity quantum communication. Here we present a robust spatial-polarization hyperentanglement distribution scheme for two-photon systems. The error on the polarization states of two-photon systems transmitted from two paths can be corrected resorting to the robust time-bin entanglement which suffers little from the channel noise. The spatial bit-flip error takes place with a very small probability and the spatial phase-flip error can be precluded by adjusting the path-length of spatial modes. Using this scheme, the two parties in quantum communication can share a maximally hyperentangled state of two-photon systems in a deterministic way, which will improve the efficiency of quantum communication largely.

  18. Polarization Imaging over Sea Surface - A Method for Measurements of Stokes Components Angular Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freda, W.; Piskozub, J.; Toczek, H.

    2015-12-01

    This article describes a method for determining the angular distribution of light polarization over a roughened surface of the sea. Our method relies on measurements of the Stokes vector elements using a polarization imaging camera that operates using the Division of Focal Plane (DoFP) method. It uses special monochrome CCD array in which the neighbouring cells, instead of recording different colours (red green and blue), are equipped with micropolarizers of four directions (0, 45, 90 and 135 degrees). We combined the camera with a fish-eye lens of Field of View (FoV) > 180 deg. Such a large FoV allowed us to crop out the fragment of the frame along the circular horizon, showing a view covering all directions of the hemisphere. Because of complicated optical design of the fish-eye lens (light refraction on surfaces of parts of the lens) connected to the sensor we checked the accuracy of the measurement system. A method to determine the accuracy of measured polarization is based on comparison of the experimentally obtained rotation matrix with its theoretical form. Such a comparison showed that the maximum error of Stokes vector elements depended on zenith angle and reached as much as 24% for light coming from just above the horizon, but decreased rapidly with decreasing zenith angle to the value of 12% for the angles 10° off the edge of FoV. Moreover we present the preliminary results prepared over rough sea surface. These results include total intensity of light, Degree of Linear Polarization (DoLP) and their standard deviations. The results have been averaged over one thousand frames of a movie. These results indicate that the maximum polarization is observed near the reflection of the sun, and the signal coming from below the surface may be observed at zenith angles far from the vertical direction.

  19. Interannual variability of monthly sea-ice distributions in the north polar region

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, C.L.

    1992-03-01

    Passive-microwave data from the Nimbus 5 and Nimbus 7 satellites have been used to determine and map, by month, the interannual variability of the spatial distribution of north polar sea ice over the period 1973-1987. Results are illustrated for the months of January and July, during the winter ice growth and summer ice decay seasons, respectively. In January, the greatest interannual variability in the distribution of the ice occurs in the Sea of Okhotsk, whereas the portions of the ice edge exhibiting the least interannual variability lie in the southern Greenland Sea and immediately to the southwest of Svalbard. In July, spatial variability is high in Hudson Bay, Baffin Bay, the southern Kara Sea, and the northern Barents Sea. The monthly maps are meant to allow ready comparison with past and future sea ice distributions and aid in the assessment of whether specific changes are climatically important.

  20. QCD CORRECTIONS TO DILEPTON PRODUCTION NEAR PARTONIC THRESHOLD IN PP SCATTERING.

    SciTech Connect

    SHIMIZU, H.; STERMAN, G.; VOGELSANG, W.; YOKOYA, H.

    2005-10-02

    We present a recent study of the QCD corrections to dilepton production near partonic threshold in transversely polarized {bar p}p scattering, We analyze the role of the higher-order perturbative QCD corrections in terms of the available fixed-order contributions as well as of all-order soft-gluon resummations for the kinematical regime of proposed experiments at GSI-FAIR. We find that perturbative corrections are large for both unpolarized and polarized cross sections, but that the spin asymmetries are stable. The role of the far infrared region of the momentum integral in the resummed exponent and the effect of the NNLL resummation are briefly discussed.

  1. The influence of subsurface flow on lake formation and north polar lake distribution on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, David G.; Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C.; Newman, Claire E.; Mitchell, Karl L.; Stiles, Bryan W.

    2016-10-01

    Observations of lakes, fluvial dissection of the surface, rapid variations in cloud cover, and lake shoreline changes indicate that Saturn's moon Titan is hydrologically active, with a hydrocarbon-based hydrological cycle dominated by liquid methane. Here we use a numerical model to investigate the Titan hydrological cycle - including surface, subsurface, and atmospheric components - in order to investigate the underlying causes of the observed distribution and sizes of lakes in the north polar region. The hydrocarbon-based hydrological cycle is modeled using a numerical subsurface flow model and analytical runoff scheme, driven by a general circulation model with an active methane-cycle. This model is run on synthetically generated topography that matches the fractal character of the observed topography, without explicit representation of the effects of erosion and deposition. At the scale of individual basins, intermediate to high permeability (10-8-10-6 cm2) aquifers are required to reproduce the observed large stable lakes. However, at the scale of the entire north polar lake district, a high permeability aquifer results in the rapid flushing of methane through the aquifer from high polar latitudes to dry lower polar latitudes, where methane is removed by evaporation, preventing large lakes from forming. In contrast, an intermediate permeability aquifer slows the subsurface flow from high polar latitudes, allowing greater lake areas. The observed distribution of lakes is best matched by either a uniform intermediate permeability aquifer, or a combination of a high permeability cap at high latitudes surrounded by an intermediate permeability aquifer at lower latitudes, as could arise due to karstic processes at the north pole. The stability of Kraken Mare further requires reduction of the evaporation rate over the sea to 1% of the value predicted by the general circulation model, likely as a result of dissolved ethane, nitrogen, or organic solutes, and/or a

  2. Visualization of the electrostatic potential distribution in both polar ionospheres using multiple satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hairston, Marc R.; Heelis, Roderick A.; Rich, Frederick J.

    1995-01-01

    During the time from December 1991 through March 1992, there were four operational DMSP satellites in polar orbit. All four satellites carried the Special Sensor-Ions, Electrons, Scintillation (SSIES) plasma package which included an ion drift meter. Data from the drift meter, combined with the magnetic field data, allowed the calculation of the electrostatic potential in the ionosphere along the satellite's path. Simultaneous polar coverage by four satellites was unprecedented, providing researchers with almost continuous monitoring of the potential distribution in both hemispheres for the four month period. Combining the magnitude and location of the potential data from each of the four satellites in order to examine the varying potential distribution pattern in both hemispheres presented a major challenge in data visualization. The problem was solved by developing a three-dimensional presentation of the data where the potentials are color coded and represented by the vertical dimension. This paper presents examples from a computer animation of several days of data demonstrating evolution of the size and shape of the potential distribution, along with how these changes correspond to variations in other geophysical parameters, such as the IMF orientation and the K(sub p) index.

  3. Distribution of the current on metallic structures with corrosion damage under nonlinear cathodic polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Galimov, A.A.; Glazov, N.P.; Ivanov, V.T.

    1985-08-01

    The protection of metallic structures from corrosion is effected by cathodic polarization and protective coatings. At sites of damage extending through the insulation an intense corrosion process, which causes the formation of corrosion pits, in which signifiant redistribution of the protective current occurs, takes place. Considered in this paper is the distribution of the current on an electrode with a corrosion pit of arbitrary shape in the example of an electrochemical system consisting of disk electrodes located in a cylindrical bath with a lateral insulator surface. The overall analysis of the numerical results points out the significant redistribution of the current on a protected metallic surface when corrosion pits appear.

  4. Pulsar magnetospheres, braking index, polar caps, and period-pulse-width distribution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. H.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the trapping of gas and its effect on the structure of the magnetic field. The aligned and orthogonal cases are discussed in detail. In each case, there are small collection zones which are both microscopically and macroscopically stable. By determining where macroscopic stability changes to instability, the separatrix between closed and open field lines is investigated together with the sizes and shapes of the polar caps. This information makes it possible to reexamine the period-pulse-width distribution and to compare it with observational data.

  5. Deeply virtual Compton scattering on longitudinally polarized protons and neutrons at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Silvia Niccolai

    2012-04-01

    This paper focuses on a measurement of deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly-6-GeV polarized electron beam, two longitudinally polarized (via DNP) solid targets of protons (NH{sub 3}) and deuterons (ND{sub 3}) and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Here, preliminary results for target-spin asymmetries and double (beam-target) asymmetries for proton DVCS, as well as a very preliminary extraction of beam-spin asymmetry for neutron DVCS, are presented and linked to Generalized Parton Distributions.

  6. Cilia distribution and polarity in the epithelial lining of the mouse middle ear cavity

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenwei; Yi, Hong; Taylor, Jeannette; Li, Jian-dong; Chi, Fanglu; Todd, N. Wendell; Lin, Xi; Ren, Dongdong; Chen, Ping

    2017-01-01

    The middle ear conducts sound to the cochlea for hearing. Otitis media (OM) is the most common illness in childhood. Moreover, chronic OM with effusion (COME) is the leading cause of conductive hearing loss. Clinically, COME is highly associated with Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia, implicating significant contributions of cilia dysfunction to COME. The understanding of middle ear cilia properties that are critical to OM susceptibility, however, is limited. Here, we confirmed the presence of a ciliated region near the Eustachian tube orifice at the ventral region of the middle ear cavity, consisting mostly of a lumen layer of multi-ciliated and a layer of Keratin-5-positive basal cells. We also found that the motile cilia are polarized coordinately and display a planar cell polarity. Surprisingly, we also found a region of multi-ciliated cells that line the posterior dorsal pole of the middle ear cavity which was previously thought to contain only non-ciliated cells. Our study provided a more complete understanding of cilia distribution and revealed for the first time coordinated polarity of cilia in the epithelium of the mammalian middle ear, thus illustrating novel structural features that are likely critical for middle ear functions and related to OM susceptibility. PMID:28358397

  7. Product polarization distribution: Stereodynamics of the reaction of atom H and radical NH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Fang; Zhai, Hong-Sheng; Gao, Ya-Li

    2008-06-01

    The product angular momentum polarization of the reaction of H+NH is calculated via the quasiclassical trajectory method (QCT) based on the extended London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato (LEPS) potential energy surface (PES) at a collision energy of 5.1 kcal/mol. The calculated results of the vector correlations are denoted by using the angular distribution functions. The polarization-dependent differential cross sections (PDDCSs) demonstrate that the rotational angular momentum of the product H2 is aligned and oriented along the direction perpendicular to the scattering plane. Vector correlation shows that the angular momentum of the product H2 is aligned in the plane perpendicular to the velocity vector. It suggests that the reaction proceeds preferentially when the reactant velocity vector lies in a plane containing all three atoms. The orientation and alignment of the product angular momentum affects the scattering direction of the product molecules. The polarization-dependent differential cross sections (PDDCSs) reveal that scattering is predominantly in the backward hemisphere.

  8. Medium Modifications of Hadron Properties and Partonic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, W. K.; Strauch, S.; Tsushima, K.

    2011-06-01

    Chiral symmetry is one of the most fundamental symmetries in QCD. It is closely connected to hadron properties in the nuclear medium via the reduction of the quark condensate , manifesting the partial restoration of chiral symmetry. To better understand this important issue, a number of Jefferson Lab experiments over the past decade have focused on understanding properties of mesons and nucleons in the nuclear medium, often benefiting from the high polarization and luminosity of the CEBAF accelerator. In particular, a novel, accurate, polarization transfer measurement technique revealed for the first time a strong indication that the bound proton electromagnetic form factors in 4He may be modified compared to those in the vacuum. Second, the photoproduction of vector mesons on various nuclei has been measured via their decay to e+e- to study possible in-medium effects on the properties of the rho meson. In this experiment, no significant mass shift and some broadening consistent with expected collisional broadening for the rho meson has been observed, providing tight constraints on model calculations. Finally, processes involving in-medium parton propagation have been studied. The medium modifications of the quark fragmentation functions have been extracted with much higher statistical accuracy than previously possible.

  9. Cloud Masking and Surface Temperature Distribution in the Polar Regions Using AVHRR and other Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Joey C.

    1995-01-01

    Surface temperature is one of the key variables associated with weather and climate. Accurate measurements of surface air temperatures are routinely made in meteorological stations around the world. Also, satellite data have been used to produce synoptic global temperature distributions. However, not much attention has been paid on temperature distributions in the polar regions. In the polar regions, the number of stations is very sparse. Because of adverse weather conditions and general inaccessibility, surface field measurements are also limited. Furthermore, accurate retrievals from satellite data in the region have been difficult to make because of persistent cloudiness and ambiguities in the discrimination of clouds from snow or ice. Surface temperature observations are required in the polar regions for air-sea-ice interaction studies, especially in the calculation of heat, salinity, and humidity fluxes. They are also useful in identifying areas of melt or meltponding within the sea ice pack and the ice sheets and in the calculation of emissivities of these surfaces. Moreover, the polar regions are unique in that they are the sites of temperature extremes, the location of which is difficult to identify without a global monitoring system. Furthermore, the regions may provide an early signal to a potential climate change because such signal is expected to be amplified in the region due to feedback effects. In cloud free areas, the thermal channels from infrared systems provide surface temperatures at relatively good accuracies. Previous capabilities include the use of the Temperature Humidity Infrared Radiometer (THIR) onboard the Nimbus-7 satellite which was launched in 1978. Current capabilities include the use of the Advance Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aboard NOAA satellites. Together, these two systems cover a span of 16 years of thermal infrared data. Techniques for retrieving surface temperatures with these sensors in the polar regions have

  10. Actively switchable nondegenerate polarization-entangled photon-pair distribution in dense wave-division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Jiang, Yun-Kun; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2013-04-01

    We have demonstrated experimentally a nondegenerate polarization-entangled photon-pair distribution in a commercial telecom dense wave-division multiplexing device (DWDM) with eight channels. A promising point of this experiment is that an entangled photon pair is obtained via spontaneous parametric down conversion in a single type-II periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal without postselection. Another promising advantage is that we can actively switch the distribution of the photon pair between different channel pairs in DWDM at will. There is no crosstalk between different channel pairs because of a limited emission bandwidth of the source. Maximum raw visibility of 97.88%±0.86% obtained in a Bell-type interference experiment and a Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality S parameter of 2.63±0.08 calculated prove high entanglement of our source. Our work is helpful for building quantum communication networks.

  11. Precision Measurement of the Longitudinal Double-Spin Asymmetry for Inclusive Jet Production in Polarized Proton Collisions at sqrt[s]=200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cudd, A B; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-08-28

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, A_{LL}, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy sqrt[s]=200  GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. The measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x>0.05.

  12. Precision measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-26

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 200 GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. Lastly, the measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x > 0.05 .

  13. Precision measurement of the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry for inclusive jet production in polarized proton collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-26

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, ALL, in polarized pp collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 200 GeV. The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC pp data. Lastly, the measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x > 0.05 .

  14. Precision Measurement of the Longitudinal Double-Spin Asymmetry for Inclusive Jet Production in Polarized Proton Collisions at √{s }=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cudd, A. B.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We report a new measurement of the midrapidity inclusive jet longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, AL L, in polarized p p collisions at center-of-mass energy √{s }=200 GeV . The STAR data place stringent constraints on polarized parton distribution functions extracted at next-to-leading order from global analyses of inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS), semi-inclusive DIS, and RHIC p p data. The measured asymmetries provide evidence at the 3 σ level for positive gluon polarization in the Bjorken-x region x >0.05 .

  15. Theoretical estimate on tensor-polarization asymmetry in proton-deuteron Drell-Yan process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumano, S.; Song, Qin-Tao

    2016-09-01

    Tensor-polarized parton distribution functions are new quantities in spin-1 hadrons such as the deuteron, and they could probe new quark-gluon dynamics in hadron and nuclear physics. In charged-lepton deep inelastic scattering, they are studied by the twist-2 structure functions b1 and b2. The HERMES Collaboration found unexpectedly large b1 values compared to a naive theoretical expectation based on the standard deuteron model. The situation should be significantly improved in the near future by an approved experiment to measure b1 at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). There is also an interesting indication in the HERMES result that finite antiquark tensor polarization exists. It could play an important role in solving a mechanism on tensor structure in the quark-gluon level. The tensor-polarized antiquark distributions are not easily determined from the charged-lepton deep inelastic scattering; however, they can be measured in a proton-deuteron Drell-Yan process with a tensor-polarized deuteron target. In this article, we estimate the tensor-polarization asymmetry for a possible Fermilab Main-Injector experiment by using optimum tensor-polarized parton distribution functions to explain the HERMES measurement. We find that the asymmetry is typically a few percent. If it is measured, it could probe new hadron physics, and such studies could create an interesting field of high-energy spin physics. In addition, we find that a significant tensor-polarized gluon distribution should exist due to Q2 evolution, even if it were zero at a low Q2 scale. The tensor-polarized gluon distribution has never been observed, so it is an interesting future project.

  16. Can the triple-parton scattering be observed in open charm meson production at the LHC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciuła, Rafał; Szczurek, Antoni

    2017-09-01

    We investigate whether the triple-parton scattering effects can be observed in open charm production in proton-proton collisions at the LHC. We use so-called factorized Ansatz for calculations of hard multiple-parton interactions. The numerical results for each parton interaction are obtained within the kT-factorization approach. Predictions for one, two and three c c bar pairs production are given for √{ s} = 7 TeV and √{ s} = 13 TeV. Quite large cross sections, of the order of milibarns, for the triple-parton scattering mechanism are obtained. We suggest a measurement of three D0 or three D0 bar mesons by the LHCb Collaboration. Confronting our results with recent LHCb experimental data for single and double D0 (or D0 bar) meson production we present our predictions for triple meson final state: D0D0D0 or D0 bar D0 bar D0 bar . We present cross sections for the LHCb fiducial volume as well as distributions for D0 meson transverse momentum and three-D0 meson invariant mass. The predicted visible cross sections, including the detector acceptance, hadronization effects and c →D0 branching fraction, is of the order of a few nanobarns. The counting rates including D0 →K-π+ branching fractions are given for known or expected integrated luminosities.

  17. Parallel aligned liquid crystal on silicon display based optical set-up for the generation of polarization spatial distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estévez, Irene; Lizana, Angel; Zheng, Xuejie; Peinado, Alba; Ramírez, Claudio; Martínez, Jose Luis; Márquez, Andrés.; Moreno, Ignacio; Campos, Juan

    2015-06-01

    Liquid Crystals on Silicon (LCOS) displays are a type of LCDs that work in reflection. Such devices, due to the double pass that the light beam performs through the LC cells, lead to larger phase modulation than transmissive LCDs with the same thickness. By taking advantage of this modulation capability exhibited by LCOS displays, we propose a new experimental set-up which is able to provide customized state of polarization spatial distributions just by means of a single LCOS display. To this aim, a double reflection on different halves of the display is properly performed. This fact is achieved by including a compact optical system that steers the light and performs a proper polarization plane rotation. The set-up has been experimentally implemented and some experimental concerns are discussed. The suitability of the system is provided by generating different experimental spatial distributions of polarization. In this regard, well-known polarization distributions, as axial, azimuthal or spiral linear polarization patterns are here provided. Based on the excellent results obtained, the suitability of the system to generate different spatially variant distributions of polarization is validated.

  18. Why do sand furrow distributions vary in the North Polar latitudes on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Mary; McGaley-Towle, Zoe

    2014-05-01

    Sand dunes on Mars display geomorphic evidence of an active and dynamic sediment flux. Barchan dunes migrate, ripples move and the slipface morphology changes annually. Aeolian sediment transport is seasonally constrained and linked to cryogenic processes. Sand furrows are geomorphic features that are eroded into the surface of dunes. They form during sublimation of the seasonal carbon dioxide deposit which moves gas and sand through vents in the ice (cryo-venting) (Bourke, 2013). They are visible on the surface of dunes using the highest resolution images available for Mars. Previous work has noted that the distribution of furrows varies spatially both on individual dunes and at different Polar locations. Here we report on the preliminary findings of a mapping project that seeks to confirm this previous qualitative observation. In addition, we aim to explain the observed spatial and temporal variation in sand furrows on North Polar dunes. Ten polar sites that reflect a latitudinal range of 9.5º are being analysed. The HiRISE images were acquired between 16/2/2012 and 31/05/2012, over a period of 105 Earth days or 102 Sols. We have completed mapping of 1711 sand furrows in an 84 km2 area of sand dunes, i.e. at four of the ten sites. The data confirm that there is variability in the distribution of sand furrows in the Polar Region. While data from all ten sites will be required to fully test the assertion of a latitudinal control, it is worth noting that the two most northerly sites have a significantly higher density of furrows compared to the two lower latitude sites. As the seasonal ice thickness is known to increases pole-ward on Mars, our data suggest that effective furrow formation may be linked to ice deposit thickness. In particular, it suggests that a threshold in ice thickness must be crossed in order for effective cryo-venting to occur. Bourke, M.C., 2013. Sand Furrows: A new surface feature on Martian dunes, EGU, EGU2013-11859, Vienna.

  19. Excited nucleon as a van der Waals system of partons

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkovszky, L. L.; Muskeyev, A. O. Yezhov, S. N.

    2012-06-15

    Saturation in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) and deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) is associated with a phase transition between the partonic gas, typical of moderate x and Q{sup 2}, and partonic fluid appearing at increasing Q{sup 2} and decreasing Bjorken x. We suggest the van der Waals equation of state to describe properly this phase transition.

  20. Spatial distribution of spin polarization in a channel on the surface of a topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoying; Shao, Huaihua; Liu, Yiman; Tang, Dongsheng; Zhou, Guanghui

    2012-05-09

    We study the spatial distribution of electron spin polarization for a gate-controlled T-shaped channel on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (3D TI). We demonstrate that an energy gap depending on channel geometry parameters is definitely opened due to the spatial confinement. Spin surface locking in momentum space for a uniform wide channel with Hamiltonian linearity in the wavevector is still kept, but it is broken with Hamiltonian nonlinearity in the wavevector, like that for two-dimensional surface states widely studied in the literature. However, the spin surface locking for a T-shaped channel is broken even with Hamiltonian linearity in the wavevector. Interestingly, the magnitude and direction of the in-plane spin polarization are spatially dependent in all regions due to the breaking of translational symmetry of the T-shaped channel system. These interesting findings for an electrically controlled nanostructure based on the 3D TI surface may be testable with the present experimental technique, and may provide further understanding the nature of 3D TI surface states.

  1. Simulation of particle size distributions in Polar Mesospheric Clouds from Microphysical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, G. E.; Merkel, A.; Bardeen, C.; Rusch, D. W.; Lumpe, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    The size distribution of ice particles is perhaps the most important observable aspect of microphysical processes in Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) formation and evolution. A conventional technique to derive such information is from optical observation of scattering, either passive solar scattering from photometric or spectrometric techniques, or active backscattering by lidar. We present simulated size distributions from two state-of-the-art models using CARMA sectional microphysics: WACCM/CARMA, in which CARMA is interactively coupled with WACCM3 (Bardeen et al, 2009), and stand-alone CARMA forced by WACCM3 meteorology (Merkel et al, this meeting). Both models provide well-resolved size distributions of ice particles as a function of height, location and time for realistic high-latitude summertime conditions. In this paper we present calculations of the UV scattered brightness at multiple scattering angles as viewed by the AIM Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) satellite experiment. These simulations are then considered discretely-sampled “data” for the scattering phase function, which are inverted using a technique (Lumpe et al, this meeting) to retrieve particle size information. We employ a T-matrix scattering code which applies to a wide range of non-sphericity of the ice particles, using the conventional idealized prolate/oblate spheroidal shape. This end-to-end test of the relatively new scattering phase function technique provides insight into both the retrieval accuracy and the information content in passive remote sensing of PMC.

  2. Large-momentum distribution of a polarized Fermi gas and p -wave contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shi-Guo; Liu, Xia-Ji; Hu, Hui

    2016-12-01

    We present a derivation of the adiabatic energy relations as well as the large momentum distribution of a polarized Fermi gas near p -wave Feshbach resonances. The leading asymptotic behavior k-2 and subleading behavior k-4 of the large momentum distribution have recently been predicted by Z. Yu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 135304 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.135304] and by M. Y. He et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 045301 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.045301] using two different approaches. Here, we show that the subleading asymptotic behavior (˜k-4 ) cannot fully be captured by the contact defined from the adiabatic energy relation related to the p -wave effective range, and there should be an extra term resulting from the center-of-mass motion of the pairs. The omission of this extra term is perhaps a reasonable approximation at zero temperature. However, it should be taken into account at finite temperature and should have significant importance to understand the recently measured momentum distribution in a resonant p -wave Fermi gas of ultracold 40K atoms [C. Luciuk et al., Nat. Phys. 12, 599 (2016), 10.1038/nphys3670].

  3. Polarization in the land distribution, land use and land cover change in the Amazon

    PubMed Central

    D'ANTONA, Alvaro; VANWEY, Leah; LUDEWIGS, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this article is to present Polarization of Agrarian Structure as a single, more complete representation than models emphasizing rural exodus and consolidation of land into large agropastoral enterprises of the dynamics of changing land distribution, land use / cover, and thus the rural milieu of Amazonia. Data were collected in 2003 using social surveys on a sample of 587 lots randomly selected from among 5,086 lots on a cadastral map produced in the 1970s. Georeferencing of current property boundaries in the location of these previously demarcated lots allows us to relate sociodemographic and biophysical variables of the surveyed properties to the changes in boundaries that have occurred since the 1970s. As have other authors in other Amazonian regions, we found concentration of land ownership into larger properties. The approach we took, however, showed that changes in the distribution of land ownership is not limited to the appearance of larger properties, those with 200 ha or more; there also exists substantial division of earlier lots into properties with fewer than five hectares, many without any agropastoral use. These two trends are juxtaposed against the decline in establishments with between five and 200 ha. The variation across groups in land use / land cover and population distribution shows the necessity of developing conceptual models, whether from socioeconomic, demographic or environmental perspectives, look beyond a single group of people or properties. PMID:24639597

  4. The Distribution of Ozone in the Early Stages of Polar Vortex Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Newman, P. A.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Bevilacqua, R.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Previous analysis has shown that the distribution of O3 at high northern latitudes in the lower-to-middle stratosphere at the beginning of the winter season, 1999-2000 has a characteristic distribution, which is consistent between in situ and satellite measurements [Kawa et al., The Interaction Between Dynamics and Chemistry of Ozone in the Set-up Phase of the Northern Hemisphere Polar Vortex, submitted manuscript, 2001 ]. Initial O3 profiles in the vortex are similar to each other and are quite different from outside the vortex at the same latitude and also from a zonal mean climatology. In the vortex, O3 is nearly constant from 500 to above 800 K with a value at 3 ppmv +/- approx.10%. Values outside the vortex are up to a factor of 2 higher and increase significantly with potential temperature. The seasonal time series of POAM data shows that relatively low O3 mixing ratios, which characterize the vortex in late fall, are already present at high latitudes at the end of summer in September before the vortex circulation sets up. This suggests a possible feedback role between O3 chemistry and the formation of the vortex, which is dominated by the seasonal radiation balance. Here we show that these characteristic O3 distributions are consistent from year to year and between the hemispheres. We will attempt to determine whether variations in fall vortex O3 are related in any way to O3 abundances and vortex structure later during winter and into spring.

  5. Narrowing of the Overhauser field distribution by feedback-enhanced dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenberg, S.; McNeil, R. P. G.; Rubbert, S.; Bluhm, H.

    2015-11-01

    In many electron spin qubit systems coherent control is impaired by the fluctuating nuclear spin bath of the host material. Previous experiments have shown dynamic nuclear polarization with feedback to significantly prolong the inhomogeneous dephasing time T2* by narrowing the distribution of nuclear Overhauser field fluctuations. We present a model relating the achievable narrowing of the Overhauser field to both the pump rate and the noise magnitude and find reasonable agreement with experimental data. It shows that former experiments on gated GaAs quantum dots were limited by the pump rate of the pumping mechanism used. Here we propose an alternative feedback scheme using electron dipole spin resonance. Sequentially applying two ac electric fields with frequencies slightly detuned from the desired Larmor frequency results in a pump curve with a stable fixed point. Our model predicts that T2* values on the order of microseconds can be achieved.

  6. Implementation of polarization-coded free-space BB84 quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.-S.; Jeong, Y.-C.; Kim, Y.-H.

    2008-06-01

    We report on the implementation of a Bennett-Brassard 1984 quantum key distribution protocol over a free-space optical path on an optical table. Attenuated laser pulses and Pockels cells driven by a pseudorandom number generator are employed to prepare polarization-encoded photons. The sifted key generation rate of 23.6 kbits per second and the quantum bit error rate (QBER) of 3% have been demonstrated at the average photon number per pulse μ = 0.16. This QBER is sufficiently low to extract final secret keys from shared sifted keys via error correction and privacy amplification. We also tested the long-distance capability of our system by adding optical losses to the quantum channel and found that the QBER remains the same regardless of the loss.

  7. Integrating the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation in polar coordinates: Application of the distributed approximating functional approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.S.; Wei, G.W.; Kouri, D.J. ); Hoffman, D.K. ); Gorman, M.; Palacios, A. ); Gunaratne, G.H. The Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy )

    1999-09-01

    An algorithm is presented to integrate nonlinear partial differential equations, which is particularly useful when accurate estimation of spatial derivatives is required. It is based on an analytic approximation method, referred to as distributed approximating functionals (DAF[close quote]s), which can be used to estimate a function and a finite number of derivatives with a specified accuracy. As an application, the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky (KS) equation is integrated in polar coordinates. Its integration requires accurate estimation of spatial derivatives, particularly close to the origin. Several stationary and nonstationary solutions of the KS equation are presented, and compared with analogous states observed in the combustion front of a circular burner. A two-ring, nonuniform counter-rotating state has been obtained in a KS model simulation of such a burner. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  8. Dynamics of hot and dense nuclear and partonic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Cassing, W.; Linnyk, O.; Konchakovski, V. P.; Voronyuk, V.; Ozvenchuk, V.

    2012-06-15

    The dynamics of hot and dense nuclear matter is discussed from the microscopic transport point of view. The basic concepts of the Hadron-String-Dynamical transport model (HSD)-derived from Kadanoff-Baym equations in phase phase-are presented as well as 'highlights' of HSD results for different observables in heavy-ion collisions from 100 A MeV (SIS) to 21 A TeV(RHIC) energies. Furthermore, a novel extension of the HSD model for the description of the partonic phase-the Parton-Hadron-String-Dynamics (PHSD) approach-is introduced. PHSD includes a nontrivial partonic equation of state-in line with lattice QCD-as well as covariant transition rates from partonic to hadronic degrees of freedom. The sensitivity of hadronic observables to the partonic phase is demonstrated for relativistic heavy-ion collisions from the FAIR/NICA up to the RHIC energy regime.

  9. Angular distribution of polarized light and its effect on light extraction efficiency in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinjuan; Ji, Cheng; Xiang, Yong; Kang, Xiangning; Shen, Bo; Yu, Tongjun

    2016-05-16

    Angular distribution of polarized light and its effect on light extraction efficiency (LEE) in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet (DUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated in this paper. A united picture is presented to describe polarized light's emission and propagation processes. It is found that the electron-hole recombinations in AlGaN multiple quantum wells produce three kinds of angularly distributed polarized emissions and propagation process can change their intensity distributions. By investigation the change of angular distributions in 277nm and 215nm LEDs, this work reveals that LEE can be significantly enhanced by modulating the angular distributions of polarized light of DUV LEDs.

  10. Eleven-Week Preparation Involving Polarized Intensity Distribution Is Not Superior to Pyramidal Distribution in National Elite Rowers.

    PubMed

    Treff, Gunnar; Winkert, Kay; Sareban, Mahdi; Steinacker, Jürgen M; Becker, Martin; Sperlich, Billy

    2017-01-01

    Polarized (POL) training intensity distribution (TID) emphasizes high-volume low-intensity exercise in zone (Z)1 (< first lactate threshold) with a greater proportion of high-intensity Z3 (>second lactate threshold) compared to Z2 (between first and second lactate threshold). In highly trained rowers there is a lack of prospective controlled evidence whether POL is superior to pyramidal (PYR; i.e., greater volume in Z1 vs. Z2 vs. Z3) TID. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of POL vs. PYR TID in rowers during an 11-wk preparation period. Fourteen national elite male rowers participated (age: 20 ± 2 years, maximal oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]O2max): 66 ± 5 mL/min/kg). The sample was split into PYR and POL by varying the percentage spent in Z2 and Z3 while Z1 was clamped to ~93% and matched for total and rowing volume. Actual TIDs were based on time within heart rate zones (Z1 and Z2) and duration of Z3-intervals. The main outcome variables were average power in 2,000 m ergometer-test (P2,000 m), power associated with 4 mmol/L [blood lactate] (P4[BLa]), and [Formula: see text]O2max. To quantify the level of polarization, we calculated a Polarization-Index as log (%Z1 × %Z3 / %Z2). PYR and POL did not significantly differ regarding rowing or total volume, but POL had a higher percentage of Z3 intensities (6 ± 3 vs. 2 ± 1%; p < 0.005) while Z2 was lower (1 ± 1 vs. 3 ± 2%; p < 0.05) and Z1 was similar (94 ± 3 vs. 93 ± 2%, p = 0.37). Consequently, Polarization-Index was significantly higher in POL (3.0 ± 0.7 vs. 1.9 ± 0.4 a.u.; p < 0.01). P2,000 m did not significantly change with PYR (1.5 ± 1.7%, p = 0.06) nor POL (1.5 ± 2.6%, p = 0.26). [Formula: see text]2max did not change (1.7 ± 5.6%, p = 0.52 or 0.6 ± 2.6, p = 0.67) and a small increase in P4[BLa] was observed in PYR only (1.9 ± 4.8%, p = 0.37 or -0.5 ± 4.1%, p = 0.77). Changes from pre to post were not significantly different between groups in any performance measure. POL did not

  11. Eleven-Week Preparation Involving Polarized Intensity Distribution Is Not Superior to Pyramidal Distribution in National Elite Rowers

    PubMed Central

    Treff, Gunnar; Winkert, Kay; Sareban, Mahdi; Steinacker, Jürgen M.; Becker, Martin; Sperlich, Billy

    2017-01-01

    Polarized (POL) training intensity distribution (TID) emphasizes high-volume low-intensity exercise in zone (Z)1 (< first lactate threshold) with a greater proportion of high-intensity Z3 (>second lactate threshold) compared to Z2 (between first and second lactate threshold). In highly trained rowers there is a lack of prospective controlled evidence whether POL is superior to pyramidal (PYR; i.e., greater volume in Z1 vs. Z2 vs. Z3) TID. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of POL vs. PYR TID in rowers during an 11-wk preparation period. Fourteen national elite male rowers participated (age: 20 ± 2 years, maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max): 66 ± 5 mL/min/kg). The sample was split into PYR and POL by varying the percentage spent in Z2 and Z3 while Z1 was clamped to ~93% and matched for total and rowing volume. Actual TIDs were based on time within heart rate zones (Z1 and Z2) and duration of Z3-intervals. The main outcome variables were average power in 2,000 m ergometer-test (P2,000 m), power associated with 4 mmol/L [blood lactate] (P4[BLa]), and V˙O2max. To quantify the level of polarization, we calculated a Polarization-Index as log (%Z1 × %Z3 / %Z2). PYR and POL did not significantly differ regarding rowing or total volume, but POL had a higher percentage of Z3 intensities (6 ± 3 vs. 2 ± 1%; p < 0.005) while Z2 was lower (1 ± 1 vs. 3 ± 2%; p < 0.05) and Z1 was similar (94 ± 3 vs. 93 ± 2%, p = 0.37). Consequently, Polarization-Index was significantly higher in POL (3.0 ± 0.7 vs. 1.9 ± 0.4 a.u.; p < 0.01). P2,000 m did not significantly change with PYR (1.5 ± 1.7%, p = 0.06) nor POL (1.5 ± 2.6%, p = 0.26). V˙O2max did not change (1.7 ± 5.6%, p = 0.52 or 0.6 ± 2.6, p = 0.67) and a small increase in P4[BLa] was observed in PYR only (1.9 ± 4.8%, p = 0.37 or −0.5 ± 4.1%, p = 0.77). Changes from pre to post were not significantly different between groups in any performance measure. POL did not prove to be superior to PYR, possibly due to

  12. Polarized 3He target and Final State Interactions in SiDIS

    DOE PAGES

    Del Dotto, Alessio; Kaptari, Leonid; Pace, Emanuele; ...

    2017-01-03

    Jefferson Lab is starting a wide experimental program aimed at studying the neutron’s structure, with a great emphasis on the extraction of the parton transverse-momentum distributions (TMDs). To this end, Semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SiDIS) experiments on polarized $^3$He will be carried out, providing, together with proton and deuteron data, a sound flavor decomposition of the TMDs. Here, given the expected high statistical accuracy, it is crucial to disentangle nuclear and partonic degrees of freedom to get an accurate theoretical description of both initial and final states. In this contribution, a preliminary study of the Final State Interaction (FSI) in themore » standard SiDIS, where a pion (or a Kaon) is detected in the final state is presented, in view of constructing a realistic description of the nuclear initial and final states.« less

  13. Polarized ^{\\varvec{3}}He Target and Final State Interactions in SiDIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Dotto, Alessio; Kaptari, Leonid; Pace, Emanuele; Salmè, Giovanni; Scopetta, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Jefferson Lab is starting a wide experimental program aimed at studying the neutron's structure, with a great emphasis on the extraction of the parton transverse-momentum distributions (TMDs). To this end, Semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SiDIS) experiments on polarized ^3He will be carried out, providing, together with proton and deuteron data, a sound flavor decomposition of the TMDs. Given the expected high statistical accuracy, it is crucial to disentangle nuclear and partonic degrees of freedom to get an accurate theoretical description of both initial and final states. In this contribution, a preliminary study of the Final State Interaction (FSI) in the standard SiDIS, where a pion (or a Kaon) is detected in the final state is presented, in view of constructing a realistic description of the nuclear initial and final states.

  14. Polarization Ray Tracing Calculation of Polarized Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (pBRDF) of Microfaceted Surfaces to Investigate Multiple Reflection Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, C. L.; Kupinski, M.; Xu, F.; Diner, D. J.; Chipman, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing algorithms for aerosol retrieval rely on surface reflectance models for the extraction of path radiance of aerosol scattering in top of atmosphere measurements. A well-defined surface boundary condition is necessary due to the variability in the surface albedo and bidirectional reflectance distribution function. Polarization measurements can help constrain the surface model. Prior work features polarization measurements taken by Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Ground-based Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (GroundMSPI). This work has shown that an analytical model that assumes singly reflected light from a rough surface comprised of microfacets sufficiently represents the polarized reflectance of natural surfaces (such as grass), but is less successful for manmade objects. For the linear Stokes parameters (I, Q, U), a single reflection of unpolarized light will result in a null U Stokes parameter relative to the scattering plane. However, some GroundMSPI measurements exhibit a non-zero U Stokes parameter. We show that multiple reflections may be a cause for this discrepancy by using a polarization ray trace (PRT) routine to calculate the polarized Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (pBRDF) for a microfaceted surface. While the effect of multiple reflections, particularly for double reflections, is an order of magnitude smaller compared to single reflections, we show non-zero U Stokes parameters generated from multiple reflections. Furthermore, we have found that for illumination-view geometries with scattering angles less than ~45 degrees, Q and U parameters can have similar magnitude. We report on the magnitude of this effect and compare the PRT simulations to non-zero U measurements from GroundMSPI.

  15. Bipolar Plasma Membrane Distribution of Phosphoinositides and Their Requirement for Auxin-Mediated Cell Polarity and Patterning in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tejos, Ricardo; Sauer, Michael; Vanneste, Steffen; Palacios-Gomez, Miriam; Li, Hongjiang; Heilmann, Mareike; van Wijk, Ringo; Vermeer, Joop E M; Heilmann, Ingo; Munnik, Teun; Friml, Jiří

    2014-05-01

    Cell polarity manifested by asymmetric distribution of cargoes, such as receptors and transporters, within the plasma membrane (PM) is crucial for essential functions in multicellular organisms. In plants, cell polarity (re)establishment is intimately linked to patterning processes. Despite the importance of cell polarity, its underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown, including the definition and distinctiveness of the polar domains within the PM. Here, we show in Arabidopsis thaliana that the signaling membrane components, the phosphoinositides phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] as well as PtdIns4P 5-kinases mediating their interconversion, are specifically enriched at apical and basal polar plasma membrane domains. The PtdIns4P 5-kinases PIP5K1 and PIP5K2 are redundantly required for polar localization of specifically apical and basal cargoes, such as PIN-FORMED transporters for the plant hormone auxin. As a consequence of the polarity defects, instructive auxin gradients as well as embryonic and postembryonic patterning are severely compromised. Furthermore, auxin itself regulates PIP5K transcription and PtdIns4P and PtdIns(4,5)P2 levels, in particular their association with polar PM domains. Our results provide insight into the polar domain-delineating mechanisms in plant cells that depend on apical and basal distribution of membrane lipids and are essential for embryonic and postembryonic patterning. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  16. The analysis of space-time structure in QCD vacuum II: Dynamics of polarization and absolute X-distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandru, Andrei; Draper, Terrence; Horvath, Ivan; Streuer, Thomas

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > We propose a method to compute the polarization for a multi-dimensional random distribution. > We apply the method to the eigenemodes of the Dirac operator in pure glue QCD. > We compute the chiral polarization for these modes and study its scale dependence. > We find that in a finite volume there is a scale where the polarization tendency changes. > We study the continuum limit of this chiral polarization scale. - Abstract: We propose a framework for quantitative evaluation of dynamical tendency for polarization in an arbitrary random variable that can be decomposed into a pair of orthogonal subspaces. The method uses measures based on comparisons of given dynamics to its counterpart with statistically independent components. The formalism of previously considered X-distributions is used to express the aforementioned comparisons, in effect putting the former approach on solid footing. Our analysis leads to the definition of a suitable correlation coefficient with clear statistical meaning. We apply the method to the dynamics induced by pure-glue lattice QCD in local left-right components of overlap Dirac eigenmodes. It is found that, in finite physical volume, there exists a non-zero physical scale in the spectrum of eigenvalues such that eigenmodes at smaller (fixed) eigenvalues exhibit convex X-distribution (positive correlation), while at larger eigenvalues the distribution is concave (negative correlation). This chiral polarization scale thus separates a regime where dynamics enhances chirality relative to statistical independence from a regime where it suppresses it, and gives an objective definition to the notion of 'low' and 'high' Dirac eigenmode. We propose to investigate whether the polarization scale remains non-zero in the infinite volume limit, in which case it would represent a new kind of low energy scale in QCD.

  17. Polar-Region Distributions of Poynting Flux: Global Models Compared With Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melanson, P. D.; Lotko, W.; Murr, D.; Gagne, J. R.; Wiltberger, M.; Lyon, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    Low-altitude distributions of electric potential, field-aligned current and Poynting flux derived from the Lyon- Fedder-Mobarry global simulation model of the magnetosphere are compared with distributions derived from SuperDARN, the Iridium satellite constellation, and the Weimer 2005 empirical model for a one-hour interval (1400-1500 UT) on 23 November 1999 during which the interplanetary magnetic field was steady and southward. Synthetic measurements along a pseudo-satellite track are also obtained from each distribution and compared with measurements from the DMSP F13 satellite. Previous studies of the event are supplemented here with updated simulation results for the electric potential and field-aligned currents, new simulation diagnostics for the Poynting flux incident on the ionosphere, and comparisons of observational and simulation results with the Weimer empirical model. The location and extent of the simulated Poynting fluxes that occur in the afternoon sector, between the Region-1 and 2 currents, are consistent with the observed and empirically modeled locations, but the magnitudes exhibit significant differences (locally up to ~100% both higher and lower). Elsewhere, the distribution of simulated fluxes more closely resembles the empirically modeled values than the observed ones and in general is greater in magnitude by about 100%. Additionally, the fraction of simulated Poynting flux that flow into the polar cap region (above 75 deg) is about one third of the total flowing into the ionosphere above 60 deg; a similar value is found for both the observed and the empirically modeled fluxes. The effect of including the parallel potential drop in the self-consistent mapping of electric potential between the ionosphere and inner boundary of the simulation domain is also examined. Globally the effect is small (< 5%); however, in regions where the field-aligned potential drop is appreciable, local changes of 100% or more are found in the magnitude of the

  18. New insight on the Sivers transverse momentum dependent distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    M. Anselmino, M. Boglione, U. D'Alesio, S. Melis, F. Murgia, A. Prokudin

    2011-05-01

    Polarised Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) processes allow to study Transverse Momentum Dependent partonic distributions (TMDs), which reveal a non trivial three dimensional internal structure of the hadrons in momentum space. One of the most representative of the TMDs is the so-called Sivers function that describes the distribution of unpolarized quarks inside a transversely polarized proton. We present a novel extraction of the Sivers distribution functions from the most recent experimental data of HERMES and COMPASS experiments. Using suitable parametrizations, within the TMD factorization scheme, and a simple fitting strategy, we also perform a preliminary exploration of the role of the proton sea quarks.

  19. Photoelectron momentum distributions of molecules in bichromatic circularly polarized attosecond UV laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D.

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically investigate molecular photoelectron momentum distributions (MPMDs) by bichromatic [frequencies (ω1,ω2)] circularly polarized attosecond UV laser pulses. Simulations performed on aligned single-electron H2+ by numerically solving the corresponding three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation within a static nucleus frame show that MPMDs exhibit a spiral structure for both co-rotating and counter-rotating schemes. Results are analyzed by attosecond perturbation ionization models. Coherent electron wave packets created, respectively, by the two color pulses in the continuum interfere with each other. Photoionization distributions are functions of the photoelectron momentum p and the ejection angle θ , thus leading to spiral MPMDs. The dependence of spiral MPMDs on the time delay between the bicircular pulses and their relative phases is also presented. The spiral interference patterns are determined by the helicities and frequencies (ω1,ω2 ) of the bicircular fields. It is also found that the spiral patterns are sensitive to the molecular alignment and suppressed by two-center ionization interference, thus offering new tools for imaging molecular geometry.

  20. Float genetic algorithm for determination of particle size distribution and refractive index in polarized LSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yong; Hu, Rui; Luo, Qingming; Lu, Qiang

    2005-04-01

    Polarized light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) is sensitive to the cell nuclear morphological changes in the various forms of epithelial dysplasia. Extensive studies illustrate it is a promising in situ technique to detect precancerous and early cancerous changes in the epithelial tissue. To determine the density and size distribution of cell nuclei with spectra, generally, Mie theory-based inverse model is adopted. This model is of multiple parameters, multiple extreme values and nonlinear. The determination of all unknown parameters needs to solve a nonlinear inverse problem. Other than least-square fitting used by previous studies, in this paper, we developed a novel method - float genetic algorithm (FGA) to determine the particle size distribution and refractive index for LSS. Our results showed that, relative errors of three estimated statistical quantities: diameter, standard deviation and refractive index are less than 5% for different additive Gauss noise levels with 70 iteration epochs. The errors gradually decrease with iteration epoch increases. Moreover, comparing with Newton-type iteration method coupled with a Marquardt-Tikhanov regularization scheme, FGA avoids the problems of local extreme value and selection of initial value and regularization parameters, thus obtains the advantages of high precision, stability and robustness.

  1. Sheath-induced distortions in particle distributions near enhanced polar outflow probe particle sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S.; Marchand, R.

    2014-07-15

    We discuss sheath and kinetic effects on ion and electron distribution functions at the aperture of enhanced Polar Outflow Probe particle sensors. For this purpose, the interaction between the CASSIOPE spacecraft and space environment is simulated fully kinetically using the electrostatic Particle In Cell code PTetra. The simulations account for the geometry of the main features of the spacecraft body, the booms, and the sensors. In addition to the background plasma, the model also accounts for Earth magnetic field. The plasma parameters assumed in the simulations are obtained from the latest version of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model and the value of magnetic field is obtained from the International Geophysical Reference Field model. Our analysis shows significant distortions in the ion distribution function in the plane of the sensor aperture, as well as in the direction along the boom holding the sensor. We argue that significant distortions and asymmetries should also occur at the aperture of the suprathermal electron imager when suprathermal electrons are detected, with energies of 5 eV or more.

  2. Terazulene Isomers: Polarity Change of OFETs through Molecular Orbital Distribution Contrast.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yuji; Takubo, Maki; Ogawa, Keisuke; Nakayama, Ken-Ichi; Koganezawa, Tomoyuki; Katagiri, Hiroshi

    2016-09-07

    Intermolecular orbital coupling is fundamentally important to organic semiconductor performance. Recently, we reported that 2,6':2',6″-terazulene (TAz1) exhibited excellent performance as an n-type organic field-effect transistor (OFET) via molecular orbital distribution control. To validate and develop this concept, here we present three other terazulene regioisomers, which have three azulene molecules connected at the 2- or 6-position along the long axis of the azulene, thus constructing a linear expanded π-conjugation system: 2,2':6',2″-terazulene (TAz2), 2,2':6',6″-terazulene (TAz3), and 6,2':6',6″-terazulene (TAz4). TAz2 and TAz3 exhibit ambipolar characteristics; TAz4 exhibits clear n-type transistor behavior as an OFET. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMOs) of all terazulenes are fully delocalized over the entire molecule. In contrast, the highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs) of TAz2 and TAz3 are delocalized over the 2,2'-biazulene units; the HOMOs of TAz4 are localized at one end of the azulene unit. These findings confirm that terazulene isomers which are simple hydrocarbon compounds are versatile materials with a tunable-polarity FET characteristic that depends on the direction of the azulene unit and the related contrast of the molecular orbital distribution in the terazulene backbone.

  3. Microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Matsuki, Yoh; Woskov, Paul P.; Corzilius, Björn; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-05-01

    We present a calculation of the microwave field distribution in a magic angle spinning (MAS) probe utilized in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. The microwave magnetic field (B 1 S) profile was obtained from simulations performed with the High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) software suite, using a model that includes the launching antenna, the outer Kel-F stator housing coated with Ag, the RF coil, and the 4 mm diameter sapphire rotor containing the sample. The predicted average B 1 S field is 13 μT/W 1/2, where S denotes the electron spin. For a routinely achievable input power of 5 W the corresponding value is γSB 1 S = 0.84 MHz. The calculations provide insights into the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including reflections from the RF coil and diffraction of the power transmitted through the coil. The variation of enhancement with rotor wall thickness was also successfully simulated. A second, simplified calculation was performed using a single pass model based on Gaussian beam propagation and Fresnel diffraction. This model provided additional physical insight and was in good agreement with the full HFSS simulation. These calculations indicate approaches to increasing the coupling of the microwave power to the sample, including the use of a converging lens and fine adjustment of the spacing of the windings of the RF coil. The present results should prove useful in optimizing the coupling of microwave power to the sample in future DNP experiments. Finally, the results of the simulation were used to predict the cross effect DNP enhancement ( ɛ) vs. ω1 S/(2 π) for a sample of 13C-urea dissolved in a 60:40 glycerol/water mixture containing the polarizing agent TOTAPOL; very good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment.

  4. Cloud Coverage and Height Distribution from the GLAS Polar Orbiting Lidar: Comparison to Passive Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhime, J. D.; Palm, S. P.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Mahesh, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) began full on orbit operations in September 2003. A main application of the two-wavelength GLAS lidar is highly accurate detection and profiling of global cloud cover. Initial analysis indicates that cloud and aerosol layers are consistently detected on a global basis to cross-sections down to 10(exp -6) per meter. Images of the lidar data dramatically and accurately show the vertical structure of cloud and aerosol to the limit of signal attenuation. The GLAS lidar has made the most accurate measurement of global cloud coverage and height to date. In addition to the calibrated lidar signal, GLAS data products include multi level boundaries and optical depth of all transmissive layers. Processing includes a multi-variable separation of cloud and aerosol layers. An initial application of the data results is to compare monthly cloud means from several months of GLAS observations in 2003 to existing cloud climatologies from other satellite measurement. In some cases direct comparison to passive cloud retrievals is possible. A limitation of the lidar measurements is nadir only sampling. However monthly means exhibit reasonably good global statistics and coverage results, at other than polar regions, compare well with other measurements but show significant differences in height distribution. For polar regions where passive cloud retrievals are problematic and where orbit track density is greatest, the GLAS results are particularly an advance in cloud cover information. Direct comparison to MODIS retrievals show a better than 90% agreement in cloud detection for daytime, but less than 60% at night. Height retrievals are in much less agreement. GLAS is a part of the NASA EOS project and data products are thus openly available to the science community (see http://glo.gsfc.nasa.gov).

  5. Cloud Coverage and Height Distribution from the GLAS Polar Orbiting Lidar: Comparison to Passive Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhime, J. D.; Palm, S. P.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Mahesh, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) began full on orbit operations in September 2003. A main application of the two-wavelength GLAS lidar is highly accurate detection and profiling of global cloud cover. Initial analysis indicates that cloud and aerosol layers are consistently detected on a global basis to cross-sections down to 10(exp -6) per meter. Images of the lidar data dramatically and accurately show the vertical structure of cloud and aerosol to the limit of signal attenuation. The GLAS lidar has made the most accurate measurement of global cloud coverage and height to date. In addition to the calibrated lidar signal, GLAS data products include multi level boundaries and optical depth of all transmissive layers. Processing includes a multi-variable separation of cloud and aerosol layers. An initial application of the data results is to compare monthly cloud means from several months of GLAS observations in 2003 to existing cloud climatologies from other satellite measurement. In some cases direct comparison to passive cloud retrievals is possible. A limitation of the lidar measurements is nadir only sampling. However monthly means exhibit reasonably good global statistics and coverage results, at other than polar regions, compare well with other measurements but show significant differences in height distribution. For polar regions where passive cloud retrievals are problematic and where orbit track density is greatest, the GLAS results are particularly an advance in cloud cover information. Direct comparison to MODIS retrievals show a better than 90% agreement in cloud detection for daytime, but less than 60% at night. Height retrievals are in much less agreement. GLAS is a part of the NASA EOS project and data products are thus openly available to the science community (see http://glo.gsfc.nasa.gov).

  6. Measurement of parity-violating spin asymmetries in W± production at midrapidity in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2016-03-23

    In this article, we present midrapidity measurements from the PHENIX experiment of large parity-violating single-spin asymmetries of high transverse momentum electrons and positrons from W±/Z decays, produced in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at center of mass energies of √s=500 and 510 GeV. These asymmetries allow direct access to the antiquark polarized parton distribution functions due to the parity-violating nature of the W-boson coupling to quarks and antiquarks. The results presented are based on data collected in 2011, 2012, and 2013 with an integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1, which exceeds previous PHENIX published results by a factor of more than 27.more » In addition, these high Q2 data probe the parton structure of the proton at W mass scale and provide an important addition to our understanding of the antiquark parton helicity distribution functions at an intermediate Bjorken x value of roughly MW/√s=0.16.« less

  7. Analysis and study of the distribution of polar and non-polar pesticides in wastewater effluents from modern and conventional treatments.

    PubMed

    Barco-Bonilla, Nieves; Romero-González, Roberto; Plaza-Bolaños, Patricia; Garrido Frenich, Antonia; Martínez Vidal, José Luis

    2010-12-10

    The analysis of a wide range of pesticides in wastewaters (WWs) undergoing different treatments (both modern and conventional) has been studied. The need for optimizing specific extraction methods for each WW effluent based on their physico-chemical characteristics has been considered. A distribution study was performed to establish if the filtration step before extraction is a correct procedure since pesticides can be more prone to be in the aqueous or the solid phase, depending on their hydrophobicity. This evaluation demonstrated that pesticides are distributed between the aqueous phase and the suspended particulate matter (SPM; e.g. pyrethroids are only found in the SPM). The proposed methodologies involved the determination of 39 polar and 139 non-polar pesticides using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and pressurized-liquid extraction (PLE) for the extraction of the aqueous phase and the SPM, respectively. Ultra high pressure liquid chromatography and gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS, GC-MS/MS) were used in the determination stage. WW samples from four different technologies were evaluated: membrane bioreactor, extended aeration, maturation pond and anaerobic pond. Validation data for the four effluents studied were generated, obtaining adequate precision values (estimated as % relative standard deviation, RSD) in almost all cases (<25%). The methods showed limits of detection at 0.01-0.20μgL(-1) and limits of quantification from 0.02 to 0.50μgL(-1). The proposed methods were applied to the analysis of real samples collected from an experimental WW treatment plant, detecting non-polar and polar pesticides at concentrations in the range 0.02-1.94μgL(-1) and 0.02-0.33μgL(-1), respectively.

  8. Spatial and Depth Distribution of Sub-surface Ice in the Polar Regions of Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, W.; Kim, K.; Janes, D.; Kerry, K.; Williams, R.; Reedy, R.; Drake, D.

    The Mars Odyssey spacecraft has been in its mapping orbit for slightly over one Mars year. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) has been collecting data with the boom extended since June 2002 and has not quite collected a full Mars year of data in this configuration. Nevertheless, the statistical precision in the polar regions is such that the spatial resolution of the GRS maps are only slightly degraded by having to average over a larger region to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Especially in the northern region, clear spatially resolved regions of different apparent ice contents can be resolved. For example in the region near 315E E. longitude, near the mouth of Chasma Boreale, has distinctly less ice (or deeper ice) than do the regions of similar latitude but at other longitudes. Although less easily resolved, it appears that the region around the Olympia Planitia also has less ice than regions surrounding it. In the case of Olympia Planitia, the hydrogen gamma ray signal is lower even than regions more equatorward at the same longitude. We have completed a detailed examination of the ground-truth calibration of the GRS by comparing the signal to that expected from a pure water ice northern residual cap. Doing so allows us to set accurate limits on the distribution of ice (really ice equivalent hydrogen) abundance with depth. Over much of the north polar region we can set limits that the distribution of ice with depth. If we assume the ice is buried beneath a hydrogen-poor dust layer, we can also set a limit on how deep the ice can be buried by assuming the lower ice-rich layer is pure ice. In this case the ice cannot be buried by more than 10 to 20 g/cm2 of hydrogen-poor dust, otherwise the gamma-ray flux would be too weak to account for the observed signal. If, on the other hand, we make the assumption that there is no dust layer to attenuate the gamma-ray signal, the ice content must be between 35% and 50% ice by mass. Because it is likely that there is at

  9. Double parton scattering in pair production of J /ψ mesons at the LHC revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borschensky, Christoph; Kulesza, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Double parton scattering (DPS) is studied for the example of J /ψ pair production in the LHCb and ATLAS experiments of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at center-of-mass energies of √{S }=7 , 8, and 13 TeV. We report theoretical predictions delivered to the LHCb and ATLAS Collaborations adjusted for the fiducial volumes of the corresponding measurements during run I, and we provide new predictions at 13 TeV collision energy. It is shown that DPS can lead to noticeable contributions in the distributions of longitudinal variables of the di-J /ψ system, especially at 13 TeV. The increased DPS rate in double J /ψ production at high energies will open up more possibilities for the separation of single parton scattering and DPS contributions in future studies.

  10. Polarization effects in Drell-Yan processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissakian, A. N.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Nagaitsev, A. P.; Ivanov, O. N.

    2010-01-01

    Effects of polarization of hadrons and constituent quarks in Drell-Yan processes are considered; they are one of the most efficient tools for investigation of the quark structure of hadrons. Special attention is paid to such important parton distribution functions as the transversity and T-odd Sivers and Boer—Mulders functions whose study is necessary for understanding the effects connected with the nonzero transverse component of the quark momentum. An original method for direct extraction of transversity and Boer—Mulders function in the proton from the data on Drell—Yan processes, in which a maximum of one hadron in the initial state is transversely polarized, is presented. This method possesses a number of important advantages. The method is applied both to Drell—Yan processes with a valence antiquark (antiproton-proton and pion-proton collisions) and with a sea antiquark (proton-proton, proton-deuteron, and deuteron-deuteron collisions). Theoretical estimates of asymmetries and cross sections for setups at RHIC (BNL, US), NICA (JINR, Russia), COMPASS (CERN, Switzerland), PAX (GSI, Germany), and J-PARC (Japan) are presented for evaluation of the measurability of transversity and T-odd distributions. These theoretical estimates are accompanied by calculations of statistical uncertainties for measured asymmetries using the new Monte Carlo generator of Drell—Yan events. The duality of Drell—Yan processes and those of production of J/Φ resonance is studied, and it may allow one to considerably reduce statistical uncertainties of parton distributions. Kinematical conditions, for which this duality can be observed, are evaluated.

  11. Angular distribution of polarized spontaneous emissions and its effect on light extraction behavior in InGaN-based light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Gangcheng; Chen, Xinjuan; Yu, Tongjun; Lu, Huimin; Chen, Zhizhong; Kang, Xiangning; Wu, Jiejun; Zhang, Guoyi

    2014-03-01

    Angular intensity distributions of differently polarized light sources in multiple quantum wells (MQWs) and their effects on extraction behavior of spontaneous emission from light emitting diode (LED) chips have been studied. Theoretical calculation based on k.p approximation, ray tracing simulation and angular electroluminescence measurement were applied in this work. It is found that the electron-hole recombination in the InGaN MQWs produces a spherical distribution of an s-polarized source and a dumbbell-shaped p-polarized source. Light rays from different polarized sources experience different extraction processes, determining the polarization degree of electro-luminescence and extraction efficiency of LEDs.

  12. Angular distribution of polarized spontaneous emissions and its effect on light extraction behavior in InGaN-based light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Gangcheng; Chen, Xinjuan; Yu, Tongjun Lu, Huimin; Chen, Zhizhong; Kang, Xiangning; Wu, Jiejun; Zhang, Guoyi

    2014-03-07

    Angular intensity distributions of differently polarized light sources in multiple quantum wells (MQWs) and their effects on extraction behavior of spontaneous emission from light emitting diode (LED) chips have been studied. Theoretical calculation based on k·p approximation, ray tracing simulation and angular electroluminescence measurement were applied in this work. It is found that the electron-hole recombination in the InGaN MQWs produces a spherical distribution of an s-polarized source and a dumbbell-shaped p-polarized source. Light rays from different polarized sources experience different extraction processes, determining the polarization degree of electro-luminescence and extraction efficiency of LEDs.

  13. Understanding the large-distance behavior of transverse-momentum-dependent parton densities and the Collins-Soper evolution kernel

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, John; Rogers, Ted

    2015-04-01

    There is considerable controversy about the size and importance of non-perturbative contributions to the evolution of transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions. Standard fits to relatively high-energy Drell-Yan data give evolution that when taken to lower Q is too rapid to be consistent with recent data in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering. Some authors provide very different forms for TMD evolution, even arguing that non-perturbative contributions at large transverse distance bT are not needed or are irrelevant. Here, we systematically analyze the issues, both perturbative and non-perturbative. We make a motivated proposal for the parameterization of the non-perturbative part of the TMD evolution kernel that could give consistency: with the variety of apparently conflicting data, with theoretical perturbative calculations where they are applicable, and with general theoretical non-perturbative constraints on correlation functions at large distances. We propose and use a scheme- and scale-independent function A(bT) that gives a tool to compare and diagnose different proposals for TMD evolution. We also advocate for phenomenological studies of A(bT) as a probe of TMD evolution. The results are important generally for applications of TMD factorization. In particular, they are important to making predictions for proposed polarized Drell- Yan experiments to measure the Sivers function.

  14. Understanding the large-distance behavior of transverse-momentum-dependent parton densities and the Collins-Soper evolution kernel

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, John; Rogers, Ted

    2015-04-01

    There is considerable controversy about the size and importance of non-perturbative contributions to the evolution of transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions. Standard fits to relatively high-energy Drell-Yan data give evolution that when taken to lower Q is too rapid to be consistent with recent data in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering. Some authors provide very different forms for TMD evolution, even arguing that non-perturbative contributions at large transverse distance bT are not needed or are irrelevant. Here, we systematically analyze the issues, both perturbative and non-perturbative. We make a motivated proposal for the parameterization of the non-perturbative part ofmore » the TMD evolution kernel that could give consistency: with the variety of apparently conflicting data, with theoretical perturbative calculations where they are applicable, and with general theoretical non-perturbative constraints on correlation functions at large distances. We propose and use a scheme- and scale-independent function A(bT) that gives a tool to compare and diagnose different proposals for TMD evolution. We also advocate for phenomenological studies of A(bT) as a probe of TMD evolution. The results are important generally for applications of TMD factorization. In particular, they are important to making predictions for proposed polarized Drell- Yan experiments to measure the Sivers function.« less

  15. A model for autumn pelagic distribution of adult female polar bears in the Chukchi Seas, 1987-1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durner, G.M.; Douglas, D.C.; Nielson, R.M.; Amstrup, Steven C.

    2006-01-01

    We made predictions of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) autumn distribution in the Chukchi Sea with a Resource Selection Function (RSF) developed from 1198 satellite radio-collar locations on 124 adult female polar bears, 1987 – 1994. The RSF was created to assist in an aerial survey design for polar bears proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The RSF was based on bathymetry and daily sea ice covariates extracted from passive microwave satellite imagery within the pelagic region > 25 km from shore. The RSF indicated that polar bears selected habitats with intermediate amounts (~50%) of ice cover in close proximity to higher ice concentrations, and over relatively shallow waters. The RSF showed good predictive abilities for the years of its construct, worked best in October, and was robust to inter-annual variability. When evaluated with recent (1997 – 2005) data, the RSF performed well for October and November but poorly in September. This loss of predictive abilities appeared to be related to recent changes in habitat due to longer melt seasons and younger sea ice, and testing the retrospective model with a small sample of recent polar bears locations from a limited region of the Chukchi Sea. Contemporary applications of this RSF must consider three factors that could limit its utility: 1) 2 different sea ice phenology; 2) distributions of males and sub-adults; and 3) occupancy in nearshore habitats.

  16. Polarized Distribution of IQGAP Proteins in Gastric Parietal Cells and Their Roles in Regulated Epithelial Cell Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rihong; Guo, Zhen; Watson, Charles; Chen, Emily; Kong, Rong; Wang, Wenxian; Yao, Xuebiao

    2003-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton plays an important role in the establishment of epithelial cell polarity. Cdc42, a member of Rho GTPase family, modulates actin dynamics via its regulators, such as IQGAP proteins. Gastric parietal cells are polarized epithelial cells in which regulated acid secretion occurs in the apical membrane upon stimulation. We have previously shown that actin isoforms are polarized to different membrane domains and that the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton is essential for acid secretion. Herein, we show that Cdc42 is preferentially distributed to the apical membrane of gastric parietal cells. In addition, we revealed that two Cdc42 regulators, IQGAP1 and IQGAP2, are present in gastric parietal cells. Interestingly, IQGAP2 is polarized to the apical membrane of the parietal cells, whereas IQGAP1 is mainly distributed to the basolateral membrane. An IQGAP peptide that competes with full-length IQGAP proteins for Cdc42-binding in vitro also inhibits acid secretion in streptolysin-O-permeabilized gastric glands. Furthermore, this peptide disrupts the association of IQGAP and Cdc42 with the apical actin cytoskeleton and prevents the apical membrane remodeling upon stimulation. We propose that IQGAP2 forms a link that associates Cdc42 with the apical cytoskeleton and thus allows for activation of polarized secretion in gastric parietal cells. PMID:12631726

  17. Estimating Fiber Orientation Distribution Functions in 3D-Polarized Light Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Axer, Markus; Strohmer, Sven; Gräßel, David; Bücker, Oliver; Dohmen, Melanie; Reckfort, Julia; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Research of the human brain connectome requires multiscale approaches derived from independent imaging methods ideally applied to the same object. Hence, comprehensible strategies for data integration across modalities and across scales are essential. We have successfully established a concept to bridge the spatial scales from microscopic fiber orientation measurements based on 3D-Polarized Light Imaging (3D-PLI) to meso- or macroscopic dimensions. By creating orientation distribution functions (pliODFs) from high-resolution vector data via series expansion with spherical harmonics utilizing high performance computing and supercomputing technologies, data fusion with Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging has become feasible, even for a large-scale dataset such as the human brain. Validation of our approach was done effectively by means of two types of datasets that were transferred from fiber orientation maps into pliODFs: simulated 3D-PLI data showing artificial, but clearly defined fiber patterns and real 3D-PLI data derived from sections through the human brain and the brain of a hooded seal. PMID:27147981

  18. Seasonal polar carbon dioxide frost on Mars: CO2 mass and columnar thickness distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, N. J.; Boynton, W. V.; Kerry, K.; Hamara, D.; Janes, D.; Reedy, R. C.; Kim, K. J.; Haberle, R. M.

    2006-12-01

    Conclusions are drawn about the column density (g/cm2), spatial extent, and mass of the seasonal carbon dioxide frost on the poles of Mars as a function of time utilizing data from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS). Quantification of these CO2 values is achieved by observing attenuation effects of the surface-emitted hydrogen gamma ray flux as the frost condenses and sublimates in a seasonal exchange of CO2 between the ground and the atmosphere. Columnar thickness and mass results are discussed and plotted for latitudes including +/-60° and poleward. GRS observations are compared to predictions from the NASA Ames Research Center General Circulation Model and to similar experimental results from the Mars Odyssey High Energy Neutron Detector and Neutron Spectrometer. Models for north and south polar atmosphere and regolith distributions are incorporated, and our results indicate that the assumption of a 100% H2O-ice residual cap underlying the seasonal frost in the north is accurate. The GRS CO2 frost observations are in good agreement with the other studies mentioned, in particular for the timing of the beginning of frost deposition to the complete sublimation of surface CO2 back into the atmosphere. The total amount of condensed carbon dioxide mass seen by the GRS is on the order of 6.0 × 1015 kg and verifies previous reports that nearly 25% of the Martian CO2 reservoir participates in the ground-atmosphere exchange cycle.

  19. A polarized neutron study of the magnetization distribution in Co₂FeSi.

    PubMed

    Brown, P J; Kainuma, R; Kanomata, T; Neumann, K-U; Okubo, A; Umetsu, R Y; Ziebeck, K R A

    2013-05-22

    The magnetization distribution in Co2FeSi which has the largest moment per formula unit ∼6 μB of all Heusler alloys, has been determined using polarized neutron diffraction. The experimentally determined magnetization has been integrated over spheres centred on the three sites of the L12 structure giving μ Fe = 3.10(3) μB and μ Co = 1.43(2) μB, results which are slightly lower than the moments in atomic spheres of similar radii obtained in recent LDA + U band structure calculations (Li et al 2010 Chin. Phys. B 19 097102). Approximately 50% of the magnetic carriers at the Fe sites were found to be in orbitals with eg symmetry. This was higher, ≃65%, at the Co sites. Both Fe and Co were found to have orbital moments that are larger than those predicted. Comparison with similar results obtained for related alloys suggests that there must be a finite density of states in both spin bands at the Fermi energy indicating that Co2FeSi is not a perfect half-metallic ferromagnet.

  20. Reweighting QCD matrix-element and parton-shower calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothmann, Enrico; Schönherr, Marek; Schumann, Steffen

    2016-11-01

    We present the implementation and validation of the techniques used to efficiently evaluate parametric and perturbative theoretical uncertainties in matrix-element plus parton-shower simulations within the Sherpa event-generator framework. By tracing the full α _s and PDF dependences, including the parton-shower component, as well as the fixed-order scale uncertainties, we compute variational event weights on-the-fly, thereby greatly reducing the computational costs to obtain theoretical-uncertainty estimates.

  1. Polarization curve measurements combined with potential probe sensing for determining current density distribution in vanadium redox-flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Maik; Bredemeyer, Niels; Tenhumberg, Nils; Turek, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Potential probes are applied to vanadium redox-flow batteries for determination of effective felt resistance and current density distribution. During the measurement of polarization curves in 100 cm2 cells with different carbon felt compression rates, alternating potential steps at cell voltages between 0.6 V and 2.0 V are applied. Polarization curves are recorded at different flow rates and states of charge of the battery. Increasing compression rates lead to lower effective felt resistances and a more uniform resistance distribution. Low flow rates at high or low state of charge result in non-linear current density distribution with high gradients, while high flow rates give rise to a nearly linear behavior.

  2. Hierarchical model of fibrillar collagen distribution for polarization-resolved SHG microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuer, Adam E.; Akens, Margarete K.; Krouglov, Serguei; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Wilson, Brian C.; Whyne, Cari M.; Barzda, Virginijus

    2013-02-01

    A hierarchical model of the organization of fibrillar collagen is developed and its implications on polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are investigated. A "ground-up" approach is employed to develop the theory for understanding of the origin of SHG from fibrillar collagen. The effects of fibril ultrastructure and fibril macroscopic organization on the second-order polarization properties of fibrillar collagen are presented in conjunction with recent ab initio results performed on a collagen triple-helix model (-GLY-PRO-HYP-)n. Various tissues containing fibrillar collagen are quantified using a polarization-resolved SHG technique, termed polarization-in, polarization-out (PIPO) and interpreted in light of the aforementioned theory. The method involves varying the incident laser polarization, while monitoring the SHG intensity through an analyzer. From the SHG polarization data the orientation of the fibers, in biological tissue, can be deduced. Unique PIPO signatures are observed for different rat tissues and interpreted in terms of the collagen composition, fibril ultrastructure, and macroscopic organization. Similarities and discrepancies in the second-order polarization properties of different collagen types and ultrastructures will be presented. PIPO SHG microscopy shows promise in its ability to quantify the organization of collagen in various tissues. The ability to characterize the structure of collagen in various tissue microenvironments will aid in the study of numerous collagen related biological process, including tissue diseases, wound repair, and tumor development and progression.

  3. Frequency spectrum of focused broadband pulses of electromagnetic radiation generated by polarization currents with superluminally rotating distribution patterns.

    PubMed

    Ardavan, Houshang; Ardavan, Arzhang; Singleton, John

    2003-11-01

    We investigate the spectral features of the emission from a superluminal polarization current whose distribution pattern rotates (with an angular frequency omega) and oscillates (with a frequency omega > omega differing from an integral multiple of omega) at the same time. This type of polarization current is found in recent practical machines designed to investigate superluminal emission. Although all of the processes involved are linear, we find that the broadband emission contains frequencies that are higher than omega by a factor of the order of (omega/omega)2. This generation of frequencies not required for the creation of the source stems from mathematically rigorous consequences of the familiar classical expression for the retarded potential. The results suggest practical applications for superluminal polarization currents as broadband radio-frequency and infrared sources.

  4. Backward dilepton production in color dipole and parton models

    SciTech Connect

    Gay Ducati, Maria Beatriz; Graeve de Oliveira, Emmanuel

    2010-03-01

    The Drell-Yan dilepton production at backward rapidities is studied in proton-nucleus collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and LHC energies by comparing two different approaches: the k{sub T} factorization at next-to-leading order with intrinsic transverse momentum and the same process formulated in the target rest frame, i.e., the color dipole approach. Our results are expressed in terms of the ratio between p(d)-A and p-p collisions as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity. Three nuclear parton distribution functions are used: EKS (Eskola, Kolhinen, and Ruuskanen), EPS08, and EPS09 and, in both approaches, dileptons show sensitivity to nuclear effects, specially regarding the intrinsic transverse momentum. Also, there is room to discriminate between formalisms: the color dipole approach lacks soft effects introduced by the intrinsic k{sub T}. Geometric scaling GBW (Golec-Biernat and Wusthoff) and BUW (Boer, Utermann, and Wessels) color dipole cross section models and also a DHJ (Dumitru, Hayashigaki, and Jalilian-Marian) model, which breaks geometric scaling, are used. No change in the ratio between collisions is observed, showing that this observable is not changed by the particular shape of the color dipole cross section. Furthermore, our k{sub T} factorization results are compared with color glass condensate results at forward rapidities: the results agree at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider although disagree at LHC, mainly due to the different behavior of target gluon and quark shadowing.

  5. Effect of hexylene glycol-altered microtubule distributions on cytokinesis and polar lobe formation in fertilized eggs of Ilyanassa obsoleta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. H.; Stephens, A. P.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Some effects of gravity on early morphogenesis are correlated with microtubule locations within cells. During first cleavage in Ilyanassa obsoleta embryos, a transitory polar lobe constriction forms and then relaxes, allowing the polar lobe to merge with one daughter cell. If the polar lobe is equally divided or removed, morphogenesis is severely disrupted. To examine microtuble locations during early Ilyanassa development, eggs were fixed and stained for polymerized alpha-tubulin during first cleavage. The mitotic apparatus assembles at the animal pole. The cleavage furrow forms between the asters, constricting to a stabilized intercellular bridge encircling midbody-bound microtubules, whereas the polar lobe constriction forms below and parallel to the spindle, constricting to a transitory intercellular bridge encircling no detectable microtubules. At metaphase an alpha-tubulin epitope is distributed throughout the spindle, whereas a beta-tubulin epitope is present predominantly in the asters. Incubation in hexylene glycol, a drug that increases microtubule polymerization, during mitosis causes the polar lobe constriction to tighten around polymerized alpha-tubulin and remain stably constricted. If hexylene glycol is removed, alpha-tubulin staining disappears from the polar lobe constriction, which relaxes, whereas microtubules remain in the cleavage furrow, which remains constricted. These observations suggest that asymmetric distribution of microtubules affects early Ilyanassa cleavage patterns, and that continued presence of microtubules extending through an intercellular bridge is important for stabilization of the bridge constriction prior to completion of cytokinesis. These data provide the basis for further analysis of the role of microtubules in possible microgravity disruptions of Ilyanassa development.

  6. Effect of hexylene glycol-altered microtubule distributions on cytokinesis and polar lobe formation in fertilized eggs of Ilyanassa obsoleta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. H.; Stephens, A. P.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Some effects of gravity on early morphogenesis are correlated with microtubule locations within cells. During first cleavage in Ilyanassa obsoleta embryos, a transitory polar lobe constriction forms and then relaxes, allowing the polar lobe to merge with one daughter cell. If the polar lobe is equally divided or removed, morphogenesis is severely disrupted. To examine microtuble locations during early Ilyanassa development, eggs were fixed and stained for polymerized alpha-tubulin during first cleavage. The mitotic apparatus assembles at the animal pole. The cleavage furrow forms between the asters, constricting to a stabilized intercellular bridge encircling midbody-bound microtubules, whereas the polar lobe constriction forms below and parallel to the spindle, constricting to a transitory intercellular bridge encircling no detectable microtubules. At metaphase an alpha-tubulin epitope is distributed throughout the spindle, whereas a beta-tubulin epitope is present predominantly in the asters. Incubation in hexylene glycol, a drug that increases microtubule polymerization, during mitosis causes the polar lobe constriction to tighten around polymerized alpha-tubulin and remain stably constricted. If hexylene glycol is removed, alpha-tubulin staining disappears from the polar lobe constriction, which relaxes, whereas microtubules remain in the cleavage furrow, which remains constricted. These observations suggest that asymmetric distribution of microtubules affects early Ilyanassa cleavage patterns, and that continued presence of microtubules extending through an intercellular bridge is important for stabilization of the bridge constriction prior to completion of cytokinesis. These data provide the basis for further analysis of the role of microtubules in possible microgravity disruptions of Ilyanassa development.

  7. Coronal electron density distributions estimated from CMEs, DH type II radio bursts, and polarized brightness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Ok; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jin-Yi; Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Kim, R.-S.

    2016-04-01

    We determine coronal electron density distributions (CEDDs) by analyzing decahectometric (DH) type II observations under two assumptions. DH type II bursts are generated by either (1) shocks at the leading edges of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) or (2) CME shock-streamer interactions. Among 399 Wind/WAVES type II bursts (from 1997 to 2012) associated with SOHO/LASCO (Large Angle Spectroscopic COronagraph) CMEs, we select 11 limb events whose fundamental and second harmonic emission lanes are well identified. We determine the lowest frequencies of fundamental emission lanes and the heights of leading edges of their associated CMEs. We also determine the heights of CME shock-streamer interaction regions. The CEDDs are estimated by minimizing the root-mean-square error between the heights from the CME leading edges (or CME shock-streamer interaction regions) and DH type II bursts. We also estimate CEDDs of seven events using polarized brightness (pB) measurements. We find the following results. Under the first assumption, the average of estimated CEDDs from 3 to 20 Rs is about 5-fold Saito's model (NSaito(r)). Under the second assumption, the average of estimated CEDDs from 3 to 10 Rs is 1.5-fold NSaito(r). While the CEDDs obtained from pB measurements are significantly smaller than those based on the first assumption and CME flank regions without streamers, they are well consistent with those on the second assumption. Our results show that not only about 1-fold NSaito(r) is a proper CEDD for analyzing DH type II bursts but also CME shock-streamer interactions could be a plausible origin for generating DH type II bursts.

  8. Polar organic marker compounds in atmospheric aerosols: Determination, time series, size distributions and sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, Ivan

    Terrestrial vegetation releases substantial amounts of reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs; e.g., isoprene, monoterpenes) into the atmosphere. The VOCs can be rapidly photooxidized under conditions of high solar radiation, yielding products that can participate in new particle formation and growth processes above forests. This thesis focuses on the characterization, identification and quantification of oxidation products of biogenic VOC (BVOCs) as well as other species (tracer compounds) that provide information on aerosol sources and source processes. Atmospheric aerosols from various forested sites (i.e., Hyytiala, southern Finland; Rondonia, Brazil; K-Puszta, Hungary and Julich, Germany) were analyzed with Gas Chromotography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) using analytical procedure that targets polar organic compounds. The study demonstrated that isoprene (i.e., 2-methyerythritol, 2-methylthreitol, 2-methylglyceric acid and C5-alkene triols (2-methyl-1,3,4-trihydroxy-l-butene (cis and trans) and 3 methyl-2,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene)) and monoterpene (pinic acid, norpinic acid, 3-hydroxyglutaric acid and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid) oxidation products were present in substantial concentrations in atmospheric aerosols suggesting that oxidation of BVOC from the vegetation is an important process in all studied sites. On the other hand, presence of levoglucosan, biomass burning marker, especially in Amazonian rain forest site at Rondonia, Brazil, pointed that all sites were affected by anthropogenic activities, namely biomass burning. Other identified compounds included plyols, arabitol, mannitol and erythritol, which are marker compounds for fungal spores and monosacharides, glucose and fructose, markers for plant polens. Temporal variations as well as mass size distributions of the detected species confirmed the possible formation mechanisms of marker compounds.

  9. Highly Effective Polarized Electron Sources Based on Strained Semiconductor Superlattice with Distributed Bragg Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Gerchikov, L. G.; Kuz'michev, V. V.; Mamaev, Yu. A.; Vasiliev, D. A.; Yashin, Yu. P.; Aulenbacher, K.; Clendenin, J. E.; Maruyama, T.; Mikhrin, V. S.; Ustinov, V. M.; Vasiliev, A. P.; Zhukov, A. E.; Roberts, J. S.

    2008-02-06

    Resonance enhancement of the quantum efficiency of new polarized electron photocathodes based on a short-period strained superlattice structures is reported. The superlattice is a part of an integrated Fabry-Perot optical cavity. We demonstrate that the Fabry-Perot resonator enhances the quantum efficiency by the order of magnitude in the wavelength region of the main polarization maximum. The high structural quality implied by these results points to the very promising application of these photocathodes for spin-polarized electron sources.

  10. Highly Effective Polarized Electron Sources Based on Strained Semiconductor Superlattice with Distributed Bragg Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Gerchikov, L.G.; Aulenbacher, K.; Clendenin, J.E.; Kuz'michev, V.V.; Mamaev, Yu.A.; Maruyama, T.; Mikhrin, V.S.; Roberts, J.S.; Utstinov, V.M.; Vasiliev, D.A.; Vasiliev, A.P.; Yashin, Yu.P.; Zhukov, A.E.; /St. Petersburg Polytechnic Inst. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /SLAC /Ioffe Phys. Tech. Inst. /Sheffield U.

    2007-11-28

    Resonance enhancement of the quantum efficiency of new polarized electron photocathodes based on a short-period strained superlattice structures is reported. The superlattice is a part of an integrated Fabry-Perot optical cavity. We demonstrate that the Fabry-Perot resonator enhances the quantum efficiency by the order of magnitude in the wavelength region of the main polarization maximum. The high structural quality implied by these results points to the very promising application of these photocathodes for spin-polarized electron sources.

  11. Nonlinear dust acoustic waves with polarization force effects in Kappa distribution plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Zhou, Suyun; Luo, Rongxiang; Liu, Sanqiu

    2017-01-01

    The propagation characteristics of dust acoustic solitary waves (DASWs) in dusty plasmas with the effects of polarization force and superthermal ions are studied. First, the polarization force induced by superthermal ions is obtained. It is shown that the superthermality of background ions affect the Debye screening of dust grains as well as the polarization force significantly. Then for small amplitude solitary waves, the KdV equation is obtained by applying the reductive perturbation technique. And for the arbitrary amplitude solitary waves, the Sagdeev potential method is employed and the Sagdeev potential is analyzed. In both case, the effects of the polarization force associated the ions’ superthermality on the characteristic of the DASWs are analyzed.

  12. Bidirectional reflectance distribution function of thermal control coatings and heat-shielding materials illuminated by polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voschula, I. V.; Dlugunovich, V. A.; Zhumar, A. Yu.

    2013-05-01

    Stokes parameters were measured for radiation reflected in the range 5° to 80° by silver-colored, white, and black thermal control coatings deposited on an aluminum alloy substrate, by green paint on a phenolic plastic surface, and by uncoated carbon-fiber reinforced plastic illuminated by linearly polarized He-Ne laser radiation at an incident angle of -5°. The bidirectional reflectance distribution function of the investigated samples was determined as a function of the view zenith angle.

  13. Distribution of Linearly Polarized Gluons and Elliptic Azimuthal Anisotropy in Deep Inelastic Scattering Dijet Production at High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, Adrian; Lappi, Tuomas; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-12-17

    In this study, we determine the distribution of linearly polarized gluons of a dense target at small x by solving the Balitsky–Jalilian-Marian–Iancu–McLerran–Weigert–Leonidov–Kovner rapidity evolution equations. From these solutions, we estimate the amplitude of cos2Φ azimuthal asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering dijet production at high energies. We find sizable long-range in rapidity azimuthal asymmetries with a magnitude in the range of v2=~10%.

  14. Distribution of Linearly Polarized Gluons and Elliptic Azimuthal Anisotropy in Deep Inelastic Scattering Dijet Production at High Energy

    DOE PAGES

    Dumitru, Adrian; Lappi, Tuomas; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-12-17

    In this study, we determine the distribution of linearly polarized gluons of a dense target at small x by solving the Balitsky–Jalilian-Marian–Iancu–McLerran–Weigert–Leonidov–Kovner rapidity evolution equations. From these solutions, we estimate the amplitude of cos2Φ azimuthal asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering dijet production at high energies. We find sizable long-range in rapidity azimuthal asymmetries with a magnitude in the range of v2=~10%.

  15. A novel sensing technique for measurement of magnitude and polarity of electrostatic charge distribution across individual particles.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Tariq; Kaialy, Waseem; Deng, Tong; Bradley, Mike S A; Nokhodchi, Ali; Armour-Chélu, David

    2013-01-30

    Electrostatic charge is generated during powder handling due to particle-particle and particle-wall collisions, rubbing, sliding, and rolling. In case of bipolar charge generation, the electrostatic forces may significantly change the inner forces and increase powder adhesion and cause a serious problem in material handling process. Therefore, the knowledge of distribution of charge across the individual particles is helpful to identify the role of triboelectrification and the effects of various relevant variables especially change in the contact materials, environmental conditions during processing, etc. A novel approach based on inductive sensor has been developed to detect the either polarity of charged particle and to characterise the bipolar charge distribution in the population of particulate material. To achieve this, an amplification unit configured as a pure integrator and signal processing techniques has been used to de-noise and correct the baseline of signal and MATLAB algorithm developed for peak detection. The polarity of charged particles obtained by this method is calibrated with Faraday pail method and the results are promising. Experimental study has been carried out by using two distinct populations of oppositely charged particles (glass beads-PVC, olivine sand, and silica sand). The obtained results indicate that the method is able to detect the distribution of polarities of charged particles.

  16. The analysis of space-time structure in QCD vacuum II: Dynamics of polarization and absolute X-distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandru, Andrei; Draper, Terrence; Horváth, Ivan; Streuer, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    We propose a framework for quantitative evaluation of dynamical tendency for polarization in an arbitrary random variable that can be decomposed into a pair of orthogonal subspaces. The method uses measures based on comparisons of given dynamics to its counterpart with statistically independent components. The formalism of previously considered X-distributions is used to express the aforementioned comparisons, in effect putting the former approach on solid footing. Our analysis leads to the definition of a suitable correlation coefficient with clear statistical meaning. We apply the method to the dynamics induced by pure-glue lattice QCD in local left-right components of overlap Dirac eigenmodes. It is found that, in finite physical volume, there exists a non-zero physical scale in the spectrum of eigenvalues such that eigenmodes at smaller (fixed) eigenvalues exhibit convex X-distribution (positive correlation), while at larger eigenvalues the distribution is concave (negative correlation). This chiral polarization scale thus separates a regime where dynamics enhances chirality relative to statistical independence from a regime where it suppresses it, and gives an objective definition to the notion of "low" and "high" Dirac eigenmode. We propose to investigate whether the polarization scale remains non-zero in the infinite volume limit, in which case it would represent a new kind of low energy scale in QCD.

  17. Application of composite flow laws to grain size distributions derived from polar ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Tobias; de Bresser, Hans; Jansen, Daniela; Weikusat, Ilka; Garbe, Christoph; Kipfstuhl, Sepp

    2014-05-01

    Apart from evaluating the crystallographic orientation, focus of microstructural analysis of natural ice during the last decades has been to create depth-profiles of mean grain size. Several ice flow models incorporated mean grain size as a variable. Although such a mean value may coincide well with the size of a large proportion of the grains, smaller/larger grains are effectively ignored. These smaller/larger grains, however, may affect the ice flow modeling. Variability in grain size is observed on centimeter, meter and kilometer scale along deep polar ice cores. Composite flow laws allow considering the effect of this variability on rheology, by weighing the contribution of grain-size-sensitive (GSS, diffusion/grain boundary sliding) and grain-size-insensitive (GSI, dislocation) creep mechanisms taking the full grain size distribution into account [1]. Extraction of hundreds of grain size distributions for different depths along an ice core has become relatively easy by automatic image processing techniques [2]. The shallow ice approximation is widely adopted in ice sheet modeling and approaches the full-Stokes solution for small ratios of vertical to horizontal characteristic dimensions. In this approximation shear stress in the vertical plain dominates the strain. This assumption is not applicable at ice divides or dome structures, where most deep ice core drilling sites are located. Within the upper two thirds of the ice column longitudinal stresses are not negligible and ice deformation is dominated by vertical strain. The Dansgaard-Johnsen model [3] predicts a dominating, constant vertical strain rate for the upper two thirds of the ice sheet, whereas in the lower ice column vertical shear becomes the main driver for ice deformation. We derived vertical strain rates from the upper NEEM ice core (North-West Greenland) and compared them to classical estimates of strain rates at the NEEM site. Assuming intervals of constant accumulation rates, we found a

  18. Polarization distribution control of anisotropic electromagnetic Gaussian-Schell model beams on free propagation by exploiting correlation properties at the source plane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Wang, Xiangzhao; Cheng, Xin; Qiu, Zicheng

    2010-11-01

    When propagating in free space, the transversal distribution of the degree of polarization of an anisotropic electromagnetic Gaussian-Schell model (AEGSM) beam will generally undergo a complex evolution process. We find that this transversal distribution of the degree of polarization of an AEGSM beam can be controlled by exploiting the partial correlation properties of the source. The main research of our paper falls into two parts. First, the concept of analogical propagation of the transversal distribution of the degree of polarization is proposed, and the condition for an AEGSM beam having an analogical propagation is obtained. When an AEGSM beam is on analogical propagation, the distribution of the degree of polarization on any cross section of the beam is always similar to that on the source plane, except that the size of the distribution pattern will expand continuously as the propagation distance increases. Second, the far-field transversal distribution of the degree of polarization is considered, and the condition for the far-field transversal polarization distribution of an AEGSM beam to be always of circularly symmetric shape, no matter how complicated it is on the source, is obtained. Our research is expected to find applications in areas that make use of the polarization properties of random electromagnetic beams.

  19. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, C.; Cisbani, E.; Hamilton, D. J.; Salmé, G.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ahmidouch, A.; Annand, J. R. M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Beaufait, J.; Bosted, P.; Brash, E. J.; Butuceanu, C.; Carter, P.; Christy, E.; Chudakov, E.; Danagoulian, S.; Day, D.; Degtyarenko, P.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Fowler, M.; Frlez, E.; Gaskell, D.; Gilman, R.; Horn, T.; Huber, G. M.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jones, M. K.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Khandaker, M.; Kohl, M.; Kumbartzki, G.; Lassiter, S.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Lovelace, H.; Luo, W.; Mack, D.; Mamyan, V.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Maxwell, J.; Mbianda, G.; Meekins, D.; Meziane, M.; Miller, J.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Mulholland, J.; Nelyubin, V.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Punjabi, V.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Slifer, K.; Smith, G.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S.; Ye, Z.; Zheng, X.

    2015-10-01

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θcmp=70 ° . The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ±0.059 ±0.048 , where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ˜3 times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  20. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, C; Cisbani, E; Hamilton, D J; Salmé, G; Wojtsekhowski, B; Ahmidouch, A; Annand, J R M; Baghdasaryan, H; Beaufait, J; Bosted, P; Brash, E J; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Christy, E; Chudakov, E; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Degtyarenko, P; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Fowler, M; Frlez, E; Gaskell, D; Gilman, R; Horn, T; Huber, G M; de Jager, C W; Jensen, E; Jones, M K; Kelleher, A; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; Kohl, M; Kumbartzki, G; Lassiter, S; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Lovelace, H; Luo, W; Mack, D; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Meziane, M; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Mulholland, J; Nelyubin, V; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Prok, Y; Puckett, A J R; Punjabi, V; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Slifer, K; Smith, G; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Wesselmann, F R; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zheng, X

    2015-10-09

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θ_{cm}^{p}=70°. The longitudinal transfer K_{LL}, measured to be 0.645±0.059±0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  1. Diphoton production at the Tevatron and the LHC in the NLO approximation of the parton Reggeization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedov, M. A.; Saleev, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The hadroproduction of prompt isolated photon pairs at high energies is studied in the framework of the parton Reggeization approach. The real part of the NLO corrections is computed (the NLO⋆ approximation), and the procedure for the subtraction of double counting between real parton emissions in the hard-scattering matrix element and unintegrated parton distribution function is constructed for the amplitudes with Reggeized quarks in the initial state. The matrix element of the important next-to-next-to-leading-order subprocess R R →γ γ with full dependence on the transverse momenta of the initial-state Reggeized gluons is obtained. We compare obtained numerical results with diphoton spectra measured at the Tevatron and the LHC and find a good agreement of our predictions with experimental data at the high values of diphoton transverse momentum, pT, and especially at the pT larger than the diphoton invariant mass, M . In this multi-Regge kinematics region, the NLO correction is strongly suppressed, demonstrating the self-consistency of the parton Reggeization approach.

  2. VBFNLO: A parton level Monte Carlo for processes with electroweak bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, K.; Bähr, M.; Bozzi, G.; Campanario, F.; Englert, C.; Figy, T.; Greiner, N.; Hackstein, C.; Hankele, V.; Jäger, B.; Klämke, G.; Kubocz, M.; Oleari, C.; Plätzer, S.; Prestel, S.; Worek, M.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2009-09-01

    VBFNLO is a fully flexible parton level Monte Carlo program for the simulation of vector boson fusion, double and triple vector boson production in hadronic collisions at next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant. VBFNLO includes Higgs and vector boson decays with full spin correlations and all off-shell effects. In addition, VBFNLO implements CP-even and CP-odd Higgs boson via gluon fusion, associated with two jets, at the leading-order one-loop level with the full top- and bottom-quark mass dependence in a generic two-Higgs-doublet model. A variety of effects arising from beyond the Standard Model physics are implemented for selected processes. This includes anomalous couplings of Higgs and vector bosons and a Warped Higgsless extra dimension model. The program offers the possibility to generate Les Houches Accord event files for all processes available at leading order. Program summaryProgram title:VBFNLO Catalogue identifier: AEDO_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDO_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPL version 2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 339 218 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 620 847 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran, parts in C++ Computer: All Operating system: Linux, should also work on other systems Classification: 11.1, 11.2 External routines: Optionally Les Houches Accord PDF Interface library and the GNU Scientific library Nature of problem: To resolve the large scale dependence inherent in leading order calculations and to quantify the cross section error induced by uncertainties in the determination of parton distribution functions, it is necessary to include NLO corrections. Moreover, whenever stringent cuts are required on decay products and/or identified jets the question arises whether the scale dependence and a k-factor, defined

  3. Photon parton distributions in nuclei and the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, Leonid; Strikman, Mark

    2010-12-01

    Photons as well as quarks and gluons are constituents of the infinite momentum frame (IMF) wave function of an energetic particle. They are mostly equivalent photons whose amplitude follows from the Lorentz transformation of the particle rest frame Coulomb field into the IMF and from the conservation of the electromagnetic current. We evaluate in a model independent way the dominant photon contribution \\propto \\alpha_{em}(Z^2/A^{4/3})\\ln(1/R_{A}m_{N}x) to the nuclear structure functions as well as the term \\propto \\alpha_{em}Z/A. In addition we show that the definition of x consistent with the exact kinematics of eA scattering (with exact sum rules) works in the same direction as the nucleus field of equivalent photons. Combined, these effects account for the bulk of the EMC effect for x\\le 0.5 where Fermi motion effects are small. In particular for these x the hadronic mechanism contribution to the EMC effect does not exceed \\sim 3% for all nuclei. Also the A-dependence of the hadronic mechanism of the EMC effect for x > 0.5 is significantly modified.

  4. Photon parton distributions in nuclei and the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, L.; Strikman, M.

    2010-12-15

    Photons, as well as quarks and gluons, are constituents of the infinite momentum frame (IMF) wave function of an energetic particle. They are mostly equivalent photons whose amplitude follows from the Lorentz transformation of the particle rest frame Coulomb field into the IMF and from the conservation of the electromagnetic current. We evaluate in a model independent way the dominant photon contribution {proportional_to}{alpha}{sub em}(Z{sup 2}/A{sup 4/3})ln(1/R{sub A}m{sub N}x) to the nuclear structure functions as well as the term {proportional_to}{alpha}{sub em}Z/A. In addition we show that the definition of x consistent with the exact kinematics of eA scattering (with exact sum rules) works in the same direction as the nucleus field of equivalent photons. Combined, these effects account for the bulk of the hadronic European Muon Collaboration (EMC) effect for x{<=}0.5 where Fermi motion effects are small. In particular, for these x the hadronic mechanism contribution to the EMC effect does not exceed {approx}3% for all nuclei. Also, the A dependence of the hadronic mechanism of the EMC effect for x>0.5 is significantly modified.

  5. Parton distributions with the combined HERA charm production cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, Valerio; Rojo, Juan

    2013-04-15

    Heavy quark structure functions from HERA provide a direct handle on the medium and small-x gluon PDF. In this contribution, we discuss ongoing progress on the implementation of the FONLL General-Mass scheme with running heavy quark masses, and of its benchmarking with the HOPPET and OpenQCDrad codes, and then present the impact of the recently released combined HERA charm production cross sections in the NNPDF 2.3 analysis. We find that the combined charm data contribute to constraining the gluon and quarks at small values of Bjorken-x.

  6. Pion Parton Distribution Function from DSE-QCD Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khitrin, Konstantin; Cobos-Martinez, Javier; Roberts, Craig; Tandy, Peter

    2012-10-01

    We obtain the valence quark PDF of the pion from a direct formulation of the moments within a Euclidean-formated modeling of QCD. There are no limitations on the number of moments that can be obtained. This approach employs the ladder-rainbow (LR) truncation of the Dyson-Schwinger equation (DSE) formulation of QCD and eliminates an obstacle that hinders a direct approach to the PDF. Bethe-Salpeter wavefunctions and dressed quark propagators from previous extensive DSE-LR work are recast in a form that allows exact Feynman integral techniques. Performance of this approach will be assessed through results for the reconstructed PDF, and considerations of the momentum sum rule.

  7. Polarized Electron - Polarized Deuteron Deep-Inelastic Scattering in Electron-Ion Collider with Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsian, Misak; Cosyn, Wim; Weiss, Christian

    2015-10-01

    For the past several years there have been an intensive research and development for the possible electron-ion collider that will be able to probe deep inelastic processes at unprecedentedly high energies in eA channel. One of the important advantages of the collider kinematics in DIS processes is the possibility for an unambiguous separation of hadrons emerging from DIS and hadrons fragmenting from the target nucleus. This creates a unique possibility for tagging the interacting nucleon with the recoil slow fragments in the DIS process. The situation is most clean for the deuteron target in which case the recoil particle is a nucleon. In addition, the possibility of having polarized deuteron beams will create unprecedented opportunities in probing polarization degrees of freedom for parton distributions in the interacting bound nucleon. In this work we develop a theoretical framework for the polarized electron-polarized deuteron deep inelastic scattering in which the recoil nucleon is detected in the target fragmentation region. Two main contributions for which theoretical models are developed are the plane-wave impulse approximation, in which no reinteractions are taking place between the final state products of DIS and the recoil nucleon.

  8. Shroom3 functions downstream of planar cell polarity to regulate myosin II distribution and cellular organization during neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    McGreevy, Erica M.; Vijayraghavan, Deepthi; Davidson, Lance A.; Hildebrand, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neural tube closure is a critical developmental event that relies on actomyosin contractility to facilitate specific processes such as apical constriction, tissue bending, and directional cell rearrangements. These complicated processes require the coordinated activities of Rho-Kinase (Rock), to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and actomyosin contractility, and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway, to direct the polarized cellular behaviors that drive convergent extension (CE) movements. Here we investigate the role of Shroom3 as a direct linker between PCP and actomyosin contractility during mouse neural tube morphogenesis. In embryos, simultaneous depletion of Shroom3 and the PCP components Vangl2 or Wnt5a results in an increased liability to NTDs and CE failure. We further show that these pathways intersect at Dishevelled, as Shroom3 and Dishevelled 2 co-distribute and form a physical complex in cells. We observed that multiple components of the Shroom3 pathway are planar polarized along mediolateral cell junctions in the neural plate of E8.5 embryos in a Shroom3 and PCP-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that Shroom3 mutant embryos exhibit defects in planar cell arrangement during neural tube closure, suggesting a role for Shroom3 activity in CE. These findings support a model in which the Shroom3 and PCP pathways interact to control CE and polarized bending of the neural plate and provide a clear illustration of the complex genetic basis of NTDs. PMID:25596276

  9. Shroom3 functions downstream of planar cell polarity to regulate myosin II distribution and cellular organization during neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Erica M; Vijayraghavan, Deepthi; Davidson, Lance A; Hildebrand, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-16

    Neural tube closure is a critical developmental event that relies on actomyosin contractility to facilitate specific processes such as apical constriction, tissue bending, and directional cell rearrangements. These complicated processes require the coordinated activities of Rho-Kinase (Rock), to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and actomyosin contractility, and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway, to direct the polarized cellular behaviors that drive convergent extension (CE) movements. Here we investigate the role of Shroom3 as a direct linker between PCP and actomyosin contractility during mouse neural tube morphogenesis. In embryos, simultaneous depletion of Shroom3 and the PCP components Vangl2 or Wnt5a results in an increased liability to NTDs and CE failure. We further show that these pathways intersect at Dishevelled, as Shroom3 and Dishevelled 2 co-distribute and form a physical complex in cells. We observed that multiple components of the Shroom3 pathway are planar polarized along mediolateral cell junctions in the neural plate of E8.5 embryos in a Shroom3 and PCP-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that Shroom3 mutant embryos exhibit defects in planar cell arrangement during neural tube closure, suggesting a role for Shroom3 activity in CE. These findings support a model in which the Shroom3 and PCP pathways interact to control CE and polarized bending of the neural plate and provide a clear illustration of the complex genetic basis of NTDs. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Systematic improvement of parton showers with effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgart, Matthew; Marcantonini, Claudio; Stewart, Iain W.

    2011-02-01

    We carry out a systematic classification and computation of next-to-leading order kinematic power corrections to the fully differential cross section in the parton shower. To do this we devise a map between ingredients in a parton shower and operators in a traditional effective field theory framework using a chain of soft-collinear effective theories. Our approach overcomes several difficulties including avoiding double counting and distinguishing approximations that are coordinate choices from true power corrections. Branching corrections can be classified as hard-scattering, that occur near the top of the shower, and jet-structure, that can occur at any point inside it. Hard-scattering corrections include matrix elements with additional hard partons, as well as power suppressed contributions to the branching for the leading jet. Jet-structure corrections require simultaneous consideration of potential 1{yields}2 and 1{yields}3 branchings. The interference structure induced by collinear terms with subleading powers remains localized in the shower.

  11. Mars Global Digital Dune Database (MGD3): North polar region (MC-1) distribution, applications, and volume estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayward, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Global Digital Dune Database (MGD3) now extends from 90??N to 65??S. The recently released north polar portion (MC-1) of MGD3 adds ~844 000km2 of moderate- to large-size dark dunes to the previously released equatorial portion (MC-2 to MC-29) of the database. The database, available in GIS- and tabular-format in USGS Open-File Reports, makes it possible to examine global dune distribution patterns and to compare dunes with other global data sets (e.g. atmospheric models). MGD3 can also be used by researchers to identify areas suitable for more focused studies. The utility of MGD3 is demonstrated through three example applications. First, the uneven geographic distribution of the dunes is discussed and described. Second, dune-derived wind direction and its role as ground truth for atmospheric models is reviewed. Comparisons between dune-derived winds and global and mesoscale atmospheric models suggest that local topography may have an important influence on dune-forming winds. Third, the methods used here to estimate north polar dune volume are presented and these methods and estimates (1130km3 to 3250km3) are compared with those of previous researchers (1158km3 to 15 000km3). In the near future, MGD3 will be extended to include the south polar region. ?? 2011 by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  12. Higgs characterisation via vector-boson fusion and associated production: NLO and parton-shower effects.

    PubMed

    Maltoni, Fabio; Mawatari, Kentarou; Zaro, Marco

    Vector-boson fusion and associated production at the LHC can provide key information on the strength and structure of the Higgs couplings to the Standard Model particles. Using an effective field theory approach, we study the effects of next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections matched to a parton shower on selected observables for various spin-0 hypotheses. We find that inclusion of NLO corrections is needed to reduce the theoretical uncertainties on the total rates as well as to reliably predict the shapes of the distributions. Our results are obtained in a fully automatic way via FeynRules and MadGraph5_aMC@NLO.

  13. The actin cytoskeleton may control the polar distribution of an auxin transport protein.

    PubMed

    Muday, G K; Hu, S; Brady, S R

    2000-06-01

    The gravitropic bending of plants has long been linked to the changes in the transport of the plant hormone auxin. To understand the mechanism by which gravity alters auxin movement, it is critical to know how polar auxin transport is initially established. In shoots, polar auxin transport is basipetal (i.e., from the shoot apex toward the base). It is driven by the basal localization of the auxin efflux carrier complex. One mechanism for localizing this efflux carrier complex to the basal membrane may be through attachment to the actin cytoskeleton. The efflux carrier protein complex is believed to consist of several polypeptides, including a regulatory subunit that binds auxin transport inhibitors, such as naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Several lines of experimentation have been used to determine if the NPA binding protein interacts with actin filaments. The NPA binding protein has been shown to partition with the actin cytoskeleton during detergent extraction. Agents that specifically alter the polymerization state of the actin cytoskeleton change the amount of NPA binding protein and actin recovered in these cytoskeletal pellets. Actin-affinity columns were prepared with polymers of actin purified from zucchini hypocotyl tissue. NPA binding activity was eluted in a single peak from the actin filament column. Cytochalasin D, which fragments the actin cytoskeleton, was shown to reduce polar auxin transport in zucchini hypocotyls. The interaction of the NPA binding protein with the actin cytoskeleton may localize it in one plane of the plasma membrane, and thereby control the polarity of auxin transport.

  14. The actin cytoskeleton may control the polar distribution of an auxin transport protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muday, G. K.; Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The gravitropic bending of plants has long been linked to the changes in the transport of the plant hormone auxin. To understand the mechanism by which gravity alters auxin movement, it is critical to know how polar auxin transport is initially established. In shoots, polar auxin transport is basipetal (i.e., from the shoot apex toward the base). It is driven by the basal localization of the auxin efflux carrier complex. One mechanism for localizing this efflux carrier complex to the basal membrane may be through attachment to the actin cytoskeleton. The efflux carrier protein complex is believed to consist of several polypeptides, including a regulatory subunit that binds auxin transport inhibitors, such as naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Several lines of experimentation have been used to determine if the NPA binding protein interacts with actin filaments. The NPA binding protein has been shown to partition with the actin cytoskeleton during detergent extraction. Agents that specifically alter the polymerization state of the actin cytoskeleton change the amount of NPA binding protein and actin recovered in these cytoskeletal pellets. Actin-affinity columns were prepared with polymers of actin purified from zucchini hypocotyl tissue. NPA binding activity was eluted in a single peak from the actin filament column. Cytochalasin D, which fragments the actin cytoskeleton, was shown to reduce polar auxin transport in zucchini hypocotyls. The interaction of the NPA binding protein with the actin cytoskeleton may localize it in one plane of the plasma membrane, and thereby control the polarity of auxin transport.

  15. The actin cytoskeleton may control the polar distribution of an auxin transport protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muday, G. K.; Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The gravitropic bending of plants has long been linked to the changes in the transport of the plant hormone auxin. To understand the mechanism by which gravity alters auxin movement, it is critical to know how polar auxin transport is initially established. In shoots, polar auxin transport is basipetal (i.e., from the shoot apex toward the base). It is driven by the basal localization of the auxin efflux carrier complex. One mechanism for localizing this efflux carrier complex to the basal membrane may be through attachment to the actin cytoskeleton. The efflux carrier protein complex is believed to consist of several polypeptides, including a regulatory subunit that binds auxin transport inhibitors, such as naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Several lines of experimentation have been used to determine if the NPA binding protein interacts with actin filaments. The NPA binding protein has been shown to partition with the actin cytoskeleton during detergent extraction. Agents that specifically alter the polymerization state of the actin cytoskeleton change the amount of NPA binding protein and actin recovered in these cytoskeletal pellets. Actin-affinity columns were prepared with polymers of actin purified from zucchini hypocotyl tissue. NPA binding activity was eluted in a single peak from the actin filament column. Cytochalasin D, which fragments the actin cytoskeleton, was shown to reduce polar auxin transport in zucchini hypocotyls. The interaction of the NPA binding protein with the actin cytoskeleton may localize it in one plane of the plasma membrane, and thereby control the polarity of auxin transport.

  16. Justifying the naive partonic sum rule for proton spin

    DOE PAGES

    Ji, Xiangdong; Zhang, Jian-Hui; Zhao, Yong

    2015-04-01

    We provide a theoretical basis for understanding the spin structure of the proton in terms of the spin and orbital angular momenta of free quarks and gluons in Feynman’s parton picture. We show that each term in the Jaffe–Manohar spin sum rule can be related to the matrix element of a gauge-invariant, but frame-dependent operator through a matching formula in large-momentum effective field theory. We present all the matching conditions for the spin content at one-loop order in perturbation theory, which provide a basis to calculate parton orbital angular momentum in lattice QCD at leading logarithmic accuracy.

  17. Double Parton Interactions in pp and pA Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treleani, Daniele; Calucci, Giorgio; Salvini, Simona

    2016-11-01

    As a consequence of the increasingly large flux of partons at small x, Double Parton Interactions (DPI) play an increasingly important role at high energies. A detail understanding of DPI dynamics is therefore mandatory, for a reliable subtraction of the background in the search of new physics. On the other hand, DPI are an interesting topic of research by themselves, as DPI probe the hadron structure in a rather different way, as compared with the large pt processes usually considered. In this note we will make a short illustration of some of the main features characterizing DPI in pp and in pA collisions.

  18. Interference effect in elastic parton energy loss in a finitemedium

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-04-18

    Similar to the radiative parton energy loss due to gluonbremsstrahlung, elastic energy loss of a parton undergoing multiplescattering in a finite medium is demonstrated to be sensitive tointerference effect. The interference between amplitudes of elasticscattering via a gluon exchange and that of gluon radiation reduces theeffective elastic energy loss in a finite medium and gives rise to anon-trivial length dependence. The reduction is most significant for apropagation length L<4/\\pi T in a medium with a temperature T. Thoughthe finite size effect is not significant for the average partonpropagation in the most central heavy-ion collisions, it will affect thecentrality dependence of its effect on jet quenching.

  19. Scattering of electromagnetic waves from a half-space of randomly distributed discrete scatterers and polarized backscattering ratio law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, P. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The effective-medium approximation is applied to investigate scattering from a half-space of randomly and densely distributed discrete scatterers. Starting from vector wave equations, an approximation, called effective-medium Born approximation, a particular way, treating Green's functions, and special coordinates, of which the origin is set at the field point, are used to calculate the bistatic- and back-scatterings. An analytic solution of backscattering with closed form is obtained and it shows a depolarization effect. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements in the cases of snow, multi- and first-year sea-ice. The root product ratio of polarization to depolarization in backscattering is equal to 8; this result constitutes a law about polarized scattering phenomena in the nature.

  20. Scattering of electromagnetic waves from a half-space of randomly distributed discrete scatterers and polarized backscattering ratio law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, P. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The effective-medium approximation is applied to investigate scattering from a half-space of randomly and densely distributed discrete scatterers. Starting from vector wave equations, an approximation, called effective-medium Born approximation, a particular way, treating Green's functions, and special coordinates, of which the origin is set at the field point, are used to calculate the bistatic- and back-scatterings. An analytic solution of backscattering with closed form is obtained and it shows a depolarization effect. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements in the cases of snow, multi- and first-year sea-ice. The root product ratio of polarization to depolarization in backscattering is equal to 8; this result constitutes a law about polarized scattering phenomena in the nature.

  1. Bidirectional reflectance distribution function of Spectralon white reflectance standard illuminated by incoherent unpolarized and plane-polarized light.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Anak; Hamre, Børge; Frette, Øvynd; Zhao, Lu; Stamnes, Jakob J; Kildemo, Morten

    2011-06-01

    A Lambert surface would appear equally bright from all observation directions regardless of the illumination direction. However, the reflection from a randomly scattering object generally has directional variation, which can be described in terms of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). We measured the BRDF of a Spectralon white reflectance standard for incoherent illumination at 405 and 680 nm with unpolarized and plane-polarized light from different directions of incidence. Our measurements show deviations of the BRDF for the Spectralon white reflectance standard from that of a Lambertian reflector that depend both on the angle of incidence and the polarization states of the incident light and detected light. The non-Lambertian reflection characteristics were found to increase more toward the direction of specular reflection as the angle of incidence gets larger.

  2. Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Microfluorescence Reveals Polarized Distribution of Atomic Elements during Differentiation of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Bruna S.; Rehen, Stevens K.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying pluripotency and differentiation in embryonic and reprogrammed stem cells are unclear. In this work, we characterized the pluripotent state towards neural differentiated state through analysis of trace elements distribution using the Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Naive and neural-stimulated embryoid bodies (EB) derived from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem (ES and iPS) cells were irradiated with a spatial resolution of 20 µm to make elemental maps and qualitative chemical analyses. Results show that these embryo-like aggregates exhibit self-organization at the atomic level. Metallic elements content rises and consistent elemental polarization pattern of P and S in both mouse and human pluripotent stem cells were observed, indicating that neural differentiation and elemental polarization are strongly correlated. PMID:22195032

  3. GLOBAL SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF THE CRAB NEBULA IN THE PROSPECT OF THE PLANCK SATELLITE POLARIZATION CALIBRATION

    SciTech Connect

    MacIas-Perez, J. F.; Mayet, F.; Aumont, J.

    2010-03-01

    Within the framework of the Planck satellite polarization calibration, we present a study of the Crab Nebula spectral energy distribution (SED) over more than six decades in frequency ranging from 1 to 10{sup 6} GHz (from 299 to 2.99 x 10{sup -4} mm). The Planck satellite mission observes the sky from 30 to 857 GHz (from 9.99 to 0.3498 mm) and therefore we focus on the millimeter region. We use radio and submillimeter data from the WMAP satellite between 23 and 94 GHz (from 13 to 3.18 mm), from the Archeops balloon experiment between 143 (2.1 mm) and 545 GHz (0.55 mm), and a compendium of other Crab Nebula observations. The Crab SED is compared to models including three main components: synchrotron that is responsible for the emission at low and high frequencies, dust that explains the excess of flux observed by the IRAS satellite, and an extra component on the millimeter regime. From this analysis, we conclude that the unpolarized emission of the Crab Nebula at microwave and millimeter wavelengths is the same synchrotron emission as the one observed in the radio domain. Therefore, we expect the millimeter emission of the Crab Nebula to be polarized with the same degree of polarization and orientation as the radio emission. We set upper limits on the possible errors induced by any millimeter extra component on the reconstruction of the degree and angle of polarization at the percent level as a maximum. This result strongly supports the choice by the Planck collaboration of the Crab Nebula emission for performing polarization cross-checks in the range 30 (299 mm) to 353 GHz (0.849 mm).

  4. Gluons and the Quark Sea at High Energies: Distributions, Polarization, Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, Daniel; Diehl, Markus; Milner, Richard; Venugopalan, Raju; Vogelsang, Werner; Kaplan, David; Montgomery, Hugh; Vigdor, Steven; Accardi, A.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Burkardt, M.; Ent, R.; Guzey, V.; Hasch, D.; Kumar, K.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Li, Ying-chuan; Marciano, W.; Marquet, C.; Sabatie, F.; Stratmann, M.; /more authors..

    2012-06-07

    This report on the science case for an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is the result of a ten-week program at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle (from September 13-November 19, 2010), motivated by the need to develop a strong case for the continued study of the QCD description of hadron structure in the coming decades. Hadron structure in the valence quark region will be studied extensively with the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV science program, the subject of an INT program the previous year. The focus of the INT program was on understanding the role of gluons and sea quarks, the important dynamical degrees of freedom describing hadron structure at high energies. Experimentally, the most direct and precise way to access the dynamical structure of hadrons and nuclei at high energies is with a high luminosity lepton probe in collider mode. An EIC with optimized detectors offers enormous potential as the next generation accelerator to address many of the most important, open questions about the fundamental structure of matter. The goal of the INT program, as captured in the writeups in this report, was to articulate these questions and to identify golden experiments that have the greatest potential to provide definitive answers to these questions. At resolution scales where quarks and gluons become manifest as degrees of freedom, the structure of the nucleon and of nuclei is intimately connected with unique features of QCD dynamics, such as confinement and the self-coupling of gluons. Information on hadron sub-structure in DIS is obtained in the form of 'snapshots' by the 'lepton microscope' of the dynamical many-body hadron system, over different momentum resolutions and energy scales. These femtoscopic snapshots, at the simplest level, provide distribution functions which are extracted over the largest accessible kinematic range to assemble fundamental dynamical insight into hadron and nuclear sub-structure. For the proton, the EIC would be the brightest

  5. Broadband source of telecom-band polarization-entangled photon-pairs for wavelength-multiplexed entanglement distribution.

    PubMed

    Lim, Han Chuen; Yoshizawa, Akio; Tsuchida, Hidemi; Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2008-09-29

    Studies on telecom-band entangled photon-pair sources for entanglement distribution have so far focused on their narrowband operations. Fiber-based sources are seriously limited by spontaneous Raman scattering while sources based on quasi-phase-matched crystals or waveguides are usually narrowband because of long device lengths and/or operations far from degeneracy. An entanglement distributor would have to multiplex many such narrowband sources before entanglement distribution to fully utilize the available fiber transmission bandwidth. In this work, we demonstrate a broadband source of polarization-entangled photon-pairs suitable for wavelength-multiplexed entanglement distribution over optical fiber. We show that our source is potentially capable of simultaneously supporting up to forty-four independent wavelength channels.

  6. Retrieval of droplet-size density distribution from multiple-field-of-view cross-polarized lidar signals: theory and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Roy, G; Bissonnette, L; Bastille, C; Vallée, G

    1999-08-20

    Multiple-field-of-view (MFOV) secondary-polarization lidar signals are used to calculate the particle-size density distribution (PSD) at the base of a cloud. At the cloud base, multiple scattering is weak and single backscattering is predominant by many orders of magnitude. Because secondary polarization is a direct measure of multiple scattering, it is therefore advantageous to use secondary polarization. A mathematical relation among the PSD, the lidar fields of view, the scattering angles, and the angular depolarization is derived to facilitate use of secondary polarization. The model is supported by experimental MFOV lidar measurements carried out in a controlled environment, and its limitations and restrictions are discussed.

  7. Generation of parallel transmission sub-pulses of spatial distribution based on polarizing splitting prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haifeng; Yang, Xiaoping; Sun, Xuna; Liu, Jun; Yang, Yong

    2016-09-01

    Parallel processing is the forefront of femtosecond laser micro-nano processing. The key to parallel processing is obtaining multichannel parallel femtosecond laser beams. A method of spatial parallel pulse splitting based on birefringence properties of polarizing splitting prism is proposed for obtaining multichannel parallel ultra-short pulse trains. The generated sub-pulses have the characteristics of equal energy and high similarity. More than that, the compact structure of the polarizing splitting prism makes it easier to be implemented. The accurate relationship between the space interval of pulse sequences and the structural angle, dimension and the distance between the two prisms is mathematically derived. The realizable array form of sub-pulse sequences is theoretically analyzed. The feasibility of the proposed method of femtosecond laser parallel processing is analyzed by software simulation and numerical calculation. The results will provide a new research direction for application of ultrashort pulse in parallel processing.

  8. Ultraviolet observations of the Saturnian north aurora and polar haze distribution with the HST-FOC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerard, J. C.; Dols, V.; Grodent, D.; Waite, J. H.; Gladstone, G. R.; Prange, R.

    1995-01-01

    Near simultaneous observations of the Saturnian H2 north ultraviolet aurora and the polar haze were made at 153 nm and 210 nm respectively with the Faint Object Camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The auroral observations cover a complete rotation of the planet and, when co-added, reveal the presence of an auroral emission near 80 deg N with a peak brightness of about 150 kR of total H2 emission. The maximum optical depth of the polar haze layer is found to be located approximately 5 deg equatorward of the auroral emission zone. The haze particles are presumably formed by hydrocarbon aerosols initiated by H2+ auroral production. In this case, the observed haze optical depth requires an efficiency of aerosol formation of about 6 percent, indicating that auroral production of hydrocarbon aerosols is a viable source of high-latitude haze.

  9. Water on Mars: Inventory, distribution, and possible sources of polar ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical considerations and various lines of morphologic evidence suggest that, in addition to the normal seasonal and climatic exchange of H2O that occurs between the Martian polar caps, atmosphere, and mid to high latitude regolith, large volumes of water have been introduced into the planet's long term hydrologic cycle by the sublimation of equatorial ground ice, impacts, catastrophic flooding, and volcanism. Under the climatic conditions that are thought to have prevailed on Mars throughout the past 3 to 4 b.y., much of this water is expected to have been cold trapped at the poles. The amount of polar ice contributed by each of the planet's potential crustal sources is discussed and estimated. The final analysis suggests that only 5 to 15 pct. of this potential inventory is now in residence at the poles.

  10. Hybrid mode-locked erbium-doped all-fiber soliton laser with a distributed polarizer.

    PubMed

    Chernykh, D S; Krylov, A A; Levchenko, A E; Grebenyukov, V V; Arutunyan, N R; Pozharov, A S; Obraztsova, E D; Dianov, E M

    2014-10-10

    A soliton-type erbium-doped all-fiber ring laser hybrid mode-locked with a co-action of arc-discharge single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE) is demonstrated. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, boron nitride-doped SWCNTs were used as a saturable absorber for passive mode-locking initiation. Moreover, the NPE was introduced through the implementation of the short-segment polarizing fiber. Owing to the NPE action in the laser cavity, significant pulse length shortening as well as pulse stability improvement were observed as compared with a SWCNTs-only mode-locked laser. The shortest achieved pulse width of near transform-limited solitons was 222 fs at the output average power of 9.1 mW and 45.5 MHz repetition frequency, corresponding to the 0.17 nJ pulse energy.

  11. Opposite polarity of virus budding and of viral envelope glycoprotein distribution in epithelial cells derived from different tissues

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We compared the surface envelope glycoprotein distribution and the budding polarity of four RNA viruses in Fischer rat thyroid (FRT) cells and in CaCo-2 cells derived from a human colon carcinoma. Whereas both FRT and CaCo-2 cells sort similarly influenza hemagglutinin and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G protein, respectively, to apical and basolateral membrane domains, they differ in their handling of two togaviruses, Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus (SFV). By conventional EM Sindbis virus and SFV were shown to bud apically in FRT cells and basolaterally in CaCo-2 cells. Consistent with this finding, the distribution of the p62/E2 envelope glycoprotein of SFV, assayed by immunoelectronmicroscopy and by domain-selective surface biotinylation was predominantly apical on FRT cells and basolateral on CaCo-2 cells. We conclude that a given virus and its envelope glycoprotein can be delivered to opposite membrane domains in epithelial cells derived from different tissues. The tissue specificity in the polarity of virus budding and viral envelope glycoprotein distribution indicate that the sorting machinery varies considerably between different epithelial cell types. PMID:1572895

  12. Polarity-dependent distribution of angiomotin localizes Hippo signaling in preimplantation embryos

    PubMed Central

    Hirate, Yoshikazu; Hirahara, Shino; Inoue, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Alarcon, Vernadeth B.; Akimoto, Kazunori; Hirai, Takaaki; Hara, Takeshi; Adachi, Makoto; Chida, Kazuhiro; Ohno, Shigeo; Marikawa, Yusuke; Nakao, Kazuki; Shimono, Akihiko; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background In preimplantation mouse embryos, the first cell fate specification to the trophectoderm or inner cell mass occurs by the early blastocyst stage. The cell fate is controlled by cell position-dependent Hippo signaling, although the mechanisms underlying position-dependent Hippo signaling are unknown. Results We showed that a combination of cell polarity and cell–cell adhesion establishes position-dependent Hippo signaling, where the outer and inner cells are polar and nonpolar, respectively. The junction-associated proteins angiomotin (Amot) and Amotl2 are essential for Hippo pathway activation and appropriate cell fate specification. In the nonpolar inner cells, Amot localizes to adherens junctions (AJs) and cell–cell adhesion activates the Hippo pathway. In the outer cells, the cell polarity sequesters Amot from basolateral AJs to apical domains, thereby suppressing Hippo signaling. The N-terminal domain of Amot is required for actin binding, Nf2/Merlin-mediated association with the E-cadherin complex, and interaction with Lats protein kinase. In AJs, Ser176 in the N-terminal domain of Amot is phosphorylated by Lats, which inhibits the actin-binding activity, thereby stabilizing the Amot–Lats interaction to activate the Hippo pathway. Conclusion We propose that the phosphorylation of S176 in Amot is a critical step for activation of the Hippo pathway in AJs and that cell polarity disconnects the Hippo pathway from cell–cell adhesion by sequestering Amot from AJ. This mechanism converts positional information into differential Hippo signaling, thereby leading to differential cell fates. PMID:23791731

  13. TESLA-N: Polarized electron-nucleon scattering at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellinghaus, Frank; Aschenauer, E. C.; Tesla-N Study-Group

    2001-06-01

    Measurements of polarized e-N scattering can be realized at the TESLA linear collider facility with projected luminosities that are about two orders of magnitude higher than those expected of other experiments at comparable energies. Longitudinally polarized electrons, accelerated as a small fraction of the total current in the e+ arm of TESLA, can be directed onto a solid state target that may be longitudinally or transversely polarized. A large variety of polarized parton distribution and fragmentation functions can be determined with unprecedented accuracy, many of them for the first time. A main goal of the experiment is the precise measurement of the x- and Q2-dependence of the unknown transversity distributions that will provide us with the full information on the nucleon's quark spin structure as relevant for high energy processes. The additional possibilities of using unpolarized targets and of experiments with a real photon beam turn TESLA-N into a versatile next-generation facility at the intersection of particle and nuclear physics. .

  14. Single/Double-Spin Asymmetry Measurements of Semi-Inclusive Pion Electroproduction on a Transversely Polarized 3He Target through Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Xin Qian

    2012-06-01

    Parton distribution functions, which represent the flavor and spin structure of the nucleon, provide invaluable information in illuminating quantum chromodynamics in the confinement region. Among various processes that measure such parton distribution functions, semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering is regarded as one of the golden channels to access transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions, which provide a 3-D view of the nucleon structure in momentum space. The Jefferson Lab experiment E06-010 focuses on measuring the target single and double spin asymmetries in the 3He(e, e'pi+,-)X reaction with a transversely polarized 3He target in Hall A with a 5.89 GeV electron beam. A leading pion and the scattered electron are detected in coincidence by the left High-Resolution Spectrometer at 16{sup o} and the BigBite spectrometer at 30{sup o} beam right, respectively. The kinematic coverage concentrates in the valence quark region, x {approx} 0.1-0.4, at Q2 {approx}1-3 Gev{sub 2}. The Collins and Sivers asymmetries of 3He and neutron are extracted. In this review, an overview of the experiment and the final results are presented. Furthermore, an upcoming 12-GeV program with a large acceptance solenoidal device and the future possibilities at an electron-ion collider are discussed.

  15. Controlled quantum key distribution with three-photon polarization-entangled states via the collective noise channel

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Li; Xiu Xiaoming; Gao Yajun; Yi, X. X.

    2011-10-15

    Using three-photon polarization-entangled GHZ states or W states, we propose controlled quantum key distribution protocols for circumventing two main types of collective noise, collective dephasing noise, or collective rotation noise. Irrespective of the number of controllers, a three-photon state can generate a one-bit secret key. The storage technique of quantum states is dispensable for the controller and the receiver, and it therefore allows performing the process in a more convenient mode. If the photon cost in a security check is disregarded, then the efficiency theoretically approaches unity.

  16. Distributed temperature sensing based on birefringence effect on transient Brillouin grating in a polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yongkang; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Liang

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate a time-domain distributed temperature sensing based on birefringence effect on transient Brillouin grating (TBG) in a polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF), which uses two short pump pulses (2 ns) to excite a TBG and a long probe pulse (6 ns) to map the transient Brillouin grating spectrum (TBGS) associated with the birefringence. The 2 ns pump pulses defines a spatial resolution of 20 cm and a temperature measurement range of a few hundred degrees Celsius, and the long probe pulse provides a narrow TBGS with a temperature resolution of 0.07 degrees C.

  17. In-Medium Parton Branching Beyond Eikonal Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolinário, Liliana

    2017-03-01

    The description of the in-medium modifications of partonic showers has been at the forefront of current theoretical and experimental efforts in heavy-ion collisions. It provides a unique laboratory to extend our knowledge frontier of the theory of the strong interactions, and to assess the properties of the hot and dense medium (QGP) that is produced in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion c